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Sample records for vivo animal study

  1. In vivo animal studies with sugammadex.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booij, L.H.D.J.; Egmond, J. van; Driessen, J.J.; Boer, H.D. de

    2009-01-01

    A review is presented of animal studies of the selective steroidal neuromuscular blocking drug binding agent sugammadex. These studies demonstrate that sugammadex is faster in onset than the currently used acetylcholinesterase inhibitors, has no muscarinic effects, and is characterised by lack of

  2. Discrete tomography in an in vivo small animal bone study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Casteele, Elke; Perilli, Egon; Van Aarle, Wim; Reynolds, Karen J; Sijbers, Jan

    2018-01-01

    This study aimed at assessing the feasibility of a discrete algebraic reconstruction technique (DART) to be used in in vivo small animal bone studies. The advantage of discrete tomography is the possibility to reduce the amount of X-ray projection images, which makes scans faster and implies also a significant reduction of radiation dose, without compromising the reconstruction results. Bone studies are ideal for being performed with discrete tomography, due to the relatively small number of attenuation coefficients contained in the image [namely three: background (air), soft tissue and bone]. In this paper, a validation is made by comparing trabecular bone morphometric parameters calculated from images obtained by using DART and the commonly used standard filtered back-projection (FBP). Female rats were divided into an ovariectomized (OVX) and a sham-operated group. In vivo micro-CT scanning of the tibia was done at baseline and at 2, 4, 8 and 12 weeks after surgery. The cross-section images were reconstructed using first the full set of projection images and afterwards reducing them in number to a quarter and one-sixth (248, 62, 42 projection images, respectively). For both reconstruction methods, similar changes in morphometric parameters were observed over time: bone loss for OVX and bone growth for sham-operated rats, although for DART the actual values were systematically higher (bone volume fraction) or lower (structure model index) compared to FBP, depending on the morphometric parameter. The DART algorithm was, however, more robust when using fewer projection images, where the standard FBP reconstruction was more prone to noise, showing a significantly bigger deviation from the morphometric parameters obtained using all projection images. This study supports the use of DART as a potential alternative method to FBP in X-ray micro-CT animal studies, in particular, when the number of projections has to be drastically minimized, which directly reduces

  3. Small animal positron emission tomography imaging and in vivo studies of atherosclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hag, Anne Mette Fisker; Ripa, Rasmus Sejersten; Pedersen, Sune Folke

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a growing health challenge globally, and despite our knowledge of the disease has increased over the last couple of decades, many unanswered questions remain. As molecular imaging can be used to visualize, characterize and measure biological processes at the molecular and cellu...... knowledge obtained from in vivo positron emission tomography studies of atherosclerosis performed in small animals....

  4. Laser-assisted cartilage reshaping: in vitro and in vivo animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Pankratov, Michail M.; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1995-05-01

    Correction of cartilaginous defects in the head and neck area remains a challenge for the surgeon. This study investigated a new technique for laser-assisted cartilage reshaping. The pulsed 1.44 micrometers Nd:YAG laser was used in vitro and in vivo experiments to irradiate cartilage to change it's shape without carbonization or vaporization of tissue. Two watts of average power in non contact manner was used to irradiate and reshape the cartilage. The extracted reshaped cartilage specimens underwent testing of elastic force with a computer assisted measurement system that recorded the changes in elastic force in the specimens from 1 hr to 11 days post-irradiation. An animal model of defective tracheal cartilage (collapsed tracheal wall) was created, allowed to heal for 6 weeks and then corrected endoscopically with the laser-assisted technique. The results of the in vitro and in vivo investigations demonstrated that it was possible to alter the cartilage and that cartilage would retain its new shape. The clinical significance of the technique is evident and warrants further animal studies and clinical trials.

  5. Drosophila melanogaster as an animal model for the study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm infections in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Mulcahy

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen capable of causing both acute and chronic infections in susceptible hosts. Chronic P. aeruginosa infections are thought to be caused by bacterial biofilms. Biofilms are highly structured, multicellular, microbial communities encased in an extracellular matrix that enable long-term survival in the host. The aim of this research was to develop an animal model that would allow an in vivo study of P. aeruginosa biofilm infections in a Drosophila melanogaster host. At 24 h post oral infection of Drosophila, P. aeruginosa biofilms localized to and were visualized in dissected Drosophila crops. These biofilms had a characteristic aggregate structure and an extracellular matrix composed of DNA and exopolysaccharide. P. aeruginosa cells recovered from in vivo grown biofilms had increased antibiotic resistance relative to planktonically grown cells. In vivo, biofilm formation was dependent on expression of the pel exopolysaccharide genes, as a pelB::lux mutant failed to form biofilms. The pelB::lux mutant was significantly more virulent than PAO1, while a hyperbiofilm strain (PAZHI3 demonstrated significantly less virulence than PAO1, as indicated by survival of infected flies at day 14 postinfection. Biofilm formation, by strains PAO1 and PAZHI3, in the crop was associated with induction of diptericin, cecropin A1 and drosomycin antimicrobial peptide gene expression 24 h postinfection. In contrast, infection with the non-biofilm forming strain pelB::lux resulted in decreased AMP gene expression in the fly. In summary, these results provide novel insights into host-pathogen interactions during P. aeruginosa oral infection of Drosophila and highlight the use of Drosophila as an infection model that permits the study of P. aeruginosa biofilms in vivo.

  6. A novel animal model for in vivo study of liver cancer metastasis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shinsuke Fujiwara; Katsutoshi Yoshizato; Hikaru Fujioka; Chise Tateno; Ken Taniguchi; Masahiro Ito; Hiroshi Ohishi; Rie Utoh; Hiromi Ishibashi; Takashi Kanematsu

    2012-01-01

    AIM:To establish an animal model with human hepatocyte-repopulated liver for the study of liver cancer metastasis.METHODS:Cell transplantation into mouse livers was conducted using alpha-fetoprotein (AFP)-producing human gastric cancer cells (h-GCCs) and h-hepatocytes as donor cells in a transgenic mouse line expressing urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) driven by the albumin enhancer/promoter crossed with a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse line (uPA/SCID mice).Host mice were divided into two groups (A and B).Group A mice were transplanted with h-GCCs alone,and group B mice were transplanted with h-GCCs and h-hepatocytes together.The replacement index (RI),which is the ratio of transplanted h-GCCs and h-hepatocytes that occupy the examined area of a histological section,was estimated by measuring h-AFP and h-albumin concentrations in sera,respectively,as well as by immunohistochemical analyses of h-AFP and human cytokeratin 18 in histological sections.RESULTS:The h-GCCs successfully engrafted,repopulated,and colonized the livers of mice in group A (RI =22.0% ± 2.6%).These mice had moderately differentiated adenocarcinomatous lesions with disrupted glandular structures,which is a characteristics feature of gastric cancers.The serum h-AFP level reached 211.0 ± 142.2 g/mL (range,7.1-324.2 g/mL).In group B mice,the h-GCCs and h-hepatocytes independently engrafted,repopulated the host liver,and developed colonies (RI =12.0% ± 6.8% and 66.0% ± 12.3%,respectively).h-GCC colonies also showed typical adenocarcinomatous glandular structures around the h-hepatocyte-colonies.These mice survived for the full 56day-study and did not exhibit any metastasis of h-GCCs in the extrahepatic regions during the observational period.The mice with an h-hepatocyte-repopulated liver possessed metastasized h-GCCs and therefore could be a useful humanized liver animal model for studying liver cancer metastasis in vivo.CONCLUSION:A novel animal model of

  7. Renaissance of morphological studies: the examination of functional structures in living animal organs using the in vivo cryotechnique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Shinichi; Saitoh, Yurika; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Terada, Nobuo

    2017-01-01

    Medical and biological scientists wish to understand the in vivo structures of the cells and tissues that make up living animal organs, as well as the locations of their molecular components. Recently, the live imaging of animal cells and tissues with fluorescence-labeled proteins produced via gene manipulation has become increasingly common. Therefore, it is important to ensure that findings derived from histological or immunohistochemical tissue sections of living animal organs are compatible with those obtained from live images of the same organs, which can be assessed using recently developed digital imaging techniques. Over the past two decades, we have performed immunohistochemical and morphological studies of the cells and tissues in living animal organs using a novel in vivo cryotechnique. The use of a specially designed liquid cryogen system with or without a cryoknife during this cryotechnique solved the technical problems that inevitably arise during the conventional preparation methods employed prior to light or electron microscopic examinations. Our in vivo cryotechnique has been found to be extremely useful for arresting transient physiological processes in cells and tissues and for maintaining their functional components-such as rapidly changing signaling molecules, membrane channels, or receptors-in situ. The purpose of the present review is to describe the basic mechanism underlying cryotechniques and the significance of our in vivo cryotechnique. In addition, it describes various morphological or immunohistochemical findings, observations made using quantum dots, and a Raman cryomicroscopy-based method for assessing oxygen saturation in the erythrocytes flowing through intestinal tissues.

  8. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Kim, Kang; Singh, Vijay P

    2014-01-01

    ± 0.037%). Using histology as a gold standard to classify mouse livers, US-TSI had a sensitivity and specificity of 70% and 90%, respectively. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.775. This ex vivo study demonstrates the feasibility of using US-TSI to detect fatty livers and warrants further investigation of US-TSI as a diagnostic tool for hepatic steatosis. (paper)

  9. Animal Models for Studying the In Vivo Functions of Cell Cycle CDKs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risal, Sanjiv; Adhikari, Deepak; Liu, Kui

    2016-01-01

    Multiple Cdks (Cdk4, Cdk6, and Cdk2) and a mitotic Cdk (Cdk1) are involved in cell cycle progression in mammals. Cyclins, Cdk inhibitors, and phosphorylations (both activating and inhibitory) at different cellular levels tightly modulate the activities of these kinases. Based on the results of biochemical studies, it was long believed that different Cdks functioned at specific stages during cell cycle progression. However, deletion of all three interphase Cdks in mice affected cell cycle entry and progression only in certain specialized cells such as hematopoietic cells, beta cells of the pancreas, pituitary lactotrophs, and cardiomyocytes. These genetic experiments challenged the prevailing biochemical model and established that Cdks function in a cell-specific, but not a stage-specific, manner during cell cycle entry and the progression of mitosis. Recent in vivo studies have further established that Cdk1 is the only Cdk that is both essential and sufficient for driving the resumption of meiosis during mouse oocyte maturation. These genetic studies suggest a minimal-essential cell cycle model in which Cdk1 is the central regulator of cell cycle progression. Cdk1 can compensate for the loss of the interphase Cdks by forming active complexes with A-, B-, E-, and D-type Cyclins in a stepwise manner. Thus, Cdk1 plays an essential role in both mitosis and meiosis in mammals, whereas interphase Cdks are dispensable.

  10. Minibeam radiotherapy with small animal irradiators; in vitro and in vivo feasibility studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazyar, Soha; Inscoe, Christina R.; O'Brian, E. Timothy; Zhou, Otto; Lee, Yueh Z.

    2017-12-01

    Minibeam radiation therapy (MBRT) delivers an ultrahigh dose of x-ray (⩾100 Gy) in 200-1000 µm beams (peaks), separated by wider non-irradiated regions (valleys) usually as a single temporal fraction. Preclinical studies performed at synchrotron facilities revealed that MBRT is able to ablate tumors while maintaining normal tissue integrity. The main purpose of the present study was to develop an efficient and accessible method to perform MBRT using a conventional x-ray irradiator. We then tested this new method both in vitro and in vivo. Using commercially available lead ribbon and polyethylene sheets, we constructed a collimator that converted the cone beam of an industrial irradiator to 44 identical beams (collimator size  ≈  4  ×  10 cm). The dosimetry characteristics of the generated beams were evaluated using two different radiochromic films (beam FWHM  =  246  ±  32 µm center-to-center  =  926  ±  23 µm peak-to-valley dose ratio  =  24.35  ±  2.10 collimator relative output factor  =  0.84  ±  0.04). Clonogenic assays demonstrated the ability of our method to induce radiobiological cell death in two radioresistant murine tumor cell lines (TRP  =  glioblastoma B16-F10  =  melanoma). A radiobiological equivalent dose (RBE) was calculated by evaluating the acute skin response to graded doses of MBRT and conventional radiotherapy (CRT). Normal mouse skin demonstrated resistance to doses up to 150 Gy on peak. MBRT significantly extended the survival of mice with flank melanoma tumors compared to CRT when RBE were applied (overall p  film. In conclusion, the initial dosimetric, in vitro and in vivo evaluations confirmed the utility of this affordable and easy-to-replicate minibeam collimator for future preclinical studies.

  11. Study and development of a high resolution tomograph for the γ radio-imagery in vivo of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valda Ochoa, A.

    1995-01-01

    By the use of molecular radio-labelled tracers, molecular biology can reveal some aspects of the functional organisation of the brain. Non invasive in vivo brain research on small laboratory animals, like mice or rats, require analysis of structures of some cubic millimeters present in a brain of the order of a cubic centimeter. Since imaging performances of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) fail in this research field, we present here a high resolution tomograph (TOHR) based on an original principle that allows to overcome the compromise between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. TOHR is a radiation counter device having a large solid angle focusing collimator. By the use of radio-tracers decaying by a cascade of two photons, coincidence detection offers an accurate delimitation of the analysed region and improves spatial resolution. TOHR acts as a scanner, so the image is built voxel by voxel by moving the animal relative to the detector. A numerical feasibility study of such a system shows that a sub millimeter spatial resolution can be achieved. We show that the chemical etching technique is well suited for manufacturing a multi-module focusing collimator by building and testing two such modules. Finally a numerical simulation exhibits TOHR's performance in a neuro-pharmacological experiment on a rat. From these results, other application of TOHR are envisaged, such as oncology (in vivo evolution of tumours) or gene therapy (distribution of viral particles in the brain). (author). 51 refs., 73 figs., 3 tabs

  12. Catabolism of native and oxidized low density lipoproteins: in vivo insights from small animal positron emission tomography studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietzsch, J; Bergmann, R; Wuest, F; Pawelke, B; Hultsch, C; van den Hoff, J

    2005-12-01

    The human organism is exposed to numerous processes that generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS may directly or indirectly cause oxidative modification and damage of proteins. Protein oxidation is regarded as a crucial event in the pathogenesis of various diseases ranging from rheumatoid arthritis to Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. As a representative example, oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) is regarded as a crucial event in atherogenesis. Data concerning the role of circulating oxidized LDL (oxLDL) in the development and outcome of diseases are scarce. One reason for this is the shortage of methods for direct assessment of the metabolic fate of circulating oxLDL in vivo. We present an improved methodology based on the radiolabelling of apoB-100 of native LDL (nLDL) and oxLDL, respectively, with the positron emitter fluorine-18 ((18)F) by conjugation with N-succinimidyl-4-[(18)F]fluorobenzoate ([(18)F]SFB). Radiolabelling of both nLDL and oxLDL using [(18)F]SFB causes neither additional oxidative structural modifications of LDL lipids and proteins nor alteration of their biological activity and functionality, respectively, in vitro. The method was further evaluated with respect to the radiopharmacological properties of both [(18)F]fluorobenzoylated nLDL and oxLDL by biodistribution studies in male Wistar rats. The metabolic fate of [(18)F]fluorobenzoylated nLDL and oxLDL in rats in vivo was further delineated by dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) using a dedicated small animal tomograph (spatial resolution of 2 mm). From this study we conclude that the use of [(18)F]FB-labelled LDL particles is an attractive alternative to, e.g., LDL iodination methods, and is of value to characterize and to discriminate the kinetics and the metabolic fate of nLDL and oxLDL in small animals in vivo.

  13. Detecting metastasis of gastric carcinoma using high-resolution micro-CT system: in vivo small animal study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Junting; Tian, Jie; Liang, Jimin; Li, Xiangsi; Yang, Xiang; Chen, Xiaofeng; Chen, Yi; Zhou, Yuanfang; Wang, Xiaorui

    2011-03-01

    Immunocytochemical and immunofluorescence staining are used for identifying the characteristics of metastasis in traditional ways. Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) is a useful tool for monitoring and longitudinal imaging of tumor in small animal in vivo. In present study, we evaluated the feasibility of the detection for metastasis of gastric carcinoma by high-resolution micro-CT system with omnipaque accumulative enhancement method in the organs. Firstly, a high-resolution micro-CT ZKKS-MCT-sharp micro-CT was developed by our research group and Guangzhou Zhongke Kaisheng Medical Technology Co., Ltd. Secondly, several gastric carcinoma models were established through inoculating 2x106 BGC-823 gastric carcinoma cells subcutaneously. Thirdly, micro-CT scanning was performed after accumulative enhancement method of intraperitoneal injection of omnipaque contrast agent containing 360 mg iodine with a concentration of 350 mg I/ml. Finally, we obtained high-resolution anatomical information of the metastasis in vivo in a BALB/c NuNu nude mouse, the 3D tumor architecture is revealed in exquisite detail at about 35 μm spatial resolution. In addition, the accurate shape and volume of the micrometastasis as small as 0.78 mm3 can be calculated with our software. Overall, our data suggest that this imaging approach and system could be used to enhance the understanding of tumor proliferation, metastasis and could be the basis for evaluating anti-tumor therapies.

  14. Protein synthesis in the rat brain: a comparative in vivo and in vitro study in immature and adult animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahbazian, F.M.

    1985-01-01

    Rates of protein synthesis of CNS and other organs were compared in immature and adult rats by in vivo and slice techniques with administration of flooding doses of labeled precursor. The relationship between synthesis and brain region, cell type, subcellular fraction, or MW was examined. Incorporation of [ 14 C]valine into protein of CNS regions in vivo was about 1.2% per hour for immature rats and 0.6% for adults. For slices, the rates decreased significantly more in adults. In adult organs, the highest synthesis rate in vivo was found in liver (2.2% per hour) followed by kidney, spleen, lung, heart, brain, and muscle (0.5% per hour). In immature animals synthesis was highest in liver and spleen (2.5% per hour) and lowest in muscle (0.9% per hour). Slices all showed lower rates than in vivo, especially in adults. In vivo, protein synthesis rates of immature neurons and astrocytes and adult neurons exceeded those of whole brain, while that in adult astrocytes was the same. These results demonstrate a developmental difference of protein synthesis (about double in immature animals) in all brain cells, cell fractions and most brain protein. Similarly the decreased synthesis in brain slices - especially in adults, affects most proteins and structural elements

  15. Properties of Resveratrol: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies about Metabolism, Bioavailability, and Biological Effects in Animal Models and Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inglés, M.; Olaso, G.; Lopez-Grueso, R.; Gimeno-Mallench, L.; Mas-Bargues, C.; Abdelaziz, K. M.; Gomez-Cabrera, M. C.; Vina, J.; Borras, C.

    2015-01-01

    Plants containing resveratrol have been used effectively in traditional medicine for over 2000 years. It can be found in some plants, fruits, and derivatives, such as red wine. Therefore, it can be administered by either consuming these natural products or intaking nutraceutical pills. Resveratrol exhibits a wide range of beneficial properties, and this may be due to its molecular structure, which endow resveratrol with the ability to bind to many biomolecules. Among these properties its activity as an anticancer agent, a platelet antiaggregation agent, and an antioxidant, as well as its antiaging, antifrailty, anti-inflammatory, antiallergenic, and so forth activities, is worth highlighting. These beneficial biological properties have been extensively studied in humans and animal models, both in vitro and in vivo. The issue of bioavailability of resveratrol is of paramount importance and is determined by its rapid elimination and the fact that its absorption is highly effective, but the first hepatic step leaves little free resveratrol. Clarifying aspects like stability and pharmacokinetics of resveratrol metabolites would be fundamental to understand and apply the therapeutic properties of resveratrol. PMID:26221416

  16. Local Delivery System of Immune Modulating Drug for Unresectable Adenocarcinoma: In Vitro Experimental Study and In Vivo Animal Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Don Haeng; Kang, Sung-Gwon; Jeong, Seok; Yoon, Chang Jin; Choi, Jung-Ah; Byun, Ju Nam; Park, Jae Hyung; Lee, Kyu Back

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a developed drug delivery system containing OK-432 through in vitro and animal study. An OK-432-impregnated polycarbonate/polyurethane stent membrane was used to develop a drug delivery system (DDS) enabling the locoregional release of OK-432. Polyethyleneglycol was used as a detergent and porosity generator. The stability of OK-432 in solvent, releasing kinetics of drug, and cytotoxicity of the DDS were evaluated. OK-432-impregnated DDS was implanted in mice in which a human adenocarcinoma cell line was injected and grown in their back. Flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for quantifying the amount of drug. OK-432 exposed to phosphate-buffered saline and OK-432 exposed to N,N-dimethylacetamide showed similar results on dot graphs and histograms. However, OK-432 exposed to tetrahydrofurane showed different dot graphs and histograms, which means that the antigenicity of the drug was changed. The release rate of OK-432 was maintained at a constant level for 6 weeks. The local delivery of OK-432 was found to have an antitumor effect on a human adenocarcinoma cell line in an animal study, but no effect on this cell line in in vitro cell culture. Histologic examination showed minimal inflammatory reaction in surrounding tissue. Our study shows that local treatment using this OK-432 release system is safe and effective in reducing adenocarcinoma in a mouse model

  17. FMT-XCT: in vivo animal studies with hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography-X-ray computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ale, Angelique; Ermolayev, Vladimir; Herzog, Eva; Cohrs, Christian; de Angelis, Martin Hrabé; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2012-06-01

    The development of hybrid optical tomography methods to improve imaging performance has been suggested over a decade ago and has been experimentally demonstrated in animals and humans. Here we examined in vivo performance of a camera-based hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system for 360° imaging combined with X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Offering an accurately co-registered, information-rich hybrid data set, FMT-XCT has new imaging possibilities compared to stand-alone FMT and XCT. We applied FMT-XCT to a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor mouse model, an Aga2 osteogenesis imperfecta model and a Kras lung cancer mouse model, using XCT information during FMT inversion. We validated in vivo imaging results against post-mortem planar fluorescence images of cryoslices and histology data. Besides offering concurrent anatomical and functional information, FMT-XCT resulted in the most accurate FMT performance to date. These findings indicate that addition of FMT optics into the XCT gantry may be a potent upgrade for small-animal XCT systems.

  18. A rapid method for selecting suitable animal species for studying pathogen interactions with plasma protein ligands in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Clément; Schumski, Ariane; Salo-Ahen, Outi M H; Herwald, Heiko; Smeds, Emanuel

    2017-05-01

    Species tropism constitutes a serious problem for developing relevant animal models of infection. Human pathogens can express virulence factors that show specific selectivity to human proteins, while their affinity for orthologs from other species can vary significantly. Suitable animal species must be used to analyse whether virulence factors are potential targets for drug development. We developed an assay that rapidly predicts applicable animal species for studying virulence factors binding plasma proteins. We used two well-characterized Staphylococcus aureus proteins, SSL7 and Efb, to develop an ELISA-based inhibition assay using plasma from different animal species. The interaction between SSL7 and human C5 and the binding of Efb to human fibrinogen and human C3 was studied. Affinity experiments and Western blot analyses were used to validate the assay. Human, monkey and cat plasma interfered with binding of SSL7 to human C5. Binding of Efb to human fibrinogen was blocked in human, monkey, gerbil and pig plasma, while human, monkey, gerbil, rabbit, cat and guinea pig plasma inhibited the binding of Efb to human C3. These results emphasize the importance of choosing correct animal models, and thus, our approach is a rapid and cost-effective method that can be used to prevent unnecessary animal experiments. © 2017 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  19. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities for bio-durg development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Choi, Dae Seong; Park, Jeonghoon; Jung, Uhee; Lee, Yun Jong

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we established the image modalities (micro-PET, SPECT/CT) using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-durg and extramural collaboration proposal. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with 99m Tc tricarbonyl bifunctional chelators and 18 F-clotrimazole derivative. SPECT imaging studies were performed with 99m Tc tricarbonyl BFCs. PET imaging study was performed with 18 F-clotrimazole derivatives. We performed the PET image study of 18 F-clotrimazole derivatives using U87MG tumor bearing mice. Also we tested the intramural and extramural collaboration using small animal imaging modalities and prepared the draft of extramural R and D operation manual for small animal imaging modalities and the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug

  20. In-vivo corneal pulsation in relation to in-vivo intraocular pressure and corneal biomechanics assessed in-vitro. An animal pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala, Maja M; Danielewska, Monika E; Antończyk, Agnieszka; Kiełbowicz, Zdzisław; Rogowska, Marta E; Kozuń, Marta; Detyna, Jerzy; Iskander, D Robert

    2017-09-01

    The aim was to ascertain whether the characteristics of the corneal pulse (CP) measured in-vivo in a rabbit eye change after short-term artificial increase of intraocular pressure (IOP) and whether they correlate with corneal biomechanics assessed in-vitro. Eight New Zealand white rabbits were included in this study and were anesthetized. In-vivo experiments included simultaneous measurements of the CP signal, registered with a non-contact method, IOP, intra-arterial blood pressure, and blood pulse (BPL), at the baseline and short-term elevated IOP. Afterwards, thickness of post-mortem corneas was determined and then uniaxial tensile tests were conducted leading to estimates of their Young's modulus (E). At the baseline IOP, backward stepwise regression analyses were performed in which successively the ocular biomechanical, biometric and cardiovascular predictors were separately taken into account. Results of the analysis revealed that the 3rd CP harmonic can be statistically significantly predicted by E and central corneal thickness (Models: R 2  = 0.662, p biomechanics in-vitro was confirmed. In particular, spectral analysis revealed that higher amplitude and power of the 3rd CP harmonic indicates higher corneal stiffness, while the 1st CP harmonic correlates positively with the corresponding harmonic of the BPL signal. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-Invasive in vivo Imaging in Small Animal Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Koo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real time in vivo molecular imaging in small animal models has become the essential bridge between in vitro data and their translation into clinical applications. The tremendous development and technological progress, such as tumour modelling, monitoring of tumour growth and detection of metastasis, has facilitated translational drug development. This has added to our knowledge on carcinogenesis. The modalities that are commonly used include Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI, Computed Tomography (CT, Positron Emission Tomography (PET, bioluminescence imaging, fluorescence imaging and multi-modality imaging systems. The ability to obtain multiple images longitudinally provides reliable information whilst reducing animal numbers. As yet there is no one modality that is ideal for all experimental studies. This review outlines the instrumentation available together with corresponding applications reported in the literature with particular emphasis on cancer research. Advantages and limitations to current imaging technology are discussed and the issues concerning small animal care during imaging are highlighted.

  2. The 10 basic requirements for a scientific paper reporting antioxidant, antimutagenic or anticarcinogenic potential of test substances in in vitro experiments and animal studies in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Verhagen, H.; Aruoma, O.I.; van Delft, J.H.M.

    2003-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that chemicals/test substances cannot only have adverse effects, but that there are many substances that can (also) have a beneficial effect on health. As this journal regularly publishes papers in this area and has every intention in continuing to do so in the near......, provided they can be justified on scientific grounds. The 10 basic requirements for a scientific paper reporting antioxidant, antimutagenic or anticarcinogenic potential of test substances in in vitro experiments and animal studies in vivo concern the following areas: (1) Hypothesis-driven study design; (2......) The nature of the test substance; (3) Valid and invalid test systems; (4) The selection of dose levels and gender; (5) Reversal of the effects induced by oxidants, carcinogens and mutagens; (6) Route of administration; (7) Number and validity of test variables; (8) Repeatability and reproducibility; (9...

  3. Study and development of a high resolution tomograph for the {gamma} radio-imagery in vivo of small animals; Etude et developpement d`un tomographe haute resolution pour la radio-imagerie {gamma} in vivo de petits animaux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valda Ochoa, A

    1995-06-23

    By the use of molecular radio-labelled tracers, molecular biology can reveal some aspects of the functional organisation of the brain. Non invasive in vivo brain research on small laboratory animals, like mice or rats, require analysis of structures of some cubic millimeters present in a brain of the order of a cubic centimeter. Since imaging performances of positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission tomography (SPECT) fail in this research field, we present here a high resolution tomograph (TOHR) based on an original principle that allows to overcome the compromise between detection efficiency and spatial resolution. TOHR is a radiation counter device having a large solid angle focusing collimator. By the use of radio-tracers decaying by a cascade of two photons, coincidence detection offers an accurate delimitation of the analysed region and improves spatial resolution. TOHR acts as a scanner, so the image is built voxel by voxel by moving the animal relative to the detector. A numerical feasibility study of such a system shows that a sub millimeter spatial resolution can be achieved. We show that the chemical etching technique is well suited for manufacturing a multi-module focusing collimator by building and testing two such modules. Finally a numerical simulation exhibits TOHR`s performance in a neuro-pharmacological experiment on a rat. From these results, other application of TOHR are envisaged, such as oncology (in vivo evolution of tumours) or gene therapy (distribution of viral particles in the brain). (author). 51 refs., 73 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Synthesis, in vitro and in vivo small-animal SPECT evaluation of novel technetium labeled bile acid analogues to study (altered) hepatic transporter function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neyt, Sara; Vliegen, Maarten; Verreet, Bjorn; De Lombaerde, Stef; Braeckman, Kim; Vanhove, Christian; Huisman, Maarten Thomas; Dumolyn, Caroline; Kersemans, Ken; Hulpia, Fabian; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Mannens, Geert; De Vos, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatobiliary transport mechanisms are crucial for the excretion of substrate toxic compounds. Drugs can inhibit these transporters, which can lead to drug–drug interactions causing toxicity. Therefore, it is important to assess this early during the development of new drug candidates. The aim of the current study is the (radio)synthesis, in vitro and in vivo evaluation of a technetium labeled chenodeoxycholic and cholic acid analogue: [ 99m Tc]-DTPA-CDCA and [ 99m ]Tc-DTPA-CA, respectively, as biomarker for disturbed transporter functionality. Methods: [99mTc]-DTPA-CDCA([ 99m Tc]-3a) and [99mTc]-DTPA-CA ([ 99m Tc]-3b) were synthesized and evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Uptake of both tracers was investigated in NTCP, OCT1, OATP1B1, OATP1B3 transfected cell lines. K m and V max values were determined and compared to [ 99m Tc]-mebrofenin ([ 99m Tc]-MEB). Efflux was investigated by means of CTRL, MRP2 and BSEP transfected inside-out vesicles. Metabolite analysis was performed using pooled human liver S9. Wild type (n = 3) and rifampicin treated (n = 3) mice were intravenously injected with 37 MBq of tracer. After dynamic small-animal SPECT and short CT acquisitions, time–activity curves of heart, liver, gallbladder and intestines were obtained. Results: We demonstrated that OATP1B1 and OATP1B3 are the involved uptake transporters of both compounds. Both tracers show a higher affinity compared to [ 99m Tc]-MEB, but are in a similar range as endogenous bile acids for OATP1B1 and OATP1B3. [ 99m Tc]-3a shows higher affinities compared to [ 99m Tc]-3b. V max values were lower compared to [ 99m Tc]-MEB, but in the same range as endogenous bile acids. MRP2 was identified as efflux transporter. Less than 7% of both radiotracers was metabolized in the liver. In vitro results were confirmed by in vivo results. Uptake in the liver and efflux to gallbladder + intestines and urinary bladder of both tracers was observed. Transport was inhibited by rifampicin

  5. In vitro and in vivo studies with [18F]fluorocholine on digestive tumoral cell lines and in an animal model of metastasized endocrine tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nejjari, Mimoun; Kryza, David; Poncet, Gilles; Roche, Colette; Perek, Nathalie; Chayvialle, Jean-Alain; Le Bars, Didier; Scoazec, Jean-Yves; Janier, Marc; Borson-Chazot, Francoise

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate (a) in vitro the relationship between [ 18 F]fluorocholine ([ 18 F]FCH) uptake and cell growth in endocrine cell lines and (b) in vivo the uptake of [ 18 F]FCH by tumoral sites in an animal model of metastasized endocrine tumor. Methods: In vitro studies were conducted on three endocrine and two nonendocrine digestive tumoral cell lines. The proliferative ratio was estimated using the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The uptake of [ 18 F]FCH and that of [ 18 F]fluorodeoxyglucose ([ 18 F]FDG) were measured before and after cytotoxic therapy. [ 18 F]FCH biodistribution was studied in nude mice and in an endocrine xenografted mice model. Results: The [ 18 F]FCH uptake in tumoral cell lines was related to their proliferative capacities as measured by the MTT assay in basal conditions. After cytotoxic therapy, the IC 50 values calculated with the [ 18 F]FCH incorporation test were very close to those determined with the MTT assay. Biodistribution studies showed that [ 18 F]FCH was predominantly concentrated in the liver and kidney of nude mice. In the STC-1 xenografted animal model, the uptake of [ 18 F]FCH in the primary tumor was only 1.1%. On autoradiography and micro-positron emission tomography, there was no uptake of [ 18 F]FCH in liver metastases but there was a significant uptake of [ 18 F]FDG. Conclusions: In vitro studies suggested that the incorporation of [ 18 F]FCH in endocrine tumor cell lines was related to their growth capacities; however, in vivo studies conducted in an endocrine xenografted animal model showed an uptake of [ 18 F]FCH in hepatic metastases lower than that in normal liver cells. An influence of the microenvironment or a competition phenomenon for [ 18 F]FCH uptake between normal liver and endocrine tumor cells cannot be excluded

  6. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamart, S.; Pierrat, N.; De Carlan, L.; Franck, D. [IRSN/DRPH/SDI/LEDI, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Dudoignon, N. [IRSN/DRPH/SRBE/LRPAT, BP 17, F-92 262 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); Rateau, S.; Van der Meeren, A.; Rouit, E. [CEA/DSV/DRR/SRCA/LRT BP no 12, F-91680 Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France); Bottlaender, M. [CEA/SHFJ, 4, place du General Leclerc F-91400 Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  7. Application of Voxel Phantoms to Study the Influence of Heterogeneous Distribution of Actinides in Lungs on In Vivo Counting Calibration Factors Using Animal Experimentations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamart, S.; Pierrat, N.; De Carlan, L.; Franck, D.; Dudoignon, N.; Rateau, S.; Van der Meeren, A.; Rouit, E.; Bottlaender, M.

    2006-01-01

    Calibration of lung counting system dedicated to retention assessment of actinides in the lungs remains critical due to large uncertainties in calibration factors. Among them, the detector positioning, the chest wall thickness and composition (muscle/fat) assessment, and the distribution of the contamination are the main parameters influencing the detector response. In order to reduce these uncertainties, a numerical approach based on the application of voxel phantoms (numerical phantoms based on tomographic images, CT or MRI) associated to a Monte-Carlo code (namely M.C.N.P.) was developed. It led to the development of a dedicated tool, called O.E.D.I.P.E., that allows to easily handle realistic voxel phantoms for the simulation of in vivo measurement (or dose calculation, application that will not be presented in this paper). The goal of this paper is to present our study of the influence of the lung distribution on calibration factors using both animal experimentations and our numerical method. Indeed, physical anthropomorphic phantoms used for calibration always consider a uniform distribution of the source in the lungs, which is not true in many contamination conditions. The purpose of the study is to compare the response of the measurement detectors using a real distribution of actinide particles in the lungs, obtained from animal experimentations, with the homogeneous one considered as the reference. This comparison was performed using O.E.D.I.P.E. that can almost simulate any source distribution. A non human primate was contaminated heterogeneously by intra-tracheal administration of actinide oxide. After euthanasia, gamma spectrometry measurements were performed on the pulmonary lobes to obtain the distribution of the contamination in the lungs. This realistic distribution was used to simulate an heterogeneous contamination in the numerical phantom of the non human primate, which was compared with a simulation of an homogeneous contamination presenting the

  8. Threats to validity in the design and conduct of preclinical efficacy studies: a systematic review of guidelines for in vivo animal experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie C Henderson

    Full Text Available The vast majority of medical interventions introduced into clinical development prove unsafe or ineffective. One prominent explanation for the dismal success rate is flawed preclinical research. We conducted a systematic review of preclinical research guidelines and organized recommendations according to the type of validity threat (internal, construct, or external or programmatic research activity they primarily address.We searched MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Google, and the EQUATOR Network website for all preclinical guideline documents published up to April 9, 2013 that addressed the design and conduct of in vivo animal experiments aimed at supporting clinical translation. To be eligible, documents had to provide guidance on the design or execution of preclinical animal experiments and represent the aggregated consensus of four or more investigators. Data from included guidelines were independently extracted by two individuals for discrete recommendations on the design and implementation of preclinical efficacy studies. These recommendations were then organized according to the type of validity threat they addressed. A total of 2,029 citations were identified through our search strategy. From these, we identified 26 guidelines that met our eligibility criteria--most of which were directed at neurological or cerebrovascular drug development. Together, these guidelines offered 55 different recommendations. Some of the most common recommendations included performance of a power calculation to determine sample size, randomized treatment allocation, and characterization of disease phenotype in the animal model prior to experimentation.By identifying the most recurrent recommendations among preclinical guidelines, we provide a starting point for developing preclinical guidelines in other disease domains. We also provide a basis for the study and evaluation of preclinical research practice. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  9. Threats to validity in the design and conduct of preclinical efficacy studies: a systematic review of guidelines for in vivo animal experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Valerie C; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Fergusson, Dean; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Hackam, Dan G

    2013-01-01

    The vast majority of medical interventions introduced into clinical development prove unsafe or ineffective. One prominent explanation for the dismal success rate is flawed preclinical research. We conducted a systematic review of preclinical research guidelines and organized recommendations according to the type of validity threat (internal, construct, or external) or programmatic research activity they primarily address. We searched MEDLINE, Google Scholar, Google, and the EQUATOR Network website for all preclinical guideline documents published up to April 9, 2013 that addressed the design and conduct of in vivo animal experiments aimed at supporting clinical translation. To be eligible, documents had to provide guidance on the design or execution of preclinical animal experiments and represent the aggregated consensus of four or more investigators. Data from included guidelines were independently extracted by two individuals for discrete recommendations on the design and implementation of preclinical efficacy studies. These recommendations were then organized according to the type of validity threat they addressed. A total of 2,029 citations were identified through our search strategy. From these, we identified 26 guidelines that met our eligibility criteria--most of which were directed at neurological or cerebrovascular drug development. Together, these guidelines offered 55 different recommendations. Some of the most common recommendations included performance of a power calculation to determine sample size, randomized treatment allocation, and characterization of disease phenotype in the animal model prior to experimentation. By identifying the most recurrent recommendations among preclinical guidelines, we provide a starting point for developing preclinical guidelines in other disease domains. We also provide a basis for the study and evaluation of preclinical research practice. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.

  10. Virtual reality, augmented reality, and robotics applied to digestive operative procedures: from in vivo animal preclinical studies to clinical use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, Luc; Marescaux, Jacques

    2006-04-01

    Technological innovations of the 20 th century provided medicine and surgery with new tools, among which virtual reality and robotics belong to the most revolutionary ones. Our work aims at setting up new techniques for detection, 3D delineation and 4D time follow-up of small abdominal lesions from standard mecial images (CT scsan, MRI). It also aims at developing innovative systems making tumor resection or treatment easier with the use of augmented reality and robotized systems, increasing gesture precision. It also permits a realtime great distance connection between practitioners so they can share a same 3D reconstructed patient and interact on a same patient, virtually before the intervention and for real during the surgical procedure thanks to a telesurgical robot. In preclinical studies, our first results obtained from a micro-CT scanner show that these technologies provide an efficient and precise 3D modeling of anatomical and pathological structures of rats and mice. In clinical studies, our first results show the possibility to improve the therapeutic choice thanks to a better detection and and representation of the patient before performing the surgical gesture. They also show the efficiency of augmented reality that provides virtual transparency of the patient in real time during the operative procedure. In the near future, through the exploitation of these systems, surgeons will program and check on the virtual patient clone an optimal procedure without errors, which will be replayed on the real patient by the robot under surgeon control. This medical dream is today about to become reality.

  11. Case Experience of Radiofrequency Ablation for Benign Thyroid Nodules: From an Ex Vivo Animal Study to an Initial Ablation in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsang Lee

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency ablation (RFA is a minimally invasive technique, used with ultrasound or computed tomography guidance, which can produce tissue coagulation necrosis in various kinds of tumors in the human body. In the past 10 years, numerous studies about RFA in benign thyroid nodules have been published. Reviewing these studies, we noticed that the effectiveness of ablation was higher when it was performed with the “moving-shot technique” via an internally cooled electrode. A consensus statement published from the Korean Society of Radiology also suggested the moving-shot technique as a standard ablation procedure for benign thyroid nodule ablation in Korea. In Taiwan, most symptomatic benign nodules are currently treated with surgical removal. RFA for mass lesions is primarily performed for the treatment of metastatic hepatic tumors. In our case, we have attempted to introduce RFA for benign thyroid nodules in Taiwan. Because endocrinologists in Taiwan were not familiar with this technique, we adopted a stepwise approach in learning how to perform RFA. We conducted ex vivo animal ablation exercises to gain experience in setting the radiofrequency generator for the right ablation mode and appropriate power output. The thyroid nodule volume reduction rate after 1 year of follow up was approximately 50% in this case. The most important thing we learned from this trial is that we confirmed the safety of thyroid nodule ablation. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported study of RFA of a thyroid nodule in Taiwan.

  12. In vivo small animal imaging: Current status and future prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kagadis, George C.; Loudos, George; Katsanos, Konstantinos; Langer, Steve G.; Nikiforidis, George C.

    2010-01-01

    The use of small animal models in basic and preclinical sciences constitutes an integral part of testing new pharmaceutical agents prior to commercial translation to clinical practice. Whole-body small animal imaging is a particularly elegant and cost-effective experimental platform for the timely validation and commercialization of novel agents from the bench to the bedside. Biomedical imaging is now listed along with genomics, proteomics, and metabolomics as an integral part of biological and medical sciences. Miniaturized versions of clinical diagnostic modalities, including but not limited to microcomputed tomography, micromagnetic resonance tomography, microsingle-photon-emission tomography, micropositron-emission tomography, optical imaging, digital angiography, and ultrasound, have all greatly improved our investigative abilities to longitudinally study various experimental models of human disease in mice and rodents. After an exhaustive literature search, the authors present a concise and critical review of in vivo small animal imaging, focusing on currently available modalities as well as emerging imaging technologies on one side and molecularly targeted contrast agents on the other. Aforementioned scientific topics are analyzed in the context of cancer angiogenesis and innovative antiangiogenic strategies under-the-way to the clinic. Proposed hybrid approaches for diagnosis and targeted site-specific therapy are highlighted to offer an intriguing glimpse of the future.

  13. In vivo quantitative imaging of point-like bioluminescent and fluorescent sources: Validation studies in phantoms and small animals post mortem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comsa, Daria Craita

    2008-10-01

    There is a real need for improved small animal imaging techniques to enhance the development of therapies in which animal models of disease are used. Optical methods for imaging have been extensively studied in recent years, due to their high sensitivity and specificity. Methods like bioluminescence and fluorescence tomography report promising results for 3D reconstructions of source distributions in vivo. However, no standard methodology exists for optical tomography, and various groups are pursuing different approaches. In a number of studies on small animals, the bioluminescent or fluorescent sources can be reasonably approximated as point or line sources. Examples include images of bone metastases confined to the bone marrow. Starting with this premise, we propose a simpler, faster, and inexpensive technique to quantify optical images of point-like sources. The technique avoids the computational burden of a tomographic method by using planar images and a mathematical model based on diffusion theory. The model employs in situ optical properties estimated from video reflectometry measurements. Modeled and measured images are compared iteratively using a Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm to improve estimates of the depth and strength of the bioluminescent or fluorescent inclusion. The performance of the technique to quantify bioluminescence images was first evaluated on Monte Carlo simulated data. Simulated data also facilitated a methodical investigation of the effect of errors in tissue optical properties on the retrieved source depth and strength. It was found that, for example, an error of 4 % in the effective attenuation coefficient led to 4 % error in the retrieved depth for source depths of up to 12mm, while the error in the retrieved source strength increased from 5.5 % at 2mm depth, to 18 % at 12mm depth. Experiments conducted on images from homogeneous tissue-simulating phantoms showed that depths up to 10mm could be estimated within 8 %, and the relative

  14. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities (micro-PET and micro-SPECT/CT) for bio-drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Park, Jeonghoon; Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Seolwha; Lee, Yunjong; Choi, Daeseong

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we established the image acquisition and analysis procedures of micro-PET, SPECT/CT using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-drug. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with 99m Tc-MDP, DMSA, and 18 F-FDG. SPECT imaging studies using 3 types of pinhole collimators. 5-MWB collimator was used for SPECT image study. To study whole-body distribution, 99m Tc-MDP SPECT image study was performed. We obtained the fine distribution image. And the CT images was obtained to provide the anatomical information. And then these two types images are fused. To study specific organ uptake, we examined 99 mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT imaging study. We also performed the PET image study using U87MG tumor bearing mice and 18 F-FDG. The overnight fasting, warming and anesthesia with 2% isoflurane pretreatment enhance the tumor image through reducing the background uptake including brown fat, harderian gland and skeletal muscles. Also we got the governmental approval for use of x-ray generator for CT and radioisotopes as sealed and open source. We prepared the draft of process procedure for the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug

  15. Bone formation in mono cortical mandibular critical size defects after augmentation with two synthetic nanostructured and one xenogenous hydroxyapatite bone substitute - in vivo animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dau, Michael; Kämmerer, Peer W; Henkel, Kai-Olaf; Gerber, Thomas; Frerich, Bernhard; Gundlach, Karsten K H

    2016-05-01

    Healing characteristics as well as level of tissue integration and degradation of two different nanostructured hydroxyapatite bone substitute materials (BSM) in comparison with a deproteinized hydroxyapatite bovine BSM were evaluated in an in vivo animal experiment. In the posterior mandible of 18 minipigs, bilateral mono cortical critical size bone defects were created. Randomized augmentation procedures with NanoBone(®) (NHA1), Ostim(®) (NHA2) or Bio-Oss(®) (DBBM) were conducted (each material n = 12). Samples were analyzed after five (each material n = 6) and 8 months (each material n = 6). Defect healing, formation of soft tissue and bone as well as the amount of remaining respective BSM were quantified both macro- and microscopically. For NHA2, the residual bone defect after 5 weeks was significantly less compared to NHA1 or DBBM. There was no difference in residual BSM between NHA1 and DBBM, but the amount in NHA2 was significantly lower. NHA2 also showed the least amount of soft tissue and the highest amount of new bone after 5 weeks. Eight months after implantation, no significant differences in the amount of residual bone defects, in soft tissue or in bone formation were detected between the groups. Again, NHA2 showed significant less residual material than NHA1 and DBBM. We observed non-significant differences in the biological hard tissue response of NHA1 and DBBM. The water-soluble NHA2 initially induced an increased amount of new bone but was highly compressed which may have a negative effect in less stable augmentations of the jaw. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. [123I]Iodobenzamide binding to the rat dopamine D2 receptor in competition with haloperidol and endogenous dopamine - an in vivo imaging study with a dedicated small animal SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Larisch, Rolf; Wirrwar, Andreas; Jamdjeu-Noune, Marlyse; Antke, Christina; Beu, Markus; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Schramm, Nils

    2005-01-01

    This study assessed [ 123 I]iodobenzamide binding to the rat dopamine D 2 receptor in competition with haloperidol and endogenous dopamine using a high-resolution small animal SPECT. Subsequent to baseline quantifications of D 2 receptor binding, imaging studies were performed on the same animals after pre-treatment with haloperidol and methylphenidate, which block D 2 receptors and dopamine transporters, respectively. Striatal baseline equilibrium ratios (V 3 '' ) of [ 123 I]iodobenzamide binding were 1.42±0.31 (mean±SD). After pre-treatment with haloperidol and methylphenidate, V 3 '' values decreased to 0.54±0.46 (p 123 I]iodobenzamide binding induced by pre-treatment with haloperidol reflects D 2 receptor blockade, whereas the decrease in receptor binding induced by pre-treatment with methylphenidate can be interpreted in terms of competition between [ 123 I]IBZM and endogenous dopamine. Findings show that multiple in vivo measurements of [ 123 I]iodobenzamide binding to D 2 receptors in competition with exogenous and endogenous ligands are feasible in the same animal. This may be of future relevance for the in vivo evaluation of novel radioligands as well as for studying the interrelations between pre- and/or postsynaptic radioligand binding and different levels of endogenous dopamine. (orig.)

  17. Establishment study of the in vivo imaging analysis with small animal imaging modalities (micro-PET and micro-SPECT/CT) for bio-drug development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Beomsu; Park, Sanghyeon; Park, Jeonghoon; Jo, Sungkee; Jung, Uhee; Kim, Seolwha; Lee, Yunjong; Choi, Daeseong

    2011-01-15

    In this study, we established the image acquisition and analysis procedures of micro-PET, SPECT/CT using the experimental animal (mouse) for the development of imaging assessment method for the bio-drug. We examined the micro-SPECT/CT, PET imaging study using the Siemens Inveon micro-multimodality system (SPECT/CT) and micro-PET with {sup 99m}Tc-MDP, DMSA, and {sup 18}F-FDG. SPECT imaging studies using 3 types of pinhole collimators. 5-MWB collimator was used for SPECT image study. To study whole-body distribution, {sup 99m}Tc-MDP SPECT image study was performed. We obtained the fine distribution image. And the CT images was obtained to provide the anatomical information. And then these two types images are fused. To study specific organ uptake, we examined {sup 99}mTc-DMSA SPECT/CT imaging study. We also performed the PET image study using U87MG tumor bearing mice and {sup 18}F-FDG. The overnight fasting, warming and anesthesia with 2% isoflurane pretreatment enhance the tumor image through reducing the background uptake including brown fat, harderian gland and skeletal muscles. Also we got the governmental approval for use of x-ray generator for CT and radioisotopes as sealed and open source. We prepared the draft of process procedure for the experimental animal imaging facility. These research results can be utilized as a basic image study protocols and data for the image assessment of drugs including biological drug.

  18. In vitro versus in vivo concordance: a case study of the replacement of an animal potency test with an immunochemical assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, T

    2002-01-01

    Early in its development, the potency of Merck's recombinant hepatitis B vaccine, RECOMBIVAX HB, was monitored using an assay performed in mice. A specification was determined to be the lowest potency which induced acceptable response in clinical trials. As a post-licensing commitment, Merck was asked to replace its mouse potency assay with an in vitro procedure for product release in the US market. Early studies with a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) yielded highly variable results. That assay, combined with a sample pretreatment step, proved more dependable and predictive of potency in the mouse assay. Based on measurements made on manufactured materials, combined with experiments contrived to yield a wide range of reactivity in the two assays, concordance was established between the EIA and the mouse potency assay. This concordance was used to calibrate a specification for the in vitro assay that is predictive of a satisfactory response in vivo. Data from clinical trials established a correspondence between human immunogenicity and these potency markers.

  19. In vivo evaluation of biofunctionalized implant surfaces with a synthetic peptide (P-15) and its impact on osseointegration. A preclinical animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Christian M; Koepple, Markus; Moest, Tobias; Neumann, Konrad; Weisel, Tamara; Schlegel, Karl Andreas

    2016-11-01

    The overall aim of the study was to investigate a biofunctionalized implant surface with electrochemically deposition of hydroxyapatite and the synthetic peptide (P-15) and its effect on osseointegration. Three modified implant types of ANKYLOS ® C/X implants were used; (1) machined implants used as negative control (M, n = 20), (2) implants with the FRIADENT ® plus surface (grit blasted and acid-etched) used as positive control (P, n = 20), and (3) implants with a biomimetic surface consisting of hydroxyapatite and the synthetic 15 aminoacids containing peptide P-15 (BP, n = 40). The implants were randomly inserted in the mandibles of 10 beagle dogs following 4 months after tooth extraction (P1-P4). Three animals were sacrificed 2 and 7 days after implant insertion, respectively, and four animals were sacrificed 6 months post implant insertion. Bone-to-implant contacts (BICs) were analyzed via histomorphometrical analyses at five different region of interests (ROIs); two at the middle part on either side of the implant (ROI 1/4), two at the apical part of the implant at each side (ROI 2/3), and one at the tip of the implant (ROI 5). All implant surfaces showed a high level of osseointegration and osteoconductivity. The cumulative implant survival rate (CSR) was 93.8%, 100% in the M, 85% in the P, and 95% in the BP group. No statistical difference in BICs at ROI 1/4, 2/3, and 5 could be shown between implant types following 2 and 7 days of healing. BIC values increased in all groups over time. After 6 months of healing the BP group showed superiority in BIC in ROI 2/3 (73.2 ± 15.6%) compared to the P (48.3 ± 10.6%) and M group (66.3 ± 30.2%) with a significant difference between BP and P (P = 0.002). It is hypothesized, that the surface biofunctionalization improves peri-implant bone formation and remodeling, leading to an increased bone-to implant contact. However, within the limitations of the study set-up no benefit in the early phase of

  20. Differences in the incidence of apoptosis between in vivo and in vitro produced blastocysts of farm animal species: a comparative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rubio Pomar, F.J.; Teerds, K.J.; Kidson, A.; Colenbrander, B.; Tharasanit, T.; Aguilar, B.; Roelen, B.A.J.

    2005-01-01

    The occurrence of pregnancies and births after embryo transfer (ET) of in vivo produced embryos is generally more successful compared to that of embryos produced in vitro. This difference in ET success has been observed when embryos of morphological equal (high) quality were used. The incidence of

  1. Clinical feasibility of a new through-the-scope fully covered esophageal self-expandable metallic stent: an in vivo animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Young Koog; Lee, Tae Yoon; Sung, In Kyung; Shim, Chan Sup

    2014-01-01

    Most delivery devices used for esophageal stents for obstructing esophageal cancer have a diameter of 5-8 mm, a size that is too large to pass through the endoscopic working channel. The conventional esophageal stent requires multiple endoscopic procedures for implantation. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the clinical feasibility of a newly developed fully covered, self-expanding, through-the-scope (TTS) esophageal stent in a porcine model. Eight mini pigs were used. Each animal underwent placement of a fully covered TTS stent (Hanarostent® Esophagus TTS) and the upper part of the stent was fixed by suturing with nylon. Fluoroscopy was carried out every week to assess migration of the stent. Follow-up endoscopy was done every month for 3 months to evaluate the status of the membrane, stent mesh, grade of tissue hyperplasia, and mucosal changes at both ends of the stent. All stents were successfully and easily deployed, and were placed without any distortion in the stent or without rupture of the membrane. In two cases, stent migration was observed after 8 weeks. No case of membrane disruption, stent mesh disruption or tissue hyperplasia at either end of the stent was found at the completion of the study. Our findings indicate that the new fully covered self-expanding TTS esophageal stent is easy and simple to implant, and no significant distortion of mesh or disruption of membrane was observed. © 2013 The Authors. Digestive Endoscopy © 2013 Japan Gastroenterological Endoscopy Society.

  2. In vivo (1)H-MRS hepatic lipid profiling in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease: an animal study at 9.4 T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yunjung; Jee, Hee-Jung; Noh, Hyungjoon; Kang, Geun-Hyung; Park, Juyeun; Cho, Janggeun; Cho, Jee-Hyun; Ahn, Sangdoo; Lee, Chulhyun; Kim, Ok-Hee; Oh, Byung-Chul; Kim, Hyeonjin

    2013-09-01

    The applicability of the in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy hepatic lipid profiling (MR-HLP) technique in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease was investigated. Using magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the relative fractions of diunsaturated (fdi), monounsaturated (fmono), and saturated (fsat) fatty acids as well as total hepatic lipid content were estimated in the livers of 8 control and 23 CCl4-treated rats at 9.4 T. The mean steatosis, necrosis, inflammation, and fibrosis scores of the treated group were all significantly higher than those of the control group (P steatosis and fibrosis are positively correlated with fmono and negatively correlated with fdi. Both necrosis and inflammation, however, were not correlated with any of the MR-HLP parameters. Hepatic lipid composition appears to be changed in association with the severity of steatosis and fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and these changes can be depicted in vivo by using the MR-HLP method at 9.4 T. Thus, while it may not likely be that MR-HLP helps differentiate between steatohepatitis in its early stages and simple steatosis, these findings altogether are in support of potential applicability of in vivo MR-HLP at high field in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. New quantitative and multi-modal approach for in-vivo studies of small animals: coupling of the β-microprobe with magnetic techniques and development of voxelized rat and mouse phantoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desbree, A.

    2005-09-01

    For the last 15 years, animal models that mimic human disorders have become ubiquitous participants to understand biological mechanisms and human disorders and to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. The necessity to study these models in the course of time has stimulated the development of instruments dedicated to in vivo small animal studies. To further understand physiopathological processes, the current challenge is to couple simultaneously several of these methods. Given this context, the combination of the magnetic and radioactive techniques remains an exciting challenge since it is still limited by strict technical constraints. Therefore we propose to couple the magnetic techniques with the radiosensitive Beta-Microprobe, developed in the IPB group and which shown to be an elegant alternative to PET measurements. In this context, the thesis was dedicated to the study of the coupling feasibility from a physical point of view, by simulation and experimental characterizations. Then, the determination of a biological protocol was carried out on the basis of pharmacokinetic studies. The experiments have shown the possibility to use the probe for radioactive measurements under intense magnetic field simultaneously to anatomical images acquisitions. Simultaneously, we have sought to improve the quantification of the radioactive signal using a voxelized phantom of a rat brain. Finally, the emergence of transgenic models led us to reproduce pharmacokinetic studies for the mouse and to develop voxelized mouse phantoms. (author)

  4. State of the art in both in vitro and in vivo aspects of small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziere, B.; Lebars, D.

    2002-01-01

    for practical reasons (with the advent of genomics and combinatorial chemistry, gene knock-out mice, transgene mice and cloned human receptors, drug discovery departments could be rapidly flooded with new active compounds making the selection for further development becoming more and more critical). Until recently, it was felt that PET and SPECT radioisotopic imaging methodologies were too expensive and that their resolution was too poor to be used in small laboratory animals like mice and rats. With the development of high-resolution and relatively low-cost imaging systems dedicated to small animals, that perception is changing. Another anticipated benefit of the use of small animal imaging techniques is that they provide a sophisticated way to work with the many transgenic mouse models of disease that have become more and more important in the drug development process. Using these in vivo imaging systems, it is now possible to repeat the same study on a single mouse allowing, for example, to monitor the response to drugs as a function of time. In a near future these small animal-imaging techniques could be used to monitor gene therapy (using radiolabelled oligonucleotides or therapy genes monitored with the reporter gene/radiolabelled reporter probe system). Animal PET/SPECT systems are unique tools to provide information on the mechanism of action of drugs and as such are more and more used as rapid screening procedures for selecting new drugs and for optimising treatment protocols. The use of small animal imaging systems is particularly valuable in small animal studies with a longitudinal or interventional design. The high-performance, application-specific research PET and SPECT systems, designed for use with small animals, should facilitate quantitative accurate research data to be translated more effectively from pharmacological labs to clinical medicine and clinical trials. PET and SPECT for small-animal imaging provide a bridge between preclinical drug

  5. Comparative microstructural analysis of bone osteotomies after cutting by computer-assisted robot-guided laser osteotome and piezoelectric osteotome: an in vivo animal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augello, Marcello; Deibel, Waldemar; Nuss, Katja; Cattin, Philippe; Jürgens, Philipp

    2018-04-13

    Most industrial laser applications utilize computer and robot assistance, for guidance, safety, repeatability, and precision. In contrast, medical applications using laser systems are mostly conducted manually. The advantages can be effective only when the system is coupled to a robotic guidance, as operating by hand does not reach the required accuracy. We currently developed the first laser osteotome which offers preoperative planning based on CT data, robot guidance, and a precise execution of the laser cuts. In an animal trial, our system was used to create a grid pattern of the same depth on the inner layer of parietal bone in 12 adult sheep. The same bone cuts were done with piezoelectric osteotome on the contralateral side. The micro-CT and histological analysis showed more new mineralized bone in the laser group compared to the piezoelectric group. As well, a cutting pattern with especially a constant osteotomy depth in the laser group was demonstrated. The here presented autonomous osteotomy tool shows not only an advantage in early bone healing stage but additionally sharp bone cuts with a very high accuracy and freely selectable design cuts.

  6. Animal Studies of Addictive Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Serge H.

    2013-01-01

    It is increasingly recognized that studying drug taking in laboratory animals does not equate to studying genuine addiction, characterized by loss of control over drug use. This has inspired recent work aimed at capturing genuine addiction-like behavior in animals. In this work, we summarize empirical evidence for the occurrence of several DSM-IV-like symptoms of addiction in animals after extended drug use. These symptoms include escalation of drug use, neurocognitive deficits, resistance to extinction, increased motivation for drugs, preference for drugs over nondrug rewards, and resistance to punishment. The fact that addiction-like behavior can occur and be studied in animals gives us the exciting opportunity to investigate the neural and genetic background of drug addiction, which we hope will ultimately lead to the development of more effective treatments for this devastating disorder. PMID:23249442

  7. Is the use of plants in Jordanian folk medicine for the treatment of male sexual dysfunction scientifically based? Review of in vitro and in vivo human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M A

    2017-04-01

    Male sexual dysfunction is a serious problem which has an impact on the quality of life. In Jordanian folk medicine, 56 plant species were reported to be used by males to improve sexual potency and as aphrodisiacs. The aim of this study was to search for scientific evidence justifying their folk use. Of the 15 studied plants, only five were found to enhance spermatogenesis. The other 10 were reported to decrease spermatogenesis at least by one study. The majority of the studied plants possessed a protective effect on testis in different in vivo models as well as antioxidant activities. The effect of these plants on steroidogenesis and the hypothalamic-gonadal axis was also reviewed. The effect of only five plants was studied on sexual behaviour enhancement and three of them were active. Three of the four studied plants enhanced erection. The mechanism of action of active constituents isolated from the studied plants was also investigated. In conclusion, many plants used in Jordanian folk medicine decreased or had no effect on spermatogenesis in animal models. These plants have antioxidant and/or adaptogenic effects, and this may result in a beneficial action on male reproductive system. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Remote in vivo stress assessment of aquatic animals with microencapsulated biomarkers for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurkov, Anton; Shchapova, Ekaterina; Bedulina, Daria; Baduev, Boris; Borvinskaya, Ekaterina; Meglinski, Igor; Timofeyev, Maxim

    2016-11-01

    Remote in vivo scanning of physiological parameters is a major trend in the development of new tools for the fields of medicine and animal physiology. For this purpose, a variety of implantable optical micro- and nanosensors have been designed for potential medical applications. At the same time, the important area of environmental sciences has been neglected in the development of techniques for remote physiological measurements. In the field of environmental monitoring and related research, there is a constant demand for new effective and quick techniques for the stress assessment of aquatic animals, and the development of proper methods for remote physiological measurements in vivo may significantly increase the precision and throughput of analyses in this field. In the present study, we apply pH-sensitive microencapsulated biomarkers to remotely monitor the pH of haemolymph in vivo in endemic amphipods from Lake Baikal, and we compare the suitability of this technique for stress assessment with that of common biochemical methods. For the first time, we demonstrate the possibility of remotely detecting a change in a physiological parameter in an aquatic organism under ecologically relevant stressful conditions and show the applicability of techniques using microencapsulated biomarkers for remote physiological measurements in environmental monitoring.

  9. Assessment of metabolic changes in the striatum of a MPTP-intoxicated canine model: in vivo ¹H-MRS study of an animal model for Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chi-Bong; Kim, Sang-Young; Lee, Sung-Ho; Jahng, Geon-Ho; Kim, Hwi-Yool; Choe, Bo-Young; Ryu, Kyung-Nam; Yang, Dal-Mo; Yim, Sung-Vin; Choi, Woo-Suk

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive loss of the dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta, which projects to the striatum. We induced a selective loss of nigrostriatal dopamine neurons, by infusing the mitochondrial complex 1 inhibitor 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) into adult beagle dogs (N=5). Single voxel ¹H water suppressed magnetic resonance spectroscopy (¹H-MRS) at 3 T was used to assess the metabolic changes in the striatum of canine before and after MPTP intoxication. The metabolite spectra obtained from the striatum (voxel size: 2 cm³) showed a lower N-acetyl aspartate to total creatine (creatine+phosphocreatine) ratio after MPTP intoxication. There were no significant differences in other metabolite ratios such as glutamate+glutamine, choline-containing compounds (glycerophosphocholine+phophorylcholine and myo-inositol). Our findings indicated that ¹H-MRS is a sensitive, noninvasive measure of neural toxicity and biochemical alterations of the striatum in a canine model of PD, and further studies are needed to confirm brain metabolic changes in association with progression of MPTP-intoxication. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. New quantitative and multi-modal approach for in-vivo studies of small animals: coupling of the {beta}-microprobe with magnetic techniques and development of voxelized rat and mouse phantoms; Nouvelle approche multimodale et quantitative pour les etudes in vivo chez le petit animal: couplage de la {beta}-MicroProbe aux techniques magnetiques et developpement de fantomes de rat et de souris voxelises

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desbree, A

    2005-09-15

    For the last 15 years, animal models that mimic human disorders have become ubiquitous participants to understand biological mechanisms and human disorders and to evaluate new therapeutic approaches. The necessity to study these models in the course of time has stimulated the development of instruments dedicated to in vivo small animal studies. To further understand physiopathological processes, the current challenge is to couple simultaneously several of these methods. Given this context, the combination of the magnetic and radioactive techniques remains an exciting challenge since it is still limited by strict technical constraints. Therefore we propose to couple the magnetic techniques with the radiosensitive Beta-Microprobe, developed in the IPB group and which shown to be an elegant alternative to PET measurements. In this context, the thesis was dedicated to the study of the coupling feasibility from a physical point of view, by simulation and experimental characterizations. Then, the determination of a biological protocol was carried out on the basis of pharmacokinetic studies. The experiments have shown the possibility to use the probe for radioactive measurements under intense magnetic field simultaneously to anatomical images acquisitions. Simultaneously, we have sought to improve the quantification of the radioactive signal using a voxelized phantom of a rat brain. Finally, the emergence of transgenic models led us to reproduce pharmacokinetic studies for the mouse and to develop voxelized mouse phantoms. (author)

  11. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; McLeod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-06-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface.

  12. Large-Animal Biventricular Working Heart Perfusion System with Low Priming Volume-Comparison between in vivo and ex vivo Cardiac Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abicht, Jan-Michael; Mayr, Tanja Axinja Jelena; Jauch, Judith; Guethoff, Sonja; Buchholz, Stefan; Reichart, Bruno; Bauer, Andreas

    2018-01-01

    Existing large-animal, ex vivo, cardiac perfusion models are restricted in their ability to establish an ischemia/reperfusion condition as seen in cardiac surgery or transplantation. Other working heart systems only challenge one ventricle or require a substantially larger priming volume. We describe a novel biventricular cardiac perfusion system with reduced priming volume. Juvenile pig hearts were cardiopleged, explanted, and reperfused ex vivo after 150 minutes of cold ischemia. Autologous whole blood was used as perfusate (minimal priming volume 350 mL). After 15 minutes of Langendorff perfusion (LM), the system was switched into a biventricular working mode (WM) and studied for 3 hours. During reperfusion, complete unloading of both ventricles and constant-pressure coronary perfusion was achieved. During working mode perfusion, the preload and afterload pressure of both ventricles was controlled within the targeted physiologic range. Functional parameters such as left ventricular work index were reduced in ex vivo working mode (in vivo: 787 ± 186 vs. 1 h WM 498 ± 66 mm Hg·mL/g·min; p  hours while functional and blood parameters are easily accessible. Moreover, because of the minimal priming volume, the novel ex vivo cardiac perfusion circuit allows for autologous perfusion, using the limited amount of blood available from the organ donating animal. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. In Vivo Respiratory-Gated Micro-CT Imaging in Small-Animal Oncology Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Cavanaugh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Micro-computed tomography (micro-CT is becoming an accepted research tool for the noninvasive examination of laboratory animals such as mice and rats, but to date, in vivo scanning has largely been limited to the evaluation of skeletal tissues. We use a commercially available micro-CT device to perform respiratory gated in vivo acquisitions suitable for thoracic imaging. The instrument is described, along with the scan protocol and animal preparation techniques. Preliminary results confirm that lung tumors as small as 1 mm in diameter are visible in vivo with these methods. Radiation dose was evaluated using several approaches, and was found to be approximately 0.15 Gy for this respiratory-gated micro-CT imaging protocol. The combination of high-resolution CT imaging and respiratory-gated acquisitions appears well-suited to serial in vivo scanning.

