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Sample records for viscoelastic tensile behavior

  1. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Rene; Hassenkam, Tue; P, Hansen

    2010-01-01

    Whole tendon and fibril bundles display viscoelastic behavior, but to the best of our knowledge this property has not been directly measured in single human tendon fibrils. In the present work an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach was used for tensile testing of two human patellar tendon fibr...

  2. Non-contact tensile viscoelastic characterization of microscale biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuhui; Hong, Yuan; Xu, Guang-Kui; Liu, Shaobao; Shi, Qiang; Tang, Deding; Yang, Hui; Genin, Guy M.; Lu, Tian Jian; Xu, Feng

    2018-06-01

    Many structures and materials in nature and physiology have important "meso-scale" structures at the micron length-scale whose tensile responses have proven difficult to characterize mechanically. Although techniques such as atomic force microscopy and micro- and nano-identation are mature for compression and indentation testing at the nano-scale, and standard uniaxial and shear rheometry techniques exist for the macroscale, few techniques are applicable for tensile-testing at the micrometre-scale, leaving a gap in our understanding of hierarchical biomaterials. Here, we present a novel magnetic mechanical testing (MMT) system that enables viscoelastic tensile testing at this critical length scale. The MMT system applies non-contact loading, avoiding gripping and surface interaction effects. We demonstrate application of the MMT system to the first analyses of the pure tensile responses of several native and engineered tissue systems at the mesoscale, showing the broad potential of the system for exploring micro- and meso-scale analysis of structured and hierarchical biological systems.

  3. Viscoelastic behavior of discrete human collagen fibrils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, René; Hassenkam, Tue; Hansen, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Whole tendon and fibril bundles display viscoelastic behavior, but to the best of our knowledge this property has not been directly measured in single human tendon fibrils. In the present work an atomic force microscopy (AFM) approach was used for tensile testing of two human patellar tendon...... saline, cyclic testing was performed in the pre-yield region at different strain rates, and the elastic response was determined by a stepwise stress relaxation test. The elastic stress-strain response corresponded to a second-order polynomial fit, while the viscous response showed a linear dependence...

  4. Viscoelastic behavior of rubbery materials

    CERN Document Server

    Roland, C M

    2011-01-01

    The gigantic size of polymer molecules makes them viscoelastic - their behavior changes depending on how fast and for how long the material is used. This book looks at the latest discoveries in the field from a fundamental molecular perspective, in order to guide the development of better and new applications for soft materials.

  5. Tensile and fracture behavior of polymer foams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabir, Md. E.; Saha, M.C.; Jeelani, S.

    2006-01-01

    Tensile and mode-I fracture behavior of cross-linked polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and rigid polyurethane (PUR) foams are examined. Tension tests are performed using prismatic bar specimens and mode-I fracture tests are performed using single edge notched bend (SENB) specimens under three-point bending. Test specimens are prepared from PVC foams with three densities and two different levels of cross-linking, and PUR foam with one density. Tension and quasi-static fracture tests are performed using a Zwick/Rowell test machine. Dynamic fracture tests are performed using a DYNATUP model 8210 instrumented drop-tower test set up at three different impact energy levels. Various parameters such as specimen size, loading rate, foam density, cross-linking, crack length, cell orientation (flow and rise-direction) and solid polymer material are studied. It is found that foam density and solid polymer material have a significant effect on tensile strength, modulus, and fracture toughness of polymer foams. Level of polymer cross-linking is also found to have a significant effect on fracture toughness. The presence of cracks in the rise- and flow direction as well as loading rate has minimal effect. Dynamic fracture behavior is found to be different as compared to quasi-static fracture behavior. Dynamic fracture toughness (K d ) increases with impact energy. Examination of fracture surfaces reveals that the fracture occurs in fairly brittle manner for all foam materials

  6. Understanding the viscoelastic behavior of silica filled rubber

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Castro, J.G.

    2014-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the understanding the viscoelastic behavior of silica filled Nitrile Butadiene Rubber (NBR) using different sizes/surface areas in three different regions of deformation that will be developed in 3 chapters. The characterization of the samples used in this work is described in

  7. Tensile behavior and tension stiffening of reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choun, Young Sun; Seo, Jeong Moon

    2001-03-01

    For the ultimate behavior analysis of containment buildings under severe accident conditions, a clear understanding of tensile behaviors of plain and reinforced concrete is necessary. Nonlinear models for tensile behaviors of concrete are also needed. This report describe following items: tensile behaviors of plain concrete, test results of reinforced concrete panels in uniaxial and biaxial tension, tension stiffening. The tensile behaviors of reinforced concrete are significantly influenced by the properties of concrete and reinforcing steel. Thus, for a more reliable evaluation of tensile behavior and ultimate pressure capacity of a reinforced or prestressed concrete containment building, an advanced concrete model which can be considered rebar-concrete interaction effects should be developed. In additions, a crack behavior analysis method and tension stiffening models, which are based on fracture mechanics, should be developed. The model should be based on the various test data from specimens considering material and sectional properties of the containment building

  8. MECHANICAL BEHAVIOR OF PRESTRESSED VISCOELASTIC ADHESIVE AREAS UNDER COMBINING LOADINGS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halil Murat Enginsoy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this article, mechanical behaviors of adhesive tape VHB 4950 elastomeric material, which is an element of acrylic polymer group and which is in viscoelastic behavior, under different pre-stress conditions and complex forces of different geometric parameters created by combining loadings have been experimentally and numerically investigated. In experimental studies, loading-unloading cyclic tests, one of the different standardized tests for the mechanical characterization of viscoelastic material, have been applied which give the most suitable convergent optimization parameters for the finite element model. Different material models were also investigated by using the data obtained from loading-unloading test results in all numerical models. According to the experimental results, the most suitable material parameters were determined with the Abaqus Parallel Rheological Framework Model (PRF for 4 Yeoh Networks with Bergstrom-Boyce Flow model created in the Mcalibration software for finite element analysis. Subsequently, using these material parameters, finite element analysis was performed as three dimension non-linear viscoelastic with a commercial finite element software Abaqus. The finite element analysis results showed good correlation to the Force (N-Displacement (mm experimental data for maximum load-carrying capacity of structural specimens.

  9. Stress-sensitive tissue regeneration in viscoelastic biomaterials subjected to modulated tensile strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfiore, Laurence A; Floren, Michael L; Paulino, Alexandre T; Belfiore, Carol J

    2011-09-01

    This research contribution addresses the mechanochemistry of intra-tissue mass transfer for nutrients, oxygen, growth factors, and other essential ingredients that anchorage-dependent cells require for successful proliferation on biocompatible surfaces. The unsteady state reaction-diffusion equation (i.e., modified diffusion equation) is solved according to the von Kármán-Pohlhausen integral method of boundary layer analysis when nutrient consumption and tissue regeneration are stimulated by harmonically imposed stress. The mass balance with diffusion and stress-sensitive kinetics represents a rare example where the Damköhler and Deborah numbers appear together in an effort to simulate the development of mass transfer boundary layers in porous viscoelastic biomaterials. The Boltzmann superposition integral is employed to calculate time-dependent strain in terms of the real and imaginary components of dynamic compliance for viscoelastic solids that transmit harmonic excitation to anchorage-dependent cells. Rates of nutrient consumption under stress-free conditions are described by third-order kinetics which include local mass densities of nutrients, oxygen, and attached cells that maintain dynamic equilibrium with active protein sites in the porous matrix. Thinner nutrient mass transfer boundary layers are stabilized at shorter dimensionless diffusion times when the stress-free intra-tissue Damköhler number increases above its initial-condition-sensitive critical value. The critical stress-sensitive intra-tissue Damköhler number, above which it is necessary to consider the effect of harmonic strain on nutrient consumption and tissue regeneration, is proportional to the Deborah number and corresponds to a larger fraction of the stress-free intra-tissue Damköhler number in rigid biomaterials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Tensile behavior of borated stainless steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stephens, J.J. Jr.; Sorenson, K.B.

    1991-01-01

    Borated stainless steel tensile testing is being conducted at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The goal of the test program is to provide data to support a code case inquiry to the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III. The adoption by ASME facilitates a material's qualification for structural use in transport cask applications. For transport cask basket applications, the potential advantage to using borated stainless steel arises from the fact that the structural and criticality control functions can be combined into one material. This can result in a decrease in net section thickness of the basket web (increased payload capacity) and eliminates the fabrication process and cost of attaching a discrete boron poison material to the basket web. In addition, adding borate stainless steel to the inventory of acceptable structural material provides the Department of Energy (DOE) and its cask contractors an alternative to current proposed materials which have not been qualified for structural service. The test program at SNL involves procuring material, machining test specimens, and conducting the tensile tests. From test measurements obtained so far, general trends indicate that tensile properties (yield strength and ultimate strength) increase with boron content and are in all cases superior to the minimum required properties established in A-240, Type 304, a typical grade of austenitic stainless steel. Therefore, in a designed basket, web thicknesses using borated stainless steel would be comparable to or thinner tan an equivalent basket manufactured from a typical stainless steel without boron additions. General trends from test results indicate that ductilities decrease with increasing boron content

  11. Fracture behavior of nuclear graphites under tensile impact loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ugachi, Hirokazu; Ishiyama, Shintaro; Eto, Motokuni

    1994-01-01

    Impact tensile strength test was performed with two kinds of HTTR graphites, fine grained isotropic graphite, IG-11 and coarse grained near isotropic graphite, PGX and deformation and fracture behavior under the strain rate of over 100s -1 was measured and the following results were derived: (1) Tensile strength for IG-11 graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but over 1 s -1 , tensile strength for IG-11 graphite increase larger than that measured under 1 s -1 . At the strain rate more than 100 s -1 , remarkable decrease of tensile strength for IG-11 graphite was found. Tensile strength of PGX graphite does not depend on the strain rate less than 1 s -1 , but beyond this value, the sharp tensile strength decrease occurs. (2) Under 100 s -1 , fracture strain for both graphites increase with increase of strain rate and over 100 s -1 , drastic increase of fracture strain for IG-11 graphite was found. (3) At the part of gage length, volume of specimen increase with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (4) Poisson's ratio for both graphites decrease with increase of tensile loading level and strain rate. (5) Remarkable change of stress-strain curve for both graphites under 100 s -1 was not found, but over 100 s -1 , the slope of these curve for IG-11 graphite decrease drastically. (author)

  12. Nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of shells of revolution under arbitrary loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonard, J.W.; Arbaki-Kanjoori, F.

    1975-01-01

    The requirement of some structural components such as propulsion systems and gas turbines to operate at high temperatures and pressures make the accurate evaluation of the creep phenomenon exigent (in fast breeder reactor for example). For the expected increases in operating temperatures and pressures, it becomes necessary to perform a thorough analysis of integral structural components of nuclear power plants throughout their life span. Since a large class of structures operating at elevated temperatures are composed of rotationally symmetric shells, a solution technique can be developed which involves the numerical integration of the governing shell equations. This method has been successfully applied to the static and dynamic analysis of thin elastic shells of revolution and for some cases of inelastic material behavior. It has been shown to render solutions efficiently and accurately, usually with only a fraction of computer time and storage requirements and data manipulation that is required for other numerical schemes such as the finite element method. Furthermore, the numerical integration method allows more flexibility for varying the integration step lengths than does the finite difference method and can provide uniform accuracy throughout the analysis. For nonlinear viscoelastic behavior the numerical integration technique is expected to provide similar efficiency to that obtained for the elastic problems. The computer program developed can accept time variation of material properties. Since a single form for the material constitutive law cannot encompass all materials, provisions are made so that the analysis of a very large class of material behavior can be accomplished

  13. Statistical behavior of the tensile property of heated cotton fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    The temperature dependence of the tensile property of single cotton fiber was studied in the range of 160-300°C using Favimat test, and its statistical behavior was interpreted in terms of structural changes. The tenacity of control cotton fiber was well described by the single Weibull distribution,...

  14. Chaotic convective behavior and stability analysis of a fractional viscoelastic fluids model in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    N'Doye, Ibrahima; Laleg-Kirati, Taous-Meriem

    2015-01-01

    , and show the existence of chaos. The behavior and stability analysis of the integer-order and the fractional commensurate and non-commensurate orders of a fractional viscoelastic fluids system, which exhibits chaos, are presented as well.

  15. Chaotic convective behavior and stability analysis of a fractional viscoelastic fluids model in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    N'Doye, Ibrahima

    2015-05-25

    In this paper, a dynamical fractional viscoelastic fluids convection model in porous media is proposed and its chaotic behavior is studied. A preformed equilibrium points analysis indicates the conditions where chaotic dynamics can be observed, and show the existence of chaos. The behavior and stability analysis of the integer-order and the fractional commensurate and non-commensurate orders of a fractional viscoelastic fluids system, which exhibits chaos, are presented as well.

  16. Behavior of fragmentation front in a porous viscoelastic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichihara, M.; Takayama, K.

    2002-12-01

    We are developing laboratory experiments to investigate dynamics of magma fragmentation during explosive volcanic eruptions. Fragmentation of such a mixture as magma consisting of viscoelastic melt, bubbles and solid particles, is not known yet, and experiments are necessary to establish a mathematical model. It has been shown that viscoelastic silicone compound (Dow Corning 3179) is a useful analogous material to simulate magma fragmentation. In the previous work, a porous specimen made of the compound was rapidly decompressed and development of brittle fragmentation was observed. However, there were arguments that the experiment was different from actual processes which produce fragments as small as volcanic ash, because in the experiment the specimen was broken into only several pieces. This time, results of the improved experiments are presented. The experimental apparatus is a kind of a vertical shock tube, which mainly consists of a high pressure test section and low pressure chambers. The test section is made of acrylic tube of which inner diameter is 25 mm. The internal phenomenon is recorded by a high-speed video camera. Pressure is measured in the gas above and beneath the specimen by piezoelectric transducers. The specimen is prepared in the following way. First, an acrylic tube filled with the compound is put in a nitrogen tank and kept at 45 bar for more than 8 hours. The compound absorbs the gas and equilibrates with the nitrogen. Next, the tank is decompressed back to the atmospheric pressure slowly. Nitrogen exsolves and bubbles are formed in the compound quite uniformly. Finally, the expanded compound sticking out of both ends of the tube is cut down, and the tube containing the specimen is attached to the shock tube. The specimen is rapidly decompressed by 24, 16, and 8 bars. The high-speed video images demonstrate a sequence of the fragmentation process. We observe propagation of a clear fracture front at 50 m/s for 24 bar of decompression and at

  17. Viscoelastic and thermal behavior of structural concrete with reference to containment vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanou, G.D.

    1981-01-01

    A method of numerical viscoelastic stress analysis is described suitable for concrete structures operating at elevated temperatures. The paper describes how approximate numerical methods of elastic analysis of the finite element type can be extended to incorporate the viscoelastic behavior of structural concrete of the quasi-static type. A new eight parameter viscoelastic model is proposed to represent concrete behavior in the loaded and unloaded stage. The deformational expressions for the proposed viscoelastic analogue are also developed. Finally, as a result of courve-fitting procedures, the evaluation of the creep law coefficients are obtained for creep laws appropriate to a test regime. The proposed method is of general application providing that the properties of concrete are assessed reasonably well. The analytical predictions are compared with experimental results obtained on concrete model specimens loaded for 3 1/2 months, at a temperature of 80 0 C. (author)

  18. Data characterizing tensile behavior of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, B R Bharath; Doddamani, Mrityunjay; Zeltmann, Steven E; Gupta, Nikhil; Ramakrishna, Seeram

    2016-03-01

    The data set presented is related to the tensile behavior of cenosphere reinforced high density polyethylene syntactic foam composites "Processing of cenosphere/HDPE syntactic foams using an industrial scale polymer injection molding machine" (Bharath et al., 2016) [1]. The focus of the work is on determining the feasibility of using an industrial scale polymer injection molding (PIM) machine for fabricating syntactic foams. The fabricated syntactic foams are investigated for microstructure and tensile properties. The data presented in this article is related to optimization of the PIM process for syntactic foam manufacture, equations and procedures to develop theoretical estimates for properties of cenospheres, and microstructure of syntactic foams before and after failure. Included dataset contains values obtained from the theoretical model.

  19. Viscoelastic materials with anisotropic rigid particles: stress-deformation behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.; Linden, van der E.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we have derived constitutive equations for the stress tensor of a viscoelastic material with anisotropic rigid particles. We have assumed that the material has fading memory. The expressions are valid for slow and small deformations from equilibrium, and for systems that are nearly

  20. Tensile creep behavior in an advanced silicon nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lofaj, F.

    2000-01-01

    Tensile creep behavior and changes in the microstructure of the advanced silicon nitride, SN 88M, were studied at temperatures from 1250 to 1400 C to reveal the creep resistance and lifetime-controlling processes. Assuming power law dependence of the minimum strain rate on stress, stress exponents from 6 to 8 and an apparent activation energy of 780 kJ/mol were obtained. Extensive electron microscopy observations revealed significant changes in the crystalline secondary phases and creep damage development. Creep damage was classified in two groups: 'inter-granular' defects in the amorphous boundary phases, and 'intra-granular' defects in silicon nitride grains. The inter-granular defects involved multigrain junction cavities, two-grain junction cavities, microcracks and cracks. The intra-granular defects included broken large grains, small symmetrical and asymmetrical cavities, and crack-like intragranular cavities. Cavities are generated continuously during the whole deformation starting from the threshold strain of ∝0.1%, and they contribute linearly to the tensile strain. Cavities produce more than 90% of the total tensile strain, and it is concluded that cavitation is the main creep mechanism in silicon nitride ceramics. The multigrain junction cavities are considered to be the most important for generating new volume and producing tensile strain. The Luecke and Wiederhorn (L and W) creep model, based on cavitation at multigrain junctions according to an exponential law, was proven to correspond to the stress dependence of the minimum strain rate. A qualitative model based on the L and W model was suggested and expanded to include intragranular cavitation. The basic mechanisms involve a repeating of the sequence grain boundary sliding (GBS) => cavitation at multigrain junctions => viscous flow and dissolution-precipitation. (orig.)

  1. The tensile behavior of GH3535 superalloy at elevated temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, F.F.; Zhou, B.M.; Huang, H.F.; Leng, B.; Lu, Y.L. [Thorium Molten Salts Reactor Center, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Dong, J.S. [Superalloy Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Li, Z.J., E-mail: lizhijun@sinap.ac.cn [Thorium Molten Salts Reactor Center, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China); Zhou, X.T. [Thorium Molten Salts Reactor Center, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2016-10-01

    The tensile behavior of GH3535 alloy has been investigated at strain rates of 8.33 × 10{sup −5}/s{sup −1}–8.33 × 10{sup −3}/s{sup −1}, in the temperature range of 25–800 °C. The results showed that the ultimate tensile strength was decreased with increasing temperature and increased with rising strain rate, whereas the yield strength kept almost a constant value at the temperature range from 550 to 800 °C in all strain rates test. The formation of M{sub 12}C carbides at the grain boundary during the tension process played an important role in increasing the yield strength of the alloy at elevated temperatures. But inhomogeneous deformation at 650 °C resulted in the minimum ductility of the alloy. Additionally, various types of serrations were noticed on the stress-strain curves for the alloy tested in the temperature range of 500–800 °C. Normal Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) effect and positive strain rate sensitivity were observed in this alloy. Type A and A + B serrations were presented to stress-strain curves at temperatures below 650 °C, whereas type C serration was noticed when the temperature rose above 650 °C. The analysis suggested that the interactions between substitutional solutes migration and mobile dislocations were the main reason for the serrated flow behavior in this alloy. - Highlights: • The tensile behavior of GH3535 alloy at elevated temperature was studied. • The yield strength anomaly was observed in the temperature range from 550 to 800 °C. • The formation of M{sub 12}C improves the grain boundary strength to a certain extent. • Inhomogeneous deformation at 650 °C results in the ductility loss of the alloy. • The interaction between solute atoms and dislocations results in the PLC effect.

  2. Viscoelastic behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes into phenolic resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Botelho, Edson Cocchieri; Costa, Michelle Leali; Braga, Carlos Isidoro, E-mail: ebotelho@feg.unesp.br [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (UNESP), Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Materiais e Tecnologia; Burkhart, Thomas [Institut fuer Verbundwerkstoffe GmbH, Kaiserslautern, (Germany); Lauke, Bernd [Leibniz-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Dresden (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    Nanostructured polymer composites have opened up new perspectives for multi-functional materials. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have the potential applications in order to improve mechanical and electrical performance in composites with aerospace application. This study focuses on the viscoelastic evaluation of phenolic resin reinforced carbon nanotubes, processed by using two techniques: aqueous-surfactant solution and three roll calender (TRC) process. According to our results a relative small amount of CNTs in a phenolic resin matrix is capable of enhancing the viscoelastic properties significantly and to modify the thermal stability. Also has been observed that when is used TRC process, the incorporation and distribution of CNT into phenolic resin is more effective when compared with aqueous solution dispersion process. (author)

  3. Tensile Fracture Behavior of Progressively-Drawn Pearlitic Steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a study is presented of the tensile fracture behavior of progressively-drawn pearlitic steels obtained from five different cold-drawing chains, including each drawing step from the initial hot-rolled bar (not cold-drawn at all to the final commercial product (pre-stressing steel wire. To this end, samples of the different wires were tested up to fracture by means of standard tension tests, and later, all of the fracture surfaces were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Micro-fracture maps (MFMs were assembled to characterize the different fractographic modes and to study their evolution with the level of cumulative plastic strain during cold drawing.

  4. Importance of Tensile Strength on the Shear Behavior of Discontinuities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghazvinian, A. H.; Azinfar, M. J.; Geranmayeh Vaneghi, R.

    2012-05-01

    In this study, the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing two different rock wall types with distinct separate compressive strengths was investigated. The designed profiles consisted of regular artificial joints molded by five types of plaster mortars, each representing a distinct uniaxial compressive strength. The compressive strengths of plaster specimens ranged from 5.9 to 19.5 MPa. These specimens were molded considering a regular triangular asperity profile and were designed so as to achieve joint walls with different strength material combinations. The results showed that the shear behavior of discontinuities possessing different joint wall compressive strengths (DDJCS) tested under constant normal load (CNL) conditions is the same as those possessing identical joint wall strengths, but the shear strength of DDJCS is governed by minor joint wall compressive strength. In addition, it was measured that the predicted values obtained by Barton's empirical criterion are greater than the experimental results. The finding indicates that there is a correlation between the joint roughness coefficient (JRC), normal stress, and mechanical strength. It was observed that the mode of failure of asperities is either pure tensile, pure shear, or a combination of both. Therefore, Barton's strength criterion, which considers the compressive strength of joint walls, was modified by substituting the compressive strength with the tensile strength. The validity of the modified criterion was examined by the comparison of the predicted shear values with the laboratory shear test results reported by Grasselli (Ph.D. thesis n.2404, Civil Engineering Department, EPFL, Lausanne, Switzerland, 2001). These comparisons infer that the modified criterion can predict the shear strength of joints more precisely.

  5. Direct assessment of tensile stress-crack opening behavior of Strain Hardening Cementitious Composites (SHCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Eduardo B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, Joaquim A.O.

    2012-01-01

    -deformation behavior of these materials is therefore of great importance and is frequently carried out by characterizing the material tensile stress–strain behavior. In this paper an alternative approach to evaluate the tensile performance of SHCC is investigated. The behavior of the material in tension is studied...

  6. Kinetic study and thermal decomposition behavior of viscoelastic memory foam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrido, María A.; Font, Rafael; Conesa, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The thermal degradation has been studied under three different atmospheres. • Pyrolysis and combustion kinetic models have been proposed. • Evolved products under different atmospheres have been analyzed by TG-FTIR and TG-MS. - Abstract: A systematic investigation of the thermal decomposition of viscoelastic memory foam (VMF) was performed using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) to obtain the kinetic parameters, and thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectrometry (TGA-FTIR) and thermogravimetric analysis coupled to Mass Spectrometry (TGA-MS) to obtain detailed information of evolved products on pyrolysis and oxidative degradations. Two consecutive nth-order reactions were employed to correlate the experimental data from dynamic and isothermal runs performed at three different heating rates (5, 10 and 20 K/min) under an inert atmosphere. On the other hand, for the kinetic study of the oxidative decomposition, the data from combustion (synthetic air) and poor oxygen combustion (N_2:O_2 = 9:1) runs, at three heating rates and under dynamic and isothermal conditions, were correlated simultaneously. A kinetic model consisting of three consecutive reactions presented a really good correlation in all runs. TGA-FTIR analysis showed that the main gases released during the pyrolysis of VMF were determined as ether and aliphatic hydrocarbons, whereas in combustion apart from the previous gases, aldehydes, amines and CO_2 have also been detected as the main gases. These results were confirmed by the TGA-MS.

  7. Analysis on dynamic tensile extrusion behavior of UFG OFHC Cu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Tae; Park, Leeju; Kim, Hak Jun; Kim, Seok Bong; Lee, Chong Soo

    2014-08-01

    Dynamic tensile extrusion (DTE) tests with the strain rate order of ~105 s-1 were conducted on coarse grained (CG) Cu and ultrafine grained (UFG) Cu. ECAP of 16 passes with route Bc was employed to fabricate UFG Cu. DTE tests were carried out by launching the sphere samples to the conical extrusion die at a speed of ~475 m/sec in a vacuumed gas gun system. UFG Cu was fragmented into 3 pieces and showed a DTE elongation of ~340%. CG Cu exhibited a larger DTE elongation of ~490% with fragmentation of 4 pieces. During DTE tests, dynamic recrystallization occurred in UFG Cu, but not in CG Cu. In order to examine the DTE behavior of CG Cu and UFG Cu under very high strain rates, a numerical analysis was undertaken by using a commercial finite element code (LS-DYNA 2D axis-symmetric model) with the Johnson - Cook model. The numerical analysis correctly predicted fragmentation and DTE elongation of CG Cu. But, the experimental DTE elongation of UFG Cu was much smaller than that predicted by the numerical analysis. This difference is discussed in terms of microstructural evolution of UFG Cu during DTE tests.

  8. Numerical Study on the Tensile Behavior of 3D Four Directional Cylindrical Braided Composite Shafts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Guoqi; Wang, Jiayi; Hao, Wenfeng; Liu, Yinghua; Luo, Ying

    2017-10-01

    The tensile behavior of 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts was analyzed with the numerical method. The unit cell models for the 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts with various braiding angles were constructed with ABAQUS. Hashin's failure criterion was used to analyze the tensile strength and the damage evolution of the unit cells. The influence of the braiding angle on the tensile behavior of the 3D four directional cylindrical braided composite shafts was analyzed. The numerical results showed that the tensile strength along the braiding direction increased as the braiding angle decreased. These results should play an integral role in the design of braiding composites shafts.

  9. Molecular Dynamics Simulations of Tensile Behavior of Copper

    OpenAIRE

    Sainath, G.; Srinivasan, V. S.; Choudhary, B. K.; Mathew, M. D.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations on tensile deformation of initially defect free single crystal copper nanowire oriented in {100} has been carried out at 10 K under adiabatic and isothermal loading conditions. The tensile behaviour was characterized by sharp rise in stress in elastic regime followed by sudden drop at the point of dislocation nucleation. The important finding is that the variation in dislocation density is correlated with the observed stress-strain response. Several interesting ...

  10. Propagation of the Stress Wave Through the Filled Joint with Linear Viscoelastic Deformation Behavior Using Time-Domain Recursive Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rui; Hu, Zhiping; Zhang, Dan; Wang, Qiyao

    2017-12-01

    The dynamic behavior of filled joints is mostly controlled by the filled medium. In addition to nonlinear elastic behavior, viscoelastic behavior of filled joints is also of great significance. Here, a theoretical study of stress wave propagation through a filled rock joint with linear viscoelastic deformation behavior has been carried out using a modified time-domain recursive method (TDRM). A displacement discontinuity model was extended to form a displacement and stress discontinuity model, and the differential constitutive relationship of viscoelastic model was adopted to introduce the mass and viscoelastic behavior of filled medium. A standard linear solid model, which can be degenerated into the Kelvin and Maxwell models, was adopted in deriving this method. Transmission and reflection coefficients were adopted to verify this method. Besides, the effects of some parameters on wave propagation across a filled rock joint with linear viscoelastic deformation behavior were discussed. Then, a comparison of the time-history curves calculated by the present method with those by frequency-domain method (FDM) was performed. The results indicated that change tendencies of the transmission and reflection coefficients for these viscoelastic models versus incident angle were the same as each other but not frequency. The mass and viscosity coupling of filled medium did not fundamentally change wave propagation. The modified TDRM was found to be more efficient than the FDM.

  11. Tension-compression viscoelastic behaviors of the periodontal ligament

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Ying Wang

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: We believe that the biomechanical properties of the PDL established via retrograde calculation in this study can lead to the construction of more accurate extra-oral models and a comprehensive understanding of the biomechanical behavior of the PDL.

  12. Effect of Thermal Cycling on the Tensile Behavior of CF/AL Fiber Metal Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farhan Noor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work was to estimate the effect of thermal cycling on the tensile behavior of CARALL composites. Fiber metal laminates (FMLs, based on 2D woven carbon fabric and 2024-T3 Alclad aluminum alloy sheet, was manufactured by pressure molding technique followed by hand layup method. Before fabrication, aluminum sheets were anodized with phosphoric acid to produce micro porous alumina layer on surface. This micro-porous layer is beneficial to produce strong bonding between metal and fiber surfaces in FMLs. The effect of thermal cycling (-65 to +70ºC on the tensile behavior of Cf/Al based FML was studied. Tensile strength was increased after 10 thermal cycles, but it was slightly decreased to some extent after 30, and 50 thermal cycles. Tensile modulus also shown the similar behavior as that of tensile strength.

  13. Tensile and high cycle fatigue behaviors of high-Mn steels at 298 and 110 K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Wongyu; Jeong, Daeho; Sung, Hyokyung; Kim, Sangshik, E-mail: sang@gnu.ac.kr

    2017-02-15

    Tensile and high cycle fatigue behaviors of high-Mn austenitic steels, including 25Mn, 25Mn0.2Al, 25Mn0.5Cu, 24Mn4Cr, 22Mn3Cr and 16Mn2Al specimens, were investigated at 298 and 110 K. Depending on the alloying elements, tensile ductility of high-Mn steels either increased or decreased with decreasing temperature from 298 to 110 K. Reasonable correlation between the tendency for martensitic tranformation, the critical twinning stress and the percent change in tensile elongation suggested that tensile deformation of high-Mn steels was strongly influenced by SFE determining TRIP and TWIP effects. Tensile strength was the most important parameter in determining the resistance to high cycle fatigue of high-Mn steels with an exceptional work hardening capability at room and cryogenic temperatures. The fatigue crack nucleation mechanism in high-Mn steels did not vary with decreasing tempertature, except Cr-added specimens with grain boundary cracking at 298 K and slip band cracking at 110 K. The EBSD (electron backscatter diffraction) analyses suggested that the deformation mechanism under fatigue loading was significantly different from tensile deformation which could be affected by TRIP and TWIP effects. - Highlights: •The resistances to HCF of various high-Mn steels were measured. •The variables affecting tensile and HCF behaviors of high-Mn steels were assessed. •The relationship between tensile and the HCF behaviors of high-Mn steels was established.

  14. Nonlinear model for viscoelastic behavior of Achilles tendon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, Cyril J F; Wang, Xiong; Rahouadj, Rachid

    2010-11-01

    Although the mechanical properties of ligament and tendon are well documented in research literature, very few unified mechanical formulations can describe a wide range of different loadings. The aim of this study was to propose a new model, which can describe tendon responses to various solicitations such as cycles of loading, unloading, and reloading or successive relaxations at different strain levels. In this work, experiments with cycles of loading and reloading at increasing strain level and sequences of relaxation were performed on white New Zealand rabbit Achilles tendons. We presented a local formulation of thermodynamic evolution outside equilibrium at a representative element volume scale to describe the tendon's macroscopic behavior based on the notion of relaxed stress. It was shown that the model corresponds quite well to the experimental data. This work concludes with the complexity of tendons' mechanical properties due to various microphysical mechanisms of deformation involved in loading such as the recruitment of collagen fibers, the rearrangement of the microstructure (i.e., collagens type I and III, proteoglycans, and water), and the evolution of relaxed stress linked to these mechanisms.

  15. A constitutive model for developing blood clots with various compositions and their nonlinear viscoelastic behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Kempen, Thomas H S; Donders, Wouter P; van de Vosse, Frans N; Peters, Gerrit W M

    2016-04-01

    The mechanical properties determine to a large extent the functioning of a blood clot. These properties depend on the composition of the clot and have been related to many diseases. However, the various involved components and their complex interactions make it difficult at this stage to fully understand and predict properties as a function of the components. Therefore, in this study, a constitutive model is developed that describes the viscoelastic behavior of blood clots with various compositions. Hereto, clots are formed from whole blood, platelet-rich plasma and platelet-poor plasma to study the influence of red blood cells, platelets and fibrin, respectively. Rheological experiments are performed to probe the mechanical behavior of the clots during their formation. The nonlinear viscoelastic behavior of the mature clots is characterized using a large amplitude oscillatory shear deformation. The model is based on a generalized Maxwell model that accurately describes the results for the different rheological experiments by making the moduli and viscosities a function of time and the past and current deformation. Using the same model with different parameter values enables a description of clots with different compositions. A sensitivity analysis is applied to study the influence of parameter variations on the model output. The relative simplicity and flexibility make the model suitable for numerical simulations of blood clots and other materials showing similar behavior.

  16. Dynamic Viscoelastic Behavior and Phase Morphology of HIPS/HDPE Blends

    OpenAIRE

    LIU Jing-ru; XIA Yang-yang; GAO Li-qun; YU Qiang

    2017-01-01

    The dynamic viscoelastic behavior and phase morphology of high impact polystyrene (HIPS)/high density polyethylene (HDPE) blends were investigated by dynamic rheological test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The compatibilizing effect of 1%(mass fraction, same as below) micron-CaCO3 and nano-CaCO3 on HIPS/HDPE(30/70) immiscible blend was compared. The results indicate that the complex viscosity and storage modulus of HIPS/HDPE blends at low frequencies show positive deviation from the ...

  17. Bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets viscoelasticity and temperature dependency in the draping process

    CERN Document Server

    Ropers, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Within the scope of this work, Steffen Ropers evaluates the viscoelastic and temperature-dependent nature of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets in order to further enhance the predictability of the draping simulation. This simulation is a useful tool for the development of robust large scale processes for continuously fiber-reinforced polymers (CFRP). The bending behavior thereby largely influences the size and position of wrinkles, which are one of the most common processing defects for continuously fiber-reinforced parts. Thus, a better understanding of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composite sheets as well as an appropriate testing method along with corresponding material models contribute to a wide-spread application of CFRPs in large scale production. Contents Thermoplastic Prepregs Draping Simulation of Thermoplastic Prepregs Bending Characterization of Textile Composites Modeling of Bending Behavior Target Groups Researchers and students in the field of polymer, lightweight,...

  18. Tensile behavior of irradiated manganese-stabilized stainless steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klueh, R.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile tests were conducted on seven experimental, high-manganese austenitic stainless steels after irradiation up to 44 dpa in the FFTF. An Fe-20Mn-12Cr-0.25C base composition was used, to which various combinations of Ti, W, V, B, and P were added to improve strength. Nominal amounts added were 0.1% Ti, 1% W, 0.1% V, 0.005% B, and 0.03% P. Irradiation was carried out at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C on the steels in the solution-annealed and 20% cold-worked conditions. Tensile tests were conducted at the irradiation temperature. Results were compared with type 316 SS. Neutron irradiation hardened all of the solution-annealed steels at 420, 520, and 600{degrees}C, as measured by the increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength. The steel to which all five elements were added to the base composition showed the least amount of hardening. It also showed a smaller loss of ductility (uniform and total elongation) than the other steels. The total and uniform elongations of this steel after irradiation at 420{degrees}C was over four times that of the other manganese-stabilized steels and 316 SS. There was much less difference in strength and ductility at the two higher irradiation temperatures, where there was considerably less hardening, and thus, less loss of ductility. In the cold-worked condition, hardening occured only after irradiation at 420{degrees}C, and there was much less difference in the properties of the steels after irradiation. At the 420{degrees}C irradiation temperature, most of the manganese-stabilized steels maintained more ductility than the 316 SS. After irradiation at 420{degrees}C, the temperature of maximum hardening, the steel to which all five of the elements were added had the best uniform elongation.

  19. The characteristics of ultra-high performance concrete and cracking behavior of reinforced concrete tensile specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Rahdar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The tensile behavior of concrete depends on some factors such as member dimensions, reinforcement ratio, diameter of rebar, strength and elasticity modulus of material. In this research the experimental method is used to examine the characteristics and the behavior of ultra-high performance concrete on the tensile behavior of concrete members reinforced by steel rebar. The results show that increasing the rebar cover on diameter rebar ratio (C/d increases the initial stiffening before the cracking stage in concrete. Also, by increasing of reinforcement ratio the cracking space decreased.

  20. The tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite posterior to hydrostatic loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoda, S.; Eto, M.

    1983-01-01

    The effects of prehydrostatic loading on microstructural changes and tensile deformation behavior of nuclear-grade isotropic graphite have been examined. Scanning electron micrographs show that formation of microcracks associated with delamination between basal planes occurs under hydrostatic loading. Hydrostatic loading on specimens results in the decrease in tensile strength and increase in residual strain generated by the applied tensile stress at various levels, indicating that the graphite material is weakened by hydrostatic loading. A relationship between residual strain and applied tensile stress for graphite hydrostatically-loaded at several pressure levels can be approximately expressed as element of= (AP + B) sigmasup(n) over a wide range hydrostatic pressure, where element of, P and sigma denote residual strain, hydrostatic pressure and applied tensile stress, respectively; A, B and n are constant. The effects of prehydrostatic loading on the tensile stress-strain behavior of the graphite were examined in more detail. The ratio of stress after hydrostatic loading to that before hydrostatic loading on the stress-strain relationship remains almost unchanged irrespective of strain. (orig.)

  1. Influence of sodium evnironment on the uniaxial tensile behavior of titanium modified type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natesan, K.; Chopra, O.K.; Kassner, T.F.

    1978-01-01

    True stress-true strain tensile data have been obtained for titanium modified type 316 stainless steel in the solution annealed condition and after exposure to a flowing sodium environment at temperature of 700, 650, 600 and 550 0 C. The specimens were exposed to sodium for times between 120 and 5012 h to produce carbon penetration depths in the range 0.05-0.30 mm. The Voce equation was used to describe tensile flow curves for plastic strains above 0.005. The results showed that, when compared with solution annealed specimens, the tensile flow behavior of the sodium exposed specimens is characterized by a higher strain hardening rate, which decreases rapidly as the flow stress increases. The loss in tensile ductility of the material due to carburization in sodium environment was found to be minimal. (Auth.)

  2. High-rate tensile behavior of steel fiber-reinforced concrete for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Jin; Park, Gi-Joon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Joo, E-mail: djkim75@sejong.ac.kr [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Sejong University, 98 Gunja-Dong, Gwangjin-Gu, Seoul 143-747 (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Jae Heum; Lee, Jang Hwa [Korea Institute of Construction Technology, 2311 Daewha-Dong, Ilsan-Gu, Goyang-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 411-712 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • The final goal is to develop a fiber reinforced concrete for containment buildings. • High rate tensile behavior of FRC was investigated. • Strain energy frame impact machine was used for tensile impact tests. • Different rate sensitivity of FRC was found according to the type fiber. • Adding more fibers by increasing S/a is positive for higher impact resistance of FRC. -- Abstract: The direct tensile behavior of fiber-reinforced concrete (FRC) at high strain rates were investigated for their potential to enhance the resistance of the containment building of nuclear power plants (NPPs) against aircraft impact. Two types of deformed steel, hooked (H) and twisted (T) fibers were employed. To improve the tensile resistance of FRCs even at higher rates by adding more fibers, the mixture of concrete was modified by either increasing the sand-to-coarse aggregate ratio or decreasing the maximum size of coarse aggregate. All FRC specimens produced two to six times greater tensile strength and one to five times higher toughness at high strain rates (4–53 s{sup −1}) than those at a static rate (0.000167 s{sup −1}). T-fiber generally produced higher tensile strength and toughness than H-fiber at both static and high rates. Although both fibers showed favorable rate sensitivity, T-fiber produced much greater enhancement, at higher strain rates, in tensile strength and slightly lower enhancement in toughness than H-fiber. As the maximum size of coarse aggregate decreased from 19 to 5 mm, the tensile strength and toughness of FRCs with T-fibers noticeably increased at both static and high strain rates.

  3. Tensile testing

    CERN Document Server

    2004-01-01

    A complete guide to the uniaxial tensile test, the cornerstone test for determining the mechanical properties of materials: Learn ways to predict material behavior through tensile testing. Learn how to test metals, alloys, composites, ceramics, and plastics to determine strength, ductility and elastic/plastic deformation. A must for laboratory managers, technicians, materials and design engineers, and students involved with uniaxial tensile testing. Tensile Testing , Second Edition begins with an introduction and overview of the test, with clear explanations of how materials properties are determined from test results. Subsequent sections illustrate how knowledge gained through tensile tests, such as tension properties to predict the behavior (including strength, ductility, elastic or plastic deformation, tensile and yield strengths) have resulted in improvements in materals applications. The Second Edition is completely revised and updated. It includes expanded coverage throughout the volume on a variety of ...

  4. Experimental characterization of post rigor mortis human muscle subjected to small tensile strains and application of a simple hyper-viscoelastic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gras, Laure-Lise; Laporte, Sébastien; Viot, Philippe; Mitton, David

    2014-10-01

    In models developed for impact biomechanics, muscles are usually represented with one-dimensional elements having active and passive properties. The passive properties of muscles are most often obtained from experiments performed on animal muscles, because limited data on human muscle are available. The aim of this study is thus to characterize the passive response of a human muscle in tension. Tensile tests at different strain rates (0.0045, 0.045, and 0.45 s⁻¹) were performed on 10 extensor carpi ulnaris muscles. A model composed of a nonlinear element defined with an exponential law in parallel with one or two Maxwell elements and considering basic geometrical features was proposed. The experimental results were used to identify the parameters of the model. The results for the first- and second-order model were similar. For the first-order model, the mean parameters of the exponential law are as follows: Young's modulus E (6.8 MPa) and curvature parameter α (31.6). The Maxwell element mean values are as follows: viscosity parameter η (1.2 MPa s) and relaxation time τ (0.25 s). Our results provide new data on a human muscle tested in vitro and a simple model with basic geometrical features that represent its behavior in tension under three different strain rates. This approach could be used to assess the behavior of other human muscles. © IMechE 2014.

  5. A Constitutive Model for Flow-Induced Anisotropic Behavior of Viscoelastic Complex Fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, H.; De Kee, D.

    2008-01-01

    Flow-induced structural anisotropy could result when a complex fluid system is removed from equilibrium by means of hydrodynamic forces. In this paper, a general theory is developed to model flow induced anisotropic behavior of complex viscoelastic systems, e.g. polymer solutions/melts and suspensions. The rheological properties are characterized by viscosity and relaxation time tensors. We consider a second-rank tensor as a measure of the microstructure. We consider the effect of the flow on the structural changes: i.e. the evolution of the microstructure tensor is governed by a relaxation-type differential equation. We also propose that the viscosity and the relaxation time tensors depend on the second-rank microstructure tensor. That is as the microstructure tensor changes with the applied rate of deformation, the viscosity and relaxation time tensors evolve accordingly. As an example we consider elongational flow of two complex fluids

  6. Tensile behavior of laser treated Fe-Si-B metallic glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Sameehan S.; Samimi, Peyman; Ghamarian, Iman; Katakam, Shravana; Collins, Peter C.; Dahotre, Narendra B., E-mail: narendra.dahotre@unt.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, 1150 Union Circle 305310, Denton, Texas 76203-5017 (United States)

    2015-10-28

    Fe-Si-B metallic glass foils were treated with a linear laser track using a continuous wave Nd-YAG laser and its effect on the overall tensile behavior was investigated. Microstructure and phase evolutions were evaluated using X-ray diffraction, resistivity measurements, and transmission electron microscopy. Crystallization fraction was estimated via the differential scanning calorimetry technique. Metallic glass foils treated with the lower laser fluences (<0.49 J/mm{sup 2}) experienced structural relaxation, whereas higher laser fluences led to crystallization within the laser treated region. The overall tensile behavior was least impacted by structural relaxation, whereas crystallization severely reduced the ultimate tensile strength of the laser treated metallic glass foils.

  7. Dynamic tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xuan; Li Yulong

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The dynamic tensile behavior of 2D C/SiC composites was experimentally investigated by means of SHTB. Both the fracture surface and bundle fracture surfaces of composites were observed. The strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface was concluded as the dominant contributor to the strain rate sensitivity of the tensile strength. Highlights: → The tensile strength increases with strain rate. → The tensile failure strain remains independent of strain rate. → Macro-structural morphology reveals rough fracture surface under dynamic loading. → SEM morphology reveals integrated bundle pull-out under dynamic loading. → Strain rate sensitivity of in-bundle interface leads to that of the tensile strength. - Abstract: An investigation has been undertaken to determine the dynamic and quasi-static tensile behavior of two-dimensional carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix (2D-C/SiC) composites by means of the split Hopkinson tension bar and an electronic universal test machine respectively. The results indicate that the tensile strength of 2D C/SiC composites is increased at high strain rate. Furthermore, coated specimens show not only a 15% improvement in tensile strength but heightened strain rate sensitivity compared with uncoated ones. It is also shown that the tensile failure strain is strain rate insensitive and remains around 0.4%. Optical macrograph of failed specimens under dynamic loading revealed jagged fracture surfaces characterized by delamination and crack deviation, together with obvious fiber pull-out/splitting, in contrast with the smooth fracture surfaces under quasi-static loading. Scanning electron microscopy micrograph of fracture surface under dynamic loading clearly displayed integrated bundle pull-out which implies suppressed in-bundle debonding and enhanced in-bundle interfacial strengthening, in contrast with extensive in-bundle debonding under quasi-static loading. Thus we conclude that, with 2D C

  8. Tensile and compressive behavior of Borsic/aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herakovich, C. T.; Davis, J. G., Jr.; Viswanathan, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    The results of an experimental investigation of the mechanical behavior of Borsic/aluminum are presented. Composite laminates were tested in tension and compression for monotonically increasing load and also for variable loading cycles in which the maximum load was increased in each successive cycle. It is shown that significant strain-hardening, and corresponding increase in yield stress, is exhibited by the metal matrix laminates. For matrix dominated laminates, the current yield stress is essentially identical to the previous maximum stress, and unloading is essentially linear with large permanent strains after unloading. For laminates with fiber dominated behavior, the yield stress increases with increase in the previous maximum stress, but the increase in yield stress does not keep pace with the previous maximum stress. These fiber dominated laminates exhibit smaller nonlinear strains, reversed nonlinear behavior during unloading, and smaller permanent strains after unloading. Compression results from sandwich beams and flat coupons are shown to differ considerably. Results from beam specimens tend to exhibit higher values for modulus, yield stress, and strength.

  9. A modified Johnson–Cook model of dynamic tensile behaviors for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ding-Ni, E-mail: siping4840@126.com [The College of Information, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Shangguan, Qian-Qian [The College of Information, Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai 200234 (China); Xie, Can-Jun [Commercial Aircraft Corporation of China, Ltd., Shanghai 200120 (China); Liu, Fu [Shanghai Aircraft Design and Research Institute of COMAC, Shanghai 201210 (China)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • The dynamic mechanical behaviors at various strain rates were measured. • The strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. • A new Johnson–Cook constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. • Numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates were conducted. • Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was proved. - Abstract: The dynamic mechanical behaviors of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy at various strain rates were measured by dynamic tensile tests using the electronic universal testing machine, high velocity testing system and split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). Stress–strain curves at different rates were obtained. The results show that the strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. By modifying the strain rate hardening term in the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, a new Johnson–Cook (JC) constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy were conducted. According to tensile loading and stress–strain relation of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, calculation results were compared with experimental results. Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was further proved.

  10. Effect of cryogenic treatment on tensile behavior of case carburized steel-815M17

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensely, A.; Senthilkumar, D.; Mohan Lal, D.; Nagarajan, G.; Rajadurai, A.

    2007-01-01

    The crown wheel and pinion represent the most highly stressed parts of a heavy vehicle; these are typically made of 815M17 steel. The reasons for the frequent failure of these components are due to tooth bending impact, wear and fatigue. The modern processes employed to produce these as high, durable components include cryogenic treatment as well as conventional heat treatment. It helps to convert retained austenite into martensite as well as promote carbide precipitation. This paper deals with the influence of cryogenic treatment on the tensile behavior of case carburized steel 815M17. The impetus for studying the tensile properties of gear steels is to ensure that steels used in gears have sufficient tensile strength to prevent failure when gears are subjected to tensile or fatigue loads, and to provide basic design information on the strength of 815M17 steel. A comparative study on the effects of deep cryogenic treatment (DCT), shallow cryogenic treatment (SCT) and conventional heat treatment (CHT) was made by means of tension testing. This test was conducted as per ASTM standard designation E 8M. The present results confirm that the tensile behavior is marginally reduced after cryogenic treatment (i.e. both shallow and deep cryogenic treatment) for 815M17 when compared with conventional heat treatment. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis of the fracture surface indicates the presence of dimples and flat fracture regions are more common in SCT specimens than for CHT and DCT-processed material

  11. A modified Johnson–Cook model of dynamic tensile behaviors for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Ding-Ni; Shangguan, Qian-Qian; Xie, Can-Jun; Liu, Fu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The dynamic mechanical behaviors at various strain rates were measured. • The strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. • A new Johnson–Cook constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. • Numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates were conducted. • Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was proved. - Abstract: The dynamic mechanical behaviors of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy at various strain rates were measured by dynamic tensile tests using the electronic universal testing machine, high velocity testing system and split Hopkinson tensile bar (SHTB). Stress–strain curves at different rates were obtained. The results show that the strain rate hardening effect of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy is significant. By modifying the strain rate hardening term in the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, a new Johnson–Cook (JC) constitutive model of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive model, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different rates for 7075-T6 aluminum alloy were conducted. According to tensile loading and stress–strain relation of 7075-T6 aluminum alloy, calculation results were compared with experimental results. Accuracy of the modified Johnson–Cook constitutive equation was further proved

  12. Floating liquid bridge tensile behavior: Electric-field-induced Young's modulus measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, Omar; Mendez Soares, David; Valente Filho, Juracyr Ferraz

    2013-12-01

    A floating bridge is formed spontaneously when high voltage is applied to polar fluids in two capillary tubes that were in contact and then separated. This bridge bends under its own weight, and its bending profile was used to calculate its Young's modulus. For electric field intensities of ˜106 V/m, water bridges exhibit viscoelastic behavior, with Young's moduli of ˜24 MPa; dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) bridges exhibited Young's moduli of ˜60 kPa. The scheme devised to measure the voltage drop across the water bridge for high voltages applied between the electrodes shows that the bulk water resistance decreases with increasing voltage.

  13. Tensile Behavior Analysis on Different Structures of 3D Glass Woven Perform for Fibre Reinforced Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Hussain Peerzada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three common 3D (Three Dimensional Glass woven structures were studied to analyze the tensile behavior. Each type of strand (Warp, weft and binder of 3D woven structure was studied in detail. Crimp percentage of those strands was measured by crimp meter. Standard size samples of each 3D woven structure were cut in warp and weft direction and were stretched by Instron Tensile testing computerized machine. Results reveal that hybrid possesses lowest crimp in core strands and higher strength in warp as well as weft direction. Layer to layer woven structure appeared with lower strength and higher strain value due to highest crimp percentage in core strands.

  14. Effects of annealing on tensile property and corrosion behavior of Ti-Al-Zr alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Tae-Kyu; Choi, Byung-Seon; Jeong, Yong-Hwan; Lee, Doo-Jeong; Chang, Moon-Hee

    2002-01-01

    The effects of annealing on the tensile property and corrosion behavior of Ti-Al-Zr alloy were evaluated. The annealing in the temperature range from 500 to 800 deg. C for 1 h induced the growth of the grain and the precipitate sizes. The results of tensile tests at room temperature showed that the strengths and the ductility were almost independent of the annealing temperature. However, the results of corrosion test in an ammonia aqueous solution of pH 9.98 at 360 deg. C showed that the corrosion resistance depended on the annealing temperature, and the corrosion rate was accelerated with increasing annealing temperature. Hydrogen contents absorbed during the corrosion test of 220 days also increased with the annealing temperature. It could be attributed to the growth of Fe-rich precipitates by annealing. It is thus suggested that the lower annealing temperatures provide the better corrosion properties without degrading the tensile properties

  15. Generalization of exponential based hyperelastic to hyper-viscoelastic model for investigation of mechanical behavior of rate dependent materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narooei, K; Arman, M

    2018-03-01

    In this research, the exponential stretched based hyperelastic strain energy was generalized to the hyper-viscoelastic model using the heredity integral of deformation history to take into account the strain rate effects on the mechanical behavior of materials. The heredity integral was approximated by the approach of Goh et al. to determine the model parameters and the same estimation was used for constitutive modeling. To present the ability of the proposed hyper-viscoelastic model, the stress-strain response of the thermoplastic elastomer gel tissue at different strain rates from 0.001 to 100/s was studied. In addition to better agreement between the current model and experimental data in comparison to the extended Mooney-Rivlin hyper-viscoelastic model, a stable material behavior was predicted for pure shear and balance biaxial deformation modes. To present the engineering application of current model, the Kolsky bars impact test of gel tissue was simulated and the effects of specimen size and inertia on the uniform deformation were investigated. As the mechanical response of polyurea was provided over wide strain rates of 0.0016-6500/s, the current model was applied to fit the experimental data. The results were shown more accuracy could be expected from the current research than the extended Ogden hyper-viscoelastic model. In the final verification example, the pig skin experimental data was used to determine parameters of the hyper-viscoelastic model. Subsequently, a specimen of pig skin at different strain rates was loaded to a fixed strain and the change of stress with time (stress relaxation) was obtained. The stress relaxation results were revealed the peak stress increases by applied strain rate until the saturated loading rate and the equilibrium stress with magnitude of 0.281MPa could be reached. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A Study on Mechanical behavior of Tensile Specimen Fabricated by Laser Cutting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Y. G.; Kim, G. S.; Baik, S. J.; Baek, S. Y. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    The mechanical testing data are required for the assessment of dry storage of the spent nuclear fuel. Laser cutting system could be useful tools for material processing such as cutting in radioactive environment due to non-contact nature, ease in handling and the laser cutting process is most advantageous, offering the narrow kerf width and heat affected zone by using small beam spot diameter. The feasibility of the laser cutting system was demonstrated for the fabrication of various types of the unirradiated cladding with and without oxide layer on the specimens. In the present study, the dimensional measurement and tensile test were conducted to investigate the mechanical behavior of the axial tensile test specimens depending on the material processing methods in a hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) of KAERI. Laser cutting system was used to fabricate the tensile test specimens, and the mechanical behavior was investigated using the dimensional measurement and tensile test. It was shown that the laser beam machining could be a useful tool to fabricate the specimens and this technique will be developed for the fabrication of various types of irradiated specimens in a hotcell.

  17. Mechanical Behavior of Red Sandstone under Incremental Uniaxial Cyclical Compressive and Tensile Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoyun Zhao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Uniaxial experiments were carried out on red sandstone specimens to investigate their short-term and creep mechanical behavior under incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading. First, based on the results of short-term uniaxial incremental cyclic compressive and tensile loading experiments, deformation characteristics and energy dissipation were analyzed. The results show that the stress-strain curve of red sandstone has an obvious memory effect in the compressive and tensile loading stages. The strains at peak stresses and residual strains increase with the cycle number. Energy dissipation, defined as the area of the hysteresis loop in the stress-strain curves, increases nearly in a power function with the cycle number. Creep test of the red sandstone was also conducted. Results show that the creep curve under each compressive or tensile stress level can be divided into decay and steady stages, which cannot be described by the conventional Burgers model. Therefore, an improved Burgers creep model of rock material is constructed through viscoplastic mechanics, which agrees very well with the experimental results and can describe the creep behavior of red sandstone better than the Burgers creep model.

  18. A Study on Mechanical behavior of Tensile Specimen Fabricated by Laser Cutting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Y. G.; Kim, G. S.; Baik, S. J.; Baek, S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical testing data are required for the assessment of dry storage of the spent nuclear fuel. Laser cutting system could be useful tools for material processing such as cutting in radioactive environment due to non-contact nature, ease in handling and the laser cutting process is most advantageous, offering the narrow kerf width and heat affected zone by using small beam spot diameter. The feasibility of the laser cutting system was demonstrated for the fabrication of various types of the unirradiated cladding with and without oxide layer on the specimens. In the present study, the dimensional measurement and tensile test were conducted to investigate the mechanical behavior of the axial tensile test specimens depending on the material processing methods in a hot cell at IMEF (Irradiated Materials Examination Facility) of KAERI. Laser cutting system was used to fabricate the tensile test specimens, and the mechanical behavior was investigated using the dimensional measurement and tensile test. It was shown that the laser beam machining could be a useful tool to fabricate the specimens and this technique will be developed for the fabrication of various types of irradiated specimens in a hotcell

  19. Characterization of the viscoelastic behavior of the pure bitumen grades 10/20 and 35/50 with macroindentation and finite element computation

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah; Guessasma, Sofiane; Bennabi, Abdelkrim

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present an identification procedure that allows the determination of the viscoelasticity behavior of different grades of pure bitumen (bitumen 35/50 and bitumen 10/20). The procedure required in the first stage a mechanical

  20. Squeeze casting of aluminum alloy A380: Microstructure and tensile behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Fang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A380 alloy with a relatively thick cross-section of 25 mm was squeeze cast using a hydraulic press with an applied pressure of 90 MPa. Microstructure and tensile properties of the squeeze cast A380 were characterized and evaluated in comparison with the die cast counterpart. Results show that the squeeze cast A380 possesses a porosity level much lower than the die cast alloy, which is disclosed by both optical microscopy and the density measurement technique. The results of tensile testing indicate the improved tensile properties, specifically ultimate tensile strength (UTS: 215.9 MPa and elongation (Ef: 5.4%, for the squeeze cast samples over those of the conventional high-pressure die cast part (UTS: 173.7 MPa, Ef: 1.0%. The analysis of tensile behavior shows that the squeeze cast A380 exhibits a high tensile toughness (8.5 MJ·m-3 and resilience (179.3 kJ·m-3 compared with the die cast alloy (toughness: 1.4 MJ·m-3, resilience: 140.6 kJ·m-3, despite that, during the onset of plastic deformation, the strain-hardening rate of the die cast specimen is higher than that of the squeeze cast specimens. The microstructure analyzed by the scanning electron microscopy (SEM shows that both the squeeze and die cast specimens contain the primary α-Al, Al2Cu, Al5FeSi phase and the eutectic Si phase. But, the Al2Cu phase present in the squeeze cast alloy is relatively large in size and quantity. The SEM fractography evidently reveals the ductile fracture features of the squeeze cast A380 alloy.

  1. Characterization of Tensile Mechanical Behavior of MSCs/PLCL Hybrid Layered Sheet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizah Intan Pangesty

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A layered construct was developed by combining a porous polymer sheet and a cell sheet as a tissue engineered vascular patch. The primary objective of this study is to investigate the influence of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs sheet on the tensile mechanical properties of porous poly-(l-lactide-co-ε-caprolactone (PLCL sheet. The porous PLCL sheet was fabricated by the solid-liquid phase separation method and the following freeze-drying method. The MSCs sheet, prepared by the temperature-responsive dish, was then layered on the top of the PLCL sheet and cultured for 2 weeks. During the in vitro study, cellular properties such as cell infiltration, spreading and proliferation were evaluated. Tensile test of the layered construct was performed periodically to characterize the tensile mechanical behavior. The tensile properties were then correlated with the cellular properties to understand the effect of MSCs sheet on the variation of the mechanical behavior during the in vitro study. It was found that MSCs from the cell sheet were able to migrate into the PLCL sheet and actively proliferated into the porous structure then formed a new layer of MSCs on the opposite surface of the PLCL sheet. Mechanical evaluation revealed that the PLCL sheet with MSCs showed enhancement of tensile strength and strain energy density at the first week of culture which is characterized as the effect of MSCs proliferation and its infiltration into the porous structure of the PLCL sheet. New technique was presented to develop tissue engineered patch by combining MSCs sheet and porous PLCL sheet, and it is expected that the layered patch may prolong biomechanical stability when implanted in vivo.

  2. Influence of dynamic strain aging on tensile deformation behavior of alloy 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekaputra, I. M. W. [Pukyong National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Woo Gon; Park, Jae Young; Kim, Seon Jin; Kim, Eung Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    To investigate the dynamic strain aging (DSA) behavior of Alloy 617, high-temperature tensile tests were carried out with strain rates variations of 10{sup -}3{sup /}s, 10{sup -4}/s, and 10{sup -5}/s from 24°C to 950°C. Five flow relationships, Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson, and Voce, were applied to describe the tensile true stress–strain curves, and the DSA region was defined. In describing the tensile curves, Ludwigson's equation was superior to the other equations, and the DSA region was adequately defined by this equation as plateaus at intermediate temperatures from 200°C to 700°C. It was identified that Alloy 617 is dominated by three types of serrations, known as Types D, A+B, and C. The activation energy values for each serration type were obtained by the Arrhenius equation. By using the obtained activation energy values, the serrated yielding map and the DSA mechanism were drawn and manifested. In addition, the relationship between the tensile strength and strain rate at higher temperatures above 700°C was found to be closely related to the amounts of slip lines. In the scanning electron microscope (SEM) fractographs, there was a significant difference at the low, intermediate, and high temperatures, but almost the same to the three strain rates.

  3. Tensile fracture behaviors of T-ZnOw/polyamide 6 composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Jing; Wang Yong; Liu Li; Bai Hongwei; Wu Jun; Jiang Chongxi; Zhou, Zuowan

    2009-01-01

    As a part of serial work about the application of tetra-needle-shaped zinc oxide whisker (T-ZnOw) in polymer composites, this work is focused on the crystallization and tensile fracture behaviors of T-ZnOw/polyamide 6 (T-ZnOw/PA6) composites. Our results show that the addition of T-ZnOw improves the composites tensile strength greatly. For virgin PA6, the stress-strain curve exhibits double-yielding phenomenon. Surface modified T-ZnOw reinforced PA6 composites exhibit higher yield stress and smaller strain-to-fracture compared with virgin PA6. The morphologies of tensile-fractured surfaces show that, addition of T-ZnOw changes the fracture mode from crazing-tearing/brittle fracture mode of virgin PA6 into fibrillation/brittle fracture mode of PA6 composites. Especially, the fracture process of T-ZnOw in composites during the tensile test has been characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM) and the corresponding reinforcement mechanism has been discussed.

