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Sample records for vitripennis walker hymenoptera

  1. Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitóide de dípteros muscóides coletado em Itumbiara, Goiás Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitoid of muscoids dipterous collected in Itumbiara, Goias, Brazil

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    C.H. Marchiori

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the occurrence of parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae parasitizing pupae of flies (Diptera in different substrata in Itumbiara, Goiás. The pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergence of flies or their parasitoids. From May 1998 through April 2002, 737 parasitoids were collected in human feces, cattle liver, chicken, fish and cattle kidney. The prevalence of parasitism was 67.8%.

  2. Characterization of phenoloxidase activity in venom from the ectoparasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

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    Abt, Michael; Rivers, David B

    2007-02-01

    Crude venom isolated from the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis was found to possess phenoloxidase (PO) activity. Enzyme activity was detected by using a modified dot blot analysis approach in which venom samples were applied to nylon membranes and incubated with either L-DOPA or dopamine. Dot formation was most intense with dopamine as the substrate and no activators appeared to be necessary to evoke a melanization reaction. No melanization occurred when venom was incubated in Schneider's insect medium containing 10% fetal bovine serum or when using tyrosine as a substrate, but melanization did occur when larval or pupal plasma from the fly host, Sarcophaga bullata, was exposed to tyrosine. Only fly larval plasma induced an enzyme reaction with the Schneider's insect medium. The PO inhibitor phenylthiourea (PTU) and serine protease inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonylfluoride (PMSF) abolished PO activity in venom and host plasma samples, but glutathione (reduced) only inhibited venom PO. Elicitors of PO activity (sodium dodecyl sulfate and trypsin) had no or a modest effect (increase) on the ability of venom, or larval and pupal plasma to trigger melanization reactions. SDS-PAGE separation of crude venom followed by in-gel staining using L-DOPA as a substrate revealed two venom proteins with PO activity with estimated molecular weights of 68 and 160 kDa. In vitro assays using BTI-TN-5B1-4 cells were performed to determine the importance of venom PO in triggering cellular changes and evoking cell death. When cell monolayers were pre-treated with 10 mM PTU or PMSF prior to venom exposure, the cells were protected from the effects of venom intoxication as evidenced by no observable cellular morphological changes and over 90% cell viability by 24 h after venom treatment. Simultaneous addition of inhibitors with venom or lower concentrations of PMSF were less effective in affording protection. These observations collectively argue that wasp venom PO is unique from that

  3. Desempenho reprodutivo de Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae em pupas crioconservadas de Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae: avaliação preliminar Reproductive performance of Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae on Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae cryopreserved pupae: preliminary evaluation

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    Eliane Maria Vieira Milward-de-Azevedo

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Avaliou-se o desempenho reprodutivo de Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae em pupas de Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae previamente armazenadas a - 20ºC de temperatura, durante 77 dias, com e sem passagem prévia em nitrogênio líquido (NL por um, três e 15 minutos. O grupo controle foi caracterizado por pupas hospedeiras frescas. Os muscóides foram expostos aos parasitóides durante 72 horas. Utilizou-se a relação de uma pupa muscóide por fêmea parasitóide. A amostra de pupas frescas permitiu a emergência de 15 parasitóides/ pupa, em média, enquanto 10 parasitóides / pupa emergiram dos espécimens prévia e diretamente armazenados em freezer (-20ºC. Observou-se um acentuado decréscimo do desempenho reprodutivo dos microhimenópteros que exploraram os substratos previamente submetidos ao NL durante um, três e 15 minutos (: 6,1; 5,5 e 5,7, respectivamente. A dissecação das pupas hospedeiras revelou um expressivo número de pteromalídeos imaturos, nas amostras que foram expostas ao NL, e de adultos faratos, em todos os tratamentosThe reproductive performance of Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae was evaluated on pupae of Chrysomya megacephala Fabricius (Diptera: Calliphoridae kept at -20ºC, during 77 days, with and no previous passage for liquid nitrogen (NL by one, three and 15 minutes. Control groups were characterized for fresh pupae hosts. There was one pupa for each parasitoid. The sample of fresh pupae exhibited average of 15 emergent parasitoids / pupa while pupae stored directly at freezer (-20ºC presented an average of 10 emergent parasitoids / pupa. In the samples exposed at one, three and 15 minutes in NL, accentuated decrease was observed on emergent hymenopterans reproductive performance (: 6.1; 5.5 and 5.7 respectively. The dissection of pupae revealed a large number of immature pteromalid in the groups with liquid nitrogen passage and farate adults in

  4. Desempenho do parasitóide Nasonia vitripennis (Walker(Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae utilizando como hospedeiro Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius (Diptera, Calliphoridae, sob diferentes tempos de exposição Performance of the parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae using as host Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius (Diptera, Calliphoridae under different exposition times

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    Leandro Silva Barbosa

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Desempenho do parasitóide Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae utilizando como hospedeiro Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius (Diptera, Calliphoridae, sob diferentes tempos de exposição. Foram estudados o desenvolvimento pós-embrionário, a produtividade da pupa hospedeira, a taxa de parasitismo e a razão sexual de Nasonia vitripennis (Walker criadas em pupas hospedeiras de Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius. Analisaram-se diferentes tempos de exposição: 24, 48, 72 e 96 horas. Fêmeas nulíparas foram individualizadas em tubos de ensaio contendo as pupas hospedeiras e tampados com algodão hidrófobo. Cada tratamento foi constituído de 10 repetições. Após a exposição, os himenópteros foram descartados e as pupas hospedeiras foram mantidas individualizadas. O controle consistiu de pupas de C. macellaria não expostas ao parasitismo utilizando-se o mesmo delineamento experimental. Os parasitóides apresentaram um desenvolvimento pós-embrionário mais lento com aumento do tempo de exposição. A exposição mais produtiva foi a de 72 horas. A razão sexual apresentou uma tendência ao nascimento de fêmeas após a exposição de 48 horas. A taxa de parasitismo apresentou crescimento até a exposição de 72 horas. A taxa de nascimento de dípteros também apresentou queda até o tempo de exposição de 72 horas.The post-embryonic development, the productivity of the host pupae, the rate of parasitism and the sex ratio of Nasonia vitripennis reared in pupae of Cochliomyia macellaria were studied. Different exposition times were used: 24, 48, 72, 96 hours. Nulliparous females originating from the stock colony were individualized in test tubes covered with hydrophobic cotton and containing the host pupae. Each treatment was constituted by 10 replicates. After exposition, the hymenopterans were discarded and the host pupae were individualized in test tubes until the emergency of the adults of C. macellaria or N

  5. Durations of immature stage development period of Nasonia vitripennis (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) under laboratory conditions: implications for forensic entomology.

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    Mello, Renata da Silva; Aguiar-Coelho, Valéria M

    2009-01-01

    Some microhymenopterans are parasitoids of flies of forensic importance. Their parasitic habit can alter the duration of post-embryonic development of these flies, altering the postmortem interval. In order to analyze possible alterations occurring during the immature development period of Nasonia vitripennis, this study tested different quantitative associations between female parasitoids and pupae of Chrysomya megacephala, which were defined by: (a) one pupa was exposed to different numbers of female parasitoids (1:1, 1:3, 1:5, 1:7, 1:9, 1:11) and (b) different numbers of pupae were exposed to one female parasitoid (1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 5:1). Analysis of variance (5% significance level) and Tukey's honestly significant difference tests were used for statistical analysis. There was a tendency of prolongation of the duration of parasitoid development, both by increasing the number of female parasitoids and by increasing the number of hosts in the associations. By increasing the number of female parasitoids per host, there is a possibility of increasing the occurrence of superparasitism, leading to competition for food source, then prolonging the duration of the immature development period. Increasing the number of hosts in the associations, females may distribute their postures among the available pupae and can cause reduction of the number of eggs per host. Since these insects are gregarious, the reduction of the number of eggs may delay the offspring development.

  6. Morphology and Ultrastructure of Brain Tissue and Fat Body from the Flesh Fly, Sarcophaga bullata Parker (Diptera: Sarcophagidae, Envenomated by the Ectoparasitic Wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae

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    David B. Rivers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study tested the hypothesis that venom from the ectoparasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis targets brain tissue and fat body from its flesh fly host, Sarcophaga bullata. By 1 h postenvenomation, some brain neurons began to show irregularities in nuclear shape, and though they were predominately euchromatic, there was evidence of heterochromatin formation. Irregularity in the nuclear envelope became more prominent by 3 h after envenomation, as did the condensation of heterochromatin. The severity of ultrastructural changes continued to increase until at least 24 h after parasitoid attack. At this point, cellular swelling and extensive heterochromatic inclusions were evident, multivesicular bodies occurred in the cytoplasm of some cells, and the rough endoplasmic reticulum was dilated in many of the cells. Immunohistochemical staining revealed significant apoptosis in neurons located in brain tissues. By contrast, there was no evidence of any morphological or ultrastructural disturbances in fat body tissues up to 24 h after envenomation, nor did any of the cells display signs of cell death.

  7. Sex determination in the haplodiploid wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera Chalcidoidea) : A critical consideration of models and evidence

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    Beukeboom, Leo W.; Kamping, Albert; van de Zande, Louis

    Sex determining mechanisms are highly diverse. Like all Hymenoptera, the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis reproduces by haplodiploidy: males are haploid and females are diploid. Sex in Nasonia is not determined by complementary alleles at sex loci. Evidence for several alternative models is

  8. Demonstration of long-term memory in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis

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    Schurmann, D.; Sommer, C.; Schinko, A.P.B.; Greschista, M.; Smid, H.M.; Steidle, J.L.M.

    2012-01-01

    We studied the formation of protein synthesis-dependent long-term memory (LTM) in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), a parasitoid of fly pupae. Female wasps were trained in one of five different training procedures in the presence of hosts and the odour

  9. Chinese species of Pediobius Walker (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae).

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    Cao, Huan-Xi; Salle, John LA; Zhu, Chao-Dong

    2017-03-08

    The Chinese species of Pediobius Walker, 1846 are treated in this paper, resulting in 34 species, of which 5 are newly described: P. bisulcatus Cao & Zhu sp. n., P. elongatus Cao & Zhu sp. n., P.petiolapilus Cao & Zhu sp. n., P. prominentis Cao & Zhu, sp. n., and P. tortricida Cao & Zhu, sp. n. Nine species are also newly recorded from China: P. anomalus (Gahan, 1920), P. bethylicidus Kerrich, 1973, P. bruchicida (Rondani, 1872), P. cassidae Erdös, 1958, P. claviger (Thomson, 1878), P. erionotae Kerrich, 1973, P. phragmitis Bouček, 1965, P. saulius (Walker, 1839), and P. tetratomus (Thomson, 1878). Four new synonyms are proposed: P. illiberidis Liao, 1987 under P. pyrgo (Walker, 1839) syn. n., P. planiceps Sheng & Kamijo, 1992 under P. inexpectatus Kerrich, 1973 syn. n., P. sinensis Sheng & Wang, 1994 under P. facialis (Giraud, 1863) syn. n., and P. songshaominus Liao, 1987 under P. yunanensis Liao, 1987 syn. n. The species-group concept is used to compare similar species, of which eight are recognized in China including two newly recognized groups: the cassidae-group and the crassicornis-group. One species complex, the P. eubius complex, is also recognized. An updated checklist of the Chinese species of Pediobius is provided, with species-group placement. New host records for Pediobius species from China are summarized in a table and valid species possibly present in China but not included in this study in another table. A key to all known females and males of Chinese Pediobius is also provided.

  10. A genome-wide identification and classification of basic helix-loop-helix genes in the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

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    Liu, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Yong; Wang, Xu-Hua; Tao, Xia-Fang; Yao, Qin; Chen, Ke-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) proteins are highly conserved DNA-binding transcription factors of a large superfamily. Animal bHLH proteins play important regulatory roles in various developmental processes such as neurogenesis, myogenesis, heart development, and hematopoiesis. The jewel wasp (Nasonia vitripennis) is a good model organism of hymenoptera insects for studies of developmental and evolutionary genetics. In this study, we identified 48 bHLH genes in the genome of N. vitripennis. According to phylogenetic analysis, based on N. vitripennis bHLH (NvbHLH) motif sequences and structural domain distribution in their full-length protein sequences, the identified NvbHLH genes were classified into 36 bHLH families with 19, 12, 9, 1, 6, and 1 member(s) in groups A, B, C, D, E, and F, respectively. Our classification to the identified NvbHLH family members confirms GenBank annotations for 21 of the 48 NvbHLH proteins and provides useful information for further characterization and annotation of the remaining 27 NvbHLH proteins. Compared to other insect species, N. vitripennis has the lowest number of bHLH family members. No NvbHLH members have been found in the families Net, MyoRa, and PTFa, while all other insect species have at least one member in each of the families. These data constitute a solid basis for further investigations into the functions of bHLH proteins in developmental regulation of N. vitripennis.

  11. Review of the East Palaearctic and North Oriental Psyttalia Walker, with the description of three new species (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Opiinae)

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    Wu, Q.; Achterberg, van C.; Tan, J.-L.; Chen, X.-X.

    2016-01-01

    The East Palaearctic and North Oriental species of the genus Psyttalia Walker (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Opiinae) are reviewed. Three new species are described and illustrated: P. latinervis Wu & van Achterberg, sp. n. and P. majocellata Wu & van Achterberg, sp. n. from China, and P. spectabilis van

  12. Effects on microhymenopteran progeny of different host exposure periods (Chrysomya megacephala, Calliphoridae to the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae

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    Renata da Silva Mello

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available To test the assumption that exposure of the host to parasitoid for long periods could provoke superparasitism, the aim of this work was to test the consequences on the immature development time, productivity of parasitoids per pupa, sex ratio and rate of parasitism of Nasonia vitripennis bred in Chrysomya megacephala pupae. Each individual pupa was placed in a glass tube with one parasitoid female for 24, 48, 72 and 96 h period of exposure, under controlled laboratory conditions. Twenty replicates of each period were performed. ANOVA with a 5% significance level was applied. The 72 h exposure caused the immature development time to increase. The mean parasitoids emergence per pupa did not vary significantly with the time of exposure. There were a significantly higher number of females than males and a trend in sex ratio deviation towards the females in all of the treatments. An increase in the number of unviable pupae rates were observed with increased exposure time.Para testar a hipótese que longos períodos de exposição do hospedeiro ao parasitóide podem ocasionar o superparasitismo, o presente estudo teve como objetivo testar as conseqüências sobre o tempo de desenvolvimento do imaturo, a produtividade de parasitóides, razão sexual e taxa de parasitismo de Nasonia vitripennis criadas em pupas de Chrysomya megacephala. Cada pupa foi individualizada e alocada em um tudo de ensaio com uma fêmea de N. vitripennis por 24, 48, 72 ou 96 h, sob condições laboratoriais controladas. Foram realizadas 20 réplicas para cada período de exposição. ANOVA com significância de 5 % foi aplicada. A exposição de 72 h causou um aumento no tempo desenvolvimento. A média de emergência de parasitóides não variou significativamente entre os tempos de exposição. Houve um número significativamente maior de fêmeas e uma tendência ao desvio da razão sexual para fêmeas em todos os tratamentos. Foi verificado um aumento no número de pupas invi

  13. Influência do aumento do número de pupas hospedeiras de Cochliomyia macellaria (Diptera, Calliphoridae no desenvolvimento do parasitóide Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae em laboratório Influence of the increase of the number of the host pupae of Cochliomyia macellaria (Diptera, Calliphoridae in the development of the parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae in laboratory

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    Leandro S. Barbosa

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available O desenvolvimento pós-embrionário, a produtividade, a taxa de parasitismo e a razão sexual de Nasonia vitripennis (Walker, 1836 criada em pupa de Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius, 1775 foram estudados. Densidades diferentes de hospedeiro foram usadas (proporções 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4 e 1:5 com tempo de exposição de 72 horas, em cada uma delas. Fêmeas nulíparas originárias da colônia estoque foram individualizadas em tubos de teste cobertos com algodão hidrófobo e contendo as pupas hospedeiras. Cada tratamento constituiu-se de 10 repetições. Depois da exposição, as vespas foram descartadas e as pupas hospedeiras foram individualizadas em tubos de teste até a emergência dos adultos de C. macellaria ou N. vitripennis. Amostras das pupas hospedeiras não expostas ao parasitismo e recebendo o mesmo tratamento experimental foram usadas como controle. Os parasitóides mostraram um desenvolvimento mais lento em relação ao aumento da densidade de hospedeiros. Houve uma diminuição na produção de parasitóides por hospedeiro em densidades elevadas. A razão sexual tendeu para um desvio para nascimento de fêmeas com o aumento da densidade do hospedeiro. Os índices de parasitismo mostraram uma diminuição quando o parasitóide foi exposto a mais de duas pupas hospedeiras.The post-embryonic development, productivity, rate of parasitism and sexual ratio of Nasonia vitripennis (Walker, 1836 reared in pupae of Cochliomyia macellaria (Fabricius, 1775 were studied. Different densities of the host were used (proportion 1:1, 1:2, 1:3, 1:4, and 1:5 and the exposition in each one lasted 72 hours. Nulliparous females originating from the stock colony were individualized in test tubes covered with hydrophobic cotton and containing the host pupae. Each treatment was constituted by 10 repetitions. After the exposition, the wasps were discarded and the host pupae were individualized in test tubes until the emergence of the adults of C. macellaria

  14. Grapevines respond to glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) oviposition by increasing local and systemic terpenoid levels

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    Grapevines (Vitis vinifera) have been observed to respond to oviposition by glassy-winged sharpshooters [Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar)(Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)] by producing volatile compounds that attract egg parasitoids such as Gonatocerus ashmeadi Girault (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae). Recent work ...

  15. Plant water stress effects on the net dispersal rate of the insect vector Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) and movement of its egg parasitoid, Gonatocerus ashmeadi Girault (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae)

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    Homalodisca vitripennis, one of the main vectors of Xylella fastidiosa, is associated with citrus plantings in California, USA. Infested citrus orchards act as a source of vectors to adjacent vineyards where X. fastidiosa causes Pierce’s disease (PD). An analysis of the pattern and rate of movement ...

  16. Winter survival of nuisance fly parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in Canada and Denmark.

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    Floate, K D; Skovgård, H

    2004-08-01

    Independent studies were performed in Canada and in Denmark to assess the survival of parasitic wasps (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) wintering in puparia of house fly, Musca domestica Linnaeus (Diptera: Muscidae). Data in Canada were collected for Muscidifurax raptorGirault & Saunders, M. raptorellus Kogan & Legner, M. zaraptor Kogan & Legner, Nasonia vitripennis(Walker), Spalangia cameroni Perkins, Trichomalopsis sarcophagae (Gahan) and Urolepis rufipes (Ashmead) in three microsites at an outdoor cattle facility in southern Alberta. Survival was highest for N. vitripennis, T. sarcophagae and U. rufipes, ranging from near zero to c. 7%. No survival was observed for S. cameroni. Daily mean values for ambient air temperature (DMAT) averaged about -3.5 degrees C during exposure periods. Data for Denmark were collected for M. raptor, S. cameroni and U. rufipes in a dairy barn and in a swine barn. Survival of M. raptor and U. rufipes was higher than that of S. cameroni in the dairy barn (DMAT = 8.6 degrees C), with the three species having similar survival in the swine barn (DMAT = 15.4 degrees C). In both studies, parasitoids in egg stages were least likely to survive. These results identify the potential for T. sarcophagae and U. rufipes to be commercialized for use in northern climates as biocontrol agents for nuisance flies, compare directly the cold-hardiness of commercialized species (i.e. all of the above species excluding T. sarcophagae and U. rufipes), and document the importance of microsite on winter survival.

  17. Phenology of Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae in pupae of Musca domestica Linnaeus (Diptera, Muscidae under laboratory conditions

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    Dani Furtado de Araújo

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the phenology of Spalangia endius Walker in pupae of Musca domestica Linnaeus under laboratory conditions. In order to understand the developmental cycle of Spalangia endius under laboratory conditions, 360 Musca domestica pupae aged from 24 to 48 hours were exposed to 15 S. endius pairs for a period of 24 hours at 26 ± 2ºC. These pupae were kept in a BOD incubator at the same temperature, with a relative humidity of <70%, and 12 hours photophase. Fifteen hymenopteran specimens were dissected daily to evaluate their stage and development time. The phenology concluded that S. endius had a development cycle of 19 days with an incubation period of 24 hours. The development of the larvae of S. endius occurred in the subsequent eight days, during which a series of morphological alterations were observed. The pre-pupal stage occurred on the tenth day, where the movement ceased and elimination of the meconium started. The pupal stage occurred from the 11th to the 19th day, with emergence of males first, followed by female emergence approximately 24 hours later. These results allowed the evaluation of aspects of the detailed bionomics of the development of S. endius in order to record and program production of this parasitoid, thus optimizing its utilization as a biological control agent.

  18. Ocorrência de Spalangia endius Walker, 1839 (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae em pupas de Musca domestica L. e Stomoxys calcitrans L. (Diptera, Muscidae no sul do Rio Grande do Sul

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    R.K Brandão

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available It was reported the occurrence of Spalangia endius Walker, 1839 (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae as a parasitoid of pupae of Musca domestica Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera, Muscidae and Stomoxys calcitrans Linnaeus, 1758 (Diptera, Muscidae in the extreme Southern of Brazil. The collection of pupae was performed in January and February, 2008. The pupae of M. domestica and S. calcitrans were collected from bovine feces using the flotation method. The pupae were individualized in glass tubes and maintained in acclimatized chamber at 27±2ºC with relative air humidity > 70% until the emergence of the flies or the parasitoids. The referred occurrence consists in the first report to Rio Grande do Sul.

  19. Parasitoids (Hymenoptera of dipterous collected in manure chicken in south of Goias/ Parasitóides (Hymenoptera de dípteros coletados em fezes de galinha no sul de Goiás

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    Carlos Henrique Marchiori

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available This study had as objective to verify the parasitoids associated with synanthropic dipterous in manure chicken, in Itumbiara, State of Goiás, from April 2006 to March 2007. The pupae were obtained by the flotation method. They were individually placed in gelatin capsules until the emergency of the adult flies or their parasitoids. The species of parasitoids collected were: one specimen of Aphaereta sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae, two specimens of Eurytoma sp. (Eurytomidae, 26 specimens of Nasonia vitripennis (Walker, 1836 (Pteromalidae, 65 specimens of Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani, 1875 (Pteromalidae, 38 specimens of Spalangia cameroni Perkins, 1910, (Pteromalidae, um specimen of Spalangia drosophilae Ashmead, 1887, 147 specimes de Spalangia endius Walker, 1839, three specimens of Spalangia nigra Latrielle, 1805, 10 specimens of Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839, 21 specimens of Spalangia sp. And 54 specimens of Tachinaephagus zealandicus (Ashmead, 1904 (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae. The specie more frequent was S. endius with 47.7%.Este estudo teve como objetivo verificar os parasitóides associados com dípteros sinantrópicos em fezes de galinha, em Itumbiara, Estado de Goiás, de abril de 2006 a março de 2007. As pupas foram obtidas pelo método de flutuação. Elas foram individualizadas em cápsulas de gelatina até a emergência das moscas domésticas e/ou dos seus parasitóides. As espécies de parasitóides coletados foram: um espécime de Aphaereta sp. (Braconidae: Alysiinae, dois espécimes de Eurytoma sp. (Eurytomidae, 26 espécimes de Nasonia vitripennis (Walker, 1836 (Pteromalidae, 65 espécimes de Pachycrepoideus vindemmiae (Rondani, 1875 (Pteromalidae, 38 espécimes de Spalangia cameroni Perkins, 1910 (Pteromalidae, um espécime de Spalangia drosophilae Ashmead, 1887, 147 espécimes de Spalangia endius Walker, 1839, três espécimes de Spalangia nigra Latrielle, 1805, 10 espécimes de Spalangia nigroaenea Curtis, 1839, 21 esp

  20. Increase of acceptability period of Musca domestic l., 1758 (diptera: muscidae) pupae, irradiated by gamma radiation as host of the pupal parasitoid Spalangia endius, Walker, 1839 (hymenoptera: pteromalidae)

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    Itepan, Natanael M., E-mail: nmitepan@ifsp.edu.br [Instituto Federal de Sao Paulo (IFSP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil); Itepan, Sara E.D.Z., E-mail: sarazenitepan@ig.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FFCLRP/USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Filosofia Ciencias e Letras; Arthur, Valter, E-mail: arthur@cena.usp.br [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA/USP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This experiment was carried out in Biological Control of Domestic Fly 'Eduardo Hiroshi Mizumoto' Laboratory at Entomology and Acarology Department (LEA/ESALQ/USP) and in Food Irradiation and Radioentomology Laboratory (LIARE/CENA/USP). The gamma radiation source used was a Co-60 irradiator model Gammabeam-650 of the Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd. whose activity in the beginning of the experiments was 9.8x10{sup 13} Bq. (2,644 Ci). The lots of pupae of Musca domestic L., 1758 and the parasitoid Spalangia endius Walker, 1839 had been kept in acclimatized room with 25 ± 2 deg C of temperature and 70 ± 5% of relative humidity. This experiment was designed to investigate if the non-viabilization M. domestic pupae, using gamma radiation, could build up the acceptability period as host of the pupal parasitoid S. endius. At these age intervals, the dose to prevent adult emergence was 25, 220, 360 and 520 Gy respectively. The 1, 2, 3 and 4 days old pupae were irradiated (dose rate: 1,510 Gy/hr) and exposed to the parasitoid S. endius at a proportion of one female parasitoid to five housefly pupae, during different periods after the irradiation. The results allow us to conclude that irradiation increase the acceptability period of the housefly pupae by the parasitoid. The best age to irradiate the housefly pupae was one day. (author)

  1. Transcriptomics and identification of the chemoreceptor superfamily of the pupal parasitoid of the oriental fruit fly, Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The oriental fruit fly, Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel, causes serious losses to fruit production and is one of the most economically important pests in many countries, including China, Spalangia endius Walker is a pupal parasitoid of various dipteran hosts, and may be considered a potentially important ectoparasitic pupal parasitoid of B. dorsalis. However, lack of genetic information on this organism is an obstacle to understanding the mechanisms behind its interaction with this host. Analysis of the S. endius transcriptome is essential to extend the resources of genetic information on this species and, to support studies on S. endius on the host B. dorsalis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed de novo assembly RNA-seq of S. endius. We obtained nearly 10 Gbp of data using a HiSeq platform, and 36319 high-quality transcripts using Trinity software. A total of 22443 (61.79% unigenes were aligned to homologous sequences in the jewel wasp and honeybee (Apis florae protein set from public databases. A total of 10037 protein domains were identified in 7892 S. endius transcripts using HMMER3 software. We identified expression of six gustatory receptor and 21 odorant receptor genes in the sample, with only one gene having a high expression level in each family. The other genes had a low expression level, including two genes regulated by splicing. This result may be due to the wasps being kept under laboratory conditions. Additionally, a total of 3727 SSR markers were predicted, which could facilitate the identification of polymorphisms and functional genes within wasp populations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This transcriptome greatly improves our genetic understanding of S. endius and provides a large number of gene sequences for further study.

  2. Metagenomics of Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Metagenomics approach was used to identify unknown organisms which live in association with the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). Metagenomics combines molecular biology and genetics to identify, and characterize genetic material from unique biological ...

  3. Two novel proteins expressed by the venom glands of Apis mellifera and Nasonia vitripennis share an ancient C1q-like domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaf, D C; Brunain, M; Scharlaken, B; Peiren, N; Devreese, B; Ebo, D G; Stevens, W J; Desjardins, C A; Werren, J H; Jacobs, F J

    2010-02-01

    An in-depth proteomic study of previously unidentified two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis spots of honey bee (Apis mellifera, Hymenoptera) venom revealed a new protein with a C1q conserved domain (C1q-VP). BlastP searching revealed a strong identity with only two proteins from other insect species: the jewel wasp, Nasonia vitripennis (Hymenoptera), and the green pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Hemiptera). In higher organisms, C1q is the first subcomponent of the classical complement pathway and constitutes a major link between innate and acquired immunity. Expression of C1q-VP in a variety of tissues of honey bee workers and drones was demonstrated. In addition, a wide spatial and temporal pattern of expression was observed in N. vitripennis. We suggest that C1q-VP represents a new member of the emerging group of venom trace elements. Using degenerate primers the corresponding gene was found to be highly conserved in eight hymenopteran species, including species of the Aculeata and the Parasitica groups (suborder Apocrita) and even the suborder Symphyta. A preliminary test using recombinant proteins failed to demonstrate Am_C1q-VP-specific immunoglobulin E recognition by serum from patients with a documented severe bee venom allergy.

  4. Dandy-Walker Malformation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rme

    Dandy-Walker variant consist of vermian hypoplasia and cystic dilttion of the fourth ventricle without enlargement of the posterior fossa. (Figure 1). Fig. 1: Dandy-Walker malformation. Dandy-. Walker variant in a 13-year-old girl with thoracal scoliosis. Sagittal T1-weighted MRI shows agenesis of the corpus callosum and a.

  5. Sequencing and de novo assembly of the transcriptome of the glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Sekhar Nandety

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The glassy-winged sharpshooter Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, is a xylem-feeding leafhopper and important vector of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa; the causal agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. The functional complexity of the transcriptome of H. vitripennis has not been elucidated thus far. It is a necessary blueprint for an understanding of the development of H. vitripennis and for designing efficient biorational control strategies including those based on RNA interference. RESULTS: Here we elucidate and explore the transcriptome of adult H. vitripennis using high-throughput paired end deep sequencing and de novo assembly. A total of 32,803,656 paired-end reads were obtained with an average transcript length of 624 nucleotides. We assembled 32.9 Mb of the transcriptome of H. vitripennis that spanned across 47,265 loci and 52,708 transcripts. Comparison of our non-redundant database showed that 45% of the deduced proteins of H. vitripennis exhibit identity (e-value ≤1(-5 with known proteins. We assigned Gene Ontology (GO terms, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG annotations, and potential Pfam domains to each transcript isoform. In order to gain insight into the molecular basis of key regulatory genes of H. vitripennis, we characterized predicted proteins involved in the metabolism of juvenile hormone, and biogenesis of small RNAs (Dicer and Piwi sequences from the transcriptomic sequences. Analysis of transposable element sequences of H. vitripennis indicated that the genome is less expanded in comparison to many other insects with approximately 1% of the transcriptome carrying transposable elements. CONCLUSIONS: Our data significantly enhance the molecular resources available for future study and control of this economically important hemipteran. This transcriptional information not only provides a more nuanced understanding of the underlying biological and physiological mechanisms that

  6. Early memory in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmann, Daria; Kugel, Dominic; Steidle, Johannes L M

    2015-04-01

    We studied early memory in Nasonia vitripennis, a parasitoid of fly pupae and emerging model organism for ecological questions in the context of learning. After associative training consisting of one drilling experience in a host in the presence of cinnamon, females showed a preference to cinnamon for at least 24 h. To study sensitisation, wasps were trained by one drilling in a host without cinnamon. These wasps were not attracted to cinnamon immediately afterwards. Obviously, sensitisation is not involved in early memory. Wasps that were anaesthetised by CO2 directly after associative training did not react to cinnamon 30-45 min later, but after 1 and 24 h. CO2 treatment≥5 min after training did not erase the reaction to cinnamon. This indicates the existence of four early memory phases. (a) One phase<5 min after training, in which CO2 has to be applied to become effective. (b) One subsequent phase which is resistant to CO2. (c) One phase<1 h in which memory can be erased by CO2 treatment directly after training. (d) One phase 1-24 h not affected by CO2 treatment. Together with earlier data this enables us to establish a complete memory structure for N. vitripennis.

  7. Dandy-Walker malformation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Maria Silian Mandu Fonseca; Marta Wey Vieira; Sandra Regina Dantas Nascimento; Sandro Blasi Esposito

    2017-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation is characterized by complete or partial agenesis of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and enlargement of the posterior fossa with displacement...

  8. Rapid Communication. Tamarixia monesus (Walker (Hym.: Eulophidae parasitoid of Bactericera tremblayi (Wagner, 1961 (Hemiptera: Triozidae in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lotfalizadeh Hossein

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Bactericera tremblayi (Wagner, 1961 (Hemiptera: Triozidae is reported on Brassica oleracea var. capitata (Brassicaceae in northwestern Iran. Tamarixia monesus (Walker (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea, Eulophidae was reared for the first time on B. tremblayi, and compared with Tamarixia tremblayi, another parasitoid of B. tremblayi. This is a new record of T. monesus from the Middle East.

  9. Sir Gilbert Thomas Walker

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and Iceland as 'North Atlantic Oscillation' and similar oscillation in the northern. Pacific Ocean as 'North Pacific Oscillation'. These three oscillations of surface pressure playa fundamental role in the variability of the earth's climate. Walker noted a tendency of the Southern Oscillation to persist for at least one to two seasons ...

  10. Dandy Walker malformation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-10-01

    Oct 1, 2014 ... Dandy Walker Syndrome is a rare congenital malforma- tion of the central nervous system. It results ... studies have detected deletion of cerebellar genes Z1C1 and Z1C43. Incidence is 1:25,000-30,000 in ... syndrome and an emerging class of dis- eases called ciliopathies., Diagnosis is by CT scan which.

  11. Dandy Walker malformation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF. EZECHUKWU

    2014-10-01

    Oct 1, 2014 ... Abstract: We present a rare case of Dandy Walker Syndrome in a child who presents with com- plaints of frontal headache, neck pain, fever, progressive visual impairment and multiple general- ized tonic clonic seizures, inabil- ity to stand and urinary inconti- nence. Given the clinical and neuro-imaging ...

  12. Dandy-Walker malformation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Silian Mandu Fonseca

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Dandy-Walker malformation is characterized by complete or partial agenesis of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and enlargement of the posterior fossa with displacement of the lateral sinuses. This article aims to present current, anatomical, etiological, pathophysiological, syndromic and treatment aspects of this malformation.

  13. Quincke random walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradillo, Gerardo; Heintz, Aneesh; Vlahovska, Petia

    2017-11-01

    The spontaneous rotation of a sphere in an applied uniform DC electric field (Quincke effect) has been utilized to engineer self-propelled particles: if the sphere is initially resting on a surface, it rolls. The Quincke rollers have been widely used as a model system to study collective behavior in ``active'' suspensions. If the applied field is DC, an isolated Quincke roller follows a straight line trajectory. In this talk, we discuss the design of a Quincke roller that executes a random-walk-like behavior. We utilize AC field - upon reversal of the field direction a fluctuation in the axis of rotation (which is degenerate in the plane perpendicular to the field and parallel to the surface) introduces randomness in the direction of motion. The MSD of an isolated Quincke walker depends on frequency, amplitude, and waveform of the electric field. Experiment and theory are compared. We also investigate the collective behavior of Quincke walkers,the transport of inert particles in a bath of Quincke walkers, and the spontaneous motion of a drop containing Quincke active particle. supported by NSF Grant CBET 1437545.

  14. Identifying the predator complex of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae): a comparative study of the efficacy of an ELISA and PCR gut content assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Valerie; Hagler, James; Daane, Kent; de León, Jesse; Groves, Russell

    2008-10-01

    A growing number of ecologists are using molecular gut content assays to qualitatively measure predation. The two most popular gut content assays are immunoassays employing pest-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays employing pest-specific DNA. Here, we present results from the first study to simultaneously use both methods to identify predators of the glassy winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae). A total of 1,229 arthropod predators, representing 30 taxa, were collected from urban landscapes in central California and assayed first by means of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using a GWSS egg-specific mAb and then by PCR using a GWSS-specific DNA marker that amplifies a 197-base pair fragment of its cytochrome oxidase gene (subunit I). The gut content analyses revealed that GWSS remains were present in 15.5% of the predators examined, with 18% of the spiders and 11% of the insect predators testing positive. Common spider predators included members of the Salticidae, Clubionidae, Anyphaenidae, Miturgidae, and Corinnidae families. Common insect predators included lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae), praying mantis (Mantodea: Mantidae), ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), assassin bugs (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), and damsel bugs (Hemiptera: Nabidae). Comparison of the two assays indicated that they were not equally effective at detecting GWSS remains in predator guts. The advantages of combining the attributes of both types of assays to more precisely assess field predation and the pros and cons of each assay for mass-screening predators are discussed.

  15. Propagation of Homalodisca Coagulata Virus-01 via Homalodisca Vitripennis cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) is a highly vagile and polyphagous insect found throughout the southwestern United States. These insects are the predominant vectors of Xylella fastidiosa, a xylem-limited bacterium that is the causal agent of Pierce's disease (PD) of grapevin...

  16. Host plant effects on development and reproduction of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Homoptera: Cicadellidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development, survivorship, longevity, reproduction and life table parameters of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), were examined in the laboratory using three host plants, sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), Chrysanthemum morifolium L. and euonymus (Euonymus japonica Thu...

  17. (gahan) (hymenoptera : eulophidae)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Etude experimentale de quelques parametres biologiques de ceranisus femoratus (gahan) (hymenoptera : eulophidae) un nouvel ennemi naturel Pour le controle de megalurothrips sjostedti (trybom) (thysanoptera : thripidae) ravageur du niebe au benin.

  18. Fall prevention walker during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kian Sek; E, Chun Zhi; Saim, Hashim; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Khialdin, Safinaz Binti Mohd; Isa, Hazlita; Awad, M. I.; Soon, Chin Fhong

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes on the design of a walker for the prevention of falling among elderlies or patients during rehabilitation whenever they use a walker to assist them. Fall happens due to impaired balance or gait problem. The assistive device is designed by applying stability concept and an accelerometric fall detection system is included. The accelerometric fall detection system acts as an alerting device that acquires body accelerometric data and detect fall. Recorded accelerometric data could be useful for further assessment. Structural strength of the walker was verified via iterations of simulation using finite element analysis, before being fabricated. Experiments were conducted to identify the fall patterns using accelerometric data. The design process and detection of fall pattern demonstrates the design of a walker that could support the user without fail and alerts the helper, thus salvaging the users from injuries due to fall and unattended situation.

  19. Walker-Warburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schachter Harry

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Walker-Warburg Syndrome (WWS is a rare form of autosomal recessive congenital muscular dystrophy associated with brain and eye abnormalities. WWS has a worldwide distribution. The overall incidence is unknown but a survey in North-eastern Italy has reported an incidence rate of 1.2 per 100,000 live births. It is the most severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with most children dying before the age of three years. WWS presents at birth with generalized hypotonia, muscle weakness, developmental delay with mental retardation and occasional seizures. It is associated with type II cobblestone lissencephaly, hydrocephalus, cerebellar malformations, eye abnormalities and congenital muscular dystrophy characterized by hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan. Several genes have been implicated in the etiology of WWS, and others are as yet unknown. Several mutations were found in the Protein O-Mannosyltransferase 1 and 2 (POMT1 and POMT2 genes, and one mutation was found in each of the fukutin and fukutin-related protein (FKRP genes. Laboratory investigations usually show elevated creatine kinase, myopathic/dystrophic muscle pathology and altered α-dystroglycan. Antenatal diagnosis is possible in families with known mutations. Prenatal ultrasound may be helpful for diagnosis in families where the molecular defect is unknown. No specific treatment is available. Management is only supportive and preventive.

  20. Olfactory host finding, intermediate memory and its potential ecological adaptation in Nasonia vitripennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmann, Daria; Collatz, Jana; Hagenbucher, Steffen; Ruther, Joachim; Steidle, Johannes L M

    2009-03-01

    Associative learning of host-associated chemical cues was studied in Nasonia vitripennis, a parasitoid of fly pupae in nests of hole-nesting birds. When females encountered a fly pupa and performed one sequence of host recognition behaviour including drilling the ovipositor into the host in the presence of the artificial odour furfurylheptanoate (FFH), they were afterwards arrested by FFH in olfactometer experiments. The response vanished after 4 days and could be blocked after 3 days by feeding wasps with ethacrynic acid prior and after the training. This indicates the formation of an intermediate form of memory by one host experience in N. vitripennis. Interestingly, the trained wasps avoided odours that were not present during the host encounter, although naive wasps did not react to these odours. This unique behaviour probably causes wasps to focus during host searching on those chemical cues they have experienced in the host environment. Studies in nests of hole-nesting birds revealed that about 30% of all nests contained only one fly pupa, and laboratory studies showed that N. vitripennis females are able to parasitise around 100 fly pupae in their life. It is discussed that under these conditions, the formation of a non-permanent intermediate memory for host-associated odours after one host encounter is adaptive to avoid costs involved with formation and maintenance of memory for misleading cues. The demonstration of associative olfactory learning in N. vitripennis, the first parasitoid species with sequenced genome, opens the gate to study molecular mechanisms of memory formation and its ecological adaptation in parasitoids.

  1. Olfactory host finding, intermediate memory and its potential ecological adaptation in Nasonia vitripennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurmann, Daria; Collatz, Jana; Hagenbucher, Steffen; Ruther, Joachim; Steidle, Johannes L. M.

    2009-03-01

    Associative learning of host-associated chemical cues was studied in Nasonia vitripennis, a parasitoid of fly pupae in nests of hole-nesting birds. When females encountered a fly pupa and performed one sequence of host recognition behaviour including drilling the ovipositor into the host in the presence of the artificial odour furfurylheptanoate (FFH), they were afterwards arrested by FFH in olfactometer experiments. The response vanished after 4 days and could be blocked after 3 days by feeding wasps with ethacrynic acid prior and after the training. This indicates the formation of an intermediate form of memory by one host experience in N. vitripennis. Interestingly, the trained wasps avoided odours that were not present during the host encounter, although naive wasps did not react to these odours. This unique behaviour probably causes wasps to focus during host searching on those chemical cues they have experienced in the host environment. Studies in nests of hole-nesting birds revealed that about 30% of all nests contained only one fly pupa, and laboratory studies showed that N. vitripennis females are able to parasitise around 100 fly pupae in their life. It is discussed that under these conditions, the formation of a non-permanent intermediate memory for host-associated odours after one host encounter is adaptive to avoid costs involved with formation and maintenance of memory for misleading cues. The demonstration of associative olfactory learning in N. vitripennis, the first parasitoid species with sequenced genome, opens the gate to study molecular mechanisms of memory formation and its ecological adaptation in parasitoids.

  2. Discrimination of Torymus sinensis Kamijo (Hymenoptera

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kaori Yara; Yasuhisa Kunimi

    2009-01-01

      Torymus sinensis and Torymus beneficus (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) are, respectively, introduced and indigenous parasitoid wasps that attack the invasive chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in Japan...

  3. Plant water stress effects on stylet probing behaviors of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) associated with acquisition and inoculation of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, is a xylem fluid-ingesting leafhopper that transmits Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of several plant diseases in the Americas. While the role of plant water stress on the population density and dispersal of H. vitripennis has been studie...

  4. Identification of Novel and Conserved microRNAs in Homalodisca vitripennis, the Glassy-Winged Sharpshooter by Expression Profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raja Sekhar Nandety

    Full Text Available The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae, is a xylem-feeding leafhopper and an important vector of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa; the causal agent of Pierce's disease of grapevines. MicroRNAs are a class of small RNAs that play an important role in the functional development of various organisms including insects. In H. vitripennis, we identified microRNAs using high-throughput deep sequencing of adults followed by computational and manual annotation. A total of 14 novel microRNAs that are not found in the miRBase were identified from adult H. vitripennis. Conserved microRNAs were also found in our datasets. By comparison to our previously determined transcriptome sequence of H. vitripennis, we identified the potential targets of the microRNAs in the transcriptome. This microRNA profile information not only provides a more nuanced understanding of the biological and physiological mechanisms that govern gene expression in H. vitripennis, but may also lead to the identification of novel mechanisms for biorationally designed management strategies through the use of microRNAs.

  5. Intelligently Controllable Walker with Magnetorheological Fluid Brake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Takehito; Tanida, Sosuke; Tanaka, Toshimasa; Kobayashi, Keigo; Mitobe, Kazuhisa

    Caster walkers are supporting frames with casters and wheels. These tools are regularly utilized as life support tools or walking rehabilitation tools in hospitals, nursing homes and individual residences. Users of the walkers can easily move it thanks to its wheels and casters. However falling accidents often happen when it moves without users. The falling accident is very serious problem and one of leading causes of secondary injuries. In the other case, it is hard to move to desired directions if users have imbalance in their motor functions or sensory functions, e.g., hemiplegic patients. To improve safeness and operability of the walkers, we installed compact MR fluid brakes on the wheels and controlled walking speed and direction of the walker. We named this intelligently controllable walker, “i-Walker” and discussed on the control methods and experimental results in this paper. Preliminary trials for direction control of the first-generation of the i-Walker (i-Walker1) are presented. On the basis of the results, we improved the control method and hardware of the i-Walker1, and developed the second-generation (i-Walker2). System description and experimental results of the i-Walker2 are also described. The i-Walker2 has better operability and lower energy consumption than that of the i-Walker1. The line-tracing controller of the i-Walker2 well controls human motions during walking experiments on the target straight line.

  6. MUSCLE MRI SEGMENTATION USING RANDOM WALKER METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Shukelovich

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A technique of marker set construction for muscle MRI segmentation using random walker approach is introduced. The possibility of clinician’s manual labor amount reduction and random walker algorithm optimization is studied.

  7. 21 CFR 890.3825 - Mechanical walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Mechanical walker. 890.3825 Section 890.3825 Food... DEVICES PHYSICAL MEDICINE DEVICES Physical Medicine Prosthetic Devices § 890.3825 Mechanical walker. (a) Identification. A mechanical walker is a four-legged device with a metal frame intended for medical purposes to...

  8. Hymenoptera Sphecoidea Fabriciana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vecht, van der J.

    1961-01-01

    INTRODUCTION In the early years of systematic entomology Johann Christian Fabricius (1745-1808) described an enormous number of insects, including several hundreds of Hymenoptera, from various parts of the world. His descriptions are generally short and incomplete, the classification of the species

  9. Design of a candidate vibrational signal for mating disruption against the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca Vitripennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter (GWSS), Homalodisca vitripennis, is an important pest of grapevines due to its ability to transmit Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of Pierce’s disease. GWSS mating communication is based on vibrational signals; therefore, vibrational mating disruption could be an ...

  10. Culture independent survey of the microbiota of the glassy-winged sharpshooter (Homalodisca vitripennis) using 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hail, Daymon; Lauzìere, Isabelle; Dowd, Scot E; Bextine, Blake

    2011-02-01

    The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), is an invasive pest that has spread across the southern and western United States. H. vitripennis is highly polyphagous and voracious, feeding on at least 100 plant species and consuming up to 100 times its weight in xylem fluid daily. The insect is a vector of the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa (Wells), which is the causative agent of Pierce's disease in grapevines. To evaluate the microbial flora associated with H. vitripennis, total DNA extracts from hemolymph, alimentary canal excretions, and whole insect bodies were subjected to 16S rDNA pyrosequencing using the bTEFAP methodology and the resulting sequences (370-520 bp in length) were compared with a curated high quality 16S database derived from GenBank http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Species from the genera Wolbachia, Delftia (formerly Pseudomonas), Pectobacterium, Moraxella, Serratia, Bacillus, and many others were detected and a comprehensive picture of the microbiome associated with H. vitripennis was established. Some of the bacteria identified in this report are initial discoveries; providing a breadth of knowledge to the microbial flora of this insect pest can serve as a reservoir of information for developing biological control strategies. © 2011 Entomological Society of America

  11. Phenotypic fitness effects of the selfish B chromosome, paternal sex ratio (PSR) in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, Leo W.

    1994-01-01

    B chromosomes are often considered genomic parasites. Paternal sex ratio (PSR) is an extreme example of a parasitic B chromosome in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. PSR is transmitted through the sperm of carrier males and destroys the other paternal chromosomes in early fertilized eggs. PSR

  12. Deletion analysis of the selfish B chromosome, Paternal Sex Ratio (PSR), in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, Leo W.; Werren, John H.

    1993-01-01

    Paternal Sex Ratio (PSR) is a “selfish” B chromosome in the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis. It is transmitted via sperm, but causes supercondensation and destruction of the paternal chromosomes in early fertilized eggs. Because this wasp has haplodiploid sex determination, the effect of PSR is

  13. Adaptive latitudinal cline of photoperiodic diapause induction in the parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, S; van de Zande, L; Beukeboom, L W

    2013-04-01

    Living in seasonally changing environments requires adaptation to seasonal cycles. Many insects use the change in day length as a reliable cue for upcoming winter and respond to shortened photoperiod through diapause. In this study, we report the clinal variation in photoperiodic diapause induction in populations of the parasitoid wasp Nasonia vitripennis collected along a latitudinal gradient in Europe. In this species, diapause occurs in the larval stage and is maternally induced. Adult Nasonia females were exposed to different photoperiodic cycles and lifetime production of diapausing offspring was scored. Females switched to the production of diapausing offspring after exposure to a threshold number of photoperiodic cycles. A latitudinal cline was found in the proportion of diapausing offspring, the switch point for diapause induction measured as the maternal age at which the female starts to produce diapausing larvae, and the critical photoperiod for diapause induction. Populations at northern latitudes show an earlier switch point, higher proportions of diapausing individuals and longer critical photoperiods. Since the photoperiodic response was measured under the same laboratory conditions, the observed differences between populations most likely reflect genetic differences in sensitivity to photoperiodic cues, resulting from local adaptation to environmental cycles. The observed variability in diapause response combined with the availability of genomic tools for N. vitripennis represent a good opportunity to further investigate the genetic basis of this adaptive trait. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  14. COMPUTER ANALYSIS OF ELECTROMOTORIC SWIVEL WALKER MOVEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef VARGA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The first mechanical construction of swivel walker is from year 1963 and it was aimed for support movement of people with disabilities. This solution was very difficult and it was main reason for purpose of electromotoric module, which facilitates movement and reduce effort of people with disabilities. Therefore further research in this area are still provided. In this paper trajectory of swivel walker with electromotoric modules is described. To analyze the tilt and trajectory structure of the walker SolidWorks software was implemented.

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Dandy-Walker malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Walker malformation , signs and symptoms caused by abnormal brain development are present at birth or develop within the first year of life. Some children have a buildup of fluid in the brain ( ...

  16. Anatomic variants in Dandy-Walker complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcă, Maria Claudia; Kozma, Kinga; Petcheşi, CodruŢa Diana; Bembea, Marius; Pop, Ovidiu Laurean; MuŢiu, Gabriela; Coroi, Mihaela Cristiana; Jurcă, Alexandru Daniel; Dobjanschi, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Dandy-Walker complex (DWC) is a malformative association of the central nervous system. DWC includes four different types: Dandy-Walker malformation (vermis agenesis or hypoplasia, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle and a large posterior fossa); Dandy-Walker variant (vermis hypoplasia, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, normal posterior fossa); mega cysterna magna (large posterior fossa, normal vermis and fourth ventricle) and posterior fossa arachnoid cyst. We present and discuss four cases with different morphological and clinical forms of the Dandy-Walker complex. In all four cases, diagnosis was reached by incorporation of clinical (macrocephaly, seizures) and imaging [X-ray, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)] data. Two patients were diagnosed with Dandy-Walker complex, one patient was diagnosed with Dandy-Walker variant in a rare association with neurofibromatosis and one patient was diagnosed with a posterior fossa arachnoid cyst associated with left-sided Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome, congenital heart disease (coarctation of the aorta, mitral stenosis) and gastroesophageal reflux. In all forms of DWC, the clinical, radiological and functional manifestations are variable and require adequate diagnostic and therapeutic measures.

  17. QTL analysis of the photoperiodic response and clinal distribution of period alleles in Nasonia vitripennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Silvia; Salis, Lucia; Vermeulen, Cornelis J; Beukeboom, Leo W; van de Zande, Louis

    2016-10-01

    In seasonal environments, organisms synchronize their life cycle with the annual cycle of environmental factors. In many insect species, this includes a diapause response: a timed dormant stage that allows to survive harsh winter conditions. Previously, we have shown that larval diapause in the parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis is induced by the mother upon exposure to a threshold number of short photoperiods (named switch point) and diapause response follows a latitudinal cline in natural populations. Here, we present a QTL analysis using two lines derived from the extremes of this clinal distribution: a northern line from Oulu, Finland and a southern line from Corsica, France. A genomic region on chromosome 1 and one on chromosome 5 were found to be associated with photoperiodic diapause induction. Interestingly, these regions contain the putative clock genes period, cycle (chromosome 1) and cryptochrome (chromosome 5). An analysis of period polymorphisms in seven European populations showed a clinal distribution of two main haplotypes that correlate with the latitudinal cline for diapause induction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. The insect chemoreceptor superfamily of the parasitoid jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, H M; Gadau, J; Wanner, K W

    2010-02-01

    Chemoreception is important for locating food, mates and other resources in many insects, including the parasitoid jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis. In the insect chemoreceptor superfamily, Nasonia has 58 gustatory receptor (Gr) genes, of which 11 are pseudogenes, leaving 47 apparently intact proteins encoded. No carbon dioxide receptors, two candidate sugar receptors, a DmGr43a orthologue, and several additional Gr lineages were identified, including significant gene subfamily expansions related to the 10 Grs found in the honey bee Apis mellifera. Nasonia has a total of 301 odorant receptor (Or) genes, of which 76 are pseudogenes, leaving 225 apparently intact Ors. Phylogenetic comparison with the 174 honey bee Ors reveals differential gene subfamily expansion in each hymenopteran lineage, along with a few losses from each species. The only simple orthologous relationship is the expected single DmOr83b orthologue. The large number of Nasonia Ors is the result of several major subfamily expansions, including one of 55 genes. Nasonia does not have the elaborate social chemical communication of honey bees, nor the diversity of floral odours honey bees detect, however, Nasonia wasps might need to detect a diversity of odours to find potential mates and hosts or avoid harmful substances in its environment.

  19. [Dandy-Walker complex: a clinicopathologic study of 9 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-bo; Gu, Yi-qun; Sun, Xiao-fei; Wang, Ying-nan; Wang, Ai-chun

    2013-12-01

    To investigate the etiology, pathogenesis, clinicopathologic characteristics, clinical prognosis and treatment of Dandy-Walker syndrome. Nine cases of Dandy-Walker syndrome were included in the study. The autopsy findings and clinical history were evaluated along with review of the literature. The causes, pathogenetic mechanism, pathologic features and prognosis of Dandy-Walker syndrome were analyzed. Among 9 Dandy-Walker syndrome cases, six patients presented with variants of Dandy-Walker complex and 3 cases had classic Dandy-Walker malformation. In addition, 4 patients presented with combined lateral ventricle expansion and multiple malformations were seen in 7 cases. Combined umbilical cord abnormality was noted in 4 patients with variant of Dandy-Walker complex and combined placental abnormality was seen in one classic Dandy-Walker syndrome. Dandy-Walker syndrome is a rare disease. In addition to complex pathogenesis with possible genetic and environmental antigenic etiologies, placental and umbilical cord abnormality may be also related to its development.

  20. How the Venom from the Ectoparasitoid Wasp Nasonia vitripennis Exhibits Anti-Inflammatory Properties on Mammalian Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danneels, Ellen L.; Gerlo, Sarah; Heyninck, Karen; Van Craenenbroeck, Kathleen; De Bosscher, Karolien; Haegeman, Guy; de Graaf, Dirk C.