  14. Differential in vivo gene expression of major Leptospira proteins in resistant or susceptible animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Mariko; Soupé, Marie-Estelle; Becam, Jérôme; Goarant, Cyrille

    2012-09-01

    Transcripts of Leptospira 16S rRNA, FlaB, LigB, LipL21, LipL32, LipL36, LipL41, and OmpL37 were quantified in the blood of susceptible (hamsters) and resistant (mice) animal models of leptospirosis. We first validated adequate reference genes and then evaluated expression patterns in vivo compared to in vitro cultures. LipL32 expression was downregulated in vivo and differentially regulated in resistant and susceptible animals. FlaB expression was also repressed in mice but not in hamsters. In contrast, LigB and OmpL37 were upregulated in vivo. Thus, we demonstrated that a virulent strain of Leptospira differentially adapts its gene expression in the blood of infected animals.

  15. Assessment of hybrid rotation-translation scan schemes for in vivo animal SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xia Yan; Liu Yaqiang; Wang Shi; Ma Tianyu; Yao Rutao; Deng Xiao

    2013-01-01

    To perform in vivo animal single photon emission computed tomography imaging on a stationary detector gantry, we introduced a hybrid rotation-translation (HRT) tomographic scan, a combination of translational and limited angle rotational movements of the image object, to minimize gravity-induced animal motion. To quantitatively assess the performance of ten HRT scan schemes and the conventional rotation-only scan scheme, two simulated phantoms were first scanned with each scheme to derive the corresponding image resolution (IR) in the image field of view. The IR results of all the scan schemes were visually assessed and compared with corresponding outputs of four scan scheme evaluation indices, i.e. sampling completeness (SC), sensitivity (S), conventional system resolution (SR), and a newly devised directional spatial resolution (DR) that measures the resolution in any specified orientation. A representative HRT scheme was tested with an experimental phantom study. Eight of the ten HRT scan schemes evaluated achieved a superior performance compared to two other HRT schemes and the rotation-only scheme in terms of phantom image resolution. The same eight HRT scan schemes also achieved equivalent or better performance in terms of the four quantitative indices than the conventional rotation-only scheme. As compared to the conventional index SR, the new index DR appears to be a more relevant indicator of system resolution performance. The experimental phantom image obtained from the selected HRT scheme was satisfactory. We conclude that it is feasible to perform in vivo animal imaging with a HRT scan scheme and SC and DR are useful predictors for quantitatively assessing the performance of a scan scheme. (paper)

  16. Animal studies on Spacelab-3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatte, C.; Grindeland, R.; Callahan, P.; Berry, W.; Funk, G.; Lencki, W.

    1987-01-01

    The flight of two squirrel monkeys and 24 rats on Spacelab-3 was the first mission to provide hands-on maintenance on animals in a laboratory environment. With few exceptions, the animals grew and behaved normally, were free of chronic stress, and differed from ground controls only for gravity dependent parameters. One of the monkeys exhibited symptoms of space sickness similar to those observed in humans, which suggests squirrel monkeys may be good models for studying the space adaptation syndrome. Among the wide variety of parameters measured in the rats, most notable was the dramatic loss of muscle mass and increased fragility of long bones. Other interesting rat findings were those of suppressed interferom production by spleen cells, defective release of growth hormone by somatrophs, possible dissociation of circadian pacemakers, changes in hepatic lipid and carbohydrate metabolism, and hypersensitivity of marrow cells to erythropoietin. These results portend a strong role for animals in identifying and elucidating the physiological and anatomical responses of mammals to microgravity.

  17. Antiviral Efficacy of Verdinexor In Vivo in Two Animal Models of Influenza A Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perwitasari, Olivia; Johnson, Scott; Yan, Xiuzhen; Register, Emery; Crabtree, Jackelyn; Gabbard, Jon; Howerth, Elizabeth; Shacham, Sharon; Carlson, Robert; Tamir, Sharon; Tripp, Ralph A.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) causes seasonal epidemics of respiratory illness that can cause mild to severe illness and potentially death. Antiviral drugs are an important countermeasure against IAV; however, drug resistance has developed, thus new therapeutic approaches are being sought. Previously, we demonstrated the antiviral activity of a novel nuclear export inhibitor drug, verdinexor, to reduce influenza replication in vitro and pulmonary virus burden in mice. In this study, in vivo efficacy of verdinexor was further evaluated in two animal models or influenza virus infection, mice and ferrets. In mice, verdinexor was efficacious to limit virus shedding, reduce pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, and moderate leukocyte infiltration into the bronchoalveolar space. Similarly, verdinexor-treated ferrets had reduced lung pathology, virus burden, and inflammatory cytokine expression in the nasal wash exudate. These findings support the anti-viral efficacy of verdinexor, and warrant its development as a novel antiviral therapeutic for influenza infection. PMID:27893810

  18. Antiviral Efficacy of Verdinexor In Vivo in Two Animal Models of Influenza A Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Perwitasari

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV causes seasonal epidemics of respiratory illness that can cause mild to severe illness and potentially death. Antiviral drugs are an important countermeasure against IAV; however, drug resistance has developed, thus new therapeutic approaches are being sought. Previously, we demonstrated the antiviral activity of a novel nuclear export inhibitor drug, verdinexor, to reduce influenza replication in vitro and pulmonary virus burden in mice. In this study, in vivo efficacy of verdinexor was further evaluated in two animal models or influenza virus infection, mice and ferrets. In mice, verdinexor was efficacious to limit virus shedding, reduce pulmonary pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, and moderate leukocyte infiltration into the bronchoalveolar space. Similarly, verdinexor-treated ferrets had reduced lung pathology, virus burden, and inflammatory cytokine expression in the nasal wash exudate. These findings support the anti-viral efficacy of verdinexor, and warrant its development as a novel antiviral therapeutic for influenza infection.

  19. Are animal models useful for studying human disc disorders / degeneration?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alini, M.; Eisenstein, S.M.; Ito, K.; Little, C.; Kettler, A.A.; Masuda, K.; Melrose, J.; Ralphs, J.; Stokes, I.; Wilke, H.J.

    2008-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is an often investigated pathophysiological condition because of its implication in causing low back pain. As human material for such studies is difficult to obtain because of ethical and government regulatory restriction, animal tissue, organs and in vivo

  20. Development of in-vivo micro CT system for small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nam, Ki Yong; Lim, Jong Hyeok; Jeong, Young Jo; Park, Jeong Gwon [Institute for Radiological Imaging Science, Iksan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung Bung [DRGEM Corp., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Kwon Ha [Institute for Radiological Imaging Science and Medical School of Radiology, Iksan (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-07-01

    Computed tomography system with the spatial resolution of {approx}25 {mu}m has been developed for the application to small animals. This system is designed by gantry-rotation type for minimizing animal movement. To get image with micro-spatial resolution, system characteristic such as geometry between main components of source, specimen and detector, field of view, etc., is described in this paper. The requirements of x-ray spot size and CCD pixel size to approach the resolution are discussed. In-vivo imaging test for mouse is also presented as a result.

  1. Development of in-vivo micro CT system for small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Ki Yong; Lim, Jong Hyeok; Jeong, Young Jo; Park, Jeong Gwon; Park, Jung Bung; Yoon, Kwon Ha

    2005-01-01

    Computed tomography system with the spatial resolution of ∼25 μm has been developed for the application to small animals. This system is designed by gantry-rotation type for minimizing animal movement. To get image with micro-spatial resolution, system characteristic such as geometry between main components of source, specimen and detector, field of view, etc., is described in this paper. The requirements of x-ray spot size and CCD pixel size to approach the resolution are discussed. In-vivo imaging test for mouse is also presented as a result

  2. Comparative assessment of fluorescent proteins for in vivo imaging in an animal model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heppert, Jennifer K; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Higgins, Christopher D; Steward, Annette; Ahringer, Julie; Kuhn, Jeffrey R; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-11-07

    Fluorescent protein tags are fundamental tools used to visualize gene products and analyze their dynamics in vivo. Recent advances in genome editing have expedited the precise insertion of fluorescent protein tags into the genomes of diverse organisms. These advances expand the potential of in vivo imaging experiments and facilitate experimentation with new, bright, photostable fluorescent proteins. Most quantitative comparisons of the brightness and photostability of different fluorescent proteins have been made in vitro, removed from biological variables that govern their performance in cells or organisms. To address the gap, we quantitatively assessed fluorescent protein properties in vivo in an animal model system. We generated transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing green, yellow, or red fluorescent proteins in embryos and imaged embryos expressing different fluorescent proteins under the same conditions for direct comparison. We found that mNeonGreen was not as bright in vivo as predicted based on in vitro data but is a better tag than GFP for specific kinds of experiments, and we report on optimal red fluorescent proteins. These results identify ideal fluorescent proteins for imaging in vivo in C. elegans embryos and suggest good candidate fluorescent proteins to test in other animal model systems for in vivo imaging experiments. © 2016 Heppert et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging for Longitudinal Monitoring of Inflammation in Animal Models of Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutowski, Michal B; Wilson, Leslie; Van Gelder, Russell N; Pepple, Kathryn L

    2017-03-01

    We develop a quantitative bioluminescence assay for in vivo longitudinal monitoring of inflammation in animal models of uveitis. Three models of experimental uveitis were induced in C57BL/6 albino mice: primed mycobacterial uveitis (PMU), endotoxin-induced uveitis (EIU), and experimental autoimmune uveitis (EAU). Intraperitoneal injection of luminol sodium salt, which emits light when oxidized, provided the bioluminescence substrate. Bioluminescence images were captured by a PerkinElmer In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS) Spectrum and total bioluminescence was analyzed using Living Image software. Bioluminescence on day zero was compared to bioluminescence on the day of peak inflammation for each model. Longitudinal bioluminescence imaging was performed in EIU and EAU. In the presence of luminol, intraocular inflammation generates detectable bioluminescence in three mouse models of uveitis. Peak bioluminescence in inflamed PMU eyes (1.46 × 105 photons/second [p/s]) was significantly increased over baseline (1.47 × 104 p/s, P = 0.01). Peak bioluminescence in inflamed EIU eyes (3.18 × 104 p/s) also was significantly increased over baseline (1.09 × 104 p/s, P = 0.04), and returned to near baseline levels by 48 hours. In EAU, there was a nonsignificant increase in bioluminescence at peak inflammation. In vivo bioluminescence may be used as a noninvasive, quantitative measure of intraocular inflammation in animal models of uveitis. Primed mycobacterial uveitis and EIU are both acute models with robust anterior inflammation and demonstrated significant changes in bioluminescence corresponding with peak inflammation. Experimental autoimmune uveitis is a more indolent posterior uveitis and generated a more modest bioluminescent signal. In vivo imaging system bioluminescence is a nonlethal, quantifiable assay that can be used for monitoring inflammation in animal models of uveitis.

  4. Transparency in the reporting of in vivo pre-clinical pain research: The relevance and implications of the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Andrew S C; Morland, Rosemary; Huang, Wenlong; Currie, Gillian L; Sena, Emily S; Macleod, Malcolm R

    2017-12-29

    Clear reporting of research is crucial to the scientific process. Poorly designed and reported studies are damaging not only to the efforts of individual researchers, but also to science as a whole. Standardised reporting methods, such as those already established for reporting randomised clinical trials, have led to improved study design and facilitated the processes of clinical systematic review and meta-analysis. Such standards were lacking in the pre-clinical field until the development of the ARRIVE (Animal Research: Reporting In Vivo Experiments) guidelines. These were prompted following a survey which highlighted a widespread lack of robust and consistent reporting of pre-clinical in vivo research, with reports frequently omitting basic information required for study replication and quality assessment. The resulting twenty item checklist in ARRIVE covers all aspects of experimental design with particular emphasis on bias reduction and methodological transparency. Influential publishers and research funders have already adopted ARRIVE. Further dissemination and acknowledgement of the importance of these guidelines is vital to their widespread implementation. Conclusions and implications Wide implementation of the ARRIVE guidelines for reporting of in vivo preclinical research, especially pain research, are essential for a much needed increased transparency and quality in publishing such research. ARRIVE will also positively influence improvements in experimental design and quality, assist the conduct of accurate replication studies of important new findings and facilitate meta-analyses of preclinical research.

  5. In vivo Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of cerebral glycogen metabolism in animals and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowaja, Ameer; Choi, In-Young; Seaquist, Elizabeth R.; Öz, Gülin

    2015-01-01

    Glycogen serves as an important energy reservoir in the human body. Despite the abundance of glycogen in the liver and skeletal muscles, its concentration in the brain is relatively low, hence its significance has been questioned. A major challenge in studying brain glycogen metabolism has been the lack of availability of non-invasive techniques for quantification of brain glycogen in vivo. Invasive methods for brain glycogen quantification such as post mortem extraction following high energy microwave irradiation are not applicable in the human brain. With the advent of 13C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS), it has been possible to measure brain glycogen concentrations and turnover in physiological conditions, as well as under the influence of stressors such as hypoglycemia and visual stimulation. This review presents an overview of the principles of the 13C MRS methodology and its applications in both animals and humans to further our understanding of glycogen metabolism under normal physiological and pathophysiological conditions such as hypoglycemia unawareness. PMID:24676563

  6. Bias During the Evaluation of Animal Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Andrew

    2012-02-23

    My recent book entitled The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments seeks to answer a key question within animal ethics, namely: is animal experimentation ethically justifiable? Or, more precisely, is it justifiable within the utilitarian cost:benefit framework that fundamentally underpins most regulations governing animal experimentation? To answer this question I reviewed more than 500 scientific publications describing animal studies, animal welfare impacts, and alternative research, toxicity testing and educational methodologies. To minimise bias I focused primarily on large-scale systematic reviews that had examined the human clinical and toxicological utility of animal studies. Despite this, Dr. Susanne Prankel recently reviewed my book in this journal, essentially accusing me of bias. However, she failed to provide any substantive evidence to refute my conclusions, let alone evidence of similar weight to that on which they are based. Those conclusions are, in fact, firmly based on utilitarian ethical reasoning, informed by scientific evidence of considerable strength, and I believe they are robust.

  7. Microscopy of bacterial translocation during small bowel obstruction and ischemia in vivo – a new animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafner Mathias

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing animal models provide only indirect information about the pathogenesis of infections caused by indigenous gastrointestinal microflora and the kinetics of bacterial translocation. The aim of this study was to develop a novel animal model to assess bacterial translocation and intestinal barrier function in vivo. Methods In anaesthetized male Wistar rats, 0.5 ml of a suspension of green fluorescent protein-transfected E. coli was administered by intraluminal injection in a model of small bowel obstruction. Animals were randomly subjected to non-ischemic or ischemic bowel obstruction. Ischemia was induced by selective clamping of the terminal mesenteric vessels feeding the obstructed bowel loop. Time intervals necessary for translocation of E. coli into the submucosal stroma and the muscularis propria was assessed using intravital microscopy. Results Bacterial translocation into the submucosa and muscularis propria took a mean of 36 ± 8 min and 80 ± 10 min, respectively, in small bowel obstruction. Intestinal ischemia significantly accelerated bacterial translocation into the submucosa (11 ± 5 min, p E. coli were visible in frozen sections of small bowel, mesentery, liver and spleen taken two hours after E. coli administration. Conclusions Intravital microscopy of fluorescent bacteria is a novel approach to study bacterial translocation in vivo. We have applied this technique to define minimal bacterial transit time as a functional parameter of intestinal barrier function.

  8. Cannabidiol Does Not Convert to Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in an In Vivo Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wray, Louise; Stott, Colin; Jones, Nicholas; Wright, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cannabidiol (CBD) can convert to Δ 9 -tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in vitro with prolonged exposure to simulated gastric fluid; however, in vitro conditions may not be representative of the in vivo gut environment. Using the minipig, we investigated whether enteral CBD converts to THC in vivo . Materials and Methods: Synthetic CBD (100 mg/mL) was administered orally in a sesame oil formulation twice daily to minipigs ( N =3) in 15 mg/kg doses for 5 consecutive days. Blood samples were taken before and 1, 2, 4, and 6 h after morning doses on Days 1 and 5. Six hours after the final dose on Day 5, the animals were euthanized, and samples of gastrointestinal (GI) tract contents were obtained. Liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry analysis determined CBD, THC, and 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC) concentrations. Lower limits of quantification: plasma CBD=1 ng/mL, plasma THC and 11-OH-THC=0.5 ng/mL, GI tract CBD=2 ng/mL, and GI tract THC and 11-OH-THC=1 ng/mL. Results: THC and 11-OH-THC were undetectable in all plasma samples. Maximum plasma concentrations ( C max ) of CBD were observed between 1 and 4 h on Days 1 and 5. CBD was present in plasma 6 h after administration on Days 1 (mean 33.6 ng/mL) and 5 (mean 98.8 ng/mL). Mean C max CBD values, 328 ng/mL (Day 1) and 259 ng/mL (Day 5), were within range of those achieved in clinical studies. Mean CBD exposure over 6 h was similar on Days 1 (921 h·ng/mL) and 5 (881 h·ng/mL). THC and 11-OH-THC were not detected in all GI tract samples. Mean CBD concentrations reached 84,500 ng/mL in the stomach and 43,900 ng/mL in the small intestine. Conclusions: Findings of the present study show that orally dosed CBD, yielding clinically relevant plasma exposures, does not convert to THC in the minipig, a species predictive of human GI tract function.

  9. Animal models for HCV and HBV studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Chemin

    2007-02-01

    the infectivity of infectious clones of HCV without chimpanzees. Chimpanzees became infected when RNA transcripts from molecular clones were inoculated directly into the liver. The infection generated by such transfection did not differ significantly from that observed in animals infected intravenously with wild-type HCV. It furthermore permits true homologous challenge in studies of protective immunity and in testing the efficacy of vaccine candidates.

    Finally, this in vivo transfection system has made it possible to test for the first time the importance of genetic elements for HCV infectivity.

    Although chimpanzees are the only animals fully permissive for HBV infection, their use for research purpose is severely limited by the high costs and strong ethical constrains. The only alternative source of HBV-permissive hepatocytes is the Asian tree shrew Tupaia belangeri. Though experimental infection of these squirrel-like mammals, phylogenetically related to primates, results only in a mild, transient replication, primary hepatocytes isolated from T. belangeri turned out to be a reliable tool for in vitro HBV infection experiments.

    Along with invaluable infection studies in chimpanzees, avian and mammalian HBV-related viruses continue to offer ample opportunities for studies in naturally occurring hosts. In general, most of our progresses in hepatitis B virus research are based on infection studies with two HBV-related animal viruses: the woodchuck HBV (WHV, which infects the Eastern American woodchuck (Marmota monax, and the duck HBV (DHBV, which infects Peking ducks. Both animal models have been essential for understanding various steps of viral life-cycle and factors involved in establishment of virus

  10. Laser-enhanced high-intensity focused ultrasound heating in an in vivo small animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Janggun; Yang, Xinmai

    2016-11-01

    The enhanced heating effect during the combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and low-optical-fluence laser illumination was investigated by using an in vivo murine animal model. The thighs of murine animals were synergistically irradiated by HIFU and pulsed nano-second laser light. The temperature increases in the target region were measured by a thermocouple under different HIFU pressures, which were 6.2, 7.9, and 9.8 MPa, in combination with 20 mJ/cm2 laser exposures at 532 nm wavelength. In comparison with conventional laser therapies, the laser fluence used here is at least one order of magnitude lower. The results showed that laser illumination could enhance temperature during HIFU applications. Additionally, cavitation activity was enhanced when laser and HIFU irradiation were concurrently used. Further, a theoretical simulation showed that the inertial cavitation threshold was indeed decreased when laser and HIFU irradiation were utilized concurrently.

  11. In Vivo Evaluation of a New Embolic Spherical Particle (HepaSphere) in a Kidney Animal Model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luis, Esther de; Bilbao, Jose I.; Ciercoles, Jose A. Garcia Jalon de; Martinez-Cuesta, Antonio; Martino Rodriguez, Alba de; Lozano, Maria D.

    2008-01-01

    HepaSphere is a new spherical embolic material developed in a dry state that absorbs fluids and adapts to the vessel wall, leaving no space between the particle and the arterial wall. The aim of this study was to elucidate the final in vivo size, deformation, final location, and main properties of the particles when reconstituted with two different contrast media (Iodixanol and Ioxaglate) in an animal model. Two sizes of 'dry-state' particles (50-100 and 150-200 μm) were reconstituted using both ionic and nonionic contrast media. The mixture was used to partly embolize both kidneys in an animal model (14 pigs). The animals were sacrificed 4 weeks after the procedure and the samples processed. The final size of the particles was 230.2 ± 62.5 μm for the 50- to 100-μm dry-state particles and 314.4 ± 71 μm for the 150- to 200-μm dry-state particles. When the contrast medium (ionic versus nonionic) used for the reconstitution was studied to compare (Student's t-test) the final size of the particles, no differences were found (p > 0.05). The mean in vivo deformation for HepaSphere was 17.1% ± 12.3%. No differences (p > 0.05) were found in the deformation of the particle regarding the dry-state size or the contrast medium (Mann-Whitney test). We conclude that HepaSphere is stable, occludes perfectly, and morphologically adapts to the vessel lumen of the arteries embolized. There is no recanalization of the arteries 4 weeks after embolization. Its final in vivo size is predictable and the particle has the same properties in terms of size and deformation with the two different contrast media (Iodixanol and Ioxaglate)

  12. In vivo fluorescence enhanced optical tomography reconstruction of lung cancer of non immersed small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervé, L.; Koenig, A.; Da Silva, A.; Berger, M.; Boutet, J.; Dinten, J. M.; Peltié, P.; Rizo, P.

    2007-02-01

    Fluorescence enhanced diffuse optical tomography (fDOT) is envisioned to be useful to collect functional information from small animal models. For oncology applications, cancer-targeted fluorescent markers can be used as a surrogate of the cancer activity. We are developing a continuous wave fDOT bench intended to be integrated in systems dedicated to whole body small animal fluorescence analyses. The focus is currently put on the reconstruction of non immersed small animals imaged by a CCD camera. The reconstruction stage already corrects the tissue heterogeneity artifacts through the computation of an optical heterogeneity map. We will show how this formalism coupled with the determination of the animal boundaries performed by a laser scanner, can be used to manage non contact acquisitions. The time of reconstruction for a 10 × 9 laser source positions, 45 × 40 detector elements and 14 × 11 × 14 mesh voxels is typically 10 minutes on a 3GHz PCs corresponding to the acquisition time allowing the two tasks to be performed in parallel. The system is validated on an in vivo experiment performed on three healthy nude mice and a mouse bearing a lung tumor at 10, 12 and 14 days after implantation allowing the follow up of the disease. The 3D fluorescence reconstructions of this mouse are presented and the total fluorescence amounts are compared.

  13. Assessing the inter- and intra-animal variability of in vivo OsteoProbe skeletal measures in untreated dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin M.B. McNerny

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The OsteoProbe is a second-generation reference point indentation (RPI device without a reference probe that is designed to simplify RPI testing for clinical use. Successful clinical implementation of the OsteoProbe would benefit from a better understanding of how its output, bone material strength index (BMSi, relates to the material properties of bone and under what conditions it reliably correlates with fracture risk. Large animal models have the potential to help fill this knowledge gap, as cadaveric studies are retrospective and limited by incomplete patient histories (including the potential use of bone matrix altering drugs such as bisphosphonates. The goal of this study was to assess the intra and inter-animal variability of OsteoProbe measures in untreated beagle dogs (n = 12, and to evaluate this variability in comparison to traditional mechanical testing. OsteoProbe measurements were performed in vivo on the left tibia of each dog and repeated 6 months later on the day of sacrifice. Within-animal variation of BMSi (CV of 5–10 indents averaged 8.9 and 9.0% at the first and second timepoints, respectively. In contrast, inter-animal variation of BMSi increased from 5.3% to 9.1%. The group variation of BMSi was on par with that of traditional 3-point mechanical testing; inter-animal variation was 10% for ultimate force, 13% for stiffness, and 12% for total work as measured on the femur. There was no significant change in mean BMSi after 6 months, but the individual change with time across the 12 dogs was highly variable, ranging from −12.4% to +21.7% (mean 1.6%, SD 10.6%. No significant correlations were found between in vivo tibia BMSi and femur mechanical properties measured by ex vivo 3-pt bending, but this may be a limitation of sample size or the tests being performed on different bones. No relationship was found between BMSi and tissue mineral density, but a strong positive correlation was found between BMSi and tibia

  14. A Comparison of Red Fluorescent Proteins to Model DNA Vaccine Expression by Whole Animal In Vivo Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinnear, Ekaterina; Caproni, Lisa J; Tregoning, John S

    2015-01-01

    DNA vaccines can be manufactured cheaply, easily and rapidly and have performed well in pre-clinical animal studies. However, clinical trials have so far been disappointing, failing to evoke a strong immune response, possibly due to poor antigen expression. To improve antigen expression, improved technology to monitor DNA vaccine transfection efficiency is required. In the current study, we compared plasmid encoded tdTomato, mCherry, Katushka, tdKatushka2 and luciferase as reporter proteins for whole animal in vivo imaging. The intramuscular, subcutaneous and tattooing routes were compared and electroporation was used to enhance expression. We observed that overall, fluorescent proteins were not a good tool to assess expression from DNA plasmids, with a highly heterogeneous response between animals. Of the proteins used, intramuscular delivery of DNA encoding either tdTomato or luciferase gave the clearest signal, with some Katushka and tdKatushka2 signal observed. Subcutaneous delivery was weakly visible and nothing was observed following DNA tattooing. DNA encoding haemagglutinin was used to determine whether immune responses mirrored visible expression levels. A protective immune response against H1N1 influenza was induced by all routes, even after a single dose of DNA, though qualitative differences were observed, with tattooing leading to high antibody responses and subcutaneous DNA leading to high CD8 responses. We conclude that of the reporter proteins used, expression from DNA plasmids can best be assessed using tdTomato or luciferase. But, the disconnect between visible expression level and immunogenicity suggests that in vivo whole animal imaging of fluorescent proteins has limited utility for predicting DNA vaccine efficacy.

  15. Micro-computed tomography newly developed for in vivo small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, Yoshinori; Ninomiya, Tadashi; Kato, Takafumi; Masuda, Yuji

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report a newly developed micro-computed tomography system for in vivo use. The system was composed of a micro-focus X-ray tube and an image intensifier (I.I.), both of which rotated around the object stage. A guinea pig and a rat were examined. The anesthetized animal was set on the secure object stage. Images of the head of the guinea pig and the tibia knee joint of the rat were taken. In addition, an image of the rat's tail was taken. The reconstruction and the image viewing were carried out using I-View software. The voxel matrix was 512 x 512 x 384. The voxel sizes ranged from 10 x 10 x 10 μm to 100 x 100 x 100 μm. The exposure time was 17 s, and the reconstruction time was 150 s. The head of the guinea pig and the tibia/knee joint of the rat were observed clearly under 100-μm and 30μm voxels, respectively. The trabecular bone of the tail was also observed clearly under a 10 μm voxel. The newly developed micro-computed tomography system makes it possible to obtain images of anesthetized animals set on a secure object stage. Clear bone images of the small animals could be obtained within a short time. (author)

  16. Understanding in vivo modelling of depression in non-human animals: a systematic review protocol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannach-Brown, Alexandra; Liao, Jing; Wegener, Gregers

    2016-01-01

    experimental model(s) to induce or mimic a depressive-like phenotype. Data that will be extracted include the model or method of induction; species and gender of the animals used; the behavioural, anatomical, electrophysiological, neurochemical or genetic outcome measure(s) used; risk of bias......The aim of this study is to systematically collect all published preclinical non-human animal literature on depression to provide an unbiased overview of existing knowledge. A systematic search will be carried out in PubMed and Embase. Studies will be included if they use non-human animal......-analysis of the preclinical studies modelling depression-like behaviours and phenotypes in animals....

  17. Human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen extrapolated from in vivo animal pharmacokinetics using in vitro human hepatic clearances and simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling for radio-labeled microdose clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Kunikane, Eriko; Nishiyama, Sayako; Murayama, Norie; Shimizu, Makiko; Sugiyama, Yuichi; Chiba, Koji; Ikeda, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the current study was to extrapolate the pharmacokinetics of drug substances orally administered in humans from rat pharmacokinetic data using tolbutamide and acetaminophen as model compounds. Adjusted animal biomonitoring equivalents from rat studies based on reported plasma concentrations were scaled to human biomonitoring equivalents using known species allometric scaling factors. In this extrapolation, in vitro metabolic clearance data were obtained using liver preparations. Rates of tolbutamide elimination were roughly similar in rat and human liver microsome experiments, but acetaminophen elimination by rat liver microsomes and cytosolic preparations showed a tendency to be faster than those in humans. Using a simple physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model, estimated human plasma concentrations of tolbutamide and acetaminophen were consistent with reported concentrations. Tolbutamide cleared in a roughly similar manner in humans and rats, but medical-dose levels of acetaminophen cleared (dependent on liver metabolism) more slowly from plasma in humans than it did in rats. The data presented here illustrate how pharmacokinetic data in combination with a simple PBPK model can be used to assist evaluations of the pharmacological/toxicological potential of new drug substances and for estimating human radiation exposures from radio-labeled drugs when planning human studies. (author)

  18. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented

  19. In vivo studies of opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Duelfer, T.; Burns, H.D.; Ravert, H.T.; Langstroem, B.; Balasubramanian, V.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1984-01-01

    To study opiate receptors noninvasively in vivo using positron emission tomography, techniques for preferentially labeling opiate receptors in vivo can be used. The rate at which receptor-bound ligand clears from the brain in vivo can be predicted by measuring the equilibrium dissociation constant (KD) at 37 degrees C in the presence of 100 mM sodium chloride and 100 microM guanyl-5'-imidodiphosphate, the drug distribution coefficient, and the molecular weight. A suitable ligand for labeling opiate receptors in vivo is diprenorphine, which binds to mu, delta, and kappa receptors with approximately equal affinity in vitro. However, in vivo diprenorphine may bind predominantly to one opiate receptor subtype, possibly the mu receptor. To predict the affinity for binding to the opiate receptor, a Hansch correlation was determined between the 50% inhibitory concentration for a series of halogen-substituted fentanyl analogs and electronic, lipophilic, and steric parameters. Radiochemical methods for the synthesis of carbon-11-labeled diprenorphine and lofentanil are presented.

  20. Nanotoxicity: the growing need for in vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Hans C; Chan, Warren C W

    2007-12-01

    Nanotoxicology is emerging as an important subdiscipline of nanotechnology. Nanotoxicology refers to the study of the interactions of nanostructures with biological systems with an emphasis on elucidating the relationship between the physical and chemical properties (e.g. size, shape, surface chemistry, composition, and aggregation) of nanostructures with induction of toxic biological responses. In the past five years, a majority of nanotoxicity research has focused on cell culture systems; however, the data from these studies could be misleading and will require verification from animal experiments. In vivo systems are extremely complicated and the interactions of the nanostructures with biological components, such as proteins and cells, could lead to unique biodistribution, clearance, immune response, and metabolism. An understanding of the relationship between the physical and chemical properties of the nanostructure and their in vivo behavior would provide a basis for assessing toxic response and more importantly could lead to predictive models for assessing toxicity. In this review article, we describe the assumptions and challenges in the nanotoxicity field and provide a rationale for in vivo animal studies to assess nanotoxicity.

  1. Senescent changes in the ribosomes of animal cells in vivo and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miquel, J.; Johnson, J. E., Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The paper examines RNA-ribosomal changes observed in protozoa and fixed postmitotic cells, as well as the characteristics of intermitotic cells. Attention is given to a discussion of the implications of the reported ribosomal changes as to the senescent deterioration of protein synthesis and physiological functions. A survey of the literature suggests that, while the data on ribosomal change in dividing cells both in vivo and in vitro are inconclusive, there is strong histological and biochemical evidence in favor of some degree of quantitative ribosomal loss in fixed postmitotic cells. Since these decreases in ribosomes are demonstrated in differential cells from nematodes, insects and mammals, they may represent a universal manifestation of cytoplasmic senescence in certain types of fixed postmitotic animal cells. The observed variability in ribosomal loss for cells belonging to the same type suggests that this involution phenomenon is rather related to the wear and tear suffered by a particular cell.

  2. Bias During the Evaluation of Animal Studies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Knight

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available My recent book entitled The Costs and Benefits of Animal Experiments seeks to answer a key question within animal ethics, namely: is animal experimentation ethically justifiable? Or, more precisely, is it justifiable within the utilitarian cost:benefit framework that fundamentally underpins most regulations governing animal experimentation? To answer this question I reviewed more than 500 scientific publications describing animal studies, animal welfare impacts, and alternative research, toxicity testing and educational methodologies. To minimise bias I focused primarily on large-scale systematic reviews that had examined the human clinical and toxicological utility of animal studies. Despite this, Dr. Susanne Prankel recently reviewed my book in this journal, essentially accusing me of bias. However, she failed to provide any substantive evidence to refute my conclusions, let alone evidence of similar weight to that on which they are based. Those conclusions are, in fact, firmly based on utilitarian ethical reasoning, informed by scientific evidence of considerable strength, and I believe they are robust.

  3. Novel antiseptic compound OPB-2045G shows potent bactericidal activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus both in vitro and in vivo: a pilot study in animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yasuhide; Hagi, Akifumi; Nii, Takuya; Tsubotani, Yoshie; Nakata, Hikaru; Iwata, Koushi

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for new compounds to effectively treat methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE). The novel monobiguanide compound 1-(3,4-dichlorobenzyl)-5-octylbiguanide gluconate (OPB-2045G) has potential bactericidal activity. We sought to elucidate the potency of OPB-2045G bactericidal activity against MRSA and VRE compared to those of chlorhexidine digluconate (CHG) and povidone iodine (PVP-I). In vitro bactericidal activity was analysed using minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) as the index. The in vivo bactericidal efficacy of OPB-2045G was examined by determining MRSA and VRE contamination of the normal dorsal skin of mice following removal of hair. After a 3 min treatment period, the MBC of OPB-2045G was lower than that of CHG and PVP-I against standard strains and clinical isolates. Additionally, in our in vivo mouse model, the in vivo bactericidal activity of 1.5 % OPB-2045G (a clinically relevant dose) was higher than that of 0.5 % CHG and equivalent to that of 10 % PVP-I against MRSA. Similarly, the in vivo bactericidal activity of OPB-2045G was higher than that of 0.5 % CHG and 10 % PVP-I against VRE. OPB-2045G showed more potent bactericidal activity against MRSA and VRE both in vitro and in vivo compared to CHG and PVP-I, indicating that OPB-2045G may provide better protection against health care-associated infections caused by these pathogens. © 2015 The Authors.

  4. Endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging: in vivo small animal tumor model validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Hu, Zhenhua; Wang, Kun; Liu, Xia; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Background: Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) provides a great potential for clinical translation of optical molecular imaging techniques through using clinical approved radiotracers. However, it is difficult to obtain the Cerenkov luminescence signal of deeper biological tissues due to the small magnitude of the signal. To efficiently acquire the weak Cerenkov luminescence, we developed an endoscopic Cerenkov luminescence imaging (ECLI) system to reduce the in vivo imaging depth with minimum invasion, and validated the system on small animal tumor models. Methods: For the ECLI system, the laparoscope was connected to a high sensitive charge-couple device (CCD) camera (DU888+, Andor, UK) by a custom made adapter. We conducted a series of in vitro and in vivo experiments by use of the system. In the in vitro experiment, the endoscopic luminescence images of the 18F-FDG with various activities in EP tubes were acquired using ECLI system, and the sensitivity was compared with conventional CLI system. In the in vivo tumor experiment, 18F-FDG with the activity of 200μCi were intravenously injected into 3 tumor mice. Then the ECLI system was used to acquire the optical images for both non-invasive and invasive conditions. Conclusion: Experimental data showed the ECLI system could detect the 18F-FDG with the activity as low as 1μCi. Furthermore, our preliminary results indicated the possibility of ECLI technique for detecting Cerenkov signals inside the tumor tissue with deeper depth and guiding the surgical operation of tumor excision. We believe that this technique can help to accelerate the clinical translation of CLI.

  5. The ''in vivo'' distribution of carbon 11 labeled-nicotine in animals. A method suitable for use in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziere, M.; Berger, G.; Plummer, D.; Comar, D.; Masse, R.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described to label nicotine with carbon 11. A hundred millicuries can be obtained, in 45 minutes, with a high specific activity. This labeling of nicotine has allowed an ''in vivo'' study of the distribution of this very toxic drug in animals. Five minutes after injection in rabbits or monkeys, it was shown with a gamma camera or with a positron camera that the radioactivity was very rapidly distributed throughout the tissues especially in brain, lungs and kidneys. 11 C-nicotine readily penetrates the blood-brain barrier and the brain radioactivity decreases very sharply with time. The eyes however retained activity, possibly in the retina. Unfortunately the monkey is not the ideal subject for 11 C-nicotine brain study because: the brain is small, considering the resolution of the cameras and the cerebral lobes are also quite overlaped in this animal; Japanese authors have shown that compared with dogs the nicotine brain uptake is lower, due to the high affinity of nicotine for skeletal muscle which occupies approximately forty to fifty % of the body weight of the monkey. Also in monkeys, the nicotine destruction is faster than in dogs because there is a higher enzyme nicotine metabolizing activity in the liver of this animal. The differences observed between various animals studies using nicotine indicate that we should not draw any firm conclusions about the behaviour of this drug in humans. In order to do so, examinations must be conducted in man and the method described in spite of its limitations provides a means for such a study

  6. The clinical utility of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy: recent in vitro, in vivo animal and clinical observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blackstock, A. William; Kwock, Lester; Mukherji, Suresh K.; Schiro, Sharon; Tepper, Joel E.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Combined radiation and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) has resulted in improved outcomes in patients treated with gastrointestinal malignancies and squamous cancers of the head and neck. In our first aim, we proposed that the enhanced cell kill and tumor regression observed with the combination of 5-FU and radiation is related to radiation potentiating the anti-tumor effects of 5-FU. Using fluorine-19 ( 19 F) nuclear magnetic resonance (nmr) we non-invasively determined the tumor clearance rates of 5-FU +/- radiation in an animal model and used this research tool to predict tumor response in patients receiving concurrent radiation and 5-FU therapy. Our second aim was to evaluate the use of proton ( 1 H) nmr spectroscopy to non-invasively determine the spectral characteristics of malignant tumors in the head and neck and liver and correlate these clinical observations with in vitro and in vivo data. Materials and Methods: 1 H and 19 F spectroscopic analysis were performed with a 2.0T Otsuka magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy system. 1 H nmr patient studies were done on a clinical 1.5T Philips MR system. In vitro magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) studies were performed on a 11 T Bruker nmr system. Animal experiments for the 19 F nmr studies were performed on 3-6 week old female (Nu/Nu) athymic nude mice. Animals were injected s.c. with 10 6 human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29) cells. At a tumor size of 1.0 cm, animals in the first group received i.v. 5-FU (100 mg/kg) immediately prior to spectroscopic analysis. Animals in the second group were treated with a single radiation dose of either 2 Gy or 10 Gy just prior to the 5-FU injection and subsequent spectroscopy. Spectroscopic analyses were performed at 20-30 minute intervals for 4-6 hr's. Results: 19 F nmr: A decrease in tumor clearance was observed in tumors pre-treated with a single dose of irradiation (2.0 Gy and 10 Gy). The clearance rate of the 5-FU for non-irradiated animals was 0.0178 min

  7. The effect of radiofrequency ablation on different organs: Ex vivo and in vivo comparative studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yoo Na [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Rhim, Hyunchul, E-mail: rhimhc@skku.edu [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Dongil; Kim, Young-sun; Lee, Min Woo; Chang, Ilsoo; Lee, Won Jae; Lim, Hyo K. [Department of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, 50 Ilwon-dong, Kangnam-Ku, Seoul 135-710 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: The purposes of this study are to evaluate the ex vivo and in vivo efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) on different porcine tissues by the ablation of three different sites simultaneously. Materials and methods: A multichannel RFA system, enables three separate tumors to be ablated simultaneously, was used. RFA procedures were applied to normal porcine liver, kidney, and muscle together ex vivo (n = 12) and in vivo (n = 17). Pre-impedances, defined as baseline systemic impedances of tissues before beginning RFA, and the areas of ablation zones were measured and compared. Results: The areas of ablation zones among three organs had a significant difference in decreasing order as follows: liver, muscle, and kidney in the ex vivo study (p = 0.001); muscle, liver, and kidney in the in vivo study (p < 0.0001). The areas of ablation zones between ex vivo and in vivo had a significant difference in the liver and muscle (each p < 0.05). There was no significant correlation between the areas of ablation zones and pre-impedances in both studies. Conclusions: Renal RFA produced the smallest ablation zone in both in vivo and ex vivo studies. Muscular RFA demonstrated the largest ablation zone in the in vivo study, and hepatic RFA showed the largest ablation zone in the ex vivo study. This variability in the tissues should be considered for performing an optimized RFA for each organ site.

  8. Current status and future perspectives of in vivo small animal imaging using radiolabeled nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loudos, George; Kagadis, George C.; Psimadas, Dimitris

    2011-01-01

    Small animal molecular imaging is a rapidly expanding efficient tool to study biological processes non-invasively. The use of radiolabeled tracers provides non-destructive, imaging information, allowing time related phenomena to be repeatedly studied in a single animal. In the last decade there has been an enormous progress in related technologies and a number of dedicated imaging systems overcome the limitations that the size of small animal possesses. On the other hand, nanoparticles (NPs) gain increased interest, due to their unique properties, which make them perfect candidates for biological applications. Over the past 5 years the two fields seem to cross more and more often; radiolabeled NPs have been assessed in numerous pre-clinical studies that range from oncology, till HIV treatment. In this article the current status in the tools, applications and trends of radiolabeled NPs reviewed.

  9. Optimization and performance evaluation of the microPET II scanner for in vivo small-animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yongfeng; Tai Yuanchuan; Siegel, Stefan; Newport, Danny F; Bai, Bing; Li, Quanzheng; Leahy, Richard M; Cherry, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    MicroPET II is a newly developed PET (positron emission tomography) scanner designed for high-resolution imaging of small animals. It consists of 17 640 LSO crystals each measuring 0.975 x 0.975 x 12.5 mm 3 , which are arranged in 42 contiguous rings, with 420 crystals per ring. The scanner has an axial field of view (FOV) of 4.9 cm and a transaxial FOV of 8.5 cm. The purpose of this study was to carefully evaluate the performance of the system and to optimize settings for in vivo mouse and rat imaging studies. The volumetric image resolution was found to depend strongly on the reconstruction algorithm employed and averaged 1.1 mm (1.4 μl) across the central 3 cm of the transaxial FOV when using a statistical reconstruction algorithm with accurate system modelling. The sensitivity, scatter fraction and noise-equivalent count (NEC) rate for mouse- and rat-sized phantoms were measured for different energy and timing windows. Mouse imaging was optimized with a wide open energy window (150-750 keV) and a 10 ns timing window, leading to a sensitivity of 3.3% at the centre of the FOV and a peak NEC rate of 235 000 cps for a total activity of 80 MBq (2.2 mCi) in the phantom. Rat imaging, due to the higher scatter fraction, and the activity that lies outside of the field of view, achieved a maximum NEC rate of 24 600 cps for a total activity of 80 MBq (2.2 mCi) in the phantom, with an energy window of 250-750 keV and a 6 ns timing window. The sensitivity at the centre of the FOV for these settings is 2.1%. This work demonstrates that different scanner settings are necessary to optimize the NEC count rate for different-sized animals and different injected doses. Finally, phantom and in vivo animal studies are presented to demonstrate the capabilities of microPET II for small-animal imaging studies

  10. SU-E-T-481: In Vivo and Post Mortem Animal Irradiation: Measured Vs. Calculated Doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintz, P [Univ New Mexico Radiology Dept., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heintz, B [Texas Oncology, PA, Southlake, TX (United States); Sandoval, D [University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Weber, W; Melo, D; Guilmette, R [Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Computerized radiation therapy treatment planning is performed on almost all patients today. However it is seldom used for laboratory irradiations. The first objective is to assess whether modern radiation therapy treatment planning (RTP) systems accurately predict the subject dose by comparing in vivo and decedent dose measurements to calculated doses. The other objective is determine the importance of using a RTP system for laboratory irradiations. Methods: 5 MOSFET radiation dosimeters were placed enterically in each subject (2 sedated Rhesus Macaques) to measure the absorbed dose at 5 levels (carina, lung, heart, liver and rectum) during whole body irradiation. The subjects were treated with large opposed lateral fields and extended distances to cover the entire subject using a Varian 600C linac. CT simulation was performed ante-mortem (AM) and post-mortem (PM). To compare AM and PM doses, calculation points were placed at the location of each dosimeter in the treatment plan. The measured results were compared to the results using Varian Eclipse and Prowess Panther RTP systems. Results: The Varian and Prowess treatment planning system agreed to within in +1.5% for both subjects. However there were significant differences between the measured and calculated doses. For both animals the calculated central axis dose was higher than prescribed by 3–5%. This was caused in part by inaccurate measurement of animal thickness at the time of irradiation. For one subject the doses ranged from 4% to 7% high and the other subject the doses ranged 7% to 14% high when compared to the RTP doses. Conclusions: Our results suggest that using proper CT RTP system can more accurately deliver the prescribed dose to laboratory subjects. It also shows that there is significant dose variation in such subjects when inhomogeneities are not considered in the planning process.

  11. High resolution propagation-based imaging system for in vivo dynamic computed tomography of lungs in small animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preissner, M.; Murrie, R. P.; Pinar, I.; Werdiger, F.; Carnibella, R. P.; Zosky, G. R.; Fouras, A.; Dubsky, S.

    2018-04-01

    We have developed an x-ray imaging system for in vivo four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) of small animals for pre-clinical lung investigations. Our customized laboratory facility is capable of high resolution in vivo imaging at high frame rates. Characterization using phantoms demonstrate a spatial resolution of slightly below 50 μm at imaging rates of 30 Hz, and the ability to quantify material density differences of at least 3%. We benchmark our system against existing small animal pre-clinical CT scanners using a quality factor that combines spatial resolution, image noise, dose and scan time. In vivo 4DCT images obtained on our system demonstrate resolution of important features such as blood vessels and small airways, of which the smallest discernible were measured as 55–60 μm in cross section. Quantitative analysis of the images demonstrate regional differences in ventilation between injured and healthy lungs.

  12. 五种多孔生物陶瓷支架的肌肉植入实验研究%In vivo study of five porous bioceramic scaffolds implanted in animal muscle

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许宋锋; 王臻; 于秀淳; 王林; 林开利; 常江

    2012-01-01

    目的 观察多孔生物玻璃(Bioglass)、β-磷酸三钙(β-tricalcium phosphate,β-TCP)、羟基磷灰石(hydroxyapatite,HA)、β-硅酸钙(β-calcium silicate,β-CS)、α-硅酸钙(α-CS)五种生物陶瓷支架植入家兔肌肉的生物学表现.方法 应用添加造孔剂工艺烧结制备得到多孔Bioglass、β-TCP、HA、β-CS 和α-CS支架,通过X线衍射、孔隙率测定、生物力学测定进行特征分析.将五种支架植入家兔背部肌肉中,4、8、12、16周取材,通过X线、Micro-CT、组织学、扫描电镜和能谱分析进行观察分析,并取材与支架接触肌肉进行聚合酶链式反应(polymerase chain reaction,PCR)分析骨形态发生蛋白-2 (bone morpho-genetic protein-2,BMP-2)和BMP-7含量.结果 五种支架特征分析表明,抗压强度:Bioglass>α-CS>β-CS>β-TCP>HA;弹性模量:α-CS<β-TCP<HA<ββ-CS<Bioglass;降解性:β-CS>α-CS>β-TCP> Bioglass> HA.组织学观察五种支架中均未出现新生骨组织.Bioglass、α-CS、β-CS表面有钙磷层形成,说明具有体内生物活性.16周时,只有β-CS出现BMP-2和BMP-7表达.结论 多孔硅酸钙支架具有良好体内生物活性、可降解性,但无体内骨诱导性.%Objective To investigate the in vivo biological performance of 5 porous bioceramic scaffolds,which were bioglass,β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP),hydroxyapatite (HA),β-calcium silicate (β-CS) and α-CS,implanted in rabbit dorsal muscle.Methods The 5 porous bioceramic scaffolds were fabricated by adding pore-forming materials and sintering,and then were investigated by X-ray diffraction,porosity mensuration and biomechanics test.The scaffolds were implanted into rabbit dorsal muscle for 4,8,12,16 weeks,respectively.The samples were analyzed by X-ray,Micro-CT,histological analysis,scanning electron microscope (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS).The expression of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP-2) and BMP-7 in the muscle in touch with bioceramic

  13. Algorithm optimization for multitined radiofrequency ablation: comparative study in ex vivo and in vivo bovine liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Liat; Sosna, Jacob; Pearson, Robert; Perez, Sarah; Nissenbaum, Yizhak; Mertyna, Pawel; Libson, Eugene; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2010-02-01

    To prospectively optimize multistep algorithms for largest available multitined radiofrequency (RF) electrode system in ex vivo and in vivo tissues, to determine best energy parameters to achieve large predictable target sizes of coagulation, and to compare these algorithms with manufacturer's recommended algorithms. Institutional animal care and use committee approval was obtained for the in vivo portion of this study. Ablation (n = 473) was performed in ex vivo bovine liver; final tine extension was 5-7 cm. Variables in stepped-deployment RF algorithm were interrogated and included initial current ramping to 105 degrees C (1 degrees C/0.5-5.0 sec), the number of sequential tine extensions (2-7 cm), and duration of application (4-12 minutes) for final two to three tine extensions. Optimal parameters to achieve 5-7 cm of coagulation were compared with recommended algorithms. Optimal settings for 5- and 6-cm final tine extensions were confirmed in in vivo perfused bovine liver (n = 14). Multivariate analysis of variance and/or paired t tests were used. Mean RF ablation zones of 5.1 cm +/- 0.2 (standard deviation), 6.3 cm +/- 0.4, and 7 cm +/- 0.3 were achieved with 5-, 6-, and 7-cm final tine extensions in a mean of 19.5 min +/- 0.5, 27.9 min +/- 6, and 37.1 min +/- 2.3, respectively, at optimal settings. With these algorithms, size of ablation at 6- and 7-cm tine extension significantly increased from mean of 5.4 cm +/- 0.4 and 6.1 cm +/- 0.6 (manufacturer's algorithms) (P mean diameter in specified time: 5.5 cm +/- 0.4 in 18.5 min +/- 0.5 (5-cm extensions) and 5.7 cm +/- 0.2 in 21.2 min +/- 0.6 (6-cm extensions). Large zones of coagulation of 5-7 cm can be created with optimized RF algorithms that help reduce number of tine extensions compared with manufacturer's recommendations. Such algorithms are likely to facilitate the utility of these devices for RF ablation of focal tumors in clinical practice. (c) RSNA, 2010.

  14. Comparative In vivo, Ex vivo, and In vitro Toxicity Studies of Engineered Nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efforts to reduce the number of animals in engineered nanomaterials (ENM) toxicity testing have resulted in the development of numerous alternative toxicity testing methods, but in vivo and in vitro results are still evolving and variable. This inconsistency could be due to the f...

  15. Animal studies on growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerchl, Alexander

    2011-12-01

    Despite the fact that no plausible biological mechanism has yet been identified how electromagnetic fields below recommended exposure limits could negatively affect health of animals or humans, many experiments have been performed in various animal species, mainly mice and rats, to investigate the possible effects on growth and development. While older studies often suffered from sub-optimal exposure conditions, recent investigations, using sophisticated exposure devices and thus preventing thermal effects, have been performed without these limitations. In principle, two types of studies can be addressed: those which have investigated the carcinogenic or co-carcinogenic effects of exposure in developing animals, and those which have been done in developing animals without the focus on carcinogenic or co-carcinogenic effects. In both areas, the vast majority of publications did not show adverse effects. The largest study so far has been done in normal mice which have been chronically exposed to UMTS signals up to 1.3 W/kg SAR, thus 16 times higher than the whole-body exposure limit for humans. Even after four generations, no systematic or dose-dependent alterations in development or fertility could be found, supporting the view that negative effects on humans are very unlikely. Ongoing experiments in our laboratory investigate the effects of head-only exposure in rats (up to 10 W/kg local SAR) which are exposed from 14 days of age daily for 2 h. A battery of behavioral tests is performed in young, adult, and pre-senile animals. The results will help to clarify possible effects of exposure on brain development. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia: Linking Postmortem and In Vivo Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C.; Vinkers, Christiaan H.; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Marsman, Anouk

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) neurons contribute to the clinical features of schizophrenia. In vivo measurement of brain GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) offers the possibility to provide more insight into the relationship between problems in GABAergic neurotransmission and clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients. This study reviews and links alterations in the GABA system in postmortem studies, animal models, and human studies in schizophrenia. Converging evidence implicates alterations in both presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia, and GABA may thus play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. MRS studies can provide direct insight into the GABAergic mechanisms underlying the development of schizophrenia as well as changes during its course. PMID:28848455

  17. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia: Linking Postmortem and In Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeroen C. de Jonge

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic neurons contribute to the clinical features of schizophrenia. In vivo measurement of brain GABA levels using magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS offers the possibility to provide more insight into the relationship between problems in GABAergic neurotransmission and clinical symptoms of schizophrenia patients. This study reviews and links alterations in the GABA system in postmortem studies, animal models, and human studies in schizophrenia. Converging evidence implicates alterations in both presynaptic and postsynaptic components of GABAergic neurotransmission in schizophrenia, and GABA may thus play an important role in the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. MRS studies can provide direct insight into the GABAergic mechanisms underlying the development of schizophrenia as well as changes during its course.

  18. Why do we study animal toxins?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHANG, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Venom (toxins) is an important trait evolved along the evolutionary tree of animals. Our knowledges on venoms, such as their origins and loss, the biological relevance and the coevolutionary patterns with other organisms are greatly helpful in understanding many fundamental biological questions, i.e., the environmental adaptation and survival competition, the evolution shaped development and balance of venoms, and the sophisticated correlations among venom, immunity, body power, intelligence, their genetic basis, inherent association, as well as the cost-benefit and trade-offs of biological economy. Lethal animal envenomation can be found worldwide. However, from foe to friend, toxin studies have led lots of important discoveries and exciting avenues in deciphering and fighting human diseases, including the works awarded the Nobel Prize and lots of key clinic therapeutics. According to our survey, so far, only less than 0.1% of the toxins of the venomous animals in China have been explored. We emphasize on the similarities shared by venom and immune systems, as well as the studies of toxin knowledge-based physiological toxin-like proteins/peptides (TLPs). We propose the natural pairing hypothesis. Evolution links toxins with humans. Our mission is to find out the right natural pairings and interactions of our body elements with toxins, and with endogenous toxin-like molecules. Although, in nature, toxins may endanger human lives, but from a philosophical point of view, knowing them well is an effective way to better understand ourselves. So, this is why we study toxins. PMID:26228472

  19. Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound: An in vivo study

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Huizhong; Zhang, Ti; Yang, Xinmai

    2013-01-01

    Laser-enhanced cavitation during high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) was studied in vivo using a small animal model. Laser light was employed to illuminate the sample concurrently with HIFU radiation. The resulting cavitation was detected with a passive cavitation detector. The in vivo measurements were made under different combinations of HIFU treatment depths, laser wavelengths, and HIFU durations. The results demonstrated that concurrent light illumination during HIFU has the potentia...

  20. An animal model to study regenerative endodontics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torabinejad, Mahmoud; Corr, Robert; Buhrley, Matthew; Wright, Kenneth; Shabahang, Shahrokh

    2011-02-01

    A growing body of evidence is demonstrating the possibility for regeneration of tissues within the pulp space and continued root development in teeth with necrotic pulps and open apices. There are areas of research related to regenerative endodontics that need to be investigated in an animal model. The purpose of this study was to investigate ferret cuspid teeth as a model to investigate factors involved in regenerative endodontics. Six young male ferrets between the ages of 36-133 days were used in this investigation. Each animal was anesthetized and perfused with 10% buffered formalin. Block sections including the mandibular and maxillary cuspid teeth and their surrounding periapical tissues were obtained, radiographed, decalcified, sectioned, and stained with hematoxylin-eosin to determine various stages of apical closure in these teeth. The permanent mandibular and maxillary cuspid teeth with open apices erupted approximately 50 days after birth. Initial signs of closure of the apical foramen in these teeth were observed between 90-110 days. Complete apical closure was observed in the cuspid teeth when the animals were 133 days old. Based on the experiment, ferret cuspid teeth can be used to investigate various factors involved in regenerative endodontics that cannot be tested in human subjects. The most appropriate time to conduct the experiments would be when the ferrets are between the ages of 50 and 90 days. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Animal imaging studies of potential brain damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatley, S. J.; Vazquez, M. E.; Rice, O.

    To date, animal studies have not been able to predict the likelihood of problems in human neurological health due to HZE particle exposure during space missions outside the Earth's magnetosphere. In ongoing studies in mice, we have demonstrated that cocaine stimulated locomotor activity is reduced by a moderate dose (120 cGy) of 1 GeV 56Fe particles. We postulate that imaging experiments in animals may provide more sensitive and earlier indicators of damage due to HZE particles than behavioral tests. Since the small size of the mouse brain is not well suited to the spatial resolution offered by microPET, we are now repeating some of our studies in a rat model. We anticipate that this will enable us to identify imaging correlates of behavioral endpoints. A specific hypothesis of our studies is that changes in the metabolic rate for glucose in striatum of animals will be correlated with alterations in locomotor activity. We will also evaluate whether the neuroprotective drug L-deprenyl reduces the effect of radiation on locomotor activity. In addition, we will conduct microPET studies of brain monoamine oxidase A and monoamine oxidase B in rats before and at various times after irradiation with HZE particles. The hypothesis is that monoamine oxidase A, which is located in nerve terminals, will be unchanged or decreased after irradiation, while monoamine oxidase B, which is located in glial cells, will be increased after irradiation. Neurochemical effects that could be measured using PET could in principle be applied in astronauts, in terms of detecting and monitoring subtle neurological damage that might have occurred during long space missions. More speculative uses of PET are in screening candidates for prolonged space missions (for example, for adequate reserve in critical brain circuits) and in optimizing medications to treat impairments after missions.

  2. NMR studies of cerebral metabolism in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prichard, J.W.

    1986-01-01

    The nature and extent of the potential synergism between PET and NMR methods is not yet well appreciated in the biomedical community. The long-range interest of medical neurobiology will be well served by efforts of PET and NMR scientists to follow each others' work so that opportunities for productive interchange can be efficiently exploited. Appreciation of the synergism by the rest of the biomedical community will follow naturally. PET is said by the people doing it to be still in its infancy, for they are more concerned with advancing their discipline than with admiring its already impressive achievements. On the scale of the same developmental metaphor, many NMR methods for studying the living human brain are still in utero. The best way to provide the reader a sense of the current status and future course of NMR research in medical neurobiology is by discussion of published in vivo studies. Such a discussion, adapted from another article is what follows

  3. Animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P.; Howard, B.J.

    1997-01-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG)

  4. The 4-vessel Sampling Approach to Integrative Studies of Human Placental Physiology In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holme, Ane M; Holm, Maia B; Roland, Marie C P; Horne, Hildegunn; Michelsen, Trond M; Haugen, Guttorm; Henriksen, Tore

    2017-08-02

    The human placenta is highly inaccessible for research while still in utero. The current understanding of human placental physiology in vivo is therefore largely based on animal studies, despite the high diversity among species in placental anatomy, hemodynamics and duration of the pregnancy. The vast majority of human placenta studies are ex vivo perfusion studies or in vitro trophoblast studies. Although in vitro studies and animal models are essential, extrapolation of the results from such studies to the human placenta in vivo is uncertain. We aimed to study human placenta physiology in vivo at term, and present a detailed protocol of the method. Exploiting the intraabdominal access to the uterine vein just before the uterine incision during planned cesarean section, we collect blood samples from the incoming and outgoing vessels on the maternal and fetal sides of the placenta. When combining concentration measurements from blood samples with volume blood flow measurements, we are able to quantify placental and fetal uptake and release of any compound. Furthermore, placental tissue samples from the same mother-fetus pairs can provide measurements of transporter density and activity and other aspects of placental functions in vivo. Through this integrative use of the 4-vessel sampling method we are able to test some of the current concepts of placental nutrient transfer and metabolism in vivo, both in normal and pathological pregnancies. Furthermore, this method enables the identification of substances secreted by the placenta to the maternal circulation, which could be an important contribution to the search for biomarkers of placenta dysfunction.

  5. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of a new large animal spirometry device using mainstream CO2 flow sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrisko, T D; Lammer, V; Schramel, J P; Moens, Y P S

    2014-07-01

    A spirometry device equipped with mainstream CO2 flow sensor is not available for large animal anaesthesia. To measure the resistance of a new large animal spirometry device and assess its agreement with reference methods for volume measurements. In vitro experiment and crossover study using anaesthetised horses. A flow partitioning device (FPD) equipped with 4 human CO2 flow sensors was tested. Pressure differences were measured across the whole FPD and across each sensor separately using air flows (range: 90-720 l/min). One sensor was connected to a spirometry monitor for in vitro volume (3, 5 and 7 l) measurements. These measurements were compared with a reference method. Five anaesthetised horses were used for tidal volume (VT) measurements using the FPD and a horse-lite sensor (reference method). Bland-Altman analysis, ANOVA and linear regression analysis were used for data analysis. Pressure differences across each sensor were similar suggesting equal flow partitioning. The resistance of the device increased with flow (range: 0.3-1.5 cmH2 O s/l) and was higher than that of the horse-lite. The limits of agreement for volume measurements were within -1 and 2% in vitro and -12 and 0% in vivo. Nine of 147 VT measurements in horses were outside of the ± 10% limits of acceptance but most of these erroneous measurements occurred with VTs lower than 4 l. The determined correction factor for volume measurements was 3.97 ± 0.03. The limits of agreement for volume measurements by the new device were within ± 10% using clinically relevant range of volumes. The new spirometry device can be recommended for measurement of VT in adult Warmblood horses. © 2013 EVJ Ltd.

  6. In vivo studies of peritendinous tissue in exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, M; Langberg, Henning; Skovgaard, D

    2000-01-01

    Soft tissue injury of tendons represents a major problem within sports medicine. Although several animal and cell culture studies have addressed this, human experiments have been limited in their ability to follow changes in specific tissue directly in response to interventions. Recently, methods...... have allowed for in vivo determination of tissue concentrations and release rates of substances involved in metabolism, inflammation and collagen synthesis, together with the measurement of tissue blood flow and oxygenation in the peritendinous region around the Achilles tendon in humans during...... exercise. This coincides with a surprisingly marked drop in tissue pressure during contraction. With regards to both circulation, metabolism and collagen formation, peritendinous tissue represents a dynamic, responsive region that adapts markedly to acute muscular activity....

  7. Animator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Art and animation work is the most significant part of electronic game development, but is also found in television commercials, computer programs, the Internet, comic books, and in just about every visual media imaginable. It is the part of the project that makes an abstract design idea concrete and visible. Animators create the motion of life in…

  8. Animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skuterud, L.; Strand, P. [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway); Howard, B.J. [Inst. of Terrestrial Ecology (United Kingdom)

    1997-10-01

    The radionuclides of most concern with respect to contamination of animals after a nuclear accident are radioiodine, radiocaesium and radiostrontium (ICRP 30, 1979). Of the other significant anthropogenic radionuclides likely to be released in most accidents, only small proportions of that ingested will be absorbed in an animals gut, and the main animal products, milk and meat, will not normally be contaminated to a significant extent. Animal products will mostly be contaminated as a result of ingestion of contaminated feed and possibly, but to a much lesser extent, from inhalation (for radioiodine only). Direct external contamination of animals is of little or no consequence in human food production. Radioiodine and radiostrontium are important with respect to contamination of milk; radiocaesium contaminates both milk and meat. The physical and chemical form of a radionuclide can influence its absorption in the animal gut. For example, following the Chernobyl accident radiocaesium incorporated into vegetation by root uptake was more readily absorbed than that associated with the original deposit. The transfer of radiocaesium and radiostrontium to animals will be presented both as transfer coefficients and aggregated transfer coefficients. For most animal meat products, only radiocaesium is important as other radionuclides do not significantly contaminate muscle. Farm animal products are the most important foodstuff determining radiocaesium intake by the average consumer in the Nordic countries. The major potential source of radioiodine and radiostrontium to humans is milk and milk products. Of the different species, the smaller animals have the highest transfer of radiocaesium from fodder to meat and milk. (EG). 68 refs.

  9. In vivo genome editing in animals using AAV-CRISPR system: applications to translational research of human disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Cia-Hin; Suh, Yousin

    2017-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has shown promising therapeutic efficacy with a good safety profile in a wide range of animal models and human clinical trials. With the advent of clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-based genome-editing technologies, AAV provides one of the most suitable viral vectors to package, deliver, and express CRISPR components for targeted gene editing. Recent discoveries of smaller Cas9 orthologues have enabled the packaging of Cas9 nuclease and its chimeric guide RNA into a single AAV delivery vehicle for robust in vivo genome editing. Here, we discuss how the combined use of small Cas9 orthologues, tissue-specific minimal promoters, AAV serotypes, and different routes of administration has advanced the development of efficient and precise in vivo genome editing and comprehensively review the various AAV-CRISPR systems that have been effectively used in animals. We then discuss the clinical implications and potential strategies to overcome off-target effects, immunogenicity, and toxicity associated with CRISPR components and AAV delivery vehicles. Finally, we discuss ongoing non-viral-based ex vivo gene therapy clinical trials to underscore the current challenges and future prospects of CRISPR/Cas9 delivery for human therapeutics. PMID:29333255

  10. Validity of bioluminescence measurements for noninvasive in vivo imaging of tumor load in small animals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerk, Clara P. W.; Overmeer, Renée M.; Niers, Tatjana M. H.; Versteeg, Henri H.; Richel, Dick J.; Buckle, Tessa; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; van Tellingen, Olaf

    2007-01-01

    A relatively new strategy to longitudinally monitor tumor load in intact animals and the effects of therapy is noninvasive bioluminescence imaging (BLI). The validity of BLI for quantitative assessment of tumor load in small animals is critically evaluated in the present review. Cancer cells are

  11. Animal in vivo models of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative diseases: special references to rabbit models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, K; Teramoto, N; Akagi, T

    2002-10-01

    Animal models of human EBV-associated diseases are essential to elucidate the pathogenesis of EBV-associated diseases. Here we review those previous models using EBV or EBV-like herpesviruses and describe the details on our two newly-developed rabbit models of lymphoproliferative diseases (LPD) induced by simian EBV-like viruses. The first is Cynomolgus-EBV-induced T-cell lymphomas in rabbits inoculated intravenously (77-90%) and orally (82-89%) during 2-5 months. EBV-DNA was detected in peripheral blood by PCR from 2 days after oral inoculation, while anti-EBV-VCA IgG was raised 3 weeks later. Rabbit lymphomas and their cell lines contained EBV-DNA and expressed EBV-encoded RNA-1 (EBER-1). Rabbit lymphoma cell lines, most of which have specific chromosomal abnormality, showed tumorigenicity in nude mice. The second is the first animal model for EBV-infected T-cell LPD with virus-associated hemophagocytic syndrome (VAHS), using rabbits infected with an EBV-like herpesvirus, Herpesvirus papio (HVP). Rabbits inoculated intravenously with HVP-producing cells showed increased anti-EBV-VCA-IgG titers, and most (85%) subsequently died of fatal LPD and VAHS, with bleeding and hepatosplenomegaly, during 22-105 days. Peroral spray of cell-free HVP induced viral infection with seroconversion in 3 out of 5 rabbits, with 2 of the 3 infected rabbits dying of LPD with VAHS. Atypical T lymphocytes containing HVP-DNA and expressing EBER-1 were observed in many organs. Hemophagocytic histiocytosis was observed in the lymph nodes, spleen, bone marrow, and thymus. These rabbit models are also useful and inexpensive alternative experimental model systems for studying the biology and pathogenesis of EBV, and prophylactic and therapeutic regimens.

