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Sample records for vision learning problem

  1. Vision and Leadership: Problem-Based Learning as a Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archbald, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    We read and hear frequently about the role of vision in leadership. Standards for leadership education programs typically emphasize vision as a core component of leadership education and published accounts of successful leadership usually extol the leader's vision. Given the prevalence of this term in discourse on leadership, it is surprising how…

  2. DEVELOPING CREATIVE THINKING SKILLS AND CREATIVE ATTITUDE THROUGH PROBLEM BASED GREEN VISION CHEMISTRY ENVIRONMENT LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Nuswowati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is to build creative thinking skills and creative attitude of students through a model of problem-based lectures Environmental Chemistry (PBL Green Chemistry visionary. Mixed methods research design experimental models embedded with pretest-posttest control group were used in this study, and the differences between assumed initial end-tests as the effects of the treatment. Creative thinking skills measured by the essay tests, non test while the creative attitude is measured from the completed questionnaires consisting of positive and negative statements of markers creative attitude. Data measurement N-gain of creative thinking skills for the control and experimental group were 0.40 and 0.71, while the creative attitude were 0.08 and 0.34. Improved tests of creative thinking skills or creative attitudes were analyzed by t-test. Implementation of research findings indicate environmental chemistry lecture- problems based Green Chemistry vision can improve thinking skills and of creative student.

  3. Company Vision and Organizational Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojko Toman

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of a company is largely dependent on the company itself; it depends above all on its corporate governance, management, and implementation, as well as on decision-making processes and coordination. Many authors believe that organizational learning and knowledge are the most relevant aspects of company effectiveness. If a company wants to be effective it needs to create and realize its vision; to do this, it needs creativity, imagination, and knowledge, which can be obtained or enhanced through learning. This paper defines vision, learning, creativity and management and, above all, their relationships. The author argues that company vision influences the learning and knowledge of employees in the company through the vision’s content, through the vision-creating process, and through the vision enforcement process. Conversely, the influence of learning on company vision is explained. The paper is aimed at the use in the practice of companies and helps them to increase their effectiveness.

  4. Understanding students visions about environmental global problems. Experience and lessons learned of teaching in Lithuania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Siarova, Hanna; Misiūnė, Ieva; Cerda, Artemi; Úbeda, Xavier

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, environment is accepted to be an important element of our welfare. Our activities and societal status are strongly related with the quality of the environment where we live. On the other hand historical and cultural backgrounds shape importantly our views about the environment and how we act towards it in our daily life. In a context of globalization and increase of competition at international level, knowledge appears to be one of the key components for the advance of the word. Most of the knowledge produced comes from high level education institutions and research centres, which have responsibility to create and encourage critical thinking. Individuals aware of the problems can be more active and can push things forward. We think that environmental knowledge and awareness are fundamental for the future of the society. In order to develop better methodologies are developed if we have a better perception of students understanding of environmental problems. The objective of this work is to study the Lithuanian university level student's perception about some environmental challenges of our society. We selected several questions for the students rate according the relevance of the question, as "Air Pollution", "Waste Management", "Resources overexplotation", "Biodiversity reduction", "Human Overpopulation" "Poverty", "Global Warming/Climate change", Natural disasters", "Terrorism", "Economical crisis", "War and armed conflicts" and the "Spread of infectious diseases". We ask to the respondents to rate the importance using a likert scale (1=Not Important, 2= not so important, 3=important, 4=very important, 5=the most important). Among all the questions, the most rated where the Water pollution, the Spread of infectious diseases and Air Pollution and the less important where Biodiversity Reduction, Human overpopulation and climate change. These results helped us to identify where some efforts should be taken to raise student's awareness about global

  5. Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167131.html Early Parkinson's May Prompt Vision Problems Changes in sight could ... in vision may be an early sign of Parkinson's disease, researchers report. The neurodegenerative condition is caused ...

  6. Vision Problems Can Harm Kids' Development, Grades

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167475.html Vision Problems Can Harm Kids' Development, Grades Eye experts ... toll on children's school performance and well-being, vision experts say. If left untreated, certain eye-related ...

  7. Machine vision and appearance based learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Alexander

    2017-03-01

    Smart algorithms are used in Machine vision to organize or extract high-level information from the available data. The resulted high-level understanding the content of images received from certain visual sensing system and belonged to an appearance space can be only a key first step in solving various specific tasks such as mobile robot navigation in uncertain environments, road detection in autonomous driving systems, etc. Appearance-based learning has become very popular in the field of machine vision. In general, the appearance of a scene is a function of the scene content, the lighting conditions, and the camera position. Mobile robots localization problem in machine learning framework via appearance space analysis is considered. This problem is reduced to certain regression on an appearance manifold problem, and newly regression on manifolds methods are used for its solution.

  8. Machine Learning for Computer Vision

    CERN Document Server

    Battiato, Sebastiano; Farinella, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Computer vision is the science and technology of making machines that see. It is concerned with the theory, design and implementation of algorithms that can automatically process visual data to recognize objects, track and recover their shape and spatial layout. The International Computer Vision Summer School - ICVSS was established in 2007 to provide both an objective and clear overview and an in-depth analysis of the state-of-the-art research in Computer Vision. The courses are delivered by world renowned experts in the field, from both academia and industry, and cover both theoretical and practical aspects of real Computer Vision problems. The school is organized every year by University of Cambridge (Computer Vision and Robotics Group) and University of Catania (Image Processing Lab). Different topics are covered each year. A summary of the past Computer Vision Summer Schools can be found at: http://www.dmi.unict.it/icvss This edited volume contains a selection of articles covering some of the talks and t...

  9. Warning Signs of Vision Problems in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... However, vision problems such as a lazy eye (amblyopia) may have no warning signs, and your child ... of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual ...

  10. Computer vision and machine learning for archaeology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Maaten, L.J.P.; Boon, P.; Lange, G.; Paijmans, J.J.; Postma, E.

    2006-01-01

    Until now, computer vision and machine learning techniques barely contributed to the archaeological domain. The use of these techniques can support archaeologists in their assessment and classification of archaeological finds. The paper illustrates the use of computer vision techniques for

  11. Eldercare at Home: Vision Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or if the problem needs further workup. Eye Diseases in Older Adults Cataracts Cataracts occur when the ... dark one for cutting light colored foods like potatoes and onions and a light cutting board for ...

  12. School Vision of Learning: Urban Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, Tiffany A.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the author develops her school vision of learning. She explains the theories she used to help develop the vision. The author then goes into detail on the methods she will use to make her vision for a school that prepares urban students for a successful life after high school. She takes into account all the stakeholders and how they…

  13. Learning Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... have a learning disability, such as dyslexia or dyscalculia (serious trouble with math), remember that you are ... Kids who have trouble with math may have dyscalculia (say: diss-kal-KYOO-lee-uh). And people ...

  14. E-LEARNING FOR THE VISION IMPAIRED: A HOLISTIC PERSPECTIVE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Permvattana

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Problems faced by vision impaired students are different from those experienced by sighted students. Most e-learning environments are designed for sighted students, utilizing complex visual images and interactive features; however students with acute vision impairments are not able to utilize these features and must rely on applications to translate the contents of screen displays and documents into forms that are accessible. Learning environments for people with physical disabilities need specific considerations in design and implementation to ensure their appropriateness and accessibility. This paper initially discusses specific problems faced by students with acute vision impairments and how e-learning environments need to address these problems in order for the student to achieve the same learning outcomes as sighted students. A brief outline of the research method is followed by a description of the holistic model proposed for accessible e-learning environment design.

  15. Building Artificial Vision Systems with Machine Learning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LeCun, Yann [New York University

    2011-02-23

    Three questions pose the next challenge for Artificial Intelligence (AI), robotics, and neuroscience. How do we learn perception (e.g. vision)? How do we learn representations of the perceptual world? How do we learn visual categories from just a few examples?

  16. Machine Learning, deep learning and optimization in computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canu, Stéphane

    2017-03-01

    As quoted in the Large Scale Computer Vision Systems NIPS workshop, computer vision is a mature field with a long tradition of research, but recent advances in machine learning, deep learning, representation learning and optimization have provided models with new capabilities to better understand visual content. The presentation will go through these new developments in machine learning covering basic motivations, ideas, models and optimization in deep learning for computer vision, identifying challenges and opportunities. It will focus on issues related with large scale learning that is: high dimensional features, large variety of visual classes, and large number of examples.

  17. Distance Learning Librarians: Their Shared Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Anne Marie

    2009-01-01

    Shared vision is a component of leadership that fosters innovation through buy-in at all levels of the organization. At times, people see a need for innovation but do not have the power to make changes on their own. Many librarians in academic institutions that were early adopters of distance learning envisioned a need for new services that were…

  18. Multistrategy Learning for Computer Vision

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bhanu, Bir

    1997-01-01

    .... With the goal of achieving robustness, our research at UCR is directed towards learning parameters, feedback, contexts, features, concepts, and strategies of IU algorithms for model-based object recognition...

  19. Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik; Guerra, Aida

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative method to organize the learning process in such a way that the students actively engage in finding answers by themselves. During the past 40 years PBL has evolved and diversified resulting in a multitude in variations in models and practices. However......, the key principles remain the same everywhere. Graaff & Kolmos (2003) identify the main PBL principles as follows: 1. Problem orientation 2. Project organization through teams or group work 3. Participant-directed 4. Experiental learning 5. Activity-based learning 6. Interdisciplinary learning and 7...... in Engineering Education. In answer to the requests for visits the Aalborg Centre for Problem Based Learning in Engineering Science and Sustainability under the auspices of UNESCO (UCPBL) a two days programme for visitors is offered two times a year. The workshop is an introduction workshop to the Aalborg PBL...

  20. Machine Learning Techniques in Clinical Vision Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caixinha, Miguel; Nunes, Sandrina

    2017-01-01

    This review presents and discusses the contribution of machine learning techniques for diagnosis and disease monitoring in the context of clinical vision science. Many ocular diseases leading to blindness can be halted or delayed when detected and treated at its earliest stages. With the recent developments in diagnostic devices, imaging and genomics, new sources of data for early disease detection and patients' management are now available. Machine learning techniques emerged in the biomedical sciences as clinical decision-support techniques to improve sensitivity and specificity of disease detection and monitoring, increasing objectively the clinical decision-making process. This manuscript presents a review in multimodal ocular disease diagnosis and monitoring based on machine learning approaches. In the first section, the technical issues related to the different machine learning approaches will be present. Machine learning techniques are used to automatically recognize complex patterns in a given dataset. These techniques allows creating homogeneous groups (unsupervised learning), or creating a classifier predicting group membership of new cases (supervised learning), when a group label is available for each case. To ensure a good performance of the machine learning techniques in a given dataset, all possible sources of bias should be removed or minimized. For that, the representativeness of the input dataset for the true population should be confirmed, the noise should be removed, the missing data should be treated and the data dimensionally (i.e., the number of parameters/features and the number of cases in the dataset) should be adjusted. The application of machine learning techniques in ocular disease diagnosis and monitoring will be presented and discussed in the second section of this manuscript. To show the clinical benefits of machine learning in clinical vision sciences, several examples will be presented in glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration

  1. Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Cappola

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this current work, I am proposing a general close examination of Problem Based Learning as a student centered educational method in which a problem constitutes  the starting point of the learning process. Such a method provides students with the suitable knowledge for problem solving and presents numerous and significant differences compared to traditional education.In particular, I analyze the theoretic aspects of problem learning by tracing a history and presenting its structure, clarifying the role of the tutor in the various phases of the learning process. The method has found a wide diffusion since the beginning of the 70s and numerous studies have confirmed the advantages. The effectiveness of PBL is construable and is based on principles of constructivism and cognitivism.

  2. Problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Sofie; Kirschner, Paul A.; Paas, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Loyens, S. M. M., Kirschner, P. A., & Paas, F. (2011). Problem-based learning. In S. Graham (Editor-in-Chief), A. Bus, S. Major, & L. Swanson (Associate Editors), APA educational psychology handbook: Vol. 3. Application to learning and teaching (pp. 403-425). Washington, DC: American Psychological

  3. Manifold learning in machine vision and robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Alexander

    2017-02-01

    Smart algorithms are used in Machine vision and Robotics to organize or extract high-level information from the available data. Nowadays, Machine learning is an essential and ubiquitous tool to automate extraction patterns or regularities from data (images in Machine vision; camera, laser, and sonar sensors data in Robotics) in order to solve various subject-oriented tasks such as understanding and classification of images content, navigation of mobile autonomous robot in uncertain environments, robot manipulation in medical robotics and computer-assisted surgery, and other. Usually such data have high dimensionality, however, due to various dependencies between their components and constraints caused by physical reasons, all "feasible and usable data" occupy only a very small part in high dimensional "observation space" with smaller intrinsic dimensionality. Generally accepted model of such data is manifold model in accordance with which the data lie on or near an unknown manifold (surface) of lower dimensionality embedded in an ambient high dimensional observation space; real-world high-dimensional data obtained from "natural" sources meet, as a rule, this model. The use of Manifold learning technique in Machine vision and Robotics, which discovers a low-dimensional structure of high dimensional data and results in effective algorithms for solving of a large number of various subject-oriented tasks, is the content of the conference plenary speech some topics of which are in the paper.

  4. Inverse problems in vision and 3D tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Mohamad-Djafari, Ali

    2013-01-01

    The concept of an inverse problem is a familiar one to most scientists and engineers, particularly in the field of signal and image processing, imaging systems (medical, geophysical, industrial non-destructive testing, etc.) and computer vision. In imaging systems, the aim is not just to estimate unobserved images, but also their geometric characteristics from observed quantities that are linked to these unobserved quantities through the forward problem. This book focuses on imagery and vision problems that can be clearly written in terms of an inverse problem where an estimate for the image a

  5. Vision impairment and dual sensory problems in middle age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawes, Piers; Dickinson, Christine; Emsley, Richard; Bishop, Paul; Cruickshanks, Karen; Edmondson-Jones, Mark; McCormack, Abby; Fortnum, Heather; Moore, David R.; Norman, Paul; Munro, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Vision and hearing impairments are known to increase in middle age. In this study we describe the prevalence of vision impairment and dual sensory impairment in UK adults aged 40 to 69 years in a very large and recently ascertained data set. The associations between vision impairment, age, sex, socioeconomic status, and ethnicity are reported. Methods This research was conducted using the UK Biobank Resource, with subsets of UK Biobank data analysed with respect to self-report of eye problems and glasses use. Better-eye visual acuity with habitually worn refractive correction was assessed with a logMAR chart (n = 116,682). Better-ear speech reception threshold was measured with an adaptive speech in noise test, the Digit Triplet Test (n = 164,770). Prevalence estimates were weighted with respect to UK 2001 Census data. Results Prevalence of mild visual impairment and low vision was estimated at 15.2% (95% CI 14.9–15.5%) and 0.9% (95% CI 0.8–1.0%), respectively. Use of glasses was 88.0% (95% CI 87.9–88.1%). The prevalence of dual sensory impairment was 3.1% (95% CI 3.0–3.2%) and there was a nine-fold increase in the prevalence of dual sensory problems between the youngest and oldest age groups. Older adults, those from low socioeconomic and ethnic minority backgrounds were most at risk for vision problems. Conclusions Mild vision impairment is common in middle aged UK adults, despite widespread use of spectacles. Possible barriers to optometric care for those from low socioeconomic and ethnic minority backgrounds may require attention. A higher than expected prevalence of dual impairment suggests that hearing and vision problems share common causes. Optometrists should consider screening for hearing problems, particularly among older adults. PMID:24888710

  6. Problem Based Learning Online

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte

    2018-01-01

    Problem- and project- based learning (PBL) was originally developed for collaboration between physically present students and teachers, but political decisions at many universities also require that collaboration, dialogues, and other PBL activities take place online. Teachers design learning...... “How do two online learning designs affect student engagement in the PBL online modules?” The empirical data were collected and analyzed using a netnographic approach. The study finds that concepts such as self-directed learning and active involvement may be perceived very differently from the students...... situations with the intention of supporting the students. This study investigates how technology influenced the interaction between teachers and students and between students in two different online modules for master’s students at Aalborg University, Denmark. The study aims to answer the research question...

  7. Problem Solving and Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    One finding of cognitive research is that people do not automatically acquire usable knowledge by spending lots of time on task. Because students' knowledge hierarchy is more fragmented, "knowledge chunks" are smaller than those of experts. The limited capacity of short term memory makes the cognitive load high during problem solving tasks, leaving few cognitive resources available for metacognition. The abstract nature of the laws of physics and the chain of reasoning required to draw meaningful inferences makes these issues critical. In order to help students, it is crucial to consider the difficulty of a problem from the perspective of students. We are developing and evaluating interactive problem-solving tutorials to help students in the introductory physics courses learn effective problem-solving strategies while solidifying physics concepts. The self-paced tutorials can provide guidance and support for a variety of problem solving techniques, and opportunity for knowledge and skill acquisition.

  8. Problem Solving and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2009-07-01

    One finding of cognitive research is that people do not automatically acquire usable knowledge by spending lots of time on task. Because students' knowledge hierarchy is more fragmented, "knowledge chunks" are smaller than those of experts. The limited capacity of short term memory makes the cognitive load high during problem solving tasks, leaving few cognitive resources available for meta-cognition. The abstract nature of the laws of physics and the chain of reasoning required to draw meaningful inferences makes these issues critical. In order to help students, it is crucial to consider the difficulty of a problem from the perspective of students. We are developing and evaluating interactive problem-solving tutorials to help students in the introductory physics courses learn effective problem-solving strategies while solidifying physics concepts. The self-paced tutorials can provide guidance and support for a variety of problem solving techniques, and opportunity for knowledge and skill acquisition.

  9. Vision-based stereo ranging as an optimal control problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, P. K. A.; Sridhar, B.; Chatterji, G. B.

    1992-01-01

    The recent interest in the use of machine vision for flight vehicle guidance is motivated by the need to automate the nap-of-the-earth flight regime of helicopters. Vision-based stereo ranging problem is cast as an optimal control problem in this paper. A quadratic performance index consisting of the integral of the error between observed image irradiances and those predicted by a Pade approximation of the correspondence hypothesis is then used to define an optimization problem. The necessary conditions for optimality yield a set of linear two-point boundary-value problems. These two-point boundary-value problems are solved in feedback form using a version of the backward sweep method. Application of the ranging algorithm is illustrated using a laboratory image pair.

  10. Beyond W3C: TruVision--Enhanced Online Learning for People Blind or Vision Impaired.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bate, Frank; Oliver, Ron

    This paper describes the design and development of TruVision, an online learning environment designed to enable blind and vision impaired students to develop skills and expertise in elementary and advanced information processing strategies to enable them to seek full-time employment within industry in such positions as administrative assistants,…

  11. The Learning Organization: An Integrative Vision for HRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsick, Victoria J.; Watkins, Karen E.

    1994-01-01

    Barriers to creating learning organizations include inability to change mental models, learned helplessness, truncated learning, individualism, culture of disrespect and fear, entrenched bureaucracy, part-time/temporary workforce, and diversity issues. Nevertheless, the learning organization is a sustainable vision for human resource development.…

  12. Vision Problems and Reduced Reading Outcomes in Queensland Schoolchildren.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Shelley; Sampson, Geoff P; Hendicott, Peter L; Wood, Joanne M

    2017-03-01

    To assess the relationship between vision and reading outcomes in Indigenous and non-Indigenous schoolchildren to determine whether vision problems are associated with lower reading outcomes in these populations. Vision testing and reading assessments were performed on 508 Indigenous and non-Indigenous schoolchildren in Queensland, Australia divided into two age groups: Grades 1 and 2 (6-7 years of age) and Grades 6 and 7 (12-13 years of age). Vision parameters measured included cycloplegic refraction, near point of convergence, heterophoria, fusional vergence range, rapid automatized naming, and visual motor integration. The following vision conditions were then classified based on the vision findings: uncorrected hyperopia, convergence insufficiency, reduced rapid automatized naming, and delayed visual motor integration. Reading accuracy and reading comprehension were measured with the Neale reading test. The effect of uncorrected hyperopia, convergence insufficiency, reduced rapid automatized naming, and delayed visual motor integration on reading accuracy and reading comprehension were investigated with ANCOVAs. The ANCOVAs explained a significant proportion of variance in both reading accuracy and reading comprehension scores in both age groups, with 40% of the variation in reading accuracy and 33% of the variation in reading comprehension explained in the younger age group, and 27% and 10% of the variation in reading accuracy and reading comprehension, respectively, in the older age group. The vision parameters of visual motor integration and rapid automatized naming were significant predictors in all ANCOVAs (P reading results were explained by reduced visual motor integration and rapid automatized naming results. Both reduced rapid automatized naming and visual motor integration were associated with poorer reading outcomes in Indigenous and non-Indigenous children. This is an important finding given the recent emphasis placed on Indigenous children

  13. Efficacy of vision therapy in children with learning disability and associated binocular vision anomalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussaindeen, Jameel Rizwana; Shah, Prerana; Ramani, Krishna Kumar; Ramanujan, Lalitha

    To report the frequency of binocular vision (BV) anomalies in children with specific learning disorders (SLD) and to assess the efficacy of vision therapy (VT) in children with a non-strabismic binocular vision anomaly (NSBVA). The study was carried out at a centre for learning disability (LD). Comprehensive eye examination and binocular vision assessment was carried out for 94 children (mean (SD) age: 15 (2.2) years) diagnosed with specific learning disorder. BV assessment was done for children with best corrected visual acuity of ≥6/9 - N6, cooperative for examination and free from any ocular pathology. For children with a diagnosis of NSBVA (n=46), 24 children were randomized to VT and no intervention was provided to the other 22 children who served as experimental controls. At the end of 10 sessions of vision therapy, BV assessment was performed for both the intervention and non-intervention groups. Binocular vision anomalies were found in 59 children (62.8%) among which 22% (n=13) had strabismic binocular vision anomalies (SBVA) and 78% (n=46) had a NSBVA. Accommodative infacility (AIF) was the commonest of the NSBVA and found in 67%, followed by convergence insufficiency (CI) in 25%. Post-vision therapy, the intervention group showed significant improvement in all the BV parameters (Wilcoxon signed rank test, p<0.05) except negative fusional vergence. Children with specific learning disorders have a high frequency of binocular vision disorders and vision therapy plays a significant role in improving the BV parameters. Children with SLD should be screened for BV anomalies as it could potentially be an added hindrance to the reading difficulty in this special population. Copyright © 2017 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Professional Vision and the Politics of Teacher Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefstein, Adam; Snell, Julia

    2011-01-01

    This article explores the political dimensions of teacher learning, both in theoretical work on teacher professional vision, and in an empirical study of video-based teacher professional development. Theoretically, we revisit the origins of "professional vision" in linguistic anthropology and trace the concept's evolution in teacher…

  15. 2020 Vision: Envisioning a New Generation of STEM Learning Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Lynn D.; Falk, John H.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue, we have compiled six original papers, outcomes from the U.S. National Science Foundation (US-NSF)-funded REESE (Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering) 2020 Vision: The Next Generation of STEM Learning Research project. The purpose of 2020 Vision was to re-envision the questions and frameworks guiding STEM…

  16. Dimensions of problem based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Andreasen, Lars Birch

    2013-01-01

    The article contributes to the literature on problem based learning and problem-oriented project work, building on and reflecting the experiences of the authors through decades of work with problem-oriented project pedagogy. The article explores different dimensions of problem based learning such...... and Learning (MIL). We discuss changes in the roles of the teachers as supervisors within this learning environment, and we explore the involvement of students as active participants and co-designers of how course and project activities unfold.......The article contributes to the literature on problem based learning and problem-oriented project work, building on and reflecting the experiences of the authors through decades of work with problem-oriented project pedagogy. The article explores different dimensions of problem based learning...

  17. Transforming Early Learning Vision into Action in Ontario, Canada

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grieve, Jim

    ..., Canada’s most populous province, has taken to implement a new vision for early learning including universal full-day kindergarten for all children aged four and five and modernizing the province’s childcare system...

  18. Vision and hearing deficits and associations with parent-reported behavioral and developmental problems in international adoptees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckerle, Judith K; Hill, Lindsay Knauf; Iverson, Sandra; Hellerstedt, Wendy; Gunnar, Megan; Johnson, Dana E

    2014-04-01

    To determine the occurrence of vision and hearing deficits in international adoptees and their associations with emotional, behavioral and cognitive problems. The Minnesota International Adoption Project (MnIAP) was a 556-item survey that was mailed to 2,969 parents who finalized an international adoption in Minnesota (MN) between January 1990 and December 1998 and whose children were between 4 and 18 years-old at the time of the survey. Families returned surveys for 1,906 children (64%); 1,005 had complete data for analyses. The survey included questions about the child's pre-adoption experiences and post-placement medical diagnoses, and the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL). Multivariate logistic regression assessed associations between hearing and vision problems and problems identified by the CBCL. Information on hearing and vision screening and specific vision and hearing problems was also collected via a telephone survey (HVS) from 96/184 children (52%) seen between June 1999 and December 2000 at the University of Minnesota International Adoption Clinic. In both cohorts, 61% of children had been screened for vision problems and 59% for hearing problems. Among those children screened, vision (MnIAP = 25%, HVS = 31%) and hearing (MnIAP = 12%, HVS = 13%) problems were common. For MnIAP children, such problems were significant independent predictors for T scores >67 for the CBCL social problems and attention subscales and parent-reported, practitioner-diagnosed developmental delay, learning and speech/language problems, and cognitive impairment. Hearing and vision problems are common in international adoptees and screening and correction are available in the immediate post-arrival period. The importance of identifying vision and hearing problems cannot be overstated as they are risk factors for development and behavior problems.

  19. Fulfilling a European Vision through Flexible Learning and Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Margaret S. G.

    2012-01-01

    This article considers the value of flexibility and free choice in learning, and examines the increasing recognition of the evolving and wide range of appropriate environments for learning, such as the workplace, the home, the community, and the virtual world. This "Lifeplace Learning" is compared to the requirements and visions of the…

  20. Variational segmentation problems using prior knowledge in imaging and vision

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fundana, Ketut

    This dissertation addresses variational formulation of segmentation problems using prior knowledge. Variational models are among the most successful approaches for solving many Computer Vision and Image Processing problems. The models aim at finding the solution to a given energy functional defined......, prior knowledge is needed to obtain the desired solution. The introduction of shape priors in particular, has proven to be an effective way to segment objects of interests. Firstly, we propose a prior-based variational segmentation model to segment objects of interest in image sequences, that can deal...

  1. PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Esema

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem-Based Learning (PBL, adalah model pembelajaran yang awalnya dikembangkan di dunia pendidikan medis, namun kini telah digunakan secara luas di berbagai jenjang dan bidang pendidikan. Basis teortits dari PBL adalah kolaborativisme dan konstruktivisme. Kemitraan, keterbukaan dan kejujuran, rasa hormat, dan kepercayaan menjadi nilai-nilai yang mendasari dan sekaligus menjadi prasyarat bagi keberhasilan PBL Sintaks PBL meliputi: pengenalan dan pemahaman konsep dasar, eksplorasi fakta dan informasi relevan secara mandiri, bertukar pemahaman dalam kelompok/kelas, kesimpulan dan evaluasi. Beberapa riset mengenai PBL baik di luar maupun di dalam negeri yang dipaparkan dan dibandingkan dalam tulisan ini menunjukkan data tentang efektifitas PBL dalam kegiatan pembelajaran.

  2. School Based Vision Centers: striving to optimize learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Stacy Ayn; Johnson, Catherine; Majzoub, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    The successful delivery of comprehensive pediatric vision care after vision screening referral is a longstanding challenge that has significant implications for child wellness. In response to the many known obstacles that prevent the diagnosis and treatment of vision conditions, School-Based Vision Centers have been established in Framingham, MA and Boston, MA to provide easy access to comprehensive vision care following a failed vision screening. These on-site Vision Centers were developed to improve access to comprehensive vision care and treatment thereby correcting vision conditions that can adversely affect student academic achievement, athletic performance, and self-esteem. This paper highlights the collaboration between two public schools in Massachusetts and The New England Eye Institute and describes a multidisciplinary approach to comprehensive care delivery to high-risk pediatric populations in school-based settings. The ultimate goal of this model is to minimize visual barriers that may impede learning in order to maximize academic success and wellness. © 2011 - IOS Press and the authors. All rights reserved

  3. Learning prosthetic vision: a virtual-reality study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Spencer C; Hallum, Luke E; Lovell, Nigel H; Suaning, Gregg J

    2005-09-01

    Acceptance of prosthetic vision will be heavily dependent on the ability of recipients to form useful information from such vision. Training strategies to accelerate learning and maximize visual comprehension would need to be designed in the light of the factors affecting human learning under prosthetic vision. Some of these potential factors were examined in a visual acuity study using the Landolt C optotype under virtual-reality simulation of prosthetic vision. Fifteen normally sighted subjects were tested for 10-20 sessions. Potential learning factors were tested at p Learning was most evident across-sessions, though 17% of sessions did express significant within-session trends. Learning was highly concentrated toward a critical range of optotype sizes, and subjects were less capable in identifying the closed optotype (a Landolt C with no gap, forming a closed annulus). Training for implant recipients should target these critical sizes and the closed optotype to extend the limit of visual comprehension. Although there was no evidence that image processing affected overall learning, subjects showed varying personal preferences.

  4. Machine learning and computer vision approaches for phenotypic profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grys, Ben T; Lo, Dara S; Sahin, Nil; Kraus, Oren Z; Morris, Quaid; Boone, Charles; Andrews, Brenda J

    2017-01-02

    With recent advances in high-throughput, automated microscopy, there has been an increased demand for effective computational strategies to analyze large-scale, image-based data. To this end, computer vision approaches have been applied to cell segmentation and feature extraction, whereas machine-learning approaches have been developed to aid in phenotypic classification and clustering of data acquired from biological images. Here, we provide an overview of the commonly used computer vision and machine-learning methods for generating and categorizing phenotypic profiles, highlighting the general biological utility of each approach. © 2017 Grys et al.

  5. Vision problems in Down syndrome adults do not hamper communication, daily living skills and socialisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dressler, Anastasia; Bozza, Margherita; Perelli, Valentina; Tinelli, Francesca; Guzzetta, Andrea; Cioni, Giovanni; Bargagna, Stefania

    2015-08-01

    Down syndrome is the most commonly occurring chromosomal condition with a prevalence of 11.2-10000 life-births in Europe. The most important concern consists of various degrees of intellectual disability and sensory deficits. The overall prevalence of ophthalmologic abnormalities has been reported to be as high as 46-100%. Impairment of vision potentially hampers the capacity of learning and communication and thus of social integration. The aim of our study is to assess prospectively the occurrence of vision problems in patients with DS with special emphasis on adaptive behaviour and cognition. Assessments included Hirschberg's corneal reflex method, eye alignment, cover test, Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scales (VABS) for adaptive behaviour and Coloured Progressive Matrices (CPM) for cognitive abilities. We included prospectively 49 individuals from 19-52 years. Ophthalmologic problems were observed in 81.6% of our DS patients. The total number of visual disorders and symptoms was equally distributed with respect to ID-group and to levels of adaptive behaviour (p > 0.050). When comparing individuals matched for age, gender, cognitive skills and sociocultural background in a subset of individuals, vision problems did not decrease adaptive behaviour skills of our patients with visual disorders and daily living skills even fared better (p = 0.046). Effective early correction and intervention on visual-motor deficits seem to be important, but nevertheless personal autonomy is not seriously detained.

  6. Applying Perceptual Learning to achieve practical changes in vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron eSeitz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Research of visual perceptual learning has illuminated the flexibility of processing in the visual system and provides insights into therapeutic approaches to remediating some components of low vision. A key observation from research of perceptual learning is that effects of training are often highly specific to the attributes of the trained stimuli. This observation has been a blessing to basic research, providing important constraints to models of learning, but is a curse to translational research, which has the goal of creating therapies that generalize widely across visual tasks and stimuli. Here we suggest that the curse of specificity can be overcome by adopting a different experimental framework than is standard in the field. Namely, translational studies should integrate many approaches together and sacrifice mechanistic understanding to gain clinical relevance. To validate this argument, we review research from our lab and others, and also present new data, that together shows how perceptual learning on basic stimuli can lead to improvements on standard vision tests as well as real world vision use such as improved reading and even improved sports performance. Furthermore, we show evidence that this integrative approach to perceptual learning can ameliorate effects of presbyopia and provides promise to improve visual function for individuals suffering from low vision.

  7. Problem Based Learning and sustainability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pizzol, Massimo; Løkke, Søren; Schmidt, Jannick Højrup

    Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a style of active learning based on problem solving. PBL aims at providing university students with flexible knowledge, capacity to self-learning, and skills in problem solving and collaboration. In this context, the present study explores the advantages and challe......Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is a style of active learning based on problem solving. PBL aims at providing university students with flexible knowledge, capacity to self-learning, and skills in problem solving and collaboration. In this context, the present study explores the advantages...... and challenges that the PBL model offers for developing five key competences in sustainability: (i) system thinking, (ii) interpersonal competence, (iii) anticipatory competence, (iv) strategic competence, (v) normative competences. The study draws on the experiences from PBL activities performed at Aalborg...... University (AAU), Denmark, and focuses on the teaching of Life Cycle Assessment as a method for sustainability assessment. The objective is providing recommendations for future LCA teaching and learning. PBL activites performed at AAU were evaluated critically to detemine to what extent they addressed...

  8. Poverty and Proximate Barriers to Learning: Vision Deficiencies, Vision Correction and Educational Outcomes in Rural Northwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannum, Emily; Zhang, Yuping

    2012-09-01

    Uncorrected vision may present a significant barrier to educational mobility in poor communities in low and middle income countries. Focusing on the case of rural Northwest China, we analyze the Gansu Survey of Children and Families (2,000 children; 100 rural villages) and the Gansu Vision Intervention Project (a randomized trial; 19,185 students, 165 schools, two counties). Four main findings emerge: significant unmet need for vision correction; socioeconomic gradients in vision correction; somewhat greater vulnerability to vision problems among higher socioeconomic status and more academically engaged children; and significant favorable effects of vision correction on math and literacy performance and class failure.

  9. 2020 Vision: Envisioning a new generation of STEM learning research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dierking, Lynn D.; Falk, John H.

    2016-03-01

    In this issue, we have compiled six original papers, outcomes from the U.S. National Science Foundation (US-NSF)-funded REESE (Research and Evaluation on Education in Science and Engineering) 2020 Vision: The Next Generation of STEM Learning Research project. The purpose of 2020 Vision was to re-envision the questions and frameworks guiding STEM research in the twenty-first century, given that notions of learning have changed significantly in the last decade. The papers present diverse research principles that emerged from an initial 2020 Vision conference at Oregon State University (OSU), were then vetted more broadly with the science education community nationally and internationally, and presented in a public 2020 Vision symposium series also at OSU. Individually and as a group, these papers argue that if STEM learning is lifelong, life-wide and life-deep, research designs need to cut across the diverse settings and investigate the multiple contexts and media in which learners live and interact. Authors call for research paradigms that holistically reflect questions of the "what, when, where, why, how and with whom" of STEM learning. Associated Forum papers respond and expand the conversation by critically examining the recommended research principles and in some cases, challenging both authors and editors to think even more broadly. Two Key Contributor pieces highlight the contributions of researchers who have helped to push on these research boundaries, advancing science education research nationally and internationally. A final synthesis paper, a case study of research being conducted in a diverse, under-resourced community in Portland, Oregon provides one example of how the 2020 Vision research principles might be integrated into a comprehensive STEM learning research study.

  10. Problem Solving, Scaffolding and Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2012-01-01

    Helping students to construct robust understanding of physics concepts and develop good solving skills is a central goal in many physics classrooms. This thesis examine students' problem solving abilities from different perspectives and explores strategies to scaffold students' learning. In studies involving analogical problem solving…

  11. Problem Solving and Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Chandralekha

    2016-01-01

    One finding of cognitive research is that people do not automatically acquire usable knowledge by spending lots of time on task. Because students' knowledge hierarchy is more fragmented, "knowledge chunks" are smaller than those of experts. The limited capacity of short term memory makes the cognitive load high during problem solving tasks, leaving few cognitive resources available for metacognition. The abstract nature of the laws of physics and the chain of reasoning required to draw meanin...

  12. Machine learning, computer vision, and probabilistic models in jet physics

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; NACHMAN, Ben

    2015-01-01

    In this talk we present recent developments in the application of machine learning, computer vision, and probabilistic models to the analysis and interpretation of LHC events. First, we will introduce the concept of jet-images and computer vision techniques for jet tagging. Jet images enabled the connection between jet substructure and tagging with the fields of computer vision and image processing for the first time, improving the performance to identify highly boosted W bosons with respect to state-of-the-art methods, and providing a new way to visualize the discriminant features of different classes of jets, adding a new capability to understand the physics within jets and to design more powerful jet tagging methods. Second, we will present Fuzzy jets: a new paradigm for jet clustering using machine learning methods. Fuzzy jets view jet clustering as an unsupervised learning task and incorporate a probabilistic assignment of particles to jets to learn new features of the jet structure. In particular, we wi...

  13. Learning surface molecular structures via machine vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziatdinov, Maxim; Maksov, Artem; Kalinin, Sergei V.

    2017-08-01

    Recent advances in high resolution scanning transmission electron and scanning probe microscopies have allowed researchers to perform measurements of materials structural parameters and functional properties in real space with a picometre precision. In many technologically relevant atomic and/or molecular systems, however, the information of interest is distributed spatially in a non-uniform manner and may have a complex multi-dimensional nature. One of the critical issues, therefore, lies in being able to accurately identify (`read out') all the individual building blocks in different atomic/molecular architectures, as well as more complex patterns that these blocks may form, on a scale of hundreds and thousands of individual atomic/molecular units. Here we employ machine vision to read and recognize complex molecular assemblies on surfaces. Specifically, we combine Markov random field model and convolutional neural networks to classify structural and rotational states of all individual building blocks in molecular assembly on the metallic surface visualized in high-resolution scanning tunneling microscopy measurements. We show how the obtained full decoding of the system allows us to directly construct a pair density function—a centerpiece in analysis of disorder-property relationship paradigm—as well as to analyze spatial correlations between multiple order parameters at the nanoscale, and elucidate reaction pathway involving molecular conformation changes. The method represents a significant shift in our way of analyzing atomic and/or molecular resolved microscopic images and can be applied to variety of other microscopic measurements of structural, electronic, and magnetic orders in different condensed matter systems.

  14. Screening for Vision Problems, Including Usher's Syndrome, among Hearing Impaired Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillman, Robyn D.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A screening program for vision problems and Usher's Syndrome (a common cause of deaf-blindness) among 210 hearing-impaired students found 44 percent had significant vision problems and 1 percent had Usher's Syndrome. The program involved an interagency network of school, health care, and support personnel and utilized a dilated ophathalmological…

  15. Characteristics of Problem-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2003-01-01

    Problem BAsed LEarning (PBL) is widely regarded as a successful and innovative method for engineering education. The article highlights the Dutch approach of directing the learning process throuogh problem analysis and the Danish model of project-organised learning......Problem BAsed LEarning (PBL) is widely regarded as a successful and innovative method for engineering education. The article highlights the Dutch approach of directing the learning process throuogh problem analysis and the Danish model of project-organised learning...

  16. Advanced IT Education for the Vision Impaired via e-Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Helen L.

    2009-01-01

    Lack of accessibility in the design of e-learning courses continues to hinder students with vision impairment. E-learning materials are predominantly vision-centric, incorporating images, animation, and interactive media, and as a result students with acute vision impairment do not have equal opportunity to gain tertiary qualifications or skills…

  17. Java problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran P, Šimić

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the self-directed problem-based learning system (PBL named Java PBL. The expert module is the kernel of Java PBL. It involves a specific domain model, a problem generator and a solution generator. The overall system architecture is represented in the paper. Java PBL can act as the stand-alone system, but it is also designed to provide support to learning management systems (LMSs. This is provided by a modular design of the system. An LMS can offer the declarative knowledge only. Java PBL offers the procedural knowledge and the progress of the learner programming skills. The free navigation, unlimited numbers of problems and recommendations represent the main pedagogical strategies and tactics implemented into the system.

  18. Teaching Problem Based Learning as Blended Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolbæk, Ditte; Nortvig, Anne-Mette

    2018-01-01

    of departure in Dewey and a methodological point of departure in netnography, this study focuses on an online module at Aalborg University where teaching is based on PBL. With the research question ‘How can teachers design for PBL online,’ this study explores the teacher’s role in a six weeks’ blended learning......Problem-based and project organized learning (PBL) was originally developed for collaboration between physically present students, but political decisions at many universities require that collaboration, dialogues, and other PBL activities take place online as well. With a theoretical point...... program, and we present suggestions for designs for blended learning PBL based on case studies from two PBL courses...

  19. Characteristics of Problems in Problem-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. Sockalingam (Nachamma)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractThis thesis focuses on characteristics of problems in Problem-based Learning (PBL). Problems initiate the students’ learning process in PBL. Several studies have shown that the quality of problems has a positive influence on students’ academic achievement and interest. In addition, the

  20. Learning Spatial Object Localization from Vision on a Humanoid Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Leitner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We present a combined machine learning and computer vision approach for robots to localize objects. It allows our iCub humanoid to quickly learn to provide accurate 3D position estimates (in the centimetre range of objects seen. Biologically inspired approaches, such as Artificial Neural Networks (ANN and Genetic Programming (GP, are trained to provide these position estimates using the two cameras and the joint encoder readings. No camera calibration or explicit knowledge of the robot's kinematic model is needed. We find that ANN and GP are not just faster and have lower complexity than traditional techniques, but also learn without the need for extensive calibration procedures. In addition, the approach is localizing objects robustly, when placed in the robot's workspace at arbitrary positions, even while the robot is moving its torso, head and eyes.

  1. Vision: Its Role and Integrations in Learning Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getman, G. N.

    1981-01-01

    The author reviews aspects of visual integration which should be assessed in students with suspected learning problems: visually directed and monitored movements, visual tactual integrations, visual auditory language integrations, and visual systems integrations. (CL)

  2. Shared Vision, Team Learning and Professional Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sue C.; McKelvy, Earline

    2007-01-01

    Many middle schools do not use one of the most important strategies to improve student achievement and create socially equitable, developmentally responsive middle schools: becoming a professional learning community. This article summarizes the five disciplines which are vital for learning organizations -- systems thinking, personal mastery,…

  3. Features and characteristics of problem based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Eser Ceker; Fezile Ozdamli

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the years, there appears to be an increase in Problem Based Learning applications in education; and Problem Based Learning related research areas. The main aim of this research is to underline the fundamentals (basic elements) of Problem Based Learning, investigate the dimensions of research approached to PBL oriented areas (with a look for the latest technology supported tools of Problem Based Learning). This research showed that the most researched characteristics of PBL are; tea...

  4. Problem effectiveness in a course using problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); W.H. Gijselaers (Wim); H.G. Schmidt (Henk); S.B. van der Meer

    1993-01-01

    textabstractBackground. Problem-based learning (PBL) emphasizes active generation of learning issues by students. Both students and reachers, however, tend to worry that not all important knowledge will be acquired. To explore this question, problem effectiveness (i.e., for each problem, the degree

  5. Features and Characteristics of Problem Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceker, Eser; Ozdamli, Fezile

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the years, there appears to be an increase in Problem Based Learning applications in education; and Problem Based Learning related research areas. The main aim of this research is to underline the fundamentals (basic elements) of Problem Based Learning, investigate the dimensions of research approached to PBL oriented areas (with a look…

  6. Problem-based learning: rationale and description

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractProblem-based learning is an instructional method that is said to provide students with knowledge suitable for problem solving. In order to test this assertion the process of problem-based learning is described and measured against three principles of learning: activation of prior

  7. Color Vision Deficiency and Color Blindness: An Introduction to the Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Mary Margaret; Harris, Kenneth R.

    The paper examines issues concerned with the education and employment of individuals, primarily males, with color vision deficiency. After a brief introduction, the first chapter looks at adult problems such as employment areas in which the disability presents problems. The next chapter considers problems of children, noting the heavy use of color…

  8. Learning Disability Problems Prevalent Among Elementary School ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... identified various learning disability problems among their children/pupils. The learning disability problem that was identified by the largest proportion of parents and teachers (81.14%) was Mathematics problems and the one identified by the smallest proportion of parents and teachers (49.04%) was Hearing problems.