    2014-01-01

    With more than 150,000 species, parasitoids are a large group of hymenopteran insects that inject venom into and then lay their eggs in or on other insects, eventually killing the hosts. Their venoms have evolved into different mechanisms for manipulating host immunity, physiology and behavior in such a way that enhance development of the parasitoid young. The venom from the ectoparasitoid Nasonia vitripennis inhibits the immune system in its host organism in order to protect their offspring from elimination. Since the major innate immune pathways in insects, the Toll and Imd pathways, are homologous to the NF-κB pathway in mammals, we were interested in whether a similar immune suppression seen in insects could be elicited in a mammalian cell system. A well characterized NF-κB reporter gene assay in fibrosarcoma cells showed a dose-dependent inhibition of NF-κB signaling caused by the venom. In line with this NF-κB inhibitory action, N. vitripennis venom dampened the expression of IL-6, a prototypical proinflammatory cytokine, from LPS-treated macrophages. The venom also inhibited the expression of two NF-κB target genes, IκBα and A20, that act in a negative feedback loop to prevent excessive NF-κB activity. Surprisingly, we did not detect any effect of the venom on the early events in the canonical NF-κB activation pathway, leading to NF-κB nuclear translocation, which was unaltered in venom-treated cells. The MAP kinases ERK, p38 and JNK are other crucial regulators of immune responses. We observed that venom treatment did not affect p38 and ERK activation, but induced a prolonged JNK activation. In summary, our data indicate that venom from N. vitripennis inhibits NF-κB signaling in mammalian cells. We identify venom-induced up regulation of the glucocorticoid receptor-regulated GILZ as a most likely molecular mediator for this inhibition. PMID:24821138

  1. Maternal provision of transformer-2 is required for female development and embryo viability in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuverink, Elzemiek; Rensink, Anna H; Rondeel, Inge; Beukeboom, Leo W; van de Zande, Louis; Verhulst, Eveline C

    2017-11-01

    In insect sex determination a primary signal starts the genetic sex determination cascade that, in most insect orders, is subsequently transduced down the cascade by a transformer (tra) ortholog. Only a female-specifically spliced tra mRNA yields a functional TRA-protein that forms a complex with TRA2, encoded by a transformer-2 (tra2) ortholog, to act as a sex specific splicing regulator of the downstream transcription factors doublesex (dsx) and fruitless (fru). Here, we identify the tra2 ortholog of the haplodiploid parasitoid wasp N. vitripennis (Nv-tra2) and confirm its function in N. vitripennis sex determination. Knock down of Nv-tra2 by parental RNA interference (pRNAi) results in complete sex reversal of diploid offspring from female to male, indicating the requirement of Nv-tra2 for female sex determination. As Nv-tra2 pRNAi leads to frequent lethality in early developmental stages, maternal provision of Nv-tra2 transcripts is apparently also required for another, non-sex determining function during embryogenesis. In addition, lethality following Nv-tra2 pRNAi appears more pronounced in diploid than in haploid offspring. This diploid lethal effect was also observed following Nv-tra pRNAi, which served as a positive control in our experiments. As diploid embryos from fertilized eggs have a paternal chromosome set in addition to the maternal one, this suggests that either the presence of this paternal chromosome set or the dosage effect resulting from the diploid state is incompatible with the induced male development in N. vitripennis caused by either Nv-tra2 or Nv-tra pRNAi. The role of Nv-tra2 in activating the female sex determination pathway yields more insight into the sex determination mechanism of Nasonia. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  2. Hymenoptera Genome Database: integrating genome annotations in HymenopteraMine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsik, Christine G; Tayal, Aditi; Diesh, Colin M; Unni, Deepak R; Emery, Marianne L; Nguyen, Hung N; Hagen, Darren E

    2016-01-04

    We report an update of the Hymenoptera Genome Database (HGD) (http://HymenopteraGenome.org), a model organism database for insect species of the order Hymenoptera (ants, bees and wasps). HGD maintains genomic data for 9 bee species, 10 ant species and 1 wasp, including the versions of genome and annotation data sets published by the genome sequencing consortiums and those provided by NCBI. A new data-mining warehouse, HymenopteraMine, based on the InterMine data warehousing system, integrates the genome data with data from external sources and facilitates cross-species analyses based on orthology. New genome browsers and annotation tools based on JBrowse/WebApollo provide easy genome navigation, and viewing of high throughput sequence data sets and can be used for collaborative genome annotation. All of the genomes and annotation data sets are combined into a single BLAST server that allows users to select and combine sequence data sets to search. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  3. Occurrence of Eretmocerus mundus Mercet (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae parasitizing Bemisia tabaci (Genn. biotype B (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Lourenção

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The parasitism of Bemisia tabaci (Genn. biotype B nymphs on cotton plants was observed during a research on resistance of cotton genotypes to this whitefly. The experiment was set in a greenhouse at the Experimental Station of the Instituto Agronômico (IAC, in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil. Samples of the parasitized nymphs were collected and maintained in laboratory to monitor the parasitism and obtain the adult parasitoids. A total of 129 adult parasitoids were obtained, including one Encarsia inaron (Walker, 13 En. lutea (Masi, and 115 Eretmocerus mundus Mercet (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae. This is the first report of Er. mundus in Brazil.

  4. A contribution to the Encarsia and Eretmocerus (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae species from the Arasbaran biosphere reserve and vicinity, northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghahari Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The fauna of the Encarsia and Eretmocerus species (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea: Aphelinidae from Arasbaran and its vicinity (Northwestern Iran is studied in this paper. A total of 16 Encarsia species, including E. acaudaleyrodis Hayat, E. aleurochitonis (Mercet, E. aurantii (Howard, E. azimi Hayat, E. berlesei (Howard, E. citrina (Craw, E. elegans (Masi, E. elongata (Dozier, E. fasciata (Malenotti, E. formosa Gahan, E. inaron (Walker, E. lounsburyi (Berlese and Paoli, E. lutea (Masi, E. luteola Howard, E. mineoi Viggiani, E. perniciosi (Tower, and 4 Eretmocerus species (Eretmocerus cadabae Viggiani, Eretmocerus mundus Mercet, Eretmocerus nikolskajae Myartseva, Eretmocerus serius Silvestre were collected.

  5. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bilo, BM; Rueff, F; Mosbech, H; Bonifazi, F; Oude Elberink, JNG

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of diagnostic procedure is to classify a sting reaction by history, identify the underlying pathogenetic mechanism, and identify the offending insect. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy thus forms the basis for the treatment. In the central and northern Europe vespid (mainly Vespula

  6. Fermi-Walker transport and Thomas precession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastor Lambare, Justo

    2017-07-01

    An exact derivation of the Thomas precession formula is presented based on the Fermi-Walker transport equation. Given that the Thomas precession effect is not a particularly intuitive phenomenon, such that when discovered in 1925 it took by surprise even experts in relativity theory, Einstein included, an alternative perspective can be useful at an intermediate level for physics students. The existing literature linking the Thomas precession to Fermi-Walker transport use geometric algebra as mathematical tool. Here the mathematics is kept within the limits of the usual vector and tensor algebra commonly used in special relativity theory at a level appropriate for advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students.

  7. Two cases of Dandy-Walker syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Chul Koo; Chang, Kee Hyun [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-06-15

    Two cases of Dandy- Walker syndrome are reported with emphasis on CT findings. The Dandy-Walker syndrome is known to be a developmental anomaly, which is a congenital cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle due to atresia of foramen Magendie and possibly also foramen Luschka, associated with some form of vermian dysgenesis. The CT finding of one cases reveal huge cystic mass in midline of the posterior cranial fossa with small compressed cerebellar hemisphere in the lateral portion, associated with hydrocephalus. The other shows semilunar-shaped cystic mass in posterior cranial fossa with anteriorly displaced cerebellum, which communicates with apparent fourth ventricle through the vallecula. Both cases show no inferior.

  8. Digital elevation model of Walker Lake, West-Central Nevada

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Walker Lake lies within a topographically closed basin in west-central Nevada and is the terminus of the Walker River. Accurately determining the bathymetry and...

  9. Dandy Walker malformation (variant): late presentation with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We present a rare case of Dandy Walker Syndrome in a child who presents with complaints of frontal headache, neck pain, fever, progressive visual impairment and multiple generalized tonic clonic seizures, inability to stand and urinary incontinence. Given the clinical and neuro-imaging findings, the diagnosis of Dandy ...

  10. Síndrome de Dandy-walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaderson Costa da Costa

    1973-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 4 pacientes com síndrome de Dandy-Walker diagnosticada pela pneumencefalografia fracionada e ventriculografia. O tratamento e a patogenia desta malformação são discutidos com base em dados embriológicos.

  11. Psychiatric misdiagnoses in Dandy-Walker variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaettner, C; Pfaffenberger, N M; Cartes-Zumelzu, F; Hofer, A

    2015-01-01

    Cases of intellectual impairment and aberrant behavior in patients with cerebellar diseases have been described since the early nineteenth century. Here, we report on a patient suffering from Dandy-Walker variant who presented with symptoms of obsessive compulsive disorder and delusional disorder. The current findings emphasize the potential relevance of focal cerebellar lesions as organic correlates of these disorders.

  12. Three Cases of Walker Warburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adnan Ayvaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS, a rare form of congenital muscular dystrophy, is an autosomal recessive disorder affecting the brain, eye, and muscles. In this study, three WWS cases followed in the pediatric clinic of Cumhuriyet University are presented. According to our knowledge, one of our patients is the longestlived case who has been reported.

  13. Plant water stress effects on stylet probing behaviors of Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae) associated with acquisition and inoculation of the bacterium Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krugner, Rodrigo; Backus, Elaine A

    2014-02-01

    ABSTRACT The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar) (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae), is a xylem fluid-ingesting leafhopper that transmits Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al., a plant-infecting bacterium that causes several plant diseases in the Americas. Although the role of plant water stress on the population density and dispersal ofH. vitripennis has been studied, nothing is known about the effects of plant water stress on the transmission of X. fastidiosa by H. vitripennis. A laboratory study was conducted to determine the influence of plant water stress on the sharpshooter stylet probing behaviors associated with the acquisition and inoculation of X. fastidiosa. Electrical penetration graph was used to monitor H. vitripennis feeding behaviors for 20-h periods on citrus [Citrus sinensis (L.) Osbeck] and almond [Prunus dulcis (Miller) D.A. Webb] plants subjected to levels of water stress. Adult H. vitripennis successfully located xylem vessels, then performed behaviors related to the evaluation of the xylem cell and fluid, and finally ingested xylem fluid from citrus and almond plants under the tested fluid tensions ranging from -5.5 to -33.0 bars and -6.0 to -24.5 bars, respectively. In general, long and frequent feeding events associated with the acquisition and inoculation of X. fastidiosa were observed only in fully irrigated plants (i.e., >-10 bars), which suggests that even low levels of plant water stress may reduce the spread of X. fastidiosa. Results provided insights to disease epidemiology and support the hypothesis that application of regulated deficit irrigation has the potential to reduce the incidence of diseases caused by X.fastidiosa by reducing the number of vectors and by decreasing pathogen transmission efficiency.

  14. Obituary: Robert Mowbray Walker, 1929-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenherr, Neil T.

    2004-12-01

    Robert M. Walker, PhD, Professor of Physics in Arts & Sciences and a faculty fellow of the McDonnell Center for the Space Sciences, died of stomach cancer Thursday, 12 February 2004, in Brussels, Belgium. He was 75. Walker worked on the frontiers of space research for more than four decades. Robert Walker was born in Philadelphia on 6 February 1929. His mother was Dorothy Potter and he considered Roger Potter his father though he was not his biological father. His early years were spent in New York City and in upstate New York. He attended the Bronx High School of Science, earned his BS in physics from Union College and in 1954, he received his PhD in particle physics from Yale University. He subsequently joined the General Electric Laboratory in Schenectady, New York where he studied the radiation effects in solids. His work on defects in irradiated copper is still regarded as the definitive work on the topic. In the early 1960s, Walker's discovery of fossil nuclear particle tracks in minerals was instrumental to new developments in geo-chronology and cosmic ray physics. In particular, his discovery of tracks from nuclei heavier than iron opened a new frontier of cosmic ray physics. He subsequently pioneered the use of plastics to detect and count such nuclei in cosmic ray balloon flights. Beginning in 1966, when he moved to Washington University and became the first McDonnell Professor of Physics, his research interests turned more toward space physics. He was the inaugural director of the McDonnell Center, which was established in 1975 by a gift from aerospace pioneer James S. McDonnell. Walker was a member of the NASA committee that allocated samples of the first returned lunar materials, and his laboratory led the way in deciphering their record of lunar, solar system and galactic evolution. Together with Ghislaine Crozaz and other colleagues, Walker made path breaking laboratory studies of the first moon rocks revealing the history of solar radiation and

  15. Management of occupational Hymenoptera allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruëff, Franziska; Chatelain, Rene; Przybilla, Bernhard

    2011-04-01

    Certain outdoor activities show a particularly high risk for being stung by Hymenoptera species. Avoidance of such stings is preferable for preventing unwanted local or systemic sting reactions. The purpose of this review is to evaluate the current knowledge on risk factors and management of Hymenoptera venom allergy. We will specifically focus on patients with an intense occupational exposure to Hymenoptera venom. Repeated stings were found to increase the risk for subsequent severe anaphylactic sting reactions. The male preponderance for severe anaphylactic sting reactions probably reflects in part a sex-specific occupational exposure being higher in males. When selecting a specific venom for therapy, current knowledge of cross-reactivity between venoms of various species should be considered. If available, venom immunotherapy should be performed using the venom of the culprit insect. Recently, a pilot study also showed the efficacy of venom immunotherapy when treating large local reactions. If an intensely exposed patient presents with a systemic anaphylactic sting reaction, efficacy of venom immunotherapy should be demonstrated by a tolerated sting challenge before allowing this patient to return to his/her occupation. Patients with bee venom allergy and an intense exposure should be treated with an increased maintenance dose of 200 μg bee venom. Patients with a history of large local reactions should be provided with an emergency kit, which should contain oral antihistamines and corticosteroids. In patients in whom local sting reactions induce symptoms of high clinical significance, an off-label use of venom immunotherapy may be discussed.

  16. Space Walker - the Cognitive Visualization System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komarinskiy, S.; Vitkovskiy, V. V.; Gorohov, V.; Zakharevski, D.

    2008-08-01

    The data cognitive visualization system --- ``Space Walker'' is presented. The creation of program products requires the practical mastery of the entire complex of achievements in the field of mathematical statistics, theory of illegible sets, cognitive machine drawing, cognitive psychology and theory of knowledge. SW system base on the ground of possibility use already acting program software intellectual support adopted solution in task control complex system with deep a priori uncertainty.

  17. Dandy–Walker malformation: An incidental finding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadakamadla, Jyothi; Kumar, Santhosh; Mamatha, G. P.

    2010-01-01

    Dandy–Walker malformation (DWM) is a rare intracranial congenital abnormality that affects the cerebellum and some of its components; particularly cerebellar vermis, fourth ventricle and is characterized by an enlarged posterior fossa. Although there is an extensive list of signs attributed to DWM, final diagnosis is solely dependent on imaging techniques as there are no signs that are characteristic of DWM. This article reports a case with DWM who was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging. PMID:20838490

  18. Hydrocephalus in Dandy-Walker malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spennato, Pietro; Mirone, Giuseppe; Nastro, Anna; Buonocore, Maria Consiglio; Ruggiero, Claudio; Trischitta, Vincenzo; Aliberti, Ferdinando; Cinalli, Giuseppe

    2011-10-01

    Even if the first description of Dandy-Walker dates back 1887, difficulty in the establishment of correct diagnosis, especially concerning differential diagnosis with other types of posterior fossa CSF collection, still persists. Further confusion is added by the inclusion, in some classification, of different malformations with different prognosis and therapeutic strategy under the same label of "Dandy-Walker". An extensive literature review concerning embryologic, etiologic, pathogenetic, clinical and neuroradiological aspects has been performed. Therapeutic options, prognosis and intellectual outcome are also reviewed. The correct interpretation of the modern neuroradiologic techniques, including CSF flow MR imaging, may help in identifying a "real" Dandy-Walker malformation. Among therapeutical strategies, single shunting (ventriculo-peritoneal or cyst-peritoneal shunts) appears effective in the control of both ventricle and cyst size. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy may be considered an acceptable alternative, especially in older children, with the aim to reduce the shunt-related problems. Prognosis and intellectual outcome mostly depend on the presence of associated malformations, the degree of vermian malformation and the adequate control of hydrocephalus.

  19. [Dandy-Walker variant: Case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueva-Núñez, José E; Lozano-Bustillo, Alejandra; Irias-Álvarez, Merlyn S; Vásquez-Montes, Raúl F; Varela-González, Douglas M

    Dandy Walker variant is defined by a variable hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermix with or without posterior fossa increase and without tentorium elevation. describe the case of a rare disease and emphasise the need to clarify the aetiology of prenatal malformations, as well as its multidisciplinary management. A male patient, 8 years of age, with a history of Infantile Cerebral Palsy and epilepsy, who was admitted with a history of tonic-clonic seizures. He was admitted due to psycho-motor developmental delay. During his hospitalisation, he had multiple seizure episodes, controlled with anticonvulsants. A computerized tomography was performed, in which communication was observed between the cisterna magna and fourth ventricle (the latter increased in size). In addition, the cerebellar vermix showed a partial hypoplasia. All these findings were compatible with a variant of the Dandy Walker syndrome. Dandy Walker variant may be asymptomatic and the images found may not indicate them as the cause of developmental disorders, due to its association with multiple syndromes and chromosomal abnormalities. Clinical presentation and prognosis depends on the related disorders, and a multidisciplinary approach is important, because the treatment depends on the symptoms presented. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Chilena de Pediatría. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Auditory perception of a human walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, David; Campbell, Megan E J

    2014-01-01

    When one hears footsteps in the hall, one is able to instantly recognise it as a person: this is an everyday example of auditory biological motion perception. Despite the familiarity of this experience, research into this phenomenon is in its infancy compared with visual biological motion perception. Here, two experiments explored sensitivity to, and recognition of, auditory stimuli of biological and nonbiological origin. We hypothesised that the cadence of a walker gives rise to a temporal pattern of impact sounds that facilitates the recognition of human motion from auditory stimuli alone. First a series of detection tasks compared sensitivity with three carefully matched impact sounds: footsteps, a ball bouncing, and drumbeats. Unexpectedly, participants were no more sensitive to footsteps than to impact sounds of nonbiological origin. In the second experiment participants made discriminations between pairs of the same stimuli, in a series of recognition tasks in which the temporal pattern of impact sounds was manipulated to be either that of a walker or the pattern more typical of the source event (a ball bouncing or a drumbeat). Under these conditions, there was evidence that both temporal and nontemporal cues were important in recognising theses stimuli. It is proposed that the interval between footsteps, which reflects a walker's cadence, is a cue for the recognition of the sounds of a human walking.

  1. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera – Apocrita (excl. Ichneumonoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea-Dan Mitroiu

    2015-03-01

    Hymenoptera is one of the four largest orders of insects, with about 130,000 described species. In the Fauna Europaea database, ‘Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excluding Ichneumonoidea’ comprises 13 superfamilies, 52 families, 91 subfamilies, 38 tribes and 13,211 species. The paper includes a complete list of taxa dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition. As a general conclusion about the European fauna of Hymenoptera, the best known countries in terms of recorded species are those from northwestern Europe, with the least known fauna probably in the more eastern and southeastern parts of Europe.

  2. Passive random walkers and riverlike networks on growing surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Chen-Shan

    2002-08-01

    Passive random walker dynamics is introduced on a growing surface. The walker is designed to drift upward or downward and then follow specific topological features, such as hill tops or valley bottoms, of the fluctuating surface. The passive random walker can thus be used to directly explore scaling properties of otherwise somewhat hidden topological features. For example, the walker allows us to directly measure the dynamical exponent of the underlying growth dynamics. We use the Kardar-Parisi-Zhang (KPZ) -type surface growth as an example. The world lines of a set of merging passive walkers show nontrivial coalescence behaviors and display the riverlike network structures of surface ridges in space-time. In other dynamics, such as Edwards-Wilkinson growth, this does not happen. The passive random walkers in KPZ-type surface growth are closely related to the shock waves in the noiseless Burgers equation. We also briefly discuss their relations to the passive scalar dynamics in turbulence.

  3. Exploring complex networks by means of adaptive walkers

    OpenAIRE

    Prignano, Luce; Moreno, Yamir; Diaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Finding efficient algorithms to explore large networks with the aim of recovering information about their structure is an open problem. Here, we investigate this challenge by proposing a model in which random walkers with previously assigned home nodes navigate through the network during a fixed amount of time. We consider that the exploration is successful if the walker gets the information gathered back home, otherwise, no data is retrieved. Consequently, at each time step, the walkers, wit...

  4. [Differential diagnosis of Dandy-Walker syndrome different presentations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobías-González, Pablo; Gil Mira, Mar; Valero de Bernabé, Javier; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2012-08-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome is a set of abnormalities of the posterior fossa including three modalities: classic Dandy-Walker malformation, Dandy-Walker variant and mega-cisterna magna. Our objective is clarify the differential diagnosis among these entities. Descriptive and retrospective study of Dandy-Walker cases diagnosed at our Department during the last five years plus a review of the related Medical literature. Three cases of Dandy-Walker modalities are reported: one case of classic Dandy-Walker malformation, one case of Dandy-Walker variant, and one case of false Dandy-Walker. In the first two cases the patients underwent legal abortion, whereas in the last one a healthy male newborn was delivered in the week 38 of gestation. Malformations in the posterior fossa, including Dandy-Walker syndrome, are still a challenge in prenatal diagnosis. Technical developments in imaging, such as in three-dimensional sonography and magnetic resonance, allow higher resolution and multiplanar images for an easier diagnose. There is a high rate of false positive, particularly before the 18th week of gestation. It is advisable not to establish a final diagnose before that week.

  5. DNA Walker-Regulated Cancer Cell Growth Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feiran; Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Ozcelikkale, Altug; Han, Bumsoo; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2016-06-16

    We demonstrate a DNAzyme-based walker system as a controlled oligonucleotide drug AS1411 release platform for breast cancer treatment. In this system, AS1411 strands are released from fuel strands as a walker moves along its carbon nanotube track. The release rate and amount of anticancer oligonucleotides are controlled by the walker operation. With a walker system embedded within the collagen extracellular matrix, we show that this drug release system can be used for in situ cancer cell growth inhibition. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biló, B M; Rueff, F; Mosbech, H; Bonifazi, F; Oude-Elberink, J N G

    2005-11-01

    The purpose of diagnostic procedure is to classify a sting reaction by history, identify the underlying pathogenetic mechanism, and identify the offending insect. Diagnosis of Hymenoptera venom allergy thus forms the basis for the treatment. In the central and northern Europe vespid (mainly Vespula spp.) and honeybee stings are the most prevalent, whereas in the Mediterranean area stings from Polistes and Vespula are more frequent than honeybee stings; bumblebee stings are rare throughout Europe and more of an occupational hazard. Several major allergens, usually glycoproteins with a molecular weight of 10-50 kDa, have been identified in venoms of bees, vespids. and ants. The sequences and structures of the majority of venom allergens have been determined and several have been expressed in recombinant form. A particular problem in the field of cross-reactivity are specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies directed against carbohydrate epitopes, which may induce multiple positive test results (skin test, in vitro tests) of still unknown clinical significance. Venom hypersensitivity may be mediated by immunologic mechanisms (IgE-mediated or non-IgE-mediated venom allergy) but also by nonimmunologic mechanisms. Reactions to Hymenoptera stings are classified into normal local reactions, large local reactions, systemic toxic reactions, systemic anaphylactic reactions, and unusual reactions. For most venom-allergic patients an anaphylactic reaction after a sting is very traumatic event, resulting in an altered health-related quality of life. Risk factors influencing the outcome of an anaphylactic reaction include the time interval between stings, the number of stings, the severity of the preceding reaction, age, cardiovascular diseases and drug intake, insect type, elevated serum tryptase, and mastocytosis. Diagnostic tests should be carried out in all patients with a history of a systemic sting reaction to detect sensitization. They are not recommended in subjects with

  7. Variante de Dandy Walker: relato de caso = Dandy Walker variant: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan, Richard Lester et al.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: relatar o caso de um paciente com variante de Dandy Walker, chamando atenção para a importância da suspeita, investigação e manejo das repercussões clínicas. Descrição do caso: é relatado o caso de um paciente do sexo masculino, com quadro clínico e radiológico típico da Variante de Dandy Walker. Durante o pré-natal, através de ecografia obstétrica com 23 semanas e 3 dias, apresentou alterações sugestivas de Síndrome de Dandy Walker. Ao nascimento apresentou exame físico com fenda palatina, criptorquidia à direita, hexodactilia em ambos os pés. Apresentava ainda ecocardiograma com forame oval patente e persistência do canal arterial. O diagnóstico foi estabelecido através da ressonância magnética realizada após o nascimento, que evidenciava hipoplasia do vermis cerebelar, alargamento da fossa posterior e leve dilatação ventricular. Conclusões: este artigo procura caracterizar a variante de Dandy Walker, que é uma malformação congênita do sistema nervoso central e é o tipo mais comum da Síndrome de Dandy Walker. Seu fenótipo é variável, devendo-se sempre pesquisar malformações tanto intra quanto extracranianas, visto que o risco de mortalidade pós-natal aumenta quando existe esta associação. O tratamento envolve equipe multidisciplinar e o prognóstico é reservado, variando conforme o fenótipo.

  8. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera - Symphyta & Ichneumonoidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Achterberg, Kees; Taeger, Andreas; Blank, Stephan M; Zwakhals, Kees; Viitasaari, Matti; Yu, Dicky Sick Ki; de Jong, Yde

    2017-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Hymenoptera, taxonomic data from one grade (Symphyta) and one Superfamily (Ichneumonoidea), including 15 families and 10,717 species, are included. Ichneumonoidea is the largest superfamily of Hymenoptera and consisting of two extant families, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae. The costal cell of the fore wing is absent, the fore wing has at least two closed cells, the constriction between the mesosoma (thorax + first abdominal segment or propodeum) and the metasoma (remainder of abdomen) is distinct and the parasitoid larvae usually spin a silken cocoon. Also, the metasoma is ventrally partly desclerotized in the vast majority of ichneumonoids.

  9. Case Report: Trigonocephaly and Dandy walker variant in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... with Opitz trigonocephaly C syndrome (OTCS). We consider our patient as a mild form of OTCS and he needs close follow up because over time there may be a developmental delay, severe mental retardation and seizures. Keywords: Dandy walker malformation – Dandy walker variant; Craniosynostosis; Trigonocephaly ...

  10. Comparative analysis of nuclear tRNA genes of Nasonia vitripennis and other arthropods, and relationships to codon usage bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behura, S K; Stanke, M; Desjardins, C A; Werren, J H; Severson, D W

    2010-02-01

    Using bioinformatics methods, we identified a total of 221 and 199 tRNA genes in the nuclear genomes of Nasonia vitripennis and honey bee (Apis mellifera), respectively. We performed comparative analyses of Nasonia tRNA genes with honey bee and other selected insects to understand genomic distribution, sequence evolution and relationship of tRNA copy number with codon usage patterns. Many tRNA genes are located physically close to each other in the form of small clusters in the Nasonia genome. However, the number of clusters and the tRNA genes that form such clusters vary from species to species. In particular, the Ala-, Pro-, Tyr- and His-tRNA genes tend to accumulate in clusters in Nasonia but not in honey bee, whereas the bee contains a long cluster of 15 tRNA genes (of which 13 are Gln-tRNAs) that is absent in Nasonia. Though tRNA genes are highly conserved, contrasting patterns of nucleotide diversity are observed among the arm and loop regions of tRNAs between Nasonia and honey bee. Also, the sequence convergence between the reconstructed ancestral tRNAs and the present day tRNAs suggests a common ancestral origin of Nasonia and honey bee tRNAs. Furthermore, we also present evidence that the copy number of isoacceptor tRNAs (those having a different anticodon but charge the same amino acid) is correlated with codon usage patterns of highly expressed genes in Nasonia.

  11. The escape problem for mortal walkers

    CERN Document Server

    Grebenkov, D S

    2016-01-01

    We introduce and investigate the escape problem for random walkers that may eventually die, decay, bleach, or lose activity during their diffusion towards an escape or reactive region on the boundary of a confining domain. In the case of a first-order kinetics (i.e., exponentially distributed lifetimes), we study the effect of the associated death rate onto the survival probability, the exit probability, and the mean first passage time. We derive the upper and lower bounds and some approximations for these quantities. We reveal three asymptotic regimes of small, intermediate and large death rates. General estimates and asymptotics are compared to several explicit solutions for simple domains, and to numerical simulations. These results allow one to account for stochastic photobleaching of fluorescent tracers in bio-imaging, degradation of mRNA molecules in genetic translation mechanisms, or high mortality rates of spermatozoa in the fertilization process. This is also a mathematical ground for optimizing stor...

  12. Speed and exercise intensity of recreational walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murtagh, Elaine M; Boreham, Colin A G; Murphy, Marie H

    2002-10-01

    Brisk walking has been identified as an activity suited to meet American College of Sport Medicine/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendations for moderate intensity exercise (55-69% HR(max), 40-59% VO(2)R). However, little is known about whether recreational walkers self-select a pace which elicits this intensity and how they interpret the term "brisk walking." The walking speed of 82 adults was covertly observed in a public park. Fifty-nine of these participants demonstrated their interpretation of "brisk walking" and the speed was noted. Eleven of these subjects subsequently walked on a treadmill at their observed and "brisk walk" speeds. Heart rate (HR), respiratory gases, and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) were measured. Mean observed and "brisk" walking speeds were 1.56 +/- 0.17 m. s(-1) and 1.79 +/- 0.19 m x s(-1) respectively (P exercise intensities during the treadmill test (n = 11) were 59.0 +/- 13.4% VO(2max) and 67.3 +/- 11.6% HR(max) for the observed speed (1.60 + 0.24 m x s(-1)). The brisk speed (1.86 +/- 0.12 m x s(-1)) equated to 68.6 +/- 14.9% VO(2max) and 78.5 +/- 15.5% HR(max). The speed and intensity selected by this group of walkers meets current recommendations for moderate intensity exercise. Instructing individuals to "walk briskly" prompts more vigorous activity. Copyright 2002 American Health Foundation and Elsevier Science (USA)

  13. Síndrome de Dandy-walker The Dandy-Walker syndrome. Report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaderson Costa da Costa

    1973-03-01

    Full Text Available São relatados os casos de 4 pacientes com síndrome de Dandy-Walker diagnosticada pela pneumencefalografia fracionada e ventriculografia. O tratamento e a patogenia desta malformação são discutidos com base em dados embriológicos.Four cases of Dandy-Walker syndrome diagnosed through encephalography and ventriculography with air are reported. The pathogenesis of this malformation is discussed. Particularly stressed are the radiological aspects of the condition, which are considered to be pathognomonic. The roentgenological findings are quite typical, indicating the extreme dolichocephaly, thinning and bulging of the bones of the posterior cranial fossa, prominent separation of the lambdoid sutures and an abnormal position of the lateral sinuses. Ventriculography shows symmetric hydrocephalus with extremely large cyst -like formation in the posterior fossa. Surgical indications are also considered. The ventricle lateral shunt is the recommended treatment for the DandyWalker malformations which show cerebral subarachnoid agenesis by pneumoencephalography.

  14. Perceiving Direction of a Walker: Effect of Body Appearance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Ono

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Human can perceive others' walking direction accurately even with 117ms observation (Sato, et al., ECVP2008. We aimed to see whether appearance of walker's body affects the accuracy of perceiving direction of the walker. Thus, we employed three different appearances: realistic human computer-graphics body (CG-human, nonrealistic cylinder-assembled body (Cylinders, and point-light walker (Points. We made a three-dimensional model of an adult-size walker who walked at a place. CG-human stimuli were generated by rendering the model with smooth shading. We made Cylinders stimuli by replacing body parts such as arms, legs, head, and hands with cylinders. Points stimuli were made by tracking 18 positions (mostly joints of the body like biological motion. One of walkers was presented for 117, 250, 500 or 1000ms while its direction was randomly varied by 3deg steps to 21deg left or right. Observers judged whether the walker was walking toward them (hit or not (miss, and self-range was measured in terms of the standard deviation for hit distributions. The perceived self-range was narrowed with long duration, and with CG-human stimulus. It is suggested that the accuracy of perceiving walker's direction depends on body appearance, and it is higher for human-like body than nonhuman body.

  15. Human-robot interaction strategies for walker-assisted locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Cifuentes, Carlos A

    2016-01-01

    This book presents the development of a new multimodal human-robot interface for testing and validating control strategies applied to robotic walkers for assisting human mobility and gait rehabilitation. The aim is to achieve a closer interaction between the robotic device and the individual, empowering the rehabilitation potential of such devices in clinical applications. A new multimodal human-robot interface for testing and validating control strategies applied to robotic walkers for assisting human mobility and gait rehabilitation is presented. Trends and opportunities for future advances in the field of assistive locomotion via the development of hybrid solutions based on the combination of smart walkers and biomechatronic exoskeletons are also discussed. .

  16. Dandy-Walker Malformation Presenting with Psychological Manifestations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohanachandra, Yasodha Maheshi; Dahanayake, Dulangi Maneksha Amerasinghe; Wijetunge, Swarna

    2016-01-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation, which is a congenital malformation of the cerebellum, is documented in literature to be associated with psychotic symptoms, obsessive compulsive symptoms, mood symptoms, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. The pathogenesis of psychiatric symptoms in Dandy-Walker malformation is thought to be due to disruption of the corticocerebellar tracts, resulting in what is known as cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. We present a case of Dandy-Walker malformation presenting with psychiatric symptoms. This case highlights the necessity to be aware of psychiatric manifestations of cerebellar disease as it has an impact on the diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Dandy-Walker Malformation Presenting with Psychological Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasodha Maheshi Rohanachandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dandy-Walker malformation, which is a congenital malformation of the cerebellum, is documented in literature to be associated with psychotic symptoms, obsessive compulsive symptoms, mood symptoms, hyperactivity, and impulsive behavior. The pathogenesis of psychiatric symptoms in Dandy-Walker malformation is thought to be due to disruption of the corticocerebellar tracts, resulting in what is known as cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome. We present a case of Dandy-Walker malformation presenting with psychiatric symptoms. This case highlights the necessity to be aware of psychiatric manifestations of cerebellar disease as it has an impact on the diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Feeding and development of the glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, on Australian native plant species and implications for Australian biosecurity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna A Rathé

    Full Text Available In any insect invasion the presence or absence of suitable food and oviposition hosts in the invaded range is a key factor determining establishment success. The glassy-winged sharpshooter, Homalodisca vitripennis, is an important insect vector of the xylem-limited bacterial plant pathogen, Xylella fastidiosa, which causes disease in numerous host plants including food and feedstock crops, ornamentals and weeds. Both the pathogen and the vector are native to the Americas and are considered to be highly invasive. Neither has been detected in Australia. Twelve Australian native plant species present in the USA were observed over two years for suitability as H. vitripennis feeding, oviposition and nymph development hosts. Hosts providing evidence of adult or nymph presence were Leptospermum laevigatum, Acacia cowleana, Eremophila divaricata, Eucalyptus wandoo, Hakea laurina, Melaleuca laterita and Swainsona galegifolia. An oviposition-suitability field study was conducted with citrus, a favoured oviposition host, as a positive control. Citrus and L. laevigatum, A. cowleana, B. ericifolia×B. spinulosa, C. pulchella, E. divaricata, E. wandoo, H. laurina, and S. galegifolia were found to be oviposition hosts. Egg parasitism by the mymarid parasitoid Gonatocerus ashmeadi was observed on all Australian plants. A number of Australian plants that may facilitate H. vitripennis invasion have been identified and categorised as 'high risk' due to their ability to support all three life stages (egg, nymph and adult of the insect in the field (L. laevigatum, A. cowleana, E. divaricata, H. laurina, and S. galegifolia. The implications of these host status and natural enemy research findings are discussed and placed in an Australian invasion context.

  19. Shifts in metabolomic profiles of the parasitoid Nasonia vitripennis associated with elevated cold tolerance induced by the parasitoid's diapause, host diapause and host diet augmented with proline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuyan; Zhang, Lisheng; Chen, Hongyin; Koštál, Vladimir; Simek, Petr; Moos, Martin; Denlinger, David L

    2015-08-01

    The ectoparasitoid wasp, Nasonia vitripennis can enhance its cold tolerance by exploiting a maternally-induced larval diapause. A simple manipulation of the fly host diapause status and supplementation of the host diet with proline also dramatically increase cold tolerance in the parasitoid. In this study, we used a metabolomics approach to define alterations in metabolite profiles of N. vitripennis caused by diapause in the parasitoid, diapause of the host, and augmentation of the host's diet with proline. Metabolic profiles of diapausing and nondiapausing parasitoid were significantly differentiated, with pronounced distinctions in levels of multiple cryoprotectants, amino acids, and carbohydrates. The dynamic nature of diapause was underscored by a shift in the wasp's metabolomic profile as the duration of diapause increased, a feature especially evident for increased concentrations of a suite of cryoprotectants. Metabolic pathways involved in amino acid and carbohydrate metabolism were distinctly enriched during diapause in the parasitoid. Host diapause status also elicited a pronounced effect on metabolic signatures of the parasitoid, noted by higher cryoprotectants and elevated compounds derived from glycolysis. Proline supplementation of the host diet did not translate directly into elevated proline in the parasitoid but resulted in an alteration in the abundance of many other metabolites, including elevated concentrations of essential amino acids, and reduction in metabolites linked to energy utilization, lipid and amino acid metabolism. Thus, the enhanced cold tolerance of N. vitripennis associated with proline augmentation of the host diet appears to be an indirect effect caused by the metabolic perturbations associated with diet supplementation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Effects of citrus and avocado irrigation and nitrogen-form soil amendment on host selection by adult Homalodisca vitripennis (Hemiptera: Cicadellidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadel, H; Seligmann, R; Johnson, M W; Hagler, J R; Stenger, D C; Groves, R L

    2008-06-01

    Host plant water status is thought to influence dispersal of the xylophagous leafhopper Homalodisca vitripennis Germar, especially where plants are grown under high evaporative demand. Preference by adult H. vitripennis for plants grown under different water deficit and nitrogen form fertilization regimens was studied under laboratory conditions. Leafhopper abundance and ovipositional preference were studied on potted 'Washington navel' orange and 'Haas' avocado in cage choice tests, and feeding rate was estimated using excreta produced by insects confined on plants. A similar study compared responses to citrus treated with 1:1 and 26:1 ratios of fertigated nitrate-N to ammonium-N. The insects were more abundant, oviposited, and fed significantly more on surplus-irrigated plants than on plants under moderate continuous deficit irrigation except avocado feeding, which was nearly significant. Plants exposed to drought became less preferred after 3 and 7 d in avocado and citrus, respectively. Citrus xylem fluid tension at this point was estimated at 0.93 MPa. A corresponding pattern of decline in feeding rate was observed on citrus, but on avocado, feeding rate was low overall and not statistically different between treatments. No statistical differences in abundance, oviposition, or feeding were detected on citrus fertigated with 26:1 or 1:1 ratios of nitrate-N to ammonium-N. Feeding occurred diurnally on both plant species. Discussion is provided on the potential deployment of regulated deficit irrigation to manage H. vitripennis movement as part of a multitactic effort to minimize the risk of disease outbreaks from Xylella fastidiosa Wells et al. in southern California agriculture.

  1. Stalk-eyed wasps--review of a largely unnoticed group of morphologically bizarre chalcidoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae: Axima) .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Penna, Diana Carolina; Pape, Thomas; Krogmann, Lars

    2014-09-25

    Axima Walker is a small genus of Eurytomidae (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) exclusive to the Western Hemisphere. Some species are distinctive in having stalked eyes and Axima sidi, sp. n. is described as the third stalk-eyed species based on a single female from Colombia. A key to facilitate species identification of stalk-eyed Axima is included. The only species of Axima for which host biology is known is a primary parasitoid of dwarf carpenter bees of the genus Ceratina Latreille (Apidae: Xylocopinae). A hypothesis about the possible function of stalked eyes in Axima as devices to assist the escape of adult wasps from hosts enclosed in the soft pith of plant stems is proposed.

  2. Instability of Walker propagating domain wall in magnetic nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, B; Wang, X R

    2013-07-12

    The stability of the well-known Walker propagating domain wall (DW) solution of the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation is analytically investigated. Surprisingly, a propagating DW is always dressed with spin waves so that the Walker rigid-body propagating DW mode does not occur in reality. In the low field region only stern spin waves are emitted while both stern and bow waves are generated under high fields. In a high enough field, but below the Walker breakdown field, the Walker solution could be convective or absolute unstable if the transverse magnetic anisotropy is larger than a critical value, corresponding to a significant modification of the DW profile and DW propagating speed.

  3. Walker Branch Watershed Vegetation Inventory, 1967-2006, R1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains five data files, in comma-separated format (.csv), derived from the Walker Branch Watershed (WBW) vegetation inventory in eastern Tennessee....

  4. Exploring complex networks by means of adaptive walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prignano, Luce; Moreno, Yamir; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2012-12-01

    Finding efficient algorithms to explore large networks with the aim of recovering information about their structure is an open problem. Here, we investigate this challenge by proposing a model in which random walkers with previously assigned home nodes navigate through the network during a fixed amount of time. We consider that the exploration is successful if the walker gets the information gathered back home, otherwise no data are retrieved. Consequently, at each time step, the walkers, with some probability, have the choice to either go backward approaching their home or go farther away. We show that there is an optimal solution to this problem in terms of the average information retrieved and the degree of the home nodes and design an adaptive strategy based on the behavior of the random walker. Finally, we compare different strategies that emerge from the model in the context of network reconstruction. Our results could be useful for the discovery of unknown connections in large-scale networks.

  5. Walker Branch Watershed Vegetation Inventory, 1967-1997

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The original objectives of the long-term vegetation survey of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee (WBW; Curlin and Nelson 1968) was to quantify...

  6. Dandy-Walker malformation: a rare association with hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coban, Dilek; Akin, Mustafa Ali; Kurtoglu, Selim; Oktem, Suat; Yikilmaz, Ali

    2010-12-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation is characterized by cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle and an enlarged posterior cranial fossa with upward displacement of the tentorium, lateral sinuses, and torcular, with agenesis or hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis. Dandy-Walker malformation occurs in approximately the 4th week of gestation and is associated with various abnormalities involving the cardiac, skeletal, genitourinary, and gastrointestinal systems. The parathyroid gland also forms in the 3rd and 4th gestational weeks. Reported here is the case of a male infant with Dandy-Walker malformation with ventricular and atrial septal defect, unilateral renal agenesis, and hypoparathyroidism. To our knowledge, this rare association with neural crest events during the development of Dandy-Walker malformation has not been reported previously. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Dandy-Walker variant associated with bipolar affective disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingeswaran, Anand; Barathi, Deepak; Sharma, Gyaneswahr

    2009-07-01

    The Dandy-Walker malformation is a congenital brain malformation, typically involving the fourth ventricle and the cerebellum. To date, the Dandy-Walker syndrome has not been described in association with bipolar disorder type I mania, and therefore we briefly report the case of a Dandy-Walker variant associated with acute mania. A 10-year-old boy was brought by his mother to the outpatient clinic of the Department of Psychiatry of a tertiary care hospital, with symptoms of mania. The MRI brain of the patient showed a posterior fossa cystic lesion, a giant cisterna magna communicating with the fourth ventricle and mild hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, with the rest of the structures being normal and no signs of hydrocephalus. These findings showed that the patient had a Dandy-Walker variant. He responded partially to valproate and olanzepine, which controlled the acute manic symptoms in the ward.

  8. SYMMETRY AS CONCEPTUAL METAPHOR IN WALKER'S THE COLOR PURPLE

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Tapia

    2003-01-01

    The author analyzes three types of the conceptual metaphor of embodied symmetry in Alice Walker's novel, The color purple (1982). These metaphorical projections, perceived as equilibrium and its breakage in abstract phenomena, enable readers to reexamine issues of race, non-traditional families, and gender roles. The dis/equilibrium emerges in the novel's epistolary structure. Biological equilibrium breaks in incidents of rape and incest. Walker creates characters in ...

  9. A Rare Cause of Congenital Hypotonia: Walker Warburg Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Cigdem Sivrice

    2014-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive rare muscle disease which characterized by type 2 lissencephaly, cerebellar abnormalities, and congenital muscular dystrophy of the retinal abnormalities. In this article, we described a patient who born from 1st degree consanguineous marriage mother and father and admitted to our hospital suction weakness and had been diagnosed Walker- Warburg syndrome with physical examination and laboratory tests as a result of severe hypotonia, atypi...

  10. Dandy-Walker Malformation Associated with Neurocutaneous Melanosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, In Yong; Kim, Sung-Hak

    2011-01-01

    Neurocutaneous melanosis associated with Dandy-Walker malformation is a rare dysmorphogenesis that is associated with single or multiple giant pigmented cutaneous nevi and diffuse involvement of the central nervous system. In this article, we present a 2-month-old patient with neurocutaneous melanosis associated with Dandy-Walker malformation. In addition, we reviewed the literature and discussed the pathogenesis based on the preferred hypotheses. PMID:22259699

  11. ACADEMIC TRAINING (R.P. Walker)

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2002-01-01

    15, 16, 17 May LECTURE SERIES from 11.00 to 12.00 hrs - Council room, bldg. 503 on 15 May, Auditorium, bldg. 500 on 16 and 17 May Introduction to free electron lasers by R.P. Walker / Rutherford Laboratory, UK The Free-electron laser (FEL) is a source of coherent electromagnetic radiation based on a relativistic electron beam. First operated 25 years ago, the FEL has now reached a stage of maturity for operation in the infra-red region of the spectrum and several facilities provide intense FEL radiation beams for research covering a wide range of disciplines. Several projects both underway and proposed aim at pushing the minimum wavelength from its present limit around 100 nm progressively down to the 1 Angstrom region where the X-ray FEL would open up many new and exciting research possibilities. Other developments aim at increasing power levels to the 10's of kW level. In this series of lectures we give an introduction to the basic principles of FELs and their different modes of operation, and summarise the...

  12. The escape problem for mortal walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebenkov, D. S.; Rupprecht, J.-F.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce and investigate the escape problem for random walkers that may eventually die, decay, bleach, or lose activity during their diffusion towards an escape or reactive region on the boundary of a confining domain. In the case of a first-order kinetics (i.e., exponentially distributed lifetimes), we study the effect of the associated death rate onto the survival probability, the exit probability, and the mean first passage time. We derive the upper and lower bounds and some approximations for these quantities. We reveal three asymptotic regimes of small, intermediate, and large death rates. General estimates and asymptotics are compared to several explicit solutions for simple domains and to numerical simulations. These results allow one to account for stochastic photobleaching of fluorescent tracers in bio-imaging, degradation of mRNA molecules in genetic translation mechanisms, or high mortality rates of spermatozoa in the fertilization process. Our findings provide a mathematical ground for optimizing storage containers and materials to reduce the risk of leakage of dangerous chemicals or nuclear wastes.

  13. Neurodevelopment in preschool idiopathic toe-walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Casas, P; Ballestero-Pérez, R; Meneses-Monroy, A; Beneit-Montesinos, J V; Atín-Arratibel, M A; Portellano-Pérez, J A

    2017-09-01

    Idiopathic toe walking, a differential diagnosis for neurological and orthopaedic disorders, has been associated with neurodevelopmental alterations. Neurodevelopmental assessment at early ages using specific tests may improve management and follow-up of these patients. The aim of our study is to analyse the neurodevelopmental characteristics of preschool idiopathic toe-walkers (ITW) by comparing them to a control group. Our descriptive cross-sectional study compared possible risk factors, neurodevelopmental characteristics, and scores on the Child Neuropsychological Maturity Questionnaire (CUMANIN) between a group of 56 ITWs aged 3 to 6 and a control group including 40 children. The proportion of males was significantly higher in the ITW group (P=.008). The percentage of patients with a family history (P=.000) and biological risk factors during the perinatal period (P=.032) was also higher in this group. According to the parents' reports, motor coordination in ITWs was significantly poorer (59%; P=.009). ITWs scored significantly lower on CUMANIN subscales of psychomotricity (=0,001) and memory (P=.001), as well as in verbal development (P=.000), non-verbal development (P=.026), and overall development (P=.004). Foot preference was less marked in the ITW group (P=.047). The neurodevelopmental characteristics of our sample suggest that idiopathic toe walking is a marker of neurodevelopmental impairment. However, further studies are necessary to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Courtship and mating behaviour of interspecific Nasonia hybrids (Hymenoptera, Pteromalidae) : A grandfather effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, L.W.; Assem, J. van den

    2001-01-01

    Nasonia courtship behaviour includes easily quantifiable, stereotyped components. We analysed displays of N. vitripennis × N. longicornis hybrid males. Most of them performed well-organised displays that were intermediate between the parental species. However, in both reciprocal crosses, a

  15. Naamlijst van de Nederlandse bronswespen (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijswijt, M.J.

    2003-01-01

    Checklist of the chalcid wasps of the Netherlands (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea) A first list of Dutch Chalcidoidea was published by Snellen van Vollenhoven in Herklots (Snellen van Vollenhoven, 1858). This list contained 24 species of chalcids, partly synonyms of each other. In a new list (Snellen van

  16. Basophil-activation tests in hymenoptera allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dubois, Anthony E. J.; van der Heide, Sicco

    The measurement of basophil-activation markers may be useful in detecting IgIE-mediated sensitization but the relevance for application of the basophil-activation test in prediction of clinical reactivity in Hymenoptera allergy is very limited. For this reason, this test currently has no established

  17. (Apidae: Hymenoptera) pollination on yields of Cucumeropsis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The honeybees play an important role in the pollinations of many field crops. Here, we assessed the effect of the presence of honeybee colonies, A. mellifera adansonii, L. 1758 (Apidae: Hymenoptera) in the production of African melon crop, C. mannii (Naudin) (Cucurbitaceae) in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of. Congo.

  18. Clinical Characteristics of Allergy to Hymenoptera Stings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visitsunthorn, Nualanong; Kijmassuwan, Teera; Visitsunthorn, Kittipos; Pacharn, Panchama; Jirapongsananuruk, Orathai

    2017-06-13

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical characteristics of allergy to stings from the Hymenoptera order of insects in a hospital in Thailand. A descriptive retrospective analytical study was carried out in inpatients and outpatients suffering from Hymenoptera stings from 2009 to 2013 in Siriraj Hospital. Medical records of 386 patients with an allergy to Hymenoptera stings were evaluated. Anaphylaxis was more common in patients younger than 15 years, who comprised 22.3% of patients in this study. The most common sting type was from wasps (58.3%). Eighty-five percent of patients sought medical treatment less than 24 hours after being stung. A systemic reaction and anaphylaxis were found in 9.9% and 4.4% of subjects, respectively. In 17 patients with anaphylaxis, only 11 patients (64.7%) received an epinephrine (adrenaline) injection as treatment, and only 8 (47.1%) received epinephrine autoinjectors or epinephrine-prefilled syringes to prevent a possible subsequent severe reaction. Significantly more patients younger than 15 years received epinephrine for prevention of an allergic reaction than did those older than 15 years (87.5% vs 11.7%, P < 0.001). Antibiotics were given to 43.0% of patients. Anaphylaxis from Hymenoptera stings was more common in children than in adults. Only half of the patients visited the emergency room within 1 hour of being stung. Overuse of antibiotics and underuse of epinephrine were found. More information about Hymenoptera stings should be provided to the public, and the use of epinephrine should be encouraged in the case of severe reactions and anaphylaxis.

  19. Revision of Khoikhoiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sharkey

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The species of the two genera of Khoikhoiinae (Hymenoptera, Braconidae are revised. Thirteen species are recognized, of which five are new and eight were previously described: Khoikhoia anthelion Sharkey, sp. n., K. lission Mason, 1984, K. oligospilos Sharkey, sp. n., K. semiadusta Mason, 1983, K. solata Mason, 1983, K. townesi Mason, 1983, K. turneri Mason, 1984, Sania browni Sharkey, sp. n., S. capensis Mason, 1983, S. henryi Mason, 1983, S. marjoriae Mason, 1983, S. masneri Sharkey, sp. n., and S. masoni Sharkey, sp. n.. All are from the Cape Region of South Africa, and all but one species are confined to the western Cape. A dichotomous key to species is presented; links to electronic interactive keys and to distribution maps are also included. Based on phylogenetic position and morphological characters, speculations on life history are made, and it is suggested that some species may be parasitoids of wood- or stem-boring Lepidoptera. The DELTA data matrix and images for the key are available at 10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.1.ik; Intkey files are available at 10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.2.ik; Lucid files in LIF and SDD format are available at doi:10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.3.ik and doi:10.3897/zookeys.20.108.app.4.ik. Publishing of DELTA raw data will facilitate future workers to edit keys and to add newly discovered taxa.

  20. Lagarta- falsa-medideira, Pseudoplusia includens (WALKER, 1857, nova praga do maracujazeiro no Espírito Santo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lúcia Rodrigues Machado Benassi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A espécie Pseudoplusia includens (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, lagarta-falsa-medideira, ataca diversas culturas de importância econômica, causando, na maioria das vezes, prejuízos consideráveis. Foram realizados levantamentos de todas as fases de desenvolvimento do inseto, no período de abril/2009 a abril/2010, em uma cultura de maracujá-azedo, Passifora edulis f. flavicarpa, no município de Linhares-ES, após ter sido constatada sua presença na área. A lagarta foi observada durante os meses de abril a novembro/2009 e de fevereiro a abril/2010, sendo constatados surtos mais severos nos meses de junho, setembro e novembro/2009, atingindo índices de até 80% de folhas danificadas. A planta invasora Solanum americanum (maria-pretinha, associada à cultura, é também hospedeira do inseto. Como inimigos naturais da lagarta, foram constatados o parasitoide Copidosoma truncatellum (Hymenoptera: Encyrtidae e o entomopatógeno Baculovirus sp.. Este é o primeiro registro da ocorrência de P. includens na cultura de maracujá-azedo.

  1. A DNA Walker as a Fluorescence Signal Amplifier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dongfang; Vietz, Carolin; Schröder, Tim; Acuna, Guillermo; Lalkens, Birka; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2017-09-13

    Sensing nucleic acids typically involves the recognition of a specific sequence and reporting by, for example, a fluorogenic reaction yielding one activated dye molecule per detected nucleic acid. Here, we show that after binding to a DNA origami track a bound DNA target (a "DNA walker") can release the fluorescence of many molecules by acting as the catalyst of an enzymatic nicking reaction. As the walking kinetics sensitively depends on the walker sequence, the resulting brightness distribution of DNA origamis is a sequence fingerprint with single-nucleotide sensitivity. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we rationalize that the random self-avoiding walk is mainly terminated when steps to nearest neighbors are exhausted. Finally, we demonstrate that the DNA walker is also active in a plasmonic hotspot for fluorescence enhancement, indicating the potential of combining different amplification mechanisms enabled by the modularity of DNA nanotechnology.

  2. Multiple Walkers in the Wang-Landau Algorithm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, G

    2005-12-28

    The mean cost for converging an estimated density of states using the Wang-Landau algorithm is measured for the Ising and Heisenberg models. The cost increases in a power-law fashion with the number of spins, with an exponent near 3 for one-dimensional models, and closer to 2.4 for two-dimensional models. The effect of multiple, simultaneous walkers on the cost is also measured. For the one-dimensional Ising model the cost can increase with the number of walkers for large systems. For both the Ising and Heisenberg models in two-dimensions, no adverse impact on the cost is observed. Thus multiple walkers is a strategy that should scale well in a parallel computing environment for many models of magnetic materials.

  3. [Congenital generalized lipodystrophy in a patient with Dandy Walker anomaly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, Cecilia Inés; Fernández Cordero, Marisa; Escruela, Romina; Sierra, Valeria; Córdoba, Antonela; Goñi, Ignacio María; Berridi, Ricardo

    2014-10-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the unexpected association between the congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL) and Dandy Walker anomaly. We report the case of a 1-year-old infant who was hospitalized at her fourth month of life with Dandy Walker anomaly diagnosis and an increased social risk. During her hospitalization, she developed progressively: acromegaloid aspect, triangular fascia, hirsutism, lipoatrophy, muscle hypertrophy, clitoromegaly, abdominal distention, progressive hepatomegaly, and hypertriglyceridemia. This led to the clinical diagnosis of congenital generalized lipodystrophy. Importance should be given to the examination of clinical aspects as well as the interdisciplinary follow-up for proper detection of insulin resistance and diabetes, early puberty, cardiomyopathy, among others. In case of Dandy Walker anomaly, it should be checked the evolution to search intracranial hypertension signs. Due to its autosomal recessive nature, it is important to provide genetic counseling to the parents.

  4. Retinal vascular nonperfusion in siblings with Dandy-Walker variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusu, Irene; Gupta, Mrinali Patel; Patel, Samir N; Oltra, Erica; Chan, R V Paul

    2016-04-01

    We report the case of a 2-month-old girl with Dandy-Walker variant who presented with strabismus, pathologic myopia measuring -16.00 D in each eye, diffuse chorioretinal atrophy and pigment mottling in the macula of both eyes, and areas of retinal capillary nonperfusion in both eyes. The patient's brother also has Dandy-Walker variant and was found to have bilateral severe myopia, myopic fundi, tilted optic disks with peripapillary atrophy, extensive areas of white without pressure, areas of lattice degeneration, and several chronic-appearing atrophic retinal holes surrounded by pigmentation. We hypothesize that children with Dandy-Walker variant may present with refractive errors such as pathologic myopia and with diverse retinal findings, including retinal ischemia. A lower threshold for ophthalmologic examination may be considered in this population. Copyright © 2016 American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Dandy walker variant and bipolar I disorder with graphomania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can, Serdar Suleyman; Karakaş Uğurlu, Görkem; Cakmak, Selcen

    2014-07-01

    Cerebellum is known to play an important role in coordination and motor functions. In some resent studies it is also considered to be involved in modulation of mood, cognition and psychiatric disorders. Dandy Walker Malformation is a congenital malformation that is characterized by hypoplasia or aplasia of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle and enlargement of the posterior fossa. When the volume of posterior fossa is normal, the malformation is called Dandy Walker Variant. Case is a 32 year old male with a 12 year history of Bipolar I Disorder presented with manic and depresive symptoms, including dysphoric and depressive affect, anhedonia, suicidal thoughts and behaviours, thoughts of fear about future, overtalkativeness and graphomania, increased energy, irregular sleep, loss of appetite, increased immersion in projects, irritability, agressive behavior, impulsivity. Cranial Magnetic Resonance Imaging was compatible to the morphological features of Dandy Walker Variant.

  6. Dandy-Walker malformation: analysis of 19 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiou, George A; Sfakianos, George; Prodromou, Neofytos

    2010-02-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation is a congenital disorder that involves the cerebellum and fourth ventricle. Regarding treatment, there is still controversy over the optimum surgical management. In the current study, we present 19 consecutive cases of Dandy-Walker malformation diagnosed between January 1992 and January 2008 that were treated in our institute. All patients presented with hydrocephalus at the time of diagnosis and were treated surgically. Combined drainage of the ventricular system and posterior fossa cyst, using a 3-way connector was performed in 5 patients. Posterior fossa cyst drainage alone was performed in 10 patients and the remaining 4 patients were treated by ventricular drainage alone. All patients improved after treatment. Dandy-Walker malformation is a developmental abnormality of the central nervous system associated with various brain and extracranial abnormalities. Surgical treatment remains controversial, whereas prognosis varies greatly according to the severity of syndrome and associated comorbidities.

