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Sample records for viruses oncogenes human

  1. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUSONCOGENIC VIRUS

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    A.N. Mayansky

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The lecture is devoted to oncogenic viruses, particularly human papilloma virus. Papilloma viral infection is found in all parts of the globe and highly contagious. In addition to exhaustive current data on classification, specifics of papilloma viruses composition and epidemiology, the author describes in great detail the malignization mechanisms of papilloma viruses pockets. Also, issues of diagnostics and specific prevention and treatment of diseases caused by this virus are illustrated. Key words: oncogenic viruses, papilloma viruses, prevention, vaccination. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(4:48-55

  2. Multiple oncogenic viruses are present in human breast tissues before development of virus associated breast cancer.

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    Lawson, James S; Glenn, Wendy K

    2017-01-01

    Multiple oncogenic viruses including, mouse mammary tumor virus, bovine leukemia virus, human papilloma virus, and Epstein Barr virus, have been identified as separate infectious pathogens in human breast cancer. Here we demonstrate that these four viruses may be present in normal and benign breast tissues 1 to 11 years before the development of same virus breast cancer in the same patients. We combined the data we developed during investigations of the individual four oncogenic viruses and breast cancer. Patients who had benign breast biopsies 1-11 years prior to developing breast cancer were identified by pathology reports from a large Australian pathology service (Douglas Hanly Moir Pathology). Archival formalin fixed specimens from these patients were collected. The same archival specimens were used for (i) investigations of mouse mammary tumour virus (also known as human mammary tumour virus) conducted at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York and at the University of Pisa, Italy, (ii) bovine leukemia virus conducted at the University of California at Berkeley,(iii) human papilloma virus and Epstein Barr virus conducted at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Seventeen normal breast tissues from cosmetic breast surgery conducted on Australian patients were used as controls. These patients were younger than those with benign and later breast cancer. Standard and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods were used to identify the four viruses. The detailed methods are outlined in the separate publications.: mouse mammary tumor virus, human papilloma virus and Epstein Barr virus (Infect Agent Cancer 12:1, 2017, PLoS One 12:e0179367, 2017, Front Oncol 5:277, 2015, PLoS One 7:e48788, 2012). Epstein Barr virus and human papilloma virus were identified in the same breast cancer cells by in situ PCR. Mouse mammary tumour virus was identified in 6 (24%) of 25 benign breast specimens and in 9 (36%) of 25 breast cancer specimens

  3. Oncogenic Viruses and Breast Cancer: Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV), Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV), Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), and Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV).

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    Lawson, James S; Salmons, Brian; Glenn, Wendy K

    2018-01-01

    Although the risk factors for breast cancer are well established, namely female gender, early menarche and late menopause plus the protective influence of early pregnancy, the underlying causes of breast cancer remain unknown. The development of substantial recent evidence indicates that a handful of viruses may have a role in breast cancer. These viruses are mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV), bovine leukemia virus (BLV), human papilloma viruses (HPVs), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-also known as human herpes virus type 4). Each of these viruses has documented oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to inform the scientific and general community about this recent evidence. MMTV and human breast cancer-the evidence is detailed and comprehensive but cannot be regarded as conclusive. BLV and human breast cancer-the evidence is limited. However, in view of the emerging information about BLV in human breast cancer, it is prudent to encourage the elimination of BLV in cattle, particularly in the dairy industry. HPVs and breast cancer-the evidence is substantial but not conclusive. The availability of effective preventive vaccines is a major advantage and their use should be encouraged. EBV and breast cancer-the evidence is also substantial but not conclusive. Currently, there are no practical means of either prevention or treatment. Although there is evidence of genetic predisposition, and cancer in general is a culmination of events, there is no evidence that inherited genetic traits are causal. The influence of oncogenic viruses is currently the major plausible hypothesis for a direct cause of human breast cancer.

  4. Oncogenic Viruses and Breast Cancer: Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV, Bovine Leukemia Virus (BLV, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV, and Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James S. Lawson

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundAlthough the risk factors for breast cancer are well established, namely female gender, early menarche and late menopause plus the protective influence of early pregnancy, the underlying causes of breast cancer remain unknown. The development of substantial recent evidence indicates that a handful of viruses may have a role in breast cancer. These viruses are mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV, bovine leukemia virus (BLV, human papilloma viruses (HPVs, and Epstein–Barr virus (EBV-also known as human herpes virus type 4. Each of these viruses has documented oncogenic potential. The aim of this review is to inform the scientific and general community about this recent evidence.The evidenceMMTV and human breast cancer—the evidence is detailed and comprehensive but cannot be regarded as conclusive. BLV and human breast cancer—the evidence is limited. However, in view of the emerging information about BLV in human breast cancer, it is prudent to encourage the elimination of BLV in cattle, particularly in the dairy industry. HPVs and breast cancer—the evidence is substantial but not conclusive. The availability of effective preventive vaccines is a major advantage and their use should be encouraged. EBV and breast cancer—the evidence is also substantial but not conclusive. Currently, there are no practical means of either prevention or treatment. Although there is evidence of genetic predisposition, and cancer in general is a culmination of events, there is no evidence that inherited genetic traits are causal.ConclusionThe influence of oncogenic viruses is currently the major plausible hypothesis for a direct cause of human breast cancer.

  5. Merkel cell polyomavirus: a newly discovered human virus with oncogenic potential.

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    Spurgeon, Megan E; Lambert, Paul F

    2013-01-05

    A marked escalation in the rate of discovery of new types of human polyomavirus has occurred over the last five years largely owing to recent technological advances in their detection. Among the newly discovered viruses, Merkel Cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV or MCV) has gained the most attention due to its link with a rare human cancer. Infection with MCPyV is common in the human population, and the virus is detected in several anatomical locations, but most frequently in skin. Study of MCPyV molecular virology has been complicated by the lack of straightforward cell culture models, but recent in vitro studies are making strides towards understanding the virus life cycle, its cellular tropism, and mode of transmission. While MCPyV shares several traditional traits with other human polyomaviruses, the burst of research since its discovery reveals insight into a virus with many unique genetic and mechanistic features. The evidence for a causal link between MCPyV and the rare neuroendocrine cancer, Merkel Cell Carcinoma (MCC), is compelling. A majority of MCCs contain clonally integrated viral DNA, express viral T antigen transcripts and protein, and exhibit an addiction to the viral large T and small t antigen oncoproteins. The MCPyV large T antigen contains MCC tumor-specific mutations that ablate its replication capacity but preserve its oncogenic functions, and the small t antigen promotes an environment favorable for cap-dependent translation. The mechanisms of MCPyV-induced transformation have not been fully elucidated, but the likely etiological role of this new polyomavirus in human cancer provides a strong opportunity to expand knowledge of virus-host interactions and viral oncology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Adeno-associated virus type 2 as an oncogenic virus in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Nault, Jean-Charles; Datta, Shalini; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Franconi, Andrea; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) is a defective DNA virus that was previously considered to be non-pathogenic. We identified somatic AAV2 integration in a subset of 11 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) that mainly developed in normal liver without known etiology through recurrent insertional mutagenesis in cancer driver genes such as telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), cyclin A2 (CCNA2), cyclin E1 (CCNE1), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 10 (TNFSF10), and lysine (K)-...

  7. Adeno-associated virus type 2 as an oncogenic virus in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

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    Nault, Jean-Charles; Datta, Shalini; Imbeaud, Sandrine; Franconi, Andrea; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    Adeno-associated virus type 2 (AAV2) is a defective DNA virus that was previously considered to be non-pathogenic. We identified somatic AAV2 integration in a subset of 11 hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) that mainly developed in normal liver without known etiology through recurrent insertional mutagenesis in cancer driver genes such as telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), cyclin A2 (CCNA2), cyclin E1 (CCNE1), tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily, member 10 (TNFSF10), and lysine (K)-specific methyltransferase 2B (KMT2B).

  8. Oncogenic virus-mediated cell fusion: new insights into initiation and progression of oncogenic viruses--related cancers.

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    Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2011-04-01

    Cell fusion is fundamental to the development and physiology of multicellular organisms, such as fertilization, placentation, development of skeletal muscle and bone. Oncogenic virus-mediated cell fusion, however, may lead to chromosomal instability (CIN) by various mechanisms when tumor suppressor p53 is deregulated and produce oncogenic aneuploid cells. It is worth noting that all human oncogenic viruses, including human papillomavirus (HPV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human herpesviruses-8/Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (HHV-8/KSHV) and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), are capable of both inducing cell fusion and inhibiting the functions of p53 as well as pRb. Although it is now not clear whether a link between virus-mediated cell fusion and cancer established in experimental systems also exists in humans, the fact that the observation of tetraploid cells is more frequent in virus-positive than virus-negative premalignant lesions supports this link. Additionally, there are now no available vaccines against most oncogenic viruses except for HBV and HPV. Given these, developing fusion inhibitors is beneficial to cancer prevention and therapy of virus-associated cancers via inhibiting virus entry, spread and oncogenic role. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Oncogenic impact of human papilloma virus in head and neck cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Heffernan, C B

    2012-02-01

    There is considerable debate within the literature about the significance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and its potential influence on the prevention, diagnosis, grading, treatment and prognosis of these cancers. Cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have traditionally been cited as the main risk factors for head and neck cancers. However, human papilloma virus, normally associated with cervical and other genital carcinomas, has emerged as a possible key aetiological factor in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, especially oropharyngeal cancers. These cancers pose a significant financial burden on health resources and are increasing in incidence. The recent introduction of vaccines targeted against human papilloma virus types 16 and 18, to prevent cervical cancer, has highlighted the need for ongoing research into the importance of human papilloma virus in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

  10. A novel monoclonal antibody for detection of galectin-9 in tissue sections: application to human tissues infected by oncogenic viruses

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    Barjon Clément

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Galectin-9 is a mammalian lectin which possesses immunosuppressive properties. Excessive production of galectin-9 has been reported in two types of human virus-associated diseases chronic hepatitis C and nasopharyngeal carcinoma associated to the Epstein-Barr virus. The objective of this study was to produce new monoclonal antibodies targeting galectin-9 in order to improve its detection in clinical samples, especially on tissue sections analysed by immunohistochemistry. Methods Hybridomas were produced through immunization of mice with the recombinant c-terminus part of galectin-9 (residues 191 to 355 of the long isoform and semi-solid fusion of spleen cells with Sp2/0 cells. Monoclonal antibodies were characterized using ELISA, epitope mapping, western blot and immunohistochemistry. Results We selected seven hybridomas producing antibodies reacting with our recombinant c-terminus galectin-9 in ELISA. Five of them reacted with the epitope “TPAIPPMMYPHPA” (common to all isoforms, residues 210 to 222 of the long isoform and stained all three isoforms of galectin-9 analysed by western blot. One of them, 1G3,demonstrated very good sensitivity and specificity when used for immunohistochemistry. Using 1G3, we could confirm the intense and constant expression of galectin-9 by Epstein-Barr virus positive malignant cells from nasopharyngeal carcinomas. In most samples, specific staining was detected in both cytoplasm and nuclei. Galectin-9 was also detected in liver biopsies from patients infected by the human hepatitis C or B viruses with expression not only in inflammatory leucocytes and Kupffer cells, but also in hepatocytes. In contrast, galectin-9 was virtually absent in non-infected liver specimens. Conclusion The 1G3 monoclonal antibody will be a powerful tool to assess galectin-9 expression and distribution especially in diseases related to oncogenic viruses.

  11. Role of TLR9 in Oncogenic Virus-Produced Cancer.

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    Martínez-Campos, Cecilia; Burguete-García, Ana I; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2017-03-01

    Nucleic acid recognition by toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) initiates signaling pathways that regulate the production of proinflammatory cytokines or type I interferons, as well as many other molecules required to initialize the immune response. The use of synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides (ODNs) has been crucial to emulate the recognition of DNA sequences by TLR9. Furthermore, ODN administration to mice has shown to confer protection against a wide range of viral, bacterial, and parasitic pathogens. In contrast, oncogenic DNA viruses like hepatitis B virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human papilloma virus inhibit TLR9 expression, thus contributing to the establishment of chronic viral infections. In this review, we will focus on TLR9 signals initiated by ODN recognition, on the inhibition of TLR9 expression mediated by DNA oncogenic viruses, and on TLR9 expression as a relevant event in the progression to cancer, considering other functions of this receptor, aside from viral recognition.

  12. Double demonstration of oncogenic high risk human papilloma virus DNA and HPV-E7 protein in oral cancers.

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    Pannone, G; Santoro, A; Carinci, F; Bufo, P; Papagerakis, S M; Rubini, C; Campisi, G; Giovannelli, L; Contaldo, M; Serpico, R; Mazzotta, M; Lo Muzio, L

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenic HPVs are necessarily involved in cervical cancer but their role in oral carcinogenesis is debated. To detect HPV in oral cancer, 38 cases of formalin fixed-paraffin embedded OSCC were studied by both DNA genotyping (MY09/11 L1 consensus primers in combination with GP5-GP6 primer pair followed by sequencing) and immunohistochemistry (monoclonal Abs against capsid protein and HPV-E7 protein, K1H8 DAKO and clone 8C9 INVITROGEN, respectively). HPV-16 tonsil cancer was used as positive control. The overall prevalence of HPV infection in OSCCs was 10.5%. Amplification of DNA samples showed single HPV DNA infection in 3 cases (HPV16; HPV53; HPV70) and double infection in one case of cheek cancer (HPV31/HPV44). The overall HR-HPV prevalence was 7.5%. E-7 antigen was immunohistochemically detected in all HPV-positive cases. HPV+ OSCC cases showed an overall better outcome than HPV negative oral cancers, as evaluated by Kaplan-Meier curves. HPVs exert their oncogenic role after DNA integration, gene expression of E5, E6 and E7 loci and p53/pRb host proteins suppression. This study showed that HPV-E7 protein inactivating pRb is expressed in oral cancer cells infected by oncogenic HPV other than classical HR-HPV-16/18. Interestingly HPV-70, considered a low risk virus with no definite collocation in oncogenic type category, gives rise to the expression of HPV-E7 protein and inactivate pRb in oral cancer. HPV-70, as proved in current literature, is able to inactivates also p53 protein, promoting cell immortalization. HPV-53, classified as a possible high risk virus, expresses E7 protein in OSCC, contributing to oral carcinogenesis. We have identified among OSCCs, a subgroup characterized by HPV infection (10.5%). Finally, we have proved the oncogenic potential of some HPV virus types, not well known in literature.

  13. E6 and E7 oncogene expression by human papilloma virus (HPV) and the aggressive behavior of recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP).

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    Shehata, Bahig M; Otto, Kristen J; Sobol, Steven E; Stockwell, Christina A; Foulks, Cora; Lancaster, Wayne; Gregoire, Lucie; Hill, Charles E

    2008-01-01

    Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP), a chronic disease associated with human papilloma virus (HPV), requires serial surgical procedures for debulking, resulting in debilitating long-term dysphonia, laryngeal scarring, and rarely malignant degeneration. Human papilloma virus 11 tumors have been widely accepted as more aggressive than HPV 6 tumors; however, the clinical course has been difficult to predict at disease onset, and the biologic mediators of proliferation have not been well characterized. A retrospective case review of 43 patients (4 months to 10 years at diagnosis) was performed on children treated for recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis. Patient charts were reviewed for demographic information, age at RLP diagnosis, approximate frequency of surgical intervention, and absolute number of surgical procedures performed. Human papilloma virus subtyping was performed. Expression analysis of the HPV-encoded E6 and E7 oncogenes was performed by reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Fourteen patients had subtype 11 (33%) and 29 patients had subtype 6 (67%). As expected, HPV 11 patients showed a more aggressive clinical course than HPV 6 patients. However, 38% of patients with subtype 6 (11 patients) followed a clinical course that mirrored the more severe subtype 11 patients. These patients expressed the disease at a younger age (P < 0.0002) and showed higher levels of E6 and E7 oncogenes compared to the patients with the more indolent course. Although HPV subtype and early onset of RLP are well characterized prognostic factors, our study documents the significance of E6 and E7 oncogene expression as potential biologic mediators of proliferation and thereby clinical behavior.

  14. Oncogenic Potential of Hepatitis C Virus Proteins

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    Ranjit Ray

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection is a major risk factor for liver disease progression, and may lead to cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The HCV genome contains a single-stranded positive sense RNA with a cytoplasmic lifecycle. HCV proteins interact with many host-cell factors and are involved in a wide range of activities, including cell cycle regulation, transcriptional regulation, cell proliferation, apoptosis, lipid metabolism, and cell growth promotion. Increasing experimental evidences suggest that HCV contributes to HCC by modulating pathways that may promote malignant transformation of hepatocytes. At least four of the 10 HCV gene products, namely core, NS3, NS5A and NS5B play roles in several potentially oncogenic pathways. Induction of both endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and oxidative stress by HCV proteins may also contribute to hepatocyte growth promotion. The current review identifies important functions of the viral proteins connecting HCV infections and potential for development of HCC. However, most of the putative transforming potentials of the HCV proteins have been defined in artificial cellular systems, and need to be established relevant to infection and disease models. The new insight into the mechanisms for HCV mediated disease progression may offer novel therapeutic targets for one of the most devastating human malignancies in the world today.

  15. Large-scale analysis of protein expression changes in human keratinocytes immortalized by human papilloma virus type 16 E6 and E7 oncogenes

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    Arnouk Hilal

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with high-risk type human papilloma viruses (HPVs is associated with cervical carcinomas and with a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes cooperate to achieve cell immortalization by a mechanism that is not yet fully understood. Here, human keratinocytes were immortalized by long-term expression of HPV type 16 E6 or E7 oncoproteins, or both. Proteomic profiling was used to compare expression levels for 741 discrete protein features. Results Six replicate measurements were performed for each group using two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE. The median within-group coefficient of variation was 19–21%. Significance of between-group differences was tested based on Significance Analysis of Microarray and fold change. Expression of 170 (23% of the protein features changed significantly in immortalized cells compared to primary keratinocytes. Most of these changes were qualitatively similar in cells immortalized by E6, E7, or E6/7 expression, indicating convergence on a common phenotype, but fifteen proteins (~2% were outliers in this regulatory pattern. Ten demonstrated opposite regulation in E6- and E7-expressing cells, including the cell cycle regulator p16INK4a; the carbohydrate binding protein Galectin-7; two differentially migrating forms of the intermediate filament protein Cytokeratin-7; HSPA1A (Hsp70-1; and five unidentified proteins. Five others had a pattern of expression that suggested cooperativity between the co-expressed oncoproteins. Two of these were identified as forms of the small heat shock protein HSPB1 (Hsp27. Conclusion This large-scale analysis provides a framework for understanding the cooperation between E6 and E7 oncoproteins in HPV-driven carcinogenesis.

  16. Risk factors and distribution of oncogenic strains of human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Risk factors and distribution of oncogenic strains of human papilloma virus in women presenting for cervical cancer screening in Port Harcourt, Nigeria. ... Results were presented in tables, test of significance and association done using student's t-test and Odds ratio, with P value < 0.05 as significant. Results: The age range ...

  17. Interactions between Hsp90 and oncogenic viruses: implications for viral cancer therapeutics.

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    Defee, Michael R; Qin, Zhiqiang; Dai, Lu; Isaacs, Jennifer S; Parsons, Chris H

    2011-01-01

    Oncogenic viruses are the etiologic agents for a significant proportion of human cancers, but effective therapies and preventative strategies are lacking for the majority of virus-associated cancers. Targeting of virus-induced signal transduction or virus-host protein interactions may offer novel therapeutic strategies for viral cancers. Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a well-characterized, multifunctional molecular chaperone involved in regulation of signal transduction, transcriptional activation, oncogenic protein stabilization, and neovascularization-pathogenic elements relevant to viral cancer pathogenesis. This review will summarize mechanistic concepts involving regulation of viral oncogenesis by both intracellular and extracellular Hsp90, as well as current therapeutic implications of these data.

  18. DNA Oncogenic Virus-Induced Oxidative Stress, Genomic Damage, and Aberrant Epigenetic Alterations

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    Mankgopo Magdeline Kgatle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of human cancers is attributable to DNA oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Unrepaired DNA damage is the most common and overlapping feature of these DNA oncogenic viruses and a source of genomic instability and tumour development. Sustained DNA damage results from unceasing production of reactive oxygen species and activation of inflammasome cascades that trigger genomic changes and increased propensity of epigenetic alterations. Accumulation of epigenetic alterations may interfere with genome-wide cellular signalling machineries and promote malignant transformation leading to cancer development. Untangling and understanding the underlying mechanisms that promote these detrimental effects remain the major objectives for ongoing research and hope for effective virus-induced cancer therapy. Here, we review current literature with an emphasis on how DNA damage influences HPV, HVB, and EBV replication and epigenetic alterations that are associated with carcinogenesis.

  19. [Mechanism of the cancerogenesis in cervix paraepidermal epithelium cells with chronic infection of oncogenic types of human papiloma virus].

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    Kedzia, Witold; Goździcka-Józefiak, Anna

    2007-09-01

    The human papillomavirus family is composed of a large number of different and variably related types, each of which is associated with a characteristic set of epithelial lesions. Each of the many identified types of human papillomavirus have shown considerable specificity of different anatomical sites and different characteristic lesions. HPV 6 and 11 are frequently associated with benign condylomas, while HPV 16 and 18 are associated with malignant progression and cervical cancer. The genome of papillomaviruses is composed of a circular double stranded DNA. Various open reading frames (ORFs) are located on only one DNA strand. The coding strand contains from 8 to 10 translational ORFs. Among them, only 6 to 8 were designated as early and 2 as late. The role of HPVs 16 and 18 in uterine cervix carcinoma has been well-documented, but their contriobution to carcinogenesis of other neoplasias is still questionable.

  20. Undifferentiated Pleomorphic Sarcoma and the Importance of Considering the Oncogenic and Immune-Suppressant Role of the Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1: A Case Report

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    Sergio Lupo

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionSoft-tissue sarcomas account for 0.7% of all malignant tumors, with an incidence rate of 3 per 100,000 persons/year. The undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS with giant cells, a high grade tumor of soft tissue, is very unusual, especially in young adults before the age of 40. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a human retrovirus, classified as group 1 human carcinogens by The International Agency for Research on Cancer, that causes an aggressive malignancy known as adult T-cell lymphoma/leukemia and a progressive chronic inflammatory neurological disease named HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HTLV-1 causes accumulation of genetic mutations in the host genome that could contribute to cellular transformation, one of the oncogenic features of HTLV-1.Case reportWe describe a case of a young woman with UPS who suffered from HAM/TSP with 3 years of evolution. In 2013, the patient started with neurological symptoms: weakness in the legs and bladder dysfunction. One year later, the patient developed a mild paraparesis in both extremities, anti-HTLV-1 antibodies were detected in plasma and in cerebrospinal fluid, and HAM/TSP was confirmed. In November 2015, a benign ganglion cyst was first suspected without intervention and by March 2016 a sarcoma was diagnosed. Three weeks after surgical resection, the tumor aroused in deep tissue and behaved aggressively, implicating a curative wide resection of the fibula, joint reconstruction, and soft-tissue graft. Histopathological examination confirmed UPS with giant cells.Concluding remarksThe unapparent subclinical immunodeficiency state due to HTLV-1 infection deserves to be considered in order to carefully monitor the possibility of developing any type of cancer. Besides, reaching an accurate and timely diagnosis of UPS can be challenging due to the difficulty in diagnosis/classification and delayed consultation. In this particular case

  1. [High oncogenic risk human papillomavirus and urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loran, O B; Sinyakova, L A; Gundorova, L V; Kosov, V A; Kosova, I V; Pogodina, I E; Kolbasov, D N

    2017-07-01

    To determine the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) of high oncogenic risk in the development of urinary bladder cancer. 100 patients (72 men and 28 women) aged 38 to 90 years (mean age 65+/-10 years) diagnosed with bladder cancer were examined and underwent treatment. Clinical assessment was complemented by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the presence of antiviral antibodies to herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), urethra scraping for detecting high oncogenic risk HPV. Tumor tissue was sampled for PCR virus detection. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to evaluate the components of lymphocyte-plasmocyte and leukocyte infiltrates and cytopathic changes in tumor tissue. There were positive correlations between cytopathic cell changes (koylocytosis and intranuclear inclusions, as manifestations of HPV) and the level of antiviral antibodies, the presence of viruses in the tumor, as well as with the components of the lymphoid-plasmocyte infiltrate. Negative correlations were found between the presence of papillomatosis and the above changes. Human papillomavirus is believed to be a trigger for the initiation of a tumor in young patients with a latent infection (CMV and EBV, HSV, HPV). Cytopathic changes (kylocytosis and intranuclear inclusions) were associated with the activity and morphological features of herpes-viral infections. Their degree varied depending on the stage of the process, but not on the anaplasia degree. Papillomatosis is associated with a more favorable course of the tumor process.

  2. A chimeric 18L1-45RG1 virus-like particle vaccine cross-protects against oncogenic alpha-7 human papillomavirus types.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bettina Huber

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC, a subset of cervical cancer (CxC. Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7 includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18 targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1 of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1. Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent

  3. Kirsten Ras* oncogene: significance of its discovery in human cancer research.

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    Tsuchida, Nobuo; Murugan, Avaniyapuram Kannan; Grieco, Michele

    2016-07-19

    The KRAS/ K-RAS oncogene is crucially involved in human cancer. The term "oncogene" -- i.e., a gene able to transform a normal cell into a tumor cell - was introduced in 1969, but the word was not used in the human carcinogenesis literature until much later. Transforming Kras and Hras oncogenes from the Kirsten and Harvey sarcoma viruses were not identified until the early 1980s due to the complicated structures of the viral genomes. Orthologs of these viral oncogenes were then found in transforming DNA fragments in human cancers in the form of mutated versions of the HRAS and KRAS proto-oncogenes. Thus, RAS genes were the first human oncogenes to be identified. Subsequent studies showed that mutated KRAS acted as an in vivo oncogenic driver, as indicated by studies of anti-EGFR therapy for metastatic colorectal cancers. This review addresses the historical background and experimental studies that led to the discovery of Kirsten Ras as an oncogene, the role of mutated KRAS in human carcinogenesis, and recent therapeutic studies of cancer cells with KRAS mutations.

  4. 4th European Seminars in Virology on Oncogenic and Oncolytic Viruses, in Bertinoro (Bologna), Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reale, Alberto; Messa, Lorenzo; Vitiello, Adriana; Loregian, Arianna; Palù, Giorgio

    2017-10-01

    The 4th European Seminars in Virology (EuSeV), which was focused on oncogenic and oncolytic viruses, was held in Bertinoro (Bologna), Italy, from June 10 to 12, 2016. This article summarizes the plenary lectures and aims to illustrate the main topics discussed at 4th EuSeV, which brought together knowledge and expertise in the field of oncogenic and oncolytic viruses from all over the world. The meeting was divided in two parts, "Mechanisms of Viral Oncogenesis" and "Viral Oncolysis and Immunotherapy," which were both focused on dissecting the complex and multi-factorial interplay between cancer and human viruses and on exploring new anti-cancer strategies. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 2641-2648, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effective tumor immunotherapy directed against an oncogene-encoded product using a vaccinia virus vector

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernards, R.A.; Destree, A.; McKenzie, S.; Gordon, E.; Weinberg, R.A.; Panicali, D.

    1987-01-01

    We have constructed a vaccinia virus recombinant that expresses the extracellular domain of the rat neu oncogene-encoded protein, a 185-kDa transmembrane glycoprotein termed p185. Strain NFS mice immunized with this recombinant virus developed a strong antibody response against the neu oncogene

  6. Cytoplasmic calcium increase via fusion with inactivated Sendai virus induces apoptosis in human multiple myeloma cells by downregulation of c-Myc oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yingzhe; Saga, Kotaro; Miyamoto, Yasuhide; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2016-06-14

    Because the emergence of drug resistance is a major limitation of current treatments for multiple myeloma (MM), it is necessary to continuously develop novel anticancer strategies. Here, using an inactivated Sendai virus (Hemagglutinating Virus of Japan; HVJ) envelope (HVJ-E), we discovered that increase of cytoplasmic Ca2+ by virus-cell fusion significantly induced apoptosis against human MM cells but not peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors. Interaction of F protein of HVJ-E with MM cells increased intracellular Ca2+ level of MMs by the induction of Ca2+ efflux from endoplasmic reticulum but not influx from extracellular region. The elevation of the Ca2+ cytoplasmic level induced SMAD1/5/8 phosphorylation and translocation into the nucleus, and SMAD1/5/8 and SMAD4 complex suppressed c-Myc transcription. Meanwhile, HVJ-E decreases S62 phosphorylation of c-Myc and promotes c-Myc protein degradation. Thus, HVJ-E-induced cell death of MM resulted from suppression of c-Myc by both destabilization of c-Myc protein and downregulation of c-Myc transcription. This study indicates that HVJ-E will be a promising tool for MM therapy.

  7. Oral prevalence and clearance of oncogenic human papilloma virus in a rehabilitation community for substance abusers in Italy: a case of behavioral correction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugliese, Davide B; Bruzzesi, Giacomo; Montaldo, Caterina; Porcu, Luca; Landi, Marco; Mastinu, Andrea; Torri, Valter; Licitra, Lisa; Locati, Laura D

    2015-10-01

    Human papilloma virus oral infection can be related to several factors including HIV infection, cigarette smoking, marijuana consumption and number of sexual partners. We conducted a study on oral HPV prevalence and clearance among the hosts of the San Patrignano community, a population considered at "high-risk" for HPV due to their previous habits. From March 2007 to September 2010 all subjects were submitted to oropharyngeal brushing and saliva collection at baseline, after 6, 12 and 48 months (for subjects HPV positive at baseline). Samples were analyzed to detect HPV DNA and virus genotypes. The correlation between HPV prevalence and demographic, behavioral or immunological characteristics was assessed. Among 194 subjects, 30 (15%) were HPV positive with 25 (13%) high-risk (HR)-HPV at baseline brushing. At 12 months HPV infection was cleared in all cases. However at 48 months HPV was newly detected in 33% of subjects. A correlation between time spent in the community and increase in the ratio of "low-risk" (LR) HPV and HR-HPV was observed. HPV infection was not associated with age, gender, HIV status, HCV, alcohol and/or drug exposure, number of years spent in community, sex with drug-addicts and condom use. Only AIDS under antiretroviral treatment was inversely correlated with the risk of infection. At 1 year a complete HPV clearance was observed which could be related to adoption of healthier lifestyles of participants. New HPV infections were detected even in the absence of the recognized and declared risky behavioral factors, suggesting a re-expression from a latent infection. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Human viruses and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Sánchez, Abigail; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2014-10-23

    The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt's lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  9. Human Viruses and Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abigail Morales-Sánchez

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The first human tumor virus was discovered in the middle of the last century by Anthony Epstein, Bert Achong and Yvonne Barr in African pediatric patients with Burkitt’s lymphoma. To date, seven viruses -EBV, KSHV, high-risk HPV, MCPV, HBV, HCV and HTLV1- have been consistently linked to different types of human cancer, and infections are estimated to account for up to 20% of all cancer cases worldwide. Viral oncogenic mechanisms generally include: generation of genomic instability, increase in the rate of cell proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, alterations in DNA repair mechanisms and cell polarity changes, which often coexist with evasion mechanisms of the antiviral immune response. Viral agents also indirectly contribute to the development of cancer mainly through immunosuppression or chronic inflammation, but also through chronic antigenic stimulation. There is also evidence that viruses can modulate the malignant properties of an established tumor. In the present work, causation criteria for viruses and cancer will be described, as well as the viral agents that comply with these criteria in human tumors, their epidemiological and biological characteristics, the molecular mechanisms by which they induce cellular transformation and their associated cancers.

  10. Comparative Evaluation of Vaccine Efficacy of Recombinant Marek's Disease Virus Vaccine Lacking Meq Oncogene in Commercial Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease virus oncogene meq has been identified as the gene involved in tumorigenesis in chickens. We have recently developed a Meq-null virus, rMd5delMeq, in which the oncogene Meq was deleted. Vaccine efficacy experiments conducted in ADOL 15I5 x 71 chickens vaccinated with rMd5delMeq virus...

  11. Attenuation of Marek's disease virus lacking the Meq oncogene in cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek’s disease virus (MDV) encodes a basic leucine zipper oncoprotein, meq, which structurally resembles the jun/fos family of transcriptional activators. It has been clearly demonstrated that deletion of meq results in loss of transformation and oncogenic capacity of MDV. Chickens vaccinated with ...

  12. The human minisatellite consensus at breakpoints of oncogene translocations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krowczynska, A.; Krontiris, T.G. (New England Medical Center Hospitals, Boston, MA (United States) Tufts Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)); Rudders, R.A. (New England Medical Center Hospitals, Boston, MA (United States))

    1990-03-11

    A reexamination of human minisatellite (hypervariable) regions following the cloning and sequencing of the new minisatellite, VTR1. 1, revealed that many of these structures possessed a strongly conserved copy of the chi-like octamer, GC(A/T)GG(A/T)GG. In oncogene translocations apparently created by aberrant VDJ recombinase activity, this VTR octamer was often found within a few bases of the breakpoint. Three bcl2 rearrangements which occurred within 2 bp of one another were located precisely adjacent to this consensus; it defined the 5{prime} border of that oncogene's major breakpoint cluster. Several c-myc translocations also occurred within 2 bp of this sequence. While the appearance of a chi-like element in polymorphic minisatellite sequences is consistent with a role promoting either recombination or replication slippage, the existence of such elements at sites of somatic translocations suggests chi function in site-specific recombination, perhaps as a subsidiary recognition signal in immunoglobulin gene rearrangement. The authors discuss the implications of these observations for mechanisms by which oncogene translocations and minisatellite sequences are generated.

  13. Oncogenic Properties of Candidate Oncogenes in Chromosome Region 17p11.2p12 in Human Osteosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Both, Joeri; Wu, Thijs; Ten Asbroek, Anneloor L M A; Baas, Frank; Hulsebos, Theo J M

    2016-01-01

    Osteosarcomas are primary tumors of bone that most often develop in adolescents. They are characterized by complex genomic changes including amplifications, deletions, and translocations. The chromosome region 17p11.2p12 is frequently amplified in human high grade osteosarcomas (25% of cases), suggesting the presence of one or more oncogenes. In previous studies, we identified 9 candidate oncogenes in this region (GID4, ARGHAP44, LRRC75A-AS1, TOP3A, COPS3, SHMT1, PRPSAP2, PMP22, and RASD1). The aim of the present study was to determine their oncogenic properties. Therefore, we generated osteosarcoma cell lines overexpressing these genes, except for LRRC75A-AS1 and PRPSAP2, and subjected these to functional oncogenic assays. We found that TOP3A, SHMT1, and RASD1 overexpression provided increased proliferation and that ARGHAP44, COPS3, and PMP22 overexpression had a stimulatory effect on migration and invasion of the cells. COPS3 and PMP22 overexpression additionally improved the ability of the cells to form new colonies. No oncogenic effect could be demonstrated for GID4 overexpression. We conclude that the concerted amplification-mediated overexpression of these genes in 17p11.2p12 may contribute to the oncogenic process in malignant osteosarcoma. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Epidemiology of virus infection and human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chien-Jen; Hsu, Wan-Lun; Yang, Hwai-I; Lee, Mei-Hsuan; Chen, Hui-Chi; Chien, Yin-Chu; You, San-Lin

    2014-01-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has comprehensively assessed the human carcinogenicity of biological agents. Seven viruses including Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), Kaposi's sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV), human immunodeficiency virus, type-1 (HIV-1), human T cell lymphotrophic virus, type-1 (HTLV-1), and human papillomavirus (HPV) have been classified as Group 1 human carcinogens by IARC. The conclusions are based on the findings of epidemiological and mechanistic studies. EBV, HPV, HTLV-1, and KSHV are direct carcinogens; HBV and HCV are indirect carcinogens through chronic inflammation; HIV-1 is an indirect carcinogen through immune suppression. Some viruses may cause more than one cancer, while some cancers may be caused by more than one virus. However, only a proportion of persons infected by these oncogenic viruses will develop specific cancers. A series of studies have been carried out to assess the viral, host, and environmental cofactors of EBV-associated nasopharyngeal carcinoma, HBV/HCV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma, and HPV-associated cervical carcinoma. Persistent infection and high viral load are important risk predictors of these virus-caused cancers. Risk calculators incorporating host and viral factors have also been developed for the prediction of long-term risk of hepatocellular carcinoma. These risk calculators are useful for the triage and clinical management of infected patients. Both clinical trials and national programs of immunization or antiviral therapy have demonstrated a significant reduction in the incidence of cancers caused by HBV, HCV, and HPV. Future researches on gene-gene and gene-environment interaction of oncogenic viruses and human host are in urgent need.

  15. Significance of hepatitis virus infection in the oncogenic initiation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukowati, Caecilia H C; El-Khobar, Korri E; Ie, Susan I; Anfuso, Beatrice; Muljono, David H; Tiribelli, Claudio

    2016-01-28

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Chronic infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a major risk factor in the development of the HCC, independently from excessive alcohol abuse and metabolic disease. Since the biology of HBV and HCV is different, their oncogenic effect may go through different mechanisms, direct and/or indirect. Viral hepatitis infection is associated with cellular inflammation, oxidative stress, and DNA damage, that may lead to subsequent hepatic injuries such as chronic hepatitis, fibrosis, cirrhosis, and finally HCC. Direct oncogenic properties of these viruses are related with their genotypic characteristics and the ability of viral proteins to interact with host proteins, thus altering the molecular pathways balance of the cells. In addition, the integration of HBV DNA, especially the gene S and X, in a particular site of the host genome can disrupt chromosomal stability and may activate various oncogenic mechanisms, including those in hematopoietic cells. Recently, several studies also had demonstrated that viral hepatitis could trigger the population of hepatic cancer stem cells. This review summarize available pre-clinical and clinical data in literature regarding oncogenic properties of HBV and HCV in the early initiation of HCC.

  16. Virus infection and human cancer: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R

    2014-01-01

    It is now estimated that approximately 10 % of worldwide cancers are attributable to viral infection, with the vast majority (>85 %) occurring in the developing world. Oncogenic viruses include various classes of DNA and RNA viruses and induce cancer by a variety of mechanisms. A unifying theme is that cancer develops in a minority of infected individuals and only after chronic infection of many years duration. The viruses associated with the greatest number of cancer cases are the human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which cause cervical cancer and several other epithelial malignancies, and the hepatitis viruses HBV and HCV, which are responsible for the majority of hepatocellular cancer. Other oncoviruses include Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV), human T-cell leukemia virus (HTLV-I), and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV). Identification of the infectious cause has led to several interventions that may reduce the risk of developing these tumors. These include preventive vaccines against HBV and HPV, HPV-based testing for cervical cancer screening, anti-virals for the treatment of chronic HBV and HCV infection, and screening the blood supply for the presence of HBV and HCV. Successful efforts to identify additional oncogenic viruses in human cancer may lead to further insight into etiology and pathogenesis as well as to new approaches for therapeutic and prophylactic intervention.

  17. Human Parainfluenza Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Parainfluenza Viruses (HPIVs) Note: Javascript is disabled or ... CDC.gov . Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) commonly cause respiratory illnesses in ...

  18. [Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1 oncogene variants in cell lines of different origin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovleva, L S; Senyuta, N B; Goncharova, E V; Scherback, L N; Smirnova, R V; Pavlish, O A; Gurtsevitch, V E

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a widespread infection in the human population. Typically, infection occurs in early childhood without serious consequences for infected people. At the same time, a secondary infection with an additional EBV strain occurs quite often. During the in vitro cultivation of peripheral blood lymphocytes from persons infected with multiple strains of the virus, only one of these strains with higher transforming potential becomes dominant, while the others are eliminated. Under certain conditions, such a highly transforming EBV strain apparently is able to be the etiologic agent of EBVassociated diseases. To find out the range of highly transforming EBV strains prevalent among Russians, cell lines from patients with EBV-associated and non-associated tumors, as well as healthy individuals, were established. The structural analysis of the latent membrane protein 1 gene (LMP1), a key oncogene of the virus, isolated from established cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes of blood donors was carried out, and data obtained were compared with the respective data for LMP1 isolates, amplified from cell lines established from African and Japanese patients with Burkitt's lymphoma. The data obtained show a genetic relationship between Russian LMP1 isolates regardless the fact whether they come from patients with tumors or healthy individuals and differ significantly from LMP1 isolates from Burkitt's lymphoma patients. Thus, the results of the study suggest that in nonendemic region for EBV-associated pathology, Russia, any strain of EBV with any structure of LMP1 with concomitant effect of additional factors may become an etiologic agent for EBV-associated neoplasia.

  19. Two novel genital human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, related to the potentially oncogenic HPV39.

    OpenAIRE

    Longuet, M; Beaudenon, S; Orth, G

    1996-01-01

    The genomes of two novel human papillomavirus (HPV) types, HPV68 and HPV70, were cloned from a low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and a vulvar papilloma, respectively, and partially sequenced. Both types are related to HPV39, a potentially oncogenic virus. HPV68 and HPV70 were also detected in genital intraepithelial neoplasia from three patients and one patient, respectively. Comparison with sequence data in the literature indicates that the subgenomic ME180-HPV DNA fragment, clone...

  20. Cáncer Oral: Oncogenes y virus como posibles factores

    OpenAIRE

    Sabater Recolons, Ma. del Mar; Viñals Iglesias, Helena; Caballero Herrera, Rafael

    1999-01-01

    La aparición del cáncer oral se ha vinculado a la presencia de multitud de factores de riesgo. En este artículo se intentan dar unas nociones sobre la posible relación de determinadas alteraciones genéticas y de los virus como factores etiológicos.

  1. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  2. Ultrasensitive detection of oncogenic human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal tissue swabs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Andre; Kostiuk, Morris; Zhang, Han; Lindsay, Cameron; Makki, Fawaz; O'Connell, Daniel A; Harris, Jeffrey R; Cote, David W J; Seikaly, Hadi; Biron, Vincent L

    2017-01-14

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) caused by oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is rising worldwide. HPV-OPSCC is commonly diagnosed by RT-qPCR of HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins or by p16 immunohistochemistry (IHC). Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been recently reported as an ultra-sensitive and highly precise method of nucleic acid quantification for biomarker analysis. To validate the use of a minimally invasive assay for detection of oncogenic HPV based on oropharyngeal swabs using ddPCR. Secondary objectives were to compare the accuracy of ddPCR swabs to fresh tissue p16 IHC and RT-qPCR, and to compare the cost of ddPCR with p16 IHC. We prospectively included patients with p16+ oral cavity/oropharyngeal cancer (OC/OPSCC), and two control groups: p16- OC/OPSCC patients, and healthy controls undergoing tonsillectomy. All underwent an oropharyngeal swab with ddPCR for quantitative detection of E6 and E7 mRNA. Surgical specimens had p16 IHC performed. Agreement between ddPCR and p16 IHC was determined for patients with p16 positive and negative OC/OPSCC as well as for healthy control patients. The sensitivity and specificity of ddPCR of oropharyngeal swabs were calculated against p16 IHC for OPSCC. 122 patients were included: 36 patients with p16+OPSCC, 16 patients with p16-OPSCC, 4 patients with p16+OCSCC, 41 patients with p16-OCSCC, and 25 healthy controls. The sensitivity and specificity of ddPCR of oropharyngeal swabs against p16 IHC were 92 and 98% respectively, using 20-50 times less RNA than that required for conventional RT-qPCR. Overall agreement between ddPCR of tissue swabs and p16 of tumor tissue was high at ĸ = 0.826 [0.662-0.989]. Oropharyngeal swabs analyzed by ddPCR is a quantitative, rapid, and effective method for minimally invasive oncogenic HPV detection. This assay represents the most sensitive and accurate mode of HPV detection in OPSCC without a tissue biopsy in the available literature.

  3. Mouse Model of Human Breast Cancer Initiated by a Fusion Oncogene

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orkin, Stuart H

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we generated a novel mouse model of human breast cancer based on a recurrent chromosomal translocation that produces the TEL-NTRK3 fusion oncogene, as the initiating mutation in human...

  4. Transactivation of proto-oncogene c-Myc by hepatitis B virus transactivator MHBst167.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Yong-Zhi; Cheng, Jun; Chi, Qing; Wang, Xue-Lei; Gao, Meng; Sun, Li-DA

    2014-08-01

    C-terminally truncated hepatitis B virus (HBV) middle size surface proteins (MHBst) has been shown to be a transcriptional activator and may be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis by transactivating gene expression. In the present study, a pcDNA3.1(-)-MHBst167 vector coding for MHBst truncated at amino acid 167 (MHBst167) was constructed and transfected into the HepG2 hepatoma cell line. mRNA and protein expression of MHBst167 in the cells was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot analysis. A cDNA library of genes transactivated by the truncated protein in HepG2 cells was made in pGEM-T Easy using suppression subtractive hybridization. The cDNAs were sequenced and analyzed with BLAST searching against the sequences in GenBank. The results showed that certain sequences, such as that of human proto-oncogene c-Myc, may be involved in tumor development. An expression vector pCAT3/c-Myc containing the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under the control of a c-Myc promoter was generated, and the transcriptional transactivating effect of MHBst167 on the c-Myc promoter was investigated by RT-PCR and western blotting. MHBst167 was found to upregulate the transcriptional activity of the promoter, as well as transcription and translation of c-Myc. MHBst167 was also shown to transactivate SV40 immediate early promoter, and transcriptionally transactivate the expression of human c-Myc. These findings provide new directions for studying the biological functions of MHBst167, and for a better understanding of the tumor development mechanisms of HBV infection.

  5. Evaluation of Factors Affecting Vaccine Efficacy of Recombinant Marek's Disease Virus Lacking the Meq Oncogene in Chickens

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have previously reported that deletion of Meq gene from oncogenic rMd5 virus rendered it apathogenic for chickens. Here we examined multiple factors affecting Marek’s disease (MD) vaccine efficacy of this non-pathogenic recombinant Meq null rMd5 virus (rMd5deltaMeq). These factors included host g...

  6. [The expression of oncogene c-myc and its role on human laryngeal cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xiaobo; Hu, Shuang; Cao, Pingping; Liu, Zheng; Zhen, Hongtao; Cui, Yonghua

    2009-12-01

    To detect the expression of oncogene c-myc and explore its role on human laryngeal cancer. The mRNA and of oncogene c-myc levels were detected in human laryngeal cancer tissues and laryngeal normal tissues by the means of real-time PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Compared with normal laryngeal tissues, the mRNA and protein levels of oncogene c-myc were both upregulated in laryngeal cancer tissues of all differentiation degree (P<0.05). Moreover, the level of c-myc was inverse correlated with the differentiation degree in human laryngeal cancer tissues. The oncogene c-myc is overexpressed in human laryngeal cancer tissues, and c-myc may play an important role in carcinogenesis and progression of human laryngeal cancer tissues. It may provide a new target for gene therapy of human laryngeal cancer.

  7. An Oncogenic Virus Promotes Cell Survival and Cellular Transformation by Suppressing Glycolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerobic glycolysis is essential for supporting the fast growth of a variety of cancers. However, its role in the survival of cancer cells under stress conditions is unclear. We have previously reported an efficient model of gammaherpesvirus Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV-induced cellular transformation of rat primary mesenchymal stem cells. KSHV-transformed cells efficiently induce tumors in nude mice with pathological features reminiscent of Kaposi's sarcoma tumors. Here, we report that KSHV promotes cell survival and cellular transformation by suppressing aerobic glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation under nutrient stress. Specifically, KSHV microRNAs and vFLIP suppress glycolysis by activating the NF-κB pathway to downregulate glucose transporters GLUT1 and GLUT3. While overexpression of the transporters rescues the glycolytic activity, it induces apoptosis and reduces colony formation efficiency in softagar under glucose deprivation. Mechanistically, GLUT1 and GLUT3 inhibit constitutive activation of the AKT and NF-κB pro-survival pathways. Strikingly, GLUT1 and GLUT3 are significantly downregulated in KSHV-infected cells in human KS tumors. Furthermore, we have detected reduced levels of aerobic glycolysis in several KSHV-infected primary effusion lymphoma cell lines compared to a Burkitt's lymphoma cell line BJAB, and KSHV infection of BJAB cells reduced aerobic glycolysis. These results reveal a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus regulates a key metabolic pathway to adapt to stress in tumor microenvironment, and illustrate the importance of fine-tuning the metabolic pathways for sustaining the proliferation and survival of cancer cells, particularly under stress conditions.

  8. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichero, Laura, E-mail: lsichero@gmail.com [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Simao Sobrinho, Joao [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Lina Villa, Luisa [Molecular Biology Laboratory, Center of Translational Oncology, Instituto do Cancer do Estado de Sao Paulo-ICESP, Sao Paulo 01246-000 (Brazil); Department of Virology, Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, Sao Paulo 01323-903 (Brazil); Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, University of Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  9. Novel Oncogene Induced Metastatic Prostate Cancer Cell Lines Define Human Prostate Cancer Progression Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Xiaoming; Ertel, Adam; Casimiro, Mathew; Yu, Zuoren; Meng, Hui; McCue, Peter A.; Walters, Rhonda; Fortina, Paolo; Lisanti, Michael P.; Pestell, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, murine prostate cancer cell lines, generated via selective transduction with a single oncogene (c-Myc, Ha-Ras, and v-Src), demonstrated oncogene-specific prostate cancer molecular signatures that were recapitulated in human prostate cancer, and developed lung metastasis in immune competent mice. Interrogation of two independent retrospective cohorts of patient samples using the oncogene signature demonstrated an ability to distinguish tumor from normal prostate with a predictive value for prostate cancer of 98 – 99%. In a blinded study, the signature algorithm demonstrated independent substratification of reduced recurrence free survival by Kaplan-Meier analysis. The generation of new oncogene-specific prostate cancer cell lines that recapitulate human prostate cancer gene expression, that metastasize in immune-competent mice, are a valuable new resource for testing targeted therapy while the molecular signatures identified herein provides further value over current gene signature markers of prediction and outcome. PMID:23204233

  10. Oncogene Activation Induces Metabolic Transformation Resulting in Insulin-Independence in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollig-Fischer, Aliccia; Dewey, T. Gregory; Ethier, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    Normal breast epithelial cells require insulin and EGF for growth in serum-free media. We previously demonstrated that over expression of breast cancer oncogenes transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Additionally, most breast cancer cell lines are insulin-independent for growth. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which oncogene over expression transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Analysis of the effects of various concentrations of insulin and/or IGF-I on proliferation of MCF10A cells demonstrated that some of the effects of insulin were independent from those of IGF-I, suggesting that oncogene over expression drives a true insulin-independent proliferative phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic functions of insulin signaling in insulin-dependent and insulin-independent cells. HER2 over expression in MCF10A cells resulted in glucose uptake in the absence of insulin at a rate equal to insulin-induced glucose uptake in non-transduced cells. We found that a diverse set of oncogenes induced the same result. To gain insight into how HER2 oncogene signaling affected increased insulin-independent glucose uptake we compared HER2-regulated gene expression signatures in MCF10A and HER2 over expressing MCF10A cells by differential analysis of time series gene expression data from cells treated with a HER2 inhibitor. This analysis identified genes specifically regulated by the HER2 oncogene, including VAMP8 and PHGDH, which have known functions in glucose uptake and processing of glycolytic intermediates, respectively. Moreover, these genes specifically implicated in HER2 oncogene-driven transformation are commonly altered in human breast cancer cells. These results highlight the diversity of oncogene effects on cell regulatory pathways and the importance of oncogene-driven metabolic transformation in breast cancer. PMID:21437235

  11. Oncogene activation induces metabolic transformation resulting in insulin-independence in human breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliccia Bollig-Fischer

    Full Text Available Normal breast epithelial cells require insulin and EGF for growth in serum-free media. We previously demonstrated that over expression of breast cancer oncogenes transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Additionally, most breast cancer cell lines are insulin-independent for growth. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which oncogene over expression transforms MCF10A cells to an insulin-independent phenotype. Analysis of the effects of various concentrations of insulin and/or IGF-I on proliferation of MCF10A cells demonstrated that some of the effects of insulin were independent from those of IGF-I, suggesting that oncogene over expression drives a true insulin-independent proliferative phenotype. To test this hypothesis, we examined metabolic functions of insulin signaling in insulin-dependent and insulin-independent cells. HER2 over expression in MCF10A cells resulted in glucose uptake in the absence of insulin at a rate equal to insulin-induced glucose uptake in non-transduced cells. We found that a diverse set of oncogenes induced the same result. To gain insight into how HER2 oncogene signaling affected increased insulin-independent glucose uptake we compared HER2-regulated gene expression signatures in MCF10A and HER2 over expressing MCF10A cells by differential analysis of time series gene expression data from cells treated with a HER2 inhibitor. This analysis identified genes specifically regulated by the HER2 oncogene, including VAMP8 and PHGDH, which have known functions in glucose uptake and processing of glycolytic intermediates, respectively. Moreover, these genes specifically implicated in HER2 oncogene-driven transformation are commonly altered in human breast cancer cells. These results highlight the diversity of oncogene effects on cell regulatory pathways and the importance of oncogene-driven metabolic transformation in breast cancer.

  12. Oncogenic rearrangements driving ionizing radiation-associated human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoro, Massimo; Carlomagno, Francesca

    2013-11-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear disaster has caused a remarkable increase in radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinoma in children and young adults. In this issue of the JCI, Ricarte-Filho and colleagues demonstrate that chromosomal rearrangements are the oncogenic "drivers" in most post-Chernobyl carcinomas and that they often lead to unscheduled activation of the MAPK signaling pathway. These findings represent a major step forward in our understanding of radiation-induced carcinogenesis and suggest various hypotheses about the mechanisms underlying the formation and selection of gene rearrangements during cancer cell evolution.

