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Sample records for vitro investigative approach

  1. A combined approach to investigate the toxicity of an industrial landfill's leachate: Chemical analyses, risk assessment and in vitro assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baderna, D.; Maggioni, S.; Boriani, E.; Gemma, S.; Molteni, M.; Lombardo, A.; Colombo, A.; Bordonali, S.; Rotella, G.; Lodi, M.; Benfenati, E.

    2011-01-01

    Solid wastes constitute an important and emerging problem. Landfills are still one of the most common ways to manage waste disposal. The risk assessment of pollutants from landfills is becoming a major environmental issue in Europe, due to the large number of sites and to the importance of groundwater protection. Furthermore, there is lack of knowledge for the environmental, ecotoxicological and toxicological characteristics of most contaminants contained into landfill leacheates. Understanding leachate composition and creating an integrated strategy for risk assessment are currently needed to correctly face the landfill issues and to make projections on the long-term impacts of a landfill, with particular attention to the estimation of possible adverse effects on human health and ecosystem. In the present study, we propose an integrated strategy to evaluate the toxicity of the leachate using chemical analyses, risk assessment guidelines and in vitro assays using the hepatoma HepG2 cells as a model. The approach was applied on a real case study: an industrial waste landfill in northern Italy for which data on the presence of leachate contaminants are available from the last 11 years. Results from our ecological risk models suggest important toxic effects on freshwater fish and small rodents, mainly due to ammonia and inorganic constituents. Our results from in vitro data show an inhibition of cell proliferation by leachate at low doses and cytotoxic effect at high doses after 48 h of exposure. - Research highlights: → We study the toxicity of leachate from a non-hazardous industrial waste landfill. → We perform chemical analyses, risk assessments and in vitro assays on HepG2 cells. → Risk models suggest toxic effects due to ammonia and inorganic constituents. → In vitro assays show that leachate inhibits cell proliferation at low doses. → Leachate can induce cytotoxic effects on HepG2 cells at high doses.

  2. Initial in vitro screening approach to investigate the potential health and environmental hazards of Envirox™ – a nanoparticulate cerium oxide diesel fuel additive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Whittingham Andrew

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nanotechnology is the new industrial revolution of the 21st Century as the various processes lead to radical improvements in medicine, manufacturing, energy production, land remediation, information technology and many other everyday products and applications. With this revolution however, there are undoubted concerns for health, safety and the environment which arise from the unique nature of materials and processes at the nanometre scale. The in vitro assays used in the screening strategy are all validated, internationally accepted protocols and provide a useful indication of potential toxicity of a chemical as a result of effects on various toxicological endpoints such as local site of contact (dermal irritation, general cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. The initial in vitro screening strategy described in this paper to investigate the potential health implications, if any, which may arise following exposure to one specific application of nanoparticulate cerium oxide used as a diesel fuel borne catalyst, reflects a precautionary approach and the results will inform judgement on how best to proceed to ensure safe use.

  3. Systematical investigation of in vitro interaction of InP/ZnS quantum dots with human serum albumin by multispectroscopic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shan; Qiu, Hangna; Liu, Yi; Huang, Chusheng; Sheng, Jiarong; Cui, Jianguo; Su, Wei; Xiao, Qi

    2016-12-01

    Cadmium-free quantum dots (QDs) have attracted great attention in biological and biomedical applications due to their less content of toxic metals, but their potential toxicity investigations on molecular biology level are rarely involved. Since few studies have addressed whether InP/ZnS QDs could bind and alter the structure and function of human serum albumin (HSA), in vitro interaction between InP/ZnS QDs and HSA was systematically characterized by multispectroscopic approaches. InP/ZnS QDs could quench the intrinsic fluorescence of HSA via static mode. The binding site of InP/ZnS QDs was mainly located at subdomain IIA of HSA. Some thermodynamic parameters suggested that InP/ZnS QDs interacted with HSA mainly through electrostatic interactions. As further revealed by three-dimensional spectrometry, FT-IR spectrometry and circular dichroism technique, InP/ZnS QDs caused more global and local conformational change of HSA than CdSe/ZnS QDs, which illustrated the stronger binding interaction and higher potential toxicity of InP/ZnS QDs on biological function of HSA. Our results offer insights into the in vitro binding mechanism of InP/ZnS QDs with HSA and provide important information for possible toxicity risk of these cadmium-free QDs to human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Investigational Approaches for Mesothelioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surmont, Veerle F.; Thiel, Eric R. E. van; Vermaelen, Karim; Meerbeeck, Jan P. van

    2011-01-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare, aggressive tumor with a poor prognosis. In view of the poor survival benefit from first-line chemotherapy and the lack of subsequent effective treatment options, there is a strong need for the development of more effective treatment approaches for patients with MPM. This review will provide a comprehensive state of the art of new investigational approaches for mesothelioma. In an introductory section, the etiology, epidemiology, natural history, and standard of care treatment for MPM will be discussed. This review provide an update of the major clinical trials that impact mesothelioma treatment, discuss the impact of novel therapeutics, and provide perspective on where the clinical research in mesothelioma is moving. The evidence was collected by a systematic analysis of the literature (2000–2011) using the databases Medline (National Library of Medicine, USA), Embase (Elsevier, Netherlands), Cochrane Library (Great Britain), National Guideline Clearinghouse (USA), HTA Database (International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment – INAHTA), NIH database (USA), International Pleural Mesothelioma Program – WHOLIS (WHO Database), with the following keywords and filters: mesothelioma, guidelines, treatment, surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, review, investigational, drugs. Currently different targeted therapies and biologicals are under investigation for MPM. It is important that the molecular biologic research should first focus on mesothelioma-specific pathways and biomarkers in order to have more effective treatment options for this disease. The use of array technology will be certainly an implicit gain in the identification of new potential prognostic or biomarkers or important pathways in the MPM pathogenesis. Probably a central mesothelioma virtual tissue bank may contribute to the ultimate goal to identify druggable targets and to develop personalized treatment for the MPM patients.

  5. Investigational approaches for mesothelioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veerle F Surmont

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available MPM is a rare, aggressive tumour with a poor prognosis. In view of the poor survival benefit from first-line chemotherapy and the lack of subsequent effective treatment options, there is a strong need for the development of more effective treatment approaches for patients with MPM. This review will provide a comprehensive state of the art of new investigational approaches for mesothelioma. In an introductory section, the aetiology, epidemiology, natural history and standard of care treatment for MPM will be discussed. This review provide an update of the major clinical trials that impact mesothelioma treatment, discuss the impact of novel therapeutics and provide perspective on where the clinical research in mesothelioma is moving.The evidence was collected by a systematic analysis of the literature (2000–2011 using the databases Medline (National Library of Medicine, USA, Embase (Elsevier, Netherlands, Cochrane Library (Great Britain, National Guideline Clearinghouse (USA, HTA Database (International Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment – INAHTA, NIH database (USA, International Pleural Mesothelioma Program – WHOLIS (WHO Database , with the following keywords and filters: mesothelioma, guidelines, treatment, surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, review, investigational, drugsCurrently different targeted therapies and biologicals are under investigation for MPM. It is important that the molecular biologic research should first focus on mesothelioma-specific pathways and biomarkers in order to have more effective treatment options for this disease. The use of array technology will be certainly an implicit gain in the identification of new potential prognostic or biomarkers or important pathways in the MPM pathogenesis. Probably a central mesothelioma virtual tissue bank may contribute to the ultimate goal to identify druggable targets and to develop personalized treatment for the MPM patients.

  6. In vitro systems toxicology approach to investigate the effects of repeated cigarette smoke exposure on human buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlage, Walter K; Iskandar, Anita R; Kostadinova, Radina; Xiang, Yang; Sewer, Alain; Majeed, Shoaib; Kuehn, Diana; Frentzel, Stefan; Talikka, Marja; Geertz, Marcel; Mathis, Carole; Ivanov, Nikolai; Hoeng, Julia; Peitsch, Manuel C

    2014-10-01

    Smoking has been associated with diseases of the lung, pulmonary airways and oral cavity. Cytologic, genomic and transcriptomic changes in oral mucosa correlate with oral pre-neoplasia, cancer and inflammation (e.g. periodontitis). Alteration of smoking-related gene expression changes in oral epithelial cells is similar to that in bronchial and nasal epithelial cells. Using a systems toxicology approach, we have previously assessed the impact of cigarette smoke (CS) seen as perturbations of biological processes in human nasal and bronchial organotypic epithelial culture models. Here, we report our further assessment using in vitro human oral organotypic epithelium models. We exposed the buccal and gingival organotypic epithelial tissue cultures to CS at the air-liquid interface. CS exposure was associated with increased secretion of inflammatory mediators, induction of cytochrome P450s activity and overall weak toxicity in both tissues. Using microarray technology, gene-set analysis and a novel computational modeling approach leveraging causal biological network models, we identified CS impact on xenobiotic metabolism-related pathways accompanied by a more subtle alteration in inflammatory processes. Gene-set analysis further indicated that the CS-induced pathways in the in vitro buccal tissue models resembled those in the in vivo buccal biopsies of smokers from a published dataset. These findings support the translatability of systems responses from in vitro to in vivo and demonstrate the applicability of oral organotypical tissue models for an impact assessment of CS on various tissues exposed during smoking, as well as for impact assessment of reduced-risk products.

  7. Investigation of srawberry hardening in low temperatures in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Lukoševičiūtė, Vanda; Rugienius, Rytis; Kavaliauskaitė, Danguolė

    2007-01-01

    Cold resistance of different strawberry varieties in vitro and ability to retain hardening after defrosting and repeated hardening. Phytohormons – gibberellin and abscisic acid added in the growing medium were investigated in Horticulture plant genetic and biotechnology department of LIH. We tried to model common conditions in temperate zone when freeze-thaw cycles often occur during wintertime. For investigation in vitro strawberries for the first time hardened in light at the temperature of...

  8. Investigation of In vitro Mineral Forming Bacterial Isolates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-30

    Jan 30, 2018 ... Keywords: Bacteria, biomineralization, supragingival dental calculus. Investigation of In vitro ... of damage that is associated with plaque‑forming ... Materials and Methods ... Amplification reaction mixture was prepared in a 30 μL .... gingiva, palatine tonsils, and throat), skin (right and .... Neisseria mucosa.

  9. In vitro investigation on antifungal activity of some plant extracts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Ogunji

    In vitro investigation on antifungal activity of some plant extracts against Pyricularia oryzae. Olufolaji, D. B.1, Adeosun, B.O.1 and Onasanya, R. O.2. 1. Department of Crop, Soil and Pest Management, The Federal University of Technology, PMB 704. Akure, Ondo state, Nigeria. 2. Department of Agriculture, Federal College ...

  10. Zeaxanthin epoxidation - an in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuczyńska, Paulina; Latowski, Dariusz; Niczyporuk, Sylvia; Olchawa-Pajor, Monika; Jahns, Peter; Gruszecki, Wiesław I; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2012-01-01

    Zeaxanthin epoxidase (ZE) is an enzyme operating in the violaxanthin cycle, which is involved in photoprotective mechanisms. In this work model systems to study zeaxanthin (Zx) epoxidation were developed. Two assay systems are presented in which epoxidation of Zx was observed. In these assays two mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana which have active only one of the two xanthophyll cycle enzymes were used. The npq1 mutant possesses an active ZE and is thus able to convert Zx to violaxanthin (Vx) but the violaxanthin de-epoxidase (VDE) is inactive, so that Vx cannot be converted to Zx. The other mutant, npq2, possesses an active VDE and can convert exogenous Vx to Zx under strong light conditions but reverse reaction is not possible. The first assay containing thylakoids from npq1 and npq2 mutants of A. thaliana gave positive results and high efficiency of epoxidation reaction was observed. The amount of Zx was reduced by 25%. To optimize high efficiency of epoxidation reaction additional factors facilitating both fusion of the two types of thylakoids and incorporation of Zx to their membranes were also studied. The second kind of assay contained npq1 mutant thylakoids of A. thaliana supplemented with exogenous Zx and monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG). Experiments with different proportions of Zx and MGDG showed that their optimal ratio is 1:60. In such system, due to epoxidation, the amount of Zx was reduced by 38% of its initial level. The in vitro systems of Zx epoxidation described in this paper enable analysis some properties of the ZE without necessity of its isolation.

  11. Investigation of some urea derivatives under in vitro conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goersch, R.; Bergner, H.

    1978-01-01

    The protein synthesis from urea, isobutylidene diurea (IBDU), acetyl urea and urea phosphate was investigated in vitro under standardized conditions. The 35 S incorporation into the trichloroacetic acid precipitable fraction of the fermentation mixture and the NH 3 level served as test criteria. If rumen juice of donor animals adapted to urea was used (test 1), only IBDU made possible a protein synthesis comparable to the urea preparation. Under conditions of IBDU adaption of the donor animals (test 2), urea, IBDU and urea phosphate proved to be of equal value. Acetyl urea showed considerably lower incorporation ratios, irrespective of the adaption of the donor animals. (author)

  12. Investigation of some urea derivatives under in vitro conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goersch, R; Bergner, H [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (German Democratic Republic). Sektion Tierproduktion und Veterinaermedizin

    1978-10-01

    The protein synthesis from urea, isobutylidene diurea (IBDU), acetyl urea and urea phosphate was investigated in vitro under standardized conditions. The /sup 35/S incorporation into the trichloroacetic acid precipitable fraction of the fermentation mixture and the NH/sub 3/ level served as test criteria. If rumen juice of donor animals adapted to urea was used (test 1), only IBDU made possible a protein synthesis comparable to the urea preparation. Under conditions of IBDU adaption of the donor animals (test 2), urea, IBDU and urea phosphate proved to be of equal value. Acetyl urea showed considerably lower incorporation ratios, irrespective of the adaption of the donor animals.

  13. Investigating a spatial approach to groundwater quantity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Received 28 April 2014; accepted in revised form 17 December 2014. Investigating a spatial approach to ... Pierce et al., 2013; Rudestam and Langridge, 2014). A thorough history of the evolution of these ...... UNESCO,. Paris. WESTER P ...

  14. Parallelogram approach using rat-human In vitro and rat in vivo toxicogenomics predicts acetaminophen-induced hepatotoxicity in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kienhuis, A.S.; Poll, M.C.G. van de; Wortelboer, H.; Herwijnen, M. van; Gottschalk, R.; Jong, C.H.C. de; Boorsma, A.; Paules, R.S.; Kleinjans, J.C.S.; Stierum, R.H.; Delft, J.H.M. van

    2009-01-01

    The frequent use of rodent hepatic in vitro systems in pharmacological and toxicological investigations challenges extrapolation of in vitro results to the situation in vivo and interspecies extrapolation from rodents to humans. The toxicogenomics approach may aid in evaluating relevance of these

  15. In vitro investigation of sodium diclofenac adsorption on sucralfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimling, Bozena; Pluta, Janusz

    2006-01-01

    Adsorption of sodium diclofenac was investigated in the presence of sucralfate--a cytoprotective agent preventing gastropathy, adverse effect of diclofenac. Evaluation of adsorption was performed by means of a static method in vitro taking into account pH of the environment, temperature, concentration of the investigated agents and the form of sucralfate. Findings obtained prove that sodium diclofenac is adsorbed on sucralfate in all investigated pH ranges and the capability of sucralfate binding depends on its form, temperature and environmental pH. The highest binding was observed at pH 5.0 in the presence of sucralfate, which at this pH has the form of a suspension, while the lowest--at pH 1.5 in the presence of sucralfate in the form of paste. Low values of adsorption temperature of diclofenac as well as the relationship between the level of its adsorption and environmental pH are the dominating factors pointing to the physical and exothermic adsorption.

  16. Investigation on the toxic potential of Tribulus terrestris in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayyak, M; Jannuzzi, A T; Özhan, G; Alpertunga, B

    2015-04-01

    Tribulus terrestris L. (Zygophyllaceae) has been commonly used to energize, vitalize, and improve sexual function and physical performance in men. This study investigates the potential cytotoxic and genotoxic, and endocrine disrupting activities of T. terrestris in vitro. The whole T. terrestris plant was extracted with water, methanol, and chloroform. The genotoxic potential of T. terrestris extracts at 3-2400 µg/mL was assessed by Comet assay in a rat kidney cell line (NRK-52E) and by Ames assay in Salmonella typhimurium TA98 and TA100 strains. Endocrine disrupting effects of the extracts at concentrations of 0.22-25 000 µg/mL were assessed by YES/YAS assay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Cytotoxic activity of the extracts was determined by the MTT test in NRK-52E cells. The different exposure times were used for four tests (3-48 h). The methanol extract of T. terrestris IC50 value was 160 µg/mL. The other extracts did not show cytotoxic effects. In the Comet and Ames genotoxicity assays, none of the extracts possessed genotoxic activities at concentrations of 0-2400 µg/mL. Only the water extract of T. terrestris induced frame shift mutations after metabolic activation. The water extract also showed estrogenic activity by YES/YAS assay in S. cerevisiae at concentrations ≥27 µg/mL (≥2.6-fold), while the other T. terrestris extracts had anti-estrogenic properties. Tribulus terrestris had estrogenic and genotoxic activities. The study was useful in determining its toxicological effects and the precautions regarding consumption.

  17. In vitro tests and ethnopharmacological investigations: wound healing as an example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houghton, P J; Hylands, P J; Mensah, A Y; Hensel, A; Deters, A M

    2005-08-22

    In vitro tests are now widely employed in ethnopharmacological research because of ethical reasons and their usefulness in bioactive-guided fractionation and determination of active compounds. For many disease conditions, a variety of in vitro tests can now be employed as the biochemical mechanisms underlying disease and healing processes are understood. Approaches to the in vitro investigations of wound healing processes are exemplified by studies on extracts of Buddleja species and three Ghanaian species Spathodea campanulata, Commelina diffusa and Secamone afzelii. Most studies have been carried out on Buddleja officinalis or Buddleja globosa. The extracts have been shown to have anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties due to flavonoids, triterpenoids, diterpenoids and caffeic acid derivatives. There appears to a slight effect on proliferation of fibroblasts at lower concentrations, but this was not significant, and higher concentrations appeared to be cytotoxic. Novel findings are the ability of Buddleja globosa leaf extracts to induce differentiation in keratinocytes and to alter the profile of proteins produced by cultured fibroblasts. Extracts also had some effect on lattice contraction. The three Ghanaian species examined show a mixture of antimicrobial and antioxidant activities. The evolution over recent years of tests for wound healing, from in vivo tests to cell-based systems and chemical reactions and on to investigations into effects on secondary messengers and protein expression, is described.

  18. A simulation framework to investigate in vitro viral infection dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bankhead, A.; Mancini, E.; Sims, A.C.; Baric, R.S.; McWeeney, S.; Sloot, P.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Virus infection is a complex biological phenomenon for which in vitro experiments provide a uniquely concise view where data is often obtained from a single population of cells, under controlled environmental conditions. Nonetheless, data interpretation and real understanding of viral dynamics is

  19. Alternative approaches to improve site investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beach, R.B.; Silka, L.R.

    1992-01-01

    Common complaints about standard investigations at hazardous waste sites include high costs and long time frames. Investigations at military bases as part of the installation restoration program or base closures suffer additionally from nonuniformity of approach and results and redundancy of work effort conducted by multiple environmental contractors. The problems of high costs and long time frames can be minimized by the consistent use of alternative sampling methods (such as soil gas surveys) and the utilization of analytical screening procedures at both on-site and off-site laboratories. Acceptable data quality is maintained by several procedures. Incorporation of quality control measures (10 % frequency), such as matrix spikes and duplicates, into the alternative analytical techniques allows assessment of the data quality relative to predetermined data quality objectives (DQOs). Confirmation of the screening results (10% frequency) using standard US EPA methods, such as the contract laboratory program (CLP) statement of work (SOW), allows an additional evaluation of the data accuracy. Depending on the investigative objectives, knowledge based computer systems (expert systems,) could be used to improve uniformity of site evaluations. Several case histories will be presented demonstrating how soil gas surveys, screening analyses and standard analyses can be utilized to give increased site information in a reduced time frame and at a cost savings of 30 to 40%. One case history illustrates a screening technique developed by the author for polynuclear aromatics (semi-volatile organic compounds) that can be conducted at a cost savings of 90% relative to a standard US EPA method. A comparison of the phased investigative approach to one using an integrated field team is presented for fuel spill or UST areas

  20. Novel in vitro platform to investigate myotube atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Oelkrug, Christopher; Horn, Katharina; Makert, Gustavo R.; Schubert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    The electrical current exclusion (ECE) principle provides an alternative to common methods of cell diameter measurement and especially in atrophy and cancer associated cachexia research. C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and treated with 100 μM dexamethasone to induce atrophy in vitro. Subsequently, they were incubated for 24 h with media containing different concentrations of curcumin and/or branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in order to counteract atrophy. After treatment wi...

  1. Investigations of oocyte in vitro maturation within a mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Alexis Heng Boon; Chye, Ng Soon

    2004-02-01

    This study attempted to develop a 'less meiotically competent' murine model for oocyte in vitro maturation (IVM), which could more readily be extrapolated to human clinical assisted reproduction. Oocyte meiotic competence was drastically reduced upon shortening the standard duration of in vivo gonadotrophin stimulation from 48 h to 24 h, and by selecting only naked or partially naked germinal vesicle oocytes, instead of fully cumulus enclosed oocyte complexes. With such a less meiotically competent model, only porcine granulosa coculture significantly enhanced the oocyte maturation rate in vitro, whereas no significant enhancement was observed with macaque and murine granulosa coculture. Increased serum concentrations and the supplementation of gonadotrophins, follicular fluid and extracellular matrix gel within the culture medium did not enhance IVM under either cell-free or coculture conditions. Culture medium conditioned by porcine granulosa also enhanced the maturation rate, and this beneficial effect was not diminished upon freeze-thawing. Enhanced IVM in the presence of porcine granulosa coculture did not, however, translate into improved developmental competence, as assessed by in vitro fertilization and embryo culture to the blastocyst stage.

  2. In vitro and in vivo approaches to study osteocyte biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalajzic, Ivo; Matthews, Brya G; Torreggiani, Elena; Harris, Marie A; Divieti Pajevic, Paola; Harris, Stephen E

    2013-06-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant cell population of the bone lineage, have been a major focus in the bone research field in recent years. This population of cells that resides within mineralized matrix is now thought to be the mechanosensory cell in bone and plays major roles in the regulation of bone formation and resorption. Studies of osteocytes had been impaired by their location, resulting in numerous attempts to isolate primary osteocytes and to generate cell lines representative of the osteocytic phenotype. Progress has been achieved in recent years by utilizing in vivo genetic technology and generation of osteocyte directed transgenic and gene deficiency mouse models. We will provide an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo models utilized to study osteocyte biology. We discuss generation of osteocyte-like cell lines and isolation of primary osteocytes and summarize studies that have utilized these cellular models to understand the functional role of osteocytes. Approaches that attempt to selectively identify and isolate osteocytes using fluorescent protein reporters driven by regulatory elements of genes that are highly expressed in osteocytes will be discussed. In addition, recent in vivo studies utilizing overexpression or conditional deletion of various genes using dentin matrix protein (Dmp1) directed Cre recombinase are outlined. In conclusion, evaluation of the benefits and deficiencies of currently used cell lines/genetic models in understanding osteocyte biology underlines the current progress in this field. The future efforts will be directed towards developing novel in vitro and in vivo models that would additionally facilitate in understanding the multiple roles of osteocytes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Characteristic MR spectroscopy in fucosidosis: in vitro investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mamourian, Alex C.; Chawla, Sanjeev; Poptani, Harish; Hopkin, Jeremy R.

    2010-01-01

    Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder that results in the deposition of the sugar fucose within various organs, including the central nervous system. Neuroimaging abnormalities on MR, specifically T2 shortening in the basal ganglia, have been reported as suggestive of fucosidosis. A more recent report of MR spectroscopy (MRS) of one patient provided evidence that MRS is specific for fucosidosis. We present another confirmed case with nearly identical MR spectroscopic findings along with in vitro data that support the contention that MR spectroscopy, in the setting of typical clinical and imaging features, is characteristic for this rare disorder. (orig.)

  4. Characteristic MR spectroscopy in fucosidosis: in vitro investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mamourian, Alex C.; Chawla, Sanjeev; Poptani, Harish [Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hopkin, Jeremy R. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Department of Neuroradiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-08-15

    Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder that results in the deposition of the sugar fucose within various organs, including the central nervous system. Neuroimaging abnormalities on MR, specifically T2 shortening in the basal ganglia, have been reported as suggestive of fucosidosis. A more recent report of MR spectroscopy (MRS) of one patient provided evidence that MRS is specific for fucosidosis. We present another confirmed case with nearly identical MR spectroscopic findings along with in vitro data that support the contention that MR spectroscopy, in the setting of typical clinical and imaging features, is characteristic for this rare disorder. (orig.)

  5. Root damage induced by intraosseous anesthesia. An in vitro investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graetz, Christian; Fawzy-El-Sayed, Karim-Mohamed; Graetz, Nicole; Dörfer, Christof-Edmund

    2013-01-01

    The principle of the intraosseous anesthesia (IOA) relies on the perforation of the cortical plate of the bone for direct application of the local anesthetic solution into the underlying cancellous structures. During this procedure, IOA needles might accidentally come in contact with the tooth roots. The aim of the current in vitro study was to examine the consequences of this 'worst case scenario' comparing five commercially available IOA systems. Extracted human roots were randomly perforated using five different IOA systems with a drilling time ≤5s. To simulate normal in vivo conditions, the roots were kept humid during the drilling procedure. Data was statistically evaluated using F-test (SPSS16, SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA) and the significance level was set at p ≤ 0.05. All examined systems resulted in root perforation. Drill fractures occurred in either none 0% (Quicksleeper, Anesto, Intraflow, Stabident) or 100% (X-Tip) of the applications. Excessive heat generation, as evident by combustion odor as well as metal and tooth discoloration, appeared in 30% (Quicksleeper), 40% (Anesto), 60% (Intraflow), 90% (Stabident) and 100% (X-Tip) of all perforations. Within the limits of in-vitro studies, the results show a potential for irreversible root damage that might be inflicted by an improper use of IOA systems.

  6. Novel in vitro platform to investigate myotube atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkrug, Christopher; Horn, Katharina; Makert, Gustavo R; Schubert, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    The electrical current exclusion (ECE) principle provides an alternative to common methods of cell diameter measurement and especially in atrophy and cancer associated cachexia research. C2C12 myoblasts were differentiated into myotubes and treated with 100 μM dexamethasone to induce atrophy in vitro. Subsequently, they were incubated for 24 h with media containing different concentrations of curcumin and/or branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) in order to counteract atrophy. After treatment with curcumin, an increase in cell diameter was detectable; the highest increase with 13.9 ± 0.4% was seen with 10 μM curcumin. The combination of curcumin and BCAAs showed an increase of 13.4 ± 1.2 %. Cell diameter measurement via the ECE showed that curcumin, and curcumin in combination with BCAAs, were able to restore atrophic C2C12 myotubes. Therefore, the application of ECE in muscle atrophy and also cancer-associated cachexia research allows rapid screening of novel compounds in order to test their efficacy in vitro. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  7. A novel approach for in vitro meat production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandurangan, Muthuraman; Kim, Doo Hwan

    2015-07-01

    The present review describes the possibility of in vitro meat production with the help of advanced co-culturing methods. In vitro meat production method could be a possible alternative for the conventional meat production. Originally, the research on in vitro meat production was initiated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for space voyages. The required key qualities for accepting in vitro meat for consumption would be good efficiency ratio, increased protein synthesis rate in skeletal muscles, and mimicking the conventional meat qualities. In vitro culturing of meat is possible with the use of skeletal muscle tissue engineering, stem cell, cell co-culture, and tissue culture methods. Co-culture of myoblast and fibroblast is believed as one of the major techniques for in vitro meat production. In our lab, we have co-cultured myoblast and fibroblast. We believe that a billion pounds of in vitro meat could be produced from one animal for consumption. However, we require a great deal of research on in vitro meat production.

  8. Ultrasound Thrombolysis in Hemodialysis Access: In Vitro Investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wildberger, Joachim Ernst; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Haage, Patrick; Pfeffer, Joachim; Ruebben, Alexander; Guenther, Rolf W.

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of ultrasound thrombolysis in occluded hemodialysis access shunts using an in vitro model.Methods: Thrombosed hemodialysis accesses were simulated by clotted bovine blood in a flow model (silicone tubing; inner diameters 4, 6, and 9 mm). After retrograde and antegrade sheath placement (7 Fr), mechanical thrombolysis was performed using an ultrasound probe (Acolysis, Angiosonics, Morrisville, NC, USA). The tip of the device measured 2.2 mm in diameter. During sonication, the catheter was moved slowly back and forth using an over-the-wire system. Thirty complete occlusions [tubing diameters 4 mm (n = 12), 6 mm (n = 12), 9 mm (n = 6)] were treated. Initial thrombus weights were 3.5 (± 0.76) g, 7.7 (± 1.74) g, and 19.4 (± 2.27) g for the three diameters. Maximum sonication time was 15 min for each probe.Results: With this device, we were able to restore a continuous lumen in all 12 occluded 4∼mm silicone tubes. No wall-adherent thrombi remained after sonication for 3.5-9.6 min. In hemodialysis access models with diameters of 6 mm, thrombus fragments persisted in 25% (3/12 accesses). These were located in the medial portion of the access loop and near to the puncture sites. However, flow was re-established after 5.0-13.0 min of treatment in all settings. Mechanical dissolution of thrombus material failed in five of six access models with diameters of 9 mm, even though ultrasound energy was applied for the maximum of 15 min.Conclusion: In a clotted hemodialysis shunt model, successful ultrasound thrombolysis was limited to small access diameters and small amounts of thrombus

  9. In vitro investigation of the antitrypanosomal potentials of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 9th test tube (carrying 100mg T. b. brucei in 1ml PSG) served as control. Total lipid of the parasites in each tube was extracted and profile of the fractions assayed to investigate the impact of Manganese. Results: Manganese caused a general increase in total lipid profile of the parasites by 5.8%. The effect of treatment with ...

  10. Cholesterol Assimilation by Lactobacillus Probiotic Bacteria: An In Vitro Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Tomaro-Duchesneau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Excess cholesterol is associated with cardiovascular diseases (CVD, an important cause of mortality worldwide. Current CVD therapeutic measures, lifestyle and dietary interventions, and pharmaceutical agents for regulating cholesterol levels are inadequate. Probiotic bacteria have demonstrated potential to lower cholesterol levels by different mechanisms, including bile salt hydrolase activity, production of compounds that inhibit enzymes such as 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A, and cholesterol assimilation. This work investigates 11 Lactobacillus strains for cholesterol assimilation. Probiotic strains for investigation were selected from the literature: Lactobacillus reuteri NCIMB 11951, L. reuteri NCIMB 701359, L. reuteri NCIMB 702655, L. reuteri NCIMB 701089, L. reuteri NCIMB 702656, Lactobacillus fermentum NCIMB 5221, L. fermentum NCIMB 8829, L. fermentum NCIMB 2797, Lactobacillus rhamnosus ATCC 53103 GG, Lactobacillus acidophilus ATCC 314, and Lactobacillus plantarum ATCC 14917. Cholesterol assimilation was investigated in culture media and under simulated intestinal conditions. The best cholesterol assimilator was L. plantarum ATCC 14917 (15.18 ± 0.55 mg/1010 cfu in MRS broth. L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 assimilated over 67% (2254.70 ± 63.33 mg/1010 cfu of cholesterol, the most of all the strains, under intestinal conditions. This work demonstrates that probiotic bacteria can assimilate cholesterol under intestinal conditions, with L. reuteri NCIMB 701089 showing great potential as a CVD therapeutic.

  11. An investigation of fake fingerprint detection approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Asraful Syifaa'; Hassan, Rohayanti; Othman, Razib M.

    2017-10-01

    The most reliable biometrics technology, fingerprint recognition is widely used in terms of security due to its permanence and uniqueness. However, it is also vulnerable to the certain type of attacks including presenting fake fingerprints to the sensor which requires the development of new and efficient protection measures. Particularly, the aim is to identify the most recent literature related to the fake fingerprint recognition and only focus on software-based approaches. A systematic review is performed by analyzing 146 primary studies from the gross collection of 34 research papers to determine the taxonomy, approaches, online public databases, and limitations of the fake fingerprint. Fourteen software-based approaches have been briefly described, four limitations of fake fingerprint image were revealed and two known fake fingerprint databases were addressed briefly in this review. Therefore this work provides an overview of an insight into the current understanding of fake fingerprint recognition besides identifying future research possibilities.

  12. Bio-active nanoemulsions enriched with gold nanoparticle, marigold extracts and lipoic acid: In vitro investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, Emine; Barlas, F Baris; Yavuz, Murat; Demir, Bilal; Gumus, Z Pinar; Baspinar, Yucel; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna

    2014-09-01

    A novel and efficient approach for the preparation of enriched herbal formulations was described and their potential applications including wound healing and antioxidant activity (cell based and cell free) were investigated via in vitro cell culture studies. Nigella sativa oil was enriched with Calendula officinalis extract and lipoic acid capped gold nanoparticles (AuNP-LA) using nanoemulsion systems. The combination of these bio-active compounds was used to design oil in water (O/W) and water in oil (W/O) emulsions. The resulted emulsions were characterized by particle size measurements. The phenolic content of each nanoemulsion was examined by using both colorimetric assay and chromatographic analyses. Two different methods containing cell free chemical assay (1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl method) and cell based antioxidant activity test were used to evaluate the antioxidant capacities. In order to investigate the bio-activities of the herbal formulations, in vitro cell culture experiments, including cytotoxicity, scratch assay, antioxidant activity and cell proliferation were carried out using Vero cell line as a model cell line. Furthermore, to monitor localization of the nanoemulsions after application of the cell culture, the cell images were monitored via fluorescence microscope after FITC labeling. All data confirmed that the enriched N. sativa formulations exhibited better antioxidant and wound healing activity than N. sativa emulsion without any enrichment. In conclusion, the incorporation of AuNP-LA and C. officinalis extract into the N. sativa emulsions significantly increased the bio-activities. The present work may support further studies about using the other bio-active agents for the enrichment of herbal preparations to strengthen their activities. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Investigating a spatial approach to groundwater quantity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... balance' volumetric method. Using South Africa as a case study, the radius of influence methodology was shown to be scientifically practical, to provide plausible results, and to be permissible under the country's water laws. The approach also provides better indicators for institutions involved in groundwater management, ...

  14. In Vitro Approaches to Evaluation of Sun Protectin Factor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bendová, H.; Akrman, J.; Krejčí, A.; Kubáč, L.; Jírová, D.; Kejlová, K.; Kolářová, H.; Brabec, Marek; Malý, M.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2007), s. 1268-1275 ISSN 0887-2333 Source of funding: V - iné verejné zdroje Keywords : sunscreens * in vitro * SPF * nonparametric model Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 2.193, year: 2007

  15. 21 CFR 312.160 - Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... research animals or in vitro tests. 312.160 Section 312.160 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION... Drugs for Investigational Use in Laboratory Research Animals or In Vitro Tests § 312.160 Drugs for investigational use in laboratory research animals or in vitro tests. (a) Authorization to ship. (1)(i) A person...

  16. Estrogenicity of halogenated bisphenol A: in vitro and in silico investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Li, Tiezhu; Wang, Tuoyi; Yuan, Cuiping; Zhong, Shuning; Guan, Tianzhu; Li, Zhuolin; Wang, Yongzhi; Yu, Hansong; Luo, Quan; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Tiehua

    2018-03-01

    The binding interactions of bisphenol A (BPA) and its halogenated derivatives (halogenated BPAs) to human estrogen receptor α ligand binding domain (hERα-LBD) was investigated using a combined in vitro and in silico approach. First, the recombinant hERα-LBD was prepared as a soluble protein in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3)pLysS. A native fluorescent phytoestrogen, coumestrol, was employed as tracer for the fluorescence polarization assay. The results of the in vitro binding assay showed that bisphenol compounds could bind to hERα-LBD as the affinity ligands. All the tested halogenated BPAs exhibited weaker receptor binding than BPA, which might be explained by the steric effect of substituents. Molecular docking studies elucidated that the halogenated BPAs adopted different conformations in the flexible hydrophobic ligand binding pocket (LBP), which is mainly dependent on their distinct halogenation patterns. The compounds with halogen substituents on the phenolic rings and on the bridging alkyl moiety acted as agonists and antagonists for hERα, respectively. Interestingly, all the compounds in the agonist conformation of hERα formed a hydrogen bond with His524, while the compounds in the antagonist conformation formed a hydrogen bond with Thr347. These docking results suggested a pivotal role of His524/Thr347 in maintaining the hERα structure in the biologically active agonist/antagonist conformation. Comparison of the calculated binding energies vs. experimental binding affinities yielded a good correlation, which might be applicable for the structure-based design of novel bisphenol compounds with reduced toxicities and for environmental risk assessment. In addition, based on hERα-LBD as a recognition element, the proposed fluorescence polarization assay may offer an alternative to chromatographic techniques for the multi-residue determination of bisphenol compounds.

  17. How to approach the ENS: various ways to analyse motility disorders in situ and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, K-H; Hagl, C I; Wink, E; Holland-Cunz, S; Klotz, M; Rauch, U; Waag, K-L

    2003-06-01

    Motility disorders of the human intestine are so variable that they cannot be diagnosed by just one technique. Their aetiology is obviously so varied that they have to be approached with a broad range of technical methods. These reach from the simple haematoxylin-stained section to the isolation of stem or precursor cells. In this study, various methods to investigate the enteric nervous system and its surrounding tissue are demonstrated. While sections from paraffin-embedded material or cryostat sections provide only a two-dimensional perspective of the ENS, the whole-mount method yields three-dimensional perspectives of large areas of the gut wall. The three-dimensional impression can even be enhanced by electron microscopy of the isolated ENS. Dynamical aspects of ENS development can be tackled by in vitro studies. The myenteric plexus can be isolated and cultivated under the influence of the microenvironment (protein extracts). Although the postnatal myenteric plexus is not fully developed, the choice of embryological neuronal cells seems to be more effective for certain approaches. They can be isolated from the embryonic mouse gut and cultivated under the influence of various factors. This method seems to us a valuable tool for the investigation of the aetiology of motility disorders, although only a "complete" approach which considers all available methods will yield at the end a clear understanding which might lead to new therapeutical concepts.

  18. In vitro investigations of a novel wound dressing concept based on biodegradable polyurethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rottmar, Markus; Richter, Michael; Mäder, Xenia; Grieder, Kathrin; Bruinink, Arie; Nuss, Katja; Karol, Agnieszka; Rechenberg, Brigitte von; Zimmermann, Erika; Buser, Stephan; Dobmann, Andreas; Blume, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Non-healing and partially healing wounds are an important problem not only for the patient but also for the public health care system. Current treatment solutions are far from optimal regarding the chosen material properties as well as price and source. Biodegradable polyurethane (PUR) scaffolds have shown great promise for in vivo tissue engineering approaches, but accomplishment of the goal of scaffold degradation and new tissue formation developing in parallel has not been observed so far in skin wound repair. In this study, the mechanical properties and degradation behavior as well as the biocompatibility of a low-cost synthetic, pathogen-free, biocompatible and biodegradable extracellular matrix mimicking a PUR scaffold was evaluated in vitro. The novel PUR scaffolds were found to meet all the requirements for optimal scaffolds and wound dressings. These three-dimensional scaffolds are soft, highly porous, and form-stable and can be easily cut into any shape desired. All the material formulations investigated were found to be nontoxic. One formulation was able to be defined that supported both good fibroblast cell attachment and cell proliferation to colonize the scaffold. Tunable biodegradation velocity of the materials could be observed, and the results additionally indicated that calcium plays a crucial role in PUR degradation. Our results suggest that the PUR materials evaluated in this study are promising candidates for next-generation wound treatment systems and support the concept of using foam scaffolds for improved in vivo tissue engineering and regeneration. (focus issue paper)

  19. Identification of androgen receptor antagonists: In vitro investigation and classification methodology for flavonoid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yang; Doering, Jon A; Ma, Zhiyuan; Tang, Song; Liu, Hongling; Zhang, Xiaowei; Wang, Xiaoxiang; Yu, Hongxia

    2016-09-01

    A tremendous gap exists between the number of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) possibly in the environment and the limitation of traditional regulatory testing. In this study, the anti-androgenic potencies of 21 flavonoids were analyzed in vitro, and another 32 flavonoids from the literature were selected as additional chemicals. Molecular dynamic simulations were employed to obtain four different separation approaches based on the different behaviors of ligands and receptors during the process of interaction. Specifically, ligand-receptor complex which highlighted the discriminating features of ligand escape or retention via "mousetrap" mechanism, hydrogen bonds formed during simulation times, ligand stability and the stability of the helix-12 of the receptor were investigated. Together, a methodology was generated that 87.5% of flavonoids could be discriminated as active versus inactive antagonists, and over 90% inactive antagonists could be filtered out before QSAR study. This methodology could be used as a "proof of concept" to identify inactive anti-androgenic flavonoids, as well could be beneficial for rapid risk assessment and regulation of multiple new chemicals for androgenicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. In vitro investigations of a novel wound dressing concept based on biodegradable polyurethane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottmar, Markus; Richter, Michael; Mäder, Xenia; Grieder, Kathrin; Nuss, Katja; Karol, Agnieszka; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Zimmermann, Erika; Buser, Stephan; Dobmann, Andreas; Blume, Jessica; Bruinink, Arie

    2015-06-01

    Non-healing and partially healing wounds are an important problem not only for the patient but also for the public health care system. Current treatment solutions are far from optimal regarding the chosen material properties as well as price and source. Biodegradable polyurethane (PUR) scaffolds have shown great promise for in vivo tissue engineering approaches, but accomplishment of the goal of scaffold degradation and new tissue formation developing in parallel has not been observed so far in skin wound repair. In this study, the mechanical properties and degradation behavior as well as the biocompatibility of a low-cost synthetic, pathogen-free, biocompatible and biodegradable extracellular matrix mimicking a PUR scaffold was evaluated in vitro . The novel PUR scaffolds were found to meet all the requirements for optimal scaffolds and wound dressings. These three-dimensional scaffolds are soft, highly porous, and form-stable and can be easily cut into any shape desired. All the material formulations investigated were found to be nontoxic. One formulation was able to be defined that supported both good fibroblast cell attachment and cell proliferation to colonize the scaffold. Tunable biodegradation velocity of the materials could be observed, and the results additionally indicated that calcium plays a crucial role in PUR degradation. Our results suggest that the PUR materials evaluated in this study are promising candidates for next-generation wound treatment systems and support the concept of using foam scaffolds for improved in vivo tissue engineering and regeneration.

  1. Validation of the method for investigation of radiopharmaceuticals for in vitro use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vranjes, S; Jovanovic, M.; Orlic, M.; Lazic, E. . E-mail address of corresponding author: sanjav@vin.bg.ac.yu

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to validate analytical method for determination of total radioactivity and radioactive concentration of 125 I-triiodotironin, radiopharmaceutical for in vitro use. Analytical parameters: selectivity, accuracy, linearity and range of this method were determined. Values obtained for all parameters are reasonable for analytical methods, therefore this method could be used for farther investigation. (author)

  2. [Traditional and modern approaches to culture of preimplantation mammalian embryos in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusentsev, E Iu; Igonina, T N; Amstislavskiĭ, S Ia

    2014-01-01

    This review covers the basic principles and methods of in vitro culture of preimplantation mammalian embryos. The features of in vitro development of embryos of various species of animals with allowance for the composition of nutrient media are described, with special attention paid to those species that have traditionally been consideredas laboratory (i.e., mice, rats, and hamsters). The effects of suboptimal culturing conditions of preimplantation embryos on the formation of the phenotype of individuals developed from these embryos are discussed. New approaches to optimize the conditions of the development of preimplantation mammalian embryos in vitro are analyzed.

  3. A CONCEPTUAL REVIEW ON LINGUISTIC APPROACHES OF IDENTITY INVESTIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meinarni Susilowati

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Identity has been a blossoming issue in different fields. The intensity of investigating identity has stimulated the diverse methods and approaches to study identity from different angles. This paper discusses the how identity can be investigated from three different linguistic approaches, sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, and sociocultural linguistics approach. The practicality of these three approaches is explored to detect the nature of identity which is fluid, multiple, fragmented, socially, culturally, historically, religiously, and politically constructed and emerges within interactions. More space, however, is invested for elaborating the five principles of sociocultural linguistic approach due to its flexibility and multidimension of the approach. Empirical data is provided for proving its practicality for identity investigation. Further areas of investigation is given at the last part of the paper.

  4. Effect of mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate on human and mouse fetal testis: In vitro and in vivo approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muczynski, V. [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratory of Development of the Gonads, Unit of Stem Cells and Radiation, BP 6, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); CEA, DSV, iRCM, SCSR, LDRG, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); INSERM, Unité 967, F-92265, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Cravedi, J.P. [INRA, INP, Université de Toulouse, UMR1331 TOXALIM, F-31027, Toulouse (France); Lehraiki, A.; Levacher, C.; Moison, D.; Lecureuil, C.; Messiaen, S. [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratory of Development of the Gonads, Unit of Stem Cells and Radiation, BP 6, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); CEA, DSV, iRCM, SCSR, LDRG, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); INSERM, Unité 967, F-92265, Fontenay aux Roses (France); Perdu, E. [INRA, INP, Université de Toulouse, UMR1331 TOXALIM, F-31027, Toulouse (France); Frydman, R. [Service de Gynécologie-Obstétrique, Hôpital A. Béclère, Université Paris Sud F-92141 Clamart (France); Habert, R. [Univ. Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Laboratory of Development of the Gonads, Unit of Stem Cells and Radiation, BP 6, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); CEA, DSV, iRCM, SCSR, LDRG, 92265 Fontenay-aux-Roses (France); INSERM, Unité 967, F-92265, Fontenay aux Roses (France); and others

    2012-05-15

    The present study was conducted to determine whether exposure to the mono-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (MEHP) represents a genuine threat to male human reproductive function. To this aim, we investigated the effects on human male fetal germ cells of a 10{sup −5} M exposure. This dose is slightly above the mean concentrations found in human fetal cord blood samples by biomonitoring studies. The in vitro experimental approach was further validated for phthalate toxicity assessment by comparing the effects of in vitro and in vivo exposure in mouse testes. Human fetal testes were recovered during the first trimester (7–12 weeks) of gestation and cultured in the presence or not of 10{sup −5} M MEHP for three days. Apoptosis was quantified by measuring the percentage of Caspase-3 positive germ cells. The concentration of phthalate reaching the fetal gonads was determined by radioactivity measurements, after incubations with {sup 14}C-MEHP. A 10{sup −5} M exposure significantly increased the rate of apoptosis in human male fetal germ cells. The intratesticular MEHP concentration measured corresponded to the concentration added in vitro to the culture medium. Furthermore, a comparable effect on germ cell apoptosis in mouse fetal testes was induced both in vitro and in vivo. This study suggests that this 10{sup −5} M exposure is sufficient to induce changes to the in vivo development of the human fetal male germ cells. -- Highlights: ► 10{sup −5} M of MEHP impairs germ cell development in the human fetal testis. ► Organotypic culture is a suitable approach to investigate phthalate effects in human. ► MEHP is not metabolized in the human fetal testis. ► In mice, MEHP triggers similar effects both in vivo and in vitro.

  5. Biotechnological approaches to enhance salidroside, rosin and its derivatives production in selected Rhodiola spp. in vitro cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grech-Baran, Marta; Sykłowska-Baranek, Katarzyna; Pietrosiuk, Agnieszka

    Rhodiola (Crassulaceae) an arctic-alpine plant, is extensively used in traditional folk medicine in Asian and European countries. A number of investigations have demonstrated that Rhodiola preparations exhibit adaptogenic, neuroprotective, anti-tumour, cardioprotective, and anti-depressant effects. The main compounds responsible for these activities are believed to be salidroside, rosin and its derivatives which became the target of biotechnological investigations. This review summarizes the results of the diverse biotechnological approaches undertaken to enhance the production of salidroside, rosin and its derivatives in callus, cell suspension and organ in vitro cultures of selected Rhodiola species.

  6. Investigation of thyroid parameters in farm animal by means of 125I in vitro tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinecke, P.; Leuthold, G.

    1988-01-01

    125 I in vitro tests especially thyroid hormone radioimmunoassays rendered it possible to study thyroidal activity of domestic animals even in large random tests. Parameters of thyroidal activity, such as effective T 4 quotient, T 3 value and total T 3 content, were investigated as to their connection to growth and environmental influence. The estimation of the hereditability yielded only low h 2 coefficients except in the T 3 value. All parameters studied depended to a great extent on farm conditions

  7. Claudication of the lower limb: an approach to investigation and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    events far outweighs the 4% risk of a major amputation over 10 years. Asymptomatic patients ... The remainder of this article focuses on patients with PAD and. IC. IC is defined as an ... lower limb: an approach to investigation and management.

  8. Resorption behavior of a nanostructured bone substitute: in vitro investigation and clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichert, Christoph; Götz, Werner; Reimann, Susanne; Keilig, Ludger; Hagner, Martin; Bourauel, Christoph; Jäger, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    To develop an in vitro assay for quantitative analysis of the degradation to which a bone substitute is exposed by osteoclasts. The aim of establishing this method was to improve the predictability of carrying out tooth movements via bone substitutes and to provide a basis for verification in exemplary clinical cases. After populating a bone substitute (NanoBone®; ArtOss, Germany) with osteoclastic cells, inductively-coupled mass spectrometry was used to evaluate changing calcium levels in the culture medium as a marker of resorption activity. It was observed that calcium levels increased substantially in the culture medium with the cells populating the bone substitute. This in vitro assay is a valid method that can assist clinicians in selecting the appropriate materials for certain patients. While tooth movements occurring through this material were successful, uncertainty about the approach will remain as long-term results are not available.

  9. Antimicrobial activity of Tachyplesin 1 against Burkholderia pseudomallei: an in vitro and in silico approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyn-Fay Lee

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis, is intrinsically resistant to many conventional antibiotics. Therefore, alternative antimicrobial agents such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensively studied to combat this issue. Our study aims to identify and understand the mode of action of the potential AMP(s that are effective against B. pseudomallei in both planktonic and biofilm state as well as to predict the possible binding targets on using in vitro and in silico approaches. In the in vitro study, 11 AMPs were tested against 100 B. pseudomallei isolates for planktonic cell susceptibility, where LL-37, and PG1, demonstrated 100.0% susceptibility and TP1 demonstrated 83% susceptibility. Since the B. pseudomallei activity was reported on LL-37 and PG1, TP1 was selected for further investigation. TP1 inhibited B. pseudomallei cells at 61.69 μM, and membrane blebbing was observed using scanning electron microscopy. Moreover, TP1 inhibited B. pseudomallei cell growth, reaching bactericidal endpoint within 2 h post exposure as compared to ceftazidime (CAZ (8 h. Furthermore, TP1 was shown to suppress the growth of B. pseudomallei cells in biofilm state at concentrations above 221 μM. However, TP1 was cytotoxic to the mammalian cell lines tested. In the in silico study, molecular docking revealed that TP1 demonstrated a strong interaction to the common peptide or inhibitor binding targets for lipopolysaccharide of Escherichia coli, as well as autolysin, pneumolysin, and pneumococcal surface protein A (PspA of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Homology modelled B. pseudomallei PspA protein (YDP also showed a favourable binding with a strong electrostatic contribution and nine hydrogen bonds. In conclusion, TP1 demonstrated a good potential as an anti-B. pseudomallei agent.

  10. In vitro co-cultures of Pinus pinaster with Bursaphelenchus xylophilus: a biotechnological approach to study pine wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Jorge M S; Sena, Inês; Vieira da Silva, Inês; Ribeiro, Bruno; Barbosa, Pedro; Ascensão, Lia; Bennett, Richard N; Mota, Manuel; Figueiredo, A Cristina

    2015-06-01

    Co-cultures of Pinus pinaster with Bursaphelenchus xylophilus were established as a biotechnological tool to evaluate the effect of nematotoxics addition in a host/parasite culture system. The pinewood nematode (PWN), Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, the causal agent of pine wilt disease (PWD), was detected for the first time in Europe in 1999 spreading throughout the pine forests in Portugal and recently in Spain. Plant in vitro cultures may be a useful experimental system to investigate the plant/nematode relationships in loco, thus avoiding the difficulties of field assays. In this study, Pinus pinaster in vitro cultures were established and compared to in vivo 1 year-old plantlets by analyzing shoot structure and volatiles production. In vitro co-cultures were established with the PWN and the effect of the phytoparasite on in vitro shoot structure, water content and volatiles production was evaluated. In vitro shoots showed similar structure and volatiles production to in vivo maritime pine plantlets. The first macroscopic symptoms of PWD were observed about 4 weeks after in vitro co-culture establishment. Nematode population in the culture medium increased and PWNs were detected in gaps of the callus tissue and in cavities developed from the degradation of cambial cells. In terms of volatiles main components, plantlets, P. pinaster cultures, and P. pinaster with B. xylophilus co-cultures were all β- and α-pinene rich. Co-cultures may be an easy-to-handle biotechnological approach to study this pathology, envisioning the understanding of and finding ways to restrain this highly devastating nematode.

  11. Methods for dynamic investigations of surface-attached in vitro bacterial and fungal biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas; Shirtliff, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Three dynamic models for the investigation of in vitro biofilm formation are described in this chapter. In the 6-well plate assay presented here, the placing of the plate on a rotating platform provides shear, thereby making the system dynamic with respect to the static microtiter assay.The second...... reported model, especially suitable for harvesting high amounts of cells for transcriptomic or proteomic investigations, is based on numerous glass beads placed in a flask incubated with shaking on a rotating platform, thus increasing the surface area for biofilm formation. Finally, the flow-cell system...

  12. Characterizing Rat PNS Electrophysiological Response to Electrical Stimulation Using in vitro Chip-Based Human Investigational Platform (iCHIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khani, Joshua [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Prescod, Lindsay [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Enright, Heather [Georgetown Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Felix, Sarah [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Osburn, Joanne [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wheeler, Elizabeth [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kulp, Kris [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-08-18

    Ex vivo systems and organ-on-a-chip technology offer an unprecedented approach to modeling the inner workings of the human body. The ultimate goal of LLNL’s in vitro Chip-based Human Investigational Platform (iCHIP) is to integrate multiple organ tissue cultures using microfluidic channels, multi-electrode arrays (MEA), and other biosensors in order to effectively simulate and study the responses and interactions of the major organs to chemical and physical stimulation. In this study, we focused on the peripheral nervous system (PNS) component of the iCHIP system. Specifically we sought to expound on prior research investigating the electrophysiological response of rat dorsal root ganglion cells (rDRGs) to chemical exposures, such as capsaicin. Our aim was to establish a protocol for electrical stimulation using the iCHIP device that would reliably elicit a characteristic response in rDRGs. By varying the parameters for both the stimulation properties – amplitude, phase width, phase shape, and stimulation/ return configuration – and the culture conditions – day in vitro and neural cell types - we were able to make several key observations and uncover a potential convention with a minimal number of devices tested. Future work will seek to establish a standard protocol for human DRGs in the iCHIP which will afford a portable, rapid method for determining the effects of toxins and novel therapeutics on the PNS.

  13. In vitro flow investigations in the aortic arch during cardiopulmonary bypass with stereo-PIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsen, Martin; Kaufmann, Tim A S; Neidlin, Michael; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon J

    2015-07-16

    The cardiopulmonary bypass is related to complications like stroke or hypoxia. The cannula jet is suspected to be one reason for these complications, due to the sandblast effect on the vessel wall. Several in silico and in vitro studies investigated the underlying mechanisms, but the applied experimental flow measurement techniques were not able to address the highly three-dimensional flow character with a satisfying resolution. In this work in vitro flow measurements in a cannulated and a non-cannulated aortic silicone model are presented. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements in multiple planes were carried out. By assembling the data of the different measurement planes, quasi 3D velocity fields with a resolution of~1.5×1.5×2.5 mm(3) were obtained. The resulting velocity fields have been compared regarding magnitude, streamlines and vorticity. The presented method shows to be a suitable in vitro technique to measure and address the three-dimensional aortic CPB cannula flow with a high temporal and spatial resolution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. In Vitro and In Vivo Investigation of the Angiogenic Effects of Liraglutide during Islet Transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allan Langlois

    Full Text Available This study investigated the angiogenic properties of liraglutide in vitro and in vivo and the mechanisms involved, with a focus on Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR.Rat pancreatic islets were incubated in vitro with 10 μmol/L of liraglutide (Lira for 12, 24 and 48 h. Islet viability was studied by fluorescein diacetate/propidium iodide staining and their function was assessed by glucose stimulation. The angiogenic effect of liraglutide was determined in vitro by the measure of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF secretion using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by the evaluation of VEGF and platelet-derived growth factor-α (PDGFα expression with quantitative polymerase chain reaction technic. Then, in vitro and in vivo, angiogenic property of Lira was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining targeting the cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31. To understand angiogenic mechanisms involved by Lira, HIF-1α and mTOR activation were studied using western blotting. In vivo, islets (1000/kg body-weight were transplanted into diabetic (streptozotocin Lewis rats. Metabolic control was assessed for 1 month by measuring body-weight gain and fasting blood glucose.Islet viability and function were respectively preserved and enhanced (p<0.05 with Lira, versus control. Lira increased CD31-positive cells, expression of VEGF and PDGFα (p<0.05 after 24 h in culture. Increased VEGF secretion versus control was also observed at 48 h (p<0.05. Moreover, Lira activated mTOR (p<0.05 signalling pathway. In vivo, Lira improved vascular density (p<0.01, body-weight gain (p<0.01 and reduced fasting blood glucose in transplanted rats (p<0.001.The beneficial effects of liraglutide on islets appeared to be linked to its angiogenic properties. These findings indicated that glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues could be used to improve transplanted islet revascularisation.

  15. Investigation on the performance of bridge approach slab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelrahman Amr

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available In Egypt, where highway bridges are to be constructed on soft cohesive soils, the bridge abutments are usually founded on rigid piles, whereas the earth embankments for the bridge approaches are directly founded on the natural soft ground. Consequently, excessive differential settlement frequently occurs between the bridge deck and the bridge approaches resulting in a “bump” at both ends of the bridge deck. Such a bump not only creates a rough and uncomfortable ride but also represents a hazardous condition to traffic. One effective technique to cope with the bump problem is to use a reinforced concrete approach slab to provide a smooth grade transition between the bridge deck and the approach pavement. Investigating the geotechnical and structural performance of approach slabs and revealing the fundamental affecting factors have become mandatory. In this paper, a 2-D finite element model is employed to investigate the performance of approach slabs. Moreover, an extensive parametric study is carried out to appraise the relatively optimum geometries of approach slab, i.e. slab length, thickness, embedded depth and slope, that can yield permissible bumps. Different geo-mechanical conditions of the cohesive foundation soil and the fill material of the bridge embankment are examined.

  16. A sequential mixed methods research approach to investigating HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sequential mixed methods research is an effective approach for investigating complex problems, but it has not been extensively used in construction management research. In South Africa, the HIV/AIDS pandemic has seen construction management taking on a vital responsibility since the government called upon the ...

  17. Applying a Modified Triad Approach to Investigate Wastewater lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pawlowicz, R.; Urizar, L.; Blanchard, S.; Jacobsen, K.; Scholfield, J.

    2006-01-01

    Approximately 20 miles of wastewater lines are below grade at an active military Base. This piping network feeds or fed domestic or industrial wastewater treatment plants on the Base. Past wastewater line investigations indicated potential contaminant releases to soil and groundwater. Further environmental assessment was recommended to characterize the lines because of possible releases. A Remedial Investigation (RI) using random sampling or use of sampling points spaced at predetermined distances along the entire length of the wastewater lines, however, would be inefficient and cost prohibitive. To accomplish RI goals efficiently and within budget, a modified Triad approach was used to design a defensible sampling and analysis plan and perform the investigation. The RI task was successfully executed and resulted in a reduced fieldwork schedule, and sampling and analytical costs. Results indicated that no major releases occurred at the biased sampling points. It was reasonably extrapolated that since releases did not occur at the most likely locations, then the entire length of a particular wastewater line segment was unlikely to have contaminated soil or groundwater and was recommended for no further action. A determination of no further action was recommended for the majority of the waste lines after completing the investigation. The modified Triad approach was successful and a similar approach could be applied to investigate wastewater lines on other United States Department of Defense or Department of Energy facilities. (authors)

  18. Clozapine-induced agranulocytosis: Evidence for an immune-mediated mechanism from a patient-specific in-vitro approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Regen, Francesca; Herzog, Irmelin; Hahn, Eric; Ruehl, Claudia; Le Bret, Nathalie; Dettling, Michael; Heuser, Isabella [Dept. of Psychiatry, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, University Medicine Berlin (Germany); Hellmann-Regen, Julian, E-mail: julian.hellmann@charite.de [Dept. of Psychiatry, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Charité, University Medicine Berlin (Germany); Berlin Institute of Health (BIH), Berlin (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    Use of the atypical antipsychotic clozapine (CZP) is compromised by the risk of potentially fatal agranulocytosis/granulocytopenia (CIAG). To address this, we have established a simple, personalized cell culture-based strategy to identify CIAG-susceptible patients, hypothesizing that an immunogenic and possibly haptene-based mechanism underlies CIAG pathophysiology. To detect a putative haptene-induced response to CZP in vitro exposure, a traditional lymphocyte stimulation assay was adapted and applied to patient-specific peripheral blood-derived mononuclear cells (PBMC). 6 patients with a history of CIAG, 6 patients under CZP treatment (without CIAG) and 12 matched healthy controls were studied. In vitro CZP exposure, even at strikingly low levels, resulted in significantly increased proliferation rates only in CIAG patients' PBMC. Other parameters including cell viability and mitogen-induced proliferation were also affected by in vitro CZP exposure, yet there was no significant difference between the groups. This personalized approach is a starting point for further investigations into a putative haptene-based mechanism underlying CIAG development, and may facilitate the future development of predictive testing. - Highlights: • Clozapine induces proliferation in PBMCs from patients with a history of CIAG. • Simple, PBMC-based assay results in robust effects of physiological clozapine levels. • Haptene-based mechanisms discussed to underlie clozapine-induced proliferation.

  19. In vitro investigation of the effects of exogenous sugammadex on coagulation in orthopedic surgical patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Il Ok; Kim, Young Sung; Chang, Hae Wone; Kim, Heezoo; Lim, Byung Gun; Lee, Mido

    2018-05-24

    Previous studies have shown that sugammadex resulted in the prolongation of prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. In this study, we aimed to investigate the in vitro effects of exogenous sugammadex on the coagulation variables of whole blood in healthy patients who underwent orthopedic surgery. The effects of sugammadex on coagulations were assessed using thromboelastography (TEG) in kaolin-activated citrated blood samples taken from 14 healthy patients who underwent orthopedic surgery. The in vitro effects of three different concentrations of sugammadex (42, 193, and 301 μg mL - 1 ) on the TEG profiles were compared with those of the control (0 μg mL - 1 ). Previous studies indicated that these exogenous concentrations correspond to the approximate maximum plasma concentrations achieved after the administration of 4, 16, and 32 mg kg - 1 sugammadex to healthy subjects. Increased sugammadex concentrations were significantly associated with reduced coagulation, as evidenced by increases in reaction time (r), coagulation time, and time to maximum rate of thrombus generation (TMRTG), and decreases in the angle, maximum amplitude, and maximum rate of thrombus generation. Compared with the control, the median percentage change (interquartile range) in the TEG values of the samples treated with the highest exogenous sugammadex concentration was the greatest for r, 53% (26, 67.3%), and TMRTG, 48% (26, 59%). This in vitro study suggests that supratherapeutic doses of exogenous sugammadex might be associated with moderate hypocoagulation in the whole blood of healthy subjects. identifier:  UMIN000029081 , registered 11 September 2017.

  20. Combinational approach using solid dispersion and semi-solid matrix technology to enhance in vitro dissolution of telmisartan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Faisal Ali

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was focused to formulate semi-solid capsules (SSCs of hydrophobic drug telmisartan (TLMS by encapsulating semi-solid matrix of its solid dispersion (SD in HPMC capsules. The combinational approach was used to reduce the lag time in drug release and improvise its dissolution. SDs of TLMS was prepared using hot fusion method by varying the combinations of Pluronic-F68, Gelucire 50/13 and Plasdone S630. A total of nine batches (SD1-SD9 were characterized for micromeritic properties, in vitro dissolution behavior and surface characterization. SD4 with 52.43% cumulative drug release (CDR in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4, in 120 min, t50% 44.2 min and DE30min 96.76% was selected for the development of semi-solid capsules. Differential scanning calorimetry of SD4 revealed molecular dispersion of TLMS in Pluronic-F68. SD4 was formulated into SSCs using Gelucire 44/14 and PEG 400 as semi-solid components and PEG 6000 as a suspending agent to achieve reduction in lag time for effective drug dissolution. SSC6 showed maximum in vitro drug dissolution 97.49 % in phosphate buffer, pH 7.4 with in 20 min that was almost a three folds reduction in the time required to achieve similar dissolution by SD. Thus, SSCs present an excellent approach to enhance in vitro dissolution as well as to reduce the lag time of dissolution for poorly water soluble drugs especially to those therapeutic classes that are intended for faster onset of action. Developed approach based on HPMC capsules provided a better alternative to target delivery of telmisartan to the vegetarian population.

  1. Caval filter implantation under MRI control - experimental in vitro and in vivo investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neuerburg, J.; Buecker, A.; Adam, G.; Leenen, M.; Guenther, R.W.; Hurtak, M.S.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: An instrument has been developed for the introduction of caval filters which can be used with MRI; it has been investigated in in vitro and in in vivo experiments. Material and method: The ferromagnetic components of a commercially available instrument for the femoral introduction of the MR-eye TM Tulip IVC filter were changed for similar, non-ferromagnetic parts and the lock and dilator marked with dysprosium oxide rings. The instrument was used in a flow phantom and in animal experiments (two domestic pigs) in order to insert filters under MRI control on a 1.5 T Philips Gyroscan with integrated mobile digital subtraction angiography. Results: Both in vitro and in vivo, the introducer, catheter and caval filter could be identified by MRI and positioned under MRI control. The position of the filter as indicated by MRI corresponded with radiological and macroscopic findings in all cases (5 phantoms, 2 pigs). Conclusion: The early experimental results indicate that percutaneous introduction of caval filters with placement under MRI control is possible. (orig.) [de

  2. In Vitro and In Vivo Investigation of the Angiogenic Effects of Liraglutide during Islet Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Allan; Mura, Carole; Bietiger, William; Seyfritz, Elodie; Dollinger, Camille; Peronet, Claude; Maillard, Elisa; Pinget, Michel; Jeandidier, Nathalie; Sigrist, Séverine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This study investigated the angiogenic properties of liraglutide in vitro and in vivo and the mechanisms involved, with a focus on Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α (HIF-1α) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Materials and Methods Rat pancreatic islets were incubated in vitro with 10 μmol/L of liraglutide (Lira) for 12, 24 and 48 h. Islet viability was studied by fluorescein diacetate/propidium iodide staining and their function was assessed by glucose stimulation. The angiogenic effect of liraglutide was determined in vitro by the measure of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) secretion using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and by the evaluation of VEGF and platelet-derived growth factor-α (PDGFα) expression with quantitative polymerase chain reaction technic. Then, in vitro and in vivo, angiogenic property of Lira was evaluated using immunofluorescence staining targeting the cluster of differentiation 31 (CD31). To understand angiogenic mechanisms involved by Lira, HIF-1α and mTOR activation were studied using western blotting. In vivo, islets (1000/kg body-weight) were transplanted into diabetic (streptozotocin) Lewis rats. Metabolic control was assessed for 1 month by measuring body-weight gain and fasting blood glucose. Results Islet viability and function were respectively preserved and enhanced (p<0.05) with Lira, versus control. Lira increased CD31-positive cells, expression of VEGF and PDGFα (p<0.05) after 24 h in culture. Increased VEGF secretion versus control was also observed at 48 h (p<0.05). Moreover, Lira activated mTOR (p<0.05) signalling pathway. In vivo, Lira improved vascular density (p<0.01), body-weight gain (p<0.01) and reduced fasting blood glucose in transplanted rats (p<0.001). Conclusion The beneficial effects of liraglutide on islets appeared to be linked to its angiogenic properties. These findings indicated that glucagon-like peptide-1 analogues could be used to improve transplanted islet revascularisation

  3. Group investigation with scientific approach in mathematics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indarti, D.; Mardiyana; Pramudya, I.

    2018-03-01

    The aim of this research is to find out the effect of learning model toward mathematics achievement. This research is quasi-experimental research. The population of research is all VII grade students of Karanganyar regency in the academic year of 2016/2017. The sample of this research was taken using stratified cluster random sampling technique. Data collection was done based on mathematics achievement test. The data analysis technique used one-way ANOVA following the normality test with liliefors method and homogeneity test with Bartlett method. The results of this research is the mathematics learning using Group Investigation learning model with scientific approach produces the better mathematics learning achievement than learning with conventional model on material of quadrilateral. Group Investigation learning model with scientific approach can be used by the teachers in mathematics learning, especially in the material of quadrilateral, which is can improve the mathematics achievement.

  4. THP-1 cell line: an in vitro cell model for immune modulation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanput, Wasaporn; Mes, Jurriaan J; Wichers, Harry J

    2014-11-01

    THP-1 is a human leukemia monocytic cell line, which has been extensively used to study monocyte/macrophage functions, mechanisms, signaling pathways, and nutrient and drug transport. This cell line has become a common model to estimate modulation of monocyte and macrophage activities. This review attempts to summarize and discuss recent publications related to the THP-1 cell model. An overview on the biological similarities and dissimilarities between the THP-1 cell line and human peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) derived-monocytes and macrophages, as well as the advantages and disadvantages of the use of THP-1 cell line, is included. The review summarizes different published co-cultivation studies of THP-1 cells with other cell types, for instance, intestinal cells, adipocytes, T-lymphocytes, platelets, and vascular smooth muscle cells, which can be an option to study cell-cell interaction in vitro and can be an approach to better mimic in vivo conditions. Macrophage polarization is a relatively new topic which gains interest for which the THP-1 cell line also may be relevant. Besides that an overview of newly released commercial THP-1 engineered-reporter cells and THP-1 inflammasome test-cells is also given. Evaluation of recent papers leads to the conclusion that the THP-1 cell line has unique characteristics as a model to investigate/estimate immune-modulating effects of compounds in both activated and resting conditions of the cells. Although the THP-1 response can hint to potential responses that might occur ex vivo or in vivo, these should be, however, validated by in vivo studies to draw more definite conclusions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. An in vitro approach for comparative interspecies metabolism of agrochemicals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whalley, Paul M; Bartels, Michael; Bentley, Karin S; Corvaro, Marco; Funk, Dorothee; Himmelstein, Matthew W; Neumann, Birgit; Strupp, Christian; Zhang, Fagen; Mehta, Jyotigna

    2017-08-01

    The metabolism and elimination of a xenobiotic has a direct bearing on its potential to cause toxicity in an organism. The confidence with which data from safety studies can be extrapolated to humans depends, among other factors, upon knowing whether humans are systemically exposed to the same chemical entities (i.e. a parent compound and its metabolites) as the laboratory animals used to study toxicity. Ideally, to understand a metabolite in terms of safety, both the chemical structure and the systemic exposure would need to be determined. However, as systemic exposure data (i.e. blood concentration/time data of test material or metabolites) in humans will not be available for agrochemicals, an in vitro approach must be taken. This paper outlines an in vitro experimental approach for evaluating interspecies metabolic comparisons between humans and animal species used in safety studies. The aim is to ensure, where possible, that all potential human metabolites are also present in the species used in the safety studies. If a metabolite is only observed in human in vitro samples and is not present in a metabolic pathway defined in the toxicological species already, the toxicological relevance of this metabolite must be evaluated. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The Increase of Critical Thinking Skills through Mathematical Investigation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumarna, N.; Wahyudin; Herman, T.