  7. [Dandy-walker syndrome and microdeletions on chromosome 7].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Can; Fu, Fang; Li, Ru; Pan, Min; Yang, Xin; Yi, Cui-xing; Li, Jian; Li, Dong-zhi

    2012-02-01

    To investigate genetic etiology of Dandy-Walker syndrome with array-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). Eight fetuses with Dandy-Walker malformations but normal karyotypes by conventional cytogenetic technique were selected. DNA samples were extracted and hybridized with Affymetrix cytogenetic 2.7 M arrays by following the manufacturer's standard protocol. The data were analyzed by special software packages. By using array-CGH technique, common deletions and duplication on chromosome 7p21.3 were identified in three cases, within which were central nervous system disease associated genes NDUFA4 and PHF14. Copy number variations (CNVs) of chromosome 7p21.3 region are associated with Dandy-Walker malformations which may be due to haploinsufficiency or overexpression of NDUFA4 and PHF14 genes.

  8. Dandy-Walker Malformation Presenting with Affective Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batmaz, Mert; Balçik, Zeynep Ezgi; Özer, Ürün; Hamurişçi Yalçin, Burcu; Özen, Şakir

    2017-09-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation is defined by enlarged posterior fossa, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and cerebellar hypoplasia. Although developmental delay and mental retardation are common in Dandy-Walker malformation cases, other comorbid psychiatric conditions have been rarely reported. There are limited numbers of case reports about comorbidity of bipolar disorder with Dandy-Walker malformation in the literature. Herein, a Dandy-Walker malformation case presenting affective symptoms is reported, and psychiatric symptoms which might be seen in this rare malformation are discussed along with diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up processes. A 27-year-old male patient, hospitalized for compulsory treatment, had been diagnosed with Dandy-Walker malformation in childhood. First complaints were attention deficiency, behavioral problems, learning difficulties; and manic and depressive episodes have occurred during follow-ups. He recently complained of decreased need for sleep, irritability, and increased speed of thought, and psychiatric examination was consistent with manic episode. Cranial computed tomography (CT) revealed bilateral ventriculomegaly, enlarged third and fourth ventricles with posterior fossa cyst, and cerebellar hypoplasia. His treatment included 30 mg/day aripiprazole, 1000 mg/day valproic acid, 200 mg/day quetiapine, 4 mg/day biperiden, and 100 mg/month paliperidone palmitate. Beside its traditional role in the regulation of coordination and motor functions, cerebellum is increasingly emphasized for its involvement in the mood regulation. Thus, as seen in Dandy-Walker malformation, cerebellar anomalies are suggested to play a role in the pathophysiology of mood disorders. Further studies are needed to better understand the relationship between mood disorders and cerebellum. Moreover, treatment options should be considered carefully in terms of resistance to treatment and potential side effects, for psychiatric disorders occurring in these

  9. A Rare Cause of Congenital Hypotonia: Walker Warburg Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Sivrice

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS is an autosomal recessive rare muscle disease which characterized by type 2 lissencephaly, cerebellar abnormalities, and congenital muscular dystrophy of the retinal abnormalities. In this article, we described a patient who born from 1st degree consanguineous marriage mother and father and admitted to our hospital suction weakness and had been diagnosed Walker- Warburg syndrome with physical examination and laboratory tests as a result of severe hypotonia, atypical facial appearance, accompanying eye and brain abnormalities are very high serum creatine phosphokinase levels and wanted to draw attention to this rare muscle disease in the differential diagnosis of hypotonic infants.

  10. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excl. Ichneumonoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitroiu, Mircea-Dan; Noyes, John; Cetkovic, Aleksandar; Nonveiller, Guido; Radchenko, Alexander; Polaszek, Andrew; Ronquist, Fredrick; Forshage, Mattias; Pagliano, Guido; Gusenleitner, Josef; Bartalucci, Mario Boni; Olmi, Massimo; Fusu, Lucian; Madl, Michael; Johnson, Norman F; Jansta, Petr; Wahis, Raymond; Soon, Villu; Rosa, Paolo; Osten, Till; Barbier, Yvan; de Jong, Yde

    2015-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Hymenoptera is one of the four largest orders of insects, with about 130,000 described species. In the Fauna Europaea database, 'Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excluding Ichneumonoidea)' comprises 13 superfamilies, 52 families, 91 subfamilies, 38 tribes and 13,211 species. The paper includes a complete list of taxa dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition. As a general conclusion about the European fauna of Hymenoptera, the best known countries in terms of recorded species are those from northwestern Europe, with the least known fauna probably in the more eastern and southeastern parts of Europe.

  11. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera – Apocrita (excl. Ichneumonoidea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyes, John; Cetkovic, Aleksandar; Nonveiller, Guido; Radchenko, Alexander; Polaszek, Andrew; Ronquist, Fredrick; Forshage, Mattias; Pagliano, Guido; Gusenleitner, Josef; Bartalucci, Mario Boni; Olmi, Massimo; Fusu, Lucian; Madl, Michael; Johnson, Norman F; Jansta, Petr; Wahis, Raymond; Soon, Villu; Rosa, Paolo; Osten, Till; Barbier, Yvan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all living European land and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at country level (up to the Urals, excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project covers about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies. This represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. Hymenoptera is one of the four largest orders of insects, with about 130,000 described species. In the Fauna Europaea database, ‘Hymenoptera - Apocrita (excluding Ichneumonoidea)’ comprises 13 superfamilies, 52 families, 91 subfamilies, 38 tribes and 13,211 species. The paper includes a complete list of taxa dealt with, the number of species in each and the name of the specialist responsible for data acquisition. As a general conclusion about the European fauna of Hymenoptera, the best known countries in terms of recorded species are those from northwestern Europe, with the least known fauna probably in the more eastern and southeastern parts of Europe. PMID:25859127

  12. Component Resolved Diagnosis in Hymenoptera Anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomsitz, D; Brockow, K

    2017-06-01

    Hymenoptera anaphylaxis is one of the leading causes of severe allergic reactions and can be fatal. Venom-specific immunotherapy (VIT) can prevent a life-threatening reaction; however, confirmation of an allergy to a Hymenoptera venom is a prerequisite before starting such a treatment. Component resolved diagnostics (CRD) have helped to better identify the responsible allergen. Many new insect venom allergens have been identified within the last few years. Commercially available recombinant allergens offer new diagnostic tools for detecting sensitivity to insect venoms. Additional added sensitivity to nearly 95% was introduced by spiking yellow jacket venom (YJV) extract with Ves v 5. The further value of CRD for sensitivity in YJV and honey bee venom (HBV) allergy is more controversially discussed. Recombinant allergens devoid of cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants often help to identify the culprit venom in patients with double sensitivity to YJV and HBV. CRD identified a group of patients with predominant Api m 10 sensitization, which may be less well protected by VIT, as some treatment extracts are lacking this allergen. The diagnostic gap of previously undetected Hymenoptera allergy has been decreased via production of recombinant allergens. Knowledge of analogies in interspecies proteins and cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants is necessary to distinguish relevant from irrelevant sensitizations.

  13. The role of walkers' needs and expectations in supporting maintenance of attendance at walking groups: a longitudinal multi-perspective study of walkers and walk group leaders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aikaterini Kassavou

    Full Text Available There is good evidence that when people's needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers' needs and walk leaders' actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research.Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders.Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers' personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers' needs.Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers' maintenance at walking groups. This should result in greater retention of walkers in walking

  14. The role of walkers' needs and expectations in supporting maintenance of attendance at walking groups: a longitudinal multi-perspective study of walkers and walk group leaders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavou, Aikaterini; Turner, Andrew; French, David P

    2015-01-01

    There is good evidence that when people's needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers' needs and walk leaders' actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research. Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a) eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b) eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders. Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers' personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers' needs. Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers' maintenance at walking groups. This should result in greater retention of walkers in walking groups, thereby

  15. Alice Walker in the Classroom: "Living by the Word." The NCTE High School Literature Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Carol

    This small book is a handy guide for bringing the work of author Alice Walker into the classroom. It includes biographical information, ideas for literature circles using Walker's short stories, sample writing lessons using Walker's poems, suggestions for teaching "The Color Purple," and a wealth of resources for further investigation of…

  16. 75 FR 35279 - Revocation of Regulations Banning Certain Baby-Walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... section G of this notice.) 2. Recent statutory changes affecting baby-walkers. The Consumer Product Safety... standard for infant walkers, based largely on the provisions of the current ASTM voluntary standard. Given... Specification for Infant Walkers (ASTM F977-07) is published by the American Society for Testing and Materials...

  17. 75 FR 24753 - The Walker Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, OH; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-05

    ... Employment and Training Administration The Walker Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, OH; Notice of Negative... TAA petition filed on behalf of workers at The Walker Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, Ohio, was based on... Walker Auto Group, Inc., Miamisburg, Ohio, supplies a service (sales and service of Pontiac automobiles...

  18. Suitability of Bactrocera dorsalis (Diptera: Tephritidae) Pupae for Spalangia endius (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang-De; Lu, Yong-Yue; Zhao, Hai-Yan

    2015-06-01

    Spalangia endius (Walker) (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is found to be one of the most important natural enemies of Bactrocera dorsalis Hendel (Diptera: Tephritidae) pupae in China. In this study, the influence of host pupal age on the preference for and suitability of the host by the parasitoid S. endius was determined using choice and nonchoice tests. S. endius females accepted the 1-7 d-old B. dorsalis pupae for oviposition, and their offspring developed successfully. However, the S. endius preferentially parasitized the 2-, 3-, and 4-d-old host pupae. The emergence rate of the adult progeny was not affected by the host pupal age, nor was the male body weight, male longevity, and sex ratio of the parasitoid offspring. However, the shortest development time of both male and female progeny and the greatest size and adult longevity of female progeny were observed in hosts that were ≤4 d old. Females emerged later and lived longer than males, and they weighed more than the males. Host mortality decreased as the age of the host increased for 1-7-d-old hosts. Our findings suggest that 2-, 3-, and 4-d-old B. dorsalis pupae would be the best host ages at which to rear S. endius for effective control in field releases. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Karyotype and meiosis studies in Oxycatantops spissus (Walker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The standard karyotype of Oxycatantops spissus (Walker) (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Acridinae) from Limbe in the South West Province of Cameroon, comprises 2n = 23 acrocentric chromosomes in the male with the XO/XX sex determining mechanism [2n = 23 (22AA+XO)]. The karyotype structure is represented by five pairs of ...

  20. Karyotype and meiosis studies in Oxycatantops spissus (Walker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RHUMSIKI

    The standard karyotype of Oxycatantops spissus (Walker) (Orthoptera: Acrididae: Acridinae) from. Limbe in the South West Province of Cameroon, comprises 2n = 23 acrocentric chromosomes in the male with the XO/XX sex determining mechanism [2n = 23 (22AA+XO)]. The karyotype structure is represented by five pairs of ...

  1. Hazard Patterns and Injury Prevention with Infant Walkers and Strollers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wishon, Phillip M.; And Others

    Mindful of the potential hazards associated with products intended for young children, this article examines pediatric accidents involving strollers and walkers. According to the latest figures available from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System of the United States (NEISS), more than 11,800 stroller injuries in 1987 were serious…

  2. A methodology to calibrate pedestrian walker models using multiple objectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Campanella, M.C.; Daamen, W.; Hoogendoorn, S.P.

    2012-01-01

    The application of walker models to simulate real situations require accuracy in several traffic situations. One strategy to obtain a generic model is to calibrate the parameters in several situations using multiple-objective functions in the optimization process. In this paper, we propose a general

  3. winged females of the cricket Gryllodes supplicans (Walker)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    other orders of insects (Jago 1985; Masaki & Walker 1987;. Roff 1990). In several of !.hese cases, including the one under discussion, the two forms were originally described in different genera. One of the mOSt imJXlrtant reasons for regarding the two fonns of G. supp/icans as one species is !.he fact !.hat winged forms ...

  4. David Walker Receives 2010 Harry H. Hess Medal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agee, Carl B.; Walker, David

    2011-01-01

    David Walker was awarded the 2010 Harry H. Hess Medal at the AGU Fall Meeting Honors Ceremony, held on 15 December 2010 in San Francisco, Calif. The medal is for “outstanding achievements in research of the constitution and evolution of Earth and other planets.”

  5. 75 FR 35265 - Safety Standard for Infant Walkers: Final Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-21

    ... demonstrated the adequacy of the stability test in the ASTM F 977-07 standard. G. Effective Date The Commission... as a voluntary standard developed by ASTM International (formerly known as the American Society for Testing and Materials), ASTM F 977-07, Standard Consumer Safety Specification for Infant Walkers, but with...

  6. Dandy-Walker malformation | Hamid | Egyptian Journal of Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dandy-Walker malformation is a rare congenital malformation and involves the cerebellum and fourth ventricle. The condition is characterized by agenesis or hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and enlargement of the posterior fossa. A large number of concomitant problems may be ...

  7. A new species of Culcua Walker (Diptera: Stratiomyidae) from Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    A new species of Culcua Walker (Diptera: Stratiomyidae), C. lingafelteri Woodley, new species, is described from northern Vietnam. It is diagnosed relative to other species using the recent revision of the genus by Rozkošný and Kozánek (2007). This is the first species of Culcua reported from Viet...

  8. Spruce aphid (Elatobium abietinum Walker) (Hemiptera: Aphididae) [Chapter XXIV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ann M. Lynch

    2014-01-01

    Elatobium abietinum Walker is a spruce-feeding aphid that in Europe is referred to as the green spruce aphid (Day et al., 1998a) (Fig. 1). However, in North America E. abietinum is known simply as the spruce aphid, while the common name "green spruce aphid" refers to a different species, Cinara fornacula Hottes (Hemiptera: Aphididae) (http://www.entsoc.org/...

  9. Bathymetry of Walker Lake, West-Central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Thomas J.; Smith, J. LaRue

    2007-01-01

    Walker Lake lies within a topographically closed basin in west-central Nevada and is the terminus of the Walker River. Much of the streamflow in the Walker River is diverted for irrigation, which has contributed to a decline in lake-surface altitude of about 150 feet and an increase in dissolved solids from 2,500 to 16,000 milligrams per liter in Walker Lake since 1882. The increase in salinity threatens the fresh-water ecosystem and survival of the Lahontan cutthroat trout, a species listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. Accurately determining the bathymetry and relations between lake-surface altitude, surface area, and storage volume are part of a study to improve the water budget for Walker Lake. This report describes the updated bathymetry of Walker Lake, a comparison of results from this study and a study by Rush in 1970, and an estimate of the 1882 lake-surface altitude. Bathymetry was measured using a single-beam echosounder coupled to a differentially-corrected global positioning system. Lake depth was subtracted from the lake-surface altitude to calculate the altitude of the lake bottom. A Lidar (light detection and ranging) survey and high resolution aerial imagery were used to create digital elevation models around Walker Lake. The altitude of the lake bottom and digital elevation models were merged together to create a single map showing land-surface altitude contours delineating areas that are currently or that were submerged by Walker Lake. Surface area and storage volume for lake-surface altitudes of 3,851.5-4,120 feet were calculated with 3-D surface-analysis software. Walker Lake is oval shaped with a north-south trending long axis. On June 28, 2005, the lake-surface altitude was 3,935.6 feet, maximum depth was 86.3 feet, and the surface area was 32,190 acres. The minimum altitude of the lake bottom from discrete point depths is 3,849.3 feet near the center of Walker Lake. The lake bottom is remarkably smooth except for mounds near

  10. Philip Glass, Scott Walker ja Sigur Ros! / Immo Mihkelson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Mihkelson, Immo, 1959-

    2007-01-01

    Pimedate Ööde 11. filmifestivali muusikafilme - Austraalia "Glass: Philipi portree 12 osas" (rež. Scott Hicks), Islandi "Sigur Ros kodus" (rež. Dean DeBois), Suurbritannia "Scott Walker: 30 Century Man" (rež. Stephen Kijak)

  11. Mapping a Memoir within Australian Landscapes: Shirley Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Moreno Álvarez

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Shirley Walker (1927, retired Senior Lecturer in English from the University of New England at Armidale, where she taught Australian Literature, decided to try her own hand at writing a memoir. The result is Roundabout at Bangalow: An Intimate Chronicle (2001, which is her account of growing up in the Northern Rivers area of New South Wales in Australia. The author has also published numerous critical articles on Australian Literature, commenting thoroughly on the work of Mary Gilmore (1865- 1962, Judith Wright (1915-2000 and Dorothy Hewett (1923-2002. Walker has also published The Ghost at the Wedding (2009 based on the life of Walker’s mother in law, a woman whose life was largely shaped by war, and who, in 1918 near the end of WW1, married a returned soldier. This biography, which was awarded the Asher Literary Prize (2009 and the Nita B Kibble Award (2010, Australia’s premier award for women’s writing, has been described as a major work of Australian literature and a major contribution to Australian history. The present article focuses on Roundabout at Bangalow: An Intimate Chronicle, where Walker narrates the complicated and, sometimes, blurred resonances of her “half-a-lifetime” memoir. This work exemplifies how Walker is deeply concerned with the unreliability of memory and the way it can exaggerate grievances or distort past perceptions, unloosing itself from historical and geographical truth and adopting first and foremost a primal function in the formation of identities.

  12. Bobble-Head Doll and Dandy-Walker Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available A female infant with macrocephaly (head circumference >95th%, hydrocephalus, and Dandy-Walker syndrome, who developed horizontal head movements of the 'no-no' type at 1 year of age, is reported from Federal University of Minas Gerais, and other centers in Brazil.

  13. Nursery Pest Management of Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) Attack ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The establishment of plantations of Milicia excelsa has been constrained by the gall-forming psyllid Phytolyma lata Walker (Scott) that causes extensive damage to young plants. We present findings of an experiment aimed at preventing Phytolyma attack on Milicia seedlings in the nursery using chemical control and ...

  14. Two new species of Psyttalia Walker (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Opiinae reared from fruit-infesting tephritid (Diptera hosts in Kenya

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Wharton

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Two species of opiine Braconidae, reared from fruit-infesting Tephritidae in Kenya, are described. Psyttalia masneri sp. n. was reared from fruits of Dracaena fragrans (L. Ker Gawl. (Liliaceae infested with Taomyia marshalli Bezzi in western Kenya. Psyttalia masneri is the only opiine braconid known to attack members of the genus Taomyia. Unusual morphological features of P. masneri and its host are detailed. Psyttalia halidayi sp. n. was reared from fruits of Lettowianthus stellatus Diels (Annonaceae infested with Ceratitis rosa Karsch in coastal Kenya. Psyttalia halidayi is morphologically similar to several described species of Psyttalia that have previously been used in the biological control of tephritid pests. Unlike these other species, P. halidayi can attack and successfully develop on C. rosa, a serious pest of cultivated fruits. A list of valid species in Psyttalia is provided, along with comments on species groups and host records.

  15. Fibreglass Total Contact Casting, Removable Cast Walkers, and Irremovable Cast Walkers to Treat Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers: A Health Technology Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Vania; Tu, Hong Anh; Wells, David; Weir, Mark; Holubowich, Corinne; Walter, Melissa

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers are a risk factor for lower leg amputation. Many experts recommend offloading with fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers as a way to treat these ulcers. Methods We completed a health technology assessment, which included an evaluation of clinical benefits and harms, value for money, and patient preferences for offloading devices. We performed a systematic literature search on August 17, 2016, to identify randomized controlled trials that compared fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers with other treatments (offloading or non-offloading) in patients with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers. We developed a decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers, and we conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. Finally, we interviewed people with diabetes who had lived experience with foot ulcers, asking them about the different offloading devices and the factors that influenced their treatment choices. Results We identified 13 randomized controlled trials. The evidence suggests that total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers are beneficial in the treatment of neuropathic, noninfected foot ulcers in patients with diabetes but without severe peripheral arterial disease. Compared to removable cast walkers, ulcer healing was improved with total contact casting (moderate quality evidence; risk difference 0.17 [95% confidence interval 0.00–0.33]) and irremovable cast walkers (low quality evidence; risk difference 0.21 [95% confidence interval 0.01–0.40]). We found no difference in ulcer healing between total contact casting and irremovable cast walkers (low quality evidence; risk difference 0.02 [95% confidence interval −0.11–0.14]). The economic analysis showed that total contact casting and irremovable

  16. Fibreglass Total Contact Casting, Removable Cast Walkers, and Irremovable Cast Walkers to Treat Diabetic Neuropathic Foot Ulcers: A Health Technology Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers are a risk factor for lower leg amputation. Many experts recommend offloading with fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers as a way to treat these ulcers. We completed a health technology assessment, which included an evaluation of clinical benefits and harms, value for money, and patient preferences for offloading devices. We performed a systematic literature search on August 17, 2016, to identify randomized controlled trials that compared fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers with other treatments (offloading or non-offloading) in patients with diabetic neuropathic foot ulcers. We developed a decision-analytic model to assess the cost-effectiveness of fibreglass total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers, and we conducted a 5-year budget impact analysis. Finally, we interviewed people with diabetes who had lived experience with foot ulcers, asking them about the different offloading devices and the factors that influenced their treatment choices. We identified 13 randomized controlled trials. The evidence suggests that total contact casting, removable cast walkers, and irremovable cast walkers are beneficial in the treatment of neuropathic, noninfected foot ulcers in patients with diabetes but without severe peripheral arterial disease. Compared to removable cast walkers, ulcer healing was improved with total contact casting (moderate quality evidence; risk difference 0.17 [95% confidence interval 0.00-0.33]) and irremovable cast walkers (low quality evidence; risk difference 0.21 [95% confidence interval 0.01-0.40]). We found no difference in ulcer healing between total contact casting and irremovable cast walkers (low quality evidence; risk difference 0.02 [95% confidence interval -0.11-0.14]). The economic analysis showed that total contact casting and irremovable cast walkers were less expensive and

  17. Revalidation of Ceresa terminalis walker and its placement in Stictocephala Stål (Hemiptera, Membracidae Revalidação de Ceresa terminalis walker e sua alocação em Stictocephala Stål (Hemiptera, Membracidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel S. de Andrade

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Ceresa terminalis Walker, 1851 is reinstated and transferred to Stictocephala Stål, 1869: Stictocephala terminalis (Walker, 1851 sp. rev., comb. nov.Ceresa terminalis Walker, 1851 é revalidada e transferida para Stictocephala Stål, 1869: Stictocephala terminalis (Walker, 1851 sp. rev., comb. nov.

  18. Reduced incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in walkers and runners.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T Williams

    Full Text Available Walking is purported to reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation by 48%, whereas jogging is purported to increase its risk by 53%, suggesting a strong anti-arrhythmic benefit of walking over running. The purpose of these analyses is to compare incident self-reported physician-diagnosed cardiac arrhythmia to baseline energy expenditure (metabolic equivalent hours per day, METhr/d from walking, running and other exercise.Proportional hazards analysis of 14,734 walkers and 32,073 runners.There were 1,060 incident cardiac arrhythmias (412 walkers, 648 runners during 6.2 years of follow-up. The risk for incident cardiac arrhythmias declined 4.4% per baseline METhr/d walked by the walkers, or running in the runners (P = 0.0001. Specifically, the risk declined 14.2% (hazard ratio: 0.858 for 1.8 to 3.6 METhr/d, 26.5% for 3.6 to 5.4 METhr/d, and 31.7% for ≥5.4 METhr/d, relative to <1.8 METhr/d. The risk reduction per METhr/d was significantly greater for walking than running (P<0.01, but only because walkers were at 34% greater risk than runners who fell below contemporary physical activity guideline recommendations; otherwise the walkers and runners had similar risks for cardiac arrhythmias. Cardiac arrhythmias were unrelated to walking and running intensity, and unrelated to marathon participation and performance.The risk for cardiac arrhythmias was similar in walkers and runners who expended comparable METhr/d during structured exercise. We found no significant risk increase for self-reported cardiac arrhythmias associated with running distance, exercise intensity, or marathon participation. Rhythm abnormalities were based on self-report, precluding definitive categorization of the nature of the rhythm disturbance. However, even if the runners' arrhythmias include sinus bradycardia due to running itself, there was no increase in arrhythmias with greater running distance.

  19. Mieren in Veluwebermen: soortenrijkdom en aanbevelingen voor beheer (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noordijk, J.; Boer, P.

    2007-01-01

    Ants in roadside verges on the Veluwe: species richness and recommendations for management (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) Highway verges in the Veluwe region contain some well developed nutrient poor plant communities, like grasslands, grey hair grass vegetation and heather vegetation. These places

  20. Bibliography of the family Braconidae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonoidea) (1964-2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghahari, H.; Yu, D.S.; Achterberg, van C.

    2006-01-01

    A bibliography of the family Braconidae/Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae is given for the period 1964-2003. It is an addition to Shenefelt's bibliography (1965), which covers the period 1785-1963. In total 10,436 references are listed.

  1. Entrevista al profesor D. Michael Walker. - Interview with Professor D. Michael Walker.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caravaca Guerrero, Consuelo Isabel

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Entrevistar a un investigador de la talla de D. Michael Walker supone hablar de un investigador reconocido a nivel nacional e internacional, uno de los mayores expertos en evolución humana de nuestros días. Nació en Colchester (Inglaterra en 1941 y tiene doble nacionalidad: británica y australiana. Actualmente es profesor emérito de la Universidad de Murcia en el Departamento de Zoología y Antropología Física de la Facultad de Biología. Pero su currículum no acaba aquí, Michael realizó tres carreras, Fisiología Animal, Medicina, y Arqueología Prehistórica, en la Universidad de Oxford. Es Doctor por esta universidad, gracias a su tesis leída sobre Paleoantropología y Prehistoria de las cuencas de los ríos Segura y Vinalopó. Nuestro entrevistado, también fue elegido Académico (Fellow –F.S.A.- en 1988 de la Society of Antiquaries of Londono SAL. Fundada en 1707, la SAL es la equivalente británica de la española Real Academia de la Historia. Es Fellow también del Real Instituto Antropológico de la Gran Bretaña (Royal Anthropological Institute of Great Britain y socio emérito de la Asociación Americana de Antropólogos Físicos (American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

  2. A checklist of Ropalidiini wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae in Indochina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Phong Huy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a basis for intensive study of the taxonomy and biogeography of Ropalidiini wasps in Indochina (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Polistinae, a checklist of Ropalidiini wasps (Hymenoptera: Vespidae is presented. A total of 57 Ropalidiini species and subspecies belonging to three genera from Indochina are listed, together with information of the type material deposited in the Natural History Collection, Ibaraki University, Japan (IUNH and the Institute of Ecology and Biological Resources (IEBR. References of their distribution in Indochina are also provided.

  3. Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) new for the fauna of Norway, Part 5

    OpenAIRE

    RIEDEL, Matthias; Hansen, Lars Ove

    2012-01-01

    The family Ichneumonidae represents a very species-rich family of parasitoid Hymenoptera. In Norway, 1583 different Ichneumonid species have been reported so far. The present survey gives distributional records for 98 additional species of the family Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) previously not known from Norway. 21 of them have hitherto not been reported from Scandinavia, including the first Palaearctic record of Syrphophilus tricinctus (Ashmead, 1902). Posted here with permission from the...

  4. Rilascio e insediamento di Torymus sinensis (Hymenoptera Torymidae) in Sardegna

    OpenAIRE

    Loru, Laura; Fois, Xenia; Fadda, Maria Leonarda; Peddes, Angelo; Pantaleoni, Roberto Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The classical biological control based on the release of the parasitoid Torymus sinensis Kamijo (Hymenoptera, Torymidae) is considered to be the only effective method of controlling Dryocosmus kuriphilus ((Hymenoptera, Cynipidae), a major pest of Castanea species worldwide. In our multi-year study, performed between 2009 and 2015, we confirm the establishment of T. sinensis in Sardinia (Italy) and its effectiveness in controlling gall wasp infestation.

  5. Developmental outcomes of Down syndrome and Dandy-Walker malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Kaitlin; Huddleston, Lillie; Olney, Pat; Wrubel, David; Visootsak, Jeannie

    2012-01-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS), or Dandy-Walker complex, is a congenital brain malformation of the posterior fossa, typically resulting in developmental delay and cognitive disability. The co-occurrence of Down syndrome (DS) and DWS is relatively uncommon; thus, its impact on developmental outcomes has not been fully elucidated. Herein, we report a case of a 37-month-old child with DS and DWS, who is functioning at the following age-equivalent: gross motor at a 9-mo level, fine motor 6 mo, expressive language 14 mo, receptive language 9 mo. As such, it is important to determine how the DWS influences developmental outcomes, and appreciate the importance of early interventional therapy. PMID:22866020

  6. Dandy-Walker syndrome with psychotic symptoms: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buonaguro, Elisabetta F; Cimmarosa, Sara; de Bartolomeis, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Here we report the case of a patient with psychotic symptoms apparently resistant to antipsychotic treatments. Since the last admission in a psychiatric division the patient was diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder type I and then referred to our Outpatients Unit of Treatment Resistant Psychosis, where she was subsequently re-diagnosed with Dandy-Walker Syndrome. The Dandy Walker Complex is a congenital brain malformation involving the fourth ventricle and the cerebellum. We investigated the cognitive impairment of the patient and found deficits prominently in executive functions. This report may add further evidence on the importance of a correct diagnosis prior to defining a patient as treatment resistant and highlights cerebellar dysfunctions that may contribute to neuropsychiatric symptoms and cognitive impairment.

  7. Dandy-Walker syndrome studied by computed tomography and pneumoencephalography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masdeu, J.C. (Hines Veterans Administration Hospital, Maywood, IL); Dobben, G.D.; Azar-Kia, B.

    1983-04-01

    Based on air studies, some authors have disputed the ability of computed tomography (CT) to diagnose posterior fossa cysts. The authors correlated the pneumoencephalographic, CT, and pathological findings in 4 patients with classic Dandy-Walker syndrome. Three cases had been misdiagnosed as retrocerebellar arachnoid cysts because the fourth ventricle was incorrectly considered normal on brow-up or erect air studies, reflecting the inability of such studies to evaluate an agenetic vermis and deficient posterior medullary velum which are characteristic of Dandy-Walker malformation. Careful correlation with autopsy findings showed that even with complete agenesis of the inferior vermis, if the slit between the cerebellar hemispheres is narrow, the fourth ventricle could be misinterpreted as normal on pneumoencephalography and sagittal CT. Radionuclide studies, a small amount of air, or metrizamide may be needed to determine whether the cyst communicates with the subarachnoid space.

  8. Coarctation of the aorta associated with Dandy–Walker variant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Lui, George K.; Shenoy, Rajesh; Taub, Cynthia C.

    2013-01-01

    This article reports a rare case of coarctation of the aorta associated with Dandy–Walker variant in a 17-year-old girl. Differential diagnoses of coarctation of the aorta and Dandy–Walker variant are extensively discussed. In addition, standard surgical treatment of coarctation as well as new approaches such as endovascular stenting are described in detail to provide therapeutic insights into her management. Although surgical or endovascular repair of coarctation results in significant improvement of systemic hypertension and is associated with better survival, cardiovascular complications are still very common. Thus, long-term follow-up after repair is required, and high-quality imaging studies such as echocardiography, CT and MRI are warranted. PMID:24396258

  9. Coarctation of the aorta associated with Dandy-Walker variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Li; Lui, George K; Shenoy, Rajesh; Taub, Cynthia C

    2013-09-01

    This article reports a rare case of coarctation of the aorta associated with Dandy-Walker variant in a 17-year-old girl. Differential diagnoses of coarctation of the aorta and Dandy-Walker variant are extensively discussed. In addition, standard surgical treatment of coarctation as well as new approaches such as endovascular stenting are described in detail to provide therapeutic insights into her management. Although surgical or endovascular repair of coarctation results in significant improvement of systemic hypertension and is associated with better survival, cardiovascular complications are still very common. Thus, long-term follow-up after repair is required, and high-quality imaging studies such as echocardiography, CT and MRI are warranted.

  10. Trigeminal neuralgia due to Dandy-Walker syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenhao; Chen, Minjie; Zhang, Weijie

    2013-07-01

    Trigeminal neuralgia (TN) is a common pain in the orofacial region. Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a congenital malformation of the cerebellar and the fourth ventricle foramina atresia. Dandy-Walker syndrome is rarely found in patients with TN. This article presents a 36-year-old man with the symptoms of typical TN. His physical examination was entirely normal. An enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was taken. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed the bilateral lateral ventricle, the fourth and third ventricle significantly enlarged with severe obstructive hydrocephalus, a huge posterior fossa cyst connected with the fourth ventricle, and hypoplastic vermis. The pain was controlled by Tegretol. The reported case suggests that DWS is an unusual cause of TN.

  11. Reduced incidence of cardiac arrhythmias in walkers and runners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Paul T; Franklin, Barry A

    2013-01-01

    Walking is purported to reduce the risk of atrial fibrillation by 48%, whereas jogging is purported to increase its risk by 53%, suggesting a strong anti-arrhythmic benefit of walking over running. The purpose of these analyses is to compare incident self-reported physician-diagnosed cardiac arrhythmia to baseline energy expenditure (metabolic equivalent hours per day, METhr/d) from walking, running and other exercise. Proportional hazards analysis of 14,734 walkers and 32,073 runners. There were 1,060 incident cardiac arrhythmias (412 walkers, 648 runners) during 6.2 years of follow-up. The risk for incident cardiac arrhythmias declined 4.4% per baseline METhr/d walked by the walkers, or running in the runners (P = 0.0001). Specifically, the risk declined 14.2% (hazard ratio: 0.858) for 1.8 to 3.6 METhr/d, 26.5% for 3.6 to 5.4 METhr/d, and 31.7% for ≥5.4 METhr/d, relative to cardiac arrhythmias. Cardiac arrhythmias were unrelated to walking and running intensity, and unrelated to marathon participation and performance. The risk for cardiac arrhythmias was similar in walkers and runners who expended comparable METhr/d during structured exercise. We found no significant risk increase for self-reported cardiac arrhythmias associated with running distance, exercise intensity, or marathon participation. Rhythm abnormalities were based on self-report, precluding definitive categorization of the nature of the rhythm disturbance. However, even if the runners' arrhythmias include sinus bradycardia due to running itself, there was no increase in arrhythmias with greater running distance.

  12. Host plants of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Plusiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Specht

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This work has the objective to catalogue the information of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, [1858] (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Plusiinae host plants. The list of plants comprehends new reports of host plants in Brazil and information from literature review around the world. It is listed 174 plants which are from 39 botanic families. The higher number of host plants of C. includens are in Asteraceae (29, Solanaceae (21, Fabaceae (18 and Lamiaceae (12.

  13. Host plants of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera, Noctuidae, Plusiinae)

    OpenAIRE

    Specht, Alexandre; Paula-Moraes, Silvana Vieira de; Sosa-Gómez,Daniel Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT This work has the objective to catalogue the information of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker, [1858]) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae: Plusiinae) host plants. The list of plants comprehends new reports of host plants in Brazil and information from literature review around the world. It is listed 174 plants which are from 39 botanic families. The higher number of host plants of C. includens are in Asteraceae (29), Solanaceae (21), Fabaceae (18) and Lamiaceae (12).

  14. Cochlear implantation in patient with Dandy-walker syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Adriana Kosma Pires; Hamerschmidt, Rogerio; Mocelin, Marcos; Rezende, Rodrigo K

    2012-07-01

     Dandy Walker Syndrome is a congenital abnormality in the central nervous system, characterized by a deficiency in the development of middle cerebelar structures, cystic dilatation of the posterior pit communicating with the fourth ventricle and upward shift of the transverse sinuses, tentorium and dyes. Among the clinical signs are occipital protuberances, a progressive increase of the skull, bowing before the fontanels, papilledema, ataxia, gait disturbances, nystagmus, and intellectual impairment.  To describe a case of female patient, 13 years old with a diagnosis of this syndrome and bilateral hearing loss underwent cochlear implant surgery under local anesthesia and sedation.  CGS, 13 years old female was referred to the Otolaryngological Department of Otolaryngology Institute of Parana with a diagnosis of "Dandy-Walker syndrome" for Otolaryngological evaluation for bilateral hearing loss with no response to the use of hearing aids. Final Comments: The field of cochlear implants is growing rapidly. We believe that the presence of Dandy-Walker syndrome cannot be considered a contraindication to the performance of cochlear implant surgery, and there were no surgical complications due to neurological disorders with very favorable results for the patient who exhibits excellent discrimination. It has less need for lip reading with improvement in speech quality.

  15. Cochlear implantation in patient with Dandy-walker syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira, Adriana Kosma Pires de

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dandy Walker Syndrome is a congenital abnormality in the central nervous system, characterized by a deficiency in the development of middle cerebelar structures, cystic dilatation of the posterior pit communicating with the fourth ventricle and upward shift of the transverse sinuses, tentorium and dyes. Among the clinical signs are occipital protuberances, a progressive increase of the skull, bowing before the fontanels, papilledema, ataxia, gait disturbances, nystagmus, and intellectual impairment. Objectives: To describe a case of female patient, 13 years old with a diagnosis of this syndrome and bilateral hearing loss underwent cochlear implant surgery under local anesthesia and sedation. Case Report: CGS, 13 years old female was referred to the Otolaryngological Department of Otolaryngology Institute of Parana with a diagnosis of "Dandy-Walker syndrome" for Otolaryngological evaluation for bilateral hearing loss with no response to the use of hearing aids. Final Comments: The field of cochlear implants is growing rapidly. We believe that the presence of Dandy-Walker syndrome cannot be considered a contraindication to the performance of cochlear implant surgery, and there were no surgical complications due to neurological disorders with very favorable results for the patient who exhibits excellent discrimination. It has less need for lip reading with improvement in speech quality.

  16. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera – Symphyta & Ichneumonoidea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kees van Achterberg

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region, and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Hymenoptera, taxonomic data from one grade (Symphyta and one Superfamily (Ichneumonoidea, including 15 families and 10,717 species, are included. Ichneumonoidea is the largest superfamily of Hymenoptera and consisting of two extant families, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae. The costal cell of the fore wing is absent, the fore wing has at least two closed cells, the constriction between the mesosoma (thorax + first abdominal segment or propodeum and the metasoma (remainder of abdomen is distinct and the parasitoid larvae usually spin a silken cocoon. Also, the metasoma is ventrally partly desclerotized in the vast majority of ichneumonoids.

  17. Fauna Europaea: Hymenoptera – Symphyta & Ichneumonoidea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taeger, Andreas; Blank, Stephan M.; Zwakhals, Kees; Viitasaari, Matti; Yu, Dicky Sick Ki

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. For the Hymenoptera, taxonomic data from one grade (Symphyta) and one Superfamily (Ichneumonoidea), including 15 families and 10,717 species, are included. Ichneumonoidea is the largest superfamily of Hymenoptera and consisting of two extant families, Ichneumonidae and Braconidae. The costal cell of the fore wing is absent, the fore wing has at least two closed cells, the constriction between the mesosoma (thorax + first abdominal segment or propodeum) and the metasoma (remainder of abdomen) is distinct and the parasitoid larvae usually spin a silken cocoon. Also, the metasoma is ventrally partly desclerotized in the vast majority of ichneumonoids. PMID:28894397

  18. Discrimination of Torymus sinensis Kamijo (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) and T. beneficus Yasumatsu et Kamijo and their hybrids by allele-specific PCR

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yara, Kaori; Kunimi, Yasuhisa

    2009-01-01

    Torymus sinensis and Torymus beneficus (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) are, respectively, introduced and indigenous parasitoid wasps that attack the invasive chestnut gall wasp, Dryocosmus kuriphilus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) in Japan...

  19. Walker-assisted gait in rehabilitation: a study of biomechanics and instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachschmidt, R A; Harris, G F; Simoneau, G G

    2001-03-01

    While walkers are commonly prescribed to improve patient stability and ambulatory ability, quantitative study of the biomechanical and functional requirements for effective walker use is limited. To date no one has addressed the changes in upper extremity kinetics that occur with the use of a standard walker, which was the objective of this study. A strain gauge-based walker instrumentation system was developed for the six degree-of-freedom measurement of resultant subject hand loads. The walker dynamometer was integrated with an upper extremity biomechanical model. Preliminary system data were collected for seven healthy, right-handed young adults following informed consent. Bilateral upper extremity kinematic data were acquired with a six camera Vicon motion analysis system using a Micro-VAX workstation. Internal joint moments at the wrist, elbow, and shoulder were determined in the three clinical planes using the inverse dynamics method. The walker dynamometer system allowed characterization of upper extremity loading demands. Significantly differing upper extremity loading patterns were identified for three walker usage methods. Complete description of upper extremity kinetics and kinematics during walker-assisted gait may provide insight into walker design parameters and rehabilitative strategies.

  20. Mechanical-Kinetic Modeling of a Molecular Walker from a Modular Design Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Ruizheng; Loh, Iong Ying; Li, Hongrong; Wang, Zhisong

    2017-02-01

    Artificial molecular walkers beyond burnt-bridge designs are complex nanomachines that potentially replicate biological walkers in mechanisms and functionalities. Improving the man-made walkers up to performance for widespread applications remains difficult, largely because their biomimetic design principles involve entangled kinetic and mechanical effects to complicate the link between a walker's construction and ultimate performance. Here, a synergic mechanical-kinetic model is developed for a recently reported DNA bipedal walker, which is based on a modular design principle, potentially enabling many directional walkers driven by a length-switching engine. The model reproduces the experimental data of the walker, and identifies its performance-limiting factors. The model also captures features common to the underlying design principle, including counterintuitive performance-construction relations that are explained by detailed balance, entropy production, and bias cancellation. While indicating a low directional fidelity for the present walker, the model suggests the possibility of improving the fidelity above 90% by a more powerful engine, which may be an improved version of the present engine or an entirely new engine motif, thanks to the flexible design principle. The model is readily adaptable to aid these experimental developments towards high-performance molecular walkers.

  1. On the Instabilities of the Walker Propagating Domain Wall Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Xiangrong

    2013-01-01

    A powerful mathematical method for front instability analysis that was recently developed in the field of nonlinear dynamics is applied to the 1+1 (spatial and time) dimensional Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert (LLG) equation. From the essential spectrum of the LLG equation, it is shown that the famous Walker rigid body propagating domain wall (DW) is not stable against the spin wave emission. In the low field region only stern spin waves are emitted while both stern and bow waves are generated under ...

  2. Gravitational birefringence of light in Robertson-Walker cosmologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, C.; Schücker, T.

    2017-08-01

    The spacetime evolution of massless spinning particles in a Robertson-Walker background is derived using the deterministic system of equations of motion from Papapetrou, Souriau and Saturnini. A numerical integration of this system of differential equations in the case of the standard model of cosmology is performed. The deviation of the photon worldlines from the null geodesics is of the order of the wavelength. Perturbative solutions are also worked out in a more general case. An experimental measurement of this deviation would test the acceleration of our expanding Universe.

  3. Difficulties with Prenatal Diagnosis of the Walker-Warburg Syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Low, A.S.C.; Lee, S.L.; Tan, A.S.A.; Chan, D.K.L.; Chan, L.L. [Singapore General Hospital (Singapore). Depts. of Diagnostic Radiology, Obstetrics and Gynecology and Neonatology

    2005-10-01

    We describe a postnatally diagnosed case of Walker-Warburg syndrome - a form of congenital muscular dystrophy with lissencephaly and eye abnormalities. We reviewed the literature to highlight its clinico-radiological diagnostic features and discuss the difficulties encountered with prenatal diagnosis, especially in cases with no positive family history. An increased awareness of this rare but lethal condition, and a high index of suspicion during routine antenatal ultrasound, could prompt further advanced fetal ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging, and aid in timely prenatal diagnosis, management, and counseling. Brain/brainstem, congenital, magnetic resonance imaging, obstetrics, pediatrics, ultrasound.

  4. Constructive solution of the robotic chassis AnyWalker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riadchykov Igor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Presented constructive solution of the robotic system effectively solves the problem of movement in human-adapted not pre-prepared environment. AnyWalker stabilization system consists of three flywheels, implemented in the form of motor-wheels or driven with the help of transfer mechanisms each from its motor, in orthogonal planes, and the centers of mass flywheels are the same. It is proposed to formalize the functionality of the movement in the human-adapted environment in the form of a standard architecture for robotic chassis with the possibility of hardware and software extension.

  5. A newborn with neurocutaneous melanocytosis and Dandy-Walker malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cock, Jens; Snauwaert, Julie; Van Rompaey, Walter; Morren, Marie-Anne; Demaerel, Philippe

    2014-03-01

    Neurocutaneous melanocytosis is a rare congenital dysplasia of the neuroectodermal melanocyte precursor cells that leads to proliferation of melanin-producing cells in the skin and leptomeninges. We describe a newborn with a giant congenital melanocytic nevus on his back, buttocks, and thighs. His brain magnetic resonance imaging study revealed bilateral T1 hyperintense lesions in the cerebellum and in the amygdala, hydrocephalus, and a Blake's pouch cyst, consistent with neurocutaneous melanocytosis and Dandy-Walker malformation. Neurocutaneous melanocytosis has a wide clinical spectrum that includes hydrocephalus, epilepsy, cranial nerve palsy, increased intracranial pressure, and sensorimotor deficits. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Atypical psychotic symptoms and Dandy-Walker variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Aislinn J; Wang, Zhenni; Taylor, Stephan F

    2016-10-01

    New-onset psychotic symptoms often respond well to antipsychotic treatment; however, symptoms may be difficult to treat when an underlying brain malformation is present. Here, we present a case of atypical psychotic symptoms in the context of a congenital cerebellar malformation (Dandy-Walker variant). The patient ultimately improved with paliperidone palmitate after multiple antipsychotic medication trials (both oral and one long-acting injectable) were ineffective. Neuroimaging may provide valuable diagnostic and prognostic information in cases of new-onset psychosis with atypical features and treatment resistance, even in the absence of neurologic signs and symptoms.

  7. Catalogue of the Iranian Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier

    2015-11-16

    In the present study, the Iranian Microgastrinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) fauna is summarized. It is based on a detailed study of all available published data and new material collected. In total 99 species belonging to 8 genera are from Iran: Apanteles Förster, 1862 (36 species), Cotesia Cameron, 1891 (34 species), Deuterixys Mason, 1981 (1 species), Diolcogaster Ashmead, 1900 (4 species), Microgaster Latreille, 1804 (4 species), Microplitis Förster, 1862 (11 species), Pholesetor Mason, 1981 (4 species) and Protapanteles Ashmead, 1898 (5 species) in 4 tribes (Apantilini, Cotesiini, Microgastrini and Microplitini). A faunistic list with distribution data, and host records are given. Four species are new records for the fauna of Iran: Apanteles brunnistigma Abdinbekova, 1969, A. ingenuoides Papp, 1971, Microplitis decipiens Prell, 1925 and M. marshallii Kokujev, 1898.

  8. The paternal-sex-ratio (PSR) chromosome in natural populations of Nasonia (Hymenoptera Chalcidoidea)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beukeboom, L.W.; Werren, J.H.

    2000-01-01

    Selfish genetic elements may be important in promoting evolutionary change. Paternal sex ratio (PSR) is a selfish B chromosome that causes all-male families in the haplodiploid parasitic wasp Nasonia vitripennis, by inducing paternal genome loss in fertilized eggs. The natural distribution and

  9. Determination of Opiinae parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) associated with crop infesting Bactrocera spp. (Diptera: Tephritidae) using COI and Cyt b sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Safiah; Yaakop, Salmah; Zain, Badrul Munir Md.

    2013-11-01

    Members of the Opiinae subfamily (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) are well known as important parasitoids of fruit fly larvae (Diptera: Tephritidae). They are widely used as biological control agents of fruit flies, especially the Bactrocera Macquart species that infest fruits. In this study, the larvae of fruit flies were collected from infested crops including star fruit, guava, wax apple and ridge gourd. The parasitized larvae were then reared under laboratory conditions until emergence of the adult parasitoids. Additionally, Malaise trap also was used to collect parasitoid species. The general concept of the multiplex PCR has been performed is to amplify two mitochondrial DNA markers, namely cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) and cytochrome b (Cyt b) simultaneously. Therefore, the lengthy process of reaction will be reduced. The status of the fruit fly species has also been confirmed by using COI marker on the early stage of the larvae. Maximum parsimony (MP) and Bayesian Inference (BI) were implemented to help and support the identification of Opiinae species. The result obtained from this study showed three parasitoid genera of the Opiinae viz. Fopius Wharton, Psyttalia Walker and Diachasmimorpha Viereck. Each genus has been determined by clustering together in a similar clade according to their infested crops. Therefore, accurate determination of parasitoids and the fruit fries species was highly useful and necessary for successful biological control of Bactrocera species.

  10. SYMMETRY AS CONCEPTUAL METAPHOR IN WALKER'S THE COLOR PURPLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Tapia

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available The author analyzes three types of the conceptual metaphor of embodied symmetry in Alice Walker's novel, The color purple (1982. These metaphorical projections, perceived as equilibrium and its breakage in abstract phenomena, enable readers to reexamine issues of race, non-traditional families, and gender roles. The dis/equilibrium emerges in the novel's epistolary structure. Biological equilibrium breaks in incidents of rape and incest. Walker creates characters in the novel through default-concept opposites of black/white, submissive/dominant, male/female and others. These contraries foreground issues of race and gender. The novel's asymmetries engage readers, leading them to rethink individual character histories and motives. The removal of objects (e.g., rape, mothers deprived of children suggests conceptual asymmetry and alerts readers to parallel themes of sexual and racial oppression. Subjugation sometimes subtle, sometimes blatant- manifests in simple oppositions. In epistemological terms, readers seek causal explanations for the asymmetries of the narrative, interpreting each to recover its history.

  11. FreeWalker: a smart insole for longitudinal gait analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baitong; Rajput, Kuldeep Singh; Tam, Wing-Kin; Tung, Anthony K H; Yang, Zhi

    2015-08-01

    Gait analysis is an important diagnostic measure to investigate the pattern of walking. Traditional gait analysis is generally carried out in a gait lab, with equipped force and body tracking sensors, which needs a trained medical professional to interpret the results. This procedure is tedious, expensive, and unreliable and makes it difficult to track the progress across multiple visits. In this paper, we present a smart insole called FreeWalker, which provides quantitative gait analysis outside the confinement of traditional lab, at low- cost. The insole consists of eight pressure sensors and two motion tracking sensors, i.e. 3-axis accelerometer and 3-axis gyroscope. This enables measurement of under-foot pressure distribution and motion sequences in real-time. The insole is enabled with onboard SD card as well as wireless data transmission, which help in continuous gait-cycle analysis. The data is then sent to a gateway, for analysis and interpretation of data, using a user interface where gait features are graphically displayed. We also present validation result of a subject's left foot, who was asked to perform a specific task. Experiment results show that we could achieve a data-sampling rate of over 1 KHz, transmitting data up to a distance of 20 meter and maintain a battery life of around 24 hours. Taking advantage of these features, FreeWalker can be used in various applications, like medical diagnosis, rehabilitation, sports and entertainment.

  12. Neuroimaging of Dandy-Walker malformation: new concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Gustavo Gumz; Amaral, Lázaro Faria; Vedolin, Leonardo Modesti

    2011-12-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is the most common human cerebellar malformation, characterized by hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle, and an enlarged posterior fossa with upward displacement of the lateral sinuses, tentorium, and torcular. Although its pathogenesis is not completely understood, there are several genetic loci related to DWM as well as syndromic malformations and congenital infections. Dandy-Walker malformation is associated with other central nervous system abnormalities, including dysgenesis of corpus callosum, ectopic brain tissue, holoprosencephaly, and neural tube defects. Hydrocephalus plays an important role in the development of symptoms and neurological outcome in patients with DWM, and the aim of surgical treatment is usually the control of hydrocephalus and the posterior fossa cyst. Imaging modalities, especially magnetic resonance imaging, are crucial for the diagnosis of DWM and distinguishing this disorder from other cystic posterior fossa lesions. Persistent Blake's cyst is seen as a retrocerebellar fluid collection with cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity and a median line communication with the fourth ventricle, commonly associated with hydrocephalus. Mega cisterna magna presents as an extraaxial fluid collection posteroinferior to an intact cerebellum. Retrocerebellar arachnoid cysts frequently compress the cerebellar hemispheres and the fourth ventricle. Patients with DWM show an enlarged posterior fossa filled with a cystic structure that communicates freely with the fourth ventricle and hypoplastic vermis. Comprehension of hindbrain embryology is of utmost importance for understanding the cerebellar malformations, including DWM, and other related entities.

  13. Updated checklist of Iranian Opiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Fischer, Maximilian

    2016-01-12

    An updated checklist of Opiinae from Iran is provided including 101 species from 11 genera (Atormus van Achterberg, 1997, Biosteres Foerster, 1862, Eurytenes Forster, 1862, Fopius Wharton, 1987, Indiopius Fischer, 1966, Opius Wesmael, 1835, Phaedrotoma Forster, 1862, Pokomandya Fischer, 1959, Psyttalia Walker, 1860, Utetes Forster, 1862 and Xynobius Forster, 1862) belonging to two tribes (Biosterini and Opiini). Moreover, seven species Biosteres (Chilotrichia) punctiscuta (Thomson, 1895), Biosteres (Biosteres) remigii Fischer, 1971, Eurytenes (Eurytenes) abnormis (Wesmael, 1835), Opius (Hypocynodus) ponticus Fischer, 1958, Opius pygmaeator (Nees, 1811), Opius (Nosopoea) speciosus Fischer, 1959 and Phaedrotoma nitidulator (Nees, 1834) are recorded for the first time from Iran.

  14. Ovarian egg morphology in chalcidoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Chalcidoidea parasitizing gall wasps (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vårdal, H.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We provide morphological egg data of 26 species of 5 chalcidoid families associated with cynipid galls (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae from western Palaearctic, including the first egg data for the family Ormyridae. Adult chalcidoid species were reared from galls, and eggs obtained from dissected female ovaries were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM. The shape of the eggs varies from oval to elongate and tapered at both ends. Eggs of Eurytomidae as well as some Eulophidae, Eupelmidae and Pteromalidae are equipped with a peduncle at the anterior end. We found a positive correlation between long eggs and long ovipositors and confirmed the expectation that eggs of endoparasitoids are generally shorter and narrower than eggs of ectoparasitoids. We were able to locate the sperm entrance or micropyle at the anterior pole of eggs of several species. It is situated at the anterior end of the egg and at the end of the peduncle when present. In addition, the eggshells of the endoparasitoid Sycophila biguttata (Swederus, 1795 (Hymenoptera: Eurytomidae and the ectoparasitoid Cecidostiba fungosa (Geoffroy, 1785 (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae, are for the first time described.En el presente trabajo se aportan datos morfol.gicos del huevo de 26 especies del Paleártico occidental pertenecientes a 5 familias de Chalcidoidea asociadas con agallas de cinípidos (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae, incluyendo los primeros datos del huevo de especies de Ormyridae. Los ejemplares adultos de las especies estudiadas fueron obtenidos por emergencia de agallas en laboratorio, los ovarios de las hembras diseccionados para obtener los huevos, que fueron finalmente estudiados utilizando técnicas de microscopía electronica de barrido. La forma de los huevos estudiados varía de ovalada a alargada y ahusada en ambos extremos. Los huevos de Eurytomidae, así como algunos de Eulophidae, Eupelmidae y Pteromalidae están provistos de un pedúnculo en el extremo anterior. Se encontr

  15. Vertical force and wrist deviation angle when using a walker to stand up and sit down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cherng-Yee; Yeh, Po-Chan

    2011-08-01

    Research investigating walkers suggests that safety and assistance for the elderly with weak lower limbs were important. However, the relationship between the use of a walker and the upper limbs has received little investigation. Standing up and sitting down are important daily activities. Therefore, the aim of this study was to explore wrist deviation and vertical force among elderly individuals using a walker for assistance to stand up and sit down. In total, 64 elderly volunteers (M age = 80.22, SD = 9.36) were enrolled. Data were obtained from four load cells and a twin-axis wrist goniometer. Wrist deviation and vertical force were examined when participants used a walker with horizontal handles to assist in standing up and sitting down. Significant wrist angle deviation occurred with the use of a walker, with dorsiflexion of the right hand greater than that of the left. Males exerted significantly greater vertical force. In the sitting position, greater ulnar deviation was seen among experienced walker users, whereas during standing, experienced users exhibited greater dorsiflexion. The horizontal handles of most marketed walkers may cause user wrist deviations, suggesting researchers should pursue improvements in walker design.

  16. Dandy-Walker sendromlu çocuk hastada anestezi yönetimi

    OpenAIRE

    Çelik, Feyzi; Tüfek, Adnan; Temel, Vildan; Akdemir, Salim; Yıldırım, Zeynep Baysal; Kavak, Gönül Ölmez

    2011-01-01

    General anesthesia management of patients with Dandy-Walker syndrome is important since intubation may be difficult due to concomitant anomalies such as hydrocephalus, micrognathia and cleft palate. It should be considered that these patients may require postoperative intensive care support. In this article, anesthesia management of a patient with Dandy-Walker syndrome underwent persistent ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was presented.

  17. The Role of Walkers? Needs and Expectations in Supporting Maintenance of Attendance at Walking Groups: A Longitudinal Multi-Perspective Study of Walkers and Walk Group Leaders

    OpenAIRE

    Aikaterini Kassavou; Andrew Turner; French, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is good evidence that when people?s needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers? nee...