  12. Cannabidiol Does Not Convert to Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol in an In Vivo Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Wray, Louise; Stott, Colin; Jones, Nicholas; Wright, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Cannabidiol (CBD) can convert to Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in vitro with prolonged exposure to simulated gastric fluid; however, in vitro conditions may not be representative of the in vivo gut environment. Using the minipig, we investigated whether enteral CBD converts to THC in vivo. Materials and Methods: Synthetic CBD (100 mg/mL) was administered orally in a sesame oil formulation twice daily to minipigs (N=3) in 15 mg/kg doses for 5 consecutive days. Blood samp...

  13. In vivo analysis of tissue by Raman microprobe: examination of human skin lesions and esophagus Barrett's mucosa on an animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Derancourt, Sylvie; Cadiot, Guillaume; Diebold, Marie D.; Bernard, Philippe; Manfait, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last few years, Raman spectroscopy has been increasingly used for the characterization of normal and pathological tissues. A new Raman system, constituted of optic fibers bundle coupled to an axial Raman spectrometer (Horiba Jobin Yvon SAS), was developed for in vivo investigations. Here, we present in vivo analysis on two tissues: human skin and esophagus mucosa on a rat model. The skin is a directly accessible organ, representing a high diversity of lesions and cancers. Including malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma, skin cancer is the cancer with the highest incidence worldwide. Several Raman investigations were performed to discriminate and classify different types of skin lesions, on thin sections of biopsies. Here, we try to characterize in vivo the different types of skin cancers in order to be able to detect them in their early stages of development and to define precisely the exeresis limits. Barrett's mucosa was also studied by in vivo examination of rat's esophagus. Barrett's mucosa, induced by gastro-esophageal reflux, is a pretumoral state that has to be carefully monitored due to its high risk of evolution in adenocarcinoma. A better knowledge of the histological transformation of esophagus epithelium in a Barrett's type will lead to a more efficient detection of the pathology for its early diagnosis. To study these changes, an animal model (rats developing Barrett's mucosa after duodenum - esophagus anastomosis) was used. Potential of vibrational spectroscopy for Barrett's mucosa identification is assessed on this model.

  14. SIC, an intracerebral radiosensitive probe for in vivo neuropharmacology investigations in small laboratory animals: theoretical considerations and practical characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, F.; Laniece, P.; Mastrippolito, R.; Charon, Y.; Comar, D.; Leviel, V.; Pujol, J. F.; Valentin, L.

    2000-02-01

    Although high-resolution tomographs provide a new approach that strongly simplifies the measurement of in vivo tracer biodistribution and kinetics in small animals, they suffer from an important drawback: the need for animal anesthesia or immobilization, which restricts the neurophysiological investigations. Furthermore, quantitative in vivo experiments realized on the brain sometimes only require a simple measurement of the radioactivity achieved on a few local points and do not necessarily imply the use of a tomograph, which is a detector of high cost. These constraints led the authors to develop an interacerebral /spl beta/ sensitive probe, sonde intracerebrate (SIC) (French acronym of intracerebral probe) that will allow chronic measurements of the neurophysiological activity in awake and unrestrained small animals. The volume to which the probe is sensitive and the noise contributions to the relevant signal have been evaluated through Monte Carlo simulations. Characterizations of a first prototype based on a small piece of scintillating fiber (500-/spl mu/m diameter and 1-mm length) fused to a same diameter optical fiber coupled in turn to a photomultiplier are also presented. A first configuration of the detector is finally proposed.

  15. Novel In Vitro/Ex Vivo Animal Modeling for Filovirus Aerosol Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Infection PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ayesha Mahmood, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Sanofi Pasteur VaxDesign Corporation...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT Sanofi Pasteur VaxDesign Corporation Orlando, Florida, 32826 9...a collaborative research effort between the USAMRIID Labs and Sanofi Pasteur VaxDesign to develop in vitro and ex vivo viral disease model systems

  16. Evaluation of in vivo biocompatibility of different devices for interventional closure of the patent ductus arteriosus in an animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Sigler, M; Handt, S; Seghaye, M; von Bernuth, G; Grabitz, R

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate the in vivo biocompatibility of three different devices following interventional closure of a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in an animal model.
MATERIALS AND METHODS—A medical grade stainless steel coil (n = 8), a nickel/titanium coil (n = 10), and a polyvinylalcohol foam plug knitted on a titanium wire frame (n = 11) were used for interventional closure of PDA in a neonatal lamb model. The PDA had been maintained by repetitive angioplasty. Between one and 278 days afte...

  17. Preliminary study for small animal preclinical hadrontherapy facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Russo, G. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, IBFM CNR-LATO, Cefalú (Italy); Pisciotta, P., E-mail: pietro.pisciotta@ibfm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, IBFM CNR-LATO, Cefalú (Italy); National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Cirrone, G.A.P.; Romano, F. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy); Cammarata, F.; Marchese, V.; Forte, G.I.; Lamia, D.; Minafra, L.; Bravatá, V. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, IBFM CNR-LATO, Cefalú (Italy); Acquaviva, R. [University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Gilardi, M.C. [Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, IBFM CNR-LATO, Cefalú (Italy); Cuttone, G. [National Institute for Nuclear Physics, Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, INFN-LNS, Catania (Italy)

    2017-02-21

    Aim of this work is the study of the preliminary steps to perform a particle treatment of cancer cells inoculated in small animals and to realize a preclinical hadrontherapy facility. A well-defined dosimetric protocol was developed to explicate the steps needed in order to perform a precise proton irradiation in small animals and achieve a highly conformal dose into the target. A precise homemade positioning and holding system for small animals was designed and developed at INFN-LNS in Catania (Italy), where an accurate Monte Carlo simulation was developed, using Geant4 code to simulate the treatment in order to choose the best animal position and perform accurately all the necessary dosimetric evaluations. The Geant4 application can also be used to realize dosimetric studies and its peculiarity consists in the possibility to introduce the real target composition in the simulation using the DICOM micro-CT image. This application was fully validated comparing the results with the experimental measurements. The latter ones were performed at the CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) facility at INFN-LNS by irradiating both PMMA and water solid phantom. Dosimetric measurements were performed using previously calibrated EBT3 Gafchromic films as a detector and the results were compared with the Geant4 simulation ones. In particular, two different types of dosimetric studies were performed: the first one involved irradiation of a phantom made up of water solid slabs where a layer of EBT3 was alternated with two different slabs in a sandwich configuration, in order to validate the dosimetric distribution. The second one involved irradiation of a PMMA phantom made up of a half hemisphere and some PMMA slabs in order to simulate a subcutaneous tumour configuration, normally used in preclinical studies. In order to evaluate the accordance between experimental and simulation results, two different statistical tests were made: Kolmogorov test and

  18. Preliminary study for small animal preclinical hadrontherapy facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Romano, F.; Cammarata, F.; Marchese, V.; Forte, G. I.; Lamia, D.; Minafra, L.; Bravatá, V.; Acquaviva, R.; Gilardi, M. C.; Cuttone, G.

    2017-02-01

    Aim of this work is the study of the preliminary steps to perform a particle treatment of cancer cells inoculated in small animals and to realize a preclinical hadrontherapy facility. A well-defined dosimetric protocol was developed to explicate the steps needed in order to perform a precise proton irradiation in small animals and achieve a highly conformal dose into the target. A precise homemade positioning and holding system for small animals was designed and developed at INFN-LNS in Catania (Italy), where an accurate Monte Carlo simulation was developed, using Geant4 code to simulate the treatment in order to choose the best animal position and perform accurately all the necessary dosimetric evaluations. The Geant4 application can also be used to realize dosimetric studies and its peculiarity consists in the possibility to introduce the real target composition in the simulation using the DICOM micro-CT image. This application was fully validated comparing the results with the experimental measurements. The latter ones were performed at the CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) facility at INFN-LNS by irradiating both PMMA and water solid phantom. Dosimetric measurements were performed using previously calibrated EBT3 Gafchromic films as a detector and the results were compared with the Geant4 simulation ones. In particular, two different types of dosimetric studies were performed: the first one involved irradiation of a phantom made up of water solid slabs where a layer of EBT3 was alternated with two different slabs in a sandwich configuration, in order to validate the dosimetric distribution. The second one involved irradiation of a PMMA phantom made up of a half hemisphere and some PMMA slabs in order to simulate a subcutaneous tumour configuration, normally used in preclinical studies. In order to evaluate the accordance between experimental and simulation results, two different statistical tests were made: Kolmogorov test and

  19. Preliminary study for small animal preclinical hadrontherapy facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russo, G.; Pisciotta, P.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Romano, F.; Cammarata, F.; Marchese, V.; Forte, G.I.; Lamia, D.; Minafra, L.; Bravatá, V.; Acquaviva, R.; Gilardi, M.C.; Cuttone, G.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this work is the study of the preliminary steps to perform a particle treatment of cancer cells inoculated in small animals and to realize a preclinical hadrontherapy facility. A well-defined dosimetric protocol was developed to explicate the steps needed in order to perform a precise proton irradiation in small animals and achieve a highly conformal dose into the target. A precise homemade positioning and holding system for small animals was designed and developed at INFN-LNS in Catania (Italy), where an accurate Monte Carlo simulation was developed, using Geant4 code to simulate the treatment in order to choose the best animal position and perform accurately all the necessary dosimetric evaluations. The Geant4 application can also be used to realize dosimetric studies and its peculiarity consists in the possibility to introduce the real target composition in the simulation using the DICOM micro-CT image. This application was fully validated comparing the results with the experimental measurements. The latter ones were performed at the CATANA (Centro di AdroTerapia e Applicazioni Nucleari Avanzate) facility at INFN-LNS by irradiating both PMMA and water solid phantom. Dosimetric measurements were performed using previously calibrated EBT3 Gafchromic films as a detector and the results were compared with the Geant4 simulation ones. In particular, two different types of dosimetric studies were performed: the first one involved irradiation of a phantom made up of water solid slabs where a layer of EBT3 was alternated with two different slabs in a sandwich configuration, in order to validate the dosimetric distribution. The second one involved irradiation of a PMMA phantom made up of a half hemisphere and some PMMA slabs in order to simulate a subcutaneous tumour configuration, normally used in preclinical studies. In order to evaluate the accordance between experimental and simulation results, two different statistical tests were made: Kolmogorov test and

  20. STRESS RESPONSE STUDIES USING ANIMAL MODELS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation will provide the evidence that ozone exposure in animal models induce neuroendocrine stress response and this stress response modulates lung injury and inflammation through adrenergic and glucocorticoid receptors.

  1. Quantitation of dopamine transporter blockade by methylphenidate: first in vivo investigation using [123I]FP-CIT and a dedicated small animal SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Arkian, Shahram; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Larisch, Rolf; Schramm, Nils

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter binding after treatment with methylphenidate in the rat using a recently developed high-resolution small animal single-photon emission computed tomograph (TierSPECT) and [ 123 I]FP-CIT. [ 123 I]FP-CIT was administered intravenously 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Animals underwent scanning 2 h after radioligand administration. The striatum was identified by superimposition of [ 123 I]FP-CIT scans with bone metabolism and perfusion scans obtained with 99m Tc-DPD and 99m Tc-tetrofosmin, respectively. As these tracers do not pass the blood-brain barrier, their distribution permits the identification of extracerebral anatomical landmarks such as the orbitae and the harderian glands. The cerebellum was identified by superimposing [ 123 I]FP-CIT scans with images of brain perfusion obtained with 99m Tc-HMPAO. Methylphenidate-treated animals and vehicle-treated animals yielded striatal equilibrium ratios (V '' 3 ) of 0.24±0.26 (mean ± SD) and 1.09±0.42, respectively (ttest, two-tailed, p '' 3 values amounted to 0.05±0.28 (methylphenidate) and 0.3±0.39 (saline, p=0.176). This first in vivo study of rat dopamine transporter binding after pre-treatment with methylphenidate showed a mean reduction of 78% in striatal [ 123 I]FP-CIT accumulation. The results can be interpreted in terms of a pharmacological blockade in the rat striatum and show that in vivo quantitation of dopamine transporter binding is feasible with [ 123 I]FP-CIT and the TierSPECT. This may be of future relevance for in vivo investigations on rat models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Furthermore, our findings suggest that investigations in other animal models, e.g. of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, may be feasible using SPECT radioligands and small animal imaging systems. (orig.)

  2. Quantitation of dopamine transporter blockade by methylphenidate: first in vivo investigation using [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and a dedicated small animal SPECT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaus, Susanne; Wirrwar, Andreas; Antke, Christina; Arkian, Shahram; Mueller, Hans-Wilhelm; Larisch, Rolf [Heinrich-Heine University, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Duesseldorf (Germany); Schramm, Nils [Research Center Juelich, Central Laboratory for Electronics, Juelich (Germany)

    2005-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of assessing dopamine transporter binding after treatment with methylphenidate in the rat using a recently developed high-resolution small animal single-photon emission computed tomograph (TierSPECT) and [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT. [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT was administered intravenously 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of methylphenidate (10 mg/kg) or vehicle. Animals underwent scanning 2 h after radioligand administration. The striatum was identified by superimposition of [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with bone metabolism and perfusion scans obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-DPD and {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin, respectively. As these tracers do not pass the blood-brain barrier, their distribution permits the identification of extracerebral anatomical landmarks such as the orbitae and the harderian glands. The cerebellum was identified by superimposing [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT scans with images of brain perfusion obtained with {sup 99m}Tc-HMPAO. Methylphenidate-treated animals and vehicle-treated animals yielded striatal equilibrium ratios (V''{sub 3}) of 0.24{+-}0.26 (mean {+-} SD) and 1.09{+-}0.42, respectively (ttest, two-tailed, p<0.0001). Cortical V''{sub 3} values amounted to 0.05{+-}0.28 (methylphenidate) and 0.3{+-}0.39 (saline, p=0.176). This first in vivo study of rat dopamine transporter binding after pre-treatment with methylphenidate showed a mean reduction of 78% in striatal [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT accumulation. The results can be interpreted in terms of a pharmacological blockade in the rat striatum and show that in vivo quantitation of dopamine transporter binding is feasible with [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and the TierSPECT. This may be of future relevance for in vivo investigations on rat models of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Furthermore, our findings suggest that investigations in other animal models, e.g. of Parkinson's and Huntington's disease, may be feasible using SPECT radioligands and

  3. [Tricholoma equestre--animal toxicity study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chodorowski, Zygmunt; Sznitowska, Małgorzata; Wiśniewski, Marek; Sein Anand, Jacek; Waldman, Wojciech; Ronikier, Anna

    2004-01-01

    Animal toxicity study of Tricholoma equestre mushrooms stored for 12 months at (-)20 degrees C was performed using 30 male BALB/c mice. Three groups of 5 mice each were given suspension of T. equestre powder in water, boiled aqueous extract and chloroform-methanol extract dissolved in Miglyol 812 by gavage for three consecutive days. Mice in control groups were given water, Miglyol 812 and p-phenylenediamine (CAS 106-50-3). Creatine kinase activity was determined in serum collected 72 hours after the final dose. Mean activity of serum creatine kinase in mice treated with T. equestre powder, aqueous extract, chloroform-methanol extract and Miglyol 812 were 157 +/- 93, 129 +/- 30, 96 +/- 38, 111 +/- 66 U/L respectively and did not differ significantly from mean activity in mice which were given water (107 +/- 38 U/L). Mean serum creatine kinase activity in p-phenylenediamine group (265 +/- 63 U/L) was significantly higher than in group treated with water (p<0.01). Extracts of Tricholoma equestre mushrooms stored for 12 months at (-)20 degrees C did not cause rhabdomyolysis in male BALB/c mice.

  4. Calorie Restriction Effect of Heat-Processed Onion Extract (ONI Using In Vitro and In Vivo Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Ri Kang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Onion (Allium cepa L. is widely consumed as food or medicinal plant due to its well-defined health benefits. The antioxidant and antihyperlipidemic effects of onion and its extracts have been reported well. However, very limited information on anti-hyperglycemic effect is available in processed onion extracts. In our previous study, we reported that Amadori rearrangement compounds (ARCs produced by heat-processing in Korean ginseng can reduce carbohydrate absorption by inhibiting intestinal carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes in both in vitro and in vivo animal models. To prove the enhancement of anti-hyperglycemic effect and ARCs content by heat-processing in onion extract, a correlation between the anti-hyperglycemic activity and the total content of ARCs of heat-processed onion extract (ONI was investigated. ONI has a high content of ARCs and had high rat small intestinal sucrase inhibitory activity (0.34 ± 0.03 mg/mL, IC50 relevant for the potential management of postprandial hyperglycemia. The effect of ONI on the postprandial blood glucose increase was investigated in Sprague Dawley (SD rats fed on sucrose or starch meals. The maximum blood glucose levels (Cmax of heat-processed onion extract were significantly decreased by about 8.7% (from 188.60 ± 5.37 to 172.27 ± 3.96, p < 0.001 and 14.2% (from 204.04 ± 8.73 to 175.13 ± 14.09, p < 0.01 in sucrose and starch loading tests, respectively. These results indicate that ARCs in onion extract produced by heat-processing have anti-diabetic effect by suppressing carbohydrate absorption via inhibition of intestinal sucrase, thereby reducing the postprandial increase of blood glucose. Therefore, enhancement of ARCs in onion by heat-processing might be a good strategy for the development of the new product on the management of hyperglycemia.

  5. CT with a CMOS flat panel detector integrated on the YAP-(S)PET scanner for in vivo small animal imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Domenico, Giovanni; Cesca, Nicola; Zavattini, Guido; Auricchio, Natalia; Gambaccini, Mauro

    2007-01-01

    Several research groups are pursuing multimodality simultaneous functional and morphological imaging. In this line of research the high resolution YAP-(S)PET small animal integrated PET-SPECT imaging system, constructed by our group of medical physics at the University of Ferrara, is being upgraded with a computed tomography (CT). In this way it will be possible to perform in vivo molecular and genomic imaging studies on small animals (such as mice and rats) and at the same time obtain morphological information necessary for both attenuation correction and accurate localization of the region under investigation. We have take simultaneous PET-CT and SPECT-CT images of phantoms obtained with a single scanner

  6. Rethinking 3R strategies: Digging deeper into AnimalTestInfo promotes transparency in in vivo biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörendahl, Antje; Leich, Nora; Vietze, Julia; Steinfath, Matthias; Chmielewska, Justyna; Hensel, Andreas; Grune, Barbara; Schönfelder, Gilbert

    2017-01-01

    In the European Union (EU), animal welfare is seen as a matter of great importance. However, with respect to animal experimentation, European citizens feel quite uninformed. The European Directive 2010/63/EU for the protection of laboratory animals aims for greater transparency and requires that a comprehensible, nontechnical summary (NTS) of each authorised research project involving animals is published by the respective Member State. However, the NTSs remain sleeping beauties if their contents are not easily and systematically accessible. The German web-based NTS database AnimalTestInfo is a unique channel for scientists to communicate their work, and provides the opportunity for large-scale analyses of planned animal studies to inform researchers and the public. For an in-depth meta-analysis, we classified the duly completed NTSs submitted to AnimalTestInfo in 2014 and 2015 according to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) system. Indexing the NTSs with ICD codes provided a fine-grained overview of the prospective uses of experimental animals. Using this approach, transparency, especially for highly controversial animal research involving, for example, nonhuman primates, is fostered, as it enables pinpointing the envisaged beneficiary down to the level of the addressed disease. Moreover, research areas with many planned projects involving animals can be specified in detail. The development of 3R (replacement, reduction, and refinement) measures in these research areas may be most efficient, as a large number of experimental animals would benefit from it. Indexing NTSs with ICD codes can support governments and funding agencies in advancing target-oriented funding of 3R research. Data drawn from NTSs can provide a basis for the development, validation, and implementation of directed 3R strategies as well as guidance for rethinking the role of animal research models. PMID:29240762

  7. Rethinking 3R strategies: Digging deeper into AnimalTestInfo promotes transparency in in vivo biomedical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bert, Bettina; Dörendahl, Antje; Leich, Nora; Vietze, Julia; Steinfath, Matthias; Chmielewska, Justyna; Hensel, Andreas; Grune, Barbara; Schönfelder, Gilbert

    2017-12-01

    In the European Union (EU), animal welfare is seen as a matter of great importance. However, with respect to animal experimentation, European citizens feel quite uninformed. The European Directive 2010/63/EU for the protection of laboratory animals aims for greater transparency and requires that a comprehensible, nontechnical summary (NTS) of each authorised research project involving animals is published by the respective Member State. However, the NTSs remain sleeping beauties if their contents are not easily and systematically accessible. The German web-based NTS database AnimalTestInfo is a unique channel for scientists to communicate their work, and provides the opportunity for large-scale analyses of planned animal studies to inform researchers and the public. For an in-depth meta-analysis, we classified the duly completed NTSs submitted to AnimalTestInfo in 2014 and 2015 according to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD) system. Indexing the NTSs with ICD codes provided a fine-grained overview of the prospective uses of experimental animals. Using this approach, transparency, especially for highly controversial animal research involving, for example, nonhuman primates, is fostered, as it enables pinpointing the envisaged beneficiary down to the level of the addressed disease. Moreover, research areas with many planned projects involving animals can be specified in detail. The development of 3R (replacement, reduction, and refinement) measures in these research areas may be most efficient, as a large number of experimental animals would benefit from it. Indexing NTSs with ICD codes can support governments and funding agencies in advancing target-oriented funding of 3R research. Data drawn from NTSs can provide a basis for the development, validation, and implementation of directed 3R strategies as well as guidance for rethinking the role of animal research models.

  8. Rethinking 3R strategies: Digging deeper into AnimalTestInfo promotes transparency in in vivo biomedical research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Bert

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the European Union (EU, animal welfare is seen as a matter of great importance. However, with respect to animal experimentation, European citizens feel quite uninformed. The European Directive 2010/63/EU for the protection of laboratory animals aims for greater transparency and requires that a comprehensible, nontechnical summary (NTS of each authorised research project involving animals is published by the respective Member State. However, the NTSs remain sleeping beauties if their contents are not easily and systematically accessible. The German web-based NTS database AnimalTestInfo is a unique channel for scientists to communicate their work, and provides the opportunity for large-scale analyses of planned animal studies to inform researchers and the public. For an in-depth meta-analysis, we classified the duly completed NTSs submitted to AnimalTestInfo in 2014 and 2015 according to the International Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems (ICD system. Indexing the NTSs with ICD codes provided a fine-grained overview of the prospective uses of experimental animals. Using this approach, transparency, especially for highly controversial animal research involving, for example, nonhuman primates, is fostered, as it enables pinpointing the envisaged beneficiary down to the level of the addressed disease. Moreover, research areas with many planned projects involving animals can be specified in detail. The development of 3R (replacement, reduction, and refinement measures in these research areas may be most efficient, as a large number of experimental animals would benefit from it. Indexing NTSs with ICD codes can support governments and funding agencies in advancing target-oriented funding of 3R research. Data drawn from NTSs can provide a basis for the development, validation, and implementation of directed 3R strategies as well as guidance for rethinking the role of animal research models.

  9. Digital Radiography for Determination of Primary Tooth Length: In Vivo and Ex Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria D. Basso

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Methods for determining the root canal length of the primary tooth should yield accurate and reproducible results. In vitro studies show some limitations, which do not allow their findings to be directly transferred to a clinical situation. Aim. To compare the accuracy of radiographic tooth length obtained from in vivo digital radiograph with that obtained from ex vivo digital radiograph. Method. Direct digital radiographs of 20 upper primary incisors were performed in teeth (2/3 radicular resorption that were radiographed by an intraoral sensor, according to the long-cone technique. Teeth were extracted, measured, and mounted in a resin block, and then radiographic template was used to standardise the sensor-target distance (30 cm. The apparent tooth length (APTL was obtained from the computer screen by means of an electronic ruler accompanying the digital radiography software (CDR 2.0, whereas the actual tooth length (ACTL was obtained by means of a digital calliper following extraction. Data were compared to the ACTL by variance analysis and Pearson’s correlation test. Results. The values for APTL obtained from in vivo radiography were slightly underestimated, whereas those values obtained from ex vivo were slightly overestimated. No significance was observed (P≤0.48 between APTL and ACTL. Conclusion. The length of primary teeth estimated by in vivo and ex vivo comparisons using digital radiography was found to be similar to the actual tooth length.

  10. In Vivo versus Augmented Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Small Animal Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Botella

    Full Text Available Although in vivo exposure is the treatment of choice for specific phobias, some acceptability problems have been associated with it. Virtual Reality exposure has been shown to be as effective as in vivo exposure, and it is widely accepted for the treatment of specific phobias, but only preliminary data are available in the literature about the efficacy of Augmented Reality. The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy and acceptance of two treatment conditions for specific phobias in which the exposure component was applied in different ways: In vivo exposure (N = 31 versus an Augmented Reality system (N = 32 in a randomized controlled trial. "One-session treatment" guidelines were followed. Participants in the Augmented Reality condition significantly improved on all the outcome measures at post-treatment and follow-ups. When the two treatment conditions were compared, some differences were found at post-treatment, favoring the participants who received in vivo exposure. However, these differences disappeared at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Regarding participants' expectations and satisfaction with the treatment, very positive ratings were reported in both conditions. In addition, participants from in vivo exposure condition considered the treatment more useful for their problem whereas participants from Augmented Reality exposure considered the treatment less aversive. Results obtained in this study indicate that Augmented Reality exposure is an effective treatment for specific phobias and well accepted by the participants.

  11. In Vivo versus Augmented Reality Exposure in the Treatment of Small Animal Phobia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botella, Cristina; Pérez-Ara, M Ángeles; Bretón-López, Juana; Quero, Soledad; García-Palacios, Azucena; Baños, Rosa María

    2016-01-01

    Although in vivo exposure is the treatment of choice for specific phobias, some acceptability problems have been associated with it. Virtual Reality exposure has been shown to be as effective as in vivo exposure, and it is widely accepted for the treatment of specific phobias, but only preliminary data are available in the literature about the efficacy of Augmented Reality. The purpose of the present study was to examine the efficacy and acceptance of two treatment conditions for specific phobias in which the exposure component was applied in different ways: In vivo exposure (N = 31) versus an Augmented Reality system (N = 32) in a randomized controlled trial. "One-session treatment" guidelines were followed. Participants in the Augmented Reality condition significantly improved on all the outcome measures at post-treatment and follow-ups. When the two treatment conditions were compared, some differences were found at post-treatment, favoring the participants who received in vivo exposure. However, these differences disappeared at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. Regarding participants' expectations and satisfaction with the treatment, very positive ratings were reported in both conditions. In addition, participants from in vivo exposure condition considered the treatment more useful for their problem whereas participants from Augmented Reality exposure considered the treatment less aversive. Results obtained in this study indicate that Augmented Reality exposure is an effective treatment for specific phobias and well accepted by the participants.

  12. In Vivo Cytogenetic Studies on Aspartame

    OpenAIRE

    AlSuhaibani, Entissar S.

    2010-01-01

    Aspartame (a-Laspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester) is a dipeptide low-calorie artificial sweetener that is widely used as a nonnutritive sweetener in foods and drinks. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic breakdown products (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol) was investigated in vivo using chromosomal aberration (CA) test and sister chromatid exchange (SCE) test in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to aspartame (3.5, 35, 350 mg/kg body weight)....

  13. Animal models to study plaque vulnerability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schapira, K.; Heeneman, S.; Daemen, M. J. A. P.

    2007-01-01

    The need to identify and characterize vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions in humans has lead to the development of various animal models of plaque vulnerability. In this review, current concepts of the vulnerable plaque as it leads to an acute coronary event are described, such as plaque rupture,

  14. In vivo metabolism of clebopride in three animal species and in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segura, J; Bakke, O M; Huizing, G; Beckett, A H

    1980-01-01

    Clebopride is extensively metabolized in the rat, rabbit, dog, and man. By use of chromatographic methods, up to 25 metabolites in hydrolyzed and nonhydrolyzed urine have been detected. All four species produced the same main metabolites, as indicated by thin-layer chromatography. These, isolated from urine of the three animal species, were identified as N-(4'-piperidyl)-2-methoxy-4-amino-5-chlorobenzamide, N-(4'-piperidyl-2'-one)-2-methoxy-4-amino-5-chlorobenzamide, and N-(1'-alpha-hydroxybenzyl-4'-piperidyl)-2-methoxy-4-amino-5-chlorobenzamide (tentative structure of a carbinolamine more stable than expected). In the dog, 2-methoxy-4-amino-5-chlorobenzoic acid was also detected. N4-glucuronidation of clebopride and some of its metabolites has been shown to occur in the three animal species. The rabbit produced large amounts of these conjugates. Clebopride N4-sulfonate was not present in the urine of any of the species investigated.

  15. Farm workers’ perception of animal welfare – A Danish Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anneberg, Inger

    2017-01-01

    The welfare of farm animals depends on development in production systems, economic drivers and regulation but also human factors – such as farmers’ perceptions of animal welfare, management strategies, communication, knowledge and training. In this study I have examined the perception of animal...

  16. Studying Biotechnological Methods Using Animations: The Teacher's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarden, Hagit; Yarden, Anat

    2011-01-01

    Animation has great potential for improving the way people learn. A number of studies in different scientific disciplines have shown that instruction involving computer animations can facilitate the understanding of processes at the molecular level. However, using animation alone does not ensure learning. Students sometimes miss essential features…

  17. 125I-β-CIT biodistribution study in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Ping

    2000-01-01

    The purpose is to study the preparation and biodistribution in animal of dopamine transporter imaging agent 125 I-β-CIT. β-CIT was 125 I radioiodinated with Iodogen method, the dynamic distribution of 125 I-β-CIT in brain and critical organs were studied with SD rat (autoradiography) and NIH mice respectively. The radiolabelling yield of 125 I-β-CIT was 84%, the radiochemical purity was better than 98%. Blood clearance could be explained by two-compartment model with a duration of 12h, (α = 3.87, T 1/2α = 0.179, β = 0.162, T 1/2β = 4.276) and three-compartment model in 24 h, (Pi = 5.28, T 1/2Pi = 0.131, α = 0.403, T 1/2α = 1.719, β 0.040, T 1/2β = 17.298). The maxim uptake rate of brain (9.1% +- 1.0%) was reaches at 1h, while at 24h, the target/noise ratio was higher . Critical organs liver, lung, spleen and kidney had high uptake rate [(9.88 +- 1.43) - (16.29 +- 1.72)], except liver, other organs showed quick clearance (T 1/2 125 I-β-CIT has a high striatum uptake and good stability in vivo, can provide good SPECT images, the best acquisition time of SPECT may be about 20h after i.v

  18. An in vivo technique for the measurement of bone blood flow in animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosenthal, M.S.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W.; Nickles, R.J.; Lehner, C.E.; Lanphier, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    A new technique to measure the in vivo clearance of 41 Ar from the bone mineral matrix is demonstrated following fast neutron production of 41 Ar in bone via the 44 Ca(n,α) reaction at 14.1 MeV. At the end of irradiation, the 41 Ar activity is assayed with a Ge(Li) detector where sequential gamma-ray spectra are taken. Following full-energy peak integration, background and dead time correction, the activity of 41 Ar as a function of time is determined. Results indicated that the Ar washout from bone in rats using this technique was approximately 16 ml (100 ml min) -1 and in agreement with other measurement techniques. For sheep the bone perfusion in the tibia was approximately 1.9+-0.2 ml (100 ml min) -1 . (author)

  19. Quantitative characterization of viscoelastic behavior in tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo animal tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Maccabi

    Full Text Available Viscoelasticity of soft tissue is often related to pathology, and therefore, has become an important diagnostic indicator in the clinical assessment of suspect tissue. Surgeons, particularly within head and neck subsites, typically use palpation techniques for intra-operative tumor detection. This detection method, however, is highly subjective and often fails to detect small or deep abnormalities. Vibroacoustography (VA and similar methods have previously been used to distinguish tissue with high-contrast, but a firm understanding of the main contrast mechanism has yet to be verified. The contributions of tissue mechanical properties in VA images have been difficult to verify given the limited literature on viscoelastic properties of various normal and diseased tissue. This paper aims to investigate viscoelasticity theory and present a detailed description of viscoelastic experimental results obtained in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMPs and ex vivo tissues to verify the main contrast mechanism in VA and similar imaging modalities. A spherical-tip micro-indentation technique was employed with the Hertzian model to acquire absolute, quantitative, point measurements of the elastic modulus (E, long term shear modulus (η, and time constant (τ in homogeneous TMPs and ex vivo tissue in rat liver and porcine liver and gallbladder. Viscoelastic differences observed between porcine liver and gallbladder tissue suggest that imaging modalities which utilize the mechanical properties of tissue as a primary contrast mechanism can potentially be used to quantitatively differentiate between proximate organs in a clinical setting. These results may facilitate more accurate tissue modeling and add information not currently available to the field of systems characterization and biomedical research.

  20. Quantitative characterization of viscoelastic behavior in tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccabi, Ashkan; Shin, Andrew; Namiri, Nikan K; Bajwa, Neha; St John, Maie; Taylor, Zachary D; Grundfest, Warren; Saddik, George N

    2018-01-01

    Viscoelasticity of soft tissue is often related to pathology, and therefore, has become an important diagnostic indicator in the clinical assessment of suspect tissue. Surgeons, particularly within head and neck subsites, typically use palpation techniques for intra-operative tumor detection. This detection method, however, is highly subjective and often fails to detect small or deep abnormalities. Vibroacoustography (VA) and similar methods have previously been used to distinguish tissue with high-contrast, but a firm understanding of the main contrast mechanism has yet to be verified. The contributions of tissue mechanical properties in VA images have been difficult to verify given the limited literature on viscoelastic properties of various normal and diseased tissue. This paper aims to investigate viscoelasticity theory and present a detailed description of viscoelastic experimental results obtained in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMPs) and ex vivo tissues to verify the main contrast mechanism in VA and similar imaging modalities. A spherical-tip micro-indentation technique was employed with the Hertzian model to acquire absolute, quantitative, point measurements of the elastic modulus (E), long term shear modulus (η), and time constant (τ) in homogeneous TMPs and ex vivo tissue in rat liver and porcine liver and gallbladder. Viscoelastic differences observed between porcine liver and gallbladder tissue suggest that imaging modalities which utilize the mechanical properties of tissue as a primary contrast mechanism can potentially be used to quantitatively differentiate between proximate organs in a clinical setting. These results may facilitate more accurate tissue modeling and add information not currently available to the field of systems characterization and biomedical research.

  1. In vivo assessment of 111In-labeled hematoporphyrin derivative in breast tumor-bearing animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.W.; Mandal, Ashis; Brown, Jerry; Reese, I.C.; Siegler, Richard; Hyman, Shigeyo

    1989-01-01

    The biological behavior of 111 In-labeled HPD has been investigated in tumor-bearing animals. Mice mammary adenocarcinomas and 7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracine induced breast tumors in Sprague-Dawley female rats were clearly visualized by 111 In-HPD nuclear scintigraphy. Optimal scans were obtained after a 48 h delay. In normal and tumor-bearing animals, the highest uptake of 111 In-HPD 72 h post-injection was found in the liver, the spleen and the kidneys. Depending on the size and the extent of necrosis, the uptake of 111 In-HPD by malignant breast tumors varied from 2.5% injected dose (ID) in mice to 1% ID in rats. Benign breast tumor uptake of 111 In-HPD was less than 1% ID. No significant amount of the radiopharmaceutical was found in pulmonary abscesses and abdominal cysts. Scintigrams of these infectious or inflammatory lesions were normal. Malignant tumor to blood, heart and lung ratios averaged 50:1, 10:1 and 3:1 respectively. Tumor to brain ratio ranged from 72 to 444:1. (author)

  2. Whole-body ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography of small animals in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun; Chatni, Muhammad R.; Maslov, Konstantin; Guo, Zijian; Wang, Kun; Anastasio, Mark; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-05-01

    We report a novel small-animal whole-body imaging system called ring-shaped confocal photoacoustic computed tomography (RC-PACT). RC-PACT is based on a confocal design of free-space ring-shaped light illumination and 512-element full-ring ultrasonic array signal detection. The free-space light illumination maximizes the light delivery efficiency, and the full-ring signal detection ensures a full two-dimensional view aperture for accurate image reconstruction. Using cylindrically focused array elements, RC-PACT can image a thin cross section with 0.10 to 0.25 mm in-plane resolutions and 1.6 s/frame acquisition time. By translating the mouse along the elevational direction, RC-PACT provides a series of cross-sectional images of the brain, liver, kidneys, and bladder.

  3. In Vivo Cytogenetic Studies on Aspartame

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entissar S. AlSuhaibani

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspartame (a-Laspartyl-L-phenylalanine 1-methylester is a dipeptide low-calorie artificial sweetener that is widely used as a nonnutritive sweetener in foods and drinks. The safety of aspartame and its metabolic breakdown products (phenylalanine, aspartic acid and methanol was investigated in vivo using chromosomal aberration (CA test and sister chromatid exchange (SCE test in the bone marrow cells of mice. Swiss Albino male mice were exposed to aspartame (3.5, 35, 350 mg/kg body weight. Bone marrow cells isolated from femora were analyzed for chromosome aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. Treatment with aspartame induced dose dependently chromosome aberrations at all concentrations while it did not induce sister chromatid exchanges. On the other hand, aspartame did not decrease the mitotic index (MI. However, statistical analysis of the results show that aspartame is not significantly genotoxic at low concentration.

  4. Application of Model Animals in the Study of Drug Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yagang; Miao, Mingsan

    2018-01-01

    Drug safety is a key factor in drug research and development, Drug toxicology test is the main method to evaluate the safety of drugs, The body condition of an animal has important implications for the results of the study, Previous toxicological studies of drugs were carried out in normal animals in the past, There is a great deviation from the clinical practice.The purpose of this study is to investigate the necessity of model animals as a substitute for normal animals for toxicological studies, It is expected to provide exact guidance for future drug safety evaluation.

  5. Comparison of in vivo efficacy of different ocular lubricants in dry eye animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaodong; Goto, Tomoko; Ohashi, Yuichi

    2014-04-29

    To compare the efficacy of three types of ocular lubricants in protecting corneal epithelial cells in dry eye animal models. Ocular lubricants containing 0.1% or 0.3% sodium hyaluronate (SH), carboxymethylcellulose (CMC), or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) were tested. First, ocular lubricant containing 0.002% fluorescein was dropped onto the rabbit corneas. The fluorescein intensity as an index of retention was measured. Second, a rabbit dry eye model was made by holding the eye open with a speculum, and 50 μL of each ocular lubricant was dropped onto the cornea. After 3 hours, the corneas were stained with 1% methylene blue (MB), and the absorbance of MB was measured. Third, a rat dry eye model was treated with the ocular lubricants for 4 weeks, and the corneal fluorescein staining was scored. Eyes treated with physiological saline were used as controls. Finally, immunohistochemistry was used to analyze occludin, an epithelial barrier protein, in cultured human corneal epithelial cells pretreated with ocular lubricants and desiccated for 20 or 60 minutes. Our results showed that 0.3% SH had a significantly longer retention time than the other lubricants (all P eye syndrome. Copyright 2014 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  6. Outstanding animal studies in allergy I. From asthma to food allergy and anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen-Jarolim, Erika; Pali-Schöll, Isabella; Roth-Walter, Franziska

    2017-06-01

    Animal models published within the past 18 months on asthma, food allergy and anaphylaxis, all conditions of rising public health concern, were reviewed. While domestic animals spontaneously develop asthma, food allergy and anaphylaxis, in animal models, divergent sensitization and challenge routes, dosages, intervals and antigens are used to induce asthmatic, food allergic or anaphylactic phenotypes. This must be considered in the interpretation of results. Instead of model antigens, gradually relevant allergens such as house dust mite in asthma, and food allergens like peanut, apple and peach in food allergy research were used. Novel engineered mouse models such as a mouse with a T-cell receptor for house dust mite allergen Der p 1, or with transgenic human hFcγR genes, facilitated the investigation of single molecules of interest. Whole-body plethysmography has become a state-of-the-art in-vivo readout in asthma research. In food allergy and anaphylaxis research, novel techniques were developed allowing real-time monitoring of in-vivo effects following allergen challenge. Networks to share tissues were established as an effort to reduce animal experiments in allergy which cannot be replaced by in-vitro measures. Natural and artificial animal models were used to explore the pathophysiology of asthma, food allergy and anaphylaxis and to improve prophylactic and therapeutic measures. Especially the novel mouse models mimicking molecular aspects of the complex immune network in asthma, food allergy and anaphylaxis will facilitate proof-of-concept studies under controlled conditions.

  7. Using Computational and Mechanical Models to Study Animal Locomotion

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Laura A.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Hedrick, Tyson L.; Tytell, Eric D.; Wang, Z. Jane; Yen, Jeannette; Alben, Silas

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in computational methods have made realistic large-scale simulations of animal locomotion possible. This has resulted in numerous mathematical and computational studies of animal movement through fluids and over substrates with the purpose of better understanding organisms’ performance and improving the design of vehicles moving through air and water and on land. This work has also motivated the development of improved numerical methods and modeling techniques for animal locom...

  8. [Pharmacokinetic study of rifampicin in the body of pregnant animals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbotina, N A; Griaznov, N S; Beliavskaia, I V; Chugunova, V I; Sazykin, Iu O

    1979-09-01

    The study on distribution of 14C-rifampicin administered intramuscularly to pregnent animals showed that its concentrations in the blood, liver, kidneys, lungs and other organs did not practically change from those in nonpregnant animals. The concentration of 14C-rifampicin in the fetus organs was much lower than that in the organs of the adult animals. The liver and kidneys of the pregnant animals, as well as the fetus though to a less extent had a capacity for metabolism of 14C-rifampicin. The following products of biotransformation were detected: N-oxide of rifampicin, 25-deacetylrifampicin, 3-formylrifamycin SV and rifamycin SV.

  9. Critically appraised topic on adverse food reactions of companion animals (4): can we diagnose adverse food reactions in dogs and cats with in vivo or in vitro tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Ralf S; Olivry, Thierry

    2017-08-30

    The gold standard to diagnose adverse food reactions (AFRs) in the dog and cat is currently an elimination diet with subsequent provocation trials. However, those trials are inconvenient and client compliance can be low. Our objective was to systematically review the literature to evaluate in vivo and in vitro tests used to diagnose AFR in small animals. We searched three databases (CAB Abstracts, MEDLINE and Web of Science) for pertinent references on September 16, 2016. Among 71, 544 and 41 articles found in the CAB Abstract, MEDLINE and Web of Science databases, respectively, we selected 22 articles and abstracts from conference proceedings that reported data usable for evaluation of tests for AFR. Serum tests for food-specific IgE and IgG, intradermal testing with food antigens, lymphocyte proliferation tests, fecal food-specific IgE, patch, gastroscopic, and colonoscopic testing were evaluated. Testing for serum food-specific IgE and IgG showed low repeatability and, in dogs, a highly variable accuracy. In cats, the accuracy of testing for food-specific IgE was low. Lymphocyte proliferation tests were more frequently positive and more accurate in animals with AFR, but, as they are more difficult to perform, they remain currently a research tool. All other reported tests were only evaluated by individual studies with small numbers of animals. Negative patch test reactions have a very high negative predictability in dogs and could enable a choice of ingredients for the elimination diet in selected patients. Gastroscopic and colonoscopic testing as well as food-specific fecal IgE or food-specific serum IgG measurements appear less useful. Currently, the best diagnostic procedure to identify AFRs in small animals remains an elimination diet with subsequent provocation trials.

  10. An original emission tomograph for in vivo brain imaging of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ochoa, A.V.; Ploux, L.; Mastrippolito, R.

    1996-01-01

    The principle of a new tomograph TOHR dedicated for small volume analysis with very high resolution is presented in this paper. We use uncorrelated multi-photons (X or gamma rays) radioisotopes and a large solid angle focusing collimator to make tomographic imaging without reconstruction algorithm. With this original device, detection efficiency and resolution are independent and submillimetric resolution can be achieved. A feasibility study shows that, made achieve the predicted performances of TOHR. We discuss its potential in rat brain tomography by simulating a realistic neuropharmacological experiment using a 1.4 mm resolution prototype of TOHR under development

  11. In vivo animal histology and clinical evaluation of multisource fractional radiofrequency skin resurfacing (FSR) applicator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadick, Neil S; Sato, Masaki; Palmisano, Diana; Frank, Ido; Cohen, Hila; Harth, Yoram

    2011-10-01

    Acne scars are one of the most difficult disorders to treat in dermatology. The optimal treatment system will provide minimal downtime resurfacing for the epidermis and non-ablative deep volumetric heating for collagen remodeling in the dermis. A novel therapy system (EndyMed Ltd., Cesarea, Israel) uses phase-controlled multi-source radiofrequency (RF) to provide simultaneous one pulse microfractional resurfacing with simultaneous volumetric skin tightening. The study included 26 subjects (Fitzpatrick's skin type 2-5) with moderate to severe wrinkles and 4 subjects with depressed acne scars. Treatment was repeated each month up to a total of three treatment sessions. Patients' photographs were graded according to accepted scales by two uninvolved blinded evaluators. Significant reduction in the depth of wrinkles and acne scars was noted 4 weeks after therapy with further improvement at the 3-month follow-up. Our data show the histological impact and clinical beneficial effects of simultaneous RF fractional microablation and volumetric deep dermal heating for the treatment of wrinkles and acne scars.

  12. In vivo study of immunogenicity and kinetic characteristics of a quantum dot-labelled baculovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Meng; Zheng, Zhenhua; Meng, Jin; Wang, Han; He, Man; Zhang, Fuxian; Liu, Yan; Hu, Bin; He, Zike; Hu, Qinxue; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-09-01

    Nanomaterials conjugated with biomacromolecules, including viruses, have great potential for in vivo applications. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the safety of nanoparticle-conjugated macromolecule biomaterials (Nano-mbio). Although a number of studies have assessed the risks of nanoparticles and macromolecule biomaterials in living bodies, only a few of them investigated Nano-mbios. Here we evaluated the in vivo safety profile of a quantum dot-conjugated baculovirus (Bq), a promising new Nano-mbio, in mice. Each animal was injected twice intraperitoneally with 50 μg virus protein labelled with around 3*10(-5)nmol conjugated qds. Control animals were injected with PBS, quantum dots, baculovirus, or a mixture of quantum dots and baculovirus. Blood, tissues and body weight were analysed at a series of time points following both the first and the second injections. It turned out that the appearance and behaviour of the mice injected with Bq were similar to those injected with baculovirus alone. However, combination of baculovirus and quantum dot (conjugated or simply mixed) significantly induced stronger adaptive immune responses, and lead to a faster accumulation and longer existence of Cd in the kidneys. Thus, despite the fact that both quantum dot and baculovirus have been claimed to be safe in vivo, applications of Bq in vivo should be cautious. To our knowledge, this is the first study examining the interaction between a nanoparticle-conjugated virus and a living body from a safety perspective, providing a basis for in vivo application of other Nano-mbios. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Animal subjectivity : a study into philosophy and theory of animal experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lijmbach, S.

    1998-01-01

    For many people, laypeople as well as animal scientists and philosophers, animal welfare involves animal feelings. Scientifically, however, animal feelings are problematic. In the concluding remarks of a conference about the welfare of domestic animals in 1994, for example, two questions

  14. Compounds used to produce cloned animals are genotoxic and mutagenic in mammalian assays in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.J. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Biociências de Rio Claro, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde em Desenvolvimento na Região Centro-Oeste, Faculdade de Medicina “Dr. Hélio Mandetta”, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Mestrado em Farmácia, Centro de Ciências Biológicas e da Saúde, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Mantovani, M.S.; Silva, A.F. da [Departamento de Biologia Geral, Universidade Estadual de Londrina, Londrina, PR (Brazil); Pesarini, J.R. [Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Saúde em Desenvolvimento na Região Centro-Oeste, Faculdade de Medicina “Dr. Hélio Mandetta”, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Mauro, M.O. [Centro de Estudos em Células Tronco, Terapia Celular e Genética Toxicológica, Núcleo de Hospital Universitário, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Programa de Doutorado em Biotecnologia e Biodiversidade - Rede Pró Centro-Oeste, Universidade Federal de Mato Grosso do Sul, Campo Grande, MS (Brazil); Ribeiro, L.R. [Programa de Pós-Graduação em Biologia Celular e Molecular, Instituto de Biociências de Rio Claro, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Rio Claro, SP (Brazil); Programa de Pós-Graduação em Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Botucatu, SP (Brazil)

    2014-03-28

    The compounds 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide promote the successful production of cloned mammals and have been used in the development of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This study investigated the effects of 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide in vitro, using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay to assess cytotoxicity, the trypan blue exclusion assay to assess cell viability, the comet assay to assess genotoxicity, and the micronucleus test with cytokinesis block to test mutagenicity. In addition, the comet assay and the micronucleus test were also performed on peripheral blood cells of 54 male Swiss mice, 35 g each, to assess the effects of the compounds in vivo. The results indicated that both 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide, at the concentrations and doses tested, were cytotoxic in vitro and genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro and in vivo, altered the nuclear division index in vitro, but did not diminish cell viability in vitro. Considering that alterations in DNA play important roles in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and morphofunctional teratogenesis and reduce embryonic viability, this study indicated that 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide utilized in the process of mammalian cloning may be responsible for the low embryo viability commonly seen in nuclear transfer after implantation in utero.

  15. Compounds used to produce cloned animals are genotoxic and mutagenic in mammalian assays in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.J. Oliveira

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The compounds 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide promote the successful production of cloned mammals and have been used in the development of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This study investigated the effects of 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide in vitro, using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay to assess cytotoxicity, the trypan blue exclusion assay to assess cell viability, the comet assay to assess genotoxicity, and the micronucleus test with cytokinesis block to test mutagenicity. In addition, the comet assay and the micronucleus test were also performed on peripheral blood cells of 54 male Swiss mice, 35 g each, to assess the effects of the compounds in vivo. The results indicated that both 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide, at the concentrations and doses tested, were cytotoxic in vitro and genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro and in vivo, altered the nuclear division index in vitro, but did not diminish cell viability in vitro. Considering that alterations in DNA play important roles in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and morphofunctional teratogenesis and reduce embryonic viability, this study indicated that 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide utilized in the process of mammalian cloning may be responsible for the low embryo viability commonly seen in nuclear transfer after implantation in utero.

  16. Compounds used to produce cloned animals are genotoxic and mutagenic in mammalian assays in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, R.J.; Mantovani, M.S.; Silva, A.F. da; Pesarini, J.R.; Mauro, M.O.; Ribeiro, L.R.

    2014-01-01

    The compounds 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide promote the successful production of cloned mammals and have been used in the development of embryos produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer. This study investigated the effects of 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide in vitro, using the thiazolyl blue tetrazolium bromide colorimetric assay to assess cytotoxicity, the trypan blue exclusion assay to assess cell viability, the comet assay to assess genotoxicity, and the micronucleus test with cytokinesis block to test mutagenicity. In addition, the comet assay and the micronucleus test were also performed on peripheral blood cells of 54 male Swiss mice, 35 g each, to assess the effects of the compounds in vivo. The results indicated that both 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide, at the concentrations and doses tested, were cytotoxic in vitro and genotoxic and mutagenic in vitro and in vivo, altered the nuclear division index in vitro, but did not diminish cell viability in vitro. Considering that alterations in DNA play important roles in mutagenesis, carcinogenesis, and morphofunctional teratogenesis and reduce embryonic viability, this study indicated that 6-dimethylaminopurine and cycloheximide utilized in the process of mammalian cloning may be responsible for the low embryo viability commonly seen in nuclear transfer after implantation in utero

  17. A novel orbital tissue expander (OTE): design, in vitro, and in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Elizabete; Tse, David; Pinchuk, Leonard; Acosta, Ana C.; Martin, John B.; Davis, Stewart B.; Hernandez, Eleut; Yamamoto, Hideo; Denham, David B.; Dubovy, Sander; Parel, Jean-Marie

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of a novel orbital tissue expander (OTE) in treating congenital anophthalmic and microphthalmic infants. Methods: The OTE implant is an inflatable (0.5 to >6cc) silicone rubber globe sliding on a titanium T-shaped bone plate secured to the temporal bone with 1mm titanium screws. In vitro testing was performed to assess injection volume versus diameter measurements to determine consistency between devices, flex fatigue for durability of the implants when compressed, weight change in isotonic saline at 37°C to mimic human body temperature, seal durability by puncturing the globe numerous times while inflating, capacity before rupture to determine the maximum amount of saline it is able to contain, and effective sterilization. Ex-vivo testing was performed for adjustments prior to in vivo study. An OTE was then implanted in five 2-week old kittens (OS only) and inflated in 0.5cc increments. Three control animals received enucleation alone. All 8 animals were followed for 18 weeks and underwent euthanasia for morphological and histopathological analysis. Results: In vitro testing confirmed a effects in the normal maturation, weight gain, and food intake of the cats. Light microscopy showed no signs of foreign body reaction. Pictures of the implants were obtained by using a shadow-photogrammetry system to compare the explanted OTE with the OD control eye. Conclusion: In vitro and in vivo studies show the implant's potential to safely treat anophthalmic and microphthalmic infants.

  18. Cytokines in the management of rotavirus infection: A systematic review of in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, Gopalsamy Rajiv; Santos, Victor Santana; Denadai, Marina; da Silva Calisto, Valdete Kaliane; de Souza Siqueira Quintans, Jullyana; de Oliveira E Silva, Ana Mara; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Narain, Narendra; Cuevas, Luis Eduardo; Júnior, Lucindo José Quintans; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz

    2017-08-01

    Rotavirus is a leading cause of childhood diarrhoea. Rotavirus vaccines are effective against severe rotavirus gastroenteritis, but have lower efficacy in low income countries in Africa. Anti-rotavirus treatment is not available. This study reviews the literature of animal studies evaluating whether cytokine mediated pathways of immune activation could improve rotavirus therapy. We performed a systematic review of articles in English published from 2010 to 2016 reporting agents with in vivo antirotavirus activity for the management of rotavirus infection. The search was carried in PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and Web of Science. Animal experiments where cytokines were investigated to assess the outcome of rotavirus therapy were included. A total of 869 publications were identified. Of these, 19 pertained the objectives of the review, and 11 articles described the effect of probiotics/commensals on rotavirus infection and immune responses in animals. Eight further in vivo studies evaluated the immunomodulating effects of herbs, secondary metabolites and food-derived products on cytokine responses of rotavirus-infected animals. Studies extensively reported the regulatory roles for T-helper (Th)1 (interferon gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4, IL-6, IL-10) cytokines responses to rotavirus pathogenesis and immunity, inhibiting rotavirus infection through suppression of inflammation by viral inhibition. Th1 and Th2 cytokines stimulate the immune system, inhibiting rotavirus binding and/or replication in animal models. Th1/Th2 cytokine responses have optimal immunomodulating effects to reduce rotavirus diarrhoea and enhance immune responses in experimental rotavirus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellulose/soy protein isolate composite membranes: evaluations of in vitro cytocompatibility with Schwann cells and in vivo toxicity to animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Lihua; Gong, Wenrong; Zhou, Yi; Yang, Lin; Li, Daokun; Huselstein, Celine; Wang, Xiong; He, Xiaohua; Li, Yinping; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro cytocompatibility of cellulose/soy protein isolate composite membranes (CSM) with Schwann cells and in vivo toxicity to animals. A series of cellulose/soy protein isolate composite membranes (CSM) were prepared by blending, solution casting and coagulation process. The cytocompatibility of the CSM to Schwann cells were evaluated by MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and by direct cells culture of Schwann cells on the surfaces of the CSM, respectively. The in vivo toxicity of the CSM to animals were also evaluated by acute toxicity testing, skin sensitization testing, pyrogen testing and intracutaneous stimulation testing, respectively, according to the ISO 10993 standard. The MTT assay showed that the cell viability of Schwann cells cultured in extracts from the CSM was higher than that from the neat cellulose membrane without containing SPI component. The direct cells culture indicated that the Schwann cells could attach and grow well on the surface of the CSM and the incorporation of SPI into cellulose contributed to improvement of cell adhesion and proliferation. The evaluations of in vivo biological safety suggested that the CSM showed no acute toxicity, no skin sensitization and no intracutaneous stimulation to the experimental animals. The CSM had in vitro cytocompatibility with Schwann cells and biological safety to animals, suggesting potential for the applications as nerve conduit for the repair of nerve defect.

  20. METHOD FOR SIMULTANEOUS 90SR AND 137CS IN-VIVO MEASUREMENTS OF SMALL ANIMALS AND OTHER ENVIRONMENTAL MEDIA DEVELOPED FOR THE CONDITIONS OF THE CHERNOBYL EXCLUSION ZONE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Jannik, T.

    2011-10-01

    To perform in vivo simultaneous measurements of the {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs content in the bodies of animals living in the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (ChEZ), an appropriate method and equipment were developed and installed in a mobile gamma beta spectrometry laboratory. This technique was designed for animals of relatively small sizes (up to 50 g). The {sup 90}Sr content is measured by a beta spectrometer with a 0.1 mm thick scintillation plastic detector. The spectrum processing takes into account the fact that the measured object is 'thick-layered' and contains a comparable quantity of {sup 137}Cs, which is a characteristic condition of the ChEZ. The {sup 137}Cs content is measured by a NaI scintillation detector that is part of the combined gamma beta spectrometry system. For environmental research performed in the ChEZ, the advantages of this method and equipment (rapid measurements, capability to measure live animals directly in their habitat, and the capability of simultaneous {sup 90}Sr and {sup 137}Cs measurements) far outweigh the existing limitations (considerations must be made for background radiation and the animal size, skeletal shape and body mass). The accuracy of these in vivo measurements is shown to be consistent with standard spectrometric and radiochemical methods. Apart from the in vivo measurements, the proposed methodology, after a very simple upgrade that is also described in the article, works even more accurately with samples of other media, such as soil and plants.

  1. Common RNA replication signals exist among group 2 coronaviruses: evidence for in vivo recombination between animal and human coronavius molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, H.-Y.; Guy, James S.; Yoo, Dongwan; Vlasak, Reinhard; Urbach, Ena; Brian, David A.

    2003-01-01

    5' and 3' UTR sequences on the coronavirus genome are known to carry cis-acting elements for DI RNA replication and presumably also virus genome replication. 5' UTR-adjacent coding sequences are also thought to harbor cis-acting elements. Here we have determined the 5' UTR and adjacent 289-nt sequences, and 3' UTR sequences, for six group 2 coronaviruses and have compared them to each other and to three previously reported group 2 members. Extensive regions of highly similar UTR sequences were found but small regions of divergence were also found indicating group 2 coronaviruses could be subdivided into those that are bovine coronavirus (BCoV)-like (BCoV, human respiratory coronavirus-OC43, human enteric coronavirus, porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus, and equine coronavirus) and those that are murine hepatitis virus (MHV)-like (A59, 2, and JHM strains of MHV, puffinosis virus, and rat sialodacryoadenitis virus). The 3' UTRs of BCoV and MHV have been previously shown to be interchangeable. Here, a reporter-containing BCoV DI RNA was shown to be replicated by all five BCoV-like helper viruses and by MHV-H2 (a human cell-adapted MHV strain), a representative of the MHV-like subgroup, demonstrating group 2 common 5' and 3' replication signaling elements. BCoV DI RNA, furthermore, acquired the leader of HCoV-OC43 by leader switching, demonstrating for the first time in vivo recombination between animal and human coronavirus molecules. These results indicate that common replication signaling elements exist among group 2 coronaviruses despite a two-cluster pattern within the group and imply there could exist a high potential for recombination among group members

  2. Real-time temperature monitoring during radiofrequency treatments on ex-vivo animal model by fiber Bragg grating sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palumbo, Giovanna; Tosi, Daniele; Schena, Emiliano; Massaroni, Carlo; Ippolito, Juliet; Verze, Paolo; Carlomagno, Nicola; Tammaro, Vincenzo; Iadicicco, Agostino; Campopiano, Stefania

    2017-05-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors applied to bio-medical procedures such as surgery and rehabilitation are a valid alternative to traditional sensing techniques due to their unique characteristics. Herein we propose the use of FBG sensor arrays for accurate real-time temperature measurements during multi-step RadioFrequency Ablation (RFA) based thermal tumor treatment. Real-time temperature monitoring in the RF-applied region represents a valid feedback for the success of the thermo-ablation procedure. In order to create a thermal multi-point map around the tumor area to be treated, a proper sensing configuration was developed. In particular, the RF probe of a commercial medical instrumentation, has been equipped with properly packaged FBGs sensors. Moreover, in order to discriminate the treatment areas to be ablated as precisely as possible, a second array 3.5 cm long, made by several FBGs was used. The results of the temperature measurements during the RFA experiments conducted on ex-vivo animal liver and kidney tissues are presented herein. The proposed FBGs based solution has proven to be capable of distinguish different and consecutive discharges and for each of them, to measure the temperature profile with a resolution of 0.1 °C and a minimum spatial resolution of 5mm. Based upon our experiments, it is possible to confirm that the temperature decreases with distance from a RF peak ablation, in accordance with RF theory. The proposed solution promises to be very useful for the surgeon because a real-time temperature feedback allows for the adaptation of RFA parameters during surgery and better delineates the area under treatment.

  3. In-vivo laser induced urethral stricture animal model for investigating the potential of LDR-brachytherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sroka, Ronald; Lellig, Katja; Bader, Markus; Stief, Christian; Weidlich, Patrick; Wechsel, G.; Assmann, Walter; Becker, R.; Fedorova, O.; Khoder, Wael

    2015-02-01

    documented for correlation. At further 28 days after catheter removal the animals were euthanasized and the urethra tissue was harvested. Histological examination of tissue with assessment of radiation damage, fibrotic and inflammatory changes were performed. After deblinding histological finding were correlated with the applied dose. Results: All animals developed a stricture, while 15/18 (83,3%) showed a significant, high grade stricture with more than 90% lumen narrowing. Histopathological examination including evaluation of urethral inflammation, fibrosis and collagen content were investigated in additional 6 rabbits confirming the former findings. No rabbits died prematurely during the study. The experiments showed that the procedure of the application of radioactive catheter was safe without any problems in contamination and protection handling. The combination of internal urethrotomy and LDR-brachytherapy results in a stricture free rate of 66.7% in the 15-Gy group, compared with only 33.3% among animals from the 0- and 30-Gy groups. Furthermore histological classification of inflammation and fibrosis of 0 Gy and 15 Gy showed similar extent. Conclusion: This new method of laser induced urethral stricture was very efficient and showed a high reproducibility, thus being useful for studying stenosis treatments. The experiments showed that application of local β-irradiation by means of radioactive catheters modulated the stenosis development. This kind of LDR-brachytherapy shows potential for prophylaxis of urethral stricture. As this was an animal pilot experiment a clinical dose response study is needed.

  4. Nanomedicine for Inner Ear Diseases: A Review of Recent In Vivo Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-Kee Kim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles are promising therapeutic options for inner ear disease. In this report, we review in vivo animal studies in the otologic field using nanoparticles over the past 5 years. Many studies have used nanoparticles to deliver drugs, genes, and growth factors, and functional and morphological changes have been observed. The constituents of nanoparticles are also diversifying into various biocompatible materials, including poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA. The safe and effective delivery of drugs or genes in the inner ear will be a breakthrough for the treatment of inner ear diseases, including age-related hearing loss.

  5. The use of Total Body In Vivo Neutron Activation Analysis (TBIVNAA) in balance studies in rodents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, D.A.; Lindsay, R.L.; Anderson, J.

    1976-01-01

    In the investigation of animals subject to alteration in diet or other metabolic experiments, the measurements of change in body calcium, phosphorus, sodium and nitrogen are of considerable interest. However, conventional balance studies are tedious and subject to both random and cumulative error, necessitating as they do accurate estimates of dietary intake and faecal and urinary output. The object of the present study was to determine the usefulness of total body in vivo neutron activation analysis, used at the beginning and end of the experimental period, as an alternative to conventional balance techniques. (orig.) [de

  6. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pickwell, E; Cole, B E; Fitzgerald, A J; Pepper, M; Wallace, V P

    2004-01-01

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation

  7. In vivo study of human skin using pulsed terahertz radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pickwell, E [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Cole, B E [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Fitzgerald, A J [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom); Pepper, M [Semiconductor Physics Group, Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge University, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HE (United Kingdom); Wallace, V P [TeraView Ltd, Unit 302/4 Cambridge Science Park, Cambridge CB4 0WG (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-07

    Studies in terahertz (THz) imaging have revealed a significant difference between skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma) and healthy tissue. Since water has strong absorptions at THz frequencies and tumours tend to have different water content from normal tissue, a likely contrast mechanism is variation in water content. Thus, we have previously devised a finite difference time-domain (FDTD) model which is able to closely simulate the interaction of THz radiation with water. In this work we investigate the interaction of THz radiation with normal human skin on the forearm and palm of the hand in vivo. We conduct the first ever systematic in vivo study of the response of THz radiation to normal skin. We take in vivo reflection measurements of normal skin on the forearm and palm of the hand of 20 volunteers. We compare individual examples of THz responses with the mean response for the areas of skin under investigation. Using the in vivo data, we demonstrate that the FDTD model can be applied to biological tissue. In particular, we successfully simulate the interaction of THz radiation with the volar forearm. Understanding the interaction of THz radiation with normal skin will form a step towards developing improved imaging algorithms for diagnostic detection of skin cancer and other tissue disorders using THz radiation.

  8. The radiosensitizing effects of ornidazole in hypoxic mammalian tissue: an in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okkan, S.; Uzel, R.

    1982-01-01

    In this study the sensitizing effects of ornidazole is investigated in vivo. The selected test system is the acute killing effect of radiation within 4-6 days after abdominal irradiation ranging from 9 to 24 Gy, in groups of C 57 black mice. Ornidazole is given intraperitoneally in 500 mg/kg, 100 mg/kg, 20 mg/kg doses prior to irradiation of animals breathing air, oxygen or nitrogen. A decreae of LD 50 dose is observed from 24.39 +/- 5.66 to 16.38 +/- 1.86 and 18.04 +/- 2.48 Gy, respectively, in nitrogen breathing animals. No sensitizing effect was observed in doses of 20 mg/kg. Enhancement Ratio (ER) was found to be 1.48 +/- 0.25 and 1.35 +/- 0.27; relative sensitizing efficiency (RSE) was 40% and 29% respectively. No sensitizing effect was observed in animals irradiated in oxic conditions. These results showed that ornidazole (Ro-7-0207) has a sensitizing effect on hypoxic cells in vivo. It is worthwhile to try this drug in a clinical study

  9. In vivo study of drug interaction with brain benzodiazepine receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, O.; Shinotoh, H.; Ito, T.; Suzuki, K.; Hashimoto, K.; Yamasaki, T.

