WorldWideScience

Sample records for visual feedback navigation

  1. Improving Precision in Navigating Laparoscopic Surgery Instruments toward a Planar Target Using Haptic and Visual Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Thomas; Szewczyk, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The poor ergonomics of laparoscopic surgery is a widely recognized source of difficulty for surgeons, leading to sub-optimal performance on their part and sometimes injury to the patient. The main recognized causes for such degraded performance are lost and distorted perception of interaction forces and degraded instrument navigation capabilities. The latter, due mainly to losses in visual and kinesthetic depth perception and modified hand-eye coordination, can prevent precise navigation of i...

  2. Audio-visual feedback improves the BCI performance in the navigational control of a humanoid robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidoni, Emmanuele; Gergondet, Pierre; Kheddar, Abderrahmane; Aglioti, Salvatore M

    2014-01-01

    Advancement in brain computer interfaces (BCI) technology allows people to actively interact in the world through surrogates. Controlling real humanoid robots using BCI as intuitively as we control our body represents a challenge for current research in robotics and neuroscience. In order to successfully interact with the environment the brain integrates multiple sensory cues to form a coherent representation of the world. Cognitive neuroscience studies demonstrate that multisensory integration may imply a gain with respect to a single modality and ultimately improve the overall sensorimotor performance. For example, reactivity to simultaneous visual and auditory stimuli may be higher than to the sum of the same stimuli delivered in isolation or in temporal sequence. Yet, knowledge about whether audio-visual integration may improve the control of a surrogate is meager. To explore this issue, we provided human footstep sounds as audio feedback to BCI users while controlling a humanoid robot. Participants were asked to steer their robot surrogate and perform a pick-and-place task through BCI-SSVEPs. We found that audio-visual synchrony between footsteps sound and actual humanoid's walk reduces the time required for steering the robot. Thus, auditory feedback congruent with the humanoid actions may improve motor decisions of the BCI's user and help in the feeling of control over it. Our results shed light on the possibility to increase robot's control through the combination of multisensory feedback to a BCI user.

  3. Audio-visual feedback improves the BCI performance in the navigational control of a humanoid robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuele eTidoni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Advancement in brain computer interfaces (BCI technology allows people to actively interact in the world through surrogates. Controlling real humanoid robots using BCI as intuitively as we control our body represents a challenge for current research in robotics and neuroscience. In order to successfully interact with the environment the brain integrates multiple sensory cues to form a coherent representation of the world. Cognitive neuroscience studies demonstrate that multisensory integration may imply a gain with respect to a single modality and ultimately improve the overall sensorimotor performance. For example, reactivity to simultaneous visual and auditory stimuli may be higher than to the sum of the same stimuli delivered in isolation or in temporal sequence. Yet, knowledge about whether audio-visual integration may improve the control of a surrogate is meager. To explore this issue, we provided human footstep sounds as audio feedback to BCI users while controlling a humanoid robot. Participants were asked to steer their robot surrogate and perform a pick-and-place task through BCI-SSVEPs. We found that audio-visual synchrony between footsteps sound and actual humanoid’s walk reduces the time required for steering the robot. Thus, auditory feedback congruent with the humanoid actions may improve motor decisions of the BCI’s user and help in the feeling of control over it. Our results shed light on the possibility to increase robot’s control through the combination of multisensory feedback to a BCI user.

  4. A 2D virtual reality system for visual goal-driven navigation in zebrafish larvae

    OpenAIRE

    Adrien Jouary; Mathieu Haudrechy; Raphaël Candelier; German Sumbre

    2016-01-01

    International audience; Animals continuously rely on sensory feedback to adjust motor commands. In order to study the role of visual feedback in goal-driven navigation, we developed a 2D visual virtual reality system for zebrafish larvae. The visual feedback can be set to be similar to what the animal experiences in natural conditions. Alternatively, modification of the visual feedback can be used to study how the brain adapts to perturbations. For this purpose, we first generated a library o...

  5. Navigating nuclear science: Enhancing analysis through visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Irwin, N.H.; Berkel, J. van; Johnson, D.K.; Wylie, B.N.

    1997-09-01

    Data visualization is an emerging technology with high potential for addressing the information overload problem. This project extends the data visualization work of the Navigating Science project by coupling it with more traditional information retrieval methods. A citation-derived landscape was augmented with documents using a text-based similarity measure to show viability of extension into datasets where citation lists do not exist. Landscapes, showing hills where clusters of similar documents occur, can be navigated, manipulated and queried in this environment. The capabilities of this tool provide users with an intuitive explore-by-navigation method not currently available in today`s retrieval systems.

  6. Haptic Feedback Compared with Visual Feedback for BCI

    OpenAIRE

    Kauhanen, L.; Palomäki, T; Jylänki, P.; Aloise, F; Nuttin, Marnix; Millán, José del R.

    2006-01-01

    Feedback plays an important role when learning to use a Brain-Computer Interface (BCI). Here we compare visual and haptic feedback in a short experiment. By imagining left and right hand movements, six subjects tried to control a BCI with the help of either visual or haptic feedback every 1s. Alpha band EEG signals from C3 and C4 were classified. The classifier was updated after each prediction using correct class information. Thus feedback could be given throughout the experiment. Subjects g...

  7. Feedback from video for virtual reality Navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsap, L V

    2000-10-27

    Important preconditions for wide acceptance of virtual reality (VR) systems include their comfort, ease and naturalness to use. Most existing trackers super from discomfort-related issues. For example, body-based trackers (hand controllers, joysticks, helmet attachments, etc.) restrict spontaneity and naturalness of motion, while ground-based devices (e.g., hand controllers) limit the workspace by literally binding an operator to the ground. There are similar problems with controls. This paper describes using real-time video with registered depth information (from a commercially available camera) for virtual reality navigation. Camera-based setup can replace cumbersome trackers. The method includes selective depth processing for increased speed, and a robust skin-color segmentation for accounting illumination variations.

  8. Visual feedback navigation for cable tracking by autonomous underwater vehicles; Jiritsugata kaichu robot no gazo shori ni motozuku cable jido tsuiju

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takai, M.; Ura, T. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science; Balasuriya, B.; Lam, W. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Kuroda, Y. [Meiji Univ., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-08-01

    A vision processing unit was introduced into autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV) to judge the visual situation and to construct an environmental observation platform that can collect wide-range and high-precision measurement data. The cable optionally installed at the bottom of the sea was recognized by vision processing to propose automatic tracking technique. An estimator that compensates for the hough conversion or time delay and a PSA controller that is used as a target value set mechanism or lower-level controller were introduced as the factor technology required for automatic tracking. The feature of the automatic tracking is that a general-purpose platform which can observe the prescribed range environmentally in high precision and density can be constructed because the observation range required by the observer can be prescribed near the sea-bottom surface using a cable. The verification result off Omi Hachiman at Lake Biwa showed that AUV can be used for the high-precision environmental survey in the range prescribed near the sea-bottom surface using a cable. 8 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Revisiting corrective saccades: Role of visual feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Jing; Ying, Howard S.; Zee, David S.

    2013-01-01

    To clarify the role of visual feedback in the generation of corrective movements after inaccurate primary saccades, we used a visually-triggered saccade task in which we varied how long the target was visible. The target was on for only 100 ms (OFF100ms), on until the start of the primary saccade (OFFonset) or on for 2 s (ON). We found that the tolerance for the post-saccadic error was small (− 2%) with a visual signal (ON) but greater (−6%) without visual feedback (OFF100ms). Saccades with a...

  10. Revisiting corrective saccades: role of visual feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Ying, Howard S.; Zee, David S.

    2013-01-01

    To clarify the role of visual feedback in the generation of corrective movements after inaccurate primary saccades, we used a visually-triggered saccade task in which we varied how long the target was visible. The target was on for only 100 ms (OFF100ms), on until the start of the primary saccade (OFFonset) or on for 2 s (ON). We found that the tolerance for the post-saccadic error was small (− 2%) with a visual signal (ON) but greater (−6%) without visual feedback (OFF100ms). Saccades with an error of −10%, however, were likely to be followed by corrective saccades regardless of whether or not visual feedback was present. Corrective saccades were generally generated earlier when visual error information was available; their latency was related to the size of the error. The LATER (Linear Approach to Threshold with Ergodic Rate) model analysis also showed a comparable small population of short latency corrective saccades irrespective of the target visibility. Finally, we found, in the absence of visual feedback, the accuracy of corrective saccades across subjects was related to the latency of the primary saccade. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the programming of corrective saccades: 1) the preparation of corrective saccades begins along with the preparation of the primary saccades, 2) the accuracy of corrective saccades depends on the reaction time of the primary saccades and 3) if visual feedback is available after the initiation of the primary saccade, the prepared correction can be updated. PMID:23891705

  11. Towards automated visual flexible endoscope navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Stap, Nanda; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Broeders, Ivo A M J

    2013-10-01

    The design of flexible endoscopes has not changed significantly in the past 50 years. A trend is observed towards a wider application of flexible endoscopes with an increasing role in complex intraluminal therapeutic procedures. The nonintuitive and nonergonomical steering mechanism now forms a barrier in the extension of flexible endoscope applications. Automating the navigation of endoscopes could be a solution for this problem. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in image-based navigation algorithms. The objectives are to find the most promising navigation system(s) to date and to indicate fields for further research. A systematic literature search was performed using three general search terms in two medical-technological literature databases. Papers were included according to the inclusion criteria. A total of 135 papers were analyzed. Ultimately, 26 were included. Navigation often is based on visual information, which means steering the endoscope using the images that the endoscope produces. Two main techniques are described: lumen centralization and visual odometry. Although the research results are promising, no successful, commercially available automated flexible endoscopy system exists to date. Automated systems that employ conventional flexible endoscopes show the most promising prospects in terms of cost and applicability. To produce such a system, the research focus should lie on finding low-cost mechatronics and technologically robust steering algorithms. Additional functionality and increased efficiency can be obtained through software development. The first priority is to find real-time, robust steering algorithms. These algorithms need to handle bubbles, motion blur, and other image artifacts without disrupting the steering process.

  12. Revisiting corrective saccades: role of visual feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jing; Ying, Howard S; Zee, David S

    2013-08-30

    To clarify the role of visual feedback in the generation of corrective movements after inaccurate primary saccades, we used a visually-triggered saccade task in which we varied how long the target was visible. The target was on for only 100ms (OFF100ms), on until the start of the primary saccade (OFFonset) or on for 2s (ON). We found that the tolerance for the post-saccadic error was small (-2%) with a visual signal (ON) but greater (-6%) without visual feedback (OFF100ms). Saccades with an error of -10%, however, were likely to be followed by corrective saccades regardless of whether or not visual feedback was present. Corrective saccades were generally generated earlier when visual error information was available; their latency was related to the size of the error. The LATER (Linear Approach to Threshold with Ergodic Rate) model analysis also showed a comparable small population of short latency corrective saccades irrespective of the target visibility. Finally, we found, in the absence of visual feedback, the accuracy of corrective saccades across subjects was related to the latency of the primary saccade. Our findings provide new insights into the mechanisms underlying the programming of corrective saccades: (1) the preparation of corrective saccades begins along with the preparation of the primary saccades, (2) the accuracy of corrective saccades depends on the reaction time of the primary saccades and (3) if visual feedback is available after the initiation of the primary saccade, the prepared correction can be updated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A 2D virtual reality system for visual goal-driven navigation in zebrafish larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouary, Adrien; Haudrechy, Mathieu; Candelier, Raphaël; Sumbre, German

    2016-09-23

    Animals continuously rely on sensory feedback to adjust motor commands. In order to study the role of visual feedback in goal-driven navigation, we developed a 2D visual virtual reality system for zebrafish larvae. The visual feedback can be set to be similar to what the animal experiences in natural conditions. Alternatively, modification of the visual feedback can be used to study how the brain adapts to perturbations. For this purpose, we first generated a library of free-swimming behaviors from which we learned the relationship between the trajectory of the larva and the shape of its tail. Then, we used this technique to infer the intended displacements of head-fixed larvae, and updated the visual environment accordingly. Under these conditions, larvae were capable of aligning and swimming in the direction of a whole-field moving stimulus and produced the fine changes in orientation and position required to capture virtual prey. We demonstrate the sensitivity of larvae to visual feedback by updating the visual world in real-time or only at the end of the discrete swimming episodes. This visual feedback perturbation caused impaired performance of prey-capture behavior, suggesting that larvae rely on continuous visual feedback during swimming.

  14. Formalization and implementation of topological visual navigation in two dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kender, John R.; Park, Il-Pyung; Yang, David

    1991-03-01

    In this paper we formalize and implement a model of topological visual navigation in two-dimensional spaces. Unlike much of traditional quantitative visual navigation the emphasis throughout is on the methods and the efficiency of qualitative visual descriptions of objects and environments and on the methods and the efficiency of direction-giving by means of visual landmarks. We formalize three domainsthe world itself the map-maker''s view of it and the navigator''s experience of itand the concepts of custom maps and landmarks. We specify for a simplified navigator (the " level helicopter" ) the several ways in which visual landmarks can be chosen depending on which of several costs (sensor distance or communication) should be minimized. We show that paths minimizing one measure can make others arbitrarily complex the algorithm for selecting the path is based on a form of Dijkstra''s algorithm and therefore automatically generates intelligent navigator overshooting and backtracking. We implement using an armheld camera such a navigator and detail its basic seek-and-adjust behaviors as it follows visual highways (or departs from them) to reach a goal. Seeking is based on topology and adjusting is based on symmetry there are essentially no quantitative measures. We describe under what circumstances its environment is visually difficult and perceptively shadowed and describe how errors in path-following impact landmark selection. Since visual landmark selection and direction-giving are in general NP-complete and rely on the nearly intractable

  15. NAViGaTOR: Network Analysis, Visualization and Graphing Toronto.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kevin R; Otasek, David; Ali, Muhammad; McGuffin, Michael J; Xie, Wing; Devani, Baiju; Toch, Ian Lawson van; Jurisica, Igor

    2009-12-15

    NAViGaTOR is a powerful graphing application for the 2D and 3D visualization of biological networks. NAViGaTOR includes a rich suite of visual mark-up tools for manual and automated annotation, fast and scalable layout algorithms and OpenGL hardware acceleration to facilitate the visualization of large graphs. Publication-quality images can be rendered through SVG graphics export. NAViGaTOR supports community-developed data formats (PSI-XML, BioPax and GML), is platform-independent and is extensible through a plug-in architecture. NAViGaTOR is freely available to the research community from http://ophid.utoronto.ca/navigator/. Installers and documentation are provided for 32- and 64-bit Windows, Mac, Linux and Unix. juris@ai.utoronto.ca Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  16. Development of visual-display aid to air navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matcovich, T. J.

    1973-01-01

    The developments are discussed in the design of a liquid-crystal, visual display, air navigation aid, which uses two VOR signals to locate the aircraft. The system concepts, liquid crystal materials, stability tests, and the electronic system are described. It is concluded that a navigational aid of this type is technically feasible, but not at the projected low cost.

  17. The role of visual feedback in supervision of grammatical spelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veys, Emilie; Hupet, Michel

    2011-06-01

    Native French speakers (N = 24; M age = 20.1 yr.) were orally presented with sentences they were asked to write on a digitizing tablet, either with full visual feedback or with no visual feedback. The study assessed the extent to which the visual feedback contributed to supervising of verbal agreement processes, either postgraphically (detecting and revising any error that has been produced) or pregraphically (checking the graphemic plan before it is transcribed). The proportion of erroneous agreements was smaller with visual feedback (7%) than without (14%). The proportion of erroneous agreements that were spontaneously corrected was much higher with visual feedback (34%) than without (0%). There were significantly more pauses right before or within the transcription of the verbal inflection with visual feedback (8%) than without (3%).

  18. Visual and Non-Visual Navigation in Blind Patients with a Retinal Prosthesis: e0134369

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sara Garcia; Karin Petrini; Gary S Rubin; Lyndon Da Cruz; Marko Nardini

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we asked whether blind individuals treated with a retinal prosthesis could also benefit from using the resultant new visual signal together with non-visual information when navigating. Four patients...

  19. Visual and Non-Visual Navigation in Blind Patients with a Retinal Prosthesis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Garcia, Sara; Petrini, Karin; Rubin, Gary S; Da Cruz, Lyndon; Nardini, Marko

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we asked whether blind individuals treated with a retinal prosthesis could also benefit from using the resultant new visual signal together with non-visual information when navigating. Four patients...

  20. Learning expressive percussion performance under different visual feedback conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Brandmeyer, A.; Timmers, R.; Sadakata, M.; Desain, P.

    2010-01-01

    A study was conducted to test the effect of two different forms of real-time visual feedback on expressive percussion performance. Conservatory percussion students performed imitations of recorded teacher performances while receiving either high-level feedback on the expressive style of their performances, low-level feedback on the timing and dynamics of the performed notes, or no feedback. The high-level feedback was based on a Bayesian analysis of the performances, while the low-level feedb...

  1. Mobile Screens: The Visual Regime of Navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeff, N.

    2012-01-01

    In this book on screen media, space, and mobility I compare synchronically, as well as diachronically, diverse and variegated screen media - their technologies and practices – as sites for virtual mobility and navigation. Mobility as a central trope can be found on the multiple levels that are

  2. Topomap: Topological Mapping and Navigation Based on Visual SLAM Maps

    OpenAIRE

    Blöchliger, Fabian; Fehr, Marius; Dymczyk, Marcin; Schneider, Thomas; Siegwart, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Visual robot navigation within large-scale, semistructured environments deals with various challenges such as computation intensive path planning algorithms or insufficient knowledge about traversable spaces. Moreover, many stateof-the-art navigation approaches only operate locally instead of gaining a more conceptual understanding of the planning objective. This limits the complexity of tasks a robot can accomplish and makes it harder to deal with uncertainties that are present in the contex...

  3. The influence of force feedback and visual feedback in grasping tissue laparoscopically

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heijnsdijk, E. A. M.; Pasdeloup, A.; van der Pijl, A. J.; Dankelman, J.; Gouma, D. J.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Due to the limited force feedback provided by laparoscopic instruments, surgeons may have difficulty in applying the appropriate force on the tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of force feedback and visual feedback on the exerted pinch force. Methods: A grasper

  4. Image processing and applications based on visualizing navigation service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Chyi-Wen

    2015-07-01

    When facing the "overabundant" of semantic web information, in this paper, the researcher proposes the hierarchical classification and visualizing RIA (Rich Internet Application) navigation system: Concept Map (CM) + Semantic Structure (SS) + the Knowledge on Demand (KOD) service. The aim of the Multimedia processing and empirical applications testing, was to investigating the utility and usability of this visualizing navigation strategy in web communication design, into whether it enables the user to retrieve and construct their personal knowledge or not. Furthermore, based on the segment markets theory in the Marketing model, to propose a User Interface (UI) classification strategy and formulate a set of hypermedia design principles for further UI strategy and e-learning resources in semantic web communication. These research findings: (1) Irrespective of whether the simple declarative knowledge or the complex declarative knowledge model is used, the "CM + SS + KOD navigation system" has a better cognition effect than the "Non CM + SS + KOD navigation system". However, for the" No web design experience user", the navigation system does not have an obvious cognition effect. (2) The essential of classification in semantic web communication design: Different groups of user have a diversity of preference needs and different cognitive styles in the CM + SS + KOD navigation system.

  5. Learning indoor robot navigation using visual and sensorimotor map information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wenjie; Weber, Cornelius; Wermter, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    As a fundamental research topic, autonomous indoor robot navigation continues to be a challenge in unconstrained real-world indoor environments. Although many models for map-building and planning exist, it is difficult to integrate them due to the high amount of noise, dynamics, and complexity. Addressing this challenge, this paper describes a neural model for environment mapping and robot navigation based on learning spatial knowledge. Considering that a person typically moves within a room without colliding with objects, this model learns the spatial knowledge by observing the person's movement using a ceiling-mounted camera. A robot can plan and navigate to any given position in the room based on the acquired map, and adapt it based on having identified possible obstacles. In addition, salient visual features are learned and stored in the map during navigation. This anchoring of visual features in the map enables the robot to find and navigate to a target object by showing an image of it. We implement this model on a humanoid robot and tests are conducted in a home-like environment. Results of our experiments show that the learned sensorimotor map masters complex navigation tasks. PMID:24109451

  6. An Indoor Navigation System for the Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Luis A.; Vasquez, Francisco; Ochoa, Sergio F.

    2012-01-01

    Navigation in indoor environments is highly challenging for the severely visually impaired, particularly in spaces visited for the first time. Several solutions have been proposed to deal with this challenge. Although some of them have shown to be useful in real scenarios, they involve an important deployment effort or use artifacts that are not natural for blind users. This paper presents an indoor navigation system that was designed taking into consideration usability as the quality requirement to be maximized. This solution enables one to identify the position of a person and calculates the velocity and direction of his movements. Using this information, the system determines the user's trajectory, locates possible obstacles in that route, and offers navigation information to the user. The solution has been evaluated using two experimental scenarios. Although the results are still not enough to provide strong conclusions, they indicate that the system is suitable to guide visually impaired people through an unknown built environment. PMID:22969398

  7. An Indoor Navigation System for the Visually Impaired

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis A. Guerrero

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Navigation in indoor environments is highly challenging for the severely visually impaired, particularly in spaces visited for the first time. Several solutions have been proposed to deal with this challenge. Although some of them have shown to be useful in real scenarios, they involve an important deployment effort or use artifacts that are not natural for blind users. This paper presents an indoor navigation system that was designed taking into consideration usability as the quality requirement to be maximized. This solution enables one to identify the position of a person and calculates the velocity and direction of his movements. Using this information, the system determines the user’s trajectory, locates possible obstacles in that route, and offers navigation information to the user. The solution has been evaluated using two experimental scenarios. Although the results are still not enough to provide strong conclusions, they indicate that the system is suitable to guide visually impaired people through an unknown built environment.

  8. Box jellyfish use terrestrial visual cues for navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garm, Anders; Oskarsson, Magnus; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2011-05-10

    Box jellyfish have an impressive set of 24 eyes of four different types, including eyes structurally similar to those of vertebrates and cephalopods [1, 2]. However, the known visual responses are restricted to simple phototaxis, shadow responses, and object avoidance responses [3-8], and it has been a puzzle why they need such a complex set of eyes. Here we report that medusae of the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora are capable of visually guided navigation in mangrove swamps using terrestrial structures seen through the water surface. They detect the mangrove canopy by an eye type that is specialized to peer up through the water surface and that is suspended such that it is constantly looking straight up, irrespective of the orientation of the jellyfish. The visual information is used to navigate to the preferred habitat at the edge of mangrove lagoons. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Learning expressive percussion performance under different visual feedback conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandmeyer, A.; Timmers, R.; Sadakata, M.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    A study was conducted to test the effect of two different forms of real-time visual feedback on expressive percussion performance. Conservatory percussion students performed imitations of recorded teacher performances while receiving either high-level feedback on the expressive style of their

  10. Enhanced visual feedback for slip prevention with a prosthetic hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engeberg, Erik D; Meek, Sanford

    2012-12-01

    Upper limb amputees have no direct sense of the grip force applied by a prosthetic hand; thus, precise control of the applied grip force is difficult for amputees. Since there is little object deformation when rigid objects are grasped, it is difficult for amputees to visually gauge the applied grip force in this situation. To determine if the applied grip force from a prosthetic hand can be visually displayed and used to more efficaciously grasp objects. Experimental controlled trial. Force feedback is used in the control algorithm for the prosthetic hand and supplied visually to the user through a bicolor LED experimentally mounted to the thumb. Several experiments are performed by able-bodied test subjects to rate the usefulness of the additional visual feedback when manipulating a clearly visible, brittle object that can break if grasped too firmly. A hybrid force-velocity sliding mode controller is used with and without additional visual force feedback supplied to the operators. Subjective evaluations and success rates from the test subjects indicate a statistically significant reduction in breaking the grasped object when using the prosthesis with the extra visual feedback. The additional visual force feedback can effectively facilitate the manipulation of brittle objects. Clinical relevance The novel approach of this research is the implementation of a noninvasive, effective and economic technique to visually indicate the grip force applied by a prosthetic hand to upper limb amputees. This technique provides a statistically significant improvement when handling brittle objects.

  11. A feedback model of visual attention

    OpenAIRE

    Spratling, M. W.; Johnson, M H

    2004-01-01

    Feedback connections are a prominent feature of cortical anatomy and are likely to have a significant functional role in neural information processing. We present a neural network model of cortical feedback that successfully simulates neurophysiological data associated with attention. In this domain, our model can be considered a more detailed, and biologically plausible, implementation of the biased competition model of attention. However, our model is more general as it can also explain a v...

  12. Real-time visual mosaicking and navigation on the seafloor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Kristof

    Remote robotic exploration holds vast potential for gaining knowledge about extreme environments accessible to humans only with great difficulty. Robotic explorers have been sent to other solar system bodies, and on this planet into inaccessible areas such as caves and volcanoes. In fact, the largest unexplored land area on earth lies hidden in the airless cold and intense pressure of the ocean depths. Exploration in the oceans is further hindered by water's high absorption of electromagnetic radiation, which both inhibits remote sensing from the surface, and limits communications with the bottom. The Earth's oceans thus provide an attractive target for developing remote exploration capabilities. As a result, numerous robotic vehicles now routinely survey this environment, from remotely operated vehicles piloted over tethers from the surface to torpedo-shaped autonomous underwater vehicles surveying the mid-waters. However, these vehicles are limited in their ability to navigate relative to their environment. This limits their ability to return to sites with precision without the use of external navigation aids, and to maneuver near and interact with objects autonomously in the water and on the sea floor. The enabling of environment-relative positioning on fully autonomous underwater vehicles will greatly extend their power and utility for remote exploration in the furthest reaches of the Earth's waters---even under ice and under ground---and eventually in extraterrestrial liquid environments such as Europa's oceans. This thesis presents an operational, fielded system for visual navigation of underwater robotic vehicles in unexplored areas of the seafloor. The system does not depend on external sensing systems, using only instruments on board the vehicle. As an area is explored, a camera is used to capture images and a composite view, or visual mosaic, of the ocean bottom is created in real time. Side-to-side visual registration of images is combined with dead

  13. The Effect of Concurrent Visual Feedback on Controlling Swimming Speed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szczepan Stefan

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Developing the ability to control the speed of swimming is an important part of swimming training. Maintaining a defined constant speed makes it possible for the athlete to swim economically at a low physiological cost. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of concurrent visual feedback transmitted by the Leader device on the control of swimming speed in a single exercise test. Material and methods. The study involved a group of expert swimmers (n = 20. Prior to the experiment, the race time for the 100 m distance was determined for each of the participants. In the experiment, the participants swam the distance of 100 m without feedback and with visual feedback. In both variants, the task of the participants was to swim the test distance in a time as close as possible to the time designated prior to the experiment. In the first version of the experiment (without feedback, the participants swam the test distance without receiving real-time feedback on their swimming speed. In the second version (with visual feedback, the participants followed a beam of light moving across the bottom of the swimming pool, generated by the Leader device. Results. During swimming with visual feedback, the 100 m race time was significantly closer to the time designated. The difference between the pre-determined time and the time obtained was significantly statistically lower during swimming with visual feedback (p = 0.00002. Conclusions. Concurrently transmitting visual feedback to athletes improves their control of swimming speed. The Leader device has proven useful in controlling swimming speed.

  14. The influence of force feedback and visual feedback in grasping tissue laparoscopically.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heijnsdijk, E A M; Pasdeloup, A; van der Pijl, A J; Dankelman, J; Gouma, D J

    2004-06-01

    Due to the limited force feedback provided by laparoscopic instruments, surgeons may have difficulty in applying the appropriate force on the tissue. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of force feedback and visual feedback on the exerted pinch force. A grasper with a force sensor in the jaws was developed. Subjects with and without laparoscopic experience grasped and pulled pig bowel with a force of 5 N. The applied pinch force was measured during tasks of 1-s and 1-min duration. Visual feedback was provided in half the measurements. Force feedback was adjusted by changing the mechanical efficiency of the forceps from 30% to 90%. The mean pinch force applied was 6.8 N (+/-0.5), whereas the force to prevent slippage was 3.0 N (+/-0.4). Improving the mechanical efficiency had no effect on the pinch force for the 1-s measurements. The amount of excessive pinch force when holding tissue for 1 min was lower at 30% mechanical efficiency compared with 90% (105% vs 131%, p = 0.04). The tissue slipped more often when the subject had no visual feedback (2% vs 8%, p = 0.02). Force feedback and visual feedback play a more limited role than expected in the task of grasping tissue with laparoscopic forceps.

  15. Visual Odometry for Autonomous Deep-Space Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shane; Pedrotty, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Visual Odometry fills two critical needs shared by all future exploration architectures considered by NASA: Autonomous Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D), and autonomous navigation during loss of comm. To do this, a camera is combined with cutting-edge algorithms (called Visual Odometry) into a unit that provides accurate relative pose between the camera and the object in the imagery. Recent simulation analyses have demonstrated the ability of this new technology to reliably, accurately, and quickly compute a relative pose. This project advances this technology by both preparing the system to process flight imagery and creating an activity to capture said imagery. This technology can provide a pioneering optical navigation platform capable of supporting a wide variety of future missions scenarios: deep space rendezvous, asteroid exploration, loss-of-comm.

  16. A Visual-Aided Inertial Navigation and Mapping System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Munguía

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available State estimation is a fundamental necessity for any application involving autonomous robots. This paper describes a visual-aided inertial navigation and mapping system for application to autonomous robots. The system, which relies on Kalman filtering, is designed to fuse the measurements obtained from a monocular camera, an inertial measurement unit (IMU and a position sensor (GPS. The estimated state consists of the full state of the vehicle: the position, orientation, their first derivatives and the parameter errors of the inertial sensors (i.e., the bias of gyroscopes and accelerometers. The system also provides the spatial locations of the visual features observed by the camera. The proposed scheme was designed by considering the limited resources commonly available in small mobile robots, while it is intended to be applied to cluttered environments in order to perform fully vision-based navigation in periods where the position sensor is not available. Moreover, the estimated map of visual features would be suitable for multiple tasks: i terrain analysis; ii three-dimensional (3D scene reconstruction; iii localization, detection or perception of obstacles and generating trajectories to navigate around these obstacles; and iv autonomous exploration. In this work, simulations and experiments with real data are presented in order to validate and demonstrate the performance of the proposal.

  17. Box jellyfish use terrestrial visual cues for navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garm, Anders; Oskarsson, Magnus; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    Box jellyfish have an impressive set of 24 eyes of four different types, including eyes structurally similar to those of vertebrates and cephalopods [1, 2]. However, the known visual responses are restricted to simple phototaxis, shadow responses, and object avoidance responses [3-8], and it has...... been a puzzle why they need such a complex set of eyes. Here we report that medusae of the box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora are capable of visually guided navigation in mangrove swamps using terrestrial structures seen through the water surface. They detect the mangrove canopy by an eye type...

  18. Learning expressive percussion performance under different visual feedback conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandmeyer, Alex; Timmers, Renee; Sadakata, Makiko; Desain, Peter

    2011-03-01

    A study was conducted to test the effect of two different forms of real-time visual feedback on expressive percussion performance. Conservatory percussion students performed imitations of recorded teacher performances while receiving either high-level feedback on the expressive style of their performances, low-level feedback on the timing and dynamics of the performed notes, or no feedback. The high-level feedback was based on a Bayesian analysis of the performances, while the low-level feedback was based on the raw participant timing and dynamics data. Results indicated that neither form of feedback led to significantly smaller timing and dynamics errors. However, high-level feedback did lead to a higher proficiency in imitating the expressive style of the target performances, as indicated by a probabilistic measure of expressive style. We conclude that, while potentially disruptive to timing processes involved in music performance due to extraneous cognitive load, high-level visual feedback can improve participant imitations of expressive performance features.

  19. Efficient visual recalibration from either visual or haptic feedback: the importance of being wrong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Wendy J; Kerrigan, Iona S; Graf, Erich W

    2010-11-03

    The human visual system adapts to the changing statistics of its environment. For example, the light-from-above prior, an assumption that aids the interpretation of ambiguous shading information, can be modified by haptic (touch) feedback. Here we investigate the mechanisms that drive this adaptive learning. In particular, we ask whether visual information can be as effective as haptics in driving visual recalibration and whether increased information (feedback from multiple modalities) induces faster learning. During several hours' training, feedback encouraged observers to modify their existing light-from-above assumption. Feedback was one of the following: (1) haptic only, (2) haptic and stereoscopic (providing binocular shape information), or (3) stereoscopic only. Haptic-only feedback resulted in substantial learning; the perceived shape of shaded objects was modified in accordance with observers' new light priors. However, the addition of continuous visual feedback (condition 2) substantially reduced learning. When visual-only feedback was provided intermittently (condition 3), mimicking the time course of the haptic feedback of conditions 1 and 2, substantial learning returned. The intermittent nature of conflict information, or feedback, appears critical for learning. It causes an initial, erroneous percept to be corrected. Contrary to previous proposals, we found no particular advantage for cross-modal feedback. Instead, we suggest that an "oops" factor drives efficient learning; recalibration is prioritized when a mismatch exists between sequential representations of an object property. This "oops" factor appears important both across and within sensory modalities, suggesting a general principle for perceptual learning and recalibration.

  20. Haptic and Visual feedback in 3D Audio Mixing Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Overholt, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation and informal evaluation of a user interface that explores haptic feedback for 3D audio mixing. The implementation compares different approaches using either the LEAP Motion for mid-air hand gesture control, or the Novint Falcon for active haptic feed- back...... in order to augment the perception of the 3D space. We compare different interaction paradigms implemented using these interfaces, aiming to increase speed and accuracy and reduce the need for constant visual feedback. While the LEAP Motion relies upon visual perception and proprioception, users can forego...

  1. Differential effects of visual feedback on subjective visual vertical accuracy and precision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Bjasch

    Full Text Available The brain constructs an internal estimate of the gravitational vertical by integrating multiple sensory signals. In darkness, systematic head-roll dependent errors in verticality estimates, as measured by the subjective visual vertical (SVV, occur. We hypothesized that visual feedback after each trial results in increased accuracy, as physiological adjustment errors (A-/E-effect are likely based on central computational mechanisms and investigated whether such improvements were related to adaptational shifts of perceived vertical or to a higher cognitive strategy. We asked 12 healthy human subjects to adjust a luminous arrow to vertical in various head-roll positions (0 to 120deg right-ear down, 15deg steps. After each adjustment visual feedback was provided (lights on, display of previous adjustment and of an earth-vertical cross. Control trials consisted of SVV adjustments without feedback. At head-roll angles with the largest A-effect (90, 105, and 120deg, errors were reduced significantly (p0.05 influenced. In seven subjects an additional session with two consecutive blocks (first with, then without visual feedback was completed at 90, 105 and 120deg head-roll. In these positions the error-reduction by the previous visual feedback block remained significant over the consecutive 18-24 min (post-feedback block, i.e., was still significantly (p<0.002 different from the control trials. Eleven out of 12 subjects reported having consciously added a bias to their perceived vertical based on visual feedback in order to minimize errors. We conclude that improvements of SVV accuracy by visual feedback, which remained effective after removal of feedback for ≥18 min, rather resulted from a cognitive strategy than by adapting the internal estimate of the gravitational vertical. The mechanisms behind the SVV therefore, remained stable, which is also supported by the fact that SVV precision - depending mostly on otolith input - was not affected by visual

  2. Three Principles for the Design of Energy Feedback Visualizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brewer, Robert S.; Xu, Yongwen; Lee, George E.

    2013-01-01

    To achieve the full benefits of the Smart Grid, end users must become active participants in the energy ecosystem. This paper presents the Kukui Cup challenge, a multifaceted serious game designed around the topic of energy conservation that incorporates a variety of energy feedback visualizations...

  3. Effects of visual feedback on manipulation performance and patient ratings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Triano, John J; Scaringe, John; Bougie, Jacqueline; Rogers, Carolyn

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the explicit targeted outcome (a criterion standard) and visual feedback on the immediate change in and the short-term retention of performance by novice operators for a high-velocity, low-amplitude procedure under realistic conditions. This study used a single-blind randomized experimental design. Forty healthy male (n = 26) and female (n = 14) chiropractic student volunteers with no formal training in spinal manipulative therapy participated. Biomechanical parameters of an L4 mammillary push spinal manipulation procedure performed by novice operators were quantified. Participants were randomly assigned to 2 groups and paired. One group received visual feedback from load-time histories of their performance compared with a criterion standard before a repeat performance. Participants then performed a 10-minute distractive exercise consisting of National Board of Chiropractic Examiners review questions. The second group received no feedback. An independent rating of performance was conducted for each participant by his/her partner. Results were analyzed separately for biomechanical parameters for partner ratings using the Student t test with levels of significance (P visual feedback was associated with change in the biomechanical performance of group 2, a minimum of 14% and a maximum of 32%. Statistical analysis rating of the performance favored the feedback group on 4 of the parameters (fast, P < .0008; force, P < .0056; precision, P < .0034; and composite, P < .0016). Quantitative feedback, based on a tangible conceptualization of the target performance, resulted in immediate and significant improvement in all measured parameters. Newly developed skills were retained at least over short intervals even after distractive tasks. Learning what to do with feedback on one's own performance may be more important than the classic teaching of how to do it.

  4. Use of visual feedback in retraining balance following acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C; Brouwer, B J; Culham, E G

    2000-09-01

    Visual feedback related to weight distribution and center-of-pressure positioning has been shown to be effective in increasing stance symmetry following stroke, although it is not clear whether functional balance ability also improves. This study compared the relative effectiveness of visual feedback training of center-of-gravity (CoG) positioning with conventional physical therapy following acute stroke. Forty-six people who had strokes within 80 days before the study, resulting in unilateral hemiparesis, and who were in need of balance retraining participated. Initially, subjects were randomly assigned to visual feedback or conventional physical therapy groups for balance retraining until 16 subjects per group were recruited. The next 14 subjects were assigned to a control group. All subjects received physical therapy and occupational therapy (regular therapy) 2 hours a day, and subjects in the 2 experimental groups received additional balance training 30 minutes a day until discharge. The visual feedback group received information about their CoG position as they shifted their weight during various activities. The conventional therapy group received verbal and tactile cues to encourage symmetrical stance and weight shifting. Static (postural sway) and activity-based measures of balance (Berg Balance Scale, gait speed, and the Timed "Up & Go" Test) were contrasted across the 3 groups at baseline, at discharge, and at 1 month following discharge using an analysis of variance for repeated measures. All groups demonstrated marked improvement over time for all measures of balance ability, with the greatest improvements occurring in the period from baseline to discharge. No between-group differences were detected in any of the outcome measures. Visual feedback or conventional balance training in addition to regular therapy affords no added benefit when offered in the early stages of rehabilitation following stroke.

  5. Navigating through virtual environments: visual realism improves spatial cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Frank; Geudeke, Branko L; van den Broek, Egon L

    2009-10-01

    Recent advances in computer technology have significantly facilitated the use of virtual environments (VE) for small and medium enterprises (SME). However, achieving visual realism in such VE requires high investments in terms of time and effort, while its usefulness has not yet become apparent from research. Other qualities of VE, such as the use of large displays, proved its effectiveness in enhancing the individual user's spatial cognition. The current study assessed whether the same benefits apply for visual realism in VE. Thirty-two participants were divided into two groups, who explored either a photorealistic or a nonrealistic supermarket presented on a large screen. The participants were asked to navigate through the supermarket on a predetermined route. Subsequently, spatial learning was tested in four pen-and-paper tests that assessed how accurately they had memorized the route and the environment's spatial layout. The study revealed increased spatial learning from the photorealistic compared to the nonrealistic supermarket. Specifically, participants performed better on tests that involved egocentric spatial knowledge. The results suggest visual realism is useful because it increases the user's spatial knowledge in the VE. Therefore, the current study provides clear evidence that it is worthwhile for SME to invest in achieving visual realism in VE.

  6. Visual map and instruction-based bicycle navigation: a comparison of effects on behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waard, Dick; Westerhuis, Frank; Joling, Danielle; Weiland, Stella; Stadtbäumer, Ronja; Kaltofen, Leonie

    2017-01-01

    Cycling with a classic paper map was compared with navigating with a moving map displayed on a smartphone, and with auditory, and visual turn-by-turn route guidance. Spatial skills were found to be related to navigation performance, however only when navigating from a paper or electronic map, not

  7. The generation of secondary saccades without postsaccadic visual feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohl, Sven; Brandt, Stephan A; Kliegl, Reinhold

    2013-04-12

    Primary saccades are often followed by small secondary saccades, which are generally thought to reduce the distance between the saccade endpoint and target location. Accumulated evidence demonstrates that secondary saccades are subject to various influences, among which retinal feedback during postsaccadic fixation constitutes only one important signal. Recently, we reported that target eccentricity and an orientation bias influence the generation of secondary saccades. In the present study, we examine secondary saccades in the absence of postsaccadic visual feedback. Although extraretinal signals (e.g., efference copy) have received widespread attention in eye-movement studies, it is still unclear whether an extraretinal error signal contributes to the programming of secondary saccades. We have observed that secondary saccade latency and amplitude depend on primary saccade error despite the absence of postsaccadic visual feedback. Strong evidence for an extraretinal error signal influencing secondary saccade programming is given by the observation that secondary saccades are more likely to be oriented in a direction opposite to the primary saccade as primary saccade error shifts from target undershoot to overshoot. We further show how the functional relationship between primary saccade landing position and secondary saccade characteristics varies as a function of target eccentricity. We propose that initial target eccentricity and an extraretinal error signal codetermine the postsaccadic activity distribution in the saccadic motor map when no visual feedback is available.

  8. Brain-actuated gait trainer with visual and proprioceptive feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Chen, Weihai; Lee, Kyuhwa; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Bouri, Mohamed; Pei, Zhongcai; Millán, José del R.

    2017-10-01

    Objective. Brain-machine interfaces (BMIs) have been proposed in closed-loop applications for neuromodulation and neurorehabilitation. This study describes the impact of different feedback modalities on the performance of an EEG-based BMI that decodes motor imagery (MI) of leg flexion and extension. Approach. We executed experiments in a lower-limb gait trainer (the legoPress) where nine able-bodied subjects participated in three consecutive sessions based on a crossover design. A random forest classifier was trained from the offline session and tested online with visual and proprioceptive feedback, respectively. Post-hoc classification was conducted to assess the impact of feedback modalities and learning effect (an improvement over time) on the simulated trial-based performance. Finally, we performed feature analysis to investigate the discriminant power and brain pattern modulations across the subjects. Main results. (i) For real-time classification, the average accuracy was 62.33 +/- 4.95 % and 63.89 +/- 6.41 % for the two online sessions. The results were significantly higher than chance level, demonstrating the feasibility to distinguish between MI of leg extension and flexion. (ii) For post-hoc classification, the performance with proprioceptive feedback (69.45 +/- 9.95 %) was significantly better than with visual feedback (62.89 +/- 9.20 %), while there was no significant learning effect. (iii) We reported individual discriminate features and brain patterns associated to each feedback modality, which exhibited differences between the two modalities although no general conclusion can be drawn. Significance. The study reported a closed-loop brain-controlled gait trainer, as a proof of concept for neurorehabilitation devices. We reported the feasibility of decoding lower-limb movement in an intuitive and natural way. As far as we know, this is the first online study discussing the role of feedback modalities in lower-limb MI decoding. Our results suggest that

  9. Self-Produced Tickle Sensation by Manipulating Visual Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Iizuka

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present paper was to clarify how the distinction of self- (sense of agency, SOA and other-produced behavior can be synthesized and recognized in multisensory integration as our cognitive processes. To address this issue, we used tickling paradigm that it is hard for us to tickle ourselves. Previous studies show that tickle sensation by their own motion increases if more delay is given between self-motion of tickling and tactile stimulation (Blakemore et al. 1998, 1999. We introduced visual feedbacks to the tickling experiments. In our hypothesis, integration of vision, proprioception, and motor commands forms the SOA and disintegration causes the breakdown the SOA, which causes the feeling of others, producing tickling sensation even by tickling oneself. We used video-see-through HMD to suddenly delay the real-time images of their hand tickling motions. The tickle sensation was measured by subjective response in the following conditions; 1 tickling oneself without any visual modulation, 2 tickled by others, 3 tickling oneself with visual feedback manipulation. The statistical analysis of ranked evaluation of tickle sensations showed that the delay of visual feedback causes the increase of tickle sensation. The SOA was discussed with Blakemore's and our results.

  10. Deliverable D.8.4. Social data visualization and navigation services -3rd Year Update-

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bitter-Rijpkema, Marlies; Brouns, Francis; Drachsler, Hendrik; Fazeli, Soude; Sanchez-Alonso, Salvador; Rajabi, Enayat; Kolovou, Lamprini

    2015-01-01

    Within the Open Discovery Space our study (T.8.4) focused on ”Enhanced Social Data Visualization & Navigation Services. This deliverable provides the prototype report regarding the deployment of adapted visualization and navigation services to be integrated in the ODS Social Data Management Layer.

  11. Learning without knowing: subliminal visual feedback facilitates ballistic motor learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbye-Jensen, Jesper; Leukel, Christian; Nielsen, Jens Bo

    ). It is a well- described phenomenon that we may respond to features of our surroundings without being aware of them. It is also a well-known principle, that learning is reinforced by augmented feedback on motor performance. In the present experiment we hypothesized that motor learning may be facilitated...... by subconscious (subliminal) augmented visual feedback on motor performance. To test this, 45 subjects participated in the experiment, which involved learning of a ballistic task. The task was to execute simple ankle plantar flexion movements as quickly as possible within 200 ms and to continuously improve...... of the feedback) was assessed in a separate test prior to the actual experiment and additional perceptual tests were performed after the learning session. In all 3 intervention groups motor performance improved as a result of practice. Not surprisingly the learning effect was significantly larger if subjects...

  12. Proprioceptive deafferentation slows down the processing of visual hand feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balslev, Daniela; Miall, R Chris; Cole, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    . Correlation analyses suggested that reaction time was influenced by the size of the visual error rather than the visuo-proprioceptive conflict or the variance in cursor position. We suggest that during movements intact proprioception is necessary for the rapid processing of visual feedback.......During visually guided movements both vision and proprioception inform the brain about the position of the hand, so interaction between these two modalities is presumed. Current theories suggest that this interaction occurs by sensory information from both sources being fused into a more reliable...... was compared under conditions with normal and reduced proprioception after 1-Hz rTMS over the hand-contralateral somatosensory cortex. Proprioceptive deafferentation slowed down the reaction time for initiating a motor correction in response to a visual perturbation in hand position, but not to a target jump...

  13. Visual Feedback of Tongue Movement for Novel Speech Sound Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Katz, William F.; Sonya eMehta

    2015-01-01

    Pronunciation training studies have yielded important information concerning the processing of audiovisual (AV) information. Second language (L2) learners show increased reliance on bottom-up, multimodal input for speech perception (compared to monolingual individuals). However, little is known about the role of viewing one's own speech articulation processes during speech training. The current study investigated whether real-time, visual feedback for tongue movement can improve a speaker's l...

  14. Motor sequence learning occurs despite disrupted visual and proprioceptive feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyd Lara A

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent work has demonstrated the importance of proprioception for the development of internal representations of the forces encountered during a task. Evidence also exists for a significant role for proprioception in the execution of sequential movements. However, little work has explored the role of proprioceptive sensation during the learning of continuous movement sequences. Here, we report that the repeated segment of a continuous tracking task can be learned despite peripherally altered arm proprioception and severely restricted visual feedback regarding motor output. Methods Healthy adults practiced a continuous tracking task over 2 days. Half of the participants experienced vibration that altered proprioception of shoulder flexion/extension of the active tracking arm (experimental condition and half experienced vibration of the passive resting arm (control condition. Visual feedback was restricted for all participants. Retention testing was conducted on a separate day to assess motor learning. Results Regardless of vibration condition, participants learned the repeated segment demonstrated by significant improvements in accuracy for tracking repeated as compared to random continuous movement sequences. Conclusion These results suggest that with practice, participants were able to use residual afferent information to overcome initial interference of tracking ability related to altered proprioception and restricted visual feedback to learn a continuous motor sequence. Motor learning occurred despite an initial interference of tracking noted during acquisition practice.

  15. Adding vibrotactile feedback to a myoelectric-controlled hand improves performance when online visual feedback is disturbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raveh, Eitan; Portnoy, Sigal; Friedman, Jason

    2018-01-17

    We investigated whether adding vibrotactile feedback to a myoelectric-controlled hand, when visual feedback is disturbed, can improve performance during a functional test. For this purpose, able-bodied subjects, activating a myoelectric-controlled hand attached to their right hand performed the modified Box & Blocks test, grasping and manipulating wooden blocks over a partition. This was performed in 3 conditions, using a repeated-measures design: in full light, in a dark room where visual feedback was disturbed and no auditory feedback - one time with the addition of tactile feedback provided during object grasping and manipulation, and one time without any tactile feedback. The average time needed to transfer one block was measured, and an infrared camera was used to give information on the number of grasping errors during performance of the test. Our results show that when vibrotactile feedback was provided, performance time was reduced significantly, compared with when no vibrotactile feedback was available. Furthermore, the accuracy of grasping and manipulation was improved, reflected by significantly fewer errors during test performance. In conclusion, adding vibrotactile feedback to a myoelectric-controlled hand has positive effects on functional performance when visual feedback is disturbed. This may have applications to current myoelectric-controlled hands, as adding tactile feedback may help prosthesis users to improve their functional ability during daily life activities in different environments, particularly when limited visual feedback is available or desirable. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. OpinionSeer: interactive visualization of hotel customer feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yingcai; Wei, Furu; Liu, Shixia; Au, Norman; Cui, Weiwei; Zhou, Hong; Qu, Huamin

    2010-01-01

    The rapid development of Web technology has resulted in an increasing number of hotel customers sharing their opinions on the hotel services. Effective visual analysis of online customer opinions is needed, as it has a significant impact on building a successful business. In this paper, we present OpinionSeer, an interactive visualization system that could visually analyze a large collection of online hotel customer reviews. The system is built on a new visualization-centric opinion mining technique that considers uncertainty for faithfully modeling and analyzing customer opinions. A new visual representation is developed to convey customer opinions by augmenting well-established scatterplots and radial visualization. To provide multiple-level exploration, we introduce subjective logic to handle and organize subjective opinions with degrees of uncertainty. Several case studies illustrate the effectiveness and usefulness of OpinionSeer on analyzing relationships among multiple data dimensions and comparing opinions of different groups. Aside from data on hotel customer feedback, OpinionSeer could also be applied to visually analyze customer opinions on other products or services.

  17. Visual Odometry for Autonomous Deep-Space Navigation Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Shane; Pedrotty, Sam

    2016-01-01

    Autonomous rendezvous and docking (AR&D) is a critical need for manned spaceflight, especially in deep space where communication delays essentially leave crews on their own for critical operations like docking. Previously developed AR&D sensors have been large, heavy, power-hungry, and may still require further development (e.g. Flash LiDAR). Other approaches to vision-based navigation are not computationally efficient enough to operate quickly on slower, flight-like computers. The key technical challenge for visual odometry is to adapt it from the current terrestrial applications it was designed for to function in the harsh lighting conditions of space. This effort leveraged Draper Laboratory’s considerable prior development and expertise, benefitting both parties. The algorithm Draper has created is unique from other pose estimation efforts as it has a comparatively small computational footprint (suitable for use onboard a spacecraft, unlike alternatives) and potentially offers accuracy and precision needed for docking. This presents a solution to the AR&D problem that only requires a camera, which is much smaller, lighter, and requires far less power than competing AR&D sensors. We have demonstrated the algorithm’s performance and ability to process ‘flight-like’ imagery formats with a ‘flight-like’ trajectory, positioning ourselves to easily process flight data from the upcoming ‘ISS Selfie’ activity and then compare the algorithm’s quantified performance to the simulated imagery. This will bring visual odometry beyond TRL 5, proving its readiness to be demonstrated as part of an integrated system.Once beyond TRL 5, visual odometry will be poised to be demonstrated as part of a system in an in-space demo where relative pose is critical, like Orion AR&D, ISS robotic operations, asteroid proximity operations, and more.

  18. Visual feedback of tongue movement for novel speech sound learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William F Katz

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pronunciation training studies have yielded important information concerning the processing of audiovisual (AV information. Second language (L2 learners show increased reliance on bottom-up, multimodal input for speech perception (compared to monolingual individuals. However, little is known about the role of viewing one’s own speech articulation processes during speech training. The current study investigated whether real-time, visual feedback for tongue movement can improve a speaker’s learning of non-native speech sounds. An interactive 3D tongue visualization system based on electromagnetic articulography (EMA was used in a speech training experiment. Native speakers of American English produced a novel speech sound (/ɖ̠/; a voiced, coronal, palatal stop before, during, and after trials in which they viewed their own speech movements using the 3D model. Talkers’ productions were evaluated using kinematic (tongue-tip spatial positioning and acoustic (burst spectra measures. The results indicated a rapid gain in accuracy associated with visual feedback training. The findings are discussed with respect to neural models for multimodal speech processing.

  19. Visual Feedback of Tongue Movement for Novel Speech Sound Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, William F; Mehta, Sonya

    2015-01-01

    Pronunciation training studies have yielded important information concerning the processing of audiovisual (AV) information. Second language (L2) learners show increased reliance on bottom-up, multimodal input for speech perception (compared to monolingual individuals). However, little is known about the role of viewing one's own speech articulation processes during speech training. The current study investigated whether real-time, visual feedback for tongue movement can improve a speaker's learning of non-native speech sounds. An interactive 3D tongue visualization system based on electromagnetic articulography (EMA) was used in a speech training experiment. Native speakers of American English produced a novel speech sound (/ɖ/; a voiced, coronal, palatal stop) before, during, and after trials in which they viewed their own speech movements using the 3D model. Talkers' productions were evaluated using kinematic (tongue-tip spatial positioning) and acoustic (burst spectra) measures. The results indicated a rapid gain in accuracy associated with visual feedback training. The findings are discussed with respect to neural models for multimodal speech processing.

  20. Remote Synchronization Experiments for Quasi-Zenith Satellite System Using Multiple Navigation Signals as Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki Iwata

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The remote synchronization system for the onboard crystal oscillator (RESSOX is a remote control method that permits synchronization between a ground station atomic clock and Japanese quasi-zenith satellite system (QZSS crystal oscillators. To realize the RESSOX of the QZSS, the utilization of navigation signals of QZSS for feedback control is an important issue. Since QZSS transmits seven navigation signals (L1C/A, L1CP, L1CD, L2CM, L2CL, L5Q, and L5I, all combinations of these signals should be evaluated. First, the RESSOX algorithm will be introduced. Next, experimental performance will be demonstrated. If only a single signal is available, ionospheric delay should be input from external measurements. If multiple frequency signals are available, any combination, except for L2 and L5, gives good performance with synchronization error being within two nanoseconds that of RESSOX. The combination of L1CD and L5Q gives the best synchronization performance (synchronization error within 1.14 ns. Finally, in the discussion, comparisons of long-duration performance, computer simulation, and sampling number used in feedback control are considered. Although experimental results do not correspond to the simulation results, the tendencies are similar. For the overlapping Allan deviation of long duration, the stability of 1.23×10−14 at 100,160 s is obtained.

  1. Visual map and instruction-based bicycle navigation: a comparison of effects on behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Waard, Dick; Westerhuis, Frank; Joling, Danielle; Weiland, Stella; Stadtbäumer, Ronja; Kaltofen, Leonie

    2017-09-01

    Cycling with a classic paper map was compared with navigating with a moving map displayed on a smartphone, and with auditory, and visual turn-by-turn route guidance. Spatial skills were found to be related to navigation performance, however only when navigating from a paper or electronic map, not with turn-by-turn (instruction based) navigation. While navigating, 25% of the time cyclists fixated at the devices that present visual information. Navigating from a paper map required most mental effort and both young and older cyclists preferred electronic over paper map navigation. In particular a turn-by-turn dedicated guidance device was favoured. Visual maps are in particular useful for cyclists with higher spatial skills. Turn-by-turn information is used by all cyclists, and it is useful to make these directions available in all devices. Practitioner Summary: Electronic navigation devices are preferred over a paper map. People with lower spatial skills benefit most from turn-by-turn guidance information, presented either auditory or on a dedicated device. People with higher spatial skills perform well with all devices. It is advised to keep in mind that all users benefit from turn-by-turn information when developing a navigation device for cyclists.

  2. LOD map--A visual interface for navigating multiresolution volume visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chaoli; Shen, Han-Wei

    2006-01-01

    In multiresolution volume visualization, a visual representation of level-of-detail (LOD) quality is important for us to examine, compare, and validate different LOD selection algorithms. While traditional methods rely on ultimate images for quality measurement, we introduce the LOD map--an alternative representation of LOD quality and a visual interface for navigating multiresolution data exploration. Our measure for LOD quality is based on the formulation of entropy from information theory. The measure takes into account the distortion and contribution of multiresolution data blocks. A LOD map is generated through the mapping of key LOD ingredients to a treemap representation. The ordered treemap layout is used for relative stable update of the LOD map when the view or LOD changes. This visual interface not only indicates the quality of LODs in an intuitive way, but also provides immediate suggestions for possible LOD improvement through visually-striking features. It also allows us to compare different views and perform rendering budget control. A set of interactive techniques is proposed to make the LOD adjustment a simple and easy task. We demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of our approach on large scientific and medical data sets.

  3. Design, Implementation and Evaluation of an Indoor Navigation System for Visually Impaired People

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martinez-Sala, Alejandro Santos; Losilla, Fernando; Sánchez-Aarnoutse, Juan Carlos; García-Haro, Joan

    2015-01-01

    Indoor navigation is a challenging task for visually impaired people. Although there are guidance systems available for such purposes, they have some drawbacks that hamper their direct application in real-life situations...

  4. Visual areas exert feedforward and feedback influences through distinct frequency channels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bastos, A.M.; Vezoli, J.; Bosman, C.A.; Schoffelen, J.M.; Oostenveld, R.; Dowdall, J.R.; de Weerd, P.; Kennedy, H.; Fries, P.

    2015-01-01

    Visual cortical areas subserve cognitive functions by interacting in both feedforward and feedback directions. While feedforward influences convey sensory signals, feedback influences modulate feedforward signaling according to the current behavioral context. We investigated whether these interareal

  5. The Effects of Visual Feedback Distortion with Unilateral Leg Loading on Gait Symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobar, Carlos; Martinez, Eva; Rhouni, Nada; Kim, Seung-Jae

    2018-02-01

    Our prior work provides evidence that visual feedback distortion drives an implicit adaptation; a gradual distortion of visual representation of step length modulated subjects' step lengths away from symmetry. To further explore the effect of the visual feedback distortion on unconscious change in step symmetry, we investigated whether such adaptation would occur even in the presence of altered limb mechanics by adding mass to one side of the leg. 26 subjects performed three 8-min trials (weight only, weight plus visual feedback, and weight plus visual feedback distortion) of treadmill walking. During the weight only trial, the subjects wore a 5 lb mass around the right ankle. The modification of limb inertia caused asymmetric gait. The visual feedback showing right and left step length information as bar graphs was displayed on a computer screen. To add visual feedback distortion, we increased the length of one side of the visual bars by 10% above the actual step length, and the visual distortion was implemented for the side that took longer in response to the added mass. We found that even when adjustments were made to unilateral loading, the subjects spontaneously changed their step symmetry in response to the visual distortion, which resulted in a more symmetric gait. This change may be characterized by sensory prediction errors, and our results suggest that visual feedback distortion has a significant impact on gait symmetry regardless of other conditions affecting limb mechanics. A rehabilitation program employing visual feedback distortion may provide an effective way to restore gait symmetry.