  18. Impact of strut height on offloading capacity of removable cast walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crews, Ryan T; Sayeed, Fraaz; Najafi, Bijan

    2012-08-01

    Reducing weight-bearing stress to diabetic foot ulcers is critical to healing and commonly called offloading. Removable cast walkers are frequently used for offloading; however, patient compliance is often poor. Walkers commonly extend to the knee. Patients complain about walkers' weight and diminished balance with their use. This study compared the offloading capacity of walkers that varied by height. Heights included: knee, ankle, and shoe levels. To ensure a fair comparison the outsole and insole were standardized across the devices. Eleven diabetic subjects with moderate to high risk of ulceration were recruited. Subjects completed four 20 m walking trials. Subjects performed one trial with each walker and one trial with an athletic shoe. Primary outcomes focused on plantar loading and were measured by pressure insoles. Secondary outcomes were associated with gait kinematics as collected by body worn sensors. Significant differences were found for the peak pressure and pressure time integrals of the different footwear. All walkers performed better than the athletic shoe. The ankle and knee-high devices performed best. Center of mass rotation data showed a trend of the ankle walker yielding a smaller range of motion (18% medial/lateral and 22% anterior/posterior) than the knee level. The ankle-high walker was able to provide similar offloading capacities as the knee-high walker. The diminished weight, along with potentially improved stability, may result in improved compliance with ankle-high walkers. A study comparing the use of the two devices for treating ulcers is now suggested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Primera cita de la Argentina de Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae y su parasitoide, Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel A AQUINO

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Se cita por primera vez de la Argentina la presencia de la avispa galí - cola exótica Ophelimus maskelli (Ashmead (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae y su para - sitoide natural, Closterocerus chamaeleon (Girault (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae en Eucalyptus camaldulensis de la provincia de Buenos Aires. Ophelimus maskelli es una especie invasora de origen Australiano que ha sido reportada como plaga de los eucaliptos en numerosos países de Asia, Europa y América. Closterocerus chamaleon es un parasitoide exótico cuyo potencial como biocontrolador de O. maskelli está siendo evaluado en algunos países.

  20. The potential of parasitoid Hymenoptera as bioindicators of arthropod diversity in agricultural grasslands

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Annette Anderson; Stephen McCormack; Alvin Helden; Helen Sheridan; Anne Kinsella; Gordon Purvis

    2011-01-01

    .... This study tested the hypothesis that parasitoid Hymenoptera are potential bioindicators that provide a useful means to assess the wider biodiversity of arthropod populations in agro-ecosystem...

  1. Walker-Warburg syndrome: report of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VASCONCELOS MARCIO M.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to describe two infants that were diagnosed with Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS, a rare form of congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD.They were studied in their clinical, laboratory, and neuroradiologic features. The index case had a brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and the second patient had a head computerized tomography (CT. In addition, a literature review was performed to describe the main forms of CMD. The index case fulfilled all criteria for WWS. A brain MRI performed at age 4 months served to corroborate the clinical diagnosis, showing severe hydrocephalus, type II lissencephaly, cerebellar vermian aplasia, and a hypoplastic brain stem. The authors were able to establish a retrospective diagnosis of WWS in the index case's older sister, based upon her clinical picture and head CT report.

  2. Electromagnetic Radiation in Multiply Connected Robertson-Walker Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1993-01-01

    Maxwell's equations on a topologically nontrivial cosmological background are studied. The cosmology is locally determined by a Robertson-Walker line element, but the spacelike slices are open hyperbolic manifolds, whose topology and geometry may vary in time. In this context the spectral resolution of Maxwell's equations in terms of horospherical elementary waves generated at infinity of hyperbolic space is given. The wave fronts are orthogonal to bundles of unstable geodesic rays, and the eikonal of geometric optics appears just as the phase of the horospherical waves. This fact is used to attach to the unstable geodesic rays a quantum mechanical momentum. In doing so the quantized energy-momentum tensor of the radiation field is constructed in a geometrically and dynamically transparent way, without appealing to the intricacies of the second quantization. In particular Planck's radiation formula, and the bearing of the multiply connected topology on the fluctuations in the temperature of the background rad...

  3. A Newborn with Dandy-Walker Malformation and Aortic Coarctation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Anık

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM is a rare anomaly of the posterior cranial fossa. Concomitant brain or systemic malformations are frequent and can influence the prognosis. DWM is associated with cardiac abnormalities. Recognition of these anomalies are important for diagnosis and accurate surgical management. Association of aortic coarctation with DWM is extremely rare. Here, we report a newborn with DWM and aortic coarctation. Our aim was to emphasize that DWM can be associated with cardiac anomalies. Cardiac congenital defects are often associated with a poor prognosis. These kinds of features should alert the clinician to consider extensive screening in these patients not only for cerebral structures but also for cardiovascular abnormalities.

  4. Field diet of the grasshopper Abracris dilecta Walker (Orthoptera, Acrididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Frankl Sperber

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Abracris dilecta Walker, 1870 (Orthoptera, Acrididae, Ommatolampinae ate leafs of at least 14 plant species, in the families Asteraceae, Lamiaceae, Malvales (Sterculiaceae, Tiliaceae or Malvaceae, Poaceae, Fabaceae, Verbenaceae, Aristolochiaceae, Rubiaceae and Melastomataccae. Elephantopus mollis H.B.K. (Asteraceae and Hyptis suaveolens Poit. (Lamiaceae comprised 50% of the diet. The diet breadth of A. dilecta was compared to that of other 11 grasshopper species of the same sub-family, with rarefaction curves. The number of plant species eaten by A. dilecta was greater than that of nine other grasshopper species of the same sub-family (Rhachicreagra spp. but was lower then two others (Microptylopteryx hebardi Rehn, 1905 and Rhachicreagra astytophallus Jago & Rowell, 1981. This results are discussed in view of the broad geographical range and possession of developed wings by A. dilecta, which contrasts with most Ommatolampinae grasshoppers.

  5. [Aicardi syndrome with Dandy-Walker type malformation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguado-Herrera, Yuly V; Manrique-Hernández, Edgar F; Peñaloza-Mantilla, Camilo A; Quintero-Gómez, David A; Contreras-García, Gustavo A; Sandoval-Martínez, Diana K

    2015-07-16

    Aicardi syndrome (OMIM 304050) was first described in 1965. Its classic triad consists of infantile spasms, partial or total agenesis of the corpus callosum and ocular disorders, such as chorioretinal lacunae. It has been posited that it is due to a mechanism involving X-linked dominant inheritance. We report the case of a full-term female, with no pathological familial history or parental consanguinity, with a prenatal diagnosis of Dandy-Walker type malformation, who presented convulsions, coloboma of the optic nerve, thoracic vertebral block with presence of scoliosis, transfontanellar ultrasound imaging showing agenesis of the corpus callosum and karyotype 46,XX. She was diagnosed with Aicardi syndrome and died at the age of one and a half months. The autopsy revealed supratentorial hydrocephalus with the presence of choroid plexus papilloma, a cyst in the posterior fossa (fourth ventricle), hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, agenesis of the left hemisphere of the corpus callosum and cerebellum, characteristic facial features of the syndrome, ogival palate, pectus excavatum, scoliosis, paraovarian cyst and hepatomegaly. Few cases of an association between the pathology and the presence of Dandy-Walker malformation have been described. We report a new case of the association, bearing in mind that the related disorders, mainly agenesis or hypoplasia of the corpus callosum, suggest the existence of an underlying genetic component. A study of the search for the aetiology must be focused on evaluating those genes that are related with neurodevelopment and its activation in the organogenesis stage. The definitive diagnosis establishes the prognosis, management and genetic counselling of the family.

  6. In-vitro diagnostics of Hymenoptera venom allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rueff, F.; Vos, B.; Przybilla, B.

    In-vitro diagnostics of Hymenoptera venom allergy Patients with a history of anaphylactic sting reactions require an allergological work-up (history, in-vitro tests, and skin tests) to clarify indications on venom immunotherapy and on the type of venom to be used. To demonstrate a venom

  7. Faunistic study on Pompilidae (Inseta: Hymenoptera) family in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this study that comprises Ankara, Kýrýkkale and Çankýrý provinces, 30 specimens in total were collected, and 6 species belonging to Turkey Pompilidae (Hymenoptera) family were identified as new records in Turkey fauna. The locality and members of these specimens are shown in this material. Their distribution is also ...

  8. Distributional record of oak gall wasp (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) that occur on oak trees (Quercus spp.) and produce galls on a certain part of the host. In this survey, oak gall wasp species were collected from the oak forests of Pardanan, Mirabad, Nalas, Sardasht, Hamran and Dar-ghabr in ...

  9. Faunistic study on Pompilidae (Inseta: Hymenoptera) family in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-01-19

    Jan 19, 2009 ... In this study that comprises Ankara, Kırıkkale and Çankırı provinces, 30 specimens in total were collected, and 6 species belonging to Turkey Pompilidae (Hymenoptera) family were identified as new records in Turkey fauna. The locality and members of these specimens are shown in this material. Their.

  10. A preliminary checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A preliminary species checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of. Kakamega Forest, Western Kenya, is presented. The species list is based on specimens sampled from 1999 until 2009, which are deposited in the ant collection of the Zoological Research Museum Koenig, Bonn, Germany, and the Natural History ...

  11. Taxonomy of ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) collected by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taxonomy of ant species (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) collected by pitfall traps from Sinai and Delta region, Egypt. Salwa Mohamed', Samy Zalatz, Hassan Fadll, Sohair Gadallal & Moustafa Sharaf“ l. Entomology Department, Faculty of Science, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt. 2. Zoology Department, Faculty of Science, ...

  12. Revision of the world species of Xeris Costa (Hymenoptera: Siricidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henri Goulet; Caroline Boudreault; Nathan M. Schiff

    2015-01-01

    Xeris is one of ten extant genera of Siricidae known as as woodwasps or horntails. They are important wood-boring Hymenoptera from the Northern Hemisphere. Adults and larvae of Xeris are often intercepted at ports and are consequently of concern as potential alien invasive species. The genus consists of 16 species with eight in...

  13. Thermoperiodism synchronizes emergence in the alfalfa leafcutting bee (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfalfa seed production in the northwestern United States and western Canada is heavily dependent upon the pollinating services of M. rotundata (F.) (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). Megachile rotundata females nest in cavities either naturally occurring or in artificial nesting blocks. Because of the ph...

  14. EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy: Hymenoptera venom allergy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sturm, Gunter J.; Varga, Eva-Maria; Roberts, Graham; Mosbech, Holger; Bilò, M. Beatrice; Akdis, Cezmi A.; Antolín-Amérigo, Darío; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Gawlik, Radoslaw; Jakob, Thilo; Kosnik, Mitja; Lange, Joanna; Mingomataj, Ervin; Mitsias, Dimitris I.; Ollert, Markus; Oude Elberink, Joanna N. G.; Pfaar, Oliver; Pitsios, Constantinos; Pravettoni, Valerio; Ruëff, Franziska; Sin, Betül Ayşe; Agache, Ioana; Angier, Elizabeth; Arasi, Stefania; Calderón, Moises A.; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Halken, Susanne; Jutel, Marek; Lau, Susanne; Pajno, Giovanni B.; van Ree, Ronald; Ryan, Dermot; Spranger, Otto; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Dhami, Sangeeta; Zaman, Hadar; Sheikh, Aziz; Muraro, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Hymenoptera venom allergy is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction following a honeybee, vespid or ant sting. Systemic allergic sting reactions have been reported in up to 7.5% of adults and up to 3.4% of children. They can be mild and restricted to the skin or moderate-to-severe with a

  15. Effects of Apis mellifera adansonii, L. 1758 (Apidae: Hymenoptera ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The honeybees play an important role in the pollinations of many field crops. Here, we assessed the effect of the presence of honeybee colonies, A. mellifera adansonii, L. 1758 (Apidae: Hymenoptera) in the production of African melon crop, C. mannii (Naudin) (Cucurbitaceae) in Kisangani, Democratic Republic of Congo.

  16. A new species of Zamischus (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae from Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma Díaz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Zamischus (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae from Brazil. A new species of Zamischus from Brazil is described and diagnosed. The species is closely related to Z. brasiliensis but differs in the morphology of antennae and scutellum. Z. aquilesi sp. nov. was collected via Malaise trapping in a tobacco field in Santa Cruz do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul.

  17. De schermbloemzandbij Andrena nitidiuscula terug in Nederland (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raemakers, I.

    2005-01-01

    New records of Andrena nitidiuscula in the Netherlands (Hymenoptera: Apidae) In 2005 Andrena nitidiuscula was observed from late June till mid August in a garden and a few other sites near Maastricht (Limburg). These observations are the first since 1950 and refute the classification as extinct in

  18. Michanthidium almeidai, a new species from northeastern Brazil (Hymenoptera, Megachilinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban, Danúncia; Parizotto, Daniele Regina

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A new species of Michanthidium Urban (Hymenoptera, Megachilinae)is described and figured from Sergipe and Bahia States, northeastern Brazil. An identification key, illustrations, and a distribution map for the three species of the genus are presented. The male genitalia of Michanthidium almeidai sp. n. and Michanthidium albitarse are illustrated and compared for the first time. PMID:22140334

  19. Calosota Curtis (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Eupelmidae – review of the New World and European fauna including revision of species from the West Indies and Central and North America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary Gibson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Two of three species previously classified in Calosota Curtis (Hymenoptera: Eupelmidae from the Neotropical region are transferred to Eupelminae. Calosota eneubulus (Walker from Galapagos Islands is transferred to Eupelmus Dalman as Eupelmus (Eupelmus eneubulus (Walker, comb. n., and Calosota silvai (Brèthes from Chile is transferred to Brasema Cameron as Brasema silvai comb. n. Calosota cecidobius (Kieffer from Argentina is retained in Calosota, with reservation, as an unrecognized species. The species of Calosota from the New World excluding South America are revised. Eleven species are recognized, including the seven newly described species Calosota albipalpus sp. n. (Costa Rica, Mexico, USA, Venezuela, Calosota bicolorata sp. n. (USA, Calosota elongata sp. n. (USA, Calosota longivena sp. n. (USA, Calosota panamaensis sp. n. (Panama, Calosota setosa sp. n. (Bahamas, Dominican Republic, USA, and Calosota speculifrons sp. n. (Costa Rica, USA. The 11 regional species and the Palaearctic species Calosota vernalis Curtis are keyed and illustrated. Calosota vernalis is not known to occur in the New World but is included in the key and diagnosed because it has been intercepted in quarantine in Canada. Calosota pseudotsugae Burks is placed in synonymy under Calosota acron (Walker, syn. n., and Calosota kentra Burks, Calosota montana Burks and Calosota septentrionalis Hedqvist are placed in synonymy under Calosota aestivalis Curtis syn. n. Calosota modesta Bolívar y Pieltain is removed from synonymy under Calosota viridis Masi, stat. rev., and Calosota viridis, Calosota matritensis Bolívar y Pieltain, and Calosota coerulea Nikol’skaya are placed in synonymy under Calosota metallica (Gahan, syn. n. Calosota grylli Erdös is confirmed as a separate species from Calosota metallica based on features of both sexes. It is suggested that Calosota ariasi Bolívar y Pieltain may be a synonym of Calosota aestivalis, Calosota bolivari Askew may be a synonym

  20. [Upper extremity kinetics and energy expenditure during walker-assisted gait in children with cerebral palsy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konop, Katherine A; Strifling, Kelly M B; Wang, Mei; Cao, Kevin; Eastwood, Daniel; Jackson, Scott; Ackman, Jeffrey; Altiok, Haluk; Schwab, Jeffrey; Harris, Gerald F

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the relationships between upper extremity (UE) kinetics and the energy expenditure index during anterior and posterior walker-assisted gait in children with spastic diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Ten children (3 boys, 7 girls; mean age 12.1 years; range 8 to 18 years) with spastic diplegic CP, who ambulated with a walker underwent gait analyses that included UE kinematics and kinetics. Upper extremity kinetics were obtained using instrumented walker handles. Energy expenditure index was obtained using the heart rate method (EEIHR) by subtracting resting heart rate from walking heart rate, and dividing by the walking speed. Correlations were sought between the kinetic variables and the EEIHR and temporal and stride parameters. In general, anterior walker use was associated with a higher EEIHR. Several kinetic variables correlated well with temporal and stride parameters, as well as the EEIHR. All of the significant correlations (r>0.80; p<0.005) occurred during anterior walker use and involved joint reaction forces (JRF) rather than moments. Some variables showed multiple strong correlations during anterior walker use, including the medial JRF in the wrist, the posterior JRF in the elbow, and the inferior and superior JRFs in the shoulder. The observed correlations may indicate a relationship between the force used to advance the body forward within the walker frame and an increased EEIHR. More work is needed to refine the correlations, and to explore relationships with other variables, including the joint kinematics.

  1. Vertical force and wrist deviation angle in a sample of elderly people using walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cherng-Yee; Yeh, Po-Chan

    2013-02-01

    Walkers are frequently used by elderly people with weak lower limbs and limited balance, but the ergonomic relationship between the use of a walker and stress on the upper limbs is relatively unstudied. The current study assessed wrist deviation and vertical force among elderly individuals using a walker for assistance in walking. 60 elderly volunteers (M age = 81.0 yr., SD = 8.8) participated, 30 of whom frequently used a walker, and 30 who had no such prior experience. Data were obtained from four load cells and a twin-axis wrist goniometer during assisted ambulation using the walker. No significant group difference was found in gait cycle. Significant wrist deviation occurred, with ulnar deviation/dorsiflexion of the right hand, which was greater than that of the left. Non-experienced participants had larger dorsiflexion than experienced participants. Experienced participants produced larger vertical force than non-experienced participants. The greaterthe wrist deviation, the greater was the vertical force. The horizontal handles of most marketed walkers cause wrist deviations. This is a concern for users, clinicians, and related industries. Improvements in walker design should be considered.

  2. Assistive devices alter gait patterns in Parkinson disease: advantages of the four-wheeled walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegelmeyer, Deb A; Parthasarathy, Sowmya; Kostyk, Sandra K; White, Susan E; Kloos, Anne D

    2013-05-01

    Gait abnormalities are a hallmark of Parkinson's disease (PD) and contribute to fall risk. Therapy and exercise are often encouraged to increase mobility and decrease falls. As disease symptoms progress, assistive devices are often prescribed. There are no guidelines for choosing appropriate ambulatory devices. This unique study systematically examined the impact of a broad range of assistive devices on gait measures during walking in both a straight path and around obstacles in individuals with PD. Quantitative gait measures, including velocity, stride length, percent swing and double support time, and coefficients of variation were assessed in 27 individuals with PD with or without one of six different devices including canes, standard and wheeled walkers (two, four or U-Step). Data were collected using the GAITRite and on a figure-of-eight course. All devices, with the exception of four-wheeled and U-Step walkers significantly decreased gait velocity. The four-wheeled walker resulted in less variability in gait measures and had less impact on spontaneous unassisted gait patterns. The U-Step walker exhibited the highest variability across all parameters followed by the two-wheeled and standard walkers. Higher variability has been correlated with increased falls. Though subjects performed better on a figure-of-eight course using either the four-wheeled or the U-Step walker, the four-wheeled walker resulted in the most consistent improvement in overall gait variables. Laser light use on a U-Step walker did not improve gait measures or safety in figure-of-eight compared to other devices. Of the devices tested, the four-wheeled-walker offered the most consistent advantages for improving mobility and safety. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Scoliosis in Dandy-Walker syndrome: a case report and review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Venugopal K; Sorur, Tamer M M; Al Ghafri, Khalifa A; Shahin, Marwan M H E

    2017-12-01

    This submission presents a case of scoliosis in a patient with established Dandy-Walker anomaly of the brain. A retrospective review of the patient's case notes was undertaken and the limited literature on this subject reviewed. The 13-year-old girl presented with a stiff right thoracic scoliosis typical of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. The scoliotic segment also presented with significant lordosis. She had facial and truncal dysmorphism characteristic of Dandy-Walker complex and her brain images confirmed the diagnosis. She underwent scoliosis surgery by the posterior approach uneventfully. In conclusion scoliosis is hitherto unreported in the Dandy-Walker complex. The results of intervention appear satisfactory.

  4. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reeuwijk, J. van; Janssen, M.; Elzen, C. van der; Beltran Valero de Bernabe, D.; Sabatelli, P.; Merlini, L.; Boon, M.; Scheffer, H.; Brockington, M.; Muntoni, F.; Huynen, M.A.; Verrips, A.; Walsh, C.A.; Barth, P.G.; Brunner, H.G.; Bokhoven, J.H.L.M. van

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres,

  5. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reeuwijk, J.; Janssen, M.; van den Elzen, C.; Beltran-Valero de Bernabé, D.; Sabatelli, P.; Merlini, L.; Boon, M.; Scheffer, H.; Brockington, M.; Muntoni, F.; Huynen, M. A.; Verrips, A.; Walsh, C. A.; Barth, P. G.; Brunner, H. G.; van Bokhoven, H.

    2005-01-01

    Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres, cerebellar

  6. POMT2 mutations cause alpha-dystroglycan hypoglycosylation and Walker-Warburg syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Reeuwijk, J; Janssen, M; van den Elzen, C; de Bernabe, DBV; Sabatelli, P; Merlini, L; Boon, M; Scheffer, H; Brockington, M; Muntoni, F; Huynen, MA; Verrips, A; Walsh, CA; Barth, PG; Brunner, HG; van Bokhoven, H

    2005-01-01

    Background: Walker-Warburg syndrome (WWS) is an autosomal recessive condition characterised by congenital muscular dystrophy, structural brain defects, and eye malformations. Typical brain abnormalities are hydrocephalus, lissencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, fusion of the hemispheres,

  7. Mercury in biota and sediment in the Walker River Basin, Nevada and California

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Common loons (Gavia immer) that stage during migration at Walker Lake, Nevada, were found to have elevated concentrations of mercury in their blood. The source of...

  8. Brachymeria pandora (Crawford (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae: a new parasitoid of Historis odius (Fabricius (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélcio R. Gil-Santana

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The first record of parasitism of Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae on Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae in the State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil is presented.Apresenta-se o primeiro registro de parasitismo de Brachymeria pandora (Crawford, 1914 (Hymenoptera, Chalcididae em Historis odius (Fabricius, 1775 (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae, no estado do Rio de Janeiro, Brasil.

  9. KEANEKARAGAMAN HYMENOPTERA PARASITIKA PADA TIPE EKOSISTEM BERBEDA DI BANGKA TENGAH, KEPULAUAN BANGKA BELITUNG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herry Marta Saputra

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in different ecosystem types in Central Bangka, Bangka-Belitung Islands. Hymenoptera richness is dominated by parasitic species. More than 80% of Hymenoptera play a role as parasitoid on arthropods that are mostly insects. Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera is widely studied in various types of terrestrial ecosystems including agro-ecosystem and non-agro-ecosystem. This study aimed to invent and compare the diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in three different ecosystems, i.e., forest, oil palm plantation, and ex-tin mining. The location was located in Central Bangka Regency, Bangka Island. The study was conducted in Juli 2014 until October 2015. Parasitic Hymenoptera was collected with insect sweep net and yellow pan trap on one transect line with 1000 m length. Parasitic Hymenoptera were found on forest as much as 732 morphospecies, 326 morphospecies on oil palm plantations, and 293 morphospecies on ex-tin mining. Diversity and abundance of parasitic Hymenoptera on forest was higher than oil palm plantation and ex-tin mining area. Braconidae family was found dominant on forest, however on oil palm plantation and extin mining area the dominant family was Scelionidae.

  10. Investigating GAIM-GM’s Capability to Sense Ionospheric Irregularities via Walker Satellite Constellations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-26

    INVESTIGATING GAIM-GM’S CAPABILITY TO SENSE IONOSPHERIC IRREGULARITIES VIA WALKER SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS THESIS Brandon T. McClung, Captain, USAF...CAPABILITY TO SENSE IONOSPHERIC IRREGULARITIES VIA WALKER SATELLITE CONSTELLATIONS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics...APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENP-MS-15-M-076 INVESTIGATING GAIM-GM’S CAPABILITY TO SENSE IONOSPHERIC IRREGULARITIES VIA

  11. Usher syndrome associated with a variant of Dandy-Walker malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simsek, Tulay; Ozdamar, Yasemin; Simsek, Enver; Men, Gamze

    2010-05-21

    Three cases of Usher syndrome associated with a variant of Dandy-Walker malformation in three siblings from consanguineous Turkish parents are described. The siblings had retinitis pigmentosa and hearing loss. Two of the siblings also had mental retardation, which is not a constant finding in Usher syndrome. Dandy-Walker malformation might have contributed to the mental retardation in two of these patients and might be a coincidental finding with Usher syndrome. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. New-onset psychosis associated with dandy-walker variant in an adolescent female patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Molly; Grenier, Ernesto; Castro, Anthony; Nemeroff, Charles B

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between psychotic disorders, in particular, schizophrenia, and neurodevelopmental abnormalities has been conceptualized in the latest literature. Dandy-Walker variant, defined by cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle and hypoplasia of the inferior portion of the vermis without enlargement of the posterior fossa, is a distinctive entity believed to represent a mild subtype of Dandy-Walker complex. The authors hypothesize a correlation between new onset of psychosis and cerebellar abnormalities in an adolescent patient.

  13. Anesthesia management in a pediatric patient with Dandy-Walker syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeynep Baysal Yıldırım

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available General anesthesia management of patients with Dandy-Walker syndrome is important since intubation may be difficult due to concomitant anomalies such as hydrocephalus, micrognathia and cleft palate. It should be considered that these patients may require postoperative intensive care support. In this article, anesthesia management of a patient with Dandy-Walker syndrome underwent persistent ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was presented. J Clin Exp Invest 2011; 2 (3: 327-329.

  14. Bipolar Disorder in a Young Girl with Dandy-Walker Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahin Eslami Shahre Babaki

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available  Dandy-Walker syndrome is a congenital brain malformation involving the cerebellum and the fourth ventricle. The key features of this syndrome are mental retardation, cerebellar ataxia, and symptoms related to hydrocephaly. The psychiatric aspects of this syndrome have been insufficiently appreciated. Described here is a 17- year- old girl with an acute manic episode emerged in the course of Dandy-Walker syndrome. Presentation and treatment are then addressed.

  15. A new walker with upper trunk suspension system for severely disabled patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoppetta, C; Scoppetta, M

    2013-10-01

    We have recently designed a new type of walker for those severely disabled patients who cannot walk with commonly used medical walkers. A drawing and the description of this new walker is reported in order to permit the worldwide companies as well as artisans to develop and produce it for the people affected from severe motor problems. This walker supposes the patient wearing either a modified climbing harness or equipped clothes and being suspended to the walking frame. It consists in two series of bands suspending the patient from the frame; the upper one suspends him for the upper part of his trunk, the lower one by his pelvis. This walker is suggested for patients belonging to three principal groups: (1) Persons who have no trunk control (e.g.: patients affected by severe stroke or ataxias). (2) Persons whose walk is allowed only if they achieve a significant reduction (up to 30-40%) of the their body weight charging on trunk, spine, and lower limbs. (3) Persons who need a differentiated reduction of the body weight either among anterior and posterior side or among their right and left part of the body (hemiparesis, Parkinson disease, scoliosis, kyphosis). Creating this walker is easy; producing costs are low; there are no maintenance costs.

  16. Aesthetic Image of the Animal Epithet in Alice Walker's Short Story "Everyday Use"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaimaa Hadi Radhi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In her short story Everyday Use, the African American writer Alice Walker labels her female characters Mrs. Johnson, and her two daughters: Maggie, and Dee by associating them with an animal quality. In my present paper I attempt to show the central and pivotal role played by the mechanism of 'Animal Epithet' in order to investigate to what extent does the writer apply the theory of 'Womanism' to her short fiction's protagonist and the other characters. Walker wants the reader to share her investigation journey in order to find a logical answer for the crucial questions raised in the research-paper: Why does Walker portray female characters by comparing them to animals? How does Walker manage to treat this topic aesthetically? What portrait of black woman does she prove? To answer these central questions, Walker is committed to construct her short narrative work on the base of the key elements of inversion, signifying, and quilting-like. Walker, as a womanist and animal activist is defiant and ridiculous of the mainstream agent of humanism represented by white males. She aesthetically inverts the meaning of the negative, dehumanizing image devised and everyday used by the men of ruling class into aesthetic and positive one to represent the identity of black women.

  17. CommWalker: Correctly Evaluating Modules in Molecular Networks in Light of Annotation Bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecken, M D; Page, M J T; Crosby, A J; Mason, S; Reinert, G; Deane, C M

    2017-11-03

    Detecting novel functional modules in molecular networks is an important step in biological research. In the absence of gold standard functional modules, functional annotations are often used to verify whether detected modules/communities have biological meaning. However, as we show, the uneven distribution of functional annotations means that such evaluation methods favour communities of well-studied proteins. We propose a novel framework for the evaluation of communities as functional modules. Our proposed framework, CommWalker, takes communities as inputs and evaluates them in their local network environment by performing short random walks. We test CommWalker's ability to overcome annotation bias using input communities from four community detection methods on two protein interaction networks. We find that modules accepted by CommWalker are similarly co-expressed as those accepted by current methods. Crucially, CommWalker performs well not only in well-annotated regions, but also in regions otherwise obscured by poor annotation. CommWalker community prioritization both faithfully captures well-validated communities, and identifies functional modules that may correspond to more novel biology. The CommWalker algorithm is freely available at opig.stats.ox.ac.uk/resources or as a docker image on the Docker Hub at hub.docker.com/r/lueckenmd/commwalker/. deane@stats.ox.ac.uk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  18. Design Principles of DNA Enzyme-Based Walkers: Translocation Kinetics and Photoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Tae-Gon; Pan, Jing; Chen, Haorong; Robinson, Heather N; Li, Xiang; Mao, Chengde; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-07-29

    Dynamic DNA enzyme-based walkers complete their stepwise movements along the prescribed track through a series of reactions, including hybridization, enzymatic cleavage, and strand displacement; however, their overall translocation kinetics is not well understood. Here, we perform mechanistic studies to elucidate several key parameters that govern the kinetics and processivity of DNA enzyme-based walkers. These parameters include DNA enzyme core type and structure, upper and lower recognition arm lengths, and divalent metal cation species and concentration. A theoretical model is developed within the framework of single-molecule kinetics to describe overall translocation kinetics as well as each reaction step. A better understanding of kinetics and design parameters enables us to demonstrate a walker movement near 5 μm at an average speed of ∼1 nm s(-1). We also show that the translocation kinetics of DNA walkers can be effectively controlled by external light stimuli using photoisomerizable azobenzene moieties. A 2-fold increase in the cleavage reaction is observed when the hairpin stems of enzyme catalytic cores are open under UV irradiation. This study provides general design guidelines to construct highly processive, autonomous DNA walker systems and to regulate their translocation kinetics, which would facilitate the development of functional DNA walkers.

  19. Dandy-Walker Malformation: is the 'tail sign' the key sign?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Silvia; Vinci, Valeria; Saldari, Matteo; Servadei, Francesca; Silvestri, Evelina; Giancotti, Antonella; Aliberti, Camilla; Porpora, Maria Grazia; Triulzi, Fabio; Rizzo, Giuseppe; Catalano, Carlo; Manganaro, Lucia

    2015-12-01

    The study aims to demonstrate the value of the 'tail sign' in the assessment of Dandy-Walker malformation. A total of 31 fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), performed before 24 weeks of gestation after second-line ultrasound examination between May 2013 and September 2014, were examined retrospectively. All MRI examinations were performed using a 1.5 Tesla magnet without maternal sedation. Magnetic resonance imaging diagnosed 15/31 cases of Dandy-Walker malformation, 6/31 of vermian partial caudal agenesis, 2/31 of vermian hypoplasia, 4/31 of vermian malrotation, 2/31 of Walker-Warburg syndrome, 1/31 of Blake pouch cyst and 1/31 of rhombencephalosynapsis. All data were compared with fetopsy results, fetal MRI after the 30th week or postnatal MRI; the follow-up depended on the maternal decision to terminate or continue pregnancy. In our review study, we found the presence of the 'tail sign'; this sign was visible only in Dandy-Walker malformation and Walker-Warburg syndrome. The 'tail sign' could be helpful in the difficult differential diagnosis between Dandy-Walker, vermian malrotation, vermian hypoplasia and vermian partial agenesis. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. An Architect Cicada in Brazilian Rainforest: Guyalna chlorogena (Walker).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Béguin, C F

    2017-04-01

    To study the noteworthy nest building behavior of the nymph of the Brazilian Rainforest cicada Guyalna chlorogena (Walker) during the last year of its underground life, we monitored a large number of edifices, consisting of a vertical well (up to 1 m deep) with a turret (20 to 40 cm tall) on top, and we also performed experiments. We have shown that the buildings are occupied by a single nymph, male or female, which increases the height of its turret each night by about 3 cm, during a short active growing phase. The nymph softens and reshapes the apex by pushing upwards a lump of freshly mixed soaked clay, without any opening present, i. e., without ever exposing itself to the outside. We also established that the nymph is very active once its building is achieved. For example, it restores the height of the turret to its original value when shortening and opens the top of its building in case of variation of environmental parameters. Finally, we have shown how the nymph opens its edifice to reach the outside for molting into an adult stage (imago). With this work, we contributed to a better understanding of the nesting behavior of Amazon cicadas.

  1. Third annual Walker Branch Watershed research symposium. Program and abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    The methods and concepts of watershed research, originally applied in an experimental or monitoring mode to relatively small catchments, are increasingly being used at larger scales and for specific applied problems. Research at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the Tennessee Valley Authority, the US Forest Service, and other agencies and institutions participating in this symposium reflects research over a broad range of spatial scales that is being integrated through large-scale experiments along with computer modeling and graphical interfaces. These research projects address the basic atmospheric, geophysical, biogeochemical, and biological processes that regulate the responses of forested ecosystems to natural environmental variation and anthropogenic stresses. Regional and global issues addressed by presentations include emissions of carbon dioxide, methane, and other hydrocarbons; deposition of sulfate, nitrate, and mercury; land-use changes; biological diversity; droughts; and water quality. The reports presented in this symposium illustrate a wide range of methods and approaches and focus more on concepts and techniques than on a specific physical site. Sites and projects that have contributed research results to this symposium include Walker Branch Watershed (DOE), the Coweeta Hydrologic Laboratory and LTER site (USFS and NSF), Great Smoky Mountains National Park (research funded by NPS, TVA, and EPRI), Imnavait Creek, Alaska (DOE), the TVA-Norris Whole-tree Facility (TVA and EPRI), and DOE`s Biomass Program.

  2. Central brain herniation in shunted Dandy Walker cyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandiwanza, Tafadzwa; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Caird, John

    2013-06-01

    Dandy-Walker Syndrome (DWS) is a constellation of congenital anomalies of the central nervous system consisting of cerebellar vermis hypoplasia or agenesis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, enlarged posterior fossa, and a high tentorium. Hydrocephalus is a common occurrence in DWS and its treatment varies between shunting-ventriculoperitoneal or cystoperitoneal or both, endoscopic cyst fenestration, and third ventriculostomy. Chronic cerebral herniation is a known complication of treatment in DWS; however, we present an unusual case of central brain herniation. A 2 year old boy with shunted DWS presented with status epilepticus. Initial CT brain scan showed no increase in ventricle or cyst size; however, tapping the shunt reservoir did not yield any CSF prompting a shunt revision. Postoperatively, he was very slow to wake and subsequently experienced an episode of fixed pupils and extensor posturing. MRI brain demonstrated severe herniation of both thalami through the tentorium. This child had chronic central brain herniation (CCBH) secondary to the shunting of his cyst. To our knowledge, this is the first case of CCBH following treatment of DW cyst.

  3. Spermatogenesis in the parasitoid Diachasmimorpha longicaudata (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Carabajal Paladino, Leonela Z.; Lo Nostro, F.; Papeschi, A.; Cladera, J.; Bressa, M. J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 1 (2017), s. 38-43 ISSN 0001-7272 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0032 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hymenoptera * modified meiosis * abortive division Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology OBOR OECD: Genetics and heredity (medical genetics to be 3) Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2016 http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/azo.12148/pdf

  4. Allergen-specific immunotherapy of Hymenoptera venom allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiener, Maximilian; Graessel, Anke; Ollert, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Stings of hymenoptera can induce IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions in venom-allergic patients, ranging from local up to severe systemic reactions and even fatal anaphylaxis. Allergic patients' quality of life can be mainly improved by altering their immune response to tolerate the venoms...... on state of the art diagnostic and therapeutic options as well as on novel directions trying to improve therapy....

  5. Dandy-Walker Malformation: A Clinical and Surgical Outcome Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bokhari, Iram; Rehman, Lal; Hassan, Sher; Hashim, M Sattar

    2015-06-01

    To determine the clinical presentations, complications and mortality in patients with Dandy-Walker Malformation (DWM) after surgery i.e., shunt with y-connector. Case series. Neurosurgery Ward, JPMC, Karachi, from January 2009 to December 2013. Cases of DWM, with associated hydrocephalus, further confirmed on CT scan of brain, were admitted through OPD. Those who were previously operated, those with other associated co-morbid or anomalies were excluded from this study. Combined drainage of the ventricular system and posterior fossa cyst, via dual shunt i.e. cystoperitoneal and ventriculoperitoneal shunt with y-connector was performed in all patients. Complications and mortality after surgical intervention in these patients were noted upto one month after surgery. The data analysis for descriptive statistics was done on SPSS version 20. In this study of 70 patients, majority of the patients were female aged between 1 - 2 years. Hydrocephalus was the predominant symptom as being present in all patients, followed by cerebellar signs in 60 (86%), and other in 5 (7.14%) patients. Complications of surgery were infection and shunt fracture dislocation in 7 (10%) each, malpositioning and shunt blockage in 6 (8.5%) each within one month of surgery, intracranial haemorrhage in 5 (7.14%) patients. Only one patient (1.42%) expired after surgical intervention. In DWM, the commonest presentation is that of hydrocephalus. Shunt malfunction and infection are the commonest complication after shunting. Dual shunt with y-connector has the lowest mortality when compared with other methods for treatment of shunt with y-connector.

  6. Phylogenetic insights into the evolution of parasitism in hymenoptera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, James B

    2003-01-01

    The Hymenoptera are one of the four megadiverse orders of insects, with over 100000 described species and several times this number still waiting to be described. A major part of this diverse group is formed of large lineages of parasitoid wasps. Some of these lineages have in turn given rise to subgroups that have gone on to diversify into other lifestyles, such as gall-forming on, and pollination of, plants, as well as a broad array of food-collecting behaviors associated with social living in colonies. Thus, the Hymenoptera demonstrate the large evolutionary potential of parasitism as a lifestyle, in contrast to early assertions that parasitism tends to lead to evolutionary 'dead ends' driven by overspecialization. Phylogenetic approaches have already led to a number of important insights into the evolution of parasitism in Hymenoptera. A series of examples are discussed in this review, including the origin of parasitism in the order, the development of koinobiosis in some groups, coevolution with symbiotic viruses, and the evolution in some groups away from parasitism and into such habits as gall formation, pollination of figs, nest building and sociality. The potential for comparative analysis of hymenopteran habits is large, but progress is still in its early stages due to the paucity of available well-supported phylogenies, and the still limited accumulation of basic biological data for many taxa.

  7. A case of anaphylaxis: horse-fly or hymenoptera sting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quercia, O; Emiliani, F; Foschi, F G; Stefanini, G F

    2009-10-01

    In literature it has been described a high risk of systemic reaction after blood-sucking Dyptera bites, like mosquitoes and horsefly, in people sensitive to hymenoptera. A 51 year old man, allergic to hymenoptera venom and with a history of i.v. reaction after Mueller, who has been treated with Vespula sp. ITS for the last 3 years, was stung by a yellow, black and green insect on the neck. Five minutes after the bite, he suffered generalized hitching and urticaria, oral cavity and lower limbs paresthesia, followed by lost of consciousness. At the Emergency Room he was successfully treated with adrenaline, intravenous antihistamines and corticosteroid. The description of the insect as well as the lack of the sting on the site suggested a wasp as the culprit. By studying one of these insect that has been captured by the patient, it turned out it wasn't a Vespula, but a horsefly, the Tabanus bovinus, which resembles Hymenoptera. Skin prick test and RAST for Tabanus confirmed the allergology diagnosis. In conclusion, also Tabanus bovines can cause systemic reaction up to anaphylactic shock.

  8. A retrospective benefit-cost analysis of the 1997 stair-fall requirements for baby walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Gregory B; Leland, Elizabeth W

    2008-01-01

    Based on estimates from the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), there were about 25,000 baby walker-related injuries treated annually in U.S. hospital emergency departments during the early 1990s. This amounted to about 8 injuries for every 1000 baby walkers in use. Most injuries resulted from falls down stairs. After CPSC initiated a regulatory proceeding in 1994, the CPSC staff worked with industry to address the stair-fall hazard. This cooperative effort resulted in requirements designed to prevent stair-fall injuries that became effective in 1997 as part of a revised voluntary safety standard. This study presents a retrospective benefit-cost analysis of the 1997 stair-fall requirements. The benefits were defined as the reduction in the costs of injuries resulting from the use of the safer walkers. The costs were defined as the additional resource costs associated with making baby walkers safer. The study found that the stair-fall requirements were highly effective in reducing the risk of stair-fall injury, and that the benefits of the requirements substantially exceeded the costs. The expected net benefits (i.e., benefits minus costs) amounted to an average of about $169 per walker, over the walker's expected product life. Given current U.S. sales of about 600,000 baby walkers annually, the present value of the expected net benefits associated with 1 year's production amounts to over $100 million annually. A sensitivity analysis showed that the major findings were robust with respect to variations in underlying assumptions.

  9. Obituary: Richard L. (Dick) Walker, Jr., 1938-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pier, Jeffrey R.; Mason, Brian

    2005-12-01

    Dick Walker, 67, died 30 March 2005 in Flagstaff, AZ, following a long illness. He was born on 9 March 1938 in Hampton, Iowa and grew up in Waterloo, Iowa. As a child, Dick was fascinated with astronomy and built his own telescope. He saved his pennies and bought and read every book on the subject he could find. He also raised pigeons, naming four of them Hertzsprung, Hoyle, Gamow, and Kron. In 1957, the year Sputnik was launched, Dick began his college studies at the University of Northern Iowa in Cedar Falls. In 1959, he transferred to the State University of Iowa (subsequently renamed the University of Iowa) in Iowa City, where he earned a BA degree in astronomy and physics in 1963. He joined the staff of the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, DC, where he worked in the Time Service Division for a year before his assignment to the Astrometry and Astrophysics Division. Dick relocated to Flagstaff, AZ, in 1966 to continue his Naval Observatory service at the Flagstaff Station. His retirement in May 1999, ended a thirty-six-year career with USNO. Dick was first and foremost an observational astronomer. From the mid 1960s through the late 1970s, much of Dick's time was devoted to the measurement of binary stars, observing with the 12-inch and 26-inch refractors in Washington and later the 40-inch and 61-inch reflectors in Flagstaff. He also made many trips to Lick Observatory to work with the 36-inch Clark Refractor there. During this time he consulted with Charles Worley, who was observing on the 26-inch, to make sure time was well-spent examining doubles that could not be observed in Washington. This period of observing overlapped with the early years of speckle interferometry, and Dick's observations, made with the largest telescope used for micrometry at the time, were very important for ascertaining the veracity of this new technique. He was a studious and very careful observer of doubles and made over 8,000 measures, resulting in almost 3,000 mean positions

  10. Parasitism, emergence, and development of Spalangia endius (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) in pupae of different ages of Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Liang-De; Ji, Xun-Cong; Han, Yun; Fu, Bu-Li; Liu, Kui

    2015-01-01

    The wasp Spalangia endius Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae) is a major parasitoid of the pupae of fruit flies, which are a common agricultural pest. An understanding of this intricate host-parasitoid interaction could provide basic information necessary for the sustainable integrated biological control of fruit flies. In this study, we investigated the effect of S. endius on different-aged pupae of the melon fly Bactrocera cucurbitae Coquillett by using choice and nonchoice tests under laboratory conditions. We showed that S. endius females oviposited, and their progeny successfully developed, in different-aged pupae of B. cucurbitae regardless of the method of exposure. There was an oviposition preference for 3-5-d-old pupa. The highest mean percentage parasitism occurred on 4- and 5-d-old hosts, followed by 2- and 3-d-old hosts. The average development time for both males and females was significantly longer in 6-7-d-old hosts than in the younger host stages. Adult females that developed from younger host pupae (2-5-d old) were significantly heavier than those from older host pupae (6-7-d old), and they also lived longer. The sex ratio (proportion of females) of the parasite progeny decreased with an increase in host age. Host mortality also decreased gradually as the pupal age increased. The differences in development time, body weight, and longevity between females and males were significant. These results suggest that S. endius is a good candidate for the biological control of B. cucurbitae. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Entomological Society of America.

  11. Laboratory investigation of triple marking the parasitoid Gonatocerus ashmeadi (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae) with a fluorescent dye and two animal proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonatocerus ashmeadi Girault, a parasitoid of Homalodisca vitripennis (Germar), was used as a model insect to investigate triple marking a minute hymenopteran for potential use for monitoring dispersal patterns of natural enemies in the field. The triple mark contained egg albumin in chicken eggs, c...

  12. Las avispas bandera (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae de Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zambrano González Giselle

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La familia Evaniidae está representada por un número relativamente pequeño de géneros y especies dentro del orden Hymenoptera. Son avispas de tamaño medio, sin aguijón y solitarias que parasitan ootecas de cucarachas. Se realizó un estudio de reconocimiento genérico de la familia Evaniidae para Colombia y su distribución a partir de colecciones  entomológicas. El primer capítulo, “Sistemática y taxonomía de  Evaniidae”, pretende ser el reflejo de un trabajo realizado por más de un año, de curadoría y determinación de especímenes presentes en colecciones entomológicas, donde se propone una clave taxonómica para la identificación de los seis géneros de evánidos encontrados en Colombia y un análisis de los caracteres utilizados para la misma. El segundo capítulo, “Biología de Evaniidae”, es una recopilación de todos los estudios existentes sobre la biología de la familia, en donde se hace evidente la falta de trabajo sobre el tema y el desconocimiento básico de algunos aspectos que podrían ser muy útiles para la implementación de nuevas estrategias de control biológico. El tercer capítulo, “Distribución geográfica de los géneros de la f amilia Evaniidae”, muestra como los diferentes géneros de la familia se encuentran distribuidos dentro del territorio colombiano y presenta el estado actual del muestreo de la familia dando información para poder definir áreas de concentración de muestras o áreas posteriores de muestreo. Por último, se presentan las conclusiones y recomendaciones finales que permiten dar una idea del trabajo que queda por hacer y los pasos a seguir.

  13. The fire-walker's high: affect and physiological responses in an extreme collective ritual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Fischer

    Full Text Available How do people feel during extreme collective rituals? Despite longstanding speculation, few studies have attempted to quantify ritual experiences. Using a novel pre/post design, we quantified physiological fluctuations (heart rates and self-reported affective states from a collective fire-walking ritual in a Mauritian Hindu community. Specifically, we compared changes in levels of happiness, fatigue, and heart rate reactivity among high-ordeal participants (fire-walkers, low-ordeal participants (non-fire-walking participants with familial bonds to fire-walkers and spectators (unrelated/unknown to the fire-walkers. We observed that fire-walkers experienced the highest increase in heart rate and reported greater happiness post-ritual compared to low-ordeal participants and spectators. Low-ordeal participants reported increased fatigue after the ritual compared to both fire-walkers and spectators, suggesting empathetic identification effects. Thus, witnessing the ritualistic suffering of loved ones may be more exhausting than experiencing suffering oneself. The findings demonstrate that the level of ritual involvement is important for shaping affective responses to collective rituals. Enduring a ritual ordeal is associated with greater happiness, whereas observing a loved-one endure a ritual ordeal is associated with greater fatigue post-ritual.

  14. Robust Redundant Input Reliable Tracking Control for Omnidirectional Rehabilitative Training Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of robust reliable tracking control on the omnidirectional rehabilitative training walker is examined. The new nonlinear redundant input method is proposed when one wheel actuator fault occurs. The aim of the study is to design an asymptotically stable controller that can guarantee the safety of the user and ensure tracking on a training path planned by a physical therapist. The redundant degrees of freedom safety control and the asymptotically zero state detectable concept of the walker are presented, the model of redundant degree is constructed, and the property of center of gravity constant shift is obtained. A controller that can satisfy asymptotic stability is obtained using a common Lyapunov function for admissible uncertainties resulting from an actuator fault. Simulation results confirm the effectiveness of the proposed method and verify that the walker can provide safe sequential motion when one wheel actuator is at fault.

  15. Bilateral Macular Edema: A New Ocular Feature of Dandy-Walker Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tranos, P; Dervenis, N; Kiouras, S

    2017-01-01

    To describe a case of bilateral cystoid macular edema in a patient with Dandy-Walker syndrome. An 18-year-old male was referred to our tertiary referral center for evaluation of his decreased visual acuity. Detailed ophthalmic examination and imaging revealed the presence of bilateral cystoid macular edema, which was successfully treated with intravitreal triamcinolone injections (2 mg in 0.05 ml). Recurrence of macular edema developed after a period of approximately four months. This is an unusual ophthalmic manifestation of Dandy-Walker syndrome. Cystoid macular edema should be included in the differential diagnosis of subjects with Dandy-Walker syndrome presenting with decreased vision. The pathogenetic mechanism for the development macular edema in this case is not clear. Intravitreal triamcinolone is an effective treatment, but edema was recurrent in our case. Other approaches (such as oral Acetazolamide or intravitreal Anti-VEGF) have to be considered as well.

  16. Empowering and Assisting Natural Empowering and Assisting Natural Human Mobility: The Simbiosis Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselmo Frizera-Neto

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the complete development of the Simbiosis Smart Walker. The device is equipped with a set of sensor subsystems to acquire user-machine interaction forces and the temporal evolution of user's feet during gait. The authors present an adaptive filtering technique used for the identification and separation of different components found on the human-machine interaction forces. This technique allowed isolating the components related with the navigational commands and developing a Fuzzy logic controller to guide the device. The Smart Walker was clinically validated at the Spinal Cord Injury Hospital of Toledo - Spain, presenting great acceptability by spinal chord injury patients and clinical staff.

  17. Test pilots 1962 - Armstrong, Walker, Dana, Peterson, McKay, Thompson, Butchart

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    The research pilots at what in 1962 was called the Flight Research Center standing in front of the X-1E. They are (left to right) Neil Armstrong, Joe Walker, Bill Dana, Bruce Peterson, Jack McKay, Milt Thompson, and Stan Butchart. of the group, Armstrong, Walker, Dana, McKay and Thompson all flew the X-15. Bruce Peterson flew the M2-F2 and HL-10 lifting bodies, while Stan Butchart was the B-29 drop plane pilot for many of the D-558-II and X-1 series research aircraft.

  18. A late presentation of Dandy-Walker malformation and aortic coarctation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venturini, Elio; Magni, Lucia; Pucci, Giovanna; Mazzinghi, Fabio

    2017-05-01

    The Dandy-Walker malformation is a rare anomaly of the posterior cranial fossa. Concomitant brain or systemic malformations are frequent and can influence the outcome. Associated cardiac congenital defects usually induce a poor prognosis. We report a case of a 58-yearold man with hydrocephalus, in whom Dandy-Walker malformation was diagnosed, for the first time, after the demonstration of aortic coarctation. This association is very rare and only a few cases have been described; moreover, to our knowledge, this is the first description of this incidence in a middle-aged patient. The characteristic of diseases and physiopathologic features are discussed, focusing attention on the rare and late clinical manifestations.

  19. Ocular Findings in a Case of Trisomy 18 With Variant of Dandy-Walker Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fong-Fong Lim

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Trisomy 18 is the second most common chromosomal syndrome and has multiple dysmorphic features. However, ocular findings in trisomy 18 are rarely reported. Retinal folds are the most common ocular finding described to date, although retinal hypopigmentation, dysplasia, and areas of hemorrhage and gliosis are also found in trisomy 18. Dandy-Walker syndrome is a brain malformation that has been reported in association with numerous chromosomal abnormalities, although it has rarely been reported in association with trisomy 18. Here, we present a case of trisomy 18 with ocular pathology and variant of Dandy-Walker syndrome, a combination that has not previously been reported.

  20. Brachymeria pandora (Crawford) (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae) as a new parasitoid of Thyrinteina leucocerae (Rindge) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zache, B; Zaché, R R C; Tavares, M T; Wilcken, C F

    2012-08-01

    This is the first report of Brachymeria pandora (Crawford) (Hymenoptera: Chalcididae)-parasitizing pupae of the eucalyptus defoliator Thyrinteina leucocerae (Rindge) (Lepidoptera: Geometridae) in Brazil.

  1. A NEW SPECIES OF INVASIVE GALL WASP (HYMENOPTERA: EULOPHIDAE: TETRASTICHINAE) ON BLUE GUM (EUCALYPTUS GLOBULUS) IN CALIFORNIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The blue gum gall wasp, Selitrichodes globulus La Salle & Gates (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae: Tetrastichinae), is described as an invasive gall inducer on blue gum, Eucalyptus globulus (Myrtaceae), in California....

  2. Simulation of the Lower Walker River Basin hydrologic system, west-central Nevada, using PRMS and MODFLOW models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allander, Kip K.; Niswonger, Richard G.; Jeton, Anne E.

    2014-01-01

    Walker Lake is a terminal lake in west-central Nevada with almost all outflow occurring through evaporation. Diversions from Walker River since the early 1900s have contributed to a substantial reduction in flow entering Walker Lake. As a result, the lake is receding, and salt concentrations have increased to a level in which Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi (Lahontan Cutthroat trout) are no longer present, and the lake ecosystem is threatened. Consequently, there is a concerted effort to restore the Walker Lake ecosystem and fishery to a level that is more sustainable. However, Walker Lake is interlinked with the lower Walker River and adjacent groundwater system which makes it difficult to understand the full effect of upstream water-management actions on the overall hydrologic system including the lake level, volume, and dissolved-solids concentrations of Walker Lake. To understand the effects of water-management actions on the lower Walker River Basin hydrologic system, a watershed model and groundwater flow model have been developed by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Bureau of Reclamation and the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.

  3. 77 FR 67811 - Porter-Walker LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Porter-Walker LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing...-referenced proceeding of Porter-Walker LLC's application for market-based rate authority, with an...

  4. Palatability of Baits Containing (S)-Methoprene to Wasmannia auropunctata (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michelle P. Montgomery; Cas Vanderwoude; A. Jasmyn J. Lynch

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Wasmannia auropunctata Roger (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), little fire ant, is recognized as a serious pest ant species that affects agriculture, homes, gardens, and natural ecosystems in Hawaii, USA, and elsewhere...

  5. A new species of the genus Homolobus Foerster from Ecuador (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Homolobinae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.; Shaw, S.R.

    2009-01-01

    A new high elevation altitude species of the genus Homolobus Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Homolobinae), H. fuscinervis spec. nov. from Ecuador (Napo province, 2163 m elevation) is described and illustrated.

  6. The first known fossil Masoninae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) from Miocene Dominican amber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    2001-01-01

    The first fossil species of the genus Masona van Achterberg, 1995, of the subfamily Masoninae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is described and illustrated. It originates from approximately 15-20 millions years old (= Miocene) Dominican amber.

  7. Two new species of the genus Peristenus Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Euphorinae) from the Canary Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.; Guerrero, E.R.

    2003-01-01

    Two new species of the genus Peristenus Foerster (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Euphorinae) from the Canary Islands are described and illustrated: Peristenus angifemoralis spec. nov. from Tenerife, and P. gloriae spec. nov. from Gran Canaria and Tenerife.

  8. Macrocentrus sylvestrellae spec. nov. (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Macrocentrinae), a parasitoid of Dioryctria sylvestrella (Ratzeburg) (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.

    2001-01-01

    A new species of the genus Macrocentrus Curtis, 1833 (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Macrocentrinae) described and illustrated: M. sylvestrellae spec. nov. from France and Italy. It is a gregarious koinobiont endoparasitoid of the pine stem borer Dioryctria sylvestrella (Ratzeburg, 1840) (Lepidoptera;

  9. Revision of Zelodia (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Agathidinae from Thailand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sharkey

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The species of Thai Zelodia (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Agathidinae are revised. Twenty-one species are treated, 19 new species are described, i.e. Zelodia charoeni, Zelodia chongkraii, Zelodia cholathorni, Zelodia idrisi, Zelodia nikomi, Zelodia nopadoli, Zelodia pahangensis, Zelodia panyaii, Zelodia poonsathii, Zelodia ratanae, Zelodia saksiti, Zelodia surachaii, Zelodia suyaneeae, Zelodia toyae, Zelodia uthaii, Zelodia wangi, Zelodia wichaii, Zelodia wirati, Zelodia wirotei. A dichotomous key to species is presented; links to electronic interactive keys and to distribution maps are also included.

  10. Register of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta Dressler (Hymenoptera, Apidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariele P. Camargo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Register of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta (Hymenoptera, Apidae. Here we provide a description of a gynandromorph of Euglossa pleosticta with partial bilateral phenotypic asymmetry. The specimen was collected by cineol baittrap at Parque Estadual São Camilo, a conservation unit in western Paraná. The bee has mostly a female phenotype, except by the right half of its head, including the presence of 11 flagellomeres, ivory markings on scape and parocular area, by the pilosity of the right galea, and by deformed male characteristics on mid and hind tibiae of right legs.