    1985-05-01

    The possibility of direct estimation of in vivo Bz receptor occupancy in brain was evaluated using C-11, or H-3-flumazepil (Ro15-1788). In animal experiments, 1 ..mu..Ci of H-3-Ro15-1788 was injected at 0.5 or 20 hr after i.v. injection of various dosage of clonazepam. Then radioactivity in cerebral cortex, cerebellum and blood at 5 min. after injection of the tracer was compared. Competitive inhibition of in vivo binding was clearly observed when clonazepam was pretreated at 0.5 hr before injection of the tracer. On the other hand, brain radioactivity was increased when clonazepam was administered at 20 hr before injection of the tracer. This increase in binding of H-3-Ro15-1788 might be caused by rebound of Bz receptor function by treatment with Bz agonist, and this rebound may have an important role in physiological function. Clinical investigation concerning drug interaction with brain Bz receptor was performed in normal volunteer and patients with neurological disorders. The distribution of C-11-Ro15-1788 in the brain of patients chronically treated with clonazepam were significantly heterogeneous. However, cerebral blood flow estimated with N-13 NH3 of these patients were normal.

  10. The Potential of Adaptive Design in Animal Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad Majid

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical trials are the backbone of medical research, and are often the last step in the development of new therapies for use in patients. Prior to human testing, however, preclinical studies using animal subjects are usually performed in order to provide initial data on the safety and effectiveness of prospective treatments. These studies can be costly and time consuming, and may also raise concerns about the ethical treatment of animals when potentially harmful procedures are involved. Adaptive design is a process by which the methods used in a study may be altered while it is being conducted in response to preliminary data or other new information. Adaptive design has been shown to be useful in reducing the time and costs associated with clinical trials, and may provide similar benefits in preclinical animal studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize various aspects of adaptive design and evaluate its potential for use in preclinical research.

  11. The Potential of Adaptive Design in Animal Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majid, Arshad; Bae, Ok-Nam; Redgrave, Jessica; Teare, Dawn; Ali, Ali; Zemke, Daniel

    2015-10-12

    Clinical trials are the backbone of medical research, and are often the last step in the development of new therapies for use in patients. Prior to human testing, however, preclinical studies using animal subjects are usually performed in order to provide initial data on the safety and effectiveness of prospective treatments. These studies can be costly and time consuming, and may also raise concerns about the ethical treatment of animals when potentially harmful procedures are involved. Adaptive design is a process by which the methods used in a study may be altered while it is being conducted in response to preliminary data or other new information. Adaptive design has been shown to be useful in reducing the time and costs associated with clinical trials, and may provide similar benefits in preclinical animal studies. The purpose of this review is to summarize various aspects of adaptive design and evaluate its potential for use in preclinical research.

  12. Two-photon microscopy imaging of thy1GFP-M transgenic mice: a novel animal model to investigate brain dendritic cell subsets in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Laperchia

    Full Text Available Transgenic mice expressing fluorescent proteins in specific cell populations are widely used for in vivo brain studies with two-photon fluorescence (TPF microscopy. Mice of the thy1GFP-M line have been engineered for selective expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP in neuronal populations. Here, we report that TPF microscopy reveals, at the brain surface of these mice, also motile non-neuronal GFP+ cells. We have analyzed the behavior of these cells in vivo and characterized in brain sections their immunophenotype.With TPF imaging, motile GFP+ cells were found in the meninges, subarachnoid space and upper cortical layers. The striking feature of these cells was their ability to move across the brain parenchyma, exhibiting evident shape changes during their scanning-like motion. In brain sections, GFP+ cells were immunonegative to antigens recognizing motile cells such as migratory neuroblasts, neuronal and glial precursors, mast cells, and fibroblasts. GFP+ non-neuronal cells exhibited instead the characteristic features and immunophenotype (CD11c and major histocompatibility complex molecule class II immunopositivity of dendritic cells (DCs, and were immunonegative to the microglial marker Iba-1. GFP+ cells were also identified in lymph nodes and blood of thy1GFP-M mice, supporting their identity as DCs. Thus, TPF microscopy has here allowed the visualization for the first time of the motile behavior of brain DCs in situ. The results indicate that the thy1GFP-M mouse line provides a novel animal model for the study of subsets of these professional antigen-presenting cells in the brain. Information on brain DCs is still very limited and imaging in thy1GFP-M mice has a great potential for analyses of DC-neuron interaction in normal and pathological conditions.

  13. A Study of Sasin-Animal Sky Map on Chonmunryucho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Jin Yang

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Chon-Mun-Ryu-Cho, written (edited by Lee Sun-Ji during the period of King Se-Jong, is a representative astronomy book of Cho-Sun (A.D. 1392 -1910 Dynasty. We find and study in the first page of the book; the description of 28 oriental constellations as a Sasin (four mythical oriental animals-animal sky map which is not widely known yet. The map consists of four groups of constellations, each of which represents the Sasin: Chang-Ryong (dragon, Baek-Ho (tigers with Ki-Rin [Oriental giraffe], Ju-Jak (Chinese phoenix, Hyun-Mu (a tortoise interwined with a snake. Each group (animals spans 2˜7 of 28 oriental constellations As we know from the illustration of the Chon-Sang-Yol-Cha-Bun-Ya-Ji-Do a representative sky map of Cho-Sun Dynasty, astronomy in Cho-Sun Dynasty is closely related to that in Go-Gu-Ryer (B.C. 37 -A.D. 668 Dynasty. Since these Sasin-animals appear in most mural paintings of Go-Gu-Ryer tombs, visualization of sky with these animal constellations could have been established as early as in Go-Gu-Ryer Dynasty. We also reconstruct this ''A Sasin-animal Korean sky map'' based on the shapes of the Sasin and Ki-Rin from Go-Gu-Ryer paintings and 28 oriental constellations in Chon-Sang-Yol-Cha-Bun-Ya-Ji-Do.

  14. Comparative study of nanosecond electric fields in vitro and in vivo on hepatocellular carcinoma indicate macrophage infiltration contribute to tumor ablation in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinhua Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND AIM: Recurrence and metastasis are associated with poor prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma even in the patients who have undergone radical resection. Therefore, effective treatment is urgently needed for improvement of patients' survival. Previously, we reported that nanosecond pulse electric fields (nsPEFs can ablate melanoma by induction of apoptosis and inhibition of angiogenesis. This study aims to investigate the in vivo ablation strategy by comparing the dose effect of nanosecond electric fields in vitro and in vivo on hepatocellular carcinoma. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Four hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines HepG2, SMMC7721, Hep1-6, and HCCLM3 were pulsed to test the anti-proliferation and anti-migration ability of 100 ns nsPEFs in vitro. The animal model of human subdermal xenograft HCCLM3 cells into BALB/c nude mouse was used to test the anti-tumor growth and macrophage infiltration in vivo. RESULTS: In vitro assays showed anti-tumor effect of nsPEFs is dose-dependant. But the in vivo study showed the strategy of low dose and multiple treatments is superior to high dose single treatment. The macrophages infiltration significantly increased in the tumors which were treated by multiple low dose nsPEFs. CONCLUSION: The low dose multiple nsPEFs application is more efficient than high dose single treatment in inhibiting the tumor volume in vivo, which is quite different from the dose-effect relationship in vitro. Beside the electric field strength, the macrophage involvement must be considered to account for effect variability and toxicology in vivo.

  15. Towards immunotherapy with redirected T cells in a large animal model: Ex vivo activation, expansion, and genetic modification of canine T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mata, Melinda; Vera, Juan; Gerken, Claudia; Rooney, Cliona M.; Miller, Tasha; Pfent, Catherine; Wang, Lisa L.; Wilson-Robles, Heather M.; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising anti-tumor activity in early phase clinical studies, especially for hematological malignancies. However, most preclinical models do not reliably mimic human disease. We reasoned that developing an adoptive T-cell therapy approach for spontaneous osteosarcoma (OS) occurring in dogs would more closely reproduce the condition in human cancer. To generate CAR-expressing canine T cells we developed expansion and transduction protocols that allow for the generation of sufficient numbers of CAR-expressing canine T cells for future clinical studies in dogs within 2 weeks of ex vivo culture. To evaluate the functionality of CAR-expressing canine T cells we targeted HER2-positive OS. We demonstrate that canine OS is positive for HER2, and that canine T cells expressing a HER2-specific CAR with human-derived transmembrane and CD28.ζ signaling domains recognize and kill HER2-positive canine OS cell lines in an antigen-dependent manner. To reduce the potential immunogenicity of the CAR we evaluated a CAR with canine-derived transmembrane and signaling domains, and found no functional difference between human and canine CARs. Hence, we have successfully developed a strategy to generate CAR-expressing canine T cells for future preclinical studies in dogs. Testing T-cell therapies in an immunocompetent, outbred animal model may improve our ability to predict their safety and efficacy prior to conducting studies in humans. PMID:25198528

  16. Chick embryo partial ischemia model: a new approach to study ischemia ex vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syamantak Majumder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Ischemia is a pathophysiological condition due to blockade in blood supply to a specific tissue thus damaging the physiological activity of the tissue. Different in vivo models are presently available to study ischemia in heart and other tissues. However, no ex vivo ischemia model has been available to date for routine ischemia research and for faster screening of anti-ischemia drugs. In the present study, we took the opportunity to develop an ex vivo model of partial ischemia using the vascular bed of 4(th day incubated chick embryo. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Ischemia was created in chick embryo by ligating the right vitelline artery using sterile surgical suture. Hypoxia inducible factor- 1 alpha (HIF-1alpha, creatine phospho kinase-MB and reactive oxygen species in animal tissues and cells were measured to confirm ischemia in chick embryo. Additionally, ranolazine, N-acetyl cysteine and trimetazidine were administered as an anti-ischemic drug to validate the present model. Results from the present study depicted that blocking blood flow elevates HIF-1alpha, lipid peroxidation, peroxynitrite level in ischemic vessels while ranolazine administration partially attenuates ischemia driven HIF-1alpha expression. Endothelial cell incubated on ischemic blood vessels elucidated a higher level of HIF-1alpha expression with time while ranolazine treatment reduced HIF-1alpha in ischemic cells. Incubation of caprine heart strip on chick embryo ischemia model depicted an elevated creatine phospho kinase-MB activity under ischemic condition while histology of the treated heart sections evoked edema and disruption of myofibril structures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present study concluded that chick embryo partial ischemia model can be used as a novel ex vivo model of ischemia. Therefore, the present model can be used parallel with the known in vivo ischemia models in understanding the mechanistic insight of ischemia development and in

  17. An in vivo model to study the anti-malaric capacity of plant extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Misael Chinchilla

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available An in vivo model to study the antimalaric effect of plant extracts is described. White mice (25-30g body weight are treated subcutaneously with 0.6ml of the diluted extract starting seven days before P. berghei infection; treatment continues until death or for 30 days. Simultaneously 0.2ml of the extract are applied per os starting three days before infection. In a test of the model, treated and non-treated animals differed in body weight, survival time, haematocrite, parasitemia development, and spleen or liver weight of recent dead or killed mice.

  18. Where are we in the study of animal emotions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vere, Amber J; Kuczaj, Stan A

    2016-09-01

    The study of emotion is rife with debate over issues as fundamental as how to define emotion, and such disputes are particularly common in the nonhuman animal emotion literature. Here, we seek to address some of these issues, especially in terms of how they relate to animal research. Definitional issues are prevalent; clear definitions are often not given of crucial terms, including 'emotion,' and even where provided, such terms may be used inconsistently throughout a single paper. Further disagreement over the structure of emotions, and the nature of conscious experiences involved, leads to consistent differences in authors' criteria for emotions. We concur with those who believe that animals experience emotions and believe that animal emotions should be studied in their own right, not only as they compare to those of humans. We also propose several avenues for future research that we believe will further our understanding of animal emotions. First, the use of multiple measurement methods to assess emotional responses is most likely to provide the information necessary to distinguish between various states and opens the field to more research in harder-to-study species, such as marine mammals. Second, researchers should also endeavor to increase the range of emotions studied, particularly positive ones, in order to move toward a more balanced range of studied states. Finally, we believe that several aspects of personality research would prove beneficial to the study of animal emotions, particularly the distinction between trait and state emotion and the use of the rating method. WIREs Cogn Sci 2016, 7:354-362. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1399 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Childhood Cruelty to Animals: A Tri-National Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellor, David; Yeow, James; Hapidzal, Noor Fizlee Mohd; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yokoyama, Akimitsu; Nobuzane, Yosuke

    2009-01-01

    Childhood cruelty to animals is a symptom of conduct disorder that has been linked to the perpetration of violence in later life. Research has identified several factors associated with its etiology, including social factors. However, no cross-cultural studies on this phenomenon have been reported. This study investigated childhood cruelty to…

  20. Influence of laboratory animal hosts on the life cycle of Hyalomma marginatum and implications for an in vivo transmission model for Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysen eGargili

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV is one of the most geographically widespread arboviruses and causes a severe hemorrhagic syndrome in humans. The virus circulates in nature in a vertebrate-tick cycle and ticks of the genus Hyalomma are the main vectors and reservoirs. Although the tick vector plays a central role in the maintenance and transmission of CCHFV in nature, comparatively little is known of CCHFV-tick interactions. This is mostly due to the fact that establishing tick colonies is laborious, and working with CCHFV requires a biosafety level 4 laboratory (BSL4 in many countries. Nonetheless, an in vivo transmission model is essential to understand the epidemiology of the transmission cycle of CCHFV. In addition, important parameters such as vectorial capacity of tick species, levels of infection in the host necessary to infect the tick, and aspects of virus transmission by tick bite including the influence of tick saliva, cannot be investigated any other way. Here, we evaluate the influence of different laboratory animal species as hosts supporting the life cycle of Hyalomma marginatum, a two-host tick. Rabbits were considered the host of choice for the maintenance of the uninfected colonies due to high larval attachment rates, shorter larval-nymphal feeding times, higher nymphal molting rates, high egg hatching rates and higher conversion efficiency index. Furthermore, we describe the successful establishment of an in vivo transmission model CCHFV in a BSL4 biocontainment setting using interferon knockout mice. This will give us a new tool to study the transmission and interaction of CCHFV with its tick vector.

  1. In vitro and in vivo approaches to study osteocyte biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalajzic, Ivo; Matthews, Brya G; Torreggiani, Elena; Harris, Marie A; Divieti Pajevic, Paola; Harris, Stephen E

    2013-06-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant cell population of the bone lineage, have been a major focus in the bone research field in recent years. This population of cells that resides within mineralized matrix is now thought to be the mechanosensory cell in bone and plays major roles in the regulation of bone formation and resorption. Studies of osteocytes had been impaired by their location, resulting in numerous attempts to isolate primary osteocytes and to generate cell lines representative of the osteocytic phenotype. Progress has been achieved in recent years by utilizing in vivo genetic technology and generation of osteocyte directed transgenic and gene deficiency mouse models. We will provide an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo models utilized to study osteocyte biology. We discuss generation of osteocyte-like cell lines and isolation of primary osteocytes and summarize studies that have utilized these cellular models to understand the functional role of osteocytes. Approaches that attempt to selectively identify and isolate osteocytes using fluorescent protein reporters driven by regulatory elements of genes that are highly expressed in osteocytes will be discussed. In addition, recent in vivo studies utilizing overexpression or conditional deletion of various genes using dentin matrix protein (Dmp1) directed Cre recombinase are outlined. In conclusion, evaluation of the benefits and deficiencies of currently used cell lines/genetic models in understanding osteocyte biology underlines the current progress in this field. The future efforts will be directed towards developing novel in vitro and in vivo models that would additionally facilitate in understanding the multiple roles of osteocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Immunomodulatory effect of Moringa peregrina leaves, ex vivo and in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Oran, Sawsan Atallah; Hassuneh, Mona Rushdie; Al-Qaralleh, Haitham Naief; Rayyan, Walid Abu; Al-Thunibat, Osama Yosef; Mallah, Eyad; Abu-Rayyan, Ahmed; Salem, Shadi

    2017-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the in vivo and ex vivo immunomodulatory effect of the ethanol leaves extract of Moringa peregrina in Balb/c mice. For this study, five groups of 5 Balb/c mice were given a single acute subtoxic oral dose of the ethanolic extract at 1.13, 11.30, 23.40 and 113.4 mg/kg and the immunomodulatory effect was assessed on the 6th day following the ingestion. In the (non-functional) assessment, the effect of the extract on the body weight, relative lymphoid organ weight, splenic cellularity and peripheral blood hematologic parameters were evaluated. While in the immunomodulation assessment (functional), we investigated the effect of the extract on the proliferative capacity of splenic lymphocytes and peripheral T and B lymphocytes using mitogen blastogenesis, mixed allogeneic MLR and IgM-Plaque forming cells assays. The ingestion of M. peregrina extract caused a significant increase in the body weight, weight and number of cells of spleen and lymph nodes of the treated mice. Furthermore, the count of RBCs, WBCs, platelets, hemoglobin concentration and PCV % were increased by the extract treatment in a dose-dependent manner. M. peregrina enhanced the proliferative responses of splenic lymphocytes for both T cell and B-cell mitogens. Likewise, the mixed lymphocyte reaction MLR assay has revealed a T-cell dependent proliferation enhancement in the extract treated mice. Moreover, the oral administration of M. peregrina leaves extracts significantly increased PFCs/106 splenocytes in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, subtoxic acute doses of M. peregrina extract demonstrated significant potential as an immunomodulatory agent even at the lowest dose of 1.13 mg/kg. PMID:29204086

  3. In vivo assessment of 111In labelled lymphocyte gut homing in a TNBS colitis mouse model determined by dedicated animal pinhole SPECT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bennink, R.J.; Bruin, C.M. de; Montfrans, C. van; Jonge, W.J. de; Deventer, S.J. van; Velde, A.A. te

    2002-01-01

    Aims: The increasing knowledge of the molecular basis of leukocyte trafficking results in the development of novel anti-inflammatory strategies for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). For optimal evaluation of therapy efficacy, information about inflammatory activity in bowel segments or lymphocyte recirculation and kinetics in the follow-up of experimental treatment for IBD is needed. The aim of this study was to evaluate a non-invasive scintigraphic technique, able to assess lymphocyte trafficking in a trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced mouse colitis model of IBD. Materials and Methods: TNBS sensitised and non-sensitised murine total splenocytes, isolated from donor TNBS colitis or placebo treated BALB/c mice, were labelled in vitro with 111 In-oxine and injected intravenously into recipient BALB/c mice with TNBS-induced colitis or healthy BALB/c mice instilled with saline. Biodistribution and specific radioactive uptake, representing transferred cells, was determined by serial dedicated animal planar scintigraphy and pinhole SPECT of the abdomen 4, 24 and 48h post injection of labelled cells. Moreover, the severity of inflammation in recipient mice was determined by histological scoring. Results: Lymphocyte migration to the inflamed colon of recipient mice increased in time and was maximal at 48h after administration of the 111 In-oxine labelled donor splenocytes. The highest specific radioactive uptake ratio in the colon after 48h was observed in recipient mice with TNBS colitis that received TNBS sensitised lymphocytes (saline vs. TNBS colitis resp. 0.22 ± 0.035 and 0.51 ± 0.033 mean ± SEM p<0.01). Histological scoring confirmed colitis in the TNBS colitis recipient groups and excluded colitis in the saline instilled recipient groups. TNBS colitis recipient mice that received sensitised lymphocytes had a more severe colitis upon histological evaluation as compared with TNBS colitis recipient mice receiving non-sensitised cells (mean histological

  4. Animal Models for the Study of Female Sexual Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marson, Lesley; Giamberardino, Maria Adele; Costantini, Raffaele; Czakanski, Peter; Wesselmann, Ursula

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Significant progress has been made in elucidating the physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of female sexual function through preclinical animal research. The continued development of animal models is vital for the understanding and treatment of the many diverse disorders that occur in women. Aim To provide an updated review of the experimental models evaluating female sexual function that may be useful for clinical translation. Methods Review of English written, peer-reviewed literature, primarily from 2000 to 2012, that described studies on female sexual behavior related to motivation, arousal, physiological monitoring of genital function and urogenital pain. Main Outcomes Measures Analysis of supporting evidence for the suitability of the animal model to provide measurable indices related to desire, arousal, reward, orgasm, and pelvic pain. Results The development of female animal models has provided important insights in the peripheral and central processes regulating sexual function. Behavioral models of sexual desire, motivation, and reward are well developed. Central arousal and orgasmic responses are less well understood, compared with the physiological changes associated with genital arousal. Models of nociception are useful for replicating symptoms and identifying the neurobiological pathways involved. While in some cases translation to women correlates with the findings in animals, the requirement of circulating hormones for sexual receptivity in rodents and the multifactorial nature of women’s sexual function requires better designed studies and careful analysis. The current models have studied sexual dysfunction or pelvic pain in isolation; combining these aspects would help to elucidate interactions of the pathophysiology of pain and sexual dysfunction. Conclusions Basic research in animals has been vital for understanding the anatomy, neurobiology, and physiological mechanisms underlying sexual function and urogenital pain

  5. Endoscopic colostomy with percutaneous colopexy: an animal feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante-Lopez, Leonardo Alfonso; Sulbaran, Marianny; Nahas, Sergio Carlos; de Moura, Eduardo Guimaraes Horneaux; Nahas, Caio Sergio; Marques, Carlos Frederico; Sakai, Christiano; Cecconello, Ivan; Sakai, Paulo

    2017-04-01

    Indications for colostomy in colorectal diseases are obstruction of the large bowel, such as in cancer, diverticular disease in the acute phase, post-radiotherapy enteritis, complex perirectal fistulas, anorectal trauma and severe anal incontinence. Some critically ill patients cannot tolerate an exploratory laparotomy, and laparoscopic assisted colostomy also requires general anesthesia. To evaluate the feasibility, safety and efficacy of performing colostomy assisted by colonoscopy and percutaneous colopexy. Five pigs underwent endoscopic assisted colostomy with percutaneous colopexy. Animals were evaluated in post-operative days 1, 2, 5 and 7 for feeding acceptance and colostomy characteristics. On day 7 full colonoscopy was performed on animals followed by exploratory laparotomy. Average procedure time was 27 minutes (21-54 min). Postoperative mobility and feeding of animals were immediate after anesthesia recovery. Position of the colostomy, edges color, appearance of periostomal area, as well as its function was satisfactory in four animals. Retraction of colostomy was present in one pig. The colonoscopy and laparotomy control on the seventh day were considered as normal. A bladder perforation that was successfully repaired through the colostomy incision occurred in one pig. The main limitation of this study is its experimental nature. Endoscopic assisted colostomy with percutaneous colopexy proves to be a safe and effective method with low morbidity for performing colostomy in experimental animals, with possible clinical application in humans.

  6. Prospects for new information relevant to radiation protection from studies of experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClellan, R.O.

    1988-01-01

    The theory underlying radiation protection was developed from studies of people, laboratory animals, tissues, cells and macromolecules. Data on people were obtained from opportunistic studies of individuals previously exposed to radiation. Rarely has it been possible to conduct prospective studies of people exposed to known quantities of radiation, which sharply restricts the nature of questions that they can address. In contrast, studies using laboratory animals and simpler biological systems can be designed to address specific questions, using controlled exposure conditions. In-vitro research with macromolecules, cells and tissues leads to understanding normal and disease processes in isolated biological components. Studies of the intact animals provide opportunities to study in vivo interactive mechanisms observed in vitro and their role in development of radiation-induced diseases such as cancer. In the future, studies of intact animals should prove increasingly valuable in linking new knowledge at the subanimal level with the more fragmentary information obtained from direct observations on people. This will provide insight into important issues such as (a) effects of low-level radiation exposures, (b) mechanism of cancer induction at high versus low radiation doses, and (c) influence of factors such as nutrition and exposure to chemicals on radiation-induced cancer. This presentation describes strategies for conducting and integrating results of research using macromolecules, cells, tissues, laboratory animals and people to improve our understanding of radiation-induced cancer. It will also emphasize the problems encountered in studies at all levels of biological organization when the disease is observed in low excess incidence long after exposure to the toxicant

  7. Experimental animal studies of radon and cigarette smoke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.; Dagle, G.E.; Gies, R.A.; Smith, L.G.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1992-01-01

    Cigarette-smoking is a dominant cause of lung cancer and confounds risk assessment of exposure to radon decay products. Evidence in humans on the interaction between cigarette-smoking and exposure to radon decay products, although limited, indicates a possible synergy. Experimental animal data, in addition to showing synergy, also show a decrease or no change in risk with added cigarette-smoke exposures. This article reviews previous animal data developed at Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires and Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) on mixed exposures to radon and cigarette smoke, and highlights new initiation-promotion-initiation (IPI) studies at PNL that were designed within the framework of a two-mutation carcinogenesis model. Also presented are the PNL exposure system, experimental protocols, dosimetry, and biological data observed to date in IPI animals

  8. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Le Cann

    Full Text Available The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level, the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  9. Pedicle Screw Fixation Study in Immature Porcine Spines to Improve Pullout Resistance during Animal Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Cann, Sophie; Cachon, Thibaut; Viguier, Eric; Miladi, Lotfi; Odent, Thierry; Rossi, Jean-Marie; Chabrand, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The porcine model is frequently used during development and validation of new spinal devices, because of its likeness to the human spine. These spinal devices are frequently composed of pedicle screws with a reputation for stable fixation but which can suffer pullouts during preclinical implantation on young animals, leading to high morbidity. With a view to identifying the best choices to optimize pedicle screw fixation in the porcine model, this study evaluates ex vivo the impact of weight (age) of the animal, the level of the vertebrae (lumbar or thoracic) and the type of screw anchorage (mono- or bi-cortical) on pedicle screw pullouts. Among the 80 pig vertebrae (90- and 140-day-old) tested in this study, the average screw pullout forces ranged between 419.9N and 1341.2N. In addition, statistical differences were found between test groups, pointing out the influence of the three parameters stated above. We found that the the more caudally the screws are positioned (lumbar level), the greater their pullout resistance is, moreover, screw stability increases with the age, and finally, the screws implanted with a mono-cortical anchorage sustained lower pullout forces than those implanted with a bi-cortical anchorage. We conclude that the best anchorage can be obtained with older animals, using a lumbar fixation and long screws traversing the vertebra and inducing bi-cortical anchorage. In very young animals, pedicle screw fixations need to be bi-cortical and more numerous to prevent pullout.

  10. Study on advancement of in vivo counting using mathematical simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinase, Sakae [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-05-01

    To obtain an assessment of the committed effective dose, individual monitoring for the estimation of intakes of radionuclides is required. For individual monitoring of exposure to intakes of radionuclides, direct measurement of radionuclides in the body - in vivo counting- is very useful. To advance in a precision in vivo counting which fulfills the requirements of ICRP 1990 recommendations, some problems, such as the investigation of uncertainties in estimates of body burdens by in vivo counting, and the selection of the way to improve the precision, have been studied. In the present study, a calibration technique for in vivo counting application using Monte Carlo simulation was developed. The advantage of the technique is that counting efficiency can be obtained for various shapes and sizes that are very difficult to change for phantoms. To validate the calibration technique, the response functions and counting efficiencies of a whole-body counter installed in JAERI were evaluated using the simulation and measurements. Consequently, the calculations are in good agreement with the measurements. The method for the determination of counting efficiency curves as a function of energy was developed using the present technique and a physiques correction equation was derived from the relationship between parameters of correction factor and counting efficiencies of the JAERI whole-body counter. The uncertainties in body burdens of {sup 137}Cs estimated with the JAERI whole-body counter were also investigated using the Monte Carlo simulation and measurements. It was found that the uncertainties of body burdens estimated with the whole-body counter are strongly dependent on various sources of uncertainty such as radioactivity distribution within the body and counting statistics. Furthermore, the evaluation method of the peak efficiencies of a Ge semi-conductor detector was developed by Monte Carlo simulation for optimum arrangement of Ge semi-conductor detectors for

  11. Study on gastro intestinal parasite of cattle at Horoguduru Animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cross sectional study was conducted to determine the prevalence of gastro intestinal parasite and protozoan emeria, to determine the common risk factor and to identify the commonly existing ... Carpological examination was done at Wollega University Shambu campus animal science and, food and nutrition department.

  12. Comparative Study of Biogas Yield Pattern in Some Animal and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research was a laboratory based work which compared Biogas yield patterns in some animal and household wastes. The parameters studied included dilution and concentration of substrates, the effect of available space in the digester, and the comparative biogas yield from different wastes. The method of research ...

  13. Studies to distinguish between human and animal faecal pollution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study the application of F-RNA coliphages and faecal sterols to distinction between human and animal excreta has .... in a shaking water bath (LABOTEC) at 100 r·min-1. .... calibration standards that were plotted using Microsoft Excel.

  14. Field Research Studying Whales in an Undergraduate Animal Behavior Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLaren, R. David; Schulte, Dianna; Kennedy, Jen

    2012-01-01

    This work describes a new field research laboratory in an undergraduate animal behavior course involving the study of whale behavior, ecology and conservation in partnership with a non-profit research organization--the Blue Ocean Society for Marine Conservation (BOS). The project involves two weeks of training and five weekend trips on whale watch…

  15. Pharmaco-EEG Studies in Animals: A History-Based Introduction to Contemporary Translational Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drinkenburg, Wilhelmus H I M; Ahnaou, Abdallah; Ruigt, Gé S F

    2015-01-01

    drugs on arousal and sleep architecture, assessing their neuropharmacological characteristics in vivo, including central exposure and information on kinetics. In view of the clear disadvantages as well as advantages of animal p-EEG as compared to clinical p-EEG, general statements about the usefulness of EEG as a biomarker to demonstrate the translatability of p-EEG effects should be made with caution, however, because they depend on the particular EEG or sleep parameter that is being studied. The contribution of animal p-EEG studies to the translational characterisation of centrally active drugs can be furthered by adherence to guidelines for methodological standardisation, which are presently under construction by the International Pharmaco-EEG Society (IPEG). © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Improvement of semi-quantitative small-animal PET data with recovery coefficients: a phantom and rat study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aide, Nicolas; Louis, Marie-Hélène; Dutoit, Soizic; Labiche, Alexandre; Lemoisson, Edwige; Briand, Mélanie; Nataf, Valérie; Poulain, Laurent; Gauduchon, Pascal; Talbot, Jean-Noël; Montravers, Françoise

    2007-10-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of semi-quantitative small-animal PET data, uncorrected for attenuation, and then of the same semi-quantitative data corrected by means of recovery coefficients (RCs) based on phantom studies. A phantom containing six fillable spheres (diameter range: 4.4-14 mm) was filled with an 18F-FDG solution (spheres/background activity=10.1, 5.1 and 2.5). RCs, defined as measured activity/expected activity, were calculated. Nude rats harbouring tumours (n=50) were imaged after injection of 18F-FDG and sacrificed. The standardized uptake value (SUV) in tumours was determined with small-animal PET and compared to ex-vivo counting (ex-vivo SUV). Small-animal PET SUVs were corrected with RCs based on the greatest tumour diameter. Tumour proliferation was assessed with cyclin A immunostaining and correlated to the SUV. RCs ranged from 0.33 for the smallest sphere to 0.72 for the largest. A sigmoidal correlation was found between RCs and sphere diameters (r(2)=0.99). Small-animal PET SUVs were well correlated with ex-vivo SUVs (y=0.48x-0.2; r(2)=0.71) and the use of RCs based on the greatest tumour diameter significantly improved regression (y=0.84x-0.81; r(2)=0.77), except for tumours with important necrosis. Similar results were obtained without sacrificing animals, by using PET images to estimate tumour dimensions. RC-based corrections improved correlation between small-animal PET SUVs and tumour proliferation (uncorrected data: Rho=0.79; corrected data: Rho=0.83). Recovery correction significantly improves both accuracy of small-animal PET semi-quantitative data in rat studies and their correlation with tumour proliferation, except for largely necrotic tumours.

  17. The contribution of animal models to the study of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speakman, John; Hambly, Catherine; Mitchell, Sharon; Król, Elzbieta

    2008-10-01

    Obesity results from prolonged imbalance of energy intake and energy expenditure. Animal models have provided a fundamental contribution to the historical development of understanding the basic parameters that regulate the components of our energy balance. Five different types of animal model have been employed in the study of the physiological and genetic basis of obesity. The first models reflect single gene mutations that have arisen spontaneously in rodent colonies and have subsequently been characterized. The second approach is to speed up the random mutation rate artificially by treating rodents with mutagens or exposing them to radiation. The third type of models are mice and rats where a specific gene has been disrupted or over-expressed as a deliberate act. Such genetically-engineered disruptions may be generated through the entire body for the entire life (global transgenic manipulations) or restricted in both time and to certain tissue or cell types. In all these genetically-engineered scenarios, there are two types of situation that lead to insights: where a specific gene hypothesized to play a role in the regulation of energy balance is targeted, and where a gene is disrupted for a different purpose, but the consequence is an unexpected obese or lean phenotype. A fourth group of animal models concern experiments where selective breeding has been utilized to derive strains of rodents that differ in their degree of fatness. Finally, studies have been made of other species including non-human primates and dogs. In addition to studies of the physiological and genetic basis of obesity, studies of animal models have also informed us about the environmental aspects of the condition. Studies in this context include exploring the responses of animals to high fat or high fat/high sugar (Cafeteria) diets, investigations of the effects of dietary restriction on body mass and fat loss, and studies of the impact of candidate pharmaceuticals on components of energy

  18. Toxicity studies of drugs and chemicals in animals: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Saganuwan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Toxicity study is the investigation of either short or long-term toxic effects of a drug or chemical on animals. The toxicity is dose-dependent as asserted by Paracelsus over 500 years ago. However, short-term toxic effect is determined using median lethal dose (LD50 first introduced by Trevan in 1927 and revised many times. Presently there is a growing preponderance of rejection of scientific papers on acute toxicity study, simply because of the belief that in the current hazard and safety as-sessment of drugs and chemicals, LD50 values are no longer used. In view of this, literature search was carried out with a view to investigating the relevance of LD50 in development and assessment of drugs and chemicals. The findings revealed that in the past, many animals had been used for LD50 determination. OECD has reduced the number of test animals to 5–15 and presently it is further re-duced to 2–6. Acute toxicity study is being carried out in medicinal plants research and in the study of patent medicine. Although the application of LD50 has been drastically reduced, it is still applied and accepted in some parts of the world. Moreover, animals on which LD50 tests are conducted, should be allowed to die to see the end effect of the test drug or chemical because euthanisia of test animals may mask some toxicity signs of the test agents. Therefore, toxicity study of drugs and chemicals is a sci-entific process necessary for discovery and development of drugs as well as identification of potential toxicants.

  19. A Guide to Studying Human Hair Follicle Cycling In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Ji Won; Kloepper, Jennifer; Langan, Ewan A; Kim, Yongsoo; Yeo, Joongyeub; Kim, Min Ji; Hsi, Tsai-Ching; Rose, Christian; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Lee, Seok-Jong; Seykora, John; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan; Kim, Moonkyu; Paus, Ralf; Plikus, Maksim V

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo lifelong cyclical transformations, progressing through stages of rapid growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative "quiescence" (telogen). Given that HF cycling abnormalities underlie many human hair growth disorders, the accurate classification of individual cycle stages within skin biopsies is clinically important and essential for hair research. For preclinical human hair research purposes, human scalp skin can be xenografted onto immunocompromised mice to study human HF cycling and manipulate long-lasting anagen in vivo. Although available for mice, a comprehensive guide on how to recognize different human hair cycle stages in vivo is lacking. In this article, we present such a guide, which uses objective, well-defined, and reproducible criteria, and integrates simple morphological indicators with advanced, (immuno)-histochemical markers. This guide also characterizes human HF cycling in xenografts and highlights the utility of this model for in vivo hair research. Detailed schematic drawings and representative micrographs provide examples of how best to identify human HF stages, even in suboptimally sectioned tissue, and practical recommendations are given for designing human-on-mouse hair cycle experiments. Thus, this guide seeks to offer a benchmark for human hair cycle stage classification, for both hair research experts and newcomers to the field. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The use of transgenic animals to study lipoprotein metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubin, E.M.; Plump, A.S.

    1993-12-01

    The application of transgenic technology to lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis was first reported in 1988. Today, a large percentage of the genes involved in lipoprotein metabolism have been overexpressed in mice, and a substantial number of these same genes have been disrupted by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. The utility of animal models of lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis is far-reaching given the complex nature of these systems. There are at least 17 known genes directly involved in lipoprotein metabolism and likely dozens more may be involved. This massive network of interacting factors has necessitated the development of in vivo systems which can be subject to genetic manipulation. The power of overexpression is obvious: elucidating function in a relatively controlled genetic environment in which the whole system is present and operational. The not-so-obvious problem with transgenics is ``background,`` or for purposes of the current discussion, the mouse`s own lipoprotein system. With the advent of gene knockout, we have been given the ability to overcome ``background.`` By recreating the genetic complement of the mouse we can alter a system in essentially any manner desired. As unique tools, and in combination with one another, the overexpression of foreign genes and the targeted disruption or alteration of endogenous genes has already and will continue to offer a wealth of information on the biology of lipoprotein metabolism and its effect on atherosclerosis susceptibility.

  1. Gene transfer in rodents and primates as a new tool for modeling diseases in animals and assessing functions by in vivo imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deglon, N. [Atomic Energy Commission (CEA), Dept. of Medical Research and MIRCen Program, 91 - Orsay (France)

    2006-07-01

    The identification of disease-causing genes in familial forms of neuro-degenerative disorders and the development of genetic models closely replicating human CNS pathologies have drastically changed our understanding of the molecular events leading to neuronal cell death. If these achievements open new opportunities of therapeutic interventions efficient delivery systems taking into account the specificity of the central nervous system are required to administer therapeutic candidates. In addition, there is a need to develop 1) genetic models in large animals that replicate late stages of the diseases and 2) imaging techniques suitable for longitudinal, quantitative and non-invasive evaluation of disease progression and the evaluation of new therapeutic strategies. Over the last few years, we have investigated the potential of lentiviral vectors as tool to model and treat CNS disorders. The use of lentiviral vectors to create animal model of these pathologies holds various advantages compared to classical transgenic approaches. Viral vectors are versatile, highly flexible tools to perform in vivo studies. Multiple genetic models can be created in a short period of time. High transduction efficiencies as well as robust and sustained trans-gene expression lead to the rapid appearance of functional and behavioral abnormalities and severe neuro-degeneration. Targeted injections in different brain areas can be used to investigate the regional specificity of the neuro-pathology and eliminate potential side effects associated with a widespread over-expression of the trans-gene. Finally, models can be established in different mammalian species including non-human primates, thereby providing an opportunity to assess complex behavioral changes and perform longitudinal follow-up of neuro-pathological alterations by imaging. We have demonstrated the proof of principle of this approach for Huntington's disease. We have shown that the intratriatal injection of lentiviral

  2. Gene transfer in rodents and primates as a new tool for modeling diseases in animals and assessing functions by in vivo imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deglon, N.

    2006-01-01

    The identification of disease-causing genes in familial forms of neuro-degenerative disorders and the development of genetic models closely replicating human CNS pathologies have drastically changed our understanding of the molecular events leading to neuronal cell death. If these achievements open new opportunities of therapeutic interventions efficient delivery systems taking into account the specificity of the central nervous system are required to administer therapeutic candidates. In addition, there is a need to develop 1) genetic models in large animals that replicate late stages of the diseases and 2) imaging techniques suitable for longitudinal, quantitative and non-invasive evaluation of disease progression and the evaluation of new therapeutic strategies. Over the last few years, we have investigated the potential of lentiviral vectors as tool to model and treat CNS disorders. The use of lentiviral vectors to create animal model of these pathologies holds various advantages compared to classical transgenic approaches. Viral vectors are versatile, highly flexible tools to perform in vivo studies. Multiple genetic models can be created in a short period of time. High transduction efficiencies as well as robust and sustained trans-gene expression lead to the rapid appearance of functional and behavioral abnormalities and severe neuro-degeneration. Targeted injections in different brain areas can be used to investigate the regional specificity of the neuro-pathology and eliminate potential side effects associated with a widespread over-expression of the trans-gene. Finally, models can be established in different mammalian species including non-human primates, thereby providing an opportunity to assess complex behavioral changes and perform longitudinal follow-up of neuro-pathological alterations by imaging. We have demonstrated the proof of principle of this approach for Huntington's disease. We have shown that the intratriatal injection of lentiviral vector

  3. Synthesis and Evaluation of Novel Imaging Probes for the Study of Glycosylation and Fatty Acid Uptake In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Allison Stacey

    2011-01-01

    Imaging represents a powerful method for advancing our understanding of biology. In particular, it has been used as a tool for the diagnosis and monitoring of diseases in vivo. Bioluminescence imaging (BLI) represents one of the molecular imaging modalities and has been applied to the study of numerous processes in cells and in animals. However, there is a need for the design of new bioluminescence imaging probes for the study of several key metabolic processes. Activatable bioluminescenc...

  4. In vivo studies: comparing the administration via and the impact on the biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinto, Suyene Rocha; Sarcinelle, Michelle Alvares; Souza Albernaz, Marta de; Silva, Franciana Maria Rosa da; Seabra, Sergio Henrique; Almeida do Nascimento, Patricia; Carvalho, Cosme Leonardo Gomes; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    The use of in vivo assay to determine the biodistribution and subsequent inter-comparison with human parameters has been used since the dawn of science. The use of this type of test admits the metabolic equity among animals for inter-comparison. Thus, the use of Wistar rats in particular is quite frequent. Regarding routes of administration, there are three ways to test priority: jugular vein, intraocular (eye plexus) and caudal; there is a consensus that these three pathways behave in the same way, or at least very similar. Biodistribution studies of drugs, especially radiopharmaceuticals, have been using randomly any of these pathways believed to be effective in their likeness without worrying about your real analytic equity. In this study, we performed in vivo assay in 8 Wistar rats using 99mTc -labeled Herceptin to review the route of administration on the biodistribution result. Thus, four mice were injected via the intraocular (eye plexus), and four were injected via tail (caudal plexus). The results were quite disparate and call the attention of the scientific community to reassess the protocols for animal experiments, in order to have uniformity and fairness between the data and may represent a test for human inter-comparison of more reliable and trustworthy way

  5. In vivo longitudinal micro-CT study of bent long limb bones in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Schaepdrijver, Luc; Delille, Peter; Geys, Helena; Boehringer-Shahidi, Christian; Vanhove, Christian

    2014-07-01

    Micro-computed X-ray tomography (micro-CT) has been reported as a reliable method to assess ex vivo rat and rabbit fetal skeletons in embryo-fetal developmental toxicity studies. Since micro-CT is a non-invasive imaging modality it has the potential for longitudinal, in vivo investigation of postnatal skeletal development. This is the first paper using micro-CT to assess the reversibility of drug-induced bent long bones in a longitudinal study from birth to early adulthood in rat offspring. Analysis of the scans obtained on postnatal Day 0, 7, 21 and 80 showed complete recovery or repair of the bent long limb bones (including the scapula) within the first 3 weeks. When assessing risk the ability to demonstrate recovery is highly advantageous when interpreting such transient skeletal change. In summary, in vivo micro-CT of small laboratory animals can aid in non-clinical safety assessment, particularly for specific mechanistic purposes or to address a particular concern in developmental biology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. In vivo biodistribution of 131I labeled bleomycin (BLM) and isomers (A2 and B2) on experimental animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avcibasi, U.; Demiroglu, H.; Uenak, P.; Mueftueler, F.Z.B.; Ichedef, C.A.; Guemueser, F.G.

    2010-01-01

    Bleomycins (BLMs; BLM, A2, and B2) were labeled with 131 I and radiopharmaceutical potentials were investigated using animal models in this study. Quality control procedures were carried out using thin layer radiochromatography (TLRC), high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and liquid chromatography (LC/MS/MS). Labeling yields of radiolabeled BLMs were found to be 90, 68, and 71%, respectively. HPLC chromatograms were taken for BLM and cold iodinated BLM ( 127 I-BLM). Five peaks were detected for BLM and three peaks for 127 I-BLM in the HPLC studies. Two peaks belong to isomers of BLM. The isomers of BLM were purified with using HPLC. Biological activity of BLM was determined on male Albino Wistar rats by biodistribution and scintigraphic studies were performed for BLMs by using New Zealand rabbits. The biodistribution results of 131 I-BLM showed high uptake in the stomach, the bladder, the prostate, the testicle, and the spinal cord in rats. Scintigraphic results on rabbits agrees with that of biodistributional studies on rats. The scintigraphy of radiolabeled isomers ( 131 I-A2 and 131 I-B2) are similarly found with that of 131 I-BLM. (author)

  7. STUDY OF THE TOXIC EFFECTS OF CYPERMETHRIN IN EXPERIMENTAL ANIMALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Mehmood Hasan

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the toxic effects of a commercially available pesticide, cypermethrin (CM, on animals. This pesticide was administered in the form of aerosol spray through a nebulizer. The study was performed in four different groups and a constant dose of the pesticide was administered once, twice, thrice and four times a day to the respective group for a period of 30 days. The animals were then dissected to study the pesticide effects on different organs. The organs were preserved in 10% formalin. The tissues were processed by basic histopathological method and the slides were prepared for observation. The results were recorded on a performa and were quantified by a unique scoring system. It is concluded that the injurious effects to the mentioned organs were dose and frequency dependent.

  8. Multigram Synthesis and in Vivo Efficacy Studies of a Novel Multitarget Anti-Alzheimer’s Compound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Sola

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We describe the multigram synthesis and in vivo efficacy studies of a donepezil‒huprine hybrid that has been found to display a promising in vitro multitarget profile of interest for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease (AD. Its synthesis features as the key step a novel multigram preparative chromatographic resolution of intermediate racemic huprine Y by chiral HPLC. Administration of this compound to transgenic CL4176 and CL2006 Caenorhabditis elegans strains expressing human Aβ42, here used as simplified animal models of AD, led to a significant protection from the toxicity induced by Aβ42. However, this protective effect was not accompanied, in CL2006 worms, by a reduction of amyloid deposits. Oral administration for 3 months to transgenic APPSL mice, a well-established animal model of AD, improved short-term memory, but did not alter brain levels of Aβ peptides nor cortical and hippocampal amyloid plaque load. Despite the clear protective and cognitive effects of AVCRI104P4, the lack of Aβ lowering effect in vivo might be related to its lower in vitro potency toward Aβ aggregation and formation as compared with its higher anticholinesterase activities. Further lead optimization in this series should thus focus on improving the anti-amyloid/anticholinesterase activity ratio.

  9. In vivo body composition studies in malnourished patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, B J; Blagojevic, N

    1987-09-01

    The establishment of an in vivo TBN facility at Lucas Heights, together with measurement techniques for whole body and extracellular water, is leading to an expanded interest in the relationships between clinical status, body composition and dietary regimes. The ANSTO program provides the opportunity for the first quantitative assessments of these factors in Australia. Body composition studies provide a common link with other-wise unrelated physiological or psychological diseases, and a pool of normal data is being established. Substantial improvements in patient care and quality of life should result from this project, together with a deeper understanding of the importance of body composition in disease-induced malnutrition.

  10. In vivo body composition studies in malnourished patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.; Blagojevic, N.

    1987-01-01

    The establishment of an in vivo TBN facility at Lucas Heights, together with measurement techniques for whole body and extracellular water, is leading to an expanded interest in the relationships between clinical status, body composition and dietary regimes. The ANSTO program provides the opportunity for the first quantitative assessments of these factors in Australia. Body composition studies provide a common link with other-wise unrelated physiological or psychological diseases, and a pool of normal data is being established. Substantial improvements in patient care and quality of life should result from this project, together with a deeper understanding of the importance of body composition in disease-induced malnutrition

  11. Reproduction in the space environment: Part I. Animal reproductive studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santy, P. A.; Jennings, R. T.; Craigie, D.

    1990-01-01

    Mankind's exploration and colonization of the frontier of space will ultimately depend on men's and women's ability to live, work, and reproduce in the space environment. This paper reviews animal studies, from microorganisms to mammals, done in space or under space-simulated conditions, which identify some of the key areas which might interfere with human reproductive physiology and/or embryonic development. Those space environmental factors which impacted almost all species included: microgravity, artificial gravity, radiation, and closed life support systems. These factors may act independently and in combination to produce their effects. To date, there have been no studies which have looked at the entire process of reproduction in any animal species. This type of investigation will be critical in understanding and preventing the problems which will affect human reproduction. Part II will discuss these problems directly as they relate to human physiology.

  12. Surface modification of nano-silica on the ligament advanced reinforcement system for accelerated bone formation: primary human osteoblasts testing in vitro and animal testing in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mengmeng; Wang, Shiwen; Jiang, Jia; Sun, Jiashu; Li, Yuzhuo; Huang, Deyong; Long, Yun-Ze; Zheng, Wenfu; Chen, Shiyi; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-05-07

    The Ligament Advanced Reinforcement System (LARS) has been considered as a promising graft for ligament reconstruction. To improve its biocompatibility and effectiveness on new bone formation, we modified the surface of a polyethylene terephthalate (PET) ligament with nanoscale silica using atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and silica polymerization. The modified ligament is tested by both in vitro and in vivo experiments. Human osteoblast testing in vitro exhibits an ∼21% higher value in cell viability for silica-modified grafts compared with original grafts. Animal testing in vivo shows that there is new formed bone in the case of a nanoscale silica-coated ligament. These results demonstrate that our approach for nanoscale silica surface modification on LARS could be potentially applied for ligament reconstruction.

  13. Animals devoid of pulmonary system as infection models in the study of lung bacterial pathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Hernández, Yamilé; Yero, Daniel; Pinos-Rodríguez, Juan M.; Gibert, Isidre

    2015-01-01

    Biological disease models can be difficult and costly to develop and use on a routine basis. Particularly, in vivo lung infection models performed to study lung pathologies use to be laborious, demand a great time and commonly are associated with ethical issues. When infections in experimental animals are used, they need to be refined, defined, and validated for their intended purpose. Therefore, alternative and easy to handle models of experimental infections are still needed to test the virulence of bacterial lung pathogens. Because non-mammalian models have less ethical and cost constraints as a subjects for experimentation, in some cases would be appropriated to include these models as valuable tools to explore host–pathogen interactions. Numerous scientific data have been argued to the more extensive use of several kinds of alternative models, such as, the vertebrate zebrafish (Danio rerio), and non-vertebrate insects and nematodes (e.g., Caenorhabditis elegans) in the study of diverse infectious agents that affect humans. Here, we review the use of these vertebrate and non-vertebrate models in the study of bacterial agents, which are considered the principal causes of lung injury. Curiously none of these animals have a respiratory system as in air-breathing vertebrates, where respiration takes place in lungs. Despite this fact, with the present review we sought to provide elements in favor of the use of these alternative animal models of infection to reveal the molecular signatures of host–pathogen interactions. PMID:25699030

  14. Drug induced acute kidney injury: an experimental animal study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, M.W.A.; Khan, B.T.; Qazi, R.A.; Ashraf, M.; Waqar, M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To assess the extent of drug induced nephrotoxicity in laboratory animals for determining the role and extent of iatrogenic kidney damage in patients exposed to nephrotoxic drugs in various clinical setups. Study Design: Randomized control trail. Place and Duration of study: Pharmacology department and animal house of Army Medical College from Jan 2011 to Aug 2011. Material and Methods: Thirty six mixed breed rabbits were used in this study. Animals were randomly divided into six groups consisting of six rabbits in each. Groups were named A, B, C, D, E and F. Group A was control group. Group B was given 0.9% normal saline. Group C rabbits were given acute nephrotoxic single dose of amphotericin B deoxycholate. Group D received 0.9% normal saline 10ml/kg followed by amphotericin B infusion. Group E was injected acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Group F received saline loading along with acute nephrotoxic regimen of cyclosporine and amphotericin B infusion. Results: Biochemical and histopathological analysis showed significant kidney injury in rabbits exposed to acute nephrotoxic doses of amphotericin B and cyclosporine. Toxicity was additive when the two drugs were administered simultaneously. Group of rabbits with saline loading had significantly lesser kidney damage. Conclusion: Iatrogenic acute kidney damage is a major cause of morbidity in experimental animals exposed to such nephrotoxic drugs like amphotericin B and cyclosporine, used either alone or in combination. Clinical studies are recommended to assess the extent of iatrogenic renal damage in patients and its economic burden. Efficient and cost effective protective measure may be adopted in clinical setups against such adverse effects. (author)

  15. Study on Romanian Consumers’ Opinion Regarding the Animal Welfare Labelling of Animal Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludovic Toma Cziszter

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to investigate the influence some factors on the consumers’ opinion regarding the animal welfare labelling of animal products. The analysed question was: “When purchasing eggs, meat or milk can you easily identify from the label those products sourced from animal welfare friendly production systems?” Respondents chosen only one answer out of the five offered: yes, most of the time; yes, some of the time; no, very rarely; no, never; and don’t know. Thirty three percent of females considered they could find sometime information regarding the animal welfare on the labels, while males considered that this information could be found very rarely. Up to 55 years of age, 50% of the consumers consider that the labels do not contain the information about animal welfare, while after this age most of consumers consider they found this information on the labels. Over 50% of Orthodox and Roman Catholic responders considered that the information on animal welfare on the labels was found some of the time or very rarely. Respondents, irrespective of their living area or monthly income, considered that there is scarce information regarding animal welfare on the labels. Internet access significantly influenced the consumers regarding the availability of the information on the labels.

  16. Differences in neurotransmitter systems of ventrolateral periaqueductal gray between the micturition reflex and nociceptive regulation : An in vivo microdialysis study

    OpenAIRE

    Kitta, Takeya; Mitsui, Takahiko; Kanno, Yukiko; Chiba, Hiroki; Moriya, Kimihiko; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro; Shinohara, Nobuo

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To elucidate the possible involvement of glutamate and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) neurons in the ventrolateral midbrain periaqueductal gray during noxious stimulation. Methods: The study was carried out by evoking a noxious stimulation by acetic acid in an animal model of cystitis. Changes in glutamate and 5-hydroxytryptamine in the periaqueductal gray during the micturition reflex and acetic acid-induced cystitis were determined using in vivo microdialysis combined with cyst...

  17. Interrogation of inhibitor of nuclear factor κB α/nuclear factor κB (IκBα/NF-κB) negative feedback loop dynamics: from single cells to live animals in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Britney L; Elhammali, Adnan; Fowlkes, Tiffanie; Gross, Shimon; Vinjamoori, Anant; Contag, Christopher H; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2012-09-07

    Full understanding of the biological significance of negative feedback processes requires interrogation at multiple scales as follows: in single cells, cell populations, and live animals in vivo. The transcriptionally coupled IκBα/NF-κB negative feedback loop, a pivotal regulatory node of innate immunity and inflammation, represents a model system for multiscalar reporters. Using a κB(5)→IκBα-FLuc bioluminescent reporter, we rigorously evaluated the dynamics of ΙκBα degradation and subsequent NF-κB transcriptional activity in response to diverse modes of TNFα stimulation. Modulating TNFα concentration or pulse duration yielded complex, reproducible, and differential ΙκBα dynamics in both cell populations and live single cells. Tremendous heterogeneity in the transcriptional amplitudes of individual responding cells was observed, which was greater than the heterogeneity in the transcriptional kinetics of responsive cells. Furthermore, administration of various TNFα doses in vivo generated ΙκBα dynamic profiles in the liver resembling those observed in single cells and populations of cells stimulated with TNFα pulses. This suggested that dose modulation of circulating TNFα was perceived by hepatocytes in vivo as pulses of increasing duration. Thus, a robust bioluminescent reporter strategy enabled rigorous quantitation of NF-κB/ΙκBα dynamics in both live single cells and cell populations and furthermore, revealed reproducible behaviors that informed interpretation of in vivo studies.

  18. Development of bupivacaine decorated reduced graphene oxide and its local anesthetic effect-In vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi; Zhang, Xin; Li, Aixiang; Ma, Chuangen

    2018-03-01

    The present works aims to develop bupivacaine modified reduced graphene oxide (BPV/RGO), and comparative evaluation of their anesthetic effect with free bupivacaine (BPV). The prepared BPV/RGO was studied by using various spectroscopic and microscopic characterization studies. In vitro drug release from BPV/RGO was studied using HPLC analysis. The cytotoxicity of BPV/RGO was studied against fibroblast (3T3) cells. In vivo evaluation of anesthetic effects was performed on animal models. BPV/RGO showed a prolonged in vitro release and lower cytotoxicity when compared to free BPV. Also, BPV/RGO showed a significantly prolonged analgesic effect when compared to free BPV. Further, the prepared BPV/RGO drug delivery system demonstrated to function as gifted to overcome the drawbacks of free BPV and other available drug delivery systems by prolonging the anesthetic effect with poor cytotoxicity. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. How to study sex differences in addiction using animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Marilyn E; Lynch, Wendy J

    2016-09-01

    The importance of studying sex as a biological variable in biomedical research is becoming increasingly apparent. There is a particular need in preclinical studies of addiction to include both sexes, as female animals are often excluded from studies, leaving large gaps in our knowledge of not only sex differences and potential prevention and treatment strategies but also with regard to the basic neurobiology of addiction. This review focuses on methodology that has been developed in preclinical studies to examine sex differences in the behavioral aspects and neurobiological mechanisms related to addiction across the full range of the addiction process, including initiation (acquisition), maintenance, escalation, withdrawal, relapse to drug seeking and treatment. This review also discusses strategic and technical issues that need to be considered when comparing females and males, including the role of ovarian hormones and how sex differences interact with other major vulnerability factors in addiction, such as impulsivity, compulsivity and age (adolescent versus adult). Novel treatments for addiction are also discussed, such as competing non-drug rewards, repurposed medications such as progesterone and treatment combinations. Practical aspects of conducting research comparing female and male animals are also considered. Making sex differences a point of examination requires additional effort and consideration; however, such studies are necessary given mounting evidence demonstrating that the addiction process occurs differently in males and females. These studies should lead to a better understanding of individual differences in the development of addiction and effective treatments for males and females. © 2016 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  20. Using Computational and Mechanical Models to Study Animal Locomotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Laura A.; Goldman, Daniel I.; Hedrick, Tyson L.; Tytell, Eric D.; Wang, Z. Jane; Yen, Jeannette; Alben, Silas

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in computational methods have made realistic large-scale simulations of animal locomotion possible. This has resulted in numerous mathematical and computational studies of animal movement through fluids and over substrates with the purpose of better understanding organisms’ performance and improving the design of vehicles moving through air and water and on land. This work has also motivated the development of improved numerical methods and modeling techniques for animal locomotion that is characterized by the interactions of fluids, substrates, and structures. Despite the large body of recent work in this area, the application of mathematical and numerical methods to improve our understanding of organisms in the context of their environment and physiology has remained relatively unexplored. Nature has evolved a wide variety of fascinating mechanisms of locomotion that exploit the properties of complex materials and fluids, but only recently are the mathematical, computational, and robotic tools available to rigorously compare the relative advantages and disadvantages of different methods of locomotion in variable environments. Similarly, advances in computational physiology have only recently allowed investigators to explore how changes at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels might lead to changes in performance at the organismal level. In this article, we highlight recent examples of how computational, mathematical, and experimental tools can be combined to ultimately answer the questions posed in one of the grand challenges in organismal biology: “Integrating living and physical systems.” PMID:22988026

  1. Comparative studies on the ossification in several experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Osamu; Fukuda, Shun

    1978-01-01

    For estimating the risk of the bone seeking radionuclides in man, it is necessary to extrapolate the data of experimental animals to those of man. Detailed information on the biological stages of development, especially on bone growth of several experimental animals and of man is required for better extrapolation. Multi-species comparison of bone growth and ossification was carried out in several mammalian species such as mouse, rat, dog and monkey. The appearance, ossifying process and fusion of the secondary ossification centers in extremities were selected as indicators of the biological stage of bone. The observation of the secondary ossification centers was made by radiography. The maturity process of the secondary ossification centers in each animal was illustrated. The ossifying process of the secondary ossification center could be divided into the following three categories; (1) the acute ossification observed in mouse, rat, dog and monkey (2) the delayed ossification observed in mouse, rat, dog and monkey, (3) the incomplete ossification without complete fusion which is specific in mouse and rat, appeared and continued up to at least 27 weeks in mouse and up to 134 weeks in rat. The results of the study suggested that a mouse 17 weeks old, a rat 17 - 21 weeks old, a dog (beagle) 14 months old and a monkey about 6 years old may correspond to a man about 20 years old. (author)

  2. In Vivo Evidence of Increased nNOS Activity in Acute MPTP Neurotoxicity: A Functional Pharmacological MRI Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiing Yee Siow

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP is a neurotoxin commonly used to produce an animal model of Parkinson’s disease. Previous studies have suggested a critical role for neuronal nitric oxide (NO synthase- (nNOS- derived NO in the pathogenesis of MPTP. However, NO activity is difficult to assess in vivo due to its extremely short biological half-life, and so in vivo evidence of NO involvement in MPTP neurotoxicity remains scarce. In the present study, we utilized flow-sensitive alternating inversion recovery sequences, in vivo localized proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy, and diffusion-weighted imaging to, respectively, assess the hemodynamics, metabolism, and cytotoxicity induced by MPTP. The role of NO in MPTP toxicity was clarified further by administering a selective nNOS inhibitor, 7-nitroindazole (7-NI, intraperitoneally to some of the experimental animals prior to MPTP challenge. The transient increase in cerebral blood flow (CBF in the cortex and striatum induced by systemic injection of MPTP was completely prevented by pretreatment with 7-NI. We provide the first in vivo evidence of increased nNOS activity in acute MPTP-induced neurotoxicity. Although the observed CBF change may be independent of the toxicogenesis of MPTP, this transient hyperperfusion state may serve as an early indicator of neuroinflammation.

  3. Advantages and disadvantages of the animal models v. in vitro studies in iron metabolism: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Y; Díaz-Castro, J

    2013-10-01

    Iron deficiency is the most common nutritional deficiency in the world. Special molecules have evolved for iron acquisition, transport and storage in soluble, nontoxic forms. Studies about the effects of iron on health are focused on iron metabolism or nutrition to prevent or treat iron deficiency and anemia. These studies are focused in two main aspects: (1) basic studies to elucidate iron metabolism and (2) nutritional studies to evaluate the efficacy of iron supplementation to prevent or treat iron deficiency and anemia. This paper reviews the advantages and disadvantages of the experimental models commonly used as well as the methods that are more used in studies related to iron. In vitro studies have used different parts of the gut. In vivo studies are done in humans and animals such as mice, rats, pigs and monkeys. Iron metabolism is a complex process that includes interactions at the systemic level. In vitro studies, despite physiological differences to humans, are useful to increase knowledge related to this essential micronutrient. Isotopic techniques are the most recommended in studies related to iron, but their high cost and required logistic, making them difficult to use. The depletion-repletion of hemoglobin is a method commonly used in animal studies. Three depletion-repletion techniques are mostly used: hemoglobin regeneration efficiency, relative biological values (RBV) and metabolic balance, which are official methods of the association of official analytical chemists. These techniques are well-validated to be used as studies related to iron and their results can be extrapolated to humans. Knowledge about the main advantages and disadvantages of the in vitro and animal models, and methods used in these studies, could increase confidence of researchers in the experimental results with less costs.

  4. Toxicity studies of drugs and chemicals in animals: An overview

    OpenAIRE

    S. Saganuwan

    2017-01-01

    Toxicity study is the investigation of either short or long-term toxic effects of a drug or chemical on animals. The toxicity is dose-dependent as asserted by Paracelsus over 500 years ago. However, short-term toxic effect is determined using median lethal dose (LD50) first introduced by Trevan in 1927 and revised many times. Presently there is a growing preponderance of rejection of scientific papers on acute toxicity study, simply because of the belief that in the current hazard and safety ...

  5. Mineral imbalances in farm animals and their study and diagnosis with isotopic tracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Underwood, E.J.

    1976-01-01

    Twenty-two mineral elements are known to be essential for animal life. These are calcium, phosphorus, sulphur, potassium, sodium, chlorine, magnesium, iron, iodine, copper, manganese, zinc, cobalt, molybdenum, selenium, chromium, tin, vanadium, fluorine, silicon, nickel and arsenic. Naturally occurring and man-made dietary imbalances of many of these elements and their interactions with other minerals are described and their functions and requirements by farm animals are outlined. The nature and importance of metabolic interactions among the mineral elements are discussed and the important concept stressed that there is no single minimum requirement or safe tolerance of a particular mineral, but a series of such minimum requirements and safe tolerances depending on the extent to which other minerals with which it interacts is present or absent from the diet. Radioactive tracer elements are shown to be of great value in the determination of mineral nutrient availability to the animal and for following mineral metabolic movements in the body. They are also shown to have considerable potential for the diagnosis of mineral imbalances. Various in vivo and in vitro techniques involving both radioactive and stable tracers developed for the early diagnosis of mineral deficiencies are described and the strengths and weaknesses of such techniques, in comparison with standard biochemical tests, are discussed. The need for further critical studies with isotopic tracers in the detection and diagnosis of mineral imbalances is emphasized. The main types of biochemical criteria used in the diagnosis of mineral deficiencies and excesses are given, with appropriate examples of their use. (author)

  6. In vivo study of central receptors in man using pet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.

    1986-09-01

    Central neurotransmitter systems and receptors are intimately involved in the mechanism of several neurologic and phychiatric disorders. Although neurotransmitter concentration and receptor function can be measured regionnally post-mortem, studies performed during life may provide insight into changes at early stages of the disease as well as follow-up data on, and pharmacological modification of, such changes. Positron Tomography (PET) allows to monitor non-invasively the time-course of regional tissue tracer concentration following administration of a radioactive drug. If the latter is known to interact selectively with specific binding sites, it can be used to probe in vivo the regional distribution and affinity of the receptors involved. As shown in this progress report, several receptor systems can now be studied reliably in humans, using PET

  7. In vivo effect of carbon dioxide laser-skin resurfacing and mechanical abrasion on the skin's microbial flora in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manolis, Evangelos N; Tsakris, Athanassios; Kaklamanos, Ioannis; Markogiannakis, Antonios; Siomos, Konstadinos

    2006-03-01

    Although beam-scanning carbon dioxide (CO2) lasers have provided a highly efficient tool for esthetic skin rejuvenation there has been no comprehensive animal studies looking into microbial skin changes following CO2 laser skin resurfacing. To evaluate the in vivo effects of CO2 laser skin resurfacing in an experimental rat model in comparison with mechanical abrasion on the skin microbial flora. Four separate cutaneous sections of the right dorsal surface of 10 Wistar rats were treated with a CO2 laser, operating at 18 W and delivering a radiant energy of 5.76 J/cm2, while mechanical abrasions of the skin were created on four sections of the left dorsal surface using a scalpel. Samples for culture and biopsies were obtained from the skin surfaces of the rats on day 1 of application of the CO2 laser or mechanical abrasion, as well as 10, 30, and 90 days after the procedure. The presence of four microorganisms (staphylococci, streptococci, diphtheroids, and yeasts) was evaluated as a microbe index for the skin flora, and colony counts were obtained using standard microbiological methods. Skin biopsy specimens, following CO2 laser treatment, initially showed epidermal and papillary dermal necrosis and later a re-epithelization of the epidermis as well as the generation of new collagen on the upper papillary dermis. The reduction in microbial counts on day 1 of the CO2 laser-inflicted wound was statistically significant for staphylococci and diphtheroids compared with the baseline counts (p=.004 and pSkin resurfacing using CO2 lasers considerably reduces microbial counts of most microorganisms in comparison with either normal skin flora or a scalpel-inflicted wound. This might contribute to the positive clinical outcome of laser skin resurfacing.