  6. The Effects of Self-Generated Synchronous and Asynchronous Visual Speech Feedback on Overt Stuttering Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Gregory J.; Hough, Monica Strauss; Blanchet, Paul; Ivy, Lennette J.; Waddell, Dwight

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Relatively recent research documents that visual choral speech, which represents an externally generated form of synchronous visual speech feedback, significantly enhanced fluency in those who stutter. As a consequence, it was hypothesized that self-generated synchronous and asynchronous visual speech feedback would likewise enhance…

  7. Reach adaptation and proprioceptive recalibration following terminal visual feedback of the hand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria eBarkley

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We have shown that when subjects reach with continuous, misaligned visual feedback of their hand, their reaches are adapted and proprioceptive sense of hand position is recalibrated to partially match the visual feedback (Salomonczyk et al., 2011. It is unclear if similar changes arise after reaching with visual feedback that is provided only at the end of the reach (i.e., terminal feedback, when there are shorter temporal intervals for subjects to experience concurrent visual and proprioceptive feedback. Subjects reached to targets with an aligned hand-cursor that provided visual feedback at the end of each reach movement across a 99-trial training block, and with a rotated cursor over 3 successive blocks of 99 trials each. After each block, no cursor reaches, to measure aftereffects, and felt hand positions were measured. Felt hand position was determined by having subjects indicate the position of their unseen hand relative to a reference marker. We found that subjects adapted their reaches following training with rotated terminal visual feedback, yet slightly less (i.e., reach aftereffects were smaller, than subjects from a previous study who experienced continuous visual feedback. Nonetheless, current subjects recalibrated their sense of felt hand position in the direction of the altered visual feedback, but this proprioceptive change increased incrementally over the three rotated training blocks. Final proprioceptive recalibration levels were comparable to our previous studies in which subjects performed the same task with continuous visual feedback. Thus, compared to reach training with continuous, but altered visual feedback, subjects who received terminal altered visual feedback of the hand produced significant but smaller reach aftereffects and similar changes in hand proprioception when given extra training. Taken together, results suggest that terminal feedback of the hand is sufficient to drive motor adaptation, and also

  8. Reach adaptation and proprioceptive recalibration following terminal visual feedback of the hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Victoria; Salomonczyk, Danielle; Cressman, Erin K.; Henriques, Denise Y. P.

    2014-01-01

    We have shown that when subjects reach with continuous, misaligned visual feedback of their hand, their reaches are adapted and proprioceptive sense of hand position is recalibrated to partially match the visual feedback (Salomonczyk et al., 2011). It is unclear if similar changes arise after reaching with visual feedback that is provided only at the end of the reach (i.e., terminal feedback), when there are shorter temporal intervals for subjects to experience concurrent visual and proprioceptive feedback. Subjects reached to targets with an aligned hand-cursor that provided visual feedback at the end of each reach movement across a 99-trial training block, and with a rotated cursor over three successive blocks of 99 trials each. After each block, no cursor reaches, to measure aftereffects, and felt hand positions were measured. Felt hand position was determined by having subjects indicate the position of their unseen hand relative to a reference marker. We found that subjects adapted their reaches following training with rotated terminal visual feedback, yet slightly less (i.e., reach aftereffects were smaller), than subjects from a previous study who experienced continuous visual feedback. Nonetheless, current subjects recalibrated their sense of felt hand position in the direction of the altered visual feedback, but this proprioceptive change increased incrementally over the three rotated training blocks. Final proprioceptive recalibration levels were comparable to our previous studies in which subjects performed the same task with continuous visual feedback. Thus, compared to reach training with continuous, but altered visual feedback, subjects who received terminal altered visual feedback of the hand produced significant but smaller reach aftereffects and similar changes in hand proprioception when given extra training. Taken together, results suggest that terminal feedback of the hand is sufficient to drive motor adaptation, and also proprioceptive

  9. Trans-Tibial Amputee Gait Correction through Real-Time Visual Feedback

    OpenAIRE

    Seyyed Farhad Tabatabi Ghomshe; Reza Osqueizadeh; Seyyedeh Hoda Nabavi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The present paper reports on program of work undertaken to evaluate the effect of real time visual feedback on kinematics of prosthetic gait. Methods: A total of 6 below-knee male amputees were included in the study. Each individual underwent three trials of self-selected speed treadmill walking, in which real time visual feedback was provided from forward, backward, and lateral views, together with a control trial without any visual feedback. Kinematic reference values were ca...

  10. A Multimedia Visual Feedback in the Web-controlled Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Turan

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents development work related to create WWW based remote control laboratory for teaching Applied Photonics. In order to minimize the cost at the end-user domain, simple WWW browser with fundamental plug-in (Java applets, HTML Pages and LabWindows applets to support the remote control and video transmission functionality of the remote control is proposed. As for telepresence and monitoring of device actions, a simple type zooming web-camera is connected to the hosting multimedia PC via the USB port. The web-camera assists in visual feedback of the system and presents the feeling of telepresence for the end-user (student. USB web-cameras are normally efficient and the presence of another video server is not necessary in this case, thanks to LabWindows.

  11. Manipulating the fidelity of lower extremity visual feedback to identify obstacle negotiation strategies in immersive virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Aram; Zhou, Zixuan; Kretch, Kari S; Finley, James M

    2017-07-01

    The ability to successfully navigate obstacles in our environment requires integration of visual information about the environment with estimates of our body's state. Previous studies have used partial occlusion of the visual field to explore how information about the body and impending obstacles are integrated to mediate a successful clearance strategy. However, because these manipulations often remove information about both the body and obstacle, it remains to be seen how information about the lower extremities alone is utilized during obstacle crossing. Here, we used an immersive virtual reality (VR) interface to explore how visual feedback of the lower extremities influences obstacle crossing performance. Participants wore a head-mounted display while walking on treadmill and were instructed to step over obstacles in a virtual corridor in four different feedback trials. The trials involved: (1) No visual feedback of the lower extremities, (2) an endpoint-only model, (3) a link-segment model, and (4) a volumetric multi-segment model. We found that the volumetric model improved success rate, placed their trailing foot before crossing and leading foot after crossing more consistently, and placed their leading foot closer to the obstacle after crossing compared to no model. This knowledge is critical for the design of obstacle negotiation tasks in immersive virtual environments as it may provide information about the fidelity necessary to reproduce ecologically valid practice environments.

  12. Sensorimotor Learning of Acupuncture Needle Manipulation Using Visual Feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won-Mo Jung

    Full Text Available Humans can acquire a wide variety of motor skills using sensory feedback pertaining to discrepancies between intended and actual movements. Acupuncture needle manipulation involves sophisticated hand movements and represents a fundamental skill for acupuncturists. We investigated whether untrained students could improve their motor performance during acupuncture needle manipulation using visual feedback (VF.Twenty-one untrained medical students were included, randomly divided into concurrent (n = 10 and post-trial (n = 11 VF groups. Both groups were trained in simple lift/thrusting techniques during session 1, and in complicated lift/thrusting techniques in session 2 (eight training trials per session. We compared the motion patterns and error magnitudes of pre- and post-training tests.During motion pattern analysis, both the concurrent and post-trial VF groups exhibited greater improvements in motion patterns during the complicated lifting/thrusting session. In the magnitude error analysis, both groups also exhibited reduced error magnitudes during the simple lifting/thrusting session. For the training period, the concurrent VF group exhibited reduced error magnitudes across all training trials, whereas the post-trial VF group was characterized by greater error magnitudes during initial trials, which gradually reduced during later trials.Our findings suggest that novices can improve the sophisticated hand movements required for acupuncture needle manipulation using sensorimotor learning with VF. Use of two types of VF can be beneficial for untrained students in terms of learning how to manipulate acupuncture needles, using either automatic or cognitive processes.

  13. Visual feedback for retuning to just intonation intervals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, R. Dean; Nordquist, Peter R.; Corn, Justin S.

    2005-04-01

    Musicians become used to equal temperament pitch intervals due to their widespread use in tuning pianos and other fixed-pitch instruments. For unaccompanied singing and some other performance situations, a more harmonious blending of sounds can be achieved by shifting to just intonation intervals. Lissajous figures provide immediate and striking visual feedback that emphasizes the frequency ratios and pitch intervals found among the first few members of a single harmonic series. Spirograph patterns (hypotrochoids) are also especially simple for ratios of small whole numbers, and their use for providing feedback to singers has been suggested previously [G. W. Barton, Jr., Am. J. Phys. 44(6), 593-594 (1976)]. A hybrid mixture of these methods for comparing two frequencies generates what appears to be a three dimensional Lissajous figure-a cylindrical wire mesh that rotates about its tilted vertical axis, with zero tilt yielding the familiar Lissajous figure. Sine wave inputs work best, but the sounds of flute, recorder, whistling, and a sung ``oo'' are good enough approximations to work well. This initial study compares the three modes of presentation in terms of the ease with which a singer can obtain a desired pattern and recognize its shape.

  14. Power Assist Control of Robotic Wheelchair Based on Visual Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oda, Naoki; Shimizu, Hiroyuki

    This paper describes a vision based self-velocity estimation and its feedback system under force/torque sensor-less power assisting control of wheelchair robot. In this method, three dimensional information obtained by stereo images, and the optical flow vectors are also used for self-velocity estimation in real-time. The human force is estimated by sensor-less reaction force observer, and the assisting force is calculated by using its estimated force and virtual impedance model. In the paper, the force based assist function is integrated into visual feedback motion controller. This approach using vision and force based assist control makes it possible to facilitate the direct intelligent interactions between human force and environments such as human following assist, obstacle avoidance one and so on. Such assist functions are changeable by the selection of the weighting matrix in the velocity estimation, which is based on weighted least square solutions from optical flow vectors. The validity of the proposed approach is verified by several experimental results.

  15. Eye movement feedback fails to improve visual search performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peltier, Chad; Becker, Mark W

    2017-01-01

    Many real-world searches (e.g., radiology and baggage screening) have rare targets. When targets are rare, observers perform rapid, incomplete searches, leading to higher miss rates. To improve search for rare (10% prevalence) targets, we provided eye movement feedback (EMF) to observers during their searches. Although the nature of the EMF varied across experiments, each method informed observers about the regions of the display that had not yet been inspected. We hypothesized that feedback would help guide attention to unsearched areas and increase the proportion of the display searched before making a target-absent response, thereby increasing accuracy. An eye tracker was used to mark fixated areas by either removing a semiopaque gray overlay (Experiments 1 and 4) as portions of the display were fixated or by adding the overlay once the eye left a segment of the image (Experiments 2 and 4). Experiment 3 provided automated EMF, such that a new region was uncovered every 540 milliseconds. Across experiments, we varied whether people searched for "Waldo" in images from "Where's Waldo?" search books or searched for a T among offset Ls. We found weak evidence that EMF improves accuracy in Experiment 1. However, in the remaining experiments, EMF had no effect (Experiment 4), or even reduced accuracy (Experiments 2 and 3). We conclude that the one positive result we found is likely a Type I error and that the EMF method that we used is unlikely to improve visual search performance.

  16. Feature-Specific Organization of Feedback Pathways in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huh, Carey Y L; Peach, John P; Bennett, Corbett; Vega, Roxana M; Hestrin, Shaul

    2018-01-08

    Higher and lower cortical areas in the visual hierarchy are reciprocally connected [1]. Although much is known about how feedforward pathways shape receptive field properties of visual neurons, relatively little is known about the role of feedback pathways in visual processing. Feedback pathways are thought to carry top-down signals, including information about context (e.g., figure-ground segmentation and surround suppression) [2-5], and feedback has been demonstrated to sharpen orientation tuning of neurons in the primary visual cortex (V1) [6, 7]. However, the response characteristics of feedback neurons themselves and how feedback shapes V1 neurons' tuning for other features, such as spatial frequency (SF), remain largely unknown. Here, using a retrograde virus, targeted electrophysiological recordings, and optogenetic manipulations, we show that putatively feedback neurons in layer 5 (hereafter "L5 feedback") in higher visual areas, AL (anterolateral area) and PM (posteromedial area), display distinct visual properties in awake head-fixed mice. AL L5 feedback neurons prefer significantly lower SF (mean: 0.04 cycles per degree [cpd]) compared to PM L5 feedback neurons (0.15 cpd). Importantly, silencing AL L5 feedback reduced visual responses of V1 neurons preferring low SF (mean change in firing rate: -8.0%), whereas silencing PM L5 feedback suppressed responses of high-SF-preferring V1 neurons (-20.4%). These findings suggest that feedback connections from higher visual areas convey distinctly tuned visual inputs to V1 that serve to boost V1 neurons' responses to SF. Such like-to-like functional organization may represent an important feature of feedback pathways in sensory systems and in the nervous system in general. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Dissociable cerebellar activity during spatial navigation and visual memory in bilateral vestibular failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandl, N M; Sprenger, A; Wojak, J F; Göttlich, M; Münte, T F; Krämer, U M; Helmchen, C

    2015-10-01

    Spatial orientation and navigation depends on information from the vestibular system. Previous work suggested impaired spatial navigation in patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF). The aim of this study was to investigate event-related brain activity by functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during spatial navigation and visual memory tasks in BVF patients. Twenty-three BVF patients and healthy age- and gender matched control subjects performed learning sessions of spatial navigation by watching short films taking them through various streets from a driver's perspective along a route to the Cathedral of Cologne using virtual reality videos (adopted and modified from Google Earth). In the scanner, participants were asked to respond to questions testing for visual memory or spatial navigation while they viewed short video clips. From a similar but not identical perspective depicted video frames of routes were displayed which they had previously seen or which were completely novel to them. Compared with controls, posterior cerebellar activity in BVF patients was higher during spatial navigation than during visual memory tasks, in the absence of performance differences. This cerebellar activity correlated with disease duration. Cerebellar activity during spatial navigation in BVF patients may reflect increased non-vestibular efforts to counteract the development of spatial navigation deficits in BVF. Conceivably, cerebellar activity indicates a change in navigational strategy of BVF patients, i.e. from a more allocentric, landmark or place-based strategy (hippocampus) to a more sequence-based strategy. This interpretation would be in accord with recent evidence for a cerebellar role in sequence-based navigation. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Visual Code Navigator : An Interactive Toolset for Source Code Investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lommerse, Gerard; Nossin, Freek; Voinea, Lucian; Telea, Alexandru

    2005-01-01

    We present the Visual Code Navigator, a set of three interrelated visual tools that we developed for exploring large source code software projects from three different perspectives, or views: The syntactic view shows the syntactic constructs in the source code. The symbol view shows the objects a

  19. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of PERCEPT indoor navigation system for visually impaired users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Aura; Schafer, James; Puleo, Elaine; Wilson, Carole; Robertson, Meg

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we introduce qualitative and quantitative evaluation of PERCEPT system, an indoor navigation system for the blind and visually impaired. PERCEPT system trials with 24 blind and visually impaired users in a multi-story building show PERCEPT system effectiveness in providing appropriate navigation instructions to these users. The uniqueness of our system is that it is affordable and that its design follows Orientation and Mobility principles. These results encourage us to generalize the solution to large indoor spaces and test it with significantly larger visually impaired population in diverse settings. We hope that PERCEPT will become a standard deployed in all indoor public spaces.

  20. Blind's Eye: Employing Google Directions API for Outdoor Navigation of Visually Impaired Pedestrians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SABA FEROZMEMON

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Vision plays a paramount role in our everyday life and assists human in almost every walk of life. The people lacking vision sense require assistance to move freely. The inability of unassisted navigation and orientation in outdoor environments is one of the most important constraints for people with visual impairment. Motivated by this problem, we developed a simplified and user friendly navigation system that allows visually impaired pedestrians to reach their desired outdoor location. We designed a Braille keyboard to allow the blind user to input their destination. The proposed system makes use of Google Directions API (Application Program Interface to generate the right path to a destination. The visually impaired pedestrians have to wear a vibration belt to keep them on the track. The evaluation exposes shortcomings of Google Directions API when used for navigating the visually impaired pedestrians in an outdoor environment.

  1. Street navigation using visual information on mobile phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nguyen, Phuong Giang; Andersen, Hans Jørgen; Høilund, Carsten

    2010-01-01

    Applications with street navigation have been recently introduced on mobile phone devices. A major part of existing systems use integrated GPS as input for indicating the location. However, these systems often fail or make abrupt shifts in urban environment due to occlusion of satellites. Further......Applications with street navigation have been recently introduced on mobile phone devices. A major part of existing systems use integrated GPS as input for indicating the location. However, these systems often fail or make abrupt shifts in urban environment due to occlusion of satellites...

  2. Augmented visual feedback-aided interventions for motor rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kearney, Elaine; Shellikeri, Sanjana; Martino, Rosemary; Yunusova, Yana

    2018-01-09

    A systematic review was performed to (1) evaluate the effectiveness of augmented visual feedback-based treatments for motor rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease, and (2) examine treatment design factors associated with enhanced outcomes following these treatments. Eight databases were searched from their start-date up to January 2017 using the key terms Parkinson's Disease and augmented visual feedback. Two independent raters screened the abstracts and full articles for inclusion. Relevant data were extracted and summarized, and methodological quality of accepted articles was assessed. Eight single-group studies and 10 randomized control trials were included in the review. Augmented visual feedback-based treatments resulted in improved outcomes with small to large effect sizes post-treatment for the majority of impairment, activity, participation, and global motor function measures, and these improvements were often superior to traditional rehabilitation/education programs. Enhanced treatment outcomes were observed in studies that provided large amounts and high intensities of treatment; gamified feedback; and provided knowledge of performance feedback in real-time on 100% of practice trials. Augmented visual feedback appears to be a useful motor rehabilitation tool in Parkinson's disease; however, high-quality, rigorous studies remain limited. Future studies should consider factors that enhance rehabilitation outcomes when designing augmented visual feedback-based interventions. Implications for rehabilitation Augmented visual feedback is a useful tool for motor rehabilitation in Parkinson's disease; augmented visual feedback-based treatments are often superior to traditional programs. These treatments are associated with improved outcomes in impairment, activity, participation, and global motor function domains. Rehabilitation professionals can optimize their use of augmented visual feedback-based treatments by providing large amounts and a high intensity of

  3. Navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiltschko, Roswitha

    2017-07-01

    Experiments with migrating birds displaced during autumn migration outside their normal migration corridor reveal two different navigational strategies: adult migrants compensate for the displacement, and head towards their traditional wintering areas, whereas young first-time migrants continue in their migratory direction. Young birds are guided to their still unknown goal by a genetically coded migration program that indicates duration and direction(s) of the migratory flight by controlling the amount of migratory restlessness and the compass course(s) with respect to the geomagnetic field and celestial rotation. Adult migrants that have already wintered and are familiar with the goal area approach the goal by true navigation, specifically heading towards it and changing their course correspondingly after displacement. During their first journey, young birds experience the distribution of potential navigational factors en route and in their winter home, which allows them to truly navigate on their next migrations. The navigational factors used appear to include magnetic intensity as a component in their multi-modal navigational 'map'; olfactory input is also involved, even if it is not yet entirely clear in what way. The mechanisms of migratory birds for true navigation over long distances appear to be in principle similar to those discussed for by homing pigeons.

  4. Self-motivated visual scanning predicts flexible navigation in a virtual environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Jeannette Ploran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability to navigate flexibly (e.g., reorienting oneself based on distal landmarks to reach a learned target from a new position may rely on visual scanning during both initial experiences with the environment and subsequent test trials. Reliance on visual scanning during navigation harkens back to the concept of vicarious trial and error, a description of the side-to-side head movements made by rats as they explore previously traversed sections of a maze in an attempt to find a reward. In the current study, we examined if visual scanning predicted the extent to which participants would navigate to a learned location in a virtual environment defined by its position relative to distal landmarks. Our results demonstrated a significant positive relationship between the amount of visual scanning and participant accuracy in identifying the trained target location from a new starting position as long as the landmarks within the environment remain consistent with the period of original learning. Our findings indicate that active visual scanning of the environment is a deliberative attentional strategy that supports the formation of spatial representations for flexible navigation.

  5. Self-Evaluation and Recruitment of Feedback for Enhanced Social Interaction by a Student with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal-Snape, Divya

    2005-01-01

    A student who is visually impaired was trained to evaluate his social behavior and to recruit feedback from his sighted peers, who were trained by him to provide the feedback. The self-recruitment of feedback improved the student's accuracy in evaluating social skills requiring visual cues. In addition, the peers extended their feedback to other…

  6. From objects to landmarks: the function of visual location information in spatial navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edgar eChan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Landmarks play an important role in guiding navigational behavior. A host of studies in the last 15 years has demonstrated that environmental objects can act as landmarks for navigation in different ways. In this review, we propose a parsimonious four-part taxonomy for conceptualizing object location information during navigation. We begin by outlining object properties that appear to be important for a landmark to attain salience. We then systematically examine the different functions of objects as navigational landmarks based on previous behavioral and neuroanatomical findings in rodents and humans. Evidence is presented showing that single environmental objects can function as navigational beacons, or act as associative or orientation cues. In addition, we argue that extended surfaces or boundaries can act as landmarks by providing a frame of reference for encoding spatial information. The present review provides a concise taxonomy of the use of visual objects as landmarks in navigation and should serve as a useful reference for future research into landmark-based spatial navigation.

  7. Towards a Sign-Based Indoor Navigation System for People with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rituerto, Alejandro; Fusco, Giovanni; Coughlan, James M.

    2017-01-01

    Navigation is a challenging task for many travelers with visual impairments. While a variety of GPS-enabled tools can provide wayfinding assistance in outdoor settings, GPS provides no useful localization information indoors. A variety of indoor navigation tools are being developed, but most of them require potentially costly physical infrastructure to be installed and maintained, or else the creation of detailed visual models of the environment. We report development of a new smartphone-based navigation aid, which combines inertial sensing, computer vision and floor plan information to estimate the user’s location with no additional physical infrastructure and requiring only the locations of signs relative to the floor plan. A formative study was conducted with three blind volunteer participants demonstrating the feasibility of the approach and highlighting the areas needing improvement. PMID:29214242

  8. Interactive Visualization and Navigation of Web Search Results Revealing Community Structures and Bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Sallaberry, Arnaud; Zaidi, Faraz; Pich, C.; Melançon, Guy

    2010-01-01

    International audience; With the information overload on the Internet, organization and visualization of web search results so as to facilitate faster access to information is a necessity. The classical methods present search results as an ordered list of web pages ranked in terms of relevance to the searched topic. Users thus have to scan text snippets or navigate through various pages before finding the required information. In this paper we present an interactive visualization system for c...

  9. Low-level Active Visual Navigation: Increasing robustness of vision-based localization using potential fields

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Romulo T.; Basiri, Meysam; Aguiar, A. Pedro; Miraldo, Pedro

    2018-01-01

    This paper proposes a low-level visual navigation algorithm to improve visual localization of a mobile robot. The algorithm, based on artificial potential fields, associates each feature in the current image frame with an attractive or neutral potential energy, with the objective of generating a control action that drives the vehicle towards the goal, while still favoring feature-rich areas within a local scope, \\replaced{thus improving}{improving in this way} the localization performance. On...

  10. PERCEPT Indoor Navigation System for the Blind and Visually Impaired: Architecture and Experimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Aura Ganz; James Schafer; Siddhesh Gandhi; Elaine Puleo; Carole Wilson; Meg Robertson

    2012-01-01

    We introduce PERCEPT system, an indoor navigation system for the blind and visually impaired. PERCEPT will improve the quality of life and health of the visually impaired community by enabling independent living. Using PERCEPT, blind users will have independent access to public health facilities such as clinics, hospitals, and wellness centers. Access to healthcare facilities is crucial for this population due to the multiple health conditions that they face such as diabetes and its complicat...

  11. Influence of visual feedback in the regulation of arm stiffness following stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piovesan, Davide; Casadio, Maura; Morasso, Pietro; Giannoni, Psiche

    2011-01-01

    Stroke survivors strongly rely on visual feedback to control their movements, since segmental reflexes are characterized by an inherent hyper-excitability. To test the effect of visual feedback on the modulation of arm stability we estimated the stiffness of the paretic arm in nine stroke survivors during robot mediated therapy, where subjects trained with and without vision. While several studies found a negligible effect in unimpaired individuals, our results highlighted a marked reduction of stroke survivors' arm stiffness in absence of visual feedback.

  12. Neural Substrates of Visual Spatial Coding and Visual Feedback Control for Hand Movements in Allocentric and Target-Directed Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaler, Lore; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Neuropsychological evidence suggests that different brain areas may be involved in movements that are directed at visual targets (e.g., pointing or reaching), and movements that are based on allocentric visual information (e.g., drawing or copying). Here we used fMRI to investigate the neural correlates of these two types of movements in healthy volunteers. Subjects (n = 14) performed right hand movements in either a target-directed task (moving a cursor to a target dot) or an allocentric task (moving a cursor to reproduce the distance and direction between two distal target dots) with or without visual feedback about their hand movement. Movements were monitored with an MR compatible touch panel. A whole brain analysis revealed that movements in allocentric conditions led to an increase in activity in the fundus of the left intra-parietal sulcus (IPS), in posterior IPS, in bilateral dorsal premotor cortex (PMd), and in the lateral occipital complex (LOC). Visual feedback in both target-directed and allocentric conditions led to an increase in activity in area MT+, superior parietal–occipital cortex (SPOC), and posterior IPS (all bilateral). In addition, we found that visual feedback affected brain activity differently in target-directed as compared to allocentric conditions, particularly in the pre-supplementary motor area, PMd, IPS, and parieto-occipital cortex. Our results, in combination with previous findings, suggest that the LOC is essential for allocentric visual coding and that SPOC is involved in visual feedback control. The differences in brain activity between target-directed and allocentric visual feedback conditions may be related to behavioral differences in visual feedback control. Our results advance the understanding of the visual coordinate frame used by the LOC. In addition, because of the nature of the allocentric task, our results have relevance for the understanding of neural substrates of magnitude estimation and vector coding of

  13. Users' Evaluations of Four Electronic Travel Aids Aimed at Navigation for Persons Who Are Visually Impaired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roentgen, Uta R.; Gelderblom, Gert Jan; de Witte, Luc P.

    2011-01-01

    Eighteen persons with visual impairments evaluated four systematically selected navigation systems. Their performance on 11 tasks, provided ratings, satisfaction on seven aspects of the assistive devices, and explanatory comments show generally valuable functionality and usability, as well as individual marked preferences for various features of…

  14. Verbalizing, Visualizing, and Navigating: The Effect of Strategies on Encoding a Large-Scale Virtual Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, David J. M.; Schinazi, Victor R.; Cawkwell, Philip B.; Tekriwal, Anand; Epstein, Russell A.; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L.

    2017-01-01

    Using novel virtual cities, we investigated the influence of verbal and visual strategies on the encoding of navigation-relevant information in a large-scale virtual environment. In 2 experiments, participants watched videos of routes through 4 virtual cities and were subsequently tested on their memory for observed landmarks and their ability to…

  15. Validation of exposure visualization and audible distance emission for navigated temporal bone drilling in phantoms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduard H J Voormolen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A neuronavigation interface with extended function as compared with current systems was developed to aid during temporal bone surgery. The interface, named EVADE, updates the prior anatomical image and visualizes the bone drilling process virtually in real-time without need for intra-operative imaging. Furthermore, EVADE continuously calculates the distance from the drill tip to segmented temporal bone critical structures (e.g. the sigmoid sinus and facial nerve and produces audiovisual warnings if the surgeon drills in too close vicinity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the accuracy and surgical utility of EVADE in physical phantoms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed 228 measurements assessing the position accuracy of tracking a navigated drill in the operating theatre. A mean target registration error of 1.33±0.61 mm with a maximum error of 3.04 mm was found. Five neurosurgeons each drilled two temporal bone phantoms, once using EVADE, and once using a standard neuronavigation interface. While using standard neuronavigation the surgeons damaged three modeled temporal bone critical structures. No structure was hit by surgeons utilizing EVADE. Surgeons felt better orientated and thought they had improved tumor exposure with EVADE. Furthermore, we compared the distances between surface meshes of the virtual drill cavities created by EVADE to actual drill cavities: average maximum errors of 2.54±0.49 mm and -2.70±0.48 mm were found. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results demonstrate that EVADE gives accurate feedback which reduces risks of harming modeled critical structures compared to a standard neuronavigation interface during temporal bone phantom drilling.

  16. The Effect of Visual Feedback on Writing Size in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriaan R. E. Potgieser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD leads to impairment in multiple cognitive domains. Micrographia is a relatively early PD sign of visuomotor dysfunction, characterized by a global reduction in writing size and a decrement in size during writing. Here we aimed to investigate the effect of withdrawal of visual feedback on writing size in patients with PD. Twenty-five patients with non-tremor-dominant PD without cognitive dysfunction and twenty-five age-matched controls had to write a standard sentence with and without visual feedback. We assessed the effect of withdrawal of visual feedback by measuring vertical word size (i, horizontal length of the sentence (ii, and the summed horizontal word length without interspacing (iii, comparing patients with controls. In both patients and controls, writing was significantly larger without visual feedback. This enlargement did not significantly differ between the groups. Smaller handwriting significantly correlated with increased disease severity. Contrary to previous observations that withdrawal of visual feedback caused increased writing size in specifically PD, we did not find differences between patients and controls. Both groups wrote larger without visual feedback, which adds insight in general neuronal mechanisms underlying the balance between feed-forward and feedback in visuomotor control, mechanisms that also hold for grasping movements.

  17. Active Visual SLAM with Exploration for Autonomous Underwater Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    cross-track image overlap for a ∼45◦ horizontal camera field of view (in water). Occasionally the vehicle was commanded to swim back toward the bow...Part 1. Rife, J., and S. Rock (2001), Visual tracking of jellyfish in situ, Proceedings of the Inter- national Conference on Image Processing, 1, 289–292

  18. Navigating through virtual environments: visual realism improves spatial cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, F.; Geudeke, Branko L.; van den Broek, Egon

    2009-01-01

    Recent advances in computer technology have significantly facilitated the use of virtual environments (VE) for small and medium enterprises (SME). However, achieving visual realism in such VE requires high investments in terms of time and effort, while its usefulness has not yet become apparent from

  19. Combined mirror visual and auditory feedback therapy for upper limb phantom pain: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Kun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Phantom limb sensation and phantom limb pain is a very common issue after amputations. In recent years there has been accumulating data implicating 'mirror visual feedback' or 'mirror therapy' as helpful in the treatment of phantom limb sensation and phantom limb pain. Case presentation We present the case of a 24-year-old Caucasian man, a left upper limb amputee, treated with mirror visual feedback combined with auditory feedback with improved pain relief. Conclusion This case may suggest that auditory feedback might enhance the effectiveness of mirror visual feedback and serve as a valuable addition to the complex multi-sensory processing of body perception in patients who are amputees.

  20. Augmented visual feedback counteracts the effects of surface muscular functional electrical stimulation on physiological tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Recent studies suggest that surface muscular functional electrical stimulation (FES) might suppress neurological upper limb tremor. We assessed its effects on upper limb physiological tremor, which is mainly driven by mechanical-reflex oscillations. We investigated the interaction between FES and augmented visual feedback, since (a) most daily activities are performed using visual cues, and (b) augmented visual feedback exacerbates upper limb tremor. Methods 10 healthy subjects (23.4 ± 7.7 years) performed 2 postural tasks with combinations of FES (4 sites; frequency of stimulation: 30 Hz; pulse width: 300 microsec; range of current delivered 10–34 mAmp) and augmented visual feedback. Results Spectral analysis of tremor showed a decrease of power spectral density to 62.18% (p = 0.01), of the integral in the 8-12 Hz frequency band to 57.67% (p = 0.003), and of tremor root mean square (RMS) to 57.16% (p = 0.002) during FES, without any changes in tremor frequency. Augmented visual feedback blocked the beneficial effect of FES, as confirmed by power spectral analysis (p = 0.01). We found a statistically significant interaction between augmented visual feedback and electrical stimulation (p = 0.039). Conclusions Augmented visual feedback antagonizes the effects of FES on physiological tremor. The absence of changes of peak frequency argues against an effect of FES on mechanical properties of the upper limb. PMID:24063436

  1. Tactile-Foot Stimulation Can Assist the Navigation of People with Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez, Ramiro; Pissaloux, Edwige; Lay-Ekuakille, Aimé

    2015-01-01

    Background. Tactile interfaces that stimulate the plantar surface with vibrations could represent a step forward toward the development of wearable, inconspicuous, unobtrusive, and inexpensive assistive devices for people with visual impairments. Objective. To study how people understand information through their feet and to maximize the capabilities of tactile-foot perception for assisting human navigation. Methods. Based on the physiology of the plantar surface, three prototypes of electronic tactile interfaces for the foot have been developed. With important technological improvements between them, all three prototypes essentially consist of a set of vibrating actuators embedded in a foam shoe-insole. Perceptual experiments involving direction recognition and real-time navigation in space were conducted with a total of 60 voluntary subjects. Results. The developed prototypes demonstrated that they are capable of transmitting tactile information that is easy and fast to understand. Average direction recognition rates were 76%, 88.3%, and 94.2% for subjects wearing the first, second, and third prototype, respectively. Exhibiting significant advances in tactile-foot stimulation, the third prototype was evaluated in navigation tasks. Results show that subjects were capable of following directional instructions useful for navigating spaces. Conclusion. Footwear providing tactile stimulation can be considered for assisting the navigation of people with visual impairments. PMID:27019593

  2. Tactile-Foot Stimulation Can Assist the Navigation of People with Visual Impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramiro Velázquez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Tactile interfaces that stimulate the plantar surface with vibrations could represent a step forward toward the development of wearable, inconspicuous, unobtrusive, and inexpensive assistive devices for people with visual impairments. Objective. To study how people understand information through their feet and to maximize the capabilities of tactile-foot perception for assisting human navigation. Methods. Based on the physiology of the plantar surface, three prototypes of electronic tactile interfaces for the foot have been developed. With important technological improvements between them, all three prototypes essentially consist of a set of vibrating actuators embedded in a foam shoe-insole. Perceptual experiments involving direction recognition and real-time navigation in space were conducted with a total of 60 voluntary subjects. Results. The developed prototypes demonstrated that they are capable of transmitting tactile information that is easy and fast to understand. Average direction recognition rates were 76%, 88.3%, and 94.2% for subjects wearing the first, second, and third prototype, respectively. Exhibiting significant advances in tactile-foot stimulation, the third prototype was evaluated in navigation tasks. Results show that subjects were capable of following directional instructions useful for navigating spaces. Conclusion. Footwear providing tactile stimulation can be considered for assisting the navigation of people with visual impairments.

  3. Guideline implementation in clinical practice: Use of statistical process control charts as visual feedback devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fahad A Al-Hussein

    2009-01-01

    Conclusions: A process of audits in the context of statistical process control is necessary for any improvement in the implementation of guidelines in primary care. Statistical process control charts are an effective means of visual feedback to the care providers.

  4. PERCEPT Indoor Navigation System for the Blind and Visually Impaired: Architecture and Experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aura Ganz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We introduce PERCEPT system, an indoor navigation system for the blind and visually impaired. PERCEPT will improve the quality of life and health of the visually impaired community by enabling independent living. Using PERCEPT, blind users will have independent access to public health facilities such as clinics, hospitals, and wellness centers. Access to healthcare facilities is crucial for this population due to the multiple health conditions that they face such as diabetes and its complications. PERCEPT system trials with 24 blind and visually impaired users in a multistory building show PERCEPT system effectiveness in providing appropriate navigation instructions to these users. The uniqueness of our system is that it is affordable and that its design follows orientation and mobility principles. We hope that PERCEPT will become a standard deployed in all indoor public spaces, especially in healthcare and wellness facilities.

  5. PERCEPT Indoor Navigation System for the Blind and Visually Impaired: Architecture and Experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganz, Aura; Schafer, James; Gandhi, Siddhesh; Puleo, Elaine; Wilson, Carole; Robertson, Meg

    2012-01-01

    We introduce PERCEPT system, an indoor navigation system for the blind and visually impaired. PERCEPT will improve the quality of life and health of the visually impaired community by enabling independent living. Using PERCEPT, blind users will have independent access to public health facilities such as clinics, hospitals, and wellness centers. Access to healthcare facilities is crucial for this population due to the multiple health conditions that they face such as diabetes and its complications. PERCEPT system trials with 24 blind and visually impaired users in a multistory building show PERCEPT system effectiveness in providing appropriate navigation instructions to these users. The uniqueness of our system is that it is affordable and that its design follows orientation and mobility principles. We hope that PERCEPT will become a standard deployed in all indoor public spaces, especially in healthcare and wellness facilities.

  6. Early infant’s use of visual feedback in voluntary reaching for a spatial target

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livia Silveira Pogetti

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Capacity of using visual feedback by infants at the age of reaching onset has been controversial. In this investigation we assessed movement kinematics in the task of reaching for a toy in 5-month-olds, comparing movements performed with the preferred arm under full vision versus visual occlusion. That comparison was made in consecutive periods of visual occlusion. Analysis of results revealed that visual occlusion led to decreased straightness of arm displacement toward the toy as compared to full vision. Longer periods of occlusion did not augment that effect. These results offer preliminary evidence for use of visual feedback early in infants’ reaching development. Reconciliation of previous and current findings is made by proposing a hybrid mode of feedback processing for manual control reweighting the roles of vision and proprioception as a function of availability of environmental information.

  7. Early infant's use of visual feedback in voluntary reaching for a spatial target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogetti, Lívia S.; de Souza, Rosana M.; Tudella, Eloísa; Teixeira, Luis A.

    2013-01-01

    Capacity of using visual feedback by infants at the age of reaching onset has been controversial. In this investigation we assessed movement kinematics in the task of reaching for a toy in 5-month-olds, comparing movements performed with the preferred arm under full vision versus visual occlusion. That comparison was made in consecutive periods of visual occlusion. Analysis of results revealed that visual occlusion led to decreased straightness of arm displacement toward the toy as compared to full vision. Longer periods of occlusion did not augment that effect. These results offer preliminary evidence for use of visual feedback early in infants' reaching development. Reconciliation of previous and current findings is made by proposing a hybrid mode of feedback processing for manual control reweighting the roles of vision and proprioception as a function of availability of environmental information. PMID:23950753

  8. Visual reliance for balance control in older adults persists when visual information is disrupted by artificial feedback delays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Ting Yeh

    Full Text Available Sensory information from our eyes, skin and muscles helps guide and correct balance. Less appreciated, however, is that delays in the transmission of sensory information between our eyes, limbs and central nervous system can exceed several 10s of milliseconds. Investigating how these time-delayed sensory signals influence balance control is central to understanding the postural system. Here, we investigate how delayed visual feedback and cognitive performance influence postural control in healthy young and older adults. The task required that participants position their center of pressure (COP in a fixed target as accurately as possible without visual feedback about their COP location (eyes-open balance, or with artificial time delays imposed on visual COP feedback. On selected trials, the participants also performed a silent arithmetic task (cognitive dual task. We separated COP time series into distinct frequency components using low and high-pass filtering routines. Visual feedback delays affected low frequency postural corrections in young and older adults, with larger increases in postural sway noted for the group of older adults. In comparison, cognitive performance reduced the variability of rapid center of pressure displacements in young adults, but did not alter postural sway in the group of older adults. Our results demonstrate that older adults prioritize vision to control posture. This visual reliance persists even when feedback about the task is delayed by several hundreds of milliseconds.

  9. Visual Reliance for Balance Control in Older Adults Persists When Visual Information Is Disrupted by Artificial Feedback Delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Ramesh

    2014-01-01

    Sensory information from our eyes, skin and muscles helps guide and correct balance. Less appreciated, however, is that delays in the transmission of sensory information between our eyes, limbs and central nervous system can exceed several 10s of milliseconds. Investigating how these time-delayed sensory signals influence balance control is central to understanding the postural system. Here, we investigate how delayed visual feedback and cognitive performance influence postural control in healthy young and older adults. The task required that participants position their center of pressure (COP) in a fixed target as accurately as possible without visual feedback about their COP location (eyes-open balance), or with artificial time delays imposed on visual COP feedback. On selected trials, the participants also performed a silent arithmetic task (cognitive dual task). We separated COP time series into distinct frequency components using low and high-pass filtering routines. Visual feedback delays affected low frequency postural corrections in young and older adults, with larger increases in postural sway noted for the group of older adults. In comparison, cognitive performance reduced the variability of rapid center of pressure displacements in young adults, but did not alter postural sway in the group of older adults. Our results demonstrate that older adults prioritize vision to control posture. This visual reliance persists even when feedback about the task is delayed by several hundreds of milliseconds. PMID:24614576

  10. Real-time computer-based visual feedback improves visual acuity in downbeat nystagmus - a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teufel, Julian; Bardins, S; Spiegel, Rainer; Kremmyda, O; Schneider, E; Strupp, M; Kalla, R

    2016-01-04

    Patients with downbeat nystagmus syndrome suffer from oscillopsia, which leads to an unstable visual perception and therefore impaired visual acuity. The aim of this study was to use real-time computer-based visual feedback to compensate for the destabilizing slow phase eye movements. The patients were sitting in front of a computer screen with the head fixed on a chin rest. The eye movements were recorded by an eye tracking system (EyeSeeCam®). We tested the visual acuity with a fixed Landolt C (static) and during real-time feedback driven condition (dynamic) in gaze straight ahead and (20°) sideward gaze. In the dynamic condition, the Landolt C moved according to the slow phase eye velocity of the downbeat nystagmus. The Shapiro-Wilk test was used to test for normal distribution and one-way ANOVA for comparison. Ten patients with downbeat nystagmus were included in the study. Median age was 76 years and the median duration of symptoms was 6.3 years (SD +/- 3.1y). The mean slow phase velocity was moderate during gaze straight ahead (1.44°/s, SD +/- 1.18°/s) and increased significantly in sideward gaze (mean left 3.36°/s; right 3.58°/s). In gaze straight ahead, we found no difference between the static and feedback driven condition. In sideward gaze, visual acuity improved in five out of ten subjects during the feedback-driven condition (p = 0.043). This study provides proof of concept that non-invasive real-time computer-based visual feedback compensates for the SPV in DBN. Therefore, real-time visual feedback may be a promising aid for patients suffering from oscillopsia and impaired text reading on screen. Recent technological advances in the area of virtual reality displays might soon render this approach feasible in fully mobile settings.

  11. Blindness enhances auditory obstacle circumvention: Assessing echolocation, sensory substitution, and visual-based navigation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Kolarik

    Full Text Available Performance for an obstacle circumvention task was assessed under conditions of visual, auditory only (using echolocation and tactile (using a sensory substitution device, SSD guidance. A Vicon motion capture system was used to measure human movement kinematics objectively. Ten normally sighted participants, 8 blind non-echolocators, and 1 blind expert echolocator navigated around a 0.6 x 2 m obstacle that was varied in position across trials, at the midline of the participant or 25 cm to the right or left. Although visual guidance was the most effective, participants successfully circumvented the obstacle in the majority of trials under auditory or SSD guidance. Using audition, blind non-echolocators navigated more effectively than blindfolded sighted individuals with fewer collisions, lower movement times, fewer velocity corrections and greater obstacle detection ranges. The blind expert echolocator displayed performance similar to or better than that for the other groups using audition, but was comparable to that for the other groups using the SSD. The generally better performance of blind than of sighted participants is consistent with the perceptual enhancement hypothesis that individuals with severe visual deficits develop improved auditory abilities to compensate for visual loss, here shown by faster, more fluid, and more accurate navigation around obstacles using sound.

  12. Autonomous Visual Navigation of an Indoor Environment Using a Parsimonious, Insect Inspired Familiarity Algorithm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas D Gaffin

    Full Text Available The navigation of bees and ants from hive to food and back has captivated people for more than a century. Recently, the Navigation by Scene Familiarity Hypothesis (NSFH has been proposed as a parsimonious approach that is congruent with the limited neural elements of these insects' brains. In the NSFH approach, an agent completes an initial training excursion, storing images along the way. To retrace the path, the agent scans the area and compares the current scenes to those previously experienced. By turning and moving to minimize the pixel-by-pixel differences between encountered and stored scenes, the agent is guided along the path without having memorized the sequence. An important premise of the NSFH is that the visual information of the environment is adequate to guide navigation without aliasing. Here we demonstrate that an image landscape of an indoor setting possesses ample navigational information. We produced a visual landscape of our laboratory and part of the adjoining corridor consisting of 2816 panoramic snapshots arranged in a grid at 12.7-cm centers. We show that pixel-by-pixel comparisons of these images yield robust translational and rotational visual information. We also produced a simple algorithm that tracks previously experienced routes within our lab based on an insect-inspired scene familiarity approach and demonstrate that adequate visual information exists for an agent to retrace complex training routes, including those where the path's end is not visible from its origin. We used this landscape to systematically test the interplay of sensor morphology, angles of inspection, and similarity threshold with the recapitulation performance of the agent. Finally, we compared the relative information content and chance of aliasing within our visually rich laboratory landscape to scenes acquired from indoor corridors with more repetitive scenery.

  13. Audio-Visual Feedback for Self-monitoring Posture in Ballet Training

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Esben Winther; Hølledig, Malte Lindholm; Bach-Nielsen, Sebastian Siem

    2017-01-01

    An application for ballet training is presented that monitors the posture position (straightness of the spine and rotation of the pelvis) deviation from the ideal position in real-time. The human skeletal data is acquired through a Microsoft Kinect v2. The movement of the student is mirrored......-coded. In an experiment with 9-12 year-old dance students from a ballet school, comparing the audio-visual feedback modality with no feedback leads to an increase in posture accuracy (p card feedback and expert interviews indicate that the feedback is considered fun and useful...... for training independently from the teacher....

  14. The role of visual and direct force feedback in robotics-assisted mitral valve annuloplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Currie, Maria E; Talasaz, Ali; Rayman, Reiza; Chu, Michael W A; Kiaii, Bob; Peters, Terry; Trejos, Ana Luisa; Patel, Rajni

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this work was to determine the effect of both direct force feedback and visual force feedback on the amount of force applied to mitral valve tissue during ex vivo robotics-assisted mitral valve annuloplasty. A force feedback-enabled master-slave surgical system was developed to provide both visual and direct force feedback during robotics-assisted cardiac surgery. This system measured the amount of force applied by novice and expert surgeons to cardiac tissue during ex vivo mitral valve annuloplasty repair. The addition of visual (2.16 ± 1.67), direct (1.62 ± 0.86), or both visual and direct force feedback (2.15 ± 1.08) resulted in lower mean maximum force applied to mitral valve tissue while suturing compared with no force feedback (3.34 ± 1.93 N; P forces on cardiac tissue during robotics-assisted mitral valve annuloplasty suturing, force feedback may be required. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Learning feedback and feedforward control in a mirror-reversed visual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, Shoko; Telgen, Sebastian; Ushiba, Junichi; Nozaki, Daichi; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2015-10-01

    When we learn a novel task, the motor system needs to acquire both feedforward and feedback control. Currently, little is known about how the learning of these two mechanisms relate to each other. In the present study, we tested whether feedforward and feedback control need to be learned separately, or whether they are learned as common mechanism when a new control policy is acquired. Participants were trained to reach to two lateral and one central target in an environment with mirror (left-right)-reversed visual feedback. One group was allowed to make online movement corrections, whereas the other group only received visual information after the end of the movement. Learning of feedforward control was assessed by measuring the accuracy of the initial movement direction to lateral targets. Feedback control was measured in the responses to sudden visual perturbations of the cursor when reaching to the central target. Although feedforward control improved in both groups, it was significantly better when online corrections were not allowed. In contrast, feedback control only adaptively changed in participants who received online feedback and remained unchanged in the group without online corrections. Our findings suggest that when a new control policy is acquired, feedforward and feedback control are learned separately, and that there may be a trade-off in learning between feedback and feedforward controllers. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  16. Reducing Trunk Compensation in Stroke Survivors: A Randomized Crossover Trial Comparing Visual and Force Feedback Modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Bulmaro Adolfo; Schneider, Andrea Nicole; Van der Loos, H F Machiel

    2017-10-01

    To investigate whether the compensatory trunk movements of stroke survivors observed during reaching tasks can be decreased by force and visual feedback, and to examine whether one of these feedback modalities is more efficacious than the other in reducing this compensatory tendency. Randomized crossover trial. University research laboratory. Community-dwelling older adults (N=15; 5 women; mean age, 64±11y) with hemiplegia from nontraumatic hemorrhagic or ischemic stroke (>3mo poststroke), recruited from stroke recovery groups, the research group's website, and the community. In a single session, participants received augmented feedback about their trunk compensation during a bimanual reaching task. Visual feedback (60 trials) was delivered through a computer monitor, and force feedback (60 trials) was delivered through 2 robotic devices. Primary outcome measure included change in anterior trunk displacement measured by motion tracking camera. Secondary outcomes included trunk rotation, index of curvature (measure of straightness of hands' path toward target), root mean square error of hands' movement (differences between hand position on every iteration of the program), completion time for each trial, and posttest questionnaire to evaluate users' experience and system's usability. Both visual (-45.6% [45.8 SD] change from baseline, P=.004) and force (-41.1% [46.1 SD], P=.004) feedback were effective in reducing trunk compensation. Scores on secondary outcome measures did not improve with either feedback modality. Neither feedback condition was superior. Visual and force feedback show promise as 2 modalities that could be used to decrease trunk compensation in stroke survivors during reaching tasks. It remains to be established which one of these 2 feedback modalities is more efficacious than the other as a cue to reduce compensatory trunk movement. Copyright © 2017 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Substituting depth for intensity and real-time phosphene rendering: visual navigation under low vision conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieby, Paulette; Barnes, Nick; McCarthy, Chris; Liu, Nianjun; Dennett, Hugh; Walker, Janine G; Botea, Viorica; Scott, Adele F

    2011-01-01

    Navigation and way finding including obstacle avoidance is difficult when visual perception is limited to low resolution, such as is currently available on a bionic eye. Depth visualisation may be a suitable alternative. Such an approach can be evaluated using simulated phosphenes with a wearable mobile virtual reality kit. In this paper, we present two novel approaches: (i) an implementation of depth visualisation; and, (ii) novel methods for rapid rendering of simulated phosphenes with an empirical comparison between them. Our new software-based method for simulated phosphene rendering shows large speed improvements, facilitating the display in real-time of a large number of phosphenes with size and brightness dependent on pixel intensity, and with customised output dynamic range. Further, we describe the protocol, navigation environment and system used for visual navigation experiments to evaluate the use of depth on low resolution simulations of a bionic eye perceptual experience. Results for these experiments show that a depth-based representation is effective for navigation, and shows significant advantages over intensity-based approaches when overhanging obstacles are present. The results of the experiments were reported in [1], [2].

  18. Stereo-Based Visual Odometry for Autonomous Robot Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Kostavelis

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robots should possess accurate self-localization capabilities in order to be successfully deployed in their environment. A solution to this challenge may be derived from visual odometry (VO, which is responsible for estimating the robot's pose by analysing a sequence of images. The present paper proposes an accurate, computationally-efficient VO algorithm relying solely on stereo vision images as inputs. The contribution of this work is twofold. Firstly, it suggests a non-iterative outlier detection technique capable of efficiently discarding the outliers of matched features. Secondly, it introduces a hierarchical motion estimation approach that produces refinements to the global position and orientation for each successive step. Moreover, for each subordinate module of the proposed VO algorithm, custom non-iterative solutions have been adopted. The accuracy of the proposed system has been evaluated and compared with competent VO methods along DGPS-assessed benchmark routes. Experimental results of relevance to rough terrain routes, including both simulated and real outdoors data, exhibit remarkable accuracy, with positioning errors lower than 2%.

  19. Relative efficacy of various strategies for visual feedback in standing balance activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Michael W; Crowell, Charles R; Striegel, Aaron D; Villano, Michael; Schmiedeler, James P

    2013-09-01

    Seventy-nine young, healthy adults were led through static balance and weight-shifting activities in order to study the effects of visual feedback on balance. Based on their performance, the relative effects of various feedback properties were analyzed: (1) arrangement [direct center of pressure (CoP) vs. lateral weight distribution feedback], (2) numbers (presence vs. absence of numeric feedback), and (3) dimensionality (1D vs. 2D CoP information). In the static balance activity, subjects were instructed to maintain equal weight across both feet; in the dynamic weight-shifting activity, subjects were instructed to shift their weight to each displayed target location. For static balance, lateral symmetry and sway were measured by classical parameters using CoP, center of gravity (CoG), and the difference between the two (CoP-CoG). Weight-shifting balance performance was measured using the time required to shift between target CoP positions. Results indicated that feedback arrangement had a significant effect on static sway and dynamic weight shifting, with direct CoP feedback resulting in better balance performance than lateral weight distribution. Also, numbers had a significant effect on static sway, reducing lateral sway compared to feedback without numbers. Finally, 2D CoP feedback resulted in faster performance than 1D CoP feedback in dynamic weight shifting. These results show that altering different properties of visual feedback can have significant effects on resulting balance performance; therefore, proper selection of visual feedback strategy needs to take these effects into consideration.

  20. A real-time articulatory visual feedback approach with target presentation for second language pronunciation learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suemitsu, Atsuo; Dang, Jianwu; Ito, Takayuki; Tiede, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Articulatory information can support learning or remediating pronunciation of a second language (L2). This paper describes an electromagnetic articulometer-based visual-feedback approach using an articulatory target presented in real-time to facilitate L2 pronunciation learning. This approach trains learners to adjust articulatory positions to match targets for a L2 vowel estimated from productions of vowels that overlap in both L1 and L2. Training of Japanese learners for the American English vowel /æ/ that included visual training improved its pronunciation regardless of whether audio training was also included. Articulatory visual feedback is shown to be an effective method for facilitating L2 pronunciation learning.

  1. Adaptation of movement endpoints to perturbations of visual feedback

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Dobbelsteen, John; Brenner, Eli; Smeets, Jeroen B.J.

    We investigated the extent to which humans can quickly adapt their goal-directed arm movements to perturbed feedback. We predicted that the magnitude of adaptation to a changed relationship between vision and kinesthesia would depend on the type of perturbation, being largest when the perturbation

  2. Outer navigation of a inspection robot by means of feedback of global guidance; Navegacion exterior de un robot de inspeccion mediante retroalimentacion de la orientacion global

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segovia de los R, A.; Bucio V, F. [ININ, 52750 La Marquesa, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Garduno G, M. [Instituto Tecnologico de Toluca, Av. Instituto Tecnologico s/n, Metepec, Estado de Mexico 52140 (Mexico)]. e-mail: asegovia@nuclear.inin.mx

    2008-07-01

    The objective of this article is the presentation of an inspection system to mobile robot navigating in exteriors by means of the employment of a feedback of instantaneous guidance with respect to a global reference throughout moment of the displacement. The robot evolves obeying the commands coming from the one tele operator which indicates the diverse addresses by means of the operation console that the robot should take using for it information provided by an electronic compass. The mobile robot employee in the experimentations is a Pioneer 3-AT, which counts with a sensor series required to obtain an operation of more autonomy. The electronic compass offers geographical information coded in a format SPI, reason for which a micro controller ({mu}C) economic of general use has been an employee for to transfer the information to the format RS-232, originally used by the Pioneer 3-AT. The orientation information received by the robot by means of their serial port RS-232 secondary it is forwarded to the computer hostess in the one which a program Java is used to generate the commands for the robot navigation control and to deploy one graphic interface user utilized to receive the order of the operator. This research is part of an ambitious project in which it is tried to count on an inspection system and monitoring of sites in which risks of high radiation levels could exist, thus a navigation systems in exteriors could be very useful. The complete system will count besides the own sensors of the robot, with certain numbers of agree sensors to the variables that are desired to monitor. The resulting values of such measurements will be visualized in real time in the graphic interface user, thanks to a bidirectional wireless communication among the station of operation and the mobile robot. (Author)

  3. Indoor navigation by people with visual impairment using a digital sign system.

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    Gordon E Legge

    Full Text Available There is a need for adaptive technology to enhance indoor wayfinding by visually-impaired people. To address this need, we have developed and tested a Digital Sign System. The hardware and software consist of digitally-encoded signs widely distributed throughout a building, a handheld sign-reader based on an infrared camera, image-processing software, and a talking digital map running on a mobile device. Four groups of subjects-blind, low vision, blindfolded sighted, and normally sighted controls-were evaluated on three navigation tasks. The results demonstrate that the technology can be used reliably in retrieving information from the signs during active mobility, in finding nearby points of interest, and following routes in a building from a starting location to a destination. The visually impaired subjects accurately and independently completed the navigation tasks, but took substantially longer than normally sighted controls. This fully functional prototype system demonstrates the feasibility of technology enabling independent indoor navigation by people with visual impairment.

  4. Development of a teleoperated micromanipulation system with visual and haptic feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Antoine; Cassier, Claude; Haddab, Yassine; Rougeot, Patrick; Chaillet, Nicolas

    2001-10-01

    Concerning the teleoperation between different scale worlds, it is important to take into account the scaling effect problem in terms of manipulator precision, human sensation, environment accessibility, dexterity, etc. To consider these different problems, this paper presents the development of a new macro-micro teleoperated micromanipulator, with two kinds of micromanipulation systems: a piezoelectric microgripper and an atomic force microscope (AFM) operating under an optical microscope. The natural force feedback sensation exerted on the piezoelectric microgripper is given through a teleoperated two-fingered planar hand mechanism. This system provides the human operator with natural force feedback sensation and augmented visual feedback while telemanipulating objects in the micro world. Firstly, the bilateral control system with active force feedback based on hybrid master-slave technologies is modeled. The results include the use of force feedback and power assist in order to demonstrate the feasibility and practicability of the micro-teleoperated system. Then, in order to improve the visual feedback issued form the optical microscope of the station, a virtual micro 3D environment is proposed. By combining 2D microscope images and augmented reality-based programming techniques, we reconstructed exactly the operational microworld. Finally, some experiments have been carried out in order to verify the validity of the proposed bilateral control scheme and to calibrate the developed virtual model incorporating visual and haptic feedback.

  5. Active training and driving-specific feedback improve older drivers' visual search prior to lane changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavallière, Martin; Simoneau, Martin; Tremblay, Mathieu; Laurendeau, Denis; Teasdale, Normand

    2012-03-02

    Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some effects of aging that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there is evidence that classroom programs (driving refresher courses) do not improve the driving performance of older drivers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify visual search behaviors of older drivers while changing lanes in urban driving. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the video-based feedback training, 10 older drivers who received a driving refresher course and feedback about their driving performance were tested with an on-road standardized evaluation before and after participating to a simulator training program (Feedback group). Their results were compared to a Control group (12 older drivers) who received the same refresher course and in-simulator active practice as the Feedback group without receiving driving-specific feedback. After attending the training program, the Control group showed no increase in the frequency of the visual inspection of three regions of interests (rear view and left side mirrors, and blind spot). In contrast, for the Feedback group, combining active training and driving-specific feedbacks increased the frequency of blind spot inspection by 100% (32.3 to 64.9% of verification before changing lanes). These results suggest that simulator training combined with driving-specific feedbacks helped older drivers to improve their visual inspection strategies, and that in-simulator training transferred positively to on-road driving. In order to be effective, it is claimed that driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving-specific feedbacks. Simulators offer a unique environment for developing such programs adapted to older drivers' needs.

  6. Active training and driving-specific feedback improve older drivers' visual search prior to lane changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavallière Martin

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Driving retraining classes may offer an opportunity to attenuate some effects of aging that may alter driving skills. Unfortunately, there is evidence that classroom programs (driving refresher courses do not improve the driving performance of older drivers. The aim of the current study was to evaluate if simulator training sessions with video-based feedback can modify visual search behaviors of older drivers while changing lanes in urban driving. Methods In order to evaluate the effectiveness of the video-based feedback training, 10 older drivers who received a driving refresher course and feedback about their driving performance were tested with an on-road standardized evaluation before and after participating to a simulator training program (Feedback group. Their results were compared to a Control group (12 older drivers who received the same refresher course and in-simulator active practice as the Feedback group without receiving driving-specific feedback. Results After attending the training program, the Control group showed no increase in the frequency of the visual inspection of three regions of interests (rear view and left side mirrors, and blind spot. In contrast, for the Feedback group, combining active training and driving-specific feedbacks increased the frequency of blind spot inspection by 100% (32.3 to 64.9% of verification before changing lanes. Conclusions These results suggest that simulator training combined with driving-specific feedbacks helped older drivers to improve their visual inspection strategies, and that in-simulator training transferred positively to on-road driving. In order to be effective, it is claimed that driving programs should include active practice sessions with driving-specific feedbacks. Simulators offer a unique environment for developing such programs adapted to older drivers' needs.