  11. Spatial Analysis of Agricultural Landscape and Hymenoptera Biodiversity at Cianjur Watershed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YAHERWANDI

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera is one of the four largest insect order (the other three are Coleoptera, Diptera, and Lepidoptera. There are curerently over 115 000 described Hymenoptera species. It is clear that Hymenoptera is one of the major components of insect biodiversity. However, Hymenoptera biodiversity is affected by ecology, environment, and ecosystem management. In an agricultural areas, the spatial structure, habitat diversity, and habitat composition may vary from cleared landscapes to structurally rich landscape. Thus, it is very likely that such large-scale spatial patterns (landscape effects may influence local biodiversity and ecological functions. Therefore, the objective of this research were to study diversity and configuration elements of agricultural landscapes at Cianjur Watershed with geographical information sytems (GIS and its influence on Hymenoptera biodiversity. The structural differences between agricultural landscapes of Nyalindung, Gasol, and Selajambe were characterized by patch analyst with ArcView 3.2 of digital land use data. Results indicated that class of land uses of Cianjur Watershed landscape were housing, mixed gardens, talun and rice, vegetable, and corn fields. Landscape structure influenced the biodiversity of Hymenoptera. Species richness and the species diversity were higher in Nyalindung landscape compare to Gasol and Selajambe landscape.

  12. Moebius syndrome with Dandy-Walker variant and agenesis of corpus callosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jomol Sara; Vanitha, R

    2013-09-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare congenital neurological disorder. The most frequent mode of presentation is facial diplegia with bilateral lateral rectus palsy, but there are variations. Here, we report a rare case of Moebius syndrome in a 15-month-old child with unilateral facial palsy, bilateral abducens nerve palsy with Dandy Walker variant, and complete agenesis of corpus callosum.

  13. Moebius syndrome with Dandy-Walker variant and agenesis of corpus callosum

    OpenAIRE

    Jomol Sara John; R Vanitha

    2013-01-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare congenital neurological disorder. The most frequent mode of presentation is facial diplegia with bilateral lateral rectus palsy, but there are variations. Here, we report a rare case of Moebius syndrome in a 15-month-old child with unilateral facial palsy, bilateral abducens nerve palsy with Dandy Walker variant, and complete agenesis of corpus callosum.

  14. Fundamental solutions of the wave equation in Robertson-Walker spaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagdjian, Karen; Galstian, Anahit

    2008-10-01

    In this article we construct the fundamental solutions for the wave equation in the Robertson-Walker spaces arising in the de Sitter model of the universe. We then use these fundamental solutions to represent solutions of the Cauchy problem for the equation with and without a source term.

  15. Random Walker Coverage Analysis for Information Dissemination in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos Skiadopoulos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The increasing technological progress in electronics provides network nodes with new and enhanced capabilities that allow the revisit of the traditional information dissemination (and collection problem. The probabilistic nature of information dissemination using random walkers is exploited here to deal with challenges imposed by unconventional modern environments. In such systems, node operation is not deterministic (e.g., does not depend only on network nodes’ battery, but it rather depends on the particulars of the ambient environment (e.g., in the case of energy harvesting: sunshine, wind. The mechanism of information dissemination using one random walker is studied and analyzed in this paper under a different and novel perspective. In particular, it takes into account the stochastic nature of random walks, enabling further understanding of network coverage. A novel and original analysis is presented, which reveals the evolution network coverage by a random walker with respect to time. The derived analytical results reveal certain additional interesting aspects regarding network coverage, thus shedding more light on the random walker mechanism. Further analytical results, regarding the walker’s spatial movement and its associated neighborhood, are also confirmed through experimentation. Finally, simulation results considering random geometric graph topologies, which are suitable for modeling mobile environments, support and confirm the analytical findings.

  16. High Performance Sustainable School Design: Roy Lee Walker Elementary, McKinney, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHW Group, Inc., Dallas, TX.

    This document describes the sustainable features of the Roy Lee Walker Elementary School (Texas), a prototype "Eco Education" school that blends the physical environment with the student learning process while protecting the site. The document also presents the process of integrating sustainability criteria in all phases of the school's…

  17. Influence of infant-walkers on motor development: mimicking spastic diplegia?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelbert, R. H.; van Empelen, R.; Scheurer, N. D.; Helders, P. J.; van Nieuwenhuizen, O.

    1999-01-01

    We discuss two patients, who used an infant walker during the period in which they learned to walk. The influence on qualitative and quantitative motor development is illustrated in this report. A disharmonic and delayed motor development, contractures of the calf-muscles and motor development

  18. [Stress parameters and behaviour of horses in walkers with and without the use of electricity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, C; Gerber, V; Howald, M; Bachmann, I; Burger, D

    2014-04-01

    In order to investigate stress responses of horses in walkers with and without electricity, 12 horses were trained during 3 weeks in a horse walker with and without the use of electricity (3.7 kV). To evaluate the stress response, cortisol levels in the blood were measured, the heart rate was monitored using the Polar® system and the behaviour was evaluated. Neither the cortisol levels nor the heart rates showed any relevant statistically significant difference between horses moved in the horse walker with or without the use of electricity. The highest cortisol levels and heart rates were recorded during the first week (habituation period). A significant difference could be observed regarding spontaneous compartment changes: while this happened mainly during the first week and before the first use of electricity, no horses changed compartments in the periods when electricity was used and thereafter. The results of this study indicate that the use of electricity in the horse walker does not seem to cause significant detectable stress in the horses.

  19. Sound production in an Australian cockroach, Megazosteria patula (Walker) (Blattodea: Blattidae: Polyzosteriinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentz, David

    2017-02-13

    The large, diurnal Australian cockroach, Megazosteria patula (Walker), produces a sound when disturbed. The sound was found to be a form of stridulation caused by the rubbing of pegs on the underside of the thoracic segments against a ridge on the following segment.

  20. Stick-slip actuation of electrostatic stepper micropositioners for data storage-the µWalker

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patrascu, M.; Stramigioli, Stefano

    2005-01-01

    This paper is about the /spl mu/Walker, an electrostatic stepper motor mainly intended for positioning the data probes with respect to the storage medium in a data storage device. It can deliver forces up to 1.7 mN for ranges as large as 140 /spl mu/m. Controlling the stick-slip effects at the

  1. Swing-Leg Retraction for Limit Cycle Walkers Improves Disturbance Rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbelen, D.G.E.; Wisse, M.

    2008-01-01

    Limit cycle walkers are bipeds that exhibit a stable cyclic gaitwithout requiring local controllability at all times during gait. A well-known example of limit cycle walking is McGeer’s “passive dynamic walking,” but the concept expands to actuated bipeds as involved in this study. One of the

  2. On Maximal Surfaces in Certain Non-Flat 3-Dimensional Robertson-Walker Spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romero, Alfonso, E-mail: aromero@ugr.es [Universidad de Granada, Departamento de Geometria y Topologia (Spain); Rubio, Rafael M., E-mail: rmrubio@uco.es [Universidad de Cordoba, Departamento de Matematicas, Campus de Rabanales (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    An upper bound for the integral, on a geodesic disc, of the squared length of the gradient of a distinguished function on any maximal surface in certain non-flat 3-dimensional Robertson-Walker spacetimes is obtained. As an application, a new proof of a known Calabi-Bernstein's theorem is given.

  3. Random walker and the telegrapher's equation: A paradigm of a generalized hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenau, P. (Department of Mechanical Engineering, Technion, Haifa 32000 (Israel) Center for Nonlinear Studies, MS-B258, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States))

    1993-08-01

    The telegrapher's equation (TE) is the continuum limit of a persisting random walker. We find that the TE reproduces the original spectrum almost exactly for all wavelengths---far beyond the validity of the expansion. This surprising property is used as a paradigm towards the derivation of a generalized hydrodynamics. Applications to other problems are explored.

  4. The Deep Semantics of Imagery in Alice Walker's The Color Purple ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hinged on this theoretical framework, the paper assesses the deep semantics of imagery in Walker's The Color Purple and highlights the salient non-ostensive references of the text and the new world it proposes. The analysis reveals the key to a deeper and broader perception of God, the imperativeness of equality of ...

  5. Collateral Damage: Veterans and Domestic Violence in Mari Sandoz's "The Tom-Walker"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, Kathy

    2010-01-01

    "The Tom-Walker" combines the best of Sandoz's realism with her worst attempts at moralizing. Unable to divine exactly what political configuration right-wing post-World War II sentiments might take, Sandoz nevertheless feared a fascist uprising in this country. Perhaps because these concerns dominated her thoughts at the time, she allowed her…

  6. Panel Discussion: Cover Crops Used at Georgia Forestry Commission Flint River and Walker Nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeff Fields

    2005-01-01

    Flint River Nursery, located near Montezuma, Georgia, has used rye, wheat, brown top millet, and sorghum sudan grass for cover crops. Flint River has just begun to return to a summer cover crop situation. At Walker Nursery, located near Reidsville, Georgia, certified rye has been sown by the State Department of Corrections (DOC) for their harvesting, with a benefit to...

  7. Experience in the management of Dandy-Walker syndrome in an ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dandy-Walker Syndrome (DWS) is a congenital brain malformation involving the cerebellum and the fluid spaces around it. There is atresia of foramenofMagendie and Lushka resulting in a complete absence of the part of the brain located between the two cerebellar hemispheres (cerebellarvermis) and cystic dilatation of ...

  8. Giant occipital meningocele in an 8-year-old child with Dandy-Walker malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talamonti, Giuseppe; Picano, Marco; Debernardi, Alberto; Bolzon, Moreno; Teruzzi, Mario; D'Aliberti, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The possibility of an association between Dandy-Walker malformation and occipital meningocele is well-known. However, just an overall number of about 40 cases have been previously reported. Giant occipital meningocele has been described only in three newborns. Incidence, pathology, clinical presentation, and proper management of this association are still poorly defined. An 8-year-old boy with Dandy-Walker malformation and giant (25 cm in diameter) occipital meningocele is presented. This boy was born without any apparent occipital mass and harbored no other significant malformations including hydrocephalus. On admission, he was neurologically intact and the giant occipital mass presented partially calcified cyst walls. Treatment consisted of the excision of the occipital malformation, cranioplasty, and cysto-peritoneal shunt. Outcome was excellent. To the best of our knowledge, among the few reported patients with Dandy-Walker malformation associated to occipital meningocele, this is the oldest one and the one with the largest occipital meningocele; he is unique with calcified walls of the occipital meningocele and the only one who survived the repair of the giant malformation. In Dandy-Walker malformation, occipital meningocele may develop and grow regardless of hydrocephalus. Giant size may be reached and the cyst may become calcified. Surgical repair may warrant favorable outcome.

  9. Menkes' disease with a Dandy-Walker variant: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Central Railway Hospital, Warsaw (Poland); Rokicki, D.; Gremida, M. [Dept. of Metabolic Diseases, Children' s Memorial Health Institute, Warsaw (Poland); Walecki, J. [Dept. of Radiology and Diagnostic Imaging, Medical Centre for Postgraduate Education, Warsaw (Poland)

    2001-11-01

    We report a boy with Menkes' disease in whom MRI revealed delayed myelination of the white matter, brain atrophy and tortuosity of the intracranial vessels. The characteristic MRI features of Menkes' disease were accompanied by a Dandy-Walker variant. (orig.)

  10. Parenchymal Neurocutaneous Melanosis in Association with Intraventricular Dermoid and Dandy-Walker Variant: A Case Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Won, Yoo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Chang, Eun Deok; Huh, Pil Woo

    2006-01-01

    Neurocutaneous melanosis (NCM) is a rare congenital disease that is characterized by the presence of large or multiple congenital melanocytic nevi and melanotic lesions of the central nervous system. We report here on the CT and MR imaging findings of an unusual case of NCM that was associated with intraventricular dermoid and Dandy-Walker malformation. PMID:16799276

  11. Moebius syndrome with Dandy-Walker variant and agenesis of corpus callosum

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Jomol Sara; Vanitha, R.

    2013-01-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare congenital neurological disorder. The most frequent mode of presentation is facial diplegia with bilateral lateral rectus palsy, but there are variations. Here, we report a rare case of Moebius syndrome in a 15-month-old child with unilateral facial palsy, bilateral abducens nerve palsy with Dandy Walker variant, and complete agenesis of corpus callosum. PMID:24470815

  12. Prenatal diagnosis of the Dandy-Walker syndrome by sonography and computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toelly, E.; Ebner, F.; Oberbauer, R.W.

    1984-07-01

    A case of Dandy-Walker-syndrome is presented, comparing the value of sonography and CT in intrauterine diagnosis. Together with a review of the literature of the subject, pathogenesis, morphology and prognosis in regard to the psychomotoric development are discussed. 3 figs.

  13. Dandy-Walker malformation with postaxial polydactly: a new case of Pierquin syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Cristóbal A; Villegas, Victor P; Aracena, Mariana I; Mellado, Cecilia X

    2013-04-01

    The combination of Dandy-Walker malformation, other central nervous system anomalies, and postaxial polydactyly has been reported previously in two pairs of siblings. We propose the name 'Pierquin syndrome' for this combination and we report a new patient with this disorder.

  14. Psychosis in a Case of Dandy-Walker Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawra, Ripu Daman; Karia, Sagar; Shah, Nilesh; Desousa, Avinash

    2017-05-01

    Dandy Walker Syndrome (DWS) is a congenital malformation with brain abnormalities, intellectual disabilities, epilepsy and visible structural changes in particular brain structures. We present here a case of psychosis in an 18-year-old male with DWS, epilepsy and intellectual disability. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the clinically relevant issues, psychopharmacological issues, neuropsychiatric manifestations and consultation liaison issues involved.

  15. Trans-sphenoidal encephalocele in association with Dandy-Walker complex and cardiovascular anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joy, H.M.; Barker, C.S. [Wessex Neurological Centre, Southampton (United Kingdom); Small, J.H. [Dept. of Radiology, Royal Bournemouth Hospital (United Kingdom); Armitage, M. [Bournemouth Diabetes and Endocrine Centre, Royal Bournemouth Hospital (United Kingdom)

    2001-01-01

    We present a case of trans-sphenoidal encephalomeningocele in association with a posterior cranial fossa malformation which fulfils the criteria for the Dandy-Walker complex. Congenital cardiovascular defects were also present. An abnormality of neural crest development may be responsible for the combined occurrence of these anomalies. (orig.)

  16. Parenchymal neurocutaneous melanosis in association with intraventricular dermoid and Dandy-walker variant: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Joo; Won, Yoo Dong; Kim, Ki Tae; Chang, Eun Deok; Huh, Pil Woo [The Catholic University of Korea, College of Medicine, Uijongbu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-06-15

    Neurocutaneous melanosis (NCM) is a rare congenital disease that is characterized by the presence of large or multiple congenital melanocytic nevi and melanotic lesions of the central nervous system. We report here on the CT and MR imaging findings of an unusual case of NCM that was associated with intraventricular dermoid and Dandy-Walker malformation.

  17. GPS constraints on shear accommodation in the northern Walker Lane, western Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, J. M.; Hammond, W. C.; Kreemer, C. W.; Blewitt, G.; Wesnousky, S. G.

    2009-12-01

    The Walker Lane is a zone of active intracontinental transtension that accommodates approximately 10 mm/yr of right-lateral deformation, up to 20-25% of Pacific-North America relative plate motion. Between Walker Lake and Lake Tahoe, the Walker Lane lacks optimally oriented strike-slip faults to accommodate northwest-directed dextral shear. In this region Quaternary deformation appears to be concentrated in a northwest-trending series of north-striking, normal fault-bounded basins. To address the question of how shear is transferred through this portion of the Walker Lane, we combine GPS data from the University of Nevada, Reno’s semi-continuous MAGNET GPS network with observations from EarthScope’s Plate Boundary Observatory to present a new velocity field for the Walker Lane with an average station spacing of 20 km. Measurements in MAGNET (http://geodesy.unr.edu/networks) began in January 2004 and now provide time series of up to 6 years for the longest running sites and >3 years for all sites. Together with recent improvements in GPS data processing models using the GIPSY-OASIS II software, this allows us to estimate rates with uncertainty well below 1 mm/yr. These recent improvements include the use of reprocessed GPS orbits from the IGS Analysis Center at JPL. Our GPS processing now includes satellite and station antenna calibrations, random-walk tropospheric zenith delay and gradients using the GMF mapping function, second-order ionospheric corrections, global-scale ambiguity resolution using our custom Ambizap software, and our custom Great Basin spatially-filtered reference frame. The velocity solution shows a smooth and continuous increase in shear across the Walker Lane in addition to NW-SE directed extension. We use a block model driven by GPS velocities to estimate the role that vertical axis rotation of fault-bounded blocks and slip on basin-bounding faults play in shear accommodation. The block model also allows us to incorporate published

  18. Active transtensional intracontinental basins: Walker Lane in the western Great Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayko, Angela S.; Bursik, Marcus

    2012-01-01

    The geometry and dimensions of sedimentary basins within the Walker Lane are a result of Plio-Pleistocene transtensive deformation and partial detachment of the Sierra Nevada crustal block from the North American plate. Distinct morpho-tectonic domains lie within this active transtensive zone. The northeast end of the Walker Lane is partly buried by active volcanism of the southern Cascades, and adjacent basins are filled or poorly developed. To the south, the basin sizes are moderate, 25–45km × 15–10 km, with narrow 8-12km wide mountain ranges mainly oriented N-S to NNE. These basins form subparallel arrays in discrete zones trending about 300° and have documented clockwise rotation. This is succeeded to the south by a releasing stepover domain ∼85-100km wide, where the basins are elongated E-W to ENE, small (∼15-30km long, 5-15km wide), and locally occupied by active volcanic centers. The southernmost part of the Walker Lane is structurally integrated, with high to extreme relief. Adjacent basins are elongate, 50-200km long and ∼5 -20km wide. Variations in transtensive basin orientations in the Walker Lane are largely attributable to variations in strain partitioning. Large basins in the Walker Lane have 2-6km displacement across basin bounding faults with up to 3 km of clastic accumulation based on gravity and drill hole data. The sedimentary deposits of the basins may include interbedded volcanic deposits with bimodal basaltic and rhyolitic associations. The basins may include lacustrine deposits that record a wide range of water chemistry from cold fresh water conditions to saline-evaporative

  19. Extraction of user's navigation commands from upper body force interaction in walker assisted gait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pons José L

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The advances in technology make possible the incorporation of sensors and actuators in rollators, building safer robots and extending the use of walkers to a more diverse population. This paper presents a new method for the extraction of navigation related components from upper-body force interaction data in walker assisted gait. A filtering architecture is designed to cancel: (i the high-frequency noise caused by vibrations on the walker's structure due to irregularities on the terrain or walker's wheels and (ii the cadence related force components caused by user's trunk oscillations during gait. As a result, a third component related to user's navigation commands is distinguished. Results For the cancelation of high-frequency noise, a Benedict-Bordner g-h filter was designed presenting very low values for Kinematic Tracking Error ((2.035 ± 0.358·10-2 kgf and delay ((1.897 ± 0.3697·101ms. A Fourier Linear Combiner filtering architecture was implemented for the adaptive attenuation of about 80% of the cadence related components' energy from force data. This was done without compromising the information contained in the frequencies close to such notch filters. Conclusions The presented methodology offers an effective cancelation of the undesired components from force data, allowing the system to extract in real-time voluntary user's navigation commands. Based on this real-time identification of voluntary user's commands, a classical approach to the control architecture of the robotic walker is being developed, in order to obtain stable and safe user assisted locomotion.

  20. Subtalar joint kinematic correlations with footprint arch index in race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvira, J L L; Vera-García, F J; Meana, M

    2008-06-01

    The aim of the paper was to analyze the relationship between footprint arch index and subtalar joint movement in race walkers. Thirteen young, highly skilled race walkers volunteered to participate. We obtained dominant-foot footprints in a bipedal stance. The arch index was measured to classify arch height. We also conducted a photogrammetric video-3D study on a running track. The support phase was recorded while subjects race walked at their individual competition speed. We calculated 4 angle time series describing the ankle joint kinematics during the support phase. Five specific step instants were calculated for each angle and correlated with the arch index. Race walkers were grouped according to arch height to compare. We also correlated the arch index with the time in medial support, and time to change from lateral to medial support during the stance phase. In the calcaneal angle we found correlations with the footprint (r=0.81; Prace walkers adopt a characteristic propulsion technique in the end of the support. No statistical differences were found in the rearfoot angle, which has been previously associated to specific injuries in running. In conclusion, race walkers with higher arches exhibit a more pronounced support with the lateral side of the foot and they do so for a longer time. Conversely, subjects with flatter feet support with the medial side of the foot. The footprint has been found to be a good predictor for the technique employed with respect to the medial and lateral strike of the foot reflected by the calcaneal angle. Coaches should keep this in mind from both performance and injury prevention viewpoints.

  1. Ground reaction force and 3D biomechanical characteristics of walking in short-leg walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Songning; Clowers, Kurt G; Powell, Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Short-leg walking boots offer several advantages over traditional casts. However, their effects on ground reaction forces (GRF) and three-dimensional (3D) biomechanics are not fully understood. The purpose of the study was to examine 3D lower extremity kinematics and joint dynamics during walking in two different short-leg walking boots. Eleven (five females and six males) healthy subjects performed five level walking trials in each of three conditions: two testing boot conditions, Gait Walker (DeRoyal Industries, Inc.) and Equalizer (Royce Medical Co.), and one pair of laboratory shoes (Noveto, Adidas). A force platform and a 6-camera Vicon motion analysis system were used to collect GRFs and 3D kinematic data during the testing session. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate selected kinematic, GRF, and joint kinetic variables (p<0.05). The results revealed that both short-leg walking boots were effective in minimizing ankle eversion and hip adduction. Neither walker increased the bimodal vertical GRF peaks typically observed in normal walking. However, they did impose a small initial peak (<1BW) earlier in the stance phase. The Gait Walker also exhibited a slightly increased vertical GRF during midstance. These characteristics may be related to the sole materials/design, the restriction of ankle movements, and/or the elevated heel heights of the tested walkers. Both walkers appeared to increase the demand on the knee extensors while they decreased the demand of the knee and hip abductors based on the joint kinetic results.

  2. Redescripción de Mastrus ridibundus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, parasitoide introducido en la Argentina para el control de Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae Redescription of Mastrus ridibundus (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, parasitoid introduced for the control of Cydia pomonella (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Torréns

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Se redescribe el agente de biocontrol introducido en la Argentina, Mastrus ridibundus (Gravenhorst (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae, para el control de Cydia pomonella (L. y se aportan nuevos caracteres para su identificación.The bio-control agent introduced in Argentina Mastrus ridibundus (Gravenhorst (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae for the control of Cydia pomonella (L. is redescribed, providing new characters for the species.

  3. Estudios etológicos en Hymenoptera (insecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge F. Genise

    1986-01-01

    Full Text Available Esta revisión sobre los estudios etológicos en Hymenoptera plP.- tende destacar la forma tan particular en que la etología es encarada en este grupo de insectos, resaltando ciertas modalidades y conceptos, algunos de ellos de posible aplicación en otros grupos, cspecialmente de invertebrados. Los puntos sobresalientes pueden resumirse así; 1 El estudio de los grupos de Hymenoptera solitarios cercanamente emparentados con los sociales, para rastrear evolutivamente los patrones de comportamiento que ya presentes en las especies no sociales se habrían combinado para dar una conducta social. 2 La división en fases de esta evolución como esquema básico para encarar las investigaciones y la búsqueda de modelos de transición entre fases que permitan ejemplificar sin discontinuidades importantes el proceso evolutivo. 3 El estudio de la filogenia de otros patrones de comportamiento no directamente relacionados con la conducta social, que alcanzan su máxima expresión en grupos no sociales. 4 El estudio del comportamiento de los organismos que posiblemente hayan actuado como agentes selectivos en la evolución. 5 La contribución que los estudios etológicos hacen a la ecología, al esclarecer ciertos aspectos relacionados con la inserción de las especies en los ecosistemas

  4. A New Species of Vespula, and First Record of Vespa crabro L. (Hymenoptera:Vespidae) from Guatemala, Central America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vespula akrei Landolt sp. nov. (Hymenoptera:Vespidae; Vespinae) is described from Guatemala. The first record of Vespa crabro L. (Hymenoptera:Vespidae:Vespinae) in Guatemala is given, and Vespula Inexspectata Eck (1994) from Mexico is re-described. We place Vespula akrei sp. nov. in the Vespula vulg...

  5. Experimental model of ultrasound thermotherapy in rats inoculated with Walker-236 tumor Modelo experimental de termoterapia ultrassônica em ratos inoculados com tumor de Walker-236

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Carlos Otaviano David Morano

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To develop a model to evaluate the effects of focal pulsed ultrasound (US waves as a source of heat for treatment of murine subcutaneous implanted Walker tumor. METHODS: An experimental, controlled, comparative study was conducted. Twenty male Wistar rats (160-300 g randomized in 2 equal groups (G-1: Control and G-2: Hyperthermia were inoculated with Walker-256 carcinosarcoma tumor. After 5 days G-2 rats were submitted to 45ºC hyperthermia. Heat was delivered directly to the tumor by an ultrasound (US equipment (3 MHz frequency, 1,5W/cm³. Tumor temperature reached 45º C in 3 minutes and was maintained at this level for 5 minutes. Tumor volume was measured on days 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 post inoculation in both groups. Unpaired t-test was used for comparison. POBJETIVO: Desenvolver um modelo para avaliar os efeitos do ultra-som focal pulsado como fonte de calor para o tratamento de tumores de Walker subcutâneos implantados em ratos. MÉTODOS: Um estudo experimental, controlado, comparativo foi realizado. Vinte ratos Wistar machos (160-300 g divididos em dois grupos (G-1: Controle e G-2: hipertermia foram inoculados com tumor de Walker carcinossarcoma-256. Após cinco dias os ratos do grupo G-2 ratos foram submetidos a hipertermia (45ºC. O calor foi aplicado diretamente no tumor por um equipamento de ultrassonografia (3 MHz, 1,5 W/cm³. A temperatura no tumor atingiu 45ºC em 3 minutos e foi mantida nesse nível por 5 minutos. O volume do tumor foi medido nos dias 5, 8, 11, 14 e 17 após a inoculação, em ambos os grupos. Teste t não pareado foi utilizado para comparação. P <0,05 foi considerado significante. RESULTADOS: O volume do tumor foi significativamente maior no 5º dia e diminuiu nos dias 11, 14 e 17 nos ratos tratados. Animais submetidos à hipertermia sobreviveram mais tempo que os animais do grupo controle. No 29º dia após a inoculação do tumor, 40% dos ratos do grupo controle e 77,78% dos ratos tratados com

  6. Coexistance of cerebral sinovenous thrombosis and Dandy Walker malformation in newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gverić-Ahmetasević, Snjezana; Colić, Ana; Gverić, Tugomir; Gasparović, Vesna Elvedi; Pavlisa, Goran; Ozretić, David

    2011-01-01

    Cerebral sinovenous thrombosis in neonatal period may cause neurological impairment, epilepsy, and lead to stroke. It is caused primarily by coagulopathy of numerous reasons, occasionally perinatal asphyxia, traumatic delivery and hyperhomocysteinemia. Dandy-Walker malformation is characterized by agenesis or hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and enlargement of the posterior fossa. Dandy-Walker malformation, variant, and mega cisterna magna represent a spectrum of developmental anomalies. Insults to developing cerebellar hemispheres and the fourth ventricle are believed to be the cause of malformation. Our patient was born from noncomplicated pregnancy, noncomplicated nontraumatic vaginal delivery at term, excellent Apgar scores, without peculiarities in clinical status. She was brest-fed by the 42nd hour of life when she had rightsided seizures during sleep that repeated for five times in next 24 hours. Brain Ultrasound (US) revealed clot in left lateral ventricle, slight dilatation of left ventricle, both sided periventricular echodensity, ischemia, slight enlargement of forth ventricle and a bit smaller cerebellum. There was no visible flow through left transverse, superior sagittal and straight sinus. Magnetic Resonance (MRI) confirmed the finding and showed thrombosis of left and right transverse venous sinuses and confluence of sinuses. Electroencephalogram (EEG) showed leftsided focal changes. The newborn was treated with phenobarbiton for 8 days and had no convulsions during that period. All coagulation parameters, homocistein, lipoproteins (a) and D-dimers were normal. There were no mutations on FV R506Q, PT 20210A, MTHFR 677C/T. No antiphospholipides were found. Heart US showed no structural anomalies. No other patology or risk factors were present at the time. Before discharge, US showed hydrocephalus. Flow in affected sinuses was visible with color Doppler. MRI showed recanalization of affected sinuses, also

  7. Finite difference method to find period-one gait cycles of simple passive walkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardel, Morteza; Safartoobi, Masoumeh; Pashaei, Mohammad Hadi; Ghasemi, Mohammad Hassan; Navaei, Mostafa Kazemi

    2015-01-01

    Passive dynamic walking refers to a class of bipedal robots that can walk down an incline with no actuation or control input. These bipeds are sensitive to initial conditions due to their style of walking. According to small basin of attraction of passive limit cycles, it is important to start with an initial condition in the basin of attraction of stable walking (limit cycle). This paper presents a study of the simplest passive walker with point and curved feet. A new approach is proposed to find proper initial conditions for a pair of stable and unstable period-one gait limit cycles. This methodology is based on finite difference method which can solve the nonlinear differential equations of motion on a discrete time. Also, to investigate the physical configurations of the walkers and the environmental influence such as the slope angle, the parameter analysis is applied. Numerical simulations reveal the performance of the presented method in finding two stable and unstable gait patterns.

  8. Evaluation of Bone Cancer Pain Induced by Different Doses of Walker 256 Mammary Gland Carcinoma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Changsheng; Wu, RuiXin; Wu, Jing; Guo, Jing; Wang, Fangyuan; Fu, Yanli; Wang, Qing; Xu, Ling; Wang, Juyong

    2016-01-01

    Cancer pain is a complex medical syndrome. Understanding its underlying mechanisms relies on the use of animal models which can mimic the human condition. A crucial component of this model is the quantity of tumor cells; however, the exact relationship between the doses of tumor cells on bone cancer pain is yet unknown. We explored the relationship of different doses of Walker 256 carcinoma cells using a bone cancer pain model in rats, and evaluated its success and stability. Experimental animal study using a comparative design. Experimental Animal Center and Tumor Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine. We constructed the bone cancer pain model by implanting Walker 256 carcinoma cells into the right tibia of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats (150 - 170 g). Spontaneous pain, mechanical threshold, and paw withdrawal latency (PWL) were measured and x-ray, bone mineral density (BMD), histological, interleukin-1 beta (IL-1beta) mRNA, carboxyterminal telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP), and bone alkaline phosphatase (BAP) were analyzed for bone pain model evaluation. The results showed that: (1) the 3 doses (3×105, 3.5×105, 4×105) of Walker 256 carcinoma cells can induce bone cancer pain from day 7 to day 21 after implantation into the right tibia of SD rats; (2) compared to the control group, 3×105, 3.5×105, and 4×105 Walker 256 carcinoma cells produced different pain manifestations, where the 3.5×105 dose of Walker 256 carcinoma cells resulted in the greatest bone cancer pain response; (3) the 3.5×105 dose induced the lowest mortality rate in rats; (4) Walker 256 carcinoma cells (3×105, 3.5×105, and 4×105) resulted in a significant decrease in the general condition and body weight of rats, where the 3.5×105 and 4×105 doses of carcinoma cells produced a greater effect than 3×105 dose of carcinoma cells; (5) progressive spontaneous pain, PWL, and mechanical threshold were exacerbated by 3.5×105 and 4×105 doses of carcinoma cells; (6) implantation of 3.5×105

  9. Impulsive behavior and recurrent major depression associated with dandy-walker variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji Hyun; Kim, Tae Ho; Choi, Young Chil; Chung, Soon-Cheol; Moon, Seok Woo

    2013-09-01

    Reported herein is a case of recurrent major depression with impulse control difficulty in a 33-year-old man with Dandy-Walker variant. He was diagnosed as having major depressive disorder a year before he presented himself to the authors' hospital, and had a history of three-time admission to a psychiatric unit in the previous 12 months. He was readmitted and treated with sodium valporate 1,500 mg/day, mirtazapine 45 mg/day, and quetiapine 800 mg/day during the three months that he was confined in the authors' hospital, and the symptoms were reduced within three months but remained thereafter. This is the only case so far reporting recurrent depression with impulse control difficulty associated with Dandy-Walker variant. This case implies that any cerebellar lesion may cause the appearance of recurrent depression with impulse control difficulty in major depressive disorder.

  10. Nasopharyngeal teratoma, congenital diaphragmatic hernia and Dandy-Walker malformation - a yet uncharacterized syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, N; Shastri, S; Singh, P K; Jana, M; Mridha, A; Verma, G; Kabra, M

    2016-11-01

    An association of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, dandy walker malformation and nasopharyngeal teratoma is very rare. Here, we report a fourth case with this association where chromosomal microarray and whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed to understand the underlying genetic basis. Findings of few variants especially a novel variation in HIRA provided some insights. An association of congenital diaphragmatic hernia, dandy walker malformation and nasopharyngeal teratoma is very rare. Here, we report a fourth case with this association where chromosomal microarray and whole exome sequencing (WES) was performed to understand the underlying genetic basis. Findings of few variants especially a novel variation in HIRA provided some insights. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Dandy-Walker syndrome with severe velopharyngeal dysfunction: a contraindication for Le Fort I surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelke, Kamil H; Pawlak, Wojciech; Gerber, Hanna

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome is a rare congenital brain deformation. Most symptoms are related with fourth ventricle and skull base malformations. Quite often, symptoms develop from infancy or progress rapidly. Cerebellar dysfunction, lack of muscle coordination, and skull deformities involving eye movement might be present. There are several Dandy-Walker syndrome complex types. We present a 23-year-old patient who had a severe dentofacial deformity with mandibular prognathism and extremely undeveloped maxillary bone resulting in palatopharyngeal and velopharyngeal dysfunction with complete lack of soft palate function resulting in increased speech tone and volume. Performing Le Fort I osteotomy in this case is greatly controversial and might result in even greater loss of function or even its total lack. Velopharyngeal complex is very important, and every surgeon should consider its value while planning Le Fort I osteotomies.

  12. Dandy-Walker Variant with Schizophrenia: Comorbidity or Cerebellar Cognitive Affective Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Pallavi; Tarwani, Jatin; Kumar, Pankaj; Garg, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Dandy-Walker complex (DWC) is a series of neurodevelopmental anomalies involving the posterior cranial fossa. The cerebellum has long been considered to be involved in motor coordination and balance. However, it has now been noted to play an important role in higher order cognitive, emotional, and behavioral functions. The concept of cerebellar cognitive affective syndrome, describing a coherent spectrum of cognitive and behavioral disturbances in adults following cerebellar damage has long been proposed. There have been reported cases of co-occurring psychiatric symptoms and DWC in literature, but the conclusive evidence for an association between the same remains lacking. Herein, we report a case of schizophrenia presenting along with Dandy-Walker Variant.

  13. Schizophrenia-like psychosis and dandy-walker variant comorbidity: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkurt Zincir, Selma; Kıvılcım, Yiğit; Izci, Filiz; Semiz, Umit Basar

    2014-01-01

    Dandy-Walker variant is a developmental malformation consisting of cerebellar hypoplasia and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle. Previous research has proposed a possible role for the cerebellum in cognition and in schizophrenia. In this paper we report a schizophrenia-like psychotic disorder in a 30 year-old woman with Dandy-Walker variant. The patient was treated with risperidone 6 mg/day, biperiden 4 mg/day and risperidone depot 50 mg injections fortnightly, and most of the symptoms were ameliorated within 2 months. The similar cognitive profile to populations with cerebellar pathology and rarity of the condition strongly suggests that there may be direct relationship between cerebellar pathology and appearence of psychotic symptoms.

  14. KEANEKARAGAMAN HYMENOPTERA PARASITOID PADA PERKEBUNAN KELAPA SAWIT PTPN VIII CINDALI, BOGOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichsan Luqmana Indra Putra

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Diversity of parasitic Hymenoptera in PTPN VIII oil palm plantation Cindali, Bogor. One group of important natural enemies in oil palm plantation is parasitic Hymenoptera. The purpose of this research is to know the diversity and fluctuation of parasitic Hymenoptera PTPN VIII Cindali oil palm plantation. This research was conducted in 6 blocks of oil palm in September 2014 – June 2015. There were 5 plots in every observation blocks 39.2 x 39.2 m in size, and used direct and indirect method. Direct method done by 5 plants in every plots was taken randomized to observed and taken the herbivore insects to reared until the parasitic Hymenoptera came out. Observation of cover crops conducted by 3 subplots determined diagonally in every plots 9.8 x 9.8 m in size and herbivore insects was observed and collected. Indirect methods used sweep net and yellow pan trap. The result of this research, 26 parasitic Hymenoptera families was found, with the Braconidae was the most morphospecies found and the most individual amount was Scelionidae. The abundance of parasitoid in every month fluctuated.

  15. Hymenoptera venom allergy: work disability and occupational impact of venom immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolocci, Giulia; Folletti, Ilenia; Torén, Kjell; Muzi, Giacomo; Murgia, Nicola

    2014-08-06

    Little is known about the Hymenoptera venom allergy impact on work ability and the effect of venom immunotherapy (VIT) on work. The objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence and predictors of work disability in patients treated with VIT and the effects of VIT on occupational functioning. 181 patients, aged 18-71 years, treated with VIT while working, were investigated by questionnaire. Participants were classified into employed and self-employed and, based on work exposure to Hymenoptera, into three risk categories: high risk, occasionally high risk and low risk. Work disability was defined as having to have changed jobs/tasks and/or suffered economic loss because of Hymenoptera venom allergy. Predictors of work disability were assessed in logistic regression models. 31 (17%) patients reported work disability. Being self-employed and having the severe reaction at work were associated with work disability (pallergy could determine work disability. Patients with Hymenoptera venom allergy having a high-risk job for exposure to Hymenoptera seem to have higher risk of work disability and refer more frequently a positive effect of VIT on work. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  16. On the number of common sites visited by N random walkers

    CERN Document Server

    Turban, L

    2016-01-01

    Majumdar and Tamm [Phys. Rev. E 86 021135 (2012), arXiv:1206.6184] recently obtained analytical expressions for the mean number of common sites W_N(t) visited up to time t by N independent random walkers starting from the origin of a d-dimensional lattice. In this short note I show how the different regimes and the corresponding asymptotic power laws can be retrieved using the notion of fractal intersection.

  17. Women in History--Madame C. J. Walker 1867-1919

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Germaine W.

    2009-01-01

    This article profiles Madame C. J. Walker. Sarah Breedlove was born on December 23, 1867, the fifth of six children of Owen and Minerva Breedlove. Sarah was the first of the Breedlove children to be born after the end of slavery. Her parents died when she was six or seven years of age. At age fourteen she married Moses McWilliams, who also died in…

  18. Comparisons between swing phase characteristics of race walkers and distance runners

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, LC; Hanley, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze swing characteristics during race walking and to compare these with distance running. The rules of race walking demand that no visible flight time should occur and the stance leg must be straightened from initial contact to midstance. Previous research has not examined whether these rules also have an effect on swing and what consequences might arise. Ten male race walkers and ten male distance runners walked or ran respectively on an instrumented treadmil...

  19. Paciente com variante da síndrome de Dandy Walker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robson Luis Ribeiro Andrade Filho

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available O quadro que seria conhecido atualmente como Síndrome de Dandy Walker, foi caracterizada por um conjunto de sinais derivados de alterações na embriogênese, principalmente no que tange a gênese do sistema nervoso central. A patogenia é classificada majoritariamente em três formas, sendo a mais comum a variante de Dandy Walker. Tem-se por objetivo, o relato do caso de um paciente masculino, 3 meses de idade, portador da Variante da Síndrome de Dandy Walker. O paciente apresentava ao exame físico geral e específico dos sistemas: macrocefalia, hidrocele, apêndices em mãos e pés, microgenitália, hérnia inguinal. Em relação ao acometimento cardíaco, havia dilatação ventricular esquerda, bulhas hipofonéticas e sopros holossistólicos. Na ressonância magnética foi observada ausência de vermis cerebelar e aumento anormal do quarto ventrículo. Método: as informações foram obtidas mediante revisão de prontuário, exames de imagem e levantamento para estudo de literatura específica referente ao caso. Considerações finais e relevância: o caso relatado e o estudo das referências apontam a caracterização do paciente na variante de Dandy Walker, tendo em consideração seu fenótipo variável. Malformações devem ser pesquisadas intra e extracranianas através de pesquisa clínica e radiológica, de forma a minimizar as taxas de mortalidade em recém-nascidos portadores da síndrome.

  20. Performance of trichogrammatids as biocontrol agents of Pseudoplusia includens Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Regiane C. O. F. Bueno; Parra,José R.P.; Bueno, Adeney F.; HADDAD, Marinéia L

    2009-01-01

    Este estudo objetivou selecionar as linhagens de tricogramatídeos mais adequadas ao controle da lagarta falsa-medideira, Pseudoplusia includens Walker. Foram avaliados os parâmetros biológicos e a taxa de parasitismo de 11 linhagens de Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, uma linhagem de Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman & Platner e uma linhagem de Trichogrammatoidea annulata De Santis, criadas em ovos de P. includens. Entre as espécies/linhagens avaliadas, a linhagem T. pretiosum RV, coletada em Rio...

  1. New Analytical Solution of the Equilibrium Ampere's Law Using the Walker's Method: a Didactic Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, A. N. Laurindo; Ojeda-González, A.; Prestes, A.; Klausner, V.; Caritá, L. A.

    2017-12-01

    This work aims to demonstrate the analytical solution of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation or generalized Ampere's law, which is important in the studies of self-consistent 2.5-D solution for current sheet structures. A detailed mathematical development is presented to obtain the generating function as shown by Walker (RSPSA 91, 410, 1915). Therefore, we study the general solution of the GS equation in terms of the Walker's generating function in details without omitting any step. The Walker's generating function g(ζ) is written in a new way as the tangent of an unspecified function K(ζ). In this trend, the general solution of the GS equation is expressed as exp(- 2Ψ) = 4|K '(ζ)|2/cos2[K(ζ) - K(ζ ∗)]. In order to investigate whether our proposal would simplify the mathematical effort to find new generating functions, we use Harris's solution as a test, in this case K(ζ) = arctan(exp(i ζ)). In summary, one of the article purposes is to present a review of the Harris's solution. In an attempt to find a simplified solution, we propose a new way to write the GS solution using g(ζ) = tan(K(ζ)). We also present a new analytical solution to the equilibrium Ampere's law using g(ζ) = cosh(b ζ), which includes a generalization of the Harris model and presents isolated magnetic islands.

  2. Test pilots 1962 - Thompson, McKay, Dana, Armstrong, Peterson, Butchart, Walker

    Science.gov (United States)

    1962-01-01

    A group photo of NASA research pilots at the front door of the Flight Research Center headquarters building. In the front row are (left to right) Milt Thompson, Jack McKay, and Bill Dana. All three flew the X-15, and Thompson and Dana were also involved in the lifting body flights. McKay was injured in a crash landing in X-15 #2. Although he recovered, the injuries eventually forced him to retire from research flying. In the back row (left to right) are Neil Armstrong, Bruce Peterson, Stanley Butchart, and Joe Walker. Armstrong and Walker also both flew the X-15. Soon after this photo was taken, Armstrong was selected as an astronaut, and seven years later became the first man to walk on the Moon. Walker made the highest flight in the X-15, reaching 354,200 feet. He then went on to fly the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle, and was killed on June 8, 1966 when his F-104N collided with the XB-70. Peterson made the first flight in the HL-10 lifting body, and was later badly injured in the crash of the M2-F2 lifting body. Butchart flew a wide range of research missions in the 1950s, and was the B-29 drop plane pilot for a number of rocket flight.

  3. Detection of Gait Perturbations Based on Proprioceptive Information. Application to Limit Cycle Walkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Gallego

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Walking on irregular surfaces and in the presence of unexpected events is a challenging problem for bipedal machines. Up to date, their ability to cope with gait disturbances is far less successful than humans’: Neither trajectory controlled robots, nor dynamic walking machines (Limit Cycle Walkers are able to handle them satisfactorily. On the contrary, humans reject gait perturbations naturally and efficiently relying on their sensory organs that, if needed, elicit a recovery action. A similar approach may be envisioned for bipedal robots and exoskeletons: An algorithm continuously observes the state of the walker and, if an unexpected event happens, triggers an adequate reaction. This paper presents a monitoring algorithm that provides immediate detection of any type of perturbation based solely on a phase representation of the normal walking of the robot. The proposed method was evaluated in a Limit Cycle Walker prototype that suffered push and trip perturbations at different moments of the gait cycle, providing 100% successful detections for the current experimental apparatus and adequately tuned parameters, with no false positives when the robot is walking unperturbed.

  4. HitWalker2: visual analytics for precision medicine and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottomly, Daniel; McWeeney, Shannon K; Wilmot, Beth

    2016-04-15

    The lack of visualization frameworks to guide interpretation and facilitate discovery is a potential bottleneck for precision medicine, systems genetics and other studies. To address this we have developed an interactive, reproducible, web-based prioritization approach that builds on our earlier work. HitWalker2 is highly flexible and can utilize many data types and prioritization methods based upon available data and desired questions, allowing it to be utilized in a diverse range of studies such as cancer, infectious disease and psychiatric disorders. Source code is freely available at https://github.com/biodev/HitWalker2 and implemented using Python/Django, Neo4j and Javascript (D3.js and jQuery). We support major open source browsers (e.g. Firefox and Chromium/Chrome). wilmotb@ohsu.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. Additional information/instructions are available at https://github.com/biodev/HitWalker2/wiki. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  5. Do Canes or Walkers Make Any Difference? NonUse and Fall Injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Clare; Bush, Tamara; Shen, Xiaoxi

    2017-04-01

    Examine patterns of cane and walker use as related to falls and fall injuries. Among people who fall at home, most do not have an assistive device with them when they fall. Nonusers who fall sustain more severe injuries. This was a cross-sectional study using a self-administered written survey completed by 262 people aged 60 and older who were community dwelling, cognitively intact, and current cane/walker users with a history of falls. They were recruited through clinical practice sites, churches, and senior housing in central Michigan. Outcomes of interest included patterns of device use, reasons for nonuse, device use at time of fall, and fall-related injuries. Seventy-five percent of respondents who fell were not using their device at the time of fall despite stating that canes help prevent falls. Reasons for nonuse included believing it was not needed, forgetfulness, the device made them feel old, and inaccessibility. Perceived risk was not high enough to engage in self-protective behavior. However, nonuse led to a significantly higher proportion of falls resulting in surgery than among device users. Among respondents requiring surgery, 100% were nonusers. Most respondents never received a home safety evaluation (68%) and only 50% received training on proper device use. Providers must place increased emphasis on the importance of cane/walker use for injury prevention through patient education to promote personal relevance, proper fitting, and training. New strategies are needed to improve device acceptability and accessibility.

  6. New Analytical Solution of the Equilibrium Ampere's Law Using the Walker's Method: a Didactic Example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, A. N. Laurindo; Ojeda-González, A.; Prestes, A.; Klausner, V.; Caritá, L. A.

    2018-02-01

    This work aims to demonstrate the analytical solution of the Grad-Shafranov (GS) equation or generalized Ampere's law, which is important in the studies of self-consistent 2.5-D solution for current sheet structures. A detailed mathematical development is presented to obtain the generating function as shown by Walker (RSPSA 91, 410, 1915). Therefore, we study the general solution of the GS equation in terms of the Walker's generating function in details without omitting any step. The Walker's generating function g( ζ) is written in a new way as the tangent of an unspecified function K( ζ). In this trend, the general solution of the GS equation is expressed as exp(- 2Ψ) = 4| K '( ζ)|2/cos2[ K( ζ) - K( ζ ∗)]. In order to investigate whether our proposal would simplify the mathematical effort to find new generating functions, we use Harris's solution as a test, in this case K( ζ) = arctan(exp( i ζ)). In summary, one of the article purposes is to present a review of the Harris's solution. In an attempt to find a simplified solution, we propose a new way to write the GS solution using g( ζ) = tan( K( ζ)). We also present a new analytical solution to the equilibrium Ampere's law using g( ζ) = cosh( b ζ), which includes a generalization of the Harris model and presents isolated magnetic islands.

  7. Protective Effect of Metformin Against Walker 256 Tumor Growth is Not Dependent on Metabolism Improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudinéia Conationi da Silva Franco

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The objective of the current work was to test the effect of metformin on the tumor growth in rats with metabolic syndrome. Methods: We obtained pre-diabetic hyperinsulinemic rats by neonatal treatment with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG, which were chronically treated every day, from weaning to 100 day old, with dose of metformin (250 mg/kg body weight. After the end of metformin treatment, the control and MSG rats, treated or untreated with metformin, were grafted with Walker 256 carcinoma cells. Tumor weight was evaluated 14 days after cancer cell inoculation. The blood insulin, glucose levels and glucose-induced insulin secretion were evaluated. Results: Chronic metformin treatment improved the glycemic homeostasis in pre-diabetic MSG-rats, glucose intolerance, tissue insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and decreased the fat tissue accretion. Meanwhile, the metformin treatment did not interfere with the glucose insulinotropic effect on isolated pancreatic islets. Chronic treatment with metformin was able to decrease the Walker 256 tumor weight by 37% in control and MSG rats. The data demonstrated that the anticancer effect of metformin is not related to its role in correcting metabolism imbalances, such as hyperinsulinemia. However, in morphological assay to apoptosis, metformin treatment increased programmed cell death. Conclusion: Metformin may have a direct effect on cancer growth, and it may programs the rat organism to attenuate the growth of Walker 256 carcinoma.

  8. Effects of aquatic walking exercise using a walker in a chronic stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Tadashi; Akezaki, Yoshiteru

    2017-07-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to examine the usefulness of aquatic walking exercise using a walker for chronic stroke patients. We also examined the psychological effects on the study subject and the primary caregiver before and after aquatic walking exercise. [Subject and Methods] The subject was a 60-year-old male with bilateral paralysis after a cerebrovascular accident. The Fugl-Meyer Assessment (FMA) total score was 116 on the right and 115 on the left. The intervention combined aquatic and land walking exercise. A U-shaped walker was used for both water and land exercise. Continuous walking distance was the measure used to evaluate land walking ability. The psychological effects on the study subject and the primary caregiver were examined with the questionnaire. [Results] In aquatic walking, the mean time to walk 5 m showed an increase from the intervention after two months. After the aquatic walking and land walking combination, continuous walking distance also showed a prolonged trend. In the survey given to the main caregivers, improvements were observed. [Conclusion] Aquatic walking practice using a walker improved motivation in a chronic stroke patient, leading to improved walking ability, with a positive psychological influence on the participant and family caregiver.

  9. [Genetic analysis of two cases with Dandy-Walker deformed fetus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Juan; Fang, Rong; Shen, Xueping; Shen, Guosong; Zhang, Su

    2017-10-10

    To explore the genetic etiology of two fetuses with Dandy-Walker malformation using single nucleotide polymorphism microarray (SNP-array). The fetuses and their parents were subjected to G banding karyotype analysis. The fetuses were also subjected to SNP-array analysis. The parents of both fetuses showed a normal karyotype. One fetus has a 46,X,?i(X)(q10), while for another conventional cell culture has failed. SNP-array showed that one fetus carried a 6p25.3p25.2 microdeletion, and another carried a Xp22.33p22.2 deletion and a Yq11.221q11 duplication. The abnormal fragments have involved FOXC1, SHOX and STS genes, which are associated with Dandy-Walker malformation. Alteration of 6p25.3p25.2, Xp22.33p22.2 copy numbers probably underlies the Dandy-Walker syndrome in the fetuses. The disorder may be attributed to abnormal expression of FOXC1, SHOX, and STS genes. SNP-array can provide an important supplement for prenatal diagnosis.

  10. A Novel Function for the Conserved Glutamate Residue in the Walker B Motif of Replication Factor C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda B. Bloom

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In all domains of life, sliding clamps tether DNA polymerases to DNA to increase the processivity of synthesis. Clamp loaders load clamps onto DNA in a multi-step process that requires ATP binding and hydrolysis. Like other AAA+ proteins, clamp loaders contain conserved Walker A and Walker B sequence motifs, which participate in ATP binding and hydrolysis, respectively. Mutation of the glutamate residue in Walker B motifs (or DExx-boxes in AAA+ proteins typically reduces ATP hydrolysis by as much as a couple orders of magnitude, but has no effect on ATP binding. Here, the Walker B Glu in each of the four active ATP sites of the eukaryotic clamp loader, RFC, was mutated to Gln and Ala separately, and ATP binding- and hydrolysis-dependent activities of the quadruple mutant clamp loaders were characterized. Fluorescence-based assays were used to measure individual reaction steps required for clamp loading including clamp binding, clamp opening, DNA binding and ATP hydrolysis. Our results show that the Walker B mutations affect ATP-binding-dependent interactions of RFC with the clamp and DNA in addition to reducing ligand-dependent ATP hydrolysis activity. Here, we show that the Walker B glutamate is required for ATP-dependent ligand binding activity, a previously unknown function for this conserved Glu residue in RFC.

  11. Land-sea thermal contrast determines the trend of Walker circulation simulated in atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yim, Bo Young; Yeh, Sang-Wook; Song, Hwan-Jin; Dommenget, Dietmar; Sohn, B. J.

    2017-06-01

    Strengthening or weakening of the Walker circulation can highly influence the global weather and climate variability by altering the location and strength of tropical heating. Therefore, there is considerable interest in understanding the mechanisms that lead to the trends in the Walker circulation intensity. Conventional wisdom indicates that a strengthening or weakening of the Walker circulation is primarily controlled by inhomogeneous sea surface temperature (SST) patterns across the tropical Pacific basin. However, we show that Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project climate model simulations with identical SST forcing have different Walker circulation trends that can be linked to differences in land surface temperatures. More prominently, stronger land-sea thermal contrast leads to increases in the precipitation in South America as well as the sea level pressure in the eastern tropical Pacific through a local circulation, resulting in a strengthening of the Walker circulation trend. This implies that correctly simulating the land temperature in atmospheric models is crucial to simulating the intensity of the Walker circulation in the present climate as well as its future change.

  12. Predator deterrence by mandibular gland secretions of bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cane, J H

    1986-06-01

    Volatile lipids from the mandibular gland secretions of bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) are potent olfactory repellents of foraging ants (Formica, Crematogaster) in biologically relevant contexts and quantities. In contrast, differential success in capture of bee and fly prey by predatory asilid flies (Efferia), reduviid bugs (Apiomerus), and arachnids (Agelenopsis, Argiope) is better explained by prey size than by chemical repellence, aposematism, or possession of a sting. Supernormal doses of some allomones, applied to worker honeybees (Apis mellifera) that were fed toArgiope aurantia spiders, elicted more frequent preenvenomation pauses following ensnarement but did not significantly increase other prey-handling times. These pauses merely delayed the bee's demise. Mandibular gland secretions of solitary bees augment their other secondary defenses in at least two contexts: (1) during intranest encounters when repelling intruding ants, and (2) retaliation delivered to their arthropodan predators which, if the bee is nearly too large for the predator to handle, may allow the bee to escape.

  13. New records of spider wasps (Hymenoptera, Pompilidae from Colombia

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    Ana Castro Huertas

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available New records of genera and species of spider wasps (Hymenoptera: Pompilidae from Colombia are provided. Agenioideus, Cryptocheilus, Evagetes, Mystacagenia, and Xerochares are newly recorded genera from Colombia. Nineteen species are first recorded from Colombia: Aimatocare vitrea (Fox; Ageniella azteca (Cameron; Ageniella curtipinus (Cameron; Ageniella fallax (Arlé; Ageniella hirsuta Banks; Ageniella pilifrons (Cameron; Ageniella pretiosa Banks; Ageniella sanguinolenta (Smith; Ageniella zeteki (Banks; Agenioideus birkmanni (Banks; Aporus (Aporus cuzco Evans; Aporus (Cosmiaporus diverticulus (Fox; Aporus (Notoplaniceps canescens Smith; Euplaniceps exilis (Banks; Euplaniceps herbertii (Fox; Irenangelus clarus Evans; Mystacagenia bellula Evans; Phanochilus nobilitatus (Smith and Xerochares expulsus Schulz. The following species and genera have their occurence ranges expanded for South America: Ageniella azteca (Cameron; Ageniella zeteki (Banks; Agenioideus birkmanni (Banks; and Xerochares expulsus Schulz; Cryptocheilus Panzer; and Xerochares Evans.

  14. On the identity of Melipona torrida Friese (Hymenoptera, Apidae

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    Gabriel A. R. Melo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available On the identity of Melipona torrida Friese (Hymenoptera, Apidae. Melipona marginata var. torrida Friese, 1916, described from three workers putatively collected in Costa Rica, never had its identity properly recognized. Since its original description, no additional specimens have ever been collected in Costa Rica. It is argued here that Melipona torrida was based on mislabeled specimens and corresponds to Melipona marginata obscurior Moure, 1971, a form known only from southern Brazil, Argentina and Paraguay. A lectotype is designated for Melipona torrida and notes on the type material of Melipona marginata obscurior are provided. Other known examples of species described from mislabeled specimens in Friese's Zur Bienenfauna von Costa Rica are discussed. It is pointed out that additional names proposed in this work, based on material from Costa Rica, might turn out to correspond to South American taxa. Also, the date of publication of this Friese's paper is discussed.

