WorldWideScience

Sample records for viruses primarily isolated

  1. Influenza virus isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Scott; Walker, David; Webster, Robert G

    2012-01-01

    The isolation of influenza viruses is important for the diagnosis of respiratory diseases in lower animals and humans, for the detection of the infecting agent in surveillance programs, and is an essential element in the development and production of vaccine. Since influenza is caused by a zoonotic virus it is necessary to do surveillance in the reservoir species (aquatic waterfowls), intermediate hosts (quails, pigs), and in affected mammals including humans. Two of the hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes of influenza A viruses (H5 and H7) can evolve into highly pathogenic (HP) strains for gallinaceous poultry; some HP H5 and H7 strains cause lethal infection of humans. In waterfowls, low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) isolates are obtained primarily from the cloaca (or feces); in domestic poultry, the virus is more often recovered from the respiratory tract than from cloacal samples; in mammals, the virus is most often isolated from the respiratory tract, and in cases of high pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) from the blood and internal organs of infected birds. Virus isolation procedures are performed by inoculation of clinical specimens into embryonated eggs (primarily chicken eggs) or onto a variety of primary or continuous tissue culture systems. Successful isolation of influenza virus depends on the quality of the sample and matching the appropriate culture method to the sample type.

  2. Evidence that the GBV-C/hepatitis G virus is primarily a lymphotropic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, T J; Smuts, H E; Eedes, C; Knobel, G D; Eickhaus, P; Robson, S C; Kirsch, R E

    2000-05-01

    GB virus-C and the hepatitis G virus (GBV-C/HGV) are variants of the same positive sense RNA flavivirus, initially thought to be associated with hepatitis. The tissue tropism of GBV-C/HGV in normal subjects has not been evaluated to date using an extended tissue spectrum. Therefore, the sites of GBV-C/HGV replication were investigated in serum and twenty-three tissues collected during post-mortem examination of four apparently healthy individuals who died accidental deaths, who were infected with GBV-C/HGV. All were anti-HIV and anti-HCV negative and three out of four were HBsAg negative. Tissues were collected carefully to prevent cross contamination. A highly strand-specific RT-PCR assay was employed for the detection of either GBV-C/HGV positive strand RNA (virion) or negative strand RNA (replicative intermediary). Strand specificity of the RT-PCR assay was assessed with synthetic positive-and negative strand GBV-C/HGV RNA generated from a plasmid, using T7 and T3 RNA polymerases. The spleen and bone marrow biopsies were found to be uniformly positive for both negative-and positive strand GBV-C/HGV RNA. In addition, one cadaver was positive for both RNA strands in the kidney, and another positive for both in the liver. No negative strand RNA was detected in the following: brain, muscle, heart, thyroid, salivary gland, tonsil, lung, lymph nodes, gall bladder, pancreas, oesophagus, stomach, small bowel, large bowel, adrenal gland, gonad, aorta, skin and cartilage. This preliminary study concludes that GBV-C/HGV is a lymphotropic virus that replicates primarily in the spleen and bone marrow. Copyright 2000 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Ethosuximide is primarily metabolized by CYP3A when incubated with isolated rat liver microsomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarver, J G; Bachmann, K A; Zhu, D; Klis, W A

    1998-01-01

    The cytochrome P450 (CYP) subfamily responsible for ethosuximide metabolism was investigated by HPLC assay of ethosuximide incubations with isolated rat liver microsomes from control rats and from rats treated with inducing agents to enrich hepatic microsomes in selected CYP isoforms. Inducing agents included beta-naphthoflavone (BNF, CYP1A inducer), phenobarbital (PB, CYP2B/2C/3A), isoniazid (INH, CYP2E1), clotrimazole (CTZ, CYP3A), clofibrate (CLO, CYP4A), and an imidazole CTZ-analog known as CDD3543 (CYP3A). Incubations with BNF, INH, CTZ, and control microsomes showed significantly (pCTZ microsomes vs. BNF, INH, and control microsomes at 10, 30, 60, and 120 min incubation. Ethosuximide metabolite levels generated by CTZ microsomes at 120 min were 36.5 times those of control microsomes. Correspondingly, ethosuximide concentrations were significantly (pCTZ microsomes compared with BNF, INH, and control microsomes at 60 and 120 min. Sixty-minute incubations with all microsome groups exhibited significantly (pCTZ (11.8x control) and PB (9.6x control) microsomes vs. all other groups. Antibody inhibition experiments demonstrated ethosuximide metabolite levels for PB microsomes were not affected by CYP2B1 antibodies, whereas CYP3A2 antibodies reduced metabolite levels for both PB and CTZ microsomes by over 80%. These results indicate CYP3A is primarily responsible for ethosuximide metabolism in rats.

  4. ISOLATES OF CANINE DIS T EMPER VIRUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    disease in France. Most commercial canine distemper vaccines are made of the Onderstepoort virus strain isolated from South Africa. Ondersteport vaccine was incubated with equal volume of a local of canine distemper virus (titre .... safe to both dogs and zoo camivores. (Kock er al., 1985). However outbreak in three week ...

  5. Toscana virus isolated from sandflies, Morocco

    OpenAIRE

    Es-sette, Nargys; Ajaoud, Malika; Anga, Latifa; Mellouki, Fouad; Lemrani, Meryem

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the transmission of phleboviruses, a total of 7,057 sandflies were collected in well-known foci of cutaneous leishmaniasis and were identified to species level according to morphological characters. Collected sandflies were tested by Nested PCR for the presence of Phleboviruses and subsequently by viral isolation on Vero cells. The corresponding products were sequenced. Toscana virus was isolated, for the first time, from 5 pools of sandflies. Hence, Toscana virus should be con...

  6. Toscana virus isolated from sandflies, Morocco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Es-sette, Nargys; Ajaoud, Malika; Anga, Latifa; Mellouki, Fouad; Lemrani, Meryem

    2015-04-03

    To investigate the transmission of phleboviruses, a total of 7,057 sandflies were collected in well-known foci of cutaneous leishmaniasis and were identified to species level according to morphological characters.Collected sandflies were tested by Nested PCR for the presence of Phleboviruses and subsequently by viral isolation on Vero cells. The corresponding products were sequenced. Toscana virus was isolated, for the first time, from 5 pools of sandflies.Hence, Toscana virus should be considered a potential risk that threatens public health and clinicians should be aware of the role of Toscana virus in cases of meningitis and encephalitis in Morocco.

  7. A Multicomponent Animal Virus Isolated from Mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladner, Jason T; Wiley, Michael R; Beitzel, Brett; Auguste, Albert J; Dupuis, Alan P; Lindquist, Michael E; Sibley, Samuel D; Kota, Krishna P; Fetterer, David; Eastwood, Gillian; Kimmel, David; Prieto, Karla; Guzman, Hilda; Aliota, Matthew T; Reyes, Daniel; Brueggemann, Ernst E; St John, Lena; Hyeroba, David; Lauck, Michael; Friedrich, Thomas C; O'Connor, David H; Gestole, Marie C; Cazares, Lisa H; Popov, Vsevolod L; Castro-Llanos, Fanny; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Kenny, Tara; White, Bailey; Ward, Michael D; Loaiza, Jose R; Goldberg, Tony L; Weaver, Scott C; Kramer, Laura D; Tesh, Robert B; Palacios, Gustavo

    2016-09-14

    RNA viruses exhibit a variety of genome organization strategies, including multicomponent genomes in which each segment is packaged separately. Although multicomponent genomes are common among viruses infecting plants and fungi, their prevalence among those infecting animals remains unclear. We characterize a multicomponent RNA virus isolated from mosquitoes, designated Guaico Culex virus (GCXV). GCXV belongs to a diverse clade of segmented viruses (Jingmenvirus) related to the prototypically unsegmented Flaviviridae. The GCXV genome comprises five segments, each of which appears to be separately packaged. The smallest segment is not required for replication, and its presence is variable in natural infections. We also describe a variant of Jingmen tick virus, another Jingmenvirus, sequenced from a Ugandan red colobus monkey, thus expanding the host range of this segmented and likely multicomponent virus group. Collectively, this study provides evidence for the existence of multicomponent animal viruses and their potential relevance for animal and human health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Synthetic virus-like particles target dendritic cell lipid rafts for rapid endocytosis primarily but not exclusively by macropinocytosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajni Sharma

    Full Text Available DC employ several endocytic routes for processing antigens, driving forward adaptive immunity. Recent advances in synthetic biology have created small (20-30 nm virus-like particles based on lipopeptides containing a virus-derived coiled coil sequence coupled to synthetic B- and T-cell epitope mimetics. These self-assembling SVLP efficiently induce adaptive immunity without requirement for adjuvant. We hypothesized that the characteristics of DC interaction with SVLP would elaborate on the roles of cell membrane and intracellular compartments in the handling of a virus-like entity known for its efficacy as a vaccine. DC rapidly bind SVLP within min, co-localised with CTB and CD9, but not caveolin-1. In contrast, internalisation is a relatively slow process, delivering SVLP into the cell periphery where they are maintained for a number of hrs in association with microtubules. Although there is early association with clathrin, this is no longer seen after 10 min. Association with EEA-1(+ early endosomes is also early, but proteolytic processing appears slow, the SVLP-vesicles remaining peripheral. Association with transferrin occurs rarely, and only in the periphery, possibly signifying translocation of some SVLP for delivery to B-lymphocytes. Most SVLP co-localise with high molecular weight dextran. Uptake of both is impaired with mature DC, but there remains a residual uptake of SVLP. These results imply that DC use multiple endocytic routes for SVLP uptake, dominated by caveolin-independent, lipid raft-mediated macropinocytosis. With most SVLP-containing vesicles being retained in the periphery, not always interacting with early endosomes, this relates to slow proteolytic degradation and antigen retention by DC. The present characterization allows for a definition of how DC handle virus-like particles showing efficacious immunogenicity, elements valuable for novel vaccine design in the future.

  9. Virus isolation for diagnosing dengue virus infections in returning travelers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teichmann, D.; Göbels, K.; Niedrig, M.; Sim-Brandenburg, J.-W.; Làge-Stehr, J.; Grobusch, M. P.

    2003-01-01

    Dengue fever is recognized as one of the most frequent imported acute febrile illnesses affecting European tourists returning from the tropics. In order to assess the value of virus isolation for the diagnosis of dengue fever, 70 cases of dengue fever confirmed in German travelers during the period

  10. ISOLATES OF CANINE DIS TEMPER VIRUS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three groups of dogs aged three months each were used in an experiment to assess efficacy of imported Canine distemper vaccine (Ondersteport strain) and measles vaccine in protecting Nigerian dogs against local isolates of Canine distemper virus. Each group consisted of four randomly selected puppies. One group ...

  11. Identification of cowpea mosaic virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Agrawal, H.O.

    1964-01-01

    Five isolates of the beetle-transmitted cowpea mosaic virus were studied. The symptoms produced by each on a number of hosts were described. The occurrence of amorphous inclusion bodies in the epidermal cells of infected cowpea and pea plants was reported. A purification procedure was described.

  12. Isolation of Ancestral Sylvatic Dengue Virus Type 1, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Abd-Jamil, Juraina

    2010-01-01

    Ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, which was isolated from a monkey in 1972, was isolated from a patient with dengue fever in Malaysia. The virus is neutralized by serum of patients with endemic DENV-1 infection. Rare isolation of this virus suggests a limited spillover infection from an otherwise restricted sylvatic cycle. PMID:21029545

  13. Cytopathological characteristics of tomato spotted wilt virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron microscopy study revealed that four examined virus isolates in the cells of the infected host plant produced different inclusions depending on the virus isolate and the time of passaging by mechanical transmission. Numerous virus particle inclusions as well as viroplasm and filamentous inclusions typical for TSWV were present in the plant cells infected with TSWV isolate (PPR. This isolate was kept in N. rustica by 4 mechanical transmissions. A similar virus isolate but maintained for 2 years by mechanical transmission in Nicotiana plants (TI produced virus particle inclusions as well as amorphous inclusions typical for defective isolates. In plant cells infected with the same isolate but maintained by mechanical transmission one year longer (T2 no virus particle inclusions were produced. In the amorphous inclusions produced by this isolate virus particles were seen, but they were not surrounded by additional membrane. The isolate G induced only amorphous inclusions dispersed within the cytoplasm of infected cells. No virus particles were seen in the amorphous inclusions. The mechanical transmission of TSWV isolates in N. rustica plants reduced the number of virus particles present in the cytoplasm. The defectivenes of the isolate cause also the appearance of a new type of inclusion - the amorphous inclusions.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of Encephalomyocarditis Virus from Dogs in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luo, Ya-Kun; Liang, Lin; Tang, Qing-Hai; Zhou, Ling; Shi, Li-Jun; Cong, Ying-Ying; Lin, Wen-Cheng; Cui, Shang-Jin

    2017-01-01

    Encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) is as a potential zoonotic agent with a wide host range. Here, we describe an EMC virus isolate, identified as EMCV C15, which was successfully obtained from the serum of dogs from animal hospitals. Virus production in cell culture was confirmed by EMCV-specific

  15. Isolation of genetically diverse Marburg viruses from Egyptian fruit bats.

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    Jonathan S Towner

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In July and September 2007, miners working in Kitaka Cave, Uganda, were diagnosed with Marburg hemorrhagic fever. The likely source of infection in the cave was Egyptian fruit bats (Rousettus aegyptiacus based on detection of Marburg virus RNA in 31/611 (5.1% bats, virus-specific antibody in bat sera, and isolation of genetically diverse virus from bat tissues. The virus isolates were collected nine months apart, demonstrating long-term virus circulation. The bat colony was estimated to be over 100,000 animals using mark and re-capture methods, predicting the presence of over 5,000 virus-infected bats. The genetically diverse virus genome sequences from bats and miners closely matched. These data indicate common Egyptian fruit bats can represent a major natural reservoir and source of Marburg virus with potential for spillover into humans.

  16. The Human NK Cell Response to Yellow Fever Virus 17D Is Primarily Governed by NK Cell Differentiation Independently of NK Cell Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquardt, Nicole; Ivarsson, Martin A; Blom, Kim; Gonzalez, Veronica D; Braun, Monika; Falconer, Karolin; Gustafsson, Rasmus; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Sandberg, Johan K; Michaëlsson, Jakob

    2015-10-01

    NK cells play an important role in the defense against viral infections. However, little is known about the regulation of NK cell responses during the first days of acute viral infections in humans. In this study, we used the live attenuated yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D as a human in vivo model to study the temporal dynamics and regulation of NK cell responses in an acute viral infection. YFV induced a robust NK cell response in vivo, with an early activation and peak in NK cell function at day 6, followed by a delayed peak in Ki67 expression, which was indicative of proliferation, at day 10. The in vivo NK cell response correlated positively with plasma type I/III IFN levels at day 6, as well as with the viral load. YFV induced an increased functional responsiveness to IL-12 and IL-18, as well as to K562 cells, indicating that the NK cells were primed in vivo. The NK cell responses were associated primarily with the stage of differentiation, because the magnitude of induced Ki67 and CD69 expression was distinctly higher in CD57(-) NK cells. In contrast, NK cells expressing self- and nonself-HLA class I-binding inhibitory killer cell Ig-like receptors contributed, to a similar degree, to the response. Taken together, our results indicate that NK cells are primed by type I/III IFN in vivo early after YFV infection and that their response is governed primarily by the differentiation stage, independently of killer cell Ig-like receptor/HLA class I-mediated inhibition or education. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  17. [Rapid centrifugation assay standarization for dengue virus isolation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Miryam; Gutierrez, Victoria; Salas, Ramses

    2010-03-01

    The plate centrifugation assay was standardized for dengue virus isolation from serum samples. C6/36-HT cells were used determining the optimal values for centrifugation spin speed, inoculum, sera dilution, and incubation time. Then, 22 positive serum samples with viral isolation and viral strains of the four reference dengue virus serotypes were tested simultaneously by the standardized plate centrifugation method and the conventional tube culture. The isolations were typified by indirect immunofluorescent test using monoclonal antibodies. The plate centrifugation method was optimized to 200 μL of inoculum, dilution of sera 1/20, centrifugation speed at 1600 rpm/30 min, and sensitivity of 95,5% after 5 days post-inoculation. We concluded that the plate centrifugation method increased dengue virus isolation, with a significant reduction of the time of isolation for dengue virus.

  18. Identification of six potato virus Y isolates from Saudi Arabia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sherif

    2012-05-22

    May 22, 2012 ... Virus isolates were purified and preparations were negatively stained and the grids were sent to the Specialized. Hospital, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt, to be examined with a. Philips 400T transmission electron microscope. Purified virus preparations were also evaluated spectrophotometry and viral.

  19. Genetic variation among isolates of White Spot Syndrome Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marks, H.; Goldbach, R.W.; Vlak, J.M.; Hulten, van M.C.W.

    2004-01-01

    White spot syndrome virus (WSSV), member of a. new virus family called Nimaviridae, is a major scourge in worldwide shrimp, cultivation. Geographical isolates of WSSV identified so far are very similar in morphology and proteome, and show little difference in restriction fragment length polymorphism

  20. A Circo-Like Virus Isolated from Penaeus monodon Shrimps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Hanh T; Yu, Qian; Boisvert, Maude; Van, Hanh T; Bergoin, Max; Tijssen, Peter

    2014-01-16

    A virus with a circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) (CRESS-DNA) genome (PmCV-1) was isolated from Penaeus monodon shrimps in Vietnam. The gene structure of the 1,777-nucleotide (nt) genome was similar to that of circoviruses and cycloviruses, but the nucleic acid and protein sequence identities to these viruses were very low.

  1. Isolation and characterization of cidofovir resistant vaccinia viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prichard Mark N

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of drug resistant viruses, together with the possibility of increased virulence, is an important concern in the development of new antiviral compounds. Cidofovir (CDV is a phosphonate nucleotide that is approved for use against cytomegalovirus retinitis and for the emergency treatment of smallpox or complications following vaccination. One mode of action for CDV has been demonstrated to be the inhibition of the viral DNA polymerase. Results We have isolated several CDV resistant (CDVR vaccinia viruses through a one step process, two of which have unique single mutations within the DNA polymerase. An additional resistant virus isolate provides evidence of a second site mutation within the genome involved in CDV resistance. The CDVR viruses were 3–7 fold more resistant to the drug than the parental viruses. The virulence of the CDVR viruses was tested in mice inoculated intranasally and all were found to be attenuated. Conclusion Resistance to CDV in vaccinia virus can be conferred individually by at least two different mutations within the DNA polymerase gene. Additional genes may be involved. This one step approach for isolating resistant viruses without serial passage and in the presence of low doses of drug minimizes unintended secondary mutations and is applicable to other potential antiviral agents.

  2. Loss of aphid transmissibility of plum pox virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamenova, I.; Lohuis, H.; Peters, D.

    2002-01-01

    The aphid transmissibility of seven Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates and the amino acid sequences of their coat proteins were analysed Two aphid transmissible isolates PPV-A and PPV-P contained the DAG amino triplet, while DAL or NAG replaced this triplet in the coat proteins of non-aphid transmissible

  3. Identification and characterization of novel adeno-associated virus isolates in ATCC virus stocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Michael; Grot, Emmanuelle; Cervenka, Peter; Wainer, Sandra; Buck, Charles; Chiorini, John A

    2006-05-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) depend on a helper virus for efficient replication. To identify novel AAV isolates, we screened a diverse set of virus isolates for the presence of AAV DNA. AAVs found in 10 simian adenovirus isolates showed greater than 96% homology to AAV1 and AAV6 but had distinct biological properties. Two representatives of this group, AAV(VR-195) and AAV(VR-355), were studied in more detail. While the novel AAVs had high sequence homologies and required sialic acid for cell binding and transduction, differences were observed in lectin competition, resulting in distinct tropisms in human cancer cell lines.

  4. Identification and Characterization of Novel Adeno-Associated Virus Isolates in ATCC Virus Stocks

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Michael; Grot, Emmanuelle; Cervenka, Peter; Wainer, Sandra; Buck, Charles; Chiorini, John A.

    2006-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) depend on a helper virus for efficient replication. To identify novel AAV isolates, we screened a diverse set of virus isolates for the presence of AAV DNA. AAVs found in 10 simian adenovirus isolates showed greater than 96% homology to AAV1 and AAV6 but had distinct biological properties. Two representatives of this group, AAV(VR-195) and AAV(VR-355), were studied in more detail. While the novel AAVs had high sequence homologies and required sialic acid for ce...

  5. Receptor specificity and erythrocyte binding preferences of avian influenza viruses isolated from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Shailesh D

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Hemagglutination (HA and hemagglutination inhibition (HI assays are conventionally used for detection and identification of influenza viruses. HI assay is also used for detection of antibodies against influenza viruses. Primarily turkey or chicken erythrocytes [red blood cells (RBCs] are used in these assays, as they are large, nucleated, and sediment fast, which makes it easy to determine the titer. Human influenza viruses agglutinate RBCs from chicken, human, and guinea pig, but not from horse. Human influenza viruses bind preferentially to sialic acid (SA linked to galactose (Gal by α 2, 6 linkage (SA α 2, 6-Gal, whereas avian influenza (AI viruses bind preferentially to SA α 2, 3-Gal linkages. With this background, the present study was undertaken to study erythrocyte binding preferences and receptor specificities of AI viruses isolated from India. Materials and methods A total of nine AI virus isolates (four subtypes from India and three reference AI strains (three subtypes were tested in HA and HI assays against mammalian and avian erythrocytes. The erythrocytes from turkey, chicken, goose, guinea pig and horse were used in the study. The receptor specificity determination assays were performed using goose and turkey RBCs. The amino acids present at 190 helix, 130 and 220 loops of the receptor-binding domain of the hemagglutinin protein were analyzed to correlate amino acid changes with the receptor specificity. Results All tested highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 viruses reacted with all five types of RBCs in the HA assay; AI H9N2 and H5N2 viruses did not react with horse RBCs. For H5N1 viruses guinea pig and goose RBCs were best for both HA and HI assays. For H9N2 viruses, guinea pig, fowl and turkey RBCs were suitable. For other tested AI subtypes, avian and guinea pig RBCs were better. Eight isolates of H5N1, one H4N6 and one H7N1 virus showed preference to avian sialic acid receptors. Importantly

  6. Isolation of bluetongue virus from sheep in Rajasthan State, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, G; Garg, A K; Minakshi; Kakker, N K; Srivastava, R N

    1994-09-01

    A cytopathic agent was isolated in a baby hamster kidney (BHK)-21 cell-line from blood samples of cross-bred sheep showing typical bluetongue symptoms at Avikanagar in Rajasthan State, India. The cytopathic agent was identified as a bluetongue virus (BTV) by immunofluorescence, the immunoperoxidase test and electron microscopy of BHK-21 cells infected with the new isolate. The new isolate was typed as BTV serotype 1.

  7. Superior immunogenicity of inactivated whole virus H5N1 influenza vaccine is primarily controlled by Toll-like receptor signalling.

    OpenAIRE

    Felix Geeraedts; Nadege Goutagny; Veit Hornung; Martina Severa; Aalzen de Haan; Judith Pool; Jan Wilschut; Katherine A Fitzgerald; Anke Huckriede

    2008-01-01

    In the case of an influenza pandemic, the current global influenza vaccine production capacity will be unable to meet the demand for billions of vaccine doses. The ongoing threat of an H5N1 pandemic therefore urges the development of highly immunogenic, dose-sparing vaccine formulations. In unprimed individuals, inactivated whole virus (WIV) vaccines are more immunogenic and induce protective antibody responses at a lower antigen dose than other formulations like split virus (SV) or subunit (...

  8. Isolated acute dysphagia due to varicella-zoster virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantero, Vittorio; Rigamonti, Andrea; Valentini, Sergio; Fiumani, Anna; Piamarta, Francesca; Bonfanti, Paolo; Salmaggi, Andrea

    2014-04-01

    We present a case of zoster sine herpete causing isolated acute dysphagia in an immunocompetent patient. The interest of this paper is the atypical presentation of varicella-zoster virus reactivation. A 77-year-old woman presented with a 3-day history of fever and worsening dysphagia for both liquid and solid foods. Cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed lymphocytic pleocytosis and PCR amplified varicella-zoster virus DNA with high antibody titers in both serum and cerebrospinal fluid. The panel was suggestive of a cranial neuritis due to varicella-zoster virus, involved cranial nerves, even in the absence of a cutaneous and mucosal rash. Varicella-zoster virus reactivation should be included in the differential diagnosis of isolated or multiple cranial nerve palsies, with or without zosteriform skin lesions. A prompt etiologic diagnosis can lead to early administration of antiviral therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation of sindbis virus from a hooded crow in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiden, Martin; Ziegler, Ute; Keller, Markus; Müller, Kerstin; Granzow, Harald; Jöst, Hanna; Schmidt-Chanasit, Jonas; Groschup, Martin H

    2014-03-01

    Sindbis virus (SINV) is an arbovirus that causes clinical symptoms, including arthritis, rash, and fever during acute human infections. In Europe, SINV outbreaks are largely restricted to northern Europe. Intrigued by the isolation of SINV from mosquitoes in southwestern Germany in 2009, we initiated a passive arbovirus-monitoring program in birds and analyzed a total of 685 samples. By this approach, we were able to detect a SINV in a Hooded Crow in Germany for the first time. It was possible to isolate SINV virus in cell cultures and even to visualize virus particles by electron microscopy. After the determination of the complete SINV genome sequence, the phylogenetic analysis revealed its close relationship to SINV genotype I sequences previously obtained from mosquitoes in Germany and Scandinavia. This first report on the isolation of viable SINV indicates the potential involvement of crows in an enzootic circulation of SINV in Germany and Central Europe.

  10. Isolation and characterization of H9N2 influenza virus isolates from poultry respiratory disease outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakhesara, Subhash J; Bhatt, Vaibhav D; Patel, Namrata V; Prajapati, Kantilal S; Joshi, Chaitanya G

    2014-01-01

    The present study reports isolation and characterization of H9N2 virus responsible for disease characterized by symptoms including difficulty in respiration, head swelling, nasal discharge, reduced feed intake, cyanotic comb, reduced egg production and mortality. Virus isolation from allantoic fluid inoculated with tracheal aspirates and whole genome sequencing of two isolates were performed on an Ion-Torrent sequencer. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two H9N2 isolates are reassortant viruses showing a G1-like lineage for HA, NA and NP, a Hok/49/98-like lineage for PB1 and PA, PK/UDL-01/05-like lineage for PB2, IL/90658/00-like lineage for NS and an unknown lineage for M gene. Analyses of the HA cleavage site showed a sequence of (333PARSSR↓GL340) indicating that these isolates are of low pathogenicity. Isolate 2 has leucine at amino acid position 226, a substitution which is associated with mammalian adaptation of avian influenza virus. Isolate 1 has the S31N substitution in the M2 gene that has been associated with drug resistance as well as R57Q and C241Y mutations in the NP gene which are associated with human adaptation. The result reported here gives deep insight in to H9N2 viruses circulating in domestic poultry of India and supports the policy of active efforts to control and manage H9N2 infections in Indian poultry.

  11. Population structure of Citrus tristeza virus from field Argentinean isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Néstor G; Gago-Zachert, Selma P; Robledo, Germán; Costa, Norma; Plata, María Inés; Vera, Osmar; Grau, Oscar; Semorile, Liliana C

    2008-02-01

    We studied the genetic variability of three genomic regions (p23, p25 and p27 genes) from 11 field Citrus tristeza virus isolates from the two main citrus growing areas of Argentina, a country where the most efficient vector of the virus, Toxoptera citricida, is present for decades. The pathogenicity of the isolates was determinated by biological indexing, single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis showed that most isolates contained high intra-isolate variability. Divergent sequence variants were detected in some isolates, suggesting re-infections of the field plants. Phylogenetic analysis of the predominant sequence variants of each isolate revealed similar grouping of isolates for genes p25 and p27. The analysis of p23 showed two groups contained the severe isolates. Our results showed a high intra-isolate sequence variability suggesting that re-infections could contribute to the observed variability and that the host can play an important role in the selection of the sequence variants present in these isolates.

  12. Tomato necrotic ringspot virus, a new tospovirus isolated in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepiban, Channarong; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Attathom, Tipvadee; Attathom, Supat

    2011-02-01

    A new tospovirus isolated from naturally infected tomato plants grown in Nakhon Pathom province (Thailand) was characterized. Infected plants showed symptoms consisting of necrotic spots, necrotic ringspots and stem necrosis. This virus was detected using general antibodies that could recognize watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV). However, it did not react with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to WSMoV and CaCV or a specific MAb to MYSV. The complete nucleotide sequences of S and M RNAs of the virus were determined. They were 3,023 and 4,716 nucleotides in length, respectively, and contained two ORFs in an ambisense arrangement. Sequence analysis indicated that amino acid sequence of the N protein shared 58.2%, 56.0% and 51.8% identity with those of CaCV, WSMoV and MYSV, respectively. The virus was experimentally transmitted by Thrips palmi and Ceratothripoides claratris. Based on our results, we conclude that this tospovirus isolate should be considered a member of a new species. The name tomato necrotic ringspot virus (TNRV) is proposed for this tospovirus.

  13. Differences among isolates of simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gravell, M; London, W T; Leon, M E; Palmer, A E; Hamilton, R S

    1986-01-01

    Simian hemorrhagic fever (SHF) virus is a member of the Togaviridae family which currently is unclassified to genus. We have studied the relatedness of four different SHF virus isolates obtained from infected macaque or patas monkeys. Differences were found among isolates in type and severity of disease produced in patas monkeys, cell sensitivity to infection, viral antigens, and levels of specific antibody induced in patas monkeys. Based on these criteria, the four isolates have been grouped in two categories: those producing acute infections in patas monkeys (LVR, P-180) and those producing persistent infections (P-248, P-741). The P-180 isolate induced the most severe disease in experimentally infected patas monkeys, but only occasionally were their infections fatal. Persistently infected patas monkeys were viremic over a period of years, but showed no signs or symptoms of infection. All four isolates were found to be antigenically related by use of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); the P-248 isolate showing the weakest antigenic relationship. However, none of the four isolates induced cross-neutralizing antibodies in infected patas monkeys. High titers of specific IgG antibody (up to 31,250 as determined by ELISA) were induced in acutely infected patas monkeys (LVR, P-180), but antibody was barely detectable (less than or equal to 50) in persistently infected patas monkeys (P-248, P-741). LVR lytically infected USU-104 cells, patas monkey peritoneal macrophages (PMAC), and rhesus monkey PMAC. The P-180 isolate lytically infected both patas monkey PMAC and rhesus monkey PMAC, but not USU-104 cells. The isolates producing persistent infections (P-248, P-741) lytically infected only rhesus monkey PMAC. These results show that marked differences exist among isolates of SHF virus from naturally infected animals. These differences should be useful in categorizing new isolates.

  14. [Internal epidemic influenza virus proteins: isolation and investigation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, V T; Rakutina, R O; Kordiukova, L V; Manykin, A A; Fedorova, N V; Ksenofontov, A L; Slepushkin, A N

    2006-01-01

    The internal influenza virus proteins M1 and RNP free from surface protein impurities were isolated from subviral particles (virions free from HA and NA ectomenes). The spikeless particles had no propensity to aggregate in the solution at pH 5.0 as compared with native viruses. The subviral particles of B/Hong Kong/330/01 influenza virus, which belonged to B/Victoria/2/87-lineage, were obtained by proteolytic treatment with the enzyme bromelain under the same conditions as in cases of influenza B viruses of B/Jamagata/16/88 lineage. A chromatographic analysis of the tryptic hydrolyzates obtained for matrix (M1) proteins of A(H1N1) and A(H3N2) influenza viruses revealed differences that were greatest between the protein M1 molecules isolated from influenza viruses of different subtypes of hemagglutinine. These findings suggest there are variations in the structure of this conservative internal viral protein M1 during evolution.

  15. Isolation and characterization of an H9N2 influenza virus isolated in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kemin; Ferreri, Lucas; Rimondi, Agustina; Olivera, Valeria; Romano, Marcelo; Ferreyra, Hebe; Rago, Virgina; Uhart, Marcela; Chen, Hongjun; Sutton, Troy; Pereda, Ariel; Perez, Daniel R.

    2016-01-01

    As part of our ongoing efforts on animal influenza surveillance in Argentina, an H9N2 virus was isolated from a wild aquatic bird (Netta peposaca), A/rosy-billed pochard/Argentina/CIP051-559/2007 (H9N2) – herein referred to as 559/H9N2. Due to the important role that H9N2 viruses play in the ecology of influenza in nature, the 559/H9N2 isolate was characterized molecularly and biologically. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA gene revealed that the 559/H9N2 virus maintained an independent evolutionary pathway and shared a sister-group relationship with North American viruses, suggesting a common ancestor. The rest of the genome segments clustered with viruses from South America. Experimental inoculation of the 559/H9N2 in chickens and quail revealed efficient replication and transmission only in quail. Our results add to the notion of the unique evolutionary trend of avian influenza viruses in South America. Our study increases our understanding of H9N2 viruses in nature and emphasizes the importance of expanding animal influenza surveillance efforts to better define the ecology of influenza viruses at a global scale. PMID:22709552

  16. Superior immunogenicity of inactivated whole virus H5N1 influenza vaccine is primarily controlled by Toll-like receptor signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Geeraedts

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In the case of an influenza pandemic, the current global influenza vaccine production capacity will be unable to meet the demand for billions of vaccine doses. The ongoing threat of an H5N1 pandemic therefore urges the development of highly immunogenic, dose-sparing vaccine formulations. In unprimed individuals, inactivated whole virus (WIV vaccines are more immunogenic and induce protective antibody responses at a lower antigen dose than other formulations like split virus (SV or subunit (SU vaccines. The reason for this discrepancy in immunogenicity is a long-standing enigma. Here, we show that stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs of the innate immune system, in particular stimulation of TLR7, by H5N1 WIV vaccine is the prime determinant of the greater magnitude and Th1 polarization of the WIV-induced immune response, as compared to SV- or SU-induced responses. This TLR dependency largely explains the relative loss of immunogenicity in SV and SU vaccines. The natural pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP recognized by TLR7 is viral genomic ssRNA. Processing of whole virus particles into SV or SU vaccines destroys the integrity of the viral particle and leaves the viral RNA prone to degradation or involves its active removal. Our results show for a classic vaccine that the acquired immune response evoked by vaccination can be enhanced and steered by the innate immune system, which is triggered by interaction of an intrinsic vaccine component with a pattern recognition receptor (PRR. The insights presented here may be used to further improve the immune-stimulatory and dose-sparing properties of classic influenza vaccine formulations such as WIV, and will facilitate the development of new, even more powerful vaccines to face the next influenza pandemic.

  17. Superior immunogenicity of inactivated whole virus H5N1 influenza vaccine is primarily controlled by Toll-like receptor signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geeraedts, Felix; Goutagny, Nadege; Hornung, Veit; Severa, Martina; de Haan, Aalzen; Pool, Judith; Wilschut, Jan; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Huckriede, Anke

    2008-08-29

    In the case of an influenza pandemic, the current global influenza vaccine production capacity will be unable to meet the demand for billions of vaccine doses. The ongoing threat of an H5N1 pandemic therefore urges the development of highly immunogenic, dose-sparing vaccine formulations. In unprimed individuals, inactivated whole virus (WIV) vaccines are more immunogenic and induce protective antibody responses at a lower antigen dose than other formulations like split virus (SV) or subunit (SU) vaccines. The reason for this discrepancy in immunogenicity is a long-standing enigma. Here, we show that stimulation of Toll-like receptors (TLRs) of the innate immune system, in particular stimulation of TLR7, by H5N1 WIV vaccine is the prime determinant of the greater magnitude and Th1 polarization of the WIV-induced immune response, as compared to SV- or SU-induced responses. This TLR dependency largely explains the relative loss of immunogenicity in SV and SU vaccines. The natural pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP) recognized by TLR7 is viral genomic ssRNA. Processing of whole virus particles into SV or SU vaccines destroys the integrity of the viral particle and leaves the viral RNA prone to degradation or involves its active removal. Our results show for a classic vaccine that the acquired immune response evoked by vaccination can be enhanced and steered by the innate immune system, which is triggered by interaction of an intrinsic vaccine component with a pattern recognition receptor (PRR). The insights presented here may be used to further improve the immune-stimulatory and dose-sparing properties of classic influenza vaccine formulations such as WIV, and will facilitate the development of new, even more powerful vaccines to face the next influenza pandemic.

  18. Susceptibility testing of fish cell lines for virus isolation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ariel, Ellen; Skall, Helle Frank; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2009-01-01

    compare susceptibility between cell lines and between lineages within a laboratory and between laboratories (Inter-laboratory Proficiency Test). The objective being that the most sensitive cell line and lineages are routinely selected for diagnostic purposes.In comparing cell lines, we simulated "non......-cell-culture-adapted" virus by propagating the virus in heterologous cell lines to the one tested. A stock of test virus was produced and stored at - 80 °C and tests were conducted biannually. This procedure becomes complicated when several cell lines are in use and does not account for variation among lineages. In comparing...... cell lineages, we increased the number of isolates of each virus, propagated stocks in a given cell line and tested all lineages of that line in use in the laboratory. Testing of relative cell line susceptibility between laboratories is carried out annually via the Inter-laboratory Proficiency Test...

  19. Characterization of viruses infecting potato plants from a single location in Shetland, an isolated scottish archipelago

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, R.J.; Shen, Xinyi; Reid, Alex

    2010-01-01

    Sequence data were obtained from 29 isolates of Potato virus A (PVA), Potato virus S (PVS), Potato virus V (PVV) and Potato virus X (PVX) infecting nine tubers from Shetland, one of the most remote inhabited islands in the United Kingdom. These isolates were sequenced in the coat protein region, ...

  20. Antifungal susceptibility of 205 Candida spp. isolated primarily during invasive Candidiasis and comparison of the Vitek 2 system with the CLSI broth microdilution and Etest methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, N; Dehandschoewercker, L; Bertout, S; Bousquet, P-J; Rispail, P; Lachaud, L

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to Candida spp. are frequent, particularly in immunocompromised and intensive care unit patients. Antifungal susceptibility tests are now required to optimize antifungal treatment given the emergence of acquired antifungal resistance in some Candida species. An antifungal susceptibility automated method, the Vitek 2 system (VK2), was evaluated. VK2 was compared to the CLSI broth microdilution reference method and the Etest procedure. For this purpose, 205 clinical isolates of Candida spp., including 11 different species, were tested for fluconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B susceptibility. For azoles, essential agreement ranged from 25% to 100%, depending on the method used and the Candida species tested. Categorical agreements for all of the species averaged 92.2% and ranged from 14.3 to 100%, depending on the 24-h or 48-h MIC reading by the Etest and CLSI methods and on the Candida species. Results obtained for Candida albicans showed excellent categorical and essential agreements with the two comparative methods. For Candida glabrata, the essential agreement was high with the CLSI method but low with the Etest method, and several very major errors in interpretation were observed between VK2 and the Etest method for both azoles. Low MICs of fluconazole were obtained for all of the Candida krusei isolates, but the VK2 expert software corrected all of the results obtained to resistant. Amphotericin B results showed MICs of CLSI), and 202 (Etest) isolates. The AST-YS01 Vitek 2 card system (bioMérieux) is a reliable and practical standardized automated antifungal susceptibility test. Nevertheless, more assays are needed to better evaluate C. glabrata fluconazole sensitivity.

  1. Antifungal Susceptibility of 205 Candida spp. Isolated Primarily during Invasive Candidiasis and Comparison of the Vitek 2 System with the CLSI Broth Microdilution and Etest Methods▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourgeois, N.; Dehandschoewercker, L.; Bertout, S.; Bousquet, P.-J.; Rispail, P.; Lachaud, L.

    2010-01-01

    Infections due to Candida spp. are frequent, particularly in immunocompromised and intensive care unit patients. Antifungal susceptibility tests are now required to optimize antifungal treatment given the emergence of acquired antifungal resistance in some Candida species. An antifungal susceptibility automated method, the Vitek 2 system (VK2), was evaluated. VK2 was compared to the CLSI broth microdilution reference method and the Etest procedure. For this purpose, 205 clinical isolates of Candida spp., including 11 different species, were tested for fluconazole, voriconazole, and amphotericin B susceptibility. For azoles, essential agreement ranged from 25% to 100%, depending on the method used and the Candida species tested. Categorical agreements for all of the species averaged 92.2% and ranged from 14.3 to 100%, depending on the 24-h or 48-h MIC reading by the Etest and CLSI methods and on the Candida species. Results obtained for Candida albicans showed excellent categorical and essential agreements with the two comparative methods. For Candida glabrata, the essential agreement was high with the CLSI method but low with the Etest method, and several very major errors in interpretation were observed between VK2 and the Etest method for both azoles. Low MICs of fluconazole were obtained for all of the Candida krusei isolates, but the VK2 expert software corrected all of the results obtained to resistant. Amphotericin B results showed MICs of ≤1 mg/liter for 201 (VK2), 190 (CLSI), and 202 (Etest) isolates. The AST-YS01 Vitek 2 card system (bioMérieux) is a reliable and practical standardized automated antifungal susceptibility test. Nevertheless, more assays are needed to better evaluate C. glabrata fluconazole sensitivity. PMID:19889902

  2. Aphid Transmission of the Ontario Isolate of Plum Pox Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, D Thomas; Vickers, Patricia M; Bittner, Lori A; Stobbs, Lorne W; Foottit, Robert G

    2015-10-01

    Utilization of timed virus acquisition access probes in studies of plum pox virus (PPV) transmission by aphids demonstrated that endemic species transmitted the virus readily from plum, Prunus domestica (L.) Batsch; peach, P. persica (L.); or dwarf flowering almond, P. glandulosa Thunberg., to peach seedlings. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae (Sulzer), was shown to be the most efficient vector. Acquisition of virus by green peach aphids from infected peach leaves resulted in 18-28% infected peach seedlings, while aphids previously fed on infected leaves of plum transferred virus to 36% of peach seedlings. Although the spirea aphid, Aphis spiraecola (Patch), was a less efficient vector than M. persicae it is perhaps more important for the spread of PPV due to its greater abundance and occurrence earlier in the season when peach trees are thought to be more susceptible to infection. Virus transmission rates varied depending on the virus source and healthy test plant species. In contrast to many previous studies, aphid inoculation of the experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana Domin occurred at a low rate, never exceeding 4%. Acquisition of PPV by M. persicae from infected peach fruit was greatly reduced compared with acquisition from leaves. The results of this research indicate that the Ontario isolate of PPV-D is readily transmissible by aphids to peach and natural spread of the virus needs to be considered in future management or eradication programs. © Her Majesty in Right of Canada, as represented by the Minister of Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America.

  3. Isolation of Kaeng Khoi virus from dead Chaerephon plicata bats in Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osborne, J C; Rupprecht, C E; Olson, J G; Ksiazek, T G; Rollin, P E; Niezgoda, M; Goldsmith, C S; An, U S; Nichol, S T

    2003-10-01

    A virus isolated from dead Chaerephon plicata bats collected near Kampot, Cambodia, was identified as a member of the family Bunyaviridae by electron microscopy. The only bunyavirus previously isolated from Chaerephon species bats in South-East Asia is Kaeng Khoi (KK) virus (genus Orthobunyavirus), detected in Thailand over 30 years earlier and implicated as a public health problem. Using RT-PCR, nucleotide sequences from the M RNA segment of several virus isolates from the Cambodian C. plicata bats were found to be almost identical and to differ from those of the prototype KK virus by only 2.6-3.2 %, despite the temporal and geographic separation of the viruses. These results identify the Cambodian bat viruses as KK virus, extend the known virus geographic range and document the first KK virus isolation in 30 years. These genetic data, together with earlier serologic data, show that KK viruses represent a distinct group within the genus Orthobunyavirus.

  4. Deep sequencing as a method of typing bluetongue virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Pavuluri Panduranga; Reddy, Yella Narasimha; Ganesh, Kapila; Nair, Shreeja G; Niranjan, Vidya; Hegde, Nagendra R

    2013-11-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is an economically important endemic disease of livestock in tropics and subtropics. In addition, its recent spread to temperate regions like North America and Northern Europe is of serious concern. Rapid serotyping and characterization of BT virus (BTV) is an essential step in the identification of origin of the virus and for controlling the disease. Serotyping of BTV is typically performed by serum neutralization, and of late by nucleotide sequencing. This report describes the near complete genome sequencing and typing of two isolates of BTV using Illumina next generation sequencing platform. Two of the BTV RNAs were multiplexed with ten other unknown samples. Viral RNA was isolated and fragmented, reverse transcribed, the cDNA ends were repaired and ligated with a multiplex oligo. The genome library was amplified using primers complementary to the ligated oligo and subjected to single and paired end sequencing. The raw reads were assembled using a de novo method and reference-based assembly was performed based on the contig data. Near complete sequences of all segments of BTV were obtained with more than 20× coverage, and single read sequencing method was sufficient to identify the genotype and serotype of the virus. The two viruses used in this study were typed as BTV-1 and BTV-9E. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Molecular characterisation of virulence graded field isolates of myxoma virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parra Francisco

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Myxoma virus (MV has been endemic in Europe since shortly after its deliberate release in France in 1952. While the emergence of more resistant hosts and more transmissible and attenuated virus is well documented, there have been relatively few studies focused on the sequence changes incurred by the virus as it has adapted to its new host. In order to identify regions of variability within the MV genome to be used for phylogenetic studies and to try to investigate causes of MV strain attenuation we have molecularly characterised nine strains of MV isolated in Spain between the years 1992 and 1995 from wide ranging geographic locations and which had been previously graded for virulence by experimental infection of rabbits. Results The findings reported here show the analysis of 16 genomic regions accounting for approximately 10% of the viral genomes. Of the 20 genes analysed 5 (M034L, M069L, M071L, M130R and M135R were identical in all strains and 1 (M122R contained only a single point mutation in an individual strain. Four genes (M002L/R, M009L, M036L and M017L showed insertions or deletions that led to disruption of the ORFs. Conclusions The findings presented here provide valuable tools for strain differentiation and phylogenetic studies of MV isolates and some clues as to the reasons for virus attenuation in the field.

  6. Molecular characterisation of virulence graded field isolates of myxoma virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Kevin P; Nicieza, Ines; Baragaño, Aroa; Alonso, Jose Manuel Martín; Parra, Francisco

    2010-02-26

    Myxoma virus (MV) has been endemic in Europe since shortly after its deliberate release in France in 1952. While the emergence of more resistant hosts and more transmissible and attenuated virus is well documented, there have been relatively few studies focused on the sequence changes incurred by the virus as it has adapted to its new host. In order to identify regions of variability within the MV genome to be used for phylogenetic studies and to try to investigate causes of MV strain attenuation we have molecularly characterised nine strains of MV isolated in Spain between the years 1992 and 1995 from wide ranging geographic locations and which had been previously graded for virulence by experimental infection of rabbits. The findings reported here show the analysis of 16 genomic regions accounting for approximately 10% of the viral genomes. Of the 20 genes analysed 5 (M034L, M069L, M071L, M130R and M135R) were identical in all strains and 1 (M122R) contained only a single point mutation in an individual strain. Four genes (M002L/R, M009L, M036L and M017L) showed insertions or deletions that led to disruption of the ORFs. The findings presented here provide valuable tools for strain differentiation and phylogenetic studies of MV isolates and some clues as to the reasons for virus attenuation in the field.

  7. Genomic characterization of a Brazilian TT Virus isolate closely related to SEN virus-F

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Diniz-Mendes

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available SEN virus (SENV is a circular, single stranded DNA virus that has been first characterized in the serum of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1-infected patient. Eight genotypes of SENV (A-H have been identified and further recognized as variants of TT virus (TTV in the family Circoviridae. Here we describe the first genomic characterization of a SENV isolate (5-A from South America. Using 'universal' primers, able to amplify most, if not all, TTV/SENV genotypes, a segment of > 3 kb was amplified by polymerase chain reaction from the serum of an HIV-1 infected patient. The amplicon was cloned and a 3087-nucleotide sequence was determined, that showed a high (85% homology with the sequence of the Italian isolate SENV-F. Proteins encoded by open reading frames (ORFs 1 to 4 consisted of 758, 129, 276, and 267 amino acids, respectively. By phylogenetic analysis, isolate 5-A was classified into TTV genotype 19 (phylogenetic group 3, together with SENV-F and TTV isolate SAa-38.

  8. Phylogenetic analysis of swine influenza viruses recently isolated in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C S; Kang, B K; Kim, H K; Park, S J; Park, B K; Jung, K; Song, D S

    2008-10-01

    Several influenza A viral subtypes were isolated from pigs during a severe outbreak of respiratory disease in Korea during 2005 and 2006. They included a classical swine H1N1 subtype, two swine-human-avian triple-recombinant H1N2 subtypes, and a swine-human-avian triple-recombinant H3N2 subtype. In the current study, genetic characterization to determine the probable origin of these recent isolates was carried out for the first time. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that all the recent Korean isolates of H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 influenza are closely related to viruses from the United States. Serologic and genetic analysis indicated that the Korean H1N2 viral subtypes were introduced directly from the United States, and did not arise from recombination between Korean H1N1 and H3N2. We suggest that the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 viral subtypes that were isolated from the Korean swine population originated in North America, and that these viruses are currently circulating in the Korean swine population.

  9. Isolation of bluetongue virus serotype 1 from aborted goat fetuses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, H C; Biswas, S K; Chand, K; Rehman, W; Das, B; Dadawala, A I; Chandel, B S; Kher, H N; Mondal, B

    2014-12-01

    Abortions and stillbirths were noticed in pregnant goats on a farm in the state of Gujarat, India. About 50% of the pregnant goats aborted or gave birth to dead kids. Bluetongue virus (BTV) antibody in the sera of affected goats was detected using a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Viral antigen in the blood of these goats and in the aborted fetal spleens was detected using a sandwich ELISA. Two viruses (SKN-9, SKN-10) were isolated in cell culture from aborted fetal spleens and were confirmed as Orbivirus by demonstration of ten bands in RNA polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and identified as BTV-1 by sequencing of the VP2 gene. Sequence analyses revealed thatthese isolates were very closely related to a BTV-1 (strain SKN-8) isolated from Culicoides vectors captured on the same farm one month after the occurrence of abortion. Isolation of BTV-1 from fetuses is probably evidence of transplacental transmission of the wild-type strain, because attenuated or laboratory-adapted BTV-1 strains have never been used in this region. This may have important implications in the epidemiology of bluetongue, considering the presence of many BTV serotypes in India.

  10. Antigenic and genetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarino, Helena; Castilho, Juliana Galera; Souto, Juanita; Oliveira, Rafael de Novaes; Carrieri, Maria Luiza; Kotait, Ivanete

    2013-05-01

    After 25 years without any reported cases of rabies in Uruguay, the northern region of the country experienced an epizootic of bovine paralytic rabies in October 2007. The outbreak affected bovines and equines, and the main source of infection was the bat Desmodus rotundus, the only hematophagous species in the country. From October 2007 to July 2008, 42 bovine, 3 equine and 120 chiropteran samples were submitted to the National Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory for rabies testing. A total of 12 samples (7 bovine, 2 equine and 3 from D. rotundus) were positive by the fluorescent antibody test, and viruses were isolated by the mouse inoculation test. The objective of this study was to compare the antigenic and genetic characteristics of these isolates and three isolates from insectivorous bats from other regions. Antigenic typing using a panel of eight monoclonal antibodies identified all 12 viruses as variant 3 (AgV3), a variant associated with D. rotundus. Two isolates from insectivorous bats (Tadarida brasiliensis and Molossus sp.) were characterized as antigenic variant 4 (AgV4) while the third, from Myotis sp., could not be characterized using this panel as its reactivity pattern did not match that of any of the known antigenic variants. Partial N-gene sequences (nt 149-1420) of these isolates were aligned with homologous sequences derived from GenBank by the CLUSTAL/W method and used to build a neighbor-joining distance tree with the Kimura 2-parameter model. All 12 isolates were genetically grouped into the D. rotundus cluster as they shared 100% identity. In the phylogenetic analysis, the three isolates from insectivorous bats segregated into three clusters: one related to T. brasiliensis, one to Myotis sp. and the other to Lasiurus sp., although the isolate associated with the latter came from a Molossus sp. specimen. These results indicate that AgV3 was associated with the outbreak of bovine paralytic rabies in Uruguay. This is the first report of rabies

  11. Characterization of Puerto Rican West Nile Virus isolates in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caraballo, Elba V; Hunsperger, Elizabeth; Martínez, Idalí

    2015-09-11

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic arbovirus that was first isolated in 1937 in the West Nile District of Uganda. The virus emerged in New York in 1999 and is now endemic in North America (2007). The first virus isolates from Puerto Rico were obtained in 2007 from a chicken (PR20wh) and a mosquito pool (PR423). Our study further characterized these viral isolates using in vitro plaque morphology assays and in vivo using a Balb/c mice pathogenesis model. In the in vitro experiments, PR WNV isolates produced significantly smaller plaques in Vero cells compared to the New York 1999 strain (NY99). For the in vivo experiments, PR WNV isolates were propagated in mammalian (Vero) and insect (C6/36) cell lines and then inoculated in Balb/c mice. When WNV was propagated in Vero cells, we observed a trend towards significance in the survival rate with PR20wh compared to NY99 (log rank, p = 0.092). Regardless of whether the viral isolates were propagated in Vero or C6/36 cells, we found a significantly greater survival in mice infected with PR20wh strain, when compared to NY99 (log rank, p = 0.04), while no statistical difference was detected between PR423 and NY99 (p = 0.84). The average survival time (AST) in mice was significantly lower in C6/36-derived PR423 when compared to C6/36-derived NY99 (t-test, p = 0.013), and Vero-derived PR423 (t-test, p Vero-derived PR423 was significantly higher when compared to NY99 and PR20wh. These results suggest that the PR WNV isolate, PR20wh, is a less pathogenic strain in mice than NY99. Moreover, we found that PR423 is a pathogenic isolate that causes faster mortality than NY99, when propagated in C6/36.

  12. Genomic characterization of Zika virus isolated from Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yudhaputri, Frilasita A; Trimarsanto, Hidayat; Perkasa, Aditya; Yohan, Benediktus; Haryanto, Sotianingsih; Wiyatno, Ageng; Soebandrio, Amin; Myint, Khin Saw; Ledermann, Jeremy P; Rosenberg, Ronald; Powers, Ann M; Sasmono, R Tedjo

    2017-10-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) JMB-185 strain was isolated from a febrile patient in Jambi, Indonesia in 2014. To understand its genetic characteristics, we performed whole genome sequencing using the Ion Torrent PGM platform on the supernatant of the first passage. The phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate was not closely related to the Brazilian ZIKV associated with microcephaly or isolates from the recent Singapore Zika outbreak. Molecular evolution analysis indicated that JMB-185 strain may have been circulating in the Southeast Asia region, including Indonesia since 2000. We observed high nucleotide sequence identity between Indonesia, Thailand, Singapore, and American strains although unique amino acid substitutions were also observed. This report provides information on the genomic characteristics of Indonesian ZIKV which may be used for further studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolation of Zika Virus Imported from Tonga into Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyke, Alyssa T; Moore, Peter R; Hall-Mendelin, Sonja; McMahon, Jamie L; Harrower, Bruce J; Constantino, Tanya R; van den Hurk, Andrew F

    2016-09-07

    The globally emergent Zika virus (ZIKV) is a threat to Australia, given the number of imported cases from epidemic regions and the presence of competent mosquito vectors. We report the isolation of ZIKV from a female traveler who recently returned from Tonga to Brisbane, Queensland, Australia in 2016. A specific TaqMan real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction assay (RT-PCR) assay was used to detect ZIKV in serum and urine samples. Conventional cell culture techniques and suckling mice were employed in an attempt to isolate ZIKV from serum and urine. A ZIKV isolate (TS17-2016) was recovered from the serum sample after one passage in suckling mouse brains and harvested 11 days post inoculation. Phylogenetic analysis of complete envelope (E) gene sequences demonstrated TS17-2016 shared 99.9% nucleotide identity with other contemporary sequences from Tonga 2016, Brazil 2015 and French Polynesia 2013 within the Asian lineage. This is the first known report of successful isolation of ZIKV from a human clinical sample in Australia and the first from a traveler from Tonga. This study highlights the potential difficulties in isolating ZIKV from acute clinical samples using conventional cell culture techniques, particularly in non-endemic countries like Australia where access to samples of sufficient viral load is limited. The successful isolation of TS17-2016 will be essential for continued investigations of ZIKV transmission and pathogenicity and will enable the advancement of new preventative control measures extremely relevant to the Australian and Pacific region.

  14. Cedar virus: a novel Henipavirus isolated from Australian bats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn A Marsh

    Full Text Available The genus Henipavirus in the family Paramyxoviridae contains two viruses, Hendra virus (HeV and Nipah virus (NiV for which pteropid bats act as the main natural reservoir. Each virus also causes serious and commonly lethal infection of people as well as various species of domestic animals, however little is known about the associated mechanisms of pathogenesis. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of a new paramyxovirus from pteropid bats, Cedar virus (CedPV, which shares significant features with the known henipaviruses. The genome size (18,162 nt and organization of CedPV is very similar to that of HeV and NiV; its nucleocapsid protein displays antigenic cross-reactivity with henipaviruses; and it uses the same receptor molecule (ephrin-B2 for entry during infection. Preliminary challenge studies with CedPV in ferrets and guinea pigs, both susceptible to infection and disease with known henipaviruses, confirmed virus replication and production of neutralizing antibodies although clinical disease was not observed. In this context, it is interesting to note that the major genetic difference between CedPV and HeV or NiV lies within the coding strategy of the P gene, which is known to play an important role in evading the host innate immune system. Unlike HeV, NiV, and almost all known paramyxoviruses, the CedPV P gene lacks both RNA editing and also the coding capacity for the highly conserved V protein. Preliminary study indicated that CedPV infection of human cells induces a more robust IFN-β response than HeV.

  15. Isolation of a virus with rhabdovirus morphology from a white-beaked dolphin (Lagenorhynchus albirostris).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.W.J. Broeders; K.S. Teppema; T. Kuiken (Thijs); J.A. House; H.W. Vos (Helma); I.K.G. Visser (Ilona)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractA virus with rhabdovirus morphology which proved to be antigenically distinct from rabies virus and vesicular stomatitis virus was isolated from a dolphin that had beached on the Dutch coast. Neutralizing antibodies to this virus were found in several European marine mammal species.

  16. Dengue-1 Virus Isolation during First Dengue Fever Outbreak on Easter Island, Chile

    OpenAIRE

    Perret, Cecilia; Abarca, Katia; Ovalle, Jimena; Ferrer, Pablo; Godoy, Paula; Olea, Andrea; Aguilera, Ximena; Ferrés, Marcela

    2003-01-01

    Dengue virus was detected for the first time in Chile, in an outbreak of dengue fever on Easter Island. The virus was isolated in tissue culture and characterized by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction as being dengue type 1.

  17. Phylogenetic characterization of rabies virus isolates from Carnivora in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Inoue, Nana; Sato, Go; Itou, Takuya; Santos, Hamilton P; Brito, Cristina J C; Gomes, Albério A B; Santos, Marli F C; Silva, Marlon V; Mota, Carla S; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2007-07-01

    The incidence of canine rabies has been widely reported in Brazil, and new rabies virus (RV) variants, genetically similar to canine RV, have recently been isolated from foxes. In order to derive the epidemiological characteristics of Brazilian Carnivora RV, Brazilian RVs isolated from dogs, cats, and foxes were genetically analyzed. Brazilian Carnivora RV isolates were divided into 2 main lineages. The predominant lineage was found in dogs and cats, which included the Argentinean and Bolivian Carnivora RV isolates, and was extensively distributed throughout Brazil and surrounding countries. The other lineage consisted of three sublineages containing Brazilian dog and fox RV isolates, with the dog sublineages located on an internal branch of 2 fox sublineages, suggesting that RV transmission events might have occurred between foxes and dogs in the past. These results suggest that contact between dogs and wildlife has the potential to generate new rabies variants and that it is important to control RV infection cycles in both dogs and wildlife to prevent spread of rabies infection.

  18. Serological and genetic characterization of newly isolated Peaton virus in Japan. Brief report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumori, Y; Inai, K; Yanase, T; Ohashi, S; Kato, T; Yoshida, K; Tsuda, T

    2002-01-01

    The viruses were isolated from the blood of sentinel cattle and Culicoides biting midges in the Kyushu district, southwestern Japan, in 1999 and identified by neutralization tests as Peaton (PEA) viruses. Before this study, PEA virus had been isolated in Australia only. The nucleotide identity of the nucleocapsid (N) protein encoded by the S segment ranged from 91.1 to 91.6% between the Australian and Japanese strains. A phylogenetic analysis of the N protein sequence revealed that the PEA virus strains are closely related to Aino (AIN) virus and suggested reassortment events for PEA and AIN viruses.

  19. Multiple sclerosis: the elevated antibody response to Epstein-Barr virus primarily targets, but is not confined to, the glycine-alanine repeat of Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruprecht, Klemens; Wunderlich, Benjamin; Gieß, René; Meyer, Petra; Loebel, Madlen; Lenz, Klaus; Hofmann, Jörg; Rosche, Berit; Wengert, Oliver; Paul, Friedemann; Reimer, Ulf; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2014-07-15

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) have elevated antibodies against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), but data on the epitope-resolved specificity of these antibodies are scarce. Using a peptide microarray containing 1465 peptides representing 8 full-length EBV proteins, we identified higher (p<0.001) antibody reactivities to 39 EBV-peptides in MS patients (n=29) compared to healthy controls (n=22). Seventeen of the 39 peptides were from EBNA-1 and 13 located within the glycine-alanine repeat of EBNA-1. Further reactivities were directed against EBNA-3, EBNA-4, EBNA-6, VP26, and LMP1. Thus, antibodies against EBV in MS patients primarily target, but are not confined to, the glycine-alanine repeat of EBNA-1. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Isolation of Borna Disease Virus from Human Brain Tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Yurie; Takahashi, Hirokazu; Shoya, Yuko; Nakaya, Takaaki; Watanabe, Makiko; Tomonaga, Keizo; Iwahashi, Kazuhiko; Ameno, Kiyoshi; Momiyama, Noriko; Taniyama, Hiroyuka; Sata, Tetsutaro; Kurata, Takeshi; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi

    2000-01-01

    Serological and molecular epidemiological studies indicate that Borna disease virus (BDV) can infect humans and is possibly associated with certain neuropsychiatric disorders. We examined brain tissue collected at autopsy from four schizophrenic patients and two healthy controls for the presence of BDV markers in 12 different brain regions. BDV RNA and antigen was detected in four brain regions of a BDV-seropositive schizophrenic patient (P2) with a very recent (2 years) onset of disease. BDV markers exhibited a regionally localized distribution. BDV RNA was found in newborn Mongolian gerbils intracranially inoculated with homogenates from BDV-positive brain regions of P2. Human oligodendroglia (OL) cells inoculated with brain homogenates from BDV-positive gerbils allowed propagation and isolation of BDVHuP2br, a human brain-derived BDV. Virus isolation was also possible by transfection of Vero cells with ribonucleoprotein complexes prepared from BDV-positive human and gerbil brain tissues. BDVHuP2br was genetically closely related to but distinct from previously reported human- and animal-derived BDV sequences. PMID:10775596

  1. Isolation of Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus from a Horse with Neurological Disease in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Roberta; Costa, Erica Azevedo; Marques, Rafael Elias; Oliveira, Taismara Simas; Furtini, Ronaldo; Bomfim, Maria Rosa Quaresma; Teixeira, Mauro Martins; Paixão, Tatiane Alves; Santos, Renato Lima

    2013-01-01

    St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) is a causative agent of encephalitis in humans in the Western hemisphere. SLEV is a positive-sense RNA virus that belongs to the Flavivirus genus, which includes West Nile encephalitis virus, Japanese encephalitis virus, Dengue virus and other medically important viruses. Recently, we isolated a SLEV strain from the brain of a horse with neurological signs in the countryside of Minas Gerais, Brazil. The SLEV isolation was confirmed by reverse-transcription RT-PCR and sequencing of the E protein gene. Virus identity was also confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence using commercial antibodies against SLEV. To characterize this newly isolated strain in vivo, serial passages in newborn mice were performed and led to hemorrhagic manifestations associated with recruitment of inflammatory cells into the central nervous system of newborns. In summary this is the first isolation of SLEV from a horse with neurological signs in Brazil. PMID:24278489

  2. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, Retno; SahBandar, Ivo N.; Theelen, Bart; Hagen, Ferry; Poot, Ge; Meis, Jacques F.; Rozalyani, Anna; Sjam, Ridhawati; Widodo, Djoko; Djauzi, Samsuridjal; Boekhout, Teun

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavueonazole and

  3. Candida nivariensis isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient suffering from oropharyngeal candidiasis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wahyuningsih, R.; SahBandar, IN; Theelen, B.; Hagen, F.; Poot, G.; Meis, J.F.; Rozalyani, A.; Sjam, R.; Widodo, D.; Djauzi, S.; Boekhout, T.

    2008-01-01

    Candida nivariensis was isolated from an Indonesian human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient who suffered from oropharyngeal candidiasis and was identified with molecular tools. Our isolate demonstrated low MICs to amphotericin B, flucytosine, posaconazole, caspofungin, and isavuconazole and

  4. Atypical myxomatosis--virus isolation, experimental infection of rabbits and restriction endonuclease analysis of the isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psikal, I; Smíd, B; Rodák, L; Valícek, L; Bendová, J

    2003-08-01

    Atypical form of myxomatosis, which caused non-lethal and clinically mild disease in domestic rabbits 1 month after immunization with a commercially available vaccine MXT, is described. The isolated myxoma virus designated as Litovel 2 (Li-2) did not induce systemic disease following subcutaneous and intradermal applications in susceptible experimental rabbits but led to the immune response demonstrated by ELISA. No severe disease was induced in those Li-2 inoculated rabbits by challenge with the virulent strains Lausanne (Lu) or Sanar (SA), while the control animals showed nodular form of myxomatosis with lethal course of the illness. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of genomic DNA with KpnI and BamHI endonucleases was used for genetic characterization of the Li-2 isolate, the vaccine strain MXT and both virulent strains Lu and SA, respectively. In general, RFLP analysis has shown to be informative for inferring genetic relatedness between myxoma viruses. Based on restriction endonuclease DNA fragment size distribution, it was evident that the pathogenic strain SA is genetically related to the reference strain Lu and the isolate Li-2 is more related, but not identical, to the vaccination strain MXT.

  5. Isolation of a novel swine influenza virus from Oklahoma in 2011 which is distantly related to human influenza C viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D; Webby, Richard J; Simonson, Randy R; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution.

  6. Isolation of a Novel Swine Influenza Virus from Oklahoma in 2011 Which Is Distantly Related to Human Influenza C Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M.; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A.; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D.; Webby, Richard J.; Simonson, Randy R.; Li, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution. PMID:23408893

  7. Identification of virus isolates inducing mosaic of sugarcane in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sugarcane mosaic disease caused by sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and sorghum mosaic Virus (SrMV) is an economically important viral disease of sugarcane worldwide. Field survey was conducted to assess the presence of the viruses involve in ...

  8. Genetic characterization of epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus strains isolated from cattle in Israel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV), an Orbivirus not previously reported in Israel, was isolated from Israeli cattle during a “bluetongue like” disease outbreak in 2006. To ascertain the origin of this new virus, three isolates from the outbreak were fully sequenced and compared with availab...