  4. Influence of dynamic strain aging on tensile deformation behavior of alloy 617

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ekaputra, I. M. W.; Kim, Woo Gon; Park, Jae Young; Kim, Seon Jin; Kim, Eung Seon

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the dynamic strain aging (DSA) behavior of Alloy 617, high-temperature tensile tests were carried out with strain rates variations of 10"-3"/s, 10"-"4/s, and 10"-"5/s from 24°C to 950°C. Five flow relationships, Hollomon, Ludwik, Swift, Ludwigson, and Voce, were applied to describe the tensile true stress–strain curves, and the DSA region was defined. In describing the tensile curves, Ludwigson's equation was superior to the other equations, and the DSA region was adequately defined by this equation as plateaus at intermediate temperatures from 200°C to 700°C. It was identified that Alloy 617 is dominated by three types of serrations, known as Types D, A+B, and C. The activation energy values for each serration type were obtained by the Arrhenius equation. By using the obtained activation energy values, the serrated yielding map and the DSA mechanism were drawn and manifested. In addition, the relationship between the tensile strength and strain rate at higher temperatures above 700°C was found to be closely related to the amounts of slip lines. In the scanning electron microscope (SEM) fractographs, there was a significant difference at the low, intermediate, and high temperatures, but almost the same to the three strain rates

  5. Analysis of Deformation and Failure Behaviors of TIG Welded Dissimilar Metal Joints Using Miniature Tensile Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Ji-Hwan; Jahanzeb, Nabeel; Kim, Min-Seong; Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Choi, Shi-Hoon [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    The deformation and failure behaviors of dissimilar metal joints between SS400 steel and STS316L steel were investigated. The dissimilar metal joints were fabricated using the tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding process with STS309 steel as a filler metal. The microstructures of the dissimilar metal joints were investigated using an optical microscope and EBSD technique. The mechanical properties of the base metal (BM), heat affected zone (HAZ) and weld metal (WM) were measured using a micro-hardness and micro-tension tester combined with the digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The HAZ of the STS316L steel exhibited the highest micro-hardness value, and yield/tensile strengths, while the BM of the SS440 steel exhibited the lowest micro-hardness value and yield /tensile strengths. The grain size refinement in the HAZ of SS400 steel induced an enhancement of micro-hardness value and yield/tensile strengths compared to the BM of the SS400 steel. The WM, which consists of primary δ-ferrite and a matrix of austenite phase, exhibited relatively a high micro-hardness value, yield /tensile strengths and elongation compared to the BM and HAZ of the SS400 steel.

  6. Microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of high temperature Al–Si–Mg–Cu cast alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohamed, A.M.A., E-mail: madel@uqac.ca [Center for Advanced Materials, Qatar University, Doha (Qatar); Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Petroleum and Mining Engineering, Suez Canal University, Box 43721, Suez (Egypt); Samuel, F.H. [Université du Québec à Chicoutimi, Chicoutimi, QC, Canada G7H 2B1 (Canada); Al Kahtani, Saleh [Industrial Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Salman bin Abdulaziz University, Al Kharj (Saudi Arabia)

    2013-08-10

    The high temperature tensile behavior of 354 aluminum cast alloy was investigated in the presence of Zr and Ni. The cast alloys were given a solutionizing treatment followed by artificial aging at 190 °C for 2 h. High temperature tensile tests were conducted at various temperatures from 25 °C to 300 °C. Optical microscopy and electron probe micro-analyzer were used to study the microstructure of different intermetallic phases formed. The fractographic observations of fracture surface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to understand the fracture mechanism. The results revealed that the intermetallics phases of (Al, Si){sub 3}(Zr, Ti), Al{sub 3}CuNi and Al{sub 9}NiFe are the main feature in the microstructures of alloys with Zr and Ni additions. The results also indicated that the tensile strength of alloy decreases with an increase in temperature. The combined addition of 0.2 wt% Zr and 0.2 wt% Ni leads to a 30% increase in the tensile properties at 300 °C compared to the base alloy. Zr and Ni bearing phases played a vital role in the fracture mechanism of the alloys studied.

  7. Microstructure, tensile properties and fracture behavior of high temperature Al–Si–Mg–Cu cast alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, A.M.A.; Samuel, F.H.; Al Kahtani, Saleh

    2013-01-01

    The high temperature tensile behavior of 354 aluminum cast alloy was investigated in the presence of Zr and Ni. The cast alloys were given a solutionizing treatment followed by artificial aging at 190 °C for 2 h. High temperature tensile tests were conducted at various temperatures from 25 °C to 300 °C. Optical microscopy and electron probe micro-analyzer were used to study the microstructure of different intermetallic phases formed. The fractographic observations of fracture surface were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy to understand the fracture mechanism. The results revealed that the intermetallics phases of (Al, Si) 3 (Zr, Ti), Al 3 CuNi and Al 9 NiFe are the main feature in the microstructures of alloys with Zr and Ni additions. The results also indicated that the tensile strength of alloy decreases with an increase in temperature. The combined addition of 0.2 wt% Zr and 0.2 wt% Ni leads to a 30% increase in the tensile properties at 300 °C compared to the base alloy. Zr and Ni bearing phases played a vital role in the fracture mechanism of the alloys studied

  8. Tensile Flow Behavior of Tungsten Heavy Alloys Produced by CIPing and Gelcasting Routes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchal, Ashutosh; Ravi Kiran, U.; Nandy, T. K.; Singh, A. K.

    2018-06-01

    Present work describes the flow behavior of tungsten heavy alloys with nominal compositions 90W-7Ni-3Fe, 93W-4.9Ni-2.1Fe, and 95W-3.5Ni-1.5Fe (wt pct) produced by CIPing and gelcasting routes. The overall microstructural features of gelcasting are finer than those of CIPing alloys. Both the grain size of W and corresponding contiguity values increase with increase in W content in the present alloys. The volume fraction of matrix phase decreases with increase in W content in both the alloys. The lattice parameter values of the matrix phase also increase with increase in W content. The yield strength ( σ YS) continuously increases with increase in W content in both the alloys. The σ YS values of CIPing alloys are marginally higher than those of gelcasting at constant W. The ultimate tensile strength ( σ UTS) and elongation values are maximum at intermediate W content. Present alloys exhibit two slopes in true stress-true plastic strain curves in low and high strain regimes and follow a characteristic Ludwigson relation. The two slopes are associated with two deformation mechanisms that are occurring during tensile deformation. The overall nature of differential curves of all the alloys is different and these curves contain three distinctive stages of work hardening (I, II, and III). This suggests varying deformation mechanisms during tensile testing due to different volume fractions of constituent phases. The slip is the predominant deformation mechanism of the present alloys during tensile testing.

  9. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet, E-mail: kanwar722@yahoo.com; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M.D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-15

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300–923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10{sup −3} s{sup −1}, 3 × 10{sup −4} s{sup −1} and 3 × 10{sup −5} s{sup −1}). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  10. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M. D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-11-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300-923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10-3 s-1, 3 × 10-4 s-1 and 3 × 10-5 s-1). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr-1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation.

  11. Tensile properties and flow behavior analysis of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Kanwarjeet; Latha, S.; Nandagopal, M.; Mathew, M.D.; Laha, K.; Jayakumar, T.

    2014-01-01

    The tensile properties and flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube have been investigated in the framework of various constitutive equations for a wide range of temperatures (300–923 K) and strain rates (3 × 10 −3 s −1 , 3 × 10 −4 s −1 and 3 × 10 −5 s −1 ). The tensile flow behavior of modified 9Cr–1Mo steel clad tube was most accurately described by Voce equation. The variation of instantaneous work hardening rate (θ = dσ/dε) and σθ with stress (σ) indicated two stage behavior characterized by rapid decrease at low stresses (transient stage) followed by a gradual decrease in high stresses (Stage III). The variation of work hardening parameters and work hardening rate in terms of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ with temperature exhibited three distinct regimes. Rapid decrease in flow stress and work hardening parameters and rapid shift of θ vs. σ and σθ vs. σ towards low stresses with increase in temperature indicated dynamic recovery at high temperatures. Tensile properties of the material have been best predicted from Voce equation

  12. Microstructure and Tensile Behavior of Laser Arc Hybrid Welded Dissimilar Al and Ti Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Gao

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber laser-cold metal transfer arc hybrid welding was developed to welding-braze dissimilar Al and Ti alloys in butt configuration. Microstructure, interface properties, tensile behavior, and their relationships were investigated in detail. The results show the cross-weld tensile strength of the joints is up to 213 MPa, 95.5% of same Al weld. The optimal range of heat input for accepted joints was obtained as 83–98 J·mm−1. Within this range, the joint is stronger than 200 MPa and fractures in weld metal, or else, it becomes weaker and fractures at the intermetallic compounds (IMCs layer. The IMCs layer of an accepted joint is usually thin and continuous, which is about 1μm-thick and only consists of TiAl2 due to fast solidification rate. However, the IMCs layer at the top corner of fusion zone/Ti substrate is easily thickened with increasing heat input. This thickened IMCs layer consists of a wide TiAl3 layer close to FZ and a thin TiAl2 layer close to Ti substrate. Furthermore, both bead shape formation and interface growth were discussed by laser-arc interaction and melt flow. Tensile behavior was summarized by interface properties.

  13. A Study of Tensile Flow and Work-Hardening Behavior of Alloy 617

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya Narayan; Moitra, A.; Bhaskar, Pragna; Dasgupta, Arup; Sasikala, G.; Bhaduri, A. K.

    2018-04-01

    The simple power relationship σ = Κɛ p n satisfactorily expresses the tensile flow behavior of many metals and alloys in their uniform plastic strain regime. However, many FCC materials with low stacking fault energy have opposed such power law relationship. Alloy 617, an age-hardenable Ni-based superalloy is also observed not to obey the simple power law relationship neither in its solution-treated nor in its aged conditions. Various flow relationships were used to obtain the best fit for the tensile data, and different relationships were identified for the different aged conditions. The work-hardening rate (θ) demonstrates three distinct regions for all aged conditions, and there is an obvious change in the trend of θ versus σ. In the initial portion, θ decreases rapidly followed by a gradual increase in the second stage and again a decrease in its third stage is perceived in the Alloy 617. These three-stage characteristics are attributed to a commonly known precipitate, γ': Ni3(Ti, Al) which evolves during aging treatment and well recognized under transmission electron microscopy (TEM) observation. TEM results also reveal a slight degree of coarsening in γ' over aging. The tensile flow and the work-hardening behavior are well correlated with other microstructural evolution during the aging treatments.

  14. The High Temperature Tensile and Creep Behaviors of High Entropy Superalloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, Te-Kang; Yeh, An-Chou; Kuo, Chen-Ming; Kakehi, Koji; Murakami, Hideyuki; Yeh, Jien-Wei; Jian, Sheng-Rui

    2017-10-04

    This article presents the high temperature tensile and creep behaviors of a novel high entropy alloy (HEA). The microstructure of this HEA resembles that of advanced superalloys with a high entropy FCC matrix and L1 2 ordered precipitates, so it is also named as "high entropy superalloy (HESA)". The tensile yield strengths of HESA surpass those of the reported HEAs from room temperature to elevated temperatures; furthermore, its creep resistance at 982 °C can be compared to those of some Ni-based superalloys. Analysis on experimental results indicate that HESA could be strengthened by the low stacking-fault energy of the matrix, high anti-phase boundary energy of the strengthening precipitate, and thermally stable microstructure. Positive misfit between FCC matrix and precipitate has yielded parallel raft microstructure during creep at 982 °C, and the creep curves of HESA were dominated by tertiary creep behavior. To the best of authors' knowledge, this article is the first to present the elevated temperature tensile creep study on full scale specimens of a high entropy alloy, and the potential of HESA for high temperature structural application is discussed.

  15. Characterization and modeling of tensile behavior of ceramic woven fabric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Chen, Wennei Y.; Parvizi-Majidi, Azar; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1991-01-01

    This paper examines the tensile behavior of SiC/SiC fabric composites. In the characterization effort, the stress-strain relation and damage evolution are studied with a series of loading and unloading tensile test experiments. The stress-strain relation is linear in response to the initial loading and becomes nonlinear when loading exceeds the proportional limit. Transverse cracking has been observed to be a dominant damage mode governing the nonlinear deformation. The damage is initiated at the inter-tow pores where fiber yarns cross over each other. In the modeling work, the analysis is based upon a fiber bundle model, in which fiber undulation in the warp and fill directions and gaps among fiber yarns have been taken into account. Two limiting cases of fabric stacking arrangements are studied. Closed form solutions are obtained for the composite stiffness and Poisson's ratio. Transverse cracking in the composite is discussed by applying a constant failure strain criterion.

  16. Effect of ageing on tensile behavior of ultrafine grained Al 6061 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, P. Nageswara [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & Centre of Nanotechnology, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Singh, Dharmendra [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Government Engineering College, Bikaner 304001 (India); Brokmeier, Heinz-Günter [Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Max Planck Straße 1, Geb 33, D-21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Jayaganthan, R., E-mail: rjayafmt@iitr.ernet.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & Centre of Nanotechnology, IIT Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2015-08-12

    In the present investigation, the ageing behavior of ultrafine grained (UFG) Al 6061 alloy, processed through multi-directional forging (MDF) at cryogenic temperature was investigated. The evolution of microstructure was investigated through transmission electron microscopy and electron back scattered diffraction technique. The results indicate that homogeneous microstructure with an ultrafine grain morphology (average size 250 nm) was achieved through cryogenic forging of the alloy subjected to prior solutionising treatment. Tensile testing at room temperature revealed that MDFed material after ageing led to significant improvement in work hardening and its tensile ductility. Strengthening of the matrix through various mechanisms has been quantified with the existing models to estimate the yield strength of the as forged and peak aged material. The precipitation hardening response in UFG material is found to be 35% lower than that of the coarse grained material as observed in the present work.

  17. Tensile behavior of nickel-base single-crystal superalloy DD6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, Xinhong, E-mail: xiongxh@whut.edu.cn [School of Logistics Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430063 (China); Quan, Dunmiao; Dai, Pengdan; Wang, Zhiping [School of Logistics Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430063 (China); Zhang, Qiaoxin [School of Mechanical and Electronic Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan 430070 (China); Yue, Zhufeng [School of Mechanics Civil Engineering and Architecture, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi' an 710072 (China)

    2015-06-11

    Tensile behavior of the nickel-base single-crystal superalloy DD6 was studied from room temperature to 1020 °C. The plate specimens were along [001] orientation parallel to the loading axis in tension. The microstructures on the surface and fracture morphology were investigated after tensile test to rupture by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results of the present investigation indicate that the yield strength at 650 °C is superior to that at room temperature, 850 °C and 1020 °C. Low ductility and serrated flow in stress–strain curves were also observed at 650 °C. The microstructures on the surface of the plate specimens and fracture morphology observation indicated that localized slip which resulted in glide plane decohesion caused the low ductility of DD6 alloy.

  18. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in static lead bismuth eutectic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian, E-mail: jliu12b@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, 100049 (China); Yan, Wei [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Sha, Wei [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Wang, Wei; Shan, Yiyin [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China); Yang, Ke, E-mail: kyang@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang, 110016 (China)

    2016-05-15

    In order to assess the susceptibility of candidate structural materials to liquid metal embrittlement, this work investigated the tensile behaviors of ferritic-martensitic steel in static lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). The tensile tests were carried out in static lead bismuth eutectic under different temperatures and strain rates. Pronounced liquid metal embrittlement phenomenon is observed between 200 °C and 450 °C. Total elongation is reduced greatly due to the liquid metal embrittlement in LBE environment. The range of ductility trough is larger under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. - Highlights: • The tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in LBE are investigated for the first time. • The SIMP is susceptible to LME at different strain rates and temperatures. • The total elongation is reduced greatly. • The ductility trough is wider under SSRT. • The tensile specimens rupture in brittle manner without obvious necking.

  19. Effects of temperature and strain rate on the tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in static lead bismuth eutectic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Jian; Yan, Wei; Sha, Wei; Wang, Wei; Shan, Yiyin; Yang, Ke

    2016-01-01

    In order to assess the susceptibility of candidate structural materials to liquid metal embrittlement, this work investigated the tensile behaviors of ferritic-martensitic steel in static lead bismuth eutectic (LBE). The tensile tests were carried out in static lead bismuth eutectic under different temperatures and strain rates. Pronounced liquid metal embrittlement phenomenon is observed between 200 °C and 450 °C. Total elongation is reduced greatly due to the liquid metal embrittlement in LBE environment. The range of ductility trough is larger under slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) test. - Highlights: • The tensile behaviors of SIMP steel in LBE are investigated for the first time. • The SIMP is susceptible to LME at different strain rates and temperatures. • The total elongation is reduced greatly. • The ductility trough is wider under SSRT. • The tensile specimens rupture in brittle manner without obvious necking.

  20. Tensile behavior change depending on the microstructure of a Fe-Cu alloy produced from rapidly solidified powder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kakisawa, Hideki; Minagawa, Kazumi; Halada, Kohmei

    2003-01-01

    The relationship between consolidating temperature and the tensile behavior of iron alloy produced from Fe-Cu rapidly solidified powder is investigated. Fe-Cu powder fabricated by high-pressure water atomization was consolidated by heavy rolling at 873-1273 K. Microstructural changes were observed and tensile behavior was examined. Tensile behavior varies as the consolidating temperature changes, and these temperature-dependent differences depend on the morphology of the microstructure on the order of micrometers. The sample consolidated at 873 K shows a good strength/elongation balance because the powder microstructure and primary powder boundaries are maintained. The samples consolidated at the higher temperatures have a microstructure of recrystallized grains, and these recrystallized samples show the conventional relationship between tensile behavior and grain size in ordinal bulk materials

  1. Notch Effect on Tensile Deformation Behavior of 304L and 316L Steels in Liquid Helium and Hydrogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, K.; Fujii, H.

    2004-01-01

    Tensile tests of type 304L and 316L steels were carried out using round bar specimens with a notch in liquid helium, hydrogen, liquid nitrogen and at ambient temperature. The obtained tensile strengths were compared with the tensile strengths of smooth specimens. For smooth specimens, tensile strength increased with a decrease in temperature and the strengths in liquid helium and hydrogen show similar values in both steels. For notched specimen of 304L steel, tensile strength (including fracture strength) increased noticeably from ambient to liquid nitrogen temperature but showed a large decrease in liquid helium and hydrogen. In liquid hydrogen and helium, the tensile strength is a little lower in liquid hydrogen than in liquid helium and both strengths are lower than tensile strengths of smooth specimens. For notched specimen of 316L steel, an increase in tensile strength from ambient to liquid nitrogen temperature was not so large and a decrease from liquid nitrogen to liquid hydrogen was small. The tensile strengths in liquid helium and hydrogen were nearly same and higher than those of smooth specimens. Different behavior of serration was observed between liquid helium and hydrogen, and between 304L and 316L steels. The reasons for these differences were discussed using computer simulation

  2. Effect of Preparation Methods on Crystallization Behavior and Tensile Strength of Poly(vinylidene fluoride) Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie; Lu, Xiaolong; Wu, Chunrui

    2013-11-21

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVDF) membranes were prepared by non solvent induced phase separation (NIPS), melt spinning and the solution-cast method. The effect of preparation methods with different membrane formation mechanisms on crystallization behavior and tensile strength of PVDF membranes was investigated. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to examine the crystal form of the surface layers and the overall membranes, respectively. Spherulite morphologies and thermal behavior of the membranes were studied by polarized light optical microscopy (PLO) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) separately. It was found that the crystallization behavior of PVDF membranes was closely related to the preparation methods. For membranes prepared by the NIPS method, the skin layers had a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase, and the total crystallinity was 60.0% with no spherulite. For melt spinning membranes, the surface layers also showed a mixture of α and β phases, the overall membranes were predominantly α phase. The total crystallinity was 48.7% with perfect spherulites. Whereas the crystallization behavior of solution-cast membranes was related to the evaporation temperature and the additive, when the evaporation temperature was 140 °C with a soluble additive in the dope solution, obvious spherulites appeared. The crystalline morphology of PVDF exerted a great influence on the tensile strength of the membranes, which was much higher with perfect spherulites.

  3. A study on fatigue crack growth behavior subjected to a single tensile overload

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.Y.; Liaw, P.K.; Choo, H.; Rogge, R.B.

    2011-01-01

    Neutron diffraction and electric potential experiments were carried out to investigate the growth behavior of a fatigue crack subjected to a single tensile overload. The specific objectives were to (i) probe the crack tip deformation and fracture behaviors under applied loads; (ii) examine the overload-induced transient crack growth micromechanism; (iii) validate the effective stress intensity factor range based on the crack closure approach as the fatigue crack tip driving force; and (iv) establish a quantitative relationship between the crack tip driving force and crack growth behavior. Immediately after a single tensile overload was introduced and then unloaded, the crack tip became blunt and enlarged compressive residual stresses in both magnitude and zone size were observed around the crack tip. The results show that the combined contributions of the overload-induced enlarged compressive residual stresses and crack tip blunting with secondary cracks are responsible for the observed changes in the crack opening load and the resultant post-overload transient crack growth behavior.

  4. Fractal network dimension and viscoelastic powerlaw behavior: II. An experimental study of structure-mimicking phantoms by magnetic resonance elastography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Jing; Posnansky, Oleg; Hirsch, Sebastian; Scheel, Michael; Taupitz, Matthias; Sack, Ingolf; Braun, Juergen

    2012-01-01

    The dynamics of the complex shear modulus, G*, of soft biological tissue is governed by the rigidity and topology of multiscale mechanical networks. Multifrequency elastography can measure the frequency dependence of G* in soft biological tissue, providing information about the structure of tissue networks at multiple scales. In this study, the viscoelastic properties of structure-mimicking phantoms containing tangled paper stripes embedded in agarose gel are investigated by multifrequency magnetic resonance elastography within the dynamic range of 40–120 Hz. The effective media viscoelastic properties are analyzed in terms of the storage modulus (the real part of G*), the loss modulus (the imaginary part of G*) and the viscoelastic powerlaw given by the two-parameter springpot model. Furthermore, diffusion tensor imaging is used for investigating the effect of network structures on water mobility. The following observations were made: the random paper networks with fractal dimensions between 2.481 and 2.755 had no or minor effects on the storage modulus, whereas the loss modulus was significantly increased about 2.2 kPa per fractal dimension unit (R = 0.962, P < 0.01). This structural sensitivity of the loss modulus was significantly correlated with the springpot powerlaw exponent (0.965, P < 0.01), while for the springpot elasticity modulus, a trend was discernable (0.895, P < 0.05). No effect of the paper network on water diffusion was observed. The gel phantoms with embedded paper stripes presented here are a feasible way for experimentally studying the effect of network topology on soft-tissue viscoelastic parameters. In the dynamic range of in vivo elastography, the fractal network dimension primarily correlates to the loss behavior of soft tissue as can be seen from the loss modulus or the powerlaw exponent of the springpot model. These findings represent the experimental underpinning of structure-sensitive elastography for an improved characterization of

  5. High strain rate tensile behavior of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh; Paman, Ashish; Madhu, V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study is to perform quasi static and high strain rate tensile tests on Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy under different strain rates ranging from 0.01–3500/s and also at temperatures of 25,100, 200 and 300 °C. The combined effect of strain rate, temperature and stress triaxiality on the material behavior is studied by testing both smooth and notched specimens. Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive and fracture models are established based on high strain rate tensile data obtained from Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) and quasi-static tests. By modifying the strain hardening and strain rate hardening terms in the Johnson–Cook (J–C) constitutive model, a new J–C constitutive model of Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy was obtained. The improved Johnson–Cook constitutive model matched the experiment results very well. With the Johnson–Cook constitutive and fracture models, numerical simulations of tensile tests at different conditions for Al-4.8Cu-1.2Mg alloy were conducted. Numerical simulations are performed using a non-linear explicit finite element code autodyn. Good agreement is obtained between the numerical simulation results and the experiment results. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  6. Characterization of the failure behavior of zinc coating on dual phase steel under tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song Guiming; Sloof, Willem G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The microcracks and voids at the zinc grain boundaries are the initial sites for the coating cracking. → The crack spacing of the fragmentally fractured zinc coating is mainly determined by the zinc grain size. → Small zinc grain size and the c-axis direction of zinc grain parallel to the zinc surface are beneficial to the mitigation of the zinc coating delamination. - Abstract: The failure behavior of hot-dip galvanized zinc coatings on dual phase steels under tensile deformation is characterized with in situ scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Under tension, the pre-existed microcracks and voids at the zinc grain boundaries propagate along the zinc grain boundaries to form crack nets within the coating, leading to a segmented fracture of the zinc coating with the crack spacing approximately equal to the zinc grain size. With further loading, the coating segments partially delaminated along the interface between the top zinc layer and the inhibition layer instead of the interface between the inhibition layer and steel substrate. As the c-axis of zinc grains trends to be normal to the tensile loading direction, the twinning deformation became more noticeable, and meanwhile the coating delamination was diminished. The transverse and incline tunneling cracks occurred in the inhibition layer with tensile deformation. The existence of the brittle FeZn 13 particles on top of the inhibition layer was unfavorable to the coating adhesion.

  7. Coating of carbon nanotube fibers: variation of tensile properties, failure behavior and adhesion strength

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith eMäder

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of the tensile properties of CNT fibers and their interphasial behavior in epoxy matrices is reported. One of the most promising applications of CNT fibers is their use as reinforcement in multifunctional composites. For this purpose, an increase of the tensile strength of the CNT fibers in unidirectional composites as well as strong interfacial adhesion strength is desirable. However, the mechanical performance of the CNT fiber composites manufactured so far is comparable to that of commercial fiber composites. The interfacial properties of CNT fiber/polymer composites have rarely been investigated and provided CNT fiber/epoxy interfacial shear strength of 14.4 MPa studied by the microbond test.In order to improve the mechanical performance of the CNT fibers, an epoxy compatible coating with nano-dispersed aqueous based polymeric film formers and low viscous epoxy resin, respectively, was applied. For impregnation of high homogeneity, low molecular weight epoxy film formers and polyurethane film formers were used. The aqueous based epoxy film formers were not crosslinked and able to interdiffuse with the matrix resin after impregnation. Due to good wetting of the individual CNT fibers by the film formers, the degree of activation of the fibers was improved leading to increased tensile strength and Young’s modulus. Cyclic tensile loading and simultaneous determination of electric resistance enabled to characterize the fiber’s durability in terms of elastic recovery and hysteresis.The pull-out tests and SEM study reveal different interfacial failure mechanisms in CNT fiber/epoxy systems for untreated and film former treated fibers, on the one hand, and epoxy resin treated ones, on the other hand. The epoxy resin penetrated between the CNT bundles in the reference or film former coated fiber, forming a relatively thick CNT/epoxy composite layer and thus shifting the fracture zone within the fiber. In contrast to this

  8. Strain rate dependent tensile behavior of advanced high strength steels: Experiment and constitutive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Daeyong; Han, Heung Nam; Barlat, F.; Lee, Myoung-Gyu

    2013-01-01

    High strain rate tensile tests were conducted for three advanced high strength steels: DP780, DP980 and TRIP780. A high strain rate tensile test machine was used for applying the strain rate ranging from 0.1/s to 500/s. Details of the measured stress–strain responses were comparatively analyzed for the DP780 and TRIP780 steels which show similar microstructural feature and ultimate tensile strength, but different strengthening mechanisms. The experimental observations included: usual strain rate dependent plastic flow stress behavior in terms of the yield stress (YS), the ultimate tensile strength (UTS), the uniform elongation (UE) and the total elongation (TE) which were observed for the three materials. But, higher strain hardening rate at early plastic strain under quasi-static condition than that of some increased strain rates was featured for TRIP780 steel, which might result from more active transformation during deformation with lower velocity. The uniform elongation that explains the onset of instability and the total elongation were larger in case of TRIP steel than the DP steel for the whole strain rate range, but interestingly the fracture strain measured by the reduction of area (RA) method showed that the TRIP steel has lower values than DP steel. The fractographs using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) at the fractured surfaces were analyzed to relate measured fracture strain and the microstructural difference of the two materials during the process of fracture under various strain rates. Finally, constitutive modeling for the plastic flow stresses under various strain rates was provided in this study. The proposed constitutive law could represent both Hollomon-like and Voce-like hardening laws and the ratio between the two hardening types was efficiently controlled as a function of strain rate. The new strength model was validated successfully under various strain rates for several grades of steels such as mild steels, DP780, TRIP780, DP980 steels.

  9. The tensile behavior of Ti36Ni49Hf15 high temperature shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.Q.; Zheng, Y.F.; Cai, W.; Zhao, L.C.

    1999-01-01

    Recently, ternary Ti-Ni-Hf alloys have attracted great interest in the field of high temperature shape memory materials research and development. Extensive studies have been made on its manufacture process, constitutional phases, phase transformation behavior, the structure, substructure and interface structure of martensite and the precipitation behavior during ageing. Yet up to date there is no report about the fundamental mechanical properties of Ti-Ni-Hf alloys, such as the stress-strain data, the variation laws of the yield strength and elongation with the temperature. In the present study, tensile tests at various temperatures are employed to investigate the mechanical behavior of Ti-Ni-Hf alloy with different matrix structures, from full martensite to full parent phase structure, with the corresponding deformation mechanism discussed

  10. On the relevance of the micromechanics approach for predicting the linear viscoelastic behavior of semi-crystalline poly(ethylene)terephtalates (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diani, J.; Bedoui, F.; Regnier, G.

    2008-01-01

    The relevance of micromechanics modeling to the linear viscoelastic behavior of semi-crystalline polymers is studied. For this purpose, the linear viscoelastic behaviors of amorphous and semi-crystalline PETs are characterized. Then, two micromechanics modeling methods, which have been proven in a previous work to apply to the PET elastic behavior, are used to predict the viscoelastic behavior of three semi-crystalline PETs. The microstructures of the crystalline PETs are clearly defined using WAXS techniques. Since microstructures and mechanical properties of both constitutive phases (the crystalline and the amorphous) are defined, the simulations are run without adjustable parameters. Results show that the models are unable to reproduce the substantial decrease of viscosity induced by the increase of crystallinity. Unlike the real materials, for moderate crystallinity, both models show materials of viscosity nearly identical to the amorphous material

  11. Quantitative characterization of viscoelastic behavior in tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo animal tissues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashkan Maccabi

    Full Text Available Viscoelasticity of soft tissue is often related to pathology, and therefore, has become an important diagnostic indicator in the clinical assessment of suspect tissue. Surgeons, particularly within head and neck subsites, typically use palpation techniques for intra-operative tumor detection. This detection method, however, is highly subjective and often fails to detect small or deep abnormalities. Vibroacoustography (VA and similar methods have previously been used to distinguish tissue with high-contrast, but a firm understanding of the main contrast mechanism has yet to be verified. The contributions of tissue mechanical properties in VA images have been difficult to verify given the limited literature on viscoelastic properties of various normal and diseased tissue. This paper aims to investigate viscoelasticity theory and present a detailed description of viscoelastic experimental results obtained in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMPs and ex vivo tissues to verify the main contrast mechanism in VA and similar imaging modalities. A spherical-tip micro-indentation technique was employed with the Hertzian model to acquire absolute, quantitative, point measurements of the elastic modulus (E, long term shear modulus (η, and time constant (τ in homogeneous TMPs and ex vivo tissue in rat liver and porcine liver and gallbladder. Viscoelastic differences observed between porcine liver and gallbladder tissue suggest that imaging modalities which utilize the mechanical properties of tissue as a primary contrast mechanism can potentially be used to quantitatively differentiate between proximate organs in a clinical setting. These results may facilitate more accurate tissue modeling and add information not currently available to the field of systems characterization and biomedical research.

  12. Quantitative characterization of viscoelastic behavior in tissue-mimicking phantoms and ex vivo animal tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maccabi, Ashkan; Shin, Andrew; Namiri, Nikan K; Bajwa, Neha; St John, Maie; Taylor, Zachary D; Grundfest, Warren; Saddik, George N

    2018-01-01

    Viscoelasticity of soft tissue is often related to pathology, and therefore, has become an important diagnostic indicator in the clinical assessment of suspect tissue. Surgeons, particularly within head and neck subsites, typically use palpation techniques for intra-operative tumor detection. This detection method, however, is highly subjective and often fails to detect small or deep abnormalities. Vibroacoustography (VA) and similar methods have previously been used to distinguish tissue with high-contrast, but a firm understanding of the main contrast mechanism has yet to be verified. The contributions of tissue mechanical properties in VA images have been difficult to verify given the limited literature on viscoelastic properties of various normal and diseased tissue. This paper aims to investigate viscoelasticity theory and present a detailed description of viscoelastic experimental results obtained in tissue-mimicking phantoms (TMPs) and ex vivo tissues to verify the main contrast mechanism in VA and similar imaging modalities. A spherical-tip micro-indentation technique was employed with the Hertzian model to acquire absolute, quantitative, point measurements of the elastic modulus (E), long term shear modulus (η), and time constant (τ) in homogeneous TMPs and ex vivo tissue in rat liver and porcine liver and gallbladder. Viscoelastic differences observed between porcine liver and gallbladder tissue suggest that imaging modalities which utilize the mechanical properties of tissue as a primary contrast mechanism can potentially be used to quantitatively differentiate between proximate organs in a clinical setting. These results may facilitate more accurate tissue modeling and add information not currently available to the field of systems characterization and biomedical research.

  13. The effect of sheet processing on the microstructure, tensile, and creep behavior of INCONEL alloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehlert, C. J.; Dickmann, D. S.; Eisinger, Ny. N. C.

    2006-01-01

    The grain size, grain boundary character distribution (GBCD), creep, and tensile behavior of INCONEL alloy 718 (IN 718) were characterized to identify processing-microstructure-property relationships. The alloy was sequentially cold rolled (CR) to 0, 10, 20, 30, 40, 60, and 80 pct followed by annealing at temperatures between 954 °C and 1050 °C and the traditional aging schedule used for this alloy. In addition, this alloy can be superplastically formed (IN 718SPF) to a significantly finer grain size and the corresponding microstructure and mechanical behavior were evaluated. The creep behavior was evaluated in the applied stress (σ a ) range of 300 to 758 MPa and the temperature range of 638 °C to 670 °C. Constant-load tensile creep experiments were used to measure the values of the steady-state creep rate and the consecutive load reduction method was used to determine the values of backstress (σ0). The values for the effective stress exponent and activation energy suggested that the transition between the rate-controlling creep mechanisms was dependent on effective stresses (σ e =σ a σ0) and the transition occurred at σ e ≅ 135 MPa. The 10 to 40 pct CR samples exhibited the greatest 650 °C strength, while IN 718SPF exhibited the greatest room-temperature (RT) tensile strength (>1550 MPa) and ductility (ɛ f >16 pct). After the 954 °C annealing treatment, the 20 pct CR and 30 pct CR microstructures exhibited the most attractive combination of elevated-temperature tensile and creep strength, while the most severely cold-rolled materials exhibited the poorest elevated-temperature properties. After the 1050 °C annealing treatment, the IN 718SPF material exhibited the greatest backstress and best creep resistance. Electron backscattered diffraction was performed to identify the GBCD as a function of CR and annealing. The data indicated that annealing above 1010 °C increased the grain size and resulted in a greater fraction of twin boundaries, which in

  14. Microstructure and dynamic tensile behavior of DP600 dual phase steel joint by laser welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Danyang, E-mail: dongdanyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Yang, Yuling, E-mail: yulingyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Li, Jinfeng, E-mail: lijinfengboda@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Ma, Min, E-mail: sharon6789@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China); Jiang, Tao, E-mail: tao.jiang906@yahoo.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, No. 11, Lane 3, WenHua Road, HePing District, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2014-01-31

    Dual phase (DP) steels have been widely used in the automotive industry to reduce vehicle weight and improve car safety. In such applications welding and joining have to be involved, which would lead to a localized change of the microstructure and property, and create potential safety and reliable issues under dynamic loading. The aim of the present study is to examine the rate-dependent mechanical properties, deformation and fracture behavior of DP600 steel and its welded joint (WJ) produced by Nd:YAG laser welding over a wide range of strain rates (0.001–1133 s{sup −1}). Laser welding results in not only significant microhardness increase in the fusion zone (FZ) and inner heat-affected zone (HAZ), but also the formation of a softened zone in the outer HAZ. The yield strength (YS) of the DP600 steel increases and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) remains almost unchanged, but the ductility decreases after welding. The DP600 base metal (BM) and WJ are of positive strain rate sensitivity and show similar stress–strain response at all studied strain rates. The enhanced ductility at strain rates ranging from 1 to 100 s{sup −1} is attributed to the retardation of the propagation of plastic strain localization due to the positive strain rate sensitivity and the thermal softening caused by deformation induced adiabatic temperature rise during dynamic tensile deformation. The tensile failure occurs in the inner HAZ of the joint and the distance of failure location from the weld centerline decreases with increasing strain rate. The mechanism for the changing failure location can be related to the different strain rate dependence of the plastic deformation behavior of the microstructures in various regions across the joint. The DP600 WJ absorbs more energy over the whole measured strain rates than that of the BM due to the higher strength at the same strain when the deformation only up to 10% is considered.

  15. Effect of High Temperature on the Tensile Behavior of CFRP and Cementitious Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toutanji, Houssam A.

    1999-01-01

    Concrete and other composite manufacturing processes are continuing to evolve and become more and more suited for use in non-Earth settings such as the Moon and Mars. The fact that structures built in lunar environments would experience a range of effects from temperature extremes to bombardment by micrometeorites and that all the materials for concrete production exist on the Moon means that concrete appears to be the most feasible building material. it can provide adequate shelter from the harshness of the lunar environment and at the same time be a cost effective building material. With a return to the Moon planned by NASA to occur after the turn of the century, it will be necessary to include concrete manufacturing as one of the experiments to be conducted in one of the coming missions. Concrete's many possible uses and possibilities for manufacturing make it ideal for lunar construction. The objectives of this research are summarized as follows: i) study the possibility of concrete production on the Moon or other planets, ii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of concrete, and iii) study the effect of high temperature on the tensile behavior of carbon fiber reinforced with inorganic polymer composites. Literature review indicates that production of concrete on the Moon or other planets is feasible using the indigenous materials. Results of this study has shown that both the tensile strength and static elastic modulus of concrete decreased with a rise in temperature from 200 to 500 C. The addition of silica fume to concrete showed higher resistance to high temperatures. Carbon fiber reinforced inorganic polymer (CFRIP) composites seemed to perform well up to 300 C. However, a significant reduction in strength was observed of about 40% at 400 C and up to 80% when the specimens were exposed to 700 C.

  16. Experimental and numerical modeling of basalt textile reinforced mortar behavior under uniaxial tensile stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larrinaga, Pello; Chastre, Carlos; Biscaia, Hugo C.; San-José, José T.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Making more deepen the knowledge of textile reinforced mortar in tensile stress. • Analyzing the effect of the reinforcing ratio of the composite. • To compare results with Aveston–Cooper–Kelly theory. • To develop a numerical model based on a finite element code. • Considering the importance of the bond-slip law of the mortar-to-textile-interface. - Abstract: During the last years several projects and studies have improved the knowledge about textile reinforced mortar (TRM) technology. TRM has already been used in strengthening masonry and reinforced concrete structural elements such as walls, arches, columns and beams. This material is presented as a real alternative to the use of fiber-reinforced polymers (FRP) in situations where these composites have presented some drawbacks or their use is banned. Textile reinforced mortar show a complex mechanical behavior derived from the heterogeneity of the constituent materials. This paper aims to deepen the knowledge of this composite material in terms of tensile behavior. Following this scope, this paper presents an experimental campaign focused on thirty-one TRM specimens reinforced with four different reinforcing ratios. The results are analyzed and contrasted with two distinct models. (i) The Aveston–Cooper–Kelly theory (ACK) which is based on a tri-linear analytical approach; and (ii) a non-linear numerical simulation with a 3D finite element code. The finite element analysis (FEA) of the TRM tensile tests also showed no significant dependence on the basalt-to-mortar interface, i.e., the choice of a bond-slip curve in order to reproduce the bond stresses and slippages along the interface is irrelevant and it can be simply considered as rigid interface

  17. Tensile and fracture behavior of AA6061-T6 aluminum alloys: micro-mechanical approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen, Y.

    2012-01-01

    The AA6061-T6 aluminum alloy was chosen as the material for the core vessel of the future Jules Horowitz testing reactor (JHR). The objective of this thesis is to understand and model the tensile and fracture behavior of the material, as well as the origin of damage anisotropy. A micro-mechanical approach was used to link the microstructure and mechanical behavior. The microstructure of the alloy was characterized on the surface via Scanning Electron Microscopy and in the 3D volume via synchrotron X-ray tomography and laminography. The damage mechanism was identified by in-situ SEM tensile testing, ex-situ X-ray tomography and in-situ laminography on different levels of triaxiality. The observations have shown that damage nucleated at lower strains on Mg 2 Si coarse precipitates than on iron rich intermetallics. The identified scenario and the in-situ measurements were then used to develop a coupled GTN damage model incorporating nucleation, growth and coalescence of cavities formed by coarse precipitates. The relationship between the damage and the microstructure anisotropies was explained and simulated. (author)

  18. Effect of tensile mean stress on fatigue behavior of single-crystal and directionally solidified superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Mcgaw, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Two nickel base superalloys, single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf, were studied in view of the potential usage of the former and usage of the latter as blade materials for the turbomachinery of the space shuttle main engine. The baseline zero mean stress (ZMS) fatigue life (FL) behavior of these superalloys was established, and then the effect of tensile mean stress (TMS) on their FL behavior was characterized. At room temperature these superalloys have lower ductilities and higher strengths than most polycrystalline engineering alloys. The cycle stress-strain response was thus nominally elastic in most of the fatigue tests. Therefore, a stress range based FL prediction approach was used to characterize both the ZMS and TMS fatigue data. In the past, several researchers have developed methods to account for the detrimental effect of tensile mean stress on the FL for polycrystalline engineering alloys. However, the applicability of these methods to single crystal and directionally solidified superalloys has not been established. In this study, these methods were applied to characterize the TMS fatigue data of single crystal PWA 1480 and directionally solidified MAR-M 246 + Hf and were found to be unsatisfactory. Therefore, a method of accounting for the TMS effect on FL, that is based on a technique proposed by Heidmann and Manson was developed to characterize the TMS fatigue data of these superalloys. Details of this method and its relationship to the conventionally used mean stress methods in FL prediction are discussed.

  19. Tensile Fracture Behavior of 316L Austenitic Stainless Steel Manufactured by Hot Isostatic Pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, A. J.; Brayshaw, W. J.; Sherry, A. H.

    2018-02-01

    Herein we investigate how the oxygen content in hot isostatically pressed (HIP'd) 316L stainless steel affects the mechanical properties and tensile fracture behavior. This work follows on from previous studies, which aimed to understand the effect of oxygen content on the Charpy impact toughness of HIP'd steel. We expand on the work by performing room-temperature tensile testing on different heats of 316L stainless steel, which contain different levels of interstitial elements (carbon and nitrogen) as well as oxygen in the bulk material. Throughout the work we repeat the experiments on conventionally forged 316L steel as a reference material. The analysis of the work indicates that oxygen does not contribute to a measureable solution strengthening mechanism, as is the case with carbon and nitrogen in austenitic stainless steels (Werner in Mater Sci Eng A 101:93-98, 1988). Neither does oxygen, in the form of oxide inclusions, contribute to precipitation hardening due to the size and spacing of particles. However, the oxide particles do influence fracture behavior; fractography of the failed tension test specimens indicates that the average ductile dimple size is related to the oxygen content in the bulk material, the results of which support an on-going hypothesis relating oxygen content in HIP'd steels to their fracture mechanisms by providing additional sites for the initiation of ductile damage in the form of voids.

  20. Effect of Thermal Cycling on the Tensile Behavior of Polymer Composites Reinforced by Basalt and Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, S. Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Moslem; Eslami-Farsani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling on the tensile behavior of three types of polymer-matrix composites — a phenolic resin reinforced with woven basalt fibers, woven carbon fibers, and hybrid basalt and carbon fibers — in an ambient environment. For this purpose, tensile tests were performed on specimens previously subjected to a certain number of thermal cycles. The ultimate tensile strength of the specimen reinforced with woven basalt fibers had by 5% after thermal cycling, but the strength of the specimen with woven carbon fibers had reduced to a value by 11% higher than that before thermal cycling.

  1. Application of Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman Constitutive Model to the Tensile Behavior of Reinforcing Bars with Corrosion Pits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yidong; Qian, Chunxiang

    2013-01-01

    Based on meso-damage mechanics and finite element analysis, the aim of this paper is to describe the feasibility of the Gurson–Tvergaard–Needleman (GTN) constitutive model in describing the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars. The orthogonal test results showed that different fracture pattern and the related damage evolution process can be simulated by choosing different material parameters of GTN constitutive model. Compared with failure parameters, the two constitutive parameters are significant factors affecting the tensile strength. Both the nominal yield and ultimate tensile strength decrease markedly with the increase of constitutive parameters. Combining with the latest data and trial-and-error method, the suitable material parameters of GTN constitutive model were adopted to simulate the tensile behavior of corroded reinforcing bars in concrete under carbonation environment attack. The numerical predictions can not only agree very well with experimental measurements, but also simplify the finite element modeling process. PMID:23342140

  2. Prediction of viscoelastic behavior of blood flow in plaque deposited capillaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solangi, M.A.; Shah, B.

    2012-01-01

    The paper investigates the viscoelastic behaviour of blood over low value of elasticity, to analyse the influence of inertia in the presence of elasticity. For viscoelastic fluids shear-thinning and strain-softening PTT (phan- Thien/tanner) constitutive model is employed to identify the influence of elasticity. The computational method adopted is based on a finite element semi-implicit time stepping Taylor-Galerkin/pressure-correction scheme. Simulations are conducted via atherosclerotic vessels along with various percentages of deposition at distinct values of Reynolds numbers. The numerical simulations are performed for recirculation flow structure and development of recirculation length to investigate the impact of atherosclerosis on partially blocked plaque deposited vessels. (author)

  3. Asymptotic behaviors of solutions for viscoelastic wave equation with space-time dependent damping term

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we consider a viscoelastic wave equation with an absorbing term and space-time dependent damping term. Based on the weighted energy method, and by assuming that the kernel decaying exponentially, we obtain the L2 decay rates of the solutions. More precisely, we show that the decay rates are the same as those obtained in Lin et al. (2010) [15] for the semilinear wave equation with absorption term. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  4. Asymptotic behaviors of solutions for viscoelastic wave equation with space-time dependent damping term

    KAUST Repository

    Said-Houari, Belkacem

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we consider a viscoelastic wave equation with an absorbing term and space-time dependent damping term. Based on the weighted energy method, and by assuming that the kernel decaying exponentially, we obtain the L2 decay rates of the solutions. More precisely, we show that the decay rates are the same as those obtained in Lin et al. (2010) [15] for the semilinear wave equation with absorption term. © 2011 Elsevier Inc.

  5. A Simplified Micromechanical Modeling Approach to Predict the Tensile Flow Curve Behavior of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Tarun; Kumar, B. Ravi; Singh, Vishal

    2017-11-01

    Micromechanical modeling is used to predict material's tensile flow curve behavior based on microstructural characteristics. This research develops a simplified micromechanical modeling approach for predicting flow curve behavior of dual-phase steels. The existing literature reports on two broad approaches for determining tensile flow curve of these steels. The modeling approach developed in this work attempts to overcome specific limitations of the existing two approaches. This approach combines dislocation-based strain-hardening method with rule of mixtures. In the first step of modeling, `dislocation-based strain-hardening method' was employed to predict tensile behavior of individual phases of ferrite and martensite. In the second step, the individual flow curves were combined using `rule of mixtures,' to obtain the composite dual-phase flow behavior. To check accuracy of proposed model, four distinct dual-phase microstructures comprising of different ferrite grain size, martensite fraction, and carbon content in martensite were processed by annealing experiments. The true stress-strain curves for various microstructures were predicted with the newly developed micromechanical model. The results of micromechanical model matched closely with those of actual tensile tests. Thus, this micromechanical modeling approach can be used to predict and optimize the tensile flow behavior of dual-phase steels.

  6. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Flow Behavior and Anisotropy of a Medium-Manganese TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturk, Rakan; Hector, Louis G.; Matthew Enloe, C.; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-06-01

    The dependence of the plastic anisotropy on the nominal strain rate for a medium-manganese (10 wt.% Mn) transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with initial austenite volume fraction of 66% (balance ferrite) has been investigated. The material exhibited yield point elongation, propagative instabilities during hardening, and austenite transformation to α'-martensite either directly or through ɛ-martensite. Uniaxial strain rates within the range of 0.005-500 s-1 along the 0°, 45°, and 90° orientations were selected based upon their relevance to automotive applications. The plastic anisotropy ( r) and normal anisotropy ( r n) indices corresponding to each direction and strain rate were determined using strain fields obtained from stereo digital image correlation systems that enabled both quasistatic and dynamic measurements. The results provide evidence of significant, orientation-dependent strain rate effects on both the flow stress and the evolution of r and r n with strain. This has implications not only for material performance during forming but also for the development of future strain-rate-dependent anisotropic yield criteria. Since tensile data alone for the subject medium-manganese TRIP steel do not satisfactorily determine the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic-scale behavior observed on tensile testing, additional tests that must supplement the mechanical test results presented herein are discussed.

  7. Tensile and fatigue behavior of polymer composites reinforced with superelastic SMA strands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daghash, Sherif M.; Ozbulut, Osman E.

    2018-06-01

    This study explores the use of superelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) strands, which consist of seven individual small-diameter wires, in an epoxy matrix and characterizes the tensile and fatigue responses of the developed SMA/epoxy composites. Using a vacuum assisted hand lay-up technique, twelve SMA fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) specimens were fabricated. The developed SMA-FRP composites had a fiber volume ratio of 50%. Tensile response of SMA-FRP specimens were characterized under both monotonic loading and increasing amplitude loading and unloading cycles. The degradation in superelastic properties of the developed SMA-FRP composites during fatigue loading at different strain amplitudes was investigated. The effect of loading rate on the fatigue response of SMA-FRP composites was also explored. In addition, fractured specimens were examined using the scanning electron microscopy (SEM) technique to study the failure mechanisms of the tested specimens. A good interfacial bonding between the SMA strands and epoxy matrix was observed. The developed SMA-FRP composites exhibited good superelastic behavior at different strain amplitudes up to at least 800 cycle after which significant degradation occurred.

  8. Tensile and Creep Behavior of Extruded AA6063/SiCp Al MMCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalifa, Tarek A.; Mahmoud, Tamer S.

    2010-01-01

    Composites of AA6063 Al alloy reinforced with SiC particles (SiC p ) were prepared by the vortex method. Hot extrusion was carried out for the as cast composites with a reduction in area of 25%. Tensile and creep behavior of as-cast and extruded composites were studied at elevated temperatures. Tensile tests carried out at room temperature showed that for the as-cast composites, the addition of SiC p up to 10% by weight improves the strength but reduces ductility. Further addition of SiC p reduces the strength and ductility of the composites. At 150 and 300 deg. C the matrix alloy exhibits higher strength than the composites. Extrusion generally raised the strength of the composites at both room and elevated temperatures. Time rupture creep tests carried out at 300 deg. C showed that the composites exhibit higher creep resistance as compared to the matrix alloy except at relatively low stresses where the matrix has a better creep resistance. Extrusion improved the resistance of composites to creep rupture.

  9. Effect of laser shock on tensile deformation behavior of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, G.X.; Liu, J.D.; Qiao, H.C.; Zhou, Y.Z.; Jin, T.; Zhao, J.B.; Sun, X.F.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2017-01-01

    This investigation focused on the tensile deformation behavior of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy, both in virgin condition and after laser shock processing (LSP) with varied technology parameters. Nanoindention tests were carried out on the sectioned specimens after LSP treatment to characterize the surface strengthening effect. Stress strain curves of tensile specimens were analyzed, and microstructural observations of the fracture surface and the longitudinal cross-sections of ruptured specimens were performed via scanning electron microscope (SEM), in an effort to clarify the fracture mechanisms. The results show that a surface hardening layer with the thickness of about 0.3–0.6 mm was gained by the experimental alloys after LSP treatment, but the formation of surface hardening layer had not affected the yield strength. Furthermore, fundamental differences in the plastic responses at different temperatures due to LSP treatment had been discovered. At 700 °C, the slip deformation was held back when it extended to the surface hardening layer and the ensuing slip steps improved the plasticity; however, at 1000 °C, surface hardening layer hindered the macro necking, which resulted in the relatively lower plasticity.

  10. Effect of laser shock on tensile deformation behavior of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, G.X. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, 19 Yuquan Road, Beijing 100049 (China); Liu, J.D., E-mail: jdliu@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Qiao, H.C. [Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 114 Nanta Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhou, Y.Z. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Jin, T., E-mail: tjin@imr.ac.cn [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Zhao, J.B. [Shenyang Institute of Automation, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 114 Nanta Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Sun, X.F.; Hu, Z.Q. [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 72 Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2017-02-16

    This investigation focused on the tensile deformation behavior of a single crystal nickel-base superalloy, both in virgin condition and after laser shock processing (LSP) with varied technology parameters. Nanoindention tests were carried out on the sectioned specimens after LSP treatment to characterize the surface strengthening effect. Stress strain curves of tensile specimens were analyzed, and microstructural observations of the fracture surface and the longitudinal cross-sections of ruptured specimens were performed via scanning electron microscope (SEM), in an effort to clarify the fracture mechanisms. The results show that a surface hardening layer with the thickness of about 0.3–0.6 mm was gained by the experimental alloys after LSP treatment, but the formation of surface hardening layer had not affected the yield strength. Furthermore, fundamental differences in the plastic responses at different temperatures due to LSP treatment had been discovered. At 700 °C, the slip deformation was held back when it extended to the surface hardening layer and the ensuing slip steps improved the plasticity; however, at 1000 °C, surface hardening layer hindered the macro necking, which resulted in the relatively lower plasticity.

  11. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Flow Behavior and Anisotropy of a Medium-Manganese TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alturk, Rakan; Hector, Louis G.; Matthew Enloe, C.; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Brown, Tyson W.

    2018-04-01

    The dependence of the plastic anisotropy on the nominal strain rate for a medium-manganese (10 wt.% Mn) transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steel with initial austenite volume fraction of 66% (balance ferrite) has been investigated. The material exhibited yield point elongation, propagative instabilities during hardening, and austenite transformation to α'-martensite either directly or through ɛ-martensite. Uniaxial strain rates within the range of 0.005-500 s-1 along the 0°, 45°, and 90° orientations were selected based upon their relevance to automotive applications. The plastic anisotropy (r) and normal anisotropy (r n) indices corresponding to each direction and strain rate were determined using strain fields obtained from stereo digital image correlation systems that enabled both quasistatic and dynamic measurements. The results provide evidence of significant, orientation-dependent strain rate effects on both the flow stress and the evolution of r and r n with strain. This has implications not only for material performance during forming but also for the development of future strain-rate-dependent anisotropic yield criteria. Since tensile data alone for the subject medium-manganese TRIP steel do not satisfactorily determine the microstructural mechanisms responsible for the macroscopic-scale behavior observed on tensile testing, additional tests that must supplement the mechanical test results presented herein are discussed.

  12. Study of tensile test behavior of austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes in cold worked condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terui, Clarice, E-mail: clarice.terui@marinha.mil.br [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha em São Paulo (CINA/CTMSP), Iperó, SP (Brazil). Centro Industrial Nuclear da Marinha; Lima, Nelson B. de, E-mail: nblima@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNE-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    These austenitic stainless steel type 347 seamless thin-walled tubes are potential candidates to be used in fuel elements of nuclear power plants (as PWR - Pressurized Water Reactor). So, their metallurgical condition and mechanical properties, as the tensile strength and yield strength, normally are very restrict in demanding project and design requirements. Several full size tensile tests at room temperature and high temperature (315 deg C) were performed in these seamless tubes in cold-worked condition. The results of specified tensile and yield strengths were achieved but the elongation of the tube, in the geometry of the component, could not be measured at high temperature due to unconventional mode of rupture (helical mode without separation of parts). The average value of elongation was obtained from stress-strain curves of hot tensile tests and was around 5%. The results obtained in this research show that this behavior of the full size tensile test samples of thin-walled tube (wall thickness less than 0.5 mm) in high temperature (315°C) is due to the combination of the manufacturing process, the material (crystallographic structure and chemical composition) and the final geometry of the component. In other words, the strong crystallographic texture of material induced by tube drawing process in addition with the geometry of the component are responsible for the behavior in hot uniaxial tensile tests. (author)

  13. Characterization of the viscoelastic behavior of the pure bitumen grades 10/20 and 35/50 with macroindentation and finite element computation

    KAUST Repository

    Hamzaoui, Rabah

    2013-06-23

    In this article, we present an identification procedure that allows the determination of the viscoelasticity behavior of different grades of pure bitumen (bitumen 35/50 and bitumen 10/20). The procedure required in the first stage a mechanical response based on macroindentation experiments with a cylindrical indenter. A finite element simulation was performed in the second stage to compute the mechanical response corresponding to a viscoelasticity model described by three mechanical parameters. The comparison between the experimental and numerical responses showed a perfect matching. In addition, the identification procedure helped to discriminate between different bitumens characterized by different asphaltene and maltene contents. Finally, the developed procedure could be used as an efficient tool to characterize the mechanical behavior of the viscoelastic materials, thanks to the quantified relationship between the viscoleastic parameters and the force-penetration response. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 130: 3440-3450, 2013 Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Tensile deformation behavior of AA5083-H111 at cold and warm temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozturk, Fahrettin; Toros, Serkan; Kilic, Suleyman [Nidge Univ. (Turkey). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-09-15

    The effects of strain rate and temperature on the deformation behavior of hardened 5083-H111 aluminum magnesium alloy sheet were investigated by performing uniaxial tensile tests at various strain rates from 0.0083 to 0.16 s{sup -1} and temperatures from -100 to 300 C. Results from the prescribed test ranges indicate that the formability of this material at cold and warm temperatures is better than at room temperature. The improvement in formability at cold temperatures is principally due to the strain hardening of the material. However, the improvement at warm temperature and low strain rate is specifically due to the high strain rate sensitivity characteristic of the material. Results indicate that this alloy should be formed at temperatures higher than 200 C and at low strain rates. (orig.)

  15. Abnormal viscoelastic behavior of side-chain liquid-crystal polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallani, J. L.; Hilliou, L.; Martinoty, P.; Keller, P.

    1994-03-01

    We show that, contrary to what is commonly believed, the isotropic phase of side-chain liquid-crystal polymers has viscoelastic properties which are totally different from those of ordinary flexible melt polymers. The results can be explained by the existence of a transient network created by the dynamic association of mesogenic groups belonging to different chains. The extremely high sensitivity of the compound to the state of the surfaces with which it is in contact offers us an unexpected method of studying surface states.

  16. Study of rheological, viscoelastic and vulcanization behavior of sponge EPDM/NR blended nano- composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M Arshad; Shahid, M; Ahmed, Riaz; Yahya, A G

    2014-01-01

    In this research paper the effect of blending ratio of natural rubber (NR) with Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) were investigated. Different samples of EPDM/NR ratio were prepared to study the variation of NR in EPDM on rheology, curing characteristics, tangent δ, and viscosity variation during vulcanization of sponge nano composites.The main aim of present research is to develop elastomeric based sponge composites with the blending ratio of base elastomers along with the carbon nano particles for high energy absorbing and damping applications. The curing characteristics, rheology and viscoelastic nature of the composite is remarkably influenced with the progressive blending ratio of the base elastomeric matrix

  17. Study of rheological, viscoelastic and vulcanization behavior of sponge EPDM/NR blended nano-composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bashir, M. A.; Shahid, M.; Ahmed, R.; Yahya, A. G.

    2013-01-01

    In this research paper the effect of blending ratio of natural rubber (NR) with Ethylene Propylene Diene Monomer (EPDM) were investigated. Different samples of EPDM/NR ratio were prepared to study the variation of NR in EPDM on rheology, curing characteristics, tangent d, and viscosity variation during vulcanization of sponge nano composites. The main aim of present research is to develop elastomeric based sponge composites with the blending ratio of base elastomers along with the carbon nano particles for high energy absorbing and damping applications. The curing characteristics, rheology and viscoelastic nature of the composite is remarkably influenced with the progressive blending ratio of the base elastomeric matrix. (author)

  18. Engineering viscoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Gutierrez-Lemini, Danton

    2014-01-01

    Engineering Viscoelasticity covers all aspects of the thermo- mechanical response of viscoelastic substances that a practitioner in the field of viscoelasticity would need to design experiments, interpret test data, develop stress-strain models, perform stress analyses, design structural components, and carry out research work. The material in each chapter is developed from the elementary to the advanced, providing the background in mathematics and mechanics that are central to understanding the subject matter being presented. The book examines how viscoelastic materials respond to the application of loads, and provides practical guidelines to use them in the design of commercial, military and industrial applications. This book also: ·         Facilitates conceptual understanding by progressing in each chapter from elementary to challenging material ·         Examines in detail both differential and integral constitutive equations, devoting full chapters to each type and using both forms in ...

  19. Viscoelastic characterization and self-heating behavior of laminated fiber composite driveshafts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henry, Todd C.; Bakis, Charles E.; Smith, Edward C.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Carbon fiber composites with different matrix moduli were manufactured. • The composites are of interest for flexible driveshaft applications. • The composites are viscoelastically characterized using dynamic mechanical analysis. • The viscoelastic properties are used to predict self-heating in spinning shafts. • Measured and predicted temperatures of shafts agreed within 0.7 °C. - Abstract: The high cyclic strain capacity of fiber reinforced polymeric composites presents an opportunity to design driveshafts that can transmit high power under imperfect alignment conditions without the use of flexible couplers. In weight sensitive applications such as rotorcraft, the design of highly optimized driveshafts requires a general modeling capability that can predict a number of shaft performance characteristics—one of which is self-heating due to dynamic loading conditions. The current investigation developed three new flexible matrix composite materials of intermediate matrix modulus that, together with previously developed composites, cover the full range of material properties that are of potential interest in driveshaft design. An analytical model for the self-heating of spinning, misaligned, laminated composite shafts was refined to suit the full range of materials. Inputs to the model include ply-level dynamic material properties of the composite, cyclic strain amplitude and frequency, and various heat transfer constants related to conduction, radiation, and convection. Predictions of the surface temperature of spinning shafts correspond well with experimental measurements for bending strains of up to 2000 με, which encompasses the range of strains expected in rotorcraft driveshaft applications

  20. Development of a stress-mode sensitive viscoelastic constitutive relationship for asphalt concrete: experimental and numerical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimi, Mohammad M.; Tabatabaee, Nader; Jahanbakhsh, H.; Jahangiri, Behnam

    2017-08-01

    Asphalt binder is responsible for the thermo-viscoelastic mechanical behavior of asphalt concrete. Upon application of pure compressive stress to an asphalt concrete specimen, the stress is transferred by mechanisms such as aggregate interlock and the adhesion/cohesion properties of asphalt mastic. In the pure tensile stress mode, aggregate interlock plays a limited role in stress transfer, and the mastic phase plays the dominant role through its adhesive/cohesive and viscoelastic properties. Under actual combined loading patterns, any coordinate direction may experience different stress modes; therefore, the mechanical behavior is not the same in the different directions and the asphalt specimen behaves as an anisotropic material. The present study developed an anisotropic nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive relationship that is sensitive to the tension/compression stress mode by extending Schapery's nonlinear viscoelastic model. The proposed constitutive relationship was implemented in Abaqus using a user material (UMAT) subroutine in an implicit scheme. Uniaxial compression and indirect tension (IDT) testing were used to characterize the viscoelastic properties of the bituminous materials and to calibrate and validate the proposed constitutive relationship. Compressive and tensile creep compliances were calculated using uniaxial compression, as well as IDT test results, for different creep-recovery loading patterns at intermediate temperature. The results showed that both tensile creep compliance and its rate were greater than those of compression. The calculated deflections based on these IDT test simulations were compared with experimental measurements and were deemed acceptable. This suggests that the proposed viscoelastic constitutive relationship correctly demonstrates the viscoelastic response and is more accurate for analysis of asphalt concrete in the laboratory or in situ.

