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Sample records for vivo enzyme activity

  1. In vivo enzyme activity in inborn errors of metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, G.N.; Walter, J.H.; Leonard, J.V.; Halliday, D. (Clinical Research Centre, Harrow (England))

    1990-08-01

    Low-dose continuous infusions of (2H5)phenylalanine, (1-13C)propionate, and (1-13C)leucine were used to quantitate phenylalanine hydroxylation in phenylketonuria (PKU, four subjects), propionate oxidation in methylmalonic acidaemia (MMA, four subjects), and propionic acidaemia (PA, four subjects) and leucine oxidation in maple syrup urine disease (MSUD, four subjects). In vivo enzyme activity in PKU, MMA, and PA subjects was similar to or in excess of that in adult controls (range of phenylalanine hydroxylation in PKU, 3.7 to 6.5 mumol/kg/h, control 3.2 to 7.9, n = 7; propionate oxidation in MMA, 15.2 to 64.8 mumol/kg/h, and in PA, 11.1 to 36.0, control 5.1 to 19.0, n = 5). By contrast, in vivo leucine oxidation was undetectable in three of the four MSUD subjects (less than 0.5 mumol/kg/h) and negligible in the remaining subject (2 mumol/kg/h, control 10.4 to 15.7, n = 6). These results suggest that significant substrate removal can be achieved in some inborn metabolic errors either through stimulation of residual enzyme activity in defective enzyme systems or by activation of alternate metabolic pathways. Both possibilities almost certainly depend on gross elevation of substrate concentrations. By contrast, only minimal in vivo oxidation of leucine appears possible in MSUD.

  2. Development of in vivo biotransformation enzyme assays for ecotoxicity screening: In vivo measurement of phases I and II enzyme activities in freshwater planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mei-Hui

    2016-08-01

    The development of a high-throughput tool is required for screening of environmental pollutants and assessing their impacts on aquatic animals. Freshwater planarians can be used in rapid and sensitive toxicity bioassays. Planarians are known for their remarkable regeneration ability but much less known for their metabolic and xenobiotic biotransformation abilities. In this study, the activities of different phase I and II enzymes were determined in vivo by directly measuring fluorescent enzyme substrate disappearance or fluorescent enzyme metabolite production in planarian culture media. For phase I enzyme activity, O-deethylation activities with alkoxyresorufin could not be detected in planarian culture media. By contrast, O-deethylation activities with alkoxycoumarin were detected in planarian culture media. Increases in 7-ethoxycoumarin O-deethylase (ECOD) activities was only observed in planarians exposed to 1μM, but not 10μM, β-naphthoflavone for 24h. ECOD activity was inhibited in planarians exposed to 10 and 100μM rifampicin or carbamazepine for 24h. For phase II enzyme activity, DT-diaphorase, arylsulfatases, uridine 5'-diphospho (UDP)-glucuronosyltransferase or catechol-O-methyltransferase activity was determined in culture media containing planarians. The results of this study indicate that freshwater planarians are a promising model organism to monitor exposure to environmental pollutants or assess their impacts through the in vivo measurement of phase I and II enzyme activities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Measuring enzyme activities under standardized in vivo-like conditions for systems biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Bouwman, Jildau; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; Postmus, Jarne; Canelas, Andre B.; Mensonides, Femke I. C.; Orij, Rick; Tuzun, Isil; van den Brink, Joost; Smits, Gertien J.; van Gulik, Walter M.; Brul, Stanley; de Winde, Johannes H.; de Mattos, M. J. Teixeira; Kettner, Carsten; Nielsen, Jens; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    Realistic quantitative models require data from many laboratories. Therefore, standardization of experimental systems and assay conditions is crucial. Moreover, standards should be representative of the in vivo conditions. However, most often, enzyme-kinetic parameters are measured under assay

  4. Generation of in vivo activating factors in the ischemic intestine by pancreatic enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuoka, Hiroshi; Kistler, Erik B.; Schmid-Schönbein, Geert W.

    2000-02-01

    One of the early events in physiological shock is the generation of activators for leukocytes, endothelial cells, and other cells in the cardiovascular system. The mechanism by which these activators are produced has remained unresolved. We examine here the hypothesis that pancreatic digestive enzymes in the ischemic intestine may be involved in the generation of activators during intestinal ischemia. The lumen of the small intestine of rats was continuously perfused with saline containing a broadly acting pancreatic enzyme inhibitor (6-amidino-2-naphthyl p-guanidinobenzoate dimethanesulfate, 0.37 mM) before and during ischemia of the small intestine by splanchnic artery occlusion. This procedure inhibited activation of circulating leukocytes during occlusion and reperfusion. It also prevented the appearance of activators in portal venous and systemic artery plasma and attenuated initiating symptoms of multiple organ injury in shock. Intestinal tissue produces only low levels of activators in the absence of pancreatic enzymes, whereas in the presence of enzymes, activators are produced in a concentration- and time-dependent fashion. The results indicate that pancreatic digestive enzymes in the ischemic intestine serve as an important source for cell activation and inflammation, as well as multiple organ failure.

  5. An easy and efficient permeabilization protocol for in vivo enzyme activity assays in cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Randi Engelberth; Erstad, Simon Matthé; Ramos Martinez, Erick Miguel

    2016-01-01

    , lysis of cyanobacterial cells is inefficient and often laborious. In some cases radioisotope-labeled substrates can be fed directly to intact cells; however, label-free assays are often favored due to safety and practical reasons. RESULTS: Here we show an easy and highly efficient method...... and subsequent activity assays were successfully adapted to the 96-well plate system. CONCLUSIONS: An easy, efficient and scalable permeabilization protocol was established for cyanobacteria. The permeabilized cells can be directly applied for measurement of G6PDH and Rubisco activities without using...... radioisotopes and the protocol may be readily adapted to studies of other cyanobacterial species and other intracellular enzymes. The permeabilization and enzyme assays can be performed in 96-well plates in a high-throughput manner....

  6. An easy and efficient permeabilization protocol for in vivo enzyme activity assays in cyanobacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Randi Engelberth; Erstad, Simon Matth?; Ramos-Martinez, Erick Miguel; Fimognari, Lorenzo; De Porcellinis, Alice Jara; Sakuragi, Yumiko

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic bacteria that thrive in diverse ecosystems and play major roles in the global carbon cycle. The abilities of cyanobacteria to fix atmospheric CO2 and to allocate the fixed carbons to chemicals and biofuels have attracted growing attentions as sustainable microbial cell factories. Better understanding of the activities of enzymes involved in the central carbon metabolism would lead to increasing product yields. Currently cell-free lysates are the mo...

  7. Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme requires oligomerization for activity of processed forms in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Wu, J; Faucheu, C; Lalanne, J L; Diu, A; Livingston, D J; Su, M S

    1995-05-01

    Interleukin-1 beta converting enzyme (ICE) is composed of 10' (p10) and 20 kDa (p20) subunits, which are derived from a common 45 kDa precursor. Recent crystallographic studies have shown that ICE exists as a tetramer (p20/p10)2 in the crystal lattice. We provide evidence that the p10 and p20 subunits of ICE associate as oligomers in transfected COS cells. Using intragenic complementation, we show that the activity of a p10/p10 interface mutant defective in autoprocessing can be restored by co-expression with active site ICE mutants. Different active site mutants can also complement each other by oligomerization to form active ICE. These studies indicate that ICE precursor polypeptides may associate in different quaternary structures and that oligomerization is required for autoprocessing. Furthermore, integenic complementation of active site mutants of ICE and an ICE homolog restores autoprocessing activity, suggesting that hetero-oligomerization occurs between ICE homologs.

  8. Changes in cytochrome P450 gene expression and enzyme activity induced by xenobiotics in rabbits in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsolya Palócz

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available As considerable inter-species differences exist in xenobiotic metabolism, developing new pharmaceutical therapies for use in different species is fraught with difficulties. For this reason, very few medicines have been registered for use in rabbits, despite their importance in inter alia meat and fur production. We have developed a rapid and sensitive screening system for drug safety in rabbits based on cytochrome P450 enzyme assays, specifically CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A6, employing an adaptation of the luciferin-based clinical assay currently used in human drug screening. Short-term (4-h cultured rabbit primary hepatocytes were treated with a cytochrome inducer (phenobarbital and 2 inhibitors (alpha-naphthoflavone and ketoconazole. In parallel, and to provide verification, New Zealand white rabbits were dosed with 80 mg/kg phenobarbital or 40 mg/kg ketoconazole for 3 d. Ketoconazole significantly increased CYP3A6 gene expression and decreased CYP3A6 activity both in vitro and in vivo. CYP1A1 activity was decreased by ketoconazole in vitro and increased in vivo. This is the first report of the inducer effect of ketoconazole on rabbit cytochrome isoenzymes in vivo. Our data support the use of a luciferin-based assay in short-term primary hepatocytes as an appropriate tool for xenobiotic metabolism assays and short-term toxicity testing in rabbits.

  9. The in vivo effect of N-nitrosomorpholine on the activity of enzymes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neoplasm antigens outnumber the enzymes which are utilized to determine the cancer. Cancer development in the living organisms chronologically follows the cytotoxic, organotoxic and mutagenic alterations. Generally, the first symptom for chemical carcinogens is a metabolical response in connection with the ...

  10. In vitro and in vivo production of pectic enzymes, polygalacturonase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Possible in vitro and in vivo production of pectic enzyme polygalacturonase and pH on the activity of the enzyme were investigated. The results of the assay for the production of polygalacturonase (PG) by the pathogen showed that the activity was 142.9 RVU in vitro and 166.7 RVU, in vivo at temperature 25°C. The optimum ...

  11. Actions of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate metabolism and ATP levels in vivo and in the perfused rat liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado, Marcos Rodrigues; Bracht, Lívia; de Sá-Nakanishi, Anacharis Babeto; Corrêa, Rúbia Carvalho Gomes; Comar, Jurandir Fernando; Peralta, Rosane Marina; Bracht, Adelar

    2018-01-01

    p-Synephrine is one of the main active components of the fruit of Citrus aurantium (bitter orange). Extracts of the bitter orange and other preparations containing p-synephrine have been used worldwide to promote weight loss and for sports performance. The purpose of the study was to measure the action of p-synephrine on hepatic enzyme activities linked to carbohydrate and energy metabolism and the levels of adenine mononucleotides. Enzymes and adenine mononucleotides were measured in the isolated perfused rat liver and in vivo after oral administration of the drug (50 and 300 mg/kg) by using standard techniques. p-Synephrine increased the activity of glycogen phosphorylase in vivo and in the perfused liver. It decreased, however, the activities of pyruvate kinase and pyruvate dehydrogenase also in vivo and in the perfused liver. p-Synephrine increased the hepatic pools of adenosine diphosphate and adenosine triphosphate. Stimulation of glycogen phosphorylase is consistent with the reported increased glycogenolysis in the perfused liver and increased glycemia in rats. The decrease in the pyruvate dehydrogenase activity indicates that p-synephrine is potentially capable of inhibiting the transformation of carbohydrates into lipids. The capability of increasing the adenosine triphosphate-adenosine diphosphate pool indicates a beneficial effect of p-synephrine on the cellular energetics. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Ginsenoside-Rd exhibits anti-inflammatory activities through elevation of antioxidant enzyme activities and inhibition of JNK and ERK activation in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yun-Xin; Wang, Li; Xiao, Er-Long; Li, Si-Jia; Chen, Jia-Jia; Gao, Bei; Min, Guang-Ning; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Wu, Yong-Jie

    2013-12-01

    Our previous study has reported that ginsenoside-Rd significantly inhibited the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines and mediators in carrageenan (Carr)-induced rat paw edema, which might be due to its blocking of the nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) signaling pathway. The aim of the present study was to clarify the more detailed mechanisms of anti-inflammatory activity of ginsenoside-Rd in Carr-induced rat paw edema model. Rats were pretreated with dexamethasone or ginsenoside-Rd 1 h before the Carr injection. Six hours after Carr injection, the malondialdehyde (MDA) level and myeloperoxidase (MPO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) and catalase (CAT) activities in inflamed paw tissues were determined. The levels of nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) in serum were measured. The expressions of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and NF-κB were detected by western blot. In addition, the extent of phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK), p38 and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) was analyzed by western blot. The results showed that ginsenoside-Rd significantly attenuated MPO activity and MDA level, increased the activities of SOD, GPx and CAT, lowered the levels of NO and PGE2, down-regulated the expressions of iNOS, COX-2 and NF-κB, and suppressed the phosphorylation of ERK and JNK. Taken together, the possible mechanisms of anti-inflammatory activity of ginsenoside-Rd were: it could reduce the inflammatory cell infiltration into inflammatory sites, inhibit the tissue lipid peroxidation, increase the antioxidant enzyme activities, and suppress the proinflammatory enzyme expressions through the downregulation of NF-κB activation via suppression of ERK and JNK phosphorylation.

  13. Hinokitiol Exerts Anticancer Activity through Downregulation of MMPs 9/2 and Enhancement of Catalase and SOD Enzymes: In Vivo Augmentation of Lung Histoarchitecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsun Huang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Melanoma is extremely resistant to chemotherapy and the death rate is increasing hastily worldwide. Extracellular matrix promotes the migration and invasion of tumor cells through the production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and -9. Evidence has shown that natural dietary antioxidants are capable of inhibiting cancer cell growth. Our recent studies showed that hinokitiol, a natural bioactive compound, inhibited vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and platelets aggregation. The present study is to investigate the anticancer efficacy of hinokitiol against B16-F10 melanoma cells via modulating tumor invasion factors MMPs, antioxidant enzymes in vitro. An in vivo mice model of histological investigation was performed to study the patterns of elastic and collagen fibers. Hinokitiol inhibited the expression and activity of MMPs-2 and -9 in B16-F10 melanoma cells, as measured by western blotting and gelatin zymography, respectively. An observed increase in protein expression of MMPs 2/9 in melanoma cells was significantly inhibited by hinokitiol. Notably, hinokitiol (1–5 μM increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT and superoxide dismutase (SOD from the reduction in melanoma cells. Also, hinokitiol (2–10 µM concentration dependently reduced in vitro Fenton reaction induced hydroxyl radical (OH· formation. An in vivo study showed that hinokitiol treatment increased elastic fibers (EF, collagens dispersion, and improved alveolar alterations in the lungs of B16/F10 injected mice. Overall, our findings propose that hinokitiol may be a potent anticancer candidate through down regulation of MMPs 9/2, reduction of OH· production and enhancement of antioxidant enzymes SOD and CAT.

  14. Epigenetics of dominance for enzyme activity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Acid phosphatase; dominance; Drosophila malerkotliana; epigenetics; heterodimeric allozymes; subunit interaction. J. Biosci. | Vol. 27 | No ...... determined enzyme activity directly after preparing crude extracts in relation to pH, an important component of the in vivo environment. Moreover, the pH range used almost certainly ...

  15. Identification of in vivo enzyme activities in the cometabolism of glucose and acetate by Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using C-13-labeled substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Maria Margarida M. dos; Gombert, A.K.; Christensen, B.

    2003-01-01

    A detailed characterization of the central metabolic network of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK 113-7D was carried out during cometabolism. of different mixtures of glucose and acetate, using aerobic C-limited chemostats in which one of these two substrates was labeled with C-13. To confirm...... metabolism and amino acid biosynthesis. Malic enzyme flux increased linearly with increasing acetate fraction. During growth on a very-high-acetate fraction, the activity of malic enzyme satisfied the biosynthetic needs of pyruvate in the mitochondria, while in the cytosol pyruvate was supplied via pyruvate...

  16. Enzyme synthesis in the regulation of hepatic `malic' enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Gillian; Walker, Deryck G.

    1974-01-01

    A homogeneous preparation of `malic' enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) from livers of thyroxine-treated rats was used to prepare in rabbits an antiserum to the enzyme that reacts monospecifically with the `malic' enzyme in livers of rats in several physiological states. Changes in enzyme activity resulting from modification of the state of the animal are hence due to an altered amount of enzyme protein. The antiserum has been used to precipitate out `malic' enzyme from heat-treated supernatant preparations of livers from both adult and neonatal rats, in a number of physiological conditions, that had been injected 30min earlier with l-[4,5-3H]leucine. The low incorporations of radioactivity into the immunoprecipitable enzyme have permitted the qualitative conclusion that changed enzyme activity in adult rats arises mainly from alterations in the rate of enzyme synthesis. The marked increase in `malic' enzyme activity that occurs naturally or as a result of thyroxine treatment of the weanling rat is likewise due to a marked increase in the rate of enzyme synthesis possibly associated with a concurrent diminished rate of enzyme degradation. PMID:4462568

  17. Enzyme synthesis in the regulation of hepatic "malic" enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, G; Walker, D G

    1974-10-01

    A homogeneous preparation of ;malic' enzyme (EC 1.1.1.40) from livers of thyroxine-treated rats was used to prepare in rabbits an antiserum to the enzyme that reacts monospecifically with the ;malic' enzyme in livers of rats in several physiological states. Changes in enzyme activity resulting from modification of the state of the animal are hence due to an altered amount of enzyme protein. The antiserum has been used to precipitate out ;malic' enzyme from heat-treated supernatant preparations of livers from both adult and neonatal rats, in a number of physiological conditions, that had been injected 30min earlier with l-[4,5-(3)H]leucine. The low incorporations of radioactivity into the immunoprecipitable enzyme have permitted the qualitative conclusion that changed enzyme activity in adult rats arises mainly from alterations in the rate of enzyme synthesis. The marked increase in ;malic' enzyme activity that occurs naturally or as a result of thyroxine treatment of the weanling rat is likewise due to a marked increase in the rate of enzyme synthesis possibly associated with a concurrent diminished rate of enzyme degradation.

  18. Purified galactooligosaccharide, derived from a mixture produced by the enzymic activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum, reduces Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium adhesion and invasion in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Laura E J; Cooley, William A; Jones, Gareth; Nunez, Alejandro; Crudgington, Bentley; Weyer, Ute; Dugdale, Alexandra H; Tzortzis, George; Collins, James W; Woodward, Martin J; La Ragione, Roberto M

    2010-12-01

    The prebiotic Bimuno(®) is a mixture containing galactooligosaccharides (GOSs), produced by the galactosyltransferase activity of Bifidobacterium bifidum NCIMB 41171 using lactose as the substrate. Previous in vivo and in vitro studies demonstrating the efficacy of Bimuno(®) in reducing Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) colonization did not ascertain whether or not the protective effects could be attributed to the prebiotic component GOS. Here we wished to test the hypothesis that GOS, derived from Bimuno(®), may confer the direct anti-invasive and protective effects of Bimuno(®). In this study the efficacy of Bimuno(®), a basal solution of Bimuno(®) without GOS [which contained glucose, galactose, lactose, maltodextrin and gum arabic in the same relative proportions (w/w) as they are found in Bimuno(®)] and purified GOS to reduce S. Typhimurium adhesion and invasion was assessed using a series of in vitro and in vivo models. The novel use of three dimensionally cultured HT-29-16E cells to study prebiotics in vitro demonstrated that the presence of ∼ 5 mg Bimuno(®) ml(-1) or ∼ 2.5 mg GOS ml(-1) significantly reduced the invasion of S. Typhimurium (SL1344nal(r)) (PBimuno(®) or GOS prevented the adherence or invasion of S. Typhimurium to enterocytes, and thus reduced its associated pathology. This protection appeared to correlate with significant reductions in the neutral and acidic mucins detected in goblet cells, possibly as a consequence of stimulating the cells to secrete the mucin into the lumen. In all assays, Bimuno(®) without GOS conferred no such protection, indicating that the basal solution confers no protective effects against S. Typhimurium. Collectively, the studies presented here clearly indicate that the protective effects conferred by Bimuno(®) can be attributed to GOS.

  19. A novel copper complex induces ROS generation in doxorubicin resistant Ehrlich ascitis carcinoma cells and increases activity of antioxidant enzymes in vital organs in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efferth Thomas

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In search of a suitable GSH-depleting agent, a novel copper complex viz., copper N-(2-hydroxyacetophenone glycinate (CuNG has been synthesized, which was initially found to be a potential resistance modifying agent and later found to be an immunomodulator in mice model in different doses. The objective of the present work was to decipher the effect of CuNG on reactive oxygen species (ROS generation and antioxidant enzymes in normal and doxorubicin-resistant Ehrlich ascites carcinoma (EAC/Dox-bearing Swiss albino mice. Methods The effect of CuNG has been studied on ROS generation, multidrug resistance-associated protein1 (MRP1 expression and on activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and glutathione peroxidase (GPx. Results CuNG increased ROS generation and reduced MRP1 expression in EAC/Dox cells while only temporarily depleted glutathione (GSH within 2 h in heart, kidney, liver and lung of EAC/Dox bearing mice, which were restored within 24 h. The level of liver Cu was observed to be inversely proportional to the level of GSH. Moreover, CuNG modulated SOD, CAT and GPx in different organs and thereby reduced oxidative stress. Thus nontoxic dose of CuNG may be utilized to reduce MRP1 expression and thus sensitize EAC/Dox cells to standard chemotherapy. Moreover, CuNG modulated SOD, CAT and and GPx activities to reduce oxidative stress in some vital organs of EAC/Dox bearing mice. CuNG treatment also helped to recover liver and renal function in EAC/Dox bearing mice. Conclusion Based on our studies, we conclude that CuNG may be a promising candidate to sensitize drug resistant cancers in the clinic.

  20. Carotid Artery Brain Aneurysm Model: In Vivo Molecular Enzyme-specific MR Imaging of Active Inflammation in a Pilot Study1

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLeo, Michael J.; Gounis, Matthew J.; Hong, Bo; Ford, John C.; Wakhloo, Ajay K.; Bogdanov, Alexei A.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the feasibility of using a myeloperoxidase (MPO)-specific paramagnetic magnetic resonance (MR) contrast agent to identify active inflammation in an animal model of common carotid artery (CCA) aneurysm. Materials and Methods: All animal experiments were approved by the institutional animal care and use committee. Elastase-induced saccular aneurysms were created at the root of the right CCA in 16 New Zealand white rabbits. Intramural and perivascular injection of Escherichia coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was performed with an endovascular approach to induce aneurysm inflammation. After intraarterial injection of an MPO-specific (di-5-hydroxytryptamide of gadopentetate dimeglumine, 0.1 mmol per kilogram of bodyweight) or a non–MPO-specific (di-tyrosine of gadopentetate dimeglumine, 0.1 mmol/kg) contrast agent, animals underwent 3-T MR imaging. Intramural presence of MPO in aneurysms in which LPS had been injected was confirmed at immunohistologic analysis. Active MPO activity was verified by measuring the spectrophotometric oxidation of guaiacol. Results: Endovascular injection of LPS resulted in inflammatory cell infiltration into the aneurysm wall, and there was a difference in active MPO expression between aneurysms in which LPS had been injected and control aneurysms (20.3 ng of MPO per milligram of tissue vs 0.12 ng of MPO per milligram of tissue, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine revealed a difference in enhancement ratio between inflamed aneurysms in which LPS had been injected and control aneurysms (1.55 ± 0.05 vs 1.16 ± 0.10, respectively; P gadopentetate dimeglumine exhibited delayed washout kinetics compared with the kinetics of di-tyrosine of gadopentetate dimeglumine. This finding enabled the verification of MPO specificity. Conclusion: The findings of this pilot study established the feasibility of an animal model of saccular aneurysm inflammation that can be seen with clinical-field-strength MR imaging and use of the

  1. Activation of interfacial enzymes at membrane surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Andresen, Thomas Lars; Halperin, Avi

    2006-01-01

    A host of water-soluble enzymes are active at membrane surfaces and in association with membranes. Some of these enzymes are involved in signalling and in modification and remodelling of the membranes. A special class of enzymes, the phospholipases, and in particular secretory phospholipase A2 (s...

  2. Bacillus subtilis PrsA is required in vivo as an extracytoplasmic chaperone for secretion of active enzymes synthesized either with or without pro-sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobs, M; Kontinen, V; Sarvas, M

    1993-01-01

    In prsA (protein secretion) mutants of Bacillus subtilis, decreased levels of exoproteins, including alpha-amylase and subtilisins, are found extracellularly. The effect of prsA on subtilisin secretion is elaborated here. Extracytoplasmic folding and secretion of active subtilisin is assisted...

  3. Detoxification enzymes activities in deltamethrin and bendiocarb ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Detoxification enzymes activities in deltamethrin and bendiocarb resistant and susceptible malarial vectors ( Anopheles gambiae ) breeding in Bichi agricultural and residential sites, Kano state, Nigeria.

  4. Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced activation of NF-κB and expression of COX-2, and induces expression of cytoprotective enzymes in mouse skin in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kundu, Joydeb Kumar [College of Pharmacy, Keimyung University, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of); Liu, Lijia; Shin, Jun-Wan [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Surh, Young-Joon, E-mail: surh@plaza.snu.ac.kr [Tumor Microenvironment Global Core Research Center, College of Pharmacy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul 110-799 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-09-06

    Highlights: •Thymoquinone inhibits phorbol ester-induced COX-2 expression in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone attenuates phosphorylation of IκBα and DNA binding of NF-κB in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone inhibits phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase, JNK and Akt in mouse skin. •Thymoquinone induces the expression of cytoprotective proteins in mouse skin. -- Abstract: Thymoquinone (TQ), the active ingredient of Nigella sativa, has been reported to possess anti-inflammatory and chemopreventive properties. The present study was aimed at elucidating the molecular mechanisms of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities of thymoquinone in mouse skin. Pretreatment of female HR-1 hairless mouse skin with TQ attenuated 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). TQ diminished nuclear translocation and the DNA binding of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) via the blockade of phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of IκBα in TPA-treated mouse skin. Pretreatment with TQ attenuated the phosphorylation of Akt, c-Jun-N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but not that of extracellular signal-regulated kinase-1/2. Moreover, topical application of TQ induced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, NAD(P)H-quinoneoxidoreductase-1, glutathione-S-transferase and glutamate cysteine ligase in mouse skin. Taken together, the inhibitory effects of TQ on TPA-induced COX-2 expression and NF-κB activation, and its ability to induce the expression of cytoprotective proteins provide a mechanistic basis of anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects of TQ in hairless mouse skin.

  5. Enzymes and Enzyme Activity Encoded by Nonenveloped Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azad, Kimi; Banerjee, Manidipa; Johnson, John E

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites that rely on host cell machineries for their replication and survival. Although viruses tend to make optimal use of the host cell protein repertoire, they need to encode essential enzymatic or effector functions that may not be available or accessible in the host cellular milieu. The enzymes encoded by nonenveloped viruses-a group of viruses that lack any lipid coating or envelope-play vital roles in all the stages of the viral life cycle. This review summarizes the structural, biochemical, and mechanistic information available for several classes of enzymes and autocatalytic activity encoded by nonenveloped viruses. Advances in research and development of antiviral inhibitors targeting specific viral enzymes are also highlighted.

  6. Enzyme Activity Experiments Using a Simple Spectrophotometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbut, Jeffrey A.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Experimental procedures for studying enzyme activity using a Spectronic 20 spectrophotometer are described. The experiments demonstrate the effect of pH, temperature, and inhibitors on enzyme activity and allow the determination of Km, Vmax, and Kcat. These procedures are designed for teaching large lower-level biochemistry classes. (MR)

  7. Enzymes with activity toward Xyloglucan

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vincken, J.P.

    2003-01-01

    Xyloglucans are plant cell wall polysaccharides, which belong to the hemicellulose class. Here the structural variations of xyloglucans will be reviewed. Subsequently, the anchoring of xyloglucan in the plant cell wall will be discussed. Enzymes involved in degradation or modification of xyloglucan

  8. Hydrogen sulfide-releasing aspirin modulates xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Mitali; Kodela, Ravinder; Nath, Niharika; Street, Cherease R; Velázquez-Martínez, Carlos A; Boring, Daniel; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2012-03-15

    The balance between phase-I carcinogen-activating and phase-II detoxifying xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes is critical to determining an individual's risk for cancer. We evaluated the effect of Hydrogen sulfide-releasing aspirin (HS-ASA) on xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes in HT-29 human colon and Hepa 1c1c7 mouse liver adenocarcinoma cells and in Wistar rats. HS-ASA inhibited the growth of HT-29 and Hepa 1c1c7 cells, with an IC(50) of 3.2 ± 0.3 μM and 4.2 ± 0.4 μM, respectively. The IC(50) for ASA in both cell lines was greater than 5000 μM at 24h. In these cell lines, HS-ASA caused a dose-dependent increase in activity and expression of the phase-II enzymes glutathione S-transferase (GST) and NAD(P)H:quinoneoxireductase (NQO1). It also caused an increase in UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) expression. The levels of CYP 1A1 a phase-I enzyme was increased by HS-ASA in both cell lines. Pretreatment of cells with NaF, an esterase inhibitor, abrogated the HS-ASA-mediated increases in NQO1 enzyme activity. HS-ASA increased the protein levels of the transcription factor Nrf2, which is a regulator of the phase-II enzymes. In vivo, HS-ASA at 100mg/kg/day had no effect on rat's weights; it induced a 3.4-fold and 1.4-fold increase in hepatic GST and NQO1 enzyme activities, respectively. GST and NQO1 protein levels were also increased. In contrast to that in cultured cells, CYP 1A1 protein levels were not altered in vivo. Therefore, HS-ASA induces phase-II enzymes, at least in part, through the action of H(2)S and by modulating Nrf2; these effects may be part of its mechanism of action against carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Soil Samples of Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeland, P. W.

    1977-01-01

    Described are nine enzyme essays for distinguishing soil samples. Colorimetric methods are used to compare enzyme levels in soils from different sites. Each soil tested had its own spectrum of activity. Attention is drawn to applications of this technique in forensic science and in studies of soil fertility. (Author/AJ)

  10. A survey of orphan enzyme activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pouliot Yannick

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using computational database searches, we have demonstrated previously that no gene sequences could be found for at least 36% of enzyme activities that have been assigned an Enzyme Commission number. Here we present a follow-up literature-based survey involving a statistically significant sample of such "orphan" activities. The survey was intended to determine whether sequences for these enzyme activities are truly unknown, or whether these sequences are absent from the public sequence databases but can be found in the literature. Results We demonstrate that for ~80% of sampled orphans, the absence of sequence data is bona fide. Our analyses further substantiate the notion that many of these enzyme activities play biologically important roles. Conclusion This survey points toward significant scientific cost of having such a large fraction of characterized enzyme activities disconnected from sequence data. It also suggests that a larger effort, beginning with a comprehensive survey of all putative orphan activities, would resolve nearly 300 artifactual orphans and reconnect a wealth of enzyme research with modern genomics. For these reasons, we propose that a systematic effort to identify the cognate genes of orphan enzymes be undertaken.

  11. A survey of orphan enzyme activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouliot, Yannick; Karp, Peter D

    2007-01-01

    Background Using computational database searches, we have demonstrated previously that no gene sequences could be found for at least 36% of enzyme activities that have been assigned an Enzyme Commission number. Here we present a follow-up literature-based survey involving a statistically significant sample of such "orphan" activities. The survey was intended to determine whether sequences for these enzyme activities are truly unknown, or whether these sequences are absent from the public sequence databases but can be found in the literature. Results We demonstrate that for ~80% of sampled orphans, the absence of sequence data is bona fide. Our analyses further substantiate the notion that many of these enzyme activities play biologically important roles. Conclusion This survey points toward significant scientific cost of having such a large fraction of characterized enzyme activities disconnected from sequence data. It also suggests that a larger effort, beginning with a comprehensive survey of all putative orphan activities, would resolve nearly 300 artifactual orphans and reconnect a wealth of enzyme research with modern genomics. For these reasons, we propose that a systematic effort to identify the cognate genes of orphan enzymes be undertaken. PMID:17623104

  12. Novel Activities of Glycolytic Enzymes in Bacillus subtilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commichau, Fabian M.; Rothe, Fabian M.; Herzberg, Christina; Wagner, Eva; Hellwig, Daniel; Lehnik-Habrink, Martin; Hammer, Elke; Völker, Uwe; Stülke, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    Glycolysis is one of the most important metabolic pathways in heterotrophic organisms. Several genes encoding glycolytic enzymes are essential in many bacteria even under conditions when neither glycolytic nor gluconeogenic activities are required. In this study, a screening for in vivo interaction partners of glycolytic enzymes of the soil bacterium Bacillus subtilis was used to provide a rationale for essentiality of glycolytic enzymes. Glycolytic enzymes proved to be in close contact with several other proteins, among them a high proportion of essential proteins. Among these essential interaction partners, other glycolytic enzymes were most prominent. Two-hybrid studies confirmed interactions of phosphofructokinase with phosphoglyceromutase and enolase. Such a complex of glycolytic enzymes might allow direct substrate channeling of glycolytic intermediates. Moreover we found associations of glycolytic enzymes with several proteins known or suspected to be involved in RNA processing and degradation. One of these proteins, Rny (YmdA), which has so far not been functionally characterized, is required for the processing of the mRNA of the glycolytic gapA operon. Two-hybrid analyses confirmed the interactions between the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase and enolase and the enzymes involved in RNA processing, RNase J1, Rny, and polynucleotide phosphorylase. Moreover RNase J1 interacts with its homologue RNase J2. We suggest that this complex of mRNA processing and glycolytic enzymes is the B. subtilis equivalent of the RNA degradosome. Our findings suggest that the functional interaction of glycolytic enzymes with essential proteins may be the reason why they are indispensable. PMID:19193632

  13. Comparative activity of polyphenol oxidase produced In vivo by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to produce polyphenol oxidase in vivo by Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus flavus seed-borne storage molds of rice (Oryzae sativa> L.) was investigated. Also, was the effect of temperature and pH on the activity of the above enzyme secreted by each of the above seed-borne storage molds of rice. The result of ...

  14. Normal Modes Expose Active Sites in Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantz-Gashai, Yitav; Samson, Abraham O.

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of active sites is an important tool in bioinformatics. Here we present an improved structure based technique to expose active sites that is based on large changes of solvent accessibility accompanying normal mode dynamics. The technique which detects EXPOsure of active SITes through normal modEs is named EXPOSITE. The technique is trained using a small 133 enzyme dataset and tested using a large 845 enzyme dataset, both with known active site residues. EXPOSITE is also tested in a benchmark protein ligand dataset (PLD) comprising 48 proteins with and without bound ligands. EXPOSITE is shown to successfully locate the active site in most instances, and is found to be more accurate than other structure-based techniques. Interestingly, in several instances, the active site does not correspond to the largest pocket. EXPOSITE is advantageous due to its high precision and paves the way for structure based prediction of active site in enzymes. PMID:28002427

  15. Testing biochemistry revisited: how in vivo metabolism can be understood from in vitro enzyme kinetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen van Eunen

    Full Text Available A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was later applied to different experimental steady-state conditions, it often exhibited unrestrained metabolite accumulation.Here we resolve this issue by showing that the results of such ab initio modeling are improved substantially by (i including appropriate allosteric regulation and (ii measuring the enzyme kinetic parameters under conditions that resemble the intracellular environment. The following modifications proved crucial: (i implementation of allosteric regulation of hexokinase and pyruvate kinase, (ii implementation of V(max values measured under conditions that resembled the yeast cytosol, and (iii redetermination of the kinetic parameters of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase under physiological conditions.Model predictions and experiments were compared under five different conditions of yeast growth and starvation. When either the original model was used (which lacked important allosteric regulation, or the enzyme parameters were measured under conditions that were, as usual, optimal for high enzyme activity, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and some other glycolytic intermediates tended to accumulate to unrealistically high concentrations. Combining all adjustments yielded an accurate correspondence between model and experiments for all five steady-state and dynamic conditions. This enhances our understanding of in vivo metabolism in terms of in vitro biochemistry.

  16. Testing Biochemistry Revisited: How In Vivo Metabolism Can Be Understood from In Vitro Enzyme Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Eunen, Karen; Kiewiet, José A. L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was later applied to different experimental steady-state conditions, it often exhibited unrestrained metabolite accumulation. Here we resolve this issue by showing that the results of such ab initio modeling are improved substantially by (i) including appropriate allosteric regulation and (ii) measuring the enzyme kinetic parameters under conditions that resemble the intracellular environment. The following modifications proved crucial: (i) implementation of allosteric regulation of hexokinase and pyruvate kinase, (ii) implementation of Vmax values measured under conditions that resembled the yeast cytosol, and (iii) redetermination of the kinetic parameters of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase under physiological conditions. Model predictions and experiments were compared under five different conditions of yeast growth and starvation. When either the original model was used (which lacked important allosteric regulation), or the enzyme parameters were measured under conditions that were, as usual, optimal for high enzyme activity, fructose 1,6-bisphosphate and some other glycolytic intermediates tended to accumulate to unrealistically high concentrations. Combining all adjustments yielded an accurate correspondence between model and experiments for all five steady-state and dynamic conditions. This enhances our understanding of in vivo metabolism in terms of in vitro biochemistry. PMID:22570597

  17. In vivo induction of tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase by ethanol: role of increased enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaprasad, P; Kasinathan, C

    1998-08-01

    Tyrosine sulfation is a posttranslational modification involved in the synthesis, secretion, and biological activity of proteins and peptides. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the enzyme activity was induced by ethanol. In the present work, the induction was studied in detail. Initial experiments were conducted to examine the time course of tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase (TPST) induction in rats pair-fed liquid diets containing either ethanol or carbohydrate substitute (controls). Marked elevation of TPST activity (3-fold) was measured on day 10 in the liver and gastric mucosa of ethanol-fed rats. Ethanol-mediated enhancement was also noticed by Western-blot analysis with anti-TPST antibody in both the liver and gastric mucosa on days 5 and 10. We then determined the steady-state TPST protein turnover in ethanol-fed and control animals that were given 35S-methionine after 10 days of pair-feeding with liquid diet. The rates of TPST synthesis assessed by measuring initial rates of incorporation of 35S-methionine into TPST was increased in the liver and gastric mucosa of animals fed with ethanol. Monophasic exponential decay curves showed that TPST protein half-lives for liver (control: 34 hr, ethanol: 32 hr) and gastric mucosa (control: 52 hr, ethanol: 48 hr) did not differ between control and ethanol groups. Our overall results indicate that the in vivo induction of TPST by ethanol involves increased enzyme synthesis rather than decreased enzyme degradation.

  18. Activity assessment of microbial fibrinolytic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotb, Essam

    2013-08-01

    Conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin inside blood vessels results in thrombosis, leading to myocardial infarction and other cardiovascular diseases. In general, there are four therapy options: surgical operation, intake of antiplatelets, anticoagulants, or fibrinolytic enzymes. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes have attracted much more attention than typical thrombolytic agents because of the expensive prices and the side effects of the latter. The fibrinolytic enzymes were successively discovered from different microorganisms, the most important among which is the genus Bacillus. Microbial fibrinolytic enzymes, especially those from food-grade microorganisms, have the potential to be developed as functional food additives and drugs to prevent or cure thrombosis and other related diseases. There are several assay methods for these enzymes; this may due to the insolubility of substrate, fibrin. Existing assay methods can be divided into three major groups. The first group consists of assay of fibrinolytic activity with natural proteins as substrates, e.g., fibrin plate methods. The second and third groups of assays are suitable for kinetic studies and are based on the determination of hydrolysis of synthetic peptide esters. This review will deal primarily with the microorganisms that have been reported in literature to produce fibrinolytic enzymes and the first review discussing the methods used to assay the fibrinolytic activity.

  19. Monovalent Cation Activation of the Radical SAM Enzyme Pyruvate Formate-Lyase Activating Enzyme

    OpenAIRE

    Shisler, Krista A.; Hutcheson, Rachel U.; Horitani, Masaki; Duschene, Kaitlin S.; Crain, Adam V.; Byer, Amanda S.; Shepard, Eric M.; Rasmussen, Ashley; Yang, Jian; Broderick, William E.; Vey, Jessica L.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Hoffman, Brian M.; Broderick, Joan B

    2017-01-01

    Pyruvate formate-lyase activating enzyme (PFL-AE) is a radical S-adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) enzyme that installs a catalytically essential glycyl radical on pyruvate formate-lyase. We show that PFL-AE binds a catalytically essential monovalent cation at its active site, yet another parallel with B12 enzymes, and we characterize this cation site by a combination of structural, biochemical, and spectroscopic approaches. Refinement of the PFL-AE crystal structure reveals Na+ as the most likely ...

  20. Enzyme activity of a Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiohydrolase

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study was to produce a secreted, heterologously expressed Phanerochaete chrysosporium cellobiohydrolase (CBHI.1) protein that required no in vitro chemical refolding and to investigate the cellulolytic activity of the clone expressing the glutathione S-transferase (GST) fused CBHI.1 protein. Plate enzyme ...

  1. Arabinogalactan proteins: focus on carbohydrate active enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eKnoch

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs are a highly diverse class of cell surface proteoglycans that are commonly found in most plant species. AGPs play important roles in many cellular processes during plant development, such as reproduction, cell proliferation, pattern formation and growth, and in plant-microbe interaction. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of their function. Numerous studies using monoclonal antibodies that recognize different AGP glycan epitopes have shown the appearance of a slightly altered AGP glycan in a specific stage of development in plant cells. Therefore, it is anticipated that the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycan is tightly regulated during development. Until recently, however, little was known about the enzymes involved in the metabolism of AGP glycans. In this review, we summarize recent discoveries of carbohydrate active enzymes (CAZy; http://www.cazy.org/ involved in the biosynthesis and degradation of AGP glycans, and we discuss the biological role of these enzymes in plant development.

  2. In vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation catalyzed by heme enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, Pedro S.; Brustad, Eric M.; Arnold, Frances H.; Wang, Zhan; Lewis, Jared C.

    2016-11-15

    The present invention provides methods for catalyzing the conversion of an olefin to any compound containing one or more cyclopropane functional groups using heme enzymes. In certain aspects, the present invention provides a method for producing a cyclopropanation product comprising providing an olefinic substrate, a diazo reagent, and a heme enzyme; and admixing the components in a reaction for a time sufficient to produce a cyclopropanation product. In other aspects, the present invention provides heme enzymes including variants and fragments thereof that are capable of carrying out in vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation reactions. Expression vectors and host cells expressing the heme enzymes are also provided by the present invention.

  3. In vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation catalyzed by heme enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Pedro S; Brustad, Eric M; Arnold, Frances H; Wang, Zhan; Lewis, Jared C

    2015-03-31

    The present invention provides methods for catalyzing the conversion of an olefin to any compound containing one or more cyclopropane functional groups using heme enzymes. In certain aspects, the present invention provides a method for producing a cyclopropanation product comprising providing an olefinic substrate, a diazo reagent, and a heme enzyme; and admixing the components in a reaction for a time sufficient to produce a cyclopropanation product. In other aspects, the present invention provides heme enzymes including variants and fragments thereof that are capable of carrying out in vivo and in vitro olefin cyclopropanation reactions. Expression vectors and host cells expressing the heme enzymes are also provided by the present invention.

  4. In vivo induction of hepatic P4502E1 by ethanol: role of increased enzyme synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsutsumi, M; Lasker, J M; Takahashi, T; Lieber, C S

    1993-07-01

    P4502E1 (2E1), an ethanol-inducible P450 enzyme, plays an important role in the bioactivation of certain hepatotoxins and chemical carcinogens. Different mechanisms of 2E1 induction by ethanol and other agents (e.g., acetone) have been proposed, ranging from enhanced de novo enzyme synthesis caused by an increase in 2E1 mRNA and/or the efficiency with which it is translated to decreased enzyme degradation stemming from substrate stabilization. To evaluate these mechanisms, we first examined the time course of hepatic 2E1 protein induction in rats pair-fed liquid diets containing 36% of total calories as either ethanol or dextrin-maltose (controls) for 28 days. Western blot analysis with anti-2E1 immunoglobulins revealed that 2E1 reached a new steady-state level (eightfold greater than that found with controls) after ethanol feeding for 10 days and remained elevated for the duration of treatment. Microsomal p-nitrophenol hydroxylation, a 2E1-catalyzed reaction, exhibited a similar induction time course, with the maximal increase in enzyme activity also observed on Day 10 of ethanol administration. We then determined steady-state 2E1 protein turnover in ethanol-fed and control animals that were given [35S]methionine plus[3H]aminolevulinate to radiolabel 2E1 apoprotein and the prosthetic heme group, respectively. Monophasic exponential decay curves showed that hepatic 2E1 protein and heme half-lives (27-28 h and 17 h, respectively) did not differ between the treatment groups. However, rates of 2E1 synthesis, assessed by measuring initial rates of incorporation of [35S]methionine and [3H]aminolevulinate into 2E1 apoprotein and heme, were increased in animals fed ethanol. Our results indicate that the in vivo induction of hepatic 2E1 protein by ethanol involves increased enzyme synthesis rather than decreased enzyme degradation. This enhancement of de novo 2E1 synthesis most likely entails the ethanol-mediated increase of steady-state levels of 2E1 mRNA and/or the

  5. Enzyme Activities in Waste Water and Activated Sludge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybroe, Ole; Jørgensen, Per Elberg; Henze, Mogens

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the potential of selected enzyme activity assays to determine microbial abundance and heterotrophic activity in waste water and activated sludge. In waste water, esterase and dehydrogenase activities were found to correlate with microbial abundance...

  6. Enzyme-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles as efficient antibacterial agents in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Li; Wang, Hao

    2013-10-01

    Despite the fact that pathogenic infections are widely treated by antibiotics in the clinic nowadays, the increasing risk of multidrug-resistance associated with abuse of antibiotics is becoming a major concern in global public health. The increased death toll caused by pathogenic bacterial infection calls for effective antibiotic alternatives. Lysozyme-coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs⊂Lys) are reported as antibacterial agents that exhibit efficient antibacterial activity both in vitro and in vivo with low cytotoxicity and negligible hemolytic side effect. The Lys corona provides multivalent interaction between MSNs⊂Lys and bacterial walls and consequently raises the local concentration of Lys on the surface of cell walls, which promotes hydrolysis of peptidoglycans and increases membrane-perturbation abilities. The minimal inhibition concentration (MIC) of MSNs⊂Lys is fivefold lower than that of free Lys in vitro. The antibacterial efficacy of MSNs⊂Lys is evaluated in vivo by using an intestine-infected mouse model. Experimental results indicate that the number of bacteria surviving in the colon is three orders of magnitude lower than in the untreated group. These natural antibacterial enzyme-modified nanoparticles open up a new avenue for design and synthesis of next-generation antibacterial agents as alternatives to antibiotics. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. A DNA enzyme with Mg(2+)-Dependent RNA Phosphoesterase Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaker, Ronald R.; Joyce, Gerald F.

    1995-01-01

    Previously we demonstrated that DNA can act as an enzyme in the Pb(2+)-dependent cleavage of an RNA phosphoester. This is a facile reaction, with an uncatalyzed rate for a typical RNA phosphoester of approx. 10(exp -4)/ min in the presence of 1 mM Pb(OAc)2 at pH 7.0 and 23 C. The Mg(2+) - dependent reaction is more difficult, with an uncatalyzed rate of approx. 10(exp -7)/ min under comparable conditions. Mg(2+) - dependent cleavage has special relevance to biology because it is compatible with intracellular conditions. Using in vitro selection, we sought to develop a family of phosphoester-cleaving DNA enzymes that operate in the presence of various divalent metals, focusing particularly on the Mg(2+) - dependent reaction. Results: We generated a population of greater than 10(exp 13) DNAs containing 40 random nucleotides and carried out repeated rounds of selective amplification, enriching for molecules that cleave a target RNA phosphoester in the presence of 1 mM Mg(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+) or Pb(2+). Examination of individual clones from the Mg(2+) lineage after the sixth round revealed a catalytic motif comprised of a three-stem junction.This motif was partially randomized and subjected to seven additional rounds of selective amplification, yielding catalysts with a rate of 0.01/ min. The optimized DNA catalyst was divided into separate substrate and enzyme domains and shown to have a similar level of activity under multiple turnover conditions. Conclusions: We have generated a Mg(2+) - dependent DNA enzyme that cleaves a target RNA phosphoester with a catalytic rate approx. 10(exp 5) - fold greater than that of the uncatalyzed reaction. This activity is compatible with intracellular conditions, raising the possibility that DNA enzymes might be made to operate in vivo.

  8. Enzyme activity assay of glycoprotein enzymes based on a boronate affinity molecularly imprinted 96-well microplate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Xiaodong; Liu, Zhen

    2014-12-16

    Enzyme activity assay is an important method in clinical diagnostics. However, conventional enzyme activity assay suffers from apparent interference from the sample matrix. Herein, we present a new format of enzyme activity assay that can effectively eliminate the effects of the sample matrix. The key is a 96-well microplate modified with molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) prepared according to a newly proposed method called boronate affinity-based oriented surface imprinting. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP), a glycoprotein enzyme that has been routinely used as an indicator for several diseases in clinical tests, was taken as a representative target enzyme. The prepared MIP exhibited strong affinity toward the template enzyme (with a dissociation constant of 10(-10) M) as well as superb tolerance for interference. Thus, the enzyme molecules in a complicated sample matrix could be specifically captured and cleaned up for enzyme activity assay, which eliminated the interference from the sample matrix. On the other hand, because the boronate affinity MIP could well retain the enzymatic activity of glycoprotein enzymes, the enzyme captured by the MIP was directly used for activity assay. Thus, additional assay time and possible enzyme or activity loss due to an enzyme release step required by other methods were avoided. Assay of ALP in human serum was successfully demonstrated, suggesting a promising prospect of the proposed method in real-world applications.

  9. In vivo study of developmental changes in carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I in rat liver. Repression of the enzyme synthesis immediately after birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, A; Kitagawa, Y; Sugimoto, E

    1983-01-20

    The regulatory mechanism of the developmental increase of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I in fetal and neonatal rat liver was studied in vivo. The appearance and rapid increase of the enzyme in late fetal period were caused by de novo synthesis of the enzyme protein. The amount of the enzyme protein analyzed by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was proportional to the enzyme activity throughout the period of development. No indication was observed for preexisting protein which could be converted into the active protein. A novel system for the in vivo study of carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I synthesis was developed. Hepatocytes, mechanically dispersed by repeated passage of the tissue through a pipet, incorporated [35S]methionine into the enzyme. Taking advantage of this system, the regulation of the enzyme synthesis was studied. In vivo synthesis of the enzyme was detected at 4 days before birth and rapidly increased until 1 day before birth. However, the enzyme synthesis was markedly repressed after birth, when the amount of carmamoyl-phosphate synthetase I itself reached the adult level. This result was in a clear contrast with the constant level of the translatable mRNA (Raymond, Y. and Shore, G.C. (1981) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 656, 111-119) and suggested that post-transcriptional regulation is important in addition to the level of mRNA for the regulation of the carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I level.

  10. High-Throughput Analysis of Enzyme Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Guoxin [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2007-01-01

    High-throughput screening (HTS) techniques have been applied to many research fields nowadays. Robot microarray printing technique and automation microtiter handling technique allows HTS performing in both heterogeneous and homogeneous formats, with minimal sample required for each assay element. In this dissertation, new HTS techniques for enzyme activity analysis were developed. First, patterns of immobilized enzyme on nylon screen were detected by multiplexed capillary system. The imaging resolution is limited by the outer diameter of the capillaries. In order to get finer images, capillaries with smaller outer diameters can be used to form the imaging probe. Application of capillary electrophoresis allows separation of the product from the substrate in the reaction mixture, so that the product doesn't have to have different optical properties with the substrate. UV absorption detection allows almost universal detection for organic molecules. Thus, no modifications of either the substrate or the product molecules are necessary. This technique has the potential to be used in screening of local distribution variations of specific bio-molecules in a tissue or in screening of multiple immobilized catalysts. Another high-throughput screening technique is developed by directly monitoring the light intensity of the immobilized-catalyst surface using a scientific charge-coupled device (CCD). Briefly, the surface of enzyme microarray is focused onto a scientific CCD using an objective lens. By carefully choosing the detection wavelength, generation of product on an enzyme spot can be seen by the CCD. Analyzing the light intensity change over time on an enzyme spot can give information of reaction rate. The same microarray can be used for many times. Thus, high-throughput kinetic studies of hundreds of catalytic reactions are made possible. At last, we studied the fluorescence emission spectra of ADP and obtained the detection limits for ADP under three different

  11. A fluorescence-based hydrolytic enzyme activity assay for quantifying toxic effects of Roundup® to Daphnia magna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsted, Michael; Roslev, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Daphnia magna is a widely used model organism for aquatic toxicity testing. In the present study, we investigated the hydrolytic enzyme activity of D. magna after exposure to toxicant stress. In vivo enzyme activity was quantified using 15 fluorogenic enzyme probes based on 4-methylumbelliferyl...... showed that hydrolytic enzyme activity was quantifiable as a combination of whole body fluorescence of D. magna, and fluorescence of the surrounding water. Exposure of D. magna to lethal and sublethal concentrations of Roundup® resulted in loss of whole body enzyme activity, and release of cell...

  12. The Impact of Enzyme Orientation and Electrode Topology on the Catalytic Activity of Adsorbed Redox Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Duncan G. G.; Marritt, Sophie J.; Kemp, Gemma L.; Gordon-Brown, Piers; Butt, Julea N.; Jeuken, Lars J. C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well established that the structural details of electrodes and their interaction with adsorbed enzyme influences the interfacial electron transfer rate. However, for nanostructured electrodes, it is likely that the structure also impacts on substrate flux near the adsorbed enzymes and thus catalytic activity. Furthermore, for enzymes converting macro-molecular substrates it is possible that the enzyme orientation determines the nature of interactions between the adsorbed enzyme and substrate and therefore catalytic rates. In essence the electrode may impede substrate access to the active site of the enzyme. We have tested these possibilities through studies of the catalytic performance of two enzymes adsorbed on topologically distinct electrode materials. Escherichia coli NrfA, a nitrite reductase, was adsorbed on mesoporous, nanocrystalline SnO2 electrodes. CymA from Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 reduces menaquinone-7 within 200 nm sized liposomes and this reaction was studied with the enzyme adsorbed on SAM modified ultra-flat gold electrodes. PMID:24634538

  13. Ligninolytic enzyme activities in mycelium of some wild and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... MnP and LiP activity and their quantitative enzyme production must .... Statistical analysis. Similarity (%) of organisms were statistically analyzed with the. MINITAB Release 13.20 program, in relation to their ligninolytic enzyme activities ..... submerged fermentation of food industry wastes. Enzyme Microb.

  14. Standardized Assay Medium To Measure Lactococcus lactis Enzyme Activities while Mimicking Intracellular Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goel, A.; Santos, F.; De Vos, W.M.; Teusink, B.; Molenaar, D.

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of how the activity of enzymes is affected under in vivo conditions is essential for analyzing their regulation and constructing models that yield an integrated understanding of cell behavior. Current kinetic parameters for Lactococcus lactis are scattered through different studies and

  15. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes*

    OpenAIRE

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a cataly...

  16. Enzyme and root activities in surface-flow constructed wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Ling; Wang, Yu-Bin; Zhao, Li-Na; Chen, Zhang-He

    2009-07-01

    Sixteen small-scale wetlands planted with four plant species were constructed for domestic wastewater purification. The objective of this study was to determine the correlations between contaminant removal and soil enzyme activity, root activity, and growth in the constructed wetlands. The results indicated that correlations between contaminant removal efficiency and enzyme activity varied depending on the contaminants. The removal efficiency of NH4+ was significantly correlated with both urease and protease activity in all wetlands, and the removal of total phosphorus and soluble reactive phosphorus was significantly correlated with phosphatase activity in most wetlands, while the removal of total nitrogen, NO3(-) , and chemical oxygen demand (COD) was significantly correlated with enzyme activity only in a few instances. Correlations between soil enzyme activity and root activity varied among species. Activities of all enzymes were significantly correlated with root activity in Vetiveria zizanioides and Phragmites australis wetlands, but not in Hymenocallis littoralis wetlands. Significant correlations between enzyme activity and root biomass and between enzyme activity and root growth were found mainly in Cyperus flabelliformis wetlands. Root activity was significantly correlated with removal efficiencies of all contaminants except NO3(-) and COD in V. zizanioides wetlands. Enzyme activities and root activity showed single-peak seasonal patterns. Activities of phosphatase, urease, and cellulase were significantly higher in the top layer of the substrate than in the deeper layers, and there were generally no significant differences between the deeper layers (deeper than 15 cm).

  17. Detection of Extracellular Enzyme Activities in Ganoderma neo-japonicum

    OpenAIRE

    Jo, Woo-Sik; Park, Ha-Na; Cho, Doo-Hyun; Yoo, Young-Bok; Park, Seung-Chun

    2011-01-01

    The ability of Ganoderma to produce extracellular enzymes, including β-glucosidase, cellulase, avicelase, pectinase, xylanase, protease, amylase, and ligninase was tested in chromogenic media. β-glucosidase showed the highest activity, among the eight tested enzymes. In particular, Ganoderma neo-japonicum showed significantly stronger activity for β-glucosidase than that of the other enzymes. Two Ganoderma lucidum isolates showed moderate activity for avicelase; however, Ganoderma neo-japonic...

  18. Recruitment of murine neutrophils in vivo through endogenous sialidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Alan S; Sakarya, Serhan; Rifat, Salahaldin; Held, Thomas K; Drysdale, Beth-Ellen; Grange, Philippe A; Cassels, Frederick J; Wang, Lai-Xi; Stamatos, Nicholas; Farese, Ann; Casey, Daniel; Powell, Jan; Bhattacharjee, Apurba K; Kleinberg, Michael; Goldblum, Simeon E

    2003-02-07

    Upon activation with various noncytokine stimuli, polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) mobilize intracellular sialidase to the plasma membrane, where the sialidase releases sialic acid from the cell surface. This desialylation enhances PMN adherence, spreading, deformability, and motility, functions critical to diapedesis. We now have examined the role of sialidase activity in PMN adhesion to and migration across the endothelium in vivo. A polyclonal antibody prepared against Clostridium perfringens neuraminidase 1) detected surface expression of sialidase on human PMNs stimulated with IL-8 in vitro and on murine PMNs stimulated in vivo, but not on that of unstimulated cells, 2) recognized proteins in human PMN lysates and granule preparations that were not detected by preimmune antibody, 3) inhibited bacterial neuraminidase and human PMN sialidase activities in vitro, and 4) inhibited both pulmonary leukostasis in mice systemically infused with cobra venom factor and intrapulmonary transendothelial migration of PMNs into the bronchoalveolar compartment of mice intranasally challenged with interleukin-8. We conclude that the chemokine interleukin-8, like other PMN agonists, induces the translocation of sialidase to the PMN surface and that surface expression of this sialidase is a prerequisite to PMN recruitment in vivo. The ability of antibodies raised against a prokaryotic neuraminidase to recognize eukaryotic sialidase extends the concept of the neuraminidase superfamily to mammalian enzymes. Inhibition of mobilized endogenous sialidase may provide a novel strategy for limiting the inflammatory response.

  19. Modulation of enzyme activities following the coadministration of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nonetheless, acid phosphatase (ACP) activity was not appreciably affected in both tissues. Corresponding significant increases (p<0.05) in activity of these enzymes in the serum was observed. However, unexpected high values of enzyme activities in both tissues when both potassium bromate and chloroquine were ...

  20. Photoactivated Spatiotemporally-Responsive Nanosensors of in Vivo Protease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudani, Jaideep S; Jain, Piyush K; Kwong, Gabriel A; Stevens, Kelly R; Bhatia, Sangeeta N

    2015-12-22

    Proteases play diverse and important roles in physiology and disease, including influencing critical processes in development, immune responses, and malignancies. Both the abundance and activity of these enzymes are tightly regulated and highly contextual; thus, in order to elucidate their specific impact on disease progression, better tools are needed to precisely monitor in situ protease activity. Current strategies for detecting protease activity are focused on functionalizing synthetic peptide substrates with reporters that emit detection signals following peptide cleavage. However, these activity-based probes lack the capacity to be turned on at sites of interest and, therefore, are subject to off-target activation. Here we report a strategy that uses light to precisely control both the location and time of activity-based sensing. We develop photocaged activity-based sensors by conjugating photolabile molecules directly onto peptide substrates, thereby blocking protease cleavage by steric hindrance. At sites of disease, exposure to ultraviolet light unveils the nanosensors to allow proteases to cleave and release a reporter fragment that can be detected remotely. We apply this spatiotemporally controlled system to probe secreted protease activity in vitro and tumor protease activity in vivo. In vitro, we demonstrate the ability to dynamically and spatially measure metalloproteinase activity in a 3D model of colorectal cancer. In vivo, veiled nanosensors are selectively activated at the primary tumor site in colorectal cancer xenografts to capture the tumor microenvironment-enriched protease activity. The ability to remotely control activity-based sensors may offer a valuable complement to existing tools for measuring biological activity.

  1. Microbial Enzyme Activity and Carbon Cycling in Grassland Soil Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, S. D.; Jastrow, J. D.

    2004-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes are necessary to degrade complex organic compounds present in soils. Using physical fractionation procedures, we tested whether old soil carbon is spatially isolated from degradative enzymes across a prairie restoration chronosequence in Illinois, USA. We found that carbon-degrading enzymes were abundant in all soil fractions, including macroaggregates, microaggregates, and the clay fraction, which contains carbon with a mean residence time of ~200 years. The activities of two cellulose-degrading enzymes and a chitin-degrading enzyme were 2-10 times greater in organic matter fractions than in bulk soil, consistent with the rapid turnover of these fractions. Polyphenol oxidase activity was 3 times greater in the clay fraction than in the bulk soil, despite very slow carbon turnover in this fraction. Changes in enzyme activity across the restoration chronosequence were small once adjusted for increases in soil carbon concentration, although polyphenol oxidase activity per unit carbon declined by 50% in native prairie versus cultivated soil. These results are consistent with a `two-pool' model of enzyme and carbon turnover in grassland soils. In light organic matter fractions, enzyme production and carbon turnover both occur rapidly. However, in mineral-dominated fractions, both enzymes and their carbon substrates are immobilized on mineral surfaces, leading to slow turnover. Soil carbon accumulation in the clay fraction and across the prairie restoration chronosequence probably reflects increasing physical isolation of enzymes and substrates on the molecular scale, rather than the micron to millimeter scale.

  2. ORENZA: a web resource for studying ORphan ENZyme activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Labedan Bernard

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the current availability of several hundreds of thousands of amino acid sequences, more than 36% of the enzyme activities (EC numbers defined by the Nomenclature Committee of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (NC-IUBMB are not associated with any amino acid sequence in major public databases. This wide gap separating knowledge of biochemical function and sequence information is found for nearly all classes of enzymes. Thus, there is an urgent need to explore these sequence-less EC numbers, in order to progressively close this gap. Description We designed ORENZA, a PostgreSQL database of ORphan ENZyme Activities, to collate information about the EC numbers defined by the NC-IUBMB with specific emphasis on orphan enzyme activities. Complete lists of all EC numbers and of orphan EC numbers are available and will be periodically updated. ORENZA allows one to browse the complete list of EC numbers or the subset associated with orphan enzymes or to query a specific EC number, an enzyme name or a species name for those interested in particular organisms. It is possible to search ORENZA for the different biochemical properties of the defined enzymes, the metabolic pathways in which they participate, the taxonomic data of the organisms whose genomes encode them, and many other features. The association of an enzyme activity with an amino acid sequence is clearly underlined, making it easy to identify at once the orphan enzyme activities. Interactive publishing of suggestions by the community would provide expert evidence for re-annotation of orphan EC numbers in public databases. Conclusion ORENZA is a Web resource designed to progressively bridge the unwanted gap between function (enzyme activities and sequence (dataset present in public databases. ORENZA should increase interactions between communities of biochemists and of genomicists. This is expected to reduce the number of orphan enzyme

  3. A Simple and Accurate Method for Measuring Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yip, Din-Yan

    1997-01-01

    Presents methods commonly used for investigating enzyme activity using catalase and presents a new method for measuring catalase activity that is more reliable and accurate. Provides results that are readily reproduced and quantified. Can also be used for investigations of enzyme properties such as the effects of temperature, pH, inhibitors,…

  4. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors suppress production of tumor necrosis factor-alpha in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, M; Satoh, J; Sagara, M; Muto, G; Muto, Y; Nishimura, S; Miyaguchi, S; Qiang, X L; Sakata, Y; Nakazawa, T; Ikehata, F; Ohta, S; Toyota, T

    1997-04-01

    It has been reported that angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors have beneficial effects on insulin resistance and congestive heart failure, in which elevations of serum tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) level have been indicated. Therefore, in this study, we examined effect of ACE inhibitors on TNF-alpha production both in vitro and in vivo by using human blood mononuclear cells and mice, respectively. LPS (20 micrograms/ml)-induced in vitro TNF-alpha production, measured by bioassay and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, was significantly inhibited with captopril, delapril and cilazapril in a concentration of 10(-3) mol/l. A single, oral administration of captopril, delapril and cilazapril at more than 10-fold doses of common clinical use in man significantly inhibited LPS (2 mg/kg)-induced serum TNF-alpha activity in Balb/c mice. These results indicate that ACE inhibitors such as captopril, delapril and cilazapril have an inhibitory effect on TNF-alpha production not only in vitro as previously reported, but also in vivo, although relatively high concentrations and large doses were required in this study.