  9. Studies on antigenic and genomic properties of Brazilian rabies virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaefer, R.; Batista, H.B.; Franco, A.C.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Roehe, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Despite the recognized stability of rabies virus, differences among isolates from different species have been found. This work was carried out with the aim to identify antigenic and genomic differences in Brazilian rabies virus isolates and to verify whether such alterations would bear any

  10. Genome Sequence Conservation of Hendra Virus Isolates during Spillover to Horses, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Shawn; Foord, Adam; Hansson, Eric; Davies, Kelly; Wright, Lynda; Morrissy, Chris; Halpin, Kim; Middleton, Deborah; Field, Hume E.; Daniels, Peter; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2010-01-01

    Bat-to-horse transmission of Hendra virus has occurred at least 14 times. Although clinical signs in horses have differed, genome sequencing has demonstrated little variation among the isolates. Our sequencing of 5 isolates from recent Hendra virus outbreaks in horses found no correlation between sequences and time or geographic location of outbreaks. PMID:21029540

  11. Extensive sequence divergence among bovine respiratory syncytial viruses isolated during recurrent outbreaks in closed herds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Tjørnehøj, Kirsten; Viuff, B.

    2000-01-01

    The nucleotides coding for the extracellular part of the G glycoprotein and the full SH protein of bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) were sequenced from viruses isolated from numerous outbreaks of BRSV infection. The isolates included viruses isolated from the same herd (closed dairy farms......, however, the most likely explanation was that BRSV was (re)introduced into the herd prior to each new outbreak These findings are highly relevant for the understanding of the transmission patterns of BRSV among calves and human respiratory syncytial virus among humans....... and veal calf production units) in different years and from all confirmed outbreaks in Denmark within a short period. The results showed that identical viruses were isolated within a herd during outbreaks and that viruses from recurrent infections varied by up to 11% in sequence even in closed herds...

  12. Genetic characterization of Aleutian mink disease viruses isolated in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwu; Huang, Juan; Jia, Yun; Du, Yijun; Jiang, Ping; Zhang, Rui

    2012-08-01

    Aleutian mink disease virus (AMDV) is a parvovirus that causes an immune complex mediated disease in minks. To understand the genetic characterization of AMDV in China, the genomic sequences of three isolates, ADV-LN1, ADV-LN2, and ADV-LN3, from different farms in the Northern China were analyzed. The results showed that the lengths of genomic sequences of three isolates were 4,543, 4,566, and 4,566 bp, respectively. They shared only 95.5-96.3 % nucleotide identity with each other. The nucleotide and amino acid homology of genome sequence between the Chinese isolates and European or American strains (ADV-G, ADV-Utah1, and ADV-SL3) were 92.4-95.0 % and 92.1-93.8 %, respectively. The amino acid substitutions randomly distributed in the genome, especially NS gene. ADV-LN1 strain had a 9-amino-acid deletion at amino acid positions 70 and 72-79 in the VP1 gene, comparing with ADV-G strain; ADV-LN2 and ADV-LN3 strains had 1-amino-acid deletion at amino acid positions 70 in the VP1. Some potential glycosylation site mutations in VP and NS genes were also observed. Phylogenetic analysis results showed that the three strains belonged to two different branches based on the complete coding sequence of VP2 gene. However, they all were in the same group together with the strains from United States based on the NS1 sequence. It indicated that Chinese AMDV isolates had genetic diversity. The origin of the ancestors of the Chinese AMDV strains might be associated with the American strains.

  13. Genetic characterization of H5N1 influenza A viruses isolated from zoo tigers in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amonsin, Alongkorn; Payungporn, Sunchai; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Thanawongnuwech, Roongroje; Suradhat, Sanipa; Pariyothorn, Nuananong; Tantilertcharoen, Rachod; Damrongwantanapokin, Sudarat; Buranathai, Chantanee; Chaisingh, Arunee; Songserm, Thaweesak; Poovorawan, Yong

    2006-01-20

    The H5N1 avian influenza virus outbreak among zoo tigers in mid-October 2004, with 45 animals dead, indicated that the avian influenza virus could cause lethal infection in a large mammalian species apart from humans. In this outbreak investigation, six H5N1 isolates were identified and two isolates (A/Tiger/Thailand/CU-T3/04 and A/Tiger/Thailand/CU-T7/04) were selected for whole genome analysis. Phylogenetic analysis of the 8 gene segments showed that the viruses clustered within the lineage of H5N1 avian isolates from Thailand and Vietnam. The hemagglutinin (HA) gene of the viruses displayed polybasic amino acids at the cleavage site, identical to those of the 2004 H5N1 isolates, which by definition are highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI). In addition, sequence analyses revealed that the viruses isolated from tigers harbored few genetic changes compared with the viruses having infected chicken, humans, tigers and a leopard isolated from the early 2004 H5N1 outbreaks. Sequence analyses also showed that the tiger H5N1 isolated in October 2004 was more closely related to the chicken H5N1 isolated in July than that from January. Interestingly, all the 6 tiger H5N1 isolates contained a lysine substitution at position 627 of the PB2 protein similar to the human, but distinct from the original avian isolates.

  14. Isolation of cytopathic small round virus (Aichi virus) from Pakistani children and Japanese travelers from Southeast Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, T; Sakae, K; Kobayashi, S; Ishihara, Y; Miyake, T; Mubina, A; Isomura, S

    1995-01-01

    Aichi virus was isolated in Vero cells from 5 (2.3%) of 222 Pakistani children with gastroenteritis but none was found in 91 healthy children. Aichi virus was also isolated from 5 (0.7%) of 722 Japanese travelers returned from tours to Southeast Asian countries and complained of gastrointestinal symptoms at the quarantine station of Nagoya International Airport in Japan. Of 5 Japanese travelers, 3 were returning from Indonesia, and 2 from Thailand or Malaysia. These results indicate that Aichi virus or a similar agent is endemic in Southeast Asian countries and is a cause of gastrointestinal symptoms in children in these areas or in Japanese travelers who visit there.

  15. Vesicular exanthema of swine virus: isolation and serotyping of field samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Edwards, J F; Yedloutschnig, R J; Dardiri, A H; Callis, J. J.

    1987-01-01

    Virus isolation was attempted from 262 field samples of vesicular material collected during the outbreaks of vesicular exanthema of swine in the U.S.A. from 1952-54. Using primary swine kidney culture, viral cytopathogenic agents were isolated from 76.3% of the samples. However, an overall recovery rate of 82.1% was obtained after samples negative in tissue culture were inoculated intradermally in susceptible swine. All vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolates were identified as serotype B...

  16. Detection and tentative grouping of Strawberry crinkle virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klerks, M.M.; Lindner, J.L.; Vasková, D.; Spak, J.; Thompson, J.R.; Jelkmann, W.; Schoen, C.D.

    2004-01-01

    A partial sequence of the putative polymerase (L) protein of Strawberry crinkle virus (SCV), genus Cytorhabdovirus, is described. The virus protein was found to be distantly related to the L protein of the rhabdoviruses Northern cereal mosaic virus, Rice yellow stunt virus and Sonchus yellow net

  17. Detection, isolation, and persistence of viruses within bivalve mollusks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norovirus (NV), hepatitis A virus (HAV), and other virus transmission by molluscan shellfish is a significant issue. Research at the ARS-Dover DE laboratory has led to the development of improved methods for detecting these viruses. To identify pathogenic viruses within mollusks, a rapid highly-se...

  18. Rabies virus isolates of India - simultaneous existence of two distinct evolutionary lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, R V Chandrasekhar; Mohana Subramanian, B; Surendra, K S N L; Babu, R P Aravindh; Rana, S K; Manjari, K Sunitha; Srinivasan, V A

    2014-10-01

    Rabies is a fatal viral disease of serious public health implication. The disease is enzootic in India. In the present study, thirty six rabies virus isolates were obtained from terrestrial mammals of India during 2002-2012. Ecto-domain coding region of the glycoprotein gene from all the isolates were sequenced and the phylogenetic analysis was performed in relation to the global rabies and rabies related virus isolates. The Indian isolates grouped into two distinctly separate lineages with majority of the Indian isolates in Arctic like 1 lineage and the remaining isolates in sub-continental lineage. Isolates of the two distinct lineages were identified simultaneously from the same geographical region. Time scaled phylogenetic tree indicated that the sub-continental lineage of the virus is one of the earliest clade of rabies virus that diverged from bat rabies virus. On the contrary, the Arctic-like 1 lineage of India appeared to be a more recent divergence event. The amino acid sequence comparison revealed that all the major antigenic sites were almost conserved among the Indian isolates whereas few amino acid variations could be identified around site IIa, minor site I and IV. The dN/dS study based on G ecto-domain is in support of the earlier reports of strong purifying selection. In conclusion, it is evident that the Indian rabies virus isolates are of two major distinct lineages with distant phylogenetic and evolutionary relationship. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficient method to isolate and purify viruses of bacteria from marine environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemb, O; Urios, L; Coetsier, C; Lebaron, P

    2008-07-01

    To isolate viruses of specific heterotrophic bacterial strains from marine environments using a host addition/virus amplification protocol (HAVAP) for use in phage/host systems. Bacteria-free seawater samples containing natural viruses assemblages were inoculated with a single laboratory grown bacterial host of interest in a nutrient-enriched [peptone, Fe(III) and yeast extract] seawater suspension. These conditions enhanced the replication of only those virus(s) capable of infecting the host bacterium. After incubation, free viruses were recovered at concentrations ranging 10(5)-10(10) infectious virus particles per ml of seawater. Using this approach, 15 viruses were isolated and represented 12 unique phage/host systems. Two of the hosts tested were infected by more than one virus. Isolation of high concentrations of specific viruses is possible even if their initial concentrations in native waters are low. This approach allows the recovery of phage/host systems that may not be numerically dominant. This host enrichment protocol for virus detection and isolation is well-suited for aquatic viral ecology studies that require phage/host systems.

  20. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  1. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, J A; Plante, J A; Plante, K S; Young, E F; McGowan, E; Gallichotte, E N; Widman, D G; Heise, M T; de Silva, A M; Baric, R S

    2016-07-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV) infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73%) failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9%) levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV. ZIKV is an emerging arbovirus that has been associated with severe neurological birth defects and fetal loss in pregnant women and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. Currently, there is no vaccine or therapeutic for ZIKV. The identification of a class of antibodies (envelope

  2. Genetic heterogeneity and subtyping of human Hepatitis E virus isolates from Uruguay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirazo, Santiago; Ramos, Natalia; Russi, José Carlos; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection is an important public health concern in many developing countries causing waterborne outbreaks, as well as sporadic autochthonous hepatitis. It is transmitted primarily by the fecal-oral route. However, zoonotic transmission from animal reservoirs to human has also been suggested. Genotype 3 is the most frequent genotype found in South America and the HEV epidemiology in this region seems to be very complex. However, data about the molecular characterization of HEV isolates of the region is still lacking and further investigation is needed. Our study characterized human HEV strains detected in a 1-year period in Uruguay, by extensive sequence analysis of three regions of the HEV genome. Uruguayan strains were closely related to a set of European strains and in turn, were dissimilar to Brazilian, Argentinean and Bolivian isolates. Additionally, the co-circulation of viral subtypes 3i and 3h was observed. Circulation of subtype 3i had been reported in Argentina and Bolivia whereas sequences of subtype 3h are rare and had never been reported in Latin America. In order to contribute to shedding light over the molecular epidemiology of this emergent infection in the region, we thoroughly analyzed the genetic variability of HEV strains detected in Uruguay, providing the largest dataset of sequences of HEV ever reported in a country in South America. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Isolation of a phylogenetically distinct rabies virus from a tufted capuchin monkey (Cebus apella) in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Yuki; Sugimoto, Kahori; Mochizuki, Nobuyuki; Segawa, Takao; Itou, Takuya; Carvalho, Adolorata A B; Nociti, Darci P; Mello, Rosane M; Santos, Anna K R A; Ito, Fumio H; Sakai, Takeo

    2013-12-26

    A rabies virus isolate (BRmk1358 strain) was discovered from a rabid tufted capuchin monkey in Brazil. The present study determined the nucleotide sequence of the BRmk1358 strain and compared with the rabies viruses isolated from marmosets and other animals in the Americas. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the BRmk1358 strain formed a lineage distant from that of marmoset rabies virus within the Chiroptera-related rabies virus cluster. This result suggests that the source of rabies infection in the tufted capuchin monkey may have been bat, and that they have a risk to act as rabies reservoir in Brazil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Isolation of influenza A virus from wild birds in western part of Mongolia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchenko, V Iu; Alekseev, A Iu; Susloparov, I M; Sharshov, K A; Il'inykh, F A; Zolotykh, S I; Shestopalov, A M; Tserennorov, D; Abmed, D; Drozdov, I G; Otgonbaatar, D

    2010-01-01

    To study circulation of influenza A viruses in western part of Mongolia. Isolation and characterization of influenza viruses was performed according to recommendations of WHO. Circulation of influenza A viruses subtypes H3N6, H4N6, H1N1, H13N8 in different wild bird species in western part of Mongolia was documented. Taxonomic and ecologic heterogeneity of bird species involved in continuous circulation of influenza A viruses was revealed. Subtype H13N8 was isolated for a first time from herring gull on territory of western Mongolia.

  5. High similarity between isolates of pepino mosaic virus suggests a common origin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, J.Th.J.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.; Roenhorst, J.W.

    2003-01-01

    The almost simultaneous outbreaks of Pepino mosaic virus in tomato crops in different European and non-European countries, was reason to have a closer look at the relationship between these isolates and the original isolate from pepino. Fifteen isolates from tomato from different locations and the

  6. Avian influenza virus isolation, propagation and titration in embryonated chicken eggs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avian influenza (AI) virus is usually isolated, propagated, and titrated in embryonated chickens eggs (ECE). Most any sample type can be accommodated for culture with appropriate processing. Isolation may also be accomplished in cell culture particularly if mammalian lineage isolates are suspected, ...

  7. The isolation of Gurnbiro virus from larvae and darkling Ivelles (Carcinops pumilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lies Parede

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Gumboro (infectious bursal disease, IBD virus was isolated from darkling beetles (Carrinaps pumilin and their larvae in a commercial pulletchicken farm with repeated outbreaks incidence of Gumboro disease in Tangertng, West Java. In addition, these over populated beetles and their larvae were suspected to be infected and then shed the virus or acted as vectors. Isolation was done by repeated passages of virus using chicken embryo fibroblast cells as prime media, which then showed the evidence of cylop: ihic effecis. The isolation was followed by antigen detection by means of ELISA test.

  8. Novel Viruses Isolated from Mosquitoes in Pantanal, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Solberg, Owen; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Nogueira, Rita Maria; Langevin, Stanley; Komar, Nicholas

    2016-11-03

    Genomic sequences are described from five novel viruses and divergent strains of Brejeira and Guaico Culex viruses from mosquitoes collected in Pantanal, Brazil, in 2010. Copyright © 2016 Pauvolid-Corrêa et al.

  9. Isolation of Tacaribe virus, a Caribbean arenavirus, from host-seeking Amblyomma americanum ticks in Florida.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine A Sayler

    Full Text Available Arenaviridae are a family of single stranded RNA viruses of mammals and boid snakes. Twenty-nine distinct mammalian arenaviruses have been identified, many of which cause severe hemorrhagic disease in humans, particularly in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and in Central and South America. Humans typically become infected with an arenavirus through contact with excreta from infected rodents. Tacaribe virus (TCRV is an arenavirus that was first isolated from bats and mosquitoes during a rabies surveillance survey conducted in Trinidad from 1956 to 1958. Tacaribe virus is unusual because it has never been associated with a rodent host and since that one time isolation, the virus has not been isolated from any vertebrate or invertebrate hosts. We report the re-isolation of the virus from a pool of 100 host-seeking Amblyomma americanum (lone star ticks collected in a Florida state park in 2012. TCRV was isolated in two cell lines and its complete genome was sequenced. The tick-derived isolate is nearly identical to the only remaining isolate from Trinidad (TRVL-11573, with 99.6% nucleotide identity across the genome. A quantitative RT-PCR assay was developed to test for viral RNA in host-seeking ticks collected from 3 Florida state parks. Virus RNA was detected in 56/500 (11.2% of surveyed ticks. As this virus was isolated from ticks that parasitize humans, the ability of the tick to transmit the virus to people should be evaluated. Furthermore, reservoir hosts for the virus need to be identified in order to develop risk assessment models of human infection.

  10. Isolation of Tacaribe virus, a Caribbean arenavirus, from host-seeking Amblyomma americanum ticks in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Katherine A; Barbet, Anthony F; Chamberlain, Casey; Clapp, William L; Alleman, Rick; Loeb, Julia C; Lednicky, John A

    2014-01-01

    Arenaviridae are a family of single stranded RNA viruses of mammals and boid snakes. Twenty-nine distinct mammalian arenaviruses have been identified, many of which cause severe hemorrhagic disease in humans, particularly in parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and in Central and South America. Humans typically become infected with an arenavirus through contact with excreta from infected rodents. Tacaribe virus (TCRV) is an arenavirus that was first isolated from bats and mosquitoes during a rabies surveillance survey conducted in Trinidad from 1956 to 1958. Tacaribe virus is unusual because it has never been associated with a rodent host and since that one time isolation, the virus has not been isolated from any vertebrate or invertebrate hosts. We report the re-isolation of the virus from a pool of 100 host-seeking Amblyomma americanum (lone star ticks) collected in a Florida state park in 2012. TCRV was isolated in two cell lines and its complete genome was sequenced. The tick-derived isolate is nearly identical to the only remaining isolate from Trinidad (TRVL-11573), with 99.6% nucleotide identity across the genome. A quantitative RT-PCR assay was developed to test for viral RNA in host-seeking ticks collected from 3 Florida state parks. Virus RNA was detected in 56/500 (11.2%) of surveyed ticks. As this virus was isolated from ticks that parasitize humans, the ability of the tick to transmit the virus to people should be evaluated. Furthermore, reservoir hosts for the virus need to be identified in order to develop risk assessment models of human infection.

  11. Molecular characterization of a Bean yellow mosaic virus isolate from Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Al-Khalaf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV, genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae was studied by comparing sequences from the coat protein (CP gene of a Syrian isolate with sequences of six other isolates from the NCBI database. A homology tree of the CP sequences was developed using DNAMAN Software. BYMV isolates were grouped into two clusters of which the first comprised the Syrian isolate together with the Indian, Australian and Japanese isolates, and the second the BYMV isolates from China, the Netherlands and the USA. Moreover, the homology tree showed that the Syrian isolate was very close to the Indian one, with 99% homology.

  12. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristi L. Koenig

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Barre Syndrome has led to a World Health Organization declaration of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. Zika virus is a vector-borne disease transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Male to female sexual transmission has been reported and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusions. After an incubation period of 2-7 days, symptomatic patients develop rapid onset fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, often associated with headache and myalgias. Emergency department (ED personnel must be prepared to address concerns from patients presenting with symptoms consistent with acute Zika virus infection, especially those who are pregnant or planning travel to Zika-endemic regions, as well as those women planning to become pregnant and their partners. The identify-isolate-inform (3I tool, originally conceived for initial detection and management of Ebola virus disease patients in the ED, and later adjusted for measles and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, can be adapted for real-time use for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I tool for initial detection and management of patients under investigation for Zika virus. Following an assessment of epidemiologic risk, including travel to countries with mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, patients are further investigated if clinically indicated. If after a rapid evaluation, Zika or other

  13. Identify-Isolate-Inform: A Tool for Initial Detection and Management of Zika Virus Patients in the Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Kristi L; Almadhyan, Abdulmajeed; Burns, Michael J

    2016-05-01

    First isolated in 1947 from a monkey in the Zika forest in Uganda, and from mosquitoes in the same forest the following year, Zika virus has gained international attention due to concerns for infection in pregnant women potentially causing fetal microcephaly. More than one million people have been infected since the appearance of the virus in Brazil in 2015. Approximately 80% of infected patients are asymptomatic. An association with microcephaly and other birth defects as well as Guillain-Barre Syndrome has led to a World Health Organization declaration of Zika virus as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern in February 2016. Zika virus is a vector-borne disease transmitted primarily by the Aedes aegypti mosquito. Male to female sexual transmission has been reported and there is potential for transmission via blood transfusions. After an incubation period of 2-7 days, symptomatic patients develop rapid onset fever, maculopapular rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, often associated with headache and myalgias. Emergency department (ED) personnel must be prepared to address concerns from patients presenting with symptoms consistent with acute Zika virus infection, especially those who are pregnant or planning travel to Zika-endemic regions, as well as those women planning to become pregnant and their partners. The identify-isolate-inform (3I) tool, originally conceived for initial detection and management of Ebola virus disease patients in the ED, and later adjusted for measles and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, can be adapted for real-time use for any emerging infectious disease. This paper reports a modification of the 3I tool for initial detection and management of patients under investigation for Zika virus. Following an assessment of epidemiologic risk, including travel to countries with mosquitoes that transmit Zika virus, patients are further investigated if clinically indicated. If after a rapid evaluation, Zika or other arthropod

  14. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Swanstrom

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73% failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9% levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV.

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a Dengue Virus Serotype 4 Strain Isolated in Roraima, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Victor C.; Silva, George A. V.; Maito, Rodrigo M.; Granja, Fabiana; Siqueira, Thalita; Acosta, Pablo O. A.

    2012-01-01

    Dengue is the most important arboviral disease worldwide. We report the complete genome sequence of a dengue virus serotype 4, genotype II strain isolated in 2010 from a patient with classical dengue fever in Boa Vista, Roraima, Brazil. PMID:22247521

  16. Characterization of a natural Plum pox virus isolate bearing a truncated coat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szathmáry, Erzsébet; Nádudvari, Júlia Novák; Szabó, László; Tóbiás, István; Balázs, Ervin; Palkovics, László

    2009-01-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates were collected in Hungary from plum varieties. PCR targeting the 3' genomic region resulted in a shorter PCR product in the case of the B1298 isolate bearing a 135-nucleotide deletion in frame in the N-terminal part of the coat protein (CP). The isolate was aphid-transmissible and the virion diameter was reduced compared to PPV-SK68. Detectability of this isolate by Western blot varied according to the antibody used. Integration of the deleted CP gene into an infectious PPV clone had no effect on infectivity and symptomatology. In competition experiments, B1298 had a considerable advantage in virus accumulation.

  17. Properties of two Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus isolates obtained from the microbial pesticide Gypchek

    Science.gov (United States)

    James M. Slavicek; John Podgwaite; Carita. Lanner-Herrera

    1992-01-01

    Two Lymantria dispar nuclear polyhedrosis virus isolates, 5-6 and A2-1, differing in the phenotypic characteristic of the number of viral occlusions in infected cells, were obtained from a production lot of the microbial pesticide Gypchek and several of their replication properties were investigated and compared. Budded virus titer produced in cell...

  18. Impact of eight isolates of Rice Yellow Mottle Virus (RYMV) from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In resistant cultivars, Gigante, Lac 23, Morobérékan and Faro 11, virus content and yield reduction varied respectively from 0.03 to 0.188 and 5 to 17%. The lowest virus content and yield reduction was observed with the isolate 7 from upland rice. The significant difference in the interaction observed between the different ...

  19. Genetic analysis of influenza B viruses isolated in Uganda during the 2009–2010 seasons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byarugaba Denis K

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza B viruses can cause morbidity and mortality in humans but due to the lack of an animal reservoir are not associated with pandemics. Because of this, there is relatively limited genetic sequences available for influenza B viruses, especially from developing countries. Complete genome analysis of one influenza B virus and several gene segments of other influenza B viruses isolated from Uganda from May 2009 through December 2010 was therefore undertaken in this study. Methods Samples were collected from patients showing influenza like illness and screened for influenza A and B by PCR. Influenza B viruses were isolated on Madin-Darby Canine Kidney cells and selected isolates were subsequently sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. Findings Of the 2,089 samples collected during the period, 292 were positive by PCR for influenza A or B; 12.3% of the PCR positives were influenza B. Thirty influenza B viruses were recovered and of these 25 that grew well consistently on subculture were subjected to further analysis. All the isolates belonged to the B/Victoria-lineage as identified by hemagglutination inhibition assay and genetic analysis except one isolate that grouped with the B-Yamagata-lineage. The Ugandan B/Victoria-lineage isolates grouped in clade 1 which was defined by the N75K, N165K and S172P substitutions in hemagglutinin (HA protein clustered together with the B/Brisbane/60/2008 vaccine strain. The Yamagata-like Ugandan strain, B/Uganda/MUWRP-053/2009, clustered with clade 3 Yamagata viruses such as B/Bangladesh/3333/2007 which is characterized by S150I and N166Y substitutions in HA. Conclusion In general there was limited variation among the Ugandan isolates but they were interestingly closer to viruses from West and North Africa than from neighboring Kenya. Our isolates closely matched the World Health Organization recommended vaccines for the seasons.

  20. Coding Complete Genome for the Mogiana Tick Virus, a Jingmenvirus Isolated from Ticks in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-04

    Coding Complete Genome for the Mogiana Tick virus, a Jingmenvirus isolated from ticks in Brazil Erika C Villaa, Sandra R Maruyamab, Isabel KF de...Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil Abstract Mogiana tick virus (MGTV) is a segmented Jingmenvirus isolated in 2011 from cattle ticks in Brazil . Here, we...Rhipicephalus microplus) collected from Holstein bulls in Ribeirão Preto, state of São Paulo, Brazil (2). MGTV was one of the earliest

  1. Isolation of Madre de Dios Virus (Orthobunyavirus; Bunyaviridae), an Oropouche Virus Species Reassortant, from a Monkey in Venezuela

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Hernandez, Rosa; Auguste, Albert J.; Tesh, Robert B.; Weaver, Scott C.; Montañez, Humberto; Liria, Jonathan; Lima, Anderson; da Rosa, Jorge Fernando Soares Travassos; da Silva, Sandro P.; Vasconcelos, Janaina M.; Oliveira, Rodrigo; Vianez, João L. S. G.; Nunes, Marcio R. T.

    2016-01-01

    Oropouche virus (OROV), genus Orthobunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae, is an important cause of human illness in tropical South America. Herein, we report the isolation, complete genome sequence, genetic characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of an OROV species reassortant, Madre de Dios virus (MDDV), obtained from a sick monkey (Cebus olivaceus Schomburgk) collected in a forest near Atapirire, a small rural village located in Anzoategui State, Venezuela. MDDV is one of a growing number of naturally occurring OROV species reassortants isolated in South America and was known previously only from southern Peru. PMID:27215299

  2. Molecular characterisation of virulence graded field isolates of myxoma virus

    OpenAIRE

    Parra Francisco; Alonso Jose; Baragaño Aroa; Nicieza Ines; Dalton Kevin P

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Myxoma virus (MV) has been endemic in Europe since shortly after its deliberate release in France in 1952. While the emergence of more resistant hosts and more transmissible and attenuated virus is well documented, there have been relatively few studies focused on the sequence changes incurred by the virus as it has adapted to its new host. In order to identify regions of variability within the MV genome to be used for phylogenetic studies and to try to investigate causes ...

  3. Isolation and characterization of a virus infecting the freshwater algae Chrysochromulina parva

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirza, S.F. [Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6 (Canada); Staniewski, M.A. [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3B2 (Canada); Short, C.M. [Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6 (Canada); Long, A.M. [Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3B2 (Canada); Chaban, Y.V. [Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6 (Canada); Short, S.M., E-mail: steven.short@utoronto.ca [Department of Biology, University of Toronto Mississauga, 3359 Mississauga Road, Mississauga, Ontario, Canada L5L 1C6 (Canada); Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 25 Willcocks Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3B2 (Canada)

    2015-12-15

    Water samples from Lake Ontario, Canada were tested for lytic activity against the freshwater haptophyte algae Chrysochromulina parva. A filterable lytic agent was isolated and identified as a virus via transmission electron microscopy and molecular methods. The virus, CpV-BQ1, is icosahedral, ca. 145 nm in diameter, assembled within the cytoplasm, and has a genome size of ca. 485 kb. Sequences obtained through PCR-amplification of DNA polymerase (polB) genes clustered among sequences from the family Phycodnaviridae, whereas major capsid protein (MCP) sequences clustered among sequences from either the Phycodnaviridae or Mimiviridae. Based on quantitative molecular assays, C. parva's abundance in Lake Ontario was relatively stable, yet CpV-BQ1's abundance was variable suggesting complex virus-host dynamics. This study demonstrates that CpV-BQ1 is a member of the proposed order Megavirales with characteristics of both phycodnaviruses and mimiviruses indicating that, in addition to its complex ecological dynamics, it also has a complex evolutionary history. - Highlights: • A virus infecting the algae C. parva was isolated from Lake Ontario. • Virus characteristics demonstrated that this novel virus is an NCLDV. • The virus's polB sequence suggests taxonomic affiliation with the Phycodnaviridae. • The virus's capsid protein sequences also suggest Mimiviridae ancestry. • Surveys of host and virus natural abundances revealed complex host–virus dynamics.

  4. CPm gene diversity in field isolates of Citrus tristeza virus from Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveros-Garay, Oscar Arturo; Martinez-Salazar, Natalhie; Torres-Ruiz, Yanneth; Acosta, Orlando

    2009-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence diversity of the CPm gene from 28 field isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) was assessed by SSCP and sequence analyses. These isolates showed two major shared haplotypes, which differed in distribution: A1 was the major haplotype in 23 isolates from different geographic regions, whereas R1 was found in isolates from a discrete region. Phylogenetic reconstruction clustered A1 within an independent group, while R1 was grouped with mild isolates T30 from Florida and T385 from Spain. Some isolates contained several minor haplotypes, which were very similar to, and associated with, the major haplotype.

  5. Isolates of Citrus tristeza virus that overcome Poncirus trifoliata resistance comprise a novel strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, S J; Dawson, T E; Pearson, M N

    2010-04-01

    The economically important rootstock species Poncirus trifoliata is resistant to most isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), but not to members of the CTV resistance-breaking (RB) strain presently found in New Zealand. In this study, five known and suspected RB isolates were separated from field mixtures, and their genomes were sequenced in full. It was found that the RB isolates are members of a single phylogenetically distinct clade with an average of 90.3% genomic nucleotide sequence identity to the closest extant isolate, T36. These isolates also show evidence of multiple recombination events throughout their evolutionary history, with T36, T30 and VT-like isolates, and with each other. Finally, the genomic sequences of these isolates show that several genes contain unique polymorphisms that may or may not be involved in overcoming resistance. These data will aid in the understanding of host-virus interactions, and the mechanism of resistance in P. trifoliata.

  6. Diversity of viruses of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Aeropyrum, and isolation of the Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1, the first representative of the family Clavaviridae

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Tanaka, Reiji; Forterre, Patrick; Sako, Yoshihiko; Prangishvili, David

    2010-01-01

    We have surveyed the morphological diversity of viruses infecting the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, the most thermophilic species among aerobic organisms, growing optimally at 90 degrees C, and isolated...

  7. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  8. Isolations of Bwamba virus from south central Uganda and north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Bwamba virus (Genus Bunyavirus, family Bunyaviridae) is widely distributed in Africa. It causes many unidentified fevers because of its benign nature. Objectives: Samples of blood from patients were received at Uganda Virus Research Institute for diagnosis and confirmation of infections. Mosquito collections ...

  9. Characterization of cucumber mosaic virus isolated from yam ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Millions of people in the West African sub-region depend on yam for food and income. In 2008, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), one of the most economically important plant viruses was detected in yam fields in Ghana, Benin and Togo, three of the five topmost yam producing countries in the world. Some strains of CMV are ...

  10. Coat protein sequence shows that Cucumber mosaic virus isolate ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A viral disease was identified on geraniums (Pelargonium spp.) grown in a greenhouse at the Institute of Himalayan Bioresource Technology (IHBT), Palampur, exhibiting mild mottling and stunting. The causal virus (Cucumber mosaic virus, CMV) was identified and characterized on the basis of host range, aphid ...

  11. Phylogenetic analysis of Croatian orf viruses isolated from sheep and goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetnic Zeljko

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Orf virus (ORFV is the prototype of the parapoxvirus genus and it primarily causes contagious ecthyma in goats, sheep, and other ruminants worldwide. In this paper, we described the sequence and phylogenetic analysis of the B2L gene of ORFV from two natural outbreaks: i in autochthonous Croatian Cres-breed sheep and ii on small family goat farm. Results Sequence and phylogenetic analyses of the ORFV B2L gene showed that the Cro-Cres-12446/09 and Cro-Goat-11727/10 were not clustered together. Cro-Cres-12446/09 shared the highest similarity with ORFV NZ2 from New Zealand, and Ena from Japan; Cro-Goat-11727/10 was closest to the HuB from China and Taiping and Hoping from Taiwan. Conclusion Distinct ORFV strains are circulating in Croatia. Although ORFV infections are found ubiquitously wherever sheep and goats are farmed in Croatia, this is the first information on genetic relatedness of any Croatian ORFV with other isolates around the world.

  12. Molecular characterization of the first Aichi viruses isolated in Europe and in South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, D-Y; Silva, P A; Hauroeder, B; Diedrich, S; Cardoso, D D P; Schreier, E

    2006-06-01

    The occurrence of Aichi virus, a picornavirus associated with acute gastroenteritis, has so far only been described in Asian countries. This study reports the first finding of Aichi virus in clinical specimens from Germany and Brazil. The nucleotide sequences of both a German and a Brazilian isolate were determined, analyzed, and compared to known Aichi sequences. The German strain turned out to be a member of genogroup A, while the Brazilian belonged to genogroup B. For a primary assessment of the epidemiological importance of Aichi virus in Germany, a panel of 485 German serum samples was screened for antibody to Aichi virus, and a seroprevalence of 76% was found.

  13. Characterization of a Tembusu virus isolated from naturally infected house sparrows (Passer domesticus) in Northern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y; Diao, Y; Yu, C; Gao, X; Ju, X; Xue, C; Liu, X; Ge, P; Qu, J; Zhang, D

    2013-04-01

    The house sparrow (Passer domesticus) is one of the most widely distributed wild birds in China. Tembusu virus (TMUV) strain, TMUV-SDHS, was isolated from house sparrows living around the poultry farms in Shandong Province, Northern China. Genetic analysis of E and NS5 genes showed that it had a close relationship with that of the YY5 strain, which can cause severe egg drop in ducks. Pathogenicity studies showed that the virus is highly virulent when experimentally inoculated into the ducks. These findings show that house sparrows carrying the Tembusu virus may play an important role in transmitting the virus among other species. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  14. Characterisation of an isolate of Narcissus degeneration virus from Chinese narcissus (Narcissus tazetta var. chinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J; Shi, Y-H; Adams, M J; Zheng, H-Y; Qin, B-X; Chen, J-P

    2007-02-01

    A potyvirus from Chinese narcissus was transmitted mechanically to three species of Narcissus and to Lycoris radiata but not to 22 other test species. In western blot, the coat protein reacted strongly with Narcissus degeneration virus (UK isolate) antiserum. Antiserum raised to the Chinese virus did not react with eighteen other potyviruses. The complete nucleotide sequence (9816 nt) had the typical genome organisation for a member of the genus Potyvirus. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analysis showed that the Chinese virus was different from all previously sequenced potyviruses but distantly related to onion yellow dwarf and shallot yellow stripe viruses.

  15. Genomic 3' terminal sequence comparison of three isolates of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, I D; Vlasak, R; Nowotny, N; Rodak, L; Carter, M J

    1992-05-15

    Comparison of sequence data is necessary in older to investigate virus origins, identify features common to virulent strains, and characterize genomic organization within virus families. A virulent caliciviral disease of rabbits recently emerged in China. We have sequenced 1100 bases from the 3' ends of two independent European isolates of this virus, and compared these with previously determined calicivirus sequences. Rabbit caliciviruses were closely related, despite the different countries in which isolation was made. This supports the rapid spread of a new virus across Europe. The capsid protein sequences of these rabbit viruses differ markedly from those determined for feline calicivirus, but a hypothetical 3' open reading frame is relatively well conserved between the caliciviruses of these two different hosts and argues for a functional role.

  16. Analysis of the fusion protein gene of Newcastle disease viruses isolated in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mase, Masaji; Murayama, Kazunori; Karino, Ayako; Inoue, Toshikazu

    2011-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequences of the fusion (F) protein gene of Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) isolated in Japan from 1930 to 2007 (45 strains total) were determined and genetically analyzed. In the deduced amino acid sequences of fusion protein, the 5 potential asparagine-linked glycosylation sites and 10 cysteine residues were all conserved in the NDV examined in this study. The major epitopes involved in virus neutralization are conserved in most of the NDV strains isolated in Japan except a few strains. By virus neutralization test, no major antigenic differences were observed among representative strains of each genotype in Japan. All chickens vaccinated with the B1 strain survived without clinical signs after challenge with 2 NDV strains isolated in Japan (velogenic strains, JP/Ibaraki/2000 and JP/Kagoshima/91), which possess amino acids substitutions involved in virus neutralization in the F protein gene.

  17. Genetic characterization of measles viruses isolated in Turkey during 2000 and 2001

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bellini William J

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular epidemiologic studies have made significant contributions to measles surveillance activities by helping to identify source and transmission pathways of the virus. This report describes the genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in Turkey in 2000 and 2001. Results Wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 cases from five provinces in Turkey during 2001. The viruses were analyzed using the standard genotyping protocols. All isolates were classified as genotype D6, the same genotype that was identified in Turkey in previous outbreaks during 1998. Conclusion Turkey has begun implementation of a national program to eliminate measles by 2010. Therefore, this baseline genotype data will provide a means to monitor the success of the elimination program.

  18. Genetic characterization of measles viruses isolated in Turkey during 2000 and 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korukluoglu, Gulay; Liffick, Stephanie; Guris, Dalya; Kobune, Fumio; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; Ceylan, Ali; Ertem, Meliksah

    2005-07-19

    Molecular epidemiologic studies have made significant contributions to measles surveillance activities by helping to identify source and transmission pathways of the virus. This report describes the genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in Turkey in 2000 and 2001. Wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 cases from five provinces in Turkey during 2001. The viruses were analyzed using the standard genotyping protocols. All isolates were classified as genotype D6, the same genotype that was identified in Turkey in previous outbreaks during 1998. Turkey has begun implementation of a national program to eliminate measles by 2010. Therefore, this baseline genotype data will provide a means to monitor the success of the elimination program.

  19. Nhumirim virus, a novel flavivirus isolated from mosquitoes from the Pantanal, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solberg, Owen; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Kenney, Joan; Serra-Freire, Nicolau; Brault, Aaron; Nogueira, Rita; Langevin, Stanley; Komar, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    We describe the isolation of a novel flavivirus, isolated from a pool of mosquitoes identified as Culex (Culex) chidesteri collected in 2010 in the Pantanal region of west-central Brazil. The virus is herein designated Nhumirim virus (NHUV) after the name of the ranch from which the mosquito pool was collected. Flavivirus RNA was detected by real-time RT-PCR of homogenized mosquitoes and from the corresponding C6/36 culture supernatant. Based on full-genome sequencing, the virus isolate was genetically distinct from but most closely related to Barkedji virus (BJV), a newly described flavivirus from Senegal. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that NHUV grouped with mosquito-borne flaviviruses forming a clade with BJV. This clade may be genetically intermediate between the Culex-borne flaviviruses amplified by birds and the insect-only flaviviruses. PMID:25252815

  20. Biological characterization and complete nucleotide sequence of a Tunisian isolate of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakoubi, S; Desbiez, C; Fakhfakh, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Marrakchi, M; Lecoq, H

    2008-01-01

    During a survey conducted in October 2005, cucurbit leaf samples showing virus-like symptoms were collected from the major cucurbit-growing areas in Tunisia. DAS-ELISA showed the presence of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV, Potyvirus), detected for the first time in Tunisia, in samples from the region of Cap Bon (Northern Tunisia). MWMV isolate TN05-76 (MWMV-Tn) was characterized biologically and its full-length genome sequence was established. MWMV-Tn was found to have biological properties similar to those reported for the MWMV type strain from Morocco. Phylogenetic analysis including the comparison of complete amino-acid sequences of 42 potyviruses confirmed that MWMV-Tn is related (65% amino-acid sequence identity) to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolates but is a member of a distinct virus species. Sequence analysis on parts of the CP gene of MWMV isolates from different geographical origins revealed some geographic structure of MWMV variability, with three different clusters: one cluster including isolates from the Mediterranean region, a second including isolates from western and central Africa, and a third one including isolates from the southern part of Africa. A significant correlation was observed between geographic and genetic distances between isolates. Isolates from countries in the Mediterranean region where MWMV has recently emerged (France, Spain, Portugal) have highly conserved sequences, suggesting that they may have a common and recent origin. MWMV from Sudan, a highly divergent variant, may be considered an evolutionary intermediate between MWMV and PRSV.

  1. How Does Sampling Methodology Influence Molecular Detection and Isolation Success in Influenza A Virus Field Studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latorre-Margalef, Neus; Avril, Alexis; Tolf, Conny; Olsen, Björn; Waldenström, Jonas

    2015-12-11

    Wild waterfowl are important reservoir hosts for influenza A virus (IAV) and a potential source of spillover infections in other hosts, including poultry and swine. The emergence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses, such as H5N1 and H5N8, and subsequent spread along migratory flyways prompted the initiation of several programs in Europe, North America, and Africa to monitor circulation of HPAI and low-pathogenicity precursor viruses (low-pathogenicity avian influenza [LPAI] viruses). Given the costs of maintaining such programs, it is essential to establish best practice for field methodologies to provide robust data for epidemiological interpretation. Here, we use long-term surveillance data from a single site to evaluate the influence of a number of parameters on virus detection and isolation of LPAI viruses. A total of 26,586 samples (oropharyngeal, fecal, and cloacal) collected from wild mallards were screened by real-time PCR, and positive samples were subjected to isolation in embryonated chicken eggs. The LPAI virus detection rate was influenced by the sample type: cloacal/fecal samples showed a consistently higher detection rate and lower cycle threshold (Ct) value than oropharyngeal samples. Molecular detection was more sensitive than isolation, and virus isolation success was proportional to the number of RNA copies in the sample. Interestingly, for a given Ct value, the isolation success was lower in samples from adult birds than in those from juveniles. Comparing the results of specific real-time reverse transcriptase (RRT)-PCRs and of isolation, it was clear that coinfections were common in the investigated birds. The effects of sample type and detection methods warrant some caution in interpretation of the surveillance data. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Respiratory transmission of an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from a harbour seal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Erik A.; Ip, Hon S.; Hall, Jeffrey S.; Yoon, Sun W.; Johnson, Jordan; Beck, Melinda A.; Webby, Richard J.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing human H7N9 influenza infections highlight the threat of emerging avian influenza viruses. In 2011, an avian H3N8 influenza virus isolated from moribund New England harbour seals was shown to have naturally acquired mutations known to increase the transmissibility of highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza viruses. To elucidate the potential human health threat, here we evaluate a panel of avian H3N8 viruses and find that the harbour seal virus displays increased affinity for mammalian receptors, transmits via respiratory droplets in ferrets and replicates in human lung cells. Analysis of a panel of human sera for H3N8 neutralizing antibodies suggests that there is no population-wide immunity to these viruses. The prevalence of H3N8 viruses in birds and multiple mammalian species including recent isolations from pigs and evidence that it was a past human pandemic virus make the need for surveillance and risk analysis of these viruses of public health importance.

  3. Differentiation of BHV-1 isolates from vaccine virus by high-resolution melting analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostertag-Hill, Claire; Fang, Liang; Izume, Satoko; Lee, Megan; Reed, Aimee; Jin, Ling

    2015-02-16

    An efficacious bovine herpesvirus type-1 (BHV-1) vaccine has been used for many years. However, in the past few years, abortion and respiratory diseases have occurred after administration of the modified live vaccine. To investigate whether BHV-1 isolates from disease outbreaks are identical to those of the vaccines used, selected regions of the BHV-1 genome were investigated by high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis and PCR-DNA sequencing. When a target region within the thymidine kinase (TK) gene was examined by HRM analysis, 6 out of the 11 isolates from abortion cases and 22 out of the 25 isolates from bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases had different melting curves compared to the vaccine virus. Surprisingly, when a conserved region within the US6 gene that encodes glycoprotein D (gD) was examined by HRM analysis, 5 out of the 11 abortion isolates and 18 out of the 23 BRD isolates had different melting curves from the vaccine virus. To determine whether SNPs within the coding regions of glycoprotein E (gE) and TK genes can be used to differentiate the isolates from the vaccine virus, PCR-DNA sequencing was used to examine these SNPs in all the isolates. This revealed that only 1 out of 11 of the abortion isolates and 4 out of 24 of the BRD isolates are different in the target region of gE from the vaccine virus, while 5 out of 11 abortion isolates and 4 out of 22 BRD isolates are different in the target region of TK from the vaccine virus. No DNA sequence differences were observed in glycoprotein G (gG) region between disease and vaccine isolates. Our study demonstrated that many disease isolates had genetic differences from the vaccine virus in regions examined by HRM and PCR-DNA sequencing analysis. In addition, many isolates contained more than one type of mutation and were composed of mixed variants. Our study suggests that a mixture of variants were present in isolates collected post-vaccination. HRM is a rapid diagnostic method that can be used for

  4. Identification of a Newly Isolated Getah Virus in the China-Laos Border, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan Yuan; Fu, Shi Hong; Guo, Xiao Fang; Lei, Wen Wen; Li, Xiao Long; Song, Jing Dong; Cao, Lei; Gao, Xiao Yan; Lyu, Zhi; He, Ying; Wang, Huan Yu; Ren, Xiao Jie; Zhou, Hong Ning; Wang, Gui Qin; Liang, Guo Dong

    2017-03-01

    In this study, we isolated a virus strain (YN12031) from specimens of Armigeres subalbatus collected in the China-Laos border. BHK-21 cells infected with YN12031 exhibited an evident cytopathic effect (CPE) 32 h post-infection. The virus particles were spherical, 70 nm in diameter, and enveloped; they also featured surface fibers. Molecular genetic analysis revealed that YN12031 was closely related to alpha viruses such as Chikungunya virus and Sindbis virus, and located in the same clade as MM2021, the prototype of Getahvirus (GETV) isolated in Malaysia in 1955. Phylogenetic analysis of the E2 and capsid genes further revealed that YN12031 was located in the same clade as the Russian isolate LEIV/16275/Mag. Analysis of the homology of nucleotides and amino acids in the coding area and E2 gene demonstrated that the YN12031 isolated from the China-Laos border (tropical region) was related closest to the LEIV/16275/Mag isolate obtained in Russia (North frigid zone area) among other isolates studied. These results suggest that GETV can adapt to different geographical environments to propagate and evolve. Thus, strengthening the detection and monitoring of GETV and its related diseases is very crucial. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  5. Neutralizing monoclonal antibodies recognize antigenic variants among isolates of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winton, J.R.; Arakawa, C.N.; Lannan, C.N.; Fryer, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    eutralizing monoclonal antibodies were developed against strains of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from steelhead trout Salmo gairdneri in the Deschutes River of Oregon, chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha in the Sacramento River of California, and rainbow trout Salmo gairdneri reared in the Hagerman Valley of Idaho, USA. These antibodies were tested for neutralization of 12 IHNV isolates obtained from salmonids in Japan, Alaska, Washington, Oregon, California, and Idaho. The antibodies recognized antigenic variants among the isolates and could be used to separate the viruses into 4 groups. The members of each group tended to be related by geographic area rather than by source host species, virulence, or date of isolation.

  6. Characterization and Field Studies of a Cucumber Mosaic Virus Isolate from Spinach in the Winter Garden Area of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Dan Wilson; R.S. Halliwell

    1985-01-01

    An isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was identified from spinach in the Winter Garden area of Texas. The isolate was very closely related serologically to strain S of CMVand is designated the Texas spinach isolate of CMV-S. The virus infected 39 species of crop plants and wild hosts in 12 of 13 families tested. The green peach aphid efficiently transmitted the...

  7. Characterization of West Nile viruses isolated form captive American flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) in Medellin, Colombia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, Jorge E.; Ciuoderis, Karl A.; Lopera, Juan G.; Piedrahita, Leidy D.; Murphy, Darby; LeVasseur, James; Carrillo, Lina; Ocampo, Martha C.; Hofmeister, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Serum samples from a total of 71 healthy captive birds belonging to 18 species were collected in July of 2008 in Medellin (Colombia) and tested for flaviviruses. Eighteen of 29 samples from American Flamingoes (Phoenicopterus ruber) were positive for West Nile virus (WNV) by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Selected positive samples were serially passaged and WNV was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Two isolates (524/08, 9835/08) were characterized in vitro and in vivo. Sequence analysis revealed WNV with 16 nucleotide substitutions resulting in six amino acid changes when compared with the NY99 strain. Colombian (COL) viruses were more closely related to Louisiana isolates from 2001. When compared with attenuated strains isolated from Texas, COL isolates differed in their plaque size and temperature sensitivity phenotype. The COL viruses were pathogenic in embryonated chicken eggs and Balb/c mice.

  8. Phylogenetic Characterization of Rabies Virus Isolates from Carnivora in Brazil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    KOBAYASHI, Yuki; INOUE, Nana; SATO, Go; ITOU, Takuya; SANTOS, Hamilton P; BRITO, Cristina J. C; GOMES, Albério A. B; SANTOS, Marli F. C; SILVA, Marlon V; MOTA, Carla S; ITO, Fumio H; SAKAI, Takeo

    2007-01-01

    ...) variants, genetically similar to canine RV, have recently been isolated from foxes. In order to derive the epidemiological characteristics of Brazilian Carnivora RV, Brazilian RVs isolated from dogs, cats, and foxes were genetically analyzed...

  9. Molecular characterization of an Akabane virus isolate from West Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    PURNOMO EDI, Suryo; IBRAHIM, Afif; SUKOCO, Rinto; BUNALI, Lukman; TAGUCHI, Masaji; KATO, Tomoko; YANASE, Tohru; SHIRAFUJI, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We isolated an arbovirus from bovine blood in Indonesia. The arbovirus was obtained from the plasma of a cow showing no clinical symptoms in West Java in February 2014, and was identified as Akabane virus (AKAV) by AKAV-specific RT-PCR and subsequent sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial S segment indicated the AKAV isolate, WJ-1SA/P/2014, was most closely related with two isolates from Israel and Turkey reported in 2001 and 2015, respectively, and that WJ-1SA/P/2014 isolate belongs to AKAV genogroup Ib. This is the first isolation of AKAV from Indonesia. PMID:28302930

  10. Molecular characterization of an Akabane virus isolate from West Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purnomo Edi, Suryo; Ibrahim, Afif; Sukoco, Rinto; Bunali, Lukman; Taguchi, Masaji; Kato, Tomoko; Yanase, Tohru; Shirafuji, Hiroaki

    2017-04-08

    We isolated an arbovirus from bovine blood in Indonesia. The arbovirus was obtained from the plasma of a cow showing no clinical symptoms in West Java in February 2014, and was identified as Akabane virus (AKAV) by AKAV-specific RT-PCR and subsequent sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial S segment indicated the AKAV isolate, WJ-1SA/P/2014, was most closely related with two isolates from Israel and Turkey reported in 2001 and 2015, respectively, and that WJ-1SA/P/2014 isolate belongs to AKAV genogroup Ib. This is the first isolation of AKAV from Indonesia.

  11. The spectrum of viruses isolated from Pulsatilla pratensis (Ranunculaceae a native plant of Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. А. Shydlovska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to virus screening of wild plants of Ukraine’s flora. The object of the research is the Red Book plant Pulsatilla pratensis (L. Mill., which grows on the territory of Kanev Nature Reserve. Isolated isometric infectious virus-like particles with diameters of 34, 36, 43, 47, 50 and 57 nm were isolated from selected plants of P. pratensis. In our research, determination of the infectious nature of the pathogen, host range, concentration of viruses in plants, species identity and virus isolation from the mixture in mixed viral infections were carried with using indicator plants. The typical viral symptoms were observed on indicator plants: browning of the leaf plate, mottling, chlorosis and necrosis. All symptoms were systemic and could be caused by a variety of viruse species. Virions with sizes from 34 to 43 nm produced the necrotic and chlorotic spotting on Chenopodium amaranticolor Coste and Reyn. On the other hand, virions with sizes from 47 to 57 nm produced the necrosis, chlorosis and deformation of the leaf plates on Cucumis sativus L. That is not typical for viruses previously discovered on P. pratensis. The viruses isolated in these plants viruses were cumulated in small concentrations and rapidly lost their infectivity. The number of isolated viruses was insufficient for their identification. Four bacteriophage isolates with long phage tails of different size were isolated from P. pratensis roots and radical soil. The biological (lytic activity towards the tracer bacteria, the morphology of negative colonies, and bacteriophage protein structure were characterized. According to our research, it is possible to divide phages into three subgroups that probably correspond to three different types of viruses. Results of the polypeptide analysis may reflect an evolutionary process in a population of phages that had a common ancestor. Comparison of phage proteins of different hosts shows a variety of molecular weights of

  12. Viruses of the family Bunyaviridae: are all available isolates reassortants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briese, Thomas; Calisher, Charles H; Higgs, Stephen

    2013-11-01

    Viruses of the family Bunyaviridae (the bunyaviruses) possess three distinct linear, single-stranded, negative sense or ambisense RNA segments (large, medium, and small). Dual infections of arthropod and perhaps vertebrate and plant hosts provide substantial opportunity for segment reassortment and an increasingly recognized number of the nearly 300 viruses in this family have been shown to be reassortants. Reassortment of RNA segments (genetic shift) complements genetic drift (accumulation of point mutations) as a powerful mechanism underlying bunyavirus evolution. Here we consider the possibility, if not likelihood, that most if not all bunyaviruses currently recognized may represent reassortants, some of which may be reassortants of existing viruses, and some of which may be reassortants of extinct viruses. If this hypothesis is correct, then the roots of the family and genus trees of bunyaviruses as currently described (or ignored) are incomplete or incorrect. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Phylogenetic Analysis of the Rabies Virus N-coding Region in Lithuanian Rabies Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dainius Zienius

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rabies infection among wild and domestic animals constitutes a well-known problem in Lithuania, but only one dog rabies virus isolate sequence (1992 from Lithuania was used in the European rabies virus phylogenetic analysis. The objective of this work was to determine nucleoprotein (N gene sequences and genetically characterize the rabies virus isolates in order to learn which virus group (biotype is circulating in reservoir species in Lithuania. Classical rabies virus isolate nucleoprotein (N gene sequences from different parts of Lithuania were found to be closely related to each other and demonstrated nucleotide identity from 97.7 to 100% and could be placed in one lineage with 100% bootstrap support. All 12 sequences of raccoon dogs, red foxes, dogs and marten rabies viruses exhibited 97.7 - 99.0% identity to previously published sequences from Eastern parts of Poland, Estonia, Finland, and the North-Eastern part of Russia. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Lithuanian strains belong to the North East Europe (NEE group of rabies virus.

  14. Vesicular exanthema of swine virus: isolation and serotyping of field samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, J F; Yedloutschnig, R J; Dardiri, A H; Callis, J J

    1987-01-01

    Virus isolation was attempted from 262 field samples of vesicular material collected during the outbreaks of vesicular exanthema of swine in the U.S.A. from 1952-54. Using primary swine kidney culture, viral cytopathogenic agents were isolated from 76.3% of the samples. However, an overall recovery rate of 82.1% was obtained after samples negative in tissue culture were inoculated intradermally in susceptible swine. All vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolates were identified as serotype B51 using complement fixation and serum neutralization tests. Two isolates did not react with antisera to known vesicular agents of swine and failed to produce vesicles or clinical signs of disease upon inoculation in swine. One vesicular exanthema of swine virus isolate from tissue of equine origin was pathogenic for swine but produced limited vesiculation at the site of intradermalingual inoculation in the tongue of a pony infected experimentally. Type B51 virus was reisolated from lesions produced in the pony and the pony became seropositive for virus type B51. PMID:3651889

  15. Multiple effects of toxins isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus on the hepatitis C virus life cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Jacqueline Farinha; Pereira, Carina Machado; Bittar, Cintia; Batista, Mariana Nogueira; Campos, Guilherme Rodrigues Fernandes; da Silva, Suely; Cintra, Adélia Cristina Oliveira; Zothner, Carsten; Harris, Mark; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Aquino, Victor Hugo; Rahal, Paula; Jardim, Ana Carolina Gomes

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the main causes of liver disease and transplantation worldwide. Current therapy is expensive, presents additional side effects and viral resistance has been described. Therefore, studies for developing more efficient antivirals against HCV are needed. Compounds isolated from animal venoms have shown antiviral activity against some viruses such as Dengue virus, Yellow fever virus and Measles virus. In this study, we evaluated the effect of the complex crotoxin (CX) and its subunits crotapotin (CP) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2-CB) isolated from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus on HCV life cycle. Huh 7.5 cells were infected with HCVcc JFH-1 strain in the presence or absence of these toxins and virus was titrated by focus formation units assay or by qPCR. Toxins were added to the cells at different time points depending on the stage of virus life cycle to be evaluated. The results showed that treatment with PLA2-CB inhibited HCV entry and replication but no effect on HCV release was observed. CX reduced virus entry and release but not replication. By treating cells with CP, an antiviral effect was observed on HCV release, the only stage inhibited by this compound. Our data demonstrated the multiple antiviral effects of toxins from animal venoms on HCV life cycle.

  16. Sequence analysis of an Archaeal virus isolated from a hypersaline lake in Inner Mongolia, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Yanhe

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We are profoundly ignorant about the diversity of viruses that infect the domain Archaea. Less than 100 have been identified and described and very few of these have had their genomic sequences determined. Here we report the genomic sequence of a previously undescribed archaeal virus. Results Haloarchaeal strains with 16S rRNA gene sequences 98% identical to Halorubrum saccharovorum were isolated from a hypersaline lake in Inner Mongolia. Two lytic viruses infecting these were isolated from the lake water. The BJ1 virus is described in this paper. It has an icosahedral head and tail morphology and most likely a linear double stranded DNA genome exhibiting terminal redundancy. Its genome sequence has 42,271 base pairs with a GC content of ~65 mol%. The genome of BJ1 is predicted to encode 70 ORFs, including one for a tRNA. Fifty of the seventy ORFs had no identity to data base entries; twenty showed sequence identity matches to archaeal viruses and to haloarchaea. ORFs possibly coding for an origin of replication complex, integrase, helicase and structural capsid proteins were identified. Evidence for viral integration was obtained. Conclusion The virus described here has a very low sequence identity to any previously described virus. Fifty of the seventy ORFs could not be annotated in any way based on amino acid identities with sequences already present in the databases. Determining functions for ORFs such as these is probably easier using a simple virus as a model system.

  17. Sequence analysis of an Archaeal virus isolated from a hypersaline lake in Inner Mongolia, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagaling, Eulyn; Haigh, Richard D; Grant, William D; Cowan, Don A; Jones, Brian E; Ma, Yanhe; Ventosa, Antonio; Heaphy, Shaun

    2007-01-01

    Background We are profoundly ignorant about the diversity of viruses that infect the domain Archaea. Less than 100 have been identified and described and very few of these have had their genomic sequences determined. Here we report the genomic sequence of a previously undescribed archaeal virus. Results Haloarchaeal strains with 16S rRNA gene sequences 98% identical to Halorubrum saccharovorum were isolated from a hypersaline lake in Inner Mongolia. Two lytic viruses infecting these were isolated from the lake water. The BJ1 virus is described in this paper. It has an icosahedral head and tail morphology and most likely a linear double stranded DNA genome exhibiting terminal redundancy. Its genome sequence has 42,271 base pairs with a GC content of ~65 mol%. The genome of BJ1 is predicted to encode 70 ORFs, including one for a tRNA. Fifty of the seventy ORFs had no identity to data base entries; twenty showed sequence identity matches to archaeal viruses and to haloarchaea. ORFs possibly coding for an origin of replication complex, integrase, helicase and structural capsid proteins were identified. Evidence for viral integration was obtained. Conclusion The virus described here has a very low sequence identity to any previously described virus. Fifty of the seventy ORFs could not be annotated in any way based on amino acid identities with sequences already present in the databases. Determining functions for ORFs such as these is probably easier using a simple virus as a model system. PMID:17996081

  18. Heterogeneity in pepper isolates of cucumber mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Alvarado, G.; Kurath, G.; Dodds, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-four cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) field isolates from pepper crops in Cali-fornia were characterized and compared by nucleic acid hybridization subgrouping, virion electrophoresis, and biological effects in several hosts. Isolates, belonging to subgroup I or subgroup II, were found that induced severe symptoms in mechanically inoculated bell pep-pers. Only two isolates, both from subgroup II, were mild. A group of 19 isolates collected from a single field were all in subgroup II and appeared identical by virion electrophoresis, but they exhibited varying degrees of symptom severity in peppers. As a more detailed indicator of heterogeneity, these 19 isolates were examined by RNase protection assays to delect sequence variation in the coat protein gene region of their genomes. The patterns of bands observed were complex and a high degree of genomic heterogeneity was detected between isolates, with no apparent correlation to symptomatology in bell pepper.

  19. Amantadine resistance among highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) isolated from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Aron; Sood, Richa; Chanu, Kh Victoria; Bhatia, Sandeep; Khandia, Rekha; Pateriya, A K; Nagarajan, S; Dimri, U; Kulkarni, D D

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of antiviral resistance among H5N1 avian influenza viruses is the major challenge in the control of pandemic influenza. Matrix 2 (M2) inhibitors (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the two classes of antiviral agents that are specifically active against influenza viruses and are used for both treatment and prophylaxis of influenza infections. Amantadine targets the M2 ion channel of influenza A virus and interrupts virus life cycle through blockade of hydrogen ion influx. This prevents uncoating of the virus in infected host cells which impedes the release of ribonucleoprotein required for transcription and replication of virion in the nucleus. The present study was carried out to review the status of amantadine resistance in H5N1 viruses isolated from India and to study their replicative capability. Results of the study revealed resistance to amantadine in antiviral assay among four H5N1 viruses out of which two viruses had Serine 31 Asparagine (AGT-AAT i.e., S31N) mutation and two had Valine 27 Alanine (GTT-GCT i.e., V27A) mutation. The four resistant viruses not only exhibited significant difference in effective concentration 50% (EC50) values of amantadine hydrochloride from that of susceptible viruses (P amantadine could also be demonstrated in a simple HA test after replication of the viruses in MDCK cells in presence of amantadine. The study identifies the correlation between in vitro antiviral assay and presence of established molecular markers of resistance, the retention of replicative capacity in the presence of amantadine hydrochloride by the resistant viruses and the emergence of resistant mutations against amantadine among avian influenza viruses (H5N1) without selective drug pressure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Viral pathogenesis of a nephrotropic infectious bronchitis virus isolated from commercial pullets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinde, H; Daft, B M; Castro, A E; Bickford, A A; Gelb, J; Reynolds, B

    1991-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis was diagnosed in 3-to-4-week-old pullets from an outbreak in a commercial flock in California. The disease was characterized by head swelling, watery discharge from the eyes and nostrils, and urates in kidneys. Mortality ranged from 1.8% to 12.5% per week. The isolation of a coronavirus from a suspension of pooled kidneys from clinically ill chickens at the fifth passage in 10-day-old chicken embryos, gross and histologic renal lesions, and seroconversion by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in inoculated birds suggested that the virus isolated was a nephrotrophic strain of infectious bronchitis virus (IBV). The virus isolate was found to be a previously unrecognized serotype, based on virus neutralization tests performed in embryonated chicken eggs. Nephropathogenicity of the IBV isolate was confirmed by inoculation of the viral isolate into specific-pathogen-free chicks and demonstration of renal lesions. The isolation of nephrotropic strains of IBV has not been reported previously from poultry in California.

  1. Molecular characterization of the complete genome of a street rabies virus WH11 isolated from donkey in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Tingbo; Yu, Hua; Wu, Jie; Ming, Pinggang; Huang, Sijia; Shen, Zhijun; Xu, Gelin; Yan, Jiaxin; Yu, Bin; Zhou, Dunjin

    2012-12-01

    The complete genomic sequence of a rabies virus isolate WH11, isolated from brain tissue of a rabid donkey in China, was determined and compared with other rabies viruses. This is the first Chinese street strain which was isolated from donkey and the entire length and organization of the virus was similar to that of other rabies viruses. Multiple alignments of amino acid sequences of the nucleoprotein, phosphoprotein, matrix protein, glycoprotein, and large protein of WH11 with those of other rabies viruses were undertaken to examine the conservative degree of functional regions. Phylogenetic analysis using the complete genomic sequence of WH11 determined that this isolate is most closely related with rabies viruses previously isolated in China and the attenuated Chinese vaccine strain CTN181.

  2. Isolation and life cycle characterization of lytic viruses infecting heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Middelboe, Mathias; Chan, Amy; Bertelsen, Sif Koldborg

    2010-01-01

    Basic knowledge on viruses infecting heterotrophic bacteria and cyanobacteria is key to future progress in understanding the role of viruses in aquatic systems and the influence of virus–host interactions on microbial mortality, biogeochemical cycles, and genetic exchange. Such studies require...... infecting such hosts. In addition to the isolation procedures, methods for life cycle characterization (one-step growth experiments) of bacteriophages and cyanophages are described. Finally, limitations and drawbacks of the proposed methods are assessed and discussed...

  3. In Vitro Identification and Characterization of a Virus Isolated from a Dog with Neurological Dysfunction

    OpenAIRE

    Baumgärtner, Wolfgang K.; Metzler, Alfred E.; Krakowka, Steven; Koestner, Adalbert

    1981-01-01

    A virus, 78-238, isolated from the cerebrospinal fluid of a dog with neurological dysfunction, was characterized as a paramyxovirus. This conclusion was supported by viral cytopathic effects and morphological appearance of virions and nucleocapsids in infected cells. Nucleocapsids were found in the cytoplasm of all infected cells and in the nuclei of 0.001% of these cells. Growth curves revealed that a high percentage (≥76%) of infectious progeny virus was cell released. Persistent infection ...

  4. Characterization of an Indian isolate of cucumber mosaic virus infecting Egyptian henbane (Hyoscyamus muticus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samad, A; Raj, S K; Srivastava, A; Chandra, G; Ajayakumar, P V; Zaim, M; Singh, B P

    2000-01-01

    A cucumber mosaic virus isolate was found to be associated with mottle crinkle and severe mosaic disease of Egyptian henbane (Hyoscyamus muticus L.). The virus has been characterized as an Indian isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) based on non-persistent transmission by aphid, presence of 28-nm isometric particles, capsid protein of 26 K and single-stranded tripartite RNA genome with a subgenomic RNA (RNA 4). There was no evidence of satellite RNA genome. The isolate showed a strong serological relationship with S and A strains of CMV (CMV-S and CMV-A) in double diffusion test. A band of the 26 K capsid protein was also detected by Western blot analysis using antibodies specific to CMV-S.

  5. Molecular, ultrastructural, and biological characterization of Pennsylvania isolates of Plum pox virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, William L; Damsteegt, Vernon D; Gildow, Fred E; Stone, Andrew L; Sherman, Diana J; Levy, Laurene E; Mavrodieva, Vessela; Richwine, Nancy; Welliver, Ruth; Luster, Douglas G

    2011-05-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) was identified in Pennsylvania in 1999. The outbreak was limited to a four-county region in southern Pennsylvania. Initial serological and molecular characterization indicated that the isolates in Pennsylvania belong to the D strain of PPV. The Pennsylvania isolates were characterized by sequence analysis, electron microscopy, host range, and vector transmission to determine how these isolates related to their previously studied European counterparts. Genetically, Pennsylvania (PPV-Penn) isolates were more closely related to each other than to any other PPV-D strains, and isolates from the United States, Canada, and Chile were more closely related to each other than to European isolates. The PPV-Penn isolates exist as two clades, suggesting the possibility of multiple introductions. Electron microscopy analysis of PPV-Penn isolates, including cytopathological studies, indicated that the virions were similar to other Potyvirus spp. PPV-Penn isolates had a herbaceous host range similar to that of European D isolates. There were distinct differences in the transmission efficiencies of the two PPV-Penn isolates using Myzus persicae and Aphis spiraecola as vectors; however, both PPV-Penn isolates were transmitted by M. persicae more efficiently than a European D isolate but less efficiently than a European M isolate.