  1. Meso-Scale Progressive Damage Behavior Characterization of Triaxial Braided Composites under Quasi-Static Tensile Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yiru; Zhang, Songjun; Jiang, Hongyong; Xiang, Jinwu

    2018-04-01

    Based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM), a sophisticated 3D meso-scale finite element (FE) model is proposed to characterize the progressive damage behavior of 2D Triaxial Braided Composites (2DTBC) with 60° braiding angle under quasi-static tensile load. The modified Von Mises strength criterion and 3D Hashin failure criterion are used to predict the damage initiation of the pure matrix and fiber tows. A combining interface damage and friction constitutive model is applied to predict the interface damage behavior. Murakami-Ohno stiffness degradation scheme is employed to predict the damage evolution process of each constituent. Coupling with the ordinary and translational symmetry boundary conditions, the tensile elastic response including tensile strength and failure strain of 2DTBC are in good agreement with the available experiment data. The numerical results show that the main failure modes of the composites under axial tensile load are pure matrix cracking, fiber and matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows, matrix tension failure in axial fiber tows and interface debonding; the main failure modes of the composites subjected to transverse tensile load are free-edge effect, matrix tension failure in bias fiber tows and interface debonding.

  2. Anisotropy in tensile and ductile-brittle transition behavior of ODS ferritic steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasada, R., E-mail: r-kasada@iae.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Lee, S.G.; Isselin, J.; Lee, J.H.; Omura, T.; Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Uji, Kyoto (Japan); Okuda, T. [KOBELCO Research Institute, 1-5-5, Takatsukadai, Nishi-ku, Kobe 651-2271 (Japan); Inoue, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002 Narita, Oarai, Ibaraki 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Ohnuki, S. [Materials Science and Engineering, Hokkaido University, N14 W8, Kita ku, Sapporo 060-8626 (Japan); Fujisawa, T. [Nagoya University, Furocho, Chikusa, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); Abe, F. [National Institute of Materials Science, Tsukuba, (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2011-10-01

    Anisotropic fracture behavior of SOC-1 oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) ferritic steel has been investigated for a hot-extruded bar by tensile tests and Charpy impact tests. These mechanical properties are better in the longitudinal direction than in the transverse directions against extrusion direction (ED). Fracture surface observations by scanning electron microscopy and auger electron spectroscopy indicated bundle-like morphology with existence of segregation/precipitation/inclusions along ED. Pole figures of the hot-extruded bar characterized using electron back scattering diffraction (EBSD) technique and X-ray diffraction exhibited <1 1 0> fiber texture formation along ED. The EBSD orientation map showed a complex bundle-like grain morphology which consists of elongated grains having a specific orientation <1 1 0>// ED and relatively isotropic and small grains having other orientation. The results conclude that the combined effects of observed elongated grain morphology and these small grains with segregation/precipitation/inclusions along ED can explain the anisotropic fracture behavior of the hot-extruded ODS ferritic steel.

  3. Viscoelastic behavior of basaltic ash from Stromboli volcano inferred from intermittent compression experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, A. K.; Miwa, T.; Okumura, S.; Uesugi, K.

    2017-12-01

    After ash-dominated Strombolian eruption, considerable amount of ash falls back to the volcanic conduit forming a dense near-surface region compacted by weights of its own and other fallback clasts (Patrick et al., 2007). Gas accumulation below this dense cap causes a substantial increase in pressure within the conduit, causing the volcanic activity to shift to the preliminary stages of a forthcoming eruption (Del Bello et al., 2015). Under such conditions, rheology of the fallback ash plays an important role because it controls whether the fallback ash can be the cap. However, little attention has been given to the point. We examined the rheology of ash collected at Stromboli volcano via intermittent compression experiments changing temperature and compression time/rate. The ash deformed at a constant rate during compression process, and then it was compressed without any deformation during rest process. The compression and rest processes repeated during each experiment to see rheological variations with progression of compaction. Viscoelastic changes during the experiment were estimated by Maxwell model. The results show that both elasticity and viscosity increases with decreasing porosity. On the other hand, the elasticity shows strong rate-dependence in the both compression and rest processes while the viscosity dominantly depends on the temperature, although the compression rate also affects the viscosity in the case of the compression process. Thus, the ash behaves either elastically or viscously depending on experimental process, temperature, and compression rate/time. The viscoelastic characteristics can be explained by magnitude relationships between the characteristic relaxation times and times for compression and rest processes. This indicates that the balance of the time scales is key to determining the rheological characteristics and whether the ash behaves elastically or viscously may control cyclic Strombolian eruptions.

  4. Tensile behavior of humid aged advanced composites for helicopter external fuel tank development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Condruz Mihaela

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Influence of humid aging on tensile properties of two polymeric composites was studied. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the suitability of the materials for a naval helicopter external fuel tank. Due to the application, the humid environment was kerosene and saline solution to evaluate the sea water effect on the composite tensile strength. The composite samples were immersed in kerosene for 168 hours, respective 1752 hours and in saline solution for 168 hours. Tensile tests were performed after the immersion. The composite sample tensile tests showed that kerosene and saline solution had no influence on the elastic modulus of the materials, but it was observed a slight improvement of the tensile strength of the two polymeric composites.

  5. A combined experimental and FE analysis procedure to evaluate tensile behavior of zircaloy pressure tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samal, M.K.; Vaze, K.K.; Balakrishnan, K.S.; Anantharaman, S.

    2012-01-01

    Determination of transverse mechanical properties from the ring type of specimens directly machined from the nuclear reactor pressure tubes is not straightforward because of the presence of combined membrane as well as bending stresses arising in the loaded condition. In this work, we have performed ring-tensile tests on the un-irradiated ring tensile specimen using two split semi-cylindrical mandrels as the loading device. A 3-D finite element (FE) analysis was performed in order to determine the material true stress-strain curve by comparing experimental load-displacement data with those predicted by FE analysis. In order to validate the methodology, miniaturized tensile specimens were machined from these tubes and tested. It was observed that the stress-strain data as obtained from ring tensile specimen could describe the load displacement curve of the miniaturized flat tensile specimen very well. (author)

  6. Viscoelastic analysis of a dental metal-ceramic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özüpek, Şebnem; Ünlü, Utku Cemal

    2012-11-01

    Porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) restorations used in prosthetic dentistry contain thermal stresses which develop during the cooling phase after firing. These thermal stresses coupled with the stresses produced by mechanical loads may be the dominant reasons for failures in clinical situations. For an accurate calculation of these stresses, viscoelastic behavior of ceramics at high temperatures should not be ignored. In this study, the finite element technique is used to evaluate the effect of viscoelasticity on stress distributions of a three-point flexure test specimen, which is the current international standard, ISO 9693, to characterize the interfacial bond strength of metal-ceramic restorative systems. Results indicate that the probability of interfacial debonding due to normal tensile stress is higher than that due to shear stress. This conclusion suggests modification of ISO 9693 bond strength definition from one in terms of the shear stress only to that accounting for both normal and shear stresses.

  7. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the tensile behavior of a thermosetting polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaorui; Qu, Jianmin

    2014-07-01

    Using a previously developed coarse-grained model, we conducted large-scale (˜85×85×85nm3) molecular dynamics simulations of uniaxial-strain deformation to study the tensile behavior of an epoxy molding compound, epoxy phenol novolacs (EPN) bisphenol A (BPA). Under the uniaxial-strain deformation, the material is found to exhibit cavity nucleation and growth, followed by stretching of the ligaments separated by the cavities, until the ultimate failure through ligament scissions. The nucleation sites of cavities are rather random and the subsequent cavity growth accounts for much (87%) of the volumetric change during the uniaxial-strain deformation. Ultimate failure of the materials occurs when the cavity volume fraction reaches ˜60%. During the entire deformation process, polymer strands in the network are continuously extended to their linear states and broken in the postyielding strain hardening stage. When most of the strands are stretched to their taut configurations, rapid scission of a large number of strands occurs within a small strain increment, which eventually leads to fracture. Finally, through extensive numerical simulations of various loading conditions in addition to uniaxial strain, we find that yielding of the EPN-BPA can be described by the pressure-modified von Mises yield criterion.

  8. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of the tensile behavior of a thermosetting polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shaorui; Qu, Jianmin

    2014-07-01

    Using a previously developed coarse-grained model, we conducted large-scale (∼ 85 × 85 × 85 nm(3)) molecular dynamics simulations of uniaxial-strain deformation to study the tensile behavior of an epoxy molding compound, epoxy phenol novolacs (EPN) bisphenol A (BPA). Under the uniaxial-strain deformation, the material is found to exhibit cavity nucleation and growth, followed by stretching of the ligaments separated by the cavities, until the ultimate failure through ligament scissions. The nucleation sites of cavities are rather random and the subsequent cavity growth accounts for much (87%) of the volumetric change during the uniaxial-strain deformation. Ultimate failure of the materials occurs when the cavity volume fraction reaches ∼ 60%. During the entire deformation process, polymer strands in the network are continuously extended to their linear states and broken in the postyielding strain hardening stage. When most of the strands are stretched to their taut configurations, rapid scission of a large number of strands occurs within a small strain increment, which eventually leads to fracture. Finally, through extensive numerical simulations of various loading conditions in addition to uniaxial strain, we find that yielding of the EPN-BPA can be described by the pressure-modified von Mises yield criterion.

  9. Effects of surface cracks and strain rate on the tensile behavior of Balmoral Red granite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mardoukhi Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental procedure for studying the effects of surface cracks on the mechanical behavior of Balmoral Red granite under dynamic and quasi-static loading. Three different thermal shocks were applied on the surface of the Brazilian Disc test samples by keeping a flame torch at a fixed distance from the sample surface for 10, 30, and 60 seconds. Microscopy clearly shows that the number of the surface cracks increases with the duration of the thermal shock. After the thermal shock, the Brazilian Disc tests were performed using a servohydraulic materials testing machine and a compression Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar (SHPB device. The results show that the tensile strength of the rock decreases and the rate sensitivity of the rock increases as more cracks are introduced to the structure. The DIC analysis of the Brazilian disc tests shows that the fracture of the sample initiates at the center of the samples or slightly closer to the incident bar contact point. This is followed by crushing of the samples at both contact points with the stress bars.

  10. Computational Viscoelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Marques, Severino P C

    2012-01-01

    This text is a guide how to solve problems in which viscoelasticity is present using existing commercial computational codes. The book gives information on codes’ structure and use, data preparation  and output interpretation and verification. The first part of the book introduces the reader to the subject, and to provide the models, equations and notation to be used in the computational applications. The second part shows the most important Computational techniques: Finite elements formulation, Boundary elements formulation, and presents the solutions of Viscoelastic problems with Abaqus.

  11. Tensile behavior of dissimilar friction stir welded joints of aluminium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shanmuga Sundaram, N.; Murugan, N.

    2010-01-01

    The heat treatable aluminium alloy AA2024 is used extensively in the aircraft industry because of its high strength to weight ratio and good ductility. The non-heat treatable aluminium alloy AA5083 possesses medium strength and high ductility and used typically in structural applications, marine, and automotive industries. When compared to fusion welding processes, friction stir welding (FSW) process is an emerging solid state joining process which is best suitable for joining these alloys. The friction stir welding parameters such as tool pin profile, tool rotational speed, welding speed, and tool axial force influence the mechanical properties of the FS welded joints significantly. Dissimilar FS welded joints are fabricated using five different tool pin profiles. Central composite design with four parameters, five levels, and 31 runs is used to conduct the experiments and response surface method (RSM) is employed to develop the model. Mathematical regression models are developed to predict the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and tensile elongation (TE) of the dissimilar friction stir welded joints of aluminium alloys 2024-T6 and 5083-H321, and they are validated. The effects of the above process parameters and tool pin profile on tensile strength and tensile elongation of dissimilar friction stir welded joints are analysed in detail. Joints fabricated using Tapered Hexagon tool pin profile have the highest tensile strength and tensile elongation, whereas the Straight Cylinder tool pin profile have the lowest tensile strength and tensile elongation. The results are useful to have a better understanding of the effects of process parameters, to fabricate the joints with desired tensile properties, and to automate the FS welding process.

  12. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) fabricated part behavior under tensile stress, thermal cycling, and fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shojib

    Material extrusion based additive manufacturing (AM) technology, such as fused deposition modeling (FDM), is gaining popularity with the numerous 3D printers available worldwide. FDM technology is advancing from exclusively prototype construction to achieving production-grade quality. Today, FDM-fabricated parts are widely used in the aerospace industries, biomedical applications, and other industries that may require custom fabricated, low volume parts. These applications are and were possible because of the different production grade material options (e.g., acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS), polycarbonate (PC), polyphenylsulfone (PPSF), etc.) available to use in FDM systems. Recent researchers are exploring other material options including polycaprolactone (PCL), polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), composites containing ceramic, glass and metal fillers, and even metals which depict the diversified materials and possibility of new material options using FDM technology. The understanding of the behavior and mechanical properties of the finished FDM-fabricated parts is of utmost importance in the advancement of this technology. The processing parameters, e.g., build orientation, raster width (RW), contour width (CW), raster angle (RA), and raster to raster air gap (RRAG) are important factors in determining the mechanical properties of FDM fabricated parts. The work presented here focused on the mechanical properties improvement by modifying those build parameters. The main concentration is on how modifying those parameters can improve ultimate tensile stress (UTS), Young's modulus, and tensile strain of the final product. In this research, PC parts were fabricated using three build methods: 1) default method, 2) Insight revision method, and 3) visual feedback method. By modifying build parameters, the highest average UTS obtained for PC was 63.96 MPa which was 7% higher than that of 59.73 MPa obtained using the default build parameters. The parameter modification

  13. Vacancy clustering behavior in hydrogen-charged martensitic steel AISI 410 under tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugita, K; Mutou, Y; Shirai, Y

    2016-01-01

    The formation and accumulation of defects under tensile deformation of hydrogen- charged AISI 410 martensitic steels were investigated by using positron lifetime spectroscopy. During the deformation process, dislocations and vacancy-clusters were introduced and increased with increasing strains. Between hydrogen-charged and uncharged samples with the same tensile strains there was no significant difference in the dislocation density and monovacancy equivalent vacancy density. (paper)

  14. Homoclinic behaviors and chaotic motions of double layered viscoelastic nanoplates based on nonlocal theory and extended Melnikov method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yu; Wang, Yi-Ze [School of Astronautics, Harbin Institute of Technology, P. O. Box 137, Harbin 150001 (China); Li, Feng-Ming, E-mail: fmli@bjut.edu.cn [School of Astronautics, Harbin Institute of Technology, P. O. Box 137, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Mechanical Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, Beijing 100124 (China)

    2015-06-15

    The nonlinear dynamical equations are established for the double layered viscoelastic nanoplates (DLNP) subjected to in-plane excitation based on the nonlocal theory and von Kármán large deformation theory. The extended high dimensional homoclinic Melnikov method is employed to study the homoclinic phenomena and chaotic motions for the parametrically excited DLNP system. The criteria for the homoclinic transverse intersection for both the asynchronous and synchronous buckling cases are proposed. Lyapunov exponents and phase portraits are obtained to verify the Melnikov-type analysis. The influences of structural parameters on the transverse homoclinic orbits and homoclinic bifurcation sets are discussed for the two buckling cases. Some novel phenomena are observed in the investigation. It should be noticed that the nonlocal effect on the homoclinic behaviors and chaotic motions is quite remarkable. Hence, the small scale effect should be taken into account for homoclinic and chaotic analysis for nanostructures. It is significant that the nonlocal effect on the homoclinic phenomena for the asynchronous buckling case is quite different from that for the synchronous buckling case. Moreover, due to the van der Walls interaction between the layers, the nonlocal effect on the homoclinic behaviors and chaotic motions for high order mode is rather tiny under the asynchronous buckling condition.

  15. Homoclinic behaviors and chaotic motions of double layered viscoelastic nanoplates based on nonlocal theory and extended Melnikov method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu; Li, Feng-Ming; Wang, Yi-Ze

    2015-06-01

    The nonlinear dynamical equations are established for the double layered viscoelastic nanoplates (DLNP) subjected to in-plane excitation based on the nonlocal theory and von Kármán large deformation theory. The extended high dimensional homoclinic Melnikov method is employed to study the homoclinic phenomena and chaotic motions for the parametrically excited DLNP system. The criteria for the homoclinic transverse intersection for both the asynchronous and synchronous buckling cases are proposed. Lyapunov exponents and phase portraits are obtained to verify the Melnikov-type analysis. The influences of structural parameters on the transverse homoclinic orbits and homoclinic bifurcation sets are discussed for the two buckling cases. Some novel phenomena are observed in the investigation. It should be noticed that the nonlocal effect on the homoclinic behaviors and chaotic motions is quite remarkable. Hence, the small scale effect should be taken into account for homoclinic and chaotic analysis for nanostructures. It is significant that the nonlocal effect on the homoclinic phenomena for the asynchronous buckling case is quite different from that for the synchronous buckling case. Moreover, due to the van der Walls interaction between the layers, the nonlocal effect on the homoclinic behaviors and chaotic motions for high order mode is rather tiny under the asynchronous buckling condition.

  16. The crack propagating behavior of composite coatings prepared by PEO on aluminized steel during in situ tensile processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Zhitong; Li Guang; Wu Zhenqiang; Xia Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Composite coatings on the aluminized steel were prepared by the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique, which comprised of Fe-Al layer, Al layer and Al 2 O 3 layer. → The evaluation method of the crack critical opening displacement δ c was introduced to describe quantitatively the resistance of Al layer to the propagation behavior of cracks and evaluate the fracture behavior of composite coatings. → The crack propagating model was established. - Abstract: This paper investigates the in situ tensile cracks propagating behavior of composite coatings on the aluminized steel generated using the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) technique. Cross-sectional micrographs and elemental compositions were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The composite coatings were shown to consist of Fe-Al, Al and Al 2 O 3 layers. The cracks propagating behavior was observed in real-time in situ SEM tensile test. In tensile process, the cracks were temporarily stopped when cracks propagated from Fe-Al layer to Al layer. The critical crack opening displacement δ c was introduced to quantitatively describe the resistance of the Al layer. There was a functional relation among the thickness ratio t Al /t Al 2 O 3 , the δ c of composite coatings and tensile cracks' spacing. The δ c increased with the increasing of the thickness ratio (t Al /t Al 2 O 3 ). The high δ c value means high fracture resistance. Therefore, a control of the thickness ratio t Al /t Al 2 O 3 was concerned as a key to improve the toughness and strength of the aluminized steel.

  17. Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Corrosion Behavior of Die-Cast Mg-7Al-1Ca- xSn Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng; Dong, Haikuo; Sun, Shijie; Wang, Zhi; Mao, Pingli; Liu, Zheng

    2018-02-01

    The microstructure, tensile properties, and corrosion behavior of die-cast Mg-7Al-1Ca- xSn ( x = 0, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0 wt.%) alloys were studied using OM, SEM/EDS, tensile test, weight loss test, and electrochemical test. The experimental results showed that Sn addition effectively refined grains and intermetallic phases and increased the amount of intermetallic phases. Meanwhile, Sn addition to the alloys suppressed the formation of the (Mg,Al)2Ca phase and resulted in the formation of the ternary CaMgSn phase and the binary Mg2Sn phase. The Mg-7Al-1Ca-0.5Sn alloy exhibited best tensile properties at room temperature, while Mg-7Al-1Ca-1.0Sn alloy exhibited best tensile properties at elevated temperature. The corrosion resistance of studied alloys was improved by the Sn addition, and the Mg-7Al-1Ca-0.5Sn alloy presented the best corrosion resistance.

  18. Unstable propagation behavior of a ductile crack in SUS-304 stainless steel under high compliance tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomoda, Yoshio

    1981-01-01

    In relation to the safe maintenance of nuclear power plants, it is necessary to prevent reactor coolant pipings from burst type failure caused by the unstable propagation of defects and cracks, such as stress corrosion cracking and fatigue cracks. In ductile materials, crack propagation is stable in tensile loading under fixed grip condition, when a specimen is controlled to deform in proportion to the increase of tensile load. However, it has been known that the instability of ductile cracks occurs after tensile load reached the maximum, especially under constant loading condition arising in the loading devices with high compliance or low tensile rigidity. In order to confirm the reliability of SUS 304 stainless pipes subjected to SCC, the crack propagation behavior was examined with the specimens having center cracks, using both testing machines with high compliance and low compliance. The instability of ductile cracks and the propagation velocity of unstable cracks were analyzed, and the calculated results were compated with the experimental results. Not only the compliance of testing machines but also the conditions of specimens affected the propagation of cracks. (Kako, I.)

  19. Construction of cryogenic testing system and tensile deformation behavior of AISI 300 series stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H.M.; Nahm, S.H.; Huh, Y.H.; Lee, J.J.; Bahng, G.W.

    1990-01-01

    For practical application of cryogenic engineering, development and characterization of structural materials for use at low temperatures are essential. For these purposes, a system for mechanical testing at liquid helium temperatures was developed and it was shown that the precision and accuracy of the system met the requirements of standards for materials testing machines. Using this system, tensile deformation behavior of AISI 304,316 and 310S austenitic stainless steels at cryogenic temperatures was investigated. Tests were conducted on round, tensile specimens having a 6.25mm diameter at 4,77, and 295 K and loading rate was 0.5mm/min. Serrations were observed in all alloys at 4 K. The stress-displacement curves at 77 and 4 K showed different tendency from those at 298 K. As the testing temperature decreased, ultimate strengths of 304 and 316 were largely increased compared to the increase of yield strengths, but the increase of ultimate strength of 310S was almost the same to that of yield strength. Type 310S had the highest yield strength and the lowest tensile strength at all temperatutes. These tensile characteristics were considered to be strongly affected by austenite stability.(Author)

  20. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Arman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A total of 8 numbers of cylinder specimens are cast and tested in 1000 kN capacity digital universal testing machine (UTM and also modeled in ANSYS. The enhancement of compressive strength and splitting tensile strength of SFRC specimen is achieved up to 17% and 146%, respectively, compared to respective plain concrete specimen. Results gathered from finite element analyses are validated with the experimental test results by identifying as well as optimizing the controlling parameters to make FE models. Modulus of elasticity, Poisson’s ratio, stress-strain behavior, tensile strength, density, and shear transfer coefficients for open and closed cracks are found to be the main governing parameters for successful model of plain concrete and SFRC in FE platform. After proper evaluation and logical optimization of these parameters by extensive analyses, finite element (FE models showed a good correlation with the experimental results.

  1. Strain Rate Effect on Tensile Behavior for a High Specific Strength Steel: From Quasi-Static to Intermediate Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The strain rate effect on the tensile behaviors of a high specific strength steel (HSSS with dual-phase microstructure has been investigated. The yield strength, the ultimate strength and the tensile toughness were all observed to increase with increasing strain rates at the range of 0.0006 to 56/s, rendering this HSSS as an excellent candidate for an energy absorber in the automobile industry, since vehicle crushing often happens at intermediate strain rates. Back stress hardening has been found to play an important role for this HSSS due to load transfer and strain partitioning between two phases, and a higher strain rate could cause even higher strain partitioning in the softer austenite grains, delaying the deformation instability. Deformation twins are observed in the austenite grains at all strain rates to facilitate the uniform tensile deformation. The B2 phase (FeAl intermetallic compound is less deformable at higher strain rates, resulting in easier brittle fracture in B2 particles, smaller dimple size and a higher density of phase interfaces in final fracture surfaces. Thus, more energy need be consumed during the final fracture for the experiments conducted at higher strain rates, resulting in better tensile toughness.

  2. Theory of viscoelasticity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Christensen, R

    1982-01-01

    Theory of Viscoelasticity: An Introduction, Second Edition discusses the integral form of stress strain constitutive relations. The book presents the formulation of the boundary value problem and demonstrates the separation of variables condition.The text describes the mathematical framework to predict material behavior. It discusses the problems to which integral transform methods do not apply. Another topic of interest is the thermoviscoelastic stress analysis. The section that follows describes the heat conduction, glass transition criterion, viscoelastic Rayleigh waves, optimal str

  3. Prediction of Tensile Behavior of UHSFRC Considering the Flow Field in the Placing Dominated by Shear Flow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon-Shik Moon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the case of fabricating a UHSFRC (ultra-high strength fiber-reinforced concrete beam with the method of one end placing and self-flowing to the other end, it was intended to simulate the variation of the fiber orientation distribution according to the flow distance and the variation of the resultant tensile behaviors. Then the validity of the simulation approach was shown by comparing the simulated results with experimental ones. A three-point bending test with a notched beam was adopted for the experiment and a finite element analysis was performed to obtain the simulated results for the bending test considering the flow-dependent tensile behavior of the UHSFRC. From the simulation for the fiber orientation distribution according to the flow distance, it could be found that the major change in the fiber orientation distribution took place within a short flow distance and most of the fibers became nearly aligned to the flow direction. After some flow distance, there was a not-so-remarkable variation in the fiber orientation distribution that could influence the tensile behavior of the composite. For this flow region, the consistent flexural test results, regardless of flow distance, demonstrate the reliability of the simulation.

  4. Prediction of Tensile Behavior of UHSFRC Considering the Flow Field in the Placing Dominated by Shear Flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Joon-Shik; Kang, Su-Tae

    2018-01-26

    Considering the case of fabricating a UHSFRC (ultra-high strength fiber-reinforced concrete) beam with the method of one end placing and self-flowing to the other end, it was intended to simulate the variation of the fiber orientation distribution according to the flow distance and the variation of the resultant tensile behaviors. Then the validity of the simulation approach was shown by comparing the simulated results with experimental ones. A three-point bending test with a notched beam was adopted for the experiment and a finite element analysis was performed to obtain the simulated results for the bending test considering the flow-dependent tensile behavior of the UHSFRC. From the simulation for the fiber orientation distribution according to the flow distance, it could be found that the major change in the fiber orientation distribution took place within a short flow distance and most of the fibers became nearly aligned to the flow direction. After some flow distance, there was a not-so-remarkable variation in the fiber orientation distribution that could influence the tensile behavior of the composite. For this flow region, the consistent flexural test results, regardless of flow distance, demonstrate the reliability of the simulation.

  5. Tensile behavior of unnotched and notched tungsten--copper laminar composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, C.A.

    1976-06-01

    Relations were studied between the tensile strengths of unnotched and of notched, and elastic moduli of unnotched laminar sheet or foil composites and the amounts of reinforcement. Tungsten was used as the reinforcement and copper as the matrix, and the tests were run at room temperature. Three thicknesses of tungsten (i.e., 0.00254, 0.0127, and 0.0254 cm (0.001, 0.005, and 0.010 in) were used, and the nominal volume fraction of tungsten was varied from about 0.05 to 0.95. It was found that the tensile strength of the unnotched specimens could be related to the amount of reinforcement, as could the elastic moduli, and that these values could be predicted by use of the rule of mixtures. The tensile strengths of the notched laminar composites could be predicted by use of the rule of mixtures using strengths for notched constituents, provided notch effects did not predominate. (Author)

  6. Noninvasive assessment of the rheological behavior of human organs using multifrequency MR elastography: a study of brain and liver viscoelasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klatt, Dieter [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Chariteplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Hamhaber, Uwe [Institute of Medical Informatics, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Asbach, Patrick [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Chariteplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Braun, Juergen [Institute of Medical Informatics, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Benjamin Franklin, Hindenburgdamm 30, 12200 Berlin (Germany); Sack, Ingolf [Department of Radiology, Charite-Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Charite Mitte, Chariteplatz 1, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2007-12-21

    MR elastography (MRE) enables the noninvasive determination of the viscoelastic behavior of human internal organs based on their response to oscillatory shear stress. An experiment was developed that combines multifrequency shear wave actuation with broad-band motion sensitization to extend the dynamic range of a single MRE examination. With this strategy, multiple wave images corresponding to different driving frequencies are simultaneously received and can be analyzed by evaluating the dispersion of the complex modulus over frequency. The technique was applied on the brain and liver of five healthy volunteers. Its repeatability was tested by four follow-up studies in each volunteer. Five standard rheological models (Maxwell, Voigt, Zener, Jeffreys and fractional Zener model) were assessed for their ability to reproduce the observed dispersion curves. The three-parameter Zener model was found to yield the most consistent results with two shear moduli {mu}{sub 1} = 0.84 {+-} 0.22 (1.36 {+-} 0.31) kPa, {mu}{sub 2} = 2.03 {+-} 0.19 (1.86 {+-} 0.34) kPa and one shear viscosity of {eta} = 6.7 {+-} 1.3 (5.5 {+-} 1.6) Pa s (interindividual mean {+-} SD) in brain (liver) experiments. Significant differences between the rheological parameters of brain and liver were found for {mu}{sub 1} and {eta} (P < 0.05), indicating that human brain is softer and possesses a higher viscosity than liver.

  7. Noninvasive assessment of the rheological behavior of human organs using multifrequency MR elastography: a study of brain and liver viscoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klatt, Dieter; Hamhaber, Uwe; Asbach, Patrick; Braun, Juergen; Sack, Ingolf

    2007-01-01

    MR elastography (MRE) enables the noninvasive determination of the viscoelastic behavior of human internal organs based on their response to oscillatory shear stress. An experiment was developed that combines multifrequency shear wave actuation with broad-band motion sensitization to extend the dynamic range of a single MRE examination. With this strategy, multiple wave images corresponding to different driving frequencies are simultaneously received and can be analyzed by evaluating the dispersion of the complex modulus over frequency. The technique was applied on the brain and liver of five healthy volunteers. Its repeatability was tested by four follow-up studies in each volunteer. Five standard rheological models (Maxwell, Voigt, Zener, Jeffreys and fractional Zener model) were assessed for their ability to reproduce the observed dispersion curves. The three-parameter Zener model was found to yield the most consistent results with two shear moduli μ 1 = 0.84 ± 0.22 (1.36 ± 0.31) kPa, μ 2 = 2.03 ± 0.19 (1.86 ± 0.34) kPa and one shear viscosity of η = 6.7 ± 1.3 (5.5 ± 1.6) Pa s (interindividual mean ± SD) in brain (liver) experiments. Significant differences between the rheological parameters of brain and liver were found for μ 1 and η (P < 0.05), indicating that human brain is softer and possesses a higher viscosity than liver

  8. Effect of Open Crack on Vibration Behavior of a Fluid-Conveying Pipe Embedded in a Visco-Elastic Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghiyam Eslami

    Full Text Available Abstract In this paper vibration behavior of a fluid-conveying cracked pipe surrounded by a visco-elastic medium has been considered. During this work, the effect of an open crack parameters and flow velocity profile shape inside the pipe on natural frequency and critical flow velocity of the system has been analytically investigated. An explicit function for the local flexibility of the cracked pipe has been offered using principle of the fracture mechanics. Comparison between the results of the present study and the experimental data reported in the literature reveals success and high accuracy of the implemented method. It is demonstrated that the existence of the crack in the pipe, decreases the natural frequency and the critical flow velocity so that the system instability onsets at a lower flow velocity in comparison with the intact pipe. Results indicate that the flow velocity profile shape inside the pipe caused by the viscosity of real fluids, significantly affects the critical flow velocity of both intact and fluid-conveying cracked pipe. For instance, as the flow-profile-modification factor decreases from 1.33 to 1.015, the dimensionless critical flow velocity of intact clamped-clamped pipe increases from 5.45 to 6.24.

  9. Influence of immersion freezing in NaCl solutions and of frozen storage on the viscoelastic behavior of mozzarella cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribero, G G; Rubiolo, A C; Zorrilla, S E

    2007-06-01

    The freezing of Mozzarella cheese by immersion in NaCl solutions may be an innovative procedure for the dairy industry because it combines conveniently salting and freezing processes. In this work, the influence of this type of freezing method and of the frozen storage of samples on the viscoelastic behavior of Mozzarella cheese was studied. Slabs (2 x 10 x 10 cm(3)) were immersed in 23% w/w NaCl solutions (control samples: 4 degrees C, 90 min; frozen samples: -15 degrees C, 180 min). Half of the frozen samples were immediately thawed at 4 degrees C . The other half was stored at -20 degrees C for 2 mo and then was thawed at 4 degrees C (frozen-stored samples). Samples were stored at 4 degrees C and assayed at 1, 7, 14, 20, 27, 34, and 41 d. Rheological tests were carried out in oscillatory mode (parallel-plate geometry, diameter: 20 mm, gap: 1 mm, frequency: 1 Hz). Strain sweeps were run (0.001 immersion freezing of Mozzarella cheese affects some of the studied parameters, the differences observed between frozen and frozen-stored samples with control samples were small. Therefore, it was considered that the immersion freezing might be useful for the manufacture and commercialization of Mozzarella cheese.

  10. Effects of niobium addition on microstructure and tensile behavior of as-cast ductile iron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Xiangru, E-mail: cxr16@shu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xu, Jie, E-mail: shuxujie@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Hu, Henry, E-mail: huh@uwindsor.ca [Department of Mechanical, Automotive and Materials Engineering University of Windsor, 401 Sunset Avenue, Windsor, Ontario, Canada N9B 3P4 (Canada); Mohrbacher, Hardy, E-mail: hm@niobelcon.net [NiobelCon bvba, Swaenebeecklaan, 2970 Schilde (Belgium); Kang, Ming, E-mail: kangming@dfcv.com.cn [Dongfeng Commercial Vehicle Co., Ltd., Wuhan 430056 (China); Zhang, Wei, E-mail: zhangwei3@citic.com [CITIC Metal Co., Ltd., Beijing 100004 (China); Guo, Aimin, E-mail: guoam@citic.com [CITIC Metal Co., Ltd., Beijing 100004 (China); Zhai, Qijie, E-mail: qjzhai@shu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Special Steel & Shanghai Key Laboratory of Advanced Ferrometallurgy & School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2017-03-14

    The effects of niobium addition up to 0.11 wt% on the microstructure and tensile properties of as-cast ductile iron (ACDI) were investigated. Metallographic analyses by both optical microscopy (OM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that niobium (Nb) promoted the formation of pearlite, reduced pearlite lamellar spacing and decreased the extent of graphitization taking place in the Nb-alloyed ACDI. The nodularity and nodule counts of graphite changed insignificantly when the Nb content was less than 0.08 wt% in the ACDI. The analysis of precipitates by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that nano and micro sized (Nb, Ti)C carbides acted as nucleation site for graphites, and promoted the formation of large graphite nodules with low roundnesses as Nb content rose above 0.08 wt%. The results of tensile testing showed that the yield strength, ultimate tensile strength and elongation of the ACDI with 0.08 wt% Nb increased by 12.1%, 11.2% and 14.3% over those of the Nb-free ACDI, respectively. The optimum values of the yield strength, tensile strength and elongation of the Nb-alloyed ACDI were found to be 418 MPa, 746.0 MPa and 8.0%, respectively, at the Nb content of 0.08 wt%. The high strain hardening rates of the Nb-containing ACDIs implied that they were capable of spontaneously strengthening itself increasingly to a large extent, in response to a slight plastic deformation after yielding.

  11. Tensile behavior of orthorhombic alpha ''-titanium alloy studied by in situ X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X.D.; Lou, H.B.; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    are indeed due to a low stress yielding (similar to 400 MPa) followed with a significant work-hardening before necking and fracture. In this process, the [0 2 2] orientation of grains more approaches the tensile direction and the [2 0 0] moves to the transverse, causing the lattice parameter a to be shrunk...

  12. Tensile behavior of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heidarzadeh, A.; Khodaverdizadeh, H.; Mahmoudi, A.; Nazari, E.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Range of parameters for defect-free friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 was reached. ► A model was developed for predicting UTS and EL of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4. ► The maximum values of UTS and EL of joints were estimated by developed model. ► The optimum values of FSW process parameters were determined. -- Abstract: In this investigation response surface methodology based on a central composite rotatable design with three parameters, five levels and 20 runs, was used to develop a mathematical model predicting the tensile properties of friction stir welded AA 6061-T4 aluminum alloy joints at 95% confidence level. The three welding parameters considered were tool rotational speed, welding speed and axial force. Analysis of variance was applied to validate the predicted model. Microstructural characterization and fractography of joints were examined using optical and scanning electron microscopes. Also, the effects of the welding parameters on tensile properties of friction stir welded joints were analyzed in detail. The results showed that the optimum parameters to get a maximum of tensile strength were 920 rev/min, 78 mm/min and 7.2 kN, where the maximum of tensile elongation was obtained at 1300 rev/min, 60 mm/min and 8 kN.

  13. Strain rate dependent deformation and failure behavior of laser welded DP780 steel joint under dynamic tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Danyang; Wang, Lei; Chu, Xi; Wang, Pengfei; Jin, Mengmeng

    2015-01-01

    Laser welded DP steel joints are used widely in the automotive industry for weight reduction. Understanding the deformation and fracture behavior of the base metal (BM) and its welded joint (WJ), especially at high strain rates, is critical for the design of vehicle structures. This paper is concerned with the effects of strain rate on the tensile properties, deformation and fracture behavior of the laser welded DP780 steel joint. Quasi-static and dynamic tensile tests were performed on the WJ and BM of the DP780 steel using an electromechanical universal testing machine and a high-speed tensile testing machine over a wide range of strain rate (0.0001–1142 s −1 ). The microstructure change and microhardness distribution of the DP780 steel after laser welding were examined. Digital image correlation (DIC) and high-speed photography were employed for the strain measurement of the DP780 WJ during dynamic tensile tests. The DP780 WJ is a heterogeneous structure with hardening in fusion zone (FZ) and inner heat-affected zone (HAZ), and softening in outer HAZ. The DP780 BM and WJ exhibit positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS, which is smaller at lower strain rates and becomes larger with increasing strain rate, while ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) tends to increase under dynamic loading. Laser welding leads to an overall reduction in the ductility of the DP780 steel. However, the WJ exhibits a similar changing trend of the ductility to that of the BM with respect to the strain rate over the whole strain rate range. As for the DP780 WJ, the distance of tensile failure location from the weld centerline decreases with increasing strain rate. The typical ductile failure characteristics of the DP780 BM and WJ do not change with increasing strain rate. DIC measurements reveal that the strain localization starts even before the maximum load is attained in the DP780 WJ and gradual transition from uniform strains to severely localized strains occurs

  14. Strain rate dependent deformation and failure behavior of laser welded DP780 steel joint under dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yang, E-mail: liuyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Dong, Danyang, E-mail: dongdanyang@mail.neu.edu.cn [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Lei, E-mail: wanglei@mail.neu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory for Anisotropy and Texture of Materials, Ministry of Education, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Chu, Xi, E-mail: chuxi.ok@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Wang, Pengfei, E-mail: wpf1963871400@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Jin, Mengmeng, E-mail: 24401878@163.com [College of Science, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-03-11

    Laser welded DP steel joints are used widely in the automotive industry for weight reduction. Understanding the deformation and fracture behavior of the base metal (BM) and its welded joint (WJ), especially at high strain rates, is critical for the design of vehicle structures. This paper is concerned with the effects of strain rate on the tensile properties, deformation and fracture behavior of the laser welded DP780 steel joint. Quasi-static and dynamic tensile tests were performed on the WJ and BM of the DP780 steel using an electromechanical universal testing machine and a high-speed tensile testing machine over a wide range of strain rate (0.0001–1142 s{sup −1}). The microstructure change and microhardness distribution of the DP780 steel after laser welding were examined. Digital image correlation (DIC) and high-speed photography were employed for the strain measurement of the DP780 WJ during dynamic tensile tests. The DP780 WJ is a heterogeneous structure with hardening in fusion zone (FZ) and inner heat-affected zone (HAZ), and softening in outer HAZ. The DP780 BM and WJ exhibit positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS, which is smaller at lower strain rates and becomes larger with increasing strain rate, while ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) tends to increase under dynamic loading. Laser welding leads to an overall reduction in the ductility of the DP780 steel. However, the WJ exhibits a similar changing trend of the ductility to that of the BM with respect to the strain rate over the whole strain rate range. As for the DP780 WJ, the distance of tensile failure location from the weld centerline decreases with increasing strain rate. The typical ductile failure characteristics of the DP780 BM and WJ do not change with increasing strain rate. DIC measurements reveal that the strain localization starts even before the maximum load is attained in the DP780 WJ and gradual transition from uniform strains to severely localized strains

  15. Fracture and flaking off behavior of coated layer of DyBCO coated conductor under applied tensile strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arai, T.; Shin, J.K.; Matsubayashi, H.; Ochiai, S.; Okuda, H.; Osamura, K.; Prusseit, W.

    2009-01-01

    The tensile behavior of the DyBa 2 Cu 3 O 7-δ (DyBCO) coated conductor with MgO buffer layer deposited on the Hastelloy C-276 substrate by inclined substrate deposition (ISD) was studied. The tensile stress-strain curve showed a flat region, characterized by the discontinuous yielding of the substrate due to the Lueders band extension from the gripped portions of the sample. In the area where the Lueders band had passed, the coating layer showed severe multiple transverse cracking due to the localized plastic deformation of the substrate. The flaking off of the coating layers took place at high applied strain, due to the buckling fracture of the coated layers in the sample width direction, accompanied by the interfacial debonding.

  16. Tensile Fracture Behavior and Failure Mechanism of Additively-Manufactured AISI 4140 Low Alloy Steel by Laser Engineered Net Shaping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoyeol Kim

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available AISI 4140 powder was directly deposited on AISI 4140 wrought substrate using laser engineered net shaping (LENS to investigate the compatibility of a LENS-deposited part with the substrate. Tensile testing at room temperature was performed to evaluate the interface bond performance and fracture behavior of the test specimens. All the samples failed within the as-deposited zone, indicating that the interfacial bond is stronger than the interlayer bond inside the deposit. The fracture surfaces were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and energy disperse X-ray spectrometry (EDS. Results show that the tensile fracture failure of the as-deposited part is primarily affected by lack-of-fusion defects, carbide precipitation, and oxide particles inclusions, which causes premature failure of the deposit by deteriorating the mechanical properties and structural integrity.

  17. The ideal tensile strength and deformation behavior of a tungsten single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuelin; Zhou Hongbo; Zhang Ying; Jin Shuo; Lu Guanghong

    2009-01-01

    We employ first-principles total energy method based on the density functional theory with the generalized gradient approximation to investigate the ideal tensile strengths of a bcc tungsten (W) single crystal systemically. The ideal tensile strengths are shown to be 29.1, 49.2 and 37.6 GPa for bcc W in the [0 0 1], [1 1 0] and [1 1 1] directions, respectively. The [0 0 1] direction is shown to be the weakest direction due to the occurrence of structure transition at the lower strain and the [1 1 0] direction is strongest. The results can provide a useful reference for W as a PFM in the nuclear fusion Tokamak.

  18. The growth and tensile deformation behavior of the silver solid solution phase with zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jiaqi; Lee, Chin C.

    2016-01-01

    The growth of homogeneous silver solid solution phase with zinc are conducted at two different compositions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscope/Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX) are carried out for phase identification and chemical composition verification. The mechanical properties of silver solid solution phase with zinc are evaluated by tensile test. The engineering and true stress vs. strain curves are presented and analyzed, with those of pure silver in comparison. According to the experimental results, silver solid solution phase with zinc at both compositions show tempered yield strength, high tensile strength and large uniform strain compared to those of pure silver. Fractography further confirmed the superior ductility of silver solid solution phase with zinc at both compositions. Our preliminary but encouraging results may pave the way for the silver based alloys to be applied in industries such as electronic packaging and structure engineering.

  19. Effect of cold work on tensile behavior of irradiated type 316 stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1986-01-01

    Tensile specimens were irradiated in ORR at 250, 290, 450, and 500 0 C to produce a displacement damage of approx.5 dpa and 40 at. ppM He. Irradiation at 250 and 290 0 C caused an increase in yield stress and ultimate tensile strength and a decrease in ductility relative to unaged and thermally aged controls. The changes were greatest for the 20%-cold-worked steel and lowest for the 50%-cold-worked steel. Irradiation at 450 0 C caused a slight relative decrease in strength for all cold-worked conditions. A large decrease was observed at 500 0 C, with the largest decrease occurring for the 50%-cold-worked specimen. No bubble, void, or precipitate formation was observed for specimens examined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The irradiation hardening was correlated with Frank-loop and ''black-dot'' loop damage. A strength decrease at 500 0 C was correlated with dislocation network recovery. Comparison of tensile and TEM results from ORR-irradiated steel with those from steels irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Experimental Breeder Reactor indicated consistent strength and microstructure changes

  20. Tensile, Creep, and Fatigue Behaviors of 3D-Printed Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyin; Cai, Linlin; Golub, Michael; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Xuehui; Schlarman, Kate; Zhang, Jing

    2018-01-01

    Acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) is a widely used thermoplastics in 3D printing. However, there is a lack of thorough investigation of the mechanical properties of 3D-printed ABS components, including orientation-dependent tensile strength and creep fatigue properties. In this work, a systematic characterization is conducted on the mechanical properties of 3D-printed ABS components. Specifically, the effect of printing orientation on the tensile and creep properties is investigated. The results show that, in tensile tests, the 0° printing orientation has the highest Young's modulus of 1.81 GPa, and ultimate strength of 224 MPa. In the creep test, the 90° printing orientation has the lowest k value of 0.2 in the plastics creep model, suggesting 90° is the most creep resistant direction. In the fatigue test, the average cycle number under load of 30 N is 3796 cycles. The average cycle number decreases to 128 cycles when the load is 60 N. Using the Paris law, with an estimated crack size of 0.75 mm, and stress intensity factor is varied from 352 to 700 N√ m, the derived fatigue crack growth rate is 0.0341 mm/cycle. This study provides important mechanical property data that is useful for applying 3D-printed ABS in engineering applications.

  1. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of a Powder-Thixoformed 2024Al/SiCp Composite at Elevated Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pubo Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present work, the tensile properties and fracture behavior of a 2024Al composite reinforced with 10 vol % SiCp and fabricated via powder thixoforming (PT were studied at temperatures ranging from 25 °C to 300 °C with a strain rate of 0.05 s−1, as well as the PT 2024 alloy. The results indicated that the tensile strengths of both the PT materials were all decreased with increasing the temperature, but the decrease rate of the composite was smaller than that of the 2024 alloy, and the composite exhibited higher tensile strength than that of the 2024 alloy at all of the employed testing temperatures due to the strengthening role of SiCp. Increasing temperature was beneficial for enhancing the ductility of materials, and the maximum elongation was reached at 250 °C. The elongation decrease over 250 °C was attributed to the cavity formation due to the debonding of the SiCp/Al interface and the fracturing of the matrix between SiCp. The fracture of the composite at room temperature initiated from the fracture of SiCp and the debonding of the SiCp/Al interface, but that at high temperatures was dominated by void nucleation and growth in the matrix besides the interface debonding.

  2. Aging effects on fracture behavior of 63Sn37Pb eutectic solder during tensile tests under the SEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding Ying; Wang Chunqing; Li Mingyu; Bang Hansur

    2004-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of aging treatment on fracture behavior of Sn-Pb eutectic solder alloys at different loading rate regime during tensile tests under the scanning electron microscope. In high homologous temperature, the solder exhibit the creep behavior that could be confirmed through the phenomena of grain boundary sliding (GBS) to both as-cast and aged specimens. Owing to the large grain scale after high temperature storage, boundary behavior was limited to some extent for the difficulty in grain rotation and boundary migration. Instead, drastic intragranular deformation occurred. Also, the phase coarsening weakened the combination between lead-rich phase and tin matrix. Consequently, surface fragmentation was detected for the aged specimens. Furthermore, the fracture mechanism changed from intergranular dominated to transgranular dominated with increasing loading rate to both specimens during early stage

  3. Dynamic tensile behavior of electron beam additive manufactured Ti6Al4V

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez, O.L.; Allison, P.G.; Whittington, W.R.; Francis, D.K.; Rivera, O.G.; Chou, K.; Gong, X.; Butler, T.M.; Burroughs, J.F.

    2015-01-01

    High rate and quasi-static tensile experiments examined strain rate dependence on flow stress and strain hardening of additive manufactured Ti6Al4V. Variations on strain-hardening coefficient indicate that the rate of thermal softening is greater than strain hardening during plastic deformation. Strain rate sensitivity calculations within the plastic strain regime suggest changes in deformation mechanisms. Fractography revealed cup-and-cone fracture for quasi-static samples and shear mechanisms for high rate samples. As-deposited microstructure consisted of bimodal α+β with the presence of secondary martensitic phase

  4. Dynamic tensile behavior of electron beam additive manufactured Ti6Al4V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, O.L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Allison, P.G., E-mail: pallison@eng.ua.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Whittington, W.R.; Francis, D.K. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS 35759 (United States); Rivera, O.G.; Chou, K.; Gong, X. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Butler, T.M. [Department of Metallurgical Engineering, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 (United States); Burroughs, J.F. [Geotechnical & Structures Laboratory, US Army ERDC, Vicksburg, MS 39180 (United States)

    2015-08-12

    High rate and quasi-static tensile experiments examined strain rate dependence on flow stress and strain hardening of additive manufactured Ti6Al4V. Variations on strain-hardening coefficient indicate that the rate of thermal softening is greater than strain hardening during plastic deformation. Strain rate sensitivity calculations within the plastic strain regime suggest changes in deformation mechanisms. Fractography revealed cup-and-cone fracture for quasi-static samples and shear mechanisms for high rate samples. As-deposited microstructure consisted of bimodal α+β with the presence of secondary martensitic phase.

  5. Ageing sintered silver: Relationship between tensile behavior, mechanical properties and the nanoporous structure evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gadaud, Pascal; Caccuri, Vincenzo; Bertheau, Denis [Institut Pprime, Dept. Phys. Mech. Mat., UPR CNRS 3346, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, 1 av. Clément Ader, Téléport 2, 86961 Futuroscope – Chasseneuil (France); Carr, James [HMXIF, Materials Science Centre, The University of Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Milhet, Xavier, E-mail: xavier.milhet@ensma.fr [Institut Pprime, Dept. Phys. Mech. Mat., UPR CNRS 3346, ENSMA, Université de Poitiers, 1 av. Clément Ader, Téléport 2, 86961 Futuroscope – Chasseneuil (France)

    2016-07-04

    Silver pastes sintering is a potential candidate for die bonding in power electronic modules. The joints, obtained by sintering, exhibit a significant pore fraction thus reducing the density of the material compared to bulk silver. This was shown to alter drastically the mechanical properties (Young's modulus, yield strength and ultimate tensile stress) at room temperature. While careful analysis of the microstructure has been reported for the as-sintered material, little is known about its quantitative evolution (pores and grains) during thermal ageing. To address this issue, sintered bulk specimens and sintered joints were aged either under isothermal conditions (125 °C up to 1500 h) or under thermal cycling (between −40 °C/+125 °C with 30 min dwell time at each temperature for 2400 cycles). Under these conditions, it is shown that the density of the material does not change but the sub-micron porosity evolves towards a broader size distribution, consistent with Oswald ripening. It is also shown that only the step at 125 °C during the non-isothermal ageing is responsible for the microstructure evolution: isothermal ageing at high temperature can be regarded as a useful tool to perform accelerated ageing tests. Tensile properties are investigated as both a function of ageing time and a function of density. It is shown that the elastic properties do not evolve with the ageing time unlike the plastic properties. This is discussed as a function of the material microstructure evolution.

  6. Tensile behavior of Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowire with a B2 crystalline precipitate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda-Macias, Matias; Amigo, Nicolas; Gutierrez, Gonzalo

    2018-02-01

    A molecular dynamics study of the effect of a single B2-CuZr precipitate on the mechanical properties of Cu50Zr50 metallic glass nanowires is presented. Four different samples are considered: three with a 2, 4 and 6 nm radii precipitate and a precipitate-free sample. These systems are submitted to uniaxial tensile test up to 25% of strain. The interface region between the precipitate and the glass matrix has high local atomic shear strain, activating shear transformation zones, which concentrates in the neighborhood of the precipitate. The plastic regime is dominated by necking, and no localized shear band is observed for the samples with a 4 and 6 nm radii precipitate. In addition, the yield stress decreases as the size of the precipitate increases. Regarding the precipitate structure, no martensitic phase transformation is observed, since neither the shear band hit the precipitate nor the stress provided by the tensile test is enough to initiate the transformation. It is concluded that, in contrast to the case when multiple precipitates are present in the sample, a single precipitate concentrates the shear strain around its surface, eventually causing the failure of the nanowire.

  7. Influence of tip indentation on the adhesive behavior of viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane networks studied by atomic force microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pickering, J.P.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2001-01-01

    A commercial atomic force microscope (AFM) outfitted with a custom control and data acquisition system was used to investigate the adhesive nature of a viscoelastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) network. Due to the complex dependence of the adhesion of this sample on factors such as indentation,

  8. Tensile deformation behavior and deformation twinning of an equimolar CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joo, S.-H.; Kato, H. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Jang, M.J.; Moon, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Tsai, C.W.; Yeh, J.W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Kim, H.S., E-mail: hskim@postech.ac.kr [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of); Center for High Entropy Alloys, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 37673 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-24

    The tensile deformation and strain hardening behaviors of an equimolar CoCrFeMnNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) were investigated and compared with low and medium entropy equiatomic alloys (LEA and MEA). The HEA had a lower yield strength than the MEA because the addition of Mn weakens solid solution hardening in the HEA. However, deformation twinning induced the multiple stage strain hardening behavior of the HEA and enhanced strength and elongation. Using tensile-interrupted electron backscatter diffraction analysis, geometrically necessary dislocations were observed as plume-shaped features in grain interior, and a considerable texture was characterized, which is typical of face centered cubic metals. Moreover, the relationship between favorably oriented grains and twinning in the HEA bore a clear resemblance to the same tendency in TWIP steels. The thickness of the twin bundles was less than 100 nm. A high density of stacking defects was found in the nanotwins. Nano twinning and stacking faults were found to contribute to the remarkable mechanical properties. Deformation induced twinning not only demonstrated the dynamic Hall-Petch effect but also changed dislocation cell substructures into microband structures.

  9. In-Plane Anisotropy in Mechanical Behavior and Microstructural Evolution of Commercially Pure Titanium in Tensile and Cyclic Loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Subhasis; Gurao, N. P.

    2017-12-01

    Tensile and cyclic deformation behavior of three samples oriented at 0, 45, and 90 deg to the rolling direction in the rolling direction-transverse direction (RD-TD) plane of cold-rolled and annealed plate of commercially pure titanium is studied in the present investigation. The sample along the RD (R0) shows the highest strength but lowest ductility in monotonic tension. Although ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and elongation of samples along 45 and 90 deg to the RD (R45 and R90, respectively) are similar, the former has significantly higher yield strength than the latter, indicating different strain-hardening behavior. It is found that the R90 sample exhibits the highest monotonic ductility as well as fatigue life. This is attributed to a higher propensity for twinning in this sample with the presence of multiple variants and twin intersections. Cyclic life is also influenced by the high tendency for detwinning of contraction twins in this orientation. Elastoplastic self-consistent (EPSC) simulations of one-cycle tension-compression load reversal indicate that the activity of pyramidal 〈 c + a〉 slip and extension twinning oscillates during cyclic loading that builds up damage in a cumulative manner, leading to failure in fatigue.

  10. Hot Tensile and Fracture Behavior of 35CrMo Steel at Elevated Temperature and Strain Rate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengbing Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the tensile deformation and fracture behavior of 35CrMo steel during hot processing, uniaxial tensile tests at elevated temperatures and strain rates were performed. Effects of deformation condition on the flow behavior, strain rate sensitivity, microstructure transformation, and fracture characteristic were characterized and discussed. The results indicated that the flow stress was sensitive to the deformation condition, and fracture occurs immediately after the peak stress level is reached, especially when the temperature is low or the strain rate is high. The strain rate sensitivity increases with the deformation temperature, which indicates that formability could improve at high temperatures. Photographs showing both the fracture surfaces and the matrix near the fracture section indicated the ductile nature of the material. However, the fracture mechanisms varied according to the deformation condition, which influences the dynamic recrystallization (DRX condition, and the DRX was accompanied by the formation of voids. For samples deformed at high temperatures or low strain rates, coalescence of numerous voids formed in the recrystallized grains is responsible for fracture, while at high strain rates or low temperatures, the grains rupture mainly by splitting because of cracks formed around the inclusions.

  11. The effect of strain-rate on the tensile and compressive behavior of graphene reinforced epoxy/nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shadlou, Shahin; Ahmadi-Moghadam, Babak; Taheri, Farid

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The epoxy/graphene nanocomposites were studied at various strain rates. • The variations in constitutive stress–strain response were scrutinized. • Positive reinforcing attributes of graphene diminished at higher strain rates. • Graphene particles have higher efficiency under compression loading than tension. • A new modification factor for Halpin–Tsai model was proposed. - Abstract: The effect of strain rate on the mechanical behavior of epoxy reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) is investigated. Nanocomposites containing various amounts of GNP are prepared and tested at four different strain rates (0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10/s) under compressive and tensile loading regimes. The results show that incorporation of GNP highly affects the behavior of epoxy. The fracture surfaces of tensile specimens are also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to discern the surface features and dispersion state of GNP. Finally, the predictive capability of some of the available models for evaluating the strength of nanocomposites are assessed and compared against the experimental results. Moreover, a modification factor to the widely used Halpin–Tsai model is proposed to improve the accuracy of the model when evaluating the Young’s modulus of nanocomposites at various strain rates

  12. Effect of heat treatment on the elevated temperature tensile and fracture toughness behavior of Alloy 718 weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, W.J.

    1980-05-01

    The effect of heat treatment on the tensile and fracture toughness properties of Alloy 718 weldments was characterized at room temperature and elevated temperatures. The two heat treatments employed during this investigation were the convectional (ASTM A637) precipitation treatment and a modified treatment designed to improve the toughness of Alloy 718 welds. Weldments were also examined in the as-welded condition. The fracture toughness behavior of the Alloy 718 weldments was determined at 24, 427 and 538 degree C using both linear-elastic (K Ic ) and elastic-plastic (J Ic ) fracture mechanics concepts. Metallographic and electron fractographic examination of Alloy 718 weld fracture surfaces revealed that differences in fracture toughness behavior for the as-welded, conventional and modified conditions were associated with variations in the weld microstructure. 28 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs

  13. Facile Synthesis and Tensile Behavior of TiO2 One-Dimensional Nanostructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shu-you

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High-yield synthesis of TiO2 one-dimensional (1D nanostructures was realized by a simple annealing of Ni-coated Ti grids in an argon atmosphere at 950 °C and 760 torr. The as-synthesized 1D nanostructures were single crystalline rutile TiO2 with the preferred growth direction close to [210]. The growth of these nanostructures was enhanced by using catalytic materials, higher reaction temperature, and longer reaction time. Nanoscale tensile testing performed on individual 1D nanostructures showed that the nanostructures appeared to fracture in a brittle manner. The measured Young’s modulus and fracture strength are ~56.3 and 1.4 GPa, respectively.

  14. Tensile behavior of Inconel alloy X-750 in air and vacuum at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taplin, D.M.R.; Mukherjee, A.K.; Pandey, M.C.

    1984-01-01

    The hot tensile properties of Inconel alloy X-750 have been investigated experimentally at 700 C in air and vacuum at strain rates varying from 10 to the -7th to 1.2 x 10 to the -6th per s. The strength and ductile characteristics of the specimens tested in vacuum are found to be better than those tested in air. In air, a ductility minimum is observed at 625 C, whereas in vacuum, significant improvements in creep ductility are observed at 575 and 625 C, with the ductility minimum shifting from 625 to 700 C. It is shown that the creep ductility of the specimens tested in air is largely determined by the following two competing processes: (1) deformation-assisted oxygen diffusion and (2) grain boundary migration. 20 references

  15. Failure behavior / characteristics of fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite and aluminum6061 on dynamic tensile loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Hyejin; Cho, Chongdu

    2017-01-01

    Composite materials are composed of multiple types of materials as reinforcement and matrix. Among them, CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced polymer) is widely used materials in automotive and defense industry. Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement, of which Young's modulus is in a prepreg form. In automotive industry, especially, high strain rate test is needed to measure dynamic properties, used in dynamic analysis like high inertia included simulation as a car crash. In this paper, a SHTB (Split Hopkinson tensile bar) machine is employed for estimating stress-strain curve under dynamic load condition on aluminum 6061 and CFRP. The strain rate range is about from 100 /s to 1000 /s and the number of prepreg layers of composite specimen is total eight plies which are stacked symmetrically to structure CFRP. As a result, stress / strain point data are obtained and used for simulation into stacked composites.

  16. Failure behavior / characteristics of fabric reinforced polymer matrix composite and aluminum6061 on dynamic tensile loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Hyejin; Cho, Chongdu [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-08-15

    Composite materials are composed of multiple types of materials as reinforcement and matrix. Among them, CFRP (Carbon fiber reinforced polymer) is widely used materials in automotive and defense industry. Carbon fibers are used as a reinforcement, of which Young's modulus is in a prepreg form. In automotive industry, especially, high strain rate test is needed to measure dynamic properties, used in dynamic analysis like high inertia included simulation as a car crash. In this paper, a SHTB (Split Hopkinson tensile bar) machine is employed for estimating stress-strain curve under dynamic load condition on aluminum 6061 and CFRP. The strain rate range is about from 100 /s to 1000 /s and the number of prepreg layers of composite specimen is total eight plies which are stacked symmetrically to structure CFRP. As a result, stress / strain point data are obtained and used for simulation into stacked composites.

  17. Analysis of surface roughening behavior of 6063 aluminum alloy by tensile testing of a trapezoidal uniaxial specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yang [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); Wang, Xiaosong, E-mail: hitxswang@hit.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); National Key Laboratory of Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Yuan, Shijian [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150090 (China); National Key Laboratory of Precision Hot Processing of Metals, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

    2016-08-30

    To determine the quantitative relationship between surface roughness and strain, the surface roughening behavior of a 6063 aluminum alloy tube was examined by tensile testing of a trapezoidal uniaxial specimen, that can provide a continuous strain distribution after tensile deformation. The surface roughness was measured using a laser scanning confocal microscope to reflect the degree of roughening. The microstructure and surface morphology were examined using electron back-scattered diffraction and in-situ scanning electron microscopy to determine the grain orientation and surface topography evolution. The surface roughness increased with strain when the strain was less than 0.067 and then decreased slightly, with a maximum surface roughness of 23.73 µm. Inhomogeneous deformation at the grain boundaries and inside the grains was enhanced with increasing strain, resulting in an increase of surface roughness when the strain was below a critical value. As the strain increased, a greater number of slip systems contributed to the further deformation. Thus, the strain became more homogeneous, and accordingly, the surface roughness slightly decreased.

  18. Tensile behavior of porous scaffolds made from poly(para phenylene) - biomed 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirienzo, Amy L; Yakacki, Christopher M; Safranski, David L; Frick, Carl P

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to fabricate and mechanically characterize a high-strength porous polymer scaffold for potential use as an orthopedic device. Poly(para-phenylene) (PPP) is an excellent candidate due to its exceptional strength and stiffness and relative inertness, but has never been explicitly investigated for use as a biomedical device. PPP has strength values 3 to 10 times higher and an elastic modulus nearly an order of magnitude higher than traditional polymers such as poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), polycaprolactone (PCL), ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE), and polyurethane (PU) and is significantly stronger and stiffer than polyetheretherketone (PEEK). By utilizing PPP we can overcome the mechanical limitations of traditional porous polymeric scaffolds since the outstanding stiffness of PPP allows for a highly porous structure appropriate for osteointegration that can match the stiffness of bone (100-250 MPa), while maintaining suitable mechanical properties for soft-tissue fixation. Porous samples were manufactured by powder sintering followed by particle leaching. The pore volume fraction was systematically varied from 50–80 vol% for a pore sizes from150-500 µm, as indicated by previous studies for optimal osteointegration. The tensile modulus of the porous samples was compared to the rule of mixtures, and closely matches foam theory up to 70 vol%. The experimental modulus for 70 vol% porous samples matches the stiffness of bone and contains pore sizes optimal for osteointegration.

