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Sample records for vitro bewo cell

  1. Modeling placental transport: correlation of in vitro BeWo cell permeability and ex vivo human placental perfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Rytting, Erik; Mose, Tina

    2009-01-01

    . Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system. J. Toxicol. Environ. Health, Part A 71, 984-991]. In this work, the transport of these same three compounds, plus the reference compound antipyrine, was investigated using BeWo (b30) cell monolayers. Transport......The placental passage of three compounds with different physicochemical properties was recently investigated in ex vivo human placental perfusion experiments (caffeine, benzoic acid, and glyphosate) [Mose, T., Kjaerstad, M.B., Mathiesen, L., Nielsen, J.B., Edelfors, S., Knudsen, L.E., 2008...... across the BeWo cells was observed in the rank order of caffeine>antipyrine>benzoic acid>glyphosate in terms of both the apparent permeability coefficient and the initial slope, defined as the linear rate of substance transferred to the fetal compartment as percent per time, a parameter used to compare...

  2. Morphological and Behavioural Features of Bewo Cells Grown on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    matrix interactions among trophoblast cells and other neighbouring cells during human implantation, BeWo cells were cultured in a 3-dimensional artificial extracellular matrix (Matrigel) using a double-chamber system. These cultures were then ...

  3. Use of the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay, combined with the BeWo transport model, to predict relative in vivo developmental toxicity of antifungal compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hequn; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Louisse, Jochem; Blok, Martine; Wang, Xinyi; Snijders, Linda; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the applicability of the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay combined with the in vitro BeWo transport model to predict the relative in vivo developmental toxicity potencies. To this purpose, the in vitro developmental toxicity of five antifungal compounds was investigated by characterizing their inhibitory effect on the differentiation of ES-D3 cells into cardiomyocytes. The BeWo transport model, consisting of BeWo b30 cells grown on transwell inserts and mimicking the placental barrier, was used to determine the relative placental transport velocity. The ES-D3 cell differentiation data were first compared to benchmark doses (BMDs) for in vivo developmental toxicity as derived from data reported in the literature. Correlation between the benchmark concentration for 50% effect (BMCd50) values, obtained in the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay, with in vivo BMD10 values showed a reasonable correlation (R(2)=0.57). When the ES-D3 cell differentiation data were combined with the relative transport rates obtained from the BeWo model, the correlation with the in vivo data increased (R(2)=0.95). In conclusion, we show that the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay is able to better predict the in vivo developmental toxicity ranking of antifungal compounds when combined with the BeWo transport model, than as a stand-alone assay. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Extended evaluation on the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay combined with the BeWo transport model, to predict relative developmental toxicity of triazole compounds.

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    Li, Hequn; Flick, Burkhard; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Louisse, Jochem; Schneider, Steffen; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2016-05-01

    The mouse embryonic stem D3 (ES-D3) cell differentiation assay is based on the morphometric measurement of cardiomyocyte differentiation and is a promising tool to detect developmental toxicity of compounds. The BeWo transport model, consisting of BeWo b30 cells grown on transwell inserts and mimicking the placental barrier, is useful to determine relative placental transport velocities of compounds. We have previously demonstrated the usefulness of the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay in combination with the in vitro BeWo transport model to predict the relative in vivo developmental toxicity potencies of a set of reference azole compounds. To further evaluate this combined in vitro toxicokinetic and toxicodynamic approach, we combined ES-D3 cell differentiation data of six novel triazoles with relative transport rates obtained from the BeWo model and compared the obtained ranking to the developmental toxicity ranking as derived from in vivo data. The data show that the combined in vitro approach provided a correct prediction for in vivo developmental toxicity, whereas the ES-D3 cell differentiation assay as stand-alone did not. In conclusion, we have validated the combined in vitro approach for developmental toxicity, which we have previously developed with a set of reference azoles, for a set of six novel triazoles. We suggest that this combined model, which takes both toxicodynamic and toxicokinetic aspects into account, should be further validated for other chemical classes of developmental toxicants.

  5. Plasmodium falciparum parasites expressing pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haase, Rikke N; Megnekou, Rosette; Lundquist, Maja

    2006-01-01

    Placenta-sequestering Plasmodium falciparum parasites causing pregnancy-associated malaria express pregnancy-specific variant surface antigens (VSA(PAM)). We report here that VSA(PAM)-expressing patient isolates adhere strongly to the choriocarcinoma cell line BeWo and that the BeWo line can...

  6. PPAR-γ Regulates Trophoblast Differentiation in the BeWo Cell Model

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    Levytska, Khrystyna; Drewlo, Sascha; Baczyk, Dora; Kingdom, John

    2014-01-01

    Common pregnancy complications, such as severe preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction, disrupt pregnancy progression and impair maternal and fetal wellbeing. Placentas from such pregnancies exhibit lesions principally within the syncytiotrophoblast (SCT), a layer in direct contact with maternal blood. In humans and mice, glial cell missing-1 (GCM-1) promotes differentiation of underlying cytotrophoblast cells into the outer SCT layer. GCM-1 may be regulated by the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ); in mice, PPAR-γ promotes labyrinthine trophoblast differentiation via Gcm-1, and, as we previously demonstrated, PPAR-γ activation ameliorates disease features in rat model of preeclampsia. Here, we aimed to characterize the baseline activity of PPAR-γ in the human choriocarcinoma BeWo cell line that mimics SCT formation in vitro and modulate PPAR-γ activity to study its effects on cell proliferation versus differentiation. We report a novel negative autoregulatory mechanism between PPAR-γ activity and expression and show that blocking PPAR-γ activity induces cell proliferation at the expense of differentiation, while these remain unaltered following treatment with the agonist rosiglitazone. Gaining a deeper understanding of the role and activity of PPAR-γ in placental physiology will offer new avenues for the development of secondary prevention and/or treatment options for placentally-mediated pregnancy complications. PMID:24711815

  7. PPAR-γ Regulates Trophoblast Differentiation in the BeWo Cell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khrystyna Levytska

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Common pregnancy complications, such as severe preeclampsia and intrauterine growth restriction, disrupt pregnancy progression and impair maternal and fetal wellbeing. Placentas from such pregnancies exhibit lesions principally within the syncytiotrophoblast (SCT, a layer in direct contact with maternal blood. In humans and mice, glial cell missing-1 (GCM-1 promotes differentiation of underlying cytotrophoblast cells into the outer SCT layer. GCM-1 may be regulated by the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ; in mice, PPAR-γ promotes labyrinthine trophoblast differentiation via Gcm-1, and, as we previously demonstrated, PPAR-γ activation ameliorates disease features in rat model of preeclampsia. Here, we aimed to characterize the baseline activity of PPAR-γ in the human choriocarcinoma BeWo cell line that mimics SCT formation in vitro and modulate PPAR-γ activity to study its effects on cell proliferation versus differentiation. We report a novel negative autoregulatory mechanism between PPAR-γ activity and expression and show that blocking PPAR-γ activity induces cell proliferation at the expense of differentiation, while these remain unaltered following treatment with the agonist rosiglitazone. Gaining a deeper understanding of the role and activity of PPAR-γ in placental physiology will offer new avenues for the development of secondary prevention and/or treatment options for placentally-mediated pregnancy complications.

  8. Iron metabolism in BeWo chorion carcinoma cells. Transferrin-mediated uptake and release of iron

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, A.; du Maine, A.; Simmons, C. F.; Schwartz, A. L.; Strous, G. J.

    1987-01-01

    Growing human choriocarcinoma BeWo b24 cells contain 1.5 X 10(6) functional cell surface transferrin binding sites and 2.0 X 10(6) intracellular binding sites. These cells rapidly accumulate iron at a rate of 360,000 iron atoms/min/cell. During iron uptake the transferrin and its receptor recycle at

  9. Caspase-8 activity is part of the BeWo trophoblast cell defense mechanisms against Trypanosoma cruzi infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo, Ileana; Droguett, Daniel; Castillo, Christian; Liempi, Ana; Muñoz, Lorena; Maya, Juan Diego; Galanti, Norbel; Kemmerling, Ulrike

    2016-09-01

    Congenital Chagas disease is caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi that must cross the placental barrier during transmission. The trophoblast constitutes the first tissue in contact with the maternal-blood circulating parasite. Importantly, the congenital transmission rates are low, suggesting the presence of local placental defense mechanisms. Cellular proliferation and differentiation as well as apoptotic cell death are induced by the parasite and constitute part of the epithelial turnover of the trophoblast, which has been suggested to be part of those placental defenses. On the other hand, caspase-8 is an essential molecule in the modulation of trophoblast turnover by apoptosis and by epithelial differentiation. As an approach to study whether T. cruzi induced trophoblast turnover and infection is mediated by caspase-8, we infected BeWo cells (a trophoblastic cell line) with the parasite and determined in the infected cells the expression and enzymatic activity of caspase-8, DNA synthesis (as proliferation marker), β-human chorionic gonadotropin (β-hCG) (as differentiation marker) and activity of Caspase-3 (as apoptotic death marker). Parasite load in BeWo cells was measured by DNA quantification using qPCR and cell counting. Our results show that T. cruzi induces caspase-8 activity and that its inhibition increases trophoblast cells infection while decreases parasite induced cellular differentiation and apoptotic cell death, but not cellular proliferation. Thus, caspase-8 activity is part of the BeWo trophoblast cell defense mechanisms against T. cruzi infection. Together with our previous results, we suggest that the trophoblast turnover is part of local placental anti-parasite mechanisms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduced syncytin-1 expression in choriocarcinoma BeWo cells activates the calpain1-AIF-mediated apoptosis, implication for preeclampsia.

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    Huang, Qiang; Chen, Haibin; Wang, Fengchao; Brost, Brian C; Li, Jinping; Gao, Yu; Li, Zongfang; Gao, Ya; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2014-08-01

    Placentas associated with preeclampsia are characterized by extensive apoptosis in trophoblast lineages. Syncytin-1 (HERVWE1) mediates the fusion of cytotrophoblasts to form syncytiotrophoblasts, which assume the placental barrier, fetal-maternal exchange and endocrine functions. While decreased syncytin-1 expression has been observed in preeclamptic placentas, it is not clear if this alteration is involved in trophoblast apoptosis. In the current study, we found that siRNA-mediated knockdown of syncytin-1 led to apoptosis in choriocarcinoma BeWo, a cell line of trophoblastic origin. Characterization of the apoptotic pathways indicated that this effect does not rely on the activation of caspases. Rather, decreased syncytin-1 levels activated the apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) apoptotic pathway by inducing the expression, cleavage, and nuclear translocation of AIF. Moreover, calpain1, the cysteine protease capable of cleaving AIF, was upregulated by syncytin-1 knockdown. Furthermore, treatment with calpain1 inhibitor MDL28170 effectively reversed AIF cleavage, AIF nuclear translocation, and cell apoptosis triggered by syncytin-1 downregulation, verifying the specific action of calpain1-AIF pathway in trophoblast apoptosis. We confirmed that preeclamptic placentas express lower levels of syncytin-1 than normal placentas, and observed an inverse correlation between syncytin-1 and AIF/calpain1 mRNA levels, a result consistent with the in vitro findings. Immunohistochemistry analyses indicated decreased syncytin-1 and increased AIF and calpain1 protein levels in apoptotic cells of preeclamptic placentas. These findings have for the first time revealed that decreased levels of syncytin-1 can trigger the AIF-mediated apoptosis pathway in BeWo cells. This novel mechanism may contribute to the structural and functional deficiencies of syncytium frequently observed in preeclamptic placentas.

  11. Reduced syncytin-1 expression in chriocarcinoma BeWo cells activates the calpain1-AIF-mediated apoptosis, implication for preeclampsia

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    Huang, Qiang; Chen, Haibin; Wang, Fengchao; Brost, Brian C.; Li, Jinping; Gao, Yu; Li, Zongfang; Gao, Ya; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Placentas associated with preeclampsia are characterized by extensive apoptosis in trophoblast lineages. Syncytin-1 (HERVWE1) mediates the fusion of cytotrophoblasts to form syncytiotrophoblasts, which assume the placental barrier, fetal-maternal exchange and endocrine functions. While decreased syncytin-1 expression has been observed in preeclamptic placentas, it is not clear if this alteration is involved in trophoblast apoptosis. In the current study we found that siRNA-mediated knockdown of syncytin-1 led to apoptosis in choriocarcinoma BeWo, a cell line of trophoblastic origin. Characterization of the apoptotic pathways indicated that this effect does not rely on the activation of caspases. Rather, decreased syncytin-1 levels activated the AIF apoptotic pathway by inducing the expression, cleavage, and nuclear translocation of AIF. Moreover, calpain1, the cysteine protease capable of cleaving AIF, was upregulated by syncytin-1 knockdown. Furthermore, treatment with calpain1 inhibitor MDL28170 effectively reversed AIF cleavage, AIF nuclear translocation, and cell apoptosis triggered by syncytin-1 downregulation, verifying the specific action of calpain1-AIF pathway in trophoblast apoptosis. We confirmed that preeclamptic placentas express lower levels of syncytin-1 than normal placentas, and observed an inverse correlation between syncytin-1 and AIF/calpain1 mRNA levels, a result consistent with the in vitro findings. Immunohistochemistry analyses indicated decreased syncytin-1, increased AIF and calpain1 protein levels in apoptotic cells of preeclamptic placentas. These findings have for the first time revealed that decreased levels of syncytin-1 can trigger the AIF-mediated apoptosis pathway in BeWo cells. This novel mechanism may contribute to the structural and functional deficiencies of syncytium frequently observed in preeclamptic placentas. PMID:24413738

  12. Effect of ATP depletion and temperature on the transferrin-mediated uptake and release of iron by BeWo choriocarcinoma cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Ende, A.; du Maine, A.; Schwartz, A. L.; Strous, G. J.

    1989-01-01

    We have recently described the transferrin-mediated uptake and release of iron by BeWo cells [van der Ende, du Maine, Simmons, Schwartz & Strous (1987) J. Biol. Chem. 262, 8910-8916]. We now extend our studies of the mechanisms responsible for uptake and release of iron by these cells. Following

  13. Enrofloxacin and Toltrazuril Are Able to Reduce Toxoplasma gondii Growth in Human BeWo Trophoblastic Cells and Villous Explants from Human Third Trimester Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela J. da Silva

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Classical treatment for congenital toxoplasmosis is based on combination of sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine plus folinic acid. Due to teratogenic effects and bone marrow suppression caused by pyrimethamine, the establishment of new therapeutic strategies is indispensable to minimize the side effects and improve the control of infection. Previous studies demonstrated that enrofloxacin and toltrazuril reduced the incidence of Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of enrofloxacin and toltrazuril in the control of T. gondii infection in human trophoblast cells (BeWo line and in human villous explants from the third trimester. BeWo cells and villous were treated with several concentrations of enrofloxacin, toltrazuril, sulfadiazine, pyrimethamine, or combination of sulfadiazine+pyrimethamine, and the cellular or tissue viability was verified. Next, BeWo cells were infected by T. gondii (2F1 clone or the ME49 strain, whereas villous samples were only infected by the 2F1 clone. Then, infected cells and villous were treated with all antibiotics and the T. gondii intracellular proliferation as well as the cytokine production were analyzed. Finally, we evaluated the direct effect of enrofloxacin and toltrazuril in tachyzoites to verify possible changes in parasite structure. Enrofloxacin and toltrazuril did not decrease the viability of cells and villous in lower concentrations. Both drugs were able to significantly reduce the parasite intracellular proliferation in BeWo cells and villous explants when compared to untreated conditions. Regardless of the T. gondii strain, BeWo cells infected and treated with enrofloxacin or toltrazuril induced high levels of IL-6 and MIF. In villous explants, enrofloxacin induced high MIF production. Finally, the drugs increased the number of unviable parasites and triggered damage to tachyzoite structure. Taken together, it can be concluded that

  14. Enrofloxacin and Toltrazuril Are Able to Reduce Toxoplasma gondii Growth in Human BeWo Trophoblastic Cells and Villous Explants from Human Third Trimester Pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rafaela J; Gomes, Angelica O; Franco, Priscila S; Pereira, Ariane S; Milian, Iliana C B; Ribeiro, Mayara; Fiorenzani, Paolo; Dos Santos, Maria C; Mineo, José R; da Silva, Neide M; Ferro, Eloisa A V; de Freitas Barbosa, Bellisa

    2017-01-01

    Classical treatment for congenital toxoplasmosis is based on combination of sulfadiazine and pyrimethamine plus folinic acid. Due to teratogenic effects and bone marrow suppression caused by pyrimethamine, the establishment of new therapeutic strategies is indispensable to minimize the side effects and improve the control of infection. Previous studies demonstrated that enrofloxacin and toltrazuril reduced the incidence of Neospora caninum and Toxoplasma gondii infection. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of enrofloxacin and toltrazuril in the control of T. gondii infection in human trophoblast cells (BeWo line) and in human villous explants from the third trimester. BeWo cells and villous were treated with several concentrations of enrofloxacin, toltrazuril, sulfadiazine, pyrimethamine, or combination of sulfadiazine+pyrimethamine, and the cellular or tissue viability was verified. Next, BeWo cells were infected by T. gondii (2F1 clone or the ME49 strain), whereas villous samples were only infected by the 2F1 clone. Then, infected cells and villous were treated with all antibiotics and the T. gondii intracellular proliferation as well as the cytokine production were analyzed. Finally, we evaluated the direct effect of enrofloxacin and toltrazuril in tachyzoites to verify possible changes in parasite structure. Enrofloxacin and toltrazuril did not decrease the viability of cells and villous in lower concentrations. Both drugs were able to significantly reduce the parasite intracellular proliferation in BeWo cells and villous explants when compared to untreated conditions. Regardless of the T. gondii strain, BeWo cells infected and treated with enrofloxacin or toltrazuril induced high levels of IL-6 and MIF. In villous explants, enrofloxacin induced high MIF production. Finally, the drugs increased the number of unviable parasites and triggered damage to tachyzoite structure. Taken together, it can be concluded that enrofloxacin and

  15. Leukemia inhibitory factor regulates differentiation of trophoblastlike BeWo cells through the activation of JAK/STAT and MAPK3/1 MAP kinase-signaling pathways.

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    Leduc, Katy; Bourassa, Vincent; Asselin, Eric; Leclerc, Pierre; Lafond, Julie; Reyes-Moreno, Carlos

    2012-02-01

    It is well established that syncytium formation involves the fusion of mononucleated trophoblasts into a multinucleated structure and the secretion of hormonal factors, such as human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). These morphological and biochemical changes are regulated by a plethora of ligands, which upon binding to specific receptors trigger the activation of many signaling pathways, such as janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) and the mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (MAPK3/1). We used the forskolin-induced syncytialization of trophoblastlike BeWo cells to characterize at the cellular level the effect mediated by leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on trophoblast differentiation and to describe its action at the molecular level. Forskolin induces both hCG secretion and BeWo cell syncytial fusion. Although LIF had no effect on the undifferentiated state of the cells, the cytokine generated a strong reduction in forskolin-induced hCG release. In contrast to its effect on hCG secretion, LIF exerts a synergistic effect toward forskolin-induced fusion. LIF reduced hormonal production through a STAT1- and STAT3-dependent mechanism, whereas MAPK3/1 was not involved in this process. However, both types of signaling molecules were required to mediate the action of LIF in forskolin-induced cell fusion. These data provide novel insights into the regulation of trophoblast cell differentiation by LIF and describe for the first time the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of the cytokine.

  16. Characterization of VAR2CSA-deficient Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes selected for adhesion to the BeWo placental cell line

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    Brown Graham V

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria in pregnancy is characterized by accumulation of infected erythrocytes (IE in the placenta. The key ligand identified as mediating this process is a Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 family member, termed VAR2CSA. VAR2CSA appears to be the main ligand responsible for adhesion to chondroitin sulphate A (CSA. Whether other PfEMP1 molecules can also mediate placental adhesion, independent of CSA binding, is unclear. Methods The parasite line CS2 carrying a disrupted var2csa gene (CS2KO was selected for adhesion to the BeWo choriocarcinoma cell line, which has been proposed as a model for placental malaria. The selected and control IE were tested for adhesion to placental sections and flow cytometry was used to measure recognition of IE by three serum sets from malaria-exposed men and women. Results Wild-type CS2 adhere to BeWo and placental tissue via CSA. CS2KO IE were successfully selected for adhesion to BeWo, and adhered by a CSA-independent mechanism. They bound to immobilized ICAM-1 and CD36. BeWo-selected CS2KO bound at moderate levels to placental sections, but most binding was to placental villi rather than to the syncytiotrophoblast to which IE adherence occurs in vivo. This binding was inhibited by a blocking antibody to CD36 but not to ICAM-1. As expected, sera from malaria-exposed adults recognized CS2 IE in a gender and parity dependent manner. In one serum set, there was a similar but less pronounced pattern of antibody binding to selected CS2KO IE, but this was not seen in two others. One var gene, It4var19, was particularly abundant in the selected line and was detected as full length transcripts in BeWo-selected IE, but not unselected CS2KO. Conclusion This study suggests that IE with characteristics similar to the CS2KO have a limited role in the pathogenesis of placental malaria. VAR2CSA appear to be the major ligand for placental adhesion, and could be the basis for a vaccine

  17. Effects of Phytoestrogen Extracts Isolated from Elder Flower on Hormone Production and Receptor Expression of Trophoblast Tumor Cells JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells.

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    Schröder, Lennard; Richter, Dagmar Ulrike; Piechulla, Birgit; Chrobak, Mareike; Kuhn, Christina; Schulze, Sandra; Abarzua, Sybille; Jeschke, Udo; Weissenbacher, Tobias

    2016-10-08

    Hereinwe investigated the effect of elderflower extracts (EFE) and of enterolactone/enterodiol on hormone production and proliferation of trophoblast tumor cell lines JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 breast cancer cells. The EFE was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of EFE. Untreated cells served as controls. Supernatants were tested for estradiol production with an ELISA method. Furthermore, the effect of the EFE on ER/ER/PR expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry. EFE contains a substantial amount of lignans. Estradiol production was inhibited in all cells in a concentration-dependent manner. EFE upregulated ER in JEG-3 cell lines. In MCF7 cells, a significant ER downregulation and PR upregulation were observed. The control substances enterolactone and enterodiol in contrast inhibited the expression of both ER and of PR in MCF7 cells. In addition, the production of estradiol was upregulated in BeWo and MCF7 cells in a concentration dependent manner. The downregulating effect of EFE on ER expression and the upregulation of the PR expression in MFC-7 cells are promising results. Therefore, additional unknown substances might be responsible for ER downregulation and PR upregulation. These findings suggest potential use of EFE in breast cancer prevention and/or treatment and warrant further investigation.

  18. Effects of Phytoestrogen Extracts Isolated from Elder Flower on Hormone Production and Receptor Expression of Trophoblast Tumor Cells JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 Breast Cancer Cells

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    Lennard Schröder

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hereinwe investigated the effect of elderflower extracts (EFE and of enterolactone/enterodiol on hormone production and proliferation of trophoblast tumor cell lines JEG-3 and BeWo, as well as MCF7 breast cancer cells. The EFE was analyzed by mass spectrometry. Cells were incubated with various concentrations of EFE. Untreated cells served as controls. Supernatants were tested for estradiol production with an ELISA method. Furthermore, the effect of the EFE on ERα/ERβ/PR expression was assessed by immunocytochemistry. EFE contains a substantial amount of lignans. Estradiol production was inhibited in all cells in a concentration-dependent manner. EFE upregulated ERα in JEG-3 cell lines. In MCF7 cells, a significant ERα downregulation and PR upregulation were observed. The control substances enterolactone and enterodiol in contrast inhibited the expression of both ER and of PR in MCF7 cells. In addition, the production of estradiol was upregulated in BeWo and MCF7 cells in a concentration dependent manner. The downregulating effect of EFE on ERα expression and the upregulation of the PR expression in MFC-7 cells are promising results. Therefore, additional unknown substances might be responsible for ERα downregulation and PR upregulation. These findings suggest potential use of EFE in breast cancer prevention and/or treatment and warrant further investigation.

  19. Regulation of pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPPA2 in a human placental trophoblast cell line (BeWo

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    Christians Julian K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pregnancy-associated plasma protein A2 (PAPPA2 is an insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP protease expressed at high levels in the placenta and upregulated in pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia and HELLP (Hemolytic anemia, Elevated Liver enzymes, and Low Platelet count syndrome. However, it is unclear whether elevated PAPPA2 expression causes abnormal placental development, or whether upregulation compensates for placental pathology. In the present study, we investigate whether PAPPA2 expression is affected by hypoxia, oxidative stress, syncytialization factors or substances known to affect the expression of PAPPA2's paralogue, PAPPA. Methods BeWo cells, a model of placental trophoblasts, were treated with one of the following: hypoxia (2% O2, oxidative stress (20 microM hydrogen peroxide, forskolin (10 microM and 100 microM, TGF-beta (10 and 50 ng/mL, TNF-alpha (100 ng/mL, IL-1beta (100 ng/mL or PGE2 (1 microM. We used quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR to quantify the mRNA levels of PAPPA2, as well as those of PAPPA and ADAM12 since these proteases have similar substrates and are also highly expressed in the placenta. Where we observed significant effects on PAPPA2 mRNA levels, we tested for effects at the protein level using an in-cell Western assay. Results Hypoxia, but not oxidative stress, caused a 47-fold increase in PAPPA2 mRNA expression, while TNF-alpha resulted in a 6-fold increase, and both of these effects were confirmed at the protein level. PGE2 resulted in a 14-fold upregulation of PAPPA2 mRNA but this was not reflected at the protein level. Forskolin, TGF-beta and IL-1beta had no significant effect on PAPPA2 mRNA expression. We observed no effects of any treatment on PAPPA or ADAM12 expression. Conclusion Our study demonstrates that factors previously known to be highly expressed in preeclamptic placentae (PGE2 and TNF-alpha, contribute to the upregulation of PAPPA2. Hypoxia, known to occur in

  20. A comparison of the embryonic stem cell test and whole embryo culture assay combined with the BeWo placental passage model for predicting the embryotoxicity of azoles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dimopoulou, Myrto; Verhoef, Aart; Gomes, Caroline A; van Dongen, Catharina W; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M; Piersma, Aldert H; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard

    2018-01-01

    In the present study, we show the value of combining toxico-dynamic and -kinetic in vitro approaches for embryotoxicity testing of azoles. Both the whole embryo culture (WEC) and the embryonic stem cells test (EST) predicted the in vivo potency ranking of twelve tested azoles with moderate accuracy.

  1. In vitro placental model optimization for nanoparticle transport studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, Laura; Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2012-01-01

    on polycarbonate membranes (3.0 μm pore size) was four times higher for the 50 nm particles compared with the 100 nm particles. CONCLUSION: The BeWo cell line has been optimized and shown to be a valid in vitro model for studying the transplacental transport of nanoparticles. Fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticle...

  2. Azithromycin treatment is able to control the infection by two genotypes of Toxoplasma gondii in human trophoblast BeWo cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Mayara; Franco, Priscila Silva; Lopes-Maria, Janice Buiate; Angeloni, Mariana Bodini; Barbosa, Bellisa de Freitas; Gomes, Angelica de Oliveira; Castro, Andressa Silva; Silva, Rafaela José da; Oliveira, Fernanda Chaves de; Milian, Iliana Claudia Balga; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis; Ietta, Francesca; Mineo, José Roberto; Ferro, Eloisa Amália Vieira

    2017-10-01

    Trophoblast infection by Toxoplasma gondii plays a pivotal role in the vertical transmission of toxoplasmosis. Here, we investigate whether the antibiotic therapy with azithromycin, spiramycin and sulfadiazine/pyrimethamine are effective to control trophoblast infection by two Brazilian T. gondii genotypes, TgChBrUD1 or TgChBrUD2. Two antibiotic protocols were evaluated, as follow: i) pre-treatment of T. gondii-tachyzoites with selected antibiotics prior trophoblast infection and ii) post-treatment of infected trophoblasts. The infection index/replication and the impact of the antibiotic therapy on the cytokine milieu were characterized. It was observed that TgChBrUD2 infection induced lower infection index/replication as compared to TgChBrUD1. Regardless the therapeutic protocol, azithromycin was more effective to control the trophoblast infection with both genotypes when compared to conventional antibiotics. Azithromycin induced higher IL-12 production in TgChBrUD1-infected cells that may synergize the anti-parasitic effect. In contrast, the effectiveness of azithromycin to control the TgChBrUD2-infection was not associated with the IL-12 production. BeWo-trophoblasts display distinct susceptibility to T. gondii genotypes and the azithromycin treatment showed to be more effective than conventional antibiotics to control the T. gondii infection/replication regardless the parasite genotype. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Human parvovirus B19 antibodies induce altered membrane protein expression and apoptosis of BeWo trophoblasts.

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    Tzang, Bor-Show; Chiang, Szu-Yi; Chan, Hsu-Chin; Liu, Chung-Hsien; Hsu, Tsai-Ching

    2016-11-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19) is harmful during pregnancy since it can be vertically transmitted to the developing fetus. In addition, the anti‑B19 antibodies induced by B19 infection are believed to have a cytopathic role in B19 transmission; however, knowledge regarding the effects of anti‑B19 antibodies during pregnancy is limited. To investigate the possible roles of anti‑B19 antibodies during pregnancy, the present study examined the effects of anti‑B19‑VP1 unique region (VP1u), anti‑B19‑VP2 and anti‑B19‑nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies on BeWo trophoblasts. Briefly, BeWo trophoblasts were incubated with purified IgG against B19‑VP1u, B19‑VP2 and B19‑NS1. Subsequently, the expression of surface proteins and apoptotic molecules were assessed in BeWo trophoblasts using flow cytometry, ELISA and western blotting. The expression levels of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)‑G were significantly increased on BeWo trophoblasts treated with rabbit anti‑B19‑VP1u IgG, and were unchanged in those treated with rabbit anti‑B19‑NS1 and anti‑B19‑VP2 IgG, as compared with the control group. Furthermore, the expression levels of globoside (P blood group antigen) and cluster of differentiation (CD)29 (β1 integrin) were significantly increased in BeWo trophoblasts treated with rabbit anti‑B19‑NS1 and anti‑B19‑VP2 IgG, whereas only CD29 was also significantly increased in cells treated with anti‑B19‑VP1u IgG. In addition, the number of cells at sub‑G1 phase; caspase‑3 activity; and the expression of intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic molecules, including Fas‑associated death domain protein, activated caspase‑8, activated caspase‑3, B‑cell lymphoma 2‑associated X protein, cytochrome c, apoptotic peptidase activating factor 1 and activated caspase‑9, were significantly increased in BeWo trophoblasts treated with anti‑B19‑VP1u and anti‑B19‑NS1 IgG. In conclusion, the present

  4. Live cell imaging of in vitro human trophoblast syncytialization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Dang, Yan-Li; Zheng, Ru; Li, Yue; Li, Weiwei; Lu, Xiaoyin; Wang, Li-Juan; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Wang, Hongmei

    2014-06-01

    Human trophoblast syncytialization, a process of cell-cell fusion, is one of the most important yet least understood events during placental development. Investigating the fusion process in a placenta in vivo is very challenging given the complexity of this process. Application of primary cultured cytotrophoblast cells isolated from term placentas and BeWo cells derived from human choriocarcinoma formulates a biphasic strategy to achieve the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion, as the former can spontaneously fuse to form the multinucleated syncytium and the latter is capable of fusing under the treatment of forskolin (FSK). Live-cell imaging is a powerful tool that is widely used to investigate many physiological or pathological processes in various animal models or humans; however, to our knowledge, the mechanism of trophoblast cell fusion has not been reported using a live- cell imaging manner. In this study, a live-cell imaging system was used to delineate the fusion process of primary term cytotrophoblast cells and BeWo cells. By using live staining with Hoechst 33342 or cytoplasmic dyes or by stably transfecting enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and DsRed2-Nuc reporter plasmids, we observed finger-like protrusions on the cell membranes of fusion partners before fusion and the exchange of cytoplasmic contents during fusion. In summary, this study provides the first video recording of the process of trophoblast syncytialization. Furthermore, the various live-cell imaging systems used in this study will help to yield molecular insights into the syncytialization process during placental development. © 2014 by the Society for the Study of Reproduction, Inc.

  5. Translocation of positively and negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles in an in vitro placental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloet, Samantha K; Walczak, Agata P; Louisse, Jochem; van den Berg, Hans H J; Bouwmeester, Hans; Tromp, Peter; Fokkink, Remco G; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2015-10-01

    To obtain insight in translocation of nanoparticles across the placental barrier, translocation was studied for one positively and two negatively charged polystyrene nanoparticles (PS-NPs) of similar size in an in vitro model. The model consisted of BeWo b30 cells, derived from a human choriocarcinoma grown on a transwell insert forming a cell layer that separates an apical from a basolateral compartment. PS-NPs were characterized with respect to size, surface charge, morphology and protein corona. Translocation of PS-NPs was not related to PS-NP charge. Two PS-NPs were translocated across the BeWo transwell model to a lower extent than amoxicillin, a model compound known to be translocated over the placental barrier to only a limited extent, whereas one PS-NP showed a slightly higher translocation. Studies on the effect of transporter inhibitors on the translocation of the PS-NPs indicated that their translocation was not mediated by known transporters and mainly dependent on passive diffusion. It is concluded that the BeWo b30 model can be used as an efficient method to get an initial qualitative impression about the capacity of NPs to translocate across the placental barrier and set priorities in further in vivo studies on translocation of NPs to the fetus. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. In vitro toxicological effects of estrogenic mycotoxins on human placental cells: Structure activity relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prouillac, Caroline, E-mail: c.prouillac@vetagro-sup.fr [Université Lyon, US/C 1233 INRA VetAgroSup, Métabolisme et Toxicologie Comparée des Xénobiotiques, 1 avenue Bourgelat, BP 83, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France); Koraichi, Farah; Videmann, Bernadette; Mazallon, Michelle [Université Lyon, US/C 1233 INRA VetAgroSup, Métabolisme et Toxicologie Comparée des Xénobiotiques, 1 avenue Bourgelat, BP 83, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France); Rodriguez, Frédéric; Baltas, Michel [Université Paul Sabatier, SPCMIB-UMR5068, Laboratoire de Synthèse et de Physicochimie des Molécules d' Intérêt Biologique, 118 route de Narbonne, 31062 TOULOUSE cedex 9 (France); Lecoeur, Sylvaine [Université Lyon, US/C 1233 INRA VetAgroSup, Métabolisme et Toxicologie Comparée des Xénobiotiques, 1 avenue Bourgelat, BP 83, 69280 Marcy l' Etoile (France)

    2012-03-15

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a non-steroid estrogen mycotoxin produced by numerous strains of Fusarium which commonly contaminate cereals. After oral administration, ZEN is reduced via intestinal and hepatic metabolism to α- and β-zearalenol (αZEL and βZEL). These reduced metabolites possess estrogenic properties, αZEL showing the highest affinity for ERs. ZEN and reduced metabolites cause hormonal effects in animals, such as abnormalities in the development of the reproductive tract and mammary gland in female offspring, suggesting a fetal exposure to these contaminants. In our previous work, we have suggested the potential impact of ZEN on placental cells considering this organ as a potential target of xenobiotics. In this work, we first compared the in vitro effects of αZEL and βΖΕL on cell differentiation to their parental molecule on human trophoblast (BeWo cells). Secondly, we investigated their molecular mechanisms of action by investigating the expression of main differentiation biomarkers and the implication of nuclear receptor by docking prediction. Conversely to ZEN, reduced metabolites did not induce trophoblast differentiation. They also induced significant changes in ABC transporter expression by potential interaction with nuclear receptors (LXR, PXR, PR) that could modify the transport function of placental cells. Finally, the mechanism of ZEN differentiation induction seemed not to involve nuclear receptor commonly involved in the differentiation process (PPARγ). Our results demonstrated that in spite of structure similarities between ZEN, αZEL and βZEL, toxicological effects and toxicity mechanisms were significantly different for the three molecules. -- Highlights: ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on trophoblast differentiation. ► ZEN and metabolites have differential effect on ABC transporter expression. ► ZEN and metabolites effects involved nuclear receptors interaction.

  7. Good cell culture practices &in vitro toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskes, Chantra; Boström, Ann-Charlotte; Bowe, Gerhard; Coecke, Sandra; Hartung, Thomas; Hendriks, Giel; Pamies, David; Piton, Alain; Rovida, Costanza

    2017-12-01

    Good Cell Culture Practices (GCCP) is of high relevance to in vitro toxicology. The European Society of Toxicology In Vitro (ESTIV), the Center for Alternatives for Animal Testing (CAAT) and the In Vitro Toxicology Industrial Platform (IVTIP) joined forces to address by means of an ESTIV 2016 pre-congress session the different aspects and applications of GCCP. The covered aspects comprised the current status of the OECD guidance document on Good In Vitro Method Practices, the importance of quality assurance for new technological advances in in vitro toxicology including stem cells, and the optimized implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices and Good Laboratory Practices for regulatory testing purposes. General discussions raised the duality related to the difficulties in implementing GCCP in an academic innovative research framework on one hand, and on the other hand, the need for such GCCP principles in order to ensure reproducibility and robustness of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing. Indeed, if good cell culture principles are critical to take into consideration for all uses of in vitro test methods for toxicity testing, the level of application of such principles may depend on the stage of development of the test method as well as on the applications of the test methods, i.e., academic innovative research vs. regulatory standardized test method. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Choline on DNA Methylation and Macronutrient Metabolic Gene Expression in in Vitro Models of Hyperglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xinyin Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Choline is an essential nutrient that plays an important role in lipid metabolism and DNA methylation. Studies in rodents suggest that choline may adversely affect glycemic control, yet studies in humans are lacking. Using the human hepatic and placental cells, HepG2 and BeWo, respectively, we examined the interaction between choline and glucose treatments. In HepG2 cells, choline supplementation (1 mM increased global DNA methylation and DNA methyltransferase expression in both low-glucose (5 mM and high-glucose (35 mM conditions. Choline supplementation increased the expression of peroxisomal acyl-coenzyme A oxidase 1 ( ACOX1 , which mediates fatty acid β-oxidation, especially in the high-glucose condition. High-glucose exposure increased the transcription of the gluconeogenic gene phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase ( PEPCK , while choline supplementation mitigated such increase. Compared to HepG2 cells, the placenta-derived BeWo cells were relatively unresponsive to either high-glucose or -choline treatment. In conclusion, choline and glucose interacted to affect macronutrient metabolic genes, yet there was no indication that choline may worsen glycemic control in these in vitro human cell culture models.

  9. Poliovirus persistence in human cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colbère-Garapin, F; Jacques, S; Drillet, A S; Pavio, N; Couderc, T; Blondel, B; Pelletier, I

    2001-01-01

    Poliovirus (PV) can persist in vivo in the intestine of immunocompromised hosts for years. Moreover, immunocompetent individuals who have survived paralytic poliomyelitis sometimes develop the post-poliomyelitis syndrome (PPS), consisting of a variety of symptoms including new muscular atrophies. PPS may be due to PV persistence. We have developed models of PV persistence in neural cells and epidermoid cells. Cell determinants are of crucial importance for the establishment of persistent infections in human neuronal cells, whereas viral determinants play the primary role in human epidermoid HEp-2 cells. The results obtained with these in vitro models show the capacity of PV to persist and reveal a virus and cell co-evolution involving PV-receptor interactions. In addition, they suggest that several mechanisms are used by PV to establish and maintain persistent infections.

  10. Antibiotics Reduce Retinal Cell Survival In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, Amy E; Townes-Anderson, Ellen

    2017-11-02

    Antibiotics such as gentamicin (an aminoglycoside) and penicillin (a beta-lactam antibiotic) are routinely used in retinal cell and explant cultures. In many cases, these in vitro systems are testing parameters regarding photoreceptor transplantation or preparing cells for transplantation. In vivo, milligram doses of gentamicin are neurotoxic to the retina. However, little is known about the effects of antibiotics to retina in vitro and whether smaller doses of gentamicin are toxic to retinal cells. To test toxicity, retinal cells were dissociated from tiger salamander, placed in culture, and treated with either 20 μg/ml gentamicin, 100 μg/ml streptomycin, 100 U/ml antibiotic/antimycotic, 0.25 μg/ml amphotericin B, or 100 U/ml penicillin G. All dosages were within manufacturer's recommended levels. Control cultures had defined medium only. Cells were fixed at 2 h or 7 days. Three criteria were used to assess toxicity: (1) survival of retinal neurons, (2) neuritic growth of photoreceptors assessed by the development of presynaptic varicosities, and (3) survival and morphology of Mueller cells. Rod cells were immunolabeled for rod opsin, Mueller cells for glial fibrillary acidic protein, and varicosities for synaptophysin. Neuronal cell density was reduced with all pharmacological treatments. The number of presynaptic varicosities was also significantly lower in both rod and cone photoreceptors in treated compared to control cultures; further, rods were more sensitive to gentamicin than cones. Penicillin G (100 U/ml) was overall the least inhibitory and amphotericin B the most toxic of all the agents to photoreceptors. Mueller cell survival was reduced with all treatments; reduced survival was accompanied by the appearance of proportionally fewer stellate and more rounded glial morphologies. These findings suggest that even microgram doses of antibiotic and antimycotic drugs can be neurotoxic to retinal cells and reduce neuritic regeneration in cell

  11. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (anti n, D/sub 0/) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL60 promyelocytic leukemia; K562 erythroleukemia; 45 acute lymphocytic leukemia; and 176 acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  12. Placental transport and in vitro effects of Bisphenol A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørck, Thit J; Sorda, Giuseppina; Bechi, Nicoletta

    2010-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogen-like chemical, leaches from consumer products potentially causing human exposure. To examine the effects of BPA exposure during pregnancy, we performed studies using the BeWo trophoblast cell line, placental explant cultures, placental perfusions and skin diffusion...

  13. In vitro placental model optimization for nanoparticle transport studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, Laura; Poulsen, Marie Sønnegaard; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2012-01-01

    microscopy indicated both cellular uptake of the fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles and the transcellular transport of these particles from the apical (maternal) to the basolateral (fetal) compartment. Over the course of 24 hours, the apparent permeability across BeWo cells grown on polycarbonate...

  14. Zinc effect on human lymphatic malformation cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O, Teresa Min-Jung; Lou, Man Si; Ma, Yupo

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic malformations (LM) are clinically characterized by episodes of inflammatory episodes. Often, an upper respiratory illness or trauma will lead to painful swelling in the distribution of the LM. Zinc is an element involved in numerous aspects of cellular metabolism and is a common dietary supplement and cold remedy. We surmise that zinc may act as a therapeutic anti-inflammatory agent for lymphatic malformations and their cellular components. We investigate the apparent cytotoxic effect of zinc ion on lymphatic malformation cells in vitro. Fresh surgical lymphatic malformation specimens from 10 patients were collected and processed in a laboratory. Tissues were processed and lymphatic malformation cells were isolated and grown. Immunohistochemistry and cell morphology were used to confirm LM cells. HUVEC cells were used as controls. Zinc chloride solution was added to the cells and its effect observed. LM cells were isolated from five of the 10 specimens. Of these, the cells of only one specimen were able to be amplified to confluence. Five specimens were contaminated. Immunohistochemical staining (CD31, D2-40, and LYVE-1) and cell morphology of our specimens were consistent with lymphatic malformation while HUVEC control cells were negative. Zinc has a cytotoxic effect on BEL isolates in vitro with no obvious effect on cell morphology or growth rate of the control HUVEC cells. When compared with the published toxic zinc concentration for most cell types in the literature (100μM total zinc in vitro), our result indicates that LM cells may have a lower tolerance to zinc (10μM total zinc in vitro). Zinc has an apparent morphological effect on lymphatic malformation cells in vitro. Compared with other cell types, LM cells have a lower tolerance to zinc. While this result looks very promising for future therapeutic use of zinc in acute lymphangitis, further studies are necessary, such as finding the IC50 of zinc for lymphatic malformation in vitro and also in

  15. Oligodendrocyte plasticity with an intact cell body in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manabu Makinodan

    Full Text Available Demyelination is generally regarded as a consequence of oligodendrocytic cell death. Oligodendrocyte processes that form myelin sheaths may, however, degenerate and regenerate independently of the cell body, in which case cell death does not necessarily occur. We provide here the first evidence of retraction and regeneration of oligodendrocyte processes with no cell death in vitro, using time-lapse imaging. When processes were severed mechanically in vitro, the cells did not undergo cell death and the processes regenerated in 36 h. In a separate experiment, moderate N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA stimuli caused process retraction without apparent cell death, and the processes regained their elaborate morphology after NMDA was removed from the culture medium. These results strongly suggest that demyelination and remyelination can take place without concomitant cell death, at least in vitro. Process regeneration may therefore become a target for future therapy of demyelinating disorders.

  16. In vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into functional hepatocytes by sodium butyrate, hepatocyte growth factor and dexamethasone under ... under chemically defined conditions, which might be useful as an in vitro system for hepatocyte transplantation therapy and toxicity screening in drug discovery.

  17. Primordial germ cell-like cells differentiated in vitro from skin-derived stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Linher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated that stem cells isolated from fetal porcine skin have the potential to form oocyte-like cells (OLCs in vitro. However, primordial germ cells (PGCs, which must also be specified during the stem cell differentiation to give rise to these putative oocytes at more advanced stages of culture, were not systematically characterized. The current study tested the hypothesis that a morphologically distinct population of cells derived from skin stem cells prior to OLC formation corresponds to putative PGCs, which differentiate further into more mature gametes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: When induced to differentiate in an appropriate microenvironment, a subpopulation of morphologically distinct cells, some of which are alkaline phosphatase (AP-positive, also express Oct4, Fragilis, Stella, Dazl, and Vasa, which are markers indicative of germ cell formation. A known differentially methylated region (DMR within the H19 gene locus, which is demethylated in oocytes after establishment of the maternal imprint, is hypomethylated in PGC-like cells compared to undifferentiated skin-derived stem cells, suggesting that the putative germ cell population undergoes imprint erasure. Additional evidence supporting the germ cell identity of in vitro-generated PGC-like cells is that, when labeled with a Dazl-GFP reporter, these cells further differentiate into GFP-positive OLCs. SIGNIFICANCE: The ability to generate germ cell precursors from somatic stem cells may provide an in vitro model to study some of the unanswered questions surrounding early germ cell formation.

  18. Reassembly of somatic cells and testicular organogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuter, Karin; Ehmcke, Jens; Stukenborg, Jan-Bernd; Simoni, Manuela; Damm, Oliver S; Redmann, Klaus; Schlatt, Stefan; Wistuba, Joachim

    2014-02-01

    Testicular organogenesis in vitro requires an environment allowing a reassembly of testicular cell types. Previous in vitro studies using male murine germ cells cultured in a defined three-dimensional environment demonstrated tubulogenesis and differentiation into spermatozoa. Combining scaffolds as artificial culture substrates with testicular cell culture, we analysed the colonization of collagen sponges by rat testicular cells focusing on cell survival and reassembly of tubule-like-structures in vitro. Isolated testicular cells obtained from juvenile Sprague Dawley and eGFP transgenic rats were cultured on collagen sponges (DMEM high glucose+Glutamax, 35°C, 5% CO2 with or without gonadotropins). Live cell imaging revealed the colonization of cells across the entire scaffold for up to 35 days. After two days, histology showed cell clusters attached to the collagen fibres and displaying signs of tubulogenesis. Clusters consisted mainly of Sertoli and peritubular cells which surrounded some undifferentiated spermatogonia. Flow cytometry confirmed lack of differentiation as no haploid cells were detected. Leydig cell activity was detected by a rise of testosterone after gonadotropin stimulation. Our approach provides a novel method which is in particular suitable to follow the somatic testicular cells in vitro an issue of growing importance for the analysis of germ line independent failure of spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. In vitro differentiation of germ cells from stem cells: a comparison between primordial germ cells and in vitro derived primordial germ cell-like cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, W; Chen, C; De Felici, M; Shen, W

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are unique cell types capable to proliferate, some of them indefinitely, while maintaining the ability to differentiate into a few or any cell lineages. In 2003, a group headed by Hans R. Schöler reported that oocyte-like cells could be produced from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro. After more than 10 years, where have these researches reached? Which are the major successes achieved and the problems still remaining to be solved? Although during the last years, many reviews have been published about these topics, in the present work, we will focus on an aspect that has been little considered so far, namely a strict comparison between the in vitro and in vivo developmental capabilities of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) isolated from the embryo and the PGC-like cells (PGC-LCs) produced in vitro from different types of stem cells in the mouse, the species in which most investigation has been carried out. Actually, the formation and differentiation of PGCs are crucial for both male and female gametogenesis, and the faithful production of PGCs in vitro represents the basis for obtaining functional germ cells. PMID:26469955

  20. In vitro differentiation of germ cells from stem cells: a comparison between primordial germ cells and in vitro derived primordial germ cell-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, W; Chen, C; De Felici, M; Shen, W

    2015-10-15

    Stem cells are unique cell types capable to proliferate, some of them indefinitely, while maintaining the ability to differentiate into a few or any cell lineages. In 2003, a group headed by Hans R. Schöler reported that oocyte-like cells could be produced from mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro. After more than 10 years, where have these researches reached? Which are the major successes achieved and the problems still remaining to be solved? Although during the last years, many reviews have been published about these topics, in the present work, we will focus on an aspect that has been little considered so far, namely a strict comparison between the in vitro and in vivo developmental capabilities of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) isolated from the embryo and the PGC-like cells (PGC-LCs) produced in vitro from different types of stem cells in the mouse, the species in which most investigation has been carried out. Actually, the formation and differentiation of PGCs are crucial for both male and female gametogenesis, and the faithful production of PGCs in vitro represents the basis for obtaining functional germ cells.

  1. Isolation and In Vitro Characterization of Epidermal Stem Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moestrup, Kasper S; Andersen, Marianne Stemann; Jensen, Kim Bak

    2017-01-01

    Colony-forming assays represent prospective methods, where cells isolated from enzymatically dissociated tissues or from tissue cultures are assessed for their proliferative capacity in vitro. Complex tissues such as the epithelial component of the skin (the epidermis) are characterized by a subs...... skin sorted by surface antigens associated with adult stem cell characteristics.......Colony-forming assays represent prospective methods, where cells isolated from enzymatically dissociated tissues or from tissue cultures are assessed for their proliferative capacity in vitro. Complex tissues such as the epithelial component of the skin (the epidermis) are characterized...... by a substantial cellular heterogeneity. Analysis of bulk populations of cells by colony-forming assays can consequently be convoluted by a number of factors that are not controlled for in population wide studies. It is therefore advantageous to refine in vitro growth assays by sub-fractionation of cells using...

  2. In vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... Key words: Embryonic stem cells, hepatic-like cells, in vitro differentiation, sodium butyrate, hepatocyte growth factor, dexamethason. INTRODUCTION. The liver is the major organ that provides multiple metabolic functions critical for the maintenance of homeostasis. One of the major causes of morbidity and.

  3. In vitro Natural Killer cell immunotherapy for medulloblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucia eFernandez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available How the immune system attacks medulloblastoma (MB tumours effectively is unclear, although natural killer (NK cells play an important role in immune defence against tumour cells. Interactions between receptors on NK cells and ligands expressed by tumour cells are critical for tumour control by immunotherapy. In this study, we analysed tumour samples from 54 MB patients for expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains A (MICA and UL16 binding protein (ULPB-2, which are ligands for the NK group 2 member D activatory receptor (NKG2D. The percentage of MICA and ULBP-2 positive cells was higher than 25% in 68% and 6% of MB patients, respectively. A moderate-high intensity of MICA cytoplasmic staining was observed in 46% MB patients and weak ULBP-2 staining was observed in 8% MB patients. No correlation between MICA/ULBP-2 expression and patient outcome was found. We observed that HTB-186, a medulloblastoma cell line, was moderately resistant to NK cell cytotoxicity in vitro. Blocking MICA/ULBP-2 on HTB-186, and NKG2D receptor on NK cells increased resistance to NK cell lysis in vitro. However, HLA class I blocking on HTB-186 and overnight incubation with IL-15 stimulated NK cells efficiently to kill tumour cells in vitro. We conclude that although NKG2D/MICA-ULBP-2 interactions have a role in NK cell cytotoxicity against MB, high expression of HLA class I can protect MB from NK cell cytotoxicity. Even so, our in vitro data indicate that if NK cells are appropriately stimulated, they may have the potential to target MB in vivo.

  4. An In Vitro Nematic Model for Proliferating Cell Cultures

    CERN Document Server

    Pai, Sunil; Green, Morgaine; Cordeiro, Christine; Cabral, Elise; Chen, Bertha; Baer, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Confluent populations of elongated cells give rise to ordered patterns seen in nematic phase liquid crystals. We correlate cell elongation and intercellular distance with intercellular alignment using an amorphous spin glass model. We compare in vitro time-lapse imaging with Monte Carlo simulation results by framing a novel hard ellipses model in terms of Boltzmann statistics. Furthermore, we find a statistically distinct alignment energy at quasi-steady state among fibroblasts, smooth muscle cells, and pluripotent cell populations when cultured in vitro. These findings have important implications in both non-invasive clinical screening of the stem cell differentiation process and in relating shape parameters to coupling in active crystal systems such as nematic cell monolayers.

  5. How do culture media influence in vitro perivascular cell behavior?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra Juliane

    2015-12-01

    Perivascular cells are multilineage cells located around the vessel wall and important for wall stabilization. In this study, we evaluated a stem cell media and a perivascular cell-specific media for the culture of primary perivascular cells regarding their cell morphology, doubling time, stem cell properties, and expression of cell type-specific markers. When the two cell culture media were compared to each other, perivascular cells cultured in the stem cell medium had a more elongated morphology and a faster doubling rate and cells cultured in the pericyte medium had a more typical morphology, with several filopodia, and a slower doubling rate. To evaluate stem cell properties, perivascular cells, CD146(-) cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were differentiated into the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. It was seen that perivascular cells, as well as CD146(-) cells and MSCs, cultured in stem cell medium showed greater differentiation than cells cultured in pericyte-specific medium. The expression of pericyte-specific markers CD146, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), myosin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) could be found in both pericyte cultures, as well as to varying amounts in CD146(-) cells, MSCs, and endothelial cells. The here presented work shows that perivascular cells can adapt to their in vitro environment and cell culture conditions influence cell functionality, such as doubling rate or differentiation behavior. Pericyte-specific markers were shown to be expressed also from cells other than perivascular cells. We can further conclude that CD146(+) perivascular cells are inhomogeneous cell population probably containing stem cell subpopulations, which are located perivascular around capillaries. © 2015 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  6. Cell sources for in vitro human liver cell culture models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeilinger, Katrin; Freyer, Nora; Damm, Georg; Seehofer, Daniel; Knöspel, Fanny

    2016-09-01

    In vitro liver cell culture models are gaining increasing importance in pharmacological and toxicological research. The source of cells used is critical for the relevance and the predictive value of such models. Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are currently considered to be the gold standard for hepatic in vitro culture models, since they directly reflect the specific metabolism and functionality of the human liver; however, the scarcity and difficult logistics of PHH have driven researchers to explore alternative cell sources, including liver cell lines and pluripotent stem cells. Liver cell lines generated from hepatomas or by genetic manipulation are widely used due to their good availability, but they are generally altered in certain metabolic functions. For the past few years, adult and pluripotent stem cells have been attracting increasing attention, due their ability to proliferate and to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro However, controlling the differentiation of these cells is still a challenge. This review gives an overview of the major human cell sources under investigation for in vitro liver cell culture models, including primary human liver cells, liver cell lines, and stem cells. The promises and challenges of different cell types are discussed with a focus on the complex 2D and 3D culture approaches under investigation for improving liver cell functionality in vitro Finally, the specific application options of individual cell sources in pharmacological research or disease modeling are described. © 2016 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  7. In vitro radiosensitivity of human leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Greenberger, J.S.; Schmidt, A.; Karpas, A.; Moloney, W.C.; Little, J.B.

    1981-05-01

    The in vitro radiobiologic survival values (n, D0) of four tumor lines derived from human hematopoietic tumors were studied. These cell lines were HL50 (n . 1.3, D0 . 117 rad(1.17 Gy)), promyelocytic leukemia; K562 (n . 1.4, D0 . 165 rad(1.65 Gy)), erythroleukemia; 45 (n . 1.1, D0 . 147 rad(1.47 Gy)), acute lymphocyte leukemia; and 176 (n . 4.0, D0 . 76 rad(0.76 Gy)), acute monomyelogenous leukemia. More cell lines must be examined before the exact relationship between in vitro radiosensitivity and clinical radiocurability is firmly established.

  8. In Vitro Endothelialization Test of Biomaterials Using Immortalized Endothelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Kono

    Full Text Available Functionalizing biomaterials with peptides or polymers that enhance recruitment of endothelial cells (ECs can reduce blood coagulation and thrombosis. To assess endothelialization of materials in vitro, primary ECs are generally used, although the characteristics of these cells vary among the donors and change with time in culture. Recently, primary cell lines immortalized by transduction of simian vacuolating virus 40 large T antigen or human telomerase reverse transcriptase have been developed. To determine whether immortalized ECs can substitute for primary ECs in material testing, we investigated endothelialization on biocompatible polymers using three lots of primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC and immortalized microvascular ECs, TIME-GFP. Attachment to and growth on polymer surfaces were comparable between cell types, but results were more consistent with TIME-GFP. Our findings indicate that TIME-GFP is more suitable for in vitro endothelialization testing of biomaterials.

  9. Quercetin inhibits adipogenesis of muscle progenitor cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoko Funakoshi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Muscle satellite cells are committed myogenic progenitors capable of contributing to myogenesis to maintain adult muscle mass and function. Several experiments have demonstrated that muscle satellite cells can differentiate into adipocytes in vitro, supporting the mesenchymal differentiation potential of these cells. Moreover, muscle satellite cells may be a source of ectopic muscle adipocytes, explaining the lipid accumulation often observed in aged skeletal muscle (sarcopenia and in muscles of patients` with diabetes. Quercetin, a polyphenol, is one of the most abundant flavonoids distributed in edible plants, such as onions and apples, and possesses antioxidant, anticancer, and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we examined whether quercetin inhibited the adipogenesis of muscle satellite cells in vitro with primary cells from rat limbs by culture in the presence of quercetin under adipogenic conditions. Morphological observations, Oil Red-O staining results, triglyceride content analysis, and quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed that quercetin was capable of inhibiting the adipogenic induction of muscle satellite cells into adipocytes in a dose-dependent manner by suppressing the transcript levels of adipogenic markers, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ and fatty acid binding protein 4. Our results suggested that quercetin inhibited the adipogenesis of muscle satellite cells in vitro by suppressing the transcription of adipogenic markers.

  10. In vitro regeneration, flowering, and cell culture of Centaurea species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... This study was conducted to establish a protocol for in vitro flowering of Centaurea cyanus and cell cultures of Centaurea montana. In four weeks, 50 to 60 adventitious shoots developed on leaf explants cultured in MS medium supplemented with 2.0 mg/L benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 0.1 mg/L indole-3-.

  11. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR G

    In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of Azadirachta indica. 113. J. Biosci. 33(1), March 2008. 1. Introduction. Chemical pesticides, once considered a boon for increasing the yield of food crops, have now become a bane owing to the numerous cases of pesticide poisoning. Alternative pesticides ...

  12. In vitro plant regeneration from embryogenic cell suspension culture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-05-02

    May 2, 2008 ... In vitro plant regeneration was achieved from embryogenic cell suspension culture of Astragalus chrysochlorus. When 30-day-old aseptically ... previous study, cytotoxic activities of stem and root ex-. *Corresponding author. E-mail: ... For callus induction, 30-day-old mesocotyl parts of seedlings were used.

  13. Translating cell biology in vitro to immunity in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boes, Marianne; Ploegh, Hidde L.

    2004-07-01

    The elimination of pathogens and pathogen-infected cells initially rests on the rapid deployment of innate immune defences. Should these defences fail, it is the lymphocytes - T cells and B cells - with their antigen-specific receptors that must rise to the task of providing adaptive immunity. Technological advances are now allowing immunologists to correlate data obtained in vitro with in vivo functions. A better understanding of T-cell activation in vivo could lead to more effective strategies for the treatment and prevention of infectious and autoimmmune diseases.

  14. In vitro germ cell differentiation from cynomolgus monkey embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaori Yamauchi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mouse embryonic stem (ES cells can differentiate into female and male germ cells in vitro. Primate ES cells can also differentiate into immature germ cells in vitro. However, little is known about the differentiation markers and culture conditions for in vitro germ cell differentiation from ES cells in primates. Monkey ES cells are thus considered to be a useful model to study primate gametogenesis in vitro. Therefore, in order to obtain further information on germ cell differentiation from primate ES cells, this study examined the ability of cynomolgus monkey ES cells to differentiate into germ cells in vitro. METHODS AND FINDINGS: To explore the differentiation markers for detecting germ cells differentiated from ES cells, the expression of various germ cell marker genes was examined in tissues and ES cells of the cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis. VASA is a valuable gene for the detection of germ cells differentiated from ES cells. An increase of VASA expression was observed when differentiation was induced in ES cells via embryoid body (EB formation. In addition, the expression of other germ cell markers, such as NANOS and PIWIL1 genes, was also up-regulated as the EB differentiation progressed. Immunocytochemistry identified the cells expressing stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA 1, OCT-4, and VASA proteins in the EBs. These cells were detected in the peripheral region of the EBs as specific cell populations, such as SSEA1-positive, OCT-4-positive cells, OCT-4-positive, VASA-positive cells, and OCT-4-negative, VASA-positive cells. Thereafter, the effect of mouse gonadal cell-conditioned medium and growth factors on germ cell differentiation from monkey ES cells was examined, and this revealed that the addition of BMP4 to differentiating ES cells increased the expression of SCP1, a meiotic marker gene. CONCLUSION: VASA is a valuable gene for the detection of germ cells differentiated from ES cells in monkeys, and the

  15. MEIS1 inhibits clear cell renal cell carcinoma cells proliferation and in vitro invasion or migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jie; Cui, Liang; Xu, Axiang; Yin, Xiaotao; Li, Fanglong; Gao, Jiangping

    2017-03-07

    Myeloid ecotropic viral integration site 1 (MEIS1) protein plays a synergistic causative role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, MEIS1 has also shown to be a potential tumor suppressor in some other cancers, such as non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and prostate cancer. Although multiple roles of MEIS1 in cancer development and progression have been identified, there is an urgent demand to discover more functions of this molecule for further therapeutic design. MEIS1 was overexpressed via adenovirus vector in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) cells. Western blot and real-time qPCR (quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction) was performed to examine the protein and mRNA levels of MEIS1. Cell proliferation, survival, in vitro migration and invasion were tested by MTT, colony formation, soft-agar, transwell (in vitro invasion/migration) assays, and tumor in vivo growthwas measured on nude mice model. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis was used to detect cell cycle arrest or non-apoptotic cell death of ccRCC cells induced by MEIS1. MEIS1 exhibits a decreased expression in ccRCC cell lines than that in non-tumor cell lines. MEIS1 overexpression inhibits ccRCC cells proliferation and induces G1/S arrest concomitant with marked reduction of G1/S transition regulators, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin A. Moreover, MEIS1-1 overexpression also induces non-apoptotic cell death of ccRCC cells via decreasing the levels of pro-survival regulators Survivin and BCL-2. Transwell migration assay (TMA) shows that MEIS1 attenuates in vitro invasion and migration of ccRCC cells with down-regulated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) process. Further, in nude mice model, MEIS1 inhibits the in vivo growth of Caki-1 cells. By investigating the role of MEIS1 in ccRCC cells' survival, proliferation, anchorage-independent growth, cell cycle progress, apoptosis and metastasis, in the present work, we propose that MEIS1 may play an important role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma (cc

  16. In vitro cultivation of Schistosoma japonicum-parasites and cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Qing; Dong, Hui-Fen; Grevelding, Christoph G; Hu, Min

    2013-12-01

    Schistosomiasis is a serious parasitic zoonosis caused by blood-dwelling flukes of the genus Schistosoma. Understanding functions of genes and proteins of this parasite is important for uncovering this pathogen's complex biology, which will provide valuable information to design new strategies for schistosomiasis control. Effective applications of molecular tools reported to investigate schistosome gene function, such as inhibitor studies and transgenesis, rely on the developments of in vitro cultivation system of this parasite and cells. Besides the in vitro culture studies dealing with Schistosoma mansoni, there are also numerous excellent studies about the in vitro cultivation of Schistosoma japonicum, which were performed by Chinese researchers and published in Chinese journals. Nearly every stage of the life-cycle of S. japonicum, including miracidia, mother sporocysts, cercariae, schistosomula, and egg-laying adult worms, was employed for developing in vitro cultivation methods, being accompanied by the introduction of several media and supplements that helped to improve culture conditions. It was not only possible to generate mother sporocysts from miracidia in vitro, but also to obtain adult worms from cercariae through in vitro cultivation. The main obstacles to complete the life cycle of S. japonicum in the lab are the transition from mother sporocysts to cercariae, and the production of fertilized and completely developed eggs by adult worms generated in vitro. With regard to cells from S. japonicum, besides established isolation protocols and morphological observations, media optimizations were conducted by using different chemical reagents, biological supplements and physical treatment. Among these, mutagens like N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and the addition of extracellular matrix were found to be able to induce mitogenic activities. Although enzyme activities or the level of silver-stained nucleolar region associated protein in cultured cells

  17. Cell-specific and dose-dependent effects of PAHs on proliferation, cell cycle, and apoptosis protein expression and hormone secretion by placental cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drwal, Eliza; Rak, Agnieszka; Grochowalski, Adam; Milewicz, Tomasz; Gregoraszczuk, Ewa Lucja

    2017-10-05

    In the preset study we measured the concentrations of 16 priority PAHs in maternal blood and placental tissue by using the GC-MS/MS system, and investigated the effects of selected PAHs (naphthalene, anthracene, phenanthrene, pyrene) and mixtures on BeWo and JEG-3 human placental cell line proliferation (Alamar Blue), cytotoxicity (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (XTT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), acid phosphatase (AP), endocrine activity (progesterone and estradiol secretion) and apoptosis (cyclin A1, cyclin D2, cdk 2, cdk 4, Bcl-xl, Bax, and caspase-3 protein expression). The concentrations of 16 PAHs in maternal blood were higher than in placental tissue. In JEG-3 cells except for naphthalene, all PAHs studied and their mixtures at maternal doses, and only naphthalene at placental doses, increased XTT, while in BeWo cells, placental doses increased XTT and AP activity. A cell-type dependent action: a proapoptotic effect (increased Bax and caspase-3) in BeWo cells and an antiapoptotic effect (decreased Bax and increased cdk2 and cyclin D1) in JEG-3 cells was observed. Naphthalene, pyrene, and phenanthrene exhibited an endocrine-disrupting effect in JEG3 cells but not in BeWo cells. Our results provide evidence of cell specific effects of selected low molecular weight PAHs on proliferation, the cell cycle, proapoptotic protein expression, and hormone secretion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. In vitro proliferation of adult human beta-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Rutti

    Full Text Available A decrease in functional beta-cell mass is a key feature of type 2 diabetes. Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1 analogues induce proliferation of rodent beta-cells. However, the proliferative capacity of human beta-cells and its modulation by GLP-1 analogues remain to be fully investigated. We therefore sought to quantify adult human beta-cell proliferation in vitro and whether this is affected by the GLP-1 analogue liraglutide.Human islets from 7 adult cadaveric organ donors were dispersed into single cells. Beta-cells were purified by FACS. Non-sorted cells and the beta-cell enriched ("beta-cells" population were plated on extracellular matrix from rat (804G and human bladder carcinoma cells (HTB9 or bovine corneal endothelial ECM (BCEC. Cells were maintained in culture+/-liraglutide for 4 days in the presence of BrdU.Rare human beta-cell proliferation could be observed either in the purified beta-cell population (0.051±0.020%; 22 beta-cells proliferating out of 84'283 beta-cells counted or in the non-sorted cell population (0.055±0.011%; 104 proliferating beta-cells out of 232'826 beta-cells counted, independently of the matrix or the culture conditions. Liraglutide increased human beta-cell proliferation on BCEC in the non-sorted cell population (0.082±0.034% proliferating beta-cells vs. 0.017±0.008% in control, p<0.05.These results indicate that adult human beta-cell proliferation can occur in vitro but remains an extremely rare event with these donors and particular culture conditions. Liraglutide increases beta-cell proliferation only in the non-sorted cell population and only on BCEC. However, it cannot be excluded that human beta-cells may proliferate to a greater extent in situ in response to natural stimuli.