  6. Peaton virus: a new Simbu group arbovirus isolated from cattle and Culicoides brevitarsis in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    St George, T D; Standfast, H A; Cybinski, D H; Filippich, C; Carley, J G

    1980-05-01

    A new member of the Simbu group of arboviruses, for which the name Peaton virus is proposed, has been isolated from midges and cattle in Australia. Nine isolates were obtained from 101 pools of the biting midge Culicoides brevitarsis collected at Peachester, Qld, (26.51 degrees S., 152.53 degrees E.) between 30 November and 8 December 1976. Three isolations of the same virus were made from the blood of sentinel cattle collected at Grafton and Tamworth, N.S.W., on 20 January and 13 April 1977, respectively. Peaton virus was shown to be a member of the Simbu group of arboviruses by complement-fixation tests using antisera prepared against Australian strains of Akabane and Aino viruses. It was readily distinguishable from these viruses in cross-neutralization tests in tissue cultures and mice. A serological survey of sentinel cattle showed that neutralizing antibody was detectable only in cattle within the recorded limits of the suspected vector C. brevitarsis. Neutralizing antibody in blood serum was detected in 22 of 157 sheep, 21 of 137 horses, 7 of 18 buffaloes, 7 of 20 goats and 3 of 62 pigs, but not in 22 camels, 34 dogs, 3 cats, 76 human beings, 240 marsupials, 19 reptiles or 31 wild birds. The pathogenecity of Peaton virus has yet to be determined. The Yale Arbovirus Research Unit and the Center for Disease Control, Fort Collins, U.S.A., found that Peaton virus was distinguishable from all other Simbu group viruses and thus is a new virus.

  7. Escherichia coli and virus isolated from ''sticky kits''

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M.; Scheutz, F.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1996-01-01

    A total of 121 Escherichia coli strains isolated from 3-week-old mink kits were serotyped and examined for virulence factors. 56 strains were isolated from healthy kits while 65 were from ''sticky kits''. Among these, 34 different serotypes were detected. No difference in serotypes or the presence...

  8. Segment 2 based characterization of a novel Indian Bluetongue virus isolate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaya Prasad

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to characterize and serotype the novel isolate of bluetongue virus (BTV isolated from India. Materials and Methods: The BTV isolate was propagated in BHK-21 cell line. Nucleic acid (dsRNA was extracted using Trizol method and cDNA was prepared using a process called reverse transcription. The cDNA was subjected to group specific PCR using ns1 gene specific primer to confirm the isolate as BTV. The type specific PCR was conducted to confirm the serotype of the virus using vp2 gene specific primers for all the BTV serotype including BTV10. The vp2 gene specific PCR amplicon was sequenced and in-silico restriction enzyme analysis and phylogenetic analysis was conducted. Results: Group specific PCR using ns1 gene specific primers showed a single 274bp amplicon in agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed the sample as BTV. The type specific PCR using BTV10 vp2 gene specific primer showed a single amplicon of 647bp. Remaining BTV serotype specific primers didn't show any amplification. The vp2 gene PCR amplicon was sequenced. The in-silico restriction enzyme analysis of vp2 gene of Indian BTV10 isolate along with other isolates from GenBank database using HindIII, XhoII and ApoI showed a common pattern between Indian and USA isolates. Similarly, phylogenetic analyses using vp2 gene nucleotide as well as deduced amino acid sequence of Indian BTV10 isolate and global isolates showed that Indian and most of the USA isolates placed in a single clad. Conclusion: A novel BTV isolate was isolated and confirmed as BTV serotype 10. Upon molecular analysis Indian BTV10 isolate was found closer to that of USA isolates than other global isolates. [Vet World 2013; 6(5.000: 244-248

  9. [Genetic characterization of wild-type mumps virus isolated in Liaoning Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Li, Dan; Ma, Yan; Han, Yue; Guo, Jun-qiao

    2011-01-01

    Three mumps virus strains were isolated using Vero/Slam cell line from the patients' throat swabs and urines during mumps outbreaks and sporadic period in Liaoning province from 2008. Fragments of 1028 nucleotides including SH genes from 3 mumps virus isolates were amplified by RT-PCR, the PCR products were ligated into pMD19-T vector and cloned to JM109 cell. By blue-white selection, the positive white clones were sequenced and analyzed. Based on the 316 nucleotides of SH gene, the phylogenetic analyses were processed with WHO mumps reference strains downloaded from GenBank and 3 mumps viruses strains. It wan shown that the 3 mumps virus strains isolated in 2008 belonged to F genotype, 3 strains (LN-2008-001-06, LN-2008-001-07 and LN-2008-001-10) showed a nucleotide and amino acid similarity of 98.7%-100% and 94.7%-100% respectively. Two strains (LN-2008-001-06 and LN-2008-001-10) had the same sequence completely. Comparing to the F reference strains, the 3 mumps virus strains' nucleotide and amino acid similarity of 92.4%-96.2% and 84.2%-94.7% respectively. Due to the limited strain numbers, whether the F genotype was the predominant circulating genotype can not be determined. The surveillance on the mumps virus in Liaoning should be therefore strengthened.

  10. Characterization of a parainfluenza virus isolated from a bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nollens, Hendrik H; Wellehan, James F X; Saliki, Jeremiah T; Caseltine, Shannon L; Jensen, Eric D; Van Bonn, William; Venn-Watson, Stephanie

    2008-04-30

    A novel member of the parainfluenza virus family was identified in a bottlenose dolphin with respiratory disease. The case animal was a 19-year old male Atlantic bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) that presented with signs of respiratory illness, including raspy, foul-odored breaths and cream-colored exudate from the blowhole. Focally extensive pyogranulomatous bronchointerstitial pneumonia with moderate numbers of intralesional yeast organisms was identified on histopathological examination. Other significant microscopic findings included multifocal erosive and ulcerative tracheitis and laryngitis consisting of active laryngeal lymphatic tissue and dilated glands with eosinophilic fluid. The cause of death was attributed to respiratory disease of unknown etiology. In addition to the postmortem isolation of Candida glabrata and mixed bacteria from lung tissue, a virus was isolated from two antemortem affected lung aspirates collected over a 2-month period and two postmortem samples (mediastinal lymph node and left lung tissue homogenate). The morphology of the virions on negative staining and transmission electron microscopy was consistent with that of paramyxoviruses. Two genomic fragments, comprising 532 and 419 nucleotides from the open reading frames that code for the viral polymerase and fusion protein, respectively, were amplified by polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers. Phylogenetic analyses of the two viral RNA segments showed that the isolate comprised a novel virus strain, tentatively named T. truncatus parainfluenza virus type 1 (TtPIV-1). The virus is monophyletic with, but genetically distinct from, the various bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 strains.

  11. Detection and molecular characterization of double-stranded RNA viruses in Philippine Trichomonas vaginalis isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Windell L; Justo, Christine Aubrey C; Relucio-San Diego, Mary Ann Cielo V; Loyola, Lorenz M

    2017-10-01

    The flagellated protozoon Trichomonas vaginalis that parasitizes the urogenital tract of humans was reported to harbor double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. These viruses, identified as Trichomonas vaginalis virus (TVV), belong to the genus Trichomonasvirus of the family Totiviridae. Four species, formally recognized by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), have been reported and distinguished by pairwise comparisons of the sequences of genes coding for major capsid protein (CP) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to amplify the complimentary DNA of target virus genes coding for CP and RdRp. Sequence analyses confirmed the identity of the TVV isolates from T. vaginalis cultures. A total of 35 dsRNA viruses were identified from 18 (19%) T. vaginalis isolates. Multiple TVV species were observed in six of the 18 T. vaginalis cultures. Phylogenetic analyses show monophyly in TVV1 and TVV2 whereas TVV3 and TVV4 appear paraphyletic. The phylogeny of Philippine Trichomonasvirus reflects the global distribution of its host. This is the first study in the Philippines and one of the two reports worldwide to detect the four TVVs and their concurrent infection in a single T. vaginalis isolate. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Isolation and Complete Genome Sequencing of Bluetongue Virus Serotype 12 from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, P P; Reddy, Y V; Hegde, N R

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) causes disease mainly in sheep, but can be transmitted via other domestic and wild ruminants, resulting in pecuniary burden and trade restrictions. Segmented genome with the possibility of reassortment, existence of 26 serotypes, geographical restriction in the distribution of many of the serotypes, use of live attenuated vaccines and the lack of complete sequences of viruses isolated from several parts of the globe have complicated our understanding of the origin, movement and distribution of BTV. Recent efforts in genome sequencing of several strains have helped in better comprehending BTV epidemiology. In an effort to contribute to the genetic epidemiology of BTV in India, we report the isolation and complete genome sequencing of a BTV serotype 12 virus (designated NMO1). This is the first BTV-12 isolated from India and the second BTV-12 to be sequenced worldwide. The analysis of sequences of this virus suggests that NMO1 derived its segments from viruses belonging to western topotype viruses, as well as those from South-East Asia and India. The results have implications for understanding the origin, emergence/re-emergence and movement of BTV as well as for the development of vaccines and diagnostics based on robust epidemiological data. © 2013 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  13. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus stability in environmental and clinical substrates: implications for virus detection and isolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornas, Fábio P; Silva, Lorena C F; de Almeida, Gabriel M; Campos, Rafael K; Boratto, Paulo V M; Franco-Luiz, Ana P M; La Scola, Bernard; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Abrahão, Jônatas S

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water) and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube) substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies.

  14. Acanthamoeba polyphaga mimivirus stability in environmental and clinical substrates: implications for virus detection and isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio P Dornas

    Full Text Available Viruses are extremely diverse and abundant and are present in countless environments. Giant viruses of the Megavirales order have emerged as a fascinating research topic for virologists around the world. As evidence of their ubiquity and ecological impact, mimiviruses have been found in multiple environmental samples. However, isolation of these viruses from environmental samples is inefficient, mainly due to methodological limitations and lack of information regarding the interactions between viruses and substrates. In this work, we demonstrate the long-lasting stability of mimivirus in environmental (freshwater and saline water and hospital (ventilator plastic device tube substrates, showing the detection of infectious particles after more than 9 months. In addition, an enrichment protocol was implemented that remarkably increased mimivirus detection from all tested substrates, including field tests. Moreover, biological, morphological and genetic tests revealed that the enrichment protocol maintained mimivirus particle integrity. In conclusion, our work demonstrated the stability of APMV in samples of environmental and health interest and proposed a reliable and easy protocol to improve giant virus isolation. The data presented here can guide future giant virus detection and isolation studies.

  15. Resistance breaking tomato spotted wilt virus isolates on resistant pepper varieties in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, A; Viggiano, A; Fanigliulo, A

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in southern Italy (Campania and Apulia regions) in protected cultivation, about one month after transplant. The percentage of symptomatic plants was 5-10% and, only in particular cases of advanced stage of cultivation, it reached 30-50% at the end of cycle. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in all resistant infected pepper hybrids: yellowing or browning of apical leaves, which later become necrotic, long necrotic streakson stems, extending to the terminal shoots, complete necrosis of younger fruits and large necrotic streaks and spots on fruits formed after infection. On ripe fruits, yellow spots with concentric rings or necrotic streaks could be observed. Leaf extracts of these samples were tested in ELISA for the detection of TSWV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and Pepper Mottle Virus (PepMoV). Only TSWV was detected in all the field samples tested. The correspondent virus isolates were inoculated mechanically and by Frankliniella occidentalis on to a set of different pepper and tomato hybrids, as well as on some herbaceous test plants, in order to investigate for their ability to overcome the resistance genes Tsw and Sw5, respectively. Tomato hybrids carrying the Sw5 gene were uninfected by all RB isolates, whereas all resistant pepper hybrids became systemically infected. RB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when they were tested with the thrips F. occidentalis. Obtained results demonstrate that evolved strains of TSWV have emerged, that they are able to overcome the Tsw resistance gene in pepper plants experimentally inoculated both

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Influenza C Viruses in the Philippines and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odagiri, Takashi; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Okamoto, Michiko; Suzuki, Akira; Saito, Mariko; Tamaki, Raita; Lupisan, Socorro P.; Sombrero, Lydia T.; Hongo, Seiji

    2014-01-01

    From November 2009 to December 2013 in the Philippines, 15 influenza C viruses were isolated, using MDCK cells, from specimens obtained from children with severe pneumonia and influenza-like illness (ILI). This is the first report of influenza C virus isolation in the Philippines. In addition, from January 2008 to December 2013, 7 influenza C viruses were isolated from specimens that were obtained from children with acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Sendai city, Japan. Antigenic analysis with monoclonal antibodies to the hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) glycoprotein showed that 19 strains (12 from the Philippines and 7 from Japan) were similar to the influenza C virus reference strain C/Sao Paulo/378/82 (SP82). Phylogenetic analysis of the HE gene showed that the strains from the Philippines and Japan formed distinct clusters within an SP82-related lineage. The clusters that included the Philippine and Japanese strains were shown to have diverged from a common ancestor around 1993. In addition, phylogenetic analysis of the internal genes showed that all strains isolated in the Philippines and Japan had emerged through reassortment events. The composition of the internal genes of the Philippine strains was different from that of the Japanese strains, although all strains were classified into an SP82-related lineage by HE gene sequence analysis. These observations suggest that the influenza C viruses analyzed here had emerged through different reassortment events; however, the time and place at which the reassortment events occurred were not determined. PMID:25552361

  17. Characterization of a New Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Isolates Found in Hippeastrum hybridum (Hort.) Plants in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Berniak Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Two Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) isolates H1 and H2 found in Hippeastrum hybridum plants were characterized based on biological, serological, and molecular properties. Virus isolates showed differences in symptom expression – H1 isolate displayed severe necrotic spots and patterns, whereas mild mosaic symptoms were observed on H2-infected H. hybridum plants. Both TSWV isolates showed comparable reactivity with TSWV-specific antibodies and they induced similar symptoms on herbaceous indica...

  18. Detection of banana streak virus (BSV) Tamil Nadu isolate (India ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-10-09

    Oct 9, 2012 ... 2Department of Fruit Crops, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Coimbatore-641 003, Tamil Nadu, India. Accepted 5 September, 2012. Banana streak virus (BSV) is of quarantine significance since Musa is a vegetatively propagated crop. Diagnosis by symptomatology is unreliable because the symptoms ...

  19. Identification of six potato virus Y isolates from Saudi Arabia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sherif

    2012-05-22

    May 22, 2012 ... E-mail: jamalsabir448@gmail.com.Tel: + 966-. 6952291. Accepted ... Egypt) and the US. The autumn crop is planted from seed tubers produced locally from the spring crop. Potato virus Y (PVY), the type member of the genus Potyvirus, ..... Experiments, Center for Agriculture Publishing and Documentation,.

  20. Diversity of Papaya ringspot virus isolates in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) devastates papaya production worldwide. In Puerto Rico, papaya fields can be completely infected with PRSV within a year of planting. Information about the diversity of the Puerto Rican PRSV population is relevant in order to establish a control strategy in the island. T...

  1. Genotyping of African swine fever virus (ASFV) isolates associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Samples from infected domestic pigs associated with an outbreak of African swine fever (ASF) in three districts of central Uganda in 2007 were confirmed as being infected with African swine fever virus (ASFV) using a P72 gene-based polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR) assay combined with restriction analysis.

  2. Identification of Turnip mosaic virus isolated from canola in northeast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    During March and April of 2011, 436 samples showing viral disease symptoms were collected from canola fields in the Khorasan Razavi province. The samples were tested by double-antibody sandwich (DAS)-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the presence of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Among the 436 ...

  3. Characterization of H5N2 influenza viruses isolated in South Korea and their influence on the emergence of a novel H9N2 influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hye-Ryoung; Park, Choi-Ku; Oem, Jae-Ku; Bae, You-Chan; Choi, Jun-Gu; Lee, O-Soo; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2010-08-01

    We characterized low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI) H5N2 and H9N2 viruses isolated in South Korea from 2008 to 2009. Genetic analysis of the H5N2 viruses isolated from wild birds and domestic ducks demonstrated that they were related to the recently isolated southern Chinese LPAI H5 viruses and various influenza viruses circulating in Eurasia. Three H9N2 viruses obtained at live bird markets and duck farms were reassortant viruses generated from the H5N2 viruses of domestic ducks and the H9N2 virus endemic in Korean chickens. The H5N2 viruses did not replicate well in experimentally infected chickens and mice, but novel H9N2 viruses, without pre-adaptation, were recovered at high titres in chickens. Our results show that reassortment between H5N2 and H9N2 viruses must have occurred in domestic ducks and may have contributed to the diversity expansion of the gene pool, which has potential to alter the pathogenicity and host range of the influenza virus.

  4. Virus isolations from sewage and from a stream receiving effluents of sewage treatment plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstein, Saul; Melnick, Joseph L.; Wallis, Craig

    1970-01-01

    In order to detect viruses in sewage or streams, it is first necessary to concentrate the virus present in the fluid sample. Available methods are not readily manageable for concentrating virus from large volumes of fluid, and have not always yielded high recovery rates. In the study described in this paper, a method for concentration of viruses by adsorption on insoluble cross-linked maleic anhydride polyelectrolytes has been utilized to survey the viral flora of sewage and of a stream receiving sewage effluents, in a residential area of Houston, Texas. On a single day the virus flow at different points along the stream varied from 304 000 to 6 014 000 PFU/min. From 84 samples each of 1 US gal, 14 520 isolates were obtained, chiefly echovirus type 7 and polioviruses of all 3 types, some of them with characteristics of virulent wild strains. With virus isolation rates as high as those achieved, it is now possible to monitor virus in natural waters more effectively. PMID:4315865

  5. Prevalence of HIV infection in seronegative high-risk individuals examined by virus isolation and PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C; Teglbjærg, Lars Stubbe; Pedersen, C

    1991-01-01

    HIV seronegative individuals with high-risk behavior were tested for HIV infection by sensitive virus isolation techniques using T4 lymphocytes and monocyte/macrophages, and by detection of proviral DNA using PCR with three different sets of nested primers. No evidence of HIV infection was found...... among the 31 seronegative high-risk subjects, either by virus isolation of by PCR (97.5% confidence limits, 0-11). Our results indicate that ongoing HIV infection in seronegative persons at high risk of infection is a rare event....

  6. Genetic characterization of the influenza A pandemic (H1N1 2009 virus isolates from India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha A Potdar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Influenza A pandemic H1N1 2009 (H1N1pdm virus appeared in India in May 2009 and thereafter outbreaks with considerable morbidity and mortality have been reported from many parts of the country. Continuous monitoring of the genetic makeup of the virus is essential to understand its evolution within the country in relation to global diversification and to track the mutations that may affect the behavior of the virus. METHODS: H1N1pdm viruses were isolated from both recovered and fatal cases representing major cities and sequenced. Phylogenetic analyses of six concatenated whole genomes and the hemagglutinin (HA gene of seven more isolates from May-September 2009 was performed with reference to 685 whole genomes of global isolates available as of November 24, 2009. Molecular characterization of all the 8 segments was carried out for known pathogenic markers. RESULTS: The first isolate of May 2009 belonged to clade 5. Although clade 7 was the dominant H1N1pdm lineage in India, both clades 6 and 7 were found to be co-circulating. The neuraminidase of all the Indian isolates possessed H275, the marker for sensitivity to the neuraminidase inhibitor Oseltamivir. Some of the mutations in HA are at or in the vicinity of antigenic sites and may therefore be of possible antigenic significance. Among these a D222G mutation in the HA receptor binding domain was found in two of the eight Indian isolates obtained from fatal cases. CONCLUSIONS: The majority of the 13 Indian isolates grouped in the globally most widely circulating H1N1pdm clade 7. Further, correlations of the mutations specific to clade 7 Indian isolates to viral fitness and adaptability in the country remains to be understood. The D222G mutation in HA from isolates of fatal cases needs to be studied for pathogenicity.

  7. Isolation and characterization of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maidana, Silvina S; Lomonaco, Patricia M; Combessies, Gustavo; Craig, María I; Diodati, Julian; Rodriguez, Daniela; Parreño, Viviana; Zabal, Osvaldo; Konrad, José L; Crudelli, Gustavo; Mauroy, Axel; Thiry, Etienne; Romera, Sonia A

    2012-06-20

    Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) was isolated from dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) naturally affected with respiratory and reproductive clinical conditions. Examination of nasal and vaginal swabs collected from 12 diseased buffaloes led to the isolation of three paramyxovirus isolates from two animals. Antigenic, morphological and biological characteristics of these three isolates were essentially similar to those of members of the Paramyxoviridae family. Antigenic analysis by direct immunofluorescence and cross neutralization test placed these isolates together with bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3). Nucleotide and amino acid phylogenetic analysis of partial matrix gene sequences of the buffalo isolates and six field BPIV3 isolates from bovines in Argentina were studied. Buffalo isolates were similar to genotype B (BPIV3b) while the six BPIV3 isolates were similar to genotypes A (BPIV3a) and C (BPIV3c). This is the first characterization of BPIV3 in water buffalo.According to the samples analyzed, in Argentina, the genotype B was found in buffalo and the genotypes A and C were found in cattle.

  8. Isolation and characterization of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 from water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maidana Silvina S

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3 was isolated from dairy buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis naturally affected with respiratory and reproductive clinical conditions. Results Examination of nasal and vaginal swabs collected from 12 diseased buffaloes led to the isolation of three paramyxovirus isolates from two animals. Antigenic, morphological and biological characteristics of these three isolates were essentially similar to those of members of the Paramyxoviridae family. Antigenic analysis by direct immunofluorescence and cross neutralization test placed these isolates together with bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3. Nucleotide and amino acid phylogenetic analysis of partial matrix gene sequences of the buffalo isolates and six field BPIV3 isolates from bovines in Argentina were studied. Buffalo isolates were similar to genotype B (BPIV3b while the six BPIV3 isolates were similar to genotypes A (BPIV3a and C (BPIV3c. Conclusions This is the first characterization of BPIV3 in water buffalo. According to the samples analyzed, in Argentina, the genotype B was found in buffalo and the genotypes A and C were found in cattle.

  9. Molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus isolates from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CTV) were collected and characterized based on coat protein gene (CPG) analysis. All isolates were collected from field trees showing various CTV symptoms such as decline in most citrus varieties, inverse pitting on some sour orange ...

  10. Genomic characterization of recent chicken anemia virus isolates in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicken infectious anemiavirus (CIAV) causes diseases in young chickens, which include increased pathogenicity of secondary infectious agents, generalized lymphoid depletion, and immune-repression. In the present study, we have identified 22 CIAV strains isolated from several commercial chicken farm...

  11. Characterization of a New Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Isolates Found in Hippeastrum hybridum (Hort. Plants in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berniak Hanna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV isolates H1 and H2 found in Hippeastrum hybridum plants were characterized based on biological, serological, and molecular properties. Virus isolates showed differences in symptom expression – H1 isolate displayed severe necrotic spots and patterns, whereas mild mosaic symptoms were observed on H2-infected H. hybridum plants. Both TSWV isolates showed comparable reactivity with TSWV-specific antibodies and they induced similar symptoms on herbaceous indicator plants, but some differences between these isolates were detected at the nucleotide sequence level of genomic S and M ssRNAs segment fragments. The nucleotide sequences encoding nucleocapsid (N and nonstructural (NSs and NSm proteins showed 98.2%, 97.5%, and 96.5% identity, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of N and NSs sequences conducted for tested isolates and 31 TSWV isolates included for comparison revealed that H1 and H2 isolates fell into the same cluster and they were grouped together with isolates found previously in different vegetables, ornamentals, and weeds. When NSm ORF was analyzed, the tested isolates formed a separate cluster: H1 isolate showed the highest affinity with TSWV isolates infecting chrysanthemum and pepper plants, whereas H2 isolate was most closely related to other virus isolates found in sweet pepper and tomatoes. These results indicate that both isolates were reassortants between different virus isolates, and represented two novel genetic patterns of TSWV.

  12. Isolation of Amantadine-Resistant Influenza A Viruses (H3N2) from Patients following Administration of Amantadine in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Iwahashi, Jun; Tsuji, Katsuro; Ishibashi, Tetsuya; Kajiwara, Junboku; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Mori, Ryoichi; Hara, Koyu; Kashiwagi, Takahito; Ohtsu, Yasushi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Hisao; Toyoda, Michiko; Toyoda, Tetsuya

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, the use of amantadine for treatment of influenza A virus infection was not accepted until November 1998, although it was widely used for treatment of Parkinsonism. Since then, we have monitored the emergence of amantadine-resistant viruses and isolated two viruses from patients on long-term treatment with amantadine.

  13. Isolation of Amantadine-Resistant Influenza A Viruses (H3N2) from Patients following Administration of Amantadine in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwahashi, Jun; Tsuji, Katsuro; Ishibashi, Tetsuya; Kajiwara, Junboku; Imamura, Yoshihiro; Mori, Ryoichi; Hara, Koyu; Kashiwagi, Takahito; Ohtsu, Yasushi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Maeda, Hisao; Toyoda, Michiko; Toyoda, Tetsuya

    2001-01-01

    In Japan, the use of amantadine for treatment of influenza A virus infection was not accepted until November 1998, although it was widely used for treatment of Parkinsonism. Since then, we have monitored the emergence of amantadine-resistant viruses and isolated two viruses from patients on long-term treatment with amantadine. PMID:11283109

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato Isolate of Parietaria Mottle Virus from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Aramburu, José; Rubio, Luis; Galipienso, Luis

    2015-12-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence of isolate T32 of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) infecting tomato plants in Turin, Italy, obtained by Sanger sequencing. T32 shares 90.48 to 96.69% nucleotide identity with other two PoMV isolates, CR8 and Pe1, respectively, whose complete genome sequences are available. Copyright © 2015 Martínez et al.

  15. Complete Genome Sequences of Zika Virus Strains Isolated from the Blood of Patients in Thailand (2014) and Philippines (2012)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-09

    Complete genome sequences of Zika Virus strains isolated from the blood of patients in 1 Thailand (2014) and Philippines (2012). 2 Ellison,D.W.1...Institute, Seoul, Republic of Korea. 20 21 Running Head: Zika Virus Genomes 22 23 ABSTRACT 24 ZIKV is an arbovirus and member of the family...genome sequences of two Zika Virus (ZIKV) strains, Zika virus /H.sapiens-27 tc/THA/2014/SV0127-14 and Zika virus /H.sapiens-tc/PHL/2012/CPC-0740, isolated

  16. Nosocomial viral infections: IV. Guidelines for cohort isolation, the communicable disease survey, collection, and transport of specimens for virus isolation, and considerations for the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenti, W M; Menegus, M A

    1981-01-01

    Virus transmission within the hospital is related to transmissibility of the virus and susceptibility of the population at risk. General guidelines for the use of cohort isolation, for the control of virus transmission in the hospital, and for the use of the communicable disease survey for pediatric patients and visitors to the hospital are out-lined. We also present a brief review of how to collect and transport specimens for virus isolation to assist the infection control practitioner and the clinician and conclude with recommendations for further investigations in the areas of virology and infection control.

  17. Ilheus virus isolation in the Pantanal, west-central Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauvolid-Corrêa, Alex; Kenney, Joan L; Couto-Lima, Dinair; Campos, Zilca M S; Schatzmayr, Hermann G; Nogueira, Rita M R; Brault, Aaron C; Komar, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    The wetlands of the Brazilian Pantanal host large concentrations of diverse wildlife species and hematophagous arthropods, conditions that favor the circulation of zoonotic arboviruses. A recent study from the Nhecolândia sub-region of Pantanal reported serological evidence of various flaviviruses, including West Nile virus and Ilheus virus (ILHV). According to the age of seropositive horses, at least three flaviviruses, including ILHV, circulated in the Brazilian Pantanal between 2005 and 2009. To extend this study, we collected 3,234 adult mosquitoes of 16 species during 2009 and 2010 in the same sub-region. Mosquito pool homogenates were assayed for infectious virus on C6/36 and Vero cell monolayers and also tested for flaviviral RNA by a group-specific real-time RT-PCR. One pool containing 50 non-engorged female specimens of Aedes scapularis tested positive for ILHV by culture and for ILHV RNA by real-time RT-PCR, indicating a minimum infection rate of 2.5 per 1000. Full-length genomic sequence exhibited 95% identity to the only full genome sequence available for ILHV. The present data confirm the circulation of ILHV in the Brazilian Pantanal.

  18. Molecular Typing of Turkish Apple Chlorotic Leaf Spot Virus Isolates Based on Partial Coat Protein Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Ulubas Serce

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV isolates from various hosts and geographic locations in Turkey were molecularly characterized by RFLP, nucleotide sequence analysis and the construction of a phylogenetic tree including ACLSV isolates from GenBank. Based on nucleotide sequence alignment and the phylogenetic tree, we proposed a classification of ACLSV isolates in which isolates were divided into three major groups. The first group contained mainly Far-Eastern isolates, the second group the Hungarian (eastern-European ACLSV isolates, and the third group, which contained isolates of variable characteristics, was again divided into two subgroups, subgroup I containing mixed European isolates, and subgroup II containing central European isolates. Three representative Turkish ACLSV isolates belonged to the third group; of these, one was from the mixed European cluster (subgroup I and two from the central European cluster (subgroup II. The nucleotide sequence divergence and geographic origin of the ACLSV isolates were correlated, which indicated the possible extraction of the Turkish isolates.

  19. Dielectrophoretic isolation and detection of cfc-DNA nanoparticulate biomarkers and virus from blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonnenberg, Avery; Marciniak, Jennifer Y; McCanna, James; Krishnan, Rajaram; Rassenti, Laura; Kipps, Thomas J; Heller, Michael J

    2013-04-01

    Dielectrophoretic (DEP) microarray devices allow important cellular nanoparticulate biomarkers and virus to be rapidly isolated, concentrated, and detected directly from clinical and biological samples. A variety of submicron nanoparticulate entities including cell free circulating (cfc) DNA, mitochondria, and virus can be isolated into DEP high-field areas on microelectrodes, while blood cells and other micron-size entities become isolated into DEP low-field areas between the microelectrodes. The nanoparticulate entities are held in the DEP high-field areas while cells are washed away along with proteins and other small molecules that are not affected by the DEP electric fields. DEP carried out on 20 μL of whole blood obtained from chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients showed a considerable amount of SYBR Green stained DNA fluorescent material concentrated in the DEP high-field regions. Whole blood obtained from healthy individuals showed little or no fluorescent DNA materials in the DEP high-field regions. Fluorescent T7 bacteriophage virus could be isolated directly from blood samples, and fluorescently stained mitochondria could be isolated from biological buffer samples. Using newer DEP microarray devices, high-molecular-weight DNA could be isolated from serum and detected at levels as low as 8-16 ng/mL. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Genomic characterization of influenza A (H7N9) viruses isolated in Shenzhen, Southern China, during the second epidemic wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shisong; Wang, Xin; Dong, Fangyuan; Jin, Tao; Liu, Guang; Lu, Xing; Peng, Bo; Wu, Weihua; Liu, Hui; Kong, Dongfeng; Tang, Xiujuan; Qin, Yanmin; Mei, Shujiang; Xie, Xu; He, Jianfan; Ma, Hanwu; Zhang, Renli; Cheng, Jinquan

    2016-08-01

    There were three epidemic waves of human infection with avian influenza A (H7N9) virus in 2013-2014. While many analyses of the genomic origin, evolution, and molecular characteristics of the influenza A (H7N9) virus have been performed using sequences from the first epidemic wave, genomic characterization of the virus from the second epidemic wave has been comparatively less reported. In this study, an in-depth analysis was performed with respect to the genomic characteristics of 11 H7N9 virus strains isolated from confirmed cases and four H7N9 virus strains isolated from environmental samples in Shenzhen during the second epidemic wave. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that six internal segments of the influenza A (H7N9) virus isolated from confirmed cases and environmental samples in Shenzhen were clustered into two different clades and that the origin of the influenza A (H7N9) virus isolated from confirmed cases in Shenzhen was different from that of viruses isolated during the first wave. In addition, H9N2 viruses, which were prevalent in southern China, played an important role in the reassortment of the influenza A (H7N9) virus isolated in Shenzhen. HA-R47K and -T122A, PB2-V139I, PB1-I397M, and NS1-T216P were the signature amino acids of the influenza A (H7N9) virus isolated from confirmed cases in Shenzhen. We found that the HA, NA, M, and PA genes of the A(H7N9) viruses underwent positive selection in the human population. Therefore, enhanced surveillance should be carried out to determine the origin and mode of transmission of the novel influenza A (H7N9) virus and to facilitate the formulation of effective policies for prevention and containment of a human infection epidemics.

  1. Isolation of mixed subtypes of influenza A virus from a bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Redig Patrick T

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract From April 2007 to March 2008, cloacal swabs were obtained from 246 casualty raptors recovered by various wildlife rehabilitation centers in the United States. The swabs were placed in a virus transport medium and transported to the laboratory on ice packs. At the laboratory, the samples were pooled with each pool consisting of five samples. All pools (n = 50 were screened for the presence of avian influenza virus (AIV using a real time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR; one of the pools was found positive. All five samples in this pool were tested individually by rRT-PCR; one sample from a bald eagle was found positive. This sample was inoculated in embryonated chicken eggs for virus isolation and a hemagglutinating virus was isolated. Complete genome sequencing of the isolate revealed a mixed infection with H1N1 and H2N1 subtypes. Further analysis revealed that the PB1-F2 gene sequence of H1N1 virus had the N66S virulence-associated substitution. Further studies on ecology and epidemiology of AIV in raptors are needed to help understand their role in the maintenance and evolution of AIV.

  2. Complete genome sequences of two distinct and diverse Citrus tristeza virus isolates from New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, S J; Dawson, T E; Pearson, M N

    2009-01-01

    Two Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from New Zealand that display distinct phenotypes were isolated, examined and sequenced in full. The first isolate, NZ-M16, is largely asymptomatic and non-transmissible by the aphid vector Toxoptera citricida, while the second, NZ-B18, is highly transmissible and induces very severe symptoms on C. sinensis and C. aurantii. Phylogenetic analysis of the genome sequences showed that both isolates were approximately 90-93% similar to the VT and T318 isolates but possessed only 89% identity to one another. Based on sequence identity, both isolates are VT subtypes, with NZ-M16 being T3-like, while NZ-B18 is a member of a novel subtype with B165 from India.

  3. Identification and isolation of Genotype-I Japanese Encephalitis virus from encephalitis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Xiaoyan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Historically, Japanese Encephalitis virus (JEV genotype III (GIII has been responsible for human diseases. In recent years, JEV genotype I (GI has been isolated from mosquitoes collected in numerous countries, but has not been isolated from patients with encephalitis. In this study, we report recovery of JEV GI live virus and identification of JEV GI RNA from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF of encephalitis patients in JE endemic areas of China. Whole-genome sequencing and molecular phylogenetic analysis of the JEV isolate from the CSF samples was performed. The isolate in this study is highly similar to other JEV GI strains which isolated from mosquitoes at both the nucleotide and deduced amino acid levels. Phylogenetic analysis based on the genomic sequence showed that the isolate belongs to JEV GI, which is consistent with the phylogenetic analysis based on the pre-membrane (PrM and Glycoprotein genes. As a conclusion, this is the first time to isolate JEV GI strain from CSF samples of encephalitis patients, so continuous survey and evaluate the infectivity and pathogenecity of JEV GI strains are necessary, especially for the JEV GI strains from encephalitis patients. With respect to the latter, because all current JEV vaccines (live and inactivated are derived from JEV GIII strains, future studies should be aimed at investigating and monitoring cross-protection of the human JEV GI isolates against widely used JEV vaccines.

  4. [Susceptibility of Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to infection with bat Japanese encephalitis virus isolates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shan; Zhang, Qionghua; Zhou, Junhua; Yu, Shouyi; Zheng, Xueli; Chen, Qing

    2012-04-01

    To evaluate the susceptibility of Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus to oral infection with bat Japanese encephalitis virus isolates (GD1 and HN2 strains). Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus were infected orally by GD1 and HN2 strains of bat Japanese encephalitis virus. TaqMan real-time PCR was used to detect the virus and monitor the changes in the viral loads in Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus at a 2-day interval, starting from 4 days till 20 days after the infection. The infected Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus were found positive for the Japanese encephalitis virus from day 4 to day 20. Both Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus were susceptible to infection by GD1 and HN2 strains, but the latter showed a greater susceptibility. The HN2 strain virus appeared to have a greater virulence than the GD1 strain. Aedes albopictus and Culex pipiens quinquefasciatus can carry GD1 and HN2 strains of bat Japanese encephalitis virus isolates.

  5. Genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in China, 2006-2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yixin; Xu, Songtao; Zhang, Yan; Zhu, Zhen; Mao, Naiying; Jiang, Xiaohong; Ma, Chao; Lu, Peishan; Wang, Changyin; Liang, Yong; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Yang; Dai, Defang; Zheng, Lei; Zhou, Jianhui; Wang, Shuang; Zhang, Zhenying; Wu, Shengwei; Nan, Lijuan; Li, Li; Liang, Xiaofeng; Featherstone, David Alexander; Rota, Paul A; Bellini, William J; Xu, Wenbo

    2010-05-25

    Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses in China during 1995-2004 demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused a resurgence of measles beginning in 2005. A total of 210,094 measles cases and 101 deaths were reported by National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS) and Chinese Measles Laboratory Network (LabNet) from 2006 to 2007, and the incidences of measles were 6.8/100,000 population and 7.2/100,000 population in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Five hundred and sixty-five wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 of 31 provinces in mainland China during 2006 and 2007, and all of the wild type virus isolates belonged to cluster 1 of genotype H1. These results indicated that H1-cluster 1 viruses were the predominant viruses circulating in China from 2006 to 2007. This study contributes to previous efforts to generate critical baseline data about circulating wild-type measles viruses in China that will allow molecular epidemiologic studies to help measure the progress made toward China's goal of measles elimination by 2012.

  6. Genetic characterization of wild-type measles viruses isolated in China, 2006-2007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Lijuan

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Molecular characterization of wild-type measles viruses in China during 1995-2004 demonstrated that genotype H1 was endemic and widely distributed throughout the country. H1-associated cases and outbreaks caused a resurgence of measles beginning in 2005. A total of 210,094 measles cases and 101 deaths were reported by National Notifiable Diseases Reporting System (NNDRS and Chinese Measles Laboratory Network (LabNet from 2006 to 2007, and the incidences of measles were 6.8/100,000 population and 7.2/100,000 population in 2006 and 2007, respectively. Five hundred and sixty-five wild-type measles viruses were isolated from 24 of 31 provinces in mainland China during 2006 and 2007, and all of the wild type virus isolates belonged to cluster 1 of genotype H1. These results indicated that H1-cluster 1 viruses were the predominant viruses circulating in China from 2006 to 2007. This study contributes to previous efforts to generate critical baseline data about circulating wild-type measles viruses in China that will allow molecular epidemiologic studies to help measure the progress made toward China's goal of measles elimination by 2012.

  7. A longitudinal study of velogenic Newcastle disease virus genotypes isolated in Italy between 1960 and 2000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herczeg, J; Pascucci, S; Massi, P; Luini, M; Selli, L; Capua, I; Lomniczi, B

    2001-04-01

    Thirty-six representative velogenic strains of Newcastle disease virus isolated in Italy since 1960 were characterized by restriction site and partial sequence analyses of the fusion protein gene. Viruses belonging to the six known genotypes of Lomniczi et al . were found. Genotype IV, which was most probably the main epizootic group in Europe before the war, was responsible for outbreaks in the 1960s and persisted until the late 1980s in Italy. An epizootic peak in 1972 to 1974 coincided with the appearance of genotype V viruses that were present for more than a decade. Outbreaks in 1992 were caused by genotype VIIa viruses and were part of a contemporaneous epizootic of Far East origin that affected Western European countries. The Newcastle disease epizootic that commenced in Italy in May 2000 was due to a genotype VIIb virus that is indistinguishable from those causing sporadic outbreaks in Great Britain and Northern Europe in the late 1990s. Isolated cases yielded a variant of genotype VI (reference epizootic: Middle East in the late 1960s) and a group VIII virus (enzootic in South Africa).

  8. Specific Insect-Virus Interactions Are Responsible for Variation in Competency of Different Thrips tabaci Isolines to Transmit Different Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Alana L.; Kennedy, George G.

    2013-01-01

    Local adaptation between sympatric host and parasite populations driven by vector genetics appears to be a factor that influences dynamics of disease epidemics and evolution of insect-vectored viruses. Although T. tabaci is the primary vector of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in some areas of the world, it is not an important vector of this economically important plant virus in many areas where it occurs. Previous studies suggest that genetic variation of thrips populations, virus isolates, or both are important factors underlying the localized importance of this species as a vector of TSWV. This study was undertaken to quantify variation in transmissibility of TSWV isolates by T. tabaci, in the ability of T. tabaci to transmit isolates of TSWV, and to examine the possibility that genetic interactions and local adaptation contribute to the localized nature of this species as a vector of TSWV. Isofemale lines of Thrips tabaci from multiple locations were tested for their ability to transmit multiple TSWV isolates collected at the same and different locations as the thrips. Results revealed that the probability of an isofemale line transmitting TSWV varied among virus isolates, and the probability of an isolate being transmitted varied among isofemale lines. These results indicate that the interaction of T. tabaci and TSWV isolate genetic determinants underlie successful transmission of TSWV by T. tabaci. Further analysis revealed sympatric vector-virus pairing resulted in higher transmission than allopatric pairing, which suggests that local adaptation is occurring between T. tabaci and TSWV isolates. PMID:23358707

  9. Molecular characterization of three ferret badger (Melogale moschata) rabies virus isolates from Jiangxi province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinghui; Liu, Ye; Zhang, Shoufeng; Zhang, Fei; Wang, Ying; Mi, Lijuan; Wang, Shuchao; Hu, Rongliang

    2014-08-01

    Ferret badger (FB) rabies viruses JX09-17(fb), JX09-18 and JX10-37 were isolated from three different regions in Jiangxi province, China, in 2009 and 2010. The complete nucleotide sequence identity between these three isolates was 87-93 %. Compared with the other Chinese rabies virus isolates and vaccine strains, 101 substitutions (53 in JX10-37, 23 in JX09-17(fb) and 25 in JX09-18) in the five structural proteins were observed, and 47 of these substitutions (27 in JX10-37, 14 in JX09-17(fb) and 6 in JX09-18) were unique among lyssaviruses. Amino acid substitutions of S231 and Q333 were noted respectively in the G protein antigenic site I of JX10-37 and site III in JX09-17(fb). Phylogenetic analysis showed that JX09-17(fb) is rooted within the China I lineage, JX09-18 is in China II, and JX10-37 is independent. Evolutionary analysis and comparative sequence data indicate that isolate JX10-37 is a variant virus that diverged from canine rabies viruses around 1933 (range 1886-1963).

  10. Complete genome sequences of two highly divergent Japanese isolates of Plantago asiatica mosaic virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Komatsu, Ken; Yamashita, Kazuo; Sugawara, Kota; Verbeek, Martin; Fujita, Naoko; Hanada, Kaoru; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Fuji, Shin Ichi

    2017-01-01

    Plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV) is a member of the genus Potexvirus and has an exceptionally wide host range. It causes severe damage to lilies. Here we report on the complete nucleotide sequences of two new Japanese PlAMV isolates, one from the eudicot weed Viola grypoceras (PlAMV-Vi), and

  11. Genomic Sequences of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Viruses Isolated from Florida White-Tailed Deer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Lednicky, John A; Loeb, Julia; Sayler, Katherine A; Wisely, Samantha M; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2017-10-26

    Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotypes 1 and 2 were isolated from Florida white-tailed deer in 2015 and 2016, respectively, and their genomes were completely sequenced. To our knowledge, these are the first full genome sequences for EHDV-1 and -2 from Florida. Copyright © 2017 Subramaniam et al.

  12. In vitro and in vivo isolation and characterization of Duvenhage virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Koraka (Penelope); B.E.E. Martina (Byron); J.M. Roose (Jouke M.); P.P.A.M. van Thiel (Pieter); G. van Amerongen (Geert); T. Kuiken (Thijs); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractA fatal human case of Duvenhage virus (DUVV) infection in a Dutch traveller who had returned from Kenya was reported in 2007. She exhibited classical symptoms of rabies encephalitis with distinct pathological findings. In the present study we describe the isolation and characterization

  13. Complete genome sequence of the first aichi virus isolated in taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jenn-Tzong; Chen, Yao-Shen; Chen, Bao-Chen; Chao, David; Chang, Tsung-Hsien

    2013-01-01

    The first Aichi virus (AiV), kvgh99012632/2010, was identified in Taiwan. The entire genome of the AiV isolate was sequenced and compared to known AiV sequences. Genome alignment revealed that the Taiwan AiV strain shares 96.3% nucleotide and 99% amino acid identities with the German strain D/VI2287/2004.

  14. Complete Genome Sequences of Identical Zika virus Isolates in a Nursing Mother and Her Infant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blohm, Gabriela M.; Lednicky, John A.; Márquez, Marilianna; White, Sarah K.; Loeb, Julia C.; Pacheco, Carlos A.; Nolan, David J.; Paisie, Taylor; Salemi, Marco; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J.; Morris, J. Glenn; Pulliam, Juliet R. C.; Carrillo, Alejandra S.; Plaza, Juan D.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Complete genome sequences were obtained for Zika viruses isolated from the breast milk of a Venezuelan patient and her child, who was exclusively breastfeeding at the time. These sequences are the first to be reported from a presumptive autochthonous postnatal transmission case from mother to child in Venezuela. PMID:28450510

  15. Molecular characterization of banana streak acuminata Vietnam virus isolated from Musa acuminata siamea (banana cultivar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lheureux, F; Laboureau, N; Muller, E; Lockhart, B E L; Iskra-Caruana, M-L

    2007-01-01

    An isolate of banana streak virus (BSV) that does not also occur as an integrant in the Musa balbisiana genome was sought in order to investigate the biological role of BSV in the evolution of either the Musa genome or of the virus itself. We isolated BSV virions from a Musa acuminata siamea accession from Vietnam and sequenced the entire viral genome. The molecular organization is similar to that described for other BSV but slightly larger (7801 bp vs. 1611-7568 bp), and ORF I has a non-conventional start codon. This genome was sufficiently different to propose it as a member of a distinct species named Banana streak virus strain acuminata Vietnam (BSAcVNV).

  16. Selection of tomato plants resistant to a local Polish isolate of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Andrzej S; Szklarczyk, Marek; Gajewski, Zbigniew; Zukowska, Ewa; Michalik, Barbara; Kobyłko, Tadeusz; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2003-01-01

    We found that the Sw-5 gene confers resistance to one of the Polish isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). A series of tomato breeding accessions was analysed along with standards of resistance and susceptibility to TSWV. The presence of the Sw-5 gene was determined using the available PCR marker. Subsequently plants from these accessions were grown in the presence of the TSWV isolate from Poland. Some of them developed severe symptoms of the TSWV disease. Expression of the virus proteins was also assayed in tissues of the investigated plants. We found general agreement between either lack or presence of the disease symptoms, virus proteins and resistance gene. Some observed discrepancies of these data are also discussed. Our results indicate that marker-assisted selection can be used for breeding of the TSWV-resistant tomato in Poland.

  17. First Isolation of West Nile virus from a patient with encephalitis in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cinnia; Slater, Brett; Rudd, Robert; Parchuri, Nandakishore; Hull, Rene; Dupuis, Michelle; Hindenburg, Alexander

    2002-12-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) was isolated from a patient who developed encephalitis while undergoing treatment with CHOP (cyclophosphamide, hydroxydoxorubicin, vincristine [Oncovin], predisone) and rituximab for a non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma. Both standard reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Taqman RT-PCR established the diagnosis of WNV infection from cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Several whole blood samples and one serum sample underwent further testing. CSF and serum samples were negative for WNV antibody; however, all samples were positive by both RT-PCR assays. Infectious virus was recovered from a blood sample, and its identity was confirmed by using a WNV-specific immunofluorescence assay. The complete WNV genomes determined from CSF and from the virus isolate adapted from cell culture were the same. The results represent the first complete WNV genome sequence obtained directly from human CSF and the first time that infectious WNV has been recovered from a patient with encephalitis in North America.

  18. Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) oronasally inoculated with a Nipah virus isolate from Bangladesh or Malaysia develop similar respiratory tract lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baseler, L; de Wit, E; Scott, D P; Munster, V J; Feldmann, H

    2015-01-01

    Nipah virus is a paramyxovirus in the genus Henipavirus, which has caused outbreaks in humans in Malaysia, India, Singapore, and Bangladesh. Whereas the human cases in Malaysia were characterized mainly by neurological symptoms and a case fatality rate of ∼40%, cases in Bangladesh also exhibited respiratory disease and had a case fatality rate of ∼70%. Here, we compared the histopathologic changes in the respiratory tract of Syrian hamsters, a well-established small animal disease model for Nipah virus, inoculated oronasally with Nipah virus isolates from human cases in Malaysia and Bangladesh. The Nipah virus isolate from Bangladesh caused slightly more severe rhinitis and bronchointerstitial pneumonia 2 days after inoculation in Syrian hamsters. By day 4, differences in lesion severity could no longer be detected. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated Nipah virus antigen in the nasal cavity and pulmonary lesions; the amount of Nipah virus antigen present correlated with lesion severity. Immunohistochemistry indicated that both Nipah virus isolates exhibited endotheliotropism in small- and medium-caliber arteries and arterioles, but not in veins, in the lung. This correlated with the location of ephrin B2, the main receptor for Nipah virus, in the vasculature. In conclusion, Nipah virus isolates from outbreaks in Malaysia and Bangladesh caused a similar type and severity of respiratory tract lesions in Syrian hamsters, suggesting that the differences in human disease reported in the outbreaks in Malaysia and Bangladesh are unlikely to have been caused by intrinsic differences in these 2 virus isolates. © The Author(s) 2014.

  19. Characteristics of Cucumber mosaic virus-GTN and Resistance Evaluation of Chilli Pepper Cultivars to Two Cucumber mosaic virus Isolates

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    Gug-Seoun Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is one of the most destructive viruses in chilli pepper. An isolate of CMV was obtained from the chilli pepper cv. Chungyang showing top necrosis symptom in 2013 and designated as CMV-GTN. CMV-GTN was compared with the well-characterized isolate, CMV-Ca-P1, by investigating their amino acid sequences of the coat protein (CP and biological reactions in several host plants. The CP of CMV-Ca-P1 composed of 217 amino acids but that of CMV-GTN composed of 218 amino acids by including additional valine in the 57th amino acid position. Amino acid sequence similarity of the CP gene among CMV-GTN and other CMV isolates recorded in the GeneBank database ranged from 96% to 99%. CMV-GTN was selected as a representative isolate to screen the resistance pepper cultivars to CMV because it was highly pathogenic to tomatoes and peppers upon biological assays. The virulence of CMV-GTN was tested on 135 pepper cultivars which has been bred in Korea and compared with that of CMV-Ca-P1. Only the cv. Premium was resistant and three cvs. Hot star, Kaiser, and Good choice were moderately resistant to CMV-GTN, whereas two cvs. Baerotta and Kaiser were resistant to CMV-Ca-P1.

  20. Molecular characterization of an Akabane virus isolate from West Java, Indonesia

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    PURNOMO EDI, Suryo; IBRAHIM, Afif; Sukoco, Rinto; BUNALI, Lukman; TAGUCHI, Masaji; Kato, Tomoko; Yanase, Tohru; Shirafuji, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We isolated an arbovirus from bovine blood in Indonesia. The arbovirus was obtained from the plasma of a cow showing no clinical symptoms in West Java in February 2014, and was identified as Akabane virus (AKAV) by AKAV-specific RT-PCR and subsequent sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis based on partial S segment indicated the AKAV isolate, WJ-1SA/P/2014, was most closely related with two isolates from Israel and Turkey reported in 2001 and 2015, respectively, and that WJ-1SA/P/2014 isola...

  1. Phylogenetic analysis of Chinese sheeppox and goatpox virus isolates

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    Zhou Tao

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sheeppox virus (SPPV and goatpox virus (GTPV, members of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family are causative agents of sheep pox and goat pox respectively, which are important contagious diseases and endemic in central and northern Africa, the Middle and Far East, and the Indian sub-continent. Both sheep pox and goat pox can cause wool and hide damage, and reduce the production of mutton and milk, which may result in significant economic losses and threaten the stockbreeding. In this study, three SPPVs and two GTPVs were collected from China in 2009 and 2011. We described the sequence features and phylogenetic analysis of the P32 gene, GPCR gene and RPO30 gene of the SPPVs and GTPVs to reveal their genetic relatedness. Results Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a close relationship among SPPV/GanS/2/2011/China, SPPV/GanS/1/2011/China and SPPV/NingX/2009/China. They were clustered on the same SPPV clade. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 belonged to the GTPV lineage. GS-V1 was closely related to other GTPV vaccine strains. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 were clustered with GTPVs from China and some southern Asian countries. Conclusion This study may expand the datum for spread trend research of Chinese SPPVs and GTPVs, meanwhile provide theoretical references to improve the preventive and control strategy.

  2. Phylogenetic analysis of Chinese sheeppox and goatpox virus isolates.

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    Zhou, Tao; Jia, Huaijie; Chen, Guohua; He, Xiaobing; Fang, Yongxiang; Wang, Xiaoxia; Guan, Qisai; Zeng, Shuang; Cui, Qing; Jing, Zhizhong

    2012-01-20

    Sheeppox virus (SPPV) and goatpox virus (GTPV), members of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family are causative agents of sheep pox and goat pox respectively, which are important contagious diseases and endemic in central and northern Africa, the Middle and Far East, and the Indian sub-continent. Both sheep pox and goat pox can cause wool and hide damage, and reduce the production of mutton and milk, which may result in significant economic losses and threaten the stockbreeding. In this study, three SPPVs and two GTPVs were collected from China in 2009 and 2011. We described the sequence features and phylogenetic analysis of the P32 gene, GPCR gene and RPO30 gene of the SPPVs and GTPVs to reveal their genetic relatedness. Sequence and phylogenetic analysis showed that there was a close relationship among SPPV/GanS/2/2011/China, SPPV/GanS/1/2011/China and SPPV/NingX/2009/China. They were clustered on the same SPPV clade. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 belonged to the GTPV lineage. GS-V1 was closely related to other GTPV vaccine strains. GTPV/HuB/2009/China and GS-V1 were clustered with GTPVs from China and some southern Asian countries. This study may expand the datum for spread trend research of Chinese SPPVs and GTPVs, meanwhile provide theoretical references to improve the preventive and control strategy.

  3. Mosquito-borne Inkoo virus in northern Sweden - isolation and whole genome sequencing.

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    Lwande, Olivia Wesula; Bucht, Göran; Ahlm, Clas; Ahlm, Kristoffer; Näslund, Jonas; Evander, Magnus

    2017-03-23

    Inkoo virus (INKV) is a less known mosquito-borne virus belonging to Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus, California serogroup. Studies indicate that INKV infection is mainly asymptomatic, but can cause mild encephalitis in humans. In northern Europe, the sero-prevalence against INKV is high, 41% in Sweden and 51% in Finland. Previously, INKV RNA has been detected in adult Aedes (Ae.) communis, Ae. hexodontus and Ae. punctor mosquitoes and Ae. communis larvae, but there are still gaps of knowledge regarding mosquito vectors and genetic diversity. Therefore, we aimed to determine the occurrence of INKV in its mosquito vector and characterize the isolates. About 125,000 mosquitoes were collected during a mosquito-borne virus surveillance in northern Sweden during the summer period of 2015. Of these, 10,000 mosquitoes were processed for virus isolation and detection using cell culture and RT-PCR. Virus isolates were further characterized by whole genome sequencing. Genetic typing of mosquito species was conducted by cytochrome oxidase subunit I (COI) gene amplification and sequencing (genetic barcoding). Several Ae. communis mosquitoes were found positive for INKV RNA and two isolates were obtained. The first complete sequences of the small (S), medium (M), and large (L) segments of INKV in Sweden were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the INKV genome was most closely related to other INKV isolates from Sweden and Finland. Of the three INKV genome segments, the INKV M segment had the highest frequency of non-synonymous mutations. The overall G/C-content of INKV genes was low for the N/NSs genes (43.8-45.5%), polyprotein (Gn/Gc/NSm) gene (35.6%) and the RNA polymerase gene (33.8%) This may be due to the fact that INKV in most instances utilized A or T in the third codon position. INKV is frequently circulating in northern Sweden and Ae. communis is the key vector. The high mutation rate of the INKV M segment may have consequences on virulence.

  4. Chapare virus, a newly discovered arenavirus isolated from a fatal hemorrhagic fever case in Bolivia.

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    Simon Delgado

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available A small focus of hemorrhagic fever (HF cases occurred near Cochabamba, Bolivia, in December 2003 and January 2004. Specimens were available from only one fatal case, which had a clinical course that included fever, headache, arthralgia, myalgia, and vomiting with subsequent deterioration and multiple hemorrhagic signs. A non-cytopathic virus was isolated from two of the patient serum samples, and identified as an arenavirus by IFA staining with a rabbit polyvalent antiserum raised against South American arenaviruses known to be associated with HF (Guanarito, Machupo, and Sabiá. RT-PCR analysis and subsequent analysis of the complete virus S and L RNA segment sequences identified the virus as a member of the New World Clade B arenaviruses, which includes all the pathogenic South American arenaviruses. The virus was shown to be most closely related to Sabiá virus, but with 26% and 30% nucleotide difference in the S and L segments, and 26%, 28%, 15% and 22% amino acid differences for the L, Z, N, and GP proteins, respectively, indicating the virus represents a newly discovered arenavirus, for which we propose the name Chapare virus. In conclusion, two different arenaviruses, Machupo and Chapare, can be associated with severe HF cases in Bolivia.

  5. Antigenic typing of brazilian rabies virus samples isolated from animals and humans, 1989-2000

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    FAVORETTO Silvana Regina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Animal and human rabies samples isolated between 1989 and 2000 were typified by means of a monoclonal antibody panel against the viral nucleoprotein. The panel had been previously established to study the molecular epidemiology of rabies virus in the Americas. Samples were isolated in the Diagnostic Laboratory of the Pasteur Institute and in other rabies diagnostic centers in Brazil. In addition to the fixed virus samples CVS-31/96-IP, preserved in mouse brain, and PV-BHK/97, preserved in cell culture, a total of 330 rabies virus samples were isolated from dogs, cats, cattle, horses, bats, sheep, goat, swine, foxes, marmosets, coati and humans. Six antigenic variants that were compatible with the pre-established monoclonal antibodies panel were defined: numbers 2 (dog, 3 (Desmodus rotundus, 4 (Tadarida brasiliensis, 5 (vampire bat from Venezuela, 6 (Lasiurus cinereus and Lab (reacted to all used antibodies. Six unknown profiles, not compatible with the panel, were also found. Samples isolated from insectivore bats showed the greatest variability and the most commonly isolated variant was variant-3 (Desmodus rotundus. These findings may be related to the existence of multiple independent transmission cycles, involving different bat species.

  6. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

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    Mi-Kyeong Kim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

  7. Differential cytopathogenesis of respiratory syncytial virus prototypic and clinical isolates in primary pediatric bronchial epithelial cells

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    Coyle Peter V

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV causes severe respiratory disease in infants. Airway epithelial cells are the principle targets of RSV infection. However, the mechanisms by which it causes disease are poorly understood. Most RSV pathogenesis data are derived using laboratory-adapted prototypic strains. We hypothesized that such strains may be poorly representative of recent clinical isolates in terms of virus/host interactions in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (PBECs. Methods To address this hypothesis, we isolated three RSV strains from infants hospitalized with bronchiolitis and compared them with the prototypic RSV A2 in terms of cytopathology, virus growth kinetics and chemokine secretion in infected PBEC monolayers. Results RSV A2 rapidly obliterated the PBECs, whereas the clinical isolates caused much less cytopathology. Concomitantly, RSV A2 also grew faster and to higher titers in PBECs. Furthermore, dramatically increased secretion of IP-10 and RANTES was evident following A2 infection compared with the clinical isolates. Conclusions The prototypic RSV strain A2 is poorly representative of recent clinical isolates in terms of cytopathogenicity, viral growth kinetics and pro-inflammatory responses induced following infection of PBEC monolayers. Thus, the choice of RSV strain may have important implications for future RSV pathogenesis studies.

  8. Lassa Virus Isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast Represent an Emerging Fifth Lineage

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    John Tyler Manning

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Previous imported cases of Lassa fever into the United Kingdom from the Ivory Coast and Mali, as well as the detection of Lassa virus among the Mastomys natalensis population within Mali has led to the suggestion that the endemic area for Lassa fever is expanding. Initial phylogenetic analyses arrange isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast separately from the classical lineage IV isolates taken from Sierra Leone, Guinea, and Liberia. The availability of full genome sequences continues to increase, allowing for a more complete phylogenetic comparison of the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast to the other existing isolates. In this study, we utilized a Bayesian approach to infer the demographic histories of each Lassa virus isolate for which the full sequence was available. Our results indicate that the isolates from Mali and the Ivory Coast group separately from the isolates of lineage IV, comprising a distinct fifth lineage. The split between lineages IV and V is estimated to have occurred around 200-300 years ago, which coincides with the colonial period of West Africa.

  9. Isolation of Irkut virus from a Murina leucogaster bat in China.

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    Ye Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Bats are recognized as a major reservoir of lyssaviruses; however, no bat lyssavirus has been isolated in Asia except for Aravan and Khujand virus in Central Asia. All Chinese lyssavirus isolates in previous reports have been of species rabies virus, mainly from dogs. Following at least two recent bat-associated human rabies-like cases in northeast China, we have initiated a study of the prevalence of lyssaviruses in bats in Jilin province and their public health implications. A bat lyssavirus has been isolated and its pathogenicity in mice and genomic alignment have been determined. RESULTS: We report the first isolation of a bat lyssavirus in China, from the brain of a northeastern bat, Murina leucogaster. Its nucleoprotein gene shared 92.4%/98.9% (nucleotide and 92.2%/98.8% (amino acid identity with the two known Irkut virus isolates from Russia, and was designated IRKV-THChina12. Following intracranial and intramuscular injection, IRKV-THChina12 produced rabies-like symptoms in adult mice with a short inoculation period and high mortality. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that IRKV-THChina12 has the same genomic organization as other lyssaviruses and its isolation provides an independent origin for the species IRKV. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified the existence of a bat lyssavirus in a common Chinese bat species. Its high pathogenicity in adult mice suggests that public warnings and medical education regarding bat bites in China should be increased, and that surveillance be extended to provide a better understanding of Irkut virus ecology and its significance for public health.

  10. Isolation and identification of a bovine viral diarrhea virus from sika deer in china

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    Wang Nan

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV infections continue to cause significantly losses in the deer population. Better isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer may contribute significantly to the development of prophylactic therapeutic, and diagnostic reagents as well as help in prevention and control of BVDV. However, isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer is seldom reported in literature. In this study, we collected some samples according to clinical sign of BVDV to isolation and identification of BVDV from sika deer. Results we isolated a suspected BVDV strain from livers of an aborted fetus from sika deer in Changchun (China using MDBK cell lines, named as CCSYD strain, and identified it by cytopathic effect (CPE, indirect immunoperoxidase test (IPX and electron microscopy(EM. The results indicated that this virus was BVDV by a series of identification. The structural proteins E0 gene was cloned and sequenced. The obtained E0 gene sequence has been submitted to GenBank with the accession number: FJ555203. Alignment with other 9 strains of BVDV, 7 strains of classical swine fever virus (CSFV and 3 strains of border disease virus(BDV in the world, showed that the homology were 98.6%-84.8%, 76.0%-74.7%, 76.6%-77.0% for nucleotide sequence, respectively. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that new isolation and identification CCSYD strain belonged to BVDV1b. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that BVDV was isolated and identified in sika deer. This current research contributes development new BVDV vaccine to prevent and control of BVD in sika deer.

  11. [Analysis on VP1 gene variation of Coxsackie virus B5 for aseptic meningitis isolated from Zhejiang Province in 2008].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Qiong; Yan, Ju-Ying; Gong, Li-Ming

    2010-02-01

    Study meningoencephalitis virus isolated from the Coxsackie B5 virus(CVB5 virus) VP1 gene characteristics of Zhejiang Province in 2008 and compare with other countries CVB5 prototype isolates, and to explore the relationship of variation of the Virus VP1 areas and epidemic viral meningoencephalitis Hep-2 and RD cells in cerebrospinal fluid and stool specimens for virus isolation, positive isolates combination with intestinal type of serum. On the separation of virus extracted RNA, and then RT-PCR amplified VP, gene CVB5 virus fragments, and purification of sequencing products, using DNAMAN and Bioedit analytical processing software. The VP1 gene of CVB5 isolated from Zhejiang province meningoencephalitis viral in 2008 was 735bp. There were no missing and insertion of nucleotide . Strains isolated from ZJ/12/02 with the nucleotide and amino acid sequence of the highest phylogenetic tree showed that they were not the same branch. The mutation caused by viral meningoencephalitis virus CVB5 Zhejiang province in 2008 was smaller. Viral meningoencephalitis distributed in some areas in the province had no significant prevalence.

  12. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of a coat protein of an Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y: comparison with homologous sequences of other isolates and phylogenetic analysis

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    Budzanivska I. G.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Identification of the widespread Ukrainian isolate(s of PVY (Potato virus Y in different potato cultivars and subsequent phylogenetic analysis of detected PVY isolates based on NA and AA sequences of coat protein. Methods. ELISA, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. Results. PVY has been identified serologically in potato cultivars of Ukrainian selection. In this work we have optimized a method for total RNA extraction from potato samples and offered a sensitive and specific PCR-based test system of own design for diagnostics of the Ukrainian PVY isolates. Part of the CP gene of the Ukrainian PVY isolate has been sequenced and analyzed phylogenetically. It is demonstrated that the Ukrainian isolate of Potato virus Y (CP gene has a higher percentage of homology with the recombinant isolates (strains of this pathogen (approx. 98.8– 99.8 % of homology for both nucleotide and translated amino acid sequences of the CP gene. The Ukrainian isolate of PVY is positioned in the separate cluster together with the isolates found in Syria, Japan and Iran; these isolates possibly have common origin. The Ukrainian PVY isolate is confirmed to be recombinant. Conclusions. This work underlines the need and provides the means for accurate monitoring of Potato virus Y in the agroecosystems of Ukraine. Most importantly, the phylogenetic analysis demonstrated the recombinant nature of this PVY isolate which has been attributed to the strain group O, subclade N:O.

  13. Complete genome analysis of three isolates of narcissus late season yellows virus and two of narcissus yellow stripe virus: three species or one?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wylie, Stephen J; Li, Hua; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Jones, Michael G K

    2014-06-01

    Complete genome sequences of two new isolates of narcissus late season yellows virus (NLSYV) from Australia were compared with the other NLSYV genome from China and with two complete genomes of isolates designated narcissus yellow stripe virus (NYSV), one from Australia and the other from China. On the basis of symptoms on natural and experimental host species, and genome sequence identity, the isolates could either be classified as closely related members of three different species or placed together in one taxon. Options for classification of these potyvirus isolates are discussed.