  13. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Transmission between Archaic and Modern Human Ancestors during the Evolution of the Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus 16.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimenoff, Ville N; de Oliveira, Cristina Mendes; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2017-01-01

    Every human suffers through life a number of papillomaviruses (PVs) infections, most of them asymptomatic. A notable exception are persistent infections by Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16), the most oncogenic infectious agent for humans and responsible for most infection-driven anogenital cancers. Oncogenic potential is not homogeneous among HPV16 lineages, and genetic variation within HPV16 exhibits some geographic structure. However, an in-depth analysis of the HPV16 evolutionary history was still wanting. We have analyzed extant HPV16 diversity and compared the evolutionary and phylogeographical patterns of humans and of HPV16. We show that codivergence with modern humans explains at most 30% of the present viral geographical distribution. The most explanatory scenario suggests that ancestral HPV16 already infected ancestral human populations and that viral lineages co-diverged with the hosts in parallel with the split between archaic Neanderthal-Denisovans and ancestral modern human populations, generating the ancestral HPV16A and HPV16BCD viral lineages, respectively. We propose that after out-of-Africa migration of modern human ancestors, sexual transmission between human populations introduced HPV16A into modern human ancestor populations. We hypothesize that differential coevolution of HPV16 lineages with different but closely related ancestral human populations and subsequent host-switch events in parallel with introgression of archaic alleles into the genomes of modern human ancestors may be largely responsible for the present-day differential prevalence and association with cancers for HPV16 variants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  15. The oncogenic potential of human cytomegalovirus and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges eHerbein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer is among the leading causes of cancer-related death among women. The vast majority of breast cancers are carcinomas that originate from cells lining the milk-forming ducts of the mammary gland. Numerous articles indicate that breast tumors exhibit diverse phenotypes depending on their distinct physiopathological signatures, clinical courses and therapeutic possibilities. The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV is a multifaceted highly host specific betaherpesvirus that is regarded as asymptomatic or mildly pathogenic virus in immunocompetent host. HCMV may cause serious in utero infections as well as acute and chronic complications in immunocompromised individual. The involvement of HCMV in late inflammatory complications underscores its possible role in inflammatory diseases and cancer. HCMV targets a variety of cell types in vivo, including macrophages, epithelial cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, stromal cells, neuronal cells, smooth muscle cells, and hepatocytes. HCMV can be detected in the milk after delivery and thereby HCMV could spread to adjacent mammary epithelial cells. HCMV also infects macrophages and induces an atypical M1/M2 phenotype, close to the tumor associated macrophage phenotype, which is associated with the release of cytokines involved in cancer initiation or promotion and breast cancer of poor prognosis. HCMV antigens and DNA have been detected in tissue biopsies of breast cancers and elevation in serum HCMV IgG antibody levels has been reported to precede the development of breast cancer in some women. In this review, we will discuss the potential role of HCMV in the initiation and progression of breast cancer.

  16. Multiple oncogenic viruses identified in Ocular surface squamous neoplasia in HIV-1 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bisson Gregory

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ocular surface squamous neoplasia (OSSN is a rare cancer that has increased in incidence with the HIV pandemic in Africa. The underlying cause of this cancer in HIV-infected patients from Botswana is not well defined. Results Tissues were obtained from 28 OSSN and 8 pterygia patients. The tissues analyzed from OSSN patients were 83% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 70% were KSHV positive, 75% were HSV-1/2 positive, and 61% were CMV positive by PCR. Tissues from pterygium patients were 88% positive for EBV, 75% were HPV positive, 50% were KSHV positive, and 60% were CMV positive. None of the patients were JC or BK positive. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry analyses further identified HPV, EBV, and KSHV in a subset of the tissue samples. Conclusion We identified the known oncogenic viruses HPV, KSHV, and EBV in OSSN and pterygia tissues. The presence of these tumor viruses in OSSN suggests that they may contribute to the development of this malignancy in the HIV population. Further studies are necessary to characterize the molecular mechanisms associated with viral antigens and their potential role in the development of OSSN.

  17. Marek’s disease herpesvirus vaccines integrate into chicken host chromosomes yet lack a virus-host phenotype associated with oncogenic transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease (MD) is a lymphotrophic and oncogenic disease of chickens that can lead to death in susceptible and unimmunized host birds. The causative pathogen, Marek's disease virus (MDV), a highly oncogenic alphaherpesvirus, integrates into host genome near the telomeres during viral latency an...

  18. Detection and expression of human papillomavirus oncogenes in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciotti, Marco; Giuliani, Laura; Ambrogi, Vincenzo; Ronci, Corrado; Benedetto, Arrigo; Mineo, Tommaso C; Syrjänen, Kari; Favalli, Cartesio

    2006-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been found in lung cancer cases with variable frequency. In the present study, we analysed a series of 38 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) (21 paraffin-embedded archival samples and 17 fresh surgical specimens) for the presence of E6 and E7 oncogenes of HPV16, 18 and 31. Eight of the tumours were positive (21%): six HPV16, one HPV16+18, and one HPV31. The normal tissue surrounding the HPV-positive tumour was negative for the presence of the virus. Sequencing analysis of URR, of HPV16, which was the most frequently found HPV type in our cases, showed an adenosine deletion at nucleotide 7861 (E2-binding site) in four out of six patients. Sequencing of the entire E6 and E7 genes of HPV16 showed a T to G transition at nucleotide position 350 of E6, in all examined cases. This mutation is associated to the European variant of HPV16. Analysis of E6 and E7 transcripts was performed on the six fresh surgical specimens infected by HPV16. Our study showed that all of the tumours investigated, except one, contained E6 and E7 transcripts. Only in one case could we identify an unspliced form of the E6 transcript. Our results strengthen the relationship between HPV and NSCLC and support the hypothesis that HPV infection could play a role in bronchial carcinogenesis.

  19. Malignant transformation of human fibroblasts caused by expression of a transfected T24 HRAS oncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    Hurlin, P J; Maher, V M; McCormick, J J

    1989-01-01

    We showed previously that diploid human fibroblasts that express a transfected HRAS oncogene from the human bladder carcinoma cell line T24 exhibit several characteristics of transformed cells but do not acquire an infinite life-span and are not tumorigenic. To extend these studies of the T24 HRAS in human cells, we have utilized an infinite life-span, but otherwise phenotypically normal, human fibroblast cell strain, MSU-1.1, developed in this laboratory after transfection of diploid fibrobl...

  20. Cataracts in transgenic mice caused by a human papillomavirus type 18 E7 oncogene driven by KRT1-14.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghim, Shinje; Jenson, A Bennett; Bubier, Jason A; Silva, Kathleen A; Smith, Richard S; Sundberg, John P

    2008-10-01

    Human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) is a common cause of cervical cancer. To create a mouse model for this common neoplastic disease, we used a human keratin 14 promoter to drive the HPV18 E7 oncogene to create transgenic mice. No mice up to a year of age developed cervical cancer. However, all transgenic mice and none of the controls developed progressive bilateral cortical cataracts. By 6 months of age, the cortex liquefied leaving the lens nucleus. Proliferation of lens epithelium formed multifocal nodules and free floating lens epithelial cells within the liquefied cortex. These cells were hyperplastic not neoplastic. Other HPV transgenic stocks develop cataracts suggesting this virus may have a broad cellular tropism.

  1. Environmentally sensitive molecular probes reveal mutations and epigenetic 5-methyl cytosine in human oncogenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taskova, M.; Barducci, M. C.; Astakhova, K.

    2017-01-01

    , bisulfite treatment of DNA is applied for the analysis, which often leads to poor specificity and reproducibility of the results. Herein we describe a simple approach that specifically detects clinically significant modifications in the human oncogenes BRAF and KRAS. We prove that this can be done using...

  2. Amplification and over-expression of the neu oncogene in human breast carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, M. J.; Mooi, W. J.; Peterse, J. L.; Nusse, R.

    1988-01-01

    Amplification of the neu (or c-erbB-2 or HER) oncogene is found to be present in 15-30% of human breast carcinomas and has been reported to correlate with poor prognosis. We briefly review the literature on this subject with emphasis on our own results on immunohistochemical detection of neu

  3. Canadian oncogenic human papillomavirus cervical infection prevalence: Systematic review and meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pham Ba'

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV infection prevalence is required to determine optimal vaccination strategies. We systematically reviewed the prevalence of oncogenic cervical HPV infection among Canadian females prior to immunization. Methods We included studies reporting DNA-confirmed oncogenic HPV prevalence estimates among Canadian females identified through searching electronic databases (e.g., MEDLINE and public health websites. Two independent reviewers screened literature results, abstracted data and appraised study quality. Prevalence estimates were meta-analyzed among routine screening populations, HPV-positive, and by cytology/histology results. Results Thirty studies plus 21 companion reports were included after screening 837 citations and 120 full-text articles. Many of the studies did not address non-response bias (74% or use a representative sampling strategy (53%. Age-specific prevalence was highest among females aged Conclusion Our results support vaccinating females

  4. Presence of highly oncogenic human papillomavirus in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic men

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Ana Paula; Gatto de Almeida, Flávia; Bonin, Camila Mareti; Martins Prata, Thiago Theodoro; Sobrinho Ávilla, Leandro; Junqueira Padovani, Cacilda Tezelli; Teixeira Ferreira, Alda Maria; dos Santos Fernandes, Carlos Eurico; Tozetti,Inês Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify highly oncogenic forms of human papillomavirus in the oral mucosa of asymptomatic men. METHODS: In this study, we analyzed samples of exfoliated cells from the oral cavity of 559 asymptomatic men. DNA-human papillomavirus was detected using the consensus primers PGMY09/11; viral genotyping was performed using type-specific PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism. RESULTS: DNA-human papillomavirus was detected in 1.3% of the s...

  5. Molecular Interactions of High Energy Fuels and Jet Fuels with Oncogenic Viruses and Endogenous Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-05-01

    2.0 or until the cultures had reached log phase (approximately 4 x 108 cells/ml). At this time, chloramphenicol at 200 Wg/ml was added to amplify...Escherichia coli in the presence of chloramphenicol . J. of Bacteriology 110 (No 2): 667-676. 21. Coffin, J. M., Varmus, H. E., Bishop, J. M., Essex, M...chenical used in the emperixLents. In vitro studies with rat or mouse cells and viruses shoed synergism (14-16). Thus, HS? and ST-FeSV systen, show a

  6. Cytogenetic damage, oncogenic transformation and p53 induction in human epithelial cells in response to irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, Mark

    Ionizing radiation can have several different effects on cells, some are almost instantaneous such as the generation of DNA damage, other cellular responses take a matter of minutes or hours - DNA repair protein induction/activation, and others may take months or even years to be manifested - carcinogenesis. Human epithelial cell lines derived from both normal, non-neoplastic tissues and from a malignant source were cultured in order to examine several effects of ionizing radiation on such cell types. Cells not from a malignant source were previously immortalized by viral infection or by transfection with viral sequences. Simian virus 40 immortalised uroepithelial cells (SV-HUC) were found to be approximately a factor of two fold more radioresistant than cells of malignant origin (T24) in terms of unrepaired clastogenic damage i.e. assessment of micronuclei levels following irradiation. SV-HUC lines unlike T24 cells are non-tumourigenic when inoculated into nude athymic mice. SV-HUC lines proved very resistant to full oncogenic transformation using radiation and chemical carcinogens. However, morphological alterations and decreased anchorage dependant growth was observed in post carcinogen treated cells after appropriate cell culture conditions were utilized. The progression from this phenotype to a fully tumourigenic one was not recorded in this study. The ability of ionizing radiation to induce increased levels of the nuclear phosphoprotein p53 was also assessed using several different cell lines. SV- HUC and T24 cell lines failed to exhibit any increased p53 stabilization following irradiation. One cell line, a human papilloma virus transformed line (HPV) did show an approximate two fold increase of the wild type p53 protein after treatment with radiation. Only the cell line HPV showed any cell cycle delay, resulting in accumulation of cells in the G2/M compartment in post irradiation cell cycle analysis. The status of p53 was also assessed i.e. wild type or

  7. Human tumor-associated viruses and new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, D; Gutkind, J S

    2008-12-01

    The study of acute-transforming retroviruses and their oncogenes and of the multiple mechanisms deployed by DNA viruses to circumvent the growth-suppressive and proapoptotic function of tumor suppressor genes has provided the foundation of our current understanding of cancer biology. Unlike acute-transforming animal viruses, however, human tumor-associated viruses lead to malignancies with a prolonged latency and in conjunction with other environmental and host-related cooperating events. The relevance of viral infection to human cancer development has often been debated. We now know that at least six human viruses, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), human papilloma virus (HPV), human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV-1) and Kaposi's associated sarcoma virus (KSHV) contribute to 10-15% of the cancers worldwide. Hence, the opportunity exists to fight cancer at the global scale by preventing the spread of these viruses, by the development and distribution of effective and safe antiviral vaccines, and by identifying their oncogenic mechanism. Here, we discuss the molecular events underlying the neoplastic potential of the human tumor-associated viruses, with emphasis on the enigmatic KSHV and its numerous virally hijacked proangiogenic, immune-evasive and tumor-promoting genes. The emerging information may facilitate the development of new molecular-targeted approaches to prevent and treat virally associated human malignancies.

  8. The mysterious human epidermal cell cycle, or an oncogene-induced differentiation checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandarillas, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, we reported that proto-oncogene MYC promoted differentiation of human epidermal stem cells, a finding that was surprising to the MYC and the skin research communities. MYC was one of the first human oncogenes identified, and it had been strongly associated with proliferation. However, it was later shown that MYC could induce apoptosis under low survival conditions. Currently, the notion that MYC promotes epidermal differentiation is widely accepted, but the cell cycle mechanisms that elicit this function remain unresolved. We have recently reported that keratinocytes respond to cell cycle deregulation and DNA damage by triggering terminal differentiation. This mechanism might constitute a homeostatic protection face to cell cycle insults. Here, I discuss recent and not-so-recent evidence suggesting the existence of a largely unexplored oncogene-induced differentiation response (OID) analogous to oncogene-induced apoptosis (OIA) or senescence (OIS). In addition, I propose a model for the role of the cell cycle in skin homeostasis maintenance and for the dual role of MYC in differentiation. PMID:23114621

  9. Oncogenic human papillomavirus E6 proteins target the discs large tumour suppressor for proteasome-mediated degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiol, D; Kühne, C; Glaunsinger, B; Lee, S S; Javier, R; Banks, L

    1999-09-30

    Previous studies have shown that the oncogenic HPV E6 proteins form a complex with the human homologue of the Drosophila tumour suppressor protein, discs large (Dlg). This is mediated by the carboxy terminus of the E6 proteins and involves recognition of at least one PDZ domain of Dlg. This region of E6 is not conserved amongst E6 proteins from the low risk papillomavirus types and, hence, binding of HPV E6 proteins to Dlg correlates with the oncogenic potential of these viruses. We have performed studies to investigate the consequences of the interaction between E6 and Dlg. Mutational analysis of both the HPV18 E6 and Dlg proteins has further defined the regions of E6 and Dlg necessary for complex formation. Strikingly, co-expression of wild type HPV18 E6 with Dlg in vitro or in vivo results in a dramatic decrease in the amount of Dlg protein, whereas mutants of E6 which fail to complex with Dlg have minimal effect on Dlg protein levels. The oncogenic HPV16 E6 also decreased the Dlg levels, but this was not observed with the low risk HPV11 E6 protein. Moreover, a region within the first 544 amino acids of Dlg containing the three PDZ domains confers susceptibility to E6 mediated degradation. Finally, treatment of cells with a proteasome inhibitor overrides the capacity of E6 to degrade Dlg. These results demonstrate that Dlg is targeted by high risk HPV E6 proteins for proteasome mediated degradation.

  10. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far.

  11. Initiating oncogenic event determines gene-expression patterns of human breast cancer models

    OpenAIRE

    Desai, Kartiki V; Xiao, Nianqing; Wang, Weili; Gangi, Lisa; Greene, John; Powell, John I.; Dickson, Robert; Furth, Priscilla; Hunter, Kent; Kucherlapati, Raju; Simon, Richard; Liu, Edison T; Green, Jeffrey E

    2002-01-01

    Molecular expression profiling of tumors initiated by transgenic overexpression of c-myc, c-neu, c-ha-ras, polyoma middle T antigen (PyMT) or simian virus 40 T/t antigen (T-ag) targeted to the mouse mammary gland have identified both common and oncogene-specific events associated with tumor formation and progression. The tumors shared great similarities in their gene-expression profiles as compared with the normal mammary gland with an induction of cell-cycle regulators, metabolic regulators,...

  12. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pandemic Other Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... A Viruses Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Although avian influenza A viruses usually do not ...

  13. Molecular Interactions of High Energy Fuels and Jet Fuels with Oncogenic Viruses and Endogenous Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-02-01

    furam failed to abrogate the inhibitory effect of MAMA , the ultimate carcinogen of SDMH. Detailed methodology required to ascertain effect of chemicals...Modern Environmental Toxicology Vol. I. Eds, N. Mishra, V. Dunkel, M. M11ehlman. Senate Press, N.J. 1980. (2) "Origins of Human Cancer ", by I.J...Longfellow, Ph.D. Assistant Chief Chemical and Physical Carcinogenesis Branch Division of Cancer Cause and Prevention NCI, NIH, Bethesda, MID 20205 VI

  14. MSH3-deficiency initiates EMAST without oncogenic transformation of human colon epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Campregher

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Elevated microsatellite instability at selected tetranucleotide repeats (EMAST is a genetic signature in certain cases of sporadic colorectal cancer and has been linked to MSH3-deficiency. It is currently controversial whether EMAST is associated with oncogenic properties in humans, specifically as cancer development in Msh3-deficient mice is not enhanced. However, a mutator phenotype is different between species as the genetic positions of repetitive sequences are not conserved. Here we studied the molecular effects of human MSH3-deficiency. METHODS: HCT116 and HCT116+chr3 (both MSH3-deficient and primary human colon epithelial cells (HCEC, MSH3-wildtype were stably transfected with an EGFP-based reporter plasmid for the detection of frameshift mutations within an [AAAG]17 repeat. MSH3 was silenced by shRNA and changes in protein expression were analyzed by shotgun proteomics. Colony forming assay was used to determine oncogenic transformation and double strand breaks (DSBs were assessed by Comet assay. RESULTS: Despite differential MLH1 expression, both HCT116 and HCT116+chr3 cells displayed comparable high mutation rates (about 4×10(-4 at [AAAG]17 repeats. Silencing of MSH3 in HCECs leads to a remarkable increased frameshift mutations in [AAAG]17 repeats whereas [CA]13 repeats were less affected. Upon MSH3-silencing, significant changes in the expression of 202 proteins were detected. Pathway analysis revealed overexpression of proteins involved in double strand break repair (MRE11 and RAD50, apoptosis, L1 recycling, and repression of proteins involved in metabolism, tRNA aminoacylation, and gene expression. MSH3-silencing did not induce oncogenic transformation and DSBs increased 2-fold. CONCLUSIONS: MSH3-deficiency in human colon epithelial cells results in EMAST, formation of DSBs and significant changes of the proteome but lacks oncogenic transformation. Thus, MSH3-deficiency alone is unlikely to drive human colon

  15. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Annette Balle; Lund, Anders Henrik; Kunder, Sandra

    2007-01-01

    leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. RESULTS...... to be associated with specific tumor diagnoses or individual viral mutants. CONCLUSION: We present here the first example of a doubly spliced transcript within the group of gammaretroviruses, and we show that mutation of the alternative splice sites that define this novel RNA product change the oncogenic potential...

  16. Viral Causes of Lymphoma: The History of Epstein-Barr Virus and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Esau

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In 1964, Epstein, Barr, and Achong published a report outlining their discovery of viral particles in lymphoblasts isolated from a patient with Burkitt lymphoma. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV was the first human cancer virus to be described, and its discovery paved the way for further investigations into the oncogenic potential of viruses. In the decades following the discovery of EBV, multinational research efforts led to the discovery of further viral causes of various human cancers. Lymphomas are perhaps the cancer type that is most closely associated with oncogenic viruses: infection with EBV, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV, Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8, and hepatitis C virus have all been associated with lymphomagenesis. Lymphomas have also played an important role in the history of oncoviruses, as both the first human oncovirus (EBV and the first human retrovirus (HTLV-1 were discovered through isolates taken from patients with unique lymphoma syndromes. The history of the discovery of these 2 key oncoviruses is presented here, and their impact on further medical research, using the specific example of HIV research, is briefly discussed.

  17. Viral Causes of Lymphoma: The History of Epstein-Barr Virus and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esau, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In 1964, Epstein, Barr, and Achong published a report outlining their discovery of viral particles in lymphoblasts isolated from a patient with Burkitt lymphoma. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was the first human cancer virus to be described, and its discovery paved the way for further investigations into the oncogenic potential of viruses. In the decades following the discovery of EBV, multinational research efforts led to the discovery of further viral causes of various human cancers. Lymphomas are perhaps the cancer type that is most closely associated with oncogenic viruses: infection with EBV, human T-lymphotropic virus 1 (HTLV-1), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8, and hepatitis C virus have all been associated with lymphomagenesis. Lymphomas have also played an important role in the history of oncoviruses, as both the first human oncovirus (EBV) and the first human retrovirus (HTLV-1) were discovered through isolates taken from patients with unique lymphoma syndromes. The history of the discovery of these 2 key oncoviruses is presented here, and their impact on further medical research, using the specific example of HIV research, is briefly discussed.

  18. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    escape senescence and acquire genomic changes. Nature 2001;409:633–7. 10. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR. Raf-1- induced growth arrest in...p16INK4a. Cell 88:593–602. 10. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR (2002) Raf-1-induced growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells is p16...Cycle 3, 244–246. Olsen CL, Gardie B, Yaswen P, Stampfer MR (2002) Raf-1-induced growth arrest in human mammary epithelial cells is p16-independent and

  19. CDC91L1 (PIG-U) is a newly discovered oncogene in human bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhongmin; Linn, Jürgen F; Wu, Guojun; Anzick, Sarah L; Eisenberger, Claus F; Halachmi, Sarel; Cohen, Yoram; Fomenkov, Alexey; Hoque, Mohammad Obaidul; Okami, Kenji; Steiner, Gabriel; Engles, James M; Osada, Motonabu; Moon, Chulso; Ratovitski, Edward; Trent, Jeffrey M; Meltzer, Paul S; Westra, William H; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Schoenberg, Mark P; Sidransky, David; Trink, Barry

    2004-04-01

    Genomic amplification at 20q11-13 is a common event in human cancers. We isolated a germline translocation breakpoint at 20q11 from a bladder cancer patient. We identified CDC91L1, the gene encoding CDC91L1 (also called phosphatidylinositol glycan class U (PIG-U), a transamidase complex unit in the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring pathway), as the only gene whose expression was affected by the translocation. CDC91L1 was amplified and overexpressed in about one-third of bladder cancer cell lines and primary tumors, as well as in oncogenic uroepithelial cells transformed with human papillomavirus (HPV) E7. Forced overexpression of CDC91L1 malignantly transformed NIH3T3 cells in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of CDC91L1 also resulted in upregulation of the urokinase receptor (uPAR), a GPI-anchored protein, and in turn increased STAT-3 phosphorylation in bladder cancer cells. Our findings suggest that CDC91L1 is an oncogene in bladder cancer, and implicate the GPI anchoring system as a potential oncogenic pathway and therapeutic target in human cancers.

  20. Rescue of avian leukosis subgroup-J-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying different lengths of the v-fps oncogene and analysis of their tumorigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yixin; Fang, Lichun; Li, Jianliang; Li, Yang; Cui, Shuai; Sun, Xiaolong; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-12-01

    In our previous study, six subgroup J strains of avian leukosis virus (ALV-J)-associated acutely transforming viruses carrying different lengths of the v-fps oncogene, designated as Fu-J and Fu-J1-5, were isolated and characterized from fibrosarcomas in ALV-J-infected chickens. In the present study, the oncogenic potential of Fu-J and Fu-J1-5 was investigated using a reverse genetics technique. Six replication-defective viruses, named rFu-J and rFu-J1-5, were rescued with the replication-competent rescued ALV-J strain rSDAU1005 as a helper virus by co-transfection of chicken embryo fibroblast monolayers with infectious clone plasmids. Experimental bird studies were performed, demonstrating that only the rescued rFu-J virus carrying the complete v-fps oncogene with rSDAU1005 as the helper virus could induce acute fibrosarcoma after inoculation in specific-pathogen-free (SPF) chickens. These results provide direct evidence that the replication-defective acutely transforming Fu-J virus, with the complete v-fps oncogene, was associated with acute fibrosarcoma in chickens infected with ALV-J in the field, as reported previously.

  1. Human papillomavirus: E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boulet, Gaëlle; Horvath, Caroline; Vanden Broeck, Davy; Sahebali, Shaira; Bogers, Johannes

    2007-01-01

    The recognition of a causal relationship between human papillomaviruses and cancer almost 30 years ago led to a rapid expansion of knowledge in the field, resulting in the description of the main mediators of HPV-induced carcinogenesis, the viral proteins E6 and E7. These oncoproteins show a remarkable pleiotropism in binding host-cell proteins, with the tumour suppressor genes p53 and pRb as their major targets. These interactions induce proliferation, immortalization and malignant transformation of infected cells. The link between HPV and cervical cancer led to the development of molecular methods, often based on the detection of E6 and E7, for screening and diagnosis. Therapeutic vaccines and gene therapy are primarily directed at E6 and E7. Although prophylactic vaccines are available, further understanding of the viral life cycle and the mechanisms underlying HPV-induced oncogenesis is necessary to face the many challenges in the field of HPV and cancer.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus endocrinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uma Sinha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV endocrinopathy encompasses a broad spectrum of disorders. Almost all the endocrine organs are virtually affected by HIV infection. HIV can directly alter glandular function. More commonly secondary endocrine dysfunction occurs due to opportunistic infections and neoplasms in immunocompromised state. The complex interaction between HIV infection and endocrine system may be manifested as subtle biochemical and hormonal perturbation to overt glandular failure. Antiretroviral therapy as well as other essential medications often result in adverse endocrinal consequences. Apart from adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadism, diabetes and bone loss, AIDS wasting syndrome and HIV lipodystrophy need special reference. Endocrinal evaluation should proceed as in other patients with suspected endocrine dysfunction. Available treatment options have been shown to improve quality of life and long-term mortality in AIDS patients.

  3. Oncogenic human papillomavirus genotyping by multiplex PCR and fragment analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souho, Tiatou; Bennani, Bahia

    2014-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) detection and genotyping are determinant in cervical cancer prevention. They help to identify women at risk and allow the establishment of epidemiologic profiles. Many PCR-based genotyping methods have been developed. They require many steps or specialized equipment increasing the assay duration and cost. This affects their routine use, especially in developing countries. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a new HPV genotyping method that can be routinely used also in low incomes countries. For this purpose, fifteen high risk HPV type specific reverse primers were designed on L1 gene and fluorescently labeled. These primers were used on two multiplex PCR with one common forward primer (MY11). The lengths of products were revealed by capillary electrophoresis. This technique identifies sixteen high risk HPVs (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 53, 56, 58, 59, 68, 73 and 82). It was optimized on HPV genome plasmids and evaluated on artificial and cervical samples. All the sixteen targeted genotypes were identified specifically and repeatedly in simple and multiple infections in both artificial and clinical samples. The developed technique is sensitive, specific, easy to perform and appropriate for routine laboratory use and high throughput screening programs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Prevalence of herpes simplex, Epstein Barr and human papilloma viruses in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Benay; Sengüven, Burcu; Demir, Cem

    2011-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the prevalence of Herpes Simplex virus, Epstein Barr virus and Human Papilloma virus -16 in oral lichen planus cases and to evaluate whether any clinical variant, histopathological or demographic feature correlates with these viruses. The study was conducted on 65 cases. Viruses were detected immunohistochemically. We evaluated the histopathological and demographic features and statistically analysed correlation of these features with Herpes Simplex virus, Epstein Barr virus and Human Papilloma virus-16 positivity. Herpes Simplex virus was positive in six (9%) cases and this was not statistically significant. The number of Epstein Barr virus positive cases was 23 (35%) and it was statistically significant. Human Papilloma virus positivity in 14 cases (21%) was statistically significant. Except basal cell degeneration in Herpes Simplex virus positive cases, we did not observe any significant correlation between virus positivity and demographic or histopathological features. However an increased risk of Epstein Barr virus and Human Papilloma virus infection was noted in oral lichen planus cases. Taking into account the oncogenic potential of both viruses, oral lichen planus cases should be detected for the presence of these viruses.

  5. Human gene control by vital oncogenes: revisiting a theoretical model and its implications for targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willis, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model predicted the

  6. BCL3 exerts an oncogenic function by regulating STAT3 in human cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao H

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Hu Zhao,1 Wuliang Wang,1 Qinghe Zhao,1 Guiming Hu,2 Kehong Deng,1 Yuling Liu1 1Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, 2Department of Pathology, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Aberrant expression of oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors play a fundamental effect on the pathogenesis and tumorigenicity of cervical cancer (CC. B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (BCL3 was previously found to be a putative proto-oncogene in human cancers and regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3, a critical oncogene, in CC cell line. However, its expression status, clinical significance and biological functions in CC remain largely unclear. The expressions of BCL3 and STAT3 in CC specimens were determined by immunohistochemistry. MTT, colony formation assays and flow cytometry analysis were carried out to test proliferation and cell cycle of CC cells. Here, the levels of BCL3 were overexpressed in CC compared to adjacent cervical tissues. Furthermore, high levels of BCL3 protein were confirmed by immunoblotting in CC cells as compared with normal cervical epithelial cells. The positive expression of BCL3 was correlated with adverse prognostic features and reduced survival rate. In addition, BCL3 regulated STAT3 abundance in CC cells. STAT3 was found to be upregulated and positively correlated with BCL3 expression in CC specimens. BCL3 overexpression resulted in prominent increased proliferation and cell cycle progression in Hela cells. By contrast, inhibition of BCL3 in CaSki cells remarkably suppressed proliferative ability and cell cycle progression. In vivo studies showed that knockdown of BCL3 inhibited tumor growth of CC in mice xenograft model. Notably, we confirmed that STAT3 mediated the oncogenic roles of BCL3 in CC. In conclusion, we suggest that BCL3 serves as an oncogene in CC by modulating proliferation and cell cycle progression, and its oncogenic effect is

  7. Individual and Complementary Effects of Human Papillomavirus Oncogenes on Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergner, Sven; Halec, Gordana; Schmitt, Markus; Aubin, François; Alonso, Angel; Auvinen, Eeva

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies on human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 protein functions have established the oncogenic nature of three viral proteins: E5, E6 and E7. Here we have studied the functions of these proteins by functional deletion of the individual E5, E6 or E7, or both E6 and E7 oncogenes in the context of the whole viral genome. These mutants, or the intact wild-type genome, were expressed from the natural viral promoters along with differentiation of epithelial HaCaT cells in three-dimensional collagen raft cultures. High episomal viral copy numbers were obtained using a transfection-based loxp-HPV16-eGFP-N1 vector system. All epithelial equivalents carrying the different HPV type 16 genomes showed pronounced hyperplastic and dysplastic morphology. Particularly the E7 oncogene, with contribution of E6, was shown to enhance cell proliferation. Specifically, the crucial role of E7 in HPV-associated hyperproliferation was clearly manifested. Based on morphological characteristics, immunohistochemical staining for differentiation and proliferation markers, and low expression of E1^E4, we propose that our raft culture models produce cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)1 and CIN2-like tissue. Our experimental setting provides an alternative tool to study concerted functions of HPV proteins in the development of epithelial dysplasia. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus: Application of CRISPR/Cas9 Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Zhen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs cause different types of cancer especially cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR/Cas9 based cancer therapies since the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 are exclusively expressed in cancerous cells. Sequence-specific gene knockdown/knockout using CRISPR/Cas9 shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, CRISPR/Cas9-based targeting therapy requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo to eliminate the potential off-target effects, necessitates verification of the delivery vehicles and the combinatory use of conventional therapies with CRISPR/Cas9 to ensure the feasibility and safety. In this review we discuss the potential of combining CRISPR/Cas9 with other treatment options as therapies for oncogenic HPVs-associated carcinogenesis. and present our assessment of the promising path to the development of CRISPR/Cas9 therapeutic strategies for clinical settings.

  9. Characterization of ERAS, a putative novel human oncogene, in skin and breast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peña Avalos, B.L. de la

    2014-07-01

    Most human tumors have mutations in genes of the RAS small GTPase protein family. RAS works as a molecular switch for signaling pathways that modulate many aspects of cell behavior, including proliferation, differentiation, motility and death. Oncogenic mutations in RAS prevent GTP hydrolysis, locking RAS in a permanently active state, being the most common mutations in HRAS, KRAS and NRAS. The human RAS family consists of at least 36 different genes, many of which have been scarcely studied. One of these relatively unknown genes is ERAS (ES cell-expressed RAS), which is a constitutively active RAS protein, localized in chromosome X and expressed only in embryonic cells, being undetectable in adult tissues. New high throughput technologies have made it possible to screen complete cancer genomes for identification of mutations associated to cancer. Using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system, ERAS was identified as a putative novel oncogene in non-melanoma skin and breast cancers. The major aim of this project is to determine the general characteristics of ERAS as a putative novel human oncogene in skin and breast cells. Forced expression of ERAS results in drastic changes in cell shape, proliferation and motility. When ERAS is overexpressed in skin and breast human cells it is mainly localized in the cytoplasmic membrane. ERAS activates the phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K) pathway but not the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. ERAS-expressing cells suffer spontaneous morphologic and phenotypic EMT-like changes, including cytoskeleton reorganization, vimentin and N-cadherin up-regulation and down-regulation of E-cadherin, which can be associated with increased malignancy, and invasive and metastatic potential. Our results suggest that inappropriate expression of ERAS lead to transformation of human cells. (Author)

  10. Amplification of the neu (c-erbB-2) oncogene in human mammmary tumors is relatively frequent and is often accompanied by amplification of the linked c-erbA oncogene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Vijver, M.; van de Bersselaar, R.; Devilee, P.; Cornelisse, C.; Peterse, J.; Nusse, R.

    1987-01-01

    We investigated alterations in the structure and expression of oncogenes in mammary tumors and mammary tumor-derived cell lines. In 16 of 95 samples, we detected amplification of the human neu oncogene, also known as c-erB-2, accompanied by overexpression in the tumors from which intact RNA could be

  11. The structure and nucleotide sequence of the 5' end of the human c-myc oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, R; Nishikura, K; Sorrentino, J; ar-Rushdi, A; Croce, C M; Rovera, G

    1983-01-01

    We have established the structure and nucleotide sequence of the 5' end of the human c-myc oncogene, using a cloned genomic fragment isolated from a fetal liver library (clone lambda MC41) and cloned cDNA from the human leukemic cell line K562. The human c-myc oncogene consists of three exons and two introns. Primer extension of the human c-myc mRNA of three different cell lines and S1 nuclease protection experiments served to establish the position of two transcription initiation sites. The splicing site of the first exon-intron boundary was determined by comparative analysis of the sequences of the genomic and cDNA clones. The first exon contains termination codons in all three reading frames and no translation initiation signals, confirming our previous observation that the c-myc mRNA has a long 5' noncoding sequence. This first exon also was found to be utilized in the formation of c-myc mRNAs in a variety of human cell lines. Images PMID:6578511

  12. A human cancer xenograft model utilizing normal pancreatic duct epithelial cells conditionally transformed with defined oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inagawa, Yuki; Yamada, Kenji; Yugawa, Takashi; Ohno, Shin-ichi; Hiraoka, Nobuyoshi; Esaki, Minoru; Shibata, Tatsuhiro; Aoki, Kazunori; Saya, Hideyuki; Kiyono, Tohru

    2014-08-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) are considered to arise through neoplastic transformation of human pancreatic duct epithelial cells (HPDECs). In order to evaluate the biological significance of genetic and epigenetic alterations in PDACs, we isolated primary HPDECs and established an in vitro carcinogenesis model. Firstly, lentivirus-mediated transduction of KRAS(G12V), MYC and human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) E6/E7 under the control of a tetracyclin-inducible promoter efficiently immortalized and transformed primary HPDECs, which gave rise to adenocarcinomas subcutaneously in an immune-deficient mouse xenograft model, depending on expression of the four genes. The tumors regressed promptly upon shutting-off the oncogenes, and the remaining tissues showed histological features corresponding to normal ductal structures with simple columnar epithelium. Reexpression of the oncogenes resulted in development of multiple PDACs through pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia-like structures. We also succeeded in efficient immortalization of primary HPDECs with transduction of mutant CDK4, cyclin D1 and TERT. The cells maintained a normal diploid status and formed duct-like structures in a three-dimensional culture. In combination with p53 silencing, KRAS(G12V) alone was sufficient to fully transform the immortalized HPDECs, and MYC markedly accelerated the development of tumors. Our PDAC model supports critical roles of KRAS mutations, inactivation of the p53 and p16-pRB pathways, active telomerase and MYC expression in pancreatic carcinogenesis and thus recapitulates many features of human PDAC development. The present system with reversible control of oncogene expression enabled de novo development of PDAC from quasinormal human tissues preformed subcutaneously in mice and might be applicable to carcinogenesis models in many organ sites. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. One-step immortalization of primary human airway epithelial cells capable of oncogenic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jordan L; Lee, Liam C; Read, Abigail; Li, Qiuning; Yu, Bing; Lee, Chih-Shia; Luo, Ji

    2016-01-01

    The ability to transform normal human cells into cancer cells with the introduction of defined genetic alterations is a valuable method for understanding the mechanisms of oncogenesis. Easy establishment of immortalized but non-transformed human cells from various tissues would facilitate these genetic analyses. We report here a simple, one-step immortalization method that involves retroviral vector mediated co-expression of the human telomerase protein and a shRNA targeting the CDKN2A gene locus. We demonstrate that this method could successfully immortalize human small airway epithelial cells while maintaining their chromosomal stability. We further showed that these cells retain p53 activity and can be transformed by the KRAS oncogene. Our method simplifies the immortalization process and is broadly applicable for establishing immortalized epithelial cell lines from primary human tissues for cancer research.

  14. Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Infection and Genotype Characterization among Women in Orodara, Western Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, I M A; Zohoncon, T M; Ndo, O; Djigma, F W; Obiri-Yeboah, D; Compaore, T R; Guigma, S P; Yonli, A T; Traore, G; Ouedraogo, P; Ouedraogo, C M R; Traore, Y; Simpore, J

    Cervical cancer usually occurs several years after persistent infection with oncogenic or high-risk human papillomavirus. The objective of this study was to determine carriage of 14 genotypes of high-risk human papillomavirus among women at Orodara and then characterize the genotypes found in these women. From June to July 2015, 120 women from the general population were recruited in the health district of Orodara. They voluntarily agreed to participate in the study. Endocervical samples were taken from these women prior to screening for precancerous lesions by visual inspection with acetic acid and lugol's iodine. Identification of high-risk human papillomavirus genotype was done using real-time PCR. High-risk human papillomavirus prevalence was 38.3% and the most common genotypes were HPV 52 (25.4%), HPV 33 (20.6%) and HPV 59 (11.1%). The HPV 66 was also identified with a prevalence of 9.5%. The HPV 16 and HPV 18 which are frequently associated with cancer worldwide were not found among the most frequent oncogenic HPV in women in Orodara.

  15. RNA extraction method is crucial for human papillomavirus E6/E7 oncogenes detection

    OpenAIRE

    Fontecha, Nerea; Nieto, Maria Carmen; And?a, Daniel; Cisterna, Ram?n; Basaras, Miren

    2017-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing plays a main role in the management of cervical cancer, however to improve the specificity in cervical screening, there is a need to develop and validate different approaches that can identify women at risk for progressive disease. Nowadays, mRNA expression of viral E6 and E7 HPV oncogenes stands up as a potential biomarker to improve cervical screening. We aimed to validate a method for RNA extraction, detect HPV mRNA expression and, assess t...

  16. The translocated c-myc oncogene of Raji Burkitt lymphoma cells is not expressed in human lymphoblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikura, K; Erikson, J; ar-Rushdi, A; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    1985-01-01

    We hybridized Raji Burkitt lymphoma cells, which carry a t(8;14) chromosome translocation, with human lymphoblastoid cells to study the expression of the translocated cellular myc oncogene (c-myc) in the hybrid cells. In Raji cells the c-myc oncogene is translocated to a switch region of the gamma heavy chain locus (S gamma). Because of sequence alterations in the 5' exon of the translocated c-myc oncogene in this cell line, it is possible to distinguish the transcripts of the translocated c-myc gene and of the normal c-myc gene. S1 nuclease protection experiments with a c-myc first exon probe indicate that Raji cells express predominantly the translocated c-myc gene, while the level of expression of the normal c-myc gene is less than 2% of that of the translocated c-myc gene. Somatic cell hybrids between Raji and human lymphoblastoid cells retain the lymphoblastoid phenotype and express only the normal c-myc oncogene. This result indicates that the activation of a c-myc oncogene translocated to a S region depends on the stage of B-cell differentiation of the cells harboring the translocated c-myc gene and not on alterations in the structure of the translocated c-myc oncogene. Images PMID:3857623

  17. Ebola virus: bioterrorism for humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pramodkumar Pyarelal Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus disease is a severe, often fatal, zoonotic infection caused by a virus of the Filoviridae family (genus Ebolavirus. Ebola virus (EBOV spreads by human to human transmission through contacts with body fluids from infected patients. Initial stages of EBOV are non-specific which makes the differential diagnosis broad. Here in this review article we focused on to show the details of EBOV, from its first case right up to the possible targets to cure this lethal disease. In this study we have shown the statistical survey, epidemiology, disease ontology, different genes coding for different proteins in EBOV and future aspects of it.

  18. BamHI-A rightward frame 1, an Epstein–Barr virus-encoded oncogene and immune modulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoebe, Eveline K; Le Large, Tessa Y S; Greijer, Astrid E; Middeldorp, Jaap M

    2013-01-01

    Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) causes several benign and malignant disorders of lymphoid and epithelial origin. EBV-related tumors display distinct patterns of viral latent gene expression, of which the BamHI-A rightward frame 1 (BARF1) is selectively expressed in carcinomas, regulated by cellular differentiation factors including ΔNp63α. BARF1 functions as a viral oncogene, immortalizing and transforming epithelial cells of different origin by acting as a mitogenic growth factor, inducing cyclin-D expression, and up-regulating antiapoptotic Bcl-2, stimulating host cell growth and survival. In addition, secreted hexameric BARF1 has immune evasive properties, functionally corrupting macrophage colony stimulating factor, as supported by recent functional and structural data. Therefore, BARF1, an intracellular and secreted protein, not only has multiple pathogenic functions but also can function as a target for immune responses. Deciphering the role of BARF1 in EBV biology will contribute to novel diagnostic and treatment options for EBV-driven carcinomas. Herein, we discuss recent insights on the regulation of BARF1 expression and aspects of structure-function relating to its oncogenic and immune suppressive properties. © 2013 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:23996634

  19. Overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms cellular metabolism and promotes glycolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie C Matrka

    Full Text Available The DEK oncogene is overexpressed in many human malignancies including at early tumor stages. Our reported in vitro and in vivo models of squamous cell carcinoma have demonstrated that DEK contributes functionally to cellular and tumor survival and to proliferation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Based on recent RNA sequencing experiments, DEK expression was necessary for the transcription of several metabolic enzymes involved in anabolic pathways. This identified a possible mechanism whereby DEK may drive cellular metabolism to enable cell proliferation. Functional metabolic Seahorse analysis demonstrated increased baseline and maximum extracellular acidification rates, a readout of glycolysis, in DEK-overexpressing keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DEK overexpression also increased the maximum rate of oxygen consumption and therefore increased the potential for oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos. To detect small metabolites that participate in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA that supplies substrate for OxPhos, we carried out NMR-based metabolomics studies. We found that high levels of DEK significantly reprogrammed cellular metabolism and altered the abundances of amino acids, TCA cycle intermediates and the glycolytic end products lactate, alanine and NAD+. Taken together, these data support a scenario whereby overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms keratinocyte metabolism to fulfill energy and macromolecule demands required to enable and sustain cancer cell growth.

  20. E7 proteins from oncogenic human papillomavirus types transactivate p73: role in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, L A; Sullivan, A; O'Nions, J; Bell, A; Dunne, B; Tidy, J A; Evans, D J; Osin, P; Vousden, K H; Gusterson, B; Farrell, P J; Storey, A; Gasco, M; Sakai, T; Crook, T

    2002-01-01

    In common with other E2F1 responsive genes such as p14ARF and B-myb, the promoter of p73 is shown to be positively regulated in cell lines and primary human keratinocytes by E7 proteins from oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types 16, 18, 31 and 33, but not HPV 6. Mutational analysis revealed that transactivation of the p73 promoter by HPV 16E7 requires association with pRb. Expression of p73 in normal cervical epithelium is confined to the basal and supra-basal layers. In contrast, expression in neoplastic lesions is detected throughout the epithelium and increases with grade of neoplasia, being maximal in squamous cell cancers (SCC). Deregulation of expression of the N-terminal splice variant p73Δ2 was observed in a significant proportion of cancers, but not in normal epithelium. The frequent over-expression of p73Δ2, which has recognized transdominant properties, in malignant and pre-malignant lesions suggests a role in the oncogenic process in cervical epithelium. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 263–268. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600033 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 The Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11870517

  1. Overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms cellular metabolism and promotes glycolysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Miki; Muraleedharan, Ranjithmenon; Lambert, Paul F.; Lane, Andrew N.; Romick-Rosendale, Lindsey E.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2017-01-01

    The DEK oncogene is overexpressed in many human malignancies including at early tumor stages. Our reported in vitro and in vivo models of squamous cell carcinoma have demonstrated that DEK contributes functionally to cellular and tumor survival and to proliferation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly understood. Based on recent RNA sequencing experiments, DEK expression was necessary for the transcription of several metabolic enzymes involved in anabolic pathways. This identified a possible mechanism whereby DEK may drive cellular metabolism to enable cell proliferation. Functional metabolic Seahorse analysis demonstrated increased baseline and maximum extracellular acidification rates, a readout of glycolysis, in DEK-overexpressing keratinocytes and squamous cell carcinoma cells. DEK overexpression also increased the maximum rate of oxygen consumption and therefore increased the potential for oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos). To detect small metabolites that participate in glycolysis and the tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) that supplies substrate for OxPhos, we carried out NMR-based metabolomics studies. We found that high levels of DEK significantly reprogrammed cellular metabolism and altered the abundances of amino acids, TCA cycle intermediates and the glycolytic end products lactate, alanine and NAD+. Taken together, these data support a scenario whereby overexpression of the human DEK oncogene reprograms keratinocyte metabolism to fulfill energy and macromolecule demands required to enable and sustain cancer cell growth. PMID:28558019

  2. Epstein-Barr virus super-enhancer eRNAs are essential for MYC oncogene expression and lymphoblast proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jun; Zhou, Hufeng; Gerdt, Catherine; Tan, Min; Colson, Tyler; Kaye, Kenneth M; Kieff, Elliott; Zhao, Bo

    2016-12-06

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) super-enhancers (ESEs) are essential for lymphoblastoid cell (LCL) growth and survival. Reanalyses of LCL global run-on sequencing (Gro-seq) data found abundant enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) being transcribed at ESEs. Inactivation of ESE components, EBV nuclear antigen 2 (EBNA2) and bromodomain-containing protein 4 (BRD4), significantly decreased eRNAs at ESEs -428 and -525 kb upstream of the MYC oncogene transcription start site (TSS). shRNA knockdown of the MYC -428 and -525 ESE eRNA caused LCL growth arrest and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, MYC ESE eRNA knockdown also significantly reduced MYC expression, ESE H3K27ac signals, and MYC ESEs looping to MYC TSS. These data indicate that ESE eRNAs strongly affect cell gene expression and enable LCL growth.

  3. A homologue of Drosophila aurora kinase is oncogenic and amplified in human colorectal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, J R; Anderson, L; Zhu, Y; Mossie, K; Ng, L; Souza, B; Schryver, B; Flanagan, P; Clairvoyant, F; Ginther, C; Chan, C S; Novotny, M; Slamon, D J; Plowman, G D

    1998-06-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies in lower eukaryotes have identified several proteins that ensure accurate segregation of chromosomes. These include the Drosophila aurora and yeast Ipl1 kinases that are required for centrosome maturation and chromosome segregation. We have identified two human homologues of these genes, termed aurora1 and aurora2, that encode cell-cycle-regulated serine/threonine kinases. Here we demonstrate that the aurora2 gene maps to chromosome 20q13, a region amplified in a variety of human cancers, including a significant number of colorectal malignancies. We propose that aurora2 may be a target of this amplicon since its DNA is amplified and its RNA overexpressed, in more than 50% of primary colorectal cancers. Furthermore, overexpression of aurora2 transforms rodent fibroblasts. These observations implicate aurora2 as a potential oncogene in many colon, breast and other solid tumors, and identify centrosome-associated proteins as novel targets for cancer therapy.

  4. Oncogenic PIK3CA Mutation and Dysregulation in Human Salivary Duct Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanglong Qiu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Salivary duct carcinoma (SDC is an aggressive malignant tumor with a high mortality, which resembles high-grade breast ductal carcinoma in morphology. The parotid gland is the most common location. Its molecular genetic characteristics remain largely unknown. We have previously reported high incidence of PIK3CA somatic mutations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, particularly in pharyngeal cancers. Here we examined the PIK3CA gene expression status and hotspot mutations in six cases of SDC by immunohistochemistry and genomic DNA sequencing. Immunohistochemistry showed that PIK3CA expression was elevated in all six patients with SDC. By DNA sequencing, two hotspot mutations of the PIK3CA gene, E545K (exon 9 and H1047R (exon 20, were identified in two of the six cases. Our results support that oncogenic PIK3CA is upregulated and frequently mutated in human SDC, adding evidence that PIK3CA oncogenic pathway is critical in the tumorigenesis of SDC, and may be a plausible drug target for this rare disease.

  5. Determination of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotypes in Anogenital Cancers in Myanmar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu Mu Shwe; Hlaing Myat Thu; Khin Saw Aye; Aye Aye Myint; Mya Thida; Khin Shwe Mar; Khin Khin Oo; Khin Sandar Aye; Okada, Shigeru; Kyaw Zin Thant

    2016-01-01

    Molecular and epidemiologic investigations suggest a causal role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital cancers. This study identified oncogenic HPV genotypes in anogenital cancers among men and women in a 2013 cross-sectional descriptive study in Myanmar. In total, 100 biopsy tissues of histologically confirmed anogenital cancers collected in 2008-2012 were studied, including 30 penile and 9 anal cancers from Yangon General Hospital and 61 vulvar cancers from Central Women's Hospital, Yangon. HPV-DNA testing and genotyping were performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Overall, 34% of anogenital cancers were HPV-positive. HPV was found in 44.4% of anal (4/9), 36.1% of vulvar (22/61), and 26.7% of penile (8/30) cancers. The most frequent genotypes in anal cancers were HPV 16 (75% ) and 18 (25% ). In vulvar cancers, HPV 33 was most common (40.9% ), followed by 16 (31.8% ), 31 (22.7% ), and 18 (4.6% ). In penile cancers, HPV 16 (62.5% ) was most common, followed by 33 (25% ) and 18 (12.5% ). This is the first report of evidencebased oncogenic HPV genotypes in anogenital cancers among men and women in Myanmar. This research provides valuable information for understanding the burden of HPV-associated cancers of the anus, penis, and vulva and considering the effectiveness of prophylactic HPV vaccination.

  6. Isolation of human oncogene sequences (v-fes homologue) from a cosmid library.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groffen; N. Heisterkamp; F.G. Grosveld (Frank); W. van de Ven (Wim); J.R. Stephenson

    1982-01-01

    textabstractTo define the human homolog (or homologs) of transforming sequences (v-fes gene) common to Gardner (GA) and Snyder Theilen (ST) isolates of feline sarcoma virus (FeSV), a representative library of human lung carcinoma DNA in a cosmid vector system was constructed. Three cosmid clones

  7. [THE COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RESULTS OF DETECTION OF CARCINOGENIC TYPES OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS BY QUALITATIVE AND QUANTITATIVE TESTS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, E T; Labigina, A V; Leshenko, O Ya; Rusanov, D N; Kuzmenko, V V; Fedko, L P; Pak, I P

    2015-05-01

    The analysis of results of screening (n = 3208; sexually active citizen aged from 18 to 59 years) was carried out to detect oncogene types of human papilloma virus in using qualitative (1150 females and 720 males) and quantitative (polymerase chain reaction in real-time (843 females and 115 males) techniques. The human papilloma virus of high oncogene type was detected in 65% and 68.4% of females and in 48.6% and 53% of males correspondingly. Among 12 types of human papilloma virus the most frequently diagnosed was human papilloma virus 16 independently of gender of examined and technique of analysis. In females, under application of qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 18.3% (n = 280) and under application of quantitative tests Rte of human papilloma virus made up to 14.9% (n = 126; p ≤ 0.05). Under examination of males using qualitative tests rate of human papilloma virus 16 made up to 8.3% (n = 60) and under application of qualitative tests made up to 12.2% (n = 14; p ≥ 0.05). Under application of qualitative tests rate of detection on the rest ofoncogene types of human papilloma virus varied in females from 3.4% to 8.4% and in males from 1.8% to 5.9%. Under application of qualitative tests to females rate of human papilloma virus with high viral load made up to 68.4%, with medium viral load - 2.85% (n = 24) and with low viral load -0.24% (n = 2). Under application of quantitative tests in males rate of detection of types of human papilloma virus made up to 53% and at that in all high viral load was established. In females, the most of oncogene types of human papilloma virus (except for 31, 39, 59) are detected significantly more often than in males.

  8. Changing faces in virology: The Dutch shift from oncogenic to oncolytic viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Belcaid (Zineb); M.L.M. Lamfers (Martine); V.W. Beusechem (Victor); R.C. Hoeben (Rob)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractViruses have two opposing faces. On the one hand, they can cause harm and disease. A virus may manifest directly as a contagious disease with a clinical pathology of varying significance. A viral infection can also have delayed consequences, and in rare cases may cause cellular

  9. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Hongtao [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Gao, Peng [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Zheng, Jie, E-mail: jiezheng54@126.com [Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Southeast University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  10. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV and its relation with cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idrees Muhammad

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV.