  7. Real-time visual feedback of COM and COP motion properties differentially modifies postural control structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilby, Melissa C; Molenaar, Peter C M; Slobounov, Semyon M; Newell, Karl M

    2017-01-01

    The experiment was setup to investigate the control of human quiet standing through the manipulation of augmented visual information feedback of selective properties of the motion of two primary variables in postural control: center of pressure (COP) and center of mass (COM). Five properties of feedback information were contrasted to a no feedback dual-task (watching a movie) control condition to determine the impact of visual real-time feedback on the coordination of the joint motions in postural control in both static and dynamic one-leg standing postures. The feedback information included 2D COP or COM position and macro variables derived from the COP and COM motions, namely virtual time-to-contact (VTC) and the COP-COM coupling. The findings in the static condition showed that the VTC and COP-COM coupling feedback conditions decreased postural motion more than the 2D COP or COM positional information. These variables also induced larger sway amplitudes in the dynamic condition showing a more progressive search strategy in exploring the stability limits. Canonical correlation analysis (CCA) found that COP-COM coupling contributed less than the other feedback variables to the redundancy of the system reflected in the common variance between joint motions and properties of sway motion. The COP-COM coupling had the lowest weighting of the motion properties to redundancy under the feedback conditions but overall the qualitative pattern of the joint motion structures was preserved within the respective static and dynamic balance conditions.

  8. Imposed visual feedback delay of an action changes mass perception based on the sensory prediction error

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    Takuya eHonda

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available While performing an action, the timing of when the sensory feedback is given can be used to establish the causal link between the action and its consequence. It has been shown that delaying the visual feedback while carrying an object makes people feel the mass of the object to be greater, suggesting that the feedback timing can also impact the perceived quality of an external object. In this study, we investigated the origin of the feedback timing information that influences the mass perception of the external object.Participants made a straight reaching movement while holding a manipulandum. The movement of the manipulandum was presented as a cursor movement on a monitor. In Experiment 1, various delays were imposed between the actual trajectory and the cursor movement. The participants’ perceived mass of the manipulandum significantly increased as the delay increased to 400 ms, but this gain did not reach significance when the delay was 800 ms. This suggests the existence of a temporal tuning mechanism for incorporating the visual feedback into the perception of mass. In Experiment 2, we examined whether the increased mass perception during the visual delay was due to the prediction error of the visual consequence of an action or to the actual delay of the feedback itself. After the participants adapted to the feedback delay, the perceived mass of the object became lighter than before, indicating that updating the temporal prediction model for the visual consequence diminishes the overestimation of the object’s mass. We propose that the misattribution of the visual delay into mass perception is induced by the sensorimotor prediction error, possibly when the amount of delay (error is within the range that can reasonably include the consequence of an action.

  9. Navigating User Feedback Channels to Chart an Evidence Based Course for Library Redesign

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    T. Derek Halling

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Objectives – The objective of this project was to redesign library spaces based on the user feedback obtained from a broad complement of feedback channels. The over-arching goal of this project was to develop an evidence based approach to the redesign of library spaces.Methods – Data from user-initiated and library-initiated feedback channels were collected and analyzed to determine priorities for library space changes. Online/onsite suggestions, a library onsite census survey, the LibQUAL+® survey, a whiteboard, ballot voting, and text voting were all used to gather input. A student advisory group was used as a sounding board for planned space changes before a final decision was made.Results – Data produced by different feedback channels varied both in the number of suggestions generated as well as the changes requested. Composite data from all feedback channels resulted in a total of 687 suggestions identifying 17 different types of space changes. An onsite whiteboard, the LibQUAL+® survey, and library census proved the most prolific in producing suggestions.Conclusion – Priorities for space changes were best determined through a composite of suggestions received from all feedback channels. The number of suggestions and requests received that were initiated by users was so small that it had to be supplemented with library-initiated feedback requests. The use of multiple feedback channels enhanced the number, variety, and scope of the suggestions that were received. Similar requests received through multiple feedback channels emphasized their importance to users. Focused follow-up feedback channels were effective in clarifying user suggestions for specific changes.

  10. 6-DOF Pose Estimation of a Robotic Navigation Aid by Tracking Visual and Geometric Features.

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    Ye, Cang; Hong, Soonhac; Tamjidi, Amirhossein

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a 6-DOF Pose Estimation (PE) method for a Robotic Navigation Aid (RNA) for the visually impaired. The RNA uses a single 3D camera for PE and object detection. The proposed method processes the camera's intensity and range data to estimates the camera's egomotion that is then used by an Extended Kalman Filter (EKF) as the motion model to track a set of visual features for PE. A RANSAC process is employed in the EKF to identify inliers from the visual feature correspondences between two image frames. Only the inliers are used to update the EKF's state. The EKF integrates the egomotion into the camera's pose in the world coordinate system. To retain the EKF's consistency, the distance between the camera and the floor plane (extracted from the range data) is used by the EKF as the observation of the camera's z coordinate. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method results in accurate pose estimates for positioning the RNA in indoor environments. Based on the PE method, a wayfinding system is developed for localization of the RNA in a home environment. The system uses the estimated pose and the floorplan to locate the RNA user in the home environment and announces the points of interest and navigational commands to the user through a speech interface. This work was motivated by the limitations of the existing navigation technology for the visually impaired. Most of the existing methods use a point/line measurement sensor for indoor object detection. Therefore, they lack capability in detecting 3D objects and positioning a blind traveler. Stereovision has been used in recent research. However, it cannot provide reliable depth data for object detection. Also, it tends to produce a lower localization accuracy because its depth measurement error quadratically increases with the true distance. This paper suggests a new approach for navigating a blind traveler. The method uses a single 3D time-of-flight camera for both 6-DOF PE and 3D object

  11. Influence of visual feedback on human task performance in ITER remote handling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schropp, Gwendolijn Y.R., E-mail: g.schropp@heemskerk-innovative.nl [Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heemskerk Innovative Technology, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Heemskerk, Cock J.M. [Heemskerk Innovative Technology, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Kappers, Astrid M.L.; Tiest, Wouter M. Bergmann [Helmholtz Institute-Utrecht University, Utrecht (Netherlands); Elzendoorn, Ben S.Q. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM/FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Clusterand ITER-NL, PO box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Bult, David [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM/FOM, Partner in the Trilateral Euregio Clusterand ITER-NL, PO box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands)

    2012-08-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The performance of human operators in an ITER-like test facility for remote handling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different sources of visual feedback influence how fast one can complete a maintenance task. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Insights learned could be used in design of operator work environment or training procedures. - Abstract: In ITER, maintenance operations will be largely performed by remote handling (RH). Before ITER can be put into operation, safety regulations and licensing authorities require proof of maintainability for critical components. Part of the proof will come from using standard components and procedures. Additional verification and validation is based on simulation and hardware tests in 1:1 scale mockups. The Master Slave manipulator system (MS2) Benchmark Product was designed to implement a reference set of maintenance tasks representative for ITER remote handling. Experiments were performed with two versions of the Benchmark Product. In both experiments, the quality of visual feedback varied by exchanging direct view with indirect view (using video cameras) in order to measure and analyze its impact on human task performance. The first experiment showed that both experienced and novice RH operators perform a simple task significantly better with direct visual feedback than with camera feedback. A more complex task showed a large variation in results and could not be completed by many novice operators. Experienced operators commented on both the mechanical design and visual feedback. In a second experiment, a more elaborate task was tested on an improved Benchmark product. Again, the task was performed significantly faster with direct visual feedback than with camera feedback. In post-test interviews, operators indicated that they regarded the lack of 3D perception as the primary factor hindering their performance.

  12. Visual Feedback Dominates the Sense of Agency for Brain-Machine Actions

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    Evans, Nathan; Gale, Steven; Schurger, Aaron; Blanke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroscience and engineering have led to the development of technologies that permit the control of external devices through real-time decoding of brain activity (brain-machine interfaces; BMI). Though the feeling of controlling bodily movements (sense of agency; SOA) has been well studied and a number of well-defined sensorimotor and cognitive mechanisms have been put forth, very little is known about the SOA for BMI-actions. Using an on-line BMI, and verifying that our subjects achieved a reasonable level of control, we sought to describe the SOA for BMI-mediated actions. Our results demonstrate that discrepancies between decoded neural activity and its resultant real-time sensory feedback are associated with a decrease in the SOA, similar to SOA mechanisms proposed for bodily actions. However, if the feedback discrepancy serves to correct a poorly controlled BMI-action, then the SOA can be high and can increase with increasing discrepancy, demonstrating the dominance of visual feedback on the SOA. Taken together, our results suggest that bodily and BMI-actions rely on common mechanisms of sensorimotor integration for agency judgments, but that visual feedback dominates the SOA in the absence of overt bodily movements or proprioceptive feedback, however erroneous the visual feedback may be. PMID:26066840

  13. Design, Implementation and Evaluation of an Indoor Navigation System for Visually Impaired People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Santos Martinez-Sala

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Indoor navigation is a challenging task for visually impaired people. Although there are guidance systems available for such purposes, they have some drawbacks that hamper their direct application in real-life situations. These systems are either too complex, inaccurate, or require very special conditions (i.e., rare in everyday life to operate. In this regard, Ultra-Wideband (UWB technology has been shown to be effective for indoor positioning, providing a high level of accuracy and low installation complexity. This paper presents SUGAR, an indoor navigation system for visually impaired people which uses UWB for positioning, a spatial database of the environment for pathfinding through the application of the A* algorithm, and a guidance module. The interaction with the user takes place using acoustic signals and voice commands played through headphones. The suitability of the system for indoor navigation has been verified by means of a functional and usable prototype through a field test with a blind person. In addition, other tests have been conducted in order to show the accuracy of different relevant parts of the system.

  14. Design, Implementation and Evaluation of an Indoor Navigation System for Visually Impaired People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sala, Alejandro Santos; Losilla, Fernando; Sánchez-Aarnoutse, Juan Carlos; García-Haro, Joan

    2015-12-21

    Indoor navigation is a challenging task for visually impaired people. Although there are guidance systems available for such purposes, they have some drawbacks that hamper their direct application in real-life situations. These systems are either too complex, inaccurate, or require very special conditions (i.e., rare in everyday life) to operate. In this regard, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) technology has been shown to be effective for indoor positioning, providing a high level of accuracy and low installation complexity. This paper presents SUGAR, an indoor navigation system for visually impaired people which uses UWB for positioning, a spatial database of the environment for pathfinding through the application of the A* algorithm, and a guidance module. The interaction with the user takes place using acoustic signals and voice commands played through headphones. The suitability of the system for indoor navigation has been verified by means of a functional and usable prototype through a field test with a blind person. In addition, other tests have been conducted in order to show the accuracy of different relevant parts of the system.

  15. Illumination Tolerance for Visual Navigation with the Holistic Min-Warping Method

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    Ralf Möller

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Holistic visual navigation methods are an emerging alternative to the ubiquitous feature-based methods. Holistic methods match entire images pixel-wise instead of extracting and comparing local feature descriptors. In this paper we investigate which pixel-wise distance measures are most suitable for the holistic min-warping method with respect to illumination invariance. Two novel approaches are presented: tunable distance measures—weighted combinations of illumination-invariant and illumination-sensitive terms—and two novel forms of “sequential” correlation which are only invariant against intensity shifts but not against multiplicative changes. Navigation experiments on indoor image databases collected at the same locations but under different conditions of illumination demonstrate that tunable distance measures perform optimally by mixing their two portions instead of using the illumination-invariant term alone. Sequential correlation performs best among all tested methods, and as well but much faster in an approximated form. Mixing with an additional illumination-sensitive term is not necessary for sequential correlation. We show that min-warping with approximated sequential correlation can successfully be applied to visual navigation of cleaning robots.

  16. Attentional capture? Synchronized feedback signals from the isthmi boost retinal signals to higher visual areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Gonzalo J; Durán, Ernesto; Morales, Cristian; González-Cabrera, Cristian; Sentis, Elisa; Mpodozis, Jorge; Letelier, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-18

    When a salient object in the visual field captures attention, the neural representation of that object is enhanced at the expense of competing stimuli. How neural activity evoked by a salient stimulus evolves to take precedence over the neural activity evoked by other stimuli is a matter of intensive investigation. Here, we describe in pigeons (Columba livia) how retinal inputs to the optic tectum (TeO, superior colliculus in mammals), triggered by moving stimuli, are selectively relayed on to the rotundus (Rt, caudal pulvinar) in the thalamus, and to its pallial target, the entopallium (E, extrastriate cortex). We show that two satellite nuclei of the TeO, the nucleus isthmi parvocelullaris (Ipc) and isthmi semilunaris (SLu), send synchronized feedback signals across tectal layers. Preventing the feedback from Ipc but not from SLu to a tectal location suppresses visual responses to moving stimuli from the corresponding region of visual space in all Rt subdivisions. In addition, the bursting feedback from the Ipc imprints a bursting rhythm on the visual signals, such that the visual responses of the Rt and the E acquire a bursting modulation significantly synchronized to the feedback from Ipc. As the Ipc feedback signals are selected by competitive interactions, the visual responses within the receptive fields in the Rt tend to synchronize with the tectal location receiving the "winning" feedback from Ipc. We propose that this selective transmission of afferent activity combined with the cross-regional synchronization of the areas involved represents a bottom-up mechanism by which salient stimuli capture attention.

  17. Tactile Gap Detection Deteriorates during Bimanual Symmetrical Movements under Mirror Visual Feedback.

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    Janet H Bultitude

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that incongruence between signals for motor intention and sensory input can cause pain and other sensory abnormalities. This claim is supported by reports that moving in an environment of induced sensorimotor conflict leads to elevated pain and sensory symptoms in those with certain painful conditions. Similar procedures can lead to reports of anomalous sensations in healthy volunteers too. In the present study, we used mirror visual feedback to investigate the effects of sensorimotor incongruence on responses to stimuli that arise from sources external to the body, in particular, touch. Incongruence between the sensory and motor signals for the right arm was manipulated by having the participants make symmetrical or asymmetrical movements while watching a reflection of their left arm in a parasagittal mirror, or the left hand surface of a similarly positioned opaque board. In contrast to our prediction, sensitivity to the presence of gaps in tactile stimulation of the right forearm was not reduced when participants made asymmetrical movements during mirror visual feedback, as compared to when they made symmetrical or asymmetrical movements with no visual feedback. Instead, sensitivity was reduced when participants made symmetrical movements during mirror visual feedback relative to the other three conditions. We suggest that small discrepancies between sensory and motor information, as they occur during mirror visual feedback with symmetrical movements, can impair tactile processing. In contrast, asymmetrical movements with mirror visual feedback may not impact tactile processing because the larger discrepancies between sensory and motor information may prevent the integration of these sources of information. These results contrast with previous reports of anomalous sensations during exposure to both low and high sensorimotor conflict, but are nevertheless in agreement with a forward model interpretation of perceptual

  18. Effects of visual feedback-induced variability on motor learning of handrim wheelchair propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leving, Marika T; Vegter, Riemer J K; Hartog, Johanneke; Lamoth, Claudine J C; de Groot, Sonja; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that a higher intra-individual variability benefits the motor learning of wheelchair propulsion. The present study evaluated whether feedback-induced variability on wheelchair propulsion technique variables would also enhance the motor learning process. Learning was operationalized as an improvement in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique, which are thought to be closely related during the learning process. 17 Participants received visual feedback-based practice (feedback group) and 15 participants received regular practice (natural learning group). Both groups received equal practice dose of 80 min, over 3 weeks, at 0.24 W/kg at a treadmill speed of 1.11 m/s. To compare both groups the pre- and post-test were performed without feedback. The feedback group received real-time visual feedback on seven propulsion variables with instruction to manipulate the presented variable to achieve the highest possible variability (1st 4-min block) and optimize it in the prescribed direction (2nd 4-min block). To increase motor exploration the participants were unaware of the exact variable they received feedback on. Energy consumption and the propulsion technique variables with their respective coefficient of variation were calculated to evaluate the amount of intra-individual variability. The feedback group, which practiced with higher intra-individual variability, improved the propulsion technique between pre- and post-test to the same extent as the natural learning group. Mechanical efficiency improved between pre- and post-test in the natural learning group but remained unchanged in the feedback group. These results suggest that feedback-induced variability inhibited the improvement in mechanical efficiency. Moreover, since both groups improved propulsion technique but only the natural learning group improved mechanical efficiency, it can be concluded that the improvement in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique do not always appear

  19. An effective visualization technique for depth perception in augmented reality-based surgical navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hyunseok; Cho, Byunghyun; Masamune, Ken; Hashizume, Makoto; Hong, Jaesung

    2016-03-01

    Depth perception is a major issue in augmented reality (AR)-based surgical navigation. We propose an AR and virtual reality (VR) switchable visualization system with distance information, and evaluate its performance in a surgical navigation set-up. To improve depth perception, seamless switching from AR to VR was implemented. In addition, the minimum distance between the tip of the surgical tool and the nearest organ was provided in real time. To evaluate the proposed techniques, five physicians and 20 non-medical volunteers participated in experiments. Targeting error, time taken, and numbers of collisions were measured in simulation experiments. There was a statistically significant difference between a simple AR technique and the proposed technique. We confirmed that depth perception in AR could be improved by the proposed seamless switching between AR and VR, and providing an indication of the minimum distance also facilitated the surgical tasks. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Trans-Tibial Amputee Gait Correction through Real-Time Visual Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyyed Farhad Tabatabi Ghomshe

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present paper reports on program of work undertaken to evaluate the effect of real time visual feedback on kinematics of prosthetic gait. Methods: A total of 6 below-knee male amputees were included in the study. Each individual underwent three trials of self-selected speed treadmill walking, in which real time visual feedback was provided from forward, backward, and lateral views, together with a control trial without any visual feedback. Kinematic reference values were captured via VICON motion analysis system, and one-minute slots of data sets were processed by its Workstation software (Plug in Gait, which were than statistically analyzed running Wilcoxon Signed-Rank Test. Results: Statistical analyses revealed significant differences in stance phase (Z=0.923, p=0.031 and stride length (Z=-1.807, p=0.043 between normal and affected sides in front visual feedback mode. Stance phase was generally extended on normal legs, and there appeared to be reductions in hip joint range of motion on affected limbs. Stride time followed relatively comparable patterns in both sides across all trials. Conclusion: The results suggest that providing visualization in the context of amputee gait rehabilitation may provide an effective way to help subjects correct gait patterns and thereby it may improve the outcome of rehabilitation.

  1. Effects of angular gain transformations between movement and visual feedback on coordination performance in unimanual circling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina eRieger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Tool actions are characterized by a transformation (of spatio-temporal and/or force-related characteristics between movements and their resulting consequences in the environment. This transformation has to be taken into account, when planning and executing movement and its existence may affect performance. In the present study we investigated how angular gain transformations between movement and visual feedback during circling movements affect coordination performance. Participants coordinated the visual feedback (feedback dot with a continuously circling stimulus (stimulus dot on a computer screen in order to produce mirror symmetric trajectories of them. The movement angle was multiplied by a gain factor (0.5 to 2; 9 levels before it was presented on the screen. Thus, the angular gain transformations changed the spatio-temporal relationship between the movement and its feedback in visual space, and resulted in a non-constant mapping of movement to feedback positions. Coordination performance was best with gain = 1. With high gains the feedback dot was in lead of the stimulus dot, with small gains it lagged behind. Anchoring (reduced movement variability occurred when the two trajectories were close to each other. Awareness of the transformation depended on the deviation of the gain from 1. In conclusion, the size of an angular gain transformation as well as its mere presence influence performance in a situation in which the mapping of movement positions to visual feedback positions is not constant. When designing machines or tools that involve transformations between movements and their external consequences, one should be aware that the mere presence of angular gains may result in performance decrements and that there can be flaws in the representation of the transformation.

  2. Neuronal correlates of continuous manual tracking under varying visual movement feedback in a virtual reality environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limanowski, Jakub; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Blankenburg, Felix

    2017-02-01

    To accurately guide one's actions online, the brain predicts sensory action feedback ahead of time based on internal models, which can be updated by sensory prediction errors. The underlying operations can be experimentally investigated in sensorimotor adaptation tasks, in which moving under perturbed sensory action feedback requires internal model updates. Here we altered healthy participants' visual hand movement feedback in a virtual reality setup, while assessing brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants tracked a continually moving virtual target object with a photorealistic, three-dimensional (3D) virtual hand controlled online via a data glove. During the continuous tracking task, the virtual hand's movements (i.e., visual movement feedback) were repeatedly periodically delayed, which participants had to compensate for to maintain accurate tracking. This realistic task design allowed us to simultaneously investigate processes likely operating at several levels of the brain's motor control hierarchy. FMRI revealed that the length of visual feedback delay was parametrically reflected by activity in the inferior parietal cortex and posterior temporal cortex. Unpredicted changes in visuomotor mapping (at transitions from synchronous to delayed visual feedback periods or vice versa) activated biological motion-sensitive regions in the lateral occipitotemporal cortex (LOTC). Activity in the posterior parietal cortex (PPC), focused on the contralateral anterior intraparietal sulcus (aIPS), correlated with tracking error, whereby this correlation was stronger in participants with higher tracking performance. Our results are in line with recent proposals of a wide-spread cortical motor control hierarchy, where temporoparietal regions seem to evaluate visuomotor congruence and thus possibly ground a self-attribution of movements, the LOTC likely processes early visual prediction errors, and the aIPS computes action goal errors and

  3. Effect of a contact monitoring system with immediate visual feedback on hand hygiene compliance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, S J; FitzGerald, G; Moore, G; Knights, E; Atkinson, S; Smith, S; Freeman, O; Cryer, P; Wilson, A P R

    2014-10-01

    Hand hygiene compliance is traditionally monitored by visual methods that are open to bias and strictly limited in time and place. Automatic monitoring may be more effective for infection control as well as performance management. To establish accuracy and acceptability of an automatic contact monitoring system for hand hygiene. Monitoring equipment was installed across 55 beds in three wards, and included modified identity badges, bedside furniture, sinks and alcohol gel dispensers. Badges were in near-skin contact (through uniform) and could detect alcohol vapour. All devices were linked by wi-fi. A traffic light system on the badge provided immediate feedback to staff and patients on the hand hygiene status of a member of staff on approach to a patient. Compliance was logged automatically. Following a period of immediate feedback, no visual feedback was given for two weeks. Subsequently, feedback was given using red/green lights for 10 days, followed by retrospective feedback to the ward. Hand hygiene was verified independently by an observer. Hand hygiene compliance increased from 21% of 97 opportunities to 66% of 197 opportunities during active immediate feedback. Compliance decreased when feedback was provided to wards retrospectively. Six staff (26%) avoided wearing a badge, saying that it was too heavy or they were not on the ward all day. Only three of 30 patients stated that they would challenge staff who had not performed hand hygiene. Automatic contact monitoring with immediate feedback was effective in increasing hand hygiene compliance, but feedback given retrospectively did not prevent a decrease in compliance. Copyright © 2014 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Technology-Assisted Rehabilitation of Writing Skills in Parkinson's Disease: Visual Cueing versus Intelligent Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackaerts, Evelien; Nieuwboer, Alice; Farella, Elisabetta

    2017-01-01

    Recent research showed that visual cueing can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on handwriting of patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and healthy controls depending on the circumstances. Hence, using other sensory modalities to deliver cueing or feedback may be a valuable alternative. Therefore, the current study compared the effects of short-term training with either continuous visual cues or intermittent intelligent verbal feedback. Ten PD patients and nine healthy controls were randomly assigned to one of these training modes. To assess transfer of learning, writing performance was assessed in the absence of cueing and feedback on both trained and untrained writing sequences. The feedback pen and a touch-sensitive writing tablet were used for testing. Both training types resulted in improved writing amplitudes for the trained and untrained sequences. In conclusion, these results suggest that the feedback pen is a valuable tool to implement writing training in a tailor-made fashion for people with PD. Future studies should include larger sample sizes and different subgroups of PD for long-term training with the feedback pen.

  5. Instructed Vision: Navigating Grammatical Rules by Using Landmarks for Linguistic Structures in Corrective Feedback Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majlesi, Ali Reza

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to show how multimodality, that is, the mobilization of various communicative resources in social actions (Mondada, 2016), can be used to teach grammar. Drawing on ethnomethodological conversation analysis (Sacks, 1992), the article provides a detailed analysis of 2 corrective feedback sequences in a Swedish-as-a-second-language…

  6. Stochastic two-delay differential model of delayed visual feedback effects on postural dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boulet, J.; Balasubramaniam, R.; Daffertshofer, A.; Longtin, A.

    2010-01-01

    We report on experiments and modelling involving the 'visuo-postural control loop' in the upright stance. We experimentally manipulated an artificial delay to the visual feedback during standing, presented at delays ranging from 0 to 1 s in increments of 250 ms. Using stochastic delay differential

  7. Enhance students’ motivation to learn programming by using direct visual feed-back

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kofoed, Lise B.; Reng, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The technical subjects chosen are within programming. Using image-processing algorithms as means to provide direct visual feedback for learning basic C/C++. The pedagogical approach is within a PBL framework and is based on dialogue and collaborative learning. At the same time the intention was t...... to a satisfactory level seen from the study board’s point of view....

  8. Interactive Football-Training Based on Rebounders with Hit Position Sensing and Audio-Visual Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mads Møller; Grønbæk, Kaj; Thomassen, Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    -visual feedback. Football Lab enables the creation of novel training games, which aim to improve players’ technical skills, and simultaneously function as a tool for measuring player performance and development over time. A logging of the Football Lab was conducted through 92 weeks, where the platform...

  9. Ultrasound as Visual Feedback in Speech Habilitation: Exploring Consultative Use in Rural British Columbia, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, B. May; Bacsfalvi, Penelope; Adler-Bock, Marcy; Shimizu, Reiko; Cheney, Audrey; Giesbrecht, Nathan; O'Connell, Maureen; Sirianni, Jason; Radanov, Bosko

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasound has shown promise as a visual feedback tool in speech therapy. Rural clients, however, often have minimal access to new technologies. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate consultative treatment using ultrasound in rural communities. Two speech-language pathologists (SLPs) trained in ultrasound use provided consultation with…

  10. A dual visual-local feedback model of the vergence eye movement system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erkelens, C.J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/069562296

    2011-01-01

    Pure vergence movements are the eye movements that we make when we change our binocular fixation between targets differing in distance but not in direction relative to the head. Pure vergence is slow and controlled by visual feedback. Saccades are the rapid eye movements that we make between targets

  11. Visualization feedback for musical ensemble practice: a case study on phrase articulation and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Trevor; Boulliot, Nicolas; Cooperstock, Jeremy R.

    2012-01-01

    We consider the possible advantages of visualization in supporting musical interpretation. Specifically, we investigate the use of visualizations in making a subjective judgement of a student's performance compared to reference "expert" performance for particular aspects of musical performance-articulation and dynamics. Our assessment criteria for the effectiveness of the feedback are based on the consistency of judgements made by the participants using each modality, that is to say, in determining how well the student musician matches the reference musician, the time taken to evaluate each pair of samples, and subjective opinion of perceived utility of the feedback. For articulation, differences in the mean scores assigned by the participants to the reference versus the student performance were not statistically significant for each modality. This suggests that while the visualization strategy did not offer any advantage over presentation of the samples by audio playback alone, visualization nevertheless provided sufficient information to make similar ratings. For dynamics, four of our six participants categorized the visualizations as helpful. The means of their ratings for the visualization-only and both-together conditions were not statistically different but were statistically different from the audio-only treatment, indicating a dominance of the visualizations when presented together with audio. Moreover, the ratings of dynamics under the visualization-only condition were significantly more consistent than the other conditions.

  12. Wearable Virtual White Cane Network for navigating people with visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yabiao; Chandrawanshi, Rahul; Nau, Amy C; Tse, Zion Tsz Ho

    2015-09-01

    Navigating the world with visual impairments presents inconveniences and safety concerns. Although a traditional white cane is the most commonly used mobility aid due to its low cost and acceptable functionality, electronic traveling aids can provide more functionality as well as additional benefits. The Wearable Virtual Cane Network is an electronic traveling aid that utilizes ultrasound sonar technology to scan the surrounding environment for spatial information. The Wearable Virtual Cane Network is composed of four sensing nodes: one on each of the user's wrists, one on the waist, and one on the ankle. The Wearable Virtual Cane Network employs vibration and sound to communicate object proximity to the user. While conventional navigation devices are typically hand-held and bulky, the hands-free design of our prototype allows the user to perform other tasks while using the Wearable Virtual Cane Network. When the Wearable Virtual Cane Network prototype was tested for distance resolution and range detection limits at various displacements and compared with a traditional white cane, all participants performed significantly above the control bar (p Wearable Virtual Cane Network rather than the white cane. The obstacle course experiment also shows that the use of the white cane in combination with the Wearable Virtual Cane Network can significantly improve navigation over using either the white cane or the Wearable Virtual Cane Network alone (p < 0.05, paired t-test). © IMechE 2015.

  13. Promoting Increased Pitch Variation in Oral Presentations with Transient Visual Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Hincks

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates learner response to a novel kind of intonation feedback generated from speech analysis. Instead of displays of pitch curves, our feedback is flashing lights that show how much pitch variation the speaker has produced. The variable used to generate the feedback is the standard deviation of fundamental frequency as measured in semitones. Flat speech causes the system to show yellow lights, while more expressive speech that has used pitch to give focus to any part of an utterance generates green lights. Participants in the study were 14 Chinese students of English at intermediate and advanced levels. A group that received visual feedback was compared with a group that received audio feedback. Pitch variation was measured at four stages: in a baseline oral presentation; for the first and second halves of three hours of training; and finally in the production of a new oral presentation. Both groups increased their pitch variation with training, and the effect lasted after the training had ended. The test group showed a significantly higher increase than the control group, indicating that the feedback is effective. These positive results imply that the feedback could be beneficially used in a system for practicing oral presentations.

  14. Effect of Animated Graphic Annotations and Immediate Visual Feedback in Aiding Japanese Pronunciation Learning: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hew, Soon-Hin; Ohki, Mitsuru

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of imagery and electronic visual feedback in facilitating students' acquisition of Japanese pronunciation skills. The independent variables, animated graphic annotation (AGA) and immediate visual feedback (IVF) were integrated into a Japanese computer-assisted language learning (JCALL) program focused on the…

  15. The Role of Visual Feedback and Creative Exploration for the Improvement of Timing Accuracy in Performing Musical Ornaments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, R.; Sadakata, M.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    in developing a visual feedback system for a creative activity such as music performance, the objective is not just to reinforce one particular manner of performing. Instead, a desirable characteristic might be that the visual feedback enhances flexibility and originality, in addition to

  16. Head and Tibial Acceleration as a Function of Stride Frequency and Visual Feedback during Running.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Busa

    Full Text Available Individuals regulate the transmission of shock to the head during running at different stride frequencies although the consequences of this on head-gaze stability remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine if providing individuals with visual feedback of their head-gaze orientation impacts tibial and head accelerations, shock attenuation and head-gaze motion during preferred speed running at different stride frequencies. Fifteen strides from twelve recreational runners running on a treadmill at their preferred speed were collected during five stride frequencies (preferred, ±10% and ±20% of preferred in two visual task conditions (with and without real-time visual feedback of head-gaze orientation. The main outcome measures were tibial and head peak accelerations assessed in the time and frequency domains, shock attenuation from tibia to head, and the magnitude and velocity of head-gaze motion. Decreasing stride frequency resulted in greater vertical accelerations of the tibia (p<0.01 during early stance and at the head (p<0.01 during early and late stance; however, for the impact portion the increase in head acceleration was only observed for the slowest stride frequency condition. Visual feedback resulted in reduced head acceleration magnitude (p<0.01 and integrated power spectral density in the frequency domain (p<0.01 in late stance, as well as overall of head-gaze motion (p<0.01. When running at preferred speed individuals were able to stabilize head acceleration within a wide range of stride frequencies; only at a stride frequency 20% below preferred did head acceleration increase. Furthermore, impact accelerations of the head and tibia appear to be solely a function of stride frequency as no differences were observed between feedback conditions. Increased visual task demands through head gaze feedback resulted in reductions in head accelerations in the active portion of stance and increased head-gaze stability.

  17. Use of visual CO2 feedback as a retrofit solution for improving classroom air quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wargocki, Pawel; Da Silva, Nuno Alexandre Faria

    2015-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors that provide a visual indication were installed in classrooms during normal school operation. During 2-week periods, teachers and students were instructed to open the windows in response to the visual CO2 feedback in 1week and open them, as they would normally do...... and the other pair with no cooling. Classrooms were matched by grade. Providing visual CO2 feedback reduced CO2 levels, as more windows were opened in this condition. This increased energy use for heating and reduced the cooling requirement in summertime. Split cooling reduced the frequency of window opening...... only when no visual CO2 feedback was present....

  18. Real-Time Knee Adduction Moment Feedback for Gait Retraining Through Visual and Tactile Displays

    KAUST Repository

    Wheeler, Jason W.

    2011-01-01

    The external knee adduction moment (KAM) measured during gait is an indicator of tibiofemoral joint osteoarthritis progression and various strategies have been proposed to lower it. Gait retraining has been shown to be an effective, noninvasive approach for lowering the KAM. We present a new gait retraining approach in which the KAM is fed back to subjects in real-time during ambulation. A study was conducted in which 16 healthy subjects learned to alter gait patterns to lower the KAM through visual or tactile (vibration) feedback. Participants converged on a comfortable gait in just a few minutes by using the feedback to iterate on various kinematic modifications. All subjects adopted altered gait patterns with lower KAM compared with normal ambulation (average reduction of 20.7%). Tactile and visual feedbacks were equally effective for real-time training, although subjects using tactile feedback took longer to converge on an acceptable gait. This study shows that real-time feedback of the KAM can greatly increase the effectiveness and efficiency of subject-specific gait retraining compared with conventional methods. © 2011 American Society of Mechanical Engineers.

  19. Automated numerical simulation of biological pattern formation based on visual feedback simulation framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingzhu; Xu, Hui; Zeng, Xingjuan; Zhao, Xin

    2017-01-01

    There are various fantastic biological phenomena in biological pattern formation. Mathematical modeling using reaction-diffusion partial differential equation systems is employed to study the mechanism of pattern formation. However, model parameter selection is both difficult and time consuming. In this paper, a visual feedback simulation framework is proposed to calculate the parameters of a mathematical model automatically based on the basic principle of feedback control. In the simulation framework, the simulation results are visualized, and the image features are extracted as the system feedback. Then, the unknown model parameters are obtained by comparing the image features of the simulation image and the target biological pattern. Considering two typical applications, the visual feedback simulation framework is applied to fulfill pattern formation simulations for vascular mesenchymal cells and lung development. In the simulation framework, the spot, stripe, labyrinthine patterns of vascular mesenchymal cells, the normal branching pattern and the branching pattern lacking side branching for lung branching are obtained in a finite number of iterations. The simulation results indicate that it is easy to achieve the simulation targets, especially when the simulation patterns are sensitive to the model parameters. Moreover, this simulation framework can expand to other types of biological pattern formation. PMID:28225811

  20. Attainment and retention of force moderation following laparoscopic resection training with visual force feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, Rafael; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Travascio, Francesco; Asfour, Shihab

    2017-11-01

    Laparoscopic training with visual force feedback can lead to immediate improvements in force moderation. However, the long-term retention of this kind of learning and its potential decay are yet unclear. A laparoscopic resection task and force sensing apparatus were designed to assess the benefits of visual force feedback training. Twenty-two male university students with no previous experience in laparoscopy underwent relevant FLS proficiency training. Participants were randomly assigned to either a control or treatment group. Both groups trained on the task for 2 weeks as follows: initial baseline, sixteen training trials, and post-test immediately after. The treatment group had visual force feedback during training, whereas the control group did not. Participants then performed four weekly test trials to assess long-term retention of training. Outcomes recorded were maximum pulling and pushing forces, completion time, and rated task difficulty. Extreme maximum pulling force values were tapered throughout both the training and retention periods. Average maximum pushing forces were significantly lowered towards the end of training and during retention period. No significant decay of applied force learning was found during the 4-week retention period. Completion time and rated task difficulty were higher during training, but results indicate that the difference eventually fades during the retention period. Significant differences in aptitude across participants were found. Visual force feedback training improves on certain aspects of force moderation in a laparoscopic resection task. Results suggest that with enough training there is no significant decay of learning within the first month of the retention period. It is essential to account for differences in aptitude between individuals in this type of longitudinal research. This study shows how an inexpensive force measuring system can be used with an FLS Trainer System after some retrofitting. Surgical

  1. Subtle changes in the landmark panorama disrupt visual navigation in a nocturnal bull ant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narendra, Ajay; Ramirez-Esquivel, Fiorella

    2017-04-05

    The ability of ants to navigate when the visual landmark information is altered has often been tested by creating large and artificial discrepancies in their visual environment. Here, we had an opportunity to slightly modify the natural visual environment around the nest of the nocturnal bull ant Myrmecia pyriformis We achieved this by felling three dead trees, two located along the typical route followed by the foragers of that particular nest and one in a direction perpendicular to their foraging direction. An image difference analysis showed that the change in the overall panorama following the removal of these trees was relatively little. We filmed the behaviour of ants close to the nest and tracked their entire paths, both before and after the trees were removed. We found that immediately after the trees were removed, ants walked slower and were less directed. Their foraging success decreased and they looked around more, including turning back to look towards the nest. We document how their behaviour changed over subsequent nights and discuss how the ants may detect and respond to a modified visual environment in the evening twilight period.This article is part of the themed issue 'Vision in dim light'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  2. Visual feedback alters force control and functional activity in the visuomotor network after stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek B. Archer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Modulating visual feedback may be a viable option to improve motor function after stroke, but the neurophysiological basis for this improvement is not clear. Visual gain can be manipulated by increasing or decreasing the spatial amplitude of an error signal. Here, we combined a unilateral visually guided grip force task with functional MRI to understand how changes in the gain of visual feedback alter brain activity in the chronic phase after stroke. Analyses focused on brain activation when force was produced by the most impaired hand of the stroke group as compared to the non-dominant hand of the control group. Our experiment produced three novel results. First, gain-related improvements in force control were associated with an increase in activity in many regions within the visuomotor network in both the stroke and control groups. These regions include the extrastriate visual cortex, inferior parietal lobule, ventral premotor cortex, cerebellum, and supplementary motor area. Second, the stroke group showed gain-related increases in activity in additional regions of lobules VI and VIIb of the ipsilateral cerebellum. Third, relative to the control group, the stroke group showed increased activity in the ipsilateral primary motor cortex, and activity in this region did not vary as a function of visual feedback gain. The visuomotor network, cerebellum, and ipsilateral primary motor cortex have each been targeted in rehabilitation interventions after stroke. Our observations provide new insight into the role these regions play in processing visual gain during a precisely controlled visuomotor task in the chronic phase after stroke.

  3. A dual visual-local feedback model of the vergence eye movement system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erkelens, Casper J

    2011-09-27

    Pure vergence movements are the eye movements that we make when we change our binocular fixation between targets differing in distance but not in direction relative to the head. Pure vergence is slow and controlled by visual feedback. Saccades are the rapid eye movements that we make between targets differing in direction. Saccades are extremely fast and controlled by a local, non-visual feedback loop. Usually, we change our fixation between targets that differ in both distance and direction. Then, vergence eye movements are combined with saccades. A number of models have been proposed to explain the dynamics of saccade-related vergence movements. The models have in common that visual input is ignored for the duration of the responses. This type of control is realistic for saccades but not for vergence. Here, I present computations performed to investigate if a model using dual visual and local feedback can replace the current models. Simulations and stability analysis lead to a model that computes an estimate of target vergence instead of retinal disparity and uses this signal as the main drive. Further analysis shows that the model describes the dynamics of pure vergence responses over the full physiological range, saccade-related vergence movements, and vergence adaptation. The structure of the model leads to new hypotheses about the control of vergence.

  4. Mobile in vivo camera robots provide sole visual feedback for abdominal exploration and cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentschler, M E; Dumpert, J; Platt, S R; Ahmed, S I; Farritor, S M; Oleynikov, D

    2006-01-01

    The use of small incisions in laparoscopy reduces patient trauma, but also limits the surgeon's ability to view and touch the surgical environment directly. These limitations generally restrict the application of laparoscopy to procedures less complex than those performed during open surgery. Although current robot-assisted laparoscopy improves the surgeon's ability to manipulate and visualize the target organs, the instruments and cameras remain fundamentally constrained by the entry incisions. This limits tool tip orientation and optimal camera placement. The current work focuses on developing a new miniature mobile in vivo adjustable-focus camera robot to provide sole visual feedback to surgeons during laparoscopic surgery. A miniature mobile camera robot was inserted through a trocar into the insufflated abdominal cavity of an anesthetized pig. The mobile robot allowed the surgeon to explore the abdominal cavity remotely and view trocar and tool insertion and placement without entry incision constraints. The surgeon then performed a cholecystectomy using the robot camera alone for visual feedback. This successful trial has demonstrated that miniature in vivo mobile robots can provide surgeons with sufficient visual feedback to perform common procedures while reducing patient trauma.

  5. Advanced age brings a greater reliance on visual feedback to maintain balance during walking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Jason R; Francis, Carrie A; Allen, Matthew S; O'Connor, Shawn M; Thelen, Darryl G

    2015-04-01

    We implemented a virtual reality system to quantify differences in the use of visual feedback to maintain balance during walking between healthy young (n=12, mean age: 24 years) and healthy old (n=11, 71 years) adults. Subjects walked on a treadmill while watching a speed-matched, virtual hallway with and without mediolateral visual perturbations. A motion capture system tracked center of mass (CoM) motion and foot kinematics. Spectral analysis, detrended fluctuation analysis, and local divergence exponents quantified old and young adults' dynamic response to visual perturbations. Old and young adults walked normally with comparable CoM spectral characteristics, lateral step placement temporal persistence, and local divergence exponents. Perturbed visual flow induced significantly larger changes in mediolateral CoM motion in old vs. young adults. Moreover, visual perturbations disrupted the control of lateral step placement and compromised local dynamic stability more significantly in old than young adults. Advanced age induces a greater reliance on visual feedback to maintain balance during waking, an effect that may compensate for degradations in somatosensation. Our findings are relevant to the early diagnosis of sensory-induced balance impairments and also point to the potential use of virtual reality to evaluate sensory rehabilitation and balance training programs for old adults. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of visual feedback-induced variability on motor learning of handrim wheelchair propulsion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika T Leving

    Full Text Available It has been suggested that a higher intra-individual variability benefits the motor learning of wheelchair propulsion. The present study evaluated whether feedback-induced variability on wheelchair propulsion technique variables would also enhance the motor learning process. Learning was operationalized as an improvement in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique, which are thought to be closely related during the learning process.17 Participants received visual feedback-based practice (feedback group and 15 participants received regular practice (natural learning group. Both groups received equal practice dose of 80 min, over 3 weeks, at 0.24 W/kg at a treadmill speed of 1.11 m/s. To compare both groups the pre- and post-test were performed without feedback. The feedback group received real-time visual feedback on seven propulsion variables with instruction to manipulate the presented variable to achieve the highest possible variability (1st 4-min block and optimize it in the prescribed direction (2nd 4-min block. To increase motor exploration the participants were unaware of the exact variable they received feedback on. Energy consumption and the propulsion technique variables with their respective coefficient of variation were calculated to evaluate the amount of intra-individual variability.The feedback group, which practiced with higher intra-individual variability, improved the propulsion technique between pre- and post-test to the same extent as the natural learning group. Mechanical efficiency improved between pre- and post-test in the natural learning group but remained unchanged in the feedback group.These results suggest that feedback-induced variability inhibited the improvement in mechanical efficiency. Moreover, since both groups improved propulsion technique but only the natural learning group improved mechanical efficiency, it can be concluded that the improvement in mechanical efficiency and propulsion technique do not

  7. Influence of visual clutter on the effect of navigated safety inspection: a case study on elevator installation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Pin-Chao; Sun, Xinlu; Liu, Mei; Shih, Yu-Nien

    2018-01-11

    Navigated safety inspection based on task-specific checklists can increase the hazard detection rate, theoretically with interference from scene complexity. Visual clutter, a proxy of scene complexity, can theoretically impair visual search performance, but its impact on the effect of safety inspection performance remains to be explored for the optimization of navigated inspection. This research aims to explore whether the relationship between working memory and hazard detection rate is moderated by visual clutter. Based on a perceptive model of hazard detection, we: (a) developed a mathematical influence model for construction hazard detection; (b) designed an experiment to observe the performance of hazard detection rate with adjusted working memory under different levels of visual clutter, while using an eye-tracking device to observe participants' visual search processes; (c) utilized logistic regression to analyze the developed model under various visual clutter. The effect of a strengthened working memory on the detection rate through increased search efficiency is more apparent in high visual clutter. This study confirms the role of visual clutter in construction-navigated inspections, thus serving as a foundation for the optimization of inspection planning.

  8. Real-time feedback on nonverbal clinical communication. Theoretical framework and clinician acceptance of ambient visual design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartzler, A L; Patel, R A; Czerwinski, M; Pratt, W; Roseway, A; Chandrasekaran, N; Back, A

    2014-01-01

    This article is part of the focus theme of Methods of Information in Medicine on "Pervasive Intelligent Technologies for Health". Effective nonverbal communication between patients and clinicians fosters both the delivery of empathic patient-centered care and positive patient outcomes. Although nonverbal skill training is a recognized need, few efforts to enhance patient-clinician communication provide visual feedback on nonverbal aspects of the clinical encounter. We describe a novel approach that uses social signal processing technology (SSP) to capture nonverbal cues in real time and to display ambient visual feedback on control and affiliation--two primary, yet distinct dimensions of interpersonal nonverbal communication. To examine the design and clinician acceptance of ambient visual feedback on nonverbal communication, we 1) formulated a model of relational communication to ground SSP and 2) conducted a formative user study using mixed methods to explore the design of visual feedback. Based on a model of relational communication, we reviewed interpersonal communication research to map nonverbal cues to signals of affiliation and control evidenced in patient-clinician interaction. Corresponding with our formulation of this theoretical framework, we designed ambient real-time visualizations that reflect variations of affiliation and control. To explore clinicians' acceptance of this visual feedback, we conducted a lab study using the Wizard-of-Oz technique to simulate system use with 16 healthcare professionals. We followed up with seven of those participants through interviews to iterate on the design with a revised visualization that addressed emergent design considerations. Ambient visual feedback on non- verbal communication provides a theoretically grounded and acceptable way to provide clinicians with awareness of their nonverbal communication style. We provide implications for the design of such visual feedback that encourages empathic patient

  9. Thoracic ROM measurement system with visual bio-feedback: system design and biofeedback evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Takeshi; Kawamura, Kazuya; Fujitani, Junko; Koike, Tomokazu; Fujimoto, Masashi; Fujie, Masakatsu G

    2011-01-01

    Patients with diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) need to improve their thorax mobility. Thoracic ROM is one of the simplest and most useful indexes to evaluate the respiratory function. In this paper, we have proposed the prototype of a simple thoracic ROM measurement system with real-time visual bio-feedback in the chest expansion test. In this system, the thoracic ROM is measured using a wire-type linear encoder whose wire is wrapped around the thorax. In this paper, firstly, the repeatability and reliability of measured thoracic ROM was confirmed as a first report of the developed prototype. Secondly, we analyzed the effect of the bio-feedback system on the respiratory function. The result of the experiment showed that it was easier to maintain a large and stable thoracic ROM during deep breathing by using the real-time visual biofeedback system of the thoracic ROM.

  10. High-speed visual feedback for realizing high-performance robotic manipulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.; Bergström, N.; Yamakawa, Y.; Senoo, T.; Ishikawa, M.

    2017-02-01

    High-speed vision sensing becomes a driving factor in developing new methods for robotic manipulation. In this paper we present two such methods in order to realize high-performance manipulation. First, we present a dynamic compensation approach which aims to achieve simultaneously fast and accurate positioning under various (from system to external environment) uncertainties. Second, a high-speed motion strategy for manipulating flexible objects is introduced to address the issue of deformation uncertainties. Both methods rely on high-speed visual feedback and are model independent, which we believe is essential to ensure good flexibility in a wide range of applications. The high-speed visual feedback tracks the relative error between the working tool and the target in image coordinates, which implies that there is no need for accurate calibrations of the vision system. Tasks for validating these methods were implemented and experimental results were provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed methods.

  11. Experimental System for Investigation of Visual Sensory Input in Postural Feedback Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jozef Pucik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The human postural control system represents a biological feedback system responsible for maintenance of upright stance. Vestibular, proprioceptive and visual sensory inputs provide the most important information into the control system, which controls body centre of mass (COM in order to stabilize the human body resembling an inverted pendulum. The COM can be measured indirectly by means of a force plate as the centre of pressure (COP. Clinically used measurement method is referred to as posturography. In this paper, the conventional static posturography is extended by visual stimulation, which provides insight into a role of visual information in balance control. Visual stimuli have been designed to induce body sway in four specific directions – forward, backward, left and right. Stabilograms were measured using proposed single-PC based system and processed to calculate velocity waveforms and posturographic parameters. The parameters extracted from pre-stimulus and on-stimulus periods exhibit statistically significant differences.

  12. Assisting the visually impaired: obstacle detection and warning system by acoustic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Alberto; Yebes, J Javier; Alcantarilla, Pablo F; Bergasa, Luis M; Almazán, Javier; Cela, Andrés

    2012-12-17

    The aim of this article is focused on the design of an obstacle detection system for assisting visually impaired people. A dense disparity map is computed from the images of a stereo camera carried by the user. By using the dense disparity map, potential obstacles can be detected in 3D in indoor and outdoor scenarios. A ground plane estimation algorithm based on RANSAC plus filtering techniques allows the robust detection of the ground in every frame. A polar grid representation is proposed to account for the potential obstacles in the scene. The design is completed with acoustic feedback to assist visually impaired users while approaching obstacles. Beep sounds with different frequencies and repetitions inform the user about the presence of obstacles. Audio bone conducting technology is employed to play these sounds without interrupting the visually impaired user from hearing other important sounds from its local environment. A user study participated by four visually impaired volunteers supports the proposed system.

  13. Assisting the Visually Impaired: Obstacle Detection and Warning System by Acoustic Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Cela

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is focused on the design of an obstacle detection system for assisting visually impaired people. A dense disparity map is computed from the images of a stereo camera carried by the user. By using the dense disparity map, potential obstacles can be detected in 3D in indoor and outdoor scenarios. A ground plane estimation algorithm based on RANSAC plus filtering techniques allows the robust detection of the ground in every frame. A polar grid representation is proposed to account for the potential obstacles in the scene. The design is completed with acoustic feedback to assist visually impaired users while approaching obstacles. Beep sounds with different frequencies and repetitions inform the user about the presence of obstacles. Audio bone conducting technology is employed to play these sounds without interrupting the visually impaired user from hearing other important sounds from its local environment. A user study participated by four visually impaired volunteers supports the proposed system.

  14. State-feedback stabilisation for stochastic non-holonomic mobile robots with uncertain visual servoing parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongkai; Wang, Chaoli; Wei, Guoliang; Zhang, Hengjun; Chen, Hua

    2014-07-01

    The stabilising problem of stochastic non-holonomic mobile robots with uncertain parameters based on visual servoing is addressed in this paper. The model of non-holonomic mobile robots based on visual servoing is extended to the stochastic case, where their forward velocity and angular velocity are both subject to some stochastic disturbances. Based on backstepping technique, state-feedback stabilising controllers are designed for stochastic non-holonomic mobile robots. A switching control strategy for the original system is presented. The proposed controllers guarantee that the closed-loop system is asymptotically stabilised at the zero equilibrium point in probability.

  15. D Web Visualization of Environmental Information - Integration of Heterogeneous Data Sources when Providing Navigation and Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, L.; Řezník, T.

    2015-08-01

    3D information is essential for a number of applications used daily in various domains such as crisis management, energy management, urban planning, and cultural heritage, as well as pollution and noise mapping, etc. This paper is devoted to the issue of 3D modelling from the levels of buildings to cities. The theoretical sections comprise an analysis of cartographic principles for the 3D visualization of spatial data as well as a review of technologies and data formats used in the visualization of 3D models. Emphasis was placed on the verification of available web technologies; for example, X3DOM library was chosen for the implementation of a proof-of-concept web application. The created web application displays a 3D model of the city district of Nový Lískovec in Brno, the Czech Republic. The developed 3D visualization shows a terrain model, 3D buildings, noise pollution, and other related information. Attention was paid to the areas important for handling heterogeneous input data, the design of interactive functionality, and navigation assistants. The advantages, limitations, and future development of the proposed concept are discussed in the conclusions.

  16. A Study of Visual Descriptors for Outdoor Navigation Using Google Street View Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Fernández

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative analysis between several methods to describe outdoor panoramic images is presented. The main objective consists in studying the performance of these methods in the localization process of a mobile robot (vehicle in an outdoor environment, when a visual map that contains images acquired from different positions of the environment is available. With this aim, we make use of the database provided by Google Street View, which contains spherical panoramic images captured in urban environments and their GPS position. The main benefit of using these images resides in the fact that it permits testing any novel localization algorithm in countless outdoor environments anywhere in the world and under realistic capture conditions. The main contribution of this work consists in performing a comparative evaluation of different methods to describe images to solve the localization problem in an outdoor dense map using only visual information. We have tested our algorithms using several sets of panoramic images captured in different outdoor environments. The results obtained in the work can be useful to select an appropriate description method for visual navigation tasks in outdoor environments using the Google Street View database and taking into consideration both the accuracy in localization and the computational efficiency of the algorithm.

  17. DEEP-SEE: Joint Object Detection, Tracking and Recognition with Application to Visually Impaired Navigational Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Tapu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the so-called DEEP-SEE framework that jointly exploits computer vision algorithms and deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs to detect, track and recognize in real time objects encountered during navigation in the outdoor environment. A first feature concerns an object detection technique designed to localize both static and dynamic objects without any a priori knowledge about their position, type or shape. The methodological core of the proposed approach relies on a novel object tracking method based on two convolutional neural networks trained offline. The key principle consists of alternating between tracking using motion information and predicting the object location in time based on visual similarity. The validation of the tracking technique is performed on standard benchmark VOT datasets, and shows that the proposed approach returns state-of-the-art results while minimizing the computational complexity. Then, the DEEP-SEE framework is integrated into a novel assistive device, designed to improve cognition of VI people and to increase their safety when navigating in crowded urban scenes. The validation of our assistive device is performed on a video dataset with 30 elements acquired with the help of VI users. The proposed system shows high accuracy (>90% and robustness (>90% scores regardless on the scene dynamics.

  18. A hierarchical model of goal directed navigation selects trajectories in a visual environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdem, Uğur M; Milford, Michael J; Hasselmo, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a Hierarchical Look-Ahead Trajectory Model (HiLAM) that incorporates the firing pattern of medial entorhinal grid cells in a planning circuit that includes interactions with hippocampus and prefrontal cortex. We show the model's flexibility in representing large real world environments using odometry information obtained from challenging video sequences. We acquire the visual data from a camera mounted on a small tele-operated vehicle. The camera has a panoramic field of view with its focal point approximately 5 cm above the ground level, similar to what would be expected from a rat's point of view. Using established algorithms for calculating perceptual speed from the apparent rate of visual change over time, we generate raw dead reckoning information which loses spatial fidelity over time due to error accumulation. We rectify the loss of fidelity by exploiting the loop-closure detection ability of a biologically inspired, robot navigation model termed RatSLAM. The rectified motion information serves as a velocity input to the HiLAM to encode the environment in the form of grid cell and place cell maps. Finally, we show goal directed path planning results of HiLAM in two different environments, an indoor square maze used in rodent experiments and an outdoor arena more than two orders of magnitude larger than the indoor maze. Together these results bridge for the first time the gap between higher fidelity bio-inspired navigation models (HiLAM) and more abstracted but highly functional bio-inspired robotic mapping systems (RatSLAM), and move from simulated environments into real-world studies in rodent-sized arenas and beyond. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Feature-saliency and feedback-information interactively impact visual category learning

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    Rubi eHammer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual category learning (VCL involves detecting which features are most relevant for categorization. This requires attentional learning, which allows effectively redirecting attention to object’s features most relevant for categorization while also filtering out irrelevant features. When features relevant for categorization are not salient VCL relies also on perceptual learning, which enable becoming more sensitive to subtle yet important differences between objects. Little is known about how attentional learning and perceptual learning interact when VCL relies on both processes at the same time. Here we tested this interaction. Participants performed VCL tasks that varied in feature-saliency (low-saliency tasks that required perceptual learning vs. high-saliency tasks, and in feedback-information (tasks with mid-information, moderately ambiguous feedback that increased attentional load vs. tasks with high-information non-ambiguous feedback. Participants were required learning to categorize novel stimuli by detecting the feature-dimension relevant for categorization. We found that mid-information and high-information feedback were similarly effective for VCL in high-saliency tasks. This suggests that an increased attentional load associated with the processing of moderately ambiguous feedback does not compromise VCL when both the task relevant feature and irrelevant features are salient. In low-saliency VCL tasks performance improvement relied on slower perceptual learning, but when the feedback was highly-informative participants were ultimately capable reaching performances matching those observed in high-saliency VCL tasks. However, VCL was much compromised when features were with low-saliency and the feedback was ambiguous. We suggest that this later learning scenario is characterized by a ‘cognitive loop paradox’ where two interdependent learning processes have to take place simultaneously.

  20. How do field of view and resolution affect the information content of panoramic scenes for visual navigation? A computational investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wystrach, Antoine; Dewar, Alex; Philippides, Andrew; Graham, Paul

    2016-02-01

    The visual systems of animals have to provide information to guide behaviour and the informational requirements of an animal's behavioural repertoire are often reflected in its sensory system. For insects, this is often evident in the optical array of the compound eye. One behaviour that insects share with many animals is the use of learnt visual information for navigation. As ants are expert visual navigators it may be that their vision is optimised for navigation. Here we take a computational approach in asking how the details of the optical array influence the informational content of scenes used in simple view matching strategies for orientation. We find that robust orientation is best achieved with low-resolution visual information and a large field of view, similar to the optical properties seen for many ant species. A lower resolution allows for a trade-off between specificity and generalisation for stored views. Additionally, our simulations show that orientation performance increases if different portions of the visual field are considered as discrete visual sensors, each giving an independent directional estimate. This suggests that ants might benefit by processing information from their two eyes independently.

  1. The Effects of Visual Feedback on CPR Skill Retention in Graduate Student Athletic Trainers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G. Miller

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Context: Studies examining the effectiveness of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR chest compressions have found compression depth and rate to be less than optimal and recoil to full release to be incomplete. Objective: To determine if visual feedback affects the rate and depth of chest compressions and chest recoil values during CPR training of athletic trainers and to determine retention of proficiency over time. Design: Pre-test, post-test. Setting: Medical simulation laboratory. Participants: Eleven females and one male (23.08+.51 years old, from an Athletic Training Graduate Program. All participants were Certified Athletic Trainers (1.12+.46 years of experience and certified in CPR for the Professional Rescuer. Interventions: Participants completed a pre-test, practice sessions, and a post-test on a SimMan® (Laerdal Medical manikin with visual feedback of skills in real time. After the pre-test, participants received feedback by the investigators. Participants completed practice sessions as needed (range=1-4 sessions, until they reached 100% skill proficiency. After achieving proficiency, participants returned 8 weeks later to perform the CPR skills. Main Outcome Measures: The average of all compression outcome measures (rate, depth, recoil was captured every 10 seconds (6x per min. All participants performed 5 cycles of 30 compressions. A two-tailed paired samples t-test (pre to post was used to compare rate of chest compressions, depth of chest compressions, and recoil of the chest. Significance was set a priori at pResults: There was a significant difference between pre and post-test compression depth average, p=.002. The pre-depth average was 41mm + 9.83mm compared to the post-depth average of 52.26mm + 5mm. There were no significant differences between pre and post-test chest compression rates and recoil. Conclusions: The use of a simulated manikin with visual feedback facilitated participants to reach the recommended compression

  2. Inferring online and offline processing of visual feedback in target-directed movements from kinematic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Michael A; Franks, Ian M; Elliott, Digby; Lawrence, Gavin P; Chua, Romeo; Bernier, Pierre-Michel; Hansen, Steve; Weeks, Daniel J

    2006-01-01

    Vision plays an important role in the planning and execution of target-directed aiming movements. In this review, we highlight the limitations that exist in detecting visual regulation of limb trajectories from traditional kinematic analyses such as the identification of discontinuities in velocity and acceleration. Alternative kinematic analyses that involve examining variability in limb trajectories to infer visual control processes are evaluated. The basic assumption underlying these methods is that noise exists in the neuromotor system that subsequently leads to variability in motor output. This leads to systematic relations in limb trajectory variability at different stages of the movement that are altered when trajectories are modified during movement execution. Hence, by examining the variability in limb trajectories and correlations of kinematic variables throughout movement for vision and no vision conditions, the contribution of visual feedback in the planning and control of movement can be determined.