  14. Isolation and characterization of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus subtype H5N1 from donkeys

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    Abdel-Ghany Ahmad E

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The highly pathogenic H5N1 is a major avian pathogen that crosses species barriers and seriously affects humans as well as some mammals. It mutates in an intensified manner and is considered a potential candidate for the possible next pandemic with all the catastrophic consequences. Methods Nasal swabs were collected from donkeys suffered from respiratory distress. The virus was isolated from the pooled nasal swabs in specific pathogen free embryonated chicken eggs (SPF-ECE. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and sequencing of both haemagglutingin and neuraminidase were performed. H5 seroconversion was screened using haemagglutination inhibition (HI assay on 105 donkey serum samples. Results We demonstrated that H5N1 jumped from poultry to another mammalian host; donkeys. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the virus clustered within the lineage of H5N1 from Egypt, closely related to 2009 isolates. It harboured few genetic changes compared to the closely related viruses from avian and humans. The neuraminidase lacks oseltamivir resistant mutations. Interestingly, HI screening for antibodies to H5 haemagglutinins in donkeys revealed high exposure rate. Conclusions These findings extend the host range of the H5N1 influenza virus, possess implications for influenza virus epidemiology and highlight the need for the systematic surveillance of H5N1 in animals in the vicinity of backyard poultry units especially in endemic areas.

  15. Surveillance, isolation and complete genome sequence of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 in Egyptian cattle

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    Nader M. Sobhy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV-3 can infect a wide variety of mammals including humans, domestic animals, and wild animals. In the present study, bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3 was isolated from nasal swabs of Egyptian cattle presenting with clinical signs of mild pneumonia. The virus was isolated in Madin-Darby bovine kidney (MDBK cells and confirmed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. The complete genome of Egyptian BPIV-3 strain was sequenced by using next generation (Illumina sequencing. The new isolate classified with genotype A of BPIV-3 and was closely related to the Chinese NM09 strain (JQ063064. Subsequently in 2015–16, a molecular surveillance study was undertaken by collecting and testing samples from cattle and buffaloes with respiratory tract infections. The survey revealed a higher rate of BPIV-3 infection in cattle than in buffaloes. The infection was inversely proportional to the age of the animals and to warm weather. This report should form a basis for further molecular studies on animal viruses in Egypt.

  16. Full-length genomic sequence of subgenotype IIIA hepatitis A virus isolate in Republic of Korea.

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    Lee, Ah-Ra; Lee, Sung-Geun; Kang, Lae-Hyung; Jheong, Weon-Hwa; Paik, Soon-Young

    2013-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus is known to cause acute hepatitis and has significant implications for public health throughout the world. In the Republic of Korea, the number of patients with hepatitis A virus infection has been increasing rapidly since 2006. In this study, the Kor-HAV-F strain was identified as subgenotype IIIA by RT-PCR, and its identity was confirmed by nucleotide sequencing and alignment analysis. Moreover, detailed phylogenetic analysis indicated that the Kor-HAV-F strain clustered into subgenotype IIIA, including strains isolated in Japan, Norway, and India. The entire amino acid sequence of the VP1 and 2A regions was compared with that of the reference strains isolated in various countries. We found 2 amino acid changes (T168A and L96P, resp.) in the VP1 and 2A regions, which had not been found in any other hepatitis A virus strain. To our knowledge, this study is the first to report the full-length sequence of a hepatitis A virus isolated in the Republic of Korea.

  17. Isolation and full-genome sequence of two reticuloendotheliosis virus strains from mixed infections with Marek's disease virus in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Ke-yan; Zhang, Yan-ping; Zheng, Hui-wen; Lv, Hong-chao; Gao, Yu-long; Wang, Jing-fei; Gao, Hong-lei; Qi, Xiao-le; Cui, Hong-yu; Wang, Yong-qiang; Ren, Xian-gang; Wang, Xiao-mei; Liu, Chang-jun

    2015-06-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), classified as a gammaretrovirus, has a variety of hosts, including chickens, ducks, geese, turkeys, and wild birds. REV causes a series of pathological syndromes, especially the immunosuppression of the host, which may lead to an increased susceptibility to other pathogens, thus greatly damaging the poultry industry. Mixed infections of REV and Marek's disease virus (MDV) have been reported in many countries, including China. Previous reports revealed that MDV vaccines were not efficacious, and even less-virulent MDV strains would cause some losses due to mixed infections with REV. Additionally, contaminants in the MDV vaccine might be the main source of REV. In this study, two clinical samples were collected from two flocks of chickens that were diagnosed with MDV. Subsequently, two REV isolates were obtained from the clinical samples. The isolates, named CY1111 and SY1209, were further confirmed through an indirect immunofluorescence assay and electron microscopy. Complete genome sequences of the two REV strains were determined to test the relationship between them and other REV strains. Phylogenetic trees showed that the two REV strains were closely related to most REV strains that were isolated from a variety of hosts. Therefore, REVs might spread freely among these hosts under natural conditions. Additionally, most REV strains in China were in the same clade. The present work offers some information regarding REV in China.

  18. Isolation of avian influenza H5N1 virus from vaccinated commercial layer flock in Egypt

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    El-Zoghby Elham F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Uninterrupted transmission of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV H5N1 of clade 2.2.1 in Egypt since 2006 resulted in establishment of two main genetic clusters. The 2.2.1/C group where all recent human and majority of backyard origin viruses clustered together, meanwhile the majority of viruses derived from vaccinated poultry in commercial farms grouped in 2.2.1.1 clade. Findings In the present investigation, an HPAIV H5N1 was isolated from twenty weeks old layers chickens that were vaccinated with a homologous H5N1 vaccine at 1, 7 and 16 weeks old. At twenty weeks of age, birds showed cyanosis of comb and wattle, decrease in egg production and up to 27% mortality. Examined serum samples showed low antibody titer in HI test (Log2 3.2± 4.2. The hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA genes of the isolated virus were closely related to viruses in 2.2.1/C group isolated from poultry in live bird market (LBM and backyards or from infected people. Conspicuous mutations in the HA and NA genes including a deletion within the receptor binding domain in the HA globular head region were observed. Conclusions Despite repeated vaccination of layer chickens using a homologous H5N1 vaccine, infection with HPAIV H5N1 resulted in significant morbidity and mortality. In endemic countries like Egypt, rigorous control measures including enforcement of biosecurity, culling of infected birds and constant update of vaccine virus strains are highly required to prevent circulation of HPAIV H5N1 between backyard birds, commercial poultry, LBM and humans.

  19. Distinct patterns of innate immune activation by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus.

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    Levitz, Ruth; Gao, Yajing; Dozmorov, Igor; Song, Ran; Wakeland, Edward K; Kahn, Jeffrey S

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. Multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate during each seasonal epidemic. Genetic heterogeneity among RSV genomes, in large part due to the error prone RNA-dependent, RNA polymerase, could mediate variations in pathogenicity. We evaluated clinical strains of RSV for their ability to induce the innate immune response. Subgroup B viruses were used to infect human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) and primary monocyte-derived human macrophages (MDM) from a variety of donors. Secretions of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES) from infected cells were measured following infection. Host and viral transcriptome expression were assessed using RNA-SEQ technology and the genomic sequences of several clinical isolates were determined. There were dramatic differences in the induction of IL-6 and CCL5 in both A549 cells and MDM infected with a variety of clinical isolates of RSV. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the pattern of innate immune activation in MDM was virus-specific and host-specific. Specifically, viruses that induced high levels of secreted IL-6 and CCL5 tended to induce cellular innate immune pathways whereas viruses that induced relatively low level of IL-6 or CCL5 did not induce or suppressed innate immune gene expression. Activation of the host innate immune response mapped to variations in the RSV G gene and the M2-1 gene. Viral transcriptome data indicated that there was a gradient of transcription across the RSV genome though in some strains, RSV G was the expressed in the highest amounts at late times post-infection. Clinical strains of RSV differ in cytokine/chemokine induction and in induction and suppression of host genes expression suggesting that these viruses may have inherent differences in virulence potential. Identification of the genetic elements responsible for these differences may lead to novel approaches to antiviral agents and vaccines.

  20. Distinct patterns of innate immune activation by clinical isolates of respiratory syncytial virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitz, Ruth; Wakeland, Edward K.

    2017-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major respiratory pathogen of infants and young children. Multiple strains of both subgroup A and B viruses circulate during each seasonal epidemic. Genetic heterogeneity among RSV genomes, in large part due to the error prone RNA-dependent, RNA polymerase, could mediate variations in pathogenicity. We evaluated clinical strains of RSV for their ability to induce the innate immune response. Subgroup B viruses were used to infect human pulmonary epithelial cells (A549) and primary monocyte-derived human macrophages (MDM) from a variety of donors. Secretions of IL-6 and CCL5 (RANTES) from infected cells were measured following infection. Host and viral transcriptome expression were assessed using RNA-SEQ technology and the genomic sequences of several clinical isolates were determined. There were dramatic differences in the induction of IL-6 and CCL5 in both A549 cells and MDM infected with a variety of clinical isolates of RSV. Transcriptome analyses revealed that the pattern of innate immune activation in MDM was virus-specific and host-specific. Specifically, viruses that induced high levels of secreted IL-6 and CCL5 tended to induce cellular innate immune pathways whereas viruses that induced relatively low level of IL-6 or CCL5 did not induce or suppressed innate immune gene expression. Activation of the host innate immune response mapped to variations in the RSV G gene and the M2-1 gene. Viral transcriptome data indicated that there was a gradient of transcription across the RSV genome though in some strains, RSV G was the expressed in the highest amounts at late times post-infection. Clinical strains of RSV differ in cytokine/chemokine induction and in induction and suppression of host genes expression suggesting that these viruses may have inherent differences in virulence potential. Identification of the genetic elements responsible for these differences may lead to novel approaches to antiviral agents and vaccines

  1. Molecular analysis of bovine viral diarrhoea virus isolates from South Africa

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    N. Kabongo

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of bovine viral diarrhoea virus in South Africa has been confirmed by several serological surveys. However, little is known about its biological properties. Twenty five isolates obtained by isolation in tissue culture and detected by means of the antigen capture ELISA from clinically sick cattle and from foetal calf serum in South Africa were characterized on the basis of analysis of the 5' non-translated (NTR region of the genome. A reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR was used to amplify specific sequences from the 5'NTR of the genome. The oligonucleotide primers corresponding to positions 105-125 and 399-378, respectively, in the sequence of BVDV strain NADL were used to generate the PCR products. Both strands were sequenced directly with these primers and fluorescence-labelled dideoxynucleotides in an automated nucleic acid sequencer. Reference strains of pestiviruses [(BVDV type I, BVDV type II, border disease virus (BDV and hog cholera virus (HCV] and isolates from a previous investigation on BVDV in southern Africa were included for comparative purposes. All the BVDV strains obtained during this study belong to subgroups of BVDV genotype I. No association could be demonstrated between the geographic origin of the isolates. A number of isolates formed another branch separate from the existing branches Ia, Ib and Ic. These findings suggest that extensive genetic diversity can be found within BVDV type I isolates from southern Africa. Isolates that group with the classical BVDV type I strains, particularly of American origin, coexist with variants that appear to represent a local genetic pool and or variants evolving from the classical strains.

  2. Genetic characteristics of mumps viruses isolated in Korea from 2007 to 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung Tae; Kim, You-Jin; Yang, Jeong-Sun; Nam, Jeong-Gu; Kim, Kisoon; Kim, Sung Soon; Kang, Hae Ji

    2016-09-01

    Mumps is a vaccine-preventable viral disease. Despite vaccine coverage of >95%, the incidence of mumps has increased in Korea since 2007. This study aimed to genetically characterize mumps virus (MuV) strains that circulated in Korea between 2007 and 2012 to determine the factors underlying mumps outbreaks. MuV was isolated from 175 clinical specimens between 2007 and 2012 in Korea. Upon analysis of the SH gene in Korean mumps virus isolates, three different genotypes were identified: I, H, and F. The MuV genotypes I and H co-circulated in Korea, and eight isolates of Korean genotype F were found within the same time period in 2008. An analysis of HN amino-acid sequence data showed that Korean isolates had no changes in their glycosylation sites. At putative neutralizing epitope sites, the Jeryl-Lynn strain showed 4-5 different amino acid sequences from those observed in Korean isolates. Korean isolates of genotypes I and H shared distinctive point mutations on putative neutralizing epitope positions in each genotype. This report describes the genetic characteristics of MuV strains circulating in Korea and provides information on endemic mumps infections. This information may be important to help prevent mumps and control outbreaks of mumps in Korea. J. Med. Virol. 88:1479-1486, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Characterization of a Borna disease virus field isolate which shows efficient viral propagation and transmissibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Yohei; Ibrahim, Madiha S; Hagiwara, Katsuro; Okamoto, Minoru; Kamitani, Wataru; Yanai, Hideyuki; Ohtaki, Naohiro; Hayashi, Yohei; Taniyama, Hiroyuki; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2007-04-01

    To investigate the biological characteristics of field isolates of Borna disease virus (BDV), as well as to understand BDV infections outside endemic countries, we isolated the virus from brain samples of a heifer with Borna disease in Japan. We demonstrate that the brain lysate contained replication products of BDV and induced viral propagation in rat glioma cells, suggesting that a replication-competent BDV existed in the bovine brain. This field strain of BDV, named Bo/04w, showed efficient viral release and transmissibility and also displayed a distinct pattern of expression of viral phosphoprotein (P) during infection, as compared with laboratory-adapted BDV strains. Interestingly, we found the level of P to be significantly low in cells infected with Bo/04w, and the transcription of this isolate to be more efficient than that of laboratory strain of BDV. These results indicated that the field isolate may regulate the expression of P at an optimal level in infected cells. We also confirmed that Bo/04w maintains biological significance in neonatal gerbil brain. Sequencing revealed that despite the biological differences, the field isolate is closely related genetically to the laboratory strains of BDV. We discuss here the sequence similarities between BDV isolates from endemic and nonendemic countries.

  4. Molecular differentiation of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus isolates from farmed and wild salmonids in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruane, N M; McCarthy, L J; Swords, D; Henshilwood, K

    2009-12-01

    This study investigated the genotypes and sub-groups of infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV) present in farmed and wild salmonid fish in Ireland. An 1100-bp portion of the VP2 region of segment A from each of 55 IPNV isolates collected over 2003-2007 was amplified by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction and the product directly sequenced. The nucleotide sequences of each isolate were aligned and compared with each other and with the corresponding sequences of a number of reference isolates. All the 55 sequenced isolates belonged to genogroup 5 (Sp serotype) and could be divided into two subgroups. Irish subgroup 1 consisted of isolates from farmed salmon originating from an Irish salmon broodstock. Irish subgroup 2 consisted of isolates from imported farmed stock and all reported clinical outbreaks of IPN were associated with isolates from subgroup 2. Isolates from wild fish were identical to some isolates from subgroup 2, and therefore are believed to have originated from infected farms. These results highlight the importance of import risk analysis for diseases not listed under current legislation.

  5. Phylogenetic analysis of Indian rabies virus isolates targeting the complete glycoprotein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, Susan; Singh, Rajendra; Singh, K P; Manjunatha Reddy, G B; Anjaneya; Ravi Kumar, G V P P S; Sumithra, T G; Singh, R P

    2015-12-01

    Rabies a fatal viral zoonosis is endemic in India. There is no report on phylogenetic study of Indian rabies virus isolates based on the complete G gene. In the present study, a total of 25 rabies positive brain samples collected during 2001-2014 from North India (UP, MP, Delhi, Rajasthan), South India (Kerala and Karnataka) and Gujarat states belonging to six different host species were subjected to G gene amplification by RT-PCR as three overlapping fragments of 881 bp, 991 bp and 618 bp. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that all Indian rabies virus isolates are genetically closely related with Arctic-like 1a lineage viruses. However, two distinct clusters were identified namely, India South and India North. All the Indian rabies isolates had 95.5-100% homology related to geography, but not to host species. Deduced amino acids on comparison revealed two amino acid changes, aa 356 in ECTO; N→K and aa 458; M→I, which were found to distinguish between the India South and India North isolates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome sequence analysis of dengue virus 1 isolated in Key West, Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dongyoung; Richards, Stephanie L; Alto, Barry W; Bettinardi, David J; Smartt, Chelsea T

    2013-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is transmitted to humans through the bite of mosquitoes. In November 2010, a dengue outbreak was reported in Monroe County in southern Florida (FL), including greater than 20 confirmed human cases. The virus collected from the human cases was verified as DENV serotype 1 (DENV-1) and one isolate was provided for sequence analysis. RNA was extracted from the DENV-1 isolate and was used in reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to amplify PCR fragments to sequence. Nucleic acid primers were designed to generate overlapping PCR fragments that covered the entire genome. The DENV-1 isolate found in Key West (KW), FL was sequenced for whole genome characterization. Sequence assembly, Genbank searches, and recombination analyses were performed to verify the identity of the genome sequences and to determine percent similarity to known DENV-1 sequences. We show that the KW DENV-1 strain is 99% identical to Nicaraguan and Mexican DENV-1 strains. Phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the DENV-1 isolated in KW originated from Nicaragua (NI) and the KW strain may circulate in KW. Also, recombination analysis results detected recombination events in the KW strain compared to DENV-1 strains from Puerto Rico. We evaluate the relative growth of KW strain of DENV-1 compared to other dengue viruses to determine whether the underlying genetics of the strain is associated with a replicative advantage, an important consideration since local transmission of DENV may result because domestic tourism can spread DENVs.

  7. FMD virus isolates: the candidate strains for polyvalent vaccine development in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayelet, G; Soressa, M; Sisay, T; Belay, A; Gelaye, E; Jembere, S; Skjerve, E; Asmare, K

    2013-06-01

    The study was conducted on foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) viruses with the aim of selecting appropriate vaccinal strain to control of FMD in Ethiopia. The study was conducted in two-dimensional virus neutralization assay to determine the antigenic relationship 'r' value between the candidate vaccine strains and field isolates. A total of 21 serotype O, 7 serotype A, and 8 serotype SAT 2 FMD viruses, which were isolated from cattle and swine. A couple of isolates from each serotype were identified as vaccine candidates in the trial (O-ETH/38/2005, O-ETH/58/2008, A-ETH/7/2008, A-ETH/6/2000, SAT2-ETH/76/2009 and SAT2-ETH/64/2009). The finding revealed all the vaccine candidate depicted high antigenic similarity, above the mean "r" value, to their own serotypes in the studied serotype population except for one serotype A field isolate, A-ETH/13/1981, with "r" value=0.14 and 0.25) which is significantly lower than the minimum requirement. In general, the result indicated that these candidate vaccinal strains can be used for polyvalent vaccine production in the country. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. ISOLATION OF VIRUS IN PRODUCTS OF CONCEPTION IN SPONTANEOUS ABORTION

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    KAMYAB S.D. AZARI S.D. NATEGH R

    1980-08-01

    Full Text Available Two hundred pa t ient s o f t he l ow socioe conomic g roup wi th an aborti on o f the f i r s t t r i mest e r were stud 1ed . The s ter i l e produc ts o f concept ion were c ul t ured on Gr e e n Monke y Kidney ti s sue cul t ure f or v i r a l de t e c - tion. Four po s i t i ve Herpe s virus, two positive Rubella"nv~ru s and t hree pos i tive unidentifie d Entero v irus l ike Vlrus were obtained The sera of 192 of these patients were titrated for Rubella antibody. The sera of a control group of 150 normal pregnant women were titrated for Rubella antibody and 8.8 per cent of these patients had a negative titre and 21.3 per cent , 1 had a tltre over 40

  9. Genetic and serological typing of European infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, T.; Einer-Jensen, K.; Batts, W.; Ahrens, P.; Bjorkblom, C.; Kurath, G.; Bjorklund, H.; Lorenzen, N.

    2009-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) causes the lethal disease infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) in juvenile salmon and trout. The nucleocapsid (N) protein gene and partial glycoprotein (G) gene (nucleotides 457 to 1061) of the European isolates IT-217A, FR-32/87, DE-DF 13/98 11621, DE-DF 4/99-8/99, AU-9695338 and RU-FR1 were sequenced and compared with IHNV isolates from the North American genogroups U, M and L. In phylogenetic studies the N gene of the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, though in a different subgroup than the isolates from the USA. Analyses of the partial G gene of these European isolates clustered them in the M genogroup close to the root while the Russian isolate clustered in the U genogroup. The European isolates together with US-WRAC and US-Col-80 were also tested in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the N protein. MAbs 136-1 and 136-3 reacted equally at all concentrations with the isolates tested, indicating that these antibodies identify a common epitope. MAb 34D3 separated the M and L genogroup isolates from the U genogroup isolate. MAb 1DW14D divided the European isolates into 2 groups. MAb 1DW14D reacted more strongly with DE-DF 13/98 11621 and RU-FR1 than with IT-217A, FR- 32/87, DE-DF 4/99-8/99 and AU-9695338. In the phylogenetic studies, the Italian, French, German and Austrian isolates clustered in the M genogroup, whereas in the serological studies using MAbs, the European M genogroup isolates could not be placed in the same specific group. These results indicate that genotypic and serotypic classification do not correlate. ?? 2009 Inter-Research.

  10. Complete genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of dengue type 1 virus isolated from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Esam I; Hashem, Anwar M; El-Kafrawy, Sherif A; Abol-Ela, Said; Abd-Alla, Adly M M; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Farraj, Suha A; Othman, Norah A; Ben-Helaby, Huda G; Ashshi, Ahmed; Madani, Tariq A; Jamjoom, Ghazi

    2015-01-16

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are mosquito-borne viruses which can cause disease ranging from mild fever to severe dengue infection. These viruses are endemic in several tropical and subtropical regions. Multiple outbreaks of DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 (DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-3) have been reported from the western region in Saudi Arabia since 1994. Strains from at least two genotypes of DENV-1 (Asia and America/Africa genotypes) have been circulating in western Saudi Arabia until 2006. However, all previous studies reported from Saudi Arabia were based on partial sequencing data of the envelope (E) gene without any reports of full genome sequences for any DENV serotypes circulating in Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the isolation and the first complete genome sequence of a DENV-1 strain (DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011) isolated from a patient from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2011. Whole genome sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed high similarity between DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011 strain and D1/H/IMTSSA/98/606 isolate (Asian genotype) reported from Djibouti in 1998. Further analysis of the full envelope gene revealed a close relationship between DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011 strain and isolates reported between 2004-2006 from Jeddah as well as recent isolates from Somalia, suggesting the widespread of the Asian genotype in this region. These data suggest that strains belonging to the Asian genotype might have been introduced into Saudi Arabia long before 2004 most probably by African pilgrims and continued to circulate in western Saudi Arabia at least until 2011. Most importantly, these results indicate that pilgrims from dengue endemic regions can play an important role in the spread of new DENVs in Saudi Arabia and the rest of the world. Therefore, availability of complete genome sequences would serve as a reference for future epidemiological studies of DENV-1 viruses.

  11. Phospholipase A2 isolated from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus inactivates dengue virus and other enveloped viruses by disrupting the viral envelope.

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    Vanessa Danielle Muller

    Full Text Available The Flaviviridae family includes several virus pathogens associated with human diseases worldwide. Within this family, Dengue virus is the most serious threat to public health, especially in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Currently, there are no vaccines or specific antiviral drugs against Dengue virus or against most of the viruses of this family. Therefore, the development of vaccines and the discovery of therapeutic compounds against the medically most important flaviviruses remain a global public health priority. We previously showed that phospholipase A2 isolated from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus was able to inhibit Dengue virus and Yellow fever virus infection in Vero cells. Here, we present evidence that phospholipase A2 has a direct effect on Dengue virus particles, inducing a partial exposure of genomic RNA, which strongly suggests inhibition via the cleavage of glycerophospholipids at the virus lipid bilayer envelope. This cleavage might induce a disruption of the lipid bilayer that causes a destabilization of the E proteins on the virus surface, resulting in inactivation. We show by computational analysis that phospholipase A2 might gain access to the Dengue virus lipid bilayer through the pores found on each of the twenty 3-fold vertices of the E protein shell on the virus surface. In addition, phospholipase A2 is able to inactivate other enveloped viruses, highlighting its potential as a natural product lead for developing broad-spectrum antiviral drugs.

  12. Phospholipase A2 isolated from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus inactivates dengue virus and other enveloped viruses by disrupting the viral envelope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Vanessa Danielle; Soares, Ricardo Oliveira; dos Santos, Nilton Nascimento; Trabuco, Amanda Cristina; Cintra, Adelia Cristina; Figueiredo, Luiz Tadeu; Caliri, Antonio; Sampaio, Suely Vilela; Aquino, Victor Hugo

    2014-01-01

    The Flaviviridae family includes several virus pathogens associated with human diseases worldwide. Within this family, Dengue virus is the most serious threat to public health, especially in tropical and sub-tropical regions of the world. Currently, there are no vaccines or specific antiviral drugs against Dengue virus or against most of the viruses of this family. Therefore, the development of vaccines and the discovery of therapeutic compounds against the medically most important flaviviruses remain a global public health priority. We previously showed that phospholipase A2 isolated from the venom of Crotalus durissus terrificus was able to inhibit Dengue virus and Yellow fever virus infection in Vero cells. Here, we present evidence that phospholipase A2 has a direct effect on Dengue virus particles, inducing a partial exposure of genomic RNA, which strongly suggests inhibition via the cleavage of glycerophospholipids at the virus lipid bilayer envelope. This cleavage might induce a disruption of the lipid bilayer that causes a destabilization of the E proteins on the virus surface, resulting in inactivation. We show by computational analysis that phospholipase A2 might gain access to the Dengue virus lipid bilayer through the pores found on each of the twenty 3-fold vertices of the E protein shell on the virus surface. In addition, phospholipase A2 is able to inactivate other enveloped viruses, highlighting its potential as a natural product lead for developing broad-spectrum antiviral drugs.

  13. Identification and Characterization of Citrus tristeza virus Isolates Breaking Resistance in Trifoliate Orange in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomi, Raymond K; Selvaraj, Vijayanandraj; Maheshwari, Yogita; Saponari, Maria; Giampetruzzi, Annalisa; Chiumenti, Michela; Hajeri, Subhas

    2017-07-01

    Most Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates in California are biologically mild and symptomless in commercial cultivars on CTV tolerant rootstocks. However, to better define California CTV isolates showing divergent serological and genetic profiles, selected isolates were subjected to deep sequencing of small RNAs. Full-length sequences were assembled, annotated and trifoliate orange resistance-breaking (RB) isolates of CTV were identified. Phylogenetic relationships based on their full genomes placed three isolates in the RB clade: CA-RB-115, CA-RB-AT25, and CA-RB-AT35. The latter two isolates were obtained by aphid transmission from Murcott and Dekopon trees, respectively, containing CTV mixtures. The California RB isolates were further distinguished into two subclades. Group I included CA-RB-115 and CA-RB-AT25 with 99% nucleotide sequence identity with RB type strain NZRB-G90; and group II included CA-RB-AT35 with 99 and 96% sequence identity with Taiwan Pumelo/SP/T1 and HA18-9, respectively. The RB phenotype was confirmed by detecting CTV replication in graft-inoculated Poncirus trifoliata and transmission from P. trifoliata to sweet orange. The California RB isolates induced mild symptoms compared with severe isolates in greenhouse indexing tests. Further examination of 570 CTV accessions, acquired from approximately 1960 and maintained in planta at the Central California Tristeza Eradication Agency, revealed 16 RB positive isolates based on partial p65 sequences. Six isolates collected from 1992 to 2011 from Tulare and Kern counties were CA-RB-115-like; and 10 isolates collected from 1968 to 2010 from Riverside, Fresno, and Kern counties were CA-RB-AT35-like. The presence of the RB genotype is relevant because P. trifoliata and its hybrids are the most popular rootstocks in California.

  14. Molecular characterization of Citrus tristeza virus isolates from the Northeastern Himalayan region of India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, K K

    2010-06-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from the Darjeeling hills of the Northeastern Himalayan region of India were characterized by biological indexing, multiple molecular marker (MMM) analysis, heteroduplex mobility assay (HMA) and sequence analysis. Variability was studied using the CP gene and a 5' ORF1a fragment of the CTV genome. HMA and sequence analysis of the 5' ORF1a fragment classified Darjeeling isolates into two groups, whereas CP gene analysis provided evidence for three different groups. Darjeeling CTV isolates shared nucleotide sequence identities of 89-97 and 91-92% in the 5' ORF1a fragment and CP gene, respectively, suggesting extensive diversity among CTV isolates from this Indian region.

  15. Detection and partial molecular characterization of atypical plum pox virus isolates from naturally infected sour cherry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna

    2013-06-01

    Atypical isolates of plum pox virus (PPV) were discovered in naturally infected sour cherry in urban ornamental plantings in Moscow, Russia. The isolates were detected by polyclonal double antibody sandwich ELISA and RT-PCR using universal primers specific for the 3'-non-coding and coat protein (CP) regions of the genome but failed to be recognized by triple antibody sandwich ELISA with the universal monoclonal antibody 5B and by RT-PCR using primers specific to for PPV strains D, M, C and W. Sequence analysis of the CP genes of nine isolates revealed 99.2-100 % within-group identity and 62-85 % identity to conventional PPV strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the atypical isolates represent a group that is distinct from the known PPV strains. Alignment of the N-terminal amino acid sequences of CP demonstrated their close similarity to those of a new tentative PPV strain, CR.

  16. Isolation and Characterization of Equine Influenza Viruses (H3N8 from China, 2010~2011

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    Gang Lu1,§, Jie Chen2,§, Wei Guo1,§, Ting Qi1,§, Liping Zhao1, Hongmei Li1, Yuanyuan Ji1, Zheng Wang1, Cuiyun Liu1, Shihua Zhao1 and Wenhua Xiang1,*

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Two equine influenza virus (EIV strains were isolated during two restricted outbreaks from Heilongjiang Province, China in 2010 and 2011. Phylogenetic analysis of HA1 (hemagglutinin 1 gene revealed that the isolates belonged to Florida 2 sublineage of American lineage. Further analysis of the putative antigenic sites located in HA1 subunit protein revealed each isolate had a unique amino acid change. Analysis of antigenic sites between Chinese EIV and vaccine strains indicated equine influenza (EI vaccines containing Richmond/1/07-like antigen seemed to have an optimum effect in China. Meanwhile, the Ohio/03 vaccine strain contained in updated ProteqFlu had the most closely genetically relationship with recent EIV isolates in China. China has not its own commercially available EI vaccine and most horses are still unvaccinated. Therefore, to monitor antigenic variation of circulating EIVs and give considerable suggestions on selection of vaccine candidate plays an important role in preventing and controlling EIV in China.

  17. Isolation and Physiological Characterization of a Novel Algicidal Virus Infecting the Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum

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    JinJoo Kim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Diatoms are a major component of the biological community, serving as the principal primary producers in the food web and sustaining oxygen levels in aquatic environments. Among marine planktonic diatoms, the cosmopolitan Skeletonema costatum is one of the most abundant and widespread species in the world’s oceans. Here, we report the basic characteristics of a new diatom-infecting S. costatum virus (ScosV isolated from Jaran Bay, Korea, in June 2008. ScosV is a polyhedral virus (45–50 nm in diameter that propagates in the cytoplasm of host cells and causes lysis of S. costatum cultures. The infectivity of ScosV was determined to be strain- rather than species-specific, similar to other algal viruses. The burst size and latent period were roughly estimated at 90–250 infectious units/cell and <48 h, respectively.

  18. Experimental infection of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss with viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus isolates from European marine and farmed fishes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skall, Helle Frank; Slierendrecht, W.J.; King, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    The susceptibility of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to infection with various isolates of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) was examined. A total of 8 experiments with rainbow trout ranging from 0.6 to 6.2 g was conducted for 139 isolates originating from wild marine fishes...... in European waters (115 isolates), farmed turbot from Scotland and Ireland (2 isolates), and farmed rainbow trout (22 isolates). The isolates were tested by immersion and/or intraperitoneal injection either as pooled or single isolates. The isolates from wild marine fishes did not cause mortality by immersion...... while some of the isolates caused mortality when injected. All VHSV isolates from farmed rainbow trout caused significant mortality by immersion. Currently, pathogenicity trials are the only way to differentiate VHSV isolates from wild marine fishes and farmed rainbow trout. The 2 farmed turbot isolates...

  19. Clinical Isolates of Measles Virus Use CD46 as a Cellular Receptor†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchester, Marianne; Eto, Danelle S.; Valsamakis, Alexandra; Liton, Paloma B.; Fernandez-Muñoz, Rafael; Rota, Paul A.; Bellini, William J.; Forthal, Donald N.; Oldstone, Michael B. A.

    2000-01-01

    Laboratory strains of measles viruses (MV), such as Edmonston and Halle, use the complement regulatory protein CD46 as a cell surface receptor. The receptor usage of clinical isolates of MV, however, remains unclear. Receptor usage by primary patient isolates of MV was compared to isolates that had been passaged on a variety of tissue culture cell lines. All of the isolates could infect cells in a CD46-dependent manner, but their tropism was restricted according to cell type (e.g., lymphocytes versus fibroblasts). The results indicate that patient isolates that have not been adapted to tissue culture cell lines use CD46 as a receptor. In addition, passaging primary MV patient isolates in B95-8 cells selected variants that had alternate receptor usage compared to the original isolate. Thus, changes in receptor usage by MV are dependent upon the cell type used for isolation. Furthermore, our results confirm the relevance of the CD46 receptor to natural measles infection. PMID:10756008

  20. Molecular characterization of KGH, the first human isolate of rabies virus in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jun-Sun; Kim, Chi-Kyeong; Kim, Su Yeon; Ju, Young Ran

    2013-04-01

    The complete genome sequence of the KGH strain of the first human rabies virus, which was isolated from a skin biopsy of a patient with rabies, whose symptoms developed due to bites from a raccoon dog in 2001. The size of the KGH strain genome was determined to be 11,928 nucleotides (nt) with a leader sequence of 58 nt, nucleoprotein gene of 1,353 nt, phosphoprotein gene of 894 nt, matrix protein gene of 609 nt, glycoprotein gene of 1,575 nt, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of 6,384 nt, and trailer region of 69 nt. Sequence similarity was compared with 39 fully sequenced rabies virus genomes currently available, and the result showed 70.6-91.6 % at the nucleotide level, and 82.8-97.9 % at the amino acid level. The deduced amino acids in the viral protein were compared with those of other rabies viruses, and various functional regions were investigated. As a result, we found that the KGH strain only had a unique amino acid substitution that was identified to be associated either with host immune response and pathogenicity in the N protein, or with a related region regulating STAT1 in the P protein, and related to pathogenicity in G protein. Based on phylogenetic analyses using the complete genome of 39 rabies viruses, the KGH strain was determined to be closely related with the NNV-RAB-H strain and transplant rabies virus serotype 1, which are Indian isolates, and was confirmed to belong to the Arctic-like 2 clade. The KGH strain was most closely related to the SKRRD0204HC and SKRRD0205HC strain when compared with Korean animal isolates, which was separated around the same time and place, and belonged to the Gangwon III subgroup.

  1. Biological and immunological studies of five Brazilian rabies virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Bernardi

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Estudou-se em camundongos aspectos do comportamento biológico de amostras brasileiras de virus rábico isoladas de cão, bovino, eqüino, morcegos hematófago e insetívoro. Observou-se transmissão oral em camundongos alimentados com cérebros infectados de morcego insetívoro (8,82%, cão (8,57% e eqüino (3,03%. O período de incubação médio para todas as amostras foi de 6 dias após a inoculação intracerebral, com sintomas variando, desde hiperexitabilidade (amostra canina, paralisia progressiva principalmente de membros posteriores e maior duração do curso clínico até a morte (eqüino e morte repentina, sem sintomas aparentes (morcego insetívoro. Pela imunoistoquímica detectou-se produção de IFN nos cérebros dos camundongos inoculados com amostra de bovino e morcego insetívoro, TNF e iNOS nos animais infectados com amostra de cão, bovino e morcego insetívoro e reação astrocitária com aumento da expressão de GFAP em todas as cinco amostras. A eficácia de 2 vacinas comerciais inativadas, uma nacional e outra importada, para a proteção contra a infecção experimental em camundongos foi avaliada através dos testes NIH e CDC, usando as amostras de campo para o desafio. Não houve diferença significativa entre o desempenho das vacinas, quando comparadas para um mesmo teste de potência e amostra de desafio sugerindo que não há necessidade de se produzir vacinas com amostras isoladas de campo.

  2. Genetic diversity and evolution of two capsid protein genes of citrus tristeza virus isolates from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guan-Wei; Tang, Min; Wang, Guo-Ping; Jin, Feng-Yin; Yang, Zuo-Kun; Cheng, Li-Jing; Hong, Ni

    2015-03-01

    The genetic diversity and population structure of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from China were investigated based on partial sequences spanning the C-terminal end of p61 and the complete sequences of the CPm and CP genes. Phylogenetic analysis revealed five known groups (RB, T30, T36, HA and VT) and one new group (VI) consisting of only Chinese CTV isolates. Incongruent phylogenetic trees coupled with recombination analysis suggested several recombination events in the CPm gene. Positive selection was detected at codon 9 of CPm and codons 31, 41 and 68 of CP. The widespread CTV subpopulation AT-1 found in China has a unique amino acid insertion at the C-terminus of p61, which could increase CTV population complexity with implications for the evolutionary history of the virus. Our results suggest relevant roles for gene flow, purifying selection and recombination in shaping the CTV population in China.

  3. [Bluetongue: isolation and characterization of the virus and identification of vectors in northeastern Argentina].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorch, C; Vagnozzi, A; Duffy, S; Miquet, J; Pacheco, J; Bolondi, A; Draghi, G; Cetra, B; Soni, C; Ronderos, M; Russo, S; Ramírez, V; Lager, I

    2002-01-01

    To establish if BTV was circulating in Argentina, 94 bovines from the Santo Tomé and Ituzaingó Departments of Corrientes Province were sampled every 30-60 days during 14 months. Red blood cells from those animals that showed seroconvertion with a c-ELISA were processed for virus isolation by inoculation in embryonated chicken eggs and cell cultures. Cells with CPE were positive by direct and indirect immunofluorescence with BTV specific reagents. These samples examined by electron microscopy showed virus particles with BTV morphological characteristics. Blood samples and tissue culture supernantants were positive by RT-PCR technique with primers corresponding to the segment 3 of the BTV genome. Haematophagous insects were captured in one farm using light traps and Culicoides insignis Lutz was the predominant species detected. This is the first isolation of BTV in Argentina from northeastern bovines without any disease symptom.

  4. Isolation of Bluetongue Virus 24 from India - An Exotic Serotype to Australasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnajyothi, Y; Maan, S; Kandimalla, K; Maan, N S; Tutika, R B; Reddy, Y V; Kumar, A; Mrunalini, N; Reddy, G H; Putty, K; Ahmed, S M; Reddy, Y N; Hemadri, D; Singh, K P; Mertens, P P C; Hegde, N R; Rao, P P

    2016-08-01

    Bluetongue (BT) is a viral disease of ruminants and is caused by different serotypes of bluetongue virus (BTV), which is transmitted by several species of Culicoides midges. The disease is endemic in tropical areas, and incursions have been observed in some of the temperate areas. Twenty-seven recognized serotypes of BTV have been reported so far. Some serotype viruses have been shown to circulate in certain geographical areas. BTV-24 has been reported from Africa, the Mediterranean and the Americas, whereas it is exotic to Australasia. Here, we report isolation of BTV-24 from India and show that it has high sequence homology in genome segment 2 with other Western isolates of BTV-24. Entry of this serotype into Australasian region is a cause of concern. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) isolates in Kosovo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goga, Izedin; Berxholi, Kristaq; Hulaj, Beqe; Sylejmani, Driton; Yakobson, Boris; Stram, Yehuda

    2014-01-01

    Three serum samples positive in Antigen ELISA BVDV have been tested to characterise genetic diversity of bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in Kosovo. Samples were obtained in 2011 from heifers and were amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, sequenced and analysed by computer-assisted phylogenetic analysis. Amplified products and nucleotide sequence showed that all 3 isolates belonged to BVDV 1 genotype and 1b sub genotype. These results enrich the extant knowledge of BVDV and represent the first documented data about Kosovo BVDV isolates.

  6. Occurrence and characterization of plum pox virus strain D isolates from European Russia and Crimea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Prikhodko, Yuri; Mitrofanova, Irina

    2016-02-01

    Numerous plum pox virus (PPV) strain D isolates have been found in geographically distant regions of European Russia and the Crimean peninsula on different stone fruit hosts. Phylogenetic analysis of their partial and complete genomes suggests multiple introductions of PPV-D into Russia. Distinct natural isolates from Prunus tomentosa were found to bear unique amino acid substitutions in the N-terminus of the coat protein (CP) that may contribute to the adaptation of PPV-D to this host. Serological analysis using the PPV-D-specific monoclonal antibody 4DG5 provided further evidence that mutations at positions 58 and 59 of the CP are crucial for antibody binding.

  7. New highly divergent Plum pox virus isolates infecting sour cherry in Russia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirkov, Sergei; Ivanov, Peter; Sheveleva, Anna; Zakubanskiy, Alexander; Osipov, Gennady

    2017-02-01

    Unusual Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates (named Tat isolates) were discovered on sour cherry (Prunus cerasus) in Russia. They failed to be recognized by RT-PCR using commonly employed primers specific to the strains C or CR (the only ones that proved able to infect sour cherry) as well as to the strains M and W. Some of them can be detected by RT-PCR using the PPV-D-specific primers P1/PD or by TAS-ELISA with the PPV-C-specific monoclonal antibody AC. Phylogenetic analysis of the 3'-terminal genomic region assigned the Tat isolates into the cluster of cherry-adapted strains. However, they grouped separately from the C and CR strains and from each other as well. The sequence divergence of the Tat isolates is comparable to the differences between the known PPV strains. They may represent new group(s) of cherry-adapted isolates which do not seem to belong to any known strain of the virus. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Isolation of hepatitis E virus genotype 4 from patients with acute cryptogenic hepatitis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sook-Hyang; Park, Byung-Joo; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Choi, Yun Suk; Ahn, Hee-Seop; Han, Sang-Hoon; Choi, In-Soo

    2017-04-01

    Autochthonous hepatitis E occurs sporadically in developed countries. The consumption of undercooked pork containing hepatitis E virus genotype 3 (HEV-3) or 4 (HEV-4) is the major risk factor for infection. The serological diagnostic kits currently used in hospitals sometimes produce false-negative or -positive results. Therefore, detection of both HEV RNA and antibodies to the virus is required for confirmative diagnosis of hepatitis E. We aimed to detect HEV in serum samples from patients with cryptogenic hepatitis and to determine the origin of HEV. A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed for detection of HEV-3 and HEV-4 in patients with hepatitis. A total of 23 serum samples, deposited in 2006-2012, from patients with acute cryptogenic hepatitis who were serologically negative for hepatitis A, B, C, and E were examined using this method. The amplified PCR products were genetically analyzed. Four HEV-4 isolates were detected from the 23 serum samples. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that three of the four isolates were closely related to HEV-4 isolates found in pigs in Korea and in patients with hepatitis E in Japan. The newly developed nested PCR method was useful for detection of HEV in patients with cryptogenic hepatitis. The close relationship between the human HEV-4 isolates identified in this study and swine isolates implied that zoonotic transmission of HEV might be a source of infection in patients with hepatitis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Phylogenetic study on the 5'-untranslated region of bovine viral diarrhoea virus isolates from Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Esmaelizad

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhoea virus is a pathogen of bovids associated with reproduction system, causing in infected animals a range of ailments, from abortion to congenital defects. In this article, the nucleotide structure of the 5'-untranslated region (5-UTR from 7 Iranian bovine diarrhoea virus (BVDV isolates was characterized and subjected to comparative analysis against a panel of BVDV isolates from different sources. To this end, a 288 bp-long stretch of the internal ribosome entry site was amplified by RT-PCR. The PCR products subsequently cloned into PTZ57T vector and sequenced using T7 promoter primers. This resulted in detection of 3 new point mutations G→A and G→T in 2 isolates. When these findings were phylogenetically assessed, all the examined Iranian isolates were deemed to belong to the type1 of BVDV. Besides, 2 subtypes were identified among these isolates. In group A, a high level of similarity (99.2% between Iranian isolates with a cytopathic Australian strain of BVDV-1c was detected; while in group B, the 4 Iranian isolates proved to be very similar to NADL-like BVDV-1a strains. We believe that the surprisingly high level of similarity between group A Iranian isolates and their corresponding Australian strain is likely to be an indication of a shared common ancestor. If correct, the most likely explanation of this observation is the introduction of such strains from Australia to Iran, possibly through exportation of infected live animals or animal productions (e.g. semen and meat at some points in the past. Nevertheless, this hypothesis remains to be proved as further epidemiological work at genomic level is required to understand population of BVDV in Iran.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of Nervous Necrosis Virus Isolated from Sevenband Grouper (Epinephelus septemfasciatus) in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Oh; Kim, Wi-Sik; Cho, Jae-Kwon; Kim, Kyong-Min; Son, Maeng-Hyun; Oh, Myung-Joo

    2014-12-11

    The draft genome sequence of the nervous necrosis virus (NNV) SGYeosu08, isolated from sevenband grouper (Epinephelus septemfasciatus) in Yeosu, South Korea, was cloned and analyzed. The full-length RNA1 was a 3,103-nucleotide-encoding region of RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and the RNA2 encoding a coat protein was 1,433 nucleotides in length. This genome sequence might be useful in the development of an accurate diagnostic tool. Copyright © 2014 Kim et al.

  11. Reduced Avian Virulence and Viremia of West Nile Virus Isolates from Mexico and Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Brault, Aaron C.; Langevin, Stanley A.; Ramey, Wanichaya N.; Fang, Ying; Beasley, David W. C.; Barker, Christopher M.; Sanders, Todd A.; Reisen, William K.; Barrett, Alan D. T.; Bowen, Richard A.

    2011-01-01

    A West Nile virus (WNV) isolate from Mexico (TM171-03) and BIRD1153, a unique genotype from Texas, have exhibited reduced murine neuroinvasive phenotypes. To determine if murine neuroinvasive capacity equates to avian virulence potential, American crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos) and house sparrows (Passer domesticus) were experimentally inoculated with representative murine neuroinvasive/non-neuroinvasive strains. In both avian species, a plaque variant from Mexico that was E-glycosylation compe...

  12. Genetic characterization of Aino and Peaton virus field isolates reveals a genetic reassortment between these viruses in nature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanase, Tohru; Aizawa, Maki; Kato, Tomoko; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Tsuda, Tomoyuki

    2010-10-01

    Sequence determination and phylogenetic analysis were conducted using the S, M and L RNA segments of the 10 Aino, 6 Peaton and 1 Sango virus (AINOV, PEAV and SANV) field isolates of the genus Orthobunyavirus in the family Bunyaviridae, respectively. The Japanese AINOV strains were genetically stable, but the sequence differences between the Japanese and Australian AINOV strains were considerably larger than those among the Japanese AINOV strains. A similar result was found in the genetic relationship among Japanese and Australian PEAVs, and SANV which was isolated in Nigeria and was thought as a synonym of PEAV, suggesting that geographic separation contributed significantly to the evolution of those viruses. The Australian AINOV strain B7974 is more closely related to the Australian PEAV strain CSIRO110 than to the Japanese AINOV strains in the S and L RNA segments, while the phylogenetic position of the M RNA segment of the B7974 strain was clustered with those of the Japanese AINOV strains. Our findings indicate that the B7974 strain is a reassortment with the M RNA segment derived from AINOV and the S and L RNA segments derived from an Australian PEAV. (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus isolated from canids in North and Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Débora Nunes; Carnieli, Pedro; Macedo, Carla Isabel; de Novaes Oliveira, Rafael; de Carvalho Ruthner Batista, Helena Beatriz; Rodrigues, Adriana Candido; Pereira, Patricia Mariano Cruz; Achkar, Samira Maria; Vieira, Luiz Fernando Pereira; Kawai, Juliana Galera Castilho

    2017-01-01

    Cases of canine rabies continue to occur in North and Northeast Brazil, and the number of notifications of rabies cases in wild canids has increased as a result of the expansion of urban areas at the expense of areas with native vegetation. In light of this, we performed molecular characterization of rabies virus isolates from dogs and Cerdocyon thous from various states in North and Northeast Brazil. In all, 102 samples from dogs (n = 56) and Cerdocyon thous (n = 46) collected between 2006 and 2012 were used. The nucleotide sequences obtained for the N gene of rabies virus were analyzed, and phylogenetic analysis revealed the presence of two distinct genetic lineages, one associated with canids and one with bats, and, within the canid cluster, two distinct sublineages circulating among dogs and Cerdocyon thous. In addition, phylogenetic groups associated with geographic region and fourteen cases of interspecific infection were observed among the isolates from canids. Our findings show that analysis of rabies virus lineages isolated from reservoirs such as canids must be constantly evaluated because the mutation rate is high.

  14. A novel monopartite dsRNA virus isolated from the entomopathogenic and nematophagous fungus Purpureocillium lilacinum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, Noemi

    2016-12-01

    Purpureocillium lilacinum is a ubiquitous saprophytic fungus commonly isolated from soils and widely known as a biological control agent against phytopathogenic nematodes and pest insects. Mycoviruses infect a wide number of fungal species, but the study of viruses infecting entomopathogenic fungi is still quite recent. In this study, a total of 86 P. lilacinum isolates collected from soil in natural and cultivated habitats throughout the Czech Republic were analyzed; 22 % of the isolates harbored double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) elements with viral characteristics. These results suggest that mycoviruses are common in P. lilacinum. One of the most common dsRNA elements detected in the survey was completely sequenced and corresponded to the 2,864-bp genome of a previously undescribed mycovirus, designated Purpureocillium lilacinum nonsegmented virus 1 (PlNV-1). Phylogenetic analysis of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of PlNV-1 indicated that this virus might belong to a new taxon related to the family Partitiviridae.

  15. Drift of the sialyl-linkage specific recognition of the sialidase of influenza B virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, G; Suzuki, T; Hanagata, G; Deya, E; Kiso, M; Hasegawa, A; Suzuki, Y

    1993-03-01

    Sialyl-linkage specificity of the sialidase of influenza B viruses isolated in different years from 1940 through 1990 (B/Lee/40,B/Setagaya/3/56,B/Tokyo/7/66,B/Kagoshima/1/68, B/Gifu/2/73, B/Kanagawa/3/76, B/Ibaraki/2/85, B/Yamagata/16/88, and B/Bangkok/163/90) was studied with N-acetylneuraminyl (alpha 2-3)- and (alpha 2-6)-lactoses, GM3 gangliosides containing the same sialyl-oligosaccharide sequences as sialyllactose, and also with type I and type II lacto-series gangliosides carrying Neu5Ac alpha 2-3Gal and NeuAc alpha 2-6Gal linkages as substrates. From an examination of up to nine strains, the sialidases of all viruses preferentially hydrolyze substrates with Neu5Ac alpha 2-3Gal linkage rather than the Neu5Ac alpha 2-6Gal linkage. It was found that the sialidase activity toward Neu5Ac alpha 2-6Gal linkage relative to Neu5Ac alpha 2-3Gal linkage is increased in later strains, whether sialyllactose or ganglioside is used as the substrate. These results suggested that the sialidase of influenza B virus isolates has shown a drift in linkage specificity which correlates with the year of isolation.

  16. Complete genome analysis of a highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza A virus isolated from a tiger in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushtaq, Muhammad Hassan; Juan, Huang; Jiang, Ping; Li, Yufeng; Li, TianXian; Du, Yijun; Mukhtar, Muhammad Mahmood

    2008-01-01

    An influenza A virus (A/Tig/SH/01/2005 (H5N1) was isolated from lung tissue samples of a dead zoo tiger with respiratory disease in China in July 2005. Complete genome analysis indicated that the isolate was highly identical to an H5N1 virus isolated from a migratory duck at Poyang lake in China in that year. The genotype of the isolate was K,G,D,5J,F,1J,F,1E, and phylogenetically it was a clade 2.2 virus. Molecular characterization of all of the gene segments revealed characteristics of highly pathogenic influenza A viruses. These results may help to identify molecular determinants of virulence and highlight the necessity for continuous surveillance.

  17. Isolation of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) virus in a Danish swine herd and experimental infection of pregnant gilts with the virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøtner, Anette; Nielsen, Jens; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    1994-01-01

    , the virus particle was found to be spherical and enveloped, measuring 45–55 nm in diameter and containing a 30–35 nm nucleocapsid. Only minor antigenic differences were found between the Danish and a Dutch isolate. Following intranasal inoculation of 3 pregnant gilts with the Danish isolate transplacental...... infection was demonstrated by the re-isolation of PRRS virus from approximately 45% of the piglets from the experimentally infected gilts. However, the experimental infection produced no significant reproductive disorders or other clinical signs. At autopsy, histopathological examination revealed slight...

  18. Genome Sequence of a Reassortant H5N1 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Domestic Green-Winged Teal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chaochao; Liu, Qian; Chen, Quanjiao; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-08-15

    An avian influenza virus strain, A/domestic green-winged teal/Hunan/3450/2006(H5N1) (DGW-T3450), was isolated from domestic green-winged teals. Genome analysis demonstrated that DGW-T3450 is a novel reassortant strain. The hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) genes of this strain originated from H5N1 viruses circulating in poultry, while its remaining genes are derived from multiple ancestors, including viruses like those that infect wild birds.

  19. Complete genome sequence of a new isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3 from Solenopsis invicta x richteri hybrid ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, Solenopsis invicta Buren. We report here the full genome (10,383 nucleotides [nt]) of an isolate infecting Solenopsis invicta x richteri hybrids, which we have identified as SI...

  20. Molecular epidemiology of Crimean- Congo hemorrhagic fever virus genome isolated from ticks of Hamadan province of Iran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tahmasebi, F; Ghiasi, Seyed Mojtaba; Mostafavi, E

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES: Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) virus is a tick-borne member of the genus Nairovirus, family Bunyaviridae. CCHFV has been isolated from at least 31 different tick species. The virus is transmitted through the bite of an infected tick, or by direct contact with CCHF...

  1. Excretion of bovine herpesvirus 1 in semen is detected much longer by PCR than by virus isolation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelenburg, van F.A.C.; Schie, van F.W.; Rijsewijk, F.A.M.; Oirschot, van J.T.

    1995-01-01

    To compare the sensitivities of PCR and virus isolation and to examine the course of virus excretion in semen, we intrapreputially inoculated eight bulls with bovine herpesvirus 1 (BHV1) and used two bulls as sentinels. From these bulls, we collected a large panel of semen samples during 65 days

  2. Serological and molecular characterization of Syrian Tomato spotted wilt virus isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faiz ISMAEIL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Thirty four Syrian isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV collected from tomato and pepper were tested against five specific monoclonal antibodies using TAS-ELISA. The isolates were in two serogroups. Fourteen tomato and sixteen pepper isolates were similar in their reaction with MAb-2, MAb-4, MAb-5 and MAb-6, but did not react with MAb-7 (Serogroup 1. Meanwhile, four isolates collected from pepper reacted with all the MAbs used (Serogroup 2. The expected 620 bp DNA fragment was obtained by RT-PCR from six samples using a specific primer pair designed to amplify the nucleocapsid protein (NP gene of TSWV. The PCR products were sequenced and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Sequence analysis revealed that the Syrian TSWV isolates were very similar at the nucleotide (97.74 to 99.84% identity and amino acid (96.17 to 99.03% identity sequences levels. The phylogenetic tree showed high similarity of Syrian TSWV isolates with many other representative isolates from different countries.

  3. Multiple recombinants in two dengue virus, serotype-2 isolates from patients from Oaxaca, Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cisneros Alejandro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue (DEN is a serious cause of mortality and morbidity in the world including Mexico, where the infection is endemic. One of the states with the highest rate of dengue cases is Oaxaca. The cause of DEN is a positive-sense RNA virus, the dengue virus (DENV that evolves rapidly increasing its variability due to the absence of a repair mechanism that leads to approximately one mutational event per genome replication; which results in enhancement of viral adaptation, including the escape from host immune responses. Additionally, recombination may play a role in driving the evolution of DENV, which may potentially affect virulence and cause host tropism changes. Recombination in DENV has not been described in Mexican strains, neither has been described the relevance in virus evolution in an endemic state such as Oaxaca where the four serotypes of DENV are circulating. Results To study whether there are isolates from Oaxaca having recombination, we obtained the sequence of 6 different isolates of DENV-2 Asian/American genotype from the outbreak 2005-6, one clone of the C(91-prM-E-NS1(2400 structural genes, and 10 clones of the E gene from the isolate MEX_OAX_1656_05. Evidence of recombination was found by using different methods along with two softwares: RDP3 and GARD. The Oaxaca MEX_OAX_1656_05 and MEX_OAX_1038_05 isolates sequenced in this study were recombinant viruses that incorporate the genome sequence from the Cosmopolitan genotype. Furthermore, the clone of the E gene namely MEX_OAX_165607_05 from this study was also recombinant, incorporating genome sequence from the American genotype. Conclusions This is the first report of recombination in DENV-2 in Mexico. Given such a recombinant activity new genomic combinations were produced, this could play a significant role in the DENV evolution and must be considered as a potentially important mechanism generating genetic variation in this virus with serious implications for

  4. Multiple recombinants in two dengue virus, serotype-2 isolates from patients from Oaxaca, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Ramirez, Gerardo; Diaz-Badillo, Alvaro; Camacho-Nuez, Minerva; Cisneros, Alejandro; Munoz, Maria de Lourdes

    2009-12-15

    Dengue (DEN) is a serious cause of mortality and morbidity in the world including Mexico, where the infection is endemic. One of the states with the highest rate of dengue cases is Oaxaca. The cause of DEN is a positive-sense RNA virus, the dengue virus (DENV) that evolves rapidly increasing its variability due to the absence of a repair mechanism that leads to approximately one mutational event per genome replication; which results in enhancement of viral adaptation, including the escape from host immune responses. Additionally, recombination may play a role in driving the evolution of DENV, which may potentially affect virulence and cause host tropism changes. Recombination in DENV has not been described in Mexican strains, neither has been described the relevance in virus evolution in an endemic state such as Oaxaca where the four serotypes of DENV are circulating. To study whether there are isolates from Oaxaca having recombination, we obtained the sequence of 6 different isolates of DENV-2 Asian/American genotype from the outbreak 2005-6, one clone of the C(91)-prM-E-NS1(2400) structural genes, and 10 clones of the E gene from the isolate MEX_OAX_1656_05. Evidence of recombination was found by using different methods along with two softwares: RDP3 and GARD. The Oaxaca MEX_OAX_1656_05 and MEX_OAX_1038_05 isolates sequenced in this study were recombinant viruses that incorporate the genome sequence from the Cosmopolitan genotype. Furthermore, the clone of the E gene namely MEX_OAX_165607_05 from this study was also recombinant, incorporating genome sequence from the American genotype. This is the first report of recombination in DENV-2 in Mexico. Given such a recombinant activity new genomic combinations were produced, this could play a significant role in the DENV evolution and must be considered as a potentially important mechanism generating genetic variation in this virus with serious implications for the vaccines and drugs formulation as occurs for other

  5. Complete nucleotide sequence of Alfalfa mosaic virus isolated from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trucco, Verónica; de Breuil, Soledad; Bejerman, Nicolás; Lenardon, Sergio; Giolitti, Fabián

    2014-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of an Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) isolate infecting alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) in Argentina, AMV-Arg, was determined. The virus genome has the typical organization described for AMV, and comprises 3,643, 2,593, and 2,038 nucleotides for RNA1, 2 and 3, respectively. The whole genome sequence and each encoding region were compared with those of other four isolates that have been completely sequenced from China, Italy, Spain and USA. The nucleotide identity percentages ranged from 95.9 to 99.1 % for the three RNAs and from 93.7 to 99 % for the protein 1 (P1), protein 2 (P2), movement protein and coat protein (CP) encoding regions, whereas the amino acid identity percentages of these proteins ranged from 93.4 to 99.5 %, the lowest value corresponding to P2. CP sequences of AMV-Arg were compared with those of other 25 available isolates, and the phylogenetic analysis based on the CP gene was carried out. The highest percentage of nucleotide sequence identity of the CP gene was 98.3 % with a Chinese isolate and 98.6 % at the amino acid level with four isolates, two from Italy, one from Brazil and the remaining one from China. The phylogenetic analysis showed that AMV-Arg is closely related to subgroup I of AMV isolates. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a complete nucleotide sequence of AMV from South America and the first worldwide report of complete nucleotide sequence of AMV isolated from alfalfa as natural host.

  6. Isolated Potato Virus A coat protein possesses unusual properties and forms different short virus-like particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ksenofontov, Alexander L; Dobrov, Eugeny N; Fedorova, Natalia V; Serebryakova, Marina V; Prusov, Andrei N; Baratova, Ludmila A; Paalme, Viiu; Järvekülg, Lilian; Shtykova, Eleonora V

    2017-06-08

    In our previous study, we have observed that the isolated coat proteins (CP) of the Potyvirus Potato Virus A (PVA) virions exhibit an intrinsic tendency to self-associate into various multimeric forms containing some fractions of cross-β-structure. In this report, we studied the effect of solution conditions on the structure and dissociation of isolated PVA CP using a number of complementary physicochemical methods. Analysis of the structure of PVA CP in solution was performed by limited proteolysis with MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis, transmission electron microscopy, intrinsic fluorescence spectroscopy, and synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). Overall structural characteristics of PVA CP obtained by combination of these methods and ab initio shape reconstruction by SAXS show that PVA CP forms large multi-subunit particles. We demonstrate that a mixture of compact virus-like particles (VLP) longer than 30 nm is assembled on dialysis of isolated CP into neutral pH buffer (at low ionic strength). Under conditions of high ionic strength (0.5 M NaCl) and high pH (pH 10.5), PVA dissociates into low compactness oval-shaped particles of approximately 30 subunits (20-30 nm). The results of limited trypsinolysis of these particles (enzyme/substrate ratio 1:100, 30 min) showed the existence of non-cleavable core-fragment, consisting of 137 amino acid residues. Trypsin treatment removed only a short N-terminal fragment in the intact virions. These particles are readily reassembled into regular VLPs by changing pH back to neutral. It is possible that these particles may represent some kind of intermediate in PVA assembly in vitro and in vivo.

  7. Isolation and identification of bluetongue virus: a serotype new to the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collisson, E W; Barber, T L

    1985-01-01

    There are 5 known serotypes of bluetongue (BT) virus (BTV) in the US: 2, 10, 11, 13 and 17. The most recently discovered US serotype, BTV 2, was isolated from blood collected from cattle at Ona, Florida in 1982. Isolations were made from the September through November bleedings and from 1 pool of Culicoides insignis Lutz collected in October. Seventeen viral isolates were obtained by injecting the samples into embryonated chicken eggs (ECE) followed by serial passage onto BHK-21 cells. A single isolate was made from inoculation of pooled bovine blood into sheep. The isolates were shown to be Orbivirus-like particles by electron microscopy and were identified as BTV by indirect immunofluorescence tests. All the isolates were found to be serotype 2, however genome analysis using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) identified 2 distinct electropherotypes. There were major differences between the 2 electropherotypes at least in genome segments 1, 5, 7, 8 and 9. The electropherotypes of viral isolates from bovine blood collected in September, 5 of those from the October bleedings, the insect isolate, and that from pooled blood were identical by PAGE and were designated Ona A. This electropherotype was also found to be indistinguishable from the prototype of the African serotype 2. The 2nd electropherotype, Ona B, included 3 of the viral isolates from the October bleedings and the single isolate from November. Ona A appeared to be closely related to the African prototype while Ona B may have resulted as a variant of Ona A after being subjected to a different environment. Both electropherotypes, however, appear to be stable forms of BTV serotype 2.

  8. Isolation and characterization of a variant porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Yongfei

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract An outbreak of diarrhea in pigs started in Guangdong, South China in January 2011. Cases were characterized by watery diarrhea, dehydration and vomiting, with 80–100% morbidity and 50–90% mortality in suckling piglets. The causative agent of the diarrhea was ultimately identified as porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV. In this study, we isolated a PEDV strain designated CHGD-01 from piglet intestines using Vero cell cultures, and its specific cytopathic effects were confirmed in susceptible cells by direct immunofluorescence testing and electron microscopy. The complete genome of CHGD-01 was shown to be 28,035 nucleotides in length, with a similar structure to that of PEDV reference strains. Phylogenetic analyses based on the whole genome revealed that CHGD-01 shared nucleotide sequence identities of 98.2–98.4% with two other Chinese isolates reported in the same year, thus constituting a new cluster. Amino acid sequence analysis based on individual virus genes indicated a close relationship between the spike protein gene of CHGD-01 and the field strain KNU0802 in Korea. Its ORF3 and nucleoprotein genes, however, were divergent from all other sequenced PEDV isolate clusters and therefore formed a new group, suggesting a new variant PEDV isolate in China. Further studies will be required to determine the immunogenicity and pathogenicity of this new variant.

  9. Propagation of Asian isolates of canine distemper virus (CDV in hamster cell lines

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    Yamaguchi Ryoji

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backgrounds The aim of this study was to confirm the propagation of various canine distemper viruses (CDV in hamster cell lines of HmLu and BHK, since only a little is known about the possibility of propagation of CDV in rodent cells irrespective of their epidemiological importance. Methods The growth of CDV in hamster cell lines was monitored by titration using Vero.dogSLAMtag (Vero-DST cells that had been proven to be susceptible to almost all field isolates of CDV, with the preparations of cell-free and cell-associated virus from the cultures infected with recent Asian isolates of CDV (13 strains and by observing the development of cytopathic effect (CPE in infected cultures of hamster cell lines. Results Eleven of 13 strains grew in HmLu cells, and 12 of 13 strains grew in BHK cells with apparent CPE of cell fusion in the late stage of infection. Two strains and a strain of Asia 1 group could not grow in HmLu cells and BHK cells, respectively. Conclusion The present study demonstrates at the first time that hamster cell lines can propagate the majority of Asian field isolates of CDV. The usage of two hamster cell lines suggested to be useful to characterize the field isolates biologically.

  10. Experimental susceptibility of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar and turbot Scophthalmus maximus to European freshwater and marine isolates of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    King, J.A.; Snow, M.; Skall, Helle Frank

    2001-01-01

    pathogenicity to Atlantic salmon. Virus was detected in some mortalities, however, demonstrating viral entry and replication. European marine VHS virus isolates do not appear to pose an imminent threat to the Atlantic salmon culture industry. Turbot were found to be refractive or of low susceptibility to marine...... of turbot culture to the VHS virus isolates that are enzootic to the European marine environment.......A number of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) virus isolates of European marine origin were shown to be of low pathogenicity or non-pathogenic to Atlantic salmon parr by waterborne infection. A reference freshwater VHS virus isolate known to be highly pathogenic to rainbow trout was also of low...

  11. Comparative effectiveness of isolation techniques for contemporary Influenza A virus strains circulating in exhibition swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Andrew S; Nelson, Sarah W; Edwards, Jody L; Hofer, Christian C; Nolting, Jacqueline M; Davis, Ian C; Slemons, Richard D

    2013-01-01

    The current study sought to compare the effectiveness of 2 virus isolation methods for the recovery of contemporary Influenza A virus (FLUAV) strains circulating in swine at agricultural exhibitions. Following the emergence of the influenza A (H1N1)pdm09 virus, increased surveillance of FLUAV strains among swine was recommended for early detection of emerging strains that threaten animal and human health. The increase in genetic drift and genomic reassortment among FLUAV strains infecting swine since 1998 necessitates that detection protocols be periodically validated for contemporary FLUAV strains. During 2009, nasal swabs were collected from 221 clinically healthy pigs at 12 agricultural exhibitions in Ohio. Nasal swabs were tested in parallel for the presence of FLUAV strains using 3 methodologies: 2 passages through Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells adapted to serum-free medium (SFM), 2 passages through embryonated chicken eggs (ECEs), and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time RT-PCR). Of the 221 samples, 40 (18.1%) were positive for FLUAV recovery in MDCK cell culture and 13 (5.9%) were positive in ECEs (P = 0.015). All samples positive in ECEs were also positive in MDCK cell culture. MDCK cell culture virus isolation results were in perfect agreement with results of the real-time RT-PCR. Hemagglutinin and neuraminidase combinations of the recovered isolates were H1N2 and H3N2, which were consistent with FLUAV strains circulating in U.S. pigs. Effectiveness and cost savings justify the use of SFM-adapted MDCK cell culture over ECEs for the recovery of contemporary FLUAV strains from exhibition swine.