  19. Invasion of epithelial cells by Trichinella spiralis: in vitro observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romarís F.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available It has been known for many years that Trichinella spiralis initiates infection by penetrating the columnar epithelium of the small intestine, however, the mechanisms used by the parasite in the establishment of its intramulticellular niche in the intestine are unknown. The recent demonstration that invasion also occurs in vitro when infective larvae of T. spiralis are inoculated onto cultures of epithelial cells provides a model that allows the direct observation of the process by which the parasite recognizes, invades and migrates within the epithelium. The finding that penetration of the cell membrane or Induction of plasma membrane wounds by larvae do not always result in invasion argue in favor of some kind of host-parasite communication in successful invasion. In this sense, the in vitro model of invasion provides a readily manipulated and controlled system to investigate both parasite, and host cell requirements for invasion.

  20. [In vitro cell culture technology in cosmetology research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gojniczek, Katarzyna; Garncarczyk, Agnieszka; Pytel, Agata

    2005-01-01

    For ages the humanity has been looking for all kind of active substances, which could be used in improving the health and the appearance of our skin. People try to find out how to protect the skin from harmful, environmental factors. Every year a lot of new natural and synthetic, chemical substances are discovered. All of them potentially could be used as a cosmetic ingredient. In cosmetology research most of new xenobiotics were tested in vivo on animals. Alternative methods to in vivo tests are in vitro tests with skin cell culture system. The aim of this work was to describe two-dimensional and tree-dimensional skin cell cultures. Additionally, in this work we wanted to prove the usefulness of in vitro skin cell cultures in cosmetology research.

  1. Veratridine increases the survival of retinal ganglion cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.P.F. Pereira

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal cell death is an important phenomenon involving many biochemical pathways. This degenerative event has been studied to understand how the cells activate the mechanisms that lead to self-destruction. Target cells and afferent cells play a relevant role in the regulation of natural cell death. We studied the effect of veratridine (1.5, 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0 µM on the survival of neonatal rat retinal ganglion cells in vitro. Veratridine (3.0 µM, a well-known depolarizing agent that opens the Na+ channel, promoted a two-fold increase in the survival of retinal ganglion cells kept in culture for 48 h. This effect was dose-dependent and was blocked by 1.0 µM tetrodotoxin (a classical voltage-dependent Na+ channel blocker and 30.0 µM flunarizine (a Na+ and Ca2+ channel blocker. These results indicate that electrical activity is also important for the maintenance of retinal ganglion cell survival in vitro

  2. Calcium-mediated differentiation of ameloblast lineage cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, James; Zhang, Yan; Mendoza, Joseph; Denbesten, Pamela

    2009-07-15

    Calcium is a key component of the mineralized enamel matrix, but may also have a role in ameloblast cell differentiation. In this study we used human ameloblast lineage cells to determine the effect of calcium on cell function. Primary human ameloblast lineage cells were isolated from human fetal tooth buds. Cells were treated with calcium ranging from 0.05 to -1.8 mM. Cell morphology was imaged by phase contrast microscopy, and amelogenin was immunolocalized. Proliferation of cells treated with calcium was measured by BrdU immunoassay. The effect of calcium on mRNA expression of amelogenin, Type 1 collagen, DSPP, amelotin, and KLK-4 was compared by PCR analysis. Von Kossa staining was used to detect mineral formation after cells were pretreated with calcium. Calcium induced cell organization and clustering at 0.1 and 0.3 mM concentrations. Increasing concentrations of calcium significantly reduced ameloblast lineage cell proliferation. The addition of 0.1 mM calcium to the cultures upregulated expression of amelogenin, Type I collagen, and amelotin. After pretreatment with 0.3 mM calcium, the cells could form a mineralized matrix. These studies, which utilized human ameloblast lineage cells grown in vitro, showed that the addition of calcium at 0.1 and 0.3 mM, induced cell differentiation and upregulation of amelogenin Type I collagen and amelotin. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. In vitro regeneration of kidney from pluripotent stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osafune, Kenji, E-mail: osafu@cira.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Center for iPS Cell Research and Application (CiRA), Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); JST Yamanaka iPS Cell Special Project, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    Although renal transplantation has proved a successful treatment for the patients with end-stage renal failure, the therapy is hampered by the problem of serious shortage of donor organs. Regenerative medicine using stem cells, including cell transplantation therapy, needs to be developed to solve the problem. We previously identified the multipotent progenitor cells in the embryonic mouse kidney that can give rise to several kinds of epithelial cells found in adult kidney, such as glomerular podocytes and renal tubular epithelia. Establishing the method to generate the progenitors from human pluripotent stem cells that have the capacity to indefinitely proliferate in vitro is required for the development of kidney regeneration strategy. We review the current status of the research on the differentiation of pluripotent stem cells into renal lineages and describe cues to promote this research field.

  4. In vitro propagation of male germline stem cells from piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yi; Tian, Xiue; Zhang, Yaqing; Qin, Jinzhou; An, Junhui; Zeng, Wenxian

    2013-07-01

    To study the effects of serum and growth factors on propagation of porcine male germline stem cells (MGSCs) in vitro and develop a culture system for these stem cells. Fresh testicular cells from neonatal piglets were obtained by mechanical dissociation and collagenase-trypsin digestion. After differential plating, non-adhering cells were cultured in media supplemented with different concentrations of serum (0, 1 %, 2 %, 5 %, 10 %). After 10 days of primary culture, the cells were maintained in media supplemented with different concentrations of growth factors (basic fibroblast growth factor and epidermal growth factor at 1, 5, 10 ng/ml). The number of MGSC-derived colonies with different sizes was determined in each treatment to assess the effects of serum concentrations and growth factors. The number of MGSC-derived colonies was significantly higher in the presence of 1 % rather than 10 % fetal bovine serum (FBS). Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) at 1, 5 ng/ml and epidermal growth factor (EGF) at 5, 10 ng/ml significantly promoted colony formation. Immunocytochemistry, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and xenotransplantation assays demonstrated the presence of functional stem cells in cultured cell population. In vitro propagation of porcine MGSCs could be maintained in the presence of 1 % FBS and supplementation of growth factors for 1 month.

  5. [Effects of emdogain on human periodontal ligament cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng-qiu; Meng, Huan-xin; Han, Jie; Liu, Kai-ning

    2012-02-18

    To investigate the effects of emdogain, enamel matrix derivative (EMD), on the proliferation, cell cycle, mineralization and ultrastructure of human periodontal ligament (PDL) cells in vitro. The influence of cell growth on PDL cells was evaluated by Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) in the presence and absence of emdogain, after 1, 3, and 5 d of culture. DNA synthesis and ultrastructure of PDL cells were observed by flow cytometry(FCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in the presence and absence of emdogain after 3 d of culture. The increasing of osteogenic capacity was verified by the expression changes of osteogenic differentiation markers of bone sialoprotein (BSP) and osteopontin (OPN) in emdogain-treated PDL cells by immunohistochemicl staining. Incubation of PDL cells with emdogain after 3 d significantly stimulated cell growth and DNA synthesis. Emdogain enhanced the osteogenic potential of PDL cells by high expression of osteogenic differentiation markers of BSP and OPN. The data indicate that Emdogain enhances cell proliferation and promotes differentiation of PDL cells, which contributes to periodontal tissue regeneration .

  6. 21 CFR 864.9225 - Cell-freezing apparatus and reagents for in vitro diagnostic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cell-freezing apparatus and reagents for in vitro... Establishments That Manufacture Blood and Blood Products § 864.9225 Cell-freezing apparatus and reagents for in vitro diagnostic use. (a) Identification. Cell-freezing apparatus and reagents for in vitro diagnostic...

  7. Mechanical cell-substrate feedback explains pairwise and collective endothelial cell behavior in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.F.M. van Oers (Rene); R.M.H. Merks (Roeland)

    2013-01-01

    htmlabstractIn vitro cultures of endothelial cells are a widely used model system of the collective behavior of endothelial cells during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. When seeded in a extracellular matrix, endothelial cells can form blood vessel-like structures, including vascular networks and

  8. Effects of cobalt nanoparticles on human T cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haitao; Liu, Fan; Yang, Huilin; Li, Yang

    2012-04-01

    Limited information is available on the potential risk of degradation products of metal-on-metal bearings in joint arthroplasty. The aim of this study was to investigate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of orthopedic-related cobalt nanoparticles on human T cells in vitro. T cells were collected using magnetic CD3 microbeads and exposed to different concentrations of cobalt nanoparticles and cobalt chloride. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium and lactate dehydrogenase release assay. Cobalt nanoparticles dissolution in culture medium was determined by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. To study the probable mechanism of cobalt nanoparticles effects on T cells, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase level was measured. Cobalt nanoparticles and cobalt ions could inhibit cell viability and enhance lactate dehydrogenase release in a concentration- and time-dependent manner (P metal-on-metal total hip arthroplasty, and the inhibition of antioxidant capacity may play important role in cobalt nanoparticles effects on T cells.

  9. In-vitro red blood cell partitioning of doxycycline

    OpenAIRE

    P.V. Deshmukh; Badgujar, P.C.; Gatne, M. M.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In-vitro red blood cell (RBC) partitioning of doxycycline was studied to determine whether doxycycline penetrates RBC and its concentration was assayed keeping in view its high lipophilicity. Materials and Methods: Standardization of doxycycline was performed in whole blood and plasma of cattle by microbiological assay using Bacillus subtillis ATCC 6633 as indicator organizm. Actual concentration of the drug was obtained by comparing zone inhibition with standard graph and the exte...

  10. Behaviour of Endothelial Cells in a Tridimensional In Vitro Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raif Eren Ayata

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a fundamental process in healing, tumor growth, and a variety of medical conditions. For this reason, in vitro angiogenesis is an area of interest for researchers. Additionally, in vitro angiogenesis is important for the survival of prevascularized tissue-engineering models. The aim of this study was to observe the self-tubular organization behaviour of endothelial cells in the self-assembly method. In this study, bilayered and dermal substitutes were prepared using the self-assembly method. Histological, immunostaining, and biochemical tests were performed. The behavioural dynamics of endothelial cells in this biological environment of supportive cells were observed, as were the steps of the in vitro angiogenic cascade with self-organizing capillary-like structures formation. The epidermal component of the substitutes was seen to promote network expansion and density. It also increased the quantity of angiogenic factors (VEGF and Ang-1 without increasing the proinflammatory factor (IL-8. In addition, the increased MMP activity contributed to matrix degradation, which facilitated capillary formation.

  11. Does LLLT stimulate laryngeal carcinoma cells? An "in vitro" study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro Antonio Luiz Barbosa

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Low level laser therapy (LLLT has been used successfully in biomedicine and some of the results are thought to be related to cell proliferation. The effects of LLLT on cell proliferation is debatable because studies have found both an increase and a decrease in proliferation of cell cultures. Cell culture is an excellent method to assess both effects and dose of treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of 635nm and 670nm laser irradiation of H.Ep.2 cells in vitro using MTT (3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. The cells were obtained from squamous cell carcinoma (SCC of the larynx and were routinely processed from defrost to the experimental condition. Twenty-four hours after transplantation the cells were irradiated with doses ranging from 0.04 to 0.48J/cm² for seven consecutive days (5 mW diode lasers: 635nm or 670nm, beam cross-section ~1mm at local light doses between 0.04 and 0.48J/cm². The results showed that 635nm laser light did not significantly stimulate the proliferation of H.Ep.2 cells at doses of 0.04J/cm² to 0.48J/cm², However, 670nm laser irradiation led to an increased cell proliferation when compared to both control and 635nm irradiated cells. The best cell proliferation was found with 670nm laser irradiated cultures exposed to doses of doses of 0.04 to 0.48J/cm². We conclude that both dose and wavelength are factors that may affect cell proliferation of H.Ep.2 cells.

  12. Enteroantigen-presenting B cells efficiently stimulate CD4(+) T cells in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Esben Gjerløff Wedebye; Kristensen, Nanna Ny; Claesson, Mogens Helweg

    2011-01-01

    Presentation of enterobacterial antigens by antigen-presenting cells and activation of enteroantigen-specific CD4(+) T cells are considered crucial steps in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) pathology. The detrimental effects of such CD4(+) T cells have been thoroughly demonstrated in models...... of colitis. Also, we have previously established an in vitro assay where murine enteroantigen-specific colitogenic CD4(+) CD25(-) T cells are activated by splenocytes pulsed with an enterobacterial extract....

  13. Stem Cells as In Vitro Model of Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia L. Martínez-Morales

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Progress in understanding neurodegenerative cell biology in Parkinson's disease (PD has been hampered by a lack of predictive and relevant cellular models. In addition, the lack of an adequate in vitro human neuron cell-based model has been an obstacle for the uncover of new drugs for treating PD. The ability to generate induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from PD patients and a refined capacity to differentiate these iPSCs into DA neurons, the relevant disease cell type, promises a new paradigm in drug development that positions human disease pathophysiology at the core of preclinical drug discovery. Disease models derived from iPSC that manifest cellular disease phenotypes have been established for several monogenic diseases, but iPSC can likewise be used for phenotype-based drug screens in complex diseases for which the underlying genetic mechanism is unknown. Here, we highlight recent advances as well as limitations in the use of iPSC technology for modelling PD “in a dish” and for testing compounds against human disease phenotypes in vitro. We discuss how iPSCs are being exploited to illuminate disease pathophysiology, identify novel drug targets, and enhance the probability of clinical success of new drugs.

  14. Effects of LLLT on malignant cells: study in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Antonio L. B.; Nascimento, Silene C.; Vieira, Alessandro L. B.; Rolim, Aluizio B.; da Silva, Pedro S.; Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima A. A.

    2001-04-01

    In addition to our previous report on the effects of LLLT on the proliferation of laryngeal carcinoma cells in which it was found that irradiation H.Ep.2 cells with 670nm laser results in increased cell proliferation, ti was decided to evaluate the effect of increased does of laser light. The aim of this study was to assess the effect off 635 and 670 nm laser irradiation of H.Ep.2 cells in vitro using MTT. The cells, obtained from SCC of the larynx, were routinely processed from defrost to the experimental condition. The cultures were kept either at 5 or 10 percent of FBS. Twenty- four hours after transplantation, the cells were irradiated with laser light at local light doses between 0.04 and 4.8 X 104 Jm-2. For 670 nm, significant differences in the proliferation were observed between the two concentrations of FBS and between irradiated cultures and controls. Although the results were not significant, 635 nm irradiated cells also proliferated more than non- irradiated ones. This occurred under both conditions of nutrition. It is concluded, that irradiation with 670 nm laser light applied at doses between 0.04 and 4.8 X 104 Jm-2 could significantly increase proliferation of laryngeal cancer cells.

  15. Enhancing human regulatory T cells in vitro for cell therapy applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milward, Kate F; Wood, Kathryn J; Hester, Joanna

    2017-10-01

    Adoptive cellular therapies are gaining popularity as a means to treat clinical conditions, with potentially fewer risks and greater efficacy than traditional pharmacological strategies. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are currently undergoing clinical trials in various immune-mediated pathologies, including transplant rejection and autoimmune conditions. In general, cell therapy relies upon ex vivo expansion of the cell product, in order to administer more cells than can be isolated from one person. In vitro manipulation of cell therapy products, prior to administration to patients, offers the opportunity to enhance the efficacy of the final cell therapy product in other ways. For example, cells can be exposed to reagents that enhance their longevity or functional potency after transfer into the patient. Genetic modification strategies can even permit the design of cells with bespoke functionality. Crucially, in vitro manipulation of therapeutic cells in isolation can exert these influences upon the biology of the therapeutic cells, without systemic exposure of the patient to the reagents being used. Quality control assessments can be integrated into the procedure prior to administration, to protect the patient from the risk of adverse events, should the procedure produce undesirable results. With a particular focus on Tregs, this review surveys the diverse strategies that are being employed to enhance the efficacy of cell therapy via in vitro manipulation of cells, and highlights some emerging technologies that may propel this endeavour in the future. Copyright © 2017 European Federation of Immunological Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: carolina_sm@hotmail.com; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S. [Instituto Adolfo Lutz, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that {sup 60}Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  17. Infidelity of translation of encephalomyocarditis viral RNA with tRNA from human malignant trophoblastic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, O.K.; Kuchino, Y.

    1977-09-23

    We have investigated tRNA from the human malignant trophoblastic cells (BeWo cell) and human chorionic tissue for the translation of specific mRNAs, in a tRNA-dependent protein synthesizing system from Ehrlich ascites cells. BeWo cell tRNA and chorionic tRNA supported oviduct mRNA or encephalomyocarditis (EMC) viral RNA directed amino acid incorporation into polypeptides equally effectively. Polypeptides synthesized with oviduct mRNA and tRNA from both sources were identical upon sodium dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. But the EMC RNA directed polypeptides synthesized with BeWo cell tRNA were different from those synthesized with chorionic tRNA. A polypeptide (molecular weight 58,000) was apparently not synthesized and the synthesis of a faster moving component (molecular weight, 14,000) was enhanced when BeWo cell tRNA was used. These results imply a functional difference in tRNA from human malignant cells compared to their normal counterpart.

  18. Proteasome-independent degradation of HIV-1 in naturally non-permissive human placental trophoblast cells

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    Barré-Sinoussi Françoise

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human placenta-derived cell line BeWo has been demonstrated to be restrictive to cell-free HIV-1 infection. BeWo cells are however permissive to infection by VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1, which enters cells by a receptor-independent mechanism, and to infection by HIV-1 via a cell-to-cell route. Results Here we analysed viral entry in wild type BeWo (CCR5+, CXCR4+ and BeWo-CD4+ (CD4+, CCR5+, CXCR4+ cells. We report that HIV-1 internalisation is not restricted in either cell line. Levels of internalised p24 antigen between VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes and R5 or X4 virions were comparable. We next analysed the fate of internalised virions; X4 and R5 HIV-1 virions were less stable over time in BeWo cells than VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes. We then investigated the role of the proteasome in restricting cell-free HIV-1 infection in BeWo cells using proteasome inhibitors. We observed an increase in the levels of VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 infection in proteasome-inhibitor treated cells, but the infection by R5-Env or X4-Env pseudotyped virions remains restricted. Conclusion Collectively these results suggest that cell-free HIV-1 infection encounters a surface block leading to a non-productive entry route, which either actively targets incoming virions for non-proteasomal degradation, and impedes their release into the cytoplasm, or causes the inactivation of mechanisms essential for viral replication.

  19. Carica papaya induces in vitro thrombopoietic cytokines secretion by mesenchymal stem cells and haematopoietic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Jazli; Abu Kassim, Noor Lide; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty; Haque, Nazmul; Rahman, Mohammad Tariqur

    2015-07-08

    Use of Carica papaya leaf extracts, reported to improve thrombocyte counts in dengue patients, demands further analysis on the underlying mechanism of its thrombopoietic cytokines induction In vitro cultures of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHED) were treated with unripe papaya pulp juice (UPJ) to evaluate its potential to induce thrombopoietic cytokines (IL-6 and SCF) RESULTS: In vitro scratch gap closure was significantly faster (p papaya to induce thrombopoietic cytokines synthesis in cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin.

  20. Physical stimulation of chondrogenic cells in vitro: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grad, Sibylle; Eglin, David; Alini, Mauro; Stoddart, Martin J

    2011-10-01

    Mechanical stimuli are of crucial importance for the development and maintenance of articular cartilage. For conditioning of cartilaginous tissues, various bioreactor systems have been developed that have mainly aimed to produce cartilaginous grafts for tissue engineering applications. Emphasis has been on in vitro preconditioning, whereas the same devices could be used to attempt to predict the response of the cells in vivo or as a prescreening method before animal studies. As a result of the complexity of the load and motion patterns within an articulating joint, no bioreactor can completely recreate the in vivo situation. This article aims to classify the various loading bioreactors into logical categories, highlight the response of mesenchymal stem cells and chondrocytes to the various stimuli applied, and determine which data could be used within a clinical setting. We performed a Medline search using specific search terms, then selectively reviewed relevant research relating to physical stimulation of chondrogenic cells in vitro, focusing on cellular responses to the specific load applied. There is much data pertaining to increases in chondrogenic gene expression as a result of controlled loading protocols. Uniaxial loading leads to selective upregulation of genes normally associated with a chondrogenic phenotype, whereas multiaxial loading results in a broader pattern of chondrogenic gene upregulation. The potential for the body to be used as an in vivo bioreactor is being increasingly explored. Bioreactors are important tools for understanding the potential response of chondrogenic cells within the joint environment. However, to replicate the natural in vivo situation, more complex motion patterns are required to induce more physiological chondrogenic gene upregulation.

  1. In Vitro plant cell growth in microgravity and on clinostat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurinavicius, R.; Kenstaviciene, P.; Rupainiene, O.; Necitailo, G.

    1994-08-01

    For the study of gravity's role in the processes of plant cell differentiation in vitro, a model ``seed-seedling-callus'' has been used. Experiments were carried out on board the orbital stations Salyut-7 and Mir as well as on clinostat. They lasted from 18 to 72 days. It was determined that the exclusion of a one-sided action of gravity vector by means of clinostat and spaceflight conditions does not impede the formation and growth of callus tissue; however, at cell and subcellular levels structural and functional changes do take place. No significant changes were observed either on clinostat or in space concerning the accumulation of fresh biomass, while the percentage of dry material in space is lower than in control. Both in microgravity (MG) and in control, even after 72 days of growth, cells with a normally developed ultrastructure are present. In space, however, callus tissue more often contains cells in which the cross-section area of a cells, a nuclei and of mitochondria are smaller and the vacuole area - bigger than in controls. In microgravity a considerable decrease in the number of starch-containing cells and a reduction in the mean area of starch grains in amyloplasts is observed. In space the amount of soluble proteins in callus tissue is 1.5 times greater than in control. However, no differences were observed in fractions when separated by the SDS-PAGE method. In microgravity the changes in cell wall material components was noted. In the space-formed callus changes in the concentration of ions K, Na, Mg, Ca and P were observed. However, the direction of these changes depends on the age of callus. Discussed are the possible reasons for modification of morphological and metabolic parameters of callus cells when grown under changed gravity conditions.

  2. Mechanical cell-matrix feedback explains pairwise and collective endothelial cell behavior in vitro.

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    René F M van Oers

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In vitro cultures of endothelial cells are a widely used model system of the collective behavior of endothelial cells during vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. When seeded in an extracellular matrix, endothelial cells can form blood vessel-like structures, including vascular networks and sprouts. Endothelial morphogenesis depends on a large number of chemical and mechanical factors, including the compliancy of the extracellular matrix, the available growth factors, the adhesion of cells to the extracellular matrix, cell-cell signaling, etc. Although various computational models have been proposed to explain the role of each of these biochemical and biomechanical effects, the understanding of the mechanisms underlying in vitro angiogenesis is still incomplete. Most explanations focus on predicting the whole vascular network or sprout from the underlying cell behavior, and do not check if the same model also correctly captures the intermediate scale: the pairwise cell-cell interactions or single cell responses to ECM mechanics. Here we show, using a hybrid cellular Potts and finite element computational model, that a single set of biologically plausible rules describing (a the contractile forces that endothelial cells exert on the ECM, (b the resulting strains in the extracellular matrix, and (c the cellular response to the strains, suffices for reproducing the behavior of individual endothelial cells and the interactions of endothelial cell pairs in compliant matrices. With the same set of rules, the model also reproduces network formation from scattered cells, and sprouting from endothelial spheroids. Combining the present mechanical model with aspects of previously proposed mechanical and chemical models may lead to a more complete understanding of in vitro angiogenesis.

  3. Immune cell activation by trophoblast-derived microvesicles is mediated by syncytin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holder, Beth S; Tower, Clare L; Forbes, Karen; Mulla, Melissa J; Aplin, John D; Abrahams, Vikki M

    2012-06-01

    Envelope glycoproteins of human endogenous retrovirus (HERV), such as syncytin 1 (HERV-W), are highly expressed in the placenta and some family members have immunomodulatory properties. Placental microvesicles (MV), which are shed into the maternal circulation during pregnancy, have been demonstrated to induce immune cell activation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the immunological properties of the highly expressed placental HERV-W protein, syncytin 1, and its potential involvement in placental MV modulation of immune cell activity. The MV shed from first trimester, normal term and pre-eclamptic term placentas, and from the BeWo trophoblast cell line, all contain syncytin 1. Recombinant syncytin 1 and syncytin 1-positive BeWo trophoblast MV both induced peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) activation, indicated through production of cytokines and chemokines. Reducing syncytin 1 content in BeWo MV inhibited PBMC activation. Recombinant syncytin 1 and syncytin-1-positive BeWo MV dampened PBMC responses to lipopolysaccharide challenge. Our findings suggest that syncytin 1 is shed from the placenta into the maternal circulation in association with MV, and modulates immune cell activation and the responses of immune cells to subsequent lipopolysaccharide stimulation. These studies implicate placental MV-associated HERV in fetal regulation of the maternal immune system. © 2012 The Authors. Immunology © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  4. Derivation of corneal endothelial cell-like cells from rat neural crest cells in vitro.

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    Chengqun Ju

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of inducing rat neural crest cells (NCC to differentiate to functional corneal endothelial cell (CEC-like cells in vitro. Rat NCC were induced with adult CEC-derived conditioned medium. Immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and real time RT-PCR assay were used to detect expression of the corneal endothelium differentiation marker N-cadherin and transcription factors FoxC1 and Pitx2. CFDA SE-labeled CEC-like cells were transplanted to the corneal endothelium of a rat corneal endothelium deficiency model, and an eye-down position was maintained for 24 hours to allow cell attachment. The animals were observed for as long as 2 months after surgery and underwent clinical and histological examination. Spindle-like NCC turned to polygonal CEC-like after induction and expressed N-cadherin, FoxC1, Pitx2, zonula occludens-1 and sodium-potassium pump Na(+/K(+ ATPase. The corneas of the experimental group were much clearer than those of the control group and the mean corneal thickness in the experimental group was significantly less than in the control group7, 14, 21 and 28 days after surgery. Confocal microscopy through focusing and histological analysis confirmed that green fluorescence-positive CEC-like cells formed a monolayer covering the Descemet's membrane in the experimental group. In conclusion, CEC-like cells derived from NCCs displayed characters of native CEC, and the induction protocol provides guidance for future human CEC induction from NCC.

  5. EFFECT OF MACROLIDE ANTIBIOTICS ON VARIOUS CELL CULTURES IN VITRO: 1. CELL MORPHOLOGY

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    Renáta Kováčová

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of macrolide antibiotics (tilmicosin, tylosin and spiramycin of various concentrations on different cell cultures in vitro. Cellular lines from animal tissues (VERO cells - kidney cells of Macacus rhesus, FE cells - feline embryonal cells, BHK 21 cellular line from young hamster kidneys were used. Tilmicosin effect: BHK cells are most sensitive, significant decrease in vital cells occurs already at the concentration of 50 μg.ml-1. VERO cells were most resistant, significant decrease of vital cells was observed only at the concentration of 300 μg.ml-1. Tylosin effect: BHK cells can be considered most sensitive, since at concentrations higher than 500 μg.ml-1, no vital cells were observed. At the concentration of 1000 μg.ml-1 were 3.13% of vital and 70.52% of subvital FE cells. In Vero cells, we observed a significant decrease at the concentration of 750 μg.ml-1. Spiramycin effect: Significant decrease of vital BHK cells was observed at the concentration of 150 μg.ml-1, at the concentration of 300 μg.ml-1, no vital cells and only 7.53% of subvital cells were observed. At the concentration of 500 μg.ml-1 reported 10.34% of vital FE cells. At the concentration of 500 μg.ml-1 22.48% of vital and 71.16% of subvital VERO cells were recorded.

  6. Griseofulvin inhibits the growth of adrenocortical cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramann, E L; Willenberg, H S; Hildebrandt, B; Müller-Mattheis, V; Schott, M; Scherbaum, W A; Haase, M

    2013-04-01

    Supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy are associated with a malignant phenotype of tumor cells. Centrosomal clustering is a mechanism used by cancer cells with supernumerary centrosomes to solve the threatening problem of multipolar spindles. Griseofulvin is an antifungal substance that interferes with the microtubule apparatus and inhibits centrosomal clustering. It has also been demonstrated that griseofulvin inhibits the growth of tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. However, it is not yet known whether treatment with griseofulvin inhibits growth of adrenocortical tumor cells. We studied the viability and antiproliferative effects of griseofulvin on cultured NCI-H295R adrenocortical carcinoma cells using Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]-thymidine assays. For the detection of apoptosis we used a caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy techniques. We observed that incubation with griseofulvin for 24-48 h leads to a decrease in the viability and proliferation of NCI-H295R cells in a dose-dependent manner. Significant effects could be observed after incubation with griseofulvin as measured by Wst-1-, BrdUrd-, and [³H]dT- uptake assays. Apoptosis of NCI-H295R cells was increased in a dose-dependent manner up to 4.5-fold after incubation with griseofulvin 40 μM for 24 h as shown by caspase 3/7 cleavage assay and light microscopy. With regard to new treatment strategies for adrenocortical cancer, griseofulvin, and possibly other agents, which interfere with the microtubule apparatus and inhibit centrosomal clustering, may turn out to be interesting targets for further research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  7. IL-4 Induces Cholinergic Differentiation of Retinal Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granja, Marcelo Gomes; Braga, Luis Eduardo Gomes; Carpi-Santos, Raul; de Araujo-Martins, Leandro; Nunes-Tavares, Nilson; Calaza, Karin C; Dos Santos, Aline Araujo; Giestal-de-Araujo, Elizabeth

    2015-07-01

    Interleukin-4 (IL-4) is a pleiotropic cytokine that regulates several phenomena, among them survival and differentiation of neuronal and glial cells. The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of IL-4 on the cholinergic differentiation of neonatal rat retinal cells in vitro, evaluating its effect on the levels of cholinergic markers (CHT1-high-affinity choline transporter; VAChT-vesicular acetylcholine transporter, ChAT-choline acetyltransferase, AChE-acetylcholinesterase), muscarinic receptors, and on the signaling pathways involved. Lister Hooded rat pups were used in postnatal days 0-2 (P0-P2). Our results show that IL-4 treatment (50 U/mL) for 48 h increases the levels of the cholinergic transporters VAChT and CHT1, the acetylcholinesterase activity, and the number of ChAT-positive cells. It also induces changes in muscarinic receptor levels, leading to a small decrease in M1 levels and a significant increase in M3 and M5 levels after 48 h of treatment. We also showed that IL-4 effect on M3 receptors is dependent on type I IL-4 receptor and on an increase in NFκB phosphorylation. These results indicate that IL-4 stimulates cholinergic differentiation of retinal cells.

  8. A signal processing analysis of Purkinje cells in vitro

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    Ze'ev R Abrams

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Cerebellar Purkinje cells in vitro fire recurrent sequences of Sodium and Calcium spikes. Here, we analyze the Purkinje cell using harmonic analysis, and our experiments reveal that its output signal is comprised of three distinct frequency bands, which are combined using Amplitude and Frequency Modulation (AM/FM. We find that the three characteristic frequencies - Sodium, Calcium and Switching – occur in various combinations in all waveforms observed using whole-cell current clamp recordings. We found that the Calcium frequency can display a frequency doubling of its frequency mode, and the Switching frequency can act as a possible generator of pauses that are typically seen in Purkinje output recordings. Using a reversibly photo-switchable kainate receptor agonist, we demonstrate the external modulation of the Calcium and Switching frequencies. These experiments and Fourier analysis suggest that the Purkinje cell can be understood as a harmonic signal oscillator, enabling a higher level of interpretation of Purkinje signaling based on modern signal processing techniques.

  9. Nanoparticle transport across in vitro olfactory cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartziandia, Oihane; Egusquiaguirre, Susana Patricia; Bianco, John; Pedraz, José Luis; Igartua, Manoli; Hernandez, Rosa Maria; Préat, Véronique; Beloqui, Ana

    2016-02-29

    Drug access to the CNS is hindered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the intranasal route has risen as a non-invasive route to transport drugs directly from nose-to-brain avoiding the BBB. In addition, nanoparticles (NPs) have been described as efficient shuttles for direct nose-to-brain delivery of drugs. Nevertheless, there are few studies describing NP nose-to-brain transport. Thus, the aim of this work was (i) to develop, characterize and validate in vitro olfactory cell monolayers and (ii) to study the transport of polymeric- and lipid-based NPs across these monolayers in order to estimate NP access into the brain using cell penetrating peptide (CPPs) moieties: Tat and Penetratin (Pen). All tested poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) formulations were stable in transport buffer and biocompatible with the olfactory mucosa cells. Nevertheless, 0.7% of PLGA NPs was able to cross the olfactory cell monolayers, whereas 8% and 22% of NLC and chitosan-coated NLC (CS-NLC) were transported across them, respectively. Moreover, the incorporation of CPPs to NLC surface significantly increased their transport, reaching 46% of transported NPs. We conclude that CPP-CS-NLC represent a promising brain shuttle via nose-to-brain for drug delivery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro analysis of human periodontal microvascular endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsubokawa, Mizuki; Sato, Soh

    2014-08-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) participate in key aspects of vascular biology, such as maintenance of capillary permeability, initiation of coagulation, and regulation of inflammation. According to previous reports, ECs have revealed highly specific characteristics depending on the organs and tissues. However, some reports have described the characteristics of the capillaries formed by human periodontal ECs. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to examine the functional characteristics of the periodontal microvascular ECs in vitro. Human periodontal ligament-endothelial cells (HPDL-ECs) and human gingiva-endothelial cells (HG-ECs) were isolated by immunoprecipitation with magnetic beads conjugated to a monoclonal anti-CD31 antibody. The isolated HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were characterized to definitively demonstrate that these cell cultures represented pure ECs. Human umbilical-vein ECs and human dermal microvascular ECs were used for comparison. These cells were compared according to the proliferation potential, the formation of capillary-like tubes, the transendothelial electric resistance (TEER), and the expression of tight junction proteins. HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs with characteristic cobblestone monolayer morphology were obtained, as determined by light microscopy at confluence. Furthermore, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs expressed the EC markers platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (also known as CD31), von Willebrand factor, and Ulex europaeus agglutinin 1, and the cells stained strongly positive for CD31 and CD309. In addition, the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs were observed to form capillary-like tubes, and they demonstrated uptake of acetylated low-density lipoprotein. Functional analyses of the HPDL-ECs and HG-ECs showed that, compared to the control cells, tube formation persisted for only a brief period of time, and TEER was substantially reduced at confluence. Furthermore, the cells exhibited delocalization of zonula occludens-1 and occludin at cell-cell contact sites

  11. HDAC2 was involved in placental P-glycoprotein regulation both in vitro and vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Hongyu; Zhou, Kaiyu; Zhang, Yi; Yue, Peng; Wang, Tao; Li, Yifei; Qiu, Dajian; Wu, Jinlin; Hua, Yimin; Wang, Chuan

    2017-10-01

    Placental P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays a significant role in regulating drugs' transplacental transfer rates. Investigations on placental P-gp regulation could provide more therapeutic targets for individualized and safe pharmacotherapy during pregnancy. Currently, the epigenetic regulation of placental P-gp is rare. Our previous study has demonstrated that HDACs inhibition could up-regulate placental P-gp and HDAC1/2/3 might be involved in this process. The present study was carried out to further explore whether HDAC1/2/3 were indeed involved in the regulation of placental P-gp or not and screen out the subtype engaged in this process. BeWo and JAR cells were transfected with HDAC1/2/3 specific siRNA. After 48 h of transfection, cells were harvested for real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR), Western blot, immunofluorescence and fluorescent dye efflux assay to evaluate P-gp expression, localization, and efflux activity, respectively. Hdac2 siRNA was intraperitoneally injected to pregnant mice every 48 h from E7.5 to E15.5 and digoxin was administered by gavages 1 h prior to euthanasia at E16.5. Placental Hdac1/2/3 and P-gp expression were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Maternal plasma and fetal-unit digoxin concentrations were detected by enzyme-multiplied immunoassay. In vitro, HDAC2 inhibition could significantly elevate P-gp expression and reduce intracellular accumulation of P-gp substrates (DiOC2 (3) and Rh 123) both in BeWo and JAR, while knockdown of HDAC1/3 had no influence on P-gp expression and its efflux activity. Additionally, in vivo, Hdac2 silencing in pregnant mice also elevated placental P-gp expression and decreased digoxin transplacental transfer rate. HDAC2 inhibition could result in induction of placental P-gp expression and functionality both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Regulatory T cells inhibit proliferation of mouse lymphoma cell line EL4 in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Kong, Yan; Guo, Jun; Ying, Zhi-Tao; Yuan, Zhi-Hong; Zhang, Yun-Tao; Zheng, Wen; Song, Yu-Qin; Li, Ping-Ping; Zhu, Jun

    2010-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effect of regulatory T (Treg) cells on the T cell lymphoma EL4 cells and its mechanism in vitro. C57BL/6 mouse Treg cells were isolated by magnetic cell sorting (MACS). The purity of Treg cells and their expression of Foxp3 were identified by flow cytometry (FCM) and PT-PCR respectively. The suppression of Treg cells on EL4 cells was detected by 3H-TdR method. At the same time, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to detect the secretion of cytokine TGF-β1 and IL-10. The results showed that CD4+CD25+ T cells could be successfully isolated by MACS with the purity reaching 94.52% and the expression of Foxp3 reaching 84.72%. After sorting, the expression of Foxp3 mRNA could be detected by RT-PCR. 3H-TdR assay confirmed that regulatory T cells could suppress the proliferation of EL4 cells with or without antigen presenting cells (APC) or dendritic cells (DC), APC or DC might effectively enhance the suppression. In addition, DC alone also suppressed the proliferation. TGF-β1 and IL-10 could be detected in the supernatant by ELISA. It is concluded that the Treg cells can obviously suppress the proliferation of T cell lymphoma cells in vitro, APC or DC can enhance this suppressive effect, while the DC alone also can suppress the proliferation of EL4 cells, the TGF-β1 and IL-10 cytokine pathway may be one of the mechanisms of suppression.

  13. In vitro functionality of human fetal liver cells and clonal derivatives under proliferative conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deurholt, Tanja; ten Bloemendaal, Lysbeth; Chhatta, Aniska A.; van Wijk, Albert C. W. A.; Weijer, Kees; Seppen, Jurgen; Elferink, Ronald P. J. Oude; Chamuleau, Robert A. F. M.; Hoekstra, Ruurdtje

    2006-01-01

    Mature human hepatocytes are not suitable for large-scale in vitro applications that rely on hepatocyte function, due to their limited availability and insufficient proliferation capacity in vitro. In contrast, human fetal liver cells (HFLC) can be easily expanded in vitro. In this study we

  14. Neuromelanin is an immune stimulator for dendritic cells in vitro

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    Oberländer Uwe

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is characterized at the cellular level by a destruction of neuromelanin (NM-containing dopaminergic cells and a profound reduction in striatal dopamine. It has been shown recently that anti-melanin antibodies are increased in sera of Parkinson patients, suggesting that NM may act as an autoantigen. In this study we tested whether NM is being recognized by dendritic cells (DCs, the major cell type for inducing T- and B-cell responses in vivo. This recognition of NM by DCs is a prerequisite to trigger an adaptive autoimmune response directed against NM-associated structures. Results Murine DCs were treated with NM of substantia nigra (SN from human subjects or with synthetic dopamine melanin (DAM. DCs effectively phagocytized NM and subsequently developed a mature phenotype (CD86high/MHCIIhigh. NM-activated DCs secreted the proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and TNF-α. In addition, they potently triggered T cell proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction, showing that DC activation was functional to induce a primary T cell response. In contrast, DAM, which lacks the protein and lipid components of NM but mimics the dopamine-melanin backbone of NM, had only very little effect on DC phenotype and function. Conclusions NM is recognized by DCs in vitro and triggers their maturation. If operative in vivo, this would allow the DC-mediated transport and presentation of SN antigens to the adaptive immune system, leading to autoimmmunity in susceptible individuals. Our data provide a rationale for an autoimmune-based pathomechanism of PD with NM as the initial trigger.

  15. Computational investigation of epithelial cell dynamic phenotype in vitro

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    Debnath Jayanta

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When grown in three-dimensional (3D cultures, epithelial cells typically form cystic organoids that recapitulate cardinal features of in vivo epithelial structures. Characterizing essential cell actions and their roles, which constitute the system's dynamic phenotype, is critical to gaining deeper insight into the cystogenesis phenomena. Methods Starting with an earlier in silico epithelial analogue (ISEA1 that validated for several Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial cell culture attributes, we built a revised analogue (ISEA2 to increase overlap between analogue and cell culture traits. Both analogues used agent-based, discrete event methods. A set of axioms determined ISEA behaviors; together, they specified the analogue's operating principles. A new experimentation framework enabled tracking relative axiom use and roles during simulated cystogenesis along with establishment of the consequences of their disruption. Results ISEA2 consistently produced convex cystic structures in a simulated embedded culture. Axiom use measures provided detailed descriptions of the analogue's dynamic phenotype. Dysregulating key cell death and division axioms led to disorganized structures. Adhering to either axiom less than 80% of the time caused ISEA1 to form easily identified morphological changes. ISEA2 was more robust to identical dysregulation. Both dysregulated analogues exhibited characteristics that resembled those associated with an in vitro model of early glandular epithelial cancer. Conclusion We documented the causal chains of events, and their relative roles, responsible for simulated cystogenesis. The results stand as an early hypothesis–a theory–of how individual MDCK cell actions give rise to consistently roundish, cystic organoids.

  16. Generation of male germ cells from mouse induced pluripotent stem cells in vitro

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    Yangfang Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Germ cells are the only cell type that passes genetic information to the next generation. In most metazoan species, primordial germ cells (PGCs were induced from epiblasts by signals from the neighboring tissues. In vitro derivation of germ cells from the pluripotent stem cells (PSCs such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs and induced PSCs (iPSCs are of great values for the treatment of infertility, for animal breeding, and for studying the mechanism of germ cell development. Although the derivations of male germ cells from PSCs have been previously reported, most of the studies failed to conduct the induction in a well-controlled and highly efficient manner. Here, we report the derivation of induced PGC-like cells (iPGCLCs from mouse iPSCs via induced epiblast-like cells (iEpiLCs as being monitored by the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein gene under the control of the promoter of stimulated by retinoic acid 8 (Stra8-EGFP. The identity of iPGCLCs was characterized by examining the expression of multiple marker genes as well as by the recovery of spermatogenesis after they were transplanted to the testis of infertile W/Wv mice. Furthermore, iPGCLCs were either induced to germline stem cell-like cells (iGSCLCs or reverted back to embryonic germ cell-like cells (iEGCLCs. In conclusion, we have established an efficient procedure for inducing iPSCs into iPGCLCs that can be further expanded and induced to more developed germ cells. This work indicates that the technology of in vitro germ cell induction is becoming more sophisticated and can be further improved.

  17. Neonatal Satellite Cells Form Small Myotubes In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvajal Monroy, P L; Grefte, S; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A M; Von den Hoff, J W; Wagener, F A D T G

    2017-03-01

    Although palatal muscle reconstruction in patients with cleft palate takes place during early childhood, normal speech development is often not achieved. We hypothesized that the intrinsic properties of head satellite cells (SCs) and the young age of these patients contribute to the poor muscle regeneration after surgery. First, we studied the fiber type distribution and the expression of SC markers in ex vivo muscle tissue from head (branchiomeric) and limb (somite-derived) muscles from neonatal (2-wk-old) and young (9-wk-old) rats. Next, we cultured SCs isolated from these muscles for 5, 7, and 9 d, and investigated the in vitro expression of SC markers, as well as changes in proliferation, early differentiation, and fusion index (myotube formation) in these cells. In our ex vivo samples, we found that virtually all myofibers in both the masseter (Mass) and the levator veli palatini (LVP) muscles contained fast myosin heavy chain (MyHC), and a small percentage of digastric (Dig) and extensor digitorum longus myofibers also contained slow MyHC. This was independent of age. More SCs were found in muscles from neonatal rats as compared with young rats [17.6 (3.8%) v. 2.3 (1.6%); P form myotubes less efficiently than those from young muscles. These age-dependent differences in stem cell properties urge careful consideration for future clinical applications in patients with cleft palate.

  18. Loss of Gadkin Affects Dendritic Cell Migration In Vitro.

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    Hannah Schachtner

    Full Text Available Migration is crucial for the function of dendritic cells (DCs, which act as outposts of the immune system. Upon detection of pathogens, skin- and mucosa-resident DCs migrate to secondary lymphoid organs where they activate T cells. DC motility relies critically on the actin cytoskeleton, which is regulated by the actin-related protein 2/3 (ARP2/3 complex, a nucleator of branched actin networks. Consequently, loss of ARP2/3 stimulators and upstream Rho family GTPases dramatically impairs DC migration. However, nothing is known yet about the relevance of ARP2/3 inhibitors for DC migration. We previously demonstrated that the AP-1-associated adaptor protein Gadkin inhibits ARP2/3 by sequestering it on intracellular vesicles. Consistent with a role of Gadkin in DC physiology, we here report Gadkin expression in bone marrow-derived DCs and show that its protein level and posttranslational modification are regulated upon LPS-induced DC maturation. DCs derived from Gadkin-deficient mice were normal with regards to differentiation and maturation, but displayed increased actin polymerization. While the actin-dependent processes of macropinocytosis and cell spreading were not affected, loss of Gadkin significantly impaired DC migration in vitro, however, in vivo DC migration was unperturbed suggesting the presence of compensatory mechanisms.

  19. In vitro co-culture of epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells on aligned nanofibrous scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppan, Purushothaman; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari

    2017-12-01

    Esophagus is a complex, hollow organ consisting of epithelial cells in the inner mucosal layer and smooth muscle cells in the outer muscle layer. In the present study, we have evaluated the in vitro co-culture of epithelial cells and smooth muscle cells on the aligned nanofibrous scaffold made of PHBV, PHBV-gelatin, PCL and PCL-gelatin developed through electrospinning using rotating drum collector. Epithelial cells were labeled with cell tracker green while the smooth muscle cells were labeled with cell tracker red. Labeled cells were seeded on the aligned nanofibers matrices and tracked using laser scanning confocal microscopy. The results demonstrate that both epithelial and smooth muscle cells attach, extend, and proliferate over these nanofibrous matrices. Confocal z-sectioning shows that epithelial and smooth muscle cells tend to separate into two distinct layers on a single nanofiber system mimicking the in vivo anatomy. Cell viability assay showed that both types of cells are viable and also interact with each other. The functional gene expression of respective cell types demonstrates that both epithelial and smooth muscle cells are phenotypically as well as functionally active when they were co-cultured. Thus the study highlighted that aligned nanofibrous scaffolds could be potential alternative graft for esophageal tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Glial cells assemble hyaluronan-based pericellular matrices in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleski, M; Hockfield, S

    1997-07-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the brain contains hyaluronan and proteoglycans, as does the ECM of cartilage. Aggrecan, the major proteoglycan of cartilage, forms large aggregates with hyaluronan, which then associate with the chondrocyte cell surface through an interaction with surface hyaluronan binding proteins. In culture, chondrocytes elaborate hyaluronan-proteoglycan aggregates, which form large hydrated pericellular matrices (PCMs) that can be visualized by a particle exclusion assay (Knudson and Toole: Dev Biol 112:308, 1985). It has recently been demonstrated that embryonic glial cells can also elaborate PCMs in culture (Deyst and Toole: Dev Brain Res 28:351, 1995). We demonstrate here that different classes of glial cells elaborate different types of endogenous PCMs in culture. Less differentiated glial cells, as evidenced by their immunoreactivity for nestin, elaborate larger endogenously produced PCMs than differentiated astrocytes, as defined by immunoreactivity for GFAP. This in vitro result may be a reflection of the larger volume of extracellular space present in the embryonic than in the mature brain. We show further that glial cells can incorporate cartilage aggrecan into their PCMs, and that both endogenous and aggrecan-supplemented glial PCMs are dependent on hyaluronan. In contrast, primary neurons from newborn (P0) and P1 rat cortex neither express endogenous matrices nor can assemble exogenous hyaluronan/aggrecan aggregates into PCMs. These results suggest that immature neurons may not have the ability to assemble hyaluronan-based PCMs, and they raise the possibility that neural proteoglycans associate with neuronal surfaces through a mechanism that may not directly involve hyaluronan.

  1. Attenuation of cell mechanosensitivity in colon cancer cells during in vitro metastasis.

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    Xin Tang

    Full Text Available Human colon carcinoma (HCT-8 cells show a stable transition from low to high metastatic state when cultured on appropriately soft substrates (21 kPa. Initially epithelial (E in nature, the HCT-8 cells become rounded (R after seven days of culture on soft substrate. R cells show a number of metastatic hallmarks [1]. Here, we use gradient stiffness substrates, a bio-MEMS force sensor, and Coulter counter assays to study mechanosensitivity and adhesion of E and R cells. We find that HCT-8 cells lose mechanosensitivity as they undergo E-to-R transition. HCT-8 R cells' stiffness, spread area, proliferation and migration become insensitive to substrate stiffness in contrast to their epithelial counterpart. They are softer, proliferative and migratory on all substrates. R cells show negligible cell-cell homotypic adhesion, as well as non-specific cell-substrate adhesion. Consequently they show the same spread area on all substrates in contrast to E cells. Taken together, these results indicate that R cells acquire autonomy and anchorage independence, and are thus potentially more invasive than E cells. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of quantitative data relating changes in cancer cell adhesion and stiffness during the expression of an in vitro metastasis-like phenotype.

  2. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

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    Wenqiang Feng

    Full Text Available Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI and B(aP compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells. This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  3. Human normal bronchial epithelial cells: a novel in vitro cell model for toxicity evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Wenqiang; Guo, Juanjuan; Huang, Haiyan; Xia, Bo; Liu, Hongya; Li, Jie; Lin, Shaolin; Li, Tiyuan; Liu, Jianjun; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Human normal cell-based systems are needed for drug discovery and toxicity evaluation. hTERT or viral genes transduced human cells are currently widely used for these studies, while these cells exhibited abnormal differentiation potential or response to biological and chemical signals. In this study, we established human normal bronchial epithelial cells (HNBEC) using a defined primary epithelial cell culture medium without transduction of exogenous genes. This system may involve decreased IL-1 signaling and enhanced Wnt signaling in cells. Our data demonstrated that HNBEC exhibited a normal diploid karyotype. They formed well-defined spheres in matrigel 3D culture while cancer cells (HeLa) formed disorganized aggregates. HNBEC cells possessed a normal cellular response to DNA damage and did not induce tumor formation in vivo by xenograft assays. Importantly, we assessed the potential of these cells in toxicity evaluation of the common occupational toxicants that may affect human respiratory system. Our results demonstrated that HNBEC cells are more sensitive to exposure of 10~20 nm-sized SiO2, Cr(VI) and B(a)P compared to 16HBE cells (a SV40-immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells). This study provides a novel in vitro human cells-based model for toxicity evaluation, may also be facilitating studies in basic cell biology, cancer biology and drug discovery.

  4. Gammadelta receptor bearing T cells in scleroderma: enhanced interaction with vascular endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaleh, M B; Fan, P S; Otsuka, T

    1999-05-01

    In view of the documented perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration in the involved organs in scleroderma (SSc) and the reported accumulation of gammadelta-T cells in SSc skin and lung, we evaluated gammadelta-T cell interaction with endothelial cells (EC) in vitro. gammadelta- and alphabeta-T cells were isolated from BPMN of SSc patients with early diffuse disease and of matched control subjects by an immunomagnetic method after stimulation with mycobacterium lysate and interleukin-2 for 2 weeks. Lymphocyte adhesion, proliferation, and cytotoxicity to EC were investigated. SSc gammadelta-T cells adhered to cultured EC and proliferated at higher rates than control cells. Furthermore, significant EC cytotoxicity by SSc gammadelta was seen. The cytotoxicity was blocked by addition of anti-gammadelta-TCR antibody and by anti-granzyme A antibody but not by anti-MHC class I and II antibodies. Expression of granzyme A mRNA was seen in five/five SSc gammadelta-T cells and in one/five control cells. alphabeta-T cells from both SSc and control subjects were significantly less interactive with EC than gammadelta-T cells. The data demonstrate EC recognition by SSc gammadelta-T cells and propose gammadelta-T cells as a possible effector cell type in the immune pathogenesis of SSc. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  5. Suitability of human and mammalian cells of different origin for the assessment of genotoxicity of metal and polymeric engineered nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowie, Hilary; Magdolenova, Zuzana; Saunders, Margaret; Drlickova, Martina; Correia Carreira, Sara; Halamoda Kenzaoi, Blanka; Gombau, Lourdes; Guadagnini, Rina; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Walker, Laura; Fjellsbø, Lise Marie; Huk, Anna; Rinna, Alessandra; Tran, Lang; Volkovova, Katarina; Boland, Sonja; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne; Marano, Francelyne; Collins, Andrew R; Dusinska, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Nanogenotoxicity is a crucial endpoint in safety testing of nanomaterials as it addresses potential mutagenicity, which has implications for risks of both genetic disease and carcinogenesis. Within the NanoTEST project, we investigated the genotoxic potential of well-characterised nanoparticles (NPs): titanium dioxide (TiO2) NPs of nominal size 20 nm, iron oxide (8 nm) both uncoated (U-Fe3O4) and oleic acid coated (OC-Fe3O4), rhodamine-labelled amorphous silica 25 (Fl-25 SiO2) and 50 nm (Fl-50 SiO) and polylactic glycolic acid polyethylene oxide polymeric NPs - as well as Endorem® as a negative control for detection of strand breaks and oxidised DNA lesions with the alkaline comet assay. Using primary cells and cell lines derived from blood (human lymphocytes and lymphoblastoid TK6 cells), vascular/central nervous system (human endothelial human cerebral endothelial cells), liver (rat hepatocytes and Kupffer cells), kidney (monkey Cos-1 and human HEK293 cells), lung (human bronchial 16HBE14o cells) and placenta (human BeWo b30), we were interested in which in vitro cell model is sufficient to detect positive (genotoxic) and negative (non-genotoxic) responses. All in vitro studies were harmonized, i.e. NPs from the same batch, and identical dispersion protocols (for TiO2 NPs, two dispersions were used), exposure time, concentration range, culture conditions and time-courses were used. The results from the statistical evaluation show that OC-Fe3O4 and TiO2 NPs are genotoxic in the experimental conditions used. When all NPs were included in the analysis, no differences were seen among cell lines - demonstrating the usefulness of the assay in all cells to identify genotoxic and non-genotoxic NPs. The TK6 cells, human lymphocytes, BeWo b30 and kidney cells seem to be the most reliable for detecting a dose-response.

  6. Amygdalin inhibits the growth of renal cell carcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juengel, Eva; Thomas, Anita; Rutz, Jochen; Makarevic, Jasmina; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2016-02-01

    Although amygdalin is used by many cancer patients as an antitumor agent, there is a lack of information on the efficacy and toxicity of this natural compound. In the present study, the inhibitory effect of amygdalin on the growth of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells was examined. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to the RCC cell lines, Caki-1, KTC-26 and A498, for 24 h or 2 weeks. Untreated cells served as controls. Tumor cell growth and proliferation were determined using MTT and BrdU tests, and cell cycle phases were evaluated. Expression of the cell cycle activating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1 and D3 as well as of the cell cycle inhibiting proteins p19 and p27 was examined by western blot analysis. Surface expression of the differentiation markers E- and N-cadherin was also investigated. Functional blockade by siRNA was used to determine the impact of several proteins on tumor cell growth. Amygdalin treatment caused a significant reduction in RCC cell growth and proliferation. This effect was correlated with a reduced percentage of G2/M-phase RCC cells and an increased percentage of cells in the G0/1-phase (Caki-1 and A498) or cell cycle arrest in the S-phase (KTC-26). Furthermore, amygdalin induced a marked decrease in cell cycle activating proteins, in particular cdk1 and cyclin B. Functional blocking of cdk1 and cyclin B resulted in significantly diminished tumor cell growth in all three RCC cell lines. Aside from its inhibitory effects on growth, amygdalin also modulated the differentiation markers, E- and N-cadherin. Hence, exposing RCC cells to amygdalin inhibited cell cycle progression and tumor cell growth by impairing cdk1 and cyclin B expression. Moreover, we noted that amygdalin affected differentiation markers. Thus, we suggest that amygdalin exerted RCC antitumor effects in vitro.

  7. Lymphoid cell blastogenesis as an in vitro indicator of cellular immunity to Legionella pneumophila antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, F; Widen, R; Klein, T; Friedman, H

    1984-01-01

    The lymphocyte blastogenic transformation assay was adapted to study responsiveness of lymphoid cells from animals and humans to Legionella pneumophila antigens in vitro. Spleen cells from guinea pigs after active immunization with Legionella vaccine, but not from normal animals, responded by blast cell transformation when stimulated in vitro with killed Legionella whole-cell vaccine, sonic extracts thereof, or a purified somatic antigen. The response was dose dependent. Similar lymphocyte bl...

  8. Trophoblast cell fusion and differentiation are mediated by both the protein kinase C and a pathways.

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    Waka Omata

    Full Text Available The syncytiotrophoblast of the human placenta is an epithelial barrier that interacts with maternal blood and is a key for the transfer of nutrients and other solutes to the developing fetus. The syncytiotrophoblast is a true syncytium and fusion of progenitor cytotrophoblasts is the cardinal event leading to the formation of this layer. BeWo cells are often used as a surrogate for cytotrophoblasts, since they can be induced to fuse, and then express certain differentiation markers associated with trophoblast syncytialization. Dysferlin, a syncytiotrophoblast membrane repair protein, is up-regulated in BeWo cells induced to fuse by treatment with forskolin; this fusion is thought to occur through cAMP/protein kinase A-dependent mechanisms. We hypothesized that dysferlin may also be up-regulated in response to fusion through other pathways. Here, we show that BeWo cells can also be induced to fuse by treatment with an activator of protein kinase C, and that this fusion is accompanied by increased expression of dysferlin. Moreover, a dramatic synergistic increase in dysferlin expression is observed when both the protein kinase A and protein kinase C pathways are activated in BeWo cells. This synergy in fusion is also accompanied by dramatic increases in mRNA for the placental fusion proteins syncytin 1, syncytin 2, as well as dysferlin. Dysferlin, however, was shown to be dispensable for stimulus-induced BeWo cell syncytialization, since dysferlin knockdown lines fused to the same extent as control cells. The classical trophoblast differentiation marker human chorionic gonadotropin was also monitored and changes in the expression closely parallel that of dysferlin in all of the experimental conditions employed. Thus different biochemical markers of trophoblast fusion behave in concert supporting the hypothesis that activation of both protein kinase C and A pathways lead to trophoblastic differentiation.

  9. In Vitro Differentiation Potential of Human Placenta Derived Cells into Skin Cells

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    Ruhma Mahmood

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Skin autografting is the most viable and aesthetic technique for treatment of extensive burns; however, this practice has potential limitations. Harvesting cells from neonatal sources (such as placental tissue is a simple, inexpensive, and noninvasive procedure. In the current study authors sought to evaluate in vitro potential of human placenta derived stem cells to develop into skin-like cells. After extensive washing, amniotic membrane and umbilical cord tissue were separated to harvest amniotic epithelial cells (AECs and umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs, respectively. Both types of cells were characterized for the expression of embryonic lineage markers and their growth characteristics were determined. AECs and UC-MSCs were induced to differentiate into keratinocytes-like and dermal fibroblasts-like cells, respectively. After induction, morphological changes were detected by microscopy. The differentiation potential was further assessed using immunostaining and RT-PCR analyses. AECs were positive for cytokeratins and E-Cadherin while UC-MSCs were positive for fibroblast specific makers. AECs differentiated into keratinocytes-like cells showed positive expression of keratinocyte specific cytokeratins, involucrin, and loricrin. UC-MSCs differentiated into dermal fibroblast-like cells indicated expression of collagen type 3, desmin, FGF-7, fibroblast activation protein alpha, procollagen-1, and vimentin. In conclusion, placenta is a potential source of cells to develop into skin-like cells.

  10. Innervation of Cochlear Hair Cells by Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Neurons In Vitro

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    Niliksha Gunewardene

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs may serve as an autologous source of replacement neurons in the injured cochlea, if they can be successfully differentiated and reconnected with residual elements in the damaged auditory system. Here, we explored the potential of hiPSC-derived neurons to innervate early postnatal hair cells, using established in vitro assays. We compared two hiPSC lines against a well-characterized hESC line. After ten days’ coculture in vitro, hiPSC-derived neural processes contacted inner and outer hair cells in whole cochlear explant cultures. Neural processes from hiPSC-derived neurons also made contact with hair cells in denervated sensory epithelia explants and expressed synapsin at these points of contact. Interestingly, hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured with hair cells at an early stage of differentiation formed synapses with a higher number of hair cells, compared to hiPSC-derived neurons cocultured at a later stage of differentiation. Notable differences in the innervation potentials of the hiPSC-derived neurons were also observed and variations existed between the hiPSC lines in their innervation efficiencies. Collectively, these data illustrate the promise of hiPSCs for auditory neuron replacement and highlight the need to develop methods to mitigate variabilities observed amongst hiPSC lines, in order to achieve reliable clinical improvements for patients.

  11. Agent-Based Computational Modeling of Cell Culture: Understanding Dosimetry In Vitro as Part of In Vitro to In Vivo Extrapolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantitative characterization of cellular dose in vitro is needed for alignment of doses in vitro and in vivo. We used the agent-based software, CompuCell3D (CC3D), to provide a stochastic description of cell growth in culture. The model was configured so that isolated cells assu...

  12. In vitro invasion of small-cell lung cancer cell lines correlates with expression of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damstrup, L; Rude Voldborg, B; Spang-Thomsen, M; Brünner, N; Skovgaard Poulsen, H

    1998-09-01

    Formation of metastasis is a multistep process involving attachment to the basement membrane, local proteolysis and migration into surrounding tissues, lymph or bloodstream. In the present study, we have analysed the correlation between in vitro invasion and presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a panel of 21 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines. We have previously reported that ten of these cell lines expressed EGFR protein detected by radioreceptor and affinity labelling assays. In 11 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, EGFR mRNA was detected by Northern blot analysis. In vitro invasion in a Boyden chamber assay was found in all EGFR-positive cell lines, whereas no invasion was detected in the EGFR-negative cell lines. Quantification of the in vitro invasion in 12 selected SCLC cell lines demonstrated that, in the EGFR-positive cell lines, between 5% and 16% of the cells added to the upper chamber were able to traverse the Matrigel membrane. Expression of several matrix metalloproteases (MMP), of tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP) and of cathepsin B was evaluated by immunoprecipitation, Western blot analysis and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). However, in vitro invasive SCLC cell lines could not be distinguished from non-invasive cell lines based on the expression pattern of these molecules. In six SCLC cell lines, in vitro invasion was also determined in the presence of the EGFR-neutralizing monoclonal antibody mAb528. The addition of this antibody resulted in a significant reduction of the in vitro invasion in three selected EGFR-positive cell lines. Our results show that only EGFR-positive SCLC cell lines had the in vitro invasive phenotype, and it is therefore suggested that the EGFR might play an important role for the invasion potential of SCLC cell lines.