  3. Visual navigation in starfish: first evidence for the use of vision and eyes in starfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garm, Anders; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2014-02-22

    Most known starfish species possess a compound eye at the tip of each arm, which, except for the lack of true optics, resembles an arthropod compound eye. Although these compound eyes have been known for about two centuries, no visually guided behaviour has ever been directly associated with their presence. There are indications that they are involved in negative phototaxis but this may also be governed by extraocular photoreceptors. Here, we show that the eyes of the coral-reef-associated starfish Linckia laevigata are slow and colour blind. The eyes are capable of true image formation although with low spatial resolution. Further, our behavioural experiments reveal that only specimens with intact eyes can navigate back to their reef habitat when displaced, demonstrating that this is a visually guided behaviour. This is, to our knowledge, the first report of a function of starfish compound eyes. We also show that the spectral sensitivity optimizes the contrast between the reef and the open ocean. Our results provide an example of an eye supporting only low-resolution vision, which is believed to be an essential stage in eye evolution, preceding the high-resolution vision required for detecting prey, predators and conspecifics.

  4. Effect of Training Japanese L1 Speakers in the Production of American English /r/ Using Spectrographic Visual Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patten, Iomi; Edmonds, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examines the effects of training native Japanese speakers in the production of American /r/ using spectrographic visual feedback. Within a modified single-subject design, two native Japanese participants produced single words containing /r/ in a variety of positions while viewing live spectrographic feedback with the aim of…

  5. Generalization and Maintenance of Social Skills of Children with Visual Impairments: Self-Evaluation and the Role of Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal-Snape, Divya

    2004-01-01

    A multiple baseline design across behaviors was used with two visually impaired girls to establish the effectiveness of self-evaluation and the role of feedback. In both cases, self-evaluation was effective in increasing the girls' social skills and social interaction. Implications of the role of significant others in providing feedback are…

  6. A new visual navigation system for exploring biomedical Open Educational Resource (OER) videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Baoquan; Xu, Songhua; Lin, Shujin; Luo, Xiaonan; Duan, Lian

    2016-04-01

    Biomedical videos as open educational resources (OERs) are increasingly proliferating on the Internet. Unfortunately, seeking personally valuable content from among the vast corpus of quality yet diverse OER videos is nontrivial due to limitations of today's keyword- and content-based video retrieval techniques. To address this need, this study introduces a novel visual navigation system that facilitates users' information seeking from biomedical OER videos in mass quantity by interactively offering visual and textual navigational clues that are both semantically revealing and user-friendly. The authors collected and processed around 25 000 YouTube videos, which collectively last for a total length of about 4000 h, in the broad field of biomedical sciences for our experiment. For each video, its semantic clues are first extracted automatically through computationally analyzing audio and visual signals, as well as text either accompanying or embedded in the video. These extracted clues are subsequently stored in a metadata database and indexed by a high-performance text search engine. During the online retrieval stage, the system renders video search results as dynamic web pages using a JavaScript library that allows users to interactively and intuitively explore video content both efficiently and effectively.ResultsThe authors produced a prototype implementation of the proposed system, which is publicly accessible athttps://patentq.njit.edu/oer To examine the overall advantage of the proposed system for exploring biomedical OER videos, the authors further conducted a user study of a modest scale. The study results encouragingly demonstrate the functional effectiveness and user-friendliness of the new system for facilitating information seeking from and content exploration among massive biomedical OER videos. Using the proposed tool, users can efficiently and effectively find videos of interest, precisely locate video segments delivering personally valuable

  7. Sensorimotor control of gait: A novel approach for the study of the interplay of visual and proprioceptive feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan eFrost

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Sensorimotor control theories propose that the central nervous system exploits expected sensory consequences generated by motor commands for movement planning, as well as online sensory feedback for comparison with expected sensory feedback for monitoring and correcting, if needed, ongoing motor output. In our study, we tested this theoretical framework by quantifying the functional role of expected versus actual proprioceptive feedback for planning and regulation of gait in humans. We addressed this question by using a novel methodological approach to deliver fast perturbations of the walking surface stiffness, in conjunction with a virtual reality system that provided visual feedback of upcoming changes of surface stiffness. In the predictable experimental condition, we asked subjects to learn associating visual feedback of changes in floor stiffness (sand patch during locomotion to quantify kinematic and kinetic changes in gait. In the unpredictable experimental condition, we perturbed floor stiffness at unpredictable instances during the gait to characterize the gait-phase dependent strategies in recovering the locomotor cycle. For the unpredictable conditions, visual feedback of changes in floor stiffness was absent or inconsistent with tactile and proprioceptive feedback. The investigation of these perturbation-induced effects on legs kinematics revealed that visual feedback of upcoming changes in floor stiffness allows for both early (preparatory and late (post-perturbation changes in leg kinematics. However, when proprioceptive feedback is not available, the early responses do not occur while the late responses are preserved although in a, slightly attenuated form. The methods proposed and the preliminary results of this study open new directions for the investigation of the relative role of visual, tactile, and proprioceptive feedback on gait control, with potential implications for designing novel robot-assisted gait rehabilitation

  8. Alpha-beta and gamma rhythms subserve feedback and feedforward influences among human visual cortical areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalareas, Georgios; Vezoli, Julien; van Pelt, Stan; Schoffelen, Jan-Mathijs; Kennedy, Henry; Fries, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Primate visual cortex is hierarchically organized. Bottom-up and top-down influences are exerted through distinct frequency channels, as was recently revealed in macaques by correlating inter-areal influences with laminar anatomical projection patterns. Because this anatomical data cannot be obtained in human subjects, we selected seven homologous macaque and human visual areas, and correlated the macaque laminar projection patterns to human inter-areal directed influences as measured with magnetoencephalography. We show that influences along feedforward projections predominate in the gamma band, whereas influences along feedback projections predominate in the alpha-beta band. Rhythmic inter-areal influences constrain a functional hierarchy of the seven homologous human visual areas that is in close agreement with the respective macaque anatomical hierarchy. Rhythmic influences allow an extension of the hierarchy to 26 human visual areas including uniquely human brain areas. Hierarchical levels of ventral and dorsal stream visual areas are differentially affected by inter-areal influences in the alpha-beta band. PMID:26777277

  9. Effects of loss of visual feedback on performance of two swimming strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicciarella, C F

    1982-12-01

    20 subjects, aged 11 to 21 yr., skilled in competitive swimming in both the crawl and the breaststroke, performed a total of 8 timed swimming trials of 25 yd. in both strokes both with and without blindfolds to test the hypothesis that the loss in performance which would occur with loss of visual feedback is related to the complexity of the motor skill being performed. After correction for differences in the speed of each stroke, the loss in speed (performance decrement) in the more complex stroke (crawl) was significantly greater than the decrement in the less complex (breast) stroke.

  10. Control Framework for Dexterous Manipulation Using Dynamic Visual Servoing and Tactile Sensors’ Feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Jara

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tactile sensors play an important role in robotics manipulation to perform dexterous and complex tasks. This paper presents a novel control framework to perform dexterous manipulation with multi-fingered robotic hands using feedback data from tactile and visual sensors. This control framework permits the definition of new visual controllers which allow the path tracking of the object motion taking into account both the dynamics model of the robot hand and the grasping force of the fingertips under a hybrid control scheme. In addition, the proposed general method employs optimal control to obtain the desired behaviour in the joint space of the fingers based on an indicated cost function which determines how the control effort is distributed over the joints of the robotic hand. Finally, authors show experimental verifications on a real robotic manipulation system for some of the controllers derived from the control framework.

  11. Visual navigation in desert ants Cataglyphis fortis: are snapshots coupled to a celestial system of reference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akesson, Susanne; Wehner, Rüdiger

    2002-07-01

    Central-place foraging insects such as desert ants of the genus Cataglyphis use both path integration and landmarks to navigate during foraging excursions. The use of landmark information and a celestial system of reference for nest location was investigated by training desert ants returning from an artificial feeder to find the nest at one of four alternative positions located asymmetrically inside a four-cylinder landmark array. The cylindrical landmarks were all of the same size and arranged in a square, with the nest located in the southeast corner. When released from the compass direction experienced during training (southeast), the ants searched most intensely at the fictive nest position. When instead released from any of the three alternative directions of approach (southwest, northwest or northeast), the same individuals instead searched at two of the four alternative positions by initiating their search at the position closest to the direction of approach when entering the landmark square and then returning to the position at which snapshot, current landmark image and celestial reference information were in register. The results show that, in the ants' visual snapshot memory, a memorized landmark scene can temporarily be decoupled from a memorized celestial system of reference.

  12. Effect of visual feedback information on isometric contraction of forearm flexor muscles in men and women after ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbutas, Tomas; Juodžbalienė, Vilma; Skurvydas, Albertas; Krutulytė, Gražina; Rimdeikienė, Inesa; Brazaitis, Marius

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of visual feedback information (VFI) on the isometric contraction of the forearm flexor muscles in men and women after an ischemic stroke when doing a physical load at 20% of strength. The study included healthy subjects (n=20) and subjects after ischemic stroke (n=20). The study was conducted in Lithuanian Sports University. The measurements of maximum voluntary strength (MVS) and accurate isometric contraction were performed using an isokinetic dynamometer Biodex System Pro 3. The absolute errors of isometric contraction of the right arm muscles at 20% of MVS were similar in all the groups during the attempt with visual feedback information. The smallest absolute errors of the healthy subjects were 1.42±0.35 Nm when the task was performed with visual feedback and the greatest absolute errors were 4.69±0.95 Nm (P<0.01) while performing the task without visual feedback. Meanwhile, the smallest and greatest absolute errors of the subjects after ischemic stroke were 1.32±0.45 Nm and 5.05±0.63 Nm, respectively, while performing the task without visual feedback (P<0.01). Maximum voluntary strength was greater in all the groups of men. The absolute errors of isometric contractions of the right and left arm muscles tended to increase in both the men and the women when there was no visual feedback information. The women and the men after an ischemic stroke produced greater absolute errors when performing the task with the right and left arm without visual feedback information than the healthy subjects.

  13. Development of an online radiology case review system featuring interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Kyung; Kim, Boh Kyoung; Jung, Ju Hyun; Kang, Heung Sik; Lee, Kyoung Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Woo, Hyun Soo [Dept. of Radiology, SMG-SNU Boramae Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Jae Min [Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Min Hee [Dept. of Radiology, Soonchunhyang University Bucheon Hospital, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    To develop an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques. Our Institutional Review Board approved the use of the patient data and waived the need for informed consent. We determined the following system requirements: volumetric navigation, accessibility, scalability, undemanding case management, trainee encouragement, and simulation of a busy practice. The system comprised a case registry server, client case review program, and commercially available cloud-based image viewing system. In the pilot test, we used 30 cases of low-dose abdomen computed tomography for the diagnosis of acute appendicitis. In each case, a trainee was required to navigate through the images and submit answers to the case questions. The trainee was then given the correct answers and key images, as well as the image dataset with annotations on the appendix. After evaluation of all cases, the system displayed the diagnostic accuracy and average review time, and the trainee was asked to reassess the failed cases. The pilot system was deployed successfully in a hands-on workshop course. We developed an online radiology case review system that allows interactive navigation of volumetric image datasets using advanced visualization techniques.

  14. Haptically facilitated bimanual training combined with augmented visual feedback in moderate to severe hemiplegia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Amy; Qiu, Qinyin; Fluet, Gerard G.; Adamovich, Sergei V.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the design and feasibility testing of a hand rehabilitation system that provides haptic assistance for hand opening in moderate to severe hemiplegia while subjects attempt to perform bilateral hand movements. A cable-actuated exoskeleton robot assists the subjects in performing impaired finger movements but is controlled by movement of the unimpaired hand. In an attempt to combine the neurophysiological stimuli of bilateral movement and action observation during training, visual feedback of the impaired hand is replaced by feedback of the unimpaired hand, either by using a sagittaly oriented mirror or a virtual reality setup with a pair of virtual hands presented on a flat screen controlled with movement of the unimpaired hand, providing a visual image of their paretic hand moving normally. Joint angles for both hands are measured using data gloves. The system is programmed to maintain a symmetrical relationship between the two hands as they respond to commands to open and close simultaneously. Three persons with moderate to severe hemiplegia secondary to stroke trained with the system for eight, 30 to 60 minute sessions without adverse events. Each demonstrated positive motor adaptations to training. The system was well tolerated by persons with moderate to severe upper extremity hemiplegia. Further testing of its effects on motor ability with a broader range of clinical presentations is indicated. PMID:22254998

  15. Laser 3-D measuring system and real-time visual feedback for teaching and correcting breathing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povšič, Klemen; Fležar, Matjaž; Možina, Janez; Jezeršek, Matija

    2012-03-01

    We present a novel method for real-time 3-D body-shape measurement during breathing based on the laser multiple-line triangulation principle. The laser projector illuminates the measured surface with a pattern of 33 equally inclined light planes. Simultaneously, the camera records the distorted light pattern from a different viewpoint. The acquired images are transferred to a personal computer, where the 3-D surface reconstruction, shape analysis, and display are performed in real time. The measured surface displacements are displayed with a color palette, which enables visual feedback to the patient while breathing is being taught. The measuring range is approximately 400×600×500 mm in width, height, and depth, respectively, and the accuracy of the calibrated apparatus is +/-0.7 mm. The system was evaluated by means of its capability to distinguish between different breathing patterns. The accuracy of the measured volumes of chest-wall deformation during breathing was verified using standard methods of volume measurements. The results show that the presented 3-D measuring system with visual feedback has great potential as a diagnostic and training assistance tool when monitoring and evaluating the breathing pattern, because it offers a simple and effective method of graphical communication with the patient.

  16. From objects to landmarks: the function of visual location information in spatial navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Edgar eChan; Oliver eBaumann; Mark A. Bellgrove; Mattingley, Jason B

    2012-01-01

    Landmarks play an important role in guiding navigational behavior. A host of studies in the last 15 years has demonstrated that environmental objects can act as landmarks for navigation in different ways. In this review, we propose a parsimonious four-part taxonomy for conceptualizing object location information during navigation. We begin by outlining object properties that appear to be important for a landmark to attain salience. We then systematically examine the different functions of obj...

  17. Eye-Hand Coordination during Visuomotor Adaptation with Different Rotation Angles: Effects of Terminal Visual Feedback.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miya K Rand

    Full Text Available This study examined adaptive changes of eye-hand coordination during a visuomotor rotation task under the use of terminal visual feedback. Young adults made reaching movements to targets on a digitizer while looking at targets on a monitor where the rotated feedback (a cursor of hand movements appeared after each movement. Three rotation angles (30°, 75° and 150° were examined in three groups in order to vary the task difficulty. The results showed that the 30° group gradually reduced direction errors of reaching with practice and adapted well to the visuomotor rotation. The 75° group made large direction errors of reaching, and the 150° group applied a 180° reversal shift from early practice. The 75°and 150° groups, however, overcompensated the respective rotations at the end of practice. Despite these group differences in adaptive changes of reaching, all groups gradually adapted gaze directions prior to reaching from the target area to the areas related to the final positions of reaching during the course of practice. The adaptive changes of both hand and eye movements in all groups mainly reflected adjustments of movement directions based on explicit knowledge of the applied rotation acquired through practice. Only the 30° group showed small implicit adaptation in both effectors. The results suggest that by adapting gaze directions from the target to the final position of reaching based on explicit knowledge of the visuomotor rotation, the oculomotor system supports the limb-motor system to make precise preplanned adjustments of reaching directions during learning of visuomotor rotation under terminal visual feedback.

  18. Effects of Visual Force Feedback on Robot-Assisted Surgical Task Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiley, Carol E.; Akinbiyi, Takintope; Burschka, Darius; Chang, David C.; Okamura, Allison M.; Yuh, David D.

    2009-01-01

    Background Direct haptic (force or tactile) feedback is negligible in current surgical robotic systems. The relevance of haptic feedback in robot-assisted performances of surgical tasks is controversial. We studied the effects of visual force feedback (VFF), a haptic feedback surrogate, on tying surgical knots with fine sutures similar to those used in cardiovascular surgery. Methods Using a modified da Vinci robotic system (Intuitive Surgical, Inc.) equipped with force-sensing instrument tips and real-time VFF overlays in the console image, ten surgeons each tied 10 knots with and 10 knots without VFF. Four surgeons had significant prior da Vinci experience while the remaining six surgeons did not. Performance parameters, including suture breakage and secure knots, peak and standard deviation of applied forces, and completion times using 5-0 silk sutures were recorded. Chi-square and Student’s t-test analyses determined differences between groups. Results Among surgeon subjects with robotic experience, no differences in measured performance parameters were found between robot-assisted knot ties executed with and without VFF. Among surgeons without robotic experience, however, VFF was associated with lower suture breakage rates, peak applied forces, and standard deviations of applied forces. VFF did not impart differences in knot completion times or loose knots for either surgeon group. Conclusions VFF resulted in reduced suture breakage, lower forces, and decreased force inconsistencies among novice robotic surgeons, although elapsed time and knot quality were unaffected. In contrast, VFF did not affect these metrics among experienced da Vinci surgeons. These results suggest that VFF primarily benefits novice robot-assisted surgeons, with diminishing benefits among experienced surgeons. PMID:18179942

  19. Virtual reality in neurosurgical education: part-task ventriculostomy simulation with dynamic visual and haptic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemole, G Michael; Banerjee, P Pat; Luciano, Cristian; Neckrysh, Sergey; Charbel, Fady T

    2007-07-01

    Mastery of the neurosurgical skill set involves many hours of supervised intraoperative training. Convergence of political, economic, and social forces has limited neurosurgical resident operative exposure. There is need to develop realistic neurosurgical simulations that reproduce the operative experience, unrestricted by time and patient safety constraints. Computer-based, virtual reality platforms offer just such a possibility. The combination of virtual reality with dynamic, three-dimensional stereoscopic visualization, and haptic feedback technologies makes realistic procedural simulation possible. Most neurosurgical procedures can be conceptualized and segmented into critical task components, which can be simulated independently or in conjunction with other modules to recreate the experience of a complex neurosurgical procedure. We use the ImmersiveTouch (ImmersiveTouch, Inc., Chicago, IL) virtual reality platform, developed at the University of Illinois at Chicago, to simulate the task of ventriculostomy catheter placement as a proof-of-concept. Computed tomographic data are used to create a virtual anatomic volume. Haptic feedback offers simulated resistance and relaxation with passage of a virtual three-dimensional ventriculostomy catheter through the brain parenchyma into the ventricle. A dynamic three-dimensional graphical interface renders changing visual perspective as the user's head moves. The simulation platform was found to have realistic visual, tactile, and handling characteristics, as assessed by neurosurgical faculty, residents, and medical students. We have developed a realistic, haptics-based virtual reality simulator for neurosurgical education. Our first module recreates a critical component of the ventriculostomy placement task. This approach to task simulation can be assembled in a modular manner to reproduce entire neurosurgical procedures.

  20. A counterbalanced cross-over study of the effects of visual, auditory and no feedback on performance measures in a simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation

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    Baxley Susan M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous research has demonstrated that trained rescuers have difficulties achieving and maintaining the correct depth and rate of chest compressions during both in and out of hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR. Feedback on rate and depth mitigate decline in performance quality but not completely with the residual performance decline attributed to rescuer fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of feedback (none, auditory only and visual only on the quality of CPR and rescuer fatigue. Methods Fifteen female volunteers performed 10 minutes of 30:2 CPR in each of three feedback conditions: none, auditory only, and visual only. Visual feedback was displayed continuously in graphic form. Auditory feedback was error correcting and provided by a voice assisted CPR manikin. CPR quality measures were collected using SkillReporter® software. Blood lactate (mmol/dl and perceived exertion served as indices of fatigue. One-way and two way repeated measures analyses of variance were used with alpha set a priori at 0.05. Results Visual feedback yielded a greater percentage of correct compressions (78.1 ± 8.2% than did auditory (65.4 ± 7.6% or no feedback (44.5 ± 8.1%. Compression rate with auditory feedback (87.9 ± 0.5 compressions per minute was less than it was with both visual and no feedback (p Conclusions In this study feedback mitigated the negative effects of fatigue on CPR performance and visual feedback yielded better CPR performance than did no feedback or auditory feedback. The perfect confounding of sensory modality and periodicity of feedback (visual feedback provided continuously and auditory feedback provided to correct error leaves unanswered the question of optimal form and timing of feedback.

  1. A counterbalanced cross-over study of the effects of visual, auditory and no feedback on performance measures in a simulated cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cason, Carolyn L; Trowbridge, Cynthia; Baxley, Susan M; Ricard, Mark D

    2011-08-02

    Previous research has demonstrated that trained rescuers have difficulties achieving and maintaining the correct depth and rate of chest compressions during both in and out of hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Feedback on rate and depth mitigate decline in performance quality but not completely with the residual performance decline attributed to rescuer fatigue. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of feedback (none, auditory only and visual only) on the quality of CPR and rescuer fatigue. Fifteen female volunteers performed 10 minutes of 30:2 CPR in each of three feedback conditions: none, auditory only, and visual only. Visual feedback was displayed continuously in graphic form. Auditory feedback was error correcting and provided by a voice assisted CPR manikin. CPR quality measures were collected using SkillReporter® software. Blood lactate (mmol/dl) and perceived exertion served as indices of fatigue. One-way and two way repeated measures analyses of variance were used with alpha set a priori at 0.05. Visual feedback yielded a greater percentage of correct compressions (78.1 ± 8.2%) than did auditory (65.4 ± 7.6%) or no feedback (44.5 ± 8.1%). Compression rate with auditory feedback (87.9 ± 0.5 compressions per minute) was less than it was with both visual and no feedback (p < 0.05). CPR performed with no feedback (39.2 ± 0.5 mm) yielded a shallower average depth of compression and a lower percentage (55 ± 8.9%) of compressions within the accepted 38-50 mm range than did auditory or visual feedback (p < 0.05). The duty cycle for auditory feedback (39.4 ± 1.6%) was less than it was with no feedback (p < 0.05). Auditory feedback produced lower lactate concentrations than did visual feedback (p < 0.05) but there were no differences in perceived exertion. In this study feedback mitigated the negative effects of fatigue on CPR performance and visual feedback yielded better CPR performance than did no feedback or auditory feedback

  2. 'Robot' Hand Illusion under Delayed Visual Feedback: Relationship between the Senses of Ownership and Agency.

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    Mohamad Arif Fahmi Ismail

    Full Text Available The rubber hand illusion (RHI is an illusion of the self-ownership of a rubber hand that is touched synchronously with one's own hand. While the RHI relates to visual and tactile integration, we can also consider a similar illusion with visual and motor integration on a fake hand. We call this a "robot hand illusion" (RoHI, which relates to both the senses of ownership and agency. Here we investigate the effect of delayed visual feedback on the RoHI. Participants viewed a virtual computer graphic hand controlled by their hand movement recorded using a data glove device. We inserted delays of various lengths between the participant's hand and the virtual hand movements (90-590 ms, and the RoHI effects for each delay condition were systematically tested using a questionnaire. The results showed that the participants felt significantly greater RoHI effects with temporal discrepancies of less than 190 ms compared with longer temporal discrepancies, both in the senses of ownership and agency. Additionally, participants felt significant, but weaker, RoHI effects with temporal discrepancies of 290-490 ms in the sense of agency, but not in the sense of ownership. The participants did not feel a RoHI with temporal discrepancies of 590 ms in either the senses of agency or ownership. Our results suggest that a time window of less than 200 ms is critical for multi-sensory integration processes constituting self-body image.

  3. The Effect of Delayed Visual Feedback on Synchrony Perception in a Tapping Task

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    Mirjam Keetels

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensory events following a motor action are, within limits, interpreted as a causal consequence of those actions. For example, the clapping of the hands is initiated by the motor system, but subsequently visual, auditory, and tactile information is provided and processed. In the present study we examine the effect of temporal disturbances in this chain of motor-sensory events. Participants are instructed to tap a surface with their finger in synchrony with a chain of 20 sound clicks (ISI 750 ms. We examined the effect of additional visual information on this ‘tap-sound’-synchronization task. During tapping, subjects will see a video of their own tapping hand on a screen in front of them. The video can either be in synchrony with the tap (real-time recording, or can be slightly delayed (∼40–160 ms. In a control condition, no video is provided. We explore whether ‘tap-sound’ synchrony will be shifted as a function of the delayed visual feedback. Results will provide fundamental insights into how the brain preserves a causal interpretation of motor actions and their sensory consequences.

  4. Explicit knowledge about the availability of visual feedback affects grasping with the left but not the right hand.

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    Tang, Rixin; Whitwell, Robert L; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2014-01-01

    Previous research (Whitwell et al. in Exp Brain Res 188:603-611, 2008; Whitwell and Goodale in Exp Brain Res 194:619-629, 2009) has shown that trial history, but not anticipatory knowledge about the presence or absence of visual feedback on an upcoming trial, plays a vital role in determining how that feedback is exploited when grasping with the right hand. Nothing is known about how the non-dominant left hand behaves under the same feedback regimens. In present study, therefore, we compared peak grip aperture (PGA) for left- and right-hand grasps executed with and without visual feedback (i.e., closed- vs. open-loop conditions) in right-handed individuals under three different trial schedules: the feedback conditions were blocked separately, they were randomly interleaved, or they were alternated. When feedback conditions were blocked, the PGA was much larger for open-loop trials as compared to closed-loop trials, although this difference was more pronounced for right-hand grasps than left-hand grasps. Like Whitwell et al., we found that mixing open- and closed-loop trials together, compared to blocking them separately, homogenized the PGA for open- and closed-loop grasping in the right hand (i.e., the PGAs became smaller on open-loop trials and larger on closed-loop trials). In addition, the PGAs for right-hand grasps were entirely determined by trial history and not by knowledge of whether or not visual feedback would be available on an upcoming trial. In contrast to grasps made with the right hand, grasps made by the left hand were affected both by trial history and by anticipatory knowledge of the upcoming visual feedback condition. But these effects were observed only on closed-loop trials, i.e., the PGAs of grasps made with the left hand on closed-loop trials were smaller when participants could anticipate the availability of feedback on an upcoming trial (alternating trials) than when they could not (randomized trials). In contrast, grasps made with the

  5. Effect of concurrent visual feedback on acquisition of a weightlifting skill.

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    Sewall, L P; Reeve, T G; Day, R A

    1988-12-01

    Practice in front of a mirror is a common procedure for activities such as dance, gymnastics, and other sports. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect that performing with concurrent visual feedback from a mirror had on the acquisition of the power clean movement. 18 college-age males who had no prior experience with the power clean movement served as subjects who were assigned to one of two groups. One group had use of a mirror during the practice trials and the other practiced without the mirror. All subjects viewed an instructional videotape and had practice trials. All subjects were evaluated for proper technique on a pretest, a posttest without the mirror, and a posttest with the mirror. Analysis showed a significant difference between pre- and posttest performances for both groups and a significant difference between groups on the posttest performances with the mirror. Evidently the videotaped instruction was sufficient to allow both groups to improve in performance of the power clean. Differences in posttest performances with the mirror reflected the type of feedback (with or without the mirror) available during training.

  6. Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans.

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    Laura L Wilkinson

    Full Text Available Deliberately eating at a slower pace promotes satiation and eating quickly has been associated with a higher body mass index. Therefore, understanding factors that affect eating rate should be given high priority. Eating rate is affected by the physical/textural properties of a food, by motivational state, and by portion size and palatability. This study explored the prospect that eating rate is also influenced by a hitherto unexplored cognitive process that uses ongoing perceptual estimates of the volume of food remaining in a container to adjust intake during a meal. A 2 (amount seen; 300 ml or 500 ml x 2 (amount eaten; 300 ml or 500 ml between-subjects design was employed (10 participants in each condition. In two 'congruent' conditions, the same amount was seen at the outset and then subsequently consumed (300 ml or 500 ml. To dissociate visual feedback of portion size and actual amount consumed, food was covertly added or removed from a bowl using a peristaltic pump. This created two additional 'incongruent' conditions, in which 300 ml was seen but 500 ml was eaten or vice versa. We repeated these conditions using a savoury soup and a sweet dessert. Eating rate (ml per second was assessed during lunch. After lunch we assessed fullness over a 60-minute period. In the congruent conditions, eating rate was unaffected by the actual volume of food that was consumed (300 ml or 500 ml. By contrast, we observed a marked difference across the incongruent conditions. Specifically, participants who saw 300 ml but actually consumed 500 ml ate at a faster rate than participants who saw 500 ml but actually consumed 300 ml. Participants were unaware that their portion size had been manipulated. Nevertheless, when it disappeared faster or slower than anticipated they adjusted their rate of eating accordingly. This suggests that the control of eating rate involves visual feedback and is not a simple reflexive response to orosensory stimulation.

  7. EFFECT OF MIRROR VISUAL FEEDBACK ON HAND FUNCTIONS IN CHILDREN WITH HEMIPARESIS

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    Mohammed Ismael Elsepaee

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hemiparetic and hemiplegic cerebral palsy(CP constitute at least a third of all people with CP. Children with hemiparesis are suffering from weak hand muscles and retarded hand use.Mirror therapy is a relatively new approach in rehabilitation used in different neurological disorders. In mirror therapy a mirror is positioned orthogonally in front of the center of the patient’s body. The less-affected (healthy extremity is moved and observed in the mirror. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of mirror visual feedback on improving hand functions in children with hemiparesis. Methods: Forty children with hemiparesis of both sexes, ranged in age from five to seven years old, participated in this study. They were divided randomly into two groups of equal number (control and study. The control group received a specially designed physical therapy exercise program for four successive weeks while the study group received mirror exercise program in addition to the same program of the control group. Hand functions assessments was done using grasping and object manipulation subtests of Peabody developmental motor scale (PDMS-2. Evaluation was performed pre and post treatment program. Results:There was no significant difference between both groups in the pre-treatment mean values of all measured variables. Also, the results of this study revealed a significant improvement in the scores of the PDMS-2 andin grasp strength of the 2 groups. Post treatment results revealed more improvement in favor of the study group as compared with the control group. Conclusion: Using the mirror visual feedback could help in improving hand functions in children with hemiparesis.

  8. Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Laura L; Ferriday, Danielle; Bosworth, Matthew L; Godinot, Nicolas; Martin, Nathalie; Rogers, Peter J; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    Deliberately eating at a slower pace promotes satiation and eating quickly has been associated with a higher body mass index. Therefore, understanding factors that affect eating rate should be given high priority. Eating rate is affected by the physical/textural properties of a food, by motivational state, and by portion size and palatability. This study explored the prospect that eating rate is also influenced by a hitherto unexplored cognitive process that uses ongoing perceptual estimates of the volume of food remaining in a container to adjust intake during a meal. A 2 (amount seen; 300 ml or 500 ml) x 2 (amount eaten; 300 ml or 500 ml) between-subjects design was employed (10 participants in each condition). In two 'congruent' conditions, the same amount was seen at the outset and then subsequently consumed (300 ml or 500 ml). To dissociate visual feedback of portion size and actual amount consumed, food was covertly added or removed from a bowl using a peristaltic pump. This created two additional 'incongruent' conditions, in which 300 ml was seen but 500 ml was eaten or vice versa. We repeated these conditions using a savoury soup and a sweet dessert. Eating rate (ml per second) was assessed during lunch. After lunch we assessed fullness over a 60-minute period. In the congruent conditions, eating rate was unaffected by the actual volume of food that was consumed (300 ml or 500 ml). By contrast, we observed a marked difference across the incongruent conditions. Specifically, participants who saw 300 ml but actually consumed 500 ml ate at a faster rate than participants who saw 500 ml but actually consumed 300 ml. Participants were unaware that their portion size had been manipulated. Nevertheless, when it disappeared faster or slower than anticipated they adjusted their rate of eating accordingly. This suggests that the control of eating rate involves visual feedback and is not a simple reflexive response to orosensory stimulation.

  9. Keeping Pace with Your Eating: Visual Feedback Affects Eating Rate in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosworth, Matthew L.; Godinot, Nicolas; Martin, Nathalie; Rogers, Peter J.; Brunstrom, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Deliberately eating at a slower pace promotes satiation and eating quickly has been associated with a higher body mass index. Therefore, understanding factors that affect eating rate should be given high priority. Eating rate is affected by the physical/textural properties of a food, by motivational state, and by portion size and palatability. This study explored the prospect that eating rate is also influenced by a hitherto unexplored cognitive process that uses ongoing perceptual estimates of the volume of food remaining in a container to adjust intake during a meal. A 2 (amount seen; 300ml or 500ml) x 2 (amount eaten; 300ml or 500ml) between-subjects design was employed (10 participants in each condition). In two ‘congruent’ conditions, the same amount was seen at the outset and then subsequently consumed (300ml or 500ml). To dissociate visual feedback of portion size and actual amount consumed, food was covertly added or removed from a bowl using a peristaltic pump. This created two additional ‘incongruent’ conditions, in which 300ml was seen but 500ml was eaten or vice versa. We repeated these conditions using a savoury soup and a sweet dessert. Eating rate (ml per second) was assessed during lunch. After lunch we assessed fullness over a 60-minute period. In the congruent conditions, eating rate was unaffected by the actual volume of food that was consumed (300ml or 500ml). By contrast, we observed a marked difference across the incongruent conditions. Specifically, participants who saw 300ml but actually consumed 500ml ate at a faster rate than participants who saw 500ml but actually consumed 300ml. Participants were unaware that their portion size had been manipulated. Nevertheless, when it disappeared faster or slower than anticipated they adjusted their rate of eating accordingly. This suggests that the control of eating rate involves visual feedback and is not a simple reflexive response to orosensory stimulation. PMID:26828922

  10. Feedback from higher to lower visual areas for visual recognition may be weaker in the periphery: Glimpses from the perception of brief dichoptic stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaoping, Li

    2017-07-01

    Eye movements bring attended visual inputs to the center of vision for further processing. Thus, central and peripheral vision should have different functional roles. Here, we use observations of visual perception under dichoptic stimuli to infer that there is a difference in the top-down feedback from higher brain centers to primary visual cortex. Visual stimuli to the two eyes were designed such that the sum and difference of the binocular input from the two eyes have the form of two different gratings. These gratings differed in their motion direction, tilt direction, or color, and duly evoked ambiguous percepts for the corresponding feature. Observers were more likely to perceive the feature in the binocular summation rather than the difference channel. However, this perceptual bias towards the binocular summation signal was weaker or absent in peripheral vision, even when central and peripheral vision showed no difference in contrast sensitivity to the binocular summation signal relative to that to the binocular difference signal. We propose that this bias can arise from top-down feedback as part of an analysis-by-synthesis computation. The feedback is of the input predicted using prior information by the upper level perceptual hypothesis about the visual scene; the hypothesis is verified by comparing the feedback with the actual visual input. We illustrate this process using a conceptual circuit model. In this framework, a bias towards binocular summation can arise from the prior knowledge that inputs are usually correlated between the two eyes. Accordingly, a weaker bias in the periphery implies that the top-down feedback is weaker there. Testable experimental predictions are presented and discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. When visuo-motor incongruence aids motor performance : the effect of perceiving motion structures during transformed visual feedback on bimanual coordination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bogaerts, H; Buekers, MJ; Zaal, FT; Swinnen, SP

    2003-01-01

    Two experiments are reported in which bimanual coordination tasks were performed under correct and transformed visual feedback conditions. Participants were to generate cyclical line-drawing patterns, with varying degrees of coordinative stability, while perceiving correct or transformed visual

  12. Technology-Assisted Rehabilitation of Writing Skills in Parkinson’s Disease: Visual Cueing versus Intelligent Feedback

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    Evelien Nackaerts

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research showed that visual cueing can have both beneficial and detrimental effects on handwriting of patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD and healthy controls depending on the circumstances. Hence, using other sensory modalities to deliver cueing or feedback may be a valuable alternative. Therefore, the current study compared the effects of short-term training with either continuous visual cues or intermittent intelligent verbal feedback. Ten PD patients and nine healthy controls were randomly assigned to one of these training modes. To assess transfer of learning, writing performance was assessed in the absence of cueing and feedback on both trained and untrained writing sequences. The feedback pen and a touch-sensitive writing tablet were used for testing. Both training types resulted in improved writing amplitudes for the trained and untrained sequences. In conclusion, these results suggest that the feedback pen is a valuable tool to implement writing training in a tailor-made fashion for people with PD. Future studies should include larger sample sizes and different subgroups of PD for long-term training with the feedback pen.

  13. Effect of visual distraction and auditory feedback on patient effort during robot-assisted movement training after stroke

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    Reinkensmeyer David J

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Practicing arm and gait movements with robotic assistance after neurologic injury can help patients improve their movement ability, but patients sometimes reduce their effort during training in response to the assistance. Reduced effort has been hypothesized to diminish clinical outcomes of robotic training. To better understand patient slacking, we studied the role of visual distraction and auditory feedback in modulating patient effort during a common robot-assisted tracking task. Methods Fourteen participants with chronic left hemiparesis from stroke, five control participants with chronic right hemiparesis and fourteen non-impaired healthy control participants, tracked a visual target with their arms while receiving adaptive assistance from a robotic arm exoskeleton. We compared four practice conditions: the baseline tracking task alone; tracking while also performing a visual distracter task; tracking with the visual distracter and sound feedback; and tracking with sound feedback. For the distracter task, symbols were randomly displayed in the corners of the computer screen, and the participants were instructed to click a mouse button when a target symbol appeared. The sound feedback consisted of a repeating beep, with the frequency of repetition made to increase with increasing tracking error. Results Participants with stroke halved their effort and doubled their tracking error when performing the visual distracter task with their left hemiparetic arm. With sound feedback, however, these participants increased their effort and decreased their tracking error close to their baseline levels, while also performing the distracter task successfully. These effects were significantly smaller for the participants who used their non-paretic arm and for the participants without stroke. Conclusions Visual distraction decreased participants effort during a standard robot-assisted movement training task. This effect was greater for

  14. Encouraging Electricity Savings in a University Residential Hall through a Combination of Feedback, Visual Prompts, and Incentives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Marthinus J.; Cumming, Tania D.; Osborne, Nikola K. P.; Bruining, Angela M.; McClean, Julia I.; Leland, Louis S., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    This experiment investigated the combined use of visual prompts, daily feedback, and rewards to reduce electricity consumption in a university residential hall. After a 17-day baseline period, the experimental intervention was introduced in the intervention hall, and no change was made in the control hall. Energy usage decreased in the…

  15. Real-Time Visual Feedback for Learning to Perform Short Rhythms with Variations in Timing and Loudness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sadakata, M.; Hoppe, D.; Brandmeyer, A.; Timmers, R.; Desain, P.W.M.

    2008-01-01

    According to learning theories and empirical observations, communication between teachers and students is a crucial factor in effective learning of musical expressions. One possibility for improving this communication could be the introduction of visual feedback (VFB) in the lesson. In the current

  16. Reflections on Mirror Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Effect of Mirror Visual Feedback on the Brain.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deconinck, F.J.; Smorenburg, A.R.P.; Benham, A.; Ledebt, A.; Feltham, M.; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Mirror visual feedback (MVF), a phenomenon where movement of one limb is perceived as movement of the other limb, has the capacity to alleviate phantom limb pain or promote motor recovery of the upper limbs after stroke. The tool has received great interest from health professionals;

  17. The Effects of Task Clarification, Visual Prompts, and Graphic Feedback on Customer Greeting and Up-Selling in a Restaurant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squires, James; Wilder, David A.; Fixsen, Amanda; Hess, Erica; Rost, Kristen; Curran, Ryan; Zonneveld, Kimberly

    2007-01-01

    An intervention consisting of task clarification, visual prompts, and graphic feedback was evaluated to increase customer greeting and up-selling in a restaurant. A combination multiple baseline and reversal design was used to evaluate intervention effects. Although all interventions improved performance over baseline, the delivery of graphic…

  18. Effects of visual center of pressure feedback on postural control in young and elderly healthy adults and in stroke patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dault, Mylène C.; de Haart, Mirjam; Geurts, Alexander C. H.; Arts, Ilse M. P.; Nienhuis, Bart

    2003-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare young and elderly healthy individuals and elderly stroke patients in their capacity to use visual CP feedback (VF) in controlling both quiet standing and weight shifting and to assess their sensory re-weighing when this VF is withdrawn. A total of 40

  19. Observability Analysis of a Matrix Kalman Filter-Based Navigation System Using Visual/Inertial/Magnetic Sensors

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    Guohu Feng

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A matrix Kalman filter (MKF has been implemented for an integrated navigation system using visual/inertial/magnetic sensors. The MKF rearranges the original nonlinear process model in a pseudo-linear process model. We employ the observability rank criterion based on Lie derivatives to verify the conditions under which the nonlinear system is observable. It has been proved that such observability conditions are: (a at least one degree of rotational freedom is excited, and (b at least two linearly independent horizontal lines and one vertical line are observed. Experimental results have validated the correctness of these observability conditions.

  20. Visual Feedback of the Non-Moving Limb Improves Active Joint-Position Sense of the Impaired Limb in Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy

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    Smorenburg, Ana R. P.; Ledebt, Annick; Deconinck, Frederik J. A.; Savelsbergh, Geert J. P.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the active joint-position sense in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP) and the effect of static visual feedback and static mirror visual feedback, of the non-moving limb, on the joint-position sense. Participants were asked to match the position of one upper limb with that of the contralateral limb. The task…

  1. Intensive treatment with ultrasound visual feedback for speech sound errors in childhood apraxia

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    Jonathan L Preston

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound imaging is an adjunct to traditional speech therapy that has shown to be beneficial in the remediation of speech sound errors. Ultrasound biofeedback can be utilized during therapy to provide clients additional knowledge about their tongue shapes when attempting to produce sounds that are in error. The additional feedback may assist children with childhood apraxia of speech in stabilizing motor patterns, thereby facilitating more consistent and accurate productions of sounds and syllables. However, due to its specialized nature, ultrasound visual feedback is a technology that is not widely available to clients. Short-term intensive treatment programs are one option that can be utilized to expand access to ultrasound biofeedback. Schema-based motor learning theory suggests that short-term intensive treatment programs (massed practice may assist children in acquiring more accurate motor patterns. In this case series, three participants ages 10-14 diagnosed with childhood apraxia of speech attended 16 hours of speech therapy over a two-week period to address residual speech sound errors. Two participants had distortions on rhotic sounds, while the third participant demonstrated lateralization of sibilant sounds. During therapy, cues were provided to assist participants in obtaining a tongue shape that facilitated a correct production of the erred sound. Additional practice without ultrasound was also included. Results suggested that all participants showed signs of acquisition of sounds in error. Generalization and retention results were mixed. One participant showed generalization and retention of sounds that were treated; one showed generalization but limited retention; and the third showed no evidence of generalization or retention. Individual characteristics that may facilitate generalization are discussed. Short-term intensive treatment programs using ultrasound biofeedback may result in the acquisition of more accurate motor

  2. Evidence that baroreflex feedback influences long-term incidental visual memory in men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moor, Tobias; Mundorff, Lukas; Bohringer, Andreas; Philippsen, Christine; Langewitz, Wolf; Reino, Silvia Tenés; Schachinger, Hartmut

    2005-11-01

    Sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity at the time of acquisition is associated with human memory. However, rather than SNS activity per se, it may be afferent baroreflex feedback that is responsible for this effect. A pharmacological design was employed to unload (SNP, sodium nitro-prusside) and load (norepinephrine) baroreceptors. In addition to two placebo periods, epinephrine and esmolol (a peripherally acting beta1-blocker) served as control conditions for altered cardiac perception. During drug infusion blood pressure, heart rate, and perception of heartbeat were tested. Twenty-four healthy men were participated. The participants viewed emotional slides while their electromyographic eye blink responses to random noise bursts were measured (affective startle modulation paradigm) to determine potential drug impact on emotional processing. Subjects were not informed that memory testing would take place after 4 weeks. Drugs did not impact startle, thus indicating unbiased emotional processing at the time of acquisition. Norepinephrine had no effect on heartbeat perception, but improved (p = .002) recognition memory. SNP (p = .0001) increased heartbeat perception but impaired (p = .038) recognition memory. Epinephrine, on the other hand, increased heartbeat perception (p = .0001) yet did not impair but partially improve memory (effect on high arousing pictures only: p = .05). Heartbeat perception in the placebo condition did not correlate with recognition memory (p's > .5). We suggest that baroreflex unloading, with subsequent feedback activation of the SNS, impairs long-term incidental visual recognition memory in humans while baroreflex loading enhances it. Further, we propose that these memory effects are neither secondary to cardiac sensations that accompany SNS activation nor to altered emotional picture processing at the time of acquisition.

  3. Effect of visual feedback on the occipito-parietal-motor network in Parkinson's disease patients with freezing of gait

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    Priya D Velu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Freezing of gait (FOG is an elusive phenomenon that debilitates a large number of Parkinson’s disease (PD patients regardless of stage of disease, medication status, or DBS implantation. Sensory cues, especially visual feedback cues, have been shown to alleviate FOG episodes or prevent episodes from even occurring. Here, we examine cortical information flow between occipital, parietal, and motor areas during the pre-movement stage of gait in a PD-with-FOG patient that had a strong positive behavioral response to visual cues, a PD-with-FOG patient without any behavioral response to visual cues, and an age-matched healthy control, before and after training with visual feedback. Results for this case study show differences in cortical information flow between the responding PD-with-FOG patient and the other two subjects, notably, an increased information flow in the beta range. Tentatively suggesting the formation of an alternative cortical sensory-motor pathway during training with visual feedback, these results are proposed as subject for further verification employing larger cohorts of patients.

  4. Muscle activation during resistance training with no external load - effects of training status, movement velocity, dominance, and visual feedback.

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    Gentil, Paulo; Bottaro, Martim; Noll, Matias; Werner, Scott; Vasconcelos, Jessica Cabral; Seffrin, Aldo; Campos, Mario Hebling

    2017-10-01

    To explore the acute effects of training status, movement velocity, dominance, and visual feedback on muscle activation and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) during resistance training with no external load (no-load resistance training; NLRT). Thirty-three men (17 untrained and 16 trained), performed elbow flexions in four NLRT sessions: 1) slow velocity with EMG visual feedback, 2) slow velocity without EMG visual feedback, 3) fast velocity with EMG feedback, and 4) fast velocity without EMG feedback. RPE was measured using the Borg Discomfort scale. EMG for the biceps and triceps were recorded for both arms. EMG feedback had no influence on RPE. The peak and mean EMG values were not different for the biceps (93.8±11.5% and 50±13.1%) and triceps (93.7±23.9% and 49.6±16.2%). The results revealed a difference in the training status, with higher peak EMG for untrained than for trained participants (96.9±20% vs. 90.2±15.6%). However the values for mean EMG were not different between the untrained and trained (50.3±15.7% vs. 49.2±13.7%) participants. There was no difference in the peak (92.8±19% vs. 94.7±20.4%) and mean (49.8±15.0% vs. 49.7±14.5%) EMG values for the dominant and non-dominant sides. Peak EMG values were not different between faster and slower velocities (93.6±19.6% and 93.9±17.8%). However, mean EMG was higher for slower (50.5±14.4%) than for faster (48.5±15.4%) velocities. The peak and mean EMG during contractions with (93.3±17.5% and 49.5±14.1%) and without visual feedback (94.2±19.9% and 50±15.4%) were not significantly different. NLRT produces high levels of muscle activation independent of training, status, dominance, movement velocity, and visual feedback. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Attention to Color Sharpens Neural Population Tuning via Feedback Processing in the Human Visual Cortex Hierarchy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartsch, Mandy V; Loewe, Kristian; Merkel, Christian; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Schoenfeld, Mircea A; Tsotsos, John K; Hopf, Jens-Max

    2017-10-25

    Attention can facilitate the selection of elementary object features such as color, orientation, or motion. This is referred to as feature-based attention and it is commonly attributed to a modulation of the gain and tuning of feature-selective units in visual cortex. Although gain mechanisms are well characterized, little is known about the cortical processes underlying the sharpening of feature selectivity. Here, we show with high-resolution magnetoencephalography in human observers (men and women) that sharpened selectivity for a particular color arises from feedback processing in the human visual cortex hierarchy. To assess color selectivity, we analyze the response to a color probe that varies in color distance from an attended color target. We find that attention causes an initial gain enhancement in anterior ventral extrastriate cortex that is coarsely selective for the target color and transitions within ∼100 ms into a sharper tuned profile in more posterior ventral occipital cortex. We conclude that attention sharpens selectivity over time by attenuating the response at lower levels of the cortical hierarchy to color values neighboring the target in color space. These observations support computational models proposing that attention tunes feature selectivity in visual cortex through backward-propagating attenuation of units less tuned to the target.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Whether searching for your car, a particular item of clothing, or just obeying traffic lights, in everyday life, we must select items based on color. But how does attention allow us to select a specific color? Here, we use high spatiotemporal resolution neuromagnetic recordings to examine how color selectivity emerges in the human brain. We find that color selectivity evolves as a coarse to fine process from higher to lower levels within the visual cortex hierarchy. Our observations support computational models proposing that feature selectivity increases over time by attenuating the

  6. Can real-time visual feedback during gait retraining reduce metabolic demand for individuals with transtibial amputation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Russell Esposito

    Full Text Available The metabolic demand of walking generally increases following lower extremity amputation. This study used real-time visual feedback to modify biomechanical factors linked to an elevated metabolic demand of walking in individuals with transtibial amputation. Eight persons with unilateral, traumatic transtibial amputation and 8 uninjured controls participated. Two separate bouts of real-time visual feedback were provided during a single session of gait retraining to reduce 1 center of mass sway and 2 thigh muscle activation magnitudes and duration. Baseline and post-intervention data were collected. Metabolic rate, heart rate, frontal plane center of mass sway, quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activity, and co-contraction indices were evaluated during steady state walking at a standardized speed. Visual feedback successfully decreased center of mass sway 12% (p = 0.006 and quadriceps activity 12% (p = 0.041; however, thigh muscle co-contraction indices were unchanged. Neither condition significantly affected metabolic rate during walking and heart rate increased with center-of-mass feedback. Metabolic rate, center of mass sway, and integrated quadriceps muscle activity were all not significantly different from controls. Attempts to modify gait to decrease metabolic demand may actually adversely increase the physiological effort of walking in individuals with lower extremity amputation who are young, active and approximate metabolic rates of able-bodied adults.

  7. Can real-time visual feedback during gait retraining reduce metabolic demand for individuals with transtibial amputation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell Esposito, Elizabeth; Choi, Harmony S; Darter, Benjamin J; Wilken, Jason M

    2017-01-01

    The metabolic demand of walking generally increases following lower extremity amputation. This study used real-time visual feedback to modify biomechanical factors linked to an elevated metabolic demand of walking in individuals with transtibial amputation. Eight persons with unilateral, traumatic transtibial amputation and 8 uninjured controls participated. Two separate bouts of real-time visual feedback were provided during a single session of gait retraining to reduce 1) center of mass sway and 2) thigh muscle activation magnitudes and duration. Baseline and post-intervention data were collected. Metabolic rate, heart rate, frontal plane center of mass sway, quadriceps and hamstrings muscle activity, and co-contraction indices were evaluated during steady state walking at a standardized speed. Visual feedback successfully decreased center of mass sway 12% (p = 0.006) and quadriceps activity 12% (p = 0.041); however, thigh muscle co-contraction indices were unchanged. Neither condition significantly affected metabolic rate during walking and heart rate increased with center-of-mass feedback. Metabolic rate, center of mass sway, and integrated quadriceps muscle activity were all not significantly different from controls. Attempts to modify gait to decrease metabolic demand may actually adversely increase the physiological effort of walking in individuals with lower extremity amputation who are young, active and approximate metabolic rates of able-bodied adults.

  8. Systematic tracking, visualizing, and interpreting of consumer feedback for drinking water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Andrea M; Phetxumphou, Katherine; Gallagher, Daniel L

    2014-12-01

    Consumer feedback and complaints provide utilities with useful data about consumer perceptions of aesthetic water quality in the distribution system. This research provides a systematic approach to interpret consumer complaint water quality data provided by four water utilities that recorded consumer complaints, but did not routinely process the data. The utilities tended to write down a myriad of descriptors that were too numerous or contained a variety of spellings so that electronic "harvesting" was not possible and much manual labor was required to categorize the complaints into majors areas, such as suggested by the Drinking Water Taste and Odor Wheel or existing check-sheets. When the consumer complaint data were categorized and visualized using spider (or radar) and run-time plots, major taste, odor, and appearance patterns emerged that clarified the issue and could provide guidance to the utility on the nature and extent of the problem. A caveat is that while humans readily identify visual issues with the water, such as color, cloudiness, or rust, describing specific tastes and odors in drinking water is acknowledged to be much more difficult for humans to achieve without training. This was demonstrated with two utility groups and a group of consumers identifying the odors of orange, 2-methylisoborneol, and dimethyl trisulfide. All three groups readily and succinctly identified the familiar orange odor. The two utility groups were much more able to identify the musty odor of 2-methylisoborneol, which was likely familiar to them from their work with raw and finished water. Dimethyl trisulfide, a garlic-onion odor associated with sulfur compounds in drinking water, was the least familiar to all three groups, although the laboratory staff did best. These results indicate that utility personnel should be tolerant of consumers who can assuredly say the water is different, but cannot describe the problem. Also, it indicates that a T&O program at a utility would

  9. Visual feedback attenuates mean concentric barbell velocity loss, and improves motivation, competitiveness, and perceived workload in male adolescent athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weakley, Jonathon Js; Wilson, Kyle M; Till, Kevin; Read, Dale B; Darrall-Jones, Joshua; Roe, Gregory; Phibbs, Padraic J; Jones, Ben

    2017-07-12

    It is unknown whether instantaneous visual feedback of resistance training outcomes can enhance barbell velocity in younger athletes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to quantify the effects of visual feedback on mean concentric barbell velocity in the back squat, and to identify changes in motivation, competitiveness, and perceived workload. In a randomised-crossover design (Feedback vs. Control) feedback of mean concentric barbell velocity was or was not provided throughout a set of 10 repetitions in the barbell back squat. Magnitude-based inferences were used to assess changes between conditions, with almost certainly greater differences in mean concentric velocity between the Feedback (0.70 ±0.04 m·s) and Control (0.65 ±0.05 m·s) observed. Additionally, individual repetition mean concentric velocity ranged from possibly (repetition number two: 0.79 ±0.04 vs. 0.78 ±0.04 m·s) to almost certainly (repetition number 10: 0.58 ±0.05 vs. 0.49 ±0.05 m·s) greater when provided feedback, while almost certain differences were observed in motivation, competitiveness, and perceived workload, respectively. Providing adolescent male athletes with visual kinematic information while completing resistance training is beneficial for the maintenance of barbell velocity during a training set, potentially enhancing physical performance. Moreover, these improvements were observed alongside increases in motivation, competitiveness and perceived workload providing insight into the underlying mechanisms responsible for the performance gains observed. Given the observed maintenance of barbell velocity during a training set, practitioners can use this technique to manipulate training outcomes during resistance training.

  10. Image-matching during ant navigation occurs through saccade-like body turns controlled by learned visual features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lent, David D; Graham, Paul; Collett, Thomas S

    2010-09-14

    Visual memories of landmarks play a major role in guiding the habitual foraging routes of ants and bees, but how these memories engage visuo-motor control systems during guidance is poorly understood. We approach this problem through a study of image matching, a navigational strategy in which insects reach a familiar place by moving so that their current retinal image transforms to match a memorized snapshot of the scene viewed from that place. Analysis of how navigating wood ants correct their course when close to a goal reveals a significant part of the mechanism underlying this transformation. Ants followed a short route to an inconspicuous feeder positioned at a fixed distance from a vertical luminance edge. They responded to an unexpected jump of the edge by turning to face the new feeder position specified by the edge. Importantly, the initial speed of the turn increased linearly with the turn's amplitude. This correlation implies that the ants' turns are driven initially by their prior calculation of the angular difference between the current retinal position of the edge and its desired position in their memorized view. Similar turns keep ants to their path during unperturbed routes. The neural circuitry mediating image-matching is thus concerned not only with the storage of views, but also with making exact comparisons between the retinal positions of a visual feature in a memorized view and of the same feature in the current retinal image.

  11. The Influence of Mirror-Visual Feedback on Training-Induced Motor Performance Gains in the Untrained Hand.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Reissig

    Full Text Available The well-documented observation of bilateral performance gains following unilateral motor training, a phenomenon known as cross-limb transfer, has important implications for rehabilitation. It has recently been shown that provision of a mirror image of the active hand during unilateral motor training has the capacity to enhance the efficacy of this phenomenon when compared to training without augmented visual feedback (i.e., watching the passive hand, possibly via action observation effects [1]. The current experiment was designed to confirm whether mirror-visual feedback (MVF during motor training can indeed elicit greater performance gains in the untrained hand compared to more standard visual feedback (i.e., watching the active hand. Furthermore, discussing the mechanisms underlying any such MVF-induced behavioural effects, we suggest that action observation and the cross-activation hypothesis may both play important roles in eliciting cross-limb transfer. Eighty participants practiced a fast-as-possible two-ball rotation task with their dominant hand. During training, three different groups were provided with concurrent visual feedback of the active hand, inactive hand or a mirror image of the active hand with a fourth control group receiving no training. Pre- and post-training performance was measured in both hands. MVF did not increase the extent of training-induced performance changes in the untrained hand following unilateral training above and beyond those observed for other types of feedback. The data are consistent with the notion that cross-limb transfer, when combined with MVF, is mediated by cross-activation with action observation playing a less unique role than previously suggested. Further research is needed to replicate the current and previous studies to determine the clinical relevance and potential benefits of MVF for cases that, due to the severity of impairment, rely on unilateral training programmes of the unaffected limb

  12. Impact of online visual feedback on motor acquisition and retention when learning to reach in a force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batcho, C S; Gagné, M; Bouyer, L J; Roy, J S; Mercier, C

    2016-11-19

    When subjects learn a novel motor task, several sources of feedback (proprioceptive, visual or auditory) contribute to the performance. Over the past few years, several studies have investigated the role of visual feedback in motor learning, yet evidence remains conflicting. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate the role of online visual feedback (VFb) on the acquisition and retention stages of motor learning associated with training in a reaching task. Thirty healthy subjects made ballistic reaching movements with their dominant arm toward two targets, on 2 consecutive days using a robotized exoskeleton (KINARM). They were randomly assigned to a group with (VFb) or without (NoVFb) VFb of index position during movement. On day 1, the task was performed before (baseline) and during the application of a velocity-dependent resistive force field (adaptation). To assess retention, participants repeated the task with the force field on day 2. Motor learning was characterized by: (1) the final endpoint error (movement accuracy) and (2) the initial angle (iANG) of deviation (motor planning). Even though both groups showed motor adaptation, the NoVFb-group exhibited slower learning and higher final endpoint error than the VFb-group. In some condition, subjects trained without visual feedback used more curved initial trajectories to anticipate for the perturbation. This observation suggests that learning to reach targets in a velocity-dependent resistive force field is possible even when feedback is limited. However, the absence of VFb leads to different strategies that were only apparent when reaching toward the most challenging target. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. A Computerized Tablet with Visual Feedback of Hand Position for Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahta eKarimpoor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychological tests - behavioral tasks that very commonly involve handwriting and drawing - are widely used in the clinic to detect abnormal brain function. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI may be useful in increasing the specificity of such tests. However, performing complex pen-and-paper tests during fMRI involves engineering challenges. Previously, we developed an fMRI-compatible, computerized tablet system to address this issue. However, the tablet did not include visual feedback of hand position (VFHP, a human factors component that may be important for fMRI of certain patient populations. A real-time system was thus developed to provide VFHP and integrated with the tablet in an augmented reality display. The effectiveness of the system was initially tested in young healthy adults who performed various handwriting tasks in front of a computer display with and without VFHP. Pilot fMRI of writing tasks were performed by two representative individuals with and without VFHP. Quantitative analysis of the behavioral results indicated improved writing performance with VFHP. The pilot fMRI results suggest that writing with VFHP requires less neural resources compared to the without VFHP condition, to maintain similar behavior. Thus, the tablet system with VFHP is recommended for future fMRI studies involving patients with impaired brain function and where ecologically valid behavior is important.