  8. In vivo toxicologic study of larger silica nanoparticles in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan WT

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Wai-Tao Chan,1–3 Cheng-Che Liu,4 Jen-Shiu Chiang Chiau,5 Shang-Ting Tsai,6 Chih-Kai Liang,6 Mei-Lien Cheng,5 Hung-Chang Lee,7,8 Chun-Yun Yeung,1,3,9 Shao-Yi Hou2,6 1Department of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition, MacKay Children’s Hospital, 2Graduate Institute of Engineering Technology, National Taipei University of Technology, 3Mackay Medicine, Nursing, and Management College, 4Institute of Preventive Medicine, National Defense Medical Center, Taipei, 5Department of Medical Research, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu, 6Graduate Institute of Biochemical and Biomedical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei, 7Department of Pediatrics, MacKay Memorial Hospital, Hsinchu, 8Department of Pediatrics, Taipei Medical University, Taipei, 9Department of Medicine, Mackay Medical College, New Taipei, Taiwan, Republic of China Abstract: Silica nanoparticles (SiNPs are being studied and used for medical purposes. As nanotechnology grows rapidly, its biosafety and toxicity have frequently raised concerns. However, diverse results have been reported about the safety of SiNPs; several studies reported that smaller particles might exhibit toxic effects to some cell lines, and larger particles of 100 nm were reported to be genotoxic to the cocultured cells. Here, we investigated the in vivo toxicity of SiNPs of 150 nm in various dosages via intravenous administration in mice. The mice were observed for 14 days before blood examination and histopathological assay. All the mice survived and behaved normally after the administration of nanoparticles. No significant weight change was noted. Blood examinations showed no definite systemic dysfunction of organ systems. Histopathological studies of vital organs confirmed no SiNP-related adverse effects. We concluded that 150 nm SiNPs were biocompatible and safe for in vivo use in mice. Keywords: in vivo, mice, silica nanoparticle, nanotoxicity

  9. Cereal grains for nutrition and health benefits: Overview of results from in vitro, animal and human studies in the HEALTHGRAIN project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Björck, I.; Östman, E.; Kristensen, M.; Mateo Anson, N.; Price, R.K.; Haenen, G.R.M.M.; Havenaar, R.; Bach Knudsen, K.E.; Frid, A.; Mykkänen, H.; Welch, R.W.; Riccardi, G.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked whole grain intake to the prevention of the metabolic syndrome, obesity and associated chronic diseases such as CVD and T2D. The Nutrition module within the HEALTHGRAIN project, included 10 partners and undertook in vitro, animal and human in vivo studies with the

  10. Pesticide Exposure and Neurodevelopmental Outcomes: Review of the Epidemiologic and Animal Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Carol J.; McIntosh, Laura J.; Mink, Pamela J.; Jurek, Anne M.; Li, Abby A.

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of whether pesticide exposure is associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes in children can best be addressed with a systematic review of both the human and animal peer-reviewed literature. This review analyzed epidemiologic studies testing the hypothesis that exposure to pesticides during pregnancy and/or early childhood is associated with neurodevelopmental outcomes in children. Studies that directly queried pesticide exposure (e.g., via questionnaire or interview) or measured pesticide or metabolite levels in biological specimens from study participants (e.g., blood, urine, etc.) or their immediate environment (e.g., personal air monitoring, home dust samples, etc.) were eligible for inclusion. Consistency, strength of association, and dose response were key elements of the framework utilized for evaluating epidemiologic studies. As a whole, the epidemiologic studies did not strongly implicate any particular pesticide as being causally related to adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in infants and children. A few associations were unique for a health outcome and specific pesticide, and alternative hypotheses could not be ruled out. Our survey of the in vivo peer-reviewed published mammalian literature focused on effects of the specific active ingredient of pesticides on functional neurodevelopmental endpoints (i.e., behavior, neuropharmacology and neuropathology). In most cases, effects were noted at dose levels within the same order of magnitude or higher compared to the point of departure used for chronic risk assessments in the United States. Thus, although the published animal studies may have characterized potential neurodevelopmental outcomes using endpoints not required by guideline studies, the effects were generally observed at or above effect levels measured in repeated-dose toxicology studies submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Suggestions for improved exposure assessment in epidemiology studies and more effective

  11. The Postprandial Anti-Hyperglycemic Effect of Pyridoxine and Its Derivatives Using In Vitro and In Vivo Animal Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyuk Hwa Kim

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, we investigated the inhibitory activity of pyridoxine, pyridoxal, and pyridoxamine, against various digestive enzymes such as α-glucosidases, sucrase, maltase, and glucoamylase. Inhibition of these enzymes involved in the absorption of disaccharide can improve post-prandial hyperglycemia due to a carbohydrate-based diet. Pyridoxal (4.14 mg/mL of IC50 had the highest rat intestinal α-glucosidase inhibitory activity, followed by pyridoxamine and pyridoxine (4.85 and 5.02 mg/mL of IC50, respectively. Pyridoxal demonstrated superior inhibition against maltase (0.38 mg/mL IC50 and glucoamylase (0.27 mg/mLIC50. In addition, pyridoxal showed significant higher α-amylase inhibitory activity (10.87 mg/mL of IC50 than that of pyridoxine (23.18 mg/mL of IC50. This indicates that pyridoxal can also inhibit starch hydrolyzing by pancreatic α-amylase in small intestine. Based on these in vitro results, the deeper evaluation of the anti-hyperglycemic potential of pyridoxine and its derivatives using Sprague-Dawley (SD rat models, was initiated. The post-prandial blood glucose levels were tested two hours after sucrose/starch administration, with and without pyridoxine and its derivatives. In the animal trial, pyridoxal (p < 0.05 had a significantly reduction to the postprandial glucose levels, when compared to the control. The maximum blood glucose levels (Cmax of pyridoxal administration group were decreased by about 18% (from 199.52 ± 22.93 to 164.10 ± 10.27, p < 0.05 and 19% (from 216.92 ± 12.46 to 175.36 ± 10.84, p < 0.05 in sucrose and starch loading tests, respectively, when compared to the control in pharmacodynamics study. The pyridoxal administration significantly decreased the minimum, maximum, and mean level of post-prandial blood glucose at 0.5 h after meals. These results indicate that water-soluble vitamin pyridoxine and its derivatives can decrease blood glucose level via the inhibition of carbohydrate

  12. Low density lipoprotein receptors: preliminary results on 'in vivo' study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupattelli, G.; Virgolini, I.; Li, S.R.; Sinzinger, H.

    1991-01-01

    Plasmatic levels of low density lipoproteins (LDL) are regulated by the receptor pathway and most LDL receptor are located in the liver. A receptor defect due to genetic mutations of the LDL receptor gene is the cause of familial hypercholesterolemia (F.H.), a disease characterized by high cholesterol levels and premature atherosclerosis. Injections of autologous radiolabelled LDL, followed by hepatic scintiscanning, can be used to obtain 'in vivo' quantification of hepatic receptor activity, both in normal and hypercholesterolemic patients. In this study we observe no hepatic increase of radioactivity in patients affected by F.H., confirming the liver receptor defect. Scintigraphy is a non-invasive technique which can be used to diagnose this disease and to monitor the efficiacy of hypolipidemic therapy. (Authors)

  13. In vitro and in vivo studies on biodegradable magnesium alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lida Hou

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The microstructure, mechanical property, electrochemical behavior and biocompatibility of magnesium alloy (BioDe MSM™ were studied in the present work. The experimental results demonstrated that grain refining induced by extrusion improves the alloy strength significantly from 162 MPa for the as-cast alloy to 241 MPa for the as-extruded one. The anticorrosion properties of the as-extruded alloy also increased. Furthermore, the hemolysis ratio was decreased from 4.7% for the as-cast alloy to 2.9% for the as-extruded one, both below 5%. BioDe MSM™ alloy shows good biocompatibility after being implanted into the dorsal muscle and the femoral shaft of the New Zealand rabbit, respectively, and there are no abnormalities after short-term implantation. In vivo observation indicated that the corrosion rate of this alloy varies with different implantation positions, with higher degradation rate in the femur than in the muscle.

  14. Using animal models to study post-partum psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perani, C V; Slattery, D A

    2014-10-01

    The post-partum period represents a time during which all maternal organisms undergo substantial plasticity in a wide variety of systems in order to ensure the well-being of the offspring. Although this time is generally associated with increased calmness and decreased stress responses, for a substantial subset of mothers, this period represents a time of particular risk for the onset of psychiatric disorders. Thus, post-partum anxiety, depression and, to a lesser extent, psychosis may develop, and not only affect the well-being of the mother but also place at risk the long-term health of the infant. Although the risk factors for these disorders, as well as normal peripartum-associated adaptations, are well known, the underlying aetiology of post-partum psychiatric disorders remains poorly understood. However, there have been a number of attempts to model these disorders in basic research, which aim to reveal their underlying mechanisms. In the following review, we first discuss known peripartum adaptations and then describe post-partum mood and anxiety disorders, including their risk factors, prevalence and symptoms. Thereafter, we discuss the animal models that have been designed in order to study them and what they have revealed about their aetiology to date. Overall, these studies show that it is feasible to study such complex disorders in animal models, but that more needs to be done in order to increase our knowledge of these severe and debilitating mood and anxiety disorders. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  15. What do animals learn in artificial grammar studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Gabriël J L; Berwick, Robert C; Okanoya, Kazuo; Bolhuis, Johan J

    2017-10-01

    Artificial grammar learning is a popular paradigm to study syntactic ability in nonhuman animals. Subjects are first trained to recognize strings of tokens that are sequenced according to grammatical rules. Next, to test if recognition depends on grammaticality, subjects are presented with grammar-consistent and grammar-violating test strings, which they should discriminate between. However, simpler cues may underlie discrimination if they are available. Here, we review stimulus design in a sample of studies that use particular sounds as tokens, and that claim or suggest their results demonstrate a form of sequence rule learning. To assess the extent of acoustic similarity between training and test strings, we use four simple measures corresponding to cues that are likely salient. All stimulus sets contain biases in similarity measures such that grammatical test stimuli resemble training stimuli acoustically more than do non-grammatical test stimuli. These biases may contribute to response behaviour, reducing the strength of grammatical explanations. We conclude that acoustic confounds are a blind spot in artificial grammar learning studies in nonhuman animals. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. 2.5D Representations Combining in vivo 3D MRI and ex vivo 2D MSI Approaches to Study the Lipid Distribution in the Whole Sheep Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Labas , Valérie; Teixeira-Gomes , Ana Paula; Andersson , Frédéric; Ménigot , Sébastien; Batailler , Martine; Adriaensen , Hans; Migaud , Martine; Chaillou , Elodie

    2015-01-01

    National audience; Mass Spectrometry Imaging (MSI) provides easily high spatially resolved masses allowing characterization of endogenous lipids. These latter constitute about 70% of the composition of the white matter of the brain which can be implicated in developmental and/or cognitive troubles. In order to examine the molecular distribution of lipids in whole sheep brain, and especially in white/grey matter, we combined in vivo and ex vivo images, obtained in the same animals, using Magne...

  17. In vivo radioprotection by alpha-TMG: preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satyamitra, M; Devi, P U; Murase, H; Kagiya, V T

    2001-08-08

    alpha-TMG is a novel water-soluble derivative of Vitamin E that has shown excellent antioxidant activity. The parent compound has demonstrated protection against radiation induced chromosomal damage in vivo. Hence, the preliminary experiments to determine the radioprotective activity of alpha-TMG were carried out in adult Swiss albino mice. Acute toxicity of the drug was studied taking 24h, 72 h and 30 day mortality after a single intraperitoneal injection of 500-2000 mg/kg body weight of the drug. The drug LD(50) for 24h and 72 h/30 day survival were found to be 1120 and 1000 mg/kg body weight, respectively. The optimum time of drug administration and drug dose-dependent effect on in vivo radiation protection of bone marrow chromosomes was studied in mice. Injection of 600 mg/kg of the drug 15 min before or within 5, 15 or 30min after 3Gy whole body gamma radiation resulted in a significant decrease in the aberrant metaphases percent at 24h post-irradiation; the maximum effect was seen when the drug was given immediately after irradiation. Injection of 200-800 mg/kg TMG within 5 min of irradiation with 3 Gy produced a significant dose-dependent reduction in the radiation induced percent aberrant metaphases and in the frequency of micronucleated erythrocytes at 24h after exposure, with a corresponding decrease in the different types of aberrations. The optimum dose for protection without drug toxicity was 600 mg/kg body weight. At this dose, TMG produced 70 and >60% reduction in the radiation induced percent aberrant metaphases and micronucleated erythrocytes, respectively. The high water solubility and effectiveness when administered post-irradiation favor TMG as a likely candidate for protection in case of accidental exposures.

  18. Renal denervation by intravascular ultrasound: Preliminary in vivo study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, Yegor; McClain, Steve; Zou, Yong; Smith, David; Warnking, Reinhard

    2012-10-01

    Ultrasound denervation has recently become a subject of intense research in connection with the treatment of complex medical conditions including neurological conditions, development of pain management, reproduction of skin sensation, neuropathic pain and spasticity. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of intravascular ultrasound to produce nerve damage in renal sympathetic nerves without significant injury to the renal artery. This technique may potentially be used to treat various medical conditions, such as hypertension. The study was approved by the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. Ultrasound was applied to renal nerves of the swine model for histopathological evaluation. Therapeutic ultrasound energy was delivered circumferentially by an intravascular catheter maneuvered into the renal arteries. Fluoroscopic imaging was conducted pre-and post-ultrasound treatment. Animals were recovered and euthanized up to 30 hours post procedure, followed by necropsy and tissue sample collection. Histopathological examination showed evidence of extensive damage to renal nerves, characterized by nuclear pyknosis, hyalinization of stroma and multifocal hemorrhages, with little or no damage to renal arteries. This study demonstrates the feasibility of intravascular ultrasound as a minimally invasive renal denervation technique. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the long-term safety and efficacy of this technique and its related clinical significance.

  19. Redox regulation of ischemic limb neovascularization – What we have learned from animal studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Matsui

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mouse hindlimb ischemia has been widely used as a model to study peripheral artery disease. Genetic modulation of the enzymatic source of oxidants or components of the antioxidant system reveal that physiological levels of oxidants are essential to promote the process of arteriogenesis and angiogenesis after femoral artery occlusion, although mice with diabetes or atherosclerosis may have higher deleterious levels of oxidants. Therefore, fine control of oxidants is required to stimulate vascularization in the limb muscle. Oxidants transduce cellular signaling through oxidative modifications of redox sensitive cysteine thiols. Of particular importance, the reversible modification with abundant glutathione, called S-glutathionylation (or GSH adducts, is relatively stable and alters protein function including signaling, transcription, and cytoskeletal arrangement. Glutaredoxin-1 (Glrx is an enzyme which catalyzes reversal of GSH adducts, and does not scavenge oxidants itself. Glrx may control redox signaling under fluctuation of oxidants levels. In ischemic muscle increased GSH adducts through Glrx deletion improves in vivo limb revascularization, indicating endogenous Glrx has anti-angiogenic roles. In accordance, Glrx overexpression attenuates VEGF signaling in vitro and ischemic vascularization in vivo. There are several Glrx targets including HIF-1α which may contribute to inhibition of vascularization by reducing GSH adducts. These animal studies provide a caution that excess antioxidants may be counter-productive for treatment of ischemic limbs, and highlights Glrx as a potential therapeutic target to improve ischemic limb vascularization. Keywords: Ischemic limb, Angiogenesis, Oxidants, GSH adducts, Glutaredoxin

  20. Animal studies with the Carmat bioprosthetic total artificial heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrémouille, Christian; Duveau, Daniel; Cholley, Bernard; Zilberstein, Luca; Belbis, Guillaume; Boughenou, Marie-Fazia; Meleard, Denis; Bruneval, Patrick; Adam, Clovis; Neuschwander, Arthur; Perles, Jean-Christophe; Jansen, Piet; Carpentier, Alain

    2015-05-01

    The Carmat bioprosthetic total artificial heart (TAH) contains bioprosthetic blood-contacting surfaces, and is designed for orthotopic cardiac replacement. In preparation for clinical studies, we evaluated the TAH performance and its effects on end-organ function in an animal model. Twelve female Charolais calves, 2-3 months of age and weighing 102-122 kg, were implanted with the TAH through a mid-sternotomy to ensure an adequate anatomic fit. The intended support duration was 4-10 days. Haematological values, creatinine, bilirubin and lactate levels were measured and mean arterial and central venous pressure, central venous oxygen saturation and TAH parameters were monitored. The calves were placed in a cage immediately postoperatively, and extubated on postoperative day 1 in most cases. Average support duration was 3 days, with 4 of 12 calves supported for 4, 4, 8 and 10 days. The initial procedures were used to refine surgical techniques and postoperative care. Pump output ranged from 7.3 to 10 l/min. Haemodynamic parameters and blood analysis were within acceptable ranges. No device failures occurred. No anticoagulation was used in the postoperative phase. The calves were euthanized in case of discomfort compromising the animal well-being, such as respiratory dysfunction, severe blood loss and cerebral dysfunction. Device explant analysis showed no thrombus formation inside the blood cavities. Histological examination of kidneys showed isolated micro-infarction in 2/12 animals; brain histology revealed no thromboembolic depositions. The Carmat bioprosthetic TAH implanted in calves up to 10 days provided adequate blood flow to organs and tissues. Low levels of haemolysis and no visible evidence of thromboembolic depositions in major organs and device cavities, without the use of anticoagulation, may indicate early-phase haemocompatibility of the TAH. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio

  1. In vitro and in vivo motility studies of radiolabelled sperm cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, L.; Szasz, F.; Janoki, Gy.A.; Toth, L.; Zoldag, L.; Huszenicza, Gy.

    1994-01-01

    A new method for radiolabelling of sperm cells with 99m Tc HM-PAO (hexamethyl-propylene-amine-oxide) - LEUCO-SCINT kit, is investigated. The labelling technique for fresh rabbit, bull, sheep and horse as well as frozen-thawed bull sperm was optimized. The optimum conditions for sperm cell labelling (incubation volume, incubation time, initial activity of 99m Tc HM-PAO, cell number) yielded a high labelling efficiency (70-80%) and survival rate (50-60%). The labelled sperm cells were used to study their motility in vitro. The migrating at 37 o C cells incubated capillary tubes containing bovine cervical mucus. The tubes were cut and the activity of the parts measured and valued. We compared the results of living and killed sperm cells and the label alone by the change of species and running time. Ten minutes after the labelling procedures the total activity of microtubes was 2-3 times higher and the activity distribution was different from the results obtained 3 hours after the labelling. The sperm migration in vivo in the living female animals using a non invasive technique was also visualized. The sperm flow was clearly demonstrated in 3 different animal model (rabbit, ewe, hen) under gamma camera. The comparison of the in vivo migration of rabbit and bull sperm cells showed that the homologous sperm migrated faster and farther. On study of bull sperm migration in the ewe genital tract the cornu uteri was clearly visualized. In the hen model the whole genital tract was demonstrated with considerable free activity in the cavum abdominal 24 hours after the artificial insemination. The new method is developed and manufactured by NRIRR, Budapest, originally designed for radiolabelling leucocytes. The 99m Tc HM-PAO Labelled sperm cells with their retained migration properties are suitable for in vitro motility assays and in vitro migration studies in both human and veterinary medicine. (author)

  2. Preliminary assessment of hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate: in-vitro and in-vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Annuar, B.O.; Muhammad Hasib, A.; Noor Rabihah, A.; Sharifah Anum, Z.; Yaakob, T.A.; Inayat Hussain, S.H.; Rajab, N.F.; Saadiah, S.; Hing, H.L.; Sahidan, S.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Eight extracts of hydroxyapatite (HA) and tricalcium phosphate (TCP) were evaluated for potential in vitro cytotoxicity, and for dermal irritation and sensitization in vivo. The samples were assessed to determine their viability in L929 murine fibroblast cultures by neutral red (NR) assay, and were evaluated for skin irritation and sensitization in rabbits and guinea pigs, respectively. Results of the NR assay indicate that a majority of extract produced no adverse reaction m L929 cells with cell viability levels exceeding 800/6. However, there was a slight decrease in viability with two HA samples producing a cytotoxicity score of 1. In the animal study, all eight extracts did not promote any dermal irritation and sensitization reactions both in the rabbits and guinea pigs. These results establish that the synthesized HA and TCP am promising biocompatible materials for orthopaedic implants. (Author)

  3. Towards ethically improved animal experimentation in the study of animal reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blache, D; Martin, G B; Maloney, S K

    2008-07-01

    The ethics of animal-based research is a continuing area of debate, but ethical research protocols do not prevent scientific progress. In this paper, we argue that our current knowledge of the factors that affect reproductive processes provides researchers with a solid foundation upon which they can conduct more ethical research and simultaneously produce data of higher quality. We support this argument by showing how a deep understanding of the genetics, nutrition and temperament of our experimental animals can improve compliance with two of the '3 Rs', reduction and refinement, simply by offering better control over the variance in our experimental model. The outcome is a better experimental design, on both ethical and scientific grounds.

  4. George Herbert Mead on Humans and Other Animals: Social Relations After Human-Animal Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Rhoda Wilkie; Andrew McKinnon

    2013-01-01

    The turn towards nonhuman animals within sociology has shed a critical light on George Herbert Mead, his apparent prioritisation of language and the anthropocentric focus of Symbolic Interactionism (SI). Although Herbert Blumer canonised Mead as the founder of this perspective he also played a key role in excising the evolutionary and 'more-than-human' components in Mead's work. This intervention not only misrepresented Mead's intellectual project, it also made symbols the predominant concern...

  5. Animal models as tools to study the pathophysiology of depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M. Abelaira

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of depressive illness is high worldwide, and the inadequacy of currently available drug treatments contributes to the significant health burden associated with depression. A basic understanding of the underlying disease processes in depression is lacking; therefore, recreating the disease in animal models is not possible. Popular current models of depression creatively merge ethologically valid behavioral assays with the latest technological advances in molecular biology. Within this context, this study aims to evaluate animal models of depression and determine which has the best face, construct, and predictive validity. These models differ in the degree to which they produce features that resemble a depressive-like state, and models that include stress exposure are widely used. Paradigms that employ acute or sub-chronic stress exposure include learned helplessness, the forced swimming test, the tail suspension test, maternal deprivation, chronic mild stress, and sleep deprivation, to name but a few, all of which employ relatively short-term exposure to inescapable or uncontrollable stress and can reliably detect antidepressant drug response.

  6. Learning Curve in a Western Training Center of the Circumferential En Bloc Esophageal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection in an In Vivo Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A. Tanimoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Evaluate the feasibility to overcome the learning curve in a western training center of the en bloc circumferential esophageal (ECE- ESD in an in vivo animal model. Methods. ECE-ESD was performed on ten canine models under general anesthesia on artificial lesions at the esophagus marked with coagulation points. After the ESD each canine model was euthanized and surgical resection of the esophagus and stomach was carried out according to “the Principles of Humane Experimental Technique, Russel and Burch.” The specimen was fixed with needles on cork submerged in formalin with the esophagus and stomach then delivered to the pathology department to be analyzed. Results. ECE-ESD was completed without complications in the last 3/10 animal models. Mean duration for the procedures was 192±35 minutes (range 140–235 minutes. All the procedures were done at the animal lab surgery room with cardio pulmonary monitoring and artificial ventilation by staff surgery members and a staff member of the Gastroenterology department trained during 1999–2001 at the Fujigaoka hospital of the Showa U. in Yokohama, Japan, length (range 15–18 mm and 51±6.99 width (range 40–60 mm. Conclusion. ECE-ESD training is feasible in canine models for postgraduate endoscopy fellows.

  7. Formulation Study of Topically Applied Lotion: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Nisar Hussain Shah

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available ntroduction: This article presents the development and evaluation of a new topical formulation of diclofenac diethylamine (DDA as a locally applied analgesic lotion. Methods: To this end, the lotion formulations were formulated with equal volume of varying concentrations (1%, 2%, 3%, 4%; v/v of permeation enhancers, namely propylene glycol (PG and turpentine oil (TO. These lotions were subjected to physical studies (pH, viscosity, spreadability, homogeneity, and accelerated stability, in vitro permeation, in vivo animal studies and sensatory perception testing. In vitro permeation of DDA from lotion formulations was evaluated across polydimethylsiloxane membrane and rabbit skin using Franz cells. Results: It was found that PG and TO content influenced the permeation of DDA across model membranes with the lotion containing 4% v/v PG and TO content showed maximum permeation enhancement of DDA. The flux values for L4 were 1.20±0.02 μg.cm-2.min-1 and 0.67 ± 0.02 μg.cm-2.min-1 for polydimethylsiloxane and rabbit skin, respectively. Flux values were significantly different (p < 0.05 from that of the control. The flux enhancement ratio of DDA from L4 was 31.6-fold and 4.8-fold for polydimethylsiloxane and rabbit skin, respectively. In the in vivo animal testing, lotion with 4% v/v enhancer content showed maximum anti-inflammatory and analgesic effect without inducing any irritation. Sensatory perception tests involving healthy volunteers rated the formulations between 3 and 4 (values ranging between -4 to +4, indicating a range of very bad to excellent, respectively. Conclusion: It was concluded that the DDA lotion containing 4% v/v PG and TO exhibit the best performance overall and that this specific formulation should be the basis for further clinical investigations.

  8. In vitro and in vivo studies of pulmonary artery flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahn, D.J.; Yoganathan, A.P.

    1986-01-01

    A variety of interesting intracardiac flow patterns have been recorded by pulsed and continuous wave Doppler technologies in humans with heart disease. Some of these patterns have, in fact, been difficult to explain and are now more easily understood using color Doppler flow mapping systems which show the spatial location of flow. The authors performed a number of studies in patients, as well as studies in in vitro systems to model some of the phenomenon that the authors observed in the pulmonary artery. Their studies with Doppler flow mapping in the clinical situation, in the in vitro model, and in the animal models of congenital heart disorders lend insights into the complex hydrodynamics present in the pulmonary artery

  9. Evidence of lung cancer risk from animal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cross, F.T.

    1988-03-01

    Human epidemiological data provide the most important basis for assessing risks of radon exposures. However, additional insight into the nature of exposure-response relationships is provided by animal experimentation and dosimetric determinations. Animal studies have now been conducted for more than 50 years to examine the levels of pollutants in underground mines that were responsible for the respiratory effects observed among miners. This work has emphasized respiratory cancer and the interaction of radon with other agents, such as ore dust, diesel-engine-exhaust fumes and cigarette smoke. The more recent data on radon-daughter inhalation exposures were provided by two American research centers, The University of Rochester (UR) and the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), and by the Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA) laboratory in France. Approximately 2000 mice, 100 rats and 80 dogs were employed in the completed UR studies, begun in the mid 1950s; 800 hamsters, 5000 rats and 100 dogs in the ongoing PNL studies, begun in the late 1960s; and 10,000 rats in the ongoing COGEMA studies, also begun in the late 1960s. More complete updated biological effects, data resulting from chronic radon-daughter inhalation exposures of mice, hamsters, rats and beagle dogs were examined. Emphasis on the carcinogenic effects of radon-decay product exposure, including the influences of radon-daughter exposure rate, unattached fraction and disequilibrium, and co-exposures to other pollutants. Plausible values for the radon (radon-daughter) lifetime lung-cancer risk coefficients are also provided. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  10. Therapeutic study of proton beam in vascular disease animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Y. M.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, M. J.; Choi, J. H.

    2010-04-01

    We previously reported that proton beam inhibited angiogenic vessels in zebrafish and that proton induced cancer cell apoptosis via p53 induction as well as caspase-3 activity. In this study, we performed to identity the effect of candidate chemicals on the angiogenic inhibition in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish Flk1:EGFP transgenic fish). And we treated small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 cells with proton beam in combination with angiogenic inhibitors we found in this study. By the MTT assay, we performed cell viability assay with cancer cells and we investigated that HIF-1α induction by proton beam by the western blot analysis. We found novel anti-angiogenic chemicals from traditional herb. That is decursin, and glyceollins from the Angelica gigas, and soy bean. Decrusin and glyceollins inhibited VEGF- or bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and zebrafish microvessel development. Moreover, glyceollins inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1α in a dose dependent manner. However, proton beam itself did not induce HIF-1α whereas it increased HIF-1α stability under hypoxia. Even proton beam induced cell death of A549 small cell lung carcinoma cells but the combination of decrusin or glyceollins did not increase the cancer cell death

  11. Therapeutic study of proton beam in vascular disease animal models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Y. M.; Jang, K. H.; Kim, M. J.; Choi, J. H. [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-04-15

    We previously reported that proton beam inhibited angiogenic vessels in zebrafish and that proton induced cancer cell apoptosis via p53 induction as well as caspase-3 activity. In this study, we performed to identity the effect of candidate chemicals on the angiogenic inhibition in vitro and in vivo (zebrafish Flk1:EGFP transgenic fish). And we treated small cell lung adenocarcinoma cell line, A549 cells with proton beam in combination with angiogenic inhibitors we found in this study. By the MTT assay, we performed cell viability assay with cancer cells and we investigated that HIF-1{alpha} induction by proton beam by the western blot analysis. We found novel anti-angiogenic chemicals from traditional herb. That is decursin, and glyceollins from the Angelica gigas, and soy bean. Decrusin and glyceollins inhibited VEGF- or bFGF-induced endothelial cell proliferation, migration and zebrafish microvessel development. Moreover, glyceollins inhibited hypoxia-induced HIF-1{alpha} in a dose dependent manner. However, proton beam itself did not induce HIF-1{alpha} whereas it increased HIF-1{alpha} stability under hypoxia. Even proton beam induced cell death of A549 small cell lung carcinoma cells but the combination of decrusin or glyceollins did not increase the cancer cell death

  12. Evaluation of in vivo selective binding of [11C]doxepin to histamine H1 receptors in five animal species

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwata, Kiichi; Kawamura, Kazunori; Wang Weifang; Tsukada, Hideo; Harada, Norihiro; Mochizuki, Hideki; Kimura, Yuichi; Ishii, Kenji; Iwata, Ren; Yanai, Kazuhiko

    2004-01-01

    The specific binding of [ 11 C]doxepin, which has been used as a radioligand for mapping histamine H 1 receptors in human brain by positron emission tomography, was evaluated in five animal species. In mice the [ 11 C]doxepin uptake was reduced by treatment with cold doxepin and two H 1 receptor antagonists, but not with H 2 /H 3 antagonists. The specific binding evaluated with treatment with (+)-chlorpheniramine (H 1 antagonist) was in the range of 10-30% in mouse, rat, rabbit, and monkey, but was not detected in guinea pig

  13. Direct anthelmintic effects of Cereus jamacaru (Cactaceae) on trichostrongylid nematodes of sheep: in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatta, A F; Kandu-Lelo, C; Ademola, I O; Eloff, J N

    2011-08-25

    Following claims of anthelmintic activity of Cereus jamacaru DC (Cactaceae) by a commercial farmer, in vivo studies were conducted to determine the possible direct anthelmintic effects of the plant on ovine gastrointestinal nematodes. Eighteen sheep were infected with 4000 Haemonchus contortus and 6000 Trichostrongylus colubriformis larvae given in three divided doses over a period of three days. Once the infections were patent, the sheep were allocated to three groups and were drenched once a week for six weeks with fresh blended C. jamacaru plant material at a single (32.3g/sheep) or double dose (64.6g/sheep) or they remained as undrenched controls. Faeces were collected from individual animals on the day of treatment and three days thereafter on a weekly basis for seven weeks for faecal egg count. While there were no statistically significant differences in the egg counts between the groups, a double dose of C. jamacaru was effective in reducing the egg counts in the sheep by 18-65% over the 49 days of the experiment. Given that all animals remained in good health throughout the course of the experiment, with no adverse events occurring during the study, further experiments using higher doses or administering the plant material for a longer period of time than in the present study would be warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. In vivo trace element speciation study by using enriched stable isotopic tracer technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng Weiyue; Chai Zhifang; Shi Junwen; Ding Wenjun

    2005-01-01

    In contrast to the radioactive tracer method, the enriched stable isotopic technique used in life sciences will not cause radiation damage to cells and its operation will be no radioactive risk, In our laboratory, the enriched stable isotopes Cr-50, Hg-196 and Hg-198 combined with biochemical separation, neutron activation analysis (NAA) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-IVIS) have been used to investigate the element speciation in vivo. Chromium (Cr) is proposed to act as a potentiator of insulin action in animals and human beings. Its deficiency induces the symptoms resembling diabetes and its supplement can alleviate these symptoms. However, as the concentration of Cr in vivo is usually at ultratrace level(- ng/g), its speciation study is usually difficult, since it is almost impossible to avoid the exogenous Cr contamination caused by separation and determination processes. Therefore, in this study, 50 Cr 2 O 3 with 94.2% 50 Cr was used as a tracer combined with gel chromatography to study the Cr speciation in serum, liver, urine and other tissues of healthy and diabetic rats. The Cr concentrations can be determined via 50 Cr(n, γ) 51 Cr by NAA, which is ideally suited for the ultratrace element analyses due to its high precision, accuracy and sensitivity. Such research have found that the most quantity of chromium in vivo is mainly combined with high molecular weight proteins, which is later identified as transferrin and low molecular weight protein is mainly excreted from urine. Mercury is listed by the International Program of Chemical Safety as one of the six most dangerous chemicals in the global environment. Mercury compounds in the environment are often difficult to degrade. However, the mechanism on mercury toxicity to developing children following long term and low dose of mercury exposure is still not clear. Therefore, high sensitive method in vivo needs to be developed to study such low level mercury toxicity to fetus In this

  15. Progesterone lipid nanoparticles: Scaling up and in vivo human study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Elisabetta; Sguizzato, Maddalena; Drechsler, Markus; Mariani, Paolo; Carducci, Federica; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Cortesi, Rita

    2017-10-01

    This investigation describes a scaling up study aimed at producing progesterone containing nanoparticles in a pilot scale. Particularly hot homogenization techniques based on ultrasound homogenization or high pressure homogenization have been employed to produce lipid nanoparticles constituted of tristearin or tristearin in association with caprylic-capric triglyceride. It was found that the high pressure homogenization method enabled to obtain nanoparticles without agglomerates and smaller mean diameters with respect to ultrasound homogenization method. X-ray characterization suggested a lamellar structural organization of both type of nanoparticles. Progesterone encapsulation efficiency was almost 100% in the case of high pressure homogenization method. Shelf life study indicated a double fold stability of progesterone when encapsulated in nanoparticles produced by the high pressure homogenization method. Dialysis and Franz cell methods were performed to mimic subcutaneous and skin administration. Nanoparticles constituted of tristearin in mixture with caprylic/capric triglyceride display a slower release of progesterone with respect to nanoparticles constituted of pure tristearin. Franz cell evidenced a higher progesterone skin uptake in the case of pure tristearin nanoparticles. A human in vivo study, based on tape stripping, was conducted to investigate the performance of nanoparticles as progesterone skin delivery systems. Tape stripping results indicated a decrease of progesterone concentration in stratum corneum within six hours, suggesting an interaction between nanoparticle material and skin lipids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair: Preclinical Studies and Insights in Translational Animal Models and Outcome Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Lo Monaco

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to the restricted intrinsic capacity of resident chondrocytes to regenerate the lost cartilage postinjury, stem cell-based therapies have been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for cartilage repair. Moreover, stem cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical settings. Despite these promising reports, the exact mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated cartilage repair remain uncertain. Stem cells can contribute to cartilage repair via chondrogenic differentiation, via immunomodulation, or by the production of paracrine factors and extracellular vesicles. But before novel cell-based therapies for cartilage repair can be introduced into the clinic, rigorous testing in preclinical animal models is required. Preclinical models used in regenerative cartilage studies include murine, lapine, caprine, ovine, porcine, canine, and equine models, each associated with its specific advantages and limitations. This review presents a summary of recent in vitro data and from in vivo preclinical studies justifying the use of MSCs and iPSCs in cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing small and large animals will be discussed, while also describing suitable outcome measures for evaluating cartilage repair.

  17. Stem Cells for Cartilage Repair: Preclinical Studies and Insights in Translational Animal Models and Outcome Measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Monaco, Melissa; Merckx, Greet; Ratajczak, Jessica; Gervois, Pascal; Hilkens, Petra; Clegg, Peter; Bronckaers, Annelies; Vandeweerd, Jean-Michel; Lambrichts, Ivo

    2018-01-01

    Due to the restricted intrinsic capacity of resident chondrocytes to regenerate the lost cartilage postinjury, stem cell-based therapies have been proposed as a novel therapeutic approach for cartilage repair. Moreover, stem cell-based therapies using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been used successfully in preclinical and clinical settings. Despite these promising reports, the exact mechanisms underlying stem cell-mediated cartilage repair remain uncertain. Stem cells can contribute to cartilage repair via chondrogenic differentiation, via immunomodulation, or by the production of paracrine factors and extracellular vesicles. But before novel cell-based therapies for cartilage repair can be introduced into the clinic, rigorous testing in preclinical animal models is required. Preclinical models used in regenerative cartilage studies include murine, lapine, caprine, ovine, porcine, canine, and equine models, each associated with its specific advantages and limitations. This review presents a summary of recent in vitro data and from in vivo preclinical studies justifying the use of MSCs and iPSCs in cartilage tissue engineering. Moreover, the advantages and disadvantages of utilizing small and large animals will be discussed, while also describing suitable outcome measures for evaluating cartilage repair.

  18. Design of laboratory and animal housing unit for radionuclide studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The design of a combined analytical laboratory and animal housing facility is discussed. By having sample processing facilities in close proximity to the experimental animals, the necessity for transporting biological specimens long distances has been curtailed. In addition, complete radionuclide counting equipment has been installed so that samples need not leave the animal housing site for analysis, a feature based on radiological health requirements. (U.S.)

  19. Qualichem in vivo: a tool for assessing the quality of in vivo studies and its application for bisphenol A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Maxim

    Full Text Available In regulatory toxicology, quality assessment of in vivo studies is a critical step for assessing chemical risks. It is crucial for preserving public health studies that are considered suitable for regulating chemicals are robust. Current procedures for conducting quality assessments in safety agencies are not structured, clear or consistent. This leaves room for criticism about lack of transparency, subjective influence and the potential for insufficient protection provided by resulting safety standards. We propose a tool called "Qualichem in vivo" that is designed to systematically and transparently assess the quality of in vivo studies used in chemical health risk assessment. We demonstrate its use here with 12 experts, using two controversial studies on Bisphenol A (BPA that played an important role in BPA regulation in Europe. The results obtained with Qualichem contradict the quality assessments conducted by expert committees in safety agencies for both of these studies. Furthermore, they show that reliance on standardized guidelines to ensure scientific quality is only partially justified. Qualichem allows experts with different disciplinary backgrounds and professional experiences to express their individual and sometimes divergent views-an improvement over the current way of dealing with minority opinions. It provides a transparent framework for expressing an aggregated, multi-expert level of confidence in a study, and allows a simple graphical representation of how well the study integrates the best available scientific knowledge. Qualichem can be used to compare assessments of the same study by different health agencies, increasing transparency and trust in the work of expert committees. In addition, it may be used in systematic evaluation of in vivo studies submitted by industry in the dossiers that are required for compliance with the REACH Regulation. Qualichem provides a balanced, common framework for assessing the quality of

  20. An ex vivo spinal cord injury model to study ependymal cells in adult mouse tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Zafra, Teresa; Codeluppi, Simone; Uhlén, Per

    2017-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is characterized by an initial cell loss that is followed by a concerted cellular response in an attempt to restore the damaged tissue. Nevertheless, little is known about the signaling mechanisms governing the cellular response to injury. Here, we have established an adult ex vivo system that exhibits multiple hallmarks of spinal cord injury and allows the study of complex processes that are difficult to address using animal models. We have characterized the ependymal cell response to injury in this model system and found that ependymal cells can become activated, proliferate, migrate out of the central canal lining and differentiate in a manner resembling the in vivo situation. Moreover, we show that these cells respond to external adenosine triphosphate and exhibit spontaneous Ca 2+ activity, processes that may play a significant role in the regulation of their response to spinal cord injury. This model provides an attractive tool to deepen our understanding of the ependymal cell response after spinal cord injury, which may contribute to the development of new treatment options for spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies in dental traumatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreasen, Jens O; Andersson, Lars

    2011-08-01

    In vivo studies are sometimes needed to understand healing processes after trauma. For several reasons, not the least ethical, such studies have to be carefully planned and important considerations have to be taken into account about suitability of the experimental model, sample size and optimizing the accuracy of the analysis. Several manuscripts of in vivo studies are submitted for publication to Dental Traumatology and rejected because of inadequate design, methodology or insufficient documentation of the results. The authors have substantial experience in experimental in vivo studies of tissue healing in dental traumatology and share their knowledge regarding critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Two new animal models for actinide toxicity studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, G.N.; Gardner, P.A.; Jones, C.W.; Lloyd, R.D.; Mays, C.W.

    1979-01-01

    Two small rodent species, the grasshopper mouse (Onychomys leucogaster) and the deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) have tenacious retention in the liver and skeleton of plutonium and americium. The retention following intraperitoneal injection of Pu and Am in citrate solution ranged from 20 to 47% (liver) and 19 to 42% (skeleton), relatively independent of post-injection times, varying from 30 to 125 days. Based on observations extended to 125 days post-injection, the biological half-times appeared to be long. Both of these rodents are relatively long-lived (median lifespans of approximately 1400 days), breed well in captivity, and adapt suitably to laboratory conditions. It is suggested that these two species of mice, in which plutonium is partitioned between the skeleton and liver in a manner similar to that of man, may be useful animal models for actinide toxicity studies

  3. An improved optimization algorithm of the three-compartment model with spillover and partial volume corrections for dynamic FDG PET images of small animal hearts in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinlin; Kundu, Bijoy K.

    2018-03-01

    The three-compartment model with spillover (SP) and partial volume (PV) corrections has been widely used for noninvasive kinetic parameter studies of dynamic 2-[18F] fluoro-2deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) positron emission tomography images of small animal hearts in vivo. However, the approach still suffers from estimation uncertainty or slow convergence caused by the commonly used optimization algorithms. The aim of this study was to develop an improved optimization algorithm with better estimation performance. Femoral artery blood samples, image-derived input functions from heart ventricles and myocardial time-activity curves (TACs) were derived from data on 16 C57BL/6 mice obtained from the UCLA Mouse Quantitation Program. Parametric equations of the average myocardium and the blood pool TACs with SP and PV corrections in a three-compartment tracer kinetic model were formulated. A hybrid method integrating artificial immune-system and interior-reflective Newton methods were developed to solve the equations. Two penalty functions and one late time-point tail vein blood sample were used to constrain the objective function. The estimation accuracy of the method was validated by comparing results with experimental values using the errors in the areas under curves (AUCs) of the model corrected input function (MCIF) and the 18F-FDG influx constant K i . Moreover, the elapsed time was used to measure the convergence speed. The overall AUC error of MCIF for the 16 mice averaged  -1.4  ±  8.2%, with correlation coefficients of 0.9706. Similar results can be seen in the overall K i error percentage, which was 0.4  ±  5.8% with a correlation coefficient of 0.9912. The t-test P value for both showed no significant difference. The mean and standard deviation of the MCIF AUC and K i percentage errors have lower values compared to the previously published methods. The computation time of the hybrid method is also several times lower than using just a stochastic

  4. Small Animal [18F]FDG PET Imaging for Tumor Model Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woo, Sang Keun; Kim, Kyeong Min; Cheon, Gi Jeong

    2008-01-01

    PET allows non-invasive, quantitative and repetitive imaging of biological function in living animals. Small animal PET imaging with [ 18 F]FDG has been successfully applied to investigation of metabolism, receptor, ligand interactions, gene expression, adoptive cell therapy and somatic gene therapy. Experimental condition of animal handling impacts on the biodistribution of [ 18 F]FDG in small animal study. The small animal PET and CT images were registered using the hardware fiducial markers and small animal contour point. Tumor imaging in small animal with small animal [ 18 F]FDG PET should be considered fasting, warming, and isoflurane anesthesia level. Registered imaging with small animal PET and CT image could be useful for the detection of tumor. Small animal experimental condition of animal handling and registration method will be of most importance for small lesion detection of metastases tumor model

  5. Differences among Branded Hyaluronic Acids in Italy, Part 1: Data from and Animal Studies and Instructions for Use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Migliore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background The use of hyaluronic acid (HA for intra-articular (IA injection is widespread around the world for patients affected by osteoarthritis. AIM The aim of this study is to identify scientific evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies supporting the use of IA HAs marketed in Italy We also evaluated the accuracy of indications and contraindications reported in the leaflets of such HAs compared with the available scientific evidence. Materials and Methods An extensive literature search was performed to identify all in vitro and in vivo model studies reporting on the effects of various HAs marketed in Italy for IA use. Data reported in the leaflets of different HA-based products for IA use were extracted and analyzed alongside evidence from in vitro and in vivo model studies. Results Nine in vitro studies and 11 studies on animal models were examined. Comparing results with what is reported in the leaflets of HAs marketed in Italy, it was observed that many branded formulations are introduced in the market without any reporting of basic scientific evidence. Only 12.82% and 17.95% of branded products had been shown to be effective with scientific evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies, respectively. The rationale of use of these products is based on their nature, as if a class effect existed such that all HAs would yield similar effects. Conclusions Data on HAs deriving from in vitro and in vivo studies are scarce and relate to only a small percentage of products marketed in Italy. Many indications and contraindications are arbitrarily reported in Italian HA leaflets without the support of scientific evidence. Larger and brand-specific studies are necessary and should be reported in the leaflets to guide clinicians in making an appropriate choice regarding HA-based IA therapy.

  6. EFSA Panel on Biological Hazards (BIOHAZ); Scientific Opinion on the risk of transmission of classical scrapie via in vivo derived embryo transfer in ovine animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hald, Tine; Baggesen, Dorte Lau

    . Under natural exposure conditions, animals that are heterozygous or homozygous A136R154R171 display respectively a low or negligible risk of being infected. The genetic control of the susceptibility to classical scrapie is also likely to impact on the risk of transmitting the disease via embryo transfer......The risk of transmission of classical scrapie via the transfer of in vivo derived embryo in ovines was assessed, taking into account the scientific information made available since the last EFSA opinion on this topic (2010) (see http://www.efsa.europa.eu/en/efsajournal/pub/1429.htm). The potential...... impact of PrP genotype of the embryo and/or of the ram and donor ewe on this risk was also assessed. The new data made available over the last three years further reinforce the view that classical scrapie could be vertically transmitted in sheep. Since the possibility of such vertical transmission...

  7. In vivo growth-restricted and reversible malignancy induced by Human Herpesvirus-8/ KSHV: a cell and animal model of virally induced Kaposi's sarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutlu, Agata D'Agostino; Cavallin, Lucas E.; Vincent, Loïc; Chiozzini, Chiara; Eroles, Pilar; Duran, Elda M.; Asgari, Zahra; Hooper, Andrea T.; La Perle, Krista M. D.; Hilsher, Chelsey; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Rafii, Shahin; Mesri, Enrique A.

    2007-01-01

    Transfection of a Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) herpesvirus (KSHV) Bacterial Artificial Chromosome (KSHVBac36) into mouse bone marrow endothelial lineage cells generates a cell (mECK36) that forms KS-like tumors in mice. mECK36 expressed most KSHV genes and were angiogenic, but didn't form colonies in soft agar. In nude mice, mECK36 formed KSHV-harboring vascularized spindle-cell sarcomas that were LANA+/podoplanin+, overexpressed VEGF and Angiopoietin ligands and receptors, and displayed KSHV and host transcriptomes reminiscent of KS. mECK36 that lost the KSHV episome reverted to non-tumorigenicity. siRNA suppression of KSHV vGPCR, an angiogenic gene up-regulated in mECK36 tumors, inhibited angiogenicity and tumorigenicity. These results show that KSHV malignancy is in vivo growth-restricted and reversible, defining mECK36 as a biologically sensitive animal model of KSHV-dependent KS. PMID:17349582

  8. Gravitational physiology of human immune cells: a review of in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogoli, A.

    1996-01-01

    The study of the function of immune cells in microgravity has been studied for more than 20 years in several laboratories. It is clear today that the immune system is depressed in more than 50% of the astronauts during and after space flight and that the activation of T lymphocytes by mitogens in vitro changes dramatically. This article gives an overview of the gravitational studies conducted by our laboratory in Spacelab, in MIR station, in sounding rockets and on the ground in the clinostat and the centrifuge. Three experimental approaches are followed in our work: (i) Ex vivo studies are performed with blood samples drawn from astronauts; (ii) in vivo studies are based on the application of seven antigens to the skin of the astronauts; (iii) in vitro studies are carried out with immune cells purified from the blood of healthy donors (not astronauts). The data from our in vivo and ex vivo studies are in agreement with those of other laboratories and show that the immunological function is depressed in the majority of astronauts as a consequence of the stress of space flight rather than by a direct influence of gravity on the cell. Immune depression may become a critical hazard on long duration flights on space stations or to other planets. In vitro experiments show that cultures of free-floating lymphocytes and monocytes undergo a dramatic depression of activation by the mitogen concanavalin A, while activation is more than doubled when the cells are attached to microcarrier beads. Such effects may be attributed to both direct and indirect effects of gravitational unloading on basic biological mechanisms of the cell. While the in vitro data are very important to clarify certain aspects of the biological mechanism of T cells activation, they are not descriptive of the changes of the immunological function of the astronauts.

  9. A retrospective study on incidence of lameness in domestic animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mohsina

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the incidence of lameness among different species of animals presented to the Veterinary Polyclinic, Indian Veterinary Research Institute, Izatnagar. Materials and Methods: Outpatient department (OPD records for the period from January 2006 to December 2010 were referred and information was collected regarding number of lameness in different species, breeds, type of injury, limb affected, gender, age at onset, treatment offered, outcome and any reoccurrence. In this study, fractured cases were not included. Results: The incidence of lameness among different species were recorded: canine (56%, equine (21%, caprine (7%, feline (3%, cattle (7%, buffalo (5.47%, sheep (0.6%, monkey (0.39% and swine (0.19%. In dog, the different conditions were reported with hind quarter weakness recording 55% of lameness followed by right hind limb lameness (14.7%, left hind limb lameness (12.6%, left forelimb lameness (12%, hip dislocation (6.3% and hip dysplasia (4.2%. In caprines, important causes of lameness were right forelimb lameness (23%, right hind limb lameness (12%, left forelimb lameness (12%, posterior paresis (9%, left shoulder dislocation (14% and right shoulder dislocation (6%. In cattle, 34.28% of cases with right hind limb lameness, 28.5% cases were due to HQW, 14.28% had hip dysplasia, 8.57% suffered left hind limb lameness, 6% cases were recorded with obturator nerve paralysis and 8.57% cases suffered contracted tendon in calves. In buffaloes, cases reported were right carpal arthritis, foot rot and left hind limb lameness (14.28% each, due to bilateral upward luxation of patella and due bilateral purulent wound in stifle (18% each and hip dislocation (21.4%. In equines, lameness were reported with right hind limb affection (13%, left forelimb affection (11%, right forelimb affection (17%, 4% each due to disease of right shoulder, HQW and both forelimb affection, lateral dislocation of patella (3%, affection of both hind limbs (9%, 5

  10. Animal Rights: Selected Resources and Suggestions for Further Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidoff, Donald J.

    1989-01-01

    Presents an annotated list of selected resources intended to serve as a guide to the growing amount of material on animal rights. Suggestions to aid in additional research include subject headings used to find books, indexes used to locate periodical articles, sources for locating organizations, and a selected list of animal rights organizations.…

  11. Studies to distinguish between human and animal faecal pollution ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human enteric viral infections are considered to be predominantly associated with human wastes, as opposed to animal wastes, and a distinction between these has benefits for water quality control and risk assessment. A variety of techniques have been described to distinguish between human and animal faecal pollution ...

  12. Preliminary studies with (/sup 18/F)haloperidol: a radioligand for in vivo studies of the dopamine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tewson, T J; Raichle, M E; Welch, M J [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (USA). Edward Mallinckrodt Inst. of Radiology

    1980-06-16

    The authors report a synthesis of (/sup 18/F)haloperidol of sufficiently high specific activity to permit the mapping of dopamine receptors in vivo in man using PET. The preliminary work with this radioligand in vivo in monkeys clearly suggests that haloperidol enters brain from blood by means of carrier-mediated, facilitated diffusion rather than simple diffusion. This rather surprising observation not only assumes special importance in the interpretation of in vivo pharmacokinetic data on dopamine receptors in man or animals but may also be important in considerations of the possible mode of action of this drug on the central nervous system.

  13. Preliminary studies with [18F]haloperidol: a radioligand for in vivo studies of the dopamine receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tewson, T.J.; Raichle, M.E.; Welch, M.J.

    1980-01-01

    The authors report a synthesis of [ 18 F]haloperidol of sufficiently high specific activity to permit the mapping of dopamine receptors in vivo in man using PET. The preliminary work with this radioligand in vivo in monkeys clearly suggests that haloperidol enters brain from blood by means of carrier-mediated, facilitated diffusion rather than simple diffusion. This rather surprising observation not only assumes special importance in the interpretation of in vivo pharmacokinetic data on dopamine receptors in man or animals but may also be important in considerations of the possible mode of action of this drug on the central nervous system. (Auth.)

  14. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bačić, Goran; Pavićević, Aleksandra; Peyrot, Fabienne

    2015-01-01

    Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS), are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI) and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans) under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes. PMID:26827126

  15. In vivo evaluation of different alterations of redox status by studying pharmacokinetics of nitroxides using magnetic resonance techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Bačić

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Free radicals, particularly reactive oxygen species (ROS, are involved in various pathologies, injuries related to radiation, ischemia-reperfusion or ageing. Unfortunately, it is virtually impossible to directly detect free radicals in vivo, but the redox status of the whole organism or particular organ can be studied in vivo by using magnetic resonance techniques (EPR and MRI and paramagnetic stable free radicals – nitroxides. Here we review results obtained in vivo following the pharmacokinetics of nitroxides on experimental animals (and a few in humans under various conditions. The focus was on conditions where the redox status has been altered by induced diseases or harmful agents, clearly demonstrating that various EPR/MRI/nitroxide combinations can reliably detect metabolically induced changes in the redox status of organs. These findings can improve our understanding of oxidative stress and provide a basis for studying the effectiveness of interventions aimed to modulate oxidative stress. Also, we anticipate that the in vivo EPR/MRI approach in studying the redox status can play a vital role in the clinical management of various pathologies in the years to come providing the development of adequate equipment and probes.

  16. In vivo toxicity studies of europium hydroxide nanorods in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Abdel Moneim, Soha S.; Wang, Enfeng; Dutta, Shamit; Patra, Sujata; Eshed, Michal; Mukherjee, Priyabrata; Gedanken, Aharon; Shah, Vijay H.; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata

    2009-01-01

    Lanthanide nanoparticles and nanorods have been widely used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in biomedical nanotechnology due to their fluorescence and pro-angiogenic properties to endothelial cells, respectively. Recently, we have demonstrated that europium (III) hydroxide [Eu III (OH) 3 ] nanorods, synthesized by the microwave technique and characterized by several physico-chemical techniques, can be used as pro-angiogenic agents which introduce future therapeutic treatment strategies for severe ischemic heart/limb disease, and peripheral ischemic disease. The toxicity of these inorganic nanorods to endothelial cells was supported by several in vitro assays. To determine the in vivo toxicity, these nanorods were administered to mice through intraperitoneal injection (IP) everyday over a period of seven days in a dose dependent (1.25 to 125 mg kg -1 day -1 ) and time dependent manner (8-60 days). Bio-distribution of europium elements in different organs was analyzed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). Short-term (S-T) and long-term (L-T) toxicity studies (mice euthanized on days 8 and 60 for S-T and L-T, respectively) show normal blood hematology and serum clinical chemistry with the exception of a slight elevation of liver enzymes. Histological examination of nanorod-treated vital organs (liver, kidney, spleen and lungs) showed no or only mild histological changes that indicate mild toxicity at the higher dose of nanorods.

  17. In vivo studies of biotin absorption in distal rat intestine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, B.B.; Rosenberg, I.H.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have extended their previous studies of biotin absorption in rat proximal jejunum (PJ) to examine biotin absorptive capacity of rat ileum (I) and proximal colon (PC) using in vivo intestinal loop technique. Intestinal loops (2.5 cm) were filled with 0.3 ml of solution containing ( 3 H)-biotin and ( 14 C)-inulin in phosphate buffer, pH 6.5. Biotin absorption was determined on the basis of luminal biotin disappearance after correction for inulin recovery and averaged (pmol/loop-10 min; X +/- SEM). In related experiments, 5-cm loops of PJ, distal I (DI), or PC were filled with 0.5 ml of solution of similar composition (1.0 μM biotin). The abdominal cavity was closed and the rats were allowed to recover from anesthesia, then sacrificed 3 hr after injection. Biotin absorption averaged 96.2% (PJ), 93.2% (DI), and 25.8% (PC) of the dose administered. These differences were reflected in the radioactive biotin content of plasma and intestinal loop, kidney, and liver. These data demonstrate significant biotin absorption in rat DI and PC, as required if the intestinal microflora are to be considered as a source of biotin for the host

  18. In vivo {sup 13}C MRS studies of carbohydrate metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halliday, Jane

    2003-07-01

    The work described in this thesis was performed by the author, except where indicated, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period between October 1999 and October 2002. Although much is known about the major pathways of carbohydrate metabolism, there is still much to be learnt about the exact mechanisms of many of these pathways. Of particular interest is how these pathways are modified under different physiological conditions and in diseased states. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy provides a non-invasive means for studying carbohydrate metabolism in vivo, and the work presented within this thesis gives two such examples of this in human subjects. Natural abundance {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was used to measure glycogen levels in gastrocnemius muscle. The diurnal changes in response to mixed meals were measured in both type 2 diabetic subjects and age and weight matched controls. Metabolic studies were performed to complement the NMR measurements. The data obtained in these studies show the effect of the failure of muscle glucose storage upon post-prandial hyperglycaemia despite a supra-normal increase in plasma insulin in type 2 diabetes. {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy was also used to study cerebral metabolism. Accumulation of {sup 13}C label into glutamate and glutamine following infusion of [1{sup 13}C] glucose allows the determination of the rates of the TCA cycle (F{sub TCA}) and neurotransmitter cycling (F{sub cyc}). These rates were measured in the visual cortex under control and activated conditions. The increases seen in F{sub TCA} upon activation, together with the lack of label accumulation in lactate, suggest that cerebral glucose metabolism is oxidative, even during strong activation. No conclusion can be made as to whether or not a similar increase is seen in F{sub cyc} due to the large associated errors in these values. (author)

  19. In vivo 13C MRS studies of carbohydrate metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halliday, Jane

    2003-01-01

    The work described in this thesis was performed by the author, except where indicated, within the Magnetic Resonance Centre at the University of Nottingham during the period between October 1999 and October 2002. Although much is known about the major pathways of carbohydrate metabolism, there is still much to be learnt about the exact mechanisms of many of these pathways. Of particular interest is how these pathways are modified under different physiological conditions and in diseased states. 13 C NMR spectroscopy provides a non-invasive means for studying carbohydrate metabolism in vivo, and the work presented within this thesis gives two such examples of this in human subjects. Natural abundance 13 C NMR spectroscopy was used to measure glycogen levels in gastrocnemius muscle. The diurnal changes in response to mixed meals were measured in both type 2 diabetic subjects and age and weight matched controls. Metabolic studies were performed to complement the NMR measurements. The data obtained in these studies show the effect of the failure of muscle glucose storage upon post-prandial hyperglycaemia despite a supra-normal increase in plasma insulin in type 2 diabetes. 13 C NMR spectroscopy was also used to study cerebral metabolism. Accumulation of 13 C label into glutamate and glutamine following infusion of [1 1 3 C] glucose allows the determination of the rates of the TCA cycle (F TCA ) and neurotransmitter cycling (F cyc ). These rates were measured in the visual cortex under control and activated conditions. The increases seen in F TCA upon activation, together with the lack of label accumulation in lactate, suggest that cerebral glucose metabolism is oxidative, even during strong activation. No conclusion can be made as to whether or not a similar increase is seen in F cyc due to the large associated errors in these values. (author)

  20. Use of Transgenic and Mutant Animal Models in the Study of Heterocyclic Amine-induced Mutagenesis and Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashwood, Roderick H.

    2008-01-01

    Heterocyclic amines (HCAs) are potent mutagens generated during the cooking of meat and fish, and several of these compounds produce tumors in conventional experimental animals. During the past 5 years or so, HCAs have been tested in a number of novel in vivo murine models, including the following: lacZ, lacI, cII, c-myc/lacZ, rpsL, and gptΔ transgenics, XPA−/−, XPC−/−, Msh2+/−, Msh2−/− and p53+/− knock-outs, Apc mutant mice (ApcΔ716, Apc1638N, Apcmin), and A33ΔNβ-cat knock-in mice. Several of these models have provided insights into the mutation spectra induced in vivo by HCAs in target and non-target organs for tumorigenesis, as well as demonstrating enhanced susceptibility to HCA-induced tumors and preneoplastic lesions. This review describes several of the more recent reports in which novel animal models were used to examine HCA-induced mutagenesis and carcinogenesis in vivo, including a number of studies which assessed the inhibitory activities of chemopreventive agents such as 1,2-dithiole-3-thione, conjugated linoleic acids, tea, curcumin, chlorophyllin-chitosan, and sulindac. PMID:12542973

  1. Persistence of DNA studied in different ex vivo and in vivo rat models simulating the human gut situation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilcks, Andrea; van Hoek, A.H.A.M.; Joosten, R.G.

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the possibility of DNA sequences from genetically modified plants to persist in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. PCR analysis and transformation assays were used to study DNA persistence and integrity in various ex vivo and in vivo systems using gnotobiotic rats. DNA......, plasmid DNA could be recovered throughout the GI tract when intestinal samples were taken up to 5 h after feeding rats with plasmid. Furthermore, DNA isolated from these intestinal samples was able to transform electro-competent Escherichia coli, showing that the plasmid was still biologically active....... The results indicate that ingested DNA may persist in the GI tract and consequently may be present for uptake by intestinal bacteria....

  2. Pulmonary toxicity of nanomaterials: a critical comparison of published in vitro assays and in vivo inhalation or instillation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsiedel, Robert; Sauer, Ursula G; Ma-Hock, Lan; Schnekenburger, Jürgen; Wiemann, Martin

    2014-11-01

    To date, guidance on how to incorporate in vitro assays into integrated approaches for testing and assessment of nanomaterials is unavailable. In addressing this shortage, this review compares data from in vitro studies to results from in vivo inhalation or intratracheal instillation studies. Globular nanomaterials (ion-shedding silver and zinc oxide, poorly soluble titanium dioxide and cerium dioxide, and partly soluble amorphous silicon dioxide) and nanomaterials with higher aspect ratios (multiwalled carbon nanotubes) were assessed focusing on the Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) reference nanomaterials for these substances. If in vitro assays are performed with dosages that reflect effective in vivo dosages, the mechanisms of nanomaterial toxicity can be assessed. In early tiers of integrated approaches for testing and assessment, knowledge on mechanisms of toxicity serves to group nanomaterials thereby reducing the need for animal testing.

  3. Genetic and ecological studies of animals in Chernobyl and Fukushima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Timothy A; Møller, Anders P

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic and ecological studies of wild animal populations in Chernobyl and Fukushima have demonstrated significant genetic, physiological, developmental, and fitness effects stemming from exposure to radioactive contaminants. The few genetic studies that have been conducted in Chernobyl generally show elevated rates of genetic damage and mutation rates. All major taxonomic groups investigated (i.e., birds, bees, butterflies, grasshoppers, dragonflies, spiders, mammals) displayed reduced population sizes in highly radioactive parts of the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone. In Fukushima, population censuses of birds, butterflies, and cicadas suggested that abundances were negatively impacted by exposure to radioactive contaminants, while other groups (e.g., dragonflies, grasshoppers, bees, spiders) showed no significant declines, at least during the first summer following the disaster. Insufficient information exists for groups other than insects and birds to assess effects on life history at this time. The differences observed between Fukushima and Chernobyl may reflect the different times of exposure and the significance of multigenerational mutation accumulation in Chernobyl compared to Fukushima. There was considerable variation among taxa in their apparent sensitivity to radiation and this reflects in part life history, physiology, behavior, and evolutionary history. Interestingly, for birds, population declines in Chernobyl can be predicted by historical mitochondrial DNA base-pair substitution rates that may reflect intrinsic DNA repair ability. © The American Genetic Association 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. In vivo x-ray phase contrast analyzer-based imaging for longitudinal osteoarthritis studies in guinea pigs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coan, Paola [Faculty of Medicine and Institute of Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians University, Munich (Germany); Wagner, Andreas; Mollenhauer, Juergen [Department of Orthopaedics of the University of Jena, Rudolf-Elle-Hospital Eisenberg (Germany); Bravin, Alberto; Diemoz, Paul C; Keyrilaeinen, Jani, E-mail: Paola.Coan@physik.uni-muenchen.d [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), Grenoble (France)

    2010-12-21

    Over the last two decades phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques have been extensively studied for applications in the biomedical field. Published results demonstrate the high capability of these imaging modalities of improving the image contrast of biological samples with respect to standard absorption-based radiography and routinely used clinical imaging techniques. A clear depiction of the anatomic structures and a more accurate disease diagnosis may be provided by using radiation doses comparable to or lower than those used in current clinical methods. In the literature many works show images of phantoms and excised biological samples proving the high sensitivity of the phase contrast imaging methods for in vitro investigations. In this scenario, the applications of the so-called analyzer-based x-ray imaging (ABI) phase contrast technique are particularly noteworthy. The objective of this work is to demonstrate the feasibility of in vivo x-ray ABI phase contrast imaging for biomedical applications and in particular with respect to joint anatomic depiction and osteoarthritis detection. ABI in planar and tomographic modes was performed in vivo on articular joints of guinea pigs in order to investigate the animals with respect to osteoarthritis by using highly monochromatic x-rays of 52 keV and a low noise detector with a pixel size of 47 x 47 {mu}m{sup 2}. Images give strong evidence of the ability of ABI in depicting both anatomic structures in complex systems as living organisms and all known signs of osteoarthritis with high contrast, high spatial resolution and with an acceptable radiation dose. This paper presents the first proof of principle study of in vivo application of ABI. The technical challenges encountered when imaging an animal in vivo are discussed. This experimental study is an important step toward the study of clinical applications of phase contrast x-ray imaging techniques.

  5. Animal models for the study of arterial hypertension

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    1Research in Biological Sciences - NUPEB, 2Department of Foods, School of Nutrition, Ouro Preto University, ..... ical (large) doses of drug required, (2) the requirement for .... Animal models can lead to understanding of the interactions.

  6. Markerless 3D motion capture for animal locomotion studies

    OpenAIRE

    William Irvin Sellers; Eishi Hirasaki

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obtaining quantitative data describing the movements of animals is an essential step in understanding their locomotor biology. Outside the laboratory, measuring animal locomotion often relies on video-based approaches and analysis is hampered because of difficulties in calibration and often the limited availability of possible camera positions. It is also usually restricted to two dimensions, which is often an undesirable over-simplification given the essentially three-dimensional na...

  7. Animal health economics: an aid to decisionmaking on animal health interventions - case studies in the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, T L; Pendell, D; Knippenberg, R

    2017-04-01

    For animal disease events the outcomes and consequences often remain unclear or uncertain, including the expected changes in benefits (e.g. profit to firms, prices to consumers) and in costs (e.g. response, clean-up). Moreover, the measurement of changes in benefits and costs across alternative interventions used to control animal disease events may be inexact. For instance, the economic consequences of alternative vaccination strategies to mitigate a disease can vary in magnitude due to trade embargoes and other factors. The authors discuss the economic measurement of animal disease outbreaks and interventions and how measurement is used in private and public decision-making. Two illustrative case studies in the United States of America are provided: a hypothetical outbreak of foot and mouth disease in cattle, and the 2014-2015 outbreak of highly pathogenic avian influenza in poultry.