  19. Assessment of microstructure and tensile behavior of continuous drive friction welded titanium tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palanivel, R.; Dinaharan, I.; Laubscher, R.F.

    2017-01-01

    Friction welding process has been applied to join Grade 2 titanium alloy tubes of outer diameter 60 mm and wall thickness 3.9 mm. In this research work, five different friction times (24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 s) were used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and microstructure of welded tubes. Recording of the process parameters during welding was done. Optical microscopy, electron back scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the microstructure. The results showed that the friction time had a significant influence on the microstructure and UTS. The rate of deformation increased with friction time and refined the grains in the weld zone. Coarse grain structure was observed from the center of the weld zone towards the flash. Identical grain structure was observed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the parent metal. It was found that a maximum joint efficiency of 98.3% was achieved at a friction time of 32 s.The details of microhardness, failure location and fracture surface of the welded tubes were reported.

  20. Assessment of microstructure and tensile behavior of continuous drive friction welded titanium tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palanivel, R., E-mail: rpalanivelme@gmail.com; Dinaharan, I., E-mail: dinaweld2009@gmail.com; Laubscher, R.F., E-mail: rflaubscher@uj.ac.za

    2017-02-27

    Friction welding process has been applied to join Grade 2 titanium alloy tubes of outer diameter 60 mm and wall thickness 3.9 mm. In this research work, five different friction times (24, 28, 32, 36 and 40 s) were used to evaluate the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and microstructure of welded tubes. Recording of the process parameters during welding was done. Optical microscopy, electron back scattered diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were used to study the microstructure. The results showed that the friction time had a significant influence on the microstructure and UTS. The rate of deformation increased with friction time and refined the grains in the weld zone. Coarse grain structure was observed from the center of the weld zone towards the flash. Identical grain structure was observed in the heat affected zone (HAZ) and the parent metal. It was found that a maximum joint efficiency of 98.3% was achieved at a friction time of 32 s.The details of microhardness, failure location and fracture surface of the welded tubes were reported.

  1. Transient waves in visco-elastic media

    CERN Document Server

    Ricker, Norman

    1977-01-01

    Developments in Solid Earth Geophysics 10: Transient Waves in Visco-Elastic Media deals with the propagation of transient elastic disturbances in visco-elastic media. More specifically, it explores the visco-elastic behavior of a medium, whether gaseous, liquid, or solid, for very-small-amplitude disturbances. This volume provides a historical overview of the theory of the propagation of elastic waves in solid bodies, along with seismic prospecting and the nature of seismograms. It also discusses the seismic experiments, the behavior of waves propagated in accordance with the Stokes wave

  2. Relationship between local deformation behavior and crystallographic features of as-quenched lath martensite during uniaxial tensile deformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michiuchi, M.; Nambu, S.; Ishimoto, Y.; Inoue, J.; Koseki, T.

    2009-01-01

    Electron backscattering diffraction patterns were used to investigate the relationship between local deformation behavior and the crystallographic features of as-quenched lath martensite of low-carbon steel during uniform elongation in tensile tests. The slip system operating during the deformation up to a strain of 20% was estimated by comparing the crystal rotation of each martensite block after deformation of 20% strain with predictions by the Taylor and Sachs models. The results indicate that the in-lath-plane slip system was preferentially activated compared to the out-of-lath-plane system up to this strain level. Further detailed analysis of crystal rotation at intervals of approximately 5% strain confirmed that the constraint on the operative slip system by the lath structure begins at a strain of 8% and that the local strain hardening of the primary slip systems occurred at approximately 15% strain.

  3. Effect of strain rate and stress triaxiality on tensile behavior of Titanium alloy Ti-10-2-3 at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bobbili, Ravindranadh, E-mail: ravindranadh@dmrl.drdo.in; Madhu, Vemuri

    2016-06-14

    In this study, Split hopkinson tension bar (SHTB) has been employed to investigate the dynamic tensile flow behavior of Ti-10-2-3 alloy at high strain rates and elevated temperatures. The combined effect of stress triaxiality, strain rate and temperature and on the tensile behavior of the alloy was evaluated. Johnson-Cook (J-C) constitutive and fracture models were developed based on high strain rate tensile data. A modified Johnson–Cook model was established and proved to have high accuracy. A comparative assessment has been done to confirm the accuracy of modified J–C model based on finite element method (FEM). The improved model provides better description on the influence of equivalent plastic strain rate and temperature on the plastic flow. The simulation results proved to be in good agreement with the experimental data. The fracture surfaces of specimens tested under various strain rates and temperatures were studied under scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  4. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hangai, Yoshihiko; Kamada, Hiroto; Utsunomiya, Takao; Kitahara, Soichiro; Kuwazuru, Osamu; Yoshikawa, Nobuhiro

    2014-03-21

    Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%-78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT) observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE) analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  5. Tensile Properties and Fracture Behavior of Aluminum Alloy Foam Fabricated from Die Castings without Using Blowing Agent by Friction Stir Processing Route

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshihiko Hangai

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Al foam has been used in a wide range of applications owing to its light weight, high energy absorption and high sound insulation. One of the promising processes for fabricating Al foam involves the use of a foamable precursor. In this study, ADC12 Al foams with porosities of 67%–78% were fabricated from Al alloy die castings without using a blowing agent by the friction stir processing route. The pore structure and tensile properties of the ADC12 foams were investigated and compared with those of commercially available ALPORAS. From X-ray computed tomography (X-ray CT observations of the pore structure of ADC12 foams, it was found that they have smaller pores with a narrower distribution than those in ALPORAS. Tensile tests on the ADC12 foams indicated that as their porosity increased, the tensile strength and tensile strain decreased, with strong relation between the porosity, tensile strength, and tensile strain. ADC12 foams exhibited brittle fracture, whereas ALPORAS exhibited ductile fracture, which is due to the nature of the Al alloy used as the base material of the foams. By image-based finite element (FE analysis using X-ray CT images corresponding to the tensile tests on ADC12 foams, it was shown that the fracture path of ADC12 foams observed in tensile tests and the regions of high stress obtained from FE analysis correspond to each other. Therefore, it is considered that the fracture behavior of ADC12 foams in relation to their pore structure distribution can be investigated by image-based FE analysis.

  6. Void coalescence and fracture behavior of notched and un-notched tensile tested specimens in fine grain dual phase steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidi, N., E-mail: navidsae@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ashrafizadeh, F.; Niroumand, B. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Forouzan, M.R.; Mohseni mofidi, S. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Barlat, F. [Materials Mechanics Laboratory (MML), Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology (GIFT), Pohang University of Science and Technology POSTECH, San 31 Hyoja-dong, Nam-gu, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-09-17

    Due to growing global concern about the environmental issues, steel developers have been forced by automobile makers to produce more efficient steel grades with high strength to weight ratios along with high crashworthiness performance. In order to find deficiencies of the existing steels and develop superior steel products, detailed understanding of deformation and damage behavior in the existing steels is needed. In the present research, deformation and damage evolution during room temperature uniaxial tensile test of a modern high strength Dual Phase Steel, i.e. DP780, were studied. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the microstructures of notched and un-notched tensile fractured specimens revealed that in notched specimen, plastic deformation was concentrated more within the notched region. Therefore, much higher reduction in thickness with a high reduction gradient occurred in this region, In the un-notched specimen, however, plastic deformation was more uniformly distributed in larger parts of the gauge length, and therefore, thickness reduction happened with a lower gradient. Although geometric notch on the specimen did not change the void nucleation and growth mechanisms, the kinetics of these phenomena was influenced. On the other hand, voids linkage mechanism tended to change from void coalescence in the un-notched specimen to void sheeting in the notched specimen. Moreover, three different models developed by Brown & Embury (BM), Thomason and Pardoen were employed to predict the final fracture strain. It was revealed that, BM model showed much more accurate predictions for the studied DP steel in comparison with those of Thomason and Pardoens’ models.

  7. Void coalescence and fracture behavior of notched and un-notched tensile tested specimens in fine grain dual phase steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeidi, N.; Ashrafizadeh, F.; Niroumand, B.; Forouzan, M.R.; Mohseni mofidi, S.; Barlat, F.

    2015-01-01

    Due to growing global concern about the environmental issues, steel developers have been forced by automobile makers to produce more efficient steel grades with high strength to weight ratios along with high crashworthiness performance. In order to find deficiencies of the existing steels and develop superior steel products, detailed understanding of deformation and damage behavior in the existing steels is needed. In the present research, deformation and damage evolution during room temperature uniaxial tensile test of a modern high strength Dual Phase Steel, i.e. DP780, were studied. Detailed scanning electron microscopy (SEM) examination of the microstructures of notched and un-notched tensile fractured specimens revealed that in notched specimen, plastic deformation was concentrated more within the notched region. Therefore, much higher reduction in thickness with a high reduction gradient occurred in this region, In the un-notched specimen, however, plastic deformation was more uniformly distributed in larger parts of the gauge length, and therefore, thickness reduction happened with a lower gradient. Although geometric notch on the specimen did not change the void nucleation and growth mechanisms, the kinetics of these phenomena was influenced. On the other hand, voids linkage mechanism tended to change from void coalescence in the un-notched specimen to void sheeting in the notched specimen. Moreover, three different models developed by Brown & Embury (BM), Thomason and Pardoen were employed to predict the final fracture strain. It was revealed that, BM model showed much more accurate predictions for the studied DP steel in comparison with those of Thomason and Pardoens’ models

  8. Mechanical behaviors of multi-filament twist superconducting strand under tensile and cyclic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Li, Yingxu; Gao, Yuanwen

    2016-01-01

    The superconducting strand, serving as the basic unit cell of the cable-in-conduit-conductors (CICCs), is a typical multi-filament twist composite which is always subjected to a cyclic loading under the operating condition. Meanwhile, the superconducting material Nb3Sn in the strand is sensitive to strain frequently relating to the performance degradation of the superconductivity. Therefore, a comprehensive study on the mechanical behavior of the strand helps understanding the superconducting performance of the strained Nb3Sn strands. To address this issue, taking the LMI (internal tin) strand as an example, a three-dimensional structural finite element model, named as the Multi-filament twist model, of the strand with the real configuration of the LMI strand is built to study the influences of the plasticity of the component materials, the twist of the filament bundle, the initial thermal residual stress and the breakage and its evolution of the filaments on the mechanical behaviors of the strand. The effective properties of superconducting filament bundle with random filament breakage and its evolution versus strain are obtained based on the damage theory of fiber-reinforced composite materials proposed by Curtin and Zhou. From the calculation results of this model, we find that the occurrence of the hysteresis loop in the cyclic loading curve is determined by the reverse yielding of the elastic-plastic materials in the strand. Both the initial thermal residual stress in the strand and the pitch length of the filaments have significant impacts on the axial and hysteretic behaviors of the strand. The damage of the filaments also affects the axial mechanical behavior of the strand remarkably at large axial strain. The critical current of the strand is calculated by the scaling law with the results of the Multi-filament twist model. The predicted results of the Multi-filament twist model show an acceptable agreement with the experiment.

  9. Static tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and synchrotron radiation white x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Kawahata, Taiji; Ishimaru, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel (S32101) from the viewpoints of plastic deformability among phases or grains, we performed static tensile tests, in situ neutron diffraction, and white x-ray diffraction experiments at room temperature. In the static tensile tests, the S32101 steel displayed a larger uniform elongation and a better tensile strength-uniform elongation balance than a commercial SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel. A larger uniform elongation of S32101 is associated with the macroscopic work hardening behavior that a work hardening rate higher than the flow stress can maintain up until high true strains. From the experimental results of synchrotron radiation white x-ray diffraction experiments, the hard phase of S32101 was changed from the ferrite (α) phase to austenite (γ) one during tensile deformation. This led to a larger stress partitioning between the phases at the latter stage of deformation. From the experimental results of in situ neutron diffraction, it was found that the stress partitioning of the γ phase in the S32101 was the largest among the present results. Therefore, the larger work hardening rate of S32101 can be explained by the large stress partitioning of the γ phase, that between γ and α phases and γ volume fraction. (author)

  10. Tensile and fracture behavior of boron and carbon modified Ti-15-3 alloys in aged conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarkar, R., E-mail: rajdeepsarkar@dmrl.drdo.in [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Ghosal, P.; Nandy, T.K. [Defence Metallurgical Research Laboratory, Kanchanbagh, Hyderabad 500058 (India); Ray, K.K. [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2016-02-22

    This work illustrates the effect of boron and carbon addition on the mechanical behavior of a beta Ti alloy, Ti–15V–3Cr–3Al–3Sn (Ti-15-3), in differently aged conditions. The alloys were prepared by consumable vacuum arc melting followed by forging and hot rolling. These were subsequently solution treated and aged at different temperatures above 500 °C for 8 h. Standard tensile and plane strain fracture toughness tests were carried out to understand the mechanical behavior of the alloys and its correlation with the microstructural features characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Both the boron- and the carbon-containing alloys exhibit improved strength with comparable elongation to failure values as compared to the base Ti-15-3 alloy. The presence of TiB and TiC precipitates in a matrix of fine α with β results in lower fracture toughness (K{sub IC}) in the boron- and carbon-containing alloys as compared to the base alloy. However, at higher aging temperatures K{sub IC} improves due to more tortuous crack path because of the presence of coarse α-phase. An empirical relationship has been proposed correlating K{sub IC} with the volume fraction, size and interspacing of α in these alloys.

  11. Improved tensile and buckling behavior of defected carbon nanotubes utilizing boron nitride coating – A molecular dynamic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Badjian, H.; Setoodeh, A.R., E-mail: setoodeh@sutech.ac.ir

    2017-02-15

    Synthesizing inorganic nanostructures such as boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have led to immense studies due to their many interesting functional features such as piezoelectricity, high temperature resistance to oxygen, electrical insulation, high thermal conductivity and very long lengths as physical features. In order to utilize the superior properties of pristine and defected carbon nanotubes (CNTs), a hybrid nanotube is proposed in this study by forming BNNTs surface coating on the CNTs. The benefits of such coating on the tensile and buckling behavior of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) are illustrated through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the resulted nanostructures during the deformation. The AIREBO and Tersoff-Brenner potentials are employed to model the interatomic forces between the carbon and boron nitride atoms, respectively. The effects of chiral indices, aspect ratio, presence of mono-vacancy defects and coating dimension on coated/non-coated CNTs are examined. It is demonstrated that the coated defective CNTs exhibit remarkably enhanced ultimate strength, buckling load capacity and Young's modulus. The proposed coating not only enhances the mechanical properties of the resulted nanostructure, but also conceals it from few external factors impacting the behavior of the CNT such as humidity and high temperature.

  12. Tensile and fatigue behaviors of printed Ag thin films on flexible substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sim, Gi-Dong; Won, Sejeong; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2012-01-01

    Flexible electronics using nanoparticle (NP) printing has been highlighted as a key technology enabling eco-friendly, low-cost, and large-area fabrication. For NP-based printing to be used as a successive alternative to photolithography and vacuum deposition, stretchability and long term reliability must be considered. This paper reports the stretchability and fatigue behavior of 100 nm thick NP-based silver thin films printed on polyethylene-terephthalate substrate and compares it to films deposited by electron-beam evaporation. NP-based films show stretchability and fatigue life comparable to evaporated films with intergranular fracture as the dominant failure mechanism.

  13. Tensile and fatigue behaviors of printed Ag thin films on flexible substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sim, Gi-Dong; Won, Sejeong; Lee, Soon-Bok

    2012-11-01

    Flexible electronics using nanoparticle (NP) printing has been highlighted as a key technology enabling eco-friendly, low-cost, and large-area fabrication. For NP-based printing to be used as a successive alternative to photolithography and vacuum deposition, stretchability and long term reliability must be considered. This paper reports the stretchability and fatigue behavior of 100 nm thick NP-based silver thin films printed on polyethylene-terephthalate substrate and compares it to films deposited by electron-beam evaporation. NP-based films show stretchability and fatigue life comparable to evaporated films with intergranular fracture as the dominant failure mechanism.

  14. Mesoscopic Modeling and Simulation of the Dynamic Tensile Behavior of Concrete

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ronnie; Simone, A.; Sluys, L. J.

    2013-01-01

    of the most significant constitutive model parameters on global and local response. Different distributions and shapes of the aggregate grains are tested. Three model parameter sets, corresponding to different moisture conditions, are employed in the analysis of two specimens in which the applied loading rate......We present a two-dimensional mesoscopic finite element model for simulating the rate- and moisture-dependent material behavior of concrete. The idealized mesostructure consists of aggregate grains surrounded by an interfacial transition zone embedded in the bulk material. We examine the influence...

  15. VISCOELASTIC STRUCTURAL MODEL OF ASPHALT CONCRETE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bogomolov

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The viscoelastic rheological model of asphalt concrete based on the generalized Kelvin model is offered. The mathematical model of asphalt concrete viscoelastic behavior that can be used for calculation of asphalt concrete upper layers of non-rigid pavements for strength and rutting has been developed. It has been proved that the structural model of Burgers does not fully meet all the requirements of the asphalt-concrete.

  16. Tensile flow and work-hardening behavior of a Ti-modified austenitic stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivaprasad, P.V.; Venugopal, S.; Venkadesan, S.

    1997-01-01

    The flow-stress data of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel in the temperature range 300 to 1,023 K was analyzed in terms of Ludwigson and Voce equations. The parameters of these equations were critically examined with respect to the effect of Ti/C ratio and test temperature. It was found that the Ludwigson equation described the flow behavior adequately up to the test temperature of 923 K, whereas the Voce equation could be employed in the full temperature range. The peaks/plateaus observed in the variation of these parameters as a function of temperature in the intermediate temperature range have been identified as one of the manifestations of dynamic strain aging (DSA). Also, the variation of these parameters with temperature clearly could bring out the different domains of DSA observed in this alloy. The work-hardening analysis of the flow-stress data revealed that in the DSA regime, the onset of stage III hardening is athermal

  17. Microstructure and Tensile Behavior of Al8Co17Cr17Cu8Fe17Ni33 (at.%) High-Entropy Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daoud, H. M.; Manzoni, A.; Völkl, R.; Wanderka, N.; Glatzel, U.

    2013-12-01

    Microstructure evolution and tensile behavior of the high-entropy alloy Al8Co17Cr17Cu8Fe17Ni33 (at.%) are investigated at room temperature and at 500°C in the as-cast state and under different heat-treatment conditions. Detailed microstructural characterizations are carried out using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The equilibrium phase evolution as a function of temperature was calculated using the Thermo-Calc software (Thermo-Calc Software, Stockholm, Sweden) integrated with TTNi-7 database. The observed majority phase is a face-centered cubic solid solution for all tested specimens. Tensile ductility at room temperature and at elevated temperature is enhanced by heat treatment at 1150°C. An embrittlement phenomenon has been observed after a heat treatment at 700°C resulting in significant degradation in tensile properties.

  18. Tensile behavior of RAFM alloys after neutron irradiation of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Materna-Morris, E., E-mail: edeltraud.materna-morris@kit.edu; Schneider, H.-C., E-mail: hans-christian.schneider@kit.edu; Möslang, A., E-mail: anton.moeslang@kit.edu

    2014-12-15

    Tensile specimen of steel EUROFER97 and other alloys on the basis of RAFM steels such, as OPTIFER and F82H alloys, and Ga3X were irradiated and post-examined during a neutron irradiation program of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in the Netherlands. These tensile results were compared with former irradiation programs, with lower neutron doses of up to 0.8 and 2.4 dpa to quantify the difference in tensile strengthening. The average increase of tensile strength was in a range of 300 MPa between 0.8 and 16.3 dpa at temperatures of 250–300 °C. This behavior can be correlated with irradiation-induced changes in the microstructure. Most of the hardening can be attributed to dislocation loops, point defects or small precipitates as observed in boron-free alloys as F82H mod. and EUROFER97. Whereas the hardening in boron-containing alloys OPTIFER alloys and Ga3X can be correlated in addition with the combination of helium bubbles. At the highest irradiation and test temperature at 450 °C, all tensile data of all investigated materials were in the range of those of non-irradiated and irradiated material due to thermal aging effects.

  19. Tensile behavior of RAFM alloys after neutron irradiation of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna-Morris, E.; Schneider, H.-C.; Möslang, A.

    2014-01-01

    Tensile specimen of steel EUROFER97 and other alloys on the basis of RAFM steels such, as OPTIFER and F82H alloys, and Ga3X were irradiated and post-examined during a neutron irradiation program of up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C in the HFR (High Flux Reactor) in the Netherlands. These tensile results were compared with former irradiation programs, with lower neutron doses of up to 0.8 and 2.4 dpa to quantify the difference in tensile strengthening. The average increase of tensile strength was in a range of 300 MPa between 0.8 and 16.3 dpa at temperatures of 250–300 °C. This behavior can be correlated with irradiation-induced changes in the microstructure. Most of the hardening can be attributed to dislocation loops, point defects or small precipitates as observed in boron-free alloys as F82H mod. and EUROFER97. Whereas the hardening in boron-containing alloys OPTIFER alloys and Ga3X can be correlated in addition with the combination of helium bubbles. At the highest irradiation and test temperature at 450 °C, all tensile data of all investigated materials were in the range of those of non-irradiated and irradiated material due to thermal aging effects

  20. Study of twinning behavior of powder metallurgy Ti-Si alloy by interrupted in-situ tensile tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, X.X., E-mail: ye-xiaoxin@jwri.osaka-u.ac.jp [Joining and Welding Institute (JWRI), Osaka University (Japan); Imai, H.; Shen, J.H.; Chen, B. [Joining and Welding Institute (JWRI), Osaka University (Japan); Han, G.Q. [College of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing University of Technology (China); Umeda, J.; Kondoh, K. [Joining and Welding Institute (JWRI), Osaka University (Japan)

    2017-01-02

    Twinning mechanism of powder metallurgy Ti-Si alloy was investigated by interrupted in-situ tensile tests. Extension twins {10−12}<10-1-1> in the fine-grained Ti-Si alloy were found in the uniform deformation period, but no twinning in the coarse pure Ti. Three deformation twinning nucleation mechanisms were proposed: i) local stress concentration by neighboured slip incompatibility, ii) slip/twin oriented relationship in the parent grain and iii) slip/twin transfer by high Luster-Morris oriented relationship. The interior back-stress state, grains rotation and dislocations pile-up drove the occurrence of detwinning phenomenon. Silicon-facilitation twinning verified the hypothesis that the substitutional Si solutes affected the core structures and thus the mobility of screw dislocations. Enhanced driving force and decreased energy barrier of nucleation in the micro/atomic scale were further proposed in the twinning activation. It was expected to deepen the understanding of twinning/detwinning behaviors and supply direct evidences building immature twinning mechanism. In-depth understanding about the relationship among the processing, mechanical properties and microstructure of Ti alloy was facilitated in the present work.

  1. Viscoelastic Properties of Human Tracheal Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safshekan, Farzaneh; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Abdouss, Majid; Shadmehr, Mohammad B

    2017-01-01

    The physiological performance of trachea is highly dependent on its mechanical behavior, and therefore, the mechanical properties of its components. Mechanical characterization of trachea is key to succeed in new treatments such as tissue engineering, which requires the utilization of scaffolds which are mechanically compatible with the native human trachea. In this study, after isolating human trachea samples from brain-dead cases and proper storage, we assessed the viscoelastic properties of tracheal cartilage, smooth muscle, and connective tissue based on stress relaxation tests (at 5% and 10% strains for cartilage and 20%, 30%, and 40% for smooth muscle and connective tissue). After investigation of viscoelastic linearity, constitutive models including Prony series for linear viscoelasticity and quasi-linear viscoelastic, modified superposition, and Schapery models for nonlinear viscoelasticity were fitted to the experimental data to find the best model for each tissue. We also investigated the effect of age on the viscoelastic behavior of tracheal tissues. Based on the results, all three tissues exhibited a (nonsignificant) decrease in relaxation rate with increasing the strain, indicating viscoelastic nonlinearity which was most evident for cartilage and with the least effect for connective tissue. The three-term Prony model was selected for describing the linear viscoelasticity. Among different models, the modified superposition model was best able to capture the relaxation behavior of the three tracheal components. We observed a general (but not significant) stiffening of tracheal cartilage and connective tissue with aging. No change in the stress relaxation percentage with aging was observed. The results of this study may be useful in the design and fabrication of tracheal tissue engineering scaffolds.

  2. Microstructural evolution and the variation of tensile behavior after aging heat treatment of precipitation hardened martensitic steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jong-Ho, E-mail: jongho.shin@doosan.com [Casting and Forging Technology Development Team, Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, 22 Doosanvolvo-ro, Changwon 642-792 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, JaeSuk [Materials and Manufacturing Development Team, Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, 22 Doosanvolvo-ro, Changwon 642-792 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jong-Wook [Casting and Forging Technology Development Team, Doosan Heavy Industries and Construction, 22 Doosanvolvo-ro, Changwon 642-792 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    The effects of aging temperature on the microstructural evolution and the tensile behavior of precipitation hardened martensitic steel were investigated. Microscopic analysis using transmission electron microscope (TEM) was combined with the microstructural analysis using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize the microstructural evolution with aging temperature. Peak hardness was obtained by precipitation of the Ni{sub 3}Al ordered phase. After aging at temperature range from 420 to 590 °C, spherical Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates and ellipsoidal M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides were observed within laths and at lath boundaries, respectively. Strain hardening behavior was analyzed with Ludwik equation. It is observed that the plastic strain regimes can be divided into two different stages by a rapid increase in strain hardening followed by a comparatively lower increase. At the first strain hardening stage, the aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen, and the exponent in the aged specimen was not changed considerably with increasing aging temperature. It is revealed that the strain hardening exponents at the first and the second stages were associated with the Ni{sub 3}Al precipitates and the domain size representing the coherent scattering area, respectively. - Highlights: • All of aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen at the first stage. • The value of strain hardening exponent in the aged specimen was nearly constant with aging temperature. • Ni{sub 3}Al precipitation dominantly influenced to the increase of strain hardening exponent at the first strain hardening stage. • Domain size was associated with strain hardening exponent at the second strain hardening stage.

  3. Microstructural evolution and the variation of tensile behavior after aging heat treatment of precipitation hardened martensitic steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Jong-Ho; Jeong, JaeSuk; Lee, Jong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    The effects of aging temperature on the microstructural evolution and the tensile behavior of precipitation hardened martensitic steel were investigated. Microscopic analysis using transmission electron microscope (TEM) was combined with the microstructural analysis using the synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) to characterize the microstructural evolution with aging temperature. Peak hardness was obtained by precipitation of the Ni 3 Al ordered phase. After aging at temperature range from 420 to 590 °C, spherical Ni 3 Al precipitates and ellipsoidal M 23 C 6 carbides were observed within laths and at lath boundaries, respectively. Strain hardening behavior was analyzed with Ludwik equation. It is observed that the plastic strain regimes can be divided into two different stages by a rapid increase in strain hardening followed by a comparatively lower increase. At the first strain hardening stage, the aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen, and the exponent in the aged specimen was not changed considerably with increasing aging temperature. It is revealed that the strain hardening exponents at the first and the second stages were associated with the Ni 3 Al precipitates and the domain size representing the coherent scattering area, respectively. - Highlights: • All of aged specimen exhibited higher strain hardening exponent than the as-quenched specimen at the first stage. • The value of strain hardening exponent in the aged specimen was nearly constant with aging temperature. • Ni 3 Al precipitation dominantly influenced to the increase of strain hardening exponent at the first strain hardening stage. • Domain size was associated with strain hardening exponent at the second strain hardening stage

  4. Microstructure and Strain Rate-Dependent Tensile Deformation Behavior of Fiber Laser-Welded Butt Joints of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Danyang; Han, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zhibin; Wang, Lu; Dong, Qingwei

    2018-05-01

    The microstructure and tensile deformation behavior of the fiber laser-welded similar and dissimilar dual-phase (DP) steel joints over a wide range of strain rates from 10-3 to 103 s-1 were investigated for the further applications on the lightweight design of vehicles. The high strain rate dynamic tensile deformation process and full-field strain distribution of the base metals and welded joints were examined using the digital image correlation method and high-speed photography. The strain rate effects on the stress-strain responses, tensile properties, deformation, and fracture behavior of the investigated materials were analyzed. The yield stress (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the dissimilar DP780/DP980 welded joints were lying in-between those of the DP780 and DP980 base metals, and all materials exhibited positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS. Owing to the microstructure heterogeneity, the welded joints showed relatively lower ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) than those of the corresponding base metals. The strain localization started before the maximum load was reached, and the strain localization occurred earlier during the whole deformation process with increasing strain rate. As for the dissimilar welded joint, the strain localization tended to occur in the vicinity of the lowest hardness value across the welded joint, which was in the subcritical HAZ at the DP780 side. As the strain rate increased, the typical ductile failure characteristic of the investigated materials did not change.

  5. Microstructure and Strain Rate-Dependent Tensile Deformation Behavior of Fiber Laser-Welded Butt Joints of Dual-Phase Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Dong, Danyang; Han, Zhiqiang; Yang, Zhibin; Wang, Lu; Dong, Qingwei

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure and tensile deformation behavior of the fiber laser-welded similar and dissimilar dual-phase (DP) steel joints over a wide range of strain rates from 10-3 to 103 s-1 were investigated for the further applications on the lightweight design of vehicles. The high strain rate dynamic tensile deformation process and full-field strain distribution of the base metals and welded joints were examined using the digital image correlation method and high-speed photography. The strain rate effects on the stress-strain responses, tensile properties, deformation, and fracture behavior of the investigated materials were analyzed. The yield stress (YS) and ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of the dissimilar DP780/DP980 welded joints were lying in-between those of the DP780 and DP980 base metals, and all materials exhibited positive strain rate dependence on the YS and UTS. Owing to the microstructure heterogeneity, the welded joints showed relatively lower ductility in terms of total elongation (TE) than those of the corresponding base metals. The strain localization started before the maximum load was reached, and the strain localization occurred earlier during the whole deformation process with increasing strain rate. As for the dissimilar welded joint, the strain localization tended to occur in the vicinity of the lowest hardness value across the welded joint, which was in the subcritical HAZ at the DP780 side. As the strain rate increased, the typical ductile failure characteristic of the investigated materials did not change.

  6. Effects of Temperature and Strain Rate on Tensile Deformation Behavior of 9Cr-0.5Mo-1.8W-VNb Ferritic Heat-Resistant Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaofeng; Weng, Xiaoxiang; Jiang, Yong; Gong, Jianming

    2017-09-01

    A series of uniaxial tensile tests were carried out at different strain rate and different temperatures to investigate the effects of temperature and strain rate on tensile deformation behavior of P92 steel. In the temperature range of 30-700 °C, the variations of flow stress, average work-hardening rate, tensile strength and ductility with temperature all show three temperature regimes. At intermediate temperature, the material exhibited the serrated flow behavior, the peak in flow stress, the maximum in average work-hardening rate, and the abnormal variations in tensile strength and ductility indicates the occurrence of DSA, whereas the sharp decrease in flow stress, average work-hardening rate as well as strength values, and the remarkable increase in ductility values with increasing temperature from 450 to 700 °C imply that dynamic recovery plays a dominant role in this regime. Additionally, for the temperature ranging from 550 to 650 °C, a significant decrease in flow stress values is observed with decreasing in strain rate. This phenomenon suggests the strain rate has a strong influence on flow stress. Based on the experimental results above, an Arrhenius-type constitutive equation is proposed to predict the flow stress.

  7. Precipitation behaviors, texture and tensile properties of an extruded Mg-7Y-1Nd-0.5Zr (wt%) alloy bar with large cross-section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Guoliang, E-mail: shigl@grinm.com; Zhang, Kui; Li, Xinggang; Li, Yongjun; Ma, Minglong; Yuan, Jiawei

    2017-02-08

    Precipitation behaviors, texture and tensile properties of an extruded Mg-7Y-1Nd-0.5Zr (wt%) (WE71) alloy bar with large cross-section of 230 mm×140 mm were investigated by hardness test, tensile test, optical microscopy (OM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction (XRD) macro-texture measurement. The bar was manufactured industrially through a procedure of “multi-direction forging (MDF)+extrusion+on-line quenching+T5 aging”. Totally different age-hardening behaviors are shown during T5 aging at 200 and 235 °C. In the first 100 h, T5 aging at 235 °C brings about 13% increases in hardness, while T5 aging at 200 °C results in 47% increase. During T5 aging at 200 °C, β′ precipitates homogeneously nucleate within the matrix with high number density; however, during T5 aging at 235 °C, β′ precipitates heterogeneously nucleate on discrete and sparse dislocations, resulting in chain-like arrangement of β′ precipitates with broad precipitate free zones in matrix. XRD macro-texture measurement illustrates that basal texture intensity of WE71 bar is much weaker than Mg-8Al-0.5Zn-0.15Mn (wt%) (AZ80) bar; the maximum basal texture intensities in the outer (O) and center (C) of WE71 bar are all about 3, while those of AZ80 bar are 17 and 14, respectively. EBSD micro-texture measurement demonstrates that the maximum texture intensities of C and O are 5.3 and 3.5, respectively. O has higher tensile properties than C because there are more un-dynamic-recrystallization (un-DRX) grains and thus larger average grain size in C. While stretching at room temperature (RT), extrusion direction (ED) in O has the best tensile properties, i.e. ultimate tensile strength (R{sub m})=368 MPa, elongation (A)=5%, and normal direction (ND) in C has the lowest tensile properties, i.e. R{sub m}=255 MPa, A=2%. While stretching at 200 °C, strength does not degrade much; ED in O still has

  8. Influence of Chemical Extraction on Rheological Behavior, Viscoelastic Properties and Functional Characteristics of Natural Heteropolysaccharide/Protein Polymer from Durio zibethinus Seed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Mirhosseini

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, the demand for a natural plant-based polymer with potential functions from plant sources has increased considerably. The main objective of the current study was to study the effect of chemical extraction conditions on the rheological and functional properties of the heteropolysaccharide/protein biopolymer from durian (Durio zibethinus seed. The efficiency of different extraction conditions was determined by assessing the extraction yield, protein content, solubility, rheological properties and viscoelastic behavior of the natural polymer from durian seed. The present study revealed that the soaking process had a more significant (p < 0.05 effect than the decolorizing process on the rheological and functional properties of the natural polymer. The considerable changes in the rheological and functional properties of the natural polymer could be due to the significant (p < 0.05 effect of the chemical extraction variables on the protein fraction present in the molecular structure of the natural polymer from durian seed. The natural polymer from durian seed had a more elastic (or gel like behavior compared to the viscous (liquid like behavior at low frequency. The present study revealed that the natural heteropolysaccharide/protein polymer from durian seed had a relatively low solubility ranging from 9.1% to 36.0%. This might be due to the presence of impurities, insoluble matter and large particles present in the chemical structure of the natural polymer from durian seed.

  9. Finite Element Modeling of Compressive and Splitting Tensile Behavior of Plain Concrete and Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Cylinder Specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Chowdhury, Md. Arman; Islam, Md. Mashfiqul; Ibna Zahid, Zubayer

    2016-01-01

    Plain concrete and steel fiber reinforced concrete (SFRC) cylinder specimens are modeled in the finite element (FE) platform of ANSYS 10.0 and validated with the experimental results and failure patterns. Experimental investigations are conducted to study the increase in compressive and tensile capacity of cylindrical specimens made of stone and brick concrete and SFRC. Satisfactory compressive and tensile capacity improvement is observed by adding steel fibers of 1.5% volumetric ratio. A tot...

  10. Cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of polypropylene/clay nanocomposites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drozdov, Aleksey; Christiansen, Jesper de Claville; Hog Lejre, Anne-Lise

    2012-01-01

    Observations are reported in tensile relaxation tests under stretching and retraction on poly-propylene/clay nanocomposites with various contents of filler. A two-phase constitutive model is developed in cyclic viscoelasticity and viscoplasticity of hybrid nanocomposites. Adjustable parameters in...

  11. Temperature Effects on Tensile and Compressive Mechanical Behaviors of C-S-H Structure via Atomic Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Xin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An atomic scale model of amorphous calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H with Ca/Si ratio of 1.67 is constructed. Effects of temperature on mechanical properties of C-S-H structure under tensile and compressive loading in the layered direction are investigated via molecular dynamics simulations. Results from present simulations show that (1 the tensile strength and Young’s modulus of C-S-H structure significantly decrease with the increase of the temperature; (2 the water layer plays an important role in the mechanical properties of C-S-H structure; (3 the compressive strength is stronger than tensile strength, which corresponds with the characteristic of cement paste.

  12. A Thermodynamic Theory Of Solid Viscoelasticity. Part 1: Linear Viscoelasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freed, Alan D.; Leonov, Arkady I.

    2002-01-01

    The present series of three consecutive papers develops a general theory for linear and finite solid viscoelasticity. Because the most important object for nonlinear studies are rubber-like materials, the general approach is specified in a form convenient for solving problems important for many industries that involve rubber-like materials. General linear and nonlinear theories for non-isothermal deformations of viscoelastic solids are developed based on the quasi-linear approach of non-equilibrium thermodynamics. In this, the first paper of the series, we analyze non-isothermal linear viscoelasticity, which is applicable in a range of small strains not only to all synthetic polymers and bio-polymers but also to some non-polymeric materials. Although the linear case seems to be well developed, there still are some reasons to implement a thermodynamic derivation of constitutive equations for solid-like, non-isothermal, linear viscoelasticity. The most important is the thermodynamic modeling of thermo-rheological complexity , i.e. different temperature dependences of relaxation parameters in various parts of relaxation spectrum. A special structure of interaction matrices is established for different physical mechanisms contributed to the normal relaxation modes. This structure seems to be in accord with observations, and creates a simple mathematical framework for both continuum and molecular theories of the thermo-rheological complex relaxation phenomena. Finally, a unified approach is briefly discussed that, in principle, allows combining both the long time (discrete) and short time (continuous) descriptions of relaxation behaviors for polymers in the rubbery and glassy regions.

  13. Recovery of electrical resistance in copper films on polyethylene terephthalate subjected to a tensile strain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glushko, O.; Marx, V.M.; Kirchlechner, C.; Zizak, I.; Cordill, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Substantial recovery (decrease) of electrical resistance during and after unloading is demonstrated for copper films on polyethylene terephthalate substrates subjected to a tensile strain with different peak values. Particularly, the films strained to 5% exhibit full resistance recovery after unloading despite clearly visible plastic deformation of the film. The recovery of electrical resistance in connection with the mechanical behavior of film/substrate couple is discussed with the help of in situ scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. - Highlights: • Tensile tests on 200 nm Cu films on PET substrate are performed. • Electrical resistance is recorded in-situ during loading and unloading. • Significant recovery (decrease) of resistance is observed during and after unloading. • Films strained to 5% demonstrate full resistance recovery. • Viscoelastic relaxation of PET is responsible for recovery of Cu film resistance

  14. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the elevated temperature tensile flow behavior of service-exposed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girish Shastry, C.; Parameswaran, P.; Mathew, M.D.; Bhanu Sankara Rao, K.; Mannan, S.L.

    2007-01-01

    The elevated temperature tensile flow behavior of service-exposed 2.25Cr-1Mo steel has been critically examined with respect to strain rate sensitivity (m) and apparent activation energy (Q) for tensile deformation. The predominant role of forest dislocations in determining the relative flow response at true plastic strains greater than 0.01 is inferred from the profile of 'm' against flow stress. The variation of 'm' with temperature and strain is discussed based on the kinetics of dislocation generation and recovery. The decrease in Q with the increase in strain rate or temperature is attributed to the increase in recovery processes like dislocation annihilation and subcell/subgrain formation. This suggestion has been supported by transmission electron microscopy

  15. Influence of Aging Products on Tensile Deformation Behavior of Al-0.62 mass%Mg-0.32 mass%Si Alloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akiyoshi, Ryutaro; Ikeda, Ken-ichi; Hata, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    mechanism, by estimating the Orowan stress and considering crystal structure of beta '' precipitates. In contrast, the aged alloys with Mg-Si clusters showed excellent performance of uniform elongation due to large work hardening compared to those of the alloy with beta '' precipitates. Dislocations......Tensile tests and microstructural observations were carried out to investigate the influence of aging products on tensile deformation behavior of Al-0.62 mass. Mg-0.32 mass-Si alloy. Solution-treated alloys were aged to form needle-like beta ''. precipitates or Mg-Si clusters. The aged alloy...... with beta '' precipitates showed higher yield stress than that with Mg-Si clusters. Transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that the beta '' precipitates pinned dislocations. It was suggested that the strengthening types of the alloy with beta '' precipitates were both Orowan and cutting...

  16. Effect of Bi modification treatment on microstructure, tensile properties, and fracture behavior of cast Al-Mg2Si metal matrix composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Bi has a good modification effect on the hypoeutectic Al-Si alloy, and the morphology of eutectic Si changes from coarse acicular to fine fibrous. Based on the similarity between Mg2Si and Si phases in crystalline structure and crystallization process, the present study investigated the effects of different concentrations of Bi on the microstructure, tensile properties, and fracture behavior of cast Al-15wt.%Mg2Si in-situ metal matrix composite. The results show that the addition of the proper amount of Bi has a significant modification effect on both primary and eutectic Mg2Si in the Al-15wt.%Mg2Si composite. With an increase in Bi content from 0 to 1wt.%, the morphology of the primary Mg2Si is changed from irregular or dendritic to polyhedral shape; and its average particle size is significantly decreased from 70 to 6 μm. Moreover, the morphology of the eutectic Mg2Si phase is altered from flake-like to very short fibrous or dot-like. When the Bi addition exceeds 4.0wt.%, the primary Mg2Si becomes coarse again. However, the eutectic Mg2Si still exhibits the modified morphology. Tensile tests reveal that the Bi addition can improve the tensile strength and ductility of the material. Compared with those of the unmodified composite, the ultimate tensile strength and percentage elongation after fracture with 1.0wt.% Bi increase 51.2% and 100%, respectively. At the same time, the Bi addition changes the fracture behavior from brittle to ductile.

  17. Earthquake sequence simulations of a fault in a viscoelastic material with a spectral boundary integral equation method: The effect of interseismic stress relaxation on a behavior of a rate-weakening patch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y.; Noda, H.

    2017-12-01

    Earthquake sequences involve many processes in a wide range of time scales, from quasistatic loading to dynamic rupture. At a depth of brittle-plastic transitional and deeper, rock behaves as a viscous fluid in a long timescale, but as an elastic material in a short timescale. Viscoelastic stress relaxation may be important in the interseismic periods at the depth, near the deeper limit of the seismogenic layer or the region of slow slip events (SSEs) [Namiki et al., 2014 and references therein]. In the present study, we implemented the viscoelastic effect (Maxwell material) in fully-dynamic earthquake sequence simulations using a spectral boundary integral equation method (SBIEM) [e.g., Lapusta et al., 2000]. SBIEM is efficient in calculation of convolutional terms for dynamic stress transfer, and the problem size is limited by the amount of memory available. Linear viscoelasticity could be implemented by convolution of slip rate history and Green's function, but this method requires additional memory and thus not suitable for the implementation to the present code. Instead, we integrated the evolution of "effective slip" distribution, which gives static stress distribution when convolved with static elastic Green's function. This method works only for simple viscoelastic property distributions, but such models are suitable for numerical experiments aiming basic understanding of the system behavior because of the virtue of SBIEM, the ability of fine on-fault spatial resolution and efficient computation utilizing the fast Fourier transformation. In the present study, we examined the effect of viscoelasticity on earthquake sequences of a fault with a rate-weakening patch. A series of simulations with various relaxation time tc revealed that as decreasing tc, recurrence intervals of earthquakes increases and seismicity ultimately disappears. As long as studied, this transition to aseismic behavior is NOT associated with SSEs. In a case where the rate-weakening patch

  18. A thermo-viscoelastic approach for the characterization and modeling of the bending behavior of thermoplastic composites – Part II

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ropers, Steffen; Sachs, Ulrich; Kardos, Marton; Osswald, Tim A.

    2017-01-01

    A proper description of the bending behavior is crucial to obtain accurate forming simulations, especially for continuous fiber-reinforced thermoplastic composites. These materials exhibit a highly temperature and bending-curvature dependent bending stiffness. These dependencies make the property

  19. Tensile behavior of EUROFER ODS steel after neutron irradiation up to 16.3 dpa between 250 and 450 °C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materna-Morris, Edeltraud; Lindau, Rainer; Schneider, Hans-Christian; Möslang, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • The first 9%CrWVTa steel (0.5% Y_2O_3), EUROFER ODS HIP, have been neutron irradiated up to 16.3 dpa, between 250 and 450 °C, in the High Flux Reactor (HFR). • After post-irradiation tensile tests, there was not any increase of the upper yield strength or strain localization after irradiation which is typical of RAFM steels. • Initially higher yield strength, R_p_0_._2, and distinctive tensile strength, R_m, of EUROFER ODS HIP compared to EUROFER97 steel. • These values increased due to the neutron irradiation at lower irradiation temperatures. - Abstract: During the development of structural material for future fusion reactors, a 50 kg heat of reduced-activation ferritic-martensitic 9%CrWVTa steel with nanoscaled Y_2O_3-particles, EUROFER97 ODS HIP, was produced using powder metallurgy fabrication technology. This first batch of EUROFER97 ODS HIP and, for comparison, the steel EUROFER97 were prepared for a post-irradiation tensile test program. During neutron irradiation in the HFR (High Flux Reactor, The Netherlands), an accumulated dose of up to 16.3 dpa was reached for 771 days at full power, with the irradiation temperature ranging between 250 and 450 °C. During the post-examinations, all specimens showed the highest tensile strength at lower irradiation temperatures between 250 and 350 °C. However, ODS-alloy and steel were found to clearly differ in the mechanical behavior, which could be documented by fully instrumented tensile tests. In the un-irradiated state, tensile strength of the ODS-alloy already was increased considerably by about 60% compared to the steel. Strengthening was further increased by another 20% after neutron irradiation, but with a much better ductility than observed in the steel. The typical irradiation-induced strain localization of EUROFER97 or RAFM steels could not be observed in the EUROFER97 ODS HIP alloy.

  20. High-Temperature Tensile Behaviors of Base Metal and Electron Beam-Welded Joints of Ni-20Cr-9Mo-4Nb Superalloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, R. K.; Anil Kumar, V.; Sukumaran, Arjun; Kumar, Vinod

    2018-05-01

    Electron beam welding of Ni-20Cr-9Mo-4Nb alloy sheets was carried out, and high-temperature tensile behaviors of base metal and weldments were studied. Tensile properties were evaluated at ambient temperature, at elevated temperatures of 625 °C to 1025 °C, and at strain rates of 0.1 to 0.001 s-1. Microstructure of the weld consisted of columnar dendritic structure and revealed epitaxial mode of solidification. Weld efficiency of 90 pct in terms of strength (UTS) was observed at ambient temperature and up to an elevated temperature of 850 °C. Reduction in strength continued with further increase of test temperature (up to 1025 °C); however, a significant improvement in pct elongation is found up to 775 °C, which was sustained even at higher test temperatures. The tensile behaviors of base metal and weldments were similar at the elevated temperatures at the respective strain rates. Strain hardening exponent `n' of the base metal and weldment was 0.519. Activation energy `Q' of base metal and EB weldments were 420 to 535 kJ mol-1 determined through isothermal tensile tests and 625 to 662 kJ mol-1 through jump-temperature tensile tests. Strain rate sensitivity `m' was low ( 775 °C) is attributed to the presence of recrystallized grains. Up to 700 °C, the deformation is through slip, where strain hardening is predominant and effect of strain rate is minimal. Between 775 °C to 850 °C, strain hardening is counterbalanced by flow softening, where cavitation limits the deformation (predominantly at lower strain rate). Above 925 °C, flow softening is predominant resulting in a significant reduction in strength. Presence of precipitates/accumulated strain at high strain rate results in high strength, but when the precipitates were coarsened at lower strain rates or precipitates were dissolved at a higher temperature, the result was a reduction in strength. Further, the accumulated strain assisted in recrystallization, which also resulted in a reduction in strength.

  1. Anisotropic behavior studies of aluminum alloy 5083-H0 using a micro-tensile test stage in a FEG-SEM

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Motsi, GT

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Motsi_18197_2016.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 1246 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Motsi_18197_2016.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Materials Science... & Engineering A, vol. 656: 266-274 Anisotropic behavior studies of aluminum alloy 5083-H0 using a micro-tensile test stage in a FEG-SEM Motsi GT Shongwe MB Sono TJ Olubambi PA ABSTRACT: The plastic anisotropic characteristics of aluminum alloy 5083-H...

  2. Microstructural evolution and tensile behavior of Ti{sub 2}AlNb alloys based α{sub 2}-phase decomposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei, E-mail: gackmol@163.com [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Zeng, Weidong, E-mail: zengwd@nwpu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Li, Dong; Zhu, Bin; Zheng, Youping [State Key Laboratory of Solidification Processing, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an 710072 (China); Liang, Xiaobo [Beijing Iron & Steel Research Institute, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2016-04-26

    The formation mechanism of the fine plate-like O-phases within α{sub 2}-phases and tensile behavior of an isothermally forged Ti–22Al–25Nb (at%) orthorhombic alloy at 1040 °C during heat treatment were investigated. The investigation indicated that the alloys were heat-treated in O+B2 phase region after α{sub 2}+B2 phase region isothermally forging, the equiaxed α{sub 2}-phase was not stable and decomposed into O+α{sub 2} phases. The α{sub 2} phases formed during isothermal forging process have higher concentration of Nb and begun to decompose during O+B2 phase region heat treatment. And then the α{sub 2} phases separated into Niobium-lean and Niobium-rich regions through the Niobium diffusion: α{sub 2}→α{sub 2} (Nb-lean)+O (Nb-rich). Nb-rich regions with composition similar to Ti{sub 2}AlNb transformed to the O-phase, while the Nb-lean regions remained untransformed and retained the α{sub 2}-phase. The deformation behavior and fracture mechanism of Ti–22Al–25Nb alloy at room temperature were discussed. The deformation behavior and microstructural evolution of this alloy at different temperatures and stain rates were also investigated using uniaxial tensile test.

  3. Linear viscoelastic properties of aging suspensions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purnomo, E.H.; Purnomo, E.H; van den Ende, Henricus T.M.; Mellema, J.; Mugele, Friedrich Gunther

    2006-01-01

    We have examined the linear viscoelastic behavior of poly-N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPAM) microgel suspensions in order to obtain insight in the aging processes in these densely packed suspensions at various temperatures below the volume transition temperature. The system is found to display a strong

  4. experimental viscoelastic characterization of corn cob composites ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Obe

    sufficient to represent the viscoelastic behavior of the corn cob. The effect of moisture content and rates of loading on the mechanical model determined were investigated. 1. ..... F = applied force or residual force σ. = contact stress .... J. Agric. Engineering. Res. 7(4):. 300-315. Journal of the British Society for. Research in ...

  5. Transient Droplet Behavior and Droplet Breakup during Bulk and Confined Shear Flow in Blends with One Viscoelastic Component: Experiments, Modelling and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinaels, Ruth; Verhulst, Kristof; Renardy, Yuriko; Moldenaers, Paula

    2008-07-01

    The transient droplet deformation and droplet orientation after inception of shear, the shape relaxation after cessation of shear and droplet breakup during shear, are microscopically studied, both under bulk and confined conditions. The studied blends contain one viscoelastic Boger fluid phase. A counter rotating setup, based on a Paar Physica MCR300, is used for the droplet visualisation. For bulk shear flow, it is shown that the droplet deformation during startup of shear flow and the shape relaxation after cessation of shear flow are hardly influenced by droplet viscoelasticity, even at moderate to high capillary and Deborah numbers. The effects of droplet viscoelasticity only become visible close to the critical conditions and a novel break-up mechanism is observed. Matrix viscoelasticity has a more pronounced effect, causing overshoots in the deformation and significantly inhibiting relaxation. However, different applied capillary numbers prior to cessation of shear flow, with the Deborah number fixed, still result in a single master curve for shape retraction, as in fully Newtonian systems. The long tail in the droplet relaxation can be qualitatively described with a phenomenological model for droplet deformation, when using a 5-mode Giesekus model for the fluid rheology. It is found that the shear flow history significantly affects the droplet shape evolution and the breakup process in blends with one viscoelastic component. Confining a droplet between two plates accelerates the droplet deformation kinetics, similar to fully Newtonian systems. However, the increased droplet deformation, due to wall effects, causes the steady state to be reached at a later instant in time. Droplet relaxation is less sensitive to confinement, leading to slower relaxation kinetics only for highly confined droplets. For the blend with a viscoelastic droplet, a non-monotonous trend is found for the critical capillary number as a function of the confinement ratio. Finally

  6. Transient Droplet Behavior and Droplet Breakup during Bulk and Confined Shear Flow in Blends with One Viscoelastic Component: Experiments, Modelling and Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardinaels, Ruth; Verhulst, Kristof; Moldenaers, Paula; Renardy, Yuriko

    2008-01-01

    The transient droplet deformation and droplet orientation after inception of shear, the shape relaxation after cessation of shear and droplet breakup during shear, are microscopically studied, both under bulk and confined conditions. The studied blends contain one viscoelastic Boger fluid phase. A counter rotating setup, based on a Paar Physica MCR300, is used for the droplet visualisation. For bulk shear flow, it is shown that the droplet deformation during startup of shear flow and the shape relaxation after cessation of shear flow are hardly influenced by droplet viscoelasticity, even at moderate to high capillary and Deborah numbers. The effects of droplet viscoelasticity only become visible close to the critical conditions and a novel break-up mechanism is observed. Matrix viscoelasticity has a more pronounced effect, causing overshoots in the deformation and significantly inhibiting relaxation. However, different applied capillary numbers prior to cessation of shear flow, with the Deborah number fixed, still result in a single master curve for shape retraction, as in fully Newtonian systems. The long tail in the droplet relaxation can be qualitatively described with a phenomenological model for droplet deformation, when using a 5-mode Giesekus model for the fluid rheology. It is found that the shear flow history significantly affects the droplet shape evolution and the breakup process in blends with one viscoelastic component. Confining a droplet between two plates accelerates the droplet deformation kinetics, similar to fully Newtonian systems. However, the increased droplet deformation, due to wall effects, causes the steady state to be reached at a later instant in time. Droplet relaxation is less sensitive to confinement, leading to slower relaxation kinetics only for highly confined droplets. For the blend with a viscoelastic droplet, a non-monotonous trend is found for the critical capillary number as a function of the confinement ratio. Finally

  7. Topology optimization of viscoelastic rectifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjærg; Szabo, Peter; Okkels, Fridolin

    2012-01-01

    An approach for the design of microfluidic viscoelastic rectifiers is presented based on a combination of a viscoelastic model and the method of topology optimization. This presumption free approach yields a material layout topologically different from experimentally realized rectifiers...

  8. Grain growth behavior and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of iridium alloy DOP-26

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKamey, C.G.; Gubbi, A.N.; Lin, Y.; Cohron, J.W.; Lee, E.H.; George, E.P.

    1998-04-01

    This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the new-process iridium-based DOP-26 alloy used for the Cassini space mission. This alloy was developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in the early 1980's and is currently used by NASA for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. Included within this report are data generated on grain growth in vacuum or low-pressure oxygen environments; a comparison of grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material with sheet material; effect of grain size, test temperature, and oxygen exposure on high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility; and grain growth in vacuum and high-temperature high-strain-rate tensile ductility of welded DOP-26. The data for the new-process material is compared to available old-process data

  9. Influence of aging treatment on deformation behavior of 96.5Sn3.5Ag lead-free solder alloy during in situ tensile tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ding, Ying; Wang, Chunqing; Tian, Yanhong; Li, Mingyu

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the influence of aging treatment on deformation behavior of 96.5Sn3.5Ag eutectic solder alloys with lower strain rate ( -3 s -1 ) during tensile tests under the scanning electron microscope. Results showed that because of the existence of Ag 3 Sn intermetallic particles and the special microstructure of β-Sn phases in Sn3.5Ag solder, grain boundary sliding was not the dominant mechanism any longer for this Pb-free solder. While the interaction of dislocations with the relatively rigid Ag 3 Sn particles began to dominate. For the as-cast specimen, accompanied by partial intragranular cracks, intergranular fracture along the grain boundaries in Sn-Ag eutectic structure or the interphase boundaries between Sn-rich dendrites and Sn-Ag eutectic phases occurred primarily in early tensile stage. However, the boundary behavior was limited by the large Ag 3 Sn particles presented along the Sn-rich dendrites boundaries after aging. Plastic flow was observed in large area, and cracks propagated in a transgranular manner across the Sn-dendrites and Sn-Ag eutectic structure

  10. Study on Tensile Fatigue Behavior of Thermal Butt Fusion in Safety Class III High-Density Polyethylene Buried Piping in Nuclear Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Young Ju; Oh, Young Jin

    2015-01-01

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) piping, which has recently been applied to safety class III piping in nuclear power plants, can be butt-joined through the thermal fusion process, which heats two fused surfaces and then subject to axial pressure. The thermal fusion process generates bead shapes on the butt fusion. The stress concentrations caused by the bead shapes may reduce the fatigue lifetime. Thus, investigating the effect of the thermal butt fusion beads on fatigue behavior is necessary. This study examined the fatigue behavior of thermal butt fusion via a tensile fatigue test under stress-controlled conditions using finite element elastic stress analysis. Based on the results, the presence of thermal butt fusion beads was confirmed to reduce the fatigue lifetime in the low-cycle fatigue region while having a negligible effect in the medium- and high-cycle fatigue regions

  11. Study on Tensile Fatigue Behavior of Thermal Butt Fusion in Safety Class III High-Density Polyethylene Buried Piping in Nuclear Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jong Sung; Lee, Young Ju [Sunchon National University, Suncheon (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Young Jin [KEPCO E and C, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    High-density polyethylene (HDPE) piping, which has recently been applied to safety class III piping in nuclear power plants, can be butt-joined through the thermal fusion process, which heats two fused surfaces and then subject to axial pressure. The thermal fusion process generates bead shapes on the butt fusion. The stress concentrations caused by the bead shapes may reduce the fatigue lifetime. Thus, investigating the effect of the thermal butt fusion beads on fatigue behavior is necessary. This study examined the fatigue behavior of thermal butt fusion via a tensile fatigue test under stress-controlled conditions using finite element elastic stress analysis. Based on the results, the presence of thermal butt fusion beads was confirmed to reduce the fatigue lifetime in the low-cycle fatigue region while having a negligible effect in the medium- and high-cycle fatigue regions.

  12. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and tensile behavior of a hot isostatically pressed nickel-based superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Chunlei, E-mail: c.qiu@bham.ac.uk [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Wu, Xinhua; Mei, Junfa [School of Metallurgy and Materials, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Andrews, Paul; Voice, Wayne [Rolls-Royce Plc, Derby DE24 8BJ (United Kingdom)

    2013-11-25

    Highlights: •Post-HIP heat treatment led to refined microstructure and improved tensile properties. •Deformation occurred mainly by forming stacking faults in γ′ at RT and elevated temperature. •Net-shape HIPed RR1000 failed in a transgranular fracture mode. -- Abstract: A nickel-based superalloy powder RR1000 has been hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) and heat treated to produce different microstructures. Microstructures were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Tensile testing was performed at room temperature and 700 °C and the deformed samples were examined using SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that in the as-HIPed condition the microstructure consisted of coarse and irregular-shaped primary and secondary γ′ together with a low volume fraction of fine γ′ (<50 nm in diameter). Solution treatment below the γ′ solvus followed by air cooling resulted in the formation of finer cuboidal secondary γ′ (350–750 nm) and medium-sized spherical tertiary γ′ (100–200 nm). This led to an improvement of both the 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Ageing of the solution-treated or of the as-HIPed samples at 760 °C resulted in the precipitation of a high population of fine γ′ (around 50 nm) which further increased the strength. Within the resolution limit of the current TEM analysis, deformation at room temperature seemed to occur mainly by dislocations cutting through secondary γ′ and very fine γ′, accompanied by the formation of stacking faults within these precipitates; most of the medium-sized tertiary γ′ precipitates in solution-treated and aged samples were not cut through but were surrounded by dislocations. Deformation at 700 °C happened by dislocations cutting through γ′ precipitates and γ matrix, leading to the formation of extended stacking faults across both γ and γ′. It is suggested that the optimum treatment of the current powder superalloy is to

  13. Influence of heat treatment on microstructure and tensile behavior of a hot isostatically pressed nickel-based superalloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, Chunlei; Wu, Xinhua; Mei, Junfa; Andrews, Paul; Voice, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Post-HIP heat treatment led to refined microstructure and improved tensile properties. •Deformation occurred mainly by forming stacking faults in γ′ at RT and elevated temperature. •Net-shape HIPed RR1000 failed in a transgranular fracture mode. -- Abstract: A nickel-based superalloy powder RR1000 has been hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) and heat treated to produce different microstructures. Microstructures were investigated using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Tensile testing was performed at room temperature and 700 °C and the deformed samples were examined using SEM and transmission electron microscope (TEM). It was found that in the as-HIPed condition the microstructure consisted of coarse and irregular-shaped primary and secondary γ′ together with a low volume fraction of fine γ′ (<50 nm in diameter). Solution treatment below the γ′ solvus followed by air cooling resulted in the formation of finer cuboidal secondary γ′ (350–750 nm) and medium-sized spherical tertiary γ′ (100–200 nm). This led to an improvement of both the 0.2% yield strength and ultimate tensile strength. Ageing of the solution-treated or of the as-HIPed samples at 760 °C resulted in the precipitation of a high population of fine γ′ (around 50 nm) which further increased the strength. Within the resolution limit of the current TEM analysis, deformation at room temperature seemed to occur mainly by dislocations cutting through secondary γ′ and very fine γ′, accompanied by the formation of stacking faults within these precipitates; most of the medium-sized tertiary γ′ precipitates in solution-treated and aged samples were not cut through but were surrounded by dislocations. Deformation at 700 °C happened by dislocations cutting through γ′ precipitates and γ matrix, leading to the formation of extended stacking faults across both γ and γ′. It is suggested that the optimum treatment of the current powder superalloy is to

  14. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W.; Tschegg, E.K.; Gerstenberg, H.

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and 6O Co γ-rays up to 1.8 x 1 0 8 Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 x lO 22 m -2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed

  15. Tensile and shear fracture behavior of fiber reinforced plastics at 77K irradiated by various radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H.W. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Hochschulen, Vienna (Austria); Tschegg, E.K. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Angewandte und Technische Physik; Egusa, Shigenori [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Birtcher, R.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Gerstenberg, H. [Technische Univ. Muenchen, Garching (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    1993-08-01

    Influence of radiation damage (gamma, electron, neutron) on mechanical properties of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) has been investigated. Different types of FRPs (two or three dimensional E-, S- or T-glass fiber reinforcement, epoxy or bismaleimide resin) have been irradiated at room temperature with 2 MeV electrons and {sup 6O}Co {gamma}-rays up to 1.8 {times} 1 0{sup 8} Gy as well as with different reactor spectra up to a fast neutron fluence of 5 {times} lO{sup 22} m{sup {minus}2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Tensile and intralaminar shear tests were carried out on the irradiated samples at 77 K. Some samples were irradiated at 5 K and tested at 77 K with and without an annealing cycle to room temperature. Results on the influence of these radiation conditions and of warm-up cycles on the mechanical properties of FRPs are compared and discussed.

  16. Development of a new ultrafine grained dual phase steel and examination of the effect of grain size on tensile deformation behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidi, N., E-mail: navidsae@gmail.com; Ashrafizadeh, F.; Niroumand, B.