  11. UV damage and repair in the domain of the human c-myc oncogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bianchi, N.O.; Bianchi, M.S.; Alitalo, K.; De La Chapelle, A. (IMBICE, La Plata (Argentina))

    1991-03-01

    We have used a modification of the Southern hybridization method to analyze the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine cyclobutane dimers from the domain of the c-myc oncogene. The study was performed in human COLO320HSR cells, which exhibit a 30- to 40-fold amplification of c-myc that is maintained in a marker chromosome as a homogeneously staining region. Intron 2 and the region upstream from the gene showed better dimer removal than intron 1 or the region downstream from the c-myc gene. Regions showing less repair coincide with regions that are hotspots for mutations and chromosome translocations. Therefore, it is proposed that the inefficiency of DNA repair may play an important role in the origin of c-myc rearrangements.

  12. Expression of the Tpl2/Cot oncogene in human T-cell neoplasias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliopoulos George D

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tpl2/Cot oncogene has been identified in murine T-cell lymphomas as a target of MoMuLV insertion. Animal and tissue culture studies have shown that Tpl2/Cot is involved in interleukin-2 (IL-2 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α production by T-cells contributing to T-cell proliferation. In the present report we examined a series of 12 adult patients with various T-cell malignancies, all with predominant leukemic expression in the periphery, for the expression of Tpl2/Cot oncogene in order to determine a possible involvement of Tpl2/Cot in the pathogenesis of these neoplasms. Results Our results showed that Tpl2/Cot was overexpressed in all four patients with Large Granular Lymphocyte proliferative disorders (LGL-PDs but in none of the remaining eight patients with other T-cell neoplasias. Interestingly, three of the LGL-PD patients displayed neutropenia, one in association with sarcoidosis. Serum TNF-α levels were increased in all Tpl2/Cot overexpressing patients while serum IL-2 was undetectable in all subjects studied. Genomic DNA analysis revealed no DNA amplification at the Tpl2/Cot locus in any of the samples analyzed. Conclusions We conclude that Tpl2/Cot, a gene extensively studied in animal and tissue culture T-cell models may be also involved in the development of human LGL-PD and may have a role in the pathogenesis of immune manifestations associated with these diseases. This is the first report implicating Tpl2/Cot in human T-cell neoplasias and provides a novel molecular event in the development of LGL-PDs.

  13. Knowledge and Attitudes About Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women in Rural Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-15

    1- Knowledge and attitudes about Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in rural Uganda Authors...Oncogenic Human Papilloma virus (HPV) strains 16 and 18. While cervical cancer is widely understood as a fatal disease, knowledge and awareness of...Abstract Cervical cancer is one of the major causes of death among women worldwide. There is an established linkage between cervical cancer and

  14. Selective elimination of high constitutive activity or chemokine binding in the human herpesvirus 8 encoded seven transmembrane oncogene ORF74

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Kledal, T N; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2000-01-01

    Open reading frame 74 (ORF74) encoded by human herpesvirus 8 is a highly constitutively active seven transmembrane (7TM) receptor stimulated by angiogenic chemokines, e.g. growth-related oncogene-alpha, and inhibited by angiostatic chemokines e.g. interferon-gamma-inducible protein. Transgenic mice...... either agonist or inverse agonist modulation as well as high constitutive activity of the virally encoded oncogene ORF74 and that these mutant forms presumably can be used in transgenic animals to identify the molecular mechanism of its transforming activity....

  15. Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Task Force Recommendations Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (Task Force) has issued a final recommendation statement on Screening for Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) . This ...

  16. Oncogenic fusion proteins expressed in immature hematopoietic cells fail to recapitulate the transcriptional changes observed in human AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, N; Porse, B T

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations are observed in one-third of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. Targeting and understanding the effects of the resulting aberrant oncogenic fusion proteins may help developing drugs against specific leukemic subtypes, as demonstrated earlier by the use of ATRA...... in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor (HSPCs) cells transduced with oncogenic fusion genes are regarded as promising in vitromodels of their corresponding AML subtypes. Here, we critically assessed the potential of such in vitro models using an integrative bioinformatics approach....... Surprisingly, we found that the gene-expression profiles of CD34+ human HSPCs transformed with the potent oncogenic fusion proteins AML-ETO or MLL-AF9, only weakly resembled those derived from primary AML samples. Hence, our work raises concerns as to the relevance of the use of in vitro transduced cells...

  17. of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: With increasing feminization of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) pandemic especially in Africa, more seropositive women are getting pregnant. There is therefore an increasing need for prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV and increased need for awareness by our women. Objective: ...

  18. A block in lineage differentiation of immortal human mammary stem / progenitor cells by ectopically-expressed oncogenes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiangshan Zhao

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Emerging evidence suggests a direct role of cancer stem cells (CSCs in the development of breast cancer. In vitro cellular models that recapitulate properties of CSCs are therefore highly desirable. We have previously shown that normal human mammary epithelial cells (hMECs immortalized with human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT possess properties of mammary stem / progenitor cells. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we used this cell system to test the idea that other known hMEC-immortalizing oncogenes (RhoA, HPVE6, HPVE7, p53 mutant, and treatment with g-radiation, share with hTERT, the ability to maintain mammary stem / progenitor cells. Results: The results presented here demonstrate that similar to hMECs immortalized with hTERT, all hMEC cell lines immortalized using various oncogenic strategies express stem / progenitor cell markers. Furthermore, analyses using 2D and 3D culture assays demonstrate that all the immortal cell lines retain their ability to self-renew and to differentiate along the luminal lineage. Remarkably, the stem / progenitor cell lines generated using various oncogenic strategies exhibit a block in differentiation along the myoepithelial lineage, a trait that is retained on hTERT-immortalized stem / progenitors. The inability to differentiate along the myoepithelial lineage could be induced by ectopic mutant p53 expression in hTERT-immortalized hMEC. Conclusions: Our studies demonstrate that stem / progenitor cell characteristics of hMECs are maintained upon immortalization by using various cancer-relevant oncogenic strategies. Oncogene-immortalized hMECs show a block in their ability to differentiate along the myoepithelial lineage. Abrogation of the myoepithelial differentiation potential by a number of distinct oncogenic insults suggests a potential explanation for the predominance of luminal and rarity of myoepithelial breast cancers.

  19. Ultrasensitive quantitation of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 oncogene sequences by nested real time PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López-Revilla Rubén

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have developed an ultrasensitive method based on conventional PCR preamplification followed by nested amplification through real time PCR (qPCR in the presence of the DNA intercalating agent EvaGreen. Results Amplification mixtures calibrated with a known number of pHV101 copies carrying a 645 base pair (bp-long insert of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 E6 oncogene were used to generate the E6-1 amplicon of 645 bp by conventional PCR and then the E6-2 amplicon of 237 bp by nested qPCR. Direct and nested qPCR mixtures for E6-2 amplification corresponding to 2.5 × 102-2.5 × 106 initial pHV101 copies had threshold cycle (Ct values in the ranges of 18.7-29.0 and 10.0-25.0, respectively. The Ct of qPCR mixtures prepared with 1/50 volumes of preamplified mixtures containing 50 ng of DNA of the SiHa cell line (derived from an invasive cervical cancer with one HPV16 genome per cell was 19.9. Thermal fluorescence extinction profiles of E6-2 amplicons generated from pHV101 and SiHa DNA were identical, with a peak at 85.5°C. Conclusions Our method based on conventional preamplification for 15 cycles increased 10,750 times the sensitivity of nested qPCR for the quantitation of the E6 viral oncogene and confirmed that the SiHa cell line contains one E6-HPV16 copy per cell.

  20. Oncogenic intra-p53 family member interactions in human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria eFerraiuolo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The p53 gene family members p53, p73 and p63 display several isoforms derived from the presence of internal promoters and alternative splicing events. They are structural homologues but hold peculiar functional properties. p53, p73 and p63 are tumor suppressor genes that promote differentiation, senescence and apoptosis. p53, unlike p73 and p63, is frequently mutated in cancer often displaying oncogenic gain of function (GOF activities correlated with the induction of proliferation, invasion, chemoresistance and genomic instability in cancer cells. These oncogenic functions are promoted either by the aberrant transcriptional cooperation of mutant p53 (mutp53 with transcription cofactors (e.g., NF-Y, E2F1, Vitamin D Receptor (VDR, Ets-1, NF-kB and YAP or by the interaction with the p53 family members, p73 and p63, determining their functional inactivation. The instauration of these aberrant transcriptional networks leads to increased cell growth, low activation of DNA damage response pathways (DNA damage response (DDR, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs response, enhanced invasion and high chemoresistance to different conventional chemotherapeutic treatments. Several studies have clearly shown that different cancers harboring mutant p53 proteins exhibit a poor prognosis when compared to those carrying wild type p53 (wt-p53 protein. The interference of mutantp53/p73 and/or mutantp53/p63 interactions, thereby restoring p53, p73 and p63 tumor suppression functions, could be among the potential therapeutic strategies for the treatment of mutant p53 human cancers.

  1. Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Co-Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections are major health problems worldwide. HCV/HIV co-infection has been shown to increase the frequency of liver disease and also maternal-fetal transmission of HCV. Little data exist on the prevalence of co-infection of these viruses in ...

  2. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and syphilis remain major infections around the world. In Angola, about 166 000 individuals are living with HIV, representing a prevalence of 1.98% in adults between 15 and 49 years of age. In a 2003 study in Luanda, 4.5% ...

  3. Inhibition of activated Ras suppresses multiple oncogenic Hub genes in human epithelial tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Lei; Wang, Ping; Luo, Hui; Wang, Xi-Rui; Wang, Xie-Feng; Zhang, Jun-Xia; Wang, Ying-Yi; Yao, Lei; Liu, Ning; You, Yong-Ping

    2014-10-01

    Cancer cells may involve diverse mutations, but they often rely on continued expression of a single oncoprotein for survival, as a response to targeting this protein. Generally, Ras is overexpressed in human epithelial tumors and cancellation of activated Ras inhibits carcinoma cell proliferation and differentiation ability, and induces apoptotosis of tumor cells. However, the mechanisms of inhibition of activated Ras that suppress the malignancy activity of human epithelial tumors remain to be illuminated. We utilized text-mining of MEDLINE abstracts with natural language processing to establish the Ras biologic association network, and identified several interactions of this network with the Ras pathway. Our investigation not only examined the expression of Ras and Hub genes (PIK3CA, MDM2, CCND1, EGFR, JUN, MYC, VEGFA, ERK1 and ERK2) but also confirmed inhibition of activated Ras reduced expression of multiple oncogene in vitro studies. Our studies provide strong support for the conclusion that cancellation of activated Ras specifically regulates defective Ras pathways in human tumor cells.

  4. Impact of Possibly Oncogenic High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Types in Triage for ASC-US Cervical Cytology Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarosa, Emily J; Winer, Rachel L; Hong, Karen J; Mao, Constance

    2015-10-01

    Current guidelines recommend including 13 or 14 high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types for triage of atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) cervical cytology; however, at least 13 additional types are considered possibly oncogenic. We evaluated the effect of including possibly oncogenic HPV types in the test panel. Outcomes for all women 30 years or older with ASC-US and positive HPV testing who underwent colposcopic biopsy at University of Washington Medical Center-affiliated clinics between 2010 and 2011 were reviewed. We compared biopsy results between cases that were HPV positive for 1 or more of 13 possibly oncogenic types only (26/53/55/62/64/67/69/71/73/82/83/84/IS39) versus 1 or more of the 14 established high-risk types (16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59/66/68). We used the Fisher exact test to compare cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or higher (CIN2+) diagnoses between HPV risk groups. Three hundred twenty-six ASC-US HPV-positive cervical cytology results were identified, with 170 that were linked to subsequent cervical biopsy results. Among 51 cases positive for possibly oncogenic types only, 31 (61%) had no neoplasia, 20 (39%) had CIN1, and none had CIN2+. Among 119 controls positive for at least one established high-risk type, 64 (53%) had no neoplasia, 42 (35%) had CIN1, and 13 (11%) had CIN2+ (p = .01 for the comparison of CIN2+ diagnoses between groups). The inclusion of possibly oncogenic types in the HPV test panel led to an additional 51 colposcopy biopsies (33% increase), with no additional cases of CIN 2+. Our results suggest that including possibly oncogenic HPV types increases the number of colposcopy biopsies with minimal improvements in detection of CIN2 +.

  5. Zinc finger protein 278, a potential oncogene in human colorectal cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaoqing Tian; Danfeng Sun; Yanjie Zhang; Shuliang Zhao; Hua Xiong; Jingyuan Fang

    2008-01-01

    Zinc finger protein 278 (ZNF278) is a novel Krueppel Cys2-His2-type zinc finger protein that is ubiquitously distributed in human tissues. Whether ZNF278 is related to the development of colorectal cancer is still unclear. The transcriptional level of ZNF278 was studied in colorectal cancer by real-time polymerase chain reaction. The results showed that ZNF278 expression was increased in 53% of colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancerous tissues. The transcriptional down-regulation of ZNF278 was detected in only three (6%) human colorectal cancer tissues compared to corresponding non-cancer tissues. No significant difference was detected in 19 (41%) pairs of samples.However, we failed to find a significant association between the up-regulation of ZNF278 transcription and age, sex, the degree of infiltration, or the tumor size of colorectal cancer.To study the function of ZNF278 in colorectal carcinogenesis,the colon cancer cell line SW1116 was stably transfected with a wild-type ZNF278 plasmid to construct an overexpression system, and was transiently transfected with the small interfering RNA of ZNF278 to construct a ZNF278 knockdown system. Cell proliferation was assessed with 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide dye and a cell counter. The results show that ZNF278 promotes cell growth, and its knockdown suppresses cell proliferation. ZNF278 could be a potential proto-oncogene in colorectal cancer.

  6. Vaccine against human Papilloma Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Julio Cesar Reina; Nubia Muñoz

    2014-01-01

    At present two prophylactic human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines are commercially available. The Tetravalent vaccine against infection with four VPH types (6, 11, 16, and 18) distributed in the national program in Colombia and the Bivalent vaccine against the VPH types 16 and 18, respectively.  The efficacy and safety of both vaccines has periodically been assessed and they have been declared efficacious and safe by the health authorities of several countries and the Global Advisory Committee...

  7. Targeting the oncogenic protein beta-catenin to enhance chemotherapy outcome against solid human cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rempinski Donald R

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-catenin is a multifunctional oncogenic protein that contributes fundamentally to cell development and biology. Elevation in expression and activity of β-catenin has been implicated in many cancers and associated with poor prognosis. Beta-catenin is degraded in the cytoplasm by glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β through phosphorylation. Cell growth and proliferation is associated with β-catenin translocation from the cytoplasm into the nucleus. This laboratory was the first to demonstrate that selenium-containing compounds can enhance the efficacy and cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs in several preclinical xenograft models. These data provided the basis to identify mechanism of selenium action focusing on β-catenin as a target. This study was designed to: (1 determine whether pharmacological doses of methylseleninic acid (MSeA have inhibitory effects on the level and the oncogenic activity of β-catenin, (2 investigate the kinetics and the mechanism of β-catenin inhibition, and (3 confirm that inhibition of β-catenin would lead to enhanced cytotoxicity of standard chemotherapeutic drugs. Results In six human cancer cell lines, the inhibition of total and nuclear expression of β-catenin by MSeA was dose and time dependent. The involvement of GSK-3β in the degradation of β-catenin was cell type dependent (GSK-3β-dependent in HT-29, whereas GSK-3β-independent in HCT-8. However, the pronounced inhibition of β-catenin by MSeA was independent of various drug treatments and was not reversed after combination therapy. Knockout of β-catenin by ShRNA and its inhibition by MSeA yielded similar enhancement of cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs. Collectively, the generated data demonstrate that β-catenin is a target of MSeA and its inhibition resulted in enhanced cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic drugs. Conclusions This study demonstrates that β-catenin, a molecule associated with drug resistance, is a target of

  8. The impact of quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV; types 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle vaccine on infection and disease due to oncogenic nonvaccine HPV types in generally HPV-naive women aged 16-26 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, Darron R; Kjaer, Susanne K; Sigurdsson, Kristján

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human papillomavirus (HPV)-6/11/16/18 vaccine reduces the risk of HPV-6/11/16/18-related cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 1-3 or adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS). Here, its impact on CIN1-3/AIS associated with nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types was evaluated. METHODS: We enrolled 17......,622 women aged 16-26 years. All underwent cervicovaginal sampling and Pap testing at regular intervals for up to 4 years. HPV genotyping was performed for biopsy samples, and histological diagnoses were determined by a pathology panel. Analyses were conducted among subjects who were negative for 14 HPV...... types on day 1. Prespecified analyses included infection of 6 months' duration and CIN1-3/AIS due to the 2 and 5 most common HPV types in cervical cancer after HPV types 16 and 18, as well as all tested nonvaccine types. RESULTS: Vaccination reduced the incidence of HPV-31/45 infection by 40.3% (95...

  9. Lymphatic Reprogramming by Kaposi Sarcoma Herpes Virus Promotes the Oncogenic Activity of the Virus-Encoded G-protein Coupled Receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Berenice; Choi, Inho; Choi, Dongwon; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Sunju; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Lee, Yong Suk; Maeng, Yong Sun; Lee, Ha Neul; Park, Eunkyung; Kim, Kyu Eui; Kim, Nam Yoon; Baik, Jae Myung; Jung, Jae U.; Koh, Chester J.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Kaposi sarcoma (KS), the most common cancer in HIV-positive individuals, is caused by endothelial transformation mediated by the KS herpes virus (KSHV)-encoded G-protein coupled receptor (vGPCR). Infection of blood vascular endothelial cells (BECs) by KSHV reactivates an otherwise silenced embryonic program of lymphatic differentiation. Thus, KS tumors express numerous lymphatic endothelial cell (LEC)-signature genes. A key unanswered question is how lymphatic reprogramming by the virus promotes tumorigenesis leading to KS formation. In this study, we present evidence that this process creates an environment needed to license the oncogenic activity of vGPCR. We found that the G-protein regulator RGS4 is an inhibitor of vGPCR that is expressed in BECs, but not in LECs. RGS4 was downregulated by the master regulator of LEC differentiation PROX1, which is upregulated by KSHV and directs KSHV-induced lymphatic reprogramming. Moreover, we found that KSHV upregulates the nuclear receptor LRH1, which physically interacts with PROX1 and synergizes with it to mediate repression of RGS4 expression. Mechanistic investigations revealed that RGS4 reduced vGPCR-enhanced cell proliferation, migration, VEGF expression and Akt activation and to suppress tumor formation induced by vGPCR. Our findings resolve long-standing questions about the pathological impact of KSHV-induced reprogramming of host cell identity, and they offer biological and mechanistic insights supporting the hypothesis that a lymphatic microenvironment is more favorable for KS tumorigenesis. PMID:22942256

  10. Positive Selection Drives Rapid Evolution of the meq Oncogene of Marek's Disease Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abinash Padhi

    Full Text Available Marek's disease (MD, caused by Marek's disease virus (MDV, a poultry-borne alphaherpesvirus, is a devastating disease of poultry causing an estimated annual loss of one billion dollars to poultry producers, worldwide. Despite decades of control through vaccination, MDV field strains continue to emerge having increased virulence. The evolutionary mechanism driving the emergence of this continuum of strains to increased MDV virulence, however, remains largely enigmatic. Increase in MDV virulence has been associated with specific amino acid changes within the C-terminus domain of Mareks's EcoRI-Q (meq-encoded oncoprotein. In this study, we sought to determine whether the meq gene has evolved adaptively and whether past vaccination efforts have had any significant effect on the reduction or increase of MDV diversity over time. Our analysis suggests that meq is estimated to be evolving at a much faster rate than most dsDNA viruses, and is comparable with the evolutionary rate of RNA viruses. Interestingly, most of the polymorphisms in meq gene appear to have evolved under positive selection and the time of divergence at the meq locus coincides with the period during which the poultry industry had undergone transitions in management practices including the introduction and widespread use of live attenuated vaccines. Our study has revealed that the decades-long use of vaccines did not reduce MDV diversity, but rather had a stimulating effect on the emergence of field strains with increased genetic diversity until the early 2000s. During the years 2004-2005, there was an abrupt decline in the genetic diversity of field isolates followed by a recovery from this bottleneck in the year 2010. Collectively, these data suggest that vaccination seems to not have had any effect on MDV eradication, but rather had a stimulating effect on MDV emergence through adaptation.

  11. Mutant p53 Protein and the Hippo Transducers YAP and TAZ: A Critical Oncogenic Node in Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraiuolo, Maria; Verduci, Lorena; Blandino, Giovanni; Strano, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    p53 protein is a well-known tumor suppressor factor that regulates cellular homeostasis. As it has several and key functions exerted, p53 is known as “the guardian of the genome” and either loss of function or gain of function mutations in the TP53 coding protein sequence are involved in cancer onset and progression. The Hippo pathway is a key regulator of developmental and regenerative physiological processes but if deregulated can induce cell transformation and cancer progression. The p53 and Hippo pathways exert a plethora of fine-tuned functions that can apparently be in contrast with each other. In this review, we propose that the p53 status can affect the Hippo pathway function by switching its outputs from tumor suppressor to oncogenic activities. In detail, we discuss: (a) the oncogenic role of the protein complex mutant p53/YAP; (b) TAZ oncogenic activation mediated by mutant p53; (c) the therapeutic potential of targeting mutant p53 to impair YAP and TAZ oncogenic functions in human cancers. PMID:28467351

  12. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction of myc oncogene expression in heptachlor-induced differentiation of human leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, A.J.; Chuang, L.F.; Chuang, R.Y. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

    1991-03-11

    Heptachlor, a chlorinated hydrocarbon insecticide, was previously demonstrated to be able to induce human leukemia ML-1 to differentiate into monocyte- or macrophage-like cells, a phenomenon similar to that induced by the known tumor promoter TPA. By hybridization studies, TPA-induced ML-1 differentiation has been shown to associate with a decline in the steady-state myc oncogene expression. In the present study, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was combined with primer-extension reverse transcription to detect subtle changes in RNA transcripts in both TPA- and heptachlor-treated ML-1 cells. Three sets of 5{prime} primers (P1, P2 and P3) within the region bordered by the two promoter sequences were individually paired with the 3{prime} primer sequence for the synthesis of the first exon of the c-myc oncogene. The results showed that RNA transcript was not detected from the P1 primer, suggesting a possible 5{prime} truncation of myc oncogene ML-1. TPA caused an initial increase of myc gene expression followed by a rapid decline of myc transcripts, as shown by PCR using P2 and P3 5{prime}-primers. Heptachlor, under the same assay conditions, decreased the expression of the myc oncogene without an initial stimulation. Furthermore, heptachlor was shown to stimulate the in vitro protein kinase C (PKC) activity and the binding of {sup 3}(H)PDBu to ML-1, indicating a dissociation of PKC activation and myc expression in ML-1.

  13. Epidemiological Patterns of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Olaleye

    ajol.com. Received: July 2007. Accepted (Revised):. October 2007. Published. January 2008. Full Length Research Article. Epidemiological Patterns of Human. Immunodeficiency Virus and Herpes Simplex. Virus Co-Infection in Ibadan, Nigeria.

  14. Virus, Oncolytic Virus and Human Prostate Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang Bin; Zhao, Liang; Zhang, Lifang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2017-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa), a disease, is characterized by abnormal cell growth in the prostate - a gland in the male reproductive system. Although older age and a family history of the disease have been recognized as the risk factors of PCa, the cause of this cancer remains unclear. Currently, PCa is one of the leading causes of cancer death among men of all races. In this review study, we first discuss the controversy of the contribution of virus infection to PCa, and subsequently summarize the development of oncolytic virotherapy for PCa in the past several years. Mounting evidence suggests that infections with various viruses are causally linked to PCa pathogenesis. Published studies have provided strong evidence that at least two viruses (RXMV and HPV) contribute to prostate tumourigenicity and impact on the survival of patients with malignant PCa. Traditional therapies including chemotherapy and radiotherapy are unable to distinguish cancer cells from normal cells, which are a significant drawback and leads to toxicities for PCa patients undergoing treatment. So far, few other options are available for treating patients with advanced PCa. For PCa treatment, oncolytic virotherapy appears to be much more attractive, which uses live viruses to selectively kill cancer cells. Oncolytic viruses can be genetically engineered to induce cancer cell lysis through virus replication and expression of cytotoxic proteins. Virotherapy is being developed to be a novel therapy for cancers, which uses oncotropic and oncolytic viruses with their abilities to find and destroy malignant cells in the body. As oncolytic viruses are a relatively new class of anti-cancer immunotherapy agents, several important barriers still exist on the road to the use of oncolytic viruses for PCa therapy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. RNA extraction method is crucial for human papillomavirus E6/E7 oncogenes detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecha, Nerea; Nieto, Maria Carmen; Andía, Daniel; Cisterna, Ramón; Basaras, Miren

    2017-03-09

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing plays a main role in the management of cervical cancer, however to improve the specificity in cervical screening, there is a need to develop and validate different approaches that can identify women at risk for progressive disease. Nowadays, mRNA expression of viral E6 and E7 HPV oncogenes stands up as a potential biomarker to improve cervical screening. We aimed to validate a method for RNA extraction, detect HPV mRNA expression and, assess the relationship between E6/E7 mRNA expression and pathology of patients' lesions and progression. This study included 50 specimens that had been previously genotyped as HPV16, 18, 31, 33 and/or 45. Cervical swabs were extracted with three different RNA extraction methods -Nuclisens manual extraction kit (bioMérieux), High Pure Viral RNA Kit (Roche) and RNeasy Plus Mini kit (Qiagen)-, and mRNA was detected with NucliSens EasyQ HPV version 1 test (bioMérieux) afterwards. Association of oncogene expression with pathology and lesion progression was analyzed for each extraction method. E6/E7 mRNA positivity rate was higher in samples analyzed with bioMérieux (62%), followed by Roche (24%) and Qiagen (6%). Women with lesions and lesion progression showed a higher prevalence of viral RNA expression than women that had not lesions or with lesion persistence. While bioMérieux revealed a higher sensitivity (77.27%), Roche presented a higher PPV (75%) and an increased specificity (89.28%). Extraction methods based on magnetic beads provided better RNA yield than those based in columns. Both Nuclisens manual extraction kit (bioMérieux) and High Pure Viral RNA Kit (Roche) seemed to be adequate for E6/E7 mRNA detection. However, none of them revealed both high sensitivity and specificity values. Further studies are needed to obtain and validate a standard gold method for RNA expression detection, to be included as part of the routine cervical screening program.

  16. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix® and Gardasil® human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults

    OpenAIRE

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin; Sehr, Peter; Bonde, Jesper; Storgaard, Merete; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix® (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil® (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no...

  17. Detection of oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes on spermatozoa from male partners of infertile couples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schillaci, Rosaria; Capra, Giuseppina; Bellavia, Carmela; Ruvolo, Giovanni; Scazzone, Concetta; Venezia, Renato; Perino, Antonio

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) sperm infection and its correlation with sperm parameters in patients who attended a fertility clinic. Cross-sectional clinical study. University-affiliated reproductive medicine clinic. A total of 308 male partners of couples undergoing in vitro fertilization techniques. Specimens of semen were collected from all patients. Sperm parameters were evaluated according to the World Health Organization manual. The presence of HPV DNA was researched by the combined use of two HPV assays and a highly sensitive nested polymerase chain reaction assay followed by HPV genotyping. To examine whether HPV was associated with the sperm, in situ hybridization (ISH) analysis was performed. Results of HPV investigation were compared with sperm parameters and ISH analysis. Twenty-four out of 308 semen samples (7.8%) were HPV DNA positive, but HPV infection did not seem to affect semen quality. Moreover, ISH revealed a clear HPV localization at the equatorial region of sperm head in infected samples. Oncogenic HPV genotypes were detected on spermatozoa from asymptomatic subjects, but a role of the infection in male infertility was not demonstrated. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Phorbol ester-induced terminal differentiation is inhibited in human U-937 monoblastic cells expressing a v-myc oncogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsson, L.G.; Ivhed, I.; Gidlund, M.; Pettersson, U.; Vennstroem, B.; Nilsson, K.

    1988-04-01

    Induction of differentiation of the human monoblastic cell line U-937 in vitro by several physiologic and nonphysiologic inducers is accompanied by a rapid decrease in expression of MYC, the endogenous human myc protooncogene. To investigate whether this reduction is a prerequisite for terminal differentiation. The authors introduced a constitutively expressed v-myc gene into U-937 cells. The results show that constitutive expression of an avian v-myc oncogene does not interfere with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced differentiation of U-937 cells early after stimulation. However, after 24 hr the differentiation process is reversed, as judged by a full recovery of the proliferative capacity and reexpression of the immature phenotype, within the next 2-4 days. They conclude that the terminal stage of macrophage differentiation is inhibited in U-937 cells constitutively expressing a v-myc oncogene.

  19. Isolation and characterization of c-myc, a cellular homolog of the oncogene (v-myc) of avian myelocytomatosis virus strain 29.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennstrom, B; Sheiness, D; Zabielski, J; Bishop, J M

    1982-01-01

    The chicken genome contains nucleotide sequences homologous to transforming genes (oncogenes) of a number of avian retroviruses. We have isolated chicken DNA (c-myc) that is homologous to the oncogene (v-myc) of the avian myelocytomatosis virus MC29 and have compared the structures of the cellular and viral genes. Results from restriction endonuclease mapping of c-myc and from analysis of heteroduplexes between the DNAs of the cellular and viral genes show that c-myc is homologous to 1,500 nucleotides in v-myc DNA. This homologous region is interrupted in c-myc by an intron-like sequence of 1,100 nucleotides which is absent from v-myc. Nuclear RNA from normal chicken cells contains at least five species of transcripts from c-myc ranging from 2.5 to 6.5 kilobases in length. By contrast, cytoplasm contains only the 2.5-kilobase c-myc RNA. These features of the c-myc gene and its nuclear transcripts are characteristic of normal cellular genes and suggest that the myc gene is of cellular rather than viral origin. The exons in c-myc may define two functional domains in the gene and may therefore facilitate the dissection of the different oncogenic potentials of the MC29 virus. Images PMID:6284994

  20. Are viruses associated with human breast cancer? Scrutinizing the molecular evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Deepti; Buehring, Gertrude Case

    2012-08-01

    The three viruses most studied as possible causes of human breast cancer are mouse mammary tumor virus-like sequences (MMTV-LS), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and oncogenic (high risk) types of human papilloma virus (HPV). The first step in fulfilling traditional criteria for inferring that a cancer is caused by a virus is to demonstrate the virus in the affected tissue. Molecular techniques, compared to host antibody assessment and immunohistochemistry, are the most definitive in establishing viral presence. Results of 85 original molecular research investigations to detect one or more of the three viruses have been extremely divergent with no consensus reached. We evaluated the methodology of these studies for the following: type of molecular assay, DNA/RNA quality control, positive and negative assay controls, type of fixation, genome targets, methods for preventing and detecting molecular contamination, pathology of specimens processed, sample size, and proportion of specimens positive for the viral genome region targeted. Only seven of the studies convincingly demonstrated the presence of an oncogenic virus biomarker (EBV: 4/30 studies (13%); HPV 3/29 studies (10%), whereas 25 convincingly demonstrated absence of the virus studied (MMTV-LS: 4/25 (16%); EBV: 15/30 (50%); 6/29 (21%). The remainder of the studies suffered shortcomings, which, in our opinion, prevented a definitive conclusion. Only one of the studies compared frequency of the virus in breast tissue of breast cancer patients versus appropriate normal control subjects with no history of breast cancer. None of the studies were designed as epidemiologic studies to determine if the presence of the virus was significantly associated with breast cancer. Based on our evaluation, the data in the publications reviewed here remain preliminary, and do not justify a conclusion that MMTV-LS, HPV, or EBV are causally associated with breast cancer. However, they form a valuable basis for redirecting future studies.

  1. Immortality, but not oncogenic transformation, of primary human cells leads to epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Katrina; Clouaire, Thomas; Bao, Xun X; Kemp, Sadie E; Xenophontos, Maria; de Las Heras, Jose Ignacio; Stancheva, Irina

    2014-04-01

    Tumourigenic transformation of normal cells into cancer typically involves several steps resulting in acquisition of unlimited growth potential, evasion of apoptosis and non-responsiveness to growth inhibitory signals. Both genetic and epigenetic changes can contribute to cancer development and progression. Given the vast genetic heterogeneity of human cancers and difficulty to monitor cancer-initiating events in vivo, the precise relationship between acquisition of genetic mutations and the temporal progression of epigenetic alterations in transformed cells is largely unclear. Here, we use an in vitro model system to investigate the contribution of cellular immortality and oncogenic transformation of primary human cells to epigenetic reprogramming of DNA methylation and gene expression. Our data demonstrate that extension of replicative life span of the cells is sufficient to induce accumulation of DNA methylation at gene promoters and large-scale changes in gene expression in a time-dependent manner. In contrast, continuous expression of cooperating oncogenes in immortalized cells, although essential for anchorage-independent growth and evasion of apoptosis, does not affect de novo DNA methylation at promoters and induces subtle expression changes. Taken together, these observations imply that cellular immortality promotes epigenetic adaptation to highly proliferative state, whereas transforming oncogenes confer additional properties to transformed human cells.

  2. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at Commercial Swine Farms Fair Organizers & Exhibitors In Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with ...

  3. Human Papilloma Virus and oral cancer: Narrative review of the literature.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandra Fernández

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection is now more common sexually transmitted diseases, with an incidence of 5.5 million worldwide, with 85% of the carrier of this virus adult population. Their oncogenic potential and increased oral lesions associated with oral HPV infection have led us to make a narrative of the literature on the role of HPV in oral cancer, especially types 16 and 18. Here we refer to the possible routes of infection, oncogenic mechanisms, both benign and potentially malignant oral lesions associated with the infection, different methods used for detection, prediction and prevention of infection. We stress the importance of the role of the dentist to identify individuals considered high risk and ease of performing detection in the oral cavity, through a quick and easy method as exfoliative cytology.

  4. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gonçales FL Jr, Pereira JS, Da Silva C, Thomaz GR, Pavan MH,. Fais VC, et al. Hepatitis B virus DNA in sera of blood donors and of patients infected with hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus. Clin Diagn Lab Immunol. 2003;10:718‑20. 25. Bahaf F, Tanomand A, Montazam H, Sany AA. Seroprevalence.

  5. Coinfection with Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV, Human Papilloma Virus (HPV and Polyoma BK Virus (BKPyV in Laryngeal, Oropharyngeal and Oral Cavity Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Drop

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Most research providing evidence for the role of oncogenic viruses in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC development is focused on one type of virus without analyzing possible interactions between two or more types of viruses. The aim of this study was to analyse the prevalence of co-infection with human papillomavirus (HPV, Epstein–Barr virus (EBV and polyoma BK virus (BKPyV in oral, oropharyngeal and laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas in Polish patients. The correlations between viral infection, SCC, demographic parameters, evidence of metastases and grading were also investigated. Fresh-frozen tumour tissue samples were collected from 146 patients with laryngeal, oropharyngeal and oral cancer. After DNA extraction, the DNA of the studied viruses was detected using polymerase chain rection (PCR assay. Males (87.7% with a history of smoking (70.6% and alcohol abuse (59.6% prevailed in the studied group. Histological type G2 was recognized in 64.4% cases. The patients were most frequently diagnosed with T2 stage (36.3% and with N1 stage (45.8%. Infection with at least two viruses was detected in 56.2% of patients. In this group, co-infection with HPV/EBV was identified in 34.1% of cases, EBV/BKV in 23.2%, HPV/BKV in 22.0%, and HPV/EBV/BKV in 20.7%. No difference of multiple infection in different locations of cancer was observed. The prevalence of poorly differentiated tumours (G3 was more frequent in co-infection with all three viruses than EBV or BKV alone. A significant correlation was observed between tumour dimensions (T and lymph-node involvement (N in co-infected patients compared to single infection. Further studies are necessary to clarify whether co-infection plays an important role in the initiation and/or progression of oncogenic transformation of oral, oropharyngeal and laryngeal epithelial cells.

  6. Oncogenic functions of hMDMX in in vitro transformation of primary human fibroblasts and embryonic retinoblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burg Marja JM

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In around 50% of all human cancers the tumor suppressor p53 is mutated. It is generally assumed that in the remaining tumors the wild-type p53 protein is functionally impaired. The two main inhibitors of p53, hMDM2 (MDM2 and hMDMX (MDMX/MDM4 are frequently overexpressed in wild-type p53 tumors. Whereas the main activity of hMDM2 is to degrade p53 protein, its close homolog hMDMX does not degrade p53, but it represses its transcriptional activity. Here we study the role of hMDMX in the neoplastic transformation of human fibroblasts and embryonic retinoblasts, since a high number of retinoblastomas contain elevated hMDMX levels. Methods We made use of an in vitro transformation model using a retroviral system of RNA interference and gene overexpression in primary human fibroblasts and embryonic retinoblasts. Consecutive knockdown of RB and p53, overexpression of SV40-small t, oncogenic HRasV12 and HA-hMDMX resulted in a number of stable cell lines representing different stages of the transformation process, enabling a comparison between loss of p53 and hMDMX overexpression. The cell lines were tested in various assays to assess their oncogenic potential. Results Both p53-knockdown and hMDMX overexpression accelerated proliferation and prevented growth suppression induced by introduction of oncogenic Ras, which was required for anchorage-independent growth and the ability to form tumors in vivo. Furthermore, we found that hMDMX overexpression represses basal p53 activity to some extent. Transformed fibroblasts with very high levels of hMDMX became largely resistant to the p53 reactivating drug Nutlin-3. The Nutlin-3 response of hMDMX transformed retinoblasts was intact and resembled that of retinoblastoma cell lines. Conclusions Our studies show that hMDMX has the essential properties of an oncogene. Its constitutive expression contributes to the oncogenic phenotype of transformed human cells. Its main function appears to be p53

  7. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Downregulates Human Papillomavirus-16 Oncogene Expression and Inhibits the Proliferation of Cervical Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph M. Bay

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The constitutive proliferation and resistance to differentiation and apoptosis of neoplastic cervical cells depend on sustained expression of human papillomavirus oncogenes. Inhibition of these oncogenes is a goal for the prevention of progression of HPV-induced neoplasias to cervical cancer. SiHa cervical cancer cells were transfected with an HPV-16 promoter reporter construct and treated with leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF, a human cytokine of the interleukin 6 superfamily. SiHa and CaSki cervical cancer cells were also assessed for proliferation by MTT precipitation, programmed cell death by flow cytometry, and HPV E6 and E7 expression by real-time PCR. LIF-treated cervical cancer cells showed significantly reduced HPV LCR activation, reduced levels of E6 and E7 mRNA, and reduced proliferation. We report the novel use of LIF to inhibit viral oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells, with concomitant reduction in proliferation suggesting re-engagement of cell-cycle regulation.

  8. Effect of oncogene activating mutations and kinase inhibitors on amino acid metabolism of human isogenic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eung-Sam; Samanta, Animesh; Cheng, Hui Shan; Ding, Zhaobing; Han, Weiping; Toschi, Luisella; Chang, Young Tae

    2015-12-01

    We investigated the changes in amino acid (AA) metabolism induced in MCF10A, a human mammary epithelial cell line, by the sequential knock-in of K-Ras and PI3K mutant oncogenes. Differentially regulated genes associated to AA pathways were identified on comparing gene expression patterns in the isogenic cell lines. Additionally, we monitored the changes in the levels of AAs and transcripts in the cell lines treated with kinase inhibitors (REGO: a multi-kinase inhibitor, PI3K-i: a PI3K inhibitor, and MEK-i: a MEK inhibitor). In total, 19 AAs and 58 AA-associated transcripts were found to be differentially regulated by oncogene knock-in and by drug treatment. In particular, the multi-kinase and MEK inhibitor affected pathways in K-Ras mutant cells, whereas the PI3K inhibitor showed a major impact in the K-Ras/PI3K double mutant cells. These findings may indicate the dependency of AA metabolism on the oncogene mutation pattern in human cancer. Thus, future therapy might include combinations of kinase inhibitors and drug targeting enzymes of AA pathways.

  9. Transfection of normal human bronchial epithelial cells with the bcl-2 oncogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, C.H.; Kenyon, K.D.; Tesfaigzi, J. [and others

    1995-12-01

    In vitro, studies examining the transformation of virus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells after exposure to chemical and physical carcinogens have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the development of lung cancer. Virus-immortalized HBE cells have been used because of both the limited life span of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in culture (approximately 30-35 population doublins) and their resistance to in vitro malignant transformation. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized HBE cells have been used to study the genetic changes that occur after exposure to {alpha}-particles in vitro. Although this model may prove to be useful for studying the 18% or less of bronchogenic carcinomas found to contain HPV sequences, it is not an appropriate model for studying the majority of lung epithelial malignancies in which HPV DNA is not detected. This view is supported by the fact that HPV-immortalized cell lines commonly exhibit aneuploidy. This results of this study suggest that: (1) NHBE cells can be transiently transfected with the pCMV{Beta} vector; and (2) the antibiotic hygromycin-resistant transfected cells.

  10. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  11. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signalingr driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-03-08

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology.

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis infections among long-distance truck ... Journal Home > Vol 10, No 1 (2016) > ... The PDF file you selected should load here if your Web browser has a PDF reader plug-in installed ...

  13. CARCINOMA OF THE LARYNX AND HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgi N. Nikolov

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Laryngeal carcinoma is one of the most common form of head and neck cancer. During the last two decades, it has been recognized that this cancer is causally related to human papillomavirus (HPV. Objective: We presented a study on prevalence of human papilloma viruses (HPV in patients with laryngeal carcinoma. Methods: This study consists of 43 patients with laryngeal carcinoma who were diagnosed and treated with surgical techniques in Department of Otorhinolaryngology, University Hospital, Pleven, Bulgaria. Immunohistochemistry of p16INK4a and Ki-67 were used to prove the relationship between high-risk-HPV (HR-HPV and carcinogenesis. Results: Papilloma virus infection with high-risk oncogenic types of HPV was determined in more than 39.5% of surgically treated patients with histologically proven laryngeal cancer. HPV-induced carcinogenesis was assumed in 17 (13.9% of all patients whose spouses were operated from cervical cancer. The patients with HPV-positive laryngeal carcinoma were younger than the others in the group (8 years on average. Risk factors for development of HPV-associated laryngeal carcinoma were related to higher number of sexual partners and the practice of oral sex. Frequently, in patients with HPV-associated laryngeal carcinoma we find data for so-called “family’s carcinogenesis”. The possibility of appearance (either preceding or following the treatment of a second carcinoma and/or tumour recurrence is higher in HPV-positive laryngeal carcinomas. Conclusion: It is recommended to extend the diagnostic methods for laryngeal and hypo pharyngeal cancer with a routine search for high-risk oncogenic HPV strains.

  14. Characterization of Leukemia-Inducing Genes Using a Proto-Oncogene/Homeobox Gene Retroviral Human cDNA Library in a Mouse In Vivo Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Su Hwa; Lee, Sohyun; Chung, Hee Yong

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a method to screen a large number of potential driver mutations of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) using a retroviral cDNA library and murine bone marrow transduction-transplantation system. As a proof-of-concept, murine bone marrow (BM) cells were transduced with a retroviral cDNA library encoding well-characterized oncogenes and homeobox genes, and the virus-transduced cells were transplanted into lethally irradiated mice. The proto-oncogenes responsible for leukemia initiation were identified by PCR amplification of cDNA inserts from genomic DNA isolated from leukemic cells. In an initial screen of ten leukemic mice, the MYC proto-oncogene was detected in all the leukemic mice. Of ten leukemic mice, 3 (30%) had MYC as the only transgene, and seven mice (70%) had additional proto-oncogene inserts. We repeated the same experiment after removing MYC-related genes from the library to characterize additional leukemia-inducing gene combinations. Our second screen using the MYC-deleted proto-oncogene library confirmed MEIS1and the HOX family as cooperating oncogenes in leukemia pathogenesis. The model system we introduced in this study will be valuable in functionally screening novel combinations of genes for leukemogenic potential in vivo, and the system will help in the discovery of new targets for leukemia therapy. PMID:26606454

  15. Saffold virus infection associated with human myocarditis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Skov; Nielsen, Alex Yde; Banner, Jytte

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Saffold virus was described in 2007 as one of the first human viruses within the genus cardioviruses. Cardioviruses may cause severe infections of the myocardium in animals, and several studies have associated saffold virus with human disease. As a result, saffold virus has been...... in the myocardium, lung tissue and blood of one child and was accompanied by histopathological inflammation in the heart and lungs, which was supportive of a viral infection. These findings suggest that cardioviruses may be associated with myocarditis in humans....

  16. VIRUSES ASSOCIATED WITH HUMAN AND ANIMAL INFLUENZA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    in humans, dogs, horses and pigs; populations of camels, ferrets, cats, seals, mink and whales also show evidence ... flu, Horse Flu and Dog flu. Influenza virus A. This genus has one species, influenza A virus ..... Hay, A., Gregory, V., Douglas, A., and Lin, Y. (2001). “The evolution of human influenza viruses” Philos Trans R.

  17. [HPV (Human Papilloma Virus) implication in other cancers than gynaecological].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badoual, C; Tartour, E; Roussel, H; Bats, A S; Pavie, J; Pernot, S; Weiss, L; Mohamed, A Si; Thariat, J; Hoffmann, C; Péré, H

    2015-08-01

    Worldwide, approximately 5 to 10% of the population is infected by a Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). Some of these viruses, with a high oncogenic risk (HPV HR), are responsible for about 5% of cancer. It is now accepted that almost all carcinomas of the cervix and the vulva are due to an HPV HR (HPV16 and 18) infection. However, these viruses are known to be involved in the carcinogenesis of many other cancers (head and neck [SCCHN], penis, anus). For head and neck cancer, HPV infection is considered as a good prognostic factor. The role of HPV HR in anal cancer is also extensively studied in high-risk patient's population. The role of HPV infection in the carcinogenesis of esophageal, bladder, lung, breast or skin cancers is still debated. Given the multiple possible locations of HPV HR infection, the question of optimizing the management of patients with a HPV+ cancer arises in the implementation of a comprehensive clinical and biological monitoring. It is the same in therapeutics with the existence of a preventive vaccination, for example. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Pesticides and oncogenic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakonaki, Elena; Androutsopoulos, Vasilis P; Liesivuori, Jyrki; Tsatsakis, Aristidis M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2013-05-10

    Pesticides constitute a diverse class of chemicals used for the protection of agricultural products. Several lines of evidence demonstrate that organochlorine and organophosphate pesticides can cause malignant transformation of cells in in vitro and in vivo models. In the current minireview a comprehensive summary of recent in vitro findings is presented along with data reported from human population studies, regarding the impact of pesticide exposure on activation or dysregulation of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Substantial mechanistic work suggests that pesticides are capable of inducing mutations in oncogenes and increase their transcriptional expression in vitro, whereas human population studies indicate associations between pesticide exposure levels and mutation occurrence in cancer-related genes. Further work is required to fully explore the exact mechanisms by which pesticide exposure affects the integrity and normal function of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes in human populations. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Immunological responses against human papilloma virus and human papilloma virus induced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitose, Shun-ichi; Sakazaki, T; Ono, T; Kurita, T; Mihashi, H; Nakashima, T

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the local immune status in the larynx in the presence of infection or carcinogenesis associated with human papilloma virus. Cytological samples (for human papilloma virus detection) and laryngeal secretions (for immunoglobulin assessment) were obtained from 31 patients with laryngeal disease, during microscopic laryngeal surgery. On histological examination, 12 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had laryngeal papilloma and 15 had other benign laryngeal disease. Cytological samples were tested for human papilloma virus DNA using the Hybrid Capture 2 assay. High risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 25 per cent of patients (three of 12) with laryngeal cancer. Low risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected only in three laryngeal papilloma patients. The mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A in human papilloma virus DNA positive patients were more than twice those in human papilloma virus DNA negative patients. A statistically significant difference was observed between the secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations in the two groups. Patients with laryngeal cancer had higher laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type, compared with patients with benign laryngeal disease. The study assessed the mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type in the 12 laryngeal cancer patients, comparing human papilloma virus DNA positive patients (n = 3) and human papilloma virus DNA negative patients (n = 9); the mean concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A tended to be greater in human papilloma virus DNA positive cancer patients, compared with human papilloma virus DNA negative cancer patients. These results suggest that the local laryngeal immune response is activated by infection or carcinogenesis due to human papilloma virus. The findings strongly suggest that secretory IgA has inhibitory activity

  20. The role of oncogenic Ras in human skin tumorigenesis depends on the clonogenic potential of the founding keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurelli, Riccardo; Tinaburri, Lavinia; Gangi, Fabio; Bondanza, Sergio; Severi, Anna Lisa; Scarponi, Claudia; Albanesi, Cristina; Mesiti, Giuseppe; Guerra, Liliana; Capogrossi, Maurizio C; Dellambra, Elena

    2016-03-01

    The role of Ras in human skin tumorigenesis induction is still ambiguous. Overexpression of oncogenic Ras causes premature senescence in cultured human cells and hyperplasia in transgenic mice. Here, we investigated whether the oncogenic insult outcome might depend on the nature of the founding keratinocyte. We demonstrate that overexpression of the constitutively active Ras-V12 induces senescence in primary human keratinocyte cultures, but that some cells escape senescence and proliferate indefinitely. Ras overexpression in transient-amplifying- or stem-cell-enriched cultures shows that p16 (encoded by CDKN2A) levels are crucial for the final result. Indeed, transient-amplifying keratinocytes expressing high levels of p16 are sensitive to Ras-V12-induced senescence, whereas cells with high proliferative potential, but that do not display p16, are resistant. The subpopulation that sustains the indefinite culture growth exhibits stem cell features. Bypass of senescence correlates with inhibition of the pRb (also known as RB1) pathway and resumption of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) activity. Immortalization is also sustained by activation of the ERK1 and ERK2 (ERK1/2, also known as MAPK3 and MAPK1) and Akt pathways. Moreover, only transduced cultures originating from cultures bearing stem cells induce tumors in nude mice. Our findings demonstrate that the Ras overexpression outcome depends on the clonogenic potential of the recipient keratinocyte and that only the stem cell compartment is competent to initiate tumorigenesis. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  1. The Heterodimeric TWIST1-E12 Complex Drives the Oncogenic Potential of TWIST1 in Human Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Jacqueroud

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The TWIST1 embryonic transcription factor displays biphasic functions during the course of carcinogenesis. It facilitates the escape of cells from oncogene-induced fail-safe programs (senescence, apoptosis and their consequent neoplastic transformation. Additionally, it promotes the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and the initiation of the metastatic spread of cancer cells. Interestingly, cancer cells recurrently remain dependent on TWIST1 for their survival and/or proliferation, making TWIST1 their Achilles’ heel. TWIST1 has been reported to form either homodimeric or heterodimeric complexes mainly in association with the E bHLH class I proteins. These complexes display distinct, sometimes even antagonistic, functions during development and unequal prometastatic functions in prostate cancer cells. Using a tethered dimer strategy, we successively assessed the ability of TWIST1 dimers to cooperate with an activated version of RAS in human mammary epithelial cell transformation, to provide mice with the ability to spontaneously develop breast tumors, and lastly to maintain a senescence program at a latent state in several breast cancer cell lines. We demonstrate that the TWIST1-E12 complex, unlike the homodimer, is an oncogenic form of TWIST1 in mammary epithelial cells and that efficient binding of both partners is a prerequisite for its activity. The detection of the heterodimer in human premalignant lesions by a proximity ligation assay, at a stage preceding the initiation of the metastatic cascade, is coherent with such an oncogenic function. TWIST1-E protein heterodimeric complexes may thus constitute the main active forms of TWIST1 with regard to senescence inhibition over the time course of breast tumorigenesis.

  2. Impairment of alternative splice sites defining a novel gammaretroviral exon within gag modifies the oncogenic properties of Akv murine leukemia virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quintanilla-Martinez Leticia

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations of an alternative splice donor site located within the gag region has previously been shown to broaden the pathogenic potential of the T-lymphomagenic gammaretrovirus Moloney murine leukemia virus, while the equivalent mutations in the erythroleukemia inducing Friend murine leukemia virus seem to have no influence on the disease-inducing potential of this virus. In the present study we investigate the splice pattern as well as the possible effects of mutating the alternative splice sites on the oncogenic properties of the B-lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. Results By exon-trapping procedures we have identified a novel gammaretroviral exon, resulting from usage of alternative splice acceptor (SA' and splice donor (SD' sites located in the capsid region of gag of the B-cell lymphomagenic Akv murine leukemia virus. To analyze possible effects in vivo of this novel exon, three different alternative splice site mutant viruses, mutated in either the SA', in the SD', or in both sites, respectively, were constructed and injected into newborn inbred NMRI mice. Most of the infected mice (about 90% developed hematopoietic neoplasms within 250 days, and histological examination of the tumors showed that the introduced synonymous gag mutations have a significant influence on the phenotype of the induced tumors, changing the distribution of the different types as well as generating tumors of additional specificities such as de novo diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL and histiocytic sarcoma. Interestingly, a broader spectrum of diagnoses was made from the two single splice-site mutants than from as well the wild-type as the double splice-site mutant. Both single- and double-spliced transcripts are produced in vivo using the SA' and/or the SD' sites, but the mechanisms underlying the observed effects on oncogenesis remain to be clarified. Likewise, analyses of provirus integration sites in tumor tissues, which identified

  3. Tools for genotyping human immunodeficiency virus, and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... Janini LM, Tanuri A, Schechter M, Peralta JM, Vicente AC, Dela Torre. N, Pieniazek NJ, Luo CC, Ramos A, Soriano V, Schochetman G,. Rayfield MA, Pieniazek D (1998). Horizontal and vertical transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 dual infections caused by viruses of subtypes B and C. J ...