  13. Effect of epithermal neutrons on viability of glioblastoma tumor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostovich, L A; Gubanova, N V; Kutsenko, O S; Aleinik, V I; Kuznetsov, A S; Makarov, A N; Sorokin, I N; Taskaev, S Yu; Nepomnyashchikh, G I; Grigor'eva, E V

    2011-06-01

    We studied in vitro effect of epithermal neutrons in various doses on viability of glioblastoma U87 tumor cells. Increasing the dose from 1.9 to 4.1 Sv promoted cell death. Cytofluorimetric analysis revealed no activation of apoptosis in the irradiated cells, which attested to necrotic death of the tumor cells exposed to epithermal neutron radiation.

  14. Investigation of In Vitro Bone Cell Adhesion and Proliferation on Ti Using Direct Current Stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodhak, Subhadip; Bose, Susmita; Kinsel, William C; Bandyopadhyay, Amit

    2012-12-01

    Our objective was to establish an in vitro cell culture protocol to improve bone cell attachment and proliferation on Ti substrate using direct current stimulation. For this purpose, a custom made electrical stimulator was developed and a varying range of direct currents, from 5 to 25 µA, were used to study the current stimulation effect on bone cells cultured on conducting Ti samples in vitro. Cell-materials interaction was studied for a maximum of 5 days by culturing with human fetal osteoblast cells (hFOB). The direct current was applied in every 8 h time interval and the duration of electrical stimulation was kept constant at 15 min for all cases. In vitro results showed that direct current stimulation significantly favored bone cell attachment and proliferation in comparison to nonstimulated Ti surface. Immunochemistry and confocal microscopy results confirmed that the cell adhesion was most pronounced on 25 µA direct current stimulated Ti surfaces as hFOB cells expressed higher vinculin protein with increasing amount of direct current. Furthermore, MTT assay results established that cells grew 30% higher in number under 25 µA electrical stimulation as compared to nonstimulated Ti surface after 5 days of culture period. In this work we have successfully established a simple and cost effective in vitro protocol offering easy and rapid analysis of bone cell-materials interaction which can be used in promotion of bone cell attachment and growth on Ti substrate using direct current electrical stimulation in an in vitro model.

  15. Retinoids, retinoid analogs, and lactoferrin interact and differentially affect cell viability of 2 bovine mammary cell types in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Baumrucker, C R

    2010-07-01

    Two bovine mammary cell types (BME-UV1 and MeBo cells) were used to evaluate the effect of natural retinoids, retinoid analogs, and bovine lactoferrin (bLf) on cell viability in vitro. Experiments with Alamar Blue showed a linear relationship between fluorescence and cell viability index. The BME-UV1 cells exhibited twice the metabolic activity but required half the doubling time of the MeBo cells. The BME-UV1 cells were very sensitive to all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) inhibition of cell viability (Pretinoid-induced inhibition of cell viability, depending on the type of bovine mammary cell studied.

  16. Interactions between osteosarcoma cell lines and dendritic cells immune function: An in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Michela; Mereuta, Oana M; Saglio, Francesco; Carraro, Francesca; Berger, Massimo; Madon, Enrico; Fagioli, Franca

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) might be partly responsible for the defective immune response in tumor bearing hosts, but no study in osteosarcoma patients is still available. Therefore, we investigated in vitro whether human osteosarcoma cell lines have an inhibitor effect on different types of DCs: CD14+DCs, DC1 and DC2. DCs derived from healthy donors were cultured with osteosarcoma cell lines and appropriate cytokine cocktails and analysed for the expression of co-stimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80, CD83, CD86, HLA-DR). Each interaction resulted in a lower phenotypic expression of the DCs maturation markers, especially on DC2. Moreover, the addition of various cytokines and compounds (rhIL-12, CD40L, Indometacin) induced the DC1 and DC2 subsets towards the Th1 pattern as shown by ELISA. Osteosarcoma highly interferes with an in vitro DCs immune function as antigen presenting cells. The understanding of tumor biology underlines the need for a specific osteosarcoma immunotherapy able to reverse this immune-surveillance inhibition.

  17. Amygdalin-mediated inhibition of non-small cell lung cancer cell invasion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Liyu; Xie, Bo; Wang, Yaguo; Qian, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor claiming the highest fatality worldwide for a long period of time. Unfortunately, most of the current treatment methods are still based on the characteristics of cancer cells in the primary lesion and the prognosis is often much poorer in patients with metastatic cancers. Amygdalin, a natural product of glycosides and lots of evidence shows that amygdalin can inhibit the proliferation of some kinds of cancer cells. In this study, we first obtained the highly metastatic NSCLC cell lines H1299/M and PA/M and further treated these cells with amygdalin. We found that the in vitro proliferability of H1299/M and PA/M was inhibited, but such inhibition required higher concentration of amygdalin. When lower concentration of amygdalin was used for the experiments, we observed that the in vitro invasive and migration capacities of H1299/M and PA/M were significantly inhibited. These results strongly suggested that amygdalin was likely to have anti-metastatic NSCLC effect. This study offers information of the role of amygdalin that may be useful as a therapeutic target in lung tumors.

  18. Spontaneous transformation of adult mesenchymal stem cells from cynomolgus macaques in vitro

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    Ren, Zhenhua [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Department of Anatomy, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, 230032 (China); Wang, Jiayin; Zhu, Wanwan; Guan, Yunqian; Zou, Chunlin [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Chen, Zhiguo, E-mail: chenzhiguo@gmail.com [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China); Stanford Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine and Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford, CA (United States); Zhang, Y. Alex, E-mail: yaz@bjsap.org [Cell Therapy Center, Xuanwu Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory of Neurodegeneration, Ministry of Education, Beijing (China)

    2011-12-10

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have shown potential clinical utility in cell therapy and tissue engineering, due to their ability to proliferate as well as to differentiate into multiple lineages, including osteogenic, adipogenic, and chondrogenic specifications. Therefore, it is crucial to assess the safety of MSCs while extensive expansion ex vivo is a prerequisite to obtain the cell numbers for cell transplantation. Here we show that MSCs derived from adult cynomolgus monkey can undergo spontaneous transformation following in vitro culture. In comparison with MSCs, the spontaneously transformed mesenchymal cells (TMCs) display significantly different growth pattern and morphology, reminiscent of the characteristics of tumor cells. Importantly, TMCs are highly tumorigenic, causing subcutaneous tumors when injected into NOD/SCID mice. Moreover, no multiple differentiation potential of TMCs is observed in vitro or in vivo, suggesting that spontaneously transformed adult stem cells may not necessarily turn into cancer stem cells. These data indicate a direct transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs into tumor cells following long-term expansion in vitro. The spontaneous transformation of the cultured cynomolgus monkey MSCs may have important implications for ongoing clinical trials and for models of oncogenesis, thus warranting a more strict assessment of MSCs prior to cell therapy. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spontaneous transformation of cynomolgus monkey MSCs in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells lack multipotency. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells are highly tumorigenic. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Transformed mesenchymal cells do not have the characteristics of cancer stem cells.

  19. In-vitro stem cell derived red blood cells for transfusion: are we there yet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun Ok

    2014-03-01

    To date, the use of red blood cells (RBCs) produced from stem cells in vitro has not proved practical for routine transfusion. However, the perpetual and widespread shortage of blood products, problems related to transfusion-transmitted infections, and new emerging pathogens elicit an increasing demand for artificial blood. Worldwide efforts to achieve the goal of RBC production through stem cell research have received vast attention; however, problems with large-scale production and cost effectiveness have yet to prove practical usefulness. Some progress has been made, though, as cord blood stem cells and embryonic stem cells have shown an ability to differentiate and proliferate, and induced pluripotent stem cells have been shown to be an unlimited source for RBC production. However, transfusion of stem cell-derived RBCs still presents a number of challenges to overcome. This paper will summarize an up to date account of research and advances in stem cell-derived RBCs, delineate our laboratory protocol in producing RBCs from cord blood, and introduce the technological developments and limitations to current RBC production practices.

  20. Isolation and culture exploration of Anas platyrhynchos amniotic fluid stem cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingming Ning

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: DAFSCs can be isolated from matrix that have strong self-renewal capacity in vitro. DAFSCs can be induced into adipocyte in vitro. These testify that DAFSCs can be an ideal seeded cells having potentials for preservation and utilization of rare genetic resources. [J Adv Vet Anim Res 2017; 4(2.000: 140-146

  1. Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells into Dopaminergic Neuron-like Cells in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, So Young; Soker, Shay; Jang, Yu-Jin; Kwon, Tae Gyun; Yoo, Eun Sang

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the potential of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) to differentiate into dopaminergic neurons in vitro as an autologous stem cell source for Parkinson's disease treatment. The hDPSCs were expanded in knockout-embryonic stem cell (KO-ES) medium containing leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on gelatin-coated plates for 3-4 days. Then, the medium was replaced with KO-ES medium without LIF to allow the formation of the neurosphere for 4 days. The neurosphere was transferred into ITS medium, containing ITS (human insulin-transferrin-sodium) and fibronectin, to select for Nestin-positive cells for 6-8 days. The cells were then cultured in N-2 medium containing basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), FGF-8b, sonic hedgehog-N, and ascorbic acid on poly-l-ornithine/fibronectin-coated plates to expand the Nestin-positive cells for up to 2 weeks. Finally, the cells were transferred into N-2/ascorbic acid medium to allow for their differentiation into dopaminergic neurons for 10-15 days. The differentiation stages were confirmed by morphological, immunocytochemical, flow cytometric, real-time PCR, and ELISA analyses. The expressions of mesenchymal stem cell markers were observed at the early stages. The expressions of early neuronal markers were maintained throughout the differentiation stages. The mature neural markers showed increased expression from stage 3 onwards. The percentage of cells positive for tyrosine hydroxylase was 14.49%, and the amount was 0.526 ± 0.033 ng/mL at the last stage. hDPSCs can differentiate into dopaminergic neural cells under experimental cell differentiation conditions, showing potential as an autologous cell source for the treatment of Parkinson's disease.

  2. In vitro migratory potential of rat quiescent hepatic stellate cells and its augmentation by cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, K; Wakahara, T; Wang, Y Q; Kadoya, H; Kawada, N; Kaneda, K

    1999-06-01

    In liver injury, hepatic stellate cells are considered to depart from the sinusoidal wall and accumulate in the necrotic lesion through migration and proliferation. In this study, we investigated the migratory capacity of quiescent stellate cells in vitro and analyzed the relationship with proliferative response. Freshly isolated stellate cells that were seeded in the upper chamber of Cell Culture Insert (Becton Dickenson, Franklin Lakes, NJ) started to migrate to the lower chamber at 1 day and increased in migration index to 19% at 2 days. Cells in the lower chamber were stretched in shape with many lipid droplets and showed quiescent properties, i.e., negative expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) or platelet-derived growth factor receptor-beta (PDGFR-beta). Migratory capacity in quiescent cells was also shown in the Matrigel-coated insert. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) messenger RNA expression was low just after isolation, but was enhanced as migration became prominent. Migrating cells further showed higher proliferative activity than resting ones. The presence of PDGF/BB and Kupffer cells accelerated stellate cell migration by the chemotactic mechanism and concurrently augmented proliferation, whereas that of dexamethasone and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) attenuated migration as a result of general suppression effects. Compared with quiescent ones, alpha-SMA and PDGFR-beta-positive activated stellate cells obtained by 14-day culture exhibited more rapid and prominent migration, being regulated by mediators in a similar manner as described previously. These data indicate that quiescent stellate cells undergo migration, which is linked to proliferation and enhanced by PDGF/BB and Kupffer cells, suggesting the involvement of this function in the initial phase of development of postnecrotic fibrosis.

  3. Constructing an in vitro cornea from cultures of the three specific corneal cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, A I; Maier-Reif, K; Graeve, T

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a reliable method for establishing pure cultures of the three types of corneal cells. This is believed to be the first time, corneal cells have been cultured from fetal pig corneas. Cell growth studies were performed in different media. Subcultures of the three corneal cell types were passaged until the 30th generation without their showing signs of senescence. For engineering an in vitro cornea, corneal epithelial cells were cultured over corneal stromal cells in an artificial biomatrix of collagen with an underlying layer of corneal endothelial cells. The morphology, histology, and differentiation of the in vitro cornea were investigated to determine the degree of comparability to the cornea in vivo. The in vitro construct displayed signs of transition to an organotypic phenotype of which the most prominent was the formation of two basement membranes.

  4. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel T. Mindaye

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5,6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  5. The proteomic dataset for bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stromal cells: Effect of in vitro passaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mindaye, Samuel T; Lo Surdo, Jessica; Bauer, Steven R; Alterman, Michail A

    2015-12-01

    Bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) have been in clinical trials for therapy. One major bottleneck in the advancement of BMSC-based products is the challenge associated with cell isolation, characterization, and ensuring cell fitness over the course of in vitro cell propagation steps. The data in this report is part of publications that explored the proteomic changes following in vitro passaging of BMSCs [4] and the molecular heterogeneity in cultures obtained from different human donors [5], [6].The methodological details involving cell manufacturing, proteome harvesting, protein identification and quantification as well as the bioinformatic analyses were described to ensure reproducibility of the results.

  6. In vitro proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of endometrial stem cells and dental pulp stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh Sadat; Torshabi, Maryam

    2017-06-01

    Stem-cell-based therapies were introduced aiming to overcome the limitations of the existing procedures for regeneration of mineralized tissues. Stem cells isolated from the endometrial tissue and dental pulp have the capacity to differentiate into various functional cells including osteoblasts. However, studies comparing their ability to regenerate mineralized tissue are lacking. The purpose of this study was to compare the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation potential of endometrial stem cells (EnSCs) and dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs) using in vitro cell culture technique. The DPSCs and EnSCs were isolated from human dental pulp and endometrium, respectively. Their proliferation and osteogenic potential were compared in the same osteogenic medium (OM) after 3, 5, 7 and 10 days using the methyl thiazol tetrazolium assay, alizarin red staining, and real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (Real-Time qRT-PCR). The EnSCs showed higher proliferation rate compared to DPSCs. Regarding osteogenesis, alizarin red-positive colonies appeared earlier and in greater amounts in DPSCs group. The real-time qRT-PCR demonstrated significantly greater osteogenic potential of DPSCs compared to EnSCs. Our findings revealed significant differences in stem cell properties based on the tissue source. The EnSCs had greater proliferation rate than DPSCs, while DPSCs showed greater osteogenic potential compared to EnSCs in the same OM.

  7. Microfabricated Electrochemical Cell-Based Biosensors for Analysis of Living Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Wang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cellular biochemical parameters can be used to reveal the physiological and functional information of various cells. Due to demonstrated high accuracy and non-invasiveness, electrochemical detection methods have been used for cell-based investigation. When combined with improved biosensor design and advanced measurement systems, the on-line biochemical analysis of living cells in vitro has been applied for biological mechanism study, drug screening and even environmental monitoring. In recent decades, new types of miniaturized electrochemical biosensor are emerging with the development of microfabrication technology. This review aims to give an overview of the microfabricated electrochemical cell-based biosensors, such as microelectrode arrays (MEA, the electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS technique, and the light addressable potentiometric sensor (LAPS. The details in their working principles, measurement systems, and applications in cell monitoring are covered. Driven by the need for high throughput and multi-parameter detection proposed by biomedicine, the development trends of electrochemical cell-based biosensors are also introduced, including newly developed integrated biosensors, and the application of nanotechnology and microfluidic technology.

  8. Reprogramming somatic cells to cells with neuronal characteristics by defined medium both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songwei He

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: In summary, this 5C medium not only provides a means to derive cells with neuronal characteristics without viral transfection in vitro but might also be useful to produce neurons in vivo for neurodegenerative disease treatment.

  9. In vitro cytotoxicity of Indonesian stingless bee products against human cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M. Kustiawan

    2014-07-01

    Conclusions: Propolis from T. incisa and Trigona fusco-balteata contain an in vitro cytotoxic activity against human cancer cell lines. Further study is required, including the isolation and characterization of the active antiproliferative agent(s.

  10. DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CATECHOLAMINES BY CHLOROTRIAZINE HERBICIDES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS IN VITRO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Differential modulation of catecholamines by chlorotriazine herbicides in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells in vitro.Das PC, McElroy WK, Cooper RL.Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599, USA.Epidemiological, wildlife, and lab...

  11. In vitro growth characteristics of human lymphoid malignancies in primary cell culture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.P. Touw (Ivo)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe experimental work presented in this thesis deals with the analysis of the in vitro growth and differentiation characteristics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia ( T end non-T), T cell non Hodgkin's lymphoma and B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in primary cell culture. For

  12. In vitro study on effect of germinated wheat on human breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    This research investigated the possible anti-cancer effects of germinated wheat flours (GWF) on cell growth and apoptosis of human breast cancer cells. In a series of in vitro experiments, estrogen receptor-positive (MCF-7) and negative (MDA-MB-231) cells were cultured and treated with GWF that wer...

  13. In vitro effects of tetraiodothyroacetic acid combined with X-irradiation on basal cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leith, John T; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A; Hercbergs, Aleck A

    2017-02-16

    We investigated radiosensitization in an untreated basal cell carcinoma (TE.354.T) cell line and post-pretreatment with tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) X 1 h at 37°C, 0.2 and 2.0 µM tetrac. Radioresistant TE.354.T cells were grown in modified medium containing fibroblast growth factor-2, stem cell factor-1 and a reduced calcium level. We also added reproductively inactivated (30 Gy) "feeder cells" to the medium. The in vitro doubling time was 34.1 h, and the colony forming efficiency was 5.09 percent. These results were therefore suitable for clonogenic radiation survival assessment. The 250 kVp X-ray survival curve of control TE.354.T cells showed linear-quadratic survival parameters of αX-ray = 0.201 Gy(-1) and βX-ray = 0.125 Gy(-2). Tetrac concentrations of either 0.2 or 2.0 µM produced αX-ray and βX-ray parameters of 2.010 and 0.282 Gy(-1) and 2.050 and 0.837 Gy(-2), respectively. The surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) for control cells was 0.581, while values for 0.2 and 2.0 µM tetrac were 0.281 and 0.024. The SF2 data show that tetrac concentrations of 0.2 and 2.0 µM sensitize otherwise radioresistant TE.354.T cells by factors of 2.1 and 24.0, respectively. Thus, radioresistant basal cell carcinoma cells may be radiosensitized pharmacologically by exposure to tetrac.

  14. N-cadherin identifies human endometrial epithelial progenitor cells by in vitro stem cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hong P T; Xiao, L; Deane, James A; Tan, Ker-Sin; Cousins, Fiona L; Masuda, Hirotaka; Sprung, Carl N; Rosamilia, Anna; Gargett, Caroline E

    2017-11-01

    Is there a specific surface marker that identifies human endometrial epithelial progenitor cells with adult stem cell activity using in vitro assays? N-cadherin isolates clonogenic, self-renewing human endometrial epithelial progenitor cells with high proliferative potential that differentiate into cytokeratin+ gland-like structures in vitro and identifies their location in some cells of gland profiles predominantly in basalis endometrium adjacent to the myometrium. Human endometrium contains a small population of clonogenic, self-renewing epithelial cells with high proliferative potential that differentiate into large gland-like structures, but their identity and location is unknown. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-1 (SSEA-1) distinguishes the epithelium of basalis from functionalis and is a marker of human post-menopausal (Post-M) endometrial epithelium. Prospective observational study of endometrial epithelial cells obtained from hysterectomy samples taken from 50 pre-menopausal (Pre-M) and 24 Post-M women, of which 4 were from women who had taken daily estradiol valerate 2 mg/day for 8 weeks prior. Gene profiling was used to identify differentially expressed surface markers between fresh EpCAM (Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule)-magnetic bead-selected basalis-like epithelial cells from Post-M endometrium compared with predominantly functionalis epithelial cells from Pre-M endometrium and validated by qRT-PCR. In vitro clonogenicity and self-renewal assays were used to assess the stem/progenitor cell properties of magnetic bead-sorted N-cadherin+ and N-cadherin- epithelial cells. The cellular identity, location and phenotype of N-cadherin+ cells was assessed by dual colour immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy for cytokeratin, proliferative status (Ki-67), ERα, SSEA-1, SOX9 and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers on full thickness human endometrium. CDH2 (N-cadherin gene) was one of 11 surface molecules highly expressed in Post-M compared to

  15. Effect of different factors on proliferation of antler cells, cultured in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Kužmová

    Full Text Available Antlers as a potential model for bone growth and development have become an object of rising interest. To elucidate processes explaining how antler growth is regulated, in vitro cultures have been established. However, until now, there has been no standard method to cultivate antler cells and in vitro results are often opposite to those reported in vivo. In addition, many factors which are often not taken into account under in vitro conditions may play an important role in the development of antler cells. In this study we investigated the effects of the antler growth stage, the male individuality, passaged versus primary cultures and the effect of foetal calf serum concentrations on proliferative potential of mixed antler cell cultures in vitro, derived from regenerating antlers of red deer males (Cervus elaphus. The proliferation potential of antler cells was measured by incorporation of (3H thymidine. Our results demonstrate that there is no significant effect of the antler growth stage, whereas male individuality and all other examined factors significantly affected antler cell proliferation. Furthermore, our results suggest that primary cultures may better represent in vivo conditions and processes occurring in regenerating antlers. In conclusion, before all main factors affecting antler cell proliferation in vitro will be satisfactorily investigated, results of in vitro studies focused on hormonal regulation of antler growth should be taken with extreme caution.

  16. Effect of oviduct epithelial cells on the fertilization and development of sheep oocytes in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter; Irvine, Brendon J.; Armstrong, David T.

    1994-01-01

    cells and then transferred to the oviducts of a recipient ewe, 30 h post oestrus, for a 6.5 day period of in vivo culture. Similar rates of fertilization ( 54-58%) and blastocyst development from cleaving zygotes ( 48-69%) were achieved in both experi- ments in vitro with no evident benefit of including...... oviductal cells. In fact, fewer (P= 0 .02) blastocysts developed from cleaved embryos when co-cultured for the 96 h period (Group 4). Whilst the blastocyst development rates obtained in vitro ( 45-58%) were similar to, or higher than (P=0.03 ), those obtained in vivo ( 43%), more than 50% of in vitro cul...

  17. PKH26 can transfer to host cells in vitro and vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Peng; Zhang, Run; Sun, Haitao; Chen, Lei; Liu, Fang; Yao, Chen; Du, Mouxuan; Jiang, Xiaodan

    2013-01-15

    The fluorescent dye, PKH26, which mainly binds to the cell membrane, has been used as the cell tracer to locate the transplanted cells in host for a long time. However, there was no detailed report that whether the PKH26 dye was specific to the transplanted cells. Therefore, the aim of this article is to explore the effect of cells debris as the cracking cells from the PKH26-labeled adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) on the cells in vitro and the host in vivo. After we tested the proliferation and toxicity of PKH26 to the ADSCs by the Cell Count-8 kit and alamar blue assay, we constructed 2 models, coculturing lots of PKH26-labeled cell debris with the unlabeled ADSCs in vitro and injecting via the tail vein in rat, to evaluate the specificity of the PKH26 dye. The result indicated that the PKH26 didn't inhibit the proliferation and had no toxicity to the ADSCs compared with the unlabeled ADSCs, but the cell debris cracking from PKH26-labeled transplanted cells can cause the unlabeled cells to emit red fluorescence in vitro and also lead the tissues displaying red fluorescence in vivo. We can conclude that the PKH26 dye, used as a cell tracer for a long time, was not an ideal cell tracer.

  18. ROCK Inhibition Facilitates In Vitro Expansion of Glioblastoma Stem-Like Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha G Tilson

    Full Text Available Due to their stem-like characteristics and their resistance to existing chemo- and radiation therapies, there is a growing appreciation that cancer stem cells (CSCs are the root cause behind cancer metastasis and recurrence. However, these cells represent a small subpopulation of cancer cells and are difficult to propagate in vitro. Glioblastoma is an extremely deadly form of brain cancer that is hypothesized to have a subpopulation of CSCs called glioblastoma stem cells (GSCs; also called brain tumor initiating cells, BTICs. We propose the use of selective Rho-kinase (ROCK inhibitors, Y-27632 and fasudil, to promote GSC/BTIC-like cell survival and propagation in vitro. ROCK inhibitors have been implicated in suppressing apoptosis, and it was hypothesized that they would increase the number of GSC/BTIC-like cells grown in vitro and improve cloning efficiencies. Indeed, our data demonstrate that transient and continuous supplementation of non-toxic concentrations of Y-27632 and fasudil inhibited apoptosis, enhanced the cells' ability to form spheres, and increased stem cell marker expressing GSC/BTIC-like cell subpopulation. Our data indicated that pharmacological and genetic (siRNA inhibitions of the ROCK pathway facilitates in vitro expansion of GSC/BTIC-like cells. Thus, ROCK pathway inhibition shows promise for future optimization of CSC culture media.

  19. In Vitro Cell Death Determination for Drug Discovery: A Landscape Review of Real Issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoite Méry

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell death plays a crucial role for a myriad of physiological processes, and several human diseases such as cancer are characterized by its deregulation. There are many methods available for both quantifying and qualifying the accurate process of cell death which occurs. Choosing the right assay tool is essential to generate meaningful data, provide sufficient information for clinical applications, and understand cell death processes. In vitro cell death assays are important steps in the search for new therapies against cancer as the ultimate goal remains the elaboration of drugs that interfere with specific cell death mechanisms. However, choosing a cell viability or cytotoxicity assay among the many available options is a daunting task. Indeed, cell death can be approached by several viewpoints and require a more holistic approach. This review provides an overview of cell death assays usually used in vitro for assessing cell death so as to elaborate new potential chemotherapeutics and discusses considerations for using each assay.

  20. [Study in the killing effect of Myxoma virus to C6 glioma cell in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Meng; Zhang, Qiu-Sheng; Liang, Shi-Jie; Ji, Tao; Lin, Heng-Zhou; Li, Wei-Ping

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate the susceptibility of C6 glioma cells to Myxoma virus and the killing effect of Myxoma virus to the C6 glioma cells in vitro. C6 glioma cells were infected with myxoma virus, used death virus as the negative control, 5-FU as the positive control, DEMD as blank control. The number of living cells were counted every 24 h, and Western-Blot method, inverted microscope and MTT assay were applicated to observe the cell morphology and survival rate in each group. The cell number were decreased rapidly in virus effected group and 5-FU group, with significant differences to the negative and blank control groups. And cells in virus effected group appeared cytopathic effect. C6 glioma cells were susceptible to myxoma virus and myxoma virus had killing effect to C6 glioma cells in vitro.

  1. In vitro differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells into functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-22

    Aug 22, 2011 ... Studies have shown that embryonic stem (ES) cells can be successfully differentiated into liver cells, which offer the potential unlimited cell source for a variety of end-stage liver disease. In our study, in order to induce mouse ES cells to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells under chemically defined.

  2. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    Existing in vitro models of the human intestine such as the established epithelial cell line, Caco-2, cultured on porous membranes have been extensively used for assessing and predicting permeability and absorption of oral drugs in the pharmaceutical industries. However, such in vitro human...... the potential to revolutionise the way of in vitro cell culture. In particular, microfluidics provides avenues for researchers to tailor the cellular microenvironment to better mimic the cellcell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, while at the same time reducing the scale of the experimental studies...... using different compounds on the in vitro human intestinal model in the microfluidic device showed comparable results with static cultures. In addition, a normal commensal intestinal bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) was successfully co-cultured on the luminal surface of the cultured epithelium...

  3. Lab on a chip automates in vitro cell culturing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perozziello, Gerardo; Møllenbach, Jacob; Laursen, Steen

    2012-01-01

    A novel in vitro fertilization system is presented based on an incubation chamber and a microfluidic device which serves as advanced microfluidic cultivation chamber. The flow is controlled by hydrostatic height differences and evaporation is avoided with help of mineral oil. Six patient compartm......A novel in vitro fertilization system is presented based on an incubation chamber and a microfluidic device which serves as advanced microfluidic cultivation chamber. The flow is controlled by hydrostatic height differences and evaporation is avoided with help of mineral oil. Six patient...

  4. Biocompatibility of magnesium implants in primary human reaming debris-derived cells stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charyeva, Olga; Dakischew, Olga; Sommer, Ursula; Heiss, Christian; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2016-03-01

    Use of magnesium for resorbable metal implants is a new concept in orthopaedic and dental medicine. The majority of studies on magnesium's biocompatibility in vitro have assessed the short-term effect of magnesium extract on cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of direct exposure to magnesium alloys on the bioactivity of primary human reaming debris-derived (HRD) cells. Pure Mg, Mg2Ag, WE43 and Mg10Gd were tested for biocompatibility. The study consisted of assessment of cell viability by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) test, evaluation of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) content, and study of cell morphology under light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), along with determination of calcification and pH changes induced by magnesium. The number of viable cells in the presence of Mg2Ag was high over the entire observation period. Inhibition of ALP content in osteogenic differentiating HRD was caused by pure Mg at day 14 and 28. All other magnesium alloys did not affect the ALP content. Exposure of HRD to magnesium increased the amount of lysosomes and endocytotic vesicles. Cellular attachment was generally the best for those crystals that formed on the surface of all materials. A decrease was observed in Ca(2+) in the medium from day 1 to day 14. In terms of cell morphology, cell viability and differentiation, cell density and the effect on the surrounding pH, Mg2Ag showed the most promising results. All magnesium materials induced calcification, which is beneficial for orthopaedic and dental applications.

  5. iNKT cell cytotoxic responses control T-lymphoma growth in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassiri, Hamid; Das, Rupali; Guan, Peng; Barrett, David M.; Brennan, Patrick J.; Banerjee, Pinaki P.; Wiener, Susan J.; Orange, Jordan S.; Brenner, Michael B.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Nichols, Kim E.

    2013-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells comprise a lineage of CD1d-restricted glycolipid-reactive T lymphocytes with important roles in host immunity to cancer. iNKT cells indirectly participate in antitumor responses by inducing dendritic cell maturation and producing cytokines that promote tumor clearance by CD8+ T and NK cells. Although iNKT cells thereby act as potent cellular adjuvants, it is less clear whether they directly control the growth of tumors. To gain insights into the direct contribution of iNKT cells to tumor immune surveillance, we developed in vitro and in vivo systems to selectively examine the antitumor activity of iNKT cells in the absence of other cytolytic effectors. Using the EL4 T-lymphoma cell line as a model, we find that iNKT cells exert robust and specific lysis of tumor cells in vitro in a manner that is differentially-induced by iNKT cell agonists of varying TCR affinities, such as OCH, α-galactosyl ceramide and PBS44. In vitro blockade of CD1d-mediated lipid antigen presentation, disruption of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, or loss of perforin expression significantly reduce iNKT cell killing. Consistent with these findings, iNKT cell reconstitution of T, B, and NK cell-deficient mice slows EL4 growth in vivo via TCR-CD1d and perforin-dependent mechanisms. Together, these observations establish that iNKT cells are sufficient to control the growth of T-lymphoma in vitro and in vivo. They also suggest that the induction of iNKT cell cytotoxic responses in situ might serve as a more effective strategy to prevent and/or treat CD1d+ cancers, such as T-lymphoma. PMID:24563871

  6. An Abbreviated Protocol for In Vitro Generation of Functional Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-Like Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Massumi, Mohammad; Pourasgari, Farzaneh; Nalla, Amarnadh

    2016-01-01

    developed an abbreviated five-stage protocol (25-30 days) to generate human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Beta-like Cells (ES-DBCs). We showed that Geltrex, as an extracellular matrix, could support the generation of ES-DBCs more efficiently than that of the previously described culture systems......The ability to yield glucose-responsive pancreatic beta-cells from human pluripotent stem cells in vitro will facilitate the development of the cell replacement therapies for the treatment of Type 1 Diabetes. Here, through the sequential in vitro targeting of selected signaling pathways, we have...... positive cells, 1% insulin and glucagon positive cells and 30% insulin and NKX6.1 co-expressing cells. Functionally, ES-DBCs were responsive to high glucose in static incubation and perifusion studies, and could secrete insulin in response to successive glucose stimulations. Mitochondrial metabolic flux...

  7. Trophic factor induction of human umbilical cord blood cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ning; Kamath, Siddharth; Newcomb, Jennifer; Hudson, Jennifer; Garbuzova-Davis, Svitlana; Bickford, Paula; Davis-Sanberg, Cyndy; Sanberg, Paul; Zigova, Tanja; Willing, Alison

    2007-06-01

    The mononuclear fraction of human umbilical cord blood (HUCBmnf) is a mixed cell population that multiple research groups have shown contains cells that can express neural proteins. In these studies, we have examined the ability of the HUCBmnf to express neural antigens after in vitro exposure to defined media supplemented with a cocktail of growth and neurotrophic factors. It is our hypothesis that by treating the HUCBmnf with these developmentally-relevant factors, we can expand the population, enhance the expression of neural antigens and increase cell survival upon transplantation. Prior to growth factor treatment in culture, expression of stem cell antigens is greater in the non-adherent HUCBmnf cells compared to the adherent cells (p cells with growth factors, increases BrdU incorporation, especially after 14 days in vitro (DIV). In HUCBmnf-embryonic mouse striata co-culture, a small number of growth factor treated HUCBmnf cells were able to integrate into the growing neural network and express immature (nestin and TuJ1) and mature (GFAP and MAP2) neural markers. Treated HUCBmnf cells implanted in the subventricular zone predominantly expressed GFAP although some grafted HUCBmnf cells were MAP2 positive. While short-term treatment of HUCBmnf cells with growth and neurotrophic factors enhanced proliferative capacity in vitro and survival of the cells in vivo, the treatment regimen employed was not enough to ensure long-term survival of HUCBmnf-derived neurons necessary for cell replacement therapies for neurodegenerative diseases.

  8. Preliminary in vitro cytotoxic assay of human liver carcinoma cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    From the preliminary in vitro cytotoxic assay study, triorganotin(IV) complexes (2 and 5) were found to exhibit better activity as compared to diorganotin(IV) complexes (1, 3 and 4) but lower activity as compared to the reference drug. In addition, within the diorganotin(IV) complexes, monomeric type (3) exhibited a slightly ...

  9. In vitro regeneration, flowering, and cell culture of Centaurea species

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    L benzylaminopurine (BAP) and 0.1 mg/L indole-3- acetic acid (IAA). In vitro flowering and seed set occurred in C. cyanus when the shoots were incubated on MS basal medium supplemented with B5 vitamins, 100 mg/L myo-inositol and 30 g/L ...

  10. Comparative mutagenesis of human cells in vivo and in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thilly, W.G.

    1992-05-01

    This report discusses measuring methods of point mutations; high density cell cultures for low dose studies; measurement and sequence determination of mutations in DNA; the mutational spectra of styrene oxide and ethlyene oxide in TK-6 cells; mutational spectrum of Cr in human lymphoblast cells; mutational spectra of radon in TK-6 cells; and the mutational spectra of smokeless tobacco. (CBS)

  11. Clinical-scale in vitro expansion preserves biological characteristics of cardiac atrial appendage stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    WINDMOLDERS, Severina; WILLEMS, Leen; DANIELS, Anita; LINSEN, Loes; FANTON, Yanick; HENDRIKX, Marc; KONINCKX, Remco; Rummens, Jean-Luc; HENSEN, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Cardiac atrial appendage stem cells (CASCs) have recently emerged as an attractive candidate for cardiac regeneration after myocardial infarction. As with other cardiac stem cells, CASCs have to be expanded ex vivo to obtain clinically relevant cell numbers. However, foetal calf serum (FCS), which is routinely used for cell culturing, is unsuitable for clinical purposes, and influence of long-term in vitro culture on CASC behaviour is unknown. Materials and methodsWe examined effe...

  12. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of sevoflurane in two human cell lines in vitro with ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Miguel Alcaraz; Samuel Quesada; David Armero; Rocio Martín-Gil; Amparo Olivares; Daniel Achel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the in vitro toxicity of different concentrations of sevoflurane in cells exposed to X-ray. Methods: The genotoxic effects of sevofluorane were studied by means of the micronucleus test in cytokinesis-blocked cells of irradiated human lymphocytes. Subsequently, its cytotoxic effects on PNT2 (normal prostate) cells was determined using the cell viability test (MTT) and compared with those induced by different doses of X-rays. Results: A dose- and time-dependent cytoto...

  13. Human spermatogonial stem cells display limited proliferation in vitro under mouse spermatogonial stem cell culture conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medrano, Jose V; Rombaut, Charlotte; Simon, Carlos; Pellicer, Antonio; Goossens, Ellen

    2016-11-01

    To study the ability of human spermatogonial stem cells (hSSCs) to proliferate in vitro under mouse spermatogonial stem cell (mSSC) culture conditions. Experimental basic science study. Reproductive biology laboratory. Cryopreserved testicular tissue with normal spermatogenesis obtained from three donors subjected to orchiectomy due to a prostate cancer treatment. Testicular cells used to create in vitro cell cultures corresponding to the following groups: [1] unsorted human testicular cells, [2] differentially plated human testicular cells, and [3] cells enriched with major histocompatibility complex class 1 (HLA - )/epithelial cell surface antigen (EPCAM + ) in coculture with inactivated testicular feeders from the same patient. Analyses and characterization including immunocytochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction for somatic and germ cell markers, testosterone and inhibin B quantification, and TUNEL assay. Putative hSSCs appeared in singlets, doublets, or small groups of up to four cells in vitro only when testicular cells were cultured in StemPro-34 medium supplemented with glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting with HLA - /EPCAM + resulted in an enrichment of 27% VASA + /UTF1 + hSSCs, compared to 13% in unsorted controls. Coculture of sorted cells with inactivated testicular feeders gave rise to an average density of 112 hSSCs/cm 2 after 2 weeks in vitro compared with unsorted cells (61 hSSCs/cm 2 ) and differentially plated cells (49 hSSCS/cm 2 ). However, putative hSSCs rarely stained positive for the proliferation marker Ki67, and their presence was reduced to the point of almost disappearing after 4 weeks in vitro. We found that hSSCs show limited proliferation in vitro under mSSC culture conditions. Coculture of HLA - /EPCAM + sorted cells with testicular

  14. In Vitro T-Cell Generation From Adult, Embryonic, and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Many Roads to One Destination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michelle J; Webber, Beau R; Mohtashami, Mahmood; Stefanski, Heather E; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-11-01

    T lymphocytes are critical mediators of the adaptive immune system and have the capacity to serve as therapeutic agents in the areas of transplant and cancer immunotherapy. While T cells can be isolated and expanded from patients, T cells derived in vitro from both hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) and human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) offer great potential advantages in generating a self-renewing source of T cells that can be readily genetically modified. T-cell differentiation in vivo is a complex process requiring tightly regulated signals; providing the correct signals in vitro to induce T-cell lineage commitment followed by their development into mature, functional, single positive T cells, is similarly complex. In this review, we discuss current methods for the in vitro derivation of T cells from murine and human HSPCs and hPSCs that use feeder-cell and feeder-cell-free systems. Furthermore, we explore their potential for adoption for use in T-cell-based therapies. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  15. Chemical Characterization and in Vitro Cytotoxicity on Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells of Carica papaya Leaf Extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T; Parat, Marie-Odile; Hodson, Mark P; Pan, Jenny; Shaw, Paul N; Hewavitharana, Amitha K

    2015-12-24

    In traditional medicine, Carica papaya leaf has been used for a wide range of therapeutic applications including skin diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Carica papaya leaves on the human oral squamous cell carcinoma SCC25 cell line in parallel with non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Two out of four extracts showed a significantly selective effect towards the cancer cells and were found to contain high levels of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric profiles of the extracts obtained with Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry were used to tentatively identify the bioactive compounds using comparative analysis. The principal compounds identified were flavonoids or flavonoid glycosides, particularly compounds from the kaempferol and quercetin families, of which several have previously been reported to possess anticancer activities. These results confirm that papaya leaf is a potential source of anticancer compounds and warrant further scientific investigation to validate the traditional use of papaya leaf to treat cancer.

  16. Chemical Characterization and in Vitro Cytotoxicity on Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells of Carica Papaya Leaf Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thao T. Nguyen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In traditional medicine, Carica papaya leaf has been used for a wide range of therapeutic applications including skin diseases and cancer. In this study, we investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of aqueous and ethanolic extracts of Carica papaya leaves on the human oral squamous cell carcinoma SCC25 cell line in parallel with non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Two out of four extracts showed a significantly selective effect towards the cancer cells and were found to contain high levels of phenolic and flavonoid compounds. The chromatographic and mass spectrometric profiles of the extracts obtained with Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry were used to tentatively identify the bioactive compounds using comparative analysis. The principal compounds identified were flavonoids or flavonoid glycosides, particularly compounds from the kaempferol and quercetin families, of which several have previously been reported to possess anticancer activities. These results confirm that papaya leaf is a potential source of anticancer compounds and warrant further scientific investigation to validate the traditional use of papaya leaf to treat cancer.

  17. Human embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal cells form spontaneously active neuronal networks in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Teemu J; Ylä-Outinen, Laura; Tanskanen, Jarno M A; Lappalainen, Riikka S; Skottman, Heli; Suuronen, Riitta; Mikkonen, Jarno E; Hyttinen, Jari A K; Narkilahti, Susanna

    2009-07-01

    The production of functional human embryonic stem cell (hESC)-derived neuronal cells is critical for the application of hESCs in treating neurodegenerative disorders. To study the potential functionality of hESC-derived neurons, we cultured and monitored the development of hESC-derived neuronal networks on microelectrode arrays. Immunocytochemical studies revealed that these networks were positive for the neuronal marker proteins beta-tubulin(III) and microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2). The hESC-derived neuronal networks were spontaneously active and exhibited a multitude of electrical impulse firing patterns. Synchronous bursts of electrical activity similar to those reported for hippocampal neurons and rodent embryonic stem cell-derived neuronal networks were recorded from the differentiated cultures until up to 4 months. The dependence of the observed neuronal network activity on sodium ion channels was examined using tetrodotoxin (TTX). Antagonists for the glutamate receptors NMDA [D(-)-2-amino-5-phosphonopentanoic acid] and AMPA/kainate [6-cyano-7-nitroquinoxaline-2,3-dione], and for GABAA receptors [(-)-bicuculline methiodide] modulated the spontaneous electrical activity, indicating that pharmacologically susceptible neuronal networks with functional synapses had been generated. The findings indicate that hESC-derived neuronal cells can generate spontaneously active networks with synchronous communication in vitro, and are therefore suitable for use in developmental and drug screening studies, as well as for regenerative medicine.

  18. In vitro proliferation of haemopoietic cells in the presence of adherent cell layers. I. Culture conditions and strain dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimann, J.; Burger, H.

    1979-01-01

    The culture system, in which a marrow-derived adherent cell population, established in vitro, exerts a long-term promoting influence on proliferation of haemopoietic cells, is reproduced. Essential parameters of the system are investigated; it is confirmed that the system is critically dependent on

  19. Layer-by-layer tissue microfabrication supports cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catros, Sylvain; Guillemot, Fabien; Nandakumar, Anandkumar; Ziane, Sophia; Moroni, Lorenzo; Habibovic, Pamela; van Blitterswijk, Clemens; Rousseau, Benoit; Chassande, Olivier; Amédée, Joëlle; Fricain, Jean-Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Layer-by-layer biofabrication represents a novel strategy to create three-dimensional living structures with a controlled internal architecture, using cell micromanipulation technologies. Laser assisted bioprinting (LAB) is an effective printing method for patterning cells, biomolecules, and biomaterials in two dimensions. "Biopapers," made of thin polymer scaffolds, may be appropriate to achieve three-dimensional constructs and to reinforce mechanical properties of printed materials. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the tridimensional organization of cells and biomaterials on cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. The experimental LAB setup was comprised of an infrared laser, focused onto a glass ribbon coated with an absorbing layer of gold. The cell bioink was made of MG63 cells (50 millions cells/mL in culture medium and 1% alginate), transduced with Luciferase gene for tracking and quantification. The printing substrate was a 100-μm-thick polycaprolacton (PCL) electrospun scaffold. The building sequence comprised sequential layers of cells and PCL scaffolds stacked using two different tridimensional arrangements, which were compared in this study (layer-by-layer vs. seeding on a single locus of the scaffolds). Then the cell-seeded materials were cultured in vitro or implanted in vivo in NOD-SCID mice. The qualitative follow-up involved scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observations, live-dead assays, and histology. The cell amount was quantified by photon imager during 21 days in vitro and 2 months in vivo. Live- dead assay and SEM revealed that the cells survived after printing and spread onto PCL membranes. Circle-shaped patterns were maintained in vitro during the first week but they were no longer observable after 2 weeks, due to cell proliferation. Luciferase tracking displayed that the cell amount was increased in vitro and in vivo when the materials and the cells where stacked layer by layer. Histological sections of the in vivo

  20. In vitro evaluation of cardiomyogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Hwan; Lee, Yong Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-10-15

    Bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are excellent candidate as therapeutic agent for cell therapy. MSCs can be expanded in vitro rapidly (more than 3-5 fold in a weeks), and maintained their stem cell properties for a long culture period. Recently, many investigators have suggested that MSCs have ability to differentiate into cardiomyocytes by given appropriate condition in vitro or in vivo. Although, MSCs may be useful cell therapeutic agents in heart disease, there are still exist major barriers to track their capacity to differentiate into functional cardiomyocytes. In our previous study, the transgenic mouse model expressing sodium iodide symporter (NIS) driven by {alpha}-myosin heavy chain ({alpha}-MHC) promoter was developed to image cardiomyocyte with {gamma}-camera and microPET in vivo. In this study, we investigate the monitoring availability of {alpha}-MHC driven NIS gene of MSCs from the transgenic mouse during cardiomyogenic differentiation in vitro

  1. Long-term maintenance of in vitro cultured honeybee (Apis mellifera embryonic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamodt Randi M

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vitro cultivation of cells allows novel investigation of in vivo- mechanisms and is a helpful tool in developmental biology, biochemistry and functional genomics. Numerous cell lines of insect species, e.g., silkworm and mosquito, have been reported. However, this is not the case for successful long-term cultivation of cells in honeybees. Results Methods for cultivation of honeybee embryonic cells are discussed here. Pre-gastrula stage embryos were used to initiate cultures, and cells were reared on 96-wells microplates with Grace insect medium, supplemented with Fetal Bovine Serum. Cells proliferated in clusters, and maintained viable and mitotic for more than three months. Conclusion We report here, for the first time, long-term cultivation of honeybee cells. Results represent a highly useful in vitro-system for studying a model organism of increasing importance in areas such as aging, sociality and neurobiology.

  2. Genotoxicity and cytotoxicity of sevoflurane in two human cell lines in vitro with ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Miguel; Quesada, Samuel; Armero, David; Martin-Gíl, Rocio; Olivares, Amparo; Achel, G Daniel

    2014-01-01

    To determine the in vitro toxicity of different concentrations of sevoflurane in cells exposed to X-ray. The genotoxic effects of sevofluorane were studied by means of the micronucleus test in cytokinesis-blocked cells of irradiated human lymphocytes. Subsequently, its cytotoxic effects on PNT2 (normal prostate) cells was determined using the cell viability test (MTT) and compared with those induced by different doses of X-rays. A dose- and time-dependent cytotoxic effect of sevofluorane on PNT2 cells was determined (p >0.001) and a dose-dependent genotoxic effect of sevofluorane was established (p >0.001). However, at volumes lower than 30 μL of sevofluorane at 100%, a non-toxic effect on PNT2 cells was shown. Sevofluorane demonstrates a genotoxic capacity as determined in vitro by micronucleus test in cytokinesis-blocked cells of irradiated human lymphocytes.

  3. Intestinal Stem Cell Niche Insights Gathered from Both In Vivo and Novel In Vitro Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolce Gjorevski

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal stem cells are located at the base of the crypts and are surrounded by a complex structure called niche. This environment is composed mainly of epithelial cells and stroma which provides signals that govern cell maintenance, proliferation, and differentiation. Understanding how the niche regulates stem cell fate by controlling developmental signaling pathways will help us to define how stem cells choose between self-renewal and differentiation and how they maintain their undifferentiated state. Tractable in vitro assay systems, which reflect the complexity of the in vivo situation but provide higher level of control, would likely be crucial in identifying new players and mechanisms controlling stem cell function. Knowledge of the intestinal stem cell niche gathered from both in vivo and novel in vitro models may help us improve therapies for tumorigenesis and intestinal damage and make autologous intestinal transplants a feasible clinical practice.

  4. Dental pulp-derived stem cells (DPSC) differentiation in vitro into ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    of the dental-pulp stem cells (DPSC) obtained from differing sources, such as primary or “baby teeth” and adult, permanent teeth. ... Dental pulp stem cell differentiation and viability in vitro. Int J Med Biomed Res 2013;2(2):133-141. 134 ... diseases for which DPSC therapy could be useful can only be addressed by obtaining.

  5. The odontogenic potential of STRO-1 sorted rat dental pulp stem cells in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, X.; Dolder, J. van den; Walboomers, X.F.; Zhang, W.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.; Jansen, J.A.

    2007-01-01

    The presence of heterogeneous cell populations in dental pulp may count for the considerable variation in the outcome of in vitro and in vivo experiments. Here, we intended to determine whether a minor cell sub-population of high proliferation and odontogenic potential existed among a larger

  6. Nocardia brasiliensis induces formation of foamy macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meester, Irene; Rosas-Taraco, Adrian Geovanni; Salinas-Carmona, Mario Cesar

    2014-01-01

    Foamy cells have been described in various infectious diseases, for example in actinomycetoma induced by Nocardia brasiliensis. These cells are generally considered to be macrophages, although they present dendritic cell (DC)-specific surface markers. In this study, we determined and confirmed the lineage of possible precursors of foamy cells in vitro and in vivo using an experimental actinomycetoma model in BALB/c mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM) or DC (BMDC) were infected in vitro with N. brasiliensis or labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE). Both, macrophages and DC, differentiated into foamy cells after in vitro infection. CFSE-labeled BMDM or BMDC were tested for phagocytosis and CD11c/CD11b receptors markers expression before being transferred into the actinomycetoma lesion site of infected mice. In vivo studies showed that BMDM and BMDC were traced at the site where foamy cells are present in the experimental actinomycetoma. Interestingly, many of the transferred BMDM and BMDC were stained with the lipid-droplet fluorophore Nile Red. In conclusion, macrophages and DC cells can be differentiated into foamy cells in vitro and in vivo during N. brasiliensis infection.

  7. Nocardia brasiliensis induces formation of foamy macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Meester

    Full Text Available Foamy cells have been described in various infectious diseases, for example in actinomycetoma induced by Nocardia brasiliensis. These cells are generally considered to be macrophages, although they present dendritic cell (DC-specific surface markers. In this study, we determined and confirmed the lineage of possible precursors of foamy cells in vitro and in vivo using an experimental actinomycetoma model in BALB/c mice. Bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDM or DC (BMDC were infected in vitro with N. brasiliensis or labeled with carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE. Both, macrophages and DC, differentiated into foamy cells after in vitro infection. CFSE-labeled BMDM or BMDC were tested for phagocytosis and CD11c/CD11b receptors markers expression before being transferred into the actinomycetoma lesion site of infected mice. In vivo studies showed that BMDM and BMDC were traced at the site where foamy cells are present in the experimental actinomycetoma. Interestingly, many of the transferred BMDM and BMDC were stained with the lipid-droplet fluorophore Nile Red. In conclusion, macrophages and DC cells can be differentiated into foamy cells in vitro and in vivo during N. brasiliensis infection.

  8. Isolation, proliferation, and induction of Bama mini-pig spermatogonial stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H M; Yang, H; Luo, F H; Li, M X; Zhang, S; Yang, X G; Lu, Y Q; Lu, S S; Wu, Y J; Lu, K H

    2016-08-12

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs), the unique seed cells of testes, can undergo meiosis and form spermatozoa, thus transmitting genetic information to offspring. Research concerning these cells explores the mechanism underlying spermatogenesis, making possible the induction of their differentiation into spermatozoa in vitro. SSCs have therefore attracted much interest among scientists. Although the proliferation of such cells in vitro has been demonstrated, we are unaware of any long-term laboratory culture of porcine SSCs. The objective of this study was to isolate, characterize, culture, and induce the differentiation of Bama mini-pig SSCs. SSCs were isolated using differential plating and cultured for over 100 days on an STO feeder cell layer without serum. Cell clusters appeared after three passages and continuously formed during subsequent cultivation. Staining showed that these clusters were positive for UCHL1 and CDH1, could be bound by Dolichos biflorus agglutinin, and that some cells expressed OCT4. Ultrastructure observations revealed SSCs in testis tissue to be round in shape, while those cultured in vitro were flat and bound together. Our attempts at inducing differentiation showed that SSCs cultured in vitro could undergo meiosis. In this study, we describe an effective culture system for Bama mini-pig SSCs capable of producing enough cells to establish a platform for further SSC research, such as genetic manipulation or exploration of the mechanism underlying spermatogenesis.

  9. Effect of Brugia malayi on the growth and proliferation of endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, U R; Zometa, C S; Vickery, A C; Kwa, B H; Nayar, J K; Sutton, E T

    1996-08-01

    Athymic mice (C3H/HeN) parasitized by Brugia malayi develop massively dilated lymphatics. The lymphatic endothelial lining is perturbed, and numerous mononuclear and giant cells are closely apposed to the endothelium. The hyperplastic endothelial cells and low opening pressure of the lymphatics suggest abnormal multiplication of these cells may be important in the dilation. We studied the in vitro growth rate of human umbilical vein endothelial cells cultured with adult worms and microfilariae of B. malayi. The tetrazolium salt reduction assays were used to quantify possible direct mitogenic or inhibitory effects. The growth factor-induced proliferation of endothelial cells was significantly suppressed by 44-51% on day 1, 46-81% on day 3, and 45-79% on day 5 in cultures containing adult female worms, which had greater suppressor activity on endothelial cell proliferation than male worms, microfilariae, or soluble adult worm extract. Culture supernatant containing female worm excretory-secretory products significantly inhibited the growth and multiplication of cells, suggesting that adult female worms release antigens or proteins that have inhibitory activity on growth factors necessary for endothelial cell proliferation in vitro. Excess human recombinant epidermal growth factor and bovine brain extract partly reversed the inhibitory activity of worms in culture and restored the endothelial cell proliferation when incubated with worm culture supernatant. Indomethacin and BW 775Hcl failed to restore normal endothelial proliferation in the presence of female worms, suggesting that parasite-derived prostanoids and cyclooxygenase products did not cause the inhibition. Lymph from dilated lymphatics, but not serum from infected mice, increased the proliferation of cells in vitro. Together, these data demonstrate that excretory-secretory products of B. malayi parasites suppress vascular endothelial proliferation in vitro. Furthermore, increases in the number of these cells

  10. [Relationship between Golgi apparatus and cell migration direction in vivo and in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bin; Liu, Zhi-feng; Ren, Bing-cheng; Chen, Cong; Ming, Hao-lang; Wang, Lei-lei; Zhao, Kai; Yang, Xue-jun

    2013-07-02

    To explore the relationship between Golgi apparatus and the direction of tumor cell migration in vivo and in vitro. Cell migration assays were conducted with rat C6 glioma cells, human U251 and SNB19 glioma cells respectively. Then immunofluorescence was used to detect the position of Golgi apparatus in migrating cells. The percentage of cells with Golgi apparatus facing towards wound edge was calculated. Cell pseudopodium was stained with TRITC-phalloidin and the relationship between Golgi apparatus and pseudopodium detected. Immunohistochemistry was used to reveal the Golgi apparatus in tumor tissue samples. And the percentage of cells with Golgi apparatus facing opposite to the necrotic zones was calculated. In cells located at wound edge, the Golgi apparatus was found facing towards the wound in the vast majority of cells (C6 83% ± 6%, U251 80% ± 7%, SNB19 82% ± 6%). In U251 and SNB19 cells, the golgi apparatus was located in the same direction with cellular pseudopodium. Immunohistochemical staining showed that in cells located around the necrotic zone, the Golgi apparatus faced opposite to the necrotic zones in most cells (rat tissue samples 80% ± 7%, human tissue samples 82% ± 6%). The Golgi apparatus is closely correlated with cell migration and it may be considered as a direction indicator of cell migration. And it provides an important index for the study of tumor cell invasion both in vivo and in vitro.

  11. [Sodium butyrate induces rat hepatic oval cells differentiating into mature hepatocytes in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Jia, Ji-Dong; Tang, Shu-Zhen; Yan, Zhong-Yu; You, Hong; Cong, Min; Wang, Bao-En; Chen, Li; An, Wei

    2004-12-01

    To elucidate the effects of sodium butyrate on rat hepatic oval cell differentiation in vitro. Hepatic oval cells were isolated from rats fed with a choline-deficient diet supplemented with 0.1% (w/w) ethonine for 4 to 6 weeks. The cultured hepatic oval cells were identified by immunohistochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). After hepatic oval cells were treated with sodium butyrate, the morphological changes were studied through Giemsa staining and the albumin expression level was tested by Western blot. Immunohistochemical results showed the isolated cells were positive for both mature hepatocyte marker albumin and bile duct cell marker cytokeratin-19. Furthermore, RT-PCR results showed that the cells expressed stem cell marker c-kit, but not hematopoietic stem cell marker CD34. In short, the isolated cells were rat hepatic oval cells. 0.75 mmol/L sodium butyrate induced obvious phenotype changes of hepatic oval cells, including enlargement of the oval cells, a decrease in nucleus to cytoplasm ratio, and a 50% increase in the number of binucleated cells. Western blot results showed that 0.75 mmol/L sodium butyrate markedly raised the expression of albumin. Sodium butyrate, a differentiation promoting agent, can induce rat hepatic oval cells (liver progenitor cells) to differentiate into mature hepatocytes in vitro.

  12. 3D in vitro cell culture models of tube formation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zegers, M.M.P.

    2014-01-01

    Building the complex architecture of tubular organs is a highly dynamic process that involves cell migration, polarization, shape changes, adhesion to neighboring cells and the extracellular matrix, physicochemical characteristics of the extracellular matrix and reciprocal signaling with the

  13. Eimeria tenella: in vitro development in irradiated bovine kidney cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crane, M.St.J.; Schmatz, D.M.; Stevens, S.; Habbersett, M.C.; Murray, P.K. (Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Labs., Rahway, NJ (USA))

    1984-06-01

    The initial infection and first-generation development of Eimeria tenella was quantified using a cloned MDBK (Madin-Darby Bovine Kidney) cell line, irradiated with gamma radiation prior to infection, as the host cell. Irradiated cell cultures were found to be more susceptible to infection and had a greater capacity to support parasite development than non-irradiated cultures. It was suggested that the larger proportion of cells in the G/sub 2/ phase of the cell cycle, the larger individual cell size and the inhibition of cell division in the irradiated cultures were all factors contributing to the increased susceptibility to infection and capacity to support parasite growth and development. The application of this technique (host cell irradiation) to the cultivation of other intracellular, protozoan parasites is discussed.

  14. Dentin regeneration in vitro: the pivotal role of supportive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    About, I

    2011-07-01

    The elaboration of dentin-pulp engineering strategies requires the investigation of not only progenitor cell potentials but also their interactions with other non-progenitor "supportive" cells. Under severe caries lesions, progenitor cells may be activated by growth factors released after the acidic dissolution of carious dentin. However, dentin regeneration has also been observed after traumatic injuries without any significant dentin dissolution. This raises questions about the origin of signals involved in progenitor cell activation, migration, and differentiation. Study models such as the entire tooth culture and co-cultures of pulp and endothelial cells highlighted the role of interactions between the different pulp cell types and the pivotal role they play in dentin regeneration. Injured pulp fibroblasts secrete growth factors involved in progenitor cell activation and differentiation as well as neoangiogenesis which may pave the pathways for progenitor cell migration. This appears to be the first paper to focus on this very important field in dental pulp biology.

  15. In vitro germ cell differentiation during sex differentiation in a teleost fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Tohru

    2010-01-01

    To clarify the sexually dimorphic mechanisms of gonadal sex differentiation, we established an in vitro culture system for gonadal sex differentiation using the teleost fish Oreochromis niloticus. In vivo, the entry of germ cells into meiosis occurs around 35 days after hatching (dah) in XX gonads, whereas in XY gonads, meiotic cells became differentiated around 85 dah. In our in vitro culture system using gonads from young fry at 23 dah, the meiotic cells in the XX gonads appeared after 21 days of culture. In contrast, in the XY gonads, no meiotic cells were detected after 21 days. These results indicate that germ cell differentiation in this culture system progresses in a manner similar to that in vivo. To identify the gene products that are involved in the entry of germ cells into meiosis or in the arrest of germ cells at the gonial stage of gonadal sex differentiation, we performed subtractive hybridization screening with this in vitro culture system. From the screening process, we identified the female-related gene, FR-3, which is a homolog of zebrafish nanos-related gene (nos). The nos gene was expressed after gonadal formation around 35 dah in XX gonads, but not in XY gonads. In situ hybridization indicated that nos is expressed in oogenic meiotic cells, but not in spermatogenic meiotic cells. Further examination revealed that nos was expressed in oogenic meiotic cells after gonadal formation, specifically in teleost fish. Together, nos may be also involved in oogenic meiosis, with the exception of primordial germ cell migration.

  16. N-Glycans influence the in vitro adhesive and invasive behaviour of three metastatic cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bironaite, D; Nesland, J M; Dalen, H; Risberg, B; Bryne, M

    2000-01-01

    Alterations in cellular glycosylation may play a key role in metastatic behaviour of tumour cells. We studied three metastatic cell lines, LOX (malignant melanoma), FEMX (malignant melanoma) and MA-11 (mammary carcinoma). These cell lines have a very different metastatic behaviour in vivo, and different glycans have been postulated to be partly responsible for these differences. To further investigate the functional role of carbohydrates, these three cell lines have been treated with tunicamycin, an inhibitor of the biosynthesis of N-glycans and benzyl- alpha-N-acetylgalactosamine (benzyl-alpha-GalNAc; BnGalNAc), an inhibitor of mature O-linked glycans. Various in vitro adhesion and invasion assays were undertaken for functional studies. Tunicamycin significantly inhibited adhesion to laminin, but only slightly affected cell adhesion to collagen IV. The same compound significantly decreased cellular invasiveness through a Matrigel invasion chamber. Moreover, tunicamycin reduced homotypic aggregation of cells. BnGalNAc had generally little effect on cell behaviour in in vitro assay. The effects of the inhibitors were, however, to some extent cell line-specific. We conclude that N-glycans, but probably not mature O-glycans have important in vitro functions in cell adhesion to laminin, cell invasion through Matrigel and cellular aggregation in the studied cell lines. These results support the view that carbohydrates are functionally involved in several steps of the metastatic process. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Differentiation ability of rat postnatal dental pulp cells in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, W.; Walboomers, X.F.; Wolke, J.G.C.; Bian, Z.; Fan, M.W.; Jansen, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    The current rapid progression in stem cell research has enhanced our knowledge of dental tissue regeneration. In this study, rat dental pulp cells were isolated and their differentiation ability was evaluated. First, dental pulp cells were obtained from maxillary incisors of male Wistar rats.

  18. Isolation and in vitro expansion of human colonic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, P.; Sato, T.; Merlos-Suarez, A.; Barriga, F.M.; Iglesias, M.; Rossell, D.; Auer, H.; Gallardo, M.; Blasco, M.A.; Sancho, E.; Clevers, H.; Batlle, E.

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the isolation of stem cells of the human colonic epithelium. Differential cell surface abundance of ephrin type-B receptor 2 (EPHB2) allows the purification of different cell types from human colon mucosa biopsies. The highest EPHB2 surface levels correspond to epithelial colonic

  19. Dynamics associated with spontaneous differentiation of ovarian stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parte, Seema; Bhartiya, Deepa; Patel, Hiren; Daithankar, Vinita; Chauhan, Anahita; Zaveri, Kusum; Hinduja, Indira

    2014-02-25

    Recent studies suggest that ovarian germ line stem cells replenish oocyte-pool in adult stage, and challenge the central doctrine of 'fixed germ cell pool' in mammalian reproductive biology. Two distinct populations of spherical stem cells with high nucleo-cytoplasmic ratio have been recently identified in the adult mammalian ovary surface epithelium (OSE) including nuclear OCT-4A positive very small embryonic-like (VSELs) and cytoplasmic OCT-4 expressing ovarian germ stem cells (OGSCs). Three weeks culture of scraped OSE cells results in spontaneous differentiation of the stem cells into oocyte-like, parthenote-like, embryoid body-like structures and also embryonic stem cell-like colonies whereas epithelial cells attach and transform into a bed of mesenchymal cells. Present study was undertaken, to further characterize ovarian stem cells and to comprehend better the process of spontaneous differentiation of ovarian stem cells into oocyte-like structures in vitro. Ovarian stem cells were enriched by immunomagnetic sorting using SSEA-4 as a cell surface marker and were further characterized. Stem cells and clusters of OGSCs (reminiscent of germ cell nests in fetal ovaries), were characterized by immuno-localization for stem and germ cell specific markers and spontaneous differentiation in OSE cultures was studied by live cell imaging. Differential expression of markers specific for pluripotent VSELs (nuclear OCT-4A, SSEA-4, CD133), OGSCs (cytoplasmic OCT-4) primordial germ cells (FRAGILIS, STELLA, VASA) and germ cells (DAZL, GDF-9, SCP-3) were studied. Within one week of culture, stem cells became bigger in size, developed abundant cytoplasm, differentiated into germ cells, revealed presence of Balbiani body-like structure (mitochondrial cloud) and exhibited characteristic cytoplasmic streaming. Presence of germ cell nests, Balbiani body-like structures and cytoplasmic streaming extensively described during fetal ovary development, are indeed well recapitulated

  20. [Trials of in vitro propagation of the scrapie agent in mouse nerve cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, P; Dormont, D; Delpech, B; Court, L; Latarjet, R

    1981-11-02

    We attempted to propagate the Scrapie agent in vitro in glia and neuroblastoma cells of Mice. Four out of seven assays of infection were positive, i.e. after several passages in vitro yielding at most a 10(9) fold final dilution of the original material, the extracts of each of the four cultures, when injected intracerebrally into CD1 Mice, produced a deadly disease displaying the clinical and pathological signs characteristic of Scrapie.