  8. A study of Polonium in human hair and in fur from animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holstein, H; Ranebo, Y.; Henriksson, F.; Rääf, C.L.; Holm, E.; Roos, P.

    2013-01-01

    Human hair and hair from animals might serve as good indicators for internal contamination, allowing for the quantification of general environmental levels of certain radioactive elements. From a sampling, analytical and hygienic point of view it would be advantageous to study hair instead of urine and faeces samples. There have been several investigations concerning Polonium in hair. The purpose of this study was to investigate if hair from humans and fur from animals constitute as matrixes for the estimation of the body burden of 210 Po. Human hair taken from 26 individuals from Sweden was analyzed for its 210 Po content. The resulting activity concentration of 210 Po ranged from 0.5 to 4.8 Bq/kg for individuals between the ages of 3 to 32 years and range from 0.5 to 11.5 Bq/kg for individuals between the ages of 32 to 60. This is in agreement with results presented in other studies. The 210 Po in hair might be due to external contamination or in vivo build up from 210 Pb. To help quantify these sources of contamination a couple of human volunteers ingested known amounts of 209 Po (which does not exist in nature). Results from the study showed that 209 Po was rather rapidly detected in the hair samples Human hair consists of 45% Carbon, 7% Hydrogen, 28% Oxygen, 15% Nitrogen and 5% Sulphur. The central core consists of polypeptide chains with hydrogen and disulphide bindings. It is suggested that the sulphide binding is the reason for transfer of Polonium into the hair. Samples from horses; mane, fur, and tail showed activity concentration levels ranging from 6 to 17 Bq/kg, with no significant differences between the various sample types. Fur samples taken from Muskox from Greenland showed much higher concentrations, i.e. 260 Bq/kg. This was expected since the animal graze over vast surface and consumes large amounts of lichen. Deposited radionuclides accumulate in lichens. Fur samples taken from other animals i.e. moose, hare, wild boar, roe deer, and sheep (lamb

  9. In and ex vivo breast disease study by Raman spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Raniero, L.; Canevari, R. A.; Ramalho, L. N. Z.

    2011-01-01

    ex vivo measurements gave the highest specificity and sensitivity: 96 and 97%, respectively, as well as a largest percentage for correct discrimination: 94%. Now that the important bands have been experimentally determined in this and other works, what remains is for first principles molecular...

  10. Fast synthesis of 11C-Raclopride and its initial PET study on animal model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jinming; Tian Jiahe; Yao Shulin; Ding Weimin; Yin Dayi; Liu Boli

    2008-01-01

    Objective: 11 C-Raclopride is a type-2 dopamine receptor (D 2 R) binding agent used in the study of Parkinson's disease. This study introduced a fast and convenient method for preparation of 11 C- Raclopride and reported on the preclinical trial of this receptor tracer on animal studies. Methods: 11 C- Raclopride was synthesized via reaction of 11 C-CH 3 -Triflate with Nor-Raclopride. The mixture of primary product was water-diluted and loaded on Sep-Pak C18 column for separation. The final product, 11 C-Raclopride, was purified by column chromatography and then eluted from the C18 column with ethanol. The bio-distribution was studied in SD rats and the in vivo imaging pattern was studied in hem ipark insonjan mon- keys. Results: Within 16 min from beginning of processing with 11 CO 2 , the synthetic yield of 11 C-Raclopride was 60%, radiochemical purity (RCP) > 95% and specific activity 8 GBq/mmol. The uptake ratios of striatum to cerebellum and cerebral cortex were 4.67 and 6.20, respectively, at 30 min after 11 C-Raclopride administration. The striatal uptake in normal rat brain could be blocked by N-methylspiperone (NMSP) and raclopride, but not by Nor-raclopride. PET imaging showed higher striatal D 2 R uptake on the D 2 receptor up-regulated side of the experimental monkeys relative to the contralateral side. Conclusions: Column chromatography for purification of 11 C-Raclopride was fast, convenient and with a RCP similar to that of high performance liquid chromatography purification. Preliminary PET findings using animal model suggested that 11 C-Raclopride by column chromatogram purification might be considered for clinical use. (authors)

  11. Animal Models in Studies of Cardiotoxicity Side Effects from Antiblastic Drugs in Patients and Occupational Exposed Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Lamberti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiotoxicity is an important side effect of cytotoxic drugs and may be a risk factor of long-term morbidity for both patients during therapy and also for staff exposed during the phases of manipulation of antiblastic drugs. The mechanism of cardiotoxicity studied in vitro and in vivo essentially concerns the formation of free radicals leading to oxidative stress, with apoptosis of cardiac cells or immunologic reactions, but other mechanisms may play a role in antiblastic-induced cardiotoxicity. Actually, some new cytotoxic drugs like trastuzumab and cyclopentenyl cytosine show cardiotoxic effects. In this report we discuss the different mechanisms of cardiotoxicity induced by antiblastic drugs assessed using animal models.

  12. ANIMAL MODELS FOR THE STUDY OF LEISHMANIASIS IMMUNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elsy Nalleli Loria-Cervera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis remains a major public health problem worldwide and is classified as Category I by the TDR/WHO, mainly due to the absence of control. Many experimental models like rodents, dogs and monkeys have been developed, each with specific features, in order to characterize the immune response to Leishmania species, but none reproduces the pathology observed in human disease. Conflicting data may arise in part because different parasite strains or species are being examined, different tissue targets (mice footpad, ear, or base of tail are being infected, and different numbers (“low” 1×102 and “high” 1×106 of metacyclic promastigotes have been inoculated. Recently, new approaches have been proposed to provide more meaningful data regarding the host response and pathogenesis that parallels human disease. The use of sand fly saliva and low numbers of parasites in experimental infections has led to mimic natural transmission and find new molecules and immune mechanisms which should be considered when designing vaccines and control strategies. Moreover, the use of wild rodents as experimental models has been proposed as a good alternative for studying the host-pathogen relationships and for testing candidate vaccines. To date, using natural reservoirs to study Leishmania infection has been challenging because immunologic reagents for use in wild rodents are lacking. This review discusses the principal immunological findings against Leishmania infection in different animal models highlighting the importance of using experimental conditions similar to natural transmission and reservoir species as experimental models to study the immunopathology of the disease.

  13. N-[11C]methylpiperidine esters as acetylcholinesterase substrates: an in vivo structure-reactivity study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kilbourn, Michael R.; Nguyen, Thinh B.; Snyder, Scott E.; Sherman, Phillip

    1998-01-01

    A series of simple esters incorporating the N-[ 11 C]methylpiperidine structure were examined as in vivo substrates for acetylcholinesterase in mouse brain. 4-N-[ 11 C]Methylpiperidinyl esters, including the acetate, propionate and isobutyrate esters, are good in vivo substrates for mammalian cholinesterases. Introduction of a methyl group at the 4-position of the 4-piperidinol esters, to form the ester of a teritary alcohol, effectively blocks enzymatic action. Methylation of 4- N-[ 11 C]methylpiperidinyl propionate at the 3-position gives a derivative with increased in vivo reactivity toward acetylcholinesterase. Esters of piperidinecarboxylic acids (nipecotic, isonipecotic and pipecolinic acid ethyl esters) are not hydrolyzed by acetylcholinesterase in vivo, nor do they act as in vivo inhibitors of the enzyme. This study has identified simple methods to both increase and decrease the in vivo reactivity of piperidinyl esters toward acetylcholinesterase

  14. Studies on the effects of ionizing radiation on the normal and diseased liver in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahmoud, S.A.

    1981-01-01

    The experiments carried out in the present study primarily concerned with the effects of ionizing radiations on the normal and diseased liver in experimental animals (mice). Different radiation intensities and different exposure schemes were used to irradiate both healthy and schistosoma mansoni infected animals. A group of uninfected and unirradiated animals were used as controls. Follow up studies were performed every 6 weeks for 30 weeks. These included histopathological studies of the liver damage at every observation periods for all animal groups

  15. Automated interactive video playback for studies of animal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butkowski, Trisha; Yan, Wei; Gray, Aaron M; Cui, Rongfeng; Verzijden, Machteld N; Rosenthal, Gil G

    2011-02-09

    Video playback is a widely-used technique for the controlled manipulation and presentation of visual signals in animal communication. In particular, parameter-based computer animation offers the opportunity to independently manipulate any number of behavioral, morphological, or spectral characteristics in the context of realistic, moving images of animals on screen. A major limitation of conventional playback, however, is that the visual stimulus lacks the ability to interact with the live animal. Borrowing from video-game technology, we have created an automated, interactive system for video playback that controls animations in response to real-time signals from a video tracking system. We demonstrated this method by conducting mate-choice trials on female swordtail fish, Xiphophorus birchmanni. Females were given a simultaneous choice between a courting male conspecific and a courting male heterospecific (X. malinche) on opposite sides of an aquarium. The virtual male stimulus was programmed to track the horizontal position of the female, as courting males do in the wild. Mate-choice trials on wild-caught X. birchmanni females were used to validate the prototype's ability to effectively generate a realistic visual stimulus.

  16. Animal experimentation in Japan: regulatory processes and application for microbiological studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi-Omoe, H; Omoe, K

    2007-07-01

    We have conducted animal experimentation as a highly effective technique in biological studies. Also in microbiological studies, we have used experimentation to prevent and treat many infectious diseases in humans and animals. In Japan, the 'Law for the Humane Treatment and Management of Animals', which covers the consideration of the three R principles, refinement, replacement and reduction for an international humane approach to animal experimentation came into effect in June 2006. Looking towards the straightforward operation of the law in animal experimentation, three government ministries established new basic guidelines for experimentation performed in their jurisdictional research and testing facilities. For future microbiological studies involving animals in Japan, we need to perform animal experiments according to the basic guidelines in association with overseas management systems. In this report, we discussed essential actions for the management of animal experimentation in microbiological studies in Japan.

  17. The minipig as an animal model to study Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and natural transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infants and children with tuberculosis (TB) account for more than 20% of cases in endemic countries. Current animal models study TB during adulthood but animal models for adolescent and infant TB are scarce. Here we propose that minipigs can be used as an animal model to study adult, adolescent and ...

  18. Animal models for the study of Helicobacter pylori infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Miszczyk

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The Gram-negative bacillus Helicobacter pylori is widely recognized as a major etiologic agent responsible for chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcers, the development of gastric cancer and mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT lymphoma. Still, little is known about the natural history of H. pylori infection, since patients usually after many years of not suffering from symptoms of the infection are simply asymptomatic. Since the research investigators carried out on human models has many limitations, there is an urgent need for the development of an animal model optimal and suitable for the monitoring of H. pylori infections. This review summarizes the recent findings on the suitability of animal models used in H. pylori research. Several animal models are useful for the assessment of pathological, microbiological and immunological consequences of infection, which makes it possible to monitor the natural

  19. Studies on treatment of radioactive animal carcass, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuoka, Osamu; Koizumi, Akira; Fukuda, Satoshi

    1979-01-01

    A new method of waste treatment of animal carcass contaminated with plutonium was proposed. A multi-step process was designed and tested at a laboratory scale which was composed of the following processes; microwave dehydration, heat decomposition and ashing. Microwave dehydration was found the most adequate as the first step of the treatment because of the negligible release of nonvolatile radioactivity. About 70% of body weight was reduced by microwave dehydration. Dehydrated animal carcass was decomposed by graded electric heating under anaerobic condition. Burnable gas and vapour produced by the heat decomposition were oxidized by passing through a reheating tube with excess air. The exhaust gas had no significant radioactivity. The residue of charred carcass was oxidized by heating with excess air. The weight of final product was up to 8% of original wet weight. The proposed multi-step process provided to be adequate for the waste disporsal of Pu contaminated animal carcass. (author)

  20. Telmisartan Modulates Glial Activation: In Vitro and In Vivo Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nofar Torika

    Full Text Available The circulating renin-angiotensin system (RAS, including the biologically active angiotensin II, is a fundamental regulatory mechanism of blood pressure conserved through evolution. Angiotensin II components of the RAS have also been identified in the brain. In addition to pro-inflammatory cytokines, neuromodulators, such as angiotensin II can induce (through angiotensin type 1 receptor (AT1R some of the inflammatory actions of brain glial cells and influence brain inflammation. Moreover, in Alzheimer's disease (AD models, where neuroinflammation occurs, increased levels of cortical AT1Rs have been shown. Still, the precise role of RAS in neuroinflammation is not completely clear. The overall aim of the present study was to elucidate the role of RAS in the modulation of glial functions and AD pathology. To reach this goal, the specific aims of the present study were a. to investigate the long term effect of telmisartan (AT1R blocker on tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, interleukin 1-β (IL1-β and nitric oxide (NO release from glial cells. b. to examine the effect of intranasally administered telmisartan on amyloid burden and microglial activation in 5X familial AD (5XFAD mice. Telmisartan effects in vivo were compared to those of perindopril (angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor. Long-term-exposure of BV2 microglia to telmisartan significantly decreased lipopolysaccharide (LPS -induced NO, inducible NO synthase, TNF-α and IL1-β synthesis. The effect of Telmisartan on NO production in BV2 cells was confirmed also in primary neonatal rat glial cells. Intranasal administration of telmisartan (1 mg/kg/day for up to two months significantly reduced amyloid burden and CD11b expression (a marker for microglia both in the cortex and hipoccampus of 5XFAD. Based on the current view of RAS and our data, showing reduced amyloid burden and glial activation in the brains of 5XFAD transgenic mice, one may envision potential intervention with the

  1. Correlation of In Vivo Versus In Vitro Benchmark Doses (BMDs) Derived From Micronucleus Test Data: A Proof of Concept Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soeteman-Hernández, Lya G; Fellows, Mick D; Johnson, George E; Slob, Wout

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we explored the applicability of using in vitro micronucleus (MN) data from human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells to derive in vivo genotoxicity potency information. Nineteen chemicals covering a broad spectrum of genotoxic modes of action were tested in an in vitro MN test using TK6 cells using the same study protocol. Several of these chemicals were considered to need metabolic activation, and these were administered in the presence of S9. The Benchmark dose (BMD) approach was applied using the dose-response modeling program PROAST to estimate the genotoxic potency from the in vitro data. The resulting in vitro BMDs were compared with previously derived BMDs from in vivo MN and carcinogenicity studies. A proportional correlation was observed between the BMDs from the in vitro MN and the BMDs from the in vivo MN assays. Further, a clear correlation was found between the BMDs from in vitro MN and the associated BMDs for malignant tumors. Although these results are based on only 19 compounds, they show that genotoxicity potencies estimated from in vitro tests may result in useful information regarding in vivo genotoxic potency, as well as expected cancer potency. Extension of the number of compounds and further investigation of metabolic activation (S9) and of other toxicokinetic factors would be needed to validate our initial conclusions. However, this initial work suggests that this approach could be used for in vitro to in vivo extrapolations which would support the reduction of animals used in research (3Rs: replacement, reduction, and refinement). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology.

  2. Platelet lysate as a substitute for animal serum for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells: present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astori, Giuseppe; Amati, Eliana; Bambi, Franco; Bernardi, Martina; Chieregato, Katia; Schäfer, Richard; Sella, Sabrina; Rodeghiero, Francesco

    2016-07-13

    The use of fetal bovine serum (FBS) as a cell culture supplement is discouraged by regulatory authorities to limit the risk of zoonoses and xenogeneic immune reactions in the transplanted host. Additionally, FBS production came under scrutiny due to animal welfare concerns. Platelet derivatives have been proposed as FBS substitutes for the ex-vivo expansion of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSCs) since platelet-derived growth factors can promote MSC ex-vivo expansion. Platelet-derived growth factors are present in platelet lysate (PL) obtained after repeated freezing-thawing cycles of the platelet-rich plasma or by applying physiological stimuli such as thrombin or CaCl2.PL-expanded MSCs have been used already in the clinic, taking advantage of their faster proliferation compared with FBS-expanded preparations. Should PL be applied to other biopharmaceutical products, its demand is likely to increase dramatically. The use of fresh platelet units for the production of PL raises concerns due to limited availability of platelet donors. Expired units might represent an alternative, but further data are needed to define safety, including pathogen reduction, and functionality of the obtained PL. In addition, relevant questions concerning the definition of PL release criteria, including concentration ranges of specific growth factors in PL batches for various clinical indications, also need to be addressed. We are still far from a common definition of PL and standardized PL manufacture due to our limited knowledge of the mechanisms that mediate PL-promoting cell growth. Here, we concisely discuss aspects of PL as MSC culture supplement as a preliminary step towards an agreed definition of the required characteristics of PL for the requirements of manufacturers and users.

  3. Direct detection and quantification of abasic sites for in vivo studies of DNA damage and repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yanming; Liu Lili; Wu Chunying; Bulgar, Alina; Somoza, Eduardo; Zhu Wenxia; Gerson, Stanton L.

    2009-01-01

    Use of chemotherapeutic agents to induce cytotoxic DNA damage and programmed cell death is a key strategy in cancer treatments. However, the efficacy of DNA-targeted agents such as temozolomide is often compromised by intrinsic cellular responses such as DNA base excision repair (BER). Previous studies have shown that BER pathway resulted in formation of abasic or apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites, and blockage of AP sites led to a significant enhancement of drug sensitivity due to reduction of DNA base excision repair. Since a number of chemotherapeutic agents also induce formation of AP sites, monitoring of these sites as a clinical correlate of drug effect will provide a useful tool in the development of DNA-targeted chemotherapies aimed at blocking abasic sites from repair. Here we report an imaging technique based on positron emission tomography (PET) that allows for direct quantification of AP sites in vivo. For this purpose, positron-emitting carbon-11 has been incorporated into methoxyamine ([ 11 C]MX) that binds covalently to AP sites with high specificity. The binding specificity of [ 11 C]MX for AP sites was demonstrated by in vivo blocking experiments. Using [ 11 C]MX as a radiotracer, animal PET studies have been conducted in melanoma and glioma xenografts for quantification of AP sites. Following induction of AP sites by temozolomide, both tumor models showed significant increase of [ 11 C]MX uptake in tumor regions in terms of radioactivity concentration as a function of time, which correlates well with conventional aldehyde reactive probe (ARP)-based bioassays for AP sites.

  4. The use of GRADE approach in systematic reviews of animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Dang; Tang, Kun; Wang, Qi; Estill, Janne; Yao, Liang; Wang, Xiaoqin; Chen, Yaolong; Yang, Kehu

    2016-03-15

    The application of GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) in SR of animal studies can promote the translation from bench to bedside. We aim to explore the use of GRADE in systematic reviews of animal studies. We used a theoretical analysis method to explore the use of GRADE in SR of animal studies and applied in a SR of animal studies. Meanwhile, we presented and discussed our results in two international conferences. Five downgrade factors were considered as follows in systematic reviews of animal studies: 1) Risk of bias: the SYRCLE tool can be used for assessing the risk of bias of animal studies. 2) Indirectness: we can assess indirectness in systematic reviews of animal studies from the PICO. 3) Inconsistency: similarity of point estimates, extent of overlap of confidence intervals and statistical heterogeneity are also suitable to evaluate inconsistency of evidence from animal studies. 4) Imprecision: optimal information size (OIS) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) are also suitable for systematic reviews of animal studies, like those of clinical trials. 5) Publication bias: we need to consider publication bias comprehensively through the qualitative and quantitative methods. The methods about the use of GRADE in systematic review of animal studies are explicit. However, the principle about GRADE in developing the policy based on the evidence from animal studies when there is an emergency of public health. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  5. Comparison of the in vitro and in vivo dissolution rates of two diuranates and research on an early urinary indicator of renal failure in humans and animals poisoned with uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henge-Napoli, M.H.; Rongier, E.; Ansoborlo, E.; Chalabreysse, J.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the solubility of industrial calcined diuranate in various in vitro systems and to test the sensitivity of biological parameters in detecting renal alterations after intoxication in animals and in human subjects. The dissolution rates in in vitro static and dynamic tests are consistent for each solution for both types of test. The in vivo results are comparable to the in vitro results obtained with Gamble solution for both compounds. The excretion kinetics observed are compared with the values calculated from ICRP standards. Urinary GGT excretion measurements are found to be a satisfactory indicator of uranium-induced kidney alterations. GGT excretion increases for injected doses exceeding 50 μg.kg -1 . Initial results in human subjects suggest that following accidental exposure to uranium, GGT is a more sensitive indicator of kidney damage than glycosuria. (author)

  6. Utility of a human-mouse xenograft model and in vivo near-infrared fluorescent imaging for studying wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugam, Victoria K; Tassi, Elena; Schmidt, Marcel O; McNish, Sean; Baker, Stephen; Attinger, Christopher; Wang, Hong; Shara, Nawar; Wellstein, Anton

    2015-12-01

    To study the complex cellular interactions involved in wound healing, it is essential to have an animal model that adequately mimics the human wound microenvironment. Currently available murine models are limited because wound contraction introduces bias into wound surface area measurements. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate utility of a human-mouse xenograft model for studying human wound healing. Normal human skin was harvested from elective abdominoplasty surgery, xenografted onto athymic nude (nu/nu) mice, and allowed to engraft for 3 months. The graft was then wounded using a 2-mm punch biopsy. Wounds were harvested on sequential days to allow tissue-based markers of wound healing to be followed sequentially. On the day of wound harvest, mice were injected with XenoLight RediJect cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) probe and imaged according to package instructions. Immunohistochemistry confirms that this human-mouse xenograft model is effective for studying human wound healing in vivo. Additionally, in vivo fluorescent imaging for inducible COX-2 demonstrated upregulation from baseline to day 4 (P = 0·03) with return to baseline levels by day 10, paralleling the reepithelialisation of the wound. This human-mouse xenograft model, combined with in vivo fluorescent imaging provides a useful mechanism for studying molecular pathways of human wound healing. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The Combination of In vivo 124I-PET and CT Small Animal Imaging for Evaluation of Thyroid Physiology and Dosimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrik H. El-Ali

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: A thyroid rat model combining functional and anatomical information would be of great benefit for better modeling of thyroid physiology and for absorbed dose calculations. Our aim was to show that 124I-PET and CT small animal imaging are useful as a combined model for studying thyroid physiology and dose calculation. Methods: Seven rats were subjects for multiple thyroid 124I-imaging and CT-scans. S-values [mGy/MBqs] for different thyroid sizes were simulated. A phantom with spheres was designed for validation of performances of the small animal PET and CT imaging systems. Results: Small animal image-based measurements of the activity amount and the volumes of the spheres with a priori known volumes showed a good agreement with their corresponding actual volumes. The CT scans of the rats showed thyroid volumes from 34–70 mL. Conclusions: The wide span in volumes of thyroid glands indicates the importance of using an accurate volume-measuring technique such as the small animal CT. The small animal PET system was on the other hand able to accurately estimate the activity concentration in the thyroid volumes. We conclude that the combination of the PET and CT image information is essential for quantitative thyroid imaging and accurate thyroid absorbed dose calculation.

  8. 21 CFR 320.25 - Guidelines for the conduct of an in vivo bioavailability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... conduct of an in vivo bioavailability study. (a) Guiding principles. (1) The basic principle in an in vivo... not been approved for marketing can be used to measure the following pharmacokinetic data: (i) The bioavailability of the formulation proposed for marketing; and (ii) The essential pharmacokinetic characteristics...

  9. In vitro and in vivo studies of gadolinium-159 liposomes in cancer treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Daniel Cristian Ferreira

    2011-01-01

    In Brazil, estimates of new cancer cases, valid for the years 2010 and 2011 show that the disease will be responsible for the deaths of about 500,000 people. As an alternative therapy the radiotherapy technique, widely used in treating various types of tumors, act indiscriminate tumoral and healthy cells. Seeking to minimize these effects, nano structured carriers containing radioisotopes, such as liposomes, have been studied with the aim of improving the specificity of action of ionizing radiation, delivering and retaining adequate amounts of radioactive material in tumor cells, leading them to death. In this context, the present study, we prepared liposomes stealth pH-sensitive metal complex containing the radioactive 159 Gd-DTPA-BMA ( 159 Gd-SpHL) aiming to study in vitro and in vivo its effects in cancer treatment. The vesicles showed encapsulation rate of about 20%, average diameter of 100 nm and low release kinetics of radioactivity in biological media. The formulation was characterized through physic-chemical and morphological studies and the results revealed a low polydispersity index and negative Zeta potential. We studied in vitro and in vivo its action against the cells of Ehrlich tumor models and RT2 (rat glioma). The results of in vitro studies showed that the complex has significant radioactive cytotoxicity against the cells of two of the three models studied and that, being encapsulated in liposomes, the cytotoxicity was greatly enhanced. Additionally, we investigated the involvement of caspase-3 protein in Ehrlich and RT2 cell death. The results suggest that the main mechanism involved in the cytotoxic action of radioactive complex is related to apoptosis. The results of in vivo studies showed that liposomes containing 159 Gd-DTPA-BMA accumulated significantly in Ehrlich solid tumor in mice. Aiming to improve this uptake, we prepared pH-sensitive liposomes coated with folate containing the same radioactive complex ( 159 Gd-FTSpHL). The results

  10. Cholic acid-modified polyethylenimine: in vitro and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dube B

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Brahmanand Dube,1,2 Abhijeet Pandey,1 Ganesh Joshi,3 Rita Mulherkar,3 Krutika Sawant1 1Pharmacy Department, Faculty of Pharmacy, The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, Vadodara, 2Wockhardt Research Centre, Wockhardt Ltd, Aurangabad, India; 3Genetic Engineering Laboratory, ACTREC Tata Memorial Centre, Kharghar, Navi Mumbai Abstract: Low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine has lower cytotoxicity than high molecular weight polyethylenimine, but it is not an efficient transfection agent because of limitations of DNA delivery into the cytoplasm. Therefore, in the present study, the hydrophobic modification of low-molecular-weight polyethylenimine (PEI 2 kDa [PEI2] by cholic acid (ChA was performed to form PEI2-ChA, and in vitro and in vivo studies were performed. Results indicate that the nanoplexes of PEI2-ChA with gWIZ-GFP have greater transfection efficiency (27% in NT8e cell lines as evaluated by flow cytometry and also observed by fluorescence imaging. The present study concluded that the transferrin-containing nanoplexes of PEI2-ChA conjugates with plasmid p53 warrant clinical trials in humans after exhaustive animal studies for use as a novel gene delivery system. Keywords: polyethylenimine, biodistribution, tumor regression

  11. Controlled release effervescent buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride: in vitro and in vivo evaluation studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaipal, A; Pandey, M M; Charde, S Y; Sadhu, N; Srinivas, A; Prasad, R G

    2016-01-01

    In the present study controlled release effervescent buccal discs of buspirone hydrochloride (BS) were designed using HPMC as rate controlling and bioadhesive polymer by direct compression method. Sodium bicarbonate and citric acid were used in varying amounts as effervescence forming agents. Carbon dioxide evolved due to reaction of sodium bicarbonate and citric acid was explored for its potential as buccal permeation enhancer. The designed buccal discs were evaluated for physical characteristics and in vitro drug release studies. Bioadhesive behavior of designed buccal discs was assessed using texture analyzer. In vivo animal studies were performed in rabbits to study bioavailability of BS in the designed buccal discs and to establish permeation enhancement ability of carbon dioxide. It was observed that effervescent buccal discs have faster drug release compared to non-effervescent buccal discs in vitro and effervescent buccal discs demonstrated significant increase in bioavailability of drug when compared to non-effervescent formulation. Hence, effervescent buccal discs can be used as an alternative to improve the drug permeation resulting in better bioavailability. However, the amount of acid and base used for generation of carbon dioxide should be selected with care as this may damage the integrity of bioadhesive dosage form.

  12. Chemical toxicity and radioactivity of depleted uranium: The evidence from in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asic, Adna; Kurtovic-Kozaric, Amina; Besic, Larisa; Mehinovic, Lejla; Hasic, Azra; Kozaric, Mirza; Hukic, Mirsada; Marjanovic, Damir

    2017-07-01

    The main aim of this review is to summarize and discuss the current state of knowledge on chemical toxicity and radioactivity of depleted uranium (DU) and their effect on living systems and cell lines. This was done by presenting a summary of previous investigations conducted on different mammalian body systems and cell cultures in terms of potential changes caused by either chemical toxicity or radioactivity of DU. In addition, the authors aimed to point out the limitations of those studies and possible future directions. The majority of both in vitro and in vivo studies performed using animal models regarding possible effects caused by acute or chronic DU exposure has been reviewed. Furthermore, exposure time and dose, DU particle solubility, and uranium isotopes as factors affecting the extent of DU effects have been discussed. Special attention has been dedicated to chromosomal aberrations, DNA damage and DNA breaks, as well as micronuclei formation and epigenetic changes, as DU has recently been considered a possible causative factor of all these processes. Therefore, this approach might represent a novel area of study of DU-related irradiation effects on health. Since different studies offer contradictory results, the main aim of this review is to summarize and briefly discuss previously obtained results in order to identify the current opinion on DU toxicity and radioactivity effects in relation to exposure type and duration, as well as DU properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Animal health and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kallfelz, F.A.; Lengemann, F.W.

    1984-01-01

    Some applications of the use of radioisotopes and radiation in animal health and production research are reviewed. These include various techniques associated with both the qualitative localization and quantitative measurements of isotopes in animals; comparator studies in which measurement of the radioactivity in one part of a system will allow computation of the mass or volume in another part; in vivo and in vitro applications of isotope dilution studies; and the use of isotopes in dynamic systems analyses. The use of stable isotopes in mass spectrometry, activation analysis and nuclear magnetic resonance in animal research is also briefly reviewed. Finally some of the successful uses of radiation produced by radioactive sources or various types of generators of electromagnetic radiations in animal production and health studies are described. (U.K.)

  14. Studying the Mammalian Intestinal Microbiome Using Animal Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hugenholtz, F.; Zhang, J.; O'Toole, P.W.; Smidt, H.

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal (GI) tract of humans and animals is colonized by microorganisms immediately after birth. The composition of the GI tract microbiota undergoes remarkable alterations during early age, reaches a relative stable status in adulthood, and is driven by external factors such as

  15. Road-Killed Animals as Resources for Ecological Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Clark E.

    1983-01-01

    Summarizes 19 literature sources identifying road-killed vertebrates and frequency of kill by numbers. Examples of how these animals can be incorporated into curricula (integrating biology, society, people, and values) are given, followed by an illustrated example of how a road-killed raccoon's skull demonstrated a human/wildlife interaction prior…

  16. Markerless 3D motion capture for animal locomotion studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Irvin Sellers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining quantitative data describing the movements of animals is an essential step in understanding their locomotor biology. Outside the laboratory, measuring animal locomotion often relies on video-based approaches and analysis is hampered because of difficulties in calibration and often the limited availability of possible camera positions. It is also usually restricted to two dimensions, which is often an undesirable over-simplification given the essentially three-dimensional nature of many locomotor performances. In this paper we demonstrate a fully three-dimensional approach based on 3D photogrammetric reconstruction using multiple, synchronised video cameras. This approach allows full calibration based on the separation of the individual cameras and will work fully automatically with completely unmarked and undisturbed animals. As such it has the potential to revolutionise work carried out on free-ranging animals in sanctuaries and zoological gardens where ad hoc approaches are essential and access within enclosures often severely restricted. The paper demonstrates the effectiveness of video-based 3D photogrammetry with examples from primates and birds, as well as discussing the current limitations of this technique and illustrating the accuracies that can be obtained. All the software required is open source so this can be a very cost effective approach and provides a methodology of obtaining data in situations where other approaches would be completely ineffective.

  17. Effect of irradiation on gene expression of rat liver adhesion molecules. In vivo and in vitro studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriconi, Federico; Malik, Ihtzaz; Ahmad, Ghayyor; Dudas, Joszef; Ramadori, Giuliano; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Vorwerk, Hilke; Hille, Andrea; Hess, Clemens Friedrich; Christiansen, Hans

    2009-01-01

    Background and purpose: Migration of leukocytes into tissue is a key element of innate and adaptive immunity. An animal study showed that liver irradiation, in spite of induction of chemokine gene expression, does not lead to recruitment of leukocytes into the parenchyma. The aim of this study was to analyze gene expression of adhesion molecules, which mediate leukocyte recruitment into organs, in irradiated rat liver in vivo and rat hepatocytes in vitro. Material and methods: Rat livers in vivo were irradiated selectively at 25 Gy. Isolated hepatocytes in vitro were irradiated at 8 Gy. RNA extracted within 48 h after irradiation in vivo and in vitro was analyzed by real-time PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and Northern blot. Adhesion molecule concentration in serum was measured by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay). Cryostat sections of livers were used for immunohistology. Results: Significant radiation-induced increase of ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1), JAM-1 (junctional adhesion molecule-1), β 1 -integrin, β 2 -integrin, E-cadherin, and P-selectin gene expression could be detected in vivo, while PECAM-1 (platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1) gene expression remained unchanged. In vitro, β 1 -integrin, JAM-1, and ICAM-2 showed a radiation-induced increased expression, whereas the levels of P-selectin, ICAM-1, PECAM-1, VCAM-1, Madcam-1 (mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1), β 2 -integrin, and E-cadherin were downregulated. However, incubation of irradiated hepatocytes with either tumor necrosis factor-(TNF-)α, interleukin-(IL-)1β, or IL-6 plus TNF-α led to an upregulation of P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. Conclusion: The findings suggest that liver irradiation modulates gene expression of the main adhesion molecules in vivo and in cytokine-activated hepatocytes, with the exception of PECAM-1. This may be one reason for the lack of inflammation in the irradiated rat liver. (orig.)

  18. Simple models for studying complex spatiotemporal patterns of animal behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyutyunov, Yuri V.; Titova, Lyudmila I.

    2017-06-01

    Minimal mathematical models able to explain complex patterns of animal behavior are essential parts of simulation systems describing large-scale spatiotemporal dynamics of trophic communities, particularly those with wide-ranging species, such as occur in pelagic environments. We present results obtained with three different modelling approaches: (i) an individual-based model of animal spatial behavior; (ii) a continuous taxis-diffusion-reaction system of partial-difference equations; (iii) a 'hybrid' approach combining the individual-based algorithm of organism movements with explicit description of decay and diffusion of the movement stimuli. Though the models are based on extremely simple rules, they all allow description of spatial movements of animals in a predator-prey system within a closed habitat, reproducing some typical patterns of the pursuit-evasion behavior observed in natural populations. In all three models, at each spatial position the animal movements are determined by local conditions only, so the pattern of collective behavior emerges due to self-organization. The movement velocities of animals are proportional to the density gradients of specific cues emitted by individuals of the antagonistic species (pheromones, exometabolites or mechanical waves of the media, e.g., sound). These cues play a role of taxis stimuli: prey attract predators, while predators repel prey. Depending on the nature and the properties of the movement stimulus we propose using either a simplified individual-based model, a continuous taxis pursuit-evasion system, or a little more detailed 'hybrid' approach that combines simulation of the individual movements with the continuous model describing diffusion and decay of the stimuli in an explicit way. These can be used to improve movement models for many species, including large marine predators.

  19. Isolation and characterization of a new cell line from spontaneous mouse mammary tumour, MBL-6, for in vivo cancer studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladan Langroudi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In search for treatments against breast cancer, cell lines are one of the basic resources, particularly as in vitro models. Additionally, animal models of cancer are used as the successive step in therapeutics research. In this regard, human breast cancer cell lines provide fundamental models in vitro. However, in vivo studies require immunodeficient mice, which lack the influence of other in vivo factors such as the native microenvironment and the immune system. There are few standard models to study the pathogenic mechanism at molecular level and cell signaling pathway of breast cancer. In this study, a new mouse breast cancer cell line, MBL-6, was successfully established and characterized from tissues of a spontaneous mammary tumor. The cell line had epithelial morphology, formed adherent monolayer, maintained continuously in vitro and was able to form new tumors when injected subcutaneously in syngeneic mice. The growth pattern and metastasis evaluations revealed a considerable in situ duration before invading distant organs. Real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis showed the expression of ER-, PR- and Her-2 receptors. The chromosome analysis showed numerous chromosomal abnormalities. Aggressive tumorigenecity in tumorigenesis test and the IC50 to cyclophosphamide (CTX, celecoxib (CLX and cisplatin (CPN was also evaluated. The numerous tests performed on the new MBL-6 cell line suggest that it is in good quality and may be used in animal models of breast cancer studies.

  20. Development of Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micellar formation for docetaxel and assessment of its in vivo distribution in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geng Hongquan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Docetaxel (DTX is a very important member of taxoid family. Despite several alternative delivery systems reported recently, DTX formulated by Polysorbate 80 and alcohol (Taxotere® is still the most frequent administration in clinical practice. In this study, we incorporated DTX into Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelles and compared its structural characteristics, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and blood compatibility with its conventional counterparts. Results showed that the mixed micelles loaded DTX possessed a mean size of approximately 13 nm with narrow size distribution and a rod-like micelle shape. In the pharmacokinetics assessment, there was no significant difference between the two preparations (P > 0.05, which demonstrated that the DTX in the two preparations may share a similar pharmacokinetic process. However, the Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelles can increase the drug residence amount of DTX in kidney, spleen, ovary and uterus, heart, and liver. The blood compatibility assessment study revealed that the mixed micelles were safe for intravenous injection. In conclusion, Polysorbate 80/Phospholipid mixed micelle is safe, can improve the tumor therapeutic effects of DTX in the chosen organs, and may be a potential alternative dosage form for clinical intravenous administration of DTX.

  1. GABA abnormalities in schizophrenia: a methodological review of in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Stephan F; Tso, Ivy F

    2015-09-01

    Abnormalities of GABAergic interneurons are some of the most consistent findings from post-mortem studies of schizophrenia. However, linking these molecular deficits with in vivo observations in patients - a critical goal in order to evaluate interventions that would target GABAergic deficits - presents a challenge. Explanatory models have been developed based on animal work and the emerging experimental literature in schizophrenia patients. This literature includes: neuroimaging ligands to GABA receptors, magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) of GABA concentration, transcranial magnetic stimulation of cortical inhibitory circuits and pharmacologic probes of GABA receptors to dynamically challenge the GABA system, usually in combination with neuroimaging studies. Pharmacologic challenges have elicited behavioral changes, and preliminary studies of therapeutic GABAergic interventions have been conducted. This article critically reviews the evidence for GABAergic dysfunction from each of these areas. These methods remain indirect measures of GABAergic function, and a broad array of dysfunction is linked with the putative GABAergic measures, including positive symptoms, cognition, emotion, motor processing and sensory processing, covering diverse brain areas. Measures of receptor binding have not shown replicable group differences in binding, and MRS assays of GABA concentration have yielded equivocal evidence of large-scale alteration in GABA concentration. Overall, the experimental base remains sparse, and much remains to be learned about the role of GABAergic interneurons in healthy brains. Challenges with pharmacologic and functional probes show promise, and may yet enable a better characterization of GABAergic deficits in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of acute sup(60)Co-gamma-irradiation on the in vivo lipid peroxidation in experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ronai, Eva; Benkoe, Gy.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of sublethal (6.0 Gy) and LDsub(50/30) (9.0 Gy) doses of sup(60)Co-gamma-irradiation on malondialdehyde (MDA) level was studied in rats. The findings suggest that in the organs investigated (brain, liver, spleen, kidneys, testicles, stomach, small intestines) acute sup(60)Co gamma-irradiation increased the formation of MDA, the main product of lipid peroxidation, in a time-related manner to an extent characteristic of the organ investigated. Differences in the degree and temporal development of the changes allow some conclusions as to the radiosensitivity of individual organs. On this basis it can be assumed that the increase in MDA level caused by irradiation considerably contributes to the development of certain symptoms of radiation sickness. (author)

  3. Varenicline increases in vivo striatal dopamine D2/3 receptor binding: an ultra-high-resolution pinhole [123I]IBZM SPECT study in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crunelle, Cleo L.; Wit, Tim C. de; Bruin, Kora de; Ramakers, Ruud M.; Have, Frans van der; Beekman, Freek J.; Brink, Wim van den; Booij, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Ex vivo storage phosphor imaging rat studies reported increased brain dopamine D 2/3 receptor (DRD 2/3 ) availability following treatment with varenicline, a nicotinergic drug. However, ex vivo studies can only be performed using cross-sectional designs. Small-animal imaging offers the opportunity to perform serial assessments. We evaluated whether high-resolution pinhole single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imaging in rats was able to reproduce previous ex vivo findings. Methods: Rats were imaged for baseline striatal DRD 2/3 availability using ultra-high-resolution pinhole SPECT (U-SPECT-II) and [ 123 I]IBZM as a radiotracer, and randomized to varenicline (n=7; 2 mg/kg) or saline (n=7). Following 2 weeks of treatment, a second scan was acquired. Results: Significantly increased striatal DRD 2/3 availability was found following varenicline treatment compared to saline (time⁎treatment effect): posttreatment difference in binding potential between groups corrected for initial baseline differences was 2.039 (P=.022), indicating a large effect size (d=1.48). Conclusions: Ultra-high-resolution pinhole SPECT can be used to assess varenicline-induced changes in DRD 2/3 availability in small laboratory animals over time. Future small-animal studies should include imaging techniques to enable repeated within-subjects measurements and reduce the amount of animals.

  4. In vitro activity and in vivo animal model efficacy of IB-367 alone and in combination with imipenem and colistin against Gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonetti, Oriana; Cirioni, Oscar; Ghiselli, Roberto; Orlando, Fiorenza; Silvestri, Carmela; Mazzocato, Susanna; Kamysz, Wojciech; Kamysz, Elzbieta; Provinciali, Mauro; Giacometti, Andrea; Guerrieri, Mario; Offidani, Annamaria

    2014-05-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate the in vitro activity of IB-367 and its bactericidal effect for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli, associated to a synergic study to test the antibiotic combinations between the peptide and colistin or imipenem. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs), the minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs), the synergy test and killing study were carried out to evaluate the IB-367 activity. In the in vivo model, a wound was incised through the panniculus carnosus of BALB/c mice, and then inoculated with 5 × 107 colony-forming units of P. aeruginosa and E. coli. For each strain, the study included an infected or not infected group that did not receive any treatment, and five contaminated groups treated with local IB- 367, intraperitoneal imipenem, intraperitoneal colistin, topical IB-367 local plus intraperitoneal imipenem or intraperitoneal colistin. All isolates were inhibited by IB-367 at concentrations of 4-64 mg/l. Killing by IB-367 was shown to be very rapid: its activity on all Gram-negative bacteria was completed within a 40 min exposure period at a concentration of 2 × MIC/l. Synergy was demonstrated when IB-367 was combined with colistin or imipenem. In in vivo studies, the groups treated with topical IB-367 and intraperitoneal colistin showed the best results in terms of bacterial load inhibition either for Pseudomonas or for E. coli. The good in vitro activity and in vivo efficacy, as well as, the synergic interactions with antibiotics suggest that IB-367 is a promising candidate for potential application in the treatment of wound Gram-negative infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ex Vivo and In Vivo Mice Models to Study Blastocystis spp. Adhesion, Colonization and Pathology: Closer to Proving Koch's Postulates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitara S R Ajjampur

    Full Text Available Blastocystis spp. are widely prevalent extra cellular, non-motile anerobic protists that inhabit the gastrointestinal tract. Although Blastocystis spp. have been associated with gastrointestinal symptoms, irritable bowel syndrome and urticaria, their clinical significance has remained controversial. We established an ex vivo mouse explant model to characterize adhesion in the context of tissue architecture and presence of the mucin layer. Using confocal microscopy with tissue whole mounts and two axenic isolates of Blastocystis spp., subtype 7 with notable differences in adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells (IEC, isolate B (ST7-B and isolate H (more adhesive, ST7-H, we showed that adhesion is both isolate dependent and tissue trophic. The more adhesive isolate, ST7-H was found to bind preferentially to the colon tissue than caecum and terminal ileum. Both isolates were also found to have mucinolytic effects. We then adapted a DSS colitis mouse model as a susceptible model to study colonization and acute infection by intra-caecal inoculation of trophic Blastocystis spp.cells. We found that the more adhesive isolate ST7-H was also a better colonizer with more mice shedding parasites and for a longer duration than ST7-B. Adhesion and colonization was also associated with increased virulence as ST7-H infected mice showed greater tissue damage than ST7-B. Both the ex vivo and in vivo models used in this study showed that Blastocystis spp. remain luminal and predominantly associated with mucin. This was further confirmed using colonic loop experiments. We were also successfully able to re-infect a second batch of mice with ST7-H isolates obtained from fecal cultures and demonstrated similar histopathological findings and tissue damage thereby coming closer to proving Koch's postulates for this parasite.

  6. Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Using a Novel Versatile Knife: An Animal Feasibility Study (with Video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Kim, Won Hee; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Hong, Sung Pyo; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims In order to reduce the procedure time and the number of accessory changes during endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), we developed a novel versatile knife, which has the combined advantages of several conventional knives. The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and histological quality of ESD performed using this novel versatile knife and a combination of several conventional knives. Methods This was an in vivo animal study comparing two different modalities of ESD in mini-pigs. Completion time of each resection was documented, and the resected specimens were retrieved and evaluated for completeness. To assess the quality control of the procedures and adverse events, detailed histopathological examinations were performed. Results A total of 18 specimens were dissected by ESD safely and easily (nine specimens using the new versatile knife; nine specimens by mixing conventional knives). All resections were completed as en bloc resections. There was no significant difference in procedure time between the 2 modalities (456 seconds vs. 355 seconds, p=0.258) and cutting speed (1.983 mm2/sec vs. 1.57 mm2/sec, p=1.000). The rate of adverse events and histological quality did not statistically differ between the modalities. Conclusions ESD with a versatile knife appeared to be an easy, safe, and technically efficient method. PMID:25505721

  7. Reliability of in vivo measurements of the dielectric properties of anisotropic tissue: a simulative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huo Xuyang; Shi Xuetao; You Fusheng; Fu Feng; Liu Ruigang; Tang Chi; Dong Xiuzhen; Lu Qiang

    2013-01-01

    A simulative study was performed to measure the dielectric properties of anisotropic tissue using several in vivo and in vitro probes. COMSOL Multiphysics was selected to carry out the simulation. Five traditional probes and a newly designed probe were used in this study. One of these probes was an in vitro measurement probe and the other five were in vivo. The simulations were performed in terms of the minimal tissue volume for in vivo measurements, the calibration of a probe constant, the measurement performed on isotropic tissue and the measurement performed on anisotropic tissue. Results showed that the in vitro probe can be used to measure the in-cell dielectric properties of isotropic and anisotropic tissues. When measured with the five in vivo probes, the dielectric properties of isotropic tissue were all measured accurately. For the measurements performed on anisotropic tissue, large errors were observed when the four traditional in vivo probes were used, but only a small error was observed when the new in vivo probe was used. This newly designed five-electrode in vivo probe may indicate the dielectric properties of anisotropic tissue more accurately than these four traditional in vivo probes. (paper)

  8. Model systems to study immunomodulation in domestic food animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, J A; Flaming, K P

    1990-01-01

    Development of immunomodulators for use in food producing animals is an active area of research. This research has generally incorporated aspects of immunosuppression in model systems. This methodology is appropriate because most of the research has been aimed at developing immunomodulators for certain economically significant diseases in which immunosuppression is believed to be an important component of their pathogenesis. The primary focus has been on stress-associated diseases (especially bovine respiratory disease), infectious diseases in young animals, and mastitis. The model systems used have limitations, but they have demonstrated that immunomodulators are capable of significantly increasing resistance to these important infectious disease syndromes. As our understanding of molecular immunology increases and as more potential immunomodulators become available, the use of relevant model systems should greatly aid advancement in the field of immunomodulation.

  9. Improving the Translation of Animal Ischemic Stroke Studies to Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Jickling, Glen C; Sharp, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    Despite testing more than 1026 therapeutic strategies in models ischemic stroke and 114 therapies in human ischemic stroke, only one agent tissue plasminogen activator has successfully been translated to clinical practice as a treatment for acute stroke. Though disappointing, this immense body of work has led to a rethinking of animal stroke models and how to better translate therapies to patients with ischemic stroke. Several recommendations have been made, including the STAIR recommendation...

  10. Studying RNA-protein interactions in vivo by RNA immunoprecipitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selth, Luke A; Close, Pierre; Svejstrup, Jesper Q

    2011-01-01

    and have significant effects on gene expression. RNA immunoprecipitation (RIP) is a powerful technique used to detect direct and indirect interactions between individual proteins and specific RNA molecules in vivo. Here, we describe RIP methods for both yeast and mammalian cells.......The crucial roles played by RNA-binding proteins in all aspects of RNA metabolism, particularly in the regulation of transcription, have become increasingly evident. Moreover, other factors that do not directly interact with RNA molecules can nevertheless function proximally to RNA polymerases...

  11. Relevance of animal studies to the human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1984-01-01

    Animal experiments are being used to examine a number of physical and biological factors that influence risk estimations, though not usually in coordination with epidemiologists. It is clear that the different mechanisms involved in different types of tumors are reflected in the diversity of dose-response relationships. The forms of the dose-response relationships are influenced by both the initial events and their expression. Evidence is accumulating that many initiated cells do not get expressed as overt cancers and that host factors may play a major role in the expression of potential tumor cells. There is a need for information about the relationship of the natural incidence and susceptibility to radiation induction for more tumor types. Such experiments will help answer the question of which risk estimate models are appropriate for different tumor types, and they can be carried out on animals. Perhaps because of the importance of host factors, risk estimates as a percentage of the natural incidence appear to be similar for human beings and mice for a small number of tumor types. Animal experiments must remain a major approach to the investigation of mechanisms of carcinogenesis. 22 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  12. Relevance of experimental animal studies to the human experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fry, R.J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Animal experiments are being used to examine a number of physical and biological factors that influence risk estimations though not usually in coordination with epidemiologists. It is clear that the different mechanisms involved in different types of tumors are reflected in the diversity of dose-response relationships. The forms of the dose-response relationships are influenced by both the initial events and their expression. Evidence is accumulating that many initiated cells do not get expressed as overt cancers and host factors may play a major role in the expression of potential tumor cells. There is a need for information about the relationship of the natural incidence and susceptibility to radiation induction for more tumor types. Such experiments will help answer the question of which risk estimate models are appropriate for different tumor types and can be carried out on animals. Perhaps because of the importance of host factors risk estimates as a percentage of the natural incidence appear to be similar for human beings and mice for a small number of tumor types. The elucidation of the mechanisms involved in different tissues while a slow business remains an important role of animal experiments

  13. Synthesis of [11C](-)-α,α-dideutero-phenylephrine for in vivo kinetic isotope studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosario, R.B. del; Wieland, D.M.

    1995-01-01

    (-)-[ 11 C]Phenylephrine and positron emission tomography could potentially be used to assess neuronal monoamine oxidase activity in the heart. Previous data for (-)-[ 11 C]phenylephrine indicate that, although its retention and neuronal selectivity parallel that of the neuronal mapping agent (-)-[ 11 C]hydroxyephedrine, its neuronal storage and clearance properties are quite different. In order to study the in vivo kinetics of (-)-[ 11 C]phenylephrine in greater detail, the dideutero analog [ 11 C]-(-)-α,α-dideutero-phenylephrine. 1, was synthesized by [ 11 C]methylation of the precursor (-)-α,α-dideutero-m-octopamine. The key step in the procedure was BD 3 reduction of the cyanohydrin derived from 3-hydroxybenzaldehyde. Deuterium incorporation at the alpha positions of m-octopamine was confirmed by NMR and mass spectroscopy of the deuterated product and by comparison of spectral data with undeuterated m-octopamine. (-)-α,α-Dideutero-m-octopamine was methylated with CF 3 SO 3 11 CH 3 to give 1 suitable for animal and clinical studies. (author)

  14. Contracting in vivo research: what are the issues?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Wendy J

    2007-07-01

    As a result of increasing internal and external pressures, research institutions are using contract research organizations for the conduct of in vivo research. Many issues arise when contracting animal research, including concern regarding animal health and welfare. Each sponsor institution should develop a program for outsourced in vivo research that evaluates and ensures appropriate care and use of research animals. Each sponsoring institution should consider establishing a policy and procedure for how outsourced in vivo studies will be approved, conducted, and monitored. An approved list of contract facilities can be established on the basis of accepted standards for animal care and use. Written contracts should include confidentiality agreements, the delineation of animal ownership, and the expectation to comply with all applicable regulations and guidelines for research animal care and use. Finally, a process for communication of adverse study or animal welfare events should be established. Thorough evaluation of contract organizations will help ensure appropriate research animal care and use.

  15. Modality comparison for small animal radiotherapy: A simulation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bazalova, Magdalena, E-mail: bazalova@stanford.edu; Nelson, Geoff; Noll, John M.; Graves, Edward E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Small animal radiation therapy has advanced significantly in recent years. Whereas in the past dose was delivered using a single beam and a lead shield for sparing of healthy tissue, conformal doses can be now delivered using more complex dedicated small animal radiotherapy systems with image guidance. The goal of this paper is to investigate dose distributions for three small animal radiation treatment modalities. Methods: This paper presents a comparison of dose distributions generated by the three approaches—a single-field irradiator with a 200 kV beam and no image guidance, a small animal image-guided conformal system based on a modified microCT scanner with a 120 kV beam developed at Stanford University, and a dedicated conformal system, SARRP, using a 220 kV beam developed at Johns Hopkins University. The authors present a comparison of treatment plans for the three modalities using two cases: a mouse with a subcutaneous tumor and a mouse with a spontaneous lung tumor. A 5 Gy target dose was calculated using the EGSnrc Monte Carlo codes. Results: All treatment modalities generated similar dose distributions for the subcutaneous tumor case, with the highest mean dose to the ipsilateral lung and bones in the single-field plan (0.4 and 0.4 Gy) compared to the microCT (0.1 and 0.2 Gy) and SARRP (0.1 and 0.3 Gy) plans. The lung case demonstrated that due to the nine-beam arrangements in the conformal plans, the mean doses to the ipsilateral lung, spinal cord, and bones were significantly lower in the microCT plan (2.0, 0.4, and 1.9 Gy) and the SARRP plan (1.5, 0.5, and 1.8 Gy) than in single-field irradiator plan (4.5, 3.8, and 3.3 Gy). Similarly, the mean doses to the contralateral lung and the heart were lowest in the microCT plan (1.5 and 2.0 Gy), followed by the SARRP plan (1.7 and 2.2 Gy), and they were highest in the single-field plan (2.5 and 2.4 Gy). For both cases, dose uniformity was greatest in the single-field irradiator plan followed by

  16. Localization of gastrointestinal deposition of mercuric chloride studied in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, J.B.; Andersen, H.L.; Soerensen, J.A.; Andersen, O.

    1992-01-01

    During the last 5 years, the site of gastrointestinal absorption of inorganic mercury has been attempted identified mainly by experiments using perfused intestinal segments in vitro or in situ. The present investigation will discuss the localization of the absorption site for mercuric chloride based on a completely undisturbed in vivo experimental model in mice. As the mice were allowed to eat their normal diet during the experimental period, the present results would independently add to existing knowledge on intestinal absorption sites for inorganic mercury. The mice were given 203 Hg labelled mercuric chloride orally, either through stomach tube or in the drinking water, and were killed after various time intervals. Mercury was localized and quantified in various segments of the gastrointestinal tract by gamma-counting. Time course analysis of the segmental deposition of mercury demonstrated that the deposition mainly takes place in the proximal jejunum and suggested that a larger part of the jejunum than previously reported is involved in absorption of mercury. Using this in vivo model, tetraethylthiuram disulfide was demonstrated to increase the intestinal deposition and absorption without changing the site of deposition. (au)

  17. A simple semi-quantitative approach studying the in vivo degradation of regenerated silk fibroin scaffolds with different pore sizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yongwei; Chen, Zhongchun; Wen, Jianchuan; Jia, Minghui; Shao, Zhengzhong; Zhao, Xia

    2017-10-01

    The biocompatibility and in vivo degradation rate of biomaterials represent critical control points in the long-term success of scaffolds for tissue restoration. In this study, new three-dimensional (3D) regenerated silk fibroin scaffolds (RSFs) were prepared by the freezing-defrosting procedure, and then were implanted beneath the dorsal skin of rats. This study aims to develop a kinetic semi-quantitative approach to assess in vivo degradation rate and biocompatibility of this kind of RSFs with different pore sizes for the first time, and to evaluate the relationship between the biodegradation and tissue responses by measuring the thickness of residual scaffolds, fibrous capsules and infiltrated tissues through integrated techniques of histology, optical imaging and image analysis. Our results showed that scaffolds with both pore sizes (74.35±10.84μm and 139.23±44.93μm, respectively) were well tolerated by host animals and pore size was found to be the rate limiting factor to the biodegradation in the subcutaneous implantation model. In addition, the biodegradation of RSFs was inflammation-mediated to a certain degree and fibroblasts may play a critical role in this process. Overall, such semi-quantitative approach was demonstrated to be a simple and effective method to assess the in vivo degradation rate, and the prepared RSFs were presented to have promising potential in tissue engineering applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Exposure setups for laboratory animals and volunteer studies using body-mounted antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahr, A.; Adami, C.; Bolz, T.; Rennings, A.; Dorn, H.; Ruettiger, L.

    2007-01-01

    For two different in vivo exposure setups body-mounted antenna systems have been designed. The first setup is designed for investigation of volunteers during simulated mobile phone usage. The setup consists of a dual-band antenna for GSM/WCDMA with enhanced carrying properties, which enables exposure for at least 8 h a day. The 10 g averaged localised SAR - normalised to an antenna input power of 1 W - measured in the flat phantom area of the SAM phantom amounts to 7.82 mW g -1 (900 MHz) and 10.98 mW g -1 (1966 MHz). The second exposure setup is used for a laboratory behavioural study on rats. The design goal was a localised, well-defined SAR distribution inside the animals' heads at 900 MHz. To fulfil the biological requirements, a loop antenna was developed. For tissues around the ears, a localised SAR value of 50.12 W kg -1 averaged over a mass of 2.2 g for an antenna input power of 1 W is obtained. (authors)

  19. Lipid nanoparticles for transdermal delivery of flurbiprofen: formulation, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaskar, Kesavan; Anbu, Jayaraman; Ravichandiran, Velayutham; Venkateswarlu, Vobalaboina; Rao, Yamsani Madhusudan

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study is to prepare aqueous dispersions of lipid nanoparticles – flurbiprofen solid lipid nanoparticles (FLUSLN) and flurbiprofen nanostructured lipid carriers (FLUNLC) by hot homogenization followed by sonication technique and then incorporated into the freshly prepared hydrogels for transdermal delivery. They are characterized for particle size, for all the formulations, more than 50% of the particles were below 300 nm after 90 days of storage at RT. DSC analyses were performed to characterize the state of drug and lipid modification. Shape and surface morphology were determined by TEM which revealed fairly spherical shape of the formulations. Further they were evaluated for in vitro drug release characteristics, rheological behaviour, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in rats following application of SLN gel (A1) and NLC gel (B1) for 24 h were evaluated. The Cmax of the B1 formulation was 38.67 ± 2.77 μg/ml, which was significantly higher than the A1 formulation (Cmax = 21.79 ± 2.96 μg/ml). The Cmax and AUC of the B1 formulation were 1.8 and 2.5 times higher than the A1 gel formulation respectively. The bioavailability of flurbiprofen with reference to oral administration was found to increase by 4.4 times when gel formulations were applied. Anti-inflammatory effect in the Carrageenan-induced paw edema in rat was significantly higher for B1 and A1 formulation than the orally administered flurbiprofen. Both the SLN and NLC dispersions and gels enriched with SLN and NLC possessed a sustained drug release over period of 24 h but the sustained effect was more pronounced with the SLN and NLC gel PMID:19243632

  20. Lipid nanoparticles for transdermal delivery of flurbiprofen: formulation, in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkateswarlu Vobalaboina

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of the study is to prepare aqueous dispersions of lipid nanoparticles – flurbiprofen solid lipid nanoparticles (FLUSLN and flurbiprofen nanostructured lipid carriers (FLUNLC by hot homogenization followed by sonication technique and then incorporated into the freshly prepared hydrogels for transdermal delivery. They are characterized for particle size, for all the formulations, more than 50% of the particles were below 300 nm after 90 days of storage at RT. DSC analyses were performed to characterize the state of drug and lipid modification. Shape and surface morphology were determined by TEM which revealed fairly spherical shape of the formulations. Further they were evaluated for in vitro drug release characteristics, rheological behaviour, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies. The pharmacokinetics of flurbiprofen in rats following application of SLN gel (A1 and NLC gel (B1 for 24 h were evaluated. The Cmax of the B1 formulation was 38.67 ± 2.77 μg/ml, which was significantly higher than the A1 formulation (Cmax = 21.79 ± 2.96 μg/ml. The Cmax and AUC of the B1 formulation were 1.8 and 2.5 times higher than the A1 gel formulation respectively. The bioavailability of flurbiprofen with reference to oral administration was found to increase by 4.4 times when gel formulations were applied. Anti-inflammatory effect in the Carrageenan-induced paw edema in rat was significantly higher for B1 and A1 formulation than the orally administered flurbiprofen. Both the SLN and NLC dispersions and gels enriched with SLN and NLC possessed a sustained drug release over period of 24 h but the sustained effect was more pronounced with the SLN and NLC gel

  1. Interaction of D-LSD with binding sites in brain: a study in vivo and in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ebersole, B.L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The localization of [ 3 H]-d-lysergic acid diethylamide ([ 3 H]LSD) binding sites in the mouse brain was compared in vivo and in vitro. Radioautography of brain sections incubated with [ 3 H]LSD in vitro revealed substantial specific [ 3 H]LSD binding in cortical layers III-IV and areas CA1 and dentate gyrus in hippocampus. In contrast, in brain sections from animals that received [ 3 H]LSD in vivo, binding in hippocampus was scant and diffuse, although the pattern of labeling in cortex was similar to that seen in vitro. The low specific binding in hippocampus relative to cortex was confirmed by homogenate filtration studies of brain areas from mice that received injections of [ 3 H]LSD. Time-course studies established that peak specific binding at ten minutes was the same in cortex and hippocampus. At all times, binding in hippocampus was about one-third of that in cortex; in contrast, the concentration of free [ 3 H]LSD did not vary between regions. This finding was unexpected, because binding studies in vitro in membrane preparations indicated that the density and affinity of [ 3 H]LSD binding sites were similar in both brain regions. Saturation binding studies in vivo showed that the lower amount of [ 3 H]LSD binding in hippocampus was attributable to a lower density of sites labeled by [ 3 H]LSD. The pharmacological identify of [ 3 H]LSD binding sites in vivo may be relevant to the hallucinogenic properties of LSD and of other related hallucinogens

  2. Transcranial vibro-acoustography can detect traumatic brain injury, in-vivo: Preliminary studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Martin W; Dever, David D; Gu, Xiaohan; Ray Illian, P; McClintic, Abbi M; Mehic, Edin; Mourad, Pierre D

    2015-08-01

    Vibro-acoustography (VA) uses two or more beams of confocal ultrasound to generate local vibrations within their target tissue through induction of a time-dependent radiation force whose frequency equals that of the difference of the applied frequencies. While VA has proven effective for assaying the mechanical properties of clinically relevant tissue such as breast lesions and tissue calcifications, its application to brain remains unexplored. Here we investigate the ability of VA to detect acute and focal traumatic brain injury (TBI) in-vivo through the use of transcranially delivered high-frequency (2 MHz) diagnostic focused ultrasound to rat brain capable of generating measurable low-frequency (200-270 kHz) acoustic emissions from outside of the brain. We applied VA to acute sham-control and TBI model rats (sham N=6; TBI N=6) and observed that acoustic emissions, captured away from the site of TBI, had lower amplitudes for TBI as compared to sham-TBI animals. The sensitivity of VA to acute brain damage at frequencies currently transmittable across human skulls, as demonstrated in this preliminary study, supports the possibility that the VA methodology may one day serve as a technique for detecting TBI. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. In Vivo Study of Polyurethane-Coated Gianturco-Rosch Biliary Z-Stents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severini, Aldo; Mantero, Sara; Tanzi, Maria Cristina; Cigada, Alberto; Addis, Flaminio; Cozzi, Guido; Salvetti, Monica; Andreola, Salvatore; Motta, Antonella; Regalia, Enrico; Pulvirenti, Andrea; De Pedri, Enrico; Doci, Roberto

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: Prototypes of Gianturco-Rosch Z-stents coated with polycarbonate urethane (PCU) were placed in the biliary tree of pigs, in order to test their biomechanical behavior, stability, and biocompatibility. Methods: The stents were surgically implanted in the common bile duct of three pairs of pigs, which were killed after 1, 3, and 6 months respectively. Explanted livers from pigs of the same race, age, and size were used to provide comparative data. The bile ducts were radiologically and histopathologically examined; the stents were processed and examined by scanning electron microscopy. Results: No complications occurred and the animals showed a normal weight gain. The main bile duct appeared radiologically and macroscopically dilated, but the stents proved to be in place. Histologically, the bile duct epithelium was destroyed, but neither hyperplastic nor inflammatory fibrotic reactions of the wall were evident. Both the metallic structure and the polymeric coating of the stents were intact. A layer of organic material with a maximum thickness of approximately 3 μm was evident on the inner surface of the stents. Conclusion: The present in vivo study demonstrates the biocompatibility, efficacy, and stability of PCU-coated Gianturco-Rosch stents in the biliary environment

  4. The effect of squalene on inflammation factors induced by candida albicans in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jun Haeng [Dept. of Radiology, Nambu University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    In the present study, whether squalene treatment relives inflammatory reactions induced by Candida albicans was checked. The experiment was conducted in vivo using seven experimental animals (ICR mice) per experimental group. Among C. albicans-induced inflammatory factors, TNF-α, IL-6, and NO were observed using the ELISA kits method. Through the experiment, the following conclusions were obtained. 1. In the group infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing NO generation in renal tissues both on the 1st and 3rd days (p < 0.05). 2. In the group pre-treated(intraperitoneal administration) with SQ (80ml/kg) once per day for seven days and infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing TNF-α generation in renal tissues only on the 3rd day(p < 0.05). 3. In the group pre-treated(intraperitoneal administration) with SQ (80ml/kg) once per day for seven days and infected with C. albicans, it could be identified that squalene treatment was inducing IL-6 generation in renal tissues only on the 3rd day(p < 0.05). In conclusion, it could be seen that for squalene to suppress C. albicans-induced inflammatory factors, preemptively supplying SQ should be effective. Therefore, effects for recovery from C. albicans-induced immunodepression can be expected from SQ treatment.

  5. Studies on the anticlastogenic effect of turmeric and curcumin on cyclophosphamide and mitomycin C in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, M J; Saha, A; Mukherjee, A

    1998-01-01

    Turmeric and its main constituent curcumin were assessed in vivo for their anticlastogenic potential. In one experimental set, Swiss albino male mice were given turmeric (8, 12 and 16 mg/kg body weight) or curcumin (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg body weight) as a single intraperitoneal injection. In another set, the mice were given 8 mg/kg body weight of turmeric or one of three concentrations of curcumin (2, 4 and 8 mg/kg body weight) as a dietary supplement by gavage for 7 consecutive days. 30 min after the last dose the mice were administered a single acute dose of two known clastogens, cyclophosphamide (CP) (20 mg/kg body weight) or mitomycin C (MMC) (1.5 mg/kg body weight). After 18 hr, chromosome preparations were made from bone marrow cells. The endpoints studied were chromosome aberrations and damaged cells. Clastogenicity of the chemicals was compared using turmeric- or curcumin-primed and non-primed animals. As single agents turmeric and curcumin were not clastogenic even after 7 days of priming. Turmeric/curcumin could not inhibit CP- or MMC-induced clastogenicity. Although curcumin is reported to be the active chemopreventive principle in turmeric effective against a number of potential carcinogens in several experimental systems, it was virtually ineffective against the clastogenicity of CP or MMC at the doses tested.