    2017-02-01

    Some research findings on critical thinking skills of prospective elementary teachers, showed a response that is not optimal. On the other hand, critical thinking skills will lead a student in the process of analysis, evaluation and synthesis in solving a mathematical problem. This study attempts to perform an alternative solution with a focus on mathematics learning conditions that is held in the lecture room through mathematical investigation approach. This research method was Quasi-Experimental design with pre-test post-test design. Data analysis using a mixed method with Embedded design. Subjects were regular students enrolled in 2014 at the study program of education of primary school teachers. The number of research subjects were 111 students consisting of 56 students in the experimental group and 55 students in the control group. The results of the study showed that (1) there is a significant difference in the improvement of critical thinking ability of students who receive learning through mathematical investigation approach when compared with students studying through expository approach, and (2) there is no interaction effect between prior knowledge of mathematics and learning factors (mathematical investigation and expository) to increase of critical thinking skills of students.

  7. Establishment Of Illumination System For Investigation Of Monochromatic Lights Combination Effects On In Vitro Plant Growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tien Thanh; Le Ngoc Trieu; Nguyen Tuong Mien; Huynh Thi Trung; Phan Quoc Minh

    2014-01-01

    Super blue and red light LEDs and other electric, electronic components are used to design and establish 11 independent illumination systems, each system can arbitrarily control to operate at 55 molarities of illumination which are different from together in monochromatic lights combination and total illumination intensity based on the microcontrollers. Programs for loading to microcontrollers were created to base on theoretical calculation and experimental correction. The illumination cycles can be controlled by setting the timer. These 11 systems and another fluorescent light illumination were used to execute the experiment for investigation the effects of monochromatic lights combination on in vitro shoot proliferation stage in Chrysanthemum and Phalaenopsis orchid. Results from this experiment showed that illumination intensity of 400 lux is suitable for chrysanthemum, 750 lux is suitable for Phalaenopsis orchid and rate of 70% red light-30% blue light are suitable for both kinds of these plants. (author)

  8. Biodegradable polymeric system for cisplatin delivery: Development, in vitro characterization and investigation of toxicity profile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alam, Noor; Khare, Vaibhav; Dubey, Ravindra; Saneja, Ankit; Kushwaha, Manoj; Singh, Gurdarshan; Sharma, Neelam; Chandan, Balkrishan; Gupta, Prem N.

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent anticancer agent used in the treatment of various solid tumors, however, its clinical use is limited due to severe adverse effects including nephrotoxicity. In this investigation cisplatin loaded poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles were developed and characterized for various in vitro characteristics including size distribution, zeta potential, drug loading and release profile. PLGA nanoparticles were successfully developed as investigated using scanning electron microscopy and exhibited average particles size and zeta potential as 284.8 nm and − 15.8 mV, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and differential scanning calorimetry indicated an absence of any polymer–drug interactions. Cisplatin nanoparticles exhibited in vitro anticancer activity against A549 cells comparable to that of cisplatin solution. The biodistribution study in mice indicated that the kidney cisplatin level was significantly (p < 0.01) lower with cisplatin nanoparticles than cisplatin solution. Following two cycles of cisplatin treatment, a week apart, blood urea nitrogen level was found to be higher in case of cisplatin solution as compared to cisplatin nanoparticles. Further, there was a significant (p < 0.01) increase in plasma creatinine level in case of cisplatin solution as compared to cisplatin nanoparticles. Histopathological examination of kidney from cisplatin nanoparticles treated group revealed no kidney damage, however, a sign of nephrotoxicity was observed in the case of cisplatin solution. The results suggest that PLGA nanoparticle based formulation could be a potential option for cisplatin delivery. - Highlights: • Cisplatin is detected by LCMS following complexation with DDTC. • Nanoparticles showed lower cisplatin accumulation in the kidney. • Nephrotoxicity was evaluated by BUN and creatinine level and by histopathology. • Nanoparticles exhibited lower nephrotoxicity

  9. An integrated in silico/in vitro approach to assess the xenoestrogenic potential of Alternaria mycotoxins and metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dellafiora, Luca; Warth, Benedikt; Schmidt, Verena; Del Favero, Giorgia; Mikula, Hannes; Fröhlich, Johannes; Marko, Doris

    2018-05-15

    Xenoestrogenic mycotoxins may contaminate food and feed posing a public health issue. Besides the zearalenone group, the Alternaria toxin alternariol (AOH) has been described as a potential mycoestrogen. However, the estrogenicity of Alternaria toxins is still largely overlooked and further data are needed to better describe the group toxicity. In the frame of risk assessment, mixed in silico/in vitro approaches already proved to be effective first-line analytical tools. An integrated in silico/in vitro approach was used to investigate the effects of metabolic and chemical modifications on the estrogenicity of AOH. Among the considered modifications, methylation was found critical for enhancing estrogenicity (as seen for alternariol monomethyl ether (AME)) while hydroxylation and glucuronidation had the opposite effect (as seen for 4-hydroxy AOH and 4-hydroxy AME). The structure-activity relationship analysis provided the structural rationale. Our results provide insights to design more efficient risk assessment studies expanding knowledge over the group toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Prion structure investigated in situ, ex vivo, and in vitro by FTIR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kneipp, Janina; Miller, Lisa M.; Spassov, Sashko; Sokolowski, Fabian; Lasch, Peter; Beekes, Michael; Naumann, Dieter

    2004-07-01

    Syrian hamster nervous tissue was investigated by FTIR microspectroscopy with conventional and synchrotron infrared light sources. Various tissue structures from the cerebellum and medulla oblongata of scrapie-infected and control hamsters were investigated at a spatial resolution of 50 μm. Single neurons in dorsal root ganglia of scrapie-infected hamsters were analyzed by raster scan mapping at 6 μm spatial resolution. These measurements enabled us to (i) scrutinize structural differences between infected and non-infected tissue and (ii) analyze for the first time the distribution of different protein structures in situ within single nerve cells. Single nerve cells exhibited areas of increased β-sheet content, which co-localized consistently with accumulations of the pathological prion protein (PrPSc). Spectral data were also obtained from purified, partly proteinase K digested PrPSc isolated from scrapie-infected nervous tissue of hamsters to elucidate similarities/dissimilarities between prion structure in situ and ex vivo. A further comparison is drawn to the recombinant Syrian hamster prion protein SHaPrP90-232, whose in vitro transition from the predominantly a-helical isoform to β-sheet rich oligomeric structures was also investigated by FTIR spectroscopy.

  11. A three-dimensional approach to in vitro culture of immune-related cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartmann, Sofie Bruun

    setups for improved activation/differentiation of immune cells. Conclusively, this work highlights the importance of acknowledging the effect from external factors when analyzing data generated from in vitro cultures. This being even more important when working with immune cells since these cells adopt......T lymphocytes are key players during the initiation of an adaptive immune response. The activation of these cells in vivo requires migration within the lymph nodes until they encounter antigen presenting cells (APCs) that can activate them to secrete IFN-γ which mediates downstream effector...... functions. The in vitro reactivation of antigen-experienced T lymphocytes and detection of IFN-γ from cell cultures can be used in a diagnostic assay to test for disease or vaccine efficacy. Practical procedures of the IFN-γ release assay (IGRA) was investigated using bovine cells and whole blood cultures...

  12. Provesicular granisetron hydrochloride buccal formulations: in vitro evaluation and preliminary investigation of in vivo performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Sami; El-Setouhy, Doaa Ahmed; El-Latif Badawi, Alia Abd; El-Nabarawi, Mohamed Ahmed

    2014-08-18

    Granisetron hydrochloride (granisetron) is a potent antiemetic that has been proven to be effective in acute and delayed emesis in cancer chemotherapy. Granisetron suffers from reduced oral bioavailability (≈60%) due to hepatic metabolism. In this study the combined advantage of provesicular carriers and buccal drug delivery has been explored aiming to sustain effect and improve bioavailability of granisetron via development of granisetron provesicular buccoadhesive tablets with suitable quality characteristics (hardness, drug content, in vitro release pattern, exvivo bioadhesion and in vivo bioadhesion behavior). Composition of the reconstituted niosomes from different prepared provesicular carriers regarding type of surfactant used and cholesterol concentration significantly affected both entrapment efficiency (%EE) and vesicle size. Span 80 proniosome-derived niosomes exhibited higher encapsulation efficiency and smaller particle size than those derived from span 20. Also, the effect of %EE and bioadhesive polymer type on in vitro drug release and in vivo performance of buccoadhesive tablets was investigated. Based on achievement of required in vitro release pattern (20-30% at 2h, 40-65% at 6h and 80-95% at 12h), in vivo swelling behavior, and in vivo adhesion time (>14 h) granisetron formulation (F19, 1.4 mg) comprising HPMC:carbopol 974P (7:3) and maltodextrin coated with the vesicular precursors span 80 and cholesterol (9:1) was chosen for in vivo study. In vivo pharmacokinetic study revealed higher bioavailability of buccal formulation relative to conventional oral formulation of granisetron (AUC0-∞ is 89.97 and 38.18 ng h/ml for buccal and oral formulation, respectively). A significantly lower and delayed Cmax (12.09±4.47 ng/ml, at 8h) was observed after buccal application compared to conventional oral tablet (31.66±10.15 ng/ml, at 0.5 h). The prepared provesicular buccoadhesive tablet of granisetron (F19) might help bypass hepatic first

  13. [Investigation of in vitro metronidazole resistance in the clinical isolates of Trichomonas vaginalis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertabaklar, Hatice; Yaman Karadam, Senem; Malatyalı, Erdoğan; Ertuğ, Sema

    2016-10-01

    -sensitive isolates were 27.17 µg/ml in aerobic and 7.75 µg/ml in anaerobic conditions. The rate of metronidazole resistance detected in this study was higher than most of reports from different countries. Despite being limited to the isolates from Aydin province (located at Agean region of Turkey), the present study has a value as it presented the existence of metronidazole-resistant isolates in Turkey for the first time. More research from other parts of Turkey is needed to better understand the metronidazole resistance at a national scale and to investigate novel strategies for the treatment. Moreover, further studies need to be carried out in order to clarify the relationship between clinical treatment response and in vitro metronidazole resistance in trichomoniasis.

  14. Fuzzy set approach to quality function deployment: An investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, Abu S. M.

    1992-01-01

    The final report of the 1992 NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Fellowship at the Space Exploration Initiative Office (SEIO) in Langley Research Center is presented. Quality Function Deployment (QFD) is a process, focused on facilitating the integration of the customer's voice in the design and development of a product or service. Various input, in the form of judgements and evaluations, are required during the QFD analyses. All the input variables in these analyses are treated as numeric variables. The purpose of the research was to investigate how QFD analyses can be performed when some or all of the input variables are treated as linguistic variables with values expressed as fuzzy numbers. The reason for this consideration is that human judgement, perception, and cognition are often ambiguous and are better represented as fuzzy numbers. Two approaches for using fuzzy sets in QFD have been proposed. In both cases, all the input variables are considered as linguistic variables with values indicated as linguistic expressions. These expressions are then converted to fuzzy numbers. The difference between the two approaches is due to how the QFD computations are performed with these fuzzy numbers. In Approach 1, the fuzzy numbers are first converted to their equivalent crisp scores and then the QFD computations are performed using these crisp scores. As a result, the output of this approach are crisp numbers, similar to those in traditional QFD. In Approach 2, all the QFD computations are performed with the fuzzy numbers and the output are fuzzy numbers also. Both the approaches have been explained with the help of illustrative examples of QFD application. Approach 2 has also been applied in a QFD application exercise in SEIO, involving a 'mini moon rover' design. The mini moon rover is a proposed tele-operated vehicle that will traverse and perform various tasks, including autonomous operations, on the moon surface. The output of the moon rover application exercise is a

  15. Raman spectroscopic approach to monitor the in vitro cyclization of creatine → creatinine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Sharma, Poornima; Singh, Sachin Kumar; Singh, Pushkar; Tarcea, Nicolae; Deckert, Volker; Popp, Jürgen; Singh, Ranjan K.

    2015-01-01

    The creatine → creatinine cyclization, an important metabolic phenomenon has been initiated in vitro at acidic pH and studied through Raman spectroscopic and DFT approach. The equilibrium composition of neutral, zwitterionic and protonated microspecies of creatine has been monitored with time as the reaction proceeds. Time series Raman spectra show clear signature of creatinine formation at pH 3 after ∼240 min at room temperature and reaction is faster at higher temperature. The spectra at pH 1 and pH 5 do not show such signature up to 270 min implying faster reaction rate at pH 3.

  16. Investigation of volatile organic biomarkers derived from Plasmodium falciparum in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Rina PM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There remains a need for techniques that improve the sensitive detection of viable Plasmodium falciparum as part of diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in clinical studies and usual-care management of malaria infections. A non-invasive breath test based on P. falciparum-associated specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs could fill this gap and provide insights into parasite metabolism and pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to determine whether VOCs are present in the headspace above in vitro P. falciparum cultures. Methods A novel, custom-designed apparatus was developed to enable efficient headspace sampling of infected and non-infected cultures. Conditions were optimized to support cultures of high parasitaemia (>20% to improve the potential detection of parasite-specific VOCs. A number of techniques for VOC analysis were investigated including solid phase micro-extraction using two different polarity fibres, and purge and trap/thermal desorption, each coupled to gas chromatography–mass spectrometry. Each experiment and analysis method was performed at least on two occasions. VOCs were identified by comparing their mass spectra against commercial mass spectral libraries. Results No unique malarial-specific VOCs could be detected relative to those in the control red blood cell cultures. This could reflect sequestration of VOCs into cell membranes and/or culture media but solvent extractions of supernatants and cell lysates using hexane, dichloromethane and ethyl acetate also showed no obvious difference compared to control non-parasitized cultures. Conclusions Future in vivo studies analysing the breath of patients with severe malaria who are harbouring a parasite biomass that is significantly greater than achievable in vitro may yet reveal specific clinically-useful volatile chemical biomarkers.

  17. In vitro performance investigation of bioresorbable scaffolds – Standard tests for vascular stents and beyond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmidt, Wolfram; Behrens, Peter; Brandt-Wunderlich, Christoph; Siewert, Stefan; Grabow, Niels; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background/Purpose: Biodegradable polymers are the main materials for coronary scaffolds. Magnesium has been investigated as a potential alternative and was successfully tested in human clinical trials. However, it is still challenging to achieve mechanical parameters comparative to permanent bare metal (BMS) and drug-eluting stents (DES). As such, in vitro tests are required to assess mechanical parameters correlated to the safety and efficacy of the device. Methods/Materials: In vitro bench tests evaluate scaffold profiles, length, deliverability, expansion behavior including acute elastic and time-dependent recoil, bending stiffness and radial strength. The Absorb GT1 (Abbott Vascular, Temecula, CA), DESolve (Elixir Medical Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA) and the Magmaris (BIOTRONIK AG, Bülach, Switzerland) that was previously tested in the BIOSOLVE II study, were tested. Results: Crimped profiles were 1.38 ± 0.01 mm (Absorb GT1), 1.39 ± 0.01 mm (DESolve) and 1.44 ± 0.00 mm (Magmaris) enabling 6F compatibility. Trackability was measured depending on stiffness and force transmission (pushability). Acute elastic recoil was measured at free expansion and within a mock vessel, respectively, yielding results of 5.86 ± 0.76 and 5.22 ± 0.38% (Absorb), 7.85 ± 3.45 and 9.42 ± 0.21% (DESolve) and 5.57 ± 0.72 and 4.94 ± 0.31% (Magmaris). Time-dependent recoil (after 1 h) was observed for the Absorb and DESolve scaffolds but not for the Magmaris. The self-correcting wall apposition behavior of the DESolve did not prevent time-dependent recoil under vessel loading. Conclusions: The results of the suggested test methods allow assessment of technical feasibility based on objective mechanical data and highlight the main differences between polymeric and metallic bioresorbable scaffolds.

  18. In vitro performance investigation of bioresorbable scaffolds - Standard tests for vascular stents and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Wolfram; Behrens, Peter; Brandt-Wunderlich, Christoph; Siewert, Stefan; Grabow, Niels; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter

    2016-09-01

    Biodegradable polymers are the main materials for coronary scaffolds. Magnesium has been investigated as a potential alternative and was successfully tested in human clinical trials. However, it is still challenging to achieve mechanical parameters comparative to permanent bare metal (BMS) and drug-eluting stents (DES). As such, in vitro tests are required to assess mechanical parameters correlated to the safety and efficacy of the device. In vitro bench tests evaluate scaffold profiles, length, deliverability, expansion behavior including acute elastic and time-dependent recoil, bending stiffness and radial strength. The Absorb GT1 (Abbott Vascular, Temecula, CA), DESolve (Elixir Medical Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA) and the Magmaris (BIOTRONIK AG, Bülach, Switzerland) that was previously tested in the BIOSOLVE II study, were tested. Crimped profiles were 1.38±0.01mm (Absorb GT1), 1.39±0.01mm (DESolve) and 1.44±0.00mm (Magmaris) enabling 6F compatibility. Trackability was measured depending on stiffness and force transmission (pushability). Acute elastic recoil was measured at free expansion and within a mock vessel, respectively, yielding results of 5.86±0.76 and 5.22±0.38% (Absorb), 7.85±3.45 and 9.42±0.21% (DESolve) and 5.57±0.72 and 4.94±0.31% (Magmaris). Time-dependent recoil (after 1h) was observed for the Absorb and DESolve scaffolds but not for the Magmaris. The self-correcting wall apposition behavior of the DESolve did not prevent time-dependent recoil under vessel loading. The results of the suggested test methods allow assessment of technical feasibility based on objective mechanical data and highlight the main differences between polymeric and metallic bioresorbable scaffolds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro performance investigation of bioresorbable scaffolds – Standard tests for vascular stents and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Wolfram, E-mail: wolfram.schmidt@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University Medicine Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Strasse 4, D-18119 Rostock-Warnemünde (Germany); Behrens, Peter, E-mail: peter.behrens@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University Medicine Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Strasse 4, D-18119 Rostock-Warnemünde (Germany); Brandt-Wunderlich, Christoph, E-mail: christoph.brandt@uni-rostock.de [Institute for ImplantTechnology and Biomaterials – IIB e.V., Associated Institute of the University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Strasse 4, D-18119 Rostock-Warnemünde (Germany); Siewert, Stefan, E-mail: stefan.siewert@uni-rostock.de [Institute for ImplantTechnology and Biomaterials – IIB e.V., Associated Institute of the University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Strasse 4, D-18119 Rostock-Warnemünde (Germany); Grabow, Niels, E-mail: niels.grabow@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University Medicine Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Strasse 4, D-18119 Rostock-Warnemünde (Germany); Schmitz, Klaus-Peter, E-mail: klaus-peter.schmitz@uni-rostock.de [Institute for ImplantTechnology and Biomaterials – IIB e.V., Associated Institute of the University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Strasse 4, D-18119 Rostock-Warnemünde (Germany)

    2016-09-15

    Background/Purpose: Biodegradable polymers are the main materials for coronary scaffolds. Magnesium has been investigated as a potential alternative and was successfully tested in human clinical trials. However, it is still challenging to achieve mechanical parameters comparative to permanent bare metal (BMS) and drug-eluting stents (DES). As such, in vitro tests are required to assess mechanical parameters correlated to the safety and efficacy of the device. Methods/Materials: In vitro bench tests evaluate scaffold profiles, length, deliverability, expansion behavior including acute elastic and time-dependent recoil, bending stiffness and radial strength. The Absorb GT1 (Abbott Vascular, Temecula, CA), DESolve (Elixir Medical Corporation, Sunnyvale, CA) and the Magmaris (BIOTRONIK AG, Bülach, Switzerland) that was previously tested in the BIOSOLVE II study, were tested. Results: Crimped profiles were 1.38 ± 0.01 mm (Absorb GT1), 1.39 ± 0.01 mm (DESolve) and 1.44 ± 0.00 mm (Magmaris) enabling 6F compatibility. Trackability was measured depending on stiffness and force transmission (pushability). Acute elastic recoil was measured at free expansion and within a mock vessel, respectively, yielding results of 5.86 ± 0.76 and 5.22 ± 0.38% (Absorb), 7.85 ± 3.45 and 9.42 ± 0.21% (DESolve) and 5.57 ± 0.72 and 4.94 ± 0.31% (Magmaris). Time-dependent recoil (after 1 h) was observed for the Absorb and DESolve scaffolds but not for the Magmaris. The self-correcting wall apposition behavior of the DESolve did not prevent time-dependent recoil under vessel loading. Conclusions: The results of the suggested test methods allow assessment of technical feasibility based on objective mechanical data and highlight the main differences between polymeric and metallic bioresorbable scaffolds.

  20. An integrated approach for the in vitro dosimetry of engineered nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a great need for screening tools capable of rapidly assessing nanomaterial toxicity. One impediment to the development of reliable in vitro screening methods is the need for accurate measures of cellular dose. We present here a methodology that enables accurate determination of delivered to cell dose metrics. This methodology includes (1) standardization of engineered nanomaterial (ENM) suspension preparation; (2) measurement of ENM characteristics controlling delivery to cells in culture; and (3) calculation of delivered dose as a function of exposure time using the ISDD model. The approach is validated against experimentally measured doses, and simplified analytical expressions for the delivered dose (Relevant In Vitro Dose (RID)f function) are derived for 20 ENMs. These functions can be used by nanotoxicologists to accurately calculate the total mass (RIDM), surface area (RIDSA), or particle number (RIDN) delivered to cells as a function of exposure time. Results The proposed methodology was used to derive the effective density, agglomerate diameter and RID functions for 17 industrially-relevant metal and metal oxide ENMs, two carbonaceous nanoparticles, and non-agglomerating gold nanospheres, for two well plate configurations (96 and 384 well plates). For agglomerating ENMs, the measured effective density was on average 60% below the material density. We report great variability in delivered dose metrics, with some materials depositing within 24 hours while others require over 100 hours for delivery to cells. A neutron-activated tracer particle system was employed to validate the proposed in vitro dosimetry methodology for a number of ENMs (measured delivered to cell dose within 9% of estimated). Conclusions Our findings confirm and extend experimental and computational evidence that agglomerate characteristics affect the dose delivered to cells. Therefore measurement of these characteristics is critical for effective use of in vitro systems

  1. Expert consensus on an in vitro approach to assess pulmonary fibrogenic potential of aerosolized nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clippinger, Amy J; Ahluwalia, Arti; Allen, David; Bonner, James C; Casey, Warren; Castranova, Vincent; David, Raymond M; Halappanavar, Sabina; Hotchkiss, Jon A; Jarabek, Annie M; Maier, Monika; Polk, William; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Sayes, Christie M; Sayre, Phil; Sharma, Monita; Stone, Vicki

    2016-07-01

    The increasing use of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in consumer products and their potential to induce adverse lung effects following inhalation has lead to much interest in better understanding the hazard associated with these nanomaterials (NMs). While the current regulatory requirement for substances of concern, such as MWCNTs, in many jurisdictions is a 90-day rodent inhalation test, the monetary, ethical, and scientific concerns associated with this test led an international expert group to convene in Washington, DC, USA, to discuss alternative approaches to evaluate the inhalation toxicity of MWCNTs. Pulmonary fibrosis was identified as a key adverse outcome linked to MWCNT exposure, and recommendations were made on the design of an in vitro assay that is predictive of the fibrotic potential of MWCNTs. While fibrosis takes weeks or months to develop in vivo, an in vitro test system may more rapidly predict fibrogenic potential by monitoring pro-fibrotic mediators (e.g., cytokines and growth factors). Therefore, the workshop discussions focused on the necessary specifications related to the development and evaluation of such an in vitro system. Recommendations were made for designing a system using lung-relevant cells co-cultured at the air-liquid interface to assess the pro-fibrogenic potential of aerosolized MWCNTs, while considering human-relevant dosimetry and NM life cycle transformations. The workshop discussions provided the fundamental design components of an air-liquid interface in vitro test system that will be subsequently expanded to the development of an alternative testing strategy to predict pulmonary toxicity and to generate data that will enable effective risk assessment of NMs.

  2. Investigations into the early stages of 'in vitro' calcification on chitosan films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aimoli, Cassiano G.; Torres, Marco A.; Beppu, Marisa M.

    2006-01-01

    This work investigated the mechanisms involved in the 'in vitro' calcification of chitosan films. The calcification process on chitosan films is a phenomenon that has not been sufficiently studied, despite its importance in the understanding of many natural processes, such as bone and shell formation. Three different techniques were used in the present investigation: X-ray fluorescence (XRF), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Natural and acetylated chitosan films were used as substrates for calcification. The experiments were carried out by immersing chitosan membranes in simulated body fluid (SBF) or in a modified version of SBF, prepared without phosphate ions, during 30 min, 3 or 12 h. Calcium maps obtained by XRF showed that the initial calcium distribution on the chitosan surface was influenced by the acetylation treatment of chitosan films. AFM indicated the distribution pattern of calcium compound deposits at different times, obtained by film surface morphological analysis. The results suggest that the calcification mechanism is nucleation on membranes followed by the crystal growth of calcium compounds. AFM showed that the deposit formation is a function of immersion time: the deposits became more homogeneous and covered the surface more evenly with longer immersion times. XRD showed that the acetylated membranes produced more organized calcium deposits

  3. Norfloxacin mixed solvency based solid dispersions: An in-vitro and in-vivo investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravindra Kamble

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Norfloxacin (NF is a synthetic fluoro-quinolone molecule that is used for the treatment of urinary tract infections. However, due to its poor aqueous solubility, it has low oral bioavailability. The aim of the present study was to improve the aqueous solubility and dissolution profile of NF by formulating its mixed-solvency based solid dispersions (SDs. The NF-loaded SDs were prepared by a solvent evaporation technique using urea, sodium benzoate and a niacinamide hydrotropic mixture. The prepared SDs were evaluated regarding their solubility, mean particle size, in-vitro drug release and oral bioavailability. The optimized batch showed a high percentage yield of 99.04% , with a mean particle size of 132.91 μm. Optimized SDs Exhibit 96.48% drug release. The oral bioavailabilities of NF from the optimized SDs, drug alone and marketed formulation were evaluated in Wistar rats at a dose of 20.0 mg/kg. In comparison to the drug alone, approximately 6.90- and 5.0-fold increases in AUC and Cmax, respectively, were observed for NF from mixed-solvency based SDs. The superior dissolution rate due to its reduced particle size may have contributed to the increased oral bioavailability. This study demonstrated that mixed-solvency may be an alternative approach for poorly soluble drugs to improve their solubility and oral bioavailability.

  4. A systems-level approach for investigating organophosphorus pesticide toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingbo; Wang, Jing; Ding, Yan; Liu, Baoyue; Xiao, Wei

    2018-03-01

    The full understanding of the single and joint toxicity of a variety of organophosphorus (OP) pesticides is still unavailable, because of the extreme complex mechanism of action. This study established a systems-level approach based on systems toxicology to investigate OP pesticide toxicity by incorporating ADME/T properties, protein prediction, and network and pathway analysis. The results showed that most OP pesticides are highly toxic according to the ADME/T parameters, and can interact with significant receptor proteins to cooperatively lead to various diseases by the established OP pesticide -protein and protein-disease networks. Furthermore, the studies that multiple OP pesticides potentially act on the same receptor proteins and/or the functionally diverse proteins explained that multiple OP pesticides could mutually enhance toxicological synergy or additive on a molecular/systematic level. To the end, the integrated pathways revealed the mechanism of toxicity of the interaction of OP pesticides and elucidated the pathogenesis induced by OP pesticides. This study demonstrates a systems-level approach for investigating OP pesticide toxicity that can be further applied to risk assessments of various toxins, which is of significant interest to food security and environmental protection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. An experimental approach towards the development of an in vitro cortical-thalamic co-culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagasabapathi, Thirukumaran T; Massobrio, Paolo; Tedesco, Mariateresa; Martinoia, Sergio; Wadman, Wytse J; Decré, Michel M J

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an experimental approach to develop an in vitro dissociated cortical-thalamic co-culture model using a dual compartment neurofluidic device. The device has two compartments separated by 10 μm wide and 3 μm high microchannels. The microchannels provide a physical isolation of neurons allowing only neurites to grow between the compartments. Long-term viable co-culture was maintained in the compartmented device, neurite growth through the microchannels was verified using immunofluorescence staining, and electrophysiological recordings from the co-culture system was investigated. Preliminary analysis of spontaneous activities from the co-culture shows a distinctively different firing pattern associated with cultures of individual cell types and further analysis is proposed for a deeper understanding of the dynamics involved in the network connectivity in such a co-culture system.

  6. Investigation of arsenic accumulation and biochemical response of in vitro developed Vetiveria zizanoides plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shraddha; Sounderajan, Suvarna; Kumar, Kiran; Fulzele, D P

    2017-11-01

    Vetiver grass (Vetiveria zizanoides L. Nash) is found to be a suitable candidate for the phytoremediation of heavy metals. An investigation of arsenic (As) accumulation, translocation and tolerance was conducted in V. zizanoides plantlets upon exposure to different concentrations of arsenic (10, 50, 100 and 200µM) for 7 and 14 d. V. zizanoides plants were found effective in remediation of As, maximum being at 200µM after 14 d of exposure. The results of TBARS and photosynthetic pigments demonstrated that plants did not experience significant toxicity at all the concentrations of As after 7 days, however an increase in their level was found after 14 d. The up-regulation of antioxidant enzyme activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX), catalase (CAT) and glutathione s-transferase (GST) in a coordinated and complementary manner enhanced tolerance to plants against arsenic induced oxidative stress. Taken together, the results indicated that in vitro developed plants of V. zizanoides have the potential to remediate and tolerate varying levels of As. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Investigations on stone fragmentation in different extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy sound fields in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Thomas; Liebler, Marko; Riedlinger, Rainer

    2005-04-01

    The mechanism of stone fragmentation in ESWL applications is still under investigation. Devices showing a wide focal area and comparably low focal pressure amplitudes have been reported to disintegrate stones more efficiently as current clinical devices with high amplitudes and small focal areas. From this the question is raised whether the underlying different physical mechanisms or treatment issues, like stone localization and movement, are responsible for these results. In this paper fragmentation experiments in vitro with different stone types (e.g., HMT and BegoStone, 15 mm diam.) under different sound fields are presented. A self focusing piezoelectric transducer with a small focal area and peak pressure amplitudes of up to 125 MPa is used. The number of pulses was counted until a complete fragmentation through a 2 mm wire mesh is reached. In order to simulate wide-focus low-pressure conditions, the stones were placed in the prefocal region. Fragmentation results are compared to the case of focal placement. Initial breakage occurs earlier in the prefocal region for the HMT stones, whereas complete fragmentation is reached significantly earlier in the focus for all stone types.

  8. An in vitro investigation of the anti inflammatory properties of potassium humate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joone, G.K.; van Rensburg, C.E.J. [University of Pretoria, Pretoria (South Africa). Faculty of Health Science, Dept. of Pharmacology

    2004-06-01

    In this study the anti-inflammatory potential of potassium humate, derived from bituminous coal, has been investigated in vitro. Exposure of resting and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulated human neutrophils to potassium humate resulted in a decreased expression of CR3 by activated, but not resting cells, in a dose-related way. Humate also inhibited the adhesion of PMA-stimulated neutrophils to a baby hamster kidney cell line expressing ICAM1 (the CR3 ligand) (BHK331-7). Similar results were obtained using normal BHK cells indicating that this inhibition does not only target specific adhesion molecules on the neutrophil and eosinophil membrane by activated phagocytes, but also affects other mechanisms involved in cell adhesion. Opsonised Sephadex or FMLP/Cyto B-induced degranulation of neutrophils and eosinophils were also decreased by humate treatment. Inhibition of the adhesion of activated phagocytes, as well as inhibition of the release of granule polypeptides, both of which are responsible for tissue damage during inflammatory processes, are attractive targets for anti-inflammatory drugs. Because humate is well tolerated with an excellent safety profile it merits further evaluation in patients suffering from inflammatory conditions.

  9. Approach to Investigating Congenital Skeletal Abnormalities in Livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittmer, K E; Thompson, K G

    2015-09-01

    Congenital skeletal abnormalities may be genetic, teratogenic, or nutritional in origin; distinguishing among these different causes is essential in the management of the disease but may be challenging. In some cases, teratogenic or nutritional causes of skeletal abnormalities may appear very similar to genetic causes. For example, chondrodysplasia associated with intrauterine zinc or manganese deficiency and mild forms of hereditary chondrodysplasia have very similar clinical features and histologic lesions. Therefore, historical data are essential in any attempt to distinguish genetic and acquired causes of skeletal lesions; as many animals as possible should be examined; and samples should be collected for future analysis, such as genetic testing. Acquired causes of defects often show substantial variation in presentation and may improve with time, while genetic causes frequently have a consistent presentation. If a disease is determined to be of genetic origin, a number of approaches may be used to detect mutations, each with advantages and disadvantages. These approaches include sequencing candidate genes, single-nucleotide polymorphism array with genomewide association studies, and exome or whole genome sequencing. Despite advances in technology and increased cost-effectiveness of these techniques, a good clinical history and description of the pathology and a reliable diagnosis are still key components of any investigation. © The Author(s) 2015.

  10. Investigating cholesterol metabolism and ageing using a systems biology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A E; Mooney, K M; Wilkinson, S J; Pickles, N A; Mc Auley, M T

    2017-08-01

    CVD accounted for 27 % of all deaths in the UK in 2014, and was responsible for 1·7 million hospital admissions in 2013/2014. This condition becomes increasingly prevalent with age, affecting 34·1 and 29·8 % of males and females over 75 years of age respectively in 2011. The dysregulation of cholesterol metabolism with age, often observed as a rise in LDL-cholesterol, has been associated with the pathogenesis of CVD. To compound this problem, it is estimated by 2050, 22 % of the world's population will be over 60 years of age, in culmination with a growing resistance and intolerance to pre-existing cholesterol regulating drugs such as statins. Therefore, it is apparent research into additional therapies for hypercholesterolaemia and CVD prevention is a growing necessity. However, it is also imperative to recognise this complex biological system cannot be studied using a reductionist approach; rather its biological uniqueness necessitates a more integrated methodology, such as that offered by systems biology. In this review, we firstly discuss cholesterol metabolism and how it is affected by diet and the ageing process. Next, we describe therapeutic strategies for hypercholesterolaemia, and finally how the systems biology paradigm can be utilised to investigate how ageing interacts with complex systems such as cholesterol metabolism. We conclude by emphasising the need for nutritionists to work in parallel with the systems biology community, to develop novel approaches to studying cholesterol metabolism and its interaction with ageing.

  11. Exploratory Investigation of Bacteroides fragilis Transcriptional Response during In vitro Exposure to Subinhibitory Concentration of Metronidazole

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Michele C. R.; Resende, Juliana A.; Ferreira-Machado, Alessandra B.; Saji, Guadalupe D. R. Q.; de Vasconcelos, Ana T. R.; da Silva, Vânia L.; Nicolás, Marisa F.; Diniz, Cláudio G.

    2016-01-01

    Bacteroides fragilis, member from commensal gut microbiota, is an important pathogen associated to endogenous infections and metronidazole remains a valuable antibiotic for the treatment of these infections, although bacterial resistance is widely reported. Considering the need of a better understanding on the global mechanisms by which B. fragilis survive upon metronidazole exposure, we performed a RNA-seq transcriptomic approach with validation of gene expression results by qPCR. Bacteria strains were selected after in vitro subcultures with subinhibitory concentration (SIC) of the drug. From a wild type B. fragilis ATCC 43859 four derivative strains were selected: first and fourth subcultures under metronidazole exposure and first and fourth subcultures after drug removal. According to global gene expression analysis, 2,146 protein coding genes were identified, of which a total of 1,618 (77%) were assigned to a Gene Ontology term (GO), indicating that most known cellular functions were taken. Among these 2,146 protein coding genes, 377 were shared among all strains, suggesting that they are critical for B. fragilis survival. In order to identify distinct expression patterns, we also performed a K-means clustering analysis set to 15 groups. This analysis allowed us to detect the major activated or repressed genes encoding for enzymes which act in several metabolic pathways involved in metronidazole response such as drug activation, defense mechanisms against superoxide ions, high expression level of multidrug efflux pumps, and DNA repair. The strains collected after metronidazole removal were functionally more similar to those cultured under drug pressure, reinforcing that drug-exposure lead to drastic persistent changes in the B. fragilis gene expression patterns. These results may help to elucidate B. fragilis response during metronidazole exposure, mainly at SIC, contributing with information about bacterial survival strategies under stress conditions in their

  12. An in vitro investigation of endocrine disrupting effects of the mycotoxin alternariol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frizzell, Caroline; Ndossi, Doreen; Kalayou, Shewit; Eriksen, Gunnar S.; Verhaegen, Steven; Sørlie, Morten; Elliott, Christopher T.; Ropstad, Erik; Connolly, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Alternariol (AOH) is a mycotoxin commonly produced by Alternaria alternata on a wide range of foods. Few studies to date have been performed to evaluate the effects of AOH on endocrine activity. The present study makes use of in vitro mammalian cellular based assays and gene expression to investigate the ability of AOH to act as an endocrine disruptor by various modes of action. Reporter gene assays (RGAs), incorporating natural steroid hormone receptors for oestrogens, androgens, progestagens and glucocorticoids were used to identify endocrine disruption at the level of nuclear receptor transcriptional activity, and the H295R steroidogenesis assay was used to assess endocrine disruption at the level of gene expression and steroid hormone production. AOH exhibited a weak oestrogenic response when tested in the oestrogen responsive RGA and binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of AOH. H295R cells when exposed to 0.1–1000 ng/ml AOH, did not cause a significant change in testosterone and cortisol hormones but exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH resulted in a significant increase in estradiol and progesterone production. In the gene expression study following exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH, only one gene NR0B1 was down-regulated, whereas expression of mRNA for CYP1A1, MC2R, HSD3B2, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B2 and CYP19 was up-regulated. Expression of the other genes investigated did not change significantly. In conclusion AOH is a weak oestrogenic mycotoxin that also has the ability to interfere with the steroidogenesis pathway. - Highlights: • Alternariol was investigated for endocrine disrupting activity. • Reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay have been used. • An oestrogenic effect of alternariol was observed. • This can lead to an increase in expression of the progesterone receptor. • Alternariol is capable of modulating hormone production and gene expression

  13. An in vitro investigation of endocrine disrupting effects of the mycotoxin alternariol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frizzell, Caroline [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ndossi, Doreen [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Sokoine University of Agriculture, Morogoro (Tanzania, United Republic of); Kalayou, Shewit [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Mekelle University College of Veterinary Medicine, Mekelle (Ethiopia); Eriksen, Gunnar S. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Verhaegen, Steven [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Sørlie, Morten [Department of Chemistry, Biotechnology and Food Science, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Ås (Norway); Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Ropstad, Erik [Section of Experimental Biomedicine, Norwegian School of Veterinary Science, Oslo (Norway); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute for Global Food Security, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-15

    Alternariol (AOH) is a mycotoxin commonly produced by Alternaria alternata on a wide range of foods. Few studies to date have been performed to evaluate the effects of AOH on endocrine activity. The present study makes use of in vitro mammalian cellular based assays and gene expression to investigate the ability of AOH to act as an endocrine disruptor by various modes of action. Reporter gene assays (RGAs), incorporating natural steroid hormone receptors for oestrogens, androgens, progestagens and glucocorticoids were used to identify endocrine disruption at the level of nuclear receptor transcriptional activity, and the H295R steroidogenesis assay was used to assess endocrine disruption at the level of gene expression and steroid hormone production. AOH exhibited a weak oestrogenic response when tested in the oestrogen responsive RGA and binding of progesterone to the progestagen receptor was shown to be synergistically increased in the presence of AOH. H295R cells when exposed to 0.1–1000 ng/ml AOH, did not cause a significant change in testosterone and cortisol hormones but exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH resulted in a significant increase in estradiol and progesterone production. In the gene expression study following exposure to 1000 ng/ml (3.87 μM) AOH, only one gene NR0B1 was down-regulated, whereas expression of mRNA for CYP1A1, MC2R, HSD3B2, CYP17, CYP21, CYP11B2 and CYP19 was up-regulated. Expression of the other genes investigated did not change significantly. In conclusion AOH is a weak oestrogenic mycotoxin that also has the ability to interfere with the steroidogenesis pathway. - Highlights: • Alternariol was investigated for endocrine disrupting activity. • Reporter gene assays and the H295R steroidogenesis assay have been used. • An oestrogenic effect of alternariol was observed. • This can lead to an increase in expression of the progesterone receptor. • Alternariol is capable of modulating hormone production and gene expression.

  14. Investigating Reasons for CPAP Adherence in Adolescents: A Qualitative Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prashad, Priya S.; Marcus, Carole L.; Maggs, Jill; Stettler, Nicolas; Cornaglia, Mary A.; Costa, Priscilla; Puzino, Kristina; Xanthopoulos, Melissa; Bradford, Ruth; Barg, Frances K.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Adolescents with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) represent an important but understudied subgroup of long-term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) users. The purpose of this qualitative study was to identify factors related to adherence from the perspective of adolescents and their caregivers. Methods: Individual open-ended, semi-structured interviews were conducted with adolescents (n = 21) and caregivers (n = 20). Objective adherence data from the adolescents' CPAP machines during the previous month was obtained. Adolescents with different adherence levels and their caregivers were asked their views on CPAP. Using a modified grounded theory approach, we identified themes and developed theories that explained the adolescents' adherence patterns. Results: Adolescent participants (n = 21) were aged 12-18 years, predominantly male (n = 15), African American (n = 16), users of CPAP for at least one month. Caregivers were mainly mothers (n = 17). Seven adolescents had high use (mean use 381 ± 80 min per night), 7 had low use (mean use 30 ± 24 min per night), and 7 had no use during the month prior to being interviewed. Degree of structure in the home, social reactions, mode of communication among family members, and perception of benefits were issues that played a role in CPAP adherence. Conclusions: Understanding the adolescent and family experience of using CPAP may be key to increasing adolescent CPAP adherence. As a result of our findings, we speculate that health education, peer support groups, and developmentally appropriate individualized support strategies may be important in promoting adherence. Future studies should examine these theories of CPAP adherence. Citation: Prashad PS; Marcus CL; Maggs J; Stettler N; Cornaglia MA; Costa P; Puzino K; Xanthopoulos M; Bradford R; Barg FK. Investigating reasons for CPAP adherence in adolescents: a qualitative approach. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(12):1303-1313. PMID:24340293

  15. Diuron metabolites and urothelial cytotoxicity: In vivo, in vitro and molecular approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli S.; Arnold, Lora L.; Dodmane, Puttappa R.; Pennington, Karen L.; Qiu, Fang; De Camargo, João Lauro V.; Cohen, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Diuron is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels. The proposed mode of action (MOA) for diuron is urothelial cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative urothelial hyperplasia. Diuron-induced urothelial cytotoxicity is not due to urinary solids. Diuron is extensively metabolized, and in rats, N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea (DCPU) and 4,5-dichloro-2-hydroxyphenyl urea (2-OH-DCPU) were the predominant urinary metabolites; lesser metabolites included N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea (DCPMU) and trace levels of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). In humans, DCPMU and DCPU have been found in the urine after a case of product abuse. To aid in elucidating the MOA of diuron and to evaluate the metabolites that are responsible for the diuron toxicity in the bladder epithelium, we investigated the urinary concentrations of metabolites in male Wistar rats treated with 2500 ppm of diuron, the urothelial cytotoxicity in vitro of the metabolites and their gene expression profiles. DCPU was found in rat urine at concentrations substantially greater than the in vitro IC50 and induced more gene expression alterations than the other metabolites tested. 2-OH-DCPU was present in urine at a concentration approximately half of the in vitro IC50, whereas DCPMU and DCA were present in urine at concentrations well below the IC50. For the diuron-induced MOA for the rat bladder, we suggest that DCPU is the primary metabolite responsible for the urothelial cytotoxicity with some contribution also by 2-OH-DCPU. This study supports a MOA for diuron-induced bladder effects in rats consisting of metabolism to DCPU (and 2-OH-DCPU to a lesser extent), concentration and excretion in urine, urothelial cytotoxicity, and regenerative proliferation

  16. Diuron metabolites and urothelial cytotoxicity: in vivo, in vitro and molecular approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Rocha, Mitscheli S; Arnold, Lora L; Dodmane, Puttappa R; Pennington, Karen L; Qiu, Fang; De Camargo, João Lauro V; Cohen, Samuel M

    2013-12-15

    Diuron is carcinogenic to the rat urinary bladder at high dietary levels. The proposed mode of action (MOA) for diuron is urothelial cytotoxicity and necrosis followed by regenerative urothelial hyperplasia. Diuron-induced urothelial cytotoxicity is not due to urinary solids. Diuron is extensively metabolized, and in rats, N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)urea (DCPU) and 4,5-dichloro-2-hydroxyphenyl urea (2-OH-DCPU) were the predominant urinary metabolites; lesser metabolites included N-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-methylurea (DCPMU) and trace levels of 3,4-dichloroaniline (DCA). In humans, DCPMU and DCPU have been found in the urine after a case of product abuse. To aid in elucidating the MOA of diuron and to evaluate the metabolites that are responsible for the diuron toxicity in the bladder epithelium, we investigated the urinary concentrations of metabolites in male Wistar rats treated with 2500ppm of diuron, the urothelial cytotoxicity in vitro of the metabolites and their gene expression profiles. DCPU was found in rat urine at concentrations substantially greater than the in vitro IC50 and induced more gene expression alterations than the other metabolites tested. 2-OH-DCPU was present in urine at a concentration approximately half of the in vitro IC50, whereas DCPMU and DCA were present in urine at concentrations well below the IC50. For the diuron-induced MOA for the rat bladder, we suggest that DCPU is the primary metabolite responsible for the urothelial cytotoxicity with some contribution also by 2-OH-DCPU. This study supports a MOA for diuron-induced bladder effects in rats consisting of metabolism to DCPU (and 2-OH-DCPU to a lesser extent), concentration and excretion in urine, urothelial cytotoxicity, and regenerative proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigation of Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm formation by various omics approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia eMuszkieta

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the lung, Aspergillus fumigatus usually forms a dense colony of filaments embedded in a polymeric extracellular matrix called biofilm (BF. This extracellular matrix embeds and glues hyphae together and protects the fungus from an outside hostile environment. This extracellular matrix is absent in fungal colonies grown under classical liquid shake conditions (PL which were historically used to understand A. fumigatus pathobiology. Recent works have shown that the fungus in this aerial grown biofilm-like state exhibits reduced susceptibility to antifungal drugs and undergoes major metabolic changes that are thought to be associated to virulence. These differences in pathological and physiological characteristics between biofilm and liquid shake conditions suggest that the PL condition is a poor in vitro disease model. In the laboratory, A. fumigatus mycelium embedded by the extracellular matrix can be produced in vitro in aerial condition using an agar-based medium. To provide a global and accurate understanding of A. fumigatus in vitro biofilm growth, we utilized microarray, RNA-sequencing and proteomic analysis to compare the global gene and protein expression profiles of A. fumigatus grown under BF and PL conditions. In this review, we will present the different signatures obtained with these three omics methods. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of each method and their complementarity.

  18. Investigations on Actuator Dynamics through Theoretical and Finite Element Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somashekhar S. Hiremath

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper gives a new approach for modeling the fluid-structure interaction of servovalve component-actuator. The analyzed valve is a precision flow control valve-jet pipe electrohydraulic servovalve. The positioning of an actuator depends upon the flow rate from control ports, in turn depends on the spool position. Theoretical investigation is made for No-load condition and Load condition for an actuator. These are used in finite element modeling of an actuator. The fluid-structure-interaction (FSI is established between the piston and the fluid cavities at the piston end. The fluid cavities were modeled with special purpose hydrostatic fluid elements while the piston is modeled with brick elements. The finite element method is used to simulate the variation of cavity pressure, cavity volume, mass flow rate, and the actuator velocity. The finite element analysis is extended to study the system's linearized response to harmonic excitation using direct solution steady-state dynamics. It was observed from the analysis that the natural frequency of the actuator depends upon the position of the piston in the cylinder. This is a close match with theoretical and simulation results. The effect of bulk modulus is also presented in the paper.

  19. Phytochemical investigation of natural and in vitro raised Vṛddhadāruka plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharati, Asha Jyoti; Bansal, Yogendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Argyreia nervosa commonly known as elephant creeper (English) and Vṛddhadāruka (Sanskrit) is a woody climber that belongs to the family Convolvulaceae. Seeds of this plant contain hallucinogens including ergot alkaloids and a naturally occurring lysergic acid amide. Traditionally the plant is used in the treatment of gonorrhea, strangury, chronic ulcers, diabetes, anemia and cerebral disorders. The plant is also used as appetitiser, brain tonic, cardiotonic, aphrodisiac. It possesses anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activities. To give an account of information on in vitro regeneration and phytochemical analysis of the plant. Nodal explants were selected for in vitro regeneration. Different aerial parts viz., seeds, natural and in vitro leaf, stem and callus were dried and extracted with different solvents and were subjected to various phytochemical analyses. Different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine showed shoot and root initiation. The study of phytochemical screening of different extracts showed the presence of bioactive substances like flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, etc. The study will provide an efficient in vitro protocol for micropropagation as an alternative method to conserve the plant and shows the presence of some important secondary metabolites in the nature grown and in vitro raised plants which can be useful for treatment of various diseases.

  20. Phytochemical investigation of natural and in vitro raised Vṛddhadāruka plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asha Jyoti Bharati

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Argyreia nervosa commonly known as elephant creeper (English and Vṛddhadāruka (Sanskrit is a woody climber that belongs to the family Convolvulaceae. Seeds of this plant contain hallucinogens including ergot alkaloids and a naturally occurring lysergic acid amide. Traditionally the plant is used in the treatment of gonorrhea, strangury, chronic ulcers, diabetes, anemia and cerebral disorders. The plant is also used as appetitiser, brain tonic, cardiotonic, aphrodisiac. It possesses anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antibacterial, antiviral and antifungal activities. Objective: To give an account of information on in vitro regeneration and phytochemical analysis of the plant. Materials and Methods: Nodal explants were selected for in vitro regeneration. Different aerial parts viz., seeds, natural and in vitro leaf, stem and callus were dried and extracted with different solvents and were subjected to various phytochemical analyses. Results: Different concentrations of 6-benzylaminopurine showed shoot and root initiation. The study of phytochemical screening of different extracts showed the presence of bioactive substances like flavonoids, alkaloids, terpenoids, etc. Conclusion: The study will provide an efficient in vitro protocol for micropropagation as an alternative method to conserve the plant and shows the presence of some important secondary metabolites in the nature grown and in vitro raised plants which can be useful for treatment of various diseases.

  1. A new bi-layered scaffold for osteochondral tissue regeneration: In vitro and in vivo preclinical investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sartori, M. [Laboratory of Biocompatibility, Technological Innovations and Advanced Therapies, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Pagani, S., E-mail: stefania.pagani@ior.it [Laboratory of Preclinical and Surgical Studies, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Ferrari, A. [Laboratory of Preclinical and Surgical Studies, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences (DIMEC), University of Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Costa, V.; Carina, V. [Innovative Technology Platform for Tissue Engineering, Theranostic and Oncology, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Palermo (Italy); Figallo, E. [Fin-Ceramica Faenza SpA, Faenza, Ravenna (Italy); Maltarello, M.C. [Laboratory of Musculoskeletal Cell Biology, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Martini, L.; Fini, M. [Laboratory of Preclinical and Surgical Studies, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Bologna (Italy); Giavaresi, G. [Innovative Technology Platform for Tissue Engineering, Theranostic and Oncology, Rizzoli Orthopedic Institute, Palermo (Italy)

    2017-01-01

    Current treatments for acute or degenerative chondral and osteochondral lesions are in need of improvement, as these types of injuries lead to disability and worsen the quality of life in a high percentage of patients. The aim of this study was to develop a new bi-layered scaffold for osteochondral tissue regeneration through a “biomimetic” and “bioinspired” approach. For chondral regeneration, the scaffold was realized with an organic compound (type I collagen), while for the regeneration of the subchondral layer, bioactive magnesium-doped hydroxyapatite (Mg/HA) crystals were co-precipitated with the organic component of the scaffold. The entire scaffold structure was stabilized with a cross-linking agent, highly reactive bis-epoxyde (1,4-butanediol diglycidyl ether – BDDGE 1 wt%). The developed scaffold was then characterized for its physico-chemical characteristics. Its structure and adhesion strength between the integrated layers were investigated. At the same time, in vitro cell culture studies were carried out to examine the ability of chondral and bone scaffold layers to separately support adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) into chondrocytes and osteoblasts, respectively. Moreover, an in vivo study with nude mice, transplanted with osteochondral scaffolds plain or engineered with undifferentiated hMSCs, was also set up with 4 and 8-week time points. The results showed that chondral and bone scaffold layers represented biocompatible scaffolds able to sustain hMSCs attachment and proliferation. Moreover, the association of scaffold stimuli and differentiation medium, induced hMSCs chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM). The ectopic implantation of the engineered osteochondral scaffolds indicated that hMSCs were able to colonize the osteochondral scaffold in depth. The scaffold appeared permissive to tissue growth and penetration, ensuring the diffusion

  2. Investigation of in vitro bone cell adhesion and proliferation on Ti using direct current stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodhak, Subhadip; Bose, Susmita; Kinsel, William C.; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2012-01-01

    Our objective was to establish an in vitro cell culture protocol to improve bone cell attachment and proliferation on Ti substrate using direct current stimulation. For this purpose, a custom made electrical stimulator was developed and a varying range of direct currents, from 5 to 25 μA, was used to study the current stimulation effect on bone cells cultured on conducting Ti samples in vitro. Cell–material interaction was studied for a maximum of 5 days by culturing with human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB). The direct current was applied in every 8 h time interval and the duration of electrical stimulation was kept constant at 15 min for all cases. In vitro results showed that direct current stimulation significantly favored bone cell attachment and proliferation in comparison to nonstimulated Ti surface. Immunochemistry and confocal microscopy results confirmed that the cell adhesion was most pronounced on 25 μA direct current stimulated Ti surfaces as hFOB cells expressed higher vinculin protein with increasing amount of direct current. Furthermore, MTT assay results established that cells grew 30% higher in number under 25 μA electrical stimulation as compared to nonstimulated Ti surface after 5 days of culture period. In this work we have successfully established a simple and cost effective in vitro protocol offering easy and rapid analysis of bone cell–material interaction which can be used in promotion of bone cell attachment and growth on Ti substrate using direct current electrical stimulation in an in vitro model. - Highlights: ► D.C. stimulation was used to enhance in vitro bone cell adhesion and proliferation. ► Cells cultured on Ti were stimulated by using a custom made electrical stimulator. ► Optimization was performed by using a varying range of direct currents ∼ 5 to 25 μA. ► 25 μA stimulation was found most beneficial for promotion of cell adhesion/growth.

  3. Contemporary investigative practices. The challenges of his new epistemological approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ignacio Herrera Rodríguez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The scientific and technical development in contemporaneity configures a new investigative thought. From this perspective, quantitative approaches are accompanied by phenomenological understandings for the explanation of processes. While qualitative research involves resources and quantitative measurement and explanation techniques. One of the problems that researchers face when organizing an investigative process is to select a methodology that is relevant to the nature of the object / subject of study. This selection leads them to take sides in favor of processes of a quantitative or qualitative nature, with plural points of view depending on the ways of perceiving and understanding the panorama before them. In addition, the conformation of a scaffolding of methods and techniques of positivist or phenomenological cut or where a complementarity between both must be expressed. We have an example in the study of human behavior where we can not lose sight of the causal nature that originates human behavior and the peculiar combination of heredity and the environment, the reasons and the orientation towards conscious goals and objectives. In this study, the use of quantitative methods and techniques may be relevant, as well as those that explore human subjectivity. The epistemological debate between rationalist and empiricist paradigms lacks a sufficient basis, since particular methods are not necessarily linked to a paradigm. The so-called positivist paradigm (quantitative, empirical-analytical, rationalist seeks to explain, predict, control phenomena, verify theories and laws to regulate phenomena; identify real, temporally preceding or simultaneous causes. On the other hand, hermeneutic rationality (qualitative, phenomenological, naturalistic, humanistic or ethnographic seeks a way to approach, study, understand, analyze and build knowledge; from processes of interpretation where the validity and reliability of knowledge rests, ultimately, on

  4. FROM THE CONVENTIONAL TO THE MILDER APPROACHES TO OVARIAN STIMULATION FOR IN VITRO FERTILIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eda Vrtačnik-Bokal

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: In-vitro fertilization (IVF is performed with oocytes collected in natural and stimulated cycles. Different approaches to ovarian stimulation have been employed worldwide. Fol- lowing the introduction of gonadotrophin realising hormone (GnRH antagonists and strategies to reduce multiple birth such as single embryo transfer, there is an interest in the revival of natural and mild approaches to ovarian stimulation in IVF. Particulary mild ovarian stimulation aims to achieve cost-effective, patient-friendly regimens which optimize the balance between outcomes and risks of treatment. Methods: Pubmed was searched up to 2009 for papers on natural, modified natural, mild and con- ventional IVF cycles. Results: Data discussed in this review do not allow any conclusions to be drawn regarding the most optimal mild ovarian stimulation protocol. However, it is absolutelly clear that introduction of GnRH antagonists into clinical practice has allowed for the introduction of milder stimulation approaches for IVF treatment because of preventing premature luteinising hor- mone (LH rise by competitive blockade of the GnRH receptors. Studies also show that mild exogenous gonadotrophins interference with the decrease in follicle-stimulating hormone ((FSH levels in the mid-folicular phase was sufficient to override the selection of a single dominant follicle and enhance the most mature follicles to growth due to their increased sensitivity for FSH and acquired responsiveness to LH. Conclusions: The implementation of mild stimulation and modified natural cycle into standard clinical practise appears to be justified, although more prospective studies are needed to find the most appropriate mild stimulation approaches.

  5. Combined in vivo and in vitro approach for the characterization of penicillin-specific polyclonal lymphocyte reactivity: tolerance tests with safe penicillins instead of challenge with culprit drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, B; Al Masaoudi, T; Merk, H F; Erdmann, S

    2004-10-01

    Amino-penicillins are a major cause of delayed-type reactions to penicillins. The aim of this study was to establish a diagnostic approach for the characterization of the individual penicillin-specific polyclonal lymphocyte reactivity in order to detect side chain-specific sensitization to amino-penicillins. Patients can then be advised to undergo a tolerance test with safe penicillins instead of provocation with culprit penicillins for confirmation of penicillin allergy. We investigated penicillin-specific polyclonal lymphocyte reactivity in nine patients with delayed-type reactions to amino-penicillins by a combined in vivo (patch, prick and intracutaneous tests with delayed readings) and in vitro (lymphocyte transformation test, LTT) approach. A combination of LTT and skin tests improved the sensitivity for the characterization of penicillin-specific polyclonal lymphocyte reactivity and allowed the detection of three different patterns of lymphocyte reactivity. Four patients showed a side chain-specific sensitization to amino-penicillins in vivo and in vitro and were advised to undergo tolerance tests with safe penicillins. Two patients agreed and were exposed to parenteral benzyl-penicillin and oral phenoxymethyl-penicillin which they tolerated without complications. These data suggest that a combined in vivo and in vitro approach is helpful for the detection of side chain-specific sensitization to amino-penicillins. Patients with such sensitization are very likely to tolerate safe penicillins, thereby expanding their therapeutic options when antibiotic treatment is required.

  6. Investigative Primary Science: A Problem-Based Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etherington, Matthew B.

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on the success of using a problem-based learning approach (PBL) as a pedagogical mode of learning open inquiry science within a traditional four-year undergraduate elementary teacher education program. In 2010, a problem-based learning approach to teaching primary science replaced the traditional content driven syllabus. During…

  7. Investigating design: A comparison of manifest and latent approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cash, Philip; Snider, Chris

    2014-01-01

    This paper contributes to the on-going focus on improving design research methods, by exploring and synthesising two key interrelated research approaches e manifest and latent. These approaches are widely used individually in design research, however, this paper represents the first work bringing...

  8. Investigating the correlation between in vivo absorption and in vitro release of fenofibrate from lipid matrix particles in biorelevant medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkar, Nrupa; Xia, Dengning; Holm, René; Gan, Yong; Müllertz, Anette; Yang, Mingshi; Mu, Huiling

    2014-01-23

    Lipid matrix particles (LMP) may be used as better carriers for poorly water-soluble drugs than liquid lipid carriers because of reduced drug mobilization in the formulations. However, the digestion process of solid lipid particles and their effect on the absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs are not fully understood. This study aimed at investigating the effect of particle size of LMP on drug release in vitro as well as absorption in vivo in order to get a better understanding on the effect of degradation of lipid particles on drug solubilisation and absorption. Fenofibrate, a model poorly water-soluble drug, was incorporated into LMP in this study using probe ultrasound sonication. The resultant LMP were characterised in terms of particle size, size distribution, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, in vitro lipolysis and in vivo absorption in rat model. LMP of three different particle sizes i.e. approximately 100 nm, 400 nm, and 10 μm (microparticles) were produced with high entrapment efficiencies. The in vitro lipolysis study showed that the recovery of fenofibrate in the aqueous phase for 100 nm and 400 nm LMP was significantly higher (pmicroparticles>control. In summary, the present study demonstrated the particle size dependence of bioavailability of fenofibrate loaded LMP in rat model which correlates well with the in vitro drug release performed in the biorelevant medium. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Investigation into Effects of Scanning Speed on in Vitro Biocompatibility of Selective Laser Melted 316L Stainless Steel Parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shang Yitong

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, selective laser melting (SLM has gained an important place in fabrication due to their strong individualization which cannot be manufactured using conventional processes such as casting or forging. By proper control of the SLM processing parameters, characteristics of the alloy can be optimized. In the present work, 316L stainless steel (SS, as a widely used biomedical material, is investigated in terms of the effects of scanning speed on in vitro biocompatibility during SLM process. Cytotoxicity assay is adopted to assess the in vitro biocompatibility. The results show the scanning speed strongly affects the in vitro biocompatibility of 316L SS parts and with prolongs of incubation time, the cytotoxicity increase and the in vitro biocompatibility gets worse. The optimal parameters are determined as follows: scanning speed of 900 mm/s, laser power of 195 W, hatch spacing of 0.09 mm and layer thickness of 0.02 mm. The processing parameters lead to the change of surface morphology and microstructures of samples, which can affect the amount of toxic ions release, such as Cr, Mo and Co, that can increase risks to patient health and reduce the biocompatibility.

  10. Investigation of anticancer potential of hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin against breast cancer by in vitro and in vivo methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukiran Parvathaneni

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To investigate the in vitro and in vivo anticancer activities of hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin isolated from Phyllanthus amarus Schum & Thonn against breast cancer. Methods: In vitro anticancer activity was evaluated against two cell lines (MCF-7 and MDAMB-231 using MTT assay. In vivo anticancer activity was tested using Sprague-Dawley rats with N-methyl-N-nitrosourea induced mammary cancer. Results: In vitro studies demonstrated a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on cell growth with IC50 values of (35.18依1.48 µg/mL (hypophyllanthin and (32.51依0.95 µg/mL (phyllanthin for MCF-7; (38.74 依1.24 (hypophyllanthin and (32.2依1.17 (phyllanthin for MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Tumor weights per group at doses of 5 and 10 mg/kg/day for hypophyllanthin (12.82 and 12.06 g and phyllanthin (11.95 and 8.87 g treated groups were significantly (P<0.001 lower than untreated N-methyl-N-nitrosourea group (35.85. Conclusions: Results of the present research work indicated that the isolated lignan compounds, hypophyllanthin and phyllanthin showed significant anticancer activities against breast cancer, in vitro and in vivo.

  11. A unique in vivo approach for investigating antimicrobial materials utilizing fistulated animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berean, Kyle J.; Adetutu, Eric M.; Zhen Ou, Jian; Nour, Majid; Nguyen, Emily P.; Paull, David; McLeod, Jess; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Bansal, Vipul; Latham, Kay; Bishop-Hurley, Greg J.; McSweeney, Chris; Ball, Andrew S.; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kourosh

    2015-06-01

    Unique in vivo tests were conducted through the use of a fistulated ruminant, providing an ideal environment with a diverse and vibrant microbial community. Utilizing such a procedure can be especially invaluable for investigating the performance of antimicrobial materials related to human and animal related infections. In this pilot study, it is shown that the rumen of a fistulated animal provides an excellent live laboratory for assessing the properties of antimicrobial materials. We investigate microbial colonization onto model nanocomposites based on silver (Ag) nanoparticles at different concentrations into polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). With implantable devices posing a major risk for hospital-acquired infections, the present study provides a viable solution to understand microbial colonization with the potential to reduce the incidence of infection through the introduction of Ag nanoparticles at the optimum concentrations. In vitro measurements were also conducted to show the validity of the approach. An optimal loading of 0.25 wt% Ag is found to show the greatest antimicrobial activity and observed through the in vivo tests to reduce the microbial diversity colonizing the surface.

  12. Investigation of the in-vitro loading on an artificial spinal disk prosthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyriacou, P A; Pancholi, M P; Yeh, J

    2009-01-01

    Spinal diseases imposes considerable burden to both patients and society. In recent years, much surgical efforts have been made in advancing the treatment of neck and back pain. Of particular prominence is the increasing clinical acceptance and use of intervertebral artificial disk prosthesis for the treatment of discogenic back pain. Despite this increased use of such disks, their in-vivo monitoring remains rudimentary. In an effort to develop an intelligent artificial spinal disk where the in-vivo loading of the spine can by studied for the first time an experimental set up has been created in order to initially study the in-vitro loading on an artificial disc prosthesis. Eight strain gauges and two piezoresistive sensors were used and placed suitably in the artificial disk prosthesis. The results from the in-vitro loading showed linear relationship between loading and the outputs from the sensors with good repeatability and less hysteresis.

  13. Investigation of the in-vitro loading on an artificial spinal disk prosthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyriacou, P A; Pancholi, M P [School of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, City University London (United Kingdom); Yeh, J, E-mail: P.Kyriacou@city.ac.u [Department of Neurosurgery, Royal London Hospital, Barts and the London NHS Trust, London (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    Spinal diseases imposes considerable burden to both patients and society. In recent years, much surgical efforts have been made in advancing the treatment of neck and back pain. Of particular prominence is the increasing clinical acceptance and use of intervertebral artificial disk prosthesis for the treatment of discogenic back pain. Despite this increased use of such disks, their in-vivo monitoring remains rudimentary. In an effort to develop an intelligent artificial spinal disk where the in-vivo loading of the spine can by studied for the first time an experimental set up has been created in order to initially study the in-vitro loading on an artificial disc prosthesis. Eight strain gauges and two piezoresistive sensors were used and placed suitably in the artificial disk prosthesis. The results from the in-vitro loading showed linear relationship between loading and the outputs from the sensors with good repeatability and less hysteresis.

  14. A sequential mixed methods research approach to investigating HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-09-03

    Sep 3, 2016 ... Sequential mixed methods research is an effective approach for ... show the effectiveness of the research method. ... qualitative data before quantitative datasets ..... whereby both types of data are collected simultaneously.

  15. Root damage induced by intraosseous anesthesia?An in vitro investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Graetz, Christian; Fawzy-El-Sayed, Karim M.; Graetz, Nicole; D?rfer, Christof-Edmund

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The principle of the intraosseous anesthesia (IOA) relies on the perforation of the cortical plate of the bone for direct application of the local anesthetic solution into the underlying cancellous structures. During this procedure, IOA needles might accidentally come in contact with the tooth roots. The aim of the current in vitro study was to examine the consequences of this ?worst case scenario? comparing five commercially available IOA systems. Material and Methods: Extracted ...

  16. In vitro and in vivo investigations of targeted chemotherapy with magnetic nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexiou, Christoph; Jurgons, Roland; Schmid, Roswitha; Hilpert, Andrea; Bergemann, Christian; Parak, Fritz; Iro, Heinrich

    2005-01-01

    Magnetic drug targeting is a local drug delivery system. Electromicroscopic pictures document the ferrofluid enrichment in the intracellular space in vitro. In vivo experiments were performed in VX2 tumor-bearing rabbits using magnetic nanoparticles bound to mitoxantrone. High-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses after magnetic drug targeting showed an increasing concentration of the chemotherapeutic agent in the tumor region compared to regular systemic chemotherapy

  17. Biotransformation of the mycotoxin enniatin B1 in pigs: A comparative in vitro and in vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Lada; Uhlig, Silvio; Devreese, Mathias; Croubels, Siska; Fæste, Christiane Kruse

    2017-07-01

    Enniatins (ENNs) are hexadepsipeptidic mycotoxins produced by Fusarium species. They occur in mg/kg levels in grain from Northern climate areas. Major ENNs such as ENN B and B1 have shown considerable cytotoxicity in different in vitro test systems. To adequately assess exposure and in vivo toxicity the toxicokinetic properties need to be investigated. The present study describes the metabolism of ENN B1 both in vitro and in vivo in pigs, comparing metabolites found in vitro in experiments with liver microsomes from different pig strains to those found in the plasma of pigs after single oral or intravenous application of ENN B1. Metabolites of hepatic biotransformation were tentatively identified and characterised by high performance liquid chromatography coupled to ion trap and high-resolution mass spectrometry, as well as chemical derivatisations. Kinetic parameters of metabolite formation and elimination were determined. Metabolite formation was higher when ENN B1 was absorbed from the gut compared to intravenous administration indicating pre-systemic metabolism of ENN B1 after oral uptake. The in vitro approach resulted in the detection of ten ENN B1 metabolites, while six were detected in in vivo samples. The putative ENN B1 metabolites were products of hydroxylation, carbonylation, carboxylation and oxidative demethylation reactions. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Introduction to social media investigation a hands-on approach

    CERN Document Server

    Golbeck, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    If you're interested in using social media as an investigative tool, Introduction to Social Media Investigation will show you how! Social networks and social media, like Facebook, Twitter, and Foursquare, are some of the most popular services on the Web, with hundreds of millions of users. The public information that people share on these sites can be valuable for anyone interested in investigating people of interest through open, public sources. Social media as an investigative device is in its infancy and not well understood. This book presents an overview of social media and discusses s

  19. Polyphenol bioavailability in nuts and seeds by an in vitro dialyzability approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbello-Hermelo, Paloma; Lamas, Juan Pablo; Lores, Marta; Domínguez-González, Raquel; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio

    2018-07-15

    An in vitro dialyzability approach has been undertaken to elucidate the bioavailable fraction of the total polyphenols (TPs) of edible nuts and seeds. The TP contents in samples and in dialyzates were assessed by the Folin-Ciocalteu spectrophotometric method. Antioxidant activity was determined in selected samples, using a modified method against Trolox®. TPs and antioxidant activity in nuts/seeds were determined after applying a pressurized liquid extraction sample pre-treatment. High dialyzability ratios were assessed in most nuts/seeds (TP dialyzability percentages within the 25-91% range). The highest TP dialyzability ratios were found in raw Brazil nuts (81 ± 5%), toasted pistachios (88 ± 9%), and fried cashews (89 ± 9%), whereas TPs in pumpkin seeds were found to be very low (TPs were not detected in the dialyzable fraction). TP dialyzability was correlated with the copper content in nuts and seeds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optical coherence tomography for blood glucose monitoring in vitro through spatial and temporal approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Pretto, Lucas Ramos; Yoshimura, Tania Mateus; Ribeiro, Martha Simões; Zanardi de Freitas, Anderson

    2016-08-01

    As diabetes causes millions of deaths worldwide every year, new methods for blood glucose monitoring are in demand. Noninvasive approaches may increase patient adherence to treatment while reducing costs, and optical coherence tomography (OCT) may be a feasible alternative to current invasive diagnostics. This study presents two methods for blood sugar monitoring with OCT in vitro. The first, based on spatial statistics, exploits changes in the light total attenuation coefficient caused by different concentrations of glucose in the sample using a 930-nm commercial OCT system. The second, based on temporal analysis, calculates differences in the decorrelation time of the speckle pattern in the OCT signal due to blood viscosity variations with the addition of glucose with data acquired by a custom built Swept Source 1325-nm OCT system. Samples consisted of heparinized mouse blood, phosphate buffer saline, and glucose. Additionally, further samples were prepared by diluting mouse blood with isotonic saline solution to verify the effect of higher multiple scattering components on the ability of the methods to differentiate glucose levels. Our results suggest a direct relationship between glucose concentration and both decorrelation rate and attenuation coefficient, with our systems being able to detect changes of 65 mg/dL in glucose concentration.