  9. [A patient with vision problems: first manifestation of a neurodegenerative condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Beer, Marlijn; Leeuwis, Annebet; Pijnenburg, Yolande

    2015-01-01

    Vision problems are common and the causes are diverse. This case illustrates the fact that vision problems may also be the first manifestation of a neurodegenerative disorder. A 46-year-old male developed progressive, incapacitating vision problems. Multiple pairs of glasses with lenses of different strengths did not improve symptoms. No ophthalmological explanation of the problems could be found. Oculomotor apraxia and visual extinction were seen on neurological examination. Visuoperceptual impairment was the main finding on neuropsychological examination. Impairment was also identified in visuoconstruction, memory and praxis. Cognitive problems in several areas, interference with activities of daily living, and young age of onset complete the clinical picture of presenile dementia. Posterior cortical atrophy is a spectrum of neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by progressive, incapacitating visuospatial and visuoperceptual impairment. The most prevalent underlying pathology is Alzheimer's disease. At present there is no curative therapy for posterior cortical atrophy.

  10. Learning from the problems of problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Epstein Richard

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The last decade has witnessed a rapid expansion of biomedical knowledge. Despite this, fashions in medical education over the same period have shifted away from factual (didactic teaching and towards contextual, or problem-based, learning (PBL. This paradigm shift has been justified by studies showing that PBL improves reasoning and communication while being associated with few if any detectable knowledge deficits. Discussion Analysis of the literature indicates that the recent rapid rise of PBL has closely paralleled the timing of the information explosion. The growing dominance of PBL could thus worsen the problems of information management in medical education via several mechanisms: first, by creating the impression that a defined spectrum of core factual knowledge suffices for clinical competence despite ongoing knowledge expansion (quality cost; second, by dissuading teachers from refining the educational utility of didactic modalities (improvement cost; and third, by reducing faculty time for developing reusable resources to impart factual knowledge more efficiently (opportunity cost. Summary These costs of PBL imply a need for strengthening the knowledge base of 21st-century medical graduates. New initiatives towards this end could include the development of more integrated cognitive techniques for facilitating the comprehension of complex data; the design of differentiated medical curricula for producing graduates with defined high-priority skill sets; and the encouragement of more cost-effective faculty teaching activities focused on the prototyping and testing of innovative commercializable educational tools.

  11. Leadership Style and Organizational Learning: The Mediate Effect of School Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Hanna; Peretz, Hilla; Hertz-Lazarowitz, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Fundamentally, the success of schools depends on first-rate school leadership, on leaders reinforcing the teachers' willingness to adhere to the school's vision, creating a sense of purpose, binding them together and encouraging them to engage in continuous learning. Leadership, vision and organizational learning are considered to be the…

  12. "Conscientization," Dialogue and Collaborative Problem Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    It has been argued that Paulo Freire's concept of conscientization, where critical awareness and engagement are central to a problem-posing pedagogy, provides the philosophical principles to underpin Problem Based Learning (PBL). By using dialogue groups and a combination of learning strategies to discover the nature of a problem, understand its…

  13. Problem based learning: Cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.S. de Grave; H.P.A. Boshuizen (Henny); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1996-01-01

    textabstractAn important phase of problem-based learning in a tutorial group is problem analysis. This article describes a study investigating the ongoing cognitive and metacognitive processes during problem analysis, by analysing the verbal communication among group members, and their thinking

  14. Problem-based learning and radiology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurley, P. [Department of Radiology, Nottingham University Hospitals, Queens Medical Centre, Nottingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: peter.thurley@ntlworld.com; Dennick, R. [Medical Education Unit, Medical School, University of Nottingham, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2008-06-15

    The Royal College of Radiologists recently published documents setting out guidelines to improve the teaching of radiology to medical students. These included recommendations that clinicians who teach radiology should be aware of newer educational techniques, such as problem-based learning, and should be involved in the development of curricula and assessment in medical schools. This review aims to introduce the educational theories behind problem-based learning and describe how a problem-based learning tutorial is run. The relevance of problem-based learning to radiology and the potential advantages and disadvantages are discussed.

  15. Enhance Environmental Literacy through Problem Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febriasari, L. K.; Supriatna, N.

    2017-09-01

    This study aims to improve environmental literacy elementary school students in Bandung. The design of this study used a classroom action research consisting of four stages, planning, implementation, observation, and reflection. The results showed that there was an increase in the students’ environmental literacy. The conclusion of this research is that students’ environmental literacy can be improved through classroom learning by applying Problem Based Learning model. Learning planning is important which includes analysis of environmental literacy component and learning model that is used, Problem Based Learning, so that learning can run effectively, efficiently, and get maximum result. Efforts to improve environmental literacy should be sustainable.

  16. Computer Use and Vision.Related Problems Among University ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: This study was undertaken to assess the pattern of computer usage and related visual problems, among University students in Ajman, United Arab Emirates. Materials and Methods A total of 500 Students studying in Gulf Medical University, Ajman and Ajman University of Science and Technology were recruited into ...

  17. Distribution of Binocular Vision Anomalies and Refractive Errors in Iranian Children With Learning Disabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yekta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Visual problems in children contribute to learning disorders, which are one of the most influential factors in learning. Objectives The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence of refractive and binocular vision errors in children with learning disorders. Patients and Methods In this cross-sectional study, 406 children with learning disorders with a mean age of 8.56 ± 2.4 years were evaluated. Examinations included the determination of refractive errors with an auto-refractometer and static retinoscopy, measurement of visual acuity with a Snellen chart, evaluation of ocular deviation, and measurement of stereopsis, amplitude of accommodation, and near point of convergence. Results Of the 406 participants, 319 (78.6% were emmetropic in the right eye, 14.5% had myopia, and 6.9% had hyperopia according to cycloplegic refraction. Astigmatism was detected in 75 (18.5% children. In our study, 89.9% of the children had no deviation, 1.0% had esophoria, and 6.4% had exophoria . In addition, 2.2% of the children had suppression. The near point of convergence ranged from 3 to 18 cm, with a mean of 10.12 ± 3.274 cm. Moreover, 98.5 and 98.0% of the participants achieved complete vision with the best correction in the right and left eye, respectively. The best corrected visual acuity in the right and left eye was achieved in 98.5 and 98.0% of the children, respectively. Conclusions The pattern of visual impairment in learning-impaired children is not much different from that in normal children; however, because these children may not be able to express themselves clearly, lack of correct diagnosis and appropriate treatment has resulted in a marked defect in recognizing visual disorders in these children. Therefore, gaining knowledge of the prevalence of refractive errors in children with learning disorders can be considered the first step in their treatment.

  18. Problem Solving Reasoning and Problem Based Instruction in Geometry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulistyowati, F.; Budiyono, B.; Slamet, I.

    2017-09-01

    This research aims to analyze the comparison Problem Solving Reasoning (PSR) and Problem Based Instruction (PBI) on problem solving and mathematical communication abilities viewed from Self-Regulated Learning (SRL). Learning was given to grade 8th junior high school students. This research uses quasi experimental method, and then with descriptive analysis. Data were analyzed using two-ways multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with different cells. The result of data analysis were learning model gives different effect, level of SRL gives the same effect, and there is no interaction between the learning model with the SRL on the problem solving and mathematical communication abilities. The t-test statistic was used to find out more effective learning model. Based on the test, regardless of the level of SRL, PSR is more effective than PBI for problemsolving ability. The result of descriptive analysis was PSR had the advantage in creating learning that optimizing the ability of learners in reasoning to solve a mathematical problem. Consequently, the PSR is the right learning model to be applied in the classroom to improve problem solving ability of learners.

  19. Integrating the centennial vision into an evidence-based fieldwork-learning experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Lew, Steve; Singh, Nandita

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT Occupational Therapy's Centennial Vision includes the concept of evidence-based practice (EBP) as a core mechanism to move the profession forward. The literature reveals that although EBP has become an expected norm by occupational therapy consumers and payers, it is difficult to implement secondary to a variety of issues. The implementation and use of an EBP fieldwork experience within the physical disabilities context require problem-based and collaborative learning approaches. Fieldwork students complete 15 practitioner-facilitated EBP modules regarding performance approaches specific to the fieldwork site. The response of the participants suggests that EBP can have a positive impact on new knowledge acquisition and its application to new clinical skills. Future program goals include the development of more in-depth outcome measures to ascertain the effectiveness of a fieldwork clinical-learning module program.

  20. Robust Active Binocular Vision through Intrinsically Motivated Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca eLonini

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficient coding hypothesis posits that sensory systems of animals strive to encode sensory signals efficiently by taking into account the redundancies in them. This principle has been very successful in explaining response properties of visual sensory neurons as adaptations to the statistics of natural images. Recently, we have begun to extend the efficient coding hypothesis to active perception through a form of intrinsically motivated learning: a sensory model learns an efficient code for the sensory signals while a reinforcement learner generates movements of the sense organs to improve the encoding of the signals. To this end, it receives an intrinsically generated reinforcement signal indicating how well the sensory model encodes the data. This approach has been tested in the context of binocular vison, leading to the autonomous development of disparity tuning and vergence control. Here we systematically investigate the robustness of the new approach in the context of a binocular vision system implemented on a robot. Robustness is an important aspect that reflects the ability of the system to deal with unmodeled disturbances or events, such as an insult to the system that displace the stereo cameras. To demonstrate the robustness of our method and its ability to self-calibrate, we introduce various perturbations and test if and how the system recovers from them. We find that 1 the system can fully recover from a perturbation that can be compensated through the system's motor degrees of freedom, 2 performance degrades gracefully if the system cannot use its motor degrees of freedom to compensate for the perturbation, and 3 recovery from a perturbation is improved if both the sensory encoding and the behavior policy can adapt to the perturbation. Overall, this work demonstrates that our intrinsically motivated learning approach for efficient coding in active perception gives rise to a self-calibrating perceptual system of high robustness.

  1. Understanding the Problems of Learning Mathematics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semilla-Dube, Lilia

    1983-01-01

    A model is being developed to categorize problems in teaching and learning mathematics. Categories include problems due to language difficulties, lack of prerequisite knowledge, and those related to the affective domain. This paper calls on individuals to share teaching and learning episodes; those submitted will then be compiled and categorized.…

  2. Problem-Based Learning Approaches in Meteorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charlton-Perez, Andrew James

    2013-01-01

    Problem-Based Learning, despite recent controversies about its effectiveness, is used extensively as a teaching method throughout higher education. In meteorology, there has been little attempt to incorporate Problem-Based Learning techniques into the curriculum. Motivated by a desire to enhance the reflective engagement of students within a…

  3. Learning from Dealing with Real World Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Hakan

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide an example of using real world issues as tools for science teaching and learning. Using real world issues provides students with experiences in learning in problem-based environments and encourages them to apply their content knowledge to solving current and local problems.

  4. Problem-Based Learning in Prenursing Courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jiménez, Emilio; Enrique-Mirón, Carmen; González-García, Juan A; Fernández-Carballo, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We conducted an observational study with 150 undergraduate nursing students to verify the usefulness of problem-based learning in the classroom and to ascertain whether this methodology facilitated the development of their knowledge acquisition skills. Problem-based learning fostered the development of integrated knowledge acquisition skills among nursing students.

  5. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF.MIREKU

    African Journal of Educational Studies in Mathematics and Sciences Vol. 10, 2012. 39. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts. F. Bahmaei6 & N. Nejad Sadeghi. Abstract. The present study deals with the influence of cooperative learning on the ability of students to solve the problems. The study also ...

  6. The learning of sciences: a gradual change in the way of learning. The case of vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina M. Bravo

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Learning the scientific way of knowledge implies a change in the most implicit principles that guide comprehension, interpretation and explanation of scientific phenomena as well as a change in the type of associated reasoning. With the aim of favouring this type of learning, a teaching programme was developed in relation to vision and implemented with a group of secondary school students. The way of learning of these students was observed at different teaching stages. Findings suggest that during the learning process the way students learn seems to change gradually and that students construct “intermediate” models (right but incomplete that become the basis for the construction of a systemic model proposed by school science.

  7. Active learning in camera calibration through vision measurement application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaoqin; Guo, Jierong; Wang, Xianchun; Liu, Changqing; Cao, Binfang

    2017-08-01

    Since cameras are increasingly more used in scientific application as well as in the applications requiring precise visual information, effective calibration of such cameras is getting more important. There are many reasons why the measurements of objects are not accurate. The largest reason is that the lens has a distortion. Another detrimental influence on the evaluation accuracy is caused by the perspective distortions in the image. They happen whenever we cannot mount the camera perpendicularly to the objects we want to measure. In overall, it is very important for students to understand how to correct lens distortions, that is camera calibration. If the camera is calibrated, the images are rectificated, and then it is possible to obtain undistorted measurements in world coordinates. This paper presents how the students should develop a sense of active learning for mathematical camera model besides the theoretical scientific basics. The authors will present the theoretical and practical lectures which have the goal of deepening the students understanding of the mathematical models of area scan cameras and building some practical vision measurement process by themselves.

  8. Assessment of night vision problems in patients with congenital stationary night blindness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieke M C Bijveld

    Full Text Available Congenital Stationary Night Blindness (CSNB is a retinal disorder caused by a signal transmission defect between photoreceptors and bipolar cells. CSNB can be subdivided in CSNB2 (rod signal transmission reduced and CSNB1 (rod signal transmission absent. The present study is the first in which night vision problems are assessed in CSNB patients in a systematic way, with the purpose of improving rehabilitation for these patients. We assessed the night vision problems of 13 CSNB2 patients and 9 CSNB1 patients by means of a questionnaire on low luminance situations. We furthermore investigated their dark adapted visual functions by the Goldmann Weekers dark adaptation curve, a dark adapted static visual field, and a two-dimensional version of the "Light Lab". In the latter test, a digital image of a living room with objects was projected on a screen. While increasing the luminance of the image, we asked the patients to report on detection and recognition of objects. The questionnaire showed that the CSNB2 patients hardly experienced any night vision problems, while all CSNB1 patients experienced some problems although they generally did not describe them as severe. The three scotopic tests showed minimally to moderately decreased dark adapted visual functions in the CSNB2 patients, with differences between patients. In contrast, the dark adapted visual functions of the CSNB1 patients were more severely affected, but showed almost no differences between patients. The results from the "2D Light Lab" showed that all CSNB1 patients were blind at low intensities (equal to starlight, but quickly regained vision at higher intensities (full moonlight. Just above their dark adapted thresholds both CSNB1 and CSNB2 patients had normal visual fields. From the results we conclude that night vision problems in CSNB, in contrast to what the name suggests, are not conspicuous and generally not disabling.

  9. Problem-based learning in the NICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational strategy that provides learners with the opportunity to investigate and solve realistic problem situations. It is also referred to as project-based learning or work-based learning. PBL combines several learning strategies including the use of case studies coupled with collaborative, facilitated, and self-directed learning. Research has demonstrated that use of PBL can result in learners having improved problem-solving skills, increased breadth and analysis of complex data, higher-level thinking skills, and improved collaboration. This article will include background information and a description of PBL, followed by examples of how this strategy can be used for learning in neonatal settings.

  10. Problems lifelong learning of nurse

    OpenAIRE

    HALUZOVÁ, Jaroslava

    2008-01-01

    My thesis addresses the issue of lifelong learning of nurses.Lifelong learing promotes high standards of profesional practice. The principles and values of lifelong learning are increasingly important. The objective of the research was to find out how motivated the health care personnel are to improve their skills and knowledge in the interest of their patients. In my research I also obsesrve if nurses have the responsibility to grow professionally and if they have enought access to informati...

  11. Stereo vision enhances the learning of a catching skill

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mazyn, L.; Lenoir, M.; Montagne, G.; Delaey, C; Savelsbergh, G.J.P.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereo vision to the acquisition of a natural interception task. Poor catchers with good (N = 8; Stereo+) and weak (N = 6; Stereo-) stereo vision participated in an intensive training program spread over 2 weeks, during which they caught

  12. Bridging disciplines through problem based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stentoft, Diana

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines whether a problem based approach to students’ learning may support interdisciplinary education at university level, where students are required to engage with the complexities inherent in constructing knowledge across disciplinary boundaries. These complexities include students...... of how a problem based approach to learning will be implemented in the programs to support students in their engagement with the complexities of amalgamating and transgressing the disciplines of technology and anthropology. The paper is concluded by a brief discussion of problem based learning...... as an approach to operationalising interdisciplinary education, and some challenges are identified....

  13. Feature Selection with Annealing for Computer Vision and Big Data Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbu, Adrian; She, Yiyuan; Ding, Liangjing; Gramajo, Gary

    2017-02-01

    Many computer vision and medical imaging problems are faced with learning from large-scale datasets, with millions of observations and features. In this paper we propose a novel efficient learning scheme that tightens a sparsity constraint by gradually removing variables based on a criterion and a schedule. The attractive fact that the problem size keeps dropping throughout the iterations makes it particularly suitable for big data learning. Our approach applies generically to the optimization of any differentiable loss function, and finds applications in regression, classification and ranking. The resultant algorithms build variable screening into estimation and are extremely simple to implement. We provide theoretical guarantees of convergence and selection consistency. In addition, one dimensional piecewise linear response functions are used to account for nonlinearity and a second order prior is imposed on these functions to avoid overfitting. Experiments on real and synthetic data show that the proposed method compares very well with other state of the art methods in regression, classification and ranking while being computationally very efficient and scalable.

  14. Vision problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... allergic to, such as soaps, sprays, lotions, creams, cosmetics, laundry products, curtains, sheets, carpets, paint, or pets? The provider will also ask about your general health and family history: Do you have any known allergies? When did ...

  15. Enhanced learning through design problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Högberg, Stig; Jensen, Frida av Fløtum

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a teaching method used in an electrical machines course, where the students learn about electrical machines by designing them. The aim of the course is not to teach design, albeit this is a side product, but rather to teach the fundamentals and the function of electrical...... machines through design. The teaching method is evaluated by a student questionnaire, designed to measure the quality and effectiveness of the teaching method. The results of the questionnaire conclusively show that this method labelled ‘learning through design’ is a very effective way of teaching...

  16. Transformation to problem and project based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2006-01-01

    . However, the internal factors at the institutional level may be unknown. Institutions have developed many different pedagogical models, using very different strategies for development. Nearly all Danish engineering institutions have implemented elements of Problem Based and Project Based Learning (PBL...

  17. Problem-based learning in astrophysics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raine, Derek [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, Leicester (United Kingdom); Collett, James [Department of Physical Sciences, University of Hertfordshire, Hatfield (United Kingdom)

    2003-03-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) can be integrated into the curriculum in many different ways. We compare three examples of PBL in undergraduate astrophysics programmes, and discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the various approaches.

  18. Keeping Up in School? Identifying Learning Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a child to understand basic math concepts (like multiplication), make change in cash transactions, or do math-related word problems. Learning difficulties can affect more than school performance. If not addressed, they can also affect ...

  19. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF.MIREKU

    The present study deals with the influence of cooperative learning on the ability of students to solve the problems. The study also concerns the introduction of mathematical mediating artifacts as factors which effect the learning of mathematics by students. Experimental research method of pre-test and post-test types was.

  20. Solving Wicked Problems through Action Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crul, Liselore

    2014-01-01

    This account of practice outlines the Oxyme Action Learning Program which was conducted as part of the Management Challenge in my final year of the MSc in Coaching and Behavioral Change at Henley Business School. The central research questions were: (1) how action learning can help to solve wicked problems and (2) what the effect of an action…

  1. Cooperative learning, problem solving and mediating artifacts ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study deals with the influence of cooperative learning on the ability of students to solve the problems. The study also concerns the introduction of mathematical mediating artifacts as factors which effect the learning of mathematics by students. Experimental research method of pre-test and post-test types was ...

  2. Problems and Inconsistencies with Kolb's Learning Styles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Iain

    2000-01-01

    Argues that there are substantial problems with the theoretical foundations of David Kolb's Learning Style Inventory (LSI). Notes anomalies with the relationship between Carl Jung's style and Kolb's use of possibility processing. Argues that these anomalies make it impossible for defining firm conclusions about the nature of Kolb's learning style.…

  3. Problems of Level in Distance Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanna T. Balmagambetova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available . The article is focused on the problems of level approach to communicative competence formation in the course of the second language learning. The change of educational paradigm demands turn of linguists to differentiated learner-centered education – level system of language learning

  4. Scaffolds in Problem-Based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S.Y. Choo (Serene)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Problem-based learning or PBL in short, is an instructional approach that helps students develop flexible understanding and lifelong learning skills (Hmelo-Silver, 2004; Schmidt, Loyens, Van Gog, & Paas, 2007; Simons & Klein, 2007). In general, the main instructional

  5. Revitalizing Precalculus with Problem-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Sonya S.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the ways in which a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to teaching precalculus can prepare students for calculus by helping students develop a conceptual understanding rather than learning through symbol manipulation and memorization. Discusses the exponential, trigonometric, polynomial, and rational function modules employed. (NB)

  6. Students' Perceptions of Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Muthu; Kogut, Galyna

    2006-01-01

    Problem-based learning has in recent times aroused keen curiosity due to its pedagogical orientation of facilitating students' active construction of knowledge. As a curriculum model it is designed based upon the solving of either simulated or real-life problems that generally tend to be ill-structured and open-ended. In such a model students are…

  7. Using Isomorphic Problems to Learn Introductory Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine introductory physics students' ability to perform analogical reasoning between two isomorphic problems which employ the same underlying physics principles but have different surface features. Three hundred and sixty two students from a calculus-based and an algebra-based introductory physics course were given a quiz in the recitation in which they had to first learn from a solved problem provided and take advantage of what they learned from it to solve another problem (which we call the quiz problem) which was isomorphic. Previous research suggests that the multiple-concept quiz problem is challenging for introductory students. Students in different recitation classes received different interventions in order to help them discern and exploit the underlying similarities of the isomorphic solved and quiz problems. We also conducted think-aloud interviews with four introductory students in order to understand in-depth the difficulties they had and explore strategies to provide better sc...

  8. Low vision rehabilitation and ocular problems among industrial workers in a developing country.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, R; Knight, V F; Aziz Mohammed, M A

    2014-01-01

    Work-related ocular injuries and illnesses were among the major causes of job absenteeism. This study was conducted to determine if low vision rehabilitation was provided following work-related ocular problems among industrial workers in a developing country. This was a retrospective analysis of case records. Randomly selected records of all employees from the Social Security Organization (SOCSO) Medical Board for 2004 who suffered from ocular injuries and illnesses were selected. Rates of ocular injuries and illnesses according to age, gender, races, types of injuries, types of industries, visual rehabilitation and types of medical interventions were tabulated and analysed. A total of 26 cases of ocular injuries and illnesses were identified where 46.2% suffered from ocular injuries. The remaining 53.8% had ocular and/or systemic diseases. The 40-49-yearold age group suffered the greatest number of injuries (26.92%). Ocular perforating injuries (66.67%) and ocular contusions (33.33%) were the most common types of ocular injury among industrial workers in Kuala Lumpur. Most injuries occurred among workers in the service industry (50%). Almost 60% of these injured workers did not receive any low vision rehabilitation after medical intervention while 25% were given contact lenses or spectacles as rehabilitation and remaining had surgery. The low vision rehabilitation is still unexplored in the management of ocular injuries and illnesses among industrial workers. Introducing low vision rehabilitation can benefit both workers and employers as it provides care beyond spectacles or contact lens prescriptions.

  9. Creative Problem Solving as a Learning Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Ninck

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The Business School at the Bern University of Applied Sciences is offering a new MScBA degree program in business development. The paper presents a practical report about the action learning approach in the course 'Business Analysis and Design'. Our problem-based approach is more than simply 'learning by doing'. In a world of increasing complexity, taking action alone will not result in a learning effect per se. What is imperative is to structure and facilitate the learning process on different levels: individual construction of mental models; understanding needs and developing adequate solutions; critical reflection of methods and processes. Reflective practice, where individuals are learning from their own professional experiences rather than from formal teaching or knowledge transfer, may be the most important source for lifelong learning.

  10. Computer vision and machine learning with RGB-D sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Shao, Ling; Kohli, Pushmeet

    2014-01-01

    This book presents an interdisciplinary selection of cutting-edge research on RGB-D based computer vision. Features: discusses the calibration of color and depth cameras, the reduction of noise on depth maps and methods for capturing human performance in 3D; reviews a selection of applications which use RGB-D information to reconstruct human figures, evaluate energy consumption and obtain accurate action classification; presents an approach for 3D object retrieval and for the reconstruction of gas flow from multiple Kinect cameras; describes an RGB-D computer vision system designed to assist t

  11. Learning openCV computer vision with the openCV library

    CERN Document Server

    Bradski, Gary

    2008-01-01

    Learning OpenCV puts you right in the middle of the rapidly expanding field of computer vision. Written by the creators of OpenCV, the widely used free open-source library, this book introduces you to computer vision and demonstrates how you can quickly build applications that enable computers to see" and make decisions based on the data. With this book, any developer or hobbyist can get up and running with the framework quickly, whether it's to build simple or sophisticated vision applications

  12. Power, Democracy and Problem-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Stentoft, Diana; Dahms, Mona-Lisa

    2007-01-01

    as a starting point, an online course titled ‘Intercultural Learning' has been developed. The course is offered as a part of a faculty training programme, Master in Problem Based Learning in Engineering and Science (MPBL) (For more information about the MPBL programme, see Du et. al. 2007). Course and program...... and create an intercultural teaching and learning environment. One of the course sessions is titled ‘Education, Power and Democracy' and the contributions from participants to the discussion in the course forum have been an exciting inspiration for this paper. The first section of the paper......  Problem Based Learning (PBL) as an educational approach has been increasingly applied in educational settings around the world. Given that PBL - as well as any other educational approach - is rooted in a given cultural context and thus carries the ‘fingerprint' of the specific context...

  13. [Vision problems causing and not causing visual impairment in a working population of Catalonia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guisasola, Laura; Tresserras, Ricard; Rius, Anna; López-Dóriga, Adriana; Purtí, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    To analyze the distribution of visual problems which cause and do not cause visual impairment in a working population, and their relation to social class. This was a cross-sectional study of 86,831 employed workers (59,397 men, and 27,421 women) in Catalonia ages 16 to 65 years who, in 2009, underwent health surveillance exams at the Asepeyo Health Prevention. The prevalence of visual problems that cause and do not cause visual impairment was calculated by age, sex and occupational social class, and associations were analyzed using logistic regression. 2.2% (95% CI 2.1-2.3) of the active working population studied had vision problems that cause visual impairment, even while wearing corrective lenses. After adjusting for age, workers in Class V show a 2.4-fold greater risk of visual impairment than those in Class I. Women, older workers and disadvantaged social groups showed the highest prevalence and risk of visual impairment. Conversely, problems resolved by vision correction that do not cause visual impairment are concentrated in non-manual workers.

  14. Problem-Based Learning in Formal and Informal Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimic, Goran; Jevremovic, Aleksandar

    2012-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a student-centered instructional strategy in which students solve problems and reflect on their experiences. Different domains need different approaches in the design of PBL systems. Therefore, we present one case study in this article: A Java Programming PBL. The application is developed as an additional module for…

  15. Problem based Learning in surveying Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    The challenge of the future will be that the only constant is change. Therefore, the educational base must be flexible. The graduates must possess skills to adapt to a rapidly changing labour market and they must possess skills to deal with even the unknown problems of the future. The point is......, that professional and technical skills can be acquired and updated at a later stage in ones career while skills for problem-solving and skills for learning to learn can only be achieved through the process of academic training at he universities. The concept of project-organised education provides just...

  16. Incorporating Problem-Based Learning in Physical Education Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hushman, Glenn; Napper-Owen, Gloria

    2011-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational method that identifies a problem as a context for student learning. Critical-thinking skills, deductive reasoning, knowledge, and behaviors are developed as students learn how theory can be applied to practical settings. Problem-based learning encourages self-direction, lifelong learning, and sharing…

  17. Problem Based Learning - Linking Students and Industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming K.

    2006-01-01

    -oriented project work: students work in teams to solve externally defined problem areas in co-operation with businesses, organisations and public institutions. Project Organised Problem Based Learning (POPBL) has generated a high degree of cooperation with the society and private companies. There are all the time......WG2_G4 Problem based learning – linking students and industry: a case study from Aalborg, Denmark Flemming K. Flink ELITE Aalborg University In Aalborg University, Denmark, all study programmes are organised around inter-disciplinary project work in groups. Up to 50% of the study work is problem...... in working life; enterprises with a clear idea of what the university stands for and how the future graduates might fit in as prospective employees; and the university with feedback and cases and ideas which can be used in research and teaching. This presentation has a focus on POPBL in engineering, which...

  18. Age-related vision problems in commuter and air taxi pilots: a study of 3019 pilots, 1987-1997.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebok, George W; Qiang, Yandong; Baker, Susan P; Li, Guohua

    2007-07-01

    Vision problems have become an increasingly important health and safety concern for pilots due to the aging of the pilot population. This paper examines the incidence of age-related vision problems in a birth cohort of commuter air carrier and air taxi pilots. A cohort of 3019 male pilots ages 45-54 yr at baseline and holding Class I medical certificates in 1987 were retrospectively studied from 1987 to 1997 through the medical certification system of the Federal Aviation Administration. Poisson regression modeling based on generalized estimation equations was used to assess the associations of pilot characteristics with risk of developing vision problems. The study period accumulated 419 incident cases of vision problems, yielding an incidence of 20.3 per 1000 person-years. For pilots ages 45-49, 50-54, 55-59, and 60-64, the incidence of vision problems was 17, 20, 24, and 39 per 1000 person-years, respectively. A baseline history of eye problems and older age were each significantly associated with an increased incidence of vision problems. The adjusted relative risks of vision problems for pilot age were 1.0 (45-49 yr), 1.2 (50-54 yr), 1.4 (55-59 yr), and 3.0 (60-64 yr). The three most prevalent types of visual problems were corneal problems (16%), glaucoma (15%), and cataracts (7%). Identifying and preventing pathological changes that alter visual performance among pilots is an important component of aviation safety. With the increasing maturity of the pilot population, it is essential that appropriate visual screening and correction be emphasized for specific age-related ophthalmic conditions.

  19. Stereo vision enhances the learning of a catching skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazyn, Liesbeth I N; Lenoir, Matthieu; Montagne, Gilles; Delaey, Christophe; Savelsbergh, Geert J P

    2007-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of stereo vision to the acquisition of a natural interception task. Poor catchers with good (N = 8; Stereo+) and weak (N = 6; Stereo-) stereo vision participated in an intensive training program spread over 2 weeks, during which they caught over 1,400 tennis balls in a pre-post-retention design. While the Stereo+ group improved from a catching percentage of 18% to 59%, catchers in the Stereo- group did not significantly improve (from 10 to 31%), this progress being indifferent from a control group (N = 9) that did not practice at all. These results indicate that the development and use of of compensatory cues for depth perception in people with weak stereopsis is insufficient to successfully deal with interceptions under high temporal constraints, and that this disadvantage cannot be fully attenuated by specific and intensive training.

  20. Problem-Based Learning in Online Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Jo; Reigeluth, Charles M.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined 3 graduate-level online courses that utilized problem-based learning (PBL), considering each course as a case. Beyond describing how PBL was implemented in each case, this study identified what worked (strengths) and did not work (weaknesses) in the PBL and explored how the PBL could be improved (improvements) by collecting…

  1. Unlearning, Critical Action Learning and Wicked Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedler, Mike; Hsu, Shih-wei

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores the idea of unlearning in Critical Action Learning (CAL) as applied to the wicked problems of organisations and societies. It draws on data and ideas developed during a research project conducted for "Skills for Care" by Pedler, Abbott, Brook and Burgoyne ("Skills for Care" 2014) and from experiences on…

  2. Problem Based Learning in Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahms, Mona-Lisa; Sauerbier, Gabriele; Stubbe, Korinna

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a recent EU-project from five European Institutions. The aim was the development and implementation of a new international Master’s programme for staff development, directed towards the introduction of Problem Based Learning methods in the field of engineering education...

  3. Producing and Scrounging during Problem Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickery, William L.

    2013-01-01

    When problem based learning occurs in a social context it is open to a common social behaviour, scrounging. In the animal behaviour literature, scroungers do not attempt to find resources themselves but rather exploit resources found by other group members (referred to as producers). We know from studies of animal behaviour (including humans) that…

  4. Collaborative Learning Utilizing Case-Based Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilvano, Nestor T.; Mathis, Karen M.; Schauer, Daniel P.

    2014-01-01

    Engaging students in discussion and creating high impact teaching and learning practices are a challenge in every classroom. Small group discussion and poster presentations were used to solve case-based problems to highlight issues for the learner and to allow each student to demonstrate understanding and application of theory to real life…

  5. METHODOLOGICAL PROBLEMS OF E-LEARNING DIDACTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey F. Sergeev

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the discussion of the methodological problems of e-learning, didactic issues the use of advanced networking and Internet technologies to create training systems and simulators based on the methodological principles of non-classical and post-non-classical psychology and pedagogy. 

  6. Problem Based Learning, curriculum development and change ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: The faculty of Medicine, (FOM) Makerere University Kampala was started in 1924 and has been running a traditional curriculum for 79 years. A few years back it embarked on changing its curriculum from traditional to Problem Based Learning (PBL) and Community Based Education and Service (COBES) as ...

  7. Teaching Gases through Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baran, Mukadder

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate not only the applicability of the method of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) to the lesson subject of "Gasses" within the scope of the 9th grade course of Chemistry in Hakkari Gazi High School but also the influence of this method on the students' achievement levels in chemistry and on their…

  8. Nonlinear programming for classification problems in machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Annabella; Fuduli, Antonio; Gaudioso, Manlio

    2016-10-01

    We survey some nonlinear models for classification problems arising in machine learning. In the last years this field has become more and more relevant due to a lot of practical applications, such as text and web classification, object recognition in machine vision, gene expression profile analysis, DNA and protein analysis, medical diagnosis, customer profiling etc. Classification deals with separation of sets by means of appropriate separation surfaces, which is generally obtained by solving a numerical optimization model. While linear separability is the basis of the most popular approach to classification, the Support Vector Machine (SVM), in the recent years using nonlinear separating surfaces has received some attention. The objective of this work is to recall some of such proposals, mainly in terms of the numerical optimization models. In particular we tackle the polyhedral, ellipsoidal, spherical and conical separation approaches and, for some of them, we also consider the semisupervised versions.

  9. Learning Matlab a problem solving approach

    CERN Document Server

    Gander, Walter

    2015-01-01

    This comprehensive and stimulating introduction to Matlab, a computer language now widely used for technical computing, is based on an introductory course held at Qian Weichang College, Shanghai University, in the fall of 2014.  Teaching and learning a substantial programming language aren’t always straightforward tasks. Accordingly, this textbook is not meant to cover the whole range of this high-performance technical programming environment, but to motivate first- and second-year undergraduate students in mathematics and computer science to learn Matlab by studying representative problems, developing algorithms and programming them in Matlab. While several topics are taken from the field of scientific computing, the main emphasis is on programming. A wealth of examples are completely discussed and solved, allowing students to learn Matlab by doing: by solving problems, comparing approaches and assessing the proposed solutions.

  10. Declarative knowledge and professional vision in teacher education: effect of courses in teaching and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stürmer, Kathleen; Könings, Karen D; Seidel, Tina

    2013-09-01

    Teachers' professional vision includes the ability to apply general pedagogical knowledge about components of effective teaching and learning to reason about significant features of classroom practice. It requires teachers to (a) describe, (b) explain, and (c) predict classroom situations. Although the acquisition of underling knowledge can be considered as a key element of university-based teacher education programmes, to date, there has been little empirical research on teacher candidates' development of professional vision. This study aims to improve understanding of how different university-based courses in teaching and learning impact the development of professional vision. Participants were teacher candidates (N= 53) attending the same teacher education programme at a German university. They were enrolled in one of three different compulsory courses in teaching and learning, lasting one semester. In a pre-test-post-test design, participants' declarative knowledge about teaching and learning was measured with a test, professional vision with the online tool Observer. Analysis of covariance and multivariate analysis of variance were conducted. Teacher candidates in all three courses showed significant gains both in declarative knowledge and professional vision. Patterns of results differed depending on the course attended. A video-based course with a focus on effective teaching resulted in highest gains in prediction of the consequences of observed events for student learning processes, which is the highest level of knowledge transfer. The development of professional vision is a strongly knowledge-guided process. In line with their content and aims, university-based courses can enhance teaching-relevant knowledge for teacher candidates. © 2012 The British Psychological Society.

  11. Producing and scrounging during Problem Based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William L. Vickery

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available When problem based learning occurs in a social context it is open to a common social behaviour, scrounging. In the animal behaviour literature, scroungers do not attempt to find resources themselves but rather exploit resources found by other group members (referred to as producers. We know from studies of animal behaviour (including humans that scrounging can be expected whenever animals exploit resources in groups. We also know that scrounging can have deleterious effects on the group. We can expect scrounging to occur during social learning because the exchange of information (which I will consider here as a resource is essential to social learning. This exchange can be seen as each individual scrounging from the other members of the group whenever the individual learns from the work of others. However, there is a danger if some individuals learn mostly through their own efforts while others indulge in “social loafing” relying heavily on colleagues to provide knowledge. Here I propose that game theory models developed to analyse feeding in animal societies may also apply to social learning. We know from studies of birds feeding in groups that scrounging behaviour depends on the extent to which resources can be shared. Further, when scrounging is prevalent groups tend to obtain fewer resources. By contrast, in social learning we attempt to facilitate sharing of knowledge. We thus encourage scrounging and run the risk of reducing learning within study groups. Here I analyse the role of scrounging in problem based learning. I argue that scrounging is inherent and necessary to any social learning process. However, it can have perverse effects if the acquisition of facts rather than understanding comes to dominate learning objectives. Further, disparities among individuals within a group can lead certain individuals to specialise in scrounging thus undermining the functioning of the group. I suggest that motivation, problem structure

  12. Cognitive components of color vision in honey bees: how conditioning variables modulate color learning and discrimination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avarguès-Weber, Aurore; Giurfa, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Since the demonstration of color vision in honey bees 100 years ago by Karl von Frisch, appetitive conditioning to color targets has been used as the principal way to access behavioral aspects of bee color vision. Yet, analyses on how conditioning parameters affect color perception remained scarce. Conclusions on bee color vision have often been made without referring them to the experimental context in which they were obtained, and thus presented as absolute facts instead of realizing that subtle variations in conditioning procedures might yield different results. Here, we review evidence showing that color learning and discrimination in bees are not governed by immutable properties of their visual system, but depend on how the insects are trained and thus learn a task. The use of absolute or differential conditioning protocols, the presence of aversive reinforcement in differential conditioning and the degrees of freedom of motor components determine dramatic variations in color discrimination. We, thus, suggest top-down attentional modulation of color vision to explain the changes in color learning and discrimination reviewed here. We discuss the possible neural mechanisms of this modulation and conclude that color vision experiments require a careful consideration of how training parameters shape behavioral responses.

  13. Professional Vision of Classroom Management and Learning Support in Science Classrooms--Does Professional Vision Differ across General and Content-Specific Classroom Interactions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensky, Mirjam; Gold, Bernadette; Holdynski, Manfred; Möller, Kornelia

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigates the internal structure of professional vision of in-service teachers and student teachers with respect to classroom management and learning support in primary science lessons. Classroom management (including monitoring, managing momentum, and rules and routines) and learning support (including cognitive activation…

  14. Solving multiconstraint assignment problems using learning automata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Geir; Oommen, B John

    2010-02-01

    This paper considers the NP-hard problem of object assignment with respect to multiple constraints: assigning a set of elements (or objects) into mutually exclusive classes (or groups), where the elements which are "similar" to each other are hopefully located in the same class. The literature reports solutions in which the similarity constraint consists of a single index that is inappropriate for the type of multiconstraint problems considered here and where the constraints could simultaneously be contradictory. This feature, where we permit possibly contradictory constraints, distinguishes this paper from the state of the art. Indeed, we are aware of no learning automata (or other heuristic) solutions which solve this problem in its most general setting. Such a scenario is illustrated with the static mapping problem, which consists of distributing the processes of a parallel application onto a set of computing nodes. This is a classical and yet very important problem within the areas of parallel computing, grid computing, and cloud computing. We have developed four learning-automata (LA)-based algorithms to solve this problem: First, a fixed-structure stochastic automata algorithm is presented, where the processes try to form pairs to go onto the same node. This algorithm solves the problem, although it requires some centralized coordination. As it is desirable to avoid centralized control, we subsequently present three different variable-structure stochastic automata (VSSA) algorithms, which have superior partitioning properties in certain settings, although they forfeit some of the scalability features of the fixed-structure algorithm. All three VSSA algorithms model the processes as automata having first the hosting nodes as possible actions; second, the processes as possible actions; and, third, attempting to estimate the process communication digraph prior to probabilistically mapping the processes. This paper, which, we believe, comprehensively reports the

  15. The Elements of Effective Teaching: Professional Learning Moves Vision, Framework, and Performance Standards into Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killion, Joellen; Hirsh, Stephanie

    2011-01-01

    Student success depends on effective teaching--not just occasionally, but every day in every classroom and school. Effective teaching impacts students' academic, physical, social-emotional, and behavioral well-being. Generating a vision, developing an instructional framework, and delineating student learning outcomes by themselves are insufficient…

  16. Teacher Justice and Parent Support as Predictors of Learning Motivation and Visions of a Just World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berti, Chiara; Mameli, Consuelo; Speltini, Giuseppina; Molinari, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    In this study we explore teacher justice and parent support in learning motivation and visions of a just world. The study sample was 509 Italian secondary school students, 163 males and 346 females. Regression analyses investigated the impact of teacher justice, parental involvement and factors of school choice (one's interests and parental…

  17. Taking Stock: Implications of a New Vision of Science Learning for State Science Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertheim, Jill

    2016-01-01

    This article presents the author's response to the article "Taking Stock: Existing Resources for Assessing a New Vision of Science Learning" by Alonzo and Ke (this issue), which identifies numerous challenges that the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) pose for large-scale assessment. Jill Werthem comments that among those…

  18. Beyond Problem-Based Learning: Using Dynamic PBL in Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overton, Tina L.; Randles, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and implementation of a novel pedagogy, dynamic problem-based learning. The pedagogy utilises real-world problems that evolve throughout the problem-based learning activity and provide students with choice and different data sets. This new dynamic problem-based learning approach was utilised to teach…

  19. Concept mapping as learning tool in problem-oriented learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fürstenau, B.; Kneppers, L.; Sánchez, J.; Cañas, A.J.; Novak, J.D.

    2010-01-01

    In two studies we investigated whether concept mapping or summary writing is more effective in supporting students’ learning from authentic problems in the field of business. We interpret concept mapping and summary writing as elaboration tools aiming at helping students to understand new

  20. Learning Radiology in an Integrated Problem-Based Learning (PBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Faculty of Medicine (FoM) has been training health professions in Uganda since 1924. Five years ago, it decided to change the undergraduate curriculum from traditional to Problem Based Learning (PBL) and adopted the SPICES model. Radiology was integrated into the different courses throughout the 5 ...

  1. Educational Change towards Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Huichun

    As a promising educational approach, PBL (Problem Based Learning) has been adopted by an increasing number of higher education institutions worldwide to replace the traditional lectured based educational approach. However, the organizational change towards PBL is not easy for higher education...... universities which are transforming their traditional educational approaches to PBL. Specifically, this book is concerned with how managers, staff members, and students interpret PBL and its implementation. It reveals that the challenges for implementing PBL are closely linked to organizational members...

  2. Perceptual learning is specific beyond vision and decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzeczkowski, Lukasz; Cretenoud, Aline; Herzog, Michael H; Mast, Fred W

    2017-06-01

    Perceptual learning is usually assumed to occur within sensory areas or when sensory evidence is mapped onto decisions. Subsequent procedural and motor processes, involved in most perceptual learning experiments, are thought to play no role in the learning process. Here, we show that this is not the case. Observers trained with a standard three-line bisection task and indicated the offset direction of the central line by pressing either a left or right push button. Before and after training, observers adjusted the central line of the same bisection stimulus using a computer mouse. As expected, performance improved through training. Surprisingly, learning did not transfer to the untrained mouse adjustment condition. The same was true for the opposite, i.e., training with mouse adjustments did not transfer to the push button condition. We found partial transfer when observers adjusted the central line with two different adjustment procedures. We suggest that perceptual learning is specific to procedural motor aspects beyond visual processing. Our results support theories were visual stimuli are coded together with their corresponding actions.