  5. Enzyme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enzymes are complex proteins that cause a specific chemical change in all parts of the body. For ... use them. Blood clotting is another example of enzymes at work. Enzymes are needed for all body ...

  6. Thermodynamic activity-based intrinsic enzyme kinetic sheds light on enzyme-solvent interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosch, Jan-Hendrik; Wagner, David; Nistelkas, Vasilios; Spieß, Antje C

    2017-01-01

    The reaction medium has major impact on biocatalytic reaction systems and on their economic significance. To allow for tailored medium engineering, thermodynamic phenomena, intrinsic enzyme kinetics, and enzyme-solvent interactions have to be discriminated. To this end, enzyme reaction kinetic modeling was coupled with thermodynamic calculations based on investigations of the alcohol dehydrogenase from Lactobacillus brevis (LbADH) in monophasic water/methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) mixtures as a model solvent. Substrate concentrations and substrate thermodynamic activities were varied separately to identify the individual thermodynamic and kinetic effects on the enzyme activity. Microkinetic parameters based on concentration and thermodynamic activity were derived to successfully identify a positive effect of MTBE on the availability of the substrate to the enzyme, but a negative effect on the enzyme performance. In conclusion, thermodynamic activity-based kinetic modeling might be a suitable tool to initially curtail the type of enzyme-solvent interactions and thus, a powerful first step to potentially understand the phenomena that occur in nonconventional media in more detail. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 33:96-103, 2017. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  7. Operating Conditions Effects Onenzyme Activity: Case Enzyme Protease

    OpenAIRE

    Adel Oueslati,; Mounirhaouala

    2014-01-01

    The Proteases an enzyme added to detergents to degrade the protein spots origin.Their action is manifested through its activity the middle of washing clothes. This activity depends on the operating conditions. In this article, the effects of temperature and pH of the reaction and the substrate concentration and time of washing medium on the enzyme activity were studied. There action mechanism has been shown. The activity measurements were made by absorption spectrometry

  8. Microarray Selection of Cooperative Peptides for Modulating Enzyme Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglin Fu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, peptide microarrays have been used to distinguish proteins, antibodies, viruses, and bacteria based on their binding to random sequence peptides. We reported on the use of peptide arrays to identify enzyme modulators that involve screening an array of 10,000 defined and addressable peptides on a microarray. Primary peptides were first selected to inhibit the enzyme at low μM concentrations. Then, new peptides were found to only bind strongly with the enzyme–inhibitor complex, but not the native enzyme. These new peptides served as secondary inhibitors that enhanced the inhibition of the enzyme together with the primary peptides. Without the primary peptides, the secondary effect peptides had little effect on the enzyme activity. Conversely, we also selected peptides that recovered the activities of inhibited enzyme–peptide complex. The selection of cooperative peptide pairs will provide a versatile toolkit for modulating enzyme functions, which may potentially be applied to drug discovery and biocatalysis.

  9. Modification of polymer surfaces to enhance enzyme activity and stability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Christian

    already been developed, combining the same goal to improve enzyme activity, stability and selectivity. Polymer materials have shown, due to their easy processibility and versatile properties, high potential as enzyme support. However, in order to achieve improved enzyme performance, the combination...... of different factors, such as the nature of the enzyme, the properties of the support, the type of immobilization and the interaction between enzyme and support, has to be taken into consideration. In this thesis, these factors are pursued and addressed by exploiting various types of polymers with focus...... of immobilized enzymes. Micro-environmental changes were generated through the introduction of tailored surface functionalities via thiol-ene chemistry (TEC) and surface chain transfer free radical polymerization (SCT-FRP), which demonstrated a significant influence on the activity of immobilized horseradish...

  10. EVOLUTIONARY TRANSITIONS IN ENZYME ACTIVITY OF ANT FUNGUS GARDENS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Fine Licht, Henrik H; Schiøtt, Morten; Mueller, Ulrich G

    2010-01-01

    the attine phylogeny. We show that, relative to sister clades, gardens of higher-attine ants have enhanced activity of protein-digesting enzymes, whereas gardens of leaf-cutting ants also have increased activity of starch-digesting enzymes. However, the enzyme activities of lower-attine fungus gardens...... are targeted primarily towards partial degradation of plant cell walls, reflecting a plesiomorphic state of non-domesticated fungi. The enzyme profiles of the higher-attine and leaf-cutting gardens appear particularly suited to digest fresh plant materials and to access nutrients from live cells without major...... an association with a monophyletic clade of specialized symbionts. In conjunction with the transition to specialized symbionts, the ants advanced in colony size and social complexity. Here we provide a comparative study of the functional specialization in extracellular enzyme activities in fungus gardens across...

  11. In vitro, ex vivo and in vivo anti-hypertensive activity of Chrysophyllum cainito L. extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Li-Mei; Qi, Xue-Wen; Hao, Ji-Heng; Liu, Hai-Feng; Xu, Qing-Hua; Bu, Pei-Li

    2015-01-01

    Chrysophyllum cainito L., a traditional herbal medicine, could have the potential for management of hypertension due to presence of polyphenolic compounds. The extracts and fractions of the pulp of plant were evaluated for in vitro (inhibition of angiotensin I converting enzyme/ACE assay), ex vivo (isolated aorta relaxation assay) and in vivo (salt induced hypertensive rat assay). The alcoholic and aqueous extract (ALE and AQE respectively) of fruit of plant C. cainito was having 14.8 and 9.2% yield respectively. The fractionation with ethyl alcohol (EAF) and butanol (BTF) yielded 2.52 & 2.17% respectively from ALE and 0.46 & 0.31% respectively from AQE with respect to fruit pulp dry weight. More phenolic content was found in ALE (3.75±0.15 mg gallic acid equivalent or GAE g(-1) of dry power of fruit pulp) compared to AQE and maximum in ethyl acetate fraction of ALE (ALE-EAF) (2.32±0.21 mg GAE g(-1) of dry power of fruit pulp) among all fractions. ACE inhibition activity was found to be maximum in ALE-EAF 62.5±7.34%. While ex vivo study using isolated tissue of aorta showed again showed maximum activity (62.82±6.19 and 46.47±8.32% relaxation with 50 µg mL(-1) and 10 µg mL(-1) GAE concentration respectively). ALE-EAF reduced the elevated arterial pressure of salt induced hypertensive rat significantly to the level of normotensive animal group. Results of ALE-EAF have shown its potential as a source for novel constituent for the treatment hypertension and should further be studied for isolation of specific constituent for more effectiveness.

  12. In vivo self-assembly of stable green fluorescent protein fusion particles and their uses in enzyme immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venning-Slater, Mark; Hooks, David O; Rehm, Bernd H A

    2014-05-01

    Bacterial inclusion bodies are aggregations of mostly inactive and misfolded proteins. However, previously the in vivo self-assembly of green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusions into fluorescent particles which displayed specific binding sites suitable for applications in bioseparation and diagnostics was demonstrated. Here, the suitability of GFP particles for enzyme immobilization was assessed. The enzymes tested were a thermostable α-amylase from Bacillus licheniformis, N-acetyl-d-neuraminic acid aldolase (NanA) from Escherichia coli, and organophosphohydrolase (OpdA) from Agrobacterium radiobacter. Respective GFP particles were isolated and could be stably maintained outside the cell. These enzyme-bearing GFP particles exhibited considerable stability across a range of temperature, pH, and storage conditions and could be recycled. The α-amylase-bearing particles retained activity after treatments at 4 to 85°C and at pHs 4 to 10, were stable for 3 months at 4°C, and could be recycled up to three times. OpdA-bearing particles retained degradation activity after treatments at 4 to 45°C and at pHs 5 to 10 and were able to be recycled up to four times. In contrast, the performance of NanA-bearing particles rapidly declined (>50% loss) after each recycling step and 3 months storage at 4°C. However, they were still able to convert N-acetylmannosamine and pyruvate to N-acetylneuraminic acid after treatment at 4 to 85°C and at pHs 4 to 11. Fluorescent GFP fusion particles represent a novel method for the immobilization and display of enzymes. Potential applications include diagnostic assays, biomass conversion, pharmaceutical production, and bioremediation.

  13. Changes in growth, survival and digestive enzyme activities of Asian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the effects of different dietary treatments on the growth, survival and digestive enzyme activities of Mystus nemurus larvae. Newly hatched larvae were reared for 14 days in twelve 15 L glass aquaria (for growth and survival) and eight 300 L fiberglass tanks (for enzyme samples) at a ...

  14. Effect of diffusion on enzyme activity in a microreactor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swarts, J.W.; Kolfschoten, R.C.; Jansen, M.C.A.A.; Janssen, A.E.M.; Boom, R.M.

    2010-01-01

    To establish general rules for setting up an enzyme microreactor system, we studied the effect of diffusion on enzyme activity in a microreactor. As a model system we used the hydrolysis of ortho-nitrophenyl-ß-d-galactopyranoside by ß-galactosidase from Kluyveromyces lactis. We found that the

  15. Activity enhancement of ligninolytic enzymes of Trametes versicolor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suspended cultures of white-rot fungus, Trametes versicolor, supplemented with bagasse powder showed a concentration dependent enhancement in the ligninolytic enzymes activity in liquid shake cultures. 2% (w/v) bagasse powder improved greater stability to the enzymes. The optimum pH is 3.5 and the optimum ...

  16. Seasonality of fibrolytic enzyme activity in herbivore microbial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fibre (cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin) is the most abundant polysaccharide in nature and is hydrolysed by gut micro-organisms of herbivores because they can produce a set of extracellular enzymes. This study examined seasonal changes in the fibrolytic enzyme activity of microbial ecosystems of five herbivores ...

  17. Why do crown ethers activate enzymes in organic solvents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Unen, D.J.; Engbersen, Johannes F.J.; Reinhoudt, David

    2002-01-01

    One of the major drawbacks of enzymes in nonaqueous solvents is that their activity is often dramatically low compared to that in water. This limitation can be largely overcome by crown ether treatment of enzymes. In this paper, we describe a number of carefully designed new experiments that have

  18. Ligninolytic enzyme activities in mycelium of some wild and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Lignin is probably one of the most recalcitrant compounds synthesized by plants. This compound is degraded by few microorganisms. White-rot fungi have been extensively studied due to its powerful ligninolytic enzymes. In this study, ligninolytic enzyme activities of different fungal species (six commercial and 13 wild) were ...

  19. Photoreactivating enzyme activity in the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhead, A.D. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY); Achey, P.M.

    1981-01-01

    There has been considerable speculation about the occurrence of photoreactivating enzyme in different organisms and about its biologic purpose. We have developed a simple, sensitive assay for estimating pyrimidine dimers in DNA which is useful in making a rapid survey for the presence of the enzyme. Using this method, we have found photoreactivating enzyme activity in the tissues of the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta. This parasite spends the majority of its life span in the bodies of its definitive or intermediate hosts, but a period is spent externally. We suggest that photoreactivating enzyme may be important in perserving the integrity of embryonic DNA during this free-living stage.

  20. Photoreactivating enzyme activity in the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodhead, A.D.; Achey, P.M.

    1981-06-01

    There has been considerable speculation about the occurrence of photoreactivating enzyme in different organisms and about its biological purpose. We have developed a simple, sensitive assay for estimating pyrimidine dimers in DNA which is useful in making a rapid survey for the presence of the enzyme. Using this method, we have found photoreactivating enzyme activity in the tissues of the rat tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta. This parasite spends the majority of its life span in the bodies of its definitive or intermediate hosts, but a period is spent externally. We suggest that photoreactivating enzyme may be important in preserving the integrity of embryonic DNA during this free-living stage.

  1. Characterization of tetracycline modifying enzymes using a sensitive in vivo reporter system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhou

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing our understanding of antibiotic resistance mechanisms is critical. To enable progress in this area, methods to rapidly identify and characterize antibiotic resistance conferring enzymes are required. Results We have constructed a sensitive reporter system in Escherichia coli that can be used to detect and characterize the activity of enzymes that act upon the antibiotic, tetracycline and its derivatives. In this system, expression of the lux operon is regulated by the tetracycline repressor, TetR, which is expressed from the same plasmid under the control of an arabinose-inducible promoter. Addition of very low concentrations of tetracycline derivatives, well below growth inhibitory concentrations, resulted in luminescence production as a result of expression of the lux genes carried by the reporter plasmid. Introduction of another plasmid into this system expressing TetX, a tetracycline-inactivating enzyme, caused a marked loss in luminescence due to enzyme-mediated reduction in the intracellular Tc concentration. Data generated for the TetX enzyme using the reporter system could be effectively fit with the known Km and kcat values, demonstrating the usefulness of this system for quantitative analyses. Conclusion Since members of the TetR family of repressors regulate enzymes and pumps acting upon almost every known antibiotic and a wide range of other small molecules, reporter systems with the same design as presented here, but employing heterologous TetR-related proteins, could be developed to measure enzymatic activities against a wide range of antibiotics and other compounds. Thus, the assay described here has far-reaching applicability and could be adapted for high-throughput applications.

  2. Structure and activity of enzymes that remove histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbert, Marc A; Marmorstein, Ronen

    2005-12-01

    The post-translational modification of histones plays an important role in chromatin regulation, a process that insures the fidelity of gene expression and other DNA transactions. Equally important as the enzymes that generate these modifications are the enzymes that remove them. Recent studies have identified some of the enzymes that remove histone modifications and have characterized their activities. In addition, structural and biochemical studies of these enzymes have focused on the histone lysine deacetylases HDAC8 and sirtuins, and on the arginine and lysine demethylases PAD and BHC110/LSD1, respectively. These new findings may be used as a context to present new information that contributes to our understanding of chromatin regulation, and to pose remaining questions pertaining to the activities of these enzymes and the roles they play in chromatin regulation.

  3. Enzyme activity in banana fruits rotted by Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nityananda Chakraborty

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activities in fruits of two cultivars of banana, 'champa' and 'kanthali' rotted by Botryodiplodia theobromae Pat. was studied. The enzymes showed much higher activities in infected than that in uninfected 'tissues. Increase in peroxidase activity was evidently inhibited by cycloheximide. Polyphenol oxidase activity was also inhibited in presence of phenylthiourea and Na-diethyldithiocarbamate more strongly by the former. Increase in activities seemed to be due to increased sytheses of the enzymes. In an in vitro culture, the fungus exhibited some peroxidase but no polyphenoloxidase activity.

  4. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Darewicz

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes. Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50% of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes.

  5. Using shotgun sequence data to find active restriction enzyme genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yu; Posfai, Janos; Morgan, Richard D.; Vincze, Tamas; Roberts, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Whole genome shotgun sequence analysis has become the standard method for beginning to determine a genome sequence. The preparation of the shotgun sequence clones is, in fact, a biological experiment. It determines which segments of the genome can be cloned into Escherichia coli and which cannot. By analyzing the complete set of sequences from such an experiment, it is possible to identify genes lethal to E. coli. Among this set are genes encoding restriction enzymes which, when active in E. coli, lead to cell death by cleaving the E. coli genome at the restriction enzyme recognition sites. By analyzing shotgun sequence data sets we show that this is a reliable method to detect active restriction enzyme genes in newly sequenced genomes, thereby facilitating functional annotation. Active restriction enzyme genes have been identified, and their activity demonstrated biochemically, in the sequenced genomes of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, Bacillus cereus ATCC 10987 and Methylococcus capsulatus. PMID:18988632

  6. Enzyme activity in bioregulator-treated tomato (Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-31

    May 31, 2010 ... Full Length Research Paper. Enzyme activity in ... Lipoxygenase (Linoleate: Oxygen Oxidoreductase, E.C. ... Research has shown the stimulatory effect of bioregulators on vegetative growth and yield of plants. (Ibrahim et al.

  7. Changes in photosynthesis and activities of enzymes involved in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tolerance, respectively were used to investigate the oxygen consumption rate of photosystem I, the oxygen evolution rate of photosystem II, cab transcript levels, and activities of enzymes involved in photosynthetic carbon reduction cycle.

  8. Compounds from silicones alter enzyme activity in curing barnacle glue and model enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Rittschof

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Attachment strength of fouling organisms on silicone coatings is low. We hypothesized that low attachment strength on silicones is, in part, due to the interaction of surface available components with natural glues. Components could alter curing of glues through bulk changes or specifically through altered enzyme activity. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: GC-MS analysis of silicone coatings showed surface-available siloxanes when the coatings were gently rubbed with a cotton swab for 15 seconds or given a 30 second rinse with methanol. Mixtures of compounds were found on 2 commercial and 8 model silicone coatings. The hypothesis that silicone components alter glue curing enzymes was tested with curing barnacle glue and with commercial enzymes. In our model, barnacle glue curing involves trypsin-like serine protease(s, which activate enzymes and structural proteins, and a transglutaminase which cross-links glue proteins. Transglutaminase activity was significantly altered upon exposure of curing glue from individual barnacles to silicone eluates. Activity of purified trypsin and, to a greater extent, transglutaminase was significantly altered by relevant concentrations of silicone polymer constituents. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Surface-associated silicone compounds can disrupt glue curing and alter enzyme properties. Altered curing of natural glues has potential in fouling management.

  9. Compounds from silicones alter enzyme activity in curing barnacle glue and model enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittschof, Daniel; Orihuela, Beatriz; Harder, Tilmann; Stafslien, Shane; Chisholm, Bret; Dickinson, Gary H

    2011-02-17

    Attachment strength of fouling organisms on silicone coatings is low. We hypothesized that low attachment strength on silicones is, in part, due to the interaction of surface available components with natural glues. Components could alter curing of glues through bulk changes or specifically through altered enzyme activity. GC-MS analysis of silicone coatings showed surface-available siloxanes when the coatings were gently rubbed with a cotton swab for 15 seconds or given a 30 second rinse with methanol. Mixtures of compounds were found on 2 commercial and 8 model silicone coatings. The hypothesis that silicone components alter glue curing enzymes was tested with curing barnacle glue and with commercial enzymes. In our model, barnacle glue curing involves trypsin-like serine protease(s), which activate enzymes and structural proteins, and a transglutaminase which cross-links glue proteins. Transglutaminase activity was significantly altered upon exposure of curing glue from individual barnacles to silicone eluates. Activity of purified trypsin and, to a greater extent, transglutaminase was significantly altered by relevant concentrations of silicone polymer constituents. Surface-associated silicone compounds can disrupt glue curing and alter enzyme properties. Altered curing of natural glues has potential in fouling management.

  10. Antioxidant Enzyme Activities of some Brassica Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodica SOARE

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper set out to comparatively study five species: white cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata alba Alef., red cabbage (Brassica oleracea L. var. capitata f. rubra Alef., Kale (Brassica oleracea L. var. Acephala, cauliflower (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis and broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. cymosa in order to identify those with high enzymatic and antioxidant activities. The enzymatic activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT and soluble peroxidase (POX as well as the antioxidant activity against 2.2’-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radical cation were determined. Total superoxide dismutase activity was measured spectrophotometrically based on inhibition in the photochemical reduction of nitroblue tetrazolium. Total soluble peroxidase was assayed by measuring the increase in A436 due to the guaiacol oxidation and the catalase activity was assayed through the colorimetric method. The capacity of extracts to scavenge the ABTS radical cation was assessed colorimetric using Trolox as a standard. The obtained results show that studied enzymatic activities and the antioxidant activity against ABTS vary depending on the analyzed species. So, among the studied Brassicaceae species, it emphasize red cabbage with the highest enzymatic activity (CAT 22.54 mM H2O2/min/g and POX 187.2 mM ΔA/1min/1g f.w. and kale with highest antioxidant activity, of 767 μmol TE/100g f.w. The results of this study recommendintroducing the studied varieties in diet due to the rich antioxidant properties.

  11. Age-dependent basal level and induction capacity of copper-zinc and manganese superoxide dismutase and other scavenging enzyme activities in leukocytes from young and elderly adults.

    OpenAIRE

    Niwa, Y; Iizawa, O.; Ishimoto, K.; AKAMATSU, H.; Kanoh, T.

    1993-01-01

    Several enzymes, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase, and D-glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase are capable of scavenging reactive oxygen species in in vivo. We assessed both basal levels and the capacity of these enzyme activities to be induced in human leukocytes in response to a variety of agents. Basal activity of copper-zinc SOD, and manganese SOD showed little variation with age. In contrast, the basal activity of the three H2O2 scavenging enzymes, catal...

  12. High performance enzyme kinetics of turnover, activation and inhibition for translational drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rumin; Wong, Kenny

    2017-01-01

    Enzymes are the macromolecular catalysts of many living processes and represent a sizable proportion of all druggable biological targets. Enzymology has been practiced just over a century during which much progress has been made in both the identification of new enzymes and the development of novel methodologies for enzyme kinetics. Areas covered: This review aims to address several key practical aspects in enzyme kinetics in reference to translational drug discovery research. The authors first define what constitutes a high performance enzyme kinetic assay. The authors then review the best practices for turnover, activation and inhibition kinetics to derive critical parameters guiding drug discovery. Notably, the authors recommend global progress curve analysis of dose/time dependence employing an integrated Michaelis-Menten equation and global curve fitting of dose/dose dependence. Expert opinion: The authors believe that in vivo enzyme and substrate abundance and their dynamics, binding modality, drug binding kinetics and enzyme's position in metabolic networks should be assessed to gauge the translational impact on drug efficacy and safety. Integrating these factors in a systems biology and systems pharmacology model should facilitate translational drug discovery.

  13. Extreme nuclear disproportion and constancy of enzyme activity in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    activity is correlated to nuclear ratio in heterokaryon— the objective of this investigation. Despite a 400-fold reduction in his-3+(EC) nuclei in mycelia grown on histi- dine, the activity of encoded enzyme remained unaltered. The present observation contrasts with the observations of Flint et al. (1981), who reported that activity ...

  14. In vivo induction of phase II detoxifying enzymes, glutathione transferase and quinone reductase by citrus triterpenoids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Hassan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several cell culture and animal studies demonstrated that citrus bioactive compounds have protective effects against certain types of cancer. Among several classes of citrus bioactive compounds, limonoids were reported to prevent different types of cancer. Furthermore, the structures of citrus limonoids were reported to influence the activity of phase II detoxifying enzymes. The purpose of the study was to evaluate how variations in the structures of citrus limonoids (namely nomilin, deacetyl nomilin, and isoobacunoic acid and a mixture of limonoids would influence phase II enzyme activity in excised tissues from a mouse model. Methods In the current study, defatted sour orange seed powder was extracted with ethyl acetate and subjected to silica gel chromatography. The HPLC, NMR and mass spectra were used to elucidate the purity and structure of compounds. Female A/J mice were treated with three limonoids and a mixture in order to evaluate their effect on phase II enzymes in four different tissues. Assays for glutathione S-transferase and NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR were used to evaluate induction of phase II enzymatic activity. Results The highest induction of GST against 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (CDNB was observed in stomach (whole, 58% by nomilin, followed by 25% isoobacunoic acid and 19% deacetyl nomilin. Deacetyl nomilin in intestine (small as well as liver significantly reduced GST activity against CDNB. Additionally isoobacunoic acid and the limonoid mixture in liver demonstrated a significant reduction of GST activity against CDNB. Nomilin significantly induced GST activity against 4-nitroquinoline 1-oxide (4NQO, intestine (280% and stomach (75% while deacetyl nomilin showed significant induction only in intestine (73%. Induction of GST activity was also observed in intestine (93% and stomach (45% treated with the limonoid mixture. Finally, a significant induction of NAD(PH: quinone reductase (QR activity was

  15. Dynamic relationships between microbial biomass, respiration, inorganic nutrients and enzyme activities: informing enzyme based decomposition models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daryl L Moorhead

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available We re-examined data from a recent litter decay study to determine if additional insights could be gained to inform decomposition modeling. Rinkes et al. (2013 conducted 14-day laboratory incubations of sugar maple (Acer saccharum or white oak (Quercus alba leaves, mixed with sand (0.4% organic C content or loam (4.1% organic C. They measured microbial biomass C, carbon dioxide efflux, soil ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate concentrations, and β-glucosidase (BG, β-N-acetyl-glucosaminidase (NAG, and acid phosphatase (AP activities on days 1, 3, and 14. Analyses of relationships among variables yielded different insights than original analyses of individual variables. For example, although respiration rates per g soil were higher for loam than sand, rates per g soil C were actually higher for sand than loam, and rates per g microbial C showed little difference between treatments. Microbial biomass C peaked on day 3 when biomass-specific activities of enzymes were lowest, suggesting uptake of litter C without extracellular hydrolysis. This result refuted a common model assumption that all enzyme production is constitutive and thus proportional to biomass, and/or indicated that part of litter decay is independent of enzyme activity. The length and angle of vectors defined by ratios of enzyme activities (BG/NAG versus BG/AP represent relative microbial investments in C (length, and N and P (angle acquiring enzymes. Shorter lengths on day 3 suggested low C limitation, whereas greater lengths on day 14 suggested an increase in C limitation with decay. The soils and litter in this study generally had stronger P limitation (angles > 45˚. Reductions in vector angles to < 45˚ for sand by day 14 suggested a shift to N limitation. These relational variables inform enzyme-based models, and are usually much less ambiguous when obtained from a single study in which measurements were made on the same samples than when extrapolated from separate studies.

  16. New synthetic peptides can enhance gene expression of key antioxidant defense enzymes in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shashoua, Victor E; Adams, David S; Volodina, Natalia V; Li, Hua

    2004-10-22

    Neurodegenerative, cardiovascular, and age-related disorders have been attributed to the cellular damage caused by elevated production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and free radicals (FRs). These cannot be adequately defended by existing levels of key antioxidant enzymes. Two peptides, 8 and 14 amino acids long, were synthesized and found to up-regulate, at nanomolar concentrations, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) m-RNAs (9- to 12-fold) within 3 h, and then elevate by 5- to 10-fold the protein levels of SOD, CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) in rat primary cortical cultures. Kinetic studies showed that the peptide up-regulation of all three enzymes appears to be a coordinated process which occurs in vitro and in vivo. We also found that ischemia alone, without added drugs, can lead to enhanced gene expression of SOD, CAT, and GPX. This suggests that the CNS can initiate its own "defense" against ROS and FR. Thus, our peptides may activate such systems, as well as AP-1 transcription factor, reported in earlier findings to lead to "repair" (growth) of injured cells.

  17. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2008-01-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes. PMID:18480028

  18. Identification of putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Akash; Davis, Matthew A; Rudel, Lawrence L

    2008-08-01

    In this report, we sought to determine the putative active site residues of ACAT enzymes. For experimental purposes, a particular region of the C-terminal end of the ACAT protein was selected as the putative active site domain due to its high degree of sequence conservation from yeast to humans. Because ACAT enzymes have an intrinsic thioesterase activity, we hypothesized that by analogy with the thioesterase domain of fatty acid synthase, the active site of ACAT enzymes may comprise a catalytic triad of ser-his-asp (S-H-D) amino acid residues. Mutagenesis studies revealed that in ACAT1, S456, H460, and D400 were essential for activity. In ACAT2, H438 was required for enzymatic activity. However, mutation of D378 destabilized the enzyme. Surprisingly, we were unable to identify any S mutations of ACAT2 that abolished catalytic activity. Moreover, ACAT2 was insensitive to serine-modifying reagents, whereas ACAT1 was not. Further studies indicated that tyrosine residues may be important for ACAT activity. Mutational analysis showed that the tyrosine residue of the highly conserved FYXDWWN motif was important for ACAT activity. Furthermore, Y518 was necessary for ACAT1 activity, whereas the analogous residue in ACAT2, Y496, was not. The available data suggest that the amino acid requirement for ACAT activity may be different for the two ACAT isozymes.

  19. Inhibition of existing denitrification enzyme activity by chloramphenicol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, M.H.; Smith, R.L.; Macalady, D.L.

    1992-01-01

    Chloramphenicol completely inhibited the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in acetylene-block incubations with (i) sediments from a nitrate-contaminated aquifer and (ii) a continuous culture of denitrifying groundwater bacteria. Control flasks with no antibiotic produced significant amounts of nitrous oxide in the same time period. Amendment with chloramphenicol after nitrous oxide production had begun resulted in a significant decrease in the rate of nitrous oxide production. Chloramphenicol also decreased (>50%) the activity of existing denitrification enzymes in pure cultures of Pseudomonas denitrificans that were harvested during log- phase growth and maintained for 2 weeks in a starvation medium lacking electron donor. Short-term time courses of nitrate consumption and nitrous oxide production in the presence of acetylene with P. denitrificans undergoing carbon starvation were performed under optimal conditions designed to mimic denitrification enzyme activity assays used with soils. Time courses were linear for both chloramphenicol and control flasks, and rate estimates for the two treatments were significantly different at the 95% confidence level. Complete or partial inhibition of existing enzyme activity is not consistent with the current understanding of the mode of action of chloramphenicol or current practice, in which the compound is frequently employed to inhibit de novo protein synthesis during the course of microbial activity assays. The results of this study demonstrate that chloramphenicol amendment can inhibit the activity of existing denitrification enzymes and suggest that caution is needed in the design and interpretation of denitrification activity assays in which chloramphenicol is used to prevent new protein synthesis.

  20. Activity of selected hydrolytic enzymes in Allium sativum L. anthers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winiarczyk, Krystyna; Gębura, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the study was to determine enzymatic activity in sterile Allium sativum anthers in the final stages of male gametophyte development (the stages of tetrads and free microspores). The analysed enzymes were shown to occur in the form of numerous isoforms. In the tetrad stage, esterase activity was predominant, which was manifested by the greater number of isoforms of the enzyme. In turn, in the microspore stage, higher numbers of isoforms of acid phosphatases and proteases were detected. The development of sterile pollen grains in garlic is associated with a high level of protease and acid phosphatase activity and lower level of esterase activities in the anther locule. Probably this is the first description of the enzymes activity (ACPH, EST, PRO) in the consecutives stages of cell wall formation which is considered to be one of the causes of male sterility in flowering plant. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Chimeric enzymes with improved cellulase activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qi; Baker, John O; Himmel, Michael E

    2015-03-31

    Nucleic acid molecules encoding chimeric cellulase polypeptides that exhibit improved cellulase activities are disclosed herein. The chimeric cellulase polypeptides encoded by these nucleic acids and methods to produce the cellulases are also described, along with methods of using chimeric cellulases for the conversion of cellulose to sugars such as glucose.

  2. Dietary cholesterol increases paraoxonase 1 enzyme activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kim, Daniel S; Burt, Amber A; Ranchalis, Jane E; Richter, Rebecca J; Marshall, Julieann K; Nakayama, Karen S; Jarvik, Ella R; Eintracht, Jason F; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A; Furlong, Clement E; Jarvik, Gail P

    2012-01-01

    .... Five dietary components, cholesterol (P < 2.0 × 10(-16)), alcohol (P = 8.51 × 10(-8)), vitamin C (P = 7.97 × 10(-5)), iron (P = 0.0026), and folic acid (0.037) were independently predictive of PON1 activity...

  3. Biotransformation of anthelmintics and the activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes in the tapeworm Moniezia expansa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prchal, Lukáš; Bártíková, Hana; Bečanová, Aneta; Jirásko, Robert; Vokřál, Ivan; Stuchlíková, Lucie; Skálová, Lenka; Kubíček, Vladimír; Lamka, Jiří; Trejtnar, František; Szotáková, Barbora

    2015-04-01

    The sheep tapeworm Moniezia expansa is very common parasite, which affects ruminants such as sheep, goats as well as other species. The benzimidazole anthelmintics albendazole (ABZ), flubendazole (FLU) and mebendazole (MBZ) are often used to treat the infection. The drug-metabolizing enzymes of helminths may alter the potency of anthelmintic treatment. The aim of our study was to assess the activity of the main drug-metabolizing enzymes and evaluate the metabolism of selected anthelmintics (ABZ, MBZ and FLU) in M. expansa. Activities of biotransformation enzymes were determined in subcellular fractions. Metabolites of the anthelmintics were detected and identified using high performance liquid chromatography/ultra-violet/VIS/fluorescence or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Reduction of MBZ, FLU and oxidation of ABZ were proved as well as activities of various metabolizing enzymes. Despite the fact that the conjugation enzymes glutathione S-transferase, UDP-glucuronosyl transferase and UDP-glucosyl transferase were active in vitro, no conjugated metabolites of anthelmintics were identified either ex vivo or in vitro. The obtained results indicate that sheep tapeworm is able to deactivate the administered anthelmintics, and thus protects itself against their action.

  4. Optimization to Low Temperature Activity in Psychrophilic Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Struvay

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychrophiles, i.e., organisms thriving permanently at near-zero temperatures, synthesize cold-active enzymes to sustain their cell cycle. These enzymes are already used in many biotechnological applications requiring high activity at mild temperatures or fast heat-inactivation rate. Most psychrophilic enzymes optimize a high activity at low temperature at the expense of substrate affinity, therefore reducing the free energy barrier of the transition state. Furthermore, a weak temperature dependence of activity ensures moderate reduction of the catalytic activity in the cold. In these naturally evolved enzymes, the optimization to low temperature activity is reached via destabilization of the structures bearing the active site or by destabilization of the whole molecule. This involves a reduction in the number and strength of all types of weak interactions or the disappearance of stability factors, resulting in improved dynamics of active site residues in the cold. Considering the subtle structural adjustments required for low temperature activity, directed evolution appears to be the most suitable methodology to engineer cold activity in biological catalysts.

  5. Metabolic activity and enzyme induction in rat fecal microflora maintained in continuous culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallett, A K; Bearne, C A; Rowland, I R

    1983-01-01

    The enzyme activity of the rat hindgut microflora maintained in an anaerobic two-stage continuous culture was compared with that of rat cecal contents. A qualitative comparison (API ZYM) showed a high degree of similarity between the two populations. Quantitative determinations showed that azoreductase, beta-glucosidase, nitrate reductase, and nitroreductase activities were comparable, and that beta-glucuronidase activity was very low in the culture. beta-Glucuronidase, beta-glucosidase, and nitrate reductase activities were induced within the culture by their respective substrates. Bile acids influenced microbial activity in vitro, with cholic acid inducing beta-glucosidase, azoreductase, and beta-glucuronidase activities and decreasing nitrate reductase activity. Chenodeoxycholic acid increased beta-glucosidase and beta-glucuronidase activities and decreased azoreductase, nitrate reductase, and nitroreductase activities in vitro. These studies demonstrate that the rat hindgut microflora may be successfully cultured in vitro and suggest control mechanisms that regulate the metabolic activity of these organisms in vivo. PMID:6416166

  6. Enzyme activation through the utilization of intrinsic dianion binding energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyes, T L; Malabanan, M M; Zhai, X; Reyes, A C; Richard, J P

    2017-03-01

    We consider 'the proposition that the intrinsic binding energy that results from the noncovalent interaction of a specific substrate with the active site of the enzyme is considerably larger than is generally believed. An important part of this binding energy may be utilized to provide the driving force for catalysis, so that the observed binding energy represents only what is left over after this utilization' [Jencks,W.P. (1975) Adv. Enzymol. Relat. Areas. Mol. Biol. , , 219-410]. The large ~12 kcal/mol intrinsic substrate phosphodianion binding energy for reactions catalyzed by triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), orotidine 5'-monophosphate decarboxylase and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase is divided into 4-6 kcal/mol binding energy that is expressed on the formation of the Michaelis complex in anchoring substrates to the respective enzyme, and 6-8 kcal/mol binding energy that is specifically expressed at the transition state in activating the respective enzymes for catalysis. A structure-based mechanism is described where the dianion binding energy drives a conformational change that activates these enzymes for catalysis. Phosphite dianion plays the active role of holding TIM in a high-energy closed active form, but acts as passive spectator in showing no effect on transition-state structure. The result of studies on mutant enzymes is presented, which support the proposal that the dianion-driven enzyme conformational change plays a role in enhancing the basicity of side chain of E167, the catalytic base, by clamping the base between a pair of hydrophobic side chains. The insight these results provide into the architecture of enzyme active sites and the development of strategies for the de novo design of protein catalysts is discussed.

  7. Improving Activity of Salt-Lyophilized Enzymes in Organic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borole, Abhijeet P.; Davison, Brian H.

    Lyophilization with salts has been identified as an important method of activating enzymes in organic media. Using salt-activated enzymes to transform molecules tethered to solid surfaces in organic phase requires solubilization of enzymes in the solvents. Methods of improving performance of salt-lyophilized enzymes, further, via chemical modification, and use of surfactants and surfactants to create fine emulsions prior to lyophilization are investigated. The reaction system used is transesterification of N-acetyl phenylalanine ethyl ester with methanol or propanol. Initial rate of formation of amino acid esters by subtilisin Carlsberg (SC) was studied and found to increase two to sevenfold by either chemical modification or addition of surfactants in certain solvents, relative to the salt (only)-lyophilized enzyme. The method to prepare highly dispersed enzymes in a salt-surfactant milieu also improved activity by two to threefold. To test the effect of chemical modification on derivatization of drug molecules, acylation of bergenin was investigated using chemically modified SC.

  8. Improving activity of salt-lyophilized enzymes in organic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Davison, Brian H [ORNL

    2008-01-01

    Lyophilization with salts has been identified as an important method of activating enzymes in organic media. Using salt-activated enzymes to transform molecules tethered to solid surfaces in organic phase requires solubilization of enzymes in the solvents. Methods of improving performance of salt-lyophilized enzymes, further, via chemical modification, and use of surfactants and surfactants to create fine emulsions prior to lyophilization are investigated. The reaction system used is transesterification of N-acetyl phenylalanine ethyl ester with methanol or propanol. Initial rate of formation of amino acid esters by subtilisin Carlsberg (SC) was studied and found to increase two to sevenfold by either chemical modification or addition of surfactants in certain solvents, relative to the salt (only)-lyophilized enzyme. The method to prepare highly dispersed enzymes in a salt-surfactant milieu also improved activity by two to threefold. To test the effect of chemical modification on derivatization of drug molecules, acylation of bergenin was investigated using chemically modified SC.

  9. Distribution and activity of hydrogenase enzymes in subsurface sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, R.; Nickel, J.; Glombitza, C.; Spivack, A. J.; D'Hondt, S. L.; Kallmeyer, J.

    2013-12-01

    Metabolically active microbial communities are present in a wide range of subsurface environments. Techniques like enumeration of microbial cells, activity measurements with radiotracer assays and the analysis of porewater constituents are currently being used to explore the subsurface biosphere, alongside with molecular biological analyses. However, many of these techniques reach their detection limits due to low microbial activity and abundance. Direct measurements of microbial turnover not just face issues of insufficient sensitivity, they only provide information about a single specific process rather than an overall microbial activity. Since hydrogenase enzymes are intracellular and ubiquitous in subsurface microbial communities, the enzyme activity represents a measure of total activity of the entire microbial community. A hydrogenase activity assay could quantify total metabolic activity without having to identify specific processes. This would be a major advantage in subsurface biosphere studies, where several metabolic processes can occur simultaneously. We quantified hydrogenase enzyme activity and distribution in sediment samples from different aquatic subsurface environments (Lake Van, Barents Sea, Equatorial Pacific and Gulf of Mexico) using a tritium-based assay. We found enzyme activity at all sites and depths. Volumetric hydrogenase activity did not show much variability between sites and sampling depths, whereas cell-specific activity ranged from 10-5 to 1 nmol H2 cell-1 d-1. Activity was lowest in sediment layers where nitrate was detected. Higher activity was associated with samples in which sulfate was the predominant electron acceptor. We found highest activity in samples from environments with >10 ppm methane in the pore water. The results show that cell-specific hydrogenase enzyme activity increases with decreasing energy yield of the electron acceptor used. It is not possible to convert volumetric or cell-specific hydrogenase activity into a

  10. Extraction of Active Enzymes from "Hard-to-Break-Cells"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottaviani, Alessio; Tesauro, Cinzia; Fjelstrup, S

    We present the utilization of a rolling circle amplification (RCA) based assay to investigate the extraction efficiency of active enzymes from a class of “hard-to-break” cells, yeast Saccaramyces cerevisiae. Current analyses of microorganisms, such as pathogenic bacteria, parasites or particular...... life stages of microorganisms (e.g. spores from bacteria or fungi) is hampered by the lack of efficient lysis protocols that preserve the activity and integrity of the cellular content. Presented herein is a flexible scheme to screen lysis protocols for active enzyme extraction. We also report a gentle...... yet effective approach for extraction of active enzymes by entrapping cells in microdroplets. Combined effort of optimized extraction protocols and effective analytical approaches is expected to generate impact in future disease diagnosis and environmental safety....

  11. IN-VIVO MONITORING OF LACTATE AND GLUCOSE WITH MICRODIALYSIS AND ENZYME REACTORS IN INTENSIVE-CARE MEDICINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEBOER, J; KORF, J; PLIJTERGROENDIJK, H

    Methods for the monitoring of glucose and lactate in intensive care units (ICU) based on microdialysis and continuous flow enzyme reactions plus some in vitro and in vivo characteristics of the probes used and the detection systems are described. Two microdialysis techniques were developed for

  12. Glyphosate on digestive enzymes activity in piava (Leporinus obtusidens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseânia Salbego

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The effects of glyphosate, a nonselective herbicide (1.0 or 5.0mg L-1 on digestive enzymes activity (stomach and intestine were evaluated in juveniles of piava (Leporinus obtusidens after 90 days of exposure. The activity of acid protease, trypsin, chymotrypsin and amylase increased with the increase of glyphosate concentration. These results indicate that glyphosate affects digestive enzyme activities in this species, and may be an indicator of poor nutrient availability when fish survive in herbicide-contaminated water.

  13. Requirement of the propeptide for in vivo formation of active yeast carboxypeptidase Y

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramos, C; Winther, Jakob R.; Kielland-Brandt, Morten

    1994-01-01

    Deletions have been constructed in the region encoding the 91-amino acid propeptide of the vacuolar enzyme carboxypeptidase Y of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in vivo effects of these mutations on the intracellular transport of the mutant proenzymes have been examined. Deletions did not include....... This region is, however, not sufficient for efficient formation of active carboxypeptidase Y, since truncated precursors in which the vacuolar targeting signal was fused to the C-terminal part of the proregion did not give rise to active enzyme. Based on the results, we propose that the carboxypeptidase Y...

  14. Patterns of functional enzyme activity in fungus farming ambrosia beetles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Fine Licht Henrik H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In wood-dwelling fungus-farming weevils, the so-called ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae, wood in the excavated tunnels is used as a medium for cultivating fungi by the combined action of digging larvae (which create more space for the fungi to grow and of adults sowing and pruning the fungus. The beetles are obligately dependent on the fungus that provides essential vitamins, amino acids and sterols. However, to what extent microbial enzymes support fungus farming in ambrosia beetles is unknown. Here we measure (i 13 plant cell-wall degrading enzymes in the fungus garden microbial consortium of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborinus saxesenii, including its primary fungal symbionts, in three compartments of laboratory maintained nests, at different time points after gallery foundation and (ii four specific enzymes that may be either insect or microbially derived in X. saxesenii adult and larval individuals. Results We discovered that the activity of cellulases in ambrosia fungus gardens is relatively small compared to the activities of other cellulolytic enzymes. Enzyme activity in all compartments of the garden was mainly directed towards hemicellulose carbohydrates such as xylan, glucomannan and callose. Hemicellulolytic enzyme activity within the brood chamber increased with gallery age, whereas irrespective of the age of the gallery, the highest overall enzyme activity were detected in the gallery dump material expelled by the beetles. Interestingly endo-β-1,3(4-glucanase activity capable of callose degradation was identified in whole-body extracts of both larvae and adult X. saxesenii, whereas endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity was exclusively detected in larvae. Conclusion Similar to closely related fungi associated with bark beetles in phloem, the microbial symbionts of ambrosia beetles hardly degrade cellulose. Instead, their enzyme activity is directed mainly towards comparatively more easily

  15. Patterns of functional enzyme activity in fungus farming ambrosia beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In wood-dwelling fungus-farming weevils, the so-called ambrosia beetles (Curculionidae: Scolytinae and Platypodinae), wood in the excavated tunnels is used as a medium for cultivating fungi by the combined action of digging larvae (which create more space for the fungi to grow) and of adults sowing and pruning the fungus. The beetles are obligately dependent on the fungus that provides essential vitamins, amino acids and sterols. However, to what extent microbial enzymes support fungus farming in ambrosia beetles is unknown. Here we measure (i) 13 plant cell-wall degrading enzymes in the fungus garden microbial consortium of the ambrosia beetle Xyleborinus saxesenii, including its primary fungal symbionts, in three compartments of laboratory maintained nests, at different time points after gallery foundation and (ii) four specific enzymes that may be either insect or microbially derived in X. saxesenii adult and larval individuals. Results We discovered that the activity of cellulases in ambrosia fungus gardens is relatively small compared to the activities of other cellulolytic enzymes. Enzyme activity in all compartments of the garden was mainly directed towards hemicellulose carbohydrates such as xylan, glucomannan and callose. Hemicellulolytic enzyme activity within the brood chamber increased with gallery age, whereas irrespective of the age of the gallery, the highest overall enzyme activity were detected in the gallery dump material expelled by the beetles. Interestingly endo-β-1,3(4)-glucanase activity capable of callose degradation was identified in whole-body extracts of both larvae and adult X. saxesenii, whereas endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity was exclusively detected in larvae. Conclusion Similar to closely related fungi associated with bark beetles in phloem, the microbial symbionts of ambrosia beetles hardly degrade cellulose. Instead, their enzyme activity is directed mainly towards comparatively more easily accessible hemicellulose

  16. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity appears in mouse sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity ... examine the presence of DNA topoisomerase II (top 2) activity in sperm heads. The initial percentage motile of male A was ..... topoisomerase 2 is required for segregation of daughter molecules at termination of DNA replication. Proc.

  17. scavenging activity, anti-inflammatory and diabetes related enzyme

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-12-31

    Dec 31, 2013 ... ENZYME INHIBITION PROPERTIES OF ETHANOL LEAVES EXTRACT OF. PHOENYX ... extracts, using superoxide anions inhibition, radical scavenging activity "DPPH" and total antioxidant activity .... Briefly, 100 µL of both the sample and the standard (gallic acid) of known concentrations were made up to.

  18. Antioxidant enzymes activities in obese Tunisian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sfar Sonia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The oxidant stress, expected to increase in obese adults, has an important role in the pathogenesis of many diseases. It results when free radical formation is greatly increased or protective antioxidant mechanisms are compromised. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the antioxidant response to obesity-related stress in healthy children. Methods A hundred and six healthy children (54 obese and 52 controls, aged 6–12 years old, participated in this study. The collected data included anthropometric measures, blood pressure, fasting glucose, total cholesterol, triglycerides and enzymatic antioxidants (Superoxide dismutase: SOD, Catalase: CAT and Glutathione peroxidase: GPx. Results The first step antioxidant response, estimated by the SOD activity, was significantly higher in obese children compared with normal-weight controls (p  Conclusions The obesity-related increase of the oxidant stress can be observed even in the childhood period. In addition to the complications of an increased BMI, obesity itself can be considered as an independent risk factor of free radical production resulting in an increased antioxidant response.

  19. Early bichemical markers of effects: Enzyme induction, oncogene activation and markers of oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E.; Loft, Steffen

    1995-01-01

    Early bichemical marker, enzyme induction, oncogene activation, oxidative damage, low-density lipoprotein......Early bichemical marker, enzyme induction, oncogene activation, oxidative damage, low-density lipoprotein...

  20. The relationship between soil properties, enzyme activity and land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błońska Ewa

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the effects of different types of land use (forest, tillage and pasture on soil properties, especially enzyme activity. Our investigation was carried out on 53 research plots with 11 plots in broadleaved forest stands, 12 plots in mixed broadleaved stands, 10 plots in mixed coniferous stands, 9 plots on tillage and 11 plots on pasture. The soil samples were collected from a depth of 0–15 cm after removing the organic horizon. Contents of organic carbon and nitrogen, pH and soil texture were investigated. Furthermore, dehydrogenase and urease activity were determined. Significant differences in the enzyme activity between forest and agricultural soils were observed, thus demonstrating that enzyme activity is influenced by the organic matter content of the soil. The highest enzyme activity was recorded in the forest soil within broadleaved stands, whilst the lowest activity was found in tillage soil, because tillage soil contained significantly less organic matter. High enzymatic activity of pasture soils is the combined result of vegetation type and the lack of plowing.

  1. De novo active sites for resurrected Precambrian enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risso, Valeria A.; Martinez-Rodriguez, Sergio; Candel, Adela M.; Krüger, Dennis M.; Pantoja-Uceda, David; Ortega-Muñoz, Mariano; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco; Gaucher, Eric A.; Kamerlin, Shina C. L.; Bruix, Marta; Gavira, Jose A.; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M.

    2017-07-01

    Protein engineering studies often suggest the emergence of completely new enzyme functionalities to be highly improbable. However, enzymes likely catalysed many different reactions already in the last universal common ancestor. Mechanisms for the emergence of completely new active sites must therefore either plausibly exist or at least have existed at the primordial protein stage. Here, we use resurrected Precambrian proteins as scaffolds for protein engineering and demonstrate that a new active site can be generated through a single hydrophobic-to-ionizable amino acid replacement that generates a partially buried group with perturbed physico-chemical properties. We provide experimental and computational evidence that conformational flexibility can assist the emergence and subsequent evolution of new active sites by improving substrate and transition-state binding, through the sampling of many potentially productive conformations. Our results suggest a mechanism for the emergence of primordial enzymes and highlight the potential of ancestral reconstruction as a tool for protein engineering.

  2. In vivo anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of Liquidambar formosana Hance infructescence (Liquidambaris fructus, ELF) in vivo, and clarify its underlying mechanisms. Methods: The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity of ELF was examined by xylene-induced ear swelling test in mice as well as carrageenan-induced ...

  3. Intrinsic effects of solvent polarity on enzymic activation energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J.; Clark, D.S.; Dordick, J.S.

    2000-01-05

    The effect of organic solvents on subtilisin Carlsberg catalysis has been investigated with the aid of a thermodynamic analysis. Saturation solubility experiments were performed to provide a quantitative measure of substrate desolvation from the reaction medium. This enabled calculation of the intrinsic enzymic activation energy and resulted in a linear free energy relationship with respect to solvent polarity. The results indicate that the intrinsic activation energy of subtilisin catalysis is lowest in polar organic solvents, which may be due to transition state stabilization of the enzyme's polar transition state for transesterification.

  4. Influence of long-term fertilization on soil enzyme activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Dora SAMUEL

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Soil enzyme activities (actual and potential dehydrogenase, catalase, acid and alkaline phosphatase were determined in the 0–10, 10–20, and 20–30 cm layers of a brown luvic soil submitted to a complex fertilization experiment with different types of green manure. It was found that each activity decreased with increasing sampling depth. It should be emphasized that greenmanuring of maize led to a significant increase in each of the five enzymatic activities determined. The enzymatic indicators of soil quality calculated from the values of enzymatic activities showed the order: lupinus + rape + oat > lupinus > vetch + oat + ryegrass > lupinus + oat + vetch > unfertilized plot. This order means that by determination of enzymatic activities valuable information can be obtained regarding fertility status of soils. There were significant correlations of soil enzyme activities with chemical properties.

  5. Enzyme-Directed Assembly of Nanoparticles in Tumors Monitored by In Vivo Whole Animal and Ex Vivo Super-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chien, Miao-Ping; Carlini, Andrea S.; Hu, Dehong; Barback, Christopher V.; Rush, Anthony M.; Hall, David J.; Orr, Galya; Gianneschi, Nathan C.

    2013-12-18

    Matrix metalloproteinase enzymes, overexpressed in HT-1080 human fibrocarcinoma tumors, were used to guide the accumulation and retention of an enzyme-responsive nanoparticle in a xenograft mouse model. The nanoparticles were prepared as micelles from amphiphilic block copolymers bearing a simple hydrophobic block, and a hydrophilic peptide brush. The polymers were end-labeled with Alexa Fluor 647 dyes leading to the formation of labeled micelles upon dialysis of the polymers from DMSO to aqueous buffer. This dye-labeling strategy allowed the presence of the retained material to be visualized via whole animal imaging in vivo, and in ex vivo organ analysis following intratumoral injection into HT-1080 xenograft tumors. We propose that the material is retained by virtue of an enzyme-induced accumulation process whereby particles change morphology from 20 nm spherical micelles to micron-scale aggregates, kinetically trapping them within the tumor. This hypothesis is tested here via an unprecedented super resolution fluorescence analysis of ex vivo tissue slices confirming a particle size increase occurs concomitantly with extended retention of responsive particles compared to unresponsive controls.

  6. Early feeding to modify digestive enzyme activity in broiler chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milagro León T.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the effect on digestive enzyme activity in broiler chickens by providing food in the first 48 hrs. after birth. Materials and methods. After incubating 300 fertile eggs from Hubbard breeding and immediately after hatching, the chicks were randomly assigned to treatments: fasting (from hatching to 48 hrs.; Hydrated Balanced Food (HBF from birth to 48 hrs.; commercial hydrating supplement (CHS from birth to 48 hrs. The diets were provided ad libitum. After 48 hrs. a commercial diet was fed. At birth and at 48 and 72 hrs. of age 30 chicks/treatment were sacrificed to determine the enzyme activity of maltase, sucrase, alkaline phosphatase, phytase, a-amylase, trypsin and lipase in samples of duodenal or pancreatic homogenate. Results. The supply of HBF or CHS during the first 48 hrs. of life increased the activity of maltase, sucrase and phytase in the first 3 days of life, with values between 1.2 and up to 4-fold compared to the control (p<0.05. Chickens that fasted for the first 48 hrs. had higher activity of the pancreatic enzymes a-amylase, trypsin, and lipase at 72 hrs. of life (p<0.05. Conclusions. The food supply in the first 48 hrs. after hatching increases the duodenal enzyme activity in the intestinal brush border during the first 3 days of age in broiler chickens.

  7. Differentiation between activity of digestive enzymes of Brachionus calyciflorus and extracellular enzymes of its epizooic bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilko H. AHLRICHS

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus was examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM for surface-attached, i.e. epizootic, bacteria to ascertain their specific localization and thus find out if we could discern between rotifer and bacterial enzyme activity. The lorica of B. calyciflorus was colonized by one distinct type of bacteria, which originated from the algal culture used for rotifer feeding. The corona, posterior epidermis and foot of all inspected individuals were always without attached bacteria. The density of the attached bacteria was higher with the increasing age of B. calyciflorus: while young individuals were colonized by ~ tens of bacterial cells, older ones had on average hundreds to thousands of attached bacteria. We hypothesize that epizooic bacteria may produce the ectoenzymes phosphatases and β-N-acetylhexosaminidases on the lorica, but not on the corona of B. calyciflorus. Since enzyme activities of epizooic bacteria may influence the values and interpretation of bulk rotifer enzyme activities, we should take the bacterial contribution into account.

  8. Fluorogenic Substrates for Visualizing Acidic Organelle Enzyme Activities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona Karen Harlan

    Full Text Available Lysosomes are acidic cytoplasmic organelles that are present in all nucleated mammalian cells and are involved in a variety of cellular processes including repair of the plasma membrane, defense against pathogens, cholesterol homeostasis, bone remodeling, metabolism, apoptosis and cell signaling. Defects in lysosomal enzyme activity have been associated with a variety of neurological diseases including Parkinson's Disease, Lysosomal Storage Diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Huntington's disease. Fluorogenic lysosomal staining probes were synthesized for labeling lysosomes and other acidic organelles in a live-cell format and were shown to be capable of monitoring lysosomal metabolic activity. The new targeted substrates were prepared from fluorescent dyes having a low pKa value for optimum fluorescence at the lower physiological pH found in lysosomes. They were modified to contain targeting groups to direct their accumulation in lysosomes as well as enzyme-cleavable functions for monitoring specific enzyme activities using a live-cell staining format. Application to the staining of cells derived from blood and skin samples of patients with Metachromatic Leukodystrophy, Krabbe and Gaucher Diseases as well as healthy human fibroblast and leukocyte control cells exhibited localization to the lysosome when compared with known lysosomal stain LysoTracker® Red DND-99 as well as with anti-LAMP1 Antibody staining. When cell metabolism was inhibited with chloroquine, staining with an esterase substrate was reduced, demonstrating that the substrates can be used to measure cell metabolism. When applied to diseased cells, the intensity of staining was reflective of lysosomal enzyme levels found in diseased cells. Substrates specific to the enzyme deficiencies in Gaucher or Krabbe disease patient cell lines exhibited reduced staining compared to that in non-diseased cells. The new lysosome-targeted fluorogenic substrates should be useful for research

  9. Activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in mdx mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comim, Clarissa M; Hoepers, Andreza; Ventura, Letícia; Freiberger, Viviane; Dominguini, Diogo; Mina, Francielle; Mendonça, Bruna P; Scaini, Giselli; Vainzof, Mariz; Streck, Emílio L; Quevedo, João

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a degenerative disease of skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscles caused by defects in the dystrophin gene. More recently, brain involvement has been verified. Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress may underlie the pathophysiology of DMD. In this study we evaluate Krebs cycle enzymes activity in the cerebral cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps muscles of mdx mice. Cortex, diaphragm, and quadriceps tissues from male dystrophic mdx and control mice were used. We observed increased malate dehydrogenase activity in the cortex; increased malate dehydrogenase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in the diaphragm; and increased citrate synthase, isocitrate dehydrogenase, and malate dehydrogenase activities in the quadriceps of mdx mice. This study showed increased activity of Krebs cycle enzymes in cortex, quadriceps, and diaphragm in mdx mice. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  11. Enzyme activities by indicator of quality in organic soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raigon Jiménez, Mo; Fita, Ana Delores; Rodriguez Burruezo, Adrián

    2016-04-01

    The analytical determination of biochemical parameters, as soil enzyme activities and those related to the microbial biomass is growing importance by biological indicator in soil science studies. The metabolic activity in soil is responsible of important processes such as mineralization and humification of organic matter. These biological reactions will affect other key processes involved with elements like carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus , and all transformations related in soil microbial biomass. The determination of biochemical parameters is useful in studies carried out on organic soil where microbial processes that are key to their conservation can be analyzed through parameters of the metabolic activity of these soils. The main objective of this work is to apply analytical methodologies of enzyme activities in soil collections of different physicochemical characteristics. There have been selective sampling of natural soils, organic farming soils, conventional farming soils and urban soils. The soils have been properly identified conserved at 4 ° C until analysis. The enzyme activities determinations have been: catalase, urease, cellulase, dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase, which bring together a representative group of biological transformations that occur in the soil environment. The results indicate that for natural and agronomic soil collections, the values of the enzymatic activities are within the ranges established for forestry and agricultural soils. Organic soils are generally higher level of enzymatic, regardless activity of the enzyme involved. Soil near an urban area, levels of activities have been significantly reduced. The vegetation cover applied to organic soils, results in greater enzymatic activity. So the quality of these soils, defined as the ability to maintain their biological productivity is increased with the use of cover crops, whether or spontaneous species. The practice of cover based on legumes could be used as an ideal choice

  12. On the salt-induced activation of lyophilized enzymes in organic solvents: Effect of salt kosmotropicity on enzyme activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ru, M.T.; Hirokane, S.Y.; Lo, A.S.; Dordick, J.S.; Reimer, J.A.; Clark, D.S.

    2000-03-01

    The dramatic activation of enzymes in nonaqueous media upon co-lyophilization with simple inorganic salts has been investigated as a function of the Jones-Dole B coefficient, a thermodynamic parameter for characterizing the salt's affinity for water and its chaotropic (water-structure breaking) or kosmotropic (water-structure making) character. In general, the water content, active-site content, and transesterification activity of freeze-dried subtilisin Carlsberg preparations containing >96% w/w salt increased with increasing kosmotropicity of the activating salt. Degrees of activation relative to the salt-free enzyme ranged from 33-fold for chaotropic sodium iodide to 2,480-fold for kosmotropic sodium acetate. Exceptions to the general trend can be explained by the mechanical properties and freezing characteristics of the salts undergoing lyophilization. The profound activating effect can thus be attributed in part to the stabilizing (salting-out) effect of kosmotropic salts and the phenomenon of preferential hydration.

  13. The effect of proteolytic and lipolytic enzyme activities on cheddar ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of proteolytic and lipolytic enzyme activities on cheddar cheese yield. K Nguz, J Shindano, D Shawa, C Kasase, DM Hikeezi. Abstract. No Abstract Available Journal of Science and Technology Special Edition 2004: 70-76. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  14. Phosphorus fractions, microbial biomass and enzyme activities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... Key words: Phosphorus fractions, microbial biomass, enzyme activities, alkaline calcareous soils. .... et al., 1987). The samples were fumigated with ethanol free CHCl3 and extracted with 0.5 M K2SO4. The organic carbon in the soil extracts was measured using an ..... by Tate (1985) and Wang et al. (2004) ...

  15. Modulation of Antioxidant Enzyme Expression and Activity by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal toxicity produced by paraquat involves the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which can overwhelm antioxidant defences, leading to oxidant injury. However, there are conflicting reports regarding the activity and/or expression of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) ...

  16. Ligninolytic enzyme activities in mycelium of some wild and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... and commercial mushrooms. Erbil Kalmış. 1, İhsan Yaşa2, Fatih Kalyoncu3*, ... ligninolytic enzyme production. Key words: Basidiomycetes, enzymatic activity, lignocellulose. INTRODUCTION ... In this study, we used mycelia that belong to 19 mushroom species. (six commercial and 13 wild) to determine ...

  17. Changes in activities of tissues enzymes in rats administered Ficus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluates the effects of methanolic extract of Ficus exasperata leaf on the activities of some enzymes in the serum, liver, kidney and heart of albino rats. Twenty four rats were sorted into four groups: Group A (control) received distilled water while rats in groups B, C and D were administered graded doses.

  18. Comparative Study on Liver Enzymes Activity and Blood Group ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this study is to determine the activities of some selected liver enzymes amongst apparently healthy subjects of different blood groups. The study involved 95 apparently healthy students of Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Edo State, Nigeria, between the ages of 18-30, and distributed as follows; blood group O ...

  19. Effect of cypermethrin toxicity on enzyme activities in the freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cyprinus carpio a freshwater fish, was exposed to lethal concentration (7.5 μg/L) for one, three, five, seven and nine days and, sublethal concentration (1.5 μg/L) for 1, 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of cypermethrin, respectively to observe the enzyme activity in functionally three different tissues; that is, muscle, gill and liver.

  20. Carotenoid-cleavage activities of crude enzymes from Pandanous amryllifolius.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningrum, Andriati; Schreiner, Matthias

    2014-11-01

    Carotenoid degradation products, known as norisoprenoids, are aroma-impact compounds in several plants. Pandan wangi is a common name of the shrub Pandanus amaryllifolius. The genus name 'Pandanus' is derived from the Indonesian name of the tree, pandan. In Indonesia, the leaves from the plant are used for several purposes, e.g., as natural colorants and flavor, and as traditional treatments. The aim of this study was to determine the cleavage of β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal by carotenoid-cleavage enzymes isolated from pandan leaves, to investigate dependencies of the enzymatic activities on temperature and pH, to determine the enzymatic reaction products by using Headspace Solid Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrophotometry (HS-SPME GC/MS), and to investigate the influence of heat treatment and addition of crude enzyme on formation of norisoprenoids. Crude enzymes from pandan leaves showed higher activity against β-carotene than β-apo-8'-carotenal. The optimum temperature of crude enzymes was 70°, while the optimum pH value was 6. We identified β-ionone as the major volatile reaction product from the incubations of two different carotenoid substrates, β-carotene and β-apo-8'-carotenal. Several treatments, e.g., heat treatment and addition of crude enzymes in pandan leaves contributed to the norisoprenoid content. Our findings revealed that the crude enzymes from pandan leaves with carotenoid-cleavage activity might provide a potential application, especially for biocatalysis, in natural-flavor industry. Copyright © 2014 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  1. Potential enzyme activities in cryoturbated organic matter of arctic soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnecker, J.; Wild, B.; Rusalimova, O.; Mikutta, R.; Guggenberger, G.; Richter, A.