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Occupational Post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    opsig

    potentially infected body fluids so that they can present themselves rapidly for risk assessment and commencement of ART if necessary in the event of an occupational exposure to HIV. INTRODUCTION. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) is the virus that causes Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome. (AIDS). It can be ...

  5. Post exposure prophylaxis against human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-11-23

    Nov 23, 2015 ... immunodeficiency virus post ex- posure prophylaxis (HIV PEP) among paediatricians in Nigeria. ... pathogens including human immunodeficiency virus. (HIV) during the course of providing care for their pa- tients. ..... Ford N, Shubber Z, Calmy A,. Irvine C, Rapparini C, Ajose O, et al. Choice of antiretroviral ...

  6. Human natural killer cells prevent infectious mononucleosis features by targeting lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chijioke, Obinna; Müller, Anne; Feederle, Regina; Barros, Mario Henrique M; Krieg, Carsten; Emmel, Vanessa; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Leung, Carol S; Antsiferova, Olga; Landtwing, Vanessa; Bossart, Walter; Moretta, Alessandro; Hassan, Rocio; Boyman, Onur; Niedobitek, Gerald; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Capaul, Riccarda; Münz, Christian

    2013-12-26

    Primary infection with the human oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can result in infectious mononucleosis (IM), a self-limiting disease caused by massive lymphocyte expansion that predisposes for the development of distinct EBV-associated lymphomas. Why some individuals experience this symptomatic primary EBV infection, whereas the majority acquires the virus asymptomatically, remains unclear. Using a mouse model with reconstituted human immune system components, we show that depletion of human natural killer (NK) cells enhances IM symptoms and promotes EBV-associated tumorigenesis mainly because of a loss of immune control over lytic EBV infection. These data suggest that failure of innate immune control by human NK cells augments symptomatic lytic EBV infection, which drives lymphocyte expansion and predisposes for EBV-associated malignancies. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV) transmission in children. Blood transfusion-related HIV ... the human immuno‑deficiency virus among transfused sickle cell anemia patients. Subjects and Methods ... z = Confidence interval (1.96). P = Prevalence of HIV in a previous study ...

  8. Assessment of human papillomavirus E6/E7 oncogene expression as cervical disease biomarker

    OpenAIRE

    Fontecha, Nerea; Basaras, Miren; Hern?ez, Silvia; And?a, Daniel; Cisterna, Ram?n

    2016-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to detect HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression in women with high-risk genotypes (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33 and -45) analysing its relationship with tissue pathology and 2) 2-year follow-up of E6/E7 mRNA tested group. Methods Our samples were genotyped and classified by pathologists according to Bethesda system. After RNA extraction, E6/E7 oncogene mRNA detection was performed by NucliSens? EasyQ? HPV v1 Test (bioM?rieux). Results The results of the present study showe...

  9. Knowledge and perception of human papilloma virus vaccine among the antenatal women in a Nigerian tertiary hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Teddy E Agida; Godwin O Akaba; Aliyu Y Isah; Bissalla Ekele

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is a major health problem globally, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria inclusive. One of the preventive measures is the vaccination of teenagers against oncogenic human papilloma virus. The aim of this study was to find out the level of knowledge mothers possess about these vaccines and their willingness to administer vaccination to their teenage girls. Materials and Methods: This was a cross-sectional descriptive study of 255 consecutive women attending ant...

  10. Genetic variations in the DNA replication origins of human papillomavirus family correlate with their oncogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Gulden; Biswas-Fiss, Esther E; Biswas, Subhasis B

    2017-12-27

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) encompasses a large family of viruses that range from benign to highly carcinogenic. The crucial differences between benign and carcinogenic types of HPV remain unknown, except that the two HPV types differ in the frequency of DNA replication. We have systematically analyzed the mechanism of HPV DNA replication initiation in low-risk and high-risk HPVs. Our results demonstrate that HPV-encoded E2 initiator protein and its four binding sites in the replication origin play pivotal roles in determining the destiny of the HPV-infected cell. We have identified strain-specific single nucleotide variations in E2 binding sites only in the high-risk HPVs. We have demonstrated that these variations result in attenuated formation of the E2-DNA complex. E2 binding to these sites is linked to the activation of the DNA replication origin as well as initiation of DNA replication. Both mobility shift assay and atomic force microscopy studies demonstrated that binding of E2 from either low- or high-risk HPVs with variant binding sequences lacked formation of multimeric E2-DNA complex formation in vitro. These results provided a molecular basis of differential DNA replication in the two types of HPVs and pointed to a correlation with the development of cancer. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Methamphetamine reduces human influenza A virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Hsiang Chen

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (meth is a highly addictive psychostimulant that is among the most widely abused illicit drugs, with an estimated over 35 million users in the world. Several lines of evidence suggest that chronic meth abuse is a major factor for increased risk of infections with human immunodeficiency virus and possibly other pathogens, due to its immunosuppressive property. Influenza A virus infections frequently cause epidemics and pandemics of respiratory diseases among human populations. However, little is known about whether meth has the ability to enhance influenza A virus replication, thus increasing severity of influenza illness in meth abusers. Herein, we investigated the effects of meth on influenza A virus replication in human lung epithelial A549 cells. The cells were exposed to meth and infected with human influenza A/WSN/33 (H1N1 virus. The viral progenies were titrated by plaque assays, and the expression of viral proteins and cellular proteins involved in interferon responses was examined by Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. We report the first evidence that meth significantly reduces, rather than increases, virus propagation and the susceptibility to influenza infection in the human lung epithelial cell line, consistent with a decrease in viral protein synthesis. These effects were apparently not caused by meth's effects on enhancing virus-induced interferon responses in the host cells, reducing viral biological activities, or reducing cell viability. Our results suggest that meth might not be a great risk factor for influenza A virus infection among meth abusers. Although the underlying mechanism responsible for the action of meth on attenuating virus replication requires further investigation, these findings prompt the study to examine whether other structurally similar compounds could be used as anti-influenza agents.

  12. Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The epidemiology of viral hepatitis and Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) during pregnancy is of great importance for health planners and program managers. However, few published data on viral hepatitis and HIV are available in Sudan especially during pregnancy. Objectives: The current study was ...

  13. Herpes Simplex Virus Type-2 and Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To estimate the seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Type 2 (HSV-2) and its association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) infections in rural Kilimanjaro Tanzania. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Oria village from March to June 2005 involving all individuals aged 15-44 years ...

  14. Karyotype analysis of the acute fibrosarcoma from chickens infected with subgroup J avian leukosis virus associated with v-src oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xuan; Ju, Sidi; Chen, Junxia; Meng, Fanfeng; Sun, Peng; Li, Yang; Wang, Xin; Wang, Yixin; Liu, Juan; Chang, Shuang; Zhao, Peng; Cui, Zhizhong

    2016-01-01

    To understand the cytogenetic characteristics of acute fibrosarcoma in chickens infected with the subgroup J avian leukosis virus associated with the v-src oncogene, we performed a karyotype analysis of fibrosarcoma cell cultures. Twenty-nine of 50 qualified cell culture spreads demonstrated polyploidy of some macrochromosomes, 21 of which were trisomic for chromosome 7, and others were trisomic for chromosomes 3, 4, 5 (sex chromosome w), and 10. In addition, one of them was trisomic for both chromosome 7 and the sex chromosome 5 (w). In contrast, no aneuploidy was found for 10 macrochromosomes of 12 spreads of normal chicken embryo fibroblast cells, although aneuploidy for some microchromosomes was demonstrated in five of the 12 spreads. The cytogenetic mosaicism or polymorphism of the aneuploidy in the acute fibrosarcoma described in this study suggests that the analysed cells are polyclonal.

  15. Development of procedures for the identification of human papilloma virus DNA fragments in laser plume

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woellmer, Wolfgang; Meder, Tom; Jappe, Uta; Gross, Gerd; Riethdorf, Sabine; Riethdorf, Lutz; Kuhler-Obbarius, Christina; Loening, Thomas

    1996-01-01

    For the investigation of laser plume for the existence of HPV DNA fragments, which possibly occur during laser treatment of virus infected tissue, human papillomas and condylomas were treated in vitro with the CO2-laser. For the sampling of the laser plume a new method for the trapping of the material was developed by use of water-soluble gelatine filters. These samples were analyzed with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique, which was optimized in regard of the gelatine filters and the specific primers. Positive PCR results for HPV DNA fragments up to the size of a complete oncogene were obtained and are discussed regarding infectiousity.

  16. LINC00152: A pivotal oncogenic long non-coding RNA in human cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Yang; Yang, Jian; Li, Quanpeng; Xu, Boming; Lian, Yifan; Miao, Lin

    2017-08-01

    In recent years, increasing evidence has shown the potential role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in multiple cancers. Deregulation of lncRNAs was detected being closely associated with many kinds of tumours where they can act as a tumour suppressor or accelerator. LINC00152 was identified as an oncogene involved in many kinds of cancers, such as gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, colon cancer, gallbladder cancer and renal cell carcinoma. Moreover, inhibition of LINC00152 can suppress proliferation, migration and invasion of the cancer cells. Increasing evidence has showed that LINC00152 may act as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker for the above-mentioned cancers. In our review, we summarize the recent research progress of the expression and role of LINC00152 in various kinds of cancers. © 2017 The Authors. Cell Proliferation Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Racial differences in the incidence and clearance of human papilloma virus (HPV): the HPV in men (HIM) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schabath, Matthew B; Villa, Luisa L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J; Akogbe, Gabriel O; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Papenfuss, Mary R; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R

    2013-10-01

    This analysis assessed the acquisition (incidence) and persistence (clearance) of human papilloma virus (HPV) infection by self-reported race among men in The HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infections. Self-reported race was categorized as White, Black, Asian/Pacific Islander (PI), or multiple and mixed race. Genital samples were combined for HPV DNA testing and categorized by any, oncogenic, and non-oncogenic HPV infections. Asian/PI race had significantly the lowest incidence of any, oncogenic, and non-oncogenic HPV infection (P HPV infection (HR = 0.61; 95% CI, 0.40-0.93) when compared to Whites. No significant associations were evident for Asian/PI race for clearance. Multiple and mixed race was significantly associated with lower probability of acquiring non-oncogenic HPV infection (HR = 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-0.99) and borderline significant associations were observed for any HPV (HR = 0.91) and oncogenic infections (HR = 0.92). Multiple and mixed race was associated with a lower probability of clearing any (HR = 0.92; 95% CI, 0.84-1.00) and oncogenic HPV infections (HR = 0.85; 95% CI, 0.75-0.95). Asian/PI race had the lowest incidence of HPV and exhibited a lower probability of acquiring new HPV infections. Multiple and mixed race had the second lowest incidence of infection and was associated with a lower probability of acquiring and clearing an HPV infection. Race-specific differences in HPV infection could be due to behavior, innate genetic differences, or circulating intratypic HPV variants.

  18. A Critical Role of Glutamine and Asparagine γ-Nitrogen in Nucleotide Biosynthesis in Cancer Cells Hijacked by an Oncogenic Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Zhu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available While glutamine is a nonessential amino acid that can be synthesized from glucose, some cancer cells primarily depend on glutamine for their growth, proliferation, and survival. Numerous types of cancer also depend on asparagine for cell proliferation. The underlying mechanisms of the glutamine and asparagine requirement in cancer cells in different contexts remain unclear. In this study, we show that the oncogenic virus Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV accelerates the glutamine metabolism of glucose-independent proliferation of cancer cells by upregulating the expression of numerous critical enzymes, including glutaminase 2 (GLS2, glutamate dehydrogenase 1 (GLUD1, and glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase 2 (GOT2, to support cell proliferation. Surprisingly, cell crisis is rescued only completely by supplementation with asparagine but minimally by supplementation with α-ketoglutarate, aspartate, or glutamate upon glutamine deprivation, implying an essential role of γ-nitrogen in glutamine and asparagine for cell proliferation. Specifically, glutamine and asparagine provide the critical γ-nitrogen for purine and pyrimidine biosynthesis, as knockdown of four rate-limiting enzymes in the pathways, including carbamoylphosphate synthetase 2 (CAD, phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate amidotransferase (PPAT, and phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetases 1 and 2 (PRPS1 and PRPS2, respectively, suppresses cell proliferation. These findings indicate that glutamine and asparagine are shunted to the biosynthesis of nucleotides and nonessential amino acids from the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle to support the anabolic proliferation of KSHV-transformed cells. Our results illustrate a novel mechanism by which an oncogenic virus hijacks a metabolic pathway for cell proliferation and imply potential therapeutic applications in specific types of cancer that depend on this pathway.

  19. Viral load and short-term natural history of type-specific oncogenic human papillomavirus infections in a high-risk cohort of midadult women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winer, Rachel L; Xi, Long Fu; Shen, Zhenping; Stern, Joshua E; Newman, Laura; Feng, Qinghua; Hughes, James P; Koutsky, Laura A

    2014-04-15

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) viral load may inform the origin of newly detected infections and characterize oncogenic HPV natural history in midadult women. From 2007 to 2011, we enrolled 521 25-65-year-old-female online daters and followed them triannually with mailed health and sexual behavior questionnaires and kits for self-sampling for PCR-based HPV DNA testing. Samples from oncogenic HPV positive women were selected for type-specific DNA load testing by real-time PCR with adjustment for cellularity. Linear or logistic regression models were used to evaluate relationships between viral levels, health and sexual behavior, and longitudinal oncogenic HPV detection. Type-specific viral levels were borderline significantly higher in oncogenic HPV infections that were prevalent versus newly detected (p = 0.092), but levels in newly detected infections were higher than in infections redetected after intercurrent negativity (p detected intermittently, the likelihood of persistent (OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 2.20-8.45) or single-time (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.03-1.71) detection increased per 1-unit increase in baseline log10 viral load. Viral load differences between redetected and newly detected infections suggest a portion of new detections were due to new acquisition, although report of recent new sex partners (a potential marker of new infection) was not predictive of viral load; oncogenic HPV infections in midadult women with new partners likely represent a mix of new acquisition and reactivation or intermittent detection of previous infection. Intermittent detection was characterized by low viral levels, suggesting that intermittent detection of persisting oncogenic HPV infection may be of limited clinical significance. © 2013 UICC.

  20. The preliminary solution structure of human p8MTCP1, a protein encoded by the putative MTCP1 oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthe, P.; Guignard, L.; Yang, Y.-S.; Chiche, L.; Strub, M.-P.; Hoh, F.; Stern, M.-H.; Roumestand, C.

    1998-02-01

    The NMR solution structure of the cystein-rich human p8 protein coded by the oncogene MTCP1 reveals an original scaffold consisting of three α-helices, two of them tightly held together by two disulphide bridges in an antiparallel α-hairpin. MTCP1 was found to be expressed in mature prolymphocytic leukemias. La structure RMN de la protéine humaine p8 en solution présente un repliement original en trois hélices α, deux d'entre elles étant étroitement maintenues dans une orientation antiparallèle par deux ponts disulfures. Cette protéine riche en cystéine est codée par l'oncogène MTCP1 qui est exprimé dans des leucémies prolymphocytaires de phénotype mature.

  1. Absence of oncogenic transformation despite acquisition of cytogenetic aberrations in long-term cultured telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haker, Björn; Fuchs, Sigrid; Dierlamm, Judith; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Wege, Henning

    2007-10-18

    As a culture model to study hepatocarcinogenesis, telomerase-immortalized human fetal hepatocytes were monitored for karyotype changes evolving in long-term culture and development of functional defects in DNA damage response. G-banding revealed acquisition of characteristic karyotype abnormalities, e.g., trisomy 7 and monosomy X, in two independently immortalized and cultured populations after 80-100 population doublings. Interestingly, the detected aneuploidies resemble some of the genetic events observed in hepatocellular cancer. However, these genetic changes were not sufficient to induce oncogenic transformation reflected by absence of anchorage-independent growth. Furthermore, long-term cultured telomerase-immortalized cells preserved p53 expression levels and effective p53-mediated damage response.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus infection presenting as a fatal case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MJP

    2015-06-25

    CMV), Epstein-. Barr virus (EBV), Hepatitis B and C virus,. Mycoplasma. Pneumoniae,. Haemophilus influenzae and Campylobacter jejuni have all been implicated in. GBS.[6]. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has ...

  3. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix(®) and Gardasil(®) human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin

    2014-01-01

    (®) (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil(®) (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross......Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix......-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®). The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross...

  4. E2F-Rb complexes assemble and inhibit cdc25A transcription in cervical carcinoma cells following repression of human papillomavirus oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, L; Goodwin, E C; Naeger, L K

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in cervical carcinoma cells represses expression of integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes, followed by repression of the cdc25A gene and other cellular genes required for cell cycle progression, resulting in dramatic growth arrest...

  5. Detection of oncogenic genital human papillomavirus (HPV) among HPV negative older and younger women after 7 years of follow-up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brogaard, Kim Agerholm; Munk, Christian; Iftner, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The knowledge on risk factors of being human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive among older women is sparse. The aim was to determine the frequency of oncogenic HPV appearance after 7 years among initially HPV-negative women and to examine potential risk factors that influence the occurrence of HPV...

  6. Human bite and human immune deficiency virus (HIV) transmission ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The concentration of human immune deficiency virus (HIV) in the saliva of a carrier is low. As a result, human bite is not considered the traditional route of HIV infection transmission. Aim: To report a case of HIV sero-positivity following a human bite. Setting: University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Port ...

  7. Human to mosquito transmission of dengue viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren B Carrington

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The successful transmission of dengue virus from a human host to a mosquito vector requires a complex set of factors to align. It is becoming increasingly important to improve our understanding of the parameters that shape the human to mosquito component of the transmission cycle so that vaccines and therapeutic anti-virals can be fully evaluated and epidemiological models refined. Here we describe these factors, and discuss the biological and environmental impacts and demographic changes that are influencing these dynamics. Specifically, we examine features of the human infection required for the mosquito to acquire the virus via natural blood feeding, as well as the biological and environmental factors that influence a mosquito’s susceptibility to infection, up to the point that they are capable of transmitting the virus to a new host.

  8. Human Neuroblastoma: From Basic Science to Clinical Debut of Cellular Oncogenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwab, Manfred

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood embryonic tumor of migrating neuroectodermal cells derived from the neural crest and destined for the adrenal medulla and the sympathetic nervous system. It very often has a rapidly progressive clinical course, and although many advances have been made in understanding the development of this tumor, improving the survival rates particularly in patients with metastatic tumor has been a frustrating experience. The mechanisms leading to neuroblastoma are largely unclear, but nonrandom chromosomal changes discovered early suggested the involvement of genetic alterations. Most prominent among these is the amplification of the oncogene MYCN, which identifies a group of patients who have a particularly dire prognosis. Amplified MYCN is used today as a prognostic marker on which therapy design is based to a large extent. An unusual aspect of neuroblastoma is the high rate at which tumors regress spontaneously, even in infants with extensive liver involvement and numerous subcutaneous nodules. Identifying the molecular and cellular basis of spontaneous regression could result in improved therapeutic approaches. Neuroblastoma is a model tumor with many fascinating aspects but has remained a challenge to the pediatric oncologist

  9. Oncogenic RAS Regulates Long Noncoding RNA Orilnc1 in Human Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongmei; Zhang, Gao; Hu, Xiaowen; Wu, Lawrence; Feng, Yi; He, Sidan; Zhang, Youyou; Hu, Zhongyi; Yang, Lu; Tian, Tian; Xu, Weiting; Wei, Zhi; Lu, Yiling; Flaherty, Keith T; Zhong, Xiaomin; Mills, Gordon B; Gimotty, Phyllis A; Xu, Xiaowei; Herlyn, Meenhard; Zhang, Lin

    2017-07-15

    RAS and its downstream cascades transmit cellular signals, resulting in increased transcription of genes involved in cell growth and division. Protein-coding gene targets of RAS signaling have been characterized extensively, but long noncoding RNAs (lncRNA) regulated by these processes have not. Using a custom-designed lncRNA microarray, we identified the lncRNA Orilnc1 as a genetic target of RAS that is critical for RAS oncogenicity. Orilnc1 expression was regulated by RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signaling via the transcription factor AP1. Orilnc1 was highly expressed in BRAF-mutant cancers, such as melanoma. Silencing of Orilnc1 blocked tumor cell proliferation and growth in vitro and in vivo In addition, Orilnc1 blockade reduced expression of cyclin E1 and induced G1-S cell-cycle arrest in tumor cells. Taken together, our results identify Orilnc1 as a novel, nonprotein mediator of RAS/RAF activation that may serve as a therapeutic target in RAS/RAF-driven cancers. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3745-57. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. Molecular Epidemiology of Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Bum Sik

    2017-01-01

    During the evolution of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), transmissions between humans and primates resulted in multiple HIV lineages in humans. This evolution has been rapid, giving rise to a complex classification and allowing for worldwide spread and intermixing of subtypes, which has consequently led to dozens of circulating recombinant forms. In the Republic of Korea, 12,522 cases of HIV infection have been reported between 1985, when AIDS was first identified, and 2015. This review fo...

  11. Human papillomavirus genotype distribution and E6/E7 oncogene expression in Turkish women with cervical cytological findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tezcan, Seda; Ozgur, Didem; Ulger, Mahmut; Aslan, Gonul; Gurses, Iclal; Serin, Mehmet Sami; Giray, Burcu Gurer; Dilek, Saffet; Emekdas, Gurol

    2014-01-01

    Infection with certain human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes is the most important risk factor related with cervical cancer. The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence of HPV infection, the distribution of HPV genotypes and HPV E6/E7 oncogene mRNA expression in Turkish women with different cervical cytological findings in Mersin province, Southern Turkey. A total of 476 cytological samples belonging to women with normal and abnormal cervical Pap smears were enrolled in the study. For the detection and genotyping assay, a PCR/direct cycle sequencing approach was used. E6/E7 mRNA expression of HPV-16, 18, 31, 33, and 45 was determined by type-specific real-time NASBA assay (NucliSENS EasyQ(®)HPV v1.1). Of the 476 samples, 106 (22.3%) were found to be positive for HPV DNA by PCR. The presence of HPV was significantly more common (p16 (20.8%), 6 (14.2%), 31 (11.3%), 53 (5.7%), and 83 (4.7%). HPV E6/E7 oncogene mRNA positivity (12/476, 2.5%) was lower than DNA positivity (38/476, 7.9%). Our data present a wide distribution of HPV genotypes in the analyzed population. HPV genotypes 66, 16, 6, 31, 53 and 83 were the predominant types and most of them were potential carcinogenic types. Because of the differences between HPV E6/E7 mRNA and DNA positivity, further studies are required to test the role of mRNA testing in the triage of women with abnormal cervical cytology or follow up of HPV DNA positive and cytology negative. These epidemiological data will be important to determine the future impact of vaccination on HPV infected women in our region.

  12. West Nile Virus: Biology, Transmission, and Human Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colpitts, Tonya M.; Conway, Michael J.; Montgomery, Ruth R.

    2012-01-01

    Summary: West Nile Virus was introduced into the Western Hemisphere during the late summer of 1999 and has been causing significant and sometimes severe human diseases since that time. This article briefly touches upon the biology of the virus and provides a comprehensive review regarding recent discoveries about virus transmission, virus acquisition, and human infection and disease. PMID:23034323

  13. Effects of c-myc oncogene modulation on differentiation of human small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Waardenburg, RCAM; Meijer, C; Pinto-Sietsma, SJ; De Vries, EGE; Timens, W; Mulder, NM

    1998-01-01

    Amplification and over-expression of oncogenes of the myc family are related to the prognosis of certain solid tumors such as small cell lung cancer (SCLC). For SCLC, c-myc is the oncogene most consistently found to correlate with the end stage behaviour of the tumour, in particular with survival

  14. Assessment of human papillomavirus E6/E7 oncogene expression as cervical disease biomarker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontecha, Nerea; Basaras, Miren; Hernáez, Silvia; Andía, Daniel; Cisterna, Ramón

    2016-11-05

    The aims of this study were to detect HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression in women with high-risk genotypes (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33 and -45) analysing its relationship with tissue pathology and 2) 2-year follow-up of E6/E7 mRNA tested group. Our samples were genotyped and classified by pathologists according to Bethesda system. After RNA extraction, E6/E7 oncogene mRNA detection was performed by NucliSens® EasyQ® HPV v1 Test (bioMérieux). The results of the present study showed that E6/E7 mRNA positivity rate was 68.29 % in women tested once and 69.56 % in women tested twice. According to tissue pathology, all samples with high-grade lesions were positive for mRNA. Among women with low-grade lesions varied over the years from 89.28 to 84 % in women tested once and from 77.77 to 70 % in tested twice. Among women without lesion, positivity rate maintained in women tested once (from 50 to 41.38 %) and decreased in tested twice, from 63.63 to 44.44 %. Regarding lesion evolution, mRNA positivity was higher in women with lesion progression (53.13 %) and in women with positive results in two tested samples (83.33 %). HPV E6/E7 mRNA detection may be an effective screening test and biomarker for cervical cancer in women infected with these five genotypes. Nonetheless, further studies are needed to standardize as routine triage test.

  15. The human homologue of the retroviral oncogene qin maps to chromosome 14q13.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastury, K; Li, J; Druck, T; Su, H; Vogt, P K; Croce, C M; Huebner, K

    1994-01-01

    Chromosomal mapping of the human QIN gene (renamed FKH2 by the Human Genome Organization Nomenclature Committee) was initially accomplished by correlation of the presence of the QIN locus with specific chromosome regions in a rodent-human hybrid panel. This analysis revealed that the human QIN gene maps to chromosome region 14q11.2-->14q32, between the TCR and IGH loci. Further analysis by fluorescence in situ hybridization techniques with a human QIN genomic clone refined the human QIN gene localization to 14q13. Images PMID:8170957

  16. Comparative interactomics for virus-human protein-protein interactions: DNA viruses versus RNA viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durmuş, Saliha; Ülgen, Kutlu Ö

    2017-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular pathogens and completely depend on their hosts for survival and reproduction. The strategies adopted by viruses to exploit host cell processes and to evade host immune systems during infections may differ largely with the type of the viral genetic material. An improved understanding of these viral infection mechanisms is only possible through a better understanding of the pathogen-host interactions (PHIs) that enable viruses to enter into the host cells and manipulate the cellular mechanisms to their own advantage. Experimentally-verified protein-protein interaction (PPI) data of pathogen-host systems only became available at large scale within the last decade. In this study, we comparatively analyzed the current PHI networks belonging to DNA and RNA viruses and their human host, to get insights into the infection strategies used by these viral groups. We investigated the functional properties of human proteins in the PHI networks, to observe and compare the attack strategies of DNA and RNA viruses. We observed that DNA viruses are able to attack both human cellular and metabolic processes simultaneously during infections. On the other hand, RNA viruses preferentially interact with human proteins functioning in specific cellular processes as well as in intracellular transport and localization within the cell. Observing virus-targeted human proteins, we propose heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins and transporter proteins as potential antiviral therapeutic targets. The observed common and specific infection mechanisms in terms of viral strategies to attack human proteins may provide crucial information for further design of broad and specific next-generation antiviral therapeutics.

  17. 110 HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) SEROPOSITIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    INTRODUCTION. An estimated 42 million people worldwide are now infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. (HIV), (1) the causative agent of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome compared with. 30million people that were infected in 1997(2). Ninety per cent (90%) of these live in developing countries.

  18. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Related Knowledge, Risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    University, Kaski, Nepal,3Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, KLE University, Belgaum, Karnataka, India, 5Department of. Obstetrics and Gynecological Nursing, Institute of Nursing science, KLE University, Belgaum, Karnataka, India. Abstract. Background: Despite the implementation of anti‑human immunodeficiency virus ...

  19. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection among Psychiatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Psychiatric patients are considered high risked group for Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. This has been found to be as a result of poor judgment and irrationality associated with some of the disorders. However, there is dearth of literature on the prevalence of HIV infection among psychiatric ...

  20. Ethnopharmacology of human immunodeficiency virus in South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the etiologic agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), continues to pose an unprecedented public health problem of enormous proportions worldwide. Current treatment options for HIV/AIDS have not been satisfactory and the quest for effective curative or ...

  1. Clinical characteristics of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Renal failure is a common finding in human immunodeficiency virus infected patients, and it contributes significantly to their morbidity and mortality. Most dialysis centres in Nigeria currently do not accept HIV positive patients for dialysis therapy for many reasons. The prevailing high level of stigmatization of HIV positive ...

  2. Transurethral prostatectomy in human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is increasing world-wide and highly active antiretroviral treatment. (HAAT) is allowing afflicted individuals to live near normal life span and acquire surgical diseases of the aged as in the unaffected population. This pose occupational hazards to operating surgeons especially in ...

  3. Dental Practice, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) is a major cause of death in Africa today and it is estimated that 80% of the over 40 million people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS (PLWHA) world-wide are residing in sub-Saharan countries.[1] In Nigeria, AIDS was first reported in 1986 following the ...

  4. Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Virus among Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The HIV/AIDS pandemic has changed the prevalence of some infectious diseases. Hepatitis B is a very important potentially lethal and presently treatable infection which affects the course of HIV disease. This study was carried out to determine the prevalence of hepatitis B virus [HBV] infection in human immunodeficiency ...

  5. Mitochondrial dysfunction and human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and the pharmacological treatment thereof have both been shown to affect mitochondrial function in a number of tissues, and each may cause specific organ pathology through specific mitochondrial pathways. HIV has been shown to kill various tissue cells by activation of ...

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus infection among migrant fishermen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: People migrate from place to place for diverse reasons chief among which is economic. Migrant fishermen like other migrant population lead high risk sexual lifestyle and are therefore, predisposed to Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Aim: To determine the prevalence of HIV among migrant ...

  7. Post exposure prophylaxis against human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the level of awareness, knowledge and practice of human immunodeficiency virus post exposure prophylaxis (HIV PEP) among paediatricians in Nigeria. Methodology: The study was a cross sectional questionnairebased survey conducted among paediatrcians that attended the Paediatric ...

  8. Comparative periodontal status of human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: There are diverse reports on the prevalence and severity of chronic periodontitis in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive persons. Few studies have been carried out in developing countries in Sub.Saharan Africa. This study was aimed at comparing the prevalence and severity of chronic periodontitis of ...

  9. Dental Practice, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Transmission and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: More than 40 oral manifestations of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection have been recorded and between 70% and 90% of persons with HIV infection will have at least one oral manifestation at some time during the course of their disease. Oral health-care workers (OHCWs) are therefore, key players ...

  10. Haematological Changes in Human immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Haematological Changes in Human immunodeficiency Virus Infected Pregnant Women in Benin City, Nigeria. ... A differential leucocyte count was also done by the thin blood film method, stained with Leishman stain and examined microscopically. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was carried out using the

  11. Epidemiological patterns of human immunodeficiency virus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is no doubt that the greatest health problem threatening the human race these times is the HIV/AIDS pandemic. The greatest burden of this scourge is in sub-saharan African. This has undoubtedly increased the incidence of opportunistic infection like herpes simplex virus infection. This study investigated the ...

  12. 110 HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS (HIV) SEROPOSITIVITY ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. A seroprevalence study of Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in new patients attending the eye clinic of LAUTECH. Teaching Hospital in Osogbo, Osun State, Nigeria showed that twenty-nine patients 2.7%) were positive to HIV1. No patient was positive to HIV 2. There were 21 males (72.4%) and 8 ...

  13. Treatment Outcomes among Human Immunodeficiency Virus and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The complex interactions between Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Tuberculosis (TB) infections may be magnified, in the presence of another potentially stressful condition like pregnancy. Though co-infection among pregnant women is rare, treatment outcomes may depend on accessibility to comprehensive ...

  14. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Seroconversion and Associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    syphilis during ANC visit (P < 0.001) were found to be independent predictors of HIV seroconversion among pregnant women ... The syphilis screening among pregnant women in the ANC in Tanzania is based on the Venereal Disease ... booked at 4 months of gestation age [Table 1]. Human immunodeficiency virus ...

  15. Comparative periodontal status of human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    P. M. B. 12003, Idi-Araba, Lagos, Nigeria. E-mail: kumeiz09@gmail.com. Introduction. Exacerbated chronic periodontitis is part of the spectrum of periodontal diseases that has been described in association with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As far back as the early 1990s, studies exploring the possible.

  16. Derepression of an endogenous long terminal repeat activates the CSF1R proto-oncogene in human lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Björn; Walter, Korden; Kreher, Stephan; Kumar, Raman; Hummel, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Köchert, Karl; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Richter, Julia; Soler, Eric; Stadhouders, Ralph; Jöhrens, Korinna; Wurster, Kathrin D; Callen, David F; Harte, Michael F; Giefing, Maciej; Barlow, Rachael; Stein, Harald; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Janz, Martin; Cockerill, Peter N; Siebert, Reiner; Dörken, Bernd; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    Mammalian genomes contain many repetitive elements, including long terminal repeats (LTRs), which have long been suspected to have a role in tumorigenesis. Here we present evidence that aberrant LTR activation contributes to lineage-inappropriate gene expression in transformed human cells and that such gene expression is central for tumor cell survival. We show that B cell-derived Hodgkin's lymphoma cells depend on the activity of the non-B, myeloid-specific proto-oncogene colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R). In these cells, CSF1R transcription initiates at an aberrantly activated endogenous LTR of the MaLR family (THE1B). Derepression of the THE1 subfamily of MaLR LTRs is widespread in the genome of Hodgkin's lymphoma cells and is associated with impaired epigenetic control due to loss of expression of the corepressor CBFA2T3. Furthermore, we detect LTR-driven CSF1R transcripts in anaplastic large cell lymphoma, in which CSF1R is known to be expressed aberrantly. We conclude that LTR derepression is involved in the pathogenesis of human lymphomas, a finding that might have diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  17. c-RET molecule in malignant melanoma from oncogenic RET-carrying transgenic mice and human cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Ohshima

    Full Text Available Malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers and its incidence worldwide has been increasing at a greater rate than that of any other cancer. We previously reported that constitutively activated RFP-RET-carrying transgenic mice (RET-mice spontaneously develop malignant melanoma. In this study, we showed that expression levels of intrinsic c-Ret, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (Gdnf and Gdnf receptor alpha 1 (Gfra1 transcripts in malignant melanomas from RET-transgenic mice were significantly upregulated compared with those in benign melanocytic tumors. These results suggest that not only introduced oncogenic RET but also intrinsic c-Ret/Gdnf are involved in murine melanomagenesis in RET-mice. We then showed that c-RET and GDNF transcript expression levels in human malignant melanoma cell lines (HM3KO and MNT-1 were higher than those in primary cultured normal human epithelial melanocytes (NHEM, while GFRa1 transcript expression levels were comparable among NHEM, HM3KO and MNT-1. We next showed c-RET and GFRa1 protein expression in HM3KO cells and GDNF-mediated increased levels of their phosphorylated c-RET tyrosine kinase and signal transduction molecules (ERK and AKT sited potentially downstream of c-RET. Taken together with the finding of augmented proliferation of HM3KO cells after GDNF stimulation, our results suggest that GDNF-mediated c-RET kinase activation is associated with the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma.

  18. Repression of human papillomavirus oncogenes in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells causes the orderly reactivation of dormant tumor suppressor pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, E C; DiMaio, D

    2000-11-07

    Most cervical carcinomas express high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) E6 and E7 proteins, which neutralize cellular tumor suppressor function. To determine the consequences of removing the E6 and E7 proteins from cervical cancer cells, we infected HeLa cells, a cervical carcinoma cell line that contains HPV18 DNA, with a recombinant virus that expresses the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein. Expression of the E2 protein resulted in rapid repression of HPV E6 and E7 expression, followed approximately 12 h later by profound inhibition of cellular DNA synthesis. Shortly after E6/E7 repression, there was dramatic posttranscriptional induction of p53. Two p53-responsive genes, mdm2 and p21, were induced with slightly slower kinetics than p53 and appeared to be functional, as assessed by inhibition of cyclin-dependent kinase activity and p53 destabilization. There was also dramatic posttranscriptional induction of p105(Rb) and p107 after E6/E7 repression, followed shortly thereafter by induction of p130. By 24 h after infection, only hypophosphorylated p105(Rb) was detectable and transcription of several Rb/E2F-regulated genes was dramatically repressed. Constitutive expression of the HPV16 E6/E7 genes alleviated E2-induced growth inhibition and impaired activation of the Rb pathway and repression of E2F-responsive genes. This dynamic response strongly suggests that the p53 and Rb tumor suppressor pathways are intact in HeLa cells and that repression of HPV E6 and E7 mobilizes these pathways in an orderly fashion to deliver growth inhibitory signals to the cells. Strikingly, the major alterations in the cell cycle machinery underlying cervical carcinogenesis can be reversed by repression of the endogenous HPV oncogenes.

  19. Cross-Neutralization between Human and African Bat Mumps Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Hiroshi; Kubota, Toru; Ihara, Toshiaki; Maeda, Ken; Takeda, Makoto; Kidokoro, Minoru

    2016-04-01

    Recently, a new paramyxovirus closely related to human mumps virus (MuV) was detected in bats. We generated recombinant MuVs carrying either or both of the fusion and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase bat virus glycoproteins. These viruses showed replication kinetics similar to human MuV in cultured cells and were neutralized efficiently by serum from healthy humans.

  20. 76 FR 58517 - Public Health Service Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-21

    ... Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV... Guideline for Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV), and... Reducing Transmission of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV), Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) and Hepatitis C Virus...

  1. Induction of human microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 by activated oncogene RhoA GTPase in A549 human epithelial cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Hye Jin [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Dong-Hyung [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Medical Research Institute, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Park, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Juil; Do, Kee Hun [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); An, Tae Jin; Ahn, Young Sup; Park, Chung Berm [Department of Herbal Crop Research, NIHHS, RDA, Eumseong (Korea, Republic of); Moon, Yuseok, E-mail: moon@pnu.edu [Laboratory of Systems Mucosal Biomodulation, Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Yangsan (Korea, Republic of); Medical Research Institute and Research Institute for Basic Sciences, Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-09-30

    Highlights: {yields} As a target of oncogene RhoA-linked signal, a prostaglandin metabolism is assessed. {yields} RhoA activation increases PGE{sub 2} levels and its metabolic enzyme mPGES-1. {yields} RhoA-activated NF-{kappa}B and EGR-1 are positively involved in mPGES-1 induction. -- Abstract: Oncogenic RhoA GTPase has been investigated as a mediator of pro-inflammatory responses and aggressive carcinogenesis. Among the various targets of RhoA-linked signals, pro-inflammatory prostaglandin E{sub 2} (PGE{sub 2}), a major prostaglandin metabolite, was assessed in epithelial cancer cells. RhoA activation increased PGE{sub 2} levels and gene expression of the rate-limiting PGE{sub 2} producing enzymes, cyclooxygenase-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E synthase 1 (mPGES-1). In particular, human mPGES-1 was induced by RhoA via transcriptional activation in control and interleukin (IL)-1{beta}-activated cancer cells. To address the involvement of potent signaling pathways in RhoA-activated mPGES-1 induction, various signaling inhibitors were screened for their effects on mPGES-1 promoter activity. RhoA activation enhanced basal and IL-1{beta}-mediated phosphorylated nuclear factor-{kappa}B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 proteins, all of which were positively involved in RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1. As one potent down-stream transcription factor of ERK1/2 signals, early growth response gene 1 product also mediated RhoA-induced gene expression of mPGES-1 by enhancing transcriptional activity. Since oncogene-triggered PGE{sub 2} production is a critical modulator of epithelial tumor cells, RhoA-associated mPGES-1 represents a promising chemo-preventive or therapeutic target for epithelial inflammation and its associated cancers.

  2. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  3. Crosstalk between animal and human influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozawa, Makoto; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Although outbreaks of highly pathogenic avian influenza in wild and domestic birds have been posing the threat of a new influenza pandemic for the last decade, the first pandemic of the 21st century came from swine viruses. This fact emphasizes the complexity of influenza viral ecology and the difficulty of predicting influenza viral dynamics. Complete control of influenza viruses seems impossible. However, we must minimize the impact of animal and human influenza outbreaks by learning lessons from past experiences and recognizing the current status. Here, we review the most recent influenza virology data in the veterinary field, including aspects of zoonotic agents and recent studies that assessed the pandemic potential of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses. PMID:25387011

  4. siRNA targeting of the viral E6 oncogene efficiently kills human papillomavirus-positive cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butz, Karin; Ristriani, Tutik; Hengstermann, Arnd; Denk, Claudia; Scheffner, Martin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2003-09-04

    The targeted inhibition of antiapoptotic factors in tumour cells may provide a rational approach towards the development of novel anticancer therapies. Using human papillomavirus (HPV)-transformed cells as a model system, we investigated if RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene silencing can be employed in order to overcome the apoptosis resistance of cancer cells. We found that both vector-borne and synthetic small interfering (si)RNAs, specifically directed against the antiapoptotic HPV E6 oncogene, restored dormant tumour suppressor pathways in HPV-positive cancer cells that are otherwise inactive in the presence of E6. This ultimately resulted in massive apoptotic cell death, selectively in HPV-positive tumour cells. These findings show that RNAi provides a powerful molecular strategy to inactivate intracellular E6 function efficiently. Moreover, they define E6 as a most promising therapeutic target to eliminate HPV-positive tumour cells specifically by RNAi. Thus, by sequence-specific targeting of antiapoptotic genes, siRNAs may be developed into novel therapeutics that can efficiently correct the apoptosis deficiency of cancer cells.

  5. Human papilloma viruses and cancer in the post-vaccine era.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galani, E; Christodoulou, C

    2009-11-01

    Human papilloma viruses (HPV) are strong human carcinogens, in fact today they are considered as the second most frequent carcinogen. In the middle of the 1970s the hypothesis that cervical cancer may arise from viruses was established and in the 1990s the relationship between HPV and cervical neoplasia was confirmed. HPV infections are the most common sexually transmitted infections. Specific subtypes of human papilomaviruses are now considered as the etiological agents in nearly all cases of cervical cancer and cervical epithelial neoplasia. Approximately 470,000 new cases and 23,000 deaths of cervical cancer occur each year, with the majority taking place in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains among the three leading causes of cancer deaths among women below the age of 45. Human papilomaviruses are classified into two groups: high-risk (oncogenic) types and low risk types. HPV types 16, 18, 45 and 31 are considered to be the most important oncogenic types. Subtypes 16 and 18 are the causative agents of more than 50% of cervical pre-cancerous lesions, and more than 70% of cervical cancer cases. High risk subtypes are also implicated with anal, perianal and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Recently, the prophylactic bivalent HPV 16/18 and the quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18/ vaccines have been approved. The development of prophylactic vaccines against human papilomavirus has been hailed as one of the most significant advances of recent years and it is expected to reduce dramatically the mortality of human papilomavirus associated cancers, but has also given rise to some of the most intense scientific debates.

  6. The role of oncogenic human papillomavirus determination for diagnosis of high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia in HIV-infected MSM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos, Joaquin; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Landolfi, Stefania; Guelar, Ana; Dinares, MªCarmen; Villar, Judith; Navarro, Jordi; Ribera, Esteve; Falcó, Vicenç; Curran, Adria

    2017-10-23

    To assess the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) determination and the cotesting HPV and anal cytology value to detect high-grade anal intraepithelial neoplasia (HGAIN) in a cohort of HIV-MSM. Prospective study of HIV-infected MSM who underwent screening for anal dysplasia. Screening program includes anal cytology, HPV testing, and high-resolution anoscopy (HRA) at each visit. Histological samples were obtained if suspicious lesions were revealed by HRA. Sensitivity and specificity of the different tests were calculated by using histological results of HRA-guided biopsy as the reference test for HGAIN diagnosis. From May 2009 to August 2016, 692 HIV-infected MSM underwent 1827 anal cytologies, 1841 HRA examinations, and 1607 HPV testing. At first screening visit, anal cytology results were abnormal in 418 (60.4%) of 692 patients, and oncogenic HPV genotypes were found in 482 (79.5%) of 606 patients. Anal cytology showed a sensitivity of 89.2% [95% confidence interval (CI); 80.7-94.2] and a specificity of 44.2% (95% CI; 40.2-48.2) to detect HGAIN. Oncogenic HPV testing had 90.4% sensitivity (95% CI; 82-86.8) and 24.4% specificity (95% CI; 20.8-28.3). Cotesting showed a 97.4% sensitivity (95% CI; 91-99.3) and 14% specificity (95% CI; 11.2-17.3). In patients with atypical squamous cells of uncertain significance on cytology, oncogenic HPV testing had 91.3% sensitivity and 28.3% specificity to detect HGAIN. Abnormal cytology and oncogenic HPV determination showed similar sensitivity for detecting HGAIN. The two tests used together improved the sensitivity but with lowered specificity. In our opinion, HPV testing does not improve HGAIN detection and should not replace anal cytology as a standard screening test for HIV-infected MSM.

  7. CDC91L1 (PIG-U) is a newly discovered oncogene in human bladder cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Guo, Z.; Linn, J.F.; Wu, G.; Anzick, S.L.; Eisenberger, C.F.; Halachmi, S.; Cohen, Y.; Fomenkov, A.; Hoque, M.O.; Okami, K.; Steiner, G.; Engles, J.M.; Osada, M.; Moon, C.; Ratovitski, E.; Trent, J.M.; Meltzer, P.S.; Westra, W.H.; Kiemeney, L.A.L.M.; Schoenberg, M.P.; Sidransky, D.; Trink, B.

    2004-01-01

    Genomic amplification at 20q11-13 is a common event in human cancers. We isolated a germline translocation breakpoint at 20q11 from a bladder cancer patient. We identified CDC91L1, the gene encoding CDC91L1 (also called phosphatidylinositol glycan class U (PIG-U), a transamidase complex unit in the

  8. Oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes and the diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marel, J. van der

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women, with more than half a million new cases worldwide each year. In the majority of cervical cancers a persistent infection with high-risk (hr) Human papillomavirus (HPV) types has been proven to be the causative agent. Prevention of cervical

  9. [West Nile virus. II. Immunopathophysiology in humans].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanteri, Marion C; Diamond, Michael S; Norris, Philip J; Busch, Michael P

    2011-04-01

    Since its emergence in 1999 in America, West Nile virus (WNV) has become the leading cause of arboviral encephalitis in the United States. The infection is often asymptomatic but, when clinical manifestations occur, a broad range of symptoms is observed from flu-like symptoms to more serious neurological disorders that can sometimes lead to death. No treatment or vaccine is available for humans. Ongoing studies are trying to understand the host-virus dynamics that lead to the development of severe neurological symptoms in a minority of infected subjects. The amount of knowledge that was gained from parallel studies in animals and humans, comparing asymptomatic and symptomatic individuals, and using what was known of other Flaviviruses, will eventually translate to the development of potential therapeutic and prophylactic solutions. This review presents a synthesis of the most relevant findings concerning the immune response to WNV and its impact on disease outcome and gives an overview of the most promising therapeutic and prophylactic solutions.

  10. Human immunodeficiency virus type 2: pathogenesis and antiretroviral therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.E. van der Ende (Marchina)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractHuman immunodeficiency virus type1 (HIV-1), human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2), and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have been identified as hither unknown primate members of the Lentivirinae subfamily of the family Retroviridae in 1983, 1986 and 1985 respectively, HIV-1

  11. Acceptability of human papilloma virus vaccine and cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-07-14

    Jul 14, 2012 ... [3] Human papilloma virus (HPV), a sexually transmitted virus has been implicated as the causative agent. ... Acceptability of human papilloma virus vaccine and cervical cancer screening among female ..... IIiyasu Z, Abubakar IS, Aliyu MH, Galadanci HS. Cervical cancer risk perception and predictors of ...

  12. Human beta-defensin 1, 2 and 3 production by amniotic epithelial cells with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, HPV oncogenic potential and the mode of delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szukiewicz, Dariusz; Alkhalayla, Habib; Pyzlak, Michal; Watroba, Mateusz; Szewczyk, Grzegorz; Wejman, Jaroslaw

    2016-08-01

    Human beta-defensins (HBD) produced by human amniotic epithelial cells (HAEC) co-create an innate antiviral immune response in the materno-placento-fetal unit. Oncogenic potential of HPV may reflect its ability to avoid immune recognition. In this study we assessed the risk of HAEC infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) in relation to the type of labor and the impact of the oncogenic potential of HPV on HBD production in HAEC. A comparative analysis [HPV(+) vs. HPV(-)HAEC] of the production of HBD were performed. HAEC were isolated from placentas of 116 HPV(+) and 36 HPV(-) parturients (groups I and II, respectively) using trypsin-based method. The cases of premature rupture of membranes (PROM), natural labors (NL) and cesarean sections (CS) were analysed in respective subgroups. High-risk (HR-HPV) and low-risk (LR-HPV) genotypes of HPV in cervical smears and HAEC were identified using the Roche Linear Array(®) HPV Genotyping Test. HBD-1,-2,-3 concentrations in the HAEC culture supernatant were assessed using ELISA. The highest percentage (42.1%) of HPV transmission to HAEC occurred in PROM, an intermediate value was observed after NL (38.5%), and the lowest (25.6%) after CS. The mean concentrations of HBD-2 and HBD-3 in group I were up to 3.1- and 2.8-fold higher (p potential of HBD-2 for HR-HPV infection should be assessed in future studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Oral Manifestations of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Epstein, Joel B.; Mathias, Richard G.

    1988-01-01

    The AIDS epidemic continues. All health-care workers, including physicians and dental personnel, may be instrumental in recognizing risk factors associated with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. Oral signs and symptoms of HIV infection may be the first presentation of the disease or may develop during the course of the disease and require management. Knowledge of the signs, symptoms and associated infections and tumours is needed to as...

  14. Psychosocial issues in pediatric human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, R K

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses the psychosocial issues associated with pediatric human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Using a psychosocial model instead of the usual medical or rehabilitation model will challenge speech-language pathologists to incorporate an understanding of the psychosocial stresses that affect a child's progression through HIV/AIDS and ensure that they receive adequate consideration in a total treatment model. A case study illustrates the relationship between communication disorders and HIV/AIDS.

  15. Malignant syphilis with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiby Rajan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malignant syphilis or Lues maligna, commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, has now seen a resurgence with the advent of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Immunosuppression and sexual promiscuity set the stage for this deadly association of HIV and Treponema pallidum that can manifest atypically and can prove to cause diagnostic problems. We report one such case in a 30-year-old female who responded favorably to treatment with penicillin.

  16. 78 FR 46969 - Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug Development and Human Immunodeficiency Virus...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Human Immunodeficiency Virus Patient-Focused Drug... Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; reopening of comment period. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...' perspective on current approaches to managing HIV, symptoms experienced because of HIV or its treatment, and...

  17. [Human PAPILLOMA Virus (HPV) vaccine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safra, Tamar

    2007-10-01

    A solid tumor related to viral infection is a rare and challenging condition to the medical community raising the possibility to fight and prevent this cancer by vaccine. Cervical cancer, caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), is a major health problem worldwide. The two HPV vaccines approved lately could lead to more than a 70% reduction in cases of cervical cancer and a similar reduction in deaths from the cancer. Pap smear screening significantly (80%) reduced disease incidence and is still useful and needed. In addition to early detection, vaccination will prevent the development of precancerous and cancerous lesion and reduce morbidity, mortality and psychological and social stress as well as stressful and expensive follow-ups in women with suspicious lesions. The vaccinations described will bring to a significant reduction in genital warts incidence, a serious social and psychological burden to the infected population. Practical social and psychological issues are still to be addressed, some of them are: time and frequency of administration, use of vaccination in men, public acceptance and behavior, appropriate populations to be vaccinated, etc. Most unresolved questions will be answered over time. The new vaccines embody a big promise to humanity, although we still have to overcome the financial burden and possible late side effects of the vaccine.

  18. Dissection of the transformation of primary human hematopoietic cells by the oncogene NUP98-HOXA9.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas R Yassin

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available NUP98-HOXA9 is the prototype of a group of oncoproteins associated with acute myeloid leukemia. It consists of an N-terminal portion of NUP98 fused to the homeodomain of HOXA9 and is believed to act as an aberrant transcription factor that binds DNA through the homeodomain. Here we show that NUP98-HOXA9 can regulate transcription without binding to DNA. In order to determine the relative contributions of the NUP98 and HOXA9 portions to the transforming ability of NUP98-HOXA9, the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on primary human CD34+ cells were dissected and compared to those of wild-type HOXA9. In contrast to previous findings in mouse cells, HOXA9 had only mild effects on the differentiation and proliferation of primary human hematopoietic cells. The ability of NUP98-HOXA9 to disrupt the differentiation of primary human CD34+ cells was found to depend primarily on the NUP98 portion, whereas induction of long-term proliferation required both the NUP98 moiety and an intact homeodomain. Using oligonucleotide microarrays in primary human CD34+ cells, a group of genes was identified whose dysregulation by NUP98-HOXA9 is attributable primarily to the NUP98 portion. These include RAP1A, HEY1, and PTGS2 (COX-2. Their functions may reflect the contribution of the NUP98 moiety of NUP98-HOXA9 to leukemic transformation. Taken together, these results suggest that the effects of NUP98-HOXA9 on gene transcription and cell transformation are mediated by at least two distinct mechanisms: one that involves promoter binding through the homeodomain with direct transcriptional activation, and another that depends predominantly on the NUP98 moiety and does not involve direct DNA binding.