  1. Pantoprazole Sodium Loaded Microballoons for the Systemic Approach: In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pravin; Kumar, Manish; Kaushik, Darpan

    2017-09-01

    Purpose: Various floating and pulsatile drug delivery systems suffer from variations in the gastric transit time affecting the bioavailability of drugs. The objective of the study was to develop Pantoprazole Sodium (PAN) microballoons that may prolong the gastric residence time and could enhance the drug bioavailability. Methods: Microballoons were prepared using Eudragit ® L100 by adopting emulsion solvent diffusion method with non-effervescent approach, in vitro studies were performed and the in vivo evaluation was carried out employing ethanol induced ulceration method. Optimization and validation were carried out through Design Expert ® software. Results: The results demonstrate an increase in percentage yield, buoyancy, encapsulation efficacy and swelling. Particles were in the size range 80-100 µm following zero order release pattern. SEM study revealed their rough surface with spherical shape, internal cavity and porous walls. DSC thermo gram confirms the encapsulation of drug in amorphous form. Significant anti ulcer activity was observed for the prepared microballoons. The calculated ulcer index and protection were 0.20±0.05 and 97.43 % respectively for LRS-O (optimized formulation). Conclusion: This kind of pH dependent drug delivery may provide an efficient dosage regimen with enhanced patient compliance.

  2. Robust, Causal, and Incremental Approaches to Investigating Linguistic Adaptation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Seán G.

    2018-01-01

    This paper discusses the maximum robustness approach for studying cases of adaptation in language. We live in an age where we have more data on more languages than ever before, and more data to link it with from other domains. This should make it easier to test hypotheses involving adaptation, and also to spot new patterns that might be explained by adaptation. However, there is not much discussion of the overall approach to research in this area. There are outstanding questions about how to formalize theories, what the criteria are for directing research and how to integrate results from different methods into a clear assessment of a hypothesis. This paper addresses some of those issues by suggesting an approach which is causal, incremental and robust. It illustrates the approach with reference to a recent claim that dry environments select against the use of precise contrasts in pitch. Study 1 replicates a previous analysis of the link between humidity and lexical tone with an alternative dataset and finds that it is not robust. Study 2 performs an analysis with a continuous measure of tone and finds no significant correlation. Study 3 addresses a more recent analysis of the link between humidity and vowel use and finds that it is robust, though the effect size is small and the robustness of the measurement of vowel use is low. Methodological robustness of the general theory is addressed by suggesting additional approaches including iterated learning, a historical case study, corpus studies, and studying individual speech. PMID:29515487

  3. Enzyme Assay: An Investigative Approach to Enhance Science Process Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartak, Rekha; Ronad, Anupama; Ghanekar, Vikrant

    2013-01-01

    Scientific investigations play a vital role in teaching and learning the process of science. An investigative task that was developed for pre-university students is described here. The task involves extraction of an enzyme from a vegetable source and its detection by biochemical method. At the beginning of the experiment, a hypothesis is presented…

  4. An Investigative, Cooperative Learning Approach to the General Microbiology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Kyle; Fenster, Amy; Dilts, Judith A.; Temple, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Investigative- and cooperative-based learning strategies have been used effectively in a variety of classrooms to enhance student learning and engagement. In the General Microbiology laboratory for juniors and seniors at James Madison University, these strategies were combined to make a semester-long, investigative, cooperative learning experience…

  5. In vitro and in vivo investigations on bone regeneration potential of laminated hydroxyapatite/gelatin nanocomposite scaffold along with DBM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tavakol, Shima [School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Nanotechnology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ragerdi Kashani, Iraj [School of Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Anatomy (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Azami, Mahmood [School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Tissue Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshzaban, Ahad [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Iranian Tissue Bank Research and Preparation Center (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tavakol, Behnaz [Kashan University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medicine (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kharrazi, Sharmin [School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Nanotechnology (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ebrahimi, Somayeh [University of Tarbiat Moallem, Department of Biology, Faculty of Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rezayat Sorkhabadi, Seyed Mahdi, E-mail: sh_tavakol@razi.tums.ac.ir [School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Nanotechnology (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    Bone regeneration ability of a scaffold strongly depends on its structure and the size of its components. In this study, a nanostructured scaffold was designed for bone repair using nano hydroxyapatite (nHA) (8-16 nm Multiplication-Sign 50-80 nm) and gelatin (GEL) as main components. In vitro investigations of calcium matrix deposition and gene expression of the seeded cells for this scaffold, demineralized bone matrix (DBM), scaffold plus DBM, and the control group were carried out. Bone regeneration in rat calvarium with critical defect size after 1, 4, and 8 weeks post implantation was investigated. The calcium matrix depositions by the osteoblast and RUNX2, ALP, osteonectin, and osteocalcin gene expression in scaffold were more significant than in other groups. Histomorphometry analysis confirmed in vitro results. In vitro and in vivo bone regeneration were least in scaffold plus DBM group. Enhanced effects in scaffold could be attributed to the shape and size of nHA particles and good architecture of the scaffold. Reduction of bone regeneration might be due to tight bonding of BMPs and nHA particles in the third group. Results obtained from this study confirmed that nano-scale size of the main components and the scaffold architecture (pore diameter, interconnectivity pores, etc.) have significant effects on bone regeneration ability of the scaffold and are important parameters in designing a temporary bone substitute.

  6. In vitro and in vivo investigations on bone regeneration potential of laminated hydroxyapatite/gelatin nanocomposite scaffold along with DBM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavakol, Shima; Ragerdi Kashani, Iraj; Azami, Mahmood; Khoshzaban, Ahad; Tavakol, Behnaz; Kharrazi, Sharmin; Ebrahimi, Somayeh; Rezayat Sorkhabadi, Seyed Mahdi

    2012-01-01

    Bone regeneration ability of a scaffold strongly depends on its structure and the size of its components. In this study, a nanostructured scaffold was designed for bone repair using nano hydroxyapatite (nHA) (8–16 nm × 50–80 nm) and gelatin (GEL) as main components. In vitro investigations of calcium matrix deposition and gene expression of the seeded cells for this scaffold, demineralized bone matrix (DBM), scaffold plus DBM, and the control group were carried out. Bone regeneration in rat calvarium with critical defect size after 1, 4, and 8 weeks post implantation was investigated. The calcium matrix depositions by the osteoblast and RUNX2, ALP, osteonectin, and osteocalcin gene expression in scaffold were more significant than in other groups. Histomorphometry analysis confirmed in vitro results. In vitro and in vivo bone regeneration were least in scaffold plus DBM group. Enhanced effects in scaffold could be attributed to the shape and size of nHA particles and good architecture of the scaffold. Reduction of bone regeneration might be due to tight bonding of BMPs and nHA particles in the third group. Results obtained from this study confirmed that nano-scale size of the main components and the scaffold architecture (pore diameter, interconnectivity pores, etc.) have significant effects on bone regeneration ability of the scaffold and are important parameters in designing a temporary bone substitute.

  7. The development and characterization of a human mesothelioma in vitro 3D model to investigate immunotoxin therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinran Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor microenvironments present significant barriers to penetration by antibodies and immunoconjugates. Tumor microenvironments, however, are difficult to study in vitro. Cells cultured as monolayers exhibit less resistance to therapy than those grown in vivo and an alternative research model more representative of the in vivo tumor is more desirable. SS1P is an immunotoxin composed of the Fv portion of a mesothelin-specific antibody fused to a bacterial toxin that is presently undergoing clinical trials in mesothelioma.Here, we examined how the tumor microenvironment affects the penetration and killing activity of SS1P in a new three-dimensional (3D spheroid model cultured in vitro using the human mesothelioma cell line (NCI-H226 and two primary cell lines isolated from the ascites of malignant mesothelioma patients. Mesothelioma cells grown as monolayers or as spheroids expressed comparable levels of mesothelin; however, spheroids were at least 100 times less affected by SS1P. To understand this disparity in cytotoxicity, we made fluorescence-labeled SS1P molecules and used confocal microscopy to examine the time course of SS1P penetration within spheroids. The penetration was limited after 4 hours. Interestingly, we found a significant increase in the number of tight junctions in the core area of spheroids by electron microscopy. Expression of E-Cadherin, a protein involved in the assembly and sealing of tight junctions and highly expressed in malignant mesothelioma, was found significantly increased in spheroids as compared to monolayers. Moreover, we found that siRNA silencing and antibody inhibition targeting E-Cadherin could enhance SS1P immunotoxin therapy in vitro.This work is one of the first to investigate immunotoxins in 3D tumor spheroids in vitro. This initial description of an in vitro tumor model may offer a simple and more representative model of in vivo tumors and will allow for further investigations of the microenvironmental

  8. Isolation of hydroxytyrosol from olive leaves extract, radioiodination and investigation of bioaffinity using in vivo/in vitro methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkan, M.; Biber Muftuler, F.Z.; Kilcar, A. Yurt; Medine, E.I.; Unak, P. [Ege Univ., Izmir (Turkey). Dept. of Nuclear Applications

    2013-11-01

    It is known that medicinal plants like olive have biological activities due to their flavonoid content such as olueropein, tyrosol, hydroxytyrosol etc. In current study, hydroxytrosol (HT) which is one of the major phenolic compounds in olive, olive leaves and olive oil, was isolated after methanol extraction and purification of olive leaves which are grown in the northern Anatolia region of Turkey. The isolated HT was radiolabeled with {sup 131}I ({sup 131}I-HT) and the bioaffinity of this radiolabeled component of olive leaves extract was investigated by using in vivo/in vitro methods. It was found that HT could be radiolabeled with {sup 131}I in yields of 95.6 {+-} 4.4% (n = 8), and in vivo studies showed that {sup 131}I-HT is taken up by urinary bladder, stomach, small intestine, large intestine, breast and prostate. Significant incorporation of activity was observed in cell lines via in vitro studies. (orig.)

  9. Investigation of the effects of monochromatic lights combination on Phalaenopsis orchid and chrysanthemum in vitro plant growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Tien Thanh; Nguyen Tuong Mien; Huynh Thi Trung; Vu Thi Trac; Pham Van Nhi

    2016-01-01

    Eleven independent monochromatic light combination systems were established using super blue and red light LEDs. These are adjustable for mixing ratio of red and blue lights, the intensity and time for illumination. A fluorescent light illumination system was included as control. These were used to implement experiments for investigation effects of monochromatic lights combination in in vitro plantlet fully-forming stage on in vitro plantlet fully-forming and on the development of plant in nursery of chrysanthemum and Phalaenopsis orchid. Results from these experiments showed that illumination with intensity of 750 lx and light mixture of 20% blue-80% red is suitable for Phalaenopsis orchid; illumination with intensity of 1100 lx and light mixture of 90% red light-10% blue light is suitable for chrysanthemum. (author)

  10. Design, synthesis, and in vitro transfection biology of novel tocopherol based monocationic lipids: a structure-activity investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedika, Bhavani; Patri, Srilakshmi V

    2011-01-27

    Herein, we report on the design, synthesis, and in vitro gene delivery efficacies of five novel tocopherol based cationic lipids (1-5) in transfecting CHO, B16F10, A-549, and HepG2 cells. The in vitro gene transfer efficiencies of lipids (1-5) were evaluated by both β-galactosidase reporter gene expression and inverted fluorescent microscopic experiments. The results of the present structure-activity investigation convincingly demonstrate that the tocopherol based lipid with three hydroxyl groups in its headgroup region showed 4-fold better transfection efficiency than the commercial formulation. The results also demonstrate that these tocopherol based lipids may be targeted to liver. Transfection efficiency of all the relevant lipids was maintained even when the serum was present during the transfection conditions. The results indicated that the designed systems are quite capable of transferring the DNA into all four types of cells studied with low or no toxicity.

  11. Complex approach of beam dynamic investigation in SC LINAC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samoshin, A.V.

    2012-01-01

    Beam dynamic investigation is difficult for superconducting linac consisting from periodic sequences of independently phased accelerating cavities and focusing solenoids. The matrix calculation was preferably used for previous estimate of accelerating structure parameters. The matrix calculation does not allow properly investigate the longitudinal motion. The smooth approximation can be used to investigate the nonlinear ion beam dynamics in such accelerating structure and to calculate the longitudinal and transverse acceptances. The potential function and equation of motion in the Hamiltonian form are devised by the smooth approximation. The advantages and disadvantages of each method will describe, the results of investigation will compare. Application package for ion beam dynamic analysis will create. A numerical simulation of beam dynamics in the full field will carry out for the different variants of the accelerator structure based on analytically obtained results.

  12. Fatty acid is a potential agent for bone tissue induction: In vitro and in vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso, Guinea Bc; Chacon, Erivelto; Chacon, Priscila Gl; Bordeaux-Rego, Pedro; Duarte, Adriana Ss; Saad, Sara T Olalla; Zavaglia, Cecilia Ac; Cunha, Marcelo R

    2017-12-01

    Our hypothesis was to investigate the fatty acid potential as a bone induction factor. In vitro and in vivo studies were performed to evaluate this approach. Oleic acid was used in a 0.5 wt.% concentration. Polycaprolactone was used as the polymeric matrix by combining solvent-casting and particulate-leaching techniques, with a final porosity of 70 wt.%, investigated by SEM images. Contact angle measurements were produced to investigate the influence of oleic acid on polycaprolactone chains. Cell culture was performed using adipocyte-derived stem cells to evaluate biocompatibility and bioactivity properties. In addition, in vivo studies were performed to evaluate the induction potential of oleic acid addition. Adipocyte-derived stem cells were used to provide differentiation after 21 days of culture. Likewise, information were obtained with in vivo data and cellular invagination was observed on both scaffolds (polycaprolactone and polycaprolactone /oleic acid); interestingly, the scaffold with oleic acid addition demonstrated that cellular migrations are not related to the surrounding tissue, indicating bioactive potential. Our hypothesis is that fatty acid may be used as a potential induction factor for bone tissue engineering. The study's findings indicate oleic acid as a possible agent for bone induction, according to data on cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration. Impact statement The biomaterial combined in this study on bone regeneration is innovative and shows promising results in the treatment of bone lesions. Polycaprolactone (PCL) and oleic acid have been studied separately. In this research, we combined biomaterials to assess the stimulus and the speed of bone healing.

  13. Targeted therapeutic approach for an anaplastic thyroid cancer in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenner, Frank; Liewen, Heike; Zweifel, Martin; Weber, Achim; Tchinda, Joelle; Bode, Beata; Samaras, Panagiotis; Bauer, Stefan; Knuth, Alexander; Renner, Christoph

    2008-09-01

    Anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) is among the most aggressive human malignancies, being responsible for the majority of thyroid cancer-related deaths. Despite multimodal therapy including surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the outcome of ATC is poor. The human ATC cell line MB1, derived from tumor tissue of a 57-year-old man with thyroid cancer and pronounced neutrophilia, was established from surgically excised tumor tissue. The karyotype of the cell line shows many chromosomal abnormalities. Preclinical investigations have shown antitumor activity and effectiveness of the BRAF kinase inhibitor Sorafenib and the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib. After establishment of the MB1 cell line these agents were applied in vitro and, showing activity in a cell culture model, were also used for in vivo treatment. Sorafenib had some clinical effect, namely normalization of leucocytosis, but had no sustained impact on subsequent tumor growth and development of distant metastasis. Molecular diagnostics of the tumor demonstrated no BRAF mutations in exons 11 and 15 concordant with a rather modest effect of Sorafenib on MB1 cell growth. Clinical benefit was seen with subsequent bortezomib therapy inducing a temporary halt to lymph node growth and a progression-free interval of 7 weeks. Our observations together with previous data from preclinical models could serve as a rationale for selecting those patients suffering from ATC most likely to benefit from targeted therapy. A prospective controlled randomized trial integrating kinase and proteasome inhibitors into a therapeutic regime for ATC is warranted.

  14. Root damage induced by intraosseous anesthesia–An in vitro investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawzy-El-Sayed, Karim M.; Graetz, Nicole; Dörfer, Christof-Edmund

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The principle of the intraosseous anesthesia (IOA) relies on the perforation of the cortical plate of the bone for direct application of the local anesthetic solution into the underlying cancellous structures. During this procedure, IOA needles might accidentally come in contact with the tooth roots. The aim of the current in vitro study was to examine the consequences of this ‘worst case scenario’ comparing five commercially available IOA systems. Material and Methods: Extracted human roots were randomly perforated using five different IOA systems with a drilling time ≤5s. To simulate normal in vivo conditions, the roots were kept humid during the drilling procedure. Data was statistically evaluated using F-test (SPSS16, SPSS Inc., Chicago, USA) and the significance level was set at p≤0.05. Results: All examined systems resulted in root perforation. Drill fractures occurred in either none 0% (Quicksleeper®, Anesto®, Intraflow®, Stabident®) or 100% (X-Tip®) of the applications. Excessive heat generation, as evident by combustion odor as well as metal and tooth discoloration, appeared in 30% (Quicksleeper®), 40% (Anesto®), 60% (Intraflow®), 90% (Stabident®) and 100% (X-Tip®) of all perforations. Conclusion: Within the limits of in-vitro studies, the results show a potential for irreversible root damage that might be inflicted by an improper use of IOA systems. Key words:Intraosseous anesthesia, complication, root damage. PMID:23229260

  15. Curriculum as a support to investigative approach in learning chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomašević Biljana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the main reasons for low achievement of our students in international tests is the lack of functional, applicable knowledge. Formation of such knowledge demands changing the usual way of implementation of instruction (transfer of ready-made knowledge to learning through performing simple research and practical work. Considering the fact that instruction, as an organised process, takes place in frameworks determined in advance, which are arranged and regulated on the national level by curricula, it is assumed that this kind of approach must originate precisely from curricula, which is not the case in our educational practice. The goal of this paper was to determine the way in which this kind of approach in instruction and learning of chemistry can be supported by the curriculum, in order for it to become a part of regular teaching practice on the national level. The paper presents how different structural components of curricula from eight different educational systems (four European countries, one Asian country, two American federal states and one Canadian province are used to promote and support the importance of research work in instruction and learning of chemistry. The curricula from Slovenia, England, Denmark, Malta, Singapore, North Carolina, Utah and Ontario were analyzed in order to determine the kind of information they offer within structural components and accordingly, the way in which each component promotes research approach to learning chemistry, how it guides the teacher in planning such activities in the classroom, organization and performing instruction, monitoring and evaluating students' achievements.

  16. An investigative, cooperative learning approach to the general microbiology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Kyle; Fenster, Amy; Dilts, Judith A; Temple, Louise

    2009-01-01

    Investigative- and cooperative-based learning strategies have been used effectively in a variety of classrooms to enhance student learning and engagement. In the General Microbiology laboratory for juniors and seniors at James Madison University, these strategies were combined to make a semester-long, investigative, cooperative learning experience involving culture and identification of microbial isolates that the students obtained from various environments. To assess whether this strategy was successful, students were asked to complete a survey at the beginning and at the end of the semester regarding their comfort level with a variety of topics. For most of the topics queried, the students reported that their comfort had increased significantly during the semester. Furthermore, this group of students thought that the quality of this investigative lab experience was much better than that of any of their previous lab experiences.

  17. Salbutamol sulphate-ethylcellulose microparticles: formulation and in-vitro evaluation with emphasis on mathematical approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Murtaza

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available "n "nBackground and the purpose of the study: This study reports the laboratory optimization for the preparation of salbutamol sulphate-ethylcellulose microparticles by a non-solvent addition coacervation technique through adjustment of the ratio of salbutamol sulphate to ethylcellulose. The variation of drug release between the microparticles and tabletted microparticles was also investigated. "nMethods: In vitro release profiles of developed microparticles and tabletted microparticles were studied using USP XXIV dissolution apparatus I and II, respectively, in 450 ml double distilled water at 50 rpm maintained at 37°C. "nResults: White microparticles with no definite shape having good entrapment efficiency (96.68 to 97.83% and production yield (97.48 ± 1.21 to 98.35 ± 1.08% were obtained. In this investigation, initial burst effect was observed in the drug release behavior. The rate of drug release from microparticles decreased as the concentration of polyisobutylene was increased from 6% to 12% during microencapsulation. The release pattern of tabletted microparticles was affected significantly (p < 0.05 by the addition of hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC as excepient and insignificantly (p > 0.05 by the type of dissolution media and stirring speed. Tabletted microparticles showed good stability and reproducibility. Ethylcellulose was found to be compatible with salbutamol sulphate. The drug release from all formulations was best fit to Higuchi's equation and the mechanism of drug release was anomalous diffusion from all formulations. "nConclusion: The results of this study suggest that by using ethylcellulose it is possible to design a single-unit, sustained-release oral dosage form of salbutamol sulphate for indication of twice a day.

  18. A Multimethod Approach for Investigating Algal Toxicity of Platinum Nanoparticles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Engelbrekt, Christian; Lützhøft, Hans-Christian Holten

    2016-01-01

    The ecotoxicity of platinum nanoparticles (PtNPs) widely used in for example automotive catalytic converters, is largely unknown. This study employs various characterization techniques and toxicity end points to investigate PtNP toxicity toward the green microalgae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata...

  19. Discovering probiotic microorganisms: in vitro, in vivo, genetic and omics approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Foligné, Benoit; Alexandraki, Voula; Kazou, Maria; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades the food industry has been revolutionized toward the production of functional foods due to an increasing awareness of the consumers on the positive role of food in wellbeing and health. By definition probiotic foods must contain live microorganisms in adequate amounts so as to be beneficial for the consumer's health. There are numerous probiotic foods marketed today and many probiotic strains are commercially available. However, the question that arises is how to determine the real probiotic potential of microorganisms. This is becoming increasingly important, as even a superficial search of the relevant literature reveals that the number of proclaimed probiotics is growing fast. While the vast majority of probiotic microorganisms are food-related or commensal bacteria that are often regarded as safe, probiotics from other sources are increasingly being reported raising possible regulatory and safety issues. Potential probiotics are selected after in vitro or in vivo assays by evaluating simple traits such as resistance to the acidic conditions of the stomach or bile resistance, or by assessing their impact on complicated host functions such as immune development, metabolic function or gut-brain interaction. While final human clinical trials are considered mandatory for communicating health benefits, rather few strains with positive studies have been able to convince legal authorities with these health claims. Consequently, concern has been raised about the validity of the workflows currently used to characterize probiotics. In this review we will present an overview of the most common assays employed in screening for probiotics, highlighting the potential strengths and limitations of these approaches. Furthermore, we will focus on how the advent of omics technologies has reshaped our understanding of the biology of probiotics, allowing the exploration of novel routes for screening and studying such microorganisms.

  20. Discovering probiotic microorganisms: in vitro, in vivo, genetic and omics approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos ePapadimitriou

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decades the food industry has been revolutionized towards the production of functional foods due to an increasing awareness of the consumers on the positive role of food in wellbeing and health. By definition probiotic foods must contain live microorganisms in adequate amounts so as to be beneficial for the consumer’s health. There are numerous probiotic foods marketed today and many probiotic strains are commercially available. However, the question that arises is how to determine the real probiotic potential of microorganisms. This is becoming increasingly important, as even a superficial search of the relevant literature reveals that the number of proclaimed probiotics is growing fast. While the vast majority of probiotic microorganisms are food-related or commensal bacteria that are often regarded as safe, probiotics from other sources are increasingly being reported raising possible regulatory and safety issues. Potential probiotics are selected after in vitro or in vivo assays by evaluating simple traits such as resistance to the acidic conditions of the stomach or bile resistance, or by assessing their impact on complicated host functions such as immune development, metabolic function or gut-brain interaction. While final human clinical trials are considered mandatory for communicating health benefits, rather few strains with positive studies have been able to convince legal authorities with these health claims. Consequently, concern has been raised about the validity of the workflows currently used to characterize probiotics. In this review we will present an overview of the most common assays employed in screening for probiotics, highlighting the potential strengths and limitations of these approaches. Furthermore, we will focus on how the advent of omics technologies has reshaped our understanding of the biology of probiotics, allowing the exploration of novel routes for screening and studying such microorganisms.

  1. Discovering probiotic microorganisms: in vitro, in vivo, genetic and omics approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadimitriou, Konstantinos; Zoumpopoulou, Georgia; Foligné, Benoit; Alexandraki, Voula; Kazou, Maria; Pot, Bruno; Tsakalidou, Effie

    2015-01-01

    Over the past decades the food industry has been revolutionized toward the production of functional foods due to an increasing awareness of the consumers on the positive role of food in wellbeing and health. By definition probiotic foods must contain live microorganisms in adequate amounts so as to be beneficial for the consumer’s health. There are numerous probiotic foods marketed today and many probiotic strains are commercially available. However, the question that arises is how to determine the real probiotic potential of microorganisms. This is becoming increasingly important, as even a superficial search of the relevant literature reveals that the number of proclaimed probiotics is growing fast. While the vast majority of probiotic microorganisms are food-related or commensal bacteria that are often regarded as safe, probiotics from other sources are increasingly being reported raising possible regulatory and safety issues. Potential probiotics are selected after in vitro or in vivo assays by evaluating simple traits such as resistance to the acidic conditions of the stomach or bile resistance, or by assessing their impact on complicated host functions such as immune development, metabolic function or gut–brain interaction. While final human clinical trials are considered mandatory for communicating health benefits, rather few strains with positive studies have been able to convince legal authorities with these health claims. Consequently, concern has been raised about the validity of the workflows currently used to characterize probiotics. In this review we will present an overview of the most common assays employed in screening for probiotics, highlighting the potential strengths and limitations of these approaches. Furthermore, we will focus on how the advent of omics technologies has reshaped our understanding of the biology of probiotics, allowing the exploration of novel routes for screening and studying such microorganisms. PMID:25741323

  2. Investigation on biological properties of tacrolimus-loaded poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruixia; Wu, Leigang; Wang, Jin; Huang, Nan

    2010-06-01

    The drug-eluting stents have been regarded as a milestone in inhibiting the restenosis of coronary arteries. However, adverse reactions caused by bare-metal stents and non-biodegradable polymer coatings may result in some clinical problems. In this study, a new tacrolimus-eluting stent coated with biodegradable poly(1,3-trimethylene carbonate) (PTMC) is developed. The structures are characterized by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, and the wettability is measured by contact angle assay. The biological behaviors are evaluated by the in vitro platelets adhesion test, APTT test, the human umbilical cord artery smooth muscle cells (HUCASMCs), 4',6-diamidine-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and actin immunofluorescence staining, MTT colorimetric assay. These results show that after blending tacrolimus into PTMC, the anticoagulant behavior is improved, and the adhesion and proliferation of HUCASMCs on samples are inhibited. This work aims to find one kind of surface erosion biodegradable polymers that can be applied as drug-eluting stent coatings.

  3. Investigation of Gelatin Polypeptides of Jellyfish (Rhopilema esculentum for Their Antioxidant Activity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Liang Zhuang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Jellyfish gelatin was hydrolyzed by different proteases to obtain antioxidative polypeptides. The gelatin hydrolysate obtained by progressive hydrolysis using trypsin and Properase E exhibited the highest hydrolysis degree and antioxidant activity. Three series of gelatin polypeptides (SCP1, SCP2 and SCP3 were obtained by ultrafiltrating the gelatin hydrolysate through molecular mass cut-off membranes of 10, 6 and 2 kDa, respectively. Amino acid composition analysis showed that SCP3 had the highest total hydrophobic amino acid content. The in vitro antioxidant tests demonstrated that SCP2 had the strongest hydroxyl radical and hydrogen peroxide scavenging activities and metal chelating ability, while SCP3 showed the highest reducing power, antioxidant activity in linoleic acid emulsion system and superoxide anion radical scavenging activity. The results support the feasibility of jellyfish gelatin as a natural antioxidant polypeptide provider, and enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration could be potent future processing technologies to utilize the abundant jellyfish resource.

  4. Direct lateral approach to lumbar fusion is a biomechanically equivalent alternative to the anterior approach: an in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laws, Cory J; Coughlin, Dezba G; Lotz, Jeffrey C; Serhan, Hassan A; Hu, Serena S

    2012-05-01

    A human cadaveric biomechanical study of lumbar mobility before and after fusion and with or without supplemental instrumentation for 5 instrumentation configurations. To determine the biomechanical differences between anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) and direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) with and without supplementary instrumentation. Some prior studies have compared various surgical approaches using the same interbody device whereas others have investigated the stabilizing effect of supplemental instrumentation. No published studies have performed a side-by-side comparison of standard and minimally invasive techniques with and without supplemental instrumentation. Eight human lumbosacral specimens (16 motion segments) were tested in each of the 5 following configurations: (1) intact, (2) with ALIF or DLIF cage, (3) with cage plus stabilizing plate, (4) with cage plus unilateral pedicle screw fixation (PSF), and (5) with cage plus bilateral PSF. Pure moments were applied to induce specimen flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. Three-dimensional kinematic responses were measured and used to calculate range of motion, stiffness, and neutral zone. Compared to the intact state, DLIF significantly reduced range of motion in flexion, extension, and lateral bending (P = 0.0117, P = 0.0015, P = 0.0031). Supplemental instrumentation significantly increased fused-specimen stiffness for both DLIF and ALIF groups. For the ALIF group, bilateral PSF increased stiffness relative to stand-alone cage by 455% in flexion and 317% in lateral bending (P = 0.0009 and P < 0.0001). The plate increased ALIF group stiffness by 211% in extension and 256% in axial rotation (P = 0.0467 and P = 0.0303). For the DLIF group, bilateral PSF increased stiffness by 350% in flexion and 222% in extension (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.0008). No differences were observed between ALIF and DLIF groups supplemented with bilateral PSF. Our data support that the direct lateral approach

  5. Investigations about the in vitro import of nucleus encoded cyanellar ploypeptides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandtner, M.

    1991-05-01

    Cyanelles are the plastids of the eukaryotic alga Cyanophora paradoxa. They share several features with cyanobacteria: a cell wall made of peptidoglycan, concentric thylakoid membranes and phycobilisomes as light harvesting complexes. Therefore cyanelles were regarded as 'missing link' between the chloroplasts and the prokaryotic ancestor according to the endosymbiotic hypothesis. The genome of the cyanelles resembles that of plastids concerning size and organization. So cyanelles have to import 90% of their proteins. In order to study the import of proteins into cyanelles, it was necessary to isolate a nucleus-encoded gene from a cDNA library. The gene could be expressed in vitro in a suitable plasmid. The radioactive labelled precursor will be incubated with isolated cyanelles. After their lysis their proteins will be run on a gel and the fate of the precursor -whether it was imported and processed respectively or not - will be detected. A method for mRNA isolation was adapted with respect to Cyanophora paradoxa. Based on the mRNA cDNA libraries were established. In parallel the mRNA was in vitro translated. Import experiments with the translation products were performed into cyanelles and pea chloroplasts. Additionally it was tried to import four precursors of higher plants into cyanelles. The isolated cyanelles were not competent for protein uptake. The gene for ferredoxin-NADP-reductase was found in a lambda ZAP cDNA library by screening with homologous antibodies. The transit peptide for the import into cyanelles shows the same general features as chloroplast transit peptides do, but differs from the three known transit peptides of ferredoxin-NADP-reductase from higher plants. (author)

  6. THEORETICAL AND METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO REGIONAL COMPETITION INVESTIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Tatarkin

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to theoretical-methodological issues of regional economy competitiveness investigation. Economic essence of regional competitiveness is analyzed, its definition is given. The factors that determine relations of competition on medium and macrolevels are proved. The basic differences between world-economical and inter-regional communications are formulated. The specific features of globalization processes as form of competitive struggle are considered.

  7. Investigation of an angular spectrum approach for pulsed ultrasound fields

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yigang; Jensen, Henrik; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2013-01-01

    An Angular Spectrum Approach (ASA)is formulated and employed to simulate linear pulsed ultra sound fields for high bandwidth signals. Ageometrically focused piston transducer is used as the acoustic source. Signals are cross-correlated to findthe true sound speed during the measurement to make...... the simulated and measured pulses in phase for comparisons. The calculated sound speed in the measurement is varied between 1487.45 m/s and 1487.75 m/s by using different initial values in the ASA simulation. Results from the pulsed ASA simulation susing both Field II simulated and hydrophone measured acoustic....... Optim al parameters for the ASA are found in the simulation .The RMS error of the ASA simulation is reduced from 10.9% to 2.4% for the optimal parameters when comparing to Field II simulation s. The comparison between the ASA calculated and measured pulses are illustrated and the corresponding RMS error...

  8. A new approach in development of data flow control and investigation system for computer networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frolov, I.; Vaguine, A.; Silin, A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a new approach in development of data flow control and investigation system for computer networks. This approach was developed and applied in the Moscow Radiotechnical Institute for control and investigations of Institute computer network. It allowed us to solve our network current problems successfully. Description of our approach is represented below along with the most interesting results of our work. (author)

  9. A Hypothesis-Driven Approach to Site Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, W.

    2008-12-01

    Variability of subsurface formations and the scarcity of data lead to the notion of aquifer parameters as geostatistical random variables. Given an information need and limited resources for field campaigns, site investigation is often put into the context of optimal design. In optimal design, the types, numbers and positions of samples are optimized under case-specific objectives to meet the information needs. Past studies feature optimal data worth (balancing maximum financial profit in an engineering task versus the cost of additional sampling), or aim at a minimum prediction uncertainty of stochastic models for a prescribed investigation budget. Recent studies also account for other sources of uncertainty outside the hydrogeological range, such as uncertain toxicity, ingestion and behavioral parameters of the affected population when predicting the human health risk from groundwater contaminations. The current study looks at optimal site investigation from a new angle. Answering a yes/no question under uncertainty directly requires recasting the original question as a hypothesis test. Otherwise, false confidence in the resulting answer would be pretended. A straightforward example is whether a recent contaminant spill will cause contaminant concentrations in excess of a legal limit at a nearby drinking water well. This question can only be answered down to a specified chance of error, i.e., based on the significance level used in hypothesis tests. Optimal design is placed into the hypothesis-driven context by using the chance of providing a false yes/no answer as new criterion to be minimized. Different configurations apply for one-sided and two-sided hypothesis tests. If a false answer entails financial liability, the hypothesis-driven context can be re-cast in the context of data worth. The remaining difference is that failure is a hard constraint in the data worth context versus a monetary punishment term in the hypothesis-driven context. The basic principle

  10. New experimental approaches to investigate the fission dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benlliure, J., E-mail: j.benlliure@usc.es; Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Ayyad, Y.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Paradela, C.; Pietras, B.; Ramos, D.; Vargas, J. [Universidade de Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Audouin, L.; Boutoux, G. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire d’Orsay, F-91406 Orsay (France); Bélier, G.; Chatillon, A.; Gorbinet, T.; Laurent, B.; Martin, J.-F.; Pellereau, E.; Taïeb, J. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Casarejos, E. [Universidad de Vigo, E-36200 Vigo (Spain); Heinz, A. [Chalmers University of Technology, SE-412 96 Gothenburg (Sweden); and others

    2016-07-07

    The first ever achieved full identification of both fission fragments, in atomic and mass number, made it possible to define new observables sensitive to the fission dynamics along the fission path up to the scission point. Moreover, proton-induced fission of {sup 208}Pb at high energies offers optimal conditions for the investigation of dissipative, and transient effects, because of the high-excitation energy of the fissioning nuclei, its low angular momentum, and limited shape distortion by the reaction. In this work we show that the charge distribution of the final fission fragments can constrain the ground-to-saddle dynamics while the mass distribution is sensitive to the dynamics until the scission point.

  11. Phytochemical and in vitro and in vivo biological investigation on the antihypertensive activity of mango leaves (Mangifera indica L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronchi, Silas Nascimento; Brasil, Girlandia Alexandre; do Nascimento, Andrews Marques; de Lima, Ewelyne Miranda; Scherer, Rodrigo; Costa, Helber B; Romão, Wanderson; Boëchat, Giovanna Assis Pereira; Lenz, Dominik; Fronza, Marcio; Bissoli, Nazaré Souza; Endringer, Denise Coutinho; de Andrade, Tadeu Uggere

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the antihypertensive effect of leaves Mangifera indica L. using in vitro and in vivo assays. The ethanol extract of leaves of M. indica was fractionated to dichloromethanic, n-butyl alcohol and aqueous fractions. The chemical composition of ethanolic extract and dichloromethanic fraction were evaluated by liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Antioxidant activity was evaluated in the DPPH scavenging activity assay. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity was investigated using in vitro and in vivo assays. The chronic antihypertensive assay was performed in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and Wistar rats treated with enalapril (10 mg/kg), dichloromethanic fraction (100 mg/kg; twice a day) or vehicle control for 30 days. The baroreflex sensitivity was evaluated through the use of sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine. Cardiac hypertrophy was evaluated by morphometric analysis. The dichloromethanic fraction exhibited the highest flavonoid, total phenolic content and high antioxidant activity. Dichloromethanic fraction elicited ACE inhibitory activity in vitro (99 ± 8%) similar to captopril. LC-MS/MS analysis revealed the presence of ferulic acid (48.3 ± 0.04 µg/g) caffeic acid (159.8 ± 0.02 µg/g), gallic acid (142.5 ± 0.03 µg/g), apigenin (11.0 ± 0.01 µg/g) and quercetin (203.3 ± 0.05 µg/g). The chronic antihypertensive effects elicited by dichloromethanic fraction were similar to those of enalapril, and the baroreflex sensitivity was normalized in SHR. Plasma ACE activity and cardiac hypertrophy were comparable with animals treated with enalapril. Dichloromethanic fraction of M. indica presented an antihypertensive effect, most likely by ACE inhibition, with benefits in baroreflex sensitivity and cardiac hypertrophy. Altogether, the results of the present study suggest that the dichloromethanic fraction of M. indica leaves may have potential as a promoting

  12. Investigation of superharmonic sound propagation and imaging in biological tissues in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qingyu; Zhang, Dong; Gong, Xiufen; Ma, Yong

    2006-04-01

    This article presents both theoretical and experimental studies on the superharmonic generation and its imaging in biological tissues. A superharmonic component is defined as a summation of the third-, fourth-, and fifth-order harmonics. A superharmonic signal is produced using an 8-mm-diam, 2.5-MHz planar piston source that is excited by eight-cycle, 2.5-MHz tone bursts. Axial and lateral field distributions of the superharmonic component and the second harmonic are first calculated based on the nonlinear KZK model and then compared with those experimentally determined at two different source pressures of 0.5 and 1 MPa. Results indicate that the amplitude of the superharmonic component can exceed that of the second harmonic, depending on the axial distance and the fundamental pressure amplitude. Also, the 3-dB beamwidth of the superharmonic component is about 23% narrower than that of the second harmonic. Additional experiments are performed in vitro using liver and fatty tissues in transmission mode and produced two-dimensional images using the fundamental, the second harmonic, and the superharmonic signals. Although the clinical applicability of this work still needs to be assessed, these results indicate that the superharmonic image quality is better than that of the other two images.

  13. A fractional calculus approach to investigate the alpha decay processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calik, A.E.; Ertik, H.; Oder, B.; Sirin, H.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the nuclear decay equation is taken under consideration by making use of fractional calculus. In this context, the first-order time derivative is changed to a Caputo fractional derivative hence, the resulting equation is the time fractional nuclear decay equation. The solution of this equation is obtained in terms of Mittag–Leffler function which plays an important role to study the non-Markovian feature of physical processes. As an application of this time fractional formalism, alpha decay half-life values have been calculated for Pb, Po, Rn, Ra, Th and U isotopes. Consequently, the theoretical half-life values have been obtained in consistent with the experimental data. The dependence of the order of fractional derivative μ being a measure of fractality of time, on the nuclear structure has been established. In the investigations carried out, we have arrived to the conclusion that for the μ values which are closed to one, where time becomes homogenous and continuous, the shell closure effects are predominant and that the fractional derivative order μ (i.e., fractality of time) and nuclear structure are closely related to each other. (author)

  14. Investigating international new product diffusion speed: A semiparametric approach

    KAUST Repository

    Hartman, Brian M.

    2012-06-01

    Global marketing managers are interested in understanding the speed of the new product diffusion process and how the speed has changed in our ever more technologically advanced and global marketplace. Understanding the process allows firms to forecast the expected rate of return on their new products and develop effective marketing strategies. The most recent major study on this topic [Marketing Science 21 (2002) 97-114] investigated new product diffusions in the United States.We expand upon that study in three important ways. (1) Van den Bulte notes that a similar study is needed in the international context, especially in developing countries. Our study covers four new product diffusions across 31 developed and developing nations from 1980-2004. Our sample accounts for about 80% of the global economic output and 60% of the global population, allowing us to examine more general phenomena. (2) His model contains the implicit assumption that the diffusion speed parameter is constant throughout the diffusion life cycle of a product. Recognizing the likely effects on the speed parameter of recent changes in the marketplace, we model the parameter as a semiparametric function, allowing it the flexibility to change over time. (3) We perform a variable selection to determine that the number of internet users and the consumer price index are strongly associated with the speed of diffusion. © Institute of Mathematical Statistics, 2012.

  15. Methodological approach to crime scene investigation: the dangers of technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Peter D.

    1997-02-01

    The visitor to any modern forensic science laboratory is confronted with equipment and processes that did not exist even 10 years ago: thermocyclers to allow genetic typing of nanogram amounts of DNA isolated from a few spermatozoa; scanning electron microscopes that can nearly automatically detect submicrometer sized particles of molten lead, barium and antimony produced by the discharge of a firearm and deposited on the hands of the shooter; and computers that can compare an image of a latent fingerprint with millions of fingerprints stored in the computer memory. Analysis of populations of physical evidence has permitted statistically minded forensic scientists to use Bayesian inference to draw conclusions based on a priori assumptions which are often poorly understood, irrelevant, or misleading. National commissions who are studying quality control in DNA analysis propose that people with barely relevant graduate degrees and little forensic science experience be placed in charge of forensic DNA laboratories. It is undeniable that high- tech has reversed some miscarriages of justice by establishing the innocence of a number of people who were imprisoned for years for crimes that they did not commit. However, this papers deals with the dangers of technology in criminal investigations.

  16. Tackling bioactive glass excessive in vitro bioreactivity: Preconditioning approaches for cell culture tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciraldo, Francesca E; Boccardi, Elena; Melli, Virginia; Westhauser, Fabian; Boccaccini, Aldo R

    2018-05-21

    Bioactive glasses (BGs) are being increasingly considered for biomedical applications in bone and soft tissue replacement approaches thanks to their ability to form strong bonding with tissues. However, due to their high reactivity once in contact with water-based solutions BGs rapidly exchange ions with the surrounding environment leading in most cases to an undesired increase of the pH under static in vitro conditions (due to alkaline ion "burst release"), making difficult or even impossible to perform cell culture studies. Several pre-conditioning treatments have been therefore proposed in laboratories worldwide to limit this problem. This paper presents an overview of the different strategies that have been put forward to pre-treat BG samples to tackle the pH raise issue in order to enable cell biology studies. The paper also discusses the relevant criteria that determine the selection of the optimal pre-treatment depending on the BG composition and morphology (e.g. particles, scaffolds). Bioactive glasses (BGs), since their discovery in 1971 by L.L Hench, have been widely used for bone replacement and repair, and, more recently, they are becoming highly attractive for bone and soft tissue engineering applications. BGs have in fact the ability to form a strong bond with both hard and soft tissues once in contact with biological fluid. The enhanced interaction of BGs with the biological environment is based on their significant surface bioreactivity. This surface effect of BGs is, on the other hand, problematic for cell biology studies by standard (static) cell culture methods: an excessive bioreactivity leads in most cases to a rapid and dramatic increase of the pH of the surrounding medium, which results in cell death and makes cell culture tests on BG samples impossible. The BG research community has been aware of this for many years and numerous pre-treatments have been proposed by different groups worldwide to limit this problem. For the first time, we have

  17. A multiplexed chip-based assay system for investigating the functional development of human skeletal myotubes in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A S T; Long, C J; Pirozzi, K; Najjar, S; McAleer, C; Vandenburgh, H H; Hickman, J J

    2014-09-20

    This report details the development of a non-invasive in vitro assay system for investigating the functional maturation and performance of human skeletal myotubes. Data is presented demonstrating the survival and differentiation of human myotubes on microscale silicon cantilevers in a defined, serum-free system. These cultures can be stimulated electrically and the resulting contraction quantified using modified atomic force microscopy technology. This system provides a higher degree of sensitivity for investigating contractile waveforms than video-based analysis, and represents the first system capable of measuring the contractile activity of individual human muscle myotubes in a reliable, high-throughput and non-invasive manner. The development of such a technique is critical for the advancement of body-on-a-chip platforms toward application in pre-clinical drug development screens. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Pediatric suppositories of sulpiride solid dispersion for treatment of Tourette syndrome: in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Emam, Sherif E; Shehata, Tamer M; Ghazy, Fakhr-eldin S

    2015-06-01

    Pharmaceutical development was adopted in the current study to propose a pediatric rectal formulation of sulpiride as a substitute to the available oral or parenteral formulations in the management of Tourette syndrome (TS). The goal was to formulate a product that is easy to use, stable, and highly bioavailable and to achieve a rapid clinical efficacy. Towards this aim, sulpiride solid dispersion (SD) with tartaric acid at a weight ratio of 1:0.25 was incorporated into different suppository bases, namely witepsol W25, witepsol H15, witepsol E75, suppocire NA, suppocire A, glycerogelatin, and polyethylene glycols. The formulae were evaluated in vitro using different pharmacotechnical methods such as visual, melting, weight and content uniformities, drug release, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. In vivo bioavailability was also assessed in rabbits to compare the bioavailability of either raw sulpiride-incorporated or its SD-incorporated witepsol H15-based suppositories to its oral suspension (reference). Sulpiride SD-incorporated witepsol H15 formulation showed acceptable in vitro characteristics with a bioavailability of 117% relative to oral dosing, which excel that in humans (27% after dosing of oral product). In addition, the proposed formula not only passed the 6-month stability study but also proposed a promising scale-up approach. Hence, it showed a great potential for pediatric product development to manage TS in rural areas.

  19. Investigation of micronuclei induction in human peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed in vitro to EMF RF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolomiets, Irina A.; Triapitsina, Galina A.; Polevik, Nikolai D.; Pryakhin, Evgeny A.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: The widespread application of cellular phones is of great concern in view possible consequences for human health. The aim of this study is to assess the capability of electromagnetic fields (EMF) RF with frequency 925 MHz and modulation 217 Hz to induce genotoxic effects as evaluated by the in vitro micronucleus assay on peripheral blood lymphocytes. The flasks of peripheral blood samples collected from healthy volunteers (5 men and 5 women) were placed just on the oscillator of emitting antenna. The signals were produced by the laboratory research plant and were evaluated at four specific absorption rates (SARs) - 0; 0.29; 1.2; 8.1 W/kg. SARs were determined by the calorimetric method. Phytohaemagglutinin stimulated lymphocytes were exposed three times for 10 minutes in the G o (the first 30 minutes after the beginning of cultivation), S (24 hours later), G 2 -M (after 48 hours from the beginning of cultivation) stages of the cell cycle. 72-hours cultures of lymphocytes were examined to determine the extent of micronuclei. The Mann-Whitney U-test was used to evaluate the significance for comparison. The data indicated a significant increase of micronuclei in human lymphocytes exposed to EMF RF (6.5 ± 0.51 0/00; 7.1 ± 0.66 0/00; 7.0 ± 0.50 0/00) in comparison with sham-exposed lymphocytes (3.0 ± 0.60 0/00). There was not revealed a dose-dependent increase of micronuclei in human lymphocytes. It was suggested that the increase of micronuclei in lymphocytes is explicated by a particularity of EMF RF just near the oscillator of emitting antenna. (author)

  20. Preventive effects of different protective agents on dentin erosion: An in vitro investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggio, Claudio; Gulino, Chiara; Mirando, Maria; Colombo, Marco; Pietrocola, Giampiero

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate the preventive effects of different protective agents on dentine erosion, measuring mean percentage weight loss. Dissolution of dentine under erosive challenges caused by soft drinks was analyzed: specimens were weighed following each immersion period, with mean percent weight losses calculated. Extracted teeth were sectioned into uniform slabs. Seventy permanent enamel specimens were randomly distributed to seven groups. Initial weights of all dentin specimens were performed. The fluoride pastes Remin Pro, MI Paste Plus, Tooth Mousse, Biorepair, Biorepair Plus and Regenerate were used in this study. A control group was treated just with tap water. The specimens then were immersed in Coca-Cola for a total of 32 min at room temperature. Finally each specimen was dry and weighed. The mass loss was calculated as a percentage of that observed prior the fluoride pastes application. Weight loss data were subjected to Analysis of Variance (One-way ANOVA) followed by Bonferroni's post hoc tests. Percent weight loss of specimens exposed to early stages in Coca-Cola showed linear progression with time. Specimen's application of fluoridated varnishes such as Biorepair or Regenerate, prior immersion in Coca-Cola, significantly protect dentin from demineralization. Otherwise, application of Tooth Mousse or Biorepair Plus increased dentin demineralization starting from 24 min of immersion in Coca-Cola. Despite the limitations of this study, the protective pastes that showed the less weight loss due to the acidic challenge are Biorepair and Regenerate. Key words: Dentine, erosion, protective agents, soft drinks, toothpastes.

  1. A tiered approach for integrating exposure and dosimetry with in vitro dose-response data in the modern risk assessment paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    High-throughput (HT) risk screening approaches apply in vitro dose-response data to estimate potential health risks that arise from exposure to chemicals. However, much uncertainty is inherent in relating bioactivities observed in an in vitro system to the perturbations of biolog...

  2. Low dose effects of ionizing radiations in in vitro and in vivo biological systems: a multi-scale approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoccia, A.; Berardinelli, F.; Argazzi, E.; Balata, M.; Bedogni, R.

    2011-01-01

    Long-term biological effects of low-dose radiation are little known nowadays and its carcinogenic risk is estimated on the assumption that risk remains linearly proportional to the radiation dose down to low-dose levels. However in the last 20 years this hypothesis has gradually begun to seem in contrast with a huge collection of experimental evidences, which has shown the presence of plethora of non-linear phenomena (including hypersensitivity and induced radioresistance, adaptive response, and non-targeted phenomena like bystander effect and genomic instability) occurring after low-dose irradiation. These phenomena might imply a non-linear behaviour of cancer risk curves in the low-dose region and question the validity of the Linear No-Threshold (LNT) model currently used for cancer risk assessment through extrapolation from existing high-dose data. Moreover only few information is available regarding the effects induced on cryo preserved cells by multi-year background radiation exposure, which might induce a radiation-damage accumulation, due to the inhibition of cellular repair mechanisms. In this framework, the multi-year Excalibur (Exposure effects at low doses of ionizing radiation in biological culture) experiment, funded by INFN-CNS5, has undertaken a multi-scale approach investigation on the biological effects induced in in vitro and in vivo biological systems, in culture and cryo preserved conditions, as a function of radiation quality (X/γ-rays, protons, He-4 ions of various energies) and dose, with particular emphasis on the low-dose region and non-linear phenomena, in terms of different biological endpoints.

  3. In vitro and in vivo investigation of matrix metalloproteinase expression in metastatic tumor models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sprague, Jennifer E. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Li Wenping [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Liang Kexian [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Achilefu, Samuel [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Anderson, Carolyn J. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)]. E-mail: andersoncj@wustl.edu

    2006-02-15

    Introduction: Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly MMP-2 and MMP-9, has been correlated with poor prognosis in several cancer types including lung, colon and breast. Noninvasive detection of MMP expression might allow physicians to better determine when more aggressive cancer therapy is appropriate. The peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC) was identified as a selective inhibitor of MMP-2/9 that inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer xenografts. Methods: CTT was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) for radiolabeling with {sup 64}Cu (t {sub 1/2}=12.7 h, 17.4% {beta}{sup +}, 39% {beta}{sup -}), a radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET). In vitro affinity was determined in a fluorogenic substrate assay. Tumor gelatinase targeting was evaluated in both biodistribution and microPET imaging studies. Results: Cu(II)-DOTA-CTT inhibited hMMP-2 (EC{sub 5}=8.7 {mu}M) and mMMP-9 (EC{sub 5}=18.2 {mu}M) with similar affinity to CTT (hMMP-2 EC{sub 5}=13.2 {mu}M; mMMP-9 EC{sub 5}=11.0 {mu}M). In biodistribution and microPET imaging studies, {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT was taken up by MMP-2/9-positive B16F10 murine melanoma tumors. Subsequently, imaging studies using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT were performed on MDA-MB-435 tumor-bearing mice. With zymography, tumor MMP-2/9 expression in this model was shown to be inconsistent, resulting in microPET detection of the MDA-MB-435 tumor in only 1 of 24 imaged mice. Following limited imaging success, {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT was shown to have poor in vivo stability. Conclusions: Despite some evidence for selective uptake of {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-CTT by gelatinase-expressing tumors, the low affinity for MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in vivo instability make this an inadequate radioligand for in vivo tumor evaluation.

  4. In vitro and in vivo investigation of matrix metalloproteinase expression in metastatic tumor models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprague, Jennifer E.; Li Wenping; Liang Kexian; Achilefu, Samuel; Anderson, Carolyn J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction: Overexpression of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), particularly MMP-2 and MMP-9, has been correlated with poor prognosis in several cancer types including lung, colon and breast. Noninvasive detection of MMP expression might allow physicians to better determine when more aggressive cancer therapy is appropriate. The peptide CTT (CTTHWGFTLC) was identified as a selective inhibitor of MMP-2/9 that inhibits the growth of MDA-MB-435 human breast cancer xenografts. Methods: CTT was conjugated with the bifunctional chelator DOTA (1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclotetradecane-N,N',N'',N'''-tetraacetic acid) for radiolabeling with 64 Cu (t 1/2 =12.7 h, 17.4% β + , 39% β - ), a radionuclide suitable for positron emission tomography (PET). In vitro affinity was determined in a fluorogenic substrate assay. Tumor gelatinase targeting was evaluated in both biodistribution and microPET imaging studies. Results: Cu(II)-DOTA-CTT inhibited hMMP-2 (EC 5 =8.7 μM) and mMMP-9 (EC 5 =18.2 μM) with similar affinity to CTT (hMMP-2 EC 5 =13.2 μM; mMMP-9 EC 5 =11.0 μM). In biodistribution and microPET imaging studies, 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT was taken up by MMP-2/9-positive B16F10 murine melanoma tumors. Subsequently, imaging studies using 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT were performed on MDA-MB-435 tumor-bearing mice. With zymography, tumor MMP-2/9 expression in this model was shown to be inconsistent, resulting in microPET detection of the MDA-MB-435 tumor in only 1 of 24 imaged mice. Following limited imaging success, 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT was shown to have poor in vivo stability. Conclusions: Despite some evidence for selective uptake of 64 Cu-DOTA-CTT by gelatinase-expressing tumors, the low affinity for MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in vivo instability make this an inadequate radioligand for in vivo tumor evaluation

  5. Expert consensus on an in vitro approach to assess pulmonary fibrogenic potential of aerosolized nanomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Report from an international workshop with the goal of reviewing the state-of-the-science and determine the technical needs to develop an in vitro system that will reduce and eventually replace the use of animals for evaluating the potential inhalation toxicity of nanomaterials (...

  6. In Vitro and In Vivo Investigation of the Potential of Amorphous Microporous Silica as a Protein Delivery Vehicle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Chaudhari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Delivering growth factors (GFs at bone/implant interface needs to be optimized to achieve faster osseointegration. Amorphous microporous silica (AMS has a potential to be used as a carrier and delivery platform for GFs. In this work, adsorption (loading and release (delivery mechanism of a model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA, from AMS was investigated in vitro as well as in vivo. In general, strong BSA adsorption to AMS was observed. The interaction was stronger at lower pH owing to favorable electrostatic interaction. In vitro evaluation of BSA release revealed a peculiar release profile, involving a burst release followed by a 6 h period without appreciable BSA release and a further slower release later. Experimental data supporting this observation are discussed. Apart from understanding protein/biomaterial (BSA/AMS interaction, determination of in vivo protein release is an essential aspect of the evaluation of a protein delivery system. In this regard micropositron emission tomography (μ-PET was used in an exploratory experiment to determine in vivo BSA release profile from AMS. Results suggest stronger in vivo retention of BSA when adsorbed on AMS. This study highlights the possible use of AMS as a controlled protein delivery platform which may facilitate osseointegration.

  7. Prediction of pharmacokinetic and toxicological parameters of a 4-phenylcoumarin isolated from geopropolis: In silico and in vitro approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Cunha, Marcos Guilherme; Franco, Gilson César Nobre; Franchin, Marcelo; Beutler, John A; de Alencar, Severino Matias; Ikegaki, Masaharu; Rosalen, Pedro Luiz

    2016-11-30

    In silico and in vitro methodologies have been used as important tools in the drug discovery process, including from natural sources. The aim of this study was to predict pharmacokinetic and toxicity (ADME/Tox) properties of a coumarin isolated from geopropolis using in silico and in vitro approaches. Cinnamoyloxy-mammeisin (CNM) isolated from Brazilian M. scutellaris geopropolis was evaluated for its pharmacokinetic parameters by in silico models (ACD/Percepta™ and MetaDrug™ software). Genotoxicity was assessed by in vitro DNA damage signaling PCR array. CNM did not pass all parameters of Lipinski's rule of five, with a predicted low oral bioavailability and high plasma protein binding, but with good predicted blood brain barrier penetration. CNM was predicted to show low affinity to cytochrome P450 family members. Furthermore, the predicted Ames test indicated potential mutagenicity of CNM. Also, the probability of toxicity for organs and tissues was classified as moderate and high for liver and kidney, and moderate and low for skin and eye irritation, respectively. The PCR array analysis showed that CNM significantly upregulated about 7% of all DNA damage-related genes. By exploring the biological function of these genes, it was found that the predicted CNM genotoxicity is likely to be mediated by apoptosis. The predicted ADME/Tox profile suggests that external use of CNM may be preferable to systemic exposure, while its genotoxicity was characterized by the upregulation of apoptosis-related genes after treatment. The combined use of in silico and in vitro approaches to evaluate these parameters generated useful hypotheses to guide further preclinical studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Phytochemical investigation GC-MS analysis and in vitro antimicrobial activity of Coleus forskohlii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnamoorthy Rajkumar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the phytochemical constituents, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis and antimicrobial activity of Coleus forskohlii. The different solvents such as ethanol, chloroform, acetone and aqueous extracts were identified pharmacologically as important bioactive compounds and their antimicrobial properties were studied. In the phytochemical investigation almost all the ethanol extract of leaf, stem and root having secondary metabolites like alkaloids, flavonoids, tannins, saponins, terpenoids, and steroids. The active constituents of the ethanol extract of C. forskohlii root was studied by GC-MS analysis. According to the antimicrobial results ethanol extract of C. froshkolii root showed highest antibacterial activity compared with stem and leaf. The highest antimicrobial activity was observed against Klebsiella pneumonia (19 mm and Candida albicans (16 mm in ethanol extract of root. Among the above extracts of leaf, stem and root, ethanol extract of root having antimicrobial activities due to the presence of phytoconstituents.

  9. In vitro investigation of cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism of dietary flavonoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breinholt, Vibeke; Offord, E.A.; Brouwer, C.

    2002-01-01

    Human and mouse liver microsomes And membranes isolated from Escherichia coli, which expressed cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2, 3A4 2C9 or 2D6, were used to investigate CYP-mediated metabolism of five selected dietary flavonoids. In human and mouse liver microsomes kaempferol, apigenin and naringenin...... were hydroxylated at the 3'-position to yield their corresponding analogs quercetin, luteolin and eriodietyol, whereas hesperetin and tamarixetin were demethylated at the 4'-position to yield eriodictyol and quercetin. respectively, Microsomal flavonoid metabolism as potently inhibited by the CYP1A2...... inhibitors. fluvoxamine and alpha-naphthoflavone. Recombinant CYP1A2 as capable of metabolizing all five investigated flavonoids. CYP3A4 recombinant protein did not catalyze hesperetin demethylation. but showed similar metabolic profiles for the remaining compounds, as did human microsomes and recombinant...

  10. In Vitro Investigation of Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Human Immature Teeth

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Talebi; Sahar Moghimi; Mina Shafagh; Hadi Kalani; Fatemeh Mazhari

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp). Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU). Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second ...

  11. Systematic investigation and in vitro biocompatibility studies on mesoporous europium doped hydroxyapatite

    OpenAIRE

    Popa Cristina; Ciobanu Carmen; Iconaru Simona; Stan Miruna; Dinischiotu Anca; Negrila Constantin; Motelica-Heino Mikael; Guegan Regis; Predoi Daniela

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper reports a systematic investigation on europium doped hydroxyapatite (Eu:HAp). In this work, a set of complementary techniques Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) technique was used to allowing a proper understanding of Eu:HAp. The XPS analysis confirmed the substitution of Ca ions by Eu ions in Eu:HAp samples. Eu:HAp and pure HAp show ...

  12. In vitro investigation of antioxidant activities of Launea taraxacifolia and Crassocephalum rubens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funmilayo B. Borokini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Launea taraxacifolia and Crassocephalum rubens are among many wild, underutilized and under cultivated vegetables in Nigeria that are at risk of extinction. Total flavonoid contents (TFC, total phenolic contents (TPC, and antioxidant activities of different concentrations (1-5 mg ml-1 were evaluated; using in vitro assays to assess the scavenging properties of 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picryl hydrazyl (DPPHRSP, nitric oxide (NORSP and hydroxyl (OHRSP. Phenolic profiles of the alcoholic extracts were characterized using high-performance liquid chromatography techniques. The results revealed higher TFC (mg/100g RE in aqueous (6.06± 0.02-78.79±0.01 than alcohol extracts (with methanol 0.93±0.01—12.73±0.04, and with ethanol -0.85±0.01-- 7.70±0.03. In a similar trend, OHRSP (% was higher in aqueous extracts (40.83±0.10--91.74±0.19 than alcoholic extracts (with methanol -11.67±0.3-- 30.83±0.06; and with ethanol -14.42±0.06- 40.27±0.05. TPC (mg/100g GAE which was higher in alcoholic extracts (with methanol -21.48±0.01--133.20±0.16 and with ethanol -9.45±0.01--59.73±0.02 than aqueous extracts (14.83±0.01--52.64±0.03 was in agreement with the trend observed for NORSP (28.24±0.05-151.76±0.08 for methanolic extracts, 21.99±0.13--49.93±0.04 for ethanolic extracts and 38.47±0.11--86.15±0.05 for aqueous extracts. DPPHRSP was also higher in alcoholic extracts (methanolic -22.81±0.01-48.41±0.05 and ethanolic-- 14.53±0.01-62.68±0.07 than aqueous extracts (13.66±0.13--42.86±0.03. TFC, TPC and antioxidant activities showed concentration dependent increase and strong positive correlation with TFC (r= 0.926 – 0.997and r= 0.432 – 1.000 and TPC (r= 0.825 – 0.999 and r= 0.473 - 0.994 for L. taraxacifolia and C. rubens respectively. Caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, ellagic acid, quercetin and kaempferol were identified as major phenolic components in the extracts. The vegetables have high antioxidant potential for promoting good health; which

  13. Preclinical and clinical investigations as an approach to rational phytotherapy in prostate diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Weisskopf, Marianne

    2004-01-01

    Phytotherapeuticals have gained widespread usage in the treatment of symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Among these phytotherapeutics, the most popular and extensively studied are extracts of the dried ripe fruit of Serenoa repens (SRE). The commercially available hydroethanolic (96%) SRE, Me180, is already used as a medical treatment of symptomatic BPH. However, this extract was so far neither investigated in vitro nor in vivo. The other extracts tested herein, de...

  14. In vitro investigations of Cynara scolymus L. extract on cell physiology of HepG2 liver cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gesine Löhr

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was the investigation of a potential influence of artichoke leaf extract (ALE on the cell physiology and gene expression of phase I/II enzymes of human liver cells HepG2 and investigation on potential cell protective effects against ethanol-induced cell toxicity against HepG2 cells. Cell biological assays under in vitro conditions using HepG2 liver cells and investigation of mitochondrial activity (MTT test, proliferation assay (BrdU incorporation ELISA, LDH as toxicity marker, gene expression analysis by RT-PCR and enzyme activity of glutationtransferase. Artichocke extract, containing 27% caffeoylquinic acids and 7% flavonoids induced mitochondrial activity, proliferation and total protein content under in vitro conditions in human liver cells HepG2. These effects could not be correlated to the well-known artichoke secondary compounds cynarin, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, luteolin and luteolin-7-O-glucoside. The flavones luteolin and luteolin-7-O-glucoside had inhibitory effects at 100 µg/mL level on HepG2 cells, with luteolin being a significant stronger inhibitor compared to the respective glucoside. Artichoke leaf extract had minor stimulating effect on gene expression of CYP1A2, while CYP3A4, GGT, GPX2, GSR and GST were slightly inhibited. GST inhibition under in vitro conditions was also shown by quantification of GST enzyme activity. Induction of gene expression of CYP1A2 was shown to be supraadditive after simultaneous application of ethanol plus artichoke extract. Artichoke leaf extract exhibited cell protective effects against ethanol-induced toxicity within cotreatment under in vitro conditions. Also H2O2 damage was significantly inhibited by simultaneous artichoke incubation. Pre- and posttreatments did not exert protective effects. DMSO-induced toxicity was significantly reduced by pre-, post- and cotreatment with artichoke extract and especially with luteolin-7-O-glucoside, indicating a direct

  15. A redox proteomics approach to investigate the mode of action of nanomaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riebeling, Christian [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemicals and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany); Wiemann, Martin [IBE R& D gGmbH, Institute for Lung Health, Münster (Germany); Schnekenburger, Jürgen [Biomedical Technology Center, Westfälische Wilhelms-University, Münster (Germany); Kuhlbusch, Thomas A.J. [Institute of Energy and Environmental Technology (IUTA) e.V., Air Quality & Sustainable Nanotechnology, Duisburg (Germany); Center for Nanointegration CENIDE, University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg, Germany, (Germany); Wohlleben, Wendel [BASF SE, Material Physics, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Luch, Andreas [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemicals and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany); Haase, Andrea, E-mail: andrea.haase@bfr.bund.de [German Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Department of Chemicals and Product Safety, Berlin (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    Numbers of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) are steadily increasing. Therefore, alternative testing approaches with reduced costs and high predictivity suitable for high throughput screening and prioritization are urgently needed to ensure a fast and effective development of safe products. In parallel, extensive research efforts are targeted to understanding modes of action of ENMs, which may also support the development of new predictive assays. Oxidative stress is a widely accepted paradigm associated with different adverse outcomes of ENMs. It has frequently been identified in in vitro and in vivo studies and different assays have been developed for this purpose. Fluorescent dye based read-outs are most frequently used for cell testing in vitro but may be limited due to possible interference of the ENMs. Recently, other assays have been put forward such as acellular determination of ROS production potential using methods like electron spin resonance, antioxidant quantification or the use of specific sensors. In addition, Omics based approaches have gained increasing attention. In particular, redox proteomics can combine the assessment of oxidative stress with the advantage of getting more detailed mechanistic information. Here we propose a comprehensive testing strategy for assessing the oxidative stress potential of ENMs, which combines acellular methods and fast in vitro screening approaches, as well as a more involved detailed redox proteomics approach. This allows for screening and prioritization in a first tier and, if required, also for unraveling mechanistic details down to compromised signaling pathways. - Highlights: • Oxidative stress is a general paradigm for nanomaterial hazard mechanism of action. • Reactive oxygen species generation can be predicted using acellular assays. • Cellular assays based on fluorescence suffer from interference by nanomaterials. • Protein carbonylation is an irreversible and predictive mark of oxidative stress.

  16. In vitro investigation of heat transfer phenomenon in human immature teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talebi, Maryam; Moghimi, Sahar; Shafagh, Mina; Kalani, Hadi; Mazhari, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp). Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU). Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second mandibular premolars. This experimental investiga-tion was carried out for recording temperature variations of different sites of tooth and two dimensional finite element models were used for heat transfer phenomenon in immature teeth. Sensitivity analysis and local tests were included in the model validation phase. Results. Overall, thermal stimulation for 30 seconds with a low-intensity LED LCU increased the temperature from 28°C to 38°C in IIT (intact immature tooth) and PIT (cavity-prepared immature tooth). When a high-intensity LED LCU was used, tooth temperature increased from 28°C to 48°C. The results of the experimental tests and mathematical modeling illustrated that using LED LCU on immature teeth did not have any detrimental effect on the pulp temperature. Conclusion. Using LED LCU in immature teeth had no effect on pulp temperature in this study. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations of heat conductivity might affect heat transfer in immature teeth; therefore, further studies are required to determine thermal conductivity of immature teeth.

  17. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shokouhozaman Soleymanifard

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5, and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells.

  18. Investigation of the bystander effect in MRC5 cells after acute and fractionated irradiation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Toossi, Mohammad Taghi Bahreyni; Samani, Roghayeh Kamran; Mohebbi, Shokoufeh

    2014-01-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has been defined as radiation responses observed in nonirradiated cells. It has been the focus of investigators worldwide due to the deleterious effects it induces in nonirradiated cells. The present study was performed to investigate whether acute or fractionated irradiation will evoke a differential bystander response in MRC5 cells. A normal human cell line (MRC5), and a human lung tumor cell line (QU-DB) were exposed to 0, 1, 2, and 4Gy of single acute or fractionated irradiation of equal fractions with a gap of 6 h. The MRC5 cells were supplemented with the media of irradiated cells and their micronucleus frequency was determined. The micronucleus frequency after single and fractionated irradiation did not vary significantly in the MRC5 cells conditioned with autologous or QU-DB cell-irradiated media, except for 4Gy where the frequency of micronucleated cells was lower in those MRC5 cells cultured in the media of QU-DB-exposed with a single dose of 4Gy. Our study demonstrates that the radiation-induced bystander effect was almost similar after single acute and fractionated exposure in MRC5 cells. (author)

  19. Carboxymethyl guar gum nanoparticles for drug delivery applications: Preparation and preliminary in-vitro investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodi, G.; Pala, A.; Barbu, E.; Peptanariu, D.; Hritcu, D.; Popa, M.I.; Tamba, B.I.