    2012-12-01

    An estimated 581 Gt organic carbon is stored in arctic soils that are affected by cryoturbtion, more than in today's atmosphere (450 Gt). The high amount of organic carbon is, amongst other factors, due to topsoil organic matter (OM) that has been subducted by freeze-thaw processes. This cryoturbated OM is usually hundreds to thousands of years old, while the chemical composition remains largely unaltered. It has therefore been suggested, that the retarded decomposition rates cannot be explained by unfavourable abiotic conditions in deeper soil layers alone. Since decomposition of soil organic material is dependent on extracellular enzymes, we measured potential and actual extracellular enzyme activities in organic topsoil, mineral subsoil and cryoturbated material from three different tundra sites, in Zackenberg (Greenland) and Cherskii (North-East Siberia). In addition we analysed the microbial community structure by PLFAs. Hydrolytic enzyme activities, calculated on a per gram dry mass basis, were higher in organic topsoil horizons than in cryoturbated horizons, which in turn were higher than in mineral horizons. When calculated on per gram carbon basis, the activity of the carbon acquiring enzyme exoglucanase was not significantly different between cryoturbated and topsoil organic horizons in any of the three sites. Oxidative enzymes, i.e. phenoloxidase and peroxidase, responsible for degradation of complex organic substances, showed higher activities in topsoil organic and cryoturbated horizons than in mineral horizons, when calculated per gram dry mass. Specific activities (per g C) however were highest in mineral horizons. We also measured actual cellulase activities (by inhibiting microbial uptake of products and without substrate addition): calculated per g C, the activities were up to ten times as high in organic topsoil compared to cryoturbated and mineral horizons, the latter not being significantly different. The total amount of PLFAs, as a proxy for

  2. A metal-based inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Jing Zhong

    Full Text Available A cyclometallated rhodium(III complex [Rh(ppy(2(dppz](+ (1 (where ppy=2-phenylpyridine and dppz=dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine dipyridophenazine has been prepared and identified as an inhibitor of NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE. The complex inhibited NAE activity in cell-free and cell-based assays, and suppressed the CRL-regulated substrate degradation and NF-κB activation in human cancer cells with potency comparable to known NAE inhibitor MLN4924. Molecular modeling analysis suggested that the overall binding mode of 1 within the binding pocket of the APPBP1/UBA3 heterodimer resembled that for MLN4924. Complex 1 is the first metal complex reported to suppress the NEDDylation pathway via inhibition of the NEDD8-activating enzyme.

  3. Enzyme butilcholinesterase activity variation in hormonal contraception users

    OpenAIRE

    Vásquez, Llermén; Dirección Regional de Salud - Puno, EsSALUD, Puno, Perú; Osorio, Jorge; Complejo Hospitalario Clínica San Pablo, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate enzyme butilcholinesterase activity in women using two hormonal contraceptives, norgestrel ethinylestradiol and medroxyprogesterone acetate, using alkaline phosphatase as indirect liver marker. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Women attending family planning program at El Agustino "7 de Octubre" health center, continuing users of hormonal contraception for over six months. Fasting blood was obtained and enzymatic activity was measured in serum. RESULTS: Users of both contraceptive...

  4. Inhibitors of testosterone biosynthetic and metabolic activation enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Leping; Su, Zhi-Jian; Ge, Ren-Shan

    2011-12-02

    The Leydig cells of the testis have the capacity to biosynthesize testosterone from cholesterol. Testosterone and its metabolically activated product dihydrotestosterone are critical for the development of male reproductive system and spermatogenesis. At least four steroidogenic enzymes are involved in testosterone biosynthesis: Cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1) for the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone within the mitochondria, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B), for the conversion of pregnenolone into progesterone, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) for the conversion of progesterone into androstenedione and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3) for the formation of testosterone from androstenedione. Testosterone is also metabolically activated into more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone by two isoforms 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1) and 2 (SRD5A2) in Leydig cells and peripheral tissues. Many endocrine disruptors act as antiandrogens via directly inhibiting one or more enzymes for testosterone biosynthesis and metabolic activation. These chemicals include industrial materials (perfluoroalkyl compounds, phthalates, bisphenol A and benzophenone) and pesticides/biocides (methoxychlor, organotins, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and prochloraz) and plant constituents (genistein and gossypol). This paper reviews these endocrine disruptors targeting steroidogenic enzymes.

  5. Inhibitors of Testosterone Biosynthetic and Metabolic Activation Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leping Ye

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The Leydig cells of the testis have the capacity to biosynthesize testosterone from cholesterol. Testosterone and its metabolically activated product dihydrotestosterone are critical for the development of male reproductive system and spermatogenesis. At least four steroidogenic enzymes are involved in testosterone biosynthesis: Cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme (CYP11A1 for the conversion of cholesterol into pregnenolone within the mitochondria, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD3B, for the conversion of pregnenolone into progesterone, 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1 for the conversion of progesterone into androstenedione and 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B3 for the formation of testosterone from androstenedione. Testosterone is also metabolically activated into more potent androgen dihydrotestosterone by two isoforms 5α-reductase 1 (SRD5A1 and 2 (SRD5A2 in Leydig cells and peripheral tissues. Many endocrine disruptors act as antiandrogens via directly inhibiting one or more enzymes for testosterone biosynthesis and metabolic activation. These chemicals include industrial materials (perfluoroalkyl compounds, phthalates, bisphenol A and benzophenone and pesticides/biocides (methoxychlor, organotins, 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane and prochloraz and plant constituents (genistein and gossypol. This paper reviews these endocrine disruptors targeting steroidogenic enzymes.

  6. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry: pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides--illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensonides, Femke I C; Bakker, Barbara M; Cremazy, Frederic; Messiha, Hanan L; Mendes, Pedro; Boogerd, Fred C; Westerhoff, Hans V

    2013-09-02

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular monitors of the state of living cells, such as ATP, affect multiple enzymes of the former and that these interactions have gone unnoticed in enzymology. We test this hypothesis in terms of the effect that ATP, ADP, and AMP might have on the major free-energy delivering pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Assaying cell-free extracts, we collected a comprehensive set of quantitative kinetic data concerning the enzymes of the glycolytic and the ethanol fermentation pathways. We determined systematically the extent to which the enzyme activities depend on the concentrations of the adenine nucleotides. We found that the effects of the adenine nucleotides on enzymes catalysing reactions in which they are not directly involved as substrate or product, are substantial. This includes effects on the Michaelis-Menten constants, adding new perspective on these, 100 years after their introduction. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of polysaccharide purified from aloe vera (Aloe barbadensis) gel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kim, Seo Young; Kim, Yoon Taek; Kim, Eun-A; Lee, Seung-Hong; Ko, Seok-Chun; Wijesinghe, W A J P; Samarakoon, Kalpa W; Kim, Young-Sun; Cho, Jin Hun; Jang, Hyeang-Su; Jeon, You-Jin

    2014-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo antioxidant potentials of a polysaccharide isolated from aloe vera gel were investigated. Enzymatic extracts were prepared from aloe vera gel by using ten digestive enzymes including five carbohydrases and five proteases. Among them, the highest yield was obtained with the Viscozyme extract and the same extract showed the best radical scavenging activity. An active polysaccharide was purified from the Viscozyme extract using ethanol-added separation and anion exchange chromatography. Purified aloe vera polysaccharide (APS) strongly scavenged radicals including DPPH, hydroxyl and alkyl radicals. In addition, APS showed a protective effect against AAPH-induced oxidative stress and cell death in Vero cells as well as in the in vivo zebrafish model. In this study, it is proved that both the in vitro and in vivo antioxidant potentials of APS could be further utilized in relevant industrial applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Extracellular enzyme activity and biogeochemical cycling in restored prairies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, L.; Hernandez, D.; Schade, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    Winter microbial activity in mid-latitude prairie ecosystems is thermally sensitive and significantly influenced by snow depth. Snow insulates the soil column facilitating microbial processing of complex organic substrates. Previous studies in forests and tundra ecosystems suggest patterns of substrate utilization and limitation are seasonal; above freezing, soil microbes access fresh litter inputs and sugar exudates from plant roots, while under frozen condition they recycle nutrients incorporated in microbial biomass. In order to liberate nutrients required for carbon degradation, soil microbes invest energy in the production of extracellular enzymes that cleave monomers from polymer bonds. The inverse relationship between relative enzyme abundance and substrate availability makes enzyme assays a useful proxy to assess changes in resources over time. Our objective in this study was to assess patterns in microbial biomass, nutrient availability, and extracellular enzyme activity in four snow exclosure sites over a seven-month period. Over the past three years, we have maintained a snow removal experiment on two restored prairies in central Minnesota. In each prairie, snow was continuously removed annually from two 4 x 4 m plots by shoveling after each snow event. Extractable C, N and P, and microbial C, N and P in soil samples were measured in samples collected from these snow removal plots, as well as in adjacent unmanipulated prairie control plots. Pools of C, N, and P were estimated using standard extraction protocols, and microbial pools were estimated using chloroform fumigation direct extraction (CFDE). We conducted fluorometric extracellular enzyme assays (EEA) to assess how the degradation potential of cellulose (cellobiohydrolase, CBH), protein (leucine aminopeptidase, LAP), and phosphate esters (phosphatase, PHOS) changed seasonally. Microbial C and N declined between October and June, while microbial P declined during the fall and winter, but increased

  9. Effect of Barley and Enzyme on Performance, Carcass, Enzyme Activity and Digestion Parameters of Broilers

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    majid kalantar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Corn has been recently used for producing ethanol fuel in the major corn-producing countries such as the US and Brazil. Recent diversion of corn for biofuel production along with the increased world's demand for this feedstuff has resulted in unprecedented rise in feed cost for poultry worldwide. Alternative grains such as wheat and barley can be successfully replaced for corn in poultry diets. These cereal grains can locally grow in many parts of the world as they have remarkably lower water requirement than corn. Wheat and barley are generally used as major sources of energy in poultry diets. Though the major components of these grains are starch and proteins, they have considerable content of non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs, derived from the cell walls (Olukosi et al. 2007; Mirzaie et al. 2012. NSPs are generally considered as anti-nutritional factors (Jamroz et al. 2002. The content and structure of NSP polymers vary between different grains, which consequently affect their nutritive value (Olukosi et al. 2007.Wheat and barley are generally used as major sources of energy in poultry diets. The major components of these grains are starch and proteins, they have considerable content of non-starch polysaccharides (NSPs, derived from the cell walls. NSPs are generally considered as anti-nutritional factors. The content and structure of NSP polymers vary between different grains, which consequently affect their nutritive value. The major part of NSPs in barley comprises polymers of (1→3 (1→4-β- glucans which could impede growth factors and consequently carcass quality through lowering the rate and amount of available nutrients in the mucosal surface of the intestinal. Materials and Methods This experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of corn and barley based diets supplemented with multi-enzyme on growth, carcass, pancreas enzyme activity and physiological characteristics of broilers. A total number of 375 one day old

  10. Cytochrome P450 Activity in Ex Vivo Cornea Models and a Human Cornea Construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kölln, Christian; Reichl, Stephan

    2016-07-01

    The pharmacokinetic behaviors of novel ophthalmic drugs are often preliminarily investigated in preclinical studies using ex vivo animal cornea or corneal cell culture models. During transcorneal passage, topically applied drugs may be affected by drug metabolizing enzymes. The knowledge regarding the functional expression of metabolic enzymes in corneal tissue is marginal; thus, the aim of this study was to investigate cytochrome P450 activity in an organotypic three-dimensional human cornea construct and to compare it with porcine and rabbit corneas, which are commonly used ex vivo cornea models. The total cytochrome P450 activity was determined by measuring the transformation of 7-ethoxycoumarin. Furthermore, the expression of the cytochrome P450 enzyme 2D6 (CYP2D6) was investigated at the protein level using immunohistochemistry and western blotting. CYP2D6 activity measurements were performed using a d-luciferin-based assay. In summary, similar levels of the total cytochrome P450 activity were identified in all 3 cornea models. The protein expression of CYP2D6 was confirmed in the human cornea construct and porcine cornea, whereas the signals in the rabbit cornea were weak. The analysis of the CYP2D6 activity indicated similar values for the human cornea construct and porcine cornea; however, a distinctly lower activity was observed in the rabbit cornea. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Antioxidant enzyme activities in maize plants colonized with Piriformospora indica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Manoj; Yadav, Vikas; Tuteja, Narendra; Johri, Atul Kumar

    2009-03-01

    The bioprotection performance of Piriformospora indica against the root parasite Fusarium verticillioides was studied. We found that maize plants first grown with F. verticillioides and at day 10 inoculated with P. indica showed improvements in biomass, and root length and number as compared with plants grown with F. verticillioides alone. To validate our finding that inoculation with P. indica suppresses colonization by F. verticillioides, we performed PCR analyses using P. indica- and F. verticillioides-specific primers. Our results showed that inoculation with P. indica suppresses further colonization by F. verticillioides. We hypothesized that as the colonization by P. indica increases, the presence of/colonization by F. verticillioides decreases. In roots, catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activities were found to be higher in F. verticillioides-colonized plants than in non-colonized plants. Increased activity of antioxidant enzymes minimizes the chances of oxidative burst (excessive production of reactive oxygen species), and therefore F. verticillioides might be protected from the oxidative defence system during colonization. We also observed decreased antioxidant enzyme activities in plants first inoculated with F. verticillioides and at day 10 inoculated with P. indica as compared with plants inoculated with F. verticillioides alone. These decreased antioxidant enzyme activities due to the presence of P. indica help the plant to overcome the disease load of F. verticillioides. We propose that P. indica can be used as a bioprotection agent against the root parasite F. verticillioides.

  12. Determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes in phenolic-rich grapevine tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Covington, Elizabeth Dunn; Roitsch, Thomas Georg; Dermastia, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Physiological studies in plants often require enzyme extraction from tissues containing high concentrations of phenols and polyphenols. Unless removed or neutralized, such compounds may hinder extraction, inactivate enzymes, and interfere with enzyme detection. The following protocol for activity...

  13. Activity-Based Screening of Metagenomic Libraries for Hydrogenase Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Nicole; Perner, Mirjam

    2017-01-01

    Here we outline how to identify hydrogenase enzymes from metagenomic libraries through an activity-based screening approach. A metagenomic fosmid library is constructed in E. coli and the fosmids are transferred into a hydrogenase deletion mutant of Shewanella oneidensis (ΔhyaB) via triparental mating. If a fosmid exhibits hydrogen uptake activity, S. oneidensis' phenotype is restored and hydrogenase activity is indicated by a color change of the medium from yellow to colorless. This new method enables screening of 48 metagenomic fosmid clones in parallel.

  14. Some enzyme activities of acetate mutants of Yarrowia lypolytica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robak, M.; Wojtatowicz, M.; Rymowicz, W. [Akademia Rolnicza, Wroclaw (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    Activity at the following enzymes: CS (oxaloacetate-lyase citrate), AH (citrate (isocitrate) hydrolyase), ICDH (threo-Ds-isocitrate: NADP oxidoreductase) and ICL (threo-Ds-isocitrate glyoxyglate-lyase) was measured at subsequent stages of citrate fermentation on glucose by wild type strain `Y, lipolytica A-101` and 2 acetate defective mutants, in order to recognize metabolic disorders in those mutants, which resulted in markedly improved homogeneity of citric acid production. Mutants did not show significant changes in activity of TCA cycle enzymes and ICL. Thus suggests that the control of citric:isocitric acid ratio is more difficult and it can also depend on transportation systems of both acids. (author). 19 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs.

  15. In vivo-generated thrombin and plasmin do not activate the complement system in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshari, Ravi S; Silasi, Robert; Lupu, Cristina; Taylor, Fletcher B; Lupu, Florea

    2017-12-14

    Sepsis concurrently activates both coagulation and complement systems. Although complement activation by bacteria is well documented, work in mice and in vitro suggests that coagulation proteases can directly cleave complement proteins. We aimed to determine whether generation of coagulation proteases in vivo can activate the complement cascade in 2 highly coagulopathic models. We compared temporal changes in activation biomarkers of coagulation (thrombin-antithrombin [TAT]), fibrinolysis (plasmin-antiplasmin [PAP]), and complement (C3b, C5a, C5b-9) in baboons infused with factor Xa (FXa) and phospholipids (FXa/phosphatidylcholine-phosphatidylserine [PCPS]) vs LD100 Escherichia coli We found that, albeit with different timing, both FXa/PCPS and E coli infusion led to robust thrombin and plasmin generation. Conversely, only E coli challenge activated the complement system, reaching a maximum at 2 hours postchallenge during the peaks of lipopolysaccharide and bacteremia but not of TAT and PAP. Despite inducing a strong burst of thrombin and plasmin, FXa/PCPS infusion did not produce measurable levels of complement activation in vivo. Similarly, ex vivo incubation of baboon serum with thrombin, plasmin, or FXa did not show noticeable complement cleavage unless supraphysiologic amounts of enzymes were used. Our results suggest that in vivo-generated thrombin and plasmin do not directly activate the complement in nonhuman primates. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  16. Non-invasive imaging of tumors by monitoring autotaxin activity using an enzyme-activated near-infrared fluorogenic substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Madan

    Full Text Available Autotaxin (ATX, an autocrine motility factor that is highly upregulated in metastatic cancer, is a lysophospholipase D enzyme that produces the lipid second messenger lysophosphatidic acid (LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Dysregulation of the lysolipid signaling pathway is central to the pathophysiology of numerous cancers, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. Consequently, the ATX/LPA pathway has emerged as an important source of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Herein we describe development and validation of a fluorogenic analog of LPC (AR-2 that enables visualization of ATX activity in vivo. AR-2 exhibits minimal fluorescence until it is activated by ATX, which substantially increases fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR region, the optimal spectral window for in vivo imaging. In mice with orthotopic ATX-expressing breast cancer tumors, ATX activated AR-2 fluorescence. Administration of AR-2 to tumor-bearing mice showed high fluorescence in the tumor and low fluorescence in most healthy tissues with tumor fluorescence correlated with ATX levels. Pretreatment of mice with an ATX inhibitor selectively decreased fluorescence in the tumor. Together these data suggest that fluorescence directly correlates with ATX activity and its tissue expression. The data show that AR-2 is a non-invasive and selective tool that enables visualization and quantitation of ATX-expressing tumors and monitoring ATX activity in vivo.

  17. Evaluation of pancreatin stability through enzyme activity determination

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    Terra Gleysson De Paula

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatin is a biotechnological product containing an enzyme complex, obtained from porcine pancreas, that is employed in treating pancreatic diseases. Experiments regarding the stability of the pharmaceutical formulation containing pancreatin were performed using standard binary mixtures with 6 excipients in a 1:1 ratio (m/m and a commercial formulation. To accomplish these goals, samples were stored for 1, 3 and 6 months at 40 ± 1 °C and 75 ± 5 % relative humidity (RH and 40 ± 1 °C and 0 % RH. Stress testing was also performed. All samples were analyzed to evaluate the α-amylase, lipase and protease activities through UV/Vis spectrophotometry. The results revealed that the excipient proprieties and the storage conditions affected enzyme stability. Humidity was a strong influencing factor in the reduction of α-amylase and protease activities. Stress testing indicated that pH 9.0 and UV light did not induce substantial alterations in enzyme activity.

  18. Alterations of digestive enzyme activities, intestinal morphology and microbiota in juvenile paddlefish, Polyodon spathula, fed dietary probiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Cheng; Ma, Mingyang; Ji, Hong; Ren, Tongjun; Mims, Steven D

    2015-02-01

    The effects of dietary supplementation of probiotics on digestive enzymes activities, intestinal morphology and microbiota in juvenile paddlefish (Polyodon spathula) were studied. A total of 400 fish were reared in two cages and fed with a basal diet (control group, CG) or diet supplemented with commercial probiotics (treatment group, TG) for 80 days. Enzymes activities analysis indicated that protease and α-amylase activities increased (P intestinal microbial species increased in TG. The similarity between the commercial bacteria product and intestinal microbiota of TG were higher than the microbiota from CG. The quantities of bacterium, Firmicutes, Proteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Fusobacteria, present an increasing trend from foregut to hindgut both in two groups. To our knowledge, this is the first in vivo study to reveal the effect of dietary probiotics on intestinal digestive enzymes activities, morphology and microbiota in paddlefish.

  19. Activation of nitrofurazone by azoreductases: multiple activities in one enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Ali; Kaplan, Elise; Laurieri, Nicola; Lowe, Edward; Sim, Edith

    2011-01-01

    Azoreductases are well known for azo pro-drug activation by gut flora. We show that azoreductases have a wider role in drug metabolism than previously thought as they can also reduce and hence activate nitrofurazone. Nitrofurazone, a nitroaromatic drug, is a broad spectrum antibiotic which has until now been considered as activated in bacteria by nitroreductases. The structure of the azoreductase with nitrofurazone bound was solved at 2.08 Å and shows nitrofurazone in an active conformation. Based on the structural information, the kinetics and stoichiometry of nitrofurazone reduction by azoreductase from P. aeruginosa, we propose a mechanism of activation which accounts for the ability of azoreductases to reduce both azo and nitroaromatic drugs. This mode of activation can explain the cytotoxic side-effects of nitrofurazone through human azoreductase homologues.

  20. Effects of Different Substrates on Lignocellulosic Enzyme Expression, Enzyme Activity, Substrate Utilization and Biological Efficiency of Pleurotus Eryngii

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    Chunliang Xie

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Pleurotus eryngii is one of the most valued and delicious mushrooms which are commercially cultivated on various agro-wastes. How different substrates affect lignocellulosic biomass degradation, lignocellulosic enzyme production and biological efficiency in Pleurotus eryngii was unclear. Methods and Results: In this report, Pleurotus eryngii was cultivated in substrates including ramie stalks, kenaf stalks, cottonseed hulls and bulrush stalks. The results showed that ramie stalks and kenaf stalks were found to best suitable to cultivate Pleurotus eryngii with the biological efficiency achieved at 55% and 57%, respectively. In order to establish correlations between different substrates and lignocellulosic enzymes expression, the extracellular proteins from four substrates were profiled with high throughput TMT-based quantitative proteomic approach. 241 non-redundant proteins were identified and 74 high confidence lignocellulosic enzymes were quantified. Most of the cellulases, hemicellulases and lignin depolymerization enzymes were highly up-regulated when ramie stalks and kenaf stalks were used as carbon sources. The enzyme activities results suggested cellulases, hemicellulases and lignin depolymerization enzymes were significantly induced by ramie stalks and kenaf stalks. Conclusion: The lignocelluloses degradation, most of the lignocellulosic enzymes expressions and activities of Pleurotus eryngii had positive correlation with the biological efficiency, which depend on the nature of lignocellulosic substrates. In addition, the lignocellulosic enzymes expression profiles during Pleurotus eryngii growth in different substrates were obtained. The present study suggested that most of the lignocellulosic enzymes expressions and activities can be used as tools for selecting better performing substrates for commercial mushroom cultivation.

  1. Pre-Eclampsia Placental Carbohydrate Metabolism Regulating Enzymes Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Oré, Raquel; Centro de Investigación en Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Suárez, Silvia; Centro de Investigación en Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Arnao, Inés; Centro de Investigación en Bioquímica y Nutrición, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Pre eclampsia is one of the most frecuent pathologies during pregnancy. The placental tissue plays an important role in the development of the pathology. In this report we performed a study of the activities of two regulatory enzymes [ Phosphofructokinase I (E.C. 2.7.1.11) and Glucose 6-P-dehidrogenase (E.C. 1.1.1.49)] of the carbohydrate metabolism in both normal and pre emclampsia placental tissue. It has been found a pronounced decreased in both activities in the pathological tissue. We di...

  2. Expression of plasminogen activators in preimplantation rat embryos developed in vivo and in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Har-Vardi Iris

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Embryo implantation plays a major role in embryogenesis and the outcome of pregnancy. Plasminogen activators (PAs have been implicated in mammalian fertilization, early stages of development and embryo implantation. The invasion of trophoblast cells into the endometrium during the implantation process can be blocked by inhibitors of serine proteases, illustrating the role of these enzymes in the invasion process. As in vitro developing embryos resulted in lower implantation rate than those developed in vivo we assume that a reduced PAs activity may lead to it. There is hardly any information regarding qualitative or quantitative differences in expression of PAs in preimplantation embryos, or comparisons between in vivo and in vitro developed embryos. The purpose of this study was to assess the expression of urokinase type (uPA and tissue type (tPA plasminogen activators in in vivo and in vitro preimplantation development in rat embryos using immunofluorescence confocal microscopy and computerized image analysis. Methods Zygotes, 2-cell, 4-cell, 8-cell, morula and blastocyst stages of development were flushed from the reproductive tract (control groups of Wistar rats. Zygotes were flushed and grown in vitro to the above mentioned developmental stages and comprised the experimental groups. Immunofluorescence microscopy and computerized image analysis were used to evaluate both qualitative (localization and quantitative expression of plasminogen activators. Results uPA and tPA were found to be expressed in rat embryos throughout their preimplantation development, both in vivo and in vitro. While uPA was localized mainly in the cell cytoplasm, the tPA was detected mainly on cell surface and in the perivitelline space. In blastocysts, both in vivo and in vitro, uPA and tPA were localized in the trophectoderm cells. Total uPA content per embryo was higher in the in vivo as compared with the in vitro developed embryos at all stages

  3. Trace elements as an activator of antioxidant enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Wołonciej

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is a state of impaired balance between the formation of free radicals and antioxidant capacity of the body. It causes many defects of the body, e.g. lipid peroxidation, DNA and protein damage. In order to prevent the effects of oxidative stress, the organism has developed defence mechanisms. These mechanisms capture and inhibit the formation of free radicals and also chelate ion metals that catalyse free radical reactions. Trace elements are components of antioxidant enzymes involved in antioxidant mechanisms. Selenium, as a selenocysteine, is a component of the active site of glutathione peroxidase (GPx. The main function of GPx is neutralization of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and organic peroxide (LOOH. Furthermore, selenium is a structural part of a large group of selenoproteins that are necessary for proper functioning of the body. Manganese, copper and zinc are a part of the group of superoxide dismutase enzymes (MnSOD, Cu/ZnSOD, which catalyse the superoxide anion dismutation into hydrogen peroxide and oxygen. Formed hydrogen peroxide is decomposed into water and oxygen by catalase or glutathione peroxidase. An integral component of catalase (CAT is iron ions. The concentration of these trace elements has a significant influence on the activity of antioxidant enzymes, and thus on defence against oxidative stress. Even a small change in the level of trace elements in the tissue causes a disturbance in their metabolism, leading to the occurrence of many diseases.

  4. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry : pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides--illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensonides, F.I.C.; Bakker, B.M.; Cremazy, F.; Messiha, H.L.; Mendes, P.; Boogerd, F.C.; Westerhoff, H.V.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular

  5. A new regulatory principle for in vivo biochemistry : Pleiotropic low affinity regulation by the adenine nucleotides - Illustrated for the glycolytic enzymes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mensonides, Femke I. C.; Bakker, Barbara M.; Cremazy, Frederic; Messiha, Hanan L.; Mendes, Pedro; Boogerd, Fred C.; Westerhoff, Hans V.

    2013-01-01

    Enzymology tends to focus on highly specific effects of substrates, allosteric modifiers, and products occurring at low concentrations, because these are most informative about the enzyme's catalytic mechanism. We hypothesized that at relatively high in vivo concentrations, important molecular

  6. Understanding drivers of peatland extracellular enzyme activity in the PEATcosm experiment: mixed evidence for enzymic latch hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl J. Romanowicz; Evan S. Kane; Lynette R. Potvin; Aleta L. Daniels; Randy Kolka; Erik A. Lilleskov

    2015-01-01

    Aims. Our objective was to assess the impacts of water table position and plant functional groups on peatland extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) framed within the context of the enzymic latch hypothesis. Methods. We utilized a full factorial experiment with 2 water table (WT) treatments (high and low) and 3 plant functional...

  7. Inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme activity by flavanol-rich foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Actis-Goretta, Lucas; Ottaviani, Javier I; Fraga, Cesar G

    2006-01-11

    Angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) activity was evaluated in the presence of flavanol-rich foods, i.e., wines, chocolates, and teas, and of purified flavonoids. All foods assayed inhibited ACE activity, red wines being more effective than white wine, and green tea more effective than black tea. The inhibition of ACE activity was associated with both phenolic and flavanol content in the foods. When isolated polyphenols were assayed, procyanidins (dimer and hexamer) and epigallocatechin significantly inhibited enzyme activity; similar concentrations of (+)-catechin, (-)-epicatechin, gallic acid, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, quercetin, kaempferol, and resveratrol were ineffective. When ACE activity was assayed in rat kidney membranes in the presence of chocolate extracts or purified procyanidins, it was observed that the inhibition depended on the chocolate content of flavanols and the number of flavanol units constituting the procyanidin. These experiments demonstrate that flavanols either isolated or present in foods could inhibit ACE activity. The occurrence of such inhibition in vivo needs to be determined, although is supported by the association between the consumption of flavanol-rich foods and reductions in blood pressure observed in several experimental models.

  8. Ozone interaction with rodent lung: effect on sulfhydryls and sulfhydryl-containing enzyme activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeLucia, A.J.; Hogue, P.M.; Mustafa, M.G.; Cross, C.E.

    1972-01-01

    Exposure of rats or rat lung homogenates to 2 ppM O/sub 3/ reduced total, protein, and non-protein sulfhydryl fractions in a dose-related fashion. The non-protein fraction was more susceptible to O/sub 3/ attack. Chronic O/sub 3/ exposure (0.8 ppM, 10 days) had no effect. Activities of SH-containing enzymes, glutathione reductase (GR) and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), in lung tissue decreased 10 to 15 and 30%, respectively, after 6 to 8 h exposure to 2 ppM O/sub 3/. In vitro exposure (2 to 3 ppM) led to reductions of 20 and 67%. Activities of cytochrome C reductases decreased 20% after acute exposure but increased 20% after chronic. Chronic exposure increased SH-generating enzyme, G6PD, activity in lung tissue 32% but had little effect on GR activity. Lipid peroxidation (as possible mechanism for SH oxidation) not affected by in vivo exposure but was increased almost 100% in vitro. G6PD activity signals hexose-monophosphate shunt pathway for NADPH production. This pathway is also active in various other diseases (e.g., toxic liver injury).

  9. Influence of the interleukin-converting enzyme inhibitor HMR-3480 on myocardial stunning in pigs in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Holger; Südkamp, Hendrik; Ebel, Dirk; Müllenheim, Jost; Schlack, Wolfgang; Preckel, Benedikt

    2007-01-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1 beta is converted into its active form by interleukin-1 beta-converting enzyme (ICE). Circulating cytokines may promote myocardial dysfunction (stunning) after ischemia. To investigate whether ICE inhibition by HMR-3840 improves myocardial stunning in vivo. Anesthetized (isoflurane and fentanyl) pigs were used for measurement of left ventricular (LV) pressure, cardiac output and blood flow in the left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) and left circumflex coronary artery. Regional myocardial function was assessed by sonomicrometry as systolic wall thickening and mean systolic thickening velocity in the anteroapical and posterobasal walls. The animals were subjected to 10 min of LAD occlusion followed by 4 h of reperfusion. The ICE inhibitor (flow-adjusted to achieve coronary plasma concentrations of 10 mug/mL) (ISCH, n=7) or the vehicle (CON, n=7) was infused via a side branch into the LAD during ischemia, or during ischemia and the first 60 min of reperfusion (REP, n=6). Occlusion of the LAD resulted in systolic outward movement (bulging) of the anteroapical wall during ischemia in all groups. Infusion of the ICE inhibitor had no effect on functional recovery when given during ischemia or when given during reperfusion (at the end of reperfusion in the anteroapical wall, values for systolic wall thickening were: CON 17.3+/-7.3%, ISCH 23.2+/-9.8% and REP 19.3+/-6.1%; and values for mean systolic thickening velocity were: CON 4.3+/-1.1 mm/s, ISCH 6.1+/-3.9 mm/s and REP 5.2+/-1.7 mm/s; all P values not significant for CON versus ISCH or REP). LAD blood flow was not affected by HMR-3840 (23.4+/-5.2 mL/min versus 24.3+/-8.1 mL/min; P not significant). Global myocardial function (LV pressure, maximum rate of LV pressure increase and cardiac output) was not different between controls and treatment groups during reperfusion. ICE inhibition by HMR-3480 had no effect on myocardial stunning in pigs in vivo.

  10. Tempol Supplementation Restores Diaphragm Force and Metabolic Enzyme Activities in mdx Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P. Burns

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD is characterized by striated muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure. Since oxidative stress is recognized as a secondary pathology in DMD, the efficacy of antioxidant intervention, using the superoxide scavenger tempol, was examined on functional and biochemical status of dystrophin-deficient diaphragm muscle. Diaphragm muscle function was assessed, ex vivo, in adult male wild-type and dystrophin-deficient mdx mice, with and without a 14-day antioxidant intervention. The enzymatic activities of muscle citrate synthase, phosphofructokinase, and lactate dehydrogenase were assessed using spectrophotometric assays. Dystrophic diaphragm displayed mechanical dysfunction and altered biochemical status. Chronic tempol supplementation in the drinking water increased diaphragm functional capacity and citrate synthase and lactate dehydrogenase enzymatic activities, restoring all values to wild-type levels. Chronic supplementation with tempol recovers force-generating capacity and metabolic enzyme activity in mdx diaphragm. These findings may have relevance in the search for therapeutic strategies in neuromuscular disease.

  11. ACTIVITY OF SUPEROXIDE DISMUTASE ENZYME IN YEAST SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blažena Lavová

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS with reactive nitrogen species (RNS are known to play dual role in biological systems, they can be harmful or beneficial to living systems. ROS can be important mediators of damage to cell structures, including proteins, lipids and nucleic acids termed as oxidative stress. The antioxidant enzymes protect the organism against the oxidative damage caused by active oxygen forms. The role of superoxide dismutase (SOD is to accelerate the dismutation of the toxic superoxide radical, produced during oxidative energy processes, to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. In this study, SOD activity of three yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae was determined. It was found that SOD activity was the highest (23.7 U.mg-1 protein in strain 612 after 28 hours of cultivation. The lowest SOD activity from all tested strains was found after 56 hours of cultivation of strain Gyöng (0.7 U.mg-1 protein.

  12. Relationship between Estradiol and Antioxidant Enzymes Activity of Ischemic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasrin Sheikh

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Some evidence suggests the neuroprotection of estrogen provided by the antioxidant activity of this compound. The main objective of this study was to determine the level of estradiol and its correlation with the activity of antioxidant enzymes, total antioxidant status and ferritin from ischemic stroke subjects. The study population consisted of 30 patients with acute ischemic stroke and 30 controls. There was no significant difference between estradiol in stroke and control group. The activity of superoxide dismutase and level of ferritin was higher in stroke compared with control group (<.05, <.001, resp.. There was no significant correlation between estradiol and glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, catalase, total antioxidant status, and ferritin in stroke and control groups. We observed inverse correlation between estradiol with superoxide dismutase in males of stroke patients (=−0.54, =.029. Our results supported that endogenous estradiol of elderly men and women of stroke or control group has no antioxidant activity.

  13. Acetazolamide Inhibits the Level of Tyrosinase and Melanin: An Enzyme Kinetic, In Vitro, In Vivo, and In Silico Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Qamar; Raza, Hussain; Hassan, Mubashir; Phull, Abdul Rehman; Kim, Song Ja; Seo, Sung-Yum

    2017-09-01

    Melanin is the major factor that determines skin color and protects from ultraviolet radiation. In present study we evaluated the anti-melanogenesis effect of acetazolamide (ACZ) using four different approaches: enzyme kinetic, in vitro, in vivo and in silico. ACZ demonstrated significant inhibitory activity (IC 50 7.895 ± 0.24 μm) against tyrosinase as compared to the standard drug kojic acid (IC 50 16.84 ± 0.64 μm) and kinetic analyses showed that ACZ is a non-competitive inhibitor without cytotoxic effect. In in vitro experiments, A375 human melanoma cells were treated with 20 or 40 μm of ACZ with or without 50 μm of l-DOPA. Western blot results showed that ACZ significantly (P < 0.05) decreased the expression level of tyrosinase at 40 μm. Zebrafish embryos were treated with 10, 20 or 40 μm of ACZ and of positive control kojic acid. At 72 h of treatment with ACZ and kojic acid, ACZ significantly (P < 0.001) decreased the embryos pigmentation to 40.8% of untreated embryos at the dose of 40 μm of ACZ while kojic acid decreased only 25.0% of pigmentation at the same dose of kojic acid. In silico docking were performed against tyrosinase using PyRx tool. Docking studies suggested that His244, Asn260 and His85 are the major interacting residues in the binding site of the protein. In conclusion, our results suggest that ACZ is a good candidate for the inhibition of melanin and it could be used as a lead for developing the drugs for hyperpigmentary disorders and skin whitening. © 2017 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  14. Role of Lysyl Oxidase Propeptide in Secretion and Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimsby, Jessica L.; Lucero, Hector A.; Trackman, Philip C.; Ravid, Katya; Kagan, Herbert M.

    2013-01-01

    Lysyl oxidase (LOX) is secreted as a proenzyme (proLOX) that is proteolytically processed in the extracellular milieu to release the propeptide and mature, active LOX. LOX oxidizes lysyl residues of a number of protein substrates in the extracellular matrix and on the cell surface, which impacts several physiological and disease states. Although the LOX propeptide (LOX-PP) is glycosylated, little is known about the role of this modification in LOX secretion and activity. To gain insight into this issue, cells were transfected with native, full-length LOX cDNA (pre-pro-LOX), the N-glycosylation null pre-[N/Q]pro-LOX cDNA and the deletion mutant pre-LOX cDNA, referred to as secretory LOX, in which mature LOX is targeted to the secretory pathway without its N-terminal propeptide sequence. The results show that glycosylation of the LOX-PP is not required for secretion and extracellular processing of pro-LOX but it is required for optimal enzyme activity of the resulting mature LOX. Complete deletion of the propeptide sequence prevents mature LOX from exiting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Taken together, our study points out the requirement of the LOX-PP for pro-LOX exit from the ER and is the first to highlight the influence of LOX-PP glycosylation on LOX enzyme activity. PMID:20717923

  15. A Computational Methodology to Screen Activities of Enzyme Variants

    CERN Document Server

    Hediger, Martin R; Svendsen, Allan; Besenmatter, Werner; Jensen, Jan H

    2012-01-01

    We present a fast computational method to efficiently screen enzyme activity. In the presented method, the effect of mutations on the barrier height of an enzyme-catalysed reaction can be computed within 24 hours on roughly 10 processors. The methodology is based on the PM6 and MOZYME methods as implemented in MOPAC2009, and is tested on the first step of the amide hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by Candida Antarctica lipase B (CalB) enzyme. The barrier heights are estimated using adiabatic mapping and are shown to give barrier heights to within 3kcal/mol of B3LYP/6-31G(d)//RHF/3-21G results for a small model system. Relatively strict convergence criteria (0.5kcal/(mol{\\AA})), long NDDO cutoff distances within the MOZYME method (15{\\AA}) and single point evaluations using conventional PM6 are needed for reliable results. The generation of mutant structure and subsequent setup of the semiempirical calculations are automated so that the effect on barrier heights can be estimated for hundreds of mutants in a matte...

  16. A computational methodology to screen activities of enzyme variants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin R Hediger

    Full Text Available We present a fast computational method to efficiently screen enzyme activity. In the presented method, the effect of mutations on the barrier height of an enzyme-catalysed reaction can be computed within 24 hours on roughly 10 processors. The methodology is based on the PM6 and MOZYME methods as implemented in MOPAC2009, and is tested on the first step of the amide hydrolysis reaction catalyzed by the Candida Antarctica lipase B (CalB enzyme. The barrier heights are estimated using adiabatic mapping and shown to give barrier heights to within 3 kcal/mol of B3LYP/6-31G(d//RHF/3-21G results for a small model system. Relatively strict convergence criteria (0.5 kcal/(molÅ, long NDDO cutoff distances within the MOZYME method (15 Å and single point evaluations using conventional PM6 are needed for reliable results. The generation of mutant structures and subsequent setup of the semiempirical calculations are automated so that the effect on barrier heights can be estimated for hundreds of mutants in a matter of weeks using high performance computing.

  17. In vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activity of Combretum racemosum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to determine the in vitro and in vivo trypanocidal activity of crude methanolic extract of Combretum racemosum leaves against Trypanosoma brucei brucei. The extract exhibited in vitro activity by immobilizing the trypanosomes and rendering them uninfective to mice at 125 to 0.2559 mg/ml.

  18. Virtual Biochemistry – pH effect on enzyme activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.N. Heidrich

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Protocols of laboratory experiments, followed by teacher's explanation, not always clearly translate to the student the dynamics to beadopted for the implementation of the proposed practice. One of these cases is related to the study of the effect of pH on enzyme activity. For better help the understanding of the technical procedure, a hypermedia was built based on a protocol adopted at the Department of Biochemistry, UFSC. The hypermedia shows how theeffect of variations in pH can be observed  in vitro. Taking as example salivary amylase and the consumption of starch (substrate by means of iodine staining, a set of pH buffers was tested to identify the best pH for this enzyme  activity. This hypermedia as introductory tool for such practice was tested on aNutrition course classroom. Students agree that the hypermedia provided a better understanding of the proposed activities. Teachers also notice a smallerreagents consumption and reduction of the time spent by the students in the achievement of the experiment.

  19. In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and In Vivo Anti-Fatigue Effect of Sea Horse (Hippocampus) Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zebin; Lin, Duanquan; Guo, Juanjuan; Zhang, Yi; Zheng, Baodong

    2017-03-18

    This study investigated changes the in vitro antioxidant activity of Hippocampus polypeptides during enzymatic hydrolysis, including the effects of enzyme species, enzyme concentration, material-liquid ratio, hydrolysis time, pH, and temperature of the reaction system. Its in vivo anti-fatigue activity was also studied. Hippocampus peptide prepared by papain digestion exhibited the highest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical scavenging rate (71.89% ± 1.50%) and strong hydroxyl radical scavenging rate (75.53% ± 0.98%), compared to those prepared by five other commonly used enzymes (i.e., trypsin, neutral protease, compound protease, flavorzyme, and alkaline protease). Additionally, maximum antioxidant activity of Hippocampus polypeptide prepared by papain digestion was reached after hydrolysis for 40 min at pH 6.0 and 60 °C of the reaction system by using 2000 U/g enzyme and a material-liquid ratio of 1:15. Moreover, compared with the control group, Hippocampus peptide prolonged the swimming time by 33%-40%, stabilized the blood glucose concentration, increased liver glycogen levels, and decreased blood lactate levels and blood urea nitrogen levels in mice (p antioxidant and anti-fatigue activity.

  20. In Vitro Antioxidant Activity and In Vivo Anti-Fatigue Effect of Sea Horse (Hippocampus Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zebin Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated changes the in vitro antioxidant activity of Hippocampus polypeptides during enzymatic hydrolysis, including the effects of enzyme species, enzyme concentration, material–liquid ratio, hydrolysis time, pH, and temperature of the reaction system. Its in vivo anti-fatigue activity was also studied. Hippocampus peptide prepared by papain digestion exhibited the highest 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl free radical scavenging rate (71.89% ± 1.50% and strong hydroxyl radical scavenging rate (75.53% ± 0.98%, compared to those prepared by five other commonly used enzymes (i.e., trypsin, neutral protease, compound protease, flavorzyme, and alkaline protease. Additionally, maximum antioxidant activity of Hippocampus polypeptide prepared by papain digestion was reached after hydrolysis for 40 min at pH 6.0 and 60 °C of the reaction system by using 2000 U/g enzyme and a material–liquid ratio of 1:15. Moreover, compared with the control group, Hippocampus peptide prolonged the swimming time by 33%–40%, stabilized the blood glucose concentration, increased liver glycogen levels, and decreased blood lactate levels and blood urea nitrogen levels in mice (p < 0.01. In conclusion, these results indicated that Hippocampus polypeptide prepared by papain digestion under optimal conditions exhibited high degrees of antioxidant and anti-fatigue activity.

  1. Different in vitro and in vivo activity of low Mr phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase on epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigacci, S; Marzocchini, R; Bucciantini, M; Berti, A

    1998-09-29

    Low Mr phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase is a cytosolic enzyme which dephosphorylates platelet-derived growth factor and insulin receptor in vivo, thus reducing cellular mitogenic response to such growth factors. Following cell stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor the phosphatase undergoes a redistribution from the citosol to the Triton X-100-insoluble fraction where its activity upon the growth factor receptor is intense. Previous research uncovered evidence that low Mr phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase dephosphorylates the epidermal growth factor receptor in vitro. Here we demonstrate that in vivo the enzyme is not active on the phosphorylated epidermal growth factor receptor and it does not influence the mitogenic response of cells. Since the enzyme distribution is not affected by epidermal growth factor stimulation, involvement of a recruitment mechanism in the definition of low Mr phosphotyrosine protein phosphatase substrate specificity is hypothesized. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  2. In-vitro and in-vivo imaging of MMP activity in cartilage and joint injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukui, Tomoaki; Tenborg, Elizabeth; Yik, Jasper H.N.; Haudenschild, Dominik R., E-mail: DRHaudenschild@ucdavis.edu

    2015-05-08

    Non-destructive detection of cartilage-degrading activities represents an advance in osteoarthritis (OA) research, with implications in studies of OA pathogenesis, progression, and intervention strategies. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are principal cartilage degrading enzymes that contribute to OA pathogenesis. MMPSense750 is an in-vivo fluorimetric imaging probe with the potential to continuously and non-invasively trace real-time MMP activities, but its use in OA-related research has not been reported. Our objective is to detect and characterize the early degradation activities shortly after cartilage or joint injury with MMPSense750. We determined the appropriate concentration, assay time, and linear range using various concentrations of recombinant MMPs as standards. We then quantified MMP activity from cartilage explants subjected to either mechanical injury or inflammatory cytokine treatment in-vitro. Finally, we performed in-vivo MMP imaging of a mouse model of post-traumatic OA. Our in-vitro results showed that the optimal assay time was highly dependent on the MMP enzyme. In cartilage explant culture media, mechanical impact or cytokine treatment increased MMP activity. Injured knees of mice showed significantly higher fluorescent signal than uninjured knees. We conclude that MMPSense750 detects human MMP activities and can be used for in-vitro study with cartilage, as well as in-vivo studies of knee injury, and can offering real-time insight into the degradative processes that occurring within the joint before structural changes become evident radiographically. - Highlights: • MMPSense750 is near-infrared fluorescent probe which can detect MMP activity. • MMPSense750 can detect human MMP-3, -9, and -13. • The reaction kinetics with MMPSense750 were different for the three MMPs. • MMPSense750 can visualized real time MMP activity in mouse injured knees. • MMPSense750 is convenient tool to evaluate real-time MMP activity non-invasively.

  3. Racecadotril demonstrates intestinal antisecretory activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primi, M P; Bueno, L; Baumer, P; Berard, H; Lecomte, J M

    1999-12-01

    Racecadotril (acetorphan), a potent enkephalinase inhibitor, protects endogenous enkephalins from degradation. Racecadotril exhibits experimental and clinical antidiarrhoeal activity without any effect on intestinal motility, suggesting selective antisecretory activity. The antisecretory effect of racecadotril was directly assessed in the present study. A 1 m, jejunal, Thiry-Vella loop was created in six mongrel dogs, and water and ionic fluxes were evaluated during infusion (2 mL/min) of Tyrode solution labelled with 14C-polyethylene glycol. Fluxes were determined both in the basal state and 5-6 h after commencement of a 2-h infusion of cholera toxin (0.4 microgram/mL). Racecadotril (10 mg/kg) or vehicle was given orally with and without prior intravenous administration of naloxone (0.1 mg/kg) or phentolamine (0.2 mg/kg). Basal absorption remained unchanged following racecadotril administration; however, racecadotril significantly decreased (P = 0.01) cholera toxin-induced water, sodium, and potassium hypersecretion, from 0.73 +/- 0.15 to 0.37 +/- 0.13 mL/min; from 125.0 +/- 16.1 to 14.7 +/- 9.5 microMol/min; and from 3.41 +/- 0.66 to 1.66 +/- 0.61 microMol/min, respectively. This antisecretory activity of racecadotril was suppressed by naloxone but not by phentolamine. This study directly demonstrates the antisecretory activity of racecadotril in relation to the protection of endogenous enkephalins.

  4. Extracellular Enzyme Activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Winding, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular Enzyme Activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity Niels Bohse Hendriksen, Anne Winding. Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark Soil enzymes originate from a variety of organisms, notably fungi and bacteria...... and especially hydrolytic extracellular enzymes are of pivotal importance for decomposition of organic substrates and biogeochemical cycling. Their activity reflects the functional diversity and activity of the microorganisms involved in decomposition processes which are essential processes for soil functioning......, experimental conditions of extraction of enzymes from soils, buffer and pH, substrate concentration, temperature and the necessary controls were optimized and standardized. This has resulted in an optimized standard operating procedure of EEA, which are being tested as an indicator of soil functional diversity...

  5. Impact of chlortetracycline and sulfapyridine antibiotics on soil enzyme activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molaei, Ali; Lakzian, Amir; Datta, Rahul; Haghnia, Gholamhosain; Astaraei, Alireza; Rasouli-Sadaghiani, MirHassan; Ceccherini, Maria T.

    2017-10-01

    Pharmaceutical antibiotics are frequently used in the livestock and poultry industries to control infectious diseases. Due to the lack of proper guidance for use, the majority of administrated antibiotics and their metabolites are excreted to the soil environment through urine and feces. In the present study, we used chlortetracycline and sulfapyridine antibiotics to screen out their effects on dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphatase and urease activity. Factorial experiments were conducted with different concentrations of antibiotic (0, 10, 25 and 100 mg kg-1 of soil) mixed with soil samples, and the enzyme activity was measured at intervals of 1, 4 and 21 days. The results show that the chlortetracycline and sulfapyridine antibiotics negatively affect the dehydrogenase activity, but the effect of sulfapyridine decreases with time of incubation. Indeed, sulfapyridine antibiotic significantly affect the alkaline phosphatase activity for the entire three-time interval, while chlortetracycline seems to inhibit its activity within 1 and 4 days of incubation. The effects of chlortetracycline and sulfapyridine antibiotics on urease activity appear similar, as they both significantly affect the urease activity on day 1 of incubation. The present study concludes that chlortetracycline and sulfapyridine antibiotics have harmful effects on soil microbes, with the extent of effects varying with the duration of incubation and the type of antibiotics used.

  6. A modern mode of activation for nucleic acid enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Lévesque

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Through evolution, enzymes have developed subtle modes of activation in order to ensure the sufficiently high substrate specificity required by modern cellular metabolism. One of these modes is the use of a target-dependent module (i.e. a docking domain such as those found in signalling kinases. Upon the binding of the target to a docking domain, the substrate is positioned within the catalytic site. The prodomain acts as a target-dependent module switching the kinase from an off state to an on state. As compared to the allosteric mode of activation, there is no need for the presence of a third partner. None of the ribozymes discovered to date have such a mode of activation, nor does any other known RNA. Starting from a specific on/off adaptor for the hepatitis delta virus ribozyme, that differs but has a mechanism reminiscent of this signalling kinase, we have adapted this mode of activation, using the techniques of molecular engineering, to both catalytic RNAs and DNAs exhibiting various activities. Specifically, we adapted three cleaving ribozymes (hepatitis delta virus, hammerhead and hairpin ribozymes, a cleaving 10-23 deoxyribozyme, a ligating hairpin ribozyme and an artificially selected capping ribozyme. In each case, there was a significant gain in terms of substrate specificity. Even if this mode of control is unreported for natural catalytic nucleic acids, its use needs not be limited to proteinous enzymes. We suggest that the complexity of the modern cellular metabolism might have been an important selective pressure in this evolutionary process.

  7. Stable Colloidal Drug Aggregates Catch and Release Active Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Christopher K.; Duan, Da; Ganesh, Ahil N.; Torosyan, Hayarpi

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule aggregates are considered nuisance compounds in drug discovery, but their unusual properties as colloids could be exploited to form stable vehicles to preserve protein activity. We investigated the co-aggregation of seven molecules chosen because they had been previously intensely studied as colloidal aggregators, co-formulating them with bis-azo dyes. The co-formulation reduced colloid sizes to colloid formulations are more stable than previous aggregator particles. Specifically, co-aggregation of Congo Red with sorafenib, tetraiodophenolphthalein (TIPT) or vemurafenib produced particles that are stable in solutions of high ionic strength and high protein concentrations. Like traditional, single compound colloidal aggregates, the stabilized colloids adsorbed and inhibited enzymes like β-lactamase, malate dehydrogenase and trypsin. Unlike traditional aggregates, the co-formulated colloid-protein particles could be centrifuged and re-suspended multiple times, and from re-suspended particles, active trypsin could be released up to 72 hours after adsorption. Unexpectedly, the stable colloidal formulations can sequester, stabilize, and isolate enzymes by spin-down, resuspension and release. PMID:26741163

  8. Structure based discovery of small molecules to regulate the activity of human insulin degrading enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Çakir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE is an allosteric Zn(+2 metalloprotease involved in the degradation of many peptides including amyloid-β, and insulin that play key roles in Alzheimer's disease (AD and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, respectively. Therefore, the use of therapeutic agents that regulate the activity of IDE would be a viable approach towards generating pharmaceutical treatments for these diseases. Crystal structure of IDE revealed that N-terminal has an exosite which is ∼30 Å away from the catalytic region and serves as a regulation site by orientation of the substrates of IDE to the catalytic site. It is possible to find small molecules that bind to the exosite of IDE and enhance its proteolytic activity towards different substrates. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we applied structure based drug design method combined with experimental methods to discover four novel molecules that enhance the activity of human IDE. The novel compounds, designated as D3, D4, D6, and D10 enhanced IDE mediated proteolysis of substrate V, insulin and amyloid-β, while enhanced degradation profiles were obtained towards substrate V and insulin in the presence of D10 only. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This paper describes the first examples of a computer-aided discovery of IDE regulators, showing that in vitro and in vivo activation of this important enzyme with small molecules is possible.

  9. Mining anaerobic digester consortia metagenomes for secreted carbohydrate active enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkens, Casper; Busk, Peter Kamp; Pilgaard, Bo

    . To gain insight into both the degradation of the carbohydrates and the various roles of the microbes in the ADs we have mined metagenomes from both types of ADs for glycoside hydrolases, carbohydrate esterases, polysaccharide lyases, auxiliary activities, and carbohydrate binding modules. The mining...... thermophilic and mesophilic ADs a wide variety of carbohydrate active enzyme functions were discovered in the metagenomic sequencing of the microbial consortia. The most dominating type of glycoside hydrolases were β-glucosidases (up to 27%), α-amylases (up to 10%), α-glucosidases (up to 8%), α......-galactosidases (up to 9%) and β-galactosidases (up to 7%). For carbohydrate esterases the by far most dominating type was acetylxylan esterases (up to 59%) followed by feruloyl esterases (up to 16%). Less than 15 polysaccharide lyases were identified in the different metagenomes and not surprisingly...

  10. Testing Biochemistry Revisited : How In Vivo Metabolism Can Be Understood from In Vitro Enzyme Kinetics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, Karen; Kiewiet, Jose A. L.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Bakker, Barbara M.

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was

  11. Testing biochemistry revisited: how in vivo metabolism can be understood from in vitro enzyme kinetics.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, K.; Kiewiet, J.A.L.; Westerhoff, H.V.; Bakker, B.M.

    2012-01-01

    A decade ago, a team of biochemists including two of us, modeled yeast glycolysis and showed that one of the most studied biochemical pathways could not be quite understood in terms of the kinetic properties of the constituent enzymes as measured in cell extract. Moreover, when the same model was

  12. [Effect of coordinational germanium compounds on enzyme synthesis and activity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seĭfullina, I I; Martsinko, E E; Batrakova, O A; Borzova, N V; Ivanko, E V; Varbanets, L D

    2002-01-01

    Germanium complexes (IV) with succinic (H2Suc), oxyethyliminodiacetic (H2Oeida) and iminodisuccinic (H4Ids) acids as well as homo- and heteroligand germanium complexes (IV)--products of interaction of triammonium salt of oxyethylidendiphosphonic acid ((NH4)3HL) and oxyacids: tartaric (H4Tart), citric (H4Citr), trioxyglutaric (H4Toglut) acids have been synthesized. Composition of the obtained complexes: [Ge(OH)2(NaSuc)2].2H2O (I); [Ge(OH) (Oeida).H2O].H2O (II); [Ge(OH)2(NaHIds)2] (III); [Ge(OH)2(NH4)3HL) (H2Tart)] (IV); [Ge(OH)2(NH4)3HL) (H2Citr)] (V); [Ge(OH)2(NH4)3HL) (H2Toglut)] (VI); [Ge(OH)2((NH4)2HL)2] (VII); [Ge (OH)2((NH4)2HL)2] (VII); [Ge(OH)2 (H2O)2(NH4) HL] (VIII) has been determined. The capability of the synthesized compounds has been studied to affect synthesis and activity of the following enzymes: collagenase, alpha-N-acetylgalactosaminidase (alpha-GalNAc-ase) and alpha-galactosidase (alpha-Gal-ase). It has been established that the complexes II-VIII activate biosynthesis of alpha-Gal-ase and alpha-GalNAc-ase, while germanium dioxide (IX) and complex I possess considerable inhibiting effect on synthesis of the above enzymes. It has been also established that all the compounds except for IV increased the activity of both alpha-Gal-ase and alpha-GalNAc-ase. All the considered complexes demonstrated similar reaction with respect to collagenase: they inhibited both synthesis and activity.

  13. Induction of phase 2 antioxidant enzymes by broccoli sulforaphane: Perspectives in maintaining the antioxidant activity of vitamins A, C, and E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekhar s Boddupalli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Consumption of fruits and vegetables is recognized as an important part of a healthy diet. Increased consumption of cruciferous vegetables in particular has been associated with a decreased risk of several degenerative and chronic diseases, including cardiovascular disease and certain cancers. Members of the cruciferous vegetable family, which includes broccoli, Brussels sprouts, cauliflower, and cabbage, accumulate significant concentrations of glucosinolates, which are metabolized in vivo to biologically active isothiocyanates (ITCs. The ITC sulforaphane, which is derived from glucoraphanin, has garnered particular interest due to its extraordinary ability to induce expression of several enzymes via the Keap1/Nrf2/ARE pathway. Nrf2/ARE gene products are typically characterized as Phase II detoxification enzymes and/or antioxidant (AO enzymes. Over the last decade, human clinical studies have begun to provide in vivo evidence of both Phase II and AO enzyme induction by SF. Many AO enzymes are redox cycling enzymes that maintain redox homeostasis and activity of free radical scavengers such as such as vitamins A, C and E. In this review, we present the existing evidence for induction of PII and AO enzymes by SF, the interactions of SF-induced AO enzymes and proposed maintenance of the essential vitamins A, C and E, and, finally, the current view of genotypic effects on ITC metabolism and AO enzyme induction and function.

  14. Novel TPP-riboswitch activators bypass metabolic enzyme dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lünse, Christina E; Scott, Fraser J; Suckling, Colin J; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    Riboswitches are conserved regions within mRNA molecules that bind specific metabolites and regulate gene expression. TPP-riboswitches, which respond to thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP), are involved in the regulation of thiamine metabolism in numerous bacteria. As these regulatory RNAs are often modulating essential biosynthesis pathways they have become increasingly interesting as promising antibacterial targets. Here, we describe thiamine analogs containing a central 1,2,3-triazole group to induce repression of thiM-riboswitch dependent gene expression in different E. coli strains. Additionally, we show that compound activation is dependent on proteins involved in the metabolic pathways of thiamine uptake and synthesis. The most promising molecule, triazolethiamine (TT), shows concentration dependent reporter gene repression that is dependent on the presence of thiamine kinase ThiK, whereas the effect of pyrithiamine (PT), a known TPP-riboswitch modulator, is ThiK independent. We further show that this dependence can be bypassed by triazolethiamine-derivatives that bear phosphate-mimicking moieties. As triazolethiamine reveals superior activity compared to pyrithiamine, it represents a very promising starting point for developing novel antibacterial compounds that target TPP-riboswitches. Riboswitch-targeting compounds engage diverse endogenous mechanisms to attain in vivo activity. These findings are of importance for the understanding of compounds that require metabolic activation to achieve effective riboswitch modulation and they enable the design of novel compound generations that are independent of endogenous activation mechanisms.

  15. Modelling thermal stability and activity of free and immobilized enzymes as a novel tool for enzyme reactor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A M P; Oliveira, M G; Maugeri, F

    2007-11-01

    In this work, a novel method is proposed to establish the most suitable operational temperature for an enzyme reactor. The method was based on mathematical modelling of the thermal stability and activity of the enzyme and was developed using thermodynamic concepts and experimental data from free and immobilized inulinases (2,1-beta-D fructan frutanohydrolase, EC 3.2.1.7) from Kluyveromyces marxianus, which were used as examples. The model was, therefore, designed to predict the enzyme activity with respect to the temperature and time course of the enzymatic process, as well as its half-life, in a broad temperature range. The knowledge and information provided by the model could be used to design the operational temperature conditions, leading to higher enzyme activities, while preserving acceptable stability levels, which represent the link between higher productivity and lower process costs. For the inulinase used in this study, the optimum temperature conditions leading to higher enzyme activities were shown to be 63 degrees C and 57.5 degrees C for the free and immobilized inulinases, respectively. However, according to the novel method of approach used here, the more appropriate operating temperatures would be 52 degrees C for free and 42 degrees C for immobilized inulinases, showing that the working temperature is not necessarily the same as the maximum reaction rate temperature, but preferably a lower temperature where the enzyme is much more stable.

  16. Serum enzymes activities in Plasmodium falciparum infection in Southern Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koay Yen Chin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH,aspartate aminotranferase (AST, alanine aminotransferase(ALT, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP were assessed todetermine the liver functions of patients infected withPlasmodium falciparum. The enzyme activities were assessedin 60 malarial patients and a control group of 44 people.Materials and Methods: The data for the study was collectedfrom the survey conducted from Liaquat University of medicaland health sciences Hospital, Hyderabad, Pakaistan. Sample of60 patients aged between 20 and 50 years were collected. Acontrol group of 44 healthy individual adults was also assessedfor comparative purposes. All the malaria patients who visitedthe OPD during the study period enrolled in the study.Results: The LDH activity in male patients was found to be674.89 ± 33.354 IU/L. This is above the control LDH activity of296.59 ± 14.476 IU/L. Similarly, in female patients, the serumLDH activity of 580.25 ± 24.507 IU/L is over twice the controlfemale serum LDH activity of 302.18 ± 18.082 IU/L. Furtherone-way anova test was performed to find any significance ininfected and control male and female.Conclusion: Hepatic dysfunction was found to be associated toP. falciparum malaria infection.

  17. Comparison between in vitro and in vivo antibacterial activity of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity of the extracts of Curcuma zedoaria from Malaysia was compared using in vitro and in vivo systems. The comparison was performed against four bacterial strains including two gram negative strains (Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and two gram positive strains (Bacillus cereus and ...

  18. Short Communication: In Vivo Trypanocidal Activity of Artemether ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Parasitemia was then followed until death of the animals. The rate of increase of parasitemia and the average survival time was assessed and compared for each dosage group and the control. Artemether showed promising in vivo antitrypanosomal activity by decreasing the rate of increase in parasitemia and increasing ...

  19. County-scale spatial distribution of soil enzyme activities and enzyme activity indices in agricultural land: implications for soil quality assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Xiangping; Xie, Baoni; Wang, Junxing; He, Wenxiang; Wang, Xudong; Wei, Gehong

    2014-01-01

    Here the spatial distribution of soil enzymatic properties in agricultural land was evaluated on a county-wide (567 km(2)) scale in Changwu, Shaanxi Province, China. The spatial variations in activities of five hydrolytic enzymes were examined using geostatistical methods. The relationships between soil enzyme activities and other soil properties were evaluated using both an integrated total enzyme activity index (TEI) and the geometric mean of enzyme activities (GME). At the county scale, soil invertase, phosphatase, and catalase activities were moderately spatially correlated, whereas urease and dehydrogenase activities were weakly spatially correlated. Correlation analysis showed that both TEI and GME were better correlated with selected soil physicochemical properties than single enzyme activities. Multivariate regression analysis showed that soil OM content had the strongest positive effect while soil pH had a negative effect on the two enzyme activity indices. In addition, total phosphorous content had a positive effect on TEI and GME in orchard soils, whereas alkali-hydrolyzable nitrogen and available potassium contents, respectively, had negative and positive effects on these two enzyme indices in cropland soils. The results indicate that land use changes strongly affect soil enzyme activities in agricultural land, where TEI provides a sensitive biological indicator for soil quality.

  20. Phlorotannins from Alaskan Seaweed Inhibit Carbolytic Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua Kellogg

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Global incidence of type 2 diabetes has escalated over the past few decades, necessitating a continued search for natural sources of enzyme inhibitors to offset postprandial hyperglycemia. The objective of this study was to evaluate coastal Alaskan seaweed inhibition of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, two carbolytic enzymes involved in serum glucose regulation. Of the six species initially screened, the brown seaweeds Fucus distichus and Alaria marginata possessed the strongest inhibitory effects. F. distichus fractions were potent mixed-mode inhibitors of α-glucosidase and α-amylase, with IC50 values of 0.89 and 13.9 μg/mL, respectively; significantly more efficacious than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 of 112.0 and 137.8 μg/mL, respectively. The activity of F. distichus fractions was associated with phlorotannin oligomers. Normal-phase liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (NPLC-MS was employed to characterize individual oligomers. Accurate masses and fragmentation patterns confirmed the presence of fucophloroethol structures with degrees of polymerization from 3 to 18 monomer units. These findings suggest that coastal Alaskan seaweeds are sources of α-glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory phlorotannins, and thus have potential to limit the release of sugar from carbohydrates and thus alleviate postprandial hyperglycemia.