  3. Deep learning and the electronic structure problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Kyle; Spanner, Michael; Tamblyn, Isaac

    In the past decade, the fields of artificial intelligence and computer vision have progressed remarkably. Supported by the enthusiasm of large tech companies, as well as significant hardware advances and the utilization of graphical processing units to accelerate computations, deep neural networks (DNN) are gaining momentum as a robust choice for many diverse machine learning applications. We have demonstrated the ability of a DNN to solve a quantum mechanical eigenvalue equation directly, without the need to compute a wavefunction, and without knowledge of the underlying physics. We have trained a convolutional neural network to predict the total energy of an electron in a confining, 2-dimensional electrostatic potential. We numerically solved the one-electron Schrödinger equation for millions of electrostatic potentials, and used this as training data for our neural network. Four classes of potentials were assessed: the canonical cases of the harmonic oscillator and infinite well, and two types of randomly generated potentials for which no analytic solution is known. We compare the performance of the neural network and consider how these results could lead to future advances in electronic structure theory.

  4. Do problem-solving interventions improve psychosocial outcomes in vision impaired adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Edith E; Xie, Jing; Sturrock, Bonnie A; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Rees, Gwyneth

    2015-05-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of problem-solving interventions on psychosocial outcomes in vision impaired adults. A systematic search of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), published between 1990 and 2013, that investigated the impact of problem-solving interventions on depressive symptoms, emotional distress, quality of life (QoL) and functioning was conducted. Two reviewers independently selected and appraised study quality. Data permitting, intervention effects were statistically pooled and meta-analyses were performed, otherwise summarised descriptively. Eleven studies (reporting on eight trials) met inclusion criteria. Pooled analysis showed problem-solving interventions improved vision-related functioning (standardised mean change [SMC]: 0.15; 95% CI: 0.04-0.27) and emotional distress (SMC: -0.36; 95% CI: -0.54 to -0.19). There was no evidence to support improvements in depressive symptoms (SMC: -0.27, 95% CI: -0.66 to 0.12) and insufficient evidence to determine the effectiveness of problem-solving interventions on QoL. The small number of well-designed studies and narrow inclusion criteria limit the conclusions drawn from this review. However, problem-solving skills may be important for nurturing daily functioning and reducing emotional distress for adults with vision impairment. Given the empirical support for the importance of effective problem-solving skills in managing chronic illness, more well-designed RCTs are needed with diverse vision impaired samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Learning via problem solving in mathematics education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piet Human

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Three forms of mathematics education at school level are distinguished: direct expository teaching with an emphasis on procedures, with the expectation that learners will at some later stage make logical and functional sense of what they have learnt and practised (the prevalent form, mathematically rigorous teaching in terms of fundamental mathematical concepts, as in the so-called “modern mathematics” programmes of the sixties, teaching and learning in the context of engaging with meaningful problems and focused both on learning to become good problem solvers (teaching for problem solving andutilising problems as vehicles for the development of mathematical knowledge andproficiency by learners (problem-centred learning, in conjunction with substantialteacher-led social interaction and mathematical discourse in classrooms.Direct expository teaching of mathematical procedures dominated in school systems after World War II, and was augmented by the “modern mathematics” movement in the period 1960-1970. The latter was experienced as a major failure, and was soon abandoned. Persistent poor outcomes of direct expository procedural teaching of mathematics for the majority of learners, as are still being experienced in South Africa, triggered a world-wide movement promoting teaching mathematics for and via problem solving in the seventies and eighties of the previous century. This movement took the form of a variety of curriculum experiments in which problem solving was the dominant classroom activity, mainly in the USA, Netherlands, France and South Africa. While initially focusing on basic arithmetic (computation with whole numbers and elementary calculus, the problem-solving movement started to address other mathematical topics (for example, elementary statistics, algebra, differential equations around the turn of the century. The movement also spread rapidly to other countries, including Japan, Singapore and Australia. Parallel with the

  6. Popular universities: An alternative vision for lifelong learning in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromquist, Nelly P.; da Costa, Romina B.

    2017-10-01

    At its inception in 1993, the European Union (EU) did not consider education one of the pillars of its regional cohesiveness and identity. As time went by, recognition of the potential role of education at individual and social levels increased. This concern for education, however, is much more centred on the acquisition of knowledge and skills towards developing a competitive labour force than towards facilitating the integration of all citizens in the European community - a bias which is reflected in EU policies and recommendations. At local levels, communities need to offer educational opportunities to all members of society, irrespective of their social, cultural and linguistic background and their level of education. In many EU member countries, this kind of learning is offered by popular universities (PUs), which are not state-funded and run in close collaboration with their respective local communities. The authors of this paper carried out a qualitative survey, collecting data on PUs in Spain and France. Their purpose was to examine how European PU offerings align with community needs, and to what extent they address emerging issues such as immigration, the refugee crisis, an aging population and youth unemployment. In the evaluation of their comparative survey, the authors link the grassroots approaches of PUs in Spain and France to the broader European Union (EU) discourse on lifelong learning (LLL) as seen in policy documents such as the European Commission's Memorandum on Lifelong Learning. Finally, they examine the ways in which PUs' approach to LLL works to contest the dominant consensus on the meaning and scope of lifelong learning, offering an alternative way forward.

  7. Reinforcement Learning for the Unit Commitment Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, Gal; Mannor, Shie

    2015-01-01

    In this work we solve the day-ahead unit commitment (UC) problem, by formulating it as a Markov decision process (MDP) and finding a low-cost policy for generation scheduling. We present two reinforcement learning algorithms, and devise a third one. We compare our results to previous work that uses simulated annealing (SA), and show a 27% improvement in operation costs, with running time of 2.5 minutes (compared to 2.5 hours of existing state-of-the-art).

  8. Knowledge formations in Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Verner

    The paper presents some of the results from a recent completed Ph.D. program about disciplinarity and inter-disciplinarity in problem based learning (PBL). Disciplinary content in PBL-programs has been questioned during recent years, so stronger concepts of how knowledge is actually organized...... and structured in PBL are needed to qualify this discussion. This paper focuses on the research question: How has the structuring/organization of knowledge in curriculum changed over time and what kinds of connections and interrelations between disciplines/subjects can be identified in current PBL...

  9. Deep and surface learning in problem-based learning: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); S.M.M. Loyens (Sofie); H. Marcq (Hélène); D. Gijbels (David)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested

  10. Deep and surface learning in problem-based learning: a review of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.J.M. Dolmans (Diana); S.M.M. Loyens (Sofie); Marcq, H. (Hélène); D. Gijbels (David)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractIn problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested

  11. Dysfunctional problem-based learning curricula: resolving the problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim William K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Problem-based learning (PBL has become the most significant innovation in medical education of the past 40 years. In contrast to exam-centered, lecture-based conventional curricula, PBL is a comprehensive curricular strategy that fosters student-centred learning and the skills desired in physicians. The rapid spread of PBL has produced many variants. One of the most common is 'hybrid PBL' where conventional teaching methods are implemented alongside PBL. This paper contends that the mixing of these two opposing educational philosophies can undermine PBL and nullify its positive benefits. Schools using hybrid PBL and lacking medical education expertise may end up with a dysfunctional curriculum worse off than the traditional approach. Discussion For hybrid PBL schools with a dysfunctional curriculum, standard PBL is a cost-feasible option that confers the benefits of the PBL approach. This paper describes the signs of a dysfunctional PBL curriculum to aid hybrid PBL schools in recognising curricular breakdown. Next it discusses alternative curricular strategies and costs associated with PBL. It then details the four critical factors for successful conversion to standard PBL: dealing with staff resistance, understanding the role of lectures, adequate time for preparation and support from the administrative leadership. Summary Hybrid PBL curricula without oversight by staff with medical education expertise can degenerate into dysfunctional curricula inferior even to the traditional approach from which PBL emerged. Such schools should inspect their curriculum periodically for signs of dysfunction to enable timely corrective action. A decision to convert fully to standard PBL is cost feasible but will require time, expertise and commitment which is only sustainable with supportive leadership.

  12. Dysfunctional problem-based learning curricula: resolving the problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Problem-based learning (PBL) has become the most significant innovation in medical education of the past 40 years. In contrast to exam-centered, lecture-based conventional curricula, PBL is a comprehensive curricular strategy that fosters student-centred learning and the skills desired in physicians. The rapid spread of PBL has produced many variants. One of the most common is 'hybrid PBL' where conventional teaching methods are implemented alongside PBL. This paper contends that the mixing of these two opposing educational philosophies can undermine PBL and nullify its positive benefits. Schools using hybrid PBL and lacking medical education expertise may end up with a dysfunctional curriculum worse off than the traditional approach. Discussion For hybrid PBL schools with a dysfunctional curriculum, standard PBL is a cost-feasible option that confers the benefits of the PBL approach. This paper describes the signs of a dysfunctional PBL curriculum to aid hybrid PBL schools in recognising curricular breakdown. Next it discusses alternative curricular strategies and costs associated with PBL. It then details the four critical factors for successful conversion to standard PBL: dealing with staff resistance, understanding the role of lectures, adequate time for preparation and support from the administrative leadership. Summary Hybrid PBL curricula without oversight by staff with medical education expertise can degenerate into dysfunctional curricula inferior even to the traditional approach from which PBL emerged. Such schools should inspect their curriculum periodically for signs of dysfunction to enable timely corrective action. A decision to convert fully to standard PBL is cost feasible but will require time, expertise and commitment which is only sustainable with supportive leadership. PMID:23009729

  13. On the Nature of Problems in Action Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmonstone, John

    2014-01-01

    The article aims to explore the nature of problems in action learning. Beginning with Revans' distinction between problems and puzzles, it draws parallels with the notion of wicked and tame problems. It offers four means of considering problems in action learning--in terms of the locus of a set's work; from the viewpoint of an…

  14. Problem Based Learning in Nursing Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weihua Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. McMaster University first introduced Problem Based Learning (PBL in the mid 1960s. However, measuring the relationship between PBL for undergraduate nursing programs and students test performance has not yet been assessed in the USA. Purpose. The main purpose of this paper is to describe the effectiveness of PBL on senior student test performance on content related to PBL in a BSN program. Diabetes mellitus and renal insufficiency were taught by traditional lecture format in the previous years. This was the first year we taught this content by the problem based learning method. Method. Historical control group was used to compare the test performances between the PBL groups and the traditional group using Student’s t-test. Result. The mean of diabetes mellitus related questions missed by the PBL group was less than the traditional group (t = 4.51, and P=.00. The mean of renal insufficiency related questions missed by the PBL group was more than the traditional group (t=-6.44, and P=.00. Discussion. This study produced inconclusive findings. Factors that could be attributed to their performance will be discussed.

  15. Problem Based Learning (PBL): a conundrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Samantha H; Warelow, Philip J; Jackson, Karen L

    2009-10-01

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) using minimal guided instruction is used as an educational strategy across a broad variety of disciplines in the tertiary sector. This paper includes some of the strengths and weaknesses of PBL, both in general and in relation to the health care setting, encompassing some of its philosophical underpinnings and its methodological approach. In an effort to explore some of the benefits and problems with PBL in the work setting, this account will comprise a realistic rather than idealistic focus and will include a range of perspectives from both a facilitator and student standpoint. We suggest that PBL is a useful strategy across a comprehensive nursing degree programme (as the ideal) provided the learning programme is supported financially and that its ideal creed which supports a small group approach are adhered to. What we find is that reality is often different, with individual facilitators condensing their PBL programmes to incorporate a modified PBL approach with this personalized approach often taking strength away from the original conceptions of PBL. What we suggest here is that these circumstances constitute a conundrum.

  16. Inquiry Teaching in Science - Problem Based Learning (PBL) in Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Rosa; Teixeira, Daniel; Roxo, Áurea; Ruas, Fátima

    2015-04-01

    Problem Based Learning (PBL) is a teaching methodology based on the Inquiry Teaching approach, which consists in finding a solution to a problem that requires the use of higher-level cognitive skills. It's best carried out in small groups. The scenario or problem must lead the student to ask questions and to find solutions through research. This methodology is a research-oriented approach, because it starts with questions (asked by the students after being introduced to the problem), it encourages the search for solutions, it develops scientific reasoning, and it helps students to learn about key aspects of scientific research, such as gathering data, finding evidence, looking for solutions, discussing and presenting findings. In PBL the teacher has the role of facilitator. In the study of the Solar System, the study of the Moon's craters started with the observation of photos, which led the students to ask questions like "What determines the size and shape of the craters?". To answer this question the students hypothesized about the size, speed and distance travelled of the object that hit the Moon. The students then planned and carried out an experimental activity to validate their hypotheses, using balls of different sizes and materials. The diameter and depth of the craters were estimated using Salsa J. With the data obtained in this experiment, the students did a Gowin's V diagram. In order to determine the relation between the characteristics of the celestial bodies and the craters formed, both on the Moon and on the Earth, we studied the Earth's craters. We used Impact Calculator, a program that estimates the effects of an impact on the Earth, using several variables, such as the size and density of the meteorite, and the speed and angle at which it impacts the Earth's surface. Another problem started with the film Visions of the Cosmos. It raised questions such as "Is there a relation between the Earth's past and the origin of the Solar System?" "How are

  17. Does this computational theory solve the right problem? Marr, Gibson, and the goal of vision

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, William H.

    2012-01-01

    David Marr’s (1982) book Vision attempted to formulate a thoroughgoing formal theory of perception. Marr borrowed much of the “computational” level from James Gibson: a proper understanding of the goal of vision, the natural constraints, and the available information is prerequisite to describing the processes and mechanisms by which the goal is achieved. Yet as a research program leading to a computational model of human vision, Marr’s program did not succeed. This article asks why, using th...

  18. Group learning capacity: The roles of open-mindedness and shared vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mimi eLord

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Open-mindedness is a construct that is considered a key foundational aspect of learning in individuals, groups and organizations. Also known as critical inquiry or reflection, open-mindedness is believed to increase learning through examination of prior beliefs, decisions and mistakes, and also through openness to new ideas. Renowned theorists including Dewey and Argyris have emphasized the relationship between open-mindedness and learning, yet little quantitative research has tested it or examined moderators of the linkage. The setting for the current study is that of endowment investment committees at U.S. universities and colleges who need to make knowledgeable and well-reasoned decisions about the composition of investment portfolios. Findings indicate that open-mindedness has a positive, significant effect on group learning capacity and also that shared vision, which represents the group’s collective purpose and direction, moderates that relationship. The literature review and discussion offer insights about how open-mindedness is related to the research on group conflict, and how shared vision differs from concepts such as interpersonal cohesiveness and conformity that have been associated with groupthink. A review of relevant research from the fields of organizational learning, group dynamics, and absorptive capacity provides context for the development of the hypotheses and the discussion of findings.

  19. Group learning capacity: the roles of open-mindedness and shared vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Mimi

    2015-01-01

    Open-mindedness (OPM) is a construct that is considered a key foundational aspect of learning in individuals, groups and organizations. Also known as critical inquiry or reflection, OPM is believed to increase learning through examination of prior beliefs, decisions and mistakes, and also through openness to new ideas. Renowned theorists including Dewey and Argyris have emphasized the relationship between OPM and learning, yet little quantitative research has tested it or examined moderators of the linkage. The setting for the current study is that of endowment investment committees at U.S. universities and colleges who need to make knowledgeable and well-reasoned decisions about the composition of investment portfolios. Findings indicate that OPM has a positive, significant effect on group learning capacity (LCAP) and also that shared vision, which represents the group's collective purpose and direction, moderates that relationship. The literature review and discussion offer insights about how OPM is related to the research on group conflict, and how shared vision (SHV) differs from concepts such as interpersonal cohesiveness and conformity that have been associated with groupthink. A review of relevant research from the fields of organizational learning, group dynamics, and absorptive capacity provides context for the development of the hypotheses and the discussion of findings.

  20. Problem based learning - A brief review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Sandra; Oliveira, Teresa A.; Oliveira, Amílcar

    2017-07-01

    Teaching is a complex mission that requires not only the theoretical knowledge transmission, but furthermore requires to provide the students the necessary skills for solving real problems in their respective professional activities where complex issues and problems must be frequently faced. Over more than twenty years we have been experiencing an increase in scholar failure in the scientific area of mathematics, which means that Teaching Mathematics and related areas can be even a more complex and hard task. Scholar failure is a complex phenomenon that depends on various factors as social factors, scholar factors or biophysical factors. After numerous attempts made in order to reduce scholar failure our goal in this paper is to understand the role of "Problem Based Learning" and how this methodology can contribute to the solution of both: increasing mathematical courses success and increasing skills in the near future professionals in Portugal. Before designing a proposal for applying this technique in our institutions, we decided to conduct a survey to provide us with the necessary information about and the respective advantages and disadvantages of this methodology, so this is the brief review aim.

  1. No Problem? No Research, Little Learning ... Big Problem!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Ornelas Marques

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The motivation to carry out this study stemmed from the generalized perception that nowadays youth lacks the skills for the 21st century. Especially the high-level competences like critical thinking, problem solving and autonomy. Several tools can help to improve these competences (e.g. the SCRATCH programming language, but, as researchers and educators, we are mostly concerned with the skill to recognize problems. What if we do not find problems to solve? What if we do not even feel the need to find or solve problems? The problem is to recognize the problem; the next step is to equate the problem; finally we have to feel the need to solve it. No need? No invention. Recognizing a problem is probably the biggest problem of everyday life, because we are permanently faced with problems (many ill-defined problems, which we need to identify, equate and solve.

  2. From Saying to Doing Interdisciplinary Learning: Is Problem-Based Learning the Answer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stentoft, Diana

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning is often characterised as an approach encompassing interdisciplinary learning; however, little attention has been explicitly paid to what a claim of interdisciplinary problem-based learning means in practice. Even less attention has been given to address the consequences of interdisciplinary problem-based learning for…

  3. Effects of cooperative and problem-solving learning strategies on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cooperative and problem-solving learning strategies on students' achievement in senior secondary school history in Oyo State, Nigeria. ... fun and learning is facilitated and internalised; students learn better when a problem is used as a starting point for new knowledge and adjustment of instructional strategies will ...

  4. Mapping Students Use of Technologies in Problem Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Khalid, Md. Saifuddin; Ryberg, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to understand how students use technology to enhance their learning in problem-based learning environments. The research methodology is based on both qualitative and quantitative studies. The results are based on students’ interviews, a survey and students’ reflections in course......-related blog posts; they show that students have positive perceptions toward using technologies in problem-based learning environments....

  5. Faculty development for problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Elizabeth A

    2004-05-01

    Changing to a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum represents a substantial challenge because many faculty members are unfamiliar with the process. Faculty development is a crucial component of successful curriculum change to PBL. This paper describes a logical process for designing and implementing a comprehensive faculty development programme at three main stages of change: curriculum transition, curriculum implementation and curriculum advancement. The components of each stage are discussed with reference to the literature and practice. Future advances in faculty development include harnessing the potential of complex adaptive systems theory in understanding and facilitating the change process, and incorporating the results of research, which illuminates the relationships of the PBL tutorial process to student achievement. There is a continuing need for rigorous outcome-based research and programme evaluation to define the best components and strategies for faculty development.

  6. Robotic surgery and cancer: the present state, problems and future vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, Makoto; Tsugawa, Kouji

    2004-05-01

    In the 1990s, laparoscopic surgery entirely changed the traditional style of surgical operations. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has spread rapidly and is now established as the standard treatment. However, besides cholecystectomy, endoscopic procedures are still not applied so widely to a variety of surgical operations. This is because laparoscopic techniques, such as suturing or ligation, make it difficult for surgeons to perform other kinds of operations and thus greatly increase their mental and physical stress. It is necessary to introduce various advanced technologies such as: surgical robots, three dimensional (3D) images, computer graphics (CG), computer simulation technology and others. Surgical robots, including the AESOP, da Vinci and ZEUS systems, provide surgeons with technologically advanced vision and hand skills. As a result, such systems are expected to revolutionize the field of surgery. However, there have so far been few studies which discuss the indications of robotic surgery for tumors/cancer. Therefore, herein we review various studies published in English to focus on the application of robotic surgery to tumors/cancer. We point out that there are several problems to be solved for robot surgery: i) price of surgical robots, ii) training systems for surgeon, iii) coverage by medical insurance, iv) downsizing and v) navigation system. In conclusion, we believe that, in the near future as robotic technology continues to develop, almost all kinds of endoscopic surgery will be performed by this technology. It will replace traditional surgery not only in the treatment of benign diseases but also in malignant illnesses.

  7. Perceptual learning in a non-human primate model of artificial vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, Nathaniel J; Vurro, Milena; Keith, Sarah B; Kyada, Margee J; Pezaris, John S

    2016-11-22

    Visual perceptual grouping, the process of forming global percepts from discrete elements, is experience-dependent. Here we show that the learning time course in an animal model of artificial vision is predicted primarily from the density of visual elements. Three naïve adult non-human primates were tasked with recognizing the letters of the Roman alphabet presented at variable size and visualized through patterns of discrete visual elements, specifically, simulated phosphenes mimicking a thalamic visual prosthesis. The animals viewed a spatially static letter using a gaze-contingent pattern and then chose, by gaze fixation, between a matching letter and a non-matching distractor. Months of learning were required for the animals to recognize letters using simulated phosphene vision. Learning rates increased in proportion to the mean density of the phosphenes in each pattern. Furthermore, skill acquisition transferred from trained to untrained patterns, not depending on the precise retinal layout of the simulated phosphenes. Taken together, the findings suggest that learning of perceptual grouping in a gaze-contingent visual prosthesis can be described simply by the density of visual activation.

  8. Extreme Learning Machine and Moving Least Square Regression Based Solar Panel Vision Inspection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heng Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, learning based machine intelligence has aroused a lot of attention across science and engineering. Particularly in the field of automatic industry inspection, the machine learning based vision inspection plays a more and more important role in defect identification and feature extraction. Through learning from image samples, many features of industry objects, such as shapes, positions, and orientations angles, can be obtained and then can be well utilized to determine whether there is defect or not. However, the robustness and the quickness are not easily achieved in such inspection way. In this work, for solar panel vision inspection, we present an extreme learning machine (ELM and moving least square regression based approach to identify solder joint defect and detect the panel position. Firstly, histogram peaks distribution (HPD and fractional calculus are applied for image preprocessing. Then an ELM-based defective solder joints identification is discussed in detail. Finally, moving least square regression (MLSR algorithm is introduced for solar panel position determination. Experimental results and comparisons show that the proposed ELM and MLSR based inspection method is efficient not only in detection accuracy but also in processing speed.

  9. Blended Problem-Based Learning for Teacher Education: Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnelly, Roisin

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores case study research of the group process for teachers as learners in an Online Learning Module delivered in a blended problem-based learning (PBL) environment. Blended learning, as the name suggests, consists of a blend of at least two pedagogical approaches: within the context of this research, blended learning is the…

  10. Problem-based learning of research skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Thomas H; Wagner, Galen S; Gleim, Gilbert; Andolsek, Kathryn M; Arheden, Hakan; Austin, Robert; Courtney-Eighmy, Anne; Gradison, Margaret; Leist, James C; Maynard, Charles; Noga, Edwin M; Ostbye, Truls; Eisenstein, Eric L

    2006-01-01

    To determine whether a short-term, problem-based educational intervention leads to increased research activity among health care practitioners. Participant's success was evaluated as a composite of 2 outcomes. These were (1) reporting results for the project designed during the practicum and (2) conducting subsequent research activities. The study population included 36 clinical research outcomes projects developed by clinical practitioners, postgraduate trainees, and medical students during 6 separate practicums. All project teams received the same educational intervention, an "outcomes research practicum" that was divided into 4 primary learning modules administered over a 1 to 4 month period. Each module included a preparatory videotape lecture, supplemental readings, and a 90-minute interactive laboratory session during which faculty members worked with participants to develop answers to a series of predefined questions relating to the design of clinical outcomes research projects. Follow-up continued for a minimum of 12 months and a maximum of 36 months. Eighty-three percent of project teams completed all 4 practicum modules, and 69% completed one of the study outcomes (50% completed their research project and 47% completing a subsequent research activity). Practitioners were more likely to complete subsequent research activities, whereas trainees were more likely to complete their study project. This short-term, problem-based educational intervention was successful in increasing the collective research activities of participants. Further, more rigorous structured research is needed to determine the ultimate impact on practice change and patient outcomes.

  11. Facilitating Problem Framing in Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svihla, Vanessa; Reeve, Richard

    2016-01-01

    While problem solving is a relatively well understood process, problem framing is less well understood, particularly with regard to supporting students to learn as they frame problems. Project-based learning classrooms are an ideal setting to investigate how teachers facilitate this process. Using participant observation, this study investigated…

  12. Effectiveness of problem-based learning among student nurses: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In nursing, problem- based learning has been used very sparingly especially in developing countries such as South Africa. The purpose of this review is to analyze available literature from 2005 to 2012 on the effectiveness of problem based learning among the nursing students. Twenty articles that discussed problem ...

  13. Improving reading speed for people with central vision loss through perceptual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Susana T L

    2011-02-01

    Perceptual learning has been shown to be effective in improving visual functions in the normal adult visual system, as well as in adults with amblyopia. In this study, the feasibility of applying perceptual learning to enhance reading speed in people with long-standing central vision loss was evaluated. Six observers (mean age, 73.8) with long-standing central vision loss practiced an oral sentence-reading task, with words presented sequentially using rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP). A pre-test consisted of measurements of visual acuities, RSVP reading speeds for six print sizes, the location of the preferred retinal locus for fixation (fPRL), and fixation stability. Training consisted of six weekly sessions of RSVP reading, with 300 sentences presented per session. A post-test, identical with the pre-test, followed the training. All observers showed improved RSVP reading speed after training. The improvement averaged 53% (range, 34-70%). Comparisons of pre- and post-test measurements revealed little changes in visual acuity, critical print size, location of the fPRL, and fixation stability. The specificity of the learning effect, and the lack of changes to the fPRL location and fixation stability suggest that the improvements are not due to observers adopting a retinal location with better visual capability, or an improvement in fixation. Rather, the improvements are likely to represent genuine plasticity of the visual system despite the older ages of the observers, coupled with long-standing sensory deficits. Perceptual learning might be an effective way of enhancing visual performance for people with central vision loss.

  14. Computer Vision and Machine Learning for Autonomous Characterization of AM Powder Feedstocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCost, Brian L.; Jain, Harshvardhan; Rollett, Anthony D.; Holm, Elizabeth A.

    2017-03-01

    By applying computer vision and machine learning methods, we develop a system to characterize powder feedstock materials for metal additive manufacturing (AM). Feature detection and description algorithms are applied to create a microstructural scale image representation that can be used to cluster, compare, and analyze powder micrographs. When applied to eight commercial feedstock powders, the system classifies powder images into the correct material systems with greater than 95% accuracy. The system also identifies both representative and atypical powder images. These results suggest the possibility of measuring variations in powders as a function of processing history, relating microstructural features of powders to properties relevant to their performance in AM processes, and defining objective material standards based on visual images. A significant advantage of the computer vision approach is that it is autonomous, objective, and repeatable.

  15. Creating Problem-Based Leadership Learning across the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Sara E.; Couto, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    This chapter explores problem-based learning (PBL) as effective pedagogy to enhance leadership learning. Through institutional examples, research, and personal experiences, the authors provide a rationale for faculty and staff to utilize PBL across the curriculum.

  16. BLENDED LEARNING IMPLEMENTATION PROBLEMS IN UKRAINIAN HIGHER SCHOOLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana F. Musiiovska

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The problems of blended learning, its advantages over distance and electronic learning, possible risks of its application in Ukrainian higher schools have been investigated in the article.

  17. Color vision and learning in the monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus (Nymphalidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackiston, Douglas; Briscoe, Adriana D; Weiss, Martha R

    2011-02-01

    The monarch butterfly, Danaus plexippus, is well known for its intimate association with milkweed plants and its incredible multi-generational trans-continental migrations. However, little is known about monarch butterflies' color perception or learning ability, despite the importance of visual information to butterfly behavior in the contexts of nectar foraging, host-plant location and mate recognition. We used both theoretical and experimental approaches to address basic questions about monarch color vision and learning ability. Color space modeling based on the three known spectral classes of photoreceptors present in the eye suggests that monarchs should not be able to discriminate between long wavelength colors without making use of a dark orange lateral filtering pigment distributed heterogeneously in the eye. In the context of nectar foraging, monarchs show strong innate preferences, rapidly learn to associate colors with sugar rewards and learn non-innately preferred colors as quickly and proficiently as they do innately preferred colors. Butterflies also demonstrate asymmetric confusion between specific pairs of colors, which is likely a function of stimulus brightness. Monarchs readily learn to associate a second color with reward, and in general, learning parameters do not vary with temporal sequence of training. In addition, monarchs have true color vision; that is, they can discriminate colors on the basis of wavelength, independent of intensity. Finally, behavioral trials confirm that monarchs do make use of lateral filtering pigments to enhance long-wavelength discrimination. Our results demonstrate that monarchs are proficient and flexible color learners; these capabilities should allow them to respond rapidly to changing nectar availabilities as they travel over migratory routes, across both space and time.

  18. Automated vision-based analysis of levodopa-induced dyskinesia with deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Michael H; Mestre, Tiago A; Fox, Susan H; Taati, Babak

    2017-07-01

    Levodopa is the gold standard therapy for Parkinson's disease (PD), but its prolonged usage leads to additional motor complications, namely levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID). To assess LID and adjust drug regimens for optimal relief, patients attend regular clinic visits. However, the intermittent nature of these visits can fail to capture important changes in a person's condition. With the recent emergence of deep learning achieving impressive results in a wide array of fields including computer vision, there is an opportunity for video analysis to be used for automated assessment of LID. Deep learning for pose estimation was studied as a viable means of extracting body movements from PD assessment videos. Movement features were computed from joint trajectories. Results show that features derived from vision-based analysis have moderate to good correlation with clinician ratings of dyskinesia severity. This study presents the first application of deep learning to video analysis in PD, and demonstrates promise for future development of a non-contact system for objective PD assessment.

  19. Using Technology to Support Project and Problem-based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Roisin

    2005-01-01

    This chapter is aimed at supporting lecturers in universities and colleges who have begun or are considering introducing project or problem-based learning (PBL) for students’ learning. In order to keep up with rapid change and make the most of learning technologies as aids to both learning strategies, a range of practical insights based on research will be provided in sections, supplemented with a variety of examples of learning technology being infused into both strategies. The range provide...

  20. Facilitating Problem Framing in Project-Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Svihla, Vanessa; Reeve, Richard

    2016-01-01

    While problem solving is a relatively well understood process, problem framing is less well understood, particularly with regard to supporting students to learn as they frame problems. Project-based learning classrooms are an ideal setting to investigate how teachers facilitate this process. Using participant observation, this study investigated how teachers supported students in taking ownership over the framing of problems in a charter school that serves students who have been underserved b...

  1. Perceptual learning improves adult amblyopic vision through rule-based cognitive compensation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun-Yun; Cong, Lin-Juan; Klein, Stanley A; Levi, Dennis M; Yu, Cong

    2014-04-01

    We investigated whether perceptual learning in adults with amblyopia could be enabled to transfer completely to an orthogonal orientation, which would suggest that amblyopic perceptual learning results mainly from high-level cognitive compensation, rather than plasticity in the amblyopic early visual brain. Nineteen adults (mean age = 22.5 years) with anisometropic and/or strabismic amblyopia were trained following a training-plus-exposure (TPE) protocol. The amblyopic eyes practiced contrast, orientation, or Vernier discrimination at one orientation for six to eight sessions. Then the amblyopic or nonamblyopic eyes were exposed to an orthogonal orientation via practicing an irrelevant task. Training was first performed at a lower spatial frequency (SF), then at a higher SF near the cutoff frequency of the amblyopic eye. Perceptual learning was initially orientation specific. However, after exposure to the orthogonal orientation, learning transferred to an orthogonal orientation completely. Reversing the exposure and training order failed to produce transfer. Initial lower SF training led to broad improvement of contrast sensitivity, and later higher SF training led to more specific improvement at high SFs. Training improved visual acuity by 1.5 to 1.6 lines (P orientations to enable learning transfer. Therefore, perceptual learning may improve amblyopic vision mainly through rule-based cognitive compensation.

  2. Problem solving and problem strategies in the teaching and learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perennial poor performance recorded annually in both internal and external examinations in Mathematics has been a great concern for the Mathematics Educators in Nigeria. This paper discusses problem-solving and influence of problem-solving strategies on students' performance in mathematics. The concept of ...

  3. Use of Problem-Based Learning in the Teaching and Learning of Horticultural Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Lord; Dowsett, Eric; Sullivan, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: Problem-based learning (PBL), a relatively novel teaching and learning process in horticulture, was investigated. Proper application of PBL can potentially create a learning context that enhances student learning. Design/Methodology/Approach: Students worked on two complex ill-structured problems: (1) to produce fresh baby greens for a…

  4. Personalized learning Ecologies in Problem and Project Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn; Ryberg, Thomas; Zander, Pär-Ola

    2012-01-01

    education, institutions leverage learning by providing courses, learning spaces and also different ICT systems as tools to support students’ learning (Virtual learning environments). However, courses, physical learning environments, and Virtual Learning Environments are just temporary learning scaffoldings.......0 tools in their academic life. As such students’ engagements with technology are composed of formal administrative systems, virtual learning environments, various other learning technologies and also a range of ‘life’-technologies, such as Facebook, Youtube and many other services which form important...... is in contrast to an artificial learning setting often found in traditional education. As many other higher education institutions, Aalborg University aims at providing learning environments that support the underlying pedagogical approach employed, and which can lead to different online and offline learning...

  5. Virtual Communities for Problem-based Learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr. Pierre Gorissen; Petra Wentzel

    2002-01-01

    The Learning Technology Research Institute (LTRI) and the Association for Learning Technology (ALT) are two organisations within the UK that focus on ICT in the field of learning and teaching. Chapter of report on the Exchange Study Trip 2002, organised by SURF from the 21st till the 26th of April

  6. Using enquiry in learning: from vision to reality in higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horne, Maria; Woodhead, Kath; Morgan, Liz; Smithies, Lynda; Megson, Denise; Lyte, Geraldine

    2007-02-01

    This paper reports on the contribution of six nurse educators to embed enquiry-led learning in a pre-registration nursing programme. Their focus was to evaluate student and facilitator perspectives of a hybrid model of problem-based learning, a form of enquiry-based learning and to focus on facilitators' perceptions of its longer-term utility with large student groups. Problem-based learning is an established learning strategy in healthcare internationally; however, insufficient evidence of its effectiveness with large groups of pre-registration students exists. Fourth Generation Evaluation was used, applying the Nominal Group Technique and Focus Group interviews, for data collection. In total, four groups representing different branches of pre-registration students (n = 121) and 15 facilitators participated. Students identified seven strengths and six areas for development related to problem-based learning. Equally, analysis of facilitators' discussions revealed several themes related to strengths and challenges. The consensus was that using enquiry aided the development of independent learning and encouraged deeper exploration of nursing and allied subject material. However, problems and frustrations were identified in relation to large numbers of groups, group dynamics, room and library resources and personal development. The implications of these findings for longer-term utility with large student groups are discussed.

  7. Learning from Examples versus Verbal Directions in Mathematical Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Fincham, Jon M.; Anderson, John R.

    2015-01-01

    This event-related fMRI study investigated the differences between learning from examples and learning from verbal directions in mathematical problem solving and how these instruction types affect the activity of relevant brain regions during instruction and solution periods within problem-solving trials. We identified distinct neural signatures…

  8. PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING IN CLINICAL CLERKSHIP - THE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ASME Medical Education Booklet No. 23 Essentials of problem- based learning. Med EdIU 1989; 23: 539-558. 6. Schwartz RW, Donnelly MB, Nash PP, Young B. The development of clinical cognitive skills in a problem-based learning surgery clerkship. Acad Med 1992; 67: 694-696. 7. Schwartz RW, Burgett lE, Blue AY, ...

  9. Student Motivation in Response to Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuzawa, Sherry; Boyd, Cleo; Cahn, Joel

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a self-directed learning strategy where students work collaboratively in small groups to investigate open-ended relatable case scenarios. Students develop transferable skills that can be applied across disciplines, such as collaboration, problem-solving, and critical thinking. Despite extensive research on…

  10. Dyscalculia and Other Learning Problems in Arithmetic: A Historical Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Mahesh C.

    1986-01-01

    Evidence on learning problems due to dyscalculia is surveyed. Definitions, factors responsible for dyscalculia, split-brain research and hemispheric roles, mathematics learning problems and personality, materials for instruction, and levels of knowing mathematics are among the topics discussed with an extensive list of references. (MNS)

  11. Managing the Gap between Curriculum Based and Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Buus, Lillian

    2009-01-01

    /or but rather both/and. In this paper we describe an approach to design and delivery of online courses in computer science which on the one hand is based on a specified curriculum and on the other hand gives room for different learning strategies, problem based learning being one of them. We discuss...... the challenges in applying problem based learning strategies in a context where several universities, with different cultures of teaching, collaboratively develop and deliver online courses. We present a pedagogical framework embracing both problem based and curriculum based strategies and show how we used...... this as a basis for trying out various online learning strategies....

  12. Educational Data Mining and Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walldén, Sari; Mäkinen, Erkki

    2014-01-01

    This paper considers the use of log data provided by learning management systems when studying whether students obey the problem-based learning (PBL) method. Log analysis turns out to be a valuable tool in measuring the use of the learning material of interest. It gives reliable figures concerning not only the number of use sessions but also the…

  13. Use of auditory learning to manage listening problems in children

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, David R.; Halliday, Lorna F.; Amitay, Sygal

    2008-01-01

    This paper reviews recent studies that have used adaptive auditory training to address communication problems experienced by some children in their everyday life. It considers the auditory contribution to developmental listening and language problems and the underlying principles of auditory learning that may drive further refinement of auditory learning applications. Following strong claims that language and listening skills in children could be improved by auditory learning, researchers hav...

  14. An Educational Approach to Problem-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan-Chieh Chen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an analysis of the educational framework of problem-based learning (PBL. As known and used, PBL finds its root in the Structuralism and Pragmatism schools of philosophy. In this paper, the three main requirements of PBL, namely learning by doing, learning in context, and focusing on the student, are discussed within the context of these two schools of thought. Given these attributes, PBL also seems ideally suited for use in learning bioethics.

  15. Problem-Based Learning in Social Work Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Merete; Mølholt, Anne-Kirstine

    2017-01-01

    ’ experiences of PBL. In this article we address this gap by exploring experiences of learning and learning preferences among master’s-level students in a Danish social work education setting where extensive problem-based project work is used. We find a discrepancy between students’ preferred learning and when...... they experience learning the most. Possible reasons for this discrepancy, and implications for teaching, are discussed....

  16. [Improvement of vision through perceptual learning in the case of refractive errors and presbyopia : A critical valuation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinrich, S P

    2017-02-01

    The idea of compensating or even rectifying refractive errors and presbyopia with the help of vision training is not new. For most approaches, however, scientific evidence is insufficient. A currently promoted method is "perceptual learning", which is assumed to improve stimulus processing in the brain. The basic phenomena of perceptual learning have been demonstrated by a multitude of studies. Some of these specifically address the case of refractive errors and presbyopia. However, many open questions remain, in particular with respect to the transfer of practice effects to every-day vision. At present, the method should therefore be judged with caution.

  17. Multisensory perceptual learning of temporal order: audiovisual learning transfers to vision but not audition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Alais

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: An outstanding question in sensory neuroscience is whether the perceived timing of events is mediated by a central supra-modal timing mechanism, or multiple modality-specific systems. We use a perceptual learning paradigm to address this question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three groups were trained daily for 10 sessions on an auditory, a visual or a combined audiovisual temporal order judgment (TOJ. Groups were pre-tested on a range TOJ tasks within and between their group modality prior to learning so that transfer of any learning from the trained task could be measured by post-testing other tasks. Robust TOJ learning (reduced temporal order discrimination thresholds occurred for all groups, although auditory learning (dichotic 500/2000 Hz tones was slightly weaker than visual learning (lateralised grating patches. Crossmodal TOJs also displayed robust learning. Post-testing revealed that improvements in temporal resolution acquired during visual learning transferred within modality to other retinotopic locations and orientations, but not to auditory or crossmodal tasks. Auditory learning did not transfer to visual or crossmodal tasks, and neither did it transfer within audition to another frequency pair. In an interesting asymmetry, crossmodal learning transferred to all visual tasks but not to auditory tasks. Finally, in all conditions, learning to make TOJs for stimulus onsets did not transfer at all to discriminating temporal offsets. These data present a complex picture of timing processes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The lack of transfer between unimodal groups indicates no central supramodal timing process for this task; however, the audiovisual-to-visual transfer cannot be explained without some form of sensory interaction. We propose that auditory learning occurred in frequency-tuned processes in the periphery, precluding interactions with more central visual and audiovisual timing processes. Functionally the patterns

  18. Deep learning-based artificial vision for grasp classification in myoelectric hands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaei, Ghazal; Alameer, Ali; Degenaar, Patrick; Morgan, Graham; Nazarpour, Kianoush

    2017-06-01

    Computer vision-based assistive technology solutions can revolutionise the quality of care for people with sensorimotor disorders. The goal of this work was to enable trans-radial amputees to use a simple, yet efficient, computer vision system to grasp and move common household objects with a two-channel myoelectric prosthetic hand. We developed a deep learning-based artificial vision system to augment the grasp functionality of a commercial prosthesis. Our main conceptual novelty is that we classify objects with regards to the grasp pattern without explicitly identifying them or measuring their dimensions. A convolutional neural network (CNN) structure was trained with images of over 500 graspable objects. For each object, 72 images, at [Formula: see text] intervals, were available. Objects were categorised into four grasp classes, namely: pinch, tripod, palmar wrist neutral and palmar wrist pronated. The CNN setting was first tuned and tested offline and then in realtime with objects or object views that were not included in the training set. The classification accuracy in the offline tests reached [Formula: see text] for the seen and [Formula: see text] for the novel objects; reflecting the generalisability of grasp classification. We then implemented the proposed framework in realtime on a standard laptop computer and achieved an overall score of [Formula: see text] in classifying a set of novel as well as seen but randomly-rotated objects. Finally, the system was tested with two trans-radial amputee volunteers controlling an i-limb UltraTM prosthetic hand and a motion controlTM prosthetic wrist; augmented with a webcam. After training, subjects successfully picked up and moved the target objects with an overall success of up to [Formula: see text]. In addition, we show that with training, subjects' performance improved in terms of time required to accomplish a block of 24 trials despite a decreasing level of visual feedback. The proposed design constitutes a

  19. Deep learning-based artificial vision for grasp classification in myoelectric hands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazaei, Ghazal; Alameer, Ali; Degenaar, Patrick; Morgan, Graham; Nazarpour, Kianoush

    2017-06-01

    Objective. Computer vision-based assistive technology solutions can revolutionise the quality of care for people with sensorimotor disorders. The goal of this work was to enable trans-radial amputees to use a simple, yet efficient, computer vision system to grasp and move common household objects with a two-channel myoelectric prosthetic hand. Approach. We developed a deep learning-based artificial vision system to augment the grasp functionality of a commercial prosthesis. Our main conceptual novelty is that we classify objects with regards to the grasp pattern without explicitly identifying them or measuring their dimensions. A convolutional neural network (CNN) structure was trained with images of over 500 graspable objects. For each object, 72 images, at {{5}\\circ} intervals, were available. Objects were categorised into four grasp classes, namely: pinch, tripod, palmar wrist neutral and palmar wrist pronated. The CNN setting was first tuned and tested offline and then in realtime with objects or object views that were not included in the training set. Main results. The classification accuracy in the offline tests reached 85 % for the seen and 75 % for the novel objects; reflecting the generalisability of grasp classification. We then implemented the proposed framework in realtime on a standard laptop computer and achieved an overall score of 84 % in classifying a set of novel as well as seen but randomly-rotated objects. Finally, the system was tested with two trans-radial amputee volunteers controlling an i-limb UltraTM prosthetic hand and a motion controlTM prosthetic wrist; augmented with a webcam. After training, subjects successfully picked up and moved the target objects with an overall success of up to 88 % . In addition, we show that with training, subjects’ performance improved in terms of time required to accomplish a block of 24 trials despite a decreasing level of visual feedback. Significance. The proposed design constitutes a substantial

  20. Random Group Problem-Based Learning in Engineering Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischfresser, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    Dynamics problem solving is highly specific to the problem at hand and to develop the general mind framework to become an effective problem solver requires ingenuity and creativity on top of a solid grounding on theoretical and conceptual knowledge. A blended approach with prototype demo, problem-based learning, and an opinion questionnaire was used during first semester of 2013. Students working in randomly selected teams had to interact with classmates while solving a randomly selected problem. The approach helps improve awareness of what is important to learn in this class while reducing grading load. It also provides a more rewarding contact time for both pupils and instructor.