  12. Adaptation and growth kinetics study of an Indian isolate of virulent duck enteritis virus in Vero cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravind, S; Kamble, Nitin M; Gaikwad, Satish S; Shukla, Sanjeev Kumar; Dey, Sohini; Mohan, C Madhan

    2015-01-01

    Duck virus enteritis, also known as duck plague, is a viral infection of ducks caused by duck enteritis virus (DEV). The control of the disease is mainly done by vaccination with chicken embryo adapted live virus that is known to be poorly immunogenic and elicits only partial protection. Further, the embryo propagated vaccine virus pose a threat of harboring other infectious agents. Seeing these limitations, the present study reports for the first time regarding propagation and adaptation of a virulent Indian isolate of duck enteritis virus in Vero cell line. In this study isolation of an outbreak virus from Kerala state was done in chicken embryo fibroblast cell culture (CEF). Then adapted the DEV isolate in the Vero cell line. The characteristic cytopathic effects (CPE) of clumping and fusion of Vero cells were observed starting from the 7th passage onwards. The presence of the virus and its multiplication in Vero cells was confirmed by detection of viral specific DNA and antigen by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immuno fluorescent assay (IIFA), respectively. PCR detection of DEV using self designed primers for US4 (gD) and UL30 (DNA Polymerase) gene has been reported for the in the present study. The kinetics of DEV in Vero cells revealed a maximum infectivity titer of 10(5.6) TCID 50/ml after 48hr of viral infection. Compared to chicken embryo adapted DVE vaccine virus, the Vero cell culture system is free from other infectious agents. So it will be a good candidate for cultivation and propagation of duck enteritis virus vaccine strain. Further research studies are suggested to explore the feasibility of utilizing this Vero cell culture adapted DEV isolate for developing an attenuated vaccine virus against duck virus enteritis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Isolation and complete genome sequencing of Mimivirus bombay, a Giant Virus in sewage of Mumbai, India

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    Anirvan Chatterjee

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We report the isolation and complete genome sequencing of a new Mimiviridae family member, infecting Acanthamoeba castellanii, from sewage in Mumbai, India. The isolated virus has a particle size of about 435 nm and a 1,182,200-bp genome. A phylogeny based on the DNA polymerase sequence placed the isolate as a new member of the Mimiviridae family lineage A and was named as Mimivirus bombay. Extensive presence of Mimiviridae family members in different environmental niches, with remarkably similar genome size and genetic makeup, point towards an evolutionary advantage that needs to be further investigated. The complete genome sequence of Mimivirus bombay was deposited at GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ under the accession number KU761889.

  14. Molecular characterization of a Korean bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Lee, Eun-Yong; Lee, Kyoung-Ki; Kim, Seong-Hee; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Hyun, Bang-Hun

    2013-02-22

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV-3) was isolated from Korean native cattle that presented clinical signs of mild pneumonia. The complete genome of a representative isolate (12Q061) was sequenced. The newly identified strain, which was found to be distinct from the previously reported genotypes A (BPIV-3a) and B (BPIV-3b) and closely related to the Chinese strain SD0835, was tentatively classified as genotype C (BPIV-3c). Our results suggest a relationship between BPIV-3 genetic variation and the geographic location of its isolation. Identification of these new BPIV-3 genotypes may facilitate the development of improved diagnostic methods and vaccines. This is to our knowledge the first report of the identification and molecular characterization of BPIV-3 in Korea. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular epidemiological study of Arctic rabies virus isolates from Greenland and comparison with isolates from throughout the Arctic and Baltic regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mansfield, K.L.; Racloz, V.; McElhinney, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    We report a Molecular epidemiological study of rabies in Arctic Countries by comparing a panel of novel Greenland isolates to a larger cohort of viral sequences from both Arctic and Baltic regions. Rabies Virus isolates originating from wildlife (Arctic/red foxes, raccoon-dogs and reindeer), from...... sequences from the Arctic and Arctic-like viruses, which were distinct from rabies isolates originating ill the Baltic region of Europe, the Steppes in Russia and from North America. The Arctic-like group consist of isolates from India, Pakistan, southeast Siberia and Japan. The Arctic group...... in northeast Siberia and Alaska. Arctic 2b isolates represent a biotype, which is dispersed throughout the Arctic region. The broad distribution of rabies in the Arctic regions including Greenland, Canada and Alaska provides evidence for the movement of rabies across borders....

  16. Partial Characterization of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Isolates from Ticks of Southern Ukraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurchenko, Oksana O; Dubina, Dmytro O; Vynograd, Nataliya O; Gonzalez, Jean-Paul

    2017-08-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis (TBE) is the most common tick-borne viral infection in Eurasia; thousands of human cases are annually reported from several European countries. Several tick species are vectors of the tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), while TBE appears to be spreading from the Eurasian continent westward to Europe. Fifteen study sites were chosen from five territories of southern Ukraine, including Odessa, Mykolaiv, Kherson Oblast, the Autonomous Republic of Crimea, and Sevastopol. Tick collection was performed in spring season of three consecutive years (1988-1990) using either flagging technique or direct collection of specimens feeding on cattle. A total of 15,243 tick imagoes and nymphs were collected from nine species, including Dermacentor marginatus, D. reticulatus, Haemaphysalis parva, H. punctata, Hyalomma marginatum, Ixodes ricinus, Rhipicephalus bursa, R. rossicus, and R. sanguineus, pooled in 282 monospecific samples. Supernatant of grinded pool was used for inoculation to suckling mice for virus isolation. Eight TBEV isolates were identified from ticks among six study sites. Ticks showed a minimum infection rate from 0.11% to 0.81%. Phylogenetic analysis of the envelope (E) protein gene of seven isolates, assigned all to the European subtype (TBEV-Eu) showing a maximum identity of 97.17% to the "Pan" TBEV-Eu reference strain. Compared to 104 TBEV-Eu isolates they clustered within the same clade as the Pan reference strain and distinguished from other TBEV-Eu isolates. Amino acid sequence analysis of the South Ukrainian TBEV-Eu isolates revealed the presence of four amino acid substitutions 67 (N), 266 (R), 306 (V), and 407 (R), in the ectodomains II and III and in the stem-anchor region of the E protein gene. This study confirmed TBEV-Eu subtype distribution in the southern region of Ukraine, which eventually overlaps with TBEV-FE (Far Eastern subtype) and TBEV-Sib (Siberian subtype) domains, showing the heterogeneity of TBEV circulating in

  17. Host Reaction of Watermelon mosaic virus Isolates Infecting Melon from Different Geographical Origins in Xinjiang of China

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    Dong WANG

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV is one of the major viruses infecting cucurbit crops worldwide. Although WMV is very common worldwide, little is known about the biological traits of WMV isolates from China. Hence, this study aimed to characterize 11 WMV isolates infecting melon from different geographical origins in Xinjiang based on experimental hosts. Sap inoculation of the 11 WMV isolates onto a range of 13 plant species revealed some differences compared to the WMV isolates collected from other countries. Our results showed that, overall, there were no obvious correlations of host responses to inoculation with WMV isolates from different geographical origins. However, isolate JS-1 caused mild mosaic on Cucurbita moschata, whereas the remaining 10 isolates were asymptomatic on this plant species. Moreover, in Datura stramonium, isolate TYG-1 induced mosaic, whereas the remaining 10 isolates did not infect this species. All isolates infected systemically Cucurbita pepo and Cucumis melo plants, causing severe symptoms. All isolates did not induce any symptoms on Cucumis sativus, but the virus could be detected using RT-PCR. Additionally, all isolates infected systemically Nicotiana tabacum plants, causing mild mosaics. Chenopodium amaranticolor and Chenopodium quinoa reacted to all isolates by chlorotic local lesions in the inoculated leaves, and the virus was detected in the inoculated leaves using RT-PCR. In addition, the attempts to transmit the isolates to Luffa cylindrica, Vicia faba, Phaseolus vulgaris, Vigna unguiculata or Pisum sativum failed as confirmed by negative RT-PCR. Our results would be useful for understanding the biological variability of WMV.

  18. The complete genome sequence of a Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever virus isolated from an endemic region in Kosovo

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    Dedushaj Iusuf

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Balkan region and Kosovo in particular, is a well-known Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF endemic region, with frequent epidemic outbreaks and sporadic cases occurring with a hospitalized case fatality of approximately 30%. Recent analysis of complete genome sequences of diverse CCHF virus strains showed that the genome plasticity of the virus is surprisingly high for an arthropod-borne virus. High levels of nucleotide and amino acid differences, frequent RNA segment reassortment and even RNA recombination have been recently described. This diversity illustrates the need to determine the complete genome sequence of CCHF virus representatives of all geographically distinct endemic areas, particularly in light of the high pathogenicity of the virus and its listing as a potential bioterrorism threat. Here we describe the first complete CCHF virus genome sequence of a virus (strain Kosova Hoti isolated from a hemorrhagic fever case in the Balkans. This virus strain was isolated from a fatal CCHF case, and passaged only twice on Vero E6 cells prior to sequence analysis. The virus total genome was found to be 19.2 kb in length, consisting of a 1672 nucleotide (nt S segment, a 5364 nt M segment and a 12150 nt L segment. Phylogenetic analysis of CCHF virus complete genomes placed the Kosova Hoti strain in the Europe/Turkey group, with highest similarity seen with Russian isolates. The virus M segments are the most diverse with up to 31 and 27% differences seen at the nt and amino acid levels, and even 1.9% amino acid difference found between the Kosova Hoti and another strain from Kosovo (9553-01. This suggests that distinct virus strains can coexist in highly endemic areas.

  19. Complete genome sequence of mumps viruses isolated from patients with parotitis, pancreatitis and encephalitis in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Chowdhury, Deepika T; Jadhav, Santoshkumar M; Hamde, Venkat S

    2016-04-01

    Limited information is available regarding epidemiology of mumps in India. Mumps vaccine is not included in the Universal Immunization Program of India. The complete genome sequences of Indian mumps virus (MuV) isolates are not available, hence this study was performed. Five isolates from bilateral parotitis and pancreatitis patients from Maharashtra, a MuV isolate from unilateral parotitis patient from Tamil Nadu, and a MuV isolate from encephalitis patient from Uttar Pradesh were genotyped by the standard protocol of the World Health Organization and subsequently complete genomes were sequenced. Indian MuV genomes were compared with published MuV genomes, including reference genotypes and eight vaccine strains for the genetic differences. The SH gene analysis revealed that five MuV isolates belonged to genotype C and two belonged to genotype G strains. The percent nucleotide divergence (PND) was 1.1% amongst five MuV genotype C strains and 2.2% amongst two MuV genotype G strains. A comparison with widely used mumps Jeryl Lynn vaccine strain revealed that Indian mumps isolates had 54, 54, 53, 49, 49, 38, and 49 amino acid substitutions in Chennai-2012, Kushinagar-2013, Pune-2008, Osmanabad-2012a, Osmanabad-2012b, Pune-1986 and Pune-2012, respectively. This study reports the complete genome sequences of Indian MuV strains obtained in years 1986, 2008, 2012 and 2013 that may be useful for further studies in India and globally. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Intersubtype Reassortments of H5N1 Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Quail.

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    Tinh Huu Nguyen

    Full Text Available H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI viruses are considered a threat to national animal industries, causing production losses and high mortality in domestic poultry. In recent years, quail has become a popular terrestrial poultry species raised for production of meat and eggs in Asia. In this study, to better understand the roles of quail in H5N1 viral evolution, two H5N1-positive samples, designated A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-49/2010 (CVVI-49/2010 and A/quail/Vietnam/CVVI-50/2014 (CVVI-50/2014, were isolated from quail during H5N1 outbreaks in Vietnam, and their whole genome were analyzed. The phylogenetic analysis reveals new evolutionary variation in the worldwide H5N1 viruses. The quail HA genes were clustered into clades 1.1.1 (CVVI-49/2010 and clade 2.3.2.1c (CVVI-50/2014, which may have evolved from viruses circulating from chickens and/or ducks in Cambodia, mainland of China, Taiwan, Indonesia, and South Korea in recent years. Interestingly, the M2 gene of the CVVI-49/2010 strain contained amino acid substitutions at position 26L-I and 31S-N that are related to amantadine-resistance. In particular, the CVVI-50/2014 strain revealed evidence of multiple intersubtype reassortment events between virus clades 2.3.2.1c, 2.3.2.1b, and 2.3.2.1a. Data from this study supports the possible role of quail as an important intermediate host in avian influenza virus evolution. Therefore, additional surveillance is needed to monitor these HPAI viruses both serologically and virologically in quail.

  1. Enrichment of measles virus-like RNA in the nucleocapsid fraction isolated from subacute sclerosing panencephalitis brains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bedows, E.; Payne, F.E. (Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor (USA). School of Public Health); Kohne, D.E. (Center for Neurologic Study, San Diego, CA, USA); Tourtellotte, W.W. (Neurology Service, V.A. Wadsworth Hospital Center, Los Angeles, CA, USA)

    1982-02-01

    A procedure has been developed which facilitates the detection of measles virus RNA sequences in human brains. The procedure involves isolating subviral components (nucleocapsids) from brain tissues prior to RNA purification, followed by hybridization of these RNAs to cDNA synthesized from measles virus 50 S RNA template. Using these techniques we were able to obtain an RNA fraction which was manyfold enriched in measles virus-specific RNA, relative to unfractionated subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) brain RNAs. 70-100% of the measles virus-specific RNA present in these SSPE brain samples were recovered in this enriched fraction.

  2. Isolation of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza H5N1 Virus from Saker Falcons (Falco cherrug in the Middle East

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henju Marjuki

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available There is accumulating evidence that birds of prey are susceptible to fatal infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus. We studied the antigenic, molecular, phylogenetic, and pathogenic properties of 2 HPAI H5N1 viruses isolated from dead falcons in Saudi Arabia and Kuwait in 2005 and 2007, respectively. Phylogenetic and antigenic analyses grouped both isolates in clade 2.2 (Qinghai-like viruses. However, the viruses appeared to have spread westward via different flyways. It remains unknown how these viruses spread so rapidly from Qinghai after the 2005 outbreak and how they were introduced into falcons in these two countries. The H5N1 outbreaks in the Middle East are believed by some to be mediated by wild migratory birds. However, sporting falcons may be at additional risk from the illegal import of live quail to feed them.

  3. Prevalence of newly isolated, cytopathic small round virus (Aichi strain) in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamashita, T; Sakae, K; Ishihara, Y; Isomura, S; Utagawa, E

    1993-01-01

    Cytopathic small round virus (Aichi strain), isolated from a patient with oyster-associated gastroenteritis, showed no reaction in the polymerase chain reaction method for enteroviruses or in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the five serotypes of astroviruses. Our ELISA was sensitive in detecting the Aichi strain antigen in stool samples, but there was no reaction in this ELISA with any non-Aichi strains of enteric viruses, with such origins as enterovirus, rotavirus, Norwalk virus, calicivirus, or astrovirus. In the ELISA, 13 of 47 stool samples from adult patients in five of nine oyster-associated gastroenteritis outbreaks were positive, but only 1 of 397 pediatric stool samples in Aichi Prefecture was positive. The prevalence rate for Aichi strain antibody was found to be 7.2% for persons aged 7 months to 4 years. The prevalence rate for antibody to Aichi strain increased with age, to about 80% in persons 35 years old. On the basis of the results of the present study, it was hypothesized that Aichi strain could be a new type of small round virus that mainly produces diarrhea in patients in the 15- to 34-year-old age group, 50 to 76% of whom possess neutralizing antibody. Images PMID:8263178

  4. Molecular and biological characterization of Potato mop-top virus (PMTV, Pomovirus) isolates from potato-growing regions in Colombia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, José; Adams, Ian; Boonham, Neil

    2016-01-01

    samples were taken from the main potato-producing regions in Colombia and virus was recovered by planting Nicotiana benthamiana as bait plants. The complete genomes of five isolates were sequenced and three of the isolates were inoculated to four different indicator plants. Based on sequence comparisons...

  5. Influence of coat protein transgene copy number on resistance in transgenic line 63-1 against Papaya ringspot virus isolates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Souza, M.T.; Níckel, O.; Gonsalves, D.

    2005-01-01

    Line 63-1 is a 'Sunset'-derived transgenic papaya expressing the coat protein (CP) gene from a mild mutant of a Hawaiian isolate of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). Previous work showed that line 63-1 R, plants exhibited a range of resistance to severe PRSV isolates from Hawaii (HA), Jamaica (JA),

  6. Complete genome sequence of the first isolate of genotype C bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konishi, Misako; Ohkura, Takashi; Shimizu, Madoka; Akiyama, Masanori; Kameyama, Ken-Ichiro; Takeuchi, Kaoru

    2014-11-26

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) isolates are classified into three genotypes (BPIV3a to -c). Here, we report the complete genome sequence of the BPIV3c isolate for the first time in Japan. Our results indicate that new primer sets will be required to detect all genotypes of BPIV3 strains. Copyright © 2014 Konishi et al.

  7. Genetic analysis and antigenic characterization of human respiratory syncytial virus group A viruses isolated in Germany 1996-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ortwin; Werzmirzowsky, Judith; Hengel, Hartmut

    2013-10-01

    The genetic and antigenic variability of 18 human respiratory syncytial virus group A viruses isolated in Germany from 1996 to 2008 was evaluated by nucleotide sequencing of the complete G and F genes and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis with anti-G and anti-F monoclonal antibodies. Phylogenetic analyses showed that the G-proteins clustered into the two genotypes GA2 and GA5. The antigenic analysis of G-gene was carried out with a panel of anti-G and anti-F monoclonal antibodies that recognized strain-specific or variable epitopes which were originally derived against long strain (subtype GA1) and MON-3-88 strain (GA2). An amino acid substitution was found in a potential O-glycosylation site leading to a loss of reactivity with a strain-specific MAb. A score was calculated for quantifying the overall reactivity of the antibodies. If reactivity of all MAbs was totalized, a net sum loss of reactivity was seen over the time suggesting that antigenic drift due to immune selection may be occurring.

  8. Single strain isolation method for cell culture-adapted hepatitis C virus by end-point dilution and infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nao Sugiyama

    Full Text Available The hepatitis C virus (HCV culture system has enabled us to clarify the HCV life cycle and essential host factors for propagation. However, the virus production level of wild-type JFH-1 (JFH-1/wt is limited, and this leads to difficulties in performing experiments that require higher viral concentrations. As the cell culture-adapted JFH-1 has been reported to have robust virus production, some mutations in the viral genome may play a role in the efficiency of virus production. In this study, we obtained cell culture-adapted virus by passage of full-length JFH-1 RNA-transfected Huh-7.5.1 cells. The obtained virus produced 3 log-fold more progeny viruses as compared with JFH-1/wt. Several mutations were identified as being responsible for robust virus production, but, on reverse-genetics analysis, the production levels of JFH-1 with these mutations did not reach the level of cell culture-adapted virus. By using the single strain isolation method by end-point dilution and infection, we isolated two strains with additional mutations, and found that these strains have the ability to produce more progeny viruses. On reverse-genetics analysis, the strains with these additional mutations were able to produce robust progeny viruses at comparable levels as cell culture-adapted JFH-1 virus. The strategy used in this study will be useful for identifying strains with unique characteristics, such as robust virus production, from a diverse population, and for determining the responsible mutations for these characteristics.

  9. Characteristics of a Lettuce mosaic virus Isolate Infecting Lettuce in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seungmo Lim

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV causes disease of plants in the family Asteraceae, especially lettuce crops. LMV isolates have previously been clustered in three main groups, LMV-Yar, LMV-Greek and LMVRoW. The first two groups, LMV-Yar and LMV-Greek, have similar characteristics such as no seed-borne transmission and non-resistance-breaking. The latter one, LMV-RoW, comprising a large percentage of the LMV isolates contains two large subgroups, LMV-Common and LMV-Most. To date, however, no Korean LMV isolate has been classified and characterized. In this study, LMV-Muju, the Korean LMV isolate, was isolated from lettuce showing pale green and mottle symptoms, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Classification method of LMV isolates based on nucleotide sequence divergence of the NIb-CP junction showed that LMV-Muju was categorized as LMV-Common. LMV-Muju was more similar to LMV-O (LMV-Common subgroup than to LMV-E (LMV-RoW group but not LMV-Common subgroup even in the amino acid domains of HC-Pro associated with pathogenicity, and in the CI and VPg regions related to ability to overcome resistance. Taken together, LMV-Muju belongs to the LMV-Common subgroup, and is expected to be a seed-borne, non-resistance-breaking isolate. According to our analysis, all other LMV isolates not previously assigned to a subgroup were also included in the LMV-RoW group.

  10. The application of molecular methods in the identification of isolated strains of parainfluenza 3 virus of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veljović Lj.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Bovine parainfluenza 3 virus (PI3 causes respiratory infections in cattle and sheep with great economic losses in livestock. The aim of this investigation was to determine the significance of molecular methods in the identification of isolated strains of PI3 virus. Twenty cattle nasal swabs were analyzed for the presence of PI3 using the standard virology method of virus isolation in MBDK cell line and virus neutralization test. The identification of isolated strains was confirmed by RT-PCR and method of direct sequencing with primers for PI3 fusion (F protein gene. PI3 virus was isolated and identified in four nasal swabs using the standard virology method and RT-PCR. The analysis of nucleotide sequences of isolated PI3 strains showed high similarity with sequences isolated from cattle in Asia. Our results showed that molecular methods are very useful in the diagnosis of PI3 infections as well as for the identification and characterization of PI3 strains in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 31008 i br. 175073

  11. Different pattern of haemagglutinin immunoreactivity of equine influenza virus strains isolated in Poland

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    Kwaśnik Małgorzata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The immunoreactivity of haemagglutinin (HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus was compared among the strains isolated in Poland, using H3 monoclonal antibody. A stronger signal in immunoblot reaction was observed for A/equi/Pulawy/2008 HA polypeptides compared to A/equi/Pulawy/2006, despite the fact that both strains are phylogenetically closely related and belong to Florida clade 2 of American lineage. The strongest signal, observed in the case of A/equi/Pulawy/2008, seemed to be connected with the presence of G135, I213, E379, and/or V530 instead of R135, M213, G379, and I530 present in A/equi/Pulawy/2006 HA sequence. This implies that point mutations within amino acid sequences of HA polypeptides of equine influenza virus may change their immunoreactivity even when they are not located within five basic antigenic sites.

  12. Evolutionary and Ecological Characterization of Mayaro Virus Strains Isolated during an Outbreak, Venezuela, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auguste, Albert J; Liria, Jonathan; Forrester, Naomi L; Giambalvo, Dileyvic; Moncada, Maria; Long, Kanya C; Morón, Dulce; de Manzione, Nuris; Tesh, Robert B; Halsey, Eric S; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Hernandez, Rosa; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Weaver, Scott C

    2015-10-01

    In 2010, an outbreak of febrile illness with arthralgic manifestations was detected at La Estación village, Portuguesa State, Venezuela. The etiologic agent was determined to be Mayaro virus (MAYV), a reemerging South American alphavirus. A total of 77 cases was reported and 19 were confirmed as seropositive. MAYV was isolated from acute-phase serum samples from 6 symptomatic patients. We sequenced 27 complete genomes representing the full spectrum of MAYV genetic diversity, which facilitated detection of a new genotype, designated N. Phylogenetic analysis of genomic sequences indicated that etiologic strains from Venezuela belong to genotype D. Results indicate that MAYV is highly conserved genetically, showing ≈17% nucleotide divergence across all 3 genotypes and 4% among genotype D strains in the most variable genes. Coalescent analyses suggested genotypes D and L diverged ≈150 years ago and genotype diverged N ≈250 years ago. This virus commonly infects persons residing near enzootic transmission foci because of anthropogenic incursions.

  13. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of Parietaria mottle virus infecting tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipienso, Luis; Rubio, Luis; López, Luis; Soler, Salvador; Aramburu, José

    2009-10-01

    The genome of a Spanish isolate of Parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) obtained from tomato (strain PMoV-T) was completely sequenced. Protein motifs conserved for RNA viruses were identified: the p1 protein contained a metyltransferase domain in its N-terminal half and a triphosphatase/ helicase domain in its C-terminal half, the p2 protein contained a RNA polymerase domain; the 3a protein contained a RNA-binding domain with α-helix and β-sheet secondary structures. In addition, stem-loop structures with potential capacity of protein interactions were predicted on the untranslated terminal regions. Comparison with the other sequenced PMoV isolate showed nucleotide identities of 93, 90, and 93% for genomic RNAs 1, 2 and 3, respectively, and amino acid identities ranging from 88 to 97% for the different proteins. A cytosine deletion was detected at position 1,366 of RNA 3, involving a start codon for the coat protein (CP) gene different from the other PMoV isolate, resulting in a CP 16 amino acids shorter. Comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations revealed different selective constraints along the genome.

  14. Isolation, molecular characterization, and phylogenetic analysis of encephalomyocarditis virus from South China tigers in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huimin; Yan, Qi; Zhao, Bo; Luo, Jing; Wang, Chengmin; Du, Yingchun; Yan, Jing; He, Hongxuan

    2013-10-01

    Although encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) can infect many host species and cause myocarditis and sudden death in many species, little is known about EMCV infection in tigers. A virus was isolated from organs of dead South China tigers with sudden death in southern China. The production of cytopathic effect on BHK cells, and the results of PCR, electron microscopy (EM), and whole genome sequencing indicated that the pathogen was EMCV, the strain was named FJ13. Other pathogenic agents were excluded as possible pathogenic agents. Phylogenetic analyses of the whole genome, ORF (open reading frame) and CCR (capsid coding region) using the neighbour-joining method revealed that EMCV isolates cluster into two groups (group 1 and 2) with two sub-clusters within group 1 (group 1a and 1b), and FJ13 belongs to group 1a. Animal experiment showed that the isolated strain FJ13 could cause clinical symptoms and pathological changes. The results of this study indicated that FJ13 caused myocarditis of tigers and provided new epidemiologic data on EMCV in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Isolation of herpes simplex virus from the genital tract during symptomatic recurrence on the buttocks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerkering, Katrina; Gardella, Carolyn; Selke, Stacy; Krantz, Elizabeth; Corey, Lawrence; Wald, Anna

    2006-10-01

    To estimate the frequency of isolation of herpes simplex virus (HSV) from the genital tract when recurrent herpes lesions were present on the buttocks. Data were extracted from a prospectively observed cohort attending a research clinic for genital herpes infections between 1975 and 2001. All patients with a documented herpes lesion on the buttocks, upper thigh or gluteal cleft ("buttock recurrence") and concomitant viral cultures from genital sites including the perianal region were eligible. We reviewed records of 237 subjects, 151 women and 86 men, with a total of 572 buttock recurrences. Of the 1,592 days with genital culture information during a buttock recurrence, participants had concurrent genital lesions on 311 (20%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 14-27%) of these days. Overall, HSV was isolated from the genital region on 12% (95% CI 8-17%) of days during a buttock recurrence. In the absence of genital lesions, HSV was isolated from the genital area on 7% (95% CI 4%-11%) of days during a buttock recurrence and, among women, from the vulvar or cervical sites on 1% of days. Viral shedding of herpes simplex virus from the genital area is a relatively common occurrence during a buttock recurrence of genital herpes, even without concurrent genital lesions, reflecting perhaps reactivation from concomitant regions of the sacral neural ganglia. Patients with buttock herpes recurrences should be instructed about the risk of genital shedding during such recurrences. II-2.

  16. Isolation of Infective Zika Virus from Urine and Saliva of Patients in Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myrna C Bonaldo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is an emergent threat provoking a worldwide explosive outbreak. Since January 2015, 41 countries reported autochthonous cases. In Brazil, an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly cases was linked to ZIKV infections. A recent report describing low experimental transmission efficiency of its main putative vector, Ae. aegypti, in conjunction with apparent sexual transmission notifications, prompted the investigation of other potential sources of viral dissemination. Urine and saliva have been previously established as useful tools in ZIKV diagnosis. Here, we described the presence and isolation of infectious ZIKV particles from saliva and urine of acute phase patients in the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil.Nine urine and five saliva samples from nine patients from Rio de Janeiro presenting rash and other typical Zika acute phase symptoms were inoculated in Vero cell culture and submitted to specific ZIKV RNA detection and quantification through, respectively, NAT-Zika, RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Two ZIKV isolates were achieved, one from urine and one from saliva specimens. ZIKV nucleic acid was identified by all methods in four patients. Whenever both urine and saliva samples were available from the same patient, urine viral loads were higher, corroborating the general sense that it is a better source for ZIKV molecular diagnostic. In spite of this, from the two isolated strains, each from one patient, only one derived from urine, suggesting that other factors, like the acidic nature of this fluid, might interfere with virion infectivity. The complete genome of both ZIKV isolates was obtained. Phylogenetic analysis revealed similarity with strains previously isolated during the South America outbreak.The detection of infectious ZIKV particles in urine and saliva of patients during the acute phase may represent a critical factor in the spread of virus. The epidemiological relevance of this finding, regarding the contribution

  17. Isolation of Infective Zika Virus from Urine and Saliva of Patients in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaldo, Myrna C; Ribeiro, Ieda P; Lima, Noemia S; Dos Santos, Alexandre A C; Menezes, Lidiane S R; da Cruz, Stephanie O D; de Mello, Iasmim S; Furtado, Nathália D; de Moura, Elaine E; Damasceno, Luana; da Silva, Kely A B; de Castro, Marcia G; Gerber, Alexandra L; de Almeida, Luiz G P; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R; Brasil, Patrícia

    2016-06-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emergent threat provoking a worldwide explosive outbreak. Since January 2015, 41 countries reported autochthonous cases. In Brazil, an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly cases was linked to ZIKV infections. A recent report describing low experimental transmission efficiency of its main putative vector, Ae. aegypti, in conjunction with apparent sexual transmission notifications, prompted the investigation of other potential sources of viral dissemination. Urine and saliva have been previously established as useful tools in ZIKV diagnosis. Here, we described the presence and isolation of infectious ZIKV particles from saliva and urine of acute phase patients in the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. Nine urine and five saliva samples from nine patients from Rio de Janeiro presenting rash and other typical Zika acute phase symptoms were inoculated in Vero cell culture and submitted to specific ZIKV RNA detection and quantification through, respectively, NAT-Zika, RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Two ZIKV isolates were achieved, one from urine and one from saliva specimens. ZIKV nucleic acid was identified by all methods in four patients. Whenever both urine and saliva samples were available from the same patient, urine viral loads were higher, corroborating the general sense that it is a better source for ZIKV molecular diagnostic. In spite of this, from the two isolated strains, each from one patient, only one derived from urine, suggesting that other factors, like the acidic nature of this fluid, might interfere with virion infectivity. The complete genome of both ZIKV isolates was obtained. Phylogenetic analysis revealed similarity with strains previously isolated during the South America outbreak. The detection of infectious ZIKV particles in urine and saliva of patients during the acute phase may represent a critical factor in the spread of virus. The epidemiological relevance of this finding, regarding the contribution of alternative non

  18. Isolation of Infective Zika Virus from Urine and Saliva of Patients in Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Kely A. B.; de Castro, Marcia G.; Gerber, Alexandra L.; de Almeida, Luiz G. P.; Lourenço-de-Oliveira, Ricardo; Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emergent threat provoking a worldwide explosive outbreak. Since January 2015, 41 countries reported autochthonous cases. In Brazil, an increase in Guillain-Barré syndrome and microcephaly cases was linked to ZIKV infections. A recent report describing low experimental transmission efficiency of its main putative vector, Ae. aegypti, in conjunction with apparent sexual transmission notifications, prompted the investigation of other potential sources of viral dissemination. Urine and saliva have been previously established as useful tools in ZIKV diagnosis. Here, we described the presence and isolation of infectious ZIKV particles from saliva and urine of acute phase patients in the Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil. Methodology/Principal Findings Nine urine and five saliva samples from nine patients from Rio de Janeiro presenting rash and other typical Zika acute phase symptoms were inoculated in Vero cell culture and submitted to specific ZIKV RNA detection and quantification through, respectively, NAT-Zika, RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. Two ZIKV isolates were achieved, one from urine and one from saliva specimens. ZIKV nucleic acid was identified by all methods in four patients. Whenever both urine and saliva samples were available from the same patient, urine viral loads were higher, corroborating the general sense that it is a better source for ZIKV molecular diagnostic. In spite of this, from the two isolated strains, each from one patient, only one derived from urine, suggesting that other factors, like the acidic nature of this fluid, might interfere with virion infectivity. The complete genome of both ZIKV isolates was obtained. Phylogenetic analysis revealed similarity with strains previously isolated during the South America outbreak. Conclusions/Significance The detection of infectious ZIKV particles in urine and saliva of patients during the acute phase may represent a critical factor in the spread of virus. The epidemiological

  19. Vaccinia viruses isolated from cutaneous disease in horses are highly virulent for rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felipetto Cargnelutti, Juliana; Schmidt, Candice; Masuda, Eduardo Kenji; Braum, Lisiane Danusa; Weiblen, Rudi; Furtado Flores, Eduardo

    2012-03-01

    Two genotypically distinct Vaccinia viruses (VACV), named P1V and P2V, were isolated from an outbreak of cutaneous disease in horses in Southern Brazil. We herein investigated the susceptibility of rabbits, a proposed animal model, to P1V and P2V infection. Groups of weanling rabbits were inoculated intranasally (IN) with P1V or P2V at low (10(2.5) TCID50), medium (10(4.5)TCID50), or high titer (10(6.5)TCID50). Rabbits inoculated with medium and high titers shed virus in nasal secretions and developed serous to hemorrhagic nasal discharge and severe respiratory distress, followed by progressive apathy and high lethality. Clinical signs appeared around days 3-6 post-inoculation (pi) and lasted up to the day of death or euthanasia (around days 5-10). Virus shedding and clinical signs were less frequent in rabbits inoculated with low virus titers. Viremia was detected in all groups, with different frequencies. Viral DNA was detected in the feces of a few animals inoculated with P1V and P2V, low titer, and with P2V at high titer. Gross necropsy findings and histological examination showed diffuse interstitial fibrousing pneumonia with necrosuppurative bronchopneumonia and intestinal liquid content. Neutralizing antibodies were detected in all inoculated animals surviving beyond day 9 pi. These results show that rabbits are highly susceptible to VACV isolated from horses, and develop severe respiratory and systemic disease upon IN inoculation. Thus, rabbits may be used to study selected aspects of VACV infection and disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. [Isolation of influenza virus A (Orthomyxoviridae, Influenza A virus), Dhori virus (Orthomyxoviridae, Thogotovirus), and Newcastle's disease virus (Paromyxoviridae, Avulavirus) on the Malyi Zhemchuzhnyi Island in the north-western area of the Caspian Sea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iashkulov, K B; Shchelkanov, M Iu; L'vov, S S; Dzhambinov, S D; Galkina, I V; Fediakina, I T; Bushkieva, B Ts; Morozova, T N; Kireev, D E; Akanina, D S; Litvin, K E; Usachev, E V; Prilipov, A G; Grebennikova, T V; Gromashevskiĭ, V L; Iamnikova, S S; Zaberezhnyĭ, A D; L'vov, D K

    2008-01-01

    The paper presents the results of the 2003 and 2006 environmental virological monitoring surveys on the Malyi Zhemchuzhnyi Island where a large breeding colony of sea gull (Laridae) is located. In the past several years, expansion of cormorants (Phalacrocorax carbo) has enhanced the intensity of populational interactions. The investigators isolated 13 strains of influenza A virus (Orthomyxoviridae, Influenza A virus) subtype H13N1 (from sea gulls (n = 4), cormorants (n = 9) 1 strain of Dhori virus (Orthomyxoviridae, Thogotovirus) from a cormorantwith clinical symptoms of the disease, 3 strains of Newcastle disease virus (Paramyxoviridae, Avulavirus) from cormorants. RT-PCR revealed influenza A virus subtype H5 in 3.1% of the cloacal lavages from cormorants. Neutralization test indicated that sera from cormorants contained specific antibodies against West Nile (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus) (15.0%), Sindbis (Togaviridae, Alphavirus) (5.0%), Dhori (10.0%), and Tahini (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus) (5.0%); sera from herring gulls had antibodies against Dhori virus (16.7%); there were no specific antibodies to Inco (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus) and mountain hare (Lepus timidus) (Bunyaviridae, Orthobunyavirus) virus.

  1. [Taxonomy of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) (Flaviviridae, Flavivirus, Entebbe bat virus group) isolated from bats (Vespertilio pipistrellus Schreber, 1774), ticks (Argasidae Koch, 1844), and birds in Kyrgyzstan].

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'vov, D K; Al'khovskiĭ, S V; Shchelkanov, M Iu; Shchetinin, A M; Deriabin, P G; Gitel'man, A K; Samokhvalov, E I; Botikov, A G

    2014-01-01

    Complete genome sequencing of the Sokuluk virus (SOKV) isolated in Kyrgyzstan from bats Vespertilio pipistrellus and their obligatory parasites--Argasidae Koch, 1844, ticks was carried out. SOKV was classified as attributed to the Flaviviridae family, Flavivirus genus. The maximum homology (71% for nucleotide and 79% for amino acid sequences) was detected with respect to the Entebbe bat virus (ENTV). ENTV and SOKV form a group joining to the yellow fever virus (YFV) within the limits of the mosquito flavivirus branch. Close relation of SOKV with bat covers and human housings permits to assume SOKV potentially patogenic to human health.

  2. Isolation of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus from a leech (Piscicola salmositica) and a copepod (Salmincola sp.), ectoparasites of sockeye salmon Oncorhynchus nerka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulcahy, Daniel M.; Klaybor, D.; Batts, W.N.

    1990-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis (IHN) virus was isolated from freshwater leeches Piscicola salmositica and copepods Salmincola sp. removed from the gills of spawning sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka. This is the first report of the isolation of IHN virus from an animal other than salmonid fishes. High levels of IHN virus were also found in leeches taken from the bottom gravel of the spawning area. The prevalence of IHN virus in samples of individual leeches was as high as 100% and the virus was isolated from 95% of pooled samples of copepod and 1.5 × 108 pfu/g in the leech. The level of virus in leeches removed from fish gills was sometimes higher than the level of virus in the gill tissue itself. Virus persisted for at least 16 d in leeches held in the laboratory without feeding. Transmission of IHN virus by leeches probably increases the infection rate of spawning sockeye salmon.

  3. Isolation and genetic characterization of bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 from cattle in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yuan-Mao; Shi, Hong-Fei; Gao, Yu-Ran; Xin, Jiu-Qing; Liu, Ni-Hong; Xiang, Wen-Hua; Ren, Xian-Gang; Feng, Jun-Ke; Zhao, Li-Ping; Xue, Fei

    2011-05-05

    Bovine parainfluenza virus type 3 (BPIV3) is one of the most important of the known viral respiratory pathogens of both young and adult cattle. However BPIV3 has not been detected or isolated in China prior to this study. In 2008, four BPIV3 strains were isolated with MDBK cells from cattle in China and characterized by RT-PCR, nucleotide sequence analysis, transmission electron microscope observation, hemadsorption and hemagglutination tests. Nucleotide phylogenetic analysis of partial hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) gene for four isolates and the complete genome for the SD0835 isolate implicated that the four Chinese BPIV3 strains were distinct from the previously reported genotype A (BPIV3a) and genotype B (BPIV3b) and might be a potentially new genotype, which was tentatively classified as genotype C (BPIV3c). This is the first study to report the isolation and genetic characterization of BPIV3 from cattle in China. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Genetic analysis of ORF5 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolated in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thuy, Nguyen Thi Dieu; Thu, Nguyen Thi Dieu; Son, Nguyen Giang; Ha, Le Thi Thu; Hung, Vo Khanh; Nguyen, Nguyen Thao; Khoa, Do Vo Anh

    2013-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most economically important swine pathogens because it is highly infectious and causes economic losses due to decreased pig productivity. In this study, the 603 bp complete major envelope protein encoding gene (ORF5) of 32 field PRRSV isolates from Vietnam collected during 2008-2012 were sequenced and analyzed. Multiple nucleotide (nt) and deduced amino acid (aa) alignments of ORF5 were performed on the 32 isolates: the representative strains (European and North American genotypes), Chinese strains available in GenBank and vaccine strains licensed for use in Vietnam. The results showed 94.8-100.0% nt identity and 94.0-100% aa similarity among the 32 isolates. These isolates shared similarities with the prototype of the North American PRRSV strain (VR-2332; nt 87.8-89.3%, aa 87.5-90.0%), and Lelystat virus, the prototype of the European PRRSV strain (LV; nt 61.1-61.9%, aa 55.1-57.0%). There was greater similarity with QN07 (nt 96.5-98.5%, aa 96.0-99.0%) from the 2007 PRRS outbreak in QuangNam Province, CH-1a (nt 93.2-95.1%, 91.5-93.5%) isolated in China in 1995 and JXA1 (nt 96.5-98.6%, aa 95.0-98.0%), the highly pathogenic strain from China isolated in 2006. The Vietnamese isolates were more similar to JXA1-R (nt 96.5-98.6%, aa 95.0-98.0%), the strain used in Chinese vaccines, than to Ingelvac MLV/BSL-PS (nt 87.2-89.0%, aa 86.0-89.0%). Phylogenetic analysis showed that the 32 isolates were of the North American genotype and classified into sub-lineage 8.7. This sub-lineage contains highly pathogenic Chinese PRRSV strains. This study documents genetic variation in circulating PRRSV strains and could assist more effective use of PRRS vaccines in Vietnam. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. The genotypes of citrus tristeza virus isolates from China revealed by sequence analysis of multiple molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Guan-Wei; Pan, Song; Wang, Guo-Ping; Tang, Min; Liu, Yong; Yang, Fan; Hong, Ni

    2013-01-01

    The genotypes of ten citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from central China were determined by examining multiple molecular markers (MMMs) using 11 primer pairs. The results revealed that one isolate contained a single T30 genotype, two isolates contained a single VT genotype, and the other seven isolates were mixtures of two or more genotypes. Sequence analysis of amplified MMMs showed a high genetic diversity in Chinese CTV populations. The genotypes resembling T36, RB and B165 were identified from Chinese CTV isolates for the first time. Our results suggest that genotype assignment of CTV cannot be based solely on the amplification profiles of MMMs, and sequencing of MMMs is required.

  6. Tissue culture technique for routine isolation of street strain rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, R J; Trimarchi, C V; Abelseth, M K

    1980-01-01

    A tissue culture test for the primary isolation of street strain rabies virus from the brains of suspect animals was evaluated. It was found to be reliable and comparable in sensitivity to the standard mouse inoculation technique. The test, which yields final results in 48 h, was performed in BHK-21 cells on tissue culture chamber slides. The addition of diethylaminoethyl dextran to the cell suspension before seeding the slide promoted the subsequent viral invasiveness of positive test specimens. The method described may be considered as a substitute for the mouse inoculation test which is currently used as a backup to the fluorescent antibody test in the diagnosis of rabies. Images PMID:6999024

  7. Characterization of the complete genomic sequence of genotype II hepatitis A virus (CF53/Berne isolate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ling; Ching, Karen Z; de Paula, Vanessa Salete; Nakano, Tatsunori; Siegl, Gunter; Weitz, Manfred; Robertson, Betty H

    2004-10-01

    The complete genomic sequence of hepatitis A virus (HAV) CF53/Berne strain was determined. Pairwise comparison with other complete HAV genomic sequences demonstrated that the CF53/Berne isolate is most closely related to the single genotype VII strain, SLF88. This close relationship was confirmed by phylogenetic analyses of different genomic regions, and was most pronounced within the capsid region. These data indicated that CF53/Berne and SLF88 isolates are related more closely to each other than are subtypes IA and IB. A histogram of the genetic differences between HAV strains revealed four separate peaks. The distance values for CF53/Berne and SLF88 isolates fell within the peak that contained strains of the same subtype, showing that they should be subtypes within a single genotype. The complete genomic data indicated that genotypes II and VII should be considered a single genotype, based upon the complete VP1 sequence, and it is proposed that the CF53/Berne isolate be classified as genotype IIA and strain SLF88 as genotype IIB. The CF53/Berne isolate is cell-adapted, and therefore its sequence was compared to that of two other strains adapted to cell culture, HM-175/7 grown in MK-5 and GBM grown in FRhK-4 cells. Mutations found at nucleotides 3889, 4087 and 4222 that were associated with HAV attenuation and cell adaptation in HM175/7 and GMB strains were not present in the CF53/Berne strain. Deletions found in the 5'UTR and P3A regions of the CF53/Berne isolate that are common to cell-adapted HAV isolates were identified, however.

  8. Isolation and propagation of Dengue virus in Vero and BHK-21 cells expressing human DC-SIGN stably.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phanthanawiboon, Supranee; A-nuegoonpipat, Atchareeya; Panngarm, Narawan; Limkittikul, Kriengsak; Ikuta, Kazuyoshi; Anantapreecha, Surapee; Kurosu, Takeshi

    2014-12-01

    The "standard" methods of isolating dengue virus (DENV) utilize the mosquito cell line C6/36, monkey kidney LLC-MK2 cells, Vero cells, or baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells. However, these cells lines lack a particular DENV receptor, known as dendritic cell-specific ICAM-3-grabbing non-integrin (DC-SIGN), which is expressed on immature dendritic cells and monocytes/macrophages. This may result in less efficient virus isolation and propagation. The present study used a lentivirus vector to establish Vero and BHK-21 cell lines (Vero-DC and BHK-DC) that express human DC-SIGN stably. Five DENV strains, each passaged several times in C6/36 cells, replicated more efficiently in Vero-DC and BHK-DC than in the parental Vero or BHK-21 cells. Vero/Vero-DC and BHK-21/BHK-DC were used to isolate virus from buffy coats and plasma samples derived from 13 patients infected with DENV. Most of the viruses showed increased production in cell lines expressing DC-SIGN. However, the isolation rate was lower (15.4-46.2%) than that from C6/36 cells (84.6%). Interestingly, when the viruses were isolated in C6/36 cells prior to infecting Vero/Vero-DC and BHK-21/BHK-DC, the rate of virus production increased markedly, reaching levels higher than those initially achieved in C6/36 cells. These data suggest that Vero-DC and BHK-DC could be useful tools for virus propagation, and that human specimens may contain a factor that interferes with virus growth in mammalian cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Isolation of EEE virus from Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus and Culiseta melanura in coastal South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Diana I; Wozniak, Arthur; Tolson, Marsha W; Turner, Pearl E; Vaughan, David R

    2003-03-01

    A 1-year arbovirus study was conducted at The Wedge Plantation located in coastal South Carolina to determine the occurrence and level of arbovirus activity in mosquito species inhabiting the site. Mosquito species composition and temporal abundance were also determined. A total of 45,051 mosquitoes representing 27 species in 9 genera was collected and identified during 130 trap-nights between August, 1997, and July, 1998. The most abundant species was Culex salinarius (n = 20,954) followed by Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus (n = 12,185). Eastern equine encephalomyelitis virus (EEE) was isolated from 2 pools collected in August, 1997; one pool of Oc. taeniorhynchus (minimum infection rate [MIR] = 0.6/1,000) and a second of Culiseta melanura (MIR = 3.8/1,000). This report represents the first record of an EEE isolation from Oc. taeniorhynchus and Cs. melanura in South Carolina.

  10. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene of the Skierniewice isolate of plum pox virus (PPV)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wypijewski, K.; Musial, W.; Augustyniak, J. [Uniwersytet Adama Mickiewicza, Poznan (Poland); Malinowski, T. [Research Institute of Pomology and Floriculture, Skierniewice (Poland)

    1994-12-31

    The coat protein (CP) gene of the Skierniewice isolate of plum pox virus (PPV-S) has been amplified using the reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned and sequenced. The nucleotide sequence of the gene and the deduced amino-acid sequences of PPV-S CP were compared with those of other PPV strains. The nucleotide sequence showed very high homology to most of the published sequences. The motif: Asp-Ala-Gly (DAG), important for the aphid transmissibility, was present in the amino-acid sequence. Our isolate did not react in ELISA with monoclonal antibodies MAb06 supposed to be specific for PPV-D. (author). 32 refs, 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  11. Isolation of influenza virus A hemagglutinin C-terminal domain by hemagglutinin proteolysis in octylglucoside micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radyukhin, Victor A; Serebryakova, Marina V; Ksenofontov, Alexander L; Lukashina, Elena V; Baratova, Lyudmila A

    2006-01-01

    A method of isolation of hydrophobic membrane-bound C-terminal domain of influenza virus A hemagglutinin (HA) is suggested. The method is based on the insertion of HA into octylglucoside micelles followed by pepsin or thermolysin hydrolysis. Subsequent treatment of proteolytic digests with chloroform-hexafluoroisopropanol mixture resulted in the extraction of a few hydrophobic peptides into organic phase. Mass-spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis revealed that the peptides with ion masses corresponding to the anchoring C-terminal domain with or without modifications predominated in the organic solution. The data obtained confirmed our speculation on the possibility of the suggested isolation scheme following from the strong interactions of anchoring domains in compact trimeric structure of HA spikes combined with micelle protection effect. Several appropriate peptides presence in the organic phase apparently arises from the presence of a few accessible proteolytic sites in HA transmembrane region.

  12. A first note on Japanese encephalitis virus isolation from Culex quinquefasciatus Say in Northern West Bengal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Thenmozhi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis (JE is endemic in many parts of India including the state of West Bengal. In West Bengal, the first major outbreaks of JE occurred in the districts of Bankura and Burdwan in 1973. The Culex vishnui subgroup of mosquitoes has been implicated as major vectors of JE. However in India, JE virus (JEV has been isolated from 16 species of mosquitoes. During September 2011, JE cases were reported from four districts -Jalpaiguri, Darjeeling, Dinajpur and Cooch Behar of West Bengal (North. Adult mosquitoes were collected, identified, pooled and screened for JEV using antigen capture ELISA. Out of 279 mosquito pools tested, one pool of Cx. pseudovishnui and three pools of Cx. quinquefasciatus were found positive for JEV. The ELISA positive pools were further confirmed as JEV by insect bioassay (Toxo-IFA. Two pools of Cx. quinquefasciatus were confirmed as JEV. This represents the first report of JEV isolation from Cx. quinquefasciatus in West Bengal.

  13. Isolation and phylogenetic analysis of canine distemper virus among domestic dogs in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Dung Van; Suzuki, Junko; Minami, Shohei; Yonemitsu, Kenzo; Nagata, Nao; Kuwata, Ryusei; Shimoda, Hiroshi; Vu, Chien Kim; Truong, Thuy Quoc; Maeda, Ken

    2017-01-20

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is one of the most serious pathogens found in many species of carnivores, including domestic dogs. In this study, hemagglutinin (H) genes were detected in five domestic Vietnamese dogs with diarrhea, and two CDVs were successfully isolated from dogs positive for H genes. The complete genome of one isolate, CDV/dog/HCM/33/140816, was determined. Phylogenetic analysis showed that all Vietnamese CDVs belonged to the Asia-1 genotype. In addition, the H proteins of Vietnamese CDV strains were the most homologous to those of Chinese CDVs (98.4% to 99.3% identity). These results indicated that the Asia-1 genotype of CDV was the predominant genotype circulating among the domestic dog population in Vietnam and that transboundary transmission of CDV has occurred between Vietnam and China.

  14. Characterization of Aujeszky's disease virus isolates from South and Southeast Brazil by RFLP analysis

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    Piatti Rosa Maria

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The genomic DNA of thirty strains of Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV isolated in the South and Southeast regions of Brazil from 1982 to 1996 were characterized by restriction endonuclease analysis with BamHI. Twenty seven strains were isolated from pigs, 1 from cattle, 1 from cat and 1 from dog. Using a systematization previously described, the 30 ADV strains could be classified as genomic types I (n = 2 and II (n = 28. Genomic type III was not observed. In this first study of genomic type characterization of brazilian ADV strains, we could demonstrate the occurence in Brazil of the genomic types I and II, with a large predominance of genomic type II.

  15. Molecular characterization of double-stranded RNA virus in Trichomonas vaginalis Egyptian isolates and its association with pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Gayar, Eman K; Mokhtar, Amira B; Hassan, Wael A

    2016-10-01

    Trichomoniasis is a common human sexually transmitted infection caused by Trichomonas vaginalis. The parasite can be infected with double-stranded RNA viruses (TVV). This viral infection may have important implications on trichomonal virulence and disease pathogenesis. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of T. vaginalis virus among isolates obtained from infected (symptomatic and asymptomatic) women in Ismailia City, Egypt, and to correlate the virus-infected isolates with the clinical manifestations of patients. In addition, the pathogenicity of TVV infected isolates on mice was also evaluated. T. vaginalis isolates were obtained from symptomatic and asymptomatic female patients followed by axenic cultivation in Diamond's TYM medium. The presence of T. vaginalis virus was determined from total extraction of nucleic acids (DNA-RNA) followed by reverse transcriptase-PCR. Representative samples were inoculated intraperitoneally in female albino/BALB mice to assess the pathogenicity of different isolates. A total of 110 women were examined; 40 (36.3 %) samples were positive for T. vaginalis infection. Of these 40 isolates, 8 (20 %) were infected by TVV. Five isolates contained TVV-2 virus species, and the remaining three isolates were infected withTVV-4 variant. A significant association was found between the presence of TVV and particular clinical manifestations of trichomoniasis. Experimental mice infection showed varying degrees of pathogenicity. This is the first report on T. vaginalis infection by TVV in Egypt. The strong association detected between TVV and particular clinical features of trichomoniasis and also the degree of pathogenicity in experimentally infected mice may indicate a possible clinical significance of TVV infection of T. vaginalis isolates.

  16. Complete genome sequence of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valles, Steven M; Allen, Clare; Varone, Laura; Briano, Juan

    2010-04-01

    Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3) is a recently described positive-strand RNA virus that infects the red imported fire ant, S. invicta. The genome of an Argentinean isolate of Solenopsis invicta virus 3 (SINV-3(ArgSF )) obtained from the Santa Fe region of Argentina was sequenced in entirety. Assembly of nine overlapping fragments yielded a consensus genome sequence 10,386 nucleotides long, excluding the poly(A) tail present on the 3' end (Genbank accession number GU017972). With the exception of the poly(A) tail, the genome length of SINV-3(ArgSF ) was identical to the North American isolate (SINV-3(USDM )). The SINV-3(ArgSF ) genome possessed three major open reading frames (ORFs) (comprised of >or=100 codons) in the sense orientation; SINV-3(USDM ) possessed only two. ORFs 1 and 2 had identical start and stop genome positions for both isolates. Blastp analysis of the translated ORF 1 of SINV-3(ArgSF ) recognized conserved domains for helicase, protease, and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase. These domains and their corresponding positions were identical to those reported for SINV-3(USDM ). ORF 2a, unique to the SINV-3(ArgSF ) genome, was also found in frame 2 and had a canonical start codon located at nucleotide position 8,351 and a stop codon ending at position 8,827. Blastp analysis of the translated amino acid sequence of ORF 2a revealed no significant similarity in the Genbank database. The two SINV-3 isolates exhibited 96.2% nucleotide sequence identity across the entire genome. The amino acid sequences of ORFs 1 and 2 exhibited higher identities (99.0 and 98.2%, respectively) than the corresponding nucleotide regions within the genome. These data indicated that the nucleotide differences between the SINV-3 isolates were largely synonymous. This observation was corroborated by codon substitution rate analysis. Thus, the majority of the SINV-3 codon changes were silent in the two polyproteins, indicating purifying selection pressure on the viral genome.

  17. Molecular characterization of Banana streak virus isolate from Musa Acuminata in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Jun; Wang, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Xin; Liu, Zhi-Xin

    2011-12-01

    Banana streak virus (BSV), a member of genus Badnavirus, is a causal agent of banana streak disease throughout the world. The genetic diversity of BSVs from different regions of banana plantations has previously been investigated, but there are relatively few reports of the genetic characteristic of episomal (non-integrated) BSV genomes isolated from China. Here, the complete genome, a total of 7722bp (GenBank accession number DQ092436), of an isolate of Banana streak virus (BSV) on cultivar Cavendish (BSAcYNV) in Yunnan, China was determined. The genome organises in the typical manner of badnaviruses. The intergenic region of genomic DNA contains a large stem-loop, which may contribute to the ribosome shift into the following open reading frames (ORFs). The coding region of BSAcYNV consists of three overlapping ORFs, ORF1 with a non-AUG start codon and ORF2 encoding two small proteins are individually involved in viral movement and ORF3 encodes a polyprotein. Besides the complete genome, a defective genome lacking the whole RNA leader region and a majority of ORF1 and which encompasses 6525bp was also isolated and sequenced from this BSV DNA reservoir in infected banana plants. Sequence analyses showed that BSAcYNV has closest similarity in terms of genome organization and the coding assignments with an BSV isolate from Vietnam (BSAcVNV). The corresponding coding regions shared identities of 88% and -95% at nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated BSAcYNV shared the closest geographical evolutionary relationship to BSAcVNV among sequenced banana streak badnaviruses.

  18. Pathogenesis of chicken-passaged Newcastle disease viruses isolated from chickens and wild and exotic birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kommers, Glaucia D; King, Daniel J; Seal, Bruce S; Brown, Corrie C

    2003-01-01

    The pathogenesis of six Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates recovered from chickens (Ckn-LBM and Ckn-Australia) and wild (Anhinga) and exotic (YN parrot, pheasant, and dove) birds was examined after the isolates had been passaged four times in domestic chickens. Groups of 10 4-wk-old specific-pathogen-free white leghorn chickens were inoculated intraconjunctivally with each one of the isolates. The infected birds were observed for clinical disease and were euthanatized and sampled at selected times from 12 hr to 14 days postinoculation or at death. Tissues were examined by histopathology, by immunohistochemistry (IHC) to detect viral nucleoprotein (IHC/NP), and by in situ hybridization to detect viral mRNA and were double labeled for apoptosis (terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling ([TUNEL] or IHC/caspase-3) and viral nucleoprorein (IHC/NP). Birds infected with the three low virulence viruses (Ckn-LBM, YN parrot, and Ckn-Australia) did not develop clinical disease. Microscopic lesions were observed only at the inoculation site and in organs of the respiratory system. The detection of viral nucleoprotein (N) was restricted to the inoculation site. The pheasant and dove isolates were highly virulent for chickens with marked tropism for lymphoid tissues, confirmed by the presence of large numbers of cells positive for viral N protein and viral mRNA. Viral N protein was detected early in the cytoplasm of cells in the center of the splenic ellipsoids. The apoptosis assays (TUNEL and IHC/caspase-3) showed increased apoptosis in the splenic ellipsoids as well. Apparently, apoptosis is an important mechanism in lymphoid depletion during NDV infection.

  19. High frequency of hepatitis E virus infection in swine from South Brazil and close similarity to human HEV isolates

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    Ana Maria Passos-Castilho

    Full Text Available Abstract Hepatitis E virus is responsible for acute and chronic liver infections worldwide. Swine hepatitis E virus has been isolated in Brazil, and a probable zoonotic transmission has been described, although data are still scarce. The aim of this study was to investigate the frequency of hepatitis E virus infection in pigs from a small-scale farm in the rural area of Paraná State, South Brazil. Fecal samples were collected from 170 pigs and screened for hepatitis E virus RNA using a duplex real-time RT-PCR targeting a highly conserved 70 nt long sequence within overlapping parts of ORF2 and ORF3 as well as a 113 nt sequence of ORF2. Positive samples with high viral loads were subjected to direct sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. hepatitis E virus RNA was detected in 34 (20.0% of the 170 pigs following positive results in at least one set of screening real-time RT-PCR primers and probes. The swine hepatitis E virus strains clustered with the genotype hepatitis E virus-3b reference sequences in the phylogenetic analysis and showed close similarity to human hepatitis E virus isolates previously reported in Brazil.

  20. Isolation and characterization of a single-stranded DNA virus infecting the marine diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11 isolated from western Japan.

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    Kei Kimura

    Full Text Available Diatoms are significant organisms for primary production in the earth's aquatic environment. Hence, their dynamics are an important focus area in current studies. Viruses are a great concern as potential factors of diatom mortality, along with other physical, chemical, and biological factors. We isolated and characterized a new diatom virus (Csp07DNAV that lyses the marine planktonic diatom Chaetoceros sp. strain SS628-11. This paper examines the physiological, morphological, and genomic characteristics of Csp07DNAV. The virus was isolated from a surface water sample that was collected at Hiroshima Bay, Japan. It was icosahedral, had a diameter of 34 nm, and accumulated in the nuclei of host cells. Rod-shaped virus particles also coexisted in the host nuclei. The latent period and burst size were estimated to be <12 h and 29 infectious units per host cell, respectively. Csp07DNAV had a closed circular single-stranded DNA genome (5,552 nucleotides, which included a double-stranded region and 3 open reading frames. The monophyly of Csp07DNAV and other Bacilladnavirus group single-stranded DNA viruses was supported by phylogenetic analysis that was based on the amino acid sequence of each virus protein. On the basis of these results, we considered Csp07DNAV to be a new member of the genus Bacilladnavirus.

  1. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Francisco C A; Souto, Francisco J D; Nabuco, Leticia C; Villela-Nogueira, Cristiane A; Coelho, Henrique Sergio M; Franz, Helena Cristina F; Saraiva, Joao Carlos P; Virgolino, Helaine A; Motta-Castro, Ana Rita C; Melo, Mabel M M; Martins, Regina M B; Gomes, Selma A

    2007-11-23

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%), and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%). Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2%) and Central (47.6%) regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13%) countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5%) belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin) indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F isolates belonged to cluster II, the presence of some

  2. Hepatitis B virus genotypes circulating in Brazil: molecular characterization of genotype F isolates

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    Virgolino Helaine A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis B virus (HBV isolates have been classified in eight genotypes, A to H, which exhibit distinct geographical distributions. Genotypes A, D and F are predominant in Brazil, a country formed by a miscegenated population, where the proportion of individuals from Caucasian, Amerindian and African origins varies by region. Genotype F, which is the most divergent, is considered indigenous to the Americas. A systematic molecular characterization of HBV isolates from different parts of the world would be invaluable in establishing HBV evolutionary origins and dispersion patterns. A large-scale study is needed to map the region-by-region distribution of the HBV genotypes in Brazil. Results Genotyping by PCR-RFLP of 303 HBV isolates from HBsAg-positive blood donors showed that at least two of the three genotypes, A, D, and F, co-circulate in each of the five geographic regions of Brazil. No other genotypes were identified. Overall, genotype A was most prevalent (48.5%, and most of these isolates were classified as subgenotype A1 (138/153; 90.2%. Genotype D was the most common genotype in the South (84.2% and Central (47.6% regions. The prevalence of genotype F was low (13% countrywide. Nucleotide sequencing of the S gene and a phylogenetic analysis of 32 HBV genotype F isolates showed that a great majority (28/32; 87.5% belonged to subgenotype F2, cluster II. The deduced serotype of 31 of 32 F isolates was adw4. The remaining isolate showed a leucine-to-isoleucine substitution at position 127. Conclusion The presence of genotypes A, D and F, and the absence of other genotypes in a large cohort of HBV infected individuals may reflect the ethnic origins of the Brazilian population. The high prevalence of isolates from subgenotype A1 (of African origin indicates that the African influx during the colonial slavery period had a major impact on the circulation of HBV genotype A currently found in Brazil. Although most genotype F

  3. Isolation and characterization of virus of highly pathogenic avian influenza H5 subtype of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia

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    Agus Wiyono

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available A study on the isolation and characterization of Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza of chicken from outbreaks in Indonesia was conducted at Indonesian Research Institute for Veterinary Science. Outbreaks of avian disease had been reported in Indonesia since August 2003 affecting commercial layer, broiler, quail, and ostrich and also native chicken with showing clinical signs such as cyanosis of wattle and comb, nasal discharges and hypersalivation, subcutaneous ptechiae on foot and leg, diarre and sudden high mortality. The aim of this study is to isolate and characterize the causal agent of the disease. Samples of serum, feather follicle, tracheal swab, as well as organs of proventriculus, intestine, caecal tonsil, trachea and lungs were collected from infected animals. Serum samples were tested haemaglutination/haemaglutination inhibition to Newcastle Disease and Egg Drop Syndrome viruses. Isolation of virus of the causal agent of the outbreak was conducted from samples of feather follicle, tracheal swab, and organs using 11 days old specific pathogen free (SPF embryonated eggs. The isolated viruses were then characterised by agar gel precipitation test using swine influenza reference antisera, by haemaglutination inhibition using H1 to H15 reference antisera, and by electron microscope examination. The pathogenicity of the viruses was confirmed by intravenous pathogenicity index test and its culture in Chicken Embryo Fibroblast primary cell culture without addition of trypsin. The study revealed that the causative agent of the outbreaks of avian disease in Indonesia was avian influenza H5 subtype virus based upon serological tests, virus isolation and characterization using swine influenza reference antisera, and electron microscope examination. While subtyping of the viruses using H1 to H15 reference antisera suggested that the virus is very likely to be an avian influenza H5N1 subtype virus. The pathogenicity test confirmed that the viruses

  4. Arbovirus investigations in Argentina, 1977-1980. III. Identification and characterization of viruses isolated, including new subtypes of western and Venezuelan equine encephalitis viruses and four new bunyaviruses (Las Maloyas, Resistencia, Barranqueras, and Antequera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calisher, C H; Monath, T P; Mitchell, C J; Sabattini, M S; Cropp, C B; Kerschner, J; Hunt, A R; Lazuick, J S

    1985-09-01

    Forty viruses isolated from mosquitoes between 1977 and 1980 in Argentina have been identified and characterized. Nineteen strains of VEE virus, identical by neutralization (N) tests, were shown by hemagglutination-inhibition tests with anti-E2 glycoprotein sera to represent a new subtype VI of the VEE complex. RNA oligonucleotide fingerprints of this virus were distinct from subtype I viruses. The virus was not lethal for English short-haired guinea pigs, indicating that it is probably not equine-virulent. Three strains of a member of the WEE virus complex were shown to differ by N tests in 1 direction from prototype WEE virus. The new WEE subtype was also found to be distinct by RNA oligonucleotide mapping. Its vector relationships indicate that it is an enzootic virus, and it has not been associated with equine disease. A new member of the Anopheles A serogroup was identified, shown to be most closely related to Lukuni and Col An 57389 viruses, and given the name Las Maloyas virus. A strain of Para virus (Bunyaviridae, Bunyavirus) was identified. Six isolates, representing 3 new viruses morphologically resembling bunyaviruses are described; the names Antequera, Barranqueras, and Resistencia are proposed for these agents, which were all isolated from Culex (Melanoconion) delpontei in Chaco Province. No serologic relationships between these viruses and other bunyaviruses were found. Since they are antigenically interrelated, they form a new (Antequera) serogroup. Eight Gamboa serogroup viruses and 2 strains of St. Louis encephalitis virus were also identified.

  5. Dynamics of the population structure and genetic variability within Iranian isolates of grapevine fanleaf virus: evidence for polyphyletic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholampour, Z; Kargar, M; Zakiaghl, M; Siampour, M; Mehrvar, M; Izadpanah, K

    To determine the genetic diversity and population structure of grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), the complete nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene of 41 isolates from different regions in Iran was determined. Phylogenetic analyses of these isolates together with those available in the GenBank revealed two evolutionary divergent lineages, designated GFLV-G and GFLV-Ir that reflect origin of the isolates. Analysis of the genetic variability in the coat protein of these isolates revealed 37 genotype groups in GFLV population. Analyses indicate that GFLV-G and GFLV-Ir clades are significantly differentiated populations of GFLV. Also, geographical subpopulations of the virus in Iran were completely distinct from each other. Examination of nonsynonymous/synonymous nucleotide diversity showed that the CP gene has been under purifying selection. The neutrality tests indicate balancing selection operating within isolates of the northwest of Iran and purifying selection within the other populations.