  15. An annotated catalogue of the Iranian Alysiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadallah, Neveen S; Ghahari, Hassan; Peris-Felipo, Francisco Javier; Fischer, Maximilian

    2015-06-19

    In the present study, a catalogue of the Iranian Alysiinae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) is given. It is based on a detailed study of all available published data. In total 78 species from 15 genera including Alloea Haliday, 1833 (1 species), Angelovia Zaykov, 1980 (1 species), Aphaereta Foerster, 1862 (2 species), Aspilota Foerster, 1862 (2 species), Chorebus Haliday, 1833 (42 species), Coelinidea Viereck, 1913 (2 species), Coloneura Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Dacnusa Haliday, 1833 (10 species), Dinotrema Foerster, 1862 (5 species), Idiasta Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Orthostigma Ratzeburg, 1844 (3 species), Phaenocarpa Foerster, 1862 (1 species), Protodacnusa Griffiths, 1964 (2 species), Pseudopezomachus Mantero, 1905 (2 species), and Synaldis Foerster, 1862 (3 species) are reported in this catalogue. Two species are new records for Iran: Coelinidea elegans (Curtis, 1829) and Dacnusa (Pachysema) aterrima Thomson, 1895. Also, a faunistic list with distribution data and host records is provided.

  16. Cytogenetic characterization of Partamona cupira (Hymenoptera, Apidae by fluorochromes

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    Jefferson de Brito Marthe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Four colonies of the stingless bee Partamona cupira (Hymenoptera: Apidae were cytogenetically analyzed using conventional staining and the fluorochromes CMA3 e DAPI. The females have 2n = 34 chromosomes (2K=32+2. Some females, however, presented an additional large B acrocentric chromosome, to a total of 2n = 35. Chromosome B and the chromosomal pairs 2, 9 and 10 showed CMA3+ bands, indicating an excess of CG base-pairs. A clear association was verified between the P. helleri B chromosome SCAR marker and the presence of a B chromosome in P. cupira. The data obtained suggests that B chromosomes in P. helleri and P. cupira share a common origin.

  17. Revision of the Paridris nephta species group (Hymenoptera, Platygastroidea, Platygastridae

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    Elijah Talamas

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The Paridris nephta group is revised (Hymenoptera: Platygastridae. Fifteen species are described, 14 of which are new: Paridris atrox Talamas, sp. n. (Yunnan Province, China, P. bunun Talamas, sp. n. (Taiwan, P. ferus Talamas, sp. n. (Thailand, P. kagemono Talamas, sp. n. (Japan, P. minator Talamas, sp. n. (Laos, Thailand, P. mystax Talamas, sp. n. (Laos, Thailand, P. nephta (Kozlov (Japan, North Korea, South Korea, Far Eastern Russia, P. nilaka Talamas, sp. n. (Thailand, P. reptilis Talamas, sp. n. (Taiwan, P. rugulosus Talamas, sp. n. (Laos, Vietnam, P. solaris Talamas, sp. n. (Laos, Thailand, Vietnam, P. teres Talamas, sp. n. (Vietnam, P. toketoki Talamas, sp. n. (Taiwan, P. verrucosus Talamas, sp. n. (Guangdong Province, China, P. yak Talamas, sp. n. (Thailand.

  18. Upper-Ocean Heat Balance Processes and the Walker Circulation in CMIP5 Model Projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, F. R.; Roberts, J. B.; Funk, C.; Lyon, B.; Ricciardulli, L.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable uncertainty remains as to the importance of mechanisms governing decadal and longer variability of the Walker Circulation, its connection to the tropical climate system, and prospects for tropical climate change in the face of anthropogenic forcing. Most contemporary climate models suggest that in response to elevated CO2 and a warmer but more stratified atmosphere, the required upward mass flux in tropical convection will diminish along with the Walker component of the tropical mean circulation as well. Alternatively, there is also evidence to suggest that the shoaling and increased vertical stratification of the thermocline in the eastern Pacific will enable a muted SST increase there-- preserving or even enhancing some of the dynamical forcing for the Walker cell flow. Over the past decade there have been observational indications of an acceleration in near-surface easterlies, a strengthened Pacific zonal SST gradient, and globally-teleconnected dislocations in precipitation. But is this evidence in support of an ocean dynamical thermostat process posited to accompany anthropogenic forcing, or just residual decadal fluctuations associated with variations in warm and cold ENSO events and other stochastic forcing? From a modeling perspective we try to make headway on this question by examining zonal variations in surface energy fluxes and dynamics governing tropical upper ocean heat content evolution in the WCRP CMIP5 model projections. There is some diversity among model simulations; for example, the CCSM4 indicates net ocean warming over the IndoPacific region while the CSIRO model concentrates separate warming responses over the central Pacific and Indian Ocean regions. The models, as with observations, demonstrate strong local coupling between variations in column water vapor, downward surface longwave radiation and SST; but the spatial patterns of changes in the sign of this relationship differ among models and, for models as a whole, with

  19. THE PARASITOID Anastatus sp. (EUPELMIDAE-HYMENOPTERA ACTION ON Dirphia rosacordis WALKER, 1855 (SATURNIIDAE-LEPIDOPTERA EGGS IN ”PEQUI” (Caryocar brasiliense CAMBESS AÇÃO DO PARASITÓIDE Anastatus sp. (EUPELMIDAE - HYMENOPTERA EM OVOS DE Dirphia rosacordis WALKER, 1855 (LEPIDOPTERA - SATURNIIDAE EM PEQUIZEIRO (Caryocar brasiliense CAMBESS

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    Antônio Henrique Garcia

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available

    The action of parasitoid Anastatus sp. on eggs of D. rosacordis, common for defoliating “pequizeiro” (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess, was studied on eggs collected in the field and eggs obtained in laboratory. Eggs were collected in Hidrolândia, Senador Canedo and Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil. In these regions, D. rosacordis shows two generations: September and December. To obtain eggs, a D. rosacordis colony was maintained on pequi leaves over the egg mass obtained in the laboratory and kept under controlled temperature, relative humidity and photoperiod. Among 1,346 eggs obtained in laboratory conditions, 44.3% were parasitized, 40.2% were viable and 15.4 % were not viable. From 697 eggs collected in the field, 25.5% were parasitized, 58.9% were viable and 15.6% were not viable. Adult emergency was observed among 83,4% of parasitized eggs. These data suggest the possibility of using this parasitoid for the pequi caterpillar control, which also causes serious damage on Eucalyptus sp., mainly in Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    KEY-WORDS: Anastatus; parasitoid; egg.

    A ação do parasitóide Anastatus sp. sobre os ovos da D. rosacordis, importante desfolhadora do pequizeiro (Caryocar brasiliense Cambess, foi estudada em ovos coletados no campo e em ovos originados da criação em laboratório. Os ovos foram coletados nos municípios de Hidrolândia, Senador Canedo e Goiânia, Goiás, no início de setembro. Nessas regiões a D. rosacordis apresenta duas gerações, setembro e dezembro. Foi mantida uma criação da D. rosacordis sobre folhas do pequizeiro em condições de laboratório para obtenção de ovos. Os parasitóides emergidos dos ovos coletados no campo foram liberados sobre as massas de ovos obtidos no laboratório. Todas as observações de laboratório foram realizadas sem controle de temperatura, umidade relativa e fotoperíodo. Entre 1.346 ovos obtidos em condições de laboratório, 44,3% foram parasitados, 40,2% foram viáveis e 15,4% não viáveis. Dos 697 coletados no campo, 25,5% estavam parasitados, 58,9% foram viáveis e 15,6% não viáveis. Entre os ovos parasitados foram observadas 83,4% de emergência dos adultos do parasitóide. Estes dados sugerem a possibilidade da utilização desse parasitóide para o controle desta lagarta desfolhadora do pequizeiro, que também causa sérios danos à cultura de Eucalyptus sp., principalmente em Minas Gerais.

    PALAVRAS-CHAVE: Parasitóide; ovos; Caryocar; Anastatus.

  20. A new scenario of bioprospecting of Hymenoptera venoms through proteomic approach

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    LD Santos

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Venoms represent a huge and essentially unexplored reservoir of bioactive components that may cure diseases that do not respond to currently available therapies. This review select advances reported in the literature from 2000 to the present about the new scenario of Hymenoptera venom composition. On account of new technologies in the proteomic approach, which presents high resolution and sensitivity, the combination of developments in new instruments, fragmentation methods, strategic analysis, and mass spectrometry have become indispensable tools for interrogation of protein expression, molecule interaction, and post- translational modifications. Thus, the biochemical characterization of Hymenoptera venom has become a major subject of research in the area of allergy and immunology, in which proteomics has been an excellent alternative to assist the development of more specific extracts for diagnosis and treatment of hypersensitive patients to Hymenoptera venoms.

  1. Vertical stratification of selected Hymenoptera in a remnant forest of the Po Plain (Italy, Lombardy (Hymenoptera: Ampulicidae, Crabronidae, Sphecidae

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    Filippo Di Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Communities of the canopy of temperate forests are still relatively unexplored. Furthermore, very little is known on how vertical stratification for some insect groups is related to biological strategies. In this study, we investigated the community composition of both canopy and understory of the families Ampulicidae, Crabronidae and Sphecidae (Hymenoptera of the Natural Reserve of “Bosco della Fontana”, a remnant lowland forest in northeastern Italy. Observed patterns in vertical stratification have been related to species foraging habits. Our study reveals that the bulk of the community of Spheciformes of the understory consists of species predating dipterans and spiders, while species associated with the canopy are mainly predators of sap-sucking honeydew producers and epiphyte grazers, like aphids, thrips, and barkflies. Comparing the communities of canopy and understory may lead to a better understanding of species ecology and provides useful information to forest managers.

  2. Hymenoptera venom allergy in outdoor workers: Occupational exposure, clinical features and effects of allergen immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toletone, Alessandra; Voltolini, Susanna; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Dini, Guglielmo; Bignardi, Donatella; Minale, Paola; Massa, Emanuela; Signori, Alessio; Troise, Costantino; Durando, Paolo

    2017-02-01

    To describe (i) the clinical characteristics of workers, exposed to hymenoptera stings, with an ascertained diagnosis of Hymenoptera Venom Allergy (HVA), (ii) the specific role of occupational exposure, (iii) the effect of Venom Immunotherapy (VIT) in reducing the severity of allergic episodes in workers exposed to repeated stings of hymenoptera, and (iv) the management of the occupational consequences caused by allergic reactions due to hymenoptera stings. Between 2000 and 2013 an observational study, including patients referred to the regional reference hospital of Liguria, Italy, with an ascertained diagnosis of HVA and treated with VIT, was performed. A structured questionnaire was administered to all patients to investigate the occupational features of allergic reactions. These were graded according to standard systems in patients at the first episode, and after re-stings, during VIT. One-hundred and 8four out of the 202 patients referred had a complete data set. In 32 (17.4%) patients, the allergic reaction occurred during work activities performed outdoor. Of these, 31.2% previously stung by hymenoptera at work, and receiving VIT, were re-stung during occupational activity. The grades of reaction developed under VIT treatment resulted clinically less severe than of those occurred at the first sting (p-value = 0.031). Our findings confirmed the clinical relevance of HVA, and described its occupational features in outdoor workers with sensitization, stressing the importance of an early identification and proper management of the professional categories recognized at high risk of hymenoptera stings. The Occupational Physician should be supported by other specialists to recommend appropriate diagnostic procedures and the prescription of VIT, which resulted an effective treatment for the prevention of episodes of severe reactions in workers with a proven HVA.

  3. Serum tryptase concentrations in beekeepers with and without Hymenoptera venom allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballada, F; Alonso, M; Vizcaino, L; Coutinho, V; Núñez, R; Vidal, C; Boquete, M; González-Quintela, A

    2013-01-01

    Increased tryptase concentrations are a risk marker for the severity of reactions to Hymenoptera stings or venom immunotherapy To investigate serum tryptase concentrations in beekeepers with and without Hymenoptera venom allergy (HVA). Serum tryptase concentrations were measured in adult patients with HVA (n = 91, 37 of whom were beekeepers), beekeepers without HVA (n = 152), and control individuals from the general adult population (n = 246). Multivariate analyses revealed that serum tryptase levels were positively associated with beekeeping activities (P Beekeeping and HVA are independently associated with increased concentrations of serum tryptase.

  4. New host association: Polybia scutellaris (Hymenoptera, Vespidae parasitized by Melaloncha (Diptera, Phoridae

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    M. Ayelen Lutz

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available New host association: Polybia scutellaris (Hymenoptera, Vespidae parasitized by Melaloncha (Diptera, Phoridae. The genus Melaloncha Brues is a large assemblage of New World, parasitoid phorid flies. They are parasitoids of Apoidea bees. However, here we present the first record of a wasp parasitized by Melaloncha sp. The new host is Polybia scutellaris (White, a neotropical eusocial wasp. The parasitized wasp was found in an urban park near the city of La Plata, Buenos Aires, Argentina. It appears that the genus Melaloncha parasitizes a wider range of social Hymenoptera than currently known.

  5. Modelo experimental de tumor na cavidade oral de ratos com carcinossarcoma de Walker 256 Experimental model of Walker 256 carcinosarcoma developed in the oral cavity of rats

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    Ana Paula Negreiros Nunes Alves

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estabelecer um modelo experimental de desenvolvimento tumoral na cavidade oral de ratos, permitindo, assim, o estudo da osteólise induzida pelo tumor nos ossos do complexo maxilomandibular como também nas estruturas dentais, através da caracterização histomorfológica da reabsorção óssea e dentária. MÉTODOS: Uma suspensão de células tumorais (0,1mL do Carcinossarcoma de Walker 256, na concentração de 10(6 células/mL foi implantado na cavidade alveolar de ratos previamente aberta por exodontia. Os animais foram observados durante 12 (doze dias consecutivos para determinação da curva de peso corpóreo, sendo posteriormente sacrificados e as mandíbulas removidas para exames radiográfico e histológico. RESULTADOS: No exame radiográfico foi verificada área lítica, sem evidência de reparo, na região dos alvéolos. No exame microscópico foi identificada infiltração óssea, periférica e central, de pequenas células hipercromáticas e pleomórficas, com leve infiltrado inflamatório mononuclear associado e áreas de necrose. O índice de pega foi de 100%. CONCLUSÃO: O modelo animal de invasão óssea, do tumor de Walker na cavidade oral, possibilita a avaliação in vivo de drogas antitumorais e esquemas terapêuticos no tratamento do câncer bucal.PURPOSE: To estabilish an experimental model of tumor development in the oral cavity of rats, that would enable to study the tumor-induced autolysis in the maxillomandibular bone complex as well as of the dental structures, through histomorphological characterization of bone and dental resorption. METHODS: Walker 256 carcinossarcoma cell suspension (0,1 mL containing 10(6 cell/mL was implanted in the alveoli of first and second molars. The animals were observed during twelve consecutive days and the body weigth were determined. Later, the animals were sacrificed and their mandibles removed to radiographic and hystologic analysis. RESULTS: The radiographic image

  6. Robust spinal neuroinflammation mediates mechanical allodynia in Walker 256 induced bone cancer rats

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    Mao-Ying Qi-Liang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract It has been reported that remarkable and sustained activation of astrocytes and/or microglia occurs in cancer induced pain (CIP, which is different from neuropathic and inflammatory pain. The present study was designed to investigate the role of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 induced glial neuroinflammation in cancer induced pain using a modified rat model of bone cancer. The rat model of CIP consisted of unilateral intra-tibial injection with Walker 256 mammary gland carcinoma. Nine days after Walker 256 inoculation, a robust activation of both astrocytes and microglia in bilateral spinal dorsal horn was observed together with significant bilateral mechanical allodynia. This neuroinflammation was characterized by enhanced immunostaining of both glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, astrocyte marker and OX-42 (microglia marker, and an elevated level of IL-1β, IL-6 and TNF-α mRNA. I.t. administration of fluorocitrate (an inhibitor of glial metabolism, 1 nmol or minocycline (an inhibitor of microglia, 100 μg has significant anti-allodynic effects on day 12 after Walker 256 inoculation. Naloxone (a nonstereoselective TLR4 signaling blocker, 60 μg, i.t. also significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia and simultaneously blocked the increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA. The results suggested that spinal TLR4 might play an important role in the sustained glial activation that critically contributed to the robust and sustained spinal neuroinflammation in CIP. This result could potentially help clinicians and researchers to better understand the mechanism of complicated cancer pain.

  7. The influence of septal lesions on sodium and water retention induced by Walker 256 tumor

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    F. Guimarães

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available In the course of studies on the effects of septal area lesions on neuroimmunomodulation and Walker 256 tumor development, it was observed that tumor-induced sodium and water retention was less marked in lesioned than in non-lesioned rats. In the present study possible mechanisms involved in this phenomenon were investigated. The experiments were performed in septal-lesioned (LW; N = 15 and sham-operated (SW; N = 7 8-week-old male Wistar rats, which received multifocal simultaneous subcutaneous (sc inoculations of Walker 256 tumor cells about 30 days after the stereotaxic surgery. Control groups (no tumor, sham-operated food-restricted (SFR, N = 7 and lesioned food-restricted (LFR, N = 10 were subjected to a feeding pattern similar to that observed in tumor-bearing animals. Multifocal inoculation of Walker 256 tumor rapidly induces anorexia, which is paradoxically accompanied by an increase in body weight, as a result of renal Na+ and fluid retention. These effects of the tumor were also seen in LW rats, although the rise in fractional sodium balance during the early clinical period was significantly smaller than in SW rats (day 4: SW = 47.6 ± 6.4% and LW = 13.8 ± 5.2%; day 5: SW = 57.5 ± 3.5% and LW = 25.7 ± 4.8%; day 6: SW = 54.4 ± 3.8% and LW = 32.1 ± 4.4%; P<0.05, suggesting a temporary reduction in tumor-induced sodium retention. In contrast, urine output was significantly reduced in SW rats and increased in LW rats (LW up to -0.85 and SW up to 4.5 ml/100 g body weight, with no change in osmolar excretion. These temporary changes in the tumor's effects on LW rats may reflect a "reversal" of the secondary central antidiuretic response induced by the tumor (from antidiuretic to diuretic.

  8. Una especie nueva del género Telenomus (Hymenoptera:Scelionidae parasitoide de posturas de Chrysopidae (Neuroptera en Mendoza, Argentina A new species of the genus Telenomus (Hymenoptera: Scelionidae egg parasitoid of Chrysopidae (Neuroptera from Mendoza , Argentina

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    Marta S. Loiácono

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Se describe e ilustra Telenomus chrysoperlae sp. nov. (Hymenoptera que se comporta como parasitoide de huevos de Chrysoperla asoralis (Bank (Neuroptera en Mendoza, Argentina. Se compara con las especies afines T. chrysopae Ashmead y T. tridentatus Johnson & Bin.Telenomus chrysoperlae sp. nov. (Hymenoptera egg parasitoid of Chrysoperla asoralis (Bank (Neuroptera from Mendoza , Argentina , is described and illustrated. It is compared with the congeners T. chrysopae Ashmead and T. tridentatus Johnson & Bin.

  9. Global surgery formula for the Casson-Walker invariant (AM-140)

    CERN Document Server

    Lescop, Christine

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a new result in 3-dimensional topology. It is well known that any closed oriented 3-manifold can be obtained by surgery on a framed link in S 3. In Global Surgery Formula for the Casson-Walker Invariant, a function F of framed links in S 3 is described, and it is proven that F consistently defines an invariant, lamda (l), of closed oriented 3-manifolds. l is then expressed in terms of previously known invariants of 3-manifolds. For integral homology spheres, l is the invariant introduced by Casson in 1985, which allowed him to solve old and famous questions in 3-dimensional

  10. Maternal grand mal seizure leads to a surprising diagnosis of Dandy-Walker variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelson, Sherri G

    2011-01-01

    Pregnant women may present with abnormal symptoms that are assumed to be related to the pregnancy. The purpose of this case study is to examine an obstetric case that provides a wider view of a grand mal seizure in a perinatal patient with previously undiagnosed Dandy-Walker Variant. When a pregnant or newly postpartum woman has seizures, eclampsia may be the most the most likely diagnosis, but it may not be accurate. © 2011 AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  11. PET/CT in a Patient Diagnosed With Dandy-Walker Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infante, Jose R; Garcia, Lucia; Rayo, Juan I; Serrano, Justo; Dominguez, Maria L; Moreno, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    The Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a rare congenital posterior fossa malformation characterized by aplasia or hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle, and enlargement of the posterior fossa. We present a 52-year-old Caucasian man diagnosed with gastrointestinal stromal tumor and submitted to 18F-FDG PET/CT as a staging procedure. The patient was previously diagnosed with DWS in brain CT scan. PET/CT images revealed an ametabolic large cyst in the posterior fossa and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis. The case is presented with the aim to show the appearance of this syndrome on PET/CT study.

  12. Dandy Walker Syndrome with Unusual Associated Findings in a Fetal Autopsy Study

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    Surekha U Arakeri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dandy Walker Syndrome (DWS is a congenital brain malformation characterized by hypoplasia or absence of cerebellar vermis, cystic dilatation of fourth ventricle and hydrocephalus. It is frequently associated with other congenital anomalies. Associated central nervous system anomalies such as agenesis of corpus callosum and vermis are associated with poor prognosis. Association of DWS with congenital absence of spleen is life threatening condition and has been reported very rarely. Autopsy findings of DWS with association of congenital absence of corpus callosum, vermis and spleen are reported in a stillborn fetus of 28 weeks gestation and review of relevant literature was done

  13. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy: Type 0 with Dandy-Walker variant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gathwala, Geeta; Silayach, Joginder; Bhakhari, Bhanu Kiran; Narwal, Varun

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. In addition to the three classical SMA types, a new form known as type 0 with intrauterine onset, profound hypotonia and a progressive and early fatal course has been described. Herein we report a case of type 0 SMA with a Dandy Walker variant anomaly, which has not hitherto been reported in the world literature.

  14. Dandy–Walker syndrome with duplex kidney abnormalities in trisomy 18 – A rare case report

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    Tun-Jun Wang

    2017-10-01

    We report a case involving a 39-year-old pregnant female with a case of trisomy 18 associated with Dandy–Walker malformation (DWM. Fetal ultrasonography showed hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis and dilatation of the fourth ventricle and was characterized by an enlarged posterior fossa. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging showed inferior vermian hypoplasia and a large posterior fossa cyst communicating with the fourth ventricle causing high insertion of the torcular herophili, which was compatible with DWM. Furthermore, the karyotyping report revealed trisomy 18. The incidence of trisomy 18 associated with DWM is rare, and our report presents an unusual case that supplements our knowledge of this condition.

  15. Central diabetes insipidus, central hypothyroidism, renal tubular acidosis and dandy-walker syndrome: new associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alafif, M M; Aljaid, S S; Al-Agha, A E

    2015-01-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a rare brain malformation involving the cerebellum, and the fluid filled spaces around it, usually detected during the antenatal period or the early infancy. Clinically, it is characterized by mental retardation, developmental delay as well as cerebellar ataxia. It has been frequently associated with other conditions such as congenital heart diseases, primary hypothyroidism, and other disorders of the central nervous, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, and orthopedic systems. In this report, we describe a 3-month-old Saudi boy with the rare association of DWS with central diabetes insipidus, congenital central hypothyroidism, and type-2 renal tubular acidosis.

  16. Encounter distribution of two random walkers on a finite one-dimensional interval

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tejedor, Vincent; Schad, Michaela; Metzler, Ralf [Physics Department, Technical University of Munich, James Franck Strasse, 85747 Garching (Germany); Benichou, Olivier; Voituriez, Raphael, E-mail: metz@ph.tum.de [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique de la Matiere Condensee (UMR 7600), Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75255 Paris Cedex (France)

    2011-09-30

    We analyse the first-passage properties of two random walkers confined to a finite one-dimensional domain. For the case of absorbing boundaries at the endpoints of the interval, we derive the probability that the two particles meet before either one of them becomes absorbed at one of the boundaries. For the case of reflecting boundaries, we obtain the mean first encounter time of the two particles. Our approach leads to closed-form expressions that are more easily tractable than a previously derived solution in terms of the Weierstrass' elliptic function. (paper)

  17. On the scalar particle creation by electromagnetic fields in Robertson–Walker spacetime

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    Kenan Sogut

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, we obtained the scalar particle creation number density by using the Klein–Gordon equation coupled to the electromagnetic fields in the Robertson–Walker spacetime with the help of the Bogoliubov transformation method. We analyzed the resulting expression for the effect of a time-dependent electric field and a constant magnetic field on the particle production rate and found that the strong time-dependent electric field amplifies the particle creation and the magnetic field reduces the rate, in accordance with the previous findings.

  18. Hyperparasitoid wasps (Hymenoptera: Trigonalidae) reared from dry forest and rain forest caterpillars of Area de Conservacion, Guanacaste, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Five species of Trigonalidae, hyperparasites of Ichneumonidae (Hymenoptera) and Tachinidae (Diptera) that parasitize caterpillars (Lepidoptera), have been reared during the ongoing caterpillar inventory of Area de Conservación Guanacaste (ACG), Guanacaste Province, northwestern Costa Rica: Lycogaste...

  19. Phylogeography of two parthenogenetic sawfly species (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae): relationship of population genetic differentiation to host plant distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, C.; Barker, A.; Boevé, J.L.; Jong, de P.W.; Vos, de H.; Brakefield, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    This study compares the population genetic structure of two obligate parthenogenetic sawfly species, Aneugmenus padi (L.) Zhelochovtsev and Eurhadinoceraea ventralis (Panzer) Enslin (Hymenoptera: Tenthredinidae). Allozymes were used to detect genetic differences in larvae collected at different

  20. Role of emerald ash borer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) larval vibrations in host-quality assessments by Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Richard W. Mankin; Yigen Chen; Jian J. Duan; Therese M. Poland; Leah S. Bauer

    2011-01-01

    The biological control agent Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) is a gregarious larval endoparasitoid of the emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an invasive cambium-feeding species responsible for recent, widespread mortality of ash (Fraxinus spp.) in...

  1. Self-medication of anaphylactic reactions due to Hymenoptera stings-an EAACI Task Force Consensus Statement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bilo, M. B; Cichocka-Jarosz, E; Pumphrey, R; Oude-Elberink, J. N; Lange, J; Jakob, T; Bonadonna, P; Fernandez, J; Kosnik, M; Helbling, A; Mosbech, H; Gawlik, R; Niedoszytko, M; Patella, V; Pravettoni, V; Roigues-Alves, R; Sturm, G. J; Rueff, F

    2016-01-01

    An anaphylactic reaction due to a Hymenoptera sting is a clinical emergency, and patients, their caregivers as well as all healthcare professionals should be familiar with its recognition and acute management...

  2. Effect of Maruca vitrata (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) host plants on life-history parameters of the parasitoid Apanteles taragamae (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dannon, A.E.; Tamo, M.; Agboton, C.; Huis, van A.; Dicke, M.

    2012-01-01

    The effect of four host plant species of the herbivore Maruca vitrata Fabricius (Lepidoptera: Crambidae) on development time, longevity, fecundity and sex ratio of the parasitoid Apanteles taragamae Viereck (Hymenoptera: Braconidae) was investigated under laboratory conditions. The larvae were

  3. Epidemiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Hymenoptera Venom Allergy in Mastocytosis Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niedoszytko, Marek; Bonadonna, Patrizia; Oude Elberink, Joanne N. G.; Golden, David B. K.

    Hymenoptera venom allergy is a typical IgE-mediated reaction caused by sensitization to 1 or more allergens of the venom, and accounts for 1.5% to 34% of all cases of anaphylaxis. Patients suffering from mastocytosis are more susceptible to the anaphylactic reactions to an insect sting. This article

  4. Diagnostic value of the basophil activation test in evaluating Hymenoptera venom sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peternelj, Andreja; Silar, Mira; Bajrovic, Nissera; Adamic, Katja; Music, Ema; Kosnik, Mitja; Korosec, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Diagnosis of allergy to Hymenoptera venom is usually confirmed with skin testing and measurement of specific serum IgE antibody, tests which are sometimes inconclusive. In these cases, additional in vitro tests are necessary. The aim of this study was to show the applicability of the basophil activation test in detecting sensitization to Hymenoptera venom and to compare the test sensitivity and clinical positive-predictive value with skin prick tests and measurement of allergen-specific serum IgE. This prospective study was conducted between June 2004 and December 2007 and included a large group of 204 patients. All patients had a history of at least one systemic allergic reaction of Müller grades II-IV after a Hymenoptera sting. We compared results of the basophil activation test, specific serum IgE and skin prick tests with patients' clinical history and data on culprit insects. The overall clinical sensitivities of the basophil activation test, specific serum IgE and skin prick tests were 90%, 76% and 64%, respectively; the clinical positive-predictive values of the three tests were 79%, 73% and 78% for bee venom, 86%, 59% and 43% for wasp venom; and 84%, 77% and 22% for both venoms. Our results revealed a higher clinical sensitivity and comparable or better clinical positive-predictive value of basophil activation tests than skin prick tests and allergen-specific serum IgE in the detection of allergy to Hymenoptera venom.

  5. The species of the Neotropical genus Fractipons Townes, 1970 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordera, Santiago; González-Moreno, Alejandra

    2011-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, two new species of the Neotropical genus Fractipons Townes, 1970 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) are described. A new diagnosis for the genus, a re-description of Fractipons cincticornis Townes, 1970 and a key to known species are provided. New distribution records for the genus now include Argentina, Costa Rica, Panama and Peru. PMID:21594146

  6. Hymenoptera of Niğde province: Studies on Sphecidae fauna

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    12 Tem 2010 ... Hymenoptera of Niğde province: Studies on Sphecidae fauna. Ayla Tüzün and Serdar Yüksel. Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, University of Ankara, Tandogan / Ankara 06100, Turkey. Accepted 19 May, 2010. The present study is based on 1240 specimens obtained from the field studies in the ...

  7. Application of recombinant antigen 5 allergens from seven allergy-relevant Hymenoptera species in diagnostics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiener, Maximilian; Eberlein, Bernadette; Moreno Aguilar, Carmen

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hymenoptera stings can cause severe anaphylaxis in untreated venom-allergic patients. A correct diagnosis regarding the relevant species for immunotherapy is often hampered by clinically irrelevant cross-reactivity. In vespid venom allergy, cross-reactivity between venoms of different...

  8. Release and establishment of Encarsia diaspidicola (Hymenoptera: Aphelididae) against white peach scale in papaya

    Science.gov (United States)

    White peach scale, Pseudaulacaspis pentagona (Hemiptera:Diaspididae) is a serious economic pest of papaya, Carica papaya L. The parasitic wasp Encarsia diaspidicola (Hymenoptera: Aphelinidae) was brought from Samoa into a quarantine containment facility in Hawaii for evaluation and potential release...

  9. The species of the genus Hypodynerus de Saussure (Hymenoptera, Vespidae, Eumeninae occurring in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bolívar Garcete-Barrett

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available An identification table and descriptions are given to recognize the two species of Hypodynerus (Hymenoptera: Vespidae: Eumeninae recorded from Brazil: H. arechavaletae (Brèthes and H. duckei (Bertoni comb. n. The lectotype is designated and the male is described for Hypodynerus duckei, its presence being recorded from Brazil for the first time.

  10. Sawflies from the Sălaj County of Romania (Hymenoptera: Symphyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zombori L.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 38 sawfly species (Hymenoptera: Symphyta were captured in the two years of 2014–2015 in the Sălaj County of Romania. Most of the species are fairly common far and wide in Transylvania.

  11. The European Pamphiliidae (Hymenoptera: Symphyta), with special reference to the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Achterberg, van C.; Aartsen, van B.

    1986-01-01

    Keys are given to the European genera and species of the Pamphiliidae (Symphyta: Megalodontoidea). Ten species are added to the list of the Dutch Hymenoptera. Cephalcia alashanica europaea Benes, 1976 is synonymized with C. a. alashanica Gussakovskij, 1935 (syn. nov.), Acantholyda parvula Zirngiebl,

  12. An annotated catalogue of Primary types of symphyta (Hymenoptera) in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thomas, P.L.L.

    1987-01-01

    The primary types of 48 species of Symphyta (Hymenoptera), described by Van Achterberg & Van Aartsen (2), Benson (7), Cameron (1), Forsius (13), Koornneef (1) and Snellen van Vollenhoven (24), housed in the collections of the Rijksmuseum van Natuurlijke Historie (Leiden), the Instituut voor

  13. Bumble bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) community structure on two sagebrush steppe sites in southern Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen P. Cook; Sara M. Birch; Frank W. Merickel; Carrie Caselton Lowe; Deborah Page-Dumroese

    2011-01-01

    Although sagebrush, Artemisia spp., does not require an insect pollinator, there are several native species of bumble bees, Bombus spp. (Hymenoptera: Apidae), that are present in sagebrush steppe ecosystems where they act as pollinators for various forbs and shrubs. These native pollinators contribute to plant productivity and reproduction. We captured 12 species of...

  14. Phylogenetic systematics and a revised generic classification of anthidiine bees (Hymenoptera: Megachile)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The bee tribe Anthidiini (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) is a large, cosmopolitan group of solitary bees that exhibit intriguing nesting behavior. We present the first molecular-based phylogenetic analysis of relationships within Anthidiini using model based methods and a large, multi-locus dataset (fiv...

  15. Suitability and accessibility of immature Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) stages to Tetrastichus planipennisi (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael D. Ulyshen; Jian J. Duan; Leah S. Bauer; Ivich. Fraser

    2010-01-01

    Tetrastichus planipennisi Yang (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae), a gregarious larval endoparasitoid, is one of three biocontrol agents from Asia currently being released in the United States to combat the invasive emerald ash borer, Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire (Coleoptera: Buprestidae). The current protocol for rearing T....

  16. The spatial distribution of Hymenoptera parasitoids in a forest reserve in Central Amazonia, Manaus, AM, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RB. Querino

    Full Text Available Parasitoids are of great importance to forest ecosystems due to their ecological role in the regulation of the population of other insects. The species richness and abundance of parasitoids in the forest canopy and understory, both on the borders and in the interior of a tropical forest reserve in Central Amazonia were investigated. For a 12-month period, specimen collections were made every 15 days from suspended traps placed in the forest canopy and in the understory strata, both on the border and in the interior of forest areas. A total of 12,835 Hymenoptera parasitoids from 23 families were acquired. Braconidae, Diapriidae, Mymaridae, Eulophidae, and Scelionidae were the most represented in the area and strata samples. The results indicate that there were no significant differences in the species richness or abundance of Hymenoptera between the forest borders and the inner forest. The data does show that the presence of Hymenoptera is significantly greater in the understory in both the border and interior areas than in the canopy (vertical stratification. Aphelinidae and Ceraphronidae were significantly associated with the inner forest, while the other seven families with the border of the reserve. The abundance of Hymenoptera parasitoids presented seasonal variations during the year related to the rainy and dry seasons.

  17. Increasing trophic complexity influences aphid attendance by ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) and predation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Species that are involved in multitrophic interactions are affected by the trophic levels that are above and below them in both indirect and direct ways. In this experiment, interactions among ants (Formica montana Wheeler; Hymenoptera: Formicidae), aphids (Myzus persicae [Sulzer]; Hemiptera: Aphidi...

  18. Five newly recorded species of the genus Streblocera Westwood (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Euphorinae from Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hye-Rin Lee

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Five species of the genus Streblocera (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Euphorinae are reported for the first time from Korea: Streblocera (Eutanycerus affinis Belokobylskij, Streblocera (E. galinae Belokobylskij, Streblocera (E. lienhuachihensis Chou, Streblocera (E. major Belokobylskij, and Streblocera (Streblocera spasskensis Belokobylskij. Diagnosis and photographs for the species are provided.

  19. De roodrandzandbij Andrena rosae in de Zuid-Hollandse Biesbosch (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Andrenidae).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der F.; Reemer, M.; Peeters, T.M.J.

    2006-01-01

    Andrena rosae in the Zuid-Hollandse Biesbosch (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Andrenidae) Andrena rosae is a fairly large, black and red mining bee. It has declined dramatically in the 20th century in northwestern Europe. In the Netherlands the species only survived in and around the Biesbosch, at the

  20. The species of the Neotropical genus Fractipons Townes, 1970 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae, Cryptinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordera, Santiago; González-Moreno, Alejandra

    2011-01-19

    In this paper, two new species of the Neotropical genus Fractipons Townes, 1970 (Hymenoptera, Ichneumonidae) are described. A new diagnosis for the genus, a re-description of Fractipons cincticornis Townes, 1970 and a key to known species are provided. New distribution records for the genus now include Argentina, Costa Rica, Panama and Peru.

  1. Insect Pupil Mechanisms. I. On the Pigment Migration in the Retinula Cells of Hymenoptera (Suborder Apocrita)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stavenga, D.G.; Kuiper, J.W.

    1977-01-01

    The pupil mechanism of Hymenoptera (suborder Apocrita) has been studied by simultaneous recordings of transmission and reflection from the compound eye of virtually intact animals. It is confirmed that the light flux in the photoreceptors is controlled by pigment granules in the retinula cells; the

  2. The prevalence of Hymenoptera venom allergy in adults: the results of a very crowded city in Euroasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelincik, Aslı; İşsever, Halim; Unal, Derya; Işık, Erol; Demirturk, Mustafa; Gül, Hülya; İliaz, Raim; Kara, Erdal; Ertek, Belkıs; Özşeker, Ferhan; Çolakoğlu, Bahattin; Büyüköztürk, Suna

    2015-01-01

    There are scarce data about the prevalence of Hymenoptera venom allergy in the general population. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Hymenoptera venom allergy in the general adult population of Istanbul. A total of 17,064 randomly selected telephone numbers were contacted and 11,816 (69.25%) individuals who agreed to participate completed a questionnaire. Those who disclosed hypersensitivity reactions due to Hymenoptera stings in this initial survey were called again and given another questionnaire. Those who were suspected of experiencing hypersensitivity reactions to Hymenoptera stings were invited for a clinical investigation with in vivo and in vitro diagnostic tests. According to the first questionnaire, a total of 1171 (9.9%; 95% CI: 9.38-10.47%) were suspected of having a hypersensitivity to Hymenoptera stings. 51.75% (n: 606) answered the second questionnaire and 21% (n: 128) of these were still suspected of having a hypersensitivity to Hymenoptera stings (1.1%; 95% CI: 0.9-1.29%). The confirmed prevalence of hypersensitivity to Hymenoptera stings according to skin tests and in vitro sIgE levels was 0.2% (95% CI: 0.14-0.30%). Nearly all of the participants with systemic reactions were admitted to the emergency department, although only one tenth of them received adrenaline in the emergency room. 2.3% carried an adrenaline injector, whereas none of the patients received venom immunotherapy. The prevalence of Hymenoptera sting reactions in our geographical region is comparable with other European studies. There is a need to increase the awareness of adrenaline in the emergency management of insect sting anaphylaxis and venom immunotherapy in the prophylaxis. Copyright © 2014 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The oophorectomy effect on Walker 256 tumor inoculated into the vagina and uterine cervix of female rats Efeito da ooforectomia no tumor de Walker 256 inoculado em vagina e colo de útero de ratos fêmeas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nara Macedo Botelho Brito

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Verify the effect of oophorectomy on the evolution of the Walker 256 tumor inoculated into the vagina and cervix of female rats. METHODS: Ten Wistar, female rats were used, distributed into two groups with 05 animals each: Tumor group (TG: Rats inoculated with Walker 256 tumor; Oophorectomy group (OG: oophorectomized rats inoculated with Walker 256 tumor. The day before the tumor vaginal inoculation, acetic acid was inoculated into the vaginas of both groups of rats; the following day, the vaginal walls were scarified with an endocervix brush, and then Walker 256 tumor was inoculated. After 12 days, the tumor was removed together with the vagina and uterine horns for macro and microscopic analyses. The data were submitted to statistical analyses. RESULTS: There was no statistical difference between the two groups; however it was observed that the behavior of tumor growth on the OG group presented greater invasion, compromising the uterine horns. CONCLUSION: The results of the study on the GO group presented a macroscopic behavior different from the TG group, however, both of them presented similar development in terms of tumor mass.OBJETIVO: Verificar o efeito da ooforectomia à inoculação do tumor de Walker 256 em vagina e colo de útero de ratas. MÉTODOS: Foram utilizadas 10 ratas Wistar, fêmeas, virgens, adultas, distribuídas em dois grupos de estudo com 05 animais cada: grupo tumor (GT: ratas inoculadas com tumor de Walker 256, e grupo Ooforectomia (GO: ratas ooforectomizadas e inoculadas com tumor de Walker 256. No dia anterior à inoculação vaginal do tumor, foram inoculados 0,3ml de ácido acético na vagina das ratas de ambos os grupos; no dia seguinte, foi realizada a escarificação da parede vaginal com uma escova de endocérvice e inoculado tumor de Walker 256. Após 12 dias, foi removido o tumor em bloco com vagina e cornos uterinos para análise macro e microscópica. Os dados foram submetidos à análise estat

  4. Fallot Pentalojisi’nin eşlik ettiği Dandy-Walker varyasyonu: Olgu sunumu

    OpenAIRE

    Güven, Ahmet; Oflaz, Mehmet; Kaya, Ali; Bolat, Fatih; Gülsever, Osman; Şalk, İsmail; Bozoklu Akkar, Özlem; İçağasıoğlu, Füsun

    2014-01-01

    ÖzetDandy-Walker varyasyonu, 4. ventrikül ve sisterna magna arasındaki devamlılıkla sonuçlanan vermisin parsiyel agenezisi ile karakterize santral sinir sisteminin nadir bir anomalisidir. Literatürde ilk kez 1988’de Kohyama ve arkadaşları tarafından bildirilen Dandy-Walker varyasyonu ve Fallot Tetralojisi birlikteliği daha sonraki yıllarda birkaç vaka sunumu şeklinde bildirilmiştir. Biz bu yazıda, Dandy-Walker varyasyonu ve Fallot Pentalojisi olan 2 günlük bir erkek hastayı bildiriyoruz.Anaht...

  5. STRUKTUR KOMUNITAS HYMENOPTERA PARASITOID PADA TUMBUHAN LIAR DI SEKITAR PERTANAMAN PADI DI DAERAH ALIRAN SUNGAI (DAS CIANJUR, JAWA BARAT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaherwandi, S. Manuwoto, D. Buchori, P. Hidayat, dan L.B. Prasetyo.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Hymenoptera Parasitoid Community Structure on Non-crops Vegetation Around Rice fields in Cianjur Watershed, West Java. Hymenoptera parasitoids have an important role in agroecosystem because of their ability in suppressing pest population. Their presence in the field is seen as the key to agricultural ecosystem. Their presence can be influenced by the availability of non-crop vegetation. Some adult Hymenoptera parasitoids require food in the form of pollen and nectar of wild flowers to ensure effective reproduction and longevity. The objective of this research was to study Hymenoptera parasitoid communities in non-crop vegetation around rice fields at Cianjur Watershed. Samplings were conducted at three different landscape, i.e. Nyalindung, Gasol and Selajambe West Java. Insects were sampled by two trapping techniques (farmcop and sweep net in two lines of transect for each landscape. A total of 257 species from 25 families of Hymenoptera parasitoids were collected in non-crop vegetation at Cianjur Watershed. Landscape structure, flowering vegetation, and pesticide application affected the species richness, diversity and evenness of Hymenoptera parasitoid in non-crop vegetation.

  6. Analysis of growth directions of columnar stromatolites from Walker Lake, western Nevada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryshyn, V A; Corsetti, F A

    2011-09-01

    Samples of digitate, branching, columnar stromatolites were collected from the steep sides and near horizontal top of four in situ boulders located on the southwestern side of Walker Lake, Nevada, to test the widely held assumption that stromatolite column formation represents a phototropic response. We would predict that the columns on the steeply dipping sides of the boulder would bend upwards toward the light during growth if phototropism was significant during stromatolite morphogenesis. Angle of growth measurements on >300 stromatolites demonstrate that the stromatolites grew nearly normal to their growth surface, regardless of the inclination of their growth surface. No significant differences in the distribution of growth angles between north-, south-, east-, or west-facing samples were observed, and stromatolite lamina thickness did not systematically vary with position on the boulder. The lack of a strong phototropic response does not rule out a biological origin for the Walker Lake structures, but it does suggest that phototropic growth was not a dominant factor controlling stromatolite morphogenesis in these stromatolites and that column formation cannot be uniquely attributed as a phototropic response in stromatolites. It is interesting to note that the morphology of the stromatolites on the top of the boulder is identical to stromatolites on the steep sides. Stromatolite morphogenetic models that predict branching typically require a vertically directed sedimentary component, a feature that would have likely affected the stromatolites on the tops of the boulders, but not the sides, suggesting that other factors may be important in stromatolite morphogenesis. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. A biological walker is faster and better recognized when aligned with body axis observer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbieri, Guillaume; Fouque, Florent; Pozzo, Thierry; Pérennou, Dominic

    2013-09-01

    The representation of the vertical direction is a compromise between the directions given by the egocentric and allocentric references. Dissociations between these two referentials in the discrimination of a biological walker which typically refers to a model of verticality questions the coordinate system (allocentric and/or egocentric) used to perceive it. With a point-light display paradigm, the characteristics of an artificial walking pattern were manipulated in order to offer to 10 healthy participants (5 men/5 women; 24.6±3.4 years) a female or male locomotion which had to be identified as such. The body position of the viewer (sitting/lying) and the walking pattern viewed (aligned/rotated in relation to the egocentric referential) were crossed. Three indices were analyzed and 200 trials recorded: percentage of correct identification, reaction time and confidence score. This paper confirms the validity of the walking pattern model since the more pronounced the gradient of the walking pattern (as female or male) the better the recognition. Furthermore, whatever the body position, artificial walking patterns were more easily identified when they were aligned with the egocentric referential rather than tilted. The participant gender had no influence on the walking pattern recognition. We conclude that the perception of a biological walker referenced to the vertical is exclusively improved by a representation of the spatial information in an egocentric coordinate system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Preliminary stability analysis of a Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahalom, Asher

    2017-05-01

    It is stated in many text books that the any metric appearing in general relativity should be locally Lorentzian i.e. of the type gµν = diag (1, -1, -1, -1) this is usually presented as an independent axiom of the theory, which cannot be deduced from other assumptions. The meaning of this assertion is that a specific coordinate (the temporal coordinate) is given a unique significance with respect to the other spatial coordinates. It was shown that the above assertion is a consequence of requirement that the metric of empty space should be linearly stable and need not be assumed. In this work we remove the empty space assumption and investigate the consequences of spatially uniform matter on the stability of a locally Lorentzian space-time that is the Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-time. It is shown that a partial stability analysis restricts the type of allowable solutions to the Friedman-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker space-time. In particular it is shown that an open section universe is stable while an Euclidean and a closed section universes are not in accordance with observation. It will be suggested that in the presence of matter an upper limit scale to the size of a locally Lorentzian universe exists which incidentally is about the size of the observable universe.

  9. Integrability and tau-functions on Random Walkers & Isomonodromy Deformation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saenz Rodriguez, Axel Ivan

    We consider three types of integrable models which happen to lie under the classification of random walkers or isomonodromic deformations. We deal with an infinite queue that moves forward at random times, indecisive walkers on a circle walking left with probability p and walking right with probability 1-p at any given time, and a deformation of a matrix multi-valued holomorphic function on the projective line which preserves the monodromy structure of the function. Particularly, we work with the Plancherel growth process where we write the Schur generating function and show that it is a KP tau-function. Also, we work with the asymmetric simple exclusion process (ASEP) on a finite ring lattice and prove that the Bethe ansatz gives a complete set of eigenfunctions for generic parameters. Lastly, we write a solution and the tau-function to the Painleve 1 isomonodromy system using the Eynard-Orantin topological recursion. Additionally, we include an introductory background for integrable systems and an appendix that gives a resolution of a family of singular maps through blow-ups, which is used for the proof on the Bethe ansatz.

  10. Confined Random Walkers in Dimensions Higher Than One and Analysis of Transmission of Infection in Epidemics

    CERN Document Server

    Sugaya, S

    2016-01-01

    A pair of random walkers, the motion of each of which in two dimensions is confined spatially by the action of a quadratic potential centered at different locations for the two walks, are analyzed in the context of reaction-diffusion. The application sought is to the process of transmission of infection in epidemics. The walkers are animals such as rodents in considerations of the Hantavirus epidemic, infected or susceptible, the reaction is the transmission of infection, and the confining potential represents the tendency of the animals to stay in the neighborhood of their home range centers. Calculations are based on a recently developed formalism (Kenkre and Sugaya, Bull. Math. Bio. 76, 3016 (2014)) structured around analytic solutions of a Smoluchowski equation and one of its aims is the resolution of peculiar but well-known problems of reaction-diffusion theory in 2-dimensions. In the present analysis, reaction occurs not at points but in spatial regions of dimensions larger than 0. The analysis uncovers...

  11. Automatic liver segmentation on Computed Tomography using random walkers for treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghbel, Mehrdad; Mashohor, Syamsiah; Mahmud, Rozi; Saripan, M. Iqbal Bin

    2016-01-01

    Segmentation of the liver from Computed Tomography (CT) volumes plays an important role during the choice of treatment strategies for liver diseases. Despite lots of attention, liver segmentation remains a challenging task due to the lack of visible edges on most boundaries of the liver coupled with high variability of both intensity patterns and anatomical appearances with all these difficulties becoming more prominent in pathological livers. To achieve a more accurate segmentation, a random walker based framework is proposed that can segment contrast-enhanced livers CT images with great accuracy and speed. Based on the location of the right lung lobe, the liver dome is automatically detected thus eliminating the need for manual initialization. The computational requirements are further minimized utilizing rib-caged area segmentation, the liver is then extracted by utilizing random walker method. The proposed method was able to achieve one of the highest accuracies reported in the literature against a mixed healthy and pathological liver dataset compared to other segmentation methods with an overlap error of 4.47 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.94 while it showed exceptional accuracy on segmenting the pathological livers with an overlap error of 5.95 % and dice similarity coefficient of 0.91. PMID:28096782

  12. A class of almost equilibrium states in Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kueskue, Muharrem

    2008-11-06

    In quantum field theory in curved spacetimes the construction of the algebra of observables of linear fields is today well understood. However, it remains a non-trivial task to construct physically meaningful states on the algebra. For instance, we are in the unsatisfactory situation that there exist no examples of states suited to describe local thermal equilibrium in a non-stationary spacetime. In this thesis, we construct a class of states for the Klein-Gordon field in Robertson-Walker spacetimes, which seem to provide the first example of thermal states in a spacetime without time translation symmetry. More precisely, in the setting of real, linear, scalar fields in Robertson-Walker spacetimes we define on the set of homogeneous, isotropic, quasi-free states a free energy functional that is based on the averaged energy density measured by an isotropic observer along his worldline. This functional is well defined and lower bounded by a suitable quantum energy inequality. Subsequently, we minimize this functional and obtain states that we interpret as 'almost equilibrium states'. It turns out that the states of low energy are the ground states of the almost equilibrium states. Finally, we prove that the almost equilibrium states satisfy the Hadamard condition, which qualifies them as physically meaningful states. (orig.)

  13. Recent Walker circulation strengthening and Pacific cooling amplified by Atlantic warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Shayne; Timmermann, Axel; Stuecker, Malte F.; England, Matthew H.; Merrifield, Mark; Jin, Fei-Fei; Chikamoto, Yoshimitsu

    2014-10-01

    An unprecedented strengthening of Pacific trade winds since the late 1990s (ref. ) has caused widespread climate perturbations, including rapid sea-level rise in the western tropical Pacific, strengthening of Indo-Pacific ocean currents, and an increased uptake of heat in the equatorial Pacific thermocline. The corresponding intensification of the atmospheric Walker circulation is also associated with sea surface cooling in the eastern Pacific, which has been identified as one of the contributors to the current pause in global surface warming. In spite of recent progress in determining the climatic impacts of the Pacific trade wind acceleration, the cause of this pronounced trend in atmospheric circulation remains unknown. Here we analyse a series of climate model experiments along with observational data to show that the recent warming trend in Atlantic sea surface temperature and the corresponding trans-basin displacements of the main atmospheric pressure centres were key drivers of the observed Walker circulation intensification, eastern Pacific cooling, North American rainfall trends and western Pacific sea-level rise. Our study suggests that global surface warming has been partly offset by the Pacific climate response to enhanced Atlantic warming since the early 1990s.

  14. Anestesia em criança com síndrome de Walker-Warburg

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    Emine Arzu Kose

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Justificativa e objetivos: A síndrome de Walker-Warburg é uma distrofia muscular autossômica recessiva congênita rara, manifestada pelo sistema nervoso central com malformações oculares e possível envolvimento de vários sistemas. O diagnóstico é estabelecido pela presença de quatro critérios: distrofia muscular congênita, lisencefalia tipo II, malformação cerebelar e malformação da retina. A maioria das crianças com a síndrome morre nos primeiros três anos de vida por causa de insuficiência respiratória, pneumonia, convulsões, hipertermia e fibrilação ventricular. Relato de caso: É discutida a conduta anestésica em uma criança do sexo masculino, de dois meses, programada para cirurgia eletiva de derivação ventrículo-peritoneal. Conclusões: Uma abordagem anestésica cuidadosa é necessária por causa do envolvimento de vários sistemas. Relatamos a conduta anestésica em uma criança do sexo masculino de dois meses com síndrome de Walker-Warburg, que foi programada para cirurgia eletiva de derivação ventrículo-peritoneal.

  15. An anxiety-induced bias in the perception of a bistable point-light walker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Cruys, Sander; Schouten, Ben; Wagemans, Johan

    2013-11-01

    Human sensitivity for social cues is exquisite, as illustrated by the ease with which simplified point-light movements invoke social and emotional responses. Compared to faces, these biological motion stimuli only recently started to be used to explore questions regarding social cognition and anxiety. We presented human point-light walkers that could be perceived as facing towards or facing away from the observer, and tested whether participants with high social anxiety would perceive these bistable stimuli differently, because this type of stimuli has particular relevance for them. The results showed that observers with high social anxiety tended to see walkers as facing away more frequently than those with low social anxiety. This may mean that high socially anxious observers are biased towards the more positive perceptual alternative because they are motivated to protect themselves against threatening social experiences, but we also explore alternative explanations. The findings are in line with the evidence for a positivity bias in perception, also called wishful seeing, but in contrast with the attentional negativity bias often found in social anxiety. We discuss reasons for this divergence and possible limitations of the current study. © 2013.

  16. The Most Common Comorbidities in Dandy-Walker Syndrome Patients: A Systematic Review of Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stambolliu, Emelina; Ioakeim-Ioannidou, Myrsini; Kontokostas, Kimonas; Dakoutrou, Maria; Kousoulis, Antonis A

    2017-09-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is a rare neurologic multi-entity malformation. This review aimed at reporting its main nonneurologic comorbidities. Following PRISMA guidelines, search in Medline was conducted (2000-2014, keyword: dandy-walker). Age, sex, country, DWS type, consanguinity or siblings with DWS, and recorded coexistent conditions (by ICD10 category) were extracted for 187 patients (46.5% male, 43% from Asia) from 168 case reports. Diagnosis was most often set in 12 years old (27.8%). One-third of cases had a chromosomal abnormality or syndrome (n = 8 PHACE), 27% had a cardiovascular condition (n = 7 Patent Ductus Arteriosus), 24% had a disease of eye and ear (n = 9 cataract); most common malignancy was nephroblastoma (n = 8, all Asian). Almost one-fifth had a mental illness diagnosis; only 6.4% had mild or severe intellectual disability. The spread of comorbidities calls for early diagnosis and multidisciplinary research and practice, especially as many cases remain clinically asymptomatic for years.

  17. Neurocutaneous melanosis and the Dandy-Walker complex: an uncommon but not so insignificant association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marnet, Dominique; Vinchon, Matthieu; Mostofi, Keyvan; Catteau, Benoit; Kerdraon, Olivier; Dhellemmes, Patrick

    2009-12-01

    Neurocutaneous melanosis represents a rare congenital but nonheritable phakomatosis defined as the association of giant or multiple congenital nonmalignant melanocytic nevi with leptomeningeal melanosis or melanoma of the central nervous system. We describe the case of an adolescent with a giant congenital bathing trunk melanocytic nevus who developed progressive intracranial hypertension due to leptomeningeal melanosis confirmed by surgical biopsy. Brain and spine magnetic resonance images showed posterior fossa malformation compatible with the Dandy-Walker complex, hydrocephalus, and extensive enhancement of posterior fossa then spine. Shunt placement, corticotherapy, and chemotherapy were attempted leading to transient relief but the boy died 12 months after the onset of primary neurological symptoms. We discuss diagnosis, pathogenesis, management, and prognosis in the light of data from the recent literature. Neurocutaneous melanosis is considered to follow from neurulation disorders which could account for associated developmental malformations as the so-called Dandy-Walker complex. Cutaneous lesions are usually recognized at birth whereas neurological manifestations develop later. Numerous neurological symptoms have been reported according to extent of leptomeningeal and parenchymal infiltration. Whether magnetic resonance imaging of the neuroaxis represents the choice radiological exam, definite diagnosis relies upon the histological data obtained by mean of biopsy. Once symptomatic, surgical and medical measures remain palliative since death occurs within 3 years.