  1. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Meat Quality of Meat Type Ducks Fed with Dried Oregano ( L. Powder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available One-day-old Cherry valley meat-strain ducks were used to investigate the effect of supplemental dried oregano powder (DOP in feed on the productivity, antioxidant enzyme activity, and breast meat quality. One hundred sixty five ducks were assigned to 5 dietary treatments for 42 days. The dietary treatment groups were control group (CON; no antibiotic, no DOP, antibiotic group (ANT; CON+0.1% Patrol, 0.1% DOP (CON+0.1% DOP, 0.5% DOP (CON+0.5% DOP, and 1.0% DOP (CON+1.0% DOP. Upon feeding, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH radical scavenging activity of oregano extracts was higher than that of tocopherol, although it was less than that of ascorbic acid. As a result of in vivo study, DOP in the diet showed no effects on final body weight, feed intake, or feed conversion ratio. However, dietary 0.5% and 1% DOP supplementation caused a significant increase in the serum enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD compared with CON and ANT, while glutathione peroxidase (GPx in tissue was increased as compared to ANT (p<0.05. Cooking loss from ducks fed with DOP decreased compared with the control ducks. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS values of duck breast meat at 5 d post slaughter was found to be significantly reduced in ducks whose diets were supplemented with 0.5% and 1% DOP (p<0.05. These results suggest that diets containing 0.5% and 1% DOP may beneficially affect antioxidant enzyme activity of GPx and SOD, improve meat cooking loss, and reduce TBARS values in breast meat at 5 d of storage in ducks.

  2. Milk clotting and proteolytic activity of enzyme preparation from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Some microorganisms have the ability to produce enzymes that could clot milk and used as a substitute for calf rennet. Strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) could produce proteolytic enzymes that may have the potential to be used as a source of milk clotting enzyme (MCE). In the present study, LAB isolated from shrimp paste ...

  3. Lactic acid bacteria: inhibition of angiotensin converting enzyme in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuglsang, Anders; Rattray, Fergal; Nilsson, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A total of 26 strains of wild-type lactic acid bacteria, mainly belonging to Lactococcus lactis and Lactobacillus helveticus , were assayed in vitro for their ability to produce a milk fermentate with inhibitory activity towards angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE). It was clear that the test stra...

  4. Effect of thymol and carvacrol feed supplementation on performance, antioxidant enzyme activities, fatty acid composition, digestive enzyme activities, and immune response in broiler chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hashemipour, H.; Kermanshahi, H.; Golian, A.; Veldkamp, T.

    2013-01-01

    This trial was conducted to evaluate the effects of dietary supplementation of phytogenic product containing an equal mixture of thymol and carvacrol at 4 levels (0, 60, 100, and 200 mg/kg of diet) on performance, antioxidant enzyme activities, fatty acid composition, digestive enzyme activities,

  5. Effects of Fertilization on Tomato Growth and Soil Enzyme Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Zhen; Hu, Xue-Feng; Cheng, Chang; Luo, Zhi-qing

    2015-04-01

    To study the effects of different fertilizer applications on soil enzyme activity, tomato plant growth and tomato yield and quality, a field experiment on tomato cultivation was carried out in the suburb of Shanghai. Three fertilizer treatments, chemical fertilizer (CF) (N, 260 g/kg; P, 25.71g/kg; K, 83.00g/kg), rapeseed cake manure (CM) (N, 37.4 g/kg; P, 9.0 g/kg; K, 8.46 g/kg), crop-leaf fermenting manure (FM) (N, 23.67 g/kg; P, 6.39 g/kg; K 44.32 g/kg), and a control without using any fertilizers (CK), were designed. The total amounts of fertilizer application to each plot for the CF, CM, FM and CK were 0.6 kg, 1.35 kg, 3.75 kg and 0 kg, respectively, 50% of which were applied as base fertilizer, and another 50% were applied after the first fruit picking as top dressing. Each experimental plot was 9 m2 (1 m × 9 m) in area. Each treatment was replicated for three times. No any pesticides and herbicides were applied during the entire period of tomato growth to prevent their disturbance to soil microbial activities. Soil enzyme activities at each plot were constantly tested during the growing period; the tomato fruit quality was also constantly analyzed and the tomato yield was calculated after the final harvesting. The results were as follows: (1) Urease activity in the soils treated with the CF, CM and FM increased quickly after applying base fertilizer. That with the CF reached the highest level. Sucrase activity was inhibited by the CF and CM to some extent, which was 32.4% and 11.2% lower than that with the CK, respectively; while that with the FM was 15.7% higher than that with the CK. Likewise, catalase activity with the CF increased by 12.3% - 28.6%; that with the CM increased by 87.8% - 95.1%; that with the FM increased by 86.4% - 93.0%. Phosphatase activity with the CF increased rapidly and reached a maximum 44 days after base fertilizer application, and then declined quickly. In comparison, that with the CM and FM increased slowly and reached a maximum

  6. Surface binding sites in carbohydrate active enzymes: An emerging picture of structural and functional diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Birte; Cockburn, Darrell

    2013-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes, particularly those that are active on polysaccharides, are often found associated with carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs), which can play several roles in supporting enzyme function, such as localizing the enzyme to the substrate. However, the presence of CBMs is not...

  7. Evaluation of Giardia lamblia thioredoxin reductase as drug activating enzyme and as drug target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitsch, David; Müller, Joachim; Müller, Norbert

    2016-12-01

    The antioxidative enzyme thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) has been suggested to be a drug target in several pathogens, including the protist parasite Giardia lamblia. TrxR is also believed to catalyse the reduction of nitro drugs, e.g. metronidazole and furazolidone, a reaction required to render these compounds toxic to G. lamblia and other microaerophiles/anaerobes. It was the objective of this study to assess the potential of TrxR as a drug target in G. lamblia and to find direct evidence for the role of this enzyme in the activation of metronidazole and other nitro drugs. TrxR was overexpressed approximately 10-fold in G. lamblia WB C6 cells by placing the trxR gene behind the arginine deiminase (ADI) promoter on a plasmid. Likewise, a mutant TrxR with a defective disulphide reductase catalytic site was strongly expressed in another G. lamblia WB C6 cell line. Susceptibilities to five antigiardial drugs, i.e. metronidazole, furazolidone, nitazoxanide, albendazole and auranofin were determined in both transfectant cell lines and compared to wildtype. Further, the impact of all five drugs on TrxR activity in vivo was measured. Overexpression of TrxR rendered G. lamblia WB C6 more susceptible to metronidazole and furazolidone but not to nitazoxanide, albendazole, and auranofin. Of all five drugs tested, only auranofin had an appreciably negative effect on TrxR activity in vivo, albeit to a much smaller extent than expected. Overexpression of TrxR and mutant TrxR had hardly any impact on growth of G. lamblia WB C6, although the enzyme also exerts a strong NADPH oxidase activity which is a source of oxidative stress. Our results constitute first direct evidence for the notion that TrxR is an activator of metronidazole and furazolidone but rather question that it is a relevant drug target of presently used antigiardial drugs. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. In vivo hypotensive effect and in vitro inhibitory activity of some Cyperaceae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Lacerda Lopes Martins

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1820, French naturalist August Saint Hillaire, during a visit in Espírito Santo (ES, a state in southeastern Brazil, reported a popular use of Cyperaceae species as antidote to snake bites. The plant may even have a hypotensive effect, though it was never properly researched. The in vitro inhibitory of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE activity of eigth ethanolic extracts of Cyperaceae was evaluated by colorimetric assay. Total phenolic and flavonoids were determined using colorimetric assay. The hypotensive effect of the active specie (Rhychonospora exaltata, ERE and the in vivo ACE assay was measured in vivo using male Wistar Kyoto (ERE, 0.01-100mg/kg, with acetylcholine (ACh as positive control (5 µg/kg, i.v.. The evaluation of ACE in vivo inhibitory effect was performed comparing the mean arterial pressure before and after ERE (10 mg/kg in animals which received injection of angiotensin I (ANG I; 0,03, 03 and 300 µg/kg, i.v.. Captopril (30 mg/kg was used as positive control. Bulbostylis capillaris (86.89 ± 15.20% and ERE (74.89 ± 11.95%, ERE were considered active in the in vitro ACE inhibition assay, at 100 µg/mL concentration. ACh lead to a hypotensive effect before and after ERE's curve (-40±5% and -41±3%. ERE showed a dose-dependent hypotensive effect and a in vivo ACE inhibitory effect. Cyperaceae species showed an inhibitory activity of ACE, in vitro, as well as high content of total phenolic and flavonoids. ERE exhibited an inhibitory effect on both in vitro and in vivo ACE. The selection of species used in popular medicine as antidotes, along with the in vitro assay of ACE inhibition, might be a biomonitoring method for the screening of new medicinal plants with hypotensive properties.

  9. Impaired in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity after myocardial infarction assessed using hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodd, Michael S; Atherton, Helen J; Carr, Carolyn A; Stuckey, Daniel J; West, James A; Griffin, Julian L; Radda, George K; Clarke, Kieran; Heather, Lisa C; Tyler, Damian J

    2014-11-01

    Myocardial infarction (MI) is one of the leading causes of heart failure. An increasing body of evidence links alterations in cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial function with the progression of heart disease. The aim of this work was to, therefore, follow the in vivo mitochondrial metabolic alterations caused by MI, thereby allowing a greater understanding of the interplay between metabolic and functional abnormalities. Using hyperpolarized carbon-13 ((13)C)-magnetic resonance spectroscopy, in vivo alterations in mitochondrial metabolism were assessed for 22 weeks after surgically induced MI with reperfusion in female Wister rats. One week after MI, there were no detectable alterations in in vivo cardiac mitochondrial metabolism over the range of ejection fractions observed (from 28% to 84%). At 6 weeks after MI, in vivo mitochondrial Krebs cycle activity was impaired, with decreased (13)C-label flux into citrate, glutamate, and acetylcarnitine, which correlated with the degree of cardiac dysfunction. These changes were independent of alterations in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. By 22 weeks, alterations were also seen in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux, which decreased at lower ejection fractions. These results were confirmed using in vitro analysis of enzyme activities and metabolomic profiles of key intermediates. The in vivo decrease in Krebs cycle activity in the 6-week post-MI heart may represent an early maladaptive phase in the metabolic alterations after MI in which reductions in Krebs cycle activity precede a reduction in pyruvate dehydrogenase flux. Changes in mitochondrial metabolism in heart disease are progressive and proportional to the degree of cardiac impairment. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Luciferin Amides Enable in Vivo Bioluminescence Detection of Endogenous Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mofford, David M; Adams, Spencer T; Reddy, G S Kiran Kumar; Reddy, Gadarla Randheer; Miller, Stephen C

    2015-07-15

    Firefly luciferase is homologous to fatty acyl-CoA synthetases. We hypothesized that the firefly luciferase substrate d-luciferin and its analogs are fatty acid mimics that are ideally suited to probe the chemistry of enzymes that release fatty acid products. Here, we synthesized luciferin amides and found that these molecules are hydrolyzed to substrates for firefly luciferase by the enzyme fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). In the presence of luciferase, these molecules enable highly sensitive and selective bioluminescent detection of FAAH activity in vitro, in live cells, and in vivo. The potency and tissue distribution of FAAH inhibitors can be imaged in live mice, and luciferin amides serve as exemplary reagents for greatly improved bioluminescence imaging in FAAH-expressing tissues such as the brain.

  11. Extracellular enzyme activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendriksen, Niels Bohse; Winding, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular enzyme activity assay as indicator of soil microbial functional diversity and activity Niels Bohse Hendriksen, Anne Winding. Department of Environmental Science, Aarhus University, 4000 Roskilde, Denmark Soils provide numerous essential ecosystem services such as carbon cycling......, recycling of nutrients and waste, soil remediation, plant growth support and regulation of above ground biodiversity, resilience, and soil suppressiveness. As such, soil ecosystem services are beneficial and vital for human life and at the same time threatened by anthropogenic activities. Increasing...... of soil microbial functions is still needed. In soil, enzymes originate from a variety of organisms, notably fungi and bacteria and especially hydrolytic extracellular enzymes are of pivotal importance for decomposition of organic substrates and biogeochemical cycling. Their activity will reflect...

  12. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir’ and ‘Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless’ varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs. PMID:27551866

  13. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yujin; Wang, Ruipu; Gong, Peijie; Li, Shuxiu; Wang, Yuejin; Zhang, Chaohong

    2016-01-01

    Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs) have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD), which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE) from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs) from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177), Cys (219)] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112), Arg (389), Ser (395)], except that Ser (395) in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF), close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs.

  14. Gene Cloning, Expression and Enzyme Activity of Vitis vinifera Vacuolar Processing Enzymes (VvVPEs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujin Tang

    Full Text Available Vacuolar processing enzymes (VPEs have received considerable attention due to their caspase-1-like activity and ability to regulate programmed cell death (PCD, which plays an essential role in the development of stenospermocarpic seedless grapes ovules. To characterize VPEs and the relationship between stenospermocarpic grapes and the VPE gene family, we identified 3 Vitis vinifera VPE genes (VvβVPE, VvγVPE, and VvδVPE from the PN40024 grape genome and cloned the full-length complementary DNAs (cDNAs from the 'Vitis vinifera cv. Pinot Noir' and 'Vitis vinifera cv. Thompson Seedless' varietals. Each of the VPEs contained a typical catalytic dyad [His (177, Cys (219] and substrate binding pocket [Arg (112, Arg (389, Ser (395], except that Ser (395 in the VvγVPE protein sequence was replaced with alanine. Phylogenetic analysis of 4 Arabidopsis thaliana and 6 Vitis vinifera VPEs revealed that the 10 VPEs form 3 major branches. Furthermore, the 6 grapevine VPEs share a similar gene structure, with 9 exons and 8 introns. The 6 grapevine VPEs are located on 3 different chromosomes. We also tested the enzymatic activity of recombinant VPEs expressed in the Pichia Pastoris expression system and found that the VvVPEs exhibit cysteine peptidase activity. Tissue-specific expression analysis showed that VvδVPE is only expressed in flowers, buds and ovules, that VvγVPE is expressed in various tissues, and that VvβVPE was expressed in roots, flowers, buds and ovules. The results of quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR suggested that VvβVPE in seeded grapes increased significantly at 30 days after full-bloom (DAF, close to the timing of endosperm abortion at 32 DAF. These results suggested that VvβVPE is related to ovule abortion in seedless grapes. Our experiments provide a new perspective for understanding the mechanism of stenospermocarpic seedlessness and represent a useful reference for the further study of VPEs.

  15. Increased levels of peroxisomal active oxygen-related enzymes in copper-tolerant pea plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, J.M.; Gomez, M.; Yanez, J.; Del Rio, L.A.

    1987-10-01

    The effect in vivo of high nutrient levels of copper (240 micromolar) on the activity of different metalloenzymes containing Cu, Mn, Fe, and Zn, distributed in chloroplasts, peroxisomes, and mitochondria, was studied in leaves of two varieties of Pisum sativum L. plants with different sensitivity to copper. The metalloenzymes studied were: cytochrome c oxidase, Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD) and Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase I (Cu,Zn-SOD I), for mitochondria; catalase and Mn-SOD, for peroxisomes; and isozyme Cu,Zn-SOD II for chloroplasts. The activity of mitochondrial SOD isozymes (Mn-SOD and Cu,Zn-SOD I) was very similar in Cu-tolerant and Cu-sensitive plants, whereas cytochrome c oxidase was lower in Cu-sensitive plants. Chloroplastid Cu,Zn-SOD activity was the same in the two plant varieties. In contrast, the peroxisomal Mn-SOD activity was considerably higher in Cu-tolerant than in Cu-sensitive plants, and the activity of catalase was also increased in peroxisomes of Cu-tolerant plants. The higher activities of these peroxisomal active oxygen-related enzymes in Cu-tolerant plants suggest the involvement of reactive oxygen intermediates (O/sub 2//sup -/, OH) in the mechanism of Cu lethality, and also imply a function for peroxisomal Mn-SOD in the molecular mechanisms of plant tolerance to Cu in Pisum sativum L.

  16. Microbial enzyme activities of peatland soils in south central Alaska lowlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial enzyme activities related to carbon and nutrient acquisition were measured on Alaskan peatland soils as indicators of nutrient limitation and biochemical sustainability. Peat decomposition is mediated by microorganisms and enzymes that in turn are limited by various ph...

  17. Genetically engineered immunomodulatory Streptococcus thermophilus strains producing antioxidant enzymes exhibit enhanced anti-inflammatory activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carmen, Silvina; de Moreno de LeBlanc, Alejandra; Martin, Rebeca; Chain, Florian; Langella, Philippe; Bermúdez-Humarán, Luis G; LeBlanc, Jean Guy

    2014-02-01

    The aims of this study were to develop strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) having both immunomodulatory and antioxidant properties and to evaluate their anti-inflammatory effects both in vitro, in different cellular models, and in vivo, in a mouse model of colitis. Different Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus strains were cocultured with primary cultures of mononuclear cells. Analysis of the pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines secreted by these cells after coincubation with candidate bacteria revealed that L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 and S. thermophilus CRL 807 display the highest anti-inflammatory profiles in vitro. Moreover, these results were confirmed in vivo by the determination of the cytokine profiles in large intestine samples of mice fed with these strains. S. thermophilus CRL 807 was then transformed with two different plasmids harboring the genes encoding catalase (CAT) or superoxide dismutase (SOD) antioxidant enzymes, and the anti-inflammatory effects of recombinant streptococci were evaluated in a mouse model of colitis induced by trinitrobenzenesulfonic acid (TNBS). Our results showed a decrease in weight loss, lower liver microbial translocation, lower macroscopic and microscopic damage scores, and modulation of the cytokine production in the large intestines of mice treated with either CAT- or SOD-producing streptococci compared to those in mice treated with the wild-type strain or control mice without any treatment. Furthermore, the greatest anti-inflammatory activity was observed in mice receiving a mixture of both CAT- and SOD-producing streptococci. The addition of L. delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus CRL 864 to this mixture did not improve their beneficial effects. These findings show that genetically engineering a candidate bacterium (e.g., S. thermophilus CRL 807) with intrinsic immunomodulatory properties by introducing a gene expressing an antioxidant enzyme enhances its anti

  18. Total enzyme activity constraint and homeostatic constraint impact on the optimization potential of a kinetic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komasilovs, Vitalijs; Pentjuss, Agris; Elsts, Atis; Stalidzans, Egils

    2017-09-28

    The application of biologically and biochemically relevant constraints during the optimization of kinetic models reduces the impact of suggested changes in processes not included in the scope of the model. This increases the probability that the design suggested by model optimization can be carried out by an organism after implementation of design in vivo. A case study was carried out to determine the impact of total enzyme activity and homeostatic constraints on the objective function values and the following ranking of adjustable parameter combinations. The application of constraints on the model of sugar cane metabolism revealed that a homeostatic constraint caused heavier limitations of the objective function than a total enzyme activity constraint. Both constraints changed the ranking of adjustable parameter combinations: no "universal" constraint-independent top-ranked combinations were found. Therefore, when searching for the best subset of adjustable parameters, a full scan of their combinations is suggested for a small number of adjustable parameters, and evolutionary search strategies are suggested for a large number. Simultaneous application of both constraints is suggested. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. In Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Deacetylasperulosidic Acid in Noni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, De-Lu; Chen, Mai; Su, Chen X.; West, Brett J.

    2013-01-01

    Deacetylasperulosidic acid (DAA) is a major phytochemical constituent of Morinda citrifolia (noni) fruit. Noni juice has demonstrated antioxidant activity in vivo and in human trials. To evaluate the role of DAA in this antioxidant activity, Wistar rats were fed 0 (control group), 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight per day for 7 days. Afterwards, serum malondialdehyde concentration and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured and compared among groups. A dose-dependent reduction in malondialdehyde was evident as well as a dose-dependent increase in superoxide dismutase activity. DAA ingestion did not influence serum glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that DAA contributes to the antioxidant activity of noni juice by increasing superoxide dismutase activity. The fact that malondialdehyde concentrations declined with increased DAA dose, despite the lack of glutathione peroxidase-inducing activity, suggests that DAA may also increase catalase activity. It has been previously reported that noni juice increases catalase activity in vivo but additional research is required to confirm the effect of DAA on catalase. Even so, the current findings do explain a possible mechanism of action for the antioxidant properties of noni juice that have been observed in human clinical trials. PMID:24371540

  20. In Vivo Antioxidant Activity of Deacetylasperulosidic Acid in Noni

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Lu Ma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Deacetylasperulosidic acid (DAA is a major phytochemical constituent of Morinda citrifolia (noni fruit. Noni juice has demonstrated antioxidant activity in vivo and in human trials. To evaluate the role of DAA in this antioxidant activity, Wistar rats were fed 0 (control group, 15, 30, or 60 mg/kg body weight per day for 7 days. Afterwards, serum malondialdehyde concentration and superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities were measured and compared among groups. A dose-dependent reduction in malondialdehyde was evident as well as a dose-dependent increase in superoxide dismutase activity. DAA ingestion did not influence serum glutathione peroxidase activity. These results suggest that DAA contributes to the antioxidant activity of noni juice by increasing superoxide dismutase activity. The fact that malondialdehyde concentrations declined with increased DAA dose, despite the lack of glutathione peroxidase-inducing activity, suggests that DAA may also increase catalase activity. It has been previously reported that noni juice increases catalase activity in vivo but additional research is required to confirm the effect of DAA on catalase. Even so, the current findings do explain a possible mechanism of action for the antioxidant properties of noni juice that have been observed in human clinical trials.

  1. An enhanced in vivo stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) model for quantification of drug metabolism enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, A Kenneth; Fallon, Padraic G; Sharp, Sheila; Henderson, Colin J; Wolf, C Roland; Huang, Jeffrey T-J

    2015-03-01

    Many of the enzymes involved in xenobiotic metabolism are maintained at a low basal level and are only synthesized in response to activation of upstream sensor/effector proteins. This induction can have implications in a variety of contexts, particularly during the study of the pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, and drug-drug interaction profile of a candidate therapeutic compound. Previously, we combined in vivo SILAC material with a targeted high resolution single ion monitoring (tHR/SIM) LC-MS/MS approach for quantification of 197 peptide pairs, representing 51 drug metabolism enzymes (DME), in mouse liver. However, as important enzymes (for example, cytochromes P450 (Cyp) of the 1a and 2b subfamilies) are maintained at low or undetectable levels in the liver of unstimulated metabolically labeled mice, quantification of these proteins was unreliable. In the present study, we induced DME expression in labeled mice through synchronous ligand-mediated activation of multiple upstream nuclear receptors, thereby enhancing signals for proteins including Cyps 1a, 2a, 2b, 2c, and 3a. With this enhancement, 115 unique, lysine-containing, Cyp-derived peptides were detected in the liver of a single animal, as opposed to 56 in a pooled sample from three uninduced animals. A total of 386 peptide pairs were quantified by tHR/SIM, representing 68 Phase I, 30 Phase II, and eight control proteins. This method was employed to quantify changes in DME expression in the hepatic cytochrome P450 reductase null (HRN) mouse. We observed compensatory induction of several enzymes, including Cyps 2b10, 2c29, 2c37, 2c54, 2c55, 2e1, 3a11, and 3a13, carboxylesterase (Ces) 2a, and glutathione S-transferases (Gst) m2 and m3, along with down-regulation of hydroxysteroid dehydrogenases (Hsd) 11b1 and 17b6. Using DME-enhanced in vivo SILAC material with tHR/SIM, therefore, permits the robust analysis of multiple DME of importance to xenobiotic metabolism, with improved utility for the study of

  2. Effect of age and diet composition on activity of pancreatic enzymes in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brzęk, Paweł; Ciminari, M Eugenia; Kohl, Kevin D; Lessner, Krista; Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2013-07-01

    Digestive enzymes produced by the pancreas and intestinal epithelium cooperate closely during food hydrolysis. Therefore, activities of pancreatic and intestinal enzymes processing the same substrate can be hypothesized to change together in unison, as well as to be adjusted to the concentration of their substrate in the diet. However, our knowledge of ontogenetic and diet-related changes in the digestive enzymes of birds is limited mainly to intestinal enzymes; it is largely unknown whether they are accompanied by changes in activities of enzymes produced by the pancreas. Here, we analyzed age- and diet-related changes in activities of pancreatic enzymes in five passerine and galloanserine species, and compared them with simultaneous changes in activities of intestinal enzymes. Mass-specific activity of pancreatic amylase increased with age in young house sparrows but not in zebra finches, in agreement with changes in typical dietary starch content and activity of intestinal maltase. However, we found little evidence for the presence of adaptive, diet-related modulation of pancreatic enzymes in both passerine and galloanserine species, even though in several cases the same birds adaptively modulated activities of their intestinal enzymes. In general, diet-related changes in mass-specific activities of pancreatic and intestinal enzymes were not correlated. We conclude that activity of pancreatic enzymes in birds is under strong genetic control, which enables evolutionary adjustment to typical diet composition but is less adept for short term, diet-related flexibility.

  3. Analysis of the ex vivo and in vivo antiretroviral activity of gemcitabine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine L Clouser

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Replication of retroviral and host genomes requires ribonucleotide reductase to convert rNTPs to dNTPs, which are then used as substrates for DNA synthesis. Inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase by hydroxyurea (HU has been previously used to treat cancers as well as HIV. However, the use of HU as an antiretroviral is limited by its associated toxicities such as myelosuppression and hepatotoxicity. In this study, we examined the ribonucleotide reductase inhibitor, gemcitabine, both in cell culture and in C57Bl/6 mice infected with LP-BM5 murine leukemia virus (LP-BM5 MuLV, a murine AIDS model. Gemcitabine decreased infectivity of MuLV in cell culture with an EC50 in the low nanomolar range with no detectable cytotoxicity. Similarly, gemcitabine significantly decreased disease progression in mice infected with LP-BM5. Specifically, gemcitabine treatment decreased spleen size, plasma IgM, and provirus levels compared to LP-BM5 MuLV infected, untreated mice. Gemcitabine efficacy was observed at doses as low as 1 mg/kg/day in the absence of toxicity. Higher doses of gemcitabine (3 mg/kg/day and higher were associated with toxicity as determined by a loss in body mass. In summary, our findings demonstrate that gemcitabine has antiretroviral activity ex vivo and in vivo in the LP-BM5 MuLV model. These observations together with a recent ex vivo study with HIV-1, suggest that gemcitabine has broad antiretroviral activity and could be particularly useful in vivo when used in combination drug therapy.

  4. Optical Imaging of Matrix Metalloproteinase-7 Activity in Vivo Using a Proteolytic Nanobeacon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randy L. Scherer

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs are extracellular proteolytic enzymes involved in tumor progression. We present the in vivo detection and quantitation of MMP7 activity using a specific near-infrared polymer-based proteolytic beacon, PB-M7NIR. PB-M7NIR is a pegylated polyamidoamine PAMAM-Generation 4 dendrimer core covalently coupled to a Cy5.5-labeled peptide representing a selective substrate that monitors MMP7 activity (sensor and AF750 as an internal reference to monitor relative substrate concentration (reference. In vivo imaging of tumors expressing MMP7 had a median sensor to reference ratio 2.2-fold higher than a that of a bilateral control tumor. Ex vivo imaging of intestines of multiple intestinal neoplasia (APCMin mice injected systemically with PB-M7NIR revealed a sixfold increase in the sensor to reference ratio in the adenomas of APCMin mice compared with control intestinal tissue or adenomas from MMP7-null Min mice. PB-M7NIR detected tumor sizes as small as 0.01 cm2, and the sensor to reference ratio was independent of tumor size. Histologic sectioning of xenograft tumors localized the proteolytic signal to the extracellular matrix; MMP7-overexpressing tumors displayed an approximately 300-fold enhancement in the sensor to reference ratio compared with nonexpressing tumor cells. In APCMin adenomas, the proteolytic signal colocalized with the endogenously expressed MMP7 protein, with sensor to reference ratios approximately sixfold greater than that of normal intestinal epithelium. PB-M7NIR provides a useful reagent for the in vivo and ex vivo quantitation and localization of MMP-selective proteolytic activity.

  5. Mineral status and superoxide dismutase enzyme activity in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Gilmara Péres; Cozzolino, Silvia Maria Franciscato; Marreiro, Dilina do Nascimento; Caldas, Daniele Rodrigues Carvalho; da Silva, Kelcylene Gomes; de Sousa Almondes, Kaluce Gonçalves; Neto, José Machado Moita; Pimentel, José Alexandre Coelho; de Carvalho, Cecília Maria Resende Gonçalves; Nogueira, Nadir do Nascimento

    2017-12-01

    The study evaluated the dietary intake of zinc and copper, as measured by plasma and erythrocyte concentrations, the Cu/Zn ratio and measure the erythrocyte superoxide dismutase enzyme (eSOD) activity and the relationship between these markers and the degree of dementia in elderly individuals with and without Alzheimer's Disease (AD). A total of 93 elderly people aged 60-94 years were divided into two groups: with AD (n=44) and without AD (n=49). The NINCDS-ADRDA criteria were used for diagnosing AD, and dementia staging was determined using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) scale. The dietary intake of Zn and Cu was obtained from a standard 3-day food record. Plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of the minerals were determined by flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry and by measuring eSOD activity in an automatic biochemical analyzer. The results showed dietary intake of Zn and Cu above the reference values with no differences observed between the two groups (p>0.05). Plasma and erythrocyte normocupremia as well as alteration in the Zn pool, with its reduced plasma concentrations and high in the erythrocytes, were observed in both groups (p>0.05). The plasma Cu/Zn ratio were not significantly different in patients with and without AD (p>0.05). The eSOD activity was high in both patient groups (p>0.05). However, among elderly patients with AD there was a positive correlation between this marker and dementia severity. According to our study results, we conclude that plasma and erythrocyte concentrations of Cu and Zn, as well as Cu/Zn ratio among elderly individuals is not related to Alzheimer's Disease. However, antioxidant activity of eSOD is associated with dementia severity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  6. Phosphate-Modified Nucleotides for Monitoring Enzyme Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermert, Susanne; Marx, Andreas; Hacker, Stephan M

    2017-04-01

    Nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been proven to be interesting entities to study the activity of a variety of different protein classes. In this chapter, we present various types of modifications that were attached as reporter molecules to the phosphate chain of nucleotides and briefly describe the chemical reactions that are frequently used to synthesize them. Furthermore, we discuss a variety of applications of these molecules. Kinase activity, for instance, was studied by transfer of a phosphate modified with a reporter group to the target proteins. This allows not only studying the activity of kinases, but also identifying their target proteins. Moreover, kinases can also be directly labeled with a reporter at a conserved lysine using acyl-phosphate probes. Another important application for phosphate-modified nucleotides is the study of RNA and DNA polymerases. In this context, single-molecule sequencing is made possible using detection in zero-mode waveguides, nanopores or by a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based mechanism between the polymerase and a fluorophore-labeled nucleotide. Additionally, fluorogenic nucleotides that utilize an intramolecular interaction between a fluorophore and the nucleobase or an intramolecular FRET effect have been successfully developed to study a variety of different enzymes. Finally, also some novel techniques applying electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR)-based detection of nucleotide cleavage or the detection of the cleavage of fluorophosphates are discussed. Taken together, nucleotides modified at the terminal phosphate position have been applied to study the activity of a large diversity of proteins and are valuable tools to enhance the knowledge of biological systems.

  7. Correlation Among Soil Enzyme Activities, Root Enzyme Activities, and Contaminant Removal in Two-Stage In Situ Constructed Wetlands Purifying Domestic Wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Lixiao; Xu, Jiajun; Chu, Xianglin; Li, Shiyin; Wang, Peifang; Li, Yiping; Li, Yong; Zhu, Liang; Wang, Chao

    2016-07-01

    Two-stage in situ wetlands (two vertical flow constructed wetlands in parallel and a horizontal flow constructed wetland) were constructed for studying domestic wastewater purification and the correlations between contaminant removal and plant and soil enzyme activities. Results indicated the removal efficiency of NH4 (+) and NO3 (-) were significantly correlated with both urease and protease activity, and the removal of total phosphorus was significantly correlated with phosphatase activity. Chemical oxygen demand removal was not correlated with enzyme activity in constructed wetlands. Plant root enzyme (urease, phosphatase, protease and cellulose) activity correlation was apparent with all contaminant removal in the two vertical flow constructed wetlands. However, the correlation between the plant root enzyme activity and contaminant removal was poor in horizontal flow constructed wetlands. Results indicated that plant roots clearly played a role in the removal of contaminants.

  8. How enzymes are adsorbed on soil solid phase and factors limiting its activity: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Rahul; Anand, Swati; Moulick, Amitava; Baraniya, Divyashri; Pathan, Shamina Imran; Rejsek, Klement; Vranova, Valerie; Sharma, Meenakshi; Sharma, Daisy; Kelkar, Aditi; Formanek, Pavel

    2017-04-01

    A majority of biochemical reactions are often catalysed by different types of enzymes. Adsorption of the enzyme is an imperative phenomenon, which protects it from physical or chemical degradation resulting in enzyme reserve in soil. This article summarizes some of the key results from previous studies and provides information about how enzymes are adsorbed on the surface of the soil solid phase and how different factors affect enzymatic activity in soil. Many studies have been done separately on the soil enzymatic activity and adsorption of enzymes on solid surfaces. However, only a few studies discuss enzyme adsorption on soil perspective; hence, we attempted to facilitate the process of enzyme adsorption specifically on soil surfaces. This review is remarkably unmatched, as we have thoroughly reviewed the relevant publications related to protein adsorption and enzymatic activity. Also, the article focuses on two important aspects, adsorption of enzymes and factors limiting the activity of adsorbed enzyme, together in one paper. The first part of this review comprehensively lays emphasis on different interactions between enzymes and the soil solid phase and the kinetics of enzyme adsorption. In the second part, we encircle various factors affecting the enzymatic activity of the adsorbed enzyme in soil.

  9. Structure of shikimate kinase, an in vivo essential metabolic enzyme in the nosocomial pathogen Acinetobacter baumannii, in complex with shikimate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Kristin A; Breen, Jennifer; MacDonald, Ulrike; Beanan, Janet M; Olson, Ruth; Russo, Thomas A; Schultz, L Wayne; Umland, Timothy C

    2015-08-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that is an important cause of healthcare-associated infections exhibiting high mortality rates. Clinical isolates of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extremely drug-resistant (XDR) A. baumannii strains are increasingly being observed. Compounding this concern is the dearth of new antibacterial agents in late-stage development that are effective against MDR and XDR A. baumannii. As part of an effort to address these concerns, two genes (aroA and aroC) of the shikimate pathway have previously been determined to be essential for the growth and survival of A. baumannii during host infection (i.e. to be essential in vivo). This study expands upon these results by demonstrating that the A. baumannii aroK gene, encoding shikimate kinase (SK), is also essential in vivo in a rat soft-tissue infection model. The crystal structure of A. baumannii SK in complex with the substrate shikimate and a sulfate ion that mimics the binding interactions expected for the β-phosphate of ATP was then determined to 1.91 Å resolution and the enzyme kinetics were characterized. The flexible shikimate-binding domain and LID region are compared with the analogous regions in other SK crystal structures. The impact of structural differences and sequence divergence between SKs from pathogenic bacteria that may influence antibiotic-development efforts is discussed.

  10. Comparison of two in vivo and two ex vivo tests to assess the antibacterial activity of several antiseptics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messager, S; Goddard, P A; Dettmar, P W; Maillard, J-Y

    2004-10-01

    An ex vivo test was adapted to mimic the in vivo conditions of testing antiseptic activity on human forearms and in the European Standard Hygienic Handwash Test (BSEN 1499). The study was to validate the ex vivo protocols using 4.8% (w/v) para-chloro-meta-xylenol (PCMX, neat Dettol), 0.5% (w/v) triclosan in 70% (v/v) isopropanol, and 2% (v/v) povidone-iodine against a high bacterial inoculum (>10(8) cfu/mL) of Escherichia coli NCTC 10538. Two ex vivo tests using human skin samples, including one introducing a mechanical rubbing effect, were compared with two corresponding in vivo tests (the forearm test and the BSEN handwashing test). All antiseptics assessed in vivo (forearm and handwash tests) produced reductions in bacterial counts that were significantly greater than those for the non-medicated soft soap control. When assessed ex vivo without rubbing, only PCMX and povidone-iodine achieved reductions significantly greater than soft soap. When assessed ex vivo with mechanical rubbing, only PCMX and triclosan achieved reductions significantly greater than soft soap. Overall, the antiseptics at the concentrations tested were more active when tested in vivo than ex vivo. The addition of a mechanical effect, either in vivo by the volunteers washing their hands or ex vivo by a drill rubbing two skin samples against each other, produced a significantly greater reduction in bacterial concentrations. The ex vivo tests were easily adapted to mimic in vivo protocols. The value of such tests, particularly the one that includes a rubbing effect, may be significant as they avoid the need for human volunteers.

  11. Computationally optimized deimmunization libraries yield highly mutated enzymes with low immunogenicity and enhanced activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, Regina S.; Parker, Andrew S.; Kirsch, Jack R.; Brooks, Seth A.

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic proteins of wide-ranging function hold great promise for treating disease, but immune surveillance of these macromolecules can drive an antidrug immune response that compromises efficacy and even undermines safety. To eliminate widespread T-cell epitopes in any biotherapeutic and thereby mitigate this key source of detrimental immune recognition, we developed a Pareto optimal deimmunization library design algorithm that optimizes protein libraries to account for the simultaneous effects of combinations of mutations on both molecular function and epitope content. Active variants identified by high-throughput screening are thus inherently likely to be deimmunized. Functional screening of an optimized 10-site library (1,536 variants) of P99 β-lactamase (P99βL), a component of ADEPT cancer therapies, revealed that the population possessed high overall fitness, and comprehensive analysis of peptide–MHC II immunoreactivity showed the population possessed lower average immunogenic potential than the wild-type enzyme. Although similar functional screening of an optimized 30-site library (2.15 × 109 variants) revealed reduced population-wide fitness, numerous individual variants were found to have activity and stability better than the wild type despite bearing 13 or more deimmunizing mutations per enzyme. The immunogenic potential of one highly active and stable 14-mutation variant was assessed further using ex vivo cellular immunoassays, and the variant was found to silence T-cell activation in seven of the eight blood donors who responded strongly to wild-type P99βL. In summary, our multiobjective library-design process readily identified large and mutually compatible sets of epitope-deleting mutations and produced highly active but aggressively deimmunized constructs in only one round of library screening. PMID:28607051

  12. Computationally optimized deimmunization libraries yield highly mutated enzymes with low immunogenicity and enhanced activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvat, Regina S; Verma, Deeptak; Parker, Andrew S; Kirsch, Jack R; Brooks, Seth A; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris; Griswold, Karl E

    2017-06-27

    Therapeutic proteins of wide-ranging function hold great promise for treating disease, but immune surveillance of these macromolecules can drive an antidrug immune response that compromises efficacy and even undermines safety. To eliminate widespread T-cell epitopes in any biotherapeutic and thereby mitigate this key source of detrimental immune recognition, we developed a Pareto optimal deimmunization library design algorithm that optimizes protein libraries to account for the simultaneous effects of combinations of mutations on both molecular function and epitope content. Active variants identified by high-throughput screening are thus inherently likely to be deimmunized. Functional screening of an optimized 10-site library (1,536 variants) of P99 β-lactamase (P99βL), a component of ADEPT cancer therapies, revealed that the population possessed high overall fitness, and comprehensive analysis of peptide-MHC II immunoreactivity showed the population possessed lower average immunogenic potential than the wild-type enzyme. Although similar functional screening of an optimized 30-site library (2.15 × 10 9 variants) revealed reduced population-wide fitness, numerous individual variants were found to have activity and stability better than the wild type despite bearing 13 or more deimmunizing mutations per enzyme. The immunogenic potential of one highly active and stable 14-mutation variant was assessed further using ex vivo cellular immunoassays, and the variant was found to silence T-cell activation in seven of the eight blood donors who responded strongly to wild-type P99βL. In summary, our multiobjective library-design process readily identified large and mutually compatible sets of epitope-deleting mutations and produced highly active but aggressively deimmunized constructs in only one round of library screening.

  13. Evaluation of a gene-directed enzyme-product therapy (GDEPT in human pancreatic tumor cells and their use as in vivo models for pancreatic cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juraj Hlavaty

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (GDEPT is a two-step treatment protocol for solid tumors that involves the transfer of a gene encoding a prodrug-activating enzyme followed by administration of the inactive prodrug that is subsequently activated by the enzyme to its tumor toxic form. However, the establishment of such novel treatment regimes to combat pancreatic cancer requires defined and robust animal model systems. METHODS: Here, we comprehensively compared six human pancreatic cancer cell lines (PaCa-44, PANC-1, MIA PaCa-2, Hs-766T, Capan-2, and BxPc-3 in subcutaneous and orthotopical mouse models as well as in their susceptibility to different GDEPTs. RESULTS: Tumor uptake was 83% to 100% in the subcutaneous model and 60% to 100% in the orthotopical mouse model, except for Hs-766T cells, which did not grow orthotopically. Pathohistological analyses of the orthotopical models revealed an infiltrative growth of almost all tumors into the pancreas; however, the different cell lines gave rise to tumors with different morphological characteristics. All of the resultant tumors were positive for MUC-1 staining indicating their origin from glandular or ductal epithelium, but revealed scattered pan-cytokeratin staining. Transfer of the cytochrome P450 and cytosine deaminase suicide gene, respectively, into the pancreatic cancer cell lines using retroviral vector technology revealed high level infectibility of these cell lines and allowed the analysis of the sensitivity of these cells to the chemotherapeutic drugs ifosfamide and 5-fluorocytosine, respectively. CONCLUSION: These data qualify the cell lines as part of valuable in vitro and in vivo models for the use in defined preclinical studies for pancreas tumor therapy.

  14. Physicochemical Properties and Enzymes Activity Studies in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil Physicochemical properties and enzyme concentration were evaluated in soil from a refined-oil contaminated community in Isiukwuato, Abia State three years after the spill. The soil enzymes examined were urease, lipase, oxidase, alkaline and acid phosphatases. Results show a significant (P< 0.05) decrease in the ...

  15. Enzyme activities and histopathology of selected tissues in rats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of chronic administration of potassium bromate (KBrO3), a flour improver, on some 'marker' enzymes of rat cellular system was investigated. The levels of these enzymes were measured progressively in the kidney, liver and small intestine, 24h after days 1, 3, 5, 10, 15 and 20 following the administration of ...

  16. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-02-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology.

  17. Nanocaged enzymes with enhanced catalytic activity and increased stability against protease digestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Zhao; Fu, Jinglin; Dhakal, Soma; Johnson-Buck, Alexander; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Ting; Woodbury, Neal W.; Liu, Yan; Walter, Nils G.; Yan, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Cells routinely compartmentalize enzymes for enhanced efficiency of their metabolic pathways. Here we report a general approach to construct DNA nanocaged enzymes for enhancing catalytic activity and stability. Nanocaged enzymes are realized by self-assembly into DNA nanocages with well-controlled stoichiometry and architecture that enabled a systematic study of the impact of both encapsulation and proximal polyanionic surfaces on a set of common metabolic enzymes. Activity assays at both bulk and single-molecule levels demonstrate increased substrate turnover numbers for DNA nanocage-encapsulated enzymes. Unexpectedly, we observe a significant inverse correlation between the size of a protein and its activity enhancement. This effect is consistent with a model wherein distal polyanionic surfaces of the nanocage enhance the stability of active enzyme conformations through the action of a strongly bound hydration layer. We further show that DNA nanocages protect encapsulated enzymes against proteases, demonstrating their practical utility in functional biomaterials and biotechnology. PMID:26861509

  18. In vivo imaging of matrix metalloprotease 12 and matrix metalloprotease 13 activities in the mouse model of collagen-induced arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Ngee Han; Meinjohanns, Ernst; Bou-Gharios, George

    2014-01-01

    Objective. To develop enzyme activatable Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) substrate probes to detect MMP-12 and MMP-13 activities in vivo in mouse models of inflammatory arthritis Methods. Peptidic FRET probes activated by MMP-12 and MMP-13 were reverse designed from inhibitors selected...

  19. Antitumour and antioxidant activity of some Red Sea seaweeds in Ehrlich ascites carcinoma in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Hanaa H; Hegazi, Muhammad M; Abd-Alla, Howaida I; Eskander, Emad F; Ellithey, Mona S

    2011-01-01

    The antitumour activities of extracts from the Red Sea seaweeds Jania rubens, Sargassum subrepandum, and Ulva lactuca were investigated in an in vivo mice model based on intramuscular injection of Ehrlich ascites tumour cells. In parallel, antioxidant activities were measured. Tumour marker levels, liver biochemical parameters, and hepatic oxidant/antioxidant status were measured to prove the anticancer and antioxidant nature of the algal extracts. Significant decreases in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and a-fetoprotein (AFP) levels, activities of liver enzymes, levels of nitric oxide (NO) and malondialdehyde (MDA), and an increase in total antioxidant capacity (TAC) were recorded in groups treated with the algal extracts. Jania rubens was selected for phytochemical screening of its phytoconstituents. In addition, carotenoids, halides, minerals, lipoidal matters, proteins, and carbohydrates were studied. Furthermore, 7-oxo-cholest-5(6)-en-3-ol (1) and cholesterol (2) were isolated from the dichloromethane fraction.

  20. Thrombolytic, anticoagulant and antiplatelet activities of codiase, a bi-functional fibrinolytic enzyme from Codium fragile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jun-Hui; Sapkota, Kumar; Park, Se-Eun; Kim, Seung; Kim, Sung-Jun

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the world. Thrombolytic agents are important for both the prevention and treatment of thrombosis. In this study, codiase, a new bi-functional fibrinolytic serine protease having thrombolytic, anticoagulant, and antiplatelet activities was purified from marine green alga, Codium fragile. The molecular weight of the enzyme was estimated to be 48.9 kDa by SDS-PAGE, and mass spectrometry. Fibrin zymography analysis showed an active band with similar molecular weight. The N-terminal sequence was found to be APKASTDQTLPL, which is different from that of other known fibrinolytic enzymes. Codiase displayed maximum activity at 30 °C and pH 6.0, and the activity was inhibited by Zn(2+) and Fe(2+). Moreover, the enzyme activity was strongly inhibited by serine protease inhibitor such as PMSF. Codiase exhibited high specificity for the substrate S-2288, and the Km and Vmax values for this substrate were found to be 0.24 mM and 79 U/ml respectively. Fibrin plate assays revealed that it was able to hydrolyze fibrin clot either directly or by activation of plasminogen. Codiase effectively hydrolyzed fibrin and fibrinogen, preferentially degrading α- and Aα chains, followed by γ-γ, and γ-chains. However, it provoked slower degradation of Bβ and β-chains. The structural change of fibrin clot and fibrinogen by codiase was also detected by FTIR-ATR spectroscopy analysis. In vitro and in vivo studies revealed that codiase reduces thrombosis in concentration-dependent manner. Codiase was found to prolong activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and prothrombin time (PT). PFA-100 studies showed that codiase prolonged the closure time (CT) of citrated whole human blood. These favorable antithrombotic profiles together with its anticoagulant and platelet disaggregation properties, and lack of toxicity to mice and NIH-3T3 cells, make it a potential agent for thrombolytic therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  1. Acetylcholinesterase Inhibition and in Vitro and in Vivo Antioxidant Activities of Ganoderma lucidum Grown on Germinated Brown Rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beong Ou Lim

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the acetylcholinesterase inhibition and in vitro and in vivo antioxidant activities of Ganoderma lucidum grown on germinated brown rice (GLBR were evaluated. In antioxidant assays in vitro, GLBR was found to have strong metal chelating activity, DPPH, ABTS, hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging activity. Cell-based antioxidant methods were used, including lipid peroxidation on brain homogenate and AAPH-induced erythrocyte haemolysis. In antioxidant assays in vivo, mice were administered with GLBR and this significantly enhanced the activities of antioxidant enzymes in the mice sera, livers and brains. The amount of total phenolic and flavonoid compounds were 43.14 mg GAE/g and 13.36 mg CE/g dry mass, respectively. GLBR also exhibited acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity. In addition, HPLC analyses of GLBR extract revealed the presence of different phenolic compounds. These findings demonstrate the remarkable potential of GLBR extract as valuable source of antioxidants which exhibit interesting acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

  2. Hepatoprotective activity of Sapindus mukorossi and Rheum emodi extracts: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Mohammed; Khaja, Mohammed Nane; Aara, Anjum; Khan, Aleem Ahmed; Habeeb, Mohammed Aejaz; Devi, Yalavarthy Prameela; Narasu, Mangamoori Lakshmi; Habibullah, Chitoor Mohammed

    2008-04-28

    To study the hepatoprotective capacity of Sapindus mukorossi (S. mukorossi) and Rheum emodi (R. emodi) extracts in CCl(4) treated male rats. The dried powder of S. mukorossi and R. emodi was extracted successively with petroleum ether, benzene, chloroform, and ethanol and concentrated in vacuum. Primary rat hepatocyte monolayer cultures were used for in vitro studies. In vivo, the hepatoprotective capacity of the extract of the fruit pericarp of S. mukorossi and the rhizomes of R. emodi was analyzed in liver injured CCl(4)-treated male rats. In vitro: primary hepatocytes monolayer cultures were treated with CCl(4) and extracts of S. mukorossi & R. emodi. A protective activity could be demonstrated in the CCl(4) damaged primary monolayer culture. In vivo: extracts of the fruit pericarp of S. mukorossi (2.5 mg/mL) and rhizomes of R. emodi (3.0 mg/mL) were found to have protective properties in rats with CCl(4) induced liver damage as judged from serum marker enzyme activities. The extracts of S. mukorossi and R. emodi do have a protective capacity both in vitro on primary hepatocytes cultures and in in vivo in a rat model of CCl(4) mediated liver injury.

  3. Tumour microenvironments induce expression of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR and concomitant activation of gelatinolytic enzymes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Synnøve Magnussen

    Full Text Available The urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR is associated with poor prognosis in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, and increased expression of uPAR is often found at the invasive tumour front. The aim of the current study was to elucidate the role of uPAR in invasion and metastasis of OSCC, and the effects of various tumour microenvironments in these processes. Furthermore, we wanted to study whether the cells' expression level of uPAR affected the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes.The Plaur gene was both overexpressed and knocked-down in the murine OSCC cell line AT84. Tongue and skin tumours were established in syngeneic mice, and cells were also studied in an ex vivo leiomyoma invasion model. Soluble factors derived from leiomyoma tissue, as well as purified extracellular matrix (ECM proteins, were assessed for their ability to affect uPAR expression, glycosylation and cleavage. Activity of gelatinolytic enzymes in the tissues were assessed by in situ zymography.We found that increased levels of uPAR did not induce tumour invasion or metastasis. However, cells expressing low endogenous levels of uPAR in vitro up-regulated uPAR expression both in tongue, skin and leiomyoma tissue. Various ECM proteins had no effect on uPAR expression, while soluble factors originating from the leiomyoma tissue increased both the expression and glycosylation of uPAR, and possibly also affected the proteolytic processing of uPAR. Tumours with high levels of uPAR, as well as cells invading leiomyoma tissue with up-regulated uPAR expression, all displayed enhanced activity of gelatinolytic enzymes.Although high levels of uPAR are not sufficient to induce invasion and metastasis, the activity of gelatinolytic enzymes was increased. Furthermore, several tumour microenvironments have the capacity to induce up-regulation of uPAR expression, and soluble factors in the tumour microenvironment may have an important role in the regulation of posttranslational

  4. Inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity by doxycycline ameliorates RANK ligand-induced osteoclast differentiation in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Gilson C.N. [Department of Immunology, Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Pharmacology, FOP/UNICAMP, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Kajiya, Mikihito [Department of Immunology, Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Nakanishi, Tadashi [Department of Immunology, Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ohta, Kouji [Department of Immunology, Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Rosalen, Pedro L.; Groppo, Francisco C. [Department of Pharmacology, FOP/UNICAMP, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Ernst, Cory W.O.; Boyesen, Janie L. [Department of Immunology, Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Bartlett, John D.; Stashenko, Philip [Department of Cytokine Biology, Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Taubman, Martin A. [Department of Immunology, Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Kawai, Toshihisa, E-mail: tkawai@forsyth.org [Department of Immunology, Forsyth Institute, Cambridge, MA (United States); Department of Oral Medicine, Infection and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-06-10

    Tetracycline antibiotics, including doxycycli/e (DOX), have been used to treat bone resorptive diseases, partially because of their activity to suppress osteoclastogenesis induced by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL). However, their precise inhibitory mechanism remains unclear. Therefore, the present study examined the effect of Dox on osteoclastogenesis signaling induced by RANKL, both in vitro and in vivo. Although Dox inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and down-modulated the mRNA expression of functional osteoclast markers, including tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and cathepsin K, Dox neither affected RANKL-induced MAPKs phosphorylation nor NFATc1 gene expression in RAW264.7 murine monocytic cells. Gelatin zymography and Western blot analyses showed that Dox down-regulated the enzyme activity of RANKL-induced MMP-9, but without affecting its protein expression. Furthermore, MMP-9 enzyme inhibitor also attenuated both RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and up-regulation of TRAP and cathepsin K mRNA expression, indicating that MMP-9 enzyme action is engaged in the promotion of RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis. Finally, Dox treatment abrogated RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis and TRAP activity in mouse calvaria along with the suppression of MMP9 enzyme activity, again without affecting the expression of MMP9 protein. These findings suggested that Dox inhibits RANKL-induced osteoclastogenesis by its inhibitory effect on MMP-9 enzyme activity independent of the MAPK-NFATc1 signaling cascade.

  5. Antihyperlipidaemic Activities of Agriophyllum squarrosum (L. Moq. in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Zhaorigetu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Agriophyllum squarrosum (L Moq. is medicine herb used as a traditional Mongolian drug. Its pharmacological effi cacy studies are rarely reported. In the present study, we tested and confi rmed the antihyperlipidaemic activity of A. squarrosum and its extracts in rats for the fi rst time. The results of the antihyperlipidaemic experiment in vivo showed that A. squarrosum and its extracts had signifi cant lipid-lowering activities. The signifi cances of A. squarrosum and its extracts on decreasing blood levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol were equal to that of simvastatin, which is a drug for the treatment of hyperlipidaemic.

  6. Imidacloprid induced alterations in enzyme activities and energy reserves of the land snail, Helix aspersa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radwan, M A; Mohamed, M S

    2013-09-01

    The in vivo sublethal toxic effects (0.2 and 0.6 LD50) of topically applied imidacloprid on biochemical biomarkers in the land snail, Helix aspersa was examined. Biochemical perturbations were assessed by measuring the three enzymatic (Acetylcholinesterase, AChE; catalase, CAT and glutathione-S-transferase, GST) activities and three energy reserves (protein, glycogen and lipids) in the snails. Snail samples were taken from each sublethal dose and control groups at 1, 3 and 7 days after treatment. The results revealed that there were overall decrease in AChE activity as well as depletion of lipids and glycogen contents in the imidacloprid-treated snails compared to control groups. The CAT and GST activities of treated snails with the sublethal doses of imidacloprid were significantly higher than those of untreated controls along the three times of exposure. Moreover, an increase in the level of total proteins was observed in animals treated with 0.6 LD50 imidacloprid compared to control groups. The alterations in all tested biochemical perturbations were most pronounced with the 0.6 LD50 than 0.2 LD50. This study suggests that alterations of the enzyme activities and energy reserves in this species that could be useful as biomarkers of imidacloprid exposure in the evaluation of terrestrial impacts of this insecticide. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anti-diabetic activity of insulin-degrading enzyme inhibitors mediated by multiple hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maianti, Juan Pablo; McFedries, Amanda; Foda, Zachariah H; Kleiner, Ralph E; Du, Xiu Quan; Leissring, Malcolm A; Tang, Wei-Jen; Charron, Maureen J; Seeliger, Markus A; Saghatelian, Alan; Liu, David R

    2014-07-03

    Despite decades of speculation that inhibiting endogenous insulin degradation might treat type-2 diabetes, and the identification of IDE (insulin-degrading enzyme) as a diabetes susceptibility gene, the relationship between the activity of the zinc metalloprotein IDE and glucose homeostasis remains unclear. Although Ide(-/-) mice have elevated insulin levels, they exhibit impaired, rather than improved, glucose tolerance that may arise from compensatory insulin signalling dysfunction. IDE inhibitors that are active in vivo are therefore needed to elucidate IDE's physiological roles and to determine its potential to serve as a target for the treatment of diabetes. Here we report the discovery of a physiologically active IDE inhibitor identified from a DNA-templated macrocycle library. An X-ray structure of the macrocycle bound to IDE reveals that it engages a binding pocket away from the catalytic site, which explains its remarkable selectivity. Treatment of lean and obese mice with this inhibitor shows that IDE regulates the abundance and signalling of glucagon and amylin, in addition to that of insulin. Under physiological conditions that augment insulin and amylin levels, such as oral glucose administration, acute IDE inhibition leads to substantially improved glucose tolerance and slower gastric emptying. These findings demonstrate the feasibility of modulating IDE activity as a new therapeutic strategy to treat type-2 diabetes and expand our understanding of the roles of IDE in glucose and hormone regulation.

  8. Activities of five enzymes following soil disturbance and weed control in a Missouri forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Jr. Ponder; Frieda Eivazi

    2008-01-01

    Forest disturbances associated with harvesting activities can affect soil properties including enzyme activity and overall soil quality. The activities of five enzymes (acid and alkaline phosphatases, betaglucosidase, aryl-sulfatase, and beta-glucosominidase) were measured after 8 years in soil from clearcut and uncut control plots of a Missouri oak-hickory (...

  9. Interrogating the activities of conformational deformed enzyme by single-molecule fluorescence-magnetic tweezers microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qing; He, Yufan; Lu, H. Peter

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the impact of fluctuating enzyme conformation on enzymatic activity is critical in understanding the structure–function relationship and enzymatic reaction dynamics. Different from studying enzyme conformations under a denaturing condition, it is highly informative to manipulate the conformation of an enzyme under an enzymatic reaction condition while monitoring the real-time enzymatic activity changes simultaneously. By perturbing conformation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) molecules using our home-developed single-molecule total internal reflection magnetic tweezers, we successfully manipulated the enzymatic conformation and probed the enzymatic activity changes of HRP in a catalyzed H2O2–amplex red reaction. We also observed a significant tolerance of the enzyme activity to the enzyme conformational perturbation. Our results provide a further understanding of the relation between enzyme behavior and enzymatic conformational fluctuation, enzyme–substrate interactions, enzyme–substrate active complex formation, and protein folding–binding interactions. PMID:26512103

  10. Pathogenicity and cell wall-degrading enzyme activities of some ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr. J. T. Ekanem

    2005-12-17

    borne pathogens most of which are fungi6,8,10,11. Many phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria have long been known to produce enzymes capable of hydrolyzing the polymeric carbohydrate constituent of higher plants cell wall.

  11. Measuring Solution Viscosity and its Effect on Enzyme Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uribe Salvador

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In proteins, some processes require conformational changes involving structural domain diffusion. Among these processes are protein folding, unfolding and enzyme catalysis. During catalysis some enzymes undergo large conformational changes as they progress through the catalytic cycle. According to Kramers theory, solvent viscosity results in friction against proteins in solution, and this should result in decreased motion, inhibiting catalysis in motile enzymes. Solution viscosity was increased by adding increasing concentrations of glycerol, sucrose and trehalose, resulting in a decrease in the reaction rate of the H+-ATPase from the plasma membrane of Kluyveromyces lactis. A direct correlation was found between viscosity (&eegr; and the inhibition of the maximum rate of catalysis (V max. The protocol used to measure viscosity by means of a falling ball type viscometer is described, together with the determination of enzyme kinetics and the application of Kramers’ equation to evaluate the effect of viscosity on the rate of ATP hydrolysis by the H+-ATPase.

  12. Bioorthogonal cyclization-mediated in situ self-assembly of small-molecule probes for imaging caspase activity in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Deju; Shuhendler, Adam J.; Cui, Lina; Tong, Ling; Tee, Sui Seng; Tikhomirov, Grigory; Felsher, Dean W.; Rao, Jianghong

    2014-06-01

    Directed self-assembly of small molecules in living systems could enable a myriad of applications in biology and medicine, and already this has been used widely to synthesize supramolecules and nano/microstructures in solution and in living cells. However, controlling the self-assembly of synthetic small molecules in living animals is challenging because of the complex and dynamic in vivo physiological environment. Here we employ an optimized first-order bioorthogonal cyclization reaction to control the self-assembly of a fluorescent small molecule, and demonstrate its in vivo applicability by imaging caspase-3/7 activity in human tumour xenograft mouse models of chemotherapy. The fluorescent nanoparticles assembled in situ were imaged successfully in both apoptotic cells and tumour tissues using three-dimensional structured illumination microscopy. This strategy combines the advantages offered by small molecules with those of nanomaterials and should find widespread use for non-invasive imaging of enzyme activity in vivo.

  13. Spatholobus suberectus Exhibits Antidiabetic Activity In Vitro and In Vivo through Activation of AKT-AMPK Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peijun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucose deposition in peripheral tissue is an important parameter for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Spatholobus suberectus (Ss on glucose disposal in skeletal muscle cells and additionally explore its in vivo antidiabetic potential. Treatment of ethanolic extract of S. suberectus (EeSs significantly enhanced the glucose uptake, mediated through the enhanced expression of GLUT4 in skeletal muscle via the stimulation of AKT and AMPK pathways in C2C12 cells. Moreover, EeSs have potential inhibitory action on α-glucosidase activity and significantly lowered the postprandial blood glucose levels in STZ-induced diabetic mice, associated with increased expression of GLUT4 and AKT and/or AMPK-mediated signaling cascade in skeletal muscle. Furthermore, administration of EeSs significantly boosted up the antioxidant enzyme expression and also mitigated the gluconeogenesis enzyme such as PEPCK and G-6-Pase enzyme expression in liver tissue of STZ-induced diabetic mice model. Collectively, these findings suggest that EeSs have a high potentiality to mitigate diabetic symptoms through stimulating glucose uptake in peripheral tissue via the activation of AKT and AMPK signaling cascade and augmenting antioxidant potentiality as well as blocking the gluconeogenesis process in diabetic mice.

  14. Finding Biomass Degrading Enzymes Through an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongyan; Delafield, Daniel G.; Wang, Zhe; You, Jianlan; Wu, Si

    2017-04-01

    The microbial secretome, known as a pool of biomass (i.e., plant-based materials) degrading enzymes, can be utilized to discover industrial enzyme candidates for biofuel production. Proteomics approaches have been applied to discover novel enzyme candidates through comparing protein expression profiles with enzyme activity of the whole secretome under different growth conditions. However, the activity measurement of each enzyme candidate is needed for confident "active" enzyme assignments, which remains to be elucidated. To address this challenge, we have developed an Activity-Correlated Quantitative Proteomics Platform (ACPP) that systematically correlates protein-level enzymatic activity patterns and protein elution profiles using a label-free quantitative proteomics approach. The ACPP optimized a high performance anion exchange separation for efficiently fractionating complex protein samples while preserving enzymatic activities. The detected enzymatic activity patterns in sequential fractions using microplate-based assays were cross-correlated with protein elution profiles using a customized pattern-matching algorithm with a correlation R-score. The ACPP has been successfully applied to the identification of two types of "active" biomass-degrading enzymes (i.e., starch hydrolysis enzymes and cellulose hydrolysis enzymes) from Aspergillus niger secretome in a multiplexed fashion. By determining protein elution profiles of 156 proteins in A. niger secretome, we confidently identified the 1,4-α-glucosidase as the major "active" starch hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.96) and the endoglucanase as the major "active" cellulose hydrolysis enzyme (R = 0.97). The results demonstrated that the ACPP facilitated the discovery of bioactive enzymes from complex protein samples in a high-throughput, multiplexing, and untargeted fashion.