  1. A novel approach to quantifying ovarian cell lipid content and lipid accumulation in vitro by confocal microscopy in lean women undergoing ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Prapti; Amin, Marli; Keller, Erica; Simerman, Ariel; Aguilera, Paul; Briton-Jones, Christine; Hill, David L; Abbott, David H; Chazenbalk, Gregorio; Dumesic, Daniel A

    2013-06-01

    To quantify intracellular lipid levels in cumulus cells (CCs) and mural granulosa cells (MGCs) of lean women undergoing gonadotropin therapy for in vitro fertilization (IVF), based upon different cell preparation methods. CCs and MGCs from 16 lean women undergoing ovarian stimulation for IVF were studied. Cells were pooled by cell type, with each type of cell separated into two groups for determination of initial lipid content (Method 1) and subsequent lipid accumulation in vitro (Method 2). Cells for initial lipid content were immediately fixed at the time of the oocyte retrieval with 4% paraformaldehyde in suspension, while those for subsequent lipid accumulation in vitro were cultured for 4 h with 5% fetal calf serum and then fixed. Cells were treated with lipid fluorescent dye BODIPY® FL C16 and nuclear marker DAPI. Intracellular lipid was quantified by confocal microscopy, using ImageJ software analysis. There was no significant effect of cell type (P = 0.2) or cell type-cell preparation method interaction (P = 0.8) on cell area (Method 1: CC 99.7 ± 5.1, MGC 132.8 ± 5.8; Method 2: CC 221.9 ± 30.4, MGC 265.1 ± 48.5 μm(2)). The mean area of all cells combined was significantly less for cells prepared by Method 1 (116.2 ± 4.9 μm(2)) vs. Method 2 (243.5 ± 22.5 μm(2), P vitro was significantly higher in CC (154.0 ± 9.1) than MGC (104.6 ± 9.9 fluorescence/cell area, P vitro (P vitro over time.

  2. In vitro pancreas duodenal homeobox-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tao; Wang, Chun-You; Yu, Feng; Gou, Shan-Miao; Wu, He-Shui; Xiong, Jiong-Xin; Zhou, Feng

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To observe whether pancreatic and duodenal homeobox factor-1 enhances the differentiation of pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. METHODS: Rat pancreatic tissue was submitted to digestion by collagenase, ductal epithelial cells were separated by density gradient centrifugation and then cultured in RPMI1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum. After 3-5 passages, the cells were incubated in a six-well plate for 24 h before transfection of recombination plasmid XlHbox8VP16. Lightcycler quantitative real-time RT-PCR was used to detect the expression of PDX-1 and insulin mRNA in pancreatic epithelial cells. The expression of PDX-1 and insulin protein was analyzed by Western blotting. Insulin secretion was detected by radioimmunoassay. Insulin-producing cells were detected by dithizone-staining. RESULTS: XlHbox8 mRNA was expressed in pancreatic ductal epithelial cells. PDX-1 and insulin mRNA as well as PDX-1 and insulin protein were significantly increased in the transfected group. The production and insulin secretion of insulin-producing cells differentiated from pancreatic ductal epithelial cells were higher than those of the untransfected cells in vitro with a significant difference (1.32 ± 0.43 vs 3.48 ± 0.81, P < 0.01 at 5.6 mmol/L; 4.86 ± 1.15 vs 10.25 ± 1.32, P < 0.01 at 16.7 mmol/L). CONCLUSION: PDX-1 can differentiate rat pancreatic ductal epithelial cells into insulin-producing cells in vitro. In vitro PDX-1 transfection is a valuable strategy for increasing the source of insulin-producing cells. PMID:17876894

  3. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  4. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Tsaur, Igor; Nelson, Karen; Pfitzenmaier, Jesco; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK) and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines) may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  5. In Vitro Compatibility of Contact Lenses With Corneal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijay, Ajay K; Fadli, Zohra; Lakkis, Carol; Coles-Brennan, Chantal; Willcox, Mark D P

    2017-07-18

    To determine the interaction of contact lenses of different materials with corneal epithelial cells grown in tissue culture. Two different corneal epithelial cell lines were grown to confluence in culture media. Two hydrogel contact lenses with and without polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) {1-DAY ACUVUE MOIST (1-Day ACUVUE [hydrogel lenses]) and a silicone hydrogel contact lens, AIR OPTIX NIGHT & DAY} were removed from their blister packs, washed in phosphate-buffered saline, and applied to the cells. After exposure for 24 hr at 37°C, lenses were removed, and the corneal cells and supernatants processed. Supernatants from the cell assays were used to quantify the amount of 17 different cytokines that were produced using a multiplex bead assay. Cells were stained to assess amount of cell death (apoptosis or necrosis) or stained to determine the level of mitochondrial activity. Stimulants of necrotic death (latex) or apoptotic death (sorbitol) were used as positive controls. Cells produced cytokines during normal growth. Exposure of cells to the hydrogel lenses resulted in only minimal changes to normal production of cytokines, but latex or sorbitol produced the most change. Exposure of the cells to all three lenses caused 4% to 23% reduction in mitochondrial activity, whereas exposure to the positive controls caused 71% to 98% reduction in mitochondrial activity. Exposure of the corneal epithelial cells to contact lenses produced minimal morphological changes, whereas exposure to latex or sorbitol produced significant changes to the human corneal epithelial cell line. Exposure of corneal epithelial cells to contact lenses had minimal impact on their physiology. There was no difference in epithelial cell responses to hydrogel with or without PVP compared with the silicone hydrogel contact lens.

  6. Immortalized endothelial cell lines for in vitro blood-brain barrier models: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Nurul Adhwa; Rasil, Alifah Nur'ain Haji Mat; Meyding-Lamade, Uta; Craemer, Eva Maria; Diah, Suwarni; Tuah, Ani Afiqah; Muharram, Siti Hanna

    2016-07-01

    Endothelial cells play the most important role in construction of the blood-brain barrier. Many studies have opted to use commercially available, easily transfected or immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. Numerous endothelial cell lines are available, but we do not currently have strong evidence for which cell lines are optimal for establishment of such models. This review aimed to investigate the application of immortalized endothelial cell lines as in vitro blood-brain barrier models. The databases used for this review were PubMed, OVID MEDLINE, ProQuest, ScienceDirect, and SpringerLink. A narrative systematic review was conducted and identified 155 studies. As a result, 36 immortalized endothelial cell lines of human, mouse, rat, porcine and bovine origins were found for the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier and brain endothelium models. This review provides a summary of immortalized endothelial cell lines as a guideline for future studies and improvements in the establishment of in vitro blood-brain barrier models. It is important to establish a good and reproducible model that has the potential for multiple applications, in particular a model of such a complex compartment such as the blood-brain barrier. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cyclosporine decreases vascular progenitor cell numbers after cardiac transplantation and attenuates progenitor cell growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, William R; Wang, Shaohua; Oi, Keiji; Bailey, Kent R; Tazelaar, Henry D; Caplice, Noel M; McGregor, Christopher G A

    2005-11-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that the neointimal proliferation seen in cardiac allograft vasculopathy may in part derive from recipient progenitor cells. The effect of cyclosporine on these circulating progenitors in the setting of cardiac transplantation is currently unknown. Three surgical series were performed: sham operation alone, sham operation with immunosuppression, and heterotopic porcine cardiac transplantation with immunosuppression. The sham operation involved laparotomy and consecutive clamping of the abdominal aorta and inferior vena cava. Post-operative immunosuppression consisted of cyclosporine at therapeutic levels (100-300 ng/ml) and 0.5 mg/kg methylprednisolone. Endothelial outgrowth colony numbers (EOC(CFU)) and smooth muscle outgrowth colony numbers (SOC(CFU)) were quantified weekly for 4 weeks post-operatively. A series of in vitro experiments were performed to determine the effect of cyclosporine on the differentiation, migration, and proliferation of EOCs and SOCs. In the sham alone series there were no changes to either EOC(CFU) or SOC(CFU). In the sham with immunosuppression and the transplant series, both EOC(CFU) and SOC(CFU) fell in the first 2 weeks (p Cyclosporine, even at a low dose, prevented differentiation, inhibited proliferation, and attenuated migration of both EOCs and SOCs. Immunosuppression in the setting of cardiac transplantation causes a profound reduction in circulating progenitor cells capable of differentiating into endothelial and smooth muscle cells. This effect can in part be explained by the inhibitory effects of cyclosporine on progenitor growth and differentiation seen in this study.

  8. PDGF-BB inhibits intervertebral disc cell apoptosis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presciutti, Steven M; Paglia, David N; Karukonda, Teja; Soung, Do Yu; Guzzo, Rosa; Drissi, Hicham; Moss, Isaac L

    2014-09-01

    Degeneration of the intervertebral disc (IVD) results in deterioration of the spinal motion segment and can lead to debilitating back pain. Given the established mitotic and anti-apoptotic effects of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor-BB (rhPDGF-BB) in a variety of cell types we postulated that rhPDGF-BB might delay disc cell degeneration through inhibition of apoptosis. To address this hypothesis, we treated human IVD cells isolated from five independent patients with rhPDGF-BB in monolayer and 3D pellet cultures. The anti-apoptotic potential, cell proliferative capacity, morphology/pellet differentiation, and gene expression of PDGF-treated IVD cells were evaluated via flow cytometry/immunohistochemistry, MTT assays, histology, and quantitative RT-PCR, respectively. We found that rhPDGF-BB treatment significantly inhibited cell apoptosis, increased cell proliferation and matrix production, and maintained mRNA expression of critical extracellular matrix genes. This study suggests two possible mechanisms for the anti-degenerative effects of rhPDGF-BB on human IVD cells. First, PDGF treatment strongly inhibited IVD cell apoptosis in 3D cultures. Second, rhPDGF-BB acts as an anabolic agent, promoting maintenance of IVD cell phenotype in 3D culture, based on the molecular and protein expression analysis. We speculate that rhPDGF-BB may be used as a biologic treatment to target early degenerative IVD disease in the future. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Towards expansion of human hair follicle stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, J H; Mohebi, P; Farkas, D L; Tajbakhsh, J

    2011-06-01

    Multipotential human hair follicle stem cells can differentiate into various cell lineages and thus are investigated here as potential autologous sources for regenerative medicine. Towards this end, we have attempted to expand these cells, directly isolated from minimal amounts of hair follicle explants, to numbers more suitable for stem-cell therapy. Two types of human follicle stem cells, commercially available and directly isolated, were cultured using an in-house developed medium. The latter was obtained from bulge areas of hair follicles by mechanical and enzymatic dissociation, and was magnetically enriched for its CD200(+) fraction. Isolated cells were cultured for up to 4 weeks, on different supports: blank polystyrene, laminin- and Matrigel(TM) -coated surfaces. Two-fold expansion was found, highlighting the slow-cycling nature of these cells. Flow cytometry characterization revealed: magnetic enrichment increased the proportion of CD200(+) cells from initially 43.3% (CD200+, CD34: 25.8%; CD200+, CD34+: 17.5%) to 78.2% (CD200+, CD34: 41.5%; CD200+, CD34+: 36.7%). Enriched cells seemed to have retained and passed on their morphological and molecular phenotypes to their progeny, as isolated CD200(+) presenting cells expanded in our medium to a population with 80% of cells being CD200(+): 51.5% (CD200(+), CD34(-)) and 29.6% (CD200(+), CD34(+)). This study demonstrates the possibility of culturing human hair follicle stem cells without causing any significant changes to phenotypes of the cells. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Emerging concepts for the in vitro derivation of murine haematopoietic stem and progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Alegria, Eva; Menegatti, Sara; Batta, Kiran; Cuvertino, Sara; Florkowska, Magdalena; Kouskoff, Valerie

    2016-11-01

    Well into the second decade of the 21st century, the field of regenerative medicine is bursting with hopes and promises to heal young and old. The bespoken generation of cells is thought to offer unprecedented cures for a vast range of diseases. Haematological disorders have already benefited tremendously from stem cell therapy in the form of bone marrow transplantation. However, lack of compatible donors often means that patients remain on transplantation waiting lists for too long. The in vitro derivation of haematopoietic stem cells offers the possibility to generate tailor-made cells for the treatment of these patients. Promising approaches to generate in vitro-derived blood progenitors include the directed differentiation of pluripotent stem cells and the reprogramming of somatic cells. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  11. In vitro Cell Culture Model for Toxic Inhaled Chemical Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Shama; Ahmad, Aftab; Neeves, Keith B.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara; Loader, Joan E.; White, Carl W.; Veress, Livia

    2014-01-01

    Cell cultures are indispensable to develop and study efficacy of therapeutic agents, prior to their use in animal models. We have the unique ability to model well differentiated human airway epithelium and heart muscle cells. This could be an invaluable tool to study the deleterious effects of toxic inhaled chemicals, such as chlorine, that can normally interact with the cell surfaces, and form various byproducts upon reacting with water, and limiting their effects in submerged cultures. Our model using well differentiated human airway epithelial cell cultures at air-liqiuid interface circumvents this limitation as well as provides an opportunity to evaluate critical mechanisms of toxicity of potential poisonous inhaled chemicals. We describe enhanced loss of membrane integrity, caspase release and death upon toxic inhaled chemical such as chlorine exposure. In this article, we propose methods to model chlorine exposure in mammalian heart and airway epithelial cells in culture and simple tests to evaluate its effect on these cell types. PMID:24837339

  12. Morphological evaluation during in vitro chondrogenesis of dental pulp stromal cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choo-Ryung Chung

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objectives The aim was to confirm the stem cell-like properties of the dental pulp stromal cells and to evaluate the morphologic changes during in vitro chondrogenesis. Materials and Methods Stromal cells were outgrown from the dental pulp tissue of the premolars. Surface markers were investigated and cell proliferation rate was compared to other mesenchymal stem cells. Multipotency of the pulp cells was confirmed by inducing osteogenesis, adipogenesis and chondrogenesis. The morphologic changes in the chondrogenic pellet during the 21 day of induction were evaluated under light microscope and transmission electron microscope. TUNEL assay was used to evaluate apoptosis within the chondrogenic pellets. Results Pulp cells were CD90, 105 positive and CD31, 34 negative. They showed similar proliferation rate to other stem cells. Pulp cells differentiated to osteogenic, adipogenic and chondrogenic tissues. During chondrogenesis, 3-dimensional pellet was created with multi-layers, hypertrophic chondrocyte-like cells and cartilage-like extracellular matrix. However, cell morphology became irregular and apoptotic cells were increased after 7 day of chondrogenic induction. Conclusions Pulp cells indicated mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics. During the in vitro chondrogenesis, cellular activity was superior during the earlier phase (within 7 day of differentiation.

  13. Stem Cells from Cryopreserved Human Dental Pulp Tissues Sequentially Differentiate into Definitive Endoderm and Hepatocyte-Like Cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Jin; Kang, Young-Hoon; Shivakumar, Sarath Belame; Bharti, Dinesh; Son, Young-Bum; Choi, Yong-Ho; Park, Won-Uk; Byun, June-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2017-01-01

    We previously described a novel tissue cryopreservation protocol to enable the safe preservation of various autologous stem cell sources. The present study characterized the stem cells derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues (hDPSCs-cryo) and analyzed their differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE) and hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. Human dental pulp tissues from extracted wisdom teeth were cryopreserved as per a slow freezing tissue cryopreservation protocol for at least a year. Characteristics of hDPSCs-cryo were compared to those of stem cells from fresh dental pulps (hDPSCs-fresh). hDPSCs-cryo were differentiated into DE cells in vitro with Activin A as per the Wnt3a protocol for 6 days. These cells were further differentiated into HLCs in the presence of growth factors until day 30. hDPSCs-fresh and hDPSCs-cryo displayed similar cell growth morphology, cell proliferation rates, and mesenchymal stem cell character. During differentiation into DE and HLCs in vitro, the cells flattened and became polygonal in shape, and finally adopted a hepatocyte-like shape. The differentiated DE cells at day 6 and HLCs at day 30 displayed significantly increased DE- and hepatocyte-specific markers at the mRNA and protein level, respectively. In addition, the differentiated HLCs showed detoxification and glycogen storage capacities, indicating they could share multiple functions with real hepatocytes. These data conclusively show that hPDSCs-cryo derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues can be successfully differentiated into DE and functional hepatocytes in vitro. Thus, preservation of dental tissues could provide a valuable source of autologous stem cells for tissue engineering. PMID:29200956

  14. Stem Cells from Cryopreserved Human Dental Pulp Tissues Sequentially Differentiate into Definitive Endoderm and Hepatocyte-Like Cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Young-Jin; Kang, Young-Hoon; Shivakumar, Sarath Belame; Bharti, Dinesh; Son, Young-Bum; Choi, Yong-Ho; Park, Won-Uk; Byun, June-Ho; Rho, Gyu-Jin; Park, Bong-Wook

    2017-01-01

    We previously described a novel tissue cryopreservation protocol to enable the safe preservation of various autologous stem cell sources. The present study characterized the stem cells derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues (hDPSCs-cryo) and analyzed their differentiation into definitive endoderm (DE) and hepatocyte-like cells (HLCs) in vitro. Human dental pulp tissues from extracted wisdom teeth were cryopreserved as per a slow freezing tissue cryopreservation protocol for at least a year. Characteristics of hDPSCs-cryo were compared to those of stem cells from fresh dental pulps (hDPSCs-fresh). hDPSCs-cryo were differentiated into DE cells in vitro with Activin A as per the Wnt3a protocol for 6 days. These cells were further differentiated into HLCs in the presence of growth factors until day 30. hDPSCs-fresh and hDPSCs-cryo displayed similar cell growth morphology, cell proliferation rates, and mesenchymal stem cell character. During differentiation into DE and HLCs in vitro, the cells flattened and became polygonal in shape, and finally adopted a hepatocyte-like shape. The differentiated DE cells at day 6 and HLCs at day 30 displayed significantly increased DE- and hepatocyte-specific markers at the mRNA and protein level, respectively. In addition, the differentiated HLCs showed detoxification and glycogen storage capacities, indicating they could share multiple functions with real hepatocytes. These data conclusively show that hPDSCs-cryo derived from long-term cryopreserved dental pulp tissues can be successfully differentiated into DE and functional hepatocytes in vitro. Thus, preservation of dental tissues could provide a valuable source of autologous stem cells for tissue engineering.

  15. In vitro invasion of small-cell lung cancer cell lines correlates with expression of epidermal growth factor receptor.

    OpenAIRE

    Damstrup, L; Rude Voldborg, B.; Spang-Thomsen, M.; Br?nner, N; Skovgaard Poulsen, H.

    1998-01-01

    Formation of metastasis is a multistep process involving attachment to the basement membrane, local proteolysis and migration into surrounding tissues, lymph or bloodstream. In the present study, we have analysed the correlation between in vitro invasion and presence of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) in a panel of 21 small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines. We have previously reported that ten of these cell lines expressed EGFR protein detected by radioreceptor and affinity labe...

  16. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Igor Tsaur; Karen Nelson; Jesco Pfitzenmaier; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as...

  17. In vitro susceptibility of goat mononuclear cells to bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, A K; Prasad, G

    1996-08-01

    Goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured and their susceptibility to bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 1 was tested. A small number of adherent and non-adherent cells were found positive for BTV antigens by immunoperoxidase and immunofluorescence tests. Both adherent and non-adherent cells supported limited level of viral replication as evidenced by low titre in the biological assay, thus indicating their susceptibility.

  18. Baculovirus integration with the vertebrate cells in system in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strokovskaya L. I.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this review the literature data are analyzed relative to the study of a new vector system for the cells of vertebrates, based on the insect viruses – baculoviruses. The ways and mechanisms of recombinant baculoviruses penetration into cells, the factors, which influence the effectiveness of transduction, the principles of the modification of virus display, and the reaction of the different types of cells on virus introduction are examined. The prospects of using recombinant baculoviruses in cellular engineering are discussed.

  19. A comparative morphological study of human germ cells in vitro or in situ within seminiferous tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L; Neaves, W B; Barnard, J J; Keillor, G E; Brown, S W; Yanagimachi, R

    1999-10-01

    For many infertile couples, intracytoplasmic germ cell/spermatozoon injection into unfertilized eggs may be their only hope for producing their own biological children. Thus far, success with injection of pre-spermatozoan germ cells such as round spermatids has not been as great as that of spermatozoon injection. This could be due in part to the difficulty of identifying younger (less mature) male germ cells in testicular biopsy dispersions. To improve the identification of various types of live, dispersed, human testicular cells in vitro, a comparative study of the morphological characteristics of human spermatogenic germ cells in vitro or in situ within seminiferous tubules was conducted. Live human testicular tissue was obtained from an organ-donating, brain-dead person with a high density of various germ cells. A cell suspension was obtained by enzymatic digestion, and cells were cultured for 3 days in an excessive volume (100-fold medium:cells; v:v) of HEPES-TC 199 medium at 5 degrees C and observed live with Nomarski optics (interference-contrast microscopy). For comparative purposes, testes from ten men obtained at autopsy were fixed, embedded in epoxy resin, sectioned at 20 microm, and observed unstained by Nomarski optics. This approach allowed comparison of morphological characteristics of individual germ cells seen in vitro or in situ in the human testis. In both live and fixed preparations from control men with varied daily sperm production rates, Sertoli cells have oval to pear-shaped nuclei with indented nuclear envelopes and large nucleoli, which makes their appearance distinctly different from germ cells. The size, shape, and chromatin pattern of nuclei, and the presence of meiotic metaphase figures, acrosomic vesicles/structures, tails, and/or mitochondria in the middle piece of germ cells are characteristically seen in live cells in vitro and in those cells observed in the fixed seminiferous tubules. Hence, this comparative approach allows

  20. Zoledronic acid inhibits vasculogenic mimicry in murine osteosarcoma cell line in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Lin Tao; Xu Weihua; Yang Shuhua; He Xianfeng; Fu Dehao; Feng Xiaobo

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background To study the effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on the vasculogenic mimicry of osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Methods A Three-dimensional culture of LM8 osteosarcoma cells on a type I collagen matrix was used to investigate whether osteosarcoma cells can develop vasculogenic mimicry, and to determine the effects of ZA on this process. In addition, the cellular ultrastructural changes were observed using scanning electron microscopy and laser confocal microscopy. The effects of ...

  1. Lactobacilli Modulate Natural Killer Cell Responses In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    . The IFN-gamma concentration was measured by ELISA. Incubation of NK cells with a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain increased the proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production, both to levels comparable to PHA stimulation. The proliferative response was further enhanced with autologous...... monocytes present, probably because cytokines, secreted by monocytes having engulfed bacteria, stimulated the NK cells. In contrast, a Lactobacillus paracasei strain caused the NK cells to proliferate only in the presence of monocytes. These results demonstrate that various strains of lactobacilli have...

  2. Human serum promotes osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Pisciotta

    Full Text Available Human dental pulp is a promising alternative source of stem cells for cell-based tissue engineering in regenerative medicine, for the easily recruitment with low invasivity for the patient and for the self-renewal and differentiation potential of cells. So far, in vitro culture of mesenchymal stem cells is usually based on supplementing culture and differentiation media with foetal calf serum (FCS. FCS is known to contain a great quantity of growth factors, and thus to promote cell attachment on plastic surface as well as expansion and differentiation. Nevertheless, FCS as an animal origin supplement may represent a potential means for disease transmission besides leading to a xenogenic immune response. Therefore, a significant interest is focused on investigating alternative supplements, in order to obtain a sufficient cell number for clinical application, avoiding the inconvenients of FCS use. In our study we have demonstrated that human serum (HS is a suitable alternative to FCS, indeed its addition to culture medium induces a high hDPSCs proliferation rate and improves the in vitro osteogenic differentiation. Furthermore, hDPSCs-collagen constructs, pre-differentiated with HS-medium in vitro for 10 days, when implanted in immunocompromised rats, are able to restore critical size parietal bone defects. Therefore these data indicate that HS is a valid substitute for FCS to culture and differentiate in vitro hDPSCs in order to obtain a successful bone regeneration in vivo.

  3. Stochastic cellular automata model of cell migration, proliferation and differentiation: validation with in vitro cultures of muscle satellite cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garijo, N; Manzano, R; Osta, R; Perez, M A

    2012-12-07

    Cell migration and proliferation has been modelled in the literature as a process similar to diffusion. However, using diffusion models to simulate the proliferation and migration of cells tends to create a homogeneous distribution in the cell density that does not correlate to empirical observations. In fact, the mechanism of cell dispersal is not diffusion. Cells disperse by crawling or proliferation, or are transported in a moving fluid. The use of cellular automata, particle models or cell-based models can overcome this limitation. This paper presents a stochastic cellular automata model to simulate the proliferation, migration and differentiation of cells. These processes are considered as completely stochastic as well as discrete. The model developed was applied to predict the behaviour of in vitro cell cultures performed with adult muscle satellite cells. Moreover, non homogeneous distribution of cells has been observed inside the culture well and, using the above mentioned stochastic cellular automata model, we have been able to predict this heterogeneous cell distribution and compute accurate quantitative results. Differentiation was also incorporated into the computational simulation. The results predicted the myotube formation that typically occurs with adult muscle satellite cells. In conclusion, we have shown how a stochastic cellular automata model can be implemented and is capable of reproducing the in vitro behaviour of adult muscle satellite cells. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Effects of hemopoietic growth factors on stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, M

    1989-09-01

    The central feature of hemopoiesis is the lifelong, stable cell renewal. This process is supported by hemopoietic stem cells, which in the steady-state appear to be dormant in cell cycling. The entry into cell cycle of the dormant stem cells may be promoted by such factors as IL-1, IL-6, and G-CSF. Available evidence indicates that the effects of IL-1 on stem cells are indirectly mediated in part by IL-6 and G-CSF. Once the stem cells leave G0 and begin proliferation, the subsequent process is characterized by continued proliferation and differentiation. While several models of stem cell differentiation have been proposed, micromanipulation studies of individual progenitors suggest that the commitment of multipotential progenitors to single lineages is a stochastic (random) process. The proliferation of early hemopoietic progenitors appears to be supported by IL-3, IL-4, and/or GM-CSF. Once the progenitors are committed to individual lineages, the subsequent maturation process appears to be supported by late-acting, lineage-specific factors such as Ep (for erythropoiesis), G-CSF (for neutrophil production), and IL-5 (for eosinophilopoiesis). Thus, hemopoietic proliferation appears to be regulated by a cascade of factors directed at different developmental stages.

  5. Stretch induces cytokine release by alveolar epithelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahakis, N E; Schroeder, M A; Limper, A H; Hubmayr, R D

    1999-07-01

    Mechanical ventilation can injure the lung, causing edema and alveolar inflammation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8) plays an important role in this inflammatory response. We postulated that cyclic cell stretch upregulates the production and release of IL-8 by human alveolar epithelium in the absence of structural cell damage or paracrine stimulation. To test this hypothesis, alveolar epithelial cells (A549 cells) were cultured on a deformable silicoelastic membrane. When stretched by 30% for up to 48 h, the cells released 49 +/- 34% more IL-8 (P static controls. Smaller deformations (20% stretch) produced no consistent increase in IL-8. Stretch of 4 h duration increased IL-8 gene transcription fourfold above baseline. Stretch had no effect on cell proliferation, cell viability as assessed by (51)Cr release assay, or the release of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and tumor necrosis factor-alpha. We conclude that deformation per se can trigger inflammatory signaling and that alveolar epithelial cells may be active participants in the alveolitis associated with ventilator-induced lung injury.

  6. In vitro effect of smokeless tobacco on gingival epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu Beklen

    2017-05-01

    Epithelial cells are the first line of defense against pathogens in the oral cavity. The results suggest that smokeless tobacco not only inhibits the growth of epithelial cells but also induce the generation of inflammatory cytokines which leads to smokeless tobacco-exacerbated disease.

  7. Photobiological studies on sensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in human cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moriwaki, K. (Mie Univ., Tsu (Japan). School of Medicine)

    1981-12-01

    The present study dealt with ultraviolet light (UV)-sensitivity and DNA repair or semiconservative DNA synthesis in Cockayne's syndrome (CS) cells in vitro. Homozygous CS cell lines were more UV-sensitive in colony-forming ability than normal human fibroblast cell lines. There was no difference between CS and normal cells in the activity of excision and postreplication repairs following UV-irradiation. The semi-conservative DNA synthesis of CS cells was depressed by UV-irradiation at a rate similar to that of normal cells, but subsequent recovery was reduced. The reduction of this recovery appears to be attributed to an inhibition of the replicon initiation following UV-irradiation. A heterozygous CS cell line was indistinguishable from normal cells. These findings support the possibility that UV-induced chromatin alteration not related to well-known DNA repair processes persists longer in CS cells than in normal cells and consequently prevents replicon initiation.

  8. Cell-Based Microarrays for In Vitro Toxicology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Joachim

    2015-07-01

    DNA/RNA and protein microarrays have proven their outstanding bioanalytical performance throughout the past decades, given the unprecedented level of parallelization by which molecular recognition assays can be performed and analyzed. Cell microarrays (CMAs) make use of similar construction principles. They are applied to profile a given cell population with respect to the expression of specific molecular markers and also to measure functional cell responses to drugs and chemicals. This review focuses on the use of cell-based microarrays for assessing the cytotoxicity of drugs, toxins, or chemicals in general. It also summarizes CMA construction principles with respect to the cell types that are used for such microarrays, the readout parameters to assess toxicity, and the various formats that have been established and applied. The review ends with a critical comparison of CMAs and well-established microtiter plate (MTP) approaches.

  9. In vitro and in vivo germ line potential of stem cells derived from newborn mouse skin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W Dyce

    Full Text Available We previously reported that fetal porcine skin-derived stem cells were capable of differentiation into oocyte-like cells (OLCs. Here we report that newborn mice skin-derived stem cells are also capable of differentiating into early OLCs. Using stem cells from mice that are transgenic for Oct4 germline distal enhancer-GFP, germ cells resulting from their differentiation are expected to be GFP(+. After differentiation, some GFP(+ OLCs reached 40-45 µM and expressed oocyte markers. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that ∼ 0.3% of the freshly isolated skin cells were GFP(+. The GFP-positive cells increased to ∼ 7% after differentiation, suggesting that the GFP(+ cells could be of in vivo origin, but are more likely induced upon being cultured in vitro. To study the in vivo germ cell potential of skin-derived cells, they were aggregated with newborn ovarian cells, and transplanted under the kidney capsule of ovariectomized mice. GFP(+ oocytes were identified within a subpopulation of follicles in the resulting growth. Our finding that early oocytes can be differentiated from mice skin-derived cells in defined medium may offer a new in vitro model to study germ cell formation and oogenesis.

  10. The endocannabinoid anandamide impairs in vitro decidualization of human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almada, M; Amaral, C; Diniz-da-Costa, M; Correia-da-Silva, G; Teixeira, N A; Fonseca, B M

    2016-10-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are endogenous mediators that along with the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2), a membrane transporter and metabolic enzymes form the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Several eCBs have been discovered with emphasis on anandamide (AEA). They are involved in several biological processes such as energy balance, immune response and reproduction. Decidualization occurs during the secretory phase of human menstrual cycle, which involves proliferation and differentiation of endometrial stromal cells into decidual cells and is crucial for the establishment and progression of pregnancy. In this study, a telomerase-immortalized human endometrial stromal cell line (St-T1b) and non-differentiated primary cultures of human decidual fibroblasts from term placenta were used to characterize the ECS using immunoblotting and qRT-PCR techniques. It was shown that St-T1b cells express CB1, but not CB2, and that both receptors are expressed in HdF cells. Furthermore, the expression of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the main degrading enzyme of AEA, increased during stromal cell differentiation. AEA inhibited cell proliferation, through deregulation of cell cycle progression and induced polyploidy. Moreover, through CB1 binding receptor, AEA also impaired cell differentiation. Therefore, AEA is proposed as a modulator of human decidualization. Our findings may provide wider implications, as deregulated levels of AEA, due to Cannabis sativa consumption or altered expression of the metabolic enzymes, may negatively regulate human endometrial stromal cell decidualization with an impact on human (in)fertility.Free Portuguese abstract: A Portuguese translation of this abstract is freely available at http://www.reproduction-online.org/content/152/4/351/suppl/DC1. © 2016 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  11. Potential neoplastic evolution of Vero cells: in vivo and in vitro characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreani, N A; Renzi, S; Piovani, G; Ajmone Marsan, P; Bomba, L; Villa, R; Ferrari, M; Dotti, S

    2017-10-01

    Vero cell lines are extensively employed in viral vaccine manufacturing. Similarly to all established cells, mutations can occur during Vero cells in vitro amplification which can result in adverse features compromising their biological safety. To evaluate the potential neoplastic evolution of these cells, in vitro transformation test, gene expression analysis and karyotyping were compared among low- (127 and 139 passages) and high-passage (passage 194) cell lines, as well as transformed colonies (TCs). In vivo tumorigenicity was also tested to confirm preliminary in vitro data obtained for low passage lines and TCs. Moreover, Vero cells cultivated in foetal bovine serum-free medium and derived from TCs were analysed to investigate the influence of cultivation methods on tumorigenic evolution. Low-passage Vero developed TCs in soft agar, without showing any tumorigenic evolution when inoculated in the animal model. Karyotyping showed a hypo-diploid modal chromosome number and rearrangements with no difference among Vero cell line passages and TCs. These abnormalities were reported also in serum-free cultivated Vero. Gene expression revealed that high-passage Vero cells had several under-expressed and a few over-expressed genes compared to low-passage ones. Gene ontology revealed no significant enrichment of pathways related to oncogenic risk. These findings suggest that in vitro high passage, and not culture conditions, induces Vero transformation correlated to karyotype and gene expression alterations. These data, together with previous investigations reporting tumour induction in high-passage Vero cells, suggest the use of low-passage Vero cells or cell lines other than Vero to increase the safety of vaccine manufacturing.

  12. Generation of T follicular helper cells in vitro: requirement for B-cell receptor cross-linking and cognate B- and T-cell interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenbrander, Anne; Grewe, Bastian; Nemazee, David; Überla, Klaus; Temchura, Vladimir

    2018-02-01

    The minimum requirements for in vitro modelling of natural CD4 + T-cell differentiation into T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are still under investigation. We co-cultured wild-type and T-cell receptor (TCR) transgenic CD4 + T cells from naive mice with dendritic cells and B-cell receptor (BCR) transgenic B cells in the presence of HIV-derived virus-like particles containing matched B-cell and T-cell epitopes. This co-culturing induced co-expression of Tfh-master regulator transcription factor BCL-6 and CXCR5 in up to 10% of the wild-type and up to 40% of the TCR-transgenic CD4 + T cells. Phenotypic markers, production of interleukin-21 and isotype switching of the B cells to IgG1 further indicated a helper function of the induced Tfh cells in vitro. Dendritic cells supported the generation of functional Tfh cells, but were unable to induce them without cognate B cells. Hence, our study presents a robust experimental system for efficient generation of functionally active Tfh cells in vitro and confirms the importance of cognate B- and T-cell cross-talk for the Tfh differentiation process. © 2017 The Authors. Immunology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Effects of 900 MHz electromagnetic radiation on ultrastructure of rats’ hippocampal neural stem cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Hai-shui LUO; Wei-hua CHU; Zi-bing WAN; Sheng-li HU; Rong HU; Nan WU; Bo HU; Hua FENG; Gang ZHU

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of 900MHz electromagnetic radiation on the ultrastructure of rat hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs) in vitro in order to provide basic materials for studying the biological effects of electromagnetic wave on the central nervous system. Methods Rat NSCs were divided into sham group, Radi1 group and Radi2 group, and they were respectively exposed to 900 MHz electromagnetic wave at power density of 0, 1, and 3mW/cm2 in vitro. Cells in Radi1 group and Radi2 g...

  14. Spatial organization of mesenchymal stem cells in vitro--results from a new individual cell-based model with podia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Hoffmann

    Full Text Available Therapeutic application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC requires their extensive in vitro expansion. MSC in culture typically grow to confluence within a few weeks. They show spindle-shaped fibroblastoid morphology and align to each other in characteristic spatial patterns at high cell density. We present an individual cell-based model (IBM that is able to quantitatively describe the spatio-temporal organization of MSC in culture. Our model substantially improves on previous models by explicitly representing cell podia and their dynamics. It employs podia-generated forces for cell movement and adjusts cell behavior in response to cell density. At the same time, it is simple enough to simulate thousands of cells with reasonable computational effort. Experimental sheep MSC cultures were monitored under standard conditions. Automated image analysis was used to determine the location and orientation of individual cells. Our simulations quantitatively reproduced the observed growth dynamics and cell-cell alignment assuming cell density-dependent proliferation, migration, and morphology. In addition to cell growth on plain substrates our model captured cell alignment on micro-structured surfaces. We propose a specific surface micro-structure that according to our simulations can substantially enlarge cell culture harvest. The 'tool box' of cell migratory behavior newly introduced in this study significantly enhances the bandwidth of IBM. Our approach is capable of accommodating individual cell behavior and collective cell dynamics of a variety of cell types and tissues in computational systems biology.

  15. Influenza A virus infection of human Schwann cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joshua; Buchman, Craig A; Fregien, Nevis

    2003-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular neuronitis, vocal fold paralysis and Bell's palsy have been associated with a viral etiology, due to the infection of nerve cells. The goal of this research was to ascertain whether Schwann cells can support infection with human influenza A virus and thereby represent a plausible alternative site for virus-host interaction. Viral infection of Schwann cells may lead to secretion of inflammatory mediators, leukocyte recruitment, demyelination and nerve damage. Cultured human Schwann cells were exposed to human influenza A virus. Infection was assayed at various times post-inoculation (0, 24, 48 and 72 h) using light microscopy, immunocytochemistry and influenza A virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A group of unexposed cells served as controls. Following exposure to the virus, vacuolization, cellular expansion and detachment from the dish were seen as early as 24 h post-inoculation. The exposed cells demonstrated positive immunocytochemical staining for influenza A virus antigen at 24, 48 and 72 h. Using RT-PCR, a sharp rise in influenza A virus-specific mRNA was detected. Human Schwann cells can be infected with human influenza A virus. Further studies will assess the inflammatory response in this model.

  16. Nesfatin-1 inhibits ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell proliferation in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Yang; Pang, Xiaoyan; Dong, Mei; Wen, Fang, E-mail: wenfang64@hotmail.com; Zhang, Yi, E-mail: syzi960@yahoo.com

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •Nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest. •Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis. •Nesfatin-1 inhibits HO-8910 cell proliferation via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. •The first report of nesfatin-1-mediated proliferation in ovarian epithelial carcinoma. -- Abstract: Nesfatin-1, an 82-amino-acid peptide derived from a 396-amino-acid precursor protein nucleobindin 2 (NUCB2), was originally identified in hypothalamic nuclei involved in the regulation of food intake. It was recently reported that nesfatin-1 is a novel depot specific adipokine preferentially produced by subcutaneous tissue, with obesity- and food deprivation-regulated expression. Although a relation between ovarian cancer mortality and obesity has been previously established, a role of nesfatin-1 in ovarian epithelial carcinoma remains unknown. The aim of the present study is to examine the effect of nesfatin-1 on ovary carcinoma cells proliferation. We found that nesfatin-1 inhibits the proliferation and growth of HO-8910 cells by G1 phase arrest, this inhibition could be abolished by nesfatin-1 neutralizing antibody. Nesfatin-1 enhances HO-8910 cell apoptosis, activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway block the effects of nesfatin-1-induced apoptosis, therefore reverses the inhibition of HO-8910 cell proliferation by nesfatin-1. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that nesfatin-1 can inhibit the proliferation in human ovarian epithelial carcinoma cell line HO-8910 cells through inducing apoptosis via mTOR and RhoA/ROCK signaling pathway. This study provides a novel regulatory signaling pathway of nesfatin-1-regulated ovarian epithelial carcinoma growth and may contribute to ovarian cancer prevention and therapy, especially in obese patients.

  17. [In vitro study of the interactions between bovine herpesvirus 4 and the bovine host cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderplasschen, A

    1999-01-01

    This work was devoted to the study of the interactions between bovine herpesvirus 4 (BHV-4) and bovine cells in vitro. It led to the discovery of two interesting properties of BVH-4 replication cycle: first, the cellular receptor heparan sulfate was proven to mediate BVH-4 binding to target cells. This is the first description of the implication of heparan sulfate in the binding process of a gammaherpesvirus. Second, using synchronised cells, the replication of BVH-4 DNA was proven to be dependent on the S phase of the cell cycle. This dependence could explain some properties of BVH-4 infection in vitro and could play an important role in the biology of the infection in vivo. Finally, in order to produce monoclonal antibodies against BVH-4 IE1 and IE2 proteins, the genes coding for these proteins were cloned and expressed in prokaryotic cells.

  18. Activated autologous T cells exert an anti-B-cell chronic lymphatic leukemia effect in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Ianni, Mauro; Moretti, Lorenzo; Terenzi, Adelmo; Bazzucchi, Federico; Del Papa, Beatrice; Bazzucchi, Moira; Ciurnelli, Raffaella; Lucchesi, Alessandro; Sportoletti, Paolo; Rosati, Emanuela; Marconi, Pier Francesco; Falzetti, Franca; Tabilio, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    The impact of chronic lymphatic leukemia (CLL) tumor burden on the autologous immune system has already been demonstrated. This study attempted to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying T-cell immunologic deficiencies in CLL. Freshly isolated CD3(+) T cells from patients with a diagnosis of CLL and healthy donors were analyzed by gene expression profiling. Activated T cells from 20 patients with CLL were tested in vitro for cytotoxicity against mutated and unmutated autologous B cells and DAUDI, K562 and P815 cell lines. To investigate T-cell mediated cytotoxicity in vivo, we co-transplanted OKT3-activated T lymphocytes and autologous B-cell CLL (B-CLL) cells into NOD/SCID mice. Gene expression profiles of peripheral blood T cells from B-CLL patients showed 25 down-regulated, and 31 up-regulated, genes that were mainly involved in cell differentiation, proliferation, survival, apoptosis, cytoskeleton formation, vesicle trafficking and T-cell activation. After culture, the T-cell count remained unchanged, CD8 cells expanded more than CD4 and a cytotoxicity index >30% was present in 5/20 patients. Cytotoxicity against B autologous leukemic cells did not correlate with B-cell mutational status. Only activated T cells exerting cytotoxicity against autologous leukemic B cells prevented CLL in a human-mouse chimera. This study indicates that patients with CLL are affected by a partial immunologic defect that might be somewhat susceptible to repair. This study identifies the molecular pathways underlying T-cell deficiencies in CLL and shows that cytotoxic T-cell functions against autologous B-CLL can be rebuilt at least in part in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Effects of lovastatin alone or combined with irradiation on tumor cells in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gabrys, D. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Inst. of Oncology, Gliwice Branch (Poland); Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); OncoRay Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); Doerfler, A.; Yaromina, A.; Hessel, F.; Krause, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); OncoRay Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); Oertel, R. [Dept. of Clinical Pharmacology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); Baumann, M. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); OncoRay Center for Radiation Research in Oncology, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany); Experimental Center, Medical Faculty Carl Gustav Carus, Univ. of Tech. Dresden (Germany)

    2008-01-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the effect of lovastatin alone or combined with radiation on U87MG and FaDu cells in vitro and U87MG tumors in vivo. Material and methods: cell number, p21{sup WAF1} expression, apoptosis, reproductive cell death, and cell-cycle distribution were investigated after incubation of U87MG and FaDu cells in vitro. The effect of lovastatin (50 mg/kg/day) on tumor growth and on tumor growth delay after single-dose irradiation with 20 Gy was investigated using U87MG tumors in nude mice. Results: lovastatin dose dependently decreased cell number and proliferation of U87MG and FaDu cells. The proportion of cells in G0/G1 phase, apoptosis and p21 protein expression increased after lovastatin alone or combined with 4-Gy irradiation in both cell lines. Effects of lovastatin on cell cycle and cell number were more pronounced in U87MG compared to FaDu. No radiosensitization of clonogenic cells by lovastatin could be demonstrated in both cells lines, but the colony-forming ability after lovastatin alone was decreased in FaDu cells. In vivo, lovastatin decreased tumor volume over time but did not increase growth delay after irradiation of U87MG tumors with 20 Gy. Conclusion: the data support effects of lovastatin on proliferation, apoptosis and colony-forming ability in vitro and tumor volume in vivo. At the drug concentration achievable, lovastatin did not improve the effects of radiation on U87MG tumors in vivo. (orig.)

  20. Enzyme-immobilized hydrogels to create hypoxia for in vitro cancer cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Camron S; Konig, Heiko; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2017-04-20

    Hypoxia is a critical condition governing many aspects of cellular fate processes. The most common practice in hypoxic cell culture is to maintain cells in an incubator with controlled gas inlet (i.e., hypoxic chamber). Here, we describe the design and characterization of enzyme-immobilized hydrogels to create solution hypoxia under ambient conditions for in vitro cancer cell culture. Specifically, glucose oxidase (GOX) was acrylated and co-polymerized with poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate (PEGDA) through photopolymerization to form GOX-immobilized PEG-based hydrogels. We first evaluated the effect of soluble GOX on inducing solution hypoxia (O2hydrogels were able to create hypoxia within the hydrogel for at least 120h, potentially due to enhanced protein stabilization by enzyme 'PEGylation' and immobilization. As a proof-of-concept, this GOX-immobilized hydrogel system was used to create hypoxia for in vitro culture of Molm14 (acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line) and Huh7 (hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line). Cells cultured in the presence of GOX-immobilized hydrogels remained viable for at least 24h. The expression of hypoxia associated genes, including carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9) and lysyl oxidase (LOX), were significantly upregulated in cells cultured with GOX-immobilized hydrogels. These results have demonstrated the potential of using enzyme-immobilized hydrogels to create hypoxic environment for in vitro cancer cell culture. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Live cell imaging techniques to study T cell trafficking across the blood-brain barrier in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coisne Caroline

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The central nervous system (CNS is an immunologically privileged site to which access for circulating immune cells is tightly controlled by the endothelial blood–brain barrier (BBB located in CNS microvessels. Under physiological conditions immune cell migration across the BBB is low. However, in neuroinflammatory diseases such as multiple sclerosis, many immune cells can cross the BBB and cause neurological symptoms. Extravasation of circulating immune cells is a multi-step process that is regulated by the sequential interaction of different adhesion and signaling molecules on the immune cells and on the endothelium. The specialized barrier characteristics of the BBB, therefore, imply the existence of unique mechanisms for immune cell migration across the BBB. Methods and design An in vitro mouse BBB model maintaining physiological barrier characteristics in a flow chamber and combined with high magnification live cell imaging, has been established. This model enables the molecular mechanisms involved in the multi-step extravasation of T cells across the in vitro BBB, to be defined with high-throughput analyses. Subsequently these mechanisms have been verified in vivo using a limited number of experimental animals and a spinal cord window surgical technique. The window enables live observation of the dynamic interaction between T cells and spinal cord microvessels under physiological and pathological conditions using real time epifluorescence intravital imaging. These in vitro and in vivo live cell imaging methods have shown that the BBB endothelium possesses unique and specialized mechanisms involved in the multi-step T cell migration across this endothelial barrier under physiological flow. The initial T cell interaction with the endothelium is either mediated by T cell capture or by T cell rolling. Arrest follows, and then T cells polarize and especially CD4+ T cells crawl over long distances against the direction of

  2. Insights into female germ cell biology: from in vivo development to in vitro derivations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Dajung; Kee, Kehkooi

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of human germ cell biology is important for developing infertility treatments. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate human gametogenesis due to the difficulties in collecting samples, especially germ cells during fetal development. In contrast to the mitotic arrest of spermatogonia stem cells in the fetal testis, female germ cells proceed into meiosis and began folliculogenesis in fetal ovaries. Regulations of these developmental events, including the initiation of meiosis and the endowment of primordial follicles, remain an enigma. Studying the molecular mechanisms of female germ cell biology in the human ovary has been mostly limited to spatiotemporal characterizations of genes or proteins. Recent efforts in utilizing in vitro differentiation system of stem cells to derive germ cells have allowed researchers to begin studying molecular mechanisms during human germ cell development. Meanwhile, the possibility of isolating female germline stem cells in adult ovaries also excites researchers and generates many debates. This review will mainly focus on presenting and discussing recent in vivo and in vitro studies on female germ cell biology in human. The topics will highlight the progress made in understanding the three main stages of germ cell developments: namely, primordial germ cell formation, meiotic initiation, and folliculogenesis.

  3. Phenotypic drug resistance in mammalian cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschure, P C; Simons, J W

    1982-05-01

    When mammalian cells are cultured at low concentrations of toxic drugs, they often become phenotypically resistant. We studied whether this phenotypic resistance is due to selection of preexisting variants. The drugs 8-azaguaine (AG) and 6-thioguanine (TG) were used and, as a parameter for resistance, the incorporation of hypoxanthine was determined. Preexisting variation among clones in the uptake of hypoxanthine was found, and this variation has a hereditary component. This transmission of aberrant incorporation of hypoxanthine does not appear a stable trait, and the aberrant cell lines returned gradually to the original steady state. There are indications that within a cell population cells with altered levels of incorporation of hypoxanthine arise continuously and at a high frequency. Treatment with marginally toxic concentrations of AG or TG indicates that, at least for AG, survival is not related to the preexisting variation in hypoxanthine uptake. The observed phenomena could be of importance for the selection of drugs to be used in cancer chemotherapy.

  4. In Vitro Photodynamic Effect of Phycocyanin against Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramaniyan Bharathiraja

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available C-phycocyanin, a natural blue-colored pigment-protein complex was explored as a novel photosensitizer for use in low-level laser therapy under 625-nm laser illumination. C-phycocyanin produced singlet oxygen radicals and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS were raised in extended time of treatment. It did not exhibit any visible toxic effect in the absence of light. Under 625-nm laser irradiation, c-phycocyanin generated cytotoxic stress through ROS induction, which killed MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depending on concentrations. Different fluorescent staining of laser-treated cells explored apoptotic cell death characteristics like the shrinking of cells, cytoplasmic condensation, nuclei cleavage, and the formation of apoptotic bodies. In conclusion, phycocyanin is a non-toxic fluorescent pigment that can be used in low-level light therapy.

  5. In Vitro Photodynamic Effect of Phycocyanin against Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharathiraja, Subramaniyan; Seo, Hansu; Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Santha Moorthy, Madhappan; Park, Suhyun; Oh, Jungwan

    2016-11-03

    C-phycocyanin, a natural blue-colored pigment-protein complex was explored as a novel photosensitizer for use in low-level laser therapy under 625-nm laser illumination. C-phycocyanin produced singlet oxygen radicals and the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were raised in extended time of treatment. It did not exhibit any visible toxic effect in the absence of light. Under 625-nm laser irradiation, c-phycocyanin generated cytotoxic stress through ROS induction, which killed MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells depending on concentrations. Different fluorescent staining of laser-treated cells explored apoptotic cell death characteristics like the shrinking of cells, cytoplasmic condensation, nuclei cleavage, and the formation of apoptotic bodies. In conclusion, phycocyanin is a non-toxic fluorescent pigment that can be used in low-level light therapy.

  6. Cell-free synthetic biology for in vitro prototype engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Simon J; MacDonald, James T; Freemont, Paul S

    2017-06-15

    Cell-free transcription-translation is an expanding field in synthetic biology as a rapid prototyping platform for blueprinting the design of synthetic biological devices. Exemplar efforts include translation of prototype designs into medical test kits for on-site identification of viruses (Zika and Ebola), while gene circuit cascades can be tested, debugged and re-designed within rapid turnover times. Coupled with mathematical modelling, this discipline lends itself towards the precision engineering of new synthetic life. The next stages of cell-free look set to unlock new microbial hosts that remain slow to engineer and unsuited to rapid iterative design cycles. It is hoped that the development of such systems will provide new tools to aid the transition from cell-free prototype designs to functioning synthetic genetic circuits and engineered natural product pathways in living cells. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. In vitro proliferation of haemopoietic cells in the presence of adherent cell layers. II. Differential effect of adherent cell layers derived from various organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reimann, J.; Burger, H.

    1979-01-01

    Mouse bone marrow-derived adherent cell populations promoted proliferation of haemopoietic cells in vitro in a liquid culture system for at least 4 weeks. Adherent cell layers derived from other haemopoietic organs (foetal liver, adult spleen) and fibroblasts from embryonic tissues did not maintain

  8. Oxygen Control For Bioreactors And In-vitro Cell Assays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nock, V.; Blaikie, R. J.; David, T.

    2009-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is an important parameter in biomedical and cell-culture applications. Several studies have found cell survival and function to be intimately linked to oxygen concentration. Laminar flow, as observed in microfluidic devices, provides an ideal environment to manipulate and control concentration gradients. In this paper we demonstrate the first characterization of integrated fluorescence-based oxygen sensors for DO measurement within a cell-culture bioreactor device. Solid-state PtOEPK/PS sensor patterns were integrated into the PDMS-based bioreactor and calibrated for detection of DO concentration with a superimposed layer of collagen and Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells. The sensor signal of the layer subjacent to the cells was found to follow a Stern-Volmer model and the intensity ratio was measured to I0/I100 = 3.9 after 3 days in culture. The device provides a novel tool for the control and spatially-resolved measurement of oxygen levels in cellular assays and cell-culture applications.

  9. Response-predictive gene expression profiling of glioma progenitor cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Moeckel

    Full Text Available High-grade gliomas are amongst the most deadly human tumors. Treatment results are disappointing. Still, in several trials around 20% of patients respond to therapy. To date, diagnostic strategies to identify patients that will profit from a specific therapy do not exist.In this study, we used serum-free short-term treated in vitro cell cultures to predict treatment response in vitro. This approach allowed us (a to enrich specimens for brain tumor initiating cells and (b to confront cells with a therapeutic agent before expression profiling.As a proof of principle we analyzed gene expression in 18 short-term serum-free cultures of high-grade gliomas enhanced for brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC before and after in vitro treatment with the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sunitinib. Profiles from treated progenitor cells allowed to predict therapy-induced impairment of proliferation in vitro.For the tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sunitinib used in this dataset, the approach revealed additional predictive information in comparison to the evaluation of classical signaling analysis.

  10. Effect of bone graft density on in vitro cell behavior with enamel matrix derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, Richard J; Caluseru, Oana M; Guillemette, Vincent; Zhang, Yufeng; Buser, Daniel; Chandad, Fatiha; Sculean, Anton

    2015-09-01

    Bone replacement grafting materials play an important role in regenerative dentistry. Despite a large array of tested bone-grafting materials, little information is available comparing the effects of bone graft density on in vitro cell behavior. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to compare the effects of cells seeded on bone grafts at low and high density in vitro for osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation. The response of osteoblasts to the presence of a growth factor (enamel matrix derivative, (EMD)) in combination with low (8 mg per well) or high (100 mg per well) bone grafts (BG; natural bone mineral, Bio-Oss®) density, was studied and compared for osteoblast cell adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation as assessed by real-time PCR. Standard tissue culture plastic was used as a control with and without EMD. The present study demonstrates that in vitro testing of bone-grafting materials is largely influenced by bone graft seeding density. Osteoblast adhesion was up to 50 % lower when cells were seeded on high-density BG when compared to low-density BG and control tissue culture plastic. Furthermore, proliferation was affected in a similar manner whereby cell proliferation on high-density BG (100 mg/well) was significantly increased when compared to that on low-density BG (8 mg/well). In contrast, cell differentiation was significantly increased on high-density BG as assessed by real-time PCR for markers collagen 1 (Col 1), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and osteocalcin (OC) as well as alizarin red staining. The effects of EMD on osteoblast adhesion, proliferation, and differentiation further demonstrated that the bone graft seeding density largely controls in vitro results. EMD significantly increased cell attachment only on high-density BG, whereas EMD was able to further stimulate cell proliferation and differentiation of osteoblasts on control culture plastic and low-density BG when compared to high-density BG. The results

  11. Complete in vitro generation of fertile oocytes from mouse primordial germ cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morohaku, Kanako; Tanimoto, Ren; Sasaki, Keisuke; Kawahara-Miki, Ryouka; Kono, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Hirao, Yuji; Obata, Yayoi

    2016-01-01

    Reconstituting gametogenesis in vitro is a key goal for reproductive biology and regenerative medicine. Successful in vitro reconstitution of primordial germ cells and spermatogenesis has recently had a significant effect in the field. However, recapitulation of oogenesis in vitro remains unachieved. Here we demonstrate the first reconstitution, to our knowledge, of the entire process of mammalian oogenesis in vitro from primordial germ cells, using an estrogen-receptor antagonist that promotes normal follicle formation, which in turn is crucial for supporting oocyte growth. The fundamental events in oogenesis (i.e., meiosis, oocyte growth, and genomic imprinting) were reproduced in the culture system. The most rigorous evidence of the recapitulation of oogenesis was the birth of fertile offspring, with a maximum of seven pups obtained from a cultured gonad. Moreover, cryopreserved gonads yielded functional oocytes and offspring in this culture system. Thus, our in vitro system will enable both innovative approaches for a deeper understanding of oogenesis and a new avenue to create and preserve female germ cells. PMID:27457928

  12. A cell culture technique for human epiretinal membranes to describe cell behavior and membrane contraction in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheimer, Christian; Eibl-Lindner, Kirsten H; Compera, Denise; Kueres, Alexander; Wolf, Armin; Docheva, Denitsa; Priglinger, Siegfried G; Priglinger, Claudia; Schumann, Ricarda G

    2017-11-01

    To introduce a human cell culture technique for investigating in-vitro behavior of primary epiretinal cells and membrane contraction of fibrocellular tissue surgically removed from eyes with idiopathic macular pucker. Human epiretinal membranes were harvested from ten eyes with idiopathic macular pucker during standard vitrectomy. Specimens were fixed on cell culture plastic using small entomological pins to apply horizontal stress to the tissue, and then transferred to standard cell culture conditions. Cell behavior of 400 epiretinal cells from 10 epiretinal membranes was observed in time-lapse microscopy and analyzed in terms of cell migration, cell velocity, and membrane contraction. Immunocytochemistry was performed for cell type-specific antigens. Cell specific differences in migration behavior were observed comprising two phenotypes: (PT1) epiretinal cells moving fast, less directly, with small round phenotype and (PT2) epiretinal cells moving slowly, directly, with elongated large phenotype. No mitosis, no outgrowth and no migration onto the plastic were seen. Horizontal contraction measurements showed variation between specimens. Masses of epiretinal cells with a myofibroblast-like phenotype expressed cytoplasmatic α-SMA stress fibers and correlated with cell behavior characteristics (PT2). Fast moving epiretinal cells (PT1) were identified as microglia by immunostaining. This in-vitro technique using traction application allows for culturing surgically removed epiretinal membranes from eyes with idiopathic macular pucker, demonstrating cell behavior and membrane contraction of primary human epiretinal cells. Our findings emphasize the abundance of myofibroblasts, the presence of microglia and specific differences of cell behavior in these membranes. This technique has the potential to improve the understanding of pathologies at the vitreomacular interface and might be helpful in establishing anti-fibrotic treatment strategies.

  13. Inhibition of Autophagy Potentiates Atorvastatin-Induced Apoptotic Cell Death in Human Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minyong Kang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Statins are cholesterol reduction agents that exhibit anti-cancer activity in several human cancers. Because autophagy is a crucial survival mechanism for cancer cells under stress conditions, cooperative inhibition of autophagy acts synergistically with other anti-cancer drugs. Thus, this study investigates whether combined treatment of atorvastatin and autophagy inhibitors results in enhancing the cytotoxic effects of atorvastatin, upon human bladder cancer cells, T24 and J82, in vitro. To measure cell viability, we performed the EZ-Cytox cell viability assay. We examined apoptosis by flow cytometry using annexin-V/propidium iodide (PI and western blot using procaspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP antibodies. To examine autophagy activation, we evaluated the co-localization of LC3 and LysoTracker by immunocytochemistry, as well as the expression of LC3 and p62/sequestosome-1 (SQSTM1 by western blot. In addition, we assessed the survival and proliferation of T24 and J82 cells by a clonogenic assay. We found that atorvastatin reduced the cell viability of T24 and J82 cells via apoptotic cell death and induced autophagy activation, shown by the co-localization of LC3 and LysoTracker. Moreover, pharmacologic inhibition of autophagy significantly enhanced atorvastatin-induced apoptosis in T24 and J82 cells. In sum, inhibition of autophagy potentiates atorvastatin-induced apoptotic cell death in human bladder cancer cells in vitro, providing a potential therapeutic approach to treat bladder cancer.

  14. Cytotoxic effects of betaxolol on healthy corneal endothelial cells both in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Miao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To demonstrate the cytotoxic effect of betaxolol and its underlying mechanism on human corneal endothelial cells(HCE cells in vitro and cat corneal endothelial cells(CCE cells in vivo, providing experimental basis for safety anti-glaucoma drug usage in clinic of ophthalmology.METHODS: In vivo and in vitro experiments were conducted to explore whether and how betaxolol participates in corneal endothelial cell injury. The in vitro morphology, growth status, plasma membrane permeability, DNA fragmentation, and ultrastructure of HCE cells treated with 0.021875-0.28g/L betaxolol were examined by light microscope, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiahiazo (-z-y1-3,5-di-phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT assay, acridine orange (AO/ethidium bromide (EB double-fluorescent staining, DNA agarose gel electrophoresis, and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The in vivo density, morphology, and ultrastructure of CCE cells, corneal thickness, and eye pressure of cat eyes treated with 0.28g/L betaxolol were investigated by specular microscopy, applanation tonometer, alizarin red staining, scanning electron microscope (SEM, and TEM.RESULTS: Exposure to betaxolol at doses from 0.0875g/L to 2.8g/L induced morphological and ultrastructural changes of in vitro cultured HCE cells such as cytoplasmic vacuolation, cellular shrinkage, structural disorganization, chromatin condensation, and apoptotic body appearance. Simultaneously, betaxolol elevated plasma membrane permeability and induced DNA fragmentation of these cells in a dose-dependent manner in AO/EB staining. Furthermore, betaxolol at a dose of 2.8g/L also induced decrease of density of CCE cells in vivo, and non-hexagonal and shrunk apoptotic cells were also found in betaxolol-treated cat corneal endothelia.CONCLUSION: Betaxolol has significant cytotoxicity on HCE cells in vitro by inducing apoptosis of these cells, and induced apoptosis of CCE cells in vivo as well. The findings help provide new insight into the apoptosis

  15. Dihydropyridine Derivatives as Cell Growth Modulators In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruvere, Imanta; Bisenieks, Egils; Uldrikis, Janis; Plotniece, Aiva; Pajuste, Karlis; Rucins, Martins; Vigante, Brigita; Kalme, Zenta; Gosteva, Marina; Domracheva, Ilona; Vukovic, Tea; Milkovic, Lidija

    2017-01-01

    The effects of eleven 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives (DHPs) used alone or together with prooxidant anticancer drug doxorubicin were examined on two cancer (HOS, HeLa) and two nonmalignant cell lines (HMEC, L929). Their effects on the cell growth (3H-thymidine incorporation) were compared with their antiradical activities (DPPH assay), using well-known DHP antioxidant diludine as a reference. Thus, tested DHPs belong to three groups: (1) antioxidant diludine; (2) derivatives with pyridinium moieties at position 4 of the 1,4-DHP ring; (3) DHPs containing cationic methylene onium (pyridinium, trialkylammonium) moieties at positions 2 and 6 of the 1,4-DHP ring. Diludine and DHPs of group 3 exerted antiradical activities, unlike compounds of group 2. However, novel DHPs had cell type and concentration dependent effects on 3H-thymidine incorporation, while diludine did not. Hence, IB-32 (group 2) suppressed the growth of HOS and HeLa, enhancing growth of L929 cells, while K-2-11 (group 3) enhanced growth of every cell line tested, even in the presence of doxorubicin. Therefore, growth regulating and antiradical activity principles of novel DHPs should be further studied to find if DHPs of group 2 could selectively suppress cancer growth and if those of group 3 promote wound healing. PMID:28473879

  16. Progress towards human primordial germ cell specification in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canovas, S; Campos, R; Aguilar, E; Cibelli, J B

    2017-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) have long been considered the link between one generation and the next. PGC specification begins in the early embryo as a result of a highly orchestrated combination of transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Understanding the molecular events that lead to proper PGC development will facilitate the development of new treatments for human infertility as well as species conservation. This article describes the latest, most relevant findings about the mechanisms of PGC formation, emphasizing human PGC. It also discusses our own laboratory's progress in using transdifferentiation protocols to derive human PGCs (hPGCs). Our preliminary results arose from our pursuit of a sequential hPGC induction strategy that starts with the repression of lineage-specific factors in the somatic cell, followed by the reactivation of germ cell-related genes using specific master regulators, which can indeed reactivate germ cell-specific genes in somatic cells. While it is still premature to assume that fully functional human gametes can be obtained in a dish, our results, together with those recently published by others, provide strong evidence that generating their precursors, PGCs, is within reach. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. The effects of hypoxia on in vitro culture of dental-derived stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Stefanie Bressan; Chagastelles, Pedro; Pranke, Patricia; Casagrande, Luciano

    2016-08-01

    The culture of cells under hypoxia is considered one of the hot topics of tissue engineering, especially when exploring the proliferation capacity, a critical step for cellular-based therapies. The use of in vitro hypoxic environment aims to simulate the oxygen concentrations found in stem cell niches. Dental tissues are attractive sources of stem cells, as they are obtained from discarded tissue, after third molar extraction and exfoliation deciduous teeth, respectively. However, small amounts of cells are obtained from these sources. Thus, optimizing the in vitro conditions for proliferation and differentiation of these cells is essential for future regenerative strategies. This review presents a summary of the results regarding the effect of hypoxia on dental-derived stem cells after an electronic search on PubMed databases. The studies show increased differentiation potential and paracrine action of dental-derived stem cells under hypoxic environment. There are controversies related to proliferation of dental-derived stem cells under induced hypoxia. The lack of standardization in cell culture techniques contributes to these biases and future studies should describe in more detail the protocols used. The knowledge regarding the effect of hypoxia on dental-derived stem cells needs further clarification for assisting the clinical application of these cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Cancer metabolism: the volatile signature of glycolysis-in vitro model in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Tali; Herbig, Jens; Kohl, Ingrid; Las, Guy; Cancilla, John C; Torrecilla, Jose S; Ilouze, Maya; Haick, Hossam; Peled, Nir

    2017-01-09

    Discovering the volatile signature of cancer cells is an emerging approach in cancer research, as it may contribute to a fast and simple diagnosis of tumors in vivo and in vitro. One of the main contributors to such a volatile signature is hyperglycolysis, which characterizes the cancerous cell. The metabolic perturbation in cancer cells is known as the Warburg effect; glycolysis is preferred over oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), even in the presence of oxygen. The precise mitochondrial alterations that underlie the increased dependence of cancer cells on aerobic glycolysis for energy generation have remained a mystery. We aimed to profile the volatile signature of the glycolysis activity in lung cancer cells. For that an in vitro model, using lung cancer cell line cultures (A549, H2030, H358, H322), was developed. The volatile signature was measured by proton transfer reaction mass spectrometry under normal conditions and glycolysis inhibition. Glycolysis inhibition and mitochondrial activity were also assessed by mitochondrial respiration capacity measurements. Cells were divided into two groups upon their glycolytic profile (PET positive and PET negative). Glycolysis blockade had a unique characteristic that was shared by all cells. Furthermore, each group had a characteristic volatile signature that enabled us to discriminate between those sub-groups of cells. In conclusion, lung cancer cells may have different subpopulations of cells upon low and high mitochondrial capacity. In both groups, glycolysis blockade induced a unique volatile signature.