  14. Mirror visual feedback-induced performance improvement and the influence of hand dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viola eRjosk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror Visual Feedback (MVF is a promising technique in clinical settings that can be used to augment performance of an untrained limb. Several studies with healthy volunteers and patients using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS or functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI indicate that functional alterations within primary motor cortex (M1 might be one candidate mechanism that could explain MVF-induced changes in behavior. Until now, most studies have used MVF to improve performance of the non-dominant hand. The question remains if the behavioural effect of MVF differs according to hand dominance. Here, we conducted a study with two groups of young, healthy right-handed volunteers who performed a complex ball-rotation task while receiving MVF of the dominant (n = 16, group 1, MVFDH or non-dominant hand (n = 16, group 2, MVFNDH. We found no significant differences in baseline performance of the untrained hand between groups before MVF was applied. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in the amount of performance improvement between MVFDH and MVFNDH indicating that the outcome of MVF seems not to be influenced by hand dominance. Thus our findings might have important implications in neurorehabilitation suggesting that patients suffering from unilateral motor impairments might benefit from MVF regardless of the dominance of the affected limb.

  15. Guideline implementation in clinical practice: use of statistical process control charts as visual feedback devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hussein, Fahad A

    2009-01-01

    To use statistical control charts in a series of audits to improve the acceptance and consistant use of guidelines, and reduce the variations in prescription processing in primary health care. A series of audits were done at the main satellite of King Saud Housing Family and Community Medicine Center, National Guard Health Affairs, Riyadh, where three general practitioners and six pharmacists provide outpatient care to about 3000 residents. Audits were carried out every fortnight to calculate the proportion of prescriptions that did not conform to the given guidelines of prescribing and dispensing. Simple random samples of thirty were chosen from a sampling frame of all prescriptions given in the two previous weeks. Thirty six audits were carried out from September 2004 to February 2006. P-charts were constructed around a parametric specification of non-conformities not exceeding 25%. Of the 1081 prescriptions, the most frequent non-conformity was failure to write generic names (35.5%), followed by the failure to record patient's weight (16.4%), pharmacist's name (14.3%), duration of therapy (9.1%), and the use of inappropriate abbreviations (6.0%). Initially, 100% of prescriptions did not conform to the guidelines, but within a period of three months, this came down to 40%. A process of audits in the context of statistical process control is necessary for any improvement in the implementation of guidelines in primary care. Statistical process control charts are an effective means of visual feedback to the care providers.

  16. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leinen, Philipp; Green, Matthew F B; Esat, Taner; Wagner, Christian; Tautz, F Stefan; Temirov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM) is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM) introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926-1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf) of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM) tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I) flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111) surface.

  17. Virtual reality visual feedback for hand-controlled scanning probe microscopy manipulation of single molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Leinen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Controlled manipulation of single molecules is an important step towards the fabrication of single molecule devices and nanoscale molecular machines. Currently, scanning probe microscopy (SPM is the only technique that facilitates direct imaging and manipulations of nanometer-sized molecular compounds on surfaces. The technique of hand-controlled manipulation (HCM introduced recently in Beilstein J. Nanotechnol. 2014, 5, 1926–1932 simplifies the identification of successful manipulation protocols in situations when the interaction pattern of the manipulated molecule with its environment is not fully known. Here we present a further technical development that substantially improves the effectiveness of HCM. By adding Oculus Rift virtual reality goggles to our HCM set-up we provide the experimentalist with 3D visual feedback that displays the currently executed trajectory and the position of the SPM tip during manipulation in real time, while simultaneously plotting the experimentally measured frequency shift (Δf of the non-contact atomic force microscope (NC-AFM tuning fork sensor as well as the magnitude of the electric current (I flowing between the tip and the surface. The advantages of the set-up are demonstrated by applying it to the model problem of the extraction of an individual PTCDA molecule from its hydrogen-bonded monolayer grown on Ag(111 surface.

  18. Adaptation effects in static postural control by providing simultaneous visual feedback of center of pressure and center of gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kenta; Mani, Hiroki; Hasegawa, Naoya; Sato, Yuki; Tanaka, Shintaro; Maejima, Hiroshi; Asaka, Tadayoshi

    2017-07-19

    The benefit of visual feedback of the center of pressure (COP) on quiet standing is still debatable. This study aimed to investigate the adaptation effects of visual feedback training using both the COP and center of gravity (COG) during quiet standing. Thirty-four healthy young adults were divided into three groups randomly (COP + COG, COP, and control groups). A force plate was used to calculate the coordinates of the COP in the anteroposterior (COPAP) and mediolateral (COPML) directions. A motion analysis system was used to calculate the coordinates of the center of mass (COM) in both directions (COMAP and COMML). The coordinates of the COG in the AP direction (COGAP) were obtained from the force plate signals. Augmented visual feedback was presented on a screen in the form of fluctuation circles in the vertical direction that moved upward as the COPAP and/or COGAP moved forward and vice versa. The COP + COG group received the real-time COPAP and COGAP feedback simultaneously, whereas the COP group received the real-time COPAP feedback only. The control group received no visual feedback. In the training session, the COP + COG group was required to maintain an even distance between the COPAP and COGAP and reduce the COGAP fluctuation, whereas the COP group was required to reduce the COPAP fluctuation while standing on a foam pad. In test sessions, participants were instructed to keep their standing posture as quiet as possible on the foam pad before (pre-session) and after (post-session) the training sessions. In the post-session, the velocity and root mean square of COMAP in the COP + COG group were lower than those in the control group. In addition, the absolute value of the sum of the COP - COM distances in the COP + COG group was lower than that in the COP group. Furthermore, positive correlations were found between the COMAP velocity and COP - COM parameters. The results suggest that the novel visual feedback training that

  19. The positive effect of mirror visual feedback on arm control in children with spastic hemiparetic cerebral palsy is dependent on which arm is viewed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorenburg, Ana R P; Ledebt, Annick; Feltham, Max G; Deconinck, Frederik J A; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2011-09-01

    Mirror visual feedback has previously been found to reduce disproportionate interlimb variability and neuromuscular activity in the arm muscles in children with Spastic Hemiparetic Cerebral Palsy (SHCP). The aim of the current study was to determine whether these positive effects are generated by the mirror per se (i.e. the illusory perception of two symmetrically moving limbs, irrespective of which arm generates the mirror visual feedback) or by the visual illusion that the impaired arm has been substituted and appears to move with less jerk and in synchrony with the less-impaired arm (i.e. by mirror visual feedback of the less-impaired arm only). Therefore, we compared the effect of mirror visual feedback from the impaired and the less-impaired upper limb on the bimanual coupling and neuromuscular activity during a bimanual coordination task. Children with SHCP were asked to perform a bimanual symmetrical circular movement in three different visual feedback conditions (i.e. viewing the two arms, viewing only one arm, and viewing one arm and its mirror image), combined with two head orientation conditions (i.e. looking from the impaired and looking from the less-impaired body side). It was found that mirror visual feedback resulted in a reduction in the eccentric activity of the Biceps Brachii Brevis in the impaired limb compared to the condition with actual visual feedback from the two arms. More specifically, this effect was exclusive to mirror visual feedback from the less-impaired arm and absent when mirror visual feedback from the impaired arm was provided. Across conditions, the less-impaired arm was the leading limb, and the nature of this coupling was independent from visual condition or head orientation. Also, mirror visual feedback did not affect the intensity of the mean neuromuscular activity or the muscle activity of the Triceps Brachii Longus. It was concluded that the positive effects of mirror visual feedback in children with SHCP are not just the

  20. Online kinematic regulation by visual feedback for grasp versus transport during reach-to-pinch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nataraj, Raviraj; Pasluosta, Cristian; Li, Zong-Ming

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated novel kinematic performance parameters to understand regulation by visual feedback (VF) of the reaching hand on the grasp and transport components during the reach-to-pinch maneuver. Conventional metrics often signify discrete movement features to postulate sensory-based control effects (e.g., time for maximum velocity to signify feedback delay). The presented metrics of this study were devised to characterize relative vision-based control of the sub-movements across the entire maneuver. Movement performance was assessed according to reduced variability and increased efficiency of kinematic trajectories. Variability was calculated as the standard deviation about the observed mean trajectory for a given subject and VF condition across kinematic derivatives for sub-movements of inter-pad grasp (distance between thumb and index finger-pads; relative orientation of finger-pads) and transport (distance traversed by wrist). A Markov analysis then examined the probabilistic effect of VF on which movement component exhibited higher variability over phases of the complete maneuver. Jerk-based metrics of smoothness (minimal jerk) and energy (integrated jerk-squared) were applied to indicate total movement efficiency with VF. The reductions in grasp variability metrics with VF were significantly greater (pjerk, suggesting separate control pathways for each component. The Markov analysis indicated that VF preferentially regulates grasp over transport when continuous control is modeled probabilistically during the movement. Efficiency measures demonstrated VF to be more integral for early motor planning of grasp than transport in producing greater increases in smoothness and trajectory adjustments (i.e., jerk-energy) early compared to late in the movement cycle. These findings demonstrate the greater regulation by VF on kinematic performance of grasp compared to transport and how particular features of this relativistic control occur continually over the

  1. Randomized crossover trial of a pressure sensing visual feedback system to improve mask fitting in noninvasive ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Anne-Kathrin; Moghal, Mohammad; Morrell, Mary J; Simonds, Anita K

    2017-10-01

    A good mask fit, avoiding air leaks and pressure effects on the skin are key elements for a successful noninvasive ventilation (NIV). However, delivering practical training for NIV is challenging, and it takes time to build experience and competency. This study investigated whether a pressure sensing system with real-time visual feedback improved mask fitting. During an NIV training session, 30 healthcare professionals (14 trained in mask fitting and 16 untrained) performed two mask fittings on the same healthy volunteer in a randomized order: one using standard mask-fitting procedures and one with additional visual feedback on mask pressure on the nasal bridge. Participants were required to achieve a mask fit with low mask pressure and minimal air leak (bridge, perceived comfort of mask fit and staff- confidence were measured. Compared with standard mask fitting, a lower pressure was exerted on the nasal bridge using the feedback system (71.1 ± 17.6 mm Hg vs 63.2 ± 14.6 mm Hg, P bridge (74.5 ± 21.2 mm Hg vs 66.1 ± 17.4 mm Hg, P = 0.023 and 67 ± 12.1 mm Hg vs 60 ± 10.6 mm Hg, P = 0.002, respectively) using the feedback system and self-rated confidence increased in the untrained group. Real-time visual feedback using pressure sensing technology supported healthcare professionals during mask-fitting training, resulted in a lower pressure on the skin and better mask fit for the volunteer, with increased staff confidence. © 2017 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  2. Interactive navigation of segmented MR angiograms using simultaneous curved planar and volume visualizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schooten, B.W.; van Dijk, Elisabeth M.A.G.; Suinesiaputra, A.; Reiber, J.H.C.

    Purpose Interactive visualization is required to inspect and monitor the automatic segmentation of vessels derived from contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiography (CE-MRA). A dual-view visualization scheme consisting of curved planar reformation (CPR) and direct volume rendering (DVR) was

  3. Feed-forward, feedback and lateral interactions in membrane potentials and spike trains from the visual cortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, David; Roland, Per

    2006-01-01

    Neurons in the visual cortex receive input from the lateral geniculate nucleus (feed-forward), higher order visual areas (feedback) and local neurons in the surroundings (lateral interactions). Here we first briefly review the approximate timing and proportion of these three types of influences on the membrane potentials in visual areas 17, 18 and 19. Then we present original results from an independent component analysis of multiunit spike trains in the same visual areas to resolve the contribution from these three sources. We stimulated the visual cortex of the ferret with a small transient contrast square stimulus and recorded the multiunit activity in areas 17, 18 and 19 with single or multiple electrodes. The spike trains had three reproducible components having their maxima at 40, 55 and 105ms after the start of the presentation of the stimulus. The time course of the third component was significantly correlated with the population membrane potential in the supragranular layers of areas 17, 18 and 19. The first spike train component was interpreted as a feed-forward response, the second spike train component as driving the laterally spreading depolarization and the third spike train component as the firing caused by the lateral spreading- and the feedback depolarization.

  4. The effects of augmented visual feedback during balance training in Parkinson's disease: study design of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Maarten R C; van Wegen, Erwin E H; de Goede, Cees J T; Burgers-Bots, Ingrid A L; Beek, Peter J; Daffertshofer, Andreas; Kwakkel, Gert

    2013-10-04

    Patients with Parkinson's disease often suffer from reduced mobility due to impaired postural control. Balance exercises form an integral part of rehabilitative therapy but the effectiveness of existing interventions is limited. Recent technological advances allow for providing enhanced visual feedback in the context of computer games, which provide an attractive alternative to conventional therapy. The objective of this randomized clinical trial is to investigate whether a training program capitalizing on virtual-reality-based visual feedback is more effective than an equally-dosed conventional training in improving standing balance performance in patients with Parkinson's disease. Patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease will participate in a five-week balance training program comprising ten treatment sessions of 60 minutes each. Participants will be randomly allocated to (1) an experimental group that will receive balance training using augmented visual feedback, or (2) a control group that will receive balance training in accordance with current physical therapy guidelines for Parkinson's disease patients. Training sessions consist of task-specific exercises that are organized as a series of workstations. Assessments will take place before training, at six weeks, and at twelve weeks follow-up. The functional reach test will serve as the primary outcome measure supplemented by comprehensive assessments of functional balance, posturography, and electroencephalography. We hypothesize that balance training based on visual feedback will show greater improvements on standing balance performance than conventional balance training. In addition, we expect that learning new control strategies will be visible in the co-registered posturographic recordings but also through changes in functional connectivity.

  5. Effect of augmented visual feedback from a virtual reality simulation system on manual dexterity training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierinck, E; Puttemans, V; Swinnen, S; van Steenberghe, D

    2005-02-01

    Little research has been published about the impact of simulation technology on the learning process of novel motor skills. Especially the role of augmented feedback (FB) on the quality of performance and the transfer of the acquired behaviour to a no-augmented FB condition require further investigation. Therefore, novice dental students were randomly assigned to one of three groups and given the task of drilling a geometrical class 1 cavity. The FB group trained under augmented visual FB conditions, provided by the virtual reality (VR) system (DentSim). The no-FB group practised under normal vision conditions, in the absence of augmented FB. A control group performed the test sessions without participating in any training programme. All preparations were evaluated by the VR grading system according to four traditional (outline shape, floor depth, floor smoothness and wall inclination), and two critical, criteria (pulp exposure and damage to adjacent teeth). Performance analyses revealed an overall trend towards significant improvement with training for the experimental groups. The FB group obtained the highest scores. It scored better for floor depth (P < 0.001), whilst the no-FB group was best for floor smoothness (P < 0.005). However, at the retention tests, the FB group demonstrated inferior performance in comparison with the no-FB group. The transfer test on a traditional unit revealed no significant differences between the training groups. Consequently, drilling experience on a VR system under the condition of frequently provided FB and lack of any tutorial input was considered to be not beneficial to learning. The present data are discussed in view of the guidance hypothesis of FB, which refers to the apprentice's dependence on FB.

  6. Anatomy of hierarchy: feedforward and feedback pathways in macaque visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Nikola T; Vezoli, Julien; Chameau, Pascal; Falchier, Arnaud; Quilodran, René; Huissoud, Cyril; Lamy, Camille; Misery, Pierre; Giroud, Pascale; Ullman, Shimon; Barone, Pascal; Dehay, Colette; Knoblauch, Kenneth; Kennedy, Henry

    2014-01-01

    The laminar location of the cell bodies and terminals of interareal connections determines the hierarchical structural organization of the cortex and has been intensively studied. However, we still have only a rudimentary understanding of the connectional principles of feedforward (FF) and feedback (FB) pathways. Quantitative analysis of retrograde tracers was used to extend the notion that the laminar distribution of neurons interconnecting visual areas provides an index of hierarchical distance (percentage of supragranular labeled neurons [SLN]). We show that: 1) SLN values constrain models of cortical hierarchy, revealing previously unsuspected areal relations; 2) SLN reflects the operation of a combinatorial distance rule acting differentially on sets of connections between areas; 3) Supragranular layers contain highly segregated bottom-up and top-down streams, both of which exhibit point-to-point connectivity. This contrasts with the infragranular layers, which contain diffuse bottom-up and top-down streams; 4) Cell filling of the parent neurons of FF and FB pathways provides further evidence of compartmentalization; 5) FF pathways have higher weights, cross fewer hierarchical levels, and are less numerous than FB pathways. Taken together, the present results suggest that cortical hierarchies are built from supra- and infragranular counterstreams. This compartmentalized dual counterstream organization allows point-to-point connectivity in both bottom-up and top-down directions. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  7. The Importance of Visual Feedback Design in BCIs; from Embodiment to Motor Imagery Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimardani, Maryam; Nishio, Shuichi; Ishiguro, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Brain computer interfaces (BCIs) have been developed and implemented in many areas as a new communication channel between the human brain and external devices. Despite their rapid growth and broad popularity, the inaccurate performance and cost of user-training are yet the main issues that prevent their application out of the research and clinical environment. We previously introduced a BCI system for the control of a very humanlike android that could raise a sense of embodiment and agency in the operators only by imagining a movement (motor imagery) and watching the robot perform it. Also using the same setup, we further discovered that the positive bias of subjects' performance both increased their sensation of embodiment and improved their motor imagery skills in a short period. In this work, we studied the shared mechanism between the experience of embodiment and motor imagery. We compared the trend of motor imagery learning when two groups of subjects BCI-operated different looking robots, a very humanlike android's hands and a pair of metallic gripper. Although our experiments did not show a significant change of learning between the two groups immediately during one session, the android group revealed better motor imagery skills in the follow up session when both groups repeated the task using the non-humanlike gripper. This result shows that motor imagery skills learnt during the BCI-operation of humanlike hands are more robust to time and visual feedback changes. We discuss the role of embodiment and mirror neuron system in such outcome and propose the application of androids for efficient BCI training.

  8. The Importance of Visual Feedback Design in BCIs; from Embodiment to Motor Imagery Learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Alimardani

    Full Text Available Brain computer interfaces (BCIs have been developed and implemented in many areas as a new communication channel between the human brain and external devices. Despite their rapid growth and broad popularity, the inaccurate performance and cost of user-training are yet the main issues that prevent their application out of the research and clinical environment. We previously introduced a BCI system for the control of a very humanlike android that could raise a sense of embodiment and agency in the operators only by imagining a movement (motor imagery and watching the robot perform it. Also using the same setup, we further discovered that the positive bias of subjects' performance both increased their sensation of embodiment and improved their motor imagery skills in a short period. In this work, we studied the shared mechanism between the experience of embodiment and motor imagery. We compared the trend of motor imagery learning when two groups of subjects BCI-operated different looking robots, a very humanlike android's hands and a pair of metallic gripper. Although our experiments did not show a significant change of learning between the two groups immediately during one session, the android group revealed better motor imagery skills in the follow up session when both groups repeated the task using the non-humanlike gripper. This result shows that motor imagery skills learnt during the BCI-operation of humanlike hands are more robust to time and visual feedback changes. We discuss the role of embodiment and mirror neuron system in such outcome and propose the application of androids for efficient BCI training.

  9. Preparing the leg for ground contact in running: the contribution of feed-forward and visual feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Roy; Häufle, Daniel Florian Benedict; Blickhan, Reinhard

    2015-02-01

    While running on uneven ground, humans are able to negotiate visible but also camouflaged changes in ground level. Previous studies have shown that the leg kinematics before touch down change with ground level. The present study experimentally investigated the contributions of visual perception (visual feedback), proprioceptive feedback and feed-forward patterns to the muscle activity responsible for these adaptations. The activity of three bilateral lower limb muscles (m. gastrocnemius medialis, m. tibialis anterior and m. vastus medialis) of nine healthy subjects was recorded during running across visible (drop of 0, -5 and -10 cm) and camouflaged changes in ground level (drop of 0 and -10 cm). The results reveal that at touchdown with longer flight time, m. tibialis anterior activation decreases and m. vastus medialis activation increases purely by feed-forward driven (flight time-dependent) muscle activation patterns, while m. gastrocnemius medialis activation increase is additionally influenced by visual feedback. Thus, feed-forward driven muscle activation patterns are sufficient to explain the experimentally observed adjustments of the leg at touchdown. © 2015. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. A depth-based head-mounted visual display to aid navigation in partially sighted individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen L Hicks

    Full Text Available Independent navigation for blind individuals can be extremely difficult due to the inability to recognise and avoid obstacles. Assistive techniques such as white canes, guide dogs, and sensory substitution provide a degree of situational awareness by relying on touch or hearing but as yet there are no techniques that attempt to make use of any residual vision that the individual is likely to retain. Residual vision can restricted to the awareness of the orientation of a light source, and hence any information presented on a wearable display would have to limited and unambiguous. For improved situational awareness, i.e. for the detection of obstacles, displaying the size and position of nearby objects, rather than including finer surface details may be sufficient. To test whether a depth-based display could be used to navigate a small obstacle course, we built a real-time head-mounted display with a depth camera and software to detect the distance to nearby objects. Distance was represented as brightness on a low-resolution display positioned close to the eyes without the benefit focussing optics. A set of sighted participants were monitored as they learned to use this display to navigate the course. All were able to do so, and time and velocity rapidly improved with practise with no increase in the number of collisions. In a second experiment a cohort of severely sight-impaired individuals of varying aetiologies performed a search task using a similar low-resolution head-mounted display. The majority of participants were able to use the display to respond to objects in their central and peripheral fields at a similar rate to sighted controls. We conclude that the skill to use a depth-based display for obstacle avoidance can be rapidly acquired and the simplified nature of the display may appropriate for the development of an aid for sight-impaired individuals.

  11. 3D WEB VISUALIZATION OF ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION – INTEGRATION OF HETEROGENEOUS DATA SOURCES WHEN PROVIDING NAVIGATION AND INTERACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Herman

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available 3D information is essential for a number of applications used daily in various domains such as crisis management, energy management, urban planning, and cultural heritage, as well as pollution and noise mapping, etc. This paper is devoted to the issue of 3D modelling from the levels of buildings to cities. The theoretical sections comprise an analysis of cartographic principles for the 3D visualization of spatial data as well as a review of technologies and data formats used in the visualization of 3D models. Emphasis was placed on the verification of available web technologies; for example, X3DOM library was chosen for the implementation of a proof-of-concept web application. The created web application displays a 3D model of the city district of Nový Lískovec in Brno, the Czech Republic. The developed 3D visualization shows a terrain model, 3D buildings, noise pollution, and other related information. Attention was paid to the areas important for handling heterogeneous input data, the design of interactive functionality, and navigation assistants. The advantages, limitations, and future development of the proposed concept are discussed in the conclusions.

  12. Optimizing analysis, visualization, and navigation of large image data sets: one 5000-section CT scan can ruin your whole day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriole, Katherine P; Wolfe, Jeremy M; Khorasani, Ramin; Treves, S Ted; Getty, David J; Jacobson, Francine L; Steigner, Michael L; Pan, John J; Sitek, Arkadiusz; Seltzer, Steven E

    2011-05-01

    The technology revolution in image acquisition, instrumentation, and methods has resulted in vast data sets that far outstrip the human observers' ability to view, digest, and interpret modern medical images by using traditional methods. This may require a paradigm shift in the radiologic interpretation process. As human observers, radiologists must search for, detect, and interpret targets. Potential interventions should be based on an understanding of human perceptual and attentional abilities and limitations. New technologies and tools already in use in other fields can be adapted to the health care environment to improve medical image analysis, visualization, and navigation through large data sets. This historical psychophysical and technical review touches on a broad range of disciplines but focuses mainly on the analysis, visualization, and navigation of image data performed during the interpretive process. Advanced postprocessing, including three-dimensional image display, multimodality image fusion, quantitative measures, and incorporation of innovative human-machine interfaces, will likely be the future. Successful new paradigms will integrate image and nonimage data, incorporate workflow considerations, and be informed by evidence-based practices. This overview is meant to heighten the awareness of the complexities and limitations of how radiologists interact with images, particularly the large image sets generated today. Also addressed is how human-machine interface and informatics technologies could combine to transform the interpretation process in the future to achieve safer and better quality care for patients and a more efficient and effective work environment for radiologists. http://radiology.rsna.org/lookup/suppl/doi:10.1148/radiol.11091276/-/DC1. RSNA, 2011

  13. Towards Visual Navigation of an Autonomous Underwater Vehicle in Areas with Posidonia Oceanica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bonin-Font

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an exhaustive, extensive and detailed experimental assessment of different types of visual key-points in terms of robustness, stability and traceability, in images taken in marine areas densely colonized with Posidonia Oceanica (P.O.. This work has been focused mainly in two issues: a evaluating the  capacity of several image color and contrast enhancing preprocessing techniques to increase the image quality and the number of stable features, and b finding the pair feature detector/descriptor, from a wide range of different combinations, that maximizes the number of inlier correspondences in consecutive frames or frames that close a loop (images that overlap, taken at distant time instants, from different viewpoints or even with different environmental conditions. Conclusions extracted from both evaluations will affect directly the quality of visual odometers and/or the image registration processes involved in visual SLAM approaches.

  14. The effects of providing visual feedback and auditory stimulation using a robotic device on balance and gait abilities in persons with stroke: a pilot study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jae Ho Park; ; Yijung Chung

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of providing visual feedback and auditory stimulation using a robotic device on balance and gait abilities in stroke patients. Design...

  15. Real-Time Visual Feedback of Airflow in Voice Training: Aerodynamic Properties of Two Flow Ball Devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lã, Filipa M B; Wistbacka, Greta; Andrade, Pedro Amarante; Granqvist, Svante

    2017-05-01

    Flow ball devices have been used as teaching tools to provide visual real-time feedback of airflow during singing. This study aims at exploring static back pressure and ball height as function of flow for two devices, marketed as flow ball and floating ball game. This is a comparative descriptive study. A flow-driven vocal tract simulator was used to investigate the aerodynamic properties of these two devices, testing them for four different ball sizes. The flow range investigated was between 0 and 0.5 L/s. Audio, flow, pressure, and ball height were recorded. The flow pressure profiles for both tested devices were similar to those observed in previous studies on narrow tubes. For lifting the ball, both devices had a flow and a pressure threshold. The tested floating ball game required considerably higher back pressure for a given flow as compared with the flow ball. Both tested devices have similar effects on back pressure as straws of 3.7 and 3.0 mm in diameter for the flow ball and the floating ball game, respectively. One might argue that both devices could be used as tools for practicing semi-occluded vocal tract exercises, with the additional benefit of providing real-time visual feedback of airflow during phonation. The flow threshold, combined with the flow feedback, would increase awareness of flow, rather than of pressure, during exercises using a flow ball device. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Oral proton pump inhibitors disrupt horizontal cell-cone feedback and enhance visual hallucinations in macular degeneration patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanneken, Anne M; Babai, Norbert; Thoreson, Wallace B

    2013-02-27

    Visual hallucinations (VHs) occur in macular degeneration patients with poor vision but normal cognitive function. The underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. We report the identification of pharmaceutical agents that enhance VH and use these agents to examine the contribution of retinal neurons to this syndrome. We detail clinical observations on VH in five macular degeneration patients treated with proton pump inhibitors having the core structure, 2-pyridyl-methylsulfinyl-benzimidazole. We tested possible retinal mechanisms using paired whole cell recordings to examine effects of these compounds on feedback interactions between horizontal cells and cones in amphibian retina. Five patients with advanced wet macular degeneration described patterned VHs that were induced or enhanced by oral proton pump inhibitors. The abnormal images increased with light, disappeared in the dark, and originated in the retina, based on ophthalmodynamometry. Simultaneous paired whole cell recordings from amphibian cones and horizontal cells showed that 2-pyridyl-methylsulfinyl-benzimidazoles blocked the negative shift in voltage dependence and increase in amplitude of the calcium current (ICa) in cones that is induced by changes in horizontal cell membrane potential. These effects disrupt the negative feedback from horizontal cells to cones that is important for the formation of center-surround receptive fields in bipolar and ganglion cells, and thus for normal spatial and chromatic perception. Our study suggests that changes in the output of retinal neurons caused by disturbances in outer retinal feedback mechanisms can enhance patterned visual hallucinations.

  17. Alpha-beta and gamma rhythms subserve feedback and feedforward influences among human visual cortical areas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Michalareas, G; Vezoli, J; Pelt, S. van; Schoffelen, J.M; Kennedy, H; Fries, P

    2016-01-01

    ... inter-areal directed influences as measured with magnetoencephalography. We show that influences along feedforward projections predominate in the gamma band, whereas influences along feedback projections predominate in the alpha-beta band...

  18. Nonimmersive virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy and its application for the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome: an open-label pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kenji; Fukumori, Satoshi; Matsusaki, Takashi; Maruo, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Shinichi; Nishie, Hiroyuki; Takata, Ken; Mizuhara, Hiroaki; Mizobuchi, Satoshi; Nakatsuka, Hideki; Matsumi, Masaki; Gofuku, Akio; Yokoyama, Masataka; Morita, Kiyoshi

    2010-04-01

    Chronic pain conditions such as phantom limb pain and complex regional pain syndrome are difficult to treat, and traditional pharmacological treatment and invasive neural block are not always effective. Plasticity in the central nervous system occurs in these conditions and may be associated with pain. Mirror visual feedback therapy aims to restore normal cortical organization and is applied in the treatment of chronic pain conditions. However, not all patients benefit from this treatment. Virtual reality technology is increasingly attracting attention for medical application, including as an analgesic modality. An advanced mirror visual feedback system with virtual reality technology may have increased analgesic efficacy and benefit a wider patient population. In this preliminary work, we developed a virtual reality mirror visual feedback system and applied it to the treatment of complex regional pain syndrome. A small open-label case series. Five patients with complex regional pain syndrome received virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy once a week for five to eight sessions on an outpatient basis. Patients were monitored for continued medication use and pain intensity. Four of the five patients showed >50% reduction in pain intensity. Two of these patients ended their visits to our pain clinic after five sessions. Our results indicate that virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy is a promising alternative treatment for complex regional pain syndrome. Further studies are necessary before concluding that analgesia provided from virtual reality mirror visual feedback therapy is the result of reversing maladaptive changes in pain perception.

  19. Comparison of the effects of visual feedback training and unstable surface training on static and dynamic balance in patients with stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Hyuck-Soon; Kim, Jin-Hong; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2017-10-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the effects of visual feedback training and unstable surface training on the static and dynamic balance of stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] The study enrolled 20 stroke patients and randomly assigned them to visual feedback training and unstable surface training groups. Both groups performed 30 minutes of conventional exercise therapy twice a week for 4 weeks. In addition, the subjects in the visual feedback training group completed a visual feedback training regimen and the subjects in the unstable surface training group completed training on an unstable surface (30-minute session three times a week for 4 weeks in both groups). Static and dynamic balance parameters were recorded immediately before and after the 4 weeks of training. For data analysis, the paired and independent t-test was used to compare the two groups. [Results] In the visual feedback training group, the sway line at the postural sway of the center of pressure and trace length decreased significantly after training. In both groups, the sway range at the limits of stability in the anteroposterior and mediolateral directions increased significantly after training. [Conclusion] Visual feedback training was better at improving static and dynamic balance than unstable surface training in stroke patients.

  20. Ambiguity and visual word recognition: can feedback explain both homophone and polysemy effects?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pexman, P M; Lupker, S J

    1999-12-01

    In a lexical-decision task (LDT), Hino and Lupker (1996) reported a polysemy effect (faster response times for polysemous words [e.g., BANK]), and attributed this effect to enhanced feedback from the semantic system to orthographic units, for polysemous words. Using the same task, Pexman, Lupker, and Jared (in review) reported a homophone effect (slower response times for homophonic words [e.g., MAID]) and attributed this effect to inconsistent feedback from the phonological system to orthographic units, for homophones. In the present paper we test two predictions derived from this feedback explanation: Polysemy and homophone effects should (a) co-occur in a standard LDT (with pseudoword foils) and (b) both be larger with pseudohomophones (e.g., BRANE) as foils in LDT. The results supported both predictions.

  1. Optimizing Video Games for the Hearing Impaired : The Use of Haptic Feedback and Visual Cues in Games

    OpenAIRE

    Mäenpää, Heidi

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis was to see how games can be optimized for the hearing impaired users without adding greatly to the development costs. The objective was to collect data on the target group’s gaming habits and explore ways haptic feedback and visual cues could be used in games. Based on the findings the aim was to create a sound-based puzzle game and optimize that to the hearing impaired gamers. The initial research data was collected from 28 people in an online survey. The resul...

  2. ENCOURAGING ELECTRICITY SAVINGS IN A UNIVERSITY RESIDENTIAL HALL THROUGH A COMBINATION OF FEEDBACK, VISUAL PROMPTS, AND INCENTIVES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekker, Marthinus J; Cumming, Tania D; Osborne, Nikola K.P; Bruining, Angela M; McClean, Julia I; Leland, Louis S

    2010-01-01

    This experiment investigated the combined use of visual prompts, daily feedback, and rewards to reduce electricity consumption in a university residential hall. After a 17-day baseline period, the experimental intervention was introduced in the intervention hall, and no change was made in the control hall. Energy usage decreased in the intervention hall, but energy usage did not change appreciably in the control hall. In the intervention hall, mean daytime and nighttime savings were 16.2% and 10.7%, respectively, compared to savings of 3.8% (day) and 6.5% (night) in the control hall. PMID:21119909

  3. A Systematic Review of the Literature on Parenting of Young Children with Visual Impairments and the Adaptions for Video-Feedback Intervention to Promote Positive Parenting (VIPP)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Ellen G. C.; van Eijden, Ans J P M; Overbeek, Mathilde M.; Kef, Sabina; Sterkenburg, Paula S.; Schuengel, Carlo

    Secure parent-child attachment may help children to overcome the challenges of growing up with a visual or visual-and-intellectual impairment. A large literature exists that provides a blueprint for interventions that promote parental sensitivity and secure attachment. The Video-feedback

  4. Anatomy of hierarchy: feedforward and feedback pathways in macaque visual cortex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markov, N.T.; Vezoli, J.; Chameau, P.; Falchier, A.; Quilodran, R.; Huissoud, C.; Lamy, C.; Misery, P.; Giroud, P.; Ullman, S.; Barone, P.; Dehay, C.; Knoblauch, K.; Kennedy, H.

    2014-01-01

    The laminar location of the cell bodies and terminals of interareal connections determines the hierarchical structural organization of the cortex and has been intensively studied. However, we still have only a rudimentary understanding of the connectional principles of feedforward (FF) and feedback

  5. Adaptive learning in a compartmental model of visual cortex - how feedback enables stable category learning and refinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg eLayher

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The categorization of real world objects is often reflected in the similarity of their visual appearances. Such categories of objects do not necessarily form disjunct sets of objects, neither semantically nor visually. The relationship between categories can often be described in terms of a hierarchical structure. For instance, tigers and leopards build two separate mammalian categories, but both belong to the category of felines. In other words, tigers and leopards are subcategories of the category Felidae. In the last decades, the unsupervised learning of categories of visual input stimuli has been addressed by numerous approaches in machine learning as well as in the computational neurosciences. However, the question of what kind of mechanisms might be involved in the process of subcategory learning, or category refinement, remains a topic of active investigation. We propose a recurrent computational network architecture for the unsupervised learning of categorial and subcategorial visual input representations. During learning, the connection strengths of bottom-up weights from input to higher-level category representations are adapted according to the input activity distribution. In a similar manner, top-down weights learn to encode the characteristics of a specific stimulus category. Feedforward and feedback learning in combination realize an associative memory mechanism, enabling the selective top-down propagation of a category's feedback weight distribution. We suggest that the difference between the expected input encoded in the projective field of a category node and the current input pattern controls the amplification of feedforward-driven representations. Large enough differences trigger the recruitment of new representational resources and the establishment of (sub- category representations. We demonstrate the temporal evolution of such learning and show how the approach successully establishes category and subcategory

  6. Time-to-contact maps for navigation with a low resolution visual prosthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Chris; Barnes, Nick

    2012-01-01

    The perception of independently moving objects in the scene is an important capability for prosthetic vision, but is impeded by the limited resolution and dynamic range of current and near-term retinal prostheses. We propose a novel, biologically-inspired visual representation for prosthetic vision based on the recovery of time-to-contact (τ) with surfaces in the scene. The representation directly encodes the extent of motion towards the observer, placing greatest emphasis on objects posing an imminent threat of collision. Our results suggest the proposed τ-based representation may facilitate earlier perception of incoming objects, and provide clearer distinction between moving objects and the static structure of the scene compared with intensity and depth-based scene representations.

  7. Novel virtual reality system integrating online self-face viewing and mirror visual feedback for stroke rehabilitation: rationale and feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiri, Shimon; Feintuch, Uri; Lorber-Haddad, Adi; Moreh, Elior; Twito, Dvora; Tuchner-Arieli, Maya; Meiner, Zeev

    2012-01-01

    To introduce the rationale of a novel virtual reality system based on self-face viewing and mirror visual feedback, and to examine its feasibility as a rehabilitation tool for poststroke patients. A novel motion capture virtual reality system integrating online self-face viewing and mirror visual feedback has been developed for stroke rehabilitation.The system allows the replacement of the impaired arm by a virtual arm. Upon making small movements of the paretic arm, patients view themselves virtually performing healthy full-range movements. A sample of 6 patients in the acute poststroke phase received the virtual reality treatment concomitantly with conservative rehabilitation treatment. Feasibility was assessed during 10 sessions for each participant. All participants succeeded in operating the system, demonstrating its feasibility in terms of adherence and improvement in task performance. Patients' performance within the virtual environment and a set of clinical-functional measures recorded before the virtual reality treatment, at 1 week, and after 3 months indicated neurological status and general functioning improvement. These preliminary results indicate that this newly developed virtual reality system is safe and feasible. Future randomized controlled studies are required to assess whether this system has beneficial effects in terms of enhancing upper limb function and quality of life in poststroke patients.

  8. Joint coordination in young and older adults during quiet stance: effect of visual feedback of the center of pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Sandra Maria Sbeghen Ferreira; Duarte, Marcos

    2012-01-01

    How aging affects body sway and joint coordination during quiet standing was investigated under two visual feedback conditions provided on a monitor screen: fixed and moving cursor representing the center of pressure (COP) position measured by a platform. The across-time joint motion variance of ankle, knee, hip, mid-trunk, and cervical spine leading to COP displacement was analyzed using the uncontrolled manifold approach. The body sway was assessed by the COP displacement. Young and older adults showed greater ankle joint contribution to COP displacement than the other joints. However, older adults showed larger variability of knee and mid-trunk joint motions than young adults. During the moving condition, the ankle joint contribution decreased and hip joint contribution increased for both groups, but the COP displacement increased only for the older adults. We conclude that joint coordination and body sway during quiet standing can be modified by providing COP visual feedback and that joint coordination is affected by aging. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Navigation and Self-Semantic Location of Drones in Indoor Environments by Combining the Visual Bug Algorithm and Entropy-Based Vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maravall, Darío; de Lope, Javier; Fuentes, Juan P

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a hybrid algorithm for the self-semantic location and autonomous navigation of robots using entropy-based vision and visual topological maps. In visual topological maps the visual landmarks are considered as leave points for guiding the robot to reach a target point (robot homing) in indoor environments. These visual landmarks are defined from images of relevant objects or characteristic scenes in the environment. The entropy of an image is directly related to the presence of a unique object or the presence of several different objects inside it: the lower the entropy the higher the probability of containing a single object inside it and, conversely, the higher the entropy the higher the probability of containing several objects inside it. Consequently, we propose the use of the entropy of images captured by the robot not only for the landmark searching and detection but also for obstacle avoidance. If the detected object corresponds to a landmark, the robot uses the suggestions stored in the visual topological map to reach the next landmark or to finish the mission. Otherwise, the robot considers the object as an obstacle and starts a collision avoidance maneuver. In order to validate the proposal we have defined an experimental framework in which the visual bug algorithm is used by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) in typical indoor navigation tasks.

  10. Navigation and Self-Semantic Location of Drones in Indoor Environments by Combining the Visual Bug Algorithm and Entropy-Based Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Maravall

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a hybrid algorithm for the self-semantic location and autonomous navigation of robots using entropy-based vision and visual topological maps. In visual topological maps the visual landmarks are considered as leave points for guiding the robot to reach a target point (robot homing in indoor environments. These visual landmarks are defined from images of relevant objects or characteristic scenes in the environment. The entropy of an image is directly related to the presence of a unique object or the presence of several different objects inside it: the lower the entropy the higher the probability of containing a single object inside it and, conversely, the higher the entropy the higher the probability of containing several objects inside it. Consequently, we propose the use of the entropy of images captured by the robot not only for the landmark searching and detection but also for obstacle avoidance. If the detected object corresponds to a landmark, the robot uses the suggestions stored in the visual topological map to reach the next landmark or to finish the mission. Otherwise, the robot considers the object as an obstacle and starts a collision avoidance maneuver. In order to validate the proposal we have defined an experimental framework in which the visual bug algorithm is used by an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV in typical indoor navigation tasks.

  11. Bursting thalamic responses in awake monkey contribute to visual detection and are modulated by corticofugal feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania eOrtuno

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The lateral geniculate nucleus is the gateway for visual information en route to the visual cortex. Neural activity is characterized by the existence of 2 firing modes: burst and tonic. Originally associated with sleep, bursts have now been postulated to be a part of the normal visual response, structured to increase the probability of cortical activation, able to act as a wake-up call to the cortex. We investigated a potential role for burst in the detection of novel stimuli by recording neuronal activity in the LGN of behaving monkeys during a visual detection task. Our results show that bursts are often the neuron’s first response, and are more numerous in the response to attended target stimuli than to unattended distractor stimuli. Bursts are indicators of the task novelty, as repetition decreased bursting. Because the primary visual cortex is the major modulatory input to the LGN, we compared the results obtained in control conditions with those observed when cortical activity was reduced by TMS. This cortical deactivation reduced visual response related bursting by 90%. These results highlight a novel role for the thalamus, able to code higher order image attributes as important as novelty early in the thalamo-cortical conversation.

  12. Constructing a survey over time: Audio-visual feedback and theatre sketches in rural Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Véronique Hertrich

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge dissemination is an emerging issue in population studies, both in terms of ethics and data quality. The challenge is especially important in long term follow-up surveys and it requires methodological imagination when the population is illiterate. The paper presents the dissemination project developed in a demographic surveillance system implemented in rural Mali over the last 20 years. After basic experience of document transfer, the feedback strategy was developed through audiovisual shows and theatre sketches. The advantages and drawbacks of these media are discussed, in terms of scientific communication and the construction of dialogue with the target population.

  13. Anticipation- and error-related EEG signals during realistic human-machine interaction: a study on visual and tactile feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Perrin, Xavier; Siegwart, Roland; Millán, José del R

    2012-01-01

    The exploitation of EEG signatures of cognitive processes can provide valuable information to improve interaction with brain actuated devices. In this work we study these correlates in a realistic situation simulated in a virtual reality environment. We focus on cortical potentials linked to the anticipation of future events (i.e. the contingent negative variation, CNV) and error-related potentials elicited by both visual and tactile feedback. Experiments with 6 subjects show brain activity consistent with previous studies using simpler stimuli, both at the level of ERPs and single trial classification. Moreover, we observe comparable signals irrespective of whether the subject was required to perform motor actions. Altogether, these results support the possibility of using these signals for practical brain machine interaction.

  14. Mirror Visual Feedback Training Improves Intermanual Transfer in a Sport-Specific Task: A Comparison between Different Skill Levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian Steinberg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Mirror training therapy is a promising tool to initiate neural plasticity and facilitate the recovery process of motor skills after diseases such as stroke or hemiparesis by improving the intermanual transfer of fine motor skills in healthy people as well as in patients. This study evaluated whether these augmented performance improvements by mirror visual feedback (MVF could be used for learning a sport-specific skill and if the effects are modulated by skill level. A sample of 39 young, healthy, and experienced basketball and handball players and 41 novices performed a stationary basketball dribble task at a mirror box in a standing position and received either MVF or direct feedback. After four training days using only the right hand, performance of both hands improved from pre- to posttest measurements. Only the left hand (untrained performance of the experienced participants receiving MVF was more pronounced than for the control group. This indicates that intermanual motor transfer can be improved by MVF in a sport-specific task. However, this effect cannot be generalized to motor learning per se since it is modulated by individuals’ skill level, a factor that might be considered in mirror therapy research.

  15. A Manipulation of Visual Feedback during Gait Training in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quincy J. Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Visual cues are known to improve gait in Parkinson's disease (PD; however, the contribution of optic flow continues to be disputed. This study manipulated transverse line cues during two gait training interventions (6 weeks. PD subjects (N=42 were assigned to one of three groups: treadmill (TG, overground (OG, or control group (CG. Participants walked across lines placed on either treadmills or 16-meter carpets, respectively. The treadmill (TG offered a reduced dynamic flow from the environment, while lines presented on the ground (OG emphasized optic flow related to the participant's own displacement. Both interventions significantly improved (and maintained through retention period step length, thus improving walking velocity. Only the OG improved in the TUG test, while only the TG showed hints of improving (and maintaining motor symptoms. Since gait improvements were found in both training groups, we conclude that by reducing optic flow, gait benefits associated with visual cueing training can still be achieved.

  16. Real-time fMRI brain-computer interface: Development of a "motivational feedback" subsystem for the regulation of visual cue reactivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses O. Sokunbi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Here we present a novel neurofeedback subsystem for the presentation of motivationally relevant visual feedback during the self-regulation of functional brain activation. Our motivational neurofeedback approach uses functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI signals elicited by visual cues (pictures and related to motivational processes such as craving or hunger. The visual feedback subsystem provides simultaneous feedback through these images as their size corresponds to the magnitude of fMRI signal change from a target brain area. During self-regulation of cue-evoked brain responses, decreases and increases in picture size thus provide real motivational consequences in terms of cue approach versus cue avoidance, which increases face validity of the approach in applied settings. Further, the outlined approach comprises of neurofeedback (regulation and mirror runs that allow to control for non-specific and task-unrelated effects, such as habituation or neural adaptation. The approach was implemented in the Python programming language. Pilot data from 10 volunteers showed that participants were able to successfully down-regulate individually defined target areas, demonstrating feasibility of the approach. The newly developed visual feedback subsystem can be integrated into protocols for imaging-based brain-computer interfaces (BCI and may facilitate neurofeedback research and applications into healthy and dysfunctional motivational processes, such food craving or addiction.

  17. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia in pantomimed grasping: removing haptic feedback induces a switch from natural to pantomime-like grasps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Leslie Whitwell

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. When patient DF, who suffers from visual form agnosia, performs natural grasps, her in-flight hand aperture is scaled to the widths of targets ('grip scaling' that she cannot discriminate amongst. In contrast, when DF's pantomime grasps are based on a memory of a previewed object, her grip scaling is very poor. Her failure on this task has been interpreted as additional support for the dissociation between the use of object vision for action and object vision for perception. Curiously, however, when DF directs her pantomimed grasps towards a displaced imagined copy of a visible object where her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling does not appear to be particularly poor. In the first of two experiments, we revisit this previous work and show that her grip scaling in this real-time pantomime grasping task does not differ from controls, suggesting that terminal tactile feedback from a proxy of the target can maintain DF's grip scaling. In a second experiment with healthy participants, we tested a recent variant of a grasping task in which no tactile feedback is available (i.e. no haptic feedback by comparing the kinematics of target-directed grasps with and without haptic feedback to those of real-time pantomime grasps without haptic feedback. Compared to natural grasps, removing haptic feedback increased RT, slowed the velocity of the reach, reduced grip aperture, sharpened the slopes relating grip aperture to target width, and reduced the final grip aperture. All of these effects were also observed in the pantomime grasping task. Taken together, these results provide compelling support for the view that removing haptic feedback induces a switch from real-time visual control to one that depends more on visual perception and cognitive supervision.

  18. Navigating on handheld displays: Dynamic versus Static Keyhole Navigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehra, S.; Werkhoven, P.; Worring, M.

    2006-01-01

    Handheld displays leave little space for the visualization and navigation of spatial layouts representing rich information spaces. The most common navigation method for handheld displays is static peephole navigation: The peephole is static and we move the spatial layout behind it (scrolling). A

  19. Interactive balance training integrating sensor-based visual feedback of movement performance: a pilot study in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwenk, Michael; Grewal, Gurtej S; Honarvar, Bahareh; Schwenk, Stefanie; Mohler, Jane; Khalsa, Dharma S; Najafi, Bijan

    2014-12-13

    Wearable sensor technology can accurately measure body motion and provide incentive feedback during exercising. The aim of this pilot study was to evaluate the effectiveness and user experience of a balance training program in older adults integrating data from wearable sensors into a human-computer interface designed for interactive training. Senior living community residents (mean age 84.6) with confirmed fall risk were randomized to an intervention (IG, n = 17) or control group (CG, n = 16). The IG underwent 4 weeks (twice a week) of balance training including weight shifting and virtual obstacle crossing tasks with visual/auditory real-time joint movement feedback using wearable sensors. The CG received no intervention. Outcome measures included changes in center of mass (CoM) sway, ankle and hip joint sway measured during eyes open (EO) and eyes closed (EC) balance test at baseline and post-intervention. Ankle-hip postural coordination was quantified by a reciprocal compensatory index (RCI). Physical performance was quantified by the Alternate-Step-Test (AST), Timed-up-and-go (TUG), and gait assessment. User experience was measured by a standardized questionnaire. After the intervention sway of CoM, hip, and ankle were reduced in the IG compared to the CG during both EO and EC condition (p = .007-.042). Improvement was obtained for AST (p = .037), TUG (p = .024), fast gait speed (p = . 010), but not normal gait speed (p = .264). Effect sizes were moderate for all outcomes. RCI did not change significantly. Users expressed a positive training experience including fun, safety, and helpfulness of sensor-feedback. Results of this proof-of-concept study suggest that older adults at risk of falling can benefit from the balance training program. Study findings may help to inform future exercise interventions integrating wearable sensors for guided game-based training in home- and community environments. Future studies should evaluate the

  20. Visualized Multiprobe Electrical Impedance Measurements with STM Tips Using Shear Force Feedback Control

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    Luis Botaya

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Here we devise a multiprobe electrical measurement system based on quartz tuning forks (QTFs and metallic tips capable of having full 3D control over the position of the probes. The system is based on the use of bent tungsten tips that are placed in mechanical contact (glue-free solution with a QTF sensor. Shear forces acting in the probe are measured to control the tip-sample distance in the Z direction. Moreover, the tilting of the tip allows the visualization of the experiment under the optical microscope, allowing the coordination of the probes in X and Y directions. Meanwhile, the metallic tips are connected to a current–voltage amplifier circuit to measure the currents and thus the impedance of the studied samples. We discuss here the different aspects that must be addressed when conducting these multiprobe experiments, such as the amplitude of oscillation, shear force distance control, and wire tilting. Different results obtained in the measurement of calibration samples and microparticles are presented. They demonstrate the feasibility of the system to measure the impedance of the samples with a full 3D control on the position of the nanotips.

  1. Naturalistic driving observations of manual and visual-manual interactions with navigation systems and mobile phones while driving.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Christoph, M. Nes, N. van & Knapper, A.

    2014-01-01

    This paper discusses a naturalistic driving study on the use of mobile phones and navigation systems while driving. Manual interactions with these devices while driving can cause distraction from the driving task and reduce traffic safety. In this study 21 subjects were observed for 5 weeks. Their

  2. EMG and kinematic analysis of sensorimotor control for patients after stroke using cyclic voluntary movement with visual feedback

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Rong

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical scales are often used to evaluate upper-limb deficits. The objective of this study is to investigate the parameters during voluntary arm tracking at different velocities for evaluating motor control performance after stroke. Methods Eight hemiplegic chronic stroke subjects were recruited to perform voluntary movements of elbow flexion and extension by following sinusoidal trajectories from 30 deg to 90 deg at six velocities in the horizontal plane by completing 3, 6, 8, 12, 15, 18 flexion and extension cycles in 36 seconds in a single trial, and the peak velocities ranged from 15.7 to 94.2 deg/s. The actual elbow angle and the target position were displayed as real-time visual feedback. The angular displacement of the arm and electromyographic (EMG signals of biceps and triceps were captured to evaluate the sensorimotor control of the affected and unaffected side. Results The results showed significant differences in the root mean square error (RMSE, response delay (RD and cocontraction index (CI when the affected and unaffected sides were compared during the arm tracking experiment (P Conclusions The method and parameters have potential for clinical use in quantitatively evaluating the sensorimotor deficiencies for patients after stroke about the accuracy of motion, response delay and cocontraction between muscle pairs.

  3. Positive effect of balance training with visual feedback on standing balance abilities in people with incomplete spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayenko, D G; Alekhina, M I; Masani, K; Vette, A H; Obata, H; Popovic, M R; Nakazawa, K

    2010-12-01

    (1) To evaluate the learning potential and performance improvements during standing balance training with visual feedback (VBT) in individuals with incomplete spinal cord injury (SCI) and (2) to determine whether standing static and dynamic stability during training-irrelevant tasks can be improved after the VBT. National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities, Tokorozawa, Japan. Six participants with chronic motor and sensory incomplete SCI who were able to stand for at least 5 min without any form of assistive device performed the VBT, 3 days per week, for a total of 12 sessions. During the training, participants stood on a force platform and were instructed to shift their center of pressure in the indicated directions as represented by a cursor on a monitor. The performance and the rate of learning were monitored throughout the training period. Before and after the program, static and dynamic stability was assessed. All participants showed substantial improvements in the scores, which varied between 236±94 and 130±14% of the initial values for different exercises. The balance performance during training-irrelevant tasks was significantly improved: for example, the area inside the stability zone after the training reached 221±86% of the pre-training values. Postural control can be enhanced in individuals with incomplete SCI using VBT. All participants showed substantial improvements during standing in both game performance and training-irrelevant tasks after the VBT.

  4. ACCURACY EVALUATION OF THE OBJECT LOCATION VISUALIZATION FOR GEO-INFORMATION AND DISPLAY SYSTEMS OF MANNED AIRCRAFTS NAVIGATION COMPLEXES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. O. Kostishin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the issue of accuracy estimating for the object location display in the geographic information systems and display systems of manned aircrafts navigation complexes. Application features of liquid crystal screens with a different number of vertical and horizontal pixels are considered at displaying of geographic information data on different scales. Estimation display of navigation parameters values on board the aircraft is done in two ways: a numeric value is directly displayed on the screen of multi-color indicator, and a silhouette of the object is formed on the screen on a substrate background, which is a graphical representation of area map in the flight zone. Various scales of area digital map display currently used in the aviation industry have been considered. Calculation results of one pixel scale interval, depending on the specifications of liquid crystal screen and zoom of the map display area on the multifunction digital display, are given. The paper contains experimental results of the accuracy evaluation for area position display of the aircraft based on the data from the satellite navigation system and inertial navigation system, obtained during the flight program run of the real object. On the basis of these calculations a family of graphs was created for precision error display of the object reference point position using the onboard indicators with liquid crystal screen with different screen resolutions (6 "×8", 7.2 "×9.6", 9"×12" for two map display scales (1:0 , 25 km, 1-2 km. These dependency graphs can be used both to assess the error value of object area position display in existing navigation systems and to calculate the error value in upgrading facilities.

  5. Trunk stabilization during sagittal pelvic tilt: from trunk-on-pelvis to trunk-in-space due to vestibular and visual feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Drunen, Paul; van der Helm, Frans C T; van Dieën, Jaap H; Happee, Riender

    2016-03-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the human ability to stabilize the trunk in space during pelvic tilt. Upper body sway was evoked in kneeling-seated healthy subjects by angular platform perturbations with a rotation around a virtual low-back pivot point between the L4 and L5 vertebrae. To investigate motor control modulation, variations in task instruction (balance naturally or minimize trunk sway), vision (eyes open or closed), and perturbation bandwidth (from 0.2 up to 1, 3, or 10 Hz) were applied. Cocontraction and proprioceptive muscle spindle feedback were associated with minimizing low-back flexion/extension (trunk-on-pelvis stabilization), while vestibular and visual feedback were supposed to contribute to trunk-in-space stabilization. Trunk-in-space stabilization was only observed with the minimize trunk sway task instruction, while the task instruction to balance naturally led to trunk-on-pelvis stabilization with trunk rotations even exceeding the perturbations. This indicates that vestibular feedback is used when minimizing trunk sway but has only a minor contribution during natural trunk stabilization in the sagittal plane. The eyes open condition resulted in reduced global trunk rotations and increased global trunk reflexive responses, demonstrating effective visual contributions to trunk-in-space stabilization. On the other hand, increasing perturbation bandwidth caused a decreased feedback contribution leading to deteriorated trunk-in-space stabilization. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Hand rim wheelchair propulsion training using biomechanical real-time visual feedback based on motor learning theory principles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Ian; Gagnon, Dany; Gallagher, Jere; Boninger, Michael

    2010-01-01

    As considerable progress has been made in laboratory-based assessment of manual wheelchair propulsion biomechanics, the necessity to translate this knowledge into new clinical tools and treatment programs becomes imperative. The objective of this study was to describe the development of a manual wheelchair propulsion training program aimed to promote the development of an efficient propulsion technique among long-term manual wheelchair users. Motor learning theory principles were applied to the design of biomechanical feedback-based learning software, which allows for random discontinuous real-time visual presentation of key spatiotemporal and kinetic parameters. This software was used to train a long-term wheelchair user on a dynamometer during 3 low-intensity wheelchair propulsion training sessions over a 3-week period. Biomechanical measures were recorded with a SmartWheel during over ground propulsion on a 50-m level tile surface at baseline and 3 months after baseline. Training software was refined and administered to a participant who was able to improve his propulsion technique by increasing contact angle while simultaneously reducing stroke cadence, mean resultant force, peak and mean moment out of plane, and peak rate of rise of force applied to the pushrim after training. The proposed propulsion training protocol may lead to favorable changes in manual wheelchair propulsion technique. These changes could limit or prevent upper limb injuries among manual wheelchair users. In addition, many of the motor learning theory-based techniques examined in this study could be applied to training individuals in various stages of rehabilitation to optimize propulsion early on.