  15. Free radical-scavenging activities of oligomeric proanthocyanidin from Rhodiola rosea L. and its antioxidant effects in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qian; Yin, Zhi-Ping; Ma, Lei; Zhao, Wen; Hao, Hong-Wei; Li, Hui-Ling

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the antioxidant activity of oligomeric proanthocyanidin from Rhodiola rosea L. (OPCRR). The free radical-scavenging activities exhibited by OPCRR, as determined by using 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl, hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion (√[Formula: see text]) scavenging assays, were greater than that of vitamin C. The effects of OPCRR on the antioxidant enzymes activity and lipid peroxide content in vivo were evaluated through three observation biomarkers, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px) and malondialdehyde (MDA) in serum, heart, liver and brain tissues in mice. The OPCRR significantly enhanced the SOD and GSH-Px activities, and reduced the MDA content in mice. These results indicated that the OPCRR has a great potential to be a natural antioxidant due to its considerable antioxidant activities in vitro and in vivo.

  16. The Combined Utility of Ex vivo IFN-γ Release Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSpot Assay and In vivo Skin Testing in Patients With Antibiotic-Associated Severe Cutaneous Adverse Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubiano, Jason A; Strautins, Kaija; Redwood, Alec J; Pavlos, Rebecca; Konvinse, Katherine C; Aung, Ar Kar; Slavin, Monica A; Thursky, Karin A; Grayson, M Lindsay; Phillips, Elizabeth J

    2017-10-31

    For severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs) associated with multiple antibiotics dosed concurrently, clinical causality is challenging and diagnostic approaches are limited, leading to constricted future antibiotic choices. To examine the combined utility of in vivo and ex vivo diagnostic approaches at assigning drug causality in a cohort of patients with antibiotic-associated (AA)-SCARs. Patients with AA-SCARs were prospectively recruited between April 2015 and February 2017. In vivo testing (patch testing or delayed intradermal testing) was performed to the implicated antibiotic(s) at the highest nonirritating concentration and read at 24 hours through 1 week. Ex vivo testing used patient peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) stimulated with a range of pharmacologically relevant concentrations of implicated antibiotics to measure dose-dependent IFN-γ release from CD4+ and CD8+ T cells via an enzyme-linked immunoSpot assay. In 19 patients with AA-SCARs, combined in vivo and ex vivo testing assigned antibiotic causality in 15 (79%) patients. Ten patients (53%) with AA-SCARs were positive on IFN-γ release enzyme-linked immunoSpot assay, with an overall reported sensitivity of 52% (95% CI, 29-76) and specificity of 100% (95% CI, 79-100), with improved sensitivity noted in acute (within 1 day to 6 weeks after SCAR onset) testing (75%) and in patients with higher phenotypic scores (59%). There was increased use of narrow-spectrum beta-lactams and antibiotics from within the implicated class following testing in patients with a positive ex vivo or in vivo test result. We demonstrate the potential utility of combined in vivo and ex vivo testing in patients with AA-SCARs to assign drug causality with high specificity. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Measurement of peroxisomal enzyme activities in the liver of brown trout (Salmo trutta, using spectrophotometric methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Resende Albina D

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study was aimed primarily at testing in the liver of brown trout (Salmo trutta spectrophotometric methods previously used to measure the activities of catalase and hydrogen peroxide producing oxidases in mammals. To evaluate the influence of temperature on the activities of those peroxisomal enzymes was the second objective. A third goal of this work was the study of enzyme distribution in crude cell fractions of brown trout liver. Results The assays revealed a linear increase in the activity of all peroxisomal enzymes as the temperature rose from 10° to 37°C. However, while the activities of hydrogen peroxide producing oxidases were strongly influenced by temperature, catalase activity was only slightly affected. A crude fraction enriched with peroxisomes was obtained by differential centrifugation of liver homogenates, and the contamination by other organelles was evaluated by the activities of marker enzymes for mitochondria (succinate dehydrogenase, lysosomes (aryl sulphatase and microsomes (NADPH cytochrome c reductase. For peroxisomal enzymes, the activities per mg of protein (specific activity in liver homogenates were strongly correlated with the activities per g of liver and with the total activities per liver. These correlations were not obtained with crude peroxisomal fractions. Conclusions The spectrophotometric protocols originally used to quantify the activity of mammalian peroxisomal enzymes can be successfully applied to the study of those enzymes in brown trout. Because the activity of all studied peroxisomal enzymes rose in a linear mode with temperature, their activities can be correctly measured between 10° and 37°C. Probably due to contamination by other organelles and losses of soluble matrix enzymes during homogenisation, enzyme activities in crude peroxisomal fractions do not correlate with the activities in liver homogenates. Thus, total homogenates will be used in future seasonal and

  18. Homology to peptide pattern for annotation of carbohydrate-active enzymes and prediction of function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busk, Peter Kamp; Pilgaard, Bo; Lezyk, Mateusz Jakub

    2017-01-01

    for prediction of enzyme function. A fastand reliable method for de novo annotation of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes is to identify conserved peptides in the curated enzyme families followed by matching of the conserved peptides to the sequence of interestas demonstrated for the glycosyl hydrolase...... and the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase families. This approach notonly assigns the enzymes to families but also provides functional prediction of the enzymes with high accuracy. Results: We identified conserved peptides for all enzyme families in the CAZy database with Peptide Pattern Recognition....... The conserved peptides were matched to protein sequence for de novo annotation and functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes with the Hotpep method. Annotation of protein sequences from 12 bacterial and 16 fungal genomes to families with Hotpep had an accuracy of 0.84 (measured as F1-score) compared...

  19. Effect of Cereal Type and Enzyme Addition on Performance, Pancreatic Enzyme Activity, Intestinal Microflora and Gut Morphology of Broilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalantar M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of grain and carbohydrase enzyme supplementation were investigated on digestive physiology of chickens. A total of 625 one-day-old chicks (Ross 308 were randomly assigned to five treatments in a completely randomized design. Treatments included two different types of grains (wheat, and barley with or without a multi-carbohydrase supplement. A corn-based diet was also considered to serve as a control. Feeding barley-based diet with multi-carbohydrase led to higher feed intake (P < 0.01 than those fed corn- and wheat-based diets. Birds fed on barley and wheat diets had lower weight gain despite a higher feed conversion ratio (P < 0.01. Total count and number of different type of bacteria including Gram-negative, E. coli, and Clostridia increased after feeding wheat and barley but the number of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria decreased (P < 0.01. Feeding barley and wheat diets reduced villus height in different parts of the small intestine when compared to those fed on a corn diet. However, enzyme supplementation of barley and wheat diets improved weight gain and feed conversion ratio and resulted in reduced number of E. coli and Clostridia and increased number of Lactobacilli and Bifidobacteria, and also restored the negative effects on intestinal villi height (P < 0.01. The activities of pancreatic α-amylase and lipase were (P < 0.01 increased in chickens fed wheat and barley diets when compared to the control fed on a corn diet. Enzyme supplementation reduced the activities of pancreatic α-amylase and lipase (P < 0.01. In conclusion, various dietary non-starch polysaccharides without enzyme supplementation have an adverse effect on digesta viscosity, ileal microflora, villi morphology, and pancreatic enzyme activity.

  20. In vitro and in vivo effects of standardized extract and fractions of Phaleria macrocarpa fruits pericarp on lead carbohydrate digesting enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Rabyah B; Atangwho, Item J; Kuar, Navneet; Ahmad, Mariam; Mahmud, Roziahanim; Asmawi, Mohd Z

    2013-02-20

    One vital therapeutic approach for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus is the use of agents that can decrease postprandial hyperglycaemia by inhibiting carbohydrate digesting enzymes. The present study investigated the effects of bioassay-guided extract and fractions of the dried fruit pericarp of Phaleria macrocarpa, a traditional anti-diabetic plant, on α-glucosidase and α-amylase, in a bid to understand their anti-diabetic mechanism, as well as their possible attenuation action on postprandial glucose increase. Methanol extract (ME), obtained by successive solvent extraction, its most effective liquid-liquid n-butanol fraction (NBF) and the flash column chromatographic sub-fraction (SFI), were evaluated for in vitro α-glucosidase (yeast) and α-amylase (porcine) activity inhibition. Furthermore, confirmatory in vivo tests were carried out in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (SDRs) using oral glucose, sucrose and starch tolerance tests. At the highest concentration employed (100 μg/ml), NBF showed highest inhibition against α-glucosidase (75%) and α-amylase (87%) in vitro (IC50 = 2.40 ± 0.23 μg/ml and 58.50 ± 0.13 μg/ml, respectively) in a dose-dependent fashion; an effect found to be about 20% higher than acarbose (55%), a standard α-glucosidase inhibitor (IC50 = 3.45 ± 0.19 μg/ml). The ME and SFI also inhibited α-glucosidase (IC50 = 7.50 ± 0.15 μg/ml and 11.45 ± 0.28 μg/ml) and α-amylase (IC50 = 43.90 ± 0.19 μg/ml and 69.80 ± 0.25 μg/ml), but to a lesser extent. In in vivo studies with diabetic rats, NBF and SFI effectively reduced peak blood glucose (PBG) by 15.08% and 6.46%, and the area under the tolerance curve (AUC) by 14.23% and 12.46%, respectively, after an oral sucrose challenge (P < 0.05); thereby validating the observed in vitro action. These reduction effects on PBG and AUC were also demonstrated in glucose and starch tolerance tests, but to a lesser degree. These findings reveal that P. macrocarpa can attenuate

  1. Temperature and UV light affect the activity of marine cell-free enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Thomson

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Microbial extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA is the rate-limiting step in the degradation of organic matter in the oceans. These extracellular enzymes exist in two forms: cell-bound, which are attached to the microbial cell wall, and cell-free, which are completely free of the cell. Contrary to previous understanding, cell-free extracellular enzymes make up a substantial proportion of the total marine EEA. Little is known about these abundant cell-free enzymes, including what factors control their activity once they are away from their sites (cells. Experiments were run to assess how cell-free enzymes (excluding microbes respond to ultraviolet radiation (UVR and temperature manipulations, previously suggested as potential control factors for these enzymes. The experiments were done with New Zealand coastal waters and the enzymes studied were alkaline phosphatase (APase, β-glucosidase, (BGase, and leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase. Environmentally relevant UVR (i.e. in situ UVR levels measured at our site reduced cell-free enzyme activities by up to 87 % when compared to controls, likely a consequence of photodegradation. This effect of UVR on cell-free enzymes differed depending on the UVR fraction. Ambient levels of UV radiation were shown to reduce the activity of cell-free enzymes for the first time. Elevated temperatures (15 °C increased the activity of cell-free enzymes by up to 53 % when compared to controls (10 °C, likely by enhancing the catalytic activity of the enzymes. Our results suggest the importance of both UVR and temperature as control mechanisms for cell-free enzymes. Given the projected warming ocean environment and the variable UVR light regime, it is possible that there could be major changes in the cell-free EEA and in the enzymes contribution to organic matter remineralization in the future.

  2. Temperature and UV light affect the activity of marine cell-free enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Blair; Hepburn, Christopher David; Lamare, Miles; Baltar, Federico

    2017-09-01

    Microbial extracellular enzymatic activity (EEA) is the rate-limiting step in the degradation of organic matter in the oceans. These extracellular enzymes exist in two forms: cell-bound, which are attached to the microbial cell wall, and cell-free, which are completely free of the cell. Contrary to previous understanding, cell-free extracellular enzymes make up a substantial proportion of the total marine EEA. Little is known about these abundant cell-free enzymes, including what factors control their activity once they are away from their sites (cells). Experiments were run to assess how cell-free enzymes (excluding microbes) respond to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and temperature manipulations, previously suggested as potential control factors for these enzymes. The experiments were done with New Zealand coastal waters and the enzymes studied were alkaline phosphatase (APase), β-glucosidase, (BGase), and leucine aminopeptidase (LAPase). Environmentally relevant UVR (i.e. in situ UVR levels measured at our site) reduced cell-free enzyme activities by up to 87 % when compared to controls, likely a consequence of photodegradation. This effect of UVR on cell-free enzymes differed depending on the UVR fraction. Ambient levels of UV radiation were shown to reduce the activity of cell-free enzymes for the first time. Elevated temperatures (15 °C) increased the activity of cell-free enzymes by up to 53 % when compared to controls (10 °C), likely by enhancing the catalytic activity of the enzymes. Our results suggest the importance of both UVR and temperature as control mechanisms for cell-free enzymes. Given the projected warming ocean environment and the variable UVR light regime, it is possible that there could be major changes in the cell-free EEA and in the enzymes contribution to organic matter remineralization in the future.

  3. On the indirect relationship between protein dynamics and enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qinyi

    2017-05-01

    The behaviors of simple thermal systems have been well studied in physical chemistry and the principles obtained from such studies have been applied to complex thermal systems, such as proteins and enzymes. But the simple application of such principles is questionable and may lead to mistakes under some circumstances. In enzymology, the transition state theory of chemical reactions has been accepted as a fundamental theory, but the role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is controversial in the context of transition state theory. By studying behaviors of complex thermal systems, we have revised the Arrhenius equation and transition state theory and our model is validated in enzymology. Formally speaking, the revised Arrhenius equation is apparently similar to a conventional Arrhenius equation, but the physical meanings of its parameters differ from that of traditional forms in principle. Within this model, the role of protein dynamics in enzyme catalysis is well defined and quantified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of in vivo antioxidant activity of Hericium erinaceus polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Zi-Hua; Ye, Jian-Min; Wang, Guan-Fu

    2013-01-01

    Hericium erinaceus polysaccharide (HEP) is a traditional Chinese medicine. In the present study, chemical composition and antioxidant activity of HEP was investigated. HPLC analysis showed that the HEP was composed of xylose (7.8%), ribose (2.7%), glucose (68.4%), arabinose (11.3%), galactose (2.5%) and mannose (5.2%). HEP was pre-administered to mice by gavage at a dose of 300 mg/kg for 15 days. Results found that HEP preadministration resulted in a significant decline in blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (Scr) and increase in creatinine clearance (CrCI) levels in HEP-pretreated group compared to renal ischemia reperfusion (IR) group. Malondialdehyde (MDA) level significantly increased, whereas Level of reduced glutathione (GSH) markedly decreased in renal IR animals. These results indicate that IR induced renal oxidative injury damage, as indicated by a increase in MDA level, and decrease in GSH level as well as the antioxidant enzymes activity. Such effects reflect that HEP can significantly decrease lipid peroxidation level and increase antioxidant enzymes activities in experimental animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Anticoagulant activities of piperlonguminine in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wonhwa Lee

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Piperlonguminine (PL, an important component of Piperlongum fruits, is known to exhibit anti-hyperlipidemic, antiplateletand anti-melanogenic activities. Here, the anticoagulantactivities of PL were examined by monitoring activatedpartial-thromboplastin-time (aPTT, prothrombin-time (PT, andthe activities of thrombin and activated factor X (FXa. Theeffects of PL on the expressions of plasminogen activatorinhibitor type 1 (PAI-1 and tissue-type plasminogen activator(t-PA were also tested in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-αactivated HUVECs. The results showed that PL prolonged aPTTand PT significantly and inhibited the activities of thrombin andFXa. PL inhibited the generation of thrombin and FXa inHUVECs. In accordance with these anticoagulant activities, PLprolonged in vivo bleeding time and inhibited TNF-α inducedPAI-1 production. Furthermore, PAI-1/t-PA ratio was significantlydecreased by PL. Collectively, our results suggest that PLpossesses antithrombotic activities and that the current studycould provide bases for the development of new anticoagulantagents. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(10: 484-489

  6. Changes in the spectrum and rates of extracellular enzyme activities in seawater following aggregate formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Ziervogel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Marine snow aggregates are heavily colonized by heterotrophic microorganisms that express high levels of hydrolytic activities, making aggregates hotspots for carbon remineralization in the ocean. To assess how aggregate formation influences the ability of seawater microbial communities to access organic carbon, we compared hydrolysis rates of six polysaccharides in coastal seawater after aggregates had been formed (via incubation on a roller table with hydrolysis rates in seawater from the same site that had not incubated on a roller table (referred to as whole seawater. Hydrolysis rates in the aggregates themselves were up to three orders of magnitude higher on a volume basis than in whole seawater. The enhancement of enzyme activity in aggregates relative to whole seawater differed by substrate, suggesting that the enhancement was under cellular control, rather than due to factors such as lysis or grazing. A comparison of hydrolysis rates in whole seawater with those in aggregate-free seawater, i.e. the fraction of water from the roller bottles that did not contain aggregates, demonstrated a nuanced microbial response to aggregate formation. Activities of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were higher than in whole seawater, while activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinogalactan hydrolyzing enzymes were lower than in whole seawater. These data suggest that aggregate formation enhanced production of laminarinase and xylanase enzymes, and the enhancement also affected the surrounding seawater. Decreased activities of chondroitin, fucoidan, and arabinoglactan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawaters relative to whole seawater are likely due to shifts in enzyme production by the aggregate-associated community, coupled with the effects of enzyme degradation. Enhanced activities of laminarin- and xylan-hydrolyzing enzymes in aggregate-free seawater were due at least in part to cell-free enzymes. Measurements

  7. Phytobiotic Utilization as Feed Additive in Feed for Pancreatic Enzyme Activity of Broiler Chicken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Purwanti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to evaluate the effect of turmeric water extract, garlic and combination turmeric and garlic as a feed additive in the broiler diet on pancreatic enzyme activity of broiler chicken. Effectivity of treatments was assessed by addition of phytobiotic (control, 015% zinc bacitracin, 2.5% TE, 2.0% GE, 2.5% TGE which were arranged Completely Randomized Design with 4 replications. The variables measured were pancreatic enzyme activity(amylase enzyme activity, protease enzyme activity  and lipase enzyme activity.The results showed that enzyme protein activity content of 2.5% TE supplementation is also high at 82.02 U/ml, then supplemented 2.5% TGE, 2.0% GE, negative control and positive control respectively 75.98 ; 72.02; 68.74; and 66.57 U/ml. The lipase enzyme activity whereas the negative control and a positive control differ significantly higher (P<0.05 to treatment with the addition of 2.5% TE, 2.0% GE and 2.5% TGE phytobiotic. The research concluded that the incorporation of 2.5% TE, 2% GE and combined 2.5% TGE as feed additive enhanced pancreatic enzyme activity.

  8. Engineering intracellular active transport systems as in vivo biomolecular tools.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bachand, George David; Carroll-Portillo, Amanda

    2006-11-01

    Active transport systems provide essential functions in terms of cell physiology and metastasis. These systems, however, are also co-opted by invading viruses, enabling directed transport of the virus to and from the cell's nucleus (i.e., the site of virus replication). Based on this concept, fundamentally new approaches for interrogating and manipulating the inner workings of living cells may be achievable by co-opting Nature's active transport systems as an in vivo biomolecular tool. The overall goal of this project was to investigate the ability to engineer kinesin-based transport systems for in vivo applications, specifically the collection of effector proteins (e.g., transcriptional regulators) within single cells. In the first part of this project, a chimeric fusion protein consisting of kinesin and a single chain variable fragment (scFv) of an antibody was successfully produced through a recombinant expression system. The kinesin-scFv retained both catalytic and antigenic functionality, enabling selective capture and transport of target antigens. The incorporation of a rabbit IgG-specific scFv into the kinesin established a generalized system for functionalizing kinesin with a wide range of target-selective antibodies raised in rabbits. The second objective was to develop methods of isolating the intact microtubule network from live cells as a platform for evaluating kinesin-based transport within the cytoskeletal architecture of a cell. Successful isolation of intact microtubule networks from two distinct cell types was demonstrated using glutaraldehyde and methanol fixation methods. This work provides a platform for inferring the ability of kinesin-scFv to function in vivo, and may also serve as a three-dimensional scaffold for evaluating and exploiting kinesin-based transport for nanotechnological applications. Overall, the technology developed in this project represents a first-step in engineering active transport system for in vivo

  9. Effects of Straw Biomass Charcoal on Enzyme Activity in Cd Contaminated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SHANG Yi-jie

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Selected straw biomass charcoal as raw material for the simulation, this study mainly explore the effect of different amount of biomass charcoal applied on different categories of Cd contaminated soil enzyme activity. The results showed that when the soil Cd content was 5 mg·kg-1 and soil carbon cycle enzymes was with different amount of biomass carbon, the FDA hydrolase and protease were more sensi-tive to Cd contaminated soil; and under soil oxidoreductase in the Cd polluted soil condition with different amount of biomass carbon into soil, urease enzyme and phosphatase enzyme were more sensitivitive. Phosphatase was more significant which changed 79.40% compared soil without Cd. At the same time, calculated the geometric mean of carbon cycle enzymes, oxidoreductase enzymes and the two types of the over-all enzyme were as a measure of its synthesis enzymes activity. Among them, the comprehensive index of the soil carbon cycle enzymes activi-ty lay between 0.071~0.235, and when biomass carbon intake was 2.5%, the value was 0.174, which was higher 7.4%and 19.5%respectively than the enzyme without biomass and biomass carbon dosage was 5%; the comprehensive index of the oxidoreductase enzyme lay between 0.093~0.202, and when biomass carbon intake was 2.5%, the value was 0.131, which was higher 18.50% and 28.90% respectively than the enzyme without biomass and biomass carbon dosage was 5%; the comprehensive index of the soil composite enzyme index lay between 0.077~0.167, and when biomass carbon intake was 2.5%, the value was 0.108, which was higher 16.26% and 28.57% respectively than the enzyme without biomass and biomass carbon dosage was 5%.

  10. Free radical scavenging, in vivo antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of folk medicine Trichodesma sedgwickianum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta S. Saboo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Trichodesma sedgwickianum has been used in folk medicine possessing anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activity. This led us to investigate for its antioxidant and hepatoprotective potential. Different polarities extracts were subjected to polyphenolic estimation and in vitro antioxidant activity. The potential extract was tested for in vivo antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity, assessed by carbon tetrachloride-induced oxidative stress in rats. Phytochemical identification of major constituents has been carried out by HPLC, GC-MS, 1HNMR and 13C NMR. Amongst the extracts, successive ethanol extract showed higher concentration of polyphenols (25.4 ± 0.1% w/w and in vitro antioxidant property. The in vivo antioxidant efficiency was confirmed by comparing the enzymatic level, superoxide dismutase, catalase, reduced glutathione and MDA in test group with the standard and control. Hepatoprotective effect was observed by changes in the serum enzyme level which were further supported by histological examination. Phytochemically ethanol extract contains gallic acid and catechin along with other constituents. Thus present study provides a scientific rationale for their traditional use.

  11. Immunoliposomes as enzyme-carriers (immuno-enzymosomes) for antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) : Optimization of prodrug activating capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vingerhoeds, MH; Haisma, HJ; Belliot, SO; Smit, RHP; Crommelin, DJA; Storm, G

    Purpose. Immuno-enzymosomes are tumor-specific immunoliposomes bearing enzymes on their surface. These enzymes are capable of converting relatively nontoxic prodrugs into active cytostatic agents. The enzyme beta-glucuronidase (GUS)(4) was coupled to the external surface of immunoliposomes directed

  12. Liposome-mediated targeting of enzymes to cancer cells for site-specific activation of prodrugs : Comparison with the corresponding antibody-enzyme conjugate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fonseca, Maria José; Jagtenberg, Joycelyn C.; Haisma, Hidde J.; Storm, Gert

    Purpose. Immunoenzymosomes are tumor-targeted immunoliposomes bearing enzymes on their surface. These enzymes are capable of converting relatively nontoxic prodrugs into active cytostatic agents. The aims of this study were to compare the enzyme delivery capability of immunoenzymosomes with that of

  13. Pectic enzymes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benen, J.A.E.; Voragen, A.G.J.; Visser, J.

    2003-01-01

    The pectic enzymes comprise a diverse group of enzymes. They consist of main-chain depolymerases and esterases active on methyl- and acetylesters of galacturonosyl uronic acid residues. The depolymerizing enzymes comprise hydrolases as wel as lyases

  14. Enzyme activity measurement via spectral evolution profiling and PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Andreas; Meyer, Anne S.; Garcia, Javier Lopez

    2013-01-01

    fingerprints of the reaction mixture at specific time points during the course of the whole enzyme catalyzed reaction and employs multi-way analysis to detect the spectral changes. The methodology is demonstrated by spectral evolution profiling of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectral fingerprints using...

  15. Decrease in Activities of Selected Rat Liver Enzymes following ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of the chemical effluent from Soap and Detergent Industry on some rat liver enzymes were investigated. Chemical analyses of both the effluent and tap water which served as the control were carried out before various concentrations of the effluent (5%v/v, 25%v/v, 50%v/v and 100%v/v) were made. The effluent ...

  16. Enzyme activity in bioregulator-treated tomato ( Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In previous studies, we have demonstrated that 100 mg/l concentration of the bioregulators; indole-acetic acid (IAA), indole butyric acid (IBA) and naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) is suitable for tomato growth in the field. In this work, spectrophotometric analysis was conducted to determine the level of enzymes that could affect ...

  17. assessment of some hepatic enzyme activities in adult rabbits

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Uwaifoh

    2012-04-30

    Apr 30, 2012 ... Therapeutic potentials of Garcinia kola (G. kola) have been extensively documented and several researches have asserted its protective uniqueness against liver disorders/diseases. It is the aim of this study to assess the level of some enzyme involved in liver cellular integrity in rabbits chronically fed G.

  18. Metarhizium anisopliae: influence of pH on enzyme activity and control of Rhipicephalus microplus ticks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Felipe Marciano

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT. Marciano A.F., Coutinho-Rodrigues C.J.B., Perinotto W.M.S., Camargo M.G., Gôlo P.S., Sá F.A., Quinelato S., Freitas M.C., Angelo I.C., Nogueira M.R.S. & Bittencourt V.R.E.P. [Metarhizium anisopliae: influence of pH on enzyme activity and control of Rhipicephalus microplus ticks.] Metarhizium anisopliae: influência do pH na atividade enzimática e no controle de Rhipicephalus microplus. Revista Brasileira de Medicina Veterinária, 37(Supl.1:85-90, 2015. Departamento de Parasitologia Animal, Universidade Federal Rural do Rio de Janeiro, BR 465, Km 47, Seropédica, RJ 23897-970, Brasil. E-mail: vaniabit@ufrrj.br Rhipicephalus microplus ticks are one of the major agents causing substantial losses to livestock worldwide. In the search for alternative control strategies, both in vitro and in vivo use of the arthropodpathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae has shown promising results against this ectoparasite. During host colonization, protease production by M. anisopliae is considered one important virulence factor once it is directly related to the active penetration process carried by the fungus on the full host cuticle. Nevertheless, limitations as environmental pH may modulate the proteases production and/or activity, as well as, the fungal virulence. The current study aimed evaluate the virulence and total protease activity of M. anisopliae CG 148 sensu lato (s.l.. Fungal aqueous suspensions or 5% mineral oil formulations were used in different pH ranges (5, 7, or 9. Suspensions and formulations were prepared using a pH meter and adjusted to 108 spores mL-1. In the bioassay, four groups were formed for each pH range: the aqueous fungal suspension, the oil-based fungal formulation and their respective controls (aqueous and oil-based, totaling 12 groups. Engorged females were immersed for 3 minutes and maintained under optimal conditions for evaluation of biological parameters. Total protease activity of the artificial medium (after

  19. Spatial distribution of enzyme activities along the root and in the rhizosphere of different plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Zarebanadkouki, Mohsen; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Extracellular enzymes are important for decomposition of many biological macromolecules abundant in soil such as cellulose, hemicelluloses and proteins. Activities of enzymes produced by both plant roots and microbes are the primary biological drivers of organic matter decomposition and nutrient cycling. So far acquisition of in situ data about local activity of different enzymes in soil has been challenged. That is why there is an urgent need in spatially explicit methods such as 2-D zymography to determine the variation of enzymes along the roots in different plants. Here, we developed further the zymography technique in order to quantitatively visualize the enzyme activities (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2013), with a better spatial resolution We grew Maize (Zea mays L.) and Lentil (Lens culinaris) in rhizoboxes under optimum conditions for 21 days to study spatial distribution of enzyme activity in soil and along roots. We visualized the 2D distribution of the activity of three enzymes:β-glucosidase, leucine amino peptidase and phosphatase, using fluorogenically labelled substrates. Spatial resolution of fluorescent images was improved by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil-root system. The newly-developed direct zymography shows different pattern of spatial distribution of enzyme activity along roots and soil of different plants. We observed a uniform distribution of enzyme activities along the root system of Lentil. However, root system of Maize demonstrated inhomogeneity of enzyme activities. The apical part of an individual root (root tip) in maize showed the highest activity. The activity of all enzymes was the highest at vicinity of the roots and it decreased towards the bulk soil. Spatial patterns of enzyme activities as a function of distance from the root surface were enzyme specific, with highest extension for phosphatase. We conclude that improved zymography is promising in situ technique to analyze, visualize and quantify

  20. Traditional Medicinal Herbs and Food Plants Have the Potential to Inhibit Key Carbohydrate Hydrolyzing Enzymes In Vitro and Reduce Postprandial Blood Glucose Peaks In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Fawzi Mahomoodally

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We hypothesized that some medicinal herbs and food plants commonly used in the management of diabetes can reduce glucose peaks by inhibiting key carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes. To this effect, extracts of Antidesma madagascariense (AM, Erythroxylum macrocarpum (EM, Pittosporum senacia (PS, and Faujasiopsis flexuosa (FF, Momordica charantia (MC, and Ocimum tenuiflorum (OT were evaluated for α-amylase and α-glucosidase inhibitory effects based on starch-iodine colour changes and PNP-G as substrate, respectively. Only FF and AM extracts/fractions were found to inhibit α-amylase activity significantly (P<0.05 and coparable to the drug acarbose. Amylase bioassay on isolated mouse plasma confirmed the inhibitory potential of AM and FF extracts with the ethyl acetate fraction of FF being more potent (P<0.05 than acarbose. Extracts/fractions of AM and MC were found to inhibit significantly (P<0.05 α-glucosidase activity, with IC50 comparable to the drug 1-deoxynojirimycin. In vivo studies on glycogen-loaded mice showed significant (P<0.05 depressive effect on elevation of postprandial blood glucose following ingestion of AM and MC extracts. Our findings tend to provide a possible explanation for the hypoglycemic action of MC fruits and AM leaf extracts as alternative nutritional therapy in the management of diabetes.

  1. Carbohydrate-active enzymes in Trichoderma harzianum: a bioinformatic analysis bioprospecting for key enzymes for the biofuels industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira Filho, Jaire Alves; Horta, Maria Augusta Crivelente; Beloti, Lilian Luzia; Dos Santos, Clelton Aparecido; de Souza, Anete Pereira

    2017-10-12

    Trichoderma harzianum is used in biotechnology applications due to its ability to produce powerful enzymes for the conversion of lignocellulosic substrates into soluble sugars. Active enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism are defined as carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes), and the most abundant family in the CAZy database is the glycoside hydrolases. The enzymes of this family play a fundamental role in the decomposition of plant biomass. In this study, the CAZymes of T. harzianum were identified and classified using bioinformatic approaches after which the expression profiles of all annotated CAZymes were assessed via RNA-Seq, and a phylogenetic analysis was performed. A total of 430 CAZymes (3.7% of the total proteins for this organism) were annotated in T. harzianum, including 259 glycoside hydrolases (GHs), 101 glycosyl transferases (GTs), 6 polysaccharide lyases (PLs), 22 carbohydrate esterases (CEs), 42 auxiliary activities (AAs) and 46 carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). Among the identified T. harzianum CAZymes, 47% were predicted to harbor a signal peptide sequence and were therefore classified as secreted proteins. The GH families were the CAZyme class with the greatest number of expressed genes, including GH18 (23 genes), GH3 (17 genes), GH16 (16 genes), GH2 (13 genes) and GH5 (12 genes). A phylogenetic analysis of the proteins in the AA9/GH61, CE5 and GH55 families showed high functional variation among the proteins. Identifying the main proteins used by T. harzianum for biomass degradation can ensure new advances in the biofuel production field. Herein, we annotated and characterized the expression levels of all of the CAZymes from T. harzianum, which may contribute to future studies focusing on the functional and structural characterization of the identified proteins.

  2. In vitro and ex vivo antiangiogenic activity of Salvia officinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keshavarz, Maryam; Mostafaie, Ali; Mansouri, Kamran; Bidmeshkipour, Ali; Motlagh, Hamid Reza Mohammadi; Parvaneh, Shahram

    2010-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a key process in the promotion of cancer and its metastasis. Herein, the antiangiogenic activity of Salvia officinalis extract and its fractions was investigated. S. officinalis aerial parts were extracted with ethanol and its successive hexane, ethyl acetate, n-butanol and aqueous fractions were evaluated for their antiangiogenic activities using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) capillary tube formation and rat aorta models in a three-dimensional collagen matrix. Furthermore, antimigrative effects of the fractions were assessed using a wound healing model. The ethanol extract of S. officinalis (ESO) potently inhibited capillary tube formation in HUVEC and rat aorta models of angiogenesis, and its hexane fraction (HSO) exerted the highest inhibitory effect. In addition, the ethanol extract of S. officinalis and its hexane fraction showed a dose-dependent inhibitory activity on the migration of the endothelial cells in the wound healing model. Furthermore, ESO inhibited endothelial cell proliferation at 50-200 μg/mL in a dose-dependent manner. These findings indicated some new pharmacological activities of S. officinalis such as antiangiogenic in vitro and ex vivo, and antimigrative activity in vitro. Therefore, S. officinalis could be a candidate as a useful herb with therapeutic or preventive activity against angiogenesis related disorders. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A new versatile microarray-based method for high throughput screening of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G T

    2015-04-03

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A New Versatile Microarray-based Method for High Throughput Screening of Carbohydrate-active Enzymes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Melgosa, Silvia; Pedersen, Henriette L.; Schückel, Julia; Arnal, Grégory; Dumon, Claire; Amby, Daniel B.; Monrad, Rune Nygaard; Westereng, Bjørge; Willats, William G. T.

    2015-01-01

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes have multiple biological roles and industrial applications. Advances in genome and transcriptome sequencing together with associated bioinformatics tools have identified vast numbers of putative carbohydrate-degrading and -modifying enzymes including glycoside hydrolases and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. However, there is a paucity of methods for rapidly screening the activities of these enzymes. By combining the multiplexing capacity of carbohydrate microarrays with the specificity of molecular probes, we have developed a sensitive, high throughput, and versatile semiquantitative enzyme screening technique that requires low amounts of enzyme and substrate. The method can be used to assess the activities of single enzymes, enzyme mixtures, and crude culture broths against single substrates, substrate mixtures, and biomass samples. Moreover, we show that the technique can be used to analyze both endo-acting and exo-acting glycoside hydrolases, polysaccharide lyases, carbohydrate esterases, and lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases. We demonstrate the potential of the technique by identifying the substrate specificities of purified uncharacterized enzymes and by screening enzyme activities from fungal culture broths. PMID:25657012

  5. Dehydroepiandrosterone supplement increases malate dehydrogenase activity and decreases NADPH-dependent antioxidant enzyme activity in rat hepatocellular carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sook-Hee; Choi, Haymie

    2008-01-01

    Beneficial effects of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) supplement on age-associated chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance and diabetes, have been reported. However, its mechanism of action in hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo has not been investigated in detail. We have previously shown that during hepatocellular carcinogenesis, DHEA treatment decreases formation of preneoplastic glutathione S-transferase placental form-positive foci in the liver and has antioxidant effects. Here we aimed to determine the mechanism of actions of DHEA, in comparison to vitamin E, in a chemically-induced hepatocellular carcinoma model in rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were administered with control diet without a carcinogen, diets with 1.5% vitamin E, 0.5% DHEA and both of the compounds with a carcinogen for 6 weeks. The doses were previously reported to have anti-cancer effects in animals without known toxicities. With DHEA treatment, cytosolic malate dehydrogenase activities were significantly increased by ~5 fold and glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities were decreased by ~25% compared to carcinogen treated group. Activities of Se-glutathione peroxidase in the cytotol was decreased significantly with DHEA treatment, confirming its antioxidative effect. However, liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 content and NADPH-dependent cytochrome P-450 reductase activities were not altered with DHEA treatment. Vitamin E treatment decreased cytosolic Se-glutathione peroxidase activities in accordance with our previous reports. However, vitamin E did not alter glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase or malate dehydrogenase activities. Our results suggest that DHEA may have decreased tumor nodule formation and reduced lipid peroxidation as previously reported, possibly by increasing the production of NADPH, a reducing equivalent for NADPH-dependent antioxidant enzymes. DHEA treatment tended to reduce glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, which may have

  6. Extraction temperature affects the activities of antioxidation, carbohydrate-digestion enzymes, and angiotensin-converting enzyme of Pleurotus citrinopileatus extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pao-Huei Chen

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Extraction temperature can potentially affect the chemical compositions and bioactivities of the extracts obtained. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of extraction temperature on the distribution of bioactive compounds and the bioactivities of Pleurotus citrinopileatus. The antioxidant activities (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid+ scavenging capabilities and the inhibitory capabilities on pancreatic α-amylase, intestinal α-glucosidase, and hypertension-linked angiotensin-converting enzyme of hot water P. citrinopileatus extract and cold water P. citrinopileatus extract were determined. The results showed that the antioxidant capabilities and inhibitory effects on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and angiotensin-converting enzyme of cold water P. citrinopileatus extract were significantly higher than those of hot water P. citrinopileatus extract. The cold water P. citrinopileatus extracted was further precipitated with 100% ammonium sulfate to obtain a polysaccharide fraction or with 75% ethanol to obtain a protein fraction. The inhibitory activities of the protein fraction of the cold water P. citrinopileatus extract on α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and angiotensin-converting enzyme were significantly higher than those of the polysaccharide fraction. In conclusion, the protein fraction of the cold water P. citrinopileatus extract could be responsible for its bioactivities.

  7. The impact of molluscicides on enzyme activities in the hepatopancreas of Deroceras reticulatum (Müller)

    OpenAIRE

    Triebskorn, Rita

    1991-01-01

    The influence of three commercial molluscicide pellets, Cloethocarb, Mesurol, and Spiess Urania 2000, on the activities of six enzymes in the hepatopancreas of Deroceras reticulatum were investigated by light and electron microscope histochemisty as well as by photometric studies. In the digestive cells, enzymes catalyzing energy-producing digestive processes (non-specific esterases and acid phosphatases) are induced, while, in the crypt cells, enzymes related to energy-consuming metabolic pa...

  8. Fungi from koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) faeces exhibit a broad range of enzyme activities against recalcitrant substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R A; Bradner, J R; Roberts, T H; Nevalainen, K M H

    2009-02-01

    Identification of fungi isolated from koala faeces and screening for their enzyme activities of biotechnological interest. Thirty-seven fungal strains were isolated from koala faeces and identified by the amplification and direct sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA. The fungi were screened for selected enzyme activities using agar plates containing a single substrate for each target class of enzyme. For xylanase, endoglucanase, ligninase (ligninolytic phenoloxidase) and protease over two-thirds of the isolates produced a clearing halo at 25 degrees C, indicating the secretion of active enzyme by the fungus, and one-third produced a halo indicating amylase, mannanase and tannase activity. Some isolates were also able to degrade crystalline cellulose and others displayed lipase activity. Many of the fungal isolates also produced active enzymes at 15 degrees C and some at 39 degrees C. Koala faeces, consisting of highly lignified fibre, undigested cellulose and phenolics, are a novel source of fungi with high and diverse enzyme activities capable of breaking down recalcitrant substrates. To our knowledge, this is the first time fungi from koala faeces have been identified using ITS sequencing and screened for their enzyme activities.

  9. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  10. In Vivo Imaging of Nuclear Receptor Transcriptional Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, D Alwyn; Bevan, Charlotte L

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear receptors drive key processes during development, reproduction, metabolism, and disease. In order to understand and analyze, as well as manipulate, their actions it is imperative that we are able to study them in whole animals and in a spatiotemporal manner. The increasing repertoire of transgenic animals, expressing reporter genes driven by a specific nuclear receptor, enables us to do this. Use of luciferase reporter genes is the method of choice of many researchers as it is well tolerated, relatively easy to use, and robust. Further, luciferase lends itself to the process as it can penetrate tissue and can be manipulated to degrade rapidly thus allowing a dynamic response. However, limited resolution, lack of quantitation, and the largely two-dimensional images acquired make it desirable to support results using ex vivo imaging and enzymatic and/or immunohistochemical analysis of dissected tissue. As well as enabling the visualization of nuclear receptor signaling in wild-type animals, crossing these mouse models with models of disease will provide invaluable information on how such signaling is dysregulated during disease progression, and how we may manipulate nuclear receptor signaling in therapy. The use of in vivo imaging therefore provides the power to determine where and when in development, aging, and disease nuclear receptors are active and how ligands or receptor modulators affect this.

  11. High-throughput fluorometric measurement of potential soil extracellular enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Colin W; Fricks, Barbara E; Rocca, Jennifer D; Steinweg, Jessica M; McMahon, Shawna K; Wallenstein, Matthew D

    2013-11-15

    Microbes in soils and other environments produce extracellular enzymes to depolymerize and hydrolyze organic macromolecules so that they can be assimilated for energy and nutrients. Measuring soil microbial enzyme activity is crucial in understanding soil ecosystem functional dynamics. The general concept of the fluorescence enzyme assay is that synthetic C-, N-, or P-rich substrates bound with a fluorescent dye are added to soil samples. When intact, the labeled substrates do not fluoresce. Enzyme activity is measured as the increase in fluorescence as the fluorescent dyes are cleaved from their substrates, which allows them to fluoresce. Enzyme measurements can be expressed in units of molarity or activity. To perform this assay, soil slurries are prepared by combining soil with a pH buffer. The pH buffer (typically a 50 mM sodium acetate or 50 mM Tris buffer), is chosen for the buffer's particular acid dissociation constant (pKa) to best match the soil sample pH. The soil slurries are inoculated with a nonlimiting amount of fluorescently labeled (i.e. C-, N-, or P-rich) substrate. Using soil slurries in the assay serves to minimize limitations on enzyme and substrate diffusion. Therefore, this assay controls for differences in substrate limitation, diffusion rates, and soil pH conditions; thus detecting potential enzyme activity rates as a function of the difference in enzyme concentrations (per sample). Fluorescence enzyme assays are typically more sensitive than spectrophotometric (i.e. colorimetric) assays, but can suffer from interference caused by impurities and the instability of many fluorescent compounds when exposed to light; so caution is required when handling fluorescent substrates. Likewise, this method only assesses potential enzyme activities under laboratory conditions when substrates are not limiting. Caution should be used when interpreting the data representing cross-site comparisons with differing temperatures or soil types, as in situ soil

  12. Evaluation of the organophosphorus hydrolase enzyme activity in creams and investigation of its stability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariye Rajaie

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this project is investigation of the organophosphorus hydrolase (OPH enzyme activity in water in oil (w/o and oil in water (o/w creams and investigation of the OPH enzyme stability in formulated creams. OPH enzyme was extracted and purified from strain flavobacterium. The w/o and o/w creams were prepared using different formulations. In order to achieve an emulsion with maximum stability, appropriate percentage of the cream components was selected by studying different formulations and the physical and chemical stability of the produced cream were considered. 5Uenzyme/90gcream enzyme was used for each formulation. To measure the enzyme activity in creams, extraction method was used and enzyme activity was determined based on parathion hydrolysis. The thermal stability of OPH in both types of w/o and o/w creams was studied at 4 and 30  °C for various time periods. The average enzyme activity was about 0.0065 U/gcream and 0.018 U/gcream for w/o and o/w creams respectivly. According to the results, the relative activity at 4 °C was reduced to 50% after 26 and 45 days in w/o and o/w creams, respectivly. The results showed that the OPH enzyme activity in o/w cream was 2.6 times more than that of w/o cream, because of the higher hydrophobicity of o/w cream compared to w/o. The OPH enzyme stability in o/w cream was greater in comparison to w/o cream. The OPH enzyme was active for nearly 2 months on o/w creams at 4 °C .

  13. Study on optimization of process parameters for enhancing the multi-hydrolytic enzyme activity in garbage enzyme produced from preconsumer organic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arun, C; Sivashanmugam, P

    2017-02-01

    The garbage enzymes produced from preconsumer organic waste containing multi hydrolytic enzyme activity which helps to solubilize the waste activated sludge. The continuous production of garbage enzyme and its scaling up process need a globe optimized condition. In present study the effect of fruit peel composition and sonication time on enzyme activity were investigated. Garbage enzyme produced from 6g pineapple peels: 4g citrus peels pre-treated with ultrasound for 20min shows higher hydrolytic enzymes activity. Simultaneously statistical optimization tools were used to model garbage enzyme production with higher activity of amylase, lipase and protease. The maximum activity of amylase, lipase and protease were predicted to be 56.409, 44.039, 74.990U/ml respectively at optimal conditions (pH (6), temperature (37°C), agitation (218 RPM) and fermentation duration (3days)). These optimized conditions can be successfully used for large scale production of garbage enzyme with higher hydrolytic enzyme activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In Vivo Activity of the Benzothiazinones PBTZ169 and BTZ043 against Nocardia brasiliensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Norma Alejandra; Lozano-Garza, Hector Gerardo; Castro-Garza, Jorge; De Osio-Cortez, Alexandra; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Cavazos-Rocha, Norma; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Makarov, Vadim; Cole, Stewart T.; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Background Mycetoma is a neglected, chronic, and deforming infectious disease caused by fungi and actinomycetes. In Mexico, N. brasiliensis is the predominant etiologic agent. Therapeutic alternatives are necessary because the current drug regimens have several disadvantages. Benzothiazinones (BTZ) are a new class of candidate drugs that inhibit decaprenyl-phosphoribose-epimerase (DprE1), an essential enzyme involved in the cell wall biosynthesis of Corynebacterineae. Methodology/Principal findings In this study, the in vitro activity of the next generation BTZ, PBTZ169, was tested against thirty Nocardia brasiliensis isolates. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for PBTZ169 were 0.0075 and 0.03 μg/mL, respectively. Because Nocardia is a potential intracellular bacterium, a THP-1 macrophage monolayer was infected with N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and then treated with PBTZ169, resulting in a decrease in the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) at a concentration of 0.25X the in vitro value. The in vivo activity was evaluated after infecting female BALB/c mice in the right hind food-pad. After 6 weeks, treatment was initiated with PBTZ169 and its activity was compared with the first generation compound, BTZ043. Both BTZ compounds were administered at 100 mg/kg twice daily by gavage, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT), at 100 mg/kg sulfamethoxazole, was used as a positive control. After 22 weeks of therapy, only PBTZ169 and SXT displayed statistically significant activity. Conclusion These results indicate that DprE1 inhibitors may be useful for treating infections of Nocardia and may therefore be active against other actinomycetoma agents. We must test combinations of these compounds with other antimicrobial agents, such as linezolid, tedizolid or SXT, that have good to excellent in vivo activity, as well as new DprE1 inhibitors that can achieve higher plasma levels. PMID:26474057

  15. In Vivo Activity of the Benzothiazinones PBTZ169 and BTZ043 against Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Alejandra González-Martínez

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a neglected, chronic, and deforming infectious disease caused by fungi and actinomycetes. In Mexico, N. brasiliensis is the predominant etiologic agent. Therapeutic alternatives are necessary because the current drug regimens have several disadvantages. Benzothiazinones (BTZ are a new class of candidate drugs that inhibit decaprenyl-phosphoribose-epimerase (DprE1, an essential enzyme involved in the cell wall biosynthesis of Corynebacterineae.In this study, the in vitro activity of the next generation BTZ, PBTZ169, was tested against thirty Nocardia brasiliensis isolates. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for PBTZ169 were 0.0075 and 0.03 μg/mL, respectively. Because Nocardia is a potential intracellular bacterium, a THP-1 macrophage monolayer was infected with N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and then treated with PBTZ169, resulting in a decrease in the number of colony-forming units (CFUs at a concentration of 0.25X the in vitro value. The in vivo activity was evaluated after infecting female BALB/c mice in the right hind food-pad. After 6 weeks, treatment was initiated with PBTZ169 and its activity was compared with the first generation compound, BTZ043. Both BTZ compounds were administered at 100 mg/kg twice daily by gavage, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT, at 100 mg/kg sulfamethoxazole, was used as a positive control. After 22 weeks of therapy, only PBTZ169 and SXT displayed statistically significant activity.These results indicate that DprE1 inhibitors may be useful for treating infections of Nocardia and may therefore be active against other actinomycetoma agents. We must test combinations of these compounds with other antimicrobial agents, such as linezolid, tedizolid or SXT, that have good to excellent in vivo activity, as well as new DprE1 inhibitors that can achieve higher plasma levels.

  16. In Vivo Activity of the Benzothiazinones PBTZ169 and BTZ043 against Nocardia brasiliensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Martínez, Norma Alejandra; Lozano-Garza, Hector Gerardo; Castro-Garza, Jorge; De Osio-Cortez, Alexandra; Vargas-Villarreal, Javier; Cavazos-Rocha, Norma; Ocampo-Candiani, Jorge; Makarov, Vadim; Cole, Stewart T; Vera-Cabrera, Lucio

    2015-01-01

    Mycetoma is a neglected, chronic, and deforming infectious disease caused by fungi and actinomycetes. In Mexico, N. brasiliensis is the predominant etiologic agent. Therapeutic alternatives are necessary because the current drug regimens have several disadvantages. Benzothiazinones (BTZ) are a new class of candidate drugs that inhibit decaprenyl-phosphoribose-epimerase (DprE1), an essential enzyme involved in the cell wall biosynthesis of Corynebacterineae. In this study, the in vitro activity of the next generation BTZ, PBTZ169, was tested against thirty Nocardia brasiliensis isolates. The MIC50 and MIC90 values for PBTZ169 were 0.0075 and 0.03 μg/mL, respectively. Because Nocardia is a potential intracellular bacterium, a THP-1 macrophage monolayer was infected with N. brasiliensis HUJEG-1 and then treated with PBTZ169, resulting in a decrease in the number of colony-forming units (CFUs) at a concentration of 0.25X the in vitro value. The in vivo activity was evaluated after infecting female BALB/c mice in the right hind food-pad. After 6 weeks, treatment was initiated with PBTZ169 and its activity was compared with the first generation compound, BTZ043. Both BTZ compounds were administered at 100 mg/kg twice daily by gavage, and sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (SXT), at 100 mg/kg sulfamethoxazole, was used as a positive control. After 22 weeks of therapy, only PBTZ169 and SXT displayed statistically significant activity. These results indicate that DprE1 inhibitors may be useful for treating infections of Nocardia and may therefore be active against other actinomycetoma agents. We must test combinations of these compounds with other antimicrobial agents, such as linezolid, tedizolid or SXT, that have good to excellent in vivo activity, as well as new DprE1 inhibitors that can achieve higher plasma levels.

  17. Quantum dot-based nanosensors for diagnosis via enzyme activity measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Birgitta R; Jepsen, Morten Leth; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2013-05-01

    Enzymes are essential in the human body, and the disorder of enzymatic activities has been associated with many different diseases and stages of disease. Luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals, also known as quantum dots (QDs), have garnered great attention in molecular diagnostics. Owing to their superior optical properties, tunable and narrow emissions, stable brightness and long lifetime, QD-based enzyme activity measurement has demonstrated improved detection sensitivity, which is considered particularly valuable for early disease diagnosis. Recent studies have also shown that QD-based nanosensors are capable of probing multiple enzyme activities simultaneously. This review highlights the current development of QD-based nanosensors for enzyme detection. The enzyme-QD hybrid system, equipped with unique electronic, optical and catalytic properties, is envisioned as a potential solution in addressing challenges in diagnostics and therapeutics.

  18. In Vivo Antihyperglycemic Activity of a Lanosteryl Triterpene from Protorhus longifolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebamang A. Mosa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Control of postprandial hyperglycemia is crucial in the management of diabetes mellitus. Despite the use of the current hypoglycemic drugs, incidence of diabetes and related diseases continue to increase. This study aimed at evaluating the in vivo antihyperglycemic activity of methyl-3β-hydroxylanosta-9,24-dien-21-oate (RA-3, a lanosteryl triterpene isolated, and characterized from Protorhus longifolia stem bark. Spectroscopic data analysis was used to establish and verify the structure of the triterpene. The antihyperglycemic activity of the triterpene was evaluated in an STZ-induced diabetes rat model. The experimental animals were orally administered with RA-3 (100 mg/kg body weight daily for 14 days. An oral glucose tolerance test was also performed. The animals were euthanized and biochemical analysis of antioxidant status, some glycolytic enzymes and glycogen content were conducted on serum and liver samples, respectively. RA-3 exhibited hypoglycemic activity by reducing blood glucose levels by 37%. The triterpene also improved glucose tolerance in the diabetic rats. Relatively higher hepatic glycogen content, hexokinase and glucokinase activity with a decrease in glucose-6-phosphatase activity were observed in the triterpene-treated diabetic group when compared with the diabetic control group. The triterpene treatment further increased antioxidant status of the diabetic animals; increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase were observed along with a decrease in malondialdehyde content. The results indicate potential pharmaceutical effects of lanosteryl triterpene in the management of diabetes mellitus.

  19. Increasing the amount of nitrogen fertilizer decreased the activity of soil enzyme in cv.Huangguogan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Ling; Feng, Zhongxue; Fu, Jialing; Liu, Xinya; Dong, Zixiang; Dong, Tiantian; Wang, Zhihui

    2017-10-01

    Study on the effect of different nitrogen treatment on cv.Huangguogan soil peroxidase, urease, phosphatase, sucrase activity. The amount of nitrogen was 3 treatments: conventional nitrogen application rate (N1), 125% conventional nitrogen application rate (N2) and 150% conventional nitrogen application rate (N3). The results showed that proper amount of nitrogen fertilizer was beneficial to improve soil enzyme activity, but the soil enzyme activity was decreased when the amount of nitrogen was increased or too much.

  20. Casein kinase 1delta activates human recombinant deoxycytidine kinase by Ser-74 phosphorylation, but is not involved in the in vivo regulation of its activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smal, Caroline; Vertommen, Didier; Amsailale, Rachid; Arts, Angélique; Degand, Hervé; Morsomme, Pierre; Rider, Mark H; Neste, Eric Van Den; Bontemps, Françoise

    2010-10-01

    Deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) is a key enzyme in the salvage of deoxynucleosides and in the activation of several anticancer and antiviral nucleoside analogues. We recently showed that dCK was activated in vivo by phosphorylation of Ser-74. However, the protein kinase responsible was not identified. Ser-74 is located downstream a Glu-rich region, presenting similarity with the consensus phosphorylation motif of casein kinase 1 (CKI), and particularly of CKI delta. We showed that recombinant CKI delta phosphorylated several residues of bacterially overexpressed dCK: Ser-74, but also Ser-11, Ser-15, and Thr-72. Phosphorylation of dCK by CKI delta correlated with increased activity reaching at least 4-fold. Site-directed mutagenesis demonstrated that only Ser-74 phosphorylation was involved in dCK activation by CKI delta, strengthening the key role of this residue in the control of dCK activity. However, neither CKI delta inhibitors nor CKI delta siRNA-mediated knock-down modified Ser-74 phosphorylation or dCK activity in cultured cells. Moreover, these approaches did not prevent dCK activation induced by treatments enhancing Ser-74 phosphorylation. Taken together, the data preclude a role of CKI delta in the regulation of dCK activity in vivo. Nevertheless, phosphorylation of dCK by CKI delta could be a useful tool for elucidating the influence of Ser-74 phosphorylation on the structure-activity relationships in the enzyme. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Clinical applications of in vivo neutron-activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.

    1982-01-01

    In vivo neutron activation has opened a new era of both clinical diagnosis and therapy evaluation, and investigation into and modelling of body composition. The techniques are new, but it is already clear that considerable strides can be made in increasing accuracy and precision, increasing the number of elements susceptible to measurement, enhancing uniformity, and reducing the dose required for the measurement. The work presently underway will yield significant data on a variety of environmental contaminants such as Cd. Compositional studies are determining the level of vital constituents such as nitrogen and potassium in both normal subjects and in patients with a variety of metabolic disorders. Therapeutic programs can be assessed while in progress.

  2. Activity of taurolidine gels on ex vivo periodontal biofilm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirracchio, Luca; Joos, Aline; Luder, Nina; Sculean, Anton; Eick, Sigrun

    2017-12-14

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the activity of two different taurolidine (TAU) gels in comparison with a 0.2% chlorhexidine (CHX) gel on an ex vivo subgingival biofilm. Subgingival including supragingival biofilm samples from periodontitis patients were cultured for 10 days, before TAU 1% and TAU 3% gels and CHX gel were applied for 10 min and thereafter diluted with nutrient media to 10% for 50 min. One third of the samples were analyzed for bacterial counts, biofilm quantity, and biofilm metabolic activity. In the two other thirds, 90% of the nutrient media were replaced and biofilms were incubated for 23 h. The second third was analyzed in the same way as before. In the third part, patients' microorganisms were added again and incubated for additional 24 h to allow reformation of biofilm before proceeding to analysis. Decrease of bacterial counts in biofilms was highest following application of TAU 3% after 60 min (0.87 log10 cfu, corresponding 86.5%), 24 and 48 h (reformation of biofilms), respectively. All antimicrobials reduced biofilm quantity after 24 h (each p activity in biofilms was decreased at 60 min (each p gels, while the activity of the reformed biofilm was lower after application of all evaluated antimicrobials (each p activity of taurolidine gels clearly depends on its taurolidine concentration. A high concentrated taurolidine gel is equally active or even superior to 0.2% chlorhexidine gel. However, the activity of antimicrobials is limited in a complex established biofilm and underlines the pivotal role of mechanical biofilm disruption. Within their limits, the data suggest that TAU 3% gel might represent a potential alternative to 0.2% chlorhexidine gel.

  3. Mini Review: Basic Physiology and Factors Influencing Exogenous Enzymes Activity in the Porcine Gastrointestinal Tract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Strube, Mikael Lenz; Meyer, Anne S.; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    activity during intestinal transit are few, it is known that the enzymes, being protein molecules, can be negatively affected by the gastrointestinal proteolytic enzymes and the low pH in the stomach ventricle. In this review, the pH-values, endogenous proteases and other factors native to the digestive...

  4. Enzyme activity in terrestrial soil in relation to exploration of the Martian surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclaren, A. D.

    1974-01-01

    Sensitive tests for the detection of extracellular enzyme activity in Martian soil was investigated using simulated Martian soil. Enzyme action at solid-liquid water interfaces and at low humidity were studied, and a kinetic scheme was devised and tested based on the growth of microorganisms and the oxidation of ammonium nitrite.

  5. Illustrating the Effect of pH on Enzyme Activity Using Gibbs Energy Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bearne, Stephen L.

    2014-01-01

    Gibbs energy profiles provide students with a visual representation of the energy changes that occur during enzyme catalysis, making such profiles useful as teaching and learning tools. Traditional kinetic topics, such as the effect of pH on enzyme activity, are often not discussed in terms of Gibbs energy profiles. Herein, the symbolism of Gibbs…

  6. Exo-inulinase of Aspergillus niger N402: A hydrolytic enzyme with significant transfructosylating activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goosen, C.; Maarel, M.J. E.C. van der; Dijkhuizen, L.

    2008-01-01

    The purified exo-inulinase enzyme of Aspergillus niger N402 (AngInuE; heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli) displayed a sucrose:inulin (S/I) hydrolysis ratio of 2.3, characteristic for a typical exo-inulinase. The enzyme also had significant transfructosylating activity with increasing

  7. Quantitation of Lipase Activity from a Bee: An Introductory Enzyme Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Kathleen A.; Jones, Marjorie A.

    1989-01-01

    This four-hour experiment uses a bee as a source of the enzyme which is reacted with a radioactive substrate to determine the specific activity of the enzyme. Uses thin layer chromatography, visible spectrophotometry, and liquid scintillation spectrometry (if not available a Geiger-Muller counter can be substituted). (MVL)

  8. Crystallization of Hevamine, an Enzyme with Lysozyme/Chitinase Activity from Hevea brasiliensis Latex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ROZEBOOM, HJ; BUDIANI, A; BEINTEMA, JJ

    1990-01-01

    Hevamine, an enzyme with both lysozyme and chitinase activity, was isolated and purified from Hevea brasiliensis (rubber tree) latex. The enzyme (molecular weight 29,000) is homologous to certain “pathogenesis-related” proteins from plants, but not to hen egg-white or phage T4 lysozyme. To

  9. Experimental strategy to discover microbes with gluten-degrading enzyme activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Wei, Guoxian

    2014-06-01

    Gluten proteins contained in the cereals barley, rye and wheat cause an inflammatory disorder called celiac disease in genetically predisposed individuals. Certain immunogenic gluten domains are resistant to degradation by mammalian digestive enzymes. Enzymes with the ability to target such domains are potentially of clinical use. Of particular interest are gluten-degrading enzymes that would be naturally present in the human body, e.g. associated with resident microbial species. This manuscript describes a selective gluten agar approach and four enzyme activity assays, including a gliadin zymogram assay, designed for the selection and discovery of novel gluten-degrading microorganisms from human biological samples. Resident and harmless bacteria and/or their derived enzymes could potentially find novel applications in the treatment of celiac disease, in the form of a probiotic agent or as a dietary enzyme supplement.

  10. Enzyme activity in bioregulator-treated tomato ( Solanum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    activities of lipoxygenase (LOX), catalase, peroxidase, alcohol dehydrogenase and acid phosphatase determined. All treated genotypes showed high LOX activity with a range of 0.06 - 1.07 mmol.abs.units (A234). The NAA-treated NHLy13 genotype had complete loss of catalase activity after 210 s. Peroxidase activity was ...

  11. Microbial dynamics and enzyme activities in tropical Andosols depending on land use and nutrient inputs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mganga, Kevin; Razavi, Bahar; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Microbial decomposition of soil organic matter is mediated by enzymes and is a key source of terrestrial CO2 emissions. Microbial and enzyme activities are necessary to understand soil biochemical functioning and identify changes in soil quality. However, little is known about land use and nutrients availability effects on enzyme activities and microbial processes, especially in tropical soils of Africa. This study was conducted to examine how microbial and enzyme activities differ between different land uses and nutrient availability. As Andosols of Mt. Kilimanjaro are limited by nutrient concentrations, we hypothesize that N and P additions will stimulate enzyme activity. N and P were added to soil samples (0-20 cm) representing common land use types in East Africa: (1) savannah, (2) maize fields, (3) lower montane forest, (4) coffee plantation, (5) grasslands and (6) traditional Chagga homegardens. Total CO2 efflux from soil, microbial biomass and activities of β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase and phosphatase involved in C, N and P cycling, respectively was monitored for 60 days. Total CO2 production, microbial biomass and enzyme activities varied in the order forest soils > grassland soils > arable soils. Increased β-glucosidase and cellobiohydrolase activities after N addition of grassland soils suggest that microorganisms increased N uptake and utilization to produce C-acquiring enzymes. Low N concentration in all soils inhibited chitinase activity. Depending on land use, N and P addition had an inhibitory or neutral effect on phosphatase activity. We attribute this to the high P retention of Andosols and low impact of N and P on the labile P fractions. Enhanced CO2 production after P addition suggests that increased P availability could stimulate soil organic matter biodegradation in Andosols. In conclusion, land use and nutrients influenced soil enzyme activities and microbial dynamics and demonstrated the decline in soil quality after landuse

  12. Chaperone-Like Activity of ß-Casein and Its Effect on Residual in Vitro Activity of Food Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sulewska, Anna Maria

    ABSTRACT Activity of endogenous enzymes may cause browning of fruits and vegetables. These enzymes can be inactivated, for example by heat treatment, but the response of enzymes to heat treatment depends on many factors. Foods are very complex systems and the stability of enzymes in such an envir......ABSTRACT Activity of endogenous enzymes may cause browning of fruits and vegetables. These enzymes can be inactivated, for example by heat treatment, but the response of enzymes to heat treatment depends on many factors. Foods are very complex systems and the stability of enzymes...... in such an environment can be influenced by other components of the system potentially leading to enhancement of unwanted reactions or reduction of wanted ones. Caseins can potentially enhance the stability of other food proteins, as they were shown to exhibit chaperone-like activity. In this study influence of β...... Agaricus bisporus and equine cytochrome c. Only for the first target β-casein was acting as a molecular chaperone i.e. its presence resulted in higher residual activity (higher degree of the function preservation). β-Casein did not have any influence on the residual activity of tyrosinase. Surprisingly...