  19. Crosstalk between tongue carcinoma cells, extracellular vesicles, and immune cells in in vitro and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Awad, Shady Adnan; Tuomainen, Katja; Zhao, Yue; Salem, Abdelhakim; Parikka, Mataleena; Salo, Tuula

    2017-09-01

    The crosstalk between immune cells, cancer cells, and extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted by cancer cells remains poorly understood. We created three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models using human leiomyoma discs and Myogel to study the effects of immune cells on highly (HSC-3) and less (SCC-25) invasive oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC) cell lines. Additionally, we studied the effects of EVs isolated from these cell lines on the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T and NK cells isolated from three healthy donors. Our analysis included the effects of these EVs on innate immunity in zebrafish larvae. Activated immune cells significantly decreased the proliferation of both OTSCC cell lines and associated with a diminished invasion area of HSC-3 cells. In general, EVs from SCC-25 increased the cytotoxic activity of CD8(+) T and NK cells more than those from HSC-3 cells. However, this effect varied depending on the source and the immune and cancer cell subgroups. In zebrafish, the amount of IL-13 mRNA was decreased by SCC-25 EVs. This study describes promising in vitro and in vivo models to investigate interactions between immune cells, cancer cells, and EVs.

  20. [Inhibitory effect of 17-AAG combined with paclitaxel on proliferation of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma Eca-109 cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Size; Chen, Xuemei; Li, Yuqi; Yang, Shu; Mo, Xianyi; Zhang, Fan; Mo, Kailan; Ding, Ying

    2015-06-01

    To investigate the effect of 17-AAG combined with paclitaxel (PTX) on the proliferation and apoptosis of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma cell line Eca-109 in vitro. Eca-109 cells were treated with 17-AAG and PTX either alone or in combination. The proliferation of Eca-109 cells was detected by MTT assay, and the cell cycle changes and cell apoptosis were determined by flow cytometry. Compared with the control group, both 17-AAG and PTX significantly inhibited the proliferation of Eca-109 cells. A combined treatment of the cells with 0.5 µmol/L PTX and 0.625 µmol/L 17-AAG produced an obviously stronger inhibitory effect on the cell proliferation than either of the agents used alone (PEca-109 cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase and S phase, respectively, and their combined use caused cell cycle arrest in both G2/M and S phases. The cell apoptosis rates of Eca-109 cells treated with 17-AAG, PTX and their combination were 4.52%, 10.91%, and 29.88%, respectively, all significantly higher than that in the control group (1.32%); the combined treatment resulted in a distinct apoptotic peak that was significantly higher than that caused by either of the agents alone. 17-AAG and PTX can inhibit cell proliferation and promote apoptosis of Eca-109 cells, and their combination produces stronger effects in inhibiting cell proliferation and increasing cell apoptosis.

  1. Local anesthetic lidocaine induces apoptosis in human corneal stromal cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Zhou

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To demonstrate the apoptosis-inducing effect of lidocaine on human corneal stromal (HCS cells in vitro, and provide experimental basis for safety anesthetic usage in clinic of ophthalmology.METHODS: In vitro cultured HCS cells were treated with lidocaine at different doses and times, and their morphology was monitored successively with inverted phase contrast microscopy. The membrane permeability of them was detected by acridine orange/ethidium bromide (AO/EB double staining. The DNA fragmentation of them was examined by agarose gel electrophoresis, and their ultrastructure was observed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM, respectively.RESULTS: Exposure to lidocaine at doses from 0.3125g/L to 20g/L induced morphological changes of HCS cells such as cytoplasmic vacuolation, cellular shrinkage, and turning round, and elevated membrane permeability of these cells in AO/EB staining. The change of morphology and membrane permeability was dose- and time-dependent, while lidocaine at dose below 0.15625g/L could not induce these changes. Furthermore, lidocaine induced DNA fragmentation and ultrastructural changes such as cytoplasmic vacuolation, structural disorganization, chromatin condensation, and apoptotic body appearance of the cells.CONCLUSION: Lidocaine has significant cytotoxicity on human corneal stromal cells in vitro in a dose- and time-dependent manner by inducing apoptosis of these cells. The established experimental model and findings based on this model here help provide new insight into the apoptosis-inducing effect of local anesthetics in eye clinic.

  2. Rapid in vitro derivation of endothelium directly from human cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer D Elster

    Full Text Available The development of an independent blood supply by a tumor is essential for maintaining growth beyond a certain limited size and for providing a portal for metastatic dissemination. Host-derived endothelial cells (ECs residing in and compromising the tumor vasculature originate via distinct processes known as sprouting angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. More recently ECs originating directly from the tumor cells themselves have been described although the basis for this phenomenon remains poorly understood. Here we describe in vitro conditions that allow lung and ovarian cancer cells to undergo a rapid and efficient transition into ECs that are indistinguishable from those obtained in vivo. A variety of methods were used to establish that the acquired phenotypes and behaviors of these tumor-derived ECs (TDECs closely resemble those of authentic ECs. Xenografts arising from co-inoculated in vitro-derived TDECs and tumor cells were also more highly vascularized than control tumors; moreover, their blood vessels were on average larger and frequently contained admixtures of host-derived ECs and TDECs derived from the initial inoculum. These results demonstrate that cancer cells can be manipulated under well-defined in vitro conditions to initiate a tumor cell-to-EC transition that is largely cell-autonomous, highly efficient and closely mimics the in vivo process. These studies provide a suitable means by which to identify and perhaps modify the earliest steps in TDEC generation.

  3. Interferon Gamma-treated Dental Pulp Stem Cells Promote Human Mesenchymal Stem Cell Migration In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strojny, Chelsee; Boyle, Michael; Bartholomew, Amelia; Sundivakkam, Premanand; Alapati, Satish

    2015-08-01

    Chronic inflammation disrupts dental pulp regeneration by disintegrating the recruitment process of progenitors for repair. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) share the common features with dental pulp stem cells (DPSCs). The aim of the study was to investigate the migration of BM-MSCs toward DPSCs in response to inflammatory chemoattractants. Additionally, our studies also delineated the signaling mechanisms from BM-MSCs in mediating the proliferation and differentiation of DPSCs in vitro. Human DPSCs and BM-MSCs between passages 2 and 4 were used and were grown in odontogenic differentiation medium. Mineralization was determined by alizarin red staining analysis. Migration was assessed using crystal violet staining in cells grown in Boyden chamber Transwell inserts (Corning Inc Foundation, Tewksbury, MA). The mineralization potential of DPSCs was evaluated using alkaline phosphatase activity assay. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis was performed to assess the gene expression profile of chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (Cxcl) 3, 5, 6, 10, 11, 12, 14, and 16; stromal cell-derived factor (SDF) α; vascular endothelial growth factor; and fibroblast growth factor. Interferon gamma (FN-γ) treatment significantly abrogated the differentiation potential of DPSCs as shown by using alizarin red and alkaline phosphatase activity analysis. An increase in the migration of BM-MSCs was documented when cocultured with IFN-γ-treated DPSCs. RNA expression studies showed an increase in the levels of Cxcl6 and Cxcl12 in BM-MSCs when cocultured with IFN-γ-treated DPSCs. Additionally, an up-regulation of proangiogenic factors vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor were observed in DPSCs exposed to IFN-γ. Our findings indicate that inflamed IFN-γ-treated DPSCs release factors (presumably Cxcl6 and 12) that contribute to the homing of MSCs. This model might provide a potential research tool for studying MSC-DPSC cross talk and

  4. [Personalized Ophthalmology - Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for In Vitro Modelling of Retinal Degenerative Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandl, Caroline; Weber, Bernhard H F

    2018-02-16

    Today, the search for therapeutic options to treat retinal degeneration often relies on an in-depth understanding of the underlying pathological events. Alternatively, it is conceivable to search, in an undirected screening approach, for chemical compounds affecting disease outcome. For both approaches, there is an urgent need for in vitro and, ideally, in vivo disease models that adequately reflect the site of pathology. Currently available animal models possess limitations as they often develop only defined aspects of disease. Primary cell cultures, derived from the posterior pole of the eye, can only be obtained after invasive surgery or are available post mortem, but due to rapid cell senescence are not suited for long-term analysis. Immortalized retinal cell lines, on the other hand, differ in many aspects from native cells. In this situation, a promising alternative could arise from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). This cell species can be generated via non-invasive techniques, they are patient-specific, can be propagated indefinitely, and theoretically can be differentiated in all types of retinal cells due to their pluripotent capacities. Importantly, the iPSC-derived retinal cells greatly resemble native cells in many characteristic traits. In this review we present a selection of established in vivo und in vitro models for retinal degenerative disease. We also discuss the potential of iPSCs for personalized in vitro modelling and provide an overview of existent iPSC-derived cell types of the posterior pole, particularly for cells of the retinal pigment epithelium. We finally give an outlook for the potential of such cells for basic research in ophthalmology. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Organotypic in vitro models of human cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Commandeur, Suzan

    2013-01-01

    Skin cancer is the most common type of cancer in fair-skinned populations. Cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) comprises about 15% of all skin cancer diagnoses. Treatment associated with the high and rising prevalence of cutaneous SCC puts an increasingly high financial burden on society,

  6. Cleft palate cells can regenerate a palatal mucosa in vitro.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, J.; Lamme, E.N.; Steegers-Theunissen, R.P.M.; Krapels, I.P.C.; Bian, Z.; Marres, H.A.M.; Spauwen, P.H.M.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Hoff, J.W. Von den

    2008-01-01

    Cleft palate repair leaves full-thickness mucosal defects on the palate. Healing might be improved by implantation of a mucosal substitute. However, the genetic and phenotypic deviations of cleft palate cells may hamper tissue engineering. The aim of this study was to construct mucosal substitutes

  7. In vitro production of azadirachtin from cell suspension cultures of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The present study aimed to elucidate the effect of nutritional alteration on biomass content and azadirachtin production in cell suspensions of the elite neem variety crida-8. Variations in total nitrogen availability in the medium in terms of different ratios of nitrate:ammonium showed that the ratio 4:1 revealed a profound effect, ...

  8. Dendritic cell-based in vitro assays for vaccine immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandebriel, Rob; Hoefnagel, Marcel M N

    2012-09-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are pivotal in the induction of adaptive immune responses because they can activate naive T-cells. Moreover, they steer these adaptive immune responses by integrating various stimuli, such as from different pathogen associated molecular patterns and the cytokine milieu. Immature DC are very well capable of ingesting protein antigens, whereas mature DC are efficient presenters of peptides to naive T cells. Human DC can be readily cultured from peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which are isolated from human blood. There is a strong need to monitor in a high-throughput fashion the immunogenicity of candidate vaccines during the process of vaccine development. Furthermore, regulators require efficacy and safety testing for batch release. For some vaccines, these tests require animal testing, causing pain and discomfort, which cannot be contested because it would interfere with the test results. With the aims of promoting vaccine development and reducing the number of animals for batch release testing, we propose to use more broadly human DC for vaccine immunogenicity testing. In this commentary, this proposition is illustrated by several examples in which the maturation of human DC was successfully used to test for vaccine and adjuvant immunogenicity.

  9. Neonatal Satellite Cells Form Small Myotubes in Vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carvajal Monroy, P.L.; Grefte, S.; Kuijpers-Jagtman, A.M.; Den Hoff, Von J.W.; Wagener, F.A.D.T.G.

    2017-01-01

    Although palatal muscle reconstruction in patients with cleft palate takes place during early childhood, normal speech development is often not achieved. We hypothesized that the intrinsic properties of head satellite cells (SCs) and the young age of these patients contribute to the poor muscle

  10. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  11. Rapid and non-enzymatic in vitro retrieval of tumour cells from surgical specimens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Mack

    Full Text Available The study of tumourigenesis commonly involves the use of established cell lines or single cell suspensions of primary tumours. Standard methods for the generation of short-term tumour cell cultures include the disintegration of tissue based on enzymatic and mechanical stress. Here, we describe a simple and rapid method for the preparation of single cells from primary carcinomas, which is independent of enzymatic treatment and feeder cells. Tumour biopsies are processed to 1 mm(3 cubes termed explants, which are cultured 1-3 days on agarose-coated well plates in specified medium. Through incisions generated in the explants, single cells are retrieved and collected from the culture supernatant and can be used for further analysis including in vitro and in vivo studies. Collected cells retain tumour-forming capacity in xenotransplantation assays, mimic the phenotype of the primary tumour, and facilitate the generation of cell lines.

  12. Rat Nasal Respiratory Mucosa-Derived Ectomesenchymal Stem Cells Differentiate into Schwann-Like Cells Promoting the Differentiation of PC12 Cells and Forming Myelin In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cell (SC transplantation as a cell-based therapy can enhance peripheral and central nerve repair experimentally, but it is limited by the donor site morbidity for clinical application. We investigated weather respiratory mucosa stem cells (REMSCs, a kind of ectomesenchymal stem cells (EMSCs, isolated from rat nasal septum can differentiate into functional Schwann-like cells (SC-like cells. REMSCs proliferated quickly in vitro and expressed the neural crest markers (nestin, vimentin, SOX10, and CD44. Treated with a mixture of glial growth factors for 7 days, REMSCs differentiated into SC-like cells. The differentiated REMSCs (dREMSCs exhibited a spindle-like morphology similar to SC cells. Immunocytochemical staining and Western blotting indicated that SC-like cells expressed the glial markers (GFAP, S100β, Galc, and P75 and CNPase. When cocultured with dREMSCs for 5 days, PC12 cells differentiated into mature neuron-like cells with long neurites. More importantly, dREMSCs could form myelin structures with the neurites of PC12 cells at 21 days in vitro. Our data indicated that REMSCs, a kind of EMSCs, could differentiate into SC-like cells and have the ability to promote the differentiation of PC12 cells and form myelin in vitro.

  13. In vitro effects of simulated microgravity on Sertoli cell function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masini, M. A.; Prato, P.; Scarabelli, L.; Lanza, C.; Palmero, S.; Pointis, G.; Ricci, F.; Strollo, F.

    2011-02-01

    With the advent of space flights questions concerning the effects of microgravity (0×G) on human reproductive physiology have received great attention. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of 0×G on Sertoli cells. A Sertoli cell line from mouse testis (42GPA9) was analyzed for cytoskeletal and Sex Hormone Binding Globilin (SHBG) changes by immunohistochemistry, for antioxidant content by RT-PCR and for culture medium lactate concentrations by protein chemistry. Cells were cultured for 6, 24 and 48 h on a three-dimensional Random Positioning Machine (3D-RPM); static controls (1×G) were positioned on the supporting frame. At the end of each experiment, cultured cells were either fixed in paraformaldehyde or lysed and RNA-extracted or used for culture medium lactate measurements as needed. At 0×G, Sertoli cytoskeleton became disorganized, microtubules fragmented and SHBG undetectable already after 24 h, with alterations worsening by 48 h. It was evident that various antioxidant systems appreciably increased during the first 24 h but significantly decreased at 48 h. No changes occurred in the 1×G samples. Initially, 0×G seemed to disturb antioxidant protection strategies allowing the testes to support sperm production, thus generating an aging-like state of oxidative stress. Lactate production at 0×G slightly decreased after 24 h. Further experiments are needed in space to investigate upon steroidogenesis and germ cell differentiation within the testis, to rule out male infertility as a possible consequence, which could be a problem, as life expectancy increases.

  14. Hydroxycinnamate conjugates as potential monolignol replacements: In vitro lignification and cell wall studies with rosmarinic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The plasticity of lignin biosynthesis should permit the inclusion of new compatible phenolic monomers such as rosmarinic acid (RA) and analogous catechol derivatives to create cell wall lignins that are less recalcitrant to biomass processing. In vitro lignin polymerization experiments revealed that...

  15. In vitro oxygen availability modulates the effect of artesunate on HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, James; Gannon, Sandra; Rawe, Sarah; Murphy, James E J

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia can affect chemotherapeutic drug efficacy in cancer patients, yet related in vitro assays in oxygen-rich environment remain the norm. Such levels are well beyond normoxic/hypoxic levels typically experienced by normal tissues/tumor masses. The present study evaluated how artesunate anti-tumor efficacy is modulated by oxygen availability in HeLa cells and its implications for future in vitro analyses. Real-time cell analysis was employed to evaluate HeLa cell toxicity to artesunate at 21%, 4% or 1% oxygen. Cell count analysis was performed to validate real-time data. An increase in artesunate efficacy was observed when oxygen concentration was reduced from atmospheric levels down to in vivo-relevant levels. Artesunate is more potent than originally reported using standard oxygen conditions during in vitro studies. The inclusion of this long overlooked variable as standard in future in vitro analysis procedures is warranted. Copyright© 2014 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  16. UP-REGULATION OF ANTITHROMBOTIC ECTONUCLEOTIDASES BY ASPIRIN IN HUMAN ENDOTHELIAL-CELLS IN-VITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CHEUNG, PK; VISSER, J; BAKKER, WW

    1994-01-01

    Ecto ATP-diphosphohydrolase (apyrase) activity of human endothelial cells following aspirin treatment has been studied in-vitro. It was shown by HPLC analysis of supernatant samples that pre-incubation of the cultures with aspirin resulted in a significantly increased turnover of supplemented ATP

  17. Assessment of MCF-7 cells as an in vitro model system for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Studies have been carried out to establish an experimental in vitro model system for routine testing of oxidative stress inducers through biochemical analysis using human breast carcinoma (MCF-7) cell line. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been chosen as a test chemical oxidant to assess the level of induced glutathione ...

  18. Effects of solvents and dosing procedure on chemical toxicity in cell-based in vitro assays.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanneberger, K.; Rico Rico, A.; Kramer, N.I.; Busser, F.J.M.; Hermens, J.L.M.; Schirmer, K.

    2010-01-01

    Due to the implementation of new legislation, such as REACh, a dramatic increase of animal use for toxicity testing is expected and the search for alternatives is timely. Cell-based in vitro assays are promising alternatives. However, the behavior of chemicals in these assays is still poorly

  19. Effect of Acrylamide on Oocyte Nuclear Maturation and Cumulus Cells Apoptosis in Mouse In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuzhen; Jiang, Ligang; Zhong, Tao; Kong, Shuhui; Zheng, Rongbin; Kong, Fengyun; Zhang, Cong; Zhang, Lei; An, Liguo

    2015-01-01

    Acrylamide (ACR) is a chemical compound with severe neurotoxicity, genotoxicity, carcinogenicity and reproductive toxicity. Recent studies showed that ACR impairs the function of reproductive organs, e.g., epididymis and testes. In vitro maturation of mouse oocyte is a sensitive assay to identify potential chemical hazard to female fertility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the adverse effects of ACR on the nuclear maturation and cumulus cells apoptosis of mouse oocytes in vitro. Cumulus–oocyte complexes were incubated in a maturation medium containing 0, 5, 10 and 20 μM of ACR. Chromosome alignment and spindle morphology of oocytes was determined by immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy. Our results showed that oocytes exposed to different doses of ACR in vitro were associated with a significant decrease of oocyte maturation, significant increase of chromosome misalignment rate, occurrence of abnormal spindle configurations, and the inhibition of oocyte parthenogenetic activation. Furthermore, apoptosis of cumulus cells was determined by TUNEL and CASPASE-3 assay. Results showed that apoptosis in cumulus cells was enhanced and the expression of CASPASE-3 was increased after cumulus–oocyte complexes were exposed to ACR. Therefore, ACR may affect the nuclear maturation of oocytes via the apoptosis of cumulus cells in vitro. PMID:26275143

  20. In vitro developmental toxicity test detects inhibition of stem cell differentiation by silica nanoparticles.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, M.V.; Annema, W.; Salvati, A.; Lesniak, A.; Elsaesser, A.; Barnes, C.; McKerr, G.; Howard, C.; Lynch, I.; Dawson, K.; Piersma, A.H.; de Jong, W.H.

    2009-01-01

    While research into the potential toxic properties of nanomaterials is now increasing, the area of developmental toxicity has remained relatively uninvestigated. The embryonic stem cell test is an in vitro screening assay used to investigate the embryotoxic potential of chemicals by determining

  1. Toxicity of formaldehyde and acrolein mixtures : in vitro studies using nasal epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cassee, F.R.; Stenhuis, W.S.; Groten, J.P.; Feron, V.J.

    1996-01-01

    In vitro studies with human and rat nasal epithelial cells were carried out to investigate the combined toxicity of formaldehyde and acrolein and the role of aldehyde dehydrogenases in this process. These studies showed that the toxic effect of mixtures of aldehydes was additive. In addition,

  2. An in vitro model of intra-epithelial expansion of transformed urothelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rebel, J.M.J.; Boer, de W.I.; Thijssen, C.D.; Vermey, M.; Zwarthoff, E.C.; Kwast, van der T.H.

    1993-01-01

    Replacement of normal urothelium by pre-cancerous epithelium may explain the high recurrence rate of human bladder cancer. An in vitro model was designed in order to study the mechanisms of expansion of transformed urothelial cells at the expense of normal urothelium. For this purpose, mouse bladder

  3. Functionally deficient neuronal differentiation of mouse embryonic neural stem cells in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Balasubramaniyan, [No Value; de Haas, AH; Bakels, R; Koper, A; Boddeke, HWGM; Copray, JM

    Embryonic mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) were isolated from E14 mice, multiplied in medium containing epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and plated in laminin-coated wells in basic serum-free neurobasal medium. After 7 days in vitro, approximately 20% of the

  4. Studying the composition of mRNPs in vitro using splicing-competent cell extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckelberg, Anna-Lena; Gehring, Niels H

    2014-02-01

    The correct processing and faithful decoding of mRNAs during gene expression depends on the interaction with RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). The association of RBPs with pre-mRNAs starts during transcription by RNA polymerase II and undergoes constant remodeling during pre-mRNA processing and later steps of genes expression. Recently developed high throughput methods enabled to define RBP binding sites in vivo and to identify a large number of novel RBPs in eukaryotic cells. However, the detailed characterization of RBP-RNA interactions as well as the analysis of functional RNPs is greatly facilitated by well-defined in vitro systems. Here, we describe a versatile method to study the assembly and splicing-dependent remodeling of mRNPs in vitro. This method employs splicing-competent whole cell extracts (WCE) generated from transfected human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. FLAG-tagged proteins present in the WCE are incorporated into mRNPs in vitro and afterwards used to immunoprecipitate substrate RNAs. We outline the principles of purifying in vitro assembled mRNPs and provide detailed protocols for the preparation and use of whole cell extracts. Alternative purification strategies and RNA substrates are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Citotoxicity evaluation of three dental adhesives on vero cells in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Catunda, Raisa-Queiroz; Vieira, Jeymesson-Raphael-Cardoso; de Oliveira, Erwelly-Barros; da Silva, Eliete-Cavalcanti; Brasil, Veruska-Lima-Moura; Perez, Danyel-Elias-da Cruz

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate, in vitro, the potential cytotoxicity of three different dental adhesives systems (Adper Single Bond 2 -SB, Silorane System Adhesive Bond -SSAB and Single Bond Universal -SBU) on cultivated Vero cells after different contact times. Material and Methods The cells were cultured in a concentration of 2 x 105 cells/mL for 24h and grown to sub-confluent monolayers. VERO cells were exposed to 25?l of conditioned extracts obtained from 24h, 48h and 72h immersion of adhesive sa...

  6. In vitro enhancement of extracellular matrix formation as natural bioscaffold for stem cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naroeni, Aroem; Shalihah, Qonitha; Meilany, Sofy

    2017-02-01

    Growing cells in plastic with liquid media for in vitro study is very common but far from physiological. The use of scaffold materials is more biocompatible. Extracellular matrix provides tissue integrity which acts as a native scaffold for cell attachment and interaction, as well as it serves as a reservoir for growth factors. For this reason, we have developed natural scaffold from mice fibroblast to form a natural scaffold for stem cell culture. Fibroblasts were cultured under crowded condition and lysed to form natural scaffold. The natural scaffold formation was observed using immunofluorescence which then will be used and tested for stem cell propagation and differentiation.

  7. In Vitro Effect of Laser-Induced Hydrodynamics on Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elagin, V V; Pavlikov, A I; Yusupov, V I; Shirmanova, M V; Zagaynova, E V; Bagratashvili, V N

    2015-11-01

    We studied the effect of laser-induced hydrodynamic on viability of Colo-26 murine colon carcinoma cells in vitro. Laser-induced hydrodynamics was generated by a laser (λ=1.56 μ, power 3 W, 5 min exposure); to this end, the fiber end was submersed into a buffer above the cell monolayer. It was found that laser-induced hydrodynamics destructed the monolayer at standoff distances of between the working end of the laser fiber to cell monolayer of 1 and 5 mm and triggers apoptotic and necrotic death in remaining cells at a distance of 4 mm from the emitter.

  8. In vitro effects and mechanisms of lycopene in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, S J; Li, J; Zhou, Y; Tuo, M; Qin, X X; Yu, Q; Cheng, H; Li, Y M

    2017-04-13

    Breast cancer adversely affects the health status of women; therefore, the prevention and treatment of breast cancer is of critical importance. Lycopene is known to possess several biological effects such as removal of free radicals, alleviation of biological oxidative injury, and inhibition of tumor growth. In this study, we aimed to illustrate the effect of lycopene on tumor cell proliferation and modulation of cancer progression as well as its possible underlying mechanisms in human breast carcinoma cell line MCF-7 in vitro. MCF-7 cells were treated with different lycopene concentrations for 24, 48, and 72 h. Light field microscopy was used to observe cell morphology. MTT assay was used to determine the effect of lycopene on MCF-7 proliferation. Flow cytometry was employed to evaluate cell apoptosis. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the expression of p53 and Bax. Under microscopic examination, the untreated MCF-7 cells appeared to have a diamond or polygonal shape. Lycopene treatment resulted in cell shrinkage and breakage, whose severity increased in a dose and duration dependent manner. In addition, reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis (P lycopene could also upregulate the expression of p53 and Bax mRNAs in MCF-7 cells. In conclusion, lycopene inhibits proliferation and facilitates apoptosis of MCF-7 cells in vitro, possibly by regulating the expression of p53 and Bax.

  9. In vitro and in vivo bioluminescent quantification of viable stem cells in engineered constructs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logeart-Avramoglou, Delphine; Oudina, Karim; Bourguignon, Marianne; Delpierre, Laetitia; Nicola, Marie-Anne; Bensidhoum, Morad; Arnaud, Eric; Petite, Herve

    2010-06-01

    Bioluminescent quantification of viable cells inside three-dimensional porous scaffolds was performed in vitro and in vivo. The assay quantified the bioluminescence of murine stem (C3H10T1/2) cells tagged with the luciferase gene reporter and distributed inside scaffolds of either soft, translucent, AN69 polymeric hydrogel or hard, opaque, coral ceramic materials. Quantitative evaluation of bioluminescence emitted from tagged cells adhering to these scaffolds was performed in situ using either cell lysates and a luminometer or intact cells and a bioluminescence imaging system. Despite attenuation of the signal when compared to cells alone, the bioluminescence correlated with the number of cells (up to 1.5 x 10(5)) present on each material scaffold tested, both in vitro and noninvasively in vivo (subcutaneous implants in the mouse model). The noninvasive bioluminescence measurement technique proved to be comparable to the cell-destructive bioluminescence measurement technique. Monitoring the kinetics of luciferase expression via bioluminescence enabled real-time assessment of cell survival and proliferation on the scaffolds tested over prolonged (up to 59 days) periods of time. This novel, sensitive, easy, fast-to-implement, quantitative bioluminescence assay has great, though untapped, potential for screening and determining noninvasively the presence of viable cells on biomaterial constructs in the tissue engineering and tissue regeneration fields.

  10. HMGN2 protein inhibits the growth of infected T24 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Danfeng; Zhang, Ping; Zhou, Min; Feng, Yun; Chen, Qianming

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells and cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been implicated as important effectors of antitumor defense. High mobility group nucleosomal-binding domain 2 (HMGN2) may be one of the effector molecules of CTL and NK cells. The antitumor effect and mechanism of HMGN2 was investigated in this study. HMGN2 was isolated and purified from the human monocyte cell line THP-1 and then characterized by Tricine-SDS-PAGE, western blot, and mass spectrum determination. Confluent T24 cells were incubated with Klebsiella pneumoniae for 2 h, after which the extracellular bacteria were killed by the addition of gentamicin. The cells then were treated with a variety of concentrations of HMGN2. The effect of HMGN2 on the proliferation of T24 cells was analyzed with MTT, Hoechst and flow cytometry assays. Cell growth assay results demonstrated that HMGN2 significantly inhibited the growth of T24 bladder cancer cell lines infected by K. pneumoniae. Furthermore, results of the Hoechst and flow cytometry assays indicated that HMGN2 may promote apoptosis in this experimental model. These results suggest HMGN2 could inhibit the growth of the infected human bladder cancer cells in vitro. HMGN2 protein could inhibit the growth of infected T24 cells in vitro, and the anti-tumor action of HMGN2 was due to induce apoptosis.

  11. The in vitro biokinetics of chlorpromazine and diazepam in aggregating rat brain cell cultures after repeated exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broeders, Jessica J W; Hermens, Joop L M; Blaauboer, Bas J; Zurich, Marie-Gabrielle

    2015-01-01

    Neurotoxic effects of compounds can be tested in vitro using cell systems. One example is aggregating rat brain cell cultures. For the extrapolation of in vitro data to the in vivo situation, it is important to take the biokinetics of the test compound into account. In addition, the exposure in vivo

  12. In-vitro monitoring of cell-mediated immunity to dinitrochlorobenzene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, D N; Ledger, V; Diamandopoulos, A

    1976-11-27

    A dinitrochlorobenzene (D.N.C.B.)/red-blood-cell conjugate inhibited migration of leucocytes which came from D.N.C.B. sensitised patients. This effect provided the basis for a rapid, sensitive, and quantitative in-vitro measure of D.N.C.B. sensitivity. Frequent serial measurement of cell-mediated immunity was possible with the test, provided D.N.C.B. sensitivity was maintained by occasional skin patch tests.

  13. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) attenuates in vitro mast cell and peripheral blood mononucleocyte cell histamine release induced by N-acetylcysteine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulson, James; Thompson, John Paul

    2010-02-01

    The treatment of acute paracetamol (acetaminophen) poisoning with N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is frequently complicated by an anaphylactoid reaction to the antidote. The mechanism that underlies this reaction is unclear. We used the human mast cell line 1 (HMC-1) and human peripheral blood mononucleocytes (PBMCs) to investigate the effects of NAC and paracetamol on histamine secretion in vitro. HMC-1 and human PBMCs were incubated in the presence of increasing concentrations of NAC +/- paracetamol. Cell viability was determined by the Trypan Blue Assay, and histamine secretion was measured by ELISA. NAC was toxic to HMC-1 cells at 100 mg/mL and to PBMCs at 67 mg/mL. NAC increased HMC-1 and PBMC histamine secretion at concentrations of NAC from 20 to 50 mg/mL and 2.5 to 100 mg/mL, respectively. NAC-induced histamine secretion by both cell types was reduced by co-incubation with 2.5 mg/mL of paracetamol. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is capable of modifying histamine secretion in vitro. This may explain the clinical observation of a lower incidence of adverse reactions to NAC in vivo when higher concentrations of paracetamol are present than when paracetamol concentrations are low. Paracetamol (acetaminophen) attenuates in vitro mast cell and PBMC cell histamine release induced by NAC.

  14. Gingival Stromal Cells as an In Vitro Model: Cannabidiol Modulates Genes Linked With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Thangavelu Soundara; Scionti, Domenico; Diomede, Francesca; Grassi, Gianpaolo; Pollastro, Federica; Piattelli, Adriano; Cocco, Lucio; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela; Trubiani, Oriana

    2017-04-01

    Research in recent years has extensively investigated the therapeutic efficacy of mesenchymal stromal cells in regenerative medicine for many neurodegenerative diseases at preclinical and clinical stages. However, the success rate of stem cell therapy remains less at translational phase. Lack of relevant animal models that potentially simulate the molecular etiology of human pathological symptoms might be a reason behind such poor clinical outcomes associated with stem cell therapy. Apparently, self-renewal and differentiation ability of mesenchymal stem cells may help to study the early developmental signaling pathways connected with the diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), etc., at in vitro level. Cannabidiol, a non-psychotrophic cannabinoid, has been demonstrated as a potent anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective agent in neurological preclinical models. In the present study, we investigated the modulatory role of cannabidiol on genes associated with ALS using human gingiva-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (hGMSCs) as an in vitro model system. Next generation transcriptomic sequencing analysis demonstrated considerable modifications in the expression of genes connected with ALS pathology, oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and excitotoxicity in hGMSCs treated with cannabidiol. Our results suggest the efficacy of cannabidiol to delineate the unknown molecular pathways, which may underlie ALS pathology at an early stage using hGMSCs as a compelling in vitro system. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 819-828, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Live Cell in Vitro and in Vivo Imaging Applications: Accelerating Drug Discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isherwood, Beverley; Timpson, Paul; McGhee, Ewan J; Anderson, Kurt I; Canel, Marta; Serrels, Alan; Brunton, Valerie G; Carragher, Neil O

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic regulation of specific molecular processes and cellular phenotypes in live cell systems reveal unique insights into cell fate and drug pharmacology that are not gained from traditional fixed endpoint assays. Recent advances in microscopic imaging platform technology combined with the development of novel optical biosensors and sophisticated image analysis solutions have increased the scope of live cell imaging applications in drug discovery. We highlight recent literature examples where live cell imaging has uncovered novel insight into biological mechanism or drug mode-of-action. We survey distinct types of optical biosensors and associated analytical methods for monitoring molecular dynamics, in vitro and in vivo. We describe the recent expansion of live cell imaging into automated target validation and drug screening activities through the development of dedicated brightfield and fluorescence kinetic imaging platforms. We provide specific examples of how temporal profiling of phenotypic response signatures using such kinetic imaging platforms can increase the value of in vitro high-content screening. Finally, we offer a prospective view of how further application and development of live cell imaging technology and reagents can accelerate preclinical lead optimization cycles and enhance the in vitro to in vivo translation of drug candidates. PMID:24310493

  16. Human saliva exposure modulates bone cell performance in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proksch, Susanne; Steinberg, Thorsten; Keller, Constantin; Wolkewitz, Martin; Wiedmann-Al-Ahmad, Margit; Finkenzeller, Guenter; Hannig, Christian; Hellwig, Elmar; Al-Ahmad, Ali

    2012-02-01

    Various situations encountered by a clinician during the daily routine including surgical periodontitis therapy, dental implant insertion, or tooth extraction involve the contact of saliva with the jaw bone. However, there are only sparse data concerning the influence of saliva on bone cells. Saliva specimens were incorporated within culture medium and administered to murine MC3T3 osteoblasts, of which the morphology (REM), proliferation (EZ4U), and differentiation (qRT-PCR, alkaline phosphatase activity, extracellular matrix calcification) were assessed. Simultaneously, the composition of saliva media was analyzed with respect to the content of lactoferrin, activities of classical salivary enzymes, and the ability to provoke inflammatory cytokine production (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) in MC3T3 osteoblasts. The morphology, proliferation, and expression of differentiation-associated genes were seriously handicapped by saliva contact. Saliva-touched cells exhibited less alkaline phosphatase but normal levels of extracellular matrix mineralization. Saliva-containing culture media featured physiological activities of salivary enzymes and considerable amounts of lactoferrin but almost completely lacked salivary alkaline phosphatase and unspecific proteases. Upon saliva incubation, MC3T3 osteoblasts did not release noteworthy levels of interleukin-1 beta or tumor necrosis factor alpha. Although saliva is generally considered to vitalize oral tissues, this study reveals that it harms osteoblast-like cells more due to the presence of salivary enzymes than by triggering of inflammation. This issue is clinically relevant because it broadens the understanding of the bone cell fate within the rather complex cosmos of the oral cavity thereby providing a basis for clinical decision making and treatment guidelines. It seems to be reasonable to restrict the contact period between saliva and bone.

  17. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  18. In vitro differentiation of human oocyte-like cells from oogonial stem cells: single-cell isolation and molecular characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silvestris, Erica; Cafforio, Paola; D'Oronzo, Stella; Felici, Claudia; Silvestris, Franco; Loverro, Giuseppe

    2018-01-03

    Are the large cells derived from cultured DEAD box polypeptide 4 (DDX4)-positive oogonial stem cells (OSCs), isolated from the ovarian cortex of non-menopausal and menopausal women, oocyte-like cells? Under appropriate culture conditions, DDX4-positive OSCs from non-menopausal and menopausal women differentiate into large haploid oocyte-like cells expressing the major oocyte markers growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF-9) and synaptonemal complex protein 3 (SYCP3) and then enter meiosis. The recent reports of OSCs in the ovaries of non-menopausal and menopausal women suggest that neo-oogenesis is inducible during ovarian senescence. However, several questions remain regarding the isolation of these cells, their spontaneous maturation in vitro, and the final differentiation state of the resulting putative oocytes. DDX4-positive OSCs were obtained from 19 menopausal and 13 non-menopausal women (who underwent hysterectomy for uterine fibroma, ovarian cyst, or other benign pathologies) and cultured for up to 3 weeks. Large and small cells were individually isolated and typed for early and late differentiation markers. Ovarian cortex fragments were processed by immuno-magnetic separation using a rabbit anti-human DDX4 antibody and the positive populations were measured by assessing both FRAGILIS and stage-specific embryonic antigen 4 (SSEA-4) expression. After 3 weeks in culture, large oocyte-like cells were individually isolated by DEPArray based on PKH26 red staining and cell size determination. GDF-9 and SYCP3 as final, and developmental pluripotency-associated protein 3 (DPPA3) as primordial, germline markers were measured by droplet digital PCR. The haploid versus diploid chromosomal content of chromosomes X and 5 was investigated using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). SSEA-4+ and FRAGILIS+ subsets of DDX4-positive populations were present at lower mean levels in menopausal (SSEA-4+: 46.7%; FRAGILIS+: 47.5%) than in non-menopausal (SSEA-4+: 64

  19. An epigenetic view of plant cells cultured in vitro: somaclonal variation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Célia; Marum, Liliana

    2011-07-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms are highly dynamic events that modulate gene expression. As more accurate and powerful tools for epigenetic analysis become available for application in a broader range of plant species, analysis of the epigenetic landscape of plant cell cultures may turn out to be crucial for understanding variant phenotypes. In vitro plant cell and tissue culture methodologies are important for many ongoing plant propagation and breeding programmes as well as for cutting-edge research in several plant model species. Although it has long been known that in vitro conditions induce variation at several levels, most studies using such conditions rely on the assumption that in vitro cultured plant cells/tissues mostly conform genotypically and phenotypically. However, when large-scale clonal propagation is the aim, there has been a concern in confirming true-to-typeness using molecular markers for evaluating stability. While in most reports genetic variation has been found to occur at relatively modest frequencies, variation in DNA methylation patterns seems to be much more frequent and in some cases it has been directly implicated in phenotypic variation. Recent advances in the field of epigenetics have uncovered highly dynamic mechanisms of chromatin remodelling occurring during cell dedifferentiation and differentiation processes on which in vitro adventitious plant regeneration systems are based. Here, an overview of recent findings related to developmental switches occurring during in vitro culture is presented. Additionally, an update on the detection of epigenetic variation in plant cell cultures will be provided and discussed in the light of recent progress in the plant epigenetics field.

  20. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cells onto a partially wounded human cornea in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Charles; Hardarson, Thorir; Ellerström, Catharina; Nordberg, Markus; Caisander, Gunilla; Rao, Mahendra; Hyllner, Johan; Stenevi, Ulf

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether cells originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) could be successfully transplanted onto a partially wounded human cornea. A second aim was to study the ability of the transplanted cells to differentiate into corneal epithelial-like cells. Spontaneously, differentiated hESCs were transplanted onto a human corneal button (without limbus) with the epithelial layer partially removed. The cells were cultured on Bowman's membrane for up to 9 days, and the culture dynamics documented in a time-lapse system. As the transplanted cells originated from a genetically engineered hESC line, they all expressed green fluorescent protein, which facilitated their identification during the culture experiments, tissue preparation and analysis. To detect any differentiation into human corneal epithelial-like cells, we analysed the transplanted cells by immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for CK3, CK15 and PAX6. The transplanted cells established and expanded on Bowman's membrane, forming a 1-4 cell layer surrounded by host corneal epithelial cells. Expression of the corneal marker PAX6 appeared 3 days after transplantation, and after 6 days, the cells were expressing both PAX6 and CK3. This shows that it is possible to transplant cells originating from hESCs onto Bowman's membrane with the epithelial layer partially removed and to get these cells to establish, grow and differentiate into corneal epithelial-like cells in vitro. © 2012 The Authors. Acta Ophthalmologica © 2012 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation.

  1. Cellular automata model for human articular chondrocytes migration, proliferation and cell death: An in vitro validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaca-González, J J; Gutiérrez, M L; Guevara, J M; Garzón-Alvarado, D A

    2017-01-01

    Articular cartilage is characterized by low cell density of only one cell type, chondrocytes, and has limited self-healing properties. When articular cartilage is affected by traumatic injuries, a therapeutic strategy such as autologous chondrocyte implantation is usually proposed for its treatment. This approach requires in vitro chondrocyte expansion to yield high cell number for cell transplantation. To improve the efficiency of this procedure, it is necessary to assess cell dynamics such as migration, proliferation and cell death during culture. Computational models such as cellular automata can be used to simulate cell dynamics in order to enhance the result of cell culture procedures. This methodology has been implemented for several cell types; however, an experimental validation is required for each one. For this reason, in this research a cellular automata model, based on random-walk theory, was devised in order to predict articular chondrocyte behavior in monolayer culture during cell expansion. Results demonstrated that the cellular automata model corresponded to cell dynamics and computed-accurate quantitative results. Moreover, it was possible to observe that cell dynamics depend on weighted probabilities derived from experimental data and cell behavior varies according to the cell culture period. Thus, depending on whether cells were just seeded or proliferated exponentially, culture time probabilities differed in percentages in the CA model. Furthermore, in the experimental assessment a decreased chondrocyte proliferation was observed along with increased passage number. This approach is expected to having other uses as in enhancing articular cartilage therapies based on tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  2. Fibroblasts derived from human pluripotent stem cells activate angiogenic responses in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamis, Yulia; Silva, Eduardo A; Hewitt, Kyle J; Brudno, Yevgeny; Levenberg, Shulamit; Mooney, David J; Garlick, Jonathan A

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESC/hiPSC) are promising cell sources for the derivation of large numbers of specific cell types for tissue engineering and cell therapy applications. We have describe a directed differentiation protocol that generates fibroblasts from both hESC and hiPSC (EDK/iPDK) that support the repair and regeneration of epithelial tissue in engineered, 3D skin equivalents. In the current study, we analyzed the secretory profiles of EDK and iPDK cells to investigate the production of factors that activate and promote angiogenesis. Analysis of in vitro secretion profiles from EDK and iPDK cells demonstrated the elevated secretion of pro-angiogenic soluble mediators, including VEGF, HGF, IL-8, PDGF-AA, and Ang-1, that stimulated endothelial cell sprouting in a 3D model of angiogenesis in vitro. Phenotypic analysis of EDK and iPDK cells during the course of differentiation from hESCs and iPSCs revealed that both cell types progressively acquired pericyte lineage markers NG2, PDGFRβ, CD105, and CD73 and demonstrated transient induction of pericyte progenitor markers CD31, CD34, and Flk1/VEGFR2. Furthermore, when co-cultured with endothelial cells in 3D fibrin-based constructs, EDK and iPDK cells promoted self-assembly of vascular networks and vascular basement membrane deposition. Finally, transplantation of EDK cells into mice with hindlimb ischemia significantly reduced tissue necrosis and improved blood perfusion, demonstrating the potential of these cells to stimulate angiogenic responses in vivo. These findings demonstrate that stable populations of pericyte-like angiogenic cells can be generated with high efficiency from hESC and hiPSC using a directed differentiation approach. This provides new cell sources and opportunities for vascular tissue engineering and for the development of novel strategies in regenerative medicine.

  3. Fibroblasts derived from human pluripotent stem cells activate angiogenic responses in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulia Shamis

    Full Text Available Human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells (hESC/hiPSC are promising cell sources for the derivation of large numbers of specific cell types for tissue engineering and cell therapy applications. We have describe a directed differentiation protocol that generates fibroblasts from both hESC and hiPSC (EDK/iPDK that support the repair and regeneration of epithelial tissue in engineered, 3D skin equivalents. In the current study, we analyzed the secretory profiles of EDK and iPDK cells to investigate the production of factors that activate and promote angiogenesis. Analysis of in vitro secretion profiles from EDK and iPDK cells demonstrated the elevated secretion of pro-angiogenic soluble mediators, including VEGF, HGF, IL-8, PDGF-AA, and Ang-1, that stimulated endothelial cell sprouting in a 3D model of angiogenesis in vitro. Phenotypic analysis of EDK and iPDK cells during the course of differentiation from hESCs and iPSCs revealed that both cell types progressively acquired pericyte lineage markers NG2, PDGFRβ, CD105, and CD73 and demonstrated transient induction of pericyte progenitor markers CD31, CD34, and Flk1/VEGFR2. Furthermore, when co-cultured with endothelial cells in 3D fibrin-based constructs, EDK and iPDK cells promoted self-assembly of vascular networks and vascular basement membrane deposition. Finally, transplantation of EDK cells into mice with hindlimb ischemia significantly reduced tissue necrosis and improved blood perfusion, demonstrating the potential of these cells to stimulate angiogenic responses in vivo. These findings demonstrate that stable populations of pericyte-like angiogenic cells can be generated with high efficiency from hESC and hiPSC using a directed differentiation approach. This provides new cell sources and opportunities for vascular tissue engineering and for the development of novel strategies in regenerative medicine.

  4. Ultrastructural analysis of different human mesenchymal stem cells after in vitro expansion: a technical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Miko

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Transmission electron microscopy reveals ultrastructural details of cells, and it is a valuable method for studying cell organelles. That is why we used this method for detailed morphological description of different adult tissuederived stem cells, focusing on the morphological signs of their functions (proteosynthetic activity, exchange with external environment, etc. and their comparison. Preparing a specimen from the cell culture suitable for transmission electron microscopy is, however, much more challenging than routine tissue processing for normal histological examination. There are several issues that need to be solved while working with cell pellets instead of solid tissue. Here we describe a simple protocol for the isolation and culture of mesenchymal stem cells from different adult tissues, with applications to stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Since we are working with population of cells that was obtained after many days of passaging, very efficient and gentle procedures are highly necessary. We demonstrated that our semi-conservative approach regarding to histological techniques and processing of cells for transmission electron microscopy is a well reproducible procedure which results in quality pictures and images of cell populations with minimum distortions and artifacts. We also commented about riskiest steps and histochemical issues (e.g., precise pH, temperature while preparing the specimen. We bring full and detailed procedures of fixation, post-fixation, infiltration, embedding, polymerization and contrasting of cell obtained from in vitro cell and tissue cultures, with modifications according to our experience. All this steps are essential for us to know more about adult stem cells derived from different sources or about other random cell populations. The knowledge about detailed ultra-structure of adult stem cells cultured in vitro are also essential for their using in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  5. Ultrastructural analysis of different human mesenchymal stem cells after in vitro expansion: a technical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miko, M; Danišovič, L; Majidi, A; Varga, I

    2015-10-26

    Transmission electron microscopy reveals ultrastructural details of cells, and it is a valuable method for studying cell organelles. That is why we used this method for detailed morphological description of different adult tissuederived stem cells, focusing on the morphological signs of their functions (proteosynthetic activity, exchange with external environment, etc.) and their comparison. Preparing a specimen from the cell culture suitable for transmission electron microscopy is, however, much more challenging than routine tissue processing for normal histological examination. There are several issues that need to be solved while working with cell pellets instead of solid tissue. Here we describe a simple protocol for the isolation and culture of mesenchymal stem cells from different adult tissues, with applications to stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. Since we are working with population of cells that was obtained after many days of passaging, very efficient and gentle procedures are highly necessary. We demonstrated that our semi-conservative approach regarding to histological techniques and processing of cells for transmission electron microscopy is a well reproducible procedure which results in quality pictures and images of cell populations with minimum distortions and artifacts. We also commented about riskiest steps and histochemical issues (e.g., precise pH, temperature) while preparing the specimen. We bring full and detailed procedures of fixation, post-fixation, infiltration, embedding, polymerization and contrasting of cell obtained from in vitro cell and tissue cultures, with modifications according to our experience. All this steps are essential for us to know more about adult stem cells derived from different sources or about other random cell populations. The knowledge about detailed ultra-structure of adult stem cells cultured in vitro are also essential for their using in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  6. Development of an in vitro cell system from zebrafish suitable to study bone cell differentiation and extracellular matrix mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, Parameswaran; Laizé, Vincent; Cardeira, João; Trindade, Marlene; Cancela, M Leonor

    2013-12-01

    Mechanisms of bone formation and skeletal development have been successfully investigated in zebrafish using a variety of in vivo approaches, but in vitro studies have been hindered due to a lack of homologous cell lines capable of producing an extracellular matrix (ECM) suitable for mineral deposition. Here we describe the development and characterization of a new cell line termed ZFB1, derived from zebrafish calcified tissues. ZFB1 cells have an epithelium-like phenotype, grow at 28°C in a regular L-15 medium supplemented with 15% of fetal bovine serum, and are maintained and manipulated using standard methods (e.g., trypsinization, cryopreservation, and transfection). They can therefore be propagated and maintained easily in most cell culture facilities. ZFB1 cells show aneuploidy with 2n=78 chromosomes, indicative of cell transformation. Furthermore, because DNA can be efficiently delivered into their intracellular space by nucleofection, ZFB1 cells are suitable for gene targeting approaches and for assessing gene promoter activity. ZFB1 cells can also differentiate toward osteoblast or chondroblast lineages, as demonstrated by expression of osteoblast- and chondrocyte-specific markers, they exhibit an alkaline phosphatase activity, a marker of bone formation in vivo, and they can mineralize their ECM. Therefore, they represent a valuable zebrafish-derived in vitro system for investigating bone cell differentiation and extracellular matrix mineralization.

  7. [Stem cells of marine invertebrates: regulation of proliferation and differentiation processes in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odintsova, N A

    2009-01-01

    Own and literary data pointing to plasticity of stem cells of marine invertebrates are viewed. Stem and embryonic cell cultures of marine invertebrates are model cell systems with a high level of all physiological and synthetic processes. The production of biological active substances in vitro may become an alternative to the chemical synthesis or marine aquaculture. The factors involved in determination and maintenance of the pluripotency of marine invertebrate stem cells are analyzed. The in vitro technology of directional differentiation of marine invertebrate stem cells in certain functionally active cell species includes the use of different growth factors, various natural and artificial substrates and also the unique biological active substances from marine invertebrate tissues. To increase expression levels of the cell growth regulatory genes and thus achieve enhanced cell growth, one method of attack was reported using the genetically engineered constructions with foreign genes. Our knowledge gained in invertebrate systems can help to determine a general mechanism of eukaryote pluripotency, and cultivated marine invertebrate cells can be used in marine biotechnology.

  8. 5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated sonosensitization of rat RG2 glioma cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Bilmin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Sonodynamic therapy (SDT is a promising technique based on the ability of certain substances, called sonosensitizers, to sensitize cancer cells to non-thermal effects of low-energy ultrasound waves, allowing their destruction. Sonosensitization is thought to induce cell death by direct physical effects such as cavitation and acoustical streaming as well as by complementary chemical reactions generating oxygen free radicals. One of the promising sonosensitizers is 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA which upon selective uptake by cancer cells is metabolized and accumulated as protoporphyrin IX. The objective of the study was to describe ALA-mediated sonodynamic effects in vitro on a rat RG2 glioma cell line. Glioma cells, seeded at the bottom of 96-well plates and incubated with ALA (10 µg/ml for 6 h, were exposed to the sinusoidal US pulses with a resonance frequency of 1 MHz, 1000 µs duration, 0.4 duty-cycle, and average acoustic power varying from 2 W to 6 W. Ultrasound waves were generated by a flat circular piezoelectric transducer with a diameter of 25 mm. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Structural cellular changes were visualized with a fluorescence microscope. Signs of cytotoxicity such as a decrease in cell viability, chromatin condensation and apoptosis were found. ALA-mediated SDT evokes cytotoxic effects of low intensity US on rat RG2 glioma cells in vitro . This cell line is indicated for further preclinical assessment of SDT in in vivo conditions.

  9. Effects of Lidocaine on HT-29 and SW480 Colon Cancer CellsIn Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bundscherer, Anika C; Malsy, Manuela; Bitzinger, Diane I; Wiese, Christoph H R; Gruber, Michael A; Graf, Bernhard M

    2017-04-01

    Evidence is growing that the risk of cancer dissemination may be enhanced during the perioperative period. Whether particular anesthetic techniques influence oncological outcome is still under discussion. For pain management, lidocaine can be administered perioperatively by intravenous, intraperitoneal or epidural infusion. Here we investigated the effect of lidocaine on colon carcinoma cell lines (HT-29 and SW480) in vitro. ELISA BrdU (Roche) for cell proliferation and FITC Annexin V detection kit (BD Pharming) for apoptosis analysis were applied. Cell-cycle profiles were investigated by flow cytometry. Cell-cycle arrest was induced in both cell lines by 1000 μM lidocaine, while no inhibition of cell proliferation was detected. Apoptosis decreased in SW480 but not in HT-29 cells. Lidocaine induces cell-cycle arrest in both colon carcinoma cell lines in vitro. The effective drug concentration can be obtained by local infiltration. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of sunitinib malate on growth of human bladder transitional cell line T24 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jin; Li, Han-zhong; Ji, Zhi-gang; Jin, Jing

    2015-03-01

    To investigate the growth-inhibitory effect of sunitinib malate on human bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) in vitro. Human bladder TCC cell line T24 was cultured and exposed to graded concentrations of sunitinib malate for 72 hours in vitro to determine the sensitivities to drug. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay. Cell apoptotic morphology was observed by fluorescence microscope following DAPI staining. Band expressions of Fas, Fas ligand, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and β-actin were analyzed by Western blot. Wound healing process of T24 cells exposed to sunitinib malate was assayed. Sunitinib malate exerted a concentration-dependent and time-dependent inhibitory effect on the T24 cell lines. Fluorescence microscopy showed that small vacuoles appeared in the nuclei of T24 cells and the vacuoles were bigger with higher drug concentrations. The expressions of Fas ligand and PARP in T24 cells treated with sunitinib malate exhibited a concentration-dependent increase. Moreover sunitinib malate suppressed the wound healing process in a concentration-dependent manner. Sunitinib malate exerted marked inhibitory activity against bladder cancer cell line T24.

  11. Sodium hyaluronate enhances colorectal tumour cell metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tan, B

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Sodium hyaluronate has been used intraperitoneally to prevent postoperative adhesions. However, the effect of sodium hyaluronate on tumour growth and metastasis in vitro and in vivo is still unknown. METHODS: Human colorectal tumour cell lines SW480, SW620 and SW707 were treated with sodium hyaluronate (10-500 microg\\/ml) and carboxymethylcellulose (0.125-1 per cent), and tumour cell proliferation and motility were determined in vitro. For the in vivo experiments male BD IX rats were randomized to a sodium hyaluronate group (n = 11; intraperitoneal administration of 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml 0.4 per cent sodium hyaluronate) or a phosphate-buffered saline group (n = 11; 0.5 x 10(6) DHD\\/K12 tumour cells and 5 ml phosphate-buffered saline intraperitoneally). Four weeks later the intraperitoneal tumour load was visualized directly. RESULTS: In vitro sodium hyaluronate increased tumour cell proliferation and motility significantly. Sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell motility appeared to be CD44 receptor dependent, whereas sodium hyaluronate-induced tumour cell proliferation was CD44 receptor independent. In vivo there was a significantly higher total tumour nodule count in the peritoneal cavity of the sodium hyaluronate-treated group compared with the control (P = 0.016). CONCLUSION: Sodium hyaluronate enhances tumour metastatic potential in vitro and in vivo, which suggests that use of sodium hyaluronate to prevent adhesions in colorectal cancer surgery may also potentiate intraperitoneal tumour growth. Presented to the Patey Prize Session of the Surgical Research Society and the annual scientific meeting of the Association of Surgeons of Great Britain and Ireland, Brighton, UK, 4-7 May 1999

  12. In vitro-induced cell-mediated immune deviation to encephalitogenic antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farooq, Shukkur M; Ashour, Hossam M

    2014-01-01

    The injection of antigens into the Anterior Chamber (AC) of the eye induces Anterior Chamber Associated Immune Deviation (ACAID), which is a potent form of immune deviation that is largely attributed to the effect of TGFβ2 in the aqueous humor on ocular antigen-presenting cells (APCs). ACAID antigen presentation via APCs and B cells leads to the generation of antigen-specific T regulatory cells. The encephalitogenic antigens Myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) and Myelin basic protein (MBP) have an obvious clinical relevance. We hypothesized that the intravenous injection of in vitro-generated ACAID APCs or in vitro-generated ACAID B cells specific to the encephalitogenic antigens MOG35-55/MBP induces specific peripheral tolerance in recipient BALB/c mice. We examined the suppression of MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific inflammatory responses using delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) assays and Local Adoptive Transfer (LAT) assays. Results indicated that MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific tolerance was generated after the intravenous injections of MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID APCs, MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID B cells, and MOG35-55-specific/MBP-specific ACAID T regulatory cells. The specific immune deviation was in vitro-induced, cell-mediated, and specific to the encephalitogenic antigens MOG35-55/MBP. This in vitro-mediated approach for the generation of MOG35-55/MBP-specific tolerance opens up avenues for the application of ACAID as a tool for the therapy of Multiple Sclerosis, Schizophrenia, and other diseases. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Infection Spread and Virus Release in Vitro in Cell Populations as a System with Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Juan G. Diaz

    The comprehension of the innate immune system of cell populations is not only of interest to understand systems in vivo but also in vitro, for example, in the control of the release of viral particles for the production of vaccines. In this report I introduce a model, based on dynamical networks, that simulates the cell signaling responsible for this innate immune response and its effect on the infection spread and virus production. The central motivation is to represent a cell population that is constantly mixed in a bio-reactor where there is a cell-to-cell signaling of cytokines (which are proteins responsible for the activation of the antiviral response inside the cell). Such signaling allows the definition of clusters of linked immune cells. Additionally, depending on the density of links, it is possible to identify critical threshold parameters associated to a percolation phase transition. I show that the control of this antiviral response is equivalent to a percolation process.

  14. Effect of hypoxia on the proliferation of murine cornea limbal epithelial progenitor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiao-Li; Liu, Han-Qiang

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effect of hypoxia on the proliferation of mouse corneal epithelial cells in vitro. Mouse corneal epithelial cells(MCEs) were cultured in normoxia (210mL/L O(2) and 50mL/L CO(2)) and hypoxia (20mL/L O(2) and 50mL/L CO(2)), respectively. Colony forming efficiency (CFE) and cell proliferation were determined. The expression of corneal epithelial progenitor cell marker p63 and K19 was investigated by immunostaining. Normoxic colonies were smaller compared with colonies formed in hypoxia. CFE was (12.50±1.50)% in hypoxic cultures, which was similar compared with normoxia cultures [(11.13±1.86)%, P>0.05)]. Cell proliferation was enhanced in hypoxia. Progenitor markers p63 and K19 were expressed in most cells under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Murine limbal epithelial progenitor cells can be efficiently expanded in hypoxic conditions.

  15. Effects of sciatic-conditioned medium on neonatal rat retinal cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres P.M.M.

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Schwann cells produce and release trophic factors that induce the regeneration and survival of neurons following lesions in the peripheral nerves. In the present study we examined the in vitro ability of developing rat retinal cells to respond to factors released from fragments of sciatic nerve. Treatment of neonatal rat retinal cells with sciatic-conditioned medium (SCM for 48 h induced an increase of 92.5 ± 8.8% (N = 7 for each group in the amount of total protein. SCM increased cell adhesion, neuronal survival and glial cell proliferation as evaluated by morphological criteria. This effect was completely blocked by 2.5 µM chelerythrine chloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC. These data indicate that PKC activation is involved in the effect of SCM on retinal cells and demonstrate that fragments of sciatic nerve release trophic factors having a remarkable effect on neonatal rat retinal cells in culture.

  16. In vitro toxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halogenated aromatic hydrocarbons to cetacean cells and tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvan, M.J. III.

    1993-01-01

    Cetaceans bioaccumulate high aromatic hydrocarbon tissue residues, and elevated levels of PCB residues in tissues are proposed to have occurred concurrently with recent epizootic deaths of dolphins. The objectives of this study were: (1) to develop and characterize an epithelial cell line derived from dolphin tissues, (2) to investigate the effects of hydrocarbon pollutants on those cells, and (3) to analyze the toxicity of hydrocarbon pollutants on cetacean tissues in vitro. An epithelial cell line, Carvan dolphin kidney (CDK), isolated from a spontaneously aborted female bottlenose dolphin, Tursiops truncatus, grew rapidly. These cells were neither transformed nor immortal. Velocity sedimentation analysis showed CDK cells contained nuclear aryl hydrocarbon receptor, suggestive of cytochrome P450 inducibility. BaP inhibited mitosis in CDK cells in a dose-dependent manner. Data indicate that CDK cells metabolize BaP, that BaP metabolites bind to cellular DNA initiating unscheduled DNA synthesis, and that the inhibition of cytochrome P450 metabolism decrease the BaP-associated inhibition of mitosis in dolphin cells. The data also suggest that TCDD acts synergistically to increase the levels of DNA damage by the procarcinogen BaP. Cetacean liver microsomes was isolated and evaluated for the presence of cytochrome P450 proteins by SDS-PAGE, apparent minimum molecular weight determination, and immunoblot analysis. P450 activity was induced in cetacean tissue samples and CDK cells by exposure in vitro to one of several cytochrome P450-inducing chemicals. The data suggest that cetacean tissues and cells can be utilized to study the in vitro induction of cytochrome P450, resultant metabolism of xenobiotic contaminants, and the subsequent cellular and molecular responses. However, the identity of specific P450 isozymes involved in this process will remain undetermined until monoclonal antibodies that recognize cetacean P450s can be generated.