    2014-04-01

    Ultrafine grained dual phase (DP) steels are among the newest grades of DP steels that incorporate the uniform distribution of fine martensite particles (in the order of 1–2 μm) within a ferrite matrix. These new grades of steels have been developed in response to the world's demand for decreasing the fuel consumption in automobiles by increasing the strength to weight ratio. In the present research, a new kind of ultrafine grained DP (UFG-DP) steel with an average grain size of about 2 μm as well as a coarse grained DP (CG-DP) steel with an average grain size of about 5.4 μm was produced by consecutive intercritical annealing and cold rolling of low carbon AISI 8620 steel. The martensite volume fraction for both microstructures was the same and about 50 percent. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) microstructural examination and room temperature tensile deformation analyses were performed on both UFG-DP and CG-DP steels and their deformation behavior in terms of strength, elongation and strain hardening was studied and compared. Room-temperature uniaxial tensile tests revealed that for a given martensite volume fraction, yield and tensile strengths were not very sensitive to martensite morphology. However, uniform and total elongation values were noticeably affected by refining martensite particles. The higher plasticity of fine martensite particles as well as the more uniform strain distribution within the UFG-DP microstructure resulted in higher strain hardenability and, finally, the higher ductility of the UFG-DP steel.

  17. High-Temperature Tensile and Tribological Behavior of Hybrid (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 In Situ Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, G.; Kumar, N.; Mohan, A.; Gautam, R. K.; Mohan, S.

    2016-09-01

    During service life, components such as piston, cylinder blocks, brakes, and discs/drums, have to work under high-temperature conditions. In order to have appropriate material for such applications high-temperature studies are important. Hybrid (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 in situ composite has been investigated from ambient to 523 K (250 °C) at an interval of 50 deg. (ZrB2+Al3Zr)/AA5052 in situ composite has been fabricated by the direct melt reaction of AA5052 alloy with zirconium and boron salts. Microstructure studies show refinement in the grain size of base alloy on in situ formation of reinforcement particles. Al3Zr particles are observed in rectangular and polyhedron shapes. It is observed from the tensile studies that ultimate tensile strength, yield strength, and percentage elongation decrease with increase in test temperature. Similar kind of behavior is also observed for flow curve properties. The tensile results have also been correlated with fractography. Wear and friction results indicate that the wear rate increases with increase in normal load, whereas coefficient of friction shows decreasing trend. With increasing test temperature, wear rate exhibits a typical phenomenon. After an initial increase, wear rate follows a decreasing trend up to 423 K (150 °C), and finally a rapid increase is observed, whereas coefficient of friction increases continuously with increase in test temperature. The mechanisms responsible for the variation of wear and friction with different temperatures have been discussed in detail with the help of worn surfaces studies under scanning electron microscope (SEM) & 3D-profilometer and debris analysis by XRD.

  18. Viscoelastic Surface Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R. D.

    2007-12-01

    General theoretical solutions for Rayleigh- and Love-Type surface waves in viscoelastic media describe physical characteristics of the surface waves in elastic as well as anelastic media with arbitrary amounts of intrinsic absorption. In contrast to corresponding physical characteristics for Rayleigh waves in elastic media, Rayleigh- Type surface waves in anelastic media demonstrate; 1) tilt of the particle motion orbit that varies with depth, and 2) amplitude and volumetric strain distributions with superimposed sinusoidal variations that decay exponentially with depth. Each characteristic is dependent on the amount of intrinsic absorption and the chosen model of viscoelasticity. Distinguishing characteristics of anelastic Love-Type surface waves include: 1) dependencies of the wave speed and absorption coefficient on the chosen model and amount of intrinsic absorption and frequency, and 2) superimposed sinusoidal amplitude variations with an exponential decay with depth. Numerical results valid for a variety of viscoelastic models provide quantitative estimates of the physical characteristics of both types of viscoelastic surface waves appropriate for interpretations pertinent to models of earth materials ranging from low-loss in the crust to moderate- and high-loss in water-saturated soils.

  19. Heat treatment effect on the microstructure, tensile properties and dry sliding wear behavior of A356-10%B4C cast composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lashgari, H.R.; Zangeneh, Sh.; Shahmir, H.; Saghafi, M.; Emamy, M.

    2010-01-01

    In present paper, an attempt was made to examine the influence of T6 heat treatment (solution treatment at 540 o C for 5 h, quenching in hot water and artificial aging at 170 o C for 8 h) on the microstructure, tensile properties and dry sliding wear behavior of A356-10%B 4 C cast composites. The composite ingots were made by stir casting process. In this work, the matrix alloy and composite were characterized by optical microscope, scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, tensile tests and conventional pin-on-disk experiment. The obtained results showed that in Al-B 4 C composite, T6 treatment was a dominant factor on the hardness improvement in comparison with hardness increasing due to the addition of B 4 C hard particles. In addition, T6 treatment can contribute to the strong bonding between B 4 C and matrix alloy and also it can change eutectic silicon morphology from acicular to near spherical. This case can lead to higher strength and wear properties of heat treated metal matrix composites in comparison with unheat treated state. Observation of worn surfaces indicated detachment of mechanically mixed layer which can primarily due to the delamination wear mechanism under higher applied load.

  20. Experimental and finite element study of the effect of temperature and moisture on the tangential tensile strength and fracture behavior in timber logs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Finn; Ormarsson, Sigurdur

    2014-01-01

    Timber is normally dried by kiln drying, in the course of which moisture-induced stresses and fractures can occur. Cracks occur primarily in the radial direction due to tangential tensile strength (TSt) that exceeds the strength of the material. The present article reports on experiments and nume......Timber is normally dried by kiln drying, in the course of which moisture-induced stresses and fractures can occur. Cracks occur primarily in the radial direction due to tangential tensile strength (TSt) that exceeds the strength of the material. The present article reports on experiments...... and numerical simulations by finite element modeling (FEM) concerning the TSt and fracture behavior of Norway spruce under various climatic conditions. Thin log disc specimens were studied to simplify the description of the moisture flow in the samples. The specimens designed for TS were acclimatized...... to a moisture content (MC) of 18% before TSt tests at 20°C, 60°C, and 90°C were carried out. The maximum stress results of the disc simulations by FEM were compared with the experimental strength results at the same temperature levels. There is a rather good agreement between the results of modeling...

  1. Tensile stress-dependent fracture behavior and its influences on photovoltaic characteristics in flexible PbS/CdS thin-film solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung Min; Yeon, Deuk Ho; Mohanty, Bhaskar Chandra; Cho, Yong Soo

    2015-03-04

    Tensile stress-dependent fracture behavior of flexible PbS/CdS heterojunction thin-film solar cells on indium tin oxide-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrates is investigated in terms of the variations of fracture parameters with applied strains and their influences on photovoltaic properties. The PbS absorber layer that exhibits only mechanical cracks within the applied strain range from ∼0.67 to 1.33% is prepared by chemical bath deposition at different temperatures of 50, 70, and 90 °C. The PbS thin films prepared at 50 °C demonstrate better mechanical resistance against the applied bending strain with the highest crack initiating bending strain of ∼1.14% and the lowest saturated crack density of 0.036 μm(-1). Photovoltaic properties of the cells depend on the deposition temperature and the level of applied tensile stress. The values of short-circuit current density and fill factor are dramatically reduced above a certain level of applied strain, while open-circuit voltage is nearly maintained. The dependency of photovoltaic properties on the progress of fractures is understood as related to the reduced fracture energy and toughness, which is limitedly controllable by microstructural features of the absorber layer.

  2. Elevated temperature tensile and creep behavior of a SiC fiber-reinforced titanium metal matrix composite. Final Report, 22 Dec. 1994 M.S. Thesis, 7 May 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurston, Rita J.

    1995-01-01

    In this research program, the tensile properties and creep behavior in air of (0)(sub 4), (0/90)(sub s) and (90)(sub 4) SCS-9/Beta 21S composite layups with 0.24 volume fraction fiber were evaluated. Monotonic tensile tests at 23, 482, 650 and 815 C yielded the temperature dependence of the elastic modulus, proportional limit, ultimate tensile strength and total strain at failure. At 650 C, the UTS of the (0)(sub 4) and (0/90)(sub s) layups decreases by almost 50 percent from the room temperature values, indicating that operating temperatures should be less than 650 C to take advantage of the specific tensile properties of these composites.

  3. Seismic Analysis of a Viscoelastic Damping Isolator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Wun Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Seismic prevention issues are discussed much more seriously around the world after Fukushima earthquake, Japan, April 2011, especially for those countries which are near the earthquake zone. Approximately 1.8×1012 kilograms of explosive energy will be released from a magnitude 9 earthquake. It destroys most of the unprotected infrastructure within several tens of miles in diameter from the epicenter. People can feel the earthquake even if living hundreds of miles away. This study is a seismic simulation analysis for an innovated and improved design of viscoelastic damping isolator, which can be more effectively applied to earthquake prevention and damage reduction of high-rise buildings, roads, bridges, power generation facilities, and so forth, from earthquake disaster. Solidworks graphic software is used to draw the 3D geometric model of the viscoelastic isolator. The dynamic behavior of the viscoelastic isolator through shock impact of specific earthquake loading, recorded by a seismometer, is obtained via ANSYS finite element package. The amplitude of the isolator is quickly reduced by the viscoelastic material in the device and is shown in a time response diagram. The result of this analysis can be a crucial reference when improving the design of a seismic isolator.

  4. Estimation of piezoelastic and viscoelastic properties in laminated structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araujo, A. L.; Soares, C. M. Mota; Herskovits, J.

    2009-01-01

    An inverse method for material parameter estimation of elastic, piezoelectric and viscoelastic laminated plate structures is presented. The method uses a gradient based optimization technique in order to solve the inverse problem, through minimization of an error functional which expresses...... the difference between experimental free vibration data and corresponding numerical data produced by a finite element model. The complex modulus approach is used to model the viscoelastic material behavior, assuming hysteretic type damping. Applications that illustrate the influence of adhesive material...

  5. Modelling water hammer in viscoelastic pipelines: short brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbanowicz, K.; Firkowski, M.; Zarzycki, Z.

    2016-10-01

    The model of water hammer in viscoelastic pipelines is analyzed. An appropriate mathematical model of water hammer in polymer pipelines is presented. An additional term has been added to continuity equation to describe the retarded deformation of the pipe wall. The mechanical behavior of viscoelastic material is described by generalized Kelvin-Voigt model. The comparison of numerical simulation and experimental data from well known papers is presented. Short discussion about obtained results are given.

  6. Viscoelasticity of biomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasser, W.G.; Hatakeyama, H.

    1992-01-01

    Viscoelasticity of Biomaterials is divided into three sections. The first offers a materials design lesson on the architectural arrangement of biopolymers in collagen. Included also are reviews on solution properties of polysacchardies, chiral and liquid crystalline solution characteristics of cellulose derivatives, and viscoelastic properties of wood and wood fiber reinforced thermoplastics. The second section, Biogels and Gelation, discusses the molecular arrangements of highly hydrated biomaterials such as mucus, gums, skinlike tissue, and silk fibroin. The physical effects that result from the transition from a liquid to a solid state are the subject of the third section, which focuses on relaxation phenomena. Gel formation, the conformation of domain structures, and motional aspects of complex biomaterials are described in terms of recent experimental advances in various fields. A relevant chapter on the effects of ionizing radiation on connective tissue is abstracted separately

  7. A Modified Constitutive Model for Tensile Flow Behaviors of BR1500HS Ultra-High-Strength Steel at Medium and Low Temperature Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Quan, Guo-Zheng; Pan, Jia; Wang, Xuan; Wu, Dong-Sen; Xia, Yu-Feng

    2018-01-01

    Constitutive model of materials is one of the most requisite mathematical model in the finite element analysis, which describes the relationships of flow behaviors with strain, strain rate and temperature. In order to construct such constitutive relationships of ultra-high-strength BR1500HS steel at medium and low temperature regions, the true stress-strain data over a wide temperature range of 293-873 K and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1 were collected from a series of isothermal uniaxial tensile tests. The experimental results show that stress-strain relationships are highly non-linear and susceptible to three parameters involving temperature, strain and strain rate. By considering the impacts of strain rate and temperature on strain hardening, a modified constitutive model based on Johnson-Cook model was proposed to characterize flow behaviors in medium and low temperature ranges. The predictability of the improved model was also evaluated by the relative error (W(%)), correlation coefficient (R) and average absolute relative error (AARE). The R-value and AARE-value for modified constitutive model at medium and low temperature regions are 0.9915 & 1.56 % and 0.9570 & 5.39 %, respectively, which indicates that the modified constitutive model can precisely estimate the flow behaviors for BR1500HS steel in the medium and low temperature regions.

  8. Non linear viscoelastic models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2011-01-01

    Viscoelastic eects are often present in loudspeaker suspensions, this can be seen in the displacement transfer function which often shows a frequency dependent value below the resonance frequency. In this paper nonlinear versions of the standard linear solid model (SLS) are investigated....... The simulations show that the nonlinear version of the Maxwell SLS model can result in a time dependent small signal stiness while the Kelvin Voight version does not....

  9. The effects of physical aging at elevated temperatures on the viscoelastic creep on IM7/K3B

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Thomas S.; Feldman, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Physical aging at elevated temperature of the advanced composite IM7/K3B was investigated through the use of creep compliance tests. Testing consisted of short term isothermal, creep/recovery with the creep segments performed at constant load. The matrix dominated transverse tensile and in-plane shear behavior were measured at temperatures ranging from 200 to 230 C. Through the use of time based shifting procedures, the aging shift factors, shift rates and momentary master curve parameters were found at each temperature. These material parameters were used as input to a predictive methodology, which was based upon effective time theory and linear viscoelasticity combined with classical lamination theory. Long term creep compliance test data was compared to predictions to verify the method. The model was then used to predict the long term creep behavior for several general laminates.

  10. Tensile properties and strain-hardening behavior of double-sided arc welded and friction stir welded AZ31B magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, S.M.; Chen, D.L.; Bhole, S.D.; Cao, X.; Powidajko, E.; Weckman, D.C.; Zhou, Y.

    2010-01-01

    Microstructures, tensile properties and work hardening behavior of double-sided arc welded (DSAWed) and friction stir welded (FSWed) AZ31B-H24 magnesium alloy sheet were studied at different strain rates. While the yield strength was higher, both the ultimate tensile strength and ductility were lower in the FSWed samples than in the DSAWed samples due to welding defects present at the bottom surface in the FSWed samples. Strain-hardening exponents were evaluated using the Hollomon relationship, the Ludwik equation and a modified equation. After welding, the strain-hardening exponents were nearly twice that of the base metal. The DSAWed samples exhibited stronger strain-hardening capacity due to the larger grain size coupled with the divorced eutectic structure containing β-Mg 17 Al 12 particles in the fusion zone, compared to the FSWed samples and base metal. Kocks-Mecking type plots were used to show strain-hardening stages. Stage III hardening occurred after yielding in both the base metal and the welded samples. At lower strains a higher strain-hardening rate was observed in the base metal, but it decreased rapidly with increasing net flow stress. At higher strains the strain-hardening rate of the welded samples became higher, because the recrystallized grains in the FSWed and the larger re-solidified grains coupled with β particles in the DSAWed provided more space to accommodate dislocation multiplication during plastic deformation. The strain-rate sensitivity evaluated via Lindholm's approach was observed to be higher in the base metal than in the welded samples.

  11. Stability of non-linear constitutive formulations for viscoelastic fluids

    CERN Document Server

    Siginer, Dennis A

    2014-01-01

    Stability of Non-linear Constitutive Formulations for Viscoelastic Fluids provides a complete and up-to-date view of the field of constitutive equations for flowing viscoelastic fluids, in particular on their non-linear behavior, the stability of these constitutive equations that is their predictive power, and the impact of these constitutive equations on the dynamics of viscoelastic fluid flow in tubes. This book gives an overall view of the theories and attendant methodologies developed independently of thermodynamic considerations as well as those set within a thermodynamic framework to derive non-linear rheological constitutive equations for viscoelastic fluids. Developments in formulating Maxwell-like constitutive differential equations as well as single integral constitutive formulations are discussed in the light of Hadamard and dissipative type of instabilities.

  12. Influence of Thermal Aging on Tensile and Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Type 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Kumar, T.; Nagesha, A.; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.

    2018-05-01

    Influence of short-term thermal aging on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 316LN austenitic stainless steel weld joint with 0.07 wt pct N has been investigated. Prior thermal exposure was found to improve the fatigue life compared with the as-welded condition. Besides, the treatment also imparted a softening effect on the weld metal, leading to an increase in the ductility of the weld joint which had a bearing on the cyclic stress response. The degree of cyclic hardening was seen to increase after aging. Automated ball-indentation (ABI) technique was employed toward understanding the mechanical properties of individual zones across the weld joint. It was observed that the base metal takes most of the applied cyclic strain during LCF deformation in the as-welded condition. In the aged condition, however, the weld also participates in the cyclic deformation. The beneficial effect of thermal aging on cyclic life is attributed to a reduction in the severity of the metallurgical notch leading to a restoration of ductility of the weld region. The transformation of δ-ferrite to σ-phase during the aging treatment was found to influence the location of crack initiation. Fatigue cracks were found to initiate in the base metal region of the joint in most of the testing conditions. However, embrittlement in the weld metal caused a shift in the point of crack initiation with increasing strain amplitude under LCF.

  13. Predictions of creep behavior of some stainless steels on the basis of short-term tensile properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bui-Quoc, T.; Biron, A.

    1979-01-01

    A concept of cumulative damage has recently been developed for evaluating the amount of damage incurred by the material under the creep process. The damage accumulation is stress-dependent and is a non-linear function of time. This new approach allows one to establish the creep curve in the sigma-T diagram (sigma:applied stress, T:time at rupture) as well as to evaluate the remaining time to rupture when the material is subjected to several specified conditions of creep loading. The method takes into account the order effect of creep loading which has been observed experimentally and reported recently in the literature. Only the procedure related to the determination of the creep curve is discussed in the present paper. The isothermal creep behavior is represented by a single equation in which two material constants must be known in order to describe the complete creep curve. A good fit with experimental results for some materials is observed when these constants are evaluated by means of two reference data points chosen in the sigma/T diagram. (orig.)

  14. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-01-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  15. Relativistic viscoelastic fluid mechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuma, Masafumi; Sakatani, Yuho

    2011-08-01

    A detailed study is carried out for the relativistic theory of viscoelasticity which was recently constructed on the basis of Onsager's linear nonequilibrium thermodynamics. After rederiving the theory using a local argument with the entropy current, we show that this theory universally reduces to the standard relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics in the long time limit. Since effects of elasticity are taken into account, the dynamics at short time scales is modified from that given by the Navier-Stokes equations, so that acausal problems intrinsic to relativistic Navier-Stokes fluids are significantly remedied. We in particular show that the wave equations for the propagation of disturbance around a hydrostatic equilibrium in Minkowski space-time become symmetric hyperbolic for some range of parameters, so that the model is free of acausality problems. This observation suggests that the relativistic viscoelastic model with such parameters can be regarded as a causal completion of relativistic Navier-Stokes fluid mechanics. By adjusting parameters to various values, this theory can treat a wide variety of materials including elastic materials, Maxwell materials, Kelvin-Voigt materials, and (a nonlinearly generalized version of) simplified Israel-Stewart fluids, and thus we expect the theory to be the most universal description of single-component relativistic continuum materials. We also show that the presence of strains and the corresponding change in temperature are naturally unified through the Tolman law in a generally covariant description of continuum mechanics.

  16. Effect of the Volume Fraction of Jute Fiber on the Interlaminar Shear Stress and Tensile Behavior Characteristics of Hybrid Glass/Jute Fiber Reinforced Polymer Composite Bar for Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan-Gi Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid glass/jute fiber reinforced polymer (HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured for concrete structures, and their interlaminar shear stress and tensile performance were evaluated. HGJFRP composite bars were manufactured using a combination of pultrusion and braiding processes. Jute fiber was surface-treated with a silane coupling agent. The mixing ratio of the fiber to the vinyl ester used in the HGJFRP composite bars was 7 : 3. Jute fiber was used to replace glass fiber in proportions of 0, 30, 50, 70, and 100%. The interlaminar shear stress decreased as the proportion of jute fiber increased. Fractures appeared due to delamination between the surface-treated component and the main part of the HGJFRP composite bar. Tensile load-strain curves with 50% jute fiber exhibited linear behavior. With a jute fiber volume fraction of 70%, some plastic deformation occurred. A jute fiber mixing ratio of 100% resulted in a display of linear elastic brittle behavior from the fiber; however, when the surface of the fiber was coated with poly(vinyl acetate, following failure, the jute fiber exhibited partial load resistance. The tensile strength decreased as the jute fiber content increased; however, the tensile strength did not vary linearly with jute fiber content.

  17. Interpretation of quasi-static and dynamic tensile behavior by digital image correlation technique in TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) and low-carbon steel sheets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Minju; Park, Jaeyeong; Sohn, Seok Su; Kim, Hyoung Seop [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Nack J. [Graduate Institute of Ferrous Technology, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sunghak, E-mail: shlee@postech.ac.kr [Center for Advanced Aerospace Materials, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-02

    In this study, dynamic tensile tests were conducted on TWinning Induced Plasticity (TWIP) and low-carbon (LC) steel sheets at a strain rate of 1500–2000/s by using a split Hopkinson tensile bar, and deformation mechanisms related with improvement of dynamic tensile properties were investigated by a digital image correlation (DIC) technique. The dynamic tensile strength was higher than the quasi-static tensile strength in both TWIP and LC sheets, while the dynamic elongation was same to the quasi-static elongation in the TWIP sheet and was much lower than the quasi-static elongation in the LC sheet. According to the DIC results of the dynamically tensioned TWIP sheet, the homogeneous deformation occurred before the necking at the strain of 47.4%. This indicated that the dynamic deformation processes were almost similar to the quasi-static ones as the TWIP sheet was homogeneously deformed in the initial and intermediate deformation stages. This could be explained by deformation mechanisms including twinning, in consideration of favorable effect of increased twinning on tensile properties under the dynamic loading. On the other hand, the dynamically tensioned LC sheet was rapidly deformed and fractured as the necking was intensified in a narrow strain-concentrated region. The present DIC technique is an outstanding method for detailed dynamic deformation analyses, and provides an important idea for practical safety analyses of automotive steel sheets.

  18. Influence of deuterium content on tensile behavior of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material in the temperature range of ambient to 300 degC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bind, A.K.; Singh, R.N.; Chakravartty, J.K.; Dhandharia, Priyesh; Ghosh, Agnish; More, Nitin S.; Chhatre, A.G.; Vijayakumar, S.

    2011-08-01

    Tensile properties of autoclaved zirconium-2.5 wt. % niobium pressure tube material were evaluated by uniaxial tension tests at temperatures between 25 and 300 degC and under strain-rates of 1.075 x 10 -4 /s. Six number of Zr-2.5Nb alloy pressure tube spools of length 130 mm were obtained from pressure tube number 19-2557-2. Five spools were polished with abrasive paper to remove the oxide layer. These spools were gaseously charged with controlled amount of deuterium. The target deuterium concentrations were 25, 50, 75, 100 and 200 wppm of hydrogen equivalent. Ten samples were machined by EDM wire cutting from every spool. The tensile specimen axis was oriented along longitudinal direction of the tube. Metallographic examination of the deuterium charged samples suggested that the deuterides were predominantly circumferential deuterides. Analysis of tensile results showed that both yield and ultimate tensile strengths of this alloy decreased monotonically with increasing test temperatures. The tensile ductility decreased marginally with increase in test temperature from ambient to 300 degC. It was also observed that both strength and ductility appear to be unaffected by deuterium content at all temperatures, thereby suggesting that at least up to 200 wppm (Heq.) of deuterium tensile properties are not influenced by deuterium. (author)

  19. Viscoelastic Analysis of Thermally Stiffening Polymer Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, Andrew; Rende, Deniz; Senses, Erkan; Akcora, Pinar; Ozisik, Rahmi

    Poly(ethylene oxide), PEO, filled with silica nanoparticles coated with poly(methyl methacrylate), PMMA, was shown to present thermally stiffening behavior above the glass transition temperature of both PEO and PMMA. In the current study, the viscoelastic beahvior of this nanocomposite system is investigated via nanoindenation experiments to complement on going rheological studies. Results were compared to neat polymers, PEO and PMMA, to understand the effect of coated nanoparticles. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. CMMI-1538730.

  20. SOLID BURNT BRICKS’ TENSILE STRENGTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aneta Maroušková

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with experimental testing of solid burnt bricks and mortar in pure (axial tension. The obtained working diagrams will be further use for a detailed numerical analysis of whole brick masonry column under concentric compressive load. Failure mechanism of compressed brick masonry column is characterized by the appearance and development of vertical tensile cracks in masonry units (bricks passing in the direction of principal stresses and is accompanied by progressive growth of horizontal deformations. These cracks are caused by contraction and interaction between two materials with different mechanical characteristics (brick and mortar. The aim of this paper is more precisely describe the response of quasi-brittle materials to uniaxial loading in tension (for now only the results from three point bending test are available. For these reasons, bricks and mortar tensile behavior is experimentally tested and the obtained results are discussed.

  1. Tensile properties of unirradiated path A PCA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braski, D.N.; Maziasz, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    The tensile properties of PCA in the Al (solution annealed), A3 (25%-cold worked), and B2 (aged, cold worked, and reaged) conditions were determined from room temperature to 600 0 C. The tensile behavior of PCA-A1 and -A3 was generally similar to that of titanium-modified type 316 stainless steel with similar microstructures. The PCA-B2 was weaker than PCA-A3, especially above 500 0 C, but demonstrated slightly better ducility

  2. Bifurcation and chaos of an axially accelerating viscoelastic beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xiaodong; Chen Liqun

    2005-01-01

    This paper investigates bifurcation and chaos of an axially accelerating viscoelastic beam. The Kelvin-Voigt model is adopted to constitute the material of the beam. Lagrangian strain is used to account for the beam's geometric nonlinearity. The nonlinear partial-differential equation governing transverse motion of the beam is derived from the Newton second law. The Galerkin method is applied to truncate the governing equation into a set of ordinary differential equations. By use of the Poincare map, the dynamical behavior is identified based on the numerical solutions of the ordinary differential equations. The bifurcation diagrams are presented in the case that the mean axial speed, the amplitude of speed fluctuation and the dynamic viscoelasticity is respectively varied while other parameters are fixed. The Lyapunov exponent is calculated to identify chaos. From numerical simulations, it is indicated that the periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic motions occur in the transverse vibrations of the axially accelerating viscoelastic beam

  3. Experimental studies on the dynamic tensile behavior of Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-3Mo-1Cr-2Nb-Si alloy with Widmanstatten microstructure at elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong Xuhui; Wang Yu; Xia Yuanming; Ge Peng; Zhao Yongqing

    2009-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a newly developed Ti-6Al-2Sn-2Zr-3Mo-1Cr-2Nb-Si alloy, referred as TC21, is investigated at temperatures ranging from 298 to 1023 K and under constant strain rate loadings ranging from 0.001 to 1270 s -1 . The results show that temperature and strain rate have significant effects on the tensile behavior of the material. At low strain rates of 0.001 and 0.05 s -1 , a discontinuity is found in the yield stress-temperature curve. And the discontinuity temperature increases with increasing strain rate. The analysis of temperature and strain rate dependence of unstable strain indicates a high-velocity-ductility phenomenon at elevated temperatures. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis shows that the material is broken in a mixture manner of ductile fracture and intergranular fracture under low strain rates at room temperature, while the fracture manner changes to totally ductile fracture under other testing conditions. The width and depth of ductile dimples increase with increasing temperature. No adiabatic shear band is found in the tensile deformation of the material.

  4. Viscoelastic and thermal properties of woven sisal fabric reinforced natural rubber biocomposites

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    John, MJ

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study explores the dynamic mechanical behavior of woven sisal fabric reinforced natural rubber composites. The influence of chemical modification on the viscoelastic properties has also been determined. Moreover, the effect of frequency...

  5. A phenomenological constitutive model for the nonlinear viscoelastic responses of biodegradable polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Kamran; El Sayed, Tamer S.

    2012-01-01

    We formulate a constitutive framework for biodegradable polymers that accounts for nonlinear viscous behavior under regimes with large deformation. The generalized Maxwell model is used to represent the degraded viscoelastic response of a polymer

  6. A boundary integral method for a dynamic, transient mode I crack problem with viscoelastic cohesive zone

    KAUST Repository

    Leise, Tanya L.; Walton, Jay R.; Gorb, Yuliya

    2009-01-01

    interpenetration, in contrast to the usual mode I boundary conditions that assume all unloaded crack faces are stress-free. The nonlinear viscoelastic cohesive zone behavior is motivated by dynamic fracture in brittle polymers in which crack propagation

  7. Effect of holes on the room temperature tensile behaviors of thin wall specimens with (210) side surface of Ni-base single crystal superalloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Z.J.; Liu, T.; Pu, S. [Superalloys Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72, Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Xu, H. [Materials Fatigue and Fracture Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72, Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Wang, L., E-mail: wangli@imr.ac.cn [Superalloys Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72, Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China); Lou, L.H. [Superalloys Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, No. 72, Wenhua Road, Shenyang 110016 (China)

    2015-10-25

    Tensile properties of Ni-base single crystal superalloy plate specimens with and without a hole at room temperature were studied in the present paper. During the testing process, an ARAMIS system based on the digital image correlation technique and in-situ scanning electron microscopy were employed to in-situ observe the strain distribution and slip traces development on the sample surfaces. It was demonstrated that the yield stress was decreased with the appearance of a hole due to the stress concentration. The results were analyzed based on the stress and strain states of specimens and the slip traces development observed on specimen surfaces. - Graphical abstract: The strain distribution for samples without and with a hole, respectively. - Highlights: • Tensile tests of plate specimens without and with a hole were performed. • Surface strain fields were in-situ observed by ARAMIS system. • Slip traces development on sample surfaces was in-situ observed by SEM. • The hole deteriorated both the tensile strength and elongation of the samples. • Tensile strength of specimens without and with a hole was discussed respectively.

  8. Effect of matrix cracking on the time delayed buckling of viscoelastic laminated circular cylindrical shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Fan; FU YiMing; CHEN YaoJun

    2008-01-01

    The effect of matrix cracking on the bifurcation creep buckling of viscoelastic laminated circular cylindrical shells is investigated. The viscoelastic behavior of laminas is modeled by Schapery's integral constitutive equation with growing ma-trix cracks. The values of damage variables are correlated to non-dimensional density of matrix cracks relying on the formulas from meso-mechanics approach, and the evolution equation predicting the growth rate of density of matrix cracks is assumed to follow a power type relation with transverse tensile stress. The gov-erning equations for pre-buckling creep deformation and bifurcation buckling of laminated circular cylindrical shells under axial compression are obtained on the basis of the Donnell type shallow shell theory and Karman-Donnell geometrically nonlinear relationship. Corresponding solution strategy is constructed by inte-grating finite-difference technique, trigonometric series expansion method and Taylor's numerical recursive scheme for convolution integration. The bifurcation creep buckling of symmetrically laminated glass-epoxy circular cylindrical shells with matrix creep cracking coupled are examined for various geometrical parame-ters and parameters of damage evolution as well as boundary conditions. The nu-merical results show that matrix creep cracking remarkably shortens the critic time of bifurcation buckling and reduces the durable critic loads, and its effects become weak and finally vanish with the increase of the ratio of radius to thickness in the case of short laminated circular cylindrical shells, also the influence of the matrix creep cracking is mainly dependent on the boundary conditions at two ends for moderately long circular cylindrical shells.

  9. Effect of matrix cracking on the time delayed buckling of viscoelastic laminated circular cylindrical shells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The effect of matrix cracking on the bifurcation creep buckling of viscoelastic laminated circular cylindrical shells is investigated.The viscoelastic behavior of laminas is modeled by Schapery’s integral constitutive equation with growing matrix cracks.The values of damage variables are correlated to non-dimensional density of matrix cracks relying on the formulas from mesomechanics approach,and the evolution equation predicting the growth rate of density of matrix cracks is assumed to follow a power type relation with transverse tensile stress.The governing equations for prebuckling creep deformation and bifurcation buckling of laminated circular cylindrical shells under axial compression are obtained on the basis of the Donnell type shallow shell theory and Kármán-Donnell geometrically nonlinear relationship.Corresponding solution strategy is constructed by integrating finite-difference technique,trigonometric series expansion method and Taylor’s numerical recursive scheme for convolution integration.The bifurcation creep buckling of symmetrically laminated glass-epoxy circular cylindrical shells with matrix creep cracking coupled are examined for various geometrical parameters and parameters of damage evolution as well as boundary conditions.The numerical results show that matrix creep cracking remarkably shortens the critic time of bifurcation buckling and reduces the durable critic loads,and its effects become weak and finally vanish with the increase of the ratio of radius to thickness in the case of short laminated circular cylindrical shells,also the influence of the matrix creep cracking is mainly dependent on the boundary conditions at two ends for moderately long circular cylindrical shells.

  10. Extensional rheometer based on viscoelastic catastrophes outline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method and a device for determining viscoelastic properties of a fluid. The invention resides inter alia in the generation of viscoelastic catastrophes in confined systems for use in the context of extensional rheology. The viscoelastic catastrophe is according ...... to the invention generated in a bistable fluid system, and the flow conditions for which the catastrophe occurs can be used as a fingerprint of the fluid's viscoelastic properties in extensional flow....

  11. SYNTHESIS OF VISCOELASTIC MATERIAL MODELS (SCHEMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Bogomolov

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The principles of structural viscoelastic schemes construction for materials with linear viscoelastic properties in accordance with the given experimental data on creep tests are analyzed. It is shown that there can be only four types of materials with linear visco-elastic properties.

  12. Identifying Mechanical Properties of Viscoelastic Materials in Time Domain Using the Fractional Zener Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Delowski Ciniello

    Full Text Available Abstract The present paper aims at presenting a methodology for characterizing viscoelastic materials in time domain, taking into account the fractional Zener constitutive model and the influence of temperature through Williams, Landel, and Ferry’s model. To that effect, a set of points obtained experimentally through uniaxial tensile tests with different constant strain rates is considered. The approach is based on the minimization of the quadratic relative distance between the experimental stress-strain curves and the corresponding ones given by the theoretical model. In order to avoid the local minima in the process of optimization, a hybrid technique based on genetic algorithms and non-linear programming techniques is used. The methodology is applied in the characterization of two different commercial viscoelastic materials. The results indicate that the proposed methodology is effective in identifying thermorheologically simple viscoelastic materials.

  13. Viscoelastic-Viscoplastic Modelling of the Scratch Response of PMMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kermouche

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at understanding how to model the time-dependent behavior of PMMA during a scratch loading at a constant speed and at middle strain levels. A brief experimental study is first presented, consisting of the analysis of microscratches carried out at various scratching velocities and normal loads. The loading conditions have been chosen in such a way that neither (viscoelasticity nor (viscoplasticity of the PMMA may be neglected a priori. The main analyzed parameter is the tip penetration depth measured during the steady state. Then, a finite element model is used to investigate the potential of classical elastic-viscoplastic constitutive models to reproduce these experimental results. It is mainly shown that these models lead to unsatisfying results. More specifically, it is pointed out here that the time-independent Young modulus used in such models is not suitable. To take into account this feature, a viscoelastic-viscoplastic model based on the connection in series of a viscoelastic part with a viscoplastic part is proposed. It is shown that it leads to more acceptable results, which points out the importance of viscoelasticity in the scratch behavior of solid polymers.

  14. Improving High-Temperature Tensile and Low-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Al-Si-Cu-Mg Alloys Through Micro-additions of Ti, V, and Zr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaha, S. K.; Czerwinski, F.; Kasprzak, W.; Friedman, J.; Chen, D. L.

    2015-07-01

    High-temperature tensile and low-cycle fatigue tests were performed to assess the influence of micro-additions of Ti, V, and Zr on the improvement of the Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg (wt pct) alloy in the as-cast condition. Addition of transition metals led to modification of microstructure where in addition to conventional phases present in the Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg base, new thermally stable micro-sized Zr-Ti-V-rich phases Al21.4Si4.1Ti3.5VZr3.9, Al6.7Si1.2TiZr1.8, Al2.8Si3.8V1.6Zr, and Al5.1Si35.4Ti1.6Zr5.7Fe were formed. The tensile tests showed that with increasing test temperature from 298 K to 673 K (25 °C to 400 °C), the yield stress and tensile strength of the present studied alloy decreased from 161 to 84 MPa and from 261 to 102 MPa, respectively. Also, the studied alloy exhibited 18, 12, and 5 pct higher tensile strength than the alloy A356, 354 and existing Al-Si-Cu-Mg alloy modified with additions of Zr, Ti, and Ni, respectively. The fatigue life of the studied alloy was substantially longer than those of the reference alloys A356 and the same Al-7Si-1Cu-0.5Mg base with minor additions of V, Zr, and Ti in the T6 condition. Fractographic analysis after tensile tests revealed that at the lower temperature up to 473 K (200 °C), the cleavage-type brittle fracture for the precipitates and ductile fracture for the matrix were dominant while at higher temperature fully ductile-type fracture with debonding and pull-out of cracked particles was identified. It is believed that the intermetallic precipitates containing Zr, Ti, and V improve the alloy performance at increased temperatures.

  15. Determining the Viscosity Coefficient for Viscoelastic Wave Propagation in Rock Bars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Leilei; Zhu, Wancheng; Li, Shaohua; Guan, Kai

    2018-05-01

    Rocks with microdefects exhibit viscoelastic behavior during stress wave propagation. The viscosity coefficient of the wave can be used to characterize the attenuation as the wave propagates in rock. In this study, a long artificial bar with a readily adjustable viscosity coefficient was fabricated to investigate stress wave attenuation. The viscoelastic behavior of the artificial bar under dynamic loading was investigated, and the initial viscoelastic coefficient was obtained based on the amplitude attenuation of the incident harmonic wave. A one-dimensional wave propagation program was compiled to reproduce the time history of the stress wave measured during the experiments, and the program was well fitted to the Kelvin-Voigt model. The attenuation and dispersion of the stress wave in long artificial viscoelastic bars were quantified to accurately determine the viscoelastic coefficient. Finally, the method used to determine the viscoelastic coefficient of a long artificial bar based on the experiments and numerical simulations was extended to determine the viscoelastic coefficient of a short rock bar. This study provides a new method of determining the viscosity coefficient of rock.

  16. Dynamical problem of micropolar viscoelasticity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging Solutions)

    gen (1964) and Tomar and Kumar (1999) discussed different types of problems in micropolar elastic medium. Eringen (1967) extended the theory of micropolar elasticity to obtain linear constitutive theory for micropolar material possessing inter- nal friction. A problem on micropolar viscoelastic waves has been discussed by ...

  17. Viscoelastic behaviour of pumpkin balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerngross, T.; Xu, Y.; Pellegrino, S.

    2008-11-01

    The lobes of the NASA ULDB pumpkin-shaped super-pressure balloons are made of a thin polymeric film that shows considerable time-dependent behaviour. A nonlinear viscoelastic model based on experimental measurements has been recently established for this film. This paper presents a simulation of the viscoelastic behaviour of ULDB balloons with the finite element software ABAQUS. First, the standard viscoelastic modelling capabilities available in ABAQUS are examined, but are found of limited accuracy even for the case of simple uniaxial creep tests on ULDB films. Then, a nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model is implemented by means of a user-defined subroutine. This approach is verified by means of biaxial creep experiments on pressurized cylinders and is found to be accurate provided that the film anisotropy is also included in the model. A preliminary set of predictions for a single lobe of a ULDB is presented at the end of the paper. It indicates that time-dependent effects in a balloon structure can lead to significant stress redistribution and large increases in the transverse strains in the lobes.

  18. Design and numerical implementation of a 3-D non-linear viscoelastic constitutive model for brain tissue during impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brands, D.W.A.; Peters, G.W.M.; Bovendeerd, P.H.M.

    2004-01-01

    Finite Element (FE) head models are often used to understand mechanical response of the head and its contents during impact loading in the head. CurrentFE models do not account for non-linear viscoelastic material behavior of brain tissue. We developed a new non-linear viscoelastic material model

  19. Dynamics of magnetic nanoparticles in viscoelastic media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmer, Hilke, E-mail: h.remmer@tu-bs.de [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Roeben, Eric; Schmidt, Annette M. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Universität zu Köln, Köln (Germany); Schilling, Meinhard; Ludwig, Frank [Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany)

    2017-04-01

    We compare different models for the description of the complex susceptibility of magnetic nanoparticles in an aqueous gelatin solution representing a model system for a Voigt-Kelvin scheme. The analysis of susceptibility spectra with the numerical model by Raikher et al. is compared with the analysis applying a phenomenological, modified Debye model. The fit of the models to the measured data allows one to extract the viscoelastic parameter dynamic viscosity η and shear modulus G. The experimental data were recorded on single-core thermally blocked CoFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles in an aqueous solution with 2.5 wt% gelatin. Whereas the dynamic viscosities obtained by fitting the model – extended by distributions of hydrodynamic diameters and viscosities – agree very well, the derived values for the shear modulus show the same temporal behavior during the gelation process, but vary approximately by a factor of two. To verify the values for viscosity and shear modulus obtained from nanorheology, macrorheological measurements are in progress. - Highlights: • Ac susceptibility spectra of CoFe2O4 nanoparticles in aqueous gelatin solution. • Analysis of spectra with different approaches of Voigt-Kelvin model. • Comparison of modified Debye model with numerical model. • Both models provide similar values for viscoelastic parameters.

  20. TIDALLY HEATED TERRESTRIAL EXOPLANETS: VISCOELASTIC RESPONSE MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henning, Wade G.; O'Connell, Richard J.; Sasselov, Dimitar D.

    2009-01-01

    Tidal friction in exoplanet systems, driven by orbits that allow for durable nonzero eccentricities at short heliocentric periods, can generate internal heating far in excess of the conditions observed in our own solar system. Secular perturbations or a notional 2:1 resonance between a hot Earth and hot Jupiter can be used as a baseline to consider the thermal evolution of convecting bodies subject to strong viscoelastic tidal heating. We compare results first from simple models using a fixed Quality factor and Love number, and then for three different viscoelastic rheologies: the Maxwell body, the Standard Anelastic Solid (SAS), and the Burgers body. The SAS and Burgers models are shown to alter the potential for extreme tidal heating by introducing the possibility of new equilibria and multiple response peaks. We find that tidal heating tends to exceed radionuclide heating at periods below 10-30 days, and exceed insolation only below 1-2 days. Extreme cases produce enough tidal heat to initiate global-scale partial melting, and an analysis of tidal limiting mechanisms such as advective cooling for earthlike planets is discussed. To explore long-term behaviors, we map equilibria points between convective heat loss and tidal heat input as functions of eccentricity. For the periods and magnitudes discussed, we show that tidal heating, if significant, is generally detrimental to the width of habitable zones.

  1. Viscoelastic deformation of lipid bilayer vesicles†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Biswas, Roshni; Wu, Shuyang; Povinelli, Michelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Lipid bilayers form the boundaries of the cell and its organelles. Many physiological processes, such as cell movement and division, involve bending and folding of the bilayer at high curvatures. Currently, bending of the bilayer is treated as an elastic deformation, such that its stress-strain response is independent of the rate at which bending strain is applied. We present here the first direct measurement of viscoelastic response in a lipid bilayer vesicle. We used a dual-beam optical trap (DBOT) to stretch 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Upon application of a step optical force, the vesicle membrane deforms in two regimes: a fast, instantaneous area increase, followed by a much slower stretching to an eventual plateau deformation. From measurements of dozens of GUVs, the average time constant of the slower stretching response was 0.225 ± 0.033 s (standard deviation, SD). Increasing the fluid viscosity did not affect the observed time constant. We performed a set of experiments to rule out heating by laser absorption as a cause of the transient behavior. Thus, we demonstrate here that the bending deformation of lipid bilayer membranes should be treated as viscoelastic. PMID:26268612

  2. Viscoelastic deformation of lipid bilayer vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Sankhagowit, Shalene; Biswas, Roshni; Wu, Shuyang; Povinelli, Michelle L; Malmstadt, Noah

    2015-10-07

    Lipid bilayers form the boundaries of the cell and its organelles. Many physiological processes, such as cell movement and division, involve bending and folding of the bilayer at high curvatures. Currently, bending of the bilayer is treated as an elastic deformation, such that its stress-strain response is independent of the rate at which bending strain is applied. We present here the first direct measurement of viscoelastic response in a lipid bilayer vesicle. We used a dual-beam optical trap (DBOT) to stretch 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). Upon application of a step optical force, the vesicle membrane deforms in two regimes: a fast, instantaneous area increase, followed by a much slower stretching to an eventual plateau deformation. From measurements of dozens of GUVs, the average time constant of the slower stretching response was 0.225 ± 0.033 s (standard deviation, SD). Increasing the fluid viscosity did not affect the observed time constant. We performed a set of experiments to rule out heating by laser absorption as a cause of the transient behavior. Thus, we demonstrate here that the bending deformation of lipid bilayer membranes should be treated as viscoelastic.

  3. Combining adhesive contact mechanics with a viscoelastic material model to probe local material properties by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganser, Christian; Czibula, Caterina; Tscharnuter, Daniel; Schöberl, Thomas; Teichert, Christian; Hirn, Ulrich

    2017-12-20

    Viscoelastic properties are often measured using probe based techniques such as nanoindentation (NI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Rarely, however, are these methods verified. In this article, we present a method that combines contact mechanics with a viscoelastic model (VEM) composed of springs and dashpots. We further show how to use this model to determine viscoelastic properties from creep curves recorded by a probe based technique. We focus on using the standard linear solid model and the generalized Maxwell model of order 2. The method operates in the range of 0.01 Hz to 1 Hz. Our approach is suitable for rough surfaces by providing a defined contact area using plastic pre-deformation of the material. The very same procedure is used to evaluate AFM based measurements as well as NI measurements performed on polymer samples made from poly(methyl methacrylate) and polycarbonate. The results of these measurements are then compared to those obtained by tensile creep tests also performed on the same samples. It is found that the tensile test results differ considerably from the results obtained by AFM and NI methods. The similarity between the AFM results and NI results suggests that the proposed method is capable of yielding results comparable to NI but with the advantage of the imaging possibilities of AFM. Furthermore, all three methods allowed a clear distinction between PC and PMMA by means of their respective viscoelastic properties.

  4. Viscoelastic Characterization of Long-Eared Owl Flight Feather Shaft and the Damping Ability Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-li Gao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Flight feather shaft of long-eared owl is characterized by a three-parameter model for linear viscoelastic solids to reveal its damping ability. Uniaxial tensile tests of the long-eared owl, pigeon, and golden eagle flight feather shaft specimens were carried out based on Instron 3345 single column material testing system, respectively, and viscoelastic response of their stress and strain was described by the standard linear solid model. Parameter fitting result obtained from the tensile tests shows that there is no significant difference in instantaneous elastic modulus for the three birds’ feather shafts, but the owl shaft has the highest viscosity, implying more obvious viscoelastic performance. Dynamic mechanical property was characterized based on the tensile testing results. Loss factor (tanδ of the owl flight feather shaft was calculated to be 1.609 ± 0.238, far greater than those of the pigeon (0.896 ± 0.082 and golden eagle (1.087 ± 0.074. It is concluded that the long-eared owl flight feather has more outstanding damping ability compared to the pigeon and golden eagle flight feather shaft. Consequently, the long-eared owl flight feathers can dissipate the vibration energy more effectively during the flying process based on the principle of damping mechanism, for the purpose of vibration attenuation and structure radiated noise reduction.

  5. Micromechanics of transformation fields in ageing linear viscoelastic composites: effects of phase dissolution or precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honorio, Tulio

    2017-11-01

    Transformation fields, in an affine formulation characterizing mechanical behavior, describe a variety of physical phenomena regardless their origin. Different composites, notably geomaterials, present a viscoelastic behavior, which is, in some cases of industrial interest, ageing, i.e. it evolves independently with respect to time and loading time. Here, a general formulation of the micromechanics of prestressed or prestrained composites in Ageing Linear Viscoelasticity (ALV) is presented. Emphasis is put on the estimation of effective transformation fields in ALV. The result generalizes Ageing Linear Thermo- and Poro-Viscoelasticity and it can be used in approaches coping with a phase transformation. Additionally, the results are extended to the case of locally transforming materials due to non-coupled dissolution and/or precipitation of a given (elastic or viscoelastic) phase. The estimations of locally transforming composites can be made with respect to different morphologies. As an application, estimations of the coefficient of thermal expansion of a hydrating alite paste are presented.

  6. Characteristics of Viscoelastic Crustal Deformation Following a Megathrust Earthquake: Discrepancy Between the Apparent and Intrinsic Relaxation Time Constants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukahata, Yukitoshi; Matsu'ura, Mitsuhiro

    2018-02-01

    The viscoelastic deformation of an elastic-viscoelastic composite system is significantly different from that of a simple viscoelastic medium. Here, we show that complicated transient deformation due to viscoelastic stress relaxation after a megathrust earthquake can occur even in a very simple situation, in which an elastic surface layer (lithosphere) is underlain by a viscoelastic substratum (asthenosphere) under gravity. Although the overall decay rate of the system is controlled by the intrinsic relaxation time constant of the asthenosphere, the apparent decay time constant at each observation point is significantly different from place to place and generally much longer than the intrinsic relaxation time constant of the asthenosphere. It is also not rare that the sense of displacement rate is reversed during the viscoelastic relaxation. If we do not bear these points in mind, we may draw false conclusions from observed deformation data. Such complicated transient behavior can be explained mathematically from the characteristics of viscoelastic solution: for an elastic-viscoelastic layered half-space, the viscoelastic solution is expressed as superposition of three decaying components with different relaxation time constants that depend on wavelength.

  7. Effect of Annealing Temperature on the Microstructure, Tensile Properties, and Fracture Behavior of Cold-Rolled High-Mn Light-Weight Steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Hyun; Cho, Kyung Mox [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Jun; Moon, Joonoh; Kang, Jun-Yun; Park, Jun-Young; Lee, Tae-Ho [Korea Institute of Materials Science, Changwon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-05-15

    The effects of the annealing temperature on the microstructure and tensile properties of cold-rolled light-weight steels are investigated using two Fe-30Mn-xAl-0.9C alloys that contain different Al content. The initial alloy microstructure is composed of a single austenite or a mixture of austenite and ferrite depending on the nominal aluminum content. For the alloy with 9 wt%Al content, the recrystallization and grain growth of austenite occurrs depending on the annealing temperature. However, for the alloy with 11 wt%Al content, the β-Mn phase is observed after annealing for 10 min at 550~800 ℃. The β-Mn transformation kinetics is the fastest at 700 ℃. The formation of the β-Mn phase has a detrimental effect on the ductility, and this leads to significant decreases in the total elongation. The same alloy also forms κ-carbide and DO3 ordering at 550~900 ℃. The investigated alloys exhibit a fully recrystallized microstructure after annealing at 900 ℃ for 10 min, which results in a high total elongation of 25~55%with a high tensile strength of 900~1170 MPa.

  8. Dynamic assessment of nonlinear typical section aeroviscoelastic systems using fractional derivative-based viscoelastic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, T. P.; Marques, Flávio D.; Pereira, Daniel A.; Rade, Domingos A.

    2018-06-01

    Nonlinear aeroelastic systems are prone to the appearance of limit cycle oscillations, bifurcations, and chaos. Such problems are of increasing concern in aircraft design since there is the need to control nonlinear instabilities and improve safety margins, at the same time as aircraft are subjected to increasingly critical operational conditions. On the other hand, in spite of the fact that viscoelastic materials have already been successfully used for the attenuation of undesired vibrations in several types of mechanical systems, a small number of research works have addressed the feasibility of exploring the viscoelastic effect to improve the behavior of nonlinear aeroelastic systems. In this context, the objective of this work is to assess the influence of viscoelastic materials on the aeroelastic features of a three-degrees-of-freedom typical section with hardening structural nonlinearities. The equations of motion are derived accounting for the presence of viscoelastic materials introduced in the resilient elements associated to each degree-of-freedom. A constitutive law based on fractional derivatives is adopted, which allows the modeling of temperature-dependent viscoelastic behavior in time and frequency domains. The unsteady aerodynamic loading is calculated based on the classical linear potential theory for arbitrary airfoil motion. The aeroelastic behavior is investigated through time domain simulations, and subsequent frequency transformations, from which bifurcations are identified from diagrams of limit cycle oscillations amplitudes versus airspeed. The influence of the viscoelastic effect on the aeroelastic behavior, for different values of temperature, is also investigated. The numerical simulations show that viscoelastic damping can increase the flutter speed and reduce the amplitudes of limit cycle oscillations. These results prove the potential that viscoelastic materials have to increase aircraft components safety margins regarding aeroelastic

  9. Generalized Fractional Derivative Anisotropic Viscoelastic Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harry H. Hilton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Isotropic linear and nonlinear fractional derivative constitutive relations are formulated and examined in terms of many parameter generalized Kelvin models and are analytically extended to cover general anisotropic homogeneous or non-homogeneous as well as functionally graded viscoelastic material behavior. Equivalent integral constitutive relations, which are computationally more powerful, are derived from fractional differential ones and the associated anisotropic temperature-moisture-degree-of-cure shift functions and reduced times are established. Approximate Fourier transform inversions for fractional derivative relations are formulated and their accuracy is evaluated. The efficacy of integer and fractional derivative constitutive relations is compared and the preferential use of either characterization in analyzing isotropic and anisotropic real materials must be examined on a case-by-case basis. Approximate protocols for curve fitting analytical fractional derivative results to experimental data are formulated and evaluated.

  10. Implementation of viscoelastic Hopkinson bars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Govender R.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the properties of soft, viscoelastic materials at high strain rates are important in furthering our understanding of their role during blast or impact events. Testing these low impedance materials using a metallic split Hopkinson pressure bar setup results in poor signal to noise ratios due to impedance mismatching. These difficulties are overcome by using polymeric Hopkinson bars. Conventional Hopkinson bar analysis cannot be used on the polymeric bars due to the viscoelastic nature of the bar material. Implementing polymeric Hopkinson bars requires characterization of the viscoelastic properties of the material used. In this paper, 30 mm diameter Polymethyl Methacrylate bars are used as Hopkinson pressure bars. This testing technique is applied to polymeric foam called Divinycell H80 and H200. Although there is a large body of of literature containing compressive data, this rarely deals with strain rates above 250s−1 which becomes increasingly important when looking at the design of composite structures where energy absorption during impact events is high on the list of priorities. Testing of polymeric foams at high strain rates allows for the development of better constitutive models.

  11. Sensitivity Analysis of Viscoelastic Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.G. de Lima

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of control of sound and vibration of mechanical systems, the use of viscoelastic materials has been regarded as a convenient strategy in many types of industrial applications. Numerical models based on finite element discretization have been frequently used in the analysis and design of complex structural systems incorporating viscoelastic materials. Such models must account for the typical dependence of the viscoelastic characteristics on operational and environmental parameters, such as frequency and temperature. In many applications, including optimal design and model updating, sensitivity analysis based on numerical models is a very usefull tool. In this paper, the formulation of first-order sensitivity analysis of complex frequency response functions is developed for plates treated with passive constraining damping layers, considering geometrical characteristics, such as the thicknesses of the multi-layer components, as design variables. Also, the sensitivity of the frequency response functions with respect to temperature is introduced. As an example, response derivatives are calculated for a three-layer sandwich plate and the results obtained are compared with first-order finite-difference approximations.

  12. Mechanical properties of Zr-2.5Nb pressure tube material manufactured employing forging routes for PHWR700 - Part 1: tensile behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bind, A.K.; Singh, R.N.; Sunil, Saurav; Chakravartty, J.K.; Ghosh, Agnish; Dhandharia, Priyesh; More, Nitin S.; Vijayakumar, S.; Chhatre, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Tensile properties of Zr-2.5Nb alloy tubes produced employing forging to break the cast structure were evaluated by carrying out uni-axial tension test at temperatures between 25 and 325 degC and under strain-rate of 1.075 x 10 -4 /s for both longitudinal and transverse specimens. Both strength and elongation values were comparable for the samples obtained from front and back end of the tube. Transverse samples showed higher strength and lower uniform elongation values as compared to longitudinal samples. The yield strength of double forged material at 25 degC is higher than the PHWR700 specification of a maximum value of 586 MPa. (author)

  13. Modeling the Monotonic and Cyclic Tensile Stress-Strain Behavior of 2D and 2.5D Woven C/SiC Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, L. B.

    2018-05-01

    The deformation of 2D and 2.5 C/SiC woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) in monotonic and cyclic loadings has been investigated. Statistical matrix multicracking and fiber failure models and the fracture mechanics interface debonding approach are used to determine the spacing of matrix cracks, the debonded length of interface, and the fraction of broken fibers. The effects of fiber volume fraction and fiber Weibull modulus on the damage evolution in the composites and on their tensile stress-strain curves are analyzed. When matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur, the fiber slippage relative to the matrix in the debonded interface region of the 0° warp yarns is the main reason for the emergance of stress-strain hysteresis loops for 2D and 2.5D woven CMCs. A model of these loops is developed, and histeresis loops for the composites in cyclic loadings/unloadings are predicted.

  14. Microstructure evolution of titanium after tensile test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wronski, S.; Wierzbanowski, K.; Jędrychowski, M.; Tarasiuk, J; Wronski, M.; Baczmanski, A.; Bacroix, B.

    2016-01-01

    The qualitative and quantitative behavior of titanium T40 during tensile loading with a special emphasis on the presence of deformation twins in the observed microstructures is described. The samples for tensile tests were cut out from the rolled titanium sheet along the rolling and transverse directions. Several microstructure maps were determined using Electron Backscatter Diffraction technique (EBSD). These data were used to obtain crystallographic textures, misorientation distributions, grain size, twin boundary length, grain orientation spread, low and high angle boundary fractions and Schmid and Taylor factors. The deformation mechanisms and microstructure characteristics are different in the samples stretched along rolling and transverse directions. A strong appearance of tensile twins was observed in the samples deformed along transverse direction. On the other hand, more frequent subgrain formation and higher orientation spread was observed in the sample deformed along rolling direction, which caused’‘orientation blurring’ leading to an increase of grain size with deformation, as determined from OIM analysis.

  15. In Situ Radiography During Tensile Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory system for testing specimens of metal-, ceramic-, and intermetallic-matrix composite materials incorporates both electromechanical tensile-testing subsystem and either of two imaging subsystems that take x-ray photographs of specimens before, during, and after tensile tests. Used to test specimens of reaction-bonded silicon nitride reinforced with silicon carbide fibers (SiC/RBSN) considered for high-temperature service in advanced aircraft turbine engines. Provides data on effects of preexisting flaws (e.g., high-density impurities and local variations of density) on fracture behavior. Accumulated internal damage monitored during loading. X-ray source illuminates specimen in load frame while specimen is pulled. X-ray images on film correlated with stress-vs.-strain data from tensile test.

  16. Effect of mushy state rolling on age-hardening and tensile behavior of Al-4.5Cu alloy and in situ Al-4.5Cu-5TiB2 composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siddhalingeshwar, I.G.; Herbert, M.A.; Chakraborty, M.; Mitra, R.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Mushy state rolling of composites reduces peak-aging times to ∼7.5-10% of that of as-cast alloy. → Uniform Cu atom distribution achieved in matrices by mushy state rolling enhances aging kinetics. → Uniform precipitate distribution obtained by mushy state rolling leads to higher microhardness. → Peak-age tensile strength and strain hardening rates are found to increase on mushy state rolling. - Abstract: The effect of mushy state rolling on aging kinetics of stir-cast Al-4.5Cu alloy and in situ Al-4.5Cu-5TiB 2 composite and their tensile behavior in solution-treated (495 deg. C) or differently aged (170 deg. C) conditions, has been investigated. As-cast or pre-hot rolled alloy and composite samples were subjected to single or multiple mushy state roll passes to 5% thickness reduction at temperatures for 20% liquid content. Peak-aging times of mushy state rolled composite matrices have been found as ∼7.5-10% of that of as-cast alloy. Such enhancement in aging kinetics is attributed to homogeneity in Cu atom distribution as well as increase in matrix dislocation density due to thermal expansion coefficient mismatch between Al and TiB 2 , matrix grain refinement and particle redistribution, achieved by mushy state rolling. Uniform precipitate distribution in mushy state rolled composite matrices leads to greater peak-age microhardness with higher yield and ultimate tensile strengths than those in as-cast alloy and composite.

  17. A time-domain finite element model reduction method for viscoelastic linear and nonlinear systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio Marcos Gonçalves de Lima

    Full Text Available AbstractMany authors have shown that the effective design of viscoelastic systems can be conveniently carried out by using modern mathematical models to represent the frequency- and temperature-dependent behavior of viscoelastic materials. However, in the quest for design procedures of real-word engineering structures, the large number of exact evaluations of the dynamic responses during iterative procedures, combined with the typically high dimensions of large finite element models, makes the numerical analysis very costly, sometimes unfeasible. It is especially true when the viscoelastic materials are used to reduce vibrations of nonlinear systems. As a matter of fact, which the resolution of the resulting nonlinear equations of motion with frequency- and temperature-dependent viscoelastic damping forces is an interesting, but hard-to-solve problem. Those difficulties motivate the present study, in which a time-domain condensation strategy of viscoelastic systems is addressed, where the viscoelastic behavior is modeled by using a four parameter fractional derivative model. After the discussion of various theoretical aspects, the exact and reduced time responses are calculated for a three-layer sandwich plate by considering nonlinear boundary conditions.

  18. Non-integer viscoelastic constitutive law to model soft biological tissues to in-vivo indentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Nagehan; Tönük, Ergin

    2014-01-01

    During the last decades, derivatives and integrals of non-integer orders are being more commonly used for the description of constitutive behavior of various viscoelastic materials including soft biological tissues. Compared to integer order constitutive relations, non-integer order viscoelastic material models of soft biological tissues are capable of capturing a wider range of viscoelastic behavior obtained from experiments. Although integer order models may yield comparably accurate results, non-integer order material models have less number of parameters to be identified in addition to description of an intermediate material that can monotonically and continuously be adjusted in between an ideal elastic solid and an ideal viscous fluid. In this work, starting with some preliminaries on non-integer (fractional) calculus, the "spring-pot", (intermediate mechanical element between a solid and a fluid), non-integer order three element (Zener) solid model, finally a user-defined large strain non-integer order viscoelastic constitutive model was constructed to be used in finite element simulations. Using the constitutive equation developed, by utilizing inverse finite element method and in vivo indentation experiments, soft tissue material identification was performed. The results indicate that material coefficients obtained from relaxation experiments, when optimized with creep experimental data could simulate relaxation, creep and cyclic loading and unloading experiments accurately. Non-integer calculus viscoelastic constitutive models, having physical interpretation and modeling experimental data accurately is a good alternative to classical phenomenological viscoelastic constitutive equations.

  19. A technique to remove the tensile instability in weakly compressible SPH

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyang; Yu, Peng

    2018-01-01

    When smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) is directly applied for the numerical simulations of transient viscoelastic free surface flows, a numerical problem called tensile instability arises. In this paper, we develop an optimized particle shifting technique to remove the tensile instability in SPH. The basic equations governing free surface flow of an Oldroyd-B fluid are considered, and approximated by an improved SPH scheme. This includes the implementations of the correction of kernel gradient and the introduction of Rusanov flux into the continuity equation. To verify the effectiveness of the optimized particle shifting technique in removing the tensile instability, the impacting drop, the injection molding of a C-shaped cavity, and the extrudate swell, are conducted. The numerical results obtained are compared with those simulated by other numerical methods. A comparison among different numerical techniques (e.g., the artificial stress) to remove the tensile instability is further performed. All numerical results agree well with the available data.