  6. Evolution and genetic characterization of hepatitis A virus isolates in China.

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    Wang, Hao; Wang, Xin-Ying; Zheng, Hui-Hui; Cao, Jing-Yuan; Zhou, Wen-Ting; Bi, Sheng-Li

    2015-04-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV), transmitted mainly through the fecal-oral route, is one of the major causes of acute viral hepatitis worldwide. HAV is endemic in China. This study performed genetic and evolutionary analysis of HAV isolates circulated in the country. Clinical samples were collected and HAV nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences were analyzed. 70 representative sequences of HAV VP3-VP1-2A regions sampled from 1988 to 2014 were compared and characterized using the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach (BEAST software, Version1.7.5). All isolates from China in this study belonged to genotype I, with most of the samples clustering in subgenotype IA, while several unique amino acid variants were observed. The estimated mean substitution rate was 5.56×10(-4) substitutions / site / year, the time to the most recent common ancestor of genotype I isolates in China was calculated to be around 180 years ago. Skyline plots showed the incidence of HAV went down gradually from the mid-1990s. The evolution estimations were consistent with the laboratory and epidemiological results. Several isolates from China showed amino acid changes close to the immunodominant sites, which needs to be further analyzed. The study results have indicated the effectiveness of improving economic and sanitation levels together with HAV vaccination to control HAV-related infections in China. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Varicella-zoster virus strains isolated from Korean patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Ho; Jeon, Jeong Seon; Kim, In Kyo; Park, Ji Seon; Park, Hosun; Shin, Ok Sarah; Lee, Chan Hee

    2017-08-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is a causative agent of chickenpox in primary infection and shingles after its reactivation from latency. Complete or almost-complete genomic DNA sequences for various VZV strains have been reported. Recently, clinical VZV strains were isolated from Korean patients whose genome was sequenced using high-throughput sequencing technology. In this study, we analyzed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of VZV strains to genetically characterize Korean clinical isolates. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that three Korean strains, YC01, YC02, and YC03, were linked to clade 2. Comprehensive SNP analysis identified 86 sites specific for the 5 VZV clades. VZV strains isolated from Korea did not form a phylogenetic cluster. Rather, YC02 and YC03 clustered strongly with Chinese strain 84-7 within clade 2, more specifically cluster 2a. Signature sequences for the cluster 2a were identified and found to play an important role in the separation of cluster 2a strains from other clade 2 strains, as shown in substitution studies. Further genetic analysis with additional strains isolated from Japan, China, and other Asian countries would provide a novel insight into the significance of two distinct subclades within clade 2.

  8. Genetic characterization of St. Louis encephalitis virus isolated from human in São Paulo, Brazil

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    Cecília Luiza Simões dos Santos

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available The molecular characterization of SPH253157, a new strain of St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV, isolated in 2004 from the first case of human infection recognized in the state of São Paulo, Brazil, is reported. The patient, presenting a febrile illness without neurological involvement, was hospitalized as a probable case of dengue fever. Genomic RNA was isolated from the supernatant of C6/36 cells infected with acute phase-serum specimen of the patient and the envelope gene was amplified by reverse-transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The complete nucleotide sequence of the envelope gene of this isolate was directly sequenced from the amplified products and compared with other Brazilian and American SLEV strains. Phylogenetic analyses were carried out under maximum likelihood criterion with outgroups both included and excluded. Outgroups comprised four flavivirus of the Japanese encephalitis group. Phylogeny also included Bayesian analysis. The results indicated that the new SLEV isolate belongs to lineage III, being closely related to an Argentinean strain recovered from Culex sp. in 1979. It is concluded that there are at least 3 lineages of SLEV in Brazil.

  9. Pathotypic characterization of Newcastle disease virus isolated from vaccinated chicken in West Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putri, Dwi Desmiyeni; Handharyani, Ekowati; Soejoedono, Retno Damajanti; Setiyono, Agus; Mayasari, Ni Luh Putu Ika; Poetri, Okti Nadia

    2017-04-01

    This research was conducted to differentiate and characterize eight Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates collected from vaccinated chicken at commercial flocks in West Java, Indonesia, in 2011, 2014 and 2015 by pathotype specific primers. A total of eight NDV isolates collected from clinical outbreaks among commercial vaccinated flocks in West Java, Indonesia, in 2011, 2014, and 2015 were used in this study. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was used to detect and differentiate virulence of NDV strains, using three sets of primers targeting their M and F gene. First primers were universal primers to detect NDV targeting matrix (M) gene. Other two sets of primers were specific for the fusion (F) gene cleavage site sequence of virulent and avirulent NDV strains. Our results showed that three isolates belong to NDV virulent strains, and other five isolates belong to NDV avirulent strains. The nucleotide sequence of the F protein cleavage site showed 112 K/R-R-Q/R-K-R/G-F 117 on NDV virulent strains and 112 G-K/R-Q-G-R-L 117 on NDV avirulent strain. Result from the current study suggested that NDV virulent strain were circulating among vaccinated chickens in West Java, Indonesia; this might possess a risk of causing ND outbreaks and causing economic losses within the poultry industry.

  10. Infection of mice, ferrets, and rhesus macaques with a clinical mumps virus isolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Pei; Huang, Zhixiang; Gao, Xiudan; Michel, Frank J; Hirsch, Gwen; Hogan, Robert J; Sakamoto, Kaori; Ho, Wenzhe; Wu, Jianguo; He, Biao

    2013-07-01

    In recent years, many mumps outbreaks have occurred in vaccinated populations worldwide. The reasons for these outbreaks are not clear. Animal models are needed to investigate the causes of outbreaks and to understand the pathogenesis of mumps virus (MuV). In this study, we have examined the infection of three animal models with an isolate of mumps virus from a recent outbreak (MuV-IA). We have found that while both ferrets and mice generated humoral and cellular immune responses to MuV-IA infection, no obvious signs of illness were observed in these animals; rhesus macaques were the most susceptible to MuV-IA infection. Infection of rhesus macaques via both intranasal and intratracheal routes with MuV-IA led to the typical clinical signs of mumps 2 weeks to 4 weeks postinfection. However, none of the infected macaques showed any fever or neurologic signs during the experimental period. Mumps viral antigen was detected in parotid glands by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Rhesus macaques represent the best animal model for the study of mumps virus pathogenesis.

  11. Pathogenicity of rabies viruses isolated in China: two fixed strains and a street strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Tang, Qing; Rayner, Simon; Gong, Kai; Song, Bo; Liang, Guo Dong

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the virulence characteristics of two fixed strains (CTN and aG) and a street strain (HN10) of rabies viruses isolated in China. ICR mice of different age groups were inoculated with CTN, aG and HN10 rabies virus strains via the intracracerebral (i.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) routes, and observed for 20 days. The CTN strain was pathogenic to 7-day-old suckling mice that received i.c. inoculations and 3-day-old suckling mice that received i.m. inoculations. The aG strain was pathogenic to 4-week-old mice that received i.c. inoculations and 7-day-old suckling mice that received i.m. inoculations. The HN10 strain was pathogenic to mice of all age groups via both inoculation routes. In moribund mice, the viruses had spread to most regions of the brain. The CTN and HN10 strains had similar dissemination patterns in the brain; both viral antigens could be found in the dentate gyrus (DG), whereas few viral antigens were present in the DG from specimens that had been infected with the aG strain. A comprehensive sequence analysis of the G protein suggested that differences in gene sequences may be responsible for producing strain-specific differences in pathogenicity and distribution in the brain. Copyright © 2013 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  12. Isolation of avian influenza virus (H9N2 from emu in china

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    Kang Wenhua

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This is the first reported isolation of avian influenza virus (AIV from emu in China. An outbreak of AIV infection occurred at an emu farm that housed 40 four-month-old birds. Various degrees of haemorrhage were discovered in the tissues of affected emus. Cell degeneration and necrosis were observed microscopically. Electron microscopy revealed round or oval virions with a diameter of 80 nm to 120 nm, surrounded by an envelope with spikes. The virus was classified as low pathogenic AIV (LPAIV, according to OIE standards. It was named A/Emu/HeNen/14/2004(H9N2(Emu/HN/2004. The HA gene (1683bp was amplified by RT-PCR and it was compared with other animal H9N2 AIV sequences in GenBank, the US National Institutes of Health genetic sequence database. The results suggested that Emu/HN/2004 may have come from an avian influenza virus (H9N2 from Southern China.

  13. Segregation of distinct variants from Citrus tristeza virus isolate SY568 using aphid transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velazquez-Monreal, J J; Mathews, D M; Dodds, J A

    2009-10-01

    A well-studied severe isolate of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) known as SY568 has previously been shown to contain multiple variants of the virus which differ in their genetic and biological characters. Aphid transmission was used in an attempt to segregate some of these variants for further characterization. Resulting infections gave symptoms which varied from asymptomatic to more severe than the inoculum source. RNase protection assays (RPAs) were used to compare nine regions of the CTV genome and determine whether unique strains could be identified. Five aphid-transmitted subcultures, with fingerprints that were different from those of the inoculum sources in at least one genomic area, were then cloned, sequenced, and compared with known isolates. An asymptomatic strain was shown to be different in every area of the CTV genome when examined by RPA and sequencing of selected regions. Mixed-infection studies using graft transmission of the asymptomatic subculture and two of the more severe aphid-transmitted subcultures showed that the mild strain was not able to compete well when in the presence of any of the severe variants tested, and its titer was significantly reduced from that seen in single infection. The mild strain and a selected severe strain were singly graft inoculated into five different citrus hosts (sweet orange, grapefruit, sour orange, lemon, and lime), where they maintained their distinct biological and genetic characteristics.

  14. Epidemiology and genetic characterization of equine infectious anaemia virus strains isolated in Belgium in 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caij, A B; Tignon, M

    2014-10-01

    In January 2010, the United Kingdom notified cases of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) in two horses introduced from Belgium. The animals came from one assembly centre in Romania and had transited through Belgium with 16 other horses. Nine of them, bought by a Belgian horse breeder, were investigated in Belgium and revealed one additional EIA-positive animal. Afterwards, the Belgian Federal Agency for the Safety of the Food Chain (FASFC) organized a serological EIA survey of the horses introduced into Belgium from Romania between 2007 and 2009. Among the 95 horses identified, six additional serological positive cases were found that had been introduced into Belgium in 2008 (n = 4) and in 2009 (n = 2). The survey was extended to the horses in contact with the positive cases, but all contact animals were negative, indicating the absence of transmission. Virological examination performed on tissue samples collected from two seropositive animals demonstrated the presence of viral DNA of EIA virus. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequences of EIA virus gag gene clustered the Belgian isolates with Romanian strains isolated in 2009. The presumption of a common Belgian origin could be rejected. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  15. Molecular determinants of human neutralizing antibodies isolated from a patient infected with Zika virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qihui; Yang, Huabing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Lianpan; Ma, Tong; Qi, Jianxun; Wong, Gary; Peng, Ruchao; Liu, Sheng; Li, Junfu; Li, Shihua; Song, Jian; Liu, Jianying; He, Jianhua; Yuan, Hui; Xiong, Ying; Liao, Yong; Li, Jianhua; Yang, Jianping; Tong, Zhou; Griffin, Bryan D; Bi, Yuhai; Liang, Mifang; Xu, Xiaoning; Qin, Chuan; Cheng, Gong; Zhang, Xinzheng; Wang, Peiyi; Qiu, Xiangguo; Kobinger, Gary; Shi, Yi; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George F

    2016-12-14

    The 2015-2016 outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) disease has affected many countries and is a major public health concern. ZIKV is associated with fetal microcephaly and neurological complications, and countermeasures are needed to treat and prevent ZIKV infection. We report the isolation of 13 specific human monoclonal antibodies from a single patient infected with ZIKV. Two of the isolated antibodies (Z23 and Z3L1) demonstrated potent ZIKV-specific neutralization in vitro without binding or neutralizing activity against strains 1 to 4 of dengue virus, the closest relative to ZIKV. These two antibodies provided postexposure protection to mice in vivo. Structural studies revealed that Z23 and Z3L1 bound to tertiary epitopes in envelope protein domain I, II, or III, indicating potential targets for ZIKV-specific therapy. Our results suggest the potential of antibody-based therapeutics and provide a structure-based rationale for the design of future ZIKV-specific vaccines. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Biologic and immunologic characterization of rabies virus isolates of domestic animals from rabies endemic areas of Brazil

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    Paulo Roberto de Oliveira

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available Biologic and immunologic profiles of rabies virus isolates obtained from domestic animals of endemic areas were compared to the CVS rabies virus by means of mice inoculation, serum-neutralization test and by the fluorescent antibody technique (FA. The mean incubation period was 10.2 days, with a range of 4 and 23 days; the disease period was found with a mean period of 3.3 days with a range of 1 and 5 days; the overall value of pathogenicity was 96.5% (332/344 and clinical manifestations all resembled rabies. All rabies virus isolates have reacted specifically to FA test and they all revealed immunologic identity to the standard strain of the CVS virus through the serum-neutralization technique.

  17. Tracking the molecular epidemiology of Brazilian Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Fernanda M F; Vidigal, Pedro M P; Myrrha, Luciana W; Fietto, Juliana L R; Silva, Abelardo; Almeida, Márcia R

    2013-01-01

    Infectious bursal disease is a highly contagious disease of young chickens caused by Infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV). Genome segment A encodes the capsid protein (VP2), while segment B encodes the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (VP1). In the present study, we trace the molecular epidemiology of IBDV in Brazil by analyzing 29 isolates collected in the major regions of poultry production. To genetically characterize the isolates, phylogenetic and population dynamic analyses were conducted using 68 VP1 (2634 nt) and 102 VP2 (1356 nt) coding sequences from IBDV isolates from different regions of the world. Furthermore, the evolution of IBDV was analyzed by characterizing the selective forces that operated during the diversification of viral isolates. We show that IBDV isolates were introduced into Brazil mainly from the Netherlands and the USA. These introductions were associated with all Brazilian poultry production regions analyzed in this work. In addition, we show that the evolution of IBDV has been shaped by a combination of very low recombination rates and relatively high rates of nucleotide substitution (2.988×10(-4) for VP1 and 3.2937×10(-4) for VP2), which themselves are a function of purifying selection operating on VP1 and VP2. Furthermore, our extended Bayesian skyline plot suggests that the increase in the effective population size of isolates of IBDV is consistent with its epidemiological history, with a large increase during the emergence of acute outbreaks of IBD in the 1980s. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Complete genome sequences of three tomato spotted wilt virus isolates from tomato and pepper plants in Korea and their phylogenetic relationship to other TSWV isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Seung; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2011-04-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infects numerous host plants and has three genome segments, called L, M and S. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Korean TSWV isolates (TSWV-1 to -3) infecting tomato and pepper plants. Although the nucleotide sequence of TSWV-1 genome isolated from tomato is very different from those of TSWV-2 and TSWV-3 isolated from pepper, the deduced amino acid sequences of the five TSWV genes are highly conserved among all three TSWV isolates. In phylogenetic analysis, deduced RdRp protein sequences of TSWV-2 and TSWV-3 were clustered together with two previously reported isolates from Japan and Korea, while TSWV-1 grouped together with a Hawaiian isolate. A phylogenetic tree based on N protein sequences, however, revealed four distinct groups of TSWV isolates, and all three Korean isolates belonged to group II, together with many other isolates, mostly from Europe and Asia. Interestingly, most American isolates grouped together as group I. Together, these results suggested that these newly identified TSWV isolates might have originated from an Asian ancestor and undergone divergence upon infecting different host plants.

  19. First detection of Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus and Grapevine rupestris vein feathering virus, and new phylogenetic groups for Grapevine fleck virus and Hop stunt viroid isolates, revealed from grapevine field surveys in Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola FIORE

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the prevalence of virus and viroid infections was conducted in a grapevine field collection in Valencia, Spain. Samples of autochthonous and traditional grapevine cultivars were collected during November 2011 and tested for the presence of fourteen viruses and five viroids, using RT-PCR. The prevalent viruses were Grapevine rupestris stem pitting-associated virus (GRSPaV: 49% infected samples and Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 2 (GLRaV-2: 15% of samples. GLRaV-1, GLRaV-3, GLRaV-4 (variants 4 and 5, Grapevine fanleaf virus, Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV, Grapevine rupestris vein feathering virus (GRVFV and Grapevine virus A were also detected. Hop stunt viroid (HSVd: 92% of plants infected and Grapevine yellow speckle viroid 1 (6% of plants were also detected. Mixed infections with two, and up to six different viruses and/or viroids were common. Only five samples (4% were free from 19 pathogens tested. This is the first report of GLRaV-4 (variants 4 and 5 in the Valencia region of Spain, and the first record of GRSPaV and GRVFV in this country. Phylogenetic analyses performed with the sequences of these viruses showed that the Spanish isolates of GLRaV-4, GFkV and HSVd belong to new phylogenetic groups.

  20. Genetic and antigenic characterization of H5 and H7 influenza viruses isolated from migratory water birds in Hokkaido, Japan and Mongolia from 2010 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiono, Takahiro; Ohkawara, Ayako; Ogasawara, Kohei; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Tamura, Tomokazu; Chu, Duc-Huy; Suzuki, Mizuho; Kuribayashi, Saya; Shichinohe, Shintaro; Takada, Ayato; Ogawa, Hirohito; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Nao, Naganori; Furuyama, Wakako; Maruyama, Junki; Eguchi, Nao; Ulziibat, Gerelmaa; Enkhbold, Bazarragchaa; Shatar, Munkhduuren; Jargalsaikhan, Tserenjav; Byambadorj, Selenge; Damdinjav, Batchuluun; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Kida, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Migratory water birds are the natural reservoir of influenza A viruses. H5 and H7 influenza viruses are isolated over the world and also circulate among poultry in Asia. In 2010, two H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (HPAIVs) were isolated from fecal samples of water birds on the flyway of migration from Siberia, Russia to the south in Hokkaido, Japan. H7N9 viruses are sporadically isolated from humans and circulate in poultry in China. To monitor whether these viruses have spread in the wild bird population, we conducted virological surveillance of avian influenza in migratory water birds in autumn from 2010 to 2014. A total of 8103 fecal samples from migratory water birds were collected in Japan and Mongolia, and 350 influenza viruses including 13 H5 and 19 H7 influenza viruses were isolated. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that all isolates are genetically closely related to viruses circulating among wild water birds. The results of the antigenic analysis indicated that the antigenicity of viruses in wild water birds is highly stable despite their nucleotide sequence diversity but is distinct from that of HPAIVs recently isolated in Asia. The present results suggest that HPAIVs and Chinese H7N9 viruses were not predominantly circulating in migratory water birds; however, continued monitoring of H5 and H7 influenza viruses both in domestic and wild birds is recommended for the control of avian influenza.

  1. Epidemiologic and genetic characteristics of mumps viruses isolated in China from 1995 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Aili; Zhu, Zhen; Chen, Meng; Zheng, Huanying; Liu, Leng; Wang, Yan; Ma, Yan; Wang, Changyin; Fang, Xueqiang; Li, Ping; Guan, Ronghui; Wang, Shuang; Zhou, Jianhui; Zheng, Lei; Gao, Hui; Ding, Zhengrong; Li, Liqun; Bo, Fang; Sun, Zhaodan; Zhang, Zhenying; Feng, Daxing; He, Jilan; Chen, Hui; Jin, Li; Rota, Paul A; Xu, Wenbo

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiologic and genetic characteristics of mumps viruses detected in China from 1995 to 2010 were analyzed in this study. Mumps remains endemic in China with a high overall incidence rate. The incidence of mumps in Western China was higher than that in other regions of the country. Each year, most of mumps cases occurred between April and July, but a small peak also occurred in November and December. Mumps cases primarily affected the under 15 year old age group. Virologic data demonstrated that genotype F was the predominant circulating genotype throughout China for at least 15 years and no other genotype was detected between 1995 and 2010. Analysis of sequence data from the small hydrophobic (SH) gene indicated that multiple transmission chains of genotype F were found in various provinces of China, with no apparent chronologic and geographic restriction. This is the first report describing the epidemiology of mumps and genetic characterization of mumps viruses at the national level in China. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Differentiation between Vaccinal and Iranian Virulent Isolates of Newcastle Disease Virus based on F Region Genotyping by HRM Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Shahdad Dibazar; Nariman Sheikhi; Farhid Hemmatzadeh; Saeed Charkhkar; Seyed Ali Pourbakhsh

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is investigate Differentiation Between Vaccinal and Iranian Virulent Isolates of Newcastle Disease Virus based on F Region Genotyping by HRM Analysis. Discrimination of circulating virulent strains of Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV) from low pathogenic and vaccine stains is the basis for implementation of strategies to control and eradication of that aims at the eradication of NDV in poultry. At the present study the applicability of Real time RT-PCR followed High-Reso...

  3. Complete genome sequences of two new virus isolates associated with cotton blue disease resistance breaking in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Anna Karoline Fausto; Romanel, Elisson; Silva, Tatiane da F; Castilhos, Yamá; Schrago, Carlos G; Galbieri, Rafael; Bélot, Jean-Louis; Vaslin, Maite F S

    2015-05-01

    Since 2006, Brazilian cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) crops planted with cultivars that are resistant to cotton blue disease have developed a new disease termed "atypical" cotton blue disease or atypical vein mosaic disease. Here, we describe the complete genomes of two virus isolates associated with this disease. The new virus isolates, called CLRDV-Acr3 and CLRDV-IMA2, were found to have a high degree of nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarity to previously described isolates of cotton leafroll dwarf virus, the causal agent of cotton blue disease. However, their P0 proteins were 86.1 % identical. These results show that this new disease is caused by a new CLRDV genotype that seems to have acquired the ability to overcome cotton blue disease resistance.

  4. Genome of orf virus. Restriction endonuclease analysis of viral DNA isolated from lesions of orf in sheep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, A.J.; Ellis, G.; Balassu, T. (Massay Univ., Palmerston North (New Zealand). Dept. of Veterinary Pathology and Public Health)

    1982-01-01

    The purification of orf virus directly from scab material from clinical cases of orf in sheep and restriction endonuclease analysis of the viral DNA is described. Between 7 x 10/sup 9/ and 1.6 x 10/sup 11/ virus particles, and 0.7 to 22.8 ..mu..g of viral DNA could be recovered from lg of scab material. Considerable heterogeneity was observed between different field isolates when restriction endonuclease digests of orf DNA were compared by gel electrophoresis. It was also shown, for two isolates that these fragment patterns did not change after plaque purification and passage in cell culture. It is suggested that restriction endonuclease analysis of viral DNA offers a convenient method of identification of isolates of orf virus. The molecular weight of orf DNA was determined and found to be 88.8 x 10/sup 6/.

  5. Molecular Characterization of Subtype H11N9 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Shorebirds in Brazil.

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    Renata Hurtado

    Full Text Available Migratory aquatic birds play an important role in the maintenance and spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV. Many species of aquatic migratory birds tend to use similar migration routes, also known as flyways, which serve as important circuits for the dissemination of AIV. In recent years there has been extensive surveillance of the virus in aquatic birds in the Northern Hemisphere; however in contrast only a few studies have been attempted to detect AIV in wild birds in South America. There are major flyways connecting South America to Central and North America, whereas avian migration routes between South America and the remaining continents are uncommon. As a result, it has been hypothesized that South American AIV strains would be most closely related to the strains from North America than to those from other regions in the world. We characterized the full genome of three AIV subtype H11N9 isolates obtained from ruddy turnstones (Arenaria interpres on the Amazon coast of Brazil. For all gene segments, all three strains consistently clustered together within evolutionary lineages of AIV that had been previously described from aquatic birds in North America. In particular, the H11N9 isolates were remarkably closely related to AIV strains from shorebirds sampled at the Delaware Bay region, on the Northeastern coast of the USA, more than 5000 km away from where the isolates were retrieved. Additionally, there was also evidence of genetic similarity to AIV strains from ducks and teals from interior USA and Canada. These findings corroborate that migratory flyways of aquatic birds play an important role in determining the genetic structure of AIV in the Western hemisphere, with a strong epidemiological connectivity between North and South America.

  6. [Sequencing and analysis of N gene of street rabies virus isolated from different hosts in Zhejiang province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoguang; Lei, Yongliang; Tao, Xiaoyan; Li, Hao; Shen, Xinxin; Yu, Pengcheng; Yin, Cuiping; Meng, Shengli; Wang, Xinying; Tang, Qing

    2014-07-01

    To elucidate the characteristics of genetic variability and its relationship with prevalence, through sequencing and analysis of N gene among street rabies virus isolated from different hosts (homo sapiens, ferret badger, dog) in Zhejiang province. Samples were screened and confirmed by direct fluorescence assay and reverse transcript PCR. Sequences were analyzed using bio-information software. Eighteen street rabies virus strains were identified, including 2 from homo sapiens, 5 from ferret badger, and 11 from dog. Similarities of N gene and N protein were calculated to be 89.7%-100.0% and 98.4%-100.0% respectively. Mutations occurred in N gene were almost non-sense mutations. In addition,Data from phylogenetic analysis showed that all these strains could be classified into traditional genotype 1. The prevalence of rabies viruses among different hosts in Zhejiang province had certain regional properties. Rabies viruses isolated from the same kind of host or from the same/adjacent county/counties had the closest relationship. However, the characteristics of rabies virus prevalent in homo sapiens were somewhat complicated. In summary, the transmission of street rabies virus in Zhejiang province was from dogs to ferret badgers and homo sapiens, and the virus could circulate and cross-regional transmit among dogs and ferret badgers.

  7. Comparison of Nucleotide Sequence of P2C Region in Diabetogenic and Non-Diabetogenic Coxsackie Virus B5 Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, Cheng-Chong; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Ke, Guan-Ming; Tung, Yi-Ching; Cheng, Jeng-Yin; Chen, Bai-Hsiun; Chao, Mei-Chyn

    2004-01-01

    Enteroviruses are environmental triggers in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). A sequence of six identical amino acids (PEVKEK) is shared by the 2C protein of Coxsackie virus B and the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) molecules. Between 1995 and 2002, we investigated 22 Coxsackie virus B5 (CVB5) isolates from southern Taiwan. Four of these isolates were obtained from four new-onset type 1 DM patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. We compared a 300 nucleotide sequence in the 2C ...

  8. Notification of the first isolation of Cacipacore virus in a human in the State of Rondônia, Brazil

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    Weber Cheli Batista

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Flavivirus is a genus of arthropod-transmitted viruses of the family Flaviviridae, and in Brazil, up to eleven different Flavivirus have been isolated. We collected blood from farmers in the municipality of Theobroma, which is located 320km from the City of Porto Velho, the former capital of the Brazilian State of Rondônia. For viral isolation, we used newborn mouse brain, followed by RT-PCR with specific universal Flavivirus primers. We obtained fragments 958bp and 800bp in length. Based on BLAST, these sequences were 91% similar to a sequence of Cacipacore virus.

  9. Genomic Characterisation of Vinegar Hill Virus, An Australian Nairovirus Isolated in 1983 from Argas Robertsi Ticks Collected from Cattle Egrets

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    Penelope J. Gauci

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the near complete genomic sequence and subsequent analysis of Vinegar Hill virus (VINHV; tentative member of the genus Orthonairovirus, family Nairoviridae, order Bunyavirales. VINHV is the second nairovirus reported to be isolated on mainland Australia and the first to be sequenced and analysed. Our genetic analysis shows that VINHV belongs to the Dera Ghazi Khan genogroup, a group of viruses previously isolated in other parts of the world including Asia, South Africa, and the USA. We discuss possible routes of entry for nairoviruses into Australia and the need to understand the virome of Australian ticks in the context of new and emerging disease.

  10. Genetic Variation of Citrus Tristeza Virus Isolates from California and Spain: Evidence for Mixed Infections and Recombination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Luis; Ayllón, María Angeles; Kong, Ping; Fernández, Andres; Polek, MaryLou; Guerri, José; Moreno, Pedro; Falk, Bryce W.

    2001-01-01

    We examined the population structure and genetic variation of four genomic regions within and between 30 Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates from Spain and California. Our analyses showed that most isolates contained a population of sequence variants, with one being predominant. Four isolates showed two major sequence variants in some genomic regions. The two major variants of three of these isolates showed very low nucleotide identity to each other but were very similar to those of other isolates, suggesting the possibility of mixed infections with two divergent isolates. Incongruencies of phylogenetic relationships in the different genomic regions and statistical analyses suggested that the genomes of some CTV sequence variants originated by recombination events between diverged sequence variants. No correlation was observed between geographic origin and nucleotide distance, and thus from a genetic view, the Spanish and Californian isolates analyzed here could be considered members of the same population. PMID:11483750

  11. Genome analysis of an orange stem pitting citrus tristeza virus isolate reveals a novel recombinant genotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Avijit; Brlansky, R H

    2010-08-01

    An orange stem pitting citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolate CTV-B165 was found to be symptomatically similar to other known CTV-VT isolates however molecular methods failed to classify it as an identifiable CTV genotype. The sequence variation of the Indian CTV-B165 isolate was compared to the three well known CTV genotypes, T36, T30, and VT. The genome of the predominant component of CTV-B165 was 19,247 nt in length with 12 open reading frames (ORFs) and was structurally identical to the other CTV isolates. All the completely sequenced CTV isolates except the VT isolate were 2-55 nt longer than the CTV-B165. In comparison to the other fully sequenced T36, T30 and VT genotypic isolates, CTV-B165 had nucleotide identity of 72-86% in ORF1 and 92-99% in ORFs 2-11. Sequence data of independent overlapping clones from the CTV-B165 genome showed highly divergent sequences of the overlapping region of 5'-UTR and ORF1a, the inter-domain region of ORF1a and the partial regions of ORF2. Phylogenetic analysis of five domains of ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 revealed that CTV-B165 isolate distinctly segregates from the existing three genotypes in the dendrograms and was supported by high bootstrap values and robust tree topology. The PHYLPRO graphical analysis showed multiple recombination signals with significant correlation values. The precise detection of recombination sites for different genomic regions in CTV sequences was supported by several recombination-detecting methods. Collectively, the phylogenetic and recombination analyses suggest that the observed CTV-B165 genotype variation is an outcome of inter-genotype recombination. To determine the presence of the CTV-B165 genotype a pair of genome specific primers was designed and standardized for reliable detection of the novel CTV genotype by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Grouping and comparison of Indian citrus tristeza virus isolates based on coat protein gene sequences and restriction analysis patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, A; Ramachandran, P; Brlansky, R H

    2003-04-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is an aphid-transmitted closterovirus, which causes one of the most important citrus diseases worldwide. Isolates of CTV differ widely in their biological properties. CTV-infected samples were collected from four locations in India: Bangalore (CTV-B), Delhi (CTV-D), Nagpur (CTV-N), and Pune (CTV-P), and were maintained by grafting into Kagzi lime ( Citrus aurantifolia (Christm. Swing.). All isolates produced typical vein clearing and flecking symptoms 6-8 weeks after grafting. In addition, CTV-B and CTV-P isolates produced stem-pitting symptoms after 8-10 months. The CTV coat protein gene (CPG) was amplified by RT-PCR using CPG specific primers, yielding an amplicon of 672 bp for all the isolates. Sequence analysis of the CPG amplicon of all the four Indian isolates showed 93-94% nucleotide sequence homology to the Californian CTV severe stem pitting isolate SY568 and 92-93% homology to the Japanese seedling yellows isolate NUagA and Israeli VT p346 isolates. In phylogenetic tree analysis, Indian CTV isolates appeared far different from other isolates as they formed a separate branch. Comparison among the Indian isolates was carried out by restriction analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). Specific primers to various genome segments of well-characterized CTV isolates were used to further classify the Indian CTV isolates.

  13. Isolation of Panels of Llama Single-Domain Antibody Fragments Binding All Nine Neuraminidase Subtypes of Influenza A Virus

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    Guus Koch

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Avian influenza A virus comprises sixteen hemagglutinin (HA and nine neuraminidase (NA subtypes (N1–N9. To isolate llama single-domain antibody fragments (VHHs against all N subtypes, four llamas were immunized with mixtures of influenza viruses. Selections using influenza virus yielded predominantly VHHs binding to the highly immunogenic HA and nucleoprotein. However, selection using enzymatically active recombinant NA (rNA protein enabled us to isolate NA binding VHHs. Some isolated VHHs cross-reacted to other N subtypes. These were subsequently used for the capture of N subtypes that could not be produced as recombinant protein (rN6 or were enzymatically inactive (rN1, rN5 in phage display selection, yielding novel VHHs. In total we isolated 188 NA binding VHHs, 64 of which were expressed in yeast. Most VHHs specifically recognize a single N subtype, but some VHHs cross-react with other N-subtypes. At least one VHH bound to all N subtypes, except N4, identifying a conserved antigenic site. Thus, this work (1 describes methods for isolating NA binding VHHs, (2 illustrates the suitability of llama immunization with multiple antigens for retrieving many binders against different antigens and (3 describes 64 novel NA binding VHHs, including a broadly reactive VHH, which can be used in various assays for influenza virus subtyping, detection or serology.

  14. Evidence of genetic reassortment between Indian isolate of bluetongue virus serotype 21 (BTV-21) and bluetongue virus serotype 16 (BTV-16).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafiq, Mukhtar; Minakshi, Prasad; Bhateja, Anshul; Ranjan, Koushlesh; Prasad, Gaya

    2013-05-01

    The genome of bluetongue virus (BTV) consists of 10 segments. Of these seg-2 encoded VP2 is the major serotype determining protein, and seg-6 encoded VP5 protein enhances the protective neutralizing activity of VP2 protein inducing higher serotype specific antibody titer than the VP2 alone. Out of the twenty-six BTV serotypes found worldwide, 22 were reported from different states of India. These include serotype 21 which was recently isolated from Andhra Pradesh, and was involved in a severe outbreak of bluetongue in Indian native sheep. BTV21 (KMNO-7) and BTV16 were circulating at the same time. This co-circulation, along with the fact that the virus genome is segmented, provides an opportunity for these two isolates of different serotypes to simultaneously infect the same animal, and even the same cell or a same vector with the potential for generation of reassortant viruses. This study was carried out to provide some insights into the outbreak. We carried out full length sequencing of genome seg-2 and seg-6 of Indian isolates VJW64 (BTV16) and KMNO-7 (BTV21). Detailed phylogenetic analysis revealed that genome seg-6 of Indian isolate KMNO-7 (BTV21) clusters with isolates of BTV16 showing maximum nucleotide similarity of 97.6% with TUR/2000/02 isolate of BTV16, which is much more than it shows with any isolate of BTV21. KMNO-7 (BTV21) significantly diverged from original strain of BTV21, and is a reassortant strain having acquired seg-6 from an isolate of BTV16. This study provides some useful insights into the epidemiology of the bluetongue disease, and undermines serotyping on genome seg-6 basis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Protein-protein interactions between proteins of Citrus tristeza virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nchongboh, Chofong Gilbert; Wu, Guan-Wei; Hong, Ni; Wang, Guo-Ping

    2014-12-01

    Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) is one of the most devastating pathogens of citrus. Its genome is organized into 12 open reading frames (ORFs), of which ten ORFs located at the 3'-terminus of the genome have multiple biological functions. The ten genes at the 3'-terminus of the genome of a severe isolate (CTV-S4) and three ORFs (CP, CPm and p20) of three other isolates (N4, S45 and HB1) were cloned into pGBKT7 and pGADT7 yeast shuttle vectors. Yeast two-hybridization (Y2H) assays results revealed a strong self-interaction for CP and p20, and a unique interaction between the CPm of CTV-S4 (severe) and CP of CTV-N4 (mild) isolates. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation also confirmed these interactions. Analysis of the deletion mutants delineated the domains of CP and p20 self-interaction. Furthermore, the domains responsible for CP and p20 self-interactions were mapped at the CP amino acids sites 41-84 and p20 amino acids sites 1-21 by Y2H. This study provided new information on CTV protein interactions which will help for further understanding the biological functions.

  16. Complete genome sequence of a novel Plum pox virus strain W isolate determined by 454 pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheveleva, Anna; Kudryavtseva, Anna; Speranskaya, Anna; Belenikin, Maxim; Melnikova, Natalia; Chirkov, Sergei

    2013-10-01

    The near-complete (99.7 %) genome sequence of a novel Russian Plum pox virus (PPV) isolate Pk, belonging to the strain Winona (W), has been determined by 454 pyrosequencing with the exception of the thirty-one 5'-terminal nucleotides. This region was amplified using 5'RACE kit and sequenced by the Sanger method. Genomic RNA released from immunocaptured PPV particles was employed for generation of cDNA library using TransPlex Whole transcriptome amplification kit (WTA2, Sigma-Aldrich). The entire Pk genome has identity level of 92.8-94.5 % when compared to the complete nucleotide sequences of other PPV-W isolates (W3174, LV-141pl, LV-145bt, and UKR 44189), confirming a high degree of variability within the PPV-W strain. The isolates Pk and LV-141pl are most closely related. The Pk has been found in a wild plum (Prunus domestica) in a new region of Russia indicating widespread dissemination of the PPV-W strain in the European part of the former USSR.

  17. Pathotyping and Phylogenetic Characterization of Newcastle Disease Viruses Isolated in Peru: Defining Two Novel Subgenotypes Within Genotype XII.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chumbe, Ana; Izquierdo-Lara, Ray; Tataje, Luis; Gonzalez, Rosa; Cribillero, Giovana; González, Armando E; Fernández-Díaz, Manolo; Icochea, Eliana

    2017-03-01

    Infections of poultry with virulent strains of avian paramyxovirus 1 (APMV-1), also known as Newcastle disease viruses (NDVs), cause Newcastle disease (ND). This highly contagious disease affects poultry and many other species of birds worldwide. In countries where the disease is prevalent, constant monitoring and characterization of isolates causing outbreaks are necessary. In this study, we report the results of pathogenicity testing and phylogenetic analyses of seven NDVs isolated from several regions of Peru between 2004 and 2015. Six viruses had intracerebral pathogenicity indices (ICPIs) of between 1.75 and 1.88, corresponding to a velogenic pathotype. The remaining virus had an ICPI of 0.00, corresponding to a lentogenic pathotype. These results were consistent with amino acid sequences at the fusion protein (F) cleavage site. All velogenic isolates had the polybasic amino acid sequence (112)RRQKR↓F(117) at the F cleavage site. Phylogenetic analyses of complete F gene sequences showed that all isolates are classified in class II of APMV-1. The velogenic viruses are classified in genotype XII, while the lentogenic virus is classified in genotype II, closely related to the LaSota vaccine strain. Moreover, tree topology, bootstrap values, and genetic distances observed within genotype XII resulted in the identification of novel subgenotypes XIIa (in South America) and XIIb (in China) and possibly two clades within genotype XIIa. All velogenic Peruvian viruses belonged to subgenotype XIIa. Overall, our results confirm the presence of genotype XII in Peru and suggest that it is the prevalent genotype currently circulating in our country. The phylogenetic characterization of these isolates helps to characterize the evolution of NDV and may help with the development of vaccines specific to our regional necessities.

  18. Reduction in Rate of Nosocomial Respiratory Virus Infections in a Children's Hospital Associated With Enhanced Isolation Precautions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Lorry G; Kohn, Nina; Nullet, Susan; Hill, Margaret

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine whether the use of enhanced isolation precautions (droplet and contact precautions) for inpatients with respiratory tract viral infections is associated with a reduction in rate of nosocomial viral respiratory infections. DESIGN Quasi-experimental study with the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infection as the primary dependent variable and rate of nosocomial Clostridium difficile infection as a nonequivalent dependent variable comparator. SETTING Cohen Children's Medical Center of NY, a tertiary-care children's hospital attached to a large general hospital. INTERVENTION During years 1 and 2 (July 2012 through June 2014), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Healthcare Infection Control Practices Advisory Committee's recommended isolation precautions for inpatients with selected respiratory virus infections were in effect. Enhanced isolation precautions were in effect during years 3 and 4 (July, 2014 through June, 2016), except for influenza, for which enhanced precautions were in effect during year 4 only. RESULTS During the period of enhanced isolation precautions, the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infections with any of 4 virus categories decreased 39% from 0.827 per 1,000 hospital days prior to enhanced precautions to 0.508 per 1,000 hospital days (Pinfections, the rates decreased 58% from 0.317 per 1,000 hospital days to 0.134 per 1,000 hospital days during enhanced precautions (Pnosocomial C. difficile infection. CONCLUSIONS Enhanced isolation precautions for inpatients with respiratory virus infections were associated with a reduction in the rate of nosocomial respiratory virus infections. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2018;39:152-156.

  19. Comparison of slot blot nucleic acid hybridization, immunofluorescence, and virus isolation techniques to detect bluetongue virus in blood mononuclear cells from cattle with experimentally induced infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Concha-Bermejillo, A; Schore, C E; Dangler, C A; de Mattos, C C; de Mattos, C A; Osburn, B I

    1992-12-01

    A slot blot hybridization technique was applied for detection of bluetongue virus (BTV) in blood mononuclear cells (BMNC) obtained from cattle with experimentally induced infection. This technique lacked sensitivity to detect the viral nucleic acid directly in clinical specimens. When aliquots of mononuclear cells from these cattle were cultivated in vitro for 10 days to amplify virus titer, only 33.3% of the samples collected during viremia gave a positive signal in the slot blot hybridization format. By contrast, results for 34.3% of noncultured and 63.3% of cultured mononuclear cell samples collected during viremia were positive by immunofluorescence. The average number of infected cells, as detected by immunofluorescence in the noncultured mononuclear cell samples, was 1 to 5/300,000, and was usually > 10/300,000 in the cultured cell samples. Virus was isolated from all postinoculation blood samples obtained from 4 heifers that were seronegative at the time of inoculation, but was not isolated from any of the preinoculation samples, or from any of the postinoculation samples obtained from 2 heifers that were seropositive at the time of inoculation. When virus isolation was attempted from separated mononuclear cells in 2 heifers, 43.7% of the noncultured and 87.5% of the cultured samples had positive results.

  20. Characterization of sour cherry isolates of plum pox virus from the Volga Basin in Russia reveals a new cherry strain of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasa, Miroslav; Prikhodko, Yuri; Predajňa, Lukáš; Nagyová, Alžbeta; Shneyder, Yuri; Zhivaeva, Tatiana; Subr, Zdeno; Cambra, Mariano; Candresse, Thierry

    2013-09-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is the causal agent of sharka, the most detrimental virus disease of stone fruit trees worldwide. PPV isolates have been assigned into seven distinct strains, of which PPV-C regroups the genetically distinct isolates detected in several European countries on cherry hosts. Here, three complete and several partial genomic sequences of PPV isolates from sour cherry trees in the Volga River basin of Russia have been determined. The comparison of complete genome sequences has shown that the nucleotide identity values with other PPV isolates reached only 77.5 to 83.5%. Phylogenetic analyses clearly assigned the RU-17sc, RU-18sc, and RU-30sc isolates from cherry to a distinct cluster, most closely related to PPV-C and, to a lesser extent, PPV-W. Based on their natural infection of sour cherry trees and genomic characterization, the PPV isolates reported here represent a new strain of PPV, for which the name PPV-CR (Cherry Russia) is proposed. The unique amino acids conserved among PPV-CR and PPV-C cherry-infecting isolates (75 in total) are mostly distributed within the central part of P1, NIa, and the N terminus of the coat protein (CP), making them potential candidates for genetic determinants of the ability to infect cherry species or of adaptation to these hosts. The variability observed within 14 PPV-CR isolates analyzed in this study (0 to 2.6% nucleotide divergence in partial CP sequences) and the identification of these isolates in different localities and cultivation conditions suggest the efficient establishment and competitiveness of the PPV-CR in the environment. A specific primer pair has been developed, allowing the specific reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction detection of PPV-CR isolates.

  1. Phylogenetic characterisation of the G(L) sequences of equine arteritis virus isolated from semen of asymptomatic stallions and fatal cases of equine viral arteritis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Lars Erik; Storgaard, Torben; Holm, Elisabeth

    2001-01-01

    The study describes for the first time the phylogenetic relationship between equine arteritis virus (EAV) isolated from asymptomatic virus-shedding stallions and fatal cases of equine viral arteritis (EVA) in an European country. EAV was isolated from three dead foals and an aborted foetus during...

  2. Complete genome sequence of frog virus 3, isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from nicaragua into the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saucedo, Bernardo; Hughes, Joseph; Beurden, van Steven J.; Suárez, Nicolás M.; Haenen, Olga L.M.; Voorbergen-Laarman, Michal; Gröne, Andrea; Kika, Marja J.L.

    2017-01-01

    Frog virus 3 was isolated from a strawberry poison frog (Oophaga pumilio) imported from Nicaragua via Germany to the Netherlands, and its complete genome sequence was determined. Frog virus 3 isolate Op/2015/Netherlands/UU3150324001 is 107,183 bp long and has a nucleotide similarity of 98.26% to the

  3. New Korean isolates of Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) differ in symptom severity and subcellular localization of the 126 kDa protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two isolates of Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) were selected from a nationwide survey of pepper fields in South Korea in 2014 and 2015, in which Cucumber mosaic virus was also detected; the two PMMoV isolates, Sangcheong 47 (S-47, KX399390) and Jeongsong 76 (J-76, KX399389), share ~99% nucleotide ...

  4. Genetic characterization of a rare H12N3 avian influenza virus isolated from a green-winged teal in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Vuong Nghia; Ogawa, Haruko; Hussein, Islam T M; Hill, Nichola J; Trinh, Dai Quang; AboElkhair, Mohammed; Sultan, Serageldeen; Ma, Eric; Saito, Keisuke; Watanabe, Yukiko; Runstadler, Jonathan A; Imai, Kunitoshi

    2015-04-01

    This study reports on the genetic characterization of an avian influenza virus, subtype H12N3, isolated from an Eurasian green-winged teal (Anas crecca) in Japan in 2009. The entire genome sequence of the isolate was analyzed, and phylogenetic analyses were conducted to characterize the evolutionary history of the isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of the hemagglutinin and neuraminidase genes indicated that the virus belonged to the Eurasian-like avian lineage. Molecular dating indicated that this H12 virus is likely a multiple reassortant influenza A virus. This is the first reported characterization of influenza A virus subtype H12N3 isolated in Japan and these data contribute to the accumulation of knowledge on the genetic diversity and generation of novel influenza A viruses.

  5. Comparison of nucleotide sequence of p2C region in diabetogenic and non-diabetogenic Coxsacie virus B5 isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Cheng-Chong; Lin, Kuei-Hsiang; Ke, Guan-Ming; Tung, Yi-Ching; Chao, Mei-Chyn; Cheng, Jeng-Yin; Chen, Bai-Hsiun

    2004-11-01

    Enteroviruses are environmental triggers in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). A sequence of six identical amino acids (PEVKEK) is shared by the 2C protein of Coxsackie virus B and the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) molecules. Between 1995 and 2002, we investigated 22 Coxsackie virus B5 (CVB5) isolates from southern Taiwan. Four of these isolates were obtained from four new-onset type 1 DM patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. We compared a 300 nucleotide sequence in the 2C protein gene (p2C) in 24 CVB5 isolates (4 diabetogenic, 18 non-diabetogenic and 2 prototype). We found 0.3-10% nucleotide differences. In the four isolates from type 1 DM patients, there was only 2.4-3.4% nucleotide difference, and there was only 1.7-7.1% nucleotide difference between type 1 DM isolates and non-diabetogenic isolates. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence between prototype virus and 22 CVB5 isolates revealed 18.4-24.1% difference. Twenty-one CVB5 isolates from type 1 DM and non-type 1 DM patients contained the PEVKEK sequence, as shown by the p2C nucleotide sequence. Our data showed that the viral p2C sequence with homology with GAD is highly conserved in CVB5 isolates. There was no difference between diabetogenic and non-diabetogenic CVB5 isolates. All four type 1 DM patients had at least one of the genetic susceptibility alleles HLA-DR, DQA1, DQB1. Other genetic and autoimmune factors such as HLA genetic susceptibility and GAD may also play important roles in the pathogenesis in type 1 DM.

  6. Comparison of Nucleotide Sequence of P2C Region in Diabetogenic and Non-Diabetogenic Coxsackie Virus B5 Isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chong Chou

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Enteroviruses are environmental triggers in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM. A sequence of six identical amino acids (PEVKEK is shared by the 2C protein of Coxsackie virus B and the glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD molecules. Between 1995 and 2002, we investigated 22 Coxsackie virus B5 (CVB5 isolates from southern Taiwan. Four of these isolates were obtained from four new-onset type 1 DM patients with diabetic ketoacidosis. We compared a 300 nucleotide sequence in the 2C protein gene (p2C in 24 CVB5 isolates (4 diabetogenic, 18 non-diabetogenic and 2 prototype. We found 0.3-10% nucleotide differences. In the four isolates from type 1 DM patients, there was only 2.4-3.4% nucleotide difference, and there was only 1.7-7.1% nucleotide difference between type 1 DM isolates and non-diabetogenic isolates. Comparison of the nucleotide sequence between prototype virus and 22 CVB5 isolates revealed 18.4-24.1% difference. Twenty-one CVB5 isolates from type 1 DM and non-type 1 DM patients contained the PEVKEK sequence, as shown by the p2C nucleotide sequence. Our data showed that the viral p2C sequence with homology with GAD is highly conserved in CVB5 isolates. There was no difference between diabetogenic and non-diabetogenic CVB5 isolates. All four type 1 DM patients had at least one of the genetic susceptibility alleles HLA-DR, DQA1, DQB1. Other genetic and autoimmune factors such as HLA genetic susceptibility and GAD may also play important roles in the pathogenesis in type 1 DM.

  7. Phylogenetic analysis of a swine influenza A(H3N2 virus isolated in Korea in 2012.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Il Kim

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV can infect avian and mammalian species, including humans. The genome nature of IAVs may contribute to viral adaptation in different animal hosts, resulting in gene reassortment and the reproduction of variants with optimal fitness. As seen again in the 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 pandemic, pigs are known to be susceptible to swine, avian, and human IAVs and can serve as a 'mixing vessel' for the generation of novel IAV variants. To this end, the emergence of swine influenza viruses must be kept under close surveillance. Herein, we report the isolation and phylogenetic study of a swine IAV, A/swine/Korea/PL01/2012 (swPL01, H3N2 subtype. After screening nasopharyngeal samples from pigs in the Gyeongsangnam-do region of Korea from December 2011 to May 2012, we isolated the swPL01 virus and sequenced its all of 8 genome segments (polymerase basic 2, PB2; polymerase basic 1, PB1; polymerase acidic, PA; hemagglutinin, HA; nucleocapsid protein, NP; neuraminidase, NA; matrix protein, M; and nonstructural protein, NS. The phylogenetic study, analyzed with reference strains registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database, indicated that the swPL01 virus was similar to the North American triple-reassortant swine strains and that the HA gene of the swPL01 virus was categorized into swine H3 cluster IV. The swPL01 virus had the M gene of the triple-reassortant swine H3N2 viruses, whereas that of other contemporary strains in Korea was transferred from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. These data suggest the possibility that various swine H3N2 viruses may co-circulate in Korea, which underlines the importance of a sustained surveillance system against swine IAVs.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Swine Influenza A(H3N2) Virus Isolated in Korea in 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sehee; Lee, Sangmoo; Hwang, Min-Woong; Bae, Joon-Yong; Heo, Jun; Kim, Donghwan; Jang, Seok-Il; Kim, Kabsu; Park, Man-Seong

    2014-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) can infect avian and mammalian species, including humans. The genome nature of IAVs may contribute to viral adaptation in different animal hosts, resulting in gene reassortment and the reproduction of variants with optimal fitness. As seen again in the 2009 swine-origin influenza A H1N1 pandemic, pigs are known to be susceptible to swine, avian, and human IAVs and can serve as a ‘mixing vessel’ for the generation of novel IAV variants. To this end, the emergence of swine influenza viruses must be kept under close surveillance. Herein, we report the isolation and phylogenetic study of a swine IAV, A/swine/Korea/PL01/2012 (swPL01, H3N2 subtype). After screening nasopharyngeal samples from pigs in the Gyeongsangnam-do region of Korea from December 2011 to May 2012, we isolated the swPL01 virus and sequenced its all of 8 genome segments (polymerase basic 2, PB2; polymerase basic 1, PB1; polymerase acidic, PA; hemagglutinin, HA; nucleocapsid protein, NP; neuraminidase, NA; matrix protein, M; and nonstructural protein, NS). The phylogenetic study, analyzed with reference strains registered in the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) database, indicated that the swPL01 virus was similar to the North American triple-reassortant swine strains and that the HA gene of the swPL01 virus was categorized into swine H3 cluster IV. The swPL01 virus had the M gene of the triple-reassortant swine H3N2 viruses, whereas that of other contemporary strains in Korea was transferred from the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus. These data suggest the possibility that various swine H3N2 viruses may co-circulate in Korea, which underlines the importance of a sustained surveillance system against swine IAVs. PMID:24523938

  9. Pathogenesis and phylogenetic analyses of canine distemper virus strain ZJ7 isolate from domestic dogs in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan Bin

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A new isolate of canine distemper virus (CDV, named ZJ7, was isolated from lung tissues of a dog suspected with CDV infection using MDCK cells. The ZJ7 isolate induced cytopathogenic effects of syncytia in MDCK cell after six passages. In order to evaluate pathogenesis of ZJ7 strain, three CDV sero-negative dogs were intranasally inoculated with its virus suspension. All infected dogs developed clinical signs of severe bloody diarrhea, conjunctivitis, ocular discharge, nasal discharge and coughing, fever and weight loss at 21 dpi, whereas the mock group infected with DMEM were normal. The results demonstrated that CDV-ZJ7 strain isolated by MDCK cell was virulent, and the nucleotide and amino acid sequences of strain ZJ7 had no change after isolation by MDCK cell when compared with the original virus from the fresh tissues. Molecular and phylogenetic analyses for the nucleocapsid (N, phosphoprotein (P and receptor binding haemagglutinin (H gene of the ZJ7 isolate clearly showed it is joins to the Asia 1 group cluster of CDV strains, the predominant genotype in China.

  10. Characterization of rabies virus isolated from a colony of Eptesicus furinalis bats in Brazil

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    Marilene Fernandes de Almeida

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Some bat species have adapted to the expanding human population by acquiring the ability to roost in urban buildings, increasing the exposure risk for people and domestic animals, and consequently, the likelihood of transmitting rabies. Three dead bats were found in the yard of a house in an urban area of Jundiaí city in the state of São Paulo in southeast Brazil. Two of the three bats tested positive for rabies, using Fluorescent Antibody and Mouse Inoculation techniques. A large colony of Eptesicus furinalis was found in the house's attic, and of the 119 bats captured, four more tested positive for rabies. The objectives of this study were to report the rabies diagnosis, characterize the isolated virus antigenically and genetically, and study the epidemiology of the colony.

  11. Characterization of a 2016 Clinical Isolate of Zika Virus in Non-human Primates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Feng Li

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Animal models are critical to understand disease and to develop countermeasures for the ongoing epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV. Here we report a non-human primate model using a 2016 contemporary clinical isolate of ZIKV. Upon subcutaneous inoculation, rhesus macaques developed fever and viremia, with robust excretion of ZIKV RNA in urine, saliva, and lacrimal fluid. Necropsy of two infected animals revealed that systematic infections involving central nervous system and visceral organs were established at the acute phrase. ZIKV initially targeted the intestinal tracts, spleen, and parotid glands, and retained in spleen and lymph nodes till 10 days post infection. ZIKV-specific immune responses were readily induced in all inoculated animals. The non-human primate model described here provides a valuable platform to study ZIKV pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccine and therapeutics.

  12. Evolutionary analysis of tomato Sw-5 resistance-breaking isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carmelo; Aramburu, José; Galipienso, Luis; Soler, Salvador; Nuez, Fernando; Rubio, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) causes severe economic losses in many crops worldwide and often overcomes resistant cultivars used for disease control. Comparison of nucleotide and amino acid sequences suggested that tomato resistance conferred by the gene Sw-5 can be overcome by the amino acid substitution C to Y at position 118 (C118Y) or T120N in the TSWV movement protein, NSm. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that substitution C118Y has occurred independently three times in the studied isolates by convergent evolution, whereas the substitution T120N was a unique event. Analysis of rates of non-synonymous and synonymous changes at individual codons showed that substitution C118Y was positively selected.

  13. Isolation of foot-and-mouth disease virus specific bovine antibody fragments from phage display libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Joo; Lebreton, Françoise; Kaiser, Claude; Crucière, Catherine; Rémond, Michelle

    2004-03-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is an important veterinary pathogen which can cause widespread epidemics. Due to the high antigenic variability of FMDV, it is important to undertake mutation analysis under immunological pressure. To study the bovine antibody response at a molecular level, phage display technology was used to produce bovine anti-FMDV Fabs. CH1-VH chains with FMDV specific binding could be isolated after selection from a library made from vaccinated cattle. Though their involvement in the bovine immune response remains to be ascertained, it is planned to express the five different selected VH domains in bacterial or insect systems as sequence homologies with integrin beta6 chain could shed light on the basis of FMDV type receptor specificities.

  14. Molecular epidemiology of current classical swine fever virus isolates of wild boar in Germany

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leifer, I; Hoffmann, B; Höper, D

    2010-01-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) has caused significant economic losses in industrialized pig production, and is still present in some European countries. Recent CSF outbreaks in Europe were mainly associated with strains of genogroup 2 (subgroup 2.3). Although there are extensive datasets regarding 2.......3 strains, there is very little information available on longer fragments or whole classical swine fever virus (CSFV) genomes. Furthermore, there are no detailed analyses of the molecular epidemiology of CSFV wild boar isolates available. Nevertheless, complete genome sequences are supportive...... in phylogenetic analyses, especially in affected wild boar populations. Here, German CSFV strains of subgroup 2.3 were fully sequenced using two different approaches: (i) a universal panel of CSFV primers that were developed to amplify the complete genome in overlapping fragments for chain-terminator sequencing...

  15. Characterization of a 2016 Clinical Isolate of Zika Virus in Non-human Primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Feng; Dong, Hao-Long; Huang, Xing-Yao; Qiu, Ye-Feng; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Na-Na; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Hui; Liu, Zhong-Yu; Fan, Hang; An, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Shi-Hui; Gao, Bo; Fa, Yun-Zhi; Tong, Yi-Gang; Zhang, Fu-Chun; Gao, George F; Cao, Wu-Chun; Shi, Pei-Yong; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2016-10-01

    Animal models are critical to understand disease and to develop countermeasures for the ongoing epidemics of Zika virus (ZIKV). Here we report a non-human primate model using a 2016 contemporary clinical isolate of ZIKV. Upon subcutaneous inoculation, rhesus macaques developed fever and viremia, with robust excretion of ZIKV RNA in urine, saliva, and lacrimal fluid. Necropsy of two infected animals revealed that systematic infections involving central nervous system and visceral organs were established at the acute phrase. ZIKV initially targeted the intestinal tracts, spleen, and parotid glands, and retained in spleen and lymph nodes till 10days post infection. ZIKV-specific immune responses were readily induced in all inoculated animals. The non-human primate model described here provides a valuable platform to study ZIKV pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccine and therapeutics. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Avian Influenza Virus Isolated in Wild Waterfowl in Argentina: Evidence of a potentially unique phylogenetic lineage in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereda, Ariel J.; Uhart, Marcela; Perez, Alberto A.; Zaccagnini, Maria E.; La Sala, Luciano; Decarre, Julieta; Goijman, Andrea; Solari, Laura; Suarez, Romina; Craig, Maria I.; Vagnozzi, Ariel; Rimondi, Agustina; König, Guido; Terrera, Maria V.; Kaloghlian, Analia; Song, Haichen; Sorrell, Erin M.; Perez, Daniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Avian Influenza (AI) viruses have been sporadically isolated in South America. The most recent reports are from an outbreak in commercial poultry in Chile in 2002 and its putative ancestor from a wild bird in Bolivia in 2001. Extensive surveillance in wild birds was carried out in Argentina during 2006-2007. Using RRT-PCR, 12 AI positive detections were made from cloacal swabs. One of those positive samples yielded an AI virus isolated from a wild kelp gull (Larus dominicanus) captured in the South Atlantic coastline of Argentina. Further characterization by nucleotide sequencing reveals that it belongs to the H13N9 subtype. Phylogenetic analysis of the 8 viral genes suggests that the 6 internal genes are related to the isolates from Chile and Bolivia. The analysis also indicates that a cluster of phylogenetically related AI viruses from South America may have evolved independently, with minimal gene exchange, from influenza viruses in other latitudes. The data produced from our investigations are valuable contributions to the study of AI viruses in South America. PMID:18632129

  17. Genomic sequence and virulence of clonal isolates of vaccinia virus Tiantan, the Chinese smallpox vaccine strain.

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    Qicheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Despite the worldwide eradication of smallpox in 1979, the potential bioterrorism threat from variola virus and the ongoing use of vaccinia virus (VACV as a vector for vaccine development argue for continued research on VACV. In China, the VACV Tiantan strain (TT was used in the smallpox eradication campaign. Its progeny strain is currently being used to develop a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV vaccine. Here we sequenced the full genomes of five TT clones isolated by plaque purification from the TT (752-1 viral stock. Phylogenetic analysis with other commonly used VACV strains showed that TT (752-1 and its clones clustered and exhibited higher sequence diversity than that found in Dryvax clones. The ∼190 kbp genomes of TT appeared to encode 273 open reading frames (ORFs. ORFs located in the middle of the genome were more conserved than those located at the two termini, where many virulence and immunomodulation associated genes reside. Several patterns of nucleotide changes including point mutations, insertions and deletions were identified. The polymorphisms in seven virulence-associated proteins and six immunomodulation-related proteins were analyzed. We also investigated the neuro- and skin- virulence of TT clones in mice and rabbits, respectively. The TT clones exhibited significantly less virulence than the New York City Board of Health (NYCBH strain, as evidenced by less extensive weight loss and morbidity in mice as well as produced smaller skin lesions and lower incidence of putrescence in rabbits. The complete genome sequences, ORF annotations, and phenotypic diversity yielded from this study aid our understanding of the Chinese historic TT strain and are useful for HIV vaccine projects employing TT as a vector.

  18. Complete Genome Sequence of a Novel Reassortant H3N6 Avian Influenza Virus Isolated from Domestic Green-Winged Teal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Chaochao; Liu, Qian; Chen, Quanjiao; Yao, Yanfeng; Wang, Huadong; Chen, Jianjun

    2013-05-16

    An avian influenza virus strain, A/domestic green-winged teal/Hunan/2036/2007(H3N6) (DGW-T2036), was isolated from healthy domestic green-winged teals (Anas crecca) in Hunan Province, South China. All eight gene segments of the isolate were sequenced. Genomic analysis demonstrated that this H3N6 virus is a novel reassortant avian influenza virus with a gene constellation originating from multiple ancestors.

  19. Genetic diversity in the 3'-terminal region of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates from watermelon in Oklahoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdalla, Osama A; Ali, Akhtar

    2012-03-01

    The 3'-terminal region (1191 nt) containing part of the NIb gene, complete coat protein (CP) and poly-A tail of 64 papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W) isolates collected during 2008-2009 from watermelon in commercial fields of four different counties of Oklahoma were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence identities ranged from 95.2-100% and 97.1-100%, respectively, among the Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates. Phylogenetic analysis showed that PRSW-W isolates clustered according to the locations where they were collected within Oklahoma, and each cluster contained two subgroups. All subgroups of Oklahoman PRSV-W isolates were on separate branches when compared to 35 known isolates originating from other parts of the world, including the one reported previously from the USA. This study helps in our understanding about the genetic diversity of PRSV-W isolates infecting cucurbits in Oklahoma.

  20. Complete nucleotide sequences of two isolates of cherry green ring mottle virus from peach (Prunus persica) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lihui; Jiang, Dongmei; Niu, Feiqing; Lu, Meiguang; Wang, Hongqing; Li, Shifang

    2013-03-01

    Two complete nucleotide sequences of cherry green ring mottle virus (CGRMV) isolated from peach in Hebei (Hs10) and Fujian (F9) Provinces, China, were determined. Five open reading frames (ORFs) were found in the genomes of both isolates. The F9 and Hs10 isolates shared 82.2 % and 83.4-94.4 % nucleotide sequence identity, respectively, with two CGRMV isolates from cherry. Analysis of the nucleotide and amino acid sequences from the five ORFs of both isolates showed that Hs10 shares the greatest sequence identity with P1A (GenBank AJ291761) from cherry. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CGRMV isolates from peach and cherry are closely related to members of the genus Foveavirus.

  1. Detection and characterisation of Plum pox virus (PPV isolates from Eastern Slovakia revealed the presence of three main viral strains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Július Rozák

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Plum pox virus (PPV, the agent responsible for Sharka disease, is the most important viral pathogen of stone fruit trees world-wide, having an endemic status in Slovakia. To increase knowledge of PPV diversity in Slovakia, a set of 11 isolates, originated from the eastern part of the country, was characterised. The isolates were chip-budded from their original Prunus hosts to the susceptible GF305 indicators, exhibiting the symptoms of variable severity. A genomic region encompassing the partial NIb and the hypervariable 5´terminal region of the CP gene was amplified from all 11 isolates in RT-PCR and directly sequenced. The phylogenetic analysis revealed the grouping of the 11 Slovak isolates into 3 distinct clusters, representing the PPV-M (2 isolates, D (7 isolates and Rec strains (2 isolates. The strain affiliation of isolates was further confirmed by strain-specific RT-PCR, using which the presence of additional mixed infection by minor PPV variants was detected in 2 samples. The results further contribute to the understanding of PPV diversity in Slovakia and confirm the specificity and sensitivity of molecular approaches used for the virus strain determination.

  2. Complete genome sequences of three rabies viruses isolated from rabid raccoon dogs and a cow in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oem, Jae-Ku; Kim, Seong-Hee; Kim, Yeon-Hee; Lee, Myoung-Heon; Lee, Kyoung-Ki

    2013-12-01

    The complete genomes of three rabies viruses (BD0406CC, BV9901PJ, and 08F40) of two raccoon dogs (Nyctereutes procyonoides koreensis) and a cow were determined. The genomic organization is typical of rabies viruses, and the open reading frames of the N, P, M, G, and L genes are 1,353, 894, 609, 1,575, and 6,384 bases in length, respectively. The full genome length of the three strains was 11,928 nucleotides, and the sequence similarity between the rabies viruses at the nucleotide level was 98.5-99.5%. Sequence comparisons indicated that these rabies viruses belong to the "Arctic and Arctic-like" group, with high homology to the Eurasian cluster. All Korean strains were clustered with the Mongolia strains, which belong to Arctic-like 1 clade. The 08F40 and BD0406CC strains were constructed with rabies virus strains isolated in Gangwon province. The BV9901PJ strain was closely related to strains isolated in Gyeonggi province in Korea. Three strains were more dependent upon geographical distribution and time period than host species. Complete genome sequencing of different host-origin rabies viruses will provide information that should contribute to understanding the transmission cycle and genetic variability of rabies from different hosts.