  18. Dandy–Walker malformation is a rare cause of syringomyelia in adults

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    G. Yu. Evzikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Neural tube defects are the most common central nervous system malformation. Dandy–Walker malformation (DWM is a rare abnormality of the posterior cranial fossa, which is generally diagnosed in the prenatal period or early infancy.The paper describes a case of the late clinical manifestation of DWM, which has caused syringomyelia. All variants of pathological changes within the Dandy–Walker complex very rarely become a cause of syringomyelia. Only four cases of DWM, in which syringomyelia was found in adults, are known.The authors believe that formation of syringomyelia cysts in these patients is associated with the impaired circulation of normal cerebrospinal fluid between the superior cistern and the subarachnoid spaces of the spinal cord due to the caudal dislocation of the cyst formed in the fourth ventricle.Decompression of the craniovertebral junction, by resecting the caudal portion of the cyst in the foramen magnum, and repair of the free communication between the superior cistern and the cerebrospinal fluid spaces of the spinal cord, which is complemented by duroplasty, are pointed out to be an optimal treatment in these patients.

  19. Dandy-Walker syndrome with duplex kidney abnormalities in trisomy 18 - A rare case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tun-Jun; Li, Yi-Ying; Wu, Wan-Ju; Lin, Chi-Kang; Wang, Chun-Kai; Wang, Chen-Yu; Hwang, Kwei-Shuai; Su, Her-Young

    2017-10-01

    Trisomy 18 is one of the major numerical chromosomal disorders. The incidence of trisomy 18 is approximately one in 6000 live births. Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is the most common congenital malformation of the cerebellum, with an incidence of about one in 5000 live births. The incidence of trisomy 18 associated with DWM is rare and long-term survival rate is very low. A case involving a 39-year-old pregnant female with a case of trisomy 18 associated with DWM. The incidence of trisomy 18 associated with DWM is rare, and our report presents an unusual case that supplements our knowledge of this condition. We report a case involving a 39-year-old pregnant female with a case of trisomy 18 associated with Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM). Fetal ultrasonography showed hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis and dilatation of the fourth ventricle and was characterized by an enlarged posterior fossa. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging showed inferior vermian hypoplasia and a large posterior fossa cyst communicating with the fourth ventricle causing high insertion of the torcular herophili, which was compatible with DWM. Furthermore, the karyotyping report revealed trisomy 18. The incidence of trisomy 18 associated with DWM is rare, and our report presents an unusual case that supplements our knowledge of this condition. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Dandy-Walker syndrome in adult mimicking myasthenia gravis Síndrome de Dandy-Walker em adulto simulando miastenia gravis

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    Juliana Cardoso

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS is a rare posterior fossa malformation. The DWS can occur associated with other brain or systemic malformations, but ocular abnormalities in this disease are rare and clinical findings mimicking myasthenia gravis have not been described to date. We report a 23-year-old woman who presented mild limitation of the ocular movements with progressive palpebral ptosis, which changed in intensity during the day. The investigation showed negative anti-acetylcholine receptor antibody, repetitive nerve stimulation and "Tensilon test", but the brain magnetic resonance image reveals DWS with hydrocephalus associated with calosal dysgenesis. The characteristic of disease, clinical manifestations and pathologic features, specially the clinical evaluation of ocular abnormalities in suspicion of DWS, including the MG in differential diagnosis are discussed.A síndrome de Dandy-Walker (DWS é uma rara malformação da fossa posterior que pode ocorrer associada com outras malformações cerebrais ou sistêmicas. As alterações oculares são raras e as manifestações clínicas, simulando miastenia gravis (MG, não foram descritas até o momento. Descrevemos uma mulher de 23 anos apresentando discreta limitação da movimentação ocular com progressiva ptose palpebral que mudava de intensidade durante o dia. A investigação mostrou negativos o anticorpo anti-receptor de acetilcolina, a estimulação nervosa repetitiva e o "teste do Tensilon", porém a ressonância magnética de crânio revelou DWS com hidrocefalia associada à disgenesia de corpo caloso. As características da doença, manifestações clínicas e patológicas, especialmente a avaliação clínica de anormalidade ocular na suspeita de DWS serão discutidas, incluindo a MG no diagnóstico diferencial.

  1. Maternal care in the parasitoid Sclerodermus harmandi (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenjie Hu

    Full Text Available Guarding behavior is an important activity in sub-social insects, and this behavior is believed to improve the survival of offspring. Sclerodermus harmandi (Hymenoptera: Bethylidae is one of most powerful epizoic parasitoid wasps, and it parasitizes Monochamus alternatus, a borer of wood and also the primary vector of the pinewood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. After laying eggs, S. harmandi exhibits sub-social behavior involving the female tending the clutch of eggs until emergence (guarding behavior. In this study, the benefits of this maternal care with regard to improvements in the survival of offspring were examined. During the developmental stages, only offspring in the egg and larval stages were sensitive to guarding behavior. A positive relationship between the survival of the offspring and the duration of guarding was detected with logistic regression analysis. A female replacement experiment demonstrated that multiparous S. harmandi stepmothers showed guarding behavior and that this behavior improved the survival of the immature offspring, whereas nulliparous stepmothers failed to exhibit the guarding behavior. These results indicate that S. harmandi females display maternal care and that this behavior improves the survival of offspring.

  2. Wolbachia in two populations of Melittobia digitata Dahms (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copeland, Claudia S.; Sivinski, John [United States Dept. of Agriculture, Gainesville, FL (United States). Center for Medical, Agriculture and Veterinary Entomology]. E-mails: cclaudia@bioinf.uni-leipzig.de; john.sivinski@ars.usda.gov; Matthews, Robert W. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). Dept. of Entomology]. E-mail: rmatthew@uga.edu; Gonzalez, Jorge M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Entomology]. E-mail: jmgonzalez@neo.tamu.edu; Aluja, Martin [Instituto de Ecologia A.C., Veracruz (Mexico)]. E-mail: martin.aluja@inecol.edu.mx

    2008-11-15

    We investigated two populations of Melittobia digitata Dahms, a gregarious parasitoid (primarily upon a wide range of solitary bees, wasps, and flies), in search of Wolbachia infection. The first population, from Xalapa, Mexico, was originally collected from and reared on Mexican fruit fly pupae, Anastrepha ludens Loew (Diptera: Tephritidae); the other, from Athens, Georgia, was collected from and reared on prepupae of mud dauber wasps, Trypoxylon politum Say (Hymenoptera: Crabronidae). PCR studies of the ITS2 region corroborated that both parasitoid populations were the same species; this potentially provides a useful molecular taxonomic profile since females of Melittobia species are superficially similar. Amplification of the Wolbachia surface protein gene (wsp) confirmed the presence of this endosymbiont in both populations. Sequencing revealed that the Wolbachia harbored in both populations exhibited a wsp belonging to a unique subgroup (denoted here as Dig) within the B-supergroup of known wsp genes. This new subgroup of wsp may either belong to a different strain of Wolbachia from those previously found to infect Melittobia or may be the result of a recombination event. In either case, known hosts of Wolbachia with a wsp of this subgroup are only distantly related taxonomically. Reasons are advanced as to why Melittobia - an easily reared and managed parasitoid - holds promise as an instructive model organism of Wolbachia infection amenable to the investigation of Wolbachia strains among its diverse hosts. (author)

  3. Catalogue of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae of Bulgaria

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    Albena Lapeva-Gjonova

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The present catalogue of the ants (Hymenoptera, Formicidae of Bulgaria is made on a base of critical reconsideration of literature (covering the period from 1892 till 2009 and part of 2010 as well as on examination of the authors‘ and several museum‘s collections. A lot of data were omitted in the previous Bulgarian monograph on ants, lots of new data were recently added and many important additions and alterations were made due to taxonomic revisions of Eurasian Formicidae during the last three decades. Two new species are reported for the country [Temnothorax graecus (Forel, 1911 and Temnothorax cf. korbi (Emery, 1924]. This catalogue contains a list of 163 ant species belonging to 40 genera of 6 subfamilies now known from Bulgaria. Synonyms and information on the previously reported names in relevant publications are given. Known localities of the species are grouped by geographic regions. Maps with concrete localities or regions for each species were prepared. The conservation status of 13 ant species is given as they are included in IUCN Red List of Threatened Species and Bulgarian Biodiversity Act. In comparison with adjacent Balkan regions the ant fauna of Bulgaria is quite rich and its core is composed of South European elements.

  4. Preservation of Domesticated Honey Bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) Drone Semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paillard, M; Rousseau, A; Giovenazzo, P; Bailey, J L

    2017-08-01

    Preservation of honey bee (Apis mellifera L., Hymenoptera: Apidae) sperm, coupled with instrumental insemination, is an effective strategy to protect the species and their genetic diversity. Our overall objective is to develop a method of drone semen preservation; therefore, two experiments were conducted. Hypothesis 1 was that cryopreservation (-196 °C) of drone semen is more effective for long-term storage than at 16 °C. Our results show that after 1 yr of storage, frozen sperm viability was higher than at 16 °C, showing that cryopreservation is necessary to conserve semen. However, the cryoprotectant used for drone sperm freezing, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), can harm the queen and reduce fertility after instrumental insemination. Hypothesis 2 was that centrifugation of cryopreserved semen to reduce DMSO prior to insemination optimize sperm quality. Our results indicate that centrifuging cryopreserved sperm to remove cryoprotectant does not affect queen survival, spermathecal sperm count, or sperm viability. Although these data do not indicate that centrifugation of frozen-thawed sperm improves queen health and fertility after instrumental insemination, we demonstrate that cryopreservation is achievable, and it is better for long-term sperm storage than above-freezing temperatures for duration of close to a year. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Oxidative stress markers in patients with hymenoptera venom allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patella, Vincenzo; Incorvaia, Cristoforo; Minciullo, Paola Lucia; Oricchio, Carmine; Saitta, Salvatore; Florio, Giovanni; Saija, Antonella; Gangemi, Sebastiano

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress occurs in many allergic and immunologic disorders as a result of the imbalance between the endogenous production of free reactive oxygen species (ROS) and/or the reduction of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), and nitrosylated proteins (NPs) can be used as markers of oxidative stress and inflammation. Our objective was to examine the serum levels of AGEs, AOPPs, and NPs in patients with allergic reactions to hymenoptera venom before and after ultrarush venom immunotherapy (VIT). The study included two groups of patients: 30 patients allergic to yellow jacket or honey bee venom and treated by aqueous preparation of Vespula spp (26 patients) or Apis mellifera (four patients) VIT, and 30 healthy donors as controls. Blood samples were collected to measure serum levels of AGEs, AOPPs, and NPs at baseline (T1), at the end of the incremental phase of the VIT protocol (T2), and after 15 days (T3). Serum AOPP levels at T1 were significantly higher in comparison with controls (p = 0.001), whereas serum levels of NPs at T1 were significantly lower than those in controls (p venom allergy (HVA) is characterized by isolated episodes of reactions to stinging insect venom and is not included among chronic inflammatory diseases, an oxidative stress status occurs in patients suffering from this kind of allergy. Furthermore, VIT does not modify serum levels of these oxidative stress biomarkers.

  6. Haruki Murakami’s Deconstructive Reading of the Myth of Johnnie Walker and Colonel Sanders in Kafka on the Shore

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    Limanta L. S.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyze how Haruki Murakami reads the real icons of Johnnie Walker and Colonel Sanders in Kafka on the Shore deconstructively. First, we will focus on the signification process of the icon, which are to a great extent molded by advertisements, and then on the deconstruction of their signifieds. For the purpose, we will apply Barthes’ idea of myth. We are also interested in revealing how Murakami constructs Johnnie Walker and Colonel Sanders to be characters in the novel. The analysis shows that the construction of the icons through advertisements leads to the creation of their mtyhs, and then Murakami reads them deconstructively to be opposite signifieds.

  7. Mutations in extracellular matrix genes NID1 and LAMC1 cause autosomal dominant Dandy-Walker malformation and occipital cephaloceles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbro, Benjamin W; Mahajan, Vinit B; Gakhar, Lokesh; Skeie, Jessica M; Campbell, Elizabeth; Wu, Shu; Bing, Xinyu; Millen, Kathleen J; Dobyns, William B; Kessler, John A; Jalali, Ali; Cremer, James; Segre, Alberto; Manak, J Robert; Aldinger, Kimerbly A; Suzuki, Satoshi; Natsume, Nagato; Ono, Maya; Hai, Huynh Dai; Viet, Le Thi; Loddo, Sara; Valente, Enza M; Bernardini, Laura; Ghonge, Nitin; Ferguson, Polly J; Bassuk, Alexander G

    2013-08-01

    We performed whole-exome sequencing of a family with autosomal dominant Dandy-Walker malformation and occipital cephaloceles and detected a mutation in the extracellular matrix (ECM) protein-encoding gene NID1. In a second family, protein interaction network analysis identified a mutation in LAMC1, which encodes a NID1-binding partner. Structural modeling of the NID1-LAMC1 complex demonstrated that each mutation disrupts the interaction. These findings implicate the ECM in the pathogenesis of Dandy-Walker spectrum disorders. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  8. Cenozoic evolution of the central Walker Lane Belt, west-central Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petronis, Michael S.

    This dissertation is a collection of four papers that investigate deformation along the North America/Pacific plate boundary, geomagnetic field behavior, and aspects of volcanism in the western part of the Basin and Range Province. Active deformation along the America/Pacific plate boundary is distributed eastward across a wide zone of the western margin of the North American plate, from the San Andreas Fault eastward into the western Basin and Range province an area referred to as the Walker Lane Belt. Chapter three and four investigate aspects of deformation that has been transferred inboard of the continental plate boundary since the mid-Cenozoic inception of the system by investigating a key areas of the central Walker Lane Belt, west-central Nevada (Mina Deflection and southwest Silver Peak Range), where a significant component of the residual strain is being distributed. Deformation in these two areas is being accommodated along a system of late Cenozoic faults with strain partitioned into components of extension, strike slip faulting, and rotation of crustal blocks between the fault systems in the region. The results of this study allow for an assessment of late Tertiary deformation, which leads to a better understanding of the kinematics of deformation in this important part of the Walker Lane Belt. Chapter two investigates the transport direction of the Candelaria pyroclastic sequence by the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) technique. The AMS data are spatially variable across the region and indicate variable transport directions of the three regionally extensive ignimbrite deposits. The AMS fabric data indicate that the Candelaria pyroclastic sequence was erupted from distinct source areas likely separated by several kilometers. Chapter one investigates unusual geomagnetic field behavior at 25.7 Ma and 23.8 Ma preserved in volcanic rocks in the Mina Deflection. Paleomagnetic data indicate that parts of two transitional field records or reversal

  9. Pore size distribution and methane equilibrium conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, northern Gulf of Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bihani, Abhishek [University of Texas at Austin; Daigle, Hugh [University of Texas at Austin; Cook, Ann [Ohio State University; Glosser, Deborah [Ohio State University; Shushtarian, Arash [University of Texas at Austin

    2015-12-15

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  10. Pore Size Distribution and Methane Equilibrium Conditions at Walker Ridge Block 313, Northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bihani, A. D.; Daigle, H.; Cook, A.; Glosser, D.; Shushtarian, A.

    2015-12-01

    Coexistence of three methane phases (liquid (L), gas (G), hydrate (H)) in marine gas hydrate systems may occur according to in-situ pressure, temperature, salinity and pore size. In sediments with salinity close to seawater, a discrete zone of three-phase (3P) equilibrium may occur near the base of the regional hydrate stability zone (RHSZ) due to capillary effects. The existence of a 3P zone influences the location of the bottom-simulating reflection (BSR) and has implications for methane fluxes at the base of the RHSZ. We studied hydrate stability conditions in two wells, WR313-G and WR313-H, at Walker Ridge Block 313 in the northern Gulf of Mexico. We determined pore size distributions (PSD) by constructing a synthetic nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation time distribution. Correlations were obtained by non-linear regression on NMR, gamma ray, and bulk density logs from well KC-151 at Keathley Canyon. The correlations enabled construction of relaxation time distributions for WR313-G and WR313-H, which were used to predict PSD through comparison with mercury injection capillary pressure measurements. With the computed PSD, L+H and L+G methane solubility was determined from in-situ pressure and temperature. The intersection of the L+G and L+H curves for various pore sizes allowed calculation of the depth range of the 3P equilibrium zone. As in previous studies at Blake Ridge and Hydrate Ridge, the top of the 3P zone moves upwards with increasing water depth and overlies the bulk 3P equilibrium depth. In clays at Walker Ridge, the predicted thickness of the 3P zone is approximately 35 m, but in coarse sands it is only a few meters due to the difference in absolute pore sizes and the width of the PSD. The thick 3P zone in the clays may explain in part why the BSR is only observed in the sand layers at Walker Ridge, although other factors may influence the presence or absence of a BSR.

  11. [Physical risks whilst walking the Nijmegen Four Days Marches in 2007: electrolyte imbalance in 1 in 5 walkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijsvogels, T.M.H.; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Poelkens, F.; Binkhorst, M.; Wouters, C.W.; Schouwenberg, B.J.J.W.; Hopman, M.T.E.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the physiological impact and health risks for walkers during the Nijmegen (the Netherlands) Four Days Marches in 2007, the largest walking event in the world with more than 45,000 participants. DESIGN: Observational study. METHODS: 66 volunteers were randomly selected and

  12. Description of a new species and subspecies of Idalus Walker from Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala (Lepidoptera, Erebidae, Arctiinae, Arctiini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Bernardo A.; Janzen, Daniel H.; Winnie Hallwachs;  J. Bolling Sullivan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract A new species and subspecies of Idalus Walker are described from Costa Rica, Honduras and Guatemala. Images of males and females and their genitalia are provided. Locality information and distribution maps for Costa Rica and for Guatemala are included. The biology and phylogeny of Idalus are discussed. PMID:23730178

  13. Kinetic equations for ultrarelativistic particles in a Robertson-Walker Universe and isotropization of relict radiation by gravitational interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatyev, Yu G

    2011-01-01

    Kinetic equations for ultrarelativistic particles with due account of gravitational interactions with massive particles in the Robertson-Walker universe are obtained. On the basis of an exact solution of the kinetic equations thus obtained, a conclusion is made as to the high degree of the uniformity of the relict radiation on scales with are less than $10'$.

  14. Case 3724 - Metochus abbreviatus Scott, 1874 (Insecta, Heteroptera): proposed precedence over Rhyparochromus erosus Walker, 1872 (currently Metochus erosus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The purpose of this application, under Article 23.9.3 of the Code, is to conserve the widely used specific name Metochus abbreviatus Scott, 1874, for a species of rhyparochromid bugs from East Asia. The name is threatened by the senior subjective synonym Metochus erosus (Walker, 1872), which has bee...

  15. Low carbohydrate, high fat diet impairs exercise economy and negates the performance benefit from intensified training in elite race walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Louise M; Ross, Megan L; Garvican-Lewis, Laura A; Welvaert, Marijke; Heikura, Ida A; Forbes, Sara G; Mirtschin, Joanne G; Cato, Louise E; Strobel, Nicki; Sharma, Avish P; Hawley, John A

    2017-05-01

    Three weeks of intensified training and mild energy deficit in elite race walkers increases peak aerobic capacity independent of dietary support. Adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate, high fat (LCHF) diet markedly increases rates of whole-body fat oxidation during exercise in race walkers over a range of exercise intensities. The increased rates of fat oxidation result in reduced economy (increased oxygen demand for a given speed) at velocities that translate to real-life race performance in elite race walkers. In contrast to training with diets providing chronic or periodised high carbohydrate availability, adaptation to an LCHF diet impairs performance in elite endurance athletes despite a significant improvement in peak aerobic capacity. We investigated the effects of adaptation to a ketogenic low carbohydrate (CHO), high fat diet (LCHF) during 3 weeks of intensified training on metabolism and performance of world-class endurance athletes. We controlled three isoenergetic diets in elite race walkers: high CHO availability (g kg -1  day -1 : 8.6 CHO, 2.1 protein, 1.2 fat) consumed before, during and after training (HCHO, n = 9); identical macronutrient intake, periodised within or between days to alternate between low and high CHO availability (PCHO, n = 10); LCHF (economy. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological Society.

  16. Changes in Energy Cost and Total External Work of Muscles in Elite Race Walkers Walking at Different Speeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chwała Wiesław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to assess energy cost and total external work (total energy depending on the speed of race walking. Another objective was to determine the contribution of external work to total energy cost of walking at technical, threshold and racing speed in elite competitive race walkers.

  17. Dandy-walker malformation and the contribution of radioisotopic studies of cerebral spinal fluid dynamics to its diagnosis. Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palma, A.; Nazar, N.; Castro, M.; Olea, E.; Guzmann, G. (Inst. of Neurosurgery, Santiago (Chile))

    1982-01-01

    One case of Dandy-Walker malformation is described. The diagnosis was mainly reached by dynamic isotope studies of CSF, and was confirmed by axial computerized tomography. The importance of these examinations is discussed, not only as a means of understanding the aetiopathology, but especially because of the functional information they give and the therapeutic consequences they have.

  18. Neuropsychological and Behavioural Phenotype of Dandy-Walker Variant Presenting in Chromosome 22 Trisomy: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searson, Ruth; Hare, Dougal Julian; Sridharan, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a case of Dandy-Walker variant syndrome associated with trisomy 22 in a 17-year-old man is described. This is the first account of this combination in a person surviving into adulthood, and the neuropsychological and behavioural presentation is described in detail and a clinical formulation is presented for the benefit of…

  19. Life table studies of rachiplusia nu (guenée) and chrysodeixis (= pseudoplusia) includens (Walker) (lepidoptera: noctuidae) on artificial diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachiplusia nu (Guenée) and Chrysodeixis (= Pseudoplusia) includens (Walker) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) are two economically important species in soybean in northern Argentina. Life cycle, reproductive and population parameters of R. nu and C. includens reared on artificial diet were determined under ...

  20. Nesting biology of Centris (Hemisiella tarsata Smith (Hymenoptera, Apidae, Centridini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cândida M. L. Aguiar

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Nests of Centris tarsata Smith, 1874 were obtained from trap-nests in areas of dry semi-deciduous forest (Baixa Grande and caatinga (Ipirá, in the State of Bahia. Nesting occurred in bamboo canes and in tubes of black cardboard with 5.8 cm (= small tube and 10.5 cm (= large tube in length and 0.6 and 0.8 cm in diameter, respectively. In both areas C. tarsata nested during the wet season producing four generations in Baixa Grande and three generations in Ipirá. The immatures of one generation underwent diapause at both sites. The bees constructed their nests with a mixture of sand and oil. In general, the cells were elongated and arranged in linear series with its opening pointing towards the nest entrance. Completed nests had two to three cells in small tubes, one to seven cells in large tubes, and two to 13 cells in bamboo canes. The nest plug resembled an uncompleted cell and was externally covered with oil. The cells were provisioned with pollen, oil, and nectar. Nests were parasitized by Mesocheira bicolor (Fabricius, 1804 (Hymenoptera: Apidae and other not identify bee species.Ninhos de Centris tarsata Smith, 1874 foram obtidos através da utilização de ninhos-armadilha, em áreas de floresta estacional semi-decídua (Baixa Grande e de caatinga (Ipirá, no Estado da Bahia. A nidificação ocorreu em gomos de bambus e em tubos de cartolina preta, estes com comprimentos de 5,8 cm (= tubos pequenos e 10,5 cm (= tubos grandes, e diâmetro de 0,6 e 0,8 cm, respectivamente. Em ambas as áreas C. tarsata nidificou durante a estação úmida, produzindo quatro gerações anuais em Baixa Grande e três em Ipirá. Os imaturos de uma das gerações passaram por diapausa em ambos os locais. As abelhas construíram seus ninhos com uma mistura de areia e óleo. Em geral, as células foram alongadas e arranjadas em série linear, com sua abertura dirigida para a entrada do ninho. Os ninhos completados tinham de duas a três células nos tubos pequenos

  1. Simplification of intradermal skin testing in Hymenoptera venom allergic children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Stobiecki, Marcin; Brzyski, Piotr; Rogatko, Iwona; Nittner-Marszalska, Marita; Sztefko, Krystyna; Czarnobilska, Ewa; Lis, Grzegorz; Nowak-Węgrzyn, Anna

    2017-03-01

    The direct comparison between children and adults with Hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis (HVA) has never been extensively reported. Severe HVA with IgE-documented mechanism is the recommendation for venom immunotherapy, regardless of age. To determine the differences in the basic diagnostic profile between children and adults with severe HVA and its practical implications. We reviewed the medical records of 91 children and 121 adults. Bee venom allergy was exposure dependent, regardless of age (P venom allergic group, specific IgE levels were significantly higher in children (29.5 kUA/L; interquartile range, 11.30-66.30 kUA/L) compared with adults (5.10 kUA/L; interquartile range, 2.03-8.30 kUA/L) (P venom were higher in bee venom allergic children compared with the wasp venom allergic children (P venom. At concentrations lower than 0.1 μg/mL, 16% of wasp venom allergic children and 39% of bee venom allergic children had positive intradermal test results. The median tryptase level was significantly higher in adults than in children for the entire study group (P = .002), as well as in bee (P = .002) and wasp venom allergic groups (P = .049). The basic diagnostic profile in severe HVA reactors is age dependent. Lower skin test reactivity to culprit venom in children may have practical application in starting the intradermal test procedure with higher venom concentrations. Copyright © 2016 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Genomic and karyotypic variation in Drosophila parasitoids (Hymenoptera, Cynipoidea, Figitidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Gokhman

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila melanogaster Meigen, 1830 has served as a model insect for over a century. Sequencing of the 11 additional Drosophila Fallen, 1823 species marks substantial progress in comparative genomics of this genus. By comparison, practically nothing is known about the genome size or genome sequences of parasitic wasps of Drosophila. Here, we present the first comparative analysis of genome size and karyotype structures of Drosophila parasitoids of the Leptopilina Förster, 1869 and Ganaspis Förster, 1869 species. The gametic genome size of Ganaspis xanthopoda (Ashmead, 1896 is larger than those of the three Leptopilina species studied. The genome sizes of all parasitic wasps studied here are also larger than those known for all Drosophila species. Surprisingly, genome sizes of these Drosophila parasitoids exceed the average value known for all previously studied Hymenoptera. The haploid chromosome number of both Leptopilina heterotoma (Thomson, 1862 and L. victoriae Nordlander, 1980 is ten. A chromosomal fusion appears to have produced a distinct karyotype for L. boulardi (Barbotin, Carton et Keiner-Pillault, 1979 (n = 9, whose genome size is smaller than that of wasps of the L. heterotoma clade. Like L. boulardi, the haploid chromosome number for G. xanthopoda is also nine. Our studies reveal a positive, but non linear, correlation between the genome size and total chromosome length in Drosophila parasitoids. These Drosophila parasitoids differ widely in their host range, and utilize different infection strategies to overcome host defense. Their comparative genomics, in relation to their exceptionally well-characterized hosts, will prove to be valuable for understanding the molecular basis of the host-parasite arms race and how such mechanisms shape the genetic structures of insect communities.

  3. EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy: Hymenoptera venom allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, Gunter J; Varga, Eva-Maria; Roberts, Graham; Mosbech, Holger; Bilò, M Beatrice; Akdis, Cezmi A; Antolín-Amérigo, Darío; Cichocka-Jarosz, Ewa; Gawlik, Radoslaw; Jakob, Thilo; Kosnik, Mitja; Lange, Joanna; Mingomataj, Ervin; Mitsias, Dimitris I; Ollert, Markus; Oude Elberink, Joanna N G; Pfaar, Oliver; Pitsios, Constantinos; Pravettoni, Valerio; Ruëff, Franziska; Sin, Betül Ayşe; Agache, Ioana; Angier, Elizabeth; Arasi, Stefania; Calderón, Moises A; Fernandez-Rivas, Montserrat; Halken, Susanne; Jutel, Marek; Lau, Susanne; Pajno, Giovanni B; van Ree, Ronald; Ryan, Dermot; Spranger, Otto; van Wijk, Roy Gerth; Dhami, Sangeeta; Zaman, Hadar; Sheikh, Aziz; Muraro, Antonella

    2017-07-27

    Hymenoptera venom allergy is a potentially life-threatening allergic reaction following a honeybee, vespid or ant sting. Systemic allergic sting reactions have been reported in up to 7.5% of adults and up to 3.4% of children. They can be mild and restricted to the skin or moderate-to-severe with a risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis. Patients should carry an emergency kit containing an adrenaline autoinjector, H1 -antihistamines, and corticosteroids depending on the severity of their previous sting reaction(s). The only treatment to prevent further systemic sting reactions is venom immunotherapy. This guideline has been prepared by the European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology's (EAACI) Taskforce on Venom Immunotherapy as part of the EAACI Guidelines on Allergen Immunotherapy initiative. The guideline aims to provide evidence-based recommendations for the use of venom immunotherapy, has been informed by a formal systematic review and meta-analysis and produced using the Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) approach. The process included representation from a range of stakeholders. Venom immunotherapy is indicated in venom allergic children and adults to prevent further moderate to severe systemic sting reactions. Venom immunotherapy is also recommended in adults with only generalized skin reactions as it results in significant improvements in quality of life compared to carrying an adrenaline auto-injector. This guideline aims to give practical advice on performing venom immunotherapy. Key sections cover general considerations before initiating venom immunotherapy, evidence-based clinical recommendations, risk factors for adverse events and for relapse of systemic sting reaction, and a summary of gaps in the evidence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Testing baits to control Argentine ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in vineyards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daane, Kent M; Cooper, Monica L; Sime, Karen R; Nelson, Erik H; Battany, Mark C; Rust, Michael K

    2008-06-01

    Liquid baits were evaluated for control of the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae), and associated mealybug and soft scale pests in California vineyards. In 2003, liquid baits with small doses ofimidacloprid, boric acid, or thiamethoxam dissolved in 25% sucrose water resulted in lower ant and mealybug densities and fruit damage, compared with an untreated control. Similar treatments in a soft scale-infested vineyard showed only a reduction of ant density and fruit infestation in only the boric acid and thiamethoxam treatments. In 2004, commercial and noncommercial formulations of liquid baits reduced ant densities in three separate trials, but they had inconsistent effects on mealybug densities and fruit infestation; granular protein bait had no effect. Using large plots and commercial application methodologies, liquid bait deployed in June resulted in lower ant density and fruit infestation, but it had no effect on mealybug density. Across all trials, liquid bait treatments resulted in lower ant density (12 of 14 trials) and fruit damage (11 of 14 sites), presenting the first report of liquid baits applied using commercial methodologies that resulted in a reduction of ants and their associated hemipteran crop damage. For commercialization of liquid baits, we showed that any of the tested insecticides can suppress Argentine ants when properly delivered in the crop system. For imidacloprid, bait dispensers must be protected from sunlight to reduce photodegradation. Results suggest that incomplete ant suppression can suppress mealybug densities. However, after ant populations are suppressed, there may be a longer period before hemipteran populations are effectively suppressed. Therefore, liquid baits should be considered part of a multiseason program rather than a direct, in-season control of hemipteran pest populations.

  5. Effect of Diapause Ondevelopment and Reproduction of White Rice Stem Borer Scirpophaga innotata Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Suparno

    1998-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the effect of diapause on the development and reproduction of white rice stem borer (WRSB, Scirpophaga innotata Walker. During diapause, larvae of the WRSB, progressively decreased in weight at the rate 3.2 mg per week. Larvae lost 50 per cent of their initial body mass and had up to four stationary molts. Larvae became less active, lost pigmentation and leg rudimentary. The longer the larvae remained in diapause, the lighter in weight the emerging moths were, with fewer eggs and oocytes. After 5 months in diapause, the emerging moths weighted about half as much and had about half as many eggs and oocytes (230.0±35.8 egg cells in ovaries as moths that emerged from nondiapausing larvae. Key words: insecta, white rice stem rice borer, Scirpophaga innotata, diapause

  6. ENSO impacts on the South American rainfall during 1980s: Hadley and Walker circulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Souza, E.B.; Ambrizzi, T. [Departamento de Ciencias Atmosfericas, Instituto Astronomico y Geofisico, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2002-04-01

    The changes in the Hadley and Walter cells and their respective impacts on the South American rainfall during the ENSO episodes observed in the decade of 80, were investigated through cross-sections analyses of the atmospheric circulation in altitude, averaged in the zonal and meridional planes. Such large-scale cells almost inverted their climatological circulation pattern, during El Nino events (1982-83 and 1986-87). In these years, manifestation of the anomalous descending branch of the Hadley and Walker cells affects most of the north-northeast of South America, which inhibited the convective activity associated to the Inter Tropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) and caused drought conditions in the rainy seasons of the Guyana, Surinam, French Guyana, center-east of the Amazon and most of the Northeast Brazil. On the other hand, conditions of excess of precipitation observed in the south-southeast of South America, were favored by the anomalous ascending branch of the Hadley cell. During La Nina events (1984-85 and 1988-89), it was observed an intensification of the ascending and descending branches associated to the Walker and Hadley cells. The anomalous large-scale ascending movement associated to these cells, was extended to the Northeast of Brazil and equatorial South Atlantic, favoring ITCZ to become more active than the normal, which resulted in an above normal rainy season in these areas. An intense subsidence was noticed in the mid latitudes of South America, which inhibited the large-scale convection in the region, explaining the deficient rainy season observed in most of the south-southeast of South America. [Spanish] Los cambios en las celulas de Hadley y Walker y sus respectivos impactos en Suramerica, en las lluvias, durante los episodios en ENOS, observados en la decada de los 80, son investigados a traves de analisis de reacciones cruzadas de la circulacion atmosferica en altitudes promediadas en planos zonal y meridional. Tales celulas de gran escala

  7. Exact distributions of cover times for N independent random walkers in one dimension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Satya N.; Sabhapandit, Sanjib; Schehr, Grégory

    2016-12-01

    We study the probability density function (PDF) of the cover time tc of a finite interval of size L by N independent one-dimensional Brownian motions, each with diffusion constant D . The cover time tc is the minimum time needed such that each point of the entire interval is visited by at least one of the N walkers. We derive exact results for the full PDF of tc for arbitrary N ≥1 for both reflecting and periodic boundary conditions. The PDFs depend explicitly on N and on the boundary conditions. In the limit of large N , we show that tc approaches its average value of ≈L2/(16 D lnN ) with fluctuations vanishing as 1 /(lnN) 2 . We also compute the centered and scaled limiting distributions for large N for both boundary conditions and show that they are given by nontrivial N independent scaling functions.

  8. Seasonal nutrient dynamics of foliage and litterfall on Walker Branch Watershed, a deciduous forest ecosystem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grizzard, T.; Henderson, G.S.; Clebsch, E.E.C.; Reichle, D.E.

    1976-03-01

    A detailed twelve-month study of litterfall, live foliage biomass, and seasonal nutrient (nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, calcium, sodium, and magnesium) dynamics in tree components was performed for forest types on Walker Branch Watershed, Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Biomass and nutrient content of foliage, reproductive parts and branches were examined for ten dominant trees in order to assess the relative importance of litterfall in returning nutrients to the forest floor in four different forest types. Litterfall, measured in pine, pine-oak-hickory, oak-hickory, and mesophytic hardwood forests, was separated into three components (leaves, reproductive parts, and branches). Seasonal comparisons of those forest types were made for biomass and nutrient inputs for each component and for total litterfall.

  9. Walker Branch Throughfall Displacement Experiment Data Report: Site Characterization, System Performance, Weather, Species Composition, and Growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P.J.

    2001-09-04

    This numeric data package provides data sets, and accompanying documentation, on site characterization, system performance, weather, species composition, and growth for the Throughfall Displacement Experiment, which was established in the Walker Branch Watershed of East Tennessee to provide data on the responses of forests to altered precipitation regimes. The specific data sets include soil water content and potential, coarse fraction of the soil profile, litter layer temperature, soil temperature, monthly weather, daily weather, hourly weather, species composition of trees and saplings, mature tree and sapling annual growth, and relative leaf area index. Fortran and SAS{trademark} access codes are provided to read the ASCII data files. The data files and this documentation are available without charge on a variety of media and via the Internet from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC).

  10. "It feels good to be measured": clinical role-play, Walker Percy, and the tingles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Nitin K

    2013-01-01

    A large online community has recently formed around autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), a pleasant and poorly understood somatic reaction to specific interpersonal triggers. Its web-based manifestations include a variety of amateur videos designed to elicit the reaction, many of which feature protracted imitations of a clinician's physical exam. This analysis considers through a literary lens the proximity of this phenomenon to clinical diagnostics, focusing in particular on characterizations of spiritual isolation elaborated in Love in the Ruins (1971), the third novel by physician-writer Walker Percy (1916-1990). Within this speculative framework, the tendency to derive pleasure from clinical milieus, real or constructed, may be interpreted as a quality particular to the postmodern psyche. Viewing web-based clinical role-play in light of Percy's writing also underscores the possibility that routine diagnostic assessments may have independent therapeutic implications.

  11. Effects of field interactions upon particle creation in Robertson-Walker universes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birrell, N. D.; Davies, P. C. W.; Ford, L. H.

    1980-01-01

    Particle creation due to field interactions in an expanding Robertson-Walker universe is investigated. A model in which pseudoscalar mesons and photons are created as a result of their mutual interaction is considered, and the energy density of created particles is calculated in model universes which undergo a bounce at some maximum curvature. The free-field creation of non-conformally coupled scalar particles and of gravitons is calculated in the same space-times. It is found that if the bounce occurs at a sufficiently early time the interacting particle creation will dominate. This result may be traced to the fact that the model interaction chosen introduces a length scale which is much larger than the Planck length.

  12. Dynamic pedobarographic classification of idiopathic toe-walkers for therapeutical indication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Martín-Casas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic toe-walkers (ITWs pedobarographic analysis has not been described yet nor its possible relationship with orthopedical and developmental characteristics. The objective of this research is to develop a dynamic pedobarographic classification of ITWs to propose a specific therapeutical approach. Through an observational study, 56 ITWs aged 3-6 years were classified by their initial foot contact; differences between idiopatic toe-walking (ITW types and with respect to 40 control children were calculated by means of ANOVA and Student t-tests. The results show that the three ITW types displayed different step models for pressure and impulse distribution and also for temporal development (p less than .05. They also showed different orthopedic and developmental characteristics (p less than .05. As a whole, they demonstrated different severity levels, which suggest different therapeutical indications. This study confirms the convenience of a specific orthopedic, developmental, and gait assessment in ITW to clarify therapeutical indication.

  13. NMR images of non-communicating hydrocephalus associated with Dandy-Walker variant and achondroplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Masaharu; Kuroda, Ryotaro; Watanabe, Masaru; Nakatani, Jiro; Ioku, Masahiko; Irisawa, Minoru; Hamada, Tatsumi; Ishida, Osamu

    1988-06-01

    Two cases of non-communicating hydrocephalus caused by a relatively rare etiology were reported. They were both diagnosed by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). The first patient, a 4-month-old boy, had Dandy-Walker variant, showing hypoplasia of the corpus callosum and the inferior vermis, and a large cyst behind the vermis, communicating with the subarachnoid space, as well as hydrocephalus; the fourth ventricle was partially reserved. The second patient, also a 4-month-old boy, had achondroplasia, resulting in a narrow foramen magnum; the disturbance of the outflow of the cerebro-spinal fluid around the cisterna magna was thought to be the cause of hydrocephalus in his case. The validity of NMR was demonstrated in the diagnoses of these conditions, for a high resolution was needed in examining the complicated structure of the posterior fossa.

  14. Intellectual prognosis of the Dandy-Walker malformation in children: the importance of vermian lobulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boddaert, N.; Brunelle, F. [Paediatric Radiology Department, Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, 149 rue de Sevres, 75015, Paris (France); ERM 0205 INSERM-CEA, Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France); Klein, O.; Parisot, D.; Pierre-Kahn, A. [Neurosurgical Department, Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, 149 rue de Sevres, 75015, Paris (France); Ferguson, N.; Sonigo, P.; Hertz-Pannier, L.; Baraton, J.; Emond, S.; Simon, I.; Chigot, V.; Schmit, P. [Paediatric Radiology Department, Hopital Necker Enfants-Malades, 149 rue de Sevres, 75015, Paris (France)

    2003-05-01

    Half of patients with the Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) have normal intellectual development. We aimed to identify feature on MRI associated with good intellectual prognosis. We reviewed 20 patients with DWM diagnosed on MRI, mean age 14.6{+-}9.9 years. We assessed their intellectual development and related it to the MRI features. We found two groups with a statistically different intellectual outcome. All 14 patients with normal intellectual development had a normal lobulation of the vermis, without supratentorial anomalies. Of the six patients with mental retardation, three had an abnormal vermis, together with dysgenesis of the corpus callosum. In the other three, there were normal vermian anatomy with associated anomalies. Normal lobulation of the vermis, in the absence of any supratentorial anomaly, appears to be a good prognostic factor in DWM. Preservation of cerebrocerebellar pathways and neonatal plasticity could explain the normal intellectual development. These findings might be useful in prenatal diagnosis. (orig.)

  15. Dandy-Walker malformation, genitourinary abnormalities, and intellectual disability in two families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Maha S; Masri, Amira; Gregor, Anne; Gleeson, Joseph G; Rosti, Rasim Ozgur

    2015-11-01

    We report on two families, each with documented consanguinity and two affected with overlapping features of Dandy-Walker malformation, genitourinary abnormalities, intellectual disability, and hearing deficit. This phenotype shares similar findings with many well-known syndromes. However, the clinical findings of this syndrome categorize this as a new syndrome as compared with the phenotype of already established syndromes. Due to parental consanguinity, occurrence in siblings of both genders and the absence of manifestations in obligate carrier parents, an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance is more likely. The authors believe that these families suggest a novel autosomal recessive cerebello-genital syndrome. Array CGH analyses of an affected did not show pathological deletions or duplications. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Dandy-Walker malformation and neurocutaneous melanosis in a three-month-old infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Shaza Mohamed; Yassin, Rehab Omer; Osman, Atika Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Dandy-Walker Malformation (DWM) is a rare congenital malformation of the brain. It is characterized by cystic enlargement of the fourth ventricle which is communicating with an enlarged posterior fossa, cerebellar dysgenesis, high tentorial insertion and hydrocephalus. Neurocutaneous Melanosis (NCM) is a congenital neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by large or multiple melanocytic nevi and benign or malignant melanocytic tumors of the leptomeninges. We report three months old boy who presented with projectile vomiting associated with a noticeable increase in head size. Several congenital nevi were seen all over his body with evident signs of hydrocephalus. The association of DWM and NCM is a rare complex, and to our knowledge, this is the eleventh case to be reported in the literature. In this article, we discuss the proposed pathogenesis, classification and management of the condition. PMID:27493376

  17. First-trimester sonographic findings associated with a Dandy-Walker malformation and inferior vermian hypoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bornstein, Eran; Goncalves Rodríguez, José Luis; Álvarez Pavón, Erika Carolina; Quiroga, Héctor; Or, Drorit; Divon, Michael Y

    2013-10-01

    We report 2 cases in which first-trimester measurements of the intracranial translucency and the brain stem-to-occipital bone diameter were markedly enlarged. This finding was thought to represent an abnormal fourth ventricle-cisterna magna complex. Subsequently, the diagnoses of a Dandy-Walker malformation with partial vermian agenesis in 1 case and inferior vermian hypoplasia in the other were established and confirmed by either postmortem autopsy or postnatal magnetic resonance imaging. These cases suggest that evaluation of the fourth ventricle-cisterna magna complex, by measuring the intracranial translucency or brain stem-to-occipital bone diameter may identify some cases with structural malformations of the cerebellum as early as the first trimester.

  18. Neurocutaneous melanosis in association with dandy-walker complex with extensive intracerebral and spinal cord involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Kyoung-Su; Song, Young-Jin

    2014-07-01

    Neurocutaneous melanosis (NCM) is a rare congenital syndrome consisting of benign or malignant melanotic tumors of the central nervous system with large or numerous cutaneous melanocytic nevi. The Dandy-Walker complex (DWC) is characterized by an enlarged posterior fossa with high insertion of the tentorium, hypoplasia or aplasia of the cerebellar vermis, and cystic dilatation of the fourth ventricle. These each two conditions are rare, but NCM associated with DWC is even more rare. Most patients of NCM with DWC present neurological symptoms early in life such as intracranial hemorrhage, hydrocephalus, and malignant transformation of the melanocytes. We report a 14-year-old male patient who was finally diagnosed as NCM in association with DWC with extensive intracerebral and spinal cord involvement.

  19. Oral findings and dental treatment in a patient with Dandy-Walker syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusumoto, Yasuka; Shinozuka, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) is congenital disease characterized by hypoplasia of the cerebellum, the formation of cysts that communicate with the fourth ventricle of the posterior cranial fossa, and hydrocephalus. In addition to various other complications, cleft lip/palate, facial retrognathia, a high-arched palate, and maldentition occur at an increased frequency in patients with DWS. However, few studies have reported the dental manifestations of DWS. Herein, we report the clinical manifestations, oral findings, and dental management of a DWS patient who was treated under general anesthesia. Poor oral hygiene, gingivitis, and several congenital dental abnormalities (e.g., generalized microdontia, conical tooth, transposition, and congenitally missing teeth) were observed. This report is the first to describe the oral findings and dental treatment of DWS. Our findings emphasize the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in the diagnosis and treatment of DWS. © 2013 Special Care Dentistry Association and Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 with hypothalamic hamartoma and Dandy-Walker malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azukizawa, Takayuki; Yamamoto, Masahito; Narumiya, Seirou; Takano, Tomoyuki

    2013-04-01

    We report a 1-year-old girl with oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 with multiple malformations of the oral cavity, face, digits, and central nervous system, including agenesis of the corpus callosum, the presence of intracerebral cysts, and agenesis of the cerebellar vermis, which is associated with the subarachnoid space separating the medial sides of the cerebellar hemispheres. This child also had a hypothalamic hamartoma and a Dandy-Walker malformation, which have not been reported previously. The clinical features, including cerebral malformations, in several types of oral-facial-digital syndrome, overlap with each other. Further accumulation of new case reports and identification of new genetic mutations in oral-facial-digital syndrome may provide novel and important insights into the genetic mechanisms of this syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Performance of trichogrammatids as biocontrol agents of Pseudoplusia includens Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bueno, Regiane C O F; Parra, José R P; de F Bueno, Adeney; Haddad, Marinéia L

    2009-01-01

    This research aimed to point out the most suitable trichogrammatid strains to control the soybean looper Pseudoplusia includes Walker. Biological parameters and parasitism ratio of 11 Trichogramma pretiosum Riley, one Trichogramma atopovirilia Oatman & Platner and one Trichogrammatoidea annulata De Santis strains reared on P. includens eggs were evaluated. Among all tested strains/species, T. pretiosum strain RV, collected in Rio Verde, GO, had the fastest development cycle and the highest percentage of parasitism of P. includens eggs. There was no difference in the parasitism and in the number of parasitoid emerged per egg among the tested parasitoid species and strains. Accordingly to the cluster analysis, T. pretiosum strain RV reared on P. includens eggs had the best performance. Considering the higher parasitism rate, shorter biological cycle, higher survival and sex ratio, T. pretiosum strain RV is the most appropriated to be used in field releases aiming at P. includens control.

  2. A Kinematic Model for Vertical Axis Rotation within the Mina Deflection of the Walker Lane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gledhill, T.; Pluhar, C. J.; Johnson, S. A.; Lindeman, J. R.; Petronis, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    The Mina Deflection, at the boundary between the Central and Southern Walker Lane, spans the California-Nevada border and includes a heavily-faulted Pliocene volcanic field overlying Miocene ignimbrites. The dextral Walker Lane accommodates 25% of relative Pacific-North America plate motion and steps right across the sinistral Mina deflection. Ours and previous work shows that the Mina Deflection partially accommodates deformation by vertical-axis rotation of up to 99.9o ± 6.1o rotation since 11 Ma. This rotation is evident in latite ignimbrite of Gilbert et al. (1971), which we have formalized as three members of Tuff of Huntoon Creek (THC). The welded, basal, normal-polarity Huntoon Valley Member of THC is overlain by the unwelded to partially-welded, reversed-polarity Adobe Hills Mbr. This member includes internal breaks suggesting multiple eruptive phases, but the paleomagnetic results from each are statistically indistinguishable, meaning that they were likely erupted in rapid succession (within a few centuries of one another). THC ends with a welded member exhibiting very shallow inclination and south declination that we call Excursional Mbr. One of the upper members has been dated at 11.17 ± 0.04 Ma. These Miocene units are overlain by Pliocene basalts, Quaternary alluvium, and lacustrine deposits. Our paleomagnetic results show a gradient between the zero rotation domain and high rotation across a 20km baseline. A micropolar model, based on 25 years of earthquake data from the Northern and Southern California Seismic Network, suggest the Mina Deflection is currently experiencing transpressional seismogenic deformation (Unruh et al., 2003). Accepting Unruh's model and assuming continuous rotation since 11 Ma, we propose a kinematic model for the western Mina Deflection that accommodates 90o of vertical axis rotation from N-S to ENE-WSW oriented blocks.

  3. “Ancestors We Didn’t Even Know We Had”: Alice Walker, Asian Religion, and Ethnic Authenticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Garton-Gundling

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent debates about the ethics of identity in a global age have dealt with how to prioritize conflicting local and global allegiances. Guided by these concerns, the fiction of Alice Walker develops a distinctive view of how local cultures and global movements can fruitfully interact. This vision depends on concepts from Asian religions, a major influence that critics of Walker have largely overlooked. Walker promotes Hindu and Buddhist meditation in a context of widespread African American skepticism toward Asian religions. According to widespread notions of cultural authenticity, Asian religions cannot nourish an African American connection to ethnic roots. In response to this challenge, Alice Walker’s fiction portrays Hindu and Buddhist mystics as African Americans’ ancestors, thus positioning these faiths as authentically black. By creatively enfolding Asian religions into her sense of African American heritage, Walker builds a spiritual cosmopolitanism that relies on claims of ancestral affiliation even when these claims are not literal. This strategy is Walker’s effort to create a new paradigm of cultural authenticity, one that allows individuals and groups to choose their ancestors. Walker’s approach seeks to incorporate disparate global influences while still valorizing the figure of the ancestor. This innovative approach places Walker at the forefront of a growing number of African American artists and intellectuals who promote Asian religions to American minorities. Walker’s work vividly dramatizes larger concerns in transnational American Studies: Eastern philosophy’s relevance to identity politics, the tensions between universal ideals and cultural specifics, and the ethics of cross-cultural appropriation.

  4. Los Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera asociados con agallas de Cinípidos (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae en la Comunidad de Madrid

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    Gómez, J. F.

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Information about the chalcid wasp parasitoid community (Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea associated with galls of Cynipidae in Madrid (Spain is compiled and updated. Studied material includes more than 1000 published and unpublished records from samplings in 80 sites in the Madrid region carried out over twenty three years by the research team. A check-list of 121 species, 19 of them provisionally identified, from 6 families of Chalcidoidea is provided as follows: 26 Eurytomidae, 27 Torymidae, 9 Ormyridae, 33 Pteromalidae, 9 Eupelmidae and 17 Eulophidae. Ormyrus rufimanus Mayr, 1904 and Idiomacromerus semiaeneus (Szelenyi, 1957 are recorded for the first time in the Iberian Peninsula. For each family and genus of Chalcidoidea data are given on biology, diversity and distribution in Comunidad de Madrid. The composition of the chalcid wasp parasitoid community associated with gall wasps in Comunidad de Madrid is discussed and compared to the same community data from the Iberian Peninsula and the Western Palaearctic. Species from the Iberian community of chalcid parasitoids that are missing from Madrid region, exclusive species and potentially present species are also commented upon. Finally two appendices are presented as follows: a list of the Chalcidoidea species reared from 73 different galls made by 71 cynipid species from Madrid with associated parasitoid records, and a final appendix with full record data of all studied material, including information on the sampling localities with X, Y georeferenced coordinates, host galls and host plants.

    Se compila y actualiza la información existente sobre la comunidad parasitoide de Chalcidoidea, asociada a agallas de cinípidos (Hymenoptera, Cynipidae en la Comunidad de Madrid. Los datos corresponden a más de 1000 registros, tanto de datos publicados, como inéditos, correspondientes a colectas en 80 localidades de Madrid efectuadas por el equipo investigador a lo largo de 23 a

  5. The Role of Walkers’ Needs and Expectations in Supporting Maintenance of Attendance at Walking Groups: A Longitudinal Multi-Perspective Study of Walkers and Walk Group Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassavou, Aikaterini; Turner, Andrew; French, David P.

    2015-01-01

    Background There is good evidence that when people’s needs and expectations regarding behaviour change are met, they are satisfied with that change, and maintain those changes. Despite this, there is a dearth of research on needs and expectations of walkers when initially attending walking groups and whether and how these needs and expectations have been satisfied after a period of attendance. Equally, there is an absence of research on how people who lead these groups understand walkers’ needs and walk leaders’ actions to address them. The present study was aimed at addressing both of these gaps in the research. Methods Two preliminary thematic analyses were conducted on face-to-face interviews with (a) eight walkers when they joined walking groups, five of whom were interviewed three months later, and (b) eight walk leaders. A multi-perspective analysis building upon these preliminary analyses identified similarities and differences within the themes that emerged from the interviews with walkers and walk leaders. Results Walkers indicated that their main needs and expectations when joining walking groups were achieving long-term social and health benefits. At the follow up interviews, walkers indicated that satisfaction with meeting similar others within the groups was the main reason for continued attendance. Their main source of dissatisfaction was not feeling integrated in the existing walking groups. Walk leaders often acknowledged the same reasons for walkers joining and maintaining attendance at walking. However, they tended to attribute dissatisfaction and drop out to uncontrollable environmental factors and/or walkers’ personalities. Walk leaders reported a lack of efficacy to effectively address walkers’ needs. Conclusions Interventions to increase retention of walkers should train walk leaders with the skills to help them modify the underlying psychological factors affecting walkers’ maintenance at walking groups. This should result in

  6. Description and biological features of a new species of Anagrus Haliday (Hymenoptera, Mymaridae

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    F. Nugnes

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anagrus lindberginae sp. n. (Hymenoptera: Mymaridae, an egg par- asitoid of the leafhopper Lindbergina aurovittata (Homoptera: Cicadellidae, is described from Italy. It is included in the atomus group of Anagrus Haliday and compared with the allied known taxa. The parasitoid’s life cycle is characterized by a long larval diapause from spring to fall, which allows for synchronization with its leafhop- per host; other biological traits of A. lindberginae on the evergreen plant Quercus ilex are discussed.

  7. New species of Hymenoptera associated with galls on Calliandra brevipes Benth. (Fabaceae, Mimosoidea) in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Angélica M. Penteado-Dias; Carvalho, Fabrício M. de

    2008-01-01

    Four species of Hymenoptera: Tanaostigmodes ringueleti (Brèthes, 1924), T. mecanga sp.nov. (Chalcidoidea, Tanaostigmatidae), Allorhogas taua sp. nov. (Braconidae, Doryctinae) and Eurytoma sp. (Chalcidoidea, Eurytomidae) were reared from two different types of galls of Calliandra brevipes Benth. (Fabaceae, Mimosoidea) in Juiz-de-Fora, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. The two Tanaostigmatidae species are probably the gall inducers; the Braconidae species probably is phytophagous inquiline in round g...

  8. The genus Nipponopius Fischer (Hymenoptera, Braconidae, Opiinae new for China, with description of a new species

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    Tong Zhou

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Nipponopius glabricaudatus sp. n. from Shaanxi and Ningxia (NW China is described and illustrated (Hymenoptera: Braconidae: Opiinae. A key to the species of Nipponopius Fischer, 1963, is added and for the first time the male is described and illustrated. The genus is reported for the second time from outside Japan and is new for China. The position of Nipponopius Fischer is discussed and it is accepted as a valid genus.

  9. Published data and new records to the fauna of Eupelmidae (Insecta: Hymenoptera) in Bulgaria

    OpenAIRE

    MIROSLAV ANTOV; ANELIA STOJANOVA

    2015-01-01

    This study presents information about published data on eupelmid fauna of Bulgaria and new records of 16 species distributed in the country. Some of them are reared from Cynipidae (Hymenoptera) galls on Quercus, Rosa, Hypecoum, as well as from Cecidomyiidae (Diptera) developing in stems of Eryngium campestre L. Other species are reared from pods of Astragalus glycyphyllos L. and seeds of Dianthus giganteus dʼUrv. New host associations are established. As a result of the study 4...

  10. Emigration of a colony of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex heyeri Forel (Hymenoptera, Formicidae

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    Mariane Aparecida Nickele

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Emigration of a colony of the leaf-cutting ant Acromyrmex heyeri Forel (Hymenoptera, Formicidae. Colony migration is a poorly studied phenomenon in leaf-cutting ants. Here we report on the emigration of a colony of the leaf-cutting ant A. heyeri in Brazil. The colony emigrated to a new location 47.4 m away from the original nest site, possibly because it had undergone considerable stress due to competitive interactions with a colony of Acromyrmex crassispinus.