  20. swelling characteristics and tensile properties of natural fiber rei

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    The swelling behavior and tensile strength of natural fiber-reinforced plastic in premium motor spirit (PMS), dual ... with fibers usually of glass fiber, Kevlar and carbon have gained ... NIGERIAN JOURNAL OF TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 27 NO.2 ...

  1. In situ formation of ZrB2 particulates and their influence on microstructure and tensile behavior of AA7075 aluminum matrix composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. David Raja Selvam

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In situ synthesis of aluminum matrix composites (AMCs has become a popular method due to several advantages over conventional stir casting method. In the present study, AA7075/ZrB2 AMCs reinforced with various content of ZrB2 particulates (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 wt.% were synthesized by the in situ reaction of molten aluminum with inorganic salts K2ZrF6 and KBF4. The composites were characterized using XRD, OM, SEM, EBSD and TEM. The XRD patterns revealed the formation of ZrB2 particulates without the presence of any other compounds. The formation of ZrB2 particulates refined the grains of aluminum matrix extensively. Most of the ZrB2 particulates were located near the grain boundaries. The ZrB2 particulates exhibited various morphologies including spherical, cylindrical and hexagonal shapes. The size of the ZrB2 particulates was in the order of nano, sub micron and micron level. A good interfacial bonding was observed between the aluminum matrix and the ZrB2 particulates. The in situ formed ZrB2 particulates enhanced the mechanical properties such as microhardness and the ultimate tensile strength. Various strengthening mechanisms were identified.

  2. Effects of torsional oscillation on tensile behavior of Sn–3.5 wt% Ag alloy with and without adding ZnO nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sobhy, M., E-mail: miladsobhym@yahoo.com

    2014-07-29

    Stress–strain characteristics of both Sn–3.5 wt% Ag and Sn–3.5 wt% Ag–0.3 wt% ZnO alloys were investigated using tensile testing machine. Different superimposed torsional oscillation frequencies ranging from 0 to 1.3 Hz at different deformation temperatures ranging from 303 to 363 K were performed. X-ray diffraction (XRD), transition electron microscopy (TEM) and optical microscopy were used to investigate the microstructures of both alloys. The mechanical parameters such as Young's modulus Y, yield stress σ{sub y}, fracture stress σ{sub f}, work hardening coefficient χ{sub p} and fracture strain ε{sub f} were calculated. The fracture stress of both alloys decreases with increasing the superimposed frequency of torsional oscillations as well as deformation temperatures. The fracture strain behaves in a different manner i.e. it increases with increasing the deformation temperature in the alloy containing ZnO nanoparticles while decreases in the alloy free from ZnO nanoparticles. With respect to the effect of the frequency of the superimposed torsional deformation, the fracture strain increases in both alloys.

  3. Anisotropy in the viscoelastic response of knee meniscus cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coluccino, Luca; Peres, Chiara; Gottardi, Riccardo; Bianchini, Paolo; Diaspro, Alberto; Ceseracciu, Luca

    2017-01-26

    The knee meniscus is instrumental to stability, shock absorption, load transmission and stress distribution within the knee joint. Such functions are mechanically demanding, and replacement constructs used in meniscus repair often fail because of a poor match with the surrounding tissue. This study focused on the native structure-mechanics relationships and on their anisotropic behavior in meniscus, to define the target biomechanical viscoelastic properties required by scaffolds upon loading. To show regional orientation of the collagen fibers and their viscoelastic behavior, bovine lateral menisci were characterized by second harmonic generation microscopy and through time-dependent mechanical tests. Furthermore, their dynamic viscoelastic response was analyzed over a wide range of frequencies. Multilevel characterization aims to expand the biomimetic approach from the structure itself, to include the mechanical characteristics that give the meniscus its peculiar properties, thus providing tools for the design of novel, effective scaffolds. An example of modeling of anisotropic open-cell porous material tailored to fulfill the measured requirements is presented, leading to a definition of additional parameters for a better understanding of the load transmission mechanism and for better scaffold functionality.

  4. Viscoelastic modes in chiral liquid crystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    amit@fs.rri.local.net (Amit Kumar Agarwal)

    our studies on the viscoelastic modes of some chiral liquid crystals using dynamic light scattering. We discuss viscoelastic ... In the vicinity of the direct beam for a sample aligned in the Bragg mode and. 297 ... experimental investigations on these modes. Duke and Du ..... scattering volume is not true in practice. In an actual ...

  5. The visco-elastic multilayer program VEROAD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hopman, P.C.

    1996-01-01

    The mathematical principles and derivation of a linear visco-elastic multilayer computer program are described. The mathematical derivation is based on Fourier Transformation. The program is called VEROAD, which is an acronym for Visco-Elastic ROad Analysis Delft. The program allows calculation of

  6. Viscoelastic behavior and microstructure of protein solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twenty percent solutions of calcium caseinate (CC), egg albumin (EA), fish protein isolate (FPI), soy protein isolate (SPI), wheat gluten (WG), and whey protein isolate (WPI) were examined during heating by small amplitude oscillatory shear measurements, which provided an indication of protein behav...

  7. Viscoelastic sorption behavior of starch and gluten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meinders, M.B.J.; Oliver, L.

    2015-01-01

    The migration of gasses and liquids through (bio) polymers plays an important role in numerous applications and processes like, e.g., drying and (re)wetting of foods and food ingredients, packaging, and controlled release. A good understanding of the transport mechanisms is therefore of great

  8. Stress Wave Propagation in Viscoelastic-Plastic Rock-Like Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rock-like materials are composites that can be regarded as a mixture composed of elastic, plastic, and viscous components. They exhibit viscoelastic-plastic behavior under a high-strain-rate loading according to element model theory. This paper presents an analytical solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials under a high-strain-rate loading and verifies the solution through an experimental test. A constitutive equation of viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was first established, and then kinematic and kinetic equations were then solved to derive the analytic solution for stress wave propagation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials. An experimental test using the SHPB (Split Hopkinson Pressure Bar for a concrete specimen was conducted to obtain a stress-strain curve under a high-strain-rate loading. Inverse analysis based on differential evolution was conducted to estimate undetermined variables for constitutive equations. Finally, the relationship between the attenuation factor and the strain rate in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials was investigated. According to the results, the frequency of the stress wave, viscosity coefficient, modulus of elasticity, and density play dominant roles in the attenuation of the stress wave. The attenuation decreases with increasing strain rate, demonstrating strongly strain-dependent attenuation in viscoelastic-plastic rock-like materials.

  9. Thermal properties of graphene under tensile stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Carlos P.; Ramírez, Rafael

    2018-05-01

    Thermal properties of graphene display peculiar characteristics associated to the two-dimensional nature of this crystalline membrane. These properties can be changed and tuned in the presence of applied stresses, both tensile and compressive. Here, we study graphene monolayers under tensile stress by using path-integral molecular dynamics (PIMD) simulations, which allows one to take into account quantization of vibrational modes and analyze the effect of anharmonicity on physical observables. The influence of the elastic energy due to strain in the crystalline membrane is studied for increasing tensile stress and for rising temperature (thermal expansion). We analyze the internal energy, enthalpy, and specific heat of graphene, and compare the results obtained from PIMD simulations with those given by a harmonic approximation for the vibrational modes. This approximation turns out to be precise at low temperatures, and deteriorates as temperature and pressure are increased. At low temperature, the specific heat changes as cp˜T for stress-free graphene, and evolves to a dependence cp˜T2 as the tensile stress is increased. Structural and thermodynamic properties display non-negligible quantum effects, even at temperatures higher than 300 K. Moreover, differences in the behavior of the in-plane and real areas of graphene are discussed, along with their associated properties. These differences show up clearly in the corresponding compressibility and thermal expansion coefficient.

  10. Love-type wave propagation in a pre-stressed viscoelastic medium influenced by smooth moving punch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A. K.; Parween, Z.; Chatterjee, M.; Chattopadhyay, A.

    2015-04-01

    In the present paper, a mathematical model studying the effect of smooth moving semi-infinite punch on the propagation of Love-type wave in an initially stressed viscoelastic strip is developed. The dynamic stress concentration due to the punch for the force of a constant intensity has been obtained in the closed form. Method based on Weiner-hopf technique which is indicated by Matczynski has been employed. The study manifests the significant effect of various affecting parameters viz. speed of moving punch associated with Love-type wave speed, horizontal compressive/tensile initial stress, vertical compressive/tensile initial stress, frequency parameter, and viscoelastic parameter on dynamic stress concentration due to semi-infinite punch. Moreover, some important peculiarities have been traced out and depicted by means of graphs.

  11. An Image-Based Finite Element Approach for Simulating Viscoelastic Response of Asphalt Mixture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenke Huang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an image-based micromechanical modeling approach to predict the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture. An improved image analysis technique based on the OTSU thresholding operation was employed to reduce the beam hardening effect in X-ray CT images. We developed a voxel-based 3D digital reconstruction model of asphalt mixture with the CT images after being processed. In this 3D model, the aggregate phase and air void were considered as elastic materials while the asphalt mastic phase was considered as linear viscoelastic material. The viscoelastic constitutive model of asphalt mastic was implemented in a finite element code using the ABAQUS user material subroutine (UMAT. An experimental procedure for determining the parameters of the viscoelastic constitutive model at a given temperature was proposed. To examine the capability of the model and the accuracy of the parameter, comparisons between the numerical predictions and the observed laboratory results of bending and compression tests were conducted. Finally, the verified digital sample of asphalt mixture was used to predict the asphalt mixture viscoelastic behavior under dynamic loading and creep-recovery loading. Simulation results showed that the presented image-based digital sample may be appropriate for predicting the mechanical behavior of asphalt mixture when all the mechanical properties for different phases became available.

  12. Influence of ZnO nano-particles addition on thermal analysis, microstructure evolution and tensile behavior of Sn–5.0 wt% Sb–0.5 wt% Cu lead-free solder alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouda, A.N., E-mail: alynabieh@yahoo.com [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, Suez-Canal University, 41522 Ismailia (Egypt); Eid, E.A., E-mail: dr_eid_hti@yahoo.com [Basic Science Department, Higher Technological Institute, 44629 10th of Ramadan City (Egypt)

    2015-04-24

    Sn–5 wt%Sb–0.5 wt%Cu (plain SSC505) and Sn–5 wt%Sb–0.5 wt%Cu–0.5 wt% ZnO (SSC-ZnO) composite solder alloys have been studied. The variation in thermal behavior, microstructure and tensile characteristics associated with mixing of 0.5 wt% ZnO nano-metric particles to plain SSC505 solder were investigated. A slight increment in the melting temperature [ΔT{sub m}=0.89 °C] was recorded using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) after addition of ZnO. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the existence of β-Sn, SbSn and Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} intermetallic compounds (IMCs) beside some of ZnO planes in SSC-ZnO composite solder. Field emission scanning electronic microscope (FE-SEM) investigation of SSC-ZnO composite solder revealed a homogenous uniform distribution, size refinement of IMCs and β-Sn grains. Addition of ZnO nano-metric particles into the plain SSC505 enhanced the yield stress σ{sub YS} by ~12% and improved the ultimate tensile strength σ{sub UTS} by ~13%. In addition, adding ZnO nano-metric particles was found to be effective for reducing ductility by ~43% of the plain solder due to the refinement of β-Sn grains within SSC-ZnO composite solder. - Highlights: • Melting point of SSC505-ZnO composite solder is slightly increased by 0.89 {sup ο}C compared with the plain SSC505 solder. • XRD and EDX analysis reflect the presence of SbSn, Cu{sub 6}Sn{sub 5} IMCs. • EF-SEM images of SSC-ZnO composite solder revealed homogenous uniform distribution of β-Sn grains and fine IMC particles. • A detectable improvement in the Young modulus, ultimate tensile strength and yield strength were observed after addition of 0.5 wt% ZnO nano-metric particles.

  13. Structural characterization and viscoelastic constitutive modeling of skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Vincent R; Tang, Yizhe; Zhao, Shiteng; Yang, Wen; Meyers, Marc A

    2017-04-15

    A fascinating material, skin has a tensile response which exhibits an extended toe region of minimal stress up to nominal strains that, in some species, exceed 1, followed by significant stiffening until a roughly linear region. The large toe region has been attributed to its unique structure, consisting of a network of curved collagen fibers. Investigation of the structure of rabbit skin reveals that it consists of layers of wavy fibers, each one with a characteristic orientation. Additionally, the existence of two preferred layer orientations is suggested based on the results of small angle X-ray scattering. These observations are used to construct a viscoelastic model consisting of collagen in two orientations, which leads to an in-plane anisotropic response. The structure-based model presented incorporates the elastic straightening and stretching of fibrils, their rotation towards the tensile axis, and the viscous effects which occur in the matrix of the skin due to interfibrillar and interlamellar sliding. The model is shown to effectively capture key features which dictate the mechanical response of skin. Examination by transmission and scanning electron microscopy of rabbit dermis enabled the identification of the key elements in its structure. The organization of collagen fibrils into flat fibers was identified and incorporated into a constitutive model that reproduces the mechanical response of skin. This enhanced quantitative predictive capability can be used in the design of synthetic skin and skin-like structures. Copyright © 2017 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic and viscoelastic response of elastomers with hard magnetic filler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramarenko, E Yu; Chertovich, A V; Semisalova, A S; Makarova, L A; Perov, N S; Khokhlov, A R; Stepanov, G V

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic elastomers (MEs) based on a silicone matrix and magnetically hard NdFeB particles have been synthesized and their magnetic and viscoelastic properties have been studied depending on the size and concentration of magnetic particles and the magnetizing field. It has been shown that magnetic particles can rotate in soft polymer matrix under applied magnetic field, this fact leading to some features in both magnetic and viscoelastic properties. In the maximum magnetic field used magnetization of MEs with smaller particles is larger while the coercivity is smaller due to higher mobility of the particles within the polymer matrix. Viscoelastic behavior is characterized by long relaxation times due to restructuring of the magnetic filler under the influence of an applied mechanical force and magnetic interactions. The storage and loss moduli of magnetically hard elastomers grow significantly with magnetizing field. The magnetic response of the magnetized samples depends on the mutual orientation of the external magnetic field and the internal sample magnetization. Due to the particle rotation within the polymer matrix, the loss factor increases abruptly when the magnetic field is turned on in the opposite direction to the sample magnetization, further decreasing with time. Moduli versus field dependences have minimum at non-zero field and are characterized by a high asymmetry with respect to the field direction. (paper)

  15. Quantitative analysis of tensile deformation behavior by in-situ neutron diffraction for ferrite-martensite type dual-phase steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morooka, Satoshi; Umezawa, Osamu; Harjo, Stefanus; Hasegawa, Kohei; Toji, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    The yielding and work-hardening behavior of ferrite-martensite type dual-phase (DP) alloys were clearly analyzed using the in-situ neutron diffraction technique. We successfully established a new method to estimate the stress and strain partitioning between ferrite and martensite phase during loading. Although these phases exhibit the same lattice structure with similar lattice parameters, their lattice strains on (110), (200) and (211) are obviously different from each other under an applied stress. The misfit strains between those phases were clearly accompanied with the phase-scaled internal stream (phase stress). Thus, the martensite phase yielded by higher applied stress than macro-yield stress, which resulted in high work-hardening rate of the DP steel. We also demonstrated that ferrite phase fraction influenced work-hardening behavior. (author)

  16. Vibration analysis of viscoelastic single-walled carbon nanotubes resting on a viscoelastic foundation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Da Peng; Lei, Yong Jun; Shen, Zhi Bin; Wang, Cheng Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Vibration responses were investigated for a viscoelastic Single-walled carbon nanotube (visco-SWCNT) resting on a viscoelastic foundation. Based on the nonlocal Euler-Bernoulli beam model, velocity-dependent external damping and Kelvin viscoelastic foundation model, the governing equations were derived. The Transfer function method (TFM) was then used to compute the natural frequencies for general boundary conditions and foundations. In particular, the exact analytical expressions of both complex natural frequencies and critical viscoelastic parameters were obtained for the Kelvin-Voigt visco-SWCNTs with full foundations and certain boundary conditions, and several physically intuitive special cases were discussed. Substantial nonlocal effects, the influence of geometric and physical parameters of the SWCNT and the viscoelastic foundation were observed for the natural frequencies of the supported SWCNTs. The study demonstrates the efficiency and robustness of the developed model for the vibration of the visco-SWCNT-viscoelastic foundation coupling system

  17. Modeling electrically active viscoelastic membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sitikantha Roy

    Full Text Available The membrane protein prestin is native to the cochlear outer hair cell that is crucial to the ear's amplification and frequency selectivity throughout the whole acoustic frequency range. The outer hair cell exhibits interrelated dimensional changes, force generation, and electric charge transfer. Cells transfected with prestin acquire unique active properties similar to those in the native cell that have also been useful in understanding the process. Here we propose a model describing the major electromechanical features of such active membranes. The model derived from thermodynamic principles is in the form of integral relationships between the history of voltage and membrane resultants as independent variables and the charge density and strains as dependent variables. The proposed model is applied to the analysis of an active force produced by the outer hair cell in response to a harmonic electric field. Our analysis reveals the mechanism of the outer hair cell active (isometric force having an almost constant amplitude and phase up to 80 kHz. We found that the frequency-invariance of the force is a result of interplay between the electrical filtering associated with prestin and power law viscoelasticity of the surrounding membrane. Paradoxically, the membrane viscoelasticity boosts the force balancing the electrical filtering effect. We also consider various modes of electromechanical coupling in membrane with prestin associated with mechanical perturbations in the cell. We consider pressure or strains applied step-wise or at a constant rate and compute the time course of the resulting electric charge. The results obtained here are important for the analysis of electromechanical properties of membranes, cells, and biological materials as well as for a better understanding of the mechanism of hearing and the role of the protein prestin in this mechanism.

  18. Elevated Temperature Tensile Tests on DU–10Mo Rolled Foils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulthess, Jason [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Tensile mechanical properties for uranium-10 wt.% molybdenum (U–10Mo) foils are required to support modeling and qualification of new monolithic fuel plate designs. It is expected that depleted uranium-10 wt% Mo (DU–10Mo) mechanical behavior is representative of the low enriched U–10Mo to be used in the actual fuel plates, therefore DU-10Mo was studied to simplify material processing, handling, and testing requirements. In this report, tensile testing of DU-10Mo fuel foils prepared using four different thermomechanical processing treatments were conducted to assess the impact of foil fabrication history on resultant tensile properties.

  19. Understanding viscoelasticity an introduction to rheology

    CERN Document Server

    Phan-Thien, Nhan

    2017-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to viscoelasticity, in particular, to the theories of dilute polymer solutions and dilute suspensions of rigid particles in viscous and incompressible fluids. These theories are important, not just because they apply to practical problems of industrial interest, but because they form a solid theoretical base upon which mathematical techniques can be built, from which more complex theories can be constructed, to better mimic material behaviour. The emphasis of this book is not on the voluminous current topical research, but on the necessary tools to understand viscoelasticity. This is a compact book for a first year graduate course in viscoelasticity and modelling of viscoelastic multiphase fluids. The Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) is introduced as a particle-based method, relevant in modelling of complex-structured fluids. All the basic ideas in DPD are reviewed. The third edition has been updated and expanded with new results in the meso-scale modelling, links between...

  20. Linear viscoelastic characterization from filament stretching rheometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    to measure both linear and nonlinear dynamics on a single apparatus. With a software modification to the FSR motor control, we show that linear viscoelasticity can be measured via small amplitude squeeze flow (SASF). Squeeze flow is a combination of both shear and extensional flow applied by axially......Traditionally, linear viscoelasticity is measured using small amplitude oscillatory shear flow. Due to experimental difficulties, shear flows are predominately confined to the linear and mildly nonlinear regime. On the other hand, extensional flows have proven more practical in measuring...... viscoelasticity well into the nonlinear regime. Therefore at present, complete rheological characterization of a material requires two apparatuses: a shear and an extensional rheometer. This work is focused on developing a linear viscoelastic protocol for the filament stretching rheometer (FSR) in order...

  1. Understanding Viscoelasticity An Introduction to Rheology

    CERN Document Server

    Phan-Thien, Nhan

    2013-01-01

    This book presents an introduction to viscoelasticity; in particular, to the theories of dilute polymer solutions and dilute suspensions of rigid particles in viscous and incompressible fluids. These theories are important, not just because they apply to practical problems of industrial interest, but because they form a solid theoretical base upon which mathematical techniques can be built, from which more complex theories can be constructed, to better mimic material behaviour. The emphasis is not on the voluminous current topical research, but on the necessary tools to understand viscoelasticity at a first year graduate level. The main aim is to provide a still compact book, sufficient at the level of first year graduate course for those who wish to understand viscoelasticity and to embark in modeling of viscoelastic multiphase fluids. To this end, a new chapter on Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) was introduced which is relevant to model complex-structured fluids. All the basic ideas in DPD are reviewed,...

  2. Viscoelastic model of tungsten 'fuzz' growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasheninnikov, S I

    2011-01-01

    A viscoelastic model of fuzz growth is presented. The model describes the main features of tungsten fuzz observed in experiments. It gives estimates of fuzz growth rate and temperature range close to experimental ones.

  3. Dynamics and Stability of Rolling Viscoelastic Tires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Potter, Trevor [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2013-04-30

    Current steady state rolling tire calculations often do not include treads because treads destroy the rotational symmetry of the tire. We describe two methodologies to compute time periodic solutions of a two-dimensional viscoelastic tire with treads: solving a minimization problem and solving a system of equations. We also expand on work by Oden and Lin on free spinning rolling elastic tires in which they disovered a hierachy of N-peak steady state standing wave solutions. In addition to discovering a two-dimensional hierarchy of standing wave solutions that includes their N-peak hiearchy, we consider the eects of viscoelasticity on the standing wave solutions. Finally, a commonplace model of viscoelasticity used in our numerical experiments led to non-physical elastic energy growth for large tire speeds. We show that a viscoelastic model of Govindjee and Reese remedies the problem.

  4. Gravitational Instability of Cylindrical Viscoelastic Medium ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    similar to that of viscoelastic fluid where both properties work together. They also ... cylindrical gravitational waves provides a strong motivation in this regard. .... which represents the solenoidal character of the magnetic field and the total stress.

  5. Influence of interstitials elements (O, C, N) on the plastic behavior in tensile stress of polycrystalline niobium between -2530C and 8500C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, J.-F.

    1972-01-01

    The fundamental mechanism of plastic deformation of polycrystalline niobium was studied with 4 samples of different purity. At low temperatures (-253 0 C, +25 0 C) there is a linear relationship between the activation energy and the temperature for the four samples. The two models of Peierls-Nabarro and Escaig-Hirsh used are complementary. Ductile-brittle transition result of a competition between relaxation by fast propagation of a defect or by local plastic deformation. At intermediate temperatures (25 0 C - 850 0 C) on the contrary interstitial impurities play an important role in the plastic behavior of niobium. Mechanical characteristics temperature are modified by aging and can lead to a Portevin-Le Chatelier effect if dislocations are saturated by impurities [fr

  6. Recent advances in elasticity, viscoelasticity and inelasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Rajagopal, KR

    1995-01-01

    This is a collection of papers dedicated to Prof T C Woo to mark his 70th birthday. The papers focus on recent advances in elasticity, viscoelasticity and inelasticity, which are related to Prof Woo's work. Prof Woo's recent work concentrates on the viscoelastic and viscoplastic response of metals and plastics when thermal effects are significant, and the papers here address open questions in these and related areas.

  7. Status of automated tensile machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satou, M.; Hamilton, M.L.; Sato, S.; Kohyama, A.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this work is to develop the Monbusho Automated Tensile machine (MATRON) and install and operate it at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). The machine is designed to provide rapid, automated testing of irradiated miniature tensile specimen in a vacuum at elevated temperatures. The MATRON was successfully developed and shipped to PNL for installation in a hot facility. The original installation plan was modified to simplify the current and subsequent installations, and the installation was completed. Detailed procedures governing the operation of the system were written. Testing on irradiated miniature tensile specimen should begin in the near future

  8. Rough viscoelastic sliding contact: Theory and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbone, G.; Putignano, C.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper, we show how the numerical theory introduced by the authors [Carbone and Putignano, J. Mech. Phys. Solids 61, 1822 (2013), 10.1016/j.jmps.2013.03.005] can be effectively employed to study the contact between viscoelastic rough solids. The huge numerical complexity is successfully faced up by employing the adaptive nonuniform mesh developed by the authors in Putignano et al. [J. Mech. Phys. Solids 60, 973 (2012), 10.1016/j.jmps.2012.01.006]. Results mark the importance of accounting for viscoelastic effects to correctly simulate the sliding rough contact. In detail, attention is, first, paid to evaluate the viscoelastic dissipation, i.e., the viscoelastic friction. Fixed the sliding speed and the normal load, friction is completely determined. Furthermore, since the methodology employed in the work allows to study contact between real materials, a comparison between experimental outcomes and numerical prediction in terms of viscoelastic friction is shown. The good agreement seems to validate—at least partially—the presented methodology. Finally, it is shown that viscoelasticity entails not only the dissipative effects previously outlined, but is also strictly related to the anisotropy of the contact solution. Indeed, a marked anisotropy is present in the contact region, which results stretched in the direction perpendicular to the sliding speed. In the paper, the anisotropy of the deformed surface and of the contact area is investigated and quantified.

  9. Chaotic convection of viscoelastic fluids in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheu, L.-J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: ljsheu@chu.edu.tw; Tam, L.-M. [Department of Electromechanical Engineering, University of Macau, Macau (China)], E-mail: fstlmt@umac.mo; Chen, J.-H. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Hua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: chen@chu.edu.tw; Chen, H.-K. [Department of Industrial Engineering and Management, Hsiuping Institute of Technology, Taichung, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: kanechen@giga.net.tw; Lin, K.-T. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung Li, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: willie@nanya.edu.tw; Kang Yuan [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Yuan Christian University, Chung Li, Taiwan (China)], E-mail: yk@cycu.edu.tw

    2008-07-15

    Buoyancy-induced convection in a viscoelastic fluid-saturated porous medium was analyzed using an Oldroydian-type constitutive relation. An autonomous system with four differential equations was deduced by applying the truncated Galerkin expansion to the momentum and heat transfer equations. The four-dimensional system can be reduced to many systems provided in the literature such as the Lorenz system, Vadasz system, Khayat system, and Akhatov system. Depending on the flow parameters, the asymptotic behavior can be stationary, periodic, or chaotic. Generation of a four-scroll, or two-'butterfly', chaotic attractor was observed. Results also show that stress relaxation tends to precipitate the onset of chaos.

  10. Calculation of dynamic stresses in viscoelastic sandwich beams using oma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelayo, F.; Aenlle, M. L.; Ismael, G.

    2017-01-01

    The mechanical response of sandwich elements with viscoelastic core is time and temperature dependent. Laminated glass is a sandwich element where the mechanical behavior of the glass layers is usually considered linear-elastic material whereas the core is made of an amorphous thermoplastic which...... data. In simple structures, analytical mode shapes can be used alternatively to the numerical ones. In this paper, the dynamic stresses on the glass layers of a laminated glass beam have estimated using the experimental acceleration responses measured at 7 points of the beam, and the experimental mode...

  11. Stress-based viscoelastic master curve construction of model tire tread compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maghami, S.; Dierkes, W.; Noordermeer, J.W.M.; Tolpekina, T.; Schultz, S.; Gögelein, C.; Wrana, C.; Gil-Negrete, Nere; Asier, Alonso

    2013-01-01

    One of the important aspects in the development of new tire compounds is the correlation between the dynamic mechanical properties of the rubber, measured on laboratory scale, and the actual tire performance. In order to predict wet traction, the viscoelastic behavior of the rubber materials at high

  12. Nonlinear shear wave in a non Newtonian visco-elastic medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, D.; Janaki, M. S.; Chakrabarti, N. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Calcutta 700 064 (India); Chaudhuri, M. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2012-06-15

    An analysis of nonlinear transverse shear wave has been carried out on non-Newtonian viscoelastic liquid using generalized hydrodynamic model. The nonlinear viscoelastic behavior is introduced through velocity shear dependence of viscosity coefficient by well known Carreau-Bird model. The dynamical feature of this shear wave leads to the celebrated Fermi-Pasta-Ulam problem. Numerical solution has been obtained which shows that initial periodic solutions reoccur after passing through several patterns of periodic waves. A possible explanation for this periodic solution is given by constructing modified Korteweg de Vries equation. This model has application from laboratory to astrophysical plasmas as well as in biological systems.

  13. Ex-Vivo Cow Skin Viscoelastic Effect for Tribological Aspects in Endoprosthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhi, K. A.; Tudor, A.; Hussein, E. K.; Wahad, H.; Chisiu, G.

    2018-01-01

    The viscoelastic behavior of ex-vivo cow skin was experimentally studied by applied load from different indenter types (circle, square and triangle, all types have the same area) for different times (10 sec, 30 sec, and 60 sec). The viscoelastic tests were carried out using a UMT series (UMT-II, CETR Corporation). The experimental results collected at different operating conditions showed that the cow skin has a higher reaction against the triangle indenter compared to the other shapes. Whereas the hysteresis of cow skin was lower at low applied load time and it's increased when the time increased.

  14. An Indentation Technique for Nanoscale Dynamic Viscoelastic Measurements at Elevated Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Jiping

    2012-08-01

    Determination of nano/micro-scale viscoelasticity is very important to understand the local rheological behavior and degradation phenomena of multifunctional polymer blend materials. This article reviews research results concerning the development of indentation techniques for making nanoscale dynamic viscoelastic measurements at elevated temperature. In the last decade, we have achieved breakthroughs in noise floor reduction in air and thermal load drift/noise reduction at high temperature before taking on the challenge of nanoscale viscoelastic measurements. A high-temperature indentation technique has been developed that facilitates viscoelastic measurements up to 200 °C in air and 500 °C in a vacuum. During the last year, two viscoelastic measurement methods have been developed by making a breakthrough in suppressing the contact area change at high temperature. One is a sharp-pointed time-dependent nanoindentation technique for microscale application and the other is a spherical time-dependent nanoindentation technique for nanoscale application. In the near future, we expect to lower the thermal load drift and load noise floor even more substantially.

  15. The development and validation of a numerical integration method for non-linear viscoelastic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramo, Nicole L.; Puttlitz, Christian M.

    2018-01-01

    Compelling evidence that many biological soft tissues display both strain- and time-dependent behavior has led to the development of fully non-linear viscoelastic modeling techniques to represent the tissue’s mechanical response under dynamic conditions. Since the current stress state of a viscoelastic material is dependent on all previous loading events, numerical analyses are complicated by the requirement of computing and storing the stress at each step throughout the load history. This requirement quickly becomes computationally expensive, and in some cases intractable, for finite element models. Therefore, we have developed a strain-dependent numerical integration approach for capturing non-linear viscoelasticity that enables calculation of the current stress from a strain-dependent history state variable stored from the preceding time step only, which improves both fitting efficiency and computational tractability. This methodology was validated based on its ability to recover non-linear viscoelastic coefficients from simulated stress-relaxation (six strain levels) and dynamic cyclic (three frequencies) experimental stress-strain data. The model successfully fit each data set with average errors in recovered coefficients of 0.3% for stress-relaxation fits and 0.1% for cyclic. The results support the use of the presented methodology to develop linear or non-linear viscoelastic models from stress-relaxation or cyclic experimental data of biological soft tissues. PMID:29293558

  16. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Mechanism for Aftershock Triggering and Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Zhang, X.

    2016-12-01

    Aftershocks are ubiquitous in nature. They are the manifestation of relaxation phenomena observed in various physical systems. In one prominent example, they typically occur after large earthquakes. They also occur in other natural or experimental systems, for example, in solar flares, in fracture experiments on porous materials and acoustic emissions, after stock market crashes, in the volatility of stock prices returns, in internet traffic variability and e-mail spamming, to mention a few. The observed aftershock sequences usually obey several well defined non-trivial empirical laws in magnitude, temporal, and spatial domains. In many cases their characteristics follow scale-invariant distributions. The occurrence of aftershocks displays a prominent temporal behavior due to time-dependent mechanisms of stress and/or energy transfer. In this work, we consider a slider-block model to mimic the behavior of a seismogenic fault. In the model, we introduce a nonlinear viscoelastic coupling mechanism to capture the essential characteristics of crustal rheology and stress interaction between the blocks and the medium. For this purpose we employ nonlinear Kelvin-Voigt elements consisting of an elastic spring and a dashpot assembled in parallel to introduce viscoelastic coupling between the blocks and the driving plate. By mapping the model into a cellular automaton we derive the functional form of the stress transfer mechanism in the model. We show that the nonlinear viscoelasticity plays a critical role in triggering of aftershocks. It explains the functional form of the Omori-Utsu law and gives physical interpretation of its parameters. The proposed model also suggests that the power-law rheology of the fault gauge and underlying lower crust and upper mantle control the decay rate of aftershocks. To verify this, we analyze several prominent aftershock sequences to estimate their decay rates and correlate with the rheological properties of the underlying lower crust and

  17. Finite element method for viscoelastic medium with damage and the application to structural analysis of solid rocket motor grain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Bin; Shen, ZhiBin; Duan, JingBo; Tang, GuoJin

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the damage-viscoelastic behavior of composite solid propellants of solid rocket motors (SRM). Based on viscoelastic theories and strain equivalent hypothesis in damage mechanics, a three-dimensional (3-D) nonlinear viscoelastic constitutive model incorporating with damage is developed. The resulting viscoelastic constitutive equations are numerically discretized by integration algorithm, and a stress-updating method is presented by solving nonlinear equations according to the Newton-Raphson method. A material subroutine of stress-updating is made up and embedded into commercial code of Abaqus. The material subroutine is validated through typical examples. Our results indicate that the finite element results are in good agreement with the analytical ones and have high accuracy, and the suggested method and designed subroutine are efficient and can be further applied to damage-coupling structural analysis of practical SRM grain.

  18. Shock-induced thermal wave propagation and response analysis of a viscoelastic thin plate under transient heating loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chenlin; Guo, Huili; Tian, Xiaogeng

    2018-04-01

    This paper is devoted to the thermal shock analysis for viscoelastic materials under transient heating loads. The governing coupled equations with time-delay parameter and nonlocal scale parameter are derived based on the generalized thermo-viscoelasticity theory. The problem of a thin plate composed of viscoelastic material, subjected to a sudden temperature rise at the boundary plane, is solved by employing Laplace transformation techniques. The transient responses, i.e. temperature, displacement, stresses, heat flux as well as strain, are obtained and discussed. The effects of time-delay and nonlocal scale parameter on the transient responses are analyzed and discussed. It can be observed that: the propagation of thermal wave is dynamically smoothed and changed with the variation of time-delay; while the displacement, strain, and stress can be rapidly reduced by nonlocal scale parameter, which can be viewed as an important indicator for predicting the stiffness softening behavior for viscoelastic materials.

  19. Using hardness to model yield and tensile strength

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Dogan, Omer N.; Schrems, Karol K.

    2005-02-01

    The current direction in hardness research is towards smaller and smaller loads as nano-scale materials are developed. There remains, however, a need to investigate the mechanical behavior of complex alloys for severe environment service. In many instances this entails casting large ingots and making numerous tensile samples as the bounds of the operating environment are explored. It is possible to gain an understanding of the tensile strength of these alloys using room and elevated temperature hardness in conjunction with selected tensile tests. The approach outlined here has its roots in the work done by Tabor for metals and low alloy and carbon steels. This research seeks to extend the work to elevated temperatures for multi-phase, complex alloys. A review of the approach will be given after which the experimental data will be examined. In particular, the yield stress and tensile strength will be compared to their corresponding hardness based values.

  20. Ab initio elastic properties and tensile strength of crystalline hydroxyapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ching, W Y; Rulis, Paul; Misra, A

    2009-10-01

    We report elastic constant calculation and a "theoretical" tensile experiment on stoichiometric hydroxyapatite (HAP) crystal using an ab initio technique. These results compare favorably with a variety of measured data. Theoretical tensile experiments are performed on the orthorhombic cell of HAP for both uniaxial and biaxial loading. The results show considerable anisotropy in the stress-strain behavior. It is shown that the failure behavior of the perfect HAP crystal is brittle for tension along the z-axis with a maximum stress of 9.6 GPa at 10% strain. Biaxial failure envelopes from six "theoretical" loading tests show a highly anisotropic pattern. Structural analysis of the crystal under various stages of tensile strain reveals that the deformation behavior manifests itself mainly in the rotation of the PO(4) tetrahedron with concomitant movements of both the columnar and axial Ca ions. These results are discussed in the context of mechanical properties of bioceramic composites relevant to mineralized tissues.

  1. 3D Viscoelastic Traction Force Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyjanova, Jennet; Hannen, Erin; Bar-Kochba, Eyal; Darling, Eric M.; Henann, David L.; Franck, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Native cell-material interactions occur on materials differing in their structural composition, chemistry, and physical compliance. While the last two decades have shown the importance of traction forces during cell-material interactions, they have been almost exclusively presented on purely elastic in-vitro materials. Yet, most bodily tissue materials exhibit some level of viscoelasticity, which could play an important role in how cells sense and transduce tractions. To expand the realm of cell traction measurements and to encompass all materials from elastic to viscoelastic, this paper presents a general, and comprehensive approach for quantifying 3D cell tractions in viscoelastic materials. This methodology includes the experimental characterization of the time-dependent material properties for any viscoelastic material with the subsequent mathematical implementation of the determined material model into a 3D traction force microscopy (3D TFM) framework. Utilizing this new 3D viscoelastic TFM (3D VTFM) approach, we quantify the influence of viscosity on the overall material traction calculations and quantify the error associated with omitting time-dependent material effects, as is the case for all other TFM formulations. We anticipate that the 3D VTFM technique will open up new avenues of cell-material investigations on even more physiologically relevant time-dependent materials including collagen and fibrin gels. PMID:25170569

  2. Three-sphere swimmer in a nonlinear viscoelastic medium

    KAUST Repository

    Curtis, Mark P.; Gaffney, Eamonn A.

    2013-01-01

    are determined analytically in both a Newtonian Stokes fluid and a zero Reynolds number, nonlinear, Oldroyd-B viscoelastic fluid with Deborah numbers of order one (or less), highlighting the effects of viscoelasticity on the net displacement of swimmer

  3. Parametric imaging of viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesinghe, Philip; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Sampson, David D.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate imaging of soft tissue viscoelasticity using optical coherence elastography. Viscoelastic creep deformation is induced in tissue using step-like compressive loading and the resulting time-varying deformation is measured using phase-sensitive optical coherence tomography. From a series of co-located B-scans, we estimate the local strain rate as a function of time, and parameterize it using a four-parameter Kelvin-Voigt model of viscoelastic creep. The estimated viscoelastic strain and time constant are used to visualize viscoelastic creep in 2D, dual-parameter viscoelastograms. We demonstrate our technique on six silicone tissue-simulating phantoms spanning a range of viscoelastic parameters. As an example in soft tissue, we report viscoelastic contrast between muscle and connective tissue in fresh, ex vivo rat gastrocnemius muscle and mouse abdominal transection. Imaging viscoelastic creep deformation has the potential to provide complementary contrast to existing imaging modalities, and may provide greater insight into disease pathology.

  4. Microscale characterization of the viscoelastic properties of hydrogel biomaterials using dual-mode ultrasound elastography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Xiaowei; Stegemann, Jan P; Deng, Cheri X

    2016-05-01

    Characterization of the microscale mechanical properties of biomaterials is a key challenge in the field of mechanobiology. Dual-mode ultrasound elastography (DUE) uses high frequency focused ultrasound to induce compression in a sample, combined with interleaved ultrasound imaging to measure the resulting deformation. This technique can be used to non-invasively perform creep testing on hydrogel biomaterials to characterize their viscoelastic properties. DUE was applied to a range of hydrogel constructs consisting of either hydroxyapatite (HA)-doped agarose, HA-collagen, HA-fibrin, or preosteoblast-seeded collagen constructs. DUE provided spatial and temporal mapping of local and bulk displacements and strains at high resolution. Hydrogel materials exhibited characteristic creep behavior, and the maximum strain and residual strain were both material- and concentration-dependent. Burger's viscoelastic model was used to extract characteristic parameters describing material behavior. Increased protein concentration resulted in greater stiffness and viscosity, but did not affect the viscoelastic time constant of acellular constructs. Collagen constructs exhibited significantly higher modulus and viscosity than fibrin constructs. Cell-seeded collagen constructs became stiffer with altered mechanical behavior as they developed over time. Importantly, DUE also provides insight into the spatial variation of viscoelastic properties at sub-millimeter resolution, allowing interrogation of the interior of constructs. DUE presents a novel technique for non-invasively characterizing hydrogel materials at the microscale, and therefore may have unique utility in the study of mechanobiology and the characterization of hydrogel biomaterials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A micro-macro constitutive model for finite-deformation viscoelasticity of elastomers with nonlinear viscosity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jianyou; Jiang, Liying; Khayat, Roger E.

    2018-01-01

    Elastomers are known to exhibit viscoelastic behavior under deformation, which is linked to the diffusion processes of the highly mobile and flexible polymer chains. Inspired by the theories of polymer dynamics, a micro-macro constitutive model is developed to study the viscoelastic behaviors and the relaxation process of elastomeric materials under large deformation, in which the material parameters all have a microscopic foundation or a microstructural justification. The proposed model incorporates the nonlinear material viscosity into the continuum finite-deformation viscoelasticity theories which represent the polymer networks of elastomers with an elastic ground network and a few viscous subnetworks. The developed modeling framework is capable of adopting most of strain energy density functions for hyperelastic materials and thermodynamics evolution laws of viscoelastic solids. The modeling capacity of the framework is outlined by comparing the simulation results with the experimental data of three commonly used elastomeric materials, namely, VHB4910, HNBR50 and carbon black (CB) filled elastomers. The comparison shows that the stress responses and some typical behaviors of filled and unfilled elastomers can be quantitatively predicted by the model with suitable strain energy density functions. Particularly, the strain-softening effect of elastomers could be explained by the deformation-dependent (nonlinear) viscosity of the polymer chains. The presented modeling framework is expected to be useful as a modeling platform for further study on the performance of different type of elastomeric materials.

  6. Shear test on viscoelastic granular material using Contact Dynamics simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quezada, Juan Carlos; Sagnol, Loba; Chazallon, Cyrille

    2017-06-01

    By means of 3D contact dynamic simulations, the behavior of a viscoelastic granular material under shear loading is investigated. A viscoelastic fluid phase surrounding the solid particles is simulated by a contact model acting between them. This contact law was implemented in the LMGC90 software, based on the Burgers model. This model is able to simulate also the effect of creep relaxation. To validate the proposed contact model, several direct shear tests were performed, experimentally and numerically using the Leutner device. The numerical samples were created using spheres with two particle size distribution, each one identified for two layers from a road structure. Our results show a reasonable agreement between experimental and numerical data regarding the strain-stress evolution curves and the stress levels measured at failure. The proposed model can be used to simulate the mechanical behavior of multi-layer road structure and to study the influence of traffic on road deformation, cracking and particles pull-out induced by traffic loading.

  7. Viscoelastic love-type surface waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, Roger D.

    2008-01-01

    The general theoretical solution for Love-Type surface waves in viscoelastic media provides theoreticalexpressions for the physical characteristics of the waves in elastic as well as anelastic media with arbitraryamounts of intrinsic damping. The general solution yields dispersion and absorption-coefficient curves for the waves as a function of frequency and theamount of intrinsic damping for any chosen viscoelastic model.Numerical results valid for a variety of viscoelastic models provide quantitative estimates of the physicalcharacteristics of the waves pertinent to models of Earth materials ranging from small amounts of damping in the Earth’s crust to moderate and large amounts of damping in soft soils and water-saturated sediments. Numerical results, presented herein, are valid for a wide range of solids and applications.

  8. The tensile strength of mechanical joint prototype of lontar fiber composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bale, Jefri; Adoe, Dominggus G. H.; Boimau, Kristomus; Sakera, Thomas

    2018-03-01

    In the present study, an experimental activity has been programmed to investigate the effect of joint prototype configuration on tensile strength of lontar (Borassus Flabellifer) fiber composite. To do so, a series of tests were conducted to establish the tensile strength of different joint prototype configuration specimen of lontar fiber composite. In addition, post observation of macroscope was used to map damage behavior. The analysis of lontar fiber composite is a challenge since the material has limited information than others natural fiber composites materials. The results shown that, under static tensile loading, the tensile strength of 13 MPa produced by single lap joint of lontar fiber composite is highest compare to 11 MPa of tensile strength generated by step lap joint and double lap joint where produced the lowest tensile strength of 6 MPa. It is concluded that the differences of tensile strength depend on the geometric dimensions of the cross-sectional area and stress distribution of each joint prototype configuration.

  9. Pseudospectral modeling and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, K.; Luo, Y.; Xia, J.; Chen, C.

    2011-01-01

    Multichannel Analysis of Surface Waves (MASW) is one of the most widely used techniques in environmental and engineering geophysics to determine shear-wave velocities and dynamic properties, which is based on the elastic layered system theory. Wave propagation in the Earth, however, has been recognized as viscoelastic and the propagation of Rayleigh waves presents substantial differences in viscoelastic media as compared with elastic media. Therefore, it is necessary to carry out numerical simulation and dispersion analysis of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media to better understand Rayleigh-wave behaviors in the real world. We apply a pseudospectral method to the calculation of the spatial derivatives using a Chebyshev difference operator in the vertical direction and a Fourier difference operator in the horizontal direction based on the velocity-stress elastodynamic equations and relations of linear viscoelastic solids. This approach stretches the spatial discrete grid to have a minimum grid size near the free surface so that high accuracy and resolution are achieved at the free surface, which allows an effective incorporation of the free surface boundary conditions since the Chebyshev method is nonperiodic. We first use an elastic homogeneous half-space model to demonstrate the accuracy of the pseudospectral method comparing with the analytical solution, and verify the correctness of the numerical modeling results for a viscoelastic half-space comparing the phase velocities of Rayleigh wave between the theoretical values and the dispersive image generated by high-resolution linear Radon transform. We then simulate three types of two-layer models to analyze dispersive-energy characteristics for near-surface applications. Results demonstrate that the phase velocity of Rayleigh waves in viscoelastic media is relatively higher than in elastic media and the fundamental mode increases by 10-16% when the frequency is above 10. Hz due to the velocity dispersion of P

  10. Comparative study of viscoelastic properties using virgin yogurt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimonte, G.; Nelson, D.; Weaver, S.; Schneider, M.; Flower-Maudlin, E.; Gore, R.; Baumgardner, J.R.; Sahota, M.S.

    1998-01-01

    We describe six different tests used to obtain a consistent set of viscoelastic properties for yogurt. Prior to yield, the shear modulus μ and viscosity η are measured nondestructively using the speed and damping of elastic waves. Although new to foodstuffs, this technique has been applied to diverse materials from metals to the earth's crust. The resultant shear modulus agrees with μ∼E/3 for incompressible materials, where the Young's modulus E is obtained from a stress - strain curve in compression. The tensile yield stress τ o is measured in compression and tension, with good agreement. The conventional vane and cone/plate rheometers measured a shear stress yield τ os ∼τ o /√ (3) , as expected theoretically, but the inferred 'apparent' viscosity from the cone/plate rheometer is much larger than the wave measurement due to the finite yield (τ os ≠0). Finally, we inverted an open container of yogurt for 10 6 s>η/μ and observed no motion. This demonstrates unequivocally that yogurt possesses a finite yield stress rather than a large viscosity. We present a constitutive model with a pre-yield viscosity to describe the damping of the elastic waves and use a simulation code to describe yielding in complex geometry. copyright 1998 Society of Rheology

  11. A phenomenological constitutive model for the nonlinear viscoelastic responses of biodegradable polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Kamran

    2012-11-09

    We formulate a constitutive framework for biodegradable polymers that accounts for nonlinear viscous behavior under regimes with large deformation. The generalized Maxwell model is used to represent the degraded viscoelastic response of a polymer. The large-deformation, time-dependent behavior of viscoelastic solids is described using an Ogden-type hyperviscoelastic model. A deformation-induced degradation mechanism is assumed in which a scalar field depicts the local state of the degradation, which is responsible for the changes in the material\\'s properties. The degradation process introduces another timescale (the intrinsic material clock) and an entropy production mechanism. Examples of the degradation of a polymer under various loading conditions, including creep, relaxation and cyclic loading, are presented. Results from parametric studies to determine the effects of various parameters on the process of degradation are reported. Finally, degradation of an annular cylinder subjected to pressure is also presented to mimic the effects of viscoelastic arterial walls (the outer cylinder) on the degradation response of a biodegradable stent (the inner cylinder). A general contact analysis is performed. As the stiffness of the biodegradable stent decreases, stress reduction in the stented viscoelastic arterial wall is observed. The integration of the proposed constitutive model with finite element software could help a designer to predict the time-dependent response of a biodegradable stent exhibiting finite deformation and under complex mechanical loading conditions. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Wien.

  12. A finite element modeling of a multifunctional hybrid composite beam with viscoelastic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ya; Inman, Daniel J.

    2013-04-01

    The multifunctional hybrid composite structure studied here consists of a ceramic outer layer capable of withstanding high temperatures, a functionally graded ceramic layer combining shape memory alloy (SMA) properties of NiTi together with Ti2AlC (called Graded Ceramic/Metal Composite, or GCMeC), and a high temperature sensor patch, followed by a polymer matrix composite laced with vascular cooling channels all held together with various epoxies. Due to the recoverable nature of SMA and adhesive properties of Ti2AlC, the damping behavior of the GCMeC is largely viscoelastic. This paper presents a finite element formulation for this multifunctional hybrid structure with embedded viscoelastic material. In order to implement the viscoelastic model into the finite element formulation, a second order three parameter Golla-Hughes-McTavish (GHM) method is used to describe the viscoelastic behavior. Considering the parameter identification, a strategy to estimate the fractional order of the time derivative and the relaxation time is outlined. The curve-fitting aspects of both GHM and ADF show good agreement with experimental data obtained from dynamic mechanics analysis. The performance of the finite element of the layered multifunctional beam is verified through experimental model analysis.

  13. The viscoelastic characterization of polymer materials exposed to the low-Earth orbit environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strganac, T.; Letton, A.

    1992-01-01

    Recent accomplishments in our research efforts have included the successful measurement of the thermal mechanical properties of polymer materials exposed to the low-earth orbit environment. In particular, viscoelastic properties were recorded using the Rheometrics Solids Analyzer (RSA 2). Dynamic moduli (E', the storage component of the elastic modulus, and E'', the loss component of the elastic modulus) were recorded over three decades of frequency (0.1 to 100 rad/sec) for temperatures ranging from -150 to 150 C. Although this temperature range extends beyond the typical use range of the materials, measurements in this region are necessary in the development of complete viscoelastic constitutive models. The experimental results were used to provide the stress relaxation and creep compliance performance characteristics through viscoelastic correspondence principles. Our results quantify the differences between exposed and control polymer specimens. The characterization is specifically designed to elucidate a constitutive model that accurately predicts the change in behavior of these materials due to exposure. The constitutive model for viscoelastic behavior reflects the level of strain, the rate of strain, and the history of strain as well as the thermal history of the material

  14. Propagation of cracks and damage in non aging linear viscoelastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, S.T.

    2010-01-01

    Most of France's energy is nuclear. The reactor building comprises a internal and external containment. The internal containment is prestressed to limit the flow of leakage in the internal-external space. The prestress decreases during time by the creep of concrete. It may propagate the cracks by the accidental internal pressure. So we define two research problems: propagation of macro-cracks in viscoelastic structure; effective behavior of micro-cracked viscoelastic material. Firstly, we develop a Burger viscoelastic model of concrete with two approaches: numerical and analytical. Then we solve the problem of single cracks in developing thermodynamically the concept of energy release rate. In the third part we develop a viscoelastic model to study the effective behavior of micro-cracked materials in the case without propagation. The problem of propagation of microcracks is then studied by a numerical approach based on the 'representative pattern morphology'. These studies are finally applied to solve the problems of crack propagation and damage of containment under accidental internal pressure. (authors)

  15. Size and temperature dependence of the tensile mechanical properties of zinc blende CdSe nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fu, Bing; Chen, Na; Xie, Yiqun; Ye, Xiang; Gu, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    The effect of size and temperature on the tensile mechanical properties of zinc blende CdSe nanowires is investigated by all atoms molecular dynamic simulation. We found the ultimate tensile strength and Young's modulus will decrease as the temperature and size of the nanowire increase. The size and temperature dependence are mainly attributed to surface effect and thermally elongation effect. High reversibility of tensile behavior will make zinc blende CdSe nanowires suitable for building efficient nanodevices.

  16. Viscoelastic characterization of carbon fiber-epoxy composites by creep and creep rupture tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farina, Luis Claudio

    2009-01-01

    One of the main requirements for the use of fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites in structural applications is the evaluation of their behavior during service life. The warranties of the integrity of these structural components demand a study of the time dependent behavior of these materials due to viscoelastic response of the polymeric matrix and of the countless possibilities of design configurations. In the present study, creep and creep rupture test in stress were performed in specimens of unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy composites with fibers orientations of 60 degree and 90 degree, at temperatures of 25 and 70 degree C. The aim is the viscoelastic characterization of the material through the creep curves to some levels of constant tension during periods of 1000 h, the attainment of the creep rupture envelope by the creep rupture curves and the determination of the transition of the linear for non-linear behavior through isochronous curves. In addition, comparisons of creep compliance curves with a viscoelastic behavior prediction model based on Schapery equation were also performed. For the test, a modification was verified in the behavior of the material, regarding the resistance, stiffness and deformation, demonstrating that these properties were affected for the time and tension level, especially in work temperature above the ambient. The prediction model was capable to represent the creep behavior, however the determination of the equations terms should be considered, besides the variation of these with the applied tension and the elapsed time of test. (author)

  17. Viscoelastic Pavement Modeling with a Spreadsheet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levenberg, Eyal

    2016-01-01

    The aim herein was to equip civil engineers and students with an advanced pavement modeling tool that is both easy to use and highly adaptive. To achieve this, a mathematical solution for a layered viscoelastic half-space subjected to a moving load was developed and subsequently implemented...

  18. Viscoelastic fingering with a pulsed pressure signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corvera Poire, E; Rio, J A del

    2004-01-01

    We derive a generalized Darcy's law in the frequency domain for a linear viscoelastic fluid flowing in a Hele-Shaw cell. This leads to an analytic expression for the dynamic permeability that has maxima which are several orders of magnitude larger than the static permeability. We then follow an argument of de Gennes (1987 Europhys. Lett. 2 195) to obtain the smallest possible finger width when viscoelasticity is important. Using this and a conservation law, we obtain the lowest bound for the width of a single finger displacing a viscoelastic fluid. When the driving force consists of a constant pressure gradient plus an oscillatory signal, our results indicate that the finger width varies in time following the frequency of the incident signal. Also, the amplitude of the finger width in time depends on the value of the dynamic permeability at the imposed frequency. When the finger is driven with a frequency that maximizes the permeability, variations in the amplitude are also maximized. This gives results that are very different for Newtonian and viscoelastic fluids. For the former ones the amplitude of the oscillation decays with frequency. For the latter ones on the other hand, the amplitude has maxima at the same frequencies that maximize the dynamic permeability

  19. On viscoelastic instability in polymeric filaments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Hassager, Ole

    1999-01-01

    The 3D Lagrangian Integral Method is used to simulate the effects of surface tension on the viscoelastic end-plate instability, occuring in the rapid extension of some polymeric filaments between parallel plates. It is shovn that the surface tension delays the onset of the instability. Furthermore...

  20. Isolation of nanoscale exosomes using viscoelastic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Guoqing; Liu, Chao

    2017-11-01

    Exosomes, molecular cargos secreted by almost all mammalian cells, are considered as promising biomarkers to identify many diseases including cancers. However, the small size of exosomes (30-200 nm) poses serious challenges on their isolation from the complex media containing a variety of extracellular vesicles (EVs) of different sizes, especially in small sample volumes. Here we develop a viscoelasticity-based microfluidic system to directly separate exosomes from cell culture media or serum in a continuous, size-dependent, and label-free manner. Using a small amount of biocompatible polymer as the additive into the media to control the viscoelastic forces exerted on EVs, we are able to achieve a high separation purity (>90%) and recovery (>80%) of exosomes. The size cutoff in viscoelasticity-based microfluidics can be easily controlled using different PEO concentrations. Based on this size-dependent viscoelastic separation strategy, we envision the handling of diverse nanoscale objects, such as gold nanoparticles, DNA origami structures, and quantum dots. This work was supported financially by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11572334, 91543125).

  1. Impact load time histories for viscoelastic missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoykovich, M.

    1977-01-01

    Generation of the impact load time history at the contact point between a viscoelastic missile and its targets is presented. In the past, in the case of aircraft striking containment shell structure, the impact load history was determined on the basis of actual measurements by subjecting a rigid wall to aircraft crash. The effects of elastic deformation of the target upon the impact load time history is formulated in this paper. The missile is idealized by a linear mass-spring-dashpot combination using viscoelastic models. These models can readily be processed taking into account the elastic as well as inelastic deformations of the missiles. The target is assumed to be either linearly elastic or rigid. In the case of the linearly elastic target, the normal mode theory is used to express the time-dependent displacements of the target which is simulated by lumped masses, elastic properties and dashpots in discrete parts. In the case of Maxwell viscoelastic model, the time-dependent displacements of the missile and the target are given in terms of the unknown impact load time history. This leads to an integral equation which may be solved by Laplace transformation. The normal mode theory is provided. Examples are given for bricks with viscoelastic materials as missiles against a rigid target. (Auth.)

  2. Viscoelasticity promotes collective swimming of sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chih-Kuan; Harvey, Benedict B.; Fiore, Alyssa G.; Ardon, Florencia; Suarez, Susan S.; Wu, Mingming

    From flocking birds to swarming insects, interactions of organisms large and small lead to the emergence of collective dynamics. Here, we report striking collective swimming of bovine sperm, with sperm orienting in the same direction within each cluster, enabled by the viscoelasticity of the fluid. A long-chain polyacrylamide solution was used as a model viscoelastic fluid such that its rheology can be fine-tuned to mimic that of bovine cervical mucus. In viscoelastic fluid, sperm formed dynamic clusters, and the cluster size increased with elasticity of the polyacrylamide solution. In contrast, sperm swam randomly and individually in Newtonian fluids of similar viscosity. Analysis of the fluid motion surrounding individual swimming sperm indicated that sperm-fluid interaction is facilitated by the elastic component of the fluid. We note that almost all biological fluids (e.g. mucus and blood) are viscoelastic in nature, this finding highlights the importance of fluid elasticity in biological function. We will discuss what the orientation fluctuation within a cluster reveals about the interaction strength. Supported by NIH Grant 1R01HD070038.

  3. Changes in protein solubility, fermentative capacity, viscoelasticity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frozen dough should be stored for fewer than 21 days; time in which the loaf volume of bread made from frozen dough was approximately 40.84% smaller than that of fresh bread dough formulation. Keywords: French type bread, frozen dough, protein solubility, baking quality, viscoelasticity. African Journal of Biotechnology ...

  4. DYNAMIC DEFORMATION THE VISCOELASTIC TWOCOMPONENT MEDIUM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Polenov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary. In the article are scope harmonious warping of the two-component medium, one component which are represent viscoelastic medium, hereditary properties which are described by the kernel aftereffect Abel integral-differential ratio BoltzmannVolterr, while second – compressible liquid. Do a study one-dimensional case. Use motion equation of two-component medium at movement. Look determination system these equalization in the form of damped wave. Introduce dimensionless coefficient. Combined equations happen to homogeneous system with complex factor relatively waves amplitude in viscoelastic component and in fluid. As a result opening system determinant receive biquadratic equation. Elastic operator express through kernel aftereffect Abel for space Fourier. With the help transformation and symbol series biquadratic equation reduce to quadratic equation. Come to the conclusion that in two-component viscoelastic medium exist two mode sonic waves. As a result solution of quadratic equation be found description advance of waves sonic in viscoelastic two-component medium, which physical-mechanical properties represent complex parameter. Velocity determination advance of sonic waves, attenuation coefficient, mechanical loss tangent, depending on characteristic porous medium and circular frequency formulas receive. Graph dependences of description advance of waves sonic from the temperature logarithm and with the fractional parameter γ are constructed.

  5. Viscoelastic properties of cellular polypropylene ferroelectrets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gaal, M.; Bovtun, Viktor; Stark, W.; Erhard, A.; Yakymenko, Y.; Kreutzbruck, M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 119, č. 12 (2016), s. 1-12, č. článku 125101. ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-08389S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : ferroelectrets * viscoelastic properties * ultrasonic Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.068, year: 2016

  6. Experimental Viscoelastic Characterization of Corn Cob Composited ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The nature of viscoelasticity in biomateria1s and the techniques for characterizing their rheological properties were reviewed. Relaxation tests were performed with cylindrical samples of corn cob composites which were initially subjected to radial compression. It was found that a Maxwell model composed of two simple ...

  7. Modeling the Peano fluidic muscle and the effects of its material properties on its static and dynamic behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, Allan Joshua; Xie, Sheng Quan; Anderson, Iain Alexander

    2016-06-01

    The promise of wearable assistive robotics cannot be realized without the development of actuators that mimic the behavior and form of biological muscles. Planar fluidic muscles known as Peano muscles or pouch motors have the potential to provide the high force and compliance of McKibben pneumatic artificial muscles with the low threshold pressure of pleated pneumatic artificial muscles. Yet they do so in a soft and slim form that can be discreetly distributed over the human body. This work is an investigation into the empirical modeling of the Peano muscle, the effect of its material on its performance, and its capabilities and limitations. We discovered that the Peano muscle could provide responsive and discreet actuation of soft and rigid bodies requiring strains between 15% and 30%. Ideally, they are made of non-viscoelastic materials with high tensile and low bending stiffnesses. While Sarosi et al’s empirical model accurately captures its static behavior with an root mean square error of 10.2 N, their dynamic model overestimates oscillation frequency and damping. We propose that the Peano muscle be modeled by a parallel ideal contractile unit and viscoelastic element, both in series with another viscoelastic element.

  8. Tissue viscoelasticity is related to tissue composition but may not fully predict the apparent-level viscoelasticity in human trabecular bone – An experimental and finite element study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ojanen, X.; Tanska, P.; Malo, M. K.H.

    2017-01-01

    Trabecular bone is viscoelastic under dynamic loading. However, it is unclear how tissue viscoelasticity controls viscoelasticity at the apparent-level. In this study, viscoelasticity of cylindrical human trabecular bone samples (n = 11, male, age 18–78 years) from 11 proximal femurs were charact......). These findings indicate that bone tissue viscoelasticity is affected by tissue composition but may not fully predict the macroscale viscoelasticity in human trabecular bone....