  17. Analysis of transient migration behavior of natural killer cells imaged in situ and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali; Vanherberghen, Bruno; Kowalewski, Jacob M; Garrod, Kym R; Lindström, Sara; Andersson-Svahn, Helene; Brismar, Hjalmar; Cahalan, Michael D; Önfelt, Björn

    2011-07-01

    We present a simple method for rapid and automatic characterization of lymphocyte migration from time-lapse fluorescence microscopy data. Time-lapse imaging of natural killer (NK) cells in vitro and in situ, both showed that individual cells transiently alter their migration behavior. Typically, NK cells showed periods of high motility, interrupted by transient periods of slow migration or almost complete arrests. Analysis of in vitro data showed that these periods frequently coincided with contacts with target cells, sometimes leading to target cell lysis. However, NK cells were also commonly observed to stop independently of contact with other cells. In order to objectively characterize the migration of NK cells, we implemented a simple method to discriminate when NK cells stop or have low motilities, have periods of directed migration or undergo random movement. This was achieved using a sliding window approach and evaluating the mean squared displacement (MSD) to assess the migration coefficient and MSD curvature along trajectories from individual NK cells over time. The method presented here can be used to quickly and quantitatively assess the dynamics of individual cells as well as heterogeneity within ensembles. Furthermore, it may also be used as a tool to automatically detect transient stops due to the formation of immune synapses, cell division or cell death. We show that this could be particularly useful for analysis of in situ time-lapse fluorescence imaging data where most cells, as well as the extracellular matrix, are usually unlabelled and thus invisible. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  18. Role of Mael in early oogenesis and during germ-cell differentiation from embryonic stem cells in mice in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahena, I; Xu, E; Betancourt, M; Casas, E; Ducolomb, Y; González, C; Bonilla, E

    2014-11-01

    In a previous study, we have identified a set of conserved spermatogenic genes whose expression is restricted to testis and ovary and that are developmentally regulated. One of these genes, the transcription factor Mael, has been reported to play an essential role in mouse spermatogenesis. Nevertheless, the role of Mael in mouse oogenesis has not been defined. In order to analyse the role of Mael in mouse oogenesis, the expression of this gene was blocked during early oogenesis in mouse in vitro using RNAi technology. In addition, the role of Mael during differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) into germ cells in vitro was analysed. Results show that downregulation of Mael by a specific short interfering RNA disrupted fetal oocyte growth and differentiation in fetal ovary explants in culture and the expression of several germ-cell markers in ESC during their differentiation. These results suggest that there is an important role for Mael in early oogenesis and during germ-cell differentiation from embryonic stem cells in mouse in vitro.

  19. Interactions between neutrophils and macrophages promote macrophage killing of rat muscle cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hal X.; Tidball, James G.

    2003-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that the physiological functions of inflammatory cells are highly sensitive to their microenvironment, which is partially determined by the inflammatory cells and their potential targets. In the present investigation, interactions between neutrophils, macrophages and muscle cells that may influence muscle cell death are examined. Findings show that in the absence of macrophages, neutrophils kill muscle cells in vitro by superoxide-dependent mechanisms, and that low concentrations of nitric oxide (NO) protect against neutrophil-mediated killing. In the absence of neutrophils, macrophages kill muscle cells through a NO-dependent mechanism, and the presence of target muscle cells causes a three-fold increase in NO production by macrophages, with no change in the concentration of inducible nitric oxide synthase. Muscle cells that are co-cultured with both neutrophils and macrophages in proportions that are observed in injured muscle show cytotoxicity through a NO-dependent, superoxide-independent mechanism. Furthermore, the concentration of myeloid cells that is necessary for muscle killing is greatly reduced in assays that use mixed myeloid cell populations, rather than uniform populations of neutrophils or macrophages. These findings collectively show that the magnitude and mechanism of muscle cell killing by myeloid cells are modified by interactions between muscle cells and neutrophils, between muscle cells and macrophages and between macrophages and neutrophils.

  20. Changes of pectin nanostructure and cell wall stiffness induced in vitro by pectinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozioł, Arkadiusz; Cybulska, Justyna; Pieczywek, Piotr M; Zdunek, Artur

    2017-04-01

    Structural modifications of fruit cell-wall pectins are controlled by various enzymes. In this in vitro study, the cell wall material (CWM) from pear fruit (Pyrus communis L.) was treated using pectinases in two concentrations. Water soluble (WSP), chelator soluble (CSP) and sodium carbonate soluble (DASP) pectin fractions were extracted from CWM. By visualization of enzymatic-induced changes of structure and CWM stiffness using an atomic force microscopy (AFM), the role of pectins in the mechanical properties of cell walls was shown. Galacturonic acid (GalA) content in pectin fractions was assayed as well. This experiment unveiled evidence of the structural degradation of molecules in pectin fractions extracted from CWM caused by in vitro pectinase action and softening of CWM due to pectin removal that might be related to the creation of empty spaces in the cellulose-hemicellulose network. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Rat parotid cell function in vitro following x irradiation in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodner, L.; Kuyatt, B.L.; Hand, A.R.; Baum, B.J.

    1984-02-01

    The effect of X irradiation on rat parotid acinar cell function was evaluated in vitro 1, 3, and 7 days following in vivo exposure to 2000 R. Several cellular functions were followed: protein secretion (amylase release), ion movement (K/sup +/ efflux and reuptake), amino acid transport (..cap alpha..-amino(/sup 14/C)isobutyric acid), and an intermediary metabolic response ((/sup 14/C)glucose oxidation). In addition both the morphologic appearance and in vivo saliva secretory ability of parotid cells were assessed. Our results demonstrate that surviving rat parotid acinar cells, isolated and studied in vitro 1-7 days following 2000 R, remain functionally intact despite in vivo diminution of secretory function.

  2. Vitrification of bovine blastocysts produced in vitro inflicts selective damage to the inner cell mass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, E; Muñoz, M; Rodríguez, A; Caamaño, J N; Facal, N; Díez, C

    2009-04-01

    In contrast to the embryos derived from live animals, the embryos produced in vitro undergo increased damage and reduced survival after cryopreservation, particularly when produced with serum. In medium containing serum, retinoic acid increases cell numbers in the inner cell mass and the trophectoderm without altering their relative proportions in the bovine blastocyst. In this work, in medium without serum, we analyzed the contribution of retinoic acid to the development of blastocyst and survival to vitrification, and found a strong cell reduction in the inner mass when compared to the trophectoderm. Day-6 in vitro-produced morulae were treated for 24 h with retinoic acid (0.7 and 1.4 microm) and subsequently cultured without additives for a further 24 h period. Day-8 blastocyst production and cell counts in hatched blastocysts were unaffected by retinoic acid. However, Day-7 expanded, vitrified embryos produced with retinoic acid 1.4 microm survived at lower rates than controls when cultured after warming. Vitrification greatly reduced cell numbers in the inner mass (p vitro survival to cryopreservation is sometimes scarcely informative on the viability of the embryo after transfer to recipients.

  3. In Vitro Cytotoxic Effect of Brazilian Green Propolis on Human Laryngeal Epidermoid Carcinoma (HEp-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle C. Búfalo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Propolis is a sticky dark-colored material showing a very complex chemical composition that honeybees collect from plants. It has been used in folk medicine since ancient times, due to several biological properties, such as antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and immunomodulatory activities, among others. Its antitumor action in vivo and in vitro has also been reported, using propolis extracts or its isolated compounds. The goal of this work was to evaluate propolis's cytotoxic action in vitro on human laryngeal epidermoid carcinoma (Hep-2 cells. These cells were incubated with different concentrations of this bee product for different time periods, and morphology and the number of viable HEp-2 cells analyzed. Data showed that propolis exhibited a cytotoxic effect in vitro against HEp-2 cells, in a dose- and time-dependent way. Propolis solvent had no effects on morphology and number of viable cells, proving that the cytotoxic effects were exclusively due to propolis components. Since humans have been using propolis for a long time, further assays will provide a better comprehension of propolis's antitumor action.

  4. [Effect of enamel matrix protein on periodontal cells in an in vitro wound healing model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuan-zheng; Shen, Chi-jing; Song, Zhong-chen; Zhang, Xiu-li

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of enamel matrix protein (EMP) on wound filling of periodontal ligament cells (PDLC) and gingival fibroblasts (GF), using an in vitro model of wound healing. In vitro wound models were mechanically created in subconfluent cultures of human GF and PDLC, by removing a 7mm wide band of the cell layer respectively. Wounded cultures were then incubated for a time periods up to 2,6,9 days in a media containing 10% fetal bovine serum (FBS), stimulated with EMP (100microg/ml) simultaneously, negative controls were those cultured only with media containing 10% FBS. Slides were fixed, stained with crystal violet and cell filling area within the wound boundaries was quantified by computer assisted histomorphometry. Statistical analysis was performed by SAS6.12 software package to determine the differences between the time points and groups. in the control group, there was difference between GF and PDLC in filling wound in vitro over 9 days of healing period. The difference was significant (P0.05) between the filling rate of two types of periodontal cells at the 6th, 9th day after wound creating. GF has a significantly greater ability to fill a wound than PDLC. However, EMP appears to exert an influence on cells that is compatible with improved wound healing, especially in that of PDLC.

  5. In vitro inhibition of Helicobacter pylori growth and adherence to gastric mucosal cells by Pycnogenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohdewald, Peter; Beil, Winfried

    2008-05-01

    The emergence of antibiotic resistant H. pylori strains has necessitated the identification of alternative additive therapies for the treatment of this infection. The study tested whether a specific pine bark extract (Pycnogenol is effective in inhibiting the growth and adherence of H. pylori in vitro. Inhibition of H. pylori growth by Pycnogenol was tested in liquid medium as well as in an in vitro model by using sessile bacteria attached to AGS cells. Adherence was determined by co-incubation of gastric cells with Pycnogenol and H. pylori in vitro. Pycnogenol inhibited H. pylori growth in suspension with an MIC(50) of 12.5 microg/mL. Growth of H. pylori in infected cells was reduced to 10% of the control value by 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. Adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells was reduced by 70% after 3 h incubation with 125 microg/mL Pycnogenol. The results show a significant, yet limited inhibition of growth and adherence of H. pylori to gastric cells by Pycnogenol. In vivo studies have to demonstrate the clinical relevance of these findings.

  6. Knockdown of ezrin suppresses the migration and angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Liang-ping; Huang, Lei; Tian, Xun; Liang, Feng-qi; Wei, Jun-cheng; Zhang, Xian; Li, Sha; Zhang, Qing-hua

    2016-04-01

    Progressive tumor growth is dependent on angiogenesis. The mechanisms by which endothelial cells (ECs) are incorporated to develop new blood vessels are not well understood. Recent studies reveal that the ezrin radixin moesin (ERM) family members are key regulators of cellular activities such as adhesion, morphogenetic change, and migration. We hypothesized that ezrin, one of the ERM family members, may play important roles in ECs organization during angiogenesis, and new vessels formation in preexisting tissues. To test this hypothesis, in this study, we investigated the effects of ezrin gene silencing on the migration and angiogenesis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. HUVECs were transfected with plasmids with ezrin-targeting short hairpin RNA by using the lipofectamine-2000 system. Wound assay in vitro and three-dimensional culture were used to detect the migration and angiogenesis capacity of HUVECs. The morphological changes of transfected cells were observed by confocal and phase contrast microscopy. Our results demonstrated that the decreased expression of ezrin in HUVECs significantly induced the morphogenetic changes and cytoskeletal reorganization of the transfected cells, and also reduced cell migration and angiogenesis capacity in vitro, suggesting that ezrin play an important role in the process of HUVECs migration and angiogenesis.

  7. Circulating tumour cells in patients with urothelial tumours: Enrichment and in vitro culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolostova, Katarina; Cegan, Martin; Bobek, Vladimir

    2014-09-01

    Results of clinical trials have demonstrated that circulating tumour cells (CTCs) are frequently detected in patients with urothelial tumours. The monitoring of CTCs has the potential to improve therapeutic management at an early stage and also to identify patients with increased risk of tumour progression or recurrence before the onset of clinically detected metastasis. In this study, we report a new effectively simplified methodology for a separation and in vitro culturing of viable CTCs from peripheral blood. We include patients diagnosed with 3 types of urothelial tumours (prostate cancer, urinary bladder cancer, and kidney cancer). A size-based separation method for viable CTC - enrichment from unclothed peripheral blood has been introduced (MetaCell, Ostrava, Czech Republic). The enriched CTCs fraction was cultured directly on the separation membrane, or transferred from the membrane and cultured on any plastic surface or a microscopic slide. We report a successful application of a CTCs isolation procedure in patients with urothelial cancers. The CTCs captured on the membrane are enriched with a remarkable proliferation potential. This has enabled us to set up in vitro cell cultures from the viable CTCs unaffected by any fixation buffers, antibodies or lysing solutions. Next, the CTCs were cultured in vitro for a minimum of 10 to 14 days to enable further downstream analysis (e.g., immunohistochemistry). We demonstrated an efficient CTCs capture platform, based on a cell size separation principle. Furthermore, we report an ability to culture the enriched cells - a critical requirement for post-isolation cellular analysis.

  8. In vitro expansion of Lin+ and Lin- mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Rohaya, M. A. W.; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul

    2013-11-01

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin-) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin+) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin- cell population. The ability of Lin+ and Lin- to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin+ and Lin- were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin+ mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin- stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however, addition of cytokines into the proliferation medium support Lin

  9. Effect of dentine matrix proteins on human endometrial adult stem-like cells: in vitro regeneration of odontoblasts cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabatabaei, Fahimeh S; Ai, Jafar; Jafarzadeh Kashi, Tahereh S; Khazaei, Mozaffar; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Ghanbari, Zinat

    2013-07-01

    Human endometrium has enormous regenerative capacity due to the presence of endometrial stem cells. The present study sought to assess the possibility of differentiation of these cells into odontoblast-like cells by in vitro induction. Endometrial stem-like cells were obtained using enzymatic digestion of the biopsy samples of the endometrium after hysterectomy and cultured in Dulbecco's Modified Eagle's Medium (DMEM) which contained dentine non-collagenous proteins (dNCPs). The results were evaluated using the following assays: analysis of morphology, enzymatic assay for measuring alkaline phosphatase activity, Alizarin Red staining to detect in vitro formation of mineralized nodules, immunofluorescence for detection of dentine sialoprotein (DSP) and dentine-matrix protein (DMP1), and Western blotting for DMP1 expression. Following induction, endometrial stem-like cells demonstrated high alkaline phosphatase activity, and expression of DSP and DMP1 confirmed the odontoblast phenotype. DMP1 level increased in samples treated with dNCPs. Study results indicated that odontoblastic differentiation of endometrial stem cells can be induced by extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. dNCPs). The capacity of endometrial stem-like cells to differentiate into odontoblast-like cells under specific conditions gives new insights into the mechanism of odontogenesis and highlights the potential of such approaches for further research on dental tissue regeneration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mouse Naïve CD4+ T Cell Isolation and In vitro Differentiation into T Cell Subsets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Stephanie; Reynolds, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen inexperienced (naïve) CD4+ T cells undergo expansion and differentiation to effector subsets at the time of T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of cognate antigen presented on MHC class II. The cytokine signals present in the environment at the time of TCR activation are a major factor in determining the effector fate of a naïve CD4+ T cell. Although the cytokine environment during naïve T cell activation may be complex and involve both redundant and opposing signals in vivo, the addition of various cytokine combinations during naive CD4+ T cell activation in vitro can readily promote the establishment of effector T helper lineages with hallmark cytokine and transcription factor expression. Such differentiation experiments are commonly used as a first step for the evaluation of targets believed to promote or inhibit the development of certain CD4+ T helper subsets. The addition of mediators, such as signaling agonists, antagonists, or other cytokines, during the differentiation process can also be used to study the influence of a particular target on T cell differentiation. Here, we describe a basic protocol for the isolation of naïve T cells from mouse and the subsequent steps necessary for polarizing naïve cells to various T helper effector lineages in vitro. PMID:25938923

  11. N-acetylcysteine effectively mitigates cadmium-induced oxidative damage and cell death in Leydig cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Smita; Mitra, Sumonto; Lakhera, Pramesh C; Khandelwal, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is known to cause severe damage to various organs including lung, liver, kidney, brain and reproductive system. Several studies have reported the induction of oxidative stress pathways following Cd exposure. Since oxidative stress is also deemed responsible for inducing male infertility, a growing worldwide concern, we tried to understand whether the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC) can be a potential therapeutic agent to counter Cd toxicity using primary Leydig cells. This study highlights the initial cellular alterations which culminate in cell death induction. Primary Leydig cells were isolated from 28-day-old male Wistar rats, exposed to various concentrations of Cd in vitro and biochemical and cell death parameters were evaluated to understand the effect of Cd. NAC pre-treatment was done to understand its protective efficacy. Following Cd exposure to Leydig cells in vitro, we found simultaneous intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)) increase and reduction in mitochondrial membrane polarization at 30 min, followed by significant induction of reactive oxygen species and MAPK-extracellular-regulated kinases with concurrent glutathione depletion at 1 h, and significant cell death (both necrotic and apoptotic) at 6 and 18 h, respectively. Pre-treatment with NAC abrogated all these toxic manifestations and showed significantly reduced cell death. NAC also rescued the expression of 3-βHSD, a major steroidogenic protein. Taken together, these data illustrated that NAC can be used as a potential protective agent against Cd-induced testicular toxicity, especially with regards to oxidative stress-induced Leydig cell toxicity.

  12. Scaffolds for 3D in vitro culture of neural lineage cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Ashley R; Laslett, Andrew; O'Brien, Carmel M; Cameron, Neil R

    2017-05-01

    Understanding how neurodegenerative disorders develop is not only a key challenge for researchers but also for the wider society, given the rapidly aging populations in developed countries. Advances in this field require new tools with which to recreate neural tissue in vitro and produce realistic disease models. This in turn requires robust and reliable systems for performing 3D in vitro culture of neural lineage cells. This review provides a state of the art update on three-dimensional culture systems for in vitro development of neural tissue, employing a wide range of scaffold types including hydrogels, solid porous polymers, fibrous materials and decellularised tissues as well as microfluidic devices and lab-on-a-chip systems. To provide some context with in vivo development of the central nervous system (CNS), we also provide a brief overview of the neural stem cell niche, neural development and neural differentiation in vitro. We conclude with a discussion of future directions for this exciting and important field of biomaterials research. Neurodegenerative diseases, including dementia, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases and motor neuron diseases, are a major societal challenge for aging populations. Understanding these conditions and developing therapies against them will require the development of new physical models of healthy and diseased neural tissue. Cellular models resembling neural tissue can be cultured in the laboratory with the help of 3D scaffolds - materials that allow the organization of neural cells into tissue-like structures. This review presents recent work on the development of different types of scaffolds for the 3D culture of neural lineage cells and the generation of functioning neural-like tissue. These in vitro culture systems are enabling the development of new approaches for modelling and tackling diseases of the brain and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. In vitro pituitary and thyroid cell proliferation assays and their relevance as alternatives to animal testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jomaa, Barae; Aarts, Jac M M J G; de Haan, Laura H J; Peijnenburg, Ad A C M; Bovee, Toine F H; Murk, Albertinka J; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the in vitro effect of eleven thyroid-active compounds known to affect pituitary and/or thyroid weights in vivo, using the proliferation of GH3 rat pituitary cells in the so-called "T-screen," and of FRTL-5 rat thyroid cells in a newly developed test denoted "TSH-screen" to gain insight into the relative value of these in vitro proliferation tests for an integrated testing strategy (ITS) for thyroid activity. Pituitary cell proliferation in the T-screen was stimulated by three out of eleven tested compounds, namely thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). Of these three compounds, only T4 causes an increase in relative pituitary weight, and thus T4 was the only compound for which the effect in the in vitro assay correlated with a reported in vivo effect. As to the newly developed TSH-screen, two compounds had an effect, namely, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) induced and T4 antagonized FRTL-5 cell proliferation. These effects correlated with in vivo changes induced by these compounds on thyroid weight. Altogether, the results indicate that most of the selected compounds affect pituitary and thyroid weights by modes of action different from a direct thyroid hormone receptor (THR) or TSH receptor (TSHR)-mediated effect, and point to the need for additional in vitro tests for an ITS. Additional analysis of the T-screen revealed a positive correlation between the THR-mediated effects of the tested compounds in vitro and their effects on relative heart weight in vivo, suggesting that the T-screen may directly predict this THR-mediated in vivo adverse effect.

  14. The production of fluorescent transgenic trout to study in vitro myogenic cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rescan Pierre-Yves

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fish skeletal muscle growth involves the activation of a resident myogenic stem cell population, referred to as satellite cells, that can fuse with pre-existing muscle fibers or among themselves to generate a new fiber. In order to monitor the regulation of myogenic cell differentiation and fusion by various extrinsic factors, we generated transgenic trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss carrying a construct containing the green fluorescent protein reporter gene driven by a fast myosin light chain 2 (MlC2f promoter, and cultivated genetically modified myogenic cells derived from these fish. Results In transgenic trout, green fluorescence appeared in fast muscle fibers as early as the somitogenesis stage and persisted throughout life. Using an in vitro myogenesis system we observed that satellite cells isolated from the myotomal muscle of transgenic trout expressed GFP about 5 days post-plating as they started to fuse. GFP fluorescence persisted subsequently in myosatellite cell-derived myotubes. Using this in vitro myogenesis system, we showed that the rate of muscle cell differentiation was strongly dependent on temperature, one of the most important environmental factors in the muscle growth of poikilotherms. Conclusions We produced MLC2f-gfp transgenic trout that exhibited fluorescence in their fast muscle fibers. The culture of muscle cells extracted from these trout enabled the real-time monitoring of myogenic differentiation. This in vitro myogenesis system could have numerous applications in fish physiology to evaluate the myogenic activity of circulating growth factors, to test interfering RNA and to assess the myogenic potential of fish mesenchymal stem cells. In ecotoxicology, this system could be useful to assess the impact of environmental factors and marine pollutants on fish muscle growth.

  15. Increased mammogram-induced DNA damage in mammary epithelial cells aged in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Hernández

    Full Text Available Concerned about the risks of mammography screening in the adult population, we analyzed the ability of human mammary epithelial cells to cope with mammogram-induced DNA damage. Our study shows that an X-ray dose of 20 mGy, which is the standard dose received by the breast surface per two-view mammogram X-ray exploration, induces increased frequencies of DNA double-strand breaks to in vitro aged-but not to young-human mammary epithelial cells. We provide evidence that aged epithelial breast cells are more radiosensitive than younger ones. Our studies point to an inefficient damage response of aged cells to low-dose radiation, this being due to both delayed and incomplete mobilization of repair proteins to DNA strand breaks. This inefficient damage response is translated into an important delay in double-strand break disappearance and consequent accumulation of unrepaired DNA breaks. The result of this is a significant increase in micronuclei frequency in the in vitro aged mammary epithelial cells exposed to doses equivalent to a single mammogram X-ray exploration. Since our experiments were carried out in primary epithelial cell cultures in which cells age at the same time as they undergo replication-dependent telomere shortening, we needed to determine the contribution of these two factors to their phenotype. In this paper, we report that the exogenous expression of human telomerase retrotranscriptase in late population doubling epithelial cells does not rescue its delayed repair phenotype. Therefore, retarded DNA break repair is a direct consequence of cellular aging itself, rather than a consequence of the presence of dysfunctional telomeres. Our findings of long-lasting double strand breaks and incomplete DNA break repair in the in vitro aged epithelial cells are in line with the increased carcinogenic risks of radiation exposures at older ages revealed by epidemiologic studies.

  16. Increased Mammogram-Induced DNA Damage in Mammary Epithelial Cells Aged In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Laia; Terradas, Mariona; Martín, Marta; Feijoo, Purificación; Soler, David; Tusell, Laura; Genescà, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Concerned about the risks of mammography screening in the adult population, we analyzed the ability of human mammary epithelial cells to cope with mammogram-induced DNA damage. Our study shows that an X-ray dose of 20 mGy, which is the standard dose received by the breast surface per two-view mammogram X-ray exploration, induces increased frequencies of DNA double-strand breaks to in vitro aged–but not to young–human mammary epithelial cells. We provide evidence that aged epithelial breast cells are more radiosensitive than younger ones. Our studies point to an inefficient damage response of aged cells to low-dose radiation, this being due to both delayed and incomplete mobilization of repair proteins to DNA strand breaks. This inefficient damage response is translated into an important delay in double-strand break disappearance and consequent accumulation of unrepaired DNA breaks. The result of this is a significant increase in micronuclei frequency in the in vitro aged mammary epithelial cells exposed to doses equivalent to a single mammogram X-ray exploration. Since our experiments were carried out in primary epithelial cell cultures in which cells age at the same time as they undergo replication-dependent telomere shortening, we needed to determine the contribution of these two factors to their phenotype. In this paper, we report that the exogenous expression of human telomerase retrotranscriptase in late population doubling epithelial cells does not rescue its delayed repair phenotype. Therefore, retarded DNA break repair is a direct consequence of cellular aging itself, rather than a consequence of the presence of dysfunctional telomeres. Our findings of long-lasting double strand breaks and incomplete DNA break repair in the in vitro aged epithelial cells are in line with the increased carcinogenic risks of radiation exposures at older ages revealed by epidemiologic studies. PMID:23667571

  17. Bioinformatics-based selection of a model cell type for in vitro biomaterial testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groen, Nathalie; van de Peppel, Jeroen; Yuan, Huipin; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M; van Blitterswijk, Clemens A; de Boer, Jan

    2013-07-01

    Biomaterial properties can be tailored for specific applications via systematic and high-throughput screening of biomaterial-cell interactions. However, progress in material development is often hampered by the lack of adequate in vitro testing methods, frequently due to incomplete understanding of involved in vivo mechanisms. In line with drug discovery in pharmacology, a crucial step in assay development for biomaterial screening is the identification of a target to direct the screen against. Herein, the cell type to be used for screening is of essential importance and has to be carefully chosen. So far, few attention has been put on selecting a cell type specifically suitable for in vitro testing of materials for predefined applications. In this manuscript, we describe an approach to define a suitable cell type for screening assays, for which biomaterials for bone regeneration served as example. Using a bioinformatics methodology, different cell lines are compared on three well-characterized model materials. The transcriptional profiles of MG63, iMSC, SV-HFO, hPPCT, hBPCT and SW480 cells are assessed on 3 calcium phosphate-based materials to evaluate their potential application in a screening assay. We show that MG63 is the most suitable cell line to evaluate biomaterials for bone regeneration applications, evidenced by their robust gene expression differences between the 3 model materials. The gene expression differences between the cell lines were assessed based on the overall gene expression profiles and specific subsets of genes and pathways related to osteogenesis and bone homeostasis in response to the 3 materials tested. In the next phase, this cell line will be used to identify a target correlating with in vivo biomaterial performance and henceforth to develop an in vitro screening system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Citotoxicity evaluation of three dental adhesives on vero cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catunda, Raisa-Queiroz; Vieira, Jeymesson-Raphael-Cardoso; de Oliveira, Erwelly-Barros; da Silva, Eliete-Cavalcanti; Brasil, Veruska-Lima-Moura; Perez, Danyel-Elias-da Cruz

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate, in vitro, the potential cytotoxicity of three different dental adhesives systems (Adper Single Bond 2 -SB, Silorane System Adhesive Bond -SSAB and Single Bond Universal -SBU) on cultivated Vero cells after different contact times. The cells were cultured in a concentration of 2 x 105 cells/mL for 24h and grown to sub-confluent monolayers. VERO cells were exposed to 25µl of conditioned extracts obtained from 24h, 48h and 72h immersion of adhesive samples in culture medium (DMEM), immediately after polymerization. Fresh DMEM was used as negative control. Cell metabolism was evaluated by the MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide). The data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, considering a significance of 5%. The values of cell viability ranged from 94.2% at 72h (SBU) to 109.6% at 48h (SB). The mean percentage of viability after exposure to the extracts of SB, SSAB and SBU were 103.2%, 100.63% and 97.43%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference (p= 0.342) between the experimental and negative control groups. At all exposure times, all adhesives tested in this study presented no cytotoxicity to Vero cells in vitro. Key words:Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity, dental adhesives, Vero cells.

  19. [The hepatic differentiation of adult and fetal liver stromal cells in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholodenko, I V; Kholodenko, R V; Manukyan, G V; Yarygin, K N

    2016-11-01

    The liver has a marked capacity for regeneration. In most cases the liver regeneration is determined by hepatocytes. The regenerative capacity of hepatocytes is significantly reduced in acute or chronic damage. In particular, repair mechanisms are not activated in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. Organ transplantation or advanced methods of regenerative medicine can help such patients. The promising results were obtained in clinical trials involving patients with various forms of liver disease who received transplantation of autologous bone marrow stem cells. However, to improve the effectiveness of such treatment it is necessary to search for more optimal sources of progenitor cells, as well as to evaluate the possibility of using descendants of these cells differentiated in vitro. In this study we isolated stromal cells from the liver biopsies of three patients with alcoholic cirrhosis, conducted their morphological and phenotypic analysis, and evaluated the hepatic potential of these cells in vitro. The stromal cells isolated from fetal liver were used for comparison. The results of this can serve as a basis for the development of a new method for the treatment of end-stage liver disease. The stromal cells isolated from the liver biopsies for a long time proliferate in a culture and this which makes it possible to expand them to large amounts for subsequent differentiation into hepatocyte-like cells and autologous transplantation.

  20. Effects of triptolide on human cervical cancer CaSki cells:an in vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-xuan NING

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects and mechanism of triptolide(TPL on proliferation and apoptosis of human cervical cancer CaSki cells in vitro.Methods CaSki cells were cultured with 0,5,10 and 20ng/ml TPL for 24,48 and 72 hours,the cell proliferation was then observed by MTT assay,the morphological characteristics were observed by inverted phase contrast microscopy,and the expression of Ki-67 and p53 protein was determined by immunohistochemistry.Results Inverted phase contrast microscopy showed the CaSki cells in TPL treated groups were shrinkage and round,with reduced volume and rough surface,cell number declined,intercellular space dilated,and the changes were aggravated with the time elapsed and the TPL concentration increased.The 5,10 and 20ng/ml TPL showed inhibitory effects on the proliferation of CaSki cells in vitro in a time-and dose-dependent manner.Immunocytochemical staining showed that the expression of Ki-67 and p53 protein decreased in a time-and dose-dependent manner in CaSki cells cultured with TPL(P < 0.01.Conclusion TPL may effectively inhibit the proliferation and induce apoptosis of CaSki cells,and the mechanism may be related to the down-regulation of Ki-67 and p53 protein expression.

  1. Effects of HB-EGF and epiregulin on wound healing of gingival cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J M; Bak, E J; Chang, J Y; Kim, S-T; Park, W-S; Yoo, Y-J; Cha, J-H

    2011-11-01

    Gingival wound healing is important to periodontal disease and surgery. This in vitro study was conducted to assess the manner in which heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) and epiregulin cooperatively participate in the wound-healing process in the gingival epithelial and fibroblast cells of the oral mucosa. Gingival epithelium and fibroblast were separated from gingival tissue biopsies and prepared to primary cultures. The changes in the mRNA expression were evaluated via real-time PCR. The effects on cell proliferation, migration, and repopulation were evaluated in vitro. The different regulation of expressions of HB-EGF, epiregulin, and epidermal growth factor receptors was observed over time and with different gingival cell types. HB-EGF exerted a cell migration-inducing effect on both epithelial and fibroblast cells, whereas epiregulin did not. Both growth factors functioned as mitogens for epithelial cell proliferation, but not for fibroblast proliferation. HB-EGF strongly promoted epithelial cell repopulation and mildly promoted fibroblast repopulation, whereas epiregulin promoted only fibroblast repopulation. These results indicated that both growth factors might function importantly in the wound-healing process of human gingival tissue via the different regulation of the expression, cell migration, proliferation, and repopulation. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  2. Effects of sargentgloryvine stem extracts on HepG-2 cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming-Hua; Long, Min; Zhu, Bao-Yi; Yang, Shu-Hui; Ren, Ji-Hong; Zhang, Hui-Zhong

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effects of sargentgloryvine stem extracts (SSE) on the hepatoma cell line HepG-2 in vitro and in vivo and determine its mechanisms of action. METHODS: Cultured HepG-2 cells treated with SSE were analysed by 3-(4,5-Dimethyl-thiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium bromide and clone formation assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis analysis were conducted by flow cytometric, TdT-Mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling and acridine orange/ethidium bromide staining methods, and protein expression was examined by both reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. The pathological changes of the tumor cells were observed by haematoxylin and eosin staining. Tumor growth inhibition and side effects were determined in a xenograft mouse model. RESULTS: SSE treatment could not only inhibit HepG-2 cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner but also induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at the S phase. The number of colonies formed by SSE-treated tumor cells was fewer than that of the controls (P 0.05). Systemic administration of SSE could inhibit the HepG-2 xenograft tumor growth with no obvious toxic side effects on normal tissues. CONCLUSION: SSE can induce apoptosis of HepG-2 cells in vitro and in vivo through decreasing expression of Bcl-xl and Mcl-1 and increasing expression of Bax. PMID:21734793

  3. Citotoxicity evaluation of three dental adhesives on vero cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catunda, Raisa-Queiroz; Vieira, Jeymesson-Raphael-Cardoso; de Oliveira, Erwelly-Barros; da Silva, Eliete-Cavalcanti; Brasil, Veruska-Lima-Moura

    2017-01-01

    Background To evaluate, in vitro, the potential cytotoxicity of three different dental adhesives systems (Adper Single Bond 2 -SB, Silorane System Adhesive Bond -SSAB and Single Bond Universal -SBU) on cultivated Vero cells after different contact times. Material and Methods The cells were cultured in a concentration of 2 x 105 cells/mL for 24h and grown to sub-confluent monolayers. VERO cells were exposed to 25µl of conditioned extracts obtained from 24h, 48h and 72h immersion of adhesive samples in culture medium (DMEM), immediately after polymerization. Fresh DMEM was used as negative control. Cell metabolism was evaluated by the MTT assay (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide). The data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA, considering a significance of 5%. Results The values of cell viability ranged from 94.2% at 72h (SBU) to 109.6% at 48h (SB). The mean percentage of viability after exposure to the extracts of SB, SSAB and SBU were 103.2%, 100.63% and 97.43%, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference (p= 0.342) between the experimental and negative control groups. Conclusions At all exposure times, all adhesives tested in this study presented no cytotoxicity to Vero cells in vitro. Key words:Biocompatibility, cytotoxicity, dental adhesives, Vero cells. PMID:28149465

  4. Fucoidan from Sargassum sp. and Fucus vesiculosus reduces cell viability of lung carcinoma and melanoma cells in vitro and activates natural killer cells in mice in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ale, Marcel Tutor; Maruyama, Hiroko; Tamauchi, Hidekazu

    2011-01-01

    Fucoidan is known to exhibit crucial biological activities, including anti-tumor activity. In this study, we examined the influence of crude fucoidan extracted from Sargassum sp. (MTA) and Fucus vesiculosus (SIG) on Lewis lung carcinoma cells (LCC) and melanoma B16 cells (MC). In vitro studies were...

  5. The SGBS cell strain as a model for the in vitro study of obesity and cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Allott, Emma H

    2012-10-01

    The murine adipocyte cell line 3T3-L1 is well characterised and used widely, while the human pre-adipocyte cell strain, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel Syndrome (SGBS), requires validation for use in human studies. Obesity is currently estimated to account for up to 41 % of the worldwide cancer burden. A human in vitro model system is required to elucidate the molecular mechanisms for this poorly understood association. This work investigates the relevance of the SGBS cell strain for obesity and cancer research in humans.

  6. In vitro culture of cell aggregates of rye (Secale cereale L.) at low densities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mottley, J; Sybenga, J

    1988-05-01

    The growth of cell aggregates from a rye suspension culture was tested at low density in three culture systems. Mass seeding was the most supportive system, followed by agarose droplets. Microdroplet culture using Cuprak dishes was the least effective system. Growth was stimulated by the presence of a feeder layer of suspension cells but only if the feeder contact with the nursed cells was via a liquid and not a gaseous phase. Plating efficiences were enhanced by the feeder effect, whereas the subsequent growth rates were less affected. The techniques described should prove useful in programs aimed at the in vitro genetic manipulation of rye or other cereals.

  7. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor induced the differentiation of amniotic fluid-derived stem cells into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruyu; Lu, Ying; Li, Ju; Wang, Jia; Liu, Caixia; Gao, Fang; Sun, Dong

    2016-02-01

    Amniotic fluid-derived stem cells (AFSCs) are a novel source of stem cells that are isolated and cultured from second trimester amniocentesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) acts as a tissue morphogen and regulates stem cell proliferation and differentiation. This study investigated the effect of an adenovirus-mediated GDNF gene, which was engineered into AFSCs, on the cells' biological properties and whether GDNF in combination with AFSCs can be directionally differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro. AFSCs were isolated and cultured using the plastic adherence method in vitro and identified by the transcription factor Oct-4, which is the primary marker of pluripotent stem cells. AFSCs were efficiently transfected by a GFP-labeled plasmid system of an adenovirus vector carrying the GDNF gene (Ad-GDNF-GFP). Transfected AFSCs stably expressed GDNF. Transfected AFSCs were cultured in endothelial growth medium-2 containing vascular endothelial growth factor. After 1 week, AFSCs were positive for von Willebrand factor (vWF) and CD31, which are markers of endothelial cells, and the recombinant GDNF group was significantly higher than undifferentiated controls and the GFP only group. These results demonstrated that AFSCs differentiated into vascular endothelial-like cells in vitro, and recombinant GDNF promoted differentiation. The differentiation-induced AFSCs may be used as seed cells to provide a new manner of cell and gene therapies for transplantation into the vascular injury site to promote angiogenesis.

  8. Multi-Sensor Arrays for Online Monitoring of Cell Dynamics in in vitro Studies with Choroid Plexus Epithelial Cells

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    Soledad García Gómez de las Heras

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensors and multi-sensor arrays are the basis of new technologies for the non-label monitoring of cell activity. In this paper we show that choroid plexus cells can be cultured on silicon chips and that sensors register in real time changes in their activity, constituting an interesting experimental paradigm for cell biology and medical research. To validate the signals recorded (metabolism = peri-cellular acidification, oxygen consumption = respiration; impedance = adhesion, cell shape and motility we performed experiments with compounds that act in a well-known way on cells, influencing these parameters. Our in vitro model demonstrates the advantages of multi-sensor arrays in assessment and experimental characterization of dynamic cellular events—in this case in choroid plexus functions, however with applicability to other cell types as well.

  9. Prevalence of heterotypic tumor/immune cell-in-cell structure in vitro and in vivo leading to formation of aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-hui; Wang, Shan; He, Mei-fang; Wang, Yanyi; Zhao, Hua; Zhu, Han-yu; Yu, Xiao-min; Ma, Jian; Che, Xiao-juan; Wang, Ju-fang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-ning

    2013-01-01

    Cell-in-cell structures refer to a unique phenomenon that one living cell enters into another living cell intactly, occurring between homotypic tumor cells or tumor (or other tissue cells) and immune cells (named as heterotypic cell-in-cell structure). In the present study, through a large scale of survey we observed that heterotypic cell-in-cell structure formation occurred commonly in vitro with host cells derived from different human carcinomas as well as xenotypic mouse tumor cell lines. Most of the lineages of human immune cells, including T, B, NK cells, monocytes as well as in vitro activated LAK cells, were able to invade tumor cell lines. Poorly differentiated stem cells were capable of internalizing immune cells as well. More significantly, heterotypic tumor/immune cell-in-cell structures were observed in a higher frequency in tumor-derived tissues than those in adjacent tissues. In mouse hepatitis models, heterotypic immune cell/hepatocyte cell-in-cell structures were also formed in a higher frequency than in normal controls. After in vitro culture, different forms of internalized immune cells in heterotypic cell-in-cell structures were observed, with one or multiple immune cells inside host cells undergoing resting, degradation or mitosis. More strikingly, some internalized immune cells penetrated directly into the nucleus of target cells. Multinuclear cells with aneuploid nucleus were formed in target tumor cells after internalizing immune cells as well as in situ tumor regions. Therefore, with the prevalence of heterotypic cell-in-cell structures observed, we suggest that shielding of immune cells inside tumor or inflammatory tissue cells implies the formation of aneuploidy with the increased multinucleation as well as fine-tuning of microenvironment under pathological status, which may define distinct mechanisms to influence the etiology and progress of tumors.

  10. Prevalence of heterotypic tumor/immune cell-in-cell structure in vitro and in vivo leading to formation of aneuploidy.

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    Yu-hui Chen

    Full Text Available Cell-in-cell structures refer to a unique phenomenon that one living cell enters into another living cell intactly, occurring between homotypic tumor cells or tumor (or other tissue cells and immune cells (named as heterotypic cell-in-cell structure. In the present study, through a large scale of survey we observed that heterotypic cell-in-cell structure formation occurred commonly in vitro with host cells derived from different human carcinomas as well as xenotypic mouse tumor cell lines. Most of the lineages of human immune cells, including T, B, NK cells, monocytes as well as in vitro activated LAK cells, were able to invade tumor cell lines. Poorly differentiated stem cells were capable of internalizing immune cells as well. More significantly, heterotypic tumor/immune cell-in-cell structures were observed in a higher frequency in tumor-derived tissues than those in adjacent tissues. In mouse hepatitis models, heterotypic immune cell/hepatocyte cell-in-cell structures were also formed in a higher frequency than in normal controls. After in vitro culture, different forms of internalized immune cells in heterotypic cell-in-cell structures were observed, with one or multiple immune cells inside host cells undergoing resting, degradation or mitosis. More strikingly, some internalized immune cells penetrated directly into the nucleus of target cells. Multinuclear cells with aneuploid nucleus were formed in target tumor cells after internalizing immune cells as well as in situ tumor regions. Therefore, with the prevalence of heterotypic cell-in-cell structures observed, we suggest that shielding of immune cells inside tumor or inflammatory tissue cells implies the formation of aneuploidy with the increased multinucleation as well as fine-tuning of microenvironment under pathological status, which may define distinct mechanisms to influence the etiology and progress of tumors.

  11. Prevalence of Heterotypic Tumor/Immune Cell-In-Cell Structure In Vitro and In Vivo Leading to Formation of Aneuploidy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-hui; Wang, Shan; He, Mei-fang; Wang, Yanyi; Zhao, Hua; Zhu, Han-yu; Yu, Xiao-min; Ma, Jian; Che, Xiao-juan; Wang, Ju-fang; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiao-ning

    2013-01-01

    Cell-in-cell structures refer to a unique phenomenon that one living cell enters into another living cell intactly, occurring between homotypic tumor cells or tumor (or other tissue cells) and immune cells (named as heterotypic cell-in-cell structure). In the present study, through a large scale of survey we observed that heterotypic cell-in-cell structure formation occurred commonly in vitro with host cells derived from different human carcinomas as well as xenotypic mouse tumor cell lines. Most of the lineages of human immune cells, including T, B, NK cells, monocytes as well as in vitro activated LAK cells, were able to invade tumor cell lines. Poorly differentiated stem cells were capable of internalizing immune cells as well. More significantly, heterotypic tumor/immune cell-in-cell structures were observed in a higher frequency in tumor-derived tissues than those in adjacent tissues. In mouse hepatitis models, heterotypic immune cell/hepatocyte cell-in-cell structures were also formed in a higher frequency than in normal controls. After in vitro culture, different forms of internalized immune cells in heterotypic cell-in-cell structures were observed, with one or multiple immune cells inside host cells undergoing resting, degradation or mitosis. More strikingly, some internalized immune cells penetrated directly into the nucleus of target cells. Multinuclear cells with aneuploid nucleus were formed in target tumor cells after internalizing immune cells as well as in situ tumor regions. Therefore, with the prevalence of heterotypic cell-in-cell structures observed, we suggest that shielding of immune cells inside tumor or inflammatory tissue cells implies the formation of aneuploidy with the increased multinucleation as well as fine-tuning of microenvironment under pathological status, which may define distinct mechanisms to influence the etiology and progress of tumors. PMID:23555668

  12. Cathepsin K Is Present in Invasive Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma In Vivo and In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitu, Carolina C.; Kauppila, Joonas H.; Bufalino, Andréia; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Teppo, Susanna; Keinänen, Meeri; Vilen, Suvi-Tuuli; Lehenkari, Petri; Nyberg, Pia; Coletta, Ricardo D.; Salo, Tuula

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in the tumor microenvironment (TME) of skin carcinoma, but nothing is known about cathepsin K in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC). Our aim was to describe the expression of cathepsin K in invasive OTSCC in vitro and in a series of clinical cancer specimens. Materials and Methods OTSCC invasion in vitro was studied using invasive HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells in 3D organotypic models. In total, 121 mobile tongue OTSCCs and 10 lymph node metastases were analyzed for cathepsin K expression. The association between cathepsin K expression and clinicopathological factors was evaluated. Results Cysteine protease inhibitor E64 and cathepsin K silencing significantly (p<0.0001) reduced HSC-3 cell invasion in the 3D models. Cathepsin K was expressed in a majority of carcinoma and metastatic cells, but the expression pattern in carcinoma cells did not correlate with clinical parameters. Instead, the weak expression of cathepsin K in the invasive TME front correlated with increased overall recurrence (p<0.05), and in early-stage tumors this pattern predicted both cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality (p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively). Conclusions Cathepsin K is expressed in OTSCC tissue in both carcinoma and TME cells. Although the diminished activity and expression in aggressive tongue HSC-3 cells reduced 3D invasion in vitro, the amount of cathepsin K in carcinoma cells was not associated with the outcome of cancer patients. Instead, cathepsin K in the invasive TME front seems to have a protective role in the complex progression of tongue cancer. PMID:23951042

  13. Cathepsin K is present in invasive oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro.

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    Carolina C Bitu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cathepsin K, a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in the tumor microenvironment (TME of skin carcinoma, but nothing is known about cathepsin K in oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC. Our aim was to describe the expression of cathepsin K in invasive OTSCC in vitro and in a series of clinical cancer specimens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: OTSCC invasion in vitro was studied using invasive HSC-3 tongue carcinoma cells in 3D organotypic models. In total, 121 mobile tongue OTSCCs and 10 lymph node metastases were analyzed for cathepsin K expression. The association between cathepsin K expression and clinicopathological factors was evaluated. RESULTS: Cysteine protease inhibitor E64 and cathepsin K silencing significantly (p<0.0001 reduced HSC-3 cell invasion in the 3D models. Cathepsin K was expressed in a majority of carcinoma and metastatic cells, but the expression pattern in carcinoma cells did not correlate with clinical parameters. Instead, the weak expression of cathepsin K in the invasive TME front correlated with increased overall recurrence (p<0.05, and in early-stage tumors this pattern predicted both cancer recurrence and cancer-specific mortality (p<0.05 and p<0.005, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Cathepsin K is expressed in OTSCC tissue in both carcinoma and TME cells. Although the diminished activity and expression in aggressive tongue HSC-3 cells reduced 3D invasion in vitro, the amount of cathepsin K in carcinoma cells was not associated with the outcome of cancer patients. Instead, cathepsin K in the invasive TME front seems to have a protective role in the complex progression of tongue cancer.

  14. Growth and differentiation of human lens epithelial cells in vitro on matrix

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    Blakely, E. A.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; McNamara, M. P.; Chang, E.; Aragon, G.; Lin, S. P.; Lui, G.; Polansky, J. R.

    2000-01-01

    PURPOSE: To characterize the growth and maturation of nonimmortalized human lens epithelial (HLE) cells grown in vitro. METHODS: HLE cells, established from 18-week prenatal lenses, were maintained on bovine corneal endothelial (BCE) extracellular matrix (ECM) in medium supplemented with basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). The identity, growth, and differentiation of the cultures were characterized by karyotyping, cell morphology, and growth kinetics studies, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), immunofluorescence, and Western blot analysis. RESULTS: HLE cells had a male, human diploid (2N = 46) karyotype. The population-doubling time of exponentially growing cells was 24 hours. After 15 days in culture, cell morphology changed, and lentoid formation was evident. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) indicated expression of alphaA- and betaB2-crystallin, fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1), and major intrinsic protein (MIP26) in exponential growth. Western analyses of protein extracts show positive expression of three immunologically distinct classes of crystallin proteins (alphaA-, alphaB-, and betaB2-crystallin) with time in culture. By Western blot analysis, expression of p57(KIP2), a known marker of terminally differentiated fiber cells, was detectable in exponential cultures, and levels increased after confluence. MIP26 and gamma-crystallin protein expression was detected in confluent cultures, by using immunofluorescence, but not in exponentially growing cells. CONCLUSIONS: HLE cells can be maintained for up to 4 months on ECM derived from BCE cells in medium containing FGF-2. With time in culture, the cells demonstrate morphologic characteristics of, and express protein markers for, lens fiber cell differentiation. This in vitro model will be useful for investigations of radiation-induced cataractogenesis and other studies of lens toxicity.

  15. An Overview of Protocols for the Neural Induction of Dental and Oral Stem Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Boon Chin; Lim, Lee Wei; Wu, Wutian; Zhang, Chengfei

    2016-06-01

    To date, various adult stem cells have been identified within the oral cavity, including dental pulp stem cells, dental follicle stem cells, stem cells from apical papilla, stem cells from human exfoliated deciduous teeth, periodontal ligament stem cells, and mesenchymal stem cells from the gingiva. All of these possess neurogenic potential due to their common developmental origin from the embryonic neural crest. Besides the relative ease of isolation of these adult stem cells from readily available biological waste routinely produced during dental treatment, these cells also possess the advantage of immune compatibility in autologous transplantation. In recent years, much interest has been focused on the derivation of neural lineages from these adult stem cells for therapeutic applications in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve regeneration. In addition, there are also promising nontherapeutic applications of stem cell-derived neurons in pharmacological and toxicological screening of neuroactive drugs, and for in vitro modeling of neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, this review will critically examine the diverse array of in vitro neural induction protocols that have been devised for dental and oral-derived stem cells. These protocols are defined not only by the culture milieu comprising the basal medium plus growth factors, small molecules, and other culture supplements but also by the substrata/surface coatings utilized, the presence of multiple culture stages, the total culture duration, the initial seeding density, and whether the spheroid/neurosphere formation is being utilized to recapitulate the three-dimensional neural differentiation microenvironment that is naturally present physiologically in vivo.

  16. A two-state cell damage model under hyperthermic conditions: theory and in vitro experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yusheng; Tinsley Oden, J; Rylander, Marissa Nichole

    2008-08-01

    The ultimate goal of cancer treatment utilizing thermotherapy is to eradicate tumors and minimize damage to surrounding host tissues. To achieve this goal, it is important to develop an accurate cell damage model to characterize the population of cell death under various thermal conditions. The traditional Arrhenius model is often used to characterize the damaged cell population under the assumption that the rate of cell damage is proportional to exp(-EaRT), where Ea is the activation energy, R is the universal gas constant, and T is the absolute temperature. However, this model is unable to capture transition phenomena over the entire hyperthermia and ablation temperature range, particularly during the initial stage of heating. Inspired by classical statistical thermodynamic principles, we propose a general two-state model to characterize the entire cell population with two distinct and measurable subpopulations of cells, in which each cell is in one of the two microstates, viable (live) and damaged (dead), respectively. The resulting cell viability can be expressed as C(tau,T)=exp(-Phi(tau,T)kT)(1+exp(-Phi(tau,T)kT)), where k is a constant. The in vitro cell viability experiments revealed that the function Phi(tau,T) can be defined as a function that is linear in exposure time tau when the temperature T is fixed, and linear as well in terms of the reciprocal of temperature T when the variable tau is held as constant. To determine parameters in the function Phi(tau,T), we use in vitro cell viability data from the experiments conducted with human prostate cancerous (PC3) and normal (RWPE-1) cells exposed to thermotherapeutic protocols to correlate with the proposed cell damage model. Very good agreement between experimental data and the derived damage model is obtained. In addition, the new two-state model has the advantage that is less sensitive and more robust due to its well behaved model parameters.

  17. In vitro and in vivo characterization of highly purified Human Mesothelioma derived cells

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    Zunino Annalisa

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant pleural mesothelioma is a rare disease known to be resistant to conventional therapies. A better understanding of mesothelioma biology may provide the rationale for new therapeutic strategies. In this regard, tumor cell lines development has been an important tool to study the biological properties of many tumors. However all the cell lines established so far were grown in medium containing at least 10% serum, and it has been shown that primary cell lines cultured under these conditions lose their ability to differentiate, acquire gene expression profiles that differ from that of tissue specific stem cells or the primary tumor they derive from, and in some cases are neither clonogenic nor tumorigenic. Our work was aimed to establish from fresh human pleural mesothelioma samples cell cultures maintaining tumorigenic properties. Methods The primary cell cultures, obtained from four human pleural mesotheliomas, were expanded in vitro in a low serum proliferation-permissive medium and the expression of different markers as well as the tumorigenicity in immunodeficient mice was evaluated. Results The established mesothelioma cell cultures are able to engraft, after pseudo orthotopic intraperitoneal transplantation, in immunodeficient mouse and maintain this ability to after serial transplantation. Our cell cultures were strongly positive for CD46, CD47, CD56 and CD63 and were also strongly positive for some markers never described before in mesothelioma cell lines, including CD55, CD90 and CD99. By real time PCR we found that our cell lines expressed high mRNA levels of typical mesothelioma markers as mesothelin (MSLN and calretinin (CALB2, and of BMI-1, a stemness marker, and DKK1, a potent Wingless [WNT] inhibitor. Conclusions These cell cultures may provide a valuable in vitro and in vivo model to investigate mesothelioma biology. The identification of new mesothelioma markers may be useful for diagnosis and

  18. Effects of Celecoxib and Ly117018 Combination on Human Breast Cancer Cells in Vitro

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    Klaus H. Baumann

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Activation and signalling of estrogen receptor (ER and COX-2 represent two important pathways in breast cancer cell regulation. Activation of either pathway is associated with breast cancer cell proliferation and eventually malignant progression. Raloxifene analogue, Ly117018, a selective estrogen receptor modulator and celecoxib, a specific COX- 2 inhibitor have been shown to inhibit breast cancer cell proliferation when used alone in vitro and in vivo. In this study, the combined drug effects on hormone-dependent MCF-7 and hormone-independent MDA-MB-435 cells in vitro were evaluated. Cell proliferation assays excluded drug antagonism and revealed a moderate synergistic growth inhibitory activity of Ly117018 and celecoxib on both cell lines when combined in specific concentrations. Growth inhibition of either compound was not associated with cell cycle arrest. In MCF-7 cells, western blot analysis revealed a decreased phosphorylation of the AKT protein by either agent alone or in combination. In MDA-MB-435 cells, celecoxib alone induced an increase in AKT phosphorylation relative to total AKT protein; this effect was decreased in the presence of Ly117018. These results indicate that these two drugs are non-antagonistic; and when combined in specific concentrations, moderate synergistic antiproliferative activity of celecoxib and Ly117018 were observed in hormone-dependent MCF-7 and hormone- independent MDA-MB-435 cells associated with changes in cell cycle distribution and regulation of AKT protein and phosphorylation. These findings further support a central role of the ER- and COX-2 pathways in human breast cancer cells.

  19. Bioavailability of iron from spinach using an in vitro/human Caco-2 cell bioassay model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutzke, Corinne J.; Glahn, Raymond P.; Rutzke, Michael A.; Welch, Ross M.; Langhans, Robert W.; Albright, Louis D.; Combs, Gerald F Jr; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) cv Whitney was tested for iron bioavailabilty using an in vitro human intestinal cell culture ferritin bioassay technique previously developed. Spinach was cultured in a growth chamber for 33 days, harvested, and freeze-dried. Total iron in the samples was an average of 71 micrograms/g dry weight. Spinach was digested in vitro (pepsin and 0.1 M HCl followed by pancreatin and 0.1 M NaHCO3) with and without the addition of supplemental ascorbic acid. Caco-2 cell cultures were used to determine iron bioavailability from the spinach mixtures. Production of the iron-binding protein ferritin in the Caco-2 cells showed the supplemental ascorbic acid doubled bioavailability of iron from spinach. The data show fresh spinach is a poor source of iron, and emphasize the importance of evaluation of whole meals rather than single food items. The data support the usefulness of the in vitro/Caco-2 cell ferritin bioassay model for prescreening of space flight diets for bioavailable iron.

  20. From pluripotency to forebrain patterning: an in vitro journey astride embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lupo, Giuseppe; Bertacchi, Michele; Carucci, Nicoletta; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Biagioni, Stefano; Cremisi, Federico

    2014-08-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have been used extensively as in vitro models of neural development and disease, with special efforts towards their conversion into forebrain progenitors and neurons. The forebrain is the most complex brain region, giving rise to several fundamental structures, such as the cerebral cortex, the hypothalamus, and the retina. Due to the multiplicity of signaling pathways playing different roles at distinct times of embryonic development, the specification and patterning of forebrain has been difficult to study in vivo. Research performed on ESCs in vitro has provided a large body of evidence to complement work in model organisms, but these studies have often been focused more on cell type production than on cell fate regulation. In this review, we systematically reassess the current literature in the field of forebrain development in mouse and human ESCs with a focus on the molecular mechanisms of early cell fate decisions, taking into consideration the specific culture conditions, exogenous and endogenous molecular cues as described in the original studies. The resulting model of early forebrain induction and patterning provides a useful framework for further studies aimed at reconstructing forebrain development in vitro for basic research or therapy.

  1. Functional Enterospheres Derived In Vitro from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

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    Rohan R. Nadkarni

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Intestinal organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs are valuable in vitro research models that enable simplified access to human gastrointestinal tissues. Here, we report the in vitro generation of enterospheres (hEnS from hPSC-derived gastrointestinal epithelial precursors. hEnS are cystic spheroids with a simple uniform structure composed entirely of intestinal epithelium. hEnS express markers of mature brush border cells and share a transcriptome profile similar to that of more mature intestinal organoids. Modulation of signaling cues enables control of hEnS growth and differentiation, including long-term propagation. We show that hEnS can be exploited for functional studies: hEnS display an innate immune response when treated with enteric pathogens, and transgenic modification of hEnS with a fluorescence cell-cycle reporter enables hEnS-forming stem cell enrichment. Our work establishes hEnS as an accessible and tractable in vitro modeling system for studying human gastrointestinal biology.

  2. Development in vitro of the female germ cells of the polychaete Ophryotrocha labronica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emanuelsson, H; Anehus, S

    1985-02-01

    In the polychaete Ophryotrocha labronica each oocyte is during its growth period associated with a single nurse cell. The fact that the oocyte-nurse cell pairs occur isolated in the female coelom makes them easily removable for analysis of their developmental ability in vitro. Using Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium supplemented with amino acids, nucleosides, foetal calf serum and sea water, we have managed to support development in vitro of germ cell pairs from early and mid-oogenesis until maturation of the oocyte, when the nurse cell degenerates and the oocyte enters meiotic metaphase. Radiolabelling of germ cells in mid-oogenesis with tritiated amino acids and uridine during the first day of incubation indicates normal development with synthesis of RNA and protein, and pulses two days later verify a continued normal protein synthesis and yolk formation. The investigation confirms autosynthesis of yolk proteins in the germ cells of this species and indicates a leading role of the nurse cell in the process.

  3. Cholera toxin inhibits human hepatocarcinoma cell proliferation in vitro via suppressing ATX/LPA axis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Qi; Deng, An-mei; Wu, Shan-shan; Zheng, Min

    2011-08-01

    To investigate the antitumor effect of cholera toxin (CT) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in vitro and the mechanisms underlying the effect. Human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines Hep3B and Huh7, which expressed moderate and high level of autotaxin (ATX), respectively, were used. Cytokine level in the cells was evaluated using ELISA assay, and cell proliferation was investigated using MTT assay. ATX expression was determined using Western blot. ATX/lyso-PLD activity in the conditioned medium was measured using FS-3, a fluorescent lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) analogue, as substrate. Exposure to CT (7.5 and 10 ng/mL) significantly inhibited the cell growth, decreased secretion of proinflammatory cytokine TNF-α and promoted secretion of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-10. CT at 10 ng/mL markedly suppressed ATX expression in Hep3B and Huh7 cells. Furthermore, ATX and lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) were found to be crucial for growth of the cancer cells. CT could inhibit TNF-α-induced expression and secretion of ATX that led to decreased activity of lysophospholipase D, thus decreasing the conversion of LPC to LPA. CT inhibits hepatocellular carcinoma cell growth in vitro via regulating the ATX-LPA pathway.

  4. [Inhibitory effect of solanine on prostate cancer cell line PC-3 in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Shi, Guo-wei

    2011-03-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of the effects of solanine on human androgen-independent prostate cancer cell line PC-3 in vitro. PC-3 cells were treated with solanine at the concentration of 0, 30, 40 and 50 microg/ml, and the cell activity was measured by CCK-8 at 12, 24 and 48 hours after the treatment. At 24 hours, the cell cycle and apoptosis were detected by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, and the protein expressions of I(kappa)B(alpha) and Bcl-2 determined by Western blot. Solanine suppressed the growth of PC-3 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner in vitro, with significant differences among different concentration and time groups (P solanine concentration groups. Solanine has an anti-prostate cancer effect by inhibiting PC-3 cell proliferation, arresting the S phase, inducing cell apoptosis, up-regulating the protein expression of I(kappa)B(alpha) and down-regulating that of Bcl-2.

  5. Retinoic acid promotes the proliferation of primordial germ cell-like cells differentiated from mouse skin-derived stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hui; Wang, Jun-Jie; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Ge, Wei; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Sun, Rui; Li, Lan; Li, Bo; Shen, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Skin-derived stem cells (SDSCs) have the potential to differentiate into gametes and are a potential resource for research and clinical applications. Sufficient amount of primordial germ cells (PGCs) is an important requirement for successful differentiation of SDSCs into gametes in vitro. Retinoic acid (RA), a vitamin A-derived small lipophilic molecule, promotes the growth of PGCs in vivo; however, the role of RA on the proliferation of PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) derived from SDSCs remains unknown. In this study, SDSCs were induced to differentiate into the embryoid body and cocultured with mouse fibroblasts to form PGCLCs. The proliferation of PGCLCs with the presence of various concentrations of RA was investigated in vitro. Immunofluorescence labeling showed that the 5-Bromo-2-deoxyUridine-positive ratio of PGCLCs was increased after the cells were treated with 5-μM RA, and flow cytometry results showed that the number of cells in the S phase was increased significantly. The messenger RNA expression levels of cell cycle-related genes, CCND1 and CDK2, were also increased. Furthermore, RA effectively promoted the external proliferation of endogenous PGCs when 11.5-days postcoitum fetal mouse genital ridges were cultured in vitro. In conclusion, 5-μM RA promoted the proliferation of SDSCs-derived PGCLCs and endogenous PGCs. Our study will provide a valuable model system for studying the differentiation of stem cells into gametes in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Studying Niche Colonization and the Dynamics of Imprint Erasure During In Vitro Acquisition of Pluripotency in Germ Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveros, Marisabel

    2014-01-01

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) are the embryonic precursors of sperm and eggs. Scalable in vitro differentiation of PGCs from pluripotent cell types has emerged as a model to study PGC biology. The in vitro PGCs (iPGCs) obtained from ESCs through the embryoid body (EB) differentiation method correspond to a pregonadal stage of PGC development. Thus, extending the applications of this model to the study of more developmentally advanced germ cells requires maturation of iPGCs to different develop...

  7. Scutellarin promotes in vitro angiogenesis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

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    Gao, Zhong-Xiu-Zi [Department of Anatomy, Basic Medical Science College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Huang, Da-Yong [Department of Oncology, The Second Clinical Hospital, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Li, Hai-Xia; Zhang, Li-Na; Lv, Yan-Hong; Cui, Hai-Dong [Department of Anatomy, Basic Medical Science College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China); Zheng, Jin-Hua, E-mail: jhzhenghrbmu@yahoo.cn [Department of Anatomy, Basic Medical Science College, Harbin Medical University, Harbin (China)

    2010-09-10

    Research highlights: {yields} It has been shown that scutellarin exhibits a variety of pharmacological actions, including anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, vasodilator as well as cardiovascular and cerebrovascular ischemia protective effects, indicating beneficial vascular effects of scutellarin. Therefore, it is speculated that scutellarin may be able to stimulate angiogenesis, which could be beneficial in the treatment of ischemic disease, wound healing and tissue regeneration. {yields} The purpose of the present study was to elucidate the direct angiogenic actions of scutellarin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. {yields} Our results showed that scutellarin to directly induce in vitro angiogenesis, which is closely correlated with upregulated MMP-2 expression, suggesting a potential for increasing angiogenesis. -- Abstract: Angiogenesis is critical to a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Scutellarin, a major flavonoid of a Chinese herbal medicine Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand. Mazz. has been shown to offer beneficial effects on cardiovascular and cerebrovascular functions. However, scutellarin's effects on angiogenesis and underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Here, we studied angiogenic effects of scutellarin on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Scutellarin was found by MTT assay to induce proliferation of HUVECs. In scutellarin-treated HUVECs, a dramatic increase in migration was measured by wound healing assay; Transwell chamber assay found significantly more invading cells in scutellarin-treated groups. Scutellarin also promoted capillary-like tube formation in HUVECs on Matrigel, and significantly upregulated platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 at both mRNA and protein levels. Scutellarin's angiogenic mechanism was investigated in vitro by measuring expression of angiogenic factors associated with cell migration and invasion. Scutellarin strongly

  8. Nano- and microstructured materials for in vitro studies of the physiology of vascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greiner, Alexandra M; Sales, Adria; Chen, Hao; Biela, Sarah A; Kaufmann, Dieter; Kemkemer, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular environment of vascular cells in vivo is complex in its chemical composition, physical properties, and architecture. Consequently, it has been a great challenge to study vascular cell responses in vitro, either to understand their interaction with their native environment or to investigate their interaction with artificial structures such as implant surfaces. New procedures and techniques from materials science to fabricate bio-scaffolds and surfaces have enabled novel studies of vascular cell responses under well-defined, controllable culture conditions. These advancements are paving the way for a deeper understanding of vascular cell biology and materials-cell interaction. Here, we review previous work focusing on the interaction of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) with materials having micro- and nanostructured surfaces. We summarize fabrication techniques for surface topographies, materials, geometries, biochemical functionalization, and mechanical properties of such materials. Furthermore, various studies on vascular cell behavior and their biological responses to micro- and nanostructured surfaces are reviewed. Emphasis is given to studies of cell morphology and motility, cell proliferation, the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions, and signal transduction pathways of vascular cells. We finalize with a short outlook on potential interesting future studies.

  9. In vitro induction and differentiation of newborn guinea pig hippocampus neural stem cells into cells resembling inner hair cells, using artificial perilymph.