    2016-01-01

    Carboxymethyl guar gum (CMGG) synthesized from commercially available polysaccharide was formulated into nanoparticles via ionic gelation using trisodium trimetaphosphate (STMP) as cross-linking agent. Characterisation using a range of analytical techniques (FTIR, NMR, GPC, TGA and DLS) confirmed the CMGG structure and revealed the effect of the CMGG and STMP concentration on the main characteristics of the obtained nanoformulations. The average nanoparticle diameter was found to be around 208 nm, as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). Experiments using simulated gastric and intestinal fluids evidenced significant pH-dependent drug release behaviour of the nanoformulations loaded with Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model drug (loading capacity in excess of 83%), as monitored by UV–Vis. While dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed, the nanoformulations appeared completely non-toxic at concentrations below 0.3 mg/mL. Results obtained so far suggest that carboxymethylated guar gum nanoparticles formulated with STMP warrant further investigations as polysaccharide based biocompatible drug nanocarriers. - Highlights: • Carboxymethyl guar gum nanoparticles preparation by ionic gelation • The optimum synthesis system designed particles around 200 nm • The nanoformulations appeared completely non-toxic at specific concentrations • The loaded formulations evidenced significant pH-dependent drug release behaviour • The results encourage further investigations as polysaccharidic drug nanocarriers

  20. Carboxymethyl guar gum nanoparticles for drug delivery applications: Preparation and preliminary in-vitro investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dodi, G., E-mail: gianina.dodi@yahoo.co.uk [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi (Romania); SCIENT — Research Centre for Instrumental Analysis, Bucharest (Romania); Pala, A. [University of Sassari, Sassari (Italy); Barbu, E. [University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth (United Kingdom); Peptanariu, D. [“Petru Poni” Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Iasi (Romania); Hritcu, D.; Popa, M.I. [“Gheorghe Asachi” Technical University of Iasi (Romania); Tamba, B.I. [“Gr. T. Popa” University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Iasi (Romania)

    2016-06-01

    Carboxymethyl guar gum (CMGG) synthesized from commercially available polysaccharide was formulated into nanoparticles via ionic gelation using trisodium trimetaphosphate (STMP) as cross-linking agent. Characterisation using a range of analytical techniques (FTIR, NMR, GPC, TGA and DLS) confirmed the CMGG structure and revealed the effect of the CMGG and STMP concentration on the main characteristics of the obtained nanoformulations. The average nanoparticle diameter was found to be around 208 nm, as determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). Experiments using simulated gastric and intestinal fluids evidenced significant pH-dependent drug release behaviour of the nanoformulations loaded with Rhodamine B (RhB) as a model drug (loading capacity in excess of 83%), as monitored by UV–Vis. While dose-dependent cytotoxicity was observed, the nanoformulations appeared completely non-toxic at concentrations below 0.3 mg/mL. Results obtained so far suggest that carboxymethylated guar gum nanoparticles formulated with STMP warrant further investigations as polysaccharide based biocompatible drug nanocarriers. - Highlights: • Carboxymethyl guar gum nanoparticles preparation by ionic gelation • The optimum synthesis system designed particles around 200 nm • The nanoformulations appeared completely non-toxic at specific concentrations • The loaded formulations evidenced significant pH-dependent drug release behaviour • The results encourage further investigations as polysaccharidic drug nanocarriers.

  1. An in-vitro investigation of the accuracy of fit of Procera and Empress crowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Garry J R; Dobinson, Marie M; Landini, Gabriel; Harris, Jonathan J

    2005-09-01

    The current study aimed to investigate the accuracy of fit and the reproducibility of inner crown profile for two types of high strength ceramics, IPS Empress and Procera. Procera and Empress crowns with four different morphologies were cemented to dies using zinc phosphate dental cement. Vertical and horizontal sections were made through each of the crown/die preparations and images of the vertical sections were compared for curvature reproduction by alignment using image processing. Measurements were made on horizontal sections to determine cement layer thickness. Alignment of the crowns using image analysis identified quantifiable variations in the inner surface profile compared with the outer surface of the die. The largest differences occurred from the cusp tips to the occlusal adaptation area and differences in surface profile were less pronounced for Procera than Empress crowns. Marginal gap varied independently of ceramic or internal crown shape from 7-529 microm for Procera and 26-548 microm for Empress. IPS Empress has a superior ability to reproduce the inner surface profile of the crown morphologies investigated compared with Procera. The reduced reproduction of surface profile was associated with an increased cement thickness at the occlusal contact area that may inadvertently lead to failure of the crowns functional characteristics.

  2. Tracheal anastomosis with the diode laser and fibrin tissue adhesive: an in vitro and in vivo investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleich, L L; Wang, Z; Pankratov, M M; Aretz, H T; Shapshay, S M

    1995-05-01

    Absorbable sutures have been advocated for tracheal anastomosis to reduce fibrosis and foreign body reaction leading to recurrent stenosis. Fibrin tissue adhesive (FTA) and diode laser welding with indocyanine green-dyed fibrinogen were evaluated in tracheal anastomosis to reduce the number of sutures and to improve healing. In vitro studies demonstrated strong anastomoses with a combination of laser welding and FTA with minimal tissue damage. In a controlled in vivo study, circumferential resections of canine tracheas were repaired with laser welding and FTA augmented with a few stay sutures. These anastomoses had less fibrosis and tissue damage than anastomoses in control animals repaired with sutures alone. This study supports investigation of laser welding and FTA in human beings for tracheal anastomosis and other procedures in which suturing may be difficult.

  3. In vitro and in vivo investigation of bisphosphonate-loaded hydroxyapatite particles for peri-implant bone augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kettenberger, Ulrike; Luginbuehl, Vera; Procter, Philip; Pioletti, Dominique P

    2017-07-01

    Locally applied bisphosphonates, such as zoledronate, have been shown in several studies to inhibit peri-implant bone resorption and recently to enhance peri-implant bone formation. Studies have also demonstrated positive effects of hydroxyapatite (HA) particles on peri-implant bone regeneration and an enhancement of the anti-resorptive effect of bisphosphonates in the presence of calcium. In the present study, both hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nHA) and zoledronate were combined to achieve a strong reinforcing effect on peri-implant bone. The nHA-zoledronate combination was first investigated in vitro with a pre-osteoclastic cell assay (RAW 264.7) and then in vivo in a rat model of postmenopausal osteoporosis. The in vitro study confirmed that the inhibitory effect of zoledronate on murine osteoclast precursor cells was enhanced by loading the drug on nHA. For the in vivo investigation, either zoledronate-loaded or pure nHA were integrated in hyaluronic acid hydrogel. The gels were injected in screw holes that had been predrilled in rat femoral condyles before the insertion of miniature screws. Micro-CT-based dynamic histomorphometry and histology revealed an unexpected rapid mineralization of the hydrogel in vivo through formation of granules, which served as scaffold for new bone formation. The delivery of zoledronate-loaded nHA further inhibited a degradation of the mineralized hydrogel as well as a resorption of the peri-implant bone as effectively as unbound zoledronate. Hyaluronic acid with zoledronate-loaded nHA, thanks to its dual effect on inducing a rapid mineralization and preventing resorption, is a promising versatile material for bone repair and augmentation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. PIXE investigation of in vitro release of chloramphenicol across polyvinyl alcohol/acrylamide hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihawy, M.S.; Alzier, A.; Allaf, A.W.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol and different amounts of acrylamide monomer were prepared by thermal cross-linking in the solid state. The hydrogels were investigated for drug delivery system applications. Chloramphenicol was adopted as a model drug to study its release behavior. Particle induced X-ray emission was utilized to study the drug release behavior across the hydrogels and a comparison study with ultraviolet measurements was performed. Fourier Transform Infrared measurements were carried out for molecular characterization. The releasing behavior of the drug exhibits a decrease and a subsequent increase in the release rate, as the acrylamide monomer increases. Characterization of the hydrogels has shown a competitive behavior between crosslinking with AAm acrylamide monomer or oligomerized version, depending on the amount added to prepare the hydrogels.

  5. The nanotoxicity investigation of optical nanoparticles to cultured cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qinghui; Shao, Dan; Ji, Wenyu; Li, Jing; Chen, Li; Song, Jie

    2014-01-01

    Optical nanoparticles (NPs) have the potential to provide new tools for diagnosis and treatment of human diseases, however, their nanotoxicity and biological characteristics are still unclear. Here, we prepared a series of typical NPs (including gold nanospheres, gold nanorods, silver nanopheres, silver triangular nanoplates and quantum dots) with different material and surface chemical modification for nanotoxicity test. Cell proliferation was investigated by SRB assay where the NPs were co-cultured with cancer cells. It was found that NPs' toxicity was highly correlated to different factors-material selection, physical size/surface area, shape, and surface chemical property, etc. This work has the potential to provide a uniform and systematic information when they are applied as probes in biological and medical fields.

  6. In vitro/in silico investigation of failure criteria to predict flexural strength of composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Mehdawi, Idris Mohamed; Sakai, Takahiko; Abe, Tomohiro; Inoue, Sayuri; Imazato, Satoshi

    2018-01-30

    The aim of this study was to investigate a failure criterion to predict flexural strengths of composite resins (CR) by three-dimensional finite element analysis (3D-FEA). Models of flexural strength for test specimens of CR and rods comprising a three-point loading were designed. Calculation of Young's moduli and Poisson's ratios of CR were conducted using a modified McGee-McCullough model. Using the experimental CR, flexural strengths were measured by three-point bending tests with crosshead speed 1.0 mm/min and compared with the values determined by in silico analysis. The flexural strengths of experimental CR calculated using the maximum principal strain significantly correlated with those obtained in silico amongst the four types of failure criteria applied. The in silico analytical model established in this study was found to be effective to predict the flexural strengths of CR incorporating various silica filler contents by maximum principal strain.

  7. PIXE investigation of in-vitro release of chloramphenicol across polyvinyl alcohol/ acrylamide hydrogel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rihawi, M.; Al-Zeer, A.; Allaf, A.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrogels based on polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and different amounts of acrylamide monomer (AAm) were prepared by thermal crosslinking process in solid state. The PVA/AAm hydrogels were investigated for drug delivery system applications. Chloramphenicol was adopted as a model drug to study its release behaviour across the prepared hydrogels. Particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) analytical technique was utilized to study the drug release behaviour across the hydrogels. A comparison study between PIXE and UV measurements was performed. FTIR measurements were carried out to perform the molecular characterization. The releasing behaviour of the drug across the hydrogels demonstrates a decrease and a subsequent increase in the drug release rate, as the AAm amount increases. The FTIR characterization of the prepared hydrogels has shown a competitive behaviour between the crosslinking of PVA with AAm monomer or oligomerized AAm, depending on the amount of AAm added to prepare the PVA/AAm hydrogels. (author)

  8. In Vitro Investigation of Heat Transfer Phenomenon in Human Immature Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Talebi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and aims. Heat generated within tooth during clinical dentistry can cause thermally induced damage to hard and soft components of the tooth (enamel, dentin and pulp. Geometrical characteristics of immature teeth are different from those of mature teeth. The purpose of this experimental and theoretical study was to investigate thermal changes in immature permanent teeth during the use of LED light-curing units (LCU. Materials and methods. This study was performed on the second mandibular premolars. This experimental investiga-tion was carried out for recording temperature variations of different sites of tooth and two dimensional finite element mod-els were used for heat transfer phenomenon in immature teeth. Sensitivity analysis and local tests were included in the mod-el validation phase. Results. Overall, thermal stimulation for 30 seconds with a low-intensity LED LCU increased the temperature from 28°C to 38°C in IIT (intact immature tooth and PIT (cavity-prepared immature tooth. When a high-intensity LED LCU was used, tooth temperature increased from 28°C to 48°C. The results of the experimental tests and mathematical modeling il-lustrated that using LED LCU on immature teeth did not have any detrimental effect on the pulp temperature. Conclusion. Using LED LCU in immature teeth had no effect on pulp temperature in this study. Sensitivity analysis showed that variations of heat conductivity might affect heat transfer in immature teeth; therefore, further studies are re-quired to determine thermal conductivity of immature teeth.

  9. Investigation of biomaterials by human epithelial gingiva cells: an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neunzehn Jörg

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction In modern medicine and dentistry the use of biomaterials is a fast developing field of increasing interest. Especially in dentistry the interaction between biomaterials like implant materials and the soft tissue in the oral cavity is in the focus of daily research. In this context the high importance of testing materials and their surfaces concerning their biocompatibility towards corresponding cells is very likely. For this purpose this study investigates cells derived from human gingival biopsies on different materials and surfaces. Methods Cells in this study were cultivated out of human biopsies by a grow out explant technique and were sub cultivated on titanium, zirconium dioxide and collagen membrane specimens. To characterise the cells on the material surfaces used in this study immunohistochemical and histological staining techniques as well as different methods of microscopy (light microscopy and SEM were applied. Results With the aid of the explant technique and the chosen cell cultivation method it was possible to investigate the human gingiva derived cells on different materials. The data of the present study show that the human gingival cells attach and proliferate on all three tested materials by exhibiting characteristic gingival keratinocyte protein expression even after long periods of culture e.g. up to 70 days. Conclusions It could be shown that the three tested materials titanium, zirconium dioxide and collagen membrane (and their special surfaces are good candidates for the application as materials in the dental gingival environment or, in the case of the collagen membrane as scaffold/cell-carrier for human gingival cells in tissue engineering.

  10. An in vitro investigation of indigenous South African medicinal plants used to treat oral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhalwaya, S; van Vuuren, S; Patel, M

    2018-01-10

    Over a 120 South African medicinal plants are used for the treatment of oral diseases. Despite the vast collection of antimicrobial studies being done on South African plants, there is still limited research on pathogens associated with oral infections. In consultation with the available ethnobotanical literature, this study investigates the antimicrobial efficacy of some South African medicinal plants against oral pathogens. To provide a detailed account of the antimicrobial properties of selected South African medicinal plants used traditionally to treat oral infections. The effect on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and the toxicity profiles of these plants are also investigated. A total of 136 aqueous and organic extracts and six essential oils were prepared from 31 different plant species. These plant samples were screened for antimicrobial efficacy against nine oral pathogens using the micro-titre plate dilution assay. Plant extracts that were found to have noteworthy antimicrobial activity against S. mutans were further evaluated on the effect on S. mutans biofilm formation using the glass slide technique. The toxicity profiles of plant samples that were found to have noteworthy antimicrobial activity were evaluated using the brine shrimp lethality assay. The organic extract of Cissampelos torulosa stems displayed the lowest MIC value of 0.05mg/mL against both Lactobacillus spp. This high antimicrobial activity was also observed with the organic extract of Spirostachys africana leaves against Candida albicans. In some instances, a direct relationship was found between the traditional use of the plant and the antimicrobial activity observed. For example, noteworthy activity (MIC plant traditionally used to treat oral thrush. Englerophytum magalismonatanum stems displayed notable activity against both Streptococcus spp. (MIC 0.83mg/mL against S. mutans and MIC 0.67mg/mL against S. sanguis). Spirostachys africana leaves displayed the greatest anti

  11. Investigating the biological impacts of nanoengineered materials in Caenorhabditis elegans and in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras, Elizabeth Quevedo

    In nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the chronic and multi-generational toxicological effects of commercially relevant engineered nanoparticles (ENPs), such as quantum dots (QDs) and silver (AgNP) caused significant changes in a number of physiological endpoints. The increased water-solubility of ENPs in commercial products, for example, makes them increasingly bioavailable to terrestrial organisms exposed to pollution and waste in the soil. Since 2008, attention to the toxicology of nanomaterials in C. elegans continues to grow. Quantitative data on multiple physiological endpoints paired with metal analysis show the uptake of QDs and AgNPs, and their effects on nematode fitness. First, C. elegans were exposed for four generations through feeding to amphiphilic polymer coated CdSe/ZnS (core-shell QDs), CdSe (core QDs), and different sizes of AgNPs. These ENPs were readily ingested. QDs were qualitatively imaged in the digestive tract using a fluorescence microscopy and their and AgNP uptake quantitatively measured using ICP-MS. Each generation was analyzed for changes in lifespan, reproduction, growth and motility using an automated computer vision system. Core-shell QDs had little impact on C. elegans due to its metal shell coating. In contrast, core QDs lacked a metal shell coating, which caused significant changes to nematode physiology. iii In the same way, at high concentrations of 100 ppm, AgNP caused the most adverse effect to lifespan and reproduction related to particle size, but its adverse effect to motility had no correlation to particle size. Using C. elegans as an animal model allowed for a better understanding of the negative impacts of ENPs than with cytotoxicity tests. Lastly, to test the toxicity of water-dispersed fullerene (nanoC60) using human dermal fibroblast cells, this thesis investigated a suite of assays and methods in order to establish a standard set of cytotoxicity tests. Ten assays and methods assessed nanoC60 samples of different

  12. A new in vitro approach to determine acquired tolerance in long-term kidney allograft recipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinsmoen, N.L.; Kaufman, D.; Matas, A.; Sutherland, D.E.; Najarian, J.S.; Bach, F.H.

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies indicate some kidney allograft recipients treated with total lymphoid irradiation, cyclosporine, or conventional immunosuppressive therapy demonstrate specific proliferative unresponsiveness in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) to donor cells at various times posttransplant. To investigate possible donor-specific hyporeactivity, we have studied 3 patients treated with TLI whose grafts have survived longer than 10 years; 2 patients given the same immunosuppressive protocol but without TLI whose grafts have survived longer than 10 years; and 27 CsA-treated living-related donor and cadaver-allograft recipients 1 year posttransplant. We confirmed previous observations of hyporeactivity of some patients' cells to stimulation by donor cells. In addition, we identified hyporeactivity to stimulation by homozygous typing cells (HTCs) defining the HLA-Dw specificities of the donor cells for all 3 of the 3 TLI patients, 1 of the 2 non-TLI patients, and 9 of the 27 patients 1 year posttransplant. The LRD recipients with donor-specific hyporeactivity as defined by the HTC analysis demonstrated fewer rejection episodes (25% vs. 57%) and lower mean creatinine levels (1.18 vs 1.78 mg/dL) than patients without donor-specific hyporeactivity. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of monitoring the immune status of allograft recipients posttransplant by means of HTC analysis, eliminating the need for pretransplant specimens. This approach provides a possible means to assess which patients may have acquired donor-specific hyporeactivity to their kidney allograft and thus may require less immunosuppression

  13. Evaluation of Nystatin Containing Chitosan Hydrogels as Potential Dual Action Bio-Active Restorative Materials: in Vitro Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tamara Perchyonok

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Healing is a specific biological process related to the general phenomenon of growth and tissue regeneration and is a process generally affected by several systemic conditions or as detrimental side-effects of chemotherapy- and radiotherapy-induced inflammation of the oral mucosa. The objectives of this study is to evaluate the novel chitosan based functional drug delivery systems, which can be successfully incorporated into “dual action bioactive restorative materials”, capable of inducing in vitro improved wound healing prototype and containing an antibiotic, such as nystatin, krill oil as an antioxidant and hydroxyapatite as a molecular bone scaffold, which is naturally present in bone and is reported to be successfully used in promoting bone integration when implanted as well as promoting healing. The hydrogels were prepared using a protocol as previously reported by us. The physico-chemical features, including surface morphology (SEM, release behaviors, stability of the therapeutic agent-antioxidant-chitosan, were measured and compared to the earlier reported chitosan-antioxidant containing hydrogels. Structural investigations of the reactive surface of the hydrogel are reported. Release of nystatin was investigated for all newly prepared hydrogels. Bio-adhesive studies were performed in order to assess the suitability of these designer materials. Free radical defense capacity of the biomaterials was evaluated using established in vitro model. The bio-adhesive capacity of the materials in the in vitro system was tested and quantified. It was found that the favorable synergistic effect of free radical built-in defense mechanism of the new functional materials increased sustainable bio-adhesion and therefore acted as a functional multi-dimensional restorative material with potential application in wound healing in vitro.

  14. In vitro and in vivo investigations into the biocompatibility of diamond-like carbon (DLC) coatings for orthopedic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, M; Myer, B; Rushton, N

    2001-05-01

    Diamond-like carbon (DLC) shows great promise as a durable, wear- and corrosion-resistant coating for biomedical implants. The effects of DLC coatings on the musculoskeletal system have not been investigated in detail. In this study, DLC coatings were deposited on polystyrene 24-well tissue culture plates by fast-atom bombardment from a hexane precursor. Two osteoblast-like cell lines were cultured on uncoated and DLC-coated plates for periods of up to 72 h. The effects of DLC coatings on cellular metabolism were investigated by measuring the production of three osteoblast-specific marker proteins: alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin, and type I collagen. There was no evidence that the presence of the DLC coating had any adverse effect on any of the parameters measured in this study. In a second series of experiments, DLC-coated cobalt-chromium cylinders were implanted in intramuscular locations in rats and in transcortical sites in sheep. Histologic analysis of specimens retrieved 90 days after surgery showed that the DLC-coated specimens were well tolerated in both sites. These data indicate that DLC coatings are biocompatible in vitro and in vivo, and further investigations into their long-term biological and tribological performance are now warranted. Copyright 2001 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. In vitro investigation of the follicular penetration of porcine ear skin using a nanoparticle-emulsion containing the antiseptic polihexanide In vitro investigation of the follicular penetration of porcine ear skin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, M.; Patzelt, A.; Vergou, T.; Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Kramer, A.; Müller, G.; Sterry, W.; Lange-Asschenfeldt, B.

    2012-05-01

    Earlier investigations regarding the distribution of the bacterial flora on the human skin demonstrate that the hair follicle acts as a bacterial reservoir, providing a quick source for secondary recontamination. These findings highlight the importance of the hair follicle as a target for modern antiseptics. In the present study, we have assessed the follicular penetration of a curcumin-labeled particle-associated antiseptic into porcine skin by laser scanning microscopy. Therefore, the follicular penetration depth of the curcumin-labeled particle-associated antiseptic was compared to the follicular penetration depth of curcumin-labeled particles without antiseptic. The investigation was performed in vitro using porcine skin biopsies. By superposition of the images acquired in the transmission and the fluorescent modus, it was possible to visualize the distribution of the fluorescent dye inside the hair follicles. Quantitative and qualitative results showed that both dispersions penetrated efficiently into the hair follicles. The average penetration depth of the particles with attached antiseptic polihexanide was significantly higher than that of particles without the attached antiseptic. Also, whilst very little sample preparation was needed, laser scanning microscopy was found to be an efficient tool to visualize the skin relief and in particular the hair follicle shaft and localize fluorescent markers within the skin tissue and hair follicles.

  16. In Vitro Antioxidant versus Metal Ion Chelating Properties of Flavonoids: A Structure-Activity Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherrak, Sabri Ahmed; Mokhtari-Soulimane, Nassima; Berroukeche, Farid; Bensenane, Bachir; Cherbonnel, Angéline; Merzouk, Hafida; Elhabiri, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    Natural flavonoids such as quercetin, (+)catechin and rutin as well as four methoxylated derivatives of quercetin used as models were investigated to elucidate their impact on the oxidant and antioxidant status of human red blood cells (RBCs). The impact of these compounds against metal toxicity was studied as well as their antiradical activities with DPPH assay. Antihemolytic experiments were conducted on quercetin, (+)catechin and rutin with excess of Fe, Cu and Zn (400 μM), and the oxidant (malondialdehyde, carbonyl proteins) and antioxidant (reduced glutathione, catalase activity) markers were evaluated. The results showed that Fe and Zn have the highest prooxidant effect (37 and 33% of hemolysis, respectively). Quercetin, rutin and (+)catechin exhibited strong antioxidant properties toward Fe, but this effect was decreased with respect to Zn ions. However, the Cu showed a weak antioxidant effect at the highest flavonoid concentration (200 μM), while a prooxidant effect was observed at the lowest flavonoid concentration (100 μM). These results are in agreement with the physico-chemical and antiradical data which demonstrated that binding of the metal ions (for FeNTA: (+)Catechin, KLFeNTA = 1.6(1) × 106 M-1 > Rutin, KLFeNTA = 2.0(9) × 105 M-1 > Quercetin, KLFeNTA = 1.0(7) × 105 M-1 > Q35OH, KLFeNTA = 6.3(8.7) × 104 M-1 > Quercetin3’4’OH and Quercetin 3OH, KLFeNTA ~ 2 × 104 M-1) reflects the (anti)oxidant status of the RBCs. This study reveals that flavonoids have both prooxidant and antioxidant activity depending on the nature and concentration of the flavonoids and metal ions. PMID:27788249

  17. In vitro and in silico investigations of the binding interactions between chlorophenols and trypsin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yan-Qing, E-mail: wyqing76@126.com [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Wetland Bioresources and Environmental Protection, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Tan, Chun-Yun [Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhuang, Shu-Lin [Institute of Environmental Science, College of Environmental and Resource Science, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310058 (China); Zhai, Peng-Zhan; Cui, Yun; Zhou, Qiu-Hua; Zhang, Hong-Mei [Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Fei, Zhenghao [Jiangsu Provincial Key Laboratory of Coastal Wetland Bioresources and Environmental Protection, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China); Institute of Applied Chemistry and Environmental Engineering, Yancheng Teachers University, Yancheng City 224002, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Binding interactions of five chlorophenols with trypsin were investigated. • The number of chlorine atoms of chlorophenols partly affected the binding ability of them to trypsin. • Noncovalent interactions stabilized the trypsin–chlorophenols complexes. • There was the one main binding site of trypsin for chlorophenols. - Abstract: Being the first-degree toxic pollutants, chlorophenols (CP) have potential carcinogenic and mutagenic activity and toxicity. Since there still lacks studies on molecular interactions of chlorophenols with trypsin, one major binding target of many exogenous environmental pollutants, the binding interactions between five chlorophenols, 2-CP, 2,6-DCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,4,6-TCP, 2,3,4,6-TCP and PCP and trypsin were characterized by the combination of multispectroscopic techniques and molecular modeling. The chlorophenols bind at the one main site of trypsin and the binding induces the changes of microenvironment and global conformations of trypsin. Different number of chloride atoms significantly affects the binding and the binding constants K{sub A} ranks as K{sub A} (2-CP) < K{sub A} (2,6-DCP) ≈ K{sub A} (2,4,6-TCP) < K{sub A} (2,3,4,6-TCP) < K{sub A} (PCP). These chlorophenols interacts with trypsin mainly through hydrophobic interactions and via hydrogen bonding interactions and aromatic–aromatic π–π stacking interaction. Our results offer insights into the binding mechanism of chlorophenols with trypsin and provide important information for possible toxicity risk of chlorophenols to human health.

  18. In vitro investigation of marginal accuracy of implant-supported screw-retained partial dentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koke, U; Wolf, A; Lenz, P; Gilde, H

    2004-05-01

    Mismatch occurring during the fabrication of implant-supported dentures may induce stress to the peri-implant bone. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of two different alloys and the fabrication method on the marginal accuracy of cast partial dentures. Two laboratory implants were bonded into an aluminium block so that the distance between their longitudinal axes was 21 mm. Frameworks designed for screw-retained partial dentures were cast either with pure titanium (rematitan) or with a CoCr-alloy (remanium CD). Two groups of 10 frameworks were cast in a single piece. The first group was made of pure titanium, and the second group of a CoCr-alloy (remanium CD). A third group of 10 was cast in two pieces and then laser-welded onto a soldering model. This latter group was also made of the CoCr-alloy. All the frameworks were screwed to the original model with defined torque. Using light microscopy, marginal accuracy was determined by measuring vertical gaps at eight defined points around each implant. Titanium frameworks cast in a single piece demonstrated mean vertical gaps of 40 microm (s.d. = 11 microm) compared with 72 microm (s.d. = 40 microm) for CoCr-frameworks. These differences were not significant (U-test, P = 0.124) because of a considerable variation of the values for CoCr-frameworks (minimum: 8 microm and maximum: 216 microm). However, frameworks cast in two pieces and mated with a laser showed significantly better accuracy in comparison with the other experimental groups (mean: 17 microm +/- 6; P laser welding. Manufacturing the framework pieces separately and then welding them together provides the best marginal fit.

  19. In vitro fluorescence displacement investigation of thyroxine transport disruption by bisphenol A

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Cao; Liang-Hong Guo; Bin Wan; Yin Wei

    2011-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical with high production volume and wide applications in many industries.Although BPA is known as an endocrine disruptor, its toxic mechanisms have not been fully characterized.Due to its structural similarity to thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), one possible mechanism of BPA toxicity is disruption of hormone transport by competitive binding with the transport proteins.In this study, the binding interactions of BPA, T4, and T3 with three thyroid hormone transport proteins, human serum albumin (HSA), transthyretin (TTR), and thyroxine-binding globulin (TBG) were investigated by fluorescence measurement.Using two site-specific fluorescence probes dansylamide and dansyl-L-proline, the binding constants of BPA with HSA at drug site I and site Ⅱ were determined as 2.90 × 104 and 3.14 × 104 L/mol, respectively.By monitoring the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan, a binding constant of 4.70 × 103 L/mol was obtained.Similarly, by employing 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid as fluorescence probe, the binding affinity of BPA with TTR and TBG was measured to be 3.10 × 105 and 5.90 × 105 L/mol, respectively.In general, BPA showed lower binding affinity with the proteins than T3 did, and even lower affinity than T4.Using these binding constants, the amount of BPA which would bind to the transport proteins in human plasma was estimated.These results suggest that the concentrations of BPA commonly found in human plasma are probably not high enough to interfere with T4 transport.

  20. In-vitro Investigations of Skin Closure using Diode Laser and Protein Solder Containing Gold Nanoshells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sadegh Nourbakhsh

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Laser tissue soldering is a new technique for repair of various tissues including the skin, liver, articular cartilage and nerves and is a promising alternative to suture. To overcome the problems of thermal damage to surrounding tissues and low laser penetration depth, some exogenous chromophores such as gold nanoshells, a new class of nanoparticles consisting of a dielectric core surrounded by a thin metal shell, are used. The aims of this study were to use two different concentrations of gold nanoshells as the exogenous material for skin tissue soldering and also to examine the effects of laser soldering parameters on the properties of the repaired skin. Material and Methods: Two mixtures of albumin solder and different concentrations of gold nanoshells were prepared. A full thickness incision of 2×20 mm2 was made on the surface and after placing 50 μl of the solder mixture on the incision, an 810 nm diode laser was used to irradiate it at different power densities. The changes of tensile strength, σt, due to temperature rise, number of scan (Ns, and scan velocity (Vs were investigated. Results: The results showed that the tensile strength of the repaired skin increased with increasing irradiance for both gold nanoshell concentrations. In addition, at constant laser irradiance (I, the tensile strength of the repaired incision increased with increasing Ns and decreasing Vs. In our case, this corresponded to st = 1610 g/cm2 at I ~ 60 Wcm-2, T ~ 65ºC, Ns = 10 and Vs = 0.2 mms-1. Discussion and Conclusion: Gold nanoshells can be used as an indocyanine green dye (ICG alterative for laser tissue soldering.  Although by increasing the laser power density, the tensile strength of the repaired skin increases, an optimum power density must be considered due to the resulting increase in tissue temperature.

  1. IN VITRO INVESTIGATION OF THE TRANSPLANTATION PROSPECTS OF MULTICELLULAR SPHEROID MICROAGGREGATES OF DONOR RETINAL PIGMENT EPITHELIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Borzenok

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study in experiment the criteria for transplantability of multicellular spheroid microaggregates of retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, prepared by the method of 3D cell culture. Materials and Methods. 11 donor eyes (6 of adrenaline index «A», 5 of index «B» were used as a source of RPE cell cultures (group «A» – 6 cultures, group «B» – 5 cultures, of which over 2000 RPE spheroids were obtained by the method of three-dimensional cell culture. 1760 spheroids of them were selected for transplantability investigation (960 – group «A», 800 – group «B». Among the selected spheroids were equal numbers of spheroids of different morphology («smooth» and «rough» and of the initial cell seeding number (500, 1000, 5000, 25 000, 125 000 cells per hanging drop. We were taking out 12 spheroids of group «A» and 10 spheroids of group «B» of the 3D culture in terms of 7, 14, 21, 28 days of 3D culture to assess their viability. We were transferring the same number of spheroids in the same terms from 3D to 2D culture conditions to assess their adhesive properties. Viability of cells within spheroids was determined using the Trypan blue exclusion. The presence or absence of adhesion was determined by microscopic observation.Results. «Smooth» spheroids of 7 and 14 days of pretransplantation cultivation and derived from hanging drops containing 500 and 1000 cells showed the highest transplantability (cell viability varied from 0.83 ± 0.38 to 0.94 ± 0.24, a 100% adhesion. «Rough» spheroids were untransplantable in all variants, despite their partial preservation of viability (in comparison to “smooth” ones p < 0.05. 21 and 28 days of pretransplantation culturing and high cell seeding numbers signifi cantly lowered transplantability of obtained spheroids (p > 0.05 for low cell numbers, p < 0.05 for the high ones. Differences in adrenaline indexes A and B of donor eyes which were the primary sources of cellular

  2. Hide and seek: a comparative autoradiographic in vitro investigation of the adenosine A3 receptor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haeusler, D.; Fuchshuber, F.; Girschele, F.; Hacker, M.; Wadsak, W.; Mitterhauser, Markus [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); Grassinger, L. [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Department of Biomedical Analytics, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Hoerleinsberger, W.J. [Medical University of Vienna, Department of Biomedical Imaging and Image-guided Therapy, Vienna (Austria); University of Vienna, Cognitive Science Research Platform, Vienna (Austria); Hoeftberger, R.; Leisser, I. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Neurology, Vienna (Austria); Shanab, K.; Spreitzer, H. [University of Vienna, Department of Drug and Natural Product Synthesis, Vienna (Austria); Gerdenitsch, W. [Medical University of Vienna, Institute of Biomedicinal Research, Vienna (Austria)

    2015-05-01

    Since the adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) is considered to be of high clinical importance in the diagnosis and treatment of ischaemic conditions (heart and brain), glaucoma, asthma, arthritis, cancer and inflammation, a suitable and selective A3R PET tracer such as [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY would be of high clinical value for clinicians as well as patients. A3R was discovered in the late 1990s, but there is still little known regarding its distribution in the CNS and periphery. Hence, in autoradiographic experiments the distribution of A3R in human brain and rat tissues was investigated and the specific binding of the A3R antagonist FE rate at SUPPY and MRS1523 compared. Immunohistochemical staining (IHC) experiments were also performed to validate the autoradiographic findings. For autoradiographic competition experiments human post-mortem brain and rat tissues were incubated with [{sup 125}I]AB-MECA and highly selective compounds to block the other adenosine receptor subtypes. Additionally, IHC was performed with an A3 antibody. Specific A3R binding of MRS1523 and FE rate at SUPPY was found in all rat peripheral tissues examined with the highest amounts in the spleen (44.0 % and 46.4 %), lung (44.5 % and 45.0 %), heart (39.9 % and 42.9 %) and testes (27.4 % and 29.5 %, respectively). Low amounts of A3R were found in rat brain tissues (5.9 % and 5.6 %, respectively) and human brain tissues (thalamus 8.0 % and 9.1 %, putamen 7.8 % and 8.2 %, cerebellum 6.0 % and 7.8 %, hippocampus 5.7 % and 5.6 %, caudate nucleus 4.9 % and 6.4 %, cortex 4.9 % and 6.3 %, respectively). The outcome of the A3 antibody staining experiments complemented the results of the autoradiographic experiments. The presence of A3R protein was verified in central and peripheral tissues by autoradiography and IHC. The specificity and selectivity of FE rate at SUPPY was confirmed by direct comparison with MRS1523, providing further evidence that [{sup 18}F]FE rate at SUPPY may be a suitable A3 PET

  3. Evaluation of the Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler using a concurrent CFD and in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worth Longest, P; Hindle, Michael

    2009-06-01

    The Respimat Soft Mist Inhaler is reported to generate an aerosol with low spray momentum and a small droplet size. However, the transport characteristics of the Respimat aerosol are not well understood. The objective of this study was to characterize the transport and deposition of an aerosol emitted from the Respimat inhaler using a combination of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling and in vitro experiments. Deposition of the Respimat aerosol was assessed in the inhaler mouthpiece (MP), a standard induction port (IP), and a more realistic mouth-throat (MT) geometry at an inhalation flow rate of 30 L/min. Aerosols were generated using an albuterol sulfate (0.6%) solution, and the drug deposition was quantified using both in vitro experiments and a CFD model of the Respimat inhaler. Laser diffraction experiments were used to determine the initial polydisperse aerosol size distribution. It was found that the aerosol generated from the highly complex process of jet collision and breakup could be approximated in the model using effective spray conditions. Computational predictions of deposition fractions agreed well with in vitro results for both the IP (within 20% error) and MT (within 10% error) geometries. The experimental results indicated that the deposition fraction of drug in the MP ranged from 27 to 29% and accounted for a majority of total drug loss. Based on the CFD solution, high MP deposition was due to a recirculating flow pattern that surrounded the aerosol spray and entrained a significant number of small droplets. In contrast, deposition of the Respimat aerosol in both the IP (4.2%) and MT (7.4%) geometries was relatively low. Results of this study indicate that modifications to the current Respimat MP and control of specific patient variables may significantly reduce deposition in the device and may decrease high oropharyngeal drug loss observed in vivo.

  4. In vitro investigation of anodization and CaP deposited titanium surface using MG63 osteoblast-like cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.M. [Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, 28 Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, J.I. [Department of Oral Pathology and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Y.J., E-mail: limdds@snu.ac.kr [Department of Prosthodontics and Dental Research Institute, School of Dentistry, Seoul National University, 28 Yeongeon-dong, Jongno-gu, Seoul 110-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate surface characteristics in four different titanium surfaces (AN: anodized at 270 V; AN-CaP: anodic oxidation and CaP deposited; SLA: sandblasted and acid etched; MA: machined) and to evaluate biological behaviors such as cell adhesion, cell proliferation, cytoskeletal organization, and osteogenic protein expression of MG63 osteoblast-like cells at the early stage. Surface analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, and a confocal laser scanning microscope. In order to evaluate cellular responses, MG63 osteoblast-like cells were used. The cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Immunofluorescent analyses of actin, type I collagen, osteonectin and osteocalcin were performed. The anodized and CaP deposited specimen showed homogeneously distributed CaP particles around micropores and exhibited anatase type oxides, titanium, and HA crystalline structures. This experiment suggests that CaP particles on the anodic oxidation surface affect cellular attachment and spreading. When designing an in vitro biological study for CaP coated titanium, it must be taken into account that preincubation in medium prior to cell seeding and the cell culture medium may affect the CaP coatings. All these observations illustrate the importance of the experimental conditions and the physicochemical parameters of the CaP coating. It is considered that further evaluations such as long-term in vitro cellular assays and in vivo experiments should be necessary to figure out the effect of CaP deposition to biological responses.

  5. In vitro investigation of anodization and CaP deposited titanium surface using MG63 osteoblast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J.M.; Lee, J.I.; Lim, Y.J.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate surface characteristics in four different titanium surfaces (AN: anodized at 270 V; AN-CaP: anodic oxidation and CaP deposited; SLA: sandblasted and acid etched; MA: machined) and to evaluate biological behaviors such as cell adhesion, cell proliferation, cytoskeletal organization, and osteogenic protein expression of MG63 osteoblast-like cells at the early stage. Surface analysis was performed using scanning electron microscopy, thin-film X-ray diffractometry, and a confocal laser scanning microscope. In order to evaluate cellular responses, MG63 osteoblast-like cells were used. The cell viability was evaluated by MTT assay. Immunofluorescent analyses of actin, type I collagen, osteonectin and osteocalcin were performed. The anodized and CaP deposited specimen showed homogeneously distributed CaP particles around micropores and exhibited anatase type oxides, titanium, and HA crystalline structures. This experiment suggests that CaP particles on the anodic oxidation surface affect cellular attachment and spreading. When designing an in vitro biological study for CaP coated titanium, it must be taken into account that preincubation in medium prior to cell seeding and the cell culture medium may affect the CaP coatings. All these observations illustrate the importance of the experimental conditions and the physicochemical parameters of the CaP coating. It is considered that further evaluations such as long-term in vitro cellular assays and in vivo experiments should be necessary to figure out the effect of CaP deposition to biological responses.

  6. Biomimetic 3D in vitro model of biofilm triggered osteomyelitis for investigating hematopoiesis during bone marrow infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raic, Annamarija; Riedel, Sophie; Kemmling, Elena; Bieback, Karen; Overhage, Joerg; Lee-Thedieck, Cornelia

    2018-04-18

    In this work, we define the requirements for a human-based osteomyelitis model which overcomes the limitations of state of the art animal models. Osteomyelitis is a severe and difficult to treat infection of the bone that develops rapidly, making it difficult to study in humans. We have developed a 3D in vitro model of the bone marrow, comprising a macroporous material, human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) and mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs). Inclusion of biofilms grown on an implant into the model system allowed us to study the effects of postoperative osteomyelitis-inducing bacteria on the bone marrow. The bacteria influenced the myeloid differentiation of HSPCs as well as MSC cytokine expression and the MSC ability to support HSPC maintenance. In conclusion, we provide a new 3D in vitro model which meets all the requirements for investigating the impact of osteomyelitis. Implant associated-osteomyelitis is a persistent bacterial infection of the bone which occurs in many implant patients and can result in functional impairments or even entire loss of the extremity. Nevertheless, surprisingly little is known on the triangle interaction between implant material, bacterial biofilm and affected bone tissue. Closing this gap of knowledge would be crucial for the fundamental understanding of the disease and the development of novel treatment strategies. For this purpose, we developed the first biomaterial-based system that is able to mimic implant-associated osteomyelitis outside of the body, thus, opening the avenue to study this fatal disease in the laboratory. Copyright © 2018 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design and Investigation of PolyFermS In Vitro Continuous Fermentation Models Inoculated with Immobilized Fecal Microbiota Mimicking the Elderly Colon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehlbaum, Sophie; Chassard, Christophe; Haug, Martina C; Fourmestraux, Candice; Derrien, Muriel; Lacroix, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    In vitro gut modeling is a useful approach to investigate some factors and mechanisms of the gut microbiota independent of the effects of the host. This study tested the use of immobilized fecal microbiota to develop different designs of continuous colonic fermentation models mimicking elderly gut fermentation. Model 1 was a three-stage fermentation mimicking the proximal, transverse and distal colon. Models 2 and 3 were based on the new PolyFermS platform composed of an inoculum reactor seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota and used to continuously inoculate with the same microbiota different second-stage reactors mounted in parallel. The main gut bacterial groups, microbial diversity and metabolite production were monitored in effluents of all reactors using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing, and HPLC, respectively. In all models, a diverse microbiota resembling the one tested in donor's fecal sample was established. Metabolic stability in inoculum reactors seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota was shown for operation times of up to 80 days. A high microbial and metabolic reproducibility was demonstrated for downstream control and experimental reactors of a PolyFermS model. The PolyFermS models tested here are particularly suited to investigate the effects of environmental factors, such as diet and drugs, in a controlled setting with the same microbiota source.

  8. Design and Investigation of PolyFermS In Vitro Continuous Fermentation Models Inoculated with Immobilized Fecal Microbiota Mimicking the Elderly Colon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Fehlbaum

    Full Text Available In vitro gut modeling is a useful approach to investigate some factors and mechanisms of the gut microbiota independent of the effects of the host. This study tested the use of immobilized fecal microbiota to develop different designs of continuous colonic fermentation models mimicking elderly gut fermentation. Model 1 was a three-stage fermentation mimicking the proximal, transverse and distal colon. Models 2 and 3 were based on the new PolyFermS platform composed of an inoculum reactor seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota and used to continuously inoculate with the same microbiota different second-stage reactors mounted in parallel. The main gut bacterial groups, microbial diversity and metabolite production were monitored in effluents of all reactors using quantitative PCR, 16S rRNA gene 454-pyrosequencing, and HPLC, respectively. In all models, a diverse microbiota resembling the one tested in donor's fecal sample was established. Metabolic stability in inoculum reactors seeded with immobilized fecal microbiota was shown for operation times of up to 80 days. A high microbial and metabolic reproducibility was demonstrated for downstream control and experimental reactors of a PolyFermS model. The PolyFermS models tested here are particularly suited to investigate the effects of environmental factors, such as diet and drugs, in a controlled setting with the same microbiota source.

  9. A novel in vitro toxicological approach to identify chemicals with a prostate-mediated effect on male reproduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Lorenzetti

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate, an overlooked target in in vitro alternative methods, is critical for male fertility. Within the EU project ReProTect, the LNCaP cell line was used as a model system to screen chemicals affecting prostate by a tiered approach integrating two toxicological endpoints: cell viability and PSA secretion. A ReProTect training set of (anti androgenic chemicals affecting reproductive tissues were used. Androgens, and unexpectedly glufosinate ammonium, markedly increased PSA, whereas anti-androgens also increased PSA, but at a much lower magnitude than androgens. Our tiered approach properly discriminated androgenic compounds as well as yielded no false positives, as based on available toxicological evidences. The PSA secretion assay is directly linked to the prostate physiological function and it may integrate the information provided by mechanistic-based assays (i.e. AR binding and gene expression.

  10. Lyophilized silica lipid hybrid (SLH) carriers for poorly water-soluble drugs: physicochemical and in vitro pharmaceutical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Rokhsana; Tan, Angel; Bremmell, Kristen E; Prestidge, Clive A

    2014-09-01

    Lyophilization was investigated to produce a powdery silica-lipid hybrid (SLH) carrier for oral delivery of poorly water-soluble drugs. The silica to lipid ratio, incorporation of cryoprotectant, and lipid loading level were investigated as performance indicators for lyophilized SLH carriers. Celecoxib, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, was used as the model poorly soluble moiety to attain desirable physicochemical and in vitro drug solubilization properties. Scanning electron microscopy and confocal fluorescence imaging verified a nanoporous, homogenous internal matrix structures of the lyophilized SLH particles, prepared from submicron triglyceride emulsions and stabilized by porous silica nanoparticles (Aerosil 380), similar to spray-dried SLH. 20-50 wt % of silica in the formulation have shown to produce nonoily SLH agglomerates with complete lipid encapsulation. The incorporation of a cryoprotectant prevented irreversible aggregation of the silica-stabilized droplets during lyophilization, thereby readily redispersing in water to form micrometre-sized particles (water-soluble therapeutics is confirmed. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  11. Magnetic core/shell nanoparticle thin films deposited by MAPLE: Investigation by chemical, morphological and in vitro biological assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristescu, R.; Popescu, C.; Socol, G.; Iordache, I.; Mihailescu, I.N.; Mihaiescu, D.E.; Grumezescu, A.M.; Balan, A.; Stamatin, I.; Chifiriuc, C.; Bleotu, C.; Saviuc, C.; Popa, M.; Chrisey, D.B.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We deposit magnetic Fe 3 O 4 /oleic acid/cephalosporin nanoparticle thin films by MAPLE. ► Thin films have a chemical structure similar to the starting material. ► Cephalosporins have an additive effect on the grain size and induce changes in grain shape. ► MAPLE can be used to develop novel strategies for fighting medical biofilms associated with chronic infections. - Abstract: We report on thin film deposition of nanostructured Fe 3 O 4 /oleic acid/ceftriaxone and Fe 3 O 4 /oleic acid/cefepime nanoparticles (core/shell/adsorption-shell) were fabricated by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) onto inert substrates. The thin films were characterized by profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and investigated by in vitro biological assays. The biological properties tested included the investigation of the microbial viability and the microbial adherence to the glass coverslip nanoparticle film, using Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains with known antibiotic susceptibility behavior, the microbial adherence to the HeLa cells monolayer grown on the nanoparticle pellicle, and the cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells. The proposed system, based on MAPLE, could be used for the development of novel anti-microbial materials or strategies for fighting pathogenic biofilms frequently implicated in the etiology of biofilm associated chronic infections.

  12. In vitro investigation of the follicular penetration of porcine ear skin using a nanoparticle-emulsion containing the antiseptic polihexanide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulmer, M; Patzelt, A; Lademann, J; Richter, H; Sterry, W; Lange-Asschenfeldt, B; Vergou, T; Kramer, A; Mueller, G

    2012-01-01

    Earlier investigations regarding the distribution of the bacterial flora on the human skin demonstrate that the hair follicle acts as a bacterial reservoir, providing a quick source for secondary recontamination. These findings highlight the importance of the hair follicle as a target for modern antiseptics. In the present study, we have assessed the follicular penetration of a curcumin-labeled particle-associated antiseptic into porcine skin by laser scanning microscopy. Therefore, the follicular penetration depth of the curcumin-labeled particle-associated antiseptic was compared to the follicular penetration depth of curcumin-labeled particles without antiseptic. The investigation was performed in vitro using porcine skin biopsies. By superposition of the images acquired in the transmission and the fluorescent modus, it was possible to visualize the distribution of the fluorescent dye inside the hair follicles. Quantitative and qualitative results showed that both dispersions penetrated efficiently into the hair follicles. The average penetration depth of the particles with attached antiseptic polihexanide was significantly higher than that of particles without the attached antiseptic. Also, whilst very little sample preparation was needed, laser scanning microscopy was found to be an efficient tool to visualize the skin relief and in particular the hair follicle shaft and localize fluorescent markers within the skin tissue and hair follicles

  13. Magnetic core/shell nanoparticle thin films deposited by MAPLE: Investigation by chemical, morphological and in vitro biological assays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cristescu, R., E-mail: rodica.cristescu@inflpr.ro [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Popescu, C.; Socol, G.; Iordache, I.; Mihailescu, I.N. [National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Lasers Department, P.O. Box MG-36, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Mihaiescu, D.E.; Grumezescu, A.M. [Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, ' Politehnica' University of Bucharest, 1-7 Polizu Street, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Balan, A.; Stamatin, I. [University of Bucharest, 3Nano-SAE Research Center, PO Box MG-38, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania); Chifiriuc, C. [Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, Microbiology Immunology Department, Aleea Portocalilor 1-3, Sector 5, 77206 Bucharest (Romania); Bleotu, C. [Stefan S. Nicolau Institute of Virology, 285 Mihai Bravu, 030304 Bucharest (Romania); Saviuc, C.; Popa, M. [Faculty of Biology, University of Bucharest, Microbiology Immunology Department, Aleea Portocalilor 1-3, Sector 5, 77206 Bucharest (Romania); Chrisey, D.B. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, School of Engineering, Departments of Materials Science and Biomedical Engineering, Troy, 12180-3590, NY (United States)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We deposit magnetic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/oleic acid/cephalosporin nanoparticle thin films by MAPLE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thin films have a chemical structure similar to the starting material. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cephalosporins have an additive effect on the grain size and induce changes in grain shape. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MAPLE can be used to develop novel strategies for fighting medical biofilms associated with chronic infections. - Abstract: We report on thin film deposition of nanostructured Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/oleic acid/ceftriaxone and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/oleic acid/cefepime nanoparticles (core/shell/adsorption-shell) were fabricated by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE) onto inert substrates. The thin films were characterized by profilometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, and investigated by in vitro biological assays. The biological properties tested included the investigation of the microbial viability and the microbial adherence to the glass coverslip nanoparticle film, using Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains with known antibiotic susceptibility behavior, the microbial adherence to the HeLa cells monolayer grown on the nanoparticle pellicle, and the cytotoxicity on eukaryotic cells. The proposed system, based on MAPLE, could be used for the development of novel anti-microbial materials or strategies for fighting pathogenic biofilms frequently implicated in the etiology of biofilm associated chronic infections.

  14. Bio-EdIP: An automatic approach for in vitro cell confluence images quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardona, Andrés; Ariza-Jiménez, Leandro; Uribe, Diego; Arroyave, Johanna C; Galeano, July; Cortés-Mancera, Fabian M

    2017-07-01

    Cell imaging is a widely-employed technique to analyze multiple biological processes. Therefore, simple, accurate and quantitative tools are needed to understand cellular events. For this purpose, Bio-EdIP was developed as a user-friendly tool to quantify confluence levels using cell culture images. The proposed algorithm combines a pre-processing step with subsequent stages that involve local processing techniques and a morphological reconstruction-based segmentation algorithm. Segmentation performance was assessed in three constructed image sets, comparing F-measure scores and AUC values (ROC analysis) for Bio-EdIP, its previous version and TScratch. Furthermore, segmentation results were compared with published algorithms using eight public benchmarks. Bio-EdIP automatically segmented cell-free regions from images of in vitro cell culture. Based on mean F-measure scores and ROC analysis, Bio-EdIP conserved a high performance regardless of image characteristics of the constructed dataset, when compared with its previous version and TScratch. Although acquisition quality of the public dataset affected Bio-EdIP segmentation, performance was better in two out of eight public sets. Bio-EdIP is a user-friendly interface, which is useful for the automatic analysis of confluence levels and cell growth processes using in vitro cell culture images. Here, we also presented new manually annotated data for algorithms evaluation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Multivariate approach to assess in vitro Fe bioaccessibility in chicken meat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Náira da Silva CAMPOS

    Full Text Available Abstract A 32 factorial design was employed to develop an in vitro digestion method for estimation of Fe bioaccessible fractions in cooked chicken meat. The effects of sample size and the in vitro bioaccessible fractions of this essential element were evaluated. A sample preparation method employing a microwave assisted digestion with dilute nitric acid was used prior to total Fe determination. For the bioacessibility studies, the optimized procedure employed 7.5 g of sample and 6% w/v of an acid pepsin solution. This procedure was applied to two kinds of chicken meat samples: breast and liver. Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry was used to determine total and bioaccessible (chyme or soluble portion levels of iron in the samples. With respect to total Fe content, the bioaccessible fractions of Fe found in these samples were around 23% and 56 %, for breast and chicken liver, respectively. The chicken liver sample showed the highest total (400 ± 10 mg kg-1 and bioaccessible Fe contents (223 ± 18 mg kg-1 and stands out as a good source of this micronutrient.

  16. Ultrasound effects on brain-targeting mannosylated liposomes: in vitro and blood-brain barrier transport investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ahmed S; Aldawsari, Hibah

    2015-01-01

    Delivering drugs to intracerebral regions can be accomplished by improving the capacity of transport through blood-brain barrier. Using sertraline as model drug for brain targeting, the current study aimed at modifying its liposomal vesicles with mannopyranoside. Box-Behnken design was employed to statistically optimize the ultrasound parameters, namely ultrasound amplitude, time, and temperature, for maximum mannosylation capacity, sertraline entrapment, and surface charge while minimizing vesicular size. Moreover, in vitro blood-brain barrier transport model was established to assess the transendothelial capacity of the optimized mannosylated vesicles. Results showed a dependence of vesicular size, mannosylation capacity, and sertraline entrapment on cavitation and bubble implosion events that were related to ultrasound power amplitude, temperature. However, short ultrasound duration was required to achieve >90% mannosylation with nanosized vesicles (ultrasound parameters of 65°C, 27%, and 59 seconds for ultrasound temperature, amplitude, and time were elucidated to produce 81.1%, 46.6 nm, and 77.6% sertraline entrapment, vesicular size, and mannosylation capacity, respectively. Moreover, the transendothelial ability was significantly increased by 2.5-fold by mannosylation through binding with glucose transporters. Hence, mannosylated liposomes processed by ultrasound could be a promising approach for manufacturing and scale-up of brain-targeting liposomes.

  17. An extensive cocktail approach for rapid risk assessment of in vitro CYP450 direct reversible inhibition by xenobiotic exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaggiari, Dany, E-mail: dany.spaggiari@unige.ch [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva, University of Lausanne, Boulevard d' Yvoy 20, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Daali, Youssef, E-mail: youssef.daali@hcuge.ch [Clinical Pharmacology and Toxicology Service, Geneva University Hospitals, Rue Gabrielle Perret-Gentil, 1211 Genève 14 (Switzerland); Rudaz, Serge, E-mail: serge.rudaz@unige.ch [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Geneva, University of Lausanne, Boulevard d' Yvoy 20, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland); Swiss Centre for Applied Human Toxicology, University of Geneva, Boulevard d' Yvoy 20, 1211 Geneva 4 (Switzerland)

    2016-07-01

    Acute exposure to environmental factors strongly affects the metabolic activity of cytochrome P450 (P450). As a consequence, the risk of interaction could be increased, modifying the clinical outcomes of a medication. Because toxic agents cannot be administered to humans for ethical reasons, in vitro approaches are therefore essential to evaluate their impact on P450 activities. In this work, an extensive cocktail mixture was developed and validated for in vitro P450 inhibition studies using human liver microsomes (HLM). The cocktail comprised eleven P450-specific probe substrates to simultaneously assess the activities of the following isoforms: 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2J2 and subfamily 3A. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the developed UHPLC-MS/MS method were critical for the success of this methodology, whose main advantages are: (i) the use of eleven probe substrates with minimized interactions, (ii) a low HLM concentration, (iii) fast incubation (5 min) and (iv) the use of metabolic ratios as microsomal P450 activities markers. This cocktail approach was successfully validated by comparing the obtained IC{sub 50} values for model inhibitors with those generated with the conventional single probe methods. Accordingly, reliable inhibition values could be generated 10-fold faster using a 10-fold smaller amount of HLM compared to individual assays. This approach was applied to assess the P450 inhibition potential of widespread insecticides, namely, chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, methylparathion and profenofos. In all cases, P450 2B6 was the most affected with IC{sub 50} values in the nanomolar range. For the first time, mixtures of these four insecticides incubated at low concentrations showed a cumulative inhibitory in vitro effect on P450 2B6. - Highlights: • Ten P450 isoforms activities assessed simultaneously with only one incubation. • P450 activity levels measured using the metabolic ratio approach. • IC{sub 50} values generated 10

  18. An extensive cocktail approach for rapid risk assessment of in vitro CYP450 direct reversible inhibition by xenobiotic exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spaggiari, Dany; Daali, Youssef; Rudaz, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Acute exposure to environmental factors strongly affects the metabolic activity of cytochrome P450 (P450). As a consequence, the risk of interaction could be increased, modifying the clinical outcomes of a medication. Because toxic agents cannot be administered to humans for ethical reasons, in vitro approaches are therefore essential to evaluate their impact on P450 activities. In this work, an extensive cocktail mixture was developed and validated for in vitro P450 inhibition studies using human liver microsomes (HLM). The cocktail comprised eleven P450-specific probe substrates to simultaneously assess the activities of the following isoforms: 1A2, 2A6, 2B6, 2C8, 2C9, 2C19, 2D6, 2E1, 2J2 and subfamily 3A. The high selectivity and sensitivity of the developed UHPLC-MS/MS method were critical for the success of this methodology, whose main advantages are: (i) the use of eleven probe substrates with minimized interactions, (ii) a low HLM concentration, (iii) fast incubation (5 min) and (iv) the use of metabolic ratios as microsomal P450 activities markers. This cocktail approach was successfully validated by comparing the obtained IC 50 values for model inhibitors with those generated with the conventional single probe methods. Accordingly, reliable inhibition values could be generated 10-fold faster using a 10-fold smaller amount of HLM compared to individual assays. This approach was applied to assess the P450 inhibition potential of widespread insecticides, namely, chlorpyrifos, fenitrothion, methylparathion and profenofos. In all cases, P450 2B6 was the most affected with IC 50 values in the nanomolar range. For the first time, mixtures of these four insecticides incubated at low concentrations showed a cumulative inhibitory in vitro effect on P450 2B6. - Highlights: • Ten P450 isoforms activities assessed simultaneously with only one incubation. • P450 activity levels measured using the metabolic ratio approach. • IC 50 values generated 10-fold faster

  19. Uranium chronic contamination effects on the cholinergic system: in vivo and in vitro approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensoussan, H.

    2009-01-01

    Uranium (U) is a heavy metal which occurs naturally in the environment. It is both a chemical and a radiological toxicant. The aim of this work was: (i) to assess the effects of U chronic exposure on the cholinergic system (biosynthesis and breakdown enzymes, receptors and on behaviour of adult, young or predisposed to neuro-degenerative illness (ApoE KO) rodents; (ii) to grasp the neurotoxic effects of U on human neuronal cells. In vivo, this work shows a structure- (cortex more sensitive than hippocampus), rodent model- (young more sensitive than adults), time- (sub-chronic exposure more harmful than chronic exposure), exposure level- and isotope-dependent effect of U. In vitro, the study underlined the neuro-cytotoxic U potential and the presence of uranium precipitates in cells. These results show the deleterious impact of U on neuronal cells, and demonstrate that U induces impairments on the cholinergic system and the behaviour of rodents. (author)

  20. The foodomics approach for the evaluation of protein bioaccessibility in processed meat upon in vitro digestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordoni, Alessandra; Laghi, Luca; Babini, Elena; Di Nunzio, Mattia; Picone, Gianfranco; Ciampa, Alessandra; Valli, Veronica; Danesi, Francesca; Capozzi, Francesco

    2014-06-01

    The present work describes a foodomics protocol coupling an in vitro static simulation of digestion to a combination of omics techniques, to grant an overview of the protein digestibility of a meat-based food, namely Bresaola. The proteolytic activity mediated by the digestive enzymes is evaluated through Bradford and SDS-PAGE assays, combined to NMR relaxometry and spectroscopy, to obtain information ranging from the microscopic to the molecular level, respectively. The simple proteomics tool adopted here points out that a clear increase of bioaccessible proteins occurs in the gastric phase, rapidly disappearing during the following duodenal digestion. However, SDS-PAGE and the Bradford assay cannot follow the fate of the digested proteins when the products are sized meat matrix. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Investigating the Discriminatory Power of BCS-Biowaiver in Vitro Methodology to Detect Bioavailability Differences between Immediate Release Products Containing a Class I Drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colón-Useche, Sarin; González-Álvarez, Isabel; Mangas-Sanjuan, Victor; González-Álvarez, Marta; Pastoriza, Pilar; Molina-Martínez, Irene; Bermejo, Marival; García-Arieta, Alfredo

    2015-09-08

    The purpose of this work is to investigate the discriminatory power of the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS)-biowaiver in vitro methodology, i.e., to investigate if a BCS-biowaiver approach would have detected the Cmax differences observed between two zolpidem tablets and to identify the cause of the in vivo difference. Several dissolution conditions were tested with three zolpidem formulations: the reference (Stilnox), a bioequivalent formulation (BE), and a nonbioequivalent formulation (N-BE). Zolpidem is highly soluble at pH 1.2, 4.5, and 6.8. Its permeability in Caco-2 cells is higher than that of metoprolol and its transport mechanism is passive diffusion. None of the excipients (alone or in combination) showed any effect on permeability. All formulations dissolved more than 85% in 15 min in the paddle apparatus at 50 rpm in all dissolution media. However, at 30 rpm the nonbioequivalent formulation exhibited a slower dissolution rate. A slower gastric emptying rate was also observed in rats for the nonbioequivalent formulation. A slower disintegration and dissolution or a delay in gastric emptying might explain the Cmax infra-bioavailability for a highly permeable drug with short half-life. The BCS-biowaiver approach would have declared bioequivalence, although the in vivo study was not conclusive but detected a 14% mean difference in Cmax that precluded the bioequivalence demonstration. Nonetheless, these findings suggest that a slower dissolution rate is more discriminatory and that rotation speeds higher than 50 rpm should not be used in BCS-biowaivers, even if a coning effect occurs.

  2. Microscale In Vitro Assays for the Investigation of Neutral Red Retention and Ethoxyresorufin-O-Deethylase of Biofuels and Fossil Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heger, Sebastian; Bluhm, Kerstin; Brendt, Julia; Mayer, Philipp; Anders, Nico; Schäffer, Andreas; Seiler, Thomas-Benjamin; Hollert, Henner

    Only few information on the potential toxic effectiveness of biofuels are available. Due to increasing worldwide demand for energy and fuels during the past decades, biofuels are considered as a promising alternative for fossil fuels in the transport sector. Hence, more information on their hazard potentials are required to understand the toxicological impact of biofuels on the environment. In the German Cluster of Excellence "Tailor-made Fuels from Biomass" design processes for economical, sustainable and environmentally friendly biofuels are investigated. In an unique and interdisciplinary approach, ecotoxicological methods are applied to gain information on potential adverse environmental effects of biofuels at an early phase of their development. In the present study, three potential biofuels, ethyl levulinate, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and 2-methylfuran were tested. Furthermore, we investigated a fossil gasoline fuel, a fossil diesel fuel and an established biodiesel. Two in vitro bioassays, one for assessing cytotoxicity and one for aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonism, so called dioxin-like activity, as measured by Ethoxyresorufin-O-Deethylase, were applied using the permanent fish liver cell line RTL-W1 (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The special properties of these fuel samples required modifications of the test design. Points that had to be addressed were high substance volatility, material compatibility and low solubility. For testing of gasoline, diesel and biodiesel, water accommodated fractions and a passive dosing approach were tested to address the high hydrophobicity and low solubility of these complex mixtures. Further work has to focus on an improvement of the chemical analyses of the fuel samples to allow a better comparison of any effects of fossil fuels and biofuels.

  3. Microscale In Vitro Assays for the Investigation of Neutral Red Retention and Ethoxyresorufin-O-Deethylase of Biofuels and Fossil Fuels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Heger

    Full Text Available Only few information on the potential toxic effectiveness of biofuels are available. Due to increasing worldwide demand for energy and fuels during the past decades, biofuels are considered as a promising alternative for fossil fuels in the transport sector. Hence, more information on their hazard potentials are required to understand the toxicological impact of biofuels on the environment. In the German Cluster of Excellence "Tailor-made Fuels from Biomass" design processes for economical, sustainable and environmentally friendly biofuels are investigated. In an unique and interdisciplinary approach, ecotoxicological methods are applied to gain information on potential adverse environmental effects of biofuels at an early phase of their development. In the present study, three potential biofuels, ethyl levulinate, 2-methyltetrahydrofuran and 2-methylfuran were tested. Furthermore, we investigated a fossil gasoline fuel, a fossil diesel fuel and an established biodiesel. Two in vitro bioassays, one for assessing cytotoxicity and one for aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonism, so called dioxin-like activity, as measured by Ethoxyresorufin-O-Deethylase, were applied using the permanent fish liver cell line RTL-W1 (Oncorhynchus mykiss. The special properties of these fuel samples required modifications of the test design. Points that had to be addressed were high substance volatility, material compatibility and low solubility. For testing of gasoline, diesel and biodiesel, water accommodated fractions and a passive dosing approach were tested to address the high hydrophobicity and low solubility of these complex mixtures. Further work has to focus on an improvement of the chemical analyses of the fuel samples to allow a better comparison of any effects of fossil fuels and biofuels.

  4. Investigating the Effects of Loading Factors on the In Vitro Pharmaceutical Performance of Mesoporous Materials as Drug Carriers for Ibuprofen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmin Lai

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of the loading factors, i.e., the initial drug loading concentration and the ratio of the drug to carriers, on the in vitro pharmaceutical performance of drug-loaded mesoporous systems. Ibuprofen (IBU was used as a model drug, and two non-ordered mesoporous materials of commercial silica Syloid® 244FP (S244FP and Neusilin® US2 (NS2 were selected in the study. The IBU-loaded mesoporous samples were prepared by a solvent immersion method with a rotary evaporation drying technique and characterized by polarized light microscopy (PLM, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. Dissolution experiments were performed in simulated gastric media at 37 °C under non-sink conditions. The concentration of IBU in solution was determined by HPLC. The study showed that the dissolution rate of IBU can be improved significantly using the mesoporous S224FP carriers due to the conversion of crystalline IBU into the amorphous form. Both of the loading factors affected the IBU dissolution kinetics. Due to the molecular interaction between the IBU and NS2 carriers, the loading factors had little effects on the drug release kinetics with incomplete drug desorption recovery and insignificant dissolution enhancement. Care and extensive evaluation must therefore be taken when mesoporous materials are chosen as carrier delivery systems.

  5. PLGA nanoparticles introduction into mitoxantrone-loaded ultrasound-responsive liposomes: In vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yuxuan; Qi, Qi; Mao, Zhenmin; Zhan, Xiaoping

    2017-08-07

    A novel ultrasound-responsive liposomal system for tumor targeting was prepared in order to increase the antitumor efficacy and decrease serious side effects. In this paper, PLGA nanoparticles were used ultrasound-responsive agents instead of conventional microbubbles. The PLGA-nanoparticles were prepared by an emulsion solvent evaporation method. The liposomes were prepared by a lipid film hydration method. Particle size, zeta potential, encapsulation efficiency and drug loading capacity of the liposomes were studied by light scattering analysis and dialysis. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscope (AFM) were used to investigate the morphology of liposomes. The release in vitro was carried out in the pH 7.4 phosphate buffer solutions, as a result, liposome L3 encapsulating PLGA-nanoparticles displayed good stability under simulative physiological conditions and quickly responsive release under the ultrasound. The release in vivo was carried out on the rats, as a result, liposome L3 showed higher bioavailability than traditional intravenous injectable administration, and liposome L3 showed higher elimination ratio after stimulation by ultrasound than L3 without stimulation. Thus, the novel ultrasound-responsive liposome encapsulating PLGA-nanoparticles has a potential to be developed as a new drug delivery system for anti-tumor drug. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Safety profile of solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with rosmarinic acid for oral use: in vitro and animal approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madureira, Ana Raquel; Nunes, Sara; Campos, Débora A; Fernandes, João C; Marques, Cláudia; Zuzarte, Monica; Gullón, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Alcalá, Luís M; Calhau, Conceição; Sarmento, Bruno; Gomes, Ana Maria; Pintado, Maria Manuela; Reis, Flávio

    2016-01-01

    Rosmarinic acid (RA) possesses several protective bioactivities that have attracted increasing interest by nutraceutical/pharmaceutical industries. Considering the reduced bioavailability after oral use, effective (and safe) delivery systems are crucial to protect RA from gastrointestinal degradation. This study aims to characterize the safety profile of solid lipid nanoparticles produced with Witepsol and Carnauba waxes and loaded with RA, using in vitro and in vivo approaches, focused on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assays, redox status markers, hematological and biochemical profile, liver and kidney function, gut bacterial microbiota, and fecal fatty acids composition. Free RA and sage extract, empty nanoparticles, or nanoparticles loaded with RA or sage extract (0.15 and 1.5 mg/mL) were evaluated for cell (lymphocytes) viability, necrosis and apoptosis, and antioxidant/prooxidant effects upon DNA. Wistar rats were orally treated for 14 days with vehicle (control) and with Witepsol or Carnauba nanoparticles loaded with RA at 1 and 10 mg/kg body weight/d. Blood, urine, feces, and several tissues were collected for analysis. Free and loaded RA, at 0.15 mg/mL, presented a safe profile, while genotoxic potential was found for the higher dose (1.5 mg/mL), mainly by necrosis. Our data suggest that both types of nanoparticles are safe when loaded with moderate concentrations of RA, without in vitro genotoxicity and cytotoxicity and with an in vivo safety profile in rats orally treated, thus opening new avenues for use in nutraceutical applications.