  9. Viscoelastic gravel-pack carrier fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehmer, W.L.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of a fluid to flow adequately into the formation during gravel-pack treatments is critical to achieving a good pack. Recent studies have indicated ''fish-eyes'' and/or ''microgels'' present in many polymer gelled carrier fluids will plug pore throats, leading to impaired leakoff and causing formation damage. Intensive manipulation of the polymer gelled fluid using shear and filter devices will help remove the particles, but it adds to the cost of the treatment in terms of equipment and manpower. Excessive shear will degrade the polymer leading to poor gravel suspension, while too little shear will cause filtration problems. A gelled carried fluid using a viscoelastic surfactant system has been found to leak off very efficiently to the formation, and cause no formation damage, without the use of shear/filter devices. Viscoelastic surfactant-base gelled fluids develop viscosity because of the association of surfactant moloecules into large rod-shaped aggregates. There is no hydration of polymer involved, so fish-eyes and microgels will not be formed in the viscoelastic fluid. A surfactant-base system having a yield point allows the gravel carrying properties to be much better than fluids gelled with conventional polymer systems (hydroxyethylcellulose [HEC]). For example, a gravel carried fluid gelled with 80 lb HEC/1,000 gal has a viscosity of about 400 cp at 170 sec/sup -1/; a viscoelastic surfactant-base system having only one-half the viscosity still flows into cores about four times more efficiently than the HEC-base fluid. The rheology, leakoff, formation damage and mixing properties of a viscoelastic, surfactant-base, gravel-pack carrier fluid are discussed

  10. Swelling Characteristics and Tensile Properties of Natural Fiber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The swelling behavior and tensile strength of natural fiber-reinforced plastic in premium motor spirit (PMS), dual purpose kerosene (DPK) and sea water have been studied. Composite formed by reinforcing polyester resin with Okam fibers was immersed in the selected solvents for 16 weeks (4 months). Swelling ...

  11. EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION ON TENSILE STRENGTH OF JACQUARD KNITTED FABRICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BRAD Raluca

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available An objective approach to select the best fabric for technical and home textiles consists in mechanical properties evaluation. The goal of this study is to analyze the behavior of knitted fabrics undergoing stretch stress. In this respect, three types of 2 colors Rib structure (backstripes jacquard, twillback jacquard and double-layered 3x3 rib fabric have been presented and tested for tensile strength and elongation on three directions. First, the elasticity and the behavior of knitted Rib fabrics were described The fabrics were knitted using 100% PAN yarns with Nm 1/15x2 on a E5 CMS 330 Stoll V-bed knitting machine, and have been tested using INSTROM 5587 Tensile Testing Machine in respect of standards conditions. After a relaxation period, 15 specimens were prepared, being disposed at 0°, 45 and 90 angles to the wale direction on the flat knitted panel. The tensile strength and the elongation values were recorded and mean values were computed. After strength and tensile elongation testing for 3 types of rib based knitted fabrics, one can see that the double layer knit presents the best mechanical behavior, followed by birds-eyebacking 2 colors Jacquard and then back striped Jacquard. For tensile stress in bias direction, the twillbacking Jacquard has a good breakage resistance value due to the higher number of rib sinker loops in structure that are positioned on the same direction with the tensile force. The twillbacking Jacquard structure could be considered as an alternative for the base material for decorative and home textile products.

  12. Spatial characterization of T1 and T2 relaxation times and the water apparent diffusion coefficient in rabbit Achilles tendon subjected to tensile loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellen, J; Helmer, K G; Grigg, P; Sotak, C H

    2005-03-01

    Tendons exhibit viscoelastic mechanical behavior under tensile loading. The elasticity arises from the collagen chains that form fibrils, while the viscous response arises from the interaction of the water with the solid matrix. Therefore, an understanding of the behavior of water in response to the application of a load is crucial to the understanding of the origin of the viscous response. Three-dimensional MRI mapping of rabbit Achilles tendons was performed at 2.0 T to characterize the response of T(1) and T(2) relaxation times and the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of water to tensile loading. The ADC was measured in directions both parallel (ADC( parallel)) and perpendicular (ADC( perpendicular)) to the long axis of the tendon. At a short diffusion time (5.8 ms) MR parameter maps showed the existence of two regions, here termed "core" and "rim", that exhibited statistically significant differences in T(1), T(2), and ADC( perpendicular) under the baseline loading condition. MR parameter maps were also generated at a second loading condition of approximately 1 MPa. At a diffusion time of 5.8 ms, there was a statistically significant increase in the rim region for both ADC( perpendicular) (57.5%) and ADC( parallel) (20.5%) upon tensile loading. The changes in core ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)), as well as the relaxation parameters in both core and rim regions, were not statistically significant. The effect of diffusion time on the ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values was investigated by creating maps at three additional diffusion times (50.0, 125.0, 250.0 ms) using a diffusion-weighted, stimulated-echo (DW-STE) pulse sequence. At longer diffusion times, ADC(( perpendicular), ( parallel)) values increased rather than approaching a constant value. This observation was attributed to T(1) spin-editing during the DW-STE pulse sequence, which resulted in the loss of short-T(1) components (with correspondingly lower ADCs) at longer diffusion times

  13. Damage-induced tensile instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hult, J.

    1975-01-01

    The paper presents a unified description of ductile and brittle rupture phenomena in structural components under tensile loading with particular emphasis on creep rupture. Two structural elements are analyzed in detail: 1) the uniform tensile bar subject to a Heaviside history of tensile force and superimposed such loadings, i.e. staircase histories, and 2) the thinwalled spherical pressure vessel subject to a Heaviside history of internal pressure. For both these structures the conditions for instantaneous as well as delayed rupture are analysed. It is shown that a state of mechanical instability will be reached at a certain load or after a certain time. The cases of purely ductile rupture and purely brittle fracture are identified as two limiting cases of this general instability phenomenon. The Kachanov-Rabotnov damage law implies that a structural component will fail in tension only when it has reached a state of complete damage, i.e. zero load carrying capacity. The extended law predicts failure at an earlier stage of the deterioration process and is therefore more compatible with experimental observation. Further experimental support is offered by predictions for staircase loading histories, both step-up and step-down type. The presented damage theory here predicts strain histories which are in closer agreement with test data than predictions based on other phenomenological theories

  14. Development of probabilistic fatigue curve for asphalt concrete based on viscoelastic continuum damage mechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Sharma

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Due to its roots in fundamental thermodynamic framework, continuum damage approach is popular for modeling asphalt concrete behavior. Currently used continuum damage models use mixture averaged values for model parameters and assume deterministic damage process. On the other hand, significant scatter is found in fatigue data generated even under extremely controlled laboratory testing conditions. Thus, currently used continuum damage models fail to account the scatter observed in fatigue data. This paper illustrates a novel approach for probabilistic fatigue life prediction based on viscoelastic continuum damage approach. Several specimens were tested for their viscoelastic properties and damage properties under uniaxial mode of loading. The data thus generated were analyzed using viscoelastic continuum damage mechanics principles to predict fatigue life. Weibull (2 parameter, 3 parameter and lognormal distributions were fit to fatigue life predicted using viscoelastic continuum damage approach. It was observed that fatigue damage could be best-described using Weibull distribution when compared to lognormal distribution. Due to its flexibility, 3-parameter Weibull distribution was found to fit better than 2-parameter Weibull distribution. Further, significant differences were found between probabilistic fatigue curves developed in this research and traditional deterministic fatigue curve. The proposed methodology combines advantages of continuum damage mechanics as well as probabilistic approaches. These probabilistic fatigue curves can be conveniently used for reliability based pavement design. Keywords: Probabilistic fatigue curve, Continuum damage mechanics, Weibull distribution, Lognormal distribution

  15. Finite element formulation of viscoelastic sandwich beams using fractional derivative operators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galucio, A. C.; Deü, J.-F.; Ohayon, R.

    This paper presents a finite element formulation for transient dynamic analysis of sandwich beams with embedded viscoelastic material using fractional derivative constitutive equations. The sandwich configuration is composed of a viscoelastic core (based on Timoshenko theory) sandwiched between elastic faces (based on Euler-Bernoulli assumptions). The viscoelastic model used to describe the behavior of the core is a four-parameter fractional derivative model. Concerning the parameter identification, a strategy to estimate the fractional order of the time derivative and the relaxation time is outlined. Curve-fitting aspects are focused, showing a good agreement with experimental data. In order to implement the viscoelastic model into the finite element formulation, the Grünwald definition of the fractional operator is employed. To solve the equation of motion, a direct time integration method based on the implicit Newmark scheme is used. One of the particularities of the proposed algorithm lies in the storage of displacement history only, reducing considerably the numerical efforts related to the non-locality of fractional operators. After validations, numerical applications are presented in order to analyze truncation effects (fading memory phenomena) and solution convergence aspects.

  16. Dynamic Tensile Experimental Techniques for Geomaterials: A Comprehensive Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heard, W.; Song, B.; Williams, B.; Martin, B.; Sparks, P.; Nie, X.

    2018-01-01

    This review article is dedicated to the Dynamic Behavior of Materials Technical Division for celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Society for Experimental Mechanics (SEM). Understanding dynamic behavior of geomaterials is critical for analyzing and solving engineering problems of various applications related to underground explosions, seismic, airblast, and penetration events. Determining the dynamic tensile response of geomaterials has been a great challenge in experiments due to the nature of relatively low tensile strength and high brittleness. Various experimental approaches have been made in the past century, especially in the most recent half century, to understand the dynamic behavior of geomaterials in tension. In this review paper, we summarized the dynamic tensile experimental techniques for geomaterials that have been developed. The major dynamic tensile experimental techniques include dynamic direct tension, dynamic split tension, and spall tension. All three of the experimental techniques are based on Hopkinson or split Hopkinson (also known as Kolsky) bar techniques and principles. Uniqueness and limitations for each experimental technique are also discussed.

  17. Modeling Asymmetric Flow of Viscoelastic Fluid in Symmetric Planar Sudden Expansion Geometry Based on User-Defined Function in FLUENT CFD Package

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi-Ying Zheng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Through embedding an in-house subroutine into FLUENT code by utilizing the functionalization of user-defined function provided by the software, a new numerical simulation methodology on viscoelastic fluid flows has been established. In order to benchmark this methodology, numerical simulations under different viscoelastic fluid solution concentrations (with solvent viscosity ratio varied from 0.2 to 0.9, extensibility parameters (100≤L2≤500, Reynolds numbers (0.1 ≤ Re ≤ 100, and Weissenberg numbers (0 ≤ Wi ≤ 20 are conducted on unsteady laminar flows through a symmetric planar sudden expansion with expansion ratio of 1: 3 for viscoelastic fluid flows. The constitutive model used to describe the viscoelastic effect of viscoelastic fluid flow is FENE-P (finitely extensive nonlinear elastic-Peterlin model. The numerical simulation results show that the influences of elasticity, inertia, and concentration on the flow bifurcation characteristics are more significant than those of extensibility. The present simulation results including the critical Reynolds number for which the flow becomes asymmetric, vortex size, bifurcation diagram, velocity distribution, streamline, and pressure loss show good agreements with some published results. That means the newly established method based on FLUENT software platform for simulating peculiar flow behaviors of viscoelastic fluid is credible and suitable for the study of viscoelastic fluid flows.

  18. Nonlinear Viscoelastic Rheology and the Occurrence of Aftershocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbakov, R.; Zhang, X.

    2017-12-01

    Aftershocks are ubiquitous in nature. They are the manifestation of relaxation phenomena observed in various physical systems. In one prominent example, they typically occur after large earthquakes. The observed aftershock sequences usually obey several well defined non-trivial empirical laws in magnitude, temporal, and spatial domains. In many cases their characteristics follow scale-invariant distributions. The occurrence of aftershocks displays a prominent temporal behavior due to time-dependent mechanisms of stress and/or energy transfer. There are compelling evidences that the lower continental crust and upper mantle are governed by various solid state creep mechanisms. Among those mechanisms a power-law viscous flow was suggested to explain the postseismic surface deformation after large earthquakes. In this work, we consider a slider-block model to mimic the behavior of a seismogenic fault. In the model, we introduce a nonlinear viscoelastic coupling mechanism to capture the essential characteristics of crustal rheology and stress interaction between the blocks and the medium. For this purpose we employ nonlinear Kelvin-Voigt elements consisting of an elastic spring and a dashpot assembled in parallel to introduce viscoelastic coupling between the blocks and the driving plate. By mapping the model into a cellular automaton we derive the functional form of the stress transfer mechanism in the model. We show that the nonlinear viscoelasticity plays a critical role in triggering of aftershocks. It explains the functional form of the Omori-Utsu law and gives physical interpretation of its parameters. The proposed model also suggests that the power-law rheology of the fault gauge and underlying lower crust and upper mantle controls the decay rate of aftershocks. To verify this, we analyze several prominent aftershock sequences to estimate their decay rates and correlate with the rheological properties of the underlying lower crust and mantle, which were estimated

  19. Sensitive electromechanical sensors using viscoelastic graphene-polymer nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boland, Conor S; Khan, Umar; Ryan, Gavin; Barwich, Sebastian; Charifou, Romina; Harvey, Andrew; Backes, Claudia; Li, Zheling; Ferreira, Mauro S; Möbius, Matthias E; Young, Robert J; Coleman, Jonathan N

    2016-12-09

    Despite its widespread use in nanocomposites, the effect of embedding graphene in highly viscoelastic polymer matrices is not well understood. We added graphene to a lightly cross-linked polysilicone, often encountered as Silly Putty, changing its electromechanical properties substantially. The resulting nanocomposites display unusual electromechanical behavior, such as postdeformation temporal relaxation of electrical resistance and nonmonotonic changes in resistivity with strain. These phenomena are associated with the mobility of the nanosheets in the low-viscosity polymer matrix. By considering both the connectivity and mobility of the nanosheets, we developed a quantitative model that completely describes the electromechanical properties. These nanocomposites are sensitive electromechanical sensors with gauge factors >500 that can measure pulse, blood pressure, and even the impact associated with the footsteps of a small spider. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  20. Microstructural evolution during tensile deformation of polypropylenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasari, A.; Rohrmann, J.; Misra, R.D.K.

    2003-01-01

    Tensile deformation processes occurring at varying strain rates in high and low crystallinity polypropylenes and ethylene-propylene di-block copolymers have been investigated by scanning electron microscopy. This is examined for both long and short chain polymeric materials. The deformation processes in different polymeric materials show striking dissimilarities in spite of the common propylene matrix. Additionally, the deformation behavior of long and their respective short chain polymers was different. Deformation mechanisms include crazing/tearing, wedging, ductile ploughing, fibrillation, and brittle fracture. The different modes of deformation are depicted in the form of strain rate-strain diagrams. At a constant strain rate, the strain to fracture follows the sequence: high crystallinity polypropylenes< low crystallinity polypropylenes< ethylene-propylene di-block copolymers, indicative of the trend in resistance to plastic deformation

  1. Viscoelasticity of metallic, polymeric and oxide glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelletier, J.M. [GEMPPM, INSA Lyon, Bat. B. Pascal, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)]. E-mail: Jean-marc.Pelletier@insa-lyon.fr; Gauthier, C. [GEMPPM, INSA Lyon, Bat. B. Pascal, 69621 Villeurbanne (France); Munch, E. [GEMPPM, INSA Lyon, Bat. B. Pascal, 69621 Villeurbanne (France)

    2006-12-20

    Present work addresses on mechanical spectroscopy experiments performed on bulk metallic glasses (Zr-Ti-Cu-Ni-Be alloys, Mg-Y-Cu alloys), on oxide glasses (SiO{sub 2}-Na{sub 2}O-CaO) and on amorphous polymers (polyethylene terephtalate (PET), nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR), etc.). It appears that whatever the nature of the chemical bonding involved in the material, we observe strong relaxation effects in an intermediate temperature range, near the glass transition temperature. In addition, when crystallization occurs in the initially amorphous material, similar evolution is observed in all the materials. A method is proposed to properly separate elastic, viscoelastic and viscoplastic contributions to the deformation. Finally a physical model is given to describe these viscoelastic phenomena.

  2. Stress wave propagation in linear viscoelasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asada, Kazuo; Fukuoka, Hidekazu.

    1992-01-01

    Decreasing characteristics of both stress and stress gradient with propagation distance at a 2-dimensional linear viscoelasticity wavefront are derived by using our 3-dimensional theoretical equation for particle velocity discontinuities. By finite-element method code DYNA3D, stress at a noncurvature dilatation wavefront of linear viscoelasticity is shown to decrease exponentially. This result is in good accordance with our theory. By dynamic photoelasticity experiment, stress gradients of urethane rubber plates at 3 types of wavefronts are shown to decrease exponentially at a noncurvature wavefront and are shown to be a decreasing function of (1/√R) exp (α 1 2 /(2α 0 3 ξ)) at a curvature wavefront. These experiment results are in good accordance with our theory. (author)

  3. Ionic and viscoelastic mechanisms of a bucky-gel actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruusamäe, Karl; Sugino, Takushi; Asaka, Kinji

    2015-07-01

    Ionic electromechanically active polymers (IEAPs) are considered attractive candidates for soft, miniature, and lightweight actuators. The bucky-gel actuator is a carbonaceous subtype of IEAP that due to its structure (i.e. two highly porous electrodes sandwiching a thin ion-permeable electrolyte layer) and composition (i.e. being composed of soft porous polymer, carbon nanotubes, and ionic liquid) is very similar to an electric double-layer capacitor. In response to the voltage applied between the electrodes of a bucky-gel actuator, the laminar structure bends. The time domain behavior exhibits, however, a phenomenon called the back-relaxation, i.e., after some time the direction of bending is reversed even though voltage remains constant. In spite of the working mechanism of IEAP actuators being generally attributed to the transport of ions within the soft multilayer system, the specific details remain unclear. A so-called two-carrier model proposes that the bending and subsequent back-relaxation are caused by the relocation of two ionic species having different mobilities as they enter and exit the electrode layers. By adopting the two-carrier model for bucky-gel actuators, we see very good agreement between the mathematical representation and the experimental data of the electromechanical behavior. Furthermore, since the bucky-gel actuator is viscoelastic, we propose to use the time domain response of a blocking force as the key parameter related to the inner ionic mechanism. We also introduce a method to estimate the viscoelastic creep compliance function from the time domain responses for curvature and blocking force. This analysis includes four types of bucky-gel actuators of varying composition and structure.

  4. Quasistatic nonlinear viscoelasticity and gradient flows

    OpenAIRE

    Ball, John M.; Şengül, Yasemin

    2014-01-01

    We consider the equation of motion for one-dimensional nonlinear viscoelasticity of strain-rate type under the assumption that the stored-energy function is λ-convex, which allows for solid phase transformations. We formulate this problem as a gradient flow, leading to existence and uniqueness of solutions. By approximating general initial data by those in which the deformation gradient takes only finitely many values, we show that under suitable hypotheses on the stored-energy function the d...

  5. Viscoelastic property identification from waveform reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leymarie, N.; Aristégui, C.; Audoin, B.; Baste, S.

    2002-05-01

    An inverse method is proposed for the determination of the viscoelastic properties of material plates from the plane-wave transmitted acoustic field. Innovations lie in a two-step inversion scheme based on the well-known maximum-likelihood principle with an analytic signal formulation. In addition, establishing the analytical formulations of the plate transmission coefficient we implement an efficient and slightly noise-sensitive process suited to both very thin plates and strongly dispersive media.

  6. Viscoelastic creep of high-temperature concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pfeiffer, P.A.; Marchertas, A.H.; Bazant, Z.P.

    1985-01-01

    Presented in this report is the analytical model for analysis of high temperature creep response of concrete. The creep law used is linear (viscoelastic), the temperature and moisture effects on the creep rate and also aging are included. Both constant and transient temperature as well as constant and transient moisture conditions are considered. Examples are presented to correlate experimental data with parameters of the analytical model by the use of a finite element scheme

  7. VISCOELASTIC MODELS OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dobos, Vera [Konkoly Thege Miklos Astronomical Institute, Research Centre of Astronomy and Earth Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1121 Konkoly Thege Miklós út 15-17, Budapest (Hungary); Turner, Edwin L., E-mail: dobos@konkoly.hu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, 08544, 4 Ivy Lane, Peyton Hall, Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life has been intensely studied on solar system moons such as Europa or Enceladus where the surface ice layer covers a tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. To study the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models because it takes into account the temperature dependence of the tidal heat flux and the melting of the inner material. Using this model, we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), which strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ using both models. We have found that the viscoelastic model predicts 2.8 times more exomoons in the TTZ with orbital periods between 0.1 and 3.5 days than the fixed Q model for plausible distributions of physical and orbital parameters. The viscoelastic model provides more promising results in terms of habitability because the inner melting of the body moderates the surface temperature, acting like a thermostat.

  8. VISCOELASTIC MODELS OF TIDALLY HEATED EXOMOONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobos, Vera; Turner, Edwin L.

    2015-01-01

    Tidal heating of exomoons may play a key role in their habitability, since the elevated temperature can melt the ice on the body even without significant solar radiation. The possibility of life has been intensely studied on solar system moons such as Europa or Enceladus where the surface ice layer covers a tidally heated water ocean. Tidal forces may be even stronger in extrasolar systems, depending on the properties of the moon and its orbit. To study the tidally heated surface temperature of exomoons, we used a viscoelastic model for the first time. This model is more realistic than the widely used, so-called fixed Q models because it takes into account the temperature dependence of the tidal heat flux and the melting of the inner material. Using this model, we introduced the circumplanetary Tidal Temperate Zone (TTZ), which strongly depends on the orbital period of the moon and less on its radius. We compared the results with the fixed Q model and investigated the statistical volume of the TTZ using both models. We have found that the viscoelastic model predicts 2.8 times more exomoons in the TTZ with orbital periods between 0.1 and 3.5 days than the fixed Q model for plausible distributions of physical and orbital parameters. The viscoelastic model provides more promising results in terms of habitability because the inner melting of the body moderates the surface temperature, acting like a thermostat

  9. Static viscoelasticity of biomass polyethylene composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyan Yang

    Full Text Available The biomass polyethylene composites filled with poplar wood flour, rice husk, cotton stalk or corn stalk were prepared by extrusion molding. The static viscoelasticity of composites was investigated by the dynamic thermal mechanical analyzer (DMA. Through the stress-strain scanning, it is found that the linear viscoelasticity interval of composites gradually decreases as the temperature rises, and the critical stress and strain values are 0.8 MPa and 0.03% respectively. The experiment shows that as the temperature rises, the creep compliance of biomass polyethylene composites is increased; under the constant temperature, the creep compliance decreases with the increase of content of biomass and calcium carbonate. The biomass and calcium carbonate used to prepare composites as filler can improve damping vibration attenuation and reduce stress deformation of composites. The stress relaxation modulus of composites is reduced and the relaxation rate increases at the higher temperature. The biomass and calcium carbonate used to prepare composites as filler not only can reduce costs, but also can increase stress relaxation modulus and improve the size thermostability of composites. The corn stalk is a good kind of biomass raw material for composites since it can improve the creep resistance property and the stress relaxation resistance property of composites more effectively than other three kinds of biomass (poplar wood flour, rice husk and cotton stalk. Keywords: Biomass, Composites, Calcium carbonate, Static viscoelasticity, Creep, Stress relaxation

  10. Viscoelastic behaviour of cold recycled asphalt mixes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cizkova, Zuzana; Suda, Jan

    2017-09-01

    Behaviour of cold recycled mixes depends strongly on both the bituminous binder content (bituminous emulsion or foamed bitumen) and the hydraulic binder content (usually cement). In the case of cold recycled mixes rich in bitumen and with low hydraulic binder content, behaviour is close to the viscoelastic behaviour of traditional hot mix asphalt. With decreasing bituminous binder content together with increasing hydraulic binder content, mixes are characteristic with brittle behaviour, typical for concrete pavements or hydraulically bound layers. The behaviour of cold recycled mixes with low content of both types of binders is similar to behaviour of unbound materials. This paper is dedicated to analysing of the viscoelastic behaviour of the cold recycled mixes. Therefore, the tested mixes contained higher amount of the bituminous binder (both foamed bitumen and bituminous emulsion). The best way to characterize any viscoelastic material in a wide range of temperatures and frequencies is through the master curves. This paper includes interesting findings concerning the dependency of both parts of the complex modulus (elastic and viscous) on the testing frequency (which simulates the speed of heavy traffic passing) and on the testing temperature (which simulates the changing climate conditions a real pavement is subjected to).

  11. Ratcheting Strain and Microstructure Evolution of AZ31B Magnesium Alloy under a Tensile-Tensile Cyclic Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhifeng; Wang, Denghui; Wang, Wenxian; Zhou, Jun; He, Xiuli; Dong, Peng; Zhang, Hongxia; Sun, Liyong

    2018-03-28

    In this paper, studies were conducted to investigate the deformation behavior and microstructure change in a hot-rolled AZ31B magnesium alloy during a tensile-tensile cyclic loading. The relationship between ratcheting effect and microstructure change was discussed. The ratcheting effect in the material during current tensile-tensile fatigue loading exceeds the material's fatigue limit and the development of ratcheting strain in the material experienced three stages: initial sharp increase stage (Stage I); steady stage (Stage II); and final abrupt increase stage (Stage III). Microstructure changes in Stage I and Stage II are mainly caused by activation of basal slip system. The Extra Geometrically Necessary Dislocations (GNDs) were also calculated to discuss the relationship between the dislocation caused by the basal slip system and the ratcheting strain during the cyclic loading. In Stage III, both the basal slip and the {11-20} twins are found active during the crack propagation. The fatigue crack initiation in the AZ31B magnesium alloy is found due to the basal slip and the {11-20} tensile twins.

  12. Extension of the beam theory for polymer bio-transducers with low aspect ratios and viscoelastic characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Ping; Lin, I-Kuan; Zhang, Xin; Lu, Hongbing

    2010-01-01

    Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based micropillars (or microcantilevers) have been used as bio-transducers for measuring cellular forces on the order of pN to µN. The measurement accuracy of these sensitive devices depends on appropriate modeling to convert the micropillar deformations into the corresponding reaction forces. The traditional approach to calculating the reaction force is based on the Euler beam theory with consideration of a linear elastic slender beam for the micropillar. However, the low aspect ratio in geometry of PDMS micropillars does not satisfy the slender beam requirement. Consequently, the Timoshenko beam theory, appropriate for a beam with a low aspect ratio, should be used. In addition, the inherently time-dependent behavior in PDMS has to be considered for accurate force conversion. In this paper, the Timoshenko beam theory, along with the consideration of viscoelastic behavior of PDMS, was used to model the mechanical response of micropillars. The viscoelastic behavior of PDMS was characterized by stress relaxation nanoindentation using a circular flat punch. A correction procedure was developed to determine the load–displacement relationship with consideration of ramp loading. The relaxation function was extracted and described by a generalized Maxwell model. The bending of rectangular micropillars was performed by a wedge indenter tip. The viscoelastic Timoshenko beam formula was used to calculate the mechanical response of the micropillar, and the results were compared with measurement data. The calculated reaction forces agreed well with the experimental data at three different loading rates. A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the accuracy of the viscoelastic Timoshenko beam model by comparing the reaction forces calculated from the elastic Euler beam, elastic Timoshenko beam and viscoelastic Euler beam models at various aspect ratios and loading rates. The extension of modeling from the elastic Euler beam theory to the

  13. Viscoelastic response of hydrogel materials at finite strains

    OpenAIRE

    Skovly, Martin Johannessen

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogel materials are very soft materials consisting of polymer networks and solvent molecules. The materials may exhibit large volume changes depending on its external chemical and mechanical environment and have viscoelastic properties which is common for many polymeric materials. In order to model the material response with the finite element method, a hydrogel constitutive model have been combined with finite viscoelastic theory and the resulting viscoelastic hydrogel constitutive model ...

  14. Salt type and concentration affect the viscoelasticity of polyelectrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkoz, Emre; Perazzo, Antonio; Arnold, Craig B.; Stone, Howard A.

    2018-05-01

    The addition of small amounts of xanthan gum to water yields viscoelastic solutions. In this letter, we show that the viscoelasticity of aqueous xanthan gum solutions can be tuned by different types of salts. In particular, we find that the decrease in viscoelasticity not only depends, as is known, on the salt concentration, but also is affected by the counterion ionic radius and the valence of the salt.

  15. Normal age-related viscoelastic properties of chondrons and chondrocytes isolated from rabbit knee

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Wang-ping; SUN Zhen-wei; LI Qi; LI Chun-jiang; WANG Li; CHEN Wei-yi; Jennifer Tickner; ZHENG Ming-hao; WEI Xiao-chun

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanical microenvironment of the chondrocytes plays an important role in cartilage homeostasis and in the health of the joint.The pericellular matrix,cellular membrane of the chondrocytes,and their cytoskeletal structures are key elements in the mechanical environment.The aims of this study are to measure the viscoelastic properties of isolated chondrons and chondrocytes from rabbit knee cartilage using micropipette aspiration and to determine the effect of aging on these properties.Methods Three age groups of rabbit knees were evaluated:(1) young (2 months,n=10);(2) adult (8 months,n=10);and (3) old (31 months,n=10).Chondrocytes were isolated from the right knee cartilage and chondrons were isolated from left knees using enzymatic methods.Micropipette aspiration combined with a standard linear viscoelastic solid model was used to quantify changes in the viscoelastic properties of chondrons and chondrocytes within 2 hours of isolation.The morphology and structure of isolated chondrons were evaluated by optical microscope using hematoxylin and eosin staining and collagen-6 immunofluorescence staining.Results In response to an applied constant 0.3-0.4 kPa of negative pressure,all chondrocytes exhibited standard linear viscoelastic solid properties.Model predictions of the creep data showed that the average equilibrium modulus (E∞),instantaneous modulus (E0).and apparent viscosity (μ) of old chondrocytes was significantly lower than the young and adult chondrocytes (P<0.001);however,no difference was found between young and adult chondrocytes (P>0.05).The adult and old chondrons generally possessed a thicker pericellular matrix (PCM) with more enclosed cells.The young and adult chondrons exhibited the same viscoelastic creep behavior under a greater applied pressure (1.0-1.1kPa) without the deformation seen in the old chondrons.The viscoelastic properties (E∞,E0,and u) of young and adult chondrons were significantly greater than that observed

  16. The viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær Bastholm, Sara; Becher, Naja; Stubbe, Peter Reimer

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize the viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs (CMPs) shed during labor at term. Spontaneously shed cervical mucus plugs from healthy women in active labor, were tested. The viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs were investigated...... with using frequency and stress sweep experiments within the linear viscoelastic region. Random-effects regression was used for statistical analysis. The CMPs are solid-like viscoelastic structures and the elastic modulus dominated the viscous modulus at all frequencies. These rheological characteristics...

  17. Viscoelastic material inversion using Sierra-SD and ROL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, Timothy [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aquino, Wilkins [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ridzal, Denis [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kouri, Drew Philip [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); van Bloemen Waanders, Bart Gustaaf [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Urbina, Angel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-11-01

    In this report we derive frequency-domain methods for inverse characterization of the constitutive parameters of viscoelastic materials. The inverse problem is cast in a PDE-constrained optimization framework with efficient computation of gradients and Hessian vector products through matrix free operations. The abstract optimization operators for first and second derivatives are derived from first principles. Various methods from the Rapid Optimization Library (ROL) are tested on the viscoelastic inversion problem. The methods described herein are applied to compute the viscoelastic bulk and shear moduli of a foam block model, which was recently used in experimental testing for viscoelastic property characterization.

  18. Study of normal and shear material properties for viscoelastic model of asphalt mixture by discrete element method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huan; Pettinari, Matteo; Stang, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture was studied by using discrete element method. The dynamic properties of asphalt mixture were captured by implementing Burger’s contact model. Different ways of taking into account of the normal and shear material properties of asphalt mi...

  19. NMClab, a model to assess the contributions of muscle visco-elasticity and afferent feedback to joint dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Alfred Christiaan; Mugge, Winfred; van der Helm, F.C.T.

    2008-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of a neuromusculoskeletal system results from the complex mechanical interaction between muscle visco-elasticity resulting from (co-)contraction and afferent feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. As a result of the multiple interactions the individual effect of

  20. Three Different Ways of Calibrating Burger's Contact Model for Viscoelastic Model of Asphalt Mixtures by Discrete Element Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Huan; Pettinari, Matteo; Stang, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    modulus. Three different approaches have been used and compared for calibrating the Burger's contact model. Values of the dynamic modulus and phase angle of asphalt mixtures were predicted by conducting DE simulation under dynamic strain control loading. The excellent agreement between the predicted......In this paper the viscoelastic behavior of asphalt mixture was investigated by employing a three-dimensional discrete element method. Combined with Burger's model, three contact models were used for the construction of constitutive asphalt mixture model with viscoelastic properties...

  1. 3D printing of an interpenetrating network hydrogel material with tunable viscoelastic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bootsma, Katherine; Fitzgerald, Martha M; Free, Brandon; Dimbath, Elizabeth; Conjerti, Joe; Reese, Greg; Konkolewicz, Dominik; Berberich, Jason A; Sparks, Jessica L

    2017-06-01

    Interpenetrating network (IPN) hydrogel materials are recognized for their unique mechanical properties. While IPN elasticity and toughness properties have been explored in previous studies, the factors that impact the time-dependent stress relaxation behavior of IPN materials are not well understood. Time-dependent (i.e. viscoelastic) mechanical behavior is a critical design parameter in the development of materials for a variety of applications, such as medical simulation devices, flexible substrate materials, cellular mechanobiology substrates, or regenerative medicine applications. This study reports a novel technique for 3D printing alginate-polyacrylamide IPN gels with tunable elastic and viscoelastic properties. The viscoelastic stress relaxation behavior of the 3D printed alginate-polyacrylamide IPN hydrogels was influenced most strongly by varying the concentration of the acrylamide cross-linker (MBAA), while the elastic modulus was affected most by varying the concentration of total monomer material. The material properties of our 3D printed IPN constructs were consistent with those reported in the biomechanics literature for soft tissues such as skeletal muscle, cardiac muscle, skin and subcutaneous tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Slow Growth of a Crack with Contacting Faces in a Viscoelastic Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selivanov, M. F.

    2017-11-01

    An algorithm for solving the problem of slow growth of a mode I crack with a zone of partial contact of the faces is proposed. The algorithm is based on a crack model with a cohesive zone, an iterative method of finding a solution for the elastic opening displacement, and elasto-viscoelastic analogy, which makes it possible to describe the time-dependent opening displacement in Boltzmann-Volterra form. A deformation criterion with a constant critical opening displacement and cohesive strength during quasistatic crack growth is used. The algorithm was numerically illustrated for tensile loading at infinity and two concentrated forces symmetric about the crack line that cause the crack faces to contact. When the crack propagates, the contact zone disappears and its dynamic growth begins.

  3. Effect of N+Cr alloying on the microstructures and tensile properties of Hadfield steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, C. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang, F.C., E-mail: zfc@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); National Engineering Research Center for Equipment and Technology of Cold Strip Rolling, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Wang, F. [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Liu, H.; Yu, B.D. [China Railway Shanhaiguan Bridge Group Co. LTD, Qinhuangdao 066205 (China)

    2017-01-02

    The microstructures and tensile behaviors of traditional Hadfield steel, named Mn12 steel, and Hadfield steel alloyed with N+Cr, named Mn12CrN steel were studied through optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, among others. Three different tensile strain rates of 5×10{sup −4}, 5×10{sup −3}, and 5×10{sup −2} s{sup −1} were selected in the tensile test. The deformation microstructures and fracture morphologies of the two steels after fracture in the tensile test were observed to analyze the tensile deformation response to different tensile strain rates. Results showed that the grain size of Mn12CrN steel was evidently refined after alloying with N+Cr. The grain would not become abnormally coarse even with increasing austenitizing temperature. During tensile deformation, the strength and plasticity of Mn12CrN steel were superior to those of Mn12 steel at the same strain rate. With increasing the strain rate, the changes in strength and plasticity of Mn12CrN steel were less sensitive to tensile strain rate compared with Mn12 steel. The effects of grain refinement and N+Cr alloying on dynamic strain aging and deformation twining behaviors were responsible for this lack of sensitivity to strain rate.

  4. Effect of N+Cr alloying on the microstructures and tensile properties of Hadfield steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.; Zhang, F.C.; Wang, F.; Liu, H.; Yu, B.D.

    2017-01-01

    The microstructures and tensile behaviors of traditional Hadfield steel, named Mn12 steel, and Hadfield steel alloyed with N+Cr, named Mn12CrN steel were studied through optical microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, among others. Three different tensile strain rates of 5×10 −4 , 5×10 −3 , and 5×10 −2 s −1 were selected in the tensile test. The deformation microstructures and fracture morphologies of the two steels after fracture in the tensile test were observed to analyze the tensile deformation response to different tensile strain rates. Results showed that the grain size of Mn12CrN steel was evidently refined after alloying with N+Cr. The grain would not become abnormally coarse even with increasing austenitizing temperature. During tensile deformation, the strength and plasticity of Mn12CrN steel were superior to those of Mn12 steel at the same strain rate. With increasing the strain rate, the changes in strength and plasticity of Mn12CrN steel were less sensitive to tensile strain rate compared with Mn12 steel. The effects of grain refinement and N+Cr alloying on dynamic strain aging and deformation twining behaviors were responsible for this lack of sensitivity to strain rate.

  5. Effects of a Pseudophysiological Environment on the Elastic and Viscoelastic Properties of Collagen Gels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghezi, Sébastien; Couet, Frédéric; Chevallier, Pascale; Mantovani, Diego

    2012-01-01

    Vascular tissue engineering focuses on the replacement of diseased small-diameter blood vessels with a diameter less than 6 mm for which adequate substitutes still do not exist. One approach to vascular tissue engineering is to culture vascular cells on a scaffold in a bioreactor. The bioreactor establishes pseudophysiological conditions for culture (medium culture, 37°C, mechanical stimulation). Collagen gels are widely used as scaffolds for tissue regeneration due to their biological properties; however, they exhibit low mechanical properties. Mechanical characterization of these scaffolds requires establishing the conditions of testing in regard to the conditions set in the bioreactor. The effects of different parameters used during mechanical testing on the collagen gels were evaluated in terms of mechanical and viscoelastic properties. Thus, a factorial experiment was adopted, and three relevant factors were considered: temperature (23°C or 37°C), hydration (aqueous saline solution or air), and mechanical preconditioning (with or without). Statistical analyses showed significant effects of these factors on the mechanical properties which were assessed by tensile tests as well as stress relaxation tests. The last tests provide a more consistent understanding of the gels' viscoelastic properties. Therefore, performing mechanical analyses on hydrogels requires setting an adequate environment in terms of temperature and aqueous saline solution as well as choosing the adequate test. PMID:22844285

  6. A viscoelastic-viscoplastic model for short-fibre reinforced polymers with complex fibre orientations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nciri M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an innovative approach for the modelling of viscous behaviour of short-fibre reinforced composites (SFRC with complex distributions of fibre orientations and for a wide range of strain rates. As an alternative to more complex homogenisation methods, the model is based on an additive decomposition of the state potential for the computation of composite’s macroscopic behaviour. Thus, the composite material is seen as the assembly of a matrix medium and several linear elastic fibre media. The division of short fibres into several families means that complex distributions of orientation or random orientation can be easily modelled. The matrix behaviour is strain-rate sensitive, i.e. viscoelastic and/or viscoplastic. Viscoelastic constitutive laws are based on a generalised linear Maxwell model and the modelling of the viscoplasticity is based on an overstress approach. The model is tested for the case of a polypropylene reinforced with short-glass fibres with distributed orientations and subjected to uniaxial tensile tests, in different loading directions and under different strain rates. Results demonstrate the efficiency of the model over a wide range of strain rates.

  7. Viscoelastic stress modeling in cementitious materials using constant viscoelastic hydration modulus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hansen, W.; Liu, Z.; Koenders, E.A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Viscoelastic stress modeling in ageing cementitious materials is of major importance in high performance concrete of low water cement ratio (e.g. w/c ~0.35) where crack resistance due to deformation restraint needs to be determined. Total stress analysis is complicated by the occurrence of internal

  8. Regionally variant collagen alignment correlates with viscoelastic properties of the disc of the human temporomandibular joint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutman, Shawn; Kim, Daniel; Tarafder, Solaiman; Velez, Sergio; Jeong, Julia; Lee, Chang H

    2018-02-01

    To determine the regionally variant quality of collagen alignment in human TMJ discs and its statistical correlation with viscoelastic properties. For quantitative analysis of the quality of collagen alignment, horizontal sections of human TMJ discs with Pricrosirius Red staining were imaged under circularly polarized microscopy. Mean angle and angular deviation of collagen fibers in each region were analyzed using a well-established automated image-processing for angular gradient. Instantaneous and relaxation moduli of each disc region were measured under stress-relaxation test both in tensile and compression. Then Spearman correlation analysis was performed between the angular deviation and the moduli. To understand the effect of glycosaminoglycans on the correlation, TMJ disc samples were treated by chondroitinase ABC (C-ABC). Our imaging processing analysis showed the region-variant direction of collagen alignment, consistently with previous findings. Interestingly, the quality of collagen alignment, not only the directions, was significantly different in between the regions. The angular deviation of fiber alignment in the anterior and intermediate regions were significantly smaller than the posterior region. Medial and lateral regions showed significantly bigger angular deviation than all the other regions. The regionally variant angular deviation values showed statistically significant correlation with the tensile instantaneous modulus and the relaxation modulus, partially dependent on C-ABC treatment. Our findings suggest the region-variant degree of collagen fiber alignment is likely attributed to the heterogeneous viscoelastic properties of TMJ disc that may have significant implications in development of regenerative therapy for TMJ disc. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Viscoelastic capillary flow: the case of whole blood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rabaud

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of spontaneous capillary flow of Newtonian fluids is well-known and can be predicted by the Lucas-Washburn-Rideal (LWR law. However a wide variety of viscoelastic fluids such as alginate, xanthan and blood, does not exhibit the same Newtonian behavior.In this work we consider the Herschel-Bulkley (HB rheological model and Navier-Stokes equation to derive a generic expression that predicts the capillary flow of non-Newtonian fluids. The Herschel-Bulkley rheological model encompasses a wide variety of fluids, including the Power-law fluids (also called Ostwald fluids, the Bingham fluids and the Newtonian fluids. It will be shown that the proposed equation reduces to the Lucas-Washburn-Rideal law for Newtonian fluids and to the Weissenberg-Rabinowitsch-Mooney (WRM law for power-law fluids. Although HB model cannot reduce to Casson’s law, which is often used to model whole blood rheology, HB model can fit the whole blood rheology with the same accuracy.Our generalized expression for the capillary flow of non-Newtonian fluid was used to accurately fit capillary flow of whole blood. The capillary filling of a cylindrical microchannel by whole blood was monitored. The blood first exhibited a Newtonian behavior, then after 7 cm low shear stress and rouleaux formation made LWR fails to fit the data: the blood could not be considered as Newtonian anymore. This non-Newtonian behavior was successfully fit by the proposed equation.

  10. Impact load time histories for viscoelastic missiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoykovich, M.

    1977-01-01

    Generation of the impact load time history at the contact point between a viscoelastic missile and its targets is presented. In the past, in the case of aircraft striking containment shell structure, the impact load time history was determined on the basis of actual measurements by subjecting a rigid wall to aircraft crash. The effects of elastic deformation of the target upon the impact load time history is formulated in this paper. The missile is idealized by a linear mass-spring-dashpot combination using viscoelastic models. These models can readily be processed taking into account the elastic as well as inelastic deformations of the missiles. The target is assumed to be either linearly elastic or rigid. In the case of the linearly elastic target, the normal mode theory is used to express the time-dependent displacements of the target which is simulated by lumped masses, elastic properties and dashpots in discrete parts. In the case of Maxwell viscoelastic model, the time-dependent displacements of the missile and the target are given in terms of the unknown impact load time history. This leads to an integral equation which may be solved by Laplace transformation. The normal mode theory is provided. The target structure may be composed of different materials with different components. Concrete and steel structural components have inherently different viscous friction damping properties. Hence, the equivalent modal damping depends on the degree of participation of these components in the modal response. An approximate rule for determining damping in any vibration mode by weighting the damping of each component according to the modal energy stored in each component is considered

  11. Experimental Characterization of Innovative Viscoelastic Foams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Viscardi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The evolutionary trend in the automotive industry has produced over time numerous performance and aesthetic innovations, however, the exponential development related to transportation technologies also introduced new requirements concerning the environmental impact [1]. The awareness of ecological issues has led to a reorganization of the evaluations and the vehicle design, currently aimed at reducing the problems that have emerged in empirical investigations and the parallel increase in environmental solutions. The vehicle renewal process involves targeted technical mutations both to observance of ecology as to the safety and comfort of the driver. New recyclable materials and more resistant have been developed in order to minimize the environmental impact of the vehicle even at the end of the operating life of its components, as well as solutions relating to the reduction of noise pollution generated as a response to the requirements of comfort. Modern research programs on a global scale have set themselves the objective of exploiting the potentiality of innovative technologies in the optimization of vehicles efficiency, the noise reduction and in the consequent reduction of fuel burn. One of the crucial topics in the greening of the new generation automotive sector is therefore the use and development of high vibro-acoustic performance materials. The goal of this research is properly focused on the analysis of viscoelastic materials appointed to increase the damping of the vibrations generated in a vehicle. The use of a viscoelastic material in this context is due to its high property to convert vibrational energy into heat, providing a significant dissipation of the vibrations. Trade-off analyses are performed in order define the stiffness and damping capacity of several viscoelastic foams with different thickness and density.

  12. Seismic Wave Propagation in Layered Viscoelastic Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borcherdt, R. D.

    2008-12-01

    Advances in the general theory of wave propagation in layered viscoelastic media reveal new insights regarding seismic waves in the Earth. For example, the theory predicts: 1) P and S waves are predominantly inhomogeneous in a layered anelastic Earth with seismic travel times, particle-motion orbits, energy speeds, Q, and amplitude characteristics that vary with angle of incidence and hence, travel path through the layers, 2) two types of shear waves exist, one with linear and the other with elliptical particle motions each with different absorption coefficients, and 3) surface waves with amplitude and particle motion characteristics not predicted by elasticity, such as Rayleigh-Type waves with tilted elliptical particle motion orbits and Love-Type waves with superimposed sinusoidal amplitude dependencies that decay exponentially with depth. The general theory provides closed-form analytic solutions for body waves, reflection-refraction problems, response of multiple layers, and surface wave problems valid for any material with a viscoelastic response, including the infinite number of models, derivable from various configurations of springs and dashpots, such as elastic, Voight, Maxwell, and Standard Linear. The theory provides solutions independent of the amount of intrinsic absorption and explicit analytic expressions for physical characteristics of body waves in low-loss media such as the deep Earth. The results explain laboratory and seismic observations, such as travel-time and wide-angle reflection amplitude anomalies, not explained by elasticity or one dimensional Q models. They have important implications for some forward modeling and inverse problems. Theoretical advances and corresponding numerical results as recently compiled (Borcherdt, 2008, Viscoelastic Waves in Layered Media, Cambridge University Press) will be reviewed.

  13. Tensile properties of orthodontic elastomeric ligatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrari, F; Jalaly, T; Zebarjad, M

    2010-01-01

    Tensile properties of elastomeric ligatures become important when efficiency of orthodontic appliances is considered. The aim of this study was to compare tensile strength, extension to tensile strength, toughness and modulus of elasticity of elastomeric ligatures in both the as--received condition and after 28 days of immersion in the simulated oral environment. Furthermore, the changes that occurred in tensile properties of each brand of ligatures after 28 days were evaluated. Experimental-laboratory based. Elastomeric ligatures were obtained from different companies and their tensile properties were measured using Zwick testing machine in both the as-received condition and after 28 days of immersion in the simulated oral environment. The data were analyzed using independent sample t-tests, analysis of variance and Tukey tests. After 28 days, all the ligatures experienced a significant decrease in tensile strength, extension to tensile strength and toughness ( P tensile properties of different brands of ligatures in both conditions ( P tensile properties of different brands of ligatures, which should be considered during selection of these products.

  14. Constitutive Investigation on Viscoelasticity of PolyVinyl Butyral: Experiments Based on Dynamic Mechanical Analysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohan Liu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available PolyVinyl Butyral (PVB film is now widely used in automotive industry and architectures serving as the protective interlayer. The dynamic modulus of PVB is measured through systematic experiments based on Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA method at various temperatures, heating rates, and vibration frequencies. Further, viscoelasticity of PVB influenced by time and temperature is systematically studied. Fitted empirical formulas describing the relationship between glass transition temperature and frequency, as well as the heating rate of PVB, are established. The master curve of PVB at 293 K is suggested based on the experiment data as to express the dynamic modulus variation at various frequencies in a wider range. Constitutive behavior of PVB is then analyzed based on Generalized Maxwell (GM model and Fractional Derivative (FD model, respectively. It is shown that PVB has higher efficiency of energy dissipation in its high energy absorption state, while both fifth-order GM model and FD model can characterize the viscoelasticity of PVB at glassy transition area. Results may offer useful fundamental experimental data and important constitutive characteristics of PVB and shed lights on further studies on viscoelasticity behavior of PVB and energy mitigation ability of laminated glass.

  15. Rigidity percolation in dispersions with a structured viscoelastic matrix

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilbrink, M.W.L.; Michels, M.A.J.; Vellinga, W.P.; Meijer, H.E.H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with rigidity percolation in composite materials consisting of a dispersion of mineral particles in a microstructured viscoelastic matrix. The viscoelastic matrix in this specific case is a hydrocarbon refinery residue. In a set of model random composites the mean interparticle

  16. Numerical simulations of viscoelastic flows with free surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comminal, Raphaël; Spangenberg, Jon; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2013-01-01

    We present a new methodology to simulate viscoelastic flows with free-surfaces. These simulations are motivated by the modelling of polymers manufacturing techniques, such as extrusion and injection moulding. One of the consequences of viscoelasticity is that polymeric materials have a “memory...

  17. On the Abaqus FEA model of finite viscoelasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Ciambella, Jacopo; Destrade, Michel; Ogden, Ray W.

    2013-01-01

    Predictions of the QLV (Quasi-Linear Viscoelastic) constitutive law are compared with those of the ABAQUS viscoelastic model for two simple motions in order to highlight, in particular, their very different dissipation rates and certain shortcomings of the ABAQUS model.

  18. Noise reduction of rotating machinery by viscoelastic bearing supports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tillema, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    The demand for silent rolling bearing applications, such as electric motors and gearboxes, has resulted in an investigation of viscoelastic bearing supports. By placing a thin viscoelastic layer between the bearing outer ring and the surrounding structure, vibrations of the shaft-bearing arrangement

  19. Transient vibration of thin viscoelastic orthotropic plates

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soukup, J.; Valeš, František; Volek, J.; Skočilas, J.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 27, č. 1 (2011), s. 98-107 ISSN 0567-7718. [International Conference on Dynamical Systems - Theory and Applications /10./. Lodz, 07.12.2009-10.12.2009] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/07/0946 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20760514 Keywords : transient vibration thin plate * orthotropic * general viscoelastic standard solid Subject RIV: BI - Acoustics Impact factor: 0.860, year: 2011 http://www.springerlink.com/content/hn67324178846n4r/

  20. Pearling Instabilities of a Viscoelastic Thread

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deblais, A.; Velikov, K. P.; Bonn, D.

    2018-05-01

    Pearling instabilities of slender viscoelastic threads have received much attention, but remain incompletely understood. We study the instabilities in polymer solutions subject to uniaxial elongational flow. Two distinctly different instabilites are observed: beads on a string and blistering. The beads-on-a-string structure arises from a capillary instability whereas the blistering instability has a different origin: it is due to a coupling between stress and polymer concentration. By varying the temperature to change the solution properties we elucidate the interplay between flow and phase separation.

  1. Direct and inverse scattering for viscoelastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammicht, E.; Corones, J.P.; Krueger, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    A time domain approach to direct and inverse scattering problems for one-dimensional viscoelastic media is presented. Such media can be characterized as having a constitutive relation between stress and strain which involves the past history of the strain through a memory function, the relaxation modulus. In the approach in this article, the relaxation modulus of a material is shown to be related to the reflection properties of the material. This relation provides a constructive algorithm for direct and inverse scattering problems. A numerical implementation of this algorithm is tested on several problems involving realistic relaxation moduli

  2. A boundary integral method for a dynamic, transient mode I crack problem with viscoelastic cohesive zone

    KAUST Repository

    Leise, Tanya L.

    2009-08-19

    We consider the problem of the dynamic, transient propagation of a semi-infinite, mode I crack in an infinite elastic body with a nonlinear, viscoelastic cohesize zone. Our problem formulation includes boundary conditions that preclude crack face interpenetration, in contrast to the usual mode I boundary conditions that assume all unloaded crack faces are stress-free. The nonlinear viscoelastic cohesive zone behavior is motivated by dynamic fracture in brittle polymers in which crack propagation is preceeded by significant crazing in a thin region surrounding the crack tip. We present a combined analytical/numerical solution method that involves reducing the problem to a Dirichlet-to-Neumann map along the crack face plane, resulting in a differo-integral equation relating the displacement and stress along the crack faces and within the cohesive zone. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  3. Elastic-plastic analysis of the SS-3 tensile specimen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.

    1998-01-01

    Tensile tests of most irradiated specimens of vanadium alloys are conducted using the miniature SS-3 specimen which is not ASTM approved. Detailed elastic-plastic finite element analysis of the specimen was conducted to show that, as long as the ultimate to yield strength ratio is less than or equal to 1.25 (which is satisfied by many irradiated materials), the stress-plastic strain curve obtained by using such a specimen is representative of the true material behavior

  4. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of the effect of microstructure on tensile behavior and retained austenite stability of thermo-mechanically processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Kun [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liss, Klaus-Dieter [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Timokhina, Ilana B. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V., E-mail: elenap@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-04-26

    Transmission electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the martensitic transformation and lattice strains under uniaxial tensile loading of Fe-Mn-Si-C-Nb-Mo-Al Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel subjected to different thermo-mechanical processing schedules. In contrast with most of the diffraction analysis of TRIP steels reported previously, the diffraction peaks from the martensite phase were separated from the peaks of the ferrite-bainite α-matrix. The volume fraction of retained γ-austenite, as well as the lattice strain, were determined from the diffraction patterns recorded during tensile deformation. Although significant austenite to martensite transformation starts around the macroscopic yield stress, some austenite grains had already experienced martensitic transformation. Hooke’s Law was used to calculate the phase stress of each phase from their lattice strain. The ferrite-bainite α-matrix was observed to yield earlier than austenite and martensite. The discrepancy between integrated phase stresses and experimental macroscopic stress is about 300 MPa. A small increase in carbon concentration in retained austenite at the early stage of deformation was detected, but with further straining a continuous slight decrease in carbon content occurred, indicating that mechanical stability factors, such as grain size, morphology and orientation of the retained austenite, played an important role during the retained austenite to martensite transformation.

  5. Effects of viscoelasticity in the high Reynolds number cylinder wake

    KAUST Repository

    Richter, David

    2012-01-16

    At Re = 3900, Newtonian flow past a circular cylinder exhibits a wake and detached shear layers which have transitioned to turbulence. It is the goal of the present study to investigate the effects which viscoelasticity has on this state and to identify the mechanisms responsible for wake stabilization. It is found through numerical simulations (employing the FENE-P rheological model) that viscoelasticity greatly reduces the amount of turbulence in the wake, reverting it back to a state which qualitatively appears similar to the Newtonian mode B instability which occurs at lower Re. By focusing on the separated shear layers, it is found that viscoelasticity suppresses the formation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability which dominates for Newtonian flows, consistent with previous studies of viscoelastic free shear layers. Through this shear layer stabilization, the viscoelastic far wake is then subject to the same instability mechanisms which dominate for Newtonian flows, but at far lower Reynolds numbers. © Copyright Cambridge University Press 2012.

  6. Effects of viscoelasticity in the high Reynolds number cylinder wake

    KAUST Repository

    Richter, David; Iaccarino, Gianluca; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2012-01-01

    At Re = 3900, Newtonian flow past a circular cylinder exhibits a wake and detached shear layers which have transitioned to turbulence. It is the goal of the present study to investigate the effects which viscoelasticity has on this state and to identify the mechanisms responsible for wake stabilization. It is found through numerical simulations (employing the FENE-P rheological model) that viscoelasticity greatly reduces the amount of turbulence in the wake, reverting it back to a state which qualitatively appears similar to the Newtonian mode B instability which occurs at lower Re. By focusing on the separated shear layers, it is found that viscoelasticity suppresses the formation of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability which dominates for Newtonian flows, consistent with previous studies of viscoelastic free shear layers. Through this shear layer stabilization, the viscoelastic far wake is then subject to the same instability mechanisms which dominate for Newtonian flows, but at far lower Reynolds numbers. © Copyright Cambridge University Press 2012.

  7. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo, E-mail: yongskim@hanyang.ac.kr

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 10{sup 13} to 1 × 10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2}. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples’ surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson–Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  8. Porosity Defect Remodeling and Tensile Analysis of Cast Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linfeng Sun

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tensile properties on ASTM A216 WCB cast steel with centerline porosity defect were studied with radiographic mapping and finite element remodeling technique. Non-linear elastic and plastic behaviors dependent on porosity were mathematically described by relevant equation sets. According to the ASTM E8 tensile test standard, matrix and defect specimens were machined into two categories by two types of height. After applying radiographic inspection, defect morphologies were mapped to the mid-sections of the finite element models and the porosity fraction fields had been generated with interpolation method. ABAQUS input parameters were confirmed by trial simulations to the matrix specimen and comparison with experimental outcomes. Fine agreements of the result curves between simulations and experiments could be observed, and predicted positions of the tensile fracture were found to be in accordance with the tests. Chord modulus was used to obtain the equivalent elastic stiffness because of the non-linear features. The results showed that elongation was the most influenced term to the defect cast steel, compared with elastic stiffness and yield stress. Additional visual explanations on the tensile fracture caused by void propagation were also given by the result contours at different mechanical stages, including distributions of Mises stress and plastic strain.

  9. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  10. LPTR irradiation of LLL vanadium tensile specimens and LLL Nb--1Zr tensile specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, S.C.; Rowe, C.L.

    1977-01-01

    The LPTR irradiation of 14 LLL vanadium tensile specimens and 14 LLL Nb-1Zr tensile specimens is described. Sample packaging, the irradiation schedule and neutron fluences for three energy ranges are given

  11. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Y., E-mail: yano.yasuhide@jaea.go.jp [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 4002, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Ukai, S.; Oono, N. [Materials Science and Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Hokkaido University, N13, W-8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8628 (Japan); Kimura, A. [Institute of Advanced Energy, Kyoto University, Gokasho, Uji, Kyoto 611-0011 (Japan); Hayashi, S. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1, Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Torimaru, T. [Nippon Nuclear Fuel Development Co., Ltd., 2163, Narita-cho, Oarai-machi, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2017-04-15

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900–1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  12. Ultra-high temperature tensile properties of ODS steel claddings under severe accident conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Y.; Tanno, T.; Oka, H.; Ohtsuka, S.; Inoue, T.; Kato, S.; Furukawa, T.; Uwaba, T.; Kaito, T.; Ukai, S.; Oono, N.; Kimura, A.; Hayashi, S.; Torimaru, T.

    2017-04-01

    Ultra-high temperature ring tensile tests were performed to investigate the tensile behavior of oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel claddings and wrapper materials under severe accident conditions with temperatures ranging from room temperature to 1400 °C which is close to the melting point of core materials. The experimental results showed that the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings was highest in the core materials at ultra-high temperatures of 900-1200 °C, but there was significant degradation in the tensile strength of 9Cr-ODS steel claddings above 1200 °C. This degradation was attributed to grain boundary sliding deformation with γ/δ transformation, which is associated with reduced ductility. By contrast, the tensile strength of recrystallized 12Cr-ODS and FeCrAl-ODS steel claddings retained its high value above 1200 °C, unlike the other tested materials.

  13. Measurement of tissue viscoelasticity with ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenleaf, J. F.; Alizad, A.

    2017-02-01

    Tissue properties such as elasticity and viscosity have been shown to be related to such tissue conditions as contraction, edema, fibrosis, and fat content among others. Magnetic Resonance Elastography has shown outstanding ability to measure the elasticity and in some cases the viscosity of tissues, especially in the liver, providing the ability to stage fibrotic liver disease similarly to biopsy. We discuss ultrasound methods of measuring elasticity and viscosity in tissues. Many of these methods are becoming widely available in the extant ultrasound machines distributed throughout the world. Some of the methods to be discussed are in the developmental stage. The advantages of the ultrasound methods are that the imaging instruments are widely available and that many of the viscoelastic measurements can be made during a short addition to the normal ultrasound examination time. In addition, the measurements can be made by ultrasound repetitively and quickly allowing evaluation of dynamic physiologic function in circumstances such as muscle contraction or artery relaxation. Measurement of viscoelastic tissue mechanical properties will become a consistent part of clinical ultrasound examinations in our opinion.

  14. Viscoelasticity of Edam cheese during its ripening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šárka Nedomová

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Series of the indentation of the ball (10 mm in diameter by the constant speed into blocks of Edam cheese has been conducted. The indentation tests were performed at different speeds (1, 5, 10, 20 and 100 mm/min, and the corresponding force–displacement responses were fitted with an analytical solution to obtain the time-dependent constants and the instantaneous force–displacement response. The measurement has been performed for the cheeses of different stages of their maturity. The dependence of the indentation force on the penetration depth has been evaluated. This dependence can be fitted by a polynom. The indentation force decreases with cheese fat content. It increases with the loading rate. Its value also decreases with the time of the cheese ripening. The recently proposed method for the indenation of the ball into viscoelastic solids has been used for our data analysis. This procedure, which needs the use of the numeric methods, enables to obtain stress relaxation moduli, which describe the viscoelasticity of the tested materials. The obtained moduli describe the stage of the cheese maturity.

  15. Polymer engineering science and viscoelasticity an introduction

    CERN Document Server

    Brinson, Hal F

    2015-01-01

    This book provides a unified mechanics and materials perspective on polymers: both the mathematics of viscoelasticity theory as well as the physical mechanisms behind polymer deformation processes. Introductory material on fundamental mechanics is included to provide a continuous baseline for readers from all disciplines. Introductory material on the chemical and molecular basis of polymers is also included, which is essential to the understanding of the thermomechanical response. This self-contained text covers the viscoelastic characterization of polymers including constitutive modeling, experimental methods, thermal response, and stress and failure analysis. Example problems are provided within the text as well as at the end of each chapter.   New to this edition:   ·         One new chapter on the use of nano-material inclusions for structural polymer applications and applications such as fiber-reinforced polymers and adhesively bonded structures ·         Brings up-to-date polymer pro...

  16. Flashing subdiffusive ratchets in viscoelastic media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, Vasyl; Goychuk, Igor

    2012-01-01

    We study subdiffusive ratchet transport in periodically and randomly flashing potentials. A central Brownian particle is elastically coupled to the surrounding auxiliary Brownian quasi-particles, which account for the influence of the viscoelastic environment. Similar to standard dynamical modeling of Brownian motion, the external force influences only the motion of the central particle, not affecting directly the environmental degrees of freedom. Just a handful of auxiliary Brownian particles suffices to model subdiffusion over many temporal decades. Time modulation of the potential violates the symmetry of thermal detailed balance and induces an anomalous subdiffusive current which exhibits a remarkably small dispersion at low temperatures, as well as a number of other surprising features such as saturation at low temperatures, and multiple inversions of the transport direction upon a change of the driving frequency in the non-adiabatic regime. It is shown that the subdiffusive current is finite at zero temperature for random flashing and can be finite for periodic flashing for a certain frequency window. Our study generalizes classical Brownian motors towards operating in sticky viscoelastic environments such as the cytosol of biological cells or dense polymer solutions. (paper)

  17. Viscoelastic Flow Modelling for Polymer Flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    de, Shauvik; Padding, Johan; Peters, Frank; Kuipers, Hans; Multi-scale Modelling of Multi-phase Flows Team

    2015-11-01

    Polymer liquids are used in the oil industry to improve the volumetric sweep and displacement efficiency of oil from a reservoir. Surprisingly, it is not only the viscosity but also the elasticity of the displacing fluid that determine the displacement efficiency. The main aim of our work is to obtain a fundamental understanding of the effect of fluid elasticity, by developing an advanced computer simulation methodology for the flow of non-Newtonian fluids through porous media. We simulate a 3D unsteady viscoelastic flow through a converging diverging geometry of realistic pore dimension using computational fluid dynamics (CFD).The primitive variables velocity, pressure and extra stresses are used in the formulation of models. The viscoelastic stress part is formulated using a FENE-P type of constitutive equation, which can predict both shear and elongational stress properties during this flow. A Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) approach using Finite volume method (FVM) with staggered grid has been applied. A novel second order Immersed boundary method (IBM) has been incorporated to mimic porous media. The effect of rheological parameters on flow characteristics has also been studied. The simulations provide an insight into 3D flow asymmetry at higher Deborah numbers. Micro-Particle Image Velocimetry experiments are carried out to obtain further insights. These simulations present, for the first time, a detailed computational study of the effects of fluid elasticity on the imbibition of an oil phase.