  1. Learned Helplessness and Attribution Theory: Redefining Children's Learning Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Lynn

    1981-01-01

    The article explores attribution theory and the concept of learned helplessness in teaching learning disabled individuals. Suggestions are given for areas of future research with learning disabled populations. The discussion includes current teaching techniques which may be related to the self regulatory behaviors and perception of personal…

  2. Learning Problems among Male and Female First Year ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There has been the observation that fresh students in their first year in the university encounter some learning problems. Specific problems investigated in this work include those of concentration ability, memory ability, study time management ability, attention problems, ability to join other students in study group work and ...

  3. Deep and Surface Learning in Problem-Based Learning: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.; Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Marcq, Hélène; Gijbels, David

    2016-01-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested and try to understand what is being studied. This review…

  4. New Realities and the Implications for Problem Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Olav Jull

    2004-01-01

    -based learning model with the new realities of today. Three new realities are discussed, the new global realities, the new business realities, and the new realities at the individual level. The new realities challenge the problem-based learning model. Adjustments are needed in terms of closer co......The background for this article is the big changes we have experienced since the idea of the problem based learning model was conceived at Aalborg University in the beginning of the 1970s. Assuming that no teaching model is context free, the challenge is to confront the basics of the problem...

  5. Developing Science Learning Material with Authentic Inquiry Learning Approach to Improve Problem Solving and Scientific Attitude

    OpenAIRE

    A. Widowati; S. Nurohman; P. Anjarsari

    2017-01-01

    This research was conducted to (1) produce science material learning based Authentic Inquiry Learning which is appropriate to improve problem solving and students scientific attitude; (2) know the potency of developing scientific attitude in science learning material based authentic inquiry learning; and (3) know the potency of developing scientific attitude in science learning material based authentic inquiry learning. The research method was Research and Development (R & D), by pointing...

  6. Problems Implementing Problem-Based Learning by a Private Malaysian University

    OpenAIRE

    Chan Chang Tik

    2014-01-01

    In this case study the focus is on lecturers’ readiness in the design of PBL problems and to facilitate students’ learning. This paper also looks into students’ readiness in terms of acquiring metacognitive skills and collaborating in group to solve PBL problems. Problems encountered by both lecturers and students are discussed in the context of the chosen private Malaysian university.

  7. Problems Implementing Problem-Based Learning by a Private Malaysian University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Chang Tik

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case study the focus is on lecturers’ readiness in the design of PBL problems and to facilitate students’ learning. This paper also looks into students’ readiness in terms of acquiring metacognitive skills and collaborating in group to solve PBL problems. Problems encountered by both lecturers and students are discussed in the context of the chosen private Malaysian university.

  8. Problem Posing with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach in Geometry Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahendra, R.; Slamet, I.; Budiyono

    2017-09-01

    One of the difficulties of students in the learning of geometry is on the subject of plane that requires students to understand the abstract matter. The aim of this research is to determine the effect of Problem Posing learning model with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach in geometry learning. This quasi experimental research was conducted in one of the junior high schools in Karanganyar, Indonesia. The sample was taken using stratified cluster random sampling technique. The results of this research indicate that the model of Problem Posing learning with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach can improve students’ conceptual understanding significantly in geometry learning especially on plane topics. It is because students on the application of Problem Posing with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach are become to be active in constructing their knowledge, proposing, and problem solving in realistic, so it easier for students to understand concepts and solve the problems. Therefore, the model of Problem Posing learning with Realistic Mathematics Education Approach is appropriately applied in mathematics learning especially on geometry material. Furthermore, the impact can improve student achievement.

  9. What students learn in problem-based learning: a process analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.H.J. Yew (Elaine); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThis study aimed to provide an account of how learning takes place in problem-based learning (PBL), and to identify the relationships between the learning-oriented activities of students with their learning outcomes. First, the verbal interactions and computer resources studied by nine

  10. Perancangan Sistem E-Learning Berbasis Web pada World Vision Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Putranto

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available World Vision Indonesia has several training programs with a very large total cost for 936 employees located in various parts of Indonesia, so that the manual training is considered less effective. Therefore, this research is conducted to design a learning management system application that supports the training process within the organization, and determine the needs for training materials. This research implemented strategy analysis based on matrix EFE, IFE, SWOT, IE, and QSPM, as well as analysis and design of materials using Addie model. Meanwhile the design used a structured design method or OOAD. This research resulted in an application that supports the learning management system training process within the organization, provides accessible training materials by all employees at any time, and provides various features that creates training activities more effectively. The implementation of learning management system supports the company's strategy primarily to improve the quality of employees as well as reduces communication barriers between trainers and trainees both within and outside of training time.

  11. Problem-Based Learning in Engineering Ethics Courses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kirkman, Robert

    2017-01-01

    I describe the first stages of a process of design research in which I employ problem-based learning in a course in engineering ethics, which fulfills a requirement for students in engineering degree programs...

  12. Problem-based learning in photonics technology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Nicholas M.; Dischino, Michele; Donnelly, Judith; Hanes, Fenna

    2008-08-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an instructional approach in which students learn by actively and collaboratively solving authentic problems encountered in real-world situations. Research demonstrates that PBL improves students' learning and retention, motivation, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and their ability to skillfully apply knowledge in new and novel situations - skills deemed critical for lifelong learning. In this paper, we present the Photon PBL project, a three-year National Science Foundation Advanced Technological Education (NSF-ATE) project aimed at developing, in partnership with photonics industry and university partners, a comprehensive series of multimedia PBL instructional materials and training for photonics technology educators from across the US and abroad. Results from first-year pilot testing of multimedia PBL instructional materials, problem development and implementation strategies are detailed.

  13. EFFECT OF PROBLEM BASED LEARNING AND MODEL CRITICAL THINKING ABILITY TO PROBLEM SOLVING SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unita S. Zuliani Nasution

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The purposes of this research were to analyze the different between physic resolving problem ability by using problem based learning model and direct instruction model, the different of physic resolving problem ability between the students that have critical thinking ability upper the average and the students that have critical thinking ability under the average, and the interaction of problem based learning model toward critical thinking ability and students’ physic resolving problem ability. This research was quasy experimental research that use critical thinking ability tests and physic resolving problem ability tests as the instruments. Result of the research showed that the students’ physic resolving problem ability by using problem based learning model was better than by using direct instruction model, students’ physic resolving problem ability and critical thinking ability upper the average showed better different and result than students’ critical thinking ability under the average, besides there was an interaction between problem based learning model and critical thinking ability in improving students’ physic resolving problem ability.

  14. Problem Based Learning and Education for Sustainable Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2012-01-01

    are problem based learning (PBL), project based learning (PjBL), case study, role play, group discussion, field work, etc. These learning approaches are capable of integrating education for sustainable development (ESD) in engineering education at different levels, and do not aim to substitute the core......An engineering education that integrates education for sustainable development (ESD) perspectives claims for a learning approach centred on students, interdisciplinary and problem oriented, and this cannot be achieve through an “add on” strategy. Example of such active learning approaches...... scientific and technological knowledge but instead align it with the social, economic and environmental dimensions of the professional practice. It is agreed among ESD experts that PBL is a suitable learning approach to integrate ESD in the engineering curricula. This paper provides an overview...

  15. On stochastic approximation algorithms for classes of PAC learning problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.V.; Uppuluri, V.R.R.; Oblow, E.M.

    1994-03-01

    The classical stochastic approximation methods are shown to yield algorithms to solve several formulations of the PAC learning problem defined on the domain [o,1]{sup d}. Under some assumptions on different ability of the probability measure functions, simple algorithms to solve some PAC learning problems are proposed based on networks of non-polynomial units (e.g. artificial neural networks). Conditions on the sizes of these samples required to ensure the error bounds are derived using martingale inequalities.

  16. An e-learning approach to informed problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Weichhart

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available When taking into account individualized learning processes not only content and interaction facilities need to be re-considered, but also the design of learning processes per se. Besides explicitness of learning objectives, interactive means of education need to enable intertwining content and communication elements as basic elements of active learning in a flexible way while preserving a certain structure of the learning process. Intelligibility Catchers are a theoretically grounded framework to enable such individualized processes. It allows learners and teachers agreeing and determining a desired learning outcome in written form. This type of e-learning contract enables students to individually explore content and participate in social interactions, while being guided by a transparent learning process structure. The developed implementation empowers learners in terms of creative problem-solving capabilities, and requires adaptation of classroom situations. The framework and its supporting semantic e-learning environment not only enables diverse learning and problem solving processes, but also supports the collaborative construction of e-learning contracts.

  17. Project- Based Learning and Problem-Based Learning: Are They Effective to Improve Student's Thinking Skills?

    OpenAIRE

    Anazifa, R. D; Djukri, D

    2017-01-01

    The study aims at finding (1) the effect of project-based learning and problem-based learning on student's creativity and critical thinking and (2) the difference effect of project-based learning and problem-based learning on student's creativity and critical thinking. This study is quasi experiment using non-equivalent control-group design. Research population of this study was all classes in eleventh grade of mathematics and natural science program of SMA N 1 Temanggung. The participants we...

  18. Learning through Debate during Problem-Based Learning: An Active Learning Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Sadaf; Latif, Rabia

    2017-01-01

    We explored medical student's views and perceptions of a series of debates conducted during problem-based learning (PBL) practiced as a part of the Spiral curriculum at the Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A series of debates were employed during PBL sessions for second-year female medical students, over the period 2014-2016.…

  19. Nursing students' perceptions of effective problem-based learning tutors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew-Maich, Nancy; Martin, Lynn; Hammond, Cynthia; Palma, Amy; Pavkovic, Maria; Sheremet, Darlene; Roche, Carmen

    2016-11-16

    Aim To explore baccalaureate nursing students' perceptions of what makes an effective tutor in problem-based learning courses, and the influence of effective teaching on students' learning and experience. Method Students enrolled in all four years of a baccalaureate nursing programme completed online surveys (n=511) and participated in focus groups (n=19). Data were analysed and combined using content analysis. Findings The data were summarised using five themes, the '5 Ps' of effective teaching in problem-based learning. Nursing students perceived effective problem-based learning tutors to be prepared with knowledge and facilitation skills, person-centred, passionate, professional and able to prepare students for success in the nursing programme. Effective tutors adjusted their approaches to students throughout the four years of the nursing programme. Conclusion Effective teaching in problem-based learning is essential and has significant effects on nursing students' learning, motivation and experience. Important attributes, skills and strategies of effective problem-based learning tutors were identified and may be used to enhance teaching and plan professional development initiatives.

  20. A reinforcement learning formulation to the complex question answering problem

    OpenAIRE

    Chali, Yllias; Hasan, Sadid A.; Mojahid, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    We use extractive multi-document summarization techniques to perform complex question answering and formulate it as a reinforcement learning problem. Given a set of complex questions, a list of relevant documents per question, and the corresponding human generated summaries (i.e. answers to the questions) as training data, the reinforcement learning module iteratively learns a number of feature weights in order to facilitate the automatic generation of summaries i.e. answers to previously u...

  1. A reinforcement learning formulation to the complex question answering problem

    OpenAIRE

    Chali, Yllias; Hasan, Sadid A.; Mojahid, Mustapha

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We use extractive multi-document summarization techniques to perform complex question answering and formulate it as a reinforcement learning problem. Given a set of complex questions, a list of relevant documents per question, and the corresponding human generated summaries (i.e. answers to the questions) as training data, the reinforcement learning module iteratively learns a number of feature weights in order to facilitate the automatic generation of summaries i.e. a...

  2. Problems with eating and nutrition: geriatric self-learning module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Virginia K

    2004-12-01

    The Geriatric Resource Nurse Model is used at the University of Virginia to improve the competency of staff in caring for older adults. Eight self-learning educational modules were developed to address common concerns in hospitalizedelders. The Problems With Eating and Nutrition: Geriatric Self-Learning Module is published here, along with a post test. This is the second in a four-part publication of self-learning modules.

  3. Are marketing students in control in problem-based learning?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geitz, Gerry; Joosten-ten Brinke, Desirée; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    This study investigated to what extent self-efficacy, learning behavior, and performance outcomes relate to each other and how they can be positively influenced by students asking for and seeking feedback within a problem-based learning (PBL) environment in order to meet today’s requirements of

  4. ICT in Problem- and Project-based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Lars Birch; Lerche Nielsen, Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses how teaching and learning practices at universities can implement new information technologies, inspired by the traditions of problem- and project-based learning. The changing roles in the teacher-student relationship, and students’ development of information literacy...

  5. ICT in Problem- and Project-based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jørgen Lerche; Birch Andreasen, Lars

    2012-01-01

    The paper discusses how teaching and learning practices at universities can implement new information technologies, inspired by the traditions of problem- and project-based learning. The changing roles in the teacher-student relationship, and students’ development of information literacy are disc...

  6. Designing Teaching Materials for Learning Problem Solving in Technology Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doornekamp, B.G.

    In the process of designing teaching materials for learning problem solving in technology education, domain-specific design specifications are considered important elements to raise learning outcomes with these materials. Two domain-specific design specifications were drawn up using a four-step

  7. Cognitive Engagement in the Problem-Based Learning Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotgans, Jerome I.; Schmidt, Henk G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to examine to what extent autonomy in problem-based learning (PBL) results in cognitive engagement with the topic at hand. To that end, a short self-report instrument was devised and validated. Moreover, it was examined how cognitive engagement develops as a function of the learning process and the extent to…

  8. Usefulness of problem-based learning in clinical nursing education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Problem based learning (PBL) in clinical nursing is described as an effective learning strategy that can encourage students to become self-directed learners and to master clinical skills that can be transferable to service users. This study explores the usefulness of PBL in a nursing clinical setting from the nursing students' ...

  9. Problems in the Deployment of Learning Networks In Small Organizations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shankle, Dean E.; Shankle, Jeremy P.

    2006-01-01

    Please, cite this publication as: Shankle, D.E., & Shankle, J.P. (2006). Problems in the Deployment of Learning Networks In Small Organizations. Proceedings of International Workshop in Learning Networks for Lifelong Competence Development, TENCompetence Conference. March 30th-31st, Sofia, Bulgaria:

  10. The Bologna Process and Lifelong Education: Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Encuentra, Eulalia; Sanchez-Carbonell, Javier

    2005-01-01

    This article describes the application of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) methodology in the context of a student congress, arguing that such new approaches to learning are best-suited to the goals of the Bologna Process. The Congress in question enabled Spanish graduate students in Psychology, many of them mid-career professionals, to increase their…

  11. A Multilevel Analysis of Problem-Based Learning Design Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Kimberly S.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing use of experience-centered approaches like problem-based learning (PBL) by learning and development practitioners and management educators has raised interest in how to design, implement and evaluate PBL in that field. Of particular interest is how to evaluate the relative impact of design characteristics that exist at the…

  12. Developing staff for the implementation of problem-based learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Educational transformation in higher education places new demands on academics, especially in terms of shifting from traditional methods of teaching and learning to the application of innovative methods. Whereas outcomes-based education leans towards a philosophy, problem-based learning (PBL) offers a structured ...

  13. A Schoolwide Investment in Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Paul S.; Knuth, Randy

    2017-01-01

    A comprehensive high school in Bellevue, Washington, embraces problem-based learning as its strategy for improvement. Supported by a federal i3 grant, the school spent five years preparing for a widespread launch of PBL at the school. After several years of implementation, researchers learned that students perform the same or better on…

  14. Foundations of problem-based learning: Some explanatory notes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe present article elaborates on cognitive effects of problem-based learning put forward by Schmidt, De Volder, De Grave, Moust & Patel (1989) and Norman & Schmidt (1992). Its purpose is to discuss, in some detail, the theoretical premises of this approach to learning and instruction.

  15. Problem-Based Learning and Civic Engagement in Undergraduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Louise C.; Losardo, Angela; McCullough, Kim C.

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning and civic engagement are complementary constructivist andragogical approaches that emphasize active learning by guiding students to develop their own understanding and knowledge of a topic through experience and reflection. By providing examples of clinical cases and community-based experiences, these approaches can enhance…

  16. The Guinea Pigs of a Problem-Based Learning Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sarasvathie; McKenna, Sioux

    2016-01-01

    Participants in a study on learning the clinical aspects of medicine in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum repeatedly referred to themselves as "Guinea pigs" at the mercy of a curriculum experiment. This article interrogates and problematises the "Guinea pig" identity ascribed to and assumed by the first cohort of…

  17. Introducing problem-based learning (PBL) into a foundation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    patterns, typified by processing the subject matter critically and self-regulating learning processes. The sustainability of the ..... the easiest way possible, checking progress regularly and thinking about ways to improve it” (Student ..... Problem-based learning for nursing: integrating lessons from other disciplines with nursing ...

  18. People with dyslexia and heart, chest, skin, digestive, musculoskeletal, vision, learning, speech and mental disorders were more dissatisfied with neighbourhoods: Scottish Household Survey, 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiue, Ivy

    2016-12-01

    Rarely do we know the perception toward neighbourhoods in people specifically with health conditions. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to understand the perception toward neighbourhoods among adults with a series of the existing health conditions in a country-wide and population-based setting. Data were retrieved from and analysed in Scottish Household Survey, 2007-2008. Information on demographics, self-reported health conditions and perception toward neighbourhoods and the surrounding facilities was obtained by household interview. Analysis including chi-square test, t test and logistic regression modelling were performed. Of 19,150 Scottish adults (aged 16-80) included in the study cohort, 1079 (7.7 %) people were dissatisfied with their living areas; particularly for those who experienced harassment (15.4 %), did not recycle or with dyslexia, chest, digestive, mental and musculoskeletal problems. Twenty to forty per cent reported common neighbourhood problems including noise, rubbish, disputes, graffiti, harassment and drug misuse. People with heart or digestive problems were more dissatisfied with the existing parks and open space. People with arthritis, chest or hearing problems were more dissatisfied with the waste management condition. People with dyslexia were more dissatisfied with the existing public transportation. People with heart problems were more dissatisfied with the current street cleaning condition. People with hearing, vision, speech, learning problems or dyslexia were also more dissatisfied with sports and recreational facilities. People with heart, chest, skin, digestive, musculoskeletal, vision, learning, speech and mental disorders and dyslexia were more dissatisfied with their current neighbourhood environments. Upgrading neighbourhood planning to tackle social environment injustice and put pleasant life experience as priorty would be suggested. Graphical abstract interrelations of individual health and neighbourhood

  19. Developing Science Learning Material with Authentic Inquiry Learning Approach to Improve Problem Solving and Scientific Attitude

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Widowati

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to (1 produce science material learning based Authentic Inquiry Learning which is appropriate to improve problem solving and students scientific attitude; (2 know the potency of developing scientific attitude in science learning material based authentic inquiry learning; and (3 know the potency of developing scientific attitude in science learning material based authentic inquiry learning. The research method was Research and Development (R & D, by pointing to Four D models and Borg & Gall Model. There were 4 main phases (define, design, develop, disseminate and additional phases (preliminary field testing, main product revision, main field testing, and operational product revision. The instruments used included product validation questionnaire, problem solving test, observation sheet of problem solving, and scientific attitude questionnaire. Result data of validation, problem solving test, scientific attitude questionnaire were analyzed descriptively. The result showed that : (1 science learning material based authentic inquiry learning that was developed was considered as very good by expert lecturers and teachers, and it was appropriate to use in learning process; (2 science learning material based authentic inquiry learning could improve students’ problem solving; (3 science learning material based authentic inquiry learning could improve students’ scientific attitude.

  20. Problem-based learning on quantitative analytical chemistry course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitri, Noor

    2017-12-01

    This research applies problem-based learning method on chemical quantitative analytical chemistry, so called as "Analytical Chemistry II" course, especially related to essential oil analysis. The learning outcomes of this course include aspects of understanding of lectures, the skills of applying course materials, and the ability to identify, formulate and solve chemical analysis problems. The role of study groups is quite important in improving students' learning ability and in completing independent tasks and group tasks. Thus, students are not only aware of the basic concepts of Analytical Chemistry II, but also able to understand and apply analytical concepts that have been studied to solve given analytical chemistry problems, and have the attitude and ability to work together to solve the problems. Based on the learning outcome, it can be concluded that the problem-based learning method in Analytical Chemistry II course has been proven to improve students' knowledge, skill, ability and attitude. Students are not only skilled at solving problems in analytical chemistry especially in essential oil analysis in accordance with local genius of Chemistry Department, Universitas Islam Indonesia, but also have skilled work with computer program and able to understand material and problem in English.

  1. Computer vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennery, D.; Cunningham, R.; Saund, E.; High, J.; Ruoff, C.

    1981-01-01

    The field of computer vision is surveyed and assessed, key research issues are identified, and possibilities for a future vision system are discussed. The problems of descriptions of two and three dimensional worlds are discussed. The representation of such features as texture, edges, curves, and corners are detailed. Recognition methods are described in which cross correlation coefficients are maximized or numerical values for a set of features are measured. Object tracking is discussed in terms of the robust matching algorithms that must be devised. Stereo vision, camera control and calibration, and the hardware and systems architecture are discussed.

  2. Use of auditory learning to manage listening problems in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, David R; Halliday, Lorna F; Amitay, Sygal

    2009-02-12

    This paper reviews recent studies that have used adaptive auditory training to address communication problems experienced by some children in their everyday life. It considers the auditory contribution to developmental listening and language problems and the underlying principles of auditory learning that may drive further refinement of auditory learning applications. Following strong claims that language and listening skills in children could be improved by auditory learning, researchers have debated what aspect of training contributed to the improvement and even whether the claimed improvements reflect primarily a retest effect on the skill measures. Key to understanding this research have been more circumscribed studies of the transfer of learning and the use of multiple control groups to examine auditory and non-auditory contributions to the learning. Significant auditory learning can occur during relatively brief periods of training. As children mature, their ability to train improves, but the relation between the duration of training, amount of learning and benefit remains unclear. Individual differences in initial performance and amount of subsequent learning advocate tailoring training to individual learners. The mechanisms of learning remain obscure, especially in children, but it appears that the development of cognitive skills is of at least equal importance to the refinement of sensory processing. Promotion of retention and transfer of learning are major goals for further research.

  3. Project organized Problem-based learning in Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2002-01-01

    Project organized problem based learning is a successful concept for on-campus engineering education at Aalborg University. Recently this "Aalborg concept" has been used in networked distance education as well. This paper describes the experiences from two years of Internet-mediated project work...... in a new Master of Information Technology education. The main conclusions are, that the project work is a strong learning motivator, enhancing peer collaboration, for off-campus students as well. However, the concept cannot be directly transferred to off-campus learning. In this paper, the main problems...... experienced with group organized project work in distance education are described, and some possible solutions are listed....

  4. Project-Organized Problem-Based Learning in Distance Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Lars Peter; Helbo, Jan; Knudsen, Morten

    2003-01-01

    Project organized problem based learning is a successful concept for on-campus engineering education at Aalborg University. Recently this "Aalborg concept" has been used in networked distance education as well. This paper describes the experiences from two years of Internet-mediated project work...... in a new Master of Information Technology education. The main conclusions are, that the project work is a strong learning motivator, enhancing peer collaboration, for off-campus students as well. However, the concept cannot be directly transferred to off-campus learning. In this paper, the main problems...... experienced with group organized project work in distance education are described, and some possible solutions are listed....

  5. Dealing with Insecurity in Problem Oriented Learning Approaches--The Importance of Problem Formulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Annie Aarup; Lund, Birthe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction of a pedagogical concept, Kubus, in a problem oriented learning context--analysed within the framework of an activity system--indicates what might happen when offering tools tempting to influence and regulate students' learning approach and hereby neglecting the importance of existing habits and values. Introduction of this new…

  6. A Framework for Problem-Based Learning: Teaching Mathematics with a Relational Problem-Based Pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schettino, Carmel

    2016-01-01

    One recommendation for encouraging young women and other underrepresented students in their mathematical studies is to find instructional methods, such as problem-based learning (PBL), that allow them to feel included in the learning process. Using a more relationally centered pedagogy along with more inclusive instructional methods may be a way…

  7. Should Children Learn to Solve Problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watras, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this comparative essay, the author discusses the opposing educational theories of John Dewey and Gregory Bateson. While Dewey believed that the scientific method was the dominant method of solving problems and thereby acquiring knowledge that mattered, Bateson warned that this one-sided approach would lead to actions that could destroy the…

  8. Learning Ethics through Everyday Problems: Informed Consent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdu, Fernando; Frances, Francesc; Castello, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The teaching of bioethics and its importance in clinical relationships is to a certain extent complicated when we address students of medicine, young people who are more used to dealing with and solving strictly clinical problems. Informed Consent is one of the aspects of professional practice that is generally and widely accepted in Western…

  9. Posing Problems to Understand Children's Learning of Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Lu Pien

    2013-01-01

    In this study, ways in which problem posing activities aid our understanding of children's learning of addition of unlike fractions and product of proper fractions was examined. In particular, how a simple problem posing activity helps teachers take a second, deeper look at children's understanding of fraction concepts will be discussed. The…

  10. An Integrated, Problem-Based Learning Material: The "Satellite" Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selcuk, Gamze Sezgin; Emiroglu, Handan Byacioglu; Tarakci, Mehmet; Ozel, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to introduce a problem-based learning material, the Satellite Module, that has integrated some of the subjects included in the disciplines of physics and mathematics at an introductory level in undergraduate education. The reason why this modular and problem-based material has been developed is to enable students to…

  11. Speak Out: Dancing into Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Mila

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Problem Based Learning (PBL) has been applied in medical and psychological areas of professional education. The PBL approach requires students to move past traditional choreographic methods toward making dances informed by real-world issues. In PBL, students work cooperatively to solve complex problems. Rather than being presented…

  12. Implementation of Problem Based Learning among Nursing Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Abdul Rahim; Kwan, Chan Li; Khan, Aqeel; Ghafar, Mohamed Najib Abdul; Sihes, Ahmad Johari

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking and effective problem solving skills have been regarded as an important element and as an educational outcome in professional nursing. The purpose of this study is to examine the implementation of Problem Based Learning (PBL) among nursing students. More specifically, it compares pretest and post test scores of the implementation…

  13. [Problem based learning from the perspective of tutors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro Hernández, Nancy; Illesca P, Mónica; Cabezas G, Mirtha

    2009-02-01

    Problem based learning is a student centered learning technique that develops deductive, constructive and reasoning capacities among the students. Teachers must adapt to this paradigm of constructing rather than transmitting knowledge. To interpret the importance of tutors in problem based learning during a module of Health research and management given to medical, nursing, physical therapy, midwifery, technology and nutrition students. Eight teachers that participated in a module using problem based learning accepted to participate in an in depth interview. The qualitative analysis of the textual information recorded, was performed using the ATLAS software. We identified 662 meaning units, grouped in 29 descriptive categories, with eight emerging meta categories. The sequential and cross-generated qualitative analysis generated four domains: competence among students, competence of teachers, student-centered learning and evaluation process. Multiprofessional problem based learning contributes to the development of generic competences among future health professionals, such as multidisciplinary work, critical capacity and social skills. Teachers must shelter the students in the context of their problems and social situation.

  14. Machine Learning and Computer Vision System for Phenotype Data Acquisition and Analysis in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro J. Navarro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Phenomics is a technology-driven approach with promising future to obtain unbiased data of biological systems. Image acquisition is relatively simple. However data handling and analysis are not as developed compared to the sampling capacities. We present a system based on machine learning (ML algorithms and computer vision intended to solve the automatic phenotype data analysis in plant material. We developed a growth-chamber able to accommodate species of various sizes. Night image acquisition requires near infrared lightning. For the ML process, we tested three different algorithms: k-nearest neighbour (kNN, Naive Bayes Classifier (NBC, and Support Vector Machine. Each ML algorithm was executed with different kernel functions and they were trained with raw data and two types of data normalisation. Different metrics were computed to determine the optimal configuration of the machine learning algorithms. We obtained a performance of 99.31% in kNN for RGB images and a 99.34% in SVM for NIR. Our results show that ML techniques can speed up phenomic data analysis. Furthermore, both RGB and NIR images can be segmented successfully but may require different ML algorithms for segmentation.

  15. Machine Learning and Computer Vision System for Phenotype Data Acquisition and Analysis in Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Pedro J; Pérez, Fernando; Weiss, Julia; Egea-Cortines, Marcos

    2016-05-05

    Phenomics is a technology-driven approach with promising future to obtain unbiased data of biological systems. Image acquisition is relatively simple. However data handling and analysis are not as developed compared to the sampling capacities. We present a system based on machine learning (ML) algorithms and computer vision intended to solve the automatic phenotype data analysis in plant material. We developed a growth-chamber able to accommodate species of various sizes. Night image acquisition requires near infrared lightning. For the ML process, we tested three different algorithms: k-nearest neighbour (kNN), Naive Bayes Classifier (NBC), and Support Vector Machine. Each ML algorithm was executed with different kernel functions and they were trained with raw data and two types of data normalisation. Different metrics were computed to determine the optimal configuration of the machine learning algorithms. We obtained a performance of 99.31% in kNN for RGB images and a 99.34% in SVM for NIR. Our results show that ML techniques can speed up phenomic data analysis. Furthermore, both RGB and NIR images can be segmented successfully but may require different ML algorithms for segmentation.

  16. Optimizing dictionary learning parameters for solving Audio Inpainting problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Mach

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recovering missing or distorted audio signal sam-ples has been recently improved by solving an Audio Inpaintingproblem. This paper aims to connect this problem with K-SVD dictionary learning to improve reconstruction error formissing signal insertion problem. Our aim is to adapt an initialdictionary to the reliable signal to be more accurate in missingsamples estimation. This approach is based on sparse signalsreconstruction and optimization problem. In the paper two staplealgorithms, connection between them and emerging problemsare described. We tried to find optimal parameters for efficientdictionary learning.

  17. Learning disabilities and social problem solving skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pina Filippello

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 14 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 Recent studies showed that children with learning disabilities present significant difficulties in learning as well as in social skills (Siperstein, 2009.Therefore, it was observed how it is difficult for these children to establish adequate relationships, especially to advise coping strategies to face interpersonal conflicts (Oliva & LaGreca, 1988. Accordingly to this argument and with reference to Agaliotis e Kalyva (2004, 2009, this study examines the preferences for strategies to solve an hypothetical conflict on a sample of children with LD in comparison to typical developing peers. They used the method of social story to conduct this research. In fact, researchers asked to the children, after they have listened a short story describing an interpersonal conflict interaction between adult and peers,  which strategies they would have chosen if they were in the same situation and the strategies that would be most appropriate to resolve a conflict. Results obtained from the experiment corroborated literature data and demonstrated that children with LD, in comparison to typical developing peers, use and prefer dysfunctional coping strategies, aggressive or passive, also in relation to the partner interaction (adult or peers to face interpersonal conflict.

  18. Speak Out: Dancing into Problem-Based Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Parrish, Mila Dr.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, Problem Based Learning (PBL) has been applied in medical and psychological areas of professional education. The PBL approach requires students to move past traditional choreographic methods toward making dances informed by real-world issues. In PBL, students work cooperatively to solve complex problems. Rather than being presented technical dance steps, they develop critical thinking abilities, acquire problem-solving skills, and communication dexterity. PBL can be effectivel...

  19. Problem-based learning in Guyana: a nursing education experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, J; Carr, A

    2012-09-01

    This paper invites the reader into sharing a journey of change through a new curriculum grounded in a problem-based learning (PBL) approach to education in the first year of a diploma nursing programme in Guyana. In Guyana, students are trained using traditional teaching methods: lectures and a single, often outdated, text. The authors had been dissatisfied previously with their students' knowledge retention, critical thinking skills and application abilities. The authors became advocates for change through the introduction of a PBL approach in nursing education within their school. PBL is quite different from 'problem solving', and the goal of learning is not to solve the problem, which has been presented. Rather, the problem is used to help students identify their own learning needs as they attempt to understand the problem, to pull together, synthesize and apply information to the problem, and to begin to work effectively to learn from group members as well as tutors. Students met in small groups to identify the problem; explore their pre-existing knowledge; generate hypotheses and possible mechanisms; and identify learning issues. Students in their first exposure to self-directed, small group learning can immediately thrive as active learners with minimal guidance and support. The programme was evaluated with the admission and scoring of homework/exams based on the school syllabus for the individual courses; and continual small group oral as well as a final written qualitative evaluation. Specific positive and negative learning factors are addressed. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  20. Role-playing in the problem-based learning class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2012-01-01

    Learning and teaching have been conceptualized and executed in many styles, such as self-learning, peer learning, and interaction between the learner and mentor. Today, openness to alternative ideas and embracing innovative approaches in nursing education are encouraged in order to meet students' learning interests and needs, and to address ever-changing healthcare requests. Problem-based learning has been widely adopted in nursing education, with various positive effects on students' learning, such as motivated learning, team work, problem-solving skills and critical thinking. Role-plays have been demonstrated as an effective learning strategy that includes an active and experiential feature that facilitates students' autonomy in their health-related learning. However, there is a lack of discussion of whether and how role-play can be used in problem-based learning (PBL). This paper shows the development of a classroom-based innovation using role-play in the PBL class for higher diploma year-one nurse students (a total of 20 students, five per group). This paper consists of five sections: a) the literature on PBL and nurse education, and role-plays as the innovation; b) the PBL case scenario with the illustration of the two role-play scripts, c) student evaluation on role-play in the PBL class; d) discussions on both achievements and limitations of this innovation, and e) the conclusion. It is hoped that this paper will be an example to other nurse educators who are keen on exploring interactive and student-driven learning and teaching strategies in the PBL class. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Designing Teaching Materials for Learning Problem Solving in Technology Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doornekamp, B. G.

    2001-01-01

    In the process of designing teaching materials for learning problem solving in technology education, domain-specific design specifications are considered important elements to raise learning outcomes with these materials. Two domain-specific design specifications were drawn up using a four-step procedure and were applied to improve existing teaching-learning packages. The study focused on a construction problem (open-ended) and an explanation problem (constrained). Construction material (fischertechnik) was used to solve the problems. In two experiments, these newly designed teaching materials were compared with the existing teaching materials. In all, 600 pupils participated in these experiments. In the experiment with the construction problem, no learning gains were made at all: the small gain in quality of the product made by the pupils cost too much time. In the experiment with the explanation problem, the quality of the pupils' product was significantly better in less time. It is argued that strongly structured teaching materials for constrained problems are more suitable for learners with little experience with construction material.

  2. What Is the Problem in Problem-Based Learning in Higher Education Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Bettina

    2018-01-01

    Problem and Project-Based Learning (PBL) emphasise collaborate work on problems relevant to society and emphases the relation between theory and practice. PBL fits engineering students as preparation for their future professions but what about mathematics? Mathematics is not just applied mathematics, but it is also a body of abstract knowledge…

  3. Developing a Blended Learning-Based Method for Problem-Solving in Capability Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwiyogo, Wasis D.

    2018-01-01

    The main objectives of the study were to develop and investigate the implementation of blended learning based method for problem-solving. Three experts were involved in the study and all three had stated that the model was ready to be applied in the classroom. The implementation of the blended learning-based design for problem-solving was…

  4. Learning processes and learning problems in German postgraduate medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bussche, Hendrik; Krause-Solberg, Lea; Scherer, Martin; Ziegler, Stine

    2017-01-01

    Objective: In order to evaluate the quality of postgraduate medical education in Germany, we examined how the learning of theoretical and practical competencies is conceptualized and how the learning process takes place in real terms. The training conditions, as perceived by medical residents, are compared with the learning objectives, as stated by the Federal Chamber of Physicians in its regulation on postgraduate education. The analysis is based on the data of the "KarMed" study (abbreviation of "career progression and career breaks among physicians during postgraduate education"), a multicentre cohort study of medical school graduates from seven universities who arre followed until they receive their licenses as specialist physicians. The study was conducted by the Institute of Primary Medical Care of the University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf starting in 2008. Methodology: The KarMed study is based on annual, standardized surveys of the population described above. 48% responded in the initial survey (n=1012) and 85% or more in each of the following surveys. Descriptive statistics and logistical regressions were used for analysis. Gender-specific analyses were performed where possible in order to highlight the differences in the professional objectives and workloads between female and male physicians. Results: The study shows that both the practical and the theoretical components of postgraduate medical education in Germany are insufficient. There is a lack of a curriculum with precise learning objectives and descriptions of the corresponding educational settings. In fact, the act of learning is identical to daily clinical work. There is no structuring of the work process with regard to learning; for example, documentation procedures and feedback discussions are prescribed but largely omitted. Evidence-based medicine is not a systematic part of the training, nor is the evaluation of residents' progress. The summative final oral examination pretends that the

  5. Problem-Based Learning to Foster Deep Learning in Preservice Geography Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golightly, Aubrey; Raath, Schalk

    2015-01-01

    In South Africa, geography education students' approach to deep learning has received little attention. Therefore the purpose of this one-shot experimental case study was to evaluate the extent to which first-year geography education students used deep or surface learning in an embedded problem-based learning (PBL) format. The researchers measured…

  6. Learning Problems in Children of Refugee Background: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Hamish R; Minhas, Ripudaman S; Paxton, Georgia

    2016-06-01

    Learning problems are common, affecting up to 1 in 10 children. Refugee children may have cumulative risk for educational disadvantage, but there is limited information on learning in this population. To review the evidence on educational outcomes and learning problems in refugee children and to describe their major risk and resource factors. Medline, Embase, PubMed, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature, PsycINFO, and Education Resources Information Center. English-language articles addressing the prevalence and determinants of learning problems in refugee children. Data were extracted and analyzed according to Arksey and O'Malley's descriptive analytical method for scoping studies. Thirty-four studies were included. Refugee youth had similar secondary school outcomes to their native-born peers; there were no data on preschool or primary school outcomes. There were limited prevalence data on learning problems, with single studies informing most estimates and no studies examining specific language disorders or autism spectrum disorders. Major risk factors for learning problems included parental misunderstandings about educational styles and expectations, teacher stereotyping and low expectations, bullying and racial discrimination, premigration and postmigration trauma, and forced detention. Major resource factors for success included high academic and life ambition, "gift-and-sacrifice" motivational narratives, parental involvement in education, family cohesion and supportive home environment, accurate educational assessment and grade placement, teacher understanding of linguistic and cultural heritage, culturally appropriate school transition, supportive peer relationships, and successful acculturation. Studies are not generalizable to other cohorts. This review provides a summary of published prevalence estimates for learning problems in resettled refugee children, highlights key risk and resource factors, and identifies gaps in research

  7. Junior High School Students’ Perception about Simple Environmental Problem as an Impact of Problem based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapilouw, M. C.; Firman, H.; Redjeki, S.; Chandra, D. T.

    2017-09-01

    Environmental problem is a real problem that occur in student’s daily life. Junior high school students’ perception about environmental problem is interesting to be investigated. The major aim of this study is to explore junior high school students’ perception about environmental problems around them and ways to solve the problem. The subject of this study is 69 Junior High School Students from two Junior High School in Bandung. This study use two open ended question. The core of first question is environmental problem around them (near school or house). The core of second question is the way to prevent or to solve the problem. These two question are as an impact of problem based learning in science learning. There are two major findings in this study. The first finding, based on most students’ perception, plastic waste cause an environmental problem. The second finding, environmental awareness can be a solution to prevent environmental pollution. The third finding, most student can classify environmental pollution into land, water and air pollution. We can conclude that Junior High School Students see the environmental problem as a phenomenon and teacher can explore environmental problem to guide the way of preventing and resolving environmental problem.

  8. Cognitive Distance Learning Problem Solver Reduces Search Cost through Learning Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, Hiroshi; Miyamoto, Yuji; Baba, Takayuki; Okada, Hiroyuki

    Our proposed cognitive distance learning problem solver generates sequence of actions from initial state to goal states in problem state space. This problem solver learns cognitive distance (path cost) of arbitrary combination of two states. Action generation at each state is selection of next state that has minimum cognitive distance to the goal, like Q-learning agent. In this paper, first, we show that our proposed method reduces search cost than conventional search method by analytical simulation in spherical state space. Second, we show that an average search cost is more reduced more the prior learning term is long and our problem solver is familiar to the environment, by a computer simulation in a tile world state space. Third, we showed that proposed problem solver is superior to the reinforcement learning techniques when goal is changed by a computer simulation. Forth, we found that our simulation result consist with psychological experimental results.

  9. The Effect of Problem Based Learning on EFL Students’ Critical Thinking Skill and Learning Outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Abdul Bashith; Saiful Amin

    2017-01-01

    This research aims to examine the effect of Problem Based Learning (PBL) model to students’ critical thinking skill and learning outcome. It was conducted on the 11th graders of social science program at SMAN 6 Malang. The research material was the problems of demography. Research method was quasi experiment with non equivalent control group design. The data analysis used t-test technique. The research result showed that PBL learning model affected students’ critical thinking skill and learni...

  10. Using standardized patients versus video cases for representing clinical problems in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Bo Young; Choi, Ikseon; Choi, Seokjin; Kim, Tae-Hee; Roh, Hyerin; Rhee, Byoung Doo; Lee, Jong-Tae

    2016-06-01

    The quality of problem representation is critical for developing students' problem-solving abilities in problem-based learning (PBL). This study investigates preclinical students' experience with standardized patients (SPs) as a problem representation method compared to using video cases in PBL. A cohort of 99 second-year preclinical students from Inje University College of Medicine (IUCM) responded to a Likert scale questionnaire on their learning experiences after they had experienced both video cases and SPs in PBL. The questionnaire consisted of 14 items with eight subcategories: problem identification, hypothesis generation, motivation, collaborative learning, reflective thinking, authenticity, patient-doctor communication, and attitude toward patients. The results reveal that using SPs led to the preclinical students having significantly positive experiences in boosting patient-doctor communication skills; the perceived authenticity of their clinical situations; development of proper attitudes toward patients; and motivation, reflective thinking, and collaborative learning when compared to using video cases. The SPs also provided more challenges than the video cases during problem identification and hypotheses generation. SPs are more effective than video cases in delivering higher levels of authenticity in clinical problems for PBL. The interaction with SPs engages preclinical students in deeper thinking and discussion; growth of communication skills; development of proper attitudes toward patients; and motivation. Considering the higher cost of SPs compared with video cases, SPs could be used most advantageously during the preclinical period in the IUCM curriculum.

  11. Computer-related vision problems in Osogbo, south-western Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Widespread use of computers for office work and e-learning has resulted in increased visual demands among computer users. The increased visual demands have led to development of ocular complaints and discomfort among users. The objective of this study is to determine the prevalence of computer related eye ...

  12. Comparison of Mathematical Resilience among Students with Problem Based Learning and Guided Discovery Learning Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, M.; Darhim; Dahlan, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Mathematical resilience is very important thing in learning mathematics. It is a positive attitude in order to make student not easily give up in the face of adversity when solving mathematics problems through discussion and research about mathematics. The purpose of this study was to examine comparison of mathematical resilience among students receiving problem based learning model and the students who received guided discovery learning model. This research was conducted at one junior high school in Jakarta. The method was used in this study is quasi-experimental with 66 students as the samples. The instrument which was used in this research is mathematical resilience scale with 24 items of statements. The result of this research is mathematical resilience between the students who received problem based learning model is better than the students who received guided discovery learning model. According to this study result the authors presented some suggestions that: 1) problem based learning and guided discovery learning model can both develop mathematical resilience, but problem based learning is more recommended to use, 2) in order to achieve mathematical resilience better than this findings, it needs to do the next research that combine problem based learning with other treatment.