  7. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a "natural" grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Robert L; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. "Natural" prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object ("haptics-based object information") once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (pantomimed) forms of prehension are thought to recruit different cortical structures: patient DF, who has visual form agnosia following bilateral damage to her temporal-occipital cortex, loses her ability to scale her grasp aperture to the size of targets ("grip scaling") when her prehensile movements are based on a memory of a target previewed 2 s before the cue to respond or when her grasps are directed towards a visible virtual target but she is denied haptics-based information about the target. In the first of two experiments, we show that when DF performs real-time pantomimed grasps towards a 7.5 cm displaced imagined copy of a visible object such that her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling is in fact quite normal. This finding suggests that real-time vision and terminal tactile feedback are sufficient to preserve DF's grip scaling slopes. In the second experiment, we examined an "unnatural" grasping task variant in which a tangible target (along with any proxy such as the surface of the table) is denied (i.e., no terminal tactile feedback). To do this, we used a mirror-apparatus to present virtual targets with and without a spatially coincident copy for the participants to grasp. We compared the grasp kinematics from trials with and without terminal tactile feedback to a real-time-pantomimed grasping task (one without tactile feedback) in which participants visualized a copy of the visible target as instructed in our laboratory in the

  8. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a “natural” grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitwell, Robert L.; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. “Natural” prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object (“haptics-based object information”) once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (pantomimed) forms of prehension are thought to recruit different cortical structures: patient DF, who has visual form agnosia following bilateral damage to her temporal-occipital cortex, loses her ability to scale her grasp aperture to the size of targets (“grip scaling”) when her prehensile movements are based on a memory of a target previewed 2 s before the cue to respond or when her grasps are directed towards a visible virtual target but she is denied haptics-based information about the target. In the first of two experiments, we show that when DF performs real-time pantomimed grasps towards a 7.5 cm displaced imagined copy of a visible object such that her fingers make contact with the surface of the table, her grip scaling is in fact quite normal. This finding suggests that real-time vision and terminal tactile feedback are sufficient to preserve DF’s grip scaling slopes. In the second experiment, we examined an “unnatural” grasping task variant in which a tangible target (along with any proxy such as the surface of the table) is denied (i.e., no terminal tactile feedback). To do this, we used a mirror-apparatus to present virtual targets with and without a spatially coincident copy for the participants to grasp. We compared the grasp kinematics from trials with and without terminal tactile feedback to a real-time-pantomimed grasping task (one without tactile feedback) in which participants visualized a copy of the visible target as instructed in our

  9. Online visual feedback during error-free channel trials leads to active unlearning of movement dynamics: evidence for adaptation to trajectory prediction errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Lago-Rodriguez

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Prolonged exposure to movement perturbations leads to creation of motor memories which decay towards previous states when the perturbations are removed. However, it remains unclear whether this decay is due only to a spontaneous and passive recovery of the previous state. It has recently been reported that activation of reinforcement-based learning mechanisms delays the onset of the decay. This raises the question whether other motor learning mechanisms may also contribute to the retention and/or decay of the motor memory. Therefore, we aimed to test whether mechanisms of error-based motor adaptation are active during the decay of the motor memory. Forty-five right-handed participants performed point-to-point reaching movements under an external dynamic perturbation. We measured the expression of the motor memory through error-clamped (EC trials, in which lateral forces constrained movements to a straight line towards the target. We found greater and faster decay of the motor memory for participants who had access to full online visual feedback during these EC trials (Cursor group, when compared with participants who had no EC feedback regarding movement trajectory (Arc group. Importantly, we did not find between-group differences in adaptation to the external perturbation. In addition, we found greater decay of the motor memory when we artificially increased feedback errors through the manipulation of visual feedback (Augmented-Error group. Our results then support the notion of an active decay of the motor memory, suggesting that adaptive mechanisms are involved in correcting for the mismatch between predicted movement trajectories and actual sensory feedback, which leads to greater and faster decay of the motor memory.

  10. Visual motion-sensitive neurons in the bumblebee brain convey information about landmarks during a navigational task

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    Marcel eMertes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bees use visual memories to find the spatial location of previously learnt food sites. Characteristic learning flights help acquiring these memories at newly discovered foraging locations where landmarks - salient objects in the vicinity of the goal location - can play an important role in guiding the animal’s homing behavior. Although behavioral experiments have shown that bees can use a variety of visual cues to distinguish objects as landmarks, the question of how landmark features are encoded by the visual system is still open. Recently, it could be shown that motion cues are sufficient to allow bees localizing their goal using landmarks that can hardly be discriminated from the background texture. Here, we tested the hypothesis that motion sensitive neurons in the bee’s visual pathway provide information about such landmarks during a learning flight and might, thus, play a role for goal localization. We tracked learning flights of free-flying bumblebees (Bombus terrestris in an arena with distinct visual landmarks, reconstructed the visual input during these flights, and replayed ego-perspective movies to tethered bumblebees while recording the activity of direction-selective wide-field neurons in their optic lobe. By comparing neuronal responses during a typical learning flight and targeted modifications of landmark properties in this movie we demonstrate that these objects are indeed represented in the bee’s visual motion pathway. We find that object-induced responses vary little with object texture, which is in agreement with behavioral evidence. These neurons thus convey information about landmark properties that are useful for view-based homing.

  11. Feasibility of visual instrumented movement feedback therapy in individuals with motor incomplete spinal cord injury walking on a treadmill

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    Daniel eSchließmann

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI leads to motor and sensory deficits. Even in ambulatory persons with good motor function an impaired proprioception may result in an insecure gait. Limited internal afferent feedback (FB can be compensated by provision of external FB by therapists or technical systems. Progress in computational power of motion analysis systems allows for implementation of instrumented real-time FB. The aim of this study was to test if individuals with iSCI can normalize their gait kinematics during FB and more importantly maintain an improvement after therapy. Methods: Individuals with chronic iSCI had to complete 6 days (one day per week of treadmill-based FB training with a 2 weeks pause after 3 days of training. Each day consists of an initial gait analysis followed by 2 blocks with FB/no-FB. During FB the deviation of the mean knee angle during swing from a speed matched reference (norm distance, ND is visualized as a number. The task consists of lowering the ND, which was updated after every stride. Prior to the tests in patients the in-house developed FB implementation was tested in healthy subjects with an artificial movement task. Results: 4 of 5 study participants benefited from FB in the short and medium term. Decrease of mean ND was highest during the first 3 sessions (from 3.93±1.54 to 2.18±1.04. After the pause mean ND stayed in the same range than before. In the last 3 sessions the mean ND decreased slower (2.40±1.18 to 2.20±0.90. Direct influences of FB ranged from 60% to 15% of reduction in mean ND compared to initial gait analysis and from 20% to 1% compared to no-FB sessions. Conclusions: Instrumented kinematic real-time FB may serve as an effective adjunct to established gait therapies in normalizing the gait pattern after incomplete spinal cord injury. Further studies with larger patient groups need to prove long term learning and the successful transfer of newly acquired skills to

  12. The Role of Audio-Visual Feedback in a Thought-Based Control of a Humanoid Robot: A BCI Study in Healthy and Spinal Cord Injured People.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidoni, Emmanuele; Gergondet, Pierre; Fusco, Gabriele; Kheddar, Abderrahmane; Aglioti, Salvatore M

    2017-06-01

    The efficient control of our body and successful interaction with the environment are possible through the integration of multisensory information. Brain-computer interface (BCI) may allow people with sensorimotor disorders to actively interact in the world. In this study, visual information was paired with auditory feedback to improve the BCI control of a humanoid surrogate. Healthy and spinal cord injured (SCI) people were asked to embody a humanoid robot and complete a pick-and-place task by means of a visual evoked potentials BCI system. Participants observed the remote environment from the robot's perspective through a head mounted display. Human-footsteps and computer-beep sounds were used as synchronous/asynchronous auditory feedback. Healthy participants achieved better placing accuracy when listening to human footstep sounds relative to a computer-generated sound. SCI people demonstrated more difficulty in steering the robot during asynchronous auditory feedback conditions. Importantly, subjective reports highlighted that the BCI mask overlaying the display did not limit the observation of the scenario and the feeling of being in control of the robot. Overall, the data seem to suggest that sensorimotor-related information may improve the control of external devices. Further studies are required to understand how the contribution of residual sensory channels could improve the reliability of BCI systems.

  13. Understanding the International Space Station Crew Perspective following Long-Duration Missions through Data Analytics & Visualization of Crew Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Cody; Meza, David; Schoenstein, Nicole; Schuh, Susan

    2017-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) first became a home and research laboratory for NASA and International Partner crewmembers over 16 years ago. Each ISS mission lasts approximately 6 months and consists of three to six crewmembers. After returning to Earth, most crewmembers participate in an extensive series of 30+ debriefs intended to further understand life onboard ISS and allow crews to reflect on their experiences. Examples of debrief data collected include ISS crew feedback about sleep, dining, payload science, scheduling and time planning, health & safety, and maintenance. The Flight Crew Integration (FCI) Operational Habitability (OpsHab) team, based at Johnson Space Center (JSC), is a small group of Human Factors engineers and one stenographer that has worked collaboratively with the NASA Astronaut office and ISS Program to collect, maintain, disseminate and analyze this data. The database provides an exceptional and unique resource for understanding the "crew perspective" on long duration space missions. Data is formatted and categorized to allow for ease of search, reporting, and ultimately trending, in order to understand lessons learned, recurring issues and efficiencies gained over time. Recently, the FCI OpsHab team began collaborating with the NASA JSC Knowledge Management team to provide analytical analysis and visualization of these over 75,000 crew comments in order to better ascertain the crew's perspective on long duration spaceflight and gain insight on changes over time. In this initial phase of study, a text mining framework was used to cluster similar comments and develop measures of similarity useful for identifying relevant topics affecting crew health or performance, locating similar comments when a particular issue or item of operational interest is identified, and providing search capabilities to identify information pertinent to future spaceflight systems and processes for things like procedure development and training. In addition

  14. Concurrent audio-visual feedback for supporting drivers at intersections : a study using two linked driving simulators.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtenbos, M. Winter, J.C.F. de Hale, A.R. Wieringa, P.A. & Hagenzieker, M.P.

    2016-01-01

    A large portion of road traffic crashes occur at intersections for the reason that drivers lack necessary visual information. This research examined the effects of an audio-visual display that provides real-time sonification and visualization of the speed and direction of another car approaching the

  15. Learning navigation – Learning with navigation. A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Jean-Yves

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this review paper is to retrieve from the existing literature relevant information (1 about the learning curve of the currently existing navigation systems and (2 about the use of navigation system for teaching orthopaedic procedures. All studies reporting on the learning curve of navigation systems support the hypothesis that computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty (TKA involves only a short learning curve and that beginners can obtain good results from the beginning of their experience, as navigation provides continuous feedback during all phases of the knee replacement surgery and allows for correcting any bone cut errors. Interestingly, there is no comparable research on the learning curve of TKA with standard, manual instrumentation. One might postulate that this learning curve might be longer than with navigation, with potentially a higher rate of outliers. The current literature does support that navigation may be an efficient teaching tool for both experienced orthopaedic surgeons and trainees. Experienced surgeons may improve their skills with conventional techniques and learn new techniques more efficiently and more quickly. Trainees may have a better understanding of the procedure and learn standard techniques with a shorter learning curve. This is probably due to the immediate feedback of navigation systems. A shorter learning curve may be associated with improved clinical and functional results for the patient during this critical period. However, there is no evidence that training with navigation excludes trainees from the need to work in academic environments with experienced teachers. Future techniques in training may include the development of laboratory simulation procedures using navigated feedback.

  16. Learning navigation – Learning with navigation. A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Picard, Frederic

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this review paper is to retrieve from the existing literature relevant information (1) about the learning curve of the currently existing navigation systems and (2) about the use of navigation system for teaching orthopaedic procedures. All studies reporting on the learning curve of navigation systems support the hypothesis that computer-navigated total knee arthroplasty (TKA) involves only a short learning curve and that beginners can obtain good results from the beginning of their experience, as navigation provides continuous feedback during all phases of the knee replacement surgery and allows for correcting any bone cut errors. Interestingly, there is no comparable research on the learning curve of TKA with standard, manual instrumentation. One might postulate that this learning curve might be longer than with navigation, with potentially a higher rate of outliers. The current literature does support that navigation may be an efficient teaching tool for both experienced orthopaedic surgeons and trainees. Experienced surgeons may improve their skills with conventional techniques and learn new techniques more efficiently and more quickly. Trainees may have a better understanding of the procedure and learn standard techniques with a shorter learning curve. This is probably due to the immediate feedback of navigation systems. A shorter learning curve may be associated with improved clinical and functional results for the patient during this critical period. However, there is no evidence that training with navigation excludes trainees from the need to work in academic environments with experienced teachers. Future techniques in training may include the development of laboratory simulation procedures using navigated feedback. PMID:28573966

  17. Influence of Whole-Body Vibration Training Without Visual Feedback on Balance and Lower-Extremity Muscle Strength of the Elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shiuan-Yu; Lai, Chung-Liang; Chang, Kai-Ling; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Lee, Meng-Chih; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of whole-body vibration (WBV) training without visual feedback on balance and lower-extremity muscle strength in the elderly. Elderly subjects who did not exercise regularly participated in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into a WBV with eyes open group, a visual feedback-deprived plus WBV (VFDWBV) group, and a control group (0 Hz, eyes open). WBV training was provided over a 3-month period, 3 times per week for 5 min each session. Balance performance was measured with the limits of stability test, and muscle strength was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. A total of 45 elderly subjects with an average age of 69.22 ± 3.97 years, divided into a WBV group (n = 14), a VFDWBV group (n = 17), and a control group (n = 14), completed the trial. Statistically significant differences were found in the balance performance of the 3 groups at different time points (time × group interaction: F = 13.213, P strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles had time × group interactions: F = 29.604, P lower-extremity muscle strength than the WBV and control groups. The 6-month follow-up showed that the rates of hospital visits for medical services due to falls were 0% in the WBV group (0/14), 0% in the VFDWBV group (0/17), and 28.57% in the control group (4/14). Results showed that WBV training at 20 Hz without visual feedback can significantly improve the balance performance and lower-extremity muscle strength of the elderly. PMID:26844514

  18. Smartphone-Based Visual Feedback Trunk Control Training Using a Gyroscope and Mirroring Technology for Stroke Patients: Single-blinded, Randomized Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Feasibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Doo Chul; Song, Chang Ho

    2016-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the preliminary efficacy and feasibility of smartphone-based visual feedback trunk control training (SPVFTCT) for improving balance and trunk performance in stroke patients. Twenty-four patients who had experienced a stroke more than 6 months previously and could sit and walk independently participated in the study. The participants were allocated to a SPVFTCT (n = 12) or to a control group (n = 12). Both groups completed five 80-minute sessions per week of conventional rehabilitation for 4 weeks. The SPVFTCT group additionally received three 20-minute sessions per week of SPVFTCT for 4 weeks. The outcome was assessed using static balance assessment, the modified functional reach test, the timed up and go test, and the trunk impairment scale. Feasibility of SPVFTCT was evaluated by retention, adherence, acceptability, and safety. The static balance assessment, modified functional reach test, timed up and go test, and trunk impairment scale scores in the SPVFTCT group improved significantly compared to those in the control group (P performance in stroke patients. Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME CME OBJECTIVES:: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Understand the role of trunk control in postural stability and functional improvement; (2) Describe the benefits of smartphone-based visual feedback trunk control training (SPVFTCT); and (3)Discuss the feasibility of incorporating smartphone-based visual feedback trunk control training in stroke rehabilitation. Advanced : The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this activity for a maximum of 1.5 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s). Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their

  19. Influence of Whole-Body Vibration Training Without Visual Feedback on Balance and Lower-Extremity Muscle Strength of the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Shiuan-Yu; Lai, Chung-Liang; Chang, Kai-Ling; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Lee, Meng-Chih; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of whole-body vibration (WBV) training without visual feedback on balance and lower-extremity muscle strength in the elderly.Elderly subjects who did not exercise regularly participated in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into a WBV with eyes open group, a visual feedback-deprived plus WBV (VFDWBV) group, and a control group (0 Hz, eyes open). WBV training was provided over a 3-month period, 3 times per week for 5 min each session. Balance performance was measured with the limits of stability test, and muscle strength was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer.A total of 45 elderly subjects with an average age of 69.22  ±  3.97 years, divided into a WBV group (n = 14), a VFDWBV group (n = 17), and a control group (n = 14), completed the trial. Statistically significant differences were found in the balance performance of the 3 groups at different time points (time × group interaction: F = 13.213, P strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles had time × group interactions: F = 29.604, P muscle strength than the WBV and control groups. The 6-month follow-up showed that the rates of hospital visits for medical services due to falls were 0% in the WBV group (0/14), 0% in the VFDWBV group (0/17), and 28.57% in the control group (4/14).Results showed that WBV training at 20  Hz without visual feedback can significantly improve the balance performance and lower-extremity muscle strength of the elderly.

  20. The effect of virtual visual feedback on supernumerary phantom limb pain in a patient with high cervical cord injury: a single-case design study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katayama, Osamu; Iki, Hidemasa; Sawa, Shunji; Osumi, Michihiro; Morioka, Shu

    2015-01-01

    We characterized the effect of virtual visual feedback (VVF) on supernumerary phantom limb pain (SPLP) in a patient with high cervical cord injury. The subject was a 22-year-old man diagnosed with complete spinal cord injury (level C2) approximately 5 years ago. We applied the ABA'B' single-case design and set phases B and B' as intervention phases for comparison. SPLP significantly improved in comparison of phase A with phase B and phase A with phase B'. We suggest that VVF reduces SPLP and the effect lasts after VVF.

  1. Postural effects of the scaled display of visual foot center of pressure feedback under different somatosensory conditions at the foot and the ankle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Bertrand, Romain; Pinsault, Nicolas

    2008-10-01

    To assess the effects of the scaled display of visual foot center of pressure (COP) feedback on upright postural control under different somatosensory conditions at the foot and the ankle. Before and after intervention trials. University medical bioengineering laboratory. Young healthy adults (N=8; mean age, 23+/-2.5 y; mean body weight, 76.8+/-11.2 kg; mean height, 179.8+/-6.8 cm). Participants were asked to stand upright, as immobile as possible, in 3 visual conditions: a stationary cross feedback (SC-FB) condition and 2 different foot COP feedback (COP-FB) conditions involving increasing scale displays of 2:1 (COP-FB2) and of 10:1 (COP-FB10). These latter conditions correspond to the ratio between the COP displacement on the screen and the actual COP displacement measured by the force platform. This postural task was executed on 2 (firm, foam) support surface conditions. In the foam condition, a 2-cm thick foam support surface was placed under the participants' feet to alter the quality and/or quantity of somatosensory information at the foot and the ankle. COP displacements were recorded using a force platform. In the firm support surface condition, no significant difference was observed between the COP-FB2 and the SC-FB conditions, whereas the COP-FB10 condition yielded decreased COP displacements relative to the SC-FB condition. In the foam support surface condition, both the COP-FB2 and the COP-FB10 conditions yielded decreased COP displacements relative to the SC-FB condition, with a greater stabilizing effect in the COP-FB10 than COP-FB2 condition. The postural effects of the scale display of visual COP feedback differed depending on the somatosensory conditions at the foot and the ankle. These findings suggest that increased reliance on augmented sensory information for controlling upright posture in conditions of altered somatosensory input from the foot and ankle could have implications in clinical and rehabilitative areas.

  2. A virtual reality-based method of decreasing transmission time of visual feedback for a tele-operative robotic catheter operating system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jin; Guo, Shuxiang; Tamiya, Takashi; Hirata, Hideyuki; Ishihara, Hidenori

    2016-03-01

    An Internet-based tele-operative robotic catheter operating system was designed for vascular interventional surgery, to afford unskilled surgeons the opportunity to learn basic catheter/guidewire skills, while allowing experienced physicians to perform surgeries cooperatively. Remote surgical procedures, limited by variable transmission times for visual feedback, have been associated with deterioration in operability and vascular wall damage during surgery. At the patient's location, the catheter shape/position was detected in real time and converted into three-dimensional coordinates in a world coordinate system. At the operation location, the catheter shape was reconstructed in a virtual-reality environment, based on the coordinates received. The data volume reduction significantly reduced visual feedback transmission times. Remote transmission experiments, conducted over inter-country distances, demonstrated the improved performance of the proposed prototype. The maximum error for the catheter shape reconstruction was 0.93 mm and the transmission time was reduced considerably. The results were positive and demonstrate the feasibility of remote surgery using conventional network infrastructures. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. V4 receptive field dynamics as predicted by a systems-level model of visual attention using feedback from the frontal eye field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamker, Fred H; Zirnsak, Marc

    2006-11-01

    Visual attention is generally considered to facilitate the processing of the attended stimulus. Its mechanisms, however, are still under debate. We have developed a systems-level model of visual attention which predicts that attentive effects emerge by the interactions between different brain areas. Recent physiological studies have provided evidence that attention also alters the receptive field structure. For example, V4 receptive fields typically shrink and shift towards the saccade target around saccade onset. We show that receptive field dynamics are inherently predicted by the mechanism of feedback in our model. According to the model an oculomotor feedback signal from an area involved in the competition for the saccade target location, e.g. the frontal eye field, enhances the gain of V4 cells. V4 receptive field dynamics can be observed after pooling the gain modulated responses to obtain a certain degree of spatial invariance. The time course of the receptive field dynamics in the model resemble those obtained from macaque V4.

  4. Concurrent audio-visual feedback for supporting drivers at intersections: A study using two linked driving simulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houtenbos, M; de Winter, J C F; Hale, A R; Wieringa, P A; Hagenzieker, M P

    2017-04-01

    A large portion of road traffic crashes occur at intersections for the reason that drivers lack necessary visual information. This research examined the effects of an audio-visual display that provides real-time sonification and visualization of the speed and direction of another car approaching the crossroads on an intersecting road. The location of red blinking lights (left vs. right on the speedometer) and the lateral input direction of beeps (left vs. right ear in headphones) corresponded to the direction from where the other car approached, and the blink and beep rates were a function of the approaching car's speed. Two driving simulators were linked so that the participant and the experimenter drove in the same virtual world. Participants (N = 25) completed four sessions (two with the audio-visual display on, two with the audio-visual display off), each session consisting of 22 intersections at which the experimenter approached from the left or right and either maintained speed or slowed down. Compared to driving with the display off, the audio-visual display resulted in enhanced traffic efficiency (i.e., greater mean speed, less coasting) while not compromising safety (i.e., the time gap between the two vehicles was equivalent). A post-experiment questionnaire showed that the beeps were regarded as more useful than the lights. It is argued that the audio-visual display is a promising means of supporting drivers until fully automated driving is technically feasible. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Optimal configuration of respiratory navigator gating for the quantification of left ventricular strain using spiral cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamlet, Sean M; Haggerty, Christopher M; Suever, Jonathan D; Wehner, Gregory J; Andres, Kristin N; Powell, David K; Zhong, Xiaodong; Fornwalt, Brandon K

    2017-03-01

    To determine the optimal respiratory navigator gating configuration for the quantification of left ventricular strain using spiral cine displacement encoding with stimulated echoes (DENSE) MRI. Two-dimensional spiral cine DENSE was performed on a 3 Tesla MRI using two single-navigator configurations (retrospective, prospective) and a combined "dual-navigator" configuration in 10 healthy adults and 20 healthy children. The adults also underwent breathhold DENSE as a reference standard for comparisons. Peak left ventricular strains, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and navigator efficiency were compared. Subjects also underwent dual-navigator gating with and without visual feedback to determine the effect on navigator efficiency. There were no differences in circumferential, radial, and longitudinal strains between navigator-gated and breathhold DENSE (P = 0.09-0.95) (as confidence intervals, retrospective: [-1.0%-1.1%], [-7.4%-2.0%], [-1.0%-1.2%]; prospective: [-0.6%-2.7%], [-2.8%-8.3%], [-0.3%-2.9%]; dual: [-1.6%-0.5%], [-8.3%-3.2%], [-0.8%-1.9%], respectively). The dual configuration maintained SNR compared with breathhold acquisitions (16 versus 18, P = 0.06). SNR for the prospective configuration was lower than for the dual navigator in adults (P = 0.004) and children (P < 0.001). Navigator efficiency was higher (P < 0.001) for both retrospective (54%) and prospective (56%) configurations compared with the dual configuration (35%). Visual feedback improved the dual configuration navigator efficiency to 55% (P < 0.001). When quantifying left ventricular strains using spiral cine DENSE MRI, a dual navigator configuration results in the highest SNR in adults and children. In adults, a retrospective configuration has good navigator efficiency without a substantial drop in SNR. Prospective gating should be avoided because it has the lowest SNR. Visual feedback represents an effective option to maintain navigator efficiency while using a dual

  6. Interação de variáveis biomecânicas na composição de "feedback" visual aumentado para o ensino do ciclismo Interacción de variables biomecánicas en la composición de feedback visual aumentado para el enseñanza del ciclismo Interaction of biomechanical variables in the composition of visual augmented feedback for learning cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Garcia Holderbaum

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi testar uma metodologia para o ensino da técnica da pedalada do ciclismo utilizando variáveis biomecánicas para desenvolver um sistema de "feedback" visual aumentado (FVA. Participaram do estudo 19 indivíduos, sem experiência no ciclismo , divididos em grupo experimental (n = 10 e controle (n = 9. Inicialmente foi realizado um pré-teste para determinar o consumo máximo de oxigênio (VO2máx bem como a carga de trabalho utilizada nas sessões práticas que correspondeu a 60% do VO2máx. Em seguida foram realizadas sete sessões de prática. O grupo experimental foi submetido ao FVA e o grupo controle ao "feedback" aumentado (FA. O teste de retenção mostrou um aumento de 21 % na média do índice de efetividade (IE do grupo experimental quando comparado ao grupo controle. Os resultados mostraram que variáveis biomecánicas são apropriadas para o desenvolvimento de FVA e podem contribuir no processo de ensino-aprendizagem da técnica da pedalada do ciclismo.El objetivo de este estudio fue probar una metodología para enseñar la técnica de el ciclismo mediante la utilización de variables biomecánicas para desarrollar un sistema de feedback visual aumentado (FVA. Fue aplicado en 19 personas sin experiencia en el ciclismo, divididos en dos grupos (experimental = 10 y control = 9. Inicialmente se realizó un pre-test para determinar el consumo máximo de oxígeno (VO2max y la carga de trabajo utilizada en las sesiones de práctica que correspondía al 60% del VO2máx. El grupo experimental fue sometido a la FVA y el control a la feedback aumentado (FA. El ensayo de retención mostró un aumento del 21% en la media del índice de eficacia (IE en el grupo experimental en comparación con el grupo control. Los resultados mostraron que las variables biomecánicas son apropiadas para el desarrollo de la FVA y puede contribuir al proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje del ciclismo.The aim of this study was to test a

  7. Cadaveric feasibility study of da Vinci Si-assisted cochlear implant with augmented visual navigation for otologic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen P; Azizian, Mahdi; Sorger, Jonathan; Taylor, Russell H; Reilly, Brian K; Cleary, Kevin; Preciado, Diego

    2014-03-01

    To our knowledge, this is the first reported cadaveric feasibility study of a master-slave-assisted cochlear implant procedure in the otolaryngology-head and neck surgery field using the da Vinci Si system (da Vinci Surgical System; Intuitive Surgical, Inc). We describe the surgical workflow adaptations using a minimally invasive system and image guidance integrating intraoperative cone beam computed tomography through augmented reality. To test the feasibility of da Vinci Si-assisted cochlear implant surgery with augmented reality, with visualization of critical structures and facilitation with precise cochleostomy for electrode insertion. Cadaveric case study of bilateral cochlear implant approaches conducted at Intuitive Surgical Inc, Sunnyvale, California. Bilateral cadaveric mastoidectomies, posterior tympanostomies, and cochleostomies were performed using the da Vinci Si system on a single adult human donor cadaveric specimen. Radiographic confirmation of successful cochleostomies, placement of a phantom cochlear implant wire, and visual confirmation of critical anatomic structures (facial nerve, cochlea, and round window) in augmented stereoendoscopy. With a surgical mean time of 160 minutes per side, complete bilateral cochlear implant procedures were successfully performed with no violation of critical structures, notably the facial nerve, chorda tympani, sigmoid sinus, dura, or ossicles. Augmented reality image overlay of the facial nerve, round window position, and basal turn of the cochlea was precise. Postoperative cone beam computed tomography scans confirmed successful placement of the phantom implant electrode array into the basal turn of the cochlea. To our knowledge, this is the first study in the otolaryngology-head and neck surgery literature examining the use of master-slave-assisted cochleostomy with augmented reality for cochlear implants using the da Vinci Si system. The described system for cochleostomy has the potential to improve the

  8. Audio Feedback -- Better Feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voelkel, Susanne; Mello, Luciane V.

    2014-01-01

    National Student Survey (NSS) results show that many students are dissatisfied with the amount and quality of feedback they get for their work. This study reports on two case studies in which we tried to address these issues by introducing audio feedback to one undergraduate (UG) and one postgraduate (PG) class, respectively. In case study one…

  9. Exploring the role of haptic feedback in enabling implicit HCI-based bookmarking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Matthew K X J; McGrenere, Joanna; Croft, Elizabeth A; MacLean, Karon E

    2014-03-01

    We examine how haptic feedback could enable an implicit human-computer interaction, in the context of an audio stream listening use case where a device monitors a user's electrodermal activity for orienting responses to external interruptions. When such a response is detected, our previously developed system automatically places a bookmark in the audio stream for later resumption of listening. Here, we investigate two uses of haptic feedback to support this implicit interaction and mitigate effects of noisy (false-positive) bookmarking: (a) low-attention notification when a bookmark is placed, and (b) focused-attention display of bookmarks during resumptive navigation. Results show that haptic notification of bookmark placement, when paired with visual display of bookmark location, significant improves navigation time. Solely visual or haptic display of bookmarks elicited equivalent navigation time; however, only the inclusion of haptic display significantly increased accuracy. Participants preferred haptic notification over no notification at interruption time, and combined haptic and visual display of bookmarks to support navigation to their interrupted location at resumption time. Our contributions include an approach to handling noisy data in implicit HCI, an implementation of haptic notifications that signal implicit system behavior, and discussion of user mental models that may be active in this context.

  10. Visualizing guided tours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Signe Herbers; Fjord-Larsen, Mads; Hansen, Frank Allan

    This paper identifies several problems with navigating and visualizing guided tours in traditional hypermedia systems. We discuss solutions to these problems, including the representation of guided tours as 3D metro maps with content preview. Issues regarding navigation and disorientation...

  11. Effects of Video-Feedback Interaction Training for Professional Caregivers of Children and Adults with Visual and Intellectual Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damen, S.; Kef, S.; Worm, M.; Janssen, M. J.; Schuengel, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Individuals in group homes may experience poor quality of social interaction with their professional caregivers, limiting their quality of life. The video-based Contact programme may help caregivers to improve their interaction with clients. Method: Seventy-two caregivers of 12 individuals with visual and intellectual disabilities…

  12. Pareto navigation: algorithmic foundation of interactive multi-criteria IMRT planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monz, M; Küfer, K H; Bortfeld, T R; Thieke, C

    2008-02-21

    Inherently, IMRT treatment planning involves compromising between different planning goals. Multi-criteria IMRT planning directly addresses this compromising and thus makes it more systematic. Usually, several plans are computed from which the planner selects the most promising following a certain procedure. Applying Pareto navigation for this selection step simultaneously increases the variety of planning options and eases the identification of the most promising plan. Pareto navigation is an interactive multi-criteria optimization method that consists of the two navigation mechanisms 'selection' and 'restriction'. The former allows the formulation of wishes whereas the latter allows the exclusion of unwanted plans. They are realized as optimization problems on the so-called plan bundle -- a set constructed from pre-computed plans. They can be approximately reformulated so that their solution time is a small fraction of a second. Thus, the user can be provided with immediate feedback regarding his or her decisions. Pareto navigation was implemented in the MIRA navigator software and allows real-time manipulation of the current plan and the set of considered plans. The changes are triggered by simple mouse operations on the so-called navigation star and lead to real-time updates of the navigation star and the dose visualizations. Since any Pareto-optimal plan in the plan bundle can be found with just a few navigation operations the MIRA navigator allows a fast and directed plan determination. Besides, the concept allows for a refinement of the plan bundle, thus offering a middle course between single plan computation and multi-criteria optimization. Pareto navigation offers so far unmatched real-time interactions, ease of use and plan variety, setting it apart from the multi-criteria IMRT planning methods proposed so far.

  13. Effects of the visual-feedback-based force platform training with functional electric stimulation on the balance and prevention of falls in older adults: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Force platform training with functional electric stimulation aimed at improving balance may be effective in fall prevention for older adults. Aim of the study is to evaluate the effects of the visual-feedback-based force platform balance training with functional electric stimulation on balance and fall prevention in older adults. Methods A single-centre, unblinded, randomized controlled trial was conducted. One hundred and twenty older adults were randomly allocated to two groups: the control group (n = 60, one-leg standing balance exercise, 12 min/d or the intervention group (n = 60, force platform training with functional electric stimulation, 12 min/d. The training was provided 15 days a month for 3 months by physical therapists. Medial–lateral and anterior–posterior maximal range of sway with eyes open and closed, the Berg Balance Scale, the Barthel Index, the Falls Efficacy scale-International were assessed at baseline and after the 3-month intervention. A fall diary was kept by each participant during the 6-month follow-up. Results On comparing the two groups, the intervention group showed significantly decreased (p < 0.01 medial–lateral and anterior–posterior maximal range of sway with eyes open and closed. There was significantly higher improvement in the Berg Balance Scale (p < 0.05, the Barthel Index (p < 0.05 and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (p < 0.05, along with significantly lesser number of injurious fallers (p < 0.05, number of fallers (p < 0.05, and fall rates (p < 0.05 during the 6-month follow-up in the intervention group. Conclusion This study showed that the visual feedback-based force platform training with functional electric stimulation improved balance and prevented falls in older adults.

  14. Feed-forward and visual feedback control of head roll orientation in wasps (Polistes humilis, Vespidae, Hymenoptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viollet, Stéphane; Zeil, Jochen

    2013-04-01

    Flying insects keep their visual system horizontally aligned, suggesting that gaze stabilization is a crucial first step in flight control. Unlike flies, hymenopteran insects such as bees and wasps do not have halteres that provide fast, feed-forward angular rate information to stabilize head orientation in the presence of body rotations. We tested whether hymenopteran insects use inertial (mechanosensory) information to control head orientation from other sources, such as the wings, by applying periodic roll perturbations to male Polistes humilis wasps flying in tether under different visual conditions indoors and in natural outdoor conditions. We oscillated the thorax of the insects with frequency-modulated sinusoids (chirps) with frequencies increasing from 0.2 to 2 Hz at a maximal amplitude of 50 deg peak-to-peak and maximal angular velocity of ±245 deg s(-1). We found that head roll stabilization is best outdoors, but completely absent in uniform visual conditions and in darkness. Step responses confirm that compensatory head roll movements are purely visually driven. Modelling step responses indicates that head roll stabilization is achieved by merging information on head angular velocity, presumably provided by motion-sensitive neurons and information on head orientation, presumably provided by light level integration across the compound eyes and/or ocelli (dorsal light response). Body roll in free flight reaches amplitudes of ±40 deg and angular velocities greater than 1000 deg s(-1), while head orientation remains horizontal for most of the time to within ±10 deg. In free flight, we did not find a delay between spontaneous body roll and compensatory head movements, and suggest that this is evidence for the contribution of a feed-forward control to head stabilization.

  15. Inter-individual difference in the effect of mirror reflection-induced visual feedback on phantom limb awareness in forearm amputees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawashima, Noritaka; Mita, Tomoki; Yoshikawa, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    To test whether the phantom limb awareness could be altered by observing mirror reflection-induced visual feedback (MVF) in unilateral forearm amputees. Ten unilateral forearm amputees were asked to perform bilateral (intact and phantom) synchronous wrist motions with and without MVF. During wrist motion, electromyographic activities in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and flexor carpi radialis muscles (FCR) were recorded with bipolar electrodes. Degree of wrist range of motion (ROM) was also recorded by electrogoniometry attached to the wrist joint of intact side. Subjects were asked to answer the degree of attainment of phantom limb motion using a visual analog scale (VAS: ranging from 0 (hard) to 10 (easy)). VAS and ROM were significantly increased by utilizing MVF, and the extent of an enhancement of the VAS and wrist ROM was positively correlated (r = 0.72, pphantom limb awareness, MVF has a potential to enhance phantom limb awareness, in case those who has a difficulty for the phantom limb motion. The present result suggests that the motor command to the missing limb can be re-activated by an appropriate therapeutic strategy such as mirror therapy.

  16. Lunar rover navigation concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, James D.

    1993-01-01

    With regard to the navigation of mobile lunar vehicles on the surface, candidate techniques are reviewed and progress of simulations and experiments made up to now are described. Progress that can be made through precursor investigations on Earth is considered. In the early seventies the problem was examined in a series of relevant tests made in the California desert. Meanwhile, Apollo rovers made short exploratory sorties and robotic Lunokhods traveled over modest distances on the Moon. In these early missions some of the required methods were demonstrated. The navigation problem for a lunar traverse can be viewed in three parts: to determine the starting point with enough accuracy to enable the desired mission; to determine the event sequence required to reach the site of each traverse objective; and to redetermine actual positions enroute. The navigator's first tool is a map made from overhead imagery. The Moon was almost completely photographed at moderate resolution by spacecraft launched in the sixties, but that data set provides imprecise topographic and selenodetic information. Therefore, more advanced orbital missions are now proposed as part of a resumed lunar exploration program. With the mapping coverage expected from such orbiters, it will be possible to use a combination of visual landmark navigation and external radio and optical references (Earth and Sun) to achieve accurate surface navigation almost everywhere on the near side of the Moon. On the far side and in permanently dark polar areas, there are interesting exploration targets where additional techniques will have to be used.

  17. INFORMATION SPACE RESEARCH IN NAVIGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gennadiy Vilsky

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abctract. Considered the problems information space navigation and the ship, as the object of informationsecurity waterways. Formed the category of information flows for modeling their interactions in order to prioritizethe information space navigation. Investigated priority flows ship information in a continuous exchange ofinformation, allowing to increase the safety of navigation. Shows an embodiment of methods of surgical analysis ofthe information space and its application in the formation of information impacts on the management of the vessel.Using matrix and Graphology analysis carried out studies of information flow in the navigation. Justified the priorityobjective and focus of the proposed method. Shows a computer visualization prioritization of information flows.Results of the study the information space will create the information - analytical system for the provision of servicesto ships under continuous threats and risks.Keywords: waterway, navigation, information flows, information security, information space model,graph, matrix state priority.

  18. Unilateral Stability and Visual Feedback Body Control Improves After Three-Month Resistance Training in Overweight Individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemková, Erika; Kyselovičová, Ol'ga; Jeleň, Michal; Kováčiková, Zuzana; Ollé, Gábor; Štefániková, Gabriela; Vilman, Tomáš; Baláž, Miroslav; Kurdiová, Timea; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcová, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    The authors evaluated the effect of 3 months of resistance and aerobic training (3 sessions/week) on body balance in a group of 25 overweight and obese individuals. Prior to and after the training, they performed static and task-oriented balance tests under various conditions. Mean center of pressure (CoP) velocity and mean trace length of the CoP in the y-axis registered during a one-legged stance significantly decreased after the resistance training (19.1%, p = .024; 29.3%, p = .009). Mean trace length of the CoP in the y-axis decreased significantly also during a bipedal stance on a foam surface with eyes open and closed (10.9%, p = .040; 18.2%, p = .027). In addition, mean CoP distance and mean squared CoP distance in the anteroposterior direction during a visually guided center of mass (CoM) tracking task significantly improved (14.7%, p = .033; 28.2%, p = .016). However, only mean trace length of the CoP in the y-axis during a bipedal stance on a foam surface with eyes open and closed significantly decreased after the aerobic training (10.3%, p = .047; 16.5%, p = .029). It may be concluded that resistance training is more efficient for the improvement of the anteroposterior unilateral stability and the accuracy of the regulation of the CoM anteroposterior position than aerobic training in overweight and obese individuals.

  19. Navigating life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Neal J

    2015-06-01

    The discoveries of "place cells" in the hippocampus and "grid cells" in the entorhinal cortex are landmark achievements in relating behavior to neural activity, permitting analysis of a powerful system for spatial representation in the brain. The contributions of this work include not only the empirical findings but also the approach this work pioneered of examining neural activity in complex behaviors with real ecological validity in freely moving animals, and of attempting to place the findings in the larger context of how the neural representations of space are used in service of real-world behavior, namely what the Nobel committee described as permitting us to "navigate our way through a complex environment." These discoveries and approaches have had far-ranging impact on and implications for work in human cognitive neuroscience, where we see (1) confirmation in humans that the hippocampus and overlying MTL cortex are critically engaged in supporting a relational representation of space, and that it can be used for flexible spatial navigation and (2) evidence that these regions are also critically involved in aspects of relational memory not limited to space, and in the flexible use of hippocampal memory extending beyond spatial navigation. Recent work, using tasks that emphasize the requirement for the active use of memory in online processing, just as spatial navigation has long placed such a requirement on rodents, suggests that the hippocampus and related MTL cortex can support the navigating of environments even more complex than what is needed in spatial navigation. It allows us to use memory in guiding upcoming actions and choices to act optimally in and on the world, permitting us to navigate life in all its beautiful complexity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Promoting smoke-free homes: a novel behavioral intervention using real-time audio-visual feedback on airborne particle levels.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil E Klepeis

    Full Text Available Interventions are needed to protect the health of children who live with smokers. We pilot-tested a real-time intervention for promoting behavior change in homes that reduces second hand tobacco smoke (SHS levels. The intervention uses a monitor and feedback system to provide immediate auditory and visual signals triggered at defined thresholds of fine particle concentration. Dynamic graphs of real-time particle levels are also shown on a computer screen. We experimentally evaluated the system, field-tested it in homes with smokers, and conducted focus groups to obtain general opinions. Laboratory tests of the monitor demonstrated SHS sensitivity, stability, precision equivalent to at least 1 µg/m(3, and low noise. A linear relationship (R(2 = 0.98 was observed between the monitor and average SHS mass concentrations up to 150 µg/m(3. Focus groups and interviews with intervention participants showed in-home use to be acceptable and feasible. The intervention was evaluated in 3 homes with combined baseline and intervention periods lasting 9 to 15 full days. Two families modified their behavior by opening windows or doors, smoking outdoors, or smoking less. We observed evidence of lower SHS levels in these homes. The remaining household voiced reluctance to changing their smoking activity and did not exhibit lower SHS levels in main smoking areas or clear behavior change; however, family members expressed receptivity to smoking outdoors. This study established the feasibility of the real-time intervention, laying the groundwork for controlled trials with larger sample sizes. Visual and auditory cues may prompt family members to take immediate action to reduce SHS levels. Dynamic graphs of SHS levels may help families make decisions about specific mitigation approaches.

  1. Inter-individual difference in the effect of mirror reflection-induced visual feedback on phantom limb awareness in forearm amputees.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noritaka Kawashima

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To test whether the phantom limb awareness could be altered by observing mirror reflection-induced visual feedback (MVF in unilateral forearm amputees. METHODS: Ten unilateral forearm amputees were asked to perform bilateral (intact and phantom synchronous wrist motions with and without MVF. During wrist motion, electromyographic activities in the extensor digitorum longus (EDL and flexor carpi radialis muscles (FCR were recorded with bipolar electrodes. Degree of wrist range of motion (ROM was also recorded by electrogoniometry attached to the wrist joint of intact side. Subjects were asked to answer the degree of attainment of phantom limb motion using a visual analog scale (VAS: ranging from 0 (hard to 10 (easy. RESULTS: VAS and ROM were significantly increased by utilizing MVF, and the extent of an enhancement of the VAS and wrist ROM was positively correlated (r = 0.72, p<0.05. Although FCR EMG activity also showed significant enhancement by MVF, this was not correlated with the changes of VAS and ROM. Interestingly, while we found negative correlation between EDL EMG activity and wrist ROM, MVF generally affected to be increasing both EDL EMG and ROM. CONCLUSIONS: Although there was larger extent of variability in the effect of MVF on phantom limb awareness, MVF has a potential to enhance phantom limb awareness, in case those who has a difficulty for the phantom limb motion. The present result suggests that the motor command to the missing limb can be re-activated by an appropriate therapeutic strategy such as mirror therapy.

  2. 3D augmented reality mirror visual feedback therapy applied to the treatment of persistent, unilateral upper extremity neuropathic pain: a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouraux, Dominique; Brassinne, Eric; Sobczak, Stéphane; Nonclercq, Antoine; Warzée, Nadine; Sizer, Phillip S; Tuna, Turgay; Penelle, Benoît

    2017-07-01

    Objective: We assessed whether or not pain relief could be achieved with a new system that combines 3D augmented reality system (3DARS) and the principles of mirror visual feedback. Methods: Twenty-two patients between 18 and 75 years of age who suffered of chronic neuropathic pain. Each patient performed five 3DARS sessions treatment of 20 mins spread over a period of one week. The following pain parameters were assessed: (1) visual analogic scale after each treatment session (2) McGill pain scale and DN4 questionnaire were completed before the first session and 24 h after the last session. Results: The mean improvement of VAS per session was 29% (p < 0.001). There was an immediate session effect demonstrating a systematic improvement in pain between the beginning and the end of each session. We noted that this pain reduction was partially preserved until the next session. If we compare the pain level at baseline and 24 h after the last session, there was a significant decrease (p < 0.001) of pain of 37%. There was a significant decrease (p < 0.001) on the McGill Pain Questionnaire and DN4 questionnaire (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Our results indicate that 3DARS induced a significant pain decrease for patients who presented chronic neuropathic pain in a unilateral upper extremity. While further research is necessary before definitive conclusions can be drawn, clinicians could implement the approach as a preparatory adjunct for providing temporary pain relief aimed at enhancing chronic pain patients' tolerance of manual therapy and exercise intervention. Level of Evidence: 4.

  3. Parsimonious Ways to Use Vision for Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Graham

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The use of visual information for navigation appears to be a universal strategy for sighted animals, amongst which, one particular group of expert navigators are the ants. The broad interest in studies of ant navigation is in part due to their small brains, thus biomimetic engineers expect to be impressed by elegant control solutions, and psychologists might hope for a description of the minimal cognitive requirements for complex spatial behaviours. In this spirit, we have been taking an interdisciplinary approach to the visual guided navigation of ants in their natural habitat. Behavioural experiments and natural image statistics show that visual navigation need not depend on the remembering or recognition of objects. Further modelling work suggests how simple behavioural routines might enable navigation using familiarity detection rather than explicit recall, and we present a proof of concept that visual navigation using familiarity can be achieved without specifying when or what to learn, nor separating routes into sequences of waypoints. We suggest that our current model represents the only detailed and complete model of insect route guidance to date. What's more, we believe the suggested mechanisms represent useful parsimonious hypotheses for the visually guided navigation in larger-brain animals.

  4. An immediate effect of axial neck rotation training with real time visual feedback using a smartphone inclinometer on improvement in axial neck rotation function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyue-Nam; Kwon, Oh-Yun; Kim, Si-Hyun; Jeon, In-Cheol

    2017-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the immediate effects of axial neck rotation training (Axi-NRT) with and without real-time visual feedback (VF) using a smartphone inclinometer on the range of motion (ROM) for axial neck rotation and the onset of compensatory neck lateral bending and extension during active neck rotation. Twenty participants with restricted ROM for neck rotation but no neck pain (21.1 ± 1.6 years and 8 males, 12 females) were recruited for Axi-NRT with VF, and twenty age- and gender-matched participants with restricted ROM for neck rotation were recruited for Axi-NRT without VF. Changes in ROM for neck rotation and the onset time of compensatory neck movement during active neck rotation were measured using an electromagnetic tracking system. Axi-NRT with VF was more effective in increasing ROM for neck rotation and decreasing and delaying the onset of compensatory neck movements during active neck rotation compared with Axi-NRT without VF. Repeated Axi-NRT using VF is useful to educate participants in maintaining the axis of the cervical spine and to increase ROM for axial neck rotation with less compensatory neck motion in participants with a restricted range of neck rotations.

  5. Celestial Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkrantz, Kurt

    2005-01-01

    In the unit described in this article, students discover the main principles of navigation, build tools to observe celestial bodies, and apply their new skills to finding their position on Earth. Along the way students see how science, mathematics, technology, and history are intertwined.

  6. 77 FR 19302 - Navigation Safety Advisory Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... the future mix of visual and electronic Aids to Navigation (ATON). (6) Automatic Identification System... measures, marine information, diving safety, and aids to navigation systems. The meeting will be open to... presentations may also be given. Speakers are requested to limit their comments to 10 minutes. Please note that...

  7. Augmented reality visualization for thoracoscopic spine surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, Frank; Vogt, Sebastian; Khamene, Ali; Heining, Sandro; Euler, Ekkehard; Schneberger, Marc; Zuerl, Konrad; Mutschler, Wolf

    2006-03-01

    We are developing an augmented reality (AR) image guidance system in which information derived from medical images is overlaid onto a video view of the patient. The centerpiece of the system is a head-mounted display custom fitted with two miniature color video cameras that capture the stereo view of the scene. Medical graphics is overlaid onto the video view and appears firmly anchored in the scene, without perceivable time lag or jitter. We have been testing the system for different clinical applications. In this paper we discuss minimally invasive thoracoscopic spine surgery as a promising new orthopedic application. In the standard approach, the thoracoscope - a rigid endoscope - provides visual feedback for the minimally invasive procedure of removing a damaged disc and fusing the two neighboring vertebrae. The navigation challenges are twofold. From a global perspective, the correct vertebrae on the spine have to be located with the inserted instruments. From a local perspective, the actual spine procedure has to be performed precisely. Visual feedback from the thoracoscope provides only limited support for both of these tasks. In the augmented reality approach, we give the surgeon additional anatomical context for the navigation. Before the surgery, we derive a model of the patient's anatomy from a CT scan, and during surgery we track the location of the surgical instruments in relation to patient and model. With this information, we can help the surgeon in both the global and local navigation, providing a global map and 3D information beyond the local 2D view of the thoracoscope. Augmented reality visualization is a particularly intuitive method of displaying this information to the surgeon. To adapt our augmented reality system to this application, we had to add an external optical tracking system, which works now in combination with our head-mounted tracking camera. The surgeon's feedback to the initial phantom experiments is very positive.

  8. Fusion imaging for intra-operative ultrasound-based navigation in neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prada, Francesco; Del Bene, Massimiliano; Mattei, Luca; Casali, Cecilia; Filippini, Assunta; Legnani, Federico; Mangraviti, Antonella; Saladino, Andrea; Perin, Alessandro; Richetta, Carla; Vetrano, Ignazio; Moiraghi, Alessandro; Saini, Marco; DiMeco, Francesco

    2014-09-01

    The major shortcoming of image-guided navigation systems is the use of presurgically acquired image data, which does not account for intra-operative changes such as brain shift, tissue deformation and tissue removal occurring during the surgical procedure. Intra-operative ultrasound (iUS) is becoming widely used in neurosurgery but they lack orientation and panoramic view. In this article, we describe our procedure for US-based real-time neuro-navigation during surgery. We used fusion imaging between preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and iUS for brain lesion removal in 67 patients so far. Surgical planning is based on preoperative MRI only. iUS images obtained during surgery are fused with the preoperative MRI. Surgery is performed under intra-operative US control. Relying on US imaging, it is possible to recalibrate navigated MRI imaging, adjusting distortion due to brain shift and tissue resection, continuously updating the two modalities. Ultrasound imaging provides excellent visualization of targets, their margins and surrounding structures. The use of navigated MRI is helpful in better understanding cerebral ultrasound images, providing orientation and panoramic view. Intraoperative US-guided neuro-navigation adjustments are very accurate and helpful in the event of brain shift. The use of this integrated system allows for a true real-time feedback during surgery.

  9. Navigation of a telepresence robot via covert visuospatial attention and real-time fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Patrik; Pluim, Josien P W; Viergever, Max A; Ramsey, Nick F

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) allow people with severe neurological impairment and without ability to control their muscles to regain some control over their environment. The BCI user performs a mental task to regulate brain activity, which is measured and translated into commands controlling some external device. We here show that healthy participants are capable of navigating a robot by covertly shifting their visuospatial attention. Covert Visuospatial Attention (COVISA) constitutes a very intuitive brain function for spatial navigation and does not depend on presented stimuli or on eye movements. Our robot is equipped with motors and a camera that sends visual feedback to the user who can navigate it from a remote location. We used an ultrahigh field MRI scanner (7 Tesla) to obtain fMRI signals that were decoded in real time using a support vector machine. Four healthy subjects with virtually no training succeeded in navigating the robot to at least three of four target locations. Our results thus show that with COVISA BCI, realtime robot navigation can be achieved. Since the magnitude of the fMRI signal has been shown to correlate well with the magnitude of spectral power changes in the gamma frequency band in signals measured by intracranial electrodes, the COVISA concept may in future translate to intracranial application in severely paralyzed people.

  10. Understanding satellite navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Acharya, Rajat

    2014-01-01

    This book explains the basic principles of satellite navigation technology with the bare minimum of mathematics and without complex equations. It helps you to conceptualize the underlying theory from first principles, building up your knowledge gradually using practical demonstrations and worked examples. A full range of MATLAB simulations is used to visualize concepts and solve problems, allowing you to see what happens to signals and systems with different configurations. Implementation and applications are discussed, along with some special topics such as Kalman Filter and Ionosphere. W

  11. Human locomotion of a route assists in subsequent blind navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Roche, R.A.P.; Murphy, J.; O'Riordan, K; Glad, K; Commins, S; Mangaoang, M.A.; O'Mara, S.M.

    2006-01-01

    Human spatial navigation requires the establishment of a sophisticated internal representation of the environment, termed the cognitive map. Non-visual navigation requires individuals to rely on their stored model of the world in order to avoid obstacles and navigate successfully.

  12. Positive feedback of NR2B-containing NMDA receptor activity is the initial step toward visual imprinting: a model for juvenile learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamori, Tomoharu; Sato, Katsushige; Kinoshita, Masae; Kanamatsu, Tomoyuki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Kohichi; Ohki-Hamazaki, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Imprinting in chicks is a good model for elucidating the processes underlying neural plasticity changes during juvenile learning. We recently reported that neural activation of a telencephalic region, the core region of the hyperpallium densocellulare (HDCo), was critical for success of visual imprinting, and that N-Methyl-D-aspartic (NMDA) receptors containing the NR2B subunit (NR2B/NR1) in this region were essential for imprinting. Using electrophysiological and multiple-site optical imaging techniques with acute brain slices, we found that long-term potentiation (LTP) and enhancement of NR2B/NR1 currents in HDCo neurons were induced in imprinted chicks. Enhancement of NR2B/NR1 currents as well as an increase in surface NR2B expression occurred even following a brief training that was too weak to induce LTP or imprinting behavior. This means that NR2B/NR1 activation is the initial step of learning, well before the activation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate receptors which induces LTP. We also showed that knockdown of NR2B/NR1 inhibited imprinting, and inversely, increasing the surface NR2B expression by treatment with a casein kinase 2 inhibitor successfully reduced training time required for imprinting. These results suggest that imprinting stimuli activate post-synaptic NR2B/NR1 in HDCo cells, increase NR2B/NR1 signaling through up-regulation of its expression, and induce LTP and memory acquisition. The study investigated the neural mechanism underlying juvenile learning. In the initial stage of chick imprinting, NMDA receptors containing the NMDA receptor subunit 2B (NR2B) are activated, surface expression of NR2B/NR1 (NMDA receptor subunit 1) is up-regulated, and consequently long-term potentiation is induced in the telencephalic neurons. We suggest that the positive feedback in the NR2B/NR1 activation is a unique process of juvenile learning, exhibiting rapid memory acquisition. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. A low-cost EEG system-based hybrid brain-computer interface for humanoid robot navigation and recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongjae Choi

    Full Text Available This paper describes a hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI technique that combines the P300 potential, the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP, and event related de-synchronization (ERD to solve a complicated multi-task problem consisting of humanoid robot navigation and control along with object recognition using a low-cost BCI system. Our approach enables subjects to control the navigation and exploration of a humanoid robot and recognize a desired object among candidates. This study aims to demonstrate the possibility of a hybrid BCI based on a low-cost system for a realistic and complex task. It also shows that the use of a simple image processing technique, combined with BCI, can further aid in making these complex tasks simpler. An experimental scenario is proposed in which a subject remotely controls a humanoid robot in a properly sized maze. The subject sees what the surrogate robot sees through visual feedback and can navigate the surrogate robot. While navigating, the robot encounters objects located in the maze. It then recognizes if the encountered object is of interest to the subject. The subject communicates with the robot through SSVEP and ERD-based BCIs to navigate and explore with the robot, and P300-based BCI to allow the surrogate robot recognize their favorites. Using several evaluation metrics, the performances of five subjects navigating the robot were quite comparable to manual keyboard control. During object recognition mode, favorite objects were successfully selected from two to four choices. Subjects conducted humanoid navigation and recognition tasks as if they embodied the robot. Analysis of the data supports the potential usefulness of the proposed hybrid BCI system for extended applications. This work presents an important implication for the future work that a hybridization of simple BCI protocols provide extended controllability to carry out complicated tasks even with a low-cost system.

  14. A low-cost EEG system-based hybrid brain-computer interface for humanoid robot navigation and recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Bongjae; Jo, Sungho

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes a hybrid brain-computer interface (BCI) technique that combines the P300 potential, the steady state visually evoked potential (SSVEP), and event related de-synchronization (ERD) to solve a complicated multi-task problem consisting of humanoid robot navigation and control along with object recognition using a low-cost BCI system. Our approach enables subjects to control the navigation and exploration of a humanoid robot and recognize a desired object among candidates. This study aims to demonstrate the possibility of a hybrid BCI based on a low-cost system for a realistic and complex task. It also shows that the use of a simple image processing technique, combined with BCI, can further aid in making these complex tasks simpler. An experimental scenario is proposed in which a subject remotely controls a humanoid robot in a properly sized maze. The subject sees what the surrogate robot sees through visual feedback and can navigate the surrogate robot. While navigating, the robot encounters objects located in the maze. It then recognizes if the encountered object is of interest to the subject. The subject communicates with the robot through SSVEP and ERD-based BCIs to navigate and explore with the robot, and P300-based BCI to allow the surrogate robot recognize their favorites. Using several evaluation metrics, the performances of five subjects navigating the robot were quite comparable to manual keyboard control. During object recognition mode, favorite objects were successfully selected from two to four choices. Subjects conducted humanoid navigation and recognition tasks as if they embodied the robot. Analysis of the data supports the potential usefulness of the proposed hybrid BCI system for extended applications. This work presents an important implication for the future work that a hybridization of simple BCI protocols provide extended controllability to carry out complicated tasks even with a low-cost system.

  15. Surgical Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Azarmehr, Iman; Stokbro, Kasper; Bell, R. Bryan

    2017-01-01

    body removal, respectively. The average technical system accuracy and intraoperative precision reported were less than 1 mm and 1 to 2 mm, respectively. In general, SN is reported to be a useful tool for surgical planning, execution, evaluation, and research. The largest numbers of studies and patients......Purpose: This systematic review investigates the most common indications, treatments, and outcomes of surgical navigation (SN) published from 2010 to 2015. The evolution of SN and its application in oral and maxillofacial surgery have rapidly developed over recent years, and therapeutic indications...... surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign body removal were the areas of interests. Results: The search generated 13 articles dealing with traumatology; 5, 6, 2, and 0 studies were found that dealt with the topics of orthognathic surgery, cancer and reconstruction surgery, skull-base surgery, and foreign...

  16. The influence of visual feedback from the recent past on the programming of grip aperture is grasp-specific, shared between hands, and mediated by sensorimotor memory not task set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Rixin; Whitwell, Robert L; Goodale, Melvyn A

    2015-05-01

    Goal-directed movements, such as reaching out to grasp an object, are necessarily constrained by the spatial properties of the target such as its size, shape, and position. For example, during a reach-to-grasp movement, the peak width of the aperture formed by the thumb and fingers in flight (peak grip aperture, PGA) is linearly related to the target's size. Suppressing vision throughout the movement (visual open loop) has a small though significant effect on this relationship. Visual open loop conditions also produce a large increase in the PGA compared to when vision is available throughout the movement (visual closed loop). Curiously, this differential effect of the availability of visual feedback is influenced by the presentation order: the difference in PGA between closed- and open-loop trials is smaller when these trials are intermixed (an effect we have called 'homogenization'). Thus, grasping movements are affected not only by the availability of visual feedback (closed loop or open loop) but also by what happened on the previous trial. It is not clear, however, whether this carry-over effect is mediated through motor (or sensorimotor) memory or through the interference of different task sets for closed-loop and open-loop feedback that determine when the movements are fully specified. We reasoned that sensorimotor memory, but not a task set for closed and open loop feedback, would be specific to the type of response. We tested this prediction in a condition in which pointing to targets was alternated with grasping those same targets. Critically, in this condition, when pointing was performed in open loop, grasping was always performed in closed loop (and vice versa). Despite the fact that closed- and open-loop trials were alternating in this condition, we found no evidence for homogenization of the PGA. Homogenization did occur, however, in a follow-up experiment in which grasping movements and visual feedback were alternated between the left and the right

  17. Formativ Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldahl, Kirsten Kofod

    Denne bog undersøger, hvordan lærere kan anvende feedback til at forbedre undervisningen i klasselokalet. I denne sammenhæng har John Hattie, professor ved Melbourne Universitet, udviklet en model for feedback, hvilken er baseret på synteser af meta-analyser. I 2009 udgav han bogen "Visible...