  19. Amplification and expression of a cellular oncogene (c-myc) in human gastric adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibuya, M; Yokota, J; Ueyama, Y

    1985-01-01

    Three of 16 human gastric adenocarcinoma samples, maintained as solid tumors in nude mice, were found to carry amplified c-myc genes. In two samples with a high degree of c-myc DNA amplification (15- to 30-fold), double minute chromosomes were observed in karyotype analysis. The level of c-myc RNA was markedly elevated in a rapidly growing and poorly differentiated tumor, whereas it was only slightly elevated in a slowly growing and more differentiated tumor. Images PMID:2579323

  20. Human papilloma viruses (HPV and breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Sutherland Lawson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Human papillomaviruses (HPV may have a role in some breast cancers. The purpose of this study is to fill important gaps in the evidence. These gaps are: (i confirmation of the presence of high risk for cancer HPVs in breast cancers, (ii evidence of HPV infections in benign breast tissues prior to the development of HPV positive breast cancer in the same patients, (iii evidence that HPVs are biologically active and not harmless passengers in breast cancer.Methods: RNA-seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA was used to identify HPV RNA sequences in breast cancers. We also conducted a retrospective cohort study based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR analyses to identify HPVs in archival specimens from Australian women with benign breast biopsies who later developed breast cancer. To assess whether HPVs in breast cancer were biologically active, the expression of the oncogenic protein HPV E7 was assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC.Results: Thirty (3.5% low risk and 20 (2.3% high risk HPV types were identified in 855 breast cancers from the TCGA data base. The high risk types were HPV 18 (48%, HPV 113 (24%, HPV 16 (10%, HPV 52 (10%. Data from the PCR cohort study, indicated that HPV type 18 was the most common type identified in breast cancer specimens (55% of 40 breast cancer specimens followed by HPV 16 (13%. The same HPV type was identified in both the benign and subsequent breast cancer in 15 patients. HPV E7 proteins were identified in 72% of benign breast specimens and 59% of invasive breast cancer specimens.Conclusions: There were 4 observations of particular interest: (i confirmation by both NGS and PCR of the presence of high risk HPV gene sequences in breast cancers, (ii a correlation between high risk HPV in benign breast specimens and subsequent HPV positive breast cancer in the same patient, (iii HPVs in breast cancer are likely to be biologically active (as shown by transcription of HPV DNA to RNA plus the expression of

  1. Viruses in cancer cell plasticity: the role of hepatitis C virus in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibner, Urszula; Grégoire, Damien

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are considered as causative agents of a significant proportion of human cancers. While the very stringent criteria used for their classification probably lead to an underestimation, only six human viruses are currently classified as oncogenic. In this review we give a brief historical account of the discovery of oncogenic viruses and then analyse the mechanisms underlying the infectious causes of cancer. We discuss viral strategies that evolved to ensure virus propagation and spread can alter cellular homeostasis in a way that increases the probability of oncogenic transformation and acquisition of stem cell phenotype. We argue that a useful way of analysing the convergent characteristics of viral infection and cancer is to examine how viruses affect the so-called cancer hallmarks. This view of infectious origin of cancer is illustrated by examples from hepatitis C infection, which is associated with a high proportion of hepatocellular carcinoma.

  2. Recapitulation of the Effects of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E7 Oncogene on Mouse Epithelium by Somatic Rb Deletion and Detection of pRb-Independent Effects of E7 In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Balsitis, Scott J; Sage, Julien; Duensing, Stefan; Münger, Karl; Jacks, Tyler; Lambert, Paul F.

    2003-01-01

    Although the human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncogene is known to contribute to the development of human cervical cancer, the mechanisms of its carcinogenesis are poorly understood. The first identified and most recognized function of E7 is its binding to and inactivation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (pRb), but at least 18 other biological activities have also been reported for E7. Thus, it remains unclear which of these many activities contribute to the oncogenic potential of E7. We ...

  3. Pathogenic human viruses in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Donaldson, Kim A.; Paul, J.H.; Rose, Joan B.

    2003-01-01

    This review addresses both historical and recent investigations into viral contamination of marine waters. With the relatively recent emergence of molecular biology-based assays, a number of investigations have shown that pathogenic viruses are prevalent in marine waters being impacted by sewage. Research has shown that this group of fecal-oral viral pathogens (enteroviruses, hepatitis A viruses, Norwalk viruses, reoviruses, adenoviruses, rotaviruses, etc.) can cause a broad range of asymptomatic to severe gastrointestinal, respiratory, and eye, nose, ear, and skin infections in people exposed through recreational use of the water. The viruses and the nucleic acid signature survive for an extended period in the marine environment. One of the primary concerns of public health officials is the relationship between the presence of pathogens and the recreational risk to human health in polluted marine environments. While a number of studies have attempted to address this issue, the relationship is still poorly understood. A contributing factor to our lack of progress in the field has been the lack of sensitive methods to detect the broad range of both bacterial and viral pathogens. The application of new and advanced molecular methods will continue to contribute to our current state of knowledge in this emerging and

  4. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS. NEW OPPORTUNITIES FOR VACCINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Gaivoronskaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important problems in the modern world is the papilloma virus infection. As is known, this is the most widely spread sexually-transmitted infection. The human papilloma virus is responsible for the occurrence of such a terrible disease as cervical cancer, which ranks third after breast cancer and cancer of the body in the structure of oncological morbidity organs of the reproductive system and mammary glands in women. The other manifestations of the papilloma virus infection are pointed condyloma genital warts, which occur frequently both in men and in women. The only reliable method of the prevention of the papilloma virus infection is immunization. The authors present new data regarding the use of bivalent vaccine, including a new scheme of immunization for girls from nine to fourteen years old. Foreign investigations showed that the double scheme of introduction of the vaccine in young girls is as effective as a triple scheme of introduction in the category of women over 15 years of age.

  5. Characterization of a human cell line stably over-expressing the candidate oncogene, dual specificity phosphatase 12.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L Cain

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of chromosomal rearrangements within primary tumors has been influential in the identification of novel oncogenes. Identification of the "driver" gene(s within cancer-derived amplicons is, however, hampered by the fact that most amplicons contain many gene products. Amplification of 1q21-1q23 is strongly associated with liposarcomas and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization narrowed down the likely candidate oncogenes to two: the activating transcription factor 6 (atf6 and the dual specificity phosphatase 12 (dusp12. While atf6 is an established transcriptional regulator of the unfolded protein response, the potential role of dusp12 in cancer remains uncharacterized.To evaluate the oncogenic potential of dusp12, we established stable cell lines that ectopically over-express dusp12 in isolation and determined whether this cell line acquired properties frequently associated with transformed cells. Here, we demonstrate that cells over-expressing dusp12 display increased cell motility and resistance to apoptosis. Additionally, over-expression of dusp12 promoted increased expression of the c-met proto-oncogene and the collagen and laminin receptor intergrin alpha 1 (itga1 which is implicated in metastasis.Collectively, these results suggest that dusp12 is oncologically relevant and exposes a potential association between dusp12 and established oncogenes that could be therapeutically targeted.

  6. Stat3 induces oncogenic Skp2 expression in human cervical carcinoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hanhui [Shanghai Medical College of Fudan University, Shanghai 200032 (China); Zhao, Wenrong [Department of Gynecology, Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai 200011 (China); Yang, Dan, E-mail: yangdandr@gmail.com [Department of Gynecology, Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai 200040 (China)

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upregulation of Skp2 by IL-6 or Stat3 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activates Skp2 expression through bound to its promoter region. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activates Skp2 expression through recruitment of P300. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Stat3 activation decreases the P27 stability. -- Abstract: Dysregulated Skp2 function promotes cell proliferation, which is consistent with observations of Skp2 over-expression in many types of human cancers, including cervical carcinoma (CC). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying elevated Skp2 expression have not been fully explored. Interleukin-6 (IL-6) induced Stat3 activation is viewed as crucial for multiple tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we demonstrate that Skp2 is a direct transcriptional target of Stat3 in the human cervical carcinoma cells. Our data show that IL-6 administration or transfection of a constitutively activated Stat3 in HeLa cells activates Skp2 mRNA transcription. Using luciferase reporter and ChIP assays, we show that Stat3 binds to the promoter region of Skp2 and promotes its activity through recruiting P300. As a result of the increase of Skp2 expression, endogenous p27 protein levels are markedly decreased. Thus, our results suggest a previously unknown Stat3-Skp2 molecular network controlling cervical carcinoma development.

  7. The Proto-Oncogene c-myc Is a Direct Target Gene of Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Carmen; Laux, Gerhard; Eick, Dirk; Jochner, Nicola; Bornkamm, Georg W.; Kempkes, Bettina

    1999-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infects and transforms primary B lymphocytes in vitro. Viral infection initiates the cell cycle entry of the resting B lymphocytes. The maintenance of proliferation in the infected cells is strictly dependent on functional EBNA2. We have recently developed a conditional immortalization system for EBV by rendering the function of EBNA2, and thus proliferation of the immortalized cells, dependent on estrogen. This cellular system was used to identify early events preceding induction of proliferation. We show that LMP1 and c-myc are directly activated by EBNA2, indicating that all cellular factors essential for induction of these genes by EBNA2 are present in the resting cells. In contrast, induction of the cell cycle regulators cyclin D2 and cdk4 are secondary events, which require de novo protein synthesis. PMID:10196351

  8. Low prevalence of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis D virus and hepatitis C virus among patients with human immunodeficiency virus or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in the Brazilian Amazon basin

    OpenAIRE

    Braga,Wornei Silva Miranda; Castilho,Márcia da Costa; Santos,Isabelle Cristina Vale dos; Moura,Marco Antônio Sabóia; Segurado,Aluisio Cotrim

    2006-01-01

    Comorbidities in human immunodeficiency virus infection are of great interest due to their association with unfavorable outcomes and failure of antiretroviral therapy. This study evaluated the prevalence of coinfection by human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis in an endemic area for hepatitis B in the Western Amazon basin. Serological markers for hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis D virus were tested in a consecutive sample of all patients referred for treatment of h...

  9. Differential expression of the ufo/axl oncogene in human leukemia-lymphoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challier, C; Uphoff, C C; Janssen, J W; Drexler, H G

    1996-05-01

    The ufo protein (also termed axl) is a member of a new family of receptor tyrosine kinases and is encoded by a transforming gene that was initially isolated from primary human myeloid leukemia cells by DNA-mediated transformation of NIH/3T3 cells. The ligand, Gas6, a protein S-related molecule lacking any known function yet, has recently been identified. We report the expression pattern of ufo mRNA in a panel of 76 human continuous leukemia-lymphoma cell lines. The gene was not expressed in cell lines derived from lymphoid malignancies (n=28), but transcription was seen in 3/11 myeloid, 0/6 monocytic, 9/13 erythroid and 11/18 megakaryocytic cell lines. Several cell lines were treated with phorbol ester leading to significant upregulation of the ufo message in constitutively positive cells. An apparent ufo mRNA overexpression was not found in any of the positive leukemia cell lines, but was identified in the drug-resistant subclones of the cervix carcinoma cell line HeLa. Southern blot analysis of restriction enzyme-digested genomic DNA did not provide evidence for gene amplification, but the HeLa subclones showed banding patterns suggestive of gene rearrangement. Two main ufo mRNA bands of 3.2 and 5.0 kb were identified; no differences in the half-lives (t1/2 = 2.5 h) of these two mRNA species could be identified. In summary, ufo, representing a novel type of receptor tyrosine kinase, is expressed solely in myeloid and erythro-megakaryocytic leukemias but not in lymphoid malignancies. These and previous data suggest an involvement of the ufo receptor tyrosine kinase in normal and malignant myelopoiesis; however, its exact role, if any, and mode of operation in leukemogenesis remains to be determined.

  10. Rare human papillomavirus 16 E6 variants reveal significant oncogenic potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommasino Massimo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of this study was to determine whether low prevalence human papillomavirus (HPV 16 E6 variants differ from high prevalence types in their functional abilities. We evaluated functions relevant to carcinogenesis for the rarely-detected European variants R8Q, R10G and R48W as compared to the commonly detected L83V. Human immortalized keratinocytes (NIKS stably transduced with the E6 variants were used in most functional assays. Low and high prevalence E6 variants displayed similar abilities in abrogation of growth arrest and inhibition of p53 elevation induced by actinomycin D. Differences were detected in the abilities to dysregulate stratification and differentiation of NIKS in organotypic raft cultures, modulate detachment induced apoptosis (anoikis and hyperactivate Wnt signaling. No distinctive phenotype could be assigned to include all rare variants. Like L83V, raft cultures derived from variants R10G and R48W similarly induced hyperplasia and aberrantly expressed keratin 5 in the suprabasal compartment with significantly lower expression of keratin 10. Unlike L83V, both variants, and particularly R48W, induced increased levels of anoikis upon suspension in semisolid medium. R8Q induced a unique phenotype characterized by thin organotypic raft cultures, low expression of keratin 10, and high expression of keratins 5 and 14 throughout all raft layers. Interestingly, in a reporter based assay R8Q exhibited a higher ability to augment TCF/β-catenin transcription. The data suggests that differences in E6 variant prevalence in cervical carcinoma may not be related to the carcinogenic potential of the E6 protein.

  11. Human papilloma virus prevalence in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gungor, A; Cincik, H; Baloglu, H; Cekin, E; Dogru, S; Dursun, E

    2007-08-01

    To determine the prevalence and type of human papilloma virus deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) in cases of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma. We analysed the prevalence of human papilloma virus infection in archived paraffin block specimens taken from 99 cases of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma between 1990 and 2005, using polymerase chain reaction techniques. Biopsy specimens from five proven verrucous skin lesions were used as positive controls, and peripheral blood samples from five healthy volunteers were used as negative controls. Four test samples were found to have inadequate deoxyribonucleic acid purity and were therefore excluded from the study. Human papilloma virus deoxyribonucleic acid was detected in seven of 95 cases of laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (7.36 per cent). Human papilloma virus genotyping revealed double human papilloma virus infection in three cases and single human papilloma virus infection in the remaining four cases. The human papilloma virus genotypes detected were 6, 11 and 16 (the latter detected in only one case). In our series, a very low human papilloma virus prevalence was found among laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cases. The human papilloma virus genotypes detected were mostly 6 and/or 11, and 16 in only one case. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of human papilloma virus prevalence in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma, based on polymerase chain reaction genotyping in a Turkish population.

  12. Effect of host age, virus dose, and route of inoculation on tumor incidence, latency, and morphology in Syrian hamsters inoculated intravenously with oncogenic DNA simian virus 40.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamandopoulos, G T; McLane, M F

    1975-08-01

    Three-week-old to 12-month-old male Syrian hamsters were inoculated iv with 10(8.5) median tissue culture infective dose of simian virus 40 (SV40). Three-week-old hamsters were similarly inoculated with aliquots of SV40 of progressively decreasing titers. The tumor incidence and, to a lesser extent, the tumor latency were directly dependent on the age of the animals at the time of virus exposure and on the dose of the virus. However, this age-dose dependence was not of the magnitude usually observed in hamsters inoculated with SV40 sc or im. Moreover, the wide morphologic spectrum of neoplasms induced, i.e., lymphosarcoma, reticulum cell sarcoma, and osteogenic sarcoma, by iv route of inoculation, contrasted sharply with the anaplastic and spindle-cell sarcomas which were the only types of malignant tumors resulting when other routes were used.

  13. Carcinoma de células escamosas oral - contribuição de vírus oncogênicos e alguns marcadores moleculares no desenvolvimento e prognóstico da lesão: uma revisão Oral squamous cell carcinoma - contribution of oncogenic virus and some molecular markers in the development and prognosis of the lesion: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz da Rocha Miranda Venturi

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available O carcinoma de células escamosas oral é um evento de muitas etapas, cuja incidência cresce continuamente, particularmente em jovens, numa amplitude que não pode ser completamente explicada pelo aumento da exposição a fatores de risco, como o tabaco e o álcool. Recentes investigações moleculares sugerem que existem múltiplos eventos genéticos, e vírus oncogênicos que são capazes de alterar as funções normais de oncogenes e genes de supressão tumoral. O objetivo deste artigo foi revisar o conhecimento atual sobre o papel do papilomavírus humano (HPV, Epstein-Barr vírus (EBV, P53 e telomerase no desenvolvimento e prognóstico do carcinoma de células escamosas oral.Oral squamous cell carcinoma is a multistep event that continues to increase in incidence, particularly in the young, and to an extent that cannot be fully explained by increased exposure to known risk factors, as tobacco or alcohol. Recent molecular investigations suggest that there are multiple genetic events, and oncogenic virus that are able to alter the normal functions of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. The aim of the present article was to review the current knowledge on the role of Human papillomavirus (HPV, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, P53 and telomerase in the development and prognosis of the oral squamous cell carcinoma.

  14. Marek's disease virus-encoded analog of microRNA-155 activates the oncogene c-Myc by targeting LTBP1 and suppressing the TGF-β signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Jia-Qi; Teng, Man; Yu, Zu-Hua; Xu, Hui; Su, Jing-Wei; Zhao, Pu; Xing, Guang-Xu; Liang, Hong-De; Deng, Rui-Guang; Qu, Liang-Hu; Zhang, Gai-Ping; Luo, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a representative alpha herpes virus able to induce rapid-onset T-cell lymphoma in its natural host and regarded as an ideal model for the study of virus-induced tumorigenesis. Recent studies have shown that the mdv1-miR-M4-5p, a viral analog of cellular miR-155, is critical for MDV׳s oncogenicity. However, the precise mechanism whereby it was involved in MD lymphomagenesis remained unknown. We have presently identified the host mRNA targets of mdv1-miR-M4-5 and identified the latent TGF-β binding protein 1 (LTBP1) as a critical target for it. We found that during MDV infection, down-regulation of LTBP1 expression by mdv1-miR-M4-5p led to a significant decrease of the secretion and activation of TGF-β1, with suppression of TGF-β signaling and a significant activation of expression of c-Myc, a well-known oncogene which is critical for virus-induced tumorigenesis. Our findings reveal a novel and important mechanism of how mdv1-miR-M4-5p potentially contributes to MDV-induced tumorigenesis. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. LINE-1 couples EMT programming with acquisition of oncogenic phenotypes in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Reyes, Elsa M; Aispuro, Ivan; Tavera-Garcia, Marco A; Field, Matthew; Moore, Sara; Ramos, Irma; Ramos, Kenneth S

    2017-11-28

    Although several lines of evidence have established the central role of epithelial-to-mesenchymal-transition (EMT) in malignant progression of non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs), the molecular events connecting EMT to malignancy remain poorly understood. This study presents evidence that Long Interspersed Nuclear Element-1 (LINE-1) retrotransposon couples EMT programming with malignancy in human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B). This conclusion is supported by studies showing that: 1) activation of EMT programming by TGF-β1 increases LINE-1 mRNAs and protein; 2) the lung carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene coregulates TGF-β1 and LINE-1 mRNAs, with LINE-1 positioned downstream of TGF-β1 signaling; and, 3) forced expression of LINE-1 in BEAS-2B cells recapitulates EMT programming and induces malignant phenotypes and tumorigenesis in vivo . These findings identify a TGFβ1-LINE-1 axis as a critical effector pathway that can be targeted for the development of precision therapies during malignant progression of intractable NSCLCs.

  16. Virus como inductores de neoplasias cutáneas

    OpenAIRE

    Bravo Puccio, Francisco; Facultad de Medicina “Alberto Hurtado”, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Médico dermatólogo.

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic role of viruses in cutaneous neoplasms has been known by humankind for more than a century, when the origin of the common wart, or verruca vulgaris, was attributed to the human papilloma virus (HPV). Currently, virus-induced cutaneous neoplasms may be grouped into solid tumors and lymphoproliferative disorders. HPV, from which various serotypes are now known, each being linked to a specific neoplasm, the human herpes virus type 8 producing Kaposi sarcoma, and the Merkel cell pol...

  17. Long-term cultivation of in vitro Apis mellifera cells by gene transfer of human c-myc proto-oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagishi, Yasuko; Okumura, Naoko; Yoshida, Hitomi; Nishimura, Yuri; Takahashi, Jun-ichi; Matsuda, Satoru

    2011-08-01

    Establishment of cell lines representative of honeybee character would greatly assist in their analysis. Here, we show that immortalized cell line, designated as MYN9, has been generated from honeybee embryo by the gene transfer of human c-myc proto-oncogene. The morphology of the cell is characteristic of embryonic stem cell, although the cell is stable and does not spontaneously differentiate. Polymerase chain reaction analyses show that the cell is originated from authentic honeybee cell. It is proposed that the integration of human c-myc gene into honeybee precursor populations results in the establishment of stable cell line suitable for cellular and molecular studies.

  18. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix® and Gardasil® human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin; Sehr, Peter; Bonde, Jesper; Storgaard, Merete; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix(®) (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil(®) (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®). The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross-reactive antibody responses against HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 were evaluated for up to 12 months using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) were compared among vaccine groups and genders at 7 and 12 months.: Both vaccines induced anti-HPV-31, -33, and -45 neutralizing antibodies in participants who were seronegative and HPV-DNA negative for those types at study entry. Geometric mean antibody titers were comparable between vaccine groups. Interestingly, anti-HPV-31 and -33 antibody titers were higher among women compared with men at 7 and 12 months.: In conclusion, both licensed HPV-vaccines induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against frequent oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults, and women had greater serological responses against HPV-31 and -33 compared with men.

  19. Viruses and human cancer: from detection to causality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarid, Ronit; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2011-06-28

    The study of cancer is incomplete without taking into consideration of tumorigenic viruses. Initially, searches for human cancer viruses were fruitless despite an expansion of our knowledge in the same period concerning acute-transforming retroviruses in animals. However, over the last 40 years, we have witnessed rapid progress in the tumor virology field. Currently, acknowledged human cancer viruses include Epstein-Barr virus, hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, high-risk human papilloma viruses, human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus. Extensive epidemiological and mechanistic studies have led to the development of novel preventive and therapeutic approaches for managing some of these infections and associated cancers. In addition, recent advances in molecular technologies have enabled the discovery of a new potential human tumor virus, Merkel cell polyomavirus, but its association with cancer remains to be validated. It is anticipated that in the next few decades many additional human cancer viruses will be discovered and the mechanisms underlying viral oncogenesis delineated. Thus, it can be expected that better tools for preventing and treating virus-associated cancer will be available in the near future. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of Intra-Type Variants of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses by Next-Generation Deep Sequencing of the E6/E7 Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico Lavezzo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Different human papillomavirus (HPV types are characterized by differences in tissue tropism and ability to promote cell proliferation and transformation. In addition, clinical and experimental studies have shown that some genetic variants/lineages of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV types are characterized by increased oncogenic activity and probability to induce cancer. In this study, we designed and validated a new method based on multiplex PCR-deep sequencing of the E6/E7 region of HR-HPV types to characterize HPV intra-type variants in clinical specimens. Validation experiments demonstrated that this method allowed reliable identification of the different lineages of oncogenic HPV types. Advantages of this method over other published methods were represented by its ability to detect variants of all HR-HPV types in a single reaction, to detect variants of HR-HPV types in clinical specimens with multiple infections, and, being based on sequencing of the full E6/E7 region, to detect amino acid changes in these oncogenes potentially associated with increased transforming activity.

  1. FOXM1 allows human keratinocytes to bypass the oncogene-induced differentiation checkpoint in response to gain of MYC or loss of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinuevo, R; Freije, A; de Pedro, I; Stoll, S W; Elder, J T; Gandarillas, A

    2017-02-16

    Tumour suppressor p53 or proto-oncogene MYC is frequently altered in squamous carcinomas, but this is insufficient to drive carcinogenesis. We have shown that overactivation of MYC or loss of p53 via DNA damage triggers an anti-oncogenic differentiation-mitosis checkpoint in human epidermal keratinocytes, resulting in impaired cell division and squamous differentiation. Forkhead box M1 (FOXM1) is a transcription factor recently proposed to govern the expression of a set of mitotic genes. Deregulation of FOXM1 occurs in a wide variety of epithelial malignancies. We have ectopically expressed FOXM1 in keratinocytes of the skin after overexpression of MYC or inactivation of endogenous p53. Ectopic FOXM1 rescues the proliferative capacity of MYC- or p53-mutant cells in spite of higher genetic damage and a larger cell size typical of differentiation. As a consequence, differentiation induced by loss of p53 or MYC is converted into increased proliferation and keratinocytes displaying genomic instability are maintained within the proliferative compartment. The results demonstrate that keratinocyte oncogene-induced differentiation is caused by mitosis control and provide new insight into the mechanisms driving malignant progression in squamous cancer.

  2. Characterization of Intra-Type Variants of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses by Next-Generation Deep Sequencing of the E6/E7 Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavezzo, Enrico; Masi, Giulia; Toppo, Stefano; Franchin, Elisa; Gazzola, Valentina; Sinigaglia, Alessandro; Masiero, Serena; Trevisan, Marta; Pagni, Silvana; Palù, Giorgio; Barzon, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Different human papillomavirus (HPV) types are characterized by differences in tissue tropism and ability to promote cell proliferation and transformation. In addition, clinical and experimental studies have shown that some genetic variants/lineages of high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) types are characterized by increased oncogenic activity and probability to induce cancer. In this study, we designed and validated a new method based on multiplex PCR-deep sequencing of the E6/E7 region of HR-HPV types to characterize HPV intra-type variants in clinical specimens. Validation experiments demonstrated that this method allowed reliable identification of the different lineages of oncogenic HPV types. Advantages of this method over other published methods were represented by its ability to detect variants of all HR-HPV types in a single reaction, to detect variants of HR-HPV types in clinical specimens with multiple infections, and, being based on sequencing of the full E6/E7 region, to detect amino acid changes in these oncogenes potentially associated with increased transforming activity. PMID:26985902

  3. Genetic alterations of the PIK3CA oncogene in human oral squamous cell carcinoma in an Indian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sejal; Shah, Siddharth; Padh, Harish; Kalia, Kiran

    2015-11-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PIK3) genes, which code for heterodimeric lipid kinases, consist of a catalytic subunit, p110α (PIK3CA), which regulates cell proliferation, apoptosis, and metastasis. Recently, a high frequency of somatic mutations was observed in the PIK3CA gene in various cancer types, including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This study aimed to determine the frequency of oncogenic hotspot mutations in exons 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene and its correlation with the clinical characteristics of OSCC patients in an Indian population. We analyzed exons 9 and 20 of the PIK3CA gene using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and direct genomic sequencing of 50 OSCC primary tumors. We observed two hotspot oncogenic mutations (E542 K, E545 K) in exon 9 and two synonymous mutations (A994 A, T1025 T) in exon 20. Moreover, we identified two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), rs114587137 (C>T) and rs17849071 (T>G), in intron 9 of the PIK3CA gene. Both oncogenic hotspot mutations were reported primarily in patients with advanced-stage cancer of the buccal mucosa. We have observed a 4% oncogenic mutation frequency of the PIK3CA gene, which plays a minor role in the development of OSCC in an Indian population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Oncogenic K-Ras Turns Death Receptors Into Metastasis-Promoting Receptors in Human and Mouse Colorectal Cancer Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogwater, Frederik J. H.; Nijkamp, Maarten W.; Smakman, Niels; Steller, Ernst J. A.; Emmink, Benjamin L.; Westendorp, B. Florien; Raats, Danielle A. E.; Sprick, Martin R.; Schaefer, Uta; van Houdt, Winan J.; de Bruijn, Menno T.; Schackmann, Ron C. J.; Derksen, Patrick W. B.; Medema, Jan-Paul; Walczak, Henning; Borel Rinkes, Inne H. M.; Kranenburg, Onno

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: Death receptors expressed on tumor cells can prevent metastasis formation by inducing apoptosis, but they also can promote migration and invasion. The determinants of death receptor signaling output are poorly defined. Here we investigated the role of oncogenic K-Ras in

  5. Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type Distribution and HPV Type 16 E6 Variants in Two Spanish Population Groups with Different Levels of HPV Infection Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, M.; Torres, M.; Muñoz, L.; Fernández-García, E.; Canals, J.; Cabornero, A. I.; Aguilar, E.; Ballesteros, J.; del Amo, J.; García-Sáiz, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types and HPV type 16 (HPV16) variant distribution in two Spanish population groups, commercial sex workers and imprisoned women (CSW/IPW) and the general population. A multicenter cross-sectional study of 1,889 women from five clinical settings in two Spanish cities was conducted from May to November 2004. Oncogenic HPV infection was tested by an Hybrid Capture II (HC2) test, and positive samples were genotyped by direct sequencing using three different primer sets in L1 (MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+) and E6/E7. HPV16 variants were identified by sequencing the E6, E2, and L1 regions. Four hundred twenty-five samples were positive for the HC2 test, 31.5% from CSW/IPW and 10.7% from the general population. HPV16 was the most frequent type. Distinct profiles of oncogenic HPV type prevalence were observed across the two populations. In order of decreasing frequency, HPV types 16, 31, 58, 66, 56, and 18 were most frequent in CSW/IPW women, and types 16, 31, 52, 68, 51, and 53 were most frequent in the general population. We analyzed HPV16 intratype variants, and a large majority (78.7%) belonged to the European lineage. AA variants were detected in 16.0% of cases. African variants belonging to classes Af1 (4.0%) and Af2 (1.3%) were detected. Different HPV types and HPV16 intratype variants are involved in oncogenic HPV infections in our population. These results suggest that HPV type distribution differs in CSW/IPW women and in the general population, although further analysis is necessary. PMID:16597872

  6. 45 CFR 96.128 - Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements regarding human immunodeficiency virus. 96.128 Section 96.128 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... human immunodeficiency virus. (a) In the case of a designated State as described in paragraph (b) of...

  7. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Roberto Lima Machado; Johnson, Warren D.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical...

  8. A microRNA activity map of human mesenchymal tumors: connections to oncogenic pathways; an integrative transcriptomic study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fountzilas Elena

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs are nucleic acid regulators of many human mRNAs, and are associated with many tumorigenic processes. miRNA expression levels have been used in profiling studies, but some evidence suggests that expression levels do not fully capture miRNA regulatory activity. In this study we integrate multiple gene expression datasets to determine miRNA activity patterns associated with cancer phenotypes and oncogenic pathways in mesenchymal tumors – a very heterogeneous class of malignancies. Results Using a computational method, we identified differentially activated miRNAs between 77 normal tissue specimens and 135 sarcomas and we validated many of these findings with microarray interrogation of an independent, paraffin-based cohort of 18 tumors. We also showed that miRNA activity is imperfectly correlated with miRNA expression levels. Using next-generation miRNA sequencing we identified potential base sequence alterations which may explain differential activity. We then analyzed miRNA activity changes related to the RAS-pathway and found 21 miRNAs that switch from silenced to activated status in parallel with RAS activation. Importantly, nearly half of these 21 miRNAs were predicted to regulate integral parts of the miRNA processing machinery, and our gene expression analysis revealed significant reductions of these transcripts in RAS-active tumors. These results suggest an association between RAS signaling and miRNA processing in which miRNAs may attenuate their own biogenesis. Conclusions Our study represents the first gene expression-based investigation of miRNA regulatory activity in human sarcomas, and our findings indicate that miRNA activity patterns derived from integrated transcriptomic data are reproducible and biologically informative in cancer. We identified an association between RAS signaling and miRNA processing, and demonstrated sequence alterations as plausible causes for differential miRNA activity

  9. Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Infection and Pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohmwald, Karen; Espinoza, Janyra A; Rey-Jurado, Emma; Gómez, Roberto S; González, Pablo A; Bueno, Susan M; Riedel, Claudia A; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2016-08-01

    The human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV) is by far the major cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs) worldwide in infants and children younger than 2 years. The overwhelming number of hospitalizations due to hRSV-induced ALRTI each year is due, at least in part, to the lack of licensed vaccines against this virus. Thus, hRSV infection is considered a major public health problem and economic burden in most countries. The lung pathology developed in hRSV-infected individuals is characterized by an exacerbated proinflammatory and unbalanced Th2-type immune response. In addition to the adverse effects in airway tissues, hRSV infection can also cause neurologic manifestations in the host, such as seizures and encephalopathy. Although the origins of these extrapulmonary symptoms remain unclear, studies with patients suffering from neurological alterations suggest an involvement of the inflammatory response against hRSV. Furthermore, hRSV has evolved numerous mechanisms to modulate and evade the immune response in the host. Several studies have focused on elucidating the interactions between hRSV virulence factors and the host immune system, to rationally design new vaccines and therapies against this virus. Here, we discuss about the infection, pathology, and immune response triggered by hRSV in the host. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  10. Molecular epidemiology and evolution of human respiratory syncytial virus and human metapneumovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaunt, Eleanor R.; Jansen, Rogier R.; Poovorawan, Yong; Templeton, Kate E.; Toms, Geoffrey L.; Simmonds, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens of the Pneumovirinae subfamily of the Paramyxoviridae. Two major surface antigens are expressed by both viruses; the highly conserved fusion (F) protein, and the extremely diverse

  11. Molecular Epidemiology and Evolution of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus and Human Metapneumovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaunt, E.R.; Jansen, R.R.; Poovorawan, Y.; Templeton, K.E.; Toms, G.L.; Simmonds, P.

    2011-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) are ubiquitous respiratory pathogens of the Pneumovirinae subfamily of the Paramyxoviridae. Two major surface antigens are expressed by both viruses; the highly conserved fusion (F) protein, and the extremely diverse

  12. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...... independently (Panemia. The mechanisms underlying why hemoglobin is such a strong prognostic...

  13. Ebola Virus: Sensationalism, Science, and Human Rights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bausch, Daniel G; Clougherty, Marguerite M

    2015-10-01

    Outbreaks of the filoviruses, Ebola and Marburg, usually garner immense public attention, often with a sensationalist bent in the lay press, focused on the apparently mysterious origins of the outbreak and the high mortality rates. The scientific community may present a more objective viewpoint, but usually with a rather technical focus on identifying epidemiological risk factors and experimental therapies and vaccines. Often lost in the discussion are the human rights elements that consistently underlie large outbreaks of these dangerous viruses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Anemia and survival in human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens Dilling; Mocroft, Amanda

    2003-01-01

    The prospective, multicenter cohort study EuroSIDA has previously reported on predictors and outcomes of anemia in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus. In a Cox proportional-hazards model with serial measures of CD4+ cell count, plasma viral load, and degrees of anemia fitted...... as time-dependent variables, the relative hazard of death increased markedly for patients with anemia versus no anemia. A clinical scoring system was developed and validated for patients receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy using the most recent laboratory measures. Mild and severe anemia were...

  15. Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Co-Infection Among Pregnant Women Attending Antenatal Clinics in Abuja, Nigeria. ... with this virus complicates issues related to diagnosis, clinical disease progression, monitoring disease activity, treatment options and basic immunology.

  16. Conditional virus replication as an approach to a safe live attenuated human immunodeficiency virus vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, Ben; Verhoef, Koen; Marzio, Giuseppe; Klaver, Bep; Vink, Monique; Zhou, Xue; Das, Atze T.

    2002-01-01

    Despite intensive efforts, no safe and effective vaccine has been developed for the prophylaxis of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Studies with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model demonstrated that live attenuated viruses are the most

  17. West Nile virus meningitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pilalas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of West Nile virus lineage 2 in central Macedonia, Greece, in 2010 resulted in large outbreaks for 5 consecutive years. We report a case of viral meningitis in an individual infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1, which preceded the recognition of the outbreak and was confirmed retrospectively as West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease.

  18. Hepatitis C virus infection in the human immunodeficiency virus infected patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Louise Nygaard; Lundbo, Lene Fogt; Benfield, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) share the same transmission routes; therefore, coinfection is frequent. An estimated 5-10 million individuals alone in the western world are infected with both viruses. The majority of people acquire HCV by injection drug use and...

  19. Soy isoflavone genistein modulates cell cycle progression and induces apoptosis in HER-2/neu oncogene expressing human breast epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katdare, Meena; Osborne, Michael; Telang, Nitin T

    2002-10-01

    In the multistep progressive pathogenesis of human breast cancer, comedo ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) represents a preinvasive precursor lesion for therapy resistant invasive cancer. Human tissue derived cell culture models exhibiting molecular similarities to clinical DCIS facilitate an important preclinical mechanistic approach for evaluation of preventive efficacy of natural and synthetic chemopreventive compounds. Natural phytochemicals present in fresh fruits, vegetables and grain products are likely to offer protection against cancer. The clinical efficacy of these natural phytochemicals, however, depends on extrapolation, and is therefore equivocal. The present study determined whether the natural soy isoflavone genistein (GEN) inhibited aberrant proliferation in 184-B5/HER cells (a model for human comedo DCIS) and identified possible mechanisms responsible for its efficacy. Human reduction mammoplasty derived HER-2/neu oncogene expressing preneoplastic 184-B5/HER cells represented the experimental system. Flow cytometry and cellular epifluorescence based assays were utilized to quantitate the alterations in cell cycle progression, cellular apoptosis, and in the status of cell cycle regulatory and apoptosis-associated gene product expression. The 184-B5/HER cells exhibited specific immunofluorescence to p185HER, p53, EGFR, but not to ERalpha, thus resembling comedo DCIS. Treatment of 184-B5/HER cells with GEN resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in the viable cell population, increase in the G0/G1:S + G2/M ratio and enhancement of sub G0/G1 (apoptotic population). Exposure to the maximum cytostatic 10 microM dose of GEN down-regulated HER-2/neu mediated signal transduction as evidenced by a 73.9% decrease (p=0.001) in p185HER specific, and a 89.8% decrease (p=0.001) in phosphotyrosine specific immunofluorescence. The increase in G0/G1:S + G2/M ratio in response to the treatment with 10 microM GEN was associated with a 85.5% decrease (p=0.001) in

  20. Targeted inhibition of heat shock protein 90 disrupts multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, thus inducing cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death in human urinary bladder cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karkoulis Panagiotis K

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geldanamycin (GA can be considered a relatively new component with a promising mode of action against human malignancies. It specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90 and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone. Methods In this study, we have investigated the effects of geldanamycin on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent oncogenic signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cells. In order to assess the biological outcome of Hsp90 inhibition on RT4 (grade I and T24 (grade III human urinary bladder cancer cell lines, we applied MTT assay, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative (sq RT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, immunofluorescence and scratch-wound assay. Results We have herein demonstrated that, upon geldanamycin treatment, bladder cancer cells are prominently arrested in the G1 phase of cell cycle and eventually undergo programmed cell death via combined activation of apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, geldanamycin administration proved to induce prominent downregulation of several Hsp90 protein clients and downstream effectors, such as membrane receptors (IGF-IR and c-Met, protein kinases (Akt, IKKα, IKKβ and Erk1/2 and transcription factors (FOXOs and NF-κΒ, therefore resulting in the impairment of proliferative -oncogenic- signaling and reduction of cell motility. Conclusions In toto, we have evinced the dose-dependent and cell line-specific actions of geldanamycin on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of critical Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling -oncogenic- integrity.

  1. Targeted inhibition of heat shock protein 90 disrupts multiple oncogenic signaling pathways, thus inducing cell cycle arrest and programmed cell death in human urinary bladder cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Geldanamycin (GA) can be considered a relatively new component with a promising mode of action against human malignancies. It specifically targets heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) and interferes with its function as a molecular chaperone. Methods In this study, we have investigated the effects of geldanamycin on the regulation of Hsp90-dependent oncogenic signaling pathways directly implicated in cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human urinary bladder cancer cells. In order to assess the biological outcome of Hsp90 inhibition on RT4 (grade I) and T24 (grade III) human urinary bladder cancer cell lines, we applied MTT assay, FACS analysis, Western blotting, semi-quantitative (sq) RT-PCR, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), immunofluorescence and scratch-wound assay. Results We have herein demonstrated that, upon geldanamycin treatment, bladder cancer cells are prominently arrested in the G1 phase of cell cycle and eventually undergo programmed cell death via combined activation of apoptosis and autophagy. Furthermore, geldanamycin administration proved to induce prominent downregulation of several Hsp90 protein clients and downstream effectors, such as membrane receptors (IGF-IR and c-Met), protein kinases (Akt, IKKα, IKKβ and Erk1/2) and transcription factors (FOXOs and NF-κΒ), therefore resulting in the impairment of proliferative -oncogenic- signaling and reduction of cell motility. Conclusions In toto, we have evinced the dose-dependent and cell line-specific actions of geldanamycin on cell cycle progression, survival and motility of human bladder cancer cells, due to downregulation of critical Hsp90 clients and subsequent disruption of signaling -oncogenic- integrity. PMID:23394616

  2. Detection of novel Human papilloma virus type 82 in laryngeal cancer: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannone, G; Sanguedolce, F; Santoro, A; Fierro, P; Panetti, M; Fierro, D; Maiello, F; De Maria, S; Giannattasio, A; Serpico, R; Lo Muzio, L; Metafora, S; Bufo, P

    2010-10-01

    Human papilloma virus infection is thought to play a role in laryngeal carcinogenesis; the variable association reported in literature may be due to wide range of HPV genotypes. We report the case of a 51-year-old man affected by laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma; analysis of DNA extracted by cancer cells by an innovative molecular virology assay (INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra) showed the presence of two high-risk HPV genotypes, HPV-73 and -82. Immunohistochemical examination confirmed positivity for both capsid protein and viral oncogenic protein E7. Such association has never been reported in literature so far, and a brief discussion on the importance of assessing HPV status in laryngeal cancer is provided. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Zika Virus: Epidemiology, Pathogenesis and Human Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Elizabeth K; Nugent, Anne K; Nugent, Rebecca; Nugent, Kenneth

    2017-05-01

    The Zika virus is a positive sense, single-stranded RNA arbovirus in the Flaviviridae family, genus Flavivirus. This virus was initially isolated in Africa and is transmitted to nonhuman primates and humans by mosquitoes. Initial reports describe sporadic mild viral infection with fever, arthralgia, myalgia and conjunctivitis in Africa and Asia. However, its geographic distribution has significantly increased, and it has caused large outbreaks in the Yap Islands in 2007, in French Polynesia in 2013 and in Brazil in 2015. Multiple cases of Guillain-Barre´ syndrome occurred in French Polynesia and Columbia during outbreaks, and infections in pregnant women in Brazil have been associated with microcephaly and fetal loss. The viremic phase in humans is short, and diagnosis usually depends on positive immunoglobulin M titers with serum neutralization tests for confirmation. Treatment is directed at symptoms; there are no antiviral drugs available. Transmission can also occur through sexual contact with infected men and through blood transfusion. Prevention is important in women and includes limiting travel to endemic areas when possible, control of mosquito populations and condom use when appropriate. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is actively involved in tracking these infections and providing up-to-date information. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural Determinants of the Gain-of-Function Phenotype of Human Leukemia-associated Mutant CBL Oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Scott A; An, Wei; Mohapatra, Bhopal C; Mushtaq, Insha; Bielecki, Timothy A; Luan, Haitao; Zutshi, Neha; Ahmad, Gulzar; Storck, Matthew D; Sanada, Masashi; Ogawa, Seishi; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2017-03-03

    Mutations of the tyrosine kinase-directed ubiquitin ligase CBL cause myeloid leukemias, but the molecular determinants of the dominant leukemogenic activity of mutant CBL oncogenes are unclear. Here, we first define a gain-of-function attribute of the most common leukemia-associated CBL mutant, Y371H, by demonstrating its ability to increase proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) derived from CBL-null and CBL/CBL-B-null mice. Next, we express second-site point/deletion mutants of CBL-Y371H in CBL/CBL-B-null HSPCs or the cytokine-dependent human leukemic cell line TF-1 to show that individual or combined Tyr → Phe mutations of established phosphotyrosine residues (Tyr-700, Tyr-731, and Tyr-774) had little impact on the activity of the CBL-Y371H mutant in HSPCs, and the triple Tyr → Phe mutant was only modestly impaired in TF-1 cells. In contrast, intact tyrosine kinase-binding (TKB) domain and proline-rich region (PRR) were critical in both cell models. PRR deletion reduced the stem cell factor (SCF)-induced hyper-phosphorylation of the CBL-Y371H mutant and the c-KIT receptor and eliminated the sustained p-ERK1/2 and p-AKT induction by SCF. GST fusion protein pulldowns followed by phospho-specific antibody array analysis identified distinct CBL TKB domains or PRR-binding proteins that are phosphorylated in CBL-Y371H-expressing TF-1 cells. Our results support a model of mutant CBL gain-of-function in which mutant CBL proteins effectively compete with the remaining wild type CBL-B and juxtapose TKB domain-associated PTKs with PRR-associated signaling proteins to hyper-activate signaling downstream of hematopoietic growth factor receptors. Elucidation of mutant CBL domains required for leukemogenesis should facilitate targeted therapy approaches for patients with mutant CBL-driven leukemias. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Detecting emerging transmissibility of avian influenza virus in human households.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michiel van Boven

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating infections of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza in humans underlines the need to track the ability of these viruses to spread among humans. A human-transmissible avian influenza virus is expected to cause clusters of infections in humans living in close contact. Therefore, epidemiological analysis of infection clusters in human households is of key importance. Infection clusters may arise from transmission events from (i the animal reservoir, (ii humans who were infected by animals (primary human-to-human transmission, or (iii humans who were infected by humans (secondary human-to-human transmission. Here we propose a method of analysing household infection data to detect changes in the transmissibility of avian influenza viruses in humans at an early stage. The method is applied to an outbreak of H7N7 avian influenza virus in The Netherlands that was the cause of more than 30 human-to-human transmission events. The analyses indicate that secondary human-to-human transmission is plausible for the Dutch household infection data. Based on the estimates of the within-household transmission parameters, we evaluate the effectiveness of antiviral prophylaxis, and conclude that it is unlikely that all household infections can be prevented with current antiviral drugs. We discuss the applicability of our method for the detection of emerging human-to-human transmission of avian influenza viruses in particular, and for the analysis of within-household infection data in general.

  6. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria is also endemic for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, ... of HIV, hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), syphilis, and co‑infections among ..... Hou J, Liu Z, Gu F. Epidemiology and prevention of hepatitis. B virus infection. Int J Med Sci 2005;2:50‑7. 9. Ogunro PS, Adekanle DA, Fadero FF, Ogungbamigbe TO,.

  7. Gene expression profile associated with oncogenic ras-induced senescence, cell death, and transforming properties in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moumtzi, Sophy S; Roberts, Michael L; Joyce, Tobias; Evangelidou, Maria; Probert, Lesley; Frillingos, Stathis; Fotsis, Theodore; Pintzas, Alexander

    2010-07-01

    We developed inducible and constitutive expression systems of Ha-RasV12 in HEK 293 cells to examine early oncogenic RasV12 signaling. Inducible expression of oncogenic Ras-triggered growth arrest, early senescence, and later apoptosis. Gene expression profile analysis revealed early Ras proliferation and cell cycle genes like c-fos, cyclin E, cdk2, cell-cell contact, and signaling like integrin a6, MEK5, and free radical signaling genes, like proline oxidase. Therefore, Ras-mediated signaling is a fine regulated process both positively and negatively influencing cell cycle, senescence, and apoptosis pathways. Novel early RAS-target genes could be potentially exploited in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.

  8. Pathogenesis of Hendra and Nipah virus infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escaffre, Olivier; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Rockx, Barry

    2013-04-17

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are emerging zoonotic viruses that cause severe and often lethal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans. Henipaviruses can infect a wide range of species and human-to-human transmission has been observed for NiV. While the exact route of transmission in humans is not known, experimental infection in different animal species suggests that infection can be efficiently initiated after respiratory challenge. The limited data on histopathological changes in fatal human cases of HeV and NiV suggest that endothelial cells are an important target during the terminal stage of infection; however, it is unknown where these viruses initially establish infection and how the virus disseminates from the respiratory tract to the central nervous system and other organs. Here we review the current concepts in henipavirus pathogenesis in humans.

  9. NHANES 2009-2012 findings: association of sexual behaviors with higher prevalence of oral oncogenic human papillomavirus infections in U.S. men

    OpenAIRE

    Chaturvedi, Anil K.; Graubard, Barry I.; Broutian, Tatevik; Pickard, Robert K.L.; Tong, Zhen-yue; Xiao, Weihong; Kahle, Lisa; Gillison, Maura L.

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancers is higher and rising more rapidly among men than women in the United States (U.S.) for unknown reasons. We compared the epidemiology of oral oncogenic HPV infection between men and women aged 14-69 years (N=9,480) within the U.S. National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys (NHANES) 2009-2012. HPV presence was detected in oral DNA by PCR. Analyses were stratified by gender and utilized NHANES sample weights. Ora...

  10. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus — hepatitis B virus co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    virus (HIV) worldwide, with 2.6 million co-infected with the hepatitis B virus (HBV). HBV infection causes 650 000 deaths annually worldwide. Botswana has a high prevalence of HIV and a growing population of patients on highly active ...

  11. Myxoma virus is a novel oncolytic virus with significant antitumor activity against experimental human gliomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lun, Xueqing; Yang, Wenqing; Alain, Tommy; Shi, Zhong-Qiao; Muzik, Huong; Barrett, John W; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Hamilton, Mark G; Senger, Donna L; Forsyth, Peter A

    2005-11-01

    Myxoma virus, a poxvirus previously considered rabbit specific, can replicate productively in a variety of human tumor cells in culture. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was efficacy or toxicities of this oncolytic virus against experimental models of human malignant gliomas in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo in malignant glioma specimens. In vitro, the majority of glioma cell lines tested (7 of 8, 87.5%) were fully permissive for myxoma virus replication and killed by infection. In vivo, intracerebral (i.c.) myxoma virus inoculation was well tolerated and produced only minimal focal inflammatory changes at the site of viral inoculation. U87 and U251 orthotopic xenograft models were used to assess myxoma virus efficacy in vivo. A single intratumoral injection of myxoma virus dramatically prolonged median survival compared with treatment with UV-inactivated myxoma virus. Median survival was not reached in myxoma virus-treated groups versus 47.3 days (U87; P = 0.0002) and 50.7 days (U251; P = 0.0027) in UV-inactivated myxoma virus-treated groups. Most myxoma virus-treated animals (12 of 13, 92%) were alive and apparently "cured" when the experiment was finished (>130 days). Interestingly, we found a selective and long-lived myxoma virus infection in gliomas in vivo. This is the first demonstration of the oncolytic activity of myxoma virus in vivo. The nonpathogenic nature of myxoma virus outside of the rabbit host, its capacity to be genetically modified, its ability to produce a long-lived infection in human tumor cells, and the lack of preexisting antibodies in the human population suggest that myxoma virus may be an attractive oncolytic agent against human malignant glioma.

  12. [Amplification of the erbb-2 (Her-2/NEU), erbb-1 (HER-1) and c-myc oncogenes is often combined with the deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in human carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imianitov, E N; Chernitsa, O I; Nikiforova, I F; Serova, O M; Sokolov, S I; Laur, O Iu; Togo, A V; Kniazev, P G

    1993-01-01

    Amplification of oncogenes erbb-2, erbb-1, c-myc and losses of heterozygosity (LOH) at chromosomes 11p (probe hras-1), 17p (probe ynz-22) and 17q (probe thh-59) were studied in 165 human tumours (60 breast, 22 ovary, 40 colorectal, 23 lung, and 20 thyroid carcinomas). The correlation (P < 0.01) between the increased copy number of mentioned oncogenes and LOH at 17p was demonstrated for tumours tested: extra copies of these oncogenes were revealed in 11 of 46 DNA specimens with LOH on ynz-22, but only in 3 of 61 without LOH. This correlation was mostly due to frequent combinations between erbb-2 amplification and 17p deletions; the incidence of increased copy number of erbb-1 and c-myc oncogenes was not high enough for final conclusions about the association of their alterations with LOH at chromosome 17p.

  13. Transgenic oncogenes induce oncogene-independent cancers with individual karyotypes and phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Andreas; Li, Nan; Nicholson, Joshua M; McCormack, Amanda A; Graessmann, Adolf; Duesberg, Peter

    2010-07-15

    Cancers are clones of autonomous cells defined by individual karyotypes, much like species. Despite such karyotypic evidence for causality, three to six synergistic mutations, termed oncogenes, are generally thought to cause cancer. To test single oncogenes, they are artificially activated with heterologous promoters and spliced into the germ line of mice to initiate cancers with collaborating spontaneous oncogenes. Because such cancers are studied as models for the treatment of natural cancers with related oncogenes, the following must be answered: 1) which oncogenes collaborate with the transgenes in cancers; 2) how do single transgenic oncogenes induce diverse cancers and hyperplasias; 3) what maintains cancers that lose initiating transgenes; 4) why are cancers aneuploid, over- and underexpressing thousands of normal genes? Here we try to answer these questions with the theory that carcinogenesis is a form of speciation. We postulate that transgenic oncogenes initiate carcinogenesis by inducing aneuploidy. Aneuploidy destabilizes the karyotype by unbalancing teams of mitosis genes. This instability thus catalyzes the evolution of new cancer species with individual karyotypes. Depending on their degree of aneuploidy, these cancers then evolve new subspecies. To test this theory, we have analyzed the karyotypes and phenotypes of mammary carcinomas of mice with transgenic SV40 tumor virus- and hepatitis B virus-derived oncogenes. We found that (1) a given transgene induced diverse carcinomas with individual karyotypes and phenotypes; (2) these karyotypes coevolved with newly acquired phenotypes such as drug resistance; (3) 8 of 12 carcinomas were transgene negative. Having found one-to-one correlations between individual karyotypes and phenotypes and consistent coevolutions of karyotypes and phenotypes, we conclude that carcinogenesis is a form of speciation and that individual karyotypes maintain cancers as they maintain species. Because activated oncogenes

  14. Guaroa Virus Infection among Humans in Bolivia and Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Patricia V.; Morrison, Amy C.; Rocha, Claudio; Watts, Douglas M.; Beingolea, Luis; Suarez, Victor; Vargas, Jorge; Cruz, Cristhopher; Guevara, Carolina; Montgomery, Joel M.; Robert B. Tesh; Tadeusz J Kochel

    2010-01-01

    Guaroa virus (GROV) was first isolated from humans in Colombia in 1959. Subsequent isolates of the virus have been recovered from febrile patients and mosquitoes in Brazil, Colombia, and Panama; however, association of the virus with human disease has been unclear. As part of a study on the etiology of febrile illnesses in Peru and Bolivia, 14 GROV strains were isolated from patients with febrile illnesses, and 3 additional cases were confirmed by IgM seroconversion. The prevalence rate of GR...