  13. Imbalance between pulmonary angiotensin-converting enzyme and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 activity in acute respiratory distress syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wosten-van Asperen, Roelie M.; Bos, Albert; Bem, Reinout A.; Dierdorp, Barbara S.; Dekker, Tamara; van Goor, Harry; Kamilic, Jelena; van der Loos, Chris M.; van den Berg, Elske; Bruijn, Martijn; van Woensel, Job B.; Lutter, Rene

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Angiotensin-converting enzyme and its effector peptide angiotensin II have been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Recently, angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 was identified as the counter-regulatory enzyme of angiotensin-converting enzyme that converts

  14. Antioxidant activity of polysaccharide purified from Acanthopanax koreanum Nakai stems in vitro and in vivo zebrafish model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Min-Cheol; Kim, Seo-Young; Kim, Eun-A; Lee, Ji-Hyeok; Kim, Young-Sun; Yu, Seok-Kyu; Chae, Jun Byoung; Choe, In-Hu; Cho, Jin Hun; Jeon, You-Jin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the antioxidative effects of a purified polysaccharide isolated from the stems of Acanthopanax koreanum Nakai (ASP) on hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress was investigated both in vitro and in vivo using a zebrafish model. A. koreanum Nakai stem was hydrolyzed using five carbohydrases and five proteases for the enzyme-assistant extraction. Of the enzyme-assistant extracts, the Protamex extract exhibited the highest yield and a potent scavenging activity against free radicals. Ethanol-added separation and anion exchange chromatography were conducted to identify the active polysaccharide. The purified polysaccharide significantly scavenged hydrogen peroxide and reduced hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death in Vero cells and in zebrafish. The results reveal that ASP is a useful antioxidant polysaccharide and might be available for relevant industrial applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Phosphorus fractions, microbial biomass and enzyme activities in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    fractions, NaOH-Pi had strong positive correlation with total organic C, alkaline phosphatase and dehydrogenase activities, while the NaOH-Po had strong positive correlation with total organic C, dehydrogenase activity, microbial biomass N, alkaline phosphatase activity and microbial biomass C. The dHCl-P fraction did ...

  16. Comparative effects of doxercalciferol (1α-hydroxyvitamin D₂) versus calcitriol (1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃) on the expression of transporters and enzymes in the rat in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Edwin C Y; Sondervan, Myrte; Jin, Cheng; Groothuis, Geny M M; Pang, K Sandy

    2011-04-01

    Effects of 1.28 nmol/kg doxercalciferol [1α(OH)D₂], a synthetic vitamin D₂ analog that undergoes metabolic activation to 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₂, the naturally occurring, biologically active form of vitamin D₂, on rat transporters and enzymes were compared with those of 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D₃ [1,25(OH)₂D₃, active form of vitamin D₃; 4.8 and 6.4 nmol/kg] given on alternate days intraperitoneally for 8 days. Changes were mostly confined to the intestine and kidney where the vitamin D receptor (VDR) was highly expressed: increased intestinal Cyp24 and Cyp3a1 messenger RNA (mRNA) and a modest elevation of apical sodium-dependent bile salt transporter (Asbt) and P-glycoprotein (P-gp) protein; increased renal VDR, Cyp24, Cyp3a9, Mdr1a, and Asbt mRNA, as well as Asbt and P-gp protein expression; and decreased renal PepT1 and Oat1 mRNA expression. In comparison, 1α(OH)D₂ treatment exerted a greater effect than 1,25(OH)₂D₃ on Cyp3a and Cyp24 mRNA. However, the farnesoid X receptor -related repressive effects on liver Cyp7a1 were absent because intestinal Asbt, FGF15 and portal bile acid concentrations were unchanged. Rats on the alternate day regimen showed milder changes and lessened signs of hypercalcemia and weight loss compared with rats receiving daily injections (similar or greater amounts of 0.64-2.56 nmol/kg daily ×4) described in previous reports, showing that the protracted pretreatment regimen was associated with milder inductive and lesser toxic effects in vivo. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Homology to peptide pattern for annotation of carbohydrate-active enzymes and prediction of function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busk, P K; Pilgaard, B; Lezyk, M J; Meyer, A S; Lange, L

    2017-04-12

    Carbohydrate-active enzymes are found in all organisms and participate in key biological processes. These enzymes are classified in 274 families in the CAZy database but the sequence diversity within each family makes it a major task to identify new family members and to provide basis for prediction of enzyme function. A fast and reliable method for de novo annotation of genes encoding carbohydrate-active enzymes is to identify conserved peptides in the curated enzyme families followed by matching of the conserved peptides to the sequence of interest as demonstrated for the glycosyl hydrolase and the lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase families. This approach not only assigns the enzymes to families but also provides functional prediction of the enzymes with high accuracy. We identified conserved peptides for all enzyme families in the CAZy database with Peptide Pattern Recognition. The conserved peptides were matched to protein sequence for de novo annotation and functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes with the Hotpep method. Annotation of protein sequences from 12 bacterial and 16 fungal genomes to families with Hotpep had an accuracy of 0.84 (measured as F1-score) compared to semiautomatic annotation by the CAZy database whereas the dbCAN HMM-based method had an accuracy of 0.77 with optimized parameters. Furthermore, Hotpep provided a functional prediction with 86% accuracy for the annotated genes. Hotpep is available as a stand-alone application for MS Windows. Hotpep is a state-of-the-art method for automatic annotation and functional prediction of carbohydrate-active enzymes.

  18. Blood superoxiddismutase and catalase: enzymes activity under oxidative stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Каріна Леонідівна Шамелашвілі

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The activity of catalase and superoxide dismutase depends not only on the used compounds of rhenium, and also on their dimensional structure and form of applying. It is established that the cis- and trans-isomers of complex compounds of rhenium did countervailing effect on superoxide dismutase and catalase activities. Cis-isomers of Rhenium dycarboxylats agreed increased activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase. While under the action of trans-isomers, where increased activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase activity decreased

  19. Catechins Variously Affect Activities of Conjugation Enzymes in Proliferating and Differentiated Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kateřina Lněničková

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of processes in intestinal cells is essential, as most xenobiotics come into contact with the small intestine first. Caco-2 cells are human colorectal adenocarcinoma that once differentiated, exhibit enterocyte-like characteristics. Our study compares activities and expressions of important conjugation enzymes and their modulation by green tea extract (GTE and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG using both proliferating (P and differentiated (D caco-2 cells. The mRNA levels of the main conjugation enzymes were significantly elevated after the differentiation of Caco-2 cells. However, no increase in conjugation enzymes’ activities in differentiated cells was detected in comparison to proliferating ones. GTE/EGCG treatment did not affect the mRNA levels of any of the conjugation enzymes tested in either type of cells. Concerning conjugation enzymes activities, GTE/EGCG treatment elevated glutathione S-transferase (GST activity by approx. 30% and inhibited catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT activity by approx. 20% in differentiated cells. On the other hand, GTE as well as EGCG treatment did not significantly affect the activities of conjugation enzymes in proliferating cells. Administration of GTE/EGCG mediated only mild changes of GST and COMT activities in enterocyte-like cells, indicating a low risk of GTE/EGCG interactions with concomitantly administered drugs. However, a considerable chemo-protective effect of GTE via the pronounced induction of detoxifying enzymes cannot be expected as well.

  20. Chrysanthemyl diphosphate synthase operates in planta as a bifunctional enzyme with chrysanthemol synthase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Ting; Gao, Liping; Hu, Hao

    2014-01-01

    (CPP). Three proteins are known to catalyze this cyclopropanation reaction of terpene precursors. Two of them, phytoene and squalene synthase, are bifunctional enzymes with both prenyltransferase and terpene synthase activity. CDS, the other member, has been reported to perform only...

  1. Cyanide does more to inhibit heme enzymes, than merely serving as an active-site ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parashar, Abhinav [Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 India (India); Venkatachalam, Avanthika [REDOx Lab, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Avinashi Road, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641004 (India); Gideon, Daniel Andrew [Center for Biomedical Research, VIT University, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, 632014 India (India); Manoj, Kelath Murali, E-mail: satyamjayatu@yahoo.com [REDOx Lab, PSG Institute of Advanced Studies, Avinashi Road, Peelamedu, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, 641004 (India)

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • Cyanide (CN) is a well-studied toxic principle, known to inhibit heme-enzymes. • Inhibition is supposed to result from CN binding at the active site as a ligand. • Diverse heme enzymes’ CN inhibition profiles challenge prevailing mechanism. • Poor binding efficiency of CN at low enzyme concentrations and ligand pressures. • CN-based diffusible radicals cause ‘non-productive electron transfers’ (inhibition). - Abstract: The toxicity of cyanide is hitherto attributed to its ability to bind to heme proteins’ active site and thereby inhibit their activity. It is shown herein that the long-held interpretation is inadequate to explain several observations in heme-enzyme reaction systems. Generation of cyanide-based diffusible radicals in heme-enzyme reaction milieu could shunt electron transfers (by non-active site processes), and thus be detrimental to the efficiency of oxidative outcomes.

  2. Development of Activity-based Cost Functions for Cellulase, Invertase, and Other Enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stowers, Chris C.; Ferguson, Elizabeth M.; Tanner, Robert D.

    As enzyme chemistry plays an increasingly important role in the chemical industry, cost analysis of these enzymes becomes a necessity. In this paper, we examine the aspects that affect the cost of enzymes based upon enzyme activity. The basis for this study stems from a previously developed objective function that quantifies the tradeoffs in enzyme purification via the foam fractionation process (Cherry et al., Braz J Chem Eng 17:233-238, 2000). A generalized cost function is developed from our results that could be used to aid in both industrial and lab scale chemical processing. The generalized cost function shows several nonobvious results that could lead to significant savings. Additionally, the parameters involved in the operation and scaling up of enzyme processing could be optimized to minimize costs. We show that there are typically three regimes in the enzyme cost analysis function: the low activity prelinear region, the moderate activity linear region, and high activity power-law region. The overall form of the cost analysis function appears to robustly fit the power law form.

  3. Deactivation and activation of lignocellulose degrading enzymes in the presence of laccase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeira Ázar, Rafaela I S; Morgan, Túlio; Dos Santos, Antonio Carlos Freitas; de Aquino Ximenes, Eduardo; Ladisch, Michael R; Guimarães, Valéria M

    2018-02-01

    Cellulase and hemicellulase activities in a 1:1 ratio of enzymes extracted from Chrysoporthe cubensis and Penicillium pinophilum were evaluated in the presence of known monocomponent phenolic inhibitors and also with phenol mixtures derived from alkali pretreated sugarcane bagasse. The cellulolytic activities from C. cubensis:P. pinophilum displayed a much higher tolerance to phenolic inhibitors than equivalent enzyme activities obtained from Trichoderma reesei and Aspergillus niger. Enzymes from T. reesei and A. niger were deactivated at 0.3 and 1.5mg phenols/mg protein, respectively, as reported previously, while enzymes from C. cubensis:P. pinophilum resisted deactivation at 35mg phenols/mg protein. However, tolerance of xylanase with respect to phenols required the presence of laccase. Removal of laccase (enzyme) activity using sodium azide resulted in a 2x higher xylanase deactivation (from 40% to 80%). This paper identifies enzymes that are phenol tolerant, and whose adoption for lignocellulose hydrolysis could contribute to reductions in enzyme loading needed to hydrolyze alkali pretreated lignocellulosic substrates in the presence of lignin derived phenols. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modest induction of phase 2 enzyme activity in the F-344 rat prostate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooks James D

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prostate cancer is the most commonly diagnosed malignancy in men and is thought to arise as a result of endogenous oxidative stress in the face of compromised carcinogen defenses. We tested whether carcinogen defense (phase 2 enzymes could be induced in the prostate tissues of rats after oral feeding of candidate phase 2 enzyme inducing compounds. Methods Male F344 rats were gavage fed sulforaphane, β-naphthoflavone, curcumin, dimethyl fumarate or vehicle control over five days, and on the sixth day, prostate, liver, kidney and bladder tissues were harvested. Cytosolic enzyme activities of nicotinamide quinone oxidoreductase (NQO1, total glutathione transferase (using DCNB and mu-class glutathione transferase (using CDNB were determined in the treated and control animals and compared. Results In prostatic tissues, sulforaphane produced modest but significant increases in the enzymatic activities of NQO1, total GST and GST-mu compared to control animals. β-naphthoflavone significantly increased NQO1 and GST-mu activities and curcumin increased total GST and GST-mu enzymatic activities. Dimethyl fumarate did not significantly increase prostatic phase 2 enzyme activity. Compared to control animals, sulforaphane also significantly induced NQO1 or total GST enzyme activity in the liver, kidney and, most significantly, in the bladder tissues. All compounds were well tolerated over the course of the gavage feedings. Conclusion Orally administered compounds will induce modestly phase 2 enzyme activity in the prostate although the significance of this degree of induction is unknown. The 4 different compounds also altered phase 2 enzyme activity to different degrees in different tissue types. Orally administered sulforaphane potently induces phase 2 enzymes in bladder tissues and should be investigated as a bladder cancer preventive agent.

  5. Changes in activity of extracellular enzymes in dual cultures of Lentinula edodes and mycoparasitic Trichoderma strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatvani, N; Kredics, L; Antal, Z; Mécs, I

    2002-01-01

    The main problem that arises during the cultivation of Lentinula edodes, the Asian Shiitake mushroom, is that the logs on which the cultivation is performed are contaminated by competing micro-organisms, especially Trichoderma spp. The aim of this study was to examine the changes in activity of extracellular enzymes in dual cultures of Trichoderma spp. and L. edodes. Extracellular enzyme activities were determined spectrophotometrically. Trichoderma enzymes important for the degradation of fungal cell walls (N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase and laminarinase) were shown to be induced by inactive L. edodes mycelia in liquid culture. The changes that occurred in the extracellular enzyme activities of L. edodes and mycoparasitic Trichoderma spp. (T. aureoviride, T. harzianum and T. viride) were examined during antagonistic interactions on solid medium. The extracellular enzyme patterns of both partners proved to be altered. Trichoderma spp. were induced to produce N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase and laminarinase in the presence of active L. edodes mycelia, similarly as observed in liquid culture. The activities of both laccase and manganese peroxidase of L. edodes decreased after physical contact with active Trichoderma mycelia, possibly in consequence of the beginning of degradation of L. edodes by the Trichoderma enzymes. However, besides a decrease in manganese peroxidase activity, an enhancement of L. edodes laccase activity was observed on solid media containing crude culture fluids from Trichoderma liquid cultures. The metabolites responsible for these effects proved to be heat stable. Induction and inhibition of several extracellular enzymes of both partners were shown in dual cultures of L. edodes and Trichoderma strains, indicating the important role of these enzymes in the antagonistic interaction between the two species. As the main problem during the large-scale cultivation of L. edodes is the contamination of the growth substrate by Trichoderma mycelia, the

  6. Defying the activity-stability trade-off in enzymes: taking advantage of entropy to enhance activity and thermostability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail

    2017-05-01

    The biotechnological applications of enzymes are limited due to the activity-stability trade-off, which implies that an increase in activity is accompanied by a concomitant decrease in protein stability. This premise is based on thermally adapted homologous enzymes where cold-adapted enzymes show high intrinsic activity linked to enhanced thermolability. In contrast, thermophilic enzymes show low activity around ambient temperatures. Nevertheless, genetically and chemically modified enzymes are beginning to show that the activity-stability trade-off can be overcome. In this review, the origin of the activity-stability trade-off, the thermodynamic basis for enhanced activity and stability, and various approaches for escaping the activity-stability trade-off are discussed. The role of entropy in enhancing both the activity and the stability of enzymes is highlighted with a special emphasis placed on the involvement of solvent water molecules. This review is concluded with suggestions for further research, which underscores the implications of these findings in the context of productivity curves, the Daniel-Danson equilibrium model, catalytic antibodies, and life on cold planets.

  7. Localization of angiotensin converting enzyme in rabbit cornea and its role in controlling corneal angiogenesis in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajay; Bettis, Daniel I; Cowden, John W; Mohan, Rajiv R

    2010-04-23

    The renin angiotensin system (RAS) has been shown to modulate vascular endothelial growth factor and angiogenesis. In this study we investigated (i) the existence of the RAS components angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) and angiotensin II receptors (AT(1) and AT(2)) in the rabbit cornea using in vitro and ex vivo models and (ii) the effect of enalapril, an ACE inhibitor, to inhibit angiogenesis in rabbit cornea in vivo. New Zealand White rabbits were used. Cultured corneal fibroblasts and corneal epithelial cells were used for RNA isolation and cDNA preparation using standard molecular biology techniques. PCR was performed to detect the presence of ACE, AT(1), and AT(2) gene expression. A corneal micropocket assay to implant a vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) pellet in the rabbit cornea was used to induce corneal angiogenesis. Rabbits of the control group received sterile water, and the treated group received 3 mg/kg enalapril intramuscularly once daily for 14 days starting from day 1 of pellet implantation. The clinical eye examination was performed by slit-lamp biomicroscopy. We monitored the level of corneal angiogenesis in live animals by stereomicroscopy at days 4, 9, and 14 after VEGF pellet implantation. Collagen type IV and lectin immunohistochemistry and fluorescent microscopy were used to measure corneal angiogenesis in tissue sections of control and enalapril-treated corneas of the rabbits. Image J software was used to quantify corneal angiogenesis in the rabbit eye in situ. Our data demonstrated the presence of ACE, AT(1), and AT(2) expression in corneal fibroblasts. Cells of corneal epithelium expressed AT(1) and AT(2) but did not show ACE expression. Slit-lamp examination did not show any significant difference between the degree of edema or cellular infiltration between the corneas of control and enalapril-treated rabbits. VEGF pellet implantation caused corneal angiogenesis in the eyes of vehicle-treated control rabbits, and the mean area

  8. Antimicrobial activity of extracts from in vivo and in vitro propagated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The antimicrobial activity of 18 different extracts from in vivo and in vitro grown L. album L. plants was evaluated against clinical bacteria and yeasts using the well diffusion method. All the used extracts demonstrated antibacterial activity, whereas only the water extracts from leaves (in vivo) possessed antifungal activity ...

  9. Effects of Eupatilin and Jaceosidin on Cytochrome P450 Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hyun Jeong

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Eupatilin and jaceosidin are bioactive flavones found in the medicinal herbs of the genus Artemisia. These bioactive flavones exhibit various antioxidant, antiinflammatory, antiallergic, and antitumor activities. The inhibitory potentials of eupatilin and jaceosidin on the activities of seven major human cytochrome P450 enzymes in human liver microsomes were investigated using a cocktail probe assay. Eupatilin and jaceosidin potently inhibited CYP1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylation with 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 9.4 mM and 5.3 mM, respectively, and CYP2C9-catalyzed diclofenac 4-hydroxylation with IC50 values of 4.1 mM and 10.2 mM, respectively. Eupatilin and jaceosidin were also found to moderately inhibit CYP2C19-catalyzed [S]-mephenytoin 4¢-hydroxylation, CYP2D6-catalyzed bufuralol 1¢-hydroxylation, and CYP2C8-catalyzed amodiaquine N-deethylation. Kinetic analysis of human liver microsomes showed that eupatilin is a competitive inhibitor of CYP1A2 with a Ki value of 2.3 mM and a mixed-type inhibitor of CYP2C9 with a Ki value of 1.6 mM. Jaceosidin was shown to be a competitive inhibitor of CYP1A2 with a Ki value of 3.8 mM and a mixed-type inhibitor of CYP2C9 with Ki value of 6.4 mM in human liver microsomes. These in vitro results suggest that eupatilin and jaceosidin should be further examined for potential pharmacokinetic drug interactions in vivo due to inhibition of CYP1A2 and CYP2C9.

  10. In vivo antioxidant and hepatoprotective activity of methanolic extracts of Daucus carota seeds in experimental animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kamlesh; Singh, Nisha; Chandy, Anish; Manigauha, Ashish

    2012-01-01

    Objective To assess the In vivo antioxidFant and hepatoprotective activity of methanolic extract of Daucus carota (D. carota) seeds in experimental animals. Methods Methanolic extracts of D. carota seeds is used for hepatoprotection assessment. Oxidative stress were induced in rats by thioacetamide 100 mg/kg s.c, in four groups of rats (two test, standard and toxic control). Two test groups received D. carota seeds extract (DCSE) at doses of 200 mg/kg and 400 mg/kg. Standard group received silymarin (25 mg/kg) and toxic control received only thioacetamide. Control group received only vehicle. On the 8th day animals were sacrificed and liver enzyme like serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase (SGPT), serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were estimated in blood serum and antioxidant enzyme like superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione reductase (GRD), glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione-S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation (LPO) were estimated in liver homogenate. Results A significant decrease in SGPT, SGOT and ALP levels was observed in all drug treated groups as compared to thioacetamide group (P < 0.001) and in case of antioxidant enzyme a significant (P < 0.001) increase in SOD, CAT, GRD, GPX and GST was observed in all drug treated groups as compared with thioacetamide group. But in case of LPO a significant (P < 0.001) reduction was observed as compared to toxic control group. Conclusions DCSE has contributed to the reduction of oxidative stress and the protection of liver in experimental rats. PMID:23569935

  11. Tree species composition influences enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere: a rhizobox approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shengzuo; Liu, Dong; Tian, Ye; Deng, Shiping; Shang, Xulan

    2013-01-01

    Monoculture causes nutrient losses and leads to declines in soil fertility and biomass production over successive cultivation. The rhizosphere, a zone of usually high microbial activities and clearly distinct from bulk soil, is defined as the volume of soil around living roots and influenced by root activities. Here we investigated enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere under different tree compositions. Six treatments with poplar, willow, and alder mono- or mixed seedlings were grown in rhizoboxes. Enzyme activities associated with nitrogen cycling and microbial biomass were measured in all rhizosphere and bulk soils. Both enzyme activities and microbial biomass in the rhizosphere differed significantly tree compositions. Microbial biomass contents were more sensitive to the changes of the rhizosphere environment than enzyme activities. Tree species coexistence did not consistently increase tested enzyme activities and microbial biomass, but varied depending on the complementarities of species traits. In general, impacts of tree species and coexistence were more pronounced on microbial composition than total biomass, evidenced by differences in microbial biomass C/N ratios stratified across the rhizosphere soils. Compared to poplar clone monoculture, other tree species addition obviously increased rhizosphere urease activity, but greatly reduced rhizosphere L-asparaginase activity. Poplar growth was enhanced only when coexisted with alder. Our results suggested that a highly productive or keystone plant species in a community had greater influence over soil functions than the contribution of diversity.

  12. Variant Amino Acid Residues Alter the Enzyme Activity of Peanut Type 2 Diacylglycerol Acyltransferases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zheng

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT catalyzes the final step in triacylglycerol (TAG biosynthesis via the acyl-CoA-dependent acylation of diacylglycerol. This reaction is a major control point in the Kennedy pathway for biosynthesis of TAG, which is the most important form of stored metabolic energy in most oil-producing plants. In this study, Arachis hypogaea type 2 DGAT (AhDGAT2 genes were cloned from the peanut cultivar ‘Luhua 14.’ Sequence analysis of 11 different peanut cultivars revealed a gene family of 8 peanut DGAT2 genes (designated AhDGAT2a-h. Sequence alignments revealed 21 nucleotide differences between the eight ORFs, but only six differences result in changes to the predicted amino acid (AA sequences. A representative full-length cDNA clone (AhDGAT2a was characterized in detail. The biochemical effects of altering the AhDGAT2a sequence to include single variable AA residues were tested by mutagenesis and functional complementation assays in transgenic yeast systems. All six mutant variants retained enzyme activity and produced lipid droplets in vivo. The N6D and A26P mutants also displayed increased enzyme activity and/or total cellular fatty acid (FA content. N6D mutant mainly increased the content of palmitoleic acid, and A26P mutant mainly increased the content of palmitic acid. The A26P mutant grew well both in the presence of oleic and C18:2, but the other mutants grew better in the presence of C18:2. AhDGAT2 is expressed in all peanut organs analyzed, with high transcript levels in leaves and flowers. These levels are comparable to that found in immature seeds, where DGAT2 expression is most abundant in other plants. Over-expression of AhDGAT2a in tobacco substantially increased the FA content of transformed tobacco seeds. Expression of AhDGAT2a also altered transcription levels of endogenous tobacco lipid metabolic genes in transgenic tobacco, apparently creating a larger carbon ‘sink’ that supports increased FA

  13. Kinetics of soil enzyme activities under different ecosystems: An index of soil quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monty Kujur

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Soil microbial activity plays an important role in regulating biotransformation, nutrient cycling and hence the microbiological processes are at the center of many ecological functions. The kinetic parameters (Vmax and KmMichaelis constant of different enzymes (amylase, invertase, protease, urease, and dehydrogenase were determined in order to assess the metabolic response of soil. The maximum reaction velocity (Vmax represents a maximum rate of activity when all enzymes are saturated, which markedly increased in forest soil as compared to fresh mine spoil due to the gradual accumulation of soil organic matter. Smaller Km value was estimated in forest soil (FS as compared to fresh mine spoil (FMS, suggesting the greater affinity of soil enzymes for substrate in FS. The catalytic efficiency (Vmax /Km reflects an impression on microbial community composition with a change in soil enzymes. These enzyme characters (activities and kinetic parameters have greater significance as early and sensitive indicators of the changes in soil properties induced by different management systems. These parameters (Vmax and Km can be useful markers to assess changes in microbial activity of soil, since they represent quantity and affinity of enzymes respectively. The metabolic index (dehydrogenase activity/organic carbon (OC was found to be correlated with Vmax of dehydrogenase (r = 0.953; p < 0.01 and OC (r = 0.880; p < 0.01. Principal component analysis was able to discriminate seven different soil samples into seven independent clusters based on their enzyme activities and kinetic parameters. Indeed, the study revealed the importance of kinetics study of soil enzymes, which can be considered valid parameters to monitor the evolution of microbiological activity in soil, and hence an index of soil quality.

  14. Activities of some enzymes associated with oxygen metablolism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-26

    Apr 26, 2010 ... Significant correlations and regressions exist among the changes observed in the SOD activity, CAT activity, MDA content, cell permeability and the relative water content. Key words: Drought stress, plant metabolism, reactive oxygen, lipid peroxidation, apple plant. INTRODUCTION. Apple (Malus domestica ...

  15. Activities of some enzymes associated with oxygen metablolism ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Measurements were made on the relative water content, cell permeability, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, catalase (CAT) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in Malus micromalus seedling during dehydration in vitro in whole seedling and during dehydration in culture of different PEG 6000 concentration.

  16. Visualization of enzyme activities inside earthworm biopores by in situ soil zymography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thu Duyen Hoang, Thi; Razavi, Bahar. S.; Blagodatskaya, Evgenia; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2015-04-01

    Earthworms can strongly activate microorganisms, increase microbial and enzyme activities and consequently the turnover of native soil organic matter. In extremely dynamic microhabitats and hotspots as biopores made by earthworms, the in situ enzyme activities are a footprint of complex biotic interactions. The effect of earthworms on the alteration of enzyme activities inside biopores and the difference between bio-pores and earthworm-free soil was visualized by in situ soil zymography (Spohn and Kuzyakov, 2014). For the first time, we prepared quantitative imaging of enzyme activities in biopores. Furthermore, we developed the zymography technique by direct application of a substrate saturated membrane to the soil to obtain better spatial resolution. Lumbricus terrestris L. was placed into transparent box (15×20×15cm). Simultaneously, maize seed was sown in the soil. Control soil box with maize and without earthworm was prepared in the same way. After two weeks when bio-pore systems were formed by earthworm, we visualized in situ enzyme activities of five hydrolytic enzymes (β-glucosidase, cellobiohydrolase, chitinase, xylanase, leucine aminopeptidase) and phosphatase. Followed by non-destructive zymography, biopore samples and control soil were destructively collected to assay enzyme kinetics by fluorogenically labeled substrates method. Zymography showed higher activity of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores comparing to bulk soil. These differences were further confirmed by fluorimetric microplate enzyme assay detected significant difference of Vmax in four above mentioned enzymes. Vmax of β-glucosidase, chitinase, xylanase and phosphatase in biopores is 68%, 108%, 50% and 49% higher than that of control soil. However, no difference in cellobiohydrolase and leucine aminopeptidase kinetics between biopores and control soil were detected. This indicated little effect of earthworms on protein and cellulose transformation in soil

  17. Lactate racemase is a nickel-dependent enzyme activated by a widespread maturation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desguin, Benoît; Goffin, Philippe; Viaene, Eric; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Martin-Diaconescu, Vlad; Maroney, Michael J; Declercq, Jean-Paul; Soumillion, Patrice; Hols, Pascal

    2014-01-01

    Racemases catalyze the inversion of stereochemistry in biological molecules, giving the organism the ability to use both isomers. Among them, lactate racemase remains unexplored due to its intrinsic instability and lack of molecular characterization. Here we determine the genetic basis of lactate racemization in Lactobacillus plantarum. We show that, unexpectedly, the racemase is a nickel-dependent enzyme with a novel α/β fold. In addition, we decipher the process leading to an active enzyme, which involves the activation of the apo-enzyme by a single nickel-containing maturation protein that requires preactivation by two other accessory proteins. Genomic investigations reveal the wide distribution of the lactate racemase system among prokaryotes, showing the high significance of both lactate enantiomers in carbon metabolism. The even broader distribution of the nickel-based maturation system suggests a function beyond activation of the lactate racemase and possibly linked with other undiscovered nickel-dependent enzymes. PMID:24710389

  18. Extracellular enzyme activities of the monokaryotic strains generated from basidiospores of shiitake mushroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyuk Woo; Back, In Joung; Ko, Han Gyu; You, Chang Hyun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2008-03-01

    To obtain basic information on the biochemical property of basidiospores of shiitake mushroom (Lentinula edodes), the ability of producing extracellular enzyme was assessed using a chromogenic plate-based assay. For the aim, amylase, avicelase, β-glucosidase, CM-cellulase, pectinase, proteinase, and xylanase were tested against monokaryotic strains generated from forty basidiospores of two different parental dikaryotic strains of shiitake mushroom, Sanjo-101Ho and Sanjo-108Ho. These two parental strains showed different degree of extracellular enzyme activity. No identical patterns of the degree of enzyme activity were observed between monokaryotic strains and parental strains of the two shiitake cultivars. The degree of extracellular enzyme activity also varied among monokaryotic strains of the two shiitake cultivars. Our results showed that dikaryotic parental strains of shiitake mushroom produce monokaryotic basidiospores having very diverse biochemical properties.

  19. Microtubule Formation and Activities of Antioxidative Enzymes in PC12 Cells Exposed to Phosphatidylcholine Hydroperoxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukako Yamanaka

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Aging increases free radical generation and lipid oxidation and, thereby, mediates neurodegenerative diseases. As the brain is rich in lipids (polyunsaturated fatty acids, the antioxidative system plays an important role in protecting brain tissues from oxidative injury. The changes in microtubule formation and antioxidative enzyme activities have been investigated in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells exposed to various concentrations of phosphatidylcholine hydroperoxides (PCOOH. We measured three typical antioxidative enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx, and catalase (CAT. The microtubule assembly system was dependent on the antioxidative enzyme system in cells exposed to oxidative stress. The activities of the three enzymes increased in a PCOOH exposure-dependent manner. In particular, the changes in the activity as a result of PCOOH exposure were similar in the three antioxidative enzymes. This is the first report indicating the compatibility between the tubulin-microtubule and antioxidative enzyme systems in cells that deteriorate as a result of phospholipid hydroperoxide administration from an exterior source. The descending order of sensitivity of the three enzymes to PCOOH is also discussed.

  20. Spatial localization of the first and last enzymes effectively connects active metabolic pathways in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pablo; Cecchi, Guillermo; Stolovitzky, Gustavo

    2014-12-14

    Although much is understood about the enzymatic cascades that underlie cellular biosynthesis, comparatively little is known about the rules that determine their cellular organization. We performed a detailed analysis of the localization of E.coli GFP-tagged enzymes for cells growing exponentially. We found that out of 857 globular enzymes, at least 219 have a discrete punctuate localization in the cytoplasm and catalyze the first or the last reaction in 60% of biosynthetic pathways. A graph-theoretic analysis of E.coli's metabolic network shows that localized enzymes, in contrast to non-localized ones, form a tree-like hierarchical structure, have a higher within-group connectivity, and are traversed by a higher number of feed-forward and feedback loops than their non-localized counterparts. A Gene Ontology analysis of these enzymes reveals an enrichment of terms related to essential metabolic functions in growing cells. Given that these findings suggest a distinct metabolic role for localization, we studied the dynamics of cellular localization of the cell wall synthesizing enzymes in B. subtilis and found that enzymes localize during exponential growth but not during stationary growth. We conclude that active biochemical pathways inside the cytoplasm are organized spatially following a rule where their first or their last enzymes localize to effectively connect the different active pathways and thus could reflect the activity state of the cell's metabolic network.

  1. Chromatographic assay to study the activity of multiple enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of dopamine and serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Lindsay D; Baker, Hannah; Yeoman, Mark S; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2012-03-21

    Serotonin and dopamine are crucial regulators of signalling in the peripheral and central nervous systems. We present an ex-vivo, isocratic chromatographic method that allows for the measurement of tyrosine, L-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (L-DOPA), dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), tryptophan, 5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), serotonin and 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) in a model central nervous (CNS) system, to study the role of key enzymes involved in the synthesis and metabolism of serotonin and dopamine. By utilising a sample splitting technique, we could test a single CNS sample at multiple time points under various pharmacological treatments. In, addition, we were able to conduct this assay by utilising the endogenous biochemical components of the CNS to study the synthesis and metabolism of serotonin and dopamine, negating the requirement of additional enzyme activators or stabilisers in the biological matrix. Finally we utilised NSD-1015, an aromatic amino acid decarboxylase enzyme inhibitor used to study the synthesis of dopamine and serotonin to monitor alterations in levels of key neurochemicals. 3-hydroxybenzylhydrazine dihydrochloride (NSD-1015) was able to reduce levels of serotonin and dopamine, whilst elevating precursors L-DOPA and 5-HTP.

  2. A new method for evaluating mucolytic expectorant activity and its application. II. Application to two proteolytic enzymes, serratiopeptidase and seaprose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasé, Y; Seo, H; Oyama, Y; Sakata, M; Tomoda, K; Takahama, K; Hitoshi, T; Okano, Y; Miyata, T

    1982-01-01

    Using our new method described in a preceding paper, in vivo effects of two proteolytic enzymes such as serratiopeptidase (SER) and seaprose (SAP) on sputa collected from bronchitis rabbits were examined. SER (20 mg/kg) and SAP (30 mg/kg) significantly reduced the viscosity of sputum (P less than 0.05) at the 1-3-h periods and the 4-6-h periods, respectively, after intraduodenal administration. 50 mg/kg of SER also significantly decreased not only viscosity (P less than 0.001) but also amount of freeze-dried substance (P less than 0.05) of sputum at the 1-3-h periods, but SAP did not affect the amount of dried substance. Both enzymes significantly increased the volume of sputum, probably as the result of liquefaction. Thus, mucolytic expectorant activity of both enzymes can be demonstrated first by the reduction in viscosity and next of the increase in volume of sputa. However, the decrease in amount of freeze-dried substance is not always in accord with the reduction viscosity.

  3. In vivo antitumoral activity of stem pineapple (Ananas comosus) bromelain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Báez, Roxana; Lopes, Miriam T; Salas, Carlos E; Hernández, Martha

    2007-10-01

    Stem bromelain (EC 3.4.22.32) is a major cysteine proteinase, isolated from pineapple ( Ananas comosus) stem. Its main medicinal use is recognized as digestive, in vaccine formulation, antitumoral and skin debrider for the treatment of burns. To verify the identity of the principle in stem fractions responsible for the antitumoral effect, we isolated bromelain to probe its pharmacological effects. The isolated bromelain was obtained from stems of adult pineapple plants by buffered aqueous extraction and cationic chromatography. The homogeneity of bromelain was confirmed by reverse phase HPLC, SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing. The in vivo antitumoral/antileukemic activity was evaluated using the following panel of tumor lines: P-388 leukemia, sarcoma (S-37), Ehrlich ascitic tumor (EAT), Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC), MB-F10 melanoma and ADC-755 mammary adenocarcinoma. Intraperitoneal administration of bromelain (1, 12.5, 25 mg/kg), began 24 h after tumor cell inoculation in experiments in which 5-fluorouracil (5-FU, 20 mg/kg) was used as positive control. The antitumoral activity was assessed by the survival increase (% survival index) following various treatments. With the exception of MB-F10 melanoma, all other tumor-bearing animals had a significantly increased survival index after bromelain treatment. The largest increase ( approximately 318 %) was attained in mice bearing EAT ascites and receiving 12.5 mg/kg of bromelain. This antitumoral effect was superior to that of 5-FU, whose survival index was approximately 263 %, relative to the untreated control. Bromelain significantly reduced the number of lung metastasis induced by LLC transplantation, as observed with 5-FU. The antitumoral activity of bromelain against S-37 and EAT, which are tumor models sensitive to immune system mediators, and the unchanged tumor progression in the metastatic model suggests that the antimetastatic action results from a mechanism independent of the primary antitumoral effect.

  4. Pyruvate formate lyase (PFL) and PFL activating enzyme in the chytrid fungus Neocallimastix frontalis: a free-radical enzyme system conserved across divergent eukaryotic lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelius-Dietrich, Gabriel; Henze, Katrin

    2004-01-01

    Fermentative formate production involves the activity of pyruvate formate lyase, an oxygen-sensitive enzyme that employs a glycyl radical in its reaction mechanism. While common among anaerobic prokaryotes, this enzyme has so far been found in only two distantly related eukaryotic lineages, anaerobic chytridiomycetes and chlorophytes. Sequence comparisons of homologues from the chytridiomycetes Piromyces and Neocallimastix, the chlorophyte Chlamydomonas, and numerous prokaryotes suggest a single, eubacterial origin of eukaryotic pyruvate formate lyases. Pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme introduces the glycyl radical into the pyruvate formate lyase protein chain. We discovered this enzyme, which had not previously been reported from eukaryotes, in the same two eukaryotic lineages and show that it shares a similar evolutionary history to pyruvate formate lyase. Sequences with high homology to pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme were identified in the genomes of the anaerobic protozoan parasites Trichomonas vaginalis, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia intestinalis. While the occurrence of pyruvate formate lyase activating enzyme together with pyruvate formate lyase in fungi and chlorophytes was to be expected, the target protein of a glycyl radical enzyme-activating enzyme in these protozoa remains to be identified.

  5. Amelioration of altered antioxidant enzymes activity and glomerulosclerosis by coenzyme Q10 in alloxan-induced diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadvand, Hassan; Tavafi, Majid; Khosrowbeygi, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Coenzyme Q10 is a natural antioxidant and scavenging free radicals. In the present study, we examined antioxidative activities of coenzyme Q10 and possible protective effect of coenzyme Q10 on in vivo and in vitro lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzymes activity and glomerulosclerosis in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Thirty Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided into three groups randomly: group 1 as control, group 2 as diabetic untreatment, and group 3 as treatments with coenzyme Q10 by 15 mg/kg i.p. daily, respectively. Diabetes was induced in the second and third groups by alloxan injection subcutaneously. After 8 weeks, animals were anaesthetized, liver and kidney were then removed immediately and used fresh or kept frozen until their lipid peroxidation analysis. Blood samples were also collected before killing to measure the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity. Kidney paraffin sections were prepared and stained by periodic acid-Schiff method. Glomerular volume and leukocyte infiltration were estimated by stereological rules and glomerular sclerosis was studied semi-quantitatively. Coenzyme Q10 significantly inhibited leukocyte infiltration, glomerulosclerosis and the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) serum and kidney content in treated group compared with the diabetic untreated group. Coenzyme Q10 significantly inhibited LDL oxidation in vitro. Coenzyme Q10 significantly increased the serum levels of glutathione (GSH) and serum activity of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) in treated group compared with the diabetic untreated group. Coenzyme Q10 alleviates leukocyte infiltration and glomerulosclerosis and exerts beneficial effects on the lipid peroxidation and antioxidant enzymes activity in alloxan-induced type 1 diabetic rats. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Strawberry Polyphenols Attenuate Ethanol-Induced Gastric Lesions in Rats by Activation of Antioxidant Enzymes and Attenuation of MDA Increase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Suarez, José M.; Dekanski, Dragana; Ristić, Slavica; Radonjić, Nevena V.; Petronijević, Nataša D.; Giampieri, Francesca; Astolfi, Paola; González-Paramás, Ana M.; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; Tulipani, Sara; Quiles, José L.; Mezzetti, Bruno; Battino, Maurizio

    2011-01-01

    Background and Aim Free radicals are implicated in the aetiology of gastrointestinal disorders such as gastric ulcer, colorectal cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. Strawberries are common and important fruit due to their high content of essential nutrient and beneficial phytochemicals which seem to have relevant biological activity on human health. In the present study we investigated the antioxidant and protective effects of three strawberry extracts against ethanol-induced gastric mucosa damage in an experimental in vivo model and to test whether strawberry extracts affect antioxidant enzyme activities in gastric mucosa. Methods/Principal Findings Strawberry extracts were obtained from Adria, Sveva and Alba cultivars. Total antioxidant capacity and radical scavenging capacity were performed by TEAC, ORAC and electron paramagnetic resonance assays. Identification and quantification of anthocyanins was carried out by HPLC-DAD-MS analyses. Different groups of animals received 40 mg/day/kg body weight of strawberry crude extracts for 10 days. Gastric damage was induced by ethanol. The ulcer index was calculated together with the determination of catalase and SOD activities and MDA contents. Strawberry extracts are rich in anthocyanins and present important antioxidant capacity. Ethanol caused severe gastric damage and strawberry consumption protected against its deleterious role. Antioxidant enzyme activities increased significantly after strawberry extract intake and a concomitantly decrease in gastric lipid peroxidation was found. A significant correlation between total anthocyanin content and percent of inhibition of ulcer index was also found. Conclusions Strawberry extracts prevented exogenous ethanol-induced damage to rats' gastric mucosa. These effects seem to be associated with the antioxidant activity and phenolic content in the extract as well as with the capacity of promoting the action of antioxidant enzymes. A diet rich in strawberries might exert a

  7. TransCent: Computational enzyme design by transferring active sites and considering constraints relevant for catalysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sterner Reinhard

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational enzyme design is far from being applicable for the general case. Due to computational complexity and limited knowledge of the structure-function interplay, heuristic methods have to be used. Results We have developed TransCent, a computational enzyme design method supporting the transfer of active sites from one enzyme to an alternative scaffold. In an optimization process, it balances requirements originating from four constraints. These are 1 protein stability, 2 ligand binding, 3 pKa values of active site residues, and 4 structural features of the active site. Each constraint is handled by an individual software module. Modules processing the first three constraints are based on state-of-the-art concepts, i.e. RosettaDesign, DrugScore, and PROPKA. To account for the fourth constraint, knowledge-based potentials are utilized. The contribution of modules to the performance of TransCent was evaluated by means of a recapitulation test. The redesign of oxidoreductase cytochrome P450 was analyzed in detail. As a first application, we present and discuss models for the transfer of active sites in enzymes sharing the frequently encountered triosephosphate isomerase fold. Conclusion A recapitulation test on native enzymes showed that TransCent proposes active sites that resemble the native enzyme more than those generated by RosettaDesign alone. Additional tests demonstrated that each module contributes to the overall performance in a statistically significant manner.

  8. Effects of diet, pregnancy, and lactation on enzyme activities and gluconeogenesis in ruminant liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesbah, M M; Baldwin, R L

    1983-04-01

    Changes of activities of liver enzymes and of metabolism during pregnancy and lactation have been documented in studies with rodents. Therefore, a study of activities of ruminant liver enzymes and metabolism was undertaken. Several changes of activities of enzymes involved in lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis were observed. However, magnitudes of enzyme change were less than expected from major changes in liver function that accompany lactation. Also, a number of enzymatic changes expected from rodent data were absent. Effects of breed and diet on enzyme activities in cow livers were minimal or absent. Changes in rates of glucose metabolism from lactation were greater than implied by enzyme adaptations. Analysis of kinetic data according to Michaelis-Menten kinetics indicated that apparent maximal velocities of conversion of lactate and propionate to glucose by liver slices from cattle ranged from 10 to 30 mumoles/(g.h) and apparent coefficients were 1.8 to 2.0- mM. Rates of gluconeogenesis with lactate plus propionate were not additive at saturating concentrations. The background data on enzymatic activities, glucose metabolism, lipogenesis, and gluconeogenesis in ruminant liver indicate that sophisticated studies with isolated hepatocytes from ruminants will be required to clarify metabolic adaptations, metabolic patterns, and regulatory mechanism in this tissue.

  9. Immobilization of enzymes to silver island films for enhanced enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Biebele; Aslan, Kadir

    2014-02-01

    The performance of the enzyme-based biosensors depends on the enzymatic activity and the use of an appropriate technique for immobilization of enzymes. The incorporation of silver island films (SIFs) into the enzyme-based biosensors is expected to enhance the enzymatic activity and to increase the detectability of analytes of interest. Two enzymes, β-galactosidase (β-Gal) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) were immobilized onto SIFs using the interactions of avidin-modified enzymes with (i) a monolayer of biotinylated bovine serum albumin (b-BSA) and/or (ii) a monolayer of biotinylated poly(ethylene-glycol)-amine (BEA molecular weight: 550-10,000Da). To confirm the effect of SIFs on enzymatic activity, two control surfaces (no silver) were also employed. No enhancement in enzymatic activity for β-Gal on all SIFs was observed, which was attributed to the inhibition of β-Gal activity due to direct interactions of β-Gal with SIFs. The AP activity on SIFs with BEA was significantly larger than that observed on SIFs with b-BSA, where a 300% increase in AP activity was observed as compared to control surfaces. These observations suggest that SIFs can significantly enhance AP activity, which could help improve the detection limits of ELISAs and immunoassays that employ AP. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Phlorotannins from Alaskan seaweed inhibit carbolytic enzyme activity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kellogg, Joshua; Grace, Mary H; Lila, Mary Ann

    2014-01-01

    ...; significantly more efficacious than the pharmaceutical acarbose (IC50 of 112.0 and 137.8 μg/mL, respectively). The activity of F. distichus fractions was associated with phlorotannin oligomers...

  11. DNA topoisomerase II enzyme activity appears in mouse sperm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sperm suspensions of 4 male mice (A, B, C and D), having an initial motility grade of 3.5 were used to examine the presence of DNA topoisomerase II (top 2) activity in sperm heads. The initial percentage motile of male A was 75%, male B was 80%, male C was 70% and male D was 60%. Top 2 activity was examined by ...

  12. Influence of development and joint pathology on stromelysin enzyme activity in equine synovial fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brama, P.A.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Beekman, B.; El, B. van; Barneveld, A.; Weeren, P.R. van

    2000-01-01

    Objective - To investigate the role of stromelysin (MMP-3) activity in synovial fluid (SF) at different stages of development and in common joint disorders in the horse. Methods - Stromelysin activity was determined with a fluorogenic enzyme activity assay in SF of normal joints of fetal, juvenile

  13. Enzymes extracted from apple peels have activity in reducing higher alcohols in Chinese liquors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Qi'an; Shi, Junling; Zhu, Jing; Lv, Hongliang; Du, Shuangkui

    2014-10-01

    As the unavoidable byproducts of alcoholic fermentation, higher alcohols are unhealthy compounds widespread in alcoholic drinks. To investigate the activity of apple crude enzymes toward higher alcohols in liquors, five kinds of apple peels, namely, Fuji, Gala, Golden Delicious, Red Star, and Jonagold, were chosen to prepare enzymes, and three kinds of Chinese liquors, namely, Xifeng (containing 45% ethanol), Taibai (containing 50% ethanol), and Erguotou (containing 56% ethanol), were tested. Enzymes were prepared in the forms of liquid solution, powder, and immobilized enzymes using sodium alginate (SA) and chitosan. The treatment was carried out at 37 °C for 1 h. The relative amounts of different alcohols (including ethanol, 1-propanol, isobutanol, 1-butanol, isoamylol, and 1-hexanol) were measured using gas chromatography (GC). Conditions for preparing SA-immobilized Fuji enzymes (SA-IEP) were optimized, and the obtained SA-IEP (containing 0.3 g of enzyme) was continuously used to treat Xifeng liquor eight times, 20 mL per time. Significant degradation rates (DRs) of higher alcohols were observed at different degrees, and it also showed enzyme specificity according to the apple varieties and enzyme preparations. After five repeated treatments, the DRs of the optimized Fuji SA-IEP remained 70% for 1-hexanol and >15% for other higher alcohols.

  14. Regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities in male and female rat macrophages by sex steroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azevedo R.B.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Human and animal immune functions present sex dimorphism that seems to be mainly regulated by sex hormones. In the present study, the activities of the antioxidant enzymes total superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px were measured in intraperitoneal resident macrophages from adult male and female rats. In addition to comparing males and females, we also examined the regulation of these enzyme activities in macrophages by sex steroids. GSH-Px activity did not differ between male and female macrophages. However, both total SOD and CAT activities were markedly higher in females than in males (83 and 180%. Removal of the gonads in both males and females (comparison between castrated groups increased the difference in SOD activity from 83 to 138% and reduced the difference in CAT activity from 180 to 86%. Castration and testosterone administration did not significantly modify the activities of the antioxidant enzymes in male macrophages. Ovariectomy did not affect SOD or GSH-Px activity but markedly reduced (48% CAT activity. This latter change was fully reversed by estrogen administration, whereas progesterone had a smaller effect. These results led us to conclude that differences in the SOD and CAT activities may partially explain some of the differences in immune function reported for males and females. Also, estrogen is a potent regulator of CAT in macrophages and therefore this enzyme activity in macrophages may vary considerably during the menstrual cycle.

  15. In vivo and in vitro characterization of CYP2E1 activity in Japanese and Caucasians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, R B; Yamazaki, H; Chiba, K; O'Shea, D; Mimura, M; Guengerich, F P; Ishizaki, T; Shimada, T; Wilkinson, G R

    1996-10-01

    Chlorzoxazone's disposition after oral administration was determined in 20 young healthy Caucasian men and a similar group of Japanese men. The drug's plasma concentrations were significantly higher and its rate of elimination slower in Japanese compared to Caucasian men. Accordingly, chlorzoxazone's oral clearance was smaller (40%) in Japanese men and a similar difference (30%) was still apparent after normalizing for body weight (3.74 +/- 1.23 versus 5.05 +/- 1.41 ml.min-1.kg-1, P relationships were found between measures of CYP2E1 activity, both in vivo and in vitro, and genomic polymorphisms in the CYP2E1 gene identified by Rsal/Pstl and Dral restriction fragment length polymorphisms. Collectively, these data show an interracial difference in CYP2E1 activity. Because this enzyme is importantly involved in the activation of environmental procarcinogens, such a difference may account, in part, for the lower rate of some cancers, e.g., lung cancer, in Japanese compared to Caucasians men.

  16. Response of enzyme activities and microbial communities to soil amendment with sugar alcohols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huili; Si, Peng; Shao, Wei; Qiao, Xiansheng; Yang, Xiaojing; Gao, Dengtao; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-08-01

    Changes in microbial community structure are widely known to occur after soil amendment with low-molecular-weight organic compounds; however, there is little information on concurrent changes in soil microbial functional diversity and enzyme activities, especially following sorbitol and mannitol amendment. Soil microbial functional diversity and enzyme activities can be impacted by sorbitol and mannitol, which in turn can alter soil fertility and quality. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of sorbitol and mannitol addition on microbial functional diversity and enzyme activities. The results demonstrated that sorbitol and mannitol addition altered the soil microbial community structure and improved enzyme activities. Specifically, the addition of sorbitol enhanced the community-level physiological profile (CLPP) compared with the control, whereas the CLPP was significantly inhibited by the addition of mannitol. The results of a varimax rotated component matrix demonstrated that carbohydrates, polymers, and carboxylic acids affected the soil microbial functional structure. Additionally, we found that enzyme activities were affected by both the concentration and type of inputs. In the presence of high concentrations of sorbitol, the urease, catalase, alkaline phosphatase, β-glucosidase, and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase activities were significantly increased, while invertase activity was decreased. Similarly, this increase in invertase, catalase, and alkaline phosphatase and N-acetyl-β-d-glucosaminidase activities was especially evident after mannitol addition, and urease activity was only slightly affected. In contrast, β-glucosidase activity was suppressed at the highest concentration. These results indicate that microbial community diversity and enzyme activities are significantly affected by soil amendment with sorbitol and mannitol. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Digestive enzyme activities are higher in the shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus, than in ectothermic sharks as a result of visceral endothermy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Kyle C; Wraith, James; Dickson, Kathryn A

    2015-08-01

    Lamnid sharks are regionally endothermic fishes that maintain visceral temperatures elevated above the ambient water temperature. Visceral endothermy is thought to increase rates of digestion and food processing and allow thermal niche expansion. We tested the hypothesis that, at in vivo temperatures, the endothermic shortfin mako shark, Isurus oxyrinchus, has higher specific activities of three digestive enzymes-gastric pepsin and pancreatic trypsin and lipase-than the thresher shark, Alopias vulpinus, and the blue shark, Prionace glauca, neither of which can maintain elevated visceral temperatures. Homogenized stomach or pancreas tissue obtained from sharks collected by pelagic longline was incubated at both 15 and 25 °C, at saturating substrate concentrations, to quantify tissue enzymatic activity. The mako had significantly higher enzyme activities at 25 °C than did the thresher and blue sharks at 15 °C. This difference was not a simple temperature effect, because at 25 °C the mako had higher trypsin activity than the blue shark and higher activities for all enzymes than the thresher shark. We also hypothesized that the thermal coefficient, or Q 10 value, would be higher for the mako shark than for the thresher and blue sharks because of its more stable visceral temperature. However, the mako and thresher sharks had similar Q 10 values for all enzymes, perhaps because of their closer phylogenetic relationship. The higher in vivo digestive enzyme activities in the mako shark should result in higher rates of food processing and may represent a selective advantage of regional visceral endothermy.

  18. Novel biohybrids of layered double hydroxide and lactate dehydrogenase enzyme: Synthesis, characterization and catalytic activity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djebbi, Mohamed Amine; Braiek, Mohamed; Hidouri, Slah; Namour, Philippe; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole; Ben Haj Amara, Abdesslem

    2016-02-01

    The present work introduces new biohybrid materials involving layered double hydroxides (LDH) and biomolecule such as enzyme to produce bioinorganic system. Lactate dehydrogenase (Lac Deh) has been chosen as a model enzyme, being immobilized onto MgAl and ZnAl LDH materials via direct ion-exchange (adsorption) and co-precipitation methods. The immobilization efficiency was largely dependent upon the immobilization methods. A comparative study shows that the co-precipitation method favors the immobilization of great and tunable amount of enzyme. The structural behavior, chemical bonding composition and morphology of the resulting biohybrids were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) study, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), respectively. The free and immobilized enzyme activity and kinetic parameters were also reported using UV-Visible spectroscopy. However, the modified LDH materials showed a decrease in crystallinity as compared to the unmodified LDH. The change in activity of the immobilized lactate dehydrogenase was considered to be due, to the reduced accessibility of substrate molecules to the active sites of the enzyme and the partial conformational change of the Lac Deh molecules as a result of the immobilization way. Finally, it was proven that there is a correlation between structure/microstructure and enzyme activity dependent on the immobilization process.

  19. Saccharification of Lignocelluloses by Carbohydrate Active Enzymes of the White Rot Fungus Dichomitus squalens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna Rytioja

    Full Text Available White rot fungus Dichomitus squalens is an efficient lignocellulose degrading basidiomycete and a promising source for new plant cell wall polysaccharides depolymerizing enzymes. In this work, we focused on cellobiohydrolases (CBHs of D. squalens. The native CBHI fraction of the fungus, consisting three isoenzymes, was purified and it maintained the activity for 60 min at 50°C, and was stable in acidic pH. Due to the lack of enzyme activity assay for detecting only CBHII activity, CBHII of D. squalens was produced recombinantly in an industrially important ascomycete host, Trichoderma reesei. CBH enzymes of D. squalens showed potential in hydrolysis of complex lignocellulose substrates sugar beet pulp and wheat bran, and microcrystalline cellulose, Avicel. Recombinant CBHII (rCel6A of D. squalens hydrolysed all the studied plant biomasses. Compared to individual activities, synergistic effect between rCel6A and native CBHI fraction of D. squalens was significant in the hydrolysis of Avicel. Furthermore, the addition of laccase to the mixture of CBHI fraction and rCel6A significantly enhanced the amount of released reducing sugars from sugar beet pulp. Especially, synergy between individual enzymes is a crucial factor in the tailor-made enzyme mixtures needed for hydrolysis of different plant biomass feedstocks. Our data supports the importance of oxidoreductases in improved enzyme cocktails for lignocellulose saccharification.

  20. Medical application of in vivo neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Zanzi, I.; Aloia, J.F.

    1978-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of total body neutron activation analysis (TBNAA) was clearly established at an IAEA panel meeting in Vienna in 1972. It is best demonstrated by the studies involving the measurement of total-body calcium. This measurement provides data useful for the diagnosis and management of metabolic bone disorders. It should be emphasized, however, that while most of the applications to date have involved calcium and phosphorus, the measurement of sodium, chlorine and nitrogen also appear to be useful clinically. Total-body calcium measurements utilizing TBNAA have been used in studies of osteoporosis to establish absolute and relative deficits of calcium in patients with this disease in comparison to a normal contrast population. Changes in total-body calcium (skeletal mass) have also been useful for quantitating the efficacy of various therapies in osteoporosis. Serial measurements over periods of years provide long-term balance data by direct measurement with a higher precision (+- 2%) than is possible by the use of any other technique. In the renal osteodystrophy observed in patients with renal failure, disorders of both calcium and phosphorus, as well as electrolyte disturbances, have been studied. The measure of total-body levels of these elements gives the clinician useful data upon which to design dialysis therapy. The measurement of bone changes in endocrine dysfunction has been studied, particularly in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disorders. In parathyroidectomy, the measurement of total-body calcium, post-operatively, can indicate the degree of bone resorption. Skeletal metabolism and body composition in acromegaly and Cushing's disease have also been investigated by TBNAA. Levels of cadmium in liver and kidney have also been measured in-vivo by prompt-gamma neutron activation and associated with hypertension, emphysema and cigarette smoking.

  1. V-1 regulates capping protein activity in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Goeh; Alexander, Christopher J; Wu, Xufeng S; Piszczek, Grzegorz; Chen, Bi-Chang; Betzig, Eric; Hammer, John A

    2016-10-25

    Capping Protein (CP) plays a central role in the creation of the Arp2/3-generated branched actin networks comprising lamellipodia and pseudopodia by virtue of its ability to cap the actin filament barbed end, which promotes Arp2/3-dependent filament nucleation and optimal branching. The highly conserved protein V-1/Myotrophin binds CP tightly in vitro to render it incapable of binding the barbed end. Here we addressed the physiological significance of this CP antagonist in Dictyostelium, which expresses a V-1 homolog that we show is very similar biochemically to mouse V-1. Consistent with previous studies of CP knockdown, overexpression of V-1 in Dictyostelium reduced the size of pseudopodia and the cortical content of Arp2/3 and induced the formation of filopodia. Importantly, these effects scaled positively with the degree of V-1 overexpression and were not seen with a V-1 mutant that cannot bind CP. V-1 is present in molar excess over CP, suggesting that it suppresses CP activity in the cytoplasm at steady state. Consistently, cells devoid of V-1, like cells overexpressing CP described previously, exhibited a significant decrease in cellular F-actin content. Moreover, V-1-null cells exhibited pronounced defects in macropinocytosis and chemotactic aggregation that were rescued by V-1, but not by the V-1 mutant. Together, these observations demonstrate that V-1 exerts significant influence in vivo on major actin-based processes via its ability to sequester CP. Finally, we present evidence that V-1's ability to sequester CP is regulated by phosphorylation, suggesting that cells may manipulate the level of active CP to tune their "actin phenotype."

  2. Soil microbial abundances and enzyme activities in different rhizospheres in an integrated vertical flow constructed wetland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Ying; Jiang, Yueping; Jiang, Qinsu; Min, Hang; Fan, Haitian; Zeng, Qiang; Chang, Jie [College of Life Sciences, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Zhang, Chongbang [School of Life Sciences, Taizhou University, Linhai (China); Yue, Chunlei [Zhejiang Forestry Academy, Hangzhou (China)

    2011-03-15

    Rhizosphere microorganism is an important bio-component for wastewater treatment in constructed wetlands (CWs). Microbial abundance and enzyme activities in the rhizospheres of nine plant species were investigated in an integrated vertical-flow CW. The abundance of denitrifiers, as well as urease, acid, and alkaline phosphatase activities were positively correlated to plant root biomass. The abundance of bacteria, fungi, actinomycetes, ammonifiers, denitrifiers, and phosphorus decomposers, related to nutrient removal efficiencies in CWs, greatly varied among rhizospheres of different plant species (p < 0.05). Significant differences in rhizosphere enzyme activity among plant species were also observed (p < 0.05), with the exception of catalase activity. The principal component analysis using the data of microbial abundance and enzyme activity showed that Miscanthus floridulus, Acorus calamus, and Reineckia carnea were candidates to be used in CWs to effectively remove nitrogen and phosphorus from wastewater. (Copyright copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  3. Antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation in corn (Zea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-31

    Aug 31, 2011 ... photochemical nitrobluetetrazolium (NBT). One unit of SOD is defined as that which is present in the volume of extract that causes inhibition of the photo reduction of NBT by 50%. Catalase (CAT) activity was estimated by monitoring the disappearance of H2O2 by recording the decline in absorbance at 240 ...

  4. Soil Rhizosphere Microbial Communities and Enzyme Activities under Organic Farming

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study investigated the activities of ß-glucosidase (C cycling, ß-glucosaminidase (C and N cycling), acid phosphatase (P cycling) and arylsulfatase (S cycling) under lettuce (Lactuca sativa), potato (Solanum Tuberosum), onion (Allium cepa L), broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. botrytis) and Tall f...

  5. activity of enzyme trypsin immobilized onto macroporous poly(epoxy

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    dell

    macropores and the unique sponge-like morphology that can permit unhindered diffusion of solutes of practically any size. (Lozinsky et al. ... sodium acetate, sodium phosphate (Na3PO4), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) and sodium hydroxide (NaOH) were from Merck. (Darmstadt, Germany). Equipment. For trypsin activity ...

  6. Enzyme Activity and Biomolecule Templating at Liquid and Solid Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harvey W. Blanch

    2004-12-01

    There are two main components of this research program. The first involves studies of the adsorption and catalytic activity of proteins at fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces; the second employs biological macromolecules as templates at the solid-liquid interface for controlled crystallization of inorganic materials, to provide materials with specific functionality.

  7. Study of Triclabendazole (TCBZ Effect on Aspartate Transaminase (AST Activity of Fasciola gigantica Parasite and Liver Enzyme Activity Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Shafaei

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available  Background: Aspartate transaminase (AST is an important enzyme in parasite and liver tissue. The purpose of this investigation is to evaluate triclabendazole (TCBZ effect on AST activity of Fasciola gigantica parasite. To compare of enzyme level of parasite and its host tissue, enzyme activity of F. gigantica parasite and liver tissues were also determined. Method:The livers were collected from sheep slaughtered in local slaughterhouse and living F. gigantica parasites were isolated. The washed parasites were cultured in buffe rmedia with or without Triclabendazole (Egaten®; 15μg/mL in an incubator at 37° C. Extractions of collected parasites and liver tissues were prepared by homogenizing buffer in a Mortar and pestle. Extraction samples were examined for protein measurement, AST activity assay and protein recognition. Results:The results of AST assay revealed, enzyme activity for treated and untreated is not significant. Healthy liver tissue shows significantly higher enzyme activity than parasite. Enzyme activity for healthy and infected liver tissues was significant. Enzymatic proteins including Cathepsin L & B (Protease were recognized in parasite samples. Conclusion:Although AST could not be concerned as an indicator for efficiency treatment, however may be involved as a biomarker for biochemical comparison of parasite and host tissue.