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    Wang, Y; Dong, M-M

    2011-08-01

    To investigate whether artificial perilymph can induce neural stem cells, derived from the hippocampus of newborn guinea pigs, to differentiate into inner ear hair cells, in vitro. Primary neural stem cells derived from the hippocampus of newborn guinea pigs were incubated in medium containing either 10 per cent fetal bovine serum or 5, 10 or 15 per cent artificial perilymph, for three weeks. Differentiated cells were identified using immunofluorescence, Western blot and scanning electron microscopy. Both fetal bovine serum and artificial perilymph induced the neural stem cells to differentiate into cells with hair-cell-specific antibodies. Neural stem cells can survive in both fetal bovine serum and artificial perilymph, and within these media can differentiate into cells with hair-cell-specific antibodies. This provides an experimental basis for transplantation of neural stem cells into the inner ear.

  10. In vitro combinations of red blood cell, plasma and platelet components evaluated by thromboelastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agren, Anna; Edgren, Gustaf; Kardell, Malin; Ostlund, Anders; Wikman, Agneta Taune

    2014-10-01

    Thromboelastography is increasingly used to evaluate coagulation in massively bleeding patients. The aim of this study was to investigate how different combinations of blood components affect in vitro whole blood clotting measured by thromboelastography. Packed red blood cells, plasma and platelets from fresh and old blood components were mixed in vitro, in proportions of 4:4:1, 5:5:2, 8:4:1 and 2:1:0, and analysed with thromboelastography. For the ratio 4:4:1 the experiment was done at both 37 °C and 32 °C. Thromboelastography curves were within normal reference values for the blood component proportions of 4:4:1 and 5:5:2. For 8:4:1, the angle and maximal amplitude were reduced below normal values, indicating low levels of fibrinogen and/or platelets. For the 2:1:0 proportion, all parameters were affected resulting in severely impaired in vitro clot formation. The reaction-time, reflecting the coagulation factor-dependent, initial clot formation, was slightly increased at a low temperature. Prolonged storage of the components did not affect the curve. With the introduction of guidelines on the management of massive bleeding it is important to have tools for the assessment of the new protocols. In vitro evaluation of mixtures of packed red blood cells, plasma and platelets by thromboelastography may be relevant in the prediction of in vivo clot formation and haemostasis.

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Relevance in Multicellular Bioengineered 3D In Vitro Tumor Models.

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    Ferreira, Luís P; Gaspar, Vítor M; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen; Mano, João F

    2017-08-18

    In vitro 3D tumor microenvironment mimicking models are gathering momentum as alternatives to traditional 2D flat monolayer cultures due to their potential for recapitulating major cancer hallmarks. To fulfill such potential, it is crucial that 3D tumor testing platforms completely emulate in vitro the complex in vivo tumor niche and its cellular constituents. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recognized to play a pivotal multi-modulatory role in cancer, generating interest as biological targets and as key tumor suppressing, or tumor promoting effectors. This review discusses the biological influence of different types of MSCs in the tumor microenvironment and showcases recent studies that engineer 3D MSCs-cancer cells co-cultures as advanced in vitro therapy testing platforms. A special focus is given to MSCs-cancer 3D co-culture set-up parameters, challenges, and future opportunities. Understanding cancer-MSCs crosstalk and their underlying effects is envisioned to support the development of advanced 3D in vitro disease models for discovery of forefront cancer treatments. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Flow Cytometry Assessment of In Vitro Generated CD138+ Human Plasma Cells

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    Rayelle Itoua Maïga

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The in vitro CD40-CD154 interaction promotes human B lymphocytes differentiation into plasma cells. Currently, CD138 is the hallmark marker enabling the detection of human plasma cells, both in vitro and in vivo; its presence can be monitored by flow cytometry using a specific antibody. We have developed a culture system allowing for the differentiation of memory B lymphocytes. In order to detect the newly formed plasma cells, we have compared their staining using five anti-CD138 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. As a reference, we also tested human cell lines, peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and bone marrow samples. The five anti-CD138 mAbs stained RPMI-8226 cells (>98% with variable stain index (SI. The highest SI was obtained with B-A38 mAb while the lowest SI was obtained with DL-101 and 1D4 mAbs. However, the anti-CD138 mAbs were not showing equivalent CD138+ cells frequencies within the generated plasma cells. B-A38, B-B4, and MI-15 were similar (15–25% while DL-101 mAb stained a higher proportion of CD138-positive cells (38–42%. DL-101 and B-A38 mAbs stained similar populations in bone marrow samples but differed in their capacity to bind to CD138high and CD138lo cell lines. In conclusion, such cellular fluctuations suggest heterogeneity in human plasma cell populations and/or in CD138 molecules.

  13. A novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro assay for the study of tumor cell invasion

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    Neufeld Gera

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The induction of tumor cell invasion is an important step in tumor progression. Due to the cost and slowness of in-vivo invasion assays, there is need for quantitative in-vitro invasion assays that mimic as closely as possible the tumor environment and in which conditions can be rigorously controlled. Methods We have established a novel asymmetric 3D in-vitro invasion assay by embedding a monolayer of tumor cells between two layers of collagen. The cells were then allowed to invade the upper and lower layers of collagen. To visualize invading cells the gels were sectioned perpendicular to the monolayer so that after seeding the monolayer appears as a thin line precisely defining the origin of invasion. The number of invading tumor cells, their proliferation rate, the distance they traverse and the direction of invasion could then be determined quantitatively. Results The assay was used to compare the invasive properties of several tumor cell types and the results compare well with those obtained by previously described assays. Lysyl-oxidase like protein-2 (Loxl2 is a potent inducer of invasiveness. Using our assay we show for the first time that inhibition of endogenous Loxl2 expression in several types of tumor cells strongly inhibits their invasiveness. We also took advantage of the asymmetric nature of the assay in order to show that fibronectin enhances the invasiveness of breast cancer cells more potently than laminin. The asymmetric properties of the assay were also used to demonstrate that soluble factors derived from fibroblasts can preferentially attract invading breast cancer cells. Conclusion Our assay displays several advantages over previous invasion assays as it is allows the quantitative analysis of directional invasive behavior of tumor cells in a 3D environment mimicking the tumor microenvironment. It should be particularly useful for the study of the effects of components of the tumor microenvironment on

  14. In vitro characterization of cancer cell morphology, chemokinesis, and matrix invasion using a novel microfabricated system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaha, Laura

    A diagnosis of metastatic cancer reduces a patient's 5-year survival rate by nearly 80% compared to a primary tumor diagnosed at an early stage. While gene expression arrays have revealed unique gene signatures for metastatic cancer cells, we are lacking an understanding of the tangible physical changes that distinguish metastatic tumor cells from each other and from their related primary tumors. At the fundamental level, this translates into first characterizing the phenotype of metastatic cancer cells in vitro both in 2D - looking at morphology and migration - and in 3D - focusing on matrix invasion. While 2D in vitro studies have provided insight into the effects of specific environmental conditions on specific cancer cell lines, the unique details included in each experimental design make it challenging to compare cell phenotype across different in vitro platforms as well as between laboratories and disciplines that share the goal of understanding cancer. While 3D phenotype studies have employed more standardized and ubiquitous assays, most available tools lack the imaging capability and geometry to effectively characterize all factors driving 3D matrix invasion. In this work, we present protocols and platforms aimed at addressing the problems identified in the tools currently available for studying metastatic cancer in vitro. First, we present a 2D study of morphology and migration using widely accepted protocols. The study is applied to characterizing phenotypes of three breast cancer cell lines with different metastatic organ tropisms. The results show that general populations of cells from each of the 3 lines are unique in shape and motility despite being derived from the same tumor line and that the observed phenotype differences may be related to differences in focal adhesion assembly. More broadly, these studies suggest that standardizing phenotype studies using commonly available techniques may provide a platform by which to compare phenotypic studies

  15. In Vitro Effects of Bromoalkyl Phenytoin Derivatives on Regulated Death, Cell Cycle and Ultrastructure of Leukemia Cells.

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    Śladowska, Katarzyna; Opydo-Chanek, Małgorzata; Król, Teodora; Trybus, Wojciech; Trybus, Ewa; Kopacz-Bednarska, Anna; Handzlik, Jadwiga; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Mazur, Lidia

    2017-11-01

    To search for new antileukemic agents, the chemical structure of phenytoin was modified. A possible cytotoxic activity of three bromoalkyl phenytoin analogs, methyl 2-(1-(3-bromopropyl)-2,4-dioxo-5,5-diphenylimidazolidin-3-yl) propanoate (PH2), 1-(3-bromopropyl)-3-methyl-5,5-diphenylimidazolidine-2,4-dione (PH3) and 1-(4-bromobutyl)-3-methyl-5,5-diphenylimidazolidine-2,4-dione (PH4) on regulated cell death, the cell cycle and cell ultrastructure was assessed. The experiments were performed in vitro on HL-60 and U937 cells, using flow cytometry and electron microscopy methods. Application of PH2, PH3, and PH4 resulted in cell surface exposure of phosphatidylserine and plasma membrane impairment, caspase-8, -9, and -3/7 activation, dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, DNA breakage, cell-cycle disturbance and cell ultrastructural changes. In general, PH3 appeared to be the most active against the leukemia cells, and all bromoalkyl hydantoins, PH2-PH4, were more active in HL-60 cells than in U937 cells. The antileukemic activity of the bromoalkyl phenytoin analogs depended on the combination of N-hydantoin substituents and the human cell line used. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  16. Adult stromal cells derived from human adipose tissue provoke pancreatic cancer cell death both in vitro and in vivo.

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    Beatrice Cousin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained by dynamic interactions between epithelial cells and their microenvironment. Disrupting this homeostasis can induce aberrant cell proliferation, adhesion, function and migration that might promote malignant behavior. Indeed, aberrant stromal-epithelial interactions contribute to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC spread and metastasis, and this raises the possibility that novel stroma-targeted therapies represent additional approaches for combating this malignant disease. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of human stromal cells derived from adipose tissue (ADSC on pancreatic tumor cell proliferation. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Co-culturing pancreatic tumor cells with ADSC and ADSC-conditioned medium sampled from different donors inhibited cancer cell viability and proliferation. ADSC-mediated inhibitory effect was further extended to other epithelial cancer-derived cell lines (liver, colon, prostate. ADSC conditioned medium induced cancer cell necrosis following G1-phase arrest, without evidence of apoptosis. In vivo, a single intra-tumoral injection of ADSC in a model of pancreatic adenocarcinoma induced a strong and long-lasting inhibition of tumor growth. CONCLUSION: These data indicate that ADSC strongly inhibit PDAC proliferation, both in vitro and in vivo and induce tumor cell death by altering cell cycle progression. Therefore, ADSC may constitute a potential cell-based therapeutic alternative for the treatment of PDAC for which no effective cure is available.

  17. Initial cell seeding density influences pancreatic endocrine development during in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem cells.

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    Gage, Blair K; Webber, Travis D; Kieffer, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have the ability to form cells derived from all three germ layers, and as such have received significant attention as a possible source for insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells for diabetes treatment. While considerable advances have been made in generating hESC-derived insulin-producing cells, to date in vitro-derived glucose-responsive beta-cells have remained an elusive goal. With the objective of increasing the in vitro formation of pancreatic endocrine cells, we examined the effect of varying initial cell seeding density from 1.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) to 5.3 x 10(4) cells/cm(2) followed by a 21-day pancreatic endocrine differentiation protocol. Low density-seeded cells were found to be biased toward the G2/M phases of the cell cycle and failed to efficiently differentiate into SOX17-CXCR4 co-positive definitive endoderm cells leaving increased numbers of OCT4 positive cells in day 4 cultures. Moderate density cultures effectively formed definitive endoderm and progressed to express PDX1 in approximately 20% of the culture. High density cultures contained approximately double the numbers of PDX1 positive pancreatic progenitor cells and also showed increased expression of MNX1, PTF1a, NGN3, ARX, and PAX4 compared to cultures seeded at moderate density. The cultures seeded at high density displayed increased formation of polyhormonal pancreatic endocrine cell populations co-expressing insulin, glucagon and somatostatin. The maturation process giving rise to these endocrine cell populations followed the expected cascade of pancreatic progenitor marker (PDX1 and MNX1) expression, followed by pancreatic endocrine specification marker expression (BRN4, PAX4, ARX, NEUROD1, NKX6.1 and NKX2.2) and then pancreatic hormone expression (insulin, glucagon and somatostatin). Taken together these data suggest that initial cell seeding density plays an important role in both germ layer specification and pancreatic progenitor commitment, which

  18. PCL-coated hydroxyapatite scaffold derived from cuttlefish bone: In vitro cell culture studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milovac, Dajana, E-mail: dmilovac@fkit.hr [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Gamboa-Martínez, Tatiana C. [Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain); Ivankovic, Marica [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb (Croatia); Gallego Ferrer, Gloria [Centre for Biomaterials and Tissue Engineering, Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain); Biomedical Research Networking Center in Bioengineering, Biomaterials and Nanomedicine, Valencia (Spain); Ivankovic, Hrvoje [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-09-01

    In the present study, we examined the potential of using highly porous poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-coated hydroxyapatite (HAp) scaffold derived from cuttlefish bone for bone tissue engineering applications. The cell culture studies were performed in vitro with preosteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells in static culture conditions. Comparisons were made with uncoated HAp scaffold. The attachment and spreading of preosteoblasts on scaffolds were observed by Live/Dead staining Kit. The cells grown on the HAp/PCL composite scaffold exhibited greater spreading than cells grown on the HAp scaffold. DNA quantification and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) confirmed a good proliferation of cells on the scaffolds. DNA content on the HAp/PCL scaffold was significantly higher compared to porous HAp scaffolds. The amount of collagen synthesis was determined using a hydroxyproline assay. The osteoblastic differentiation of the cells was evaluated by determining alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and collagen type I secretion. Furthermore, cell spreading and cell proliferation within scaffolds were observed using a fluorescence microscope. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite/poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffold with interconnected pores was prepared • Cytotoxicity test showed that the scaffold was not cytotoxic towards MC3T3-E1 cells • The scaffold supported the attachment, proliferation and differentiation of cells • A 3D cell colonization was confirmed using the fluorescence microscopy • The scaffold might be a promising candidate for bone tissue engineering.

  19. Mouse Germ Cell Development in-vivo and in-vitro

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    Deshira Saiti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In mammalian development, primordial germ cells (PGCs represent the initial population of cells that are committed to the germ cell lineage. PGCs segregate early in development, triggered by signals from the extra-embryonic ectoderm. They are distinguished from surrounding cells by their unique gene expression patterns. Some of the more common genes used to identify them are Blimp1, Oct3/4, Fragilis, Stella, c-Kit, Mvh, Dazl and Gcna1. These genes are involved in regulating their migration and differentiation, and in maintaining the pluripotency of these cells. Recent research has demonstrated the possibility of obtaining PGCs, and subsequently, mature germ cells from a starting population of embryonic stem cells (ESCs in culture. This phenomenon has been investigated using a variety of methods, and ESC lines of both mouse and human origin. Embryonic stem cells can differentiate into germ cells of both the male and female phenotype and in one case has resulted in the birth of live pups from the fertilization of oocytes with ESC derived sperm. This fi nding leads to the prospect of using ESC derived germ cells as a treatment for sterility. This review outlines the evolvement of germ cells from ESCs in vitro in relation to in vivo events.

  20. Cytokines can reduce clonal, CD34-positive cells in acute myeloid leukemia in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, S; Gerhartz, H H; Schmetzer, H M

    2000-07-01

    We studied the influence of cytokine mixes on the survival of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone-marrow (BM) cells in a 14-day culture assay in vitro. Southern-blot analysis using a panel of different probes in combination with densitometry and flow cytometry were used to detect and compare the amount of clonal or CD34-positive BM cells before and after the culturing procedure. A significant reduction of CD34-positive cells after incubation with a cytokine mix [interleukin (IL)-1beta, IL-3, IL-6, stem cell factor (SCF), erythropoietin (EP) with granulocyte macrophage/colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF, Cytok1) could be achieved in all 16 cases with a CD34-positive blast phenotype studied at diagnosis (PVitality of BM cells was not influenced by 14-day cytokine treatment; however, the total cell count could be increased by Cytok1 and Cytok2 by 55-174%, but not by the control medium. Our data show that: (1) clonal cell populations can be regularly detected at diagnosis, during complete remission, and at relapse; (2) CD34-positive cells in AML can be demonstrated to be clonal, gene-rearranged cells; (3) incubation of AML BM-cells with Cytokl leads to a reduction of the CD34-positive, clonal cell load in all cases at diagnosis and in 78% of the cases in complete remission of AML, but in only 25% of the cases at relapse; (4) in all healthy BM samples, proportions of 'healthy' CD34-positive cells were increased. Moreover, absolute cell counts were increased by cytokine incubation of cells obtained at diagnosis, relapse, or complete remission of AML and from healthy donors indicating a selective stimulation of healthy, but not of leukemic CD34-positive cells; (5) cytokine cocktails containing GM-CSF are more efficient in reducing leukemic cells than cocktails without GM-CSF; and (6) in vitro reactivity of clonal or CD34-positive BM cells against Cytokl has clinical relevance. We conclude, that Southern-blot analysis and flow cytometry are suitable methods to detect and

  1. Inhibitory effect of calcium channel blockers on proliferation of human glioma cells in vitro

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    Kunert-Radek, J.; Stepien, H.; Lyson, K.; Pawlikowski, M.; Radek, A.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of 2 specific calcium channel blockers, verapamil and nimodipine, on the proliferation of human glioma tumour cells were investigated in vitro. Tumour tissues for primary cell cultures were obtained bioptically from 3 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of glioblastoma. The (/sup 3/H)-thymidine incorporation into glioma tumour cells DNA was used as a sensitive index of the cell proliferation. It was found that varapamil (10/sup 4/-10/sup 5/M) and nimodipine (10/sup 4/-10/sup 6/M) significantly inhibited the (/sup 3/H)-thymidine uptake in a dose-related manner. The inhibitory effect of both calcium channel antagonists was reversed by stimultancous addition of calcium chloride (5x10/sup 3/M). These results indicate that verapamil and nimodipine may exert an antiproliferative effect on glioma cells growth acting through a blokade of specific voltage-dependent calcium channels.

  2. In Vitro Efficient Expansion of Tumor Cells Deriving from Different Types of Human Tumor Samples

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    Ilaria Turin

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Obtaining human tumor cell lines from fresh tumors is essential to advance our understanding of antitumor immune surveillance mechanisms and to develop new ex vivo strategies to generate an efficient anti-tumor response. The present study delineates a simple and rapid method for efficiently establishing primary cultures starting from tumor samples of different types, while maintaining the immuno-histochemical characteristics of the original tumor. We compared two different strategies to disaggregate tumor specimens. After short or long term in vitro expansion, cells analyzed for the presence of malignant cells demonstrated their neoplastic origin. Considering that tumor cells may be isolated in a closed system with high efficiency, we propose this methodology for the ex vivo expansion of tumor cells to be used to evaluate suitable new drugs or to generate tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes or vaccines.

  3. Photobiomodulation of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in vitro with red laser light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipshidze, Nicholas; Keelan, Michael H., Jr.; Horn, Joseph B.; Nikolaychik, Victor

    1996-12-01

    Numerous reports suggest that low power red laser light (LPRLL) is capable of affecting cellular processes in the absence of significant thermal effect. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of LPRLL on viability, growth, and attachment characteristics of rabbit and human aortic endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in vitro. All cell cultures were irradiated with single dose LPRLL using a He-Ne continuous wave laser with different energy densities. Assessment of effect on cell viability, growth, and attachment was performed utilizing Alamar Blue assay. Based upon our experiments, we conclude that: 1) stimulation and/or inhibition of cell growth and death can be obtained with LPRLL by varying the energy level, 2) LPRLL increases EC attachment, and 3) EC are more sensitive to photobiomodulation with LPRLL than SMC. These data may have significant importance leading to the establishment of new methods for phototherapy of atherosclerosis and restenosis.

  4. Effects of Aramid, a high strength synthetic fiber, on respiratory cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, J P; Mossman, B T; Driscoll, K E; Schins, R F; Borm, P J

    1994-01-01

    Industry continues to develop synthetic fibers for new technologies and as replacements for asbestos, a toxic and carcinogenic fiber. To determine whether the in vitro effects of the aromatic polyamide fiber, Aramid (Kevlar, Twaron), resembled those induced by asbestos, fibers were surveyed for (1) cytotoxicity as measured by total cell protein, and (2) proliferative capacity as measured by [3H]thymidine incorporation, colony forming efficiency (CFE), and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in two target cells of mineral dust-induced lung damage, hamster tracheal epithelial (HTE) cells and rat lung (RL90) fibroblasts. Results of cytotoxicity tests indicated that Aramid was as toxic to HTE and RL90 cells as were crocidolite and chrysotile asbestos when expressed on both an equal mass and equal fiber number basis. In HTE cells, Aramid caused a statistically significant increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation and CFE and produced a dose-dependent induction of ODC enzyme activity. Proliferative effects by asbestos or Aramid were not observed in RL90 fibroblasts. Thus, when tested over a respirable size range, Aramid exhibited many of the same effects on epithelial cells in vitro as did asbestos, including increased radiolabeled nucleotide incorporation into DNA and induction of ODC enzyme activity.

  5. Luciferase expression and bioluminescence does not affect tumor cell growth in vitro or in vivo

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    Rasko John EJ

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Live animal imaging is becoming an increasingly common technique for accurate and quantitative assessment of tumor burden over time. Bioluminescence imaging systems rely on a bioluminescent signal from tumor cells, typically generated from expression of the firefly luciferase gene. However, previous reports have suggested that either a high level of luciferase or the resultant light reaction produced upon addition of D-luciferin substrate can have a negative influence on tumor cell growth. To address this issue, we designed an expression vector that allows simultaneous fluorescence and luminescence imaging. Using fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS, we generated clonal cell populations from a human breast cancer (MCF-7 and a mouse melanoma (B16-F10 cell line that stably expressed different levels of luciferase. We then compared the growth capabilities of these clones in vitro by MTT proliferation assay and in vivo by bioluminescence imaging of tumor growth in live mice. Surprisingly, we found that neither the amount of luciferase nor biophotonic activity was sufficient to inhibit tumor cell growth, in vitro or in vivo. These results suggest that luciferase toxicity is not a necessary consideration when designing bioluminescence experiments, and therefore our approach can be used to rapidly generate high levels of luciferase expression for sensitive imaging experiments.

  6. The Antidiabetic Drug Metformin Inhibits the Proliferation of Bladder Cancer Cells in Vitro and in Vivo

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    Tao Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies suggest that metformin, a widely used antidiabetic agent, may reduce cancer risk and improve prognosis of certain malignancies. However, the mechanisms for the anti-cancer effects of metformin remain uncertain. In this study, we investigated the effects of metformin on human bladder cancer cells and the underlying mechanisms. Metformin significantly inhibited the proliferation and colony formation of 5637 and T24 cells in vitro; specifically, metformin induced an apparent cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phases, accompanied by a strong decrease of cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4, E2F1 and an increase of p21waf-1. Further experiments revealed that metformin activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK and suppressed mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, the central regulator of protein synthesis and cell growth. Moreover, daily treatment of metformin led to a substantial inhibition of tumor growth in a xenograft model with concomitant decrease in the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, cyclin D1 and p-mTOR. The in vitro and in vivo results demonstrate that metformin efficiently suppresses the proliferation of bladder cancer cells and suggest that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of bladder cancer.

  7. Establishment of an In Vitro Intestinal Epithelial Cell Culture Model of Avian Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Annette; Willer, Thomas; Steinberg, Pablo; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2017-06-01

    The role of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) in the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of chickens and pathogenesis of various diseases in chickens is still poorly understood. IECs line the GIT and represent the border between the unsterile environment and the sterile internal tissues. Bacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic pathogens are able to invade or pass IECs under certain circumstances and cause various diseases. Pathogen-host interactions in the chicken gut are poorly understood because of the lack of suitable in vitro and ex vivo models. In this context, there is a need to optimize the cell isolation and culture conditions to be able to provide reproducible IEC cultures with defined epithelial characteristics. We compared different mechanical IEC isolation protocols and cell culture media and established a reproducible primary intestinal epithelial cell culture model from specific-pathogen-free layer-type chickens. By using isolated crypts from the duodenum of 5- to 12-wk-old birds to create the starting material, we were able to culture replicating cells between 7 and 10 days. Cells built an almost closed monolayer and showed epithelial-like characteristics, such as the expression of cytokeratin and epithelial cadherin. The primary IEC cultures described in this study represent a suitable model with which to investigate in vitro pathogen-host interactions relevant to the chicken gut.

  8. In vitro effects of extracts of extra virgin olive oil on human colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampaloni, Barbara; Mavilia, Carmelo; Fabbri, Sergio; Romani, Annalisa; Ieri, Francesca; Tanini, Annalisa; Tonelli, Francesco; Brandi, Maria Luisa

    2014-01-01

    The Mediterranean diet is associated with a lower incidence of atherosclerosis, cardiovascular diseases, and some types of cancer. Recent interest has been focused on the biological activity of phenolic compounds present in extra virgin olive oils (EVOOs). Both in vivo and in vitro studies have shown that EVOO components have positive effects on metabolic parameters, such as plasma lipoproteins, oxidative damage, inflammatory markers, platelet function, and antimicrobial activity. We have investigated the possible interactions between 2 extracts of extra virgin olive oil and estrogen receptor β (ERβ) in an in vitro model of colon cancer. The qualification and quantification of the components of the 2 samples tested showed that phenolic compounds-hydroxytyrosol, secoiridoids, and lignans-are the major represented compounds. EVOO extracts were tested on a colon cancer cell line engineered to overexpress ERβ (HCT8-β8). By using custom made Oligo microarray, gene expression profiles of colon cancer cells challenged with EVOO-T extracts when compared with those of cells exposed to 17β-estradiol (17β-E2). This study demonstrated that the EVOO extracts tested showed an antiproliferative effect on colon cancer cells through the interaction with estrogen-dependent signals involved in tumor cell growth. Specifically, the ability of EVOO extracts to inhibit cell proliferation was superimposable to the activation of the ERβ receptor, similar to what was observed after 17β-E2 challenge.

  9. Effects of GDNF and LIF on mouse spermatogonial stem cells proliferation in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Suo, Li-Juan; Wang, Yan-Feng; Shang, Hua; Li, Guang-Xuan; Hu, Jian-Hong; Li, Qing-Wang

    2014-03-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are the only type of cells that transmit genes to the subsequent generations. The proliferation, cultivation and identification of SSCs in vitro are critical to understanding of male infertility, genetic resources and conservation of endangered species. To investigate the effects of glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) on the proliferation of mouse SSCs in vitro, supplement of GDNF and/or LIF were designed to culture SSCs. The testes of 6-8 d mouse were harvested and digested by two-step enzyme digestion method. The SSCs and Sertoli cells were separated by differential plating. Then the SSCs were identified by alkaline phosphatase staining, RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence cell analysis. The cellular proliferation capacity was measured by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay. The results showed that addition of 20 and 40 ng/ml of GDNF could strongly promote growth of mouse SSCs (p  0.05). However, the combination of 20 ng/ml GDNF and 1,000 U/ml LIF could significantly enhance the invitro proliferation of mouse SSCs (p < 0.05), and the OD490 value was 0.696 at day 5 of culture when the density of SSCs was 5-10 × 10(4) cells/ml.

  10. The influence of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skardelly, Marco, E-mail: Marco.Skardelly@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Glien, Anja; Groba, Claudia; Schlichting, Nadine [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Kamprad, Manja [Institute of Clinical Immunology, Medical Faculty, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany); Meixensberger, Juergen [Department of Neurosurgery, University Hospital, Leipzig (Germany); Milosevic, Javorina [Translational Centre for Regenerative Medicine, University of Leipzig, Leipzig (Germany)

    2013-12-10

    In allogenic and xenogenic transplantation, adequate immunosuppression plays a major role in graft survival, especially over the long term. The effect of immunosuppressive drugs on neural stem/progenitor cell fate has not been sufficiently explored. The focus of this study is to systematically investigate the effects of the following four different immunotherapeutic strategies on human neural progenitor cell survival/death, proliferation, metabolic activity, differentiation and migration in vitro: (1) cyclosporine A (CsA), a calcineurin inhibitor; (2) everolimus (RAD001), an mTOR-inhibitor; (3) mycophenolic acid (MPA, mycophenolate), an inhibitor of inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and (4) prednisolone, a steroid. At the minimum effective concentration (MEC), we found a prominent decrease in hNPCs' proliferative capacity (BrdU incorporation), especially for CsA and MPA, and an alteration of the NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity. Cell death rate, neurogenesis, gliogenesis and cell migration remained mostly unaffected under these conditions for all four immunosuppressants, except for apoptotic cell death, which was significantly increased by MPA treatment. - Highlights: • Four immunosuppresants (ISs) were tested in human neural progenitor cells in vitro. • Cyclosporine A and mycophenolic acid showed a prominent anti-proliferative activity • Mycophenolic acid exhibited a significant pro-apoptotic effect. • NAD(P)H-dependent metabolic activity was occasionally induced by ISs. • Neuronal differentiation and migration potential remained unaffected by ISs treatment.

  11. Bioelectric Field Enhancement: The Influence on Membrane Potential and Cell Migration In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnell, Marcy C; Skrinjar, Terence J

    2016-12-01

    Objective: The extracellular matrix consists of critical components that affect fibroblast polarization and migration. The existence of both intrinsic and extrinsic electrical signals that play essential roles in the development, physiology, regeneration, and pathology of cells was discovered over a century ago. In this study, we study how the Bioelectric Field Enhancement (BEFE) device and its generated electromagnetic field (EMF) by continuous direct current (DC) significantly affect the membrane potential and cell migration of fibroblasts in vitro. Approach: This is an experimental analysis of membrane potential and cell migration of murine fibroblasts when grown in treated media that has been reconstituted with an aqueous solution that has been exposed to an EMF, which is generated by this device versus fibroblasts grown in identically prepared control media that has not been exposed to the EMF. Results: The growth of fibroblasts in the treated media shows a strong percent change in polarization of the plasma membrane and significant increase in cell migration compared to control groups. Innovation: These experiments show the potential for an adjunct wound care therapy using a continuous DC EMF application through a medium of water. Conclusion: Growth media that was reconstituted with an aqueous solution that had been exposed to this DC derived EMF shows significant changes in cell polarity and cell migration of fibroblasts in vitro. The BEFE device has shown enhanced chronic wound healing in anecdotal reports from patients globally for decades when used as a footbath/bath and could lead to a novel EMF application in wound healing.

  12. Golgi-like staining of visual cortex cells obtained by extracellular biocytin application in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenan-Vaknin, G; Katz, H; Malach, R

    1992-02-07

    We report here the application of biocytin (a biotin-lysine complex) as an extracellular tracer in vitro. Biocytin was applied extracellularly, revealing Golgi-like staining of cells in the adult in vitro rat visual cortex. Micropipettes were filled with a solution of 2.3-2.6% biocytin dissolved in 0.05 M Tris buffer, pH 7.4. Biocytin was applied by one of 3 methods: diffusion, pressure injection or drop application. Cell bodies and dendrites around the application site and their efferent axonal processes were stained; dendritic spines were often visible. The injection sites varied in size from a single cell to a diameter of 400 microns. When applied in layer I-III, few filled cells were also seen in layers IV and V, outside the application site. The drop application (5-10 microliters) of biocytin resulted in filling of cells throughout the cortex. The combination of biocytin and the slice preparation was found to be very useful in revealing cell morphology and tracing interlaminar connections in the visual cortex. The advantages of this technique are its ease of application, the precise and restricted injection sites, and Golgi-like morphological detail.

  13. 3D cell culture to determine in vitro biocompatibility of bioactive glass in association with chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bédouin, Y; Pellen Mussi, P; Tricot-Doleux, S; Chauvel-Lebret, D; Auroy, P; Ravalec, X; Oudadesse, H; Perez, F

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the in vitro biocompatibility of a composite biomaterial composed of 46S6 bioactive glass in association with chitosan (CH) by using 3D osteoblast culture of SaOS2. The 46S6 and CH composite (46S6-CH) forms small hydroxyapatite crystals on its surface after only three days immersion in the simulated body fluid. For 2D osteoblast culture, a significant increase in cell proliferation was observed after three days of contact with 46S6 or 46S6-CH-immersed media. After six days, 46S6-CH led to a significant increase in cell proliferation (128%) compared with pure 46S6 (113%) and pure CH (122%). For 3D osteoblast culture, after six days of culture, there was an increase in gene expression of markers of the early osteoblastic differentiation (RUNX2, ALP, COL1A1). Geometric structures corresponding to small apatite clusters were observed by SEM on the surface of the spheroids cultivated with 46S6 or 46S6-CH-immersed media. We showed different cellular responses depending on the 2D and 3D cell culture model. The induction of osteoblast differentiation in the 3D cell culture explained the differences of cell proliferation in contact with 46S6, CH or 46S6-CH-immersed media. This study confirmed that the 3D cell culture model is a very promising tool for in vitro biological evaluation of bone substitutes' properties.

  14. Kidney specific protein-positive cells derived from embryonic stem cells reproduce tubular structures in vitro and differentiate into renal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morizane, Ryuji; Monkawa, Toshiaki; Fujii, Shizuka; Yamaguchi, Shintaro; Homma, Koichiro; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Okano, Hideyuki; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells have the ability to differentiate into various organs and tissues, and are regarded as new tools for the elucidation of disease mechanisms as well as sources for regenerative therapies. However, a method of inducing organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells is urgently needed. Although many scientists have been developing methods to induce various organ-specific cells from pluripotent stem cells, renal lineage cells have yet to be induced in vitro because of the complexity of kidney structures and the diversity of kidney-component cells. Here, we describe a method of inducing renal tubular cells from mouse embryonic stem cells via the cell purification of kidney specific protein (KSP)-positive cells using an anti-KSP antibody. The global gene expression profiles of KSP-positive cells derived from ES cells exhibited characteristics similar to those of cells in the developing kidney, and KSP-positive cells had the capacity to form tubular structures resembling renal tubular cells when grown in a 3D culture in Matrigel. Moreover, our results indicated that KSP-positive cells acquired the characteristics of each segment of renal tubular cells through tubular formation when stimulated with Wnt4. This method is an important step toward kidney disease research using pluripotent stem cells, and the development of kidney regeneration therapies.

  15. Gonadotropins facilitate potential differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells into Leydig cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lin; Dong, Qiang; Wu, Yun-Jian; Sun, Yuan-Xing; Guo, Yan-Yu; Huo, Yue-Hong

    2016-01-01

    Infertility due to low testosterone levels has increased in recent years. This has impacted the social well-being of the patients. This study was undertaken to investigate the potential of gonadotropins in facilitating differentiation of human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) into Leydig cells in vitro. BMSCs were isolated, cultured, and their biological characteristics were observed. BMSCs were induced with gonadotropins in vitro and their ability to differentiate into Leydig cells was studied. The level of expression of 3-beta hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) and secretion of testosterone were determined using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively, and the results were compared between the experimental and control groups. The cultured BMSCs showed a typical morphology of the fibroblast-like colony. The growth curve of cells formed an S-shape. After inducing the cells for 8-13 days, the cells in the experimental group increased in size and showed typical characteristics of Leydig cells, and the growth occurred in spindle or stellate shapes. Cells from the experimental group highly expressed 3β-HSD, and there was a gradual increase in the number of Leydig cells. The control group did not express 3β-HSD. The level of testosterone in the experimental group was higher than the control group (p group secreted higher levels of testosterone with increased culture time. The expression of Leydig cell-specific markers in the experimental group was significantly higher (p < 0.05). With these findings, BMSCs can be considered a new approach for the treatment of patients with low androgen levels. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  16. In vitro characterization of bone marrow stromal cells from osteoarthritic donors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maik Stiehler

    2016-05-01

    Overall, the in vitro characteristics of BMSCs are not markedly influenced by OA. However, increased SOX9 and CD90 as well as reduced CD166 expression levels in OA-BMSCs warrant further investigation. These data will help to further understand the role of BMSC in OA and facilitate the application of autologous cell-based strategies for musculoskeletal tissue regeneration in OA patients.

  17. In Vitro Toxicity of Silver Nanoparticles in Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    team not only studied silver nanoparticles , but also other nanomaterials (MoO3, Al, Fe3O4, and TiO2 ). They determined through the use of MTT and LDH...the lungs diminishes quickly. Silver nanoparticles were consequently detected in the blood and other organs (heart, liver, kidney , and brain) (2008...IN VITRO TOXICITY OF SILVER NANOPARTICLES IN HUMAN LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS THESIS Christina

  18. Rhinovirus has the unique ability to directly activate human T cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilarraza, Ramses; Wu, Yingqi; Skappak, Christopher D; Ajamian, Farnam; Proud, David; Adamko, Darryl J

    2013-02-01

    Rhinovirus infection is a leading cause of exacerbation of airway diseases. We hypothesize that airway viruses activate inflammatory cells, inducing airway dysfunction. We have previously shown that airway viruses can induce eosinophil degranulation when cocultured with T cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). These findings suggested that antigen presentation was important for T-cell activation. Given the clinical importance of rhinovirus, we sought to determine whether it had any unique abilities to activate inflammatory cells compared with another common virus, such as respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). We cocultured combinations of human leukocytes (T cells, moDCs, and eosinophils) with each virus. Using assays of BrdU incorporation, flow cytometry, and ELISA, we measured T-cell activation, rhinovirus expression, T-cell death, and eosinophil cysteinyl leukotriene release. In contrast to RSV, rhinovirus induced T-cell activation without the involvement of moDCs. Without moDCs, rhinovirus induced T-cell proliferation of both CD4 and CD8(+) cells, cytokine production, and ultimately, eosinophil stimulation. Although chloroquine inhibited RSV-induced activation of T cells through moDCs, rhinovirus was not inhibited; UV inactivation did block the rhinovirus effect. We also found that T cells could be infected by rhinovirus in vitro and within human nasal explant tissue. Although Toll-like receptors did not appear to be involved in T-cell activation, antagonists of Jun N-terminal kinase and nuclear factor κB did inhibit T-cell responses to rhinovirus. Rhinovirus has the unique ability to bypass antigen presentation and directly infect and activate human T cells. This could explain the strong association of rhinovirus with exacerbation of airway diseases. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect on growth and cell cycle kinetics of estradiol and tamoxifen on MCF-7 human breast cancer cells grown in vitro and in nude mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brünner, N; Bronzert, D; Vindeløv, L L

    1989-01-01

    The effects of estradiol and tamoxifen (TAM) on the estrogen-dependent human breast cancer cell line MCF-7 grown in vitro and in nude mice were compared. The effect on growth was determined by cell number in vitro and by tumor growth curves in nude mice. The effects on the cell cycle kinetics were...... determined by repeated flow cytometric DNA analyses in vitro and in vivo and by the technique of labeled mitosis in nude mouse-grown tumors. Under in vitro conditions, estradiol induced a pronounced increase in S-phase fraction and cell number. TAM inhibited growth of MCF-7 cells with a concomitant increase...... cytometric DNA analysis and percentage of labeled mitosis investigations revealed no significant differences in the proliferation kinetics of TAM-treated and control tumors. Calculating the cell loss factor demonstrated an increase from 69% in control tumors to 107% in TAM-treated tumors. These experiments...

  20. Carrageenan delays cell cycle progression in human cancer cells in vitro demonstrated by FUCCI imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasedya, Eka Sunarwidhi; Miyake, Masao; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Hazama, Akihiro

    2016-08-04

    Carrageenan is a sulfated polysaccharide that exists in red seaweeds recently shown to have anticancer properties. Previous findings show various effects of carrageenan suppressing tumor cell growth. One of the hallmarks of cancer is uncontrolled proliferation, a consequence of loss of normal cell-cycle control, that underlies tumor growth. Recently there is an increasing interest in potential anticancer agents that affect cell cycle in cancer cells. Thus, in this study we investigated the effects of carrageenan on the tumor cell cycle. Using human cervical carcinoma cells (HeLa) cells as and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC), the cytotoxic effects of kappa carrageenan (k-CO) and lambda carrageenan (λ-CO) at the concentrations of 250-2500 μg/mL were observed. Cell viability was determined using the MTT assay while cell death rates were determined using staining with calcein-AM/propidium iodide. Cell-cycle profile and progression were demonstrated with HeLa cells expressing FUCCI (fluorescence ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator) probes (HeLa-FUCCI). Carrageenan had no significant effect on HUVEC (normal cells). In contrast both forms of carrageenan were cytotoxic towards HeLa cells (cancer cells). Furthermore, according to cell-cycle analysis with FUCCI cells, the cell cycle of HeLa cells was delayed in specific phases due to different carrageenan treatments. Considering these results, it could be suggested that carrageenan affects the cell-cycle of HeLa cells not only by arresting the cell cycle in specific phases but also by delaying the time needed for the cell to progress through the cell cycle. Additionally, different types of carrageenans have different effects on cell cycle progression. This effect of carrageenan towards cancer cells could possibly be developed into a tumor cell-specific anticancer agent.

  1. Arsenic sulfide inhibits cell migration and invasion of gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang L

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lian Zhang,1 Sungkyoung Kim,1 Wenping Ding,1 Yingying Tong,1 Xiuli Zhang,1 Minggui Pan,2 Siyu Chen1 1Department of Oncology, Xin Hua Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Oncology and Hematology, Kaiser Permanente Medical Center, Santa Clara, CA, USA Background: We previously showed that arsenic sulfide (As4S4 induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in several human solid tumor cell lines, including those of gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of As4S4 on the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo.Methods: The human gastric cancer cell lines AGS and MGC803 were selected as in vitro models. Wound-healing migration assay and Transwell invasion assay were carried out to determine the effects of As4S4 on cell migration and invasion. The expressions of E-cadherin, β-catenin, Sp1, KLF4, and VEGF were measured by Western blotting analysis. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2 and MMP-9 in MGC803 cells were demonstrated by zymography assay. A mouse xenograft model was established by inoculation with MGC803 cells, then intraperitoneal injected with As4S4 for 3 weeks and monitored for body weight and tumor changes. Finally, the inhibition rate of tumor growth was calculated, and the expression of proteins and genes associated with tumor invasion and metastasis in tumor tissues were measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction assay.Results: As4S4 significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines. The expression of E-cadherin and KLF4 was upregulated, while the expressions of β-catenin, VEGF, and Sp1 were downregulated following treatment with As4S4. Moreover, the protease activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were suppressed by As4S4 in MGC803 cells. Meanwhile, As4S4 effectively suppressed the abilities of tumor growth and

  2. Arsenic sulfide inhibits cell migration and invasion of gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lian; Kim, Sungkyoung; Ding, Wenping; Tong, Yingying; Zhang, Xiuli; Pan, Minggui; Chen, Siyu

    2015-01-01

    Background We previously showed that arsenic sulfide (As4S4) induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in several human solid tumor cell lines, including those of gastric cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of As4S4 on the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. Methods The human gastric cancer cell lines AGS and MGC803 were selected as in vitro models. Wound-healing migration assay and Transwell invasion assay were carried out to determine the effects of As4S4 on cell migration and invasion. The expressions of E-cadherin, β-catenin, Sp1, KLF4, and VEGF were measured by Western blotting analysis. The activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in MGC803 cells were demonstrated by zymography assay. A mouse xenograft model was established by inoculation with MGC803 cells, then intraperitoneal injected with As4S4 for 3 weeks and monitored for body weight and tumor changes. Finally, the inhibition rate of tumor growth was calculated, and the expression of proteins and genes associated with tumor invasion and metastasis in tumor tissues were measured by immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and real-time polymerase chain reaction assay. Results As4S4 significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cell lines. The expression of E-cadherin and KLF4 was upregulated, while the expressions of β-catenin, VEGF, and Sp1 were downregulated following treatment with As4S4. Moreover, the protease activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9 were suppressed by As4S4 in MGC803 cells. Meanwhile, As4S4 effectively suppressed the abilities of tumor growth and invasion in the xenograft tumor model. We found that As4S4 upregulated the expression of E-cadherin and downregulated the expression of β-catenin, Sp1, VEGF, and CD34 in mouse tumor tissues, consistent with the results in vitro. Conclusion As4S4 inhibited the migration and invasion of gastric cancer cells by blocking tumor cell adhesion, decreasing the ability of

  3. Ethanol reduces amyloid aggregation in vitro and prevents toxicity in cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormeño, David; Romero, Fernando; López-Fenner, Julio; Avila, Andres; Martínez-Torres, Ataulfo; Parodi, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) alters cognitive functions. A mixture of soluble β-amyloid aggregates (Aβ) are known to act as toxic agents. It has been suggested that moderate alcohol intake reduces the development of neurodegenerative diseases, but the molecular mechanisms leading to this type of prevention have been elusive. We show the ethanol effect in the generation of complex Aβ in vitro and the impact on the viability of two cell lines. The effect of ethanol on the kinetics of β-amyloid aggregation in vitro was assessed by turbimetry. Soluble- and ethanol-treated β-amyloid were added to the cell lines HEK and PC-12 to compare their effects on metabolic activity using the MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. In addition, we used molecular modeling to assess the impact of exposure to ethanol on the structure of β-amyloid. Exposure to soluble β-amyloid was toxic to both cell lines; however, exposing the cells to β-amyloid aggregated in 10 mmol ethanol prevented the effect. In silico modeling suggested that ethanol alters the dynamics for assembling Aβ by disrupting a critical salt bridge between residues Asp 23 and Lys 28, required for amyloid dimerization. Thus, ethanol prevented the formation of complex short (∼100 nm) Aβ, which are related to higher cell toxicity. Ethanol prevents the formation of stable Aβ dimers in vitro, thus protecting the cells maintained in culture. Accordingly, in silico modelling predicts that soluble β-amyloid molecules do not form stable multimers when exposed to ethanol. Copyright © 2013 IMSS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An in vitro monocyte culture method and establishment of a human monocytic cell line (K63

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuyuki Kadoi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A novel method of monocyte culture in vitro was developed. The fraction of monocytes was obtained by density centrifugation of heparinised human venous blood samples. Monocytes were suspended in a modified Rosewell Park Memorial Institute medium (RPMI-1640 (mRPMI supplemented with 10% non-inactivated autologous serum added to the feeder cells. An avian cell line was used for feeder cells. Only those monocytes that settled on feeder cells grew rapidly at 37°C-38°C into a formation of clumped masses within two to three days. The cell mass was harvested and subcultures were made without feeder cells. A stable cell line (K63 was established from subcultures using a limited dilution method and cell cloning in microplates. K63 cells were adapted for later growth in the mRPMI medium supplemented with 10% foetal calf serum. The cells were well maintained at over 50th passage levels. This method proved to be applicable for monocyte cultures of animals as well.

  5. Fluoxetine Induces Proliferation and Inhibits Differentiation of Hypothalamic Neuroprogenitor Cells In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa-Ferreira, Lígia; Aveleira, Célia; Botelho, Mariana; Álvaro, Ana Rita; Pereira de Almeida, Luís; Cavadas, Cláudia

    2014-01-01

    A significant number of children undergo maternal exposure to antidepressants and they often present low birth weight. Therefore, it is important to understand how selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) affect the development of the hypothalamus, the key center for metabolism regulation. In this study we investigated the proliferative actions of fluoxetine in fetal hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells and demonstrate that fluoxetine induces the proliferation of these cells, as shown by increased neurospheres size and number of proliferative cells (Ki-67+ cells). Moreover, fluoxetine inhibits the differentiation of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells, as demonstrated by decreased number of mature neurons (Neu-N+ cells) and increased number of undifferentiated cells (SOX-2+ cells). Additionally, fluoxetine-induced proliferation and maintenance of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells leads to changes in the mRNA levels of appetite regulator neuropeptides, including Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Cocaine-and-Amphetamine-Regulated-Transcript (CART). This study provides the first evidence that SSRIs affect the development of hypothalamic neuroprogenitor cells in vitro with consequent alterations on appetite neuropeptides. PMID:24598761

  6. In vitro T cell activation in elderly individuals: failure in CD69 and CD71 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lio, D; Candore, G; Cigna, D; D'Anna, C; Di Lorenzo, G; Giordano, C; Lucania, G; Mansueto, P; Melluso, M; Modica, M A; Caruso, C

    1996-07-31

    A large number of T cell dysfunctions have been observed in the elderly. The most widely observed is the inability of these cells to proliferate at a level comparable to T cells from young individuals after stimulation by mitogens. To better characterize T cell impairment, we have focused on the in vitro T cell activation, analyzing by flow cytometry the activation molecules CD69 and CD71 on mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes from young and elderly subjects. The results show that the percentages of CD69+ and CD71 + T cells were significantly decreased in cultures from elderly subjects when compared to values obtained culturing cells from young individuals. The differences observed seem not due to differences in CD4 and CD8 rates in the "old' cells that underwent activation, since, following activation, the pattern of CD4 and CD8 phenotypes was the same in both groups of subjects. Signals from CD69 are relevant in controlling cytokine gene expression because its stimulation leads to interleukin-2 production and increases its receptor expression. The interaction of this cytokine with its cellular receptor is an essential requirement for T lymphocytes to express CD71 and to start proliferation. Thus, a key role in the age-associated impairment of T cell activation could be played by an ineffective modulation of CD69 expression suggesting a defect in the signal transduction pathway of the T cell receptor-CD3 complex in elderly.

  7. The in Vitro Assessment of Biochemical Factors in Hepatocyte like Cells Derived from Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A KHoramroodi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Umbilical cord blood (UCB is a source of Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSC and progenitor cells that can reconstitute the hematopoietic system in patients with malignant and nonmalignant disorders. Mesenchymal stem cell-derived from umbilical cord blood (UCB have been differentiated to some kind of cells, such as osteobblast, adipoblast and chondroblast in Vitro. This study examined the differentiation of Umbilical Cord Blood (UCB derived stem cells to functional hepatocytes. Materials & Methods: The present study was an experimental study which was carried out in the Payam-e-Noor University of Tehran in cooperation with Hamedan University of Medical Sciences in 2008. Umbilical cord blood (UCB was obtained from Fatemieh hospital (Hamadan, Iran. Stem cells were isolated from the cord blood by combining density gradient centrifugation with plastic adherence. When the isolated cells reached 80% confluence, they differentiated to hepatocyte like cells. The medium which was used was consists of DMEM and 10% Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS supplemented with 20 ng/mL Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF, 10 ng/mL basic Fibroblast Growth Factor (bFGF and 20 ng/mL Oncostatin M (OSM.The medium was changed every 3 days and stored for Albumin (ALB, Alpha Fetoprotein (AFP, Alkaline Phosphatase (ALP, and urea assay. Finally PAS stain was done to study Glycogen storage in the differentiated cell. Results: Measurement of biochemical factors in different days showed that concentration of albumin (ALB, alpha fetoprotein (AFP, alkaline phosphatase (ALP, and Urea gradually increased. Also, PAS staining showed the storage of glycogen in these cells. Conclusion: Stem cell-derived from human umbilical cord blood (HUCB is a new source of cell types for cell transplantation therapy of hepatic diseases and under certain conditions these cells can differentiate into liver cells.

  8. Chemoablated mouse seminiferous tubular cells enriched for very small embryonic-like stem cells undergo spontaneous spermatogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Sandhya; Patel, Hiren; Bhartiya, Deepa

    2015-04-18

    Extensive research is ongoing to empower cancer survivors to have biological parenthood. For this, sperm are cryopreserved prior to therapy and in younger children testicular biopsies are cryopreserved with a hope to mature the germ cells into sperm later on for assisted reproduction. In addition, lot of hope was bestowed on pluripotent embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cells to differentiate into sperm and oocytes. However, obtaining functional gametes from pluripotent stem cells still remains a distant dream and major bottle-neck appears to be their inefficient differentiation into primordial germ cells (PGCs). There exists yet another population of pluripotent stem cells termed very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) in adult body organs including gonads. We have earlier reported that busulphan (25 mg/Kg) treatment to 4 weeks old mice destroys actively dividing cells and sperm but VSELs survive and differentiate into sperm when a healthy niche is provided in vivo. Mouse testicular VSELs that survived busulphan treatment were cultured for 3 weeks. A mix of surviving cells in seminiferous tubules (VSELs, possibly few spermatogonial stem cells and Sertoli cells) were cultured using Sertoli cells conditioned medium containing fetal bovine serum, follicle stimulating hormone and with no additional growth factors. Stem cells underwent proliferation and clonal expansion in culture and spontaneously differentiated into sperm whereas Sertoli cells attached and provided a somatic support. Transcripts specific for various stages of spermatogenesis were up-regulated by qRT-PCR studies on day 7 suggesting VSELs (Sca1) and SSCs (Gfra) proliferate (Pcna), undergo spermatogenesis (spermatocyte specific marker prohibitin), meiosis (Scp3) and differentiate into sperm (post-meiotic marker protamine). Process of spermatogenesis and spermiogenesis was replicated in vitro starting with testicular cells that survived busulphan treatment. We have earlier reported similar

  9. In Vitro-Generated Tc17 Cells Present a Memory Phenotype and Serve As a Reservoir of Tc1 Cells In Vivo

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    Felipe Flores-Santibáñez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Memory CD8+ T cells are ideal candidates for cancer immunotherapy because they can mediate long-term protection against tumors. However, the therapeutic potential of different in vitro-generated CD8+ T cell effector subsets to persist and become memory cells has not been fully characterized. Type 1 CD8+ T (Tc1 cells produce interferon-γ and are endowed with high cytotoxic capacity, whereas IL-17-producing CD8+ T (Tc17 cells are less cytotoxic but display enhanced self-renewal capacity. We sought to evaluate the functional properties of in vitro-generated Tc17 cells and elucidate their potential to become long lasting memory cells. Our results show that in vitro-generated Tc17 cells display a greater in vivo persistence and expansion in response to secondary antigen stimulation compared to Tc1 cells. When transferred into recipient mice, Tc17 cells persist in secondary lymphoid organs, present a recirculation behavior consistent with central memory T cells, and can shift to a Tc1 phenotype. Accordingly, Tc17 cells are endowed with a higher mitochondrial spare respiratory capacity than Tc1 cells and express higher levels of memory-related molecules than Tc1 cells. Together, these results demonstrate that in vitro-generated Tc17 cells acquire a central memory program and provide a lasting reservoir of Tc1 cells in vivo, thus supporting the use of Tc17 lymphocytes in the design of novel and more effective therapies.

  10. Arctigenin inhibits prostate tumor cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Piwen Wang; Walter Solorzano; Tanya Diaz; Clara E. Magyar; Henning, Susanne M.; Vadgama, Jaydutt V.

    2017-01-01

    The low bioavailability of most phytochemicals limits their translation to humans. We investigated whether arctigenin, a novel anti-inflammatory lignan from the seeds of Arctium lappa, has favorable bioavailability/potency against prostate cancer. The anticarcinogenic activity of arctigenin was investigated both in vitro using the androgen-sensitive LNCaP and LAPC-4 human prostate cancer cells and pre-malignant WPE1-NA22 cells, and in vivo using xenograft mouse models. Arctigenin at lower dos...

  11. [In vitro modification of the morphology and the growth of cells infected with scrapie (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markovits, P; Dormont, D; Maunoury, R; Delamarche, C; Delpech, A; Dianoux, L; Latarjet, R

    1982-02-15

    Seven cell lines originated either in brains or in neuroblastomas of Mice, were infected with Scrapie. After 12 to 16 in vitro passages, 6 lines out of 7 showed changes of their morphology, and of their growth, resembling those occurring in the course of a malignant transformation. The Scrapie infected cells acquired the capacity to form 2 to 4 times more colonies in liquid medium than the controls, and to develop large tridimensional colonies in semisolid medium. The role of Scrapie in these changes is discussed.

  12. Osteoblasts and bone marrow mesenchymal stromal cells control hematopoietic stem cell migration and proliferation in 3D in vitro model.

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    Ana Paula D N de Barros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Migration, proliferation, and differentiation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are dependent upon a complex three-dimensional (3D bone marrow microenvironment. Although osteoblasts control the HSC pool, the subendosteal niche is complex and its cellular composition and the role of each cell population in HSC fate have not been established. In vivo models are complex and involve subtle species-specific differences, while bidimensional cultures do not reflect the 3D tissue organization. The aim of this study was to investigate in vitro the role of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSC and active osteoblasts in control of migration, lodgment, and proliferation of HSCs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A complex mixed multicellular spheroid in vitro model was developed with human BMSC, undifferentiated or induced for one week into osteoblasts. A clear limit between the two stromal cells was established, and deposition of extracellular matrix proteins fibronectin, collagens I and IV, laminin, and osteopontin was similar to the observed in vivo. Noninduced BMSC cultured as spheroid expressed higher levels of mRNA for the chemokine CXCL12, and the growth factors Wnt5a and Kit ligand. Cord blood and bone marrow CD34(+ cells moved in and out the spheroids, and some lodged at the interface of the two stromal cells. Myeloid colony-forming cells were maintained after seven days of coculture with mixed spheroids, and the frequency of cycling CD34(+ cells was decreased. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Undifferentiated and one-week osteo-induced BMSC self-assembled in a 3D spheroid and formed a microenvironment that is informative for hematopoietic progenitor cells, allowing their lodgment and controlling their proliferation.

  13. Multivalent ligands control stem cell behaviour in vitro and in vivo

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    Conway, Anthony; Vazin, Tandis; Spelke, Dawn P.; Rode, Nikhil A.; Healy, Kevin E.; Kane, Ravi S.; Schaffer, David V.

    2013-11-01

    There is broad interest in designing nanostructured materials that can interact with cells and regulate key downstream functions. In particular, materials with nanoscale features may enable control over multivalent interactions, which involve the simultaneous binding of multiple ligands on one entity to multiple receptors on another and are ubiquitous throughout biology. Cellular signal transduction of growth factor and morphogen cues (which have critical roles in regulating cell function and fate) often begins with such multivalent binding of ligands, either secreted or cell-surface-tethered to target cell receptors, leading to receptor clustering. Cellular mechanisms that orchestrate ligand-receptor oligomerization are complex, however, so the capacity to control multivalent interactions and thereby modulate key signalling events within living systems is currently very limited. Here, we demonstrate the design of potent multivalent conjugates that can organize stem cell receptors into nanoscale clusters and control stem cell behaviour in vitro and in vivo. The ectodomain of ephrin-B2, normally an integral membrane protein ligand, was conjugated to a soluble biopolymer to yield multivalent nanoscale conjugates that potently induce signalling in neural stem cells and promote their neuronal differentiation both in culture and within the brain. Super-resolution microscopy analysis yielded insights into the organization of the receptor-ligand clusters at the nanoscale. We also found that synthetic multivalent conjugates of ephrin-B1 strongly enhance human embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell differentiation into functional dopaminergic neurons. Multivalent bioconjugates are therefore powerful tools and potential nanoscale therapeutics for controlling the behaviour of target stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

  14. Migratory and adhesive properties of Xenopus laevis primordial germ cells in vitro

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    Aliaksandr Dzementsei

    2013-11-01

    The directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs to the site of gonad formation is an advantageous model system to study cell motility. The embryonic development of PGCs has been investigated in different animal species, including mice, zebrafish, Xenopus and Drosophila. In this study we focus on the physical properties of Xenopus laevis PGCs during their transition from the passive to the active migratory state. Pre-migratory PGCs from Xenopus laevis embryos at developmental stages 17–19 to be compared with migratory PGCs from stages 28–30 were isolated and characterized in respect to motility and adhesive properties. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we observed a decline in adhesiveness of PGCs upon reaching the migratory state, as defined by decreased attachment to extracellular matrix components like fibronectin, and a reduced adhesion to somatic endodermal cells. Data obtained from qPCR analysis with isolated PGCs reveal that down-regulation of E-cadherin might contribute to this weakening of cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, however, using an in vitro migration assay, we found that movement of X. laevis PGCs can also occur independently of specific interactions with their neighboring cells. The reduction of cellular adhesion during PGC development is accompanied by enhanced cellular motility, as reflected in increased formation of bleb-like protrusions and inferred from electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS as well as time-lapse image analysis. Temporal alterations in cell shape, including contraction and expansion of the cellular body, reveal a higher degree of cellular dynamics for the migratory PGCs in vitro.

  15. Migratory and adhesive properties of Xenopus laevis primordial germ cells in vitro.

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    Dzementsei, Aliaksandr; Schneider, David; Janshoff, Andreas; Pieler, Tomas

    2013-12-15

    The directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs) to the site of gonad formation is an advantageous model system to study cell motility. The embryonic development of PGCs has been investigated in different animal species, including mice, zebrafish, Xenopus and Drosophila. In this study we focus on the physical properties of Xenopus laevis PGCs during their transition from the passive to the active migratory state. Pre-migratory PGCs from Xenopus laevis embryos at developmental stages 17-19 to be compared with migratory PGCs from stages 28-30 were isolated and characterized in respect to motility and adhesive properties. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we observed a decline in adhesiveness of PGCs upon reaching the migratory state, as defined by decreased attachment to extracellular matrix components like fibronectin, and a reduced adhesion to somatic endodermal cells. Data obtained from qPCR analysis with isolated PGCs reveal that down-regulation of E-cadherin might contribute to this weakening of cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, however, using an in vitro migration assay, we found that movement of X. laevis PGCs can also occur independently of specific interactions with their neighboring cells. The reduction of cellular adhesion during PGC development is accompanied by enhanced cellular motility, as reflected in increased formation of bleb-like protrusions and inferred from electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) as well as time-lapse image analysis. Temporal alterations in cell shape, including contraction and expansion of the cellular body, reveal a higher degree of cellular dynamics for the migratory PGCs in vitro.

  16. [Beneficial effects of retinoic acid on in vitro invasiveness of human thyroid carcinoma cell lines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Ling; Cui, Dai; Luo, Yong; Shi, Bing-yin; Deng, Li-li; Zhang, Guo-ying; Deng, Wei; Wang, Hong

    2010-09-14

    To investigate the anti metastatic potential of retinoic acid as an important determinant of metastatic behavior in thyroid carcinoma and understand the role of invasion associated proteins. Differentiated thyroid carcinoma cell lines FTC-133 and XTC.UC1, anaplastic thyroid cancer cell lines C643 and HTH74 were studied. All cell lines were cultured with all-trans-RA (ATRA) or solvent ethanol. The in vitro invasion and adhesion potency were studied by transwell experiment and short-term adhesion assay. The functions of invasion associated proteins, urokinase type plasminogen activator (uPA), uPA receptor (uPAR), MMP2 and E-cadherin were investigated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and Western blot. In vitro invasion assay revealed that ATRA treatment could reduce the invasive potency in all the thyroid cancer cell lines. On Day 5 of ATRA treatment, the numbers of cells that migrated through extracellular matrix were as follows, in contrast to control group, FTC-133: 91±9 vs 118±10, C643: 92±17 vs 164±21, HTH74: 87±18 vs 169±15, and XTC.UC1: 95±23 vs 136±15, respectively (all PXTC.UC1. RT-PCR and Western blot both revealed diminished expression of uPAR in all four carcinoma cell lines. In C643 and HTH74 cell lines, the expression of uPA was reduced and the expression of E-Cadherin was increased; whereas the MMP2 expression was not significantly down-regulated in ATRA treated group. In ATRA treated FTC-133 and XTC.UC1 cell lines, MMP2 expression was decreased, but no significant changes in uPA and E-Cadherin expression were observed. The present study demonstrates the influence of ATRA on two important determinants of metastatic behavior ("de adhesion" and proteolysis) in thyroid carcinoma cell lines.

  17. In vitro culture of embryonic mouse intestinal epithelium: cell differentiation and introduction of reporter genes

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    Hornsey Mark A

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Study of the normal development of the intestinal epithelium has been hampered by a lack of suitable model systems, in particular ones that enable the introduction of exogenous genes. Production of such a system would advance our understanding of normal epithelial development and help to shed light on the pathogenesis of intestinal neoplasia. The criteria for a reliable culture system include the ability to perform real time observations and manipulations in vitro, the preparation of wholemounts for immunostaining and the potential for introducing genes. Results The new culture system involves growing mouse embryo intestinal explants on fibronectin-coated coverslips in basal Eagle's medium+20% fetal bovine serum. Initially the cultures maintain expression of the intestinal transcription factor Cdx2 together with columnar epithelial (cytokeratin 8 and mesenchymal (smooth muscle actin markers. Over a few days of culture, differentiation markers appear characteristic of absorptive epithelium (sucrase-isomaltase, goblet cells (Periodic Acid Schiff positive, enteroendocrine cells (chromogranin A and Paneth cells (lysozyme. Three different approaches were tested to express genes in the developing cultures: transfection, electroporation and adenoviral infection. All could introduce genes into the mesenchyme, but only to a small extent into the epithelium. However the efficiency of adenovirus infection can be greatly improved by a limited enzyme digestion, which makes accessible the lateral faces of cells bearing the Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor. This enables reliable delivery of genes into epithelial cells. Conclusion We describe a new in vitro culture system for the small intestine of the mouse embryo that recapitulates its normal development. The system both provides a model for studying normal development of the intestinal epithelium and also allows for the manipulation of gene expression. The explants can be cultured for up

  18. In vitro generation of renal tubular epithelial cells from fibroblasts: implications for precision and regenerative medicine in nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Christina M; Dubois, Nicole

    2017-02-01

    Prior efforts to generate renal epithelial cells in vitro have relied on pluripotent or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells. A recent publication in Nature Cell Biology describes the generation of induced tubular epithelial cells from fibroblasts, potentially offering a novel platform for personalized drug toxicity screening and in vitro disease modeling. This report serves as a promising proof of principle study and opens future research directions, including the optimization of the reprogramming process, efficient translation to adult human fibroblasts, and the generation of highly specific functional renal cell types. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. In Vitro Cytotoxic Activity of Origanum vulgare L. on HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231 Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grbović, Filip; Stanković, Milan S.; Ćurčić, Milena; Đorđević, Nataša; Šeklić, Dragana; Topuzović, Marina; Marković, Snežana

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, we examined the cytotoxic effect of methanolic extract from Origanum vulgare on HCT-116 and MDA-MB-231 cell line in vitro. In order to determine the cytotoxic effects we used an MTT viability assay. The results showed that cell growth is significantly lower in extract treated cells compared to untreated control. The effect of inhibition of cell growth was higher in the treatment of HCT-116 cell line than in MDA-MB-231. Based on the results it is determined that O. vulgare is a significant source of biologically active substances that have cytotoxic and antiproliferative activity in vitro. PMID:27137381

  20. Toxic effect of C60 fullerene-doxorubicin complex towards tumor and normal cells in vitro

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    Prylutska S. V.