  15. Myxoma Virus Is a Novel Oncolytic Virus with Significant Antitumor Activity against Experimental Human Gliomas

    OpenAIRE

    Lun, Xueqing; Yang, Wenqing; Alain, Tommy; Shi, Zhong-Qiao; Muzik, Huong; Barrett, John W.; McFadden, Grant; Bell, John; Hamilton, Mark G.; Senger, Donna L.; Forsyth, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    Myxoma virus, a poxvirus previously considered rabbit specific, can replicate productively in a variety of human tumor cells in culture. The purpose of this study was to determine if there was efficacy or toxicities of this oncolytic virus against experimental models of human malignant gliomas in vitro, in vivo, and ex vivo in malignant glioma specimens. In vitro, the majority of glioma cell lines tested (7 of 8, 87.5%) were fully permissive for myxoma virus replication and killed by infectio...

  16. The MYC 3′ Wnt-Responsive Element Drives Oncogenic MYC Expression in Human Colorectal Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri A. Rennoll

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in components of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway drive colorectal cancer (CRC by deregulating expression of downstream target genes including the c-MYC proto-oncogene (MYC. The critical regulatory DNA enhancer elements that control oncogenic MYC expression in CRC have yet to be fully elucidated. In previous reports, we correlated T-cell factor (TCF and β-catenin binding to the MYC 3′ Wnt responsive DNA element (MYC 3′ WRE with MYC expression in HCT116 cells. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 to determine whether this element is a critical driver of MYC. We isolated a clonal population of cells that contained a deletion of a single TCF binding element (TBE within the MYC 3′ WRE. This deletion reduced TCF/β-catenin binding to this regulatory element and decreased MYC expression. Using RNA-Seq analysis, we found altered expression of genes that regulate metabolic processes, many of which are known MYC target genes. We found that 3′ WRE-Mut cells displayed a reduced proliferative capacity, diminished clonogenic growth, and a decreased potential to form tumors in vivo. These findings indicate that the MYC 3′ WRE is a critical driver of oncogenic MYC expression and suggest that this element may serve as a therapeutic target for CRC.

  17. Theories about evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus in primates and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Frederico de Carvalho Dominguez Souza

    Full Text Available Introduction: The human hepatitis B virus causes acute and chronic hepatitis and is considered one of the most serious human health issues by the World Health Organization, causing thousands of deaths per year. There are similar viruses belonging to the Hepadnaviridae family that infect non-human primates and other mammals as well as some birds. The majority of non-human primate virus isolates were phylogenetically close to the human hepatitis B virus, but like the human genotypes, the origins of these viruses remain controversial. However, there is a possibility that human hepatitis B virus originated in primates. Knowing whether these viruses might be common to humans and primates is crucial in order to reduce the risk to humans. Objective: To review the existing knowledge about the evolutionary origins of viruses of the Hepadnaviridae family in primates. Methods: This review was done by reading several articles that provide information about the Hepadnaviridae virus family in non-human primates and humans and the possible origins and evolution of these viruses. Results: The evolutionary origin of viruses of the Hepadnaviridae family in primates has been dated back to several thousand years; however, recent analyses of genomic fossils of avihepadnaviruses integrated into the genomes of several avian species have suggested a much older origin of this genus. Conclusion: Some hypotheses about the evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus have been debated since the '90s. One theory suggested a New World origin because of the phylogenetic co-segregation between some New World human hepatitis B virus genotypes F and H and woolly B virus in basal sister-relationship to the Old monkey human hepatitis World non-human primates and human hepatitis B virus variants. Another theory suggests an Old World origin of human hepatitis B virus, and that it would have been spread following prehistoric human migrations over 100,000 years ago. A third theory

  18. Theories about evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus in primates and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Breno Frederico de Carvalho Dominguez; Drexler, Jan Felix; Lima, Renato Santos de; Rosário, Mila de Oliveira Hughes Veiga do; Netto, Eduardo Martins

    2014-01-01

    The human hepatitis B virus causes acute and chronic hepatitis and is considered one of the most serious human health issues by the World Health Organization, causing thousands of deaths per year. There are similar viruses belonging to the Hepadnaviridae family that infect non-human primates and other mammals as well as some birds. The majority of non-human primate virus isolates were phylogenetically close to the human hepatitis B virus, but like the human genotypes, the origins of these viruses remain controversial. However, there is a possibility that human hepatitis B virus originated in primates. Knowing whether these viruses might be common to humans and primates is crucial in order to reduce the risk to humans. To review the existing knowledge about the evolutionary origins of viruses of the Hepadnaviridae family in primates. This review was done by reading several articles that provide information about the Hepadnaviridae virus family in non-human primates and humans and the possible origins and evolution of these viruses. The evolutionary origin of viruses of the Hepadnaviridae family in primates has been dated back to several thousand years; however, recent analyses of genomic fossils of avihepadnaviruses integrated into the genomes of several avian species have suggested a much older origin of this genus. Some hypotheses about the evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus have been debated since the '90s. One theory suggested a New World origin because of the phylogenetic co-segregation between some New World human hepatitis B virus genotypes F and H and woolly monkey human hepatitis B virus in basal sister-relationship to the Old World non-human primates and human hepatitis B virus variants. Another theory suggests an Old World origin of human hepatitis B virus, and that it would have been spread following prehistoric human migrations over 100,000 years ago. A third theory suggests a co-speciation of human hepatitis B virus in non-human primate

  19. EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS-DRIVEN LYMPHOMAGENESIS IN THE CONTEXT OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1 INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Raffaella ePetrara

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV is a ubiquitous human γ-herpes virus which establishes a life-long asymptomatic infection in immunocompetent hosts. In HIV-1 infected patients, the impaired immunosurveillance against EBV may favor the development of EBV-related diseases, ranging from lymphoproliferative disorders to B-cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL. Antiretroviral therapy (ART has significantly modified the natural course of HIV-1 infection, resulting in decreased HIV-1 plasmaviremia, increased CD4 lymphocytes, and decreased opportunistic infections, indicating a restoration of immune functions. However, the impact of ART appears to be less favorable on EBV-related malignancies than on other AIDS-defining tumors (ADC, such as Kaposi’s Sarcoma, and NHL remains the most common cancer during the ART era. EBV-driven tumors are associated with selective expression of latent oncogenic proteins, but uncontrolled lytic cycle with virus replication and/or reactivation may favor cell transformation, at least in the early phases. Several host's factors may promote EBV reactivation and replication; besides immunodepression, inflammation/chronic immune stimulation may play an important role. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, through Toll-like receptors (TLR, activate the immune system and may promote EBV reactivation and/or polyclonal expansion of EBV-infected cells. A body of evidence suggests that chronic immune stimulation is a hallmark of HIV-1 pathogenesis and may persist even in ART-treated patients. This review focuses on lymphomagenesis driven by EBV both in the context of the natural history of HIV-1 infection and in ART-treated patients. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the expansion of EBV-infected cells is a premise for the identification of prognostic markers of EBV-associated malignancies.

  20. Characterization of the human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) mediated Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction in proliferating mammalian dopaminergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Lei [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Department of Physiology, Nankai University School of Medicine, Tianjin 300071 (China); Carr, Aprell L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Ping; Lee, Jessica; McGregor, Mary [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Li, Lei, E-mail: Li.78@nd.edu [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Center for Zebrafish Research, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-07-11

    Highlights: • Stil is a human oncogene that is conserved in vertebrate species. • Stil functions in the Shh pathway in mammalian cells. • The expression of Stil is required for mammalian dopaminergic cell proliferation. - Abstract: The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in all vertebrate species. In humans, the expression of Stil is involved in cancer cell survival, apoptosis and proliferation. In this research, we investigated the roles of Stil expression in cell proliferation of mammalian dopaminergic (DA) PC12 cells. Stil functions through the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signal transduction pathway. Co-immunoprecipitation tests revealed that STIL interacts with Shh downstream components, which include SUFU and GLI1. By examining the expression of Stil, Gli1, CyclinD2 (cell-cycle marker) and PCNA (proliferating cell nuclear antigen), we found that up-regulation of Stil expression (transfection with overexpression plasmids) increased Shh signaling transduction and PC12 cell proliferation, whereas down-regulation of Stil expression (by shRNA) inhibited Shh signaling transduction, and thereby decreased PC12 cell proliferation. Transient transfection of PC12 cells with Stil knockdown or overexpression plasmids did not affect PC12 cell neural differentiation, further indicating the specific roles of Stil in cell proliferation. The results from this research suggest that Stil may serve as a bio-marker for neurological diseases involved in DA neurons, such as Parkinson’s disease.

  1. Human muscle satellite cells as targets of Chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ozden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya (CHIK virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells, and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans.

  2. Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nigeria which has one of the world's highest burden of children living with Sickle cell anaemia is also endemic for hepatitis B, C and the Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). This study set out to determine the prevalence of Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), antibodies to Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) and Human ...

  3. Seroprevalence of human parainfluenza virus type 2 infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Serological survey was carried out to determine the level of Human Parainfluenza virus type 2 (HPIV-2) IgG antibodies in children aged 1-5 years. Blood samples were collected from 379 children who met the selection criteria in selected hospitals in Zaria. Serum IgG antibody level for. Human Parainfluenza virus type 2 was ...

  4. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK mediates the induction of pro-oncogenic and fibrogenic phenotypes in hepatitis C virus (HCV-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Alisi

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C Virus (HCV infection is one of the most common etiological factors involved in fibrosis development and its progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The pivotal role of hepatic stellate cells (HCSs and extracellular matrix (ECM in fibrogenesis is now certainly accepted, while the network of molecular interactions connecting HCV is emerging as a master regulator of several biological processes including proliferation, inflammation, cytoskeleton and ECM remodeling. In this study, the effects of HCV proteins expression on liver cancer cells, both pro-invasive and pro-fibrogenic phenotypes were explored. As a model of HCV infection, we used permissive Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells infected with JFH1-derived ccHCV. Conditioned medium from these cells was used to stimulate LX-2 cells, a line of HSCs. We found that the HCV infection of Huh7.5.1 cells decreased adhesion, increased migration and caused the delocalization of alpha-actinin from plasma membrane to cytoplasm and increased expression levels of paxillin. The treatment of LX-2 cells, with conditioned medium from HCV-infected Huh7.5.1 cells, caused an increase in cell proliferation, expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, hyaluronic acid release and apoptosis rate measured as cleaved poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. These effects were accompanied in Huh7.5.1 cells by an HCV-dependent increasing of FAK activation that physically interacts with phosphorylated paxillin and alpha-actinin, and a rising of tumor necrosis factor alpha production/release. Silencing of FAK by siRNA reverted all effects of HCV infection, both those directed on Huh7.5.1 cells, and those indirect effects on the LX-2 cells. Moreover and interestingly, FAK inhibition enhances apoptosis in HCV-conditioned LX-2 cells. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that HCV, through FAK activation, may promote cytoskeletal reorganization and a pro-oncogenic phenotype in hepatocyte-like cells, and a fibrogenic phenotype in

  5. Prevalence and prognostic significance of infection with TT virus in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, JK; Eugen-Olsen, Jesper; Sørensen, M

    2000-01-01

    No clear association between human disease and TT virus (TTV) has been documented. A possible pathogenic role of TTV was investigated in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). TTV serum concentrations were estimated in 185 HIV-infected patients by dilution polymerase chain rea...... TTV viremia (Psuspected to be an opportunistic pathogen with an independent influence on HIV progression....

  6. Human papilloma virus in oral cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent cancer among women, and it arises from cells that originate in the cervix uteri. Among several causes of cervical malignancies, infection with some types of human papilloma virus (HPV) is well known to be the greatest cervical cancer risk factor. Over 150 subtypes of HPV have been identified; more than 40 types of HPVs are typically transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region and oral cavity. The recently introduced vaccine for HPV infection is effective against certain subtypes of HPV that are associated with cervical cancer, genital warts, and some less common cancers, including oropharyngeal cancer. Two HPV vaccines, quadrivalent and bivalent types that use virus-like particles (VLPs), are currently used in the medical commercial market. While the value of HPV vaccination for oral cancer prevention is still controversial, some evidence supports the possibility that HPV vaccination may be effective in reducing the incidence of oral cancer. This paper reviews HPV-related pathogenesis in cancer, covering HPV structure and classification, trends in worldwide applications of HPV vaccines, effectiveness and complications of HPV vaccination, and the relationship of HPV with oral cancer prevalence. PMID:28053902

  7. Oncogenes and inflammation rewire host energy metabolism in the tumor microenvironment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Curry, Joseph M; Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Tuluc, Madalina; Cognetti, David; Birbe, Ruth C; Pribitkin, Edmund; Bombonati, Alessandro; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-01-01

    Here, we developed a model system to evaluate the metabolic effects of oncogene(s) on the host microenvironment. A matched set of “normal” and oncogenically transformed epithelial cell lines were co-cultured with human fibroblasts, to determine the “bystander” effects of oncogenes on stromal cells. ROS production and glucose uptake were measured by FACS analysis. In addition, expression of a panel of metabolic protein biomarkers (Caveolin-1, MCT1, and MCT4) was analyzed in parallel. Interestingly, oncogene activation in cancer cells was sufficient to induce the metabolic reprogramming of cancer-associated fibroblasts toward glycolysis, via oxidative stress. Evidence for “metabolic symbiosis” between oxidative cancer cells and glycolytic fibroblasts was provided by MCT1/4 immunostaining. As such, oncogenes drive the establishment of a stromal-epithelial “lactate-shuttle”, to fuel the anabolic growth of cancer cells. Similar results were obtained with two divergent oncogenes (RAS and NFκB), indicating that ROS production and inflammation metabolically converge on the tumor stroma, driving glycolysis and upregulation of MCT4. These findings make stromal MCT4 an attractive target for new drug discovery, as MCT4 is a shared endpoint for the metabolic effects of many oncogenic stimuli. Thus, diverse oncogenes stimulate a common metabolic response in the tumor stroma. Conversely, we also show that fibroblasts protect cancer cells against oncogenic stress and senescence by reducing ROS production in tumor cells. Ras-transformed cells were also able to metabolically reprogram normal adjacent epithelia, indicating that cancer cells can use either fibroblasts or epithelial cells as “partners” for metabolic symbiosis. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) selectively halted mitochondrial biogenesis in Ras-transformed cells, but not in normal epithelia. NAC also blocked stromal induction of MCT4, indicating that NAC effectively functions as an “MCT4

  8. Human papilloma virus infection and psoriasis: Did human papilloma virus infection trigger psoriasis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Sonia P; Gulhane, Sachin; Pandey, Neha; Bisne, Esha

    2015-01-01

    Psoriasis is an autoimmune chronic inflammatory skin disease known to be triggered by streptococcal and HIV infections. However, human papilloma virus infection (HPV) as a triggering factor for the development of psoriasis has not been reported yet. We, hereby report a case of plaque type with inverse psoriasis which probably could have been triggered by genital warts (HPV infection) and discuss the possible pathomechanisms for their coexistence and its management.

  9. Centrosomal Nlp is an oncogenic protein that is gene-amplified in human tumors and causes spontaneous tumorigenesis in transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Shujuan; Liu, Rong; Wang, Yang; Song, Yongmei; Zuo, Lihui; Xue, Liyan; Lu, Ning; Hou, Ning; Wang, Mingrong; Yang, Xiao; Zhan, Qimin

    2010-02-01

    Disruption of mitotic events contributes greatly to genomic instability and results in mutator phenotypes. Indeed, abnormalities of mitotic components are closely associated with malignant transformation and tumorigenesis. Here we show that ninein-like protein (Nlp), a recently identified BRCA1-associated centrosomal protein involved in microtubule nucleation and spindle formation, is an oncogenic protein. Nlp was found to be overexpressed in approximately 80% of human breast and lung carcinomas analyzed. In human lung cancers, this deregulated expression was associated with NLP gene amplification. Further analysis revealed that Nlp exhibited strong oncogenic properties; for example, it conferred to NIH3T3 rodent fibroblasts the capacity for anchorage-independent growth in vitro and tumor formation in nude mice. Consistent with these data, transgenic mice overexpressing Nlp displayed spontaneous tumorigenesis in the breast, ovary, and testicle within 60 weeks. In addition, Nlp overexpression induced more rapid onset of radiation-induced lymphoma. Furthermore, mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) derived from Nlp transgenic mice showed centrosome amplification, suggesting that Nlp overexpression mimics BRCA1 loss. These findings demonstrate that Nlp abnormalities may contribute to genomic instability and tumorigenesis and suggest that Nlp might serve as a potential biomarker for clinical diagnosis and therapeutic target.

  10. Oncogene alterations in endometrial carcinosarcomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biscuola, Michele; Van de Vijver, Koen; Castilla, María Ángeles; Romero-Pérez, Laura; López-García, María Ángeles; Díaz-Martín, Juan; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Oliva, Esther; Palacios Calvo, José

    2013-05-01

    receptor]) in 2 tumors (5.9%) and in EGFR in one (2.9%). Our study evidences mutations in oncogenes in endometrial carcinosarcomas that are targets or modulators of response to specific therapies in other human cancers, with PI3K/AKT being the most frequently altered pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Long-term exposure of MCF-12A normal human breast epithelial cells to ethanol induces epithelial mesenchymal transition and oncogenic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Robert; Vernet, Dolores; Bruhn, Kevin; Vadgama, Jaydutt; Gonzalez-Cadavid, Nestor F

    2016-06-01

    Alcoholism is associated with breast cancer incidence and progression, and moderate chronic consumption of ethanol is a risk factor. The mechanisms involved in alcohol's oncogenic effects are unknown, but it has been speculated that they may be mediated by acetaldehyde. We used the immortalized normal human epithelial breast cell line MCF-12A to determine whether short- or long-term exposure to ethanol or to acetaldehyde, using in vivo compatible ethanol concentrations, induces their oncogenic transformation and/or the acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Cultures of MCF-12A cells were incubated with 25 mM ethanol or 2.5 mM acetaldehyde for 1 week, or with lower concentrations (1.0-2.5 mM for ethanol, 1.0 mM for acetaldehyde) for 4 weeks. In the 4-week incubation, cells were also tested for anchorage-independence, including isolation of soft agar selected cells (SASC) from the 2.5 mM ethanol incubations. Cells were analyzed by immunocytofluorescence, flow cytometry, western blotting, DNA microarrays, RT/PCR, and assays for miRs. We found that short-term exposure to ethanol, but not, in general, to acetaldehyde, was associated with transcriptional upregulation of the metallothionein family genes, alcohol metabolism genes, and genes suggesting the initiation of EMT, but without related phenotypic changes. Long-term exposure to the lower concentrations of ethanol or acetaldehyde induced frank EMT changes in the monolayer cultures and in SASC as demonstrated by changes in cellular phenotype, mRNA expression, and microRNA expression. This suggests that low concentrations of ethanol, with little or no mediation by acetaldehyde, induce EMT and some traits of oncogenic transformation such as anchorage-independence in normal breast epithelial cells.

  12. NHANES 2009-2012 Findings: Association of Sexual Behaviors with Higher Prevalence of Oral Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Infections in U.S. Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaturvedi, Anil K; Graubard, Barry I; Broutian, Tatevik; Pickard, Robert K L; Tong, Zhen-Yue; Xiao, Weihong; Kahle, Lisa; Gillison, Maura L

    2015-06-15

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancers is higher and increasing more rapidly among men than women in the United States for unknown reasons. We compared the epidemiology of oral oncogenic HPV infection between men and women ages 14 to 69 years (N = 9,480) within the U.S. National Health and Nutritional Examination Surveys (NHANES) 2009-2012. HPV presence was detected in oral DNA by PCR. Analyses were stratified by gender and used NHANES sample weights. Oral oncogenic HPV prevalence was higher among men than women (6.6% vs. 1.5%, P men versus 1.54 million women with prevalent infection at any point in time during 2009-2012. Prevalence increased significantly with age, current smoking, and lifetime number of sexual partners for both genders (adjusted Ptrend men had more partners than women (mean = 18 vs. 7, P HPV prevalence was similar for men and women with 0 to 1 lifetime partners, the male-female difference in prevalence significantly increased with number of lifetime partners (adjusted prevalence differences for none, 1, 2-5, 6-10, 11-20, and 20+ partners = 1.0%, 0.5%, 3.0%, 5.7%, 4.6%, and 9.3%, respectively). Importantly, the per-sexual partner increase in prevalence was significantly stronger among men than among women (adjusted synergy index = 3.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-9.7), and this increase plateaued at 25 lifetime partners among men versus 10 partners among women. Our data suggest that the higher burden of oral oncogenic HPV infections and HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancers among men than women arises in part from higher number of lifetime sexual partners and stronger associations with sexual behaviors among men. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Role of DLC1 tumor suppressor gene and MYC oncogene in pathogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma: potential prospects for combined targeted therapeutics (review).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimonjic, Drazen B; Popescu, Nicholas C

    2012-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the third leading cause of cancer death, and its incidence is increasing worldwide in an alarming manner. The development of curative therapy for advanced and metastatic HCC is a high clinical priority. The HCC genome is complex and heterogeneous; therefore, the identification of recurrent genomic and related gene alterations is critical for developing clinical applications for diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy of the disease. This article focuses on recent research progress and our contribution in identifying and deciphering the role of defined genetic alterations in the pathogenesis of HCC. A significant number of genes that promote or suppress HCC cell growth have been identified at the sites of genomic reorganization. Notwithstanding the accumulation of multiple genetic alterations, highly recurrent changes on a single chromosome can alter the expression of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes (TSGs) whose deregulation may be sufficient to drive the progression of normal hepatocytes to malignancy. A distinct and highly recurrent pattern of genomic imbalances in HCC includes the loss of DNA copy number (associated with loss of heterozygosity) of TSG-containing chromosome 8p and gain of DNA copy number or regional amplification of protooncogenes on chromosome 8q. Even though 8p is relatively small, it carries an unusually large number of TSGs, while, on the other side, several oncogenes are dispersed along 8q. Compelling evidence demonstrates that DLC1, a potent TSG on 8p, and MYC oncogene on 8q play a critical role in the pathogenesis of human HCC. Direct evidence for their role in the genesis of HCC has been obtained in a mosaic mouse model. Knockdown of DLC1 helps MYC in the induction of hepatoblast transformation in vitro, and in the development of HCC in vivo. Therapeutic interventions, which would simultaneously target signaling pathways governing both DLC1 and MYC functions in hepatocarcinogenesis, could

  14. Herpes viruses and human papilloma virus in nasal polyposis and controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioannidis, Dimitrios; Lachanas, Vasileios A; Florou, Zoe; Bizakis, John G; Petinaki, Efthymia; Skoulakis, Charalampos E

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is a multifactorial disease entity with an unclear pathogenesis. Contradictory data exist in the literature on the potential implication of viral elements in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. To compare the prevalence of human herpes viruses (1-6) and Human Papilloma Virus in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls. Viral DNA presence was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction application to nasal polyps specimens from 91 chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps patients and nasal turbinate mucosa from 38 healthy controls. Epstein-Barr virus positivity was higher in nasal polyps (24/91; 26.4%) versus controls (4/38; 10.5%), but the difference did not reach significance (p=0.06). Human herpes virus-6 positivity was lower in nasal polyps (13/91; 14.29%) versus controls (10/38; 26.32%, p=0.13). In chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps group, 1 sample was herpes simplex virus-1-positive (1/91; 1.1%), and another was cytomegalovirus-positive (1/91; 1.1%), versus none in controls. No sample was positive for herpes simplex virus-2, varicella-zoster virus, high-risk-human papilloma viruses (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59) and low-risk-human papilloma viruses (6, 11). Differences in Epstein-Barr virus and human herpes virus-6 positivity among patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls are not statistically significant, weakening the likelihood of their implication in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Herpes viruses and human papilloma virus in nasal polyposis and controls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Ioannidis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps is a multifactorial disease entity with an unclear pathogenesis. Contradictory data exist in the literature on the potential implication of viral elements in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis. OBJECTIVE: To compare the prevalence of human herpes viruses (1-6 and Human Papilloma Virus in adult patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls. METHODS: Viral DNA presence was evaluated by real-time polymerase chain reaction application to nasal polyps specimens from 91 chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps patients and nasal turbinate mucosa from 38 healthy controls. RESULTS: Epstein-Barr virus positivity was higher in nasal polyps (24/91; 26.4% versus controls (4/38; 10.5%, but the difference did not reach significance (p = 0.06. Human herpes virus-6 positivity was lower in nasal polyps (13/91; 14.29% versus controls (10/38; 26.32%,p = 0.13. In chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps group, 1 sample was herpes simplex virus-1-positive (1/91; 1.1%, and another was cytomegalovirus-positive (1/91; 1.1%, versus none in controls. No sample was positive for herpes simplex virus-2, varicella-zoster virus, high-risk-human papilloma viruses (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59 and low-risk-human papilloma viruses (6, 11. CONCLUSION: Differences in Epstein-Barr virus and human herpes virus-6 positivity among patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps and healthy controls are not statistically significant, weakening the likelihood of their implication in chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps pathogenesis.

  16. The oncogene EVI1 enhances transcriptional and biological responses of human myeloid cells to all-trans retinoic acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmetz, Birgit; Hackl, Hubert; Slabáková, Eva; Schwarzinger, Ilse; Smějová, Monika; Spittler, Andreas; Arbesu, Itziar; Shehata, Medhat; Souček, Karel; Wieser, Rotraud

    2014-01-01

    The product of the ecotropic virus integration site 1 (EVI1) gene, whose overexpression is associated with a poor prognosis in myeloid leukemias and some epithelial tumors, regulates gene transcription both through direct DNA binding and through modulation of the activity of other sequence specific transcription factors. Previous results from our laboratory have shown that EVI1 influenced transcription regulation in response to the myeloid differentiation inducing agent, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), in a dual manner: it enhanced ATRA induced transcription of the RARβ gene, but repressed the ATRA induction of the EVI1 gene itself. In the present study, we asked whether EVI1 would modulate the ATRA regulation of a larger number of genes, as well as biological responses to this agent, in human myeloid cells. U937 and HL-60 cells ectopically expressing EVI1 through retroviral transduction were subjected to microarray based gene expression analysis, and to assays measuring cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. These experiments showed that EVI1 modulated the ATRA response of several dozens of genes, and in fact reinforced it in the vast majority of cases. A particularly strong synergy between EVI1 and ATRA was observed for GDF15, which codes for a member of the TGF-β superfamily of cytokines. In line with the gene expression results, EVI1 enhanced cell cycle arrest, differentiation, and apoptosis in response to ATRA, and knockdown of GDF15 counteracted some of these effects. The potential clinical implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:25486480

  17. Structure of human POFUT1, its requirement in ligand-independent oncogenic Notch signaling, and functional effects of Dowling-Degos mutations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMillan, Brian J.; Zimmerman, Brandon; Egan, Emily D.; Lofgren, Michael; Xu, Xiang; Hesser, Anthony; Blacklow, Stephen C.

    2017-03-17

    Protein O-fucosyltransferase-1 (POFUT1), which transfers fucose residues to acceptor sites on serine and threonine residues of epidermal growth factor-like repeats of recipient proteins, is essential for Notch signal transduction in mammals. Here, we examine the consequences of POFUT1 loss on the oncogenic signaling associated with certain leukemia-associated mutations of human Notch1, report the structures of human POFUT1 in free and GDP-fucose bound states, and assess the effects of Dowling-Degos mutations on human POFUT1 function. CRISPR-mediated knockout of POFUT1 in U2OS cells suppresses both normal Notch1 signaling, and the ligand-independent signaling associated with leukemogenic mutations of Notch1. Normal and oncogenic signaling are rescued by wild-type POFUT1 but rescue is impaired by an active-site R240A mutation. The overall structure of the human enzyme closely resembles that of the Caenorhabditis elegans protein, with an overall backbone RMSD of 0.93 Å, despite primary sequence identity of only 39% in the mature protein. GDP-fucose binding to the human enzyme induces limited backbone conformational movement, though the side chains of R43 and D244 reorient to make direct contact with the fucose moiety in the complex. The reported Dowling-Degos mutations of POFUT1, except for M262T, fail to rescue Notch1 signaling efficiently in the CRISPR-engineered POFUT1-/- background. Together, these studies identify POFUT1 as a potential target for cancers driven by Notch1 mutations and provide a structural roadmap for its inhibition.

  18. Influenza A virus infection of human Schwann cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joshua; Buchman, Craig A; Fregien, Nevis

    2003-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular neuronitis, vocal fold paralysis and Bell's palsy have been associated with a viral etiology, due to the infection of nerve cells. The goal of this research was to ascertain whether Schwann cells can support infection with human influenza A virus and thereby represent a plausible alternative site for virus-host interaction. Viral infection of Schwann cells may lead to secretion of inflammatory mediators, leukocyte recruitment, demyelination and nerve damage. Cultured human Schwann cells were exposed to human influenza A virus. Infection was assayed at various times post-inoculation (0, 24, 48 and 72 h) using light microscopy, immunocytochemistry and influenza A virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A group of unexposed cells served as controls. Following exposure to the virus, vacuolization, cellular expansion and detachment from the dish were seen as early as 24 h post-inoculation. The exposed cells demonstrated positive immunocytochemical staining for influenza A virus antigen at 24, 48 and 72 h. Using RT-PCR, a sharp rise in influenza A virus-specific mRNA was detected. Human Schwann cells can be infected with human influenza A virus. Further studies will assess the inflammatory response in this model.

  19. Propagation of Computer Virus under Human Intervention: A Dynamical Model

    OpenAIRE

    Chenquan Gan; Xiaofan Yang; Wanping Liu; Qingyi Zhu; Xulong Zhang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the propagation behavior of computer virus under human intervention. A dynamical model describing the spread of computer virus, under which a susceptible computer can become recovered directly and an infected computer can become susceptible directly, is proposed. Through a qualitative analysis of this model, it is found that the virus-free equilibrium is globally asymptotically stable when the basic reproduction number R0≤1, whereas the viral equilibrium is globally asympt...

  20. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Espinosa, Benjamín; Moro-Rodríguez, Ernesto; Álvarez-Fernández, Emilio

    2013-12-10

    We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here: http

  1. Inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo with lentiviral-vector delivered short hairpin RNA targeting human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, W; Putral, L; Hengst, K; Minto, K; Saunders, N A; Leggatt, G; McMillan, N A J

    2006-11-01

    In this study, we investigated the suppressive effect of a short hairpin RNA delivered by a lentiviral vector (LV-shRNA) against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 E6 on the expression of the oncogenes E6 and E7 in cervical cancer HeLa cells both in vitro and in vivo. The LV-shRNA effectively delivered the shRNA to HeLa cells and lead to a dose-dependent reduction of E7 protein and the stabilization of E6 target proteins, p53 and p21. Low-dose infection of HeLa cells with LV-shRNA caused reduced cell growth and the induction of senescence, whereas a high-dose infection resulted in specific cell death via apoptosis. Transplant of HeLa cells infected with a low dose of LV-shRNA into Rag-/- mice significantly reduced the tumor weight, whereas transplant of cells infected with a high dose resulted in a complete loss of tumor growth. Systemic delivery of LV-shRNA into mice with established HeLa cell lung metastases led to a significant reduction in the number of tumor nodules. Our data collectively suggest that lentiviral delivery is an effective way to achieve stable suppression of E6/E7 oncogene expression and induce inhibition of tumor growth both in vitro and in vivo. These results encourage further investigation of this form of RNA interference as a promising treatment for cervical cancer.

  2. Human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus and syphilis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and syphilis infections among longdistance truck drivers has been well documented globally, such data are sparse from Africa, and there has been no such data from Ghana. This study carried out between the months ...

  3. Sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three hundred and seven (307) healthy blood donors aged 18 – 55 years were used to determine the sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) and Hepatitis B virus (HBV) in Yola, Nigeria. The association between donors' age, occupation and marital status and the prevalence of the infections among blood ...

  4. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus infection among tuberculosis suspect patients in Accra, Ghana, ... man immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and tuberculosis. (TB) is well known. A previous study showed a 16,8 % .... HIV~1 and HIV-(Z; Fujirebio Inc, TokyoJapan) and con-- firmed with the synthetic peptide based ...

  5. The Ebola Virus and Human Rights Concerns in Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    2015-09-03

    Sep 3, 2015 ... In the wake of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) that is ravaging parts of Africa certain measures are being taken by governments to ... Dans le sillage de la maladie à virus Ebola (MVE) qui ravage certaines parties de l'Afrique sont les mesures prises par les ..... Z, Fineberg H. Health and Human Rights. Health.

  6. Awareness and practice of Human Immunodeficiency Virus And ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human Immunodeficiency Virus(HIV) and Hepatitis B Virus(HBV) infections are global viral diseases with various seroprevalence rates in different parts of the world. They share similar modes of transmission and are very important in Transfusion Medicine. Aim/Objective: To determine the level of awareness ...

  7. Sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and hepatitis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sero-prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus and hepatitis viruses and their correlation with CD4 T-cell lymphocyte counts in pregnant women in the Buea Health District of Cameroon. ... Prior to this study, very few studies in Cameroon have addressed co-infection of HIV and hepatitis in pregnancy. The aim of this ...

  8. Hepatitis B Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus co-infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B Virus(HBV) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus(HIV) share similar properties such as modes of transmission. This study was therefore designed to find out the prevalence of HBV/HIV co-infection in Zawan village. Three hundred subjects were recruited into the study through simple random sampling method ...

  9. Companion Animals as a Source of Viruses for Human Beings and Food Production Animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reperant, L A; Brown, I H; Haenen, O L; de Jong, M D; Osterhaus, A D M E; Papa, A; Rimstad, E; Valarcher, J-F; Kuiken, T

    2016-07-01

    Companion animals comprise a wide variety of species, including dogs, cats, horses, ferrets, guinea pigs, reptiles, birds and ornamental fish, as well as food production animal species, such as domestic pigs, kept as companion animals. Despite their prominent place in human society, little is known about the role of companion animals as sources of viruses for people and food production animals. Therefore, we reviewed the literature for accounts of infections of companion animals by zoonotic viruses and viruses of food production animals, and prioritized these viruses in terms of human health and economic importance. In total, 138 virus species reportedly capable of infecting companion animals were of concern for human and food production animal health: 59 of these viruses were infectious for human beings, 135 were infectious for food production mammals and birds, and 22 were infectious for food production fishes. Viruses of highest concern for human health included hantaviruses, Tahyna virus, rabies virus, West Nile virus, tick-borne encephalitis virus, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus, Aichi virus, European bat lyssavirus, hepatitis E virus, cowpox virus, G5 rotavirus, influenza A virus and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Viruses of highest concern for food production mammals and birds included bluetongue virus, African swine fever virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, lumpy skin disease virus, Rift Valley fever virus, porcine circovirus, classical swine fever virus, equine herpesvirus 9, peste des petits ruminants virus and equine infectious anaemia virus. Viruses of highest concern for food production fishes included cyprinid herpesvirus 3 (koi herpesvirus), viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus. Of particular concern as sources of zoonotic or food production animal viruses were domestic carnivores, rodents and food production animals kept as companion animals. The current list of viruses provides an objective

  10. The human Rgr oncogene is overexpressed in T cell malignancies and induces transformation by acting as a GEF for Ras and Ral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osei-Sarfo, Kwame; Martello, Laura; Ibrahim, Sherif; Pellicer, Angel

    2011-01-01

    The Ras superfamily of GTPases is involved in the modification of many cellular processes including cellular motility, proliferation and differentiation. Our laboratory has previously identified the RalGDS related (Rgr) oncogene in a DMBA-induced rabbit squamous cell carcinoma and its human orthologue, hRgr. In the present study, we analyzed the expression levels of the human hRgr transcript in a panel of human hematopoietic malignancies and found that a truncated form (diseased-truncated; Dtr-hrgr) was significantly overexpressed in many T-cell derived neoplasms. Although the Rgr proto-oncogene belongs to the RalGDS family of guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), we show that upon the introduction of hRgr into fibroblast cell lines it is able to elicit the activation of both Ral and Ras GTPases. Moreover, in vitro guanine nucleotide exchange assays confirm that hRgr promotes Ral and Ras activation through GDP dissociation, which is a critical characteristic of GEF proteins. hRgr has guanine nucleotide exchange activity for both small GTPases and this activity was reduced when a point mutation within the catalytic domain (CDC25) of the protein, (cd) Dtr-hRgr, was utilized. These observations prompted the analysis of the biological effects of hRgr and (cd) hRgr expression in cultured cells. Here, we show that hRgr increases proliferation in low serum, increases invasion, reduces anchorage dependence, and promotes the progression into S phase of the cell cycle; properties that are abolished or severely reduced in the presence of the catalytic dead mutant. We conclude that the ability of hRgr to activate both Ral and Ras is responsible for its transformation-inducing phenotype and it could be an important contributor in the development of some T cell malignancies. PMID:21441953

  11. Microbiological diagnosis of human papilloma virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Lindemann, Maria Luisa; Pérez-Castro, Sonia; Rodríguez-Iglesias, Manuel; Pérez-Gracia, Maria Teresa

    2017-11-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the leading cause of sexually transmitted infection worldwide. This virus generally causes benign lesions, such as genital warts, but persistent infection may lead to cervical cancer, anal cancer, vaginal cancer, and oropharyngeal cancer, although less frequently. Cervical cancer is a severe disease with a high mortality in some countries. Screening with cytology has been very successful in the last few years, but nowadays there are numerous studies that confirm that cytology should be replaced with the detection of HPV as a first line test in population based screening. There are several commercially available FDA approved tests for screening of cervical cancer. A new strategy, based on individual detection of the high risk genotypes HPV16 and HPV18, present in 70% of cervical cancer biopsies, has been proposed by some experts, and is going to be implemented in most countries in the future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. [Cerebral infarction in human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanche, P; Toulon, P; de La Blanchardière, A; Sicard, D

    1995-06-03

    Patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) appear to have a high risk of ischaemic cerebral events. We observed two cases of cerebral infarction in patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). In the first case, a 38-year-old homosexual with no cardiovascular risk other than smoking presented with rapidly progressive hemiparesia. Brain CT-scan visualized two infarcts in the territory of the right sylvian artery and the arteriography an occlusion of the internal carotid artery. In the second, a 37-year-old homosexual, hospitalization was required for a left-sided pure sensitive epilepsy seizure. There was no cardiovascular risk other than smoking. Magnetic resonance imaging showed parietal ischaemia and thrombus in the left atrium without atrial hypertrophy was seen at transoesophageal echocardiography. In both cases, there was no evidence of endocarditis, dissection of the neck vessels or disseminated intravascular coagulation nor of associated viral or bacterial infectious complication of AIDS. Angiographic findings eliminated cerebral vascularitis. Among the perturbed haemostasis factors previously reported in HIV+ patients, we observed free proteins S deficiency (68 and 43%) and heparin cofactor II deficiency (54 and 40%). Serum albumin was 33 and 32 g/l respectively. Outcome was favourable in both cases with anticoagulant therapy. These coagulation anomalies would not appear sufficient to explain cerebral infarction. Other mechanisms including immune complexed deposition, direct HIV toxicity for endothelial cells or the effect of cytokines on smooth muscles fibres and fibroblasts are probably more important causal factors.

  13. Human papilloma virus infection prior to coitarche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerfler, Daniela; Bernhaus, Astrid; Kottmel, Andrea; Sam, Christine; Koelle, Dieter; Joura, Elmar A

    2009-05-01

    The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence and the natural course of anogenital human papilloma virus (HPV) infections in girls prior to coitarche attending an outpatient gynecological unit. Specimens were taken from the anogenital region of 114 unselected 4-15 year old girls who were referred consecutively for various gynecological problems. Four girls were excluded because of sexual abuse. Low-risk HPV-deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was detected in 4 girls (3.6%) and high-risk HPV DNA in 15 children (13.6%). Two girls testing positive for HPV DNA had clinical apparent warts. After 1 year, 2 children had persistent high-risk HPV DNA, and in 1 case we found a switch from high-risk to low-risk HPV DNA. Subclinical genital low- and high-risk HPV infections are common in girls without any history of sexual abuse or sexual activity. We found persistence of genital HPV infection in children, which could be a reservoir for HPV-associated diseases later in life.

  14. Plasmoblastic lymphoma associated with human immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horváth, Emoke; Krenács, L; Bagdi, Eniko; Pávai, Z; Macarie, I; Nagy, Elod-Erno; Demian, Smaranda

    2008-01-01

    Plasmoblastic lymphoma (PBL) is a subtype of the diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, typically present as extranodal disease associated with human immune deficiency virus (HIV) infection. PBLs are often the initial manifestation of AIDS. Here we present a case of PBL concerning the oral cavity. A 34-year-old woman presented a tumor in the oral cavity that involved the maxilla and gingiva (confirmed by CT-scan). The gingival biopsy showed a massive infiltration by large lymphoid cells with round, vesicular nuclei, prominent nucleoli, fine chromatin and an significant amount of basophilic cytoplasm which express CD79a, CD138, cytoplasmic lambda light chain and LCA, without staining for CD20, CD38, CD3 and CTK. Serological analysis confirmed HIV positivity. PBLs lack most B-lineage markers, but many express CD79a in at least some of the cells, therefore generate difficulties in differential diagnosis. Overall assessment and correlation of the histopathological and immunohistochemical features with the clinical findings and serology investigation are the most helpful diagnostic tools and can lead to the final diagnosis.

  15. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Arikan

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The incidence and prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection in women of child-bearing age continue to increase both internationally and in Canada. The care of HIV-infected pregnant women is complex, and multiple issues must be addressed, including the current and future health of the woman, minimization of the risk of maternal-infant HIV transmission, and maintenance of the well-being of the fetus and neonate. Vertical transmission of HIV can occur in utero, intrapartum and postpartum, but current evidence suggests that the majority of transmission occurs toward end of term, or during labour and delivery. Several maternal and obstetrical factors influence transmission rates, which can be reduced by optimal medical and obstetrical care. Zidovudine therapy has been demonstrated to reduce maternal-infant transmission significantly, but several issues, including the short and long term safety of antiretrovirals and the optimal use of combination antiretroviral therapy in pregnancy, remain to be defined. It is essential that health care workers providing care to these women fully understand the natural history of HIV disease in pregnancy, the factors that affect vertical transmission and the management issues during pregnancy. Close collaboration among a multidisciplinary team of knowledgeable health professionals and, most importantly, the woman herself can improve both maternal and infant outcomes.

  16. Human papilloma virus (HPV) molecular diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroupis, Christos; Vourlidis, Nikolaos

    2011-11-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is becoming a menace worldwide, especially to the developing world, due to its involvement in a variety of malignancies, with cervical cancer being the most important and prevalent. There are many HPV types; HPV 16/18 are the most carcinogenic but few others are also characterized as high-risk (HR). They can cause a variety of low- or high-grade cellular abnormalities, most frequently detected in a routine Pap test. Most infections clear within 2 years, however, a minority persists and potentially could progress to cervical cancer. Molecular tests detecting HPV DNA, RNA or proteins are now being available either commercially or in-house developed. DNA detection is nowadays an established tool for diagnosis and monitoring of HPV-related disease, however, there is lack of a reference method and standardization with reference materials. The various available test formats create confusion on which molecular test to choose and what are its limitations. Therefore, the need for lab accreditation and participation in proficiency testing has to be stressed. Novel HPV biomarkers (RNA, protein etc.) are now intensively examined for their inclusion as adjunct tools. Recently, developed prophylactic vaccines for HPV 16/18 have already proven safe and efficient and raise high expectations for the complete eradication of these types in the future.

  17. Virus trap in human serum albumin nanotube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Teruyuki; Qu, Xue; Ihara, Hiromi; Fujihara, Mitsuhiro; Azuma, Hiroshi; Ikeda, Hisami

    2011-03-16

    Infectious hepatitis B virus (HBV), namely Dane particles (DPs), consists of a core nucleocapsid including genome DNA covered with an envelope of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). We report the synthesis, structure, and HBV-trapping capability of multilayered protein nanotubes having an anti-HBsAg antibody (HBsAb) layer as an internal wall. The nanotubes were prepared using an alternating layer-by-layer assembly of human serum albumin (HSA) and oppositely charged poly-L-arginine (PLA) into a nanoporous polycarbonate (PC) membrane (pore size, 400 nm), followed by depositions of poly-L-glutamic acid (PLG) and HBsAb. Subsequent dissolution of the PC template yielded (PLA/HSA)(2)PLA/PLG/HBsAb nanotubes (AbNTs). The SEM measurements revealed the formation of uniform hollow cylinders with a 414 ± 16 nm outer diameter and 59 ± 4 nm wall thickness. In an aqueous medium, the swelled nanotubes captured noninfectious spherical small particles of HBsAg (SPs); the binding constant was 3.5 × 10(7) M(-1). Surprisingly, the amount of genome DNA in the HBV solution (HBsAg-positive plasma or DP-rich solution) decreased dramatically after incubation with the AbNTs (-3.9 log order), which implies that the infectious DPs were completely entrapped into the one-dimensional pore space of the AbNTs.

  18. Landscape of DNA Virus Associations across Human Malignant Cancers: Analysis of 3,775 Cases Using RNA-Seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannir, Nizar M.; Williams, Michelle D.; Chen, Yunxin; Yao, Hui; Zhang, Jianping; Thompson, Erika J.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Medeiros, L. Jeffrey; Weinstein, John N.

    2013-01-01

    Elucidation of tumor-DNA virus associations in many cancer types has enhanced our knowledge of fundamental oncogenesis mechanisms and provided a basis for cancer prevention initiatives. RNA-Seq is a novel tool to comprehensively assess such associations. We interrogated RNA-Seq data from 3,775 malignant neoplasms in The Cancer Genome Atlas database for the presence of viral sequences. Viral integration sites were also detected in expressed transcripts using a novel approach. The detection capacity of RNA-Seq was compared to available clinical laboratory data. Human papillomavirus (HPV) transcripts were detected using RNA-Seq analysis in head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma, uterine endometrioid carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma of the lung. Detection of HPV by RNA-Seq correlated with detection by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry in squamous cell carcinoma tumors of the head and neck. Hepatitis B virus and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were detected using RNA-Seq in hepatocellular carcinoma and gastric carcinoma tumors, respectively. Integration sites of viral genes and oncogenes were detected in cancers harboring HPV or hepatitis B virus but not in EBV-positive gastric carcinoma. Integration sites of expressed viral transcripts frequently involved known coding areas of the host genome. No DNA virus transcripts were detected in acute myeloid leukemia, cutaneous melanoma, low- and high-grade gliomas of the brain, and adenocarcinomas of the breast, colon and rectum, lung, prostate, ovary, kidney, and thyroid. In conclusion, this study provides a large-scale overview of the landscape of DNA viruses in human malignant cancers. While further validation is necessary for specific cancer types, our findings highlight the utility of RNA-Seq in detecting tumor-associated DNA viruses and identifying viral integration sites that may unravel novel mechanisms of cancer pathogenesis. PMID:23740984

  19. Theories about evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus in primates and humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breno Frederico de Carvalho Dominguez Souza

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: Some hypotheses about the evolutionary origins of human hepatitis B virus have been debated since the ‘90s. One theory suggested a New World origin because of the phylogenetic co-segregation between some New World human hepatitis B virus genotypes F and H and woolly monkey human hepatitis B virus in basal sister-relationship to the Old World non-human primates and human hepatitis B virus variants. Another theory suggests an Old World origin of human hepatitis B virus, and that it would have been spread following prehistoric human migrations over 100,000 years ago. A third theory suggests a co-speciation of human hepatitis B virus in non-human primate hosts because of the proximity between the phylogeny of Old and New World non-human primate and their human hepatitis B virus variants. The importance of further research, related to the subject in South American wild fauna, is paramount and highly relevant for understanding the origin of human hepatitis B virus.

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and female lower genital tract malignancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuhn, L; Sun, X W; Wright, T C

    1999-02-01

    The risk of lower genital tract neoplasia is increased in women infected with HIV. This has been best demonstrated in cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions, but has also been observed in vulvar and perianal intraepithelial lesions in some studies. Alterations in the prevalence and natural history of human papillomavirus infections of the lower genital tract appear to account for much of the increase. HIV-infected women are approximately four times more likely to be infected with human papillomavirus (including infection with high oncogenic risk human papillomavirus types) than are HIV-uninfected women, and these infections are more likely to be persistent. Human papilomavirus-associated lesions may be more difficult to treat in HIV-infected women. These data highlight the need to develop effective cervical cancer prevention programs for HIV-infected women.

  1. Rome Consensus Conference - statement; human papilloma virus diseases in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenzi, Andrea; Mirone, Vincenzo; Gentile, Vincenzo; Bartoletti, Riccardo; Ficarra, Vincenzo; Foresta, Carlo; Mariani, Luciano; Mazzoli, Sandra; Parisi, Saverio G; Perino, Antonio; Picardo, Mauro; Zotti, Carla Maria

    2013-02-07

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a very resistant, ubiquitous virus that can survive in the environment without a host. The decision to analyse HPV-related diseases in males was due to the broad dissemination of the virus, and, above all, by the need to stress the importance of primary and secondary prevention measures (currently available for women exclusively). The objective of the Consensus Conference was to make evidence-based recommendations that were designed to facilitate the adoption of a standard approach in clinical practice in Italy. The Sponsoring Panel put a series of questions to the members of the Scientific Committee who prepared a summary of the currently available information, relevant for each question, after the review and grading of the existing scientific literature. The summaries were presented to a Jury, also called multidisciplinary Consensus Panel, who drafted a series of recommendations. The prevalence of HPV in males ranges between 1.3-72.9%;. The prevalence curve in males is much higher than that in females and does not tend to decline with age. Women appear to have a higher probability of acquiring HPV genotypes associated with a high oncogenic risk, whereas in males the probability of acquiring low- or high-risk genotypes is similar. The HPV-related diseases that affect males are anogenital warts and cancers of the penis, anus and oropharynx. The quadrivalent vaccine against HPV has proved to be effective in preventing external genital lesions in males aged 16-26 years in 90.4%; (95%; CI: 69.2-98.1) of cases. It has also proved to be effective in preventing precancerous anal lesions in 77.5%; (95%; CI: 39.6-93.3) of cases in a per-protocol analysis and in 91.7%; (95%; CI: 44.6-99.8) of cases in a post-hoc analysis. Early ecological studies demonstrate reduction of genital warts in vaccinated females and some herd immunity in males when vaccine coverage is high, although males who have sex with males gained no benefit at all. Males with

  2. Sudden cardiac death in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tseng, Zian H; Secemsky, Eric A; Dowdy, David; Vittinghoff, Eric; Moyers, Brian; Wong, Joseph K; Havlir, Diane V; Hsue, Priscilla Y

    2012-01-01

    ...) in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. As the HIV-infected population ages, cardiovascular disease prevalence and mortality are increasing, but the incidence and features of SCD have not yet been described...

  3. Cardiovascular implications from untreated human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baker, Jason V; Lundgren, Jens D

    2011-01-01

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become an important cause of morbidity and mortality among individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection with access to antiretroviral medications, as the risk for AIDS has fallen and life expectancy improved. Traditional CVD risk...

  4. parental acceptance of human papilloma virus vaccine for their pre

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2011-05-05

    May 5, 2011 ... PARENTAL ACCEPTANCE OF HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS VACCINE FOR THEIR PRE-PUBERTAL AND TEENAGE. DAUGHTERS. Omondi-Ogutu .... AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL. 165. Table 1. Demographic profile of respondents. Demographic of Subjects. N. Percentage. Respondent. Father. 51.

  5. Using Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) As Surrogate for Human Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    This test is designed to validate virucidal effectiveness claims for a product to be registered as a virucide. It determines the potential of the test agent to disinfect hard surfaces contaminated with human Hepatitis C virus (HCV).

  6. Dengue Virus Coinfection in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-1-Infected Patients on the West Coast of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza-Gómez, Francisco; Delgado-Enciso, Iván; Valle-Reyes, Salvador; Ochoa-Jiménez, Rodolfo; Arechiga-Ramírez, Conrado; Gámez-Arroyo, José L; Vázquez-Campuzano, Roberto; Guzmán-Bracho, Carmen; Vásquez, Clemente; López-Lemus, Uriel A

    2017-09-01

    Dengue virus infection in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients is not well studied. Previous reports suggest a transitory inhibition of the HIV-1 viral load, as well as a benign clinical progression of dengue. The follow-up of six HIV-1-infected patients, diagnosed and hospitalized with dengue virus infection in the State of Colima, Mexico, was carried out to analyze the progression of this viral coinfection. The presence of dengue virus serotype 1 was confirmed through molecular tests. No severe complications were observed in any of the patients during dengue virus infection. Significant alteration of the HIV-1 viral loads was not observed during dengue virus infection and 6 months after coinfection. Further studies are required to understand the pathology, as well as the clinical course, of these viral coinfections.

  7. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus — hepatitis B virus co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Azhani Mandiwana

    thirds of new HIV infections by 2020 and to reduce 90% of new cases of chronic hepatitis by 2030.1 Worldwide, about 36.9 million people live with HIV; of these 2.6 million are co-infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV).2,3 Primary modes of the HIV–HBV co- infection transmission include sexual contact, injection drug use,.

  8. Seroprevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus, Hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigeria is also endemic for hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, a virus that shares similar transmission routes with HIV.[4]. Over 2 billion of the world's population have been exposed to HBV and an estimated 387 million of these are now chronically infected with a rate of 10 million new carriers each year.[5] Approximately, 13% ...