  8. Thalidomide Increases Human Hepatic Cytochrome P450 3A Enzymes by Direct Activation of Pregnane X Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemizu, Hiroshi; Guillouzo, Christiane Guguen; Shibata, Norio; Yajima, Kanako; Utoh, Masahiro; Shimizu, Makiko; Chesné, Christophe; Nakamura, Masato; Guengerich, F. Peter; Houtman, René; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Heterotropic cooperativity of human cytochrome P450 (P450) 3A4/3A5 by the teratogen thalidomide was recently demonstrated by H. Yamazaki et al. (2013) using the model substrate midazolam in various in vitro and in vivo models. Chimeric mice with humanized liver also displayed enhanced midazolam clearance upon pre treatment with orally administered thalidomide, presumably because of human P450 3A induction. In the current study, we further investigated the regulation of human hepatic drug metabolizing enzymes. Thalidomide enhanced levels of P450 3A4 and 2B6 mRNA, protein expression, and/or oxidation activity in human hepatocytes, indirectly suggesting activation of upstream transcription factors involved in detoxication, e.g. the nuclear receptors pregnane X receptor (PXR) and constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). A key event after ligand binding is an alteration of nuclear receptor conformation and recruitment of co regulator proteins that alter chromatin accessibility of target genes. To investigate direct engagement and functional alteration of PXR and CAR by thalidomide, we utilized a peptide microarray with 154 co regulator derived nuclear receptor interaction motifs and co regulator and nuclear receptor boxes, which serves as a sensor for nuclear receptor conformation and activity status as a function of ligand. Thalidomide and its human proximate metabolite 5 hydroxythalidomide displayed significant modulation of co regulator interaction with PXR and CAR ligand binding domains, similar to established agonists for these receptors. These results collectively suggest that thalidomide acts as a ligand for PXR and CAR and causes enzyme induction leading to increased P450 enzyme activity. The possibilities of drug interactions during thalidomide therapy in humans require further evaluation. PMID:24460184

  9. Antioxidant Enzyme Activity and Meat Quality of Meat Type Ducks Fed with Dried Oregano (Origanum vulgare L.) Powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J H; Kang, S N; Shin, D; Shim, K S

    2015-01-01

    One-day-old Cherry valley meat-strain ducks were used to investigate the effect of supplemental dried oregano powder (DOP) in feed on the productivity, antioxidant enzyme activity, and breast meat quality. One hundred sixty five ducks were assigned to 5 dietary treatments for 42 days. The dietary treatment groups were control group (CON; no antibiotic, no DOP), antibiotic group (ANT; CON+0.1% Patrol), 0.1% DOP (CON+0.1% DOP), 0.5% DOP (CON+0.5% DOP), and 1.0% DOP (CON+1.0% DOP). Upon feeding, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity of oregano extracts was higher than that of tocopherol, although it was less than that of ascorbic acid. As a result of in vivo study, DOP in the diet showed no effects on final body weight, feed intake, or feed conversion ratio. However, dietary 0.5% and 1% DOP supplementation caused a significant increase in the serum enzyme activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) compared with CON and ANT, while glutathione peroxidase (GPx) in tissue was increased as compared to ANT (p<0.05). Cooking loss from ducks fed with DOP decreased compared with the control ducks. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) values of duck breast meat at 5 d post slaughter was found to be significantly reduced in ducks whose diets were supplemented with 0.5% and 1% DOP (p<0.05). These results suggest that diets containing 0.5% and 1% DOP may beneficially affect antioxidant enzyme activity of GPx and SOD, improve meat cooking loss, and reduce TBARS values in breast meat at 5 d of storage in ducks.

  10. Induction of antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level in ion-beam-bombarded rice seeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Semsang, Nuananong, E-mail: nsemsang@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Yu, LiangDeng [Plasma and Beam Physics Research Facility, Department of Physics and Materials Science, Faculty of Science, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, Commission on Higher Education, 328 Si Ayutthaya Road, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2013-07-15

    Highlights: ► Ion beam bombarded rice seeds in vacuum. ► Studied seed survival from the ion bombardment. ► Determined various antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level. ► Discussed vacuum, ion species and ion energy effects. ► Attributed the changes to free radical formation due to ion bombardment. -- Abstract: Low-energy ion beam bombardment has been used to mutate a wide variety of plant species. To explore the indirect effects of low-energy ion beam on biological damage due to the free radical production in plant cells, the increase in antioxidant enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation level was investigated in ion-bombarded rice seeds. Local rice seeds were bombarded with nitrogen or argon ion beams at energies of 29–60 keV and ion fluences of 1 × 10{sup 16} ions cm{sup −2}. The activities of the antioxidant enzymes; superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST) and lipid peroxidation level were assayed in the germinated rice seeds after ion bombardment. The results showed most of the enzyme activities and lipid peroxidation levels in both the argon and nitrogen bombarded samples were higher than those in the natural control. N-ion bombardment could induce higher levels of antioxidant enzyme activities in the rice samples than the Ar-ion bombardment. Additional effects due to the vacuum condition were found to affect activities of some antioxidant enzymes and lipid peroxidation level. This study demonstrates that ion beam bombardment and vacuum condition could induce the antioxidant enzyme activity and lipid peroxidation level which might be due to free radical production in the bombarded rice seeds.

  11. Effect of environmental pH on enzyme activity and growth of Bacteroides gingivalis W50.

    OpenAIRE

    McDermid, A S; McKee, A. S.; Marsh, P.D.

    1988-01-01

    Since the pH of the gingival crevice increases from below neutrality in health to above pH 8 in disease, we decided to investigate the effect of environmental pH on the growth and enzyme activity of Bacteroides gingivalis W50. Cells were grown in a chemostat under hemin-excess conditions over a range of pH values; stable growth was observed only between pH 6.7 and 8.3, with the maximum yields obtained between pH 7.0 and 8.0. The enzyme profile of cells varied markedly with pH. Enzymes with a ...

  12. DNA-based nanosensors for next-generation clinical diagnostics via detection of enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stougaard, Magnus; Ho, Yi-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Specific and sensitive detection of DNA-modifying enzymes represents a cornerstone in modern medical diagnostics. Many of the currently prevalent methods are not preferred in the clinics because they rely heavily on pre-amplification or post-separation steps. This editorial highlights the potential of adopting DNA-based nanosensors for the assessment of the activities of DNA-modifying enzymes, with emphasis on the topoisomerase and tyrosyl-DNA phosphodiesterase families. By underlining the existing challenges, we expect that the DNA-nanosensors may soon be promoted to clinical diagnostics via enzyme detection.

  13. Revealing hidden effect of earthworm on C distribution and enzyme activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Bahar S.; Hoang, Duyen; Kuzyakov, Yakov

    2017-04-01

    Despite its importance for terrestrial nutrient and carbon cycling, the spatial organization and localization of microbial activity in soil and in biopores is poorly understood. We hypothesized that biopores created by earthworm play a critical role in reducing the gap of SOM input and microbial activities between topsoil and subsoil. Accordingly, Carbon (C) allocation by earthworms was related to enzyme distribution along soil profile. For the first time we visualized spatial distribution of enzyme activities (β-glucosidase, chitinase and acid phosphatase) and C allocation (by 14C imaging) in earthworm biopores in topsoil and subsoil. Soil zymography (an in situ method for the analysis of the two-dimensional distribution of enzyme activity in soil) was accompanied with 14C imaging (a method that enables to trace distribution of litter and C in soil profile) to visualize change of enzyme activities along with SOM incorporation by earthworms from topsoil to subsoil. Experiment was set up acquiring rhizoboxes (9×1×50 cm) filled up with fresh soil and 3 earthworms (L. terrestris), which were then layered with 14C-labeled plant-litter of 0.3 MBq on the soil surface. 14C imaging and zymography have been carried out after one month. Activities of all enzymes regardless of their nutrient involvement (C, N, P) were higher in the biopores than in bulk soil, but the differences were larger in topsoil compared to subsoil. Among three enzymes, Phosphatase activity was 4-times higher in the biopore than in the bulk soil. Phosphatase activity was closely associated with edge of burrows and correlate positively with 14C activity. These results emphasized especial contribution of hotspheres such as biopores to C allocation in subsoil - which is limited in C input and nutrients - and in stimulation of microbial and enzymatic activity by input of organic residues, e.g. by earthworms. In conclusion, biopore increased enzymatic mobilization of nutrients (e.g. P) inducing allocation

  14. Modulation of digestive enzyme activities during ontogeny of Labeo rohita larvae fed ascorbic acid enriched zooplankton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Gopa; Mukhopadhyay, P K; Ayyappan, S

    2008-04-01

    The effect of supplementation of ascorbic acid through enriched zooplankton [10%, 20% and 30% ascorbyl palmitate (AP) inclusion in diet of zooplankton] on different digestive enzyme activities during ontogeny of Labeo rohita larvae was studied from 4 day to 15 day post hatch. Ascorbic acid (AA) content in different groups of unenriched (8.6+/-0.71) and enriched zooplankton were, 750+/-29.3, 1409.1+/-45.5, 2009.21+/-199.2 mug/g respectively on dry matter basis with differences (Pdigestive enzyme activities in response to 10%, 20% and 30% AP enriched zooplankton feeding was evidenced from positive correlations between dietary AA content with magnitude of elevation of enzyme activity in different groups. There were 57, 55, 29.2 and 2 fold increases in amylase activity; 7.35, 7.02, 4.43 and 2.73 fold increases in protease activity; 45.636, 41.50, 19.83 and 13.69 fold increases in lipase activity and 6, 5, 3, and 2 fold increases in alkaline phosphatase activity observed in the 15th day post hatch larvae fed 20%, 30%, 10%AP enriched and normal zooplankton respectively, than 4-day post hatch larvae of the respective groups. Enzyme activities were also positively correlated with specific growth rates of wet weight of rohu larvae at the 15th day post hatch. Increased AA might have played an important role in advancing morphological transformation of the digestive tract, protecting gastric mucosa and accelerating growth by the process of tissue formation, which necessitated the requirement of more nutrient thereby, increasing digestive enzyme activity. The regulatory role of AA in the modulation of different digestive enzymes activity and its physiological consequences of nutrient digestibility and utilization during ontogenesis could be extrapolated for better nutrient management of the larvae.

  15. [Change in soil enzymes activities after adding biochar or straw by fluorescent microplate method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Lan; Chen, Li-Jun; Duan, Zheng-Hu; Wu, Zhi-Jie; Sun, Cai-Xia; Wang, Jun-Yu

    2014-02-01

    The present work was aimed to study soil a-glucosidase and beta-glucosidase activities of and red soils based on fluorescence detection method combined with 96 microplates with TECAN Infinite 200 Multi-Mode Microplate Reader. We added biochar or straw (2.5 g air dry sample/50g air dry soil sample) into and red soils and the test was carried under fixed temperature and humidity condition (25 degrees C, 20% soil moisture content). The results showed that straw addition enhances soil alpha-glucosidase and beta-glucosidase activities, beta-glucosidase activity stimulated by rice straw treatment was higher than that of corn straw treatment, and activity still maintains strong after 40 days, accounting for increasing soil carbon transformation with straw inputting. Straw inputting increased soil nutrients contents and may promote microbial activity, which also lead to the increase oin enzyme Straw inputting increased soil nutrients contents and may promote microbial activity, which also lead to the increase oin enzyme activities. Different effects of straw kinds may be related to material source that needs further research. However, biochar inputting has little effect on soil alpha-glucosidase and beta-glucosidase activity. Biochar contains less available nutrients than straw and have degradation-resistant characteristics. Compared with the conventional spectrophotometric method, fluorescence microplate method is more sensitive to soil enzyme activities in suspension liquid, which can be used in a large number of samples. In brief, fluorescence microplate method is fast, accurate, and simple to determine soil enzymes activities.

  16. Preliminary In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Antidiabetic Activity of Ducrosia anethifolia Boiss. and Its Linear Furanocoumarins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagwa M. M. Shalaby

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Ducrosia anethifolia is used as flavoring additive. There have been little detailed phytochemical reports on this genus and the antidiabetic activity of this plant is not yet evaluated. Method. Structure of compounds was deduced by spectroscopic analyses. Preliminary in vitro evaluation of the antidiabetic activity of crude extract and its furanocoumarins was carried out (α-amylase, α-glucosidase, and β-galactosidase. The in vivo activity was investigated by measuring some oxidative stress markers. Biomarkers of liver injury and kidney were also determined. Results. Eight linear furanocoumarins, psoralen, 5-methoxypsoralen, 8-methoxypsoralen, imperatorin, isooxypeucedanin, pabulenol, oxypeucedanin methanolate, oxypeucedanin hydrate, and 3-O-glucopyranosyl-β-sitosterol, were isolated. All compounds were reported for the first time from the genus Ducrosia except pabulenol. The blood glucose level, liver function enzymes, total protein, lipid, and cholesterol levels were significantly normalized by extract treatment. The antioxidant markers, glucolytic, and gluconeogenic enzymes were significantly ameliorated and the elevated level of kidney biomarkers in the diabetic groups was restored. The compounds showed inhibitory activity in a concentration dependant manner. Imperatorin and 5-methoxypsoralen showed the most potent inhibiting power. Conclusion. D. anethifolia extract showed hypoglycemic, hypolipidemic, and antioxidant effect as well as ameliorating kidney function. This extract and some linear furanocoumarins exhibited carbohydrate metabolizing enzymes inhibitory effect.

  17. SUMF1 enhances sulfatase activities in vivo in five sulfatase deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraldi, Alessandro; Biffi, Alessandra; Lombardi, Alessia; Visigalli, Ilaria; Pepe, Stefano; Settembre, Carmine; Nusco, Edoardo; Auricchio, Alberto; Naldini, Luigi; Ballabio, Andrea; Cosma, Maria Pia

    2007-04-15

    Sulfatases are enzymes that hydrolyse a diverse range of sulfate esters. Deficiency of lysosomal sulfatases leads to human diseases characterized by the accumulation of either GAGs (glycosaminoglycans) or sulfolipids. The catalytic activity of sulfatases resides in a unique formylglycine residue in their active site generated by the post-translational modification of a highly conserved cysteine residue. This modification is performed by SUMF1 (sulfatase-modifying factor 1), which is an essential factor for sulfatase activities. Mutations in the SUMF1 gene cause MSD (multiple sulfatase deficiency), an autosomal recessive disease in which the activities of all sulfatases are profoundly reduced. In previous studies, we have shown that SUMF1 has an enhancing effect on sulfatase activity when co-expressed with sulfatase genes in COS-7 cells. In the present study, we demonstrate that SUMF1 displays an enhancing effect on sulfatases activity when co-delivered with a sulfatase cDNA via AAV (adeno-associated virus) and LV (lentivirus) vectors in cells from individuals affected by five different diseases owing to sulfatase deficiencies or from murine models of the same diseases [i.e. MLD (metachromatic leukodystrophy), CDPX (X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata) and MPS (mucopolysaccharidosis) II, IIIA and VI]. The SUMF1-enhancing effect on sulfatase activity resulted in an improved clearance of the intracellular GAG or sulfolipid accumulation. Moreover, we demonstrate that the SUMF1-enhancing effect is also present in vivo after AAV-mediated delivery of the sulfamidase gene to the muscle of MPSIIIA mice, resulting in a more efficient rescue of the phenotype. These results indicate that co-delivery of SUMF1 may enhance the efficacy of gene therapy in several sulfatase deficiencies.

  18. Redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO2nanostructures: Intrinsic influence of exposed facets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yushi; Mao, Zhou; Huang, Wenjie; Liu, Lihua; Li, Junli; Li, Jialiang; Wu, Qingzhi

    2016-10-17

    CeO 2 nanoparticles (NPs) have been well demonstrated as an antioxidant in protecting against oxidative stress-induced cellular damages and a potential therapeutic agent for various diseases thanks to their redox enzyme-mimicking activities. The Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio and oxygen vacancies on the surface have been considered as the major originations responsible for the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO 2 NPs. Herein, CeO 2 nanostructures (nanocubes and nanorods) exposed different facets were synthesized via a facile hydrothermal method. The characterizations by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and UV-Vis spectroscopy show that the Ce 3+ /Ce 4+ ratio and oxygen vacancy content on the surfaces of as-synthesized CeO 2 nanostructures are nearly at the same levels. Meanwhile, the enzymatic activity measurements indicate that the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of as-synthesized CeO 2 nanostructures are greatly dependent on their exposed facets. CeO 2 nanocubes with exposed {100} facets exhibit a higher peroxidase but lower superoxide dismutase activity than those of the CeO 2 nanorods with exposed {110} facets. Our results provide new insights into the redox enzyme-mimicking activities of CeO 2 nanostructures, as well as the design and synthesis of inorganic nanomaterials-based artificial enzymes.

  19. Phospholipase D from Allium sativum bulbs: A highly active and thermal stable enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatoon, Hafeeza; Talat, Sariya; Younus, Hina

    2008-05-01

    This is the first report on the identification and partial characterization of phospholipase D (EC 3.1.4.4) from Allium sativum (garlic) bulbs (PLD(GB)). The enzyme shares the phenomenon of interfacial activation with other lipolytic enzymes, i.e. the hydrolytic rate increases when the substrate changes to a more aggregated state. The enzyme activity is highly temperature tolerant and the temperature optimum was measured to be 70 degrees C. PLD(GB) unlike many plant PLDs exhibited high thermal stability. It was activated further after exposure to high temperatures, i.e. 80 degrees C, indicating that the enzyme refolds better upon cooling back to room temperature after short exposure to thermal stress. The activity of PLD(GB) is optimum in 70mM calcium ion concentration and the enzyme is activated further in the presence of phosphatidyl-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)). PLD(GB) exhibited both hydrolytic and transphosphatidylation activities, both of which appear to be higher than those of PLD from cabbage leaves (PLD(CL)).

  20. Prediction of in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor activity using hierarchical clustering

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, hierarchical clustering classification models were developed to predict in vitro and in vivo oestrogen receptor (ER) activity. Classification models were developed for binding, agonist, and antagonist in vitro ER activity and for mouse in vivo uterotrophic ER bindi...

  1. Nandrolone increases angiotensin-I converting enzyme activity in rats tendons

    OpenAIRE

    Marqueti, Rita de Cassia; Hashimoto, Nara Yumi; Durigan, João Luiz Quaglioti; Batista e Silva, Lívia Larissa; Almeida, Jeeser Alves de; Silva, Maria da Glória da; Oliveira, Edilamar Menezes de; Araújo, Heloisa Sobreiro Selistre de

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been associated with several biological processes of the human body, regulating, among others blood pressure and water and electrolytes balance. Moreover, RAS also regulates connective tissue growth. Recently, studies have shown that the use of nandrolone modifies the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) activity and increases collagen deposition in the heart. OBJECTIVE: The aim of study was to evaluate the Angiotensin-I converting enzyme ...

  2. Discovering novel carbohydrate-active enzymes in the cellulosome of anaerobic bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandes, Vânia Ondina Pedro

    2015-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Ciências Veterinárias, especialidade em Ciências Biológicas e Biomédicas Carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes) include a range of enzymes that, in nature, make, break or modify glycosidic bonds. CAZymes act on highly recalcitrant polysaccharides, such as cellulose and hemicellulose, and often exhibit a modular architecture including catalytic domains fused through flexible linker regions to non-catalytic domains such as carbohydrate-binding modules (CBMs). ...

  3. Inhibition of Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Activity by Flavonoids: Structure-Activity Relationship Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Ligia; Castillo, Julián; Quiñones, Mar; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago; Arola, Lluis; Pujadas, Gerard; Muguerza, Begoña

    2012-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that certain flavonoids can have an inhibitory effect on angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, which plays a key role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure. In the present study, 17 flavonoids belonging to five structural subtypes were evaluated in vitro for their ability to inhibit ACE in order to establish the structural basis of their bioactivity. The ACE inhibitory (ACEI) activity of these 17 flavonoids was determined by fluorimetric method at two concentrations (500 µM and 100 µM). Their inhibitory potencies ranged from 17 to 95% at 500 µM and from 0 to 57% at 100 µM. In both cases, the highest ACEI activity was obtained for luteolin. Following the determination of ACEI activity, the flavonoids with higher ACEI activity (i.e., ACEI >60% at 500 µM) were selected for further IC50 determination. The IC50 values for luteolin, quercetin, rutin, kaempferol, rhoifolin and apigenin K were 23, 43, 64, 178, 183 and 196 µM, respectively. Our results suggest that flavonoids are an excellent source of functional antihypertensive products. Furthermore, our structure-activity relationship studies show that the combination of sub-structures on the flavonoid skeleton that increase ACEI activity is made up of the following elements: (a) the catechol group in the B-ring, (b) the double bond between C2 and C3 at the C-ring, and (c) the cetone group in C4 at the C-ring. Protein-ligand docking studies are used to understand the molecular basis for these results. PMID:23185345

  4. Positron emitter labeled enzyme inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J.S.; MacGregor, R.R.; Wolf, A.P.

    1987-05-22

    This invention involved a new strategy for imaging and mapping enzyme activity in the living human and animal body using positron emitter-labeled suicide enzyme inactivators or inhibitors which become covalently bound to the enzyme as a result of enzymatic catalysis. Two such suicide in activators for monoamine oxidase have been labeled with carbon-11 and used to map the enzyme subtypes in the living human and animal body using PET. By using positron emission tomography to image the distribution of radioactivity produced by the body penetrating radiation emitted by carbon-11, a map of functionally active monoamine oxidase activity is obtained. Clorgyline and L-deprenyl are suicide enzyme inhibitors and irreversibly inhibit monoamine oxidase. When these inhibitors are labeled with carbon-11 they provide selective probes for monoamine oxidase localization and reactivity in vivo using positron emission tomography. 2 figs.

  5. Effect of bleaching on mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzyme activities: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Filiz Yalcin; Ergin, Esra; Gurgan, Sevil; Sabuncuoglu, Suna; Arpa, Cigdem Sahin; Tokgoz, İlknur; Ozgunes, Hilal; Kiremitci, Arlin

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this pilot clinical study was to determine the mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzyme activities (Superoxide Dismutase [SOD] and Catalase[CAT] ) in body fluids after exposure to two different vital tooth bleaching systems. Twenty eight subjects with an average age of 25.6 years (18-41) having at least two but not more than four Class II amalgam fillings on each quadrant arch in the mouth participated in the study. Baseline concentrations of mercury levels in whole blood, urine, and saliva were measured by a Vapor Generation Accessory connected to an Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Erythrocyte enzymes, SOD, and CAT activities in blood were determined kinetically. Subjects were randomly assigned to two groups of 14 volunteers. Group 1 was treated with an at-home bleaching system (Opalescence PF 35% Carbamide Peroxide, Ultradent), and Group 2 was treated with a chemically activated office bleaching system (Opalescence Xtra Boost 38% Hydrogen Peroxide, Ultradent) according to the manufacturer's recommendations. Twenty-four hours after bleaching treatments, concentrations of mercury and enzymes were remeasured. There were no significant differences on mercury levels in blood, urine, and saliva before and after bleaching treatments (p > 0.05). No differences were also found in the level of antioxidant enzyme activities (SOD and CAT) before and after treatments (p > 0.05). Mercury release did not affect the enzyme activities (p > 0.05). Bleaching treatments either office or home did not affect the amount of mercury released from amalgam fillings in blood, urine, and saliva and the antioxidant-enzyme activities in blood. Bleaching treatments with the systems tested in this pilot study have no deleterious effect on the mercury release from amalgam fillings and antioxidant enzymes in body fluids. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effects of electrokinetic treatment of a heavy metal contaminated soil on soil enzyme activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cang Long [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhou Dongmei, E-mail: dmzhou@issas.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Wang Quanying; Wu Danya [State Key Laboratory of Soil and Sustainable Agriculture, Institute of Soil Science, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2009-12-30

    There is a growing concern on the potential application of a direct current (DC) electric field to soil for removing contaminants, but little is known about its impact on soil enzyme activities. This study investigated the change of enzyme activities of a heavy metal contaminated soil before and after electrokinetic (EK) treatments at lab-scale and the mechanisms of EK treatment to affect soil enzyme activities were explored. After treatments with 1-3 V cm{sup -1} of voltage gradient for 420 h, soil pH, electrical conductivity (EC), soil organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), soil heavy metal concentration and enzyme activities were analyzed. The results showed that the average removal efficiencies of soil copper were about 65% and 83% without and with pH control of catholyte, respectively, and all the removal efficiencies of cadmium were above 90%. The soil invertase and catalase activities increased and the highest invertase activity was as 170 times as the initial one. The activities of soil urease and acidic phosphatase were lower than the initial ones. Bivariate correlation analyses indicated that the soil invertase and acidic phosphatase activities were significantly correlated with soil pH, EC, and DOC at P < 0.05, but the soil urease activities had no correlation with the soil properties. On the other hand, the effects of DC electric current on solution invertase and catalase enzyme protein activities indicated that it had negative effect on solution catalase activity and little effect on solution invertase activity. From the change of invertase and catalase activities in soil and solution, the conclusion can be drawn that the dominant effect mechanism is the change of soil properties by EK treatments.

  7. Modelling the effect of temperature and pH on the activity of enzymes: the case of phytases.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tijskens, L.M.M.; Greiner, R.; Biekman, E.S.A.; Konietzny, U.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, the behavior of enzyme activity as a function of pH and temperature is modeled on the basis of fundamental considerations. A formulation is developed that includes the activation of enzymes with increasing temperatures and the deactivation of enzymes at higher temperature, together

  8. Deletion of creB in Aspergillus oryzae increases secreted hydrolytic enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, A J; Morris, T A; Jin, B; Saint, C P; Kelly, J M

    2013-09-01

    Aspergillus oryzae has been used in the food and beverage industry for centuries, and industrial strains have been produced by multiple rounds of selection. Targeted gene deletion technology is particularly useful for strain improvement in such strains, particularly when they do not have a well-characterized meiotic cycle. Phenotypes of an Aspergillus nidulans strain null for the CreB deubiquitinating enzyme include effects on growth and repression, including increased activity levels of various enzymes. We show that Aspergillus oryzae contains a functional homologue of the CreB deubiquitinating enzyme and that a null strain shows increased activity levels of industrially important secreted enzymes, including cellulases, xylanases, amylases, and proteases, as well as alleviated inhibition of spore germination on glucose medium. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis showed that the increased levels of enzyme activity in both Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus oryzae are mirrored at the transcript level, indicating transcriptional regulation. We report that Aspergillus oryzae DAR3699, originally isolated from soy fermentation, has a similar phenotype to that of a creB deletion mutant of the RIB40 strain, and it contains a mutation in the creB gene. Collectively, the results for Aspergillus oryzae, Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei, and Penicillium decumbens show that deletion of creB may be broadly useful in diverse fungi for increasing production of a variety of enzymes.

  9. Oscillatory behavior of US -galactosidase enzyme activity in Escherichia coli during perturbed batch experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pih, N.P.; Dhurjat, P.

    1987-02-05

    The behaviour of a wild-type and mutant strain of Escherichia coli under batch aerobic conditions were studied. In these experiments the bacteria were initially grown with lactose as the sole carbon source. When exponential growth on lactose was achieved, the batch was perturbed with D-glucose. Periodic off-line samples were taken from the fermentor and analyzed for US -galactosidase enzyme activity, D-glucose, and lactose. Continuous on-line measurements of optical density of fermentation media were also made. Oscillations in the measured enzyme activity were observed. Oscillatory behavior of US -galactosidase enzyme in E. coli was previously reported by Knorre. In his study cells were grown in D-glucose, washed, and then grown on lactose. Oscillations were attributed to the varying enzyme synthesis rate. In the present study the cells were grown initally on lactose, thus assuring high synthesis rates of US -galactosidase from the start. The oscillations observed after perturbation with glucose are pronounced and appear to be the result of combined changes in the substrate transport system and enzyme activity in addition to possible changes in enzyme synthesis rate. 10 references.

  10. Purification and characterization of a trehalase-invertase enzyme with dual activity from Candida utilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahiri, Sagar; Basu, Arghya; Sengupta, Shinjinee; Banerjee, Shakri; Dutta, Trina; Soren, Dhananjay; Chattopadhyay, Krishnananda; Ghosh, Anil K

    2012-06-15

    Trehalose and sucrose, two important anti-stress non-reducing natural disaccharides, are catabolized by two enzymes, namely trehalase and invertase respectively. In this study, a 175 kDa enzyme protein active against both substrates was purified from wild type Candida utilis and characterized in detail. Substrate specificity assay and activity staining revealed the enzyme to be specific for both sucrose and trehalose. The ratio between trehalase and invertase activity was found to be constant at 1:3.5 throughout the entire study. Almost 40-fold purification and 30% yield for both activities were achieved at the final step of purification. The presence of common enzyme inhibitors, thermal and pH stress had analogous effects on its trehalase and invertase activity. Km values for two activities were similar while Vmax and Kcat also differed by a factor of 3.5. Competition plot for both substrates revealed the two activities to be occurring at the single active site. N-terminal sequencing and MALDI-TOF data analysis revealed higher similarity of the purified protein to previously known neutral trehalases. While earlier workers mentioned independent purification of neutral trehalase or invertase from different sources, the present study reports the purification of a single protein showing dual activity. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. Objective: The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. Materials and Methods: The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. Results: In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59–22.76 μg/mL and 110.71–526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. Conclusion: These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. SUMMARY Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin

  12. Effects of Curcuma xanthorrhiza Extracts and Their Constituents on Phase II Drug-metabolizing Enzymes Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Nurul Afifah Mohd; Ismail, Sabariah; Ab Halim, Mohd Rohaimi

    2016-01-01

    Curcuma xanthorrhiza is a native Indonesian plant and traditionally utilized for a range of illness including liver damage, hypertension, diabetes, and cancer. The study determined the effects of C. xanthorrhiza extracts (ethanol and aqueous) and their constituents (curcumene and xanthorrhizol) on UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) and glutathione transferase (GST) activities. The inhibition studies were evaluated both in rat liver microsomes and in human recombinant UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 enzymes. p-nitrophenol and beetle luciferin were used as the probe substrates for UGT assay while 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as the probe for GST assay. The concentrations of extracts studied ranged from 0.1 to 1000 μg/mL while for constituents ranged from 0.01 to 500 μM. In rat liver microsomes, UGT activity was inhibited by the ethanol extract (IC50 =279.74 ± 16.33 μg/mL). Both UGT1A1 and UGT2B7 were inhibited by the ethanol and aqueous extracts with IC50 values ranging between 9.59-22.76 μg/mL and 110.71-526.65 μg/Ml, respectively. Rat liver GST and human GST Pi-1 were inhibited by ethanol and aqueous extracts, respectively (IC50 =255.00 ± 13.06 μg/mL and 580.80 ± 18.56 μg/mL). Xanthorrhizol was the better inhibitor of UGT1A1 (IC50 11.30 ± 0.27 μM) as compared to UGT2B7 while curcumene did not show any inhibition. For GST, both constituents did not show any inhibition. These findings suggest that C. xanthorrhiza have the potential to cause herb-drug interaction with drugs that are primarily metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Findings from this study would suggest which of Curcuma xanthorrhiza extracts and constituents that would have potential interactions with drugs which are highly metabolized by UGT and GST enzymes. Further clinical studies can then be designed if needed to evaluate the in vivo pharmacokinetic relevance of these interactions Abbreviations Used: BSA: Bovine serum albumin, CAM: Complementary and alternative medicine, cDNA: Complementary

  13. Altered Activities of Antioxidant Enzymes in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucie Vávrová

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome (MetS, an increase of oxidative stress could play an important role which is closely linked with insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and chronic inflammation. The aim of our study was to assess several parameters of the antioxidant status in MetS. Methods: 40 subjects with MetS and 40 age- and sex-matched volunteers without MetS were examined for activities of superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPX1, glutathione reductase (GR, paraoxonase1 (PON1, concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH, and conjugated dienes in low-density lipoprotein (CD-LDL. Results: Subjects with MetS had higher activities of CuZnSOD (p Conclusions: Our results implicated an increased oxidative stress in MetS and a decreased antioxidative defense that correlated with some laboratory (triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C and clinical (waist circumference, blood pressure components of MetS.

  14. Effects of protease and non-starch polysaccharide enzyme on performance, digestive function, activity and gene expression of endogenous enzyme of broilers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Yuan

    Full Text Available Three hundred one-day-old male broiler chickens (Ross-308 were fed corn-soybean basal diets containing non-starch polysaccharide (NSP enzyme and different levels of acid protease from 1 to 42 days of age to investigate the effects of exogenous enzymes on growth performance, digestive function, activity of endogenous digestive enzymes in the pancreas and mRNA expression of pancreatic digestive enzymes. For days 1-42, compared to the control chickens, average daily feed intake (ADFI and average daily gain (ADG were significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme in combination with protease supplementation at 40 or 80 mg/kg (p<0.05. Feed-to-gain ratio (FGR was significantly improved by supplementation with NSP enzymes or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease compared to the control diet (p<0.05. Apparent digestibility of crude protein (ADCP was significantly enhanced by the addition of NSP enzyme or NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease (p<0.05. Cholecystokinin (CCK level in serum was reduced by 31.39% with NSP enzyme combined with protease supplementation at 160 mg/kg (p<0.05, but the CCK level in serum was increased by 26.51% with NSP enzyme supplementation alone. After 21 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 74.13%, 70.66% and 42.59% (p<0.05, respectively. After 42 days, supplementation with NSP enzyme and NSP enzyme combined with 40 mg/kg protease increased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 32.45% and 27.41%, respectively (p<0.05. However, supplementation with NSP enzyme and 80 or 160 mg/kg protease decreased the activity of pancreatic trypsin by 10.75% and 25.88%, respectively (p<0.05. The activities of pancreatic lipase and amylase were significantly higher in treated animals than they were in the control group (p<0.05. Supplementation with NSP enzyme, NSP enzyme combined with 40 or 80 mg/kg protease increased

  15. Interactions of bacteria and fungi on decomposing litter: differential extracellular enzyme activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaní, Anna M; Fischer, Helmut; Mille-Lindblom, Cecilia; Tranvik, Lars J

    2006-10-01

    Fungi and bacteria are key agents in plant litter decomposition in freshwater ecosystems. However, the specific roles of these two groups and their interactions during the decomposition process are unclear. We compared the growth and patterns of degradative enzymes expressed by communities of bacteria and fungi grown separately and in coexistence on Phragmites leaves. The two groups displayed both synergistic and antagonistic interactions. Bacteria grew better together with fungi than alone. In addition, there was a negative effect of bacteria on fungi, which appeared to be caused by suppression of fungal growth and biomass accrual rather than specifically affecting enzyme activity. Fungi growing alone had a high capacity for the decomposition of plant polymers such as lignin, cellulose, and hemicellulose. In contrast, enzyme activities were in general low when bacteria grew alone, and the activity of key enzymes in the degradation of lignin and cellulose (phenol oxidase and cellobiohydrolase) was undetectable in the bacteria-only treatment. Still, biomass-specific activities of most enzymes were higher in bacteria than in fungi. The low total activity and growth of bacteria in the absence of fungi in spite of apparent high enzymatic efficiency during the degradation of many substrates suggest that fungi provide the bacteria with resources that the bacteria were not able to acquire on their own, most probably intermediate decomposition products released by fungi that could be used by bacteria.

  16. Soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in sea-buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides plantation at different ages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miao Yang

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the impact of forest age and season on the soil microbial community and enzyme activities in sea-buckthorn plantation system and to determine the relative contributions to soil microbial properties. Soil sampling was carried out in the dry season (April and wet season (September in four areas, including: abandoned farmland (NH, an 8-year- old plantation (young plantation, 8Y, a 13-year-old plantation (middle-aged plantation, 13Y, and an 18-year-old plantation (mature plantation, 18Y. The results showed that forest age and season have a significant effect on soil microbial community structure and enzyme activities. The total, bacterial, fungal, Gram-negative (G+, and Gram-positive (G- PLFAs increased gradually with forest age, with the highest values detected in 18Y. All the detected enzyme activities showed the trend as a consequence of forest age. The microbial PLFAs and soil enzyme activities were higher in the wet season than the dry season. However, there were no significant interactions between forest age and season. A Correlation analysis suggested that soil microbial communities and enzyme activities were significantly and positively correlated with pH, total nitrogen (TN and available phosphorus (AP. Season had a stronger influence on soil microbial communities than forest age. In general, sea-buckthorn plantations establishment might be a potential tool for maintaining and increasing soil fertility in arid and semi-arid regions.

  17. Soil microbial communities and enzyme activities in sea-buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides) plantation at different ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Miao; Yang, Dan; Yu, Xuan

    2018-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the impact of forest age and season on the soil microbial community and enzyme activities in sea-buckthorn plantation system and to determine the relative contributions to soil microbial properties. Soil sampling was carried out in the dry season (April) and wet season (September) in four areas, including: abandoned farmland (NH), an 8-year- old plantation (young plantation, 8Y), a 13-year-old plantation (middle-aged plantation, 13Y), and an 18-year-old plantation (mature plantation, 18Y). The results showed that forest age and season have a significant effect on soil microbial community structure and enzyme activities. The total, bacterial, fungal, Gram-negative (G+), and Gram-positive (G-) PLFAs increased gradually with forest age, with the highest values detected in 18Y. All the detected enzyme activities showed the trend as a consequence of forest age. The microbial PLFAs and soil enzyme activities were higher in the wet season than the dry season. However, there were no significant interactions between forest age and season. A Correlation analysis suggested that soil microbial communities and enzyme activities were significantly and positively correlated with pH, total nitrogen (TN) and available phosphorus (AP). Season had a stronger influence on soil microbial communities than forest age. In general, sea-buckthorn plantations establishment might be a potential tool for maintaining and increasing soil fertility in arid and semi-arid regions.

  18. Plant carbohydrate binding module enhances activity of hybrid microbial cellulase enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caitlin Siobhan Byrt

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A synthetic, highly active cellulase enzyme suitable for in planta production may be a valuable tool for biotechnological approaches to develop transgenic biofuel crops with improved digestibility. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of a plant derived carbohydrate binding module (CBM to a synthetic glycosyl hydrolase (GH improved the activity of the hydrolase in releasing sugar from plant biomass. A CEL-HYB1-CBM enzyme was generated by fusing a hybrid microbial cellulase, CEL-HYB1, with the carbohydrate-binding module (CBM of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum SlCel9C1 cellulase. CEL-HYB1 and CEL-HYB1-CBM enzymes were produced in vitro using Pichia pastoris and the activity of these enzymes was tested using CMC, MUC and native crystalline cellulose assays. The presence of the CBM substantially improved the endo-glucanase activity of CEL-HYB1, especially against the native crystalline cellulose encountered in Sorghum plant cell walls. These results indicate that addition of an endogenous plant derived CBM to cellulase enzymes may enhance hydrolytic activity.

  19. Plant carbohydrate binding module enhances activity of hybrid microbial cellulase enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrt, Caitlin S; Cahyanegara, Ricky; Grof, Christopher P L

    2012-01-01

    A synthetic, highly active cellulase enzyme suitable for in planta production may be a valuable tool for biotechnological approaches to develop transgenic biofuel crops with improved digestibility. Here, we demonstrate that the addition of a plant derived carbohydrate binding module (CBM) to a synthetic glycosyl hydrolase improved the activity of the hydrolase in releasing sugar from plant biomass. A CEL-HYB1-CBM enzyme was generated by fusing a hybrid microbial cellulase, CEL-HYB1, with the CBM of the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) SlCel9C1 cellulase. CEL-HYB1 and CEL-HYB1-CBM enzymes were produced in vitro using Pichia pastoris and the activity of these enzymes was tested using carboxymethylcellulose, MUC, and native crystalline cellulose assays. The presence of the CBM substantially improved the endoglucanase activity of CEL-HYB1, especially against the native crystalline cellulose encountered in Sorghum bicolor plant cell walls. These results indicate that addition of an endogenous plant derived CBM to cellulase enzymes may enhance hydrolytic activity.

  20. Interactive Effect of Salicylic Acid on Some Physiological Features and Antioxidant Enzymes Activity in Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawa Z. E. Jaafar

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The effect of foliar salicylic acid (SA applications (10−3 and 10−5 M on activities of nitrate reductase, guaiacol peroxidase (POD, superoxide dismutases (SOD, catalase (CAT and proline enzymes and physiological parameters was evaluated in two ginger varieties (Halia Bentong and Halia Bara under greenhouse conditions. In both varieties, tested treatments generally enhanced photosynthetic rate and total dry weight. Photosynthetic rate increases were generally accompanied by increased or unchanged stomatal conductance levels, although intercellular CO2 concentrations of treated plants were typically lower than in controls. Lower SA concentrations were generally more effective in enhancing photosynthetic rate and plant growth. Exogenous application of SA increased antioxidant enzyme activities and proline content; the greatest responses were obtained in plants sprayed with 10–5 M SA, with significant increases observed in CAT (20.1%, POD (45.2%, SOD (44.1% and proline (43.1% activities. Increased CAT activity in leaves is naturally expected to increase photosynthetic efficiency and thus net photosynthesis by maintaining a constant CO2 supply. Our results support the idea that low SA concentrations (10–5 M may induce nitrite reductase synthesis by mobilizing intracellular NO3− and can provide protection to nitrite reductase degradation in vivo in the absence of NO3–. Observed positive correlations among proline, SOD, CAT and POD activities in the studied varieties suggest that increased SOD activity was accompanied by increases in CAT and POD activities because of the high demands of H2O2 quenching.

  1. Noninvasive assessment of microsomal enzyme activity in occupational medicine: present state of knowledge and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Døssing, M

    1984-01-01

    The activity of the hepatic microsomal enzyme system, which may be of great importance for metabolic activation and deactivation of hepatotoxic agents and carcinogens, is changed by exposure to commonly used industrial chemicals. The antipyrine test is the most widely used method for assessing microsomal enzyme activity in man. The clearance of antipyrine can be accurately calculated from one sample of saliva obtained about 24 h after an oral dose of the drug. By measuring antipyrine metabolism during exposure to industrial chemicals and at the end of 3-4 weeks free from exposure, the impact of industrial chemicals on antipyrine metabolism can be estimated, provided the chemicals are eliminated within 3-4 weeks. This test can be performed by skilled and unskilled workers using written instructions. This has broadened the application of the test. Other noninvasive indices of microsomal enzyme activity include the aminopyrine and caffeine breath tests and the urinary excretion of 6-beta-hydroxycortisol and D-glucaric acid. These tests probably reflect the activity of different but overlapping parts of the microsomal enzyme system and may be of value in research in occupational medicine. Previous studies indicate that chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticides, phenoxyacids, chlorophenols, polychlorinated biphenyles, some organic solvents and high concentrations of inhalation anaesthetics may stimulate microsomal enzyme activity, while styrene, toluene and inhalation anaesthetics in concentrations at about the allowed safety limit values have no effect. Lead, chemicals used by spray painters, and carbon disulphide probably inhibit the activity. While the short-term consequences of these changes include altered metabolism of hormones, vitamins, drugs, and other microsomally metabolized compounds, the possible impact on health on a long-term scale is unknown. It is now possible to study this with the use of the available noninvasive simple indices of microsomal enzyme

  2. Sublethal gamma irradiation affects reproductive impairment and elevates antioxidant enzyme and DNA repair activities in the monogonont rotifer Brachionus koreanus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Jeonghoon; Won, Eun-Ji [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Il-Chan; Yim, Joung Han [Division of Life Sciences, Korea Polar Research Institute, Incheon 406-840 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Su-Jae [Department of Life Science, College of Natural Sciences, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae-Seong, E-mail: jslee2@skku.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • No mortality within 96 h even at a high intensity (1200 Gy). • A reduced fecundity of Brachionus koreanus at over 150 Gy with a decrease in lifespan. • Dose-dependent ROS increase with GST enzyme activity at sub-lethal doses. • Significant impact on life table parameters, particularly fecundity. • Significant up-regulation of DNA repair-associated genes at sublethal doses. - Abstract: To examine the effects of gamma radiation on marine organisms, we irradiated several doses of gamma ray to the microzooplankton Brachionus koreanus, and measured in vivo and in vitro endpoints including the survival rate, lifespan, fecundity, population growth, gamma ray-induced oxidative stress, and modulated patterns of enzyme activities and gene expressions after DNA damage. After gamma radiation, no individuals showed any mortality within 96 h even at a high intensity (1200 Gy). However, a reduced fecundity (e.g. cumulated number of offspring) of B. koreanus at over 150 Gy was observed along with a slight decrease in lifespan. At 150 Gy and 200 Gy, the reduced fecundity of the rotifers led to a significant decrease in population growth, although in the second generation the population growth pattern was not affected even at 200 Gy when compared to the control group. At sub-lethal doses, reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels dose-dependently increased with GST enzyme activity. In addition, up-regulations of the antioxidant and chaperoning genes in response to gamma radiation were able to recover cellular damages, and life table parameters were significantly influenced, particularly with regard to fecundity. DNA repair-associated genes showed significantly up-regulated expression patterns in response to sublethal doses (150 and 200 Gy), as shown in the expression of the gamma-irradiated B. koreanus p53 gene, suggesting that these sublethal doses were not significantly fatal to B. koreanus but induced DNA damages leading to a decrease of the population size.

  3. AM-2201 Inhibits Multiple Cytochrome P450 and Uridine 5′-Diphospho-Glucuronosyltransferase Enzyme Activities in Human Liver Microsomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Hyun Kim

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available AM-2201 is a synthetic cannabinoid that acts as a potent agonist at cannabinoid receptors and its abuse has increased. However, there are no reports of the inhibitory effect of AM-2201 on human cytochrome P450 (CYP or uridine 5′-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT enzymes. We evaluated the inhibitory effect of AM-2201 on the activities of eight major human CYPs (1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, and 3A4 and six major human UGTs (1A1, 1A3, 1A4, 1A6, 1A9, and 2B7 enzymes in pooled human liver microsomes using liquid chromatography–tandem mass spectrometry to investigate drug interaction potentials of AM-2201. AM-2201 potently inhibited CYP2C9-catalyzed diclofenac 4′-hydroxylation, CYP3A4-catalyzed midazolam 1′-hydroxylation, UGT1A3-catalyzed chenodeoxycholic acid 24-acyl-glucuronidation, and UGT2B7-catalyzed naloxone 3-glucuronidation with IC50 values of 3.9, 4.0, 4.3, and 10.0 μM, respectively, and showed mechanism-based inhibition of CYP2C8-catalyzed amodiaquine N-deethylation with a Ki value of 2.1 μM. It negligibly inhibited CYP1A2, CYP2A6, CYP2B6, CYP2C19, CYP2D6, UGT1A1, UGT1A4, UGT1A6, and UGT1A9 activities at 50 μM in human liver microsomes. These in vitro results indicate that AM-2201 needs to be examined for potential pharmacokinetic drug interactions in vivo due to its potent inhibition of CYP2C8, CYP2C9, CYP3A4, UGT1A3, and UGT2B7 enzyme activities.

  4. In vivo and in Vitro Antioxidant Activity of Hydro-Alcoholic Extract of Pistacia Atlantica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bahrebar

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background & aim: The genus Pistacia belonging to the Anacardiaceae family which consists of 15 species only three species of which, namely Pistacia vera, Pistacia Atlantica, ,and Pistacia Khinjuk grow in Iran. The aim of present study was to investigate the antioxidant activity of Pistacia Atlantica fruit hydroalcoholic extract in Yasuj. Methods: In the present experimental study, the extract was carried out with two, maceration and Soxhlet methods. For in vitro antioxidant assay, (trolex equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC, Diphenyl-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH phosphomolybdenum (PMB was conducted. For determination of antioxidant components, total phenolic and flavonoids contents were analyzed in in vitro assay. To evaluate the antioxidant activity by In Vivo method, the hydro alcoholic extract, having the most antioxidant activity, was used. 24 Wistar rats with the weight 250-300 g were examined that were randomly divided into 4 groups of 6. Group 1 (control group used distilled water by oral route with amount of 0.5 ml/kg. Groups 2, 3, and 4 used 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg of Pistacia Atlantica hydro alcoholic extract by gavages, respectively. After 4 weeks of treatment, blood samples were collected by heart puncture. Catalase enzyme activity, Mallon dialdehyde and Ferric reducing antioxidant power were measured in rats’ plasma. ANOVA was used for data analysis. Results: Methanol extract of Pistacia Atlantica contained the maximum amount of phytochemical and antioxidant activities. A significant decrease was observed in serum malondialdehyde (MDA of the treatment group compared to the control group (P<001.There was a significant increase in level of Catalase and Ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP of treatment groups compared to the control group (P<001. Conclusion: Pistacia Atlantica extracts depending on type and system of extraction contains different antioxidant potential. Key words: Antioxidant Activity, Pistacia Atlantica

  5. Effect of cereal brans on Lentinula edodes growth and enzyme activities during cultivation on forestry waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, E M; Machuca, A; Milagres, A M F

    2005-01-01

    To develop strategies for increasing the growth of Lentinula edodes in eucalyptus residues. To this end, we have examined the effects of cereal brans additions on production of mycelial biomass and enzymes. Three isolates of the mushroom shiitake, L. edodes (Berk. Pegler), were evaluated for enzyme and ergosterol production on eucalyptus residue supplemented with 5, 10, 15 and 20% (w/w) of soya, wheat or rice brans. Nitrogen imput on eucalyptus residues accelerated mycelial growth by supplying the L. edodes with this limiting nutrient. High levels of enzymes activities were produced in eucalyptus residues supplemented by soya bran. Comparison of cellulose and xylanase production with manganese peroxidase (MnP) at 20% soya bran indicated that hydrolytic enzymes, but oxidative enzymes were reduced. Mycelial growth measurements revealed that eucalyptus residues supplemented with cereal brans supported fast growth of L. edodes, indicating that mycelium extension is related to the bioavailability of nitrogen. The type and concentration of nutrient supplement has a considerable effect both on substrate colonization and on the type of hydrolytic and oxidative enzymes produced. These characteristics may be useful for mushroom growing. Lentinula edodes is commercially important for edible mushroom production and supplements which enhance growth and enzymes production might also be beneficial for mushroom yields.

  6. Effects of NaCl on growth and activity of enzymes involved in carbon ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Along with the boosting of the activity of these enzymes involved in the process of carbon assimilation, there is a gradual decrease in soluble sugars content, suggesting a resumption of the normal activity of photosynthetic assimilation process. All these results verify our hypothesis and can be explained by the ability of the ...

  7. Angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and cognitive impairment during hypoglycaemia in healthy humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thomsen, Carsten E; Høgenhaven, Hans

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In type 1 diabetes increased risk of severe hypoglycaemia is associated with high angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. We tested in healthy humans the hypothesis that this association is explained by the reduced ability of subjects with high ACE activity to maintain normal ...

  8. Using Carbohydrate Interaction Assays to Reveal Novel Binding Sites in Carbohydrate Active Enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cockburn, Darrell; Wilkens, Casper; Dilokpimol, Adiphol

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrate active enzymes often contain auxiliary binding sites located either on independent domains termed carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs) or as so-called surface binding sites (SBSs) on the catalytic module at a certain distance from the active site. The SBSs are usually critical...

  9. The interplay of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase activities on the digestion of starch in in vitro enzymic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Frederick J; Zhang, Bin; Waltzer, Gina; Gidley, Michael J; Dhital, Sushil

    2015-03-06

    In vitro hydrolysis assays are a key tool in understanding differences in rate and extent of digestion of starchy foods. They offer a greater degree of simplicity and flexibility than dynamic in vitro models or in vivo experiments for quantifiable, mechanistic exploration of starch digestion. In the present work the influence of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase activities on the digestion of maize and potato starch granules was measured using both glucose and reducing sugar assays. Data were analysed through initial rates of digestion, and by 1st order kinetics, utilising logarithm of slope (LOS) plots. The rate and extent of starch digestion was dependent on the activities of both enzymes and the type of starch used. Potato required more enzyme than maize to achieve logarithmic reaction curves, and complete digestion. The results allow targeted design of starch digestion experiments through a thorough understanding of the contributions of α-amylase and amyloglucosidase to digestion rates. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Epigenetic drugs that do not target enzyme activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, Dafydd R; Trzupek, John D

    2014-06-01

    While the installation and removal of epigenetic post-translational modifications or ‘marks’ on both DNA and histone proteins are the tangible outcome of enzymatically catalyzed processes, the role of the epigenetic reader proteins looks, at first, less obvious. As they do not catalyze a chemical transformation or process as such, their role is not enzymatic. However, this does not preclude them from being potential targets for drug discovery as their function is clearly correlated to transcriptional activity and as a class of proteins, they appear to have binding sites of sufficient definition and size to be inhibited by small molecules. This suggests that this third class of epigenetic proteins that are involved in the interpretation of post-translational marks (as opposed to the creation or deletion of marks) may represent attractive targets for drug discovery efforts. This review mainly summarizes selected publications, patent literature and company disclosures on these non-enzymatic epigenetic reader proteins from 2009 to the present. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd . All rights reserved.

  11. Daily rhythms of digestive enzyme activity and gene expression in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) during ontogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata-Sotres, José Antonio; Moyano, Francisco Javier; Martínez-Rodríguez, Gonzalo; Yúfera, Manuel

    2016-07-01

    In order to identify daily changes in digestive physiology in developing gilthead seabream larvae, the enzyme activity (trypsin, lipases and α-amylase) and gene expression (trypsinogen-try, chymotrypsinogen-ctrb, bile salt-activated lipase-cel1b, phospholipase A2-pla2 and α-amylase-amy2a) were measured during a 24h cycle in larvae reared under a 12h light/12h dark photoperiod. Larvae were sampled at 10, 18, 30 and 60days post-hatch. In each sampling day, larvae were sampled every 3h during a complete 24h cycle. The enzyme activity and gene expression exhibited a marked dependent behavior to the light/darkness cycle in all tested ages. The patterns of activity and expression of all tested enzymes were compared to the feeding pattern found in the same larvae, which showed a rhythmic feeding pattern with a strong light synchronization. In the four tested ages, the activities of trypsin, and to a lesser extent lipases and amylase, were related to feeding activity. Molecular expression of the pancreatic enzymes tended to increase during the night, probably as an anticipation of the forthcoming ingestion of food that will take place during the next light period. It follows that the enzymatic activities are being regulated at translational and/or post-translational level. The potential variability of enzyme secretion along the whole day is an important factor to take into account in future studies. A particularly striking consequence of the present results is the reliability of studies based in only one daily sample taken at the same hour of the day, as those focused to assess ontogeny of digestive enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Determination of restriction enzyme activity when cutting DNA labeled with the TOTO dye family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maschmann, April; Kounovsky-Shafer, Kristy L

    2017-06-03

    Optical mapping, a single DNA molecule genome analysis platform that can determine methylation profiles, uses fluorescently labeled DNA molecules that are elongated on the surface and digested with a restriction enzyme to produce a barcode of that molecule. Understanding how the cyanine fluorochromes affect enzyme activity can lead to other fluorochromes used in the optical mapping system. The effects of restriction digestion on fluorochrome labeled DNA (Ethidium Bromide, DAPI, H33258, EthD-1, TOTO-1) have been analyzed previously. However, TOTO-1 is a part of a family of cyanine fluorochromes (YOYO-1, TOTO-1, BOBO-1, POPO-1, YOYO-3, TOTO-3, BOBO-3, and POPO-3) and the rest of the fluorochromes have not been examined in terms of their effects on restriction digestion. In order to determine if the other dyes in the TOTO-1 family inhibit restriction enzymes in the same way as TOTO-1, lambda DNA was stained with a dye from the TOTO family and digested. The restriction enzyme activity in regards to each dye, as well as each restriction enzyme, was compared to determine the extent of digestion. YOYO-1, TOTO-1, and POPO-1 fluorochromes inhibited ScaI-HF, PmlI, and EcoRI restriction enzymes. Additionally, the mobility of labeled DNA fragments in an agarose gel changed depending on which dye was intercalated.

  13. Enzyme renaturation to higher activity driven by the sol-gel transition: Carbonic anhydrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinogradov, Vladimir V.; Avnir, David

    2015-09-01

    We describe a so-far unknown route for renaturing denatured enzymes, namely subjecting the denatured enzyme to an oxide sol-gel transition. The phenomenon was revealed in a detailed study of denatured carbonic anhydrase which was subjected to an alumina sol-gel transition, up to the thermally stabilizing entrapment in the final xerogel. Remarkably, not only that the killed enzyme regained its activity during the sol-gel process, but its activity increased to 180% of the native enzyme. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of enhanced activity following by renaturing (a “Phoenix effect”). Kinetic study which revealed a five-orders of magnitude (!) increase in the Arrhenius prefactor upon entrapment compared to solution. Circular dichroism analysis, differential scanning calorimetry, zeta potential analyses as well as synchronous fluorescence measurements, all of which were used to characterize the phenomenon, are consistent with a proposed mechanism which is based on the specific orienting interactions of the active site of the enzyme with respect to the alumina interface and its pores network.

  14. Discovery, Molecular Mechanisms and Industrial Applications of Cold-Active Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Santiago

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cold-active enzymes constitute an attractive resource for biotechnological applications. Their high catalytic activity at temperatures below 25 ºC makes them excellent biocatalysts that eliminate the need of heating processes hampering the quality, sustainability and cost-effectiveness of industrial production. Here we provide a review of the isolation and characterization of novel cold-active enzymes from microorganisms inhabiting different environments, including a revision of the latest techniques that have been used for accomplishing these paramount tasks. We address the progress made in the overexpression and purification of cold-adapted enzymes, the evolutionary and molecular basis of their high activity at low temperatures and the experimental and computational techniques used for their identification, along with protein engineering endeavors based on these observations to improve some of the properties of cold-adapted enzymes to better suit specific applications. We finally focus on examples of the evaluation of their potential use as biocatalysts under conditions that reproduce the challenges imposed by the use of solvents and additives in industrial processes and of the successful use of cold-adapted enzymes in biotechnological and industrial applications.

  15. Characterization of inhibitor(s) of β-glucuronidase enzyme activity in GUS-transgenic wheat

    KAUST Repository

    Ramadan, Ahmed M Ali

    2011-06-26

    The uidA gene, encoding for β-glucuronidase (GUS), is the most frequently used reporter gene in plants. As a reporter enzyme, GUS can be assayed both qualitatively and quantitatively. In wheat, there are numerous reports of failure in detecting GUS enzyme activity in tissues of transgenic plants, while other reports have suggested presence of β-glucuronidase inhibitor(s) in wheat tissues. In the present study, we show that the β-glucuronidase enzyme activity is not only tissue-specific but also genotype-dependent. Our data demonstrate that the glucuronic acid could be the candidate inhibitor for β-glucuronidase enzyme activity in wheat leaves and roots. It should be noted that the assays to detect β-glucuronidase enzyme activity in wheat should be interpreted carefully. Based on the data of our present study, we recommend studying the chemical pathways, the unintended effects and the possible loss-of-function of any candidate transgene prior to transformation experiments. © 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  16. Enzyme activity effects of N-terminal His-tag attached to catalytic sub-unit of phosphoinositide-3-kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickson, James M J; Lee, Woo-Jeong; Shepherd, Peter R; Buchanan, Christina M

    2013-11-05

    NTT (N-terminal tags) on the catalytic (p110) sub-unit of PI 3-K (phosphoinositol 3-kinase) have previously been shown to increase cell signalling and oncogenic transformation. Here we test the impact of an NT (N-terminal) His-tag on in vitro lipid and protein kinase activity of all class-1 PI 3-K isoforms and two representative oncogenic mutant forms (E545K and H1047R), in order to elucidate the mechanisms behind this elevated signalling and transformation observed in vivo. Our results show that an NT His-tag has no impact on lipid kinase activity as measured by enzyme titration, kinetics and inhibitor susceptibility. Conversely, the NT His-tag did result in a differential effect on protein kinase activity, further potentiating the elevated protein kinase activity of both the helical domain and catalytic domain oncogenic mutants with relation to p110 phosphorylation. All other isoforms also showed elevated p110 phosphorylation (although not statistically significant). We conclude that the previously reported increase in cell signalling and oncogenic-like transformation in response to p110 NTT is not mediated via an increase in the lipid kinase activity of PI 3-K, but may be mediated by increased p110 autophosphorylation and/or other, as yet unidentified, intracellular protein/protein interactions. We further observe that tagged recombinant protein is suitable for use in in vitro lipid kinase screens to identify PI 3-K inhibitors; however, we recommend that in vivo (including intracellular) experiments and investigations into the protein kinase activity of PI 3-K should be conducted with untagged constructs.

  17. Prediction of enzyme mutant activity using computational mutagenesis and incremental transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, Nada; Wechsler, Harry

    2011-01-01

    Wet laboratory mutagenesis to determine enzyme activity changes is expensive and time consuming. This paper expands on standard one-shot learning by proposing an incremental transductive method (T2bRF) for the prediction of enzyme mutant activity during mutagenesis using Delaunay tessellation and 4-body statistical potentials for representation. Incremental learning is in tune with both eScience and actual experimentation, as it accounts for cumulative annotation effects of enzyme mutant activity over time. The experimental results reported, using cross-validation, show that overall the incremental transductive method proposed, using random forest as base classifier, yields better results compared to one-shot learning methods. T2bRF is shown to yield 90% on T4 and LAC (and 86% on HIV-1). This is significantly better than state-of-the-art competing methods, whose performance yield is at 80% or less using the same datasets.

  18. Prediction of Enzyme Mutant Activity Using Computational Mutagenesis and Incremental Transduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Basit

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wet laboratory mutagenesis to determine enzyme activity changes is expensive and time consuming. This paper expands on standard one-shot learning by proposing an incremental transductive method (T2bRF for the prediction of enzyme mutant activity during mutagenesis using Delaunay tessellation and 4-body statistical potentials for representation. Incremental learning is in tune with both eScience and actual experimentation, as it accounts for cumulative annotation effects of enzyme mutant activity over time. The experimental results reported, using cross-validation, show that overall the incremental transductive method proposed, using random forest as base classifier, yields better results compared to one-shot learning methods. T2bRF is shown to yield 90% on T4 and LAC (and 86% on HIV-1. This is significantly better than state-of-the-art competing methods, whose performance yield is at 80% or less using the same datasets.

  19. [Effects of nitrogen addition on soil physico-chemical properties and enzyme activities in desertified steppe].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jie-Qiong; Li, Xin-Rong; Bao, Jing-Ting

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the impacts of nitrogen (N) enrichment on soil physico-chemical property and soil enzyme activities in desert ecosystems, a field experiment by adding N at 0, 1.75, 3.5, 7, or 14 g N x m(-2) a(-1) was conducted in a temperate desert steppe in the southeastern fringe of the Tengger Desert. The results showed that N addition led to accumulations of total N, NO(3-)-N, NH(4+)-N, and available N in the upper soil (0-10 cm) and subsoil (10-20 cm), however, reductions in soil pH were observed, causing soil acidification to some extent. N addition pronouncedly inhibited soil enzyme activities, which were different among N addition levels, soil depths, and years, respectively. Soil enzyme activities were significantly correlated with the soil N level, soil pH, and soil moisture content, respectively.

  20. Quality of Water Content, Diastase Enzyme Activity and Hidroximetilfurfural (HMF in Rubber and Rambutan Honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulis Setio Toto Harjo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to determine the water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF of the rubber and rambutan honey. The method was a laboratory experiments with statistical analysis unpaired student t-test by two treatments and fifteen replications. The variable of this research were water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF. The results of rubber and rambutan honey showed that there were significant difference effect (P0.05 that is 11 DN and there is a highly significant difference (P<0.01 on the HMF content of 17.23±0.54 mg/kg and 7.61±0.23 mg/kg. Rubber and rambutan honey have good quality based on the water content, diastase enzyme activity and HMF. It was concluded that the rubber and rambutan honey used were of good quality because it has met the requirements of SNI.