  7. Novel targeted approach to better understand how natural structural barriers govern carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility in vegetable-based systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmero, Paola; Lemmens, Lien; Ribas-Agustí, Albert; Sosa, Carola; Met, Kristof; de Dieu Umutoni, Jean; Hendrickx, Marc; Van Loey, Ann

    2013-12-01

    An experimental approach, allowing us to understand the effect of natural structural barriers (cell walls, chromoplast substructures) on carotenoid bioaccessibility, was developed. Different fractions with different levels of carotenoid bio-encapsulation (carotenoid-enriched oil, chromoplasts, small cell clusters, and large cell clusters) were isolated from different types of carrots and tomatoes. An in vitro method was used to determine carotenoid bioaccessibility. In the present work, a significant decrease in carotenoid in vitro bioaccessibility could be observed with an increasing level of bio-encapsulation. Differences in cell wall material and chromoplast substructure between matrices influenced carotenoid release and inclusion in micelles. For carrots, cell walls and chromoplast substructure were important barriers for carotenoid bioaccessibility while, in tomatoes, the chromoplast substructure represented the most important barrier governing bioaccessibility. The highest increase in carotenoid bioaccessibility, for all matrices, was obtained after transferring carotenoids into the oil phase, a system lacking cell walls and chromoplast substructures that could hamper carotenoid release. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A new approach for in vitro regeneration of tomato plants devoid of exogenous plant growth hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plana, Dagmara; Fuentes, Alejandro; Alvarez, Marta; Lara, Regla M; Alvarez, Félix; Pujol, Merardo

    2006-10-01

    Many available methodologies for in vitro regeneration of commercial tomato varieties promote not only the production of normal shoots but also individual leaves, shoots without apical meristems and vitrified structures. All these abnormal formations influence and diminish the regeneration efficiency. At the basis of this phenomenon lies callus development. We optimized an alternative procedure by which the regeneration occurs without abnormal shoot formation. The portion including the proximal part of hypocotyls and the radicle was cultured on medium consisting of Murashige and Skoog salts, 4 mg/L thiamine, 100 mg/L mio-inositol and 3% sucrose. After two-three weeks, 60% explants showed adventitious shoot formation. No changes in the morphological characteristics of regenerated plants and fruits were observed as compared with parents. Karyotypic analysis of regenerated plants showed no variations in chromosome number. The optimized procedure offers the advantage of tomato plant regeneration avoiding callus formation, which enables normal plant recovery with an efficiency ranging from 1.45 +/- 0.05 to 2.57 +/- 0.06 shoots per explant in Campbell-28, Amalia, Lignon, and Floradel cultivars.

  9. Does carbonation of steel slag particles reduce their toxicity? An in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibouraadaten, Saloua; van den Brule, Sybille; Lison, Dominique

    2015-06-01

    Mineral carbonation can stabilize industrial residues and, in the steel industry, may contribute to simultaneously valorize CO2 emissions and slag. We hypothesized that, by restricting the leaching of metals of toxicological concern such as Cr and V, carbonation can suppress the toxicity of these materials. The cytotoxic activity (WST1 assay) of slag dusts collected from a stainless and a Linz-Donawitz (LD) steel plant, before and after carbonation, was examined in J774 macrophages. The release of Cr, V, Fe, Mn and Ni was measured after incubation in artificial lung fluids mimicking the extracellular and phagolysosomal milieu to which particles are confronted after inhalation. LD slag had the higher Fe, Mn and V content, and was more cytotoxic than stainless steel slag. The cytotoxic activity of LD but not of stainless dusts was reduced after carbonation. The cytotoxic activity of the dusts toward J774 macrophages necessitated a direct contact with the cells and was reduced in the presence of inhibitors of phagocytosis (cytochalasin D) or phagolysosome acidification (bafilomycin), pointing to a key role of metallic constituents released in phagolysosomes. This in vitro study supports a limited reduction of the cytotoxic activity of LD, but not of stainless, steel dusts upon carbonation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. 44Sc for labeling of DOTA- and NODAGA-functionalized peptides: preclinical in vitro and in vivo investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domnanich, Katharina A; Müller, Cristina; Farkas, Renata; Schmid, Raffaella M; Ponsard, Bernard; Schibli, Roger; Türler, Andreas; van der Meulen, Nicholas P

    2017-01-01

    Recently, 44 Sc (T 1/2  = 3.97 h, Eβ + av  = 632 keV, I = 94.3 %) has emerged as an attractive radiometal candidate for PET imaging using DOTA-functionalized biomolecules. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of using NODAGA for the coordination of 44 Sc. Two pairs of DOTA/NODAGA-derivatized peptides were investigated in vitro and in vivo and the results obtained with 44 Sc compared with its 68 Ga-labeled counterparts.DOTA-RGD and NODAGA-RGD, as well as DOTA-NOC and NODAGA-NOC, were labeled with 44 Sc and 68 Ga, respectively. The radiopeptides were investigated with regard to their stability in buffer solution and under metal challenge conditions using Fe 3+ and Cu 2+ . Time-dependent biodistribution studies and PET/CT imaging were performed in U87MG and AR42J tumor-bearing mice. Both RGD- and NOC-based peptides with a DOTA chelator were readily labeled with 44 Sc and 68 Ga, respectively, and remained stable over at least 4 half-lives of the corresponding radionuclide. In contrast, the labeling of NODAGA-functionalized peptides with 44 Sc was more challenging and the resulting radiopeptides were clearly less stable than the DOTA-derivatized matches. 44 Sc-NODAGA peptides were clearly more susceptible to metal challenge than 44 Sc-DOTA peptides under the same conditions. Instability of 68 Ga-labeled peptides was only observed if they were coordinated with a DOTA in the presence of excess Cu 2+ . Biodistribution data of the 44 Sc-labeled peptides were largely comparable with the data obtained with the 68 Ga-labeled counterparts. It was only in the liver tissue that the uptake of 68 Ga-labeled DOTA compounds was markedly higher than for the 44 Sc-labeled version and this was also visible on PET/CT images. The 44 Sc-labeled NODAGA-peptides showed a similar tissue distribution to those of the DOTA peptides without any obvious signs of in vivo instability. Although DOTA revealed to be the preferred chelator for stable coordination of 44

  11. Ultrasound effects on brain-targeting mannosylated liposomes: in vitro and blood–brain barrier transport investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zidan AS

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Ahmed S Zidan,1,2 Hibah Aldawsari1 1Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 2Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt Abstract: Delivering drugs to intracerebral regions can be accomplished by improving the capacity of transport through blood–brain barrier. Using sertraline as model drug for brain targeting, the current study aimed at modifying its liposomal vesicles with mannopyranoside. Box-Behnken design was employed to statistically optimize the ultrasound parameters, namely ultrasound amplitude, time, and temperature, for maximum mannosylation capacity, sertraline entrapment, and surface charge while minimizing vesicular size. Moreover, in vitro blood–brain barrier transport model was established to assess the transendothelial capacity of the optimized mannosylated vesicles. Results showed a dependence of vesicular size, mannosylation capacity, and sertraline entrapment on cavitation and bubble implosion events that were related to ultrasound power amplitude, temperature. However, short ultrasound duration was required to achieve >90% mannosylation with nanosized vesicles (<200 nm of narrow size distribution. Optimized ultrasound parameters of 65°C, 27%, and 59 seconds for ultrasound temperature, amplitude, and time were elucidated to produce 81.1%, 46.6 nm, and 77.6% sertraline entrapment, vesicular size, and mannosylation capacity, respectively. Moreover, the transendothelial ability was significantly increased by 2.5-fold by mannosylation through binding with glucose transporters. Hence, mannosylated liposomes processed by ultrasound could be a promising approach for manufacturing and scale-up of brain-targeting liposomes. Keywords: CNS delivery, sizing, lipid based formulations, quality by design, sertraline hydrochloride

  12. Accuracy of preemptively constructed, Cone Beam CT-, and CAD/CAM technology-based, individual Root Analogue Implant technique: an in vitro pilot investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moin, D.A.; Hassan, B.; Parsa, A.; Mercelis, P.; Wismeijer, D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this in vitro pilot investigation is to assess the accuracy of the preemptive individually fabricated root analogue implant (RAI) based on three-dimensional (3D) root surface models obtained from a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan, computer-aided designing (CAD), and

  13. Investigations on the effects of triazole group fungicides on some important antagonistic fungi and non-pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht) in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Demirci, A.; Katırcıoğlu, Z.; Demirci, F.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of eight triazole fungicides (cyproconazole, diniconazole, flusilazole hexaconazole, myclobutanil, penconazole, tebuconazole and triticinazole) on some important antagonistic fungi [Trichoderma harzianum (Rifai), T. viride (Pers. ex Gray), T. pseudokoningii (Rifai), T. hamatum (Bonard), Gliociadium viride (Matrouchot), Aspergillus niger (Tieghem), Penicillium verrııcosum (Dierckx)] and non-pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht) were investigated on PDA in vitro. EC5 0 values ...

  14. Investigations on the effects of triazole group fungicides on some important antagonistic fungi and non-pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht) in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Demirci, A.; Katırcıoğlu, Z.; Demirci, F.

    2008-01-01

    The effects of eight triazole fungicides (cyproconazole, diniconazole, flusilazole hexaconazole, myclobutanil, penconazole, tebuconazole and triticinazole) on some important antagonistic fungi [Trichoderma harzianum (Rifai), T. viride (Pers. ex Gray), T. pseudokoningii (Rifai), T. hamatum (Bonard), Gliociadium viride (Matrouchot), Aspergillus niger (Tieghem), Penicillium verrııcosum (Dierckx)] and non-pathogen Fusarium oxysporum (Schlecht) were investigated on PDA in vitro. EC5 0 values ...

  15. Pharmacokinetic and Toxicological Evaluation of a Zinc Gluconate-Based Chemical Sterilant Using In Vitro and In Silico Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Araujo-Lima

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sclerosing agents as zinc gluconate-based chemical sterilants (Infertile® are used for chemical castration. This solution is injected into the animal testis, but there are not enough evidences of its safety profiles for the receivers. The present work aimed to establish the pharmacokinetics and toxicological activity of Infertile, using in vitro and in silico approaches. The evaluation at the endpoint showed effects in a dose-dependent manner. Since necrosis is potentially carcinogenic, the possible cell death mechanism could be apoptosis. Our data suggested that Infertile at 60 mM presented risk for animal health. Even though Infertile is a licensed product by the Brazilian Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Supply, it presented a high mutagenic potential. We suggest that the optimal dose must be less than 6 mM, once, at this concentration, no mutagenicity or genotoxicity was observed.

  16. Accuracy of Digital vs Conventional Implant Impression Approach: A Three-Dimensional Comparative In Vitro Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basaki, Kinga; Alkumru, Hasan; De Souza, Grace; Finer, Yoav

    To assess the three-dimensional (3D) accuracy and clinical acceptability of implant definitive casts fabricated using a digital impression approach and to compare the results with those of a conventional impression method in a partially edentulous condition. A mandibular reference model was fabricated with implants in the first premolar and molar positions to simulate a patient with bilateral posterior edentulism. Ten implant-level impressions per method were made using either an intraoral scanner with scanning abutments for the digital approach or an open-tray technique and polyvinylsiloxane material for the conventional approach. 3D analysis and comparison of implant location on resultant definitive casts were performed using laser scanner and quality control software. The inter-implant distances and interimplant angulations for each implant pair were measured for the reference model and for each definitive cast (n = 20 per group); these measurements were compared to calculate the magnitude of error in 3D for each definitive cast. The influence of implant angulation on definitive cast accuracy was evaluated for both digital and conventional approaches. Statistical analysis was performed using t test (α = .05) for implant position and angulation. Clinical qualitative assessment of accuracy was done via the assessment of the passivity of a master verification stent for each implant pair, and significance was analyzed using chi-square test (α = .05). A 3D error of implant positioning was observed for the two impression techniques vs the reference model, with mean ± standard deviation (SD) error of 116 ± 94 μm and 56 ± 29 μm for the digital and conventional approaches, respectively (P = .01). In contrast, the inter-implant angulation errors were not significantly different between the two techniques (P = .83). Implant angulation did not have a significant influence on definitive cast accuracy within either technique (P = .64). The verification stent

  17. Investigating the role of retinal Müller cells with approaches in genetics and cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Suhua; Zhu, Meili; Ash, John D; Wang, Yunchang; Le, Yun-Zheng

    2014-01-01

    Müller cells are major macroglia and play many essential roles as a supporting cell in the retina. As Müller cells only constitute a small portion of retinal cells, investigating the role of Müller glia in retinal biology and diseases is particularly challenging. To overcome this problem, we first generated a Cre/lox-based conditional gene targeting system that permits the genetic manipulation and functional dissection of gene of interests in Müller cells. To investigate diabetes-induced alteration of Müller cells, we recently adopted methods to analyze Müller cells survival/death in vitro and in vivo. We also used normal and genetically altered primary cell cultures to reveal the mechanistic insights for Müller cells in biological and disease processes. In this article, we will discuss the applications and limitations of these methodologies, which may be useful for research in retinal Müller cell biology and pathophysiology.

  18. New probiotic strains for inflammatory bowel disease management identified by combining in vitro and in vivo approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alard, J; Peucelle, V; Boutillier, D; Breton, J; Kuylle, S; Pot, B; Holowacz, S; Grangette, C

    2018-02-27

    Alterations in the gut microbiota composition play a key role in the development of chronic diseases such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The potential use of probiotics therefore gained attention, although outcomes were sometimes conflicting and results largely strain-dependent. The present study aimed to identify new probiotic strains that have a high potential for the management of this type of pathologies. Strains were selected from a large collection by combining different in vitro and in vivo approaches, addressing both anti-inflammatory potential and ability to improve the gut barrier function. We identified six strains with an interesting anti-inflammatory profile on peripheral blood mononuclear cells and with the ability to restore the gut barrier using a gut permeability model based on Caco-2 cells sensitized with hydrogen peroxide. The in vivo evaluation in two 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid-induced murine models of colitis highlighted that some of the strains exhibited beneficial activities against acute colitis while others improved chronic colitis. Bifidobacterium bifidum PI22, the strain that exhibited the most protective capacities against acute colitis was only slightly efficacious against chronic colitis, while Bifidobacterium lactis LA804 which was less efficacious in the acute model was the most protective against chronic colitis. Lactobacillus helveticus PI5 was not anti-inflammatory in vitro but the best in strengthening the epithelial barrier and as such able to significantly dampen murine acute colitis. Interestingly, Lactobacillus salivarius LA307 protected mice significantly against both types of colitis. This work provides crucial clues for selecting the best strains for more efficacious therapeutic approaches in the management of chronic inflammatory diseases. The strategy employed allowed us to identify four strains with different characteristics and a high potential for the management of inflammatory diseases, such as IBD.

  19. Two-dimensional HPLC coupled to ICP-MS and electrospray ionisation (ESI)-MS/MS for investigating the bioavailability in vitro of arsenic species from edible seaweed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Sartal, Cristina; Barciela-Alonso, Maria del Carmen; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar [University of Santiago de Compostela, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Taebunpakul, Sutthinun [LGC Limited, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine, South Kensington, Department of Materials, London (United Kingdom); National Institute of Metrology (Thailand), Pathumthani (Thailand); Stokes, Emma; Goenaga-Infante, Heidi [LGC Limited, Teddington, Middlesex (United Kingdom)

    2012-04-15

    Edible seaweed consumption is a route of exposure to arsenic. However, little attention has been paid to estimate the bioaccessibility and/or bioavailability of arsenosugars in edible seaweed and their possible degradation products during gastrointestinal digestion. This work presents first use of combined inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS) with electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (ESI-MS/MS) with two-dimensional HPLC (size exclusion followed by anion exchange) to compare the qualitative and quantitative arsenosugars speciation of different edible seaweed with that of their bioavailable fraction as obtained using an in vitro gastrointestinal digestion procedure. Optimal extraction conditions for As species from four seaweed namely kombu, wakame, nori and sea lettuce were selected as a compromise between As extraction efficiency and preservation of compound identity. For most investigated samples, the use of ammonium acetate buffer as extractant and 1 h sonication in a water bath followed by HPLC-ICP-MS resulted in 40-61% of the total As to be found in the buffered aqueous extract, of which 86-110% was present as arsenosugars (glycerol sugar, phosphate sugar and sulfonate sugar for wakame and kombu and glycerol sugar and phosphate sugar for nori). The exception was sea lettuce, for which the arsenosugar fraction (glycerol sugar, phosphate sugar) only comprised 44% of the total extracted As. Interestingly, the ratio of arsenobetaine and dimethylarsinic acid to arsenosugars in sea lettuce extracts seemed higher than that for the rest of investigated samples. After in vitro gastrointestinal digestion, approximately 11-16% of the total As in the solid sample was found in the dialyzates with arsenosugars comprising 93-120% and 41% of the dialyzable As fraction for kombu, wakame, nori and sea lettuce, respectively. Moreover, the relative As species distribution in seaweed-buffered extracts and dialyzates was found to be very similar

  20. In vitro chronic hepatic disease characterization with a multiparametric ultrasonic approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meziri, M; Pereira, W C A; Abdelwahab, A; Degott, C; Laugier, P

    2005-03-01

    Although, high resolution, real-time ultrasonic (US) imaging is routinely available, image interpretation is based on grey-level and texture and quantitative evaluation is limited. Other potentially useful diagnostic information from US echoes may include modifications in tissue acoustic parameters (speed, attenuation and backscattering) resulting from disease development. Changes in acoustical parameters can be detected using time-of-flight and spectral analysis techniques. The objective of this study is to explore the potential of three parameters together (attenuation coefficient, US speed and integrated backscatter coefficient-IBC) to discriminate healthy and fibrosis subgroups in liver tissue. Echoes from 21 fresh in vitro samples of human liver and from a plane reflector were obtained using a 20-MHz central frequency transducer (6-30 MHz bandpass). The scan plane was parallel to the reflector placed beneath the liver. A 30 x 20 matrix of A-scans was obtained, with a 200-microm step. The samples were classified according to the Metavir scale in five different degrees of fibrosis. US speed, attenuation and IBC were estimated from standard methods described in the literature. Statistical tests were applied to the results of each parameter individually and indicated that it was not possible to identify all the fibrosis groups. Then a discriminant analysis was performed for the three parameters together resulting in a reasonable separation of fibrotic groups. Although the number of tissue samples is limited, this study opens the possibility of enhancing the discriminant capability of ultrasonic parameters of liver tissue disease when they are combined together.

  1. An in vitro approach for prioritization and evaluation of chemical effects on glucocorticoid receptor mediated adipogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Jessica K; Beames, Tyler; Parks, Bethany; Doheny, Daniel; Song, Gina; Efremenko, Alina; Yoon, Miyoung; Foley, Briana; Deisenroth, Chad; McMullen, Patrick D; Clewell, Rebecca A

    2018-05-18

    Rising obesity rates worldwide have socio-economic ramifications. While genetics, diet, and lack of exercise are major contributors to obesity, environmental factors may enhance susceptibility through disruption of hormone homeostasis and metabolic processes. The obesogen hypothesis contends that chemical exposure early in development may enhance adipocyte differentiation, thereby increasing the number of adipocytes and predisposing for obesity and metabolic disease. We previously developed a primary human adipose stem cell (hASC) assay to evaluate the effect of environmental chemicals on PPARG-dependent adipogenesis. Here, the assay was modified to determine the effects of chemicals on the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) pathway. In differentiation cocktail lacking the glucocorticoid agonist dexamethasone (DEX), hASCs do not differentiate into adipocytes. In the presence of GR agonists, adipocyte maturation was observed using phenotypic makers for lipid accumulation, adipokine secretion, and expression of key genes. To evaluate the role of environmental compounds on adipocyte differentiation, progenitor cells were treated with 19 prioritized compounds previously identified by ToxPi as having GR-dependent bioactivity, and multiplexed assays were used to confirm a GR-dependent mode of action. Five chemicals were found to be strong agonists. The assay was also modified to evaluate GR-antagonists, and 8/10 of the hypothesized antagonists inhibited adipogenesis. The in vitro bioactivity data was put into context with extrapolated human steady state concentrations (Css) and clinical exposure data (Cmax). These data support using a human adipose-derived stem cell differentiation assay to test the potential of chemicals to alter human GR-dependent adipogenesis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. In vitro approach to studying cutaneous metabolism and disposition of topically applied xenobiotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kao, J.; Hall, J.; Shugart, L.R.; Holland, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    The extent to which cutaneous metabolism may be involved in the penetration and fate of topically applied xenobiotics was examined by metabolically viable and structurally intact mouse skin in organ culture. Evidence that skin penetration of certain chemicals is coupled to cutaneous metabolism was based upon observations utilizing [ 14 C]benzo[a]pyrene (BP). As judged by the recovery of radioactivity in the culture medium 24 hr after in vitro topical application of [ 14 C]BP to the skin from both control and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-induced C3H mice, skin penetration of BP was higher in the induced tissue. All classes of metabolites of BP were found in the culture medium; water-soluble metabolites predominated and negligible amounts of unmetabolized BP were found. As shown by enzymatic hydrolysis of the medium, TCDD induction resulted in shifting the cutaneous metabolism of BP toward the synthesis of more water-soluble conjugates. Differences in the degree of covalent binding of BP, via diol epoxide intermediates to epidermal DNA, from control and induced tissues were observed. These differences may reflect a change in the pathways of metabolism as a consequence of TCDD induction. These results indicated that topically applied BP is metabolized by the skin during its passage through the skin; and the degree of percutaneous penetration and disposition of BP was dependent upon the metabolic status of the tissue. This suggests that cutaneous metabolism may play an important role in the translocation and subsequent physiological disposition of topically applied BP. 33 references, 5 figures, 2 tables

  3. Technological Innovations for High-Throughput Approaches to In Vitro Allergy Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Martin D; Wuenschmann, Sabina; King, Eva; Pomés, Anna

    2015-07-01

    Allergy diagnostics is being transformed by the advent of in vitro IgE testing using purified allergen molecules, combined with multiplex technology and biosensors, to deliver discriminating, sensitive, and high-throughput molecular diagnostics at the point of care. Essential elements of IgE molecular diagnostics are purified natural or recombinant allergens with defined purity and IgE reactivity, planar or bead-based multiplex systems to enable IgE to multiple allergens to be measured simultaneously, and, most recently, nanotechnology-based biosensors that facilitate rapid reaction rates and delivery of test results via mobile devices. Molecular diagnostics relies on measurement of IgE to purified allergens, the "active ingredients" of allergenic extracts. Typically, this involves measuring IgE to multiple allergens which is facilitated by multiplex technology and biosensors. The technology differentiates between clinically significant cross-reactive allergens (which could not be deduced by conventional IgE assays using allergenic extracts) and provides better diagnostic outcomes. Purified allergens are manufactured under good laboratory practice and validated using protein chemistry, mass spectrometry, and IgE antibody binding. Recently, multiple allergens (from dog) were expressed as a single molecule with high diagnostic efficacy. Challenges faced by molecular allergy diagnostic companies include generation of large panels of purified allergens with known diagnostic efficacy, access to flexible and robust array or sensor technology, and, importantly, access to well-defined serum panels form allergic patients for product development and validation. Innovations in IgE molecular diagnostics are rapidly being brought to market and will strengthen allergy testing at the point of care.

  4. Characterization of microbial metabolism of Syrah grape products in an in vitro colon model using targeted and non-targeted analytical approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Aura, Anna-Marja; Mattila, Ismo; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Cheynier, Veronique; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Bes, Magali; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Guyot, Sylvain; Orešič, Matej

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Syrah red grapes are used in the production of tannin-rich red wines. Tannins are high molecular weight molecules, proanthocyanidins (PAs), and poorly absorbed in the upper intestine. In this study, gut microbial metabolism of Syrah grape phenolic compounds was investigated. Methods Syrah grape pericarp was subjected to an enzymatic in vitro digestion model, and red wine and grape skin PA fraction were prepared. Microbial conversion was screened using an in vitro colon model with faec...

  5. A CDT-Based Heuristic Zone Design Approach for Economic Census Investigators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changixu Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses a special zone design problem for economic census investigators that is motivated by a real-world application. This paper presented a heuristic multikernel growth approach via Constrained Delaunay Triangulation (CDT. This approach not only solved the barriers problem but also dealt with the polygon data in zoning procedure. In addition, it uses a new heuristic method to speed up the zoning process greatly on the premise of the required quality of zoning. At last, two special instances for economic census were performed, highlighting the performance of this approach.

  6. Integral approach to innovative fuel and material investigations in the Halden reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, B.

    2009-01-01

    Integral approach used for fuel and material investigations in the Halden reactor can be used in support of qualification and certification of fuel to be introduced in commercial NPPs. This approach has been partly used for WWER fuel investigation in the Halden Reactor in a series of irradiation tests. In-pile fuel performance tests with reliable measurements provided by Halden instrumentation under different conditions can be used for validation of the WWER fuel behaviour models and verification of fuel performance codes. These models and codes can be used for qualification of innovative fuel behaviour under extended conditions

  7. Investigation of the optimal timing for chondrogenic priming of MSCs to enhance osteogenic differentiation in vitro as a bone tissue engineering strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, F E; Haugh, M G; McNamara, L M

    2016-04-01

    Recent in vitro tissue engineering approaches have shown that chondrogenic priming of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can have a positive effect on osteogenesis in vivo. However, whether chondrogenic priming is an effective in vitro bone regeneration strategy is not yet known. In particular, the appropriate timing for chondrogenic priming in vitro is unknown albeit that in vivo cartilage formation persists for a specific period before bone formation. The objective of this study is to determine the optimum time for chondrogenic priming of MSCs to enhance osteogenic differentiation by MSCs in vitro. Pellets derived from murine and human MSCs were cultured in six different media groups: two control groups (chondrogenic and osteogenic) and four chondrogenic priming groups (10, 14, 21 and 28 days priming). Biochemical analyses (Hoechst, sulfate glycosaminoglycan (sGAG), Alkaline Phosphate (ALP), calcium), histology (Alcian Blue, Alizarin Red) and immunohistochemistry (collagen types I, II and X) were performed on the samples at specific times. Our results show that after 49 days the highest amount of sGAG production occurred in MSCs chondrogenically primed for 21 days and 28 days. Moreover we found that chondrogenic priming of MSCs in vitro for specific amounts of time (14 days, 21 days) can have optimum influence on their mineralization capacity and can produce a construct that is mineralized throughout the core. Determining the optimum time for chondrogenic priming to enhance osteogenic differentiation in vitro provides information that might lead to a novel regenerative treatment for large bone defects, as well as addressing the major limitation of core degradation and construct failure. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. New approaches for the reliable in vitro assessment of binding affinity based on high-resolution real-time data acquisition of radioligand-receptor binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Markus; Pichler, Florian; Nics, Lukas; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Spreitzer, Helmut; Hacker, Marcus; Mitterhauser, Markus

    2017-12-01

    Resolving the kinetic mechanisms of biomolecular interactions have become increasingly important in early-phase drug development. Since traditional in vitro methods belong to dose-dependent assessments, binding kinetics is usually overlooked. The present study aimed at the establishment of two novel experimental approaches for the assessment of binding affinity of both, radiolabelled and non-labelled compounds targeting the A 3 R, based on high-resolution real-time data acquisition of radioligand-receptor binding kinetics. A novel time-resolved competition assay was developed and applied to determine the K i of eight different A 3 R antagonists, using CHO-K1 cells stably expressing the hA 3 R. In addition, a new kinetic real-time cell-binding approach was established to quantify the rate constants k on and k off , as well as the dedicated K d of the A 3 R agonist [ 125 I]-AB-MECA. Furthermore, lipophilicity measurements were conducted to control influences due to physicochemical properties of the used compounds. Two novel real-time cell-binding approaches were successfully developed and established. Both experimental procedures were found to visualize the kinetic binding characteristics with high spatial and temporal resolution, resulting in reliable affinity values, which are in good agreement with values previously reported with traditional methods. Taking into account the lipophilicity of the A 3 R antagonists, no influences on the experimental performance and the resulting affinity were investigated. Both kinetic binding approaches comprise tracer administration and subsequent binding to living cells, expressing the dedicated target protein. Therefore, the experiments resemble better the true in vivo physiological conditions and provide important markers of cellular feedback and biological response.

  9. Disruption of thyroid hormone functions by low dose exposure of tributyltin: an in vitro and in vivo approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Shruti; Nikhil, Kumar; Roy, Partha

    2014-09-15

    Triorganotins, such as tributyltin chloride (TBTCl), are environmental contaminants that are commonly found in the antifouling paints used in ships and other vessels. The importance of TBTCl as an endocrine-disrupting chemical (EDC) in different animal models is well known; however, its adverse effects on the thyroid gland are less understood. Hence, in the present study, we aimed to evaluate the thyroid-disrupting effects of this chemical using both in vitro and in vivo approaches. We used HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells for the in vitro studies, as they are a thyroid hormone receptor (TR)-positive and thyroid responsive cell line. For the in vivo studies, Swiss albino male mice were exposed to three doses of TBTCl (0.5, 5 and 50μg/kg/day) for 45days. TBTCl showed a hypo-thyroidal effect in vivo. Low-dose treatment of TBTCl exposure markedly decreased the serum thyroid hormone levels via the down-regulation of the thyroid peroxidase (TPO) and thyroglobulin (Tg) genes by 40% and 25%, respectively, while augmenting the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. Thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR) expression was up-regulated in the thyroid glands of treated mice by 6.6-fold relative to vehicle-treated mice (p<0.05). In the transient transactivation assays, TBTCl suppressed T3 mediated transcriptional activity in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, TBTCl was found to decrease the expression of TR. The present study thus indicates that low concentrations of TBTCl suppress TR transcription by disrupting the physiological concentrations of T3/T4, followed by the recruitment of NCoR to TR, providing a novel insight into the thyroid hormone-disrupting effects of this chemical. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Biomechanics of Hybrid Anterior Cervical Fusion and Artificial Disc Replacement in 3-Level Constructs: An In Vitro Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhenhua; Fogel, Guy R.; Pu, Ting; Gu, Hongsheng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The ideal surgical approach for cervical disk disease remains controversial, especially for multilevel cervical disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of the cervical spine after 3-level hybrid surgery compared with 3-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Material/Methods Eighteen human cadaveric spines (C2-T1) were evaluated under displacement-input protocol. After intact testing, a simulated hybrid construct or fusion construct was created between C3 to C6 and tested in the following 3 conditions: 3-level disc plate disc (3DPD), 3-level plate disc plate (3PDP), and 3-level plate (3P). Results Compared to intact, almost 65~80% of motion was successfully restricted at C3-C6 fusion levels (p0.05). 3PDP construct resulted in significant decrease of ROM at C3-C6 levels less than 3P (pbiomechanical advantages compared to fusion in normalizing motion. PMID:26529430

  11. Identifying endogenous neural stem cells in the adult brain in vitro and in vivo: novel approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rueger, Maria Adele; Androutsellis-Theotokis, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    In the 1960s, Joseph Altman reported that the adult mammalian brain is capable of generating new neurons. Today it is understood that some of these neurons are derived from uncommitted cells in the subventricular zone lining the lateral ventricles, and the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus. The first area generates new neuroblasts which migrate to the olfactory bulb, whereas hippocampal neurogenesis seems to play roles in particular types of learning and memory. A part of these uncommitted (immature) cells is able to divide and their progeny can generate all three major cell types of the nervous system: neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes; these properties define such cells as neural stem cells. Although the roles of these cells are not yet clear, it is accepted that they affect functions including olfaction and learning/memory. Experiments with insults to the central nervous system also show that neural stem cells are quickly mobilized due to injury and in various disorders by proliferating, and migrating to injury sites. This suggests a role of endogenous neural stem cells in disease. New pools of stem cells are being discovered, suggesting an even more important role for these cells. To understand these cells and to coax them to contribute to tissue repair it would be very useful to be able to image them in the living organism. Here we discuss advances in imaging approaches as well as new concepts that emerge from stem cell biology with emphasis on the interface between imaging and stem cells.

  12. submitter Biologically optimized helium ion plans: calculation approach and its in vitro validation

    CERN Document Server

    Mairani, A; Magro, G; Tessonnier, T; Kamp, F; Carlson, D J; Ciocca, M; Cerutti, F; Sala, P R; Ferrari, A; Böhlen, T T; Jäkel, O; Parodi, K; Debus, J; Abdollahi, A; Haberer, T

    2016-01-01

    Treatment planning studies on the biological effect of raster-scanned helium ion beams should be performed, together with their experimental verification, before their clinical application at the Heidelberg Ion Beam Therapy Center (HIT). For this purpose, we introduce a novel calculation approach based on integrating data-driven biological models in our Monte Carlo treatment planning (MCTP) tool. Dealing with a mixed radiation field, the biological effect of the primary $^4$He ion beams, of the secondary $^3$He and $^4$He (Z  =  2) fragments and of the produced protons, deuterons and tritons (Z  =  1) has to be taken into account. A spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) in water, representative of a clinically-relevant scenario, has been biologically optimized with the MCTP and then delivered at HIT. Predictions of cell survival and RBE for a tumor cell line, characterized by ${{(\\alpha /\\beta )}_{\\text{ph}}}=5.4$ Gy, have been successfully compared against measured clonogenic survival data. The mean ...

  13. Investigating Learner Attitudes toward E-Books as Learning Tools: Based on the Activity Theory Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng; Huang, Hsiu-Mei

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the use of e-books as learning tools in terms of learner satisfaction, usefulness, behavioral intention, and learning effectiveness. Based on the activity theory approach, this research develops a research model to understand learner attitudes toward e-books in two physical sizes: 10? and 7?. Results suggest that screen…

  14. Student-Centred Learning Environments: An Investigation into Student Teachers' Instructional Preferences and Approaches to Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baeten, Marlies; Dochy, Filip; Struyven, Katrien; Parmentier, Emmeline; Vanderbruggen, Anne

    2016-01-01

    The use of student-centred learning environments in education has increased. This study investigated student teachers' instructional preferences for these learning environments and how these preferences are related to their approaches to learning. Participants were professional Bachelor students in teacher education. Instructional preferences and…

  15. Approaches to Learning at Work: Investigating Work Motivation, Perceived Workload, and Choice Independence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyndt, Eva; Raes, Elisabeth; Dochy, Filip; Janssens, Els

    2013-01-01

    Learning and development are taking up a central role in the human resource policies of organizations because of their crucial contribution to the competitiveness of those organizations. The present study investigates the relationship of work motivation, perceived workload, and choice independence with employees' approaches to learning at work.…

  16. Investigating the Efficiency of Scenario Based Learning and Reflective Learning Approaches in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hursen, Cigdem; Fasli, Funda Gezer

    2017-01-01

    The main purpose of this research is to investigate the efficiency of scenario based learning and reflective learning approaches in teacher education. The impact of applications of scenario based learning and reflective learning on prospective teachers' academic achievement and views regarding application and professional self-competence…

  17. An Investigation of First-Year Engineering Student and Instructor Perspectives of Learning Analytics Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, David B.; Brozina, Cory; Novoselich, Brian

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates how first-year engineering undergraduates and their instructors describe the potential for learning analytics approaches to contribute to student success. Results of qualitative data collection in a first-year engineering course indicated that both students and instructors\temphasized a preference for learning analytics…

  18. Investigating Preservice Teachers' Beliefs toward Cultural Diversity Employing an Inquiry through Literature Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rangseechatchawan, Dusadee

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated preservice teachers' beliefs toward cultural diversity by employing an inquiry through literature approach. The purpose of this study was to examine the impact of an inquiry through literature instructional format, such as book clubs, and whole class and individual inquiry, on preservice teachers' beliefs regarding cultural…

  19. A Visual Approach to Investigating Shared and Global Memory Behavior of CUDA Kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Rosen, Paul

    2013-06-01

    We present an approach to investigate the memory behavior of a parallel kernel executing on thousands of threads simultaneously within the CUDA architecture. Our top-down approach allows for quickly identifying any significant differences between the execution of the many blocks and warps. As interesting warps are identified, we allow further investigation of memory behavior by visualizing the shared memory bank conflicts and global memory coalescence, first with an overview of a single warp with many operations and, subsequently, with a detailed view of a single warp and a single operation. We demonstrate the strength of our approach in the context of a parallel matrix transpose kernel and a parallel 1D Haar Wavelet transform kernel. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. A Visual Approach to Investigating Shared and Global Memory Behavior of CUDA Kernels

    KAUST Repository

    Rosen, Paul

    2013-01-01

    We present an approach to investigate the memory behavior of a parallel kernel executing on thousands of threads simultaneously within the CUDA architecture. Our top-down approach allows for quickly identifying any significant differences between the execution of the many blocks and warps. As interesting warps are identified, we allow further investigation of memory behavior by visualizing the shared memory bank conflicts and global memory coalescence, first with an overview of a single warp with many operations and, subsequently, with a detailed view of a single warp and a single operation. We demonstrate the strength of our approach in the context of a parallel matrix transpose kernel and a parallel 1D Haar Wavelet transform kernel. © 2013 The Author(s) Computer Graphics Forum © 2013 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells derived in vitro transdifferentiated insulin-producing cells: A new approach to treat type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti Dave

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pathophysiology of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is largely related to an innate defect in the immune system culminating in a loss of self-tolerance and destruction of the insulin-producing β-cells. Currently, there is no definitive cure for T1DM. Insulin injection does not mimic the precise regulation of β-cells on glucose homeostasis, leading long term to the development of complications. Stem cell therapy is a promising approach and specifically mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs offer a promising possibility that deserves to be explored further. MSCs are multipotent, nonhematopoietic progenitors. They have been explored as an treatment option in tissue regeneration as well as potential of in vitro transdifferentiation into insulin-secreting cells. Thus, the major therapeutic goals for T1DM have been achieved in this way. The regenerative capabilities of MSCs have been a driving force to initiate studies testing their therapeutic effectiveness; their immunomodulatory properties have been equally exciting; which would appear capable of disabling immune dysregulation that leads to β-cell destruction in T1DM. Furthermore, MSCs can be cultured under specially defined conditions, their transdifferentiation can be directed toward the β-cell phenotype, and the formation of insulin-producing cells (IPCs can be targeted. To date, the role of MSCs-derived IPC in T1DM-a unique approach with some positive findings-have been unexplored, but it is still in its very early phase. In this study, a new approach of MSCs-derived IPCs, as a potential therapeutic benefit for T1DM in experimental animal models as well as in humans has been summarized.

  2. Serotonin Shapes the Migratory Potential of NK Cells - An in vitro Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Philipp; Bloch, Wilhelm; Kieven, Markus; Lövenich, Lukas; Lehmann, Jonas; Holthaus, Michelle; Theurich, Sebastian; Schenk, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    Increased serotonin (5-HT) levels have been shown to influence natural killer cell (NK cell) function. Acute exercise mobilizes and activates NK cells and further increases serum 5-HT concentrations in a dose-dependent manner. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of different serum 5-HT concentrations on NK cell migratory potential and cytotoxicity. The human NK cell line KHYG-1 was assigned to 4 conditions, including 3 physiological concentrations of 5-HT (100, 130 or 170 µg/l 5-HT) and one control condition. NK cells were analyzed regarding cytotoxicity, migratory potential and expression of adhesion molecules. No treatment effect on NK cell cytotoxicity and expression of integrin subunits was detected. Migratory potential was increased in a dose dependent manner, indicating the highest protease activity in cells that were incubated with 170 µg/l 5-HT (170 µg/l vs. control, p<0.001, 170 µg/l vs. 100 µg/l, p<0.001; 170 µg/l vs. 130 µg/l, p=0.003; 130 µg/l vs. control, p<0.001, 130 µg/l vs. 100 µg/l, p<0.001). These results suggest that elevated 5-HT serum levels play a mediating role in NK cell function. As exercise has been shown to be involved in NK cell mobilization and redistribution, the influence of 5-HT should be investigated in ex vivo and in vivo experiments. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  3. Development of a co-culture of keratinocytes and immune cells for in vitro investigation of cutaneous sulfur mustard toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balszuweit, Frank; Menacher, Georg; Bloemeke, Brunhilde; Schmidt, Annette; Worek, Franz; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk

    2014-11-05

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent causing skin blistering, ulceration and delayed wound healing. Inflammation and extrinsic apoptosis are known to have an important role in SM-induced cytotoxicity. As immune cells are involved in those processes, they may significantly modulate SM toxicity, but the extent of those effects is unknown. We adapted a co-culture model of immortalized keratinocytes (HaCaT) and immune cells (THP-1) and exposed this model to SM. Changes in necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation, depending on SM challenge, absence or presence and number of THP-1 cells were investigated. THP-1 were co-cultured for 24h prior to SM exposure in order to model SM effects on immune cells continuously present in the skin. Our results indicate that the presence of THP-1 strongly increased necrosis, apoptosis and inflammation. This effect was already significant when the ratio of THP-1 and HaCaT cells was similar to the ratio of Langerhans immune cells and keratinocytes in vivo. Any further increases in the number of THP-1 had only slight additional effects on SM-induced cytotoxicity. In order to assess the effects of immune cells migrating into skin areas damaged by SM, we added non-exposed THP-1 to SM-exposed HaCaT. Those THP-1 had only slight effects on SM-induced cytotoxicity. Notably, in HaCaT exposed to 300μM SM, necrosis and inflammation were slightly reduced by adding intact THP-1. This effect was dependent on the number of immune cells, steadily increasing with the number of unexposed THP-1 added. In summary, we have demonstrated that (a) the presented co-culture is a robust model to assess SM toxicity and can be used to test the efficacy of potential antidotes in vitro; (b) immune cells, damaged by SM strongly amplified cytotoxicity, (c) in contrast, unexposed THP-1 (simulating migration of immune cells into affected areas after exposure in vivo) had no pronounced adverse, but exhibited some protective effects. Thus, protecting immune cells

  4. Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora caninum in Brazilian opossums (Didelphis spp.): Molecular investigation and in vitro isolation of Sarcocystis spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Leane S Q; Jesus, Rogério F; Ribeiro-Andrade, Müller; Silva, Jean C R; Siqueira, Daniel B; Marvulo, Maria F V; Aléssio, Felipe M; Mauffrey, Jean-François; Julião, Fred S; Savani, Elisa San Martin Mouriz; Soares, Rodrigo M; Gondim, Luís F P

    2017-08-30

    Sarcocystis neurona and Neospora spp. are protozoan parasites that induce neurological diseases in horses and other animal species. Opossums (Didelphis albiventris and Didelphis virginiana) are definitive hosts of S. neurona, which is the major cause of equine protozoal myeloencephalitis (EPM). Neospora caninum causes abortion in cattle and infects a wide range of animal species, while N. hughesi is known to induce neurologic disease in equids. The aims of this study were to investigate S. neurona and N. caninum in tissues from opossums in the northeastern Brazil, and to isolate Brazilian strains of Sarcocystis spp. from wild opossums for comparison with previously isolated strains. Carcasses of 39 opossums from Bahia state were available for molecular identification of Sarcocystis spp. and N. caninum in their tissues, and for sporocyst detection by intestinal scraping. In addition, Sarcocystis-like sporocysts from nine additional opossums, obtained in São Paulo state, were tested. Sarcocystis DNA was found in 16 (41%) of the 39 opossums' carcasses; N. caninum DNA was detected in tissues from three opossums. The sporocysts from the nine additional opossums from São Paulo state were tested by bioassay and induced infection in nine budgerigars, but in none of the gamma-interferon knockout mice. In vitro isolation was successful using tissues from all nine budgerigars. The isolated strains were maintained in CV-1 and Vero cells. Three of nine isolates presented contamination in cell culture and were discarded. Analysis of six isolates based on five loci showed that these parasites were genetically different from each other and also distinct from S. neurona, S. falcatula, S. lindsayi, and S. speeri. In conclusion, opossums in the studied regions were infected with N. caninum and Sarcocystis spp. and represent a potential source of infection to other animals. This is the first report of N. caninum infection in tissues from black-eared opossum (D. aurita or D

  5. Radiolabeling of NOTA and DOTA with Positron Emitting {sup 68}Ga and Investigation of In Vitro Properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, Yun Sang; Lee, Dong Soo; Chung, June Key; Lee, Myung Chul [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    We established radiolabeling conditions of NOTA and DOTA with a generator-produced PET radionuclide {sup 68}Ga and studied in vitro characteristics such as stability, serum protein binding, octanol/water distribution, and interference with other metal ions. Various concentrations of NOTA{center_dot}3HCl and DOTA{center_dot}4HCl were labeled with 1 mL {sup 68}GaCl{sub 3} (0.18{approx}5.75 mCi in 0.1 M HCl) in various pH. NOTA{center_dot}3HCl (0.373 mM) was labeled with {sup 68}GaCl{sub 3} (0.183{approx}0.232 mCi/0.1 M HCl 1.0 mL) in the presence of CuCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2}, InCl{sub 3}, FeCl{sub 3}, GaCl{sub 3}, MgCl{sub 2} or CaCl{sub 2} (0{approx}6.07 mM) at room temperature. The labeling efficiencies of {sup 68}Ga-NOTA and {sup 68}Ga-DOTA were checked by ITLC-SG using acetone or saline as mobile phase. Stabilities, protein bindings, and octanol distribution coefficients of the labeled compounds also were investigated. {sup 68}Ga-NOTA and {sup 68}Ga-DOTA were labeled optimally at pH 6.5 and pH 3.5, respectively, and the chelates were stable for 4 hr either in the reaction mixture at room temperature or in the human serum at 37 .deg. C. NOTA was labeled at room temperature while DOTA required heating for labeling. {sup 68}Ga-NOTA labeling efficiency was reduced by CuCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 2}, InCl{sub 2}, FeCl{sub 3} or GaCl{sub 3}, however, was not influenced by MgCl{sub 2} or CaCl{sub 2}. The protein binding was low (2.04{approx}3.32%). Log P value of {sup 68}Ga-NOTA was -3.07 indicating high hydrophilicity. We found that NOTA is a better bifunctional chelating agent than DOTA for {sup 68}Ga labeling. Although, {sup 68}Ga-NOTA labeling is interfered by various metal ions, it shows high stability and low serum protein binding.

  6. A three dimensional in vitro glial scar model to investigate the local strain effects from micromotion around neural implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Kevin C; Sy, Jay C; Falcón-Banchs, Roberto; Cima, Michael J

    2017-02-28

    Glial scar formation remains a significant barrier to the long term success of neural probes. Micromotion coupled with mechanical mismatch between the probe and tissue is believed to be a key driver of the inflammatory response. In vitro glial scar models present an intermediate step prior to conventional in vivo histology experiments as they enable cell-device interactions to be tested on a shorter timescale, with the ability to conduct broader biochemical assays. No established in vitro models have incorporated methods to assess device performance with respect to mechanical factors. In this study, we describe an in vitro glial scar model that combines high-precision linear actuators to simulate axial micromotion around neural implants with a 3D primary neural cell culture in a collagen gel. Strain field measurements were conducted to visualize the local displacement within the gel in response to micromotion. Primary brain cell cultures were found to be mechanically responsive to micromotion after one week in culture. Astrocytes, as determined by immunohistochemical staining, were found to have significantly increased in cell areas and perimeters in response to micromotion compared to static control wells. These results demonstrate the importance of micromotion when considering the chronic response to neural implants. Going forward, this model provides advantages over existing in vitro models as it will enable critical mechanical design factors of neural implants to be evaluated prior to in vivo testing.

  7. Investigating the effect of clamping force on the fatigue life of bolted plates using volumetric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esmaeili, F.; Chakherlou, T. N.; Zehsaz, M.; Hasanifard, S.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the effects of bolt clamping force on the fatigue life for bolted plates made from Al7075-T6 have been studied on the values of notch strength reduction factor obtained by volumetric approach. To attain stress distribution around the notch (hole) which is required for volumetric approach, nonlinear finite element simulations were carried out. To estimate the fatigue life, the available smooth S-N curve of Al7075-T6 and the notch strength reduction factor obtained from volumetric method were used. The estimated fatigue life was compared with the available experimental test results. The investigation shows that there is a good agreement between the life predicted by the volumetric approach and the experimental results for various specimens with different amount of clamping forces. Volumetric approach and experimental results showed that the fatigue life of bolted plates improves because of the compressive stresses created around the plate hole due to clamping force.

  8. The fitness landscape of HIV-1 gag: advanced modeling approaches and validation of model predictions by in vitro testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaclyn K Mann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Viral immune evasion by sequence variation is a major hindrance to HIV-1 vaccine design. To address this challenge, our group has developed a computational model, rooted in physics, that aims to predict the fitness landscape of HIV-1 proteins in order to design vaccine immunogens that lead to impaired viral fitness, thus blocking viable escape routes. Here, we advance the computational models to address previous limitations, and directly test model predictions against in vitro fitness measurements of HIV-1 strains containing multiple Gag mutations. We incorporated regularization into the model fitting procedure to address finite sampling. Further, we developed a model that accounts for the specific identity of mutant amino acids (Potts model, generalizing our previous approach (Ising model that is unable to distinguish between different mutant amino acids. Gag mutation combinations (17 pairs, 1 triple and 25 single mutations within these predicted to be either harmful to HIV-1 viability or fitness-neutral were introduced into HIV-1 NL4-3 by site-directed mutagenesis and replication capacities of these mutants were assayed in vitro. The predicted and measured fitness of the corresponding mutants for the original Ising model (r = -0.74, p = 3.6×10-6 are strongly correlated, and this was further strengthened in the regularized Ising model (r = -0.83, p = 3.7×10-12. Performance of the Potts model (r = -0.73, p = 9.7×10-9 was similar to that of the Ising model, indicating that the binary approximation is sufficient for capturing fitness effects of common mutants at sites of low amino acid diversity. However, we show that the Potts model is expected to improve predictive power for more variable proteins. Overall, our results support the ability of the computational models to robustly predict the relative fitness of mutant viral strains, and indicate the potential value of this approach for understanding viral immune evasion

  9. Complex spatial dynamics of oncolytic viruses in vitro: mathematical and experimental approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Wodarz

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses replicate selectively in tumor cells and can serve as targeted treatment agents. While promising results have been observed in clinical trials, consistent success of therapy remains elusive. The dynamics of virus spread through tumor cell populations has been studied both experimentally and computationally. However, a basic understanding of the principles underlying virus spread in spatially structured target cell populations has yet to be obtained. This paper studies such dynamics, using a newly constructed recombinant adenovirus type-5 (Ad5 that expresses enhanced jellyfish green fluorescent protein (EGFP, AdEGFPuci, and grows on human 293 embryonic kidney epithelial cells, allowing us to track cell numbers and spatial patterns over time. The cells are arranged in a two-dimensional setting and allow virus spread to occur only to target cells within the local neighborhood. Despite the simplicity of the setup, complex dynamics are observed. Experiments gave rise to three spatial patterns that we call "hollow ring structure", "filled ring structure", and "disperse pattern". An agent-based, stochastic computational model is used to simulate and interpret the experiments. The model can reproduce the experimentally observed patterns, and identifies key parameters that determine which pattern of virus growth arises. The model is further used to study the long-term outcome of the dynamics for the different growth patterns, and to investigate conditions under which the virus population eliminates the target cells. We find that both the filled ring structure and disperse pattern of initial expansion are indicative of treatment failure, where target cells persist in the long run. The hollow ring structure is associated with either target cell extinction or low-level persistence, both of which can be viewed as treatment success. Interestingly, it is found that equilibrium properties of ordinary differential equations describing the

  10. Management Approach for NASA's Earth Venture-1 (EV-1) Airborne Science Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Anthony R.; Denkins, Todd C.; Allen, B. Danette

    2013-01-01

    The Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP) Program Office (PO) is responsible for programmatic management of National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Science Mission Directorate's (SMD) Earth Venture (EV) missions. EV is composed of both orbital and suborbital Earth science missions. The first of the Earth Venture missions is EV-1, which are Principal Investigator-led, temporally-sustained, suborbital (airborne) science investigations costcapped at $30M each over five years. Traditional orbital procedures, processes and standards used to manage previous ESSP missions, while effective, are disproportionally comprehensive for suborbital missions. Conversely, existing airborne practices are primarily intended for smaller, temporally shorter investigations, and traditionally managed directly by a program scientist as opposed to a program office such as ESSP. In 2010, ESSP crafted a management approach for the successful implementation of the EV-1 missions within the constructs of current governance models. NASA Research and Technology Program and Project Management Requirements form the foundation of the approach for EV-1. Additionally, requirements from other existing NASA Procedural Requirements (NPRs), systems engineering guidance and management handbooks were adapted to manage programmatic, technical, schedule, cost elements and risk. As the EV-1 missions are nearly at the end of their successful execution and project lifecycle and the submission deadline of the next mission proposals near, the ESSP PO is taking the lessons learned and updated the programmatic management approach for all future Earth Venture Suborbital (EVS) missions for an even more flexible and streamlined management approach.

  11. Synergistic drug-cytokine induction of hepatocellular death as an in vitro approach for the study of inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosgrove, Benjamin D.; King, Bracken M.; Hasan, Maya A.; Alexopoulos, Leonidas G.; Farazi, Paraskevi A.; Hendriks, Bart S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Sorger, Peter K.; Tidor, Bruce; Xu, Jinghai J.

    2009-01-01

    Idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity represents a major problem in drug development due to inadequacy of current preclinical screening assays, but recently established rodent models utilizing bacterial LPS co-administration to induce an inflammatory background have successfully reproduced idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity signatures for certain drugs. However, the low-throughput nature of these models renders them problematic for employment as preclinical screening assays. Here, we present an analogous, but high-throughput, in vitro approach in which drugs are administered to a variety of cell types (primary human and rat hepatocytes and the human HepG2 cell line) across a landscape of inflammatory contexts containing LPS and cytokines TNF, IFNγ, IL-1α, and IL-6. Using this assay, we observed drug-cytokine hepatotoxicity synergies for multiple idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (ranitidine, trovafloxacin, nefazodone, nimesulide, clarithromycin, and telithromycin) but not for their corresponding non-toxic control compounds (famotidine, levofloxacin, buspirone, and aspirin). A larger compendium of drug-cytokine mix hepatotoxicity data demonstrated that hepatotoxicity synergies were largely potentiated by TNF, IL-1α, and LPS within the context of multi-cytokine mixes. Then, we screened 90 drugs for cytokine synergy in human hepatocytes and found that a significantly larger fraction of the idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants (19%) synergized with a single cytokine mix than did the non-hepatotoxic drugs (3%). Finally, we used an information theoretic approach to ascertain especially informative subsets of cytokine treatments for most highly effective construction of regression models for drug- and cytokine mix-induced hepatotoxicities across these cell systems. Our results suggest that this drug-cytokine co-treatment approach could provide a useful preclinical tool for investigating inflammation-associated idiosyncratic drug hepatotoxicity.

  12. Novel approach to integrated DNA adductomics for the assessment of in vitro and in vivo environmental exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yuan-Jhe; Cooke, Marcus S; Hu, Chiung-Wen; Chao, Mu-Rong

    2018-06-25

    Adductomics is expected to be useful in the characterization of the exposome, which is a new paradigm for studying the sum of environmental causes of diseases. DNA adductomics is emerging as a powerful method for detecting DNA adducts, but reliable assays for its widespread, routine use are currently lacking. We propose a novel integrated strategy for the establishment of a DNA adductomic approach, using liquid chromatography-triple quadrupole tandem mass spectrometry (LC-QqQ-MS/MS), operating in constant neutral loss scan mode, screening for both known and unknown DNA adducts in a single injection. The LC-QqQ-MS/MS was optimized using a representative sample of 23 modified 2'-deoxyribonucleosides reflecting a range of biologically relevant DNA lesions. Six internal standards (ISTDs) were evaluated for their ability to normalize, and hence correct, possible variation in peak intensities arising from matrix effects, and the quantities of DNA injected. The results revealed that, with appropriate ISTDs adjustment, any bias can be dramatically reduced from 370 to 8.4%. Identification of the informative DNA adducts was achieved by triggering fragmentation spectra of target ions. The LC-QqQ-MS/MS method was successfully applied to in vitro and in vivo studies to screen for DNA adducts formed following representative environmental exposures: methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) and five N-nitrosamines. Interestingly, five new DNA adducts, induced by MMS, were discovered using our adductomic approach-an added strength. The proposed integrated strategy provides a path forward for DNA adductomics to become a standard method to discover differences in DNA adduct fingerprints between populations exposed to genotoxins, and facilitate the field of exposomics.

  13. Cooking temperature is a key determinant of in vitro meat protein digestion rate: investigation of underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bax, Marie-Laure; Aubry, Laurent; Ferreira, Claude; Daudin, Jean-Dominique; Gatellier, Philippe; Rémond, Didier; Santé-Lhoutellier, Véronique

    2012-03-14

    The present study aimed to evaluate the digestion rate and nutritional quality of pig muscle proteins in relation to different meat processes (aging, mincing, and cooking). Under our experimental conditions, aging and mincing had little impact on protein digestion. Heat treatments had different temperature-dependent effects on the meat protein digestion rate and degradation potential. At 70 °C, the proteins underwent denaturation that enhanced the speed of pepsin digestion by increasing enzyme accessibility to protein cleavage sites. Above 100 °C, oxidation-related protein aggregation slowed pepsin digestion but improved meat protein overall digestibility. The digestion parameters defined here open new insights on the dynamics governing the in vitro digestion of meat protein. However, the effect of cooking temperature on protein digestion observed in vitro needs to be confirmed in vivo.

  14. Investigating the correlation between in vivo absorption and in vitro release of fenofibrate from lipid matrix particles in biorelevant medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkar, Nrupa Nitin; Xia, Dengning; Holm, René

    2014-01-01

    Lipid matrix particles (LMP) may be used as better carriers for poorly water-soluble drugs than liquid lipid carriers because of reduced drug mobilization in the formulations. However, the digestion process of solid lipid particles and their effect on the absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs......-soluble drug, was incorporated into LMP in this study using probe ultrasound sonication. The resultant LMP were characterised in terms of particle size, size distribution, zeta potential, entrapment efficiency, in vitro lipolysis and in vivo absorption in rat model. LMP of three different particle sizes i.......e. approximately 100 nm, 400 nm, and 10 μm (microparticles) were produced with high entrapment efficiencies. The in vitro lipolysis study showed that the recovery of fenofibrate in the aqueous phase for 100 nm and 400 nm LMP was significantly higher (p

  15. A tan in a test tube - in vitro models for investigating ultraviolet radiation-induced damage in skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Tara L; Dawson, Rebecca A; Van Lonkhuyzen, Derek R; Kimlin, Michael G; Upton, Zee

    2012-06-01

    Presently, global rates of skin cancers induced by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure are on the rise. In view of this, current knowledge gaps in the biology of photocarcinogenesis and skin cancer progression urgently need to be addressed. One factor that has limited skin cancer research has been the need for a reproducible and physiologically-relevant model able to represent the complexity of human skin. This review outlines the main currently-used in vitro models of UVR-induced skin damage. This includes the use of conventional two-dimensional cell culture techniques and the major animal models that have been employed in photobiology and photocarcinogenesis research. Additionally, the progression towards the use of cultured skin explants and tissue-engineered skin constructs, and their utility as models of native skin's responses to UVR are described. The inherent advantages and disadvantages of these in vitro systems are also discussed. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  16. Study on geological environment in the Tono area. An approach to surface-based investigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-12-01

    Mizunami Underground Research (MIU) Project has aimed at preparation of basis of investigation, analysis and evaluation of geology of deep underground and basis of engineering technologies of ultra deep underground. This report stated an approach and information of surface-based investigation for ground water flow system and MIU Project by the following contents, 1) objects and preconditions, 2) information of geological environment for analysis of material transition and design of borehole, 3) modeling, 4) tests and investigations and 5) concept of investigation. The reference data consists of results of studies such as the geological construction model, topography, geologic map, structural map, linear structure and estimated fault, permeability, underground stream characteristics, the quality of underground water and rock mechanics. (S.Y.)

  17. Development of a Combined In Vitro Physiologically Based Kinetic (PBK) and Monte Carlo Modelling Approach to Predict Interindividual Human Variation in Phenol-Induced Developmental Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strikwold, Marije; Spenkelink, Bert; Woutersen, Ruud A; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Punt, Ans

    2017-06-01

    With our recently developed in vitro physiologically based kinetic (PBK) modelling approach, we could extrapolate in vitro toxicity data to human toxicity values applying PBK-based reverse dosimetry. Ideally information on kinetic differences among human individuals within a population should be considered. In the present study, we demonstrated a modelling approach that integrated in vitro toxicity data, PBK modelling and Monte Carlo simulations to obtain insight in interindividual human kinetic variation and derive chemical specific adjustment factors (CSAFs) for phenol-induced developmental toxicity. The present study revealed that UGT1A6 is the primary enzyme responsible for the glucuronidation of phenol in humans followed by UGT1A9. Monte Carlo simulations were performed taking into account interindividual variation in glucuronidation by these specific UGTs and in the oral absorption coefficient. Linking Monte Carlo simulations with PBK modelling, population variability in the maximum plasma concentration of phenol for the human population could be predicted. This approach provided a CSAF for interindividual variation of 2.0 which covers the 99th percentile of the population, which is lower than the default safety factor of 3.16 for interindividual human kinetic differences. Dividing the dose-response curve data obtained with in vitro PBK-based reverse dosimetry, with the CSAF provided a dose-response curve that reflects the consequences of the interindividual variability in phenol kinetics for the developmental toxicity of phenol. The strength of the presented approach is that it provides insight in the effect of interindividual variation in kinetics for phenol-induced developmental toxicity, based on only in vitro and in silico testing. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. An approach for investigation of secure access processes at a combined e-learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romansky, Radi; Noninska, Irina

    2017-12-01

    The article discuses an approach to investigate processes for regulation the security and privacy control at a heterogenous e-learning environment realized as a combination of traditional and cloud means and tools. Authors' proposal for combined architecture of e-learning system is presented and main subsystems and procedures are discussed. A formalization of the processes for using different types resources (public, private internal and private external) is proposed. The apparatus of Markovian chains (MC) is used for modeling and analytical investigation of the secure access to the resources is used and some assessments are presented.

  19. Integrated investigation approach for determining mechanical properties of poly-silicon membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Brueckner, J.; Dehe, A.; Auerswald, E.; Dudek, R.; Michel, B.; Rzepka, S.

    2014-01-01

    A methodology is presented for determining mechanical properties of free-standing thin films such as poly-silicon membranes. The integrated investigation approach comprises test structure development, mechanical testing, and numerical simulation. All membrane test structures developed and manufactured consist of the same material but have different stiffness due to variations in the geometric design. The mechanical tests apply microscopic loads utilizing a nanoindentation tool. Young's modulu...

  20. Tumor Microenvironment In Experimental Models Of Human Cancer: Morphological Investigational Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia Minoli

    2017-05-01

    Discussion and conclusions. Due to the microenvironmental heterogeneity which influence tumor development and biological behavior, a sole quantification is unreliable for characterizing the TME. Considering that, morphological techniques proved to be a valuable approach, allowing the evaluation of the spatial distribution and mutual interaction between the different elements. Additional studies are needed for further investigate the biological significance of spatial distribution of the components of the TME.

  1. A study to evaluate the potential of an in silico approach for predicting dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory activity in vitro of protein hydrolysates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tzu-Yuan; Hsieh, Cheng-Hong; Hung, Chuan-Chuan; Jao, Chia-Ling; Lin, Pei-Yi; Hsieh, You-Liang; Hsu, Kuo-Chiang

    2017-11-01

    A total of 294 edible protein sequences and 5 commercial proteases listed in the BIOPEP database were analyzed in silico. The frequency (A), a parameter in silico described previously, was examined further to calculating the ratio of truncated peptides with Xaa-proline and/or Xaa-alanine to all peptide fragments in a protein hydrolyzed with a protease, using the BIOPEP database. Then the in vitro DPP-IV inhibitory activity was determined using the same 15 protein and protease combinations to evaluate their relationship. The result shows that A values considering the number of Xaa-proline+Xaa-alanine exhibited a strong correlation with in vitro DPP-IV inhibition rates by Pearson's correlation analysis (r=0.6993; Psilico approach is effective to predict DPP-IV inhibitory activities in vitro of protein hydrolysates. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating an approach to the alliance based on interpersonal defense theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westerman, Michael A; Muran, J Christopher

    2017-09-01

    Notwithstanding consistent findings of significant relationships between the alliance and outcome, questions remain to be answered about the relatively small magnitude of those correlations, the mechanisms underlying the association, and how to conceptualize the alliance construct. We conducted a preliminary study of an approach to the alliance based on interpersonal defense theory, which is an interpersonal reconceptualization of defense processes, to investigate the promise of this alternative approach as a way to address the outstanding issues. We employed qualitative, theory-building case study methodology, closely examining alliance processes at four time points in the treatment of a case in terms of a case formulation based on interpersonal defense theory. The results suggested that our approach made it possible to recognize key processes in the alliance and that it helps explain how the alliance influences outcome. Our analyses also provided a rich set of concrete illustrations of the alliance phenomena identified by the theory. The findings suggest that an approach to the alliance based on interpersonal defense theory holds promise. However, although the qualitative method we employed has advantages, it also has limitations. We offer suggestions about how future qualitative and quantitative investigations could build on this study.

  3. Earthworms and in vitro physiologically-based extraction tests: complementary tools for a holistic approach towards understanding risk at arsenic-contaminated sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Button, Mark; Watts, Michael J; Cave, Mark R; Harrington, Chris F; Jenkin, Gawen T

    2009-04-01

    The relationship of the total arsenic content of a soil and its bioaccumulation by earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Dendrodrilus rubidus) to the arsenic fraction bioaccessible to humans, measured using an in vitro physiologically-based extraction test (PBET), was investigated. Soil and earthworm samples were collected at 24 sites at the former arsenic mine at the Devon Great Consols (DGC) in southwest England (UK), along with an uncontaminated site in Nottingham, UK, for comparison. Analysis of soil and earthworm total arsenic via inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was performed following a mixed acid digestion. Arsenic concentrations in the soil were elevated (204-9,025 mg kg(-1)) at DGC. The arsenic bioaccumulation factor (BAF) for both earthworm species was found to correlate positively with the human bioaccessible fraction (HBF), although the correlation was only significant (P earthworms as complementary tools is explored as a holistic and multidisciplinary approach towards understanding risk at contaminated sites. Arsenic resistant earthworm species such as the L. rubellus populations at DGC are presented as a valuable tool for understanding risk at highly contaminated sites.

  4. An in vitro metabolomics approach to identify hepatotoxicity biomarkers in human L02 liver cells treated with pekinenal, a natural compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jiexia; Zhou, Jing; Ma, Hongyue; Guo, Hongbo; Ni, Zuyao; Duan, Jin'ao; Tao, Weiwei; Qian, Dawei

    2016-02-01

    An in vitro cell metabolomics study was performed on human L02 liver cells to investigate the toxic biomarkers of pekinenal from the herb Euphorbia pekinensis Rupr. Pekinenal significantly induced L02 cell damage, which was characterised by necrosis and apoptosis. Metabolomics combined with data pattern recognition showed that pekinenal significantly altered the profiles of more than 1299 endogenous metabolites with variable importance in the projection (VIP) > 1. Further, screening correlation coefficients between the intensities of all metabolites and the extent of L02 cell damage (MTT) identified 12 biomarker hits: ten were downregulated and two were upregulated. Among these hits, LysoPC(18:1(9Z)/(11Z)), PC(22:0/15:0) and PC(20:1(11Z)/14:1(9Z)) were disordered, implying the initiation of inflammation and cell damage. Several fatty acids (FAs) (3-hydroxytetradecanedioic acid, pivaloylcarnitine and eicosapentaenoyl ethanolamide) decreased due to fatty acid oxidation. Dihydroceramide and Cer(d18:0/14:0) were also altered and are associated with apoptosis. Additional examination of the levels of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and two eicosanoids (PGE2, PGF2α) in the cell supernatant confirmed the fatty acid oxidation and arachidonic acid metabolism pathways, respectively. In summary, cell metabolomics is a highly efficient approach for identifying toxic biomarkers and helping understand toxicity mechanisms and predict herb-induced liver injury.

  5. Safety profile of solid lipid nanoparticles loaded with rosmarinic acid for oral use: in vitro and animal approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madureira AR

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ana Raquel Madureira,1 Sara Nunes,2 Débora A Campos,1 João C Fernandes,2 Cláudia Marques,3 Monica Zuzarte,2 Beatriz Gullón,1 Luís M Rodríguez-Alcalá,1 Conceição Calhau,3,4 Bruno Sarmento,5–7 Ana Maria Gomes,1 Maria Manuela Pintado,1 Flávio Reis2 1Catholic University of Portugal, CBQF – Center for Biotechnology and Fine Chemistry – Associate Laboratory, Faculty of Biotechnology, Porto, Portugal; 2Laboratory of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Life Sciences (IBILI, Faculty of Medicine, and CNC.IBILI Consortium, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal; 3Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 4Center for Health Technology and Services Research (CINTESIS, Porto, Portugal; 5Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Institute of Health Sciences-North, CESPU, Gandra, Portugal; 6“I3S” Instituto de Investigação e Inovação em Saúde, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal; 7INEB, Institute of Biomedical Engineering, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal Abstract: Rosmarinic acid (RA possesses several protective bioactivities that have attracted increasing interest by nutraceutical/pharmaceutical industries. Considering the reduced bioavailability after oral use, effective (and safe delivery systems are crucial to protect RA from gastrointestinal degradation. This study aims to characterize the safety profile of solid lipid nanoparticles produced with Witepsol and Carnauba waxes and loaded with RA, using in vitro and in vivo approaches, focused on genotoxicity and cytotoxicity assays, redox status markers, hematological and biochemical profile, liver and kidney function, gut bacterial microbiota, and fecal fatty acids composition. Free RA and sage extract, empty nanoparticles, or nanoparticles loaded with RA or sage extract (0.15 and 1.5 mg/mL were evaluated for cell (lymphocytes viability, necrosis and apoptosis, and antioxidant

  6. Studying inhibition of calcium oxalate stone formation: an in vitro approach for screening hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Vaitheeswari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTPurpose:Calcium oxalate urolithiasis is one of the most common urinary tract diseases and is of high prevalence. The present study proposes to evaluate the antilithiatic property of hydrogen sulfide and its metabolites like thiosulfate & sulfate in an in vitro model.Materials and Methods:The antilithiatic activity of sodium hydrogen sulfide (NaSH, sodium thiosulfate (Na2S2O3 and sodium sulfate (Na2SO4 on the kinetics of calcium oxalate crystal formation was investigated both in physiological buffer and in urine from normal and recurrent stone forming volunteers. The stones were characterized by optical and spectroscopic techniques.Results:The stones were characterized to be monoclinic, prismatic and bipyramidal habit which is of calcium monohydrate and dihydrate nature. The FTIR displayed fingerprint corresponding to calcium oxalate in the control while in NaSH treated, S=O vibrations were visible in the spectrum. The order of percentage inhibition was NaSH>Na2S2O3>Na2SO4.Conclusion:Our study indicates that sodium hydrogen sulfide and its metabolite thiosulfate are inhibitors of calcium oxalate stone agglomeration which makes them unstable both in physiological buffer and in urine. This effect is attributed to pH changes and complexing of calcium by S2O32-and SO42- moiety produced by the test compounds.