  9. Malignancies and infection due to the human immunodeficiency virus. Are these emerging diseases?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Ortega, M E

    2017-09-02

    Since the start of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic, tumour disease among patients has been significant. The collection of malignancies can be divided primarily into 2 groups: those associated with HIV (all of which are related to viral diseases) and those not associated with HIV (only some of which are associated with viral diseases). The origin of these malignancies is multifactorial, and the main causes that have led to an increase in tumour disease are immunosuppression, coinfection with oncogenic viruses and life prolongation secondary to the use of antiretroviral therapy. Establishing the general characteristics of the undiagnosed AIDS tumours is difficult, mainly because they are a highly heterogeneous group formed by malignancies of a diverse nature. The treatments do not differ from those used in the general population, although the management can be more difficult due to the late diagnosis, drug interactions and associated comorbidities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  10. Amino acid sequence homology between protein products of oncogenes and hormones (v-myc--gastrin and oxytocin; v-sis--secretin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korec, E; Hlozánek, I; Korcová, H; Simůnek, J

    1985-01-01

    Computer comparisons of amino acid sequences from 8 retroviral oncogenes and 26 protein hormones were done with respect to structure similarity and so-called uninterrupted structure similarity. Sequence homology was found between v-myc, the transforming protein of MC29 virus, and human gastrin and oxytocin on the one hand, and between v-sis, the transforming protein of simian sarcoma virus, and secretin on the other.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus and Burkitt lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowe, Martin; Fitzsimmons, Leah; Bell, Andrew I

    2014-01-01

    In 1964, a new herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), was discovered in cultured tumor cells derived from a Burkitt lymphoma (BL) biopsy taken from an African patient. This was a momentous event that reinvigorated research into viruses as a possible cause of human cancers. Subsequent studies demonstrated that EBV was a potent growth-transforming agent for primary B cells, and that all cases of BL carried characteristic chromosomal translocations resulting in constitutive activation of the c-MYC oncogene. These results hinted at simple oncogenic mechanisms that would make Burkitt lymphoma paradigmatic for cancers with viral etiology. In reality, the pathogenesis of this tumor is rather complicated with regard to both the contribution of the virus and the involvement of cellular oncogenes. Here, we review the current understanding of the roles of EBV and c-MYC in the pathogenesis of BL and the implications for new therapeutic strategies to treat this lymphoma. PMID:25418195

  12. Drosophila as a genetic model for studying pathogenic human viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tamara T; Allen, Amanda L; Bardin, Joseph E; Christian, Megan N; Daimon, Kansei; Dozier, Kelsey D; Hansen, Caom L; Holcomb, Lisa M; Ahlander, Joseph

    2012-02-05

    Viruses are infectious particles whose viability is dependent on the cells of living organisms, such as bacteria, plants, and animals. It is of great interest to discover how viruses function inside host cells in order to develop therapies to treat virally infected organisms. The fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster is an excellent model system for studying the molecular mechanisms of replication, amplification, and cellular consequences of human viruses. In this review, we describe the advantages of using Drosophila as a model system to study human viruses, and highlight how Drosophila has been used to provide unique insight into the gene function of several pathogenic viruses. We also propose possible directions for future research in this area. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Function of oncogenes in cancer development: a changing paradigm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicente-Dueñas, Carolina; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Cobaleda, Cesar; Sánchez-García, Isidro

    2013-05-29

    Tumour-associated oncogenes induce unscheduled proliferation as well as genomic and chromosomal instability. According to current models, therapeutic strategies that block oncogene activity are likely to selectively target tumour cells. However, recent evidences have revealed that oncogenes are only essential for the proliferation of some specific tumour cell types, but not all. Indeed, the latest studies of the interactions between the oncogene and its target cell have shown that oncogenes contribute to cancer development not only by inducing proliferation but also by developmental reprogramming of the epigenome. This provides the first evidence that tumorigenesis can be initiated by stem cell reprogramming, and uncovers a new role for oncogenes in the origin of cancer. Here we analyse these evidences and propose an updated model of oncogene function that can explain the full range of genotype-phenotype associations found in human cancer. Finally, we discuss how this vision opens new avenues for developing novel anti-cancer interventions.

  14. [Generation of recombinant human antibodies for EV71 virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Li-Na; Zhang, Li; Zhang, Fu-Shun; Li, Chuan; Zhang, Quan-Fu; Li, De-Xin; Liang, Mi-Fang

    2011-06-01

    To obtain recombinant human anti-EV71 antibodies from a EV71-associated hand-foot-and-mouth disease patient-derived antibody phage library. A combinatorial human scFv library to enterovirus 71 (EV71) virus was constructed using antibody genes harvested from the blood of EV71 virus patients. The library was panned and selected by using purified VP1 protein of EV71 virus with phage display. After that the specific antibody was converted to full human IgG antibody with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. One unique human scFv antibody specific for EV71 virus VP1 protein was obtained by ELISA, IFA and analysis of the antibody DNA sequence. The specific anti-VP1 human scFv antibody was converted to full human IgG antibody with recombinant baculovirus/insect cell system. The full human IgG antibody was tested in vitro for EV71 virus neutralization, resulting in no neutralizing activity with EV71 A type and EV71 C4 subtype. The obtained human anti-EV71 antibodies without neutralizing activity laid the foundation for diagnosis of human EV71-associated hand-foot-and-mouth disease.

  15. Survival and Death Signals Can Be Used to Predict when Oncogene Inactivation Will Elicit Oncogene Addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuoc T.; Bendapudi, Pavan K.; Lin, H. Jill; Choi, Peter; Koh, Shan; Chen, Joy; Horng, George; Hughes, Nicholas P.; Schwartz, Lawrence H.; Miller, Vincent A.; Kawashima, Toshiyuki; Kitamura, Toshio; Paik, David; Felsher, Dean W.

    2012-01-01

    Cancers can exhibit dramatic tumor regression following oncogene inhibition through the phenomenon of “oncogene addiction”. The ability to predict when a tumor will exhibit oncogene addiction would be useful in the development of targeted therapeutics. Oncogene addiction is likely the consequence of many cellular programs. However, we reasoned that many of these inputs may converge on aggregate survival and death signals. To test this, we measured the sequence of changes that occur upon oncogene inactivation in conditional genetically engineered mouse models of K-rasG12D- or MYC-induced lung tumors and lymphoma. We combined quantitative imaging with an in situ analysis of biomarkers of proliferation and apoptosis. Indeed, oncogene addiction could be modeled as differential changes in intracellular survival and death signals following oncogene inactivation. Our model used different imaging methods (CT and bioluminescence imaging) and histochemical markers of proliferation and apoptosis (Ki-67 and caspase 3) to blindly predict the differential in dynamics of several pro-survival and pro-death signaling factors (phosphorylated Erk1/2, Akt1, Stat3/5 and p38) that contribute to the aggregate survival and death signals. The model was predictive of different oncogenes (K-rasG12D and MYC) in multiple tumor types (lung and lymphoma). Furthermore, we could predict the influence of specific genetic lesions (p53-/-, Stat3-d358L and myr-Akt1) on tumor regression upon oncogene inactivation. Finally, our model could utilize quantitative imaging data to predict both EGFR genotype and progression-free survival in human patients with lung cancer shortly after the initiation of treatment with the targeted therapy erlotinib. Hence, the consequences of oncogene inactivation can be accurately modeled based on a relatively small number of parameters that may predict when targeted therapeutics will elicit oncogene addiction. PMID:21974937

  16. Human coronavirus NL63, a new respiratory virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Hoek, Lia; Pyrc, Krzysztof; Berkhout, Ben

    2006-01-01

    From the mid-1960s onwards, it was believed that only two human coronavirus species infect humans: HCoV-229E and HCoV-OC43. Then, in 2003, a novel member of the coronavirus family was introduced into the human population: SARS-CoV, causing an aggressive lung disease. Fortunately, this virus was soon

  17. Human Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Confiscated Gorilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Gardner-Roberts, David; Kinani, Jean-Felix; Spelman, Lucy; Barry, Peter A.; Cranfield, Michael R.; Lowenstine, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, we detected human herpes simplex virus type 1, which caused stomatitis, in a juvenile confiscated eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) that had a high degree of direct contact with human caretakers. Our findings confirm that pathogens can transfer between nonhuman primate hosts and humans. PMID:25341185

  18. Regulation of the equilibrium between G-quadruplex and duplex DNA in promoter of human c-myc oncogene by a pyrene derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenjiang; He, Xiangwei; Yuan, Gu

    2011-12-01

    It has been established that the equilibrium between duplex and G-quadruplex of the nuclease hypersensitivity element III1 (NHE III1) in human c-myc promoter is linked with this gene's transcription. Using NMR and ESI-MS, we have found a pyrene derivative, DMAPP, is able to modulate this equilibrium and, thus, might have the potential to regulate this oncogene's transcription. DMAPP has shown as a G-quadruplex binding agent and could induce c-myc G-quadruplex formation out of duplex. These results provide new clue for rational drug design to target transcription control of c-myc. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Nipah virus: an emergent paramyxovirus causing severe encephalitis in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, William J; Harcourt, Brian H; Bowden, Nadine; Rota, Paul A

    2005-10-01

    Nipah virus is a recently emergent paramyxovirus that is capable of causing severe disease in both humans and animals. The first outbreak of Nipah virus occurred in Malaysia and Singapore in 1999 and, more recently, outbreaks were detected in Bangladesh. In humans, Nipah virus causes febrile encephalitis with respiratory syndrome that has a high mortality rate. The reservoir for Nipah virus is believed to be fruit bats, and humans are infected by contact with infected bats or by contact with an intermediate animal host such as pigs. Person to person spread of the virus has also been described. Nipah virus retains many of the genetic and biologic properties found in other paramyxoviruses, though it also has several unique characteristics. However, the virologic characteristics that allow the virus to cause severe disease over a broad host range, and the epidemiologic, environmental and virologic features that favor transmission to humans are unknown. This review summarizes what is known about the virology, epidemiology, pathology, diagnosis and control of this novel pathogen.

  20. Critical role of the virus-encoded microRNA-155 ortholog in the induction of Marek's disease lymphomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuguang Zhao

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Notwithstanding the well-characterised roles of a number of oncogenes in neoplastic transformation, microRNAs (miRNAs are increasingly implicated in several human cancers. Discovery of miRNAs in several oncogenic herpesviruses such as KSHV has further highlighted the potential of virus-encoded miRNAs to contribute to their oncogenic capabilities. Nevertheless, despite the identification of several possible cancer-related genes as their targets, the direct in vivo role of virus-encoded miRNAs in neoplastic diseases such as those induced by KSHV is difficult to demonstrate in the absence of suitable models. However, excellent natural disease models of rapid-onset Marek's disease (MD lymphomas in chickens allow examination of the oncogenic potential of virus-encoded miRNAs. Using viruses modified by reverse genetics of the infectious BAC clone of the oncogenic RB-1B strain of MDV, we show that the deletion of the six-miRNA cluster 1 from the viral genome abolished the oncogenicity of the virus. This loss of oncogenicity appeared to be primarily due to the single miRNA within the cluster, miR-M4, the ortholog of cellular miR-155, since its deletion or a 2-nucleotide mutation within its seed region was sufficient to inhibit the induction of lymphomas. The definitive role of this miR-155 ortholog in oncogenicity was further confirmed by the rescue of oncogenic phenotype by revertant viruses that expressed either the miR-M4 or the cellular homolog gga-miR-155. This is the first demonstration of the direct in vivo role of a virus-encoded miRNA in inducing tumors in a natural infection model. Furthermore, the use of viruses deleted in miRNAs as effective vaccines against virulent MDV challenge, enables the prospects of generating genetically defined attenuated vaccines.

  1. Activation of the interleukin-32 pro-inflammatory pathway in response to human papillomavirus infection and over-expressionof interleukin-32 controls the expression of the humanpapillomavirus oncogene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sojung; Kim, Jung-Hee; Kim, Heejong; Kang, Jeong Woo; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Yang, Young; Kim, Jinman; Park, JongSup; Park, SurNie; Hong, JinTae; Yoon, Do-Young

    2011-01-01

    High-risk variants of human papillomavirus (HPV) induce cervical cancer by persistent infection, and are regarded as the principal aetiological factor in this malignancy. The pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-32 (IL-32) is present at substantial levels in cervical cancer tissues and in HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. In this study, we identified the mechanism by which the high-risk HPV-16 E7 oncogene induces IL-32 expression in cervical cancer cells. We used antisense transfection, over-expression, or knock-down of IL-32 to assess the effects of the HPV-16 E7 oncogene on IL-32 expression in cervical cancer cells. Cyclo-oxygenase 2 (COX-2) inhibitor treatment was conducted, and the expression levels, as well as the promoter activities, of IL-32 and COX-2 were evaluated in human HPV-positive cervical cancer cell lines. E7 antisense treatment reduced the expression levels and promoter activities of COX-2, which is constitutively expressed in HPV-infected cells. Constitutively expressed IL-32 was also inhibited by E7 antisense treatment. Moreover, IL-32 expression was blocked by the application of the selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS398, whereas COX-2 over-expression resulted in increased IL-32 levels. These results show that the high-risk variant of HPV induces IL-32 expression via E7-mediated COX-2 stimulation. However, E7 and COX-2 were down-regulated in the IL-32γ over-expressing cells and recovered by IL-32 small interfering RNA, indicating that E7 and COX-2 were feedback-inhibited by IL-32γ in cervical cancer cells. PMID:21208204

  2. Effect of interleukin 10 on the release of the CXC chemokines growth related oncogene GRO-alpha and epithelial cell-derived neutrophil activating peptide (ENA)-78 during human endotoxemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olszyna, D. P.; Pajkrt, D.; van Deventer, S. J.; van der Poll, T.

    2001-01-01

    Pretreatment with interleukin (IL)-10 inhibited the release of growth-related oncogene GRO-alpha but not of epithelial-cell derived neutrophil activating protein (ENA)-78, after injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) into healthy humans. In vitro, IL-10 dose-dependently attenuated LPS-induced release

  3. High prevalence of high risk human papillomavirus-capsid antibodies in human immunodeficiency virus-seropositive men: a serological study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarcletti Mario

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Serological study of human papillomavirus (HPV-antibodies in order to estimate the HPV-prevalence as risk factor for the development of HPV-associated malignancies in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-positive men. Methods Sera from 168 HIV-positive men and 330 HIV-negative individuals (including 198 controls were tested using a direct HPV-ELISA specific to HPV-6, -11, -16, -18, -31 and bovine PV-1 L1-virus-like particles. Serological results were correlated with the presence of HPV-associated lesions, the history of other sexually transmitted diseases (STD and HIV classification groups. Results In HIV-negative men low risk HPV-antibodies were prevailing and associated with condylomatous warts (25.4%. Strikingly, HIV-positive men were more likely to have antibodies to the high-risk HPV types -16, -18, -31, and low risk antibodies were not increased in a comparable range. Even those HIV-positive heterosexual individuals without any HPV-associated lesions exhibited preferentially antibody responses to the oncogenic HPV-types (cumulative 31.1%. The highest antibody detection rate (88,8% was observed within the subgroup of nine HIV-positive homosexual men with anogenital warts. Three HIV-positive patients had HPV-associated carcinomas, in all of them HPV-16 antibodies were detected. Drug use and mean CD4-cell counts on the day of serologic testing had no influence on HPV-IgG antibody prevalence, as had prior antiretroviral therapy or clinical category of HIV-disease. Conclusion High risk HPV-antibodies in HIV-infected and homosexual men suggest a continuous exposure to HPV-proteins throughout the course of their HIV infection, reflecting the known increased risk for anogenital malignancies in these populations. The extensive increase of high risk antibodies (compared to low risk antibodies in HIV-positive patients cannot be explained by differences in exposure history alone, but suggests defects of the immunological control of

  4. Orientation and position of avian leukosis virus DNA relative to the cellular oncogene c-myc in B-lymphoma tumors of highly susceptible 15I5 X 7(2) chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Y K; Crittenden, L B; Kung, H J

    1982-01-01

    We previously reported our characterizations of the B-lymphoma tumors induced in a highly susceptible line of chickens (15I5 X 7(2)) by the avian leukosis virus RAV-1 (Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 78:3418-3422, 1981). We demonstrated that in greater than 90% of the tumors, the RAV-1 provirus is integrated near a cellular oncogene, c-myc. In the present study, we devised a simple approach, relying on SalI digestion, for further defining the locations and orientations of the proviruses with respect to the c-myc gene. We report here that in the great majority of cases the provirus is situated upstream from and in the same transcriptional direction as the c-myc gene--a configuration compatible with the promoter-insertion model proposed by Hayward et al. (Nature [London] 290:475-480, 1981). Images PMID:6292531

  5. Human papilloma virus (HPV) prophylactic vaccination: challenges for public health and implications for screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, M; Jasani, B; Fiander, A

    2007-04-20

    Prophylactic vaccination against high risk human papilloma virus (HPV) 16 and 18 represents an exciting means of protection against HPV related malignancy. However, this strategy alone, even if there is a level of cross protection against other oncogenic viruses, cannot completely prevent cervical cancer. In some developed countries cervical screening programmes have reduced the incidence of invasive cervical cancer by up to 80% although this decline has now reached a plateau with current cancers occurring in patients who have failed to attend for screening or where the sensitivity of the tests have proved inadequate. Cervical screening is inevitably associated with significant anxiety for the many women who require investigation and treatment following abnormal cervical cytology. However, it is vitally important to stress the need for continued cervical screening to complement vaccination in order to optimise prevention in vaccinees and prevent cervical cancer in older women where the value of vaccination is currently unclear. It is likely that vaccination will ultimately change the natural history of HPV disease by reducing the influence of the highly oncogenic types HPV 16 and 18. In the long term this is likely to lead to an increase in recommended screening intervals. HPV vaccination may also reduce the positive predictive value of cervical cytology by reducing the number of truly positive abnormal smears. Careful consideration is required to ensure vaccination occurs at an age when the vaccine is most effective immunologically and when uptake is likely to be high. Antibody titres following vaccination in girls 12-16 years have been shown to be significantly higher than in older women, favouring vaccination in early adolescence prior contact with the virus. Highest prevalence rates for HPV infection are seen following the onset of sexual activity and therefore vaccination would need to be given prior to sexual debut. Since 20% of adolescents are sexually

  6. Type-dependent association between risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and viral load of oncogenic human papillomavirus types other than types 16 and 18.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu Xi, Long; Schiffman, Mark; Ke, Yang; Hughes, James P; Galloway, Denise A; He, Zhonghu; Hulbert, Ayaka; Winer, Rachel L; Koutsky, Laura A; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2017-04-15

    Studies of the clinical relevance of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA load have focused mainly on HPV16 and HPV18. Data on other oncogenic types are rare. Study subjects were women enrolled in the atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) triage study who had ≥1 of 11 non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types detected during a 2-year follow-up at 6-month intervals. Viral load measurements were performed on the first type-specific HPV-positive specimens. The association of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (CIN2/3) with type-specific HPV DNA load was assessed with discrete-time Cox regression. Overall, the increase in the cumulative risk of CIN2/3 per 1 unit increase in log 10 -transformed viral load was statistically significant for four types within species 9 including HPV31 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR adjusted ] = 1.32: 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-1.52), HPV35 (HR adjusted  = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.23-1.76), HPV52 (HR adjusted  = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.01-1.30) and HPV58 (HR adjusted  = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.23-1.82). The association was marginally significant for HPV33 (species 9) and HPV45 (species 7) and was not appreciable for other types. The per 1 log 10 -unit increase in viral load of a group of species 9 non-HPV16 oncogenic types was statistically significantly associated with risk of CIN2/3 for women with a cytologic diagnosis of within normal limits, ASC-US, or LSIL at the first HPV-positive visit but not for those with high-grade SIL. Findings suggest that the viral load-associated risk of CIN2/3 is type-dependent, and mainly restricted to the species of HPV types related to HPV16, which shares this association. © 2017 UICC.

  7. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy K Sheaffer

    Full Text Available A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16 transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50 values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose polymerase cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment.

  8. A Small Molecule Inhibitor Selectively Induces Apoptosis in Cells Transformed by High Risk Human Papilloma Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheaffer, Amy K; Lee, Min S; Qi, Huilin; Chaniewski, Susan; Zheng, Xiaofan; Farr, Glen A; Esposito, Kim; Harden, David; Lei, Ming; Schweizer, Liang; Friborg, Jacques; Agler, Michele; McPhee, Fiona; Gentles, Robert; Beno, Brett R; Chupak, Lou; Mason, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    A phenotypic high-throughput cell culture screen was performed to identify compounds that prevented proliferation of the human Papilloma virus type 16 (HPV-16) transformed cell line Ca Ski. A series of quinoxaline compounds exemplified by Compound 1 was identified. Testing against a panel of cell lines demonstrated that Compound 1 selectively inhibited replication of all HPV-16, HPV-18, and HPV-31 transformed cell lines tested with 50% Inhibitory Concentration (IC50) values of 2 to 8 μM relative to IC50 values of 28 to 73 μM in HPV-negative cell lines. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a cascade of multiple apoptotic events, including selective activation of effector caspases 3 and 7, fragmentation of cellular DNA, and PARP (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) cleavage in HPV-positive cells relative to HPV-negative cells. Unregulated proliferation of HPV transformed cells is dependent on the viral oncogenes, E6 and E7. Treatment with Compound 1 resulted in a decrease in HPV E7 protein in Ca Ski cells. However, the timing of this reduction relative to other effects of compound treatment suggests that this was a consequence, rather than a cause, of the apoptotic cascade. Likewise, compound treatment resulted in no obvious effects on the E6- and E7- mediated down regulation of p53 and Rb, or their downstream effectors, p21 or PCNA. Further investigation of apoptotic signals induced by Compound 1 revealed cleavage of Caspase-8 in HPV-positive cells as early as 2 hours post-treatment, suggesting the compound initiates apoptosis through the extrinsic, death receptor-mediated, pathway of cell death. These studies provide proof of concept that cells transformed by oncogenic Papillomaviruses can be selectively induced to undergo apoptosis by compound treatment.

  9. C-myc proto-oncogene amplification detected by polymerase chain reaction in archival human ovarian carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, G.; Dubeau, L.

    1990-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology was used to examine the state of amplification of the proto-oncogene c-myc in archival ovarian carcinomas. Sequences from the c-myc gene and from a control gene were amplified simultaneously by PCR and the ratios of the two products measured. The results provided an accurate measurement of the relative number of copies of the two genes in each tumor genome if the control and test sequences amplified by PCR were of equal lengths. The results were not affected by the number of PCR cycles used. This technique should facilitate gene amplification studies in clinical medicine. Increased c-myc copy number was found in 17% of the 30 cases examined when a control from the same chromosome as c-myc was used, but in 37% of cases if a control from another chromosome was used. This underlines the importance of the genetic location of the selected control genes for such studies. Images Figure 2 PMID:2205100

  10. Inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth by human papillomavirus virus-like particles packaged with human papillomavirus oncoprotein short hairpin RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousarghin, Latifa; Touze, Antoine; Gaud, Guillaume; Iochmann, Sophie; Alvarez, Eva; Reverdiau, Pascale; Gaitan, Julien; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Sizaret, Pierre-Yves; Coursaget, Pierre L

    2009-02-01

    Overexpression of human papillomavirus (HPV E6 and HPV E7) oncogenes in human cervical cells results in the development of cancer, and E6 and E7 proteins are therefore targets for preventing cervical cancer progression. Here, we describe the silencing of E6 and E7 expression in cervical carcinoma cells by RNA interference. In order to increase the efficacy of the RNA interference, HPV pseudovirions coding for a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) sequence were produced. The results indicated the degradation of E6 and E7 mRNAs when shRNA against E6 or E7 were delivered by pseudovirions in HPV-positive cells (CaSki and TC1 cells). E6 silencing resulted in the accumulation of cellular p53 and reduced cell viability. More significant cell death was observed when E7 expression was suppressed. Silencing E6 and E7 and the consequences for cancer cell growth were also investigated in vivo in mice using the capacity of murine TC1 cells expressing HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes to induce fast-growing tumors. Treatment with lentiviruses and HPV virus-like particle vectors coding for an E7 shRNA sequence both resulted in dramatic inhibition of tumor growth. These results show the ability of pseudovirion-delivered shRNA to produce specific gene suppression and provide an effective means of reducing HPV-positive tumor growth.

  11. Sequencing and G-quadruplex folding of the canine proto-oncogene KIT promoter region: might dog be used as a model for human disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Da Ros

    Full Text Available Downregulation of gene expression by induction of non-canonical DNA structures at promotorial level is a novel attractive anticancer strategy. In human, two guanine-rich sequences (h_kit1 and h_kit2 were identified in the promotorial region of oncogene KIT. Their stabilization into G-quadruplex structures can find applications in the treatment of leukemias, mastocytosis, gastrointestinal stromal tumor, and lung carcinomas which are often associated to c-kit mis-regulation. Also the most common skin cancer in domestic dog, mast cell tumor, is linked to a mutation and/or to an over-expression of c-kit, thus supporting dog as an excellent animal model. In order to assess if the G-quadruplex mediated mechanism of regulation of c-kit expression is conserved among the two species, herein we cloned and sequenced the canine KIT promoter region and we compared it with the human one in terms of sequence and conformational equilibria in physiologically relevant conditions. Our results evidenced a general conserved promotorial sequence between the two species. As experimentally confirmed, this grants that the conformational features of the canine kit1 sequence are substantially shared with the human one. Conversely, two isoforms of the kit2 sequences were identified in the analyzed dog population. In comparison with the human counterpart, both of them showed an altered distribution among several folded conformations.

  12. Inactivation of a Human Norovirus Surrogate, Human Norovirus Virus-Like Particles, and Vesicular Stomatitis Virus by Gamma Irradiation ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kurtis; Divers, Erin; Ma, Yuanmei; Li, Jianrong

    2011-01-01

    Gamma irradiation is a nonthermal processing technology that has been used for the preservation of a variety of food products. This technology has been shown to effectively inactivate bacterial pathogens. Currently, the FDA has approved doses of up to 4.0 kGy to control food-borne pathogens in fresh iceberg lettuce and spinach. However, whether this dose range effectively inactivates food-borne viruses is less understood. We have performed a systematic study on the inactivation of a human norovirus surrogate (murine norovirus 1 [MNV-1]), human norovirus virus-like particles (VLPs), and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) by gamma irradiation. We demonstrated that MNV-1 and human norovirus VLPs were resistant to gamma irradiation. For MNV-1, only a 1.7- to 2.4-log virus reduction in fresh produce at the dose of 5.6 kGy was observed. However, VSV was more susceptible to gamma irradiation, and a 3.3-log virus reduction at a dose of 5.6 kGy in Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium (DMEM) was achieved. We further demonstrated that gamma irradiation disrupted virion structure and degraded viral proteins and genomic RNA, which resulted in virus inactivation. Using human norovirus VLPs as a model, we provide the first evidence that the capsid of human norovirus has stability similar to that of MNV-1 after exposure to gamma irradiation. Overall, our results suggest that viruses are much more resistant to irradiation than bacterial pathogens. Although gamma irradiation used to eliminate the virus contaminants in fresh produce by the FDA-approved irradiation dose limits seems impractical, this technology may be practical to inactivate viruses for other purposes, such as sterilization of medical equipment. PMID:21441330

  13. Attenuation of TGF-β signaling suppresses premature senescence in a p21-dependent manner and promotes oncogenic Ras-mediated metastatic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shu; Yang, Junhua; Elkahloun, Abdel G.; Bandyopadhyay, Abhik; Wang, Long; Cornell, John E.; Yeh, I-Tien; Agyin, Joseph; Tomlinson, Gail; Sun, Lu-Zhe

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that drive triple-negative, basal-like breast cancer progression are elusive. Few molecular targets have been identified for the prevention or treatment of this disease. Here we developed a series of isogenic basal-like human mammary epithelial cells (HMECs) with altered transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) sensitivity and different malignancy, resembling a full spectrum of basal-like breast carcinogenesis, and determined the molecular mechanisms that contribute to oncogene-induced transformation of basal-like HMECs when TGF-β signaling is attenuated. We found that expression of a dominant-negative type II receptor (DNRII) of TGF-β abrogated autocrine TGF-β signaling in telomerase-immortalized HMECs and suppressed H-Ras-V12–induced senescence-like growth arrest (SLGA). Furthermore, coexpression of DNRII and H-Ras-V12 rendered HMECs highly tumorigenic and metastatic in vivo in comparison with H-Ras-V12–transformed HMECs that spontaneously escaped H-Ras-V12–induced SLGA. Microarray analysis revealed that p21 was the major player mediating Ras-induced SLGA, and attenuated or loss of p21 expression contributed to the escape from SLGA when autocrine TGF-β signaling was blocked in HMECs. Furthermore, knockdown of p21 also suppressed H-Ras-V12–induced SLGA. Our results identify that autocrine TGF-β signaling is an integral part of the cellular anti-transformation network by suppressing the expression of a host of genes, including p21-regulated genes, that mediate oncogene-induced transformation in basal-like breast cancer. PMID:22357622

  14. Isolation of a novel swine influenza virus from Oklahoma in 2011 which is distantly related to human influenza C viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D; Webby, Richard J; Simonson, Randy R; Li, Feng

    2013-02-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution.

  15. Isolation of a Novel Swine Influenza Virus from Oklahoma in 2011 Which Is Distantly Related to Human Influenza C Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hause, Ben M.; Ducatez, Mariette; Collin, Emily A.; Ran, Zhiguang; Liu, Runxia; Sheng, Zizhang; Armien, Anibal; Kaplan, Bryan; Chakravarty, Suvobrata; Hoppe, Adam D.; Webby, Richard J.; Simonson, Randy R.; Li, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses, only influenza A viruses are thought to exist as multiple subtypes and has non-human maintenance hosts. In April 2011, nasal swabs were collected for virus isolation from pigs exhibiting influenza-like illness. Subsequent electron microscopic, biochemical, and genetic studies identified an orthomyxovirus with seven RNA segments exhibiting approximately 50% overall amino acid identity to human influenza C virus. Based on its genetic organizational similarities to influenza C viruses this virus has been provisionally designated C/Oklahoma/1334/2011 (C/OK). Phylogenetic analysis of the predicted viral proteins found that the divergence between C/OK and human influenza C viruses was similar to that observed between influenza A and B viruses. No cross reactivity was observed between C/OK and human influenza C viruses using hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays. Additionally, screening of pig and human serum samples found that 9.5% and 1.3%, respectively, of individuals had measurable HI antibody titers to C/OK virus. C/OK virus was able to infect both ferrets and pigs and transmit to naive animals by direct contact. Cell culture studies showed that C/OK virus displayed a broader cellular tropism than a human influenza C virus. The observed difference in cellular tropism was further supported by structural analysis showing that hemagglutinin esterase (HE) proteins between two viruses have conserved enzymatic but divergent receptor-binding sites. These results suggest that C/OK virus represents a new subtype of influenza C viruses that currently circulates in pigs that has not been recognized previously. The presence of multiple subtypes of co-circulating influenza C viruses raises the possibility of reassortment and antigenic shift as mechanisms of influenza C virus evolution. PMID:23408893

  16. Oncogenes and inflammation rewire host energy metabolism in the tumor microenvironment: RAS and NFκB target stromal MCT4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Outschoorn, Ubaldo E; Curry, Joseph M; Ko, Ying-Hui; Lin, Zhao; Tuluc, Madalina; Cognetti, David; Birbe, Ruth C; Pribitkin, Edmund; Bombonati, Alessandro; Pestell, Richard G; Howell, Anthony; Sotgia, Federica; Lisanti, Michael P

    2013-08-15

    Here, we developed a model system to evaluate the metabolic effects of oncogene(s) on the host microenvironment. A matched set of "normal" and oncogenically transformed epithelial cell lines were co-cultured with human fibroblasts, to determine the "bystander" effects of oncogenes on stromal cells. ROS production and glucose uptake were measured by FACS analysis. In addition, expression of a panel of metabolic protein biomarkers (Caveolin-1, MCT1, and MCT4) was analyzed in parallel. Interestingly, oncogene activation in cancer cells was sufficient to induce the metabolic reprogramming of cancer-associated fibroblasts toward glycolysis, via oxidative stress. Evidence for "metabolic symbiosis" between oxidative cancer cells and glycolytic fibroblasts was provided by MCT1/4 immunostaining. As such, oncogenes drive the establishment of a stromal-epithelial "lactate-shuttle", to fuel the anabolic growth of cancer cells. Similar results were obtained with two divergent oncogenes (RAS and NFκB), indicating that ROS production and inflammation metabolically converge on the tumor stroma, driving glycolysis and upregulation of MCT4. These findings make stromal MCT4 an attractive target for new drug discovery, as MCT4 is a shared endpoint for the metabolic effects of many oncogenic stimuli. Thus, diverse oncogenes stimulate a common metabolic response in the tumor stroma. Conversely, we also show that fibroblasts protect cancer cells against oncogenic stress and senescence by reducing ROS production in tumor cells. Ras-transformed cells were also able to metabolically reprogram normal adjacent epithelia, indicating that cancer cells can use either fibroblasts or epithelial cells as "partners" for metabolic symbiosis. The antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC) selectively halted mitochondrial biogenesis in Ras-transformed cells, but not in normal epithelia. NAC also blocked stromal induction of MCT4, indicating that NAC effectively functions as an "MCT4 inhibitor". Taken

  17. Contemporary North American influenza H7 viruses possess human receptor specificity: Implications for virus transmissibility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belser, Jessica A; Blixt, Ola; Chen, Li-Mei

    2008-01-01

    Avian H7 influenza viruses from both the Eurasian and North American lineage have caused outbreaks in poultry since 2002, with confirmed human infection occurring during outbreaks in The Netherlands, British Columbia, and the United Kingdom. The majority of H7 infections have resulted in self......-limiting conjunctivitis, whereas probable human-to-human transmission has been rare. Here, we used glycan microarray technology to determine the receptor-binding preference of Eurasian and North American lineage H7 influenza viruses and their transmissibility in the ferret model. We found that highly pathogenic H7N7...

  18. Projected impact of Cervarix™ vaccination on oncogenic human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Effelterre, Thierry P; Hogea, Cosmina; Taylor, Sylvia M

    2016-01-01

    We developed a dynamic compartmental model to assess the impact of HPV Universal Mass Vaccination (UMV) with Cervarix™, which offers protection against HPV16/18 and cross-protection against other cancer-causing types, using up-to-date efficacy data. Analyses were performed in the UK because of the large amount of high quality epidemiological data available. For each HPV type/group of types considered, the model was calibrated to 14 epidemiological datasets (prevalence of HPV infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN): CIN1, CIN2, CIN3 pre-screening and cervical cancer (CC) incidence over 10 y post-screening). Impacts of cross-protection, female catch-up vaccination, and additional male vaccination on oncogenic infections, high-grade CIN (CIN2+) and CC were evaluated. Our results show that female UMV with 80% coverage and cross-protection against high-risk types resulted in 81% CIN2+ and 88% CC reductions vs. 57% and 75%, respectively, without cross-protection. Vaccinating 40% of males and 80% of females was equivalent to 90% female-only coverage regarding CIN2+ (87% and 87%, respectively) and CC (93% and 94%, respectively) reductions. Female-only coverage of 80% substantially reduced male HPV16 and 18 infection due to herd protection (74% and 89%, respectively). Increasing female coverage to 90% reduced HPV16 and HPV18 infections in males relatively similarly to 80% female combined with 40% male coverage. Model outcomes strengthen previous conclusions about the significant added value of Cervarix™ cross-protection for CC prevention, the primary HPV vaccination public health priority. Regarding female CC prevention and male HPV16/18 infection, small increases in female coverage induce similar benefits to those achieved by additionally vaccinating men with 40% coverage.

  19. Projected impact of Cervarix® vaccination on oncogenic human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Effelterre, Thierry; Hogea, Cosmina; Taylor, Sylvia

    2014-01-01

    We developed a dynamic compartmental model to assess the impact of HPV Universal Mass Vaccination with Cervarix(®), which offers protection against HPV16/18 and cross-protection against other cancer-causing types, using up-to-date efficacy data.   Analyses were performed in the UK because of the large amount of high quality epidemiological data available. For each HPV type/group of types considered, the model was calibrated to 14 epidemiological data sets (prevalence of HPV infection, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN): CIN1, CIN2, CIN3 pre-screening and cervical cancer (CC) incidence over 10 years post-screening). Impacts of cross-protection, female catch-up vaccination, and additional male vaccination on oncogenic infections, high-grade CIN (CIN2+) and CC were evaluated. Our results show that female UMV with 80% coverage and cross-protection against high-risk types resulted in 79% CIN2+ and 84% CC reductions vs. 55% and 71%, respectively, without cross-protection. Vaccinating 40% of males and 80% of females was equivalent to 90% female-only coverage regarding CIN2+ (85% and 86%, respectively) and CC (90% and 91%, respectively) reductions. Female-only coverage of 80% substantially reduced male HPV16 and 18 infection due to herd protection (59% and 80%, respectively). Increasing female coverage to 90% reduced HPV16 and HPV18 infections in males similarly to 80% female combined with 20% and 40% male coverage, respectively. Model outcomes strengthen previous conclusions about the significant added value of Cervarix(®) cross-protection for CC prevention, the primary HPV vaccination public health priority. Regarding female CC prevention and male HPV16/18 infection, small increases in female coverage induce similar benefits achieved by additionally vaccinating men with 20-40% coverage.

  20. Imaging and tracking HIV viruses in human cervical mucus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boukari, Fatima; Makrogiannis, Sokratis; Nossal, Ralph; Boukari, Hacène

    2016-09-01

    We describe a systematic approach to image, track, and quantify the movements of HIV viruses embedded in human cervical mucus. The underlying motivation for this study is that, in HIV-infected adults, women account for more than half of all new cases and most of these women acquire the infection through heterosexual contact. The endocervix is believed to be a susceptible site for HIV entry. Cervical mucus, which coats the endocervix, should play a protective role against the viruses. Thus, we developed a methodology to apply time-resolved confocal microscopy to examine the motion of HIV viruses that were added to samples of untreated cervical mucus. From the images, we identified the viruses, tracked them over time, and calculated changes of the statistical mean-squared displacement (MSD) of each virus. Approximately half of tracked viruses appear constrained while the others show mobility with MSDs that are proportional to τα+ν2τ2, over time range τ, depicting a combination of anomalous diffusion (0viruses. Although a more extensive study is warranted, these results support the assumption of mucus being a barrier against the motion of these viruses.

  1. Global gene expression changes of in vitro stimulated human transformed germinal centre B cells as surrogate for oncogenic pathway activation in individual aggressive B cell lymphomas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are a group of lymphomas derived from germinal centre B cells which display a heterogeneous pattern of oncogenic pathway activation. We postulate that specific immune response associated signalling, affecting gene transcription networks, may be associated with the activation of different oncogenic pathways in aggressive Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Methodology The B cell receptor (BCR), CD40, B-cell activating factor (BAFF)-receptors and Interleukin (IL) 21 receptor and Toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) were stimulated in human transformed germinal centre B cells by treatment with anti IgM F(ab)2-fragments, CD40L, BAFF, IL21 and LPS respectively. The changes in gene expression following the activation of Jak/STAT, NF-кB, MAPK, Ca2+ and PI3K signalling triggered by these stimuli was assessed using microarray analysis. The expression of top 100 genes which had a change in gene expression following stimulation was investigated in gene expression profiles of patients with Aggressive non-Hodgkin Lymphoma (NHL). Results αIgM stimulation led to the largest number of changes in gene expression, affecting overall 6596 genes. While CD40L stimulation changed the expression of 1194 genes and IL21 stimulation affected 902 genes, only 283 and 129 genes were modulated by lipopolysaccharide or BAFF receptor stimulation, respectively. Interestingly, genes associated with a Burkitt-like phenotype, such as MYC, BCL6 or LEF1, were affected by αIgM. Unique and shared gene expression was delineated. NHL-patients were sorted according to their similarity in the expression of TOP100 affected genes to stimulated transformed germinal centre B cells The αIgM gene module discriminated individual DLBCL in a similar manner to CD40L or IL21 gene modules. DLBCLs with low module activation often carry chromosomal MYC aberrations. DLBCLs with high module activation show strong expression of genes involved in cell-cell communication, immune responses

  2. Post-transcriptional control of c-myc proto-oncogene expression by glucocorticoid hormones in human T lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroder, M.; Vacca, A.; Screpanti, I.; Petrangeli, E.; Frati, L. (Univ. La Sapienza, Roma (Italy)); Martinotti, S.; Gulino, A. (Univ. of L' Aquila (Italy))

    1990-03-11

    The authors have studied the regulation of the human c-myc proto-oncogene by glucocorticoid hormones in T lymphoblastic leukemic cells. A significant decrease (50%) of the steady state levels of c-myc mRNA was observed as early as 3 hours after dexamethasone treatment of CEM-1.3 human lymphoma cells, reaching less than 5% values, with respect to untreated cells, 24 hours after hormone administration. Nuclear run-on experiments showed no modifications of the transcriptional rate from the first exon. However, a slight decrease (15%) of the transcript elongation from the first exon/first intron boundary was observed in the dexamethasone-treated cells. Using actinomycin D to block gene transcription, they observed a significant increase in the rate of c-myc RNA specific decay after dexamethasone treatment. The data suggest that dexamethasone is able to inhibit human c-myc gene expression primarily at the post-transcriptional level, through the synthesis of hormone-transcriptional level, through the synthesis of hormone-induced regulatory protein(s) controlling c-myc transcript stability.

  3. Mislocalized activation of oncogenic RTKs switches downstream signaling outcomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Chuna Ram; Olsen, Jesper V; Brandts, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Inappropriate activation of oncogenic kinases at intracellular locations is frequently observed in human cancers, but its effects on global signaling are incompletely understood. Here, we show that the oncogenic mutant of Flt3 (Flt3-ITD), when localized at the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), aberrantly...... patterns of the receptor itself. Thus, intracellular activation of RTKs by oncogenic mutations in the biosynthetic route may exploit cellular architecture to initiate aberrant signaling cascades, thus evading negative regulation....

  4. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4+ T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    McLinden, James H.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K.; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Xiang, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glyc...

  5. The interaction between human papillomavirus and other viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, J T; Scott, R S

    2017-03-02

    The etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital tract and head and neck cancers is well established. However, only a low percentage of HPV-positive women develop cancer, indicating that HPV is necessary but not sufficient in carcinogenesis. Several biological and environmental cofactors have been implicated in the development of HPV-associated carcinoma that include immune status, hormonal changes, parity, dietary habits, tobacco usage, and co-infection with other sexually transmissible agents. Such cofactors likely contribute to HPV persistent infection through diverse mechanisms related to immune control, efficiency of HPV infection, and influences on tumor initiation and progression. Conversely, HPV co-infection with other factors may also harbor anti-tumor effects. Here, we review epidemiological and experimental studies investigating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as viral cofactors in or therapeutic factors against the development of genital and oral HPV-associated carcinomas. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Myxoma virus is oncolytic for human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Yanghee; Kelly, Kaitlyn J; Stanford, Marianne M; Galanis, Charles; Chun, Yun Shin; Fong, Yuman; McFadden, Grant

    2008-08-01

    Viral oncolytic therapy, which seeks to exploit the use of live viruses to treat cancer, has shown promise in the treatment of cancers resistant to conventional anticancer therapies. Among the most difficult to treat cancers is advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Our study investigates the ability of a novel oncolytic agent, myxoma virus, to infect, productively replicate in, and kill human pancreatic cancer cells in vitro. The myxoma virus vMyxgfp was tested against a panel of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell lines. Infectivity, viral proliferation, and tumor cell kill were assessed. Infection of tumor cells was assessed by expression of the marker gene enhanced green fluorescent protein (e-GFP). vMyxgfp had the ability to infect all pancreatic cancer cell lines tested. Killing of tumor cells varied among the 6 cell lines tested, ranging from >90% cell kill at 7 days for the most sensitive Panc-1 cells, to 39% in the most resistant cell line Capan-2. Sensitivity correlated to replication of virus, and was found to maximally exhibit a four-log increase in foci-forming units for the most sensitive Panc-1 cells within 72 h. Our study demonstrates for the first time the ability of the myxoma virus to productively infect, replicate in, and lyse human pancreatic adenocarcinoma cells in vitro. These data encourage further investigation of this virus, which is pathogenic only in rabbits, for treatment of this nearly uniformly fatal cancer.

  7. Neopterin and human immunodeficiency virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofmann, B

    1993-01-01

    to predict the later development of AIDS. The increased neopterin concentrations show that the immune system is activated in HIV infection and demonstrate the presence of an interaction between the virus and the immune system. The most important future use of neopterin measurements may be in fast evaluation...

  8. Oncogenes: The Passport for Viral Oncolysis through PKR Inhibition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Fernandes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The transforming properties of oncogenes are derived from gain-of-function mutations, shifting cell signaling from highly regulated homeostatic to an uncontrolled oncogenic state, with the contribution of the inactivating mutations in tumor suppressor genes P53 and RB, leading to tumor resistance to conventional and target-directed therapy. On the other hand, this scenario fulfills two requirements for oncolytic virus infection in tumor cells: inactivation of tumor suppressors and presence of oncoproteins, also the requirements to engage malignancy. Several of these oncogenes have a negative impact on the main interferon antiviral defense, the double-stranded RNA-activated protein kinase (PKR, which helps viruses to spontaneously target tumor cells instead of normal cells. This review is focused on the negative impact of overexpression of oncogenes on conventional and targeted therapy and their positive impact on viral oncolysis due to their ability to inhibit PKR-induced translation blockage, allowing virion release and cell death.

  9. VirusSeq: software to identify viruses and their integration sites using next-generation sequencing of human cancer tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxin; Yao, Hui; Thompson, Erika J; Tannir, Nizar M; Weinstein, John N; Su, Xiaoping

    2013-01-15

    We developed a new algorithmic method, VirusSeq, for detecting known viruses and their integration sites in the human genome using next-generation sequencing data. We evaluated VirusSeq on whole-transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) data of 256 human cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas. Using these data, we showed that VirusSeq accurately detects the known viruses and their integration sites with high sensitivity and specificity. VirusSeq can also perform this function using whole-genome sequencing data of human tissue. VirusSeq has been implemented in PERL and is available at http://odin.mdacc.tmc.edu/∼xsu1/VirusSeq.html. xsu1@mdanderson.org Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  10. SIRT1 activation by a c-MYC oncogenic network promotes the maintenance and drug resistance of human FLT3-ITD acute myeloid leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ling; Osdal, Tereza; Ho, Yinwei; Chun, Sookhee; McDonald, Tinisha; Agarwal, Puneet; Lin, Allen; Chu, Su; Qi, Jing; Li, Liang; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Dos Santos, Cedric; Yuan, Hongfeng; Ha, Trung-Quang; Popa, Mihaela; Hovland, Randi; Bruserud, Øystein; Gjertsen, Bjørn Tore; Kuo, Ya-Huei; Chen, Wenyong; Lain, Sonia; McCormack, Emmet; Bhatia, Ravi

    2014-10-02

    The FLT3-ITD mutation is frequently observed in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is associated with poor prognosis. In such patients, FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are only partially effective and do not eliminate the leukemia stem cells (LSCs) that are assumed to be the source of treatment failure. Here, we show that the NAD-dependent SIRT1 deacetylase is selectively overexpressed in primary human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs. This SIRT1 overexpression is related to enhanced expression of the USP22 deubiquitinase induced by c-MYC, leading to reduced SIRT1 ubiquitination and enhanced stability. Inhibition of SIRT1 expression or activity reduced the growth of FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and significantly enhanced TKI-mediated killing of the cells. Therefore, these results identify a c-MYC-related network that enhances SIRT1 protein expression in human FLT3-ITD AML LSCs and contributes to their maintenance. Inhibition of this oncogenic network could be an attractive approach for targeting FLT3-ITD AML LSCs to improve treatment outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in human lymphoma cells: a role for the proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor TDAG8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhigang; Dong, Lixue; Dean, Eric; Yang, Li V

    2013-10-11

    Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65) is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression.

  12. Acidosis Decreases c-Myc Oncogene Expression in Human Lymphoma Cells: A Role for the Proton-Sensing G Protein-Coupled Receptor TDAG8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigang Li

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Acidosis is a biochemical hallmark of the tumor microenvironment. Here, we report that acute acidosis decreases c-Myc oncogene expression in U937 human lymphoma cells. The level of c-Myc transcripts, but not mRNA or protein stability, contributes to c-Myc protein reduction under acidosis. The pH-sensing receptor TDAG8 (GPR65 is involved in acidosis-induced c-Myc downregulation. TDAG8 is expressed in U937 lymphoma cells, and the overexpression or knockdown of TDAG8 further decreases or partially rescues c-Myc expression, respectively. Acidic pH alone is insufficient to reduce c-Myc expression, as it does not decrease c-Myc in H1299 lung cancer cells expressing very low levels of pH-sensing G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs. Instead, c-Myc is slightly increased by acidosis in H1299 cells, but this increase is completely inhibited by ectopic overexpression of TDAG8. Interestingly, TDAG8 expression is decreased by more than 50% in human lymphoma samples in comparison to non-tumorous lymph nodes and spleens, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor function of TDAG8 in lymphoma. Collectively, our results identify a novel mechanism of c-Myc regulation by acidosis in the tumor microenvironment and indicate that modulation of TDAG8 and related pH-sensing receptor pathways may be exploited as a new approach to inhibit Myc expression.

  13. Seroprevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV1) is a lymphotropic virus which can contribute to carcinogenesis in adult T-cell leukemia, myleopathy and other disorders. 20 million people are affected by this virus in the world. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of human T-cell lymph tropic virus type 1 ...

  14. Avian Influenza virus glycoproteins restrict virus replication and spread through human airway epithelium at temperatures of the proximal airways

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Scull, Margaret A; Gillim-Ross, Laura; Santos, Celia; Roberts, Kim L; Bordonali, Elena; Subbarao, Kanta; Barclay, Wendy S; Pickles, Raymond J

    2009-01-01

    .... Using an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium (HAE), we demonstrate that while human and avian influenza viruses efficiently infect at temperatures of the human distal airways (37 degrees C...

  15. Unique human immune signature of Ebola virus disease in Guinea

    OpenAIRE

    Ruibal, Paula; Oestereich, Lisa; Lüdtke, Anja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Wozniak, David M.; Kerber, Romy; Korva, Miša; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Bore, Joseph A.; Koundouno, Fara Raymond; Duraffour, Sophie; Weller, Romy; Thorenz, Anja; Cimini, Eleonora; Viola, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    Despite the magnitude of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, there is still a fundamental lack of knowledge about the pathophysiology of EVD 1 . In particular, very little is known about human immune responses to Ebola virus (EBOV) 2,3 . Here, we have for the first time evaluated the physiology of the human T cell immune response in EVD patients at the time of admission at the Ebola Treatment Center (ETC) in Guinea, and longitudinally until discharge or death. Through the u...

  16. Characteristics of an infinite life span diploid human fibroblast cell strain and a near-diploid strain arising from a clone of cells expressing a transfected v-myc oncogene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morgan, T.L.; Dajun Yang; Fry, D.G.; Hurlin, P.J.; Kohler, S.K.; Maher, V.M.; McCormick, J.J. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing (United States))

    1991-11-01

    Diploid human fibroblasts were transfected with a plasmid carrying a v-myc oncogene linked to the neo gene or with a vector control carrying a neo gene. Drug-resistant clones were isolated and subcultured as needed. All populations went into crisis and eventually senesced. But while they were senescing, viable-appearing clones were noted among the progeny of a transfected population that expressed the v-myc oncogene. After several months, these cells began replicating more rapidly. Karyotype analysis indicated that they were clonally derived since all of them had 45 chromosomes, including 2 marker chromosomes. This cell strain was designated MSU-1.1. Similar analysis showed that cells from an earlier passage were diploid. These cells were designated MSU-1.0. The expression of v-myc is probably required for acquisition of an infinite life span, since this phenotype did not develop in populations not expressing this oncogene. However, expression of v-myc is clearly not sufficient, since all of the progeny of the clone that gave rise to the MSU-1.0 cells expressed this oncogene, but the vast majority of them senesced.

  17. SKP2 oncogene is a direct MYC target gene and MYC down-regulates p27(KIP1) through SKP2 in human leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bretones, Gabriel; Acosta, Juan C; Caraballo, Juan M; Ferrándiz, Nuria; Gómez-Casares, M Teresa; Albajar, Marta; Blanco, Rosa; Ruiz, Paula; Hung, Wen-Chun; Albero, M Pilar; Perez-Roger, Ignacio; León, Javier

    2011-03-18

    SKP2 is the ubiquitin ligase subunit that targets p27(KIP1) (p27) for degradation. SKP2 is induced in the G(1)-S transit of the cell cycle, is frequently overexpressed in human cancer, and displays transformation activity in experimental models. Here we show that MYC induces SKP2 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in human myeloid leukemia K562 cells with conditional MYC expression. Importantly, in these systems, induction of MYC did not activate cell proliferation, ruling out SKP2 up-regulation as a consequence of cell cycle entry. MYC-dependent SKP2 expression was also detected in other cell types such as lymphoid, fibroblastic, and epithelial cell lines. MYC induced SKP2 mRNA expression in the absence of protein synthesis and activated the SKP2 promoter in luciferase reporter assays. With chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, MYC was detected bound to a region of human SKP2 gene promoter that includes E-boxes. The K562 cell line derives from human chronic myeloid leukemia. In a cohort of chronic myeloid leukemia bone marrow samples, we found a correlation between MYC and SKP2 mRNA levels. Analysis of cancer expression databases also indicated a correlation between MYC and SKP2 expression in lymphoma. Finally, MYC-induced SKP2 expression resulted in a decrease in p27 protein in K562 cells. Moreover, silencing of SKP2 abrogated the MYC-mediated down-regulation of p27. Our data show that SKP2 is a direct MYC target gene and that MYC-mediated SKP2 induction leads to reduced p27 levels. The results suggest the induction of SKP2 oncogene as a new mechanism for MYC-dependent transformation.

  18. Virus load in chimpanzees infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: effect of pre-exposure vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Haaft, P.; Cornelissen, M.; Goudsmit, J.; Koornstra, W.; Dubbes, R.; Niphuis, H.; Peeters, M.; Thiriart, C.; Bruck, C.; Heeney, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Many reports indicate that a long-term asymptomatic state following human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with a low amount of circulating virus. To evaluate the possible effect of stabilizing a low virus load by non-sterilizing pre-exposure vaccination, a quantitative

  19. Global Mapping of O-Glycosylation of Varicella Zoster Virus, Human Cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nordén, Rickard; Joshi, Hiren J

    2016-01-01

    of the herpesvirus family: varicella zoster virus, human cytomegalovirus, and Epstein-Barr virus. We identified a large number of O-glycosites distributed on most envelope proteins in all viruses and further demonstrated conserved patterns of O-glycans on distinct homologous proteins. Because glycosylation is highly...