  1. BluB/CobT2 fusion enzyme activity reveals mechanisms responsible for production of active form of vitamin B₁₂ by Propionibacterium freudenreichii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deptula, Paulina; Kylli, Petri; Chamlagain, Bhawani; Holm, Liisa; Kostiainen, Risto; Piironen, Vieno; Savijoki, Kirsi; Varmanen, Pekka

    2015-11-23

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a food grade bacterium that has gained attention as a producer of appreciable amounts of cobalamin, a cobamide with activity of vitamin B12. Production of active form of vitamin is a prerequisite for attempts to naturally fortify foods with B12 by microbial fermentation. Active vitamin B12 is distinguished from the pseudovitamin by the presence of 5,6-dimethylbenzimidazole (DMBI) as the lower ligand. Genomic data indicate that P. freudenreichii possesses a fusion gene, bluB/cobT2, coding for a predicted phosphoribosyltransferase/nitroreductase, which is presumably involved in production of vitamin B12. Understanding the mechanisms affecting the synthesis of different vitamin forms is useful for rational strain selection and essential for engineering of strains with improved B12 production properties. Here, we investigated the activity of heterologously expressed and purified fusion enzyme BluB/CobT2. Our results show that BluB/CoBT2 is responsible for the biosynthesis of the DMBI base and its activation into α-ribazole phosphate, preparing it for attachment as the lower ligand of cobalamin. The fusion enzyme was found to be efficient in metabolite channeling and the enzymes' inability to react with adenine, a lower ligand present in the pseudovitamin, revealed a mechanism favoring the production of the active form of the vitamin. P. freudenreichii did not produce cobalamin under strictly anaerobic conditions, confirming the requirement of oxygen for DMBI synthesis. In vivo experiments also revealed a clear preference for incorporating DMBI over adenine into cobamide under both microaerobic and anaerobic conditions. The herein described BluB/CobT2 is responsible for the production and activation of DMBI. Fusing those two activities results in high pressure towards production of the true vitamin B12 by efficiently activating DMBI formed within the same enzymatic complex. This indicates that BluB/CobT2 is the crucial enzyme in the

  2. Extraction of consortium of hydrolytic enzymes from waste activated sludge using ultrasonication and stirring with surfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anbazhagan, Sethupathy; Palani, Sivashanmugam

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, the consortium of hydrolytic enzymes namely protease, α-amylase, lipase, cellulase and α-glucosidase were extracted from sludge flocs of municipal returned waste activated sludge (MRWAS) and different proportion of mixed sludge namely (MRWAS) and pulp and paper sludge using ultrasonication and stirring with TX100 (Triton X100) and AOT (Dioctyl sodium sulphosuccinate). Ultrasonication with specific energy of 27,027kJ/kg TS with duration 10min was optimized to get maximum activity of enzymes. Mixed sludge with ratio (55:75) had yielded more enzymes activity than the municipal returned waste activated sludge. Further, enzymes extraction efficiency by stirring using TX100, AOT and ultrasonication combined with TX00 and AOT methods were investigated in an optimized mixed sludge ratio (55:75) with varying dosage and stirring or sonication time. In stirring method, the optimum dosage and time of (1% v/v, 60min) and (2% v/v, 180min) respectively were obtained for TX100 and AOT. In ultrasonication method, the optimum dosage of TX100 (1% v/v) and AOT (2% v/v) were obtained at an optimized specific energy of 27,027kJ/kg for 10min. Among the extraction methods, ultrasonication combined with TX100 method exhibited maximum activity of protease, α-amylase, cellulase, lipase and α-glucosidase and these were predicted to be respectively 43.6, 54.4, 34.7, 23, 12.5Units/g VSS. It was concluded that ultrasonication combined with TX100 method is more suitable as it requires a short time and minimum dosage adequate to extract maximum activity of consortium enzymes from sludge flocs, which is essential for the enzymes to be recovered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pegylated derivatives of recombinant human arginase (rhArg1 for sustained in vivo activity in cancer therapy: preparation, characterization and analysis of their pharmacodynamics in vivo and in vitro and action upon hepatocellular carcinoma cell (HCC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheatley Denys N

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein used in medicine, e.g. interferon, are immunogenic and quickly broken down by the body. Pegylation is a recognized way of preserving their integrity and reducing immune reactions, and works well with enzymes used to degrade amino acids, a recent focus of attention in controlling cancer growth. Of the two arginine-degrading enzymes being explored clinically, arginine deiminase is a decidedly foreign mycoplasm-derived enzyme, whereas human arginase 1 is a native liver enzyme. Both have been pegylated, the former with adjuncts of 20 kD, the latter with 5 kD PEG. Pegylation is done by several different methods, not all of which are satisfactory or desirable. Methods The preparation of novel polyethylene glycol (PEG derivatives for modifying proteins is described, but directed specifically at pegylation of recombinant human arginase 1 (rhArg1. rhArg1 expressed in Escherichia coli was purified and coupled in various ways with 5 different PEG molecules to compare their protective properties and the residual enzyme activity, using hepatocellular cell lines both in vitro and in vivo. Results Methoxypolyethylene glycol-succinimidyl propionate (mPEG-SPA 5,000 coupled with very high affinity under mild conditions. The resulting pegylated enzyme (rhArg1-peg5,000 mw had up to 6 PEG chains of 5K length which not only protected it from degradation and any residual immunogenicity, but most importantly let it retain >90% of its native catalytic activity. It remained efficacious in depleting arginine in rats after a single ip injection of 1,500 U of the conjugate as the native enzyme, plasma arginine falling to >0.05 μM from ~170 μM within 20 min and lasting 6 days. The conjugate had almost the same efficacy as unpegylated rhArg1 on 2 cultured human liver cancer (HCC cell lines. It was considerably more effective than 4 other pegylated conjugates prepared. Conclusion Valuable data on the optimization of the pegylation procedure and

  4. Analysis of α-glucosidase enzyme activity used in a rapid test for steam sterilization assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setlow, B; Korza, G; Setlow, P

    2016-05-01

    This study was to determine the sources, location and identity of α-glucosidases in dormant/germinating/outgrowing spores and growing cells of Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953, an enzymatic activity in spores used in rapid tests of steam sterilization. α-Glucosidase activity in spores and cells was determined measuring methylumbelliferyl-α-d-glucoside (α-MUG) or α-MUG-6-phosphate hydrolysis fluorometrically. While α-MUG-6-phosphate was not hydrolysed by cell or spore extracts, assays with α-MUG showed that: (1) the α-glucosidase activity was inside and outside spores, and the activity outside spores was largely removed by buffer washes or heat activation, whereas α-glucosidase activity was only inside vegetative cells; (2) most α-glucosidase activity in cells and spores was soluble; (3) Western blots and enzyme inhibition using an anti-α-glucosidase antiserum identified ≥2 α-glucosidases in spores and growing cells; (4) α-glucosidase-specific activities were similar in dormant, germinated and outgrowing spore and growing cell extracts; and (5) significant α-glucosidase was synthesized during spore germination and outgrowth and cell growth, this synthesis was not repressed by glucose nor induced by α-MUG, but glucose inhibited α-MUG uptake. α-MUG hydrolysis by G. stearothermophilus is by α-MUG uptake and hydrolysis by ≥2 α-glucosidases associated with dormant spores and synthesized by germinating and outgrowing spores. The enzyme activity observed by sterilization assurance assays appears likely to come from heat-stable enzyme in the spore core and enzyme(s) synthesized in spore outgrowth. The results of this work provide new insight into the science behind a rapid test for steam sterilization assurance. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Enzyme activity assays within microstructured optical fibers enabled by automated alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Nie, Guiying; Schartner, Erik P; Salamonsen, Lois A; Monro, Tanya M

    2012-12-01

    A fluorescence-based enzyme activity assay has been demonstrated within a small-core microstructured optical fiber (MOF) for the first time. To achieve this, a reflection-based automated alignment system has been developed, which uses feedback and piezoelectric actuators to maintain optical alignment. The auto-alignment system provides optical stability for the time required to perform an activity assay. The chosen assay is based on the enzyme proprotein convertase 5/6 (PC6) and has important applications in women's health.

  6. Influence of probiotics on the growth and digestive enzyme activity of white Pacific shrimp ( Litopenaeus vannamei)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, R. Geovanny D.; Shen, M. A.

    2008-05-01

    The influence of Bacillus probiotics on the digestive enzyme activity and the growth of Litopenaeus vannamei were determined in this study. The shrimp was treated with five percentages (1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0 and 7.5) of probiotics ( Bacillus spp.) supplemented to the feed and cultured for 45d. The growth measured as the weight gain at the end of culturing was significantly ( Pprobiotic-treated shrimps than that of the control (without receiving probiotics). Activities of protease and amylase, two digestive enzymes of the midgut gland and the intestine were significantly ( Pprobiotic-treated shrimp than in the control.

  7. Effects of metribuzin on the activity of some enzymes in soil

    OpenAIRE

    Ljiljana Šantrić; Ljiljana Radivojević; Slavica Gašić; Radmila Stanković-Kalezić; Jelena Gajić-Umiljendić

    2008-01-01

    Effects of metribuzin on the activity of some enzymes in soil was investigated. Trials were set up in the laboratory on a clay loam soil. Metribuzin was applied at 12.0, 24.0 and 60.0 mg/kg soil rates and soil samples were collected 3, 7, 15, 30 and 45 days after metribuzin treatment for analyses. Alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, dehydrogenase, urease and b-glucosidase were recorded. The results showed that the intensity of metribuzin effects on the activity of enzymes depended on trea...

  8. Enzyme activity of Chromic Luvisols under different degree of erosion and land use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostadinka Nedyalkova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Soil erosion is a serious environmental problem and a threat to the sustainable agriculture production. Little information is available on enzyme activities of eroded soils in Bulgaria, especially on their relations to the degree of erosion and soil properties. In this work, slightly, moderately and severely eroded Chromic Luvisols under different land use (pasture, crop field and virgin were studied. Enzyme activities (invertase, catalase and phosphatase, total nitrogen, total carbon, available phosphorus contents and soil particle distribution were determined and possible relations between them were examined. Data showed that enzyme activities tended to lower with increasing the degree of erosion. This was better pronounced for invertase and phosphatase in pasture and virgin soils. Depending on land use, all enzyme activities decreased in the order pasture > virgin > crop field soils, showing positive impact of soil cover and negative effect of cultivation practices. Soil invertase and phosphatase activities were in close relations with soil carbon content. The activities of catalase and phosphatase correlated positively with soil clay. Invertase only was in positive relation with soil silt and in negative relation with the sand content. Data obtained are intended to contribute to development of biological indicators of eroded soils.

  9. Potato responds to salt stress by increased activity of antioxidant enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaei, Keyvan; Ehsanpour, Ali Akber; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2009-12-01

    To understand the response of potato to salt stress, antioxidant enzyme activities and ion content were analyzed for a sensitive and a tolerant cultivar. Nodal cuttings of the tolerant cultivar, Kennebec, and the sensitive cultivar, Concord, were exposed to media without or with 30, 60, 90 or 120 mmol/L NaCl for 4 weeks. On exposure to NaCl, the length and fresh and dry weight of both shoots and roots of Concord showed greater decrease than those of Kennebec. The decrease in shoot growth was more severe than that of the root for both cultivars. The K(+) content of shoots and roots of both cultivars was reduced in a dose-dependent manner by exposure to NaCl; the Na(+) content increased. Activities of ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase were increased in NaCl-exposed shoots of Kennebec; the corresponding activities in NaCl-exposed shoots of Concord were decreased. Roots of both cultivars showed similar changes in the activities of these enzymes on exposure to NaCl. These studies established that enzyme activities in Concord shoots are inversely related to the NaCl concentration, whereas those in Kennebec do not show a dose dependency, which is also the case for the roots of both cultivars. Our findings suggest that an increase in activity of antioxidant enzymes, such as ascorbate peroxidase, catalase and glutathione reductase, can contribute to salt tolerance in Kennebec, a salt resistant cultivar of potato.

  10. In vivo optical molecular imaging of matrix metalloproteinase activity in abdominal aortic aneurysms correlates with treatment effects on growth rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheth, Rahul A; Maricevich, Marco; Mahmood, Umar

    2010-09-01

    We present a method to quantify the inflammatory processes that drive abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) development that may help predict the rate of growth and thus guide medical and surgical management. We use an in vivo optical molecular imaging approach to quantify protease activity within the walls of AAAs in a rodent model. AAAs were generated in mice by topical application of calcium chloride, followed by the administration of the MMP inhibitor doxycycline for 3 months. After this time period, an enzyme-activatable optical molecular imaging agent sensitive to MMP activity was administered, and MMP proteolytic activity was measured in vivo. Histology and in situ zymography were performed for validation. AAAs were also generated in rats, and MMP activity within the walls of the AAAs was also quantified endovascularly. A dose-dependent response of AAA growth rate to doxycycline administration was demonstrated, with high doses of the drug resulting in nearly complete suppression of aneurysm formation. There was a direct relationship between the rate of aneurysmal growth and measured MMP activity, with a linear best-fit well approximating the relationship. We additionally performed endovascular imaging of AAAs in rats and demonstrated a similar suppression of intramural MMP activity following doxycycline administration. We present an in vivo evaluation of MMP activity within the walls of AAAs in rodents and show a direct, linear relationship between proteolytic activity and aneurysmal growth. We also illustrate that this functional imaging method can be performed endovascularly, demonstrating potential pre-clinical and clinical applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Viral Pseudo Enzymes Activate RIG-I via Deamidation to Evade Cytokine Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Shanping; Zhao, Jun; Song, Shanshan; He, Xiaojing; Minassian, Arlet; Zhou, Yu; Zhang, Junjie; Brulois, Kevin; Wang, Yuqi; Cabo, Jackson; Zandi, Ebrahim; Liang, Chengyu; Jung, Jae U; Zhang, Xuewu; Feng, Pinghui

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY RIG-I is a pattern recognition receptor that senses viral RNA and is crucial for host innate immune defense. Here we describe a mechanism of RIG-I activation through amidotransferase-mediated deamidation. We show that viral homologues of phosphoribosylformyglycinamide synthase (PFAS), although lacking intrinsic enzyme activity, recruit cellular PFAS to deamidate and activate RIG-I. Accordingly, depletion and biochemical inhibition of PFAS impair RIG-I deamidation and concomitant activation. Purified PFAS and viral homologue thereof deamidate RIG-I in vitro. Ultimately, herpesvirus hijacks activated RIG-I to avoid antiviral cytokine production; loss of RIG-I or inhibition of RIG-I deamidation results in elevated cytokine production. Together, these findings demonstrate a surprising mechanism of RIG-I activation that is mediated by an enzyme. PMID:25752576

  12. Characterization of CenC, an enzyme from Cellulomonas fimi with both endo- and exoglucanase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomme, P; Kwan, E; Gilkes, N R; Kilburn, D G; Warren, R A

    1996-01-01

    The cenC gene, encoding beta-1,4-glucanase C (CenC) from Cellulomonas fimi, was overexpressed in Escherichia coli with a tac-based expression vector. The resulting polypeptide, with an apparent molecular mass of 130 kDa, was purified from the cell extracts by affinity chromatography on cellulose followed by anion-exchange chromatography. N-terminal sequence analysis showed the enzyme to be properly processed. Mature CenC was optimally active at pH 5.0 and 45 degrees C. The enzyme was extremely active on soluble, fluorophoric, and chromophoric glycosides (4-methylumbelliferyl beta-glycosides, 2'-chloro-4'-nitrophenyl-beta-D-cellobioside, and 2'-chloro-4'-nitrophenyl-lactoside) and efficiently hydrolyzed carboxymethyl cellulose, barley beta-glucan, lichenan, and, to a lesser extent, glucomannan. CenC also hydrolyzed acid-swollen cellulose, Avicel, and bacterial microcrystalline cellulose. However, degradation of the latter was slow compared with its degradation by CenB, another C. fimi cellulose belonging to the same enzyme family. CenC acted with inversion of configuration at the anomeric carbon, in accordance with its classification as a family 9 member. The enzyme released mainly cellobiose from soluble cellodextrins and insoluble cellulose. Attack appeared to be from the reducing chain ends. Analysis of carboxymethyl cellulose hydrolysis suggests that CenC is semiprocessive enzyme with both endo- and exoglucanase activities. PMID:8763951

  13. In vivo Antimalarial Activity of Methanol and Water Extracts of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the in vivo antimalarial effect of Eryngium thorifolium, an endemic plant in Turkey. Methods: The methanol and water extracts were prepared and phytochemical analysis conducted on the extracts. Twenty four healthy Balb/c male mice, divided into 4 groups (n = 6), were infected intravenously with ...

  14. Tissue hypoxygenation activates the adrenomedullin system in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofbauer, K H; Jensen, B L; Kurtz, A

    2000-01-01

    Our study aimed to investigate the influence of tissue hypo-oxygenation on the adrenomedullin (ADM) system in vivo. For this purpose, male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to normobaric hypoxia (8% oxygen) or to functional anemia [0.1% carbon monoxide (CO)] or to cobalt chloride (60 mg/kg) for 6 ...

  15. ENZYME ACTIVITY OF HUMAN MILK DURING THE FIRST MONTH OF LACTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordana Kocić

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic of enzyme activities in human colostrum and milk changes, depending on the lactation stimulation. The aim of the study was to study the activity of alkaline phosphatase, amylase, transaminases (ALT and AST and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH in the samples of human colostrum and mature milk obtained by manual squeezing. The study involved 35 women, 18-39 years of age, who had given birth at the Clinic for Gynecology and Obstetrics, Faculty of Medicine in Niš, with normal delivery, without any complications reported. The samples of colostrum and milk were collected by mechanical squeezing of milk during three intervals: the first sample of colostrum was obtained immediately after the appearance of the first drops of milk after childbirth; the second sample was obtained after 24 hours, and the third after one month. The samples were collected in the morning, and kept in sterile test tubes in the freezer until the performance of analysis. The activity of these enzymes was reduced (statistically significant for amylase in the period after one month, which means that it corresponded to the amount of protein. The activity of transaminases (ALT and AST and alkaline phosphatase activity showed a tendency to fall after a month, but statistically significant difference was obtained with AST. The dynamic of alkaline phosphatase activity showed statistically significant decrease after one month. Enzyme activity in human milk represents an important field of research, from the aspect of functional importance and benefits of human milk compared to the cow’s milk, in which enzymes are generally destroyed by pasteurization. On the other hand, increased activity of certain enzymes may be a useful and valid diagnostic marker of mechanical tissue irritation, epithelial desqamation and increase of the concentration of inflammatory cells during mastitis.

  16. The changes in enzyme activities during citric acid fermentation by Aspergillus niger in solid culture.

    OpenAIRE

    桐村, 光太郎; 熊谷, 和夫; 森貞, 信也; "河邊, 誠一郎"; 宇佐美, 昭次; KOTARO, KIRIMURA; Kazuo, KUMAGAI; SHINYA, MORISADA; Seiichiro", "Kawabe; Shoji, Usami; 住友化学工業株式会社; 岡山理科大学基礎理学科; 早稲田大学理工学部応用化学科; Department of Applied Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University

    1984-01-01

    The changes of enzyme activities during citric acid fermentation in solid culture were studied with a high citric acidproducing strain, Aspergillus niger Yang no. 2,cultivated in synthetic medium containing 2 g/l of gelatin and glass wool as carrier.With fermentation time, the specific activity ratio of fructose-bisphosphate aldolase to glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase increased. Of the TCA cycle enzmes, the specific activities of citrate synthetase and aconitate hydratase remained almost co...

  17. In Vitro and In Vivo Enzyme-Mediated Biomineralization of Oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) Fumarate Hydrogels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongio, M; Nejadnik, M.R.; Tahmasebi Birgani, Zeinab; Habibovic, Pamela; Kinard, L.A.; Kasper, F.K.; Mikos, A.G.; Jansen, J.A.; Leeuwenburgh, S.C.G.; van den Beucken, J.J.J.P.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is added at different concentrations (i.e., 0, 2.5, and 10 mg · ml−1) to oligo(poly(ethylene glycol)fumarate) (OPF) hydrogels. The scaffolds are either incubated in 10 mM calcium glycerophosphate (Ca–GP) solution for 2 weeks or implanted in a rat subcutaneous

  18. Superoxide Dismutase (SOD Enzyme Activity Assay in Fasciola spp. Para-sites and Liver Tissue Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Assady

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The purpose of this comparative study was to detect superoxide dismutase (SOD activities in Fasciola hepatica, F. gigantica parasites, infected and healthy liver tissues in order to determine of species effects and liver infection on SODs activity level.Methods: Fasciola spp. parasites and sheep liver tissues (healthy and infected liver tissues, 10 samples for each, were collected, homogenized and investigated for protein measurement, protein detection and SOD enzyme activity assay. Protein concentration was measured by Bradford method and SODs band protein was detected on SDS-PAGE. SODs activity was determined by iodonitrotetrazolium chloride, INT, and xanthine substrates. Independent samples t-test was conducted for analysis of SODs activities difference.Results: Protein concentration means were detected for F. hepatica 1.3 mg/ ml, F. gigantica 2.9 mg/ml, healthy liver tissue 5.5 mg/ml and infected liver tissue 1.6 mg/ml (with similar weight sample mass. Specific enzyme activities in the samples were obtained 0.58, 0.57, 0.51, 1.43 U/mg for F. hepatica, F. gigantica, healthy liver and infected liver respectively. Gel electrophoresis of Fasciola spp. and sheep liver tissue extracts revealed a band protein with MW of 60 kDa. The statistical analysis revealed significant difference between SOD activities of Fasciola species and also between SOD activity of liver tissues (P<.05.Conclusion: Fasciola species and liver infection are effective causes on SOD enzyme activity level.

  19. Influence of Molting and Starvation on Digestive Enzyme Activities and Energy Storage in Gammarus fossarum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs. PMID:24788197

  20. Influence of molting and starvation on digestive enzyme activities and energy storage in Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs.

  1. Differential Activity of four Selected Enzymes in the Pistils of two Members of the Family Bignoniaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulshan Chaudhary

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present study two members of the family Bignoniaceae, Tacoma stans, a fruit bearing plant, and Pyrostegia venusta, a twine that does not bear fruits were chosen to study the activity of four enzymes, namely, peroxidase, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase and esterase. The aim of the study was to understand if pollination with viable and non-viable pollen grains has any influence on the activity of the four selected enzymes in post pollinated pistils. T. stans produces viable pollen grains while P. venusta produces non-viable pollen grains. Seven developmental stages starting from anthesis till 12 hours of flower opening were identified for both the plants. Controlled pollinations were carried out in the two plants. Stigma of T. stans was pollinated with self pollen grains that were viable while P. venusta stigma received pollen grains that were non-viable. In T. stans the four enzymes peroxidase, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase and esterase showed normal activity though peroxidase activity was comparatively subdued. In P. venusta, however, peroxidase showed hyper-activity while the other three enzymes, acid phosphatase, polyphenol oxidase and esterase were more subdued. The results have been discussed in the light of the available literature.

  2. A cascading activity-based probe sequentially targets E1-E2-E3 ubiquitin enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulder, Monique P C; Witting, Katharina; Berlin, Ilana; Pruneda, Jonathan N; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Chang, Jer-Gung; Merkx, Remco; Bialas, Johanna; Groettrup, Marcus; Vertegaal, Alfred C O; Schulman, Brenda A; Komander, David; Neefjes, Jacques; El Oualid, Farid; Ovaa, Huib

    2016-07-01

    Post-translational modifications of proteins with ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like modifiers (Ubls), orchestrated by a cascade of specialized E1, E2 and E3 enzymes, control a wide range of cellular processes. To monitor catalysis along these complex reaction pathways, we developed a cascading activity-based probe, UbDha. Similarly to the native Ub, upon ATP-dependent activation by the E1, UbDha can travel downstream to the E2 (and subsequently E3) enzymes through sequential trans-thioesterifications. Unlike the native Ub, at each step along the cascade, UbDha has the option to react irreversibly with active site cysteine residues of target enzymes, thus enabling their detection. We show that our cascading probe 'hops' and 'traps' catalytically active Ub-modifying enzymes (but not their substrates) by a mechanism diversifiable to Ubls. Our founder methodology, amenable to structural studies, proteome-wide profiling and monitoring of enzymatic activity in living cells, presents novel and versatile tools to interrogate Ub and Ubl cascades.

  3. Influence of molting and starvation on digestive enzyme activities and energy storage in Gammarus fossarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Charron

    Full Text Available Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities and physiological (energy reserves responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs.

  4. Probiotic activity of lignocellulosic enzyme as bioactivator for rice husk degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamid, Mirni; Al-Arif, Anam; Warsito, Sunaryo Hadi

    2017-02-01

    The utilization of lignocellulosic enzyme will increase nutritional value of rice husk. Cellulase consists of C1 (β-1, 4-glucan cellobiohydrolase or exo-β-1,4glucanase), Cc (endo-β-1,4-glucanase) and component and cellobiose (β-glucocidase). Hemicellulase enzyme consists of endo-β-1,4-xilanase, β-xilosidase, α-L arabinofuranosidase, α-D-glukuronidaseand asetil xilan esterase. This research aimed to study the activity of lignocellulosic enzyme, produced by cows in their rumen, which can be used as a bioactivator in rice husk degradation. This research resulted G6 and G7 bacteria, producing xylanase and cellulase with the activity of 0.004 U mL-1 and 0.021 U mL-1; 0.003 ( U mL-1) and 0.026 (U mL-1) respectively.

  5. Killing of Staphylococci by θ-Defensins Involves Membrane Impairment and Activation of Autolytic Enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam Wilmes

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available θ-Defensins are cyclic antimicrobial peptides expressed in leukocytes of Old world monkeys. To get insight into their antibacterial mode of action, we studied the activity of RTDs (rhesus macaque θ-defensins against staphylococci. We found that in contrast to other defensins, RTDs do not interfere with peptidoglycan biosynthesis, but rather induce bacterial lysis in staphylococci by interaction with the bacterial membrane and/or release of cell wall lytic enzymes. Potassium efflux experiments and membrane potential measurements revealed that the membrane impairment by RTDs strongly depends on the energization of the membrane. In addition, RTD treatment caused the release of Atl-derived cell wall lytic enzymes probably by interaction with membrane-bound lipoteichoic acid. Thus, the premature and uncontrolled activity of these enzymes contributes strongly to the overall killing by θ-defensins. Interestingly, a similar mode of action has been described for Pep5, an antimicrobial peptide of bacterial origin.

  6. Effects of Metribuzin on the Activity of Some Enzymes in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Šantrić

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Eeffects of metribuzin on the activity of some enzymes in soil was investigated. Trials were set up in the laboratory on a clay loam soil. Metribuzin was applied at 12.0, 24.0 and 60.0 mg/kg soil rates and soil samples were collected 3, 7, 15, 30 and 45 days after metribuzin treatment for analyses. Alkaline phosphatase, acid phosphatase, dehydrogenase, urease and β-glucosidase were recorded.The results showed that the intensity of metribuzin effects on the activity of enzymes depended on treatment rate, exposure time and enzyme group. Metribuzin had an inhibiting effect on acid phosphatese and dehydrogenase, as well as on alkaline phosphatase inthe initial stage before it turned into a stimulating one, while metribuzin stimulated urease and had no effect on β-glucosidase.

  7. Effect of sprint cycle training on activities of antioxidant enzymes in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Apple, F. S.; Sjödin, B.

    1996-01-01

    The effect of intermittent sprint cycle training on the level of muscle antioxidant enzyme protection was investigated. Resting muscle biopsies, obtained before and after 6 wk of training and 3, 24, and 72 h after the final session of an additional 1 wk of more frequent training, were analyzed...... (P trained muscle. The present study demonstrates that intermittent sprint cycle training that induces an enhanced capacity for anaerobic energy generation also improves...... for activities of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase (GPX), glutathione reductase (GR), and superoxide dismutase (SOD). Activities of several muscle metabolic enzymes were determined to assess the effectiveness of the training. After the first 6-wk training period, no change in GPX, GR, or SOD...

  8. Characterization of novel anthracycline prodrugs activated by human beta-glucuronidase for use in antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houba, PHJ; Leenders, RGG; Boven, E; Scheeren, JW; Pinedo, HM; Haisma, HJ

    1996-01-01

    Antibody-directed enzyme prodrug therapy (ADEPT) alms at the specific activation of a prodrug by an enzyme-immuoconjugate localized in tumor tissue. The use of an enzyme of human origin is preferable in ADEPT because it might not be immunogenic when administered to patients. In the case of human

  9. Apoferritin Nanoparticle: A Novel and Biocompatible Carrier for Enzyme Immobilization with Enhanced Activity and Stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Youyu; Tang, Zhiwen; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong J.; Lin, Chiann Tso; Lin, Yuehe

    2011-11-01

    Apoferritin is a nanostructured material with a uniform size and spherical structure, and it has excellent bio-compatibility. In this work, we report the use of apoferritin as a novel and biocompatible carrier for stabilizing enzymes and their activities. We used glucose oxidase (GOx) as a model enzyme. GOx was immobilized on the surface of the apoferritin through a green synthetic approach taking advantage of bioaffinity binding between streptavidin and biotin. As a result, a glucose oxidase-biotin/streptavidin/biotin-apoferritin conjugate (Apo-GOx) was prepared using streptavidin as a bridge. The synthesized Apo-GOx was characterized with transmission electron microscopy, ultraviolet, and fluorescence spectroscopy. The activity and stability of GOx on the surface of the apoferritin were studied in different environments, such as temperature, chemicals, and pH, in comparison with the biotinylated GOx (B-GOx). The results showed that the activity of GOx on the apoferritin surface was significantly enhanced. The thermal and chemical stability of the GOx on the apoferritin was also greatly improved compared to free B-GOx in a solution. It was found that the activity of the GOx on the apoferritin only lost 30% in comparison to a 70% loss of free B-GOx after a 2 h incubation at 50oC. There was almost no decrease in activity for the GOx on the apoferritin as compared to an 80% activity decrease for free B-GOx after 30 min incubation in a 5 M urea solution. Glucose detection was used as a model application for the enzyme immobilization method developed in this work. The GOx immobilized apoferritin nanoparticles exhibited high sensitivity for glucose detection with a detection limit of 3 nM glucose. This work offers a novel approach for immobilizing enzymes with enhanced stability and activity, and this method may find a number of applications, such as in enzyme catalysis, DNA assays and immunoassays.

  10. In vitro and in vivo antioxidant activity of a fructan from the roots of Arctium lappa L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Wang, Jiajia; Zhang, Zhenzhen; Xu, Jinnan; Xie, Zhuohong; Slavin, Margaret; Gao, Xiangdong

    2014-04-01

    To explore new antioxidant resource from food, a water-soluble polysaccharide (ALP1) was extracted and purified from the roots of Arctium lappa L. (A. lappa L.) through hot water extraction followed by ethanol precipitation, ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The antioxidant activity of ALP1 was then evaluated in vitro and in vivo. ALP1 was characterized as a fructan composed of fructose and glucose in the ratio of 13.0:1.0, with an average molecular weight of 4600 Da. The linkages in ALP1 were →1)-Fruf-(2→, Fruf-(2→ and Glcp-(1→. In vitro antioxidant assays demonstrated that ALP1 possessed moderate ABTS(+) scavenging activity, strong hydroxyl radical scavenging activity and strong ferrous ion chelating activity. In in vivo antioxidant assays, ALP1 administration significantly enhanced antioxidant enzyme activities and total antioxidant capacity, as well as decreased the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in both the serum and liver of aging mice. These results suggest that ALP1 has potential as a novel natural antioxidant in food industry and pharmaceuticals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A proanthocyanidin-rich extract from Cassia abbreviata exhibits antioxidant and hepatoprotective activities in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobeh, Mansour; Mahmoud, Mona F; Abdelfattah, Mohamed A O; Cheng, Haroan; El-Shazly, Assem M; Wink, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Cassia abbreviata is a small to medium sized branched umbrella-shaped deciduous tree. It is widely spread in the tropics, especially in Africa, having a long history in traditional medicine for the treatment of numerous conditions such as headaches, diarrhea, constipation, some skin diseases, malaria, syphilis, pneumonia, stomach troubles, uterine pains, and against gonorrhea. We investigated the phytochemical constituents of a root extract from Cassia abbreviata using HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS. We also determined the antioxidant activities in vitro and in vivo using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism. The hepatoprotective activities in case of D-galactosamine (D-GaIN)-induced hepatotoxicity were studied in a rat model. HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS analysis allowed the identification of the secondary metabolites of the methanol extract. DPPH and FRAP assays were used to determine the antioxidant activities in vitro. Using the C. elegans model, survival rates under juglone induced oxidative stress, intracellular ROS content, quantification of Phsp-16.2: GFP expression and subcellular DAF-16: GFP localization were investigated to determine the antioxidant activities in vivo. The in vivo hepatoprotective potential of the root extract was evaluated for D-galactosamine (D-GaIN)-induced hepatotoxicity in rats. The activity of the liver enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT), in addition to liver peroxidation product malondialdehyde (MDA) and glutathione content (GSH), as well as albumin and total bilirubin concentration, were determined. A histopathological study was also performed. C. abbreviata root extract is rich in polyphenolics, particularly proanthocyanidins. HPLC-PDA-ESI-MS/MS analysis resulted in the identification of 57 compounds on the bases of their mass spectra. (epi)-Catechin, (epi)-afzelechin, (epi)-guibourtinidol, and (ent)-cassiaflavan monomers as well as their dimers, trimers, and

  12. Regulation of sucrose metabolism in higher plants: localization and regulation of activity of key enzymes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, H.; Huber, S. C.; Brown, C. S. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Sucrose (Suc) plays a central role in plant growth and development. It is a major end product of photosynthesis and functions as a primary transport sugar and in some cases as a direct or indirect regulator of gene expression. Research during the last 2 decades has identified the pathways involved and which enzymes contribute to the control of flux. Availability of metabolites for Suc synthesis and 'demand' for products of sucrose degradation are important factors, but this review specifically focuses on the biosynthetic enzyme sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS), and the degradative enzymes, sucrose synthase (SuSy), and the invertases. Recent progress has included the cloning of genes encoding these enzymes and the elucidation of posttranslational regulatory mechanisms. Protein phosphorylation is emerging as an important mechanism controlling SPS activity in response to various environmental and endogenous signals. In terms of Suc degradation, invertase-catalyzed hydrolysis generally has been associated with cell expansion, whereas SuSy-catalyzed metabolism has been linked with biosynthetic processes (e.g., cell wall or storage products). Recent results indicate that SuSy may be localized in multiple cellular compartments: (1) as a soluble enzyme in the cytosol (as traditionally assumed); (2) associated with the plasma membrane; and (3) associated with the actin cytoskeleton. Phosphorylation of SuSy has been shown to occur and may be one of the factors controlling localization of the enzyme. The purpose of this review is to summarize some of the recent developments relating to regulation of activity and localization of key enzymes involved in sucrose metabolism in plants.

  13. Co-immobilization of different enzyme activities to non-woven polyester surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouaimi-Bachmann, Meryem; Skilewitsch, Olga; Senhaji-Dachtler, Saida; Bisswanger, Hans

    2007-03-01

    Co-immobilization was applied to combine complementary enzyme reactions. Therefore, trypsin was co-immobilized together with both, lipase and alpha-amylase, onto the surface of non-woven polyester material. The progress of the immobilization reaction was directly monitored by investigating covalent fixation of the enzymes to the polyester flees using (1)H-MAS-NMR. Co-immobilization of the different types of enzymes to the polyester support showed retained enzymatic activity. However, a competition of binding to the support was observed. Increasing amounts of one type of enzyme reduced the degree of immobilization for the other type. In order to investigate the distribution of trypsin and alpha-amylase on the polyester support, the flees was treated with a mixture of rhodamine isothiocyanate labeled with anti-trypsin antibodies and fluorescein isothiocyanate labeled with anti-alpha-amylase antibodies. Using fluorescence microscopy, the co-immobilization was analyzed by selective excitation of both chromophores at 480 and 530 nm, respectively. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy was applied by direct labeling of trypsin and lipase prior to co-immobilization to the polyester support. A special prism of plexiglass was constructed, which fit into a 10 x 10 mm fluorescence cuvette in that way that a diagonal plane was formed within the cuvette. The non-woven support was fixed in the cuvette and fluorescence spectra were obtained to characterize the amount of different enzymes linked to the support. Using FRET it was demonstrated that a uniform distribution of the various enzyme species was achieved, where the different enzyme activities are bound on the support in close neighborhood to one another.

  14. Activating Intrinsic Carbohydrate-Active Enzymes of the Smut Fungus Ustilago maydis for the Degradation of Plant Cell Wall Components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiser, Elena; Reindl, Michèle; Blank, Lars M; Feldbrügge, Michael; Wierckx, Nick; Schipper, Kerstin

    2016-09-01

    The microbial conversion of plant biomass to valuable products in a consolidated bioprocess could greatly increase the ecologic and economic impact of a biorefinery. Current strategies for hydrolyzing plant material mostly rely on the external application of carbohydrate-active enzymes (CAZymes). Alternatively, production organisms can be engineered to secrete CAZymes to reduce the reliance on externally added enzymes. Plant-pathogenic fungi have a vast repertoire of hydrolytic enzymes to sustain their lifestyle, but expression of the corresponding genes is usually highly regulated and restricted to the pathogenic phase. Here, we present a new strategy in using the biotrophic smut fungus Ustilago maydis for the degradation of plant cell wall components by activating its intrinsic enzyme potential during axenic growth. This fungal model organism is fully equipped with hydrolytic enzymes, and moreover, it naturally produces value-added substances, such as organic acids and biosurfactants. To achieve the deregulated expression of hydrolytic enzymes during the industrially relevant yeast-like growth in axenic culture, the native promoters of the respective genes were replaced by constitutively active synthetic promoters. This led to an enhanced conversion of xylan, cellobiose, and carboxymethyl cellulose to fermentable sugars. Moreover, a combination of strains with activated endoglucanase and β-glucanase increased the release of glucose from carboxymethyl cellulose and regenerated amorphous cellulose, suggesting that mixed cultivations could be a means for degrading more complex substrates in the future. In summary, this proof of principle demonstrates the potential applicability of activating the expression of native CAZymes from phytopathogens in a biocatalytic process. This study describes basic experiments that aim at the degradation of plant cell wall components by the smut fungus Ustilago maydis As a plant pathogen, this fungus contains a set of lignocellulose

  15. Activity of antioxidative defense enzymes in the blood of patients with liver echinococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilić Aleksandar

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Chronic echinococcocal disease is the parasite human disease caused by the penetration of larval (asexual stages of the canine tapeworm (Echinococcus granulosus in the liver of humans. After the penetration of the parasite, the host organism react by activating complement- depending immune response. The aim of this study was to elucidate the influence of larval form of Echinococcus granulosus in the liver on the activity of antioxidative defense enzymes in the blood of patients before and after the surgical intervention. Methods. We investigated the activity of antioxidative defense enzymes: copper/zinc containing superoxide dismutase (CuZn SOD, catalase (CAT, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, glutathione reductase (GR and glutathione-S-transferase (GST in the blood of patients before and after the surgical intervention in respect to the controls, clinically healthy persons. Results. Our results showed that the activity of the GSH-Px was significantly decreased in the plasma of the patients with echinocococal disease before the surgery in respect to the controls. The activity of GST was significantly higher in the blood of the patients after the surgery in comparison to the controls. Conclusion. Chronic liver echinoccocal disease caused significant changes of some antioxidative defense enzymes, first of all Se-dependent enzyme GSH-Px, which could be a suitabile biomarker in the biochemical evaluation of the disease. This work represents a first comprehensive study of the activity of antioxidative defense enzymes in cronic liver echinococcocosis in the patients before and after the surgical intervention in respect to the clinically healthy persons.

  16. Effects of Recurring Droughts on Extracellular Enzyme Activity in Mountain Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchslueger, L.; Bahn, M.; Kienzl, S.; Hofhansl, F.; Schnecker, J.; Richter, A.

    2015-12-01

    Water availability is a key factor for biogeochemical processes and determines microbial activity and functioning, and thereby organic matter decomposition in soils by affecting the osmotic potential, soil pore connectivity, substrate diffusion and nutrient availability. Low water availability during drought periods therefore directly affects microbial activity. Recurring drought periods likely induce shifts in microbial structure that might be reflected in altered responses of microbial turnover of organic matter by extracellular enzymes. To study this we measured a set of potential extracellular enzyme activity rates (cellobiohydrolase CBH; leucine-amino-peptidase LAP; phosphatase PHOS; phenoloxidase POX), in grassland soils that were exposed to extreme experimental droughts during the growing seasons of up to five subsequent years. During the first drought period after eight weeks of rain exclusion all measured potential enzyme activities were significantly decreased. In parallel, soil extractable organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations increased and microbial community structure, determined by phospholipid fatty acid analysis, changed. In soils that were exposed to two and three drought periods only PHOS decreased. After four years of drought again CBH, PHOS and POX decreased, while LAP was unaffected; after five years of drought PHOS and POX decreased and CBH and LAP remained stable. Thus, our results suggest that recurring extreme drought events can cause different responses of extracellular enzyme activities and that the responses change over time. We will discuss whether and to what degree these changes were related to shifts in microbial community composition. However, independent of whether a solitary or a recurrent drought was imposed, in cases when enzyme activity rates were altered during drought, they quickly recovered after rewetting. Overall, our data suggest that microbial functioning in mountain grassland is sensitive to drought, but highly

  17. Triclabendazole Effect on Protease Enzyme Activity in the Excretory- Secretory Products of Fasciola hepatica in Vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosef Shrifi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Fasciola hepatica is one of the most important helminthes parasites and triclabendazole (TCBZ is routinely used for treatment of infected people and animals. Secreted protease enzymes by the F. hepatica plays a critical role in the invasion, migration, nutrition and the survival of parasite and are key targets for novel drugs and vaccines. The aim of study was to determine the protease activity of excretory- secretory products (ESP of F. hepatica in the presence of TCBZ anthelmintic.F. hepatica helminthes were collected and cultured within RPMI 1640 [TCBZ treated (test and untreated (control] for 6 h at 37 °C. ESP of treated and control were collected, centrifuged and supernatants were stored at -20°C. Protein concentrations were measured according to Bradford method. Protease enzymes activities of ESP samples were estimated by using sigma's non-specific protease activity assay. ESP protein bands were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE.Mean protein concentrations in control and treated of ESP samples were determined 196.1 ±14.52 and 376.4 ±28.20 μg/ml, respectively. Mean protease enzymes activities in control and treated were 0.37 ±0.1 and 0.089 ±0.03 U/ml, respectively. Significant difference between proteins concentrations and protease enzymes activities of two groups was observed (P<0.05. SDS-PAGE showed different patterns of protein bands between treated and control samples.The TCBZ reduced secreted protease enzymes activities and possibly effects on invasion, migration, nutrition and particularly survival of the parasite in the host tissues.

  18. Carbon-degrading enzyme activities stimulated by increased nutrient availability in Arctic tundra soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Koyama

    Full Text Available Climate-induced warming of the Arctic tundra is expected to increase nutrient availability to soil microbes, which in turn may accelerate soil organic matter (SOM decomposition. We increased nutrient availability via fertilization to investigate the microbial response via soil enzyme activities. Specifically, we measured potential activities of seven enzymes at four temperatures in three soil profiles (organic, organic/mineral interface, and mineral from untreated native soils and from soils which had been fertilized with nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P since 1989 (23 years and 2006 (six years. Fertilized plots within the 1989 site received annual additions of 10 g N · m(-2 · year(-1 and 5 g P · m(-2 · year(-1. Within the 2006 site, two fertilizer regimes were established--one in which plots received 5 g N · m(-2 · year(-1 and 2.5 g P · m(-2 · year(-1 and one in which plots received 10 g N · m(-2 · year(-1 and 5 g P · m(-2 · year(-1. The fertilization treatments increased activities of enzymes hydrolyzing carbon (C-rich compounds but decreased phosphatase activities, especially in the organic soils. Activities of two enzymes that degrade N-rich compounds were not affected by the fertilization treatments. The fertilization treatments increased ratios of enzyme activities degrading C-rich compounds to those for N-rich compounds or phosphate, which could lead to changes in SOM chemistry over the long term and to losses of soil C. Accelerated SOM decomposition caused by increased nutrient availability could significantly offset predicted increased C fixation via stimulated net primary productivity in Arctic tundra ecosystems.

  19. Vivo-morpholinos induced transient knockdown of physical activity related proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Ferguson

    Full Text Available Physical activity is associated with disease prevention and overall wellbeing. Additionally there has been evidence that physical activity level is a result of genetic influence. However, there has not been a reliable method to silence candidate genes in vivo to determine causal mechanisms of physical activity regulation. Vivo-morpholinos are a potential method to transiently silence specific genes. Thus, the aim of this study was to validate the use of Vivo-morpholinos in a mouse model for voluntary physical activity with several sub-objectives. We observed that Vivo-morpholinos achieved between 60-97% knockdown of Drd1-, Vmat2-, and Glut4-protein in skeletal muscle, the delivery moiety of Vivo-morpholinos (scramble did not influence physical activity and that a cocktail of multiple Vivo-morpholinos can be given in a single treatment to achieve protein knockdown of two different targeted proteins in skeletal muscle simultaneously. Knocking down Drd1, Vmat2, or Glut4 protein in skeletal muscle did not affect physical activity. Vivo-morpholinos injected intravenously alone did not significantly knockdown Vmat2-protein expression in the brain (p = 0.28. However, the use of a bradykinin analog to increase blood-brain-barrier permeability in conjunction with the Vivo-morpholinos significantly (p = 0.0001 decreased Vmat2-protein in the brain with a corresponding later over-expression of Vmat2 coincident with a significant (p = 0.0016 increase in physical activity. We conclude that Vivo-morpholinos can be a valuable tool in determining causal gene-phenotype relationships in whole animal models.

  20. Molecular Basis for Enzymatic Sulfite Oxidation -- HOW THREE CONSERVED ACTIVE SITE RESIDUES SHAPE ENZYME ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bailey, Susan; Rapson, Trevor; Johnson-Winters, Kayunta; Astashkin, Andrei; Enemark, John; Kappler, Ulrike

    2008-11-10

    Sulfite dehydrogenases (SDHs) catalyze the oxidation and detoxification of sulfite to sulfate, a reaction critical to all forms of life. Sulfite-oxidizing enzymes contain three conserved active site amino acids (Arg-55, His-57, and Tyr-236) that are crucial for catalytic competency. Here we have studied the kinetic and structural effects of two novel and one previously reported substitution (R55M, H57A, Y236F) in these residues on SDH catalysis. Both Arg-55 and His-57 were found to have key roles in substrate binding. An R55M substitution increased Km(sulfite)(app) by 2-3 orders of magnitude, whereas His-57 was required for maintaining a high substrate affinity at low pH when the imidazole ring is fully protonated. This effect may be mediated by interactions of His-57 with Arg-55 that stabilize the position of the Arg-55 side chain or, alternatively, may reflect changes in the protonation state of sulfite. Unlike what is seen for SDHWT and SDHY236F, the catalytic turnover rates of SDHR55M and SDHH57A are relatively insensitive to pH (~;;60 and 200 s-1, respectively). On the structural level, striking kinetic effects appeared to correlate with disorder (in SDHH57A and SDHY236F) or absence of Arg-55 (SDHR55M), suggesting that Arg-55 and the hydrogen bonding interactions it engages in are crucial for substrate binding and catalysis. The structure of SDHR55M has sulfate bound at the active site, a fact that coincides with a significant increase in the inhibitory effect of sulfate in SDHR55M. Thus, Arg-55 also appears to be involved in enabling discrimination between the substrate and product in SDH.

  1. A study of the fine structure, enzyme activities and pattern of 14CO2 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A detailed study of selected grasses has been made with respect to fine structures characteristics, enzyme activities associated with C-4 and C-3 pathway photosynthesis, and short term carbon dioxide-14 incorporation experiments. A good correlation was obtained between the fine structure, the carbon pathway and the ...

  2. Effects of ABO/Rh blood groups, G-6-P-D enzyme activity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective was to investigate the effects of ABO/Rh blood groups, haemoglobin genotype and G-6-P-D enzyme activity on malaria. The study was carried out in Buea, South West Province, Cameroon. Subjects consulting at health care facilities in Buea were randomly recruited into the study. A total of 121 febrile ...

  3. Effect of “Tai Chi” exercise on antioxidant enzymes activities and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: “Tai Chi” is a useful exercise that increases physical strength and relax the mind. Materials and Methods: The study investigates effect of “tai chi” exercise on antioxidant enzymes activities and immunity function in participants. These participants were randomly divided into two groups: “tai chi” exercise group ...

  4. Biomass and enzyme activity of two soil transects at King George Island, Maritime Antarctica

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tscherko, D.; Bölter, M.; Beyer, L.; Chen, J.; Elster, Josef; Kandeler, E.; Kuhn, D.; Blume, H. P.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 1 (2003), s. 34-47 ISSN 1523-0430 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA205/94/0156; GA AV ČR KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6005908 Keywords : Maritime Antarctica * microbial soil biomass * enzyme activity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.954, year: 2003

  5. Enzyme activity of topsoii layer on reclaimed and unreclaimed post-mining sites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heděnec, Petr; Vindušková, O.; Kukla, J.; Šnajdr, Jaroslav; Baldrian, Petr; Frouz, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 1 (2017), s. 19-25 ISSN 2542-2154 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC06066; GA ČR GAP504/12/1288 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : enzyme assay * microbial activity * litterbag * macrofauna * soil fauna Subject RIV: DF - Soil Science OBOR OECD: Soil science

  6. Post cold-storage conditioning time affects soil denitrifying enzyme activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chirinda, Ngoni; Olesen, Jørgen E; Porter, John R.

    2011-01-01

    Soil denitrifying enzyme activity (DEA) is often assessed after cold storage. Previous studies using the short-term acetylene inhibition method have not considered conditioning time (post-cold-storage warm-up time prior to soil analysis) as a factor influencing results. We observed fluctuations...

  7. Soil enzyme activities in Pinus tabuliformis (Carriere) plantations in northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiwei Wang; Deborah Page-Dumroese; Ruiheng Lv; Chen Xiao; Guolei Li; Yong Liu

    2016-01-01

    Changes in forest stand structure may alter the activity of invertase, urease, catalase and phenol oxidase after thinning Pinus tabuliformis (Carriére) plantations in Yanqing County of Beijing, China. We examined changes in these soil enzymes as influenced by time since thinning (24, 32, and 40 years since thinning) for 3 seasons (spring, summer and autumn)...

  8. Prediction of severe hypoglycaemia by angiotensin-converting enzyme activity and genotype in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Agerholm-Larsen, Birgit; Pramming, S

    2003-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: We have previously shown a strong relationship between high angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity, presence of the deletion (D) allele of the ACEgene and recall of severe hypoglycaemic events in patients with Type 1 diabetes. This study was carried out to assess this relat...

  9. Effect of water quality and confounding factors on digestive enzyme activities in Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, L; Geffard, O; Chaumot, A; Coulaud, R; Queau, H; Geffard, A; Dedourge-Geffard, O

    2013-12-01

    The feeding activity and subsequent assimilation of the products resulting from food digestion allow organisms to obtain energy for growth, maintenance and reproduction. Among these biological parameters, we studied digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase and trypsin) in Gammarus fossarum to assess the impact of contaminants on their access to energy resources. However, to enable objective assessment of a toxic effect of decreased water quality on an organisms' digestive capacity, it is necessary to establish reference values based on its natural variability as a function of changing biotic and abiotic factors. To limit the confounding influence of biotic factors, a caging approach with calibrated male organisms from the same population was used. This study applied an in situ deployment at 23 sites of the Rhone basin rivers, complemented by a laboratory experiment assessing the influence of two abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity). The results showed a small effect of conductivity on cellulase activity and a significant effect of temperature on digestive enzyme activity but only at the lowest temperature (7 °C). The experimental conditions allowed us to define an environmental reference value for digestive enzyme activities to select sites where the quality of the water impacted the digestive capacity of the organisms. In addition to the feeding rate, this study showed the relevance of digestive enzymes as biomarkers to be used as an early warning tool to reflect organisms' health and the chemical quality of aquatic ecosystems.

  10. Digestive enzyme activities of turbot (Scophthalmus maximus L.) during early developmental stages under culture condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, X H; Xu, S H; Liu, Q H; Li, J; Xiao, Z Z; Ma, D Y

    2012-06-01

    Digestive enzyme activities were analysed in turbot (Scophthalmus maximus) from hatching until 60 days after hatching (DAH). Trypsin sharply increased to the climax at 17 DAH and decreased until 31 DAH followed by a stable level thereafter. Amylase was determined at 4 DAH, reached the maximum value at 19 DAH and declined sharply to 39 DAH and remained at a low level thereafter, suggesting the carbohydrate component should remain at a low level in formulated diets. Pepsin was detected at 9 DAH and increased to 34 DAH and then remained at a stable level. The above results revealed pancreatic enzymes are no longer main enzymes for food digestion after the formation of functional stomach. Leucine-alanine peptidase (Leu-ala) and alkaline phosphatase (AP) and leucine aminopeptidase N (LAP) were found in newly hatched larvae. Both AP and LAP activities markedly increased to 23 DAH, decreased abruptly to 50 DAH and increased gradually to 60 DAH. Leu-ala reached the plateau from 23 to 39 DAH, followed by a decline to 46 DAH and an increase until 60 DAH. The brush border membrane (BBM)-bound enzyme activities increased from 30% at 31 DAH to 81% at 38 DAH of the total activities, indicating the maturation of intestinal tract.

  11. Nuclear Localization of Mitochondrial TCA Cycle Enzymes as a Critical Step in Mammalian Zygotic Genome Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagaraj, Raghavendra; Sharpley, Mark S; Chi, Fangtao; Braas, Daniel; Zhou, Yonggang; Kim, Rachel; Clark, Amander T; Banerjee, Utpal

    2017-01-12

    Transcriptional control requires epigenetic changes directed by mitochondrial tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle metabolites. In the mouse embryo, global epigenetic changes occur during zygotic genome activation (ZGA) at the 2-cell stage. Pyruvate is essential for development beyond this stage, which is at odds with the low activity of mitochondria in this period. We now show that a number of enzymatically active mitochondrial enzymes associated with the TCA cycle are essential for epigenetic remodeling and are transiently and partially localized to the nucleus. Pyruvate is essential for this nuclear localization, and a failure of TCA cycle enzymes to enter the nucleus correlates with loss of specific histone modifications and a block in ZGA. At later stages, however, these enzymes are exclusively mitochondrial. In humans, the enzyme pyruvate dehydrogenase is transiently nuclear at the 4/8-cell stage coincident with timing of human embryonic genome activation, suggesting a conserved metabolic control mechanism underlying early pre-implantation development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Activity of peroxisomal enzymes and intracellular distribution of catalase in Zellweger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schrakamp, G.; Bosch, H. van den; Roest, B.; Kos, M.; Meijer, A.J.; Heymans, H.S.A.; Tegelaers, W.H.H.; Schutgens, R.B.H.; Tager, J.M.; Wanders, R.J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The activity of peroxisomal enzymes was studied in human liver and cultured human skin fibroblasts in relation to the finding (Goldfischer, S. et al. (1973) Science 182, 62–64) that morphologically distinct peroxisomes are not detectable in patients with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger)

  13. [Effects of tillage and straw returning on microorganism quantity, enzyme activities in soils and grain yield].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ya-li; Guo, Hai-bin; Xue, Zhi-wei; Mu, Xin-yuan; Li, Chao-hai

    2015-06-01

    A two-year field study with split plot design was conducted to investigate the effects of different soil tillage (conventional tillage, CT; deep tillage, DT; subsoil tillage, ST) and straw returning (all straw retention, AS; no straw returning, NS) on microorganism quantity, enzyme activities in soil and grain yield. The results showed that, deep or subsoil tillage and straw returning not only reduced the soil bulk density and promoted the content of organic carbon in soil, but increased the soil microbial quantity, soil enzyme activities and grain yield. Furthermore, such influences in maize season were greater than that in wheat season. Compared with CT+NS, DT+AS and ST+AS decreased the soil bulk density at 20-30 cm depth by 8.5% and 6.6%, increased the content of soil organic carbon by 14.8% and 12.4%, increased the microorganism quantity by 45.9% and 33.9%, increased the soil enzyme activities by 34.1% and 25.5%, increased the grain yield by 18.0% and 19.3%, respectively. No significant difference was observed between DT+AS and ST+AS. We concluded that retaining crop residue and deep or subsoil tillage improved soil microorganism quantity, enzyme activities and crop yield.

  14. THE PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF HEVAMINE, AN ENZYME WITH LYSOZYME CHITINASE ACTIVITY FROM HEVEA-BRASILIENSIS LATEX

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JEKEL, PA; HARTMANN, JBH; BEINTEMA, JJ

    1991-01-01

    The primary structure of hevamine, an enzyme with lysozyme/chitinase activity from Hevea brasiliensis latex, has been determined predominantly with conventional non-automatic methods. The positions of three disulfide bridges have been determined. The sequence has about 60% identity with that of a

  15. The effect of aluminium on enzyme activities in two wheat cultivars ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to study the effect of different aluminum (Al) concentrations on the enzyme activities of wheat seedlings and the effect of malate and citrate treatments as chelates for reducing the noxious effect of Al in medium culture, the seedlings of two wheat cultivars, Darab (Al-sensitive) and Maroon (Al-tolerant) were grown on ...

  16. Activity of peroxisomal enzymes and intracellular distribution of catalase in Zellweger syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, R. J.; Kos, M.; Roest, B.; Meijer, A. J.; Schrakamp, G.; Heymans, H. S.; Tegelaers, W. H.; van den Bosch, H.; Schutgens, R. B.; Tager, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    The activity of peroxisomal enzymes was studied in human liver and cultured human skin fibroblasts in relation to the finding (Goldfischer, S. et al. (1973) Science 182, 62-64) that morphologically distinct peroxisomes are not detectable in patients with the cerebro-hepato-renal (Zellweger)

  17. Determination of the activity signature of key carbohydrate metabolism enzymes in phenolic-rich grapevine tissues

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Convigton, E. D.; Roitsch, Thomas; Dernastia, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 4 (2016), s. 757-762 ISSN 1318-0207 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : AGPase * carbohydrates * invertases * sucrose synthase * panel of enzyme activity assays * phytoplasma Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.983, year: 2016

  18. Microbial respiration and extracellular enzyme activity in sediments from the Gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study explores the relationship between sediment chemistry (TC, TN, TP) and microbial respiration (DHA) and extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) across the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) hypoxic zone. TC, TN, and TP were all positively correlated with each other (r=0.19-0.68). DHA was ...

  19. Catalytic promiscuity of a proline-based tautomerase : Aldolase activities and enzyme redesign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rahimi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Numerous enzymes have been found to catalyze additional and completely different types of reactions relative to the natural activity they evolved for. This interesting phenomenon, called catalytic promiscuity, has proven to be a fruitful guide for the development of novel biocatalysts for organic

  20. Effect of citric acid and microbial phytase on serum enzyme activities ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An experiment was conducted to study the effect of microbial phytase supplementation and citric acid in broiler chicks fed corn-soybean meal base diets on enzyme activities and some blood parameters of serum and plasma minerals concentration in Ross 308 strain broilers. The data was analysed using a randomized ...

  1. Chitotriosidase enzyme activity: is this a possible chronic inflammation marker in children with common variable immunodeficiency and early atherosclerosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarsız, Elif; Karaca, Neslihan; Levent, Erturk; Kutukculer, Necil; Sozmen, Eser

    2017-11-01

    Background Common variable immunodeficiency is a rare clinically symptomatic primary immunodeficiency disorder which manifests a wide variability of symptoms, complications. Atherosclerosis in common variable immunodeficiency patients has not been investigated yet contrary to other severe clinical complications. We aimed to investigate the chitotriosidase enzyme's role as an inflammation and atherosclerosis marker in paediatric common variable immunodeficiency patients. Methods Common variable immunodeficiency patients (n = 24) and healthy controls (n = 23) evaluated for chitotriosidase activity with other inflammation markers (hsCRP, myeloperoxidase, serum amyloid A, ferritin), lipid profile and echocardiographic findings (carotid artery intima media thickness - cIMT, brachial artery flow-mediated vazodilatation - FMD%). Results In patients, the mean chitotriosidase activity (8.98 ± 6.28) was significantly higher than the controls (5.17 ± 3.42) ( P = 0.014). Chitotriosidase showed positive relation with hs-CRP ( P = 0.011) and SAA ( P = 0.011) but had no relation with ferritin ( P = 0.155), HDL ( P = 0.152) or LDL-cholesterol ( P = 0.380). Mean cIMT increased in patients compared with the controls ( P variable immunodeficiency patients demonstrated in vivo the presence of activated macrophages indicating ongoing inflammation. Echocardiographic diastolic functional deficiency, increased cIMT and decreased FMD% may be accepted as early atherosclerotic findings, but none of them showed relationship with chitotriosidase activities.

  2. Utility of Adenosine Monophosphate Detection System for Monitoring the Activities of Diverse Enzyme Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subhanjan; Hsiao, Kevin; Goueli, Said A

    Adenosine monophosphate (AMP) is a key cellular metabolite regulating energy homeostasis and signal transduction. AMP is also a product of various enzymatic reactions, many of which are dysregulated during disease conditions. Thus, monitoring the activities of these enzymes is a primary goal for developing modulators for these enzymes. In this study, we demonstrate the versatility of an enzyme-coupled assay that quantifies the amount of AMP produced by any enzymatic reaction regardless of its substrates. We successfully implemented it to enzyme reactions that use adenosine triphosphate (ATP) as a substrate (aminoacyl tRNA synthetase and DNA ligase) by an elaborate strategy of removing residual ATP and converting AMP produced into ATP; so it can be detected using luciferase/luciferin and generating light. We also tested this assay to measure the activities of AMP-generating enzymes that do not require ATP as substrate, including phosphodiesterases (cyclic adenosine monophosphate) and Escherichia coli DNA ligases (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide [NAD(+)]). In a further elaboration of the AMP-Glo platform, we coupled it to E. coli DNA ligase, enabling measurement of NAD(+) and enzymes that use NAD(+) like monoadenosine and polyadenosine diphosphate-ribosyltransferases. Sulfotransferases use 3'-phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphosulfate as the universal sulfo-group donor and phosphoadenosine-5'-phosphate (PAP) is the universal product. PAP can be quantified by converting PAP to AMP by a Golgi-resident PAP-specific phosphatase, IMPAD1. By coupling IMPAD1 to the AMP-Glo system, we can measure the activities of sulfotransferases. Thus, by utilizing the combinations of biochemical enzymatic conversion of various cellular metabolites to AMP, we were able to demonstrate the versatility of the AMP-Glo assay.

  3. Determination of enzyme activity in rabbit seminal plasma and its relationship with quality semen parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. Viudes de Castro

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine rabbit seminal plasma enzyme activity. Furthermore, correlations between semen parameters and enzyme activity and male age were examined. The study was performed using 17 New Zealand White males from 5 to 9 mo old. Overall, 252 semen samples were collected from bucks from May to September. Semen characteristics were analysed and the seminal plasma was obtained by centrifugation. The activities of alanyl aminopeptidase (APN, aspartate transaminase (AST, alanine aminotransferase (ALT, γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and alkaline phosphatase (ALKP in the seminal plasma fluid were measured. Significant differences between males were found in APN, GGT, LDH, ALKP and ALT activities (P<0.05. No significant differences between enzyme activity and male age were found. We also observed significant positive correlations between male age and sperm concentration (r=0.26, progressive motility (r=0.17 and amplitude of lateral head displacement (r=0.21, and negative ones between male age and average path velocity (r=–0.56, velocity of the sperm head along its actual curvilinear path (r=–0.61, straight line velocity (r=–0.50, linearity index (r=–0.13, and cytoplasmic droplet (r=–0.33. Furthermore, a significant negative correlation between APN activity and the status of the acrosome (r=–0.20 and significant positive correlations between APN activity and the sperm abnormalities (r=0.21, GGT activity and sperm concentration (r=0.34 and the status of the acrosome (r=0.31, and ALKP activity and sperm concentration were observed (r=0.41. In our study, APN and GGT seem to be the most predictive enzymes for rabbit semen quality.

  4. Activities of Extracellular Enzymes in Soils Following Woody Plant Invasion of Grassland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filley, T. R.; Stott, D. E.; Dooling, V.; Sorg, L.; Boutton, T.

    2008-12-01

    Extracellular enzymes produced by microbes and immobilize in the soil environment are the principle means by which complex plant and microbial compounds are degraded. The concentration of these enzymes and their ability to interact with litter and soil organic matter contributes both to the stabilization and destabilization of soil carbon. We quantified the activities of three extracellular enzymes, B-glucosidase, B- glucosaminidase, polyphenol oxidase (PPO), and a general marker for hydrolytic activity through fluorescein diacetate (FDA) hydrolysis activity, in a subtropical savanna parkland in southern Texas where woody plants have invaded a once open grassland. Previous research has demonstrated that areas which have shifted to woody vegetation are accruing soil carbon, undergoing a dramatic shift in the chemistry of plant input, and increasing in hyphal biomass. Soils were obtained along a successional chronosequence from grassland dominated by C4 grasses to woody patches dominated by C3 trees/shrubs in Oct 2006 and stored immediately frozen until thawing for enzyme assay. Most enzymes, with the exception of PPO, show distinct behavior when comparing grassland and clusters in that grasslands exhibit far lower mass normalized activity than clusters and no activity trend with respect to age of the adjacent cluster. Both FDA and B- glucosaminidase activities are positively correlated with the age of the woody clusters and increase their activity by as much as 10-fold across the age gradient from 14 yr to 86 yr old clusters. The cellulose degrading enzyme, B-glucosidase, always exhibited greater activity (1.5 -4 fold) in woody clusters than in grasslands, but did not exhibit a trend with increasing cluster age. The PPO activity is anomalous in that there is no quantitative difference in mass normalized activity between grassland and cluster and no trend with cluster age. The results for the FDA and B-glucosaminidase assays are consistent with concurrent studies

  5. In vitro and in vivo activities of Peganum harmala extract against Leishmania major

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvaneh Rahimi-Moghaddam

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: P harmala seeds extract showed significant in vitro and in vivo antileishmanial activities. Most biological activity of the extract could be attributed to its beta-carboline content. However, another alkaloid of P harmala seeds extract, peganine, has also been reported to have antileishmanial activity. These beneficial effects can be attributed to the cumulative effects of various biologically active components present in it.

  6. Influence of green manure fertilization on soil enzyme activities and other soil properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Dora SAMUEL

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Agricultural practices that improve agricultural sustainability are needed particularly for brown luvic soil. Soil enzyme activities can provide information on how soil management is affecting the processes in soil such as decomposition and nutrient cycling. Soil enzyme activities (actual and potential dehydrogenase, catalase, acid and alkaline phosphatase were determined in the 0–10, 10–20, and 20–30 cm layers of a brown luvic soil submitted to a complex fertilization experiment with different types of green manure. It was found that each activity decreased with increasing sampling depth. It should be emphasized that green-manuring of maize led to a significant increase in each of the five enzymatic activities determined. The enzymatic indicators of soil quality calculated from the values of enzymatic activities showed the order: lupinus + rape + oat > lupinus > vetch + oat + ryegrass > lupinus + oat + vetch > unfertilized plot. This order means that by determination of enzymatic act