  13. The Effect of Problem Based Learning (PBL) Instruction on Students' Motivation and Problem Solving Skills of Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argaw, Aweke Shishigu; Haile, Beyene Bashu; Ayalew, Beyene Tesfaw; Kuma, Shiferaw Gadisa

    2017-01-01

    Through the learning of physics, students will acquire problem solving skills which are relevant to their daily life. Determining the best way in which students learn physics takes a priority in physics education. The goal of the present study was to determine the effect of problem based learning strategy on students' problem solving skills and…

  14. Characterizing Reinforcement Learning Methods through Parameterized Learning Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-03

    et al., 2009) (9) Adaptive epilepsy treatment Partial Continuous Extremely randomized (Guez et al., 2008) trees (114) Computer memory scheduling...among action values from a state, different types of state noise, the sparsity and spread of the rewards, and the average episode length , would also be...updates to a linear function approxi- mator. Unfortunately, Greedy-GQ requires that the policy followed while learning stay fixed, preventing the agent from

  15. LEARNING STYLES AND STUDENTS’ PERFORMANCE IN DESIGN PROBLEM SOLVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elçin Tezel

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Design curricula and all core design studio courses are prepared for performance attainment by giving theoretical and professional training. However students’ performance may be affected by both the constraints set on a design problem, and their learning styles. This study explores the performance of interior architectural students in relation to their learning styles (as proposed by Kolb’s Experiential Learning Theory, and different types of constraints set on design problems. Design performance, measured as conceptual development, form and spatial configuration, structural innovation and ergonomics, and craftsmanship, was found to change throughout the two bipolar continuum of the learning cycle with regard to two design conditions characterized by different types of constraint use.

  16. Facilitation of problem finding among first year medical school students undergoing problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Toshimasa; Suganuma, Taiyo; Tang, Ann C; Matsushita, Susumu; Manno, Sumie; Kozu, Tadahiko

    2005-01-01

    Adaptation to problem-based learning (PBL) is a difficult process for high school graduates who are not used to self-directed learning, especially in the freshmen year of medical school. The difficulty includes finding problems from a given case. Evaluate the effect of an intervention to facilitate case-based problem finding among medical school freshmen undergoing a PBL tutorial. Medical school freshmen in 2000 (nonintervened group) and 2001 (intervened group) participated in the study. The intervened group received the modified problem-based program by (a) having briefings on the importance of problem finding, (b) encouragement by the tutors in problem finding, and (c) reinforcement using a self-assessment sheet. At the end of the year, the ability of students to extract problems from a short case was evaluated and compared with the nonintervened students. The intervened group extracted a significantly greater number of problems than the nonintervened group. When extracted problems were categorized, the intervened group was able to generate more questions in a greater number of specified categories. Interventions to foster problem finding significantly facilitated acquisition of problem extraction skills among young medical students.

  17. UICEE Centre for Problem Based Learning (UCPBL) at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming Kobberøe; Enemark, Stig; Moesby, Egon

    2002-01-01

    and engineering schools worldwide are consequently seeking consultancy and cooperation with Aalborg University. The establishment of UCPBL is therefore welcomed as a possibility to merge these activities into one organisational structure and to strengthen the effort of improving engineering education......UICEE Centre for Problem-Based Learning (UCPBL) is a global centre for Problem-Based Learning located at Aalborg University, Denmark UCPBL is established as a partner to the UNESCO International Centre for Engineering Education (UICEE) located at Monash University, Melbourne, Australia. Aalborg...... University is considered to have a strong position in Problem-Based Learning (PBL) with many years of experience. Within engineering education co-operation with industry has also always been a field of high importance for Aalborg University and part of the PBL concept. An increasing number of universities...

  18. Cognitive engagement in the problem-based learning classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Rotgans, Jerome; Schmidt, Henk

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the present study was to examine to what extent autonomy in problem-based learning (PBL) results in cognitive engagement with the topic at hand. To that end, a short self-report instrument was devised and validated. Moreover, it was examined how cognitive engagement develops as a function of the learning process and the extent to which cognitive engagement determines subsequent levels of cognitive engagement during a one-day PBL event. Data were analyzed by means ...

  19. The patient's voice in a problem-based learning case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chur-Hansen, Anna; Koopowitz, Les

    2004-03-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) relies upon trigger material, often a paper case, to stimulate self-directed enquiry and group discussion. We describe the process of writing a PBL case based upon a patient's narrative account of her experiences of psychiatric illness, and the possible benefits of that collaboration for the patient, as well as for student learning. Real patients are under-utilized in teaching, as are their narratives, and both are believed to be resources worthy of further attention.

  20. Evaluating potentialities and constrains of Problem Based Learning curriculum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guerra, Aida

    2013-01-01

    encloses three methodological approaches to investigate three interrelated research questions. Phase one, a literature review; aims develop a theoretical and analytical framework. The second phase aims to investigate examples of practices that combine PBL and Education for Sustainable Development (ESD......This paper presents a research design to evaluate Problem Based Learning (PBL) curriculum potentialities and constrains for future changes. PBL literature lacks examples of how to evaluate and analyse established PBL learning environments to address new challenges posed. The research design...

  1. Dealing with Insecurity in Problem Oriented Learning Approaches - The Importance of Problem Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annie Aarup Jensen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to learn and develop creative and innovative competences, students’ may act, experiment, reflect and solve problems (Dewey, 1916. Creativity is an important component of problem solving (Ruco, 2014. Being sensitive to problems and problem finding characterize creativity (Csikszentmihalyi, 1996. It is consequently expected that problem oriented group work enhances students’ innovative competences (Illeris, 1974 per se. We question this assumption and present the results of an experiment where students were given a tool designed to support chaotic and unstable processes grounded in management theories. Data from three cohorts of students were analysed based on Engeströms Activity Theory (Engeström 1997, 2009; Engeström & Sannino, 2010 allowing us to uncover aspects of contradictions and potentials of expansive learning. Based on the findings the article discusses to what extent and how the introduction of the new concept and tool influences division of labor and collaboration aiming at developing students’ innovation skills.

  2. PHOTON PBL: problem-based learning in photonics technology education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Nicholas; Audet, Richard; Donnelly, Judith; Hanes, Fenna; Kehrhahn, Marijke

    2007-06-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an educational approach whereby students learn course content by actively and collaboratively solving real-world problems presented in a context similar to that in which the learning is to be applied. Research shows that PBL improves student learning and retention, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and the ability to skillfully apply knowledge to new situations - skills deemed critical to lifelong learning. Used extensively in medical education since the 1970's, and widely adopted in other fields including business, law, and education, PBL is emerging as an alternative to traditional lecture-based courses in engineering and technology education. In today's ever-changing global economy where photonics technicians are required to work productively in teams to solve complex problems across disciplines as well as cultures, PBL represents an exciting alternative to traditional lecture-based photonics education. In this paper we present the PHOTON PBL project, a National Science Foundation Advanced Technology Education (NSF-ATE) project aimed at creating, in partnership with the photonics industry and university research labs from across the US, a comprehensive series of multimedia-based PBL instructional resource materials and offering faculty professional development in the use of PBL in photonics technology education. Quantitative and qualitative research will be conducted on the effectiveness of PBL in photonics technician education.

  3. PENERAPAN BLENDED-PROBLEM BASED LEARNING DALAM PEMBELAJARAN BIOLOGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Agus Triyanto

    2016-07-01

    Biologi abad 21 merupakan integrasi dan mengintegrasikan kembali sub disiplin ilmu biologi, serta integrasi biologi dengan disiplin ilmu lain untuk mengatasi permasalahan sosial. Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui penerapan Blended-Problem Based Learning, aktivitas belajar, dan respon siswa dalam pembelajaran biologi. Penelitian ini merupakan penelitian survei dengan pendekatan deskriptif kualitatif. Data hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa aktivitas positif siswa dalam pembelajaran memuaskan, sedangkan respon siswa baik terhadap pembelajaran. Berdasarkan hasil penelitian, disimpulkan bahwa Blended-Problem Based Learning dapat diterapkan dan diterima sebagai model dalam pembelajaran.

  4. Problem-based and project-oriented learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Frede; Teodorescu, Remus; Chen, Zhe

    2005-01-01

    . Generally, the content of the curriculum should be more expanded without extra study time. This paper presents a teaching approach, which makes it possible very fast for the students to obtain in-depth skills into new research areas, and this method is the problem-oriented and project-based learning....... In this paper the necessary skills for power electronic engineers are outlined that is followed up by a description on how the problem-oriented and project-based learning are implemented. A complete curriculum in power electronics and drives at Aalborg University is presented where different power electronics...

  5. Problem based learning: an opportunity for theatre nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, J

    1999-11-01

    In my experience theatre nurses are always saying that student nurses just don't know enough anatomy, even with compulsory regular teaching of the subject in pre-registration nurse education. Boud and Feletti (1997) say anatomy and other subjects are forgotten because when they are taught students do not perceive their relevance. Problem based learning (PBL) seeks to overcome this difficulty by integrating theory and practice. This article will describe problem based learning and give an example of a scenario used in this educational process. The benefits of a PBL theatre nursing course and the implications for theatre nurse education will be discussed.

  6. Integrating Symbolic and Statistical Methods for Testing Intelligent Systems Applications to Machine Learning and Computer Vision

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Sumit Kumar [University of Central Florida, Orlando; Pullum, Laura L [ORNL; Ramanathan, Arvind [ORNL

    2016-01-01

    Embedded intelligent systems ranging from tiny im- plantable biomedical devices to large swarms of autonomous un- manned aerial systems are becoming pervasive in our daily lives. While we depend on the flawless functioning of such intelligent systems, and often take their behavioral correctness and safety for granted, it is notoriously difficult to generate test cases that expose subtle errors in the implementations of machine learning algorithms. Hence, the validation of intelligent systems is usually achieved by studying their behavior on representative data sets, using methods such as cross-validation and bootstrapping.In this paper, we present a new testing methodology for studying the correctness of intelligent systems. Our approach uses symbolic decision procedures coupled with statistical hypothesis testing to. We also use our algorithm to analyze the robustness of a human detection algorithm built using the OpenCV open-source computer vision library. We show that the human detection implementation can fail to detect humans in perturbed video frames even when the perturbations are so small that the corresponding frames look identical to the naked eye.

  7. Can we address depression in vision rehabilitation settings? Professionals' perspectives on the barriers to integrating problem-solving treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, Edith; Sturrock, Bonnie; Lamoureux, Ecosse; Keeffe, Jill; Hegel, Mark; Casten, Robin; Mellor, David; Rees, Gwyneth

    2018-02-01

    Low vision rehabilitation (LVR) is a pertinent context for integrating early, evidence-based psychological interventions given the high prevalence of untreated depression in adults with vision impairment. This study aims to identify the perceived barriers and facilitators to staff-delivered telephone-based problem-solving treatment for primary care (PST-PC) offered as an integrated component of LVR. Qualitative semi-structured interviews, developed using the theoretical domains framework (TDF) and Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), were conducted with 21 LVR professionals and a clinical psychologist involved in the delivery of PST-PC. Barriers and facilitators at the practitioner, client, intervention, and organizational level were identified with thematic analysis using a "theoretical" approach. Prominent barriers were a lack of role recognition for PST-PC practitioners (n = 32), unmet client expectation with PST-PC (n = 28), dissatisfaction with telephone delivery (n = 27), and limited organizational awareness of PST-PC (n = 39). Facilitating factors included a recognized need for evidence-based psychological services (n = 28), clients experiencing benefits in early sessions (n = 38), PST-PC promoting practical skills (n = 26), and comprehensive PST-PC training (n = 36). PST-PC may provide an accessible early intervention for LVR clients with depressive symptoms. Ongoing practitioner training, clinical support, and screening potential LVR clients for treatment suitability are likely to enhance delivery in this setting. Implications for rehabilitation Depression is highly prevalent in adults engaged in low vision rehabilitation (LVR) programs, yet few receive support. Clinical guidelines recommend integrated models of care be offered within rehabilitation settings as early intervention for mild to moderate levels of depressive symptoms. Integrated telephone-based problem-solving treatment for primary care

  8. Problem and Project Based Learning in Hybrid Spaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ryberg, Thomas; Davidsen, Jacob; Hodgson, Vivien

    2016-01-01

    and project based learning. Based on interviews, workshops and observations of students’ actual group practices in open, shared and flexible spaces in Aalborg University (AAU), we identify and discuss how students incorporate networked and digital technologies into their group work and into the study places......There is a need within networked learning to understand and conceptualise the interplay between digital and physical spaces or what we could term hybrid spaces. Therefore, we discuss a recent study of students from two different programmes who are engaged in long-term, group-based problem...... of networked learning' and one that impacts on the kind and nature of collaboration that takes place....

  9. How play enhances creativity in problem based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsted, Ann Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    This article draws on 20 Danish university students’ reflections in and on a Problem-based Learning process (PBL). The study showed how a more playful approach changed how the students collaborated, communicated, and approached a given task. They felt more creative, open minded and engaged compared...... to some of their earlier learning experiences. They sensed a change in how they interacted with each other, a different tone arose in their social bonding, which led to the overall question for this article: What happens when play becomes part of a PBL process and how can we understand the relation...... between play and creativity in higher education learning processes?...

  10. Nursing problem-based learning activity: song writing and singing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Zenobia C Y

    2014-08-01

    The function of song is not only to deliver individual's messages, but also to serve as a learning approach to facilitate students' learning. To observe the effectiveness of songs in facilitating students' learning, a Problem-based Learning (PBL) class with twenty students was divided into four groups with five students per group. Each group was asked to write a song based on two given scenarios, to sing the song out loud, and to participate in a follow-up focus group interview afterwards. The four songs reflected the students' understanding of academic knowledge and their perspectives toward the protagonists in the presented scenarios. Two songs are presented in this paper to demonstrate how the approach was carried out in the nursing PBL class. This paper aims to show the implication of song writing and singing in PBL and shed some light on teaching and learning. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Automated problem generation in Learning Management Systems: a tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime Romero

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The benefits of solving problems have been widely acknowledged by literature. Its implementation in e–learning platforms can make easier its management and the learning process itself. However, its implementation can also become a very time–consuming task, particularly when the number of problems to generate is high. In this tutorial we describe a methodology that we have developed aiming to alleviate the workload of producing a great deal of problems in Moodle for an undergraduate business course. This methodology follows a six-step process and allows evaluating student’s skills in problem solving, minimizes plagiarism behaviors and provides immediate feedback. We expect this tutorial encourage other educators to apply our six steps process, thus benefiting themselves and their students of its advantages.

  12. Agro-designing: sustainability-driven, vision-oriented, problem preventing and knowledge-based methodology for improving farming systems sustainability

    OpenAIRE

    Znaor, Darko; Goewie, Eric

    1999-01-01

    ABSTRACT While classical research focuses to problem solving, design is a problem- prevention methodology, and is suitable for multi- and and interdisciplinary research teams with the vision of how to improve the agricultural sustainability. Since organic agriculture is based on the holistic approach and is also problem-prevention oriented in that it refrains from certain inputs and practices, design is an interesting methodology that could be applied more often in organic agriculture. ...

  13. Problem Based Learning (PBL) - An Effective Approach to Improve Learning Outcomes in Medical Teaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preeti, Bajaj; Ashish, Ahuja; Shriram, Gosavi

    2013-12-01

    As the "Science of Medicine" is getting advanced day-by-day, need for better pedagogies & learning techniques are imperative. Problem Based Learning (PBL) is an effective way of delivering medical education in a coherent, integrated & focused manner. It has several advantages over conventional and age-old teaching methods of routine. It is based on principles of adult learning theory, including student's motivation, encouragement to set goals, think critically about decision making in day-to-day operations. Above all these, it stimulates challenge acceptance and learning curiosity among students and creates pragmatic educational program. To measure the effectiveness of the "Problem Based Learning" as compared to conventional theory/didactic lectures based learning. The study was conducted on 72 medical students from Dayanand Medical College & Hospital, Ludhiana. Two modules of problem based sessions designed and delivered. Pre & Post-test score's scientific statistical analysis was done. Student feed-back received based on questionnaire in the five-point Likert scale format. Significant improvement in overall performance observed. Feedback revealed majority agreement that "Problem-based learning" helped them create interest (88.8 %), better understanding (86%) & promotes self-directed subject learning (91.6 %). Substantial improvement in the post-test scores clearly reveals acceptance of PBL over conventional learning. PBL ensures better practical learning, ability to create interest, subject understanding. It is a modern-day educational strategy, an effective tool to objectively improve the knowledge acquisition in Medical Teaching.

  14. A PROBLEM GENERATOR SYSTEM TO LEARN FIRST-DEGREE EQUATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    ALAVİ MİLANİ, Mir Mohammad Reza; PEHLİVAN, Hüseyin; HOSSEİNPOUR, Sahereh

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learningenhances academic productivity, and improves long-term memory. Thus it isbetter than traditional instruction. Meanwhile, the teaching of mathematicseducation is more important than others. Much software is developed for visuallearning mathematics, but there is a great need for problem-based systems. Thisis more visible, due to the increasing proliferation of e-learning education.On the other hand, first degree equations are a uniquely important topic inhigh school and co...

  15. Teaching introductory thermal physics through problem based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Tracey, Rebecca

    2005-01-01

    The development and delivery of an introductory thermal physics module taught through Problem Based Learning (PBL) in a lecture-based curriculum is reported on. The development and implementation of the module is illustrated through discussion of the problems and students responses. The PBL methodology is compared with traditional lecture style teaching and the educational theories that the methodologies stem from are discussed. Examples of how PBL has been used to teach physics, along wi...

  16. Problem-Based Learning to Improve Students’ Grammar Competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukminatus Zuhriyah

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Grammar becomes one of the subjects studied in all Indonesian English Department. It is because grammar has the important role in all English skills. Grammar makes those four English skills meaningful. Somebody can be said as a master of English when he or she also masters grammar. Unfortunately, learning grammar is not as easy as what we think. It needs the effective method that can make the learners motivated and active in learning as well as in applying the grammar in the real life. Problem-based learning applied in this research is one of the alternatives that can help the learners learn grammar easily. This research was a collaborative action research whose general purpose to know whether or not Problem-based learning could improve the students’ grammar competence. Meanwhile, the specific purposes were to know the lecturer’s activities, the students’ activities, and the students’ responses when problem-based learning was implemented in grammar class. Nine students of the fifth semester of English department of education faculty of Hasyim Asy’ari University (UNHASY Tebuireng Jombang in the academic year of 2016/2017 became the subjects of this research. The data got was from the observation notes and the grammar test. There was an improvement on students’ grammar competence from cycle one to cycle two. It was proven by their mean score from 66.7 in cycle one to 72.8 in cycle two. Meanwhile, the percentage of students passing the minimum mastery criteria was from 44.4 in cycle one and 88.9 in cycle two. So that it can be concluded that problem-based learning could improve students’ grammar competence.

  17. Learning problems in kindergarten students with extremely preterm birth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, H Gerry; Klein, Nancy; Anselmo, Marcia G; Minich, Nori; Espy, Kimberly A; Hack, Maureen

    2011-09-01

    To assess learning problems among kindergarten students with extremely preterm birth and to identify risk factors. Cohort study. Children's hospital. A cohort of 148 children born between January 1, 2001, and December 31, 2003, with extremely preterm birth, defined as less than 28 weeks' gestation or having a birth weight of less than 1000 g, and 111 classmate control individuals born at term with normal birth weight. The children were enrolled in the study during their first year in kindergarten and were assessed on measures of learning progress. Achievement testing, teacher ratings of learning progress, and individual educational assistance. Children with extremely preterm birth had lower mean standard scores than controls on achievement tests of spelling (8.52; 95% confidence interval, 4.58-12.46) and applied mathematics (11.02; 6.76-15.28). They had higher rates of substandard learning progress by teacher report in written language (odds ratio, 4.23; 95% CI, 2.32-7.73) and mathematics (7.08; 2.79-17.95). Group differences in mathematics achievement and in teacher ratings of learning progress were statistically significant even in children without neurosensory deficits or low global cognitive ability. Neonatal risk factors, early childhood neurodevelopmental impairment, and socioeconomic status predicted learning problems in children with extremely preterm birth; however, many children with problems were not enrolled in a special education program. Learning problems in children with extremely preterm birth are evident in kindergarten and are associated with neonatal and early childhood risk factors. Our findings support efforts to provide more extensive monitoring and interventions before and during the first year of school.

  18. Systematic comparison of solved problems as a cooperative learning task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taconis, Ruurd; van Hout-Wolters, Bernadette

    1999-09-01

    Problem-solving skills and understanding of domain, knowledge (e.g., fighting misconceptions) are important goals in both secondary and tertiary science education. A prototype of an instructional task is presented which aims at improved problem-solving skills based on understanding of domain knowledge. In this task, comparing carefully selected solved problems by groups of students is utilised as a learning activity for the acquisition of adequate problem schemata. The task is designed as a part of the so-called UBP-program (UBP=Understanding Based Problem solving) currently being developed, for education in science. The result of an evaluative study for the field of mechanics is presented. The UBP-task appears apt to improve problem-solving skills at a less advanced level of physics education (e.g., 10th grade), especially for students normally performing poorly—who are often girls.

  19. Enhancing students' learning in problem based learning: validation of a self-assessment scale for active learning and critical thinking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khoiriyah, U.; Roberts, C.; Jorm, C.; Vleuten, C.P. van der

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Problem based learning (PBL) is a powerful learning activity but fidelity to intended models may slip and student engagement wane, negatively impacting learning processes, and outcomes. One potential solution to solve this degradation is by encouraging self-assessment in the PBL

  20. Self-Directed Learning in Problem-Based Learning and Its Relationships with Self-Regulated Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyens, Sofie M. M.; Magda, Joshua; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated the role of self-directed learning (SDL) in problem-based learning (PBL) and examined how SDL relates to self-regulated learning (SRL). First, it is explained how SDL is implemented in PBL environments. Similarities between SDL and SRL are highlighted. However, both concepts differ on important aspects. SDL includes an…

  1. Self-directed learning in problem-based learning and its relationships with self-regulated learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M.M. Loyens (Sofie); J. Magda (Joshua); R.M.J.P. Rikers (Remy)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigated the role of self-directed learning (SDL) in problem-based learning (PBL) and examined how SDL relates to self-regulated learning (SRL). First, it is explained how SDL is implemented in PBL environments. Similarities between SDL and SRL are highlighted. However,

  2. Foreign Language Learning Problems of Students Classified as Learning Disabled and Non-Learning Disabled: Is There a Difference?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Richard L.

    2001-01-01

    Research on students with foreign language (FL) learning problems is reviewed and the Linguistic Coding Difference Hypotheses is described. The continuum of FL learning is explained and the role of linguistic variables in FL learning is supported. Recent research outcomes and a court decision regarding FL course substitutions are discussed.…

  3. Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision--The Science of Making Learning Fun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Linda

    2004-01-01

    It may be true that students are born with an innate interest in science and technology. However, teachers say many students do not sustain that interest through their school years. In this article, the author describes the Toshiba/NSTA ExploraVision program. One of the world's largest K-12 science and technology competitions, ExploraVision is a…

  4. Deep hierarchies in the primate visual cortex: what can we learn for computer vision?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krüger, Norbert; Janssen, Peter; Kalkan, Sinan; Lappe, Markus; Leonardis, Ales; Piater, Justus; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Antonio J; Wiskott, Laurenz

    2013-08-01

    Computational modeling of the primate visual system yields insights of potential relevance to some of the challenges that computer vision is facing, such as object recognition and categorization, motion detection and activity recognition, or vision-based navigation and manipulation. This paper reviews some functional principles and structures that are generally thought to underlie the primate visual cortex, and attempts to extract biological principles that could further advance computer vision research. Organized for a computer vision audience, we present functional principles of the processing hierarchies present in the primate visual system considering recent discoveries in neurophysiology. The hierarchical processing in the primate visual system is characterized by a sequence of different levels of processing (on the order of 10) that constitute a deep hierarchy in contrast to the flat vision architectures predominantly used in today's mainstream computer vision. We hope that the functional description of the deep hierarchies realized in the primate visual system provides valuable insights for the design of computer vision algorithms, fostering increasingly productive interaction between biological and computer vision research.

  5. Weaving a Formal Methods Education with Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, J. Paul

    The idea of weaving formal methods through computing (or software engineering) degrees is not a new one. However, there has been little success in developing and implementing such a curriculum. Formal methods continue to be taught as stand-alone modules and students, in general, fail to see how fundamental these methods are to the engineering of software. A major problem is one of motivation — how can the students be expected to enthusiastically embrace a challenging subject when the learning benefits, beyond passing an exam and achieving curriculum credits, are not clear? Problem-based learning has gradually moved from being an innovative pedagogique technique, commonly used to better-motivate students, to being widely adopted in the teaching of many different disciplines, including computer science and software engineering. Our experience shows that a good problem can be re-used throughout a student's academic life. In fact, the best computing problems can be used with children (young and old), undergraduates and postgraduates. In this paper we present a process for weaving formal methods through a University curriculum that is founded on the application of problem-based learning and a library of good software engineering problems, where students learn about formal methods without sitting a traditional formal methods module. The process of constructing good problems and integrating them into the curriculum is shown to be analagous to the process of engineering software. This approach is not intended to replace more traditional formal methods modules: it will better prepare students for such specialised modules and ensure that all students have an understanding and appreciation for formal methods even if they do not go on to specialise in them.

  6. Designing Digital Problem Based Learning Tasks that Motivate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Loon, Anne-Marieke; Ros, Anje; Martens, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This study examines whether teachers are able to apply the principles of autonomy support and structure support in designing digital problem based learning (PBL) tasks. We examine whether these tasks are more autonomy- and structure-supportive and whether primary and secondary school students experience greater autonomy, competence, and motivation…

  7. Problem-Based Learning in the English Language Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Normala; Shah, Mohamed Ismail Ahamad

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the problem-based learning approach (PBL) on students in language classes in two areas: course content and language development. The study was conducted on 128 students, grouped into the experimental and control groups, and employed an experimental research design. The syllabus, textbook,…

  8. "Theory repositories" via the web for problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Johan (CTIT); van Riemsdijk, Maarten; Jones, Valerie M.; Collis, Betty

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes a series of experiments conducted at the School of Management Studies at the University of Twente designed to improve students' concentration on the theoretical study materials in a particular course. In 1997 a problem-based learning approach was introduced into a course on

  9. Introduction to Problem Based Learning for Engineering Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moesby, Egon; Rosenørn, Torben

    2003-01-01

    Documentation material and working papers for the workshop "Introduction to Problem Based Learning for Engineering Education" held at Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai, Thailand, 6 - 10 October 2003. The material support the workshop where the participants go through a complete pre-planning cycle...

  10. Relationship between Learning Problems and Attention Deficit in Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponde, Milena Pereira; Cruz-Freire, Antonio Carlos; Silveira, Andre Almeida

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To assess the impact of attention deficit on learning problems in a sample of schoolchildren in the city of Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Method: All students enrolled in selected elementary schools were included in this study, making a total of 774 children. Each child was assessed by his or her teacher using a standardized scale. "The…

  11. Learning Styles and Problem Solving Skills of Turkish Prospective Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gencel, Ilke Evin

    2015-01-01

    Global changes in educational discourse have an impact on educational systems, so teacher education programs need to be transformed to better train teachers and to contribute to their professional development. In this process learning styles and problem solving skills should be considered as individual differences which have an impact in…

  12. Cognitive engagement in the problem-based learning classroom

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.I. Rotgans (Jerome); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe objective of the present study was to examine to what extent autonomy in problem-based learning (PBL) results in cognitive engagement with the topic at hand. To that end, a short self-report instrument was devised and validated. Moreover, it was examined how cognitive engagement

  13. Medical student's perspective of problem based learning (PBL ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medical student's perspective of problem based learning (PBL) curriculum at the University of Traskei. ... The use of SWOT analysis to evaluate current and future directions can lead to the successful evolution of any organization. The aim ... It also gives them the opportunity to meet the outcomes of the program in due time.

  14. Travels towards Problem Based Learning in Medical Education (VPBL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowdish, Bruce E.; Chauvin, Sheila W.; Kreisman, Norman; Britt, Mike

    2003-01-01

    Reports results of an investigation of the effectiveness of a prototype virtual problem-based learning (VPBL) exercise delivered via the World Wide Web to first year medical students. Compares the VPBL and a text-based version of the same exercise on students' achievement and examines instructional design issues including learner control and…

  15. Advanced prototyping tools for project- and problem-based learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Teodorescu, Remus; Bech, Michael Møller; Holm, Allan J.

    2002-01-01

    A new approach in prototyping for project- and problem-based learning is achieved by using the new Total Development Environment concept introduced by dSPACE that allows a full visual block-oriented programming of dynamic real-time systems to be achieved  using the Matlab/Simulink environment. A ...

  16. Problem-Based Learning for Production and Operations Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanet, John J.; Barut, Mehmet

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we describe our application of "problem-based learning" in the teaching of production/operations management. We describe a study of the effectiveness of this approach and present the results and analysis of this study. We provide a collection of our experiences in using this method and conclude with some general…

  17. Problem-based learning as a facilitator of conceptual change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Loyens, Sofie M M; Jones, Suzanne H.; Mikkers, Jeroen; van Gog, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    We investigated whether problem-based learning (PBL) can foster conceptual change. Students were randomly assigned to a PBL, lecture-based, or self-study group, all receiving instruction about the topic of Newtonian laws. Conceptual change was measured from pre- to immediate post-test (directly

  18. Teaching Agile Software Engineering Using Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Khalili, Nuha H.

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have reported the utilization of Problem-Based Learning (PBL) in teaching Software Engineering courses. However, these studies have different views of the effectiveness of PBL. This paper presents the design of an Advanced Software Engineering course for undergraduate Software Engineering students that uses PBL to teach them Agile…

  19. The problem-based learning (PBL and health education.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carine Moraes Vignochi

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The Problem-Based Learning (Problem-Based Learning - PBL has been recognized worldwide as an approach to promote the acquisition of knowledge by students at the same time that helps them develop skills and professional attitudes desirable. Unlike the conventional methods of teaching that use of application problems after the theory was presented, the PBL uses a problem to start, focus and motivate the learning of new concepts 13. In this approach, the student uses different mental processes, such as ability to raise hypotheses, compare, analyze, interpret, and evaluate and develop the ability to take responsibility for their education 11.12. The methodology of PBL has been a valuable tool in shaping the health care professional, with advantages over the traditional method of teaching. However, for its deployment there is a need for considerable institutional effort. Are necessary adjustments, including changes in the way of evaluation, for changes in mindset about the role of teachers in the process teaching / learning, investment in infrastructure, adaptations of the environment, improvement of libraries and other 19,20,21, 22. The process of change in education will bring many challenges, such as a break with traditional models of education and train health professionals with skills to recover the essential dimension of care: the relationship between humans.

  20. Problem-based learning: Developing resilience in nursing students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jih-Yuan Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A society needs mature and confident nurse practitioners, who are able to think analytically and flexibly, recognize needs for further preparation, and willing to engage in self-development. Concern is raised regarding how educators will build the capacity of resilient students with a knowledge base and a minimum set of skills in responding to various issues and for engaging in self-reflection. Drawing on the framework of nursing competencies and global standards for the education of professional nurses, resilient students may contribute through their social competence, problem-solving ability, sense of purpose, and persistence in the process to achieve the goal of the project. Educators should know how to build the resilient attribute in students by encouraging them to engage in self-reflection. This article discusses four areas that help students build resilience from project-based learning of a small group: the impact of problem-based learning at clinical practice, project/problem-based learning, resilient nursing student, and developing nursing students’ resilience. Self-assessment to check the promoting skills for teaching in a problem-based learning program helps the faculty holding the empowerment to encourage or support the students to face the challenge within the small team.

  1. Problem-Based Learning in Engineering Ethics Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkman, Robert

    2016-01-01

    I describe the first stages of a process of design research in which I employ problem-based learning in a course in engineering ethics, which fulfills a requirement for students in engineering degree programs. The aim of the course is to foster development of particular cognitive skills contributing to moral imagination, a capacity to notice,…

  2. Students' Experience of Problem-Based Learning in Virtual Space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbings, Peter; Lidstone, John; Bruce, Christine

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports outcomes of a study focused on discovering qualitatively different ways students experience problem-based learning in virtual space. A well-accepted and documented qualitative research method was adopted for this study. Five qualitatively different conceptions are described, each revealing characteristics of increasingly complex…

  3. Utilizing Problem-Based Learning in Qualitative Analysis Lab Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Randall W.; Bevsek, Holly M.

    2012-01-01

    A series of qualitative analysis (QA) laboratory experiments utilizing a problem-based learning (PBL) module has been designed and implemented. The module guided students through the experiments under the guise of cleaning up a potentially contaminated water site as employees of an environmental chemistry laboratory. The main goal was the…

  4. Analysis of an Assessment Method for Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, B. Serpil

    2004-01-01

    The paper commences by briefly introducing the systems engineering programme, then focuses on the "systems" module, which requires the first-year students to undertake a number of "open-ended" projects. During the problem-based learning (PBL) based projects the students are expected to combine creativity and the knowledge they acquire during the…

  5. Student and tutor perception of a new problem based learning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The Makerere University Faculty of Medicine started the implementation of the Problem Based Learning/Community Based Education and Service curriculum for incoming students in the academic year 2003/2004. It undertook an intense preparatory period of 2 years before implementation, which included ...

  6. Adapting Problem-Based Learning to Social Studies Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Andrew S.; Sears, Alan M.; Clarke, Gerald M.

    1998-01-01

    Describes how Problem-Based Learning (PBL) was adapted for use in social studies teacher education. Reviews the background of PBL as used in professional faculties, and offers curricular justification for its use. Examines difficulties experienced in adapting PBL to teacher education, taking into account perspectives from prospective teachers and…

  7. Learning Verbs without Arguments: The Problem of Raising Verbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Misha

    2005-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of learning the class of raising verbs (e.g. seem). These verbs are potentially problematic for learners in that unlike typical main verbs, these verbs do not stand in a semantic relation with any Noun Phrase (NP) arguments. Moreover, a second class of verbs, known as control verbs, shares certain distributional…

  8. The Impact of Problem Sets on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myeong Hwan; Cho, Moon-Heum; Leonard, Karen Moustafa

    2012-01-01

    The authors examined the role of problem sets on student learning in university microeconomics. A total of 126 students participated in the study in consecutive years. independent samples t test showed that students who were not given answer keys outperformed students who were given answer keys. Multiple regression analysis showed that, along with…

  9. EFFECT OF PROBLEM BASED LEARNING IN COMPARISION WITH LECTURE BASED LEARNING IN FORENSIC MEDICINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padmakumar

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Problem based learning (PBL is an approach to learning and instruction in which students tackle problems in small groups under the supervision of a teacher. This style of learning assumed to foster increased retention of knowledge, improve student’s gene ral problem solving skills, enhance integration of basic science concepts in to clinical problems, foster the development of self - directed learning skills and strengthen student’s intrinsic motivation. AIM: The study was conducted to compare the effect of Problem based learning in comparison with lecture based learning. SETTING: A cross - sectional study was conducted among 2nd year MBBS students of Jubilee Mission Medical College and Research Institute, Thrissur during the period of December 2014 to March 20 15. METHODOLOGY: The batch is divided into two groups (A & B, 45 in each group. By using PBL method, blunt force injuries were taught to Group - A and sharp weapon injuries to group - B. By using lecture based learning (LBL method blunt force injuries were t aught to Group - B and sharp weapon injuries to group - A. At the end of the session a test in the form of MCQ was conducted on the students to evaluate their learning outcome. OBSERVATION AND RESU LTS: In session I, the average test score of LBL group was 8.16 and PBL group was 12. The difference was statistically significant. In session - II also 45 students has participated each in LBL and PBL classes. The average of test score of LBL group was 7.267 and PBL was 11.289, which was highly significant statistical ly . CONCLUSION: Study has proven that problem based learning is an effective teaching learning method when compared to conventional lecture based learning.

  10. Problem-based learning in continuing medical education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Azri, Hilal; Ratnapalan, Savithiri

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To investigate the effects of problem-based learning (PBL) in continuing medical education. Data sources PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and ERIC databases were searched for randomized controlled trials published in English from January 2001 to May 2011 using key words problem-based learning, practice-based, self-directed, learner-centered, and active learning, combined with continuing medical education, continuing professional development, post professional, postgraduate, and adult learning. Study selection Randomized controlled trials that described the effects of PBL on knowledge enhancement, performance improvement, participants’ satisfaction, or patients’ health outcomes were selected for analysis. Synthesis Fifteen studies were included in this review: 4 involved postgraduate trainee doctors, 10 involved practising physicians, and 1 had both groups. Online learning was used in 7 studies. Among postgraduate trainees PBL showed no significant differences in knowledge gain compared with lectures or non–case-based learning. In continuing education, PBL showed no significant difference in knowledge gain when compared with other methods. Several studies did not provide an educational intervention for the control group. Physician performance improvement showed an upward trend in groups participating in PBL, but no significant differences were noted in health outcomes. Conclusion Online PBL is a useful method of delivering continuing medical education. There is limited evidence that PBL in continuing education would enhance physicians’ performance or improve health outcomes. PMID:24522680

  11. Applying a Problem Based Learning Approach to Land Management Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    Land management covers a wide range activities associated with the management of land and natural resources that are required to fulfil political objectives and achieve sustainable development. This paper presents an overall understanding of the land management paradigm and the benefits of good l...... are presented using the surveying programme at Aalborg University as an example. This paper is work in progress and draws from previous research. The paper supports the lecture on Problem Based Learning given at NUST 3 March 2016.......-world context. The combination of different disciplines can be taught through a “learning-by-doing approach”. Problem solving skills can be taught through a project-oriented approach to surveying education with a focus on developing skills for “learning to learn”. The basic principles of this educational model...

  12. Effect of Problem Based Learning Media Assisted Learning Achievement Physics KOKAMI against Judging from Problem Solving Ability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suryadi Suryadi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Pengaruh Pembelajaran Berbasis Masalah Berbantuan Media KOKAMI terhadap Prestasi Belajar Fisika Ditinjau dari Kemampuan Pemecahan Masalah Abstract: problem-based learning (PBM is one of the strategies that use the problem as a first step to collect and integrate new knowledge. The use of PBM requires media. Media KOKAMI is an alternative that is used to aid the learning process. The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of problem-based learning to the learning achievement of physics in terms of students' problem-solving abilities. This study used a 2x2 factorial design. The subjects were students of class XI SMA Negeri 1 Jember, amounting to 190 students in fifth grade. Samples are two classes taken by simple random sampling technique. The instrument consists of treatment and measurement instruments. Homogeneity and normality test data using SPSS 16.0 for Windows, hypothesis testing using ANOVA followed two paths and Tukey's test. Results of the study are: (1 studying physics student achievement using the PBM KOKAMI higher than students who learn to use PBM, (2 the achievement of learning physics problem-solving ability students learn to use high higher than using PBM PBM KOKAMI, (3 physics learning achievement low problem-solving ability students learn to use PBM lower KOKAMI than using PBM, and (4 there is an interaction between physics learning achievement of students who learn to use PBM KOKAMI and problem solving skills. Key Words: problem-based learning, media KOKAMI, problem solving, learning achievement Abstrak: Pembelajaran berbasis masalah (PBM merupakan salah satu strategi pembelajaran yang menggunakan masalah sebagai langkah awal mengumpulkan dan mengintegrasikan pengetahuan baru. Penggunaan PBM memerlukan media. Media KOKAMI merupakan alternatif yang digunakan untuk membantu proses pembelajaran. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menguji efektivitas pembelajaran berbasis masalah terhadap prestasi belajar fisika

  13. Low Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... USAJobs Home > Statistics and Data > Low Vision Low Vision Low Vision Defined: Low Vision is defined as the best- ... 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence Rates for Low Vision by Age, and Race/Ethnicity Table for 2010 ...

  14. Improving mathematical problem solving ability through problem-based learning and authentic assessment for the students of Bali State Polytechnic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darma, I. K.

    2018-01-01

    This research is aimed at determining: 1) the differences of mathematical problem solving ability between the students facilitated with problem-based learning model and conventional learning model, 2) the differences of mathematical problem solving ability between the students facilitated with authentic and conventional assessment model, and 3) interaction effect between learning and assessment model on mathematical problem solving. The research was conducted in Bali State Polytechnic, using the 2x2 experiment factorial design. The samples of this research were 110 students. The data were collected using a theoretically and empirically-validated test. Instruments were validated by using Aiken’s approach of technique content validity and item analysis, and then analyzed using anova stylistic. The result of the analysis shows that the students facilitated with problem-based learning and authentic assessment models get the highest score average compared to the other students, both in the concept understanding and mathematical problem solving. The result of hypothesis test shows that, significantly: 1) there is difference of mathematical problem solving ability between the students facilitated with problem-based learning model and conventional learning model, 2) there is difference of mathematical problem solving ability between the students facilitated with authentic assessment model and conventional assessment model, and 3) there is interaction effect between learning model and assessment model on mathematical problem solving. In order to improve the effectiveness of mathematics learning, collaboration between problem-based learning model and authentic assessment model can be considered as one of learning models in class.

  15. Integrated Design Process in Problem-Based Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudstrup, Mary-Ann

    2004-01-01

    and the method that are developed during the semester when working with an Integrated Design Process combining architecture, design, functional aspects, energy consumption, indoor environment, technology, and construction. I will emphasize the importance of working with different tools in the design process, e.......g. the computer as a tool for designing and optimising the building. I will also consider the dilemma of the Integrated Design Process in Problem Based Learning that emerges when the number of courses in the learning model, as is often the case, clashes with the demand for time and scope for reflection which......This article reports and reflects on the learning achievements and the educational experiences in connection with the first years of the curriculum in Architecture at Aalborg University ?s Civil Engineer Education in Architecture & Design. In the article I will focus on the learning activity...

  16. Deep and surface learning in problem-based learning: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, Diana H J M; Loyens, Sofie M M; Marcq, Hélène; Gijbels, David

    2016-12-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), implemented worldwide, students learn by discussing professionally relevant problems enhancing application and integration of knowledge, which is assumed to encourage students towards a deep learning approach in which students are intrinsically interested and try to understand what is being studied. This review investigates: (1) the effects of PBL on students' deep and surface approaches to learning, (2) whether and why these effects do differ across (a) the context of the learning environment (single vs. curriculum wide implementation), and (b) study quality. Studies were searched dealing with PBL and students' approaches to learning. Twenty-one studies were included. The results indicate that PBL does enhance deep learning with a small positive average effect size of .11 and a positive effect in eleven of the 21 studies. Four studies show a decrease in deep learning and six studies show no effect. PBL does not seem to have an effect on surface learning as indicated by a very small average effect size (.08) and eleven studies showing no increase in the surface approach. Six studies demonstrate a decrease and four an increase in surface learning. It is concluded that PBL does seem to enhance deep learning and has little effect on surface learning, although more longitudinal research using high quality measurement instruments is needed to support this conclusion with stronger evidence. Differences cannot be explained by the study quality but a curriculum wide implementation of PBL has a more positive impact on the deep approach (effect size .18) compared to an implementation within a single course (effect size of -.05). PBL is assumed to enhance active learning and students' intrinsic motivation, which enhances deep learning. A high perceived workload and assessment that is perceived as not rewarding deep learning are assumed to enhance surface learning.

  17. Visions and Revisions: Seamus Heaney, ‘Foreign’ Poetry, and The Problem of Assimilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Kay

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This essay considers the unusual position of Irish and Polish cultures and how it correlates to the construction of lyric subjects that appear unassimilable to dominant postcolonial literary-critical paradigms. Translation and assimilation become crucial concepts when understood in relation to attempts to take inspiration from foreign sources, especially when such attempts do not accord with typical patterns of influence. These concepts, however, only reveal their utility when they are grounded. The problem of assimilation is here considered in reference to debates over the Eastern European influences behind Seamus Heaney’s volume The Haw Lantern, which reveal the cultural pressures brought to bear upon a well-known poet whose work challenges dominant assumptions about the proper idiom of the Anglo-American lyric.

  18. Verticality and Urban Mobility : Learning lessons from past visions of elevated transport systems in the post-war city

    OpenAIRE

    Dodge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    AbstractThe space above crowded city streets has long been alluring to planners as a solution to the problem of urban mobility. In the post-war decades in particular there were many visions propagated for a revolution in transport exploiting verticality to separate out modes of lateral movement. Schemes were proposed for elevated highways carving through city centres, futuristic monorails running overhead and pedestrian decks connecting buildings, along with prospects of helicopters hopping b...