  3. Isolation and Genetic Characterization of Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Wild Birds in the Azov-Black Sea Region of Ukraine (2001-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzyka, Denys; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary; Spackman, Erica; Smith, Diane; Rula, Oleksandr; Muzyka, Nataliia; Stegniy, Borys

    2016-05-01

    Wild bird surveillance for avian influenza virus (AIV) was conducted from 2001 to 2012 in the Azov - Black Sea region of the Ukraine, considered part of the transcontinental wild bird migration routes from northern Asia and Europe to the Mediterranean, Africa, and southwest Asia. A total of 6281 samples were collected from wild birds representing 27 families and eight orders for virus isolation. From these samples, 69 AIVs belonging to 15 of the 16 known hemagglutinin (HA) subtypes and seven of nine known neuraminidase (NA) subtypes were isolated. No H14, N5, or N9 subtypes were identified. In total, nine H6, eight H1, nine H5, seven H7, six H11, six H4, five H3, five H10, four H8, three H2, three H9, one H12, one H13, one H15, and one H16 HA subtypes were isolated. As for the NA subtypes, twelve N2, nine N6, eight N8, seven N7, six N3, four N4, and one undetermined were isolated. There were 27 HA and NA antigen combinations. All isolates were low pathogenic AIV except for eight highly pathogenic (HP) AIVs that were isolated during the H5N1 HPAI outbreaks of 2006-08. Sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the HA genes revealed epidemiological connections between the Azov-Black Sea regions and Europe, Russia, Mongolia, and Southeast Asia. H1, H2, H3, H7, H8, H6, H9, and H13 AIV subtypes were closely related to European, Russian, Mongolian, and Georgian AIV isolates. H10, H11, and H12 AIV subtypes were epidemiologically linked to viruses from Europe and Southeast Asia. Serology conducted on serum and egg yolk samples also demonstrated previous exposure of many wild bird species to different AIVs. Our results demonstrate the great genetic diversity of AIVs in wild birds in the Azov-Black Sea region as well as the importance of this region for monitoring and studying the ecology of influenza viruses. This information furthers our understanding of the ecology of avian influenza viruses in wild bird species.

  4. Complexities in Isolation and Purification of Multiple Viruses from Mixed Viral Infections: Viral Interference, Persistence and Exclusion.

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    Naveen Kumar

    Full Text Available Successful purification of multiple viruses from mixed infections remains a challenge. In this study, we investigated peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV and foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV mixed infection in goats. Rather than in a single cell type, cytopathic effect (CPE of the virus was observed in cocultured Vero/BHK-21 cells at 6th blind passage (BP. PPRV, but not FMDV could be purified from the virus mixture by plaque assay. Viral RNA (mixture transfection in BHK-21 cells produced FMDV but not PPRV virions, a strategy which we have successfully employed for the first time to eliminate the negative-stranded RNA virus from the virus mixture. FMDV phenotypes, such as replication competent but noncytolytic, cytolytic but defective in plaque formation and, cytolytic but defective in both plaque formation and standard FMDV genome were observed respectively, at passage level BP8, BP15 and BP19 and hence complicated virus isolation in the cell culture system. Mixed infection was not found to induce any significant antigenic and genetic diversity in both PPRV and FMDV. Further, we for the first time demonstrated the viral interference between PPRV and FMDV. Prior transfection of PPRV RNA, but not Newcastle disease virus (NDV and rotavirus RNA resulted in reduced FMDV replication in BHK-21 cells suggesting that the PPRV RNA-induced interference was specifically directed against FMDV. On long-term coinfection of some acute pathogenic viruses (all possible combinations of PPRV, FMDV, NDV and buffalopox virus in Vero cells, in most cases, one of the coinfecting viruses was excluded at passage level 5 suggesting that the long-term coinfection may modify viral persistence. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documented evidence describing a natural mixed infection of FMDV and PPRV. The study not only provides simple and reliable methodologies for isolation and purification of two epidemiologically and economically important groups of

  5. Isolation of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae from a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) with a concurrent pox virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, L W; Chengappa, M M; Greer, S; Alderson, C

    1987-10-01

    Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae was isolated from the spleen, liver, lung, heart, kidney, and skin of a red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) which had a concurrent avian pox virus infection. The hawk had been housed on a farm with domestic turkeys, providing a possible source of the E. rhusiopathiae.

  6. Characterization of field isolates of Suid herpesvirus 1 (Aujeszky's disease virus) as derivatives of attenuated vaccine strains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Laurids Siig; Medveczky, I.; Strandbygaard, Bertel

    1992-01-01

    Field isolates of suid herpesvirus 1 (Aujeszky's disease virus) from Poland and Hungary were identified by restriction fragment pattern analysis as derivatives of attenuated vaccine strains. The Polish isolates were found to be related to the BUK-TK-900 strain (Suivac A) which is widely used...... as a live vaccine in Poland, and the Hungarian isolates were related to the Bartha K-61 vaccine strain widely used in Hungary. Pigs experimentally infected with derivatives of BUK-TK-900 or BUK-TK-900 itself were found to develop gI-antibodies, while pigs infected with derivatives of Bartha K-61 showed a g...

  7. Pathogenic and Genotypic Characterization of a Japanese Encephalitis Virus Isolate Associated with Reproductive Failure in an Indian Pig Herd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desingu, P A; Ray, Pradeep K; Patel, B H M; Singh, R; Singh, R K; Saikumar, G

    2016-01-01

    India is endemic to Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and recurrent outbreaks occur mainly in rice growing areas. Pigs are considered to be the amplifying host for JEV and infection in gestating pigs results in reproductive failure. Most studies conducted on JEV infection in Indian pigs have been serological surveys and very little is known about JEV genotypes circulating in pigs. So the potential risk posed by pigs in JEV transmission and the genetic relationship between viruses circulating in pigs, mosquitoes and humans is poorly understood. This study was conducted in pigs with a history of reproductive failure characterized by stillborn piglets with neuropathological lesions. Japanese encephalitis (JE) suspected brain specimens inoculated intracerebrally into mice and Vero cells resulted in successful isolation of JEV/SW/IVRI/395A/2014. Clinicopathological observations in infected mice, demonstration of JEV antigen in brain, and analysis of the envelope protein identified the swine isolate as being neurovirulent. Phylogenetic analysis based on prM and E gene sequences showed that it belonged to genotype III. This swine isolate was closely related to JEV associated with the 2005 outbreak in India and JaoArS982 from Japan. Phylogenetic analysis of JEV strains collected between 1956 and 2014 in India categorized the GIII viruses into different clades blurring their spatial distribution, which has been discernible in the previous century. Isolation of JEV from stillborn piglets and its close genetic relationship with viruses detected at least three decades ago in humans and mosquitoes in Japan suggests that the virus may have been circulating among Indian pigs for several decades. The close similarity between the present swine isolate and those detected in humans affected in the 2005 outbreak in Uttar Pradesh, India, suggests the need for more intensive surveillance of pigs and implementation of suitable strategies to control JE in India.

  8. Cell culture replication of a genotype 1b hepatitis C virus isolate cloned from a patient who underwent liver transplantation.

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    George Koutsoudakis

    Full Text Available The introduction of the genotype 2a isolate JFH1 was a major breakthrough in the field of hepatitis C virus (HCV, allowing researchers to study the complete life cycle of the virus in cell culture. However, fully competent culture systems encompassing the most therapeutically relevant HCV genotypes are still lacking, especially for the highly drug-resistant genotype 1b. For most isolated HCV clones, efficient replication in cultured hepatoma cells requires the introduction of replication-enhancing mutations. However, such mutations may interfere with viral assembly, as occurs in the case of the genotype 1b isolate Con1. In this study, we show that a clinical serum carrying a genotype 1b virus with an exceptionally high viral load was able to infect Huh7.5 cells. Similar to previous reports, inoculation of Huh7.5 cells by natural virus is very inefficient compared to infection by cell culture HCV. A consensus sequence of a new genotype 1b HCV isolate was cloned from the clinical serum (designated Barcelona HCV1, and then subjected to replication studies. This virus replicated poorly in a transient fashion in Huh7.5 cells after electroporation with in vitro transcribed RNA. Nonetheless, approximately 3 weeks post electroporation and thereafter, core protein-positive cells were detected by immunofluorescence. Surprisingly, small amounts of core protein were also measurable in the supernatant of electroporated cells, suggesting that HCV particles might be assembled and released. Our findings not only enhance the current method of cloning in vitro HCV replication-competent isolates, but also offer valuable insights for the realization of fully competent culture systems for HCV.

  9. Complete genome sequence analysis of goatpox virus isolated from China shows high variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiancheng; Chi, Xuelin; Li, Wei; Hao, Wenbo; Li, Ming; Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Yifan; Rock, Daniel L; Luo, Shuhong; Wang, Shihua

    2014-09-17

    Goatpox virus (GTPV), a member of the Capripoxvirus genus of the Poxviridae family, is the causative agent of variolo caprina (goatpox). GTPV can cause significant economic losses of domestic ruminants in endemic regions and can threaten breeding stocks. In this study, we report on the compilation of the complete genomic sequence of an isolated GTPV field strain FZ (GTPV_FZ). The 150,194bp GTPV genome consists of a central coding region bounded by two identical 2301bp inverted terminal repeats and contains 151 putative genes. Comparative genomic analysis reveals the apparent genetic relationships among Capripoxviruses are close, but sufficient genomic variants in the field isolate strain FZ have been identified to distinguish it from other GTPV strains and other Capripoxvirus species. Phylogenetic analysis based on the p32 and complete GTPV genome can be used to differentiate SPPVs, GTPVs and LSDVs. These data may contribute to the epidemiological study of the Chinese capripoxvirus and help to develop more specific detection methods to distinguish GTPVs, SPPVs and LSDVs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pathogenicity study of local bluetongue virus isolates in local and imported sheep

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    Indrawati Sendow

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Bluetongue is one of arboviruses that caused economical impact to sheep farmers. Six local bluetongue virus (BT serotypes isolates were obtained from sentinel cattle blood in West Java and Irian Jaya (Papua, but its pathogenicity has not been identified. Propagation of viraemic blood inoculum from 3 local BT serotypes such as serotypes 1,9 and 21, that had been conducted in Merino sheep, will be used for pathogenicity study. The study was devided into 3 groups, each group contained local and imported sheep as control and infected sheep. All sheep had been tested as negative BT antibodies. Observation on clinical signs had been conducted twice daily for 28 days. Heparinised blood and sera were collected everyday to obtain the viraemia period by Ag-C-ELISA test and antibody respons by C-ELISA test. The clinical signs produced were varied from normal to very mild in local sheep and very mild to mild-moderate in Merino sheep.The lowest severe degree of clinical signs was BT 9 followed by BT 1 and BT 21. No dead, neither local and Merino sheep occurred. Viraemia in Merino sheep occurred between 3-5 days and in local sheep between 4-7 days post inoculation (DPI. Antibody respons occurred as quick as 10 DPI in Merino sheep and 9 DPI in local sheep, and stayed until the end of experiment. This study showed that local BT isolates were not pathogen and not producing clasical BT infection.

  11. Comparison of complete genome sequences of dog rabies viruses isolated from China and Mexico reveals key amino acid changes that may be associated with virus replication and virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Fulai; Zhang, Guoqing; Zhong, Xiangfu; Han, Na; Song, Yunfeng; Zhao, Ling; Cui, Min; Rayner, Simon; Fu, Zhen F

    2014-07-01

    Rabies is a global problem, but its impact and prevalence vary across different regions. In some areas, such as parts of Africa and Asia, the virus is prevalent in the domestic dog population, leading to epidemic waves and large numbers of human fatalities. In other regions, such as the Americas, the virus predominates in wildlife and bat populations, with sporadic spillover into domestic animals. In this work, we attempted to investigate whether these distinct environments led to selective pressures that result in measurable changes within the genome at the amino acid level. To this end, we collected and sequenced the full genome of two isolates from divergent environments. The first isolate (DRV-AH08) was from China, where the virus is present in the dog population and the country is experiencing a serious epidemic. The second isolate (DRV-Mexico) was taken from Mexico, where the virus is present in both wildlife and domestic dog populations, but at low levels as a consequence of an effective vaccination program. We then combined and compared these with other full genome sequences to identify distinct amino acid changes that might be associated with environment. Phylogenetic analysis identified strain DRV-AH08 as belonging to the China-I lineage, which has emerged to become the dominant lineage in the current epidemic. The Mexico strain was placed in the D11 Mexico lineage, associated with the West USA-Mexico border clade. Amino acid sequence analysis identified only 17 amino acid differences in the N, G and L proteins. These differences may be associated with virus replication and virulence-for example, the short incubation period observed in the current epidemic in China.

  12. Antiviral Activity of Bacillus sp. Isolated from the Marine Sponge Petromica citrina against Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus, a Surrogate Model of the Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; de Menezes, Cláudia Beatriz Afonso; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2013-01-01

    The Hepatitis C virus causes chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Bovine viral diarrhea virus is used as a surrogate model for antiviral assays for the HCV. From marine invertebrates and microorganisms isolated from them, extracts were prepared for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 128 tested, 2 were considered active and 1 was considered promising. The best result was obtained from the extracts produced from the Bacillus sp. isolated from the sponge Petromica citrina. The extracts 555 (500 µg/mL, SI>18) and 584 (150 µg/mL, SI 27) showed a percentage of protection of 98% against BVDV, and the extract 616, 90% of protection. All of them showed activity during the viral adsorption. Thus, various substances are active on these studied organisms and may lead to the development of drugs which ensure an alternative therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C. PMID:23628828

  13. Detection of rainbow trout antibodies against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) by neutralisation test is highly dependent on the virus isolate used

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fregeneda-Grandes, J.M.; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2007-01-01

    Three serological tests, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), 50 % plaque neutralisation test (50%PNT) and Western blotting (WB), were used to detect antibodies against viral haemorrhagic septicaerma virus (VHSV) in 50 rainbow trout broodstock from a rainbow trout farm endemically infected...... %PNT, 90 % of the fish were found to be positive. By examining a panel of different VHSV isolates in 50 %PNT, it was demonstrated that the virus isolate used as test antigen could significantly affect the sensitivity and titre determination in 50 %PNT for detection of rainbow trout antibodies against...... VHSV. When the sera were examined for the presence of VHSV antibodies by ELISA or WB, 61 % were found to be positive. When conducting WB analysis, the viral glycoprotein was the protein most frequently recognized, followed by the viral nucleoprotein....

  14. Antiviral activity of Bacillus sp. isolated from the marine sponge Petromica citrina against bovine viral diarrhea virus, a surrogate model of the hepatitis C virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastos, Juliana Cristina Santiago; Kohn, Luciana Konecny; Fantinatti-Garboggini, Fabiana; Padilla, Marina Aiello; Flores, Eduardo Furtado; da Silva, Bárbara Pereira; de Menezes, Cláudia Beatriz Afonso; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2013-04-29

    The Hepatitis C virus causes chronic infections in humans, which can develop to liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. The Bovine viral diarrhea virus is used as a surrogate model for antiviral assays for the HCV. From marine invertebrates and microorganisms isolated from them, extracts were prepared for assessment of their possible antiviral activity. Of the 128 tested, 2 were considered active and 1 was considered promising. The best result was obtained from the extracts produced from the Bacillus sp. isolated from the sponge Petromica citrina. The extracts 555 (500 µg/mL, SI>18) and 584 (150 µg/mL, SI 27) showed a percentage of protection of 98% against BVDV, and the extract 616, 90% of protection. All of them showed activity during the viral adsorption. Thus, various substances are active on these studied organisms and may lead to the development of drugs which ensure an alternative therapy for the treatment of hepatitis C.

  15. Complete genome sequencing and evolutionary analysis of Indian isolates of Dengue virus type 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Paban Kumar, E-mail: pabandash@rediffmail.com; Sharma, Shashi; Soni, Manisha; Agarwal, Ankita; Parida, Manmohan; Rao, P.V.Lakshmana

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •Complete genome of Indian DENV-2 was deciphered for the first time in this study. •The recent Indian DENV-2 revealed presence of many unique amino acid residues. •Genotype shift (American to Cosmopolitan) characterizes evolution of DENV-2 in India. •Circulation of a unique clade of DENV-2 in South Asia was identified. -- Abstract: Dengue is the most important arboviral infection of global public health significance. It is now endemic in most parts of the South East Asia including India. Though Dengue virus type 2 (DENV-2) is predominantly associated with major outbreaks in India, complete genome information of Indian DENV-2 is not available. In this study, the full-length genome of five DENV-2 isolates (four from 2001 to 2011 and one from 1960), from different parts of India was determined. The complete genome of the Indian DENV-2 was found to be 10,670 bases long with an open reading frame coding for 3391 amino acids. The recent Indian DENV-2 (2001–2011) revealed a nucleotide sequence identity of around 90% and 97% with an older Indian DENV-2 (1960) and closely related Sri Lankan and Chinese DENV-2 respectively. Presence of unique amino acid residues and non-conservative substitutions in critical amino acid residues of major structural and non-structural proteins was observed in recent Indian DENV-2. Selection pressure analysis revealed positive selection in few amino acid sites of the genes encoding for structural and non-structural proteins. The molecular phylogenetic analysis based on comparison of both complete coding region and envelope protein gene with globally diverse DENV-2 viruses classified the recent Indian isolates into a unique South Asian clade within Cosmopolitan genotype. A shift of genotype from American to Cosmopolitan in 1970s characterized the evolution of DENV-2 in India. Present study is the first report on complete genome characterization of emerging DENV-2 isolates from India and highlights the circulation of a

  16. Molecular characterization of the Great Lakes viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV isolate from USA

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    Vakharia Vikram N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV is a highly contagious viral disease of fresh and saltwater fish worldwide. VHSV caused several large scale fish kills in the Great Lakes area and has been found in 28 different host species. The emergence of VHS in the Great Lakes began with the isolation of VHSV from a diseased muskellunge (Esox masquinongy caught from Lake St. Clair in 2003. VHSV is a member of the genus Novirhabdovirus, within the family Rhabdoviridae. It has a linear single-stranded, negative-sense RNA genome of approximately 11 kbp, with six genes. VHSV replicates in the cytoplasm and produces six monocistronic mRNAs. The gene order of VHSV is 3'-N-P-M-G-NV-L-5'. This study describes molecular characterization of the Great Lakes VHSV strain (MI03GL, and its phylogenetic relationships with selected European and North American isolates. Results The complete genomic sequences of VHSV-MI03GL strain was determined from cloned cDNA of six overlapping fragments, obtained by RT-PCR amplification of genomic RNA. The complete genome sequence of MI03GL comprises 11,184 nucleotides (GenBank GQ385941 with the gene order of 3'-N-P-M-G-NV-L-5'. These genes are separated by conserved gene junctions, with di-nucleotide gene spacers. The first 4 nucleotides at the termini of the VHSV genome are complementary and identical to other novirhadoviruses genomic termini. Sequence homology and phylogenetic analysis show that the Great Lakes virus is closely related to the Japanese strains JF00Ehi1 (96% and KRRV9822 (95%. Among other novirhabdoviruses, VHSV shares highest sequence homology (62% with snakehead rhabdovirus. Conclusion Phylogenetic tree obtained by comparing 48 glycoprotein gene sequences of different VHSV strains demonstrate that the Great Lakes VHSV is closely related to the North American and Japanese genotype IVa, but forms a distinct genotype IVb, which is clearly different from the three European genotypes. Molecular

  17. Molecular characterization of dengue viruses isolated from patients in Central Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusmintarsih, Endang S; Hayati, Rahma F; Turnip, Oktaviani N; Yohan, Benediktus; Suryaningsih, Suhestri; Pratiknyo, Hery; Denis, Dionisius; Sasmono, R Tedjo

    2017-10-19

    Dengue is hyper-endemic in Indonesia. Purwokerto city in Central Java province is routinely ravaged by the disease. Despite the endemicity of dengue in this city, there is still no data on the virological aspects of dengue in the city. We conducted a molecular surveillance study of the circulating dengue viruses (DENV) in Purwokerto city to gain information on the virus origin, serotype and genotype distribution, and phylogenetic characteristics of DENV. A cross-sectional dengue molecular surveillance study was conducted in Purwokerto. Sera were collected from dengue-suspected patients attending three hospitals in the city. Diagnosis was performed using dengue NS1 antigen and IgG/IgM antibodies detection. DENV serotyping was performed using Simplexa Dengue real-time RT-PCR. Sequencing was conducted to obtain full-length DENV Envelope (E) gene sequences, which were then used in phylogenetic and genotypic analyses. Patients' clinical and demographic data were collected and analyzed. A total of 105 dengue-suspected patients' sera were collected, in which 80 (76.2%) were positive for IgM and/or IgG, and 57 (54.2%) were confirmed as dengue by NS1 antigen and/or DENV RNA detection using RT-PCR. Serotyping was successful for 47 isolates. All four serotypes circulated in the area with DENV-3 as the predominant serotype. Phylogenetic analyses grouped the isolates into Genotype I for DENV-1, Cosmopolitan genotype for DENV-2, and Genotype I and II for DENV-3 and -4, respectively. The analyses also revealed the close relatedness of Purwokerto isolates to other DENV strains from Indonesia and neighboring countries. We reveal the molecular and virological characteristics of DENV in Purwokerto, Banyumas regency, Central Java. The genotype and phylogenetic analyses indicate the endemicity of the circulating DENV in the city. Our serotype and genotype data provide references for future dengue molecular epidemiology studies and disease management in the region. Copyright © 2017 The

  18. Genetics, Receptor Binding, Replication, and Mammalian Transmission of H4 Avian Influenza Viruses Isolated from Live Poultry Markets in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Libin; Deng, Guohua; Shi, Jianzhong; Wang, Shuai; Zhang, Qianyi; Kong, Huihui; Gu, Chunyang; Guan, Yuntao; Suzuki, Yasuo; Li, Yanbing; Jiang, Yongping; Tian, Guobin; Liu, Liling

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT H4 avian influenza virus (AIV) is one of the most prevalent influenza virus subtypes in the world. However, whether H4 AIVs pose a threat to public health remains largely unclear. Here, we analyzed the phylogenetic relationships, receptor binding properties, replication, and transmissibility in mammals of H4 AIVs isolated from live poultry markets in China between 2009 and 2012. Genomic sequence analysis of 36 representative H4 viruses revealed 32 different genotypes, indicating that these viruses are undergoing complex and frequent reassortment events. All 32 viruses tested could replicate in the respiratory organs of infected mice without prior adaptation. Receptor binding analysis demonstrated that the H4 AIVs bound to α-2,6-linked glycans, although they retained the binding preference for α-2,3-linked glycans. When we tested the direct-contact transmission of 10 H4 viruses in guinea pigs, we found that three viruses did not transmit to any of the contact animals, one virus transmitted to one of three contact animals, and six viruses transmitted to all three contact animals. When we further tested the respiratory droplet transmissibility of four of the viruses that transmitted efficiently via direct contact, we found that three of them could transmit to one or two of the five exposed animals. Our study demonstrates that the current circulating H4 AIVs can infect, replicate in, and transmit to mammalian hosts, thereby posing a potential threat to human health. These findings emphasize the continual need for enhanced surveillance of H4 AIVs. IMPORTANCE Numerous surveillance studies have documented the wide distribution of H4 AIVs throughout the world, yet the biological properties of H4 viruses have not been well studied. In this study, we found that multiple genotypes of H4 viruses are cocirculating in the live poultry markets of China and that H4 viruses can replicate in mice, possess human-type receptor binding specificity, and transmit between

  19. Vaccinia viruses isolated from skin infection in horses produced cutaneous and systemic disease in experimentally infected rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cargnelutti, Juliana Felipetto; Schmidt, Candice; Masuda, Eduardo Kenji; Nogueira, Paula Rochelle Kurrle; Weiblen, Rudi; Flores, Eduardo Furtado

    2012-10-01

    The susceptibility of rabbits to two isolates of Vaccinia virus (VACV) recovered from cutaneous disease in horses in Southern Brazil was investigated. Rabbits were inoculated in the ear skin with both VACV isolates, either in single or mixed infection. All inoculated animals presented local skin lesions characterized by hyperaemia, papules, vesicles, pustules and ulcers. Infectious virus was detected in the lungs and intestine of rabbits that died during acute disease. Histological examination of the skin revealed changes characteristic of those associated with members of the genus Orthopoxvirus. These results demonstrate that rabbits develop skin disease accompanied by systemic signs upon intradermal inoculation of these two equine VACV isolates, either alone or in combination, opening the way for using rabbits to study selected aspects of the biology and pathogenesis of VACV infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Striking differences in the biological and molecular properties of onion and garlic isolates of onion yellow dwarf virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, M G; Torrico, A K; Kiehr, M; Conci, V C

    2013-06-01

    Complete nucleotide (nt) and deduced amino acid sequences of two onion yellow dwarf virus (OYDV) isolates showing mild and severe symptoms in onion but being unable to infect garlic were determined. The genomes consisted of 10,459 and 10,461 nt (without the 3' poly(A) tail) and were 92.2 % identical. Comparison of their whole genomes, polyproteins and P1, HC-Pro, P3, CI, VPg and NIa-Pro regions with those of garlic isolates previously identified as OYDV gave percentage values below that proposed as the molecular threshold for potyvirus species demarcation. This and the striking differences in host range between onion and garlic isolates suggest that they represent different virus species.

  1. Biological characterization and variability of the nucleocapsid protein gene of Groundnut bud necrosis virus isolates infecting pea from India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad AKRAM

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A disease of pea characterized by browning in veins, leaves and stems, mostly in growing tips, and brown circular spots on pods, was recorded in four districts of Uttar Pradesh, India. The causal agent of this disease was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR using primers pair HRP 26/HRP 28 and identified as Groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV on the basis of nucleocapsid protein (NP gene sequence. Virus isolates from Bareilly (BRY, Kanpur (KNP, Udham Singh Nagar (USN and Shahjahanpur (SJP were designated as GBNV-[Pea_BRY], GBNV-[Pea_KNP], GBNV-[Pea_USN] and GBNV-[Pea_SJP] and their NP genes sequenced. The sequence data of each isolate were deposited at NCBI database (JF281101-JF281104. The complete nucleotide sequence of the NP genes of all the GBNV isolates had a single open reading frame of 831 nucleotides and 276 amino acids. The isolates had among them 2% variability at amino acid level and 2‒3 variability at nucleotide level, but had variability with other GBNV isolates of fabaceous hosts in the range of 0‒6% at amino acid level and 1‒8% at nucleotide level. Though this variation in nucleotide sequences of GBNV isolates from fabaceous hosts is within the limits of species demarcation for tospoviruses, formation of a separate cluster within the GBNV isolates indicates the possibility of distinct variants in GBNV.

  2. Characterization of a new Vaccinia virus isolate reveals the C23L gene as a putative genetic marker for autochthonous Group 1 Brazilian Vaccinia virus.

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    Felipe L Assis

    Full Text Available Since 1999, several Vaccinia virus (VACV isolates, the etiological agents of bovine vaccinia (BV, have been frequently isolated and characterized with various biological and molecular methods. The results from these approaches have grouped these VACV isolates into two different clusters. This dichotomy has elicited debates surrounding the origin of the Brazilian VACV and its epidemiological significance. To ascertain vital information to settle these debates, we and other research groups have made efforts to identify molecular markers to discriminate VACV from other viruses of the genus Orthopoxvirus (OPV and other VACV-BR groups. In this way, some genes have been identified as useful markers to discriminate between the VACV-BR groups. However, new markers are needed to infer ancestry and to correlate each sample or group with its unique epidemiological and biological features. The aims of this work were to characterize a new VACV isolate (VACV DMTV-2005 molecularly and biologically using conserved and non-conserved gene analyses for phylogenetic inference and to search for new genes that would elucidate the VACV-BR dichotomy. The VACV DMTV-2005 isolate reported in this study is biologically and phylogenetically clustered with other strains of Group 1 VACV-BR, the most prevalent VACV group that was isolated during the bovine vaccinia outbreaks in Brazil. Sequence analysis of C23L, the gene that encodes for the CC-chemokine-binding protein, revealed a ten-nucleotide deletion, which is a new Group 1 Brazilian VACV genetic marker. This deletion in the C23L open reading frame produces a premature stop-codon that is shared by all Group 1 VACV-BR strains and may also reflect the VACV-BR dichotomy; the deletion can also be considered to be a putative genetic marker for non-virulent Brazilian VACV isolates and may be used for the detection and molecular characterization of new isolates.

  3. A novel single-stranded RNA virus isolated from a phytopathogenic filamentous fungus, Rosellinia necatrix, with similarity to hypo-like viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui; Liu, Shengxue; Chiba, Sotaro; Kondo, Hideki; Kanematsu, Satoko; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Here we report a biological and molecular characterization of a novel positive-sense RNA virus isolated from a field isolate (NW10) of a filamentous phytopathogenic fungus, the white root rot fungus that is designated as Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1). A recently developed technology using zinc ions allowed us to transfer RnFV1 to two mycelially incompatible Rosellinia necatrix strains. A biological comparison of the virus-free and -recipient isogenic fungal strains suggested that RnFV1 infects latently and thus has no potential as a virocontrol agent. The virus has an undivided positive-sense RNA genome of 6286 nucleotides excluding a poly (A) tail. The genome possesses two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs): a large ORF1 that encodes polypeptides with RNA replication functions and a smaller ORF2 that encodes polypeptides of unknown function. A lack of coat protein genes was suggested by the failure of virus particles from infected mycelia. No evidence was obtained by Northern analysis or classical 5′-RACE for the presence of subgenomic RNA for the downstream ORF. Sequence similarities were found in amino-acid sequence between RnFV1 putative proteins and counterparts of a previously reported mycovirus, Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1). Interestingly, several related sequences were detected by BLAST searches of independent transcriptome assembly databases one of which probably represents an entire virus genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase showed that RnFV1, FgV1, and these similar sequences are grouped in a cluster distinct from distantly related hypoviruses. It is proposed that a new taxonomic family termed Fusariviridae be created to include RnFV1 and FgV1. PMID:25101066

  4. A novel single-stranded RNA virus isolated from a phytopathogenic filamentous fungus, Rosellinia necatrix, with similarity to hypo-like viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui eZhang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Here we report a biological and molecular characterization of a novel positive-sense RNA virus isolated from a field isolate (NW10 of a filamentous phytopathogenic fungus, the white root rot fungus that is designated as Rosellinia necatrix fusarivirus 1 (RnFV1. A recently developed technology using zinc ions allowed us to transfer RnFV1 to two mycelially incompatible Rosellinia necatrix strains. A biological comparison of the virus-free and -recipient isogenic fungal strains suggested that RnFV1 infects latently and thus has no potential as a virocontrol agent. The virus has an undivided positive-sense RNA genome of 6286 nucleotides excluding a poly (A tail. The genome possesses two non-overlapping open reading frames (ORFs: a large ORF1 that encodes polypeptides with RNA replication functions and a smaller ORF2 that encodes polypeptides of unknown function. A lack of coat protein genes was suggested by the failure of virus particles from infected mycelia. No evidence was obtained by Northern analysis or classical 5'-RACE for the presence of subgenomic RNA for the downstream ORF. Sequence similarities were found in amino-acid sequence between RnFV1 putative proteins and counterparts of a previously reported mycovirus, Fusarium graminearum virus 1 (FgV1. Interestingly, several related sequences were detected by BLAST searches of independent transcriptome assembly databases one of which probably represents an entire virus genome. Phylogenetic analysis based on the conserved RNA-dependent RNA polymerase showed that RnFV1, FgV1, and these similar sequences are grouped in a cluster distinct from distantly related hypoviruses. It is proposed that a new taxonomic family termed Fusariviridae be created to include RnFV1and FgV1.

  5. Experimental evaluation of sand fly collection and storage methods for the isolation and molecular detection of Phlebotomus-borne viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remoli, Maria Elena; Bongiorno, Gioia; Fortuna, Claudia; Marchi, Antonella; Bianchi, Riccardo; Khoury, Cristina; Ciufolini, Maria Grazia; Gramiccia, Marina

    2015-11-09

    Several viruses have been recently isolated from Mediterranean phlebotomine sand flies; some are known to cause human disease while some are new to science. To monitor the Phlebotomus-borne viruses spreading, field studies are in progress using different sand fly collection and storage methods. Two main sampling techniques consist of CDC light traps, an attraction method allowing collection of live insects in which the virus is presumed to be fairly preserved, and sticky traps, an interception method suitable to collect dead specimens in high numbers, with a risk for virus viability or integrity. Sand flies storage requires a "deep cold chain" or specimen preservation in ethanol. In the present study the influence of sand fly collection and storage methods on viral isolation and RNA detection performances was evaluated experimentally. Specimens of laboratory-reared Phlebotomus perniciosus were artificially fed with blood containing Toscana virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Phlebovirus). Various collection and storage conditions of blood-fed females were evaluated to mimic field procedures using single and pool samples. Isolation on VERO cell cultures, quantitative Real time-Retro-transcriptase (RT)-PCR and Nested-RT-PCR were performed according to techniques commonly used in surveillance studies. Live engorged sand flies stored immediately at -80 °C were the most suitable sample for phlebovirus identification by both virus isolation and RNA detection. The viral isolation rate remained very high (26/28) for single dead engorged females frozen after 1 day, while it was moderate (10/30) for specimens collected by sticky traps maintained up to 3 days at room temperature and then stored frozen without ethanol. Opposed to viral isolation, molecular RNA detection kept very high on dead sand flies collected by sticky traps when left at room temperature up to 6 days post blood meal and then stored frozen in presence (88/95) or absence (87/88) of ethanol. Data were

  6. Experimental inoculation of late term pregnant sows with a field isolate of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome vaccine-derived virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens; Bøtner, Anette; Bille-Hansen, Vivi

    2002-01-01

    The use of a live attenuated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine in piglets has been associated with reproductive disorders in non-vaccinated sows. Vaccine-derived virus (VDV) has been isolated from foctuses, stillborn pigs, and dead: piglets, indicating...... that the live vaccine spread from vaccinated piglets to non-vaccinated sows, and that the virus might be implicated in the severe reproductive problems observed. In the present study, one such VDV isolate was used to experimentally infect pregnant sows in the last trimester. The chosen isolate, which had more...... than 99.6% identity to the attenuated vaccine virus, originated from the lungs of a stillborn pig from a swine herd with a sudden high level of stillborn pigs and increased piglet mortality in the nursing period. Intranasal inoculation of sows with the virus isolate resulted in congenital infection...

  7. Characterization of Tomato spotted wilt virus isolates that overcome the Sw-5 resistance gene in tomato and fitness assays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose ARAMBURU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance-breaking (RB isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV that overcome the resistance conferred by the Sw-5 gene in tomato have had only a limited spread since they were first detected in north-eastern Spain in 2002. Symptom expression, homogeneity, stability and the transmission capacity of RB and non-resistance breaking (NRB isolates were biologically compared. The fitness of both types of isolates infecting tomato plants was determined in competition assays. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in a wide range of plant species, except RB isolates in tomato carrying the Sw-5 resistance gene and pepper carrying the Tsw resistance gene. The mechanical transmission of RB isolates to tomato plants with the Sw-5 gene failed in some trials, although NRB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when tested with the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis. Biological clones from individual local lesions obtained by mechanically inoculating Nicotiana glutinosa in some TSWV field samples showed that they were biologically homogeneous. Mixed infections of RB and wilt-type isolates were not found. The RB isolates were relatively stable because no reversion to NRB isolates was seen after serial passages in susceptible tomato plants. In competition assays between RB and NRB isolates, after serial passages in susceptible tomato plants, the prevalence of a particular isolate was not related to its capacity to overcome Sw-5 gene resistance. The low spread of the RB isolates in Spain does not seem to be related to a loss of fitness in tomato plants or to differences in transmission capacity by thrips, but it could be related to the reduction of the selection pressure of RB isolates as consequence of the gradual replacement of susceptible tomato plants by resistant tomato plants by growers.

  8. Identification of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus isolated from Pacific cod Gadus macrocephalus in Prince William Sound Alaska, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, T.R.; Sullivan, J.; Emmenegger, E.; Follett, J.; Short, S.; Batts, W.N.; Winton, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Ulcerative slun tissues from 2 Pacific cod Gadus rnacrocephalus caught in Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA, were examined for virus by Fish Pathology staff within the F.R.E.D. Division of the Alaska Department of Fish and Game. Six days after inoculation of Epitheliorna papulosum cyprini (EPC) cells at 14"C, diffuse rounding and lifting of cells from the monolayers suggestive of cytopathlc effect became visible in the lower sample dilutions. Ultrastructural examinations of affected EPC cells showed rhabdovirus particles within cytoplasmic vacuoles and on the cell surface membranes. Virus isolates from both cod were subsequently confirmed as viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) by serum neutralizabon and immunoblot assay. This is the first VHSV isolated from Pacific cod, which represents a new host species for the virus. Histologically, cod skin ulcers appeared to be caused by a foreign-body-type inflammatory response to foci of protozoa resembling X cells that also had plasmodial stages. Whether the rhabdovirus was incidental to the slun lesion or played a role in its etiology remains to be determined. The possible relationship between thls virus and the recent occurrences of VHSV in anadromous salmoruds from Washington State, USA, is discussed.

  9. Diversity of viruses of the hyperthermophilic archaeal genus Aeropyrum, and isolation of the Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1, the first representative of the family Clavaviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Tomohiro; Yoshida, Takashi; Tanaka, Reiji; Forterre, Patrick; Sako, Yoshihiko; Prangishvili, David

    2010-07-05

    We have surveyed the morphological diversity of viruses infecting the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix, the most thermophilic species among aerobic organisms, growing optimally at 90 degrees C, and isolated and characterized a novel virus, Aeropyrum pernix bacilliform virus 1, APBV1. This is the first virus to be described of the genus Aeropyrum and the archaeal order Desulfurococcales. The virion of APBV1 has rigid bacilliform morphology, about 140x20nm, with one end pointed and the other rounded. It contains highly glycosylated single major protein and three minor proteins. The circular, double-stranded DNA genome comprising 5278bp is the smallest for known archaeal viruses. None of the 14 putative genes, all on the same DNA strand, shows significant similarity to sequences in the public databases. The APBV1 infection caused neither retardation of host growth nor lysis of host cells, and integration of the viral genome into the host chromosome was not detected. On the basis of unusual morphological and genomic properties, we propose to consider APBV1 as the first representative of a new viral family, the Clavaviridae. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Susceptibility of various Japanese freshwater fish species to an isolate of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Takafumi; Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    2013-11-25

    Genotype IVb of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) was isolated for the first time in the Great Lakes basin in 2003, where it spread and caused mass mortalities in several wild fish species throughout the basin. In order to prevent further spreading of the disease and to assess risks of new genotypes invading new watersheds, basic microbiological information such as pathogenicity studies are essential. In this study, experimental infections were conducted on 7 indigenous freshwater fish species from Japan by immersion with a VHSV genotype IVb isolate. In Expt 1, cumulative mortalities in bluegill Lepomis macrochirus used as positive controls, Japanese fluvial sculpin Cottus pollux, and iwana Salvelinus leucomaenis pluvius were 50, 80 and 0%, respectively. In Expt 2, cumulative mortalities of 100, 100 and 10% were observed in Japanese fluvial sculpin C. pollux, Japanese rice fish Oryzias latipes and yoshinobori Rhinogobius sp., respectively. No mortality was observed in honmoroko Gnathopogon caerulescens, akaza Liobagrus reini or Japanese striped loach Cobitis biwae. VHSV was detected by RT-PCR from samples of kidney, spleen, and brain from all dead fish, and virus re-isolation by cell culture was successful from all dead fish. We detected the virus in the brain from a few surviving bluegill 50 d post exposure by both cell culture and RT-PCR. These results revealed that VHSV IVb could become a serious threat to wild freshwater fish species in Japan, and that some surviving fish might become healthy carriers of the virus.

  11. ISOLATION OF EGG DROP SYNDROME VIRUS AND ITS MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION USING SODIUM DODECYL SULPHATE POLYACRYLAMIDE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Rasool, S. U. Rahman and M. K. Mansoor

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Six isolates of egg drop syndrome (EDS virus were recovered from five different outbreaks of EDS in commercial laying hens in and around Faisalabad. The aberrant eggs were fed to the susceptible laying hens for experimental induction of infection. The samples from infected birds (egg washing, cloacal swabs, oviducts and spleens were collected, processed and inoculated into 11-day old duck embryos. The presence of virus in harvested allanto-amniotic fluid was monitored by spot and microhaemagglutination tests and confirmed by haemagglutination inhibition and agar gel precipitation tests. The EDS virus grew well in duck embryos and agglutinated only avian but not mammalian red blood cells. These isolates were purified through velocity density gradient centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined through Lowry method and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was conducted by loading 300 µg protein concentration on 12.5% gel using discontinuous buffer system. All the six isolates showed 13 polypeptides, which were identical to those described in the referral EDS-76 virus (strain-127. The molecular weights of the polypeptides ranged from 6.5 KDa to 126 KDa.

  12. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of human influenza A viruses isolated in Iran during the 2014-2015 season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moasser, Elham; Behzadian, Farida; Moattari, Afagh; Fotouhi, Fatemeh; Rahimi, Amir; Zaraket, Hassan; Hosseini, Seyed Younes

    2017-07-01

    Influenza A viruses are an important cause of severe infectious diseases in humans and are characterized by their fast evolution rate. Global monitoring of these viruses is critical to detect newly emerging variants during annual epidemics. Here, we sought to genetically characterize influenza A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 viruses collected in Iran during the 2014-2015 influenza season. A total of 200 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from patients with influenza-like illnesses. Swabs were screened for influenza A and B using real-time PCR. Furthermore, positive specimens with high virus load underwent virus isolation and genetic characterization of their hemagglutinin (HA) and M genes. Of the 200 specimens, 80 were influenza A-positive, including 44 A/H1N1pdm09 and 36 A/H3N2, while 18 were influenza B-positive. Phylogenetic analysis of the HA genes of the A/H1N1pdm09 viruses revealed the circulation of clade 6C, characterized by amino acid substitutions D97N, V234I and K283E. Analysis of the A/H3N2 viruses showed a genetic drift from the vaccine strain A/Texas/50/2012 with 5 mutations (T128A, R142G, N145S, P198S and S219F) belonging to the antigenic sites A, B, and D of the HA protein. The A/H3N2 viruses belonged to phylogenetic clades 3C.2 and 3C.3. The M gene trees of the Iranian A/H1N1pdm09 and A/H3N2 mirrored the clustering patterns of their corresponding HA trees. Our results reveal co-circulation of several influenza A virus strains in Iran during the 2014-2015 influenza season.

  13. Identification of unique B virus (Macacine Herpesvirus 1 epitopes of zoonotic and macaque isolates using monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Katz

    Full Text Available Our overall aim is to develop epitope-based assays for accurate differential diagnosis of B virus zoonotic infections in humans. Antibodies to cross-reacting epitopes on human-simplexviruses continue to confound the interpretation of current assays where abundant antibodies exist from previous infections with HSV types 1 and 2. To find B virus-specific epitopes we cloned ten monoclonal antibodies (mAbs from the hybridomas we produced. Our unique collection of rare human sera from symptomatic and asymptomatic patients infected with B virus was key to the evaluation and identification of the mAbs as reagents in competition ELISAs (mAb-CE. The analysis of the ten mAbs revealed that the target proteins for six mAbs was glycoprotein B of which two are reactive to simian simplexviruses and not to human simplexviruses. Two mAbs reacted specifically with B virus glycoprotein D, and two other mAbs were specific to VP13/14 and gE-gI complex respectively. The mAbs specific to VP13/14 and gE-gI are strain specific reacting with B virus isolates from rhesus and Japanese macaques and not with isolates from cynomolgus and pigtail macaques. The mAb-CE revealed that a high proportion of naturally B virus infected rhesus macaques and two symptomatic humans possess antibodies to epitopes of VP13/14 protein and on the gE-gI complex. The majority of sera from B virus infected macaques and simplexvirus-infected humans competed with the less specific mAbs. These experiments produced a novel panel of mAbs that enabled B virus strain identification and confirmation of B virus infected macaques by the mAb-CE. For human sera the mAb-CE could be used only for selected cases due to the selective B virus strain-specificity of the mAbs against VP13/14 and gE/gI. To fully accomplish our aim to provide reagents for unequivocal differential diagnosis of zoonotic B virus infections, additional mAbs with a broader range of specificities is critical.

  14. Development of a simplified RT-PCR without RNA isolation for rapid detection of RNA viruses in a single small brown planthopper (Laodelphax striatellus Fallén).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiufang; Liu, Haoqiu; Yuan, Pingping; Zhang, Xiaoxia; Chen, Qingqing; Jiang, Xuanli; Zhou, Yijun

    2017-05-03

    The small brown planthopper (SBPH) is an important pest of cereal crops and acts as a transmission vector for multiple RNA viruses. Rapid diagnosis of virus in the vector is crucial for efficient forecast and control of viral disease. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for virus detection. The traditional RT-PCR contains a RNA isolation step and is widely used for virus detection in insect. However, using the traditional RT-PCR for detecting RNA virus in individual SBPHs becomes challenging because of the expensive reagents and laborious procedure associated with RNA isolation when processing a large number of samples. We established a simplified RT-PCR method without RNA isolation for RNA virus detection in a single SBPH. This method is achieved by grinding a single SBPH in sterile water and using the crude extract directly as the template for RT-PCR. The crude extract containing the virus RNA can be prepared in approximately two minutes. Rice stripe virus (RSV), rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) and Himetobi P virus (HiPV) were successfully detected using this simplified method. The detection results were validated by sequencing and dot immunobinding assay, indicating that this simplified method is reliable for detecting different viruses in insects. The evaluation of the sensitivity of this method showed that both RSV and HiPV can be detected when the cDNA from the crude extract was diluted up to 10 3 fold. Compared to the traditional RT-PCR with RNA isolation, the simplified RT-PCR method greatly reduces the sample processing time, decreases the detection cost, and improves the efficiency by avoiding RNA isolation. A simplified RT-PCR method is developed for rapid detection of RNA virus in a single SBPH without the laborious RNA isolation step. It offers a convenient alternative to the traditional RT-PCR method.

  15. Genome analysis of orf virus isolates from goats in the Fujian Province of southern China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuelin eChi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Orf virus (ORFV, a species of the genus Parapoxvirus of the family Poxviridae, causes nonsystemic, highly contagious and eruptive disease in sheep, goat, and other wild and domestic ruminants. Our previous work shows orf to be ubiquitous in the Fujian Province of China, a region where there is considerable heterogeneity among ORFVs. In this study, we sequenced full genomes of four Fujian goat ORFV strains (OV-GO, OV-YX, OV-NP and OV-SJ1. The four strains were 132 to 139 kb in length, with each containing 124 to 132 genes and about 64% G+C content. The most notable differences between the four strains were found near the genome termini. OV-NP lacked seven and OV-SJ1 lacked three genes near the right terminus when compared against other ORFVs. We also investigated the skin-virulence of the four Fujian ORFVs in goats. The ORFVs with gene deletions showed low virulence while the ORFVs without gene deletions showed high virulence in goats suggesting gene deletion possibly leads to attenuation of ORFVs. Gene 134 was disrupted in OV-NP genome due to the lack of initial code. The phylogenetic tree based on complete Parapoxviruse genomes showed that sheep originated and goat originated ORFVs formed distinctly separate branches with 100% bootstrap. Based on the single gene phylogenetic tree of 132 genes of ORFVs, 32 genes can be easily distinguished as having originated from sheep or goats. Multiple alignment of amino acid sequences of gene 008 from the genome of 5 goat ORFVs and 4 sheep ORFVs revealed 33 unique amino acids differentiating it as having sheep or goats as host. The availability of genomic sequences of four Fujian goat ORFVs aids in our understanding of the diversity of orf virus isolates in this region and can assist in distinguishing between orf strains that originate in sheep and goats.

  16. Partial sequence analysis of an atypical Turkish isolate provides further information on the evolutionary history of Plum pox virus (PPV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glasa, Miroslav; Candresse, Thierry

    2005-03-01

    A variety of techniques, such as typing with subgroup-specific monoclonal antibodies, restriction length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis or subgroup-specific RT-PCR are available for the discrimination of Plum pox virus (PPV) isolates. However, the existence of PPV isolates showing abnormal typing properties has been observed in the past [Candresse, T., Cambra, M., Dallot, S., Lanneau, M., Asensio, M., Gorris, M.T., Revers, F., Macquaire, G., Olmos, A., Boscia, D., Quiot J.B., Dunez, J., 1998. Comparison of monoclonal antibodies and polymerase chain reaction assays for the typing of isolates belonging to the D and M serotypes of Plum pox potyvirus. Phytopathology 88, 198-204.]. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying such anomalous serological and molecular typing characteristics, partial 3' (1449 nt) and 5' (3706 nt) sequences have been determined for an atypical Turkish PPV isolate (Abricotier Turquie or Ab-Tk). The results obtained indicate that its unusual typing behaviour is caused by point mutations affecting key restriction sites and epitopes and confirm that this isolate represents a divergent member of the PPV-M subgroup. In addition, analysis of the partial Ab-Tk genomic sequences demonstrated that the 5' region of the genome of this isolate has a mosaic structure resulting from recombination event(s), shedding new light on the evolutionary history of Plum pox virus.

  17. Construction of an infectious clone of simian foamy virus of Japanese macaque (SFVjm) and phylogenetic analyses of SFVjm isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Rokusuke; Nakagawa, So; Okamoto, Munehiro; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2014-09-10

    Foamy viruses belong to the genus Spumavirus of the family Retroviridae and have been isolated from many mammalian species. It was reported that simian foamy viruses (SFVs) have co-evolved with host species. In this study, we isolated four strains (WK1, WK2, AR1 and AR2) of SFV (named SFVjm) from Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) in main island Honshu of Japan. We constructed an infectious molecular clone of SFVjm strain WK1, termed pJM356. The virus derived from the clone replicated and induced syncytia in human (human embryonic kidney 293T cells), African green monkey (Vero cells) and mouse cell lines (Mus dunni tail fibroblast cells). Phylogenetic analysis also revealed that these four SFVjm strains formed two distinct SFVjm clusters. SFVjm strains WK1 and WK2 and SFV isolated from Taiwanese macaques (Macaca cyclopis) formed one cluster, whereas strains AR1 and AR2 formed the other cluster with SFV isolated from a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A recently isolated Lassa virus from Mali demonstrates atypical clinical disease manifestations and decreased virulence in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Strong, James E; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Sogoba, Nafomon; Brining, Douglas; Geisbert, Thomas W; Scott, Dana P; Feldmann, Heinz

    2013-04-15

    The virulence of Soromba-R, a Lassa virus strain recently isolated from southern Mali, was assessed in 2 animal models of Lassa fever: inbred strain 13 guinea pigs and cynomolgus macaques. In both models, the Malian isolate demonstrated tissue tropism and viral titers similar to those of historical Lassa virus isolates from Sierra Leone (Josiah) and Liberia (Z-132); however, the Soromba-R isolate was found to be less pathogenic, as determined by decreased mortality and prolonged time to euthanasia in macaques. Interestingly, in addition to the classic indicators of Lassa fever, Soromba-R infection presented with moderate to severe pulmonary manifestations in the macaque model. Analysis of host responses demonstrated increased immune activation in Soromba-R-infected macaques, particularly in neutrophil-activating or -potentiating proinflammatory cytokines or growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor α, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, interleukin 1β, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, as well as interleukin 5, which may be responsible for the decreased lethality and uncharacteristic clinical presentation. These results suggest that the strain of Lassa virus circulating in Mali might be less pathogenic than strains circulating in the historical region of endemicity and may result in an atypical presentation for Lassa fever, which could complicate clinical diagnosis.

  19. Sequence analysis of the ORF 7 region of transmissible gastroenteritis viruses isolated in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jeong Ho; Han, Jeong Hee; Kwon, Hyuk Moo

    2008-02-01

    Three (KT2, 133, and DAE) transmissible gastroenteritis viruses (TGEVs) were isolated from pigs suspected of having TGE in Korea. One, KT2 (KT2-L), was passaged 128 times (KT2-H) in swine testicular cells. The open reading frame 7 (ORF 7) gene from each of the four TGEVs (KT2-L, KT2-H, 133, and DAE), which is located at the 3' end of the TGEV genome, was amplified by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Amplified PCR products were cloned, sequenced, and compared with published sequences of non-Korean TGEV strains. Differences in replication and cytopathic effect (CPE) between the KT2-L and KT2-H strains in swine testicular cells were investigated. Korean TGEV field strains had 94.8-99.6% nucleotide and 92.1-98.7% amino acid sequence similarity with each other, and 87.8-100.0% nucleotide and 84.2-100.0% amino acid sequence similarity with non-Korean TGEV strains. Compared to the original KT2-L strain, the KT2-H strain differed by 2.2 and 3.9% in nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively. Specifically, the KT2-H had six nucleotide and two amino acid deletions compared to the original KT2-L strain. In phylogenetic analysis of the ORF 7 gene, Korean TGEV strains were clustered into two groups. One group (KT2-L, KT2-H, 133) was related to TGEV strains isolated in Japan. Another Korean TGEV isolate (DAE) was related to a strain from China and one from the USA. The Korean TGEV isolates appear to have evolved from a separate lineage of TGEV strain. Differences in growth rate and CPE between the KT2-L and KT2-H strains were discovered in swine testicular cells (STCs). The KT2-H strain exhibited a higher replication rate than KT2-L and produced a CPE distinctly different from that of the KT2-L strain.

  20. Tissue tropism and molecular characterization of a Japanese encephalitis virus strain isolated from pigs in southwest China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Lei; Wu, Rui; Liu, Hanyang; Wen, Xintian; Huang, Xiaobo; Wen, Yiping; Ma, Xiaoping; Yan, Qigui; Huang, Yong; Zhao, Qin; Cao, Sanjie

    2016-04-02

    Since September 2012, an epidemic has been spreading among swine in a pig farm located in Sichuan province, southwest China, which has resulted in abortion, stillbirth, and fetal mummification. The brains of stillborn pigs were collected and a previously unknown Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), namely SCYA201201, was isolated. According to the results of agarose gel diffusion precipitation, indirect immunofluorescence analysis, neutralization testing, reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) amplification, and physical and chemical testing, the virus was conformed to have the characteristics of JEV. The virus titer in BHK-21 cells was 10(8.47)PFU/ml and the median lethal dose (LD50) to 3-week-old and 7-day-old mice was 1.99 log10 and 1.02 log10 PFU/LD50, respectively. The results of tissue tropism for mice showed that the viral load in the brain was significantly higher than other organs, indicating that the isolate was strongly neurotropic. Additionally, the complete genome sequence of the isolate was determined and compared with other JEV strains. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate belongs to genotype I and may be an imported virus. The isolate had 88.4% nucleotide identity with the Chinese vaccine strain SA14-14-2. However, there were 69 amino acid substitutions compared with the strain SA14-14-2. Some substitutions indicated that SCYA201201 was highly neurovirulent and infective, in accordance with the results of animal testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hepatitis C virus infection in haemodialysis: the 'no-isolation' policy should not be generalized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Sanjay Kumar; Dash, Suresh Chand; Gupta, Sanjay; Pandey, Ravinder Mohan

    2009-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the most common blood-borne viral infection in haemodialysis. It causes significant morbidity and long-term mortality. Practice of universal precautions has been reported to be sufficient to prevent HCV seroconversion in dialysis units. However, the seroconversion rate remains very high in many dialysis units. A previous study from 1995 to 1998 at our own hospital without isolation showed that nosocomial transmission is the major cause of HCV seroconversion. The present study was therefore conducted with the aim to study the impact of isolation on HCV seroconversion. In this prospective cohort study, with non-probability consecutive sampling, patients with HCV infection were dialysed in an isolated room. In addition, standard universal precautions were practiced. HCV seroconversion rate was compared with the previous study. All patients with end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) admitted to our hospital for renal replacement therapy were included in the present study. At the time of admission, HCV screening was done. All anti-HCV-positive patients were dialysed in an isolated room. While on maintenance haemodialysis, all patients were monthly tested for anti-HCV, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase. Any patient who had HCV seroconversion was transferred to an isolated room for maintenance haemodialysis. Patients with HCV infection were managed by further testing for HCV-RNA and liver biopsy. Every patient who ultimately received renal transplantation at our hospital was also tested for HCV just prior to renal transplantation as well as 3 months after renal transplantation. HCV infection was diagnosed by detecting anti-HCV antibodies using an ELISA-based third-generation diagnostic test kit. Serum bilirubin, aspartate aminotransferase and alanine aminotransferase were assayed using standard laboratory techniques. From March 2003 to February 2006, 1,417 patients were admitted for haemodialysis in our unit. Of these 1

  2. Genotyping of Cucumber mosaic virus isolates in western New York State during epidemic years: Characterization of an emergent plant virus population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Jeremy R; Langenhan, Jamie L; Fuchs, Marc; Perry, Keith L

    2015-12-02

    In the early 2000s an epidemic of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) spread within the Midwestern and Eastern US affecting snap and dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivation. Fifty one CMV isolates from this period were partially characterized from varied hosts by sequencing a section from each of the three genomic RNAs. Aside from one subgroup II strain from pepper, all isolates, including those from snap bean, fell within the IA subgroup. The nucleotide sequence diversity of virus populations sampled at multiple sites and at different years was significantly higher than that of a population from single site in a single year, although in general the number of polymorphisms was low (pepper infecting isolates. Infection by Bn57 in snap bean had a significant effect on pod number and mass with a 55 and 41 percent reduction in greenhouse assays, respectively. To our knowledge Bn57 is the first CMV strain isolated from P. vulgaris to be fully sequenced and cloned, providing a useful tool for analyses of CMV-host interactions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Pathology and Virus Distribution in the Lung and Lymphoid Tissues of Pigs Experimentally Inoculated with Three Distinct Type 1 PRRS Virus Isolates of Varying Pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, S B; Frossard, J P; Pallares, F J; Gough, J; Stadejek, T; Graham, S P; Steinbach, F; Drew, T W; Salguero, F J

    2016-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) continues to be the most economically important disease of swine worldwide. The appearance of highly pathogenic PRRS virus (PRRSV) strains in Europe and Asia has raised concerns about this disease and initiated increased efforts to understand the pathogenesis. In this study, we have compared the pathology and the virus distribution in tissues of pigs experimentally inoculated with three different genotype 1 PRRSV isolates. Sixty 5-week-old pigs were inoculated intranasally with a) the Lelystad virus (LV), b) a field strain from the UK causing respiratory clinical signs (UK) or c) a highly pathogenic strain from Belarus (BE). Sixteen animals were mock-infected and used as controls. The animals were euthanized at 3, 7 and 35 days post-infection (dpi), and lung and lymphoid tissues collected for histopathological examination and PRRSV detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Histopathological lesions consisted of interstitial pneumonia with mononuclear cell infiltrates in the lungs, lymphoid depletion, apoptosis and follicular hyperplasia in the spleen, lymph nodes and tonsil and lymphoid depletion in the thymus. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus was detected mainly in monocytes-macrophages. BE-infected animals showed the highest pathological scores and the highest presence of virus at 3 and 7 dpi, followed by the UK field strain and then LV. Moderate lesions were observed at 35 dpi with lesser detection of PRRSV by IHC in each infected group. The highly pathogenic BE strain induced more severe pathology in both lungs and lymphoid organs of pigs compared with the classic field isolate and the prototype LV. The increased severity of pathology was in correlation with the presence of a higher number of PRRSV-infected cells in the tissues. © 2014 Crown copyright. This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO/Queen‘s Printer for Scotland and Animal and Plant Health Agency.

  4. Full genome sequences and molecular characterization of tick-borne encephalitis virus strains isolated from human patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formanová, Petra; Černý, Jiří; Bolfíková, Barbora Černá; Valdés, James J; Kozlova, Irina; Dzhioev, Yuri; Růžek, Daniel

    2015-02-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), one of the most important human neuroinfections across Eurasia. Up to date, only three full genome sequences of human European TBEV isolates are available, mostly due to difficulties with isolation of the virus from human patients. Here we present full genome characterization of an additional five low-passage TBEV strains isolated from human patients with severe forms of TBE. These strains were isolated in 1953 within Central Bohemia in the former Czechoslovakia, and belong to the historically oldest human TBEV isolates in Europe. We demonstrate here that all analyzed isolates are distantly phylogenetically related, indicating that the emergence of TBE in Central Europe was not caused by one predominant strain, but rather a pool of distantly related TBEV strains. Nucleotide identity between individual sequenced TBEV strains ranged from 97.5% to 99.6% and all strains shared large deletions in the 3' non-coding region, which has been recently suggested to be an important determinant of virulence. The number of unique amino acid substitutions varied from 3 to 9 in individual isolates, but no characteristic amino acid substitution typical exclusively for all human TBEV isolates was identified when compared to the isolates from ticks. We did, however, correlate that the exploration of the TBEV envelope glycoprotein by specific antibodies were in close proximity to these unique amino acid substitutions. Taken together, we report here the largest number of patient-derived European TBEV full genome sequences to date and provide a platform for further studies on evolution of TBEV since the first emergence of human TBE in Europe. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification and genome characterization of genotype B and genotype C bovine parainfluenza type 3 viruses isolated in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, John D; Ridpath, Julia F; Valayudhan, Binu T

    2015-05-15

    Bovine parainfluenza 3 viruses (BPI3V) are respiratory pathogens of cattle that cause disease singly but are often associated with bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC) in conjunction with other viral and bacterial agents. Bovine vaccines currently contain BPI3V to provide protection against the virus, but there is no current information regarding the BPI3V strains that are circulating in the U.S. A project was initiated to sequence archival BPI3V isolates to study viral evolution over time. This was done with a deep sequencing protocol that generated sequences of multiple RNA virus genomes simultaneously. Analysis of the BPI3V sequences revealed that, in addition to the genotype A (BPI3Va) viruses previously described in the United States, there were two additional genotypes of BPI3V circulating that had been described only in Australia (BPI3Vb) and Asia (BPI3Vc). The U.S. BPI3Vb and BPI3Vc isolates showed some divergence from the Australian and Asian strains; the BPI3Vb were 93 % similar to the Australian Q5592 strain and the BPI3Vc viruses were 98 % similar to the 12Q061 strain that was described in South Korea. Overall, the three genotypes were 82 to 84 % identical to each other and 80 % identical to the most similar human PI3V. Cross-neutralization studies using an APHIS/NVSL BPI3V reference serum showed that neutralization titers against the genotype B and C viruses were 4- to ≥16-fold less then the titer against the APHIS BPI3Va reference strain, SF-4. This study clearly demonstrated that BPI3Vb and BPI3Vc strains, previously thought to be foreign to the U.S., are indeed circulating in domestic livestock herds. Based on virus neutralization using polyclonal antisera, there were antigenic differences between viruses from these genotypes and the BPI3Va viruses that are included in currently marketed bovine vaccines. Further study of these viruses is warranted to determine pathogenic potential and cross-protection afforded by vaccination.

  6. Comparison of the complete sequences of three different isolates of Pepino mosaic virus: size variability of the TGBp3 protein between tomato and L. peruvianum isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, C; Soler, S; Nuez, F

    2005-03-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the genomes of two Spanish isolates (LE-2000 and LE-2002) from tomato and one Peruvian isolate (LP-2001) from Lycopersicon peruvianum of the Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) were determined. The tomato isolates share identities higher than 99%, while the genome of LP-2001 had mean nucleotide identities of 95.6% to 96.0% with tomato isolates. The predicted amino acid sequences showed similarities ranging between 95.2% and 100% with TGBp3 and TGBp2 and CP proteins, respectively. In LP-2001 two main differences were found with respect to the tomato isolates; (i) the 5' untranslated region (UTR) was 2 nt shorter by deletion at position 12-13 and it had some polymorphims at the putative promoter sequence reported for PepMV tomato isolates and other potexviruses, which could be functionally significant for RNA replication, and (ii) the TGBp3 protein had two extra amino acids in the C-terminal region.

  7. Differential Neurovirulence of African and Asian Genotype Zika Virus Isolates in Outbred Immunocompetent Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggal, Nisha K; Ritter, Jana M; McDonald, Erin M; Romo, Hannah; Guirakhoo, Farshad; Davis, Brent S; Chang, Gwong-Jen J; Brault, Aaron C

    2017-11-01

    Although first isolated almost 70 years ago, Zika virus (ZIKV; Flavivirus, Flaviviridae) has only recently been associated with significant outbreaks of disease in humans. Several severe ZIKV disease manifestations have also been recently documented, including fetal malformations, such as microcephaly, and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. Although principally transmitted by mosquitoes, sexual transmission of ZIKV has been documented. Recent publications of several interferon receptor knockout mouse models have demonstrated ZIKV-induced disease. Herein, outbred immunocompetent CD-1/ICR adult mice were assessed for susceptibility to disease by intracranial (i.c.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) inoculation with the Ugandan prototype strain (MR766; African genotype), a low-passage Senegalese strain (DakAr41524; African genotype) and a recent ZIKV strain isolated from a traveler infected in Puerto Rico (PRVABC59; Asian genotype). Morbidity was not observed in mice inoculated by the i.p. route with either MR766 or PRVABC59 for doses up to 6 log10 PFU. In contrast, CD-1/ICR mice inoculated i.c. with the MR766 ZIKV strain exhibited an 80-100% mortality rate that was age independent. The DakAr41524 strain delivered by the i.c route caused 30% mortality, and the Puerto Rican ZIKV strain failed to elicit mortality but did induce a serum neutralizing immune response in 60% of mice. These data provide a potential animal model for assessing neurovirulence determinants of different ZIKV strains as well as a potential immunocompetent challenge model for assessing protective efficacy of vaccine candidates.

  8. Hepatitis B Virus Genotype D Isolates Circulating in Chapeco, Southern Brazil, Originate from Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Souza Gusatti

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus genotype A1 (HBV/A1, of African origin, is the most prevalent genotype in Brazil, while HBV/F predominates in the other South American countries. However, HBV/D is the most common in the three states of southern Brazil, where 'islands' of elevated prevalence, as Chapecó and other cities, have been described. In this study, 202 HBV chronic carriers attending in 2013 the viral hepatitis ambulatory of Chapecó, were investigated. In comparison with previous studies performed in the same ambulatory, a rapid aging of the HBV infected population was observed (mean age of the newly diagnosed patients increasing from 29.9 ± 10.3 years in 1996 to 44.4 ± 13.3 years in 2013, probably due to a singular vaccination schedule at Chapecó that included not only children but also adolescents. Phylogenetic and BLAST analyses (S region classified 91 HBV isolates into genotypes A (n = 3 and D (n = 88. The majority of HBV/D isolates were closely related to D3 sequences. To understand the reasons for the absence or near absence of genotypes A and F, and how HBV/D was introduced in the south of Brazil, HBV/D infected patients were inquired about their genealogical and geographical origins. Forty-three (52% patients have their four grandparents of Italian origin, vs. seven (8% who have their four grandparents of Brazilian origin. At all, 65 out of 83 (78% patients had at least one grandparent originating from Italy. Taking into consideration the fact that Italy is one of the few countries where subgenotype D3 is predominant, the results strongly suggested that HBV/D was introduced in Brazil through Italian immigration which culminated between 1870 and 1920.

  9. Genetic characterisation of novel, highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N6 viruses isolated in birds, South Korea, November 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si, Young-Jae; Lee, In Won; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Young-Il; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Park, Su-Jin; Nguyen, Hiep Dinh; Kim, Se Mi; Kwon, Jin-Jung; Choi, Won-Suk; Beak, Yun Hee; Song, Min-Suk; Kim, Chul-Joong; Webby, Richard J; Choi, Young-Ki

    2017-01-05

    A novel genotype of H5N6 influenza viruses was isolated from migratory birds in South Korea during November 2016. Domestic outbreaks of this virus were associated with die-offs of wild birds near reported poultry cases in Chungbuk province, central South Korea. Genetic analysis and animal studies demonstrated that the Korean H5N6 viruses are highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses and that these viruses are novel reassortants of at least three different subtypes (H5N6, H4N2 and H1N1). This article is copyright of The Authors, 2017.

  10. Detection and molecular characterization of double-stranded RNA viruses in Philippine Trichomonas vaginalis isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera, Windell L.; Christine Aubrey C. Justo; Relucio-San Diego, Mary Ann Cielo V.; Loyola, Lorenz M.