  20. Cerebral glial tumors and human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection. More than a coincidental association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moulignier, A; Mikol, J; Pialoux, G; Eliaszewicz, M; Thurel, C; Thiebaut, J B

    1994-07-15

    The authors describe the clinical and morphologic patterns in four patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) who developed intracranial glial tumors. This retrospective study reports 70 patients at various stages of human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) infection who underwent stereotactic brain biopsy for an intracerebral space-occupying lesion. Of these patients, four had glial tumors: one astroblastoma, two astrocytomas, and one glioblastoma. Glial tumors probably arise from a complex interplay of factors; possibilities include the activation of a dominant oncogene or viral inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene by a viral promoter (like the tat protein), impairment of immune defenses (which facilitates the growth of astrocytomas in acute lymphoblastic leukemia), production of cellular growth factors, cytokines, possible infection of glial cells by HIV, and the potentiation of a coinfectious agent. These cases illustrate that glial tumors should be considered in the differential diagnosis of brain masses in HIV-1 infection, especially because specific treatment for these tumors is available. Moreover, the occurrence of glial tumors in AIDS patients is not only an important event from a clinical point of view, but may also have implications for the pathogenesis of tumors in AIDS.

  1. [Ten years of human papilloma virus vaccination. From dermatology to oncology via the infectious diseases department].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraga-Llop, Fernando A

    2018-02-07

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) was first identified in dermatology, and it was subsequently demonstrated that is was required for the development of uterine cervical cancer and other tumours, after a persistent infection by any of its oncogenic genotypes. Ten years ago, the most common infections and cancers associated with HPV could be prevented by immunisation with 2vaccines, one bivalent, and another tetravalent, and having just marketed a nonavalent one. During the period 2007-2008, the HPV vaccine was included in the Autonomous Communities vaccination calendar, and it is the second vaccine, after that of Hepatitis B, that prevents cancer. In these 10 years that these vaccines have been available the knowledge has progressed and there have been significant advances in vaccination strategies, as well as in the indications and recommendations. These include, lowering the age in the vaccination schedule, prescribing of 2doses at 9 years and at 13-14 years, systematic vaccination of the male in some countries, immunisation of the woman after adolescence, implementation of vaccination programmes in developed countries, prevention of other cancers, recommendations for vaccinations for populations at high risk of HPV infection, scientific evidence on the impact and effectiveness of vaccination, and confirmation of the safety of these vaccines, with more than 270 million doses administered, as has already been observed in clinical trials. The role of health professionals is essential to achieve and maintain high vaccine coverage. Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  2. Prevalence and viral load of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in pterygia in multi‐ethnic patients in the Malay Peninsula

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chong, Pei Pei; Tung, Chee Hong; Rahman, Nurul Asyikin bt Abdul; Yajima, Misako; Chin, Fee Wai; Yeng, Crystale Lim Siew; Go, Eng Soon; Chan, Cordelia M. L; Yawata, Nobuyo; Yamamoto, Naoki

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in primary and recurrent pterygia samples collected from different ethnic groups in the equatorial Malay Peninsula...

  3. miR-10b exerts oncogenic activity in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by targeting expression of CUB and sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Qiao; Gong, Li; Wang, Jun; Tu, Qian; Yao, Li; Zhang, Jia-Rui; Han, Xiu-Juan; Zhu, Shao-Jun; Wang, Shu-Mei; Li, Yan-Hong; Zhang, Wei

    2016-10-18

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a lethal disease, while the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of HCC pathogenesis remain to be defined. MicroRNA (miRNA), a class of non-coding small RNAs, can post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression. Altered miRNA expression has been reported in HCCs. This study assessed expression and the oncogenic activity of miRNA-10b (miR-10b) in HCC. Forty-five paired human HCC and adjacent non-tumor tissues were collected for qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analysis of miR-10b and CUB and Sushi multiple domains 1 (CSMD1), respectively. We analyzed the clinicopathological data from these patients to further determine if there was an association between miR-10b and CSMD1. HCC cell lines were used to assess the effects of miR-10b mimics or inhibitors on cell viability, migration, invasion, cell cycle distribution, and colony formation. Luciferase assay was used to assess miR-10b binding to the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of CSMD1. miR-10b was highly expressed in HCC tissues compared to normal tissues. In vitro, overexpression of miR-10b enhanced HCC cell viability, migration, and invasion; whereas, downregulation of miR-10b expression suppressed these properties in HCC cells. Injection of miR-10b mimics into tumor cell xenografts also promoted xenograft growth in nude mice. Bioinformatics and luciferase reporter assay demonstrated that CSMD1 was the target gene of miR-10b. Immunocytochemical, immunohistochemical, and qRT-PCR data indicated that miR-10b decreased CSMD1 expression in HCC cells. We showed that miR-10b is overexpressed in HCC tissues and miR-10b mimics promoted HCC cell viability and invasion via targeting CSMD1 expression. Our findings suggest that miR-10b acts as an oncogene by targeting the tumor suppressor gene, CSMD1, in HCC.

  4. The In Vitro Effect of Acidic-Pepsin on Nuclear Factor KappaB Activation and Its Related Oncogenic Effect on Normal Human Hypopharyngeal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarence T Sasaki

    Full Text Available Extra-esophageal carcinogenesis has been widely discussed in relation to the chronic effects of laryngopharyngeal reflux and most prominently with pepsin historically central to this discussion. With refluxate known to include gastric (pepsin and duodenal (bile fluids, we recently demonstrated the mechanistic role of NF-κB in mediating the preneoplastic effects of acidic-bile. However, the role of pepsin in promoting hypopharyngeal premalignant events remains historically unclear. Here, we investigate the in vitro effect of acidic-pepsin on the NF-κB oncogenic pathway to better define its potential role in hypopharyngeal neoplasia.Human hypopharyngeal primary cells (HHPC and keratinocytes (HHK were repetitively exposed to physiologic pepsin concentrations (0.1 mg/ml at pH 4.0, 5.0 and 7.0. Cellular localization of phospho-NF-κB and bcl-2 was determined using immunofluorescence and western blotting. NF-κB transcriptional activity was tested by luc reporter and qPCR. Analysis of DNA content of pepsin treated HHK and HHPC was performed using Fluorescence-activated-cell sorting assay. To explore a possible dose related effect, pepsin concentration was reduced from 0.1 to 0.05 and 0.01 mg/ml.At physiologic concentration, acidic-pepsin (0.1 mg/ml at pH 4.0 is lethal to most normal hypopharyngeal cells. However, in surviving cells, no NF-κB transcriptional activity is noted. Acidic-pepsin fails to activate the NF-κB or bcl-2, TNF-α, EGFR, STAT3, and wnt5α but increases the Tp53 mRNAs, in both HHPC and HHK. Weakly acidic-pepsin (pH 5.0 and neutral-pepsin (pH 7.0 induce mild activation of NF-κB with increase in TNF-α mRNAs, without oncogenic transcriptional activity. Lower concentrations of pepsin at varying pH do not produce NF-κB activity or transcriptional activation of the analyzed genes.Our findings in vitro do not support the role of acidic-pepsin in NF-κB related hypopharyngeal carcinogenesis.

  5. Codon optimization of the human papillomavirus E7 oncogene induces a CD8+ T cell response to a cryptic epitope not harbored by wild-type E7.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix K M Lorenz

    Full Text Available Codon optimization of nucleotide sequences is a widely used method to achieve high levels of transgene expression for basic and clinical research. Until now, immunological side effects have not been described. To trigger T cell responses against human papillomavirus, we incubated T cells with dendritic cells that were pulsed with RNA encoding the codon-optimized E7 oncogene. All T cell receptors isolated from responding T cell clones recognized target cells expressing the codon-optimized E7 gene but not the wild type E7 sequence. Epitope mapping revealed recognition of a cryptic epitope from the +3 alternative reading frame of codon-optimized E7, which is not encoded by the wild type E7 sequence. The introduction of a stop codon into the +3 alternative reading frame protected the transgene product from recognition by T cell receptor gene-modified T cells. This is the first experimental study demonstrating that codon optimization can render a transgene artificially immunogenic through generation of a dominant cryptic epitope. This finding may be of great importance for the clinical field of gene therapy to avoid rejection of gene-corrected cells and for the design of DNA- and RNA-based vaccines, where codon optimization may artificially add a strong immunogenic component to the vaccine.

  6. V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) contributes to poor disease outcome in humans and mice with pneumococcal meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valls Serón, Mercedes; Ferwerda, Bart; Engelen-Lee, JooYeon; Geldhoff, Madelijn; Jaspers, Valery; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Tanck, Michael W; Baas, Frank; van der Ende, Arie; Brouwer, Matthijs C; van de Beek, Diederik

    2016-05-18

    Pneumococcal meningitis is the most common and severe form of bacterial meningitis. Fatality rates are substantial, and long-term sequelae develop in about half of survivors. Here, we have performed a prospective nationwide genetic association study using the Human Exome BeadChip and identified gene variants in encoding dynactin 4 (DCTN4), retinoic acid early transcript 1E (RAET1E), and V-akt murine thymoma viral oncogene homolog 3 (AKT3) to be associated with unfavourable outcome in patients with pneumococcal meningitis. No clinical replication cohort is available, so we validated the role of one of these targets, AKT3, in a pneumococcal meningitis mouse model. Akt3 deficient mice had worse survival and increased histopathology scores for parenchymal damage (infiltration) and vascular infiltration (large meningeal artery inflammation) but similar bacterial loads, cytokine responses, compared to wild-type mice. We found no differences in cerebrospinal fluid cytokine levels between patients with risk or non-risk alleles. Patients with the risk genotype (rs10157763, AA) presented with low scores on the Glasgow Coma Scale and high rate of epileptic seizures. Thus, our results show that AKT3 influences outcome of pneumococcal meningitis.

  7. Herpes viruses and tumours in kidney transplant recipients. The role of immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponticelli, Claudio

    2011-06-01

    Herpes virus infections are frequent in renal transplant recipients. Some herpes viruses are not only responsible for life-threatening infections and renal graft injury but can also increase the risk of malignancy. Three herpes viruses, namely cytomegalovirus (CMV) or human herpes virus 5, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) or herpes virus 4 and human herpes virus 8 (HHV8), may play an oncogenic role. The oncogenic role of CMV is controversial. However, there is growing evidence showing that CMV can infect cancer cells and favour their resistance to the immune system and chemotherapy. B cells infected by EBV can have uncontrolled proliferation eventually resulting in polyclonal polymorphic or monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative diseases (PTLD), which are particularly frequent in children and in EBV-negative recipients. In some ethnicities, the carriers of HHV8 are susceptible to develop Kaposi's sarcoma after transplantation. The intensity of immunosuppression therapy plays a critical role in mediating infections from oncogenic herpes viruses. However, the type of immunosuppressive drugs can also influence the risk of virus-mediated neoplasias. An aggressive induction therapy aimed at depleting lymphocytes may favour the reactivation and dissemination of oncogenic herpes viruses, while anti-CD25 monoclonal antibodies have little impact on virus reactivation. Calcineurin inhibitors can increase the risk of viral infections and malignancy. Mycofenolate salts may perhaps protect from EBV-related PTLD. Finally, the inhibitors of the mammalian target of rapamycine may reduce the risk of viral disease by inhibiting the cascade of kinases that govern the proliferation and replication of oncogenic herpes viruses.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Wendy K; Heng, Benjamin; Delprado, Warick; Iacopetta, Barry; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV), high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV) co-exist in some breast cancers. All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis) and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc). EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%), HPV, 20%) and MMTV (32%) of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. We conclude that (i) EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii) the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  9. Epstein-Barr virus, human papillomavirus and mouse mammary tumour virus as multiple viruses in breast cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wendy K Glenn

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The purpose of this investigation is to determine if Epstein Barr virus (EBV, high risk human papillomavirus (HPV, and mouse mammary tumour viruses (MMTV co-exist in some breast cancers. MATERIALS AND METHODS: All the specimens were from women residing in Australia. For investigations based on standard PCR, we used fresh frozen DNA extracts from 50 unselected invasive breast cancers. For normal breast specimens, we used DNA extracts from epithelial cells from milk donated by 40 lactating women. For investigations based on in situ PCR we used 27 unselected archival formalin fixed breast cancer specimens and 18 unselected archival formalin fixed normal breast specimens from women who had breast reduction surgery. Thirteen of these fixed breast cancer specimens were ductal carcinoma in situ (dcis and 14 were predominantly invasive ductal carcinomas (idc. RESULTS: EBV sequences were identified in 68%, high risk HPV sequences in 50%, and MMTV sequences in 78% of DNA extracted from 50 invasive breast cancer specimens. These same viruses were identified in selected normal and breast cancer specimens by in situ PCR. Sequences from more than one viral type were identified in 72% of the same breast cancer specimens. Normal controls showed these viruses were also present in epithelial cells in human milk - EBV (35%, HPV, 20% and MMTV (32% of 40 milk samples from normal lactating women, with multiple viruses being identified in 13% of the same milk samples. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that (i EBV, HPV and MMTV gene sequences are present and co-exist in many human breast cancers, (ii the presence of these viruses in breast cancer is associated with young age of diagnosis and possibly an increased grade of breast cancer.

  10. A new class of synthetic peptide inhibitors blocks attachment and entry of human pathogenic viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krepstakies, Marcel; Lucifora, Julie; Nagel, Claus-Henning; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Holstermann, Barbara; Hohenberg, Heinrich; Kowalski, Ina; Gutsmann, Thomas; Baumert, Thomas F; Brandenburg, Klaus; Hauber, Joachim; Protzer, Ulrike

    2012-06-01

    Many enveloped viruses, including herpes viruses, hepatitis B virus (HBV), and hepatitis C virus (HCV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), are among the most important human pathogens and are often responsible for coinfections involving ≥2 types of viruses. However, therapies that are effective against multiple virus classes are rare. Here we present a new class of synthetic anti-lipopolysaccharide peptides (SALPs) that bind to heparan sulfate moieties on the cell surface and inhibit infection with a variety of enveloped viruses. We demonstrate that SALPs inhibit entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, HBV, and HCV to their respective host cells. Despite their high antiviral efficiency, SALPs were well tolerated, and neither toxicity nor measurable inhibitor-induced adverse effects were observed. Since these broad-spectrum antiviral peptides target a host cell rather than a viral component, they may also be useful for suppression of viruses that are resistant to antiviral drugs.

  11. No evidence of murine leukemia virus-related viruses in live attenuated human vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available The association of xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV-related virus (XMRV in prostate cancer and chronic fatigue syndrome reported in previous studies remains controversial as these results have been questioned by recent data. Nonetheless, concerns have been raised regarding contamination of human vaccines as a possible source of introduction of XMRV and MLV into human populations. To address this possibility, we tested eight live attenuated human vaccines using generic PCR for XMRV and MLV sequences. Viral metagenomics using deep sequencing was also done to identify the possibility of other adventitious agents.All eight live attenuated vaccines, including Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV (SA-14-14-2, varicella (Varivax, measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR-II, measles (Attenuvax, rubella (Meruvax-II, rotavirus (Rotateq and Rotarix, and yellow fever virus were negative for XMRV and highly related MLV sequences. However, residual hamster DNA, but not RNA, containing novel endogenous gammaretrovirus sequences was detected in the JEV vaccine using PCR. Metagenomics analysis did not detect any adventitious viral sequences of public health concern. Intracisternal A particle sequences closest to those present in Syrian hamsters and not mice were also detected in the JEV SA-14-14-2 vaccine. Combined, these results are consistent with the production of the JEV vaccine in Syrian hamster cells.We found no evidence of XMRV and MLV in eight live attenuated human vaccines further supporting the safety of these vaccines. Our findings suggest that vaccines are an unlikely source of XMRV and MLV exposure in humans and are consistent with the mounting evidence on the absence of these viruses in humans.

  12. Local Risk Factors in Genital Human Papilloma Virus Infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Papdopoulus AG, Devaja O, Cason J, Raju KS. The clinical implications of human papilloma virus infection in cervical cancinogenesis and emerging therapies. In: Studd J, editor. Prorgess in Obstetrics and Gynaecology. Vol. 14. Edinburgh: Churchhill Livingstone Publications; 2000. p. 281‑93. 2. Ijaiya MA, Aboyeji PA, ...

  13. Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Agents | Okolie | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article gives a brief review of anti-retroviral agents with activity against the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) the causative agen of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS). It also outlines the principles, mode of action of anti-HIV agents and their sites of therapeutic intervention. Zidovudine or Azidothymidine ...

  14. human papilloma virus genotypes in ghanaian women with cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-08-08

    Aug 8, 2010 ... general primer-mediated PCR and two cocktails of oligonucleotide probes. J. Clin. Microbiol.1995; 33:901-. 905. 21. Fife, K.H., Cramer, H.M., Schroeder, H.M. et al. Detection of multiple human papilloma-virus types in the lower genital tract correlates with cervical dysplasia. J. Med. Virol. 2001; 64: 550-559.

  15. Local Risk Factors in Genital Human Papilloma Virus Infection in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cervical cancer and identified other risk factors. Molecular epidemiologic evidence clearly indicates that certain types of. HPV are the principal cause of invasive cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.[3]. Local Risk Factors in Genital Human Papilloma Virus. Infection in Cervical Smears. Ojiyi EC, Dike IE, Okeudo C, ...

  16. Awareness and knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Awareness and knowledge of human immunodeficiency virus post exposure prophylaxis among Nigerian Family Physicians. ... Conclusion: This study shows that despite high levels of awareness and knowledge of HIV PEP, access to its use among family physicians in Nigeria is still sub‑optimal. Keywords: Family ...

  17. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositivity and hepatitis B ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Method: A total of 130 donors comprising 120 commercial donors and 10 voluntary donors were tested for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B surface antigen in Benin city using Immunocomb HIV - 1 and 2 Biospot kit and Quimica Clinica Aplicada direct latex agglutination method respectively.

  18. Human influenza a virus-specific CD8

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.E. van de Sandt (Carolien); M.L.B. Hillaire (Marine); M.M. Geelhoed-Mieras (Martina); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); R.A.M. Fouchier (Ron); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractAnimal and human studies have demonstrated the importance of influenza A virus (IAV)-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in heterosubtypic cross-protective immunity. Using peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained intermittently from healthy HLA-typed blood donors

  19. Early infant male circumcision for human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Swaziland has the highest prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the world at 26% of the adult population. ... Acceptability of medical circumcision was high in this study, but concerns about safety, pain, autonomy and cultural factors reduce the acceptability of infant circumcision more specifically.

  20. Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection among pregnant women in an antenatal clinic in Port-Harcourt, Nigeria. ... 6, No 3 (2007) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. ... A total of 10,032 pregnant women were screened for the possible occurrence of HIV 1 and HIV 2 within the period.

  1. Acceptability of human papilloma virus vaccine and cervical cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acceptability of human papilloma virus vaccine and cervical cancer screening among female health-care workers in Enugu, Southeast Nigeria. ... Statistical analysis was both descriptive and inferential at 95% confidence level using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) computer software version 16. A P value ...

  2. prevalence of hepatitis a, b, c and human immunodeficiency virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2004-04-01

    Apr 1, 2004 ... PREVALENCE OF HEPATITIS A, B, C AND HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS SEROPOSITIVITY AMONG PATIENTS WITH ACUTE ICTERIC .... computer software. The 95% confidence level was used to assess statistical significance. The Pearson chi-square test was utilised in assesing statistical ...

  3. Disparities in the Magnitude of Human Immunodeficiency Virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disparities in the Magnitude of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-related Opportunistic Infections Between High and Low/Middle-income Countries: Is Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy Changing the ... Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader.

  4. Awareness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To determine the level of awareness of Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection among antenatal clients in Nnewi Nigeria. Subjects and Methods: A cross sectional descriptive study of six hundred consecutive antenatal clients attending the Nnamdi Azikiwe University Teaching Hospital and five private ...

  5. Controlled human infection models for vaccine development: Zika virus debate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopichandran, Vijayaprasad

    2017-10-31

    An ethics panel, convened by the National Institute of Health and other research bodies in the USA, disallowed researchers from the Johns Hopkins University and University of Vermont from performing controlled human infection of healthy volunteers to develop a vaccine against Zika virus infection. The members published their ethical analysis and recommendations in February 2017. They have elaborated on the risks posed by human challenge with Zika virus to the volunteers and other uninvolved third parties and have systematically analysed the social value of such a human challenge experiment. They have also posited some mandatory ethical requirements which should be met before allowing the infection of healthy volunteers with the Zika virus. This commentary elaborates on the debate on the ethics of the human challenge model for the development of a Zika virus vaccine and the role of systematic ethical analysis in protecting the interests of research participants. It further analyses the importance of this debate to the development of a Zika vaccine in India.

  6. seroprevalence of human herpes virus 8 (hhv8) infection among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Praise

    SEROPREVALENCE OF HUMAN HERPES VIRUS 8 (HHV8) INFECTION. AMONG COMMERCIAL SEX WORKERS IN JOS. Zakari1, H., Nimzing2, L., Agabi1, Y. A., Amagam3, P. and Dashen,1 M. M.. 1Department of Microbiology, Faculty of Natural Sciences, University o f Jos, Nigeria. 2Department of Medical Microbiology, ...

  7. Prevalence And Risk Factors For Human Pappiloma Virus Infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human Pappiloma Virus (HPV) infection is a disease of global public health importance, culminating into a high risk of cervical cancer. Most of the risk factors are modifiable, thus making HPV itself preventable. Efforts towards community HPV prevention and vaccination have not yielded the desired results, most especially ...

  8. The Role of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) Testing in Cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Screening for the premalignant lesions has reduced the mortality from cervical cancer mainly in developed countries. Cancer of the cervix is regarded as a sexually transmitted disease because of its association with human papilloma virus. The backbone of screening has been pap smear. The variability of the sensitivity ...

  9. Health Disparity in Human Papilloma Virus Related Infections | Poku ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In spite of the volume of information of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) and the HPV vaccines, there are racial and gender differences in the knowledge and awareness of HPV among Guyanese. The study aimed to assess the knowledge and attitude towards HPV infection, cervical cancer and HPV vaccines. The study was ...

  10. Human Papilloma virus Genotypes in Ghanaian women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human papilloma viruses (HPV s) have been considered to be the necessary and central agents of cervical cancer among women with nearly 80% of cases found in developing countries. Objective: To determine HPV genotypes prevalent in Ghanaian women with cervical cancer. Design: Retrospective study.

  11. The influence of marital factors on genital human papilloma virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To study the association between marital factors and human papilloma virus (HPV) infection of the cervix. Method: The subjects were 450 randomly selected sexually active women attending the antenatal, postnatal, gynaecology and family planning clinics in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology of the ...

  12. Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination for Control of Cervical Cancer ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Pub Med search was done; key words included Human papilloma virus, HPV vaccine and sub-Saharan Africa. Other resources included locally-published articles and additional internet resources. The potential benefit of mass HPV vaccination appears enormous. However, the challenges of competing health demands, ...

  13. human papilloma virus genotypes in ghanaian women with cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    High-risk types such as HPV 16,. 18,31,33,35,39,45,51,52,56,58,66 and 68 are associated. East African Medical Journal Vol. 87 No. 8 August 2010. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS GENOTYPES IN GHANAIAN WOMEN WITH CERVICAL CARCINOMA. S. Attoh, MBChB, MPhil, MWACP, Department of Pathology, University of ...

  14. Human Papilloma Virus vaccination: knowledge, attitude and uptake ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is implicated in the cause of cervical cancer which is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. HPV vaccination is a primary prevention toolagainst HPV infection, thus the need to assess the knowledge, attitude and uptake of HPV vaccination among female ...

  15. Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine: Determinants of Acceptability by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vaccination of adolescent females against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), the causative agent for cervical cancer has recently become available. As minors, parental acceptance of the vaccines for adolescent daughters requires exploration. This was a cross-sectional survey of 201 mothers attending the gynaecology clinic ...

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus infection and child sexual abuse

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection and child sexual abuse. Hendrik Simon Schaaf. Child sexual abuse (CSA) has not previously been regarded as important in the overall transmission of HIV infection to. childrenY However, with both CSA'·' and HIV infection on the increase, the risk of acquiring HIV infection through ...

  17. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by

  18. Prevalence of Anaemia Among Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Anaemia is the most commonly encountered haematological abnormality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients with estimates climbing as high as 95% depending on clinical settings. The twin effects of HIV infection and anaemia in pregnancy is associated with adverse maternal and ...

  19. Animal models of human respiratory syncytial virus disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bem, Reinout A.; Domachowske, Joseph B.; Rosenberg, Helene F.

    2011-01-01

    Infection with the human pneumovirus pathogen, respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), causes a wide spectrum of respiratory disease, notably among infants and the elderly. Laboratory animal studies permit detailed experimental modeling of hRSV disease and are therefore indispensable in the search for

  20. Pregnancy and transmission of Human Immunodefiency Virus (HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: The incidence of HIV transmission to the male uninfected partner in a serodiscodant setting in Jos during pregnancy is low but its occurrence in this study suggests the need to re-test the seronegative male partners after every pregnancy. Keywords: pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus, serodiscordance, ...

  1. Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Co ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    TNHJOURNALPH

    Hepatitis B, C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV). Co-infection in Nigerian Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia. Type of Article:CSWI. 1Lucy Eberechukwu Yaguo Ide, 2Seye Babatunde. Departments of 1Paediatrics And Child ... of haemolytic anemia and one of the most common in our society.1 It is a major cause of.

  2. Awareness and Uptake of Human Papilloma Virus Vaccination and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second leading malignancy affecting women worldwide. Human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination protects against developing cervical cancer. The study was designed to determine the awareness and uptake of HPV vaccination and cervical screening among female undergraduates in ...

  3. Knowledge of the Human Papilloma Virus vaccines, and opinions

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Morhason-Bello et al. HPV Vaccine Knowledge and Opinion. African Journal of Reproductive Health June 2013; 17(2): 150. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Knowledge of the Human Papilloma Virus vaccines, and opinions of. Gynaecologists on its implementation in Nigeria. Imran O. Morhason-Bello*. 1. , Olubukola A.

  4. Knowledge of the Human Papilloma Virus vaccines, and opinions of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to determine the knowledge and perception of Nigerian Obstetricians and Gynaecologists towards human papilloma virus vaccine use in Nigeria. A cross sectional study was conducted amongst participants that attended the 42nd Society of Gynaecology and Obstetrics of Nigeria. The findings ...

  5. Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in Humans and Swine, Bolivia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavallo, Annalisa; Gonzales, José Luis; Bonelli, Sara Irene; Valda, Ybar; Pieri, Angela; Segundo, Higinio; Ibañez, Ramón; Mantella, Antonia; Bartalesi, Filippo; Tolari, Francesco; Bartoloni, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    We determined the seroprevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in persons in 2 rural communities in southeastern Bolivia and the presence of HEV in human and swine fecal samples. HEV seroprevalence was 6.3%, and HEV genotype 3 strains with high sequence homology were detected. PMID:21801630

  6. Oncogenic Papillomavirus and Polyomavirus in Water Environments: Is There a Potential for Waterborne Transmission?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, M; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2014-03-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses through contact with sewage-contaminated water environments can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses. Gastrointestinal symptoms are the most commonly encountered manifestations of waterborne viral illness. Respiratory diseases, neurological diseases and paralysis can also occur. Whether viral infections resulting in health outcomes like cancer might also be transmitted by the waterborne route is unknown. Recently, viruses belonging to two oncogenic groups-Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) and Human Polyomaviruses (HPyVs)-have been detected in urban sewages worldwide. The latter have also been identified in other water environments. HPVs are epitheliotropic viruses responsible for several diseases of skin and mucosae, from common warts to squamous intraepithelial lesions that can either heal or progress to invasive carcinoma of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus or oropharynx. Human PyVs infect different tissues and organs, causing infections that are usually subclinical in immunocompetent individuals but can be serious in immunocompromised hosts. These pathogens belong to a family of DNA tumour viruses. Merkel cell polyomavirus, a HPyV identified in recent years, has attracted much attention due to its link with a rare and aggressive form of human cancer. Merkel cell carcinoma, the incidence of which has tripled over the past two decades. JC polyomavirus and BK polyomavirus are also potentially oncogenic. The observed abundance and wide dissemination of HPVs and HPyVs in water environments strongly suggest the need to shed light on the fate of these viruses in water environments and to elucidate their potential for waterborne transmission. Such information is essential for the improvement of wastewater management programs in terms of both sewage treatment and water quality surveillance.

  7. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Wendy K; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2012-09-01

    Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Standard (liquid) and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer.High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15%) from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%). The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers.

  8. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wendy K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Findings Standard (liquid and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer. High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15% from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%. Conclusion The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers.

  9. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  10. Norovirus and other human enteric viruses in moroccan shellfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benabbes, Laila; Ollivier, Joanna; Schaeffer, Julien; Parnaudeau, Sylvain; Rhaissi, Houria; Nourlil, Jalal; Le Guyader, Françoise S

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of human enteric viruses in shellfish collected along the Mediterranean Sea and Atlantic Coast of Morocco. A total of 77 samples were collected from areas potentially contaminated by human sewage. Noroviruses were detected in 30 % of samples, with an equal representation of GI and GII strains, but were much more frequently found in cockles or clams than in oysters. The method used, including extraction efficiency controls, allowed the quantification of virus concentration. As in previous reports, results showed levels of contamination between 100 and 1,000 copies/g of digestive tissues. Sapoviruses were detected in 13 % of samples mainly in oyster and clam samples. Hepatitis A virus was detected in two samples, with concentrations around 100 RNA copies/g of digestive tissues. Only two samples were contaminated with enterovirus and none with norovirus GIV or Aichi virus. This study highlights the interest of studying shellfish samples from different countries and different production areas. A better knowledge of shellfish contamination helps us to understand virus levels in shellfish and to improve shellfish safety, thus protecting consumers.

  11. Zika Virus Infects Human Fetal Brain Microglia and Induces Inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lum, Fok-Moon; Low, Donovan K S; Fan, Yiping; Tan, Jeslin J L; Lee, Bernett; Chan, Jerry K Y; Rénia, Laurent; Ginhoux, Florent; Ng, Lisa F P

    2017-04-01

    The unprecedented reemergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) has startled the world with reports of increased microcephaly in Brazil. ZIKV can infect human neural progenitors and impair brain growth. However, direct evidence of ZIKV infection in human fetal brain tissues remains elusive. Investigations were performed with brain cell preparations obtained from 9 donors. Virus infectivity was assessed by detection of virus antigen by flow cytometry together with various hematopoietic cell surface markers. Virus replication was determined by viral RNA quantification. Cytokine levels in supernatant obtained from virus-infected fetal brain cells were measured simultaneously in microbead-based immunoassays. We also show that ZIKV infection was particularly evident in hematopoietic cells with microglia, the brain-resident macrophage population being one of the main targets. Infection induces high levels of proinflammatory immune mediators such as interleukin 6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1β (IL-1β), and monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1). Our results highlight an important role for microglia and neuroinflammation during congenital ZIKV pathogenesis.

  12. N-Myc expression enhances the oncolytic effects of vesicular stomatitis virus in human neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Corredor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available N-myc oncogene amplification is associated but not present in all cases of high-risk neuroblastoma (NB. Since oncogene expression could often modulate sensitivity to oncolytic viruses, we wanted to examine if N-myc expression status would determine virotherapy efficacy to high-risk NB. We showed that induction of exogenous N-myc in a non-N-myc-amplified cell line background (TET-21N increased susceptibility to oncolytic vesicular stomatitis virus (mutant VSVδM51 and alleviated the type I IFN-induced antiviral state. Cells with basal N-myc, on the other hand, were less susceptible to virus-induced oncolysis and established a robust IFN-mediated antiviral state. The same effects were also observed in NB cell lines with and without N-myc amplification. Microarray analysis showed that N-myc overexpression in TET-21N cells downregulated IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs with known antiviral functions. Furthermore, virus infection caused significant changes in global gene expression in TET-21N cells overexpressing N-myc. Such changes involved ISGs with various functions. Therefore, the present study showed that augmented susceptibility to VSVδM51 by N-myc at least involves downregulation of ISGs with antiviral functions and alleviation of the IFN-stimulated antiviral state. Our studies suggest the potential utility of N-myc amplification/overexpression as a predictive biomarker of virotherapy response for high-risk NB using IFN-sensitive oncolytic viruses.

  13. Concurrent detection of other respiratory viruses in children shedding viable human respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, T B; Paula, F E; Iwamoto, M A; Proença-Modena, J L; Santos, A E; Camara, A A; Cervi, M C; Cintra, O A L; Arruda, E

    2013-10-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is an important cause of respiratory disease. The majority of studies addressing the importance of virus co-infections to the HRSV-disease have been based on the detection of HRSV by RT-PCR, which may not distinguish current replication from prolonged shedding of remnant RNA from previous HRSV infections. To assess whether co-detections of other common respiratory viruses are associated with increased severity of HRSV illnesses from patients who were shedding viable-HRSV, nasopharyngeal aspirates from children younger than 5 years who sought medical care for respiratory infections in Ribeirão Preto (Brazil) were tested for HRSV by immunofluorescence, RT-PCR and virus isolation in cell culture. All samples with viable-HRSV were tested further by PCR for other respiratory viruses. HRSV-disease severity was assessed by a clinical score scale. A total of 266 samples from 247 children were collected and 111 (42%) were HRSV-positive. HRSV was isolated from 70 (63%), and 52 (74%) of them were positive for at least one additional virus. HRSV-positive diseases were more severe than HRSV-negative ones, but there was no difference in disease severity between patients with viable-HRSV and those HRSV-positives by RT-PCR. Co-detection of other viruses did not correlate with increased disease severity. HRSV isolation in cell culture does not seem to be superior to RT-PCR to distinguish infections associated with HRSV replication in studies of clinical impact of HRSV. A high rate of co-detection of other respiratory viruses was found in samples with viable-HRSV, but this was not associated with more severe HRSV infection. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Virus-neutralizing antibody response of mice to consecutive infection with human and avian influenza A viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janulíková, J; Stropkovská, A; Bobišová, Z; Košík, I; Mucha, V; Kostolanský, F; Varečková, E

    2015-06-01

    In this work we simulated in a mouse model a naturally occurring situation of humans, who overcame an infection with epidemic strains of influenza A, and were subsequently exposed to avian influenza A viruses (IAV). The antibody response to avian IAV in mice previously infected with human IAV was analyzed. We used two avian IAV (A/Duck/Czechoslovakia/1956 (H4N6) and the attenuated virus rA/Viet Nam/1203-2004 (H5N1)) as well as two human IAV isolates (virus A/Mississippi/1/1985 (H3N2) of medium virulence and A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (H1N1) of high virulence). Two repeated doses of IAV of H4 or of H5 virus elicited virus-specific neutralizing antibodies in mice. Exposure of animals previously infected with human IAV (of H3 or H1 subtype) to IAV of H4 subtype led to the production of antibodies neutralizing H4 virus in a level comparable with the level of antibodies against the human IAV used for primary infection. In contrast, no measurable levels of virus-neutralizing (VN) antibodies specific to H5 virus were detected in mice infected with H5 virus following a previous infection with human IAV. In both cases the secondary infection with avian IAV led to a significant increase of the titer of VN antibodies specific to the corresponding human virus used for primary infection. Moreover, cross-reactive HA2-specific antibodies were also induced by sequential infection. By virtue of these results we suggest that the differences in the ability of avian IAV to induce specific antibodies inhibiting virus replication after previous infection of mice with human viruses can have an impact on the interspecies transmission and spread of avian IAV in the human population.

  15. Varicella Zoster Virus (VZV-Human Neuron Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don Gilden

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV is a highly neurotropic, exclusively human herpesvirus. Primary infection causes varicella (chickenpox, wherein VZV replicates in multiple organs, particularly the skin. Widespread infection in vivo is confirmed by the ability of VZV to kill tissue culture cells in vitro derived from any organ. After varicella, VZV becomes latent in ganglionic neurons along the entire neuraxis. During latency, virus DNA replication stops, transcription is restricted, and no progeny virions are produced, indicating a unique virus-cell (neuron relationship. VZV reactivation produces zoster (shingles, often complicated by serious neurological and ocular disorders. The molecular trigger(s for reactivation, and thus the identity of a potential target to prevent it, remains unknown due to an incomplete understanding of the VZV-neuron interaction. While no in vitro system has yet recapitulated the findings in latently infected ganglia, recent studies show that VZV infection of human neurons in SCID mice and of human stem cells, including induced human pluripotent stem cells and normal human neural progenitor tissue-like assemblies, can be established in the absence of a cytopathic effect. Usefulness of these systems in discovering the mechanisms underlying reactivation awaits analyses of VZV-infected, highly pure (>90%, terminally differentiated human neurons capable of prolonged survival in vitro.

  16. 75 FR 51273 - Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately Affected Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    ... Announcement CDC-RFA-PS10-10138, ``Expanded Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Testing for Disproportionately... Assistance Number: 93.523 The Affordable Care Act: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention and Public... Number 93.523 The Affordable Care Act: Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Prevention and Public Health...

  17. 21 CFR 610.46 - Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) âlookbackâ... Disease Agents § 610.46 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) “lookback” requirements. (a) If you are an... calendar days after a donor tests reactive for evidence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection...

  18. Continental synchronicity of human influenza virus epidemics despite climactic variation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoghegan, Jemma L; Saavedra, Aldo F; Duchêne, Sebastián; Sullivan, Sheena; Barr, Ian; Holmes, Edward C

    2018-01-01

    The factors that determine the pattern and rate of spread of influenza virus at a continental-scale are uncertain. Although recent work suggests that influenza epidemics in the United States exhibit a strong geographical correlation, the spatiotemporal dynamics of influenza in Australia, a country and continent of approximately similar size and climate complexity but with a far smaller population, are not known. Using a unique combination of large-scale laboratory-confirmed influenza surveillance comprising >450,000 entries and genomic sequence data we determined the local-level spatial diffusion of this important human pathogen nationwide in Australia. We used laboratory-confirmed influenza data to characterize the spread of influenza virus across Australia during 2007-2016. The onset of established epidemics varied across seasons, with highly synchronized epidemics coinciding with the emergence of antigenically distinct viruses, particularly during the 2009 A/H1N1 pandemic. The onset of epidemics was largely synchronized between the most populous cities, even those separated by distances of >3000 km and those that experience vastly diverse climates. In addition, by analyzing global phylogeographic patterns we show that the synchronized dissemination of influenza across Australian cities involved multiple introductions from the global influenza population, coupled with strong domestic connectivity, rather than through the distinct radial patterns of geographic dispersal that are driven by work-flow transmission as observed in the United States. In addition, by comparing the spatial structure of influenza A and B, we found that these viruses tended to occupy different geographic regions, and peak in different seasons, perhaps indicative of moderate cross-protective immunity or viral interference effects. The highly synchronized outbreaks of influenza virus at a continental-scale revealed here highlight the importance of coordinated public health responses in the

  19. Roles of the PDZ-binding motif of HPV 16 E6 protein in oncogenic transformation of human cervical keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimatsu, Yuki; Nakahara, Tomomi; Tanaka, Katsuyuki; Inagawa, Yuki; Narisawa-Saito, Mako; Yugawa, Takashi; Ohno, Shin-Ichi; Fujita, Masatoshi; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Kiyono, Tohru

    2017-07-01

    The high-risk human papillomavirus E6 proteins have been shown to interact with and lead to degradation of PDZ-domain-containing proteins through its carboxy-terminal motif. This PDZ-binding motif plays important roles in transformation of cultured cells and carcinogenesis of E6-transgenic mice. However, its biological effects on the natural host cells have not been elucidated. We have examined its roles in an in vitro carcinogenesis model for cervical cancer, in which E6 and E7 together with activated HRAS (HRASG12V ) can induce tumorigenic transformation of normal human cervical keratinocytes. In this model, E6Δ151 mutant, which is defective in binding to PDZ domains, almost lost tumorigenic ability, whereas E6SAT mutant, which is defective in p53 degradation showed activity close to wild-type E6. Interestingly, we found decreased expression of PAR3 in E6-expressing cells independently of E6AP, which has not been previously recognized. Therefore, we knocked down several PDZ-domain containing proteins including PAR3 in human cervical keratinocytes expressing E7, HRASG12V and E6Δ151 to examine whether depletion of these proteins can restore the tumorigenic ability. Single knockdown of SCRIB, MAGI1 or PAR3 significantly but partially restored the tumorigenic ability. The combinatorial knockdown of SCRIB and MAGI1 cooperatively restored the tumorigenic ability, and additional depletion of PAR3 further enhanced the tumorigenic ability surpassing that induced by wild-type E6. These data highlight the importance of the carboxy-terminal motif of the E6 protein and downregulation of PAR3 in tumorigenic transformation of human cervical keratinocytes. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Update on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-2 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Yesufu, Omobolaji T; Gandhi, Rajesh T

    2011-03-15

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) occurs mainly in West Africa, but an increasing number of cases have been recognized in Europe, India, and the United States. In this era of global integration, clinicians must be aware of when to consider the diagnosis of HIV-2 infection and how to test for this virus. Although there is debate regarding when therapy should be initiated and which regimen should be chosen, recent trials have provided important information on treatment options for HIV-2 infection. In this review, we present information on recent clinical advances in our understanding of HIV-2 infection and highlight remaining diagnostic and therapeutic challenges.

  1. New human pathogenic dengue like virus infections (Zika, Alkhumraand Mayaro viruses: a short review

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    Sora Yasri

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an important pathogenic arbovirus that causes acute febrile illness with hemorrhagic complication. This disease is an important tropical disease that is the present public health threat. To diagnose dengue, it is usually based on clinical diagnosis. However, there are many dengues like infections that can be easily missed diagnosed. In the past decades, there are many new emerging dengues like infections that should be mentioned. Here, the authors briefly review on 2 important new human pathogenic dengue like virus infections (Zika, Alkhumra and Mayaro viruses.

  2. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication prior to Reverse Transcription by Influenza Virus Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Blazevic, Vesna; Patterson, Bruce K.; Mac Trubey, C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Gene M Shearer

    2000-01-01

    It is now recognized that, in addition to drug-mediated therapies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the immune system can exert antiviral effects via CD8+ T-cell-generated anti-HIV factors. This study demonstrates that (i) supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with influenza A virus inhibit replication of CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 isolates prior to reverse transcription; (ii) the HIV-suppressive supernatants can be generated by CD4- or CD...

  3. Molecular principles of human virus protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halehalli, Rachita Ramachandra; Nagarajaram, Hampapathalu Adimurthy

    2015-04-01

    Viruses, from the human protein-protein interaction network perspective, target hubs, bottlenecks and interconnected nodes enriched in certain biological pathways. However, not much is known about the general characteristic features of the human proteins interacting with viral proteins (referred to as hVIPs) as well as the motifs and domains utilized by human-virus protein-protein interactions (referred to as Hu-Vir PPIs). Our study has revealed that hVIPs are mostly disordered proteins, whereas viral proteins are mostly ordered proteins. Protein disorder in viral proteins and hVIPs varies from one subcellular location to another. In any given viral-human PPI pair, at least one of the two proteins is structurally disordered suggesting that disorder associated conformational flexibility as one of the characteristic features of virus-host interaction. Further analyses reveal that hVIPs are (i) slowly evolving proteins, (ii) associated with high centrality scores in human-PPI network, (iii) involved in multiple pathways, (iv) enriched in eukaryotic linear motifs (ELMs) associated with protein modification, degradation and regulatory processes, (v) associated with high number of splice variants and (vi) expressed abundantly across multiple tissues. These aforementioned findings suggest that conformational flexibility, spatial diversity, abundance and slow evolution are the characteristic features of the human proteins targeted by viral proteins. Hu-Vir PPIs are mostly mediated via domain-motif interactions (DMIs) where viral proteins employ motifs that mimic host ELMs to bind to domains in human proteins. DMIs are shared among viruses belonging to different families indicating a possible convergent evolution of these motifs to help viruses to adopt common strategies to subvert host cellular pathways. Hu-Vir PPI data, DDI and DMI data for human-virus PPI can be downloaded from http://cdfd.org.in/labpages/computational_biology_datasets.html. Supplementary data are

  4. Hepatitis B and C Viruses Infections and Their Association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus: A Cross-Sectional Study among Blood Donors in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yami, Alemeshet; Alemseged, Fissehaye; Hassen, Alima

    2011-03-01

    Since the introduction of Highly Active Anti-Retroviral Therapy and the dramatic improvement in the prognosis of individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus, liver disease due to chronic viral hepatitis has become as important cause of morbidity and mortality in co-infected individuals. The objective of the study was to determine the Sero-prevalence of Hepatitis B Virus, Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus and the association of the virus with Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatitis C Virus infection. As Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis B Virus infections are highly prevalent and they are among the major public health concern in developing countries including Ethiopia investigating this problem is of paramount benefit. Although studies on co-infection of Hepatitis C Virus and Human Immunodeficiency Virus have clearly identified adverse effects of co-infection, the prevalence of Hepatitis C Virus infection and the association with Human Immunodeficiency Virus in developing countries including Ethiopia has not been know for sure. A cross sectional study was conducted from January 1 to 31, 2010, in Jimma University specialized hospital Blood Bank. The inclusion criteria of the study was adult who donated blood to Jimma University specialized hospital blood bank any time from establishment of the unit until January 2010 and whose record was retrieved. Accordingly 9,204 adults were included of which 6,063 were selected by lottery method. Data on socio-demographic variables (age and sex), laboratory test result for Hepatitis B surface Antigen, anti-Hepatitis C Virus antibody, anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus 1 antibody, and Rapid Plasma Reagin tests were collected using structured questionnaire. After the data were collected, they were entered into a computer and analyzed using SPSS -16 for windows. P-Value of Virus, Hepatitis C Virus, Human Immunodeficiency Virus and syphilis infection were 2.1%, 0.2%, 2.1% and 0.7%, respectively. Sex and age had

  5. Oncogenic HPV among HIV infected female population in West Bengal, India

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    Sengupta Sharmila

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prevalence of both cervical cancer and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV infection are very high in India. Natural history of Human Papilloma Virus (HPV infection is known to be altered in HIV positive women and there is an increased possibility of persistence of HPV infections in this population. Therefore, this study was conducted to understand the epidemiology and circulating genotypes of oncogenic HPV among HIV positive and negative female population in West Bengal, India. Methods In this hospital-based cross-sectional study, 93 known HIV positive females attending a pre-ART registration clinic and 1106 HIV negative females attending a Reproductive and Child Health Care Clinic were subjected to study. Cervical cell samples collected from the study population were tested for the presence of HPV 16, 18 using specific primers. Roche PCR assay was used to detect other specific HPV genotypes in the cervical cells specimens of HIV positive cases only. Results Prevalence of HPV 16, 18 among HIV positive females (32.2%; n = 30 was higher than HIV negative females (9.1%; n = 101. About 53% (23/43 of cases with oncogenic HPV were infected with genotypes other than 16, 18 either as single/multiple infections. HPV 18 and HPV 16 were the predominant genotypes among HIV positive and HIV negative subjects respectively. Oncogenic HPV was not found to be associated with age and duration of sexual exposure. But the presence of HIV was found to a statistically significant predictor oncogenic HPV. Conclusion The currently available HPV vaccines offer protection only against HPV 16 and 18 and some cross- protection to few associated genotypes. These vaccines are therefore less likely to offer protection against cervical cancer in HIV positive women a high percentage of who were infected with non-16 and non-18 oncogenic HPV genotypes. Additionally, there is a lack of sufficient evidence of immunogenicity in HIV infected individuals. Therefore

  6. Human papillomavirus oncogenic mRNA testing for cervical cancer screening: baseline and longitudinal results from the CLEAR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Jennifer L; Wright, Thomas C; Stoler, Mark H; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Dockter, Janel; Getman, Damon; Giachetti, Cristina

    2015-09-01

    This study determined the longitudinal clinical performance of a high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) E6/E7 RNA assay (Aptima HPV [AHPV]; Hologic, San Diego, CA) compared with an HR-HPV DNA assay (Hybrid Capture 2 [HC2]; Qiagen, Gaithersburg, MD) as an adjunctive method for cervical cancer screening. Women 30 years or older with a negative result for intraepithelial lesions or malignancy cytology (n = 10,860) positive by AHPV and/or HC2 assays and randomly selected women negative by both assays were referred to colposcopy at baseline. Women without baseline cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade 2 or higher (CIN2+) continued into the 3-year follow-up. The specificity of AHPV for CIN2 or lower was significantly greater at 96.3% compared with HC2 specificity of 94.8% (P detection of CIN2+ were similar between the two assays. After 3 years of follow-up, women negative by either human papillomavirus test had a very low risk of CIN2+ (<0.3%) compared with CIN2+ risk in women with positive AHPV results (6.3%) or positive HC2 results (5.1%). These results support the use of AHPV as a safe and effective adjunctive cervical cancer screening method. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  7. LMP1-induced cell death may contribute to the emergency of its oncogenic property.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocqueville, Guillaume; Ndour, Papa Alioune; Ouk, Tan-Sothéa; Le Goff, Arnaud; De Witte, Caroline; Mougel, Alexandra; Coll, Jean; Fafeur, Véronique; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Adriaenssens, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1) is linked to a variety of malignancies including Hodgkin's disease, lymphomas, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinoma. LMP1 exerts its transforming or oncogenic activity mainly through the recruitment of intracellular adapters via LMP1 C-terminal Transformation Effector Sites (TES) 1 and 2. However, LMP1 is also reported to elicit significant cytotoxic effects in some other cell types. This cytotoxic effect is quite intriguing for an oncogenic protein, and it is unclear whether both functional aspects of the protein are related or mutually exclusive. Using different ectopic expression systems in both Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cells and human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells, we observe that LMP1 ectopic expression massively induces cell death. Furthermore, we show that LMP1-induced cytotoxicity mainly implies LMP1 C-terminal transformation effector sites and TRADD recruitment. However, stable expression of LMP1 in the same cells, is found to be associated with an increase of cell survival and an acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype as evidenced by morphological modifications, increased cell mobility, increased expression of MMP9 and decreased expression of E-cadherin. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic and oncogenic effects of LMP1 are not mutually exclusive but may operate sequentially. We suggest that in a total cell population, cells resistant to LMP1-induced cytotoxicity are those that could take advantage of LMP1 oncogenic activity by integrating LMP1 signaling into the pre-existent signaling network. Our findings thus reconcile the apparent opposite apoptotic and oncogenic effects described for LMP1 and might reflect what actually happens on LMP1-induced cell transformation after EBV infection in patients.

  8. LMP1-induced cell death may contribute to the emergency of its oncogenic property.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Brocqueville

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 is linked to a variety of malignancies including Hodgkin's disease, lymphomas, nasopharyngeal and gastric carcinoma. LMP1 exerts its transforming or oncogenic activity mainly through the recruitment of intracellular adapters via LMP1 C-terminal Transformation Effector Sites (TES 1 and 2. However, LMP1 is also reported to elicit significant cytotoxic effects in some other cell types. This cytotoxic effect is quite intriguing for an oncogenic protein, and it is unclear whether both functional aspects of the protein are related or mutually exclusive. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using different ectopic expression systems in both Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK epithelial cells and human embryonic kidney HEK-293 cells, we observe that LMP1 ectopic expression massively induces cell death. Furthermore, we show that LMP1-induced cytotoxicity mainly implies LMP1 C-terminal transformation effector sites and TRADD recruitment. However, stable expression of LMP1 in the same cells, is found to be associated with an increase of cell survival and an acquisition of epithelial mesenchymal transition phenotype as evidenced by morphological modifications, increased cell mobility, increased expression of MMP9 and decreased expression of E-cadherin. Our results demonstrate for the first time that the cytotoxic and oncogenic effects of LMP1 are not mutually exclusive but may operate sequentially. We suggest that in a total cell population, cells resistant to LMP1-induced cytotoxicity are those that could take advantage of LMP1 oncogenic activity by integrating LMP1 signaling into the pre-existent signaling network. Our findings thus reconcile the apparent opposite apoptotic and oncogenic effects described for LMP1 and might reflect what actually happens on LMP1-induced cell transformation after EBV infection in patients.

  9. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

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    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  10. Oncogenic human papillomavirus imposes an instructive pattern of DNA methylation changes which parallel the natural history of cervical HPV infection in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, Sarah M; Wei, Wenbin; Collins, Stuart I; Pereira, Merlin; Diyaf, Afaf; Constandinou-Williams, Christothea; Young, Lawrence S; Roberts, Sally; Woodman, Ciarán B

    2012-07-01

    The contribution of early virus-induced epigenetic changes to human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Using genome-wide methylation array profiling and a cell-based model, which supports replication of HPV episomes, we found that transfection of primary human foreskin keratinocytes with episomal forms of high-risk HPV types was followed by upregulation of the DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3B, and changes in the methylation status of cellular genes many of which are reported to be differentially methylated in cervical neoplasia. HPV16- and HPV18-associated changes were not randomly distributed across the genome, but clustered at specific chromosomal locations which mapped on to known HPV integration sites and to chromosomal regions lost and gained in high-grade cervical neoplasia. Methylation changes were directed in part by the same cis-acting factors that appear to direct methylation changes in cancer, the presence of a bivalent chromatin mark in human embryonic stem cells and promoter CpG content; these associations explain much of the ontological profile of genes found to have increased methylation following HPV16 transfection. We were also able to show, using sequential samples from a cohort of young women with incident HPV16 infections, that the detection in cervical samples of methylated forms of the tumour suppressor gene, RARB, often parallels the natural history of cervical HPV infection. Our findings suggest that further investigation of the distribution and determinants of early virus-induced epigenetic reprogramming will provide important insights into the pathogenesis of virus-associated malignancy.

  11. Human Hendra virus infection causes