  19. Supporting Student Self-Regulated Learning in Problem-and Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Mary C.; Kitsantas, Anastasia

    2013-01-01

    In order to be successful in problem-or project-based learning (PBL), students must take responsibility for the learning process by setting goals, monitoring, reflecting, and sustaining their motivation from the beginning of the project until the end. However, for many students, these processes do not occur naturally or easily. Therefore, the…

  20. Effect of worksheet scaffolds on student learning in problem-based learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S.Y. Choo (Serene); J.I. Rotgans (Jerome); E.H.J. Yew (Elaine); H.G. Schmidt (Henk)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of worksheets as a scaffolding tool on students' learning achievement in a problem-based learning (PBL) environment. Seventeen PBL classes (N = 241) were randomly assigned to two experimental groups-one with a worksheet provided and

  1. Fostering Critical Thinking Skills in Students with Learning Disabilities through Online Problem-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    As a pedagogical approach, problem-based learning (PBL) has shown success for average and gifted students (HmeloSiver, 2004) and there are numerous incentives for its implementation in online learning environments (Savid-Baden, 2007; Chernobilsky, Nagarajan, & Hmelo-Silver, 2005). However, little research has been conducted regarding the…

  2. Problem-based learning in comparison with lecture-based learning among medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faisal, Rizwan; Bahadur, Sher; Shinwari, Laiyla

    2016-06-01

    To compare performance of medical students exposed to problem-based learning and lecture-based learning. The descriptive study was conducted at Rehman Medical College, Peshawar, Pakistan from May 20 to September 20, 2014, and comprised 146 students of 3rd year MBBS who were randomised into two equal groups. One group was taught by the traditional lecture based learning, while problem-based learning was conducted for the other group on the same topic. At the end of sessions, the performance of the two groups was evaluated by one-best type of 50 multiple choice questions. Total marks were 100, with each question carrying 2 marks. SPSS 15 was used for statistical analysis. There were 146 students who were divided into two equal groups of 73(50%) each. The mean score in the group exposed to problem-based learning was 3.2 ± 0.8 while those attending lecture-based learning was 2.7±0.8 (p= 0.0001). Problem-based learning was more effective than lecture based learning in the academic performance of medical students.

  3. Mobile Learning for Higher Education in Problem-Based Learning Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rongbutsri, Nikorn

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the PhD project on Mobile Learning for Higher Education in Problem-Based Learning Environment which aims to understand how students gain benefit from using mobile devices in the aspect of project work collaboration. It demonstrates research questions, theoretical perspective...

  4. Factors Affecting Perceived Learning of Engineering Students in Problem Based Learning Supported by Business Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaparro-Pelaez, Julian; Iglesias-Pradas, Santiago; Pascual-Miguel, Felix J.; Hernandez-Garcia, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Although literature about problem based learning (PBL) is not scarce, there is little research on experiences about learning methodologies that combine PBL and the use of simulation tools. This lack of studies is even more notable in the case of engineering courses. The motivation for this study is to show how such a combination of PBL and…

  5. Rethinking the globalisation of problem-based learning: how culture challenges self-directed learning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Frambach, J.M.; Driessen, E.W.; Chan, L.C.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2012-01-01

    Medical Education 2012: 46: 738-747 Context Medical schools worldwide are increasingly switching to student-centred methods such as problem-based learning (PBL) to foster lifelong self-directed learning (SDL). The cross-cultural applicability of these methods has been questioned because of their

  6. Evaluating a problem based learning course: an action research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, J; Bailey, S; Brasell-Brian, R; Gould, S

    2001-03-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been widely used in the United States, United Kingdom and Australasia in undergraduate nursing education to develop critical thinking and problem solving skills. PBL has been used since 1996 in a Bachelor of Nursing course at a New Zealand tertiary institution, and several modifications have been made to foster effective learning. The 'pure' PBL process has been adapted to move students gradually from teacher direction to taking responsibility for their learning. This has provided the opportunity for students to develop critical thinking, problem solving, information retrieval and evaluation skills, and group process skills over an 18-week period. Because rigorous evaluation of these changes had not been formally undertaken, the purpose of this study was to evaluate how the current format was developing students' understanding and integration of knowledge. Two cycles of the action research method (Cardno and Piggot-Irvine, 1994) were used, involving 4 lecturers and 17 students. Data was collected both quantitatively and qualitatively over a 16-week period. Findings indicated the importance of: explaining the purpose and process of PBL; communicating in detail the role of both students and lecturers; keeping communication lines open; addressing timetabling issues and valuing this method of learning for nursing practice. Implications for nursing education are addressed.

  7. Twelve tips for constructing problem-based learning cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A; Peterson, Ray; Guerrero, Anthony P S; Edgren, Gudrun

    2012-01-01

    One of the key elements for introducing a problem-based learning (PBL) programme is constructing good PBL cases. Good cases should reflect the educational principles of PBL including (a) integration of basic and clinical sciences together with professionalism and psychosocial components, (b) encouragement of discussion of cognitive domains such as identification of problems, generation of hypotheses, construction of an enquiry plan, weighing evidence for and against each hypothesis, interpretation of findings, construction of mechanisms, using evidence to refine the hypothesis and construction of a management plan, (c) encouragement of discussion of cases in small groups with an emphasis on student-centred learning, (d) promotion of collaborative learning and contribution of students to the case discussion and (e) encouragement of teamwork and self-directed learning strategies. Despite the importance of construction of good PBL cases to the success of a PBL programme, the art of construction of these cases is understudied or described in the literature. Based on our experience in PBL and evidence from literature, we described 12 tips for constructing good PBL cases. Constructing good PBL cases is an art that necessitates teamwork and input from several different disciplines. Cases should be constructed using a template reflecting the educational objectives of the programme. This approach will ensure optimum learning outcomes and consistency in the design and delivery of cases.

  8. Problem-based learning for technical students on the base TRIZ (theory of inventive problem solving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babenko Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The basis of modern educational technology in teaching is problem-based learning through the use of educational technologies Powerful Thinking - Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ, including a systematic approach to the complex organization of independent work of search and research character. Developed by systemic administration of the physical features workshops on the basis TRIZ in the cycle of the natural sciences with the implementation of all aspects of the educational activities - substantive, procedural and motivational. A new model of the physical design of the workshop and its form of organization, which is based on problem-based learning with the use of TRIZ Interactive form of organization of the workshop allows you to get high-quality substantive and personality of the students who have a significant role in the formation of professional competencies and affect the quality of produce practice-oriented specialists.

  9. Lattice point sets for deterministic learning and approximate optimization problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervellera, Cristiano

    2010-04-01

    In this brief, the use of lattice point sets (LPSs) is investigated in the context of general learning problems (including function estimation and dynamic optimization), in the case where the classic empirical risk minimization (ERM) principle is considered and there is freedom to choose the sampling points of the input space. Here it is proved that convergence of the ERM principle is guaranteed when LPSs are employed as training sets for the learning procedure, yielding up to a superlinear convergence rate under some regularity hypotheses on the involved functions. Preliminary simulation results are also provided.

  10. PENGEMBANGAN MODUL BERORIENTASI PROBLEM BASED LEARNING BERBANTUAN APLIKASI ANDROID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anggih Alfiantara

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Peningkatan kualitas pembelajaran dapat dilakukan dari berbagai variabel pembelajaran, salah satunya berupa modul sebagai variabel bahan ajar. Pengembangan modul berbantuan android application mobile berorientasi Problem Based Learning diharapkan dapat meningkatkan aktivitas dan hasil belajar. Penelitian pengembangan ini bertujuan untuk mengetahui validitas modul berorientasi Problem Based Learning dan untuk mendapatkan respon dari pengguna. Desain penelitian yang digunakan yaitu four-D Models yang dimodifikasi. Pengumpulan data menggunakan lembar validasi dan metode angket. Kelayakan awal bahan ajar ditentukan oleh ahli materi dan ahli media menggunakan teknik deskriptif persentase. Kelayakan akhir bahan ajar ditentukan berdasarkan hasil pengujian. Data hasil penelitian dianalisis menggunakan metode analisis deskriptif kuantitatif. Secara kuantitatif, data hasil penelitian dianalisis dengan cara menghitung rerata skor dan menentukan kriteria pada interval kelas tertentu. Uji validitas modul memperoleh nilai rata-rata sebesar 3,196, dengan persentase skor rata-rata 79,905%. Data skor perolehan angket tanggapan siswa sebesar 3,21, dan angket tanggapan guru sebesar 3,40, sehingga modul ini terbukti memenuhi kriteria layak yang didukung dengan respon baik dari pengguna. Berdasarkan hasil analisis data dapat disimpulkan bahwa modul ini dinyatakan valid dan mendapat respon baik dari pengguna sehingga dapat digunakan sebagai sumber belajar.Improving the quality of learning can be done from a variety of learning variables, one of them is a variable module as teaching materials. Module development with android application oriented Problem Based Learning is expected to increase activity and learning outcomes. This development study aims to determine the validity of the module oriented problem based learning and getting response from users. The study design used is four-D Models were modified. Data collection is using validation sheet and questionnaires

  11. Motivating programming students by Problem Based Learning and LEGO robots

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Marianne; Coto Chotto, Mayela; Mora, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Retention of first year students in Computer Science is a concern for universities internationally. Especially programming courses are regarded as difficult, and often have the highest failure and dropout rates. The Informatics School at Universidad Nacional in Costa Rica is not an exception....... For this reason the school is focusing on different teaching methods to help their students master these skills. This paper introduces an experimental, controlled comparison study of three learning designs, involving a problem based learning (PBL) approach in connection with the use of LEGO Mindstorms to improve...

  12. Evaluation of problem-based learning in medical students' education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imanieh, Mohammad Hadi; Dehghani, Seyed Mohsen; Sobhani, Ahmad Reza; Haghighat, Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    In traditional medical education systems much interest is placed on the cramming of basic and clinical facts without considering their applicability in the future professional career. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novice medical training method (problem-based learning) as compared to the contemporary teacher-based medical education or traditional methods. Selection of the study subjects was done through simple sampling and according to the division of medical students introduced from Medical Faculty to the Pediatrics Department with no personal involvement. 120 medical students were assigned to 8 groups of 15 students each. For four months, 4 groups were trained with traditional method and 4 other groups underwent problem-based learning method on selected subject materials. In each method, a pre-course test at the beginning and a post-course test at the end of each course were given to each group. The questionnaire used in this study as the instrument was composed of 39 questions, 37 multiple choice questions and two short answer questions. Three professors of pediatric gastroenterologist took part in the training. Two of these professors were responsible for solving task training method. The third professor used traditional teacher-centered methodology to eliminate any possible bias. Scores obtained from these tests were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. P-values of less than 0.05 were considered as significant. The scores of the students undergoing the traditional method were 14.70±3.03 and 21.20±4.07 in the first and second test, respectively. In problem-based learning, the scores were 15.82±3.29 in the first and 27.52±4.72 in the second test. There was a significant difference between the mean scores of post-course exams of the two groups (p=0.001), while no significant difference was observed between the mean scores of pre-course exams of the groups (p=0.550). It may be concluded that problem-based learning method leads to a

  13. Teaching with Concrete and Abstract Visual Representations: Effects on Students' Problem Solving, Problem Representations, and Learning Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Roxana; Ozogul, Gamze; Reisslein, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In 3 experiments, we examined the effects of using concrete and/or abstract visual problem representations during instruction on students' problem-solving practice, near transfer, problem representations, and learning perceptions. In Experiments 1 and 2, novice students learned about electrical circuit analysis with an instructional program that…

  14. Investigating the Effectiveness of Teaching 'Online Learning' in a Problem-based Learning Online Environment.

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, Roisin

    2004-01-01

    This chapter reports on the evaluation and subsequent re-design of an e-learning module that utilised a problem-based pedagogy. The module was a component of a Postgraduate Diploma in Third Level Learning and Teaching for lecturers from a range of higher education institutions in the Republic of Ireland. The online delivery took the form of using a range of electronic resources and online asynchronous and synchronous discussion to solve a problem-based learning scenario. In designing the orig...

  15. A child's vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Christina

    2014-06-01

    Implementing standard vision screening techniques in the primary care practice is the most effective means to detect children with potential vision problems at an age when the vision loss may be treatable. A critical period of vision development occurs in the first few weeks of life; thus, it is imperative that serious problems are detected at this time. Although it is not possible to quantitate an infant's vision, evaluating ocular health appropriately can mean the difference between sight and blindness and, in the case of retinoblastoma, life or death. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vision based guidance and flight control in problems of aerial tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stepanyan, Vahram

    The use of visual sensors in providing the necessary information for the autonomous guidance and navigation of the unmanned-air vehicles (UAV) or micro-air vehicles (MAV) applications is inspired by biological systems and is motivated first of all by the reduction of the navigational sensor cost. Also, visual sensors can be more advantageous in military operations since they are difficult to detect. However, the design of a reliable guidance, navigation and control system for aerial vehicles based only on visual information has many unsolved problems, ranging from hardware/software development to pure control-theoretical issues, which are even more complicated when applied to the tracking of maneuvering unknown targets. This dissertation describes guidance law design and implementation algorithms for autonomous tracking of a flying target, when the information about the target's current position is obtained via a monocular camera mounted on the tracking UAV (follower). The visual information is related to the target's relative position in the follower's body frame via the target's apparent size, which is assumed to be constant, but otherwise unknown to the follower. The formulation of the relative dynamics in the inertial frame requires the knowledge of the follower's orientation angles, which are assumed to be known. No information is assumed to be available about the target's dynamics. The follower's objective is to maintain a desired relative position irrespective of the target's motion. Two types of guidance laws are designed and implemented in the dissertation. The first one is a smooth guidance law that guarantees asymptotic tracking of a target, the velocity of which is viewed as a time-varying disturbance, the change in magnitude of which has a bounded integral. The second one is a smooth approximation of a discontinuous guidance law that guarantees bounded tracking with adjustable bounds when the target's acceleration is viewed as a bounded but otherwise

  17. The Use of Problem-Based Learning Model to Improve Quality Learning Students Morals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurzaman

    2017-01-01

    Model of moral cultivation in MTsN Bangunharja done using three methods, classical cultivation methods, extra-curricular activities in the form of religious activities, scouting, sports, and Islamic art, and habituation of morals. Problem base learning models in MTsN Bangunharja applied using the following steps: find the problem, define the…

  18. Introducing Problem-Based Learning as a Learning Strategy for Masters Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Janice

    2012-01-01

    The introduction of problem-based learning (PBL) as an innovative strategy is often challenging to both teaching staff and students. This is particularly the case when it is only used on one module within a programme. This case study reports on an evaluation of the experiences of students and staff in the first cohort introduced to problem-based…

  19. Interactions between students and tutor in problem-based learning: the significance of deep learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azer, Samy A

    2009-05-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an excellent opportunity for students to take responsibility for their learning and to develop a number of cognitive skills. These include identifying problems in the trigger, generating hypotheses, constructing mechanisms, developing an enquiry plan, ranking their hypotheses on the basis of available evidence, interpreting clinical and laboratory findings, identifying their learning needs, and dealing with uncertainty. Students also need to work collaboratively in their group, communicate effectively, and take active roles in the tutorials. Therefore, interaction in the group between students and their tutor is vital to ensure deep learning and successful outcomes. The aims of this paper are to discuss the key principles for successful interaction in PBL tutorials and to highlight the major symptoms of superficial learning and poor interactions. This comprises a wide range of symptoms for different group problems, including superficial learning. By early detection of such problems, tutors will be able to explore actions with the group and negotiate changes that can foster group dynamics and enforce deep learning.

  20. Interactions Between Students and Tutor in Problem-Based Learning: The Significance of Deep Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samy A. Azer

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Problem-based learning (PBL is an excellent opportunity for students to take responsibility for their learning and to develop a number of cognitive skills. These include identifying problems in the trigger, generating hypotheses, constructing mechanisms, developing an enquiry plan, ranking their hypotheses on the basis of available evidence, interpreting clinical and laboratory findings, identifying their learning needs, and dealing with uncertainty. Students also need to work collaboratively in their group, communicate effectively, and take active roles in the tutorials. Therefore, interaction in the group between students and their tutor is vital to ensure deep learning and successful outcomes. The aims of this paper are to discuss the key principles for successful interaction in PBL tutorials and to highlight the major symptoms of superficial learning and poor interactions. This comprises a wide range of symptoms for different group problems, including superficial learning. By early detection of such problems, tutors will be able to explore actions with the group and negotiate changes that can foster group dynamics and enforce deep learning.

  1. The relationships between problem characteristics, achievement-related behaviors, and academic achievement in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockalingam, Nachamma; Rotgans, Jerome I; Schmidt, Henk G

    2011-10-01

    This study investigated the influence of five problem characteristics on students' achievement-related classroom behaviors and academic achievement. Data from 5,949 polytechnic students in PBL curricula across 170 courses were analyzed by means of path analysis. The five problem characteristics were: (1) problem clarity, (2) problem familiarity, (3) the extent to which the problem stimulated group discussion, (4) self-study, and (5) identification of learning goals. The results showed that problem clarity led to more group discussion, identification of learning goals, and self-study than problem familiarity. On the other hand, problem familiarity had a stronger and direct impact on academic achievement.

  2. Students’ Mathematical Creative Thinking through Problem Posing Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulfah, U.; Prabawanto, S.; Jupri, A.

    2017-09-01

    The research aims to investigate the differences in enhancement of students’ mathematical creative thinking ability of those who received problem posing approach assisted by manipulative media and students who received problem posing approach without manipulative media. This study was a quasi experimental research with non-equivalent control group design. Population of this research was third-grade students of a primary school in Bandung city in 2016/2017 academic year. Sample of this research was two classes as experiment class and control class. The instrument used is a test of mathematical creative thinking ability. Based on the results of the research, it is known that the enhancement of the students’ mathematical creative thinking ability of those who received problem posing approach with manipulative media aid is higher than the ability of those who received problem posing approach without manipulative media aid. Students who get learning problem posing learning accustomed in arranging mathematical sentence become matter of story so it can facilitate students to comprehend about story

  3. A Danish Perspective on Problem Based Learning in Space Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan D. V.; Bisgaard, Morten; Alminde, Lars

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the goals of the Student Satellite Program at Aalborg University (AAU), and the means for implementing it, namely a concept called Problem Based Learning, which is the cornerstone in the education at AAU. AAU has within the last decade chosen to focus strongly on education in...... attractive for the industry in general, and not only for the space industry....... in space technology, not because the country lacks aerospace engineers, but because space projects require the students to think about systems rather than individual modules, while providing problems that are technically challenging for the students to solve. This combination makes the graduates very...

  4. Prospective measurement of a problem-based learning course sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolder, Christian R; Olin, Jacqueline L; Alston, Gregory L

    2012-11-12

    To measure the effect, over time, of a 2-year problem-based learning (PBL) sequence on the skills, knowledge, and abilities it was designed to develop and enhance. At the start of each PBL semester, students were provided a "work sample" case with a main medical issue not previously covered in the curriculum. A standardized form containing 6 sections (hypotheses, learning issues to investigate, how hypotheses ruled in/out, primary-problem identification, plan, and goals of plan) was completed for each case. To rate student performance, investigators used a standardized form with 5-point Likert scale. Sixty-seven students who completed 4 assessments were included in data analyses. Scores significantly improved for each semester compared with baseline. Minimal significant differences were observed among semesters 2, 3, and 4. The 2-year PBL sequence improved students' performance compared with baseline, but the performance ceiling observed in our study requires further investigation.

  5. Problem-based learning in optical engineering studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, the Problem-Based Learning (PBL) is one of the most prospective educational technologies. PBL is based on evaluation of learning outcomes of a student, both professional and personal, instead of traditional evaluation of theoretical knowledge and selective practical skills. Such an approach requires changes in the curricula development. There should be introduced projects (cases) imitating real tasks from the professional life. These cases should include a problem summary with necessary theoretic description, charts, graphs, information sources etc, task to implement and evaluation indicators and criteria. Often these cases are evaluated with the assessment-center method. To motivate students for the given task they could be divided into groups and have a contest. Whilst it looks easy to implement in social, economic or teaching fields PBL is pretty complicated in engineering studies. Examples of cases in the first-cycle optical engineering studies are shown in this paper. Procedures of the PBL implementation and evaluation are described.

  6. Problem-based learning in a health sciences librarianship course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitroff, A; Ancona, A M; Beman, S B; Dodge, A M; Hutchinson, K L; LaBonte, M J; Mays, T L; Simon, D T

    1998-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has been adopted by many medical schools in North America. Because problem solving, information seeking, and lifelong learning skills are central to the PBL curriculum, health sciences librarians have been actively involved in the PBL process at these medical schools. The introduction of PBL in a library and information science curriculum may be appropriate to consider at this time. PBL techniques have been incorporated into a health sciences librarianship course at the School of Library and Information Science (LIS) at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee to explore the use of this method in an advanced Library and Information Science course. After completion of the course, the use of PBL has been evaluated by the students and the instructor. The modified PBL course design is presented and the perceptions of the students and the instructor are discussed. PMID:9681169

  7. Evaluation of problem-based learning in medical students’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MOHAMMAD HADI IMANIEH

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In traditional medical education systems much interest is placed on the cramming of basic and clinical facts without considering their applicability in the future professional career. The aim of this study is to evaluate a novice medical training method (problem-based learning as compared to the contemporary teacher-based medical education or traditional methods. Methods: Selection of the study subjects was done through simple sampling and according to the division of medical students introduced from Medical Faculty to the Pediatrics Department with no personal involvement. 120 medical students were assigned to 8 groups of 15 students each. For four months, 4 groups were trained with traditional method and 4 other groups underwent problem-based learning method on selected subject materials. In each method, a pre-course test at the beginning and a post-course test at the end of each course were given to each group. The questionnaire used in this study as the instrument was composed of 39 questions, 37 multiple choice questions and two short answer questions. Three professors of pediatric gastroenterologist took part in the training. Two of these professors were responsible for solving task training method. The third professor used traditional teacher-centered methodology to eliminate any possible bias. Scores obtained from these tests were analyzed using paired t-test and independent t-test. P values of less than 0.05 were considered as significant. Results: The scores of the students undergoing the traditional method were 14.70±3.03 and 21.20±4.07 in the first and second test, respectively. In problembased learning, the scores were 15.82±3.29 in the first and 27.52±4.72 in the second test. There was a significant difference between the mean scores of post-course exams of the two groups (p=0.001, while no significant difference was observed between the mean scores of pre-course exams of the groups (p=0.550. Conclusion: It may be

  8. THE ROLE OF STUDENT CHARACTERISTICS IN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mia Damiyanti

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available To reach the effectiveness of study, it is recommended to work on active learning method. The learning activity must be done with emphasis on the students’ characteristics. The characteristic means internal factors (cognitive entry behavior and affective entry characteristics, which are considered important as solving problems. The previous studies have shown that there is a correlation between achievement test and students’ characteristic entry behavior. At the beginning of the academic year of 2003, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Indonesia started active learning with PBL curriculum for the BDS degree. From a study about the correlation between the achievement and students’ entry behavior (previous knowledge, self concept, attitude, and anxiety during attending the test the study showed that characteristic entry behavior contributes to the student’s achievement test. The results supported the previous study.

  9. Investing in practice: enquiry- and problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, G; Grandis, S; Glasper, E A

    Enquiry-based learning (EBL) and problem-based learning (PBL) are two similar methods of educating nurses and midwives which have been recommended by the UKCC in its new report 'Fitness for Practice' (UKCC, 1999). The integration of theory and practice within the student programme is the key to bridging the theory/practice gap. The incorporation of EBL and PBL into the curriculum may help resolve this gap. As these methods of education foster learning through the use of real client scenarios it is important to stress that the partnership between clinical and academic staff is of paramount importance. This article explores EBL and PBL from the practitioner's perspective and examines some of the factors necessary for its successful implementation.

  10. Evaluating problem-based learning in a multilingual student population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, C; Seneque, M

    1999-10-01

    The University of Natal Medical School in South Africa provides training for a student body composed of two groups: one with English as a first language and the other with an African language as a first language and English as the second. A new methodology was developed to evaluate an innovative course using modified problem-based learning techniques in this heterogeneous environment. The learning model proposed required achieving a balance of three components: content, enquiry/learning process and social interaction/group process. A multidimensional system, felt to be consistent with this educational philosophy, was developed using seven different quantitative and qualitative techniques. The University of Natal Medical School. First-year multilingual medical students. The results revealed that social interaction was highly successful in reducing barriers between the student groups and between students and facilitators. However, the emphasis on group participation may have overshadowed the enquiry process, leading to superficial discussions of problems and feelings of repetitiveness. During the course students and facilitators expressed concern that the innovative assessments used did not assess the course content adequately. While the group presentations and projects were useful exercises for consolidation and group interaction, they did not enable facilitators to identify struggling students. The outcome of the evaluation stressed the need of achieving an appropriate balance both in the curriculum and assessments of the three components of the learning model, particularly in a setting where student backgrounds and language ability differ. Multidimensional methodology is needed for effective evaluation that promotes critical reflection.

  11. N-learners problem: Learning Boolean combinations of halfspaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.V. (Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science); Oblow, E.M.; Glover, C.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1992-03-01

    Given two subsets S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} (not necessarily finite) of {Re}{sup d} separable by a Boolean combination of N halfspaces, we consider the problem of learning the separation function from a finite set of examples, i.e. we produce with high probability a function close to the actual separating function. Our solution consists of a system of N perceptrons and a single consolidator which combines the outputs of the individual perceptrons. We show that an off-line version of this problem, where the examples are given in a batch, can be solved in time polynomial in the number of examples. We also provide an on-line learning algorithm that incrementally solves the problem by suitably training a system of N perceptrons much in the spirit of the classical perceptron learning algorithm. This solution constitutes an example of a composite system of N learners capable of accomplishing a task that is not achievable by a single learner, for a single perceptron is incapable of separating sets that are not linearly separable.

  12. Using an Isomorphic Problem Pair to Learn Introductory Physics: Transferring from a Two-step Problem to a Three-step Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we examine introductory physics students' ability to perform analogical reasoning between two isomorphic problems which employ the same underlying physics principles but have different surface features. Three hundred and eighty two students from a calculus-based and an algebra-based introductory physics course were asked to learn from a solved problem provided and take advantage of what they learned from it to solve another isomorphic problem (which we call the quiz problem). The solved problem provided has two sub-problems while the quiz problem has three sub-problems, which is known to be challenging for introductory students from previous research. In addition to the solved problem, students also received extra scaffolding supports that were intended to help them discern and exploit the underlying similarities of the isomorphic solved and quiz problems. The results suggest that students had great difficulty in transferring what they learned from a 2-step problem to a 3-step problem. Although...

  13. EVALUATING MANAGEMENT STUDENTS AND PROFESSORS REGARDING THEIR PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karine de Lima Guedes

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of Problem-Based Learning (PBL from the points of view of students and teachers in a Higher Education Institute (HEI. PBL is one of the modalities within active methodologies and uses problem resolution for students to analyze and study content. This methodology educates through stimulating students to have a proactive attitude in seeking knowledge. The study utilizes a qualitative research approach and sought to analyze a PBL teaching proposal in with the sample groups coming from professors and students in an undergraduate Business Administration degree at a private institution. The subjects comprised students enrolled in the first period of the second half of 2013 and the professors lectured during that same period, for the following courses, at the Lapa campus: Executive Functions in Management, Sociology of Organizations, Management Theory Evolution, Management Challenges, and Economic Theory Evolution. Semi-structured interviews and Focus Groups (FG were used to collect data from professors and students, respectively. The data showed the PBL method, in addition to bringing students and teachers together in more fruitful relationships, encouraged students to develop a critical sense and improved their teamwork skills, expanding their vision of the problem and thus providing opportunities for broader research and improving their reasoning and creativity.

  14. Physical Assessment Experience in a Problem-Based Learning Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riche, Daniel M.; Stover, Kayla R.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the impact of a physical-assessment learning experience implemented in the problem-based learning (PBL) format of the third year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Design. Students enrolled in a PBL course completed survey instruments to measure knowledge and confidence before and after participating in the learning experience. A simulation stethoscope was used to teach students abnormal pulmonary and cardiovascular sounds in 1-hour sessions for each of 12 PBL groups. Assessment. The 92 students enrolled in the PBL course completed pre- and post-experience survey instruments. Students’ scores on knowledge questions increased significantly (p < 0.0001) from 40.4% ± 11.4% at baseline to 62.5% ± 13.7% and 63.1 ± 11.6%, respectively, on the 2 sets of post-experience questions. Students scored a median of 3 or 4 on a 5-point Likert scale after a learning experience on questions measuring confidence. Conclusion. Use of a simulation stethoscope in a physical-assessment learning experience increased pharmacy students’ knowledge in performing pulmonary and cardiovascular assessment techniques. PMID:22102746

  15. An electronic study guide for problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, G A; Bligh, J G; Leinster, S F; Warenius, H M

    1995-11-01

    This paper describes the development and structure of an Electronic Study Guide for Oncology (LETSGO) for undergraduate medical students. LETSGO is aimed at clinical students learning about cancer. The subject of the guide is breast cancer and learning objectives cover structure and function, behavioural science, public health and epidemiology and professional and personal values. LETSGO is designed to follow the steps used in problem-based learning. The student is encouraged to carry out individual brainstorming around cases with the issues identified acting as the first step in an educational audit loop. Clear definition of prior knowledge is available by way of interactive features, and hyper-text links to core text and diagrams (including microscopic sections) precede definition of both broad aims and objectives for the module and specific objectives for assessment purposes. Core knowledge is available via hyper-text links. Assessment has three components: open ended questions asking for free text responses linking to 'model' answers; extended matching items linking to 'model' answers and providing peer-referenced feedback as a bar-chart distribution, and an educational audit loop referring back to the original issues identified at the beginning of the package in brainstorming. Clear mapping throughout the guide is a major feature and the student's progress is clearly displayed at each stage of the guide. The program provides dynamic access to the student's existing knowledge base and stimulates new learning based on the student's own learning needs.

  16. Problem-based learning online: perceptions of health science students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valaitis, Ruta K; Sword, Wendy A; Jones, Bob; Hodges, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    This qualitative study explored health sciences students' perceptions of their experiences in online problem based learning (PBL) and focused on their views about learning and group process in the online environment. Participants were novices to online learning and highly experienced in PBL, therefore, they could reflect on past face-to-face PBL experiences. Three groups of learners were involved, including undergraduate nursing and midwifery students and graduate students in a neonatal nurse practitioner program. Findings are presented using the six steps of the PBL process (Rideout & Carpio, 2001). Results indicated that it is feasible to conduct PBL online. Students felt that it increased their flexibility for learning, enhanced their ability to deeply process content, and provided access to valuable learning resources. Students experienced a period of adaptation to the online environment, perceived a heavy workload, and had difficulties making group decisions online. In addition to using asynchronous communication, chats (synchronous communication) were valued to support group decision-making online. Students appreciated validation of their online contributions from their peers and wanted clear expectations of what constituted successful tutorial participation from their tutors. Although online PBL can work effectively, tutors and students need to develop online literacy skills to smooth their transition to an online PBL environment.

  17. SUPPORT PROBLEM FOR COGNITIVE FUNCTIONS IN THE E-LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liubov S. Lisitsyna

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Successful development of such important human cognitive functions as attention, perception and information processing speed, working and long-term memory, thinking, etc. is a necessary foundation for increasing the effectiveness of e-learning. One way for further developments of students' cognitive functions in the process of e-learning consists in computer cognitive training sessions, which are included in the individual learning paths to promote a learner to the successful implementation of specific learning tasks of e-course. Analysis of the estimating problems for cognitive training effects (severity, stability and transfer is done and the ways for their solution are proposed. It is shown that the biological basis for cognitive training effects consists in the processes of neuroplasticity of the brain that influence the duration and intensity of training. An approach to the organization of research for the effects of cognitive training, based on the usage of random methods is suggested. The prospects of game mechanics application for cognitive training implementation in elearning are shown. A detailed analysis of the approaches to the training of the basic cognitive functions, including working memory of learners, is carried out. The practical significance of this paper is to identify priorities for research and development of cognitive training in e-learning.

  18. Do learning approaches of medical students affect their satisfaction with problem-based learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurpinar, Erol; Kulac, Esin; Tetik, Cihat; Akdogan, Ilgaz; Mamakli, Sumer

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the satisfaction of medical students with problem-based learning (PBL) and their approaches to learning to investigate the effect of learning approaches on their levels of satisfaction. The study group was composed of medical students from three different universities, which apply PBL at different levels in their curricula. The revised two-factor study process survey was applied to the study group to determine their approaches to learning as "deep" or "surface" learning. In addition, another survey of 20 questions was used to determine satisfaction levels of students with PBL and other variables. Of the study group, 64.6% were found to adopt a deep approach to learning, and we confirmed that these students were reasonably more satisfied with PBL.

  19. Problem based learning to improve proportional reasoning of students in mathematics learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misnasanti, Utami, Ratna Widianti; Suwanto, Fevi Rahmawati

    2017-08-01

    This paper reviews about the using of Problem Based Learning (PBL) to improve proportional reasoning of students in mathematics learning. Mathematics is one of the subjects at school which generally has a goal to help students preparing themselves in this growth century. To achieve the goal of mathematics learning, student's good reasoning is needed as the base of mathematics itself. This reasoning is an ability to think through logic ideas about mathematics concept. One of reasoning mathematics ability is the proportional reasoning. Proportional reasoning is knowing the multiplicative relationship between the base ratio and the proportional situation to which it's applied. Proportional reasoning is important to have by students in learning mathematics. Many topics within the school mathematics require knowledge and understanding of ratio and proportion, for examples problem solving and calculation activities in domains involving scale, probability, percent, rate, trigonometry, equivalence, measurement, the geometry of plane shapes, algebra are assisted through ratio and proportion knowledge. But, the mastership of proportional reasoning ability, of course, can't be apart from teacher's role. In learning, a teacher has to choose and apply the right model so that it can improve the proportional reasoning ability of students. One of the alternative ways which could be applied to improve proportional reasoning ability of students is by applying PBL Model. Applying PBL which based on problem indirectly has trained students to solve every problem in front of them. Thus, applying PBL can improve mathematics proportional reasoning of students in mathematics learning.

  20. Process competencies in a problem and project based learning environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Xiangyun; Kolmos, Anette

    2006-01-01

    competencies. Consequently, engineering education is facing challenges regarding how to facilitate students with scientific-technological competencies as well as process competencies. Problem based learning (PBL) as an educational model is regarded as an effective example regarding preparing students......Future engineers are not only required to master technological competencies concerning solving problems, producing and innovating technology, they are also expected to have capabilities of cooperation, communication, and project management in diverse social context, which are referred to as process...... with the expected professional competencies. Based on the educational practice of PBL Aalborg Model, which is characterized by problem-orientation, project-organization and team work, this paper examines the process of developing process competencies through studying engineering in a PBL environment from...

  1. Problem based learning in acoustics at Aalborg University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershøi, Dorte; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Christensen, Flemming

    2010-01-01

    The master program in Acoustics (M. Sc.) from Aalborg University is taught at the Department of Electronic system. The M. Sc. program consists of three semesters with course units and problem based project work organized in groups, and a final semester for a master thesis. During the first three...... semesters, the learning objectives are distributed between courses with independent examination, and a semester project. Each semester has a theme the projects must comply with. Either supervisors, students or industry propose the problem that become the basis for the project work. Under supervision......, the students narrow down the problem, address possible solutions, and typically implement one or more of the options for further evaluation. The courses supplement the project work by adding specific and general knowledge of the subject areas of each semester. The courses either have direct application...

  2. Commentary for the Special Issue: PBL Scholarship: Building on the Educational Vision of Howard Barrows

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ertmer, Peggy A; Ertmer, Peggy A

    2013-01-01

    ...’ vision on the scholarship and practice of problem-based learning (PBL). Collectively, these articles represent a variety of contexts, content areas, delivery formats, and structures in PBL implementations and research...

  3. Comparison on testability of visual acuity, stereo acuity and colour vision tests between children with learning disabilities and children without learning disabilities in government primary schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu Bakar, Nurul Farhana; Chen, Ai-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Children with learning disabilities might have difficulties to communicate effectively and give reliable responses as required in various visual function testing procedures. The purpose of this study was to compare the testability of visual acuity using the modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) and Cambridge Crowding Cards, stereo acuity using Lang Stereo test II and Butterfly stereo tests and colour perception using Colour Vision Test Made Easy (CVTME) and Ishihara's Test for Colour Deficiency (Ishihara Test) between children in mainstream classes and children with learning disabilities in special education classes in government primary schools. A total of 100 primary school children (50 children from mainstream classes and 50 children from special education classes) matched in age were recruited in this cross-sectional comparative study. The testability was determined by the percentage of children who were able to give reliable respond as required by the respective tests. 'Unable to test' was defined as inappropriate response or uncooperative despite best efforts of the screener. The testability of the modified ETDRS, Butterfly stereo test and Ishihara test for respective visual function tests were found lower among children in special education classes ( P Stereo test II and CVTME. Non verbal or "matching" approaches were found to be more superior in testing visual functions in children with learning disabilities. Modifications of vision testing procedures are essential for children with learning disabilities.

  4. Comparison on testability of visual acuity, stereo acuity and colour vision tests between children with learning disabilities and children without learning disabilities in government primary schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurul Farhana Abu Bakar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Children with learning disabilities might have difficulties to communicate effectively and give reliable responses as required in various visual function testing procedures. Aims: The purpose of this study was to compare the testability of visual acuity using the modified Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS and Cambridge Crowding Cards, stereo acuity using Lang Stereo test II and Butterfly stereo tests and colour perception using Colour Vision Test Made Easy (CVTME and Ishihara′s Test for Colour Deficiency (Ishihara Test between children in mainstream classes and children with learning disabilities in special education classes in government primary schools. Materials and Methods: A total of 100 primary school children (50 children from mainstream classes and 50 children from special education classes matched in age were recruited in this cross-sectional comparative study. The testability was determined by the percentage of children who were able to give reliable respond as required by the respective tests. ′Unable to test′ was defined as inappropriate response or uncooperative despite best efforts of the screener. Results: The testability of the modified ETDRS, Butterfly stereo test and Ishihara test for respective visual function tests were found lower among children in special education classes ( P < 0.001 but not in Cambridge Crowding Cards, Lang Stereo test II and CVTME. Conclusion: Non verbal or "matching" approaches were found to be more superior in testing visual functions in children with learning disabilities. Modifications of vision testing procedures are essential for children with learning disabilities.

  5. The Effect of Problem Based Learning on EFL Students’ Critical Thinking Skill and Learning Outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Bashith

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This research aims to examine the effect of Problem Based Learning (PBL model to students’ critical thinking skill and learning outcome. It was conducted on the 11th graders of social science program at SMAN 6 Malang. The research material was the problems of demography. Research method was quasi experiment with non equivalent control group design. The data analysis used t-test technique. The research result showed that PBL learning model affected students’ critical thinking skill and learning outcome in SMAN 6 Malang. The average gain score of experimental class is 33.10, higher than control class, which is 16.24. The result of t-test analysis is 0.000 smaller than the significance of 0.05. It is suggested that PBL becomes one of aalternative teaching models that could be implemented to enhance students critical thingking skill.

  6. Advantages of video trigger in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Ki; Patil, Nivritti G; Chen, Julie Y; Lam, Jamie C M; Lau, Chak S; Ip, Mary S M

    2010-01-01

    Traditionally, paper cases are used as 'triggers' to stimulate learning in problem-based learning (PBL). However, video may be a better medium because it preserves the original language, encourages the active extraction of information, avoids depersonalization of patients and allows direct observation of clinical consultations. In short, it exposes the students to the complexity of actual clinical problems. The study aims to find out whether students and facilitators who are accustomed to paper cases would prefer video triggers or paper cases and the reasons for their preference. After students and facilitators had completed a video PBL tutorial, their responses were measured by a structured questionnaire using a modified Likert scale. A total of 257 students (92%) and 26 facilitators (100%) responded. The majority of students and facilitators considered that using video triggers could enhance the students' observational powers and clinical reasoning, help them to integrate different information and better understand the cases and motivate them to learn. They found PBL using video triggers more interesting and preferred it to PBL using paper cases. Video triggers are preferred by both students and facilitators over paper cases in PBL.

  7. Learning Problems Related to the Concept of Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradamante, Francesca; Michelini, Marisa; Stefanel, Alberto

    The concept of field has formed itself through a process of elaboration of concepts both on the historical level, and on that of mathematic formalism (integral or differential approach, Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formalism), and in the relationship between mathematics and physics. In didactic tradition it is used as an example of the formalised analogical process. Its phenomenological aspects and its characteristics of time and space are only partially described for the various types of field, mixing the descriptive and interpretative levels. In this review we select some of the main teaching-learning problems and student's diffculties with learning the concept of field, that many researches have stressed, such as: the concept of field and its representation by lines of force, the difference between field and force, the connection between field and its sources, the concept of the field's superposition and the interpretation of mathematical formulas, the application of the third principle of dynamics, the motion of the field's characteristic particles in the field itself. We consider the field in static situations, because these learning problems are fundamental and basic for when we will pass to dynamic situations (electromagnetic field).

  8. Solving problems with group work in problem-based learning: hold on to the philosophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolmans, D H; Wolfhagen, I H; van der Vleuten, C P; Wijnen, W H

    2001-09-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) has gained a foothold within many schools in higher education as a response to the problems faced within traditional education. Working with PBL tutorial groups is assumed to have positive effects on student learning. Several studies provide empirical evidence that PBL stimulates cognitive effects and leads to restructuring of knowledge and enhanced intrinsic interest in the subject matter. However, staff members do not always experience the positive effects of group work which they had hoped for. When confronted with problems in group work, such as students who only maintain an appearance of being actively involved and students who let others do the work, teachers all too often implement solutions which can be characterized as teacher- directed rather than student-directed. Teachers tend to choose solutions which are familiar from their own experience during professional training, i.e. using the teacher-directed model. These solutions are not effective in improving group work and the negative experiences persist. It is argued that teachers should hold on to the underlying educational philosophy when solving problems arising from group work in PBL, by choosing actions which are consistent with the student-directed view of education in PBL.