  7. Acellular therapeutic approach for heart failure: in vitro production of extracellular vesicles from human cardiovascular progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Harane, Nadia; Kervadec, Anaïs; Bellamy, Valérie; Pidial, Laetitia; Neametalla, Hany J; Perier, Marie-Cécile; Lima Correa, Bruna; Thiébault, Léa; Cagnard, Nicolas; Duché, Angéline; Brunaud, Camille; Lemitre, Mathilde; Gauthier, Jeanne; Bourdillon, Alexandra T; Renault, Marc P; Hovhannisyan, Yeranuhi; Paiva, Solenne; Colas, Alexandre R; Agbulut, Onnik; Hagège, Albert; Silvestre, Jean-Sébastien; Menasché, Philippe; Renault, Nisa K E

    2018-05-21

    We have shown that extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted by embryonic stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitor cells (Pg) recapitulate the therapeutic effects of their parent cells in a mouse model of chronic heart failure (CHF). Our objectives are to investigate whether EV released by more readily available cell sources are therapeutic, whether their effectiveness is influenced by the differentiation state of the secreting cell, and through which mechanisms they act. The total EV secreted by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiovascular progenitors (iPSC-Pg) and human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CM) were isolated by ultracentrifugation and characterized by Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis, western blot, and cryo-electron microscopy. In vitro bioactivity assays were used to evaluate their cellular effects. Cell and EV microRNA (miRNA) content were assessed by miRNA array. Myocardial infarction was induced in 199 nude mice. Three weeks later, mice with left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ≤ 45% received transcutaneous echo-guided injections of iPSC-CM (1.4 × 106, n = 19), iPSC-Pg (1.4 × 106, n = 17), total EV secreted by 1.4 × 106 iPSC-Pg (n = 19), or phosphate-buffered saline (control, n = 17) into the peri-infarct myocardium. Seven weeks later, hearts were evaluated by echocardiography, histology, and gene expression profiling, blinded to treatment group. In vitro, EV were internalized by target cells, increased cell survival, cell proliferation, and endothelial cell migration in a dose-dependent manner and stimulated tube formation. Extracellular vesicles were rich in miRNAs and most of the 16 highly abundant, evolutionarily conserved miRNAs are associated with tissue-repair pathways. In vivo, EV outperformed cell injections, significantly improving cardiac function through decreased left ventricular volumes (left ventricular end systolic volume: -11%, P < 0.001; left

  8. Methodological factors affecting gas and methane production during in vitro rumen fermentation evaluated by meta-analysis approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccarana, Laura; Cattani, Mirko; Tagliapietra, Franco; Schiavon, Stefano; Bailoni, Lucia; Mantovani, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Effects of some methodological factors on in vitro measures of gas production (GP, mL/g DM), CH4 production (mL/g DM) and proportion (% CH4 on total GP) were investigated by meta-analysis. These factors were considered: pressure in the GP equipment (0 = constant; 1 = increasing), incubation time (0 = 24; 1 = ≥ 48 h), time of rumen fluid collection (0 = before feeding; 1 = after feeding of donor animals), donor species of rumen fluid (0 = sheep; 1 = bovine), presence of N in the buffer solution (0 = presence; 1 = absence), and ratio between amount of buffered rumen fluid and feed sample (BRF/FS; 0 = ≤ 130 mL/g DM; 1 = 130-140 mL/g DM; 2 = ≥ 140 mL/g DM). The NDF content of feed sample incubated (NDF) was considered as a continuous variable. From an initial database of 105 papers, 58 were discarded because one of the above-mentioned factors was not stated. After discarding 17 papers, the final dataset comprised 30 papers (339 observations). A preliminary mixed model analysis was carried out on experimental data considering the study as random factor. Variables adjusted for study effect were analyzed using a backward stepwise analysis including the above-mentioned variables. The analysis showed that the extension of incubation time and reduction of NDF increased GP and CH4 values. Values of GP and CH4 also increased when rumen fluid was collected after feeding compared to before feeding (+26.4 and +9.0 mL/g DM, for GP and CH4), from bovine compared to sheep (+32.8 and +5.2 mL/g DM, for GP and CH4), and when the buffer solution did not contain N (+24.7 and +6.7 mL/g DM for GP and CH4). The increase of BRF/FS ratio enhanced GP and CH4 production (+7.7 and +3.3 mL/g DM per each class of increase, respectively). In vitro techniques for measuring GP and CH4 production are mostly used as screening methods, thus a full standardization of such techniques is not feasible. However, a greater harmonization

  9. Investigating the in vitro and in vivo angiogenic activity of five Philippine medicinal plants associated with wound healing properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacson, Mona Lisa B.; Macahig, Rene Angelo S.; Rojas, Nina Rosario L.

    2015-01-01

    Plants have been used since time immemorial to treat many ailments and speed up healing process. Plant parts and extracts have been traditionally used to heal wounds. Angiogenesis is one of the events associated with wound healing. It is a tightly regulated process of blood vessel formation and an important target for diseases like coronary infarction, ischemia and stroke. Several in vitro and in vivo methods have been developed to assess the angiogenic activity of different compounds. These include the chorio-allantaoic membrane (CAM) assay which uses the egg's gas exchange membrane to assess the angiogenic potential of a substance and the tube formation assay which uses endothelial cells grown in the lab. Aqueous ethanolic extracts of five Philippine medicinal plants associated with wound healing were used in the study. Preliminary phytochemical screening using spray raegents and toxicity test using brine shrimp (Artemia salina) nauplii was done. 10% of the computed LC 5 0 value was used to screen the angiogenic potential of the plant extracts using human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in an in vitro tube formation assay and in vivo chorio-allantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Phorbol myristate (PMA) a known pro-angiogenic compound was used as positive control. Initial phytochemical screening showed that the crude enthanolic extracts of the leaves of the five contain flavonoids, steroids, phenols, saponins, alkanoids, coumarins, anthranoids, anthraquinones, sugars and essential oils. Brine shrimp lethality assay revealed that the plants used were not toxic to Artemia salina nauplii at 1000 μg/mL. In vitro tube formation assay revealed the crude ethanolic extracts of the leaves of M. indica showed the greatest angiogenic activity, closely followed by C. pubescens, T. catappa, A. barbadensis and C. odorata. The effect of the crude ethanolic extracts of the plants on blood vessel formation in the in vivo CAM model showed A. barbadensis with the highest

  10. [The investigation of genomes of some species of the genus Gentiana in nature and in vitro cell culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nyk, V M; Spiridonova, K V; Andrieiev, I O; Strashniuk, N M; Kunakh, V A

    2002-01-01

    The comparative study of the genomes of intact plants-representatives of some species of the genus Gentiana L. as well as cultured cells of G. lutea and G. punctata was performed using restriction analysis. Species specificity of restriction fragment patterns for studied representatives of this genus was revealed. The differences between electrophoretic patterns of digested DNA purified from rhizome and leaves of G. lutea and G. punctata were found. The changes in genomes of G. lutea and G. punctata cells cultured in vitro compared with the genomes of intact plants were detected. The data obtained evidence that some of them may be of nonrandom character.

  11. Human in vitro 3D co-culture model to engineer vascularized bone-mimicking tissues combining computational tools and statistical experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bersini, Simone; Gilardi, Mara; Arrigoni, Chiara; Talò, Giuseppe; Zamai, Moreno; Zagra, Luigi; Caiolfa, Valeria; Moretti, Matteo

    2016-01-01

    The generation of functional, vascularized tissues is a key challenge for both tissue engineering applications and the development of advanced in vitro models analyzing interactions among circulating cells, endothelium and organ-specific microenvironments. Since vascularization is a complex process guided by multiple synergic factors, it is critical to analyze the specific role that different experimental parameters play in the generation of physiological tissues. Our goals were to design a novel meso-scale model bridging the gap between microfluidic and macro-scale studies, and high-throughput screen the effects of multiple variables on the vascularization of bone-mimicking tissues. We investigated the influence of endothelial cell (EC) density (3-5 Mcells/ml), cell ratio among ECs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and osteo-differentiated MSCs (1:1:0, 10:1:0, 10:1:1), culture medium (endothelial, endothelial + angiopoietin-1, 1:1 endothelial/osteo), hydrogel type (100%fibrin, 60%fibrin+40%collagen), tissue geometry (2 × 2 × 2, 2 × 2 × 5 mm(3)). We optimized the geometry and oxygen gradient inside hydrogels through computational simulations and we analyzed microvascular network features including total network length/area and vascular branch number/length. Particularly, we employed the "Design of Experiment" statistical approach to identify key differences among experimental conditions. We combined the generation of 3D functional tissue units with the fine control over the local microenvironment (e.g. oxygen gradients), and developed an effective strategy to enable the high-throughput screening of multiple experimental parameters. Our approach allowed to identify synergic correlations among critical parameters driving microvascular network development within a bone-mimicking environment and could be translated to any vascularized tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In vitro cytochrome P450 inhibition potential of methylenedioxy-derived designer drugs studied with a two-cocktail approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Julia; Meyer, Markus R; Maurer, Hans H

    2016-02-01

    In vitro cytochrome P450 (CYP) inhibition assays are common approaches for testing the inhibition potential of drugs for predicting potential interactions. In contrast to marketed medicaments, drugs of abuse, particularly the so-called novel psychoactive substances, were not tested before distribution and consumption. Therefore, the inhibition potential of methylenedioxy-derived designer drugs (MDD) of different drug classes such as aminoindanes, amphetamines, benzofurans, cathinones, piperazines, pyrrolidinophenones, and tryptamines should be elucidated. The FDA-preferred test substrates, split in two cocktails, were incubated with pooled human liver microsomes and analysed after protein precipitation using LC-high-resolution-MS/MS. IC50 values were determined of MDD showing more than 50 % inhibition in the prescreening. Values were calculated by plotting the relative metabolite concentration formed over the logarithm of the inhibitor concentration. All MDD showed inhibition against CYP2D6 activity and most of them in the range of the clinically relevant CYP2D6 inhibitors quinidine and fluoxetine. In addition, the beta-keto compounds showed inhibition of the activity of CYP2B6, 5,6-MD-DALT of CYP1A2 and CYP3A, and MDAI of CYP2A6, all in the range of clinically relevant inhibitors. In summary, all MDD showed inhibition of the activity of CYP2D6, six of CYP1A2, three of CYP2A6, 13 of CYP2B6, two of CYP2C9, six of CYP2C19, one of CYP2E1, and six of CYP3A. These results showed that the CYP inhibition by MDD might be clinically relevant, but further studies are needed for final conclusions.

  13. Nanobiotechnology approach using plant rooting hormone synthesized silver nanoparticle as “nanobullets” for the dynamic applications in horticulture – An in vitro and ex vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Muthuramalingam Thangavelu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Horticulture is the branch of agriculture that deals with science and technology and business of plant cultivation and it is considered to be the foremost part of the world economy. Even though, one of the major challenges which has seriously influenced the economic loss of horticulture is rooting of cuttings and root growth inhibiting plant pathogens. To address this issue through nanobiotechnology, we ingeniously build a concept of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs as “nano-bullets” can act for a dual mode like root enhancer and pathogen destroyer on the target site. After that, we succeeded in AgNPs synthesis, using two auxin rooting hormones of Indole-3-acetic acid and Indole-3-butyric acid as a reducing cum stabilizing agent. Further, its efficacy of root promoting and pathogen inhibitory action was sufficiently validated through in vitro and ex vitro studies with model plants and plant pathogens. As a result, the action duality of hormone-stabilized AgNPs was manifested to threefold enhanced root growth compared to controls and it increased the rooting capabilities against root growth inhibiting phytopathogens. This feature was also proved by the direct antifungal assay. Moreover, hormone-AgNPs left no toxicity to treated plants which was revealed by RAPD molecular markers. Therefore, with a detailed study and analysis with instruments such as Spectroscopy, TEM, Zetasizer, FTIR, Cyclic Voltammetry, Fluorescence microscopy (nanoparticles uptake, SEM coupled with EDS (bioaccumulation, TGA (grafting density and PCR (RAPD analysis, this study can unravel the relevance, scope and current challenges at horticulture plants root development and plant disease management for the sustainable agricultural crop production.

  14. The ethological approach as a new way of investigating behavioural health in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafforin, Carole

    2011-04-01

    From an interdisciplinary perspective, the goal of our research in human ethology is to investigate the adaptive dynamics of small groups in isolation and confinement with a particular emphasis on unexplored environments, from circumpolar missions on earth to interplanetary missions in space. The ethological observations were designed to monitor the polar teams on the Subantarctic islands, the Antarctic continent and the Arctic Ocean. The working hypothesis viewed the periodic changes in the groups' organization as optimal behavioural strategies in extreme living and working conditions. The general methodological feature is a quantitative description of observable events based on the motor activity of individuals, interactions and communications among individuals and spatial mapping in collective areas. We observed group organization, group disorganization and group reorganization over extended time periods in the polar stations. Cultural grouping and gender-based individualities were observed as well. Focusing on the Tara Expedition in the Arctic, we observed variations in spatial indicators, including inter-individual positions, and in temporal indicators, like collective times, as behavioural strategies for preventing the monotony of social life. The ethological approach, using non-invasive techniques of observation, description and quantification of spontaneous human behaviour, offers an innovative and complementary tool for sociocultural approaches, enhancing the knowledge of contemporary circumpolar micro-societies. With the changing of environmental context, the Arctic natives would undertake changes in their group organization for maintaining their behavioural health. Such social adaptation could be investigated with this new approach in the field.

  15. Challenges and Approaches to Statistical Design and Inference in High Dimensional Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, Karen A.; Allison, David B.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Advances in modern technologies have facilitated high-dimensional experiments (HDEs) that generate tremendous amounts of genomic, proteomic, and other “omic” data. HDEs involving whole-genome sequences and polymorphisms, expression levels of genes, protein abundance measurements, and combinations thereof have become a vanguard for new analytic approaches to the analysis of HDE data. Such situations demand creative approaches to the processes of statistical inference, estimation, prediction, classification, and study design. The novel and challenging biological questions asked from HDE data have resulted in many specialized analytic techniques being developed. This chapter discusses some of the unique statistical challenges facing investigators studying high-dimensional biology, and describes some approaches being developed by statistical scientists. We have included some focus on the increasing interest in questions involving testing multiple propositions simultaneously, appropriate inferential indicators for the types of questions biologists are interested in, and the need for replication of results across independent studies, investigators, and settings. A key consideration inherent throughout is the challenge in providing methods that a statistician judges to be sound and a biologist finds informative. PMID:19588106

  16. Challenges and approaches to statistical design and inference in high-dimensional investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadbury, Gary L; Garrett, Karen A; Allison, David B

    2009-01-01

    Advances in modern technologies have facilitated high-dimensional experiments (HDEs) that generate tremendous amounts of genomic, proteomic, and other "omic" data. HDEs involving whole-genome sequences and polymorphisms, expression levels of genes, protein abundance measurements, and combinations thereof have become a vanguard for new analytic approaches to the analysis of HDE data. Such situations demand creative approaches to the processes of statistical inference, estimation, prediction, classification, and study design. The novel and challenging biological questions asked from HDE data have resulted in many specialized analytic techniques being developed. This chapter discusses some of the unique statistical challenges facing investigators studying high-dimensional biology and describes some approaches being developed by statistical scientists. We have included some focus on the increasing interest in questions involving testing multiple propositions simultaneously, appropriate inferential indicators for the types of questions biologists are interested in, and the need for replication of results across independent studies, investigators, and settings. A key consideration inherent throughout is the challenge in providing methods that a statistician judges to be sound and a biologist finds informative.

  17. Investigations of contaminated fluvial sediment deposits: merging of statistical and geomorphic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryti, Randall T; Reneau, Steven L; Katzman, Danny

    2005-05-01

    Concentrations of contaminants in sediment deposits can have large spatial variability resulting from geomorphic processes acting over long time periods. Thus, systematic (e.g., regularly spaced sample locations) or random sampling approaches might be inefficient and/or lead to highly biased results. We demonstrate the bias associated with systematic sampling and compare these results to those achieved by methods that merge a geomorphic approach to evaluating the physical system and stratified random sampling concepts. By combining these approaches, we achieve a more efficient and less biased characterization of sediment contamination in fluvial systems. These methods are applied using a phased sampling approach to characterize radiological contamination in sediment deposits in two semiarid canyons that have received historical releases from the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Uncertainty in contaminant inventory was used as a metric to evaluate the adequacy of sampling during these phased investigations. Simple, one-dimensional Monte Carlo simulations were used to estimate uncertainty in contaminant inventory. We also show how one can use stratified random sampling theory to help estimate uncertainty in mean contaminant concentrations.

  18. Priorities and approaches to investigating Asian youth health: perspectives of young Asian New Zealanders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Agnes; Peiris-John, Roshini; Sobrun-Maharaj, Amritha; Ameratunga, Shanthi

    2015-12-01

    The proportion of young people in New Zealand identifying with Asian ethnicities has increased considerably. Despite some prevalent health concerns, Asian youth are less likely than non-Asian peers to seek help. As preparatory research towards a more nuanced approach to service delivery and public policy, this qualitative study aimed to identify young Asian New Zealanders' perspectives on best approaches to investigate health issues of priority concern to them. Three semi-structured focus group discussions were conducted with 15 Asian youth leaders aged 18-24 years. Using an inductive approach for thematic analysis, key themes were identified and analysed. Study participants considered ethno-cultural identity, racism and challenges in integration to play significant roles influencing the health of Asian youth (especially mental health) and their access to health services. While emphasising the importance of engaging young Asians in research and service development so that their needs and aspirations are met, participants also highlighted the need for approaches that are cognisant of the cultural, contextual and intergenerational dimensions of issues involved in promoting youth participation. Research that engages Asian youth as key agents using methods that are sensitive to their cultural and sociological contexts can inform more responsive health services and public policy. This is of particular relevance in primary health care where culturally competent services can mitigate risks of unmet health needs and social isolation.

  19. A global analysis approach for investigating structural resilience in urban drainage systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mugume, Seith N; Gomez, Diego E; Fu, Guangtao; Farmani, Raziyeh; Butler, David

    2015-09-15

    Building resilience in urban drainage systems requires consideration of a wide range of threats that contribute to urban flooding. Existing hydraulic reliability based approaches have focused on quantifying functional failure caused by extreme rainfall or increase in dry weather flows that lead to hydraulic overloading of the system. Such approaches however, do not fully explore the full system failure scenario space due to exclusion of crucial threats such as equipment malfunction, pipe collapse and blockage that can also lead to urban flooding. In this research, a new analytical approach based on global resilience analysis is investigated and applied to systematically evaluate the performance of an urban drainage system when subjected to a wide range of structural failure scenarios resulting from random cumulative link failure. Link failure envelopes, which represent the resulting loss of system functionality (impacts) are determined by computing the upper and lower limits of the simulation results for total flood volume (failure magnitude) and average flood duration (failure duration) at each link failure level. A new resilience index that combines the failure magnitude and duration into a single metric is applied to quantify system residual functionality at each considered link failure level. With this approach, resilience has been tested and characterised for an existing urban drainage system in Kampala city, Uganda. In addition, the effectiveness of potential adaptation strategies in enhancing its resilience to cumulative link failure has been tested. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. A SYSTEMATIC APPROACH TO THE PSYCHOLOGICAL IMPACT OF THE INVESTIGATOR ON A PERSON BEING INTERROGATED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Cherevko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the research is an interaction with a person being interrogated organized by an investigator with the use of his interests, needs and other individual-mental features, his reinforcement, which must be done through secretive, invisible influence in an organized situation encouraging to do deeds desirable for investigation. The object of the research is interrogation as the most psychologized investigative action. The methodological basis of the research is made by the systematic and logical approach aimed at neutralization of watchfulness of the interrogated, penetration into his inner world influencing both rational and irrational spheres of mental make-up, actualization of the unity of understanding and experience. In this research general scientific and specific scientific methods of cognition are used. General scientific methods of the research are represented by systemic structural, comparative, formal and legal, statistical methods. The approach to the psychological impact on a person being interrogated as a systemic phenomenon has enabled to develop a conceptual model presented in the form of a diagram made up of four blocks reflecting emotional background sources of interrogation procedures, the interrogated case, interaction and basic methods of psychological influence, the leading of which is persuasion. Suggestion is purposeful influence on feelings and volitional pressure acts as pressure maintenance, complementary, used depending on the situational behaviour of the interrogated. Methods of implementation of each of these methods of psychological influence are also considered in this article.

  1. Use of a combination of in vitro models to investigate the impact of chlorpyrifos and inulin on the intestinal microbiota and the permeability of the intestinal mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Réquilé, Marina; Gonzàlez Alvarez, Dubàn O; Delanaud, Stéphane; Rhazi, Larbi; Bach, Véronique; Depeint, Flore; Khorsi-Cauet, Hafida

    2018-05-28

    Dietary exposure to the organophosphorothionate pesticide chlorpyrifos (CPF) has been linked to dysbiosis of the gut microbiota. We therefore sought to investigate whether (i) CPF's impact extends to the intestinal barrier and (ii) the prebiotic inulin could prevent such an effect. In vitro models mimicking the intestinal environment (the SHIME®) and the intestinal mucosa (Caco-2/TC7 cells) were exposed to CPF. After the SHIME® had been exposed to CPF and/or inulin, we assessed the system's bacterial and metabolic profiles. Extracts from the SHIME®'s colon reactors were then transferred to Caco-2/TC7 cultures, and epithelial barrier integrity and function were assessed. We found that inulin co-treatment partially reversed CPF-induced dysbiosis and increased short-chain fatty acid production in the SHIME®. Furthermore, co-treatment impacted tight junction gene expression and inhibited pro-inflammatory signaling in the Caco-2/TC7 intestinal cell line. Whereas, an isolated in vitro assessment of CPF and inulin effects provides useful information on the mechanism of dysbiosis, combining two in vitro models increases the in vivo relevance.

  2. An exposure-response analysis based on rifampin suggests CYP3A4 induction is driven by AUC: an in vitro investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Cheng; Yang, Xin; Fahmi, Odette A; Riccardi, Keith A; Di, Li; Obach, R Scott

    2017-08-01

    1. Induction is an important mechanism contributing to drug-drug interactions. It is most commonly evaluated in the human hepatocyte assay over 48-h or 72-h incubation period. However, whether the overall exposure (i.e. Area Under the Curve (AUC) or C ave ) or maximum exposure (i.e. C max ) of the inducer is responsible for the magnitude of subsequent induction has not been thoroughly investigated. Additionally, in vitro induction assays are typically treated as static systems, which could lead to inaccurate induction potency estimation. Hence, European Medicines Agency (EMA) guidance now specifies quantitation of drug levels in the incubation. 2. This work treated the typical in vitro evaluation of rifampin induction as an in vivo system by generating various target engagement profiles, measuring free rifampin concentration over 3 d of incubation and evaluating the impact of these factors on final induction response. 3. This rifampin-based analysis demonstrates that the induction process is driven by time-averaged target engagement (i.e. AUC-driven). Additionally, depletion of rifampin in the incubation medium over 3 d as well as non-specific/specific binding were observed. 4. These findings should help aid the discovery of clinical candidates with minimal induction liability and further expand our knowledge in the quantitative translatability of in vitro induction assays.

  3. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Salamon

    Full Text Available In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer.A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4 was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography.Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide.4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  4. Magnetic Particle / Magnetic Resonance Imaging: In-Vitro MPI-Guided Real Time Catheter Tracking and 4D Angioplasty Using a Road Map and Blood Pool Tracer Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamon, Johannes; Hofmann, Martin; Jung, Caroline; Kaul, Michael Gerhard; Werner, Franziska; Them, Kolja; Reimer, Rudolph; Nielsen, Peter; Vom Scheidt, Annika; Adam, Gerhard; Knopp, Tobias; Ittrich, Harald

    2016-01-01

    In-vitro evaluation of the feasibility of 4D real time tracking of endovascular devices and stenosis treatment with a magnetic particle imaging (MPI) / magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) road map approach and an MPI-guided approach using a blood pool tracer. A guide wire and angioplasty-catheter were labeled with a thin layer of magnetic lacquer. For real time MPI a custom made software framework was developed. A stenotic vessel phantom filled with saline or superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (MM4) was equipped with bimodal fiducial markers for co-registration in preclinical 7T MRI and MPI. In-vitro angioplasty was performed inflating the balloon with saline or MM4. MPI data were acquired using a field of view of 37.3×37.3×18.6 mm3 and a frame rate of 46 volumes/sec. Analysis of the magnetic lacquer-marks on the devices were performed with electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectrometry and micro-computed tomography. Magnetic marks allowed for MPI/MRI guidance of interventional devices. Bimodal fiducial markers enable MPI/MRI image fusion for MRI based roadmapping. MRI roadmapping and the blood pool tracer approach facilitate MPI real time monitoring of in-vitro angioplasty. Successful angioplasty was verified with MPI and MRI. Magnetic marks consist of micrometer sized ferromagnetic plates mainly composed of iron and iron oxide. 4D real time MP imaging, tracking and guiding of endovascular instruments and in-vitro angioplasty is feasible. In addition to an approach that requires a blood pool tracer, MRI based roadmapping might emerge as a promising tool for radiation free 4D MPI-guided interventions.

  5. Interactions among biotic and abiotic factors affect the reliability of tungsten microneedles puncturing in vitro and in vivo peripheral nerves: A hybrid computational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sergi, Pier Nicola, E-mail: p.sergi@sssup.it [Translational Neural Engineering Laboratory, The Biorobotics Institute, Scuola Superiore Sant' Anna, Viale Rinaldo Piaggio 34, Pontedera, 56025 (Italy); Jensen, Winnie [Department of Health Science and Technology, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7, 9220 Aalborg (Denmark); Yoshida, Ken [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Indiana University - Purdue University Indianapolis, 723 W. Michigan St., SL220, Indianapolis, IN 46202 (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Tungsten is an elective material to produce slender and stiff microneedles able to enter soft tissues and minimize puncture wounds. In particular, tungsten microneedles are used to puncture peripheral nerves and insert neural interfaces, bridging the gap between the nervous system and robotic devices (e.g., hand prostheses). Unfortunately, microneedles fail during the puncture process and this failure is not dependent on stiffness or fracture toughness of the constituent material. In addition, the microneedles' performances decrease during in vivo trials with respect to the in vitro ones. This further effect is independent on internal biotic effects, while it seems to be related to external biotic causes. Since the exact synergy of phenomena decreasing the in vivo reliability is still not known, this work explored the connection between in vitro and in vivo behavior of tungsten microneedles through the study of interactions between biotic and abiotic factors. A hybrid computational approach, simultaneously using theoretical relationships and in silico models of nerves, was implemented to model the change of reliability varying the microneedle diameter, and to predict in vivo performances by using in vitro reliability and local differences between in vivo and in vitro mechanical response of nerves. - Highlights: • We provide phenomenological Finite Element (FE) models of peripheral nerves to study the interactions with W microneedles • We provide a general interaction-based approach to model the reliability of slender microneedles • We evaluate the reliability of W microneedels to puncture in vivo nerves • We provide a novel synergistic hybrid approach (theory + simulations) involving interactions among biotic and abiotic factors • We validate the hybrid approach by using experimental data from literature.

  6. Interactions among biotic and abiotic factors affect the reliability of tungsten microneedles puncturing in vitro and in vivo peripheral nerves: A hybrid computational approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sergi, Pier Nicola; Jensen, Winnie; Yoshida, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Tungsten is an elective material to produce slender and stiff microneedles able to enter soft tissues and minimize puncture wounds. In particular, tungsten microneedles are used to puncture peripheral nerves and insert neural interfaces, bridging the gap between the nervous system and robotic devices (e.g., hand prostheses). Unfortunately, microneedles fail during the puncture process and this failure is not dependent on stiffness or fracture toughness of the constituent material. In addition, the microneedles' performances decrease during in vivo trials with respect to the in vitro ones. This further effect is independent on internal biotic effects, while it seems to be related to external biotic causes. Since the exact synergy of phenomena decreasing the in vivo reliability is still not known, this work explored the connection between in vitro and in vivo behavior of tungsten microneedles through the study of interactions between biotic and abiotic factors. A hybrid computational approach, simultaneously using theoretical relationships and in silico models of nerves, was implemented to model the change of reliability varying the microneedle diameter, and to predict in vivo performances by using in vitro reliability and local differences between in vivo and in vitro mechanical response of nerves. - Highlights: • We provide phenomenological Finite Element (FE) models of peripheral nerves to study the interactions with W microneedles • We provide a general interaction-based approach to model the reliability of slender microneedles • We evaluate the reliability of W microneedels to puncture in vivo nerves • We provide a novel synergistic hybrid approach (theory + simulations) involving interactions among biotic and abiotic factors • We validate the hybrid approach by using experimental data from literature

  7. In situ biomimetic synthesis, characterization and in vitro investigation of bone-like nanohydroxyapatite in starch matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadjadi, M.S., E-mail: msadjad@gmail.com [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Poonak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Meskinfam, M. [Department of Chemistry, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Poonak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, B. [Department of Chemistry, Tonekabon Branch, Islamic Azad university, Tonekabon (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Jazdarreh, H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zare, K. [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Shahid Beheshti University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    In this work, we report the synthesis of bone-like hydroxyapatite (HAp) nanorods in wheat starch matrix via a biomimetic process. Characterization of the samples was performed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). Scanning and transmission electron microscopy (SEM and TEM) were used to determine the size, shape and morphology of nano-HAp. The results indicate that, the shape and morphology of nHAp is influenced by the presence of starch as a template agent and rod-like nHAp similar to the inorganic component in the human body is obtained at room temperature. In vitro bioactivity of the synthesized HAp nanocomposites was finally verified by comparison of the HAp's structures and morphology before and after immersion in simulated body fluid (SBF) solution for 3, 7, and 14 days.

  8. Development of an In Vitro PIV Setup for Preliminary Investigation of the Effects of Aortic Compliance on Flow Patterns and Hemodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Büsen, Martin; Arenz, Christian; Neidlin, Michael; Liao, Sam; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas; Steinseifer, Ulrich; Sonntag, Simon J

    2017-09-01

    The aorta with its compliance plays a major role in hemodynamics as it saves a portion of ejected blood during systole which is then released in diastole. The aortic compliance decreases with increasing age, which is related to several cardiovascular imparities and diseases. Changes in flow patterns and pressure curves, due to varying aortic compliance, are difficult to investigate in vivo. As a result, the aim of the present work was to develop an in vitro setup enabling standardized investigations on the effect of compliance changes on flow patterns and pressure curves. Therefore an experimental setup with an anatomically correct silicone phantom of the aortic arch was developed, suitable for optical flow measurements under pulsatile inflow conditions. The setup was developed for precise adjustments of different compliances and optical flow measurements. Particle image velocimetry measurements were carried out downstream of the aortic valve in the center plane perpendicular to the valve with compliance adjusted between 0.62 × 10 -3 to 1.82 × 10 -3  mmHg -1 . Preliminary results of the in vitro investigations showed that decreases in compliance results in significant increases in pressure changes with respect to time (dp/dt) and altered pressure curves in the aortic arch. In terms of flow, an increased aortic stiffness lead to higher mean velocities and decreased vortex development in the aortic sinuses. As in vivo validation and translation remains difficult, the results have to be considered as preliminary in vitro insights into the mechanisms of (age-related) compliance changes.

  9. Identifying barriers to and facilitators of tuberculosis contact investigation in Kampala, Uganda: a behavioral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayakaka, Irene; Ackerman, Sara; Ggita, Joseph M; Kajubi, Phoebe; Dowdy, David; Haberer, Jessica E; Fair, Elizabeth; Hopewell, Philip; Handley, Margaret A; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Katamba, Achilles; Davis, J Lucian

    2017-03-09

    The World Health Organization recommends routine household tuberculosis contact investigation in high-burden countries but adoption has been limited. We sought to identify barriers to and facilitators of TB contact investigation during its introduction in Kampala, Uganda. We collected cross-sectional qualitative data through focus group discussions and interviews with stakeholders, addressing three core activities of contact investigation: arranging household screening visits through index TB patients, visiting households to screen contacts and refer them to clinics, and evaluating at-risk contacts coming to clinics. We analyzed the data using a validated theory of behavior change, the Capability, Opportunity, and Motivation determine Behavior (COM-B) model, and sought to identify targeted interventions using the related Behavior Change Wheel implementation framework. We led seven focus-group discussions with 61 health-care workers, two with 21 lay health workers (LHWs), and one with four household contacts of newly diagnosed TB patients. We, in addition, performed 32 interviews with household contacts from 14 households of newly diagnosed TB patients. Commonly noted barriers included stigma, limited knowledge about TB among contacts, insufficient time and space in clinics for counselling, mistrust of health-center staff among index patients and contacts, and high travel costs for LHWs and contacts. The most important facilitators identified were the personalized and enabling services provided by LHWs. We identified education, persuasion, enablement, modeling of health-positive behaviors, incentivization, and restructuring of the service environment as relevant intervention functions with potential to alleviate barriers to and enhance facilitators of TB contact investigation. The use of a behavioral theory and a validated implementation framework provided a comprehensive approach for systematically identifying barriers to and facilitators of TB contact

  10. A network pharmacology approach to investigate the pharmacological effects of Guizhi Fuling Wan on uterine fibroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Liuting; Yang, Kailin; Liu, Huiping; Zhang, Guomin

    2017-11-01

    To investigate the pharmacological mechanism of Guizhi Fuling Wan (GFW) in the treatment of uterine fibroids, a network pharmacology approach was used. Information on GFW compounds was collected from traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) databases, and input into PharmMapper to identify the compound targets. Genes associated with uterine fibroids genes were then obtained from the GeneCards and Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man databases. The interaction data of the targets and other human proteins was also collected from the STRING and IntAct databases. The target data were input into the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery for gene ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analyses. Networks of the above information were constructed and analyzed using Cytoscape. The following networks were compiled: A compound-compound target network of GFW; a herb-compound target-uterine fibroids target network of GWF; and a compound target-uterine fibroids target-other human proteins protein-protein interaction network, which were subjected to GO and pathway enrichment analyses. According to this approach, a number of novel signaling pathways and biological processes underlying the effects of GFW on uterine fibroids were identified, including the negative regulation of smooth muscle cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the Ras, wingless-type, epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathways. This network pharmacology approach may aid the systematical study of herbal formulae and make TCM drug discovery more predictable.

  11. The soft computing-based approach to investigate allergic diseases: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartarisco, Gennaro; Tonacci, Alessandro; Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Billeci, Lucia; Pioggia, Giovanni; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2017-01-01

    Early recognition of inflammatory markers and their relation to asthma, adverse drug reactions, allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis and other allergic diseases is an important goal in allergy. The vast majority of studies in the literature are based on classic statistical methods; however, developments in computational techniques such as soft computing-based approaches hold new promise in this field. The aim of this manuscript is to systematically review the main soft computing-based techniques such as artificial neural networks, support vector machines, bayesian networks and fuzzy logic to investigate their performances in the field of allergic diseases. The review was conducted following PRISMA guidelines and the protocol was registered within PROSPERO database (CRD42016038894). The research was performed on PubMed and ScienceDirect, covering the period starting from September 1, 1990 through April 19, 2016. The review included 27 studies related to allergic diseases and soft computing performances. We observed promising results with an overall accuracy of 86.5%, mainly focused on asthmatic disease. The review reveals that soft computing-based approaches are suitable for big data analysis and can be very powerful, especially when dealing with uncertainty and poorly characterized parameters. Furthermore, they can provide valuable support in case of lack of data and entangled cause-effect relationships, which make it difficult to assess the evolution of disease. Although most works deal with asthma, we believe the soft computing approach could be a real breakthrough and foster new insights into other allergic diseases as well.

  12. An Investigation of Primary School Teachers’ PCK towards Science Subjects Using an Inquiry-Based Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menşure ALKIŞ KÜÇÜKAYDIN

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK of four experienced primary school teachers was investigated within the “Let’s Solve the Riddle of Our Body Unit”. The PCK investigation adopted a learning approach based on inquiry, content representation and pedagogical and professional-experience repertoires (PaP-eRs, and interview forms were used as data collection tools. During the course of the research, the findings obtained from observations made during a total of 18 course hours formed the basic data source of the study. According to the results of the study, in which descriptive and content analysis were used concurrently, primary school teachers lack subject matter knowledge, do not interrogate the pre-knowledge of students and some misconceptions exist regarding about blood moves and exercise with pulse. Additionally, some deficiencies were detected in the curriculum, i.e., it offers non-inquisitional knowledge. Furthermore, teachers employee assessment methods with traditional teaching methods and techniques. In the context of an inquiry-based learning approach, teachers appeared to believe that classroom activities were adversely affected by the physical conditions (class size, lack of laboratory etc., students’ cognitive levels and parent profiles. The result of this study revealed that PCK components affect one another. The PCK findings pertaining to primary school teachers as it concerns the unit are briefly discussed and some suggestions about the development of PCK are submitted.

  13. A quality by design approach on polymeric nanocarrier delivery of gefitinib: formulation, in vitro, and in vivo characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kola Srinivas NS

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Navya Sree Kola Srinivas,1 Ruchi Verma,2 Girish Pai Kulyadi,1 Lalit Kumar1 1Department of Pharmaceutics, 2Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, Manipal College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India Abstract: Gefitinib is an anticancer agent which acts by inhibiting epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase receptors. The aim of the present study was to prepare gefitinib nanosuspension. Gefitinib was encapsulated in Eudragit® RL100 and then dispersed in stabilizer solution, polyvinyl alcohol, and polyvinylpyrrolidone K30. Nanosuspension was prepared by using homogenization and ultrasonication techniques. The quality by design approach was also used in the study to understand the effect of critical material attributes (CMAs and critical processing parameters (CPPs on critical quality attributes and to improve the quality and safety of formulation. To study the effect of CMAs and CPPs, 23 full factorial design was applied. The particle size, polydispersity index, and zeta potential of the optimized solution were 248.20 nm, 0.391, and -5.62 mV, respectively. Drug content of the optimized nanoformulation was found to be 87.74%±1.19%. Atomic force microscopy studies of the optimized formulation confirmed that the prepared nanoparticles are smooth and spherical in nature. In vitro cytotoxicity studies of the nanosuspension on Vero cell line revealed that the formulation is nontoxic. The gefitinib nanosuspension released 60.03%±4.09% drug over a period of 84 h, whereas standard drug dispersion released only 10.39%±3.37% drug in the same duration. From the pharmacokinetic studies, half-life, Cmax, and Tmax of the drug of an optimized nanosuspension were found to be 8.65±1.99 h, 46,211.04±5,805.97 ng/mL, and 6.67±1.77 h, respectively. A 1.812-fold increase in relative bioavailability of nanosuspension was found, which confirmed that the present formulation is suitable to enhance the oral bioavailability

  14. Transfer of uranium throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract of the rat: In vivo and in vitro approaches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dublineau, I.; Grison, S.; Dudoignon, N.; Baudelin, C.; Aigueperse, J.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of uranium in environment either natural or due to civil and military use, may lead to contamination of the public throughout the entire life mainly by chronic ingestion. The mechanisms of uranium transfer from alimentary bolus to blood are still not well known. In particular, few information are available on the different absorption sites along the gastrointestinal tract, the different cellular pathways (para-or trans-cellular), and the transporters implicated in the uranium absorption. In addition, the specific role of Peyer's patches, the aggregated structure of Gut-Associated Lymphoid tissue, in the intestinal transfer of uranium has never been determined. In fact, the transport of uranium through these structures specialized in antigen uptake from intestinal lumen may lead to major dysfunctions in mucosal immunity. Thus, different approaches have to be developed to determine the role of the different gastrointestinal structures and to apprehend the biological consequences of daily passage of uranium through these structures. These experiments include in vivo measurement of uranium in blood after in situ deposit of uranium (233U) in the different segments of the alimentary tract (buccal cavity, stomach, small intestine, colon) and ex vivo experiments in Using chambers to compare uranium passage from luminal to serosal side through intestinal epithelium and Peyer's patches. In vitro studies are also necessary to determine the nature of the cells as well as the transporters implicated in the gastrointestinal passage of uranium. Autoradiography experiments were performed to determine if uranium absorption was only restricted to villi which contained absorptive cells or if uranium absorption was also due to crypt cells. In addition, the transporter implicated in the uranium passage id dependent of the physico-chemical form of uranium present at the different gastrointestinal sites. When complexed to phosphate, uranium is transported by the sodium

  15. Transfer of uranium throughout the entire gastrointestinal tract of the rat: In vivo and in vitro approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dublineau, I.; Grison, S.; Dudoignon, N.; Baudelin, C.; Aigueperse, J.

    2004-07-01

    The presence of uranium in environment either natural or due to civil and military use, may lead to contamination of the public throughout the entire life mainly by chronic ingestion. The mechanisms of uranium transfer from alimentary bolus to blood are still not well known. In particular, few information are available on the different absorption sites along the gastrointestinal tract, the different cellular pathways (para-or trans-cellular), and the transporters implicated in the uranium absorption. In addition, the specific role of Peyer's patches, the aggregated structure of Gut-Associated Lymphoid tissue, in the intestinal transfer of uranium has never been determined. In fact, the transport of uranium through these structures specialized in antigen uptake from intestinal lumen may lead to major dysfunctions in mucosal immunity. Thus, different approaches have to be developed to determine the role of the different gastrointestinal structures and to apprehend the biological consequences of daily passage of uranium through these structures. These experiments include in vivo measurement of uranium in blood after in situ deposit of uranium (233U) in the different segments of the alimentary tract (buccal cavity, stomach, small intestine, colon) and ex vivo experiments in Using chambers to compare uranium passage from luminal to serosal side through intestinal epithelium and Peyer's patches. In vitro studies are also necessary to determine the nature of the cells as well as the transporters implicated in the gastrointestinal passage of uranium. Autoradiography experiments were performed to determine if uranium absorption was only restricted to villi which contained absorptive cells or if uranium absorption was also due to crypt cells. In addition, the transporter implicated in the uranium passage is dependent of the physico-chemical form of uranium present at the different gastrointestinal sites. When complexed to phosphate, uranium is transported by the

  16. Pharmaceutical characterization of novel tenofovir liposomal formulations for enhanced oral drug delivery: in vitro pharmaceutics and Caco-2 permeability investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spinks CB

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Crystal B Spinks,1 Ahmed S Zidan,2,3 Mansoor A Khan,4 Muhammad J Habib,1 Patrick J Faustino2 1Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, School of Pharmacy, Howard University, Washington, DC, 2Division of Product Quality Research, Office of Pharmaceutical Quality, Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, MD, USA; 3Faculty of Pharmacy, Zagazig University, Zagazig, Egypt; 4Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy, Texas A&M Health Science Center, College Station, TX, USA Abstract: Tenofovir, currently marketed as the prodrug tenofovir disoproxil fumarate, is used clinically to treat patients with HIV/AIDS. The oral bioavailability of tenofovir is relatively low, limiting its clinical effectiveness. Encapsulation of tenofovir within modified long-circulating liposomes would deliver this hydrophilic anti-HIV drug to the reticuloendothelial system for better therapeutic efficacy. The objectives of the current study were to prepare and pharmaceutically characterize model liposomal tenofovir formulations in an attempt to improve their bioavailability. The entrapment process was performed using film hydration method, and the formulations were characterized in terms of encapsulation efficiency and Caco-2 permeability. An efficient reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed and validated for tenofovir quantitation in both in vitro liposomal formulations and Caco-2 permeability samples. Separation was achieved isocratically on a Waters Symmetry C8 column using 10 mM Na2PO4/acetonitrile pH 7.4 (95:5 v/v. The flow rate was 1 mL/min with a 12 min elution time. Injection volume was 10 µL with ultraviolet detection at 270 nm. The method was validated according to United States Pharmacopeial Convention category I requirements. The obtained result showed that tenofovir encapsulation within the prepared liposomes was dependent on the employed amount of the positive charge-imparting agent. The obtained results indicated that

  17. Band gaps from the Tran-Blaha modified Becke-Johnson approach: A systematic investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong

    2013-04-01

    The semi-local Becke-Johnson (BJ) exchange-correlation potential and its modified form proposed by Tran and Blaha (TB-mBJ) have attracted a lot of interest recently because of the surprisingly accurate band gaps they can deliver for many semiconductors and insulators. In this work, we have investigated the performance of the TB-mBJ potential for the description of electronic band structures in a comprehensive set of semiconductors and insulators. We point out that a perturbative use of the TB-mBJ potential can give overall better results. By investigating a set of IIB-VI and III-V semiconductors, we point out that although the TB-mBJ approach can describe the band gap of these materials quite well, the binding energies of semi-core d-states in these materials deviate strongly from experiment. The difficulty of the TB-mBJ potential to describe the localized states is likely the cause for the fact that the electronic band structures of Cu2O and La2O3 are still poorly described. Based on these observations, we propose to combine the TB-mBJ approach with the Hubbard U correction for localized d/f states, which is able to provide overall good descriptions for both the band gaps and semi-core states binding energies. We further apply the approach to calculate the band gaps of a set of Ti(IV)-oxides, many of which have complicated structures so that the more advanced methods like GW are expensive to treat directly. An overall good agreement with experiment is obtained, which is remarkable considering its little computational efforts compared to GW.

  18. Assessment of primary eye and skin irritants by in vitro cytotoxicity and phototoxicity models: an in vitro approach of new arginine-based surfactant-induced irritation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benavides, T.; Mitjans, M.; Martinez, V.; Clapes, P.; Infante, M.R.; Clothier, R.H.; Vinardell, M.P.

    2004-01-01

    Extensive efforts have been made, recently, to find surfactants with lower irritation potential than those presently commercially available, for use in pharmaceutical and cosmetic preparations. Cytotoxic and phototoxic effects of a novel family of dicationic arginine-diglyceride surfactant compounds, 1,2-diacyl,3-O-(L-arginyl)-rac-glycerol with alkyl chain lengths in the range from 8 to 14 carbon atoms, were compared to three commercial surfactants. The end-points used to assess toxicity were the red blood cell lysis assay and uptake of the vital dye neutral red 24 h after dosing (NRU), respectively. Two immortalized cell lines, murine fibroblast cell line, 3T3, and one human keratinocyte cell line, HaCaT, were used as in vitro models to predict the potential phototoxicity which could result in irritation, determined by resazurin reduction to resorufin and neutral red uptake (NRU). All tested surfactants had cytotoxicity effects as demonstrated by and decrease of NR uptake, which showed a clear concentration-response relationship. Concentrations resulting in 50% inhibition of NR uptake (IC 50 ) range from 1 μmol l -1 (hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide) to 565 μmol l -1 (12,12-L-arginine). Erythrocyte haemolysis also showed a clear concentration-response relationship, the 50% of haemolysis ranged from 37 μmol l -1 (10,10-L-arginine) to 151 μmol l -1 (sodium lauryl sulphate). Phototoxicity was performed with 12,12-L-acetyl-arginine, the most stable chemical structure. The validated 3T3 NRU photoxicity assay was used and revealed a phototoxic potential

  19. Numerical Investigation of Desulfurization Kinetics in Gas-Stirred Ladles by a Quick Modeling Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Nastac, Laurentiu; Pitts-Baggett, April; Yu, Qiulin

    2018-03-01

    A quick modeling analysis approach for predicting the slag-steel reaction and desulfurization kinetics in argon gas-stirred ladles has been developed in this study. The model consists of two uncoupled components: (i) a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for predicting the fluid flow and the characteristics of slag-steel interface, and (ii) a multicomponent reaction kinetics model for calculating the desulfurization evolution. The steel-slag interfacial area and mass transfer coefficients predicted by the CFD simulation are used as the processing data for the reaction model. Since the desulfurization predictions are uncoupled from the CFD simulation, the computational time of this uncoupled predictive approach is decreased by at least 100 times for each case study when compared with the CFD-reaction kinetics fully coupled model. The uncoupled modeling approach was validated by comparing the evolution of steel and slag compositions with the experimentally measured data during ladle metallurgical furnace (LMF) processing at Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa, Inc. Then, the validated approach was applied to investigate the effects of the initial steel and slag compositions, as well as different types of additions during the refining process on the desulfurization efficiency. The results revealed that the sulfur distribution ratio and the desulfurization reaction can be promoted by making Al and CaO additions during the refining process. It was also shown that by increasing the initial Al content in liquid steel, both Al oxidation and desulfurization rates rapidly increase. In addition, it was found that the variation of the initial Si content in steel has no significant influence on the desulfurization rate. Lastly, if the initial CaO content in slag is increased or the initial Al2O3 content is decreased in the fluid-slag compositional range, the desulfurization rate can be improved significantly during the LMF process.

  20. Numerical Investigation of Desulfurization Kinetics in Gas-Stirred Ladles by a Quick Modeling Analysis Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Qing; Nastac, Laurentiu; Pitts-Baggett, April; Yu, Qiulin

    2018-06-01

    A quick modeling analysis approach for predicting the slag-steel reaction and desulfurization kinetics in argon gas-stirred ladles has been developed in this study. The model consists of two uncoupled components: (i) a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model for predicting the fluid flow and the characteristics of slag-steel interface, and (ii) a multicomponent reaction kinetics model for calculating the desulfurization evolution. The steel-slag interfacial area and mass transfer coefficients predicted by the CFD simulation are used as the processing data for the reaction model. Since the desulfurization predictions are uncoupled from the CFD simulation, the computational time of this uncoupled predictive approach is decreased by at least 100 times for each case study when compared with the CFD-reaction kinetics fully coupled model. The uncoupled modeling approach was validated by comparing the evolution of steel and slag compositions with the experimentally measured data during ladle metallurgical furnace (LMF) processing at Nucor Steel Tuscaloosa, Inc. Then, the validated approach was applied to investigate the effects of the initial steel and slag compositions, as well as different types of additions during the refining process on the desulfurization efficiency. The results revealed that the sulfur distribution ratio and the desulfurization reaction can be promoted by making Al and CaO additions during the refining process. It was also shown that by increasing the initial Al content in liquid steel, both Al oxidation and desulfurization rates rapidly increase. In addition, it was found that the variation of the initial Si content in steel has no significant influence on the desulfurization rate. Lastly, if the initial CaO content in slag is increased or the initial Al2O3 content is decreased in the fluid-slag compositional range, the desulfurization rate can be improved significantly during the LMF process.

  1. In vitro and in vivo investigation of bacterial cellulose dressing containing uniform silver sulfadiazine nanoparticles for burn wound healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxiao Wen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Silver sulfadiazine (SSD particles in homogeneous dispersion state were prepared by an ultrasonic method and then nano- and microparticles were separated using centrifugation. SSD particles with narrow size distribution were impregnated with bacterial cellulose (BC to produce BC–SSD composite membrane used as burn wound dressing. A scanning electron microscope (SEM was used to examine the surface morphology of BC–SSD membranes. The incorporation of SSD in BC–SSD was confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD. Antimicrobial tests in vitro indicated that BC–SSD showed excellent antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli. The effects of BC–SSD on burn wound healing were assessed by rat models. The comparative study confirmed that the wound treated with BC–SSD showed high healing rate. The bacteria count in BC–SSD group was far less than control group. Histological analysis showed that epithelialization progressed better in wound treated with BC–SSD. These values demonstrated that the BC–SSD composite membrane could be a promising wound dressing for burn.

  2. In Vitro Investigation of the Individual Contributions of Ultrasound-Induced Stable and Inertial Cavitation in Targeted Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourevich, Dana; Volovick, Alexander; Dogadkin, Osnat; Wang, Lijun; Mulvana, Helen; Medan, Yoav; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery is a therapeutic modality under development with the potential to treat cancer. Its ability to produce local hyperthermia and cell poration through cavitation non-invasively makes it a candidate to trigger drug delivery. Hyperthermia offers greater potential for control, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging temperature measurement. However, cavitation may offer reduced treatment times, with real-time measurement of ultrasonic spectra indicating drug dose and treatment success. Here, a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery system was used to study ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery in vitro. Drug uptake into breast cancer cells in the vicinity of ultrasound contrast agent was correlated with occurrence and quantity of stable and inertial cavitation, classified according to subharmonic spectra. During stable cavitation, intracellular drug uptake increased by a factor up to 3.2 compared with the control. Reported here are the value of cavitation monitoring with a clinical system and its subsequent employment for dose optimization. Copyright © 2015 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. An investigation of the relationship between the anti-inflammatory activity, polyphenolic content, and antioxidant activities of cooked and in vitro digested culinary herbs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chohan, Magali; Naughton, Declan P; Jones, Lucy; Opara, Elizabeth I

    2012-01-01

    There is little research on how cooking and digestion affect the anti-inflammatory activity of culinary herbs. Thus, the aim of this paper was to investigate this activity following cooking and in vitro digestion of the common culinary herbs, rosemary, sage, and thyme, and the relationship between their anti-inflammatory activity, polyphenol content, and antioxidant capacity. The anti-inflammatory activity of uncooked (U), cooked (C), cooked and in vitro digested (C&D), and standardised (STD, 30 mg/mL) culinary herbs was assessed by measuring their effect on interleukin 8 (IL-8) release from stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and Caco-2 cells. The trolox equivalent capacity (TEAC) and estimated total phenolic content of the herbs were also determined. There was a significant decrease in IL-8 release from PBLs stimulated with H(2)O(2) incubated with (U), (C), (C&D), and (STD) herbs and from Caco-2 cells stimulated with TNFα incubated with (C&D) and (STD) herbs. PBLs pre-incubated with (C&D) herbs prior to stimulation (H(2)O(2) or TNFα) caused a significant inhibition in IL-8 release. The significant correlations between TEAC and estimated phenolic content and the anti-inflammatory activity suggest a possible contributory role of polyphenols to the anti-inflammatory activity of the culinary herbs investigated.

  4. Laetiporus sulphureus, edible mushroom from Serbia: investigation on volatile compounds, in vitro antimicrobial activity and in situ control of Aspergillus flavus in tomato paste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrović, Jovana; Glamočlija, Jasmina; Stojković, Dejan S; Ćirić, Ana; Nikolić, Miloš; Bukvički, Danka; Guerzoni, Maria Elisabetta; Soković, Marina D

    2013-09-01

    The volatile compounds of fruiting bodies of wild Laetiporus sulphureus (Bull.) Murrill, growing on willow trees from Serbia, were isolated and extracted using methanol, acetone and dichloromethane and investigated by GC/MS-SPME. A total of 56 components were identified in the extracts. Hydrocarbons predominated (76.90%, 77.20%, and 43.10%) in dichloromethane, acetone and methanol extracts, respectively. Fatty acids, esters and sesquiterpenes were present in amounts equal or lower than 2.00%. Ketones were represented with moderate amount with the exception of methanol extract where it reached as much as 28.90% of the total investigated compounds. Extracts were also tested for antimicrobial activity with and without the addition of food additive - potassium disulfite in vitro against eight bacterial and eight fungal species, and in situ in tomato paste against Aspergillus flavus. All the tested extracts showed good antimicrobial activity, but methanol extract with addition of E224 showed the best antimicrobial activity in vitro. In situ results indicate complete inhibition of A. flavus growth in tomato paste after 15 days of the treatment. This study is the first report on volatile composition of L. sulphureus growing wild in Serbia. We describe for the first time the application of its extract as antifungal food preservative. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Systems biology approach to transplant tolerance: proof of concept experiments using RNA interference (RNAi) to knock down hub genes in Jurkat and HeLa cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lwin, Wint Wah; Park, Ken; Wauson, Matthew; Gao, Qin; Finn, Patricia W; Perkins, David; Khanna, Ajai

    2012-07-01

    Systems biology is gaining importance in studying complex systems such as the functional interconnections of human genes [1]. To investigate the molecular interactions involved in T cell immune responses, we used databases of physical gene-gene interactions to constructed molecular interaction networks (interconnections) with R language algorithms. This helped to identify highly interconnected "hub" genes AT(1)P5C1, IL6ST, PRKCZ, MYC, FOS, JUN, and MAPK1. We hypothesized that suppression of these hub genes in the gene network would result in significant phenotypic effects on T cells and examined this in vitro. The molecular interaction networks were then analyzed and visualized with Cytoscape. Jurkat and HeLa cells were transfected with siRNA for the selected hub genes. Cell proliferation was measured using ATP luminescence and BrdU labeling, which were measured 36, 72, and 96 h after activation. Following T cell stimulation, we found a significant decrease in ATP production (P cells. However, HeLa cells showed a significant (P cell proliferation when the genes MAPK1, IL6ST, ATP5C1, JUN, and FOS were knocked down. In both Jurkat and HeLa cells, targeted gene knockdown using siRNA showed decreased cell proliferation and ATP production in both Jurkat and HeLa cells. However, Jurkat T cells and HELA cells use different hub genes to regulate activation responses. This experiment provides proof of principle of applying siRNA knockdown of T cell hub genes to evaluate their proliferative capacity and ATP production. This novel concept outlines a systems biology approach to identify hub genes for targeted therapeutics. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Signal transduction profile of chemical sensitisers in dendritic cells: An endpoint to be included in a cell-based in vitro alternative approach to hazard identification?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, Bruno Miguel; Goncalo, Margarida; Figueiredo, Americo; Duarte, Carlos B.; Lopes, Maria Celeste; Cruz, Maria Teresa

    2011-01-01

    The development of non-animal testing methods for the assessment of skin sensitisation potential is an urgent challenge within the framework of existing and forthcoming legislation. Efforts have been made to replace current animal tests, but so far no alternative methods have been developed. It is widely recognised that alternatives to animal testing cannot be accomplished with a single approach, but rather will require the integration of results obtained from different in vitro and in silico assays. The argument subjacent to the development of in vitro dendritic cell (DC)-based assays is that sensitiser-induced changes in the DC phenotype can be differentiated from those induced by irritants. This assumption is derived from the unique capacity of DC to convert environmental signals encountered at the skin into a receptor expression pattern (MHC class II molecules, co-stimulatory molecules, chemokine receptors) and a soluble mediator release profile that will stimulate T lymphocytes. Since signal transduction cascades precede changes in surface marker expression and cytokine/chemokine secretion, these phenotypic modifications are a consequence of a signal transduction profile that is specifically triggered by sensitisers and not by irritants. A limited number of studies have addressed this subject and the present review attempts to summarise and highlight all of the signalling pathways modulated by skin sensitisers and irritants. Furthermore, we conclude this review by focusing on the most promising strategies suitable for inclusion into a cell-based in vitro alternative approach to hazard identification.

  7. Integrated in vitro approaches to assess the bioaccessibility and bioavailability of silicon-biofortified leafy vegetables and preliminary effects on bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Imperio, Massimiliano; Brunetti, Giacomina; Gigante, Isabella; Serio, Francesco; Santamaria, Pietro; Cardinali, Angela; Colucci, Silvia; Minervini, Fiorenza

    2017-03-01

    Food industries are increasingly oriented toward new foods to improve nutritional status and/or to combat nutritional deficiency diseases. In this context, silicon biofortification could be an innovative tool for obtaining new foods with possible positive effects on bone mineralization. In this paper, an alternative and quick in vitro approach was applied in order to evaluate the potential health-promoting effects of five silicon-biofortified leafy vegetables (tatsoi, mizuna, purslane, Swiss chard and chicory) on bone mineralization compared with a commercial silicon supplement. The silicon bioaccessibility and bioavailability of the five leafy vegetables (biofortified or not) and of the supplement were assessed by applying a protocol consisting of in vitro gastrointestinal digestion coupled with a Caco-2 cell model. Silicon bioaccessibility ranged from 0.89 to 8.18 mg/L and bioavailability ranged from 111 to 206 μg/L of Si for both vegetables and supplement. Furthermore, the bioavailable fractions were tested on a human osteoblast cell model following the expression of type 1 collagen and alkaline phosphatase. The results obtained highlighted that the bioavailable fraction of biofortified purslane and Swiss chard improved the expression of both osteoblast markers compared with the supplement and other vegetables. These results underline the potentially beneficial effect of biofortified leafy vegetables and also indicate the usefulness of in vitro approaches for selecting the best vegetable with positive bone effects for further in vivo research.

  8. Earthworms and in vitro physiologically-based extraction tests : complementary tools for a holistic approach towards understanding risk at arsenic-contaminated sites

    OpenAIRE

    Button, Mark; Watts, Michael J.; Cave, Mark R.; Harrington, Chris F.; Jenkin, Gawen R.T.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship of the total arsenic content of a soil and its bioaccumulation by earthworms (Lumbricus rubellus and Dendrodrilus rubidus) to the arsenic fraction bioaccessible to humans, measured using an in vitro physiologically-based extraction test (PBET), was investigated. Soil and earthworm samples were collected at 24 sites at the former arsenic mine at the Devon Great Consols (DGC) in southwest England (UK), along with an uncontaminated site in Nottingham, UK, for comparison. Analysi...

  9. In-vitro investigations of a pH- and ionic-strength-responsive polyelectrolytic hydrogel using a piezoresistive microsensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Volker; Guenther, Margarita; Gerlach, Gerald; Magda, Jules J.; Tathireddy, Prashant; Rieth, Loren; Solzbacher, Florian

    2010-01-01

    Environmental responsive or smart hydrogels show a volume phase transition due to changes of external stimuli such as pH or ionic strength of an ambient solution. Thus, they are able to convert reversibly chemical energy into mechanical energy and therefore they are suitable as sensitive material for integration in biochemical microsensors and MEMS devices. In this work, micro-fabricated silicon pressure sensor chips with integrated piezoresistors were used as transducers for the conversion of mechanical work into an appropriate electrical output signal due to the deflection of a thin silicon bending plate. Within this work two different sensor designs have been studied. The biocompatible poly(hydroxypropyl methacrylate-N,N-dimethylaminoethyl methacrylate-tetra-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) (HPMA-DMA-TEGDMA) was used as an environmental sensitive element in piezoresistive biochemical sensors. This polyelectrolytic hydrogel shows a very sharp volume phase transition at pH values below about 7.4 which is in the range of the physiological pH. The sensor's characteristic response was measured in-vitro for changes in pH of PBS buffer solution at fixed ionic strength. The experimental data was applied to the Hill equation and the sensor sensitivity as a function of pH was calculated out of it. The time-dependent sensor response was measured for small changes in pH, whereas different time constants have been observed. The same sensor principal was used for sensing of ionic strength. The time-dependent electrical sensor signal of both sensors was measured for variations in ionic strength at fixed pH value using PBS buffer solution. Both sensor types showed an asymmetric swelling behavior between the swelling and the deswelling cycle as well as different time constants, which was attributed to the different nature of mechanical hydrogel-confinement inside the sensor. PMID:21152365

  10. Innovation of novel 'Tab in Tab' system for release modulation of milnacipran HCl: optimization, formulation and in vitro investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parejiya, Punit B; Barot, Bhavesh S; Patel, Hetal K; Shelat, Pragna K; Shukla, Arunkumar

    2013-11-01

    The study was aimed toward development of modified release oral drug delivery system for highly water soluble drug, Milnacipran HCl (MH). Novel Tablet in Tablet system (TITs) comprising immediate and extended release dose of MH in different parts was fabricated. The outer shell was composed of admixture of MH, lactose and novel herbal disintegrant obtained from seeds of Lepidium sativum. In the inner core, MH was matrixed with blend of hydrophilic (Benecel®) and hydrophobic (Compritol®) polymers. 3² full factorial design and an artificial neuron network (ANN) were employed for correlating effect of independent variables on dependent variables. The TITs were characterized for pharmacopoeial specifications, in vitro drug release, SEM, drug release kinetics and FTIR study. The release pattern of MH from batch A10 containing 25.17% w/w Benecel® and 8.21% w/w of Compritol® exhibited drug release pattern close proximal to the ideal theoretical profile (t(50%) = 5.92 h, t(75%) = 11.9 h, t(90%) = 18.11 h). The phenomenon of drug release was further explained by concept of percolation and the role of Benecel® and Compritol® in drug release retardation was studied. The normalized error obtained from ANN was less, compared with the multiple regression analysis, and exhibits the higher accuracy in prediction. The results of short-term stability study revealed stable chataracteristics of TITs. SEM study of TITs at different dissolution time points confirmed both diffusion and erosion mechanisms to be operative during drug release from the batch A10. Novel TITs can be a succesful once a day delivery system for highly water soluble drugs.

  11. In vitro to in vivo extrapolation of effective dosimetry in developmental toxicity testing : Application of a generic PBK modelling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fragki, Styliani; Piersma, Aldert H; Rorije, Emiel; Zeilmaker, Marco J

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of kinetics to quantitative in vitro to in vivo extrapolations (QIVIVE) is a key step for the realization of a non-animal testing paradigm, in the sphere of regulatory toxicology. The use of Physiologically-Based Kinetic (PBK) modelling for determining systemic doses of chemicals at

  12. In vitro to in vivo extrapolation of effective dosimetry in developmental toxicity testing: Application of a generic PBK modelling approach.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fragki, Styliani; Piersma, Aldert H; Rorije, Emiel; Zeilmaker, Marco J

    2017-01-01

    Incorporation of kinetics to quantitative in vitro to in vivo extrapolations (QIVIVE) is a key step for the realization of a non-animal testing paradigm, in the sphere of regulatory toxicology. The use of Physiologically-Based Kinetic (PBK) modelling for determining systemic doses of chemicals at

  13. A novel experimental approach for three-dimensional geometry assessment of calcified human stenotic arteries in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boekhoven, R.W.; Lopata, R.G.P.; Sambeek, van M.R.H.M.; Vosse, van de F.N.; Rutten, M.C.M.

    2013-01-01

    To improve diagnosis and understanding of the risk of rupture of atherosclerotic plaque, new strategies to realistically determine mechanical properties of atherosclerotic plaque need to be developed. In this study, an in vitro experimental method is proposed for accurate 3-D assessment of

  14. A novel approach for investigating the trends in nitrogen dioxide levels in UK cities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, Margaret Carol; Galatioto, Fabio; Chakravartty, Ayan; Namdeo, Anil

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates the variations in levels of nitrogen dioxide, NO 2 , monitored over the decade 2001–2010, in Newcastle-upon-Tyne (UK) city centre, to develop fundamental understanding of the periods of persistence of levels of NO 2 greater than 40 μg m −3 (∼21 ppb) defined as air pollution event duration. The appropriateness of the hazard theory as a mechanism to understand failure rate of the duration of poor air pollution events was explored. The results revealed two types of air quality events. The longer duration air quality events (between 24 and 68 h) were associated with the “extreme-weather” conditions and were responsible for a small number of extremely long air pollution duration events. These created bias in the results and therefore the analysis was restricted specifically to the ‘normal-weather’ related air pollution event durations, conforming to a geometric distribution. This novel approach shows promise as a mechanism to monitor and investigate year on year trends observed in air quality data. -- Highlights: • Innovative method for the analysis of the duration of pollution events. • Hazard theory to better understand reasons of pollution events prevail year on year. • Duration of time of exceedences used as a parameter to assess trends in pollution. • Deteriorated or improved air quality from year to year over a decade investigated. -- Capsule: Explored appropriateness of the hazard theory to understand the failure rate of air pollution events and to investigate the year on year trends observed in air quality data in major cities

  15. What can we learn from PISA?: Investigating PISA's approach to scientific literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Cheryl Jean

    This dissertation is an investigation of the relationship between the multidimensional conception of scientific literacy and its assessment. The Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), developed under the auspices of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), offers a unique opportunity to evaluate the assessment of scientific literacy. PISA developed a continuum of performance for scientific literacy across three competencies (i.e., process, content, and situation). Foundational to the interpretation of PISA science assessment is PISA's definition of scientific literacy, which I argue incorporates three themes drawn from history: (a) scientific way of thinking, (b) everyday relevance of science, and (c) scientific literacy for all students. Three coordinated studies were conducted to investigate the validity of PISA science assessment and offer insight into the development of items to assess scientific 2 literacy. Multidimensional models of the internal structure of the PISA 2003 science items were found not to reflect the complex character of PISA's definition of scientific literacy. Although the multidimensional models across the three competencies significantly decreased the G2 statistic from the unidimensional model, high correlations between the dimensions suggest that the dimensions are similar. A cognitive analysis of student verbal responses to PISA science items revealed that students were using competencies of scientific literacy, but the competencies were not elicited by the PISA science items at the depth required by PISA's definition of scientific literacy. Although student responses contained only knowledge of scientific facts and simple scientific concepts, students were using more complex skills to interpret and communicate their responses. Finally the investigation of different scoring approaches and item response models illustrated different ways to interpret student responses to assessment items. These

  16. Investigation of AA2024-T3 surfaces modified by cerium compounds: A localized approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paussa, L.; Andreatta, F.; De Felicis, D.; Bemporad, E.; Fedrizzi, L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •The precipitation of cerium compounds occurs on the entire AA2024-T3 surface. •The matrix is less involved in the cerium precipitation. •Cerium intensely precipitates on Mg-rich IM particles. •The electrochemical behavior of Mg-rich IM particles influences the mechanism of cerium precipitation. -- Abstract: The precipitation of cerium compounds on polished AA2024-T3 surfaces was investigated following an electrochemical and microstructural localized approach. It was found that cerium precipitation occurs on the entire surface covering intermetallic particles and the matrix as well. The matrix is the region where the precipitation of cerium is less favoured. The highest amount of cerium was observed on magnesium-rich intermetallic particles. The localized analyses suggest that precipitation of cerium on magnesium-rich intermetallic particles could happen following two mechanisms: the former based on a potential reversal of the intermetallic particles and the latter due to a partial magnesium dissolution

  17. The liquid-vapour interface of chain molecules investigated using a density functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bryk, P; Bucior, K; Sokolowski, S; Zukocinski, G

    2004-01-01

    A microscopic density functional theory is used to investigate the liquid-vapour interface of fluids composed of short linear chains. We analyse the structure of the interface and evaluate the dependence of the surface tension and of the interfacial width on the temperature. The difference in chain length leads to differences in the thermodynamic properties of the fluids. The liquid-phase parts of the interfacial profiles of shorter chains exhibit oscillations at low temperatures. These oscillations vanish for longer chains. The surface tension and the interfacial width at a given temperature are found to increase with the chain length. Both the surface tension and the interfacial width scale as power laws upon approaching the critical point with critical exponents characteristic of mean-field-type theories and with prefactors depending on the chain length only

  18. BIOTECHNOLOGICAL APPROACHES FOR CONSERVATION OF THE ENDANGERED SPECIES Crambe koktebelica (JUNGE N. BUSCH AND EFFECT OF ASEPTIC IN VITRO CULTIVATION ON ITS BIOCHEMICAL PROPERTIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushkarova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish efficient protocols of seed surface sterilization with further multiplication in vitro for threatened species Crambe koktebelica (Junge N. Busch and to show the effect of biotechnological approach (in vitro cultivation of biodiversity conservation on plants biochemical properties. Seed surface sterilization was carried out according to the original method with further microclonal multiplication of aseptic sprouts from lateral buds on the Murashige and Skoog (MS medium supplemented with different concentrations of growth regulators. Fatty acid content was determined using Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry of fatty acid ethers. Antioxidant activity was determined using 2.2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging method. Total soluble protein content was measured using Bradford method and polyfructan content determination was based upon ketosugars ability to color in the acidic environment with resorcinol. Plants that were grown under in vitro and in vivo conditions and seeds were used in this research. Efficient protocol of surface sterilization that resulted in 45% of aseptic seed material 50% of which has sprouted was elaborated for C. koktebelica as well as fast microclonal multiplication methods that provided with up to 5.25 ± 0.50 new formed plantlets from 1 lateral bud (on the MS medium that contained 1 mg/L of 6-benzylaminopurine. It was also shown that aseptic cultivation benefits to saturated fatty acid accumulation and increases protein content but on the other hand it reduces unsaturated fatty acid amount and polyfructan content as well as antioxidant activity of plant material. Obtained data confirms the prospect of biotechnology approach to biodiversity conservation and suggest the necessity of father in vitro cultivation effect on biochemical composition of plant study.

  19. Investigating students' view on STEM in learning about electrical current through STS approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tupsai, Jiraporn; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to investigate Grade 11 students' views on Science Technology Engineering Mathematics (STEM) with the integration of learning about electrical current based on Science Technology Society (STS) approach [8]. The participants were 60 Grade 11 students in Demonstration Secondary School, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen Province, Thailand. The methodology is in the respect of interpretive paradigm. The teaching and learning about Electrical Current through STS approach carried out over 6 weeks. The Electrical Current unit through STS approach was developed based on framework[8] that consists of five stages including (1) identification of social issues, (2) identification of potential solutions, (3) need for knowledge, (4) decision making, and (5) socialization stage. To start with, the question "what if this world is lack of electricity" was challenged in the class in order to move students to find the problem of how to design Electricity Generation from Clean Energy. Students were expected to apply scientific and other knowledge to design of Electricity Generation. Students' views on STEM were collected during their learning by participant' observation and students' tasks. Their views on STEM were categorized when they applied their knowledge for designing the Electricity Generation. The findings indicated that students cooperatively work to solve the problem when applying knowledge about the content of Science and Mathematics and processing skill of Technology and Engineering. It showed that students held the integration of science, technology, engineering and mathematics to design their possible solutions in learning about Electrical Current. The paper also discusses implications for science teaching and learning through STS in Thailand.