  6. NMR studies of renal phosphate metabolites in vivo: Effects of hydration and dehydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, S.D.; Eng, C.; Balaban, R.S.

    1988-01-01

    The present study characterizes the 31 P-nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrum of rabbit kidneys in vivo and evaluates the effect of hydration on phosphorous metabolites including the organic solute glycerophosphorylcholine (GPC). Cortical phosphorylethanolamine is the predominant component of the phosphomonoester region of the 31 P spectrum. The contribution of blood to the spectrum is mainly from 2,3 diphosphoglycerate, which comprises ∼30% of the inorganic phosphate region. Acute infusion of 0.9% saline decreases the sodium content of the inner medulla by >50% in 15 min as shown by 23 Na imaging. Despite this medullary Na dilution, no change in renal GPC content was observed for >1 h even with the addition of furosemide or furosemide and antidiuretic hormone. However, 20 h of chronic dehydration with 0.45% saline did result in a 30% decrease in renal GPC content when compared with dehydrated animals. These findings are consistent with GPC not playing a role in the short-term regulation of the medullary intracellular milieu in response to acute reductions in medullary Na content

  7. Studies on treatment of radioactive animal carcass, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koizumi, Akira; Fukuda, Satoshi; Matsuoka, Osamu

    1980-01-01

    A method of dehydration for the waste treatment of radioactive animal carcass by microwave heating was developed. A heating apparatus was devised by annexing the microwave output controlling circuit to a 600 W commercial microwave oven, and the aqueous vapour from the animal carcass was collected by duplex cold traps. Body weight of the carcass was reduced to 20-30% by dehydration, and a three-year storage test proved that the dehydrated carcass was very hard to decompose. Time needed for dehydration was about 10 min for a 25 g mouse, and about 1 hr for 668 g dog. Violent rupture of the carcass, and/or fuming due to overheating that had often been observed during dehydration were proved to be avoidable by controlling the microwave output during the process. The ratio of radioactivity ( 60 Co, 137 Cs, 85 Sr, 144 Ce) that escaped from the carcass during dehydration was found to be less than 3 x 10 -4 by a series of experiment. Some related radiation safety problems were discussed. (author)

  8. Cytokines in mycobacterial infections: `in vitro` and `ex vivo` studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flad, H.D.; Gercken, J.; Huebner, L.; Schlueter, C.; Ernst, M. [Forschungsinstitut Borstel (Germany). Inst. fuer Experimentelle Biologie und Medizin; Pryjma, J. [Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Cracow (Poland)

    1995-12-31

    Different species of mycobacteria differ in their capacity to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-{alpha} (TNF-{alpha}) by human monocytes `in vitro`. Whereas `M. tuberculosis` is a potent inducer of TNF-{alpha}, `M. leprae` is much less potent. TNF-{alpha} production is found to be associated with the availability of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} generated by activated monocytes, as superoxide enhancing H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration increases and catalase degrading H{sub 2}O{sub 2} decreases TNF-{alpha} production. Furthermore, `M. kansasii` with high intrinsic catalase induce less TNF-{alpha} than mycobacteria with low intrinsic catalase. `In vitro` infection of monocytes with `M. tuberculosis` leads to an impairment of the antigen-presenting capacity, as determined by a reduction of antigen-induced T cell proliferation and interferon {gamma} (IFN-{gamma}) production. Of crucial importance in this impairment is the `M. tuberculosis`-induced down-modulation of MHC class II antigens. The role of TNF-{alpha} `in vivo` is reflected in patients with various forms of leprosy. In skin lesions of lepromatous leprosy patients TNF-{alpha}, interleukin 1{beta} (IL-1{beta}), and IFN-{gamma} production are found to be rare, whereas these cytokines are well expressed in skin lesions of patients with tuberculoid leprosy. After multidrug chemotherapy an increase of local cytokine production is found. Taken together, these findings suggest that components of mycobacteria may interfere with local cell-mediated immune reactions `in vivo`. The molecular mechanisms involved in these local responses need to be defined. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 5 tabs.

  9. Cytokines in mycobacterial infections: 'in vitro' and 'ex vivo' studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flad, H.D.; Gercken, J.; Huebner, L.; Schlueter, C.; Ernst, M.

    1995-01-01

    Different species of mycobacteria differ in their capacity to induce the production of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) by human monocytes 'in vitro'. Whereas 'M. tuberculosis' is a potent inducer of TNF-α, 'M. leprae' is much less potent. TNF-α production is found to be associated with the availability of H 2 O 2 generated by activated monocytes, as superoxide enhancing H 2 O 2 concentration increases and catalase degrading H 2 O 2 decreases TNF-α production. Furthermore, 'M. kansasii' with high intrinsic catalase induce less TNF-α than mycobacteria with low intrinsic catalase. 'In vitro' infection of monocytes with 'M. tuberculosis' leads to an impairment of the antigen-presenting capacity, as determined by a reduction of antigen-induced T cell proliferation and interferon γ (IFN-γ) production. Of crucial importance in this impairment is the 'M. tuberculosis'-induced down-modulation of MHC class II antigens. The role of TNF-α 'in vivo' is reflected in patients with various forms of leprosy. In skin lesions of lepromatous leprosy patients TNF-α, interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and IFN-γ production are found to be rare, whereas these cytokines are well expressed in skin lesions of patients with tuberculoid leprosy. After multidrug chemotherapy an increase of local cytokine production is found. Taken together, these findings suggest that components of mycobacteria may interfere with local cell-mediated immune reactions 'in vivo'. The molecular mechanisms involved in these local responses need to be defined. (author). 10 refs, 3 figs, 5 tabs

  10. International symposium on in vivo body composition studies: Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-01-01

    This booklet contains the program and individual abstracts for papers presented at the International symposium on in vivo body composition studies. The presentations were divided into five sessions. Individual abstracts were indexed for the Energy Data Base. (DT)

  11. In vivo 7Li and 19F NMR studies of drugs in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komoroski, Richard A.

    1999-01-01

    For various reasons, it is advantageous to measure the concentration of a psychoactive drug in the brain in vivo. Many drugs contain the element fluorine. Using 19 F NMR spectroscopy, we have studied the psychoactive drugs trifluoperazine and fluoxetine in the brain in vivo. Using 7 Li NMR, it is possible to detect lithium ion, used to treat manic depressive illness. We have measured the concentration and distribution of lithium in both human and rat brain in vivo. Measurement of drug levels in the human brain may provide a measure of therapeutic or toxic effects, as well as insight into drug metabolism and mechanism of action. (author)

  12. In vivo imaging of brain androgen receptors in rats: a [18F]FDHT PET study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khayum, M.A.; Doorduin, J.; Antunes, I.F.; Kwizera, C.; Zijlma, R.; Boer, J.A. den; Dierckx, R.A.J.O.; Vries, E.F.J. de

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Steroid hormones like androgens play an important role in the development and maintenance of several brain functions. Androgens can act through androgen receptors (AR) in the brain. This study aims to demonstrate the feasibility of positron emission tomography (PET) with 16β-[ 18 F]fluoro-5α-dihydrotestosterone ([ 18 F]FDHT) to image AR expression in the brain. Methods: Male Wistar rats were either orchiectomized to inhibit endogenous androgen production or underwent sham-surgery. Fifteen days after surgery, rats were subjected to a 90-min dynamic [ 18 F]FDHT PET scan with arterial blood sampling. In a subset of orchiectomized rats, 1 mg/kg dihydrotestosterone was co-injected with the tracer in order to saturate the AR. Plasma samples were analyzed for the presence of radioactive metabolites by radio-TLC. Pharmacokinetic modeling was performed to quantify brain kinetics of the tracer. After the PET scan, the animals were terminated for ex-vivo biodistribution. Results: PET imaging and ex vivo biodistribution studies showed low [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in all brain regions, except pituitary. [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in the surrounding cranial bones was high and increased over time. [ 18 F]FDHT was rapidly metabolized in rats. Metabolism was significantly faster in orchiectomized rats than in sham-orchiectomized rats. Quantitative analysis of PET data indicated substantial spill-over of activity from cranial bones into peripheral brain regions, which prevented further analysis of peripheral brain regions. Logan graphical analysis and kinetic modeling using 1- and 2-tissue compartment models showed reversible and homogenously distributed tracer uptake in central brain regions. [ 18 F]FDHT uptake in the brain could not be blocked by endogenous androgens or administration of dihydrotestosterone. Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that imaging of AR availability in rat brain with [ 18 F]FDHT PET is not feasible. The low AR expression in the brain, the

  13. A quantitative analysis of statistical power identifies obesity end points for improved in vivo preclinical study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selimkhanov, J; Thompson, W C; Guo, J; Hall, K D; Musante, C J

    2017-08-01

    The design of well-powered in vivo preclinical studies is a key element in building the knowledge of disease physiology for the purpose of identifying and effectively testing potential antiobesity drug targets. However, as a result of the complexity of the obese phenotype, there is limited understanding of the variability within and between study animals of macroscopic end points such as food intake and body composition. This, combined with limitations inherent in the measurement of certain end points, presents challenges to study design that can have significant consequences for an antiobesity program. Here, we analyze a large, longitudinal study of mouse food intake and body composition during diet perturbation to quantify the variability and interaction of the key metabolic end points. To demonstrate how conclusions can change as a function of study size, we show that a simulated preclinical study properly powered for one end point may lead to false conclusions based on secondary end points. We then propose the guidelines for end point selection and study size estimation under different conditions to facilitate proper power calculation for a more successful in vivo study design.

  14. Fermentation of animal components in strict carnivores: a comparative study with cheetah fecal inoculum

    OpenAIRE

    Depauw, S.; Bosch, G.; Hesta, M.; Whitehouse-Tedd, K.; Hendriks, W.H.; Kaandorp, J.; Janssens, G.P.J.

    2012-01-01

    The natural diet of felids contains highly digestible animal tissues but also fractions resistant to small intestinal digestion, which enter the large intestine where they may be fermented by the resident microbial population. Little information exists on the microbial degradability of animal tissues in the large intestine of felids consuming a natural diet. This study aimed to rank animal substrates in their microbial degradability by means of an in vitro study using captive cheetahs fed a s...

  15. Economic Feasibility Study for Using Irradiation Technology in Preservation of Animalism Foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Gameel, E.A.

    2011-01-01

    The present study discus the economic feasibility for the preservation animalism foods by using irradiation technology. This study has included the technical data, regression foretelling for the throughput, determination of irradiators types and radiation sources activity. This study comprises the financial analysis for the establishment animalism foods irradiation facilities (types: tote box, pallet conveyor) and the national return

  16. Accuracy and reproducibility of tumor positioning during prolonged and multi-modality animal imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Mutian; Huang Minming; Le, Carl; Zanzonico, Pat B; Ling, C Clifton; Koutcher, Jason A; Humm, John L; Claus, Filip; Kolbert, Katherine S; Martin, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    Dedicated small-animal imaging devices, e.g. positron emission tomography (PET), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanners, are being increasingly used for translational molecular imaging studies. The objective of this work was to determine the positional accuracy and precision with which tumors in situ can be reliably and reproducibly imaged on dedicated small-animal imaging equipment. We designed, fabricated and tested a custom rodent cradle with a stereotactic template to facilitate registration among image sets. To quantify tumor motion during our small-animal imaging protocols, 'gold standard' multi-modality point markers were inserted into tumor masses on the hind limbs of rats. Three types of imaging examination were then performed with the animals continuously anesthetized and immobilized: (i) consecutive microPET and MR images of tumor xenografts in which the animals remained in the same scanner for 2 h duration, (ii) multi-modality imaging studies in which the animals were transported between distant imaging devices and (iii) serial microPET scans in which the animals were repositioned in the same scanner for subsequent images. Our results showed that the animal tumor moved by less than 0.2-0.3 mm over a continuous 2 h microPET or MR imaging session. The process of transporting the animal between instruments introduced additional errors of ∼0.2 mm. In serial animal imaging studies, the positioning reproducibility within ∼0.8 mm could be obtained.

  17. A comparative in vivo and in vitro L-band EPR study of irradiated rat incisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zdravkova, M.; Gallez, B.; Debuyst, R.

    2005-01-01

    L-band (∼1GHz) EPR has the potential to measure the absorbed radiation dose in human teeth inside the mouth (in vivo analyses). One crucial point in the development of the method is to know if dosimetry evaluation carried out in vivo after accidental exposures can be reliably based on calibration curves built in vitro. The aim of the present work is to specifically address this point. First, we compared L-band in vitro and in vivo analyses in irradiated rat teeth and estimated the possible loss in in vivo experiments due to rat movements and mouth proximity. Second, the lower pair of rat incisors were analysed by L-band EPR before and after irradiation (50Gy), first on the living rat, then on the same dead rat, finally after extraction of the teeth. X-band powder spectra were also taken after crushing of the two teeth. Irradiations of dead rats and extracted teeth were also carried out. Comparing L-band spectra obtained with living rats and removed heads does not show any significant difference due to possible small rat movements or breathing. Relative standard deviations of the amplitudes of the dosimetric signal are quite high (27-54%). Nevertheless, it seems to be a tendency to have higher signals in irradiated extracted teeth than in irradiated animals

  18. In Vivo RNAi-Based Screens: Studies in Model Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Yamamoto-Hino

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is a technique widely used for gene silencing in organisms and cultured cells, and depends on sequence homology between double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and target mRNA molecules. Numerous cell-based genome-wide screens have successfully identified novel genes involved in various biological processes, including signal transduction, cell viability/death, and cell morphology. However, cell-based screens cannot address cellular processes such as development, behavior, and immunity. Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans are two model organisms whose whole bodies and individual body parts have been subjected to RNAi-based genome-wide screening. Moreover, Drosophila RNAi allows the manipulation of gene function in a spatiotemporal manner when it is implemented using the Gal4/UAS system. Using this inducible RNAi technique, various large-scale screens have been performed in Drosophila, demonstrating that the method is straightforward and valuable. However, accumulated results reveal that the results of RNAi-based screens have relatively high levels of error, such as false positives and negatives. Here, we review in vivo RNAi screens in Drosophila and the methods that could be used to remove ambiguity from screening results.

  19. A new generation of PET scanners for small animal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hegyesi, G.; Imrek, J.; Kalinka, G.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D.; Valastyan, I.; Balkay, L.; Emri, M.; Kis, S.; Tron, L.

    2008-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. Research on small animal PET scanners has been a hot topic in recent years. These devices are used in the preclinical phases of drug tests and during the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. They also provide a cost efficient way to test new materials, new design concepts and new technologies that later can be used to build more efficient human medical imaging devices. The development of a PET scanner requires expertise on different fields, therefore a consortium was formed that brought together Hungarian academic and industrial partners: the Nuclear Research Institute (which has experience in the development of nuclear detectors and data acquisition systems), the PET Center of the University of Debrecen (which has clinical experience in the application of nuclear imaging devices and background in image processing software), Mediso Ltd. (which has been developing, manufacturing, selling and servicing medical imaging devices since 1990) and other academic partners. This consortium has been working together since 2003: the knowledge base acquired during the development of our small animal PET scanners (miniPET-I and miniPET-II) is now being utilized to build a commercial multimodal human PET scanner. The operation of a PET scanner is based on the simultaneous detection ('coincidence') of two gamma photons originating from a positron annihilation. In traditional PET scanners coincidence is detected by a central unit during the measurement. In our system there is no such central module: all detected single gamma events are recorded (list mode data acquisition), and the list of events are processed using a computer cluster (built from PCs). The usage of independent detector modules and commercial components reduce both development and maintenance costs. Also, this mode of data acquisition is more suitable for development purposes, since once the data is collected and stored it can be used many times to test different signal

  20. High-throughput on-chip in vivo neural regeneration studies using femtosecond laser nano-surgery and microfluidics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Christopher B.; Zeng, Fei; Gilleland, Cody; Samara, Chrysanthi; Yanik, Mehmet F.

    2009-02-01

    In recent years, the advantages of using small invertebrate animals as model systems for human disease have become increasingly apparent and have resulted in three Nobel Prizes in medicine or chemistry during the last six years for studies conducted on the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans). The availability of a wide array of species-specific genetic techniques, along with the transparency of the worm and its ability to grow in minute volumes make C. elegans an extremely powerful model organism. We present a suite of technologies for complex high-throughput whole-animal genetic and drug screens. We demonstrate a high-speed microfluidic sorter that can isolate and immobilize C. elegans in a well-defined geometry, an integrated chip containing individually addressable screening chambers for incubation and exposure of individual animals to biochemical compounds, and a device for delivery of compound libraries in standard multiwell plates to microfluidic devices. The immobilization stability obtained by these devices is comparable to that of chemical anesthesia and the immobilization process does not affect lifespan, progeny production, or other aspects of animal health. The high-stability enables the use of a variety of key optical techniques. We use this to demonstrate femtosecond-laser nanosurgery and three-dimensional multiphoton microscopy. Used alone or in various combinations these devices facilitate a variety of high-throughput assays using whole animals, including mutagenesis and RNAi and drug screens at subcellular resolution, as well as high-throughput high-precision manipulations such as femtosecond-laser nanosurgery for large-scale in vivo neural degeneration and regeneration studies.

  1. Stratum corneum damage and ex vivo porcine skin water absorption - a pilot study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duch Lynggaard, C; Bang Knudsen, D; Jemec, G B E

    2009-01-01

    A simple ex vivo screening technique would be of interest for mass screening of substances for potential barrier disruptive qualities. Ex vivo water absorption as a marker of skin barrier integrity was studied on pig ear skin. Skin water absorption was quantified by weighing and weight changes were...... found to reflect prehydration barrier damage. It is suggested that this simple model may be elaborated to provide a rapid, economical screening tool for potential skin irritants....

  2. In-vivo study and histological examination of laser reshaping of cartilage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sviridov, Alexander P.; Sobol, Emil N.; Bagratashvili, Victor N.; Omelchenko, Alexander I.; Ovchinnikov, Yuriy M.; Shekhter, Anatoliy B.; Svistushkin, Valeriy M.; Shinaev, Andrei A.; Nikiforova, G.; Jones, Nicholas

    1999-06-01

    The results of recent study of cartilage reshaping in vivo are reported. The ear cartilage of piglets of 8-12 weeks old have been reshaped in vivo using the radiation of a holmium laser. The stability of the shape and possible side effects have been examined during four months. Histological investigation shown that the healing of irradiated are could accompany by the regeneration of ear cartilage. Finally, elastic type cartilage has been transformed into fibrous cartilage or cartilage of hyaline type.

  3. Augmentation of bone defect healing using a new biocomposite scaffold: an in vivo study in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Pol, U; Mathieu, L; Zeiter, S; Bourban, P-E; Zambelli, P-Y; Pearce, S G; Bouré, L P; Pioletti, D P

    2010-09-01

    Previous studies support resorbable biocomposites made of poly(L-lactic acid) (PLA) and beta-tricalcium phosphate (TCP) produced by supercritical gas foaming as a suitable scaffold for tissue engineering. The present study was undertaken to demonstrate the biocompatibility and osteoconductive properties of such a scaffold in a large animal cancellous bone model. The biocomposite (PLA/TCP) was compared with a currently used beta-TCP bone substitute (ChronOS, Dr. Robert Mathys Foundation), representing a positive control, and empty defects, representing a negative control. Ten defects were created in sheep cancellous bone, three in the distal femur and two in the proximal tibia of each hind limb, with diameters of 5 mm and depths of 15 mm. New bone in-growth (osteoconductivity) and biocompatibility were evaluated using microcomputed tomography and histology at 2, 4 and 12 months after surgery. The in vivo study was validated by the positive control (good bone formation with ChronOS) and the negative control (no healing with the empty defect). A major finding of this study was incorporation of the biocomposite in bone after 12 months. Bone in-growth was observed in the biocomposite scaffold, including its central part. Despite initial fibrous tissue formation observed at 2 and 4 months, but not at 12 months, this initial fibrous tissue does not preclude long-term application of the biocomposite, as demonstrated by its osteointegration after 12 months, as well as the absence of chronic or long-term inflammation at this time point. 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 containing lumbrokinase isolated from Lumbricus rubellus: ex vivo, in vivo, and pharmaceutic studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjandrawinata RR

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Raymond R Tjandrawinata,1 Jessica Trisina,1 Puji Rahayu,1 Lorentius Agung Prasetya,1 Aang Hanafiah,2 Heni Rachmawati3 1Dexa Laboratories of Biomolecular Sciences, Dexa Medica, Cikarang, Indonesia; 2National Nuclear Energy Agency, Bandung, Indonesia; 3School of Pharmacy, Bandung Institute of Technology, Bandung, Indonesia Abstract: DLBS1033 is a bioactive protein fraction isolated from Lumbricus rubellus that tends to be unstable when exposed to the gastrointestinal environment. Accordingly, appropriate pharmaceutical development is needed to maximize absorption of the protein fraction in the gastrointestinal tract. In vitro, ex vivo, and in vivo stability assays were performed to study the stability of the bioactive protein fraction in gastric conditions. The bioactive protein fraction DLBS1033 was found to be unstable at low pH and in gastric fluid. The “enteric coating” formulation showed no leakage in gastric fluid–like medium and possessed a good release profile in simulated intestinal medium. DLBS1033 was absorbed through the small intestine in an intact protein form, confirmed by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS PAGE analysis. This result confirmed that an enteric coating formula using methacrylic acid copolymer could protect DLBS1033 from the acidic condition of the stomach by preventing the release of DLBS1033 in the stomach, while promoting its release when reaching the intestine. From the blood concentration–versus-time curve, 99mTc-DLBS1033 showed a circulation half-life of 70 minutes. This relatively long biological half-life supports its function as a thrombolytic protein. Thus, an enteric delivery system is considered the best approach for DLBS1033 as an oral thrombolytic agent. Keywords: bioactive protein fraction, enteric coated tablet, pharmacodynamic

  5. [Formal sample size calculation and its limited validity in animal studies of medical basic research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, B; Muche, R

    2013-01-01

    Animal studies are highly relevant for basic medical research, although their usage is discussed controversially in public. Thus, an optimal sample size for these projects should be aimed at from a biometrical point of view. Statistical sample size calculation is usually the appropriate methodology in planning medical research projects. However, required information is often not valid or only available during the course of an animal experiment. This article critically discusses the validity of formal sample size calculation for animal studies. Within the discussion, some requirements are formulated to fundamentally regulate the process of sample size determination for animal experiments.

  6. In vitro and in vivo study of commercial calcium phosphate cement HydroSet™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, Niall W; Blunn, Gordon; Karpukhina, Natalia; Davis, Graham; de Godoy, Roberta Ferro; Wilson, Rory M; Coathup, Melanie; Onwordi, Lyris; Quak, Wen Yu; Hill, Robert

    2018-01-01

    The commercial calcium phosphate cement, HydroSet™, was investigated in vitro, studying phase formation, compressive strength and setting time, followed by an ovine in vivo study to measure osseointegration, bone apposition and bone-to-graft contact. The X-ray diffraction and 31 P Magic Angle Spinning Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (MAS NMR) results showed the initial formation of octacalcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite at one hour. Over 7 days the octacalcium phosphate transformed to apatite, which was the only crystalline phase of the cement at 28 days. This apatite phase is thought to be a calcium deficient apatite. In the scanning electron microscopy, histological images of 12-week ovine in vivo results showed a high degree of osseointegration, 92.5%. Compressive strength comparisons between in vitro and in vivo measurements showed a dramatic difference between the in vitro measurements (highest 25.4 MPa) and in vivo (95 MPa), attributed to bone ingrowth into the cement in vivo. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time phase evolution of HydroSet™ and the properties studied in vitro complement the in vivo evaluation of the cement in a publication. The significance of the new finding of initial formation of octacalcium phosphate in this cement is discussed. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 106B: 21-30, 2018. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Kinetics of corneal epithelium turnover in vivo. Studies of lovastatin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cenedella, R.J.; Fleschner, C.R.

    1990-01-01

    The authors developed a direct chemical approach for estimating the rate of turnover of the corneal epithelium in vivo. The method was used to examine the effects of lovastatin, a potent inhibitor of cholesterol biosynthesis, on proliferation and turnover of the epithelium. Corneal DNA was labeled by pulse injection (IP) of the rat with 3H-thymidine, and 3H-labeled DNA was recovered from peripheral and central corneas over the next 15 days. Only the epithelium became labeled, and the loss of label by cell desquamation began 3 days after injection. The loss of 3H-DNA from the cornea (peripheral plus central region) followed first-order kinetics. The half-life of the disappearance was about 3 days. The peripheral cornea became more highly labeled than the central cornea and began to lose 3H-DNA before the central cornea. These observations support the possibility of a higher mitotic rate in the peripheral region and the centripetal movement of a population of peripheral epithelial cells in the normal cornea. The half-lives of the disappearance of 3H-DNA from peripheral and central corneas measured between days 5 and 15 postinjection were identical, both at 3 days. Complete turnover of the corneal epithelium would, therefore, require about 2 weeks (4-5 half-lives). Treatment of the rat with lovastatin had no obvious effects upon the proliferation or turnover of the corneal epithelium. Although lovastatin inhibited corneal 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase, the key regulatory enzyme of cholesterol synthesis, the cornea compensated by induction of this enzyme so that there was no net inhibition of cholesterol synthesis in the cornea

  8. Measurement of local blood flow and oxygen consumption in evolving irreversible cerebral infarction: an in vivo study in man

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baron, J.C.; Rougemont, D.; Lebrun-Grandie, P.; Bousser, M.G.; Cabanis, E.; Bories, J.; Comar, D.; Castaigne, P.

    1982-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) allows in vivo measurement of local cerebral blood flow (1CBF), oxygen consumption rate (1CMRO 2 ) and glucose utilisation (1CMRG1c) in man. Although 1CMRG1c is accessible in animals, this is not the case for 1CMRO 2 , an excellent index of local functional state. PET imaging of the local interrelationship of CBF and metabolism in completed ischemic stroke has attracted considerable interest because of its potential to differentiate irreversibly damaged from viable tissue on the basis of the CBF- metabolism patterns. Several qualitative or semi-quantitative pioneering studies provided a limited insight into this question, while the single truly quantitative study was only briefly reported. We report here a detailed study of the local CBF-CMRO 2 quantitative patterns in irreversibly infarcted brain regions

  9. Animal study on transplantation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells for corneal endothelial decompensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cui

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To explore the feasibility of culturing human umbilical vein endothelial cells(HUVECon acellular corneal stroma and performing the posterior lamellar endothelial keratoplasty(PLEKtreating corneal endothelial decompensation.METHODS: Thirty New-Zealand rabbits were divided into three groups randomly, 10 rabbits for experimental group, 10 for stroma group and 10 for control group. Corneal endothelial cells were removed to establish animal model of corneal endothelial failure. PLEK was performed on the rabbits of experimental group and stroma group, and nothing was transplantated onto the rabbits of control group with the deep layer excised only. Postoperative observation was taken for 3mo. The degree of corneal edema and central corneal thickness were recorded for statistical analysis.RESULTS: Corneas in experimental group were relieved in edema obviously compared with that in stroma group and the control group, and showed increased transparency 7d after the operation. The average density of endothelial cells was 2 026.4±129.3cells/mm2, and average central corneal thickness was 505.2±25.4μm in experimental group, while 1 535.6±114.5μm in stroma group and 1 493.5±70.2μm in control group 3mo after operation.CONCLUSION:We achieved preliminary success in our study that culturing HUVEC on acellular corneal stroma and performing PLEK for corneal endothelial decompensation. HUVEC transplanted could survive in vivo, and have normal biological function of keeping cornea transparent. This study provides a new idea and a new way clinically for the treatment of corneal endothelial diseases.

  10. Apoptosis imaging studies in various animal models using radio-iodinated peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwak, Wonjung; Ha, Yeong Su; Soni, Nisarg; Lee, Woonghee; Park, Se-Il; Ahn, Heesu; An, Gwang Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon; Yoo, Jeongsoo

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis has a role in many medical disorders and treatments; hence, its non-invasive evaluation is one of the most riveting research topics. Currently annexin V is used as gold standard for imaging apoptosis. However, several drawbacks, including high background, slow body clearance, make it a suboptimum marker for apoptosis imaging. In this study, we radiolabeled the recently identified histone H1 targeting peptide (ApoPep-1) and evaluated its potential as a new apoptosis imaging agent in various animal models. ApoPep-1 (CQRPPR) was synthesized, and an extra tyrosine residue was added to its N-terminal end for radiolabeling. This peptide was radiolabeled with (124)I and (131)I and was tested for its serum stability. Surgery- and drug-induced apoptotic rat models were prepared for apoptosis evaluation, and PET imaging was performed. Doxorubicin was used for xenograft tumor treatment in mice, and the induced apoptosis was studied. Tumor metabolism and proliferation were assessed by [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FLT PET imaging and compared with ApoPep-1 after doxorubicin treatment. The peptide was radiolabeled at high purity, and it showed reasonably good stability in serum. Cell death was easily imaged by radiolabeled ApoPep-1 in an ischemia surgery model. And, liver apoptosis was more clearly identified by ApoPep-1 rather than [(124)I]annexin V in cycloheximide-treated models. Three doxorubicin doses inhibited tumor growth, which was evaluated by 30-40% decreases of [(18)F]FDG and [(18)F]FLT PET uptake in the tumor area. However, ApoPep-1 demonstrated more than 200% increase in tumor uptake after chemotherapy, while annexin V did not show any meaningful uptake in the tumor compared with the background. Biodistribution data were also in good agreement with the microPET imaging results. All of the experimental data clearly demonstrated high potential of the radiolabeled ApoPep-1 for in vivo apoptosis imaging.

  11. The Usefulness of Systematic Reviews of Animal Experiments for the Design of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rob B. M.; Wever, Kimberley E.; Avey, Marc T.; Stephens, Martin L.; Sena, Emily S.; Leenaars, Marlies

    2014-01-01

    The question of how animal studies should be designed, conducted, and analyzed remains underexposed in societal debates on animal experimentation. This is not only a scientific but also a moral question. After all, if animal experiments are not appropriately designed, conducted, and analyzed, the results produced are unlikely to be reliable and the animals have in effect been wasted. In this article, we focus on one particular method to address this moral question, namely systematic reviews of previously performed animal experiments. We discuss how the design, conduct, and analysis of future (animal and human) experiments may be optimized through such systematic reviews. In particular, we illustrate how these reviews can help improve the methodological quality of animal experiments, make the choice of an animal model and the translation of animal data to the clinic more evidence-based, and implement the 3Rs. Moreover, we discuss which measures are being taken and which need to be taken in the future to ensure that systematic reviews will actually contribute to optimizing experimental design and thereby to meeting a necessary condition for making the use of animals in these experiments justified. PMID:25541545

  12. In vivo and in vitro animal investigation of the effect of a mixture of herbal extracts from Tribulus terrestris and Cornus officinalis on penile erection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kam, Sung Chul; Do, Jung Mo; Choi, Jae Hwi; Jeon, Byeong Tak; Roh, Gu Seob; Hyun, Jae Seog

    2012-10-01

    Herbal preparations have long been used as folk remedies for erectile dysfunction (ED). This study examined the effects of Tribulus terrestris and Cornus officinalis extracts on relaxation of the smooth muscle of the corpus cavernosum (CC), their mechanisms of action, and the effects of oral administration of a mixture of the herbal extracts on penile erection. The relaxation effects and the mechanisms of action of T. terrestris extract, C. officinalis extract, and the mixture of both extracts on the rabbit CC were investigated in an organ bath. To evaluate whether the relaxation response of the CC shown in an organ bath occurs in vivo, intracavernous pressure (ICP) was calculated in rats after oral administration for a month. Additionally, adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) and guanosine 3', 5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) in the CC were measured using immunoassay. Smooth muscle relaxation was expressed as the percent decrease in precontraction induced by phenylephrine. ICP was assessed in rats after the oral administration of a mixture of both extracts for 1 month and changes in cGMP and cAMP concentrations were measured based on the concentration of the mixture of both extracts. T. terrestris extract, C. officinalis extract, and the mixture of both extracts showed concentration-dependent relaxation effects of the CC. In both the endothelium-removed group and N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester pretreatment group, T. terrestris extract inhibited relaxation. ICP measured after oral administration of the extract mixture for a month was higher than that measured in the control group, and a significant increase in cAMP was observed in the mixture group. T. terrestris extract and C. officinalis extract exhibited concentration-dependent relaxation in an organ bath. In the in vivo study of the extract mixture, ICP and cAMP was significantly potentiated. Accordingly, the mixture of T. terrestris extract and C. officinalis extract may improve erectile function.

  13. Determinants associated with veterinary antimicrobial prescribing in farm animals in the Netherlands: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speksnijder, D C; Jaarsma, A D C; van der Gugten, A C; Verheij, T J M; Wagenaar, J A

    2015-04-01

    Antimicrobial use in farm animals might contribute to the development of antimicrobial resistance in humans and animals, and there is an urgent need to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. Veterinarians are typically responsible for prescribing and overseeing antimicrobial use in animals. A thorough understanding of veterinarians' current prescribing practices and their reasons to prescribe antimicrobials might offer leads for interventions to reduce antimicrobial use in farm animals. This paper presents the results of a qualitative study of factors that influence prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians. Semi-structured interviews with eleven farm animal veterinarians were conducted, which were taped, transcribed and iteratively analysed. This preliminary analysis was further discussed and refined in an expert meeting. A final conceptual model was derived from the analysis and sent to all the respondents for validation. Many conflicting interests are identifiable when it comes to antimicrobial prescribing by farm animal veterinarians. Belief in the professional obligation to alleviate animal suffering, financial dependency on clients, risk avoidance, shortcomings in advisory skills, financial barriers for structural veterinary herd health advisory services, lack of farmers' compliance to veterinary recommendations, public health interests, personal beliefs regarding the veterinary contribution to antimicrobial resistance and major economic powers are all influential determinants in antimicrobial prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians. Interventions to change prescribing behaviour of farm animal veterinarians could address attitudes and advisory skills of veterinarians, as well as provide tools to deal with (perceived) pressure from farmers and advisors to prescribe antimicrobials. Additional (policy) measures could probably support farm animal veterinarians in acting as a more independent animal health consultant. © 2014 Blackwell

  14. SU-G-IeP4-11: Monitoring Tumor Growth in Subcutaneous Murine Tumor Model in Vivo: A Comparison Between MRI and Small Animal CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B; He, W; Cvetkovic, D; Chen, L; Fan, J; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of the study is to compare the volume measurement of subcutaneous tumors in mice with different imaging platforms, namely a GE MRI and a Sofie-Biosciences small animal CT scanner. Methods: A549 human lung carcinoma cells and FaDu human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells were implanted subcutaneously into flanks of nude mice. Three FaDu tumors and three A549 tumors were included in this study. The MRI scans were done with a GE Signa 1.5 Tesla MR scanner using a fast T2-weighted sequence (70mm FOV and 1.2mm slice thickness), while the CT scans were done with the CT scanner on a Sofie-Biosciences G8 PET/CT platform dedicated for small animal studies (48mm FOV and 0.2mm slice thickness). Imaging contrast agent was not used in this study. Based on the DICOM images from MRI and CT scans, the tumors were contoured with Philips DICOM Viewer and the tumor volumes were obtained by summing up the contoured area and multiplied by the slice thickness. Results: The volume measurements based on the CT scans agree reasonably with that obtained with MR images for the subcutaneous tumors. The mean difference in the absolute tumor volumes between MRI- and CT-based measurements was found to be −6.2% ± 1.0%, with the difference defined as (VMR – VCT)*100%/VMR. Furthermore, we evaluated the normalized tumor volumes, which were defined for each tumor as V/V{sub 0} where V{sub 0} stands for the volume from the first MR or CT scan. The mean difference in the normalized tumor volumes was found to be 0.10% ± 0.96%. Conclusion: Despite the fact that the difference between normal and abnormal tissues is often less clear on small animal CT images than on MR images, one can still obtain reasonable tumor volume information with the small animal CT scans for subcutaneous murine xenograft models.

  15. A comparative approach to the study of Keeper-Animal Relationships in the zoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlstead, Kathy

    2009-11-01

    Research on intensively farmed animals over the past 25 years has shown that human-animal interactions, by affecting the animal's fear of humans, can markedly limit the productivity and welfare of farm animals. This article begins to explore some of the factors that need to be considered to investigate Keeper-Animal Relationships (KARs) in the zoo. In the mid-1990s, a large body of multi-institutional data on zookeepers and animals was collected from 46 Zoos. Using standardized questionnaires, 82 keepers rated how they behaved towards animals, their husbandry routine, how the animal responds to them and to other people, and provided information about themselves. These data include 219 individuals of four endangered species: black rhinoceros, cheetah, maned wolf, and great hornbill. At each zoo, keepers were also videotaped calling to their animals in order to directly observe animal responses to keeper behaviors. Principle Components Analysis reduced eight animal variables to three components and ten keeper variables to five components. Scores for animals and for keepers were calculated on these components and compared, according to five predictions based on models of human-animal interactions in the literature. Animal responses to keepers varied along three dimensions: Affinity to Keeper, Fear of People, and Sociable/Curious. Animal scores of Fear of People were significantly and positively correlated with independent measures of poor welfare from two later studies: fecal corticoid concentrations for 12 black rhinos and "tense-fearful" scores for 12 cheetahs. (1) Significant species differences were found for Affinity to Keeper and Fear of People, and the interaction of these two dimensions of animal response to keepers appears to be species-specific. (2) The quality of KAR is influenced by whether the zookeeper goes in the enclosure with the animal or not, the frequency and time of feeding, and keeper visibility to the animal. Among keepers who go in with their

  16. Flaws in animal studies exploring statins and impact on meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moja, Lorenzo; Pecoraro, Valentina; Ciccolallo, Laura; Dall'Olmo, Luigi; Virgili, Gianni; Garattini, Silvio

    2014-06-01

    Animal experiments should be appropriately designed, correctly analysed and transparently reported to increase their scientific validity and maximise the knowledge gained from each experiment. This systematic review of animal experiments investigating statins evaluates their quality of reporting and methodological aspects as well as their implications for the conduction of meta-analyses. We searched medline and embase for studies reporting research on statins in mice, rats and rabbits. We collected detailed information about the characteristics of studies, animals and experimental methods. We retrieved 161 studies. A little over half did not report randomisation (55%) and most did not describe blinding (88%). All studies reported details on the experimental procedure, although many omitted information about animal gender, age or weight. Four percent did not report the number of animals used. None reported the sample size. Fixed- and random-effects models gave different results (ratio of effect size increased by five folds). Heterogeneity was consistently substantial within animal models, for which accounting for covariates had minimal impact. Publication bias is highly suspected across studies. Although statins showed efficacy in animal models, preclinical studies highlighted fundamental problems in the way in which such research is conducted and reported. Results were often difficult to interpret and reproduce. Different meta-analytic approaches were highly inconsistent: a reliable approach to estimate the true parameter was imperceptible. Policies that address these issues are required from investigators, editors and institutions that care about the quality standards and ethics of animal research. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  17. Laboratory studies of imitation/field studies of tradition: towards a synthesis in animal social learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galef, Bennett G

    2015-03-01

    Here I discuss: (1) historical precedents that have resulted in comparative psychologists accepting the two-action method as the "gold standard" in laboratory investigations of imitation learning, (2) evidence suggesting that the two-action procedure may not be adequate to answer questions concerning the role of imitation in the development of traditional behaviors of animals living in natural habitat, and (3) an alternative approach to the laboratory study of imitation that might increase the relevance of laboratory studies of imitation to the work of behavioral ecologists/primatologists interested in animal traditions and their relationship to human cumulative culture. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Tribute to Tom Zentall. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Oral fondaparinux: use of lipid nanocapsules as nanocarriers and in vivo pharmacokinetic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan A

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Alyaa Ramadan1,4, Frederic Lagarce1,3, Anne Tessier-Marteau2, Olivier Thomas1, Pierre Legras5, Laurent Macchi2, Patrick Saulnier1, Jean Pierre Benoit1,31LUNAM Université, Ingénierie de la Vectorisation Particulaire, Inserm U-646, Angers, France; 2Hematology Department, Angers University Hospital, Angers, France; 3Department of Pharmacy, Angers University Hospital, Angers, France; 4Department of Pharmaceutics, Faculty of Pharmacy, Alexandria University, Alexandria, Egypt; 5SCAHU, Animal House, Angers, FranceAbstract: Oral anticoagulant therapy could be advanced using lipid-based nanoparticulate systems. This study examined lipid nanocapsules for their oral absorption potential as the first step in developing oral fondaparinux (Fp novel carriers. Using phase inversion method and cationic surfactants such as hexadecyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB or stearylamine (SA, cationic lipid nanocapsules (cLNCs, loaded with Fp on their surface, were prepared and characterized (zeta potential, size and Fp association efficiency and content. In vivo studies were conducted after single oral increasing doses of Fp-loaded cLNCs (0.5 to 5 mg/kg of Fp in rats and the concentration of Fp in the plasma was measured by anti-factor Xa activity assay. The monodisperse, (~50 nm, positively charged Fp-cLNCs with high drug loadings demonstrated linear pharmacokinetic profiles of the drug with an increased oral absolute bioavailability (up to ~21% compatible with therapeutic anticoagulant effect (>0.2 µg/mL.Keywords: oral anticoagulant, fondaparinux, lipid nanocapsules, bioavailability, pharmacokinetics, rats

  19. EX VIVO STUDY OF QUANTITATIVE ULTRASOUND PARAMETERS IN FATTY RABBIT LIVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Kemmerer, Jeremy P.; Miller, Rita J.; Oelze, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects more than 30% of Americans, and with increasing problems of obesity in the United States, NAFLD is poised to become an even more serious medical concern. At present, accurate classification of steatosis (fatty liver) represents a significant challenge. In this study, the use of high-frequency (8 to 25 MHz) quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging to quantify fatty liver was explored. QUS is an imaging technique that can be used to quantify properties of tissue giving rise to scattered ultrasound. The changes in the ultrasound properties of livers in rabbits undergoing atherogenic diets of varying durations were investigated using QUS. Rabbits were placed on a special fatty diet for 0, 3, or 6 weeks. The fattiness of the livers was quantified by estimating the total lipid content of the livers. Ultrasonic properties, such as speed of sound, attenuation, and backscatter coefficients, were estimated in ex vivo rabbit liver samples from animals that had been on the diet for varying periods. Two QUS parameters were estimated based on the backscatter coefficient: effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC), using a spherical Gaussian scattering model. Two parameters were estimated based on the backscattered envelope statistics (the k parameter and the μ parameter) according to the homodyned K distribution. The speed of sound decreased from 1574 to 1565 m/s and the attenuation coefficient increased from 0.71 to 1.27 dB/cm/MHz, respectively, with increasing fat content in the liver. The ESD decreased from 31 to 17 μm and the EAC increased from 38 to 63 dB/cm3 with increasing fat content in the liver. A significant increase in the μ parameter from 0.18 to 0.93 scatterers/mm3 was observed with increasing fat content in the liver samples. The results of this study indicate that QUS parameters are sensitive to fat content in the liver. PMID:23062376

  20. Towards informed metrics for examining the role of human-induced animal responses in tag studies on wild animals

    KAUST Repository

    Wilson, Rory P.; Holton, Mark; Wilson, Vianney L.; Gunner, Richard; Tysse, Brenda; Wilson, Gwendoline I; Quintana, Flavio; Duarte, Carlos M.; Scantlebury, D. Michael

    2018-01-01

    Two prime issues can detrimentally affect animals that have been equipped with tags; (i) the effect of the capture and restraint process and (ii) the effect of the tag itself. This work examines some of the issues surrounding quantification of tag effects on wild animals for both restrained and free-living animals. A new method to quantify stress effects based on monitoring ventilation rates in relation to activity is suggested for restrained animals which may help improve the practice of handling animals. It is also suggested that various metrics, many derived from accelerometers, can be examined in tagged wild animals to examine the change in behaviours over time with a view to having a better understanding of welfare issues, assuring the quality of recorded data and informing best practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. Towards informed metrics for examining the role of human-induced animal responses in tag studies on wild animals

    KAUST Repository

    Wilson, Rory P.

    2018-05-31

    Two prime issues can detrimentally affect animals that have been equipped with tags; (i) the effect of the capture and restraint process and (ii) the effect of the tag itself. This work examines some of the issues surrounding quantification of tag effects on wild animals for both restrained and free-living animals. A new method to quantify stress effects based on monitoring ventilation rates in relation to activity is suggested for restrained animals which may help improve the practice of handling animals. It is also suggested that various metrics, many derived from accelerometers, can be examined in tagged wild animals to examine the change in behaviours over time with a view to having a better understanding of welfare issues, assuring the quality of recorded data and informing best practice. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. In vivo demonstration of ultrasound power delivery to charge implanted medical devices via acute and survival porcine studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radziemski, Leon; Makin, Inder Raj S

    2016-01-01

    Animal studies are an important step in proving the utility and safety of an ultrasound based implanted battery recharging system. To this end an Ultrasound Electrical Recharging System (USER™) was developed and tested. Experiments in vitro demonstrated power deliveries at the battery of up to 600 mW through 10-15 mm of tissue, 50 mW of power available at tissue depths of up to 50 mm, and the feasibility of using transducers bonded to titanium as used in medical implants. Acute in vivo studies in a porcine model were used to test reliability of power delivery, temperature excursions, and cooling techniques. The culminating five-week survival study involved repeated battery charging, a total of 10.5h of ultrasound exposure of the intervening living tissue, with an average RF input to electrical charging efficiency of 20%. This study was potentially the first long term cumulative living-tissue exposure using transcutaneous ultrasound power transmission to an implanted receiver in situ. Histology of the exposed tissue showed changes attributable primarily due to surgical implantation of the prototype device, and no damage due to the ultrasound exposure. The in vivo results are indicative of the potential safe delivery of ultrasound energy for a defined set of source conditions for charging batteries within implants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A step-by-step guide to systematically identify all relevant animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leenaars, Marlies; Hooijmans, Carlijn R; van Veggel, Nieky; ter Riet, Gerben; Leeflang, Mariska; Hooft, Lotty; van der Wilt, Gert Jan; Tillema, Alice; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel

    2012-01-01

    Before starting a new animal experiment, thorough analysis of previously performed experiments is essential from a scientific as well as from an ethical point of view. The method that is most suitable to carry out such a thorough analysis of the literature is a systematic review (SR). An essential first step in an SR is to search and find all potentially relevant studies. It is important to include all available evidence in an SR to minimize bias and reduce hampered interpretation of experimental outcomes. Despite the recent development of search filters to find animal studies in PubMed and EMBASE, searching for all available animal studies remains a challenge. Available guidelines from the clinical field cannot be copied directly to the situation within animal research, and although there are plenty of books and courses on searching the literature, there is no compact guide available to search and find relevant animal studies. Therefore, in order to facilitate a structured, thorough and transparent search for animal studies (in both preclinical and fundamental science), an easy-to-use, step-by-step guide was prepared and optimized using feedback from scientists in the field of animal experimentation. The step-by-step guide will assist scientists in performing a comprehensive literature search and, consequently, improve the scientific quality of the resulting review and prevent unnecessary animal use in the future. PMID:22037056

  4. Reducing the number of laboratory animals used in tissue engineering research by restricting the variety of animal models. Articular cartilage tissue engineering as a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rob B M; Buma, Pieter; Leenaars, Marlies; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Gordijn, Bert

    2012-12-01

    The use of laboratory animals in tissue engineering research is an important underexposed ethical issue. Several ethical questions may be raised about this use of animals. This article focuses on the possibilities of reducing the number of animals used. Given that there is considerable debate about the adequacy of the current animal models in tissue engineering research, we investigate whether it is possible to reduce the number of laboratory animals by selecting and using only those models that have greatest predictive value for future clinical application of the tissue engineered product. The field of articular cartilage tissue engineering is used as a case study. Based on a study of the scientific literature and interviews with leading experts in the field, an overview is provided of the animal models used and the advantages and disadvantages of each model, particularly in terms of extrapolation to the human situation. Starting from this overview, it is shown that, by skipping the small models and using only one large preclinical model, it is indeed possible to restrict the number of animal models, thereby reducing the number of laboratory animals used. Moreover, it is argued that the selection of animal models should become more evidence based and that researchers should seize more opportunities to choose or create characteristics in the animal models that increase their predictive value.

  5. Esophageal Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection Assisted by an Overtube with a Traction Forceps: An Animal Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Ohata

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Esophageal endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD is technically difficult. To make it safer, we developed a novel method using overtube with a traction forceps (OTF for countertraction during submucosal dissection. We conducted an ex vivo animal study and compared the clinical outcomes between OTF-ESD and conventional method (C-ESD. A total of 32 esophageal ESD procedures were performed by four beginner and expert endoscopists. After circumferential mucosal incision for the target lesion, structured as the isolated pig esophagus 3 cm long, either C-ESD or OTF-ESD was randomly selected for submucosal dissection. All the ESD procedures were completed as en bloc resections, while perforation only occurred in a beginner’s C-ESD procedure. The dissection time for OTF-ESD was significantly shorter than that for C-ESD for both the beginner and expert endoscopists (22.8±8.3 min versus 7.8±4.5 min, P<0.001, and 11.3±4.4 min versus 5.9±2.5 min, P=0.01, resp.. The frequency and volume of the submucosal injections were significantly smaller for OTF-ESD than for C-ESD (1.3±0.6 times versus 2.9±1.5 times, P<0.001, and 5.3±2.8 mL versus 15.6±7.3 mL, P<0.001, resp.. Histologically, muscular injury was more common among the C-ESD procedures (80% versus 13%, P=0.009. Our results indicated that the OTF-ESD technique is useful for the safe and easy completion of esophageal ESD.

  6. A valuable animal model of spinal cord injury to study motor dysfunctions, comorbid conditions, and aging associated diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouleau, Pascal; Guertin, Pierre A

    2013-01-01

    Most animal models of contused, compressed or transected spinal cord injury (SCI) require a laminectomy to be performed. However, despite advantages and disadvantages associated with each of these models, the laminectomy itself is generally associated with significant problems including longer surgery and anaesthesia (related post-operative complications), neuropathic pain, spinal instabilities, deformities, lordosis, and biomechanical problems, etc. This review provides an overview of findings obtained mainly from our laboratory that are associated with the development and characterization of a novel murine model of spinal cord transection that does not require a laminectomy. A number of studies successfully conducted with this model provided strong evidence that it constitutes a simple, reliable and reproducible transection model of complete paraplegia which is particularly useful for studies on large cohorts of wild-type or mutant animals - e.g., drug screening studies in vivo or studies aimed at characterizing neuronal and non-neuronal adaptive changes post-trauma. It is highly suitable also for studies aimed at identifying and developing new pharmacological treatments against aging associated comorbid problems and specific SCI-related dysfunctions (e.g., stereotyped motor behaviours such as locomotion, sexual response, defecation and micturition) largely related with 'command centers' located in lumbosacral areas of the spinal cord.

  7. Elements of societal perception of farm animal welfare: A quantitative study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogaard, B.K.; Oosting, S.J.; Bock, B.B.

    2006-01-01

    To study societal perception of animal welfare in The Netherlands and to search for intervention possibilities to influence this perception, 1074 randomly selected Dutch respondents completed a questionnaire on animal welfare. We analysed 15 propositions (4-point Likert scale) and through factor

  8. Regulating Animal Health, Gender and Quality Control: A Study of Veterinary Surgeons in Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enticott, Gareth

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores the validity of performance management regimes for quality assuring animal health regulation by comparing the results of tests for bovine tuberculosis (bTB) between male and female vets. In doing so it hopes to present some practical solutions to the regulation of animal disease and encourage further sociological study of the…

  9. An Exploratory Study of Animal-Assisted Interventions Utilized by Mental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Dana M.; Chandler, Cynthia K.

    2011-01-01

    This study implemented an exploratory analysis to examine how a sample of mental health professionals incorporates specific animal-assisted techniques into the therapeutic process. An extensive review of literature related to animal-assisted therapy (AAT) resulted in the identification of 18 techniques and 10 intentions for the practice of AAT in…

  10. The value of animations in biology teaching: a study of long-term memory retention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Day, Danton H

    2007-01-01

    Previous work has established that a narrated animation is more effective at communicating a complex biological process (signal transduction) than the equivalent graphic with figure legend. To my knowledge, no study has been done in any subject area on the effectiveness of animations versus graphics in the long-term retention of information, a primary and critical issue in studies of teaching and learning. In this study, involving 393 student responses, three different animations and two graphics-one with and one lacking a legend-were used to determine the long-term retention of information. The results show that students retain more information 21 d after viewing an animation without narration compared with an equivalent graphic whether or not that graphic had a legend. Students' comments provide additional insight into the value of animations in the pedagogical process, and suggestions for future work are proposed.

  11. In vitro and in vivo studies of biodegradable fine grained AZ31 magnesium alloy produced by equal channel angular pressing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratna Sunil, B; Sampath Kumar, T S; Chakkingal, Uday; Nandakumar, V; Doble, Mukesh; Devi Prasad, V; Raghunath, M

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present work is to investigate the role of different grain sizes produced by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) on the degradation behavior of magnesium alloy using in vitro and in vivo studies. Commercially available AZ31 magnesium alloy was selected and processed by ECAP at 300°C for up to four passes using route Bc. Grain refinement from a starting size of 46μm to a grain size distribution of 1-5μm was successfully achieved after the 4th pass. Wettability of ECAPed samples assessed by contact angle measurements was found to increase due to the fine grain structure. In vitro degradation and bioactivity of the samples studied by immersing in super saturated simulated body fluid (SBF 5×) showed rapid mineralization within 24h due to the increased wettability in fine grained AZ31 Mg alloy. Corrosion behavior of the samples assessed by weight loss and electrochemical tests conducted in SBF 5× clearly showed the prominent role of enhanced mineral deposition on ECAPed AZ31 Mg in controlling the abnormal degradation. Cytotoxicity studies by MTT colorimetric assay showed that all the samples are viable. Additionally, cell adhesion was excellent for ECAPed samples particularly for the 3rd and 4th pass samples. In vivo experiments conducted using New Zealand White rabbits clearly showed lower degradation rate for ECAPed sample compared with annealed AZ31 Mg alloy and all the samples showed biocompatibility and no health abnormalities were noticed in the animals after 60days of in vivo studies. These results suggest that the grain size plays an important role in degradation management of magnesium alloys and ECAP technique can be adopted to achieve fine grain structures for developing degradable magnesium alloys for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells for cartilage tissue engineering: state-of-the-art in in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Maglio, Melania; Tschon, Matilde; Aldini, Nicolò Nicoli; Fini, Milena

    2014-07-01

    Several therapeutic approaches have been developed to address hyaline cartilage regeneration, but to date, there is no universal procedure to promote the restoration of mechanical and functional properties of native cartilage, which is one of the most important challenges in orthopedic surgery. For cartilage tissue engineering, adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are considered as an alternative cell source to chondrocytes. Since little is known about adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell (ADSC) cartilage regeneration potential, the aim of this review was to give an overview of in vivo studies about the chondrogenic potential and regeneration ability of culture-expanded ADSCs when implanted in heterotopic sites or in osteoarthritic and osteochondral defects. The review compares the different studies in terms of number of implanted cells and animals, cell harvesting sites, in vitro expansion and chondrogenic induction conditions, length of experimental time, defect dimensions, used scaffolds and post-explant analyses of the cartilage regeneration. Despite variability of the in vivo protocols, it seems that good cartilage formation and regeneration were obtained with chondrogenically predifferentiated ADSCs (1 × 10(7) cells for heterotopic cartilage formation and 1 × 10(6) cells/scaffold for cartilage defect regeneration) and polymeric scaffolds, even if many other aspects need to be clarified in future studies. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Refining Housing, Husbandry and Care for Animals Used in Studies Involving Biotelemetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Penny

    2014-01-01

    Simple Summary Biotelemetry, the remote detection and measurement of an animal function or activity, is widely used in animal research. Biotelemetry devices transmit physiological or behavioural data and may be surgically implanted into animals, or externally attached. This can help to reduce animal numbers and improve welfare, e.g., if animals can be group housed and move freely instead of being tethered to a recording device. However, biotelemetry can also cause pain and distress to animals due to surgery, attachment, single housing and long term laboratory housing. This article explains how welfare and science can be improved by avoiding or minimising these harms. Abstract Biotelemetry can contribute towards reducing animal numbers and suffering in disciplines including physiology, pharmacology and behavioural research. However, the technique can also cause harm to animals, making biotelemetry a ‘refinement that needs refining’. Current welfare issues relating to the housing and husbandry of animals used in biotelemetry studies are single vs. group housing, provision of environmental enrichment, long term laboratory housing and use of telemetered data to help assess welfare. Animals may be singly housed because more than one device transmits on the same wavelength; due to concerns regarding damage to surgical sites; because they are wearing exteriorised jackets; or if monitoring systems can only record from individually housed animals. Much of this can be overcome by thoughtful experimental design and surgery refinements. Similarly, if biotelemetry studies preclude certain enrichment items, husbandry refinement protocols can be adapted to permit some environmental stimulation. Nevertheless, long-term laboratory housing raises welfare concerns and maximum durations should be defined. Telemetered data can be used to help assess welfare, helping to determine endpoints and refine future studies. The above measures will help to improve data quality as well as

  14. Characterizing interspecies uncertainty using data from studies of anti-neoplastic agents in animals and humans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Price, Paul S.; Keenan, Russell E.; Swartout, Jeffrey C.

    2008-01-01

    For most chemicals, the Reference Dose (RfD) is based on data from animal testing. The uncertainty introduced by the use of animal models has been termed interspecies uncertainty. The magnitude of the differences between the toxicity of a chemical in humans and test animals and its uncertainty can be investigated by evaluating the inter-chemical variation in the ratios of the doses associated with similar toxicological endpoints in test animals and humans. This study performs such an evaluation on a data set of 64 anti-neoplastic drugs. The data set provides matched responses in humans and four species of test animals: mice, rats, monkeys, and dogs. While the data have a number of limitations, the data show that when the drugs are evaluated on a body weight basis: 1) toxicity generally increases with a species' body weight; however, humans are not always more sensitive than test animals; 2) the animal to human dose ratios were less than 10 for most, but not all, drugs; 3) the current practice of using data from multiple species when setting RfDs lowers the probability of having a large value for the ratio. These findings provide insight into inter-chemical variation in animal to human extrapolations and suggest the need for additional collection and analysis of matched toxicity data in humans and test animals

  15. A radiotracer for In vivo studies of acetylcholinesterase: p-[{sup 18}F]fluorodonepezil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.; Choi, Y. S.; Choi, Y.; Kim, S. E.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, B. T. [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J. W. [Seoul National Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1999-05-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of senile dementia caused by lack of acetylcholine in central nervous system, and in vivo studies of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) have been carried out using many radiolabeled AChE inhibitors (donepezil, tacrine, physostigmine, CP-126,998, etc). Donepezil, a FDA approved drug for AD is now in clinical use. Therefore, we synthesized and evaluated p-[{sup 18}F]fluorodonepezil in mice. Biodistribution studies demonstrated that p-[{sup 18}F]fluorodonepezil binds non-specifically in vivo and does not suffer from metabolism in mouse brain. This study suggests that radioligands with higher binding affinity may be required to visualize AChE in vivo and further studies are needed to develop better radiotracers.

  16. In vivo experimental study on laser welded ICG-loaded chitosan patches for vessel repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Francesca; Matteini, Paolo; Esposito, Giuseppe; Albanese, Alessio; Puca, Alfredo; Maira, Giulio; Rossi, Giacomo; Pini, Roberto

    2011-03-01

    Laser welding of microvessels provides several advantages over conventional suturing techniques: surgical times reduction, vascular healing process improvement, tissue damage reduction. We present the first application of biopolymeric patches in an in vivo laser assisted procedure for vessel repair. The study was performed in 20 New Zealand rabbits. After anesthesia, a 3-cm segment of the right common carotid artery was exposed and clamped proximally and distally. A linear lesion 3 mm in length was carried out. We used a diode laser emitting at 810 nm and equipped with a 300 μm diameter optical fiber. To close the cut, ICG-loaded chitosan films were prepared: chitosan is characterized by biodegradability, biocompatibility, antimicrobial, haemostatic and wound healing-promoting activity. ICG is an organic chromophore commonly used in the laser welding procedures to mediate the photothermal conversion at the basis of the welding effect. The membranes were used to wrap the whole length of the cut, and then they were welded in the correct position by delivering single laser spots to induce local patch/tissue adhesion. The result is an immediate closure of the wound, with no bleeding at clamps release. The animals were observed during follow-up and sacrificed after 2, 7, 30 and 90 days. All the repaired vessels were patent, no bleeding signs were documented. The carotid samples underwent histological examinations. The advantages of the proposed technique are: simplification of the surgical procedure and shortening of the operative time; good strength of the vessel repair; decreased foreign-body reaction, reduced inflammatory response and improved vascular healing process.

  17. Study of hypocholesterolemic activity of Algerian Pistacia lentiscus leaves extracts in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Cheurfa

    Full Text Available Abstract Plants are a large source of new bioactive molecules with therapeutic potentials. However, only a small amount of worldwide plants have been phytochemically investigated. The aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Pistacia lentiscus L., Anacardiaceae, leaves were evaluated for hypocholesterolemic activity in vivo. In this study, hypercholesterolemia was induced in animals by feeding them high cholesterol (1% food. The extracts of P. lentiscus were orally administered at a dose of 200 mg/kg body weight along with a high cholesterol diet for thirty successive days. Lipid parameters such as total cholesterol, triacylglyceride, low density lipoprotein, very low density lipoprotein and high density lipoprotein were measured in the plasma. Total phenol and flavonoid contents were also evaluated. Flavonoid content was found to be more present in the ethanolic extract (8.218 ± 0.009 mg of QE/g compared to the aqueous extract (3.107 ± 0.014 mg of QE/g. The administration of P. lentiscus extracts produced a significant decrease in total cholesterol, triacylglyceride and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (154.6 ± 18.10, 71.2 ± 4.38 and 99.36 ± 18.77 mg/dl respectively in the ethanolic extract, while the aqueous extract showed a significant decrease in total cholesterol and triacylglyceride (203.6 ± 9.18 and 97.6 ± 3.57 mg/dl respectively. The results of the investigation demonstrated that P. lentiscus leaf extract has hypocholesterolemic properties and might be used for the prevention of hypercholesterolemia associated disorders.

  18. A study on current risk assessments and guidelines on the use of food animal products derived from cloned animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hur, Sun Jin

    2017-10-01

    The author widely surveyed and analyzed the food safety issues, ethical issues, permits, and approval of animal products from animals cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer worldwide. As a result of a 2-year survey, the author found that there is no evidence that meat and milk derived from cloned animals or their progeny pose a risk to food safety in terms of genotoxicity, adverse reproductive effects, or allergic reactions. Most countries have not approved meat and milk derived from cloned animals, and their progeny are entering the food supply. To establish the guidelines, the author suggests four principles of safety assessment for meat and milk derived from cloned animals. The four main principles for safety assessment are similarities of chemical composition, adverse reproductive effects, genotoxicity, and allergic reactions under the influence of meat and milk from cloned animals and noncloned counterparts. This principle means that meat and milk derived from a cloned animal are safe if there are no differences in the four safety assessments of meat and milk between cloned animal's progeny and noncloned counterparts. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Some aspects of mineral nutrition in animals and the use of radioisotope techniques for its study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edwardly, J.S.

    1975-01-01

    Much work has been done to determine the physiological function of mineral nutrients in animals and to establish the dietary mineral requirements for optical growth, health, and productivity. These studies were directed towards: (a) the definition of mineral levels required in animal food under different circumstances, (b) mineral responsive diseases in livestock, and (c) the many interrelationships between minerals in their physiological functions in the animal body. Many diseases caused by deficiences and/or imbalances of essential minerals in animal food and pastures have been reported to occur in various regions of the world. This review examines some aspects of mineral nutrition in animals and describes some particular studies in which radioisotope techniques were used. (author)

  20. Challenges and solutions for studying collective animal behaviour in the wild.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughey, Lacey F; Hein, Andrew M; Strandburg-Peshkin, Ariana; Jensen, Frants H

    2018-05-19

    Mobile animal groups provide some of the most compelling examples of self-organization in the natural world. While field observations of songbird flocks wheeling in the sky or anchovy schools fleeing from predators have inspired considerable interest in the mechanics of collective motion, the challenge of simultaneously monitoring multiple animals in the field has historically limited our capacity to study collective behaviour of wild animal groups with precision. However, recent technological advancements now present exciting opportunities to overcome many of these limitations. Here we review existing methods used to collect data on the movements and interactions of multiple animals in a natural setting. We then survey emerging technologies that are poised to revolutionize the study of collective animal behaviour by extending the spatial and temporal scales of inquiry, increasing data volume and quality, and expediting the post-processing of raw data.This article is part of the theme issue 'Collective movement ecology'. © 2018 The Author(s).

  1. Isotopic study of liver function after narcosis in small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Qui Cuong; Kiss, Bela; Jakab, Tivadar; Szilvasi, Istvan; Spett, Borbala

    1984-01-01

    Dinamic functional study of the liver was performed by sup(99m)Tc-TECHIDA in narcotized (Halothane) mice and rabbits. Hepatic uptake of the radiopharmaceutical decreased in narcotized group significantly. Excretion also decreased but statistically insignificantly. These alterations in the liver function could be attributed to the hypotensive effect of Halothane. (author)

  2. Development of Curcumin loaded chitosan polymer based nanoemulsion gel: In vitro, ex vivo evaluation and in vivo wound healing studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Lydia; Zakir, Foziyah; Mirza, Mohd Aamir; Anwer, Md Khalid; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Iqbal, Zeenat

    2017-08-01

    In the present study, various nanoemulsions were prepared using Labrafac PG+Triacetin as oil, Tween 80 as a surfactant and polyethylene glycol (PEG 400) as a co-surfactant. The developed nanoemulsions (NE1-NE5) were evaluated for physicochemical characterizations and ex-vivo for skin permeation and deposition studies. The highest skin deposition was observed for NE2 with 46.07% deposition amongst all developed nanoemulsions (NE1-NE5). Optimized nanoemulsion (NE2) had vesicle size of 84.032±0.023nm, viscosity 78.23±22.2 cps, refractive index 1.404. Nanoemulsion gel were developed by incorporation of optimized nanoemulsion (NE2) into 1-3% chitosan and characterized by physical evaluation and rheological studies. Chitosan gel (2%) was found to be suitable for gelation of nanoemulsion based on its consistency, feel and ease of spreadability. The flux of nanoemulsion gel was found 68.88μg/cm 2 /h as compared to NE2 (76.05μg/cm 2 /h) is significantly lower suggesting limited skin permeation of curcumin form gel. However, the retained amount of curcumin on skin by gel formulation (980.75±88μg) is significantly higher than NE2 (771.25±67μg). Enhanced skin permeation of NE2 (46.07%) was observed when compared to nanoemulsion gel (31.25%) and plain gel (11.47%). The outcome of this study evidently points out the potential of curcumin entrapped nanoemulsion gel in wound healing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Electrosteric stealth Rivastigmine loaded liposomes for brain targeting: preparation, characterization, ex vivo, bio-distribution and in vivo pharmacokinetic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nageeb El-Helaly, Sara; Abd Elbary, Ahmed; Kassem, Mohamed A; El-Nabarawi, Mohamed A

    2017-11-01

    Being one of the highly effective drugs in treatment of Alzheimer's disease, Rivastigmine brain targeting is highly demandable, therefore liposomal dispersion of Rivastigmine was prepared containing 2 mol% PEG-DSPE added to Lecithin, Didecyldimethyl ammonium bromide (DDAB), Tween 80 in 1:0.02:0.25 molar ratio. A major challenge during the preparation of liposomes is maintaining a stable formulation, therefore the aim of our study was to increase liposomal stability by addition of DDAB to give an electrostatic stability and PEG-DSPE to increase stability by steric hindrance, yielding what we called an electrosteric stealth (ESS) liposomes. A medium nano-sized liposome (478 ± 4.94 nm) with a nearly neutral zeta potential (ZP, -8 ± 0.2 mV) and an entrapment efficiency percentage of 48 ± 6.22 was prepared. Stability studies showed no major alteration after three months storage period concerning particle size, polydispersity index, ZP, entrapment efficiency and in vitro release study confirming the successful formation of a stable liposomes. No histopathological alteration was recorded for ESS liposomes of the sheep nasal mucosa. While ESS liposomes showed higher % of drug permeating through the sheep nasal mucosa (48.6%) than the drug solution (28.7%). On completing the in vivo pharmacokinetic studies of 36 rabbits showed 424.2% relative bioavailability of the mean plasma levels of the formula ESS compared to that of RHT intranasal solution and 486% relative bioavailability of the mean brain levels.