  18. Multimodal Guidance for Land Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-01

    operational task demands, ratings of task workload (visual, audio, cognitive, speech , physical), and theory-based predictions, drawn from Multiple...Journal of Human Performance in Extreme Environments June 2001, 5 (2), 50-54. Sarter, N. B. The Need for Multisensory Feedback in Support of Effective

  19. Merge Fuzzy Visual Servoing and GPS-Based Planning to Obtain a Proper Navigation Behavior for a Small Crop-Inspection Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Bengochea-Guevara

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The concept of precision agriculture, which proposes farming management adapted to crop variability, has emerged in recent years. To effectively implement precision agriculture, data must be gathered from the field in an automated manner at minimal cost. In this study, a small autonomous field inspection vehicle was developed to minimise the impact of the scouting on the crop and soil compaction. The proposed approach integrates a camera with a GPS receiver to obtain a set of basic behaviours required of an autonomous mobile robot to inspect a crop field with full coverage. A path planner considered the field contour and the crop type to determine the best inspection route. An image-processing method capable of extracting the central crop row under uncontrolled lighting conditions in real time from images acquired with a reflex camera positioned on the front of the robot was developed. Two fuzzy controllers were also designed and developed to achieve vision-guided navigation. A method for detecting the end of a crop row using camera-acquired images was developed. In addition, manoeuvres necessary for the robot to change rows were established. These manoeuvres enabled the robot to autonomously cover the entire crop by following a previously established plan and without stepping on the crop row, which is an essential behaviour for covering crops such as maize without damaging them.

  20. Merge Fuzzy Visual Servoing and GPS-Based Planning to Obtain a Proper Navigation Behavior for a Small Crop-Inspection Robot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengochea-Guevara, José M; Conesa-Muñoz, Jesus; Andújar, Dionisio; Ribeiro, Angela

    2016-02-24

    The concept of precision agriculture, which proposes farming management adapted to crop variability, has emerged in recent years. To effectively implement precision agriculture, data must be gathered from the field in an automated manner at minimal cost. In this study, a small autonomous field inspection vehicle was developed to minimise the impact of the scouting on the crop and soil compaction. The proposed approach integrates a camera with a GPS receiver to obtain a set of basic behaviours required of an autonomous mobile robot to inspect a crop field with full coverage. A path planner considered the field contour and the crop type to determine the best inspection route. An image-processing method capable of extracting the central crop row under uncontrolled lighting conditions in real time from images acquired with a reflex camera positioned on the front of the robot was developed. Two fuzzy controllers were also designed and developed to achieve vision-guided navigation. A method for detecting the end of a crop row using camera-acquired images was developed. In addition, manoeuvres necessary for the robot to change rows were established. These manoeuvres enabled the robot to autonomously cover the entire crop by following a previously established plan and without stepping on the crop row, which is an essential behaviour for covering crops such as maize without damaging them.

  1. Merge Fuzzy Visual Servoing and GPS-Based Planning to Obtain a Proper Navigation Behavior for a Small Crop-Inspection Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengochea-Guevara, José M.; Conesa-Muñoz, Jesus; Andújar, Dionisio; Ribeiro, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The concept of precision agriculture, which proposes farming management adapted to crop variability, has emerged in recent years. To effectively implement precision agriculture, data must be gathered from the field in an automated manner at minimal cost. In this study, a small autonomous field inspection vehicle was developed to minimise the impact of the scouting on the crop and soil compaction. The proposed approach integrates a camera with a GPS receiver to obtain a set of basic behaviours required of an autonomous mobile robot to inspect a crop field with full coverage. A path planner considered the field contour and the crop type to determine the best inspection route. An image-processing method capable of extracting the central crop row under uncontrolled lighting conditions in real time from images acquired with a reflex camera positioned on the front of the robot was developed. Two fuzzy controllers were also designed and developed to achieve vision-guided navigation. A method for detecting the end of a crop row using camera-acquired images was developed. In addition, manoeuvres necessary for the robot to change rows were established. These manoeuvres enabled the robot to autonomously cover the entire crop by following a previously established plan and without stepping on the crop row, which is an essential behaviour for covering crops such as maize without damaging them. PMID:26927102

  2. Blind persons navigate in virtual reality (VR); hearing and feeling communicates "reality".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Max, M L; Gonzalez, J R

    1997-01-01

    Can Virtual Reality (VR) developments in audio navigation for blind persons support therapies for all? Working with Crystal River Engineering we are developing navigable Virtual Reality worlds for blind users, using spatialized audio [1], [2]. All persons, however, use specialized channels, such as: visual, aural, and kinetic learning senses. Predominantly visual VR worlds and health informatics models from World Wide Webs, may be downloaded, tailored, augmented, and delivered to each of these learning senses using VR. We are also testing a proof of concept system with Boston Dynamics which downloads 3-dimensional, satellite-derived map models from the World Wide Web, and makes them navigable by "feeling" the terrain using haptic (tactual or force feedback to your hand) robotic interfaces. Ultimately, these multi-sensory VR access methods: sight, localization by audio, and "feeling" of data sets could open up the World Wide Web to individuals with sight impairments. This could also, however, benefit government, businesses, universities, and (elementary) education. It could contribute more powerful communications, education, and medical simulation applications on the World Wide Web. This work is part of government technology transfer to telemedicine, (elementary) education, disabilities access to the Web, and new Internet access and productivity efforts under Vice President Gore's National Performance Review.

  3. Sizing up visualizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Mikkel Rønne; Hornbæk, Kasper

    2011-01-01

    techniques with varying display sizes (13.8, 1.5, and 0.17 megapixels). Participants navigated geographical maps to find specific locations, compare items, and follow routes. Results show that for multi-scale navigation, classic interactive visualization techniques did not benefit from being scaled...

  4. Autonomous robot navigation: appearance based topological SLAM

    OpenAIRE

    Lui, Wen Lik Dennis

    2017-01-01

    The main focus of this research is to develop an autonomous robot capable of self-navigation in an unknown environment. The proposed system performs autonomous navigation primarily based on the following visually perceived information: 1) Range Estimation: A novel variable single/multi baseline omnidirectional stereovision system with an option to automatically select the baseline that is adjusted to the environment with the establishment of stereo correspondences and triangulation offloa...

  5. Tools to aid navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Rovira, Cristòfol

    2001-01-01

    The problem of disorientation brought about by hypertext navigation can be solved by efficient tools to aid navigation such as summaries, indexes or navigation maps. In the article we analyse the main tools to aid navigation used in the Internet web, going futher into those which use knowledge representation to carry out their faction. We propose new ways of making navigation maps to favour access and understanding of information for hypertext environments in teaching-learning.

  6. Hand Motion-Based Remote Control Interface with Vibrotactile Feedback for Home Robots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Wu

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a hand-held interface system for the locomotion control of home robots. A handheld controller is proposed to implement hand motion recognition and hand motion-based robot control. The handheld controller can provide a ‘connect-and-play’ service for the users to control the home robot with visual and vibrotactile feedback. Six natural hand gestures are defined for navigating the home robots. A three-axis accelerometer is used to detect the hand motions of the user. The recorded acceleration data are analysed and classified to corresponding control commands according to their characteristic curves. A vibration motor is used to provide vibrotactile feedback to the user when an improper operation is performed. The performances of the proposed hand motion-based interface and the traditional keyboard and mouse interface have been compared in robot navigation experiments. The experimental results of home robot navigation show that the success rate of the handheld controller is 13.33% higher than the PC based controller. The precision of the handheld controller is 15.4% more than that of the PC and the execution time is 24.7% less than the PC based controller. This means that the proposed hand motion-based interface is more efficient and flexible.

  7. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a ?natural? grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps

    OpenAIRE

    Whitwell, Robert L.; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. ?Natural? prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object (?haptics-based object information?) once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (...

  8. Real-time vision, tactile cues, and visual form agnosia: removing haptic feedback from a “natural” grasping task induces pantomime-like grasps

    OpenAIRE

    Whitwell, Robert L.; Ganel, Tzvi; Byrne, Caitlin M.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2015-01-01

    Investigators study the kinematics of grasping movements (prehension) under a variety of conditions to probe visuomotor function in normal and brain-damaged individuals. “Natural” prehensile acts are directed at the goal object and are executed using real-time vision. Typically, they also entail the use of tactile, proprioceptive, and kinesthetic sources of haptic feedback about the object (“haptics-based object information”) once contact with the object has been made. Natural and simulated (...

  9. Towards Safe Navigation by Formalizing Navigation Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arne Kreutzmann

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available One crucial aspect of safe navigation is to obey all navigation regulations applicable, in particular the collision regulations issued by the International Maritime Organization (IMO Colregs. Therefore, decision support systems for navigation need to respect Colregs and this feature should be verifiably correct. We tackle compliancy of navigation regulations from a perspective of software verification. One common approach is to use formal logic, but it requires to bridge a wide gap between navigation concepts and simple logic. We introduce a novel domain specification language based on a spatio-temporal logic that allows us to overcome this gap. We are able to capture complex navigation concepts in an easily comprehensible representation that can direcly be utilized by various bridge systems and that allows for software verification.

  10. Shape Perception and Navigation in Blind Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Monica; Cappagli, Giulia; Baud-Bovy, Gabriel; Finocchietti, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Different sensory systems interact to generate a representation of space and to navigate. Vision plays a critical role in the representation of space development. During navigation, vision is integrated with auditory and mobility cues. In blind individuals, visual experience is not available and navigation therefore lacks this important sensory signal. In blind individuals, compensatory mechanisms can be adopted to improve spatial and navigation skills. On the other hand, the limitations of these compensatory mechanisms are not completely clear. Both enhanced and impaired reliance on auditory cues in blind individuals have been reported. Here, we develop a new paradigm to test both auditory perception and navigation skills in blind and sighted individuals and to investigate the effect that visual experience has on the ability to reproduce simple and complex paths. During the navigation task, early blind, late blind and sighted individuals were required first to listen to an audio shape and then to recognize and reproduce it by walking. After each audio shape was presented, a static sound was played and the participants were asked to reach it. Movements were recorded with a motion tracking system. Our results show three main impairments specific to early blind individuals. The first is the tendency to compress the shapes reproduced during navigation. The second is the difficulty to recognize complex audio stimuli, and finally, the third is the difficulty in reproducing the desired shape: early blind participants occasionally reported perceiving a square but they actually reproduced a circle during the navigation task. We discuss these results in terms of compromised spatial reference frames due to lack of visual input during the early period of development.

  11. The vestibular contribution to the head direction signal and navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoder, Ryan M; Taube, Jeffrey S

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction (HD) cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we review the role of the vestibular system in generating various spatial signals in rodents, focusing primarily on HD cells. We also examine the vestibular system's role in navigation and the possible pathways by which vestibular information is conveyed to higher navigation centers.

  12. Traffic Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Picozzi, Matteo; Verdezoto, Nervo; Pouke, Matti

    2013-01-01

    techniques to give a rapid overview of traffic data. We illustrate our approach as a case study for traffic visualization systems, using datasets from the city of Oulu that can be extended to other city planning activities. We also report the feedback of real users (traffic management employees, traffic police...

  13. feedback.html | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; feedback.html. 404! error. The page your are looking for can not be found! Please check the link or use the navigation bar at the top. YouTube; Twitter; Facebook; Blog. Academy News. IAS Logo. Theory Of Evolution. Posted on 23 January 2018. Joint Statement by the Three Science Academies of India on the ...

  14. Modeling of Helicopter Pilot Misperception During Overland Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Confidence App. Red dot is the participant’s perceived location and confidence scroll bar from 0 to 100. ...........................................27...Field of View GPS Global Positioning System MOVES Modeling, Virtual Environments and Simulation MSL Mean Sea Level OTW Out-The-Window PAC Pilot...CNATRA P-458). The navigational task can be done by visual navigation, dead reckoning, or electronic navigation using Global Positioning System

  15. Optical Navigation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal is for a flexible navigation system for deep space operations that does not require GPS measurements. The navigation solution is computed using an...

  16. NIAAA Alcohol Treatment Navigator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQS Helpful Links Toolkit Find Your Way to Alcohol Treatment The search for alcohol treatment can feel ... and make a choice. Who is the NIAAA Alcohol Treatment Navigator SM for? The Navigator helps adults ...

  17. Review of the Visiting Teachers Service for Children with Hearing and Visual Impairment in Supporting Inclusive Educational Practice in Ireland: Examining Stakeholder Feedback through an Ecological Systems Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Mike; McCracken, Wendy

    2016-01-01

    In line with recent developments in inclusive practice in Ireland, children with sensory needs are increasingly educated in mainstream rather than specialist provision. Educational supports are provided by a range of practitioners and include input from the visiting teachers service for children with hearing and visual impairment. This paper…

  18. Tactile displays for navigation and orientation : perception and behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van

    2007-01-01

    Perceiving and understanding information of, for example, a visual navigation display may be difficult for people with a visual challenge or in situations where the user's visual sense and cognitive resources are heavily loaded. Developing information presentation schemes that reduce the threat of

  19. Tactile Cueing as a Gravitational Substitute for Spatial Navigation During Parabolic Flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, K. L.; Beaton, K. H.; Barba, J. M.; Cackler, J. M.; Son, J. H.; Horsfield, S. P.; Wood, S. J.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Spatial navigation requires an accurate awareness of orientation in your environment. The purpose of this experiment was to examine how spatial awareness was impaired with changing gravitational cues during parabolic flight, and the extent to which vibrotactile feedback of orientation could be used to help improve performance. METHODS: Six subjects were restrained in a chair tilted relative to the plane floor, and placed at random positions during the start of the microgravity phase. Subjects reported their orientation using verbal reports, and used a hand-held controller to point to a desired target location presented using a virtual reality video mask. This task was repeated with and without constant tactile cueing of "down" direction using a belt of 8 tactors placed around the mid-torso. Control measures were obtained during ground testing using both upright and tilted conditions. RESULTS: Perceptual estimates of orientation and pointing accuracy were impaired during microgravity or during rotation about an upright axis in 1g. The amount of error was proportional to the amount of chair displacement. Perceptual errors were reduced during movement about a tilted axis on earth. CONCLUSIONS: Reduced perceptual errors during tilts in 1g indicate the importance of otolith and somatosensory cues for maintaining spatial awareness. Tactile cueing may improve navigation in operational environments or clinical populations, providing a non-visual non-auditory feedback of orientation or desired direction heading.

  20. Vibrotactile Feedback for Brain-Computer Interface Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Febo Cincotti

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To be correctly mastered, brain-computer interfaces (BCIs need an uninterrupted flow of feedback to the user. This feedback is usually delivered through the visual channel. Our aim was to explore the benefits of vibrotactile feedback during users' training and control of EEG-based BCI applications. A protocol for delivering vibrotactile feedback, including specific hardware and software arrangements, was specified. In three studies with 33 subjects (including 3 with spinal cord injury, we compared vibrotactile and visual feedback, addressing: (I the feasibility of subjects' training to master their EEG rhythms using tactile feedback; (II the compatibility of this form of feedback in presence of a visual distracter; (III the performance in presence of a complex visual task on the same (visual or different (tactile sensory channel. The stimulation protocol we developed supports a general usage of the tactors; preliminary experimentations. All studies indicated that the vibrotactile channel can function as a valuable feedback modality with reliability comparable to the classical visual feedback. Advantages of using a vibrotactile feedback emerged when the visual channel was highly loaded by a complex task. In all experiments, vibrotactile feedback felt, after some training, more natural for both controls and SCI users.

  1. FlyAR: augmented reality supported micro aerial vehicle navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollmann, Stefanie; Hoppe, Christof; Langlotz, Tobias; Reitmayr, Gerhard

    2014-04-01

    Micro aerial vehicles equipped with high-resolution cameras can be used to create aerial reconstructions of an area of interest. In that context automatic flight path planning and autonomous flying is often applied but so far cannot fully replace the human in the loop, supervising the flight on-site to assure that there are no collisions with obstacles. Unfortunately, this workflow yields several issues, such as the need to mentally transfer the aerial vehicle’s position between 2D map positions and the physical environment, and the complicated depth perception of objects flying in the distance. Augmented Reality can address these issues by bringing the flight planning process on-site and visualizing the spatial relationship between the planned or current positions of the vehicle and the physical environment. In this paper, we present Augmented Reality supported navigation and flight planning of micro aerial vehicles by augmenting the user’s view with relevant information for flight planning and live feedback for flight supervision. Furthermore, we introduce additional depth hints supporting the user in understanding the spatial relationship of virtual waypoints in the physical world and investigate the effect of these visualization techniques on the spatial understanding.

  2. Radar and electronic navigation

    CERN Document Server

    Sonnenberg, G J

    2013-01-01

    Radar and Electronic Navigation, Sixth Edition discusses radar in marine navigation, underwater navigational aids, direction finding, the Decca navigator system, and the Omega system. The book also describes the Loran system for position fixing, the navy navigation satellite system, and the global positioning system (GPS). It reviews the principles, operation, presentations, specifications, and uses of radar. It also describes GPS, a real time position-fixing system in three dimensions (longitude, latitude, altitude), plus velocity information with Universal Time Coordinated (UTC). It is accur

  3. Design and Evaluation of Shape-Changing Haptic Interfaces for Pedestrian Navigation Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Adam J; Dollar, Aaron M

    2017-01-01

    Shape-changing interfaces are a category of device capable of altering their form in order to facilitate communication of information. In this work, we present a shape-changing device that has been designed for navigation assistance. 'The Animotus' (previously, 'The Haptic Sandwich' ), resembles a cube with an articulated upper half that is able to rotate and extend (translate) relative to the bottom half, which is fixed in the user's grasp. This rotation and extension, generally felt via the user's fingers, is used to represent heading and proximity to navigational targets. The device is intended to provide an alternative to screen or audio based interfaces for visually impaired, hearing impaired, deafblind, and sighted pedestrians. The motivation and design of the haptic device is presented, followed by the results of a navigation experiment that aimed to determine the role of each device DOF, in terms of facilitating guidance. An additional device, 'The Haptic Taco', which modulated its volume in response to target proximity (negating directional feedback), was also compared. Results indicate that while the heading (rotational) DOF benefited motion efficiency, the proximity (translational) DOF benefited velocity. Combination of the two DOF improved overall performance. The volumetric Taco performed comparably to the Animotus' extension DOF.

  4. Environmental Feedback and Spatial Conditioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Isak Worre; Poulsen, Esben Skouboe

    2010-01-01

    with structural integrity, where thermal energy flow through the prototype, to be understood as a membrane, can be controlled and the visual transparancy altered. The work shows performance based feedback systems and physical prototype models driven by information streaming, screening and application....

  5. Visual motion imagery neurofeedback based on the hMT+/V5 complex: evidence for a feedback-specific neural circuit involving neocortical and cerebellar regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banca, Paula; Sousa, Teresa; Catarina Duarte, Isabel; Castelo-Branco, Miguel

    2015-12-01

    Objective. Current approaches in neurofeedback/brain-computer interface research often focus on identifying, on a subject-by-subject basis, the neural regions that are best suited for self-driven modulation. It is known that the hMT+/V5 complex, an early visual cortical region, is recruited during explicit and implicit motion imagery, in addition to real motion perception. This study tests the feasibility of training healthy volunteers to regulate the level of activation in their hMT+/V5 complex using real-time fMRI neurofeedback and visual motion imagery strategies. Approach. We functionally localized the hMT+/V5 complex to further use as a target region for neurofeedback. An uniform strategy based on motion imagery was used to guide subjects to neuromodulate hMT+/V5. Main results. We found that 15/20 participants achieved successful neurofeedback. This modulation led to the recruitment of a specific network as further assessed by psychophysiological interaction analysis. This specific circuit, including hMT+/V5, putative V6 and medial cerebellum was activated for successful neurofeedback runs. The putamen and anterior insula were recruited for both successful and non-successful runs. Significance. Our findings indicate that hMT+/V5 is a region that can be modulated by focused imagery and that a specific cortico-cerebellar circuit is recruited during visual motion imagery leading to successful neurofeedback. These findings contribute to the debate on the relative potential of extrinsic (sensory) versus intrinsic (default-mode) brain regions in the clinical application of neurofeedback paradigms. This novel circuit might be a good target for future neurofeedback approaches that aim, for example, the training of focused attention in disorders such as ADHD.

  6. Mandibular Surgical Navigation: An Innovative Guiding Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbate, Vincenzo; Orabona, Giovanni Dell' Aversana; Solari, Domenico; Bonavolontà, Paola; Iaconetta, Giorgio; Califano, Luigi

    2017-11-01

    Mandibular osteotomies are usually required to treat craniomaxillofacial disorders. Losses of mandibular continuity result in esthetic and functional deficiency. During the past 30 years, the spread of the computer-assisted surgery techniques, rapid prototyping, and surgical navigation technique has improved the reliability and the outcomes of mandibular resections and reconstructions, by providing realtime feedback to surgeon. Recent studies reported the feasibility and the precision of surgical navigation applied to mandibular surgical resection and reconstruction with fibula flap but none of them describes a method to navigate the jaw allowing its full motility during the operation. To our knowledge, this is the first-time description of such a kind of method to navigate the jaw positioning the dynamic reference frame directly on the mandibular branch to maintain the full mobility of the mandible. The method described in our series has allowed an accurate surgical navigation of the jaw without the need of intermaxillary fixation. This technique could greatly facilitate resection and reconstructive surgical procedures of the jaw while ensuring precision and accuracy. The encouraging results obtained in the present report suggest to further investigate the possibilities of this technique to better define the method and its indications.

  7. Autonomous Robot Navigation based on Visual Landmarks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livatino, Salvatore

    2005-01-01

    of the proposed method is based on a system with a simple setup. The novelty and potentiality, are in combining algorithms for panoramic view-synthesis, attention selection, stereo reconstruction, triangulation, optimal triplet selection, and image-based rendering. Experiments demonstrate that the system can...

  8. Kinesthetic and Vestibular Information Modulate Alpha Activity during Spatial Navigation: A Mobile EEG Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benedikt Valerian Ehinger

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In everyday life, spatial navigation involving locomotion provides congruent visual, vestibular and kinesthetic information that need to be integrated. Yet, previous studies on human brain activity during navigation focus on stationary setups, neglecting vestibular and kinesthetic feedback. The aim of our work is to uncover the influence of those sensory modalities on cortical processing. We developed a fully immersive virtual reality setup combined with high-density mobile electroencephalography (EEG. Participants traversed one leg of a triangle, turned on the spot, continued along the second leg and finally indicated the location of their starting position. Vestibular and kinesthetic information was provided either in combination, as isolated sources of information or not at all within a 2x2 full factorial intra-subjects design. EEG data were processed by clustering independent components, and time-frequency spectrograms were calculated. In parietal, occipital and temporal clusters, we detected alpha suppression during the turning movement, which is associated with a heightened demand of visuo-attentional processing, and closely resembles results reported in previous stationary studies. This decrease is present in all conditions and therefore seems to generalize to more natural settings. Yet, in incongruent conditions, when different sensory modalities did not match, the decrease is significantly stronger. Additionally, in more anterior areas, we found that providing only vestibular but no kinesthetic information results in alpha increase. These observations demonstrate that stationary experiments omit important aspects of sensory feedback. Therefore, it is important to develop more natural experimental settings in order to capture a more complete picture of neural correlates of spatial navigation.

  9. Kinesthetic and vestibular information modulate alpha activity during spatial navigation: a mobile EEG study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehinger, Benedikt V; Fischer, Petra; Gert, Anna L; Kaufhold, Lilli; Weber, Felix; Pipa, Gordon; König, Peter

    2014-01-01

    In everyday life, spatial navigation involving locomotion provides congruent visual, vestibular, and kinesthetic information that need to be integrated. Yet, previous studies on human brain activity during navigation focus on stationary setups, neglecting vestibular and kinesthetic feedback. The aim of our work is to uncover the influence of those sensory modalities on cortical processing. We developed a fully immersive virtual reality setup combined with high-density mobile electroencephalography (EEG). Participants traversed one leg of a triangle, turned on the spot, continued along the second leg, and finally indicated the location of their starting position. Vestibular and kinesthetic information was provided either in combination, as isolated sources of information, or not at all within a 2 × 2 full factorial intra-subjects design. EEG data were processed by clustering independent components, and time-frequency spectrograms were calculated. In parietal, occipital, and temporal clusters, we detected alpha suppression during the turning movement, which is associated with a heightened demand of visuo-attentional processing and closely resembles results reported in previous stationary studies. This decrease is present in all conditions and therefore seems to generalize to more natural settings. Yet, in incongruent conditions, when different sensory modalities did not match, the decrease is significantly stronger. Additionally, in more anterior areas we found that providing only vestibular but no kinesthetic information results in alpha increase. These observations demonstrate that stationary experiments omit important aspects of sensory feedback. Therefore, it is important to develop more natural experimental settings in order to capture a more complete picture of neural correlates of spatial navigation.

  10. Ethical Navigation in Leadership Training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Øyvind Kvalnes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Business leaders frequently face dilemmas, circumstances where whatever course of action they choose, something of important value will be offended. How can an organisation prepare its decision makers for such situations? This article presents a pedagogical approach to dilemma training for business leaders and managers. It has evolved through ten years of experience with human resource development, where ethics has been an integral part of programs designed to help individuals to become excellent in their professional roles. The core element in our approach is The Navigation Wheel, a figure used to keep track of relevant decision factors. Feedback from participants indicates that dilemma training has helped them to recognise the ethical dimension of leadership. They respond that the tools and concepts are highly relevant in relation to the challenges that occur in the working environment they return to after leadership training.http://dx.doi.org/10.5324/eip.v6i1.1778

  11. Mixing navigation on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tao

    2008-05-01

    In this article, we propose a mixing navigation mechanism, which interpolates between random-walk and shortest-path protocol. The navigation efficiency can be remarkably enhanced via a few routers. Some advanced strategies are also designed: For non-geographical scale-free networks, the targeted strategy with a tiny fraction of routers can guarantee an efficient navigation with low and stable delivery time almost independent of network size. For geographical localized networks, the clustering strategy can simultaneously increase efficiency and reduce the communication cost. The present mixing navigation mechanism is of significance especially for information organization of wireless sensor networks and distributed autonomous robotic systems.

  12. Indoor wayfinding and navigation

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Due to the widespread use of navigation systems for wayfinding and navigation in the outdoors, researchers have devoted their efforts in recent years to designing navigation systems that can be used indoors. This book is a comprehensive guide to designing and building indoor wayfinding and navigation systems. It covers all types of feasible sensors (for example, Wi-Fi, A-GPS), discussing the level of accuracy, the types of map data needed, the data sources, and the techniques for providing routes and directions within structures.

  13. Implant-oriented navigation in orbital reconstruction. Part 1: technique and accuracy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreurs, R; Dubois, L; Becking, A G; Maal, T J J

    2018-03-01

    Intraoperative navigation is frequently used to assess the position of the implant in orbital reconstruction. Interpretation of the feedback from the navigation system to a three-dimensional position of the implant needs to be done by the surgeon, and feedback is only gathered after the implant has been positioned. An implant-oriented navigation approach is proposed, with real-time intuitive feedback during insertion. A technical framework was set up for implant-oriented navigation, with requirements for planning, implant tracking, and feedback. A dedicated navigation instrument was designed and a software tool was developed in order to meet the technical requirements. An accuracy study was performed to investigate the accuracy of the method in comparison to the regular navigation pointer. A proof of concept was provided. The results showed a translation error of 1.12-1.15mm for implant-oriented navigation with regular registration (pointer 0.71-0.98mm) and 0.81mm with accurate registration (pointer 0.54mm). Rotational error was found to be small (<3°). Quantitative and intuitive qualitative feedback could be provided to the surgeon in real-time during insertion of an orbital implant. Following this proof of concept and accuracy study, the implications for the clinical workflow should be evaluated. An implant-oriented approach may form the foundation for augmented reality or robotic-aided implant insertion. Copyright © 2017 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of a portable image overlay projector for the visualisation of surgical navigation data: phantom studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaghan, K; Oliveira-Santos, T; Peterhans, M; Reyes, M; Kim, H; Anderegg, S; Weber, S

    2012-07-01

    Presenting visual feedback for image-guided surgery on a monitor requires the surgeon to perform time-consuming comparisons and diversion of sight and attention away from the patient. Deficiencies in previously developed augmented reality systems for image-guided surgery have, however, prevented the general acceptance of any one technique as a viable alternative to monitor displays. This work presents an evaluation of the feasibility and versatility of a novel augmented reality approach for the visualisation of surgical planning and navigation data. The approach, which utilises a portable image overlay device, was evaluated during integration into existing surgical navigation systems and during application within simulated navigated surgery scenarios. A range of anatomical models, surgical planning data and guidance information taken from liver surgery, cranio-maxillofacial surgery, orthopaedic surgery and biopsy were displayed on patient-specific phantoms, directly on to the patient's skin and on to cadaver tissue. The feasibility of employing the proposed augmented reality visualisation approach in each of the four tested clinical applications was qualitatively assessed for usability, visibility, workspace, line of sight and obtrusiveness. The visualisation approach was found to assist in spatial understanding and reduced the need for sight diversion throughout the simulated surgical procedures. The approach enabled structures to be identified and targeted quickly and intuitively. All validated augmented reality scenes were easily visible and were implemented with minimal overhead. The device showed sufficient workspace for each of the presented applications, and the approach was minimally intrusiveness to the surgical scene. The presented visualisation approach proved to be versatile and applicable to a range of image-guided surgery applications, overcoming many of the deficiencies of previously described AR approaches. The approach presents an initial step

  15. Maps and navigation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, A

    1922-01-01

    Different maps and scales are discussed with particular emphasis on their use in aviation. The author makes the observation that current navigation methods are slow and dangerous and should be replaced by scientific methods of navigation based on loxodromy and the use of the compass.

  16. Geo Embedded Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilsøe, Peer Møller; Kolar, Jan

    2005-01-01

    challenges in this context is to develop a simple and intuitive general purpose navigation mode that will work well for a single planet from outer space to a street level. Such works are missing today. Although the need for global navigation in disaster management is rather conceptual than practical...

  17. Repeated training with augmentative vibrotactile feedback increases object manipulation performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cara E Stepp

    Full Text Available Most users of prosthetic hands must rely on visual feedback alone, which requires visual attention and cognitive resources. Providing haptic feedback of variables relevant to manipulation, such as contact force, may thus improve the usability of prosthetic hands for tasks of daily living. Vibrotactile stimulation was explored as a feedback modality in ten unimpaired participants across eight sessions in a two-week period. Participants used their right index finger to perform a virtual object manipulation task with both visual and augmentative vibrotactile feedback related to force. Through repeated training, participants were able to learn to use the vibrotactile feedback to significantly improve object manipulation. Removal of vibrotactile feedback in session 8 significantly reduced task performance. These results suggest that vibrotactile feedback paired with training may enhance the manipulation ability of prosthetic hand users without the need for more invasive strategies.

  18. Feedback: Breakfast of Champions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Justman, Jeffrey J.

    Feedback is an important skill that people need to learn in life. Feedback is crucial in a public speaking class to improve speaking skills. Providing and receiving feedback is what champions feed on to be successful, thus feedback is called the "Breakfast of Champions." Feedback builds speakers' confidence. Providing in-depth feedback…

  19. Restricted Navigation Areas - USACE IENC

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These inland electronic Navigational charts (IENCs) were developed from available data used in maintenance of Navigation channels. Users of these IENCs should be...

  20. A LBL Positioning Method Based on Feedback Kalman Filter

    OpenAIRE

    Jucheng Zhang; Dajun Sun; Changlin Ji

    2014-01-01

    LBL (Long Basic Line) positioning is an important and high-precision method for underwater vehicle navigation. Due to its narrow work frequency-band, system would be easily affected by external factors and gave wrong results. A new Kalman filter model based on the feedback from travel time and position information was presented in this paper. By combining travel time with positioning in the Kalman filter, the navigation state of underwater vehicle was accurately estimated. Experimental result...

  1. Calibrating space: exploration is important for allothetic and idiothetic navigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whishaw, I Q; Brooks, B L

    1999-01-01

    Allothetic and idiothetic navigation strategies rely on very different cues and computational procedures. Allothetic navigation uses the relationships between external cues (visual, auditory, and olfactory) and mapping or geometrical calculations to locate places. Idiothetic navigation relies on cues generated by self-movement (proprioceptive cues or cues from optic, auditory, and olfactory flow, or efference copy of motor commands) and path integration to locate a present location and/or a starting point. Whereas it is theorized that exploratory behavior is used by animals to create a central representation of allothetic cues, it is unclear whether exploration plays a role in idiothetic navigation. Computational models suggest that either a reference frame, calibrated by exploration, or vector addition, without reference to exploration, could support path integration. The present study evaluated the contribution of exploration in these navigation strategies by comparing its contribution to the solution of both allothetic and idiothetic navigation problems. In two experiments, rats were trained to forage on an open table for large food pellets, which they then carried to a refuge to eat. Once trained, they were given probe trials from novel locations in either normal light, which permits the use of allothetic cues, or in infrared light, which requires the use of idiothetic cues. When faced with a new problem in either lighting condition, the rats first explored the foraging table before navigating directly home with the food. That exploration is equally important for allothetic and idiothetic navigation, suggests that both navigation strategies require a calibrated representation of the environment.

  2. Effects of Varied Enhancement Strategies (Chunking, Feedback, Gaming) in Complementing Animated Instruction in Facilitating Different Types of Learning Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munyofu, Mine

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the instructional effectiveness of different levels of chunking (simple visual/text and complex visual/text), different forms of feedback (item-by-item feedback, end-of-test feedback and no feedback), and use of instructional gaming (game and no game) in complementing animated programmed instruction on a…

  3. Getting Lost Through Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debus, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    In this presentation, I argued two things. First, that it is navigation that lies at the core of contemporary (3D-) videogames and that its analysis is of utmost importance. Second, that this analysis needs a more rigorous differentiation between specific acts of navigation. Considering the Oxford...... in videogames is a configurational rather than an interpretational one (Eskelinen 2001). Especially in the case of game spaces, navigation appears to be of importance (Wolf 2009; Flynn 2008). Further, it does not only play a crucial role for the games themselves, but also for the experience of the player...

  4. Navigation by images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Espen Hagen

    1993-07-01

    Full Text Available A new navigation method based on measurements of image tokens and Kalman filtering is presented. An image token is the central projection of a landmark, a point on the terrain surface. This surface being described by an elevation map, a Kalman filter processes the measurements to update estimates of camera position and orientation, and landmarks. The method has been implemented for off-line simulations of aeroplane navigation. Preliminary tests indicate a performance at least comparable to that of satellite navigation systems. The implemented algorithm also seems to have high tolerance against noise and modeling errors.

  5. A LBL Positioning Method Based on Feedback Kalman Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucheng Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available LBL (Long Basic Line positioning is an important and high-precision method for underwater vehicle navigation. Due to its narrow work frequency-band, system would be easily affected by external factors and gave wrong results. A new Kalman filter model based on the feedback from travel time and position information was presented in this paper. By combining travel time with positioning in the Kalman filter, the navigation state of underwater vehicle was accurately estimated. Experimental results show that the influence of random high-frequency measurement noise on positioning results was effectively solved and the navigation precision was improved.

  6. [Navigated retinal laser therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kernt, M; Ulbig, M; Kampik, A; Neubauer, A S

    2013-08-01

    Navigated laser therapy introduces for the first time computerized assistance systems for retinal laser therapy. The Navilas system offers high precision and safety and provides additional benefits regarding standardization of planning, execution, documentation and quality assurance. The current focus of clinical application for navigated laser therapy besides laser treatment after retinal vein occlusion and panretinal laser photocoagulation in proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR) is diabetic macular edema. Recent data indicate that combined initial anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) and navigated macular laser therapy allows achievement and maintenance of treatment success with a minimum number of interventions. Despite very promising results the current assessment of navigated laser therapy is still limited by the evidence available worldwide.

  7. USACE Navigation Channels 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This dataset represents both San Francisco and Los Angeles District navigation channel lines. All San Francisco District channel lines were digitized from CAD files...

  8. Short-distance navigation in cephalopods: a review and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Christelle; Boal, Jean G; Dickel, Ludovic

    2008-12-01

    This paper provides a short overview of the scientific knowledge concerning short-distance navigation in cephalopods. Studies in laboratory controlled conditions and observations in the field provide converging evidence that cephalopods use visual cues to navigate and demonstrate spatial memory. A recent study also provides the first evidence for the neural substrates underlying spatial abilities in cuttlefish. The functions of spatial cognition in cephalopods are discussed from an evolutionary standpoint.

  9. Mapping, Navigation, and Learning for Off-Road Traversal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Konolige, Kurt; Agrawal, Motilal; Blas, Morten Rufus

    2009-01-01

    The challenge in the DARPA Learning Applied to Ground Robots (LAGR) project is to autonomously navigate a small robot using stereo vision as the main sensor. During this project, we demonstrated a complete autonomous system for off-road navigation in unstructured environments, using stereo vision......, online terrain traversability learning, visual odometry, map registration, planning, and control. At the end of 3 years, the system we developed outperformed all nine other teams in final blind tests over previously unseen terrain....

  10. Field-Based Validation of a Tactile Navigation Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Linda R; van Erp, Jan B F; Redden, Elizabeth S; Duistermaat, Maaike

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present three field-based evaluations of a tactile land navigation system. In Experiment 1, we transition from a laboratory setting to rugged terrain used to train US Army soldier land navigation. Navigation in this challenging terrain requires careful attention to one's surroundings. Participants navigated 3 waypoints along 600 meters through heavily wooded terrain, using 1) map and compass, 2) standard alpha-numeric handheld GPS device, and 3) the tactile GPS system, while also responding to radio requests for information. Experiment 2 used the same challenging terrain during night operations, where participants must also search for live and silhouette targets, using 1) handheld GPS device, 2) head-mounted map-based GPS, and 3) the tactile GPS system. In addition to navigating, participants searched for silhouette and live (human) targets. Experiment 3 had participants navigate with 1) a commercial GPS arrow display, 2) the tactile GPS system, and 3) both together. We conclude that tactile navigation displays can be used in strenuous outdoor environments and can outperform visual displays under conditions of high cognitive and visual workload.

  11. An aerial–ground robotic system for navigation and obstacle mapping in large outdoor areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garzón, Mario; Valente, João; Zapata, David; Barrientos, Antonio

    2013-01-21

    There are many outdoor robotic applications where a robot must reach a goal position or explore an area without previous knowledge of the environment around it. Additionally, other applications (like path planning) require the use of known maps or previous information of the environment. This work presents a system composed by a terrestrial and an aerial robot that cooperate and share sensor information in order to address those requirements. The ground robot is able to navigate in an unknown large environment aided by visual feedback from a camera on board the aerial robot. At the same time, the obstacles are mapped in real-time by putting together the information from the camera and the positioning system of the ground robot. A set of experiments were carried out with the purpose of verifying the system applicability. The experiments were performed in a simulation environment and outdoor with a medium-sized ground robot and a mini quad-rotor. The proposed robotic system shows outstanding results in simultaneous navigation and mapping applications in large outdoor environments.

  12. An Aerial-Ground Robotic System for Navigation and Obstacle Mapping in Large Outdoor Areas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Zapata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There are many outdoor robotic applications where a robot must reach a goal position or explore an area without previous knowledge of the environment around it. Additionally, other applications (like path planning require the use of known maps or previous information of the environment. This work presents a system composed by a terrestrial and an aerial robot that cooperate and share sensor information in order to address those requirements. The ground robot is able to navigate in an unknown large environment aided by visual feedback from a camera on board the aerial robot. At the same time, the obstacles are mapped in real-time by putting together the information from the camera and the positioning system of the ground robot. A set of experiments were carried out with the purpose of verifying the system applicability. The experiments were performed in a simulation environment and outdoor with a medium-sized ground robot and a mini quad-rotor. The proposed robotic system shows outstanding results in simultaneous navigation and mapping applications in large outdoor environments.

  13. Intra-operative visualisation of 3D temperature maps and 3D navigation during tissue cryoablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samset, E; Mala, T; Aurdal, L; Balasingham, I

    2005-09-01

    Thermotherapeutic tools are increasingly used for tissue ablation, although the intra-operative monitoring is not adequate for such procedures. This is a main challenge for more extensive use of any ablative technique. The present work focuses on treatment of hepatic tumours by cryo therapy. For any thermotherapeutic tool there are specific thermal conditions that have to be met to ensure treatment adequacy. A software tool was made to calculate and visualise 3D temperature distributions during hepatic cryoablation combined with a 3D intra-operative navigation system. This system aids the user in placing the cryoprobe using an optical tracking system and 3D visualisation of the probe placement in relation to the target anatomy and the planned trajectory. 3D temperature distributions are calculated and visualized intra-operatively. The system is integrated with an interventional Magnetic Resonance 0.5T scanner. The system was tested in an animal experiment, exemplifying the usefulness of the navigation system and its ability to give intuitive feedback to the user on thermodynamic conditions induced in the target region. The system constitutes a novel tool for enhanced intra-operative control during cryoablative procedures, and motivates for studies using this tool to investigate predictors applied as indicators of treatment adequacy and patient outcome.

  14. Skriftlig feedback i engelskundervisningen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Hanne Wacher

    2017-01-01

    The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools.......The article describes useful feedback strategies in language teaching and describes the feedback practices of lower-seconday teachers in Denmark. The article is aimed at language teahcers in secondary schools....

  15. Learning anticipation via spiking networks: application to navigation control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Paolo; Fortuna, Luigi; Frasca, Mattia; Patané, Luca

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we introduce a network of spiking neurons devoted to navigation control. Three different examples, dealing with stimuli of increasing complexity, are investigated. In the first one, obstacle avoidance in a simulated robot is achieved through a network of spiking neurons. In the second example, a second layer is designed aiming to provide the robot with a target approaching system, making it able to move towards visual targets. Finally, a network of spiking neurons for navigation based on visual cues is introduced. In all cases, the robot was assumed to rely on some a priori known responses to low-level sensors (i.e., to contact sensors in the case of obstacles, to proximity target sensors in the case of visual targets, or to the visual target for navigation with visual cues). Based on their knowledge, the robot has to learn the response to high-level stimuli (i.e., range finder sensors or visual input). The biologically plausible paradigm of spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) is included in the network to make the system able to learn high-level responses that guide navigation through a simple unstructured environment. The learning procedure is based on classical conditioning.

  16. Tactile feedback improves auditory spatial localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gori, Monica; Vercillo, Tiziana; Sandini, Giulio; Burr, David

    2014-01-01

    Our recent studies suggest that congenitally blind adults have severely impaired thresholds in an auditory spatial bisection task, pointing to the importance of vision in constructing complex auditory spatial maps (Gori et al., 2014). To explore strategies that may improve the auditory spatial sense in visually impaired people, we investigated the impact of tactile feedback on spatial auditory localization in 48 blindfolded sighted subjects. We measured auditory spatial bisection thresholds before and after training, either with tactile feedback, verbal feedback, or no feedback. Audio thresholds were first measured with a spatial bisection task: subjects judged whether the second sound of a three sound sequence was spatially closer to the first or the third sound. The tactile feedback group underwent two audio-tactile feedback sessions of 100 trials, where each auditory trial was followed by the same spatial sequence played on the subject's forearm; auditory spatial bisection thresholds were evaluated after each session. In the verbal feedback condition, the positions of the sounds were verbally reported to the subject after each feedback trial. The no feedback group did the same sequence of trials, with no feedback. Performance improved significantly only after audio-tactile feedback. The results suggest that direct tactile feedback interacts with the auditory spatial localization system, possibly by a process of cross-sensory recalibration. Control tests with the subject rotated suggested that this effect occurs only when the tactile and acoustic sequences are spatially congruent. Our results suggest that the tactile system can be used to recalibrate the auditory sense of space. These results encourage the possibility of designing rehabilitation programs to help blind persons establish a robust auditory sense of space, through training with the tactile modality.

  17. Evaluation of multimodal feedback effects on improving rowing competencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korman Maria

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study focused on the selection and preliminary evaluation of different types of modal and information feedback in virtual environment to facilitate acquisition and transfer of a complex motor-cognitive skill of rowing. Specifically, we addressed the effectiveness of immediate information feedback provided visually as compared to sensory haptic feedback on the improvement in hands kinematics and changes in cognitive load during the course of learning the basic rowing technique. Several pilot experiments described in this report lead to the evaluation and optimization of the training protocol, to enhance facilitatory effects of adding visual and haptic feedback during training.

  18. Is sensorimotor BCI performance influenced differently by mono, stereo, or 3-D auditory feedback?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreadie, Karl A; Coyle, Damien H; Prasad, Girijesh

    2014-05-01

    Imagination of movement can be used as a control method for a brain-computer interface (BCI) allowing communication for the physically impaired. Visual feedback within such a closed loop system excludes those with visual problems and hence there is a need for alternative sensory feedback pathways. In the context of substituting the visual channel for the auditory channel, this study aims to add to the limited evidence that it is possible to substitute visual feedback for its auditory equivalent and assess the impact this has on BCI performance. Secondly, the study aims to determine for the first time if the type of auditory feedback method influences motor imagery performance significantly. Auditory feedback is presented using a stepped approach of single (mono), double (stereo), and multiple (vector base amplitude panning as an audio game) loudspeaker arrangements. Visual feedback involves a ball-basket paradigm and a spaceship game. Each session consists of either auditory or visual feedback only with runs of each type of feedback presentation method applied in each session. Results from seven subjects across five sessions of each feedback type (visual, auditory) (10 sessions in total) show that auditory feedback is a suitable substitute for the visual equivalent and that there are no statistical differences in the type of auditory feedback presented across five sessions.

  19. Mobile Robot Navigation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Robots will soon take part in everyone’s daily life. In industrial production this has been the case for many years, but up to now the use of mobile robots has been limited to a few and isolated applications like lawn mowing, surveillance, agricultural production and military applications....... The research is now progressing towards autonomous robots which will be able to assist us in our daily life. One of the enabling technologies is navigation, and navigation is the subject of this thesis. Navigation of an autonomous robot is concerned with the ability of the robot to direct itself from...... validation of the implemented solutions and the ability of the methods to solve real world problems. The amount of software needed by an autonomous robot can be overwhelming. Software reuse and distributed development are therefore important issues. The thesis describes a new component architecture...

  20. Aerocapture navigation at Neptune

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haw, Robert J.

    2003-01-01

    A proposed Neptune orbiter Aerocapture mission will use solar electric propulsion to send an orbiter to Neptune. Navigation feasibility of direct-entry aerocapture for orbit insertion at Neptune is shown. The navigation strategy baselines optical imaging and (delta)VLBI measurement in order to satisfy the flight system's atmosphere entry flight path angle, which is targeted to enter Neptune with an entry flight path angle of -11.6 . Error bars on the entry flight path angle of plus/minus0.55 (3(sigma)) are proposed. This requirement can be satisfied with a data cutoff 3.2 days prior to arrival. There is some margin in the arrival template to tighten (i.e. reduce) the entry corridor either by scheduling a data cutoff closer to Neptune or alternatively, reducing uncertainties by increasing the fidelity of the optical navigation camera.

  1. Neurocognitive Treatment for a Patient with Alzheimer's Disease Using a Virtual Reality Navigational Environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J.F. White

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, a man at the onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD was enrolled in a cognitive treatment program based upon spatial navigation in a virtual reality (VR environment. We trained him to navigate to targets in a symmetric, landmark-less virtual building. Our research goals were to determine whether an individual with AD could learn to navigate in a simple VR navigation (VRN environment and whether that training could also bring real-life cognitive benefits. The results show that our participant learned to perfectly navigate to desired targets in the VRN environment over the course of the training program. Furthermore, subjective feedback from his primary caregiver (his wife indicated that his skill at navigating while driving improved noticeably and that he enjoyed cognitive improvement in his daily life at home. These results suggest that VRN treatments might benefit other people with AD.

  2. Improving Canada's Marine Navigation System through e-Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Breton

    2016-06-01

    The conclusion proposed is that on-going work with key partners and stakeholders can be used as the primary mechanism to identify e-Navigation related innovation and needs, and to prioritize next steps. Moving forward in Canada, implementation of new e-navigation services will continue to be stakeholder driven, and used to drive improvements to Canada's marine navigation system.

  3. Orientierung und Navigation in zoombaren Benutzerschnittstellen unter besonderer Berücksichtigung kognitions-psychologischer Erkenntnisse

    OpenAIRE

    Gerken, Jens

    2006-01-01

    Zoomable User Interfaces (ZUIs) allow access to information-objects in a natural and visual-spatial way. Instead of navigating in abstract hierarchies and structures, the user can navigate in an infinite information landscape by zooming and panning. Informationobjects are therefore organized in space and scale, which allows the user to navigate analogue to the real world. If someone would like to access more information about an object in the real world they simply step closer to it. In a sim...

  4. Inland Electronic Navigational Charts (IENC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Army Corps of Engineers, Department of the Army, Department of Defense — These Inland Electronic Navigational Charts (IENCs) were developed from available data used in maintenance of Navigation channels. Users of these IENCs should be...

  5. Master VISUALLY Excel 2010

    CERN Document Server

    Marmel, Elaine

    2010-01-01

    The complete visual reference on Excel basics. Aimed at visual learners who are seeking an all-in-one reference that provides in-depth coveage of Excel from a visual viewpoint, this resource delves into all the newest features of Excel 2010. You'll explore Excel with helpful step-by-step instructions that show you, rather than tell you, how to navigate Excel, work with PivotTables and PivotCharts, use macros to streamline work, and collaborate with other users in one document.: This two-color guide features screen shots with specific, numbered instructions so you can learn the actions you need

  6. Navigating in higher education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thingholm, Hanne Balsby; Reimer, David; Keiding, Tina Bering

    Denne rapport er skrevet på baggrund af spørgeskemaundersøgelsen – Navigating in Higher Education (NiHE) – der rummer besvarelser fra 1410 bachelorstuderende og 283 undervisere fordelt på ni uddannelser fra Aarhus Universitet: Uddannelsesvidenskab, Historie, Nordisk sprog og litteratur...

  7. Navigating between the Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleron, Julian F.; Ecke, Volker

    2011-01-01

    Generations have been inspired by Edwin A. Abbott's profound tour of the dimensions in his novella "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" (1884). This well-known satire is the story of a flat land inhabited by geometric shapes trying to navigate the subtleties of their geometric, social, and political positions. In this article, the authors…

  8. Navigating ‘riskscapes’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gee, Stephanie; Skovdal, Morten

    2017-01-01

    This paper draws on interview data to examine how international health care workers navigated risk during the unprecedented Ebola outbreak in West Africa. It identifies the importance of place in risk perception, including how different spatial localities give rise to different feelings of threat...

  9. Astronomy and Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenta, Fernando

    Different people, seafaring in different parts of the world, used strategies well adapted to their environment with the purpose of safely reaching their destination. Astronomical elements, present in their navigation "toolkit" for orientation, calendar purposes, and time reckoning, contributed to their conceptualization of space and time and were eventually integrated in their ritual, social organization, and social power structure.

  10. Landmark-based pedestrian navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Basiri, Anahid; Winstanley, Adam; Amirian, Pouria

    2013-01-01

    Car navigation has become one of the most widely used examples of Location-Based Services (LBSs). However current car navigation systems are not fully suitable for the navigational needs of pedestrians mainly because walkers are not as restricted as car drivers. Pedestrians can easily go into a building or underground to get to their destination where GPS signals are unavailable. Seamless indoor and outdoor navigation is one of the most important features which should be handle...

  11. Unpacking social hypersensitivity: vulnerability to the absence of positive feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cikara, Mina; Girgus, Joan S

    2010-10-01

    Navigating social life requires accurately calibrated sensitivity to external feedback, thus extreme sensitivity to external feedback may be maladaptive. Using a daily diary design, the authors investigated whether the relationship between social hypersensitivity and daily events predicted level, lability, and reactivity of both self-esteem and affect. Relative to their less sensitive peers, socially hypersensitive people exhibited lower levels of self-esteem and greater negative affect and experienced greater fluctuations in self-esteem and negative affect. Although most people were negatively reactive to the presence of negative feedback, socially hypersensitive people were negatively reactive to the absence of positive feedback as well. The authors argue that reactivity to the absence of positive feedback is a fundamental, heretofore untested aspect of what makes social hypersensitivity a pernicious orientation.

  12. Rateless feedback codes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Koike-Akino, Toshiaki; Orlik, Philip

    2012-01-01

    This paper proposes a concept called rateless feedback coding. We redesign the existing LT and Raptor codes, by introducing new degree distributions for the case when a few feedback opportunities are available. We show that incorporating feedback to LT codes can significantly decrease both...... the coding overhead and the encoding/decoding complexity. Moreover, we show that, at the price of a slight increase in the coding overhead, linear complexity is achieved with Raptor feedback coding....

  13. Coastal Piloting & Charting: Navigation 101.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osinski, Alison

    This curriculum guide for a beginning course on marine navigation describes marine navigation (the art of and science of determining position of a ship and its movement from one position to another in order to keep track of where the ship is and where it is going) and defines dead reckoning, piloting, electronic navigation, and celestial…

  14. Developing Sustainable Feedback Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carless, David; Salter, Diane; Yang, Min; Lam, Joy

    2011-01-01

    Feedback is central to the development of student learning, but within the constraints of modularized learning in higher education it is increasingly difficult to handle effectively. This article makes a case for sustainable feedback as a contribution to the reconceptualization of feedback processes. The data derive from the Student Assessment and…

  15. Performance Improvement of Inertial Navigation System by Using Magnetometer with Vehicle Dynamic Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daehee Won

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A navigation algorithm is proposed to increase the inertial navigation performance of a ground vehicle using magnetic measurements and dynamic constraints. The navigation solutions are estimated based on inertial measurements such as acceleration and angular velocity measurements. To improve the inertial navigation performance, a three-axis magnetometer is used to provide the heading angle, and nonholonomic constraints (NHCs are introduced to increase the correlation between the velocity and the attitude equation. The NHCs provide a velocity feedback to the attitude, which makes the navigation solution more robust. Additionally, an acceleration-based roll and pitch estimation is applied to decrease the drift when the acceleration is within certain boundaries. The magnetometer and NHCs are combined with an extended Kalman filter. An experimental test was conducted to verify the proposed method, and a comprehensive analysis of the performance in terms of the position, velocity, and attitude showed that the navigation performance could be improved by using the magnetometer and NHCs. Moreover, the proposed method could improve the estimation performance for the position, velocity, and attitude without any additional hardware except an inertial sensor and magnetometer. Therefore, this method would be effective for ground vehicles, indoor navigation, mobile robots, vehicle navigation in urban canyons, or navigation in any global navigation satellite system-denied environment.

  16. Evaluation of navigation interfaces in virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Daniel R.

    2014-02-01

    When users are immersed in cave-like virtual reality systems, navigational interfaces have to be used when the size of the virtual environment becomes larger than the physical extent of the cave floor. However, using navigation interfaces, physically static users experience self-motion (visually-induced vection). As a consequence, sensorial incoherence between vision (indicating self-motion) and other proprioceptive inputs (indicating immobility) can make them feel dizzy and disoriented. We tested, in two experimental studies, different locomotion interfaces. The objective was twofold: testing spatial learning and cybersickness. In a first experiment, using first-person navigation with a flystick ®, we tested the effect of sensorial aids, a spatialized sound or guiding arrows on the ground, attracting the user toward the goal of the navigation task. Results revealed that sensorial aids tended to impact negatively spatial learning. Moreover, subjects reported significant levels of cybersickness. In a second experiment, we tested whether such negative effects could be due to poorly controlled rotational motion during simulated self-motion. Subjects used a gamepad, in which rotational and translational displacements were independently controlled by two joysticks. Furthermore, we tested first- versus third-person navigation. No significant difference was observed between these two conditions. Overall, cybersickness tended to be lower, as compared to experiment 1, but the difference was not significant. Future research should evaluate further the hypothesis of the role of passively perceived optical flow in cybersickness, but manipulating the virtual environment'sperrot structure. It also seems that video-gaming experience might be involved in the user's sensitivity to cybersickness.

  17. Control algorithms for autonomous robot navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jorgensen, C.C.

    1985-09-20

    This paper examines control algorithm requirements for autonomous robot navigation outside laboratory environments. Three aspects of navigation are considered: navigation control in explored terrain, environment interactions with robot sensors, and navigation control in unanticipated situations. Major navigation methods are presented and relevance of traditional human learning theory is discussed. A new navigation technique linking graph theory and incidental learning is introduced.

  18. Utilizing Implicit User Feedback to Improve Interactive Video Retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanos Vrochidis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an approach to exploit the implicit user feedback gathered during interactive video retrieval tasks. We propose a framework, where the video is first indexed according to temporal, textual, and visual features and then implicit user feedback analysis is realized using a graph-based methodology. The generated graph encodes the semantic relations between video segments based on past user interaction and is subsequently used to generate recommendations. Moreover, we combine the visual features and implicit feedback information by training a support vector machine classifier with examples generated from the aforementioned graph in order to optimize the query by visual example search. The proposed framework is evaluated by conducting real-user experiments. The results demonstrate that significant improvement in terms of precision and recall is reported after the exploitation of implicit user feedback, while an improved ranking is presented in most of the evaluated queries by visual example.

  19. SIMULATING NAVIGATION WITH VIRTUAL 3D GEOVISUALIZATIONS – A FOCUS ON MEMORY RELATED FACTORS

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    I. Lokka; A. Çöltekin

    2016-01-01

    .... When simulating a geographic environment as a virtual world with the intention to train navigational memory in humans, an effective and efficient visual design is important to facilitate the amount of recall...

  20. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casal, Sandro; DellaValle, Nives; Mittone, Luigi; Soraperra, Ivan

    2017-01-01

    Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  1. Feedback and Incentives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie Claire

    2009-01-01

    use two pay schemes, a piece rate and a tournament. We find that overall feedback does not improve performance. In contrast to the piece-rate pay scheme there is some evidence of positive peer effects in tournaments since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay schemes and relative performance feedback policies on employee effort. We explore three feedback rules: no feedback on relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback. We...... behind, and front runners do not slack off. But in both pay schemes relative performance feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work; we refer to this as a "negative quality peer effect"....

  2. Situated Formative Feedback

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukassen, Niels Bech; Wahl, Christian; Sorensen, Elsebeth Korsgaard

    This study addresses the conceptual challenge of providing students with good quality feedback to enhance student learning in an online community of practice (COP). The aim of the study is to identify feedback mechanisms in a virtual learning environment (VLE) and to create a full formative...... feedback episode (FFE) through an online dialogue. The paper argues that dialogue is crucial for student learning and that feedback is not only something the teacher gives to the student. Viewing good quality feedback as social, situated, formative, emphasis is put on the establishment of dialogue. We...... refer to this type of feedback as, Situated Formative Feedback (SFF). As a basis for exploring, identifying and discussing relevant aspects of SFF the paper analyses qualitative data from a Moodle dialogue. Data are embedded in the qualitative analytic program Nvivo and are analysed with a system...

  3. Navigating Distributed Services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beute, Berco

    2002-01-01

    This thesis explores the impact of three current trends which, when taken together, arefundamentally changing the way in which the task of navigating virtual environmentsis accomplished. The first concerns the changeover from a situation in which all dataand functionality reside locally to the user......, to a situation where they are distributedacross the Internet. The second trend is the shift from a virtual environment that solelyconsists of distributed documents to a virtual environment that consists of bothdistributed documents and distributed services. The third and final trend is theincreasing diversity...... of devices used to access information on the Internet.The focal point of the thesis is an initial exploration of the effects of the trends onusers as they navigate the virtual environment of distributed documents and services.To begin the thesis uses scenarios as a heuristic device to identify and analyse...