  9. Integrating Ultrasound Teaching into Preclinical Problem-based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tshibwabwa, Eli Tumba; Cannon, Jenifer; Rice, James; Kawooya, Michael G; Sanii, Reza; Mallin, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The aim is to provide students in the preclinical with ultrasound image interpretation skills. Research question: Are students in smaller groups with access to a combination of lectures and hands-on patient contact most likely to have better ultrasound image interpretation skills, than students in larger groups with only interactive didactic lectures? First-year students at the preclinical Program of the College of Medicine, participated in two 2-h introductory interactive ultrasound sessions. The study comprised two cohorts: 2012/2013 students, who were offered large group teaching (LGT) sessions (control group), and 2013/2014 students, who received the intervention in small group learning problem-based learning (PBL) sessions (experimental group). The overall learning objectives were identical for both groups. The success of the module was evaluated using pre- and post-tests as well as students' feedback. The students in the experimental group showed significantly higher scores in interpretations of images than those in the control group. The experimental group showed achievement of learning outcomes along with higher levels of satisfaction with the module compared to the latter. Posttest knowledge of the basics of ultrasound improved significantly over the pretest in the experimental group. In addition, students' overall satisfaction of the ultrasound module was shown to be higher for the PBL compared to the LGT groups. Small groups in an interactive and PBL setting along with opportunities for hands-on practice and simultaneous visualization of findings on a high definition screen should enhance preclinical student learning of the basics of ultrasound. Despite the potential of ultrasound as a clinical, teaching and learning tool for students in the preclinical years, standardized recommendations have yet to be created regarding its integration into the curricula within academic institutions and clinical medicine. The interactive and PBL is here to stay at the

  10. Assessment of goals in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özbıçakçı, Şeyda; Bilik, Özlem; İntepeler, Şeyda Seren

    2012-11-01

    Assessing the learning goals set by faculty is an important part of problem-based learning (PBL). Students also develop individual and group goals during module tutorials. They choose learning activities and create a framework for their self-directed study in order to achieve these goals. This investigation analyzes perceptions of the depth of understanding that students acquire. The effects of setting learning goals by faculty and by students themselves are examined, and we explore differences within groups and within the different years in the program. Nursing students responded to a questionnaire indicating how well they thought they had understood new material, according to both the goals preset by the faculty and those developed by the students themselves. A five-point Likert scale was used for this. The findings indicate no significant difference between tutors' and students' evaluations of student level of understanding within the different years of the program. Students and tutors in all three years indicated that they achieved adequate or good understanding of learning goals. (Students: First year: 91.6%, second year: 76.5%, third year: 90.1%; Tutors: First year: 76.8%, second year: 65.7%, third year: 89.1%) These findings are useful for evaluation of PBL outcomes for curriculum committees. Based on these research results, our faculty curriculum committee has decided to give the students a list of faculty generated learning goals at the end of every curriculum module. The students then compare these with their own self-directed goals in feedback sessions with faculty members. These feedback sessions have been very popular with students. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. What Mathematics Education Can Learn from Art: The Assumptions, Values, and Vision of Mathematics Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietiker, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Elliot Eisner proposed that educational challenges can be met by applying an artful lens. This article draws from Eisner's proposal to consider the assumptions, values, and vision of mathematics education by theorizing mathematics curriculum as an art form. By conceptualizing mathematics curriculum (both in written and enacted forms) as stories…

  12. Incorporating technology-based learning tools into teaching and learning of optimization problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Irene

    2014-07-01

    The traditional approach of teaching optimization problems in calculus emphasizes more on teaching the students using analytical approach through a series of procedural steps. However, optimization normally involves problem solving in real life problems and most students fail to translate the problems into mathematic models and have difficulties to visualize the concept underlying. As an educator, it is essential to embed technology in suitable content areas to engage students in construction of meaningful learning by creating a technology-based learning environment. This paper presents the applications of technology-based learning tool in designing optimization learning activities with illustrative examples, as well as to address the challenges in the implementation of using technology in teaching and learning optimization. The suggestion activities in this paper allow flexibility for educator to modify their teaching strategy and apply technology to accommodate different level of studies for the topic of optimization. Hence, this provides great potential for a wide range of learners to enhance their understanding of the concept of optimization.

  13. Exploring a Problem-Based Learning Approach in Pharmaceutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Barbara; Brown, Alyson

    2017-09-20

    The basis of this study was to explore the impact of the initiation of a Problem-Base Learning (PBL) approach within a second-year pharmaceutics degree on a Master of Pharmacy programme, introduced as a way of improving deep learning and to foster independent learning. A semi-structured interview was used to seek feedback from the students, and feedback from staff was secured though a focus group. A thematic approach was used for the analysis, once data saturation had been reached. Exam pass-rate statistics were also analysed. Five parent themes were identified from the student interviews: Module structure, Promoting lifelong learning, Integration and future practice, Outcomes and Student experience. The third year exam pass rate improved by 12% in the year following the introduction of PBL in second year. Various recommendations were proposed to further improve the module, based on the findings of this study. These include improving feedback and support through tutorials, reducing the volume of directed study, as well as highlighting the relevance of pharmaceutics to the pharmacy degree. A long-term review would be needed to assess the full implications of PBL teaching within this course.

  14. Exploring a Problem-Based Learning Approach in Pharmaceutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara McKenzie

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The basis of this study was to explore the impact of the initiation of a Problem-Base Learning (PBL approach within a second-year pharmaceutics degree on a Master of Pharmacy programme, introduced as a way of improving deep learning and to foster independent learning. Design. A semi-structured interview was used to seek feedback from the students, and feedback from staff was secured though a focus group. A thematic approach was used for the analysis, once data saturation had been reached. Exam pass-rate statistics were also analysed. Assessment. Five parent themes were identified from the student interviews: Module structure, Promoting lifelong learning, Integration and future practice, Outcomes and Student experience. The third year exam pass rate improved by 12% in the year following the introduction of PBL in second year. Conclusions. Various recommendations were proposed to further improve the module, based on the findings of this study. These include improving feedback and support through tutorials, reducing the volume of directed study, as well as highlighting the relevance of pharmaceutics to the pharmacy degree. A long-term review would be needed to assess the full implications of PBL teaching within this course.

  15. Problem-based Learning in Veterinary Medicine: Advantages and Disadvantages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgeta Rata

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the research is to see if Problem-based Learning (PBL can be successfully used in veterinary medicine. Research results show that PBL offers several advantages (it contributes towards the reduction of information overload; it develops generic skills and aptitudes; it facilitates an integrated core curriculum; it facilitates the relevance of curriculum content; it fosters active, deep learning, improved understanding, and retention and development of lifelong learning skills; it is a constructivist approach; it makes the students more responsible for their learning; and it motivates both teachers and students over traditional teaching methods. However, it also has several well recognised disadvantages (it deprives students’ access to a particular inspirational teacher who, in a traditional curriculum, would deliver lectures to a large group; it is difficult and frustrating for the tutors who cannot “teach”; it makes students be unsure about how much self-directed study to do and what information is relevant and useful; it needs more human resources to take part in the tutoring process; it needs more material resources for the students to access simultaneously. The conclusion is that PBL can successfully be used in the teaching of veterinary medicine-related disciplines provided the teachers work on its disadvantages

  16. Problem-centric Process for Research-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Shaban

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Research-based Learning (RbL extends Inquiry and Project-based Learning by facilitating an early stage exposure and training for future scientists through authentic research activities. In this paper, an iterative problem-centric RbL process is introduced, and its activities and management aspects are described. The process helps implement course-integrated research systematically and practically. Furthermore, the novel process follows constructivist methods in incorporating inquiry, scaffolding, open-ended projects, as well as a goal oriented learning approach. The RbL process is adopted in two advanced computing courses, at two different universities: a leading comprehensive Western university and a new university in a developing country. The paper summarizes new lessons learned in these rewarding experiences. In particular, the instructor should help students start their projects, by providing them with previous work or data and pre-approving the papers to review by students. He should also maintain a continuous feedback to and from students to keep the students motivated and help the instructor refine and adapt the RBL process. We note that research collaborators can help students in identifying the research topics early. The paper also shows how to alleviate difficulties that may be encountered by students who find the novel approach demanding, and consequently it also helps the instructors better manage the course contents.

  17. Sharpening coarse-to-fine stereo vision by perceptual learning: asymmetric transfer across the spatial frequency spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Roger W; Tran, Truyet T; Craven, Ashley P; Leung, Tsz-Wing; Chat, Sandy W; Levi, Dennis M

    2016-01-01

    Neurons in the early visual cortex are finely tuned to different low-level visual features, forming a multi-channel system analysing the visual image formed on the retina in a parallel manner. However, little is known about the potential 'cross-talk' among these channels. Here, we systematically investigated whether stereoacuity, over a large range of target spatial frequencies, can be enhanced by perceptual learning. Using narrow-band visual stimuli, we found that practice with coarse (low spatial frequency) targets substantially improves performance, and that the improvement spreads from coarse to fine (high spatial frequency) three-dimensional perception, generalizing broadly across untrained spatial frequencies and orientations. Notably, we observed an asymmetric transfer of learning across the spatial frequency spectrum. The bandwidth of transfer was broader when training was at a high spatial frequency than at a low spatial frequency. Stereoacuity training is most beneficial when trained with fine targets. This broad transfer of stereoacuity learning contrasts with the highly specific learning reported for other basic visual functions. We also revealed strategies to boost learning outcomes 'beyond-the-plateau'. Our investigations contribute to understanding the functional properties of the network subserving stereovision. The ability to generalize may provide a key principle for restoring impaired binocular vision in clinical situations.

  18. Learning through debate during problem-based learning: an active learning strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumtaz, Sadaf; Latif, Rabia

    2017-09-01

    We explored medical student's views and perceptions of a series of debates conducted during problem-based learning (PBL) practiced as a part of the Spiral curriculum at the Imam Abdulrahman Bin Faisal University, Saudi Arabia. A series of debates were employed during PBL sessions for second-year female medical students, over the period 2014-2016. Each cohort of students was randomly split into 10 small PBL groups and exposed to weekly PBL activity. Within each group, the students were divided into a proposition half and an opposition half. Students were given 1 wk for debate preparation. The students' responses were recorded on a formulated questionnaire. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze quantitative data, and results are presented as percentages. The usefulness of debate in alleviating potential difficulties in communicating with patients was agreed to by 69% ( n = 126) of participants. That these sessions evoked critical thinking among students was reported by 78% ( n = 142). This series of debates helped 61% ( n = 111) of students to learn effectively about controversial issues. Seventy-one percent ( n = 130) considered that debate promoted argument generation and interpretation skills. Enhanced ability to analyze and research evidence was reported by 59% ( n = 108) of students. One hundred and thirteen students (62%) agreed that debate helped them to improve clinical decision-making, and 75% of students agreed that debates encouraged tolerance toward diverse viewpoints/convincing strategies. The majority of our medical students found debating enhanced analytic decision-making, communication, and critical thinking skills. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Developement, implementation and evaluation of problem-based learning and project based learning in university

    OpenAIRE

    Vrhovski Mohorič, Mojca; Žerovnik, Alenka; Klemen, Brigita; Jakšić Ivačič, Živa; Krstulović, Ajda; Štular, Maruša

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays, different ways of teaching are becoming more and more significant. That means that the emphasis is based on learning as an active process in which a pupil is the one who creates his own knowledge and a teacher attain a role of a tutor or a model. Two of such ways are project based learning and problem-based learning, which fall under constructivist paradigm of teaching and enable a developement of various knowledges, skills and dexterities. Since the year 2013/2014 a department of S...

  20. Blended Learning and Problem Based Learning in a multinational and multidisciplinary setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jens Myrup; Lazaro, José; Mank, Lea

    2017-01-01

    , and a project part where the students work in groups across nationalities and disciplines on real-world Projects posed by companies. This paper presents the evaluations carried out by all participating students, and discusses the experiences with the different learning components including different features...... of the Learning Management System Moodle, which was used for the modules. Moreover, it introduces the concept of just-in-time resources for Problem Based Learning, where we tackle the challenge of providing the students with methods and tools to be used in the projects just when they need it....

  1. PBL - Problem Based Learning for Companies and Clusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamburg, I; Vladut, G.

    2016-07-01

    Small and medium sized companies (SMEs) assure economic growth in Europe. Generally many SMEs are struggling to survive in an ongoing global recession and often they are becoming reluctant to release or pay for staff training. In this paper we present shortly the learning methods in SMEs particularly the Problem Based Learning (PBL) as an efficient form for SMEs and entrepreneurship education. In the field of Urban Logistics it was developed four Clusters with potential of innovation and research in four European Regions: Tuscany - Italy, Valencia - Spain, Lisbon and Tagus - Portugal, Oltenia – Romania. Training and mentoring for SMEs, are essential to create competitiveness. Information and communication technologies (ICT) support the tutors by using an ICT platform which is in the development. (Author)

  2. Using Supervised Deep Learning for Human Age Estimation Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drobnyh, K. A.; Polovinkin, A. N.

    2017-05-01

    Automatic facial age estimation is a challenging task upcoming in recent years. In this paper, we propose using the supervised deep learning features to improve an accuracy of the existing age estimation algorithms. There are many approaches solving the problem, an active appearance model and the bio-inspired features are two of them which showed the best accuracy. For experiments we chose popular publicly available FG-NET database, which contains 1002 images with a broad variety of light, pose, and expression. LOPO (leave-one-person-out) method was used to estimate the accuracy. Experiments demonstrated that adding supervised deep learning features has improved accuracy for some basic models. For example, adding the features to an active appearance model gave the 4% gain (the error decreased from 4.59 to 4.41).

  3. Transitioning to the Real World through Problem-Based Learning: A Collaborative Approach to Teacher Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barron, Lisa; Wells, Lauren

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) creates opportunities for authentic learning in teacher preparation programs. In addition to developing content knowledge and pedagogy, problem-based learning affords students the framework for a holistic, collaborative approach to solving several interconnected problems. As students move through the process of…

  4. A Look at Problem-Based Learning in High School Classrooms to Promote Student Activism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Anne-Rose L.

    2011-01-01

    Problem based learning has more recently become a common term in public education. There is much positive potential when implementing problem based learning at the high school level. Here I review positives while not completely ignoring some of the negatives associated with implementing a problem based learning model at the high school level. More…

  5. Investigation of learning environment for arithmetic word problems by problem posing as sentence integration in Indonesian language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasanah, N.; Hayashi, Y.; Hirashima, T.

    2017-02-01

    Arithmetic word problems remain one of the most difficult area of teaching mathematics. Learning by problem posing has been suggested as an effective way to improve students’ understanding. However, the practice in usual classroom is difficult due to extra time needed for assessment and giving feedback to students’ posed problems. To address this issue, we have developed a tablet PC software named Monsakun for learning by posing arithmetic word problems based on Triplet Structure Model. It uses the mechanism of sentence-integration, an efficient implementation of problem-posing that enables agent-assessment of posed problems. The learning environment has been used in actual Japanese elementary school classrooms and the effectiveness has been confirmed in previous researches. In this study, ten Indonesian elementary school students living in Japan participated in a learning session of problem posing using Monsakun in Indonesian language. We analyzed their learning activities and show that students were able to interact with the structure of simple word problem using this learning environment. The results of data analysis and questionnaire suggested that the use of Monsakun provides a way of creating an interactive and fun environment for learning by problem posing for Indonesian elementary school students.

  6. [Problem-based learning in nursing training: liberation or confinement?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goopy, S E; Sansoni, J

    2001-01-01

    In this article some considerations are introduced on the method of the Problem Based Learning (PBL) for Nursing education. The method is criticized in its application. From the idea that it can be an active method, not conservative and that can be useful to develop the critical thinking, if it is not correctly used, it can result instead in a method that confines the education, negatively standardizes it and limits the critical thought. Some reflection points are underlined to promote a debate on the topic.

  7. Medical Libraries and Problem Based Learning: New Challenges and Opportunities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuan-nien Chen

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the changing role of the medical library and librarians in the context of problem-based learning in terms of fives aspects - impacts on medical libraries, library instruction, technology, the collection, and the new role of the librarians. For the libraries, the role change process is ongoing rather than a single event. The medical school and the library must collaborate and interact in the areas of curriculum design, communications, and library user education. In addition, administrative supports such as budgets, staffing, and the building space of the library are always in demand. [Article content in Chinese

  8. Ohio's Comprehensive Vision Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunner, Richard T.

    1973-01-01

    A vision screening program in seven Ohio counties tested 3,261 preschool children and 44,885 school age children for problems of distance visual acuity, muscle balance, and observable eye problems. (DB)

  9. Development of a problem-based learning model via a virtual learning environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojana Phungsuk

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this research was the development of a problem-based learning model using a virtual learning environment (VLE for undergraduate students in the Photography for Communication Arts course. The model supports and enhances students' learning, achievements and problem-solving skills. An efficiency test for the model revealed an above average set of criteria at 80/83.93, which conformed to the research hypothesis. The principles of instructional systems design (ISD and systems approach were integrated into the design and assessment phases of model development, which resulted in more effective management of relevant instructional courses and materials. Based on its efficiency and potential application to real-life situations, the model has been deemed suitable by experts. The selected student group in the problem-based learning model via VLE achieved higher test scores compared to a group of students in a normal classroom with a statistical significance of .05. Because students learn using models that promote self-awareness and make it possible to choose their own topic of study employing resources provided by VLE, an assessment of their work quality found that they gained more knowledge of information technology as well as access to up-to-date information. Students are able to choose the most comfortable time to study. The model encourages students to learn through participation, practice problem-solving skills on an individual basis, and exchange ideas with other members of a group. The virtual environment involves many forms of media and materials that stimulate students' interest in learning and results in higher satisfaction. The gap in the communication channel between students and teachers is reduced due to easier and more informal communication.

  10. Problem-Based Learning and Information Literacy: A Natural Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate Wenger

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to student overreliance on search engines and the time constraints of one-shot instruction sessions, librarians struggle to teach many of the information literacy skills that students need to conduct successful research. Problem-based learning (PBL provides a way to integrate information literacy naturally into an assignment or course by guiding students through the research process as they work to find a solution to a problem. This article first explains the PBL process, then describes the design and implementation of a PBL project in a required first-year general education course. Finally, it details the Association of College & Research Libraries’ (ACRL Information Literacy Competency Standards for Higher Education addressed by the project, as well as possible future modifications.

  11. The Development of Online Tutorial Program Design Using Problem-Based Learning in Open Distance Learning System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Asnah; Syarif, Edy

    2016-01-01

    This research aimed to evaluate of online tutorial program design by applying problem-based learning Research Methods currently implemented in the system of Open Distance Learning (ODL). The students must take a Research Methods course to prepare themselves for academic writing projects. Problem-based learning basically emphasizes the process of…

  12. Teacher in a Problem-Based Learning Environment--Jack of All Trades?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Mona Lisa; Spliid, Claus Monrad; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is one among several approaches to active learning. Being a teacher in a PBL environment can, however, be a challenge because of the need to support students' learning within a broad "landscape of learning". In this article we will analyse the landscape of learning by use of the study activity model (SAM)…

  13. Bidirectional extreme learning machine for regression problem and its learning effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yimin; Wang, Yaonan; Yuan, Xiaofang

    2012-09-01

    It is clear that the learning effectiveness and learning speed of neural networks are in general far slower than required, which has been a major bottleneck for many applications. Recently, a simple and efficient learning method, referred to as extreme learning machine (ELM), was proposed by Huang , which has shown that, compared to some conventional methods, the training time of neural networks can be reduced by a thousand times. However, one of the open problems in ELM research is whether the number of hidden nodes can be further reduced without affecting learning effectiveness. This brief proposes a new learning algorithm, called bidirectional extreme learning machine (B-ELM), in which some hidden nodes are not randomly selected. In theory, this algorithm tends to reduce network output error to 0 at an extremely early learning stage. Furthermore, we find a relationship between the network output error and the network output weights in the proposed B-ELM. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method can be tens to hundreds of times faster than other incremental ELM algorithms.

  14. Problem-based Learning and Task-based Learning: A Practical Synthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzo Takahashi

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The author of this article attended the International PBL Workshop in Kaohsiung Medical University in 2007 as an international tutor. Based on his personal experiences in the workshop and at his own medical school, he finds there are frequent problems in PBL programs related to the difficulty in providing expert tutors. Students in PBL tutorials may fear they are unable to get sufficient guidance from tutors in terms of learning the issues they should research; moreover, PBL case writers fear their cases are less effective, because non-expert tutors may misdirect students in the step 1 tutorial discussion. The author proposes that combining standard problem-based learning (PBL methods with elements of task-based learning (TBL can be effective at addressing both of these problems. The TBL method he proposes involves providing students with an additional sheet at the end of PBL tutorials. This sheet is written by the case writer and details key learning issues, questions and perspectives the students should investigate during their research process. This reduces the need to have expert tutors who know the full range of facts about the case, and leaves students feeling supported and less concerned they will miss important learning issues.

  15. Problem-Based Learning in Multimodal Learning Environments: Learners' Technology Adoption Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannou, Andri; Vasiliou, Christina; Zaphiris, Panayiotis

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we enhanced a problem-based learning (PBL) environment with affordable, everyday technologies that can be found in most university classrooms (e.g., projectors, tablets, students' own smartphones, traditional paper-pencil, and Facebook). The study was conducted over a 3-year period, with 60 postgraduate learners in a human-computer…

  16. Feedback and Feed-Forward for Promoting Problem-Based Learning in Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Ashley; Moallem, Mahnaz

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The study aimed to (1) review the literature to construct conceptual models that could guide instructional designers in developing problem/project-based learning environments while applying effective feedback strategies, (2) use the models to design, develop, and implement an online graduate course, and (3) assess the efficiency of the…

  17. Peer Instruction in Chemistry Education: Assessment of Students' Learning Strategies, Conceptual Learning and Problem Solving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gok, Tolga; Gok, Ozge

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this research was to investigate the effects of peer instruction on learning strategies, problem solving performance, and conceptual understanding of college students in a general chemistry course. The research was performed students enrolled in experimental and control groups of a chemistry course were selected. Students in the…

  18. Creative Writing, Problem-Based Learning, and Game-Based Learning Principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trekles, Anastasia M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines how virtual worlds and other advanced social media can be married with problem-based learning to encourage creativity and critical thinking in the English/Language Arts classroom, particularly for middle school, high school, and undergraduate college education. Virtual world experiences such as "Second Life," Jumpstart.com, and…

  19. Investigating ICT Using Problem-Based Learning in Face-to-Face and Online Learning Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, John

    2006-01-01

    This article reports on the design, implementation and evaluation of a module in the MEd (Business) in the Faculty of Education at the University of Hong Kong in which an explicit problem-based learning (PBL) approach was used to investigate the challenges associated with the adoption and use of information and communication technologies (ICT) in…

  20. Concept mapping and text writing as learning tools in problem-oriented learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fürstenau, B.; Kneppers, L.; Dekker, R.; Cañas, A.J.; Novak, J.D.; Vanhaer, J.

    2012-01-01

    In two studies we investigated whether concept mapping or summary writing better support students while learning from authentic problems in the field of business. We interpret concept mapping and summary writing as elaboration tools aiming at helping students to understand new information, and to

  1. The relationships between problem characteristics, achievement-related behaviors, and academic achievement in problem-based learning

    OpenAIRE

    Sockalingam, Nachamma; Rotgans, Jerome; Schmidt, Henk

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis study investigated the influence of five problem characteristics on students' achievement-related classroom behaviors and academic achievement. Data from 5,949 polytechnic students in PBL curricula across 170 courses were analyzed by means of path analysis. The five problem characteristics were: (1) problem clarity, (2) problem familiarity, (3) the extent to which the problem stimulated group discussion, (4) self-study, and (5) identification of learning goals. The results sh...

  2. Effect of students' learning styles on classroom performance in problem-based learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghasham, Abdullah A

    2012-01-01

    Since problem-based learning (PBL) sessions require a combination of active discussion, group interaction, and inductive and reflective thinking, students with different learning styles can be expected to perform differently in the PBL sessions. Using "Learning Style Inventory Questionnaire," students were divided into separate active and reflective learner groups. Tutors were asked to observe and assess the students' behavioral performance during the PBL sessions for a period of 5 weeks. A questionnaire of 24 items was developed to assess students' behavioral performance in PBL sessions. Active students tended to use multiple activities to obtain the needed information were more adjusted to the group norms and regulation and more skillful in using reasoning and problem-solving skills and in participation in discussion. On the other hand, reflective students used independent study more, listened actively and carefully to others and used previously acquired information in the discussion more frequently. Formative assessment quizzes did not indicate better performance of either group. There were no significant gender differences in PBL behavioral performance or quizzes' scores. Active and reflective learners differ in PBL class behavioral performance but not in the formative assessment. We recommend that students should be informed about their learning style and that they should learn strategies to compensate for any lacks in PBL sessions through self-study. Also, educational planners should ensure an adequate mix of students with different learning styles in the PBL groups to achieve PBL desired objectives.

  3. Facilitating problem based learning in an online biology laboratory course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesolowski, Meredith C.

    Online instruction offers many benefits to underserved populations in higher education, particularly increased access. However, incorporation of preferred pedagogical methods, particularly those involving student collaboration, can be more difficult to facilitate in online courses due to geographic separation. In the area of laboratory science education, there is a strong argument for use of constructivist, collaborative pedagogy to promote many facets of student learning. This EPP describes the process used to develop two problem based learning (PBL) laboratory activities based on recommendations found in the literature, their incorporation into an online biology laboratory science course (BIO101) and their impact on student achievement and critical thinking skills. Data analysis revealed a high level of achievement within the study semester. In addition, use of synchronous group discussions as part of the PBL framework resulted in a broad range of discussions reflective of successful problem solving interactions described in the literature. Together, these suggest a observed benefit from incorporation of PBL in this online course. In addition, specific areas for modification were identified as potential future improvements.

  4. Incremental online object learning in a vehicular radar-vision fusion framework

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, Zhengping [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weng, Juyang [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Luciw, Matthew [IEEE; Zeng, Shuqing [IEEE

    2010-10-19

    In this paper, we propose an object learning system that incorporates sensory information from an automotive radar system and a video camera. The radar system provides a coarse attention for the focus of visual analysis on relatively small areas within the image plane. The attended visual areas are coded and learned by a 3-layer neural network utilizing what is called in-place learning, where every neuron is responsible for the learning of its own signal processing characteristics within its connected network environment, through inhibitory and excitatory connections with other neurons. The modeled bottom-up, lateral, and top-down connections in the network enable sensory sparse coding, unsupervised learning and supervised learning to occur concurrently. The presented work is applied to learn two types of encountered objects in multiple outdoor driving settings. Cross validation results show the overall recognition accuracy above 95% for the radar-attended window images. In comparison with the uncoded representation and purely unsupervised learning (without top-down connection), the proposed network improves the recognition rate by 15.93% and 6.35% respectively. The proposed system is also compared with other learning algorithms favorably. The result indicates that our learning system is the only one to fit all the challenging criteria for the development of an incremental and online object learning system.

  5. New journal: Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ryberg

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Kære kolleger Hermed en kort notits om, at der netop er blevet lanceret en ny international open access journal, som har stærke rødder i dansk uddannelsestradition og forskning og dermed også skulle have bred interesse for flere danske forsknings- og uddannelsesmiljøer. Tidsskriftet hedder ’Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher Education’ og er således specielt dedikeret til forskningsartikler, der vedrører de lange og mellemlange videregående uddannelser. Tidsskriftets fokus er Problem Based Learning, eller det, der i en dansk kontekst, kendes bedre som problemorienteret projektarbejde/projektpædagogik. Begrebet Problem Based Learning/Problembaseret Læring kan dog også forstås bredere som en mere studenter-centreret pædagogik, hvor der i forbindelse med kurser tages udgangspunkt i og arbejdes med problemer som udgangspunkt for læring; hvor der arbejdes med cases, eller hvor de studerende aktiveres gennem f.eks. projektforløb. De mere specifikke fokus- og interesseområder kan man dog læse mere om i den vedhæftede flyer, som alle er velkomne til at cirkulere til evt. interesserede kolleger. Særlig interessant for læsere og forfattere i LOM er naturligvis, at redaktionen er interesserede i artikler, der involverer brugen af IKT og medier i forbindelse med Problembaseret Læring og problemorienteret projektarbejde. Vi forestiller os, at artikler udgivet i LOM, der omhandler dette, med fordel kunne viderebearbejdes til et internationalt publikum. Man kan læse mere, om tidskriftet, fokus og guidelines på adressen: http://ojs.statsbiblioteket.dk/index.php/pbl Vi håber at mange af LOMs læsere og forfatter også vil være interesseret i dette nye tidsskrift, og hvis nogle skulle have spørgsmål eller kommentarer er de velkomne til at kontakte: Thomas Ryberg (ryberg@hum.aau.dk

  6. New journal: Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Ryberg

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Kære kolleger Hermed en kort notits om, at der netop er blevet lanceret en ny international open access journal, som har stærke rødder i dansk uddannelsestradition og forskning og dermed også skulle have bred interesse for flere danske forsknings- og uddannelsesmiljøer. Tidsskriftet hedder ’Journal of Problem Based Learning in Higher Education’ og er således specielt dedikeret til forskningsartikler, der vedrører de lange og mellemlange videregående uddannelser. Tidsskriftets fokus er Problem Based Learning, eller det, der i en dansk kontekst, kendes bedre som problemorienteret projektarbejde/projektpædagogik. Begrebet Problem Based Learning/Problembaseret Læring kan dog også forstås bredere som en mere studenter-centreret pædagogik, hvor der i forbindelse med kurser tages udgangspunkt i og arbejdes med problemer som udgangspunkt for læring; hvor der arbejdes med cases, eller hvor de studerende aktiveres gennem f.eks. projektforløb. De mere specifikke fokus- og interesseområder kan man dog læse mere om i den vedhæftede flyer, som alle er velkomne til at cirkulere til evt. interesserede kolleger. Særlig interessant for læsere og forfattere i LOM er naturligvis, at redaktionen er interesserede i artikler, der involverer brugen af IKT og medier i forbindelse med Problembaseret Læring og problemorienteret projektarbejde. Vi forestiller os, at artikler udgivet i LOM, der omhandler dette, med fordel kunne viderebearbejdes til et internationalt publikum. Man kan læse mere, om tidskriftet, fokus og guidelines på adressen: http://ojs.statsbiblioteket.dk/index.php/pbl Vi håber at mange af LOMs læsere og forfatter også vil være interesseret i dette nye tidsskrift, og hvis nogle skulle have spørgsmål eller kommentarer er de velkomne til at kontakte: Thomas Ryberg (ryberg@hum.aau.dk

  7. Problem-Based Learning: An Overview of its Process and Impact on Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine H.J. Yew

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we provide an overview of the process of problem-based learning (PBL and the studies examining the effectiveness of PBL. We also discuss a number of naturalistic and empirical studies that have examined the process of PBL and how its various components impact students’ learning. We conclude that the studies comparing the relative effectiveness of PBL are generally consistent in demonstrating its superior efficacy for longer-term knowledge retention and in the application of knowledge. Studies on the process of PBL, however, are still inconclusive as to which component(s of PBL most significantly impact students’ learning, although causal studies have demonstrated that all the phases of PBL are necessary in influencing students’ learning outcomes.

  8. Does Problem-Based Learning Improve Problem Solving Skills?--A Study among Business Undergraduates at Malaysian Premier Technical University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadir, Z. Abdul; Abdullah, N. H.; Anthony, E.; Salleh, B. Mohd; Kamarulzaman, R.

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based Learning (PBL) approach has been widely used in various disciplines since it is claimed to improve students' soft skills. However, empirical supports on the effect of PBL on problem solving skills have been lacking and anecdotal in nature. This study aimed to determine the effect of PBL approach on students' problem solving skills…

  9. [E-learning and problem based learning integration in cardiology education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürpinar, Erol; Zayim, Neşe; Başarici, Ibrahim; Gündüz, Filiz; Asar, Mevlüt; Oğuz, Nurettin

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine students' satisfaction with an e-learning environment which is developed to support classical problem-based learning (PBL) in medical education and its effect on academic achievement. In this cross-sectional study, students were provided with a web-based learning environment including learning materials related to objectives of the subject of PBL module, which could be used during independent study period. The study group comprised of all of the second year students (164 students) of Akdeniz University, Medical Faculty, during 2007-2008 education period. In order to gather data about students' satisfaction with learning environment, a questionnaire was administered to the students. Comparison of students' academic achievement was based on their performance score in PBL exam. Statistical analyses were performed using unpaired t test and Mann Whitney U test. Findings indicated that 72.6% of the students used e-learning practice. There is no statistically significant difference between mean PBL performance scores of users and non-users of e-learning practice (103.58 vs. 100.88) (t=-0.998, p=0.320). It is found that frequent users of e-learning application had statistically significant higher scores than non-frequent users (106.28 vs. 100.59) (t=-2.373, p=0.01). In addition, 72.6% of the students declared they were satisfied with the application. Our study demonstrated that the most of the students use e-learning application and are satisfied with it. In addition, it is observed that e-learning application positively affects the academic achievement of the students. This study gains special importance by providing contribution to limited literature in the area of instructional technology in PBL and Cardiology teaching.

  10. Integrating Ultrasound Teaching into Preclinical Problem-based Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Tumba Tshibwabwa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim is to provide students in the preclinical with ultrasound image interpretation skills. Research question: Are students in smaller groups with access to a combination of lectures and hands-on patient contact most likely to have better ultrasound image interpretation skills, than students in larger groups with only interactive didactic lectures? Methodology: First-year students at the preclinical Program of the College of Medicine, participated in two 2-h introductory interactive ultrasound sessions. The study comprised two cohorts: 2012/2013 students, who were offered large group teaching (LGT sessions (control group, and 2013/2014 students, who received the intervention in small group learning problem-based learning (PBL sessions (experimental group. The overall learning objectives were identical for both groups. The success of the module was evaluated using pre- and post-tests as well as students′ feedback. Results: The students in the experimental group showed significantly higher scores in interpretations of images than those in the control group. The experimental group showed achievement of learning outcomes along with higher levels of satisfaction with the module compared to the latter. Conclusion: Posttest knowledge of the basics of ultrasound improved significantly over the pretest in the experimental group. In addition, students′ overall satisfaction of the ultrasound module was shown to be higher for the PBL compared to the LGT groups. Small groups in an interactive and PBL setting along with opportunities for hands-on practice and simultaneous visualization of findings on a high definition screen should enhance preclinical student learning of the basics of ultrasound. Despite the potential of ultrasound as a clinical, teaching and learning tool for students in the preclinical years, standardized recommendations have yet to be created regarding its integration into the curricula within academic institutions and

  11. The effect of problem-based learning with cooperative-learning strategies in surgery clerkships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turan, Sevgi; Konan, Ali; Kılıç, Yusuf Alper; Özvarış, Şevkat Bahar; Sayek, Iskender

    2012-01-01

    Cooperative learning is used often as part of the problem-based learning (PBL) process. But PBL does not demand that students work together until all individuals master the material or share the rewards for their work together. A cooperative learning and assessment structure was introduced in a PBL course in 10-week surgery clerkship, and the difference was evaluated between this method and conventional PBL in an acute abdominal pain module. An experimental design was used. No significant differences in achievement were found between the study and control group. Both the study and control group students who scored low on the pretest made the greatest gains at the end of the education. Students in the cooperative learning group felt that cooperation helped them learn, it was fun to study and expressed satisfaction, but they complained about the amount of time the groups had to work together, difficulties of group work, and noise during the sessions. This study evaluated the impact of a cooperative learning technique (student team learning [STL]) in PBL and found no differences. The study confirms that a relationship exists between allocated study time and achievement, and student's satisfaction about using this technique. Copyright © 2012 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. LEARNING PARSIMONIOUS ENSEMBLES FOR UNBALANCED COMPUTATIONAL GENOMICS PROBLEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    STANESCU, ANA; PANDEY, GAURAV

    2016-01-01

    Prediction problems in biomedical sciences are generally quite difficult, partially due to incomplete knowledge of how the phenomenon of interest is influenced by the variables and measurements used for prediction, as well as a lack of consensus regarding the ideal predictor(s) for specific problems. In these situations, a powerful approach to improving prediction performance is to construct ensembles that combine the outputs of many individual base predictors, which have been successful for many biomedical prediction tasks. Moreover, selecting a parsimonious ensemble can be of even greater value for biomedical sciences, where it is not only important to learn an accurate predictor, but also to interpret what novel knowledge it can provide about the target problem. Ensemble selection is a promising approach for this task because of its ability to select a collectively predictive subset, often a relatively small one, of all input base predictors. One of the most well-known algorithms for ensemble selection, CES (Caruana et al.’s Ensemble Selection), generally performs well in practice, but faces several challenges due to the difficulty of choosing the right values of its various parameters. Since the choices made for these parameters are usually ad-hoc, good performance of CES is difficult to guarantee for a variety of problems or datasets. To address these challenges with CES and other such algorithms, we propose a novel heterogeneous ensemble selection approach based on the paradigm of reinforcement learning (RL), which offers a more systematic and mathematically sound methodology for exploring the many possible combinations of base predictors that can be selected into an ensemble. We develop three RL-based strategies for constructing ensembles and analyze their results on two unbalanced computational genomics problems, namely the prediction of protein function and splice sites in eukaryotic genomes. We show that the resultant ensembles are indeed substantially

  13. Vision-based mobile robot navigation through deep convolutional neural networks and end-to-end learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yachu; Zhao, Yuejin; Liu, Ming; Dong, Liquan; Kong, Lingqin; Liu, Lingling

    2017-09-01

    In contrast to humans, who use only visual information for navigation, many mobile robots use laser scanners and ultrasonic sensors along with vision cameras to navigate. This work proposes a vision-based robot control algorithm based on deep convolutional neural networks. We create a large 15-layer convolutional neural network learning system and achieve the advanced recognition performance. Our system is trained from end to end to map raw input images to direction in supervised mode. The images of data sets are collected in a wide variety of weather conditions and lighting conditions. Besides, the data sets are augmented by adding Gaussian noise and Salt-and-pepper noise to avoid overfitting. The algorithm is verified by two experiments, which are line tracking and obstacle avoidance. The line tracking experiment is proceeded in order to track the desired path which is composed of straight and curved lines. The goal of obstacle avoidance experiment is to avoid the obstacles indoor. Finally, we get 3.29% error rate on the training set and 5.1% error rate on the test set in the line tracking experiment, 1.8% error rate on the training set and less than 5% error rate on the test set in the obstacle avoidance experiment. During the actual test, the robot can follow the runway centerline outdoor and avoid the obstacle in the room accurately. The result confirms the effectiveness of the algorithm and our improvement in the network structure and train parameters

  14. Rich environments for active learning in action: problem-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Grabinger

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available In today's complex world of rapid change, of increasing innovation and of proliferating knowledge, employers and employees must be able to apply tools and knowledge to new situations with increasing frequency to remain productive and competitive (see Nash, 1994. Because we face an environment in which knowledge and skills become rapidly obsolete, people need to know how to be involved in a continual process of 'retooling' their knowledge and skill base (see Swanson et al, 1993. Consequently, learning to think critically, to analyse and synthesize information to solve technical, social, economic, political, and scientific problems, and to engage in lifelong learning, are crucial for successful and fulfilling participation in our competitive society. Learning environments which prepare learners for the complexities of the professional world utilize instructional activities reflecting the problemsolving and challenge-meeting process professionals use on their jobs. Learners need to: • determine for themselves what issues need to be addressed when facing a new problem; • identify knowledge and skills they already possess that can be applied to the situation; • determine which skill and knowledge areas are deficient, arid create learning plans to address those deficiencies; • create timelines, manage resources, and monitor their progress; • apply what they know to problems that may change substantially from one moment to another; and • assess their performance and make changes in personal processes for use to meet subsequent challenges.

  15. Supporting Problem Solving with Case-Stories Learning Scenario and Video-based Collaborative Learning Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Hu

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we suggest that case-based resources, which are used for assisting cognition during problem solving, can be structured around the work of narratives in social cultural psychology. Theories and other research methods have proposed structures within narratives and stories which may be useful to the design of case-based resources. Moreover, embedded within cases are stories which are contextually rich, supporting the epistemological groundings of situated cognition. Therefore the purposes of this paper are to discuss possible frameworks of case-stories; derive design principles as to “what” constitutes a good case story or narrative; and suggest how technology can support story-based learning. We adopt video-based Computer-Supported Collaborative Learning (CSCL technology to support problem solving with case-stories learning scenarios. Our hypothesis in this paper is that well-designed case-based resources are able to aid in the cognitive processes undergirding problem solving and meaning making. We also suggest the use of an emerging video-based collaborative learning technology to support such an instructional strategy.

  16. Keeping the Vision: Sustaining Social Consciousness with Nursing Students following International Learning Experiences

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Reimer Kirkham, Sheryl; Van Hofwegen, Lynn; Pankratz, Darlane

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In an era of globalization, increasing numbers of nursing programs are initiating international learning experiences, yet empirical data is lacking regarding long term benefits and effects...

  17. A taxonomy of Deep Convolutional Neural Nets for Computer Vision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj eSrinivas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Traditional architectures for solving computer vision problems and the degree of success they enjoyed have been heavily reliant on hand-crafted features. However, of late, deep learning techniques have offered a compelling alternative -- that of automatically learning problem-specific features. With this new paradigm, every problem in computer vision is now being re-examined from a deep learning perspective. Therefore, it has become important to understand what kind of deep networks are suitable for a given problem. Although general surveys of this fast-moving paradigm (i.e. deep-networks exist, a survey specific to computer vision is missing. We specifically consider one form of deep networks widely used in computer vision - convolutional neural networks (CNNs. We start with AlexNet'' as our base CNN and then examine the broad variations proposed over time to suit different applications. We hope that our recipe-style survey will serve as a guide, particularly for novice practitioners intending to use deep-learning techniques for computer vision.

  18. Using Problem-Based Learning for Occupational and Environmental Health Nursing Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivicek, Kristy; de Castro, A. B.; Salazar, Mary K.; Murphy, Helen H.; Keifer, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Problem-based learning, which emphasizes group collaboration to solve real-world case scenarios, is an instructional approach that is well suited to occupational and environmental health nursing education. Learners actively work through case studies rather than passively receive information presented through lectures. Problem-based learning methods promote critical thinking skills and motivate learning, preparing learners for professional practice in complex, ever-changing environments. Despite these advantages, problem-based learning is underutilized in nursing education compared to more traditional lecture methods. This article presents key concepts of problem-based learning, discusses problem-based learning in educating occupational and environmental health nurses, and describes the development of a problem-based learning case aimed at increasing occupational and environmental health nurses’ capacity to address pesticide exposure among migrant and seasonal agricultural workers. PMID:21366187

  19. The Effectiveness of Problem-Based Learning on Teaching the First Law of Thermodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatar, Erdal; Oktay, Munir

    2011-01-01

    Background: Problem-based learning (PBL) is a teaching approach working in cooperation with self-learning and involving research to solve real problems. The first law of thermodynamics states that energy can neither be created nor destroyed, but that energy is conserved. Students had difficulty learning or misconceptions about this law. This study…

  20. Design and Evaluation of a Problem-Based Learning Environment for Teacher Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemker, Laura; Prescher, Claudia; Narciss, Susanne

    2017-01-01

    Problem-based learning can have a great impact on the acquisition of practical knowledge, which is a central learning aim in the field of teacher education. Therefore, we implemented a problem-based learning approach in four seminars on educational assessment. In this paper, we outline our didactic design and discuss the results of the first…

  1. Striking the Right Balance: An Evaluation of a Literature Database To Support Problem Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, Kathleen M.

    Faculty at the College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, have developed a bibliographic database of articles to support problem based learning. The database, its role in the curriculum, and its effectiveness in guiding, without undermining, self-directed learning were studied, using the goals of problem based learning as a framework.…

  2. The Effect of Guidance in Problem-Based Learning of Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppink, Jimmie; Broers, Nick J.; Imbos, Tjaart; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.; Berger, Martijn P. F.

    2014-01-01

    Contrary to classical problem-based learning, in guided problem-based learning, the learning goals are predetermined by the instructor--on the basis of a detailed decomposition of the subject matter to be studied--to activate prior knowledge and to structure self-study and subsequent group discussion. This study investigated the effects of…

  3. Design of a Problem-Based Online Learning Environment and Evaluation of Its Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Abdullah Yasin; Alemdag, Ecenaz; Yasar, Sevil; Erdem, Mukaddes

    2016-01-01

    Problem-based learning approach presents several advantages such as improving students' engagement in learning and fostering their higher-order thinking skills. Although there is a plethora of research regarding implementation of problem-based learning in classrooms, its design and application process for web-based environments need further…

  4. Problem based learning in continuing medical education: a review of controlled evaluation studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, P. B. A.; Verbeek, J. H. A. M.; de Buisonjé, C. D.

    2002-01-01

    Reviews of undergraduate medical education cautiously support the short term and long term outcomes of problem based learning compared with traditional learning. The effectiveness of problem based learning in continuing medical education, however, has not been reviewed. This review of controlled

  5. Evaluation of Health Profession Student Attitudes toward an Online Nutrition Education Problem-Based Learning Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Kathleen; Sadera, William

    2015-01-01

    The intent of problem-based learning (PBL) is to increase student motivation to learn, to promote critical thinking and to teach students to learn with complexity. PBL encourages students to understand that there are no straightforward answers and that problem solutions depend on context. This paper discusses the experience of undergraduate health…

  6. The association between motivation, affect, and self-regulated learning when solving problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Baars (Marieke); L. Wijnia (Lisette); G.W.C. Paas (Fred)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractSelf-regulated learning (SRL) skills are essential for learning during school years, particularly in complex problem-solving domains, such as biology and math. Although a lot of studies have focused on the cognitive resources that are needed for learning to solve problems in a

  7. Effects of problem-based learning by learning style in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Su-Jin

    2012-12-01

    Although problem-based learning (PBL) has been popularized in many colleges, few studies have analyzed the relationship between individual differences and PBL. The purpose of this study was to analyze the relationship between learning style and the perception on the effects of PBL. Grasha-Riechmann Student Learning Style Scales was used to assess the learning styles of 38 students at Ajou University School of Medicine who were enrolled in a respiratory system course in 2011. The data were analyzed by regression analysis and Spearman correlation analysis. By regression analysis, dependent beta=0.478) and avoidant styles (beta=-0.815) influenced the learner's satisfaction with PBL. By Spearman correlation analysis, there was significant link between independent, dependent, and avoidant styles and the perception of the effect of PBL. There are few significant relationships between learning style and the perception of the effects of PBL. We must determine how to teach students with different learning styles and the factors that influence PBL.