  20. ICP-MS analysis of lanthanide-doped nanoparticles: A quantitative and multiplexing approach to investigate biodistribution, blood clearance, and targeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crayton, Samuel

    The rapidly progressing field of nanotechnology promises to revolutionize healthcare in the 21st century, with applications in the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of a wide range of diseases. However, before nanoparticulate agents can be brought into clinical use, they must first be developed, optimized, and evaluated in animal models. In the typical pre-clinical paradigm, almost all of the optimization is done at the in vitro level, with only a few select agents reaching the level of animal studies. Since only one experimental nanoparticle formulation can be investigated in a single animal, and in vivo experiments have relatively higher complexity, cost, and time requirements, it is not feasible to evaluate a very large number of agents at the in vivo stage. A major drawback of this approach, however, is that in vitro assays do not always accurately predict how a nanoparticle will perform in animal studies. Therefore, a method that allows many agents to be evaluated in a single animal subject would allow for much more efficient and predictive optimization of nanoparticles. We have found that by incorporating lanthanide tracer metals into nanoparticle formulations, we are successfully able to use inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) to quantitatively determine a nanoparticle's blood clearance kinetics, biodistribution, and tumor delivery. This approach was applied to evaluate both passive and active tumor targeting, as well as metabolically directed targeting of nanoparticles to low pH tumor microenvironments. Importantly, we found that these in vivo measurements could be made for many nanoparticle formulations simultaneously, in single animals, due to the high-order multiplexing capability of mass spectrometry. This approach allowed for efficient and reproducible comparison of performance between different nanoparticle formulations, by eliminating the effects of subject-to-subject variability. In the future, we envision that this "higher

  1. [Applicability of the da Vinci robotic system in the skull base surgical approach. Preclinical investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez-Nogueras Jimenez, Francisco J; Segura Fernandez-Nogueras, Miguel; Jouma Katati, Majed; Arraez Sanchez, Miguel Ángel; Roda Murillo, Olga; Sánchez Montesinos, Indalecio

    2015-01-01

    The role of robotic surgery is well established in various specialties such as urology and general surgery, but not in others such as neurosurgery and otolaryngology. In the case of surgery of the skull base, it has just emerged from an experimental phase. To investigate possible applications of the da Vinci surgical robot in transoral skull base surgery, comparing it with the authors' experience using conventional endoscopic transnasal surgery in the same region. A transoral transpalatal approach to the nasopharynx and medial skull base was performed on 4 cryopreserved cadaver heads. We used the da Vinci robot, a 30° standard endoscope 12mm thick, dual camera and dual illumination, Maryland forceps on the left terminal and curved scissors on the right, both 8mm thick. Bone drilling was performed manually. For the anatomical study of this region, we used 0.5cm axial slices from a plastinated cadaver head. Various skull base structures at different depths were reached with relative ease with the robot terminals Transoral robotic surgery with the da Vinci system provides potential advantages over conventional endoscopic transnasal surgery in the surgical approach to this region. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigation of the thermal mixing in a T-junction flow with different SRS approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gritskevich, M.S., E-mail: gritskevich@ymail.com [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Garbaruk, A.V. [St. Petersburg State Polytechnical University, 195251 St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Frank, Th.; Menter, F.R. [Software Development Department, ANSYS, 83714 Otterfing (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • Global (SAS, DDES) and zonal (ELES-WMLES) models are compared for the T-junction flow. • All the models accurately predict mean, RMS, and spectral quantities. • ELES-WMLES approach yields very good results independent of the advection scheme. • SAS and the DDES models are slightly less accurate. • SAS depends on the advection scheme. - Abstract: An investigation of different turbulence Scale-Resolving Simulation (SRS) modeling approaches for the flow in a T-junction has been conducted using the Scale-Adaptive Simulation (SAS), the Delayed Detached Eddy Simulation (DDES) and the Embedded Large Eddy Simulation (ELES) methods. The results show that all models are able to accurately predict mean and RMS velocity profiles and velocity spectra, when are used in combination with a low dissipation advection scheme. However, when a slightly more dissipative scheme is used, the SAS model yields less accurate results, indicating that this flow does not produce a strong enough flow instability to allow the safe application of this model. The DDES and the ELES models show less sensitivity to the numerical setting compared to the SAS model. The main goal of the study is the accurate prediction of heat transfer on the walls in the mixing zone. In that respect, the ELES method produces the most consistent agreement with the experimental data.

  3. Microscale In Vitro Assays for the Investigation of Neutral Red Retention and Ethoxyresorufin-O-Deethylase of Biofuels and Fossil Fuels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heger, Sebastian; Bluhm, Kerstin; Brendt, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Only few information on the potential toxic effectiveness of biofuels are available. Due to increasing worldwide demand for energy and fuels during the past decades, biofuels are considered as a promising alternative for fossil fuels in the transport sector. Hence, more information on their hazard...... gasoline fuel, a fossil diesel fuel and an established biodiesel. Two in vitro bioassays, one for assessing cytotoxicity and one for aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonism, so called dioxin-like activity, as measured by Ethoxyresorufin-O-Deethylase, were applied using the permanent fish liver cell line RTL-W1...... dosing approach were tested to address the high hydrophobicity and low solubility of these complex mixtures. Further work has to focus on an improvement of the chemical analyses of the fuel samples to allow a better comparison of any effects of fossil fuels and biofuels....

  4. Correlating Coating Characteristics with the Performance of Drug-Coated Balloons – A Comparative In Vitro Investigation of Own Established Hydrogel- and Ionic Liquid-Based Coating Matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaule, Sebastian; Minrath, Ingo; Stein, Florian; Kragl, Udo; Schmidt, Wolfram; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Sternberg, Katrin; Petersen, Svea

    2015-01-01

    Drug-coated balloons (DCB), which have emerged as a therapeutic alternative to drug-eluting stents in percutaneous cardiovascular intervention, are well described with regard to clinical efficacy and safety within a number of clinical studies. In vitro studies elucidating the correlation between coating additive and DCB performance are however rare but considered important for the understanding of DCB requirements and the improvement of established DCB. In this regard, we examined three different DCB-systems, which were developed in former studies based on the ionic liquid cetylpyridinium salicylate, the body-own hydrogel hyaluronic acid and the pharmaceutically well-established hydrogel polyvinylpyrrolidone, considering coating morphology, coating thickness, drug-loss, drug-transfer to the vessel wall, residual drug-concentration on the balloon surface and entire drug-load during simulated use in an in vitro vessel model. Moreover, we investigated particle release of the different DCB during simulated use and determined the influence of the three coatings on the mechanical behavior of the balloon catheter. We could show that coating characteristics can be indeed correlated with the performance of DCB. For instance, paclitaxel incorporation in the matrix can reduce the drug wash-off and benefit a high drug transfer. Additionally, a thin coating with a smooth surface and high but delayed solubility can reduce drug wash-off and decrease particle burden. As a result, we suggest that it is very important to characterize DCB in terms of mentioned properties in vitro in addition to their clinical efficacy in order to better understand their function and provide more data for the clinicians to improve the tool of DCB in coronary angioplasty. PMID:25734818

  5. A Workflow to Investigate Exposure and Pharmacokinetic Influences on High-Throughput in Vitro Chemical Screening Based on Adverse Outcome Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Martin B.; Leonard, Jeremy A.; Grulke, Christopher M.; Chang, Daniel T.; Edwards, Stephen W.; Brooks, Raina; Goldsmith, Michael-Rock; El-Masri, Hisham; Tan, Yu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    Background Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) link adverse effects in individuals or populations to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using in vitro methods. Practical application of AOPs in chemical-specific risk assessment requires incorporation of knowledge on exposure, along with absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties of chemicals. Objectives We developed a conceptual workflow to examine exposure and ADME properties in relation to an MIE. The utility of this workflow was evaluated using a previously established AOP, acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibition. Methods Thirty chemicals found to inhibit human AChE in the ToxCast™ assay were examined with respect to their exposure, absorption potential, and ability to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Structures of active chemicals were compared against structures of 1,029 inactive chemicals to detect possible parent compounds that might have active metabolites. Results Application of the workflow screened 10 “low-priority” chemicals of 30 active chemicals. Fifty-two of the 1,029 inactive chemicals exhibited a similarity threshold of ≥ 75% with their nearest active neighbors. Of these 52 compounds, 30 were excluded due to poor absorption or distribution. The remaining 22 compounds may inhibit AChE in vivo either directly or as a result of metabolic activation. Conclusions The incorporation of exposure and ADME properties into the conceptual workflow eliminated 10 “low-priority” chemicals that may otherwise have undergone additional, resource-consuming analyses. Our workflow also increased confidence in interpretation of in vitro results by identifying possible “false negatives.” Citation Phillips MB, Leonard JA, Grulke CM, Chang DT, Edwards SW, Brooks R, Goldsmith MR, El-Masri H, Tan YM. 2016. A workflow to investigate exposure and pharmacokinetic influences on high-throughput in vitro chemical screening based on adverse outcome pathways. Environ

  6. Investigation of moxifloxacin loaded chitosan–dextran nanoparticles for topical instillation into eye: In-vitro and ex-vivo evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskoos, Raad A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Management of ocular surface disease by conventional formulation is limited by poor residence of drug at cul-de-sac of eye. To overcome this limitation, prolonged released mucoadhesive chitosan (CS)–dextran sulfate (DS) nanoparticles (NPs) were investigated for the prolonged topical ophthalmic delivery of moxifloxacin (Mox). Methods: Formulation was optimized by 3-factors (CS, DS, and Mox concentration), 3-levels (−1, 0, +1) Box-Behnken design. Optimized formulation was characterized for various in-vitro attributes, including particles size, zeta potential, shape and morphology, in-vitro release profile, corneal permeation, corneal retention, ocular tolerance test as well as antimicrobial activity. Results: Average hydrodynamic particle size of statistically optimized formulation was found to be 279.18 ± 15.63 nm with good polydispersity index, 0.367 ± 0.016 and positive zeta potential, +31.23 ± 1.32. NPs showed entrapment efficiency, 72.82 ± 3.6% and transmission electron microscopic analysis revealed a spherical shape of particles. Formulation exhibited biphasic release profile with an initial fast release (≈25% in 1st h) followed by sustained release (≈95% in next 24 h) following Korsmeyer–Peppas model with a nonFickian diffusion process. Mox loaded CS-DS NPs exhibited a significantly higher (P < 0.01), approximately 1.8-fold transcorneal permeation as well as significantly higher corneal retention (P < 0.01), around 4-5-fold when compared to free solution. Developed formulation exhibited safety profile comparable to normal saline, which was revealed by ocular tolerance test (Hen's egg test-chorioallantoic membrane). Mox-CS-DS NPs exhibited significantly high (P < 0.01) antimicrobial activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Conclusion: In-vitro and ex-vivo studies revealed that developed formulation could be a potential substitute for prolonged topical ocular delivery. PMID:25426437

  7. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBaron, Matthew J.; Geter, David R.; Rasoulpour, Reza J.; Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar; Thomas, Johnson; Murray, Jennifer; Kan, H. Lynn; Wood, Amanda J.; Elcombe, Cliff; Vardy, Audrey; McEwan, Jillian; Terry, Claire; Billington, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  8. An integrated approach for prospectively investigating a mode-of-action for rodent liver effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeBaron, Matthew J., E-mail: MJLeBaron@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Geter, David R., E-mail: dave.geter@gmail.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Rasoulpour, Reza J. [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Gollapudi, B. Bhaskar, E-mail: BBGollapudi@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Thomas, Johnson, E-mail: JThomas4@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Murray, Jennifer, E-mail: AMurray@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Kan, H. Lynn, E-mail: HLKan@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Wood, Amanda J., E-mail: AJWood@dow.com [Toxicology and Environmental Research and Consulting, The Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI, 48674 (United States); Elcombe, Cliff, E-mail: CliffElcombe@cxrbiosciences.com [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Vardy, Audrey, E-mail: audrey_vardy@europe.bd.com [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); McEwan, Jillian, E-mail: jillian.mcewan@rtmcewan.co.uk [CXR Biosciences, 2 James Lindsay Place, Dundee Technopole, Dundee, DD1 5JJ, Scotland (United Kingdom); Terry, Claire, E-mail: CTerry@dow.com [Dow AgroSciences, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Billington, Richard, E-mail: RBillington@dow.com [Dow AgroSciences, Abingdon, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Registration of new plant protection products (e.g., herbicide, insecticide, or fungicide) requires comprehensive mammalian toxicity evaluation including carcinogenicity studies in two species. The outcome of the carcinogenicity testing has a significant bearing on the overall human health risk assessment of the substance and, consequently, approved uses for different crops across geographies. In order to understand the relevance of a specific tumor finding to human health, a systematic, transparent, and hypothesis-driven mode of action (MoA) investigation is, appropriately, an expectation by the regulatory agencies. Here, we describe a novel approach of prospectively generating the MoA data by implementing additional end points to the standard guideline toxicity studies with sulfoxaflor, a molecule in development. This proactive MoA approach results in a more robust integration of molecular with apical end points while minimizing animal use. Sulfoxaflor, a molecule targeting sap-feeding insects, induced liver effects (increased liver weight due to hepatocellular hypertrophy) in an initial palatability probe study for selecting doses for subsequent repeat-dose dietary studies. This finding triggered the inclusion of dose-response investigations of the potential key events for rodent liver carcinogenesis, concurrent with the hazard assessment studies. As predicted, sulfoxaflor induced liver tumors in rats and mice in the bioassays. The MoA data available by the time of the carcinogenicity finding supported the conclusion that the carcinogenic potential of sulfoxaflor was due to CAR/PXR nuclear receptor activation with subsequent hepatocellular proliferation. This MoA was not considered to be relevant to humans as sulfoxaflor is unlikely to induce hepatocellular proliferation in humans and therefore would not be a human liver carcinogen. - Highlights: • We prospectively generated MoA data into standard guideline toxicity studies. • A proactive MoA approach

  9. A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fornace, Jr, A J

    2007-03-03

    Abstract for final report for project entitled A functional genomics approach using radiation-induced changes in gene expression to study low dose radiation effects in vitro and in vivo which has been supported by the DOE Low Dose Radiation Research Program for approximately 7 years. This project has encompassed two sequential awards, ER62683 and then ER63308, in the Gene Response Section in the Center for Cancer Research at the National Cancer Institute. The project was temporarily suspended during the relocation of the Principal Investigators laboratory to the Dept. of Genetics and Complex Diseases at Harvard School of Public Health at the end of 2004. Remaining support for the final year was transferred to this new site later in 2005 and was assigned the DOE Award Number ER64065. The major aims of this project have been 1) to characterize changes in gene expression in response to low-dose radiation responses; this includes responses in human cells lines, peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL), and in vivo after human or murine exposures, as well as the effect of dose-rate on gene responses; 2) to characterize changes in gene expression that may be involved in bystander effects, such as may be mediated by cytokines and other intercellular signaling proteins; and 3) to characterize responses in transgenic mouse models with relevance to genomic stability. A variety of approaches have been used to study transcriptional events including microarray hybridization, quantitative single-probe hybridization which was developed in this laboratory, quantitative RT-PCR, and promoter microarray analysis using genomic regulatory motifs. Considering the frequent responsiveness of genes encoding cytokines and related signaling proteins that can affect cellular metabolism, initial efforts were initiated to study radiation responses at the metabolomic level and to correlate with radiation-responsive gene expression. Productivity includes twenty-four published and in press manuscripts

  10. A network-based biomarker approach for molecular investigation and diagnosis of lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Bor-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Many studies have investigated the carcinogenic process and identified the biomarkers for signature classification. However, based on the research dedicated to this field, there is no highly sensitive network-based method for carcinogenesis characterization and diagnosis from the systems perspective. Methods In this study, a systems biology approach integrating microarray gene expression profiles and protein-protein interaction information was proposed to develop a network-based biomarker for molecular investigation into the network mechanism of lung carcinogenesis and diagnosis of lung cancer. The network-based biomarker consists of two protein association networks constructed for cancer samples and non-cancer samples. Results Based on the network-based biomarker, a total of 40 significant proteins in lung carcinogenesis were identified with carcinogenesis relevance values (CRVs. In addition, the network-based biomarker, acting as the screening test, proved to be effective in diagnosing smokers with signs of lung cancer. Conclusions A network-based biomarker using constructed protein association networks is a useful tool to highlight the pathways and mechanisms of the lung carcinogenic process and, more importantly, provides potential therapeutic targets to combat cancer.

  11. How noninvasive investigation has modified our therapeutic approach in vascular medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antignani PL

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available PL AntignaniItalian Society for Vascular InvestigationNoninvasive diagnostic methods have modified our therapeutic decision-making in several vascular diseases. In particular, many forms of surgical treatment, both endovascular and open, are performed based exclusively on evaluation with duplex scanning. The purpose of noninvasive ultrasound testing is to distinguish normal from pathological vessels, to classify a wide range of disease states, to assess the collateral circulation, and to do so in a safe and cost-effective manner. The primary aim is to identify patients who are at risk for acute and chronic vascular disease and who may require specific treatment. A secondary aim is to document progressive or recurrent disease in patients already known to be at risk. Of course, individual vascular laboratories must validate their own results against a suitable gold standard, and they have to guarantee the best quality and maximum accuracy.1     With regard to diseases of the carotid artery, color flow duplex scanning is the investigation of choice for diagnosis and measurement of carotid stenosis, provided that objective criteria are used and scanning is done by experienced operators. Several velocity criteria used to detect the presence and severity of carotid artery disease and the morphological evaluation of lesions allow us to have a specificity of 90% and a sensitivity of 99% when all categories of carotid disease are considered. On the basis of these criteria, we can identify the best therapeutic approach for specific pathological conditions.

  12. Every Newton Hertz: a macro to micro approach to investigating brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Stefan M; Rowson, Steven

    2009-01-01

    The high incidence of concussion in contact sports provides a unique opportunity to collect data to characterize mild traumatic brain injury. This paper outlines a macro to micro approach in which the organ level response of the head is analyzed through head acceleration data from human volunteers and the tissue level response is analyzed through finite element analysis of these data. The helmets of Virginia Tech football players are instrumented with multi-accelerometer measurement devices to record linear and rotational head accelerations for every impact during a game or practice. These impacts are then modeled using the Simulated Injury Monitor (SIMon) finite element head model. Cumulative strain damage measure was investigated for the impacts resulting in the high linear and rotational accelerations. The effect of head impacts on functional performance in football players is also investigated to identify any cognitive effects from repetitive sub-concussive impacts. A better understanding of the effects of head impacts and the mechanisms of brain injury will likely result in insight to future head injury prevention methods and cellular research on brain injury.

  13. Contribution to the investigation of the p53 in vivo and in vitro trans-activation activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meiller, A.

    2004-03-01

    Among the body's defence mechanisms, the programmed cellular death or apoptosis is an important safeguard way which allows the body to get rid of the injured cells before they acquire steady genetic modifications leading to an anarchistic multiplication. As p53 tumor suppressor gene plays a predominant role within this process, this research report first presents the p53 protein, its structure, its activities as a transcription factor, its modifications and the implications on its functional activities, its biological activities, and describes the p53 intracellular rate regulation and the use of this protein in radiology, particularly in 'in vivo' investigations on irradiated mice. It also presents the p53 family. Then, the author reports experimental investigations on possible other genes which could be trans-activated by p53. A gene is identified as a new target gene. She also demonstrates a new p53 activation path induced by another member of the p53 family, the p73 alpha protein

  14. Testing strategies for embryo-fetal toxicity of human pharmaceuticals. Animal models vs. in vitro approaches: a workshop report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Laan, Jan Willem; Chapin, Robert E; Haenen, Bert; Jacobs, Abigail C; Piersma, Aldert

    2012-06-01

    Reproductive toxicity testing is characterized by high animal use. For registration of pharmaceutical compounds, developmental toxicity studies are usually conducted in both rat and rabbits. Efforts have been underway for a long time to design alternatives to animal use. Implementation has lagged, partly because of uncertainties about the applicability domain of the alternatives. The reproductive cycle is complex and not all mechanisms of development can be mimicked in vitro. Therefore, efforts are underway to characterize the available alternative tests with regard to the mechanism of action they include. One alternative test is the mouse embryonic stem cell test (EST), which has been studied since the late 1990s. It is a genuine 3R "alternative" assay as it is essentially animal-free. A meeting was held to review the state-of-the-art of various in vitro models for prediction of developmental toxicity. Although the predictivity of individual assays is improving, a battery of several assays is likely to have even higher predictivity, which is necessary for regulatory acceptance. The workshop concluded that an important first step is a thorough survey of the existing rat and rabbit studies, to fully characterize the frequency of responses and the types of effects seen. At the same time, it is important to continue the optimization of in vitro assays. As more experience accumulates, the optimal conditions, assay structure, and applicability of the alternative assays are expected to emerge. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Influence of grinding on the nutritive value of peas for ruminants: comparison between in vitro and in situ approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giger-Reverdin, Sylvie; Maaroufi, Chiraze; Chapoutot, Patrick; Peyronnet, Corinne; Sauvant, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    In ruminant nutrition, peas are characterized by high protein solubility and degradability, which impair its protein value estimated by the official in situ method. Grinding can be used as a technological treatment of pea seeds to modify their nutritional value. The aim of this study was to compare the in situ method with an in vitro method on the same pea either in a coarse pea flour form (PCF) or in a ground pea fine flour form (PFF) to understand the effect of grinding. Both forms were also reground (GPCF and GPFF). PCF presented a lower rate of in vitro degradation than PFF, and more stable fermentation parameters (pH, ammonia, soluble carbohydrates) even if gas production was higher for the PCF after 48 h of incubation. In situ dry matter and protein degradation were lower for PCF than those for PFF; these differences were more marked than with the in vitro method. Reground peas were very similar to PFF. The values for pea protein digestible in the intestine (PDI) were higher for PCF than those for PFF. This study points out the high sensitivity of the in situ method to grinding. The study needs to be validated by in vivo measurements. PMID:25473488

  16. Immunogenicity investigations of lipidoid structures in vitro and in silico: Modulating lipidoid-mediated TLR4 activation by nanoparticle design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Groot, Anne Marit; Thanki, Kaushik; Gangloff, Monique

    2018-01-01

    , we showed that encapsulation of siRNA in lipid-polymer hybrid nanoparticles (LPNs), based on poly(DL-lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) and cationic lipid-like materials (lipidoids), remarkably enhances intracellular delivery of siRNA as compared to siRNA delivery with LPNs modified...... acid lipid particles, which was the reference formulation for siRNA delivery, proved to activate TLR4. However, by combining lipidoids with PLGA into LPNs, TLR4 activation was abrogated. Thus, lipidoid-mediated TLR4 activation during siRNA delivery may be modulated via optimization of the formulation......Therapeutics based on small interfering RNA (siRNA) have promising potential as antiviral and anti-inflammatory agents. To deliver siRNA across cell membranes to reach the RNA interference pathway in the cytosol of target cells, non-viral nanoparticulate delivery approaches are explored. Recently...

  17. Hall versus conventional stainless steel crown techniques: in vitro investigation of marginal fit and microleakage using three different luting agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdemci, Zeynep Yalçınkaya; Cehreli, S Burçak; Tirali, R Ebru

    2014-01-01

    This study's purpose was to investigate microleakage and marginal discrepancies in stainless steel crowns (SSCs) placed using conventional and Hall techniques and cemented with three different luting agents. Seventy-eight human primary maxillary second molars were randomly assigned to two groups (N=39), and SSCs were applied either with the Hall or conventional technique. These two groups were further subgrouped according to the material used for crown cementation (N=13 per group). Two specimens in each group were processed for scanning electron microscopy investigation. The extent of microleakage and marginal fit was quantified in millimeters on digitally photographed sections using image analysis software. The data were compared with a two-way independent and a two-way mixed analysis of variance (P=.05). The scores in the Hall group were significantly worse than those in the conventional technique group (Pcement displayed the lowest extent of microleakage, followed by glass ionomer and polycarboxylate cements (Psteel crowns applied using the Hall technique displayed higher microleakage scores than those applied using the conventional technique, regardless of the cementation material. When the interaction of the material and technique was assessed, resin cement presented as the best choice for minimizing microleakage in both techniques.

  18. In vitro investigation on the impact of Solutol HS 15 on the uptake of colchicine into rat hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo González, Roberto Carlos; Boess, Franziska; Durr, Evelyne; Schaub, Nathalie; Bittner, Beate

    2004-07-26

    In the current investigation, the impact of the surface-active formulation ingredient Solutol HS 15 on the uptake of colchicine into freshly isolated rat hepatocytes was investigated using a centrifugal filtration technique through a silicone oil layer. Colchicine is taken up into the cells by an active transport mechanism. When conducting the experiment at 37 degrees C, it was found that at concentrations below its critical micellar concentration (CMC) of 0.021% (0.0003 and 0.003%, w/v), Solutol HS 15 did not impact the uptake of colchicine. By contrast, at a Solutol HS 15 concentration above its CMC (0.03%, w/v), the amount of colchicine taken up into the cells as well as its uptake velocity were significantly decreased. However, in control experiments performed at 4 degrees C, a temperature at which active transport processes should be significantly slowed down, Solutol HS 15 at 0.03% did not affect colchicine uptake and/or its association with the cells. The described findings might be rationalized by inhibition of colchicine transport either due to direct interaction at the transport site or due to alterations of membrane properties in the presence of Solutol HS 15 at concentrations above its CMC. Moreover, a strong molecular interaction between Solutol HS 15 and colchicine as well as an incorporation of colchicine into micelles formed by Solutol HS 15, this way resulting in a limited contact of colchicine with the cells, cannot be excluded as contributors to the observed effect.

  19. Investigations on the method of in vitro accumulation measurements of 14C phenylalanine on human small intestine biopsies, illustrated by the example of Diabetes mellitus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zenneck, A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed, by which actively transported substrates can accumulationarily be measured out in vitro on biopsy material. The applicability of this method as index for an active transport performance could then be examined on the example of a control group with sound small intestine and on patients with diabetes mellitus. In order to complete this parameter of the transport function, the specific saccharase activity in the overall homogenate of the mucous membrane was determined. The basis of this determination were the previous investigations on the experimental diabetes mellitus, in which morphologic and functional alterations had been detected. The various influences are discussed, which may be important for the detected alterations. However, a comparison with the results obtained in animal experiments is possible only to a very limited extent, since the situation in human diabetes mellitus is very complicated. (orig./MG) [de

  20. PLGA encapsulation and radioiodination of indole-3-carbinol: investigation of anticancerogenic effects against MCF7, Caco2 and PC3 cells by in vitro assays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorkem Yildiz; Ayfer Yurt Kilcar; Medine, E.I.; Volkan Tekin; Ozge Kozgus Guldu; Zumrut Biber Muftuler, F.

    2017-01-01

    Encapsulation with PLGA of I3C and radioiodination have been performed. Anticancerogenic effects of I3C and I3C-PLGA have been investigated utilizing in vitro methods on breast adenocarcinoma epithelial (MCF7), colon adenocarcinoma epithelial (Caco2), prostate carcinoma epithelial (PC3) cells. Characterization of I3C-PLGA have been performed with DLS method and SEM analysis. I3C and I3C-PLGA compounds have been radiolabeled in high yields with "1"3"1I which is widely used for diagnosis and treatment in Nuclear Medicine. All experimental results demonstrated that radioiodinated compounds are promising in order to be used in Nuclear Medicine as well as present study contributed previously reported studies. (author)

  1. Three approaches to investigating the multidimensional nature of a science assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokiert, Rebecca Jayne

    The purpose of this study was to investigate a multi-method approach for collecting validity evidence about the underlying knowledge and skills measured by a large-scale science assessment. The three approaches included analysis of dimensionality, differential item functioning (DIF), and think-aloud interviews. The specific research questions addressed were: (1) Does the 4-factor model previously found by Hamilton et al. (1995) for the grade 8 sample explain the data? (2) Do the performances of male and female students systematically differ? Are these performance differences captured in the dimensions? (3) Can think-aloud reports aid in the generation of hypotheses about the underlying knowledge and skills that are measured by this test? A confirmatory factor analysis of the 4-factor model revealed good model data fit for both the AB and AC tests. Twenty-four of the 83 AB test items and 16 of the 77 AC test items displayed significant DIF, however, items were found, on average, to favour both males and females equally. There were some systematic differences found across the 4-factors; items favouring males tended to be related to earth and space sciences, stereotypical male related activities, and numerical operations. Conversely, females were found to outperform males on items that required careful reading and attention to detail. Concurrent and retrospective verbal reports (Ericsson & Simon, 1993) were collected from 16 grade 8 students (9 male and 7 female) while they solved 12 DIF items. Four general cognitive processing themes were identified from the student protocols that could be used to explain male and female problem solving. The themes included comprehension (verbal and visual), visualization, background knowledge/experience (school or life), and strategy use. There were systematic differences in cognitive processing between the students that answered the items correctly and the students who answered the items incorrectly; however, this did not always

  2. Combined approach based on principal component analysis and canonical discriminant analysis for investigating hyperspectral plant response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Maria Stellacci

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Hyperspectral (HS data represents an extremely powerful means for rapidly detecting crop stress and then aiding in the rational management of natural resources in agriculture. However, large volume of data poses a challenge for data processing and extracting crucial information. Multivariate statistical techniques can play a key role in the analysis of HS data, as they may allow to both eliminate redundant information and identify synthetic indices which maximize differences among levels of stress. In this paper we propose an integrated approach, based on the combined use of Principal Component Analysis (PCA and Canonical Discriminant Analysis (CDA, to investigate HS plant response and discriminate plant status. The approach was preliminary evaluated on a data set collected on durum wheat plants grown under different nitrogen (N stress levels. Hyperspectral measurements were performed at anthesis through a high resolution field spectroradiometer, ASD FieldSpec HandHeld, covering the 325-1075 nm region. Reflectance data were first restricted to the interval 510-1000 nm and then divided into five bands of the electromagnetic spectrum [green: 510-580 nm; yellow: 581-630 nm; red: 631-690 nm; red-edge: 705-770 nm; near-infrared (NIR: 771-1000 nm]. PCA was applied to each spectral interval. CDA was performed on the extracted components to identify the factors maximizing the differences among plants fertilised with increasing N rates. Within the intervals of green, yellow and red only the first principal component (PC had an eigenvalue greater than 1 and explained more than 95% of total variance; within the ranges of red-edge and NIR, the first two PCs had an eigenvalue higher than 1. Two canonical variables explained cumulatively more than 81% of total variance and the first was able to discriminate wheat plants differently fertilised, as confirmed also by the significant correlation with aboveground biomass and grain yield parameters. The combined

  3. Investigation of Aspergillus fumigatus biofilm formation by various “omics” approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muszkieta, Laetitia; Beauvais, Anne; Pähtz, Vera; Gibbons, John G.; Anton Leberre, Véronique; Beau, Rémi; Shibuya, Kazutoshi; Rokas, Antonis; Francois, Jean M.; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Brakhage, Axel A.; Latgé, Jean P.

    2013-01-01

    In the lung, Aspergillus fumigatus usually forms a dense colony of filaments embedded in a polymeric extracellular matrix called biofilm (BF). This extracellular matrix embeds and glues hyphae together and protects the fungus from an outside hostile environment. This extracellular matrix is absent in fungal colonies grown under classical liquid shake conditions (PL), which were historically used to understand A. fumigatus pathobiology. Recent works have shown that the fungus in this aerial grown BF-like state exhibits reduced susceptibility to antifungal drugs and undergoes major metabolic changes that are thought to be associated to virulence. These differences in pathological and physiological characteristics between BF and liquid shake conditions suggest that the PL condition is a poor in vitro disease model. In the laboratory, A. fumigatus mycelium embedded by the extracellular matrix can be produced in vitro in aerial condition using an agar-based medium. To provide a global and accurate understanding of A. fumigatus in vitro BF growth, we utilized microarray, RNA-sequencing, and proteomic analysis to compare the global gene and protein expression profiles of A. fumigatus grown under BF and PL conditions. In this review, we will present the different signatures obtained with these three “omics” methods. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of each method and their complementarity. PMID:23407341

  4. Evaluation of the antidiabetic property of aqueous leaves extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. using in vivo and in vitro approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey Vana Rynjah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the antidiabetic potential of the aqueous leaves extract of Zanthoxylum armatum DC. leaves using in vivo and in vitro approaches. For in vivo studies, blood glucose level was monitored at different intervals after administration of varying doses of the extract for its hypoglycemic (100–6000 mg/kg b.w. and antihyperglycemic (250 mg/kg b.w. effect in normoglycemic and diabetic mice. In vitro enzymatic inhibition activity was tested against α-amylase, α- and β-glucosidase and lipase. Additionally hydroxyl radical, hydrogen peroxide scavenging assay and phytochemical screening were also performed. Element analysis of the plant was studied by Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS and Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES. The plant extract showed significant hypoglycemic and antihyperglycemic effect in normoglycemic and diabetic mice. The IC50 values of extract for α-amylase, β-glucosidase, lipase, hydroxyl radical scavenging activity, hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity were 7.40 mg/ml, 0.30 mg/ml, 8.35 mg/ml, 3.25 mg/ml, 9.62 mg/ml respectively and the percentage of inhibition for α-glucosidase was 79.82% at 0.8 mg/ml. In vitro studies were compared with their respective standards. Elemental analysis revealed the presence of essential elements such as Mg, V, Fe, Cr, Zn, Cu, Mo, Mn, K, Ca, P and Sr which are all known to play a role in regulating blood glucose. The results demonstrate that Z. armatum aqueous leaves extract possess antidiabetic property in both in vivo and in vitro condition.

  5. Statistical study of the reproductive hormones in relation to age and PCOS for patients undergoing in vitro investigation in Khartoum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelgadir, O. M.

    2002-09-01

    In this study 587 Sudanese woman were studied those women were referred to gynecological clinics a infertile cases. Hormonal investigations were done for them, prolactin, (PRL). Female stimulating hormones (FSH) luotulizing hormones (LH) level were analyzed at Sudan Atomic Energy Commission (SAEC), (RIA ) lab, with the radioimmunoassay (RIA) method. The objective of this study was to find the relation between age versus hyperprolicinemia and (PCOS) polycystic ovary syndrome. Statistical analysis was done with the (SPSS) computer program. The result was 39.2% of the total patient 587 were high prolactin level hyper prolactin >370 mu/I which 10% of them were in the age between 25-30 years old. Age between 30-35 years old was found to be high frequency complain high FSH levels (>8 mu/ I) 29.1% of the patients. Found to be of high LH/FSH. Ratio which clear indication of polycystic ovary syndrome. (PCOS). (Author)

  6. An in vitro investigation of a newer intracanal medicament Nisin on Enterococcus faecalis in comparison with chlorhexidine and calcium hydroxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suneel Kumar Chinni

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To determine the antibacterial efficacy of Nisin in comparison with Calcium hydroxide and Chlorhexidine. Materials and Methods: Fifty extracted lower premolar single-rooted teeth were collected and were instrumented with K3 rotary files. Then, root canals were inoculated with a bacterial solution of Enterococcus faecalis. After 21 days, the canals were inoculated with Saline, Nisin, Vancomycin, Calcium hydroxide, and Chlorhexidine. The roots were left for 7 days and on the 8 th day, to investigate the degree of infection of the radicular dentin, specimens of the dentin chips from the full length of the root canal were harvested using a sterile rotary K3 instrument (size 25 6% taper. Results: The results of the present study showed that Nisin and Chlorhexidine showed none of Colony Forming Units (CFU in their respective group. Conclusion: Within the limits of the study, Nisin was effective in eradicating E. faecalis cells in pure culture and root canal dentin.

  7. Investigation of antibacterial effects of ethanolic extract of Sumac (Rhus coriaria L. against Escherichia coli in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Moshtaghi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The antibacterial effect of etbhanolic extract of Sumac (Rhus coriaria L. was investigated quantitatively and qualitatively on Escherichia coli. The results of well diffusion test showed that extracts of Sumac in concentration of 0.5%, 1%, 2.5% and 5% could inhibited E. coli. In this study it was shown that MIC of the alcoholic extract of Sumac against E. coli was 6.25 mg/ml and its MBC against this bacterium was 50 mg/ml. The results from evaluation of the antibacterial effects of the Sumac revealed that at 4 and 15 °C, the growth of E. coli in test tubes containing meat extracts has increased Throughout the 48 h of incubation period. Results showed that the growth of this bacteria in different concentration of Sumac extract as decreased in the both tested temperatures in comparison to time zero (p

  8. Investigation of geometrical effects in the carbon allotropes manipulation based on AFM: multiscale approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korayem, M. H., E-mail: hkorayem@iust.ac.ir; Hefzabad, R. N.; Homayooni, A.; Aslani, H. [Iran University of Science and Technology, Robotic Research Laboratory, Center of Excellence in Experimental Solid Mechanics and Dynamics, School of Mechanical Engineering (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-01-15

    Carbon allotropes are used as nanocarriers for drug and cell delivery. To obtain an accurate result in the nanoscale, it is important to use a precise model. In this paper, a multiscale approach is presented to investigate the manipulation process of carbon allotropes based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). For this purpose, the AFM setup is separated into two parts with different sizes as macro field (MF) and nano field (NF). Using Kirchhoff’s plate model, the cantilever (the main part of MF) is modeled. The molecular dynamics method is applied to model the NF part, and then the MF and NF are coupled with the multiscale algorithm. With this model, by considering the effect of size and shape, the manipulation of carbon allotropes is carried out. The manipulations of armchair CNTs and fullerenes are performed to study the diameter changing effects. The result shows that the manipulation and friction force increases by increasing the diameter. The result of the indentation depth for the armchair CNTs indicates that decreasing the diameter causes the indentation depth to reduce. Moreover, the manipulations of four kinds of carbon allotropes with the same number of atoms have been studied to investigate the geometrical effects. The shapes of these nanoparticles change from sphere to cylinder. The results illustrate that the manipulation and the friction force decrease as the nanoparticle shape varies from sphere to cylinder. The Von-Mises results demonstrate that by changing the nanoparticle shape from the spherical to the cylindrical form, the stress increases, although the manipulation force reduces.

  9. Investigation of geometrical effects in the carbon allotropes manipulation based on AFM: multiscale approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korayem, M. H.; Hefzabad, R. N.; Homayooni, A.; Aslani, H.

    2017-01-01

    Carbon allotropes are used as nanocarriers for drug and cell delivery. To obtain an accurate result in the nanoscale, it is important to use a precise model. In this paper, a multiscale approach is presented to investigate the manipulation process of carbon allotropes based on atomic force microscopy (AFM). For this purpose, the AFM setup is separated into two parts with different sizes as macro field (MF) and nano field (NF). Using Kirchhoff’s plate model, the cantilever (the main part of MF) is modeled. The molecular dynamics method is applied to model the NF part, and then the MF and NF are coupled with the multiscale algorithm. With this model, by considering the effect of size and shape, the manipulation of carbon allotropes is carried out. The manipulations of armchair CNTs and fullerenes are performed to study the diameter changing effects. The result shows that the manipulation and friction force increases by increasing the diameter. The result of the indentation depth for the armchair CNTs indicates that decreasing the diameter causes the indentation depth to reduce. Moreover, the manipulations of four kinds of carbon allotropes with the same number of atoms have been studied to investigate the geometrical effects. The shapes of these nanoparticles change from sphere to cylinder. The results illustrate that the manipulation and the friction force decrease as the nanoparticle shape varies from sphere to cylinder. The Von-Mises results demonstrate that by changing the nanoparticle shape from the spherical to the cylindrical form, the stress increases, although the manipulation force reduces.

  10. Investigation on the relationship between solubility of artemisinin and polyvinylpyrroli done addition by using DAOSD approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin; Guo, Ran; He, Anqi; Weng, Shifu; Gao, Xiuxiang; Xu, Yizhuang; Noda, Isao; Wu, Jinguang

    2017-07-01

    In this work, we investigated the influence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on the solubility of artemisinin in aqueous solution by using quantitative 1H NMR. Experimental results demonstrate that about 4 times of incremental increase occurs on the solubility of artemisinin upon introducing PVP. In addition, dipole-dipole interaction between the ester group of artemisinin and the amide group of N-methylpyrrolidone (NMP), a model compound of PVP, is characterized by two-dimensional (2D) correlation FTIR spectroscopy with the DAOSD (Double Asynchronous Orthogonal Sample Design) approach developed in our previous work. The observation of cross peaks in a pair of 2D asynchronous spectra suggests that dipole-dipole interaction indeed occurs between the ester group of artemisinin and amide group of NMP. Moreover, the pattern of cross peaks indicates that the carbonyl band of artemisinin undergoes blue-shift while the bandwidth and absorptivity increases via interaction with NMP, and the amide band of NMP undergoes blue-shift while the absorptivity increases via interaction with artemisinin. Dipole-dipole interaction, as one of the strongest intermolecular interaction between artemisinin and excipient, may play an important role in the enhancement of the solubility of artemisinin in aqueous solution.

  11. CFD modeling using PDF approach for investigating the flame length in rotary kilns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elattar, H. F.; Specht, E.; Fouda, A.; Bin-Mahfouz, Abdullah S.

    2016-12-01

    Numerical simulations using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) are performed to investigate the flame length characteristics in rotary kilns using probability density function (PDF) approach. A commercial CFD package (ANSYS-Fluent) is employed for this objective. A 2-D axisymmetric model is applied to study the effect of both operating and geometric parameters of rotary kiln on the characteristics of the flame length. Three types of gaseous fuel are used in the present work; methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO) and biogas (50 % CH4 + 50 % CO2). Preliminary comparison study of 2-D modeling outputs of free jet flames with available experimental data is carried out to choose and validate the proper turbulence model for the present numerical simulations. The results showed that the excess air number, diameter of kiln air entrance, radiation modeling consideration and fuel type have remarkable effects on the flame length characteristics. Numerical correlations for the rotary kiln flame length are presented in terms of the studied kiln operating and geometric parameters within acceptable error.

  12. The investigation of anti-inflammatory activity of Yi Guanjian decoction by serum metabonomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shui, Sufang; Cai, Xiaorong; Huang, Rongqing; Xiao, Bingkun; Yang, Jianyun

    2017-01-30

    Yi Guanjian (YGJ), one of the Chinese herbal medicines most commonly used in western countries, reported to possess significant anti-inflammatary effects that inhibit the process of inflammation. However, the mechanisms underlying its anti-inflammation effects remain largely unresolved. This study was aimed to investigate the anti-inflammatory activity of YGJ and to explore its potential anti-inflammatory mechanisms by serum metabonomics approach. An xylene-induced mouse right-ear-edema model was used as an inflammatory response in vivo model. Ear edema, prostaglandin E2 (PGE 2 ) and Tumor-Necrosis-Factor-alpha (TNF-α) were detected. Then, serum metabolic profiling was analyzed and pathway analysis performed on the biomarkers reversed after YGJ administration and further integration of metabolic networks. The results showed that YGJ alleviated ear edema and decreased serum PGE 2 and TNF-α levels. Fourteen biomarkers were screened, and the levels were all reversed to different degrees after YGJ administration. These biomarkers were mainly related to linoleic acid metabolism, taurine and hypotaurine metabolism, glyoxylate and dicarboxylate metabolism, glycine, serine and threonine metabolism and citrate cycle (TCA cycle). In metabolic networks, glycine and pyruvate were node molecules. This indicated that YGJ could significantly inhibit inflammatory response triggered by acute local stimulation and exerted anti-inflammatory activity mainly by regulating node molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A Systems Biology Approach to Investigating Sex Differences in Cardiac Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Josephine; Fillmore, Natasha; Gao, Shouguo; Yang, Yanqin; Zhang, Xue; Liu, Poching; Stoehr, Andrea; Chen, Ye; Springer, Danielle; Zhu, Jun; Wang, Xujing; Murphy, Elizabeth

    2017-08-19

    Heart failure preceded by hypertrophy is a leading cause of death, and sex differences in hypertrophy are well known, although the basis for these sex differences is poorly understood. This study used a systems biology approach to investigate mechanisms underlying sex differences in cardiac hypertrophy. Male and female mice were treated for 2 and 3 weeks with angiotensin II to induce hypertrophy. Sex differences in cardiac hypertrophy were apparent after 3 weeks of treatment. RNA sequencing was performed on hearts, and sex differences in mRNA expression at baseline and following hypertrophy were observed, as well as within-sex differences between baseline and hypertrophy. Sex differences in mRNA were substantial at baseline and reduced somewhat with hypertrophy, as the mRNA differences induced by hypertrophy tended to overwhelm the sex differences. We performed an integrative analysis to identify mRNA networks that were differentially regulated in the 2 sexes by hypertrophy and obtained a network centered on PPARα (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α). Mouse experiments further showed that acute inhibition of PPARα blocked sex differences in the development of hypertrophy. The data in this study suggest that PPARα is involved in the sex-dimorphic regulation of cardiac hypertrophy. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  14. Ligand-Induced Dynamics of Neurotrophin Receptors Investigated by Single-Molecule Imaging Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetti, Laura; Luin, Stefano; Bonsignore, Fulvio; de Nadai, Teresa; Beltram, Fabio; Cattaneo, Antonino

    2015-01-01

    Neurotrophins are secreted proteins that regulate neuronal development and survival, as well as maintenance and plasticity of the adult nervous system. The biological activity of neurotrophins stems from their binding to two membrane receptor types, the tropomyosin receptor kinase and the p75 neurotrophin receptors (NRs). The intracellular signalling cascades thereby activated have been extensively investigated. Nevertheless, a comprehensive description of the ligand-induced nanoscale details of NRs dynamics and interactions spanning from the initial lateral movements triggered at the plasma membrane to the internalization and transport processes is still missing. Recent advances in high spatio-temporal resolution imaging techniques have yielded new insight on the dynamics of NRs upon ligand binding. Here we discuss requirements, potential and practical implementation of these novel approaches for the study of neurotrophin trafficking and signalling, in the framework of current knowledge available also for other ligand-receptor systems. We shall especially highlight the correlation between the receptor dynamics activated by different neurotrophins and the respective signalling outcome, as recently revealed by single-molecule tracking of NRs in living neuronal cells. PMID:25603178

  15. Computational investigation of fluid flow and heat transfer of an economizer by porous medium approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, C. Rajesh; Kumar, P.; Rajamohan, G.

    2017-07-01

    Computation of fluid flow and heat transfer in an economizer is simulated by a porous medium approach, with plain tubes having a horizontal in-line arrangement and cross flow arrangement in a coal-fired thermal power plant. The economizer is a thermal mechanical device that captures waste heat from the thermal exhaust flue gasses through heat transfer surfaces to preheat boiler feed water. In order to evaluate the fluid flow and heat transfer on tubes, a numerical analysis on heat transfer performance is carried out on an 110 t/h MCR (Maximum continuous rating) boiler unit. In this study, thermal performance is investigated using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation using ANSYS FLUENT. The fouling factor ε and the overall heat transfer coefficient ψ are employed to evaluate the fluid flow and heat transfer. The model demands significant computational details for geometric modeling, grid generation, and numerical calculations to evaluate the thermal performance of an economizer. The simulation results show that the overall heat transfer coefficient 37.76 W/(m2K) and economizer coil side pressure drop of 0.2 (kg/cm2) are found to be conformity within the tolerable limits when compared with existing industrial economizer data.

  16. An investigative approach to explore optimum assembly process design for annular targets carrying LEU foil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Annemarie

    Technetium-99m is the most widely used nuclear isotope in the medical field, with nearly 80 to 85% of all diagnostic imaging procedures. The daughter isotope of molybdenum-99 is currently produced using weapons-grade uranium. A suggested design for aluminum targets carrying low-enriched uranium (LEU) foil is presented for the fulfillment of eliminating highly enriched uranium (HEU) for medical isotope production. The assembly process that this research focuses on is the conventional draw-plug process which is currently used and lastly the sealing process. The research is unique in that it is a systematic approach to explore the optimal target assembly process to produce those targets with the required quality and integrity. Conducting 9 parametric experiments, aluminum tubes with a nickel foil fission-barrier and a surrogate stainless steel foil are assembled, welded and then examined to find defects, to determine residual stresses, and to find the best cost-effective target dimensions. The experimental design consists of 9 assembly combinations that were found through orthogonal arrays in order to explore the significance of each factor. Using probabilistic modeling, the parametric study is investigated using the Taguchi method of robust analysis. Depending on the situation, optimal conditions may be a nominal, a minimized or occasionally a maximized condition. The results will provide the best target design and will give optimal quality with little or no assembly defects.

  17. The emotional and reconstructive determinants of emotional memories: an experimental approach to flashbulb memory investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanciano, Tiziana; Curci, Antonietta; Semin, Gun R

    2010-07-01

    Flashbulb memories (FBMs) are vivid and detailed memories of the reception context of a public emotional event. Brown and Kulik (1977) introduced the label FBM to suggest the idea that individuals are able to preserve knowledge of an event in an indiscriminate way, in analogy with a photograph that preserves all details of a scene. Research work on FBMs has primarily been conducted using a naturalistic approach in order to explore the role of the emotional and reconstructive factors on FBM formation and maintenance. Nevertheless, these studies lack a sufficient control on the factors that might intervene in the process of FBM formation. The contribution of the present studies is addressed to experimentally investigating the role of emotional and reconstructive factors on emotionally charged memories, specifically on FBMs. Paralleling FBM findings, the two studies revealed that simply being in an emotional state allows people to remember all available information, such as irrelevant and unrelated details. Furthermore, the resulting memories are affected by reconstructive processes so that they are not as accurate as their richness of details would suggest.

  18. Investigation of joint costs management practices of dairy industry: a contingency approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinícius Costa da Silva Zonatto

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The research has investigated the adoption of administration practices in the set of costs in dairy product industries in the Southwest Region in Parana State, as well as, the contingency factors which has influenced the system in the management control at these companies. The explore research was developed through a study on data in quantitative approach in forty- three dairies. From these, just twenty-three produce milk and the other twenty cheese and its derivatives. According to the study these companies are concerned on how to check their costs on production. However, just the dairies which produce cheese and its derivatives are managing costs based on data in a planning and control process. The way used to determine the costs is based on the method of market value. These organizations stand out by the development of control systems of computerized costs where the aims are related to right identification of the costs and the prices for sale, as well. The main outside elements which have affected the organizations are the market needs and the goods availability. In relation to the model  of the manage control in these organizations, it was  checked that these are different from the others in the strategies structure, complexity in the production process, level of computerization and the aims of the use. It was concluded that the administration practices in those researched dairies are influenced by contingency factors.

  19. Investigation of the spatial generalization of Kato's theorem by a variational density-functional approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Csavinszky, P.

    1990-01-01

    In a recent work, March has considered the quantum-mechanical system of an arbitrary number of closed electronic shells around an atomic nucleus of charge Z a e. March has assumed that the shells are filled by noninteracting electrons, moving in the bare Coulomb potential energy of V(r) = -Z a e 2 /r. In this framework, the basic quantity is the total electron (number) density ρ(r), built by summing the (number) density ρ n (r) of the nth closed electronic shell over the principal quantum number n. March has shown that Kato's theorem, (∂ρ(r)/∂r) r=0 = -(2Z a /a 0 )ρ (r = 0), with a 0 = ℎ 2 /me 2 , is amenable to a spatially dependent generalization that can be expressed by ∂ρ(r)/∂r = -(2Z a /a 0 )ρ s (r), where ρ s (r) is the s-state contribution from the n closed electronic shells to ρ(r). The present work investigates the spatially dependent generalization of Kato's theorem for the Ne atom by making use of a variational density-functional approach and adopting several expressions for the kinetic-energy functional of the electrons. The intriguing question of identifying the best kinetic-energy functional is raised and discussed

  20. An in vitro investigation into retention strength and fatigue resistance of various designs of tooth/implant supported overdentures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatalla, Abdalbseet A; Song, Ke; Du, Tianfeng; Cao, Yingguang

    2012-02-01

    Previously, the choice of prosthetic implant-retained overdentures has depended on data from previous studies about the retention-fatigue strength of the attachment system selected. Little or no data have been available on the correlation between the attachment system selected and the overdenture support configuration. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the retention force and fatigue resistance of three attachment systems and four support designs of overdenture prosthesis. Four lower edentulous acrylic models were prepared and eight combinations of attachments groups were investigated in the study. These included: O-Rings with mini-dental implants (MDIs), Dalbo elliptic with Dalbo Rotex and fabricated flexible acrylic attachments with both MDI and Dalbo Rotex. The study was divided into four test groups: groups A and B, controls, and groups C and D, experimental groups. Control group A contained three overdenture supports: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with Dalbo Rotex screwed in. Control group B contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with Dalbo Rotex screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Experimental group C contained three overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the canine region and at the midline, and one simulated tooth root with MDI screwed in. Experimental group D contained four overdenture support foundations: two free standing MDIs in the right canine region and the first premolar region, and two simulated tooth roots with MDIs screwed in at the same MDI position, but on the left side of the model. Each group was further divided into two subgroups according to attachment type used. Five samples were prepared for each group. Retention force (N) values were recorded initially (0 cycles) and after 360, 720, 1440

  1. Effects of sertraline and fluoxetine on p-glycoprotein at barrier sites: in vivo and in vitro approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amita Kapoor

    Full Text Available Retention of substances from systemic circulation in the brain and testes are limited due to high levels of P-glycoprotein (P-gp in the luminal membranes of brain and testes capillary endothelial cells. From a clinical perspective, P-gp rapidly extrudes lipophilic therapeutic agents, which then fail to reach efficacious levels. Recent studies have demonstrated that acute administration of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI can affect P-gp function, in vitro and in vivo. However, little is known concerning the time-course of these effects or the effects of different SSRI in vivo.The P-gp substrate, tritiated digoxin ([(3H] digoxin, was co-administered with fluoxetine or sertraline to determine if either compound increased drug accumulation within the brains and testes of mice due to inhibition of P-gp activity. We undertook parallel studies in endothelial cells derived from brain microvessels to determine the dose-response and time-course of effects.In vitro, sertraline resulted in rapid and potent inhibition of P-gp function in brain endothelial cells, as determined by cellular calcein accumulation. In vivo, a biphasic effect was demonstrated. Brain accumulation of [(3H] digoxin was increased 5 minutes after treatment with sertraline, but by 60 minutes after sertraline treatment, brain accumulation of digoxin was reduced compared to control. By 240 minutes after sertraline treatment brain digoxin accumulation was elevated compared to control. A similar pattern of results was obtained in the testes. There was no significant effect of fluoxetine on P-gp function, in vitro or in vivo.Acute sertraline administration can modulate P-gp activity in the blood-brain barrier and blood-testes barrier. This clearly has implications for the ability of therapeutic agents that are P-gp substrates, to enter the brain when co-administered with SSRI.

  2. New Approaches for Quantitating the Inhibition of HIV-1 Replication by Antiviral Drugs in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahon, Moira A.; Shen, Lin; Siliciano, Robert F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review With highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-1 infection has become a manageable lifelong disease. Developing optimal treatment regimens requires understanding how to best measure anti-HIV activity in vitro and how drug dose response curves generated in vitro correlate with in vivo efficacy. Recent findings Several recent studies have indicated that conventional multi-round infectivity assays are inferior to single cycle assays at both low and high levels of inhibition. Multi-round infectivity assays can fail to detect subtle but clinically significant anti-HIV activity. The discoveries of the anti-HIV activity of the hepatitis B drug entecavir and the herpes simplex drug acyclovir were facilitated by single round infectivity assays. Recent studies using a single round infectivity assay have shown that a previously neglected parameter, the dose response curve slope, is an extremely important determinant of antiviral activity. Some antiretroviral drugs have steep slopes that result in extraordinary levels of antiviral activity. The instantaneous inhibitory potential (IIP), the log reduction in infectivity in a single round assay at clinical drug concentrations, has been proposed as a novel index for comparing antiviral activity. Summary Among in vitro measures of antiviral activity, single round infection assays have the advantage of measure instantaneous inhibition by a drug. Re-evaluating the antiviral activity of approved HIV-1 drugs has shown that the slope parameter is an important factor in drug activity. Determining the IIP by using a single round infectivity assay may provide important insights that can predict the in vivo efficacy of anti-HIV-1 drugs. PMID:19841584

  3. A preliminary investigation into the impact of a pesticide combination on human neuronal and glial cell lines in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D Coleman

    Full Text Available Many pesticides are used increasingly in combinations during crop protection and their stability ensures the presence of such combinations in foodstuffs. The effects of three fungicides, pyrimethanil, cyprodinil and fludioxonil, were investigated together and separately on U251 and SH-SY5Y cells, which can be representative of human CNS glial and neuronal cells respectively. Over 48h, all three agents showed significant reductions in cellular ATP, at concentrations that were more than tenfold lower than those which significantly impaired cellular viability. The effects on energy metabolism were reflected in their marked toxic effects on mitochondrial membrane potential. In addition, evidence of oxidative stress was seen in terms of a fall in cellular thiols coupled with increases in the expression of enzymes associated with reactive species formation, such as GSH peroxidase and superoxide dismutase. The glial cell line showed significant responsiveness to the toxin challenge in terms of changes in antioxidant gene expression, although the neuronal SH-SY5Y line exhibited greater vulnerability to toxicity, which was reflected in significant increases in caspase-3 expression, which is indicative of the initiation of apoptosis. Cyprodinil was the most toxic agent individually, although oxidative stress-related enzyme gene expression increases appeared to demonstrate some degree of synergy in the presence of the combination of agents. This report suggests that the impact of some pesticides, both individually and in combinations, merits further study in terms of their impact on human cellular health.

  4. The in vivo pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion investigation of mesaconine in rats and its in vitro intestinal absorption study using UPLC-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuxiu; Tang, Minghai; Liu, Taohong; Wang, Chunyan; Tang, Qiaoxin; Xiao, Yaxin; Yang, Ruixin; Chao, Ruobing

    2017-12-27

    1. Mesaconine, an ingredient from Aconitum carmichaelii Debx., has been proven to have cardiac effect. For further development and better pharmacological elucidation, the in vivo process and intestinal absorptive behavior of mesaconine should be investigated comprehensively. 2. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantitation of mesaconine in rat plasma, tissue homogenates, urine and feces to investigate the in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution and excretion. The intestinal absorptive behavior of mesaconine was investigated using in vitro everted rat gut sac model. 3. Mesaconine was well distributed in tissues and a mass of unchanged form was detected in feces. It was difficultly absorbed into blood circulatory system after oral administration. The insufficient oral bioavailability of mesaconine may be mainly attributed to its low intestinal permeability due to a lack of lipophilicity. The absorption of mesaconine in rat's intestine is a first-order process with the passive diffusion mechanism.

  5. Herbal infusions of black seed and wheat germ oil: Their chemical profiles, in vitro bio-investigations and effective formulations as Phyto-Nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumus, Z Pinar; Guler, Emine; Demir, Bilal; Barlas, F Baris; Yavuz, Murat; Colpankan, Dilara; Senisik, A Murat; Teksoz, Serap; Unak, Perihan; Coskunol, Hakan; Timur, Suna

    2015-09-01

    The reported studies related to black seed oil (BSO) and wheat germ oil (WGO) have illustrated that they have a wide range of biological activities. Therefore, enhancing the amount of bio-active compounds that caused higher cell based anti-oxidative effect as well as cell proliferation, etc. in seed oils, infusion of crude plant material has been gained importance as a traditional technique. Herein, we accomplished the infusion of Calendula flowers that also contains many phyto-constituents into BSO and WGO. After the infusion of oils, the change of phytochemical amount was investigated and evaluated according to the oils by chromatography, radical scavenging activity. Subsequently, for investigating the biological impact upon live cells, cytotoxicity, cell-based antioxidant capacity, wound healing and radioprotective activity were tested with monkey kidney fibroblast like cells (Vero) and HaCaT keratinocytes. In vitro cell based experiments (wound healing and radioprotective activity) confirmed that Calendula infused BSO and WGO have greater bio-activity when compared to those plain forms. The herbal oils prepared with an effective extraction technique were incorporated into nanoemulsion systems which will be then called as 'Phyto-Nanoemulsion'. After herbal oil biomolecules were encapsulated into nanoemulsion based delivery systems, the designed formulations were investigated in terms of biological activities. In conclusion, these preparations could be a good candidate as a part of dermal cosmetic products or food supplements which have the therapeutic efficiency, especially after radio- or chemotherapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Polymer adhesion predictions for oral dosage forms to enhance drug administration safety. Part 2: In vitro approach using mechanical force methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drumond, Nélio; Stegemann, Sven

    2018-06-01

    Predicting the potential for unintended adhesion of solid oral dosage forms (SODF) to mucosal tissue is an important aspect that should be considered during drug product development. Previous investigations into low strength mucoadhesion based on particle interactions methods provided evidence that rheological measurements could be used to obtain valid predictions for the development of SODF coatings that can be safely swallowed. The aim of this second work was to estimate the low mucoadhesive strength properties of different polymers using in vitro methods based on mechanical forces and to identify which methods are more precise when measuring reduced mucoadhesion. Another aim was to compare the obtained results to the ones achieved with in vitro particle interaction methods in order to evaluate which methodology can provide stronger predictions. The combined results correlate between particle interaction methods and mechanical force measurements. The polyethylene glycol grades (PEG) and carnauba wax showed the lowest adhesive potential and are predicted to support safe swallowing. Hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) along with high molecular grades of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) exhibited strong in vitro mucoadhesive strength. The combination of rheological and force tensiometer measurements should be considered when assessing the reduced mucoadhesion of polymer coatings to support safe swallowing of SODF. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In-vitro investigations of skin closure using diode laser and protein solder containing gold nano shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nourbakhsh, M. S.; Etrati Khosroshahi, M.

    2011-01-01

    Laser tissue soldering is a new technique for repair of various tissues including the skin, liver, articular cartilage and nerves and is a promising alternative to suture. To overcome the problems of thermal damage to surrounding tissues and low laser penetration depth, some exogenous chromophores such as gold nano shells, a new class of nanoparticles consisting of a dielectric core surrounded by a thin metal shell, are used. The aims of this study were to use two different concentrations of gold nano shells as the exogenous material for skin tissue soldering and also to examine the effects of laser soldering parameters on the properties of the repaired skin. Material and Methods: Two mixtures of albumin solder and different concentrations of gold nano shells were prepared. A full thickness incision of 2*20 mm 2 was made on the surface and after placing 50 μ1 of the solder mixture on the incision, an 810 nm diode laser was used to irradiate it at different power densities. The changes of tensile strength, σt, due to temperature rise, number of scan (Ns), and scan velocity (Vs) were investigated. Results: The results showed that the tensile strength of the repaired skin increased with increasing irradiance for both gold nano shell concentrations. In addition, at constant laser irradiance (I), the tensile strength of the repaired incision increased with increasing Ns and decreasing Vs. In our case, this corresponded to σt = 1610 g/cm 2 at I ∼ 60 W cm-2, T ∼ 65 d egree C , Ns = 10 and Vs = 0.2 mms-1. Discussion and Conclusion: Gold nano shells can be used as an indocyanine green dye alterative for laser tissue soldering. Although by increasing the laser power density, the tensile strength of the repaired skin increases, an optimum power density must be considered due to the resulting increase in tissue temperature.

  8. A multi-directional in vitro investigation into friction, damage and wear of innovative chondroplasty materials against articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northwood, Ewen; Fisher, John

    2007-08-01

    The wear of the biomaterial/cartilage interface is vital for the development of innovative chondroplasty therapies. The aim of this study was to investigate potential chondroplasty biomaterials when sliding against natural articular cartilage under uniaxial reciprocating and multi-directional rotation/reciprocating motions. Three biphasic hydrogels were compared to articular cartilage (negative control) and stainless steel (positive control). Friction was measured by means of a simple geometry friction and wear simulator. All tests were completed in 25% bovine serum at 20 degrees C. Mechanical alterations to the surface structure were quantified using surface topography. Articular cartilage produced a constant friction value of 0.05 (confidence interval=0.015) with and without rotation. Stainless steel against articular cartilage produced an increase in friction over time resulting in a peak value of 0.7 (confidence interval=0.02) without rotation, increasing to 0.88 (confidence interval=0.03) with rotation. All biphasic hydrogels produced peak friction values lower than the positive control and demonstrated no difference between uni- and multi-directional motion. Degradation of the opposing cartilage surface showed a significant difference between the positive and negative controls, with the greater cartilage damage when sliding against stainless steel under uni-directional motion. The lower friction and reduction of opposing cartilage surface degradation with the potential chondroplasty biomaterials can be attributed to their biphasic properties. This study illustrated the importance of biphasic properties within the tribology of cartilage substitution materials and future work will focus on the optimisation of biphasic properties such that materials more closely mimic natural cartilage.

  9. In Vivo and In Vitro Genotoxic and Epigenetic Effects of Two Types of Cola Beverages and Caffeine: A Multiassay Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Mateo-Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to assess the biological and food safety of two different beverages: Classic Coca Cola™ (CCC and Caffeine-Free Coca Cola (CFCC. To this end, we determined the genotoxicological and biological effects of different doses of lyophilised CCC and CFCC and Caffeine (CAF, the main distinctive constituent. Their toxic/antitoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic, and chronic toxicity (lifespan assay effects were determined in vivo using the Drosophila model. Their cytotoxic activities were determined using the HL-60 in vitro cancer model. In addition, clastogenic DNA toxicity was measured using internucleosomal fragmentation and SCGE assays. Their epigenetic effects were assessed on the HL-60 methylation status using some repetitive elements. The experimental results showed a slight chemopreventive effect of the two cola beverages against HL-60 leukaemia cells, probably mediated by nonapoptotic mechanisms. Finally, CCC and CAF induced a global genome hypomethylation evaluated in LINE-1 and Alu M1 repetitive elements. Overall, we demonstrated for the first time the safety of this famous beverage in in vivo and in vitro models.

  10. A novel approach for in vitro studies applying electrical fields to cell cultures by transformer-like coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, R; Neubert, H; Seifert, A; Bierbaum, S; Hart, D A; Scharnweber, D

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a new apparatus for in vitro studies applying low frequency electrical fields to cells without interfering side effects like biochemical reactions or magnetic fields which occur in currently available systems. We developed a non-invasive method by means of the principle of transformer-like coupling where the magnetic field is concentrated in a toroid and, therefore, does not affect the cell culture. Next to an extensive characterization of the electrical field parameters, initial cell culture studies have focused on examining the response of bone marrow-derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to pulsed electrical fields. While no significant differences in the proliferation of human MSCs could be detected, significant increases in ALP activity as well as in gene expression of other osteogenic markers were observed. The results indicate that transformer-like coupled electrical fields can be used to influence osteogenic differentiation of human MSCs in vitro and can pose a useful tool in understanding the influence of electrical fields on the cellular and molecular level.

  11. Hypotensive effect of aqueous extract of Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) in rats: an in vivo and in vitro approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soncini, Roseli; Santiago, Michael B; Orlandi, Lidiane; Moraes, Gabriel O I; Peloso, André Luiz M; dos Santos, Marcelo H; Alves-da-Silva, Geraldo; Paffaro, Valdemar A; Bento, Antonio C; Giusti-Paiva, Alexandre

    2011-01-27

    Averrhoa carambola L. (Oxalidaceae) leaves are used in Brazilian traditional medicine to treat hypertension. This study was conducted to evaluate the hypotensive effect of the aqueous extract of Averrhoa carambola (AEAc) and its underlying mechanisms in the isolated rat aorta. The effect of AEAc on the mean arterial pressure (MAP) was determined in vivo in anesthetized rats. In vitro, thoracic aortic rings were isolated and suspended in organ baths, and the effects of AEAc were studied by means of isometric tension recording experiments. In HPLC analysis, the fingerprint chromatogram of AEAc was established. In normotensive rats, AEAc (12.5-50.0 mg/kg, i.v.) induced dose-dependent hypotension. In vitro, AEAc caused a depression in the E(max) response to phenylephrine without a change in sensibility. Also, in a depolarized Ca(2+)-free medium, AEAc inhibited CaCl(2)-induced contractions and caused a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the response curves, indicating that AEAc inhibited the contractile mechanisms involving extracellular Ca(2+) influx. These results demonstrate the hypotensive effects of AEAc, and these effects may, in part, be due to the inhibition of Ca(2+), which supports previous claims of its traditional use. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. In Vivo and In Vitro Genotoxic and Epigenetic Effects of Two Types of Cola Beverages and Caffeine: A Multiassay Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo-Fernández, Marcos; Merinas-Amo, Tania; Moreno-Millán, Miguel; Alonso-Moraga, Ángeles; Demyda-Peyrás, Sebastián

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the biological and food safety of two different beverages: Classic Coca Cola™ (CCC) and Caffeine-Free Coca Cola (CFCC). To this end, we determined the genotoxicological and biological effects of different doses of lyophilised CCC and CFCC and Caffeine (CAF), the main distinctive constituent. Their toxic/antitoxic, genotoxic/antigenotoxic, and chronic toxicity (lifespan assay) effects were determined in vivo using the Drosophila model. Their cytotoxic activities were determined using the HL-60 in vitro cancer model. In addition, clastogenic DNA toxicity was measured using internucleosomal fragmentation and SCGE assays. Their epigenetic effects were assessed on the HL-60 methylation status using some repetitive elements. The experimental results showed a slight chemopreventive effect of the two cola beverages against HL-60 leukaemia cells, probably mediated by nonapoptotic mechanisms. Finally, CCC and CAF induced a global genome hypomethylation evaluated in LINE-1 and Alu M1 repetitive elements. Overall, we demonstrated for the first time the safety of this famous beverage in in vivo and in vitro models.

  13. An electric and electromagnetic geophysical approach for subsurface investigation of anthropogenic mounds in an urban environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazzi, Veronica; Tapete, Deodato; Cappuccini, Luca; Fanti, Riccardo

    2016-11-01

    cost-effective approach is to inform the design of maintenance and restoration measures based on improved geognostic knowledge. The geophysical and surface evidence informs decisions on where interventions are to be prioritised and whether costly invasive investigations are needed.