  11. Side-effects of pesticides on the generalist endoparasitoid Palmistichus elaeisis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Alc?ntara-de la Cruz, Ricardo; Zanuncio, Jos? Cola; Lacerda,Mabio Chrisley; Wilcken, Carlos Frederico; Fernandes, Fl?vio Lemes; Tavares, Wagner de Souza; Soares, Marcus Alvarenga; Sediyama,Carlos Sigueyuki

    2017-01-01

    New plant protection strategies focus on minimizing chemical pesticide use and increasing their compatibility with biological control agents. The objective was to evaluate the side-effects of glyphosate, diflubenzuron, malathion, tebuconazole and triflumuron (at 720, 45, 400, 150 and 20?g ai ha?1, respectively), pesticides authorized for soybean crops in Brazil, on the parasitoid Palmistichus elaeisis (Hymenoptera: Eulophidae) reared on Anticarsia gemmatalis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The emer...

  12. Accelerated evolution of mitochondrial but not nuclear genomes of Hymenoptera: new evidence from crabronid wasps.

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    Martin Kaltenpoth

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial genes in animals are especially useful as molecular markers for the reconstruction of phylogenies among closely related taxa, due to the generally high substitution rates. Several insect orders, notably Hymenoptera and Phthiraptera, show exceptionally high rates of mitochondrial molecular evolution, which has been attributed to the parasitic lifestyle of current or ancestral members of these taxa. Parasitism has been hypothesized to entail frequent population bottlenecks that increase rates of molecular evolution by reducing the efficiency of purifying selection. This effect should result in elevated substitution rates of both nuclear and mitochondrial genes, but to date no extensive comparative study has tested this hypothesis in insects. Here we report the mitochondrial genome of a crabronid wasp, the European beewolf (Philanthus triangulum, Hymenoptera, Crabronidae, and we use it to compare evolutionary rates among the four largest holometabolous insect orders (Coleoptera, Diptera, Hymenoptera, Lepidoptera based on phylogenies reconstructed with whole mitochondrial genomes as well as four single-copy nuclear genes (18S rRNA, arginine kinase, wingless, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase. The mt-genome of P. triangulum is 16,029 bp in size with a mean A+T content of 83.6%, and it encodes the 37 genes typically found in arthropod mt genomes (13 protein-coding, 22 tRNA, and two rRNA genes. Five translocations of tRNA genes were discovered relative to the putative ancestral genome arrangement in insects, and the unusual start codon TTG was predicted for cox2. Phylogenetic analyses revealed significantly longer branches leading to the apocritan Hymenoptera as well as the Orussoidea, to a lesser extent the Cephoidea, and, possibly, the Tenthredinoidea than any of the other holometabolous insect orders for all mitochondrial but none of the four nuclear genes tested. Thus, our results suggest that the ancestral parasitic lifestyle of

  13. Morphology and function of the ovipositor mechanism in Ceraphronoidea (Hymenoptera, Apocrita

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    Andrew Ernst

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The ovipositor of apocritan Hymenoptera is an invaluable source of phylogenetically relevant characters, and our understanding of its functional morphology stands to enlighten us about parasitoid life history strategies. Although Ceraphronoidea is one of the most commonly collected Hymenoptera taxa with considerable economic importance, our knowledge about their natural history and phylogenetic relationships, both to other apocritan lineages and within the superfamily itself, is limited. As a first step towards revealing ceraphronoid natural diversity we describe the skeletomuscular system of the ceraphronoid ovipositor for the first time. Dissections and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy 3D media files were used to visualize the ovipositor complex and to develop character concepts. Morphological structures were described in natural language and then translated into a character-character state format, whose terminology was linked to phenotype-relevant ontologies. Four unique anatomical phenotypes were revealed: 1. The first valvifer (gonangulum of the genus Trassedia is composed of two articulating sclerites, a condition present only in a few basal insect taxa. The bipartition of the first valvifer in Trassedia is most likely secondary and might allow more rapid oviposition. 2. Ceraphronoids, unlike other Hymenoptera, lack the retractor muscle of the terebra; instead the egg laying device is retracted by the seventh sternite. 3. Also unlike other Hymenoptera, the cordate apodeme and the anterior flange of the second valvifer are fused and compose one ridge that serves as the site of attachment for the dorsal and ventral T9-second valvifer muscles. Overall, the ceraphronoid ovipositor system is highly variable and can be described by discrete, distinguishable character states. However, these differences, despite their discrete nature, do not reflect the present classification of the superfamily and might represent parallelisms driven by host

  14. Hymenoptera “Parasitica” in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul, Brazil

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    Eduardo Mitio Shimbori

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT A checklist composed of 105 species of parasitic Hymenoptera, which includes the non-aculeate Apocrita, recorded in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul (MS, Brazil, is presented. A new list, containing 153 genera obtained in recent surveys is also presented; out of these 131 are new records. The major knowledge gaps for these organisms in the State and the prospects for future studies for these organisms are discussed.

  15. Chemoreceptor Evolution in Hymenoptera and Its Implications for the Evolution of Eusociality

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Rokas, Antonis; Berger, Shelley L.; Liebig, Jürgen; Ray, Anandasankar; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2015-01-01

    Eusocial insects, mostly Hymenoptera, have evolved unique colonial lifestyles that rely on the perception of social context mainly through pheromones, and chemoreceptors are hypothesized to have played important adaptive roles in the evolution of sociality. However, because chemoreceptor repertoires have been characterized in few social insects and their solitary relatives, a comprehensive examination of this hypothesis has not been possible. Here, we annotate ∼3,000 odorant and gustatory rec...

  16. Prenatal diagnosis and molecular characterization of a novel locus for Dandy-Walker malformation on chromosome 7p21.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Can; Fu, Fang; Li, Ru; Yang, Xin; Xu, Qing; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2012-01-01

    We present three foetuses with Dandy-Walker malformation, intra-uterine growth restriction and multiple congenital abnormalities, who were studied by array-based comparative genomic hybridization and revealed a novel locus on chromosome 7p21.3. The association of pure chromosome 7p aberrations with Dandy-Walker malformation has rarely been reported. The present study suggests that the critical region associated with Dandy-Walker malformation is restricted to 7p21.3, including the cerebellar disease associated genes NDUFA4 and PHF14. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Diagnosis of a case of Dandy-Walker malformation aided by measurement of the brainstem-vermis angle at 14 weeks gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichizuka, Kiyotake; Mishina, Miyuki; Hasegawa, Junichi; Matsuoka, Ryu; Sekizawa, Akihiko; Pooh, Ritsuko K

    2015-05-01

    Reported is a fetal Dandy-Walker malformation that was strongly suspected in the first trimester through measurement of the brainstem-vermis (B-V) angle, which was found to be 119° on transvaginal ultrasound examination at 14 weeks and 2 days gestation. Definitive diagnosis of the Dandy-Walker malformation was made by magnetic resonance imaging following stillbirth. Ultrasound measurement of the B-V angle may be a useful index for prenatal diagnosis of Dandy-Walker anomalies during early pregnancy. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2014 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  18. Simultaneous intradermal testing with hymenoptera venoms is safe and more efficient than sequential testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmeier, B; Aberer, W; Bokanovic, D; Komericki, P; Sturm, G J

    2013-04-01

    According to current guidelines, skin testing for hymenoptera venom allergy should be performed in a stepwise manner, maintaining 15- to 20-min intervals between the injections of venom. Given the long-winded procedure of sequential skin testing, we retrospectively explored the safety of simultaneous intradermal testing. Four hundred and seventy-eight consecutive patients with a convincing history of an anaphylactic reaction after a hymenoptera sting were tested. All venom concentrations (0.02 ml of 0.001, 0.01, 0.1, and 1.0 μg/ml of honey bee and wasp venom) were administered simultaneously to the skin. Four hundred and seventy-two (98.7%) patients tolerated the simultaneous intradermal test without any side-effects. Only three subjects (0.6%) had a presumed allergic reaction during the test; another three reactions were considered vasovagal. Our skin test protocol with four simultaneously injected concentrations of two hymenoptera venoms is safe and permits the investigator to draw rapid conclusions about the individual's sensitization pattern. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. Hymenoptera venom proteins and peptides for diagnosis and treatment of venom allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Ulrich R

    2011-10-01

    Stings by insects of the order Hymenoptera cause systemic, sometimes life threatening allergic reactions in 1 - 5% of the population in Europe and North America. Responsible for these reactions is an IgE mediated sensitization to proteins of the venoms injected during the stings of social Hymenoptera species, mainly the honey bee (Apis mellifera), vespids like Vespula sp., Polistes sp. and ants, in southern US and central America Solenopsis invicta and in Australia Myrmecia pilosula. The venoms of these insects are composed of low molecular weight substances like biogenic amines, cytotoxic and neurotoxic peptides like melittin, apamin, MCD-peptide and mastoparan, and proteins, mostly enzymes like phospholipase A and hyaluronidase, which are major venom allergens. Immunotherapy with Hymenoptera venoms has been shown to protect 80 to over 95% of patients with a history of systemic allergic sting reaction from further systemic reactions after re-stings. The procedure, safety and efficacy of this treatment and the immune mechanisms involved are discussed. Since ancient times honey bee venom has been used for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease, especially arthritis. Anti-inflammatory effects of bee venom have been documented in animal experiments. Most clinical studies suggest an antiinflammatory effect as well, but are uncontrolled. The only few controlled studies could not confirm efficacy of treatment with bee venom so far.

  20. Chemoreceptor Evolution in Hymenoptera and Its Implications for the Evolution of Eusociality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaofan; Rokas, Antonis; Berger, Shelley L; Liebig, Jürgen; Ray, Anandasankar; Zwiebel, Laurence J

    2015-08-12

    Eusocial insects, mostly Hymenoptera, have evolved unique colonial lifestyles that rely on the perception of social context mainly through pheromones, and chemoreceptors are hypothesized to have played important adaptive roles in the evolution of sociality. However, because chemoreceptor repertoires have been characterized in few social insects and their solitary relatives, a comprehensive examination of this hypothesis has not been possible. Here, we annotate ∼3,000 odorant and gustatory receptors in recently sequenced Hymenoptera genomes and systematically compare >4,000 chemoreceptors from 13 hymenopterans, representing one solitary lineage (wasps) and three independently evolved eusocial lineages (ants and two bees). We observe a strong general tendency for chemoreceptors to expand in Hymenoptera, whereas the specifics of gene gains/losses are highly diverse between lineages. We also find more frequent positive selection on chemoreceptors in a facultative eusocial bee and in the common ancestor of ants compared with solitary wasps. Our results suggest that the frequent expansions of chemoreceptors have facilitated the transition to eusociality. Divergent expression patterns of odorant receptors between honeybee and ants further indicate differential roles of chemoreceptors in parallel trajectories of social evolution. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  1. Foraging behaviour at the fourth trophic level: a comparative study of host location in aphid hyperparasitoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Vet, L.E.M.; Boivin, G.; Brodeur, J.

    2005-01-01

    In studies of foraging behaviour in a multitrophic context, the fourth trophic level has generally been ignored. We used four aphid hyperparasitoid species: Dendrocerus carpenteri (Curtis) (Hymenoptera: Megaspilidae), Asaphes suspensus Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Alloxysta victrix (Westwood)

  2. Foraging behaviour at the fourth tropic level: a comparative study of host location in aphid hyperparasitoids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buitenhuis, R.; Vet, L.E.M.; Boivin, G.; Brodeur, J.

    2005-01-01

    In studies of foraging behaviour in a multitrophic context, the fourth trophic level has generally been ignored. We used four aphid hyperparasitoid species: Dendrocerus carpenteri (Curtis) (Hymenoptera: Megaspilidae), Asaphes suspensus Walker (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae), Alloxysta victrix (Westwood)

  3. Las “Avispas Bandera” (Hymenoptera: Evaniidae de Colombia

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    Serna Francisco

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available La familia Evaniidae está representada por un número relativamente pequeño de géneros y especies dentro del
    orden Hymenoptera. Son avispas de tamaño medio, sin aguijón y solitarias que parasitan ootecas de cucarachas.
    Se realizó un estudio de reconocimiento genérico de la familia Evaniidae para Colombia y su distribución a partir de colecciones entomológicas. El primer capítulo, “Sistemática y Taxonomía de Evaniidae”, pretende ser el reflejo de un trabajo realizado por más de un año, de curadoría y determinación de especímenes presentes en colecciones entomológicas, donde se propone una clave taxonómica para la identificación de los seis géneros de evánidos encontrados en Colombia y un análisis de los caracteres utilizados para la misma. El segundo
    capítulo, “Biología de Evaniidae”, es una recopilación de todos los estudios existentes sobre la biología de la familia, en donde se hace evidente la falta de trabajo sobre el tema y el desconocimiento básico de algunos aspectos que podrían ser muy útiles para la implementación de nuevas estrategias de control biológico. El tercer capítulo, “Distribución Geográfica de los Géneros de la Familia Evaniidae”, muestra como los diferentes géneros de la familia se encuentran distribuidos dentro del territorio colombiano y presenta el estado actual del muestreo de la familia dando información para poder definir áreas de concentración de muestras o áreas posteriores
    de muestreo. Por último, se presentan las conclusiones y recomendaciones finales que permiten dar una idea del trabajo que queda por hacer y los pasos a seguir.

  4. Las hormigas Ecitoninae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae de Morelos, México

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis N Quiroz-Robledo

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un inventario de las hormigas ecitoninas del estado de Morelos, ubicado en la región centro-sur de la república mexicana. Los muestreos fueron realizados por medio de colectas directas y del uso de trampas de intercepción; ocasionalmente se capturaron también machos atraidos a la luz. Se encontraron 15 especies de hormigas ecitoninas: Labidus coecus (Latreille, 1802; L. praedator s. str. (Fr. Smith, 1858; Neivamyrmex agilis Borgmeier, 1953; N. cornutus (Watkins, 1975; N. fallax Borgmeier, 1953; N. graciellae (Mann, 1926; N. impudens (Mann, 1922; N. macropterus Borgmeier, 1953; N. melanocephalus (Emery, 1985; N. nigrescens (Cresson, 1872; N. opacithorax (Emery, 1894; N. pauxilus (Wheeler, 1903; N. sumichrasti (Norton, 1868; N. swainsoni (Shuckard, 1840 y Nomamyrmex esenbecki mordax (Santschi, 1928. Doce de estos registros son nuevos para la entidad. Las especies más abundantes fueron L. coecus, N. melanocephalus, N. nigrescens y N. esenbecki. Se proporciona también alguna información sobre la distribución de estas especies en el estado y las fechas de vuelo de los machos que fueron recolectados. Por último, se anexa una clave para la identificación de obreras y machos en la cual se incluye una especie adicional (N. fuscipennis, que no fue recolectada por nosotros pero ha sido informada por otro autor para la entidad.The Ecitoninae ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae from Morelos, México. To produce an inventory of the Ecitoninae ants from Morelos State (south central Mexico, we used direct capture and pit-fall traps. Occasionally, males were also collected near artificial light sources. Fifteen species were found: Labidus coecus, L. praedator s. str., Neivamyrmex agilis, N. cornutus, N. fallax, N. graciellae, N. impudens, N. macropterus, N. melanocephalus, N. nigrescens, N. opacithorax, N. pauxilus, N. sumichrasti, N. swainsoni and Nomamyrmex esenbecki mordax. Twelve of these species are new records for the state. The most

  5. SAFETY OF VENOMENHAL® VENOM IN MAINTENANCE HYMENOPTERA VENOM IMMUNOTHERAPY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitja Košnik

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. Venomenhal® (V is a new brand ofHymenoptera venom allergen for diagnosis and immunotherapyof venom allergy. We studied the safety of switching thepatients treated with other brands of venom to V. Methods. We performed duplicate skin prick tests with V andALK Reless® (R venom extract (100 μg/ml in 68 patients (50males, 42 ± 15 years on maintenance immunotherapy withhoney bee (26 or wasp (42 venom. On two consecutive maintenanceinjection days 53 patients received in random ordereither 100 μg of R or V venom. Results. Weal diameter in skin prick tests (mean ± st.dev. were3.9 ± 1.1 mm (V and 4.1 ± 1.0 mm (R for bee venom (NSand 3.4 ± 1.0 mm (V and 3.9 ± 1.2 mm (R for wasp venom (p< 0.01. Local reaction 30 minutes after maintenance injectionwere 6.1 ± 1.7 cm (V and 5.4 ± 2.5 cm (R for bee venom(NS and 5.1 ± 1.8 cm (V and 6.1 ± 1.8 cm (R for wasp venom(p < 0.05.Late local reactions (LLR and tiredness (T on the day of injectionand 24 hours after injection were equally distributedamong both groups and were mild (LLR on the day of injection:38% of patients [V] vs. 43% [R]. LLR after 24 hours: 28%[V] vs. 28% [R]. T on the day of injection: 21% [V] vs. 23% [R].T after 24 hours: 0% [V] vs. 6% [R]. Conclusions. V was at least as safe as A. There were no adversereactions due to switching from one brand to another. Slightlybut significantly smaller weal in skin prick tests and immediatelocal reactions might be due to lesser potency or betterpurification of V wasp extract.

  6. Revision of the ant genus Melophorus (Hymenoptera, Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E. Heterick

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fauna of the purely Australian formicine ant genus Melophorus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae is revised. This project involved integrated morphological and molecular taxonomy using one mitochondrial gene (COI and four nuclear genes (AA, H3, LR and Wg. Seven major clades were identified and are here designated as the M. aeneovirens, M. anderseni, M. biroi, M. fulvihirtus, M. ludius, M. majeri and M. potteri species-groups. Within these clades, smaller complexes of similar species were also identified and designated species-complexes. The M. ludius species-group was identified purely on molecular grounds, as the morphology of its members is indistinguishable from typical members of the M. biroi species-complex within the M. biroi species-group. Most species-complexes sampled were also found to be monophyletic. Sequencing generally supported monophyly in taxa sampled but some species of the M. fieldi complex and M. biroi were not monophyletic and the implications arising from this are discussed in this monograph. Based on morphology, ninety-three species are recognized, 73 described as new. A further new species (here called 'Species K' [TERC Collection] is noted in the taxonomic list, but is not described in this work. One species is removed from Melophorus: M. scipio Forel is here placed provisionally in Prolasius. Six species and five subspecies pass into synonymy. Of the full species, M. constans Santschi, M. iridescens (Emery and M. insularis Wheeler are synonymized under M. aeneovirens (Lowne, M. pillipes Santschi is synonymized under M. turneri Forel, M. marius Forel is synonymized under M. biroi Forel, and M. omniparens Forel is synonymized under M. wheeleri Forel. Of the subspecies, M. iridescens fraudatrix and M. iridescens froggatti Forel are synonymized under M. aeneovirens (Lowne, M. turneri aesopus Forel and M. turneri candidus Santschi are synonymized under M. turneri Forel and M. fieldi propinqua Viehmeyer is synonymized under M

  7. Molecular phylogenetics of ponerine ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Chris

    2013-01-01

    Recent molecular phylogenetic studies of ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) have revolutionized our understanding of how these ecologically dominant organisms diversified, but detailed phylogenies are lacking for most major ant subfamilies. I report the results of the first detailed phylogenetic study of the ant subfamily Ponerinae, a diverse cosmopolitan lineage whose properties make it an attractive model system for investigating social and ecological evolution in ants. Molecular sequence data were obtained from four nuclear genes (wingless, long-wavelength rhodopsin, rudimentary [CAD], 28S rDNA; total of ~3.3 kb) for 86 ponerine taxa, representing all three ponerine tribes, 22 of the 28 currently recognized genera, and 14 of the 18 informal subgenera of Pachycondyla, a heterogeneous grouping whose monophyly is doubtful on morphological grounds. Phylogenetic reconstructions using maximum likelihood and Bayesian inference support the monophyly of Ponerinae and tribe Platythyreini, but fail to support the monophyly of the large tribe Ponerini due to its inclusion of the unusual genus Thaumatomyrmex. Pachycondyla is inferred to be broadly non-monophyletic. Numerous novel generic and suprageneric relationships are inferred within Ponerini, which was found to consist of four major multi-generic clades (the Ponera, Pachycondyla, Plectroctena and Odontomachus genus groups) plus the single genera Hypoponera and Harpegnathos. Uncertainty remains in some regions of the phylogeny, including at the base of Ponerini, possibly reflecting rapid radiation. Divergence dating using a Bayesian relaxed clock method estimates an origin for stem Ponerinae in the upper Cretaceous, a major burst of diversification near the K/T boundary, and a rich and continual history of diversification during the Cenozoic. These results fail to support the predictions of the "dynastic-succession hypothesis" previously developed to explain the high species diversity of Ponerinae. Though model

  8. Organic geochemistry and brine composition in Great Salt, Mono, and Walker Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domagalski, J.L.; Orem, W.H.; Eugster, H.P.

    1989-01-01

    Samples of Recent sediments, representing up to 1000 years of accumulation, were collected from three closed basin lakes (Mono Lake, CA, Walker Lake, NV, and Great Salt Lake, UT) to assess the effects of brine composition on the accumulation of total organic carbon, the concentration of dissolved organic carbon, humic acid structure and diagenesis, and trace metal complexation. The Great Salt Lake water column is a stratified Na-Mg-Cl-SO4 brine with low alkalinity. Algal debris is entrained in the high density (1.132-1.190 g/cc) bottom brines, and in this region maximum organic matter decomposition occurs by anaerobic processes, with sulfate ion as the terminal electron acceptor. Organic matter, below 5 cm of the sediment-water interface, degrades at a very slow rate in spite of very high pore-fluid sulfate levels. The organic carbon concentration stabilizes at 1.1 wt%. Mono Lake is an alkaline (Na-CO3-Cl-SO4) system. The water column is stratified, but the bottom brines are of lower density relative to the Great Salt Lake, and sedimentation of algal debris is rapid. Depletion of pore-fluid sulfate, near l m of core, results in a much higher accumulation of organic carbon, approximately 6 wt%. Walker Lake is also an alkaline system. The water column is not stratified, and decomposition of organic matter occurs by aerobic processes at the sediment-water interface and by anaerobic processes below. Total organic carbon and dissolved organic carbon concentrations in Walker Lake sediments vary with location and depth due to changes in input and pore-fluid sulfate concentrations. Nuclear magnetic resonance studies (13C) of humic substances and dissolved organic carbon provide information on the source of the Recent sedimentary organic carbon (aquatic vs. terrestrial), its relative state of decomposition, and its chemical structure. The spectra suggest an algal origin with little terrestrial signature at all three lakes. This is indicated by the ratio of aliphatic to

  9. Field Studies of Streamflow Generation Using Natural and Injected Tracers on Bickford and Walker Branch Watersheds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genereux, D.

    1992-01-01

    Field studies of streamflow generation were undertaken on two forested watersheds, the West Road subcatchment of Bickford Watershed in central Massachusetts and the West Fork of Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee. A major component of the research was development of a two-stage methodology for the use of naturally-occurring {sup 222}Rn as a tracer. The first of the two stages was solving a mass-balance equation for {sup 222}Rn around a stream reach of interest in order to calculate [Rn]{sub q}, the {sup 222}Rn content of the lateral inflow to the reach; a conservative tracer (chloride) and a volatile tracer (propane) were injected into the study stream to account for lateral inflow to, and {sup 222}Rn volatilization from, the study reach. The second stage involved quantitative comparison of [Rn]{sub q} to the measured {sup 222}Rn concentrations of different subsurface waters in order to assess how important these waters were in contributing lateral inflow to the stream reach. The method was first applied to a 34 m stream reach at Bickford during baseflow; results suggested that {ge} 70% of the lateral inflow could be considered vadose zone water (water which had been in a saturated zone for less than a few days), and the remainder ''soil groundwater'' or ''saturated zone water'' (which had a longer residence time in a soil saturated zone). The method was then applied to two stream reaches on the West Fork of Walker Branch over a wide range of flow conditions; four springs were also investigated. It was found that springwater and inflow to the stream could be viewed as a mixture of water from three end members: the two defined at Bickford (vadose zone water and soil groundwater) and a third (bedrock groundwater) to account for the movement of water through fractured dolomite bedrock. Calcium was used as a second naturally-occurring tracer to distinguish bedrock groundwater from the other two end members. The behavior

  10. Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, CLRC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, United Kingdom

    CERN Document Server

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    L. to. r.: Dr. Ian Wilson, CLIC Deputy Study Leader, Prof. Ken J. Peach, Head of the Particle Physics Department, Prof. John Wood, Chief Executive Designate, Dr. Gordon Walker, Directorate, Chief Executive

  11. Henri Cartier-Bresson / Walker Evans : Photographier l’Amérique (1929-1947

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Brunet

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dans un mot adressé en 2001 à Peter Galassi, conservateur de la photographie au MOMA, Henri Cartier-Bresson, alors âgé de quatre-vingt-treize ans, écrivait plaisamment — mais non pas complaisamment : « If it had not been for the challenge of the work of Walker Evans, I don’t think I would have remained a fotographer » (« sans le défi constitué par le travail de Walker Evans, je ne crois pas que je serais resté fotographe ». Pour fêter le centenaire de Cartier-Bresson, c’est ce défi — plutôt ...

  12. Biological aspects of Periga circumstans Walker, 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: Hemileucinae with larvae reared on khaki and mate-plant leaves

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    A. Specht

    Full Text Available The goal of the present study was to investigate biological aspects of Periga circumstans Walker, 1855 (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae: Hemileucinae whose larvae were fed on leaves of khaki-plant (Diospyros khaki Linnaeus - Ebenaceae and Mate-plant (Ilex paraguariensis Saint Hilaire - Aquifoliaceae leaves. The biological parameters were obtained from specimens kept under controlled conditions: temperature of 25 ± 1 °C, relative humidity of 70 ± 10%, and photoperiod of 12 hours. For each developmental stage, morphological and ethological parameters are described. The larvae passed through six instars with a growth average rate of 1.4 for each instar. The host plants influenced significantly only the total duration of the larval phase, which was prolonged for larvae fed on khaki-plant leaves. Several aspects related to the morphology and the ethology of P. circumstans are similar to those described for Lonomia obliqua Walker, 1855.

  13. Seizure and unilateral facial nerve paralysis in a newborn with Dandy-Walker malformation – A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subhajit Bhakta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS is a rare posterior fossa malformation. It can have a varied presentation depending on the age. A newborn presenting with neonatal seizure along with unilateral facial nerve palsy is rather a rare presentation of DWS and very few such cases were reported in the past. We are reporting a case of a newborn male baby presenting with neonatal seizure within 48 hrs of birth along with right sided LMN type facial nerve palsy which on due course of investigation revealed as a case of Dandy–Walker malformation. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal, 2013, Vol-9, No-1, 48-51 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v9i1.9673

  14. A New Anatomic Variation: Coexistence of Both Dandy-Walker Variant and Ophthalmic Artery Originating From Contralateral Internal Carotid Artery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogul, Hayri; Havan, Nuri; Gedikli, Yusuf; Pirimoglu, Berhan; Kantarci, Mecit

    2016-06-01

    The authors report on 1 patient of variant origin of right ophthalmic artery (OA) from ophthalmic segment of the left internal carotid artery. A 41-year-old man was performed magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR angiography. Cerebral MR imaging revealed a Dandy-Walker variant. In MR angiography the authors observed this unusual variant of origin of OA and a complete occlusion of right internal carotid artery. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first patient who has coincidence of both Dandy-Walker variant and origin of OA from contralateral internal carotid artery. Careful observation of MR angiography images with maximum intensity projection is very important for detecting rare vascular variations.

  15. [Reseña] Charles F. Walker, Smoldering ashes: Cusco and the creation of Republican Peru, 1780-1840

    OpenAIRE

    Latasa, P. (Pilar)

    2002-01-01

    Reseña del libro de Walker, Charles F.: De Túpac Amaru a Gamarra: Cusco y la formación del Perú Republicano, 1780-1840, Cusco, Centro de Estudios Regionales Andinos “Bartolomé de Las Casas”, 1999, 316 págs. [Smoldering ashes: Cusco and the creation of Republican Peru, 1780-1840, Durham, N.C., Duke University Press, 1999].

  16. New Lethal Skeletal Dysplasia with Dandy-Walker Malformation, Congenital Heart Defects, Abnormal Thumbs, Hypoplastic Genitalia, and Distinctive Facies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cathy A.; Lachman, Ralph S.

    2011-01-01

    We report on two sibs with a lethal form of bone dysplasia with distinctive skeletal findings including rhizomelic and mesomelic limb shortening, hooked clavicles, dumbbell femurs, and absence of talus and calcaneus ossification. Other clinical features include Dandy-Walker malformation, congenital heart defects, joint contractures, genital hypoplasia, and distinctive facial features. These sibs appear to have a previously undescribed skeletal dysplasia, which is most likely inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion. PMID:20602491

  17. Hybridization between multi-objective genetic algorithm and support vector machine for feature selection in walker-assisted gait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maria; Costa, Lino; Frizera, Anselmo; Ceres, Ramón; Santos, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Walker devices are often prescribed incorrectly to patients, leading to the increase of dissatisfaction and occurrence of several problems, such as, discomfort and pain. Thus, it is necessary to objectively evaluate the effects that assisted gait can have on the gait patterns of walker users, comparatively to a non-assisted gait. A gait analysis, focusing on spatiotemporal and kinematics parameters, will be issued for this purpose. However, gait analysis yields redundant information that often is difficult to interpret. This study addresses the problem of selecting the most relevant gait features required to differentiate between assisted and non-assisted gait. For that purpose, it is presented an efficient approach that combines evolutionary techniques, based on genetic algorithms, and support vector machine algorithms, to discriminate differences between assisted and non-assisted gait with a walker with forearm supports. For comparison purposes, other classification algorithms are verified. Results with healthy subjects show that the main differences are characterized by balance and joints excursion in the sagittal plane. These results, confirmed by clinical evidence, allow concluding that this technique is an efficient feature selection approach. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. How do walkers behave when crossing the way of a mobile robot that replicates human interaction rules?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassallo, Christian; Olivier, Anne-Hélène; Souères, Philippe; Crétual, Armel; Stasse, Olivier; Pettré, Julien

    2018-02-01

    Previous studies showed the existence of implicit interaction rules shared by human walkers when crossing each other. Especially, each walker contributes to the collision avoidance task and the crossing order, as set at the beginning, is preserved along the interaction. This order determines the adaptation strategy: the first arrived increases his/her advance by slightly accelerating and changing his/her heading, whereas the second one slows down and moves in the opposite direction. In this study, we analyzed the behavior of human walkers crossing the trajectory of a mobile robot that was programmed to reproduce this human avoidance strategy. In contrast with a previous study, which showed that humans mostly prefer to give the way to a non-reactive robot, we observed similar behaviors between human-human avoidance and human-robot avoidance when the robot replicates the human interaction rules. We discuss this result in relation with the importance of controlling robots in a human-like way in order to ease their cohabitation with humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Metabolic effects of Hedyotis diffusa on rats bearing Walker 256 tumor revealed by NMR-based metabolomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhiyong; Gao, Kuo; Xu, Can; Gao, Jian; Yan, Yujing; Wang, Yingfeng; Li, Zhongfeng; Chen, Jianxin

    2017-08-28

    Hedyotis diffusa, a traditional Chinese herbal medicine, is widely used for oncotherapy and shows a positive effect in the clinical treatment. But its mechanism of anticancer activities is complicated and unclear. This study was undertaken to assess the therapeutic effects and reveal detailed mechanisms of H. diffusa for oncotherapy. A Walker 256 tumor-bearing rat model was established, and metabolomic profiles of plasma and urine were obtained from (1) H NMR technique. Multivariate statistical analysis methods were used to characterize the discriminating metabolites between control (C), Walker 256 tumor-bearing rats model (M), and H. diffusa treatment (H) groups. Finally, 13 and 10 metabolomic biomarkers in urine and plasma samples were further identified as characteristic metabolites in M group, whereas H group showed a partial metabolic balance recovered, such as ornithine, N-acetyl-l-aspartate, l-aspartate, and creatinine in urine samples, and acetate, lactate, choline, l-glutamine, and 3-hydroxybutyrate in plasma samples. On the basis of the methods above, we hypothesized H. diffusa treatment reduced the injury caused by Walker 256 tumor and maintained a metabolic balance. Our study demonstrated that this method provided new insights into metabolic alterations in tumor-bearing biosystems and researching on the effects of H. diffusa on the endogenous metabolism in tumor-bearing rats. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Dandy-Walker malformation associated with heterozygous ZIC1 and ZIC4 deletion: Report of a new patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohyama, Jun; Kato, Mitsuhiro; Kawasaki, Sari; Harada, Naoki; Kawara, Hiroki; Matsui, Takeshi; Akasaka, Noriyuki; Ohashi, Tsukasa; Kobayashi, Yu; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2011-01-01

    We report on a female patient with Dandy-Walker malformation possibly caused by heterozygous loss of ZIC1 and ZIC4. The patient presented with mental retardation, epilepsy, and multiple congenital malformations including spina bifida, mild dysmorphic facial features including, thick eyebrows, broad nose, full lips, macroglossia, and hypoplasia of the cerebellar vermis with enlargement of the fourth ventricle on brain magnetic resonance imaging, which is consistent with Dandy-Walker malformation. A chromosome analysis showed interstitial deletion of chromosome 3q23-q25.1. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and microarray-based genomic analysis revealed the heterozygous deletion of ZIC1 and ZIC4 loci on 3q24. Her facial features were not consistent with those observed in blepharophimosis-ptosis-epicanthus inversus syndrome (BPES) involving FOXL2 abnormality. Other deleted genes at 3q23-25.1 might contribute to the dysmorphic facial appearance. A milder phenotype as the Dandy-Walker malformation in our patient supports the idea that modifying loci/genes can influence the development of cerebellar malformation. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Synopsis of the 6th Walker's Cay Colloquium on Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marincola Francesco M

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The 6th annual Cancer Vaccines and Immunotherapy Colloquium at Walker's Cay was held under the auspices of the Albert B. Sabin Vaccine Institute on March 10–13, 2004. The Colloquium consisted of a select group of 34 scientists representing academia, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industry. The main goal of this gathering was to promote in a peaceful and comfortable environment exchanges between basic and clinical science. The secondary benefit was to inspire novel bench to bedside ventures and at the same time provide feed back about promising and/or disappointing clinical results that could help re-frame some scientific question or guide the design of future trials. Several topics were covered that included tumor antigen discovery and validation, platforms for vaccine development, tolerance, immune suppression and tumor escape mechanisms, adoptive T cell therapy and dendritic cell-based therapies, clinical trials and assessment of response. Here we report salient points raised by speakers or by the audience during animated discussion that followed each individual presentation.

  2. Discrimination of locomotion direction in impoverished displays of walkers by macaque monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vangeneugden, Joris; Vancleef, Kathleen; Jaeggli, Tobias; VanGool, Luc; Vogels, Rufin

    2009-04-28

    A vast literature exists on human biological motion perception in impoverished displays, e.g., point-light walkers. Less is known about the perception of impoverished biological motion displays in macaques. We trained 3 macaques in the discrimination of facing direction (left versus right) and forward versus backward walking using motion-capture-based locomotion displays (treadmill walking) in which the body features were represented by cylinder-like primitives. The displays did not contain translatory motion. Discriminating forward versus backward locomotion requires motion information while the facing-direction/view task can be solved using motion and/or form. All monkeys required lengthy training to learn the forward-backward task, while the view task was learned more quickly. Once acquired, the discriminations were specific to walking and stimulus format but generalized across actors. Although the view task could be solved using form cues, there was a small impact of motion. Performance in the forward-backward task was highly susceptible to degradations of spatiotemporal stimulus coherence and motion information. These results indicate that rhesus monkeys require extensive training in order to use the intrinsic motion cues related to forward versus backward locomotion and imply that extrapolation of observations concerning human perception of impoverished biological motion displays onto monkey perception needs to be made cautiously.

  3. Purification and characterization of hemocyte phenoloxidases in Chilo suppressalis walker (Lepidoptera: Crambidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirhaghparast Seyyedeh Kimia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, two phenoloxidases (POs from the larvae of Chilo suppressalis Walker were extracted and purified by column chromatography using Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-Cellulose fast flow column. Two proteins possessing PO activity, named as POI and POII, were extracted by purification, 5.08- and 5.62-fold, respectively, with 8.94% and 7.31% recoveries, respectively. Also, the specific activities of POI and POII were 0.478 and 0.529 U/mg protein, respectively. Finally, the molecular weights of POI and POII were calculated as 94.6 and 95.7 kDa, respectively. Kinetic parameters of the purified phenoloxidases by Lineweaver-Burk analysis were Vmax of 2.27 and 1.11 U/mg protein and Km of 15.51 and 17.31 mM for POI and POII, respectively. Mg2+ and Cu2+ significantly increased the PO activities. Ca2+ decreased the activity of POI and showed no statistical effects on POII activity. EDTA and DTC significantly inhibited the activities of the purified enzymes, while triethylenetetramine hexaacetic acid (TTHA and RGTA showed no significant effects on enzymatic activities.

  4. Safe childbirth: Concept Analysis According to the Walker and Avant Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Maria Carvalho Fontenele

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study analyzed the concept of "Safe delivery" using the method proposed by Walker and Avant, which establishes eight steps for the construction of a concept. Method: Literature search was carried out in the Virtual Health Library (VHL and the Scientific Electronic Library Online (Scielo in the period from April to July 2016. Controlled descriptors were: "Parturition", "Safety" and "Patient safety", in Portuguese and English.  The compound term "Safe Delivery" was also used.  Thirty two productions were included in this analysis. Results: Among the attributes, maternal and fetal monitoring stand out and, as antecedent, the identification of risks for preventing damage. The reduction of maternal and infant mortality and the well-being of the mother-child binomial were evident in this work. Following the establishment of model case and opposite case, the definition of safe delivery was obtained: "the set of care measures that seek to identify risks, prevent damage and/or complications during delivery, ensuring maternal and fetal monitoring in favor of the welfare of mother and child ". Conclusion: The analysis of the essential attributes, its antecedents and consequences made it possible to define the concept of safe delivery. However, it is considered that this concept is changeable bearing in mind that there is a lack of randomized studies to identify potential risks to childbirth.

  5. Platynota rostrana (Walker (Tortricidae and Phidotricha erigens Raganot (Pyralidae: artificial diet effects on biological cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Nava

    Full Text Available The lepidopterans Platynota rostrana (Walker (Tortricidae and Phidotricha erigens Raganot (Pyralidae have been found frequently in citrus groves in São Paulo State in recent years. Since in Brazil, the fertility cycle of these two species is largely unknown, as are details of the damage wrought by them in crops, this research studied these aspects of the two species, which were kept under laboratory conditions (temperature 25 ± 2 °C, 70 ± 10% RH, 14 h photophase and on an artificial diet. The duration of the biological cycle (egg-adult for P. rostrana was 38.3 days and total viability was 44.0%; for P. erigens these values were 32.5 days and 63.6%, respectively. Both species showed five larval instars. Females of P. rostrana laid an average of 308 eggs, whereas those of P. erigens laid an average of 106 eggs. In both species, female pupae were heavier than males. Male and female longevity for both species was nearly 10 days. Based on the data obtained, the artificial diet produced better results in P. rostrana than in P. erigens. If these species, which have the potential to reach pest status in the citrus groves of São Paulo State, could be reared on an artificial diet, research on their control by alternative methods would be easier.

  6. Approximate KMS states for scalar and spinor fields in Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dappiaggi, Claudio; Hack, Thomas-Paul [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). II. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Pinamonti, Nicola [Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Matematica

    2010-09-15

    We construct and discuss Hadamard states for both scalar and Dirac spinor fields in a large class of spatially flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker spacetimes characterised by an initial phase either of exponential or of power-law expansion. The states we obtain can be interpreted as being in thermal equilibrium at the time when the scale factor a has a specific value a = a{sub 0}. In the case a{sub 0} = 0, these states fulfil a strict KMS condition on the boundary of the spacetime, which is either a cosmological horizon, or a Big Bang hypersurface. Furthermore, in the conformally invariant case, they are conformal KMS states on the full spacetime. However, they provide a natural notion of an approximate KMS state also in the remaining cases, especially for massive fields. On the technical side, our results are based on a bulk-to-boundary reconstruction technique already successfully applied in the scalar case and here proven to be suitable also for spinor fields. The potential applications of the states we find range over a broad spectrum, but they appear to be suited to discuss in particular thermal phenomena such as the cosmic neutrino background or the quantum state of dark matter. (orig.)

  7. Interacting cosmic fluids in power-law Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cataldo, Mauricio [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad del Bio-Bio, Avenida Collao 1202, Casilla 5-C, Concepcion (Chile)], E-mail: mcataldo@ubiobio.cl; Mella, Patricio [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)], E-mail: patriciomella@udec.cl; Minning, Paul [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Concepcion, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion (Chile)], E-mail: pminning@udec.cl; Saavedra, Joel [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Valparaiso, Casilla 4950, Valparaiso (Chile)], E-mail: joel.saavedra@ucv.cl

    2008-05-01

    We provide a detailed description for power-law scaling Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological scenarios dominated by two interacting perfect fluid components during the expansion. As a consequence of the mutual interaction between the two fluids, neither component is conserved separately and the energy densities are proportional to 1/t{sup 2}. It is shown that in flat FRW cosmological models there can exist interacting superpositions of two perfect fluids (each of them having a positive energy density) which accelerate the expansion of the universe. In this family there also exist flat power-law cosmological scenarios where one of the fluids may have a 'cosmological constant' or 'vacuum energy' equation of state (p=-{rho}) interacting with the other component; this scenario exactly mimics the behavior of the standard flat Friedmann solution for a single fluid with a barotropic equation of state. These possibilities of combining interacting perfect fluids do not exist for the non-interacting mixtures of two perfect cosmic fluids, where the general solution for the scale factor is not described by power-law expressions and has a more complicated behavior. In this study is considered also the associated single fluid model interpretation for the interaction between two fluids.

  8. Dispersion, Topological Scattering, and Self-Interference in Multiply Connected Robertson-Walker Cosmologies

    CERN Document Server

    Tomaschitz, R

    1994-01-01

    We investigate scattering effects in open Robertson-Walker cosmologies whose spacelike slices are multiply connected hyperbolic manifolds. We work out an example in which the 3-space is infinite and has the topology of a solid torus. The world-lines in these cosmologies are unstable, and classical probability densities evolving under the horospherical geodesic flow show dispersion, as do the densities of scalar wave packets. The rate of dispersion depends crucially on the expansion factor, and we calculate the time evolution of their widths. We find that the cosmic expansion can confine dispersion: The diameter of the domain of chaoticity in the 3-manifold provides the natural, time-dependent length unit in an infinite, multiply connected universe. In a toroidal 3-space manifold this diameter is just the length of the limit cycle. On this scale we find that the densities take a finite limit width in the late stage of the expansion. In the early stage classical densities and conformally coupled fields approach...

  9. Fitness test profiles and trainng intensities in skilled race-walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, T; Hopkins, J; Howlett, N

    1979-06-01

    A broad profile of national standard race-walkers was obtained. Subjects were taller and had more body fat than competitive runners of comparable distance as found in the literature. Pulmonary function, blood pressure and maximal heart rates were similar to normal sedentary values. The group's somatotype was 2.5 : 3 : 4, low mesomorphy being reflected in inferior strength measures. Haematological status corresponded to the runners of Brotherhood et al (1975). Predicted VO2 max (x = 70 ml kg min-1) was not related to performance. Time to exhaustion on a treadmill test correlated with 20 km race time (R = -.94; p less than .001). Multiple regression equations derived to predict race performance from combinations of 4 to 6 personality traits were non-significant. Mean heart rate in typical training regimes was 167 beats min-1 for interval training at 13 kmh-1 on the track and 134 beats min-1 over a 2.1 h road walk at 10.3 kmh-1. Physiological strain was greater in uphill than in level or downhill walking (P less than .001).

  10. Biotic potential, fertility and life table ofSpodoptera albula (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae, under controlled conditions

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    DÉBORA G. MONTEZANO

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to evaluate the biotic potential, life table parameters and fertility of Spodoptera albula (Walker, 1857 under controlled conditions (25 ± 1°C, 70 ± 10% RH and 14 hour photo phase. The longevity, pre, post and oviposition periods, fecundity and fertility of 13 couples were evaluated. The longevity of females (13.500 days was significantly higher than those of males (11.154 days. The mean durations of the pre, post and oviposition periods were 2.615, 1.769 and 9.385 days, respectively. The mean fecundity was 1.417.69 eggs and mean fertility was 1.340.401 larvae, per female. On average, females copulated 1, 231 times. A strong positive correlation was observed between the number of copulations and fecundity (r = 0.847, p <0.001, as well as a strong negative correlation between the number of copulations and the duration of the pre-oviposition period (r = -0.762, p = 0.002, and longevity (r = -0.788, p = 0.001. The biotic potential of S. albula was estimated at 8.768 x 1022 individuals / female / year. The net reproductive rate (Ro was 353,904 times per generation and the mean generation time (T was 37.187 days. The intrinsic rate of increase (rm was 1,105, with a finite rate of increase (λ of 3,019.

  11. A measure on the set of compact Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roukema, Boudewijn F [Torun Centre for Astronomy, Nicolaus Copernicus University, ul. Gagarina 11, 87-100 Torun (Poland); Blanloeil, Vincent [IRMA, Departement de Mathematiques, Universite de Strasbourg, 7 rue Rene Descartes, 67084 Strasbourg, Cedex (France)

    2010-12-21

    Compact, flat Friedmann-Lemaitre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) models have recently regained interest as a good fit to the observed cosmic microwave background temperature fluctuations. However, it is generally thought that a globally, exactly flat FLRW model is theoretically improbable. Here, in order to obtain a probability space on the set F of compact, comoving, 3-spatial sections of FLRW models, a physically motivated hypothesis is proposed, using the density parameter {Omega} as a derived rather than fundamental parameter. We assume that the processes that select the 3-manifold also select a global mass-energy and a Hubble parameter. The requirement that the local and global values of {Omega} are equal implies a range in {Omega} that consists of a single real value for any 3-manifold. Thus, the obvious measure over F is the discrete measure. Hence, if the global mass-energy and Hubble parameter are a function of 3-manifold choice among compact FLRW models, then probability spaces parametrized by {Omega} do not, in general, give a zero probability of a flat model. Alternatively, parametrization by a spatial size parameter, the injectivity radius r{sub inj}, suggests the Lebesgue measure. In this case, the probability space over the injectivity radius implies that flat models occur almost surely (a.s.), in the sense of probability theory, and non-flat models a.s. do not occur.

  12. Cortical regions for judgments of emotions and personality traits from point-light walkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberlein, Andrea S; Adolphs, Ralph; Tranel, Daniel; Damasio, Hanna

    2004-09-01

    Humans are able to use nonverbal behavior to make fast, reliable judgments of both emotional states and personality traits. Whereas a sizeable body of research has identified neural structures critical for emotion recognition, the neural substrates of personality trait attribution have not been explored in detail. In the present study, we investigated the neural systems involved in emotion and personality trait judgments. We used a type of visual stimulus that is known to convey both emotion and personality information, namely, point-light walkers. We compared the emotion and personality trait judgments made by subjects with brain damage to those made by neurologically normal subjects and then conducted a lesion overlap analysis to identify neural regions critical for these two tasks. Impairments on the two tasks dissociated: Some subjects were impaired at emotion recognition, but judged personality normally; other subjects were impaired on the personality task, but normal at emotion recognition. Moreover, these dissociations in performance were associated with damage to specific neural regions: Right somatosensory cortices were a primary focus of lesion overlap in subjects impaired on the emotion task, whereas left frontal opercular cortices were a primary focus of lesion overlap in subjects impaired on the personality task. These findings suggest that attributions of emotional states and personality traits are accomplished by partially dissociable neural systems.

  13. Description and field performance of the Walker Branch throughfall displacement experiment: 1993--1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, P.J.; Todd, D.E.; Huston, M.A. [Oak Ridge National lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Joslin, J.D. [Tennessee Valley Authority, Norris, TN (United States); Croker, J.L.; Auge, R.M. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Inst. of Agriculture

    1998-04-01

    The authors are conducting a large-scale manipulative field experiment in an upland oak forest on the Walker Branch Watershed in eastern Tennessee to identify important ecosystem responses that might result from future precipitation changes. The manipulation of soil water content is being implemented by a gravity-driven transfer of throughfall from one 6400-m{sup 2} treatment plot to another. Throughfall is intercepted in {approx}1850 subcanopy troughs suspended above the forest floor of the dry plot and transferred by gravity flow across an ambient plot for subsequent distribution onto the wet treatment plot. Soil water content is being monitored at two depths with time domain reflectometers at 310 sampling locations across the site. The experimental system is able to produce statistically significant differences in soil water content in years having both dry and wet conditions. Maximum soil water content differentials between wet and dry plots in the 0- to 0.35-m horizon were 8 to 10% during summers with abundant precipitation and 3 to 5% during drought periods. Treatment impacts on soil water potential were restricted to the surface soil layer. Comparisons of pre- and post-installation soil and litter temperature measurements showed the ability of the experimental design to produce changes in soil water content and water potential without creating large artifacts in the forest understory environment.

  14. An Acquired Form of Dandy-Walker Malformation with Enveloping Hemosiderin Deposits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadashi Shiohama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM is a posterior fossa anomaly characterized by hypoplasia and upward rotation of the cerebellar vermis and cystic dilation of the fourth ventricle. The cyst of DWM rarely extends posteriorly to almost completely fill the entire posterior fossa, which mimics primary cerebellar agenesis, a cerebellar porencephalic cyst, and an arachnoid cyst due to the lack of clarity of the thin cystic wall. A 10-month-old female born at 23 weeks’ gestation with cerebellar hemorrhage in the neonatal period was admitted to our hospital with dysphagia and side-to-side head bobbing. The detection of hemosiderin deposits enveloping the cyst wall by T2 star-weighted angiography (SWAN was useful for the differential diagnosis of an acquired form of DWM from primary cerebellar agenesis. Cyst fenestration successfully improved dysphagia and head bobbing. A pathological specimen of the perforated cyst consisted of collagen fibers with hemosiderin deposits but lacked congenital cyst components. In infants with posterior fossa cysts, SWAN will be useful for a differential diagnosis between DWM and primary cerebellar agenesis.

  15. Chronic Glibenclamide Treatment Attenuates Walker-256 Tumour Growth in Prediabetic Obese Rats

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    Claudinéia Conationi da Silva Franco

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: The sulphonylurea glibenclamide (Gli is widely used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes. In addition to its antidiabetic effects, low incidences of certain types of cancer have been observed in Gli-treated diabetic patients. However, the mechanisms underlying this observation remain unclear. The aim of the present work was to evaluate whether obese adult rats that were chronically treated with an antidiabetic drug, glibenclamide, exhibit resistance to rodent breast carcinoma growth. Methods: Neonatal rats were treated with monosodium L-glutamate (MSG to induce prediabetes. Control and MSG groups were treated with Gli (2 mg/kg body weight/day from weaning to 100 days old. After Gli treatment, the control and MSG rats were grafted with Walker-256 tumour cells. After 14 days, grafted rats were euthanized, and tumour weight as well as glucose homeostasis were evaluated. Results: Treatment with Gli normalized tissue insulin sensitivity and glucose tolerance, suppressed fasting hyperinsulinaemia, reduced fat tissue accretion in MSG rats, and attenuated tumour growth by 27% in control and MSG rats. Conclusions: Gli treatment also resulted in a large reduction in the number of PCNA-positive tumour cells. Although treatment did improve the metabolism of pre-diabetic MSG-rats, tumour growth inhibition may be a more direct effect of glibenclamide.

  16. Long-term follow-up of successful treatment for dandy-walker syndrome (DWS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jun; Liang, Guobiao; Liang, Yong; Kou, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Various managements of Dandy-Walker syndrome (DWS) from open excision of the cysts to CSF diversion have been reported. However, optimal treatment for DWS remains elusive. Cyst fenestration was employed firstly, but failed 15 days after the surgery. Then a ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt was inserted and the patient discharged from hospital 13 days after the second surgery. During the 12-year follow-up, CT scanning, MRI, and X-radiation were performed. CT scanning showed that the size of ventricular system gradually returned to normal. MRI revealed similar changes of the ventricular system, and further revealed the development of supratentorial brain. The results of X-radiation during the follow-up years showed that the peritoneal end of the shunt might be already out of the abdominal cavity. Slow refilling of the shunt valve may suggest that the shunt could be probably not functional. The treatment of the patient was successfully, and the abnormal cerebral ventricle system gradually recovered during the 12-year follow-up. Because the patient might be probably independent on the shunt, further choice of the shunt removal should be thinking thoroughly, considering both safety and quality of life for the patient.

  17. Extensive intracranial calcification of pseudo-TORCH syndrome with features of Dandy–Walker malformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Das, Srikanta

    2017-01-01

    Pseudo-TORCH syndrome or congenital infection-like syndrome is a group of conditions which resemble congenital infections such as those caused by toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes (TORCH) group of organisms, clinico-radiologically, but serological tests are negative for the organisms. One of the variety shows features such as microcephaly, extensive intracranial calcification showing gross resemblance to congenital CMV infection, making its other name as microcephaly intracranial calcification syndrome (MICS). Dandy–Walker malformation (DWM), in addition to posterior fossa large cyst, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and hydrocephalus is often associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum and callosal lipomas, dysplasia of the brainstem, and cerebellar hypoplasia or dysgenesis. But radiological features of DWM with microcephaly and intracranial calcification are very unusual and have been rarely reported in the literature.[1] We report a case of infant showing clinical features suggestive of congenital CMV infection with negative serology and radiological imaging suggestive of DWM with extensive intracranial calcification. Pseudo-TORCH syndrome with radiological features of DWM is a congenital developmental abnormality. Inspite of hydrocephalus, it does not require cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversionary procedure due to lack of increased intracranial pressure. Conservative management for seizure disorder is the optimal therapy. PMID:28761539

  18. Extensive intracranial calcification of pseudo-TORCH syndrome with features of Dandy-Walker malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Ashis; Mishra, Sudhansu Sekhar; Das, Srikanta

    2017-01-01

    Pseudo-TORCH syndrome or congenital infection-like syndrome is a group of conditions which resemble congenital infections such as those caused by toxoplasmosis, rubella, cytomegalovirus (CMV), herpes (TORCH) group of organisms, clinico-radiologically, but serological tests are negative for the organisms. One of the variety shows features such as microcephaly, extensive intracranial calcification showing gross resemblance to congenital CMV infection, making its other name as microcephaly intracranial calcification syndrome (MICS). Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM), in addition to posterior fossa large cyst, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, and hydrocephalus is often associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum and callosal lipomas, dysplasia of the brainstem, and cerebellar hypoplasia or dysgenesis. But radiological features of DWM with microcephaly and intracranial calcification are very unusual and have been rarely reported in the literature.[1] We report a case of infant showing clinical features suggestive of congenital CMV infection with negative serology and radiological imaging suggestive of DWM with extensive intracranial calcification. Pseudo-TORCH syndrome with radiological features of DWM is a congenital developmental abnormality. Inspite of hydrocephalus, it does not require cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversionary procedure due to lack of increased intracranial pressure. Conservative management for seizure disorder is the optimal therapy.

  19. Syringomyelia caused by an arachnoid web in a patient with shunted Dandy-Walker malformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Chang; Choi, Jung Won; Lee, Ji Yeoun; Phi, Ji Hoon; Kim, Seung-Ki; Cho, Byung-Kyu; Wang, Kyu-Chang

    2017-04-01

    Dandy-Walker malformation (DWM) is a congenital brain anomaly characterized by dysgenesis of the cerebellar vermis and the presence of a posterior fossa cyst. The association of syringomyelia with DWM is extremely rare. A 10-year-old patient who was diagnosed with DWM in infancy presented with progressive scoliosis and fecal incontinence. He had been treated with cystoventriculoperitoneal shunting with a Y-connection during infancy, which was followed by a revision 6 years later. During the revision surgery, intraventricular bleeding occurred and was managed conservatively. Imaging studies for the current visit revealed syringomyelia along the cervicothoracic spinal cord and a membranous structure around the cervicomedullary junction. Phase-contrast cine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed disturbed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow across the membrane. We excised the arachnoid web that was tethering the brainstem and blocking CSF flow. Postoperatively, the patient experienced symptom relief, and the follow-up imaging study demonstrated a dramatic decrease in the size of the syringomyelia. We suggest that syrinx formation in this patient was possibly caused by disturbed CSF flow and tethering of the brainstem. We experienced an unusual case of DWM with syringomyelia which was caused by an arachnoid web blocking CSF flow and tethering the brainstem. The arachnoid web seems to be formed by previous bleeding which occurred at the time of shunt revision. After excision of the arachnoid web, the patient showed good outcome.

  20. Dandy-Walker Variant in A Fetus of an ICSI Twin Gestation: A Case Report

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    Banu Kumbak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Dandy-Walker variant (DWV might be considered as one of the borderlines in the examination of fetal brain. We report the first case of a DWV in a fetus conceived by ICSI. A 34 year-old woman underwent assisted reproductive treatment due to male factor infertility. A twin gestation was achieved, one of the fetuses was diagnosed as DWV on 22 weeks’ ultrasound examination. Fetal MRI confirmed the diagnosis. The couple did not allow fetal karyotyping. Pregnancy continued uneventfully. Associated cardiac and minor skeletal anomalies were seen in the postpartum examination of the affected newborn. She died six days after birth due to pulmonary insufficiency. Karyotype analysis of the affected infant performed after birth was reported to be partial trisomy 9. Parental karyotype analysis was further performed and balanced reciprocal translocation t(4;9 was found in the mother. A careful posterior fossa evaluation should be performed as part of routine anatomical survey in ICSI conceptions. Upon the detection of an anomaly, a comprehensive fetal ultrasound for associated abnormalities and karyotype analysis are vital for obstetric management and neonatal survival.