  8. Providing Pediatric Palliative Care Education Using Problem-Based Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Karen; McHugh, Marlene; Baker, Rebecca; Cohen, Hillel; Pinto, Priya; Deutsch, Stephanie; Santizo, Ruth O; Schechter, Miriam; Fausto, James; Joo, Pablo

    2018-01-01

    The Institute of Medicine and the American Academy of Pediatrics has called for improvement in education and training of pediatricians in pediatric palliative care (PPC). Given the shortage of PPC physicians and the immediate need for PPC medical education, this study reports the outcomes of a problem-based learning (PBL) module facilitated by academic general and subspecialty pediatric faculty (non-PPC specialists) to third year medical students. Objectives/Setting: To test the effectiveness of a PPC-PBL module on third year medical students' and pediatric faculty's declarative knowledge, attitudes toward, perceived exposure, and self-assessed competency in PPC objectives. A PBL module was developed using three PPC learning objectives as a framework: define core concepts in palliative care; list the components of a total pain assessment; and describe key principles in establishing therapeutic relationships with patients. A PPC physician and nurse practitioner guided pediatric faculty on facilitating the PPC-PBL. In Part 1, students identified domains of palliative care for a child with refractory leukemia and self-assigned questions to research and present at the follow-up session. In Part 2, students were expected to develop a care plan demonstrating the three PPC objectives. Measures included a knowledge exam and a survey instrument to assess secondary outcomes. Students' declarative knowledge, perceived exposure, and self-assessed competency in all three PPC learning objectives improved significantly after the PPC-PBL, p = 0.002, p 80%). Students and faculty rated palliative care education as "important or very important" at baseline and follow-up. This study suggests that key concepts in PPC can be taught to medical students utilizing a PBL format and pediatric faculty resulting in improved knowledge and self-assessed competency in PPC.

  9. Problem based learning in midwifery--the students' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowan, Catherine J; McCourt, Christine; Beake, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) has been adopted in many settings for the education of health professionals. It has generally been evaluated well by students although much of the literature comes from medical education. The aim of this study was to ascertain the views of student midwives at the beginning and at the end of their programme and three months after graduation about the use of a PBL based programme in midwifery. Eight focus groups were conducted with students whilst undertaking a PBL programme from both a shortened and three year programme across two sites. A questionnaire was sent 3 months after graduation to midwives who had completed the programme. Key themes which emerged from this study were that although students gained skills in information retrieval and critique some did not always feel well prepared for practice. The focus on individual presentations in the tutorial tended to be interpreted as performance rather than discussion in a spirit of enquiry. Students reported being particularly anxious at the beginning of their programme about their learning. They felt that their experience was dependent upon the participation and motivation of the group members.

  10. An approach towards problem-based learning in virtual space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freudenberg, Lutz S; Bockisch, Andreas; Beyer, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is an established and efficient approach to sustainable teaching. Here, we describe translation of PBL into the virtual classroom thereby offering novel teaching aspects in the field of Nuclear Medicine. Our teaching approach is implemented on a "moodle" platform and consists of 2 modules: complementary seminar teaching materials and a virtual PBL-classroom, which can be attended via Skype.Over the course of 4 semesters 539 students have accessed our teaching platform. 21 students have participated in the PBL seminar (module 2). After resolving some minor technical difficulties our virtual seminars have evolved into a forum of intense studies, whereby the participating students have learned to become more independent along the workup of the teaching cases. This was reflected in the results of the intra-group presentations and discussions.Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of our moodle-based PBL platform indicates an increasing level of acceptance and enthusiasm by the students. This has initiated discussions about opening our PBL concept to a wider audience within the university and beyond the Nuclear Medicine specialty.

  11. Low Vision Aids and Low Vision Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Low Vision Aids Low Vision Resources Low Vision Rehabilitation and Low Vision Aids Leer en Español: La ... that same viewing direction for other objects. Vision rehabilitation: using the vision you have Vision rehabilitation is ...

  12. Vision Lab

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Vision Lab personnel perform research, development, testing and evaluation of eye protection and vision performance. The lab maintains and continues to develop...

  13. Simulation of artificial vision: II. Eccentric reading of full-page text and the learning of this task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerhalder, Jörg; Rappaz, Benjamin; de Haller, Raoul; Fornos, Angélica Pérez; Safran, Avinoam B; Pelizzone, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Reading of isolated words in conditions mimicking artificial vision has been found to be a difficult but feasible task. In particular at relatively high eccentricities, a significant adaptation process was required to reach optimal performances [Vision Res. 43 (2003) 269]. The present study addressed the task of full-page reading, including page navigation under control of subject's own eye movements. Conditions of artificial vision mimicking a retinal implant were simulated by projecting stimuli with reduced information content (lines of pixelised text) onto a restricted and eccentric area of the retina. Three subjects, naïve to the task, were trained for almost two months (about 1 h/day) to read full-page texts. Subjects had to use their own eye movements to displace a 10 degrees x 7 degrees viewing window, stabilised at 15 degrees eccentricity in their lower visual field. Initial reading scores were very low for two subjects (about 13% correctly read words), and astonishingly high for the third subject (86% correctly read words). However, all of them significantly improved their performance with time, reaching close to perfect reading scores (ranging from 86% to 98% correct) at the end of the training process. Reading rates were as low as 1-5 words/min at the beginning of the experiment and increased significantly with time to 14-28 words/min. Qualitative text understanding was also estimated. We observed that reading scores of at least 85% correct were necessary to achieve 'good' text understanding. Gaze position recordings, made during the experimental sessions, demonstrated that the control of eye movements, especially the suppression of reflexive vertical saccades, constituted an important part of the overall adaptive learning process. Taken together, these results suggest that retinal implants might restore full-page text reading abilities to blind patients. About 600 stimulation contacts, distributed on an implant surface of 3 x 2 mm2, appear to be a

  14. Combining Vision with Voice: A Learning and Implementation Structure Promoting Teachers' Internalization of Practices Based on Self-Determination Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assor, Avi; Kaplan, Haya; Feinberg, Ofra; Tal, Karen

    2009-01-01

    We propose that self-determination theory's conceptualization of internalization may help school reformers overcome the recurrent problem of "the predictable failure of educational reform" (Sarason, 1993). Accordingly, we present a detailed learning and implementation structure to promote teachers' internalization and application of ideas and…

  15. Comparison of problem-based learning and lecture-based learning in midwifery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangestani, Gita; Khatiban, Mahnaz

    2013-08-01

    Lecturing is the most common teaching method in the medical education. Problem-based learning (PBL) is one of the active and student-oriented learning strategies which have gained attention in the recent decades. To compare the effect of PBL and lecture-based learning (LBL) on the satisfaction and learning progress of undergraduate midwifery students. Quasi-experimental study. Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamedan, Iran. Fifty-six undergraduate midwifery students in two different classes participated in the study. Randomly, one class (experimental group) received PBL in addition to LBL and the other one (control group) received traditional LBL. "Pregnancy and childbirth", a 2-credit course, was selected for this purpose. Scientific pre-test and post-tests were performed and satisfaction questionnaire was filled in for both groups. A questionnaire to compare PBL and LBL was filled in only for the experimental group. The instruments used in the study were "Demographic data form", "Students' learning progress test", "Student's satisfaction of teaching method", and the "Teaching method evaluation". Learning progress in PBL group was significantly more than control group. PBL improved application of theory lesson in clinical practice, increased learning motivation and enhanced educational activity in class. There was more satisfaction with PBL method. There was no relationship between the students' satisfaction and learning progress. 81.8% of students considered PBL the more suitable and better method. PBL should be applied more in undergraduate midwifery courses. According to these advantages, the quality of midwifery education can be improved via this method. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Co-Regulation and Knowledge Construction in an Online Synchronous Problem Based Learning Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lila; Lajoie, Susanne P.; Poitras, Eric G.; Nkangu, Miriam; Doleck, Tenzin

    2017-01-01

    Learning to monitor and regulate one's learning in an academic setting is a task that all students must engage in. Learning in "group" situations requires both self- and co-regulation. This research examines a case study of a small group of medical student interactions during an on-line problem based learning activity (PBL) where…

  17. Gifted and Learning-Disabled Gifted Students' Knowledge and Use of Mathematical Problem-Solving Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montague, Marjorie

    1991-01-01

    Three gifted and three learning-disabled gifted students (ages 13-15) viewed themselves on videotape solving mathematical problems and responded to questions pertaining to their problem-solving strategies. The non-learning-disabled students applied substantially more cognitive and metacognitive knowledge to the problem-solving task. (Author/DB)

  18. Changing Visions of Excellence in Ontario School Policy: The Cases of "Living and Learning" and "For the Love of Learning"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno-Jofre, Rosa; Hills, George

    2011-01-01

    In this essay, Rosa Bruno-Jofre and George Hills examine two major Ontario policy documents: 1968's "Living and Learning" and 1994's "For the Love of Learning." The purpose is, first, to gain insight into the uses of the term "excellence" in the context of discourse about educational aims and evaluation, and, second,…

  19. Degas: Vision and Perception.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Richard

    1988-01-01

    The art of Edgar Degas is discussed in relation to his impaired vision, including amblyopia, later blindness in one eye, corneal scarring, and photophobia. Examined are ways in which Degas compensated for vision problems, and dominant themes of his art such as the process of perception and spots of brilliant light. (Author/JDD)

  20. Extreme Learning Machine and Moving Least Square Regression Based Solar Panel Vision Inspection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heng Liu; Caihong Zhang; Dongdong Huang

    2017-01-01

    .... Through learning from image samples, many features of industry objects, such as shapes, positions, and orientations angles, can be obtained and then can be well utilized to determine whether there is defect...

  1. Learning about “wicked” problems in the Global South. Creating a film-based learning environment with “Visual Problem Appraisal”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loes Witteveen

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The current complexity of sustainable development in the Global South calls for the design of learning strategies that can deal with this complexity. One such innovative learning strategy, called Visual Problem Appraisal (VPA, is highlighted in this article. The strategy is termed visual as it creates a learning environment that is film-based. VPA enhances the analysis of complex issues, and facilitates stakeholder dialogue and action planning. The strategy is used in workshops dealing with problem analysis and policy design, and involves the participants “meeting” stakeholders through filmed narratives. The article demonstrates the value of using film in multi stakeholder learning environments addressing issues concerning sustainable development.

  2. Effects of conventional and problem-based learning on clinical and general competencies and career development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cohen-Schotanus, Janke; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Schonrock-Adema, Johanna; Geertsma, Jelle; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    OBJECTIVE: To test hypotheses regarding the longitudinal effects of problem-based learning (PBL) and conventional learning relating to students' appreciation of the curriculum, self-assessment of general competencies, summative assessment of clinical competence and indicators of career development.

  3. Differential effects of problem-solving demands on individual and collaborative learning outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Femke; Paas, Fred; Kirschner, Paul A.; Janssen, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    Kirschner, F., Paas, F., Kirschner, P. A., & Janssen, J. (2011). Differential effects of problem-solving demands on individual and collaborative learning outcomes. Learning and Instruction, 21, 587-599.

  4. Problems Affecting Successful Implementation of Blended Learning in Higher Education: the Teacher Perspective

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mozelius, Peter

    2017-01-01

    .... There are less studies on the teacher view of blended learning environments. This study had the aim to explore, analyse and discuss teachers' perceived problems and barriers to a successful implementation of blended learning at university...

  5. Vision-based interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Turk, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    In its early years, the field of computer vision was largely motivated by researchers seeking computational models of biological vision and solutions to practical problems in manufacturing, defense, and medicine. For the past two decades or so, there has been an increasing interest in computer vision as an input modality in the context of human-computer interaction. Such vision-based interaction can endow interactive systems with visual capabilities similar to those important to human-human interaction, in order to perceive non-verbal cues and incorporate this information in applications such

  6. Problem-based learning in internal medicine: virtual patients or paper-based problems?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobocan, Monika; Turk, Neja; Dinevski, Dejan; Hojs, Radovan; Pecovnik Balon, Breda

    2017-01-01

    Teaching using paper problem-based learning (p-PBL) sessions has left some students fatigued with the learning process. Therefore, attempts have been made to replace p-PBL with digitally enhanced, decision-making PBL in the form of virtual patients (VP). Student enthusiasm for substituting p-PBL with VP has not been quantitatively evaluated on the intended educational effects. To determine the educational effects of substituting p-PBL sessions with VP on undergraduate medical students in their internal medicine course. We conducted a randomised controlled study on 34 third-year undergraduate medical students in the academic year 2015-2016. Student performance after an intervention substituting p-PBL sessions with VP was analysed. The educational outcomes were measured with knowledge exams and the Diagnostic Thinking Inventory. There was no difference in exam performance between groups (P > 0.833) immediately after the intervention, or in long term. Nor was there a significant difference in improvement of diagnostic thinking between groups (P > 0.935 and P > 0.320). Our study showed no significant improvement in diagnostic thinking abilities or knowledge exam results with the use of VP. Educators can add VP to sessions to motivate students, but a significant improvement to educational outcome should not be expected. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Keefektifan setting TPS dalam pendekatan discovery learning dan problem-based learning pada pembelajaran materi lingkaran SMP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Hidayati

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the effectiveness of setting Think Pair Share (TPS in the approach to discovery learning and problem-based learning in terms of student achievement, mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills of the student.  This study was a quasi-experimental study using the pretest-posttest nonequivalent group design. The research population comprised all Year VIII students of SMP Negeri 1 Yogyakarta. The research sample was randomly selected from eight classes, two classes were elected. The instrument used in this study is the learning achievement test, a test of mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills student questionnaires. To test the effectiveness of setting Think Pair Share (TPS in the approach to discovery learning and problem-based learning, the one sample t-test was carried out. Then, to investigate the difference in effectiveness between the setting Think Pair Share (TPS in the approach to discovery learning and problem-based learning, the Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA was carried out. The research findings indicate that the setting TPS discovery approach to learning and problem-based approach to learning (PBL is effective in terms of learning achievement, mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills of the students. No difference in effectiveness between setting TPS discovery approach to learning and problem-based learning (PBL in terms of learning achievement, mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills of the students. Keywords: TPS setting in discovery learning approach, in problem-based learning, academic achievement, mathematical communication skills, and interpersonal skills of the student

  8. Project-Based Learning Using Discussion and Lesson-Learned Methods via Social Media Model for Enhancing Problem Solving Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jewpanich, Chaiwat; Piriyasurawong, Pallop

    2015-01-01

    This research aims to 1) develop the project-based learning using discussion and lesson-learned methods via social media model (PBL-DLL SoMe Model) used for enhancing problem solving skills of undergraduate in education student, and 2) evaluate the PBL-DLL SoMe Model used for enhancing problem solving skills of undergraduate in education student.…

  9. Prevention of communication disorders--screening pre-school and school-age children for problems with hearing, vision and speech: European Consensus Statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skarżyński, Henryk; Piotrowska, Anna

    2012-04-01

    Communication is an integral part of human behaviour. Communication disorders are associated mainly with impairment in hearing, vision, and/or speech, which influences the ability to receive, comprehend, produce, and express verbal, nonverbal, and graphic information. When unrecognized and unmanaged, these very often "invisible" conditions can have a significant detrimental effect on a child's development, affecting educational, social, and psychological progress. A panel of experts discussed the screening of pre-school and school-age children for problems with hearing, vision, and speech during the 10th Congress of the European Federation of Audiology Societies (EFAS), held in Warsaw, Poland, on 22 June, 2011. The European Consensus Statement on Hearing, Vision, and Speech Screening in Pre-School and School-Age Children was the result of the scientific discussions. It was endorsed by experts in audiology, otolaryngology, phoniatry, ophthalmology, and speech language pathology from throughout Europe. Key elements of the consensus, as described herein, are: 1) defining the role of screening programmes in the identification and treatment of communication disorders; 2) identifying the target population; 3) promoting general awareness about the consequences of communication disorders; 4) recognizing the need for a quality control system in screening programmes; 5) encouraging cooperation among European countries to provide a high level of public health services for the prevention, identification, and treatment of communication disorders. The European Consensus Statement on Hearing, Vision, and Speech Screening in Pre-School and School-Age Children will encourage the appropriate authorities of the various countries involved to initiate screening for communication disorders in pre-school and school-age children.

  10. Comparing alternate learning pathways within a problem-based learning speech-language pathology curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Shane; Serry, Tanya Anne

    2016-02-01

    This qualitative study investigated the learning process for speech-language pathology (SLP) students engaging in a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum and compared the perspectives of students from two pathways. Sixteen final-year SLP students participated in one of four focus groups. Half the participants entered the course directly via an undergraduate pathway and the other half entered via a graduate entry pathway. Each focus group comprised two students from each pathway. Data were generated via a semi-structured interview and analysed thematically. Regardless of participants' pathway, many similar themes about factors that influenced their expectations prior to PBL commencing as well as their actual PBL experiences were raised. Participants believed that PBL was a productive way to learn and to develop clinical competencies. Many were critical of variations in PBL facilitation styles and were sensitive to changes in facilitators. The majority of participants viewed experiential opportunities to engage in PBL prior to commencement of semester as advantageous. Combining students with different backgrounds has many advantages to the PBL learning process. Regardless of prior experiences, all students must be sufficiently prepared. Furthermore, the facilitator has a crucial role with the potential to optimise or detract from the learning experience.

  11. How to Enhance Interdisciplinary Competence--Interdisciplinary Problem-Based Learning versus Interdisciplinary Project-Based Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassler, Mirjam; Dettmers, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Interdisciplinary competence is important in academia for both employability and sustainable development. However, to date, there are no specific interdisciplinary education models and, naturally, no empirical studies to assess them. Since problem-based learning (PBL) and project-based learning (PjBL) are learning approaches that emphasize…

  12. Effects of the Digital Game-Development Approach on Elementary School Students' Learning Motivation, Problem Solving, and Learning Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Hui-Chun; Hung, Chun-Ming

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the game-based development approach is proposed for improving the learning motivation, problem solving skills, and learning achievement of students. An experiment was conducted on a learning activity of an elementary school science course to evaluate the performance of the proposed approach. A total of 59 sixth graders from two…

  13. Analysis of an Interactive Technology Supported Problem-Based Learning STEM Project Using Selected Learning Sciences Interest Areas (SLSIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, David Devraj

    2017-01-01

    This paper reports an analysis of an interactive technology-supported, problem-based learning (PBL) project in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) from a Learning Sciences perspective using the Selected Learning Sciences Interest Areas (SLSIA). The SLSIA was adapted from the "What kinds of topics do ISLS [International…

  14. Pengembangan problem based learning dengan assessment for learning berbantuan smartphone dalam pembelajaran matematika

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Ridlo Yuwono

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available [Bahasa]: Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk menghasilkan model Problem Based Learning (PBL menggunakan penilaian Assessment for Learning (AfL berbantuan smartphone, disingkat PBL-AfL-S yang valid, praktis dan efektif untuk mendukung implementasi kurikulum 2013 di SMA. Tahap-tahap pengembangan model PBL-AfL-S terdiri dari penelitian pendahuluan, pengembangan/prototiping, dan evaluasi. Kualitas model PBL-AfL-S mengacu pada kriteria kualitas menurut Nieveen (1999 yaitu valid, praktis, dan efektif. Model PBL-AfL-S diujicobakan di SMA Negeri 3 Klaten dalam dua tahap uji coba. Uji coba tahap I dilaksanakan di kelas XI-IPA 6 dan uji coba tahap II dilaksanakan di kelas XI-IPA 7. Instrumen penelitian terdiri dari: 1 Instrumen penilaian kevalidan komponen model dan perangkat pendukung pembelajaran, 2 Instrumen kepraktisan aktivitas guru dan siswa, dan 3 Instrumen keefektifan yang meliputi angket penilaian diri, lembar penilaian proyek, tes prestasi belajar, dan lembar respon siswa. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa model PBL-AfL-S dan perangkat pembelajarannya telah memenuhi kriteria valid, praktis dan efektif. Kata kunci: Pembelajaran; Masalah; Asesmen; Smartphone [English]: This study aims to develop a Problem Based Learning (PBL model using Assessment for Learning (AFL with smartphone, abbreviated as PBL-AfL-S as valid, practical and effective to support the implementation of the 2013 curriculum in High School. The stages of developing the PBL-AfL-S model consist of preliminary research, development or prototyping, and evaluation. The quality criteria of PBL-AfL-S refer to Nieveen (1999, i.e. valid, practical, and effective. The PBL-AfL-S model was piloted in SMA Negeri 3 Klaten in two phases. Tryout 1 was conducted in class XI-IPA 6 and tryout 2 was in class XI-IPA 7. The research instruments consist of: 1 The validity instrument of the model and its learning support tools, 2 the practicality of the teacher’s and students’ activity, and 3 The

  15. Effects of problem-based learning vs. traditional lecture on Korean nursing students' critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Eunyoung; Lindquist, Ruth; Song, Yeoungsuk

    2014-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is a method widely used in nursing education to develop students' critical thinking skills to solve practice problems independently. Although PBL has been used in nursing education in Korea for nearly a decade, few studies have examined its effects on Korean nursing students' learning outcomes, and few Korean studies have examined relationships among these outcomes. The objectives of this study are to examine outcome abilities including critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning of nursing students receiving PBL vs. traditional lecture, and to examine correlations among these outcome abilities. A quasi-experimental non-equivalent group pretest-posttest design was used. First-year nursing students (N=90) were recruited from two different junior colleges in two cities (GY and GJ) in South Korea. In two selected educational programs, one used traditional lecture methods, while the other used PBL methods. Standardized self-administered questionnaires of critical thinking, problem-solving, and self-directed learning abilities were administered before and at 16weeks (after instruction). Learning outcomes were significantly positively correlated, however outcomes were not statistically different between groups. Students in the PBL group improved across all abilities measured, while student scores in the traditional lecture group decreased in problem-solving and self-directed learning. Critical thinking was positively associated with problem-solving and self-directed learning (r=.71, and r=.50, respectively, pcritical student abilities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Association between Motivation, Affect, and Self-regulated Learning When Solving Problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Martine; Wijnia, Lisette; Paas, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Self-regulated learning (SRL) skills are essential for learning during school years, particularly in complex problem-solving domains, such as biology and math. Although a lot of studies have focused on the cognitive resources that are needed for learning to solve problems in a self-regulated way, affective and motivational resources have received much less research attention. The current study investigated the relation between affect (i.e., Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale), motivation (i.e., autonomous and controlled motivation), mental effort, SRL skills, and problem-solving performance when learning to solve biology problems in a self-regulated online learning environment. In the learning phase, secondary education students studied video-modeling examples of how to solve hereditary problems, solved hereditary problems which they chose themselves from a set of problems with different complexity levels (i.e., five levels). In the posttest, students solved hereditary problems, self-assessed their performance, and chose a next problem from the set of problems but did not solve these problems. The results from this study showed that negative affect, inaccurate self-assessments during the posttest, and higher perceptions of mental effort during the posttest were negatively associated with problem-solving performance after learning in a self-regulated way.

  17. The Association between Motivation, Affect, and Self-regulated Learning When Solving Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Baars

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Self-regulated learning (SRL skills are essential for learning during school years, particularly in complex problem-solving domains, such as biology and math. Although a lot of studies have focused on the cognitive resources that are needed for learning to solve problems in a self-regulated way, affective and motivational resources have received much less research attention. The current study investigated the relation between affect (i.e., Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale, motivation (i.e., autonomous and controlled motivation, mental effort, SRL skills, and problem-solving performance when learning to solve biology problems in a self-regulated online learning environment. In the learning phase, secondary education students studied video-modeling examples of how to solve hereditary problems, solved hereditary problems which they chose themselves from a set of problems with different complexity levels (i.e., five levels. In the posttest, students solved hereditary problems, self-assessed their performance, and chose a next problem from the set of problems but did not solve these problems. The results from this study showed that negative affect, inaccurate self-assessments during the posttest, and higher perceptions of mental effort during the posttest were negatively associated with problem-solving performance after learning in a self-regulated way.

  18. The Association between Motivation, Affect, and Self-regulated Learning When Solving Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baars, Martine; Wijnia, Lisette; Paas, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Self-regulated learning (SRL) skills are essential for learning during school years, particularly in complex problem-solving domains, such as biology and math. Although a lot of studies have focused on the cognitive resources that are needed for learning to solve problems in a self-regulated way, affective and motivational resources have received much less research attention. The current study investigated the relation between affect (i.e., Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale), motivation (i.e., autonomous and controlled motivation), mental effort, SRL skills, and problem-solving performance when learning to solve biology problems in a self-regulated online learning environment. In the learning phase, secondary education students studied video-modeling examples of how to solve hereditary problems, solved hereditary problems which they chose themselves from a set of problems with different complexity levels (i.e., five levels). In the posttest, students solved hereditary problems, self-assessed their performance, and chose a next problem from the set of problems but did not solve these problems. The results from this study showed that negative affect, inaccurate self-assessments during the posttest, and higher perceptions of mental effort during the posttest were negatively associated with problem-solving performance after learning in a self-regulated way. PMID:28848467

  19. Impact of problem-based learning in a large classroom setting: student perception and problem-solving skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klegeris, Andis; Hurren, Heather

    2011-12-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) can be described as a learning environment where the problem drives the learning. This technique usually involves learning in small groups, which are supervised by tutors. It is becoming evident that PBL in a small-group setting has a robust positive effect on student learning and skills, including better problem-solving skills and an increase in overall motivation. However, very little research has been done on the educational benefits of PBL in a large classroom setting. Here, we describe a PBL approach (using tutorless groups) that was introduced as a supplement to standard didactic lectures in University of British Columbia Okanagan undergraduate biochemistry classes consisting of 45-85 students. PBL was chosen as an effective method to assist students in learning biochemical and physiological processes. By monitoring student attendance and using informal and formal surveys, we demonstrated that PBL has a significant positive impact on student motivation to attend and participate in the course work. Student responses indicated that PBL is superior to traditional lecture format with regard to the understanding of course content and retention of information. We also demonstrated that student problem-solving skills are significantly improved, but additional controlled studies are needed to determine how much PBL exercises contribute to this improvement. These preliminary data indicated several positive outcomes of using PBL in a large classroom setting, although further studies aimed at assessing student learning are needed to further justify implementation of this technique in courses delivered to large undergraduate classes.

  20. Collaborative Learning in Problem Solving: A Case Study in Metacognitive Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly L. Wismath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Problem solving and collaborative communication are among the key 21st century skills educators want students to develop. This paper presents results from a study of the collaborative work patterns of 133 participants from a university level course designed to develop transferable problem-solving skills. Most of the class time in this course was spent on actually solving puzzles, with minimal direct instruction; students were allowed to work either independently or in small groups of two or more, as they preferred, and to move back and forth between these two modalities as they wished. A distinctive student-driven pattern blending collaborative and independent endeavour was observed, consistently over four course offerings in four years. We discuss a number of factors which appear to be related to this variable pattern of independent and collaborative enterprise, including the thinking and learning styles of the individuals, the preference of the individuals, the types of problems being worked on, and the stage in a given problem at which students were working. We also consider implications of these factors for the teaching of problem solving, arguing that the development of collaborative problem solving abilities is an important metacognitive skill.

  1. Acquisition of nonlinear forward optics in generative models: two-stage "downside-up" learning for occluded vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajima, Satohiro; Watanabe, Masataka

    2011-03-01

    We propose a two-stage learning method which implements occluded visual scene analysis into a generative model, a type of hierarchical neural network with bi-directional synaptic connections. Here, top-down connections simulate forward optics to generate predictions for sensory driven low-level representation, whereas bottom-up connections function to send the prediction error, the difference between the sensory based and the predicted low-level representation, to higher areas. The prediction error is then used to update the high-level representation to obtain better agreement with the visual scene. Although the actual forward optics is highly nonlinear and the accuracy of simulated forward optics is crucial for these types of models, the majority of previous studies have only investigated linear and simplified cases of forward optics. Here we take occluded vision as an example of nonlinear forward optics, where an object in front completely masks out the object behind. We propose a two-staged learning method inspired by the staged development of infant visual capacity. In the primary learning stage, a minimal set of object basis is acquired within a linear generative model using the conventional unsupervised learning scheme. In the secondary learning stage, an auxiliary multi-layer neural network is trained to acquire nonlinear forward optics by supervised learning. The important point is that the high-level representation of the linear generative model serves as the input and the sensory driven low-level representation provides the desired output. Numerical simulations show that occluded visual scene analysis can indeed be implemented by the proposed method. Furthermore, considering the format of input to the multi-layer network and analysis of hidden-layer units leads to the prediction that whole object representation of partially occluded objects, together with complex intermediate representation as a consequence of nonlinear transformation from non-occluded to

  2. Problem-based learning using patient-simulated videos showing daily life for a comprehensive clinical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ikegami, Akiko; Ohira, Yoshiyuki; Uehara, Takanori; Noda, Kazutaka; Suzuki, Shingo; Shikino, Kiyoshi; Kajiwara, Hideki; Kondo, Takeshi; Hirota, Yusuke; Ikusaka, Masatomi

    2017-01-01

    Objectives We examined whether problem-based learning tutorials using patient-simulated videos showing daily life are more practical for clinical learning, compared with traditional paper-based problem-based learning, for the consideration rate of psychosocial issues and the recall rate for experienced learning. Methods Twenty-two groups with 120 fifth-year students were each assigned paper-based problem-based learning and video-based problem-based learning using patient-simulated videos. We ...

  3. Computer vision cracks the leaf code.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilf, Peter; Zhang, Shengping; Chikkerur, Sharat; Little, Stefan A; Wing, Scott L; Serre, Thomas

    2016-03-22

    Understanding the extremely variable, complex shape and venation characters of angiosperm leaves is one of the most challenging problems in botany. Machine learning offers opportunities to analyze large numbers of specimens, to discover novel leaf features of angiosperm clades that may have phylogenetic significance, and to use those characters to classify unknowns. Previous computer vision approaches have primarily focused on leaf identification at the species level. It remains an open question whether learning and classification are possible among major evolutionary groups such as families and orders, which usually contain hundreds to thousands of species each and exhibit many times the foliar variation of individual species. Here, we tested whether a computer vision algorithm could use a database of 7,597 leaf images from 2,001 genera to learn features of botanical families and orders, then classify novel images. The images are of cleared leaves, specimens that are chemically bleached, then stained to reveal venation. Machine learning was used to learn a codebook of visual elements representing leaf shape and venation patterns. The resulting automated system learned to classify images into families and orders with a success rate many times greater than chance. Of direct botanical interest, the responses of diagnostic features can be visualized on leaf images as heat maps, which are likely to prompt recognition and evolutionary interpretation of a wealth of novel morphological characters. With assistance from computer vision, leaves are poised to make numerous new contributions to systematic and paleobotanical studies.

  4. Differentiating case-based learning from problem-based learning after a twoday introductory workshop on case-based learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aqil Mohammad Daher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background Considerable overlap exists between case-based learning (CBL and problem-based learning (PBL and differentiating between the two can be difficult for a lot of the academicians. Aims This study gauged the ability of members of medical school, familiar with a problem-based learning (PBL curriculum, to differentiate between case-based learning (CBL and PBL after a two-day workshop on CBL. Methods A questionnaire was distributed to all participants, attending the introductory course on CBL. It was designed to document the basic characteristics of the respondents, their preference for either CBL or PBL, their ability to recognize differences between CBL and PBL, and their overall perception of the course. Results Of the total workshop participants, 80.5 per cent returned the completed questionnaire. The mean age of the respondents was 44.12±12.31 years and women made up a slight majority. Majority favoured CBL over PBL and felt it was more clinical, emphasizes on self-directed learning, provides more opportunities for learning, permits in-depth exploration of cases, has structured environment and encourages the use of all learning resources. On the respondents’ ability to discriminate CBL from PBL, a weighted score of 39.9 per cent indicated a failure on the part of the respondents to correctly identify differences between CBL and PBL. Less than half opined that CBL was a worthwhile progression from PBL and about third would recommend CBL over PBL. Conclusion It seems that majority of the respondents failed to adequately differentiate between CBL and PBL and didn’t favour CBL over PBL.

  5. Home vision tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or eye disease and you should have a professional eye examination. Amsler grid test: If the grid appears distorted or broken, there may be a problem with the retina . Distance vision test: If you do not read the ...

  6. Stereo vision with texture learning for fault-tolerant automatic baling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blas, Morten Rufus; Blanke, Mogens

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents advances in using stereovision for automating baling. A robust classification scheme is demonstrated for learning and classifying based on texture and shape. Using a state-of-the-art texton approach a fast classifier is obtained that can handle non-linearities in the data...

  7. Gazing into the Crystal Ball: Using Scenarios for Future Visioning of a Distance Learning Library Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Anne Marie; Cawthorne, Jon E.; Citro, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the use of scenarios as a tool to assist a large distance learning library service in its strategic planning. Through a description of the scenario process from beginning to end, the authors detail the steps that the library director and the consultant took initially; their missteps; and the successful conclusion. This study…

  8. What's in a Vision? Introducing an Organisational Learning Strategy in a Local Authority's Education Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Jenny; Boreham, Nick

    2006-01-01

    It is frequently asserted that schools and local authorities should become "learning organisations" as a pre-condition for school improvement, but there is very little evidence about the specific processes and activities involved in such a transformation. This paper analyses the initial stages of the implementation by a Scottish local…

  9. Self-directed learning readiness of Asian students: students perspective on a hybrid problem based learning curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leatemia, Lukas D; Susilo, Astrid P; van Berkel, Henk

    2016-12-03

    To identify the student's readiness to perform self-directed learning and the underlying factors influencing it on the hybrid problem based learning curriculum. A combination of quantitative and qualitative studies was conducted in five medical schools in Indonesia. In the quantitative study, the Self Directed Learning Readiness Scale was distributed to all students in all batches, who had experience with the hybrid problem based curriculum. They were categorized into low- and high -level based on the score of the questionnaire. Three focus group discussions (low-, high-, and mixed level) were conducted in the qualitative study with six to twelve students chosen randomly from each group to find the factors influencing their self-directed learning readiness. Two researchers analysed the qualitative data as a measure of triangulation. The quantitative study showed only half of the students had a high-level of self-directed learning readiness, and a similar trend also occurred in each batch. The proportion of students with a high level of self-directed learning readiness was lower in the senior students compared to more junior students. The qualitative study showed that problem based learning processes, assessments, learning environment, students' life styles, students' perceptions of the topics, and mood, were factors influencing their self-directed learning. A hybrid problem based curriculum may not fully affect the students' self-directed learning. The curriculum system, teacher's experiences, student's background and cultural factors might contribute to the difficulties for the student's in conducting self-directed learning.

  10. Using problem-based learning to redesign nursing administration masters programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, C M

    2000-01-01

    Problem-based learning (PBL) is offered as an appropriate pedagogy to prepare nurse managers for the uncertainties of future administrative practice. It is a student-centered, experiential learning strategy aimed at developing clinical reasoning, structuring knowledge in real-life contexts, motivating learning, and developing self-learning skills. Health professions and business schools report positive feedback from their stakeholders after adopting this new learning paradigm.

  11. The Development of Learning Sets and Research Methodology Module Using Problem Based Learning for Accounting Education Students

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Partono; Nurkhin, Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Improving the learning process is very important for every lecturer by implement innovative learning methods or media. The purpose of this study is to develop a research methodology learning instruction and module based of problem based learning for accounting education students. This research applied research and development design in the research methodology course in Economics Education (Accounting) Department, Faculty Of Economics, Semarang State University. Data analysis was used to test...

  12. PENGEMBANGAN KETRAMPILAN BERPIKIR TINGKAT TINGGI DENGAN MENGGUNAKAN STRATEGI METAKOGNITIF MODEL PEMBELAJARAN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sucipto Sucipto

    2017-05-01

    In general, higher order thinking skills achievements of learners is still low compared to other countries. To develop higher order thinking skills, educators are required to create a learning atmosphere that supports and use learning strategies. Efforts to improve thinking skills that learners can do to improve metacognitive skills. There are different types of metacognitive strategies that can be selected educators, one of which uses problem solving strategies. In the process of solving problems, individuals using both cognitive abilities and practical skills, which include metacognitive activities such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. Problem-based learning is an instructional approach used to stimulate students' higher order thinking in situations oriented real problems, including learning how to learn. Keywords: higher order thinking skills, metacognitive strategies, problem based learning

  13. Influence on Learning of a Collaborative Learning Method Comprising the Jigsaw Method and Problem-based Learning (PBL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kayoko; Takahashi, Kiyoshi; Masukawa, Hiroyuki; Shimamori, Yoshimitsu

    2017-01-01

    Recently, the practice of active learning has spread, increasingly recognized as an essential component of academic studies. Classes incorporating small group discussion (SGD) are conducted at many universities. At present, assessments of the effectiveness of SGD have mostly involved evaluation by questionnaires conducted by teachers, by peer assessment, and by self-evaluation of students. However, qualitative data, such as open-ended descriptions by students, have not been widely evaluated. As a result, we have been unable to analyze the processes and methods involved in how students acquire knowledge in SGD. In recent years, due to advances in information and communication technology (ICT), text mining has enabled the analysis of qualitative data. We therefore investigated whether the introduction of a learning system comprising the jigsaw method and problem-based learning (PBL) would improve student attitudes toward learning; we did this by text mining analysis of the content of student reports. We found that by applying the jigsaw method before PBL, we were able to improve student attitudes toward learning and increase the depth of their understanding of the area of study as a result of working with others. The use of text mining to analyze qualitative data also allowed us to understand the processes and methods by which students acquired knowledge in SGD and also changes in students' understanding and performance based on improvements to the class. This finding suggests that the use of text mining to analyze qualitative data could enable teachers to evaluate the effectiveness of various methods employed to improve learning.

  14. Teenage motherhood: its relationship to undetected learning problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauch-Elnekave, H

    1994-01-01

    This study describes characteristics of a group of 64 adolescent mothers and their infants who participated in a program for teenage mothers run by a local health department. A majority of the girls for whom California Achievement Test (CAT) scores were available scored one or more years below grade level in reading and in language skills. Relative delays in infant development (language and social domains) were also documented. High levels of self-esteem as well as general social acceptance (by adults and peers) of early out-of-wedlock parenting suggest that early motherhood may represent an alternative avenue to experiencing success for girls who are having academic difficulties. These findings, which suggest the likelihood of a high incidence of undetected learning problems in this population, indicate that these difficulties may have a significant relationship to the high rate of school dropout associated with adolescent motherhood. The findings bring into question the notion of "unintended pregnancies" and the wisdom of current federal policies for preventing adolescent parenthood that rely on the promotion of abstinence.

  15. Inquiry, play, and problem solving in a process learning environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thwaits, Anne Y.

    United States. This dissertation presents an account of the history of the institution and the continuing legacy of the early Exploratorium and its founder, Frank Oppenheimer. I argue that the institution is an early example of a constructivist learning museum. I then describe how art encourages learning in the museum. It provides means of presenting information that engage all of the senses and encourage emotional involvement. It reframes familiar sights so that viewers look more closely in search of recognition, and it presents intangible or dematerialized things in a tangible way. It facilitates play, with its many benefits. It brings fresh perspectives and processes to problem solving and the acquisition of new knowledge. This project is the study of an institution where art and science have always coexisted with equal importance, setting it apart from more traditional museums where art was added as a secondary focus to the original disciplinary concentration of the institution. Many of the exhibits were created by artists, but the real value the visual arts bring to the museum is in its contributions to processes such as inquiry, play, problem-solving, and innovation.

  16. Integrating Problem-Based Learning and Simulation: Effects on Student Motivation and Life Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Young Sook; Kim, Sang Suk

    2015-07-01

    Previous research has suggested that a teaching strategy integrating problem-based learning and simulation may be superior to traditional lecture. The purpose of this study was to assess learner motivation and life skills before and after taking a course involving problem-based learning and simulation. The design used repeated measures with a convenience sample of 83 second-year nursing students who completed the integrated course. Data from a self-administered questionnaire measuring learner motivation and life skills were collected at pretest, post-problem-based learning, and post-simulation time points. Repeated-measures analysis of variance determined that the mean scores for total learner motivation (F=6.62, P=.003), communication (F=8.27, Plearning (F=4.45, P=.016) differed significantly between time points. Post hoc tests using the Bonferroni correction revealed that total learner motivation and total life skills significantly increased both from pretest to postsimulation and from post-problem-based learning test to postsimulation test. Subscales of learner motivation and life skills, intrinsic goal orientation, self-efficacy for learning and performance, problem-solving skills, and self-directed learning skills significantly increased both from pretest to postsimulation test and from post-problem-based learning test to post-simulation test. The results demonstrate that an integrating problem-based learning and simulation course elicits significant improvement in learner motivation and life skills. Simulation plus problem-based learning is more effective than problem-based learning alone at increasing intrinsic goal orientation, task value, self-efficacy for learning and performance, problem solving, and self-directed learning.

  17. Enhancing students' learning in problem based learning: validation of a self-assessment scale for active learning and critical thinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoiriyah, Umatul; Roberts, Chris; Jorm, Christine; Van der Vleuten, C P M

    2015-08-26

    Problem based learning (PBL) is a powerful learning activity but fidelity to intended models may slip and student engagement wane, negatively impacting learning processes, and outcomes. One potential solution to solve this degradation is by encouraging self-assessment in the PBL tutorial. Self-assessment is a central component of the self-regulation of student learning behaviours. There are few measures to investigate self-assessment relevant to PBL processes. We developed a Self-assessment Scale on Active Learning and Critical Thinking (SSACT) to address this gap. We wished to demonstrated evidence of its validity in the context of PBL by exploring its internal structure. We used a mixed methods approach to scale development. We developed scale items from a qualitative investigation, literature review, and consideration of previous existing tools used for study of the PBL process. Expert review panels evaluated its content; a process of validation subsequently reduced the pool of items. We used structural equation modelling to undertake a confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) of the SSACT and coefficient alpha. The 14 item SSACT consisted of two domains "active learning" and "critical thinking." The factorial validity of SSACT was evidenced by all items loading significantly on their expected factors, a good model fit for the data, and good stability across two independent samples. Each subscale had good internal reliability (>0.8) and strongly correlated with each other. The SSACT has sufficient evidence of its validity to support its use in the PBL process to encourage students to self-assess. The implementation of the SSACT may assist students to improve the quality of their learning in achieving PBL goals such as critical thinking and self-directed learning.

  18. applying reinforcement learning to the weapon assignment problem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ismith

    the machine-learning subfield of reinforcement learning (RL), namely a Monte. Carlo (MC) control algorithm with exploring ... What sets RL apart from other machine-learning methods is the fact that the agent is not told which actions to take, ..... For our simple model, the DA was situated at the centre of the grid and was fixed.

  19. Learning Disability: Not Just a Problem Children Outgrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    President's Committee on Employment of the Handicapped, Washington, DC.

    Three papers concerning learning disabled adults and a list of resources available for disabled people are presented. The first paper, "Colin's Own Story," was written by a 16 year old learning disabled individual, and recounts his struggles and what it is like to be learning disabled. Two poems by the author further describe his emotions and…

  20. Riemannian computing in computer vision

    CERN Document Server

    Srivastava, Anuj

    2016-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive treatise on Riemannian geometric computations and related statistical inferences in several computer vision problems. This edited volume includes chapter contributions from leading figures in the field of computer vision who are applying Riemannian geometric approaches in problems such as face recognition, activity recognition, object detection, biomedical image analysis, and structure-from-motion. Some of the mathematical entities that necessitate a geometric analysis include rotation matrices (e.g. in modeling camera motion), stick figures (e.g. for activity recognition), subspace comparisons (e.g. in face recognition), symmetric positive-definite matrices (e.g. in diffusion tensor imaging), and function-spaces (e.g. in studying shapes of closed contours).   ·         Illustrates Riemannian computing theory on applications in computer vision, machine learning, and robotics ·         Emphasis on algorithmic advances that will allow re-application in other...