  18. Local linear viscoelasticity of confined fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, J S; Daivis, P J; Todd, B D

    2007-04-14

    In this paper the authors propose a novel method to study the local linear viscoelasticity of fluids confined between two walls. The method is based on the linear constitutive equation and provides details about the real and imaginary parts of the local complex viscosity. They apply the method to a simple atomic fluid undergoing zero mean oscillatory flow using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The method shows that the viscoelastic properties of the fluid exhibit dramatic spatial changes near the wall-fluid boundary due to the high density in this region. It is also shown that the real part of the viscosity converges to the frequency dependent local shear viscosity sufficiently far away from the wall. This also provides valuable information about the transport properties in the fluid, in general. The viscosity is compared with predictions from the local average density model. The two methods disagree in that the local average density model predicts larger viscosity variations near the wall-fluid boundary than what is observed through the method presented here.

  19. Neutron and gamma radiation effects on the viscoelastic behaviour of poly (aryl ether ether ketone)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Page, J.Y.S.; Bonon, H.W.; Bui, V.T.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of combined neutron and gamma radiation on the viscoelastic behaviour of two industrial semi-crystalline PEEK grades (VICTREX 150P and 450P) were investigated. Tensile test samples were processed on an ENGEL55 injection moulder, then irradiated in a reactor pool environment, against the reactor vessel wall of the SLOWPOKE-2 facility at the Royal Military College of Canada (RMC), for exposures resulting in dosages ranging from 10 kGy to 320 kGy. First, the morphology of the irradiated resins was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction and density measurements. Secondly, the viscoelastic behaviour of the material was studied at three thermodynamic states, in order to define the nature of the structural damage suffered by PEEK, by comparing its degrees of molecular motion with the dose received. Therefore, standard mechanical testing was performed at room temperature, stress relaxation near the glass transition temperature (T g ), at 140 degrees C, and melt viscosity above the melting point (T m ), at 350 degrees C. Results confirmed that PEEK is highly resistant to radiation, but also suggested that PEEK degrades faster under a combined neutron and gamma flux, in a reactor pool environment, than observed in previous work under electron beam or gamma alone. The density increased slightly over the range of irradiation (150P: 1300 to 1303 kg/m 3 ; 450P: 1296 to 1299 kg/m 3 ), while the crystallinity (150P: 27 %, 450P: 24 %), and the thermal properties, like T g and T m , remained unaffected. Therefore, the increases in density were attributed to transformations occurring mostly in the amorphous phase, which is also consistent with previous work. The viscoelastic behaviour analysis provided the following damage assessment for PEEK: the amorphous phase is subject to both crosslinking and chain scission; the effects of chain scission, on the viscoelastic behaviour of PEEK, are predominant for doses high than 100 kGy; tie

  20. Evolution of tensile design stresses for lumber

    Science.gov (United States)

    William L. Galligan; C. C. Gerhards; R. L. Ethington

    1979-01-01

    Until approximately 1965, allowable design stresses for lumber in tension were taken as equal to those assigned for bending. As interest in tensile properties increased, testing machines were designed specifically to stress lumber in tension. Research results that accumulated on tensile tests of full-size lumber suggested lower design stresses for tension than for...

  1. Dilatometer for use in tensile tests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Coumans, W.J.; Heikens, D.

    1980-01-01

    An accurate dilatometer is described which permits simultaneous and automatic recording of sample vol. change during tensile tests on a com. tester. Liq. displacements in the dilatometer capillary, which correspond to vol. changes of the sample, are detected by a cond. meter. Tensile load is

  2. Tensile characterisation of the aorta across quasi-static to blast loading strain rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnus, Danyal; Proud, William; Haller, Antoine; Jouffroy, Apolline

    2017-06-01

    The dynamic tensile failure mechanisms of the aorta during Traumatic Aortic Injury (TAI) are poorly understood. In automotive incidents, where the aorta may be under strains of the order of 100/s, TAI is the second largest cause of mortality. In these studies, the proximal descending aorta is the most common site where rupture is observed. In particular, the transverse direction is most commonly affected due to the circumferential orientation of elastin, and hence the literature generally concentrates upon axial samples. This project extends these dynamic studies to the blast loading regime where strain-rates are of the order of 1000/s. A campaign of uniaxial tensile experiments are conducted at quasi-static, intermediate (drop-weight) and high (tensile Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar) strain rates. In each case, murine and porcine aorta models are considered and the extent of damage assessed post-loading using histology. Experimental data will be compared against current viscoelastic models of the aorta under axial stress. Their applicability across strain rates will be discussed. Using a multi-disciplinary approach, the conditions applied to the samples replicate in vivo conditions, employing a blood simulant-filled tubular specimen surrounded by a physiological solution.

  3. Indentation analysis of active viscoelastic microplasmodia of P. polycephalum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessel, Adrian; Oettmeier, Christina; Wechsler, Klaus; Döbereiner, Hans-Günther

    2018-01-01

    Simple organisms like Physarum polycephalum realize complex behavior, such as shortest path optimization or habituation, via mechanochemical processes rather than by a network of neurons. A full understanding of these phenomena requires detailed investigation of the underlying mechanical properties. To date, micromechanical measurements on P. polycephalum are sparse and lack reproducibility. This prompts study of microplasmodia, a reproducible and homogeneous form of P. polycephalum that resembles the plasmodial ectoplasm responsible for mechanical stability and generation of forces. We combine investigation of ultra-structure and dimension of P. polycephalum with the analysis of data obtained by indentation of microplasmodia, employing a novel nonlinear viscoelastic scaling model that accounts for finite dimension of the sample. We identify the multi-modal distribution of parameters such as Young’s moduls, Poisson’s ratio, and relaxation times associated with viscous processes that cover five orders of magnitude. Results suggest a characterization of microplasmodia as porous, compressible structures that act like elastic solids with high Young’s modulus on short time scales, whereas on long time-scales and upon repeated indentation viscous behavior dominates and the effective modulus is significantly decreased. Furthermore, Young’s modulus is found to oscillate in phase with shape of microplasmodia, emphasizing that modeling P. polycephalum oscillations as a driven oscillator with constant moduli is not practicable.

  4. Aero-servo-viscoelasticity theory: Lifting surfaces, plates, velocity transients, flutter, and instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrett, Craig G.

    indicates that the flutter condition should be taken when simple harmonic motion occurs and certain additional velocity derivatives are satisfied. 3. The viscoelastic material behavior imposes a flutter time indicating that the presence of flutter should be verified for the entire life time of a flight vehicle. 4. An expanded definition for instability of a lifting surface or panel. Traditionally, instability is treated as a static phenomenon. The static case is only a limiting case of dynamic instability for a viscoelastic structure. Instability occurs when a particular combination of flight velocity and time are reached leading to growing displacements of the structure. 5. The inclusion of flight velocity transients that occur during maneuvers. Two- and three-dimensional unsteady incompressible and compressible aerodynamics were reformulated for a time dependent velocity. The inclusion of flight velocity transients does affect the flutter and instability conditions for a lifting surface and a panel. The applications of aero-servo-viscoelasticity are to aircraft design, wind turbine blades, submarine's stealth coatings and hulls, and land transportation to name a few examples. One caveat regarding this field of research is that general predictions for an application are not always possible as the stability of a structure depends on the phase relations between the various parameters such as mass, stiffness, damping, and the aerodynamic loads. The viscoelastic material parameters in particular alter the system parameters in directions that are difficult to predict. The inclusion of servo controls permits an additional design factor and can improve the performance of a structure beyond the native performance; however over-control is possible so a maximum limit to useful control does exist. Lastly, the number of material and control parameters present in aero-servo-viscoelasticity are amenable to optimization protocols to produce the optimal structure for a given mission.

  5. Numerical and Experimental Low-Velocity Impact Behaivor of Sandwich Plates with Viscoelastic Core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soroush Sadeghnejad

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A numerical and experimental low-velocity impact behavior of sandwich plates have been presently studied with regard to the compressibility and viscoelasticity features of their cores. Face sheets were assumed to be anisotropic composites or isotropic aluminum materials and a viscoelastic behavior has been considered for core. The boundary conditions are assumed to be simply supported or rigid. Abaqus, as FEM software, and its python script programming feature, have been used to model the specimens. To model hyper-viscoelastic nonlinear behavior of the core, Ogden hyper-foam elasticity and Prony series approach are manipulated. To solve the numerical problem, dynamic explicit solver option with sufficient solving amplitude has been used. Prony series have been used to model the core time-dependent behavior. In conjunction with a simple indentation experiment, FEM used to formulate a novel method for finding the Prony series coefficients. By performing some low-velocity impact experiments, the impact force and displacement of the composite sandwich plates have been investigated. The results indicate that increasing the structural damping increases the contact time and missing energy and decreases the stored energy of the system. The structures with composite face sheets have a minimum ratio of upper face sheet displacement to lower face sheet displacement in comparison to those with the isotropic face sheets. Impact behavior of isotropic face sheet specimens are more flattened than that of the composite face sheets. In addition, the specific energy stored in the sandwich plates with composite face sheets, on different supports, is greater than that stored in the aluminum face sheets.

  6. Viscoelasticity evaluation of rubber by surface reflection of supersonic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omata, Nobuaki; Suga, Takahiro; Furusawa, Hirokazu; Urabe, Shinichi; Kondo, Takeru; Ni, Qing-Qing

    2006-12-22

    The main characteristic of rubber is a viscoelasticity. So it is important to research the characteristic of the viscoelasticity of the high frequency band for the friction between a rubber material and the hard one with roughness, for instance, the tire and the road. As for the measurement of the viscoelasticity of rubber, DMA (dynamic mechanical analysis) is general. However, some problems are pointed out to the measurement of the high frequency band by DMA. Then, we evaluated the viscoelasticity characteristic by the supersonic wave measurement. However, attenuation of rubber is large, and when the viscoelasticity is measured by the supersonic wave therefore, it is inconvenient and limited in a past method by means of bottom reflection. In this report, we tried the viscoelasticity evaluation by the method of using complex surface reflection coefficient and we compared with the friction coefficient under wide-range friction velocity. As a result, some relationships had been found for two properties. We report the result that character of viscoelasticity of rubber was comparable to friction coefficient.

  7. Tensile properties of irradiated TZM and tungsten

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steichen, J.M.

    1975-04-01

    The effect of neutron irradiation on the elevated temperature tensile properties of TZM and tungsten has been experimentally determined. Specimens were irradiated at a temperature of approximately 720 0 F to fluences of 0.4 and 0.9 x 10 22 n/cm 2 (E greater than 0.1 MeV). Test parameters for both control and irradiated specimens included strain rates from 3 x 10 -4 to 1 s -1 and temperatures from 72 to 1700 0 F. The results of these tests were correlated with a rate-temperature parameter (T ln A/epsilon) to provide a concise description of material behavior over the range of deformation conditions of this study. The yield strength of the subject materials was significantly increased by decreasing temperature, increasing strain rate, and increasing fluence. Ductility was significantly reduced at any temperature or strain rate by increasing fluence. Cleavage fractures occurred in both unirradiated and irradiated specimens when the yield strength was elevated to the effective cleavage stress by temperature and/or strain rate. Neutron irradiation for the conditions of this study increased the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature of tungsten by approximately 300 0 F and TZM by approximately 420 0 F. (U.S.)

  8. A variational constitutive framework for the nonlinear viscoelastic response of a dielectric elastomer

    KAUST Repository

    Khan, Kamran

    2012-11-10

    We formulate a variational constitutive framework that accounts for nonlinear viscous behavior of electrically sensitive polymers, specifically Dielectric Elastomers (DEs), under large deformation. DEs are highly viscoelastic and their actuation response is greatly affected in dynamic applications. We used the generalized Maxwell model to represent the viscoelastic response of DE allowing the material to relax with multiple mechanisms. The constitutive updates at each load increment are obtained by minimizing an objective function formulated using the free energy and electrostatic energy of the elastomer, in addition to the viscous dissipation potential of the dashpots in each Maxwell branch. The model is then used to predict the electromechanical instability (EMI) of DE. The electro-elastic response of the DE is verified with available analytical solutions in the literature and then the material parameters are calibrated using experimental data. The model is integrated with finite element software to perform a variety of simulations on different types of electrically driven actuators under various electromechanical loadings. The electromechanical response of the DE and the critical conditions at which EMI occurs were found to be greatly affected by the viscoelasticity. Our model predicts that under a dead load EMI can be avoided if the DE operates at a high voltage rate. Subjected to constant, ramp and cyclic voltage, our model qualitatively predicts responses similar to the ones obtained from the analytical solutions and experimental data available in the literature. © 2012 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  9. Influence of storage in the texture and viscoelasticity of buns of corn variety white Cariaco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José David Torres-González

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to determine the influence of storage time on the variation of texture and visco-elasticity of buns of corn of the white Cariaco variety. The samples were stored refrigerated at 15 °C during 15 days. Textural parameters were determined every two days, using a texture analyzer; viscoelastic properties were set by a test of relaxation and com-pression effort, adjusting the experimental data to the generalized Maxwell model. Also, to determine the model parameters described, an iterative process was performed by non-linear regression using least squares techniques damped by the Solver add-on in Excel 2013. The storage time influenced the texture profile of buns, and the increase of hardness from the eleventh day, which was attributed to moisture loss of the product during cooling. Chewiness was higher for longer storage time. Cohesiveness, adhesiveness and elasticity reported no significant differences with respect to storage time. Statistical differences were presented at initial and final relaxation speeds expressed in the Maxwell model. The experimental data were successfully fitted to the model (R2 > 0.95 which was statistically significant (p < 0.05 and the performance of the elastic module indicated that buns from the white Cariaco variety showed a characteristic behavior of a viscoelastic material, increasing its hardness during the days of storage.

  10. Bifurcations and chaos of the nonlinear viscoelastic plates subjected to subsonic flow and external loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Fengxian; Chen, Fangqi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The subharmonic bifurcations and chaotic motions are studied by means of Melnikov method. • The critical conditions for the occurrence of chaotic motions and subharmonic bifurcations are obtained. • The chaotic features on the system parameters are discussed. • The theoretical predictions are confirmed by numerical simulations. - Abstract: The subharmonic bifurcations and chaotic motions of the nonlinear viscoelastic plates subjected to subsonic flow and external loads are studied by means of Melnikov method. The critical conditions for the occurrence of chaotic motions are obtained. The chaotic features on the system parameters are discussed in detail. The conditions for subharmonic bifurcations are also obtained. For the system with no structural damping, chaotic motions can occur through infinite subharmonic bifurcations of odd orders. Furthermore, we confirm our theoretical predictions by numerical simulations. The theoretical results obtained here can help us to eliminate or suppress large nonlinear vibrations and chaotic motions of the nonlinear viscoelastic plates. Based on Melnikov method, complex dynamical behaviors of the nonlinear viscoelastic plates can be controlled by modifying the system parameters.

  11. Measurement of the viscoelastic compliance of the eustachian tube using a modified forced-response test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadiali, Samir N; Federspiel, William J; Swarts, J Douglas; Doyle, William J

    2002-01-01

    Eustachian tube compliance (ETC) was suggested to be an important determinate of function. Previous attempts to quantify ETC used summary measures that are not clearly related to the physical properties of the system. Here, we present a new method for measuring ETC that conforms more closely to the engineering definition of compliance. The forced response test was modified to include oscillations in applied flow after the forced tubal opening. Pressure and flow were recorded during the standard and modified test in 12 anesthetized cynomolgus monkeys. The resulting pressure-flow, hysteresis loops were compared with those predicted by a simple fluid-structure model of the Eustachian tube with linear-elastic or viscoelastic properties. The tubal compliance index (TCI) and a viscoelastic compliance (C(v)) were calculated from these data for each monkey. The behavior of a viscoelastic, but not a linear elastic model accurately reproduced the experimental data for the monkey. The TCI and C(v) were linearly related, but the shared variance in these measures was only 63%. This new method for measuring ETC captures all information contained in the traditional TCI, but also provides information regarding the contribution of wall viscosity to Eustachian tube mechanics.

  12. Role of EVA viscoelastic properties in the protective performance of a sport shoe: computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Even-Tzur, Nurit; Weisz, Ety; Hirsch-Falk, Yifat; Gefen, Amit

    2006-01-01

    Modern sport shoes are designed to attenuate mechanical stress waves, mainly through deformation of the viscoelastic midsole which is typically made of ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) foam. Shock absorption is obtained by flow of air through interconnected air cells in the EVA during shoe deformation under body-weight. However, when the shoe is overused and air cells collapse or thickness of the EVA is reduced, shock absorption capacity may be affected, and this may contribute to running injuries. Using lumped system and finite element models, we studied heel pad stresses and strains during heel-strike in running, considering the viscoelastic constitutive behavior of both the heel pad and EVA midsole. In particular, we simulated wear cases of the EVA, manifested in the modeling by reduced foam thickness, increased elastic stiffness, and shorter stress relaxation with respect to new shoe conditions. Simulations showed that heel pad stresses and strains were sensitive to viscous damping of the EVA. Wear of the EVA consistently increased heel pad stresses, and reduced EVA thickness was the most influential factor, e.g., for a 50% reduction in thickness, peak heel pad stress increased by 19%. We conclude that modeling of the heel-shoe interaction should consider the viscoelastic properties of the tissue and shoe components, and the age of the studied shoe.

  13. Numerical simulation of viscoelastic layer rearrangement in polymer melts using OpenFOAM®

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Köpplmayr, Thomas, E-mail: tkoepplmayr@gmail.com; Mayrhofer, Elias [Institute of Polymer Extrusion and Compounding, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-05-22

    In addition to their shear-thinning behavior, polymer melts are characterized by first and second normal stress differences, which cause secondary motions. Polymer coextrusion processes involve viscoelastic two-phase flows that influence layer formation. Using polymer melts with different pigmentation makes visible the layers deformed by second normal stress differences. We used a new solver for the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox which handles viscoelastic two-phase flows. A derivative of the volume-of-fluid (VoF) methodology was employed to describe the interface. Different types of polymer melt, such as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were investigated. In a coextrusion process, the less viscous phase usually tends to encapsulate the more viscous one. However, the different viscoelastic properties of the melts also influence interface deformation. The materials were characterized by small-amplitude oscillatory-shear rheometry, and a multimode Giesekus model was used to fit shear viscosity, storage and loss modulus. Our simulations also took interfacial tension into account. Experimental observations and corresponding numerical simulations were found to be in good accordance.

  14. Numerical simulation of viscoelastic layer rearrangement in polymer melts using OpenFOAM®

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Köpplmayr, Thomas; Mayrhofer, Elias

    2015-01-01

    In addition to their shear-thinning behavior, polymer melts are characterized by first and second normal stress differences, which cause secondary motions. Polymer coextrusion processes involve viscoelastic two-phase flows that influence layer formation. Using polymer melts with different pigmentation makes visible the layers deformed by second normal stress differences. We used a new solver for the OpenFOAM CFD toolbox which handles viscoelastic two-phase flows. A derivative of the volume-of-fluid (VoF) methodology was employed to describe the interface. Different types of polymer melt, such as polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene terephthalate (PET) were investigated. In a coextrusion process, the less viscous phase usually tends to encapsulate the more viscous one. However, the different viscoelastic properties of the melts also influence interface deformation. The materials were characterized by small-amplitude oscillatory-shear rheometry, and a multimode Giesekus model was used to fit shear viscosity, storage and loss modulus. Our simulations also took interfacial tension into account. Experimental observations and corresponding numerical simulations were found to be in good accordance

  15. Tensile and compressive failure modes of laminated composites loaded by fatigue with different mean stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotem, Assa

    1990-01-01

    Laminated composite materials tend to fail differently under tensile or compressive load. Under tension, the material accumulates cracks and fiber fractures, while under compression, the material delaminates and buckles. Tensile-compressive fatigue may cause either of these failure modes depending on the specific damage occurring in the laminate. This damage depends on the stress ratio of the fatigue loading. Analysis of the fatigue behavior of the composite laminate under tension-tension, compression-compression, and tension-compression had led to the development of a fatigue envelope presentation of the failure behavior. This envelope indicates the specific failure mode for any stress ratio and number of loading cycles. The construction of the fatigue envelope is based on the applied stress-cycles to failure (S-N) curves of both tensile-tensile and compressive-compressive fatigue. Test results are presented to verify the theoretical analysis.

  16. Interrogating the viscoelastic properties of tissue using viscoelastic response (VISR) ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selzo, Mallory Renee

    Affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 newborn males, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is one of the most common lethal genetic disorders in humans. Boys with DMD suffer progressive loss of muscle strength and function, leading to wheelchair dependence, cardiac and respiratory compromise, and death during young adulthood. There are currently no treatments that can halt or reverse the disease progression, and translating prospective treatments into clinical trials has been delayed by inadequate outcome measures. Current outcome measures, such as functional and muscle strength assessments, lack sensitivity to individual muscles, require subjective effort of the child, and are impacted by normal childhood growth and development. The goal of this research is to develop Viscoelastic Response (VisR) ultrasound which can be used to delineate compositional changes in muscle associated with DMD. In VisR, acoustic radiation force (ARF) is used to produce small, localized displacements within the muscle. Using conventional ultrasound to track the motion, the displacement response of the tissue can be evaluated against a mechanical model. In order to develop signal processing techniques and assess mechanical models, finite element method simulations are used to model the response of a viscoelastic material to ARF excitations. Results are then presented demonstrating VisR differentiation of viscoelastic changes with progressive dystrophic degeneration in a dog model of DMD. Finally, clinical feasibility of VisR imaging is demonstrated in two boys with DMD.

  17. The viscoelastic properties of the cervical mucus plug

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastholm, Sara K.; Becher, Naja; Stubbe, Peter Reimer

    2014-01-01

    labor. MethodsViscoelastic properties of CMPs were investigated with a dynamic oscillatory rheometer using frequency and stress sweep experiments within the linear viscoelastic region. Main outcome measuresThe rheological variables obtained were as follows: elastic modulus (G), viscous modulus (G......ObjectiveTo characterize the viscoelastic properties of cervical mucus plugs (CMPs) shed during labor at term. DesignExperimental research. SettingDepartment of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark. Population/SampleSpontaneously shed CMPs from 18 healthy women in active...

  18. Thermal convection of viscoelastic shear-thinning fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albaalbaki, Bashar; Khayat, Roger E; Ahmed, Zahir U

    2016-01-01

    The Rayleigh–Bénard convection for non-Newtonian fluids possessing both viscoelastic and shear-thinning behaviours is examined. The Phan-Thien–Tanner (PTT) constitutive equation is implemented to model the non-Newtonian character of the fluid. It is found that while the shear-thinning and viscoelastic effects could annihilate one another for the steady roll flow, presence of both behaviours restricts the roll stability limit significantly compared to the cases when the fluid is either inelastic shear-thinning or purely viscoelastic with constant viscosity. (paper)

  19. Tensile deformation and failure of North American porcupine quills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, S.F.; Overfelt, R.A., E-mail: overfra@auburn.edu

    2011-12-01

    Although the mechanical properties of some keratin-based biological materials have been extensively studied (i.e., wool) and others are beginning to be studied (e.g., horn, hooves and avian quills), data on the properties of porcupine quill are less common. Porcupine quill is a keratin-based biological material composed of a cylindrical outer shell with an inner foam core. The present paper reports on the physical characteristics, tensile properties and fracture behavior of North American porcupine quills conditioned at relative humidities of 65% and 100%. Increasing the water content decreased the tensile stiffness and strength and increased the strain at fracture of the porcupine quills. The tensile fracture strength of porcupine quill was found to be 146 MPa at 65% RH and 60 MPa at 100% RH. Although these values compare favorably with reported values for African porcupine quill, reported values of the tensile strengths of wool with similar moisture contents are considerably higher. The initial moduli of porcupine quill (2700 MPa at 65% RH and 1000 MPa at 100% RH) compare favorably to those reported for wool but are considerably less than previous reports for African porcupine quill. The engineering strains at fracture were measured as 25% at 65% RH and 49% at 100% RH and these values are also comparable to other keratin-based mammalian materials. Scanning electron microscopy of the fracture surfaces of porcupine quills revealed that the cylindrical outer shells of quills are composed of 2-3 layers with distinctly different fracture characteristics, especially when the samples contain 100% RH. The outer layer of the porcupine quill shell appears to resist the plasticizing effects of moisture and appears to exhibit considerably less ductility than the inner layers, perhaps due to the presence of hydrophobic lipids in the outer layer. Highlights: {yields} We characterize the tensile properties of north American porcupine quill. {yields} Elastic modulus, tensile

  20. Tensile properties of neutron irradiated 316Ti and 15-15Ti steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fissolo, A.; Levy, V.; Seran, J.L.; Maillard, A.; Royer, J.; Rabouille, O.

    1992-01-01

    This paper deals with the tensile behavior of CW316Ti and CW15-15Ti Phenix fuel pin cladding. The tensile tests were conducted on defueled tubes irradiated up to 115 dpa 3 in the 400-640 deg C temperature range. Test temperature corresponds essentially to irradiation temperature. The results emphasize that although irradiation induces a reduction of ductility, failure always occurs with significant plastic deformation even for the most irradiated clads. (author). 15 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  1. Water evaporation on highly viscoelastic polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Gang; Severtson, Steven J

    2012-07-03

    Results are reported for a study on the evaporation of water droplets from a highly viscoelastic acrylic polymer surface. These are contrasted with those collected for the same measurements carried out on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). For PDMS, the evaporation process involves the expected multistep process including constant drop area, constant contact angle, and finally a combination of these steps until the liquid is gone. In contrast, water evaporation from the acrylic polymer shows a constant drop area mode throughout. Furthermore, during the evaporation process, the drop area actually expands on the acrylic polymer. The single mode evaporation process is consistent with formation of wetting structures, which cannot be propagated by the capillary forces. Expansion of the drop area is attributed to the influence of the drop capillary pressure. Furthermore, the rate of drop area expansion is shown to be dependent on the thickness of the polymer film.

  2. Viscoelastic characterization of soft biological materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayar, Vinod Timothy

    Progressive and irreversible retinal diseases are among the primary causes of blindness in the United States, attacking the cells in the eye that transform environmental light into neural signals for the optic pathway. Medical implants designed to restore visual function to afflicted patients can cause mechanical stress and ultimately damage to the host tissues. Research shows that an accurate understanding of the mechanical properties of the biological tissues can reduce damage and lead to designs with improved safety and efficacy. Prior studies on the mechanical properties of biological tissues show characterization of these materials can be affected by environmental, length-scale, time, mounting, stiffness, size, viscoelastic, and methodological conditions. Using porcine sclera tissue, the effects of environmental, time, and mounting conditions are evaluated when using nanoindentation. Quasi-static tests are used to measure reduced modulus during extended exposure to phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), as well as the chemical and mechanical analysis of mounting the sample to a solid substrate using cyanoacrylate. The less destructive nature of nanoindentation tests allows for variance of tests within a single sample to be compared to the variance between samples. The results indicate that the environmental, time, and mounting conditions can be controlled for using modified nanoindentation procedures for biological samples and are in line with averages modulus values from previous studies but with increased precision. By using the quasi-static and dynamic characterization capabilities of the nanoindentation setup, the additional stiffness and viscoelastic variables are measured. Different quasi-static control methods were evaluated along with maximum load parameters and produced no significant difference in reported reduced modulus values. Dynamic characterization tests varied frequency and quasi-static load, showing that the agar could be modeled as a linearly

  3. Algebraic Theory of Linear Viscoelastic Nematodynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leonov, Arkady I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper consists of two parts. The first one develops algebraic theory of linear anisotropic nematic 'N-operators' build up on the additive group of traceless second rank 3D tensors. These operators have been implicitly used in continual theories of nematic liquid crystals and weakly elastic nematic elastomers. It is shown that there exists a non-commutative, multiplicative group N 6 of N-operators build up on a manifold in 6D space of parameters. Positive N-operators, which in physical applications hold thermodynamic stability constraints, do not generally form a subgroup of group N 6 . A three-parametric, commutative transversal-isotropic subgroup S 3 subset of N 6 of positive symmetric nematic operators is also briefly discussed. The special case of singular, non-negative symmetric N-operators reveals the algebraic structure of nematic soft deformation modes. The second part of the paper develops a theory of linear viscoelastic nematodynamics applicable to liquid crystalline polymer. The viscous and elastic nematic components in theory are described by using the Leslie-Ericksen-Parodi (LEP) approach for viscous nematics and de Gennes free energy for weakly elastic nematic elastomers. The case of applied external magnetic field exemplifies the occurrence of non-symmetric stresses. In spite of multi-(10) parametric character of the theory, the use of nematic operators presents it in a transparent form. When the magnetic field is absent, the theory is simplified for symmetric case with six parameters, and takes an extremely simple, two-parametric form for viscoelastic nematodynamics with possible soft deformation modes. It is shown that the linear nematodynamics is always reducible to the LEP-like equations where the coefficients are changed for linear memory functionals whose parameters are calculated from original viscosities and moduli

  4. Tensile properties of latex paint films with TiO2 pigment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Eric W. S.; Charalambides, Maria N.; Young, Christina T.; Learner, Thomas J. S.; Hackney, Stephen

    2009-05-01

    The tensile properties of latex paint films containing TiO2 pigment were studied with respect to temperature, strain-rate and moisture content. The purpose of performing these experiments was to assist museums in defining safe conditions for modern paintings held in collections. The glass transition temperature of latex paint binders is in close proximity to ambient temperature, resulting in high strain-rate dependence in typical exposure environments. Time dependence of modulus and failure strain is discussed in the context of time-temperature superposition, which was used to extend the experimental time scale. Nonlinear viscoelastic material models are also presented, which incorporate a Prony series with the Ogden or Neo-Hookean hyperelastic function for different TiO2 concentrations.

  5. Correlation between the viscoelastic properties of the gel layer of swollen HPMC matrix tablets and their in vitro drug release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamed, Rania; Al Baraghthi, Tamadur; Sunoqrot, Suhair

    2016-11-21

    Drug release from hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) hydrophilic matrix tablets is controlled by drug diffusion through the gel layer of the matrix-forming polymer upon hydration, matrix erosion or combination of diffusion and erosion mechanisms. In this study, the relationship between viscoelastic properties of the gel layer of swollen intact matrix tablets and drug release was investigated. Two sets of quetiapine fumarate (QF) matrix tablets were prepared using the high viscosity grade HPMC K4M at low (70 mg/tablet) and high (170 mg/tablet) polymer concentrations. Viscoelastic studies using a controlled stress rheometer were performed on swollen matrices following hydration in the dissolution medium for predetermined time intervals. The gel layer of swollen tablets exhibited predominantly elastic behavior. Results from the in vitro release study showed that drug release was strongly influenced by the viscoelastic properties of the gel layer of K4M tablets, which was further corroborated by results from water uptake studies conducted on intact tablets. The results provide evidence that the viscoelastic properties of the gel layer can be exploited to guide the selection of an appropriate matrix-forming polymer, to better understand the rate of drug release from matrix tablets in vitro and to develop hydrophilic controlled-release formulations.

  6. Viscoelasticity in Polymers: Phenomenological to Molecular Mathematical Modelling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banks, H. T; Luke, N. S

    2006-01-01

    We report on two recent advances in the modelling of viscoelastic polymers: (i) a new constitutive model which combines the virtual stick-slip continuum "molecular-based" ideas of Johnson and Stacer with the Rouse bead chain ideas; (ii...

  7. Linear Viscoelasticity, Reptation, Chain Stretching and Constraint Release

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Neergaard, Jesper; Schieber, Jay D.; Venerus, David C.

    2000-01-01

    A recently proposed self-consistent reptation model - alreadysuccessful at describing highly nonlinear shearing flows of manytypes using no adjustable parameters - is used here to interpretthe linear viscoelasticity of the same entangled polystyrenesolution. Using standard techniques, a relaxatio...

  8. Experimental characterisation of a novel viscoelastic rectifier design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristian Ejlebjærg; Okkels, Fridolin; Szabo, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A planar microfluidic system with contractions and obstacles is characterized in terms of anisotropic flow resistance due to viscoelastic effects. The working mechanism is illustrated using streak photography, while the diodicity performance is quantified by pressure drop measurements. The point ...

  9. Stagnation point flow and heat transfer for a viscoelastic fluid ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M REZA

    2017-11-09

    Nov 9, 2017 ... MS received 15 August 2016; revised 26 February 2017; accepted 15 March 2017; published online 9 ... surface has several engineering applications within, for ... viscoelastic fluids in several industrial manufacturing pro-.

  10. Large deflection of viscoelastic beams using fractional derivative model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahranini, Seyed Masoud Sotoodeh; Eghtesad, Mohammad; Ghavanloo, Esmaeal; Farid, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with large deflection of viscoelastic beams using a fractional derivative model. For this purpose, a nonlinear finite element formulation of viscoelastic beams in conjunction with the fractional derivative constitutive equations has been developed. The four-parameter fractional derivative model has been used to describe the constitutive equations. The deflected configuration for a uniform beam with different boundary conditions and loads is presented. The effect of the order of fractional derivative on the large deflection of the cantilever viscoelastic beam, is investigated after 10, 100, and 1000 hours. The main contribution of this paper is finite element implementation for nonlinear analysis of viscoelastic fractional model using the storage of both strain and stress histories. The validity of the present analysis is confirmed by comparing the results with those found in the literature.

  11. Visco-Elastic Properties of Sodium Hyaluronate Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulicke, Werner-Michael; Meyer, Fabian; Bingöl, Ali Ö.; Lohmann, Derek

    2008-07-01

    Sodium Hyaluronate (NaHA) is a member of the glycosaminoglycans and is present in the human organism as part of the synovial fluid and the vitreous body. HA is mainly commercialized as sodium or potassium salt. It can be extracted from cockscombs or can be produced by bacterial fermentation ensuring a low protein content. Because of its natural origin and toxicological harmlessness, NaHA is used to a great extent for pharmaceutical and cosmetic products. In medical applications, NaHA is already being used as a component of flushing and stabilizing fluids in the treatment of eye cataract and as a surrogate for natural synovial fluid. Another growing domain in the commercial utilization of NaHA is the field of skin care products like dermal fillers or moisturizers. In this spectrum, NaHA is used in dilute over semidilute up to concentrated (0viscoelastic behavior. We therefore present in this contribution the results of a comprehensive investigation of the viscous and elastic material functions of different NaHA samples. This includes, besides shear flow and oscillatory experiments, the performance of rheo-optical measurements in order to determine the elastic component in the range of low shear rates and low concentrations.

  12. Energy decay of a viscoelastic wave equation with supercritical nonlinearities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanqiu; Rammaha, Mohammad A.; Sakuntasathien, Sawanya

    2018-06-01

    This paper presents a study of the asymptotic behavior of the solutions for the history value problem of a viscoelastic wave equation which features a fading memory term as well as a supercritical source term and a frictional damping term: u_{tt}- k(0) Δ u - \\int \\limits _0^{&infty } k'(s) Δ u(t-s) ds +|u_t|^{m-1}u_t =|u|^{p-1}u, { in } Ω × (0,T), u(x,t)=u_0(x,t), \\quad { in } Ω × (-∞,0]), where Ω is a bounded domain in R^3 with a Dirichlét boundary condition and u_0 represents the history value. A suitable notion of a potential well is introduced for the system, and global existence of solutions is justified, provided that the history value u_0 is taken from a subset of the potential well. Also, uniform energy decay rate is obtained which depends on the relaxation kernel -k'(s) as well as the growth rate of the damping term. This manuscript complements our previous work (Guo et al. in J Differ Equ 257:3778-3812, 2014, J Differ Equ 262:1956-1979, 2017) where Hadamard well-posedness and the singularity formulation have been studied for the system. It is worth stressing the special features of the model, namely the source term here has a supercritical growth rate and the memory term accounts to the full past history that goes back to -∞.

  13. Viscoelasticity and pattern formations in stock market indices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündüz, Güngör; Gündüz, Aydın

    2017-06-01

    The viscoelastic and thermodynamic properties of four stock indices, namely, DJI, Nasdaq-100, Nasdaq-Composite, and S&P were analyzed for a period of 30 years from 1986 to 2015. The asset values (or index) can be placed into Aristotelian `potentiality-actuality' framework by using scattering diagram. Thus, the index values can be transformed into vectorial forms in a scattering diagram, and each vector can be split into its horizontal and vertical components. According to viscoelastic theory, the horizontal component represents the conservative, and the vertical component represents the dissipative behavior. The related storage and the loss modulus of these components are determined and then work-like and heat-like terms are calculated. It is found that the change of storage and loss modulus with Wiener noise (W) exhibit interesting patterns. The loss modulus shows a featherlike pattern, whereas the storage modulus shows figurative man-like pattern. These patterns are formed due to branchings in the system and imply that stock indices do have a kind of `fine-order' which can be detected when the change of modulus values are plotted with respect to Wiener noise. In theoretical calculations it is shown that the tips of the featherlike patterns stay at negative W values, but get closer to W = 0 as the drift in the system increases. The shift of the tip point from W = 0 indicates that the price change involves higher number of positive Wiener number corrections than the negative Wiener. The work-like and heat-like terms also exhibit patterns but with different appearance than modulus patterns. The decisional changes of people are reflected as the arrows in the scattering diagram and the propagation path of these vectors resemble the path of crack propagation. The distribution of the angle between two subsequent vectors shows a peak at 90°, indicating that the path mostly obeys the crack path occurring in hard objects. Entropy mimics the Wiener noise in the evolution

  14. Behaviour of eggshell membranes at tensile loading

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Strnková, M.J.; Nedomová, Š.; Trnka, Jan; Buchar, J.; Kumbár, V.

    46 B, December (2014), s. 44-48 ISSN 0324-1130 Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : eggshell membrane * tensile loading * loading rate * stress * strain strength Subject RIV: GM - Food Processing Impact factor: 0.201, year: 2014

  15. On the stabilization of viscoelastic laminated beams with interfacial slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Muhammad I.

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, we consider a viscoelastic laminated beam model. This structure is given by two identical uniform layers on top of each other, taking into account that an adhesive of small thickness is bonding the two surfaces and produces an interfacial slip. We use viscoelastic damping with general assumptions on the relaxation function and establish explicit energy decay result from which we can recover the optimal exponential and polynomial rates. Our result generalizes the earlier related results in the literature.

  16. Investigation of transient cavitating flow in viscoelastic pipes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keramat, A; Tijsseling, A S; Ahmadi, A

    2010-01-01

    A study on water hammer in viscoelastic pipes when the fluid pressure drops to liquid vapour pressure is performed. Two important concepts including column separation and the effects of retarded strains in the pipe wall on the fluid response have been investigated separately in recent works, but there is some curiosity as to how the results for pressure and discharge are when column separation occurs in a viscoelastic pipe. For pipes made of plastic such as polyethylene (PE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), viscoelasticity is a crucial mechanical property which changes the hydraulic and structural transient responses. Based on previous developments in the analysis of water hammer, a model which is capable of analysing column separation in viscoelastic pipes is presented and used for solving the selected case studies. For the column-separation modelling the Discrete Vapour Cavity Model (DVCM) is utilised and the viscoelasticity property of the pipe wall is modelled by Kelvin-Voigt elements. The effects of viscoelasticity play an important role in the column separation phenomenon because it changes the water hammer fundamental frequency and so affects the time of opening or collapse of the cavities. Verification of the implemented computer code is performed for the effects of viscoelasticity and column separation - separately and simultaneously - using experimental results from the literature. In the provided examples the focus is placed on the simultaneous effect of viscoelasticity and column separation on the hydraulic transient response. The final conclusions drawn are that if rectangular grids are utilised the DVCM gives acceptable predictions of the phenomenon and that the pipe wall material's retarded behaviour strongly dampens the pressure spikes caused by column separation.

  17. Modelling Viscoelasticity of Loudspeaker Suspensions using Retardation Spectra

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritter, Tobias; Agerkvist, Finn T.

    2010-01-01

    , the viscoelastic retardation spectrum, which provides a more fundamental description of the suspension viscoelasticity, is rst used to explain the accuracy of the empirical LOG creep model (Knudsen et al.). Then, two extensions to the LOG model are proposed which include the low and high frequency limit...... of the compliance, not accounted for in the original LOG model. The new creep models are veried by measurements on two 5.5 loudspeakers with different surrounds....

  18. Investigation of transient cavitating flow in viscoelastic pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keramat, A.; Tijsseling, A. S.; Ahmadi, A.

    2010-08-01

    A study on water hammer in viscoelastic pipes when the fluid pressure drops to liquid vapour pressure is performed. Two important concepts including column separation and the effects of retarded strains in the pipe wall on the fluid response have been investigated separately in recent works, but there is some curiosity as to how the results for pressure and discharge are when column separation occurs in a viscoelastic pipe. For pipes made of plastic such as polyethylene (PE) and polyvinyl chloride (PVC), viscoelasticity is a crucial mechanical property which changes the hydraulic and structural transient responses. Based on previous developments in the analysis of water hammer, a model which is capable of analysing column separation in viscoelastic pipes is presented and used for solving the selected case studies. For the column-separation modelling the Discrete Vapour Cavity Model (DVCM) is utilised and the viscoelasticity property of the pipe wall is modelled by Kelvin-Voigt elements. The effects of viscoelasticity play an important role in the column separation phenomenon because it changes the water hammer fundamental frequency and so affects the time of opening or collapse of the cavities. Verification of the implemented computer code is performed for the effects of viscoelasticity and column separation - separately and simultaneously - using experimental results from the literature. In the provided examples the focus is placed on the simultaneous effect of viscoelasticity and column separation on the hydraulic transient response. The final conclusions drawn are that if rectangular grids are utilised the DVCM gives acceptable predictions of the phenomenon and that the pipe wall material's retarded behaviour strongly dampens the pressure spikes caused by column separation.

  19. Tensile Properties of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlouhý, Ivo; Řehořek, Lukáš; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 409, - (2009), s. 168-175 ISSN 1013-9826. [Fractography of Advanced Ceramics /3./. Stará Lesná, 07.09.2008-10.09.2008] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/0724; GA ČR GD106/05/H008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : tensile test * ceramics foam * open porosity * tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass

  20. Tensile Behaviour of Open Cell Ceramic Foams

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Řehořek, Lukáš; Dlouhý, Ivo; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 4 (2009), s. 237-241 ISSN 0862-5468 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA101/09/1821; GA ČR GD106/09/H035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Tensile test * Ceramics foam * Open porosity * Tensile strength Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 0.649, year: 2009

  1. Tensile strength and durability characteristics of high-performance fiber reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramadoss, P.; Nagamani, K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents investigations towards developing a better understanding of the contribution of steel fibers to the tensile strength of high-performance fiber reinforced concrete (HPFRC). For 32 series of mixes, flexural and splitting tensile strengths were determined at 28 days. The variables investigated were fiber volume fraction (0%, 0.5%, 1% and 1.5% with an aspect of 80), silica fume replacement level (SF/CM=0.05 and 0.10) and matrix composition (w/cm ratios ranging from 0.25 t 0.40). The influence of fiber content in terms of fiber reinforcing index on the flexural and splitting tensile strengths of HPFRC is presented. Comparative studies were performed on the tensile behavior of SFRC measured by two different loading tests: flexural test and splitting test. Based on the test results, using the least square method, empirical expressions were developed to predict 28-day tensile strength of HPFRC in terms of fiber reinforcing index. Durability tests were carried out to examine the performance of the SFRC. Relationship between flexural and splitting tensile strengths has been developed using regression analysis. The experimental values of previous researchers were compared with the values predicted by the empirical equations and the absolute variation obtained was within 6% and 5% for flexural and splitting tensile strengths respectively. (author)

  2. An anisotropic linear thermo-viscoelastic constitutive law - Elastic relaxation and thermal expansion creep in the time domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pettermann, Heinz E.; DeSimone, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    A constitutive material law for linear thermo-viscoelasticity in the time domain is presented. The time-dependent relaxation formulation is given for full anisotropy, i.e., both the elastic and the viscous properties are anisotropic. Thereby, each element of the relaxation tensor is described by its own and independent Prony series expansion. Exceeding common viscoelasticity, time-dependent thermal expansion relaxation/creep is treated as inherent material behavior. The pertinent equations are derived and an incremental, implicit time integration scheme is presented. The developments are implemented into an implicit FEM software for orthotropic material symmetry under plane stress assumption. Even if this is a reduced problem, all essential features are present and allow for the entire verification and validation of the approach. Various simulations on isotropic and orthotropic problems are carried out to demonstrate the material behavior under investigation.

  3. On the propagation of transient waves in a viscoelastic Bessel medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombaro, Ivano; Giusti, Andrea; Mainardi, Francesco

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we discuss the uniaxial propagation of transient waves within a semi-infinite viscoelastic Bessel medium. First, we provide the analytic expression for the response function of the material as we approach the wave front. To do so, we take profit of a revisited version of the so called Buchen-Mainardi algorithm. Secondly, we provide an analytic expression for the long-time behavior of the response function of the material. This result is obtained by means of the Tauberian theorems for the Laplace transform. Finally, we relate the obtained results to a peculiar model for fluid-filled elastic tubes.

  4. A discrete-element model for viscoelastic deformation and fracture of glacial ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riikilä, T. I.; Tallinen, T.; Åström, J.; Timonen, J.

    2015-10-01

    A discrete-element model was developed to study the behavior of viscoelastic materials that are allowed to fracture. Applicable to many materials, the main objective of this analysis was to develop a model specifically for ice dynamics. A realistic model of glacial ice must include elasticity, brittle fracture and slow viscous deformations. Here the model is described in detail and tested with several benchmark simulations. The model was used to simulate various ice-specific applications with resulting flow rates that were compatible with Glen's law, and produced under fragmentation fragment-size distributions that agreed with the known analytical and experimental results.

  5. Electromechanical behavior of polyaniline/poly (vinyl alcohol) blend films under static, dynamic and time-dependent strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhilesan, S; Lakshmana Rao, C; Varughese, S

    2014-01-01

    We report on the experimentally observed electrical conductivity enhancement in polyaniline/poly (vinyl alcohol) blend films under uniaxial tensile loading. Polyaniline (PANI) is an intrinsically conducting polymer, which does not form stretchable free-standing films easily and hence its electromechanical characterization is a challenge. Blending of PANI with other insulating polymers is a good choice to overcome the processability problem. We report the electromechanical response of solution blended and HCl doped PANI/PVA blends subjected to uniaxial, static, dynamic and time-dependent tensile loading. The demonstrated viscoelastic and morphological contributions of the component polymers to the electrical conductivity behavior in these blends could lead to interesting applications in strain sensors and flexible electronics. The reversibility of the electromechanical response under dynamic strain is found to increase in blends with higher PANI content. Time-dependent conductivity studies during mechanical stress relaxation reveal that variations in the micro-domain ordering and the relative relaxation rate of the individual polymer phases can give rise to interesting electrical conductivity changes in PANI blends. From morphological and electrical conductivity studies, we show that PANI undergoes primary and secondary agglomeration behavior in these blends that contributes to the changes in conductivity behavior during the deformation. A 3D variable range hopping (VRH) process, which uses a deformable core and shell concept based on blend morphology analysis, is used to explain the experimentally observed electromechanical behavior. (papers)

  6. A Novel Geometry for Shear Test Using Axial Tensile Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibo Yuan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies a novel geometry for the in-plane shear test performed with an axial electromechanical testing machine. In order to investigate the influence of the triaxiality rate on the mechanical behavior, different tests will be performed on the studied material: simple tensile tests, large tensile tests and shear tests. For the whole campaign, a common equipment should be employed to minimize the impact of the testing device. As a consequence, for the shear tests, the geometry of the specimen must be carefully designed in order to adapt the force value and make it comparable to the one obtained for the tensile tests. Like most of the existing shear-included tensile test specimens, the axial loading is converted to shear loading at a particular region through the effect of geometry. A symmetric shape is generally preferred, since it can restrict the in-plane rotation of the shear section, keep shear increasing in a more monotonic path and double the force level thanks to the two shear zones. Due to the specific experimental conditions, such as dimensions of the furnace and the clamping system, the position of the extensometer or the restriction of sheet thickness (related to the further studies of size effect at mesoscale and hot temperature, several geometries were brought up and evaluated in an iterative procedure via finite element simulations. Both the numerical and experimental results reveal that the final geometry ensures some advantages. For instance, a relatively low triaxiality in the shear zone, limited in-plane rotation and no necking are observed. Moreover, it also prevents any out-of-plane displacement of the specimen which seems to be highly sensitive to the geometry, and presents a very limited influence of the material and the thickness.

  7. Tensile and Flexural Test on Kenaf Hybrid Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleh, Z.; Yunus, S.; Masdek, N. R. N. M.; Taib, Y. M.; Azhar, I. I. S.; Hyie, K. M.

    2018-03-01

    The widely use of synthetic materials like carbon and fiberglass in various industries such as automotive and aircraft has lead to human health and environment problems. Therefore, the use of natural fibres such as kenaf has received higher attention as reinforcement. Kenaf or the scientific name is Hibiscus Cannabinus. L is one of the group of Malvecea plant which in the early days, the application of kenaf served only rope and canvas. However, it has more advantages than synthetic materials such as; widely availaible, renewable, lightweight, non-abbrasiveness during processing, high specific strength, free from health hazard and biodegradeable. This study was carried out to investigate the effects of different arrangement of kenaf and fiberglass composites on Young’s Modulus. The material composite was hardened with polyester resin and their properties was characterized. The tensile and the flexural properties is determined using an Instron universal tensile testing machine and carried out by following ASTM D3039 for tensile and ASTM D790 for a flexural test. The experimental program was designed to correlate the flexural and tensile Young’s Modulus of kenaf and fiberglass composite under the same load condition but different arrangement of kenaf and fiberglass on the mold . The resistance to change in shape was described by the behavior and characteristic of the composite materials. The stiffness or the elastic modulus of the composite material was determined at the end of the experiment. The results obtained show that the [±90FG/0/90/90/0/±90FG] kenaf/fiberglass composite arrangement has the highest elastic value.

  8. Monitoring tensile damage evolution in Nextel 312/BlackglasTM composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jeongguk; Liaw, Peter K.

    2005-01-01

    Tensile damage evolution was monitored with the aid of nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques. Several NDE methods, such as ultrasonic testing (UT), infrared (IR) thermography, and acoustic emission (AE) techniques, were employed to analyze damage evolution during tensile testing of Nextel 312/Blackglas TM composites. Prior to tensile testing, UT was used to characterize the initial defect distribution of the samples. During tensile testing, AE sensors and an IR camera were used for in situ monitoring of the progressive damage of the samples. AE provided the amounts of damage evolution in terms of the AE intensity and/or energy, and the IR camera was used to obtain the temperature changes during the test. Microstructural characterization using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was performed to investigate the fracture mechanisms and modes of Nextel 312/Blackglas TM samples. Moreover, SEM characterization was used to document failure behavior, and to show comparable results with NDE signatures

  9. High strain rate tensile properties of annealed 2 1/4 Cr--1 Mo steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klueh, R.L.; Oakes, R.E. Jr.

    1975-01-01

    The high strain rate tensile properties of annealed 2 1 / 4 Cr-1 Mo steel were determined and the tensile behavior from 25 to 566 0 C and strain rates of 2.67 x 10 -6 to 144/s were described. Above 0.1/s at 25 0 C, both the yield stress and the ultimate tensile strength increased rapidly with increasing strain rate. As the temperature was increased, a dynamic strain aging peak appeared in the ultimate tensile strength-temperature curves. The peak height was a maximum at about 350 0 C and 2.67 x 10 -6 /s. With increasing strain rate, a peak of decreased height occurred at progressively higher temperatures. The major effect of strain rate on ductility occurred at elevated temperatures, where a decrease in strain rate caused an increase in total elongation and reduction in area

  10. The Effects of Fe-Particles on the Tensile Properties of Al-Si-Cu Alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Bjurenstedt

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of Fe-rich particles has been a topic for discussion in the aluminum casting industry because of the negative impact they exert on the mechanical properties. However, there are still contradictions on the effects of various morphologies of Fe-particles. In this study, microstructural characterization of tensile tested samples has been performed to reveal how unmodified and modified Fe-rich particles impact on the tensile behavior. Analysis of additions of Fe modifiers such as Mn and Cr, showed higher amounts of primary Fe-rich particles (sludge with increased porosity and, as result, degraded tensile properties. From the fracture analysis of tensile tested hot isostatic pressed (HIPed samples it could be concluded that the mechanical properties were mainly governed by the Fe-rich particles, which were fracturing through cleavage, not by the porosity.

  11. Making High-Tensile-Strength Amalgam Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grugel, Richard

    2008-01-01

    Structural components made of amalgams can be made to have tensile strengths much greater than previously known to be possible. Amalgams, perhaps best known for their use in dental fillings, have several useful attributes, including room-temperature fabrication, corrosion resistance, dimensional stability, and high compressive strength. However, the range of applications of amalgams has been limited by their very small tensile strengths. Now, it has been discovered that the tensile strength of an amalgam depends critically on the sizes and shapes of the particles from which it is made and, consequently, the tensile strength can be greatly increased through suitable choice of the particles. Heretofore, the powder particles used to make amalgams have been, variously, in the form of micron-sized spheroids or flakes. The tensile reinforcement contributed by the spheroids and flakes is minimal because fracture paths simply go around these particles. However, if spheroids or flakes are replaced by strands having greater lengths, then tensile reinforcement can be increased significantly. The feasibility of this concept was shown in an experiment in which electrical copper wires, serving as demonstration substitutes for copper powder particles, were triturated with gallium by use of a mortar and pestle and the resulting amalgam was compressed into a mold. The tensile strength of the amalgam specimen was then measured and found to be greater than 10(exp 4) psi (greater than about 69 MPa). Much remains to be done to optimize the properties of amalgams for various applications through suitable choice of starting constituents and modification of the trituration and molding processes. The choice of wire size and composition are expected to be especially important. Perusal of phase diagrams of metal mixtures could give insight that would enable choices of solid and liquid metal constituents. Finally, whereas heretofore, only binary alloys have been considered for amalgams

  12. Dynamic strain aging of twinning-induced plasticity (TWIP) steel in tensile testing and deep drawing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.G.; Hong, S.; Anjabin, N.; Park, B.H.; Kim, S.K.; Chin, K.-G.; Lee, S.; Kim, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    The dynamic strain aging (DSA) of metallic materials due to solute atom diffusion to mobile dislocations induce deformation instability with load fluctuations and deformation localizations, hence reducing their sheet formability. In this paper, DSA behaviors of twinning induced plasticity (TWIP) steel with and without Al during tensile testing and deep drawing are investigated in terms of strain localization and the Portevin-Le Chatelier (PLC) band. A theoretical DSA model with internal variables of dislocation density and twin volume fraction is presented for an estimation of strain localization and strain hardening behavior of TWIP steels. The simulation results of the load history and PLC bands during tensile testing and deep drawing are in good agreement with the experimental values. A serration behavior is observed in high-Mn TWIP steels and its tensile residual stress is higher than that in the Al-added TWIP steels, which results in a deformation crack or delayed fracture of deep drawn specimens

  13. Adherence performances of pressure sensitive adhesives on a model viscoelastic synthetic film: a tool for the understanding of adhesion on the human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renvoise, Julien; Burlot, Delphine; Marin, Gérard; Derail, Christophe

    2009-02-23

    This work deals with the rheological behavior and adherence properties of pressure sensitive adhesive formulations dedicated to medical applications. We have developed a specific viscoelastic substrate which mimics adhesion on human skin to measure the adherence properties of PSAs when they are stuck on the human skin. By comparing peeling results of PSAs, dedicated to medical applications, stuck on human skin and on this viscoelastic substrate we show that this substrate, based on a blend of natural proteins, presents a better representation of the interactions occurring at the skin/adhesive interface than conventional substrates used for peel test (i.e. glass and steel).

  14. Framework for analyzing hyper-viscoelastic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Akash; Siviour, Clive

    2017-06-01

    Hyper-viscoelastic polymers have multiple areas of application including aerospace, biomedicine, and automotive. Their mechanical responses are therefore extremely important to understand, particularly because they exhibit strong rate and temperature dependence, including a low temperature brittle transition. Relationships between the response at various strain rates and temperatures are investigated and a framework developed to predict response at rates where experiments are unfeasible. A master curve of the storage modulus's rate dependence at a reference temperature is constructed using a DMA test of the polymer. A frequency sweep spanning two decades and a temperature range from pre-glass transition to pre-melt is used. A fractional derivative model is fitted to the experimental data, and this model's parameters are used to derive stress-strain relationships at a desired strain rate. Finite element simulations with this constitutive model are used for verification with experimental data. This material is based upon work supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, Air Force Materiel Command, USAF under Award No. FA9550-15-1-0448.

  15. Viscoelastic response of a model endothelial glycocalyx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nijenhuis, Nadja; Spaan, Jos A E; Mizuno, Daisuke; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2009-01-01

    Many cells cover themselves with a multifunctional polymer coat, the pericellular matrix (PCM), to mediate mechanical interactions with the environment. A particular PCM, the endothelial glycocalyx (EG), is formed by vascular endothelial cells at their luminal side, forming a mechanical interface between the flowing blood and the endothelial cell layer. The glycosaminoglycan (GAG) hyaluronan (HA) is involved in the main functions of the EG, mechanotransduction of fluid shear stress and molecular sieving. HA, due to its length, is the only GAG in the EG or any other PCM able to form an entangled network. The mechanical functions of the EG are, however, impaired when any one of its components is removed. We here used microrheology to measure the effect of the EG constituents heparan sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, whole blood plasma and albumin on the high-bandwidth mechanical properties of a HA solution. Furthermore, we probed the effect of the hyaldherin aggrecan, a constituent of the PCM of chondrocytes, and very similar to versican (present in the PCM of various cells, and possibly in the EG). We show that components directly interacting with HA (chondroitin sulfate and aggrecan) can increase the viscoelastic shear modulus of the polymer composite

  16. Deformation of extreme viscoelastic metals and composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Y.C.; Ludwigson, M.; Lakes, R.S.

    2004-01-01

    The figure of merit for structural damping and damping layer applications is the product of stiffness E and damping tan δ. For most materials, even practical polymer damping layers, E tan δ is less than 0.6 GPa. We consider several methods to achieve high values of this figure of merit: high damping metals, metal matrix composites and composites containing constituents of negative stiffness. As for high damping metals, damping of polycrystalline zinc was determined and compared with InSn studied earlier. Damping of Zn is less dependent on frequency than that of InSn, so Zn is superior at high frequency. High damping and large stiffness anomalies are possible in viscoelastic composites with inclusions of negative stiffness. Negative stiffness entails a reversal of the usual directional relationship between force and displacement in deformed objects. An isolated object with negative stiffness is unstable, but an inclusion embedded in a composite matrix can be stabilized under some circumstances. Ferroelastic domains in the vicinity of a phase transition can exhibit a region of negative stiffness. Metal matrix composites containing vanadium dioxide were prepared and studied. The concentration of embedded particles was sensitive to the processing method

  17. Identification of constitutive theory parameters using a tensile machine for deposited filaments of microcrystalline ink by the direct-write method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lourdel, N; Therriault, D; Lévesque, M

    2009-01-01

    A custom-designed tensile machine is developed to characterize the mechanical properties of ink micro-filaments deposited by the direct-write method. The direct-write method has been used for the fabrication of a wide variety of micro-systems such as microvascular networks, chaotic mixers and laboratory on chips. The tensile machine was used to measure the induced force in ink filaments during tensile and tension-relaxation tests as a function of the applied strain rate, the ink composition and the filament diameter. Experimental data were fitted by a linearly viscoelastic model using a data reduction procedure in order to identify the constitutive theory parameters of the deposited ink filaments. The model predictions based on the linearly viscoelastic model and the defined constitutive theory parameters give a close approximation of all experimental data generated in this study. Such models will be useful for the development and optimization of future 3D complex structures made by the direct-write method

  18. Oscillatory squeeze flow for the study of linear viscoelastic behavior

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wingstrand, Sara Lindeblad; Alvarez, Nicolas J.; Hassager, Ole

    2016-01-01

    of molten polymers and suspensions. The principal advantage of squeeze flow rheometer over rotational devices is the simplicity of the apparatus. It has no air bearing and is much less expensive and easier to use. Accuracy may be somewhat reduced, but for quality control purposes, it could be quite useful....... It might also find application as the central component of a high-throughput rheometer for evaluating experimental materials. The deformation is not simple shear, but equations have been derived to show that the oscillatory compressive (normal) force that is measured can serve as a basis for calculating...

  19. The viscoelastic behavior of a composite in a thermal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D. H.; Brinson, H. F.; Griffith, W. I.; Yeow, Y. T.

    1979-01-01

    A proposed method for the accelerated predictions of modulus and life times for time dependent polymer matrix composite laminates is presented. The method, based on the time temperature superposition principle and lamination theory, is described in detail. Unidirectional reciprocal of compliance master curves and the shift functions needed are presented and discussed. Master curves for arbitrarily oriented unidirectional laminates are predicted and compared with experimantal results obtained from master curves generated from 15 minute tests and with 25 hour tests. Good agreement is shown. Predicted 30 deg and 60 deg unidirectional strength master curves are presented and compared to results of creep rupture tests. Reasonable agreement is demonstrated. In addition, creep rupture results for a (90 deg + or - 60 deg/90 deg) sub 2s laminate are presented.

  20. Studies about strength recovery and generalized relaxation behavior of rock (4)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanada, Masanori; Kishi, Hirokazu; Hayashi, Katsuhiko; Takebe, Atsuji; Okubo, Seisuke

    2011-11-01

    Surrounding rock failure occurs due to the increasing stress with tunnel excavation and extent of the failure depends on rock strength and rock stress. The NATM (New Austrian Tunneling Method) assumes that supporting effects by shotcrete and rock bolt prevent rock failure maximizing the potential capability of rock mass. Recently, it was found that failed rock just behind tunnel support recovers its strength. This phenomenon should take into account in evaluation of tunnel stability and long-term mechanical behavior of rock mass after closure of a repository for high-level radioactive waste (HLW). Visco-elastic behavior of rock is frequently studied by creep testing, but creep occasionally occurs together with relaxation in-situ due to the effect of various supports and rock heterogeneity. Therefore generalized stress relaxation in which both load and displacement are controlled is proper to study such behavior under the complicated conditions. It is also important to understand rock behavior in tensile stress field which may be developed in the surrounding rock of deposition hole or tunnel by swelling of bentonite or volume expansion of overpack with corrosion after the repository closure. Cores sampled at 'Horonobe Underground Research Laboratory' has been tested to reveal the above-mentioned behavior. Quantitative evaluation and modeling of the rock behavior, however, have not been established mainly because of large scatter of data. As a factor of the large scatter of data, it was expected that the evaporation of moisture from the surface of the test piece influences the test outcome because it tested in the nature. In this study, strength recovery, generalized stress relaxation and two tensile strength tests were carried out using shale sampled in the Wakkanai-formation. As the results, recovery of failed rocks in strength and hydraulic conductivity were observed under a certain condition. We believe this result is very important for the stability evaluation