  4. Wearable Navigation Assistance - A tool for the blind

    OpenAIRE

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the system architecture for a navigation tool for visually impaired persons. The major parts are: a multi-sensory system (comprising stereo vision, acoustic range finding and movement sensors), a mapper, a warning system and a tactile human-machine interface. The sensory parts are described in more detail, and the first experimental results are presented.

  5. Wearable Navigation Assistance - A tool for the blind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the system architecture for a navigation tool for visually impaired persons. The major parts are: a multi-sensory system (comprising stereo vision, acoustic range finding and movement sensors), a mapper, a warning system and a tactile human-machine interface. The sensory parts

  6. Wearable navigation assistance - A tool for the blind

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Regtien, Paulus P.L.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the system architecture for a navigation tool for visually impaired persons. The major parts are: a multi-sensory system (comprising stereo vision, acoustic range finding and movement sensors), a mapper, a warning system and a tactile human-machine interface. The sensory parts

  7. Navigation in virtual environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Erik; Hancock, Peter A.; Telke, Susan

    1996-06-01

    Virtual environments show great promise in the area of training. ALthough such synthetic environments project homeomorphic physical representations of real- world layouts, it is not known how individuals develop models to match such environments. To evaluate this process, the present experiment examined the accuracy of triadic representations of objects having learned them previously under different conditions. The layout consisted of four different colored spheres arranged on a flat plane. These objects could be viewed in either a free navigation virtual environment condition (NAV) or a single body position virtual environment condition. The first condition allowed active exploration of the environment while the latter condition allowed the participant only a passive opportunity to observe form a single viewpoint. These viewing conditions were a between-subject variable with ten participants randomly assigned to each condition. Performance was assessed by the response latency to judge the accuracy of a layout of three objects over different rotations. Results showed linear increases in response latency as the rotation angle increased from the initial perspective in SBP condition. The NAV condition did not show a similar effect of rotation angle. These results suggest that the spatial knowledge acquisition from virtual environments through navigation is similar to actual navigation.

  8. The attack navigator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Probst, Christian W.; Willemson, Jan; Pieters, Wolter

    2016-01-01

    The need to assess security and take protection decisions is at least as old as our civilisation. However, the complexity and development speed of our interconnected technical systems have surpassed our capacity to imagine and evaluate risk scenarios. This holds in particular for risks that are c......The need to assess security and take protection decisions is at least as old as our civilisation. However, the complexity and development speed of our interconnected technical systems have surpassed our capacity to imagine and evaluate risk scenarios. This holds in particular for risks...... that are caused by the strategic behaviour of adversaries. Therefore, technology-supported methods are needed to help us identify and manage these risks. In this paper, we describe the attack navigator: a graph-based approach to security risk assessment inspired by navigation systems. Based on maps of a socio......-technical system, the attack navigator identifies routes to an attacker goal. Specific attacker properties such as skill or resources can be included through attacker profiles. This enables defenders to explore attack scenarios and the effectiveness of defense alternatives under different threat conditions....

  9. Towards Visual Sedimentation

    OpenAIRE

    Huron, Samuel; Vuillemot, Romain; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    2012-01-01

    This Poster receive the Best Poster award from the IEEE INFOVIS committee.; International audience; We present Visual Sedimentation, a new design metaphor for visualizing streaming data inspired by the geological process of sedimentation. Our work started by early experiments visualiz- ing political Twitter streams during the French 2012 presidential elections, and social interactions during a TV show. In both cases, the positive feedback we received expressed an unexpectedly high level of en...

  10. Enhanced Motor Imagery Training Using a Hybrid BCI With Feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tianyou; Xiao, Jun; Wang, Fangyi; Zhang, Rui; Gu, Zhenghui; Cichocki, Andrzej; Li, Yuanqing

    2015-07-01

    Motor imagery-related mu/beta rhythms, which can be voluntarily modulated by subjects, have been widely used in EEG-based brain computer interfaces (BCIs). Moreover, it has been suggested that motor imagery-specific EEG differences can be enhanced by feedback training. However, the differences observed in the EEGs of naive subjects are typically not sufficient to provide reliable EEG control and thus result in unintended feedback. Such feedback can frustrate subjects and impede training. In this study, a hybrid BCI paradigm combining motor imagery and steady-state visually evoked potentials (SSVEPs) has been proposed to provide effective continuous feedback for motor imagery training. During the initial training sessions, subjects must focus on flickering buttons to evoke SSVEPs as they perform motor imagery tasks. The output/feedback of the hybrid BCI is based on hybrid features consisting of motor imagery- and SSVEP-related brain signals. In this context, the SSVEP plays a more important role than motor imagery in generating feedback. As the training progresses, the subjects can gradually decrease their visual attention to the flickering buttons, provided that the feedback is still effective. In this case, the feedback is mainly based on motor imagery. Our experimental results demonstrate that subjects generate distinguishable brain patterns of hand motor imagery after only five training sessions lasting approximately 1.5 h each. The proposed hybrid feedback paradigm can be used to enhance motor imagery training. This hybrid BCI system with feedback can effectively identify the intentions of the subjects.

  11. Follower-Centered Perspective on Feedback: Effects of Feedback Seeking on Identification and Feedback Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Zhenxing; Li, Miaomiao; Qi, Yaoyuan; Zhang, Na

    2017-01-01

    In the formation mechanism of the feedback environment, the existing research pays attention to external feedback sources and regards individuals as objects passively accepting feedback. Thus, the external source fails to realize the individuals’ need for feedback, and the feedback environment cannot provide them with useful information, leading to a feedback vacuum. The aim of this study is to examine the effect of feedback-seeking by different strategies on the supervisor-feedback environme...

  12. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Urakov, A. L.; Nigmatullina, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient's exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  13. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasatkin, A. A., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru; Nigmatullina, A. R. [Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation); Urakov, A. L., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru [Institute of Mechanics Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, T.Baramzinoy street 34, Izhevsk, Russia, 426067, Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  14. Tactile Navigation Display

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Erp, J.B.F. van

    2001-01-01

    The use of the tactile modality is not common in Human Computer Interaction. However, there may be good reasons to do so. For example in situations in which the visual sense is restricted (e.g., in virtual environments lacking a wide field of view, or for the visually handicapped persons), or

  15. Is navigation in virtual reality with FMRI really navigation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taube, Jeffrey S; Valerio, Stephane; Yoder, Ryan M

    2013-07-01

    Identifying the neural mechanisms underlying spatial orientation and navigation has long posed a challenge for researchers. Multiple approaches incorporating a variety of techniques and animal models have been used to address this issue. More recently, virtual navigation has become a popular tool for understanding navigational processes. Although combining this technique with functional imaging can provide important information on many aspects of spatial navigation, it is important to recognize some of the limitations these techniques have for gaining a complete understanding of the neural mechanisms of navigation. Foremost among these is that, when participants perform a virtual navigation task in a scanner, they are lying motionless in a supine position while viewing a video monitor. Here, we provide evidence that spatial orientation and navigation rely to a large extent on locomotion and its accompanying activation of motor, vestibular, and proprioceptive systems. Researchers should therefore consider the impact on the absence of these motion-based systems when interpreting virtual navigation/functional imaging experiments to achieve a more accurate understanding of the mechanisms underlying navigation.

  16. Analysis of a novel device-level SINS/ACFSS deeply integrated navigation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Qin, Shiqiao; Wang, Xingshu; Jiang, Guangwen; Tan, Wenfeng; Wu, Wei

    2017-02-01

    The combination of the strap-down inertial navigation system(SINS) and the celestial navigation system(CNS) is one of the popular measures to constitute the integrated navigation system. A star sensor(SS) is used as a precise attitude determination device in CNS. To solve the problem that the star image obtained by SS is motion-blurred under dynamic conditions, the attitude-correlated frames(ACF) approach is presented and the star sensor which works based on ACF approach is named ACFSS. Depending on the ACF approach, a novel device-level SINS/ACFSS deeply integrated navigation method is proposed in this paper. Feedback to the ACF process from the error of the gyro is one of the typical characters of the SINS/CNS deeply integrated navigation method. Herein, simulation results have verified its validity and efficiency in improving the accuracy of gyro and it can be proved that this method is feasible.

  17. RF feedback for KEKB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ezura, Eizi; Yoshimoto, Shin-ichi; Akai, Kazunori [National Lab. for High Energy Physics, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1996-08-01

    This paper describes the present status of the RF feedback development for the KEK B-Factory (KEKB). A preliminary experiment concerning the RF feedback using a parallel comb-filter was performed through a choke-mode cavity and a klystron. The RF feedback has been tested using the beam of the TRISTAN Main Ring, and has proved to be effective in damping the beam instability. (author)

  18. Neural cryptography with feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  19. Neural cryptography with feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruttor, Andreas; Kinzel, Wolfgang; Shacham, Lanir; Kanter, Ido

    2004-04-01

    Neural cryptography is based on a competition between attractive and repulsive stochastic forces. A feedback mechanism is added to neural cryptography which increases the repulsive forces. Using numerical simulations and an analytic approach, the probability of a successful attack is calculated for different model parameters. Scaling laws are derived which show that feedback improves the security of the system. In addition, a network with feedback generates a pseudorandom bit sequence which can be used to encrypt and decrypt a secret message.

  20. Feedback in surgical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Boghdady, Michael; Alijani, Afshin

    2017-04-01

    The positive effect of feedback has long been recognized in surgical education. Surgical educators convey feedback to improve the performance of the surgical trainees. We aimed to review the scientific classification and application of feedback in surgical education, and to propose possible future directions for research. A literature search was performed using Pubmed, OVID, CINAHL, Web of science, EMBASE, ERIC database and Google Scholar. The following search terms were used: 'feedback', 'feedback in medical education', 'feedback in medical training' and 'feedback in surgery'. The search was limited to articles in English. From 1157 citations, 12 books and 43 articles met the inclusion criteria and were selected for this review. Feedback comes in a variety of types and is an essential tool for learning and developing performance in surgical education. Different methods of feedback application are evolving and future work needs to concentrate on the value of each method as well as the role of new technologies in surgical education. Copyright © 2016 Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh (Scottish charity number SC005317) and Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Strategies for effective feedback

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-01-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education...

  2. Feedback stabilization initiative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-06-01

    Much progress has been made in attaining high confinement regimes in magnetic confinement devices. These operating modes tend to be transient, however, due to the onset of MHD instabilities, and their stabilization is critical for improved performance at steady state. This report describes the Feedback Stabilization Initiative (FSI), a broad-based, multi-institutional effort to develop and implement methods for raising the achievable plasma betas through active MHD feedback stabilization. A key element in this proposed effort is the Feedback Stabilization Experiment (FSX), a medium-sized, national facility that would be specifically dedicated to demonstrating beta improvement in reactor relevant plasmas by using a variety of MHD feedback stabilization schemes.

  3. Policy Feedback System (PFS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Social Security Administration — The Policy Feedback System (PFS) is a web application developed by the Office of Disability Policy Management Information (ODPMI) team that gathers empirical data...

  4. Feedback Loop Gains and Feedback Behavior (1996)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kampmann, Christian Erik

    2012-01-01

    Linking feedback loops and system behavior is part of the foundation of system dynamics, yet the lack of formal tools has so far prevented a systematic application of the concept, except for very simple systems. Having such tools at their disposal would be a great help to analysts in understanding...... large, complicated simulation models. The paper applies tools from graph theory formally linking individual feedback loop strengths to the system eigenvalues. The significance of a link or a loop gain and an eigenvalue can be expressed in the eigenvalue elasticity, i.e., the relative change...... of an eigenvalue resulting from a relative change in the gain. The elasticities of individual links and loops may be found through simple matrix operations on the linearized system. Even though the number of feedback loops can grow rapidly with system size, reaching astronomical proportions even for modest systems...

  5. Indoor navigation by image recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Io Teng; Leong, Chi Chong; Hong, Ka Wo; Pun, Chi-Man

    2017-07-01

    With the progress of smartphones hardware, it is simple on smartphone using image recognition technique such as face detection. In addition, indoor navigation system development is much slower than outdoor navigation system. Hence, this research proves a usage of image recognition technique for navigation in indoor environment. In this paper, we introduced an indoor navigation application that uses the indoor environment features to locate user's location and a route calculating algorithm to generate an appropriate path for user. The application is implemented on Android smartphone rather than iPhone. Yet, the application design can also be applied on iOS because the design is implemented without using special features only for Android. We found that digital navigation system provides better and clearer location information than paper map. Also, the indoor environment is ideal for Image recognition processing. Hence, the results motivate us to design an indoor navigation system using image recognition.

  6. The navigation system of the JPL robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, A. M.

    1977-01-01

    The control structure of the JPL research robot and the operations of the navigation subsystem are discussed. The robot functions as a network of interacting concurrent processes distributed among several computers and coordinated by a central executive. The results of scene analysis are used to create a segmented terrain model in which surface regions are classified by traversibility. The model is used by a path planning algorithm, PATH, which uses tree search methods to find the optimal path to a goal. In PATH, the search space is defined dynamically as a consequence of node testing. Maze-solving and the use of an associative data base for context dependent node generation are also discussed. Execution of a planned path is accomplished by a feedback guidance process with automatic error recovery.

  7. Relative optical navigation around small bodies via Extreme Learning Machine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Andrew M.

    To perform close proximity operations under a low-gravity environment, relative and absolute positions are vital information to the maneuver. Hence navigation is inseparably integrated in space travel. Extreme Learning Machine (ELM) is presented as an optical navigation method around small celestial bodies. Optical Navigation uses visual observation instruments such as a camera to acquire useful data and determine spacecraft position. The required input data for operation is merely a single image strip and a nadir image. ELM is a machine learning Single Layer feed-Forward Network (SLFN), a type of neural network (NN). The algorithm is developed on the predicate that input weights and biases can be randomly assigned and does not require back-propagation. The learned model is the output layer weights which are used to calculate a prediction. Together, Extreme Learning Machine Optical Navigation (ELM OpNav) utilizes optical images and ELM algorithm to train the machine to navigate around a target body. In this thesis the asteroid, Vesta, is the designated celestial body. The trained ELMs estimate the position of the spacecraft during operation with a single data set. The results show the approach is promising and potentially suitable for on-board navigation.

  8. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Yang, Yuanxi; Fan, Shiwei; Yu, Wenxian

    2017-01-01

    These proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2017, held during 23th-25th May in Shanghai, China. The theme of CSNC2017 is Positioning, Connecting All. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2017, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  9. China Satellite Navigation Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Jingnan; Fan, Shiwei; Wang, Feixue

    2016-01-01

    These Proceedings present selected research papers from CSNC2016, held during 18th-20th May in Changsha, China. The theme of CSNC2016 is Smart Sensing, Smart Perception. These papers discuss the technologies and applications of the Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), and the latest progress made in the China BeiDou System (BDS) especially. They are divided into 12 topics to match the corresponding sessions in CSNC2016, which broadly covered key topics in GNSS. Readers can learn about the BDS and keep abreast of the latest advances in GNSS techniques and applications.

  10. High-accuracy brain-machine interfaces using feedback information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Gi Yeom

    Full Text Available Sensory feedback is very important for movement control. However, feedback information has not been directly used to update movement prediction model in the previous BMI studies, although the closed-loop BMI system provides the visual feedback to users. Here, we propose a BMI framework combining image processing as the feedback information with a novel prediction method. The feedback-prediction algorithm (FPA generates feedback information from the positions of objects and modifies movement prediction according to the information. The FPA predicts a target among objects based on the movement direction predicted from the neural activity. After the target selection, the FPA modifies the predicted direction toward the target and modulates the magnitude of the predicted vector to easily reach the target. The FPA repeats the modification in every prediction time points. To evaluate the improvements of prediction accuracy provided by the feedback, we compared the prediction performances with feedback (FPA and without feedback. We demonstrated that accuracy of movement prediction can be considerably improved by the FPA combining feedback information. The accuracy of the movement prediction was significantly improved for all subjects (P<0.001 and 32.1% of the mean error was reduced. The BMI performance will be improved by combining feedback information and it will promote the development of a practical BMI system.

  11. Effects of four types of non-obtrusive feedback on computer behaviour, task performance and comfort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, E.M.; Huijsmans, M.A.; de Jong, A.M.; van de Ven, J.G.M.; Ruijsendaal, M.

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of non-obtrusive feedback on continuous lifted hand/finger behaviour, task performance and comfort. In an experiment with 24 participants the effects of two visual and two tactile feedback signals were compared to a no-feedback condition in a computer task.

  12. Effect of task-related continuous auditory feedback during learning of tracking motion exercises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosati Giulio

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This paper presents the results of a set of experiments in which we used continuous auditory feedback to augment motor training exercises. This feedback modality is mostly underexploited in current robotic rehabilitation systems, which usually implement only very basic auditory interfaces. Our hypothesis is that properly designed continuous auditory feedback could be used to represent temporal and spatial information that could in turn, improve performance and motor learning. Methods We implemented three different experiments on healthy subjects, who were asked to track a target on a screen by moving an input device (controller with their hand. Different visual and auditory feedback modalities were envisaged. The first experiment investigated whether continuous task-related auditory feedback can help improve performance to a greater extent than error-related audio feedback, or visual feedback alone. In the second experiment we used sensory substitution to compare different types of auditory feedback with equivalent visual feedback, in order to find out whether mapping the same information on a different sensory channel (the visual channel yielded comparable effects with those gained in the first experiment. The final experiment applied a continuously changing visuomotor transformation between the controller and the screen and mapped kinematic information, computed in either coordinate system (controller or video, to the audio channel, in order to investigate which information was more relevant to the user. Results Task-related audio feedback significantly improved performance with respect to visual feedback alone, whilst error-related feedback did not. Secondly, performance in audio tasks was significantly better with respect to the equivalent sensory-substituted visual tasks. Finally, with respect to visual feedback alone, video-task-related sound feedback decreased the tracking error during the learning of a novel

  13. Effect of task-related continuous auditory feedback during learning of tracking motion exercises

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper presents the results of a set of experiments in which we used continuous auditory feedback to augment motor training exercises. This feedback modality is mostly underexploited in current robotic rehabilitation systems, which usually implement only very basic auditory interfaces. Our hypothesis is that properly designed continuous auditory feedback could be used to represent temporal and spatial information that could in turn, improve performance and motor learning. Methods We implemented three different experiments on healthy subjects, who were asked to track a target on a screen by moving an input device (controller) with their hand. Different visual and auditory feedback modalities were envisaged. The first experiment investigated whether continuous task-related auditory feedback can help improve performance to a greater extent than error-related audio feedback, or visual feedback alone. In the second experiment we used sensory substitution to compare different types of auditory feedback with equivalent visual feedback, in order to find out whether mapping the same information on a different sensory channel (the visual channel) yielded comparable effects with those gained in the first experiment. The final experiment applied a continuously changing visuomotor transformation between the controller and the screen and mapped kinematic information, computed in either coordinate system (controller or video), to the audio channel, in order to investigate which information was more relevant to the user. Results Task-related audio feedback significantly improved performance with respect to visual feedback alone, whilst error-related feedback did not. Secondly, performance in audio tasks was significantly better with respect to the equivalent sensory-substituted visual tasks. Finally, with respect to visual feedback alone, video-task-related sound feedback decreased the tracking error during the learning of a novel visuomotor perturbation, whereas

  14. Evaluation of Augmented Reality Feedback in Surgical Training Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahiri, Mohsen; Nelson, Carl A; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Ka-Chun

    2017-11-01

    Providing computer-based laparoscopic surgical training has several advantages that enhance the training process. Self-evaluation and real-time performance feedback are 2 of these advantages, which avoid dependency of trainees on expert feedback. The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a visual time indicator as real-time feedback correlated with the laparoscopic surgical training. Twenty novices participated in this study working with (and without) different presentations of time indicators. They performed a standard peg transfer task, and their completion times and muscle activity were recorded and compared. Also of interest was whether the use of this type of feedback induced any side effect in terms of motivation or muscle fatigue. Of the 20 participants, 15 (75%) preferred using a time indicator in the training process rather than having no feedback. However, time to task completion showed no significant difference in performance with the time indicator; furthermore, no significant differences in muscle activity or muscle fatigue were detected with/without time feedback. The absence of significant difference between task performance with/without time feedback shows that using visual real-time feedback can be included in surgical training based on user preference. Trainees may benefit from this type of feedback in the form of increased motivation. The extent to which this can influence training frequency leading to performance improvement is a question for further study.

  15. Practical indoor mobile robot navigation using hybrid maps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özkil, Ali Gürcan; Fan, Zhun; Xiao, Jizhong

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a practical navigation scheme for indoor mobile robots using hybrid maps. The method makes use of metric maps for local navigation and a topological map for global path planning. Metric maps are generated as 2D occupancy grids by a range sensor to represent local information...... about partial areas. The global topological map is used to indicate the connectivity of the 'places-of-interests' in the environment and the interconnectivity of the local maps. Visual tags on the ceiling to be detected by the robot provide valuable information and contribute to reliable localization...... robot and evaluated in a hospital environment....

  16. Projection-based visual guidance for robot-aided RF needle insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Rong; Chui, Chee-Kong; Ong, Sim-Heng; Lim, Kah-Bin; Chang, Stephen Kin-Yong

    2013-11-01

    The use of projector-based augmented reality (AR) in surgery may enable surgeons to directly view anatomical models and surgical data from the patient's surface (skin). It has the advantages of a consistent viewing focus on the patient, an extended field of view and augmented interaction. This paper presents an AR guidance mechanism with a projector-camera system to provide the surgeon with direct visual feedback for supervision of robotic needle insertion in radiofrequency (RF) ablation treatment. The registration of target organ models to specific positions on the patient body is performed using a surface-matching algorithm and point-based registration. An algorithm based on the extended Kalman filter and spatial transformation is used to intraoperatively compute the virtual needle's depth in the patient's body for AR display. Experiments of this AR system on a mannequin were conducted to evaluate AR visualization and accuracy of virtual RF needle insertion. The average accuracy of 1.86 mm for virtual needle insertion met the clinical requirement of 2 mm or better. The feasibility of augmented interaction with a surgical robot using the proposed open AR interface with active visual feedback was demonstrated. The experimental results demonstrate that this guidance system is effective in assisting a surgeon to perform a robot-assisted radiofrequency ablation procedure. The novelty of the work lies in establishing a navigational procedure for percutaneous surgical augmented intervention integrating a projection-based AR guidance and robotic implementation for surgical needle insertion.

  17. Feedback in Language Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamel, Vivian

    In this paper, two theoretical approaches to language teaching, the audio-lingual and the cognitive code methods, are examined with respect to how they deal with feedback in the classroom situation. Audio-lingual theorists either ignore completely the need for feedback in the classroom or deal with it only in terms of its reinforcing attributes.…

  18. Fault Tolerant Feedback Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stoustrup, Jakob; Niemann, H.

    2001-01-01

    An architecture for fault tolerant feedback controllers based on the Youla parameterization is suggested. It is shown that the Youla parameterization will give a residual vector directly in connection with the fault diagnosis part of the fault tolerant feedback controller. It turns out that there...

  19. Feedback og interpersonel kommunikation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dindler, Camilla

    2016-01-01

    Som interpersonel kommunikationsform handler feedback om at observere, mærke og italesætte det, som handler om relationen mellem samtaleparterne mere end om samtaleemnet. Her er fokus på, hvad der siges og hvordan der kommunikeres sammen. Feedback er her ikke en korrigerende tilbagemelding til...

  20. Ionospheric modelling for navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragon Angel, M. A.

    Signals transmitted to and from satellites for communication and navigation purposes must pass through the ionosphere Ionospheric irregularities most common at equatorial latitudes although they could occur anywhere can have a major impact on system performance and reliability and commercial navigation service satellite-based providers need to account for their effects For a GNSS single-frequency receiver the Slant Total Electron Content STEC must be known by the user through broadcast corrections In this context there are several sets of broadcast parameters that can be defined to take into account this ionospheric term The chosen model to generate the ionospheric correction coefficients for the present study is the NeQuick model although with a number of adaptations intended to improve effective ionospheric effect modelling performances The aim of this study is to describe a possible adaptation to the NeQuick model for real time purposes and suitable for single frequency users Therefore it will be necessary to determine the performance of this modified NeQuick model in correcting the ionospheric delay In order to generate the ionospheric corrections for single frequency receivers using the NeQuick model a certain approach should be followed to adapt the performance of NeQuick since this model was originally developed to provide TEC using averaged monthly information of the solar activity and not daily one Thus to use NeQuick for real time applications as an ionospheric broadcasted model such as Klobuchar solar daily information at the user point

  1. Learning for Autonomous Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelova, Anelia; Howard, Andrew; Matthies, Larry; Tang, Benyang; Turmon, Michael; Mjolsness, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Robotic ground vehicles for outdoor applications have achieved some remarkable successes, notably in autonomous highway following (Dickmanns, 1987), planetary exploration (1), and off-road navigation on Earth (1). Nevertheless, major challenges remain to enable reliable, high-speed, autonomous navigation in a wide variety of complex, off-road terrain. 3-D perception of terrain geometry with imaging range sensors is the mainstay of off-road driving systems. However, the stopping distance at high speed exceeds the effective lookahead distance of existing range sensors. Prospects for extending the range of 3-D sensors is strongly limited by sensor physics, eye safety of lasers, and related issues. Range sensor limitations also allow vehicles to enter large cul-de-sacs even at low speed, leading to long detours. Moreover, sensing only terrain geometry fails to reveal mechanical properties of terrain that are critical to assessing its traversability, such as potential for slippage, sinkage, and the degree of compliance of potential obstacles. Rovers in the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) mission have got stuck in sand dunes and experienced significant downhill slippage in the vicinity of large rock hazards. Earth-based off-road robots today have very limited ability to discriminate traversable vegetation from non-traversable vegetation or rough ground. It is impossible today to preprogram a system with knowledge of these properties for all types of terrain and weather conditions that might be encountered.

  2. Feedback i matematik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sortkær, Bent

    2017-01-01

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hartberg, Dobson, & Gran, 2012; Hattie & Timperley, 2007; Wiliam, 2015). Dette på trods af, at flere forskere påpeger, at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende...... (Hattie & Gan, 2011), og nogle endda viser, at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). Artiklen vil undersøge disse tilsyneladende modstridende resultater ved at stille spørgsmålet: Under hvilke forudsætninger virker feedback i matematik læringsfremmende......? Dette gøres ved at dykke ned i forskningslitteraturen omhandlende feedback ud fra en række temaer for på den måde at besvare ovenstående spørgsmål....

  3. Visualizing multi-channel networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Antemijczuk, Paweł; Magiera, Marta; Jørgensen, Sune Lehmann

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a visualization to illustrate social interactions, built from multiple distinct channels of communication. The visualization displays a summary of dense personal information in a compact graphical notation. The starting point is an abstract drawing of a spider’s web. Below......, we describe the meaning of each data dimension along with the background and motivation for their inclusion. Finally, we present feedback provided by the users (31 individuals) of the visualization....

  4. Personified and multistate camera motions for first-person navigation in desktop virtual reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terziman, Léo; Marchal, Maud; Multon, Franck; Arnaldi, Bruno; Lécuyer, Anatole

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we introduce novel 'Camera Motions' (CMs) to improve the sensations related to locomotion in virtual environments (VE). Traditional Camera Motions are artificial oscillating motions applied to the subjective viewpoint when walking in the VE, and they are meant to evoke and reproduce the visual flow generated during a human walk. Our novel camera motions are: (1) multistate, (2) personified, and (3) they can take into account the topography of the virtual terrain. Being multistate, our CMs can account for different states of locomotion in VE namely: walking, but also running and sprinting. Being personified, our CMs can be adapted to avatar's physiology such as to its size, weight or training status. They can then take into account avatar's fatigue and recuperation for updating visual CMs accordingly. Last, our approach is adapted to the topography of the VE. Running over a strong positive slope would rapidly decrease the advance speed of the avatar, increase its energy loss, and eventually change the locomotion mode, influencing the visual feedback of the camera motions. Our new approach relies on a locomotion simulator partially inspired by human physiology and implemented for a real-time use in Desktop VR. We have conducted a series of experiments to evaluate the perception of our new CMs by naive participants. Results notably show that participants could discriminate and perceive transitions between the different locomotion modes, by relying exclusively on our CMs. They could also perceive some properties of the avatar being used and, overall, very well appreciated the new CMs techniques. Taken together, our results suggest that our new CMs could be introduced in Desktop VR applications involving first-person navigation, in order to enhance sensations of walking, running, and sprinting, with potentially different avatars and over uneven terrains, such as for: training, virtual visits or video games.

  5. Detecting Traversable Area and Water Hazards for the Visually Impaired with a pRGB-D Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kailun; Wang, Kaiwei; Cheng, Ruiqi; Hu, Weijian; Huang, Xiao; Bai, Jian

    2017-01-01

    The use of RGB-Depth (RGB-D) sensors for assisting visually impaired people (VIP) has been widely reported as they offer portability, function-diversity and cost-effectiveness. However, polarization cues to assist traversability awareness without precautions against stepping into water areas are weak. In this paper, a polarized RGB-Depth (pRGB-D) framework is proposed to detect traversable area and water hazards simultaneously with polarization-color-depth-attitude information to enhance safety during navigation. The approach has been tested on a pRGB-D dataset, which is built for tuning parameters and evaluating the performance. Moreover, the approach has been integrated into a wearable prototype which generates a stereo sound feedback to guide visually impaired people (VIP) follow the prioritized direction to avoid obstacles and water hazards. Furthermore, a preliminary study with ten blindfolded participants suggests its effectivity and reliability. PMID:28817069

  6. Feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ane Qvortrup

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Feedback tilskrives stor betydning for læring, men trods intensiv forskning på området synes det svært at fange, hvori feedbacks særlige potentiale består. I forsøgene på at gøre dette knyttes an til en række faktorer eller parametre, der fremhæves som centrale. En af disse faktorer er tid, hvor der kredses om forskellen mellem umiddelbar og forsinket feedback samt om fordele og ulemper ved hver af de to. I denne artikel knyttes der an til en forståelse af feedback som tredjeordensiagttagelse, og der sættes herfra fokus på, hvordan man i en praktisk undervisningssituation kan imødekomme tidsfaktoren knyttet til feedback. Med udgangspunkt i et undervisningsforløb på bachelorniveau, hvor der er arbejdet systematisk med feedback understøttet af Wikis, belyses det, hvordan et sådant arbejde synes at have potentiale for understøttelse af såvel læring som undervisning. En sådan teoretisk reflekteret belysning kan udgøre et refleksionsprogram for fremtidig planlægning af og løbende refleksion over undervisning.     The article investigates the effect of feedback on learning. Feedback has been shown to be one of the most powerful influences on achievement in education. But, in spite of much research on the matter, there is no agreement on how the special potential of feedback can be described, and consequently no agreement on what is good and bad feedback. This article sets out to rectify this omission by seeking a new theoretical framework that is sensitive to the complexity of the impact of feedback. The author propose a system theoretical frame and through its use identifies significant didactical issues. Although feedback is described as an internal, system-relative construction, when seen through a system theoretical lens different teaching environments create diverse conditions for feedback constructions. The final section of the paper explores this idea in relation to wikis.

  7. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    OpenAIRE

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they wer...

  8. Finding Home: Landmark Ambiguity in Human Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Jetzschke

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Memories of places often include landmark cues, i.e., information provided by the spatial arrangement of distinct objects with respect to the target location. To study how humans combine landmark information for navigation, we conducted two experiments: To this end, participants were either provided with auditory landmarks while walking in a large sports hall or with visual landmarks while walking on a virtual-reality treadmill setup. We found that participants cannot reliably locate their home position due to ambiguities in the spatial arrangement when only one or two uniform landmarks provide cues with respect to the target. With three visual landmarks that look alike, the task is solved without ambiguity, while audio landmarks need to play three unique sounds for a similar performance. This reduction in ambiguity through integration of landmark information from 1, 2, and 3 landmarks is well modeled using a probabilistic approach based on maximum likelihood estimation. Unlike any deterministic model of human navigation (based e.g., on distance or angle information, this probabilistic model predicted both the precision and accuracy of the human homing performance. To further examine how landmark cues are integrated we introduced systematic conflicts in the visual landmark configuration between training of the home position and tests of the homing performance. The participants integrated the spatial information from each landmark near-optimally to reduce spatial variability. When the conflict becomes big, this integration breaks down and precision is sacrificed for accuracy. That is, participants return again closer to the home position, because they start ignoring the deviant third landmark. Relying on two instead of three landmarks, however, goes along with responses that are scattered over a larger area, thus leading to higher variability. To model the breakdown of integration with increasing conflict, the probabilistic model based on a

  9. Two-Dimensional Spoiled Gradient-Recalled Echo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Liver Using Respiratory Navigator-Gating Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Hata, Hirofumi; Matsunaga, Keiji; Nakajima, Ai; Komi, Shotaro; Abe, Yutaka; Miyatake, Hiroki

    We assessed the feasibility of T1-weighted 2-dimensional spoiled gradient-recalled (2D SPGR) acquisition in steady-state imaging of the liver with various respiratory navigator gating techniques. A total of 12 healthy volunteers underwent in-phase and out-of-phase 2D SPGR imaging of the liver during breath-holding and free-breathing. Four techniques for respiratory navigation, 2 conventional navigator techniques and 2 self-navigator techniques, were used for free-breathing imaging. Good navigator waveforms were obtained in conventional navigation, whereas fluctuations were evident in self navigation. All of the 4 navigator-based methods provided better images in terms of background signals and visual image quality compared with images obtained with no respiratory control. However, differences remained in comparison with breath-holding. Superiority of self-navigation to conventional navigation was not shown. Navigator-gating techniques improved 2D SPGR images of the liver acquired during free-breathing, suggesting feasibility and beneficial effects, although navigator-based images were still inferior to breath-hold images.

  10. Feedback and efficient behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandro Casal

    Full Text Available Feedback is an effective tool for promoting efficient behavior: it enhances individuals' awareness of choice consequences in complex settings. Our study aims to isolate the mechanisms underlying the effects of feedback on achieving efficient behavior in a controlled environment. We design a laboratory experiment in which individuals are not aware of the consequences of different alternatives and, thus, cannot easily identify the efficient ones. We introduce feedback as a mechanism to enhance the awareness of consequences and to stimulate exploration and search for efficient alternatives. We assess the efficacy of three different types of intervention: provision of social information, manipulation of the frequency, and framing of feedback. We find that feedback is most effective when it is framed in terms of losses, that it reduces efficiency when it includes information about inefficient peers' behavior, and that a lower frequency of feedback does not disrupt efficiency. By quantifying the effect of different types of feedback, our study suggests useful insights for policymakers.

  11. Feedback and Incentives:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Tor Viking; Poulsen, Anders; Villeval, Marie-Claire

    This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedba...... of positive peer effects since the underdogs almost never quit the competition even when lagging significantly behind, and frontrunners do not slack off. Moreover, in both pay schemes information feedback reduces the quality of the low performers' work.......This paper experimentally investigates the impact of different pay and relative performance information policies on employee effort. We explore three information policies: No feedback about relative performance, feedback given halfway through the production period, and continuously updated feedback....... The pay schemes are a piece rate payment scheme and a winner-takes-all tournament. We find that, regardless of the pay scheme used, feedback does not improve performance. There are no significant peer effects in the piece-rate pay scheme. In contrast, in the tournament scheme we find some evidence...

  12. Strategies for effective feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kritek, Patricia A

    2015-04-01

    Provision of regular feedback to trainees on clinical performance by supervising providers is increasingly recognized as an essential component of undergraduate and graduate health sciences education; however, many individuals have not been formally trained in this pedagogical skill. At the bedside or in the clinic, effective performance feedback can be accomplished by following four key steps. Begin by setting expectations that incorporate the trainee's personal goals and external objectives. Delineate how and when you will provide feedback to the learner. Next, directly observe the trainee's performance. This can be challenging while engaged on a busy clinical service, but a focus on discrete activities or interactions (e.g., family meeting, intravascular volume assessment using bedside ultrasound, or obtaining informed consent) is helpful. The third step is to plan and prioritize the feedback session. Feedback is most effective when given in a timely fashion and delivered in a safe environment. Limit the issues addressed because learners often disengage if confronted with too many deficiencies. Finally, when delivering feedback, begin by listening to the trainee's self-evaluation and then take a balanced approach. Describe in detail what the trainee does well and discuss opportunities for improvement with emphasis on specific, modifiable behaviors. The feedback loop is completed with a plan for follow-up reassessment. Through the use of these relatively simple practices, both the trainee and teacher can have a more productive learning experience.

  13. Feedback - fra et elevperspektiv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Benedikte Vilslev; Pedersen, Bent Sortkær

    Feedback bliver i litteraturen igen og igen fremhævet som et af de mest effektive midler til at fremme elevers præstationer i skolen (Hattie og Timperley, 2007). Andre studier er dog inde på at feedback ikke altid er læringsfremmende og nogle viser endda at feedback kan have en negativ virkning i...... forhold til præstationer (Kluger & DeNisi, 1996). I forsøget på at forklare hvordan og hvorfor feedback virker (forskelligt), er der undersøgt flere dimensioner og forhold omkring feedback (se bl.a. Black og Wiliam, 1998; Hattie og Timperley, 2007; Shute, 2008). Dog er der få studier der undersøger...... hvordan feedback opleves fra et elevperspektiv (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013). Samtidig er der i feedbacklitteraturen en mangel på kvalitative studier, der kommer tæt på fænomenet feedback, som det viser sig i klasserummet (Ruiz-Primo og Li, 2013) i naturlige omgivelser (Black og Wiliam, 1998), og hvordan...

  14. Dynamic Transportation Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiaofeng; Chen, Jidong

    Miniaturization of computing devices, and advances in wireless communication and sensor technology are some of the forces that are propagating computing from the stationary desktop to the mobile outdoors. Some important classes of new applications that will be enabled by this revolutionary development include intelligent traffic management, location-based services, tourist services, mobile electronic commerce, and digital battlefield. Some existing application classes that will benefit from the development include transportation and air traffic control, weather forecasting, emergency response, mobile resource management, and mobile workforce. Location management, i.e., the management of transient location information, is an enabling technology for all these applications. In this chapter, we present the applications of moving objects management and their functionalities, in particular, the application of dynamic traffic navigation, which is a challenge due to the highly variable traffic state and the requirement of fast, on-line computations.

  15. Optimetrics for Precise Navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Guangning; Heckler, Gregory; Gramling, Cheryl

    2017-01-01

    Optimetrics for Precise Navigation will be implemented on existing optical communication links. The ranging and Doppler measurements are conducted over communication data frame and clock. The measurement accuracy is two orders of magnitude better than TDRSS. It also has other advantages of: The high optical carrier frequency enables: (1) Immunity from ionosphere and interplanetary Plasma noise floor, which is a performance limitation for RF tracking; and (2) High antenna gain reduces terminal size and volume, enables high precision tracking in Cubesat, and in deep space smallsat. High Optical Pointing Precision provides: (a) spacecraft orientation, (b) Minimal additional hardware to implement Precise Optimetrics over optical comm link; and (c) Continuous optical carrier phase measurement will enable the system presented here to accept future optical frequency standard with much higher clock accuracy.

  16. Fear of feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Jay M; Strober, Myra H

    2003-04-01

    Nobody likes performance reviews. Subordinates are terrified they'll hear nothing but criticism. Bosses think their direct reports will respond to even the mildest criticism with anger or tears. The result? Everyone keeps quiet. That's unfortunate, because most people need help figuring out how to improve their performance and advance their careers. This fear of feedback doesn't come into play just during annual reviews. At least half the executives with whom the authors have worked never ask for feedback. Many expect the worst: heated arguments, even threats of dismissal. So rather than seek feedback, people try to guess what their bosses are thinking. Fears and assumptions about feedback often manifest themselves in psychologically maladaptive behaviors such as procrastination, denial, brooding, jealousy, and self-sabotage. But there's hope, say the authors. Those who learn adaptive techniques can free themselves from destructive responses. They'll be able to deal with feedback better if they acknowledge negative emotions, reframe fear and criticism constructively, develop realistic goals, create support systems, and reward themselves for achievements along the way. Once you've begun to alter your maladaptive behaviors, you can begin seeking regular feedback from your boss. The authors take you through four steps for doing just that: self-assessment, external assessment, absorbing the feedback, and taking action toward change. Organizations profit when employees ask for feedback and deal well with criticism. Once people begin to know how they are doing relative to management's priorities, their work becomes better aligned with organizational goals. What's more, they begin to transform a feedback-averse environment into a more honest and open one, in turn improving performance throughout the organization.

  17. Effect of vibrotactile feedback on an EMG-based proportional cursor control system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shunchong; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Dingguo; Sheng, Xinjun; Zhu, Xiangyang

    2013-01-01

    Surface electromyography (sEMG) has been introduced into the bio-mechatronics systems, however, most of them are lack of the sensory feedback. In this paper, the effect of vibrotactile feedback for a myoelectric cursor control system is investigated quantitatively. Simultaneous and proportional control signals are extracted from EMG using a muscle synergy model. Different types of feedback including vibrotactile feedback and visual feedback are added, assessed and compared with each other. The results show that vibrotactile feedback is capable of improving the performance of EMG-based human machine interface.

  18. MONTE: the next generation of mission design and navigation software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Scott; Taber, William; Drain, Theodore; Smith, Jonathon; Wu, Hsi-Cheng; Guevara, Michelle; Sunseri, Richard; Evans, James

    2018-01-01

    The Mission analysis, Operations and Navigation Toolkit Environment (MONTE) (Sunseri et al. in NASA Tech Briefs 36(9), 2012) is an astrodynamic toolkit produced by the Mission Design and Navigation Software Group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. It provides a single integrated environment for all phases of deep space and Earth orbiting missions. Capabilities include: trajectory optimization and analysis, operational orbit determination, flight path control, and 2D/3D visualization. MONTE is presented to the user as an importable Python language module. This allows a simple but powerful user interface via CLUI or script. In addition, the Python interface allows MONTE to be used seamlessly with other canonical scientific programming tools such as SciPy, NumPy, and Matplotlib. MONTE is the prime operational orbit determination software for all JPL navigated missions.

  19. Rats are able to navigate in virtual environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölscher, C; Schnee, A; Dahmen, H; Setia, L; Mallot, H A

    2005-02-01

    Virtual reality (VR) systems are useful tools that enable users to alter environmental settings and the location of landmarks in an accurate and fast way. Primates have been shown to be able to navigate in virtual environments. For rodents, however, all previous attempts to develop VR systems in which rats behave in the same way as in corresponding 3-D environments have failed. The question arises as to whether, in principle, rodents can be trained to navigate in a properly designed virtual environment (VE), or whether this peculiarity is limited to primates and humans. We built a virtual reality set-up that takes the wide-angle visual system of rats into account. We show for the first time that rats learn spatial tasks in this VE quite readily. This set-up opens up new opportunities for investigations of information processing in navigation (e.g. the importance of optic flow or vestibular input).

  20. Effects of Vibrotactile Feedback on Human Learning of Arm Motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bark, Karlin; Hyman, Emily; Tan, Frank; Cha, Elizabeth; Jax, Steven A.; Buxbaum, Laurel J.; Kuchenbecker, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Tactile cues generated from lightweight, wearable actuators can help users learn new motions by providing immediate feedback on when and how to correct their movements. We present a vibrotactile motion guidance system that measures arm motions and provides vibration feedback when the user deviates from a desired trajectory. A study was conducted to test the effects of vibrotactile guidance on a subject’s ability to learn arm motions. Twenty-six subjects learned motions of varying difficulty with both visual (V), and visual and vibrotactile (VVT) feedback over the course of four days of training. After four days of rest, subjects returned to perform the motions from memory with no feedback. We found that augmenting visual feedback with vibrotactile feedback helped subjects reduce the root mean square (rms) angle error of their limb significantly while they were learning the motions, particularly for 1DOF motions. Analysis of the retention data showed no significant difference in rms angle errors between feedback conditions. PMID:25486644

  1. Ontology-enriched Visualization of Human Anatomy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pouchard, LC

    2005-12-20

    The project focuses on the problem of presenting a human anatomical 3D model associated with other types of human systemic information ranging from physiological to anatomical information while navigating the 3D model. We propose a solution that integrates a visual 3D interface and navigation features with the display of structured information contained in an ontology of anatomy where the structures of the human body are formally and semantically linked. The displayed and annotated anatomy serves as a visual entry point into a patient's anatomy, medical indicators and other information. The ontology of medical information provides labeling to the highlighted anatomical parts in the 3D display. Because of the logical organization and links between anatomical objects found in the ontology and associated 3D model, the analysis of a structure by a physician is greatly enhanced. Navigation within the 3D visualization and between this visualization and objects representing anatomical concepts within the model is also featured.

  2. Haptic feedback for virtual assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luecke, Greg R.; Zafer, Naci

    1998-12-01

    Assembly operations require high speed and precision with low cost. The manufacturing industry has recently turned attenuation to the possibility of investigating assembly procedures using graphical display of CAD parts. For these tasks, some sort of feedback to the person is invaluable in providing a real sense of interaction with virtual parts. This research develops the use of a commercial assembly robot as the haptic display in such tasks. For demonstration, a peg-hole insertion task is studied. Kane's Method is employed to derive the dynamics of the peg and the contact motions between the peg and the hole. A handle modeled as a cylindrical peg is attached to the end effector of a PUMA 560 robotic arm. The arm is handle modeled as a cylindrical peg is attached to the end effector of a PUMA 560 robotic arm. The arm is equipped with a six axis force/torque transducer. The use grabs the handle and the user-applied forces are recorded. A 300 MHz Pentium computer is used to simulate the dynamics of the virtual peg and its interactions as it is inserted in the virtual hole. The computed torque control is then employed to exert the full dynamics of the task to the user hand. Visual feedback is also incorporated to help the user in the process of inserting the peg into the hole. Experimental results are presented to show several contact configurations for this virtually simulated task.

  3. Feedback Valence Affects Auditory Perceptual Learning Independently of Feedback Probability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amitay, Sygal; Moore, David R.; Molloy, Katharine; Halliday, Lorna F.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that negative feedback is more effective in driving learning than positive feedback. We investigated the effect on learning of providing varying amounts of negative and positive feedback while listeners attempted to discriminate between three identical tones; an impossible task that nevertheless produces robust learning. Four feedback conditions were compared during training: 90% positive feedback or 10% negative feedback informed the participants that they were doing equally well, while 10% positive or 90% negative feedback informed them they were doing equally badly. In all conditions the feedback was random in relation to the listeners’ responses (because the task was to discriminate three identical tones), yet both the valence (negative vs. positive) and the probability of feedback (10% vs. 90%) affected learning. Feedback that informed listeners they were doing badly resulted in better post-training performance than feedback that informed them they were doing well, independent of valence. In addition, positive feedback during training resulted in better post-training performance than negative feedback, but only positive feedback indicating listeners were doing badly on the task resulted in learning. As we have previously speculated, feedback that better reflected the difficulty of the task was more effective in driving learning than feedback that suggested performance was better than it should have been given perceived task difficulty. But contrary to expectations, positive feedback was more effective than negative feedback in driving learning. Feedback thus had two separable effects on learning: feedback valence affected motivation on a subjectively difficult task, and learning occurred only when feedback probability reflected the subjective difficulty. To optimize learning, training programs need to take into consideration both feedback valence and probability. PMID:25946173

  4. Feedback in analog circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Ochoa, Agustin

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a consistent and direct methodology to the analysis and design of analog circuits with particular application to circuits containing feedback. The analysis and design of circuits containing feedback is generally presented by either following a series of examples where each circuit is simplified through the use of insight or experience (someone else’s), or a complete nodal-matrix analysis generating lots of algebra. Neither of these approaches leads to gaining insight into the design process easily. The author develops a systematic approach to circuit analysis, the Driving Point Impedance and Signal Flow Graphs (DPI/SFG) method that does not require a-priori insight to the circuit being considered and results in factored analysis supporting the design function. This approach enables designers to account fully for loading and the bi-directional nature of elements both in the feedback path and in the amplifier itself, properties many times assumed negligible and ignored. Feedback circuits a...

  5. NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback

    Data.gov (United States)

    Farm Service Agency, Department of Agriculture — The NAIP 2015 Imagery Feedback web application allows users to make comments and observations about the quality of the 2015 National Agriculture Imagery Program...

  6. Smart Glasses for Neurosurgical Navigation by Augmented Reality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Keisuke; Watanabe, Eiju; Kin, Taichi; Saito, Kuniaki; Kumakiri, Atsushi; Noguchi, Akio; Nagane, Motoo; Shiokawa, Yoshiaki

    2018-01-24

    Wearable devices with heads-up displays or smart glasses can overlay images onto the sight of the wearer. This technology has never been applied to surgical navigation. To assess the applicability and accuracy of smart glasses for augmented reality (AR)-based neurosurgical navigation. Smart glasses were applied to AR-based neurosurgical navigation. Three-dimensional computer graphics were created based on preoperative magnetic resonance images and visualized in see-through smart glasses. Optical markers were attached to the smart glasses and the patient's head for accurate navigation. Two motion capture cameras were used for registration and continuous monitoring of the location of the smart glasses in relation to the patient's head. After the accuracy was assessed with a phantom, this technique was applied in 2 patients with brain tumors located in the brain surface. A stereoscopic view by image overlay through the smart glasses was successful in the phantom and in both patients. Hands-free neuronavigation inside the operative field was available from any angles and distances. The targeting error in the phantom measured in 75 points ranged from 0.2 to 8.1 mm (mean 3.1 ± 1.9 mm, median 2.7 mm). The intraoperative targeting error between the visualized and real locations in the 2 patients (measured in 40 points) ranged from 0.6 to 4.9 mm (mean 2.1 ± 1.1 mm, median 1.8 mm). Smart glasses enabled AR-based neurosurgical navigation in a hands-free fashion. Stereoscopic computer graphics of targeted brain tumors corresponding to the surgical field were clearly visualized during surgery.

  7. Magnetic navigation in ultrasound-guided interventional radiology procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, H.-X., E-mail: xuhuixiong@hotmail.com [Department of Medical Ultrasound, Tenth People' s Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai (China); Department of Medical Ultrasonics, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Lu, M.-D., E-mail: lumd@live.com [Department of Medical Ultrasonics, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, L.-N.; Guo, L.-H. [Department of Medical Ultrasound, Tenth People' s Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai (China)

    2012-05-15

    Aim: To evaluate the usefulness of magnetic navigation in ultrasound (US)-guided interventional procedures. Materials and methods: Thirty-seven patients who were scheduled for US-guided interventional procedures (20 liver cancer ablation procedures and 17 other procedures) were included. Magnetic navigation with three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), 3D US, and position-marking magnetic navigation were used for guidance. The influence on clinical outcome was also evaluated. Results: Magnetic navigation facilitated applicator placement in 15 of 20 ablation procedures for liver cancer in which multiple ablations were performed; enhanced guidance in two small liver cancers invisible on conventional US but visible at CT or MRI; and depicted the residual viable tumour after transcatheter arterial chemoembolization for liver cancer in one procedure. In four of 17 other interventional procedures, position-marking magnetic navigation increased the visualization of the needle tip. Magnetic navigation was beneficial in 11 (55%) of 20 ablation procedures; increased confidence but did not change management in five (25%); added some information but did not change management in two (10%); and made no change in two (10%). In the other 17 interventional procedures, the corresponding numbers were 1 (5.9%), 2 (11.7%), 7 (41.2%), and 7 (41.2%), respectively (p = 0.002). Conclusion: Magnetic navigation in US-guided interventional procedure provides solutions in some difficult cases in which conventional US guidance is not suitable. It is especially useful in complicated interventional procedures such as ablation for liver cancer.

  8. Navigable networks as Nash equilibria of navigation games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, András; Bíró, József J.; Kőrösi, Attila; Rétvári, Gábor; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01

    Common sense suggests that networks are not random mazes of purposeless connections, but that these connections are organized so that networks can perform their functions well. One function common to many networks is targeted transport or navigation. Here, using game theory, we show that minimalistic networks designed to maximize the navigation efficiency at minimal cost share basic structural properties with real networks. These idealistic networks are Nash equilibria of a network construction game whose purpose is to find an optimal trade-off between the network cost and navigability. We show that these skeletons are present in the Internet, metabolic, English word, US airport, Hungarian road networks, and in a structural network of the human brain. The knowledge of these skeletons allows one to identify the minimal number of edges, by altering which one can efficiently improve or paralyse navigation in the network. PMID:26138277

  9. Navigable networks as Nash equilibria of navigation games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulyás, András; Bíró, József J.; Kőrösi, Attila; Rétvári, Gábor; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-07-01

    Common sense suggests that networks are not random mazes of purposeless connections, but that these connections are organized so that networks can perform their functions well. One function common to many networks is targeted transport or navigation. Here, using game theory, we show that minimalistic networks designed to maximize the navigation efficiency at minimal cost share basic structural properties with real networks. These idealistic networks are Nash equilibria of a network construction game whose purpose is to find an optimal trade-off between the network cost and navigability. We show that these skeletons are present in the Internet, metabolic, English word, US airport, Hungarian road networks, and in a structural network of the human brain. The knowledge of these skeletons allows one to identify the minimal number of edges, by altering which one can efficiently improve or paralyse navigation in the network.

  10. Radio Navigation Waveform Experiment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA is installing the Communications, Navigation, and Networking reConfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT) onto the truss of the International Space Station to demonstrate...

  11. Potential applications of satellite navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaenzer, G.

    The applicability of Navstar GPS to civil air navigation is discussed. The accuracy of current air-navigation systems is reviewed; the basic principle and accuracy of GPS navigation are characterized; the relatively low cost of GPS receiving equipment is pointed out; and particular attention is given to hybrid systems combining GPS with inertial navigation. It is predicted that CAT III landings will be possible using such hybrid systems when the GPS satellites are fully deployed, even without access to the military GPS code. Techniques for GPS-based precision landings, reduced-noise landings, landings on parallel runways, control of taxiing maneuvers, and aircraft-based geodetic measurements are briefly described and illustrated with diagrams.

  12. Almanac services for celestial navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelmes, S.; Whittaker, J.

    2015-08-01

    Celestial navigation remains a vitally important back up to Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) and relies on the use of almanac services. HM Nautical Almanac Office (HMNAO) provides a number of these services. The printed book, The Nautical Almanac, produced yearly and now available as an electronic publication, is continuously being improved, making use of the latest ideas and ephemerides to provide the user with their required data. HMNAO also produces NavPac, a software package that assists the user in calculating their position as well as providing additional navigational and astronomical tools. A new version of NavPac will be released in 2015 that will improve the user experience. The development of applications for mobile devices is also being considered. HMNAO continues to combine the latest improvements and theories of astrometry with the creation of books and software that best meet the needs of celestial navigation users.

  13. NOAA Electronic Navigational Charts (ENC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Office of Coast Survey (OCS) has been involved in the development of a NOAA Electronic Navigational Chart (NOAA ENC) suite to support the marine transportation...

  14. Navigable Waterway Network Node Locations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — The National Waterway Network is a comprehensive network database of the nation's navigable waterways. The data set covers the 48 contiguous states plus the District...

  15. Autonomous Navigation Using Celestial Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, David; Gramling, Cheryl; Leung, Dominic; Belur, Sheela; Long, Anne

    1999-01-01

    In the twenty-first century, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Enterprises envision frequent low-cost missions to explore the solar system, observe the universe, and study our planet. Satellite autonomy is a key technology required to reduce satellite operating costs. The Guidance, Navigation, and Control Center (GNCC) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) currently sponsors several initiatives associated with the development of advanced spacecraft systems to provide autonomous navigation and control. Autonomous navigation has the potential both to increase spacecraft navigation system performance and to reduce total mission cost. By eliminating the need for routine ground-based orbit determination and special tracking services, autonomous navigation can streamline spacecraft ground systems. Autonomous navigation products can be included in the science telemetry and forwarded directly to the scientific investigators. In addition, autonomous navigation products are available onboard to enable other autonomous capabilities, such as attitude control, maneuver planning and orbit control, and communications signal acquisition. Autonomous navigation is required to support advanced mission concepts such as satellite formation flying. GNCC has successfully developed high-accuracy autonomous navigation systems for near-Earth spacecraft using NASA's space and ground communications systems and the Global Positioning System (GPS). Recently, GNCC has expanded its autonomous navigation initiative to include satellite orbits that are beyond the regime in which use of GPS is possible. Currently, GNCC is assessing the feasibility of using standard spacecraft attitude sensors and communication components to provide autonomous navigation for missions including: libration point, gravity assist, high-Earth, and interplanetary orbits. The concept being evaluated uses a combination of star, Sun, and Earth sensor measurements along with forward-link Doppler

  16. Encouraging residents to seek feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delva, Dianne; Sargeant, Joan; Miller, Stephen; Holland, Joanna; Alexiadis Brown, Peggy; Leblanc, Constance; Lightfoot, Kathryn; Mann, Karen

    2013-12-01

    To explore resident and faculty perceptions of the feedback process, especially residents' feedback-seeking activities. We conducted focus groups of faculty and residents exploring experiences in giving and receiving feedback, feedback-seeking, and suggestions to support feedback-seeking. Using qualitative methods and an iterative process, all authors analyzed the transcribed audiotapes to identify and confirm themes. Emerging themes fit a framework situating resident feedback-seeking as dependent on four central factors: (1) learning/workplace culture, (2) relationships, (3) purpose/quality of feedback, (4) emotional responses to feedback. Residents and faculty agreed on many supports and barriers to feedback-seeking. Strengthening the workplace/learning culture through longitudinal experiences, use of feedback forms and explicit expectations for residents to seek feedback, coupled with providing a sense of safety and adequate time for observation and providing feedback were suggested. Tensions between faculty and resident perceptions regarding feedback-seeking related to fear of being found deficient, the emotional costs related to corrective feedback and perceptions that completing clinical work is more valued than learning. Resident feedback-seeking is influenced by multiple factors requiring attention to both faculty and learner roles. Further study of specific influences and strategies to mitigate the tensions will inform how best to support residents in seeking feedback.

  17. The N456 Navigator System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    acoustic navigation. Its two basic functions are generation of acoustic signals, and receipt and timing of returns. When combined with the new dsnav...system, the N456 timing functions are not used or affected. – 4 – 5. PRV Mode This is a common navigation method for the Jason/ Medea system. In...this mode, a trigger is sent down the tether, where it is causes an interrogation pulse from Medea . Boards dedicated to Medea and Jason both time the

  18. The navigation of space probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliegel, H. F.; Ohandley, D. A.; Zielenbach, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    A new navigational method combining electronic measurement procedures and celestial mechanics makes it possible to conduct a space probe very close to a desired point in the neighborhood of a remote planet. Approaches for the determination of the position of the space probe in space are discussed, giving attention to the effects of errors in the employed data. The application of the navigational methods in a number of space missions is also considered.

  19. The vestibular contribution to the head direction cells signal and navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Yoder, Ryan M.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial learning and navigation depend on neural representations of location and direction within the environment. These representations, encoded by place cells and head direction cells, respectively, are dominantly controlled by visual cues, but require input from the vestibular system. Vestibular signals play an important role in forming spatial representations in both visual and non-visual environments, but the details of this vestibular contribution are not fully understood. Here, we r...

  20. Localization Framework for Real-Time UAV Autonomous Landing: An On-Ground Deployed Visual Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei Kong

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available [-5]One of the greatest challenges for fixed-wing unmanned aircraft vehicles (UAVs is safe landing. Hereafter, an on-ground deployed visual approach is developed in this paper. This approach is definitely suitable for landing within the global navigation satellite system (GNSS-denied environments. As for applications, the deployed guidance system makes full use of the ground computing resource and feedbacks the aircraft’s real-time localization to its on-board autopilot. Under such circumstances, a separate long baseline stereo architecture is proposed to possess an extendable baseline and wide-angle field of view (FOV against the traditional fixed baseline schemes. Furthermore, accuracy evaluation of the new type of architecture is conducted by theoretical modeling and computational analysis. Dataset-driven experimental results demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the developed approach.