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Creation of new nanostructures possessing high antitumor activity is an important problem of modern biotechnology. Aim. To evaluate cytotoxicity of created complex of pristine C60 fullerene with the anthracycline antibiotic doxorubicin (Dox, as well as of free C60 fullerene and Dox, towards different cell types – tumor, normal immunocompetent and hepatocytes. Methods. Measurement of size distribution for particles in C60 + Dox mixture was performed by a dynamic light scattering (DLS technique. Toxic effect of C60 + Dox complex in vitro towards tumor and normal cells was studied using the MTT assay. Results. DLS experiment demonstrated that the main fraction of the particles in C60 + Dox mixture had a diameter in the range of about 132 nm. The toxic effect of C60 + Dox complex towards normal (lymphocytes, macrophages, hepatocytes and tumor (Ehrlich ascites carcinoma, leukemia L1210, Lewis lung carcinoma cells was decreased by ~10–16 % and ~7–9 %, accordingly, compared with the same effect of free Dox. Conclusions. The created C60 + Dox composite may be considered as a new pharmacological agent that kills effectively tumor cells in vitro and simultaneously prevents a toxic effect of the free form of Dox on normal cells.

  1. Identification and characterization of secondary neural tube-derived embryonic neural stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Mohammed R; Kim, Joo Yeon; Kim, Hyun; Sun, Woong

    2015-05-15

    Secondary neurulation is an embryonic progress that gives rise to the secondary neural tube, the precursor of the lower spinal cord region. The secondary neural tube is derived from aggregated Sox2-expressing neural cells at the dorsal region of the tail bud, which eventually forms rosette or tube-like structures to give rise to neural tissues in the tail bud. We addressed whether the embryonic tail contains neural stem cells (NSCs), namely secondary NSCs (sNSCs), with the potential for self-renewal in vitro. Using in vitro neurosphere assays, neurospheres readily formed at the rosette and neural-tube levels, but less frequently at the tail bud tip level. Furthermore, we identified that sNSC-generated neurospheres were significantly smaller in size compared with cortical neurospheres. Interestingly, various cell cycle analyses revealed that this difference was not due to a reduction in the proliferation rate of NSCs, but rather the neuronal commitment of sNSCs, as sNSC-derived neurospheres contain more committed neuronal progenitor cells, even in the presence of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). These results suggest that the higher tendency for sNSCs to spontaneously differentiate into progenitor cells may explain the limited expansion of the secondary neural tube during embryonic development.

  2. Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles inhibit the growth of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Dong-Fu; Ma, Yan-Bin; Li, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (nano-HAPs) have been reported to exhibit antitumor effects on various human cancers, but the effects of nano-HAPs on human glioma cells remain unclear. The aim of this study was to explore the inhibitory effect of nano-HAPs on the growth of human glioma U251 and SHG44 cells in vitro and in vivo. Nano-HAPs could inhibit the growth of U251 and SHG44 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, according to methyl thiazoletetrazolium assay and flow cytometry. Treated with 120 mg/L and 240 mg/L nano-HAPs for 48 hours, typical apoptotic morphological changes were noted under Hoechst staining and transmission electron microscopy. The tumor growth of cells was inhibited after the injection in vivo, and the related side effects significantly decreased in the nano-HAP-and-drug combination group. Because of the function of nano-HAPs, the expression of c-Met, SATB1, Ki-67, and bcl-2 protein decreased, and the expression of SLC22A18 and caspase-3 protein decreased noticeably. The findings indicate that nano-HAPs have an evident inhibitory action and induce apoptosis of human glioma cells in vitro and in vivo. In a drug combination, they can significantly reduce the adverse reaction related to the chemotherapeutic drug 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU). PMID:22888225

  3. Embryonic stem-like cells derived from in vitro produced bovine blastocysts

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    Erika Regina Leal de Freitas

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the derivation of bovine embryonic stem-like (ES-like cells from the inner cell mass (ICM of in vitro produced blastocysts. The ICMs were mechanically isolated and six out of seventeen (35% ICMs could attach to a monolayer of murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEF. Ten days after, primary outgrowths were mechanically dissected into several small clumps and transferred to a new MEF layer. Cells were further propagated and passaged by physical dissociation over a 60 days period. The pluripotency of the bovine ES-like cells was confirmed by RT-PCR of Oct-4 and STAT-3 gene markers. The colonies were weakly stained for alkaline phosphatase and the mesoderm and endoderm differentiation gene markers such as GATA-4 and Flk-1, respectively, were not expressed. Embryoid bodies were spontaneously formed at the seventh passage. Results showed that bovine ES-like cells could be obtained and passaged by mechanical procedures from the fresh in vitro produced blastocysts.

  4. In vitro studies evaluating the effects of biofilms on wound-healing cells: a review.

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    Kirker, Kelly R; James, Garth A

    2017-04-01

    Chronic wounds are characterized as wounds that have failed to proceed through the well-orchestrated healing process and have remained open for months to years. Open wounds are at risk for colonization by opportunistic pathogens. Bacteria that colonize the open wound bed form surface-attached, multicellular communities called biofilms, and chronic wound biofilms can contain a diverse microbiota. Investigators are just beginning to elucidate the role of biofilms in chronic wound pathogenesis, and have simplified the complex wound environment using in vitro models to obtain a fundamental understanding of the impact of biofilms on wound-healing cell types. The intent of this review is to describe current in vitro methodologies and their results. Investigations started with one host cell-type and single species biofilms and demonstrated that biofilms, or their secretions, had deleterious effects on wound-healing cells. More complex systems involved the use of multiple host cell/tissue types and single species biofilms. Using human skin-equivalent tissues, investigators demonstrated that a number of different species can grow on the tissue and elicit an inflammatory response from the tissue. A full understanding of how biofilms impact wound-healing cells and host tissues will have a profound effect on how chronic wounds are treated. © 2017 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Furano diterpenes from Pterodon pubescens Benth with selective in vitro anticancer activity for prostate cell line

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    Spindola, Humberto M.; Carvalho, Joao E. de; Ruiz, Ana Lucia T.G.; Rodrigues, Rodney A. F.; Denny, Carina; Sousa, Ilza M. de Oliveira; Foglio, Mary Ann [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Centro Pluridisciplinar de Pesquisas Quimicas, Biologicas e Agricolas (CPQBA)]. E-mail: foglioma@cpqba.unicamp.br; Tamashiro, Jorge Y. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    2009-07-01

    Activity guided fractionation of Pterodon pubescens Benth. methylene chloride-soluble fraction afforded novel 6{alpha}-acetoxi 7{beta}-hydroxy-vouacapan 1 and four known diterpene furans 2, 3, 4, 5. The compounds were evaluated for in vitro cytotoxic activities against human normal cells and tumour cell lines UACC-62 (melanoma), MCF-7 (breast), NCI-H460 (lung, non-small cells), OVCAR-03 (ovarian), PC-3 (prostate), HT-29 (colon), 786-0 (renal), K562 (leukemia) and NCI-ADR/RES (ovarian expressing phenotype multiple drugs resistance). Results were expressed by three concentration dependent parameters GI{sub 50} (concentration that produces 50% growth inhibition), TGI (concentration that produces total growth inhibition or cytostatic effect) and LC{sub 50} (concentration that produces .50% growth, a cytotoxicity parameter). Also, in vitro cytotoxicity was evaluated against 3T3 cell line (mouse embryonic fibroblasts). Antiproliferative properties of compounds 1, 4 and 5 are herein reported for the first time. These compounds showed selectivity in a concentration-dependent way against human PC-3. Compound 1 demonstrated selectivity 26 fold more potent than the positive control, doxorubicin, for PC-3 (prostrate) cell line based on GI{sub 50} values, causing cytostatic effect (TGI value) at a concentration fifteen times less than positive control. Moreover comparison of 50% lethal concentration (LC{sub 50} value) with positive control (doxorubicin) suggested that compound 1 was less toxic. (author)

  6. Interphase chromosome positioning in in vitro porcine cells and ex vivo porcine tissues

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    Foster Helen A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In interphase nuclei of a wide range of species chromosomes are organised into their own specific locations termed territories. These chromosome territories are non-randomly positioned in nuclei which is believed to be related to a spatial aspect of regulatory control over gene expression. In this study we have adopted the pig as a model in which to study interphase chromosome positioning and follows on from other studies from our group of using pig cells and tissues to study interphase genome re-positioning during differentiation. The pig is an important model organism both economically and as a closely related species to study human disease models. This is why great efforts have been made to accomplish the full genome sequence in the last decade. Results This study has positioned most of the porcine chromosomes in in vitro cultured adult and embryonic fibroblasts, early passage stromal derived mesenchymal stem cells and lymphocytes. The study is further expanded to position four chromosomes in ex vivo tissue derived from pig kidney, lung and brain. Conclusions It was concluded that porcine chromosomes are also non-randomly positioned within interphase nuclei with few major differences in chromosome position in interphase nuclei between different cell and tissue types. There were also no differences between preferred nuclear location of chromosomes in in vitro cultured cells as compared to cells in tissue sections. Using a number of analyses to ascertain by what criteria porcine chromosomes were positioned in interphase nuclei; we found a correlation with DNA content.

  7. Schiff base-Poloxamer P85 combination demonstrates chemotherapeutic effect on prostate cancer cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Selami; Doğan, Ayşegül; Türkmen, Neşe Başak; Telci, Dilek; Rizvanov, Albert A; Şahin, Fikrettin

    2017-02-01

    Prostate cancer is a multistep and complicated cancer type that is regulated by androgens at the cellular level and remains the second commonest cause of death among men. Discovery and development of novel chemotherapeutic agents enabling rapid tumor cell death with minimal toxic effects to healthy tissues might greatly improve the safety of chemotherapy. The present study evaluates the anti-cancer activity of a novel heterodinuclear copper(II)Mn(II) complex (Schiff base) in combination with poly(ethylene oxide) and poly(propylene oxide) block copolymer (Pluronic) P85. We used assays for cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell migration and invasion, DNA binding and cleavage to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action, in addition to the anti-inflammatory potency of the new combination. The combined treatment of Schiff base and P85 lead to a remarkable anti-cancer effect on prostate cancer cell lines. Cell proliferation was inhibited in Schiff base-P85 treatment. The activity of this formulation is on DNA binding and cleavage and prevents inflammation in in vitro conditions. This is the first study presenting the anti-cancer activity of the present Schiff base derivative and its combination with P85 to treat prostate cancer in vitro. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Human adipose cells in vitro are either refractory or responsive to insulin, reflecting host metabolic state.

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    Vladimir A Lizunov

    Full Text Available While intercellular communication processes are frequently characterized by switch-like transitions, the endocrine system, including the adipose tissue response to insulin, has been characterized by graded responses. Yet here individual cells from adipose tissue biopsies are best described by a switch-like transition between the basal and insulin-stimulated states for the trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4. Two statistically-defined populations best describe the observed cellular heterogeneity, representing the fractions of refractive and responsive adipose cells. Furthermore, subjects exhibiting high systemic insulin sensitivity indices (SI have high fractions of responsive adipose cells in vitro, while subjects exhibiting decreasing SI have increasing fractions of refractory cells in vitro. Thus, a two-component model best describes the relationship between cellular refractory fraction and subject SI. Since isolated cells exhibit these different response characteristics in the presence of constant culture conditions and milieu, we suggest that a physiological switching mechanism at the adipose cellular level ultimately drives systemic SI.

  9. Articular cartilage-derived cells hold a strong osteogenic differentiation potential in comparison to mesenchymal stem cells in vitro

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    Salamon, Achim, E-mail: achim.salamon@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Jonitz-Heincke, Anika, E-mail: anika.jonitz@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Adam, Stefanie, E-mail: stefanie.adam@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Rychly, Joachim, E-mail: joachim.rychly@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Müller-Hilke, Brigitte, E-mail: brigitte.mueller-hilke@med.uni-rostock.de [Institute of Immunology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 68, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Bader, Rainer, E-mail: rainer.bader@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Lochner, Katrin, E-mail: katrin.lochner@med.uni-rostock.de [Biomechanics and Implant Technology Research Laboratory, Department of Orthopedics, Rostock University Medical Center, Doberaner Straße 142, D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Peters, Kirsten, E-mail: kirsten.peters@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Cell Biology, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 69, D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Cartilaginous matrix-degenerative diseases like osteoarthritis (OA) are characterized by gradual cartilage erosion, and also by increased presence of cells with mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) character within the affected tissues. Moreover, primary chondrocytes long since are known to de-differentiate in vitro and to be chondrogenically re-differentiable. Since both findings appear to conflict with each other, we quantitatively assessed the mesenchymal differentiation potential of OA patient cartilage-derived cells (CDC) towards the osteogenic and adipogenic lineage in vitro and compared it to that of MSC isolated from adipose tissue (adMSC) of healthy donors. We analyzed expression of MSC markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166, and, following osteogenic and adipogenic induction in vitro, quantified their expression of osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation markers. Furthermore, CDC phenotype and proliferation were monitored. We found that CDC exhibit an MSC CD marker expression pattern similar to adMSC and a similar increase in proliferation rate during osteogenic differentiation. In contrast, the marked reduction of proliferation observed during adipogenic differentiation of adMSC was absent in CDC. Quantification of differentiation markers revealed a strong osteogenic differentiation potential for CDC, however almost no capacity for adipogenic differentiation. Since in the pathogenesis of OA, cartilage degeneration coincides with high bone turnover rates, the high osteogenic differentiation potential of OA patient-derived CDC may affect clinical therapeutic regimens aiming at autologous cartilage regeneration in these patients. - Highlights: • We analyze the mesenchymal differentiation capacity of cartilage-derived cells (CDC). • CDC express mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers CD29, CD44, CD105, and CD166. • CDC and MSC proliferation is reduced in adipogenesis and increased in osteogenesis. • Adipogenic differentiation is virtually absent in CDC, but

  10. Post-radiation increase in VEGF enhances glioma cell motility in vitro

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    Kil Whoon

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is among the most lethal of all human tumors, with frequent local recurrences after radiation therapy (RT. The mechanism accounting for such a recurrence pattern is unclear. It has classically been attributed to local recurrence of treatment-resistant cells. However, accumulating evidence suggests that additional mechanisms exist that involve the migration of tumor or tumor stem cells from other brain regions to tumor bed. VEGFs are well-known mitogens and can be up-regulated after RT. Here, we examine the effect of irradiation-induced VEGF on glioma cell motility. Materials and methods U251 and LN18 cell lines were used to generate irradiated-conditioned medium (IR-CM. At 72 h after irradiation, the supernatants were harvested. VEGF level in IR-CM was quantified by ELISA, and expression levels for VEGF mRNA were detected by RT-PCR. In vitro cancer cell motility was measured in chambers coated with/without Matrigel and IR-CM as a cell motility enhancer and a VEGF antibody as a neutralizer of VEGF bioactivity. Immunoblots were performed to evaluate the activity of cell motility-related kinases. Proliferation of GBM cells after treatment was measured by flow cytometry. Results Irradiation increased the level of VEGF mRNA that was mitigated by pre-RT exposure to Actinomycin D. U251 glioma cell motility (migration and invasion was enhanced by adding IR-CM to un-irradiated cells (174.9 ± 11.4% and 334.2 ± 46% of control, respectively. When we added VEGF antibody to IR-CM, this enhanced cell motility was negated (110.3 ± 12.0% and 105.7 ± 14.0% of control, respectively. Immunoblot analysis revealed that IR-CM increased phosphorylation of VEGF receptor-2 (VEGFR2 secondary to an increase in VEGF, with a concomitant increase of phosphorylation of the downstream targets (Src and FAK. Increased phosphorylation was mitigated by adding VEGF antibody to IR-CM. There was no difference in the mitotic index of

  11. [Isolation and in vitro characterization of CD133(+) side population cells from laryngeal cancer cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chun-ping; Zhou, Liang; Xie, Ming; Tao, Lei; Zhang, Ming; Tian, Jie

    2011-09-01

    To investigate an approach enriching cancer stem cells (CSCs) more effectively from laryngeal cancer cell line. CD133(+)SP and CD133(-)SP subpopulation was detected and isolated from Hep-2 cell line using Hoechst33342 dye and phycoerythrin (PE)-conjugated CD133 monoclonal antibody assisted by fluorescence activated cell sorting technology. Sorted CD133(+)SP and CD133(-)SP cells were compared in CSCs-related assays including proliferation, differentiation, spheroid formation and drug sensitivity. CD133(+)SP cells accounted for a very small fraction of (0.30 ± 0.12)% in Hep-2 cell line, far less than the proportion of CD133(+) subgroup and side population subgroup, which were (3.15 ± 0.83)% and (17.1 ± 2.0)% respectively. Intriguingly, CD133(+)SP cells proliferated much faster than CD133(-)SP cells in RPMI1640 and gave rise to CD133(-)SP cells and other heterogeneous cells that formed the bulk of the tumor. In contrast, CD133(-)SP cells were not able to differentiate into CD133(+)SP cells. In serum-free medium CD133(+)SP cells grew as spherical clusters and remained floating. In addition, CD133(+)SP cells manifested the marked resistance to chemotherapy than CD133(-)SP cells. Compared with CD133(-)SP cells, CD133(+)SP subpopulation exhibited extraordinary cancer stem-like properties, were enriched for cancer stem cells more effectively and might serve as an ideal putative candidate for CSCs research in laryngeal cancer.

  12. Role of PDGF-BB in proliferation, differentiation and maintaining stem cell properties of PDL cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaylova, Zornitsa; Tsikandelova, Rozaliya; Sanimirov, Pavel; Gateva, Natalia; Mitev, Vanyo; Ishkitiev, Nikolay

    2018-01-01

    Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) is one of the most abundant growth factors in platelet derived products and has been shown to stimulate regeneration after tissue injury. There is a population of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) in human periodontal ligament (PDL) which can contribute to tissue regeneration under appropriate conditions. PDL cells were isolated and characterized using stem cell and differentiation markers via immunofluorescence and flow cytometry and then cultured in vitro and treated with different concentrations of PDGF-BB. The effect of PDGF-BB on cell proliferation, stem cell and differentiation markers expression, soluble collagen production, lysyl oxidase (LOX) activity, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and calcium nodules formation was assessed. PDGF-BB stimulated the proliferation of cells with the maximum effect at 50ng/mL. The growth factor increased the expression of stem cell markers and SPARC; Col1a2 expression was decreased, whereas the expression of Col3a1 remain unchanged. Soluble collagen production, ALP activity and calcium nodules formation were also significantly decreased by PDGF-BB; LOX activity was significantly increased. PDGF-BB is a powerful promoter of cell proliferation and increases the expression of stem cell markers; inhibites collagen production and mineraliration but accelerates the maturation of collagen chains through increased LOX activity and SPARC expression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Flow cytometric analysis of in vitro bluetongue virus infection of bovine blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt-Boyes, S M; Rossitto, P V; Stott, J L; MacLachlan, N J

    1992-08-01

    Cultures of adherent and non-adherent bovine peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells were inoculated with bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 10. Some cultures of non-adherent cells were stimulated with interleukin 2 (IL-2) and concanavalin A for 24 h prior to virus inoculation. Cells were harvested at various intervals up to 72 h after inoculation. A panel of leukocyte differentiation antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), specific for bovine CD2, CD4 or CD8, monocytes and granulocytes, B cells, gamma delta T cells or the IL-2 receptor (IL-2r), was directly conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate, and a MAb specific for the BTV major core protein VP7 was directly conjugated to phycoerythrin. Cells were labelled with conjugated MAbs in single- and double-label immunofluorescence studies to identify specifically the BTV-infected cells in inoculated cultures. The viability of cells was determined by propidium iodide exclusion, and all analyses were done using flow cytometry. Productive infection of cultures of PBM cells was confirmed by virus titration. The data revealed a clear difference between subsets of bovine PBM cells in susceptibility to infection with BTV in vitro. Monocytes were readily infected with BTV, as were stimulated CD4+ cells, and infection was cytopathic to monocytes and stimulated lymphocytes. The proportion of infected cells decreased after 24 h and virus titres dropped markedly by 72 h in all cultures. CD4+ cells in cultures of unstimulated non-adherent cells inoculated with BTV showed increased expression of IL-2r. The possible relevance of these findings to the pathogenesis of BTV infection of cattle is discussed.

  14. Speckle based configuration for simultaneous in vitro inspection of mechanical contractions of cardiac myocyte cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golberg, Mark; Fixler, Dror; Shainberg, Asher; Zlochiver, Sharon; Micó, Vicente; Garcia, Javier; Beiderman, Yevgeny; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2013-04-01

    In this manuscript we propose optical lensless configuration for a remote non-contact measuring of mechanical contractions of vast number of cardiac myocytes. All the myocytes were taken from rats, and the measurements were done in an in vitro mode. The optical method is based on temporal analysis of secondary reflected speckle patterns generated in lensless microscope configuration. The processing involves analyzing the movement and the change in the statistics of the generated secondary speckle patterns that are created on top of the cell culture when it is illuminated by a spot of laser beam. The main advantage of the proposed system is the ability to measure many cells simultaneously (approximately one thousand cells) and to extract the statistical data of their movement at once. The presented experimental results also include investigation the effect of isoproteranol on cells contraction process.

  15. In vitro organogenesis in three dimensions: self-organising stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasai, Yoshiki; Eiraku, Mototsugu; Suga, Hidetaka

    2012-11-01

    Organ formation during embryogenesis is a complex process that involves various local cell-cell interactions at the molecular and mechanical levels. Despite this complexity, organogenesis can be modelled in vitro. In this article, we focus on two recent examples in which embryonic stem cells can self-organise into three-dimensional structures - the optic cup and the pituitary epithelium; and one case of self-organising adult stem cells - the gut epithelium. We summarise how these approaches have revealed intrinsic programs that drive locally autonomous modes of organogenesis and homeostasis. We also attempt to interpret the results of previous in vivo studies of retinal development in light of the self-organising nature of the retina.

  16. In vitro evaluation of three different biomaterials as scaffolds for canine mesenchymal stem cells

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    Oduvaldo Câmara Marques Pereira-Junior

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To evaluate in vitro ability the of three different biomaterials - purified hydroxyapatite, demineralized bone matrix and castor oil-based polyurethane - as biocompatible 3D scaffolds for canine bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell (MSC intending bone tissue engineering. METHODS: MSCs were isolated from canine bone marrow, characterized and cultivated for seven days with the biomaterials. Cell proliferation and adhesion to the biomaterial surface were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy while differentiation into osteogenic lineage was evaluated by Alizarin Red staining and Sp7/Osterix surface antibody marker. RESULTS: The biomaterials allowed cellular growth, attachment and proliferation. Osteogenic differentiation occurred in the presence of hydroxyapatite, and matrix deposition commenced in the presence of the castor oil-based polyurethane. CONCLUSION: All the tested biomaterials may be used as mesenchymal stem cell scaffolds in cell-based orthopedic reconstructive therapy.

  17. In vitro red blood cell assay for oxidant toxicity of petroleum oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couillard, C.M.; Leighton, F.A. (Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada))

    1993-05-01

    Petroleum oil has caused hemolytic anemia in birds and mammals. In birds, an oxidant damage on circulating red cells has been identified as the primary toxic effect of ingested petroleum oils. An in vitro red blood cell assay was developed to discriminate among the oxidant activities of different petroleum oils. The assay used rabbit red blood cells with a rat liver enzyme system and formation of methemoglobin was measured as an indicator of oxidant damage to the red cells. The assay was applied to five different petroleum oils and to naphthalene, a petroleum hydrocarbon known to cause hemolytic anemia. Different petroleum oils differed in their capacity to induce methemoglobin formation. Methemoglobin levels varied from 2.9% with Arabian light crude oil to 6.2% with South Louisiana crude oil. Naphthalene induced formation of up to 37% methemoglobin. Naphthalene and the five petroleum oils generated methemoglobin only in the presence of liver enzymes.

  18. BMP7 transfection induces in-vitro osteogenic differentiation of dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells

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    Ka Po John Yau

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess whether in-vitro osteogenic differentiation of human dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells can be induced by transient transfection with the gene encoding human bone morphogenic protein 7 (BMP7. Materials and Methods: A mesenchymal stem cell population was isolated from the dental pulp of two extracted permanent premolars, expanded and characterized. The human BMP7 gene, as a recombinant pcDNA3.1/V5-His-TOPO-BMP7 plasmid, was transfected into the cells. Three negative controls were used: No plasmid, empty vector, and an unrelated vector encoding green fluorescent protein. After the interval of 24 and 48 h, mRNA levels of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin as markers of in-vitro osteogenic differentiation were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction and standardized against β-actin mRNA levels. Results: The level of alkaline phosphatase mRNA was significantly higher for the BMP7 group than for all three negative controls 48 h after transfection (706.9 vs. 11.24 for untransfected cells, 78.05 for empty vector, and 73.10 for green fluorescent protein vector. The level of osteocalcin mRNA was significantly higher for the BMP7 group than for all three negative controls 24 h after transfection (1.0, however, decreased after another 24 h. Conclusions: In-vitro osteoblastic differentiation of human dental pulp mesenchymal stem cells, as indicated by expression of alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin, can be induced by transient transfection with the BMP7 gene.

  19. Cytotoxicity assessment of modified bioactive glasses with MLO-A5 osteogenic cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modglin, Vernon C; Brown, Roger F; Jung, Steven B; Day, Delbert E

    2013-05-01

    The primary objective of this study was to evaluate in vitro responses of MLO-A5 osteogenic cells to two modifications of the bioactive glass 13-93. The modified glasses, which were designed for use as cell support scaffolds and contained added boron to form the glasses 13-93 B1 and 13-93 B3, were made to accelerate formation of a bioactive hydroxyapatite surface layer and possibly enhance tissue growth. Quantitative MTT cytotoxicity tests revealed no inhibition of growth of MLO-A5 cells incubated with 13-93 glass extracts up to 10 mg/ml, moderate inhibition of growth with 13-93 B1 glass extracts, and noticeable inhibition of growth with 13-93 B3 glass extracts. A morphology-based biocompatibility test was also performed and yielded qualitative assessments of the relative biocompatibilities of glass extracts that agree with those obtained by the quantitative MTT test. However, as a proof of concept experiment, when MLO-A5 cells were seeded onto 13-93 B3 scaffolds in a dynamic in vitro environment, cell proliferation occurred as evidenced by qualitative and quantitative MTT labeling of scaffolds. Together these results demonstrate the in vitro toxicity of released borate ion in static experiments; however borate ion release can be mitigated in a dynamic environment similar to the human body where microvasculature is present. Here we argue that despite toxicity in static environments, boron-containing 13-93 compositions may warrant further study for use in tissue engineering applications.

  20. Polyvinyl Alcohol/Lithospermum Erythrorhizon Nanofibrous Membrane: Characterizations, In Vitro Drug Release, and Cell Viability

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    Ching-Wen Lou

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes an optimization process of the Lithospermum erythrorhizon (LE extraction with a higher purity of shikonin (SK. The influence of extraction temperature on the concentration of SK is examined, and an in vitro cell viability assay is used to examine the optimal concentration of SK. Afterwards, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA/LE solutions at ratios of 90/10, 80/20, and 70/30 w/w are electrospun into LE electrospun nanofibrous membranes (LENMs. The optimal manufacture parameters of LENMs are evaluated based on the test results of in vitro drug release test and cell viability assay. The optimal concentration occurs when the extraction temperature is −10 °C. The purity of the LE extract reaches 53.8% and the concentration of SK is 1.07 mg/mL. Moreover, the cell viability of nanofibrous membranes significantly increases to 136.8% when 0.7 μM SK is used. The diameter of nanofibers of LENM is decreased by 43.9% when the ratio of PVA solution to LE extract is 70/30 (w/w. 80/20 (w/w LENM has the maximum amount of drug release of 79% for a continuous period of 48 h. In particular, 90/10 (w/w LENM can create the maximum cell proliferation of 157.5% in a 24-h in vitro cell viability assay. This suggests that LENM has great potential to be used in facilitating tissue regeneration and wound healing.

  1. Effects of vitamin A on in vitro maturation of pre-pubertal mouse spermatogonial stem cells.

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    Albanne Travers

    Full Text Available Testicular tissue cryopreservation is the only potential option for fertility preservation in pre-pubertal boys exposed to gonadotoxic treatment. Completion of spermatogenesis after in vitro maturation is one of the future uses of harvested testicular tissue. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the effects of vitamin A on in vitro maturation of fresh and frozen-thawed mouse pre-pubertal spermatogonial stem cells in an organ culture system. Pre-pubertal CD1 mouse fresh testes were cultured for 7 (D7, 9 (D9 and 11 (D11 days using an organ culture system. Basal medium was supplemented with different concentrations of retinol (Re or retinoic acid (RA alone or in combination. Seminiferous tubule morphology (tubule diameter, intra-tubular cell type, intra-tubular cell death and proliferation (PCNA antibody and testosterone level were assessed at D7, D9 and D11. Pre-pubertal mouse testicular tissue were frozen after a soaking temperature performed at -7 °C, -8 °C or -9 °C and after thawing, were cultured for 9 days, using the culture medium preserving the best fresh tissue functionality. Retinoic acid at 10(-6M and retinol at 3.3.10(-7M, as well as retinol 10(-6M are favourable for seminiferous tubule growth, maintenance of intra-tubular cell proliferation and germ cell differentiation of fresh pre-pubertal mouse spermatogonia. Structural and functional integrity of frozen-thawed testicular tissue appeared to be well-preserved after soaking temperature at -8 °C, after 9 days of organotypic culture using 10(-6M retinol. RA and Re can control in vitro germ cell proliferation and differentiation. Re at a concentration of 10(-6M maintains intra-tubular cell proliferation and the ability of spermatogonia to initiate spermatogenesis in fresh and frozen pre-pubertal mouse testicular tissue using a soaking temperature at -8 °C. Our data suggested a possible human application for in vitro maturation of cryopreserved pre-pubertal testicular

  2. Physiological normal levels of androgen inhibit proliferation of prostate cancer cells in vitro

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    Weitao Song

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available For more than 70 years, it has been believed that a severe reduction of serum androgen levels caused regression of prostate cancer (PCa and that increasing androgen levels enhanced growth of PCa. However, numerous recent studies have questioned this traditional belief. In our study, LNCaP and MDA PCa 2b PCa cells were treated with various levels of androgens for 10 or 20 days, and the cell growth was measured with crystal violet mitogenic assay. The results indicated that the effect of androgens on the proliferation of PCa cells occurs in a biphasic pattern, with the androgen levels promoting optimal cell growth at approximately 0.23 ng ml−1 for LNCaP cells and between 1 and 2 ng ml−1 for MDA PCa 2b cells. Both of the optimal androgen levels are within the adult men's physiological low range (<2.4 ng ml−1 . At lower concentrations than the optimal androgen level, increasing androgen concentration promoted the proliferation of PCa cells. However, at the higher concentrations, increasing androgen concentration resulted in a dose-dependent proliferative inhibition. We conclude that physiologically normal levels of androgen inhibit the proliferation of PCa cells in vitro. However, at very low levels androgens are essential for initial growth of PCa cells.

  3. CRISPR/Cas9-Mediated In Vitro Mutagenesis in GC-Like B Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Van Trung; Graf, Robin; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The CRISPR/Cas9 technology has developed into a powerful tool for genome editing, both in terms of gene silencing and the insertion of precise mutations. However, the application of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated mutagenesis in primary immune cells, in particular in B cells, is still in its infancy because of the difficulty to deliver the CRISPR/Cas9 system into these cells. Here, we describe a new method to use CRISPR/Cas9 for manipulating genes in germinal center (GC)-like B cells in vitro. We isolated Cas9-expressing B cells from R26-Cas9iGFP/+ mice (expressing Cas9 constitutively from the Rosa26 locus) and mixed them with control B cells. Primary B cells were cultured on CD40L- and BAFF-expressing feeder cells and transduced with retroviral particles expressing the sgRNAs of interest. Using this system, we have achieved complete gene knockouts in up to 92% of activated B cells.

  4. Inhibition of Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation and In Vitro Tumorigenesis by a New Red Apple Cultivar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavano, Giuditta Fiorella; De Santi, Mauro; Brandi, Giorgio; Fanelli, Mirco; Bucchini, Anahi; Giamperi, Laura; Giomaro, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative activity in breast cancer cells and the inhibition of tumorigenesis in pre-neoplastic cells of a new apple cultivar with reddish pulp, called the Pelingo apple. The antiproliferative activity was evaluated in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. The inhibition of tumorigenesis was performed in JB6 promotion-sensitive (P+) cells. Results showed that Pelingo apple juice is characterized by a very high polyphenol content and strongly inhibited breast cancer cell proliferation. Its antiproliferative activity was found to be higher than the other five apple juices tested. Pelingo juice induced cell accumulation in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle and autophagy through overexpression of p21, inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity and an increase in lipidated microtubule-associated protein-1 light chain-3 beta (LC3B). Remarkably, Pelingo juice inhibited the 12-o-tetra-decanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA)-induced tumorigenesis of JB6 P+ cells, suppressing colony formation in semi-solid medium and TPA-induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Our data indicate that the Pelingo apple is rich in food components that can markedly inhibit in vitro tumorigenesis and growth of human breast cancer cells and could provide natural bioactive non-nutrient compounds, with potential chemopreventive activity.

  5. In Vitro Propagation and Branching Morphogenesis from Single Ureteric Bud Cells

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    Shunsuke Yuri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A method to maintain and rebuild ureteric bud (UB-like structures from UB cells in vitro could provide a useful tool for kidney regeneration. We aimed in our present study to establish a serum-free culture system that enables the expansion of UB progenitor cells, i.e., UB tip cells, and reconstruction of UB-like structures. We found that fibroblast growth factors or retinoic acid (RA was sufficient for the survival of UB cells in serum-free condition, while the proliferation and maintenance of UB tip cells required glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor together with signaling from either WNT-β-catenin pathway or RA. The activation of WNT-β-catenin signaling in UB cells by endogenous WNT proteins required R-spondins. Together with Rho kinase inhibitor, our culture system facilitated the expansion of UB tip cells to form UB-like structures from dispersed single cells. The UB-like structures thus formed retained the original UB characteristics and integrated into the native embryonic kidneys.

  6. Adult murine skeletal muscle contains cells that can differentiate into beating cardiomyocytes in vitro.

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    Steve O Winitsky

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available It has long been held as scientific fact that soon after birth, cardiomyocytes cease dividing, thus explaining the limited restoration of cardiac function after a heart attack. Recent demonstrations of cardiac myocyte differentiation observed in vitro or after in vivo transplantation of adult stem cells from blood, fat, skeletal muscle, or heart have challenged this view. Analysis of these studies has been complicated by the large disparity in the magnitude of effects seen by different groups and obscured by the recently appreciated process of in vivo stem-cell fusion. We now show a novel population of nonsatellite cells in adult murine skeletal muscle that progress under standard primary cell-culture conditions to autonomously beating cardiomyocytes. Their differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes is characterized here by video microscopy, confocal-detected calcium transients, electron microscopy, immunofluorescent cardiac-specific markers, and single-cell patch recordings of cardiac action potentials. Within 2 d after tail-vein injection of these marked cells into a mouse model of acute infarction, the marked cells are visible in the heart. By 6 d they begin to differentiate without fusing to recipient cardiac cells. Three months later, the tagged cells are visible as striated heart muscle restricted to the region of the cardiac infarct.

  7. Adult Murine Skeletal Muscle Contains Cells That Can Differentiate into Beating Cardiomyocytes In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Winitsky Steve O

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It has long been held as scientific fact that soon after birth, cardiomyocytes cease dividing, thus explaining the limited restoration of cardiac function after a heart attack. Recent demonstrations of cardiac myocyte differentiation observed in vitro or after in vivo transplantation of adult stem cells from blood, fat, skeletal muscle, or heart have challenged this view. Analysis of these studies has been complicated by the large disparity in the magnitude of effects seen by different groups and obscured by the recently appreciated process of in vivo stem-cell fusion. We now show a novel population of nonsatellite cells in adult murine skeletal muscle that progress under standard primary cell-culture conditions to autonomously beating cardiomyocytes. Their differentiation into beating cardiomyocytes is characterized here by video microscopy, confocal-detected calcium transients, electron microscopy, immunofluorescent cardiac-specific markers, and single-cell patch recordings of cardiac action potentials. Within 2 d after tail-vein injection of these marked cells into a mouse model of acute infarction, the marked cells are visible in the heart. By 6 d they begin to differentiate without fusing to recipient cardiac cells. Three months later, the tagged cells are visible as striated heart muscle restricted to the region of the cardiac infarct.

  8. Biodegradable nanoparticles for targeted ultrasound imaging of breast cancer cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Jun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Li Jie [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Ohio State University, 270 Bevis Hall, 1080 Carmack Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Rosol, Thomas J [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, Ohio State University, 1925 Coffey Rd, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Pan Xueliang [Department of Statistics, Ohio State University, 1958 Neil Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Voorhees, Jeffrey L [Ohio State Biochemistry Program, Ohio State University, 108 Aronoff Building, 318 West 12 Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2007-08-21

    Disease-specific enhanced imaging through a targeted agent promises to improve the specificity of medical ultrasound. Nanoparticles may provide unique advantages for targeted ultrasound imaging due to their novel physical and surface properties. In this study, we examined a nanoparticle agent developed from a biodegradable polymer, polylactic acid (PLA). The nanoparticles (mean diameter = 250 nm) were surface conjugated to an anti-Her2 antibody (i.e., Herceptin) for specific binding to breast cancer cells that overexpress Her2 receptors. We examined the targeting specificity and the resultant ultrasound enhancement in Her2-positive and negative cells. Flow cytometry and confocal imaging were used to assess the nanoparticle-cell binding. Her2-positive cells demonstrated substantial staining after incubation with nanoparticle/antibody conjugates, while minimal staining was found in Her2-negative cells, indicating receptor-specific binding of the conjugated PLA nanoparticles. In high-resolution ultrasound B-mode images, the average gray scale of the Her2-positive cells was consistently and significantly higher after nanoparticle treatment (133 {+-} 4 in treated cells versus 109 {+-} 4 in control, p < 0.001, n = 5), while no difference was detected in the cells that did not overexpress the receptors (117 {+-} 3 in treated cells versus 118 {+-} 5 in control). In conclusion, the feasibility of using targeted nanoparticles to enhance ultrasonic images was demonstrated in vitro. This may be a promising approach to target cancer biomarkers for site-specific ultrasound imaging.

  9. Human primordial germ cell commitment in vitro associates with a unique PRDM14 expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawa, Fumihiro; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Yoon, Juyong; Kim, Kee-Pyo; Aramaki, Shinya; Wu, Guangming; Stehling, Martin; Psathaki, Olympia E; Hübner, Karin; Schöler, Hans R

    2015-04-15

    Primordial germ cells (PGCs) develop only into sperm and oocytes in vivo. The molecular mechanisms underlying human PGC specification are poorly understood due to inaccessibility of cell materials and lack of in vitro models for tracking the earliest stages of germ cell development. Here, we describe a defined and stepwise differentiation system for inducing pre-migratory PGC-like cells (PGCLCs) from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). In response to cytokines, PSCs differentiate first into a heterogeneous mesoderm-like cell population and then into PGCLCs, which exhibit minimal PRDM14 expression. PGC specification in humans is similar to the murine process, with the sequential activation of mesodermal and PGC genes, and the suppression of neural induction and of de novo DNA methylation, suggesting that human PGC formation is induced via epigenesis, the process of germ cell specification via inductive signals from surrounding somatic cells. This study demonstrates that PGC commitment in humans shares key features with that of the mouse, but also highlights key differences, including transcriptional regulation during the early stage of human PGC development (3-6 weeks). A more comprehensive understanding of human germ cell development may lead to methodology for successfully generating PSC-derived gametes for reproductive medicine. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY NC ND 4.0 license.

  10. Effects of retinoic acid signaling on extraocular muscle myogenic precursor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Sadie L; Fitzpatrick, Krysta R; McConnell, Samantha A; Cucak, Anja; Yuan, Ching; McLoon, Linda K

    2017-12-01

    One major difference between limb and extraocular muscles (EOM) is the presence of an enriched population of Pitx2-positive myogenic precursor cells in EOM compared to limb muscle. We hypothesize that retinoic acid regulates Pitx2 expression in EOM myogenic precursor cells and that its effects would differ in leg muscle. The two muscle groups expressed differential retinoic acid receptor (RAR) and retinoid X receptor (RXR) levels. RXR co-localized with the Pitx2-positive cells but not with those expressing Pax7. EOM-derived and LEG-derived EECD34 cells were treated with vehicle, retinoic acid, the RXR agonist bexarotene, the RAR inverse agonist BMS493, or the RXR antagonist UVI 3003. In vitro, fewer EOM-derived EECD34 cells expressed desmin and fused, while more LEG-derived cells expressed desmin and fused when treated with retinoic acid compared to vehicle. Both EOM and LEG-derived EECD34 cells exposed to retinoic acid showed a higher percentage of cells expressing Pitx2 compared to vehicle, supporting the hypothesis that retinoic acid plays a role in maintaining Pitx2 expression. We hypothesize that retinoic acid signaling aids in the maintenance of large numbers of undifferentiated myogenic precursor cells in the EOM, which would be required to maintain EOM normalcy throughout a lifetime of myonuclear turnover. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Knockdown of SVCT2 impairs in-vitro cell attachment, migration and wound healing in bone marrow stromal cells

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    Rajnikumar Sangani

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC adhesion and migration are fundamental to a number of pathophysiologic processes, including fracture and wound healing. Vitamin C is beneficial for bone formation, fracture repair and wound healing. However, the role of the vitamin C transporter in BMSC adhesion, migration and wound healing is not known. In this study, we knocked-down the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter, SVCT2, the only known transporter of vitamin C in BMSCs, and performed cell adhesion, migration, in-vitro scratch wound healing and F-actin re-arrangement studies. We also investigated the role of oxidative stress on the above processes. Our results demonstrate that both oxidative stress and down-regulation of SVCT2 decreased cell attachment and spreading. A trans-well cell migration assay showed that vitamin C helped in BMSC migration and that knockdown of SVCT2 decreased cell migration. In the in-vitro scratch wound healing studies, we established that oxidative stress dose-dependently impairs wound healing. Furthermore, the supplementation of vitamin C significantly rescued the BMSCs from oxidative stress and increased wound closing. The knockdown of SVCT2 in BMSCs strikingly decreased wound healing, and supplementing with vitamin C failed to rescue cells efficiently. The knockdown of SVCT2 and induction of oxidative stress in cells produced an alteration in cytoskeletal dynamics. Signaling studies showed that oxidative stress phosphorylated members of the MAP kinase family (p38 and that vitamin C inhibited their phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that both the SVCT2 transporter and oxidative stress play a vital role in BMSC attachment, migration and cytoskeletal re-arrangement. BMSC-based cell therapy and modulation of SVCT2 could lead to a novel therapeutic approach that enhances bone remodeling, fracture repair and wound healing in chronic disease conditions.

  12. Long-term generation and expansion of human primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srour, E F; Brandt, J E; Briddell, R A; Grigsby, S; Leemhuis, T; Hoffman, R

    1993-02-01

    Although sustained production of committed human hematopoietic progenitor cells in long-term bone marrow cultures (LTBMC) is well documented, evidence for the generation and expansion of human primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells (PHPC) in such cultures is lacking. For that purpose, we attempted to determine if the human high proliferative potential colony-forming cell (HPP-CFC), a primitive hematopoietic marrow progenitor cell, is capable of generation and expansion in vitro. To that effect, stromal cell-free LTBMC were initiated with CD34+ HLA-DR-CD15- rhodamine 123dull bone marrow cells and were maintained with repeated addition of c-kit ligand and a synthetic interleukin-3/granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor fusion protein. By day 21 of LTBMC, a greater than twofold increase in the number of assayable HPP-CFC was detected. Furthermore, the production of HPP-CFC in LTBMC continued for up to 4 weeks, resulting in a 5.5-fold increase in HPP-CFC numbers. Weekly phenotypic analyses of cells harvested from LTBMC showed that the number of CD34+ HLA-DR- cells increased from 10(4) on day 0 to 56 CD34+ HLA-DR- cells increased from 10(4) on day 0 to 56 x 10(4) by day 21. To examine further the nature of the in vitro HPP-CFC expansion, individual HPP-CFC colonies were serially cloned. Secondary cloning of individual, day 28 primary HPP-CFC indicated that 46% of these colonies formed an average of nine secondary colony-forming unit--granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM)--derived colonies, whereas 43% of primary HPP-CFC gave rise to between one and six secondary HPP-CFC colonies and 6 to 26 CFU-GM. These data show that CD34+ HLA-DR- CD15- rhodamine 123dull cells represent a fraction of human bone marrow highly enriched for HPP-CFC and that based on their regeneration and proliferative capacities, a hierarchy of HPP-CFC exists. Furthermore, these studies indicate that in the presence of appropriate cytokine stimulation, it is possible to expand the number of PHPC

  13. Impacts of Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium and Its speG Gene on the Transcriptomes of In Vitro M Cells and Caco-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke-Chuan; Huang, Chih-Hung; Huang, Ching-Jou

    2016-01-01

    Microfold or membranous (M) cells are specialized intestinal epithelial cells responsible for host immunity. The speG mutant of Salmonella Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium) is a nonreplicating strain within human cells to be a candidate vaccine vector for interacting with M cells. We conducted this study to identify the genes are differently expressed between in vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells, and to determine whether S. Typhimurium and speG affect the transcriptomes of both cell types. In vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells were infected with wild-type (WT) S. Typhimurium, its ΔspeG mutant, or none for 1 h for RNA microarrays; the transcriptomes among the 6 pools were pairwisely compared. Genetic loci encoding scaffold (e.g., HSCHR7_CTG4_4, HSCHR9_CTG9_35), long noncoding RNA, membrane-associated protein (PITPNB), neuron-related proteins (OR8D1, OR10G9, and NTNG2), and transporter proteins (MICU2 and SLC28A1) were significantly upregulated in uninfected M cells compared with uninfected Caco-2 cells; and their encoding proteins are promising M-cell markers. Significantly upregulated HSCHR7_CTG4_4 of uninfected in vitro M cells were speG-independently downregulated by S. Typhimurium infection that is a remarkable change representing an important but unreported characteristic of M cells. The immune responses of in vitro M cells and Caco-2 cells can differ and reply on speG or not, with speG-dependent regulation of KYL4, SCTR, IL6, TNF, and CELF4 in Caco-2 cells, JUN, KLF6, and KCTD11 in M cells, or speG-independent modulation of ZFP36 in both cells. This study facilitates understanding of the immune responses of in vitro M cells after administering the S. Typhimurium ΔspeG mutant as a future vaccine vector. PMID:27064787

  14. A simple in vitro method for evaluating dendritic cell-based vaccinations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham PV

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Phuc Van Pham, Nhung Thi Nguyen, Hoang Minh Nguyen, Lam Tan Khuat, Phong Minh Le, Viet Quoc Pham, Sinh Truong Nguyen, Ngoc Kim Phan Laboratory of Stem Cell Research and Application, University of Science, Vietnam National University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam Background: Dendritic cell (DC therapy is a promising therapy for cancer-targeting treatments. Recently, DCs have been used for treatment of some cancers. We aimed to develop an in vitro assay to evaluate DC therapy in cancer treatment using a breast cancer model. Methods: DCs were induced from murine bone marrow mononuclear cells in Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with GM-CSF (20 ng/mL and IL-4 (20 ng/mL. Immature DCs were primed with breast cancer stem cell (BCSC-derived antigens. BCSCs were sorted from 4T1 cell lines based on aldehyde dehydrogenase expression. A mixture of DCs and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs were used to evaluate the inhibitory effect of antigen-primed DCs on BCSCs. BCSC proliferation and doubling time were recorded based on impedance-based cell analysis using the xCELLigence system. The specification of inhibitory effects of DCs and CTLs was also evaluated using the same system. Results: The results showed that impedance-based analysis of BCSCs reflected cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of DCs and CTLs at 72 hours. Differences in ratios of DC:CTL changed the cytotoxicity of DCs and CTLs. Conclusion: This study successfully used impedance-based cell analysis as a new in vitro assay to evaluate DC efficacy in cancer immunotherapy. We hope this technique will contribute to the development and improvement of immunotherapies in the near future. Keywords: CTLs, cytotoxicity assay, dendritic cells, immunotherapy, targeting therapy

  15. Proposing a Caco-2/HepG2 cell model for in vitro iron absorption studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheers, Nathalie M; Almgren, Annette B; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2014-07-01

    The Caco-2 cell line is well established as an in vitro model for iron absorption. However, the model does not reflect the regulation of iron absorption by hepcidin produced in the liver. We aimed to develop the Caco-2 model by introducing human liver cells (HepG2) to Caco-2 cells. The Caco-2 and HepG2 epithelia were separated by a liquid compartment, which allowed for epithelial interaction. Ferritin levels in cocultured Caco-2 controls were 21.7±10.3 ng/mg protein compared to 7.7±5.8 ng/mg protein in monocultured Caco-2 cells. The iron transport across Caco-2 layers was increased when liver cells were present (8.1%±1.5% compared to 3.5%±2.5% at 120 μM Fe). Caco-2 cells were exposed to 0, 80 and 120 μM Fe and responded with increased hepcidin production at 120 μM Fe (3.6±0.3 ng/ml compared to 2.7±0.3 ng/ml). The expression of iron exporter ferroportin in Caco-2 cells was decreased at the hepcidin concentration of 3.6 ng/ml and undetectable at external addition of hepcidin (10 ng/ml). The apical transporter DMT1 was also undetectable at 10 ng/ml but was unchanged at the lower concentrations. In addition, we observed that sourdough bread, in comparison to heat-treated bread, increased the bioavailability of iron despite similar iron content (53% increase in ferritin formation, 97% increase in hepcidin release). This effect was not observed in monocultured Caco-2 cells. The Caco-2/HepG2 model provides an alternative approach to in vitro iron absorption studies in which the hepatic regulation of iron transport must be considered. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. In vitro cell cultures obtained from different explants of Corylus avellana produce Taxol and taxanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cavalli Francesca

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Taxol is an effective antineoplastic agent, originally extracted from the bark of Taxus brevifolia with a low yield. Many attempts have been made to produce Taxol by chemical synthesis, semi-synthesis and plant tissue cultures. However, to date, the availability of this compound is not sufficient to satisfy the commercial requirements. The aim of the present work was to produce suspension cell cultures from plants not belonging to Taxus genus and to verify whether they produced Taxol and taxanes. For this purpose different explants of hazel (Corylus avellana species were used to optimize the protocol for inducing in vitro callus, an undifferentiated tissue from which suspension cell cultures were established. Results Calli were successfully induced from stems, leaves and seeds grown in various hormone concentrations and combinations. The most suitable callus to establish suspension cell cultures was obtained from seeds. Media recovered from suspension cell cultures contained taxanes, and showed antiproliferative activity on human tumour cells. Taxol, 10-deacetyltaxol and 10-deacetylbaccatin III were the main taxanes identified. The level of Taxol recovered from the media of hazel cultures was similar to that found in yew cultures. Moreover, the production of taxanes in hazel cell cultures increased when elicitors were used. Conclusion Here we show that hazel cell cultures produce Taxol and taxanes under controlled conditions. This result suggests that hazel possesses the enzymes for Taxol production, which until now was considered to be a pathway particular to Taxus genus. The main benefit of producing taxanes through hazel cell cultures is that hazel is widely available, grows at a much faster rate in vivo, and is easier to cultivate in vitro than yew. In addition, the production of callus directly from hazel seeds shortens the culture time and minimizes the probability of contamination. Therefore, hazel could become a

  17. Development of an in vitro culture method for cells and tissues from the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha)

    OpenAIRE

    WILSON, JAMES GOW

    2009-01-01

    PUBLISHED Despite the successful transfer of mammalian in vitro techniques for use with fish and other vertebrates, little progress has been made in the area of invertebrate tissue culture. This paper describes the development of an in vitro technique for the culture of both cells in suspension and tissue explants from the gill, digestive gland and mantle of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and their successful maintenance in culture for up to 14 days. Cell suspensions from the gill...

  18. Development of an in vitro culture method for cells and tissues from the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha)

    OpenAIRE

    Quinn, Brian; Costello, Mark J.; Dorange, Germaine; Wilson, James G.; Mothersill, Carmel

    2009-01-01

    Despite the successful transfer of mammalian in vitro techniques for use with fish and other vertebrates, little progress has been made in the area of invertebrate tissue culture. This paper describes the development of an in vitro technique for the culture of both cells in suspension and tissue explants from the gill, digestive gland and mantle of the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha) and their successful maintenance in culture for up to 14 days. Cell suspensions from the gills and digesti...

  19. Brimonidine Can Prevent In Vitro Hydroquinone Damage on Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells and Retinal Müller Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez, Claudio; Cáceres-del-Carpio, Javier; Chu, Justin; Chu, Joshua; Moustafa, M Tarek; Chwa, Marilyn; Limb, G Astrid; Kuppermann, Baruch D; Kenney, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    Brimonidine is a selective alpha-2 adrenergic agonist used to reduce intraocular pressure and it has been shown to have some neuroprotective effects. Hydroquinone (HQ) is a toxicant present in cigarette smoke, and other sources. In this study, we investigated the cyto-protective effects in vitro of Brimonidine on human retinal pigment epithelium cells (ARPE-19) and human retinal Müller cells (MIO-M1) that had been treated with HQ. Cells were pretreated for 6 h with different doses of Brimonidine tartrate 0.1% (1/2×, 1×, 5×, 10×), followed by a 24-h exposure to 100 μM of HQ, while the Brimonidine was still present. Assays were used to measure cell viability, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release. Brimonidine increased the cell viability at all concentrations studied in both cell lines studied. ΔΨm also improved at all Brimonidine doses in ARPE-19 cells and in the 5× and 10× dosages MIO-M1 cells. The ROS levels decreased at 1×, 5×, and 10× doses of Brimonidine in ARPE-19 but only at 10× on MIO-M1 cells. The 10×-Brimonidine ARPE-19 cells had decreased LDH release, but no LDH changes were observed on MIO-M1 cells. HQ-induced toxicity is mediated through mitochondrial damaging, oxidative stress-related and necrosis-related pathways; Brimonidine significantly prevented the mitochondrial damaging and oxidative stress-related effects but had little effect on blocking the necrosis component of HQ-toxicity. Brimonidine protective effects differ between the different retinal cell types and high concentrations of Brimonidine (10×) have minimal damaging effects on human retinal cells.

  20. Isolation and Culture of Pig Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Their in Vitro Differentiation into Neuron-Like Cells and Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs renew themselves throughout the life of an organism and also differentiate into sperm in the adult. They are multipopent and therefore, can be induced to differentiate into many cells types in vitro. SSCs from pigs, considered an ideal animal model, are used in studies of male infertility, regenerative medicine, and preparation of transgenic animals. Here, we report on a culture system for porcine SSCs and the differentiation of these cells into neuron-like cells and adipocytes. SSCs and Sertoli cells were isolated from neonatal piglet testis by differential adhesion and SSCs were cultured on a feeder layer of Sertoli cells. Third-generation SSCs were induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells by addition of retinoic acid, β-mercaptoethanol, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX to the induction media and into adipocytes by the addition of hexadecadrol, insulin, and IBMX to the induction media. The differentiated cells were characterized by biochemical staining, qRT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry. The cells were positive for SSC markers, including alkaline phosphatase and SSC-specific genes, consistent with the cells being undifferentiated. The isolated SSCs survived on the Sertoli cells for 15 generations. Karyotyping confirmed that the chromosomal number of the SSCs were normal for pig (2n = 38, n = 19. Pig SSCs were successfully induced into neuron-like cells eight days after induction and into adipocytes 22 days after induction as determined by biochemical and immunocytochemical staining. qPCR results also support this conclusion. The nervous tissue markers genes, Nestin and β-tubulin, were expressed in the neuron-like cells and the adipocyte marker genes, PPARγ and C/EBPα, were expressed in the adipocytes.

  1. Isolation and Culture of Pig Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Their in Vitro Differentiation into Neuron-Like Cells and Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Tingfeng; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun; Xu, Qi; Song, Chengyi

    2015-11-04

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) renew themselves throughout the life of an organism and also differentiate into sperm in the adult. They are multipopent and therefore, can be induced to differentiate into many cells types in vitro. SSCs from pigs, considered an ideal animal model, are used in studies of male infertility, regenerative medicine, and preparation of transgenic animals. Here, we report on a culture system for porcine SSCs and the differentiation of these cells into neuron-like cells and adipocytes. SSCs and Sertoli cells were isolated from neonatal piglet testis by differential adhesion and SSCs were cultured on a feeder layer of Sertoli cells. Third-generation SSCs were induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells by addition of retinoic acid, β-mercaptoethanol, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) to the induction media and into adipocytes by the addition of hexadecadrol, insulin, and IBMX to the induction media. The differentiated cells were characterized by biochemical staining, qRT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry. The cells were positive for SSC markers, including alkaline phosphatase and SSC-specific genes, consistent with the cells being undifferentiated. The isolated SSCs survived on the Sertoli cells for 15 generations. Karyotyping confirmed that the chromosomal number of the SSCs were normal for pig (2n = 38, n = 19). Pig SSCs were successfully induced into neuron-like cells eight days after induction and into adipocytes 22 days after induction as determined by biochemical and immunocytochemical staining. qPCR results also support this conclusion. The nervous tissue markers genes, Nestin and β-tubulin, were expressed in the neuron-like cells and the adipocyte marker genes, PPARγ and C/EBPα, were expressed in the adipocytes.

  2. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in melanoma comprise high numbers of T-cell clonotypes that are lost during in vitro culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    thor Straten, P; Kirkin, A F; Siim, E

    2000-01-01

    -associated peptide epitopes. Cultured TIL have been studied in order to unveil characteristics of TIL and the interactions of TIL and melanoma cells. Whether in vitro cultured TIL mirrors the in situ situation has, however, been questioned. In the present study we have taken advantage of T-cell receptor clonotype...... mapping methodology to conduct a full and detailed analysis of the T-cell clonotypes in melanoma lesions and in corresponding lines of TIL established in vitro. All melanoma lesions and the corresponding TIL cultures comprised high numbers of T-cell clonotypes, typically in the range of 40 to more than 60...... that in situ T-cell clonotypes in melanoma are not readily expanded in vitro and that the majority of T-cell clonotypes present in cultured TIL are not present in situ....

  3. Side Population Cells Derived from Adult Human Liver Generate Hepatocyte-like Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    HUSSAIN, SUNNY ZAHEED; Strom, Stephen C.; Kirby, Martha R.; Burns, Sean; Langemeijer, Saskia; Ueda, Takahiro; HSIEH, MATTHEW; Tisdale, John F.

    2005-01-01

    We sought to determine whether hepatic side population (SP) cells derived from adult human liver possess the potential of a novel candidate hepatic stem cell. Human cadaveric donor liver was subjected to collagenase perfusion and hepatocytes were separated from nonparenchymal cells by differential centrifugation. SP cells were isolated from the nonparenchymal portion after Hoechst 33342 staining. Since CD45 is a panleukocyte antigen, CD45-negative SP cells were separated from the vast majorit...

  4. Cytotoxic and cell transforming activities of the fungicide methyl thiophanate on BALB/c 3T3 cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perocco, P; Del Ciello, C; Mazzullo, M; Rocchi, P; Ferreri, A M; Paolini, M; Pozzetti, L; Cantelli-Forti, G

    1997-11-27

    Cytotoxic and cell-transforming activities of methyl thiophanate a systemic fungicide capable of entering plant cells and thus controlling fungal diseases that have already started were studied in an in vitro medium-term (6-8 weeks) experimental model utilizing BALB/c 3T3 cells. Cells were exposed to the chemical, dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide, in the absence or presence of an exogenous metabolizing system derived from rat livers supplemented with cofactors (S9 mix). In the absence of metabolic activation, methyl thiophanate exerted cytotoxic activity, evidenced through the formation of cell colonies, at low doses (> 10 micrograms/ml). However, the cytotoxic activity was greatly reduced by the S9 mix-induced metabolic activation of the chemical. Without bioactivation, cell-transforming potential, evidenced through the induction of transformation foci, was observable only at the highest (weakly toxic) dose employed (25 micrograms/ml). On the contrary, in the presence of metabolic activation, the cell-transforming activity was detectable at all tested doses (i.e. from 20 to 200 micrograms/ml) and it was particularly evident in a level-II transformation amplification test when the cells were allowed to perform active proliferative activity. These results, providing further information on the activity of methyl thiophanate in multistep carcinogenesis as possible genotoxic and/or co-carcinogenic agent, may contribute to better evaluate the oncogenic risk to man.

  5. Swainsonine promotes apoptosis in human oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo through activation of mitochondrial pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaocal; Huang, Yong; Dong, Feng; Li, Wei; Ding, Li; Yu, Gaoshui; Xu, Dan; Yang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Xingang; Tong, Dewen

    2012-12-01

    Swainsonine, a natural indolizidine alkaloid, has been reported to have antitumour effects, and can induce apoptosis in human gastric and lung cancer cells. In the present study, we evaluated the antitumour effects of swainsonine on several oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma cells and investigated relative molecular mechanisms. Swainsonine treatment inhibited the growth of Eca-109, TE-1 and TE-10 cells in a concentration-dependent manner as measured by MTT assay. Morphological observation, DNA laddering detection and flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that swainsonine treatment induced Eca-109 cell apoptosis in vitro. Further results showed that swainsonine treatment up-regulated Bax, downregulated Bcl-2 expression, triggered Bax translocation to mitochondria, destructed mitochondria integrity and activated mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, followed by the release of cytochrome c, which in turn activated caspase-9 and caspase-3, promoted the cleavage of PARP, resulting in Eca-109 cell apoptosis. Moreover, swainsonine treatment inhibited Bcl-2 expression, promoted Bax translocation, cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation in xenograft tumour cells, resulting in a significant decrease of tumour volume and tumour weight in the swainsoninetreated xenograft mice groups compared with that in the control group. Taken together, this study demonstrated that swainsonine inhibited Eca-109 cells growth through activation of mitochondria-mediated caspase-dependent pathway.

  6. Detrimental effect of fast neutrons on cultured immature rat hippocampal cells: relative biological effectiveness of in vitro cell death indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Kim, J S; Son, Y; Kim, J; Kim, J Y; Kim, S H; Kim, J C; Shin, T; Moon, C

    2011-09-01

    This in vitro study compared the detrimental effect and relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of high-linear energy transfer (LET) fast neutrons on rat immature hippocampal cultured cells with those of low-LET γ rays. Immature hippocampal cells were exposed to fast neutrons or γ rays. Cytotoxicity and cell viability were analyzed using a lactate dehydrogenase (LDH)-release assay and a 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, respectively. The cytotoxicity and cell viability with fast neutrons or γ rays varied in a dose-dependent pattern. In the LDH release and MTT assay indices, the RBEs of fast neutrons were approximately 2.35 and 2.42, respectively. Fast neutrons markedly induced apoptotic changes in immature hippocampal cells with increased expression of active caspase-3 and cleaved poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Increased cytotoxicity and decreased cell viability in immature hippocampal cells were seen in a dose-dependent pattern after fast-neutron and γ irradiation. Fast neutrons have a higher RBE for cell death indices than γ rays.

  7. Ethanol-based proliposome delivery systems of paclitaxel for in vitro application against brain cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najlah, Mohammad; Jain, Mohit; Wan, Ka-Wai; Ahmed, Waqar; Albed Alhnan, Mohamed; Phoenix, David A; Taylor, Kevin M G; Elhissi, Abdelbary

    2016-12-14

    In this study the anticancer activity of paclitaxel-loaded nano-liposomes on glioma cell lines was investigated. Soya phosphatidylcholine:cholesterol (SPC:Chol), hydrogenated soya phosphatidylcholine:cholesterol (HSPC:Chol) or dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine:cholesterol (DPPC:Chol) in 1:1 mole ratio were used to prepare ethanol-based proliposomes. Following hydration of proliposomes, the size of resulting vesicles was subsequently reduced to nanometer scale via probe-sonication. The resulting formulations were characterized in terms of size, zeta potential and morphology of the vesicles, and entrapment efficiency of paclitaxel (PX) as well as the final pH of the preparations. DPPC-liposomes entrapped 35-92% of PX compared to 27-74% and 25-60% entrapped by liposomes made from SPC and HSPC formulations respectively, depending on drug concentration. The entrapment efficiency of liposomes was dependent on the lipid bilayer properties and ability of PX to modify surface charge of the vesicles. In vitro cytotoxicity studies revealed that PX-liposome formulations were more selective at inhibiting the malignant cells. The cytotoxicity of PX-liposomes was dependent on their drug-entrapment efficiency. This study has shown PX-liposomes generated from proliposomes have selective activity against glioma cell lines, and the synthetic DPPC phospholipid was most suitable for maximized drug entrapment and highest activity against the malign