  14. Investigation of various factors influencing Raman spectra interpretation with the use of likelihood ratio approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Aleksandra; Martyna, Agnieszka; Zadora, Grzegorz

    2018-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to verify whether selected analytical parameters may affect solving the comparison problem of Raman spectra with the use of the likelihood ratio (LR) approach. Firstly the LR methodologies developed for Raman spectra of blue automotive paints obtained with the use of 785nm laser source (results published by the authors previously) were implemented for good quality spectra recorded for these paints with the use of 514.5nm laser source. For LR models construction two types of variables were used i.e. areas under selected pigments bands and coefficients derived from discrete wavelet transform procedure (DWT). Few experiments were designed for 785nm and 514.5nm Raman spectra databases after constructing well performing LR models (low rates of false positive and false negative answers and acceptable results of empirical cross entropy approach). In order to verify whether objective magnification described by its numerical aperture affects spectra interpretation, three objective magnifications -20×(N.A.=0.4.), 50×(N.A.=0.75) and 100×(N.A.=0.85) within each of the applied laser sources (514.5nm and 785nm) were tested for a group of blue solid and metallic automotive paints having the same sets of pigments depending on the applied laser source. The findings obtained by two types of LR models indicate the importance of this parameter for solving the comparison problem of both solid and metallic automotive paints regardless of the laser source used for measuring Raman signal. Hence, the same objective magnification, preferably 50× (established based on the analysis of within- and between-samples variability and F-factor value), should be used when focusing the laser on samples during Raman measurements. Then the influence of parameters (laser power and time of irradiation) of one of the recommended fluorescence suppression techniques, namely photobleaching, was under investigation. Analysis performed on a group of solid automotive paint

  15. Investigation of the in vitro toxicological properties of the synthetic cannabimimetic drug CP-47,497-C8

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koller, Verena J., E-mail: verena.koller@meduniwien.ac.at [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8A, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Auwärter, Volker [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University Medical Center Freiburg, Albertstraße 9, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Grummt, Tamara [German Federal Environmental Agency, Heinrich-Heine-Str., 12, 08645 Bad Elster (Germany); Moosmann, Bjoern [Institute of Forensic Medicine, University Medical Center Freiburg, Albertstraße 9, 79104 Freiburg (Germany); Mišík, Miroslav [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8A, 1090 Vienna (Austria); Knasmüller, Siegfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Department of Internal Medicine 1, Comprehensive Cancer Center, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8A, 1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-06-01

    Cannabicyclohexanol (CP-47,497-C8) is a representative of a group of cannabimimetic cyclohexylphenols which is added to herbal mixtures as a cannabis substitute since 2008. Although in the beginning CP-47,497-C8 was the main ingredient of “Spice” and similar products, it was partly replaced by aminoalkylindole-type cannabinoid receptor agonists like JWH-018, JWH-073 or JWH-250, but never completely disappeared from the market. Since information on its toxicological properties is scarce, we investigated the effects of the drug in human derived cell lines. The cytotoxic effects were studied in a panel of assays (SRB, XTT, LDHe and NR tests) in a buccal derived (TR146) and a liver derived (HepG2) cell line. The strongest effects were seen in the two former assays at levels ≥ 7.5 μM indicating that the compound interferes with protein synthesis and causes membrane damage. In additional comet assays, DNA damage was detected at levels ≥ 10 μM. Experiments with lesion specific enzymes showed that these effects are not due to oxidative damage of DNA bases. The negative findings obtained in Salmonella/microsome assays and the positive results of micronucleus tests with the cell lines indicate that the compound does not cause gene mutations but acts on the chromosomal level. In contrast to other synthetic cannabinoids, no indication for estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties was seen in a luciferase assay with bone marrow derived U2-OS cells. In conclusion, our findings show that the drug has only weak cytotoxic properties. However, the induction of chromosomal damage indicates that it may cause adverse effects in users due to its impact on the stability of the genetic material. - Highlights: • We tested the toxic properties of a synthetic cannabinoid. • Acute cytotoxic effects were detected with doses ≥ 7 μM. • No hormonal effects were found. • DNA damage was detected at levels ≥ 10 μM in comet assay and micronucleus tests. • Effects in directly

  16. Investigation of the in vitro toxicological properties of the synthetic cannabimimetic drug CP-47,497-C8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koller, Verena J.; Auwärter, Volker; Grummt, Tamara; Moosmann, Bjoern; Mišík, Miroslav; Knasmüller, Siegfried

    2014-01-01

    Cannabicyclohexanol (CP-47,497-C8) is a representative of a group of cannabimimetic cyclohexylphenols which is added to herbal mixtures as a cannabis substitute since 2008. Although in the beginning CP-47,497-C8 was the main ingredient of “Spice” and similar products, it was partly replaced by aminoalkylindole-type cannabinoid receptor agonists like JWH-018, JWH-073 or JWH-250, but never completely disappeared from the market. Since information on its toxicological properties is scarce, we investigated the effects of the drug in human derived cell lines. The cytotoxic effects were studied in a panel of assays (SRB, XTT, LDHe and NR tests) in a buccal derived (TR146) and a liver derived (HepG2) cell line. The strongest effects were seen in the two former assays at levels ≥ 7.5 μM indicating that the compound interferes with protein synthesis and causes membrane damage. In additional comet assays, DNA damage was detected at levels ≥ 10 μM. Experiments with lesion specific enzymes showed that these effects are not due to oxidative damage of DNA bases. The negative findings obtained in Salmonella/microsome assays and the positive results of micronucleus tests with the cell lines indicate that the compound does not cause gene mutations but acts on the chromosomal level. In contrast to other synthetic cannabinoids, no indication for estrogenic/antiestrogenic properties was seen in a luciferase assay with bone marrow derived U2-OS cells. In conclusion, our findings show that the drug has only weak cytotoxic properties. However, the induction of chromosomal damage indicates that it may cause adverse effects in users due to its impact on the stability of the genetic material. - Highlights: • We tested the toxic properties of a synthetic cannabinoid. • Acute cytotoxic effects were detected with doses ≥ 7 μM. • No hormonal effects were found. • DNA damage was detected at levels ≥ 10 μM in comet assay and micronucleus tests. • Effects in directly

  17. An in vitro investigation of immunomodulatory properties of Lactobacillus plantarum and L. delbrueckii cells and their extracellular polysaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Mana; Nomoto, Ryohei; Mizuno, Masashi; Osawa, Ro

    2017-01-01

    Many probiotic lactobacilli and their extracellular polysaccharides (EPS) have beneficial immunological properties. However, it is unclear how they elicit the host immune response. We thus investigated the immunological properties of UV-killed Lactobacillus delbrueckii TU-1 and L. plantarum KM-9 cells as well as their extracellular polysaccharides (EPSs). High-performance liquid chromatography and ion exchange chromatography analyses showed that their EPSs differ in sugar composition and sugar fractionation. The immunological properties were evaluated in a semi-intestinal model using a Transwell co-culture system that employed human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells on the apical side and murine macrophage (RAW264.7) cells on the basolateral side. The UV-killed cells and EPSs were added to the apical side to allow direct contact with Caco-2 cells and incubated for 6 hr. After incubation, the amounts of tumor necrosis factor-α and several cytokines released by RAW264.7 or Caco-2 cells were quantified by cytotoxic activity on L929 cells (murine fibrosarcoma cell line) and quantitative reverse-transcriptase PCR. We found that the UV-killed cells and their EPSs had immunological effects on RAW264.7 cells via Caco-2 cells. The RAW264.7 cells showed different cytokine production profiles when treated with UV-killed cells and EPSs. The UV-killed cells and EPSs promoted a Th1-type cellular response. Furthermore, we found that the UV-killed cells sent positive signals through Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2. Meanwhile, neither EPS sent a positive signal through TLR4 and TLR2. This evidence suggests that both UV-killed cells of the lactobacillus strains and their EPSs trigger a Th1-type immune response in a human host, with the former triggering the response via the TLRs expressed on its epithelium and the latter employing a mechanism yet to be determined, possibly involving a novel receptor that is designed to recognize specific patterns of repeating sugar in the EPSs.

  18. Investigation of the Influence of the As-Grown ZnO Nanorods and Applied Potentials on an Electrochemical Sensor for In-Vitro Glucose Monitoring

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    Mohammed Marie

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the as-grown zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NRs on the fabricated electrochemical sensor for in vitro glucose monitoring were investigated. A direct growth of ZnO NRs was performed on the Si/SiO2/Au electrode, using hydrothermal and sol-gel techniques at low temperatures. The structure, consisting of a Si/SiO2/Au/GOx/Nafion membrane, was considered as a baseline, and it was tested under several applied potential 0.1–0.8 V. The immobilized working electrode, with GOx and a nafion membrane, was characterized amperometrically using a source meter Keithely 2410, and an electrochemical impedance Gamry potentiostat. The sensor exhibited the following: a high sensitivity of ~0.468 mA/cm2 mM, a low detection limit in the order of 166.6 µM, and a fast and sharp response time of around 2 s. The highest sensitivity and the lowest limit of detection were obtained at 0.4 volt, after the growth of ZnO NRs. The highest net sensitivity was obtained after subtracting the sensitivity of the baseline, and it was in the order of 0.315 mA/cm2·mM. The device was tested with a range of glucose concentrations from 1–10 mM, showing a linear line from 3–8 mM, and the device was saturated after exceeding high concentrations of glucose. Such devices can be used for in vitro glucose monitoring, since glucose changes can be accurately detected.

  19. In vitro culturing of porcine tracheal mucosa as an ideal model for investigating the influence of drugs on human respiratory mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stennert, Eberhard; Siefer, Oliver; Zheng, Meihua; Walger, Martin; Mickenhagen, Axel

    2008-09-01

    It has been previously shown that fresh mucosa from different mammals could serve as raw material for in vitro culturing with the differentiation of cilia, which are the most important morphological structures for the function of the mucociliary system. Increasing legal restrictions on the removal of human tissue and changing surgical techniques have led to a lack of fresh human mucosa for culturing. Most of the animals that have been used as donors up to now are genetically not very close to human beings and must all be sacrificed for such studies. We, therefore, established a modified system of culturing mucosa cells from the trachea of pigs, which is available as a regular by-product after slaughtering. With respect to the possibility of developing "beating" cilia, it could be shown that the speed of cell proliferation until adhesion to the coated culture dishes, the formation of conjunctions of cell clusters and the proliferation of cilia were comparable for porcine and human mucosa. Moreover, it could be demonstrated that the porcine cilia beat frequency of 7.57 +/- 1.39 Hz was comparable to the human mucosa cells beat frequency of 7.3 +/- 1.4 Hz and that this beat frequency was absolutely constant over the investigation time of 360 min. In order to prove whether the reaction to different drugs is comparable between the porcine and human cilia, we initially tested benzalkonium chloride, which is known to be toxic for human cells, followed by naphazoline, which we found in previous studies on human mucosa to be non-toxic. The results clearly showed that the functional and morphological reactions of the porcine ciliated cells to these substances were similar to the reaction we found in the in vitro cultured human mucosa.

  20. Theoretical and numerical investigations of TAP experiments. New approaches for variable pressure conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senechal, U.; Breitkopf, C. [Technische Univ. Dresden (Germany). Inst. fuer Energietechnik

    2011-07-01

    Temporal analysis of products (TAP) is a valuable tool for characterization of porous catalytic structures. Established TAP-modeling requires a spatially constant diffusion coefficient and neglect convective flows, which is only valid in Knudsen diffusion regime. Therefore in experiments, the number of molecules per pulse must be chosen accordingly. New approaches for variable process conditions are highly required. Thus, a new theoretical model is developed for estimating the number of molecules per pulse to meet these requirements under any conditions and at any time. The void volume is calculated as the biggest sphere fitting between three pellets. The total number of pulsed molecules is assumed to fill the first void volume at the inlet immediately. Molecule numbers from these calculations can be understood as maximum possible molecules at any time in the reactor to be in Knudsen diffusion regime, i.e., above the Knudsen number of 2. Moreover, a new methodology for generating a full three-dimensional geometrical representation of beds is presented and used for numerical simulations to investigate spatial effects. Based on a freely available open-source game physics engine library (BULLET), beds of arbitrary-sized pellets can be generated and transformed to CFD-usable geometry. In CFD-software (ANSYS CFX registered) a transient diffusive transport equation with time-dependent inlet boundary conditions is solved. Three different pellet diameters were investigated with 1e18 molecules per pulse, which is higher than the limit from the theoretical calculation. Spatial and temporal distributions of transported species show regions inside the reactor, where non-Knudsen conditions exist. From this results, the distance from inlet can be calculated where the theoretical pressure limit (Knudsen number equals 2) is obtained, i.e., from this point to the end of the reactor Knudsen regime can be assumed. Due to linear dependency of pressure and concentration (assuming ideal

  1. A Tox21 Approach to Altered Epigenetic Landscapes: Assessing Epigenetic Toxicity Pathways Leading to Altered Gene Expression and Oncogenic Transformation In Vitro

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    Craig L. Parfett

    2017-06-01

    A, UHRF1, CTCF, HOTAIR and ANRIL were found to have experimental evidence showing that functional perturbations played “driver” roles in human cellular transformation. Measurement of epigenotoxicants presents challenges for short-term carcinogenicity testing, especially in the high-throughput modes emphasized in the Tox21 chemicals testing approach. There is need to develop and validate in vitro tests to detect both, locus-specific, and genome-wide, epigenetic alterations with causal links to oncogenic cellular phenotypes. Some recent examples of cell-based high throughput chemical screening assays are presented that have been applied or have shown potential for application to epigenetic endpoints.

  2. Investigating β-adrenergic-induced cardiac hypertrophy through computational approach: classical and non-classical pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalilimeybodi, Ali; Daneshmehr, Alireza; Sharif-Kashani, Babak

    2018-07-01

    The chronic stimulation of β-adrenergic receptors plays a crucial role in cardiac hypertrophy and its progression to heart failure. In β-adrenergic signaling, in addition to the well-established classical pathway, Gs/AC/cAMP/PKA, activation of non-classical pathways such as Gi/PI3K/Akt/GSK3β and Gi/Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK contribute in cardiac hypertrophy. The signaling network of β-adrenergic-induced hypertrophy is very complex and not fully understood. So, we use a computational approach to investigate the dynamic response and contribution of β-adrenergic mediators in cardiac hypertrophy. The proposed computational model provides insights into the effects of β-adrenergic classical and non-classical pathways on the activity of hypertrophic transcription factors CREB and GATA4. The results illustrate that the model captures the dynamics of the main signaling mediators and reproduces the experimental observations well. The results also show that despite the low portion of β2 receptors out of total cardiac β-adrenergic receptors, their contribution in the activation of hypertrophic mediators and regulation of β-adrenergic-induced hypertrophy is noticeable and variations in β1/β2 receptors ratio greatly affect the ISO-induced hypertrophic response. The model results illustrate that GSK3β deactivation after β-adrenergic receptor stimulation has a major influence on CREB and GATA4 activation and consequent cardiac hypertrophy. Also, it is found through sensitivity analysis that PKB (Akt) activation has both pro-hypertrophic and anti-hypertrophic effects in β-adrenergic signaling.

  3. Investigation of Liver Injury of Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. in Rats by Metabolomics and Traditional Approaches

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    Yun-Xia Li

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Liver injury induced by Polygonum multiflorum Thunb. (PM have been reported since 2006, which aroused widespread concern. However, the toxicity mechanism of PM liver injury remained unclear. In this study, the mechanism of liver injury induced by different doses of PM after long-term administration was investigated in rats by metabolomics and traditional approaches. Rats were randomly divided into control group and PM groups. PM groups were oral administered PM of low (10 g/kg, medium (20 g/kg, high (40 g/kg dose, while control group was administered distilled water. After 28 days of continuous administration, the serum biochemical indexes in the control and three PM groups were measured and the liver histopathology were analyzed. Also, UPLC-Q-TOF-MS with untargeted metabolomics was performed to identify the possible metabolites and pathway of liver injury caused by PM. Compared with the control group, the serum levels of ALT, AST, ALP, TG, and TBA in middle and high dose PM groups were significantly increased. And the serum contents of T-Bil, D-Bil, TC, TP were significantly decreased. However, there was no significant difference between the low dose group of PM and the control group except serum AST, TG, T-Bil, and D-Bil. Nine biomarkers were identified based on biomarkers analysis. And the pathway analysis indicated that fat metabolism, amino acid metabolism and bile acid metabolism were involved in PM liver injury. Based on the biomarker pathway analysis, PM changed the lipid metabolism, amino acid metabolism and bile acid metabolism and excretion in a dose-dependent manner which was related to the mechanism of liver injury.

  4. Experimental approach to investigate the constrained recovery behavior of coiled monofilament polymer fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendes, S. S.; Nunes, L. C. S.

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this work is to propose a new approach for investigating the thermo-mechanical behavior of coiled oriented polymer fibers with fixed ends and promote an understanding of the actuation response of coiled polymers in constrained recovery applications. In the proposed experimental methodology, a coiled fiber was pre-stretched by 50% and the distance between its ends remained constant, then it was subjected to a heating-cooling cycle ranging from 30 °C to 120 °C and the induced restoring force was measured. Based on these measurements, axial deformation and shear strain were obtained from full-field displacements extracted by the digital image correlation method from images of the coiled fiber. Three coiled fibers with different initial pitch angles were manufactured, and samples with lengths of 15 mm and 20 mm were tested. Bias angles and coil radius were also estimated using the experimental data associated with the helical spring theory. Results show that significant shape changes can be noticed above the glass transition temperature (47 °C), and these changes induce variation in the resultant forces. The effects of thermal softening and thermal contraction for a modest negative thermal expansion coefficient became evident at temperatures ranging from ∼47 °C to ∼90 °C, while the response of a coiled homochiral polymer fiber was achieved at temperatures close to 90 °C. During the cooling process, saturated states of the axial deformation and shear strain of the coiled fibers were observed at temperatures between 120 °C and 100 °C.

  5. An itinerant sensory approach to investigate consumers' perception and acceptability at a food exhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torri, Luisa; Salini, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    In a food exhibition where several producers of the same product category are present at the same time, consumers usually have the opportunity to taste several free samples of the same product type, thus they can experience and compare the sensory characteristics of each and evaluate their liking for each sample tasted. This study assessed the potential of an itinerant sensory data collection in understanding the consumers' perception and acceptance of cheese during a multiple tasting experience at a food exhibition. Subjects tasted seven samples of Parmigiano Reggiano cheese aged for different times (24 and 36months) at seven producer stands and recorded their evaluations using tablets, on which an application specifically developed for this study was installed. This evaluation situation was defined as "pseudo-natural," in opposition to the "natural" and the "naturalistic" settings. The itinerant sensory session comprised a liking test, a rate-all-that-apply (RATA) test using a just about right (JAR) scale, a food pairing test, and a questionnaire. Consumers significantly (panalysis, and decision tree models in investigating the relationships between liking and the RATA data, provided results revealing that the attributes elasticity, sweetness, humidity, fresh fruit, and butter were the main drivers of liking. Whereas, the attributes sourness, bitterness, and hardness were the main drivers of dislike. Therefore, even though no significant differences in terms of liking were observed among the tested cheeses, consumers preferred the attributes more frequently perceived in the least aged products. In conclusion, the presented itinerant sensory approach had provided meaningful information to understand the consumers' cheese perception and acceptability. In the future, it could advantageously be applied for studying food perception in other situations in which subjects naturally choose or consume several products while freely moving from one to another (e.g. self

  6. A multiscale approach to blast neurotrauma modeling:Part II: Methodology for inducing blast injury to in vitro models

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    Gwen B. Effgen

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Due to the prominent role of improvised explosive devices (IEDs in wounding patterns of U.S. war-fighters in Iraq and Afghanistan, blast injury has risen to a new level of importance and is recognized to be a major cause of injuries to the brain. However, an injury risk-function for microscopic, macroscopic, behavioral, and neurological deficits has yet to be defined. While operational blast injuries can be very complex and thus difficult to analyze, a simplified blast injury model would facilitate studies correlating biological outcomes with blast biomechanics to define tolerance criteria. Blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI results from the translation of a shock wave in air, such as that produced by an IED, into a pressure wave within the skull-brain complex. Our blast injury methodology recapitulates this phenomenon in vitro, allowing for control of the injury biomechanics via a compressed-gas shock tube used in conjunction with a custom-designed, fluid-filled receiver that contains the living culture. The receiver converts the air shock wave into a fast-rising pressure transient with minimal reflections, mimicking the intracranial pressure history in blast. We have developed an organotypic hippocampal slice culture model that exhibits cell death when exposed to a 530  17.7 kPa peak overpressure with a 1.026 ± 0.017 ms duration and 190 ± 10.7 kPa-ms impulse in-air. We have also injured a simplified in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier, which exhibits disrupted integrity immediately following exposure to 581  10.0 kPa peak overpressure with a 1.067 ms ± 0.006 ms duration and 222 ± 6.9 kPa-ms impulse in-air. To better prevent and treat bTBI, both the initiating biomechanics and the ensuing pathobiology must be understood in greater detail. A well-characterized, in vitro model of bTBI, in conjunction with animal models, will be a powerful tool for developing strategies to mitigate the risks of bTBI.

  7. Investigating the effect of processing parameters on pharmaceutical tablet disintegration using a real-time particle imaging approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, Arthi D; Reynolds, Gavin K; Wilson, David; Wren, Stephen; Hounslow, Michael J; Salman, Agba D

    2016-09-01

    Tablet disintegration is a fundamental parameter that is tested in vitro before a product is released to the market, to give confidence that the tablet will break up in vivo and that active drug will be available for absorption. Variations in tablet properties cause variation in disintegration behaviour. While the standardised pharmacopeial disintegration test can show differences in the speed of disintegration of different tablets, it does not give any mechanistic information about the underlying cause of the difference. With quantifiable disintegration data, and consequently an improved understanding into tablet disintegration, a more knowledge-based approach could be applied to the research and development of future tablet formulations. The aim of the present research was to introduce an alternative method which will enable a better understanding of tablet disintegration using a particle imaging approach. A purpose-built flow cell was employed capable of online observation of tablet disintegration, which can provide information about the changing tablet dimensions and the particles released with time. This additional information can improve the understanding of how different materials and process parameters affect tablet disintegration. Standard USP analysis was also carried out to evaluate and determine whether the flow cell method can suitably differentiate the disintegration behaviour of tablets produced using different processing parameters. Placebo tablets were produced with varying ratios of insoluble and soluble filler (mannitol and MCC, respectively) so that the effect of variation in the formulation can be investigated. To determine the effect of the stress applied during granulation and tableting on tablet disintegration behaviour, analysis was carried out on tablets produced using granular material compressed at 20 or 50bar, where a tableting load of either 15 or 25kN was used. By doing this the tablet disintegration was examined in terms of the

  8. Evaluation of amniotic mesenchymal cell derivatives on cytokine production in equine alveolar macrophages: an in vitro approach to lung inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zucca, Enrica; Corsini, Emanuela; Galbiati, Valentina; Lange-Consiglio, Anna; Ferrucci, Francesco

    2016-09-20

    Data obtained in both animal models and clinical trials suggest that cell-based therapies represent a potential therapeutic strategy for lung repair and remodeling. Recently, new therapeutic approaches based on the use of stem cell derivatives (e.g., conditioned medium (CM) and microvesicles (MVs)) to regenerate tissues and improve their functions were proposed. The aim of this study was to investigate the immunomodulatory effects of equine amniotic mesenchymal cell derivatives on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced cytokine production in equine alveolar macrophages, which may be beneficial in lung inflammatory disorders such as recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) in horses. RAO shares many features with human asthma, including an increased number of cells expressing mRNA for interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 and a decreased expression of IFN-γ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of affected horses. The release of TNF-α, IL-6, and TGF-β1 at different time points (1, 24, 48, and 72 h) was measured in equine alveolar macrophages stimulated or not with LPS (10 and 100 ng/mL) in the presence or absence of 10 % CM or 50 × 10(6) MVs/mL. Cytokines were measured using commercially available ELISA kits. For multiple comparisons, analysis of variance was used with Tukey post-hoc test. Differences were considered significant at p ≤ 0.05. Significant modulatory effects of CM on LPS-induced TNF-α release at 24 h, and of both CM and MVs on TNF-α release at 48 h were observed. A trend toward a modulatory effect of both CM and MVs on the release of TGF-β and possibly IL-6 was visible over time. Results support the potential use of CM and MVs in lung regenerative medicine, especially in situations in which TGF-β may be detrimental, such as respiratory allergy. Further studies should evaluate the potential clinical applications of CM and MVs in equine lung diseases, such as RAO and other inflammatory disorders.

  9. In vitro model of production of antibodies; a new approach to reveal the presence of key bacteria in polymicrobial environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chongcong; Nakka, Sravya; Mansouri, Sepahdar; Bengtsson, Torbjörn; Nayeri, Tayeb; Nayeri, Fariba

    2016-09-09

    There is a rapid emergence of multiple resistant gram-negative bacteria due to overuse of antibiotics in the treatment of infections. Biofilms consist of polymicrobial communities that survive the host's defense system. The key bacteria in biofilms are slow growing and support an attachment and rapid growth of other microorganisms. Current antimicrobial strategies often fail due to poor diagnosis of key pathogens in biofilms. The study aims to develop anti-bacterial human antibodies in vitro from patients who had recently undergone a systemic infection by pathogenic bacteria and to use these antibodies as a tool for detecting bacteria in biofilms. Lymphocytes were separated from whole blood of patients (n = 10) and stimulated with heat-killed bacteria to produce antibodies in vitro. The specificity of antibodies in recognizing the bacteria against which they were directed was evaluated by surface plasmon resonance system (SPR) and electron microscopy. The ulcer secretions from patients with chronic and acute leg ulcers and healthy controls were analyzed by the SPR system and the results were compared with culture studies. The produced antibodies recognized bacteria with high sensitivity (SPR). The antibodies against Enterococcus fecalis bound specifically to the microorganism in a bacterial co-culture that was visualized by electron microscopy. In the present work, a method for producing specific antibodies against bacteria is introduced to recognize bacterial components in body fluids of patients suffering from pathogenic biofilms. This diagnostic technique may be most useful in clinical microbiology and in the choice of antibiotics in the treatment of serious infections.

  10. Investigating DIF and extensions using an LLTM approach and also an individual differences approach: an international testing context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YIYU XIE

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This study intends to investigate two ways to generalise differential item functioning (DIF by grouping of items that share a common feature, or an item property as in the Linear Logistic Test Model (LLTM. An item “facet” refers to this type of grouping, and DIF can be expressed in terms of more fundamental parameters that relate to the facet of items. Hence the differential facet functioning (DFF model, a particular version of the LLTM, helps to explain the DIF effects more substantively. Using the mathematics data from the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA 2003, this study shows that modeling the DFF effect through an interaction of the group-by-facet parameter rather than DIF effect on the individual item level can be handled easily with the NLMIXED procedure of SAS. We found that the results are more interpretable when the bias is interpreted on the facet level rather than the item level. Analogous to the multidimensional DIF model, one natural extension of the DFF model is to make the model multidimensional when DFF facets (i.e., LLTM facets are considered as dimensions. This extension, multidimensional DFF (MDFF, is also investigated. The MDFF model allows individual differences to be modeled on the dimension that exhibits a DFF effect. However, it is always recommended to check the individual DIF estimates and construct a substantive analysis first before conducting DFF and MDFF analysis.

  11. A Curriculum-Linked Professional Development Approach to Support Teachers' Adoption of Web GIS Tectonics Investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodzin, Alec; Anastasio, David; Sahagian, Dork; Henry, Jill Burrows

    2016-01-01

    A curriculum-linked professional development approach designed to support middle level science teachers' understandings about tectonics and geospatial pedagogical content knowledge was developed. This approach takes into account limited face-to-face professional development time and instead provides pedagogical support within the design of a…

  12. Investigation of Multi-Criteria Decision Consistency: A Triplex Approach to Optimal Oilfield Portfolio Investment Decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaradaghi, Mohammed

    Complexity of the capital intensive oil and gas portfolio investments is continuously growing. It is manifested in the constant increase in the type, number and degree of risks and uncertainties, which consequently lead to more challenging decision making problems. A typical complex decision making problem in petroleum exploration and production (E&P) is the selection and prioritization of oilfields/projects in a portfolio investment. Prioritizing oilfields maybe required for different purposes, including the achievement of a targeted production and allocation of limited available development resources. These resources cannot be distributed evenly nor can they be allocated based on the oilfield size or production capacity alone since various other factors need to be considered simultaneously. These factors may include subsurface complexity, size of reservoir, plateau production and needed infrastructure in addition to other issues of strategic concern, such as socio-economic, environmental and fiscal policies, particularly when the decision making involves governments or national oil companies. Therefore, it would be imperative to employ decision aiding tools that not only address these factors, but also incorporate the decision makers' preferences clearly and accurately. However, the tools commonly used in project portfolio selection and optimization, including intuitive approaches, vary in their focus and strength in addressing the different criteria involved in such decision problems. They are also disadvantaged by a number of drawbacks, which may include lacking the capacity to address multiple and interrelated criteria, uncertainty and risk, project relationship with regard to value contribution and optimum resource utilization, non-monetary attributes, decision maker's knowledge and expertise, in addition to varying levels of ease of use and other practical and theoretical drawbacks. These drawbacks have motivated researchers to investigate other tools and

  13. Risk factor investigation for cardiovascular health through WHO STEPS approach in Ardabil, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mashadi-Abdollahi H

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available H Sadeghi-Bazargani1,2, H Jafarzadeh3, M Fallah4, S Hekmat3, J Bashiri3, GH Hosseingolizadeh3, MS Soltanmohammadzadeh3, A Mortezazadeh3, A Shaker3, M Danehzan3, A Zohouri3, O Khosravi3, R Nasimidoust3, N Malekpour3, E Kharazmi4, M Babaei3, M Nadirmohammadi3, H Mashhadi-Abdollahi51Neuroscience Research Center, 2Statistics and Epidemiology Department, Faculty of Health and Nutrition, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, Iran; 3Public Health Department, Ardabil University of Medical Sciences, Ardabil, Iran; 4Tampere School of Public Health, University of Tampere, Tampere, Finland; 5National Public Health Management Center (NPMC, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Tabriz, IranObjectives: Reliable evidence is the keystone for any noncommunicable disease (NCD prevention plan to be initiated. In this study we carried out a risk factor investigation based on the WHO Stepwise approach to Surveillance (STEPS.Methods: The study was conducted out on 1000 adults between 15 and 64 years of age living in Ardabil province, north-west Iran during 2006, based on the WHO STEPS approach to surveillance of risk factors for NCD. At this stage only the first and second steps were carried out. Data were collected through standard questionnaires and methods analyzed using STATA version 8 statistical software package.Results: 29.0% of men and 2.6% of women were current daily tobacco smokers. The mean number of manufactured cigarettes smoked per day was 18.9 among current daily smokers. Smoking was most prevalent among men of low-income families and those of lower education. The mean body mass index (BMI was 26.6 kg/m2, and was significantly correlated with systolic blood pressure. 58.9% were overweight or obese; 18.0% had raised blood pressure and 3.7% had isolated systolic hypertension. The mean number of servings of fruit consumed per day was 1.1; 33.1% had low levels of activity. Combined risk factor analysis showed that 4.1% of participants were in the

  14. In vitro solubility, dissolution and permeability studies combined with semi-mechanistic modeling to investigate the intestinal absorption of desvenlafaxine from an immediate- and extended release formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franek, F; Jarlfors, A; Larsen, F; Holm, P; Steffansen, B

    2015-09-18

    Desvenlafaxine is a biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) class 1 (high solubility, high permeability) and biopharmaceutical drug disposition classification system (BDDCS) class 3, (high solubility, poor metabolism; implying low permeability) compound. Thus the rate-limiting step for desvenlafaxine absorption (i.e. intestinal dissolution or permeation) is not fully clarified. The aim of this study was to investigate whether dissolution and/or intestinal permeability rate-limit desvenlafaxine absorption from an immediate-release formulation (IRF) and Pristiq(®), an extended release formulation (ERF). Semi-mechanistic models of desvenlafaxine were built (using SimCyp(®)) by combining in vitro data on dissolution and permeation (mechanistic part of model) with clinical data (obtained from literature) on distribution and clearance (non-mechanistic part of model). The model predictions of desvenlafaxine pharmacokinetics after IRF and ERF administration were compared with published clinical data from 14 trials. Desvenlafaxine in vivo dissolution from the IRF and ERF was predicted from in vitro solubility studies and biorelevant dissolution studies (using the USP3 dissolution apparatus), respectively. Desvenlafaxine apparent permeability (Papp) at varying apical pH was investigated using the Caco-2 cell line and extrapolated to effective intestinal permeability (Peff) in human duodenum, jejunum, ileum and colon. Desvenlafaxine pKa-values and octanol-water partition coefficients (Do:w) were determined experimentally. Due to predicted rapid dissolution after IRF administration, desvenlafaxine was predicted to be available for permeation in the duodenum. Desvenlafaxine Do:w and Papp increased approximately 13-fold when increasing apical pH from 5.5 to 7.4. Desvenlafaxine Peff thus increased with pH down the small intestine. Consequently, desvenlafaxine absorption from an IRF appears rate-limited by low Peff in the upper small intestine, which "delays" the predicted

  15. “Positive Regulation of RNA Metabolic Process” Ontology Group Highly Regulated in Porcine Oocytes Matured In Vitro: A Microarray Approach

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    Piotr Celichowski

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs growth and development during folliculogenesis and oogenesis are accompanied by changes involving synthesis and accumulation of large amount of RNA and proteins. In this study, the transcriptomic profile of genes involved in “oocytes RNA synthesis” in relation to in vitro maturation in pigs was investigated for the first time. The RNA was isolated from oocytes before and after in vitro maturation (IVM. Interactions between differentially expressed genes/proteins belonging to “positive regulation of RNA metabolic process” ontology group were investigated by STRING10 software. Using microarray assays, we found expression of 12258 porcine transcripts. Genes with fold change higher than 2 and with corrected p value lower than 0.05 were considered as differentially expressed. The ontology group “positive regulation of RNA metabolic process” involved differential expression of AR, INHBA, WWTR1, FOS, MEF2C, VEGFA, IKZF2, IHH, RORA, MAP3K1, NFAT5, SMARCA1, EGR1, EGR2, MITF, SMAD4, APP, and NR5A1 transcripts. Since all of the presented genes were downregulated after IVM, we suggested that they might be significantly involved in regulation of RNA synthesis before reaching oocyte MII stage. Higher expression of “RNA metabolic process” related genes before IVM indicated that they might be recognized as important markers and specific “transcriptomic fingerprint” of RNA template accumulation and storage for further porcine embryos growth and development.

  16. Characterization of microbial metabolism of Syrah grape products in an in vitro colon model using targeted and non-targeted analytical approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aura, Anna-Marja; Mattila, Ismo; Hyötyläinen, Tuulia; Gopalacharyulu, Peddinti; Cheynier, Veronique; Souquet, Jean-Marc; Bes, Magali; Le Bourvellec, Carine; Guyot, Sylvain; Orešič, Matej

    2013-03-01

    Syrah red grapes are used in the production of tannin-rich red wines. Tannins are high molecular weight molecules, proanthocyanidins (PAs), and poorly absorbed in the upper intestine. In this study, gut microbial metabolism of Syrah grape phenolic compounds was investigated. Syrah grape pericarp was subjected to an enzymatic in vitro digestion model, and red wine and grape skin PA fraction were prepared. Microbial conversion was screened using an in vitro colon model with faecal microbiota, by measurement of short-chain fatty acids by gas chromatography (GC) and microbial phenolic metabolites using GC with mass detection (GC-MS). Red wine metabolites were further profiled using two-dimensional GC mass spectrometry (GCxGC-TOFMS). In addition, the effect of PA structure and dose on conversion efficiency was investigated by GC-MS. Red wine exhibited a higher degree of C1-C3 phenolic acid formation than PA fraction or grape pericarp powders. Hydroxyphenyl valeric acid (flavanols and PAs as precursors) and 3,5-dimethoxy-4-hydroxybenzoic acid (anthocyanin as a precursor) were identified from the red wine metabolite profile. In the absence of native grape pericarp or red wine matrix, the isolated PAs were found to be effective in the dose-dependent inhibition of microbial conversions and short-chain fatty acid formation. Metabolite profiling was complementary to targeted analysis. The identified metabolites had biological relevance, because the structures of the metabolites resembled fragments of their grape phenolic precursors or were in agreement with literature data.

  17. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Kegel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug induced liver injury (DILI is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2±0.9×106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay and cell activity (XTT assay. The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production.

  18. Subtoxic Concentrations of Hepatotoxic Drugs Lead to Kupffer Cell Activation in a Human In Vitro Liver Model: An Approach to Study DILI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Victoria; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Liu, Jia L.; Zeilinger, Katrin; Nüssler, Andreas K.; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2015-01-01

    Drug induced liver injury (DILI) is an idiosyncratic adverse drug reaction leading to severe liver damage. Kupffer cells (KC) sense hepatic tissue stress/damage and therefore could be a tool for the estimation of consequent effects associated with DILI. Aim of the present study was to establish a human in vitro liver model for the investigation of immune-mediated signaling in the pathogenesis of DILI. Hepatocytes and KC were isolated from human liver specimens. The isolated KC yield was 1.2 ± 0.9 × 106 cells/g liver tissue with a purity of >80%. KC activation was investigated by the measurement of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROI, DCF assay) and cell activity (XTT assay). The initial KC activation levels showed broad donor variability. Additional activation of KC using supernatants of hepatocytes treated with hepatotoxic drugs increased KC activity and led to donor-dependent changes in the formation of ROI compared to KC incubated with supernatants from untreated hepatocytes. Additionally, a compound- and donor-dependent increase in proinflammatory cytokines or in anti-inflammatory cytokines was detected. In conclusion, KC related immune signaling in hepatotoxicity was successfully determined in a newly established in vitro liver model. KC were able to detect hepatocyte stress/damage and to transmit a donor- and compound-dependent immune response via cytokine production. PMID:26491234

  19. Investigating on Besnoitia besnoiti (Apicomplexa, Sarcocystidae in naturally infected dairy cattle by an integrated approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Villa

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Bovine besnoitiosis, caused by Besnoitia besnoiti, is a (reemerging disease in Europe (Cortes et al., 2014, including Italy (Gazzonis et al., 2014; 2017. However, its economic impact is scarcely considered and generally underestimated and there are still little studied aspects concerning both the parasite and the disease. Following a natural outbreak of besnoitiosis in a dairy herd, a study was planned to characterize B. besnoiti infection in cattle through a multidisciplinary approach. Suspicious abortions and clinical cases of besnoitiosis were reported in a dairy farm (September 2017, Northern Italy housing 216 Holstein cattle. Blood samples were collected; haematological and serological analyses (ELISA and confirmatory WB were performed (Fernandez-Garcia et al., 2009. Histology and molecular (endpoint ITS-1 PCR (Cortes et al., 2007 and sequencing analyses of tissues from a slaughtered cow with chronic besnoitiosis were carried out.  Out of 59 ELISA-positive animals, 50 (23% were confirmed by WB. B. besnoiti prevalence was higher in cows (41% than in calves (12%; any heifer did not result positive. Considering haematological parameters, a significant shift in the differential leucocyte formula from lymphocyte to granulocyte was recorded in infected cows (Mean±S.D.:L=46.1±18.4,G=53.9±18.4 if compared to negative animals (Student’s T-test,p=0.012. This finding could be helpful in diagnosis, treatment and control of besnoitiosis. Histology revealed a high load of B. besnoiti tissue cysts in skin, vulva, muzzle, sclera, eyelid, respiratory tract, emphasizing the possibility of parasite transmission through direct contact among animals. B. besnoiti was confirmed by PCR in other organs (heart, liver, aorta wall, tonsil and especially in ovary, uterus and vulva, suggesting that the infection could affect cows’ fertility. Parasite DNA was also found in masseters posing an important question for food security, even if B. besnoiti is not

  20. Perspectives for the information approach application to natural and artificial ecosystems investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lankin, Yuliy

    As a methodological matter, all modern conceptions of life development can be subdivided into the substrate (S), the energetic (E) and the informational (I). The S-conception is based on biochemical, genetic and morphological ideas. The E-conception deals with an idea of development of complicated open systems (COS) which are characterized by energy getting constantly from the outside, by improvement of substance cycles and as speeding-up and increasing of "power" of them as well, and by increasing of energy intensity transformation by the each structure of COS. The I-conception has been developing so far in the main within the frameworks of the traditional both cybernetic ideas and information theory that are convenient for many technical applications but are deficient for investigation of ecoand bio-systems. Situation was changed when the conception of adaptive systems (CAS) based on the ideas of ecology, biology and neurocybernetic (neuroinforamtic) had offered. As a consequence of this, the I-conception based on the CAS well accords with the S- and the E-conceptions and allows to hope to their combine into one the S + E + I conception that will include all virtues of the S-, the E-, and the I-conceptions and eliminate of their limitations. Thanks to relative easiness of hierarchic adaptive nonlinear models making using of the CAS, it is possible overcome effectively both of the problems as the "dimensionality problem" and the "loss of stability" as well for complicated models of ecosystems (CME). Optimization of energy and substance consumption process and adaptation of the CME to changes of current conditions are well realized in ranges given by goal function. A use adaptive networks (including neural nets) in frames of the CAS allows to realize any continuous function in control loops and at information processing. The considered features of the S + E + I proposed approach based on the CAS make it perspective for construction as biosphere models and

  1. Use of a human skin in vitro model to investigate the influence of 'every-day' clothing and skin surface decontamination on the percutaneous penetration of organophosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, C A; Wilkinson, S C; Blain, P G; Dunn, M; Aust, G A; Williams, F M

    2014-08-17

    Organophosphates (OPs) are widely used in agriculture. Many studies have investigated the capability of personal protective equipment (PPE) to reduce chemical exposure; however, investigations into the protective effect of 'every-day' clothing are rare. The purpose of this study was to investigate the protective effect of 'every-day' clothing against dermal exposure and to measure early decontamination of skin following exposure to chlorpyrifos and dichlorvos. Using human skin in vitro, absorption of (14)C-labelled chlorpyrifos (500 ng/cm(2)), was shown to be significantly reduced when applied to clothed skin (cotton shirt), regardless of application vehicle (isopropanol (IPA) or propylene glycol (PG)). The majority of applied dose was retained within the clothing after 4 h exposure. Significant reduction in absorption of chlorpyrifos (in PG) was seen through clothed skin when supplemented with skin decontamination at 4 h, compared with clothed skin decontaminated after 24 h, however, this was not observed with IPA. Absorption of dichlorvos (5 μg/cm(2)) was greater through unclothed skin than chlorpyrifos for all vehicles (IPA, isopropyl myristate (IPM) and PG). Significant reduction in absorption was observed when decontaminating clothed skin at 30 min, compared with decontamination at 24 h (post-exposure) for all vehicles. indicate that 'every-day' clothing is effective at reducing exposure to chemicals in contact with skin. Washing the skin surface immediately following removal of exposed clothing can further reduce exposure, depending on the properties of the chemical and vehicle applied. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Investigating the relationships between approaches to learning, learner identities and academic achievement in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrmann, Kim Jesper; Bager-Elsborg, Anna; McCune, Velda

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers relationships between approaches to learning, learner identities, self-efficacy beliefs and academic achievement in higher education. In addition to already established survey instruments, a new scale, subject area affinity, was developed. The scale explores the extent to which...... students identify with their area of study and imagine being part of it in future. The new scale showed strong psychometric properties when it was tested on a sample of 4377 students at a research-intensive university. The new scale correlated positively with both the deep approach and self-efficacy scales....... The new scale also correlated negatively with the surface approach scale. K-means cluster analysis identified seven distinct groups of students who espoused interpretable combinations of approaches, self-efficacy and subject area affinity. Cluster membership was associated with differences in academic...

  3. An Adjusted Likelihood Ratio Approach Analysing Distribution of Food Products to Assist the Investigation of Foodborne Outbreaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norström, Madelaine; Kristoffersen, Anja Bråthen; Görlach, Franziska Sophie; Nygård, Karin; Hopp, Petter

    2015-01-01

    In order to facilitate foodborne outbreak investigations there is a need to improve the methods for identifying the food products that should be sampled for laboratory analysis. The aim of this study was to examine the applicability of a likelihood ratio approach previously developed on simulated data, to real outbreak data. We used human case and food product distribution data from the Norwegian enterohaemorrhagic Escherichia coli outbreak in 2006. The approach was adjusted to include time, space smoothing and to handle missing or misclassified information. The performance of the adjusted likelihood ratio approach on the data originating from the HUS outbreak and control data indicates that the adjusted approach is promising and indicates that the adjusted approach could be a useful tool to assist and facilitate the investigation of food borne outbreaks in the future if good traceability are available and implemented in the distribution chain. However, the approach needs to be further validated on other outbreak data and also including other food products than meat products in order to make a more general conclusion of the applicability of the developed approach. PMID:26237468

  4. Effect of In Vitro Transcorneal Approach of Aceclofenac Eye Drops through Excised Goat, Sheep, and Buffalo Corneas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Dave

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The current study involves the evaluation of factors that influence the transcorneal permeation of aqueous drops of aceclofenac ophthalmic formulation through freshly excised goat, sheep, and buffalo corneas. Aceclofenac formulation with different concentrations 0.1–0.5% (w/v and with different pH and different preservatives, was taken into account. The amount of drug permeated from different formulations was estimated using an Franz diffusion cell. A linear increase in drug permeation was observed with increase in pH (5.5 to 7.4. The apparent permeability coefficient was found to be maximum 15.01±0.45 on goat cornea and maximum transport of aceclofenac was observed at physiological pH of tears (i.e., 7. The results advocate that aceclofenac 0.5% (w/v ophthalmic solution (pH 7.0 containing BAK (0.01% provides maximum in vitro ocular permeability through goat, sheep, and buffalo corneas.

  5. In vitro approaches to evaluate toxicity induced by organotin compounds tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT), and monobutyltin (MBT) in neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Martiña; Blanco, Lucía; Garrido, Alejandro; Vieites, Juan M; Cabado, Ana G

    2013-05-01

    The toxic effects of the organotin compounds (OTCs) monobutyltin (MBT), dibutyltin (DBT), and tributyltin (TBT) were evaluated in vitro in a neuroblastoma human cell line. Mechanisms of cell death, apoptosis versus necrosis, were studied by using several markers: inhibition of cell viability and proliferation, F-actin, and mitochondrial membrane potential changes as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and DNA fragmentation. The most toxic effects were detected with DBT and TBT even at very low concentrations (0.1-1 μM). In contrast, MBT induced lighter cytotoxic changes at the higher doses tested. None of the studied compounds stimulated propidium iodide uptake, although the most toxic chemical, TBT, caused lactate dehydrogenase release at the higher concentrations tested. These findings suggest that in neuroblastoma, OTC-induced cytotoxicity involves different pathways depending on the compound, concentration, and incubation time. A screening method for DBT and TBT quantification based on cell viability loss was developed, allowing a fast detection alternative to complex methodology.

  6. Assessing the Impact of Mechanical Damage on Full-Thickness Porcine and Human Skin Using an In Vitro Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinda Dabboue

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available For most xenobiotics, the rates of percutaneous absorption are limited by diffusion through the horny layer of skin. However, percutaneous absorption of chemicals may seriously increase when the skin is damaged. The aim of this work was to develop an in vitro representative model of mechanically damaged skins. The epidermal barrier was examined following exposure to a razor, a rotating brush, and a microneedle system in comparison to tape-stripping which acted as a reference. Excised full-thickness skins were mounted on a diffusion chamber in order to evaluate the effect of injuries and to mimic physiological conditions. The transepidermal water loss (TEWL was greatly increased when the barrier function was compromised. Measurements were made for all the damaged biopsies and observed histologically by microscopy. On human and porcine skins, the tape-stripping application (0 to 40 times showed a proportional increase in TEWL which highlights the destruction of the stratum corneum. Similar results were obtained for all cosmetic instruments. This is reflected in our study by the nonsignificant difference of the mean TEWL scores between 30 strips and mechanical damage. For a specific appreciation, damaged skins were then selected to qualitatively evaluate the absorption of a chlorogenic acid solution using fluorescence microscopy.

  7. A preliminary investigation of the enzymatic inhibition of 5alpha-reduction and growth of prostatic carcinoma cell line LNCap-FGC by natural astaxanthin and Saw Palmetto lipid extract in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Mark L

    2005-01-01

    Inhibition of 5alpha-reductase has been reported to decrease the symptoms of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and possibly inhibit or help treat prostate cancer. Saw Palmetto berry lipid extract (SPLE) is reported to inhibit 5alpha-reductase and decrease the clinical symptoms of BPH. Epidemiologic studies report that carotenoids such as lycopene may inhibit prostate cancer. In this investigation the effect of the carotenoid astaxanthin, and SPLE were examined for their effect on 5alpha-reductase inhibition as well as the growth of prostatic carcinoma cells in vitro. These studies support patent #6,277,417 B1. The results show astaxanthin demonstrated 98% inhibition of 5alpha-reductase at 300 microg/mL in vitro. Alphastat, the combination of astaxanthin and SPLE, showed a 20% greater inhibition of 5alpha-reductase than SPLE alone n vitro. A nine day treatment of prostatic carcinoma cells with astaxanthin in vitro produced a 24% decrease in growth at 0.1 mcg/mL and a 38% decrease at 0.01 mcg/mL. SPLE showed a 34% decrease at 0.1 mcg/mL. Low levels of carotenoid astaxanthin inhibit 5alpha-reductase and decrease the growth of human prostatic cancer cells in vitro. Astaxanthin added to SPLE shows greater inhibition of 5alpha-reductase than SPLE alone in vitro.

  8. In Vitro Investigation of Self-Assembled Nanoparticles Based on Hyaluronic Acid-Deoxycholic Acid Conjugates for Controlled Release Doxorubicin: Effect of Degree of Substitution of Deoxycholic Acid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Hao Wei

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Self-assembled nanoparticles based on a hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid (HD chemical conjugate with different degree of substitution (DS of deoxycholic acid (DOCA were prepared. The degree of substitution (DS was determined by titration method. The nanoparticles were loaded with doxorubicin (DOX as the model drug. The human cervical cancer (HeLa cell line was utilized for in vitro studies and cell cytotoxicity of DOX incorporated in the HD nanoparticles was accessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. In addition, cellular uptake of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles was also investigated. An increase in the degree of deoxycholic acid substitution reduced the size of the nanoparticles and also enhanced their drug encapsulation efficiency (EE, which increased with the increase of DS. A higher degree of deoxycholic acid substitution also lead to a lower release rate and an initial burst release of doxorubicin from the nanoparticles. In summary, the degree of substitution allows the modulation of the particle size, drug encapsulation efficiency, drug release rate, and cell uptake efficiency of the nanoparticles. The herein developed hyaluronic acid-deoxycholic acid conjugates are a good candidate for drug delivery and could potentiate therapeutic formulations for doxorubicin–mediated cancer therapy.

  9. A proposal framework for investigating website success in the context of e-banking:an analytic network process approach

    OpenAIRE

    Salehi, Mona; Keramati, Abbas

    2009-01-01

    This study proposes a framework to investigate website success factors, and their relative importance in selecting the most preferred e-banking website. For one thing, Updated Delone and Mclean IS success model is chosen to extract significant website success factors in the context of e-banking in Iran. Secondly, Updated Delone and McLean IS success model is extended through applying an analytic network process (ANP) approach in order to investigate the relative importance of each factor and ...

  10. Seniors Falls Investigative Methodology (SFIM): A Systems Approach to the Study of Falls in Seniors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecevic, Aleksandra A.; Salmoni, Alan W.; Lewko, John H.; Vandervoort, Anthony A.

    2007-01-01

    An in-depth understanding of human factors and human error is lacking in current research on seniors' falls. Additional knowledge is needed to understand why seniors are falling. The purpose of this article is to describe the adapting of the Integrated Safety Investigation Methodology (ISIM) (used for investigating transportation and industrial…

  11. Cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP): New approach for the delivery of biomolecules into cytoplasm in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Daeyou; Jeon, Choonju; Kim, Jeong-Hwan; Kim, Mi-Seon; Yoon, Cheol-Hee; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Sung-Hoon; Bae, Yong-Soo

    2006-01-01

    The protein transduction domain (PTD) of HIV-1 TAT has been extensively documented with regard to its membrane transduction potential, as well as its efficient delivery of biomolecules in vivo. However, the majority of PTD and PTD-conjugated molecules translocate to the nucleus rather than to the cytoplasm after transduction, due to the functional nuclear localization sequence (NLS). Here, we report a cytoplasmic transduction peptide (CTP), which was deliberately designed to ensure the efficient cytoplasmic delivery of the CTP-fused biomolecules. In comparison with PTD, CTP and its fusion partners exhibited a clear preference for cytoplasmic localization, and also markedly enhanced membrane transduction potential. Unlike the mechanism underlying PTD-mediated transduction, CTP-mediated transduction occurs independently of the lipid raft-dependent macropinocytosis pathway. The CTP-conjugated Smac/DIABLO peptide (Smac-CTP) was also shown to be much more efficient than Smac-PTD in the blockage of the antiapoptotic properties of XIAP, suggesting that cytoplasmic functional molecules can be more efficiently targeted by CTP-mediated delivery. In in vivo trafficking studies, CTP-fused β-gal exhibited unique organ tropisms to the liver and lymph nodes when systemically injected into mice, whereas PTD-β-gal exhibited no such tropisms. Taken together, our findings implicate CTP as a novel delivery peptide appropriate for (i) molecular targeting to cytoplasmic compartments in vitro, (ii) the development of class I-associated CTL vaccines, and (iii) special drug delivery in vivo, without causing any untoward effects on nuclear genetic material

  12. Investigation of tt in the full hadronic final state at CDF with a neural network approach

    CERN Document Server

    Sidoti, A; Busetto, G; Castro, A; Dusini, S; Lazzizzera, I; Wyss, J

    2001-01-01

    In this work we present the results of a neural network (NN) approach to the measurement of the tt production cross-section and top mass in the all-hadronic channel, analyzing data collected at the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) experiment. We have used a hardware implementation of a feedforward neural network, TOTEM, the product of a collaboration of INFN (Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare)-IRST (Istituto per la Ricerca Scientifica e Tecnologica)-University of Trento, Italy. Particular attention has been paid to the evaluation of the systematics specifically related to the NN approach. The results are consistent with those obtained at CDF by conventional data selection techniques. (38 refs).

  13. Proteome analysis of in vitro and in vivo root tissue of Withania ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We applied this technique to investigate the protein changes under in vitro and in vivo conditions, since in vitro cultures is considered to be an alternative approach to traditional agriculture in the industrial production of the biomolecules. To better understand the proteins and enzymes involved in withanolide biosynthetic ...

  14. Spectroscopic investigations on the complexation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) with organic model ligands and their binding mode in human urine (in vitro)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Anne

    2011-01-01

    In case of incorporation, trivalent actinides (An(III)) and lanthanides (Ln(III)) pose a serious health risk to humans. An(III) are artificial, highly radioactive elements which are mainly produced during the nuclear fuel cycle in nuclear power plants. Via hazardous accidents or nonprofessional storage of radioactive waste, they can be released in the environment and enter the human food chain. In contrast, Ln(III) are nonradioactive, naturally occurring elements with multiple applications in technique and medicine. Consequently it is possible that humans get in contact and incorporate both, An(III) and Ln(III). Therefore, it is of particular importance to elucidate the behaviour of these elements in the human body. While macroscopic processes such as distribution, accumulation and excretion are studied quite well, knowledge about the chemical binding form (speciation) of An(III) and Ln(III) in various body fluids is still sparse. In the present work, for the first time, the speciation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in natural human urine (in vitro) has been investigated spectroscopically and the formed complex identified. For this purpose, also basic investigations on the complex formation of Cm(III) and Eu(III) in synthetic model urine as well as with the urinary relevant, organic model ligands urea, alanine, phenylalanine, threonine and citrate have been performed and the previously unknown complex stability constants determined. Finally, all experimental results were compared to literature data and predictions calculated by thermodynamic modelling. Since both, Cm(III) and Eu(III), exhibit unique luminescence properties, particularly the suitability of time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) could be demonstrated as a method to investigate these metal ions in untreated, complex biofluids. The results of this work provide new scientific findings on the biochemical reactions of An(III) and Ln(III) in human body fluids on a molecular scale and

  15. Mastery-Approach Goals and Knowledge Transfer: An Investigation into the Effects of Task Structure and Framing Instructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belenky, Daniel M.; Nokes-Malach, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    Although prior work has shown that mastery-approach achievement goals are related to positive learning behaviors (e.g., more interest, perseverance, and self-regulation), less is known about how these goals interact with instruction to influence knowledge transfer. To address these issues we conducted a laboratory experiment investigating how two…

  16. Investigating the Effectiveness of Storylines Embedded within a Context-Based Approach: The Case for the Periodic Table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu, Hulya; Demircioglu, Gokhan; Calik, Muammar

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the context-based approach on 9th grade students' conceptions of the Periodic Table. Within a nonequivalent pretest-posttest control group design the study was conducted with 80 grade 9 students (aged 15-16) drawn from two classes (39 and 41 students) in a high school in Turkey. The experimental group was exposed to…

  17. Balancing options for shrimp farming : a landscape approach to investigate the future of shrimp farming in the Mekong Delta

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joffre, O.M.

    2015-01-01

    Balancing options for shrimp farming

    A landscape approach to investigate the future of shrimp farming in the Mekong Delta

    Olivier Joffre

    While providing an option for development in coastal areas, shrimp farming is usually associated with high environmental

  18. In vitro approaches to assess the effects of açai (Euterpe oleracea) digestion on polyphenol availability and the subsequent impact on the faecal microbiota.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqurashi, Randah M; Alarifi, Sehad N; Walton, Gemma E; Costabile, Adele F; Rowland, Ian R; Commane, Daniel M

    2017-11-01

    A considerable proportion of dietary plant-polyphenols reach the colon intact; determining the effects of these compounds on colon-health is of interest. We hypothesise that both fibre and plant polyphenols present in açai (Euterpe oleracea) provide prebiotic and anti-genotoxic benefits in the colon. We investigated this hypothesis using a simulated in vitro gastrointestinal digestion of açai pulp, and a subsequent pH-controlled, anaerobic, batch-culture fermentation model reflective of the distal region of the human large intestine. Following in vitro digestion, 49.8% of the total initial polyphenols were available. In mixed-culture fermentations with faecal inoculate, the digested açai pulp precipitated reductions in the numbers of both the Bacteroides-Prevotella spp. and the Clostridium-histolyticum groups, and increased the short-chain fatty acids produced compared to the negative control. The samples retained significant anti-oxidant and anti-genotoxic potential through digestion and fermentation. Dietary intervention studies are needed to prove that consuming açai is beneficial to gut health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. GRAND PLAZA SITE INVESTIGATION USING THE TRIAD APPROACH AND EVALUATION OF VAPOR INTRUSION - (ITER)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document provides a detailed report about a field study conducted by EQM/URS on behalf of EPA/NRMRL to characterize the subsurface contamination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a Brownfield commercial site. The TRIAD approach was implemented to characterize the exten...

  20. Investigating the management of diabetes in nursing homes using a mixed methods approach.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hurley, L

    2017-03-21

    As populations age there is an increased demand for nursing home (NH) care and a parallel increase in the prevalence of diabetes. Despite this, there is growing evidence that the management of diabetes in NHs is suboptimal. The reasons for this are complex and poorly understood. This study aimed to identify the current level of diabetes care in NHs using a mixed methods approach.

  1. Is Combining Child Labour and School Education the Right Approach? Investigating the Cambodian Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chae-Young

    2009-01-01

    The paper considers whether letting children combine work and school is a valid and effective approach in Cambodia. Policy makers' suggestions that child labour should be allowed to some extent due to household poverty appear ungrounded as no significant relation between children's work and household poverty is found while arranging school…

  2. Investigating the Relationships between Approaches to Learning, Learner Identities and Academic Achievement in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, K. J.; Bager-Elsborg, A.; McCune, V.

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers relationships between approaches to learning, learner identities, self-efficacy beliefs and academic achievement in higher education. In addition to already established survey instruments, a new scale, "subject area affinity," was developed. The scale explores the extent to which students identify with their area of…

  3. Integrative approaches to investigating human-natural systems: the Baltimore ecosystem study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary L. Cadenasso; Steward T.A. Pickett; Morgan J. Grove; Morgan J. Grove

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the research approaches used to study metropolitan Baltimore (Maryland, USA) as an ecological system. The urban ecosystem is a complex of biophysical, social, and built components, and is studied by an interdisciplinary teamof biological, social, and physical scientists, and urban designers. Ecology ?of? themetropolis is addressed...

  4. Approaching Knowledge Management through the Lens of the Knowledge Life Cycle: A Case Study Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlin, Julaine M.; Cennamo, Katherine S.

    2017-01-01

    More organizational leaders are recognizing that their greatest competitive advantage is the knowledge base of their employees and for organizations to thrive knowledge management (KM) systems need to be in place that encourage the natural interplay and flow of tacit and explicit knowledge. Approaching KM through the lens of the knowledge life…

  5. Investigating Separate and Concurrent Approaches for Item Parameter Drift in 3PL Item Response Theory Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce-Ferrer, Alvaro J.; Bulut, Okan

    2017-01-01

    This study examines separate and concurrent approaches to combine the detection of item parameter drift (IPD) and the estimation of scale transformation coefficients in the context of the common item nonequivalent groups design with the three-parameter item response theory equating. The study uses real and synthetic data sets to compare the two…

  6. Investigating the Interrelationships among Conceptions of, Approaches to, and Self-Efficacy in Learning Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Lanqin; Dong, Yan; Huang, Ronghuai; Chang, Chun-Yen; Bhagat, Kaushal Kumar

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relations between primary school students' conceptions of, approaches to, and self-efficacy in learning science in Mainland China. A total of 1049 primary school students from Mainland China participated in this study. Three instruments were adapted to measure students' conceptions of learning science,…

  7. Approaching Patients with Hyper-reflectivity and Perplexity: An Empirical Qualitative Investigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arnfred, Sidse Marie; Møller, Paul; Davidsen, Annette

    A qualitative approach was applied. The data material encompass email interviews with four phenomenological researchers. Email interviews have drawbacks compared to face-to-face interviews. The lack of emotional expressions was partly circumvented by the use of emoticons and expressive formatting....

  8. An Investigation on Individual Students' Perceptions of Interest Utilizing a Blended Learning Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shroff, Ronnie H.; Vogel, Douglas R.

    2010-01-01

    Research has established that individual student interest has a positive effect on learning and academic achievement. However, little is known about the impact of a blended learning approach on individual student interest and whether combinations of online and face-to-face learning activities significantly enhance student interest. This paper…

  9. Evaluating the predictability of the in vitro transfer model and in vivo rat studies as a surrogate to investigate the supersaturation and precipitation behaviour of different Albendazole formulations for humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Aaron; Holm, René; Kostewicz, Edmund S

    2017-07-15

    The present study investigated the ability of the in vitro transfer model and an in vivo pharmacokinetic study in rats to investigate the supersaturation and precipitation behaviour of albendazole (ABZ) relative to data from a human intestinal aspiration study reported in the literature. Two lipid based formulation systems, a hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) solution and the addition of a crystallization inhibitor (HPMC-E5) on the behaviour of ABZ was investigated. These formulations were investigated to represent differences in their ability to facilitate supersaturation within the small intestine. Overall, both the in vitro transfer model and the in vivo rat study were able to rank order the formulations (as aqueous suspension±HPMCvitro transfer model could reflect the performance of the ABZ formulations in the human study. Whilst the rat was able to provide information on the overall plasma exposure, through the use of the in vitro transfer model, a more mechanistic understanding of the supersaturation and precipitation behaviour of ABZ using the different formulation strategies, could be attained. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A Case Investigation of Product Structure Complexity in Mass Customization Using a Data Mining Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter; Brunø, Thomas Ditlev; Nielsen, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a data mining method for analyzing historical configuration data providing a number of opportunities for improving mass customization capabilities. The overall objective of this paper is to investigate how specific quantitative analyses, more specifically the association rule...

  11. An investigation of emotion experiences at work : a critical incident technique approach / Natalie Booth

    OpenAIRE

    Booth, Natalie

    2013-01-01

    Orientation: Emotions at work have been considered as an important facet of employees’ work life. However, research regarding the investigation of the emotion experiences at work per se has been lacking. Research Purpose: The general objective of this study is to critically investigate what emotion events are experienced and how these events are appraised for them to result in specific emotions. Motivation for the study: Currently a lack of research regarding emotion experiences as a pr...

  12. Mimicking exposures to acute and lifetime concentrations of inhaled silver nanoparticles by two different in vitro approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Herzog

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the emerging market of nano-sized products, silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs are widely used due to their antimicrobial properties. Human interaction with Ag NPs can occur through the lung, skin, gastrointestinal tract, and bloodstream. However, the inhalation of Ag NP aerosols is a primary concern. To study the possible effects of inhaled Ag NPs, an in vitro triple cell co-culture model of the human alveolar/airway barrier (A549 epithelial cells, human peripheral blood monocyte derived dendritic and macrophage cells together with an air–liquid interface cell exposure (ALICE system was used in order to reflect a real-life exposure scenario. Cells were exposed at the air–liquid interface (ALI to 0.03, 0.3, and 3 µg Ag/cm2 of Ag NPs (diameter 100 nm; coated with polyvinylpyrrolidone: PVP. Ag NPs were found to be highly aggregated within ALI exposed cells with no impairment of cell morphology. Furthermore, a significant increase in release of cytotoxic (LDH, oxidative stress (SOD-1, HMOX-1 or pro-inflammatory markers (TNF-α, IL-8 was absent. As a comparison, cells were exposed to Ag NPs in submerged conditions to 10, 20, and 30 µg Ag/mL. The deposited dose per surface area was estimated by using a dosimetry model (ISDD to directly compare submerged vs ALI exposure concentrations after 4 and 24 h. Unlike ALI exposures, the two highest concentrations under submerged conditions promoted a cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory response after 24 h. Interestingly, when cell cultures were co-incubated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, no synergistic inflammatory effects were observed. By using two different exposure scenarios it has been shown that the ALI as well as the suspension conditions for the lower concentrations after 4 h, reflecting real-life concentrations of an acute 24 h exposure, did not induce any adverse effects in a complex 3D model mimicking the human alveolar/airway barrier. However, the highest concentrations used in the ALI setup, as well

  13. A Workflow to Investigate Exposure and Pharmacokinetic Influences on High-Throughput in Vitro Chemical Screening Based on Adverse Outcome Pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) link adverse effects in individuals or populations to a molecular initiating event (MIE) that can be quantified using in vitro methods. Practical application of AOPs in chemical-specific risk assessment requires incorporation of knowled...

  14. Investigation on accordance of DNA double-strand break of blood between in vivo and in vitro irradiation using single cell gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiang; Jiang Enhai; Li Jin; Tang Weisheng; Wang Zhiquan; Zhao Yongcheng; Fan Feiyue

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To observe the consistency of DNA double-strand break between in vivo and in vitro irradiation, as a prophase study in radiation biodosimetry using single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE). Methods: Detect DNA double-strand break after whole-body and in vitro radiation in mice lymphocytes using neutral single cell gel electrophoresis. The comet images were processed by CASP software and all the data were analysed by SPSS12.0. Results: There is no difference between in vivo and in vitro irradiation group in HDNA%, TDNA%, CL, TL, TM and OTM. Conclusion: The result of neutral single cell gel electrophoresis shortly after in vitro irradiation can precisely reflect the DNA double-strand break of lymphocytes in whole-body irradiation. (authors)

  15. A Proteomic Approach to Investigating Gene Cluster Expression and Secondary Metabolite Functionality in Aspergillus fumigatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Rebecca A.; Hammel, Stephen; Sheridan, Kevin J.; Jones, Gary W.; Doyle, Sean

    2014-01-01

    A combined proteomics and metabolomics approach was utilised to advance the identification and characterisation of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus fumigatus. Here, implementation of a shotgun proteomic strategy led to the identification of non-redundant mycelial proteins (n = 414) from A. fumigatus including proteins typically under-represented in 2-D proteome maps: proteins with multiple transmembrane regions, hydrophobic proteins and proteins with extremes of molecular mass and pI. Indirect identification of secondary metabolite cluster expression was also achieved, with proteins (n = 18) from LaeA-regulated clusters detected, including GliT encoded within the gliotoxin biosynthetic cluster. Biochemical analysis then revealed that gliotoxin significantly attenuates H2O2-induced oxidative stress in A. fumigatus (p>0.0001), confirming observations from proteomics data. A complementary 2-D/LC-MS/MS approach further elucidated significantly increased abundance (pproteome and experimental strategies, plus mechanistic data pertaining to gliotoxin functionality in the organism. PMID:25198175

  16. Strategies for Determining Correct Cytochrome P450 Contributions in Hepatic Clearance Predictions: In Vitro-In Vivo Extrapolation as Modelling Approach and Tramadol as Proof-of Concept Compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    T'jollyn, Huybrecht; Snoeys, Jan; Van Bocxlaer, Jan; De Bock, Lies; Annaert, Pieter; Van Peer, Achiel; Allegaert, Karel; Mannens, Geert; Vermeulen, An; Boussery, Koen

    2017-06-01

    Although the measurement of cytochrome P450 (CYP) contributions in metabolism assays is straightforward, determination of actual in vivo contributions might be challenging. How representative are in vitro for in vivo CYP contributions? This article proposes an improved strategy for the determination of in vivo CYP enzyme-specific metabolic contributions, based on in vitro data, using an in vitro-in vivo extrapolation (IVIVE) approach. Approaches are exemplified using tramadol as model compound, and CYP2D6 and CYP3A4 as involved enzymes. Metabolism data for tramadol and for the probe substrates midazolam (CYP3A4) and dextromethorphan (CYP2D6) were gathered in human liver microsomes (HLM) and recombinant human enzyme systems (rhCYP). From these probe substrates, an activity-adjustment factor (AAF) was calculated per CYP enzyme, for the determination of correct hepatic clearance contributions. As a reference, tramadol CYP contributions were scaled-back from in vivo data (retrograde approach) and were compared with the ones derived in vitro. In this view, the AAF is an enzyme-specific factor, calculated from reference probe activity measurements in vitro and in vivo, that allows appropriate scaling of a test drug's in vitro activity to the 'healthy volunteer' population level. Calculation of an AAF, thus accounts for any 'experimental' or 'batch-specific' activity difference between in vitro HLM and in vivo derived activity. In this specific HLM batch, for CYP3A4 and CYP2D6, an AAF of 0.91 and 1.97 was calculated, respectively. This implies that, in this batch, the in vitro CYP3A4 activity is 1.10-fold higher and the CYP2D6 activity 1.97-fold lower, compared to in vivo derived CYP activities. This study shows that, in cases where the HLM pool does not represent the typical mean population CYP activities, AAF correction of in vitro metabolism data, optimizes CYP contributions in the prediction of hepatic clearance. Therefore, in vitro parameters for any test compound

  17. A proteomic approach to investigating gene cluster expression and secondary metabolite functionality in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    OpenAIRE

    Owens, RA; Hammel, S; Sheridan, KJ; Jones, GW; Doyle, S

    2014-01-01

    A combined proteomics and metabolomics approach was utilised to advance the identification and characterisation of secondary metabolites in Aspergillus fumigatus. Here, implementation of a shotgun proteomic strategy led to the identification of non-redundant mycelial proteins (n = 414) from A. fumigatus including proteins typically under-represented in 2-D proteome maps: proteins with multiple transmembrane regions, hydrophobic proteins and proteins with extremes of molecular mass and pI. Ind...

  18. Investigating Outcomes of T-Government Using a Public Value Management Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Veenstra , Anne; Janssen , Marijn

    2012-01-01

    Part 5: Evaluation; International audience; A main objective of transformational government (t-government) is to realize public sector reform. Initiatives of public sector reform, commonly referred to as New Public Management (NPM), often failed to achieve the desired results and led to undesired outcomes. Hence, a new reform approach, referred to as Public Value Management (PVM), emerged to overcome these negative effects and to which the use of information technology (IT) is central. This p...

  19. Commentary: Utilizing Community-Engaged Approaches to Investigate and Address Hmong Women’s Cancer Disparities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shannon M.A. Sparks

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a growing concern for women in the Hmong community. Hmong women experience poor health outcomes for both cervical and breast cancer, largely due to low rates of screening and resultant late-stage at diagnosis. Both breast and cervical cancer screening are complicated by a multitude of social, cultural and environmental factors which influence health care decision-making and can otherwise serve to restrict access. We argue that community-engaged research, an orientation which prioritizes collaborative, equitable partnerships and community voice in identifying both problems and solutions, can be a valuable approach to helping address cancer health disparities for Hmong women. Using the Milwaukee-based “Healthy Hmong Women” project as a case example, we detail how the community-engaged approach implemented by the project partners was critical in identifying factors contributing to Hmong cancer disparities and appropriate interve