    2017-01-01

    Background/Purpose: The flagellated protozoon Trichomonas vaginalis that parasitizes the urogenital tract of humans was reported to harbor double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) viruses. These viruses, identified as Trichomonas vaginalis virus (TVV), belong to the genus Trichomonasvirus of the family Totiviridae. Four species, formally recognized by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (ICTV), have been reported and distinguished by pairwise comparisons of the sequences of genes coding for...

  11. Characterization of Pseudomonas aeruginosa phage KPP21 belonging to family Podoviridae genus N4-like viruses isolated in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigehisa, Ryu; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Kato, Shin-Ichiro; Takemura-Uchiyama, Iyo; Yamaguchi, Kotoe; Miyata, Reina; Ujihara, Takako; Sakaguchi, Yoshihiko; Okamoto, Noriaki; Shimakura, Hidekatsu; Daibata, Masanori; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Shigenobu

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) belonging to the family Podoviridae genus N4-like viruses have been used as therapeutic agent in phage therapy against Pseudomonas aeruginosa infections. P. aeruginosa phage KPP21 was isolated in Japan, and phylogenetically investigated the phages belonging to this viral genus. Morphological and genetic analyses confirmed that phage KPP21 belongs to the family Podoviridae genus N4-like viruses. Moreover, phylogenetic analyses based on putative DNA polymerase and major virion protein showed that P. aeruginosa phages belonging to the genus N4-like viruses are separated into two lineages and that phage KPP21 is in the same clade as phage LUZ7. © 2015 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Natural infection of the redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus with presumptive spawner-isolated mortality virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, L; McElnea, C

    2000-04-20

    Crayfish farmers reported reduced tolerance of stress in specimens of Cherax quadricarinatus, which were formerly robust crayfish. Furthermore, one farmer reported a large reduction in yield with final harvest only equaling the stocking weight. Upon trapping, one-third of the crayfish regularly died overnight and a further one-third died on the sorting tray during sexing of juveniles (approximately 3 mo old). Histopathological examination revealed very light (1 or 2 cells per section) infections with Cherax giardiavirus and sometimes mild atrophy of hepatopancreatic cells. Gene probe analysis with a DIG-labeled spawner-isolated mortality virus (SMV) probe demonstrated extensive positive signals in nuclei of many tissues. The hepatopancreas, the midgut, glands associated with the midgut, the epithelium of seminal ducts and follicle cells surrounding oocytes gave the strongest positive signals. Nuclei of the heart, haemocytes, connective tissue and subcutis gave positive signals in some individuals. Although signals were intense and extensive, cytolysis of infected cells was very limited. The possibility of cross infections of SMV between prawns and freshwater crayfish is of international quarantine significance.

  13. Molecular epidemiology of rabies virus isolated of herbivores from Brazilian Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haila Chagas Peixoto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Rabies virus samples (n = 17 isolated from bovines (n = 11, equines (n = 4 and buffalo (n = 2 from Pará State (n = 7, Tocantins (n = 6 and Rondônia (n = 4 were submitted to RT-PCR in order to obtain partial sequences of nucleoprotein (N and glycoprotein gene (G. Nucleotide sequences were analyzed using Neighbor-Joining model, Kimura 2-parameters evolutionary model. All the 17 samples analyzed were related to cluster A, lineage associated with the hematophagous bat Desmodus rotundus. The phylogenetic analysis based on the N and G genes, suggests the presence of five sub-lineages (A1-A5, while G gene showed seven sub-lineages (A1-A7. In both phylogenies, sublineages A1 to A3 exhibit a similar composition and geographic distribution. Diverse composition of remaining groups of N and G gene is attributable to different sequences used in the alignments for each genomic region. Glycoprotein amino acid sequence showed molecular markers in sub-lineages A2, A3, A4 and A7. This information provides a better comprehension of molecular epidemiology of rabies, starting with the knowledge of viral lineages circulating in the Brazilian Amazon.

  14. Genetic characterisation and analysis of infectious bronchitis virus isolated from Brazilian flocks between 2010 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Claudia; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Santander Parra, Silvana H; Nuñez, Luis F N; Penzes, Zoltan; Chacón, Jorge L; Sesti, Luiz; Chacón, Ruy D; Piantino Ferreira, Antonio J

    2017-12-01

    1. Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) variants in Brazil were isolated during 2010-2015 for epidemiological and molecular analysis to characterise the different variants and perform a bioinformatic analysis to compare with sequences of variants collected over the previous 40 years. 2. Of the 453 samples examined, 61.4% were positive for IBV and 75.9% of these were considered to have the BR-I genotype and were detected in birds of all ages distributed in all five Brazilian regions. 3. The ratio of non-synonymous substitutions per non-synonymous site (dN) to synonymous substitutions per synonymous site (dS), i.e. dN/dS, revealed a predominance of codons with non-synonymous substitutions in the first third of the S1 gene and a dN/dS ratio of 0.67. Additionally, prediction of N-glycosylation sites showed that most of the BR-I variants (from 2003 to early 2014) had an extra site at amino acid position 20, whereas the newest variants lacked this extra site. 4. These results suggest that Brazilian IBV variants probably underwent drastic mutations at various points between 1983 and 2003 and that the selection processes became silent after achieving a sufficiently effective antigenic structure for invasion and replication in their hosts. Brazilian IBV genotype BR-I is currently the predominant genotype circulating in Brazil and South America.

  15. Detection of potato leafroll virus isolated from potato fields in Tehran ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-04-19

    Apr 19, 2010 ... The surveys conducted during 2006 and 2007 revealed the infection of the virus in potato fields in ... Potato leafroll virus (PLRV), a species of the genus Pole- ..... Potato leafroll virus. In: Hooker WJ (Ed),. Compendium of potato diseases, The American Phytopathological. Society, St. Paul, MN, pp. 68-70.

  16. A Tomato necrotic dwarf virus isolate from Datura with poor transmissibility by the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato necrotic dwarf virus (ToNDV); genus Torradovirus, is a whitefly-transmitted virus that caused significant losses for tomato production in the Imperial Valley of California during the 1980s. The virus causes severe stunting, dwarfing of leaves, foliar and fruit necrosis, and greatly reduced f...

  17. Complete nucleotide sequences of seven soybean mosaic viruses (SMV), isolated from wild soybeans (Glycine soja) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yun-Xia; Wu, Mian; Ma, Fang-Fang; Chen, Jian-Qun; Wang, Bin

    2017-03-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is a devastating plant virus classified in the family Potyviridae, and known to infect cultivated soybeans (Glycine max). In this study, seven new SMVs were isolated from wild soybean samples and analyzed by whole-genome sequencing. An updated SMV phylogeny was built with the seven new and 83 known SMV genomic sequences. Results showed that three northeastern SMV isolates were distributed in clade III and IV, while four southern SMVs were grouped together in clade II and all contained a recombinant BCMV fragment (~900 bp) in the upstream part of the genome. This work revealed that wild soybeans in China also act as important SMV hosts and play a role in the transmission and diversity of SMVs.

  18. The first outbreak of eastern equine encephalitis in Vermont: outbreak description and phylogenetic relationships of the virus isolate.

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    Kali D Saxton-Shaw

    Full Text Available The first known outbreak of eastern equine encephalitis (EEE in Vermont occurred on an emu farm in Rutland County in 2011. The first isolation of EEE virus (EEEV in Vermont (VT11 was during this outbreak. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that VT11 was most closely related to FL01, a strain from Florida isolated in 2001, which is both geographically and temporally distinct from VT11. EEEV RNA was not detected in any of the 3,905 mosquito specimens tested, and the specific vectors associated with this outbreak are undetermined.

  19. Susceptibility of juvenile sole Solea senegalensis to marine isolates of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus from wild and farmed fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Vázquez, C; Conde, M; Dopazo, C P; Barja, J L; Bandín, I

    2011-01-21

    The susceptibility of sole Solea senegalensis to infection with 3 viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) strains obtained from wild Greenland halibut Reinhardtius hippoglossoides and farmed turbot Psetta maxima was demonstrated. Fish were infected by an intraperitoneal (i.p.), immersion or cohabitational route, and maintained at 16 degrees C. Infection trials showed that VHSV isolates were pathogenic for sole fingerlings by i.p. injection and waterborne exposure causing moderate levels of mortality (10 to 55%). In addition, the mortality observed in fish cohabitating with i.p.-infected sole confirms horizontal transmission of the virus. However, the low rates of mortality registered in this challenge suggest that there is a low dissemination of virus by the i.p.-infected sole, which results in lower secondary challenge of the cohabitating fish. External signs of disease included haemorrhaging of the ventral area and ascitic fluid in the body cavity. Dead fish were tested for VHSV by both cell culture and RT-PCR assay, using pools of kidney and spleen from 10 individuals. Virus was recovered from most of the pools composed of dead fish. The results obtained in this study not only demonstrate the susceptibility of sole to the VHSV strains employed but also indicate that wild VHSV marine isolates represent a potential risk for sole aquaculture.

  20. Susceptibility of a fetal tongue cell line derived from bighorn sheep to five serotypes of bluetongue virus and its potential for the isolation of viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, A E; Montague, S R; Dotson, J F; Jessup, D A; DeForge, J R

    1989-07-01

    A cell line (BHFTE) was derived from a tongue explant of a bighorn sheep fetus (Ovis canadensis nelsoni). The cells have been maintained through 23 serial passages, and the modal number of chromosomes was calculated to be 55. Monolayer cultures were shown to be susceptible to various viruses, including bluetongue virus (BTV). Of 5 BTV serotypes (2, 10, 11, 13, and 17) tested, each produced a cytopathic effect (CPE) on initial passage at 33 C. A field isolate (serotype 10) of BTV from a black-tailed deer (Odocoileus hemionus columbianus) in its second passage in Vero-M cells also produced CPE when inoculated into BHFTE cells. Antigens of BTV were demonstrated by direct immunofluorescence in the cytoplasm of BHFTE cells inoculated with homogenates of chicken embryos injected with clinical specimens from a domestic sheep and an Arabian oryx (Oryx gazella leucoryx). A suspension of BTV-infected gnats (Culicoides spp.) produced CPE and BTV-specific fluorescence on the first passage in cells inoculated with a suspension of blood from sheep experimentally infected with BTV. Additionally, selected bovine viruses induced CPE in the cells. The cell line, which is free of mycoplasma and bovine viral diarrhea virus contamination, may be useful in diagnostic medicine and research involving the ruminant species.

  1. Isolation of porcine circovirus-like viruses from pigs with a wasting disease in the USA and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, G M; McNeilly, F; Kennedy, S; Daft, B; Clarke, E G; Ellis, J A; Haines, D M; Meehan, B M; Adair, B M

    1998-01-01

    Samples of lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, and lymph node from pigs with postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome from California (USA) and samples of mesenteric lymph nodes from similarly diseased pigs from Brittany (France) were examined by light microscopy, in situ hybridization (ISH), and/or virus isolation. Whole genomic probes for porcine circovirus (PCV) and chicken anemia virus (CAV) were used for ISH. Tissue homogenate supernatants were inoculated onto PK/15 cells for virus isolation, and the presence of viral antigen and viral particles was verified by indirect immunofluorescence, ISH, and electron microscopy. Histologic examination of lung from pigs from California revealed interstitial pneumonia, alveolar epithelial hyperplasia, and basophilic nuclear and cytoplasmic inclusions in mononuclear cell infiltrates and various pulmonary epithelial cells. Granulomatous lymphadenitis with syncytial cells typified the lesions seen in the pigs from France. PCV-like nucleic acid was detected by ISH in lung, pancreas, lymph node, kidney, and liver in pigs from California. Positive signal was also obtained in lymph node sections from pigs from France. Probes for CAV were consistently negative. PK/15 cell cultures inoculated with lung preparations from diseased California pigs and mesenteric lymph node preparations from pigs from France had positive fluorescence by indirect staining for PCV using pooled polyclonal pig sera and hyperimmune rabbit serum and had variable staining with a panel of 7 monoclonal antibodies specific for cell culture contaminant PCV. PCV-like nucleic acid was also detected by ISH in cell cultures. Cytopathic effect was not observed. Electron microscopic examination of inoculated cell cultures revealed 17-nm viral particles morphologically consistent with PCV. No other virus particles were observed. Although genomic analysis for the definitive identification of these viral isolates remains to be done, the evidence provided strongly

  2. Isolates of Liao ning virus from wild-caught mosquitoes in the Xinjiang province of China in 2005.

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    Xinjun Lv

    Full Text Available Liao ning virus (LNV is related to Banna virus, a known human-pathogen present in south-east Asia. Both viruses belong to the genus Seadornavirus, family Reoviridae. LNV causes lethal haemorrhage in experimentally infected mice. Twenty seven isolates of LNV were made from mosquitoes collected in different locations within the Xinjiang province of north-western China during 2005. These mosquitoes were caught in the accommodation of human patients with febrile manifestations, or in animal barns where sheep represent the main livestock species. The regions where LNV was isolated are affected by seasonal encephalitis, but are free of Japanese encephalitis (JE. Genome segment 10 (Seg-10 (encoding cell-attachment and serotype-determining protein VP10 and Seg-12 (encoding non-structural protein VP12 were sequenced for multiple LNV isolates. Phylogenetic analyses showed a less homogenous Seg-10 gene pool, as compared to segment 12. However, all of these isolates appear to belong to LNV type-1. These data suggest a relatively recent introduction of LNV into Xinjiang province, with substitution rates for LNV Seg-10 and Seg-12, respectively, of 2.29×10(-4 and 1.57×10(-4 substitutions/nt/year. These substitution rates are similar to those estimated for other dsRNA viruses. Our data indicate that the history of LNV is characterized by a lack of demographic fluctuations. However, a decline in the LNV population in the late 1980s-early 1990s, was indicated by data for both Seg-10 and Seg-12. Data also suggest a beginning of an expansion in the late 1990s as inferred from Seg-12 skyline plot.

  3. Evaluation of the Abington isolate of the gypsy moth nuclear polyhedrosis virus against a formulation of Gypchek in small field plots

    Science.gov (United States)

    R. E. Webb; M. Shapiro; J. D. Podgwaite; D. D. Cohen; R. L. Ridgway

    1991-01-01

    The "Abington" isolate of the nuclear polyhedrosis virus (NPV) of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) was compared with a formulation of Gypchek against a natural gypsy moth population in the Swallow Falls State Forest in Garrett County, MD.

  4. Ring test evaluation of the detection of influenza A virus in swine oral fluids by real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and virus isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The probability of detecting influenza A virus (IAV) in oral fluid (OF) specimens was calculated for each of 13 real-time, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) and 7 virus isolation (VI) assays. To conduct the study, OF was inoculated with H1N1 or H3N2 IAV and serially 10-fold d...

  5. Myxoma virus M156 is a specific inhibitor of rabbit PKR but contains a loss-of-function mutation in Australian virus isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chen; Haller, Sherry L; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Rothenburg, Stefan

    2016-04-05

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a rabbit-specific poxvirus, which is highly virulent in European rabbits. The attenuation of MYXV and the increased resistance of rabbits following the release of MYXV in Australia is one of the best-documented examples of host-pathogen coevolution. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms that contribute to the restriction of MYXV infection to rabbits and MYXV attenuation in the field, we have studied the interaction of the MYXV protein M156 with the host antiviral protein kinase R (PKR). In yeast and cell-culture transfection assays, M156 only inhibited rabbit PKR but not PKR from other tested mammalian species. Infection assays with human HeLa PKR knock-down cells, which were stably transfected with human or rabbit PKR, revealed that only human but not rabbit PKR was able to restrict MYXV infection, whereas both PKRs were able to restrict replication of a vaccinia virus (VACV) strain that lacks the PKR inhibitors E3 and K3. Inactivation of M156R led to MYXV virus attenuation in rabbit cells, which was rescued by the ectopic expression of VACV E3 and K3. We further show that a mutation in the M156 encoding gene that was identified in more than 50% of MYXV field isolates from Australia resulted in an M156 variant that lost its ability to inhibit rabbit PKR and led to virus attenuation. The species-specific inhibition of rabbit PKR by M156 and the M156 loss-of-function in Australian MYXV field isolates might thus contribute to the species specificity of MYXV and to the attenuation in the field, respectively.

  6. Limited susceptibility of rhesus macaques to a cowpox virus isolated from a lethal outbreak among New World monkeys

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    K. Mätz-Rensing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to the calpox virus, an orthopoxvirus (OPXV of the Cowpox virus species (CPXV, which is uniformly lethal in common marmosets. Six rhesus monkeys were either intravenously (i.v. or intranasally (i.n. exposed to the virus. Monitoring of the macaques after viral exposure included physical examinations, the determination of viral load by real-time PCR and plaque assay, and the analysis of humoral responses. Two i.v. inoculated animals developed numerous classical pox lesions that started after inoculation at days 7 and 10. Both animals became viremic and seroconverted. They exhibited maximal numbers of lesions of approximately 50 and 140 by day 21. One animal completely recovered, while the other one suffered from a phlegmonous inflammation of a leg initially induced by a secondarily infected pox lesion and was euthanized for animal welfare reasons. In contrast to previous pathogenicity studies with the calpox virus in marmosets, none of the four animals inoculated intranasally with doses of the calpox virus exceeding those used in marmosets by orders of magnitude showed typical clinical symptoms. No viral DNA was detectable in the blood of those animals, but three animals seroconverted. In two of these three animals, infectious virus was sporadically isolated from saliva. This indicates that rhesus monkeys are less susceptible to calpox virus infection, which limits their use in further intervention studies with OPXV.

  7. CHARACTERISTICS OF VIRAL PROTEIN, VP-15, OF WHITESPOT SYNDROME VIRUS ISOLATED FROM INFECTED TIGER SHRIMP Penaeus monodon (Fabricius, 1798

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    Andi Parenrengi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available White spot syndrome virus (WSSV has caused mass mortality on tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon culture and adversely affects prawn industry worldwide including Indonesia. It is well known that the protein structure of WSSV plays an important role in the virus infection and morphogenesis process. A viral protein structure called VP-15 is located in the nucleocapsid of virion virus. The protein structure involves in the life cycle of WSSV in host cells. A gene encoding VP-15 could be involved in constructing the RNA interference (RNAi, so it is needed to isolate and characterize for RNAi technology purpose. The study was aimed to isolate and characterize the VP-15 from the infected WSSV tiger shrimp. The characterization of VP-15 was undertaken through assessment of nucleotide sequence, amino acid deduction, alignment nucleotide/protein searches using Genetyx and BLAST program, and dendrogram construction analysis. The results showed that VP-15 was successfully isolated in form of ORFDNA with a fragment size of 243 bp. The phylogenetic tree analysis revealed three clusters corresponding to the time (year of isolates collection. The VP-15 consisted of 80 amino acids, two start codons (ATG, one stop codon (TAA, and one Kozak context (AAAATGG. Hydrophilic amino acid was the highest composition (44.2%, followed by neutral (31.2% and hydrophobic (24.6% amino acid groups. The VP-15 was rich in amino acid of lysine (21.3%, arginine (22.9% and serine (24.6%. The successful isolation of VP-15 is a very important step in providing a basic yet suitable material in constructing the dsRNA vaccine to control shrimp diseases in aquaculture.

  8. Evaluation of homologous inactivated influenza vaccine for protection of chickens against the H7N9 virus isolated in Anhui, China during 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent outbreak of avian influenza (AI) H7N9 in humans in China in 2013 has resulted in approximately 30 % mortality. The genetic composition of these H7N9 viruses appears to be solely of avian origin. Although few isolations of these viruses have been demonstrated on poultry farms, the correlat...

  9. Efficacy of inactivated influenza vaccines for protection of poultry against the H7N9 low pathogenic avian influenza virus isolated in China during 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    The recent outbreak in China of avian influenza (AI) H7N9 in birds and humans underscores the interspecies movement of these viruses. Interestingly, the genetic composition of these H7N9 viruses appears to be solely of avian origin and of low pathogenicity in birds. Although few isolations of these ...

  10. Pandemic H1N1 influenza virus in Chilean commercial turkeys with genetic and serologic comparisons to U.S. H1N1 avian influenza vaccine isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beginning in April 2009, a novel H1N1 influenza virus has caused acute respiratory disease in humans, first in Mexico and then spreading around the world. The resulting pandemic influenza A H1N1 2009 (pH1N1) virus was isolated in swine in Canada in June, 2009, and later in turkey breeders in Chile, ...

  11. Virus isolation vs RT-PCR: which method is more successful in detecting VHSV and IHNV in fish tissue sampled under field conditions?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knüsel, R.; Bergmann, S. M.; Einer-Jensen, Katja

    2007-01-01

    (total of 859 fish) originating from a field survey on the occurrence of VHSV and IHNV in farmed and wild salmonids in Switzerland. These samples represented all sites with fish that were either identified as virus-positive by means of virus isolation (three sites, four positive tissue sample pools) and...

  12. Genome sequences of seven foot-and-mouth disease virus isolates collected from serial samples from one persistently infected carrier cow in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several FMDV carrier cattle were identified in Vietnam by recovery of infectious virus from oropharyngeal fluid. This report contains the first near-complete genome sequences of seven viruses isolated from a single carrier animal over the course of one year. Understanding within-host viral evolution...

  13. Nucleotide heterogeneity at the genomic 5’- and 3’-termini of California (CA) isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nucleotide (nt) sequences in the genomic ends of sense (+)-RNA viruses serve essential biological functions and are important considerations in the construction of infectious clones. Two isolates of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) from California (CA) having a T30- and a T36-genotype were inoculated in ...

  14. Stability of Citrus tristeza virus protective isolates in field conditions Estabilidade de isolados protetores contra Citrus tristeza virus em condições de campo

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    Alessandra Tenório Costa

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to monitor the maintenance of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV protective isolates stability in selected clones of 'Pêra' sweet orange (Citrus sinensis, preimmunized or naturally infected by the virus, after successive clonal propagations. The work was carried out in field conditions in the north of Paraná State, Brazil. Coat protein gene (CPG analysis of 33 isolates collected from 16 clones of 'Pêra' sweet orange was performed using single strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP. Initially, the isolates were characterized by symptoms of stem pitting observed in clones. Then viral genome was extracted and used as template for the amplification of CPG by reverse transcription polimerase chain reaction (RTPCR. RTPCR products electrophoretic profiles were analyzed using the Jaccard coefficient and the UPGMA method. The majority of the clones had weak to moderate stem pitting symptoms and its CTV isolates showed alterations in the SSCP profiles. However, the stability of the protective complex has been maintained, except for isolates from two analised clones. Low genetic variability was observed within the isolates during the studied years.O objetivo deste trabalho foi monitorar a manutenção da estabilidade de isolados protetores contra Citrus tristeza virus (CTV em clones selecionados de laranja 'Pêra' (Citrus sinensis pré-imunizados ou infectados naturalmente pelo vírus, após sucessivas propagações clonais. O trabalho foi realizado em condições de campo, no norte do Estado do Paraná. A análise do gene da capa protéica (GPC de 33 isolados, coletados de 16 clones de laranjeira 'Pêra', foi realizada com o uso da técnica polimorfismo conformacional da fita simples (SSCP. Inicialmente, os isolados foram caracterizados por meio de sintomas de caneluras observados nos clones. Em seguida, o genoma viral foi extraído e utilizado como molde para a amplificação do GCP com uso da transcrição reversa da rea

  15. Genetic diversity of early (1998) and recent (2010) avian influenza H9N2 virus strains isolated from poultry in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bashashati, Mohsen; Vasfi Marandi, Mehdi; Sabouri, Fereshteh

    2013-10-01

    Infection with avian influenza H9N2 virus is widespread in the Asian poultry industry, resulting in great economic losses due to mortality and a severe decline in egg production. To obtain more-comprehensive genomic data from circulating H9N2 viruses in Iran, we sequenced the whole genomes of early (Ck/IR/ZMT-101/98) and recent (Ck/IR/EBGV-88/10) isolates of this virus in Iran. The M and NS genes of Ck/IR/EBGV-88/10 shared a high level of similarity with a highly pathogenic H7N3 virus isolated from Pakistan. The cleavage site within the HA protein of these viruses contained two different motifs, RSSR and KSSR, which are similar to those found in low-pathogenic viruses. The deduced amino acid sequence of the new isolate contained the mutation Q226L, which is a characteristic of human-type sialic acid influenza receptor binding. An analysis of the viral amino acid sequence of the M2 protein of the recent strain revealed a V27A mutation, which is associated with amantadine resistance in avian influenza virus. The present results emphasize the need for continuous surveillance of H9N2 viruses in poultry and the human population to obtain more information about the nature and evolution of future pandemic influenza viruses.

  16. Zika and Chikungunya virus co-infection in a traveller returning from Colombia, 2016: virus isolation and genetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherabuddi, Kartikeya; Iovine, Nicole M; Shah, Kairav; White, Sarah K; Paisie, Taylor; Salemi, Marco; Morris, J Glenn; Lednicky, John A

    2016-12-01

    Zikavirus (ZIKV) and Chikungunyavirus (CHIKV) can share the same mosquito vector, and co-infections by these viruses can occur in humans. While infections with these viruses share commonalities, CHIKV is unique in causing arthritis and arthralgias that may persist for a year or more. These infections are commonly diagnosed by RT-PCR-based methods during the acute phase of infection. Even with the high specificity and sensitivity characteristic of PCR, false negatives can occur, highlighting the need for additional diagnostic methods for confirmation. On her return to the USA, a traveller to Colombia, South America developed an illness consistent with Zika, Chikungunya and/or Dengue. RT-PCR of her samples was positive only for ZIKV. However, arthralgias persisted for months, raising concerns about co-infection with CHIKV or Mayaro viruses. Cell cultures inoculated with her original clinical samples demonstrated two types of cytopathic effects, and both ZIKV and CHIKV were identified in the supernatants. On phylogenetic analyses, both viruses were found to be related to strains found in Colombia. These findings highlight the need to consider CHIKV co-infection in patients with prolonged rheumatological symptoms after diagnosis with ZIKV, and the usefulness of cell culture as an amplification step for low-viremia blood and other samples.

  17. Sequencing and sequence analysis of partial nucleoprotein (N) gene and phylogenetic analysis of rabies virus field isolates from Gujarat state, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vagheshwari, Dhaval H; Bhanderi, Bharat B; Mathakiya, Rafyuddin A; Jhala, Mayurdhvaj K

    2017-09-01

    The present study was undertaken with an aim of characterization of rabies virus (genus Lyssavirus of the family Rhabdoviridae under the order Mononegavirales) by sequencing of partial nucleoprotein (N) gene of rabies virus and phylogenetic analysis to know the genotype and lineage of rabies virus present in Gujarat state of India. A total of 32 samples (18 brain samples and 14 saliva samples) were aseptically collected from live and dead animals (viz. dog, buffalo, cow, goat, donkey and hyena) for rabies virus detection. Out of 32 samples, 24 samples were found positive by Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reactions and from these 24 positive samples, 20 samples were selected for sequencing having good concentration of gene product. ClustalW alignment of nucleotide sequences and amino acid sequences of field rabies isolates revealed 95.20-100 and 97.95-100% similarity among themselves, respectively. Multiple sequence alignment of field rabies isolates and reference vaccine strains [Pasteur strain and Challenge Virus Strain (CVS)] indicated single nucleotide mutations at total 91 positions and amino acid mutations at total 17 different positions. Phylogenetic analysis of N gene sequences using our 20 field rabies isolates and 21 other reported isolates in Genbank resulted in 3 phylogenetic clusters. All the field rabies isolates showed same genetic lineage among themselves and with other earlier reported Indian rabies isolates placing them in Arctic like lineage of Genotype 1 Rabies virus. However, they were at genetic distance with reference Pasteur and CVS strains, which grouped in different phylogenetic cluster.

  18. The First Identified Citrus tristeza virus Isolate of Turkey Contains a Mixture of Mild and Severe Strains

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    Bayram Çevik

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The presence of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV has previously been reported in citrus growing regions of Turkey. All serologically and biologically characterized isolates including Iğdır, which was the first identified CTV isolates from Turkey, were considered mild isolates. In this study, molecular characteristics of the Iğdır isolate were determined by different methods. Analysis of the Iğdır isolate by western blot and BD-RT-PCR assays showed the presence of MCA13 epitope, predominantly found in severe isolates, in the Iğdır isolate revealing that it contains a severe component. For further characterization, the coat protein (CP and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp genes representing the 3′ and 5′ half of CTV genome, respectively, were amplified from dsRNA by RT-PCR. Both genes were cloned separately and two clones for each gene were sequenced. Comparisons of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences showed that while two CP gene sequences were identical, two RdRp clones showed only 90% and 91% sequence identity in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, suggesting a mixed infection with different strains. Phylogenetic analyses of the CP and RdRp genes of Iğdır isolate with previously characterized CTV isolates from different citrus growing regions showed that the CP gene was clustered with NZRB-TH30, a resistance breaking isolate from New Zealand, clearly showing the presence of severe component. Furthermore, two different clones of the RdRp gene were clustered separately with different CTV isolates with a diverse biological activity. While the RdRp-1 was clustered with T30 and T385, two well-characterized mild isolates from Florida and Spain, respectively, the RdRp-2 was most closely related to NZRB-G90 and NZRB-TH30, two well-characterized resistance breaking and stem pitting (SP isolates from New Zealand confirming the mixed infection. These results clearly demonstrated that the Iğdır isolate, which

  19. The First Identified Citrus tristeza virus Isolate of Turkey Contains a Mixture of Mild and Severe Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevik, Bayram; Yardimci, Nejla; Korkmaz, Savaş

    2013-03-01

    The presence of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) has previously been reported in citrus growing regions of Turkey. All serologically and biologically characterized isolates including Iğdır, which was the first identified CTV isolates from Turkey, were considered mild isolates. In this study, molecular characteristics of the Iğdır isolate were determined by different methods. Analysis of the Iğdır isolate by western blot and BD-RT-PCR assays showed the presence of MCA13 epitope, predominantly found in severe isolates, in the Iğdır isolate revealing that it contains a severe component. For further characterization, the coat protein (CP) and the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) genes representing the 3' and 5' half of CTV genome, respectively, were amplified from dsRNA by RT-PCR. Both genes were cloned separately and two clones for each gene were sequenced. Comparisons of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences showed that while two CP gene sequences were identical, two RdRp clones showed only 90% and 91% sequence identity in their nucleotide and amino acid sequences, respectively, suggesting a mixed infection with different strains. Phylogenetic analyses of the CP and RdRp genes of Iğdır isolate with previously characterized CTV isolates from different citrus growing regions showed that the CP gene was clustered with NZRB-TH30, a resistance breaking isolate from New Zealand, clearly showing the presence of severe component. Furthermore, two different clones of the RdRp gene were clustered separately with different CTV isolates with a diverse biological activity. While the RdRp-1 was clustered with T30 and T385, two well-characterized mild isolates from Florida and Spain, respectively, the RdRp-2 was most closely related to NZRB-G90 and NZRB-TH30, two well-characterized resistance breaking and stem pitting (SP) isolates from New Zealand confirming the mixed infection. These results clearly demonstrated that the Iğdır isolate, which was previously

  20. Genetic analysis of H3N2 avian influenza viruses isolated from live poultry markets and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dequan; Liu, Jian; Ju, Houbin; Ge, Feifei; Wang, Jian; Li, Xin; Zhou, Jinping; Liu, Peihong

    2015-08-01

    Five H3N2 avian influenza viruses (AIVs) were isolated from live poultry markets (LPMs) and poultry slaughterhouses in Shanghai, China in 2013. All viruses were characterized by whole-genome sequencing with subsequent genetic comparison and phylogenetic analysis. The hemagglutinin cleavage site of all viruses indicated that the five strains were low-pathogenic AIVs. Phylogenetic analysis of all eight viral genes showed that the five H3N2 viruses clustered in the Eurasian lineage of influenza viruses. The eight genes showed evidence of reassortment events between these H3 subtype viruses and other subtype viruses, especially H5 and H7 subtypes, probably in pigeons, domestic ducks, and wild birds. These findings emphasized the importance of AIV surveillance in LPMs and poultry slaughterhouses for understanding the genesis and emergence of novel reassortants with pandemic potential.

  1. Population structure and diversity of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) isolates in Hunan province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Cui; Yao, Run-Xian; Li, Fang; Dai, Su-Ming; Licciardello, Grazia; Catara, Antonino; Gentile, Alessandra; Deng, Zi-Niu

    2017-02-01

    Stem-pitting (SP) is the main type of citrus tristeza virus (CTV) that causes severe damage to citrus trees, especially those of sweet orange, in Hunan province, China. Understanding the local CTV population structure should provide clues for effective mild strain cross-protection (MSCP) of the SP strain of CTV. In this study, markers for the p23 gene, multiple molecular markers (MMMs), and sequence analysis of the three silencing suppressor genes (p20, p23 and p25) were employed to analyze the genetic diversity and genotype composition of the CTV population based on 51 CTV-positive samples collected from 14 citrus orchards scattered around six major citrus-growing areas of Hunan. The results indicated that the CTV population structure was extremely complex and that infection was highly mixed. In total, p23 gene markers resulted in six profiles, and MMMs demonstrated 25 profiles. The severe VT and T3 types appeared to be predominantly associated with SP, while the mild T30 and RB types were related to asymptomatic samples. Based on phylogenetic analysis of the amino acid sequences of p20, p23 and p25, 19 representative CTV samples were classified into seven recently established CTV groups and a potentially novel one. A high level of genetic diversity, as well as potential recombination, was revealed among different CTV isolates. Five pure SP severe and two pure mild strains were identified by genotype composition analysis. Taken together, the results update the genetic diversity of CTV in Hunan with the detection of one possible novel strain, and this information might be applicable for the selection of appropriate mild CTV strains for controlling citrus SP disease through cross-protection.

  2. Characterization of Citrus tristeza virus isolates recovered in Syria and Apulia (southern Italy using different molecular tools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raied ABOU KUBAA

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Citrus tristeza virus (CTV is the causal agent of the most important virus disease of citrus. CTV isolates differing in biological and molecular characteristics have been reported worldwide. Recently, CTV was detected in Syria in citrus groves from two Governorates (Lattakia and Tartous and several CTV outbreaks have been reported in Apulia (southern Italy since 2003. To molecularly characterize the CTV populations spreading in Syria and Italy, a number of isolates from each region was selected and examined by different molecular approaches including: Multiple Molecular Markers analysis (MMM, real time RT-(qPCR, single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP of the major coat protein (CP gene (P25, and sequence analysis of the CP (P25, P18, P20 and RdRp genes. SSCP analysis of CP25 yielded two distinct simple patterns among the Syrian isolates and three different patterns in the Italian isolates. Based on MMM analysis, all Syrian CTV isolates were categorized as VT-like genotype, whereas the Italian isolates reacted only with the markers specific for the T30 genotype. These findings were also confirmed by RT-qPCR and by sequencing analysis of four genomic regions. The Italian isolates had nucleotide identities which varied: from 99.5 to 99.8 for the CP gene; from 97.4% to 98.3% for the P18 gene; from 98.6% to 99.8% for the P20 and from 97.8% to 99.1% for the partial RdRp sequenced. High sequence identity was found for all genomic regions analyzed between the Syrian isolates (from 98.9% to 99.6%. These results show that the CTV populations spreading in Apulia and Syria are associated with different genotypes, indicating different potential impacts on the citrus trees in the field. Since in both areas the introduction of the virus is relatively recent, infected plants resulted to contain a single and common genotype, suggesting that CTV is spreading from the first outbreaks by aphids or local movement of autochthonous infected plant material.

  3. Genotyping and subtyping of mumps virus isolates from the Indian subcontinent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Baijayantimala; Pujhari, Sujit Kumar; Dhiman, Vandana; Mahalakshmi, P; Bharadwaj, Abhinav; Pokhrel, Sandeep; Sharma, Deepak; Sharma, Mirnalini; Bhatia, Deepak; Ratho, Radha Kanta

    2013-11-01

    Mumps is a vaccine-preventable disease that usually occurs as a self-limiting parotitis, but it can also lead to several life-threatening complications, including pancreatitis, meningitis, and encephalitis. The molecular epidemiology of the virus is poorly understood. The present study describes an outbreak of mumps virus infection in Punjab, India. The etiology was confirmed by serology and RNA detection to be mumps virus in 72 % of the cases and 50 % of contacts. This study, for the first time, revealed the mumps virus genotypes circulating in the Indian subcontinent as subtype G2 of genotype G.

  4. DNA-A of a highly pathogenic Indian cassava mosaic virus isolated from Jatropha curcas causes symptoms in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gang; Sun, Yanwei; Xu, Ruirui; Qu, Jing; Tee, Chuansia; Jiang, Xiyuan; Ye, Jian

    2014-04-01

    Jatropha curcas mosaic disease (JcMD) is a newly emerging disease that has been reported in Africa and India. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequence of a new Indian cassava mosaic virus isolate (ICMV-SG) from Singapore. Infection of ICMV-SG showed more severe JcMD in Jatropha curcas and Nicotiana benthamiana than the other ICMV isolates reported previously, though ICMV-SG shares high sequence identity with the other ICMV isolates. Agroinfectious DNA-A alone sufficiently induced systemic symptoms in N. benthamiana, but not in J. curcas. Results from agroinfection assays showed that systemic infection of ICMV-SG in J. curcas required both DNA-A and DNA-B components.

  5. Different Pathogenesis of CCR5-Using Primary HIV-1 Isolates from Non-Switch and Switch Virus Patients in Human Lymphoid Tissue Ex Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iarlsson, Ingrid; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Chen. Silvia; Karlsson, Anders; Albert, Jan; Fenyol, Eva Maria; Margolis, Leonid B.

    2005-01-01

    CCR5-utilizing HIV-1 variants (R5) typically transmit infection and dominate its early stages, whereas emergence of CXCR4-using (X4 or R5X4) HIV-1 is often associated with disease progression. However, such a switch in co-receptor usage can only be detected in approximately onehalf of HIV-infected patients (switch virus patients), and progression to immunodeficiency may also occur in patients without detectable switch in co-receptor usage (non-switch virus patients). Here, we used a system of ex vivo-infected tonsillar tissue to compare the pathogenesis of sequential primary R5 HIV-1 isolates from the switch and non-switch patients. Inoculation of ex vivo tissue with these R5 isolates resulted in viral replication and CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cell depletion. The levels of such depletion by HIV-1 isolated from non-switch virus patients were significantly higher than those by R5 HIV-1 isolates from switch virus patients. T cell depletion seemed to be controlled by viral factors and did not significantly vary between tissues from different donors. In contrast, viral replication did not correlate with the switch status of the patients; in tissues fiom different donors it varied 30-fold and seemed to be controlled by a combination of viral and tissue factors. Nevertheless, replication-level hierarchy among sequential isolates remained constant in tissues from various donors. Viral load in vivo was higher in switch virus patients compared to non-switch virus patients. The high cytopathogenicity of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by R5 HIV-1 isolates from non-switch virus patients may explain the steady decline of CD4(+) T cells in the absence of CXCR4 using virus; elimination of target cells by these isolates may limit their own replication in vivo.

  6. More recent swine vesicular disease virus isolates retain binding to coxsackie-adenovirus receptor, but have lost the ability to bind human decay-accelerating factor (CD55).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez-Clavero, Miguel A; Escribano-Romero, Estela; Ley, Victoria; Spiller, O Brad

    2005-05-01

    Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) evolved from coxsackie B virus serotype 5 (CVB5) in the recent past, crossing the species barrier from humans to pigs. Here, SVDV isolates from early and recent outbreaks have been compared for their capacity to utilize the progenitor virus receptors coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and decay-accelerating factor (DAF; CD55). Virus titre of CVB5 and SVDV isolates It'66 and UK'72 on human HeLa cells was reduced by pre-incubation with either anti-DAF or anti-CAR antibodies; however, recent SVDV isolates R1072, R1120 and SPA'93 did not infect HeLa cells lytically. CVB5 and SVDV infection of the pig cell line IB-RS-2 was inhibited completely by anti-CAR antibodies for all isolates, and no reduction was observed following pre-incubation of cells with anti-pig DAF antibodies. Expression of human DAF in the pig cell line IB-RS-2 enhanced the virus titre of early SVDV isolates by 25-fold, but had no effect on recent SVDV isolate titre. Binding of radiolabelled CVB5 to IB-RS-2 cells was increased seven- to eightfold by expression of human DAF and binding of early SVDV isolates was increased 1.2-1.3-fold, whereas no increase in binding by recent SVDV isolates was mediated by human DAF expression. Addition of soluble hDAF-Fc inhibited CVB5, but not SVDV, infection of pig cells. Pre-incubation of all viruses with soluble hCAR-Fc blocked infection of IB-RS-2 pig cells completely; titration of the amount of soluble hCAR-Fc required to block infection revealed that early isolate UK'72 was the least susceptible to inhibition, and the most recent isolate, SPA'93, was the most susceptible.

  7. African Swine Fever Virus Georgia Isolate Harboring Deletions of MGF360 and MGF505 Genes Is Attenuated in Swine and Confers Protection against Challenge with Virulent Parental Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Vivian; Holinka, Lauren G; Gladue, Douglas P; Sanford, Brenton; Krug, Peter W; Lu, Xiqiang; Arzt, Jonathan; Reese, Bo; Carrillo, Consuelo; Risatti, Guillermo R; Borca, Manuel V

    2015-06-01

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is the etiological agent of a contagious and often lethal disease of domestic pigs that has significant economic consequences for the swine industry. The control of African swine fever (ASF) has been hampered by the unavailability of vaccines. Experimental vaccines have been developed using genetically modified live attenuated ASFVs where viral genes involved in virus virulence were removed from the genome. Multigene family 360 (MGF360) and MGF505 represent a group of genes sharing partial sequence and structural identities that have been connected with ASFV host range specificity, blocking of the host innate response, and virus virulence. Here we report the construction of a recombinant virus (ASFV-G-ΔMGF) derived from the highly virulent ASFV Georgia 2007 isolate (ASFV-G) by specifically deleting six genes belonging to MGF360 or MGF505: MGF505-1R, MGF360-12L, MGF360-13L, MGF360-14L, MGF505-2R, and MGF505-3R. ASFV-G-ΔMGF replicates as efficiently in primary swine macrophage cell cultures as the parental virus. In vivo, ASFV-G-ΔMGF is completely attenuated in swine, since pigs inoculated intramuscularly (i.m.) with either 10(2) or 10(4) 50% hemadsorbing doses (HAD50) remained healthy, without signs of the disease. Importantly, when these animals were subsequently exposed to highly virulent parental ASFV-G, no signs of the disease were observed, although a proportion of these animals harbored the challenge virus. This is the first report demonstrating the role of MGF genes acting as independent determinants of ASFV virulence. Additionally, ASFV-G-ΔMGF is the first experimental vaccine reported to induce protection in pigs challenged with highly virulent and epidemiologically relevant ASFV-G. The main problem for controlling ASF is the lack of vaccines. Studies focusing on understanding ASFV virulence led to the production of genetically modified recombinant viruses that, while attenuated, are able to confer protection in pigs

  8. Diversity of Infectious Pancreatic Necrosis Virus Strains Isolated from Fish, Shellfish, and Other Reservoirs in Northwestern Spain†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrin, J. M.; Olveira, J. G.; Barja, J. L.; Dopazo, C. P.

    2000-01-01

    A comparison was done of 231 strains of birnavirus isolated from fish, shellfish, and other reservoirs in a survey study that began in 1986 in Galicia (northwestern Spain). Reference strains from all of the infectious pancreatic necrosis virus serotypes were included in the comparison, which was done by neutralization tests and agarose and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the viral genome. The neutralization tests with antisera against the West Buxton, Spajarup (Sp), and Abild (Ab) strains showed that most of the Galician isolates were European types Sp and Ab; however, many isolates (30%) could not be typed. Results from agarose gels did not provided information for grouping of the strains, since all were found to have genomic segments of similar sizes. Analysis of polyacrylamide gels, however, allowed six electropherogroups (EGs) to be differentiated on the basis of genome mobility and separation among segments, and a certain relationship between EGs and serotypes was observed. A wide diversity of electropherotypes was observed among the Galician isolates, and as neutralization tests showed, most of the isolates were included in EGs corresponding to European types Ab and Sp. Only 6.5% of the isolates had the electropherotype characteristic of American strains. PMID:10653762

  9. A molecular and antigenic survey of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates from smallholder duck farms in Central Java, Indonesia during 2007-2008

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    Junaidi Akhmad

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indonesia is one of the countries most severely affected by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus in terms of poultry and human health. However, there is little information on the diversity of H5N1 viruses circulating in backyard farms, where chickens and ducks often intermingle. In this study, H5N1 virus infection occurring in 96 smallholder duck farms in central Java, Indonesia from 2007-2008 was investigated and the molecular and antigenic characteristics of H5N1 viruses isolated from these farms were analysed. Results All 84 characterised viruses belonged to H5N1 clade 2.1 with three virus sublineages being identified: clade 2.1.1 (1, clade 2.1.3 (80, and IDN/6/05-like viruses (3 that did not belong to any of the present clades. All three clades were found in ducks, while only clade 2.1.3 was isolated from chickens. There were no significant amino acid mutations of the hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA sites of the viruses, including the receptor binding, glycosylation, antigenic and catalytic sites and NA inhibitor targets. All the viruses had polybasic amino acids at the HA cleavage site. No evidence of major antigenic variants was detected. Based on the HA gene, identical virus variants could be found on different farms across the study sites and multiple genetic variants could be isolated from HPAI outbreaks simultaneously or at different time points from single farms. HPAI virus was isolated from both ducks and chickens; however, the proportion of surviving duck cases was considerably higher than in chickens. Conclusions The 2.1.3 clade was the most common lineage found in this study. All the viruses had sequence characteristic of HPAI, but negligible variations in other recognized amino acids at the HA and NA proteins which determine virus phenotypes. Multiple genetic variants appeared to be circulating simultaneously within poultry communities. The high proportion of live duck cases compared to

  10. A molecular and antigenic survey of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus isolates from smallholder duck farms in Central Java, Indonesia during 2007-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibawa, Hendra; Henning, Joerg; Wong, Frank; Selleck, Paul; Junaidi, Akhmad; Bingham, John; Daniels, Peter; Meers, Joanne

    2011-09-07

    Indonesia is one of the countries most severely affected by H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) virus in terms of poultry and human health. However, there is little information on the diversity of H5N1 viruses circulating in backyard farms, where chickens and ducks often intermingle. In this study, H5N1 virus infection occurring in 96 smallholder duck farms in central Java, Indonesia from 2007-2008 was investigated and the molecular and antigenic characteristics of H5N1 viruses isolated from these farms were analysed. All 84 characterised viruses belonged to H5N1 clade 2.1 with three virus sublineages being identified: clade 2.1.1 (1), clade 2.1.3 (80), and IDN/6/05-like viruses (3) that did not belong to any of the present clades. All three clades were found in ducks, while only clade 2.1.3 was isolated from chickens. There were no significant amino acid mutations of the hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) sites of the viruses, including the receptor binding, glycosylation, antigenic and catalytic sites and NA inhibitor targets. All the viruses had polybasic amino acids at the HA cleavage site. No evidence of major antigenic variants was detected. Based on the HA gene, identical virus variants could be found on different farms across the study sites and multiple genetic variants could be isolated from HPAI outbreaks simultaneously or at different time points from single farms. HPAI virus was isolated from both ducks and chickens; however, the proportion of surviving duck cases was considerably higher than in chickens. The 2.1.3 clade was the most common lineage found in this study. All the viruses had sequence characteristic of HPAI, but negligible variations in other recognized amino acids at the HA and NA proteins which determine virus phenotypes. Multiple genetic variants appeared to be circulating simultaneously within poultry communities. The high proportion of live duck cases compared to chickens over the study period suggests that ducks are

  11. Lack of detection of host associated differences in Newcastle disease viruses of genotype VIId isolated from chickens and geese

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    Wang Yuyang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The goose is usually considered to be resistant even to strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV that are markedly virulent for chickens. However, ND outbreaks have been frequently reported in goose flocks in China since the late 1990s with the concurrent emergence of genotype VIId NDV in chickens. Although the NDVs isolated from both chickens and geese in the past 15 years have been predominantly VIId viruses, published data comparing goose- and chicken-originated ND viruses are scarce and controversial. Results In this paper, we compared genotype VIId NDVs originated from geese and chickens genetically and pathologically. Ten entire genomic sequences and 329 complete coding sequences of individual genes from genotype VIId NDVs of both goose- and chicken-origin were analyzed. We then randomly selected two goose-originated and two chicken-originated VIId NDVs and compared their pathobiology in both geese and chickens in vivo and in vitro with genotype IV virus Herts/33 as a reference. The results showed that all the VIId NDVs either from geese or from chickens shared high sequence homology and characteristic amino acid substitutions and clustered together in phylogenetic trees. In addition, geese and chickens infected by goose or chicken VIId viruses manifested very similar pathological features distinct from those of birds infected with Herts/33. Conclusions There is no genetic or phenotypic difference between genotype VIId NDVs originated from geese and chickens. Therefore, no species-preference exists for either goose or chicken viruses and more attention should be paid to the trans-species transmission of VIId NDVs between geese and chickens for the control and eradication of ND.

  12. Complete Genome Sequences of Mumps and Measles Virus Isolates from Three States in the United States.

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    Magaña, Laura C; Espinosa, Alex; Marine, Rachel L; Ng, Terry Fei Fan; Castro, Christina J; Montmayeur, Anna M; Hacker, Jill K; Scott, Samantha; Whyte, Thomas; Bankamp, Bettina; Oberste, M Steven; Rota, Paul A

    2017-08-17

    We report here the full coding sequence of nine paramyxovirus genomes, including two full-length mumps virus genomes (genotypes G and H) and seven measles virus genomes (genotypes B3 and D4, D8, and D9), from respiratory samples of patients from California, Virginia, and Alabama obtained between 2010 and 2014.

  13. Isolation and Genomic Sequence of Hepatitis A Virus from Mixed Frozen Berries in Italy

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    Chiapponi, Chiara; Pavoni, Enrico; Bertasi, Barbara; Baioni, Laura; Scaltriti, Erika; Chiesa, Edoardo; Cianti, Luca; Losio, Marina Nadia; Pongolini, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) was detected in two samples of mixed frozen berries linked to Italian hepatitis A outbreak in April and September 2013. Both viruses were fully sequenced by next-generation sequencing and the genomes clustered with HAV complete genomes of sub-genotype IA with nucleotide identities of 95–97 %.

  14. Isolation and genomic sequence of hepatitis A virus from mixed frozen berries in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiapponi, Chiara; Pavoni, Enrico; Bertasi, Barbara; Baioni, Laura; Scaltriti, Erika; Chiesa, Edoardo; Cianti, Luca; Losio, Marina Nadia; Pongolini, Stefano

    2014-09-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) was detected in two samples of mixed frozen berries linked to Italian hepatitis A outbreak in April and September 2013. Both viruses were fully sequenced by next-generation sequencing and the genomes clustered with HAV complete genomes of sub-genotype IA with nucleotide identities of 95-97%.

  15. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) capsid genes isolated from rat and mouse liver genomic DNA define two new AAV species distantly related to AAV-5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochrie, Michael A; Tatsuno, Gwen P; Arbetman, Alejandra E; Jones, Kris; Pater, Cheryl; Smith, Peter H; McDonnell, Jennifer W; Zhou, Shang-Zhen; Kachi, Shu; Kachi, Michiko; Campochiaro, Peter A; Pierce, Glenn F; Colosi, Peter

    2006-09-15

    Using polymerase chain reactions and genome walking strategies, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-like capsid genes were isolated from rat and mouse liver genomic DNA, where they are present at AAVs since their amino acid sequences are AAV capsid. They are most similar to the AAV-5 and goat AAV capsids. A recombinant vector with the mouse AAV capsid and a lacZ transgene (rAAV-mo.1 lacZ) was able to transduce rodent cell lines in vitro. However, it was not able to transduce eight human cell lines or primary human fibroblasts in vitro. It did not bind heparin and its ability to transduce cells in vitro was not inhibited by heparin, mucin, or sialic acid suggesting it uses a novel entry receptor. rAAV-mo.1 lacZ was 29 times more resistant to in vitro neutralization by pooled, purified human IgG than AAV-2. In vivo, rAAV-mo.1 lacZ efficiently transduced murine ocular cells after a subretinal injection. Intramuscular injection of a rAAV-mo.1 human factor IX (hFIX) vector into mice resulted in no detectable hFIX in plasma, but intravenous injection resulted in high plasma levels of hFIX, equivalent to that obtained from a rAAV-8 hFIX vector. Biodistribution analysis showed that rAAV-mo.1 primarily transduced liver after an intravenous injection. These AAV capsids may be useful for gene transfer in rodents.

  16. Human H3N2 Influenza Viruses Isolated from 1968 To 2012 Show Varying Preference for Receptor Substructures with No Apparent Consequences for Disease or Spread.

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    Shelly Gulati

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that human influenza viruses bind glycans containing sialic acid linked α2-6 to the next sugar, that avian influenza viruses bind glycans containing the α2-3 linkage, and that mutations that change the binding specificity might change the host tropism. We noted that human H3N2 viruses showed dramatic differences in their binding specificity, and so we embarked on a study of representative human H3N2 influenza viruses, isolated from 1968 to 2012, that had been isolated and minimally passaged only in mammalian cells, never in eggs. The 45 viruses were grown in MDCK cells, purified, fluorescently labeled and screened on the Consortium for Functional Glycomics Glycan Array. Viruses isolated in the same season have similar binding specificity profiles but the profiles show marked year-to-year variation. None of the 610 glycans on the array (166 sialylated glycans bound to all viruses; the closest was Neu5Acα2-6(Galβ1-4GlcNAc3 in either a linear or biantennary form, that bound 42 of the 45 viruses. The earliest human H3N2 viruses preferentially bound short, branched sialylated glycans while recent viruses bind better to long polylactosamine chains terminating in sialic acid. Viruses isolated in 1996, 2006, 2010 and 2012 bind glycans with α2-3 linked sialic acid; for 2006, 2010 and 2012 viruses this binding was inhibited by oseltamivir, indicating binding of α2-3 sialylated glycans by neuraminidase. More significantly, oseltamivir inhibited virus entry of 2010 and 2012 viruses into MDCK cells. All of these viruses were representative of epidemic strains that spread around the world, so all could infect and transmit between humans with high efficiency. We conclude that the year-to-year variation in receptor binding specificity is a consequence of amino acid sequence changes driven by antigenic drift, and that viruses with quite different binding specificity and avidity are equally fit to infect and transmit in the human

  17. Guillain-Barré Syndrome, Acute Disseminated Encephalomyelitis and Encephalitis Associated with Zika Virus Infection in Brazil: Detection of Viral RNA and Isolation of Virus during Late Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito Ferreira, Maria Lucia; Antunes de Brito, Carlos Alexandre; Moreira, Álvaro José Porto; de Morais Machado, Maria Íris; Henriques-Souza, Adélia; Cordeiro, Marli Tenório; de Azevedo Marques, Ernesto Torres; Pena, Lindomar José

    2017-11-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) emerged in Brazil in 2015, which was followed by an increase of Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) cases. We report the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory findings of the first six neurological cases associated with ZIKV in Brazil seen in a reference neurology hospital in Pernambuco, Brazil. In all cases, ZIKV was detected in serum and/or cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. In this case series, four cases were defined as GBS, one as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and the other as encephalitis. ZIKV was detected in all cases by RT-PCR and virus isolation was successful in two patients. The time between ZIKV acute symptoms and the development of neurological manifestations varied from 3 to 13 days and ZIKV was detected between 15 and 34 days after the initial symptoms. Our results highlight the need to include ZIKV as a differential diagnosis for neurological syndromes in countries with circulation of this arbovirus. Because the viremia in these patients appears to persist longer, direct diagnostic techniques such as RT-PCR and viral isolation should be considered even if it is after the acute phase of viral infection.

  18. Phylogeographical characterization of H5N8 viruses isolated from poultry and wild birds during 2014-2016 in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Byung-Min; Lee, Eun-Kyoung; Lee, Yu-Na; Heo, Gyeong-Beom; Lee, Hee-Soo; Lee, Youn-Jeong

    2017-03-30

    During 2014–2016 HPAI outbreak in South Korea, H5N8 viruses have been mostly isolated in western areas of the country, which provide wintering habitats for wild birds and have a high density of poultry. Analysis of a total of 101 Korean isolates revealed that primitive H5N8 viruses (C0 group) have evolved into multiple genetic subgroups appearing from various epidemiological sources, namely, the viruses circulating in poultry farms (C1 and C5) and those reintroduced by migratory birds in late 2014 (C2 and C4). No C3 groups were detected. The results may explain the possible reasons of the recent long-term persistence of H5N8 viruses in South Korea, and help to develop the effective measures in controlling HPAI viruses.

  19. [SH and HN Protein Genetic Characterization Analysis of Mumps Virus Isolated in Liaoning Province from 2008 to 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yan; Ma, Yan; Hao, Shuang; Xu, Xiaoting; Han, Yue; Yao, Wenqing; Zhao, Zhuo

    2016-03-01

    To analyze the genetic characterization of epidemic mumps virus strains in Liaoning Province and provide the basis for mumps control. A total of 32 mumps viruses strains were isolated during 2008-2104. The fragment of SH genes and HN genes were amplified by RT-PCR, the PCR products were sequenced and analyzed. Basing on the 316 nucleotides of SH gene, The phylogenetic analyses were processed with the data of WHO mumps reference strains downloaded from GenBank and 32 mumps viruses strains. It showed that the 31 mumps virus strains belong to F genotype except MuVi/Liaoning. CHN/16.11 which was G genotype . Comparing to the A reference strains (Jeryl-Lynn and S-79), F genotype MuV were mutated on 12 amino acids sites and 27 amino acids siteson on HN gene. F genotype MuV added one N-glycosylation site in 464th-466th amino acids. The antigenic sites on HN were mutated on 121th, 123th, 279th, 287th, 336th, 356th and 442th. Maybe, it will influence the MuV antigenic.

  20. TWELVE ISOLATIONS OF ZIKA VIRUS FROM AEDES (STEGOMYIA) AFRICANUS (THEOBALD) TAKEN IN AND ABOVE A UGANDA FOREST.

    Science.gov (United States)

    HADDOW, A J; WILLIAMS, M C; WOODALL, J P; SIMPSON, D I; GOMA, L K

    1964-01-01

    In continuation of a series of studies of arboreal mosquitos as virus vectors in Uganda, 12 strains of Zika virus and one strain of another Group B arbovirus were isolated between November 1961 and June 1963 from pools of Aedes (Stegomyia) africanus caught on a 120-foot (36.5-m) tower in Zika forest. For five strains it is known at what height the mosquitos were caught: one was from mosquitos taken at ground level, and the other four were from mosquitos taken in or above the upper canopy after sunset. No small mammal trapped in the forest either on the ground or in the trees showed serum antibody for Zika virus.These findings suggest that in Zika forest, A. (S.) africanus becomes infected from a virus reservoir that is probably not among the small animals tested and that infected mosquitos are liable to be spread widely beyond the forest by convection currents above the tree-tops in the first two or three hours after sunset.

  1. Genetic variability and evolutionary implications of RNA silencing suppressor genes in RNA1 of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus isolates infecting sweetpotato and related wild species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugume, Arthur K; Amayo, Robert; Weinheimer, Isabel; Mukasa, Settumba B; Rubaihayo, Patrick R; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2013-01-01

    The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae) encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3), a putative hydrophobic protein (p7) and a 22-kDa protein (p22) from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas) virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae) in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA) strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae) and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b) encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3) able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in sweetpotato. A second virus encoding an RNase3-like RNA silencing suppressor was

  2. Molecular characterization and phylogenetics of Fennoscandian cowpox virus isolates based on the p4c and atip genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Cowpox virus (CPXV), a rodent-borne Orthopoxvirus (OPV) that is indigenous to Eurasia can infect humans, cattle, felidae and other animals. Molecular characterization of CPXVs isolated from different geographic locations is important for the understanding of their biology, geographic distribution, classification and evolution. Our aim was to characterize CPXVs isolated from Fennoscandia on the basis of A-type inclusion (ATI) phenotype, restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) profiles of atip gene fragment amplicon, and phylogenetic tree topology in conjunction with the patristic and genetic distances based on full length DNA sequence of the atip and p4c genes. Methods ATI phenotypes were determined by transmission electron microcopy and RFLP profiles were obtained by restriction enzyme digestion of the atip gene fragment PCR product. A 6.2 kbp region spanning the entire atip and p4c genes of Fennoscandian CPXV isolates was amplified and sequenced. The phylogenetic affinity of Fennoscandian CPXV isolates to OPVs isolated from other geographic regions was determined on the basis of the atip and p4c genes. Results Fennoscandian CPXV isolates encoded full length atip and p4c genes. They produce wild type V+ ATI except for CPXV-No-H2. CPXVs were resolved into six and seven species clusters based on the phylogeny of the atip and p4c genes respectively. The CPXVs isolated from Fennoscandia were grouped into three distinct clusters that corresponded to isolates from Norway, Sweden and Finland. Conclusion CPXV is a polyphyletic assemblage of six or seven distinct clusters and the current classification in which CPXVs are united as one single species should be re-considered. Our results are of significance to the classification and evolution of OPVs. PMID:24972911

  3. High rates of double-stranded RNA viruses and Mycoplasma hominis in Trichomonas vaginalis clinical isolates in South Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Luz Becker, Débora; dos Santos, Odelta; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-08-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiological agent of trichomoniasis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease (STD) in world, with 276.4 million new cases each year. T. vaginalis can be naturally infected with Mycoplasma hominis and Trichomonasvirus species. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of T. vaginalis infected with four distinct T. vaginalis viruses (TVVs) and M. hominis among isolates from patients in Porto Alegre city, South Brazil. An additional goal of this study was to investigate whether there is association between metronidazole resistance and the presence of M. hominis during TVV infection. The RNA expression level of the pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase (PFOR) gene was also evaluated among metronidazole-resistant and metronidazole-sensitive T. vaginalis isolates. A total of 530 urine samples were evaluated, and 5.7% samples were positive for T. vaginalis infection. Among them, 4.51% were isolated from female patients and 1.12% were from male patients. Remarkably, the prevalence rates of M. hominis and TVV-positive T. vaginalis isolates were 56.7% and 90%, respectively. Most of the T. vaginalis isolates were metronidazole-sensitive (86.7%), and only four isolates (13.3%) were resistant. There is no statistically significant association between infection by M. hominis and infection by TVVs. Our results refute the hypothesis that the presence of the M. hominis and TVVs is enough to confer metronidazole resistance to T. vaginalis isolates. Additionally, the role of PFOR RNA expression levels in metronidazole resistance as the main mechanism of resistance to metronidazole could not be established. This study is the first report of the T. vaginalis infection by M. hominis and TVVs in a large collection of isolates from South Brazil. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular characterization and epidemic history of hepatitis C virus using core sequences of isolates from Central Province, Saudi Arabia.

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    Medhat K Shier

    Full Text Available The source of HCV transmission in Saudi Arabia is unknown. This study aimed to determine HCV genotypes in a representative sample of chronically infected patients in Saudi Arabia. All HCV isolates were genotyped and subtyped by sequencing of the HCV core region and 54 new HCV isolates were identified. Three sets of primers targeting the core region were used for both amplification and sequencing of all isolates resulting in a 326 bp fragment. Most HCV isolates were genotype 4 (85%, whereas only a few isolates were recognized as genotype 1 (15%. With the assistance of Genbank database and BLAST, subtyping results showed that most of genotype 4 isolates were 4d whereas most of genotype 1 isolates were 1b. Nucleotide conservation and variation rates of HCV core sequences showed that 4a and 1b have the highest levels of variation. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences by Maximum Likelihood and Bayesian Coalescent methods was used to explore the source of HCV transmission by investigating the relationship between Saudi Arabia and other countries in the Middle East and Africa. Coalescent analysis showed that transmissions of HCV from Egypt to Saudi Arabia are estimated to have occurred in three major clusters: 4d was introduced into the country before 1900, the major 4a clade's MRCA was introduced between 1900 and 1920, and the remaining lineages were introduced between 1940 and 1960 from Egypt and Middle Africa. Results showed that no lineages seem to have crossed from Egypt to Saudi Arabia in the last 15 years. Finally, sequencing and characterization of new HCV isolates from Saudi Arabia will enrich the HCV database and help further studies related to treatment and management of the virus.

  5. Pathogenicity of local isolate virus BHV-1 as the aetiological agent of Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis in Bali Cattle

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    Rini I Damayanti

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Infectious Bovine Rhinotracheitis is a disease of cattle characterised by clinical signs of the upper respiratory tract, reproductive tract and nervous system. A study to define the pathogenicity of four BHV-1 local isolates has been conducted. Fourteen Bali cattle that were free of BHV-1 has been selected and divided into four treatment groups. Each group of three was infected with virus isolate I, II, III and IV respectively with approximately a dose of 108TCID50 /10 ml and two cattle were used as control animals. Isolate I and III were originated from semen from IBR positive bulls number G 867 and G 148 respectively whereas isolate II was collected from vaginal mucosa and isolate IV was from nasal mucosa of IBR positive cattle treated with dexamethasone. Clinical response, gross-pathological and histopathological changes were observed. Immunohistochemical staining was applied to detect the antigen in tissue section. The results show that the BHV-1 local isolates could produce IBR syndrome namely fever and changes in the respiratory and reproductive tracts even though the clinical responses seemed to be disappeared by 21 days PI. Grossly there were hyperaemic nasal and vaginal mucosa and pneumonia whereas histologically there were non suppurative rhinitis, tracheitis, pneumonia and vulvovaginitis. Immunohistochemically the antigen was detected in the nasal concha and trachea. Dexamethasone treatment at 60-64 days PI could produce less severe clinical features and the second necroppsy at 69 days PI also results in less severe pathological responses. The findings also suggest that the pathogenicity of BHV-1 local isolates were as follows: isolates I, II, IV and III.

  6. Repeated isolation of virulent Newcastle disease viruses of sub-genotype VIId from backyard chickens in Bulgaria and Ukraine between 2002 and 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitrov, Kiril M; Bolotin, Vitaliy; Muzyka, Denys; Goraichuk, Iryna V; Solodiankin, Olexii; Gerilovych, Anton; Stegniy, Borys; Goujgoulova, Gabriela V; Silko, Nikita Y; Pantin-Jackwood, Mary J; Miller, Patti J; Afonso, Claudio L

    2016-12-01

    Here, we report the circulation of highly related virulent Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) in Bulgaria and Ukraine from 2002 until 2013. All of these NDV isolates have the same virulence-associated cleavage site ("113RQKR↓F117"), and selected ones have intracerebral pathogenicity index values ranging from 1.61 to 1.96. These isolates are most closely related to viruses circulating in Eastern Europe, followed by viruses isolated in Asia during the same period of time. Interestingly, the majority of the viruses were isolated from backyard poultry, suggesting the possibility of a "domestic" or "urban" cycle of maintenance. The molecular characterization of the nucleotide sequence of the complete fusion protein gene of the studied viruses suggests continued circulation of virulent NDV of sub-genotype VIId in Eastern Europe, with occasional introductions from Asia. Furthermore, the high level of genetic similarity among those isolates suggests that the NDV isolates of sub-genotype VIId from Bulgaria and Ukraine may have been part of a broader epizootic process in Eastern Europe rather than separate introductions from Asia or Africa. The continuous monitoring of backyard poultry flocks for the presence of circulating virulent NDV strains will allow early identification of Newcastle disease outbreaks.

  7. Genetic analysis of nonstructural genes (NS1 and NS2) of H9N2 and H5N1 viruses recently isolated in Israel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banet-Noach, Caroline; Panshin, Alexander; Golender, Natalia; Simanov, Lubov; Rozenblut, Ezra; Pokamunski, Shimon; Pirak, Michael; Tendler, Yevgenii; García, Maricarmen; Gelman, Boris; Pasternak, Ruslan; Perk, Shimon

    2007-04-01

    The avian influenza virus subtype H9N2 affects wild birds, domestic