  4. Antimicrobial, antiparasitic and anticancer properties of Hibiscus sabdariffa (L.) and its phytochemicals: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, Sherif T S; Berchová, Kateřina; Šudomová, Miroslava

    In the last few decades, Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae; H. sabdariffa) has gained much attention in research field because of its potentially useful bioactivity as well as a great safety and tolerability. For decades, microbial, parasitic and cancer diseases remain a serious threat to human health and animals as well. To treat such diseases, a search for new sources such as plants that provide various bioactive compounds useful in the treatment of several physiological conditions is urgently needed, since most of the drugs currently used in the therapy have several undesirable side effects, toxicity, and drug resistance. In this paper, we aim to present an updated overview of in vitro and in vivo studies that show the significant therapeutic properties of the crude extracts and phytochemicals derived from H. sabdariffa as antimicrobial, antiparasitic, and anticancer agents. The future directions of the use of H. sabdariffa in clinical trials will be discussed. Hibiscus sabdariffa L. antimicrobial agents cancer preventive agents antiparasitic drugs natural products.

  5. Titanium Implant Impairment and Surrounding Muscle Cell Death Following High-Salt Diet: An In Vivo Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu Lecocq

    Full Text Available High-salt consumption has been widely described as a risk factor for cardiovascular, renal and bone functions. In the present study, the extent to which high-salt diet could influence Ti6Al4V implant surface characteristic, its adhesion to rat tibial crest, and could modify muscle cell viability of two surrounding muscles, was investigated in vivo. These parameters have also been assessed following a NMES (neuro-myoelectrostimulation program similar to that currently used in human care following arthroplasty.After a three-week diet, a harmful effect on titanium implant surface and muscle cell viability was noted. This is probably due to salt corrosive effect on metal and then release of toxic substance around biologic tissue. Moreover, if the use of NMES with high-salt diet induced muscles damages, the latter were higher when implant was added. Unexpectedly, higher implant-to-bone adhesion was found for implanted animals receiving salt supplementation.Our in vivo study highlights the potential dangerous effect of high-salt diet in arthroplasty based on titanium prosthesis. This effect appears to be more important when high-salt diet is combined with NMES.

  6. X-ray PIV measurement of blood flow in deep vessels of a rat: An in vivo feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hanwook; Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-18

    X-ray PIV measurement is a noninvasive approach to measure opaque blood flows. However, it is not easy to measure real pulsatile blood flows in the blood vessels located at deep position of the body, because the surrounding tissues significantly attenuate the contrast of X-ray images. This study investigated the effect of surrounding tissues on X-ray beam attenuation by measuring the velocity fields of blood flows in deep vessels of a live rat. The decrease in image contrast was minimized by employing biocompatible CO2 microbubbles as tracer particles. The maximum measurable velocity of blood flows in the abdominal aorta of a rat model was found through comparative examination between the PIV measurement accuracy and the level of image contrast according to the input flow rate. Furthermore, the feasibility of using X-ray PIV to accurately measure in vivo blood flows was demonstrated by determining the velocity field of blood flows in the inferior vena cava of a rat. This study may serve as a reference in conducting in vivo X-ray PIV measurements of pulsatile blood flows in animal disease models and investigating hemodynamic characteristics and circulatory vascular diseases.

  7. Reproducibility of preclinical animal research improves with heterogeneity of study samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Lucile; Sena, Emily S.; Würbel, Hanno

    2018-01-01

    Single-laboratory studies conducted under highly standardized conditions are the gold standard in preclinical animal research. Using simulations based on 440 preclinical studies across 13 different interventions in animal models of stroke, myocardial infarction, and breast cancer, we compared the accuracy of effect size estimates between single-laboratory and multi-laboratory study designs. Single-laboratory studies generally failed to predict effect size accurately, and larger sample sizes rendered effect size estimates even less accurate. By contrast, multi-laboratory designs including as few as 2 to 4 laboratories increased coverage probability by up to 42 percentage points without a need for larger sample sizes. These findings demonstrate that within-study standardization is a major cause of poor reproducibility. More representative study samples are required to improve the external validity and reproducibility of preclinical animal research and to prevent wasting animals and resources for inconclusive research. PMID:29470495

  8. GABAergic Mechanisms in Schizophrenia : Linking Postmortem and In Vivo Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Jeroen C; Vinkers, Christiaan H; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Marsman, Anouk

    2017-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a psychiatric disorder characterized by hallucinations, delusions, disorganized thinking, and impairments in cognitive functioning. Evidence from postmortem studies suggests that alterations in cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAergic) neurons contribute to the clinical features of

  9. The influence of thiazolidinediones on adipogenesis in vitro and in vivo: potential modifiers of intramuscular adipose tissue deposition in meat animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausman, G J; Poulos, S P; Pringle, T D; Azain, M J

    2008-04-01

    Thiazolidinediones (TZD) are insulin sensitizing agents currently used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes and are widely used as adipogenic agents because they are ligands of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a key adipogenic transcription factor. In vivo and in vitro studies of TZD as potential modifiers of intramuscular or marbling adipogenesis are reviewed. Thiazolidinedione-induced adipogenesis has been reported in numerous cell culture systems, including rodent, human, bovine, and porcine adipose tissue stromal-vascular (S-V) cell cultures. Studies of porcine S-V cell cultures derived from semitendinosus muscle show that TZD can potentially modify intramuscular or marbling adipogenesis. Preadipocyte recruitment was TZD-dependent in muscle S-V cultures but TZD-independent in adipose S-V cultures. There appear to be differences between adipocytes in muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue, reminiscent of differences observed in adipocytes from different adipose tissue depots. Troglitazone, a TZD, induces marbling adipogenesis without inhibiting myogenesis when cells are grown on laminin precoated culture dishes. Additionally, troglitazone treatment does not increase lipid content in porcine adipose tissue or muscle S-V cell cultures. Thiazolidinedione treatment increases lipid content of muscle in rodents and humans; however, rosiglitazone treatment for 49 d in pigs did not influence muscle lipid content and meat quality, but several significant changes in muscle fatty acid composition were observed. Although timing of treatment with TZD needs to be optimized, evidence suggests these compounds may enhance marbling deposition in swine.

  10. Cytogenetical evaluation of a new animal model for radiobiological studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasazzi, N.; Taja, M.R.; Nagle, C.; Gimenez, J.C.

    1992-01-01

    The response of a New World monkey species (Cebus apella paraguayanus) lymphocytes to various doses of 60 Co gamma-rays has been studied using dicentrics + rings frequency in first mitosis and compared to that of man. Results have shown that differences between both species are no significant. The distribution of 200 breakpoints in G-banded metaphases has been scored showing an excess of breaks in chromosomes 1, 11, 12 and 16. Terminal heterochromatin blocks differ from intercalar heterochromatin in the response to gamma radiation being the former more affected. (author)

  11. Cytogenetical evaluation of a new animal model for radiobiological studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasazzi, N.; Taja, M.R. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Nagle, C. [Centro de Educacion Medica e Investigaciones Clinicas, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Gimenez, J.C. [Comision Nacional de Energia Atomica, Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    1992-07-01

    The response of a New World monkey species (Cebus apella paraguayanus) lymphocytes to various doses of 60 Co gamma-rays has been studied using dicentrics + rings frequency in first mitosis and compared to that of man. Results have shown that differences between both species are no significant. The distribution of 200 breakpoints in G-banded metaphases has been scored showing an excess of breaks in chromosomes 1, 11, 12 and 16. Terminal heterochromatin blocks differ from intercalar heterochromatin in the response to gamma radiation being the former more affected. (author)

  12. In vivo and in vitro studies of cartilage differentiation in altered gravities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montufar-Solis, D.; Duke, P. J.; D'Aunno, D.

    The in vivo model our laboratory uses for studies of cartilage differentiation in space is the rat growth plate. Differences between missions, and in rat age and recovery times, provided differing results from each mission. However, in all missions, proliferation and differentiation of chondrocytes in the epiphyseal plate of spaceflown rats was altered as was matrix organization. In vitro systems, necessary complements to in vivo work, provide some advantages over the in vivo situation. In vitro, centrifugation of embryonic limb buds suppressed morphogenesis due to precocious differentiation, and changes in the developmental pattern suggest the involvement of Hox genes. In space, embryonic mouse limb mesenchyme cells differentiating in vitro on IML-1 had smoother membranes and lacked matrix seen in controls. Unusual formations, possibly highly ruffled membranes, were found in flight cultures. These results, coupled with in vivo centrifugation studies, show that in vivo or in vitro, the response of chondrocytes to gravitational changes follows Hert's curve as modified by Simon, i.e. decreased loading decreases differentiation, and increased loading speeds it up, but only to a point. After that, additional increases again slow down chondrogenesis.

  13. Experimental animal study of a novel radiofrequency endovascular occlusion device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharoulis, Dimitris; Lazoura, Olga; Rountas, Christos; Katsimboulas, Michael; Mantzianas, George; Tzovaras, George; Habib, Nagy

    2011-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a radiofrequency (RF) endovascular occlusion device (ie, Habib VesCoag Catheter; EMcision Ltd, London, UK) and to evaluate safety and efficacy of the device for complete occlusion of normal porcine vessels. The study included 20 pigs. In each pig, a segmental branch of the right hepatic artery, a branch of the splenic artery, and a branch of one of the renal arteries were catheterized. A single or multiple applications of RF energy were performed until vessel occlusion was achieved. Fifteen days later, angiography was repeated to assess vessel patency. The vessels were then excised for pathological analysis. Vessels 2.5 to 6 mm in diameter were treated. Complete occlusion with a single attempt was achieved using a mean amount of energy of 110.67 J in vessels 2.5 to 3 mm, 111.67 J in vessels 3.5 to 4 mm, and 116.63 J in vessels 5 to 6 mm in diameter and was confirmed by angiography at the 15-day follow-up. Vascular occlusion can be effectively and safely achieved by endovascular application of RF energy to normal porcine arteries using the Habib VesCoag catheter. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epidemiology of Animal Bites in Azarshahr town: A Cross-sectional Study of Key Determinants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Jafari-Khounigh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ​Background and objectives : Animal bites are among the most significant public health problems due to the risk of rabies. Because of high mortality rate and economic damages, rabies is of very importance. This study was conducted to investigate the epidemiology of animal bites in Azarshahr in 2010 and 2011. Material and Methods : In this cross-sectional and descriptive-analytical study, all cases of animal bites in 2010 and 2011 that were recorded in rabies treatment centers of Azarshahr were included in the study using census method according to the existing data recorded in animal bites registry. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and Chi-square test using SPSS software. Results : During 2010 and 2011, a total number of 630 animal bites cases occurred that 86.5% of the cases were male. In 51.7% of the cases, animal bites occurred in urban areas. The incidence rate of animal bites was calculated as 291.0 in 100000. The average age and the standard deviation of cases was 31.52±16.73. The main biting animal was domesticated dog (66.3% and most of the bites happened during summer (28.4%. The most injured body organ was hand (47.6%. The association between animal type and injured organ was statistically significant (P Conclusion : Due to the high costs of vaccination and immunoglobulin expenses, prevention strategies seem to be necessary. Since most of the bites were caused by domestic dogs, health education interventions with the aim of more controls on domestic animals could be a cost-effective approach.

  15. Evaluation of an animation tool developed to supplement dental student study of the cranial nerves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, M; McKenna, J P; Cryan, J F; Vagg, T; Toulouse, A; Downer, E J

    2017-12-30

    The structure/function of the cranial nerves is a core topic for dental students. However, due to the perceived complexity of the subject, it is often difficult for students to develop a comprehensive understanding of key concepts using textbooks and models. It is accepted that the acquisition of anatomical knowledge can be facilitated by visualisation of structures. This study aimed to develop and assess a novel cranial nerve animation as a supplemental learning aid for dental students. A multidisciplinary team of anatomists, neuroscientists and a computer scientist developed a novel animation depicting the cranial nerves. The animation was viewed by newly enrolled first-year dental students, graduate entry dental students (year 1) and dental hygiene students (year 1). A simple life scenario employing the use of the cranial nerves was developed using a cartoon-type animation with a viewing time of 3.58 minutes. The animation was developed with emphasis on a life scenario. The animation was placed online for 2 weeks with open access or viewed once in a controlled laboratory setting. Questionnaires were designed to assess the participants' attitude towards the animation and their knowledge of the cranial nerves before and after visualisation. This study was performed before the delivery of core lectures on the cranial nerves. Our findings indicate that the use of the animation can act as a supplemental tool to improve student knowledge of the cranial nerves. Indeed, data indicate that a single viewing of the animation, in addition to 2-week access to the animation, can act as a supplemental learning tool to assist student understanding of the structure and function of cranial nerves. The animation significantly enhanced the student's opinion that their cranial nerve knowledge had improved. From a qualitative point of view, the students described the animation as an enjoyable and useful supplement to reading material/lectures and indicated that the animation was a

  16. Clinical, microbiological, and experimental animal studies of Candida lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, T J; Salkin, I F; Dixon, D M; Hurd, N J

    1989-01-01

    Candida lipolytica was recovered from six patients in three different clinical centers. The index isolate caused a persistent fungemia with catheter-associated Candida thrombophlebitis, the second isolate was from a polymicrobial sinusitis, and the remaining four isolates were involved in tissue colonization. These and 20 other isolates were consistent in their morphological and physiological characteristics. All formed true hyphae and blastoconidia on cornmeal-Tween 80 agar and all assimilated glucose, glycerol, and erythritol. In a murine model of disseminated candidiasis, the index isolate that caused clinical fungemia caused no mortality and produced only two lesions on a kidney, as determined at necropsy. The nine isolates selected for in vitro antifungal susceptibility studies had intermediate susceptibilities to amphotericin B but were susceptible to ketoconazole. We conclude that C. lipolytica is a weakly virulent pathogen which may require an intravascular foreign body to cause fungemia. Images PMID:2745702

  17. Toxicology and Biodistribution: The Clinical Value of Animal Biodistribution Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Silva Lima

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Since the human genome decoding, understanding and identification of genetic disturbances behind many diseases, including cancer, are intensively increasing. Scientific and technological advances in this area trigger the search for therapeutic (curative approaches targeting the correction of gene disturbances. Gene therapy medicinal products (GTMPs emerge in this context, bringing new challenges for their characterization. Compared to small molecules, biodistribution is fundamental to identifying target organs and anticipating safety and efficacy, may be integrated into safety and pharmacology studies, and may eventually be anticipated based on specificities of vectors and constructs. This review describes and discusses the requirements for nonclinical development and evaluation of GTMPs versus conventional ones and the needs and challenges of constructing nonclinical packages that assure GTMPs’ human safety from early development, taking into consideration usefulness and/or limitations of many conventional, preclinical models. The experience gained in the European context is referenced.

  18. In vivo studies of transdermal nanoparticle delivery with microneedles using photoacoustic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moothanchery, Mohesh; Seeni, Razina Z.; Xu, Chenjie; Pramanik, Manojit

    2017-01-01

    Microneedle technology allows micron-sized conduits to be formed within the outermost skin layers for both localized and systemic delivery of therapeutics including nanoparticles. Histological methods are often employed for characterization, and unfortunately do not allow for the in vivo visualization of the delivery process. This study presents the utilization of optical resolution-photoacoustic microscopy to characterize the transdermal delivery of nanoparticles using microneedles. Specifically, we observe the in vivo transdermal delivery of gold nanoparticles using microneedles in mice ear and study the penetration, diffusion, and spatial distribution of the nanoparticles in the tissue. The promising results reveal that photoacoustic microscopy can be used as a potential imaging modality for the in vivo characterization of microneedles based drug delivery. PMID:29296482

  19. Osseoconductivity of a Specific Streptavidin-Biotin-Fibronectin Surface Coating of Biotinylated Titanium Implants - A Rabbit Animal Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kämmerer, Peer W; Lehnert, Michael; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Kumar, Vinay V; Hagmann, Sebastien; Alshihri, Abdulmonem; Frerich, Bernhard; Veith, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Biofunctionalized implant surfaces may accelerate bony integration and increase long-term stability. The aim of the study was to evaluate the osseous reaction toward biomimetic titanium implants surfaces coated with quasicovalent immobilized fibronectin in an in vivo animal model. A total of 84 implants (uncoated [control 1, n = 36], streptavidin-biotin coated [test 1, n = 24], streptavidin-biotin-fibronectin coated [test 2, n = 24]) were inserted 1 mm supracortically in the proximal tibia of 12 rabbits. The samples were examined after 3 and 6 weeks. Total bone-implant contact (tBIC; %), bone-implant contact in the cortical (cBIC; %) and in the spongious bone (sBIC; %) as well as the percentage of linear bone fill (PLF; %) were evaluated. After 3 weeks, streptavidin-biotin-fibronectin implants had a significant higher sBIC (p = .043) and PLF (p = .007) compared with the uncoated samples. After 6 weeks, this difference was significant for tBIC (p = .016) and cBIC (p biotin-coated implants showed less bone growth at both time points of all examined parameters when compared with their counterparts (all p biotin-fibronectin system on smooth surface titanium shows a beneficial faster osseous healing in vivo. Besides, an antifouling effect of the streptavidin-biotin coating was proven. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Productively infected murine Kaposi's sarcoma-like tumors define new animal models for studying and targeting KSHV oncogenesis and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brittany M Ashlock

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma (KS is an AIDS-defining cancer caused by the KS-associated herpesvirus (KSHV. KS tumors are composed of KSHV-infected spindle cells of vascular origin with aberrant neovascularization and erythrocyte extravasation. KSHV genes expressed during both latent and lytic replicative cycles play important roles in viral oncogenesis. Animal models able to recapitulate both viral and host biological characteristics of KS are needed to elucidate oncogenic mechanisms, for developing targeted therapies, and to trace cellular components of KS ontogeny. Herein, we describe two new murine models of Kaposi's sarcoma. We found that murine bone marrow-derived cells, whether established in culture or isolated from fresh murine bone marrow, were infectable with rKSHV.219, formed KS-like tumors in immunocompromised mice and produced mature herpesvirus-like virions in vivo. Further, we show in vivo that the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA/Vorinostat enhanced viral lytic reactivation. We propose that these novel models are ideal for studying both viral and host contributions to KSHV-induced oncogenesis as well as for testing virally-targeted antitumor strategies for the treatment of Kaposi's sarcoma. Furthermore, our isolation of bone marrow-derived cell populations containing a cell type that, when infected with KSHV, renders a tumorigenic KS-like spindle cell, should facilitate systematic identification of KS progenitor cells.

  1. Studies on the red absorption band of chlorophyll a in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, J.B.; Kleinen Hammans, J.W.; Arnolds, W.J.

    1965-01-01

    It was studied whether certain earlier observed weak shoulders on the red absorption band of chlorophyll a in vivo might represent anomalies due to overlap of absorption bands. The results are suggested of the fact that no such anomalies occur. It is therefore concluded that the present study

  2. Simulating clinical studies of the glucoregulatory system: in vivo meets in silico

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wendt, Sabrina Lyngbye; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Møller, Jan Kloppenborg

    metabolism at varying ambient insulin levels. The report compares in vivo and in silico results head-to-head, and discusses similarities and differences. We design and simulate simple studies to emphasize the implications of some glucoregulatory dynamics which are ignored in most previous clinical studies...

  3. Critical considerations when planning experimental in vivo studies in dental traumatology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens O; Andersson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In vivo studies are sometimes needed to understand healing processes after trauma. For several reasons, not the least ethical, such studies have to be carefully planned and important considerations have to be taken into account about suitability of the experimental model, sample size and optimizing...

  4. Fluid Reading Practice: On the Queer Potential of Studying Nonhuman Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sari Irni

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper contributes to recent discussions about the relevance of the natural sciences and nonhuman animals in feminist theory by drawing from feminist debates on the queer potential of studying nonhuman animals. The paper discusses readings on the intertwining of scientific accounts of nonhuman animals and politics; how different nonhuman animal bodies have enabled various conceptualisations of sex and physical intimacy and have been enmeshed in the politics of sex; and how to read the relevance of accounts of the diversity of nonhuman animal sex(es for feminist endeavours. These discussions contribute to an exploration of ‘fluid reading’, a feminist reading practice which draws inspiration from and moves with both new materialisms and poststructuralisms. The paper proposes that not only mood is important in feminist reading practices but also movements and flows.

  5. Fluconazole and testosterone: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanger, D P; Jevons, S; Shaw, J T

    1988-05-01

    Fluconazole (UK-49,858), a novel bis-triazole antifungal agent, was given orally to groups of 10 male volunteers at doses of 25 and 50 mg/day for 28 days. Blood samples for testosterone estimation were taken from these and from a placebo group at several time points on days 1, 14, and 28 of the study, and the assay results demonstrated that the compound had no significant effect on circulating testosterone levels. Similarly, in studies with rat Leydig cells in vitro, fluconazole at concentrations up to 10 micrograms/ml was found to be only a weak inhibitor of testosterone production, whereas ketoconazole caused more than 50% inhibition at 0.1 microgram/ml. It is concluded that fluconazole, in contrast to ketoconazole, has little effect on the biosynthesis of testosterone by mammalian cells.

  6. In-vivo studies of reflectance pulse oximeter sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jian; Takatani, Setsuo; Noon, George P.; Nose, Yukihiko

    1993-08-01

    Reflectance oximetry can offer an advantage of being applicable to any portion of the body. However, the major problem of reflectance oximetry is low pulsatile signal level which prevents prolonged clinical application during extreme situations, such as hypothermia and vasoconstriction. In order to improve the pulsatile signal level of reflectance pulse oximeter and thus its accuracy, three different sensors, with the separation distances (SPD) between light emitting diode (LED) and photodiode being 3, 5, and 7 mm respectively, were studied on nine healthy volunteers. With the increase of the SPD, it was found that both the red (660 nm) and near-infrared (830 nm) pulsatile to average signal ratio (AC/DC) increased, and the standard deviations of (AC/DC)red/(AC/DC)infrared ratio decreased, in spite of the decrease of the absolute signal level. Further clinical studies of 3 mm and 7 mm SPD sensors on seven patients also showed that the (AC/DC)red/(AC/DC)infrared ratio measured by the 7 mm sensor were less disturbed than the 3 mm sensor during the surgery. A theoretical study based on the three-dimensional photon diffusion theory supports the experimental and clinical results. As a conclusion, the 7 mm sensor has the highest signal-to- noise ratio among three different sensors. A new 7 mm SPD reflectance sensor, with the increased number of LEDs around the photodiode, was designed to increase the AC/DC ratio, as well as to increase the absolute signal level.

  7. IN-VIVO DIAGNOSIS OF CHEMICALLY INDUCED MELANOMA IN AN ANIMAL MODEL USING UV-VISIBLE AND NIR ELASTIC SCATTERING SPECTROSCOPY: PRELIMINARY TESTING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C. A' AMAR; R. LEY; ET AL

    2001-01-01

    Elastic light scattering spectroscopy (ESS) has the potential to provide spectra that contain both morphological and chromophore information from tissue. We report on a preliminary study of this technique, with the hope of developing a method for diagnosis of highly-pigmented skin lesions, commonly associated with skin cancer. Four opossums were treated with dimethylbenz(a)anthracene to induce both malignant melanoma and benign pigmented lesions. Skin lesions were examined in vivo using both UV-visible and near infrared (NIR) ESS, with wavelength ranges of 330-900 nm and 900-1700 nm, respectively. Both portable systems used identical fiber-optic probe geometry throughout all of the measurements. The core diameters for illuminating and collecting fibers were 400 and 200 {micro}m, respectively, with center-to-center separation of 350 {micro}m. The probe was placed in optical contact with the tissue under investigation. Biopsies from lesions were analyzed by two standard histopathological procedures. Taking into account only the biopsied lesions, UV-visible ESS showed distinct spectral correlation for 11/13 lesions. The NIR-ESS correlated well with 12/13 lesions correctly. The results of these experiments showed that UV-visible and NIR-ESS have the potential to classify benign and malignant skin lesions, with encouraging agreement to that provided by standard histopathological examination. These initial results show potential for ESS based diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions, but further trials are required in order to substantiate the technique.

  8. The Stent Patency and Migration Rate of Different Shaped Plastic Stents in Bile Flow Phantom Model and In Vivo Animal Bile Duct Dilation Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Chang-Il; Kim, Gwangil; Jeong, Seok; Lee, Don Haeng; Kim, Kyoung Ah; Ko, Kwang Hyun; Cho, Joo Young; Hong, Sung Pyo

    2017-05-01

    In research and development of biliary plastic stents (PS), continuous efforts have been made to overcome short patency time and high rate of migration. The aim of this study was to evaluate the patency and migration rate of different PS shapes for a given period of time. Using an in vitro bile phantom model, we compared the patency among different shapes of PS (three straight PS, four double-pigtail PS, and a new screw-shaped PS). We performed an analysis of the degree of luminal narrowing by light microscopic examination. Using an in vivo swine model, we compared the patency and migration rate among the three different types of PS. Eight weeks after the bile exposure in the bile flow phantom model, 80 PS were retrieved and analyzed. The straight PS showed less biofilm formation and luminal narrowing than other types of PS (p stent migration occurred less frequently in the double-pigtail PS and the screw-shaped PS than it did in the straight PS (11.1, 10, and 27.3%, respectively). However, there was no statistical difference in stent patency among the different shapes. Stent patency may not be significantly different depending on the shape of PS for 8 weeks. The screw-shaped PS showed similar patency and migration rate to the double-pigtail PS. These results may help guiding future PS development and clinical decisions.

  9. Eating frequency, food intake, and weight: a systematic review of human and animal experimental studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hollie eRaynor

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Eating frequently during the day, or grazing, has been proposed to assist with managing food intake and weight. This systematic review assessed the effect of greater eating frequency (EF on intake and anthropometrics in human and animal experimental studies. Studies were identified through the PubMed electronic database. To be included, studies needed to be conducted in controlled settings or use methods that carefully monitored food intake, and measure food intake or anthropometrics. Studies using human or animal models of disease states (i.e., conditions influencing glucose or lipid metabolism, aside from being overweight or obese, were not included. The 25 reviewed studies (15 human and 10 animal studies contained varying study designs, EF manipulations (1 to 24 eating occasions per day, lengths of experimentation (230 min to 28 weeks, and sample sizes (3 to 56 participants/animals per condition. Studies were organized into four categories for reporting results: 1 human studies conducted in laboratory/metabolic ward settings; 2 human studies conducted in field settings; 3 animal studies with experimental periods 1 month. Out of the 13 studies reporting on consumption, 8 (61.5% found no significant effect of EF. Seventeen studies reported on anthropometrics, with 11 studies (64.7% finding no significant effect of EF. Future, adequately powered, studies should examine if other factors (i.e., disease states, physical activity, energy balance and weight status, long-term increased EF influence the relationship between increased EF and intake and/or anthropometrics.

  10. High-resolution ex vivo magnetic resonance angiography: a feasibility study on biological and medical tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boel Lene WT

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In biomedical sciences, ex vivo angiography is a practical mean to elucidate vascular structures three-dimensionally with simultaneous estimation of intravascular volume. The objectives of this study were to develop a magnetic resonance (MR method for ex vivo angiography and to compare the findings with computed tomography (CT. To demonstrate the usefulness of this method, examples are provided from four different tissues and species: the human placenta, a rice field eel, a porcine heart and a turtle. Results The optimal solution for ex vivo MR angiography (MRA was a compound containing gelatine (0.05 g/mL, the CT contrast agent barium sulphate (0.43 mol/L and the MR contrast agent gadoteric acid (2.5 mmol/L. It was possible to perform angiography on all specimens. We found that ex vivo MRA could only be performed on fresh tissue because formalin fixation makes the blood vessels permeable to the MR contrast agent. Conclusions Ex vivo MRA provides high-resolution images of fresh tissue and delineates fine structures that we were unable to visualise by CT. We found that MRA provided detailed information similar to or better than conventional CTA in its ability to visualize vessel configuration while avoiding interfering signals from adjacent bones. Interestingly, we found that vascular tissue becomes leaky when formalin-fixed, leading to increased permeability and extravascular leakage of MR contrast agent.

  11. In Vivo Study of Dynamics and Stability of Dendritic Spines on Olfactory Bulb Interneurons in Xenopus laevis Tadpoles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Bin Huang

    Full Text Available Dendritic spines undergo continuous remodeling during development of the nervous system. Their stability is essential for maintaining a functional neuronal circuit. Spine dynamics and stability of cortical excitatory pyramidal neurons have been explored extensively in mammalian animal models. However, little is known about spiny interneurons in non-mammalian vertebrate models. In the present study, neuronal morphology was visualized by single-cell electroporation. Spiny neurons were surveyed in the Xenopus tadpole brain and observed to be widely distributed in the olfactory bulb and telencephalon. DsRed- or PSD95-GFP-expressing spiny interneurons in the olfactory bulb were selected for in vivo time-lapse imaging. Dendritic protrusions were classified as filopodia, thin, stubby, or mushroom spines based on morphology. Dendritic spines on the interneurons were highly dynamic, especially the filopodia and thin spines. The stubby and mushroom spines were relatively more stable, although their stability significantly decreased with longer observation intervals. The 4 spine types exhibited diverse preferences during morphological transitions from one spine type to others. Sensory deprivation induced by severing the olfactory nerve to block the input of mitral/tufted cells had no significant effects on interneuron spine stability. Hence, a new model was established in Xenopus laevis tadpoles to explore dendritic spine dynamics in vivo.

  12. A Salmonella Typhimurium-Typhi genomic chimera: a model to study Vi polysaccharide capsule function in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela M Jansen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The Vi capsular polysaccharide is a virulence-associated factor expressed by Salmonella enterica serotype Typhi but absent from virtually all other Salmonella serotypes. In order to study this determinant in vivo, we characterised a Vi-positive S. Typhimurium (C5.507 Vi(+, harbouring the Salmonella pathogenicity island (SPI-7, which encodes the Vi locus. S. Typhimurium C5.507 Vi(+ colonised and persisted in mice at similar levels compared to the parent strain, S. Typhimurium C5. However, the innate immune response to infection with C5.507 Vi(+ and SGB1, an isogenic derivative not expressing Vi, differed markedly. Infection with C5.507 Vi(+ resulted in a significant reduction in cellular trafficking of innate immune cells, including PMN and NK cells, compared to SGB1 Vi(- infected animals. C5.507 Vi(+ infection stimulated reduced numbers of TNF-α, MIP-2 and perforin producing cells compared to SGB1 Vi(-. The modulating effect associated with Vi was not observed in MyD88(-/- and was reduced in TLR4(-/- mice. The presence of the Vi capsule also correlated with induction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 in vivo, a factor that impacted on chemotaxis and the activation of immune cells in vitro.

  13. Review of Russian language studies on radionuclide behaviour in agricultural animals: biological half-lives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fesenko, S.; Isamov, N.; Barnett, C.L.; Beresford, N.A.; Howard, B.J.; Sanzharova, N.; Fesenko, E.

    2015-01-01

    Extensive studies on transfer of radionuclides to animals were carried out in the USSR from the 1950s. Few of these studies were published in the international refereed literature or taken into account in international reviews. This paper continues a series of reviews of Russian language literature on radionuclide transfer to animals, providing information on biological half-lives of radionuclides in various animal tissues. The data are compared, where possible, with those reported in other countries. The data are normally quantified using a single or double exponential accounting for different proportions of the loss. For some products, such as milk, biological half-lives tend to be rapid at 1–3 d for most radionuclides and largely described by a single exponential. However, for other animal products biological half-lives can vary widely as they are influenced by many factors such as the age and size of the animal. Experimental protocols, such as the duration of the study, radionuclide administration and/or sample collection protocol also influence the value of biological half-lives estimated. - Highlights: • The data on biological half-lives from Russian language literature were reviewed. • Radionuclides with the shortest half-lives in animals are those which accumulate in soft tissues. • Short term behaviour is affected by the form in which radionuclides are administered. • There is a tendency for more rapid radionuclide turnover in younger animals

  14. Fermentation of animal components in strict carnivores: a comparative study with cheetah fecal inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depauw, S; Bosch, G; Hesta, M; Whitehouse-Tedd, K; Hendriks, W H; Kaandorp, J; Janssens, G P J

    2012-08-01

    The natural diet of felids contains highly digestible animal tissues but also fractions resistant to small intestinal digestion, which enter the large intestine where they may be fermented by the resident microbial population. Little information exists on the microbial degradability of animal tissues in the large intestine of felids consuming a natural diet. This study aimed to rank animal substrates in their microbial degradability by means of an in vitro study using captive cheetahs fed a strict carnivorous diet as fecal donors. Fresh cheetah fecal samples were collected, pooled, and incubated with various raw animal substrates (chicken cartilage, collagen, glucosamine-chondroitin, glucosamine, rabbit bone, rabbit hair, and rabbit skin; 4 replicates per substrate) for cumulative gas production measurement in a batch culture technique. Negative (cellulose) and positive (casein and fructo-oligosaccharides; FOS) controls were incorporated in the study. Additionally, after 72 h of incubation, short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), including branched-chain fatty acids (BCFA), and ammonia concentrations were determined for each substrate. Glucosamine and glucosamine-chondroitin yielded the greatest organic matter cumulative gas volume (OMCV) among animal substrates (P carnivore, and indicates that animal tissues have potentially similar functions as soluble or insoluble plant fibers in vitro. Further research is warranted to assess the impact of fermentation of each type of animal tissue on gastro-intestinal function and health in the cheetah and other felid species.

  15. Factors that Influence Intake to One Municipal Animal Control Facility in Florida: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry Spencer

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This qualitative study identified a study area by visualizing one year of animal intake from a municipal animal shelter on geographic information systems (GIS maps to select an area of high stray-dog intake to investigate. Researchers conducted semi-structured interviews with residents of the selected study area to elucidate why there were high numbers of stray dogs coming from this location. Using grounded theory, three themes emerged from the interviews: concerns, attitudes, and disparities. The residents expressed concerns about animal welfare, personal safety, money, and health. They held various attitudes toward domestic animals in the community, including viewing them as pets, pests, or useful commodities (products. Residents expressed acceptance as well as some anger and fear about the situation in their community. Interviewees revealed they faced multiple socioeconomic disparities related to poverty. Pet abandonment can result when pet owners must prioritize human needs over animal needs, leading to increased shelter intake of stray dogs. Community-specific strategies for reducing local animal shelter intake should address the issue of pet abandonment by simultaneously targeting veterinary needs of animals, socioeconomic needs of residents, and respecting attitude differences between residents and shelter professionals.

  16. Understanding disease processes in multiple sclerosis through magnetic resonance imaging studies in animal models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeela Nathoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are exciting new advances in multiple sclerosis (MS resulting in a growing understanding of both the complexity of the disorder and the relative involvement of grey matter, white matter and inflammation. Increasing need for preclinical imaging is anticipated, as animal models provide insights into the pathophysiology of the disease. Magnetic resonance (MR is the key imaging tool used to diagnose and to monitor disease progression in MS, and thus will be a cornerstone for future research. Although gadolinium-enhancing and T2 lesions on MRI have been useful for detecting MS pathology, they are not correlative of disability. Therefore, new MRI methods are needed. Such methods require validation in animal models. The increasing necessity for MRI of animal models makes it critical and timely to understand what research has been conducted in this area and what potential there is for use of MRI in preclinical models of MS. Here, we provide a review of MRI and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS studies that have been carried out in animal models of MS that focus on pathology. We compare the MRI phenotypes of animals and patients and provide advice on how best to use animal MR studies to increase our understanding of the linkages between MR and pathology in patients. This review describes how MRI studies of animal models have been, and will continue to be, used in the ongoing effort to understand MS.

  17. Studies of DNA supercoiling in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, D.N.

    1990-10-01

    This thesis describes a number of diverse experiments whose common theme is to elaborate some aspect of DNA supercoiling. The torsion elastic constant of DNA is measure as a function of superhelix density using the technique of picosecond Time Resolved Fluorescence Polarization Anisotropy (FPA) of intercalated ethidium bromide. The results agree with theories which predict that the anisotropy decay should vary with the square root of the relative viscosity. This experiment furthermore demonstrates a sensitivity of FPA to a change in torsion elastic constant of less than 10%. A number of covalently closed DNA samples, ranging in superhelix density from = [minus]0.123 to [plus]0.042, are then examined. A novel method for measuring changes in local supercoiling on a large PNA molecule which is sensitive to changes in supercoiling of regions of chromosomal DNA as short as 1 kilobase in length is presented. Study of chromosomal supercoiling regulating anaerobic gene expression in the facultative photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus showed that no stable change in chromosomal supercoiling upon a shift from aerobic respiratory growth to anaerobic photosynthetic conditions. Studies to detect transient changes in DNA supercoiling indicate that DNA downstream from heavily transcribed genes for the photosynthetic reaction center are relaxed or perhaps overwound upon the induction of photosynthetic metabolism. These results are interpreted in terms of the twin domain model of transcriptional supercoiling.

  18. Studies of DNA supercoiling in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David Nelson [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1990-10-01

    This thesis describes a number of diverse experiments whose common theme is to elaborate some aspect of DNA supercoiling. The torsion elastic constant of DNA is measure as a function of superhelix density using the technique of picosecond Time Resolved Fluorescence Polarization Anisotropy (FPA) of intercalated ethidium bromide. The results agree with theories which predict that the anisotropy decay should vary with the square root of the relative viscosity. This experiment furthermore demonstrates a sensitivity of FPA to a change in torsion elastic constant of less than 10%. A number of covalently closed DNA samples, ranging in superhelix density from = -0.123 to +0.042, are then examined. A novel method for measuring changes in local supercoiling on a large PNA molecule which is sensitive to changes in supercoiling of regions of chromosomal DNA as short as 1 kilobase in length is presented. Study of chromosomal supercoiling regulating anaerobic gene expression in the facultative photosynthetic bacterium, Rhodobacter capsulatus showed that no stable change in chromosomal supercoiling upon a shift from aerobic respiratory growth to anaerobic photosynthetic conditions. Studies to detect transient changes in DNA supercoiling indicate that DNA downstream from heavily transcribed genes for the photosynthetic reaction center are relaxed or perhaps overwound upon the induction of photosynthetic metabolism. These results are interpreted in terms of the twin domain model of transcriptional supercoiling.

  19. A multiplexable TALE-based binary expression system for in vivo cellular interaction studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toegel, Markus; Azzam, Ghows; Lee, Eunice Y; Knapp, David J H F; Tan, Ying; Fa, Ming; Fulga, Tudor A

    2017-11-21

    Binary expression systems have revolutionised genetic research by enabling delivery of loss-of-function and gain-of-function transgenes with precise spatial-temporal resolution in vivo. However, at present, each existing platform relies on a defined exogenous transcription activator capable of binding a unique recognition sequence. Consequently, none of these technologies alone can be used to simultaneously target different tissues or cell types in the same organism. Here, we report a modular system based on programmable transcription activator-like effector (TALE) proteins, which enables parallel expression of multiple transgenes in spatially distinct tissues in vivo. Using endogenous enhancers coupled to TALE drivers, we demonstrate multiplexed orthogonal activation of several transgenes carrying cognate variable activating sequences (VAS) in distinct neighbouring cell types of the Drosophila central nervous system. Since the number of combinatorial TALE-VAS pairs is virtually unlimited, this platform provides an experimental framework for highly complex genetic manipulation studies in vivo.

  20. In vitro and in vivo suppository studies with perturbed angular correlation and external scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jay, M.; Beihn, R.M.; Snyder, G.A.; McClanahan, J.S.; Digenis, G.A.; Caldwell, L.; Mlodozeniec, A.

    1983-01-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in the rectal delivery of drugs as an alternative to parenteral administration. Because of their complexity, little is known about the release behavior of drugs from suppositories in vivo, and the universal applicability of most in vitro tests developed to date awaits broad acceptance. A novel technique has recently been utilized for the measurement of both in vitro and in vivo dissolution profiles of solid oral dosage forms. This technique, known as perturbed angular correlation (PAC), utilizes the property of cascading decay exhibited by indium-111. The authors now wish to report on the application of this technique for in vitro studies measuring the dissolution of an [ 111 In]salicylate coprecipitate incorporated in a suppository base. The PAC technique was also used in combination with external scintigraphic techniques for the in vivo measurement of the deformation and liquefaction of a suppository containing 111 In in humans in a totally non-invasive manner. (Auth.)

  1. In vitro and in vivo suppository studies with perturbed angular correlation and external scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay, M.; Beihn, R.M.; Snyder, G.A.; McClanahan, J.S.; Digenis, G.A. (Kentucky Univ., Lexington (USA). College of Pharmacy and Medicine); Caldwell, L.; Mlodozeniec, A. (INTER Research Corporation, Lawrence, KS (USA). Merck, Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories)

    1983-04-01

    Recently, there has been an increased interest in the rectal delivery of drugs as an alternative to parenteral administration. Because of their complexity, little is known about the release behavior of drugs from suppositories in vivo, and the universal applicability of most in vitro tests developed to date awaits broad acceptance. A novel technique has recently been utilized for the measurement of both in vitro and in vivo dissolution profiles of solid oral dosage forms. This technique, known as perturbed angular correlation (PAC), utilizes the property of cascading decay exhibited by indium-111. The authors now wish to report on the application of this technique for in vitro studies measuring the dissolution of an (/sup 111/In)salicylate coprecipitate incorporated in a suppository base. The PAC technique was also used in combination with external scintigraphic techniques for the in vivo measurement of the deformation and liquefaction of a suppository containing /sup 111/In in humans in a totally non-invasive manner.

  2. HEK293 cell culture media study towards bioprocess optimization: Animal derived component free and animal derived component containing platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liste-Calleja, Leticia; Lecina, Martí; Cairó, Jordi Joan

    2014-04-01

    The increasing demand for biopharmaceuticals produced in mammalian cells has lead industries to enhance bioprocess volumetric productivity through different strategies. Among those strategies, cell culture media development is of major interest. In the present work, several commercially available culture media for Human Embryonic Kidney cells (HEK293) were evaluated in terms of maximal specific growth rate and maximal viable cell concentration supported. The main objective was to provide different cell culture platforms which are suitable for a wide range of applications depending on the type and the final use of the product obtained. Performing simple media supplementations with and without animal derived components, an enhancement of cell concentration from 2 × 10(6) cell/mL to 17 × 10(6) cell/mL was achieved in batch mode operation. Additionally, the media were evaluated for adenovirus production as a specific application case of HEK293 cells. None of the supplements interfered significantly with the adenovirus infection although some differences were encountered in viral productivity. To the best of our knowledge, the high cell density achieved in the work presented has never been reported before in HEK293 batch cell cultures and thus, our results are greatly promising to further study cell culture strategies in bioreactor towards bioprocess optimization. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Use of scanner characteristics in iterative image reconstruction for high-resolution positron emission tomography studies of small animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brix, G. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Doll, J. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Bellemann, M.E. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Trojan, H. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Haberkorn, U. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Schmidlin, P. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Ostertag, H. [Research Program ``Radiological Diagnostics and Therapy``, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany)

    1997-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve of the spatial resolution of a whole-body PET system for experimental studies of small animals by incorporation of scanner characteristics into the process of iterative image reconstruction. The image-forming characteristics of the PET camera were characterized by a spatially variant line-spread function (LSF), which was determined from 49 activated copper-64 line sources positioned over a field of view (FOV) of 21.0 cm. During the course of iterative image reconstruction, the forward projection of the estimated image was blurred with the LSF at each iteration step before the estimated projections were compared with the measured projections. Moreover, imaging studies of a rat and two nude mice were performed to evaluate the imaging properties of our approach in vivo. The spatial resolution of the scanner perpendicular to the direction of projection could be approximated by a one-dimensional Gaussian-shaped LSF with a full-width at half-maximum increasing from 6.5 mm at the centre to 6.7 mm at a radial distance of 10.5 cm. The incorporation of this blurring kernel into the iteration formula resulted in a significantly improved spatial resolution of about 3.9 mm over the examined FOV. As demonstrated by the phantom and the animal experiments, the high-resolution algorithm not only led to a better contrast resolution in the reconstructed emission scans but also improved the accuracy for quantitating activity concentrations in small tissue structures without leading to an amplification of image noise or image mottle. The presented data-handling strategy incorporates the image restoration step directly into the process of algebraic image reconstruction and obviates the need for ill-conditioned ``deconvolution`` procedures to be performed on the projections or on the reconstructed image. In our experience, the proposed algorithm is of special interest in experimental studies of small animals. (orig./AJ). With 9 figs.

  4. Use of scanner characteristics in iterative image reconstruction for high-resolution positron emission tomography studies of small animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brix, G.; Doll, J.; Bellemann, M.E.; Trojan, H.; Haberkorn, U.; Schmidlin, P.; Ostertag, H.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to improve of the spatial resolution of a whole-body PET system for experimental studies of small animals by incorporation of scanner characteristics into the process of iterative image reconstruction. The image-forming characteristics of the PET camera were characterized by a spatially variant line-spread function (LSF), which was determined from 49 activated copper-64 line sources positioned over a field of view (FOV) of 21.0 cm. During the course of iterative image reconstruction, the forward projection of the estimated image was blurred with the LSF at each iteration step before the estimated projections were compared with the measured projections. Moreover, imaging studies of a rat and two nude mice were performed to evaluate the imaging properties of our approach in vivo. The spatial resolution of the scanner perpendicular to the direction of projection could be approximated by a one-dimensional Gaussian-shaped LSF with a full-width at half-maximum increasing from 6.5 mm at the centre to 6.7 mm at a radial distance of 10.5 cm. The incorporation of this blurring kernel into the iteration formula resulted in a significantly improved spatial resolution of about 3.9 mm over the examined FOV. As demonstrated by the phantom and the animal experiments, the high-resolution algorithm not only led to a better contrast resolution in the reconstructed emission scans but also improved the accuracy for quantitating activity concentrations in small tissue structures without leading to an amplification of image noise or image mottle. The presented data-handling strategy incorporates the image restoration step directly into the process of algebraic image reconstruction and obviates the need for ill-conditioned ''deconvolution'' procedures to be performed on the projections or on the reconstructed image. In our experience, the proposed algorithm is of special interest in experimental studies of small animals. (orig./AJ). With 9 figs

  5. In vivo comparative study of hydroxyapatite labeled with different radioisotopes: evaluation of the scintigraphic images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Renata Martinussi; Barboza, Marycel Figols de; Souza, Adriano Aparecido de; Muramoto, Emiko; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de, E-mail: rmcouto@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Centro de Radiofarmacia

    2008-07-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of joints that is characterized by the inflammation and proliferation of synovial tissues. Approximately 3% of the adult population in the world is affected by this disease which causes pain, joint immobility and disability. Adyo synovectomy (RSV) is a radiotherapeutic modality where a b--emitting radionuclide is administered locally by intra-articular injection on the form of a colloid or radiolabeled particulate. RSV is a well-accepted therapeutic procedure in inflammatory joint diseases and has been successfully employed for more than 50 years as a viable alternative to surgical and chemical synovectomy in the treatment of RA and other inflammatory arthropathies. There are several radionuclides available for this purpose such as {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y, {sup 153}Sm, {sup 165}Dy, and {sup 166}Ho. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is one of the preferred particulates for this application because it is the major chemical constituent of skeletal bone and it is converted into Ca and PO4 ions in the body. In addition HA is completely eliminated over a period of six weeks. The aim of this work is to compare the in vivo stability of hydroxyapatite labeled with {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y and {sup 153}Sm in order to determine the influence of the radionuclide on biological pattern. In biological studies, 100mL of labeled HAs suspended in normal saline were injected into normal knee joints of Wistar rats and the retention of the activity into the synovium was determined. Labeled particles were also injected by intravenous and intramuscular administration, to verify the biodistribution in the case of an eventual leakage of the products from the joint. Sequential scintigraphic images were acquired from 1 hour to 7 days p.i. after anesthetizing the animals with ketamine. Hydroxyapatite was radiolabeled by all radionuclides with high yield. {sup 177}Lu-HA, {sup 90}Y-HA and {sup 153}Sm-HA were retained in the joint for 7 days, showing

  6. In vivo comparative study of hydroxyapatite labeled with different radioisotopes: evaluation of the scintigraphic images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Renata Martinussi; Barboza, Marycel Figols de; Souza, Adriano Aparecido de; Muramoto, Emiko; Mengatti, Jair; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de

    2008-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disorder of joints that is characterized by the inflammation and proliferation of synovial tissues. Approximately 3% of the adult population in the world is affected by this disease which causes pain, joint immobility and disability. Adyo synovectomy (RSV) is a radiotherapeutic modality where a b--emitting radionuclide is administered locally by intra-articular injection on the form of a colloid or radiolabeled particulate. RSV is a well-accepted therapeutic procedure in inflammatory joint diseases and has been successfully employed for more than 50 years as a viable alternative to surgical and chemical synovectomy in the treatment of RA and other inflammatory arthropathies. There are several radionuclides available for this purpose such as 177 Lu, 90 Y, 153 Sm, 165 Dy, and 166 Ho. Hydroxyapatite (HA) is one of the preferred particulates for this application because it is the major chemical constituent of skeletal bone and it is converted into Ca and PO4 ions in the body. In addition HA is completely eliminated over a period of six weeks. The aim of this work is to compare the in vivo stability of hydroxyapatite labeled with 177 Lu, 90 Y and 153 Sm in order to determine the influence of the radionuclide on biological pattern. In biological studies, 100mL of labeled HAs suspended in normal saline were injected into normal knee joints of Wistar rats and the retention of the activity into the synovium was determined. Labeled particles were also injected by intravenous and intramuscular administration, to verify the biodistribution in the case of an eventual leakage of the products from the joint. Sequential scintigraphic images were acquired from 1 hour to 7 days p.i. after anesthetizing the animals with ketamine. Hydroxyapatite was radiolabeled by all radionuclides with high yield. 177 Lu-HA, 90 Y-HA and 153 Sm-HA were retained in the joint for 7 days, showing stability and usefulness as tools in the RSV treatment

  7. Enhancing search efficiency by means of a search filter for finding all studies on animal experimentation in PubMed.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooijmans, C.R.; Tillema, A.; Leenaars, M.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, M.

    2010-01-01

    Collecting and analysing all available literature before starting an animal experiment is important and it is indispensable when writing a systematic review (SR) of animal research. Writing such review prevents unnecessary duplication of animal studies and thus unnecessary animal use (Reduction).

  8. Experimental study on 32P uptake in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamazaki, Yoshiyuki

    1978-01-01

    Disturbances in the development of the teeth which were caused by internal irradiation of 32 P were studied using rats of Wister strain about one month old. The experiment with a dose of 7 μc/g of 32 P showed that 4 of 30 rats died within 90 days of observation. The experiment with a dose of 10 μc/g of 32 P showed that none of the rats survived longer than 18 days. Correlationship was found among increase and decrease of the body weight, myelogram of the femoral bone, and ability of the tooth development. The disturbances showed a peak about 20 days after the administration of 32 P and then subsided. As regards the relationship between the mechanisms of tooth formation and tooth eruption, reformation of the dentine was noted but no recovery of tooth eruption was noted 30 days after 32 P-administration. Some recovery from disturbance of the tooth formation could be observed after 30 days of the administration of 32 P. 90 days after the administration, dentin formation could still be noted in the apical part, while germ cells of the tooth had been destroyed completely and peridental tissues had also been destroyed remarkably. Persistent osteoid dentin, characteristic of disturbance of the incisor due to internal irradiation, proliferated in a shape of a belt along the dentin blastocytes in the labial side, gradually infiltrating into the center of the dental pulp. The osteoid dentin proliferated in a shape of lump in the dental germ of the lingual side. In the experiments with 7 μc/g, there was left a possibility of maintaining vital power of rats judging from their weights and myelogram of the femoral bone, while the dose had destructive effects on the incisors. This was substantiated by the fact that the absorbed dose of the incisor was highest among those of the hard tissues. (Ueda, J.)

  9. Mechanisms of pollution-induced airway disease: in vivo studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peden, D.B. [Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, North Carolina (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Several studies have investigated the effects of ozone, sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), and nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) on lung function in normal and asthmatic subjects. Decreased lung function has been observed with ozone levels as low as 0.15 ppm - this effect is concentration dependent and is exacerbated by exercise. A number of lines of evidence suggest that the effect on lung function is mediated, at lest in part, by neural mechanisms. In both normals and asthmatics, ozone has been shown to induce neutrophilic inflammation, with increased levels of several inflammatory mediators, including prostaglandin E{sub 2}. However, in normal subjects, none of the markers of inflammation correlate with changes in lung function. The lung function changes in asthmatics may be associated with inflammatory effects; alternatively, ozone may prime the airways for an increased response to subsequently inhaled allergen. Indeed, an influx of both polymorphonucleocytes and eosinophils has been observed in asthmatic patients after ozone exposure. It has been suggested that the effect of ozone on classic allergen-induced bronchoconstriction may be more significant than any direct effect of this pollutant in asthmatics. SO{sub 2} does not appear to affect lung function in normal subjects, but may induce bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. Nasal breathing, which is often impaired in asthmatics, reduces the pulmonary effects of SO{sub 2}, since this water-soluble gas is absorbed by the nasal mucosa. NO{sub 2} may also influence lung function in asthmatics, but further research is warranted. SO{sub 2} and NO{sub 2} alone do not seem to have a priming effect in asthmatics, but a combination of these two gases has resulted in a heightened sensitivity to subsequently inhaled allergen. (au)

  10. In vivo study of myocardial elastography under graded ischemia conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wei-Ning; Provost, Jean; Konofagou, Elisa E [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Fujikura, Kana [Department of Radiology, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States); Wang Jie, E-mail: ek2191@columbia.edu [Department of Medicine, Columbia University, New York, NY (United States)

    2011-02-21

    The capability of currently available echocardiography-based strain estimation techniques to fully map myocardial abnormality at early stages of myocardial ischemia is yet to be investigated. In this study, myocardial elastography (ME), a radio-frequency (RF)-based strain imaging technique that maps the full 2D transmural angle-independent strain tensor in standard echocardiographic views at both high spatial and temporal resolution is presented. The objectives were to (1) evaluate the performance of ME on mapping the onset, extent and progression of myocardial ischemia at graded coronary constriction levels (from partial to complete coronary flow reduction), and (2) validate the accuracy of the strain estimates against sonomicrometry (SM) measurements. A non-survival canine ischemic model (n = 5) was performed by gradually constricting the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary blood flow from 0% (baseline blood flow) to 100% (zero blood flow) at 20% increments. An open-architecture ultrasound system was used to acquire RF echocardiograms in a standard full short-axis view at the frame rate of 211 fps, at least twice higher than what is typically used in conventional echocardiographic systems, using a previously developed, fully automated composite technique. Myocardial deformation was estimated by ME and validated against sonomicrometry. ME estimates and maps transmural (1) 2D displacements using RF cross-correlation and recorrelation; and (2) 2D polar (radial and circumferential) strains, derived from 2D (i.e. both lateral and axial) displacement components, at high accuracy. Full-view strain images were shown and found to reliably depict decreased myocardial function in the region at risk at increased levels of coronary flow reduction. The ME radial strain was deemed to be a more sensitive, quantitative, regional measure of myocardial ischemia as a result of coronary flow reduction when compared to the conventional wall motion score index and ejection fraction

  11. Facilitating healthcare decisions by assessing the certainty in the evidence from preclinical animal studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R.; de Vries, Rob B. M.; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Rovers, Maroeska M.; Leeflang, Mariska M.; IntHout, Joanna; Wever, Kimberley E.; Hooft, Lotty; de Beer, Hans; Kuijpers, Ton; Macleod, Malcolm R.; Sena, Emily S.; ter Riet, Gerben; Morgan, Rebecca L.; Thayer, Kristina A.; Rooney, Andrew A.; Guyatt, Gordon H.; Schünemann, Holger J.

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory animal studies are used in a wide range of human health related research areas, such as basic biomedical research, drug research, experimental surgery and environmental health. The results of these studies can be used to inform decisions regarding clinical research in humans, for example the decision to proceed to clinical trials. If the research question relates to potential harms with no expectation of benefit (e.g., toxicology), studies in experimental animals may provide the only relevant or controlled data and directly inform clinical management decisions. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are important tools to provide robust and informative evidence summaries of these animal studies. Rating how certain we are about the evidence could provide important information about the translational probability of findings in experimental animal studies to clinical practice and probably improve it. Evidence summaries and certainty in the evidence ratings could also be used (1) to support selection of interventions with best therapeutic potential to be tested in clinical trials, (2) to justify a regulatory decision limiting human exposure (to drug or toxin), or to (3) support decisions on the utility of further animal experiments. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach is the most widely used framework to rate the certainty in the evidence and strength of health care recommendations. Here we present how the GRADE approach could be used to rate the certainty in the evidence of preclinical animal studies in the context of therapeutic interventions. We also discuss the methodological challenges that we identified, and for which further work is needed. Examples are defining the importance of consistency within and across animal species and using GRADE’s indirectness domain as a tool to predict translation from animal models to humans. PMID:29324741

  12. Facilitating healthcare decisions by assessing the certainty in the evidence from preclinical animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooijmans, Carlijn R; de Vries, Rob B M; Ritskes-Hoitinga, Merel; Rovers, Maroeska M; Leeflang, Mariska M; IntHout, Joanna; Wever, Kimberley E; Hooft, Lotty; de Beer, Hans; Kuijpers, Ton; Macleod, Malcolm R; Sena, Emily S; Ter Riet, Gerben; Morgan, Rebecca L; Thayer, Kristina A; Rooney, Andrew A; Guyatt, Gordon H; Schünemann, Holger J; Langendam, Miranda W

    2018-01-01

    Laboratory animal studies are used in a wide range of human health related research areas, such as basic biomedical research, drug research, experimental surgery and environmental health. The results of these studies can be used to inform decisions regarding clinical research in humans, for example the decision to proceed to clinical trials. If the research question relates to potential harms with no expectation of benefit (e.g., toxicology), studies in experimental animals may provide the only relevant or controlled data and directly inform clinical management decisions. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses are important tools to provide robust and informative evidence summaries of these animal studies. Rating how certain we are about the evidence could provide important information about the translational probability of findings in experimental animal studies to clinical practice and probably improve it. Evidence summaries and certainty in the evidence ratings could also be used (1) to support selection of interventions with best therapeutic potential to be tested in clinical trials, (2) to justify a regulatory decision limiting human exposure (to drug or toxin), or to (3) support decisions on the utility of further animal experiments. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) approach is the most widely used framework to rate the certainty in the evidence and strength of health care recommendations. Here we present how the GRADE approach could be used to rate the certainty in the evidence of preclinical animal studies in the context of therapeutic interventions. We also discuss the methodological challenges that we identified, and for which further work is needed. Examples are defining the importance of consistency within and across animal species and using GRADE's indirectness domain as a tool to predict translation from animal models to humans.

  13. Real-Time Amperometric Recording of Extracellular H2O2 in the Brain of Immunocompromised Mice: An In Vitro, Ex Vivo and In Vivo Characterisation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Caroline H.; Finnerty, Niall J.

    2017-01-01

    We detail an extensive characterisation study on a previously described dual amperometric H2O2 biosensor consisting of H2O2 detection (blank) and degradation (catalase) electrodes. In vitro investigations demonstrated excellent H2O2 sensitivity and selectivity against the interferent, ascorbic acid. Ex vivo studies were performed to mimic physiological conditions prior to in vivo deployment. Exposure to brain tissue homogenate identified reliable sensitivity and selectivity recordings up to seven days for both blank and catalase electrodes. Furthermore, there was no compromise in pre- and post-implanted catalase electrode sensitivity in ex vivo mouse brain. In vivo investigations performed in anaesthetised mice confirmed the ability of the H2O2 biosensor to detect increases in amperometric current following locally perfused/infused H2O2 and antioxidant inhibitors mercaptosuccinic acid and sodium azide. Subsequent recordings in freely moving mice identified negligible effects of control saline and sodium ascorbate interference injections on amperometric H2O2 current. Furthermore, the stability of the amperometric current was confirmed over a five-day period and analysis of 24-h signal recordings identified the absence of diurnal variations in amperometric current. Collectively, these findings confirm the biosensor current responds in vivo to increasing exogenous and endogenous H2O2 and tentatively supports measurement of H2O2 dynamics in freely moving NOD SCID mice. PMID:28698470

  14. Hydrophilic and lipophilic radiopharmaceuticals as tracers in pharmaceutical development: In vitro – In vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terán, Mariella; Savio, Eduardo; Paolino, Andrea; Frier, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphic studies have been performed to assess the release, both in vitro and in vivo, of radiotracers from tablet formulations. Four different tracers with differing physicochemical characteristics have been evaluated to assess their suitability as models for drug delivery. In-vitro disintegration and dissolution studies have been performed at pH 1, 4 and 7. In-vivo studies have been performed by scintigraphic imaging in healthy volunteers. Two hydrophilic tracers, ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and ( 99m Tc-MDP), and two lipophilic tracers, ( 99m Tc-ECD) and ( 99m Tc-MIBI), were used as drug models. Dissolution and disintegration profiles, differed depending on the drug model chosen. In vitro dissolution velocity constants indicated a probable retention of the radiotracer in the formulation. In vivo disintegration velocity constants showed important variability for each radiopharmaceutical. Pearson statistical test showed no correlation between in vitro drug release, and in vivo behaviour, for 99m Tc-DTPA, 99m Tc-ECD and 99m Tc-MIBI. High correlation coefficients were found for 99m Tc-MDP not only for in vitro dissolution and disintegration studies but also for in vivo scintigraphic studies. Scintigraphic studies have made a significant contribution to the development of drug delivery systems. It is essential, however, to choose the appropriate radiotracers as models of drug behaviour. This study has demonstrated significant differences in release patterns, depending on the model chosen. It is likely that each formulation would require the development of a specific model, rather than being able to use a generic drug model on the basis of its physicochemical characteristics

  15. In Vitro Membrane Permeation Studies and in Vivo Antinociception of Glycosylated Dmt(1)-DALDA Analogues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ballet, Steven; Betti, Cecilia; Novoa, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    In this study the μ opioid receptor (MOR) ligands DALDA (Tyr-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2) and Dmt(1)-DALDA (Dmt-d-Arg-Phe-Lys-NH2, Dmt = 2',6'-dimethyltyrosine) were glycosylated at the N- or C-terminus. Subsequently, the modified peptides were subjected to in vitro and in vivo evaluation. In contrast to t...

  16. 'In vivo' and high resolution spectroscopy in solids by NMR: an instrument for transgenic plants study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colnago, L.A.; Herrmann, P.S.P.; Bernardes Filho, R.

    1995-01-01

    This work has developed a study on transgenic plants using two different techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance, in vivo NMR and high resolution NMR. In order to understand the gene mutations and characterize the plants constituents, NMR spectral data were analysed and discussed, then the results were presented

  17. Exogenous melatonin entrains rhythm and reduces amplitude of endogenous melatonin : An in vivo microdialysis study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drijfhout, W.J; Homan, E.J; Brons, H.F; Oakley, M; Skingle, M; Grol, Cor; Westerink, B.H.C.

    The circadian rhythm of melatonin production was studied using on-line, in vivo microdialysis in the rat pineal gland. With this technique it was possible to record a pronounced melatonin rhythm with very high time resolution. Three phase-markers of the rhythm were calculated from the data,

  18. Using the Chinese herb Scutellaria barbata against extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Chin-Chuan; Lin, Chi-Shiuan; Hsu, Chun-Ru; Chang, Chiu-Ming; Chang, I-Wei; Lin, Li-Wei; Hung, Chih-Hsin; Wang, Jiun-Ling

    2018-03-20

    No animal model studies have been conducted in which the efficacy of herbal compounds has been tested against multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii infections. Very few antibiotics are available for the treatment of pulmonary infections caused by extensively drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (XDRAB). To find alternative treatments, traditional Chinese herbs were screened for their antimicrobial potential. The present study screened 30 herbs that are traditionally used in Taiwan and that are commonly prescribed for heat clearing and detoxification. The herbs with antibacterial activities were analysed by disc diffusion assays, time-kill assays and a murine lung infection model. Of the 30 herbs tested, only Scutellaria barbata demonstrated 100% in vitro activity against XDRAB. Furthermore, we compared the antibacterial effect of the S. barbata extract with that of colistin, and the S. barbata extract showed better antibacterial effect. In the XDRAB pneumonia murine model, we compared the antimicrobial effects of the orally administered S. barbata extract (200 mg/kg, every 24 h), the intratracheally administered colistin (75,000 U/kg, every 12 h), and the control group. The bacterial load in the lungs of the treatment group that received the oral S. barbata extract showed a significant decrease in comparison to that in the lungs of the control group. In addition, histopathological examinations also revealed better resolution of perivascular, peribronchial, and alveolar inflammation in the oral S. barbata extract-treated group. Our in vitro and in vivo data from the animal model support the use of S. barbata as an alternate drug to treat XDRAB pulmonary infections. However, detailed animal studies and clinical trials are necessary to establish the clinical utility of S. barbata in treating XDRAB pulmonary infections.

  19. Post-operative benefits of animal-assisted therapy in pediatric surgery: a randomised study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcaterra, Valeria; Veggiotti, Pierangelo; Palestrini, Clara; De Giorgis, Valentina; Raschetti, Roberto; Tumminelli, Massimiliano; Mencherini, Simonetta; Papotti, Francesca; Klersy, Catherine; Albertini, Riccardo; Ostuni, Selene; Pelizzo, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Interest in animal-assisted therapy has been fuelled by studies supporting the many health benefits. The purpose of this study was to better understand the impact of an animal-assisted therapy program on children response to stress and pain in the immediate post-surgical period. Forty children (3-17 years) were enrolled in the randomised open-label, controlled, pilot study. Patients were randomly assigned to the animal-assisted therapy-group (n = 20, who underwent a 20 min session with an animal-assisted therapy dog, after surgery) or the standard-group (n = 20, standard postoperative care). The study variables were determined in each patient, independently of the assigned group, by a researcher unblinded to the patient's group. The outcomes of the study were to define the neurological, cardiovascular and endocrinological impact of animal-assisted therapy in response to stress and pain. Electroencephalogram activity, heart rate, blood pressure, oxygen saturation, cerebral prefrontal oxygenation, salivary cortisol levels and the faces pain scale were considered as outcome measures. After entrance of the dog faster electroencephalogram diffuse beta-activity (> 14 Hz) was reported in all children of the animal-assisted therapy group; in the standard-group no beta-activity was recorded (100% vs 0%, panimal-assisted therapy, though a higher variability in diastolic pressure was observed. Salivary cortisol levels did not show different behaviours over time between groups (p=0.70). Lower pain perception was noted in the animal-assisted group in comparison with the standard-group (p = 0.01). Animal-assisted therapy facilitated rapid recovery in vigilance and activity after anaesthesia, modified pain perception and induced emotional prefrontal responses. An adaptative cardiovascular response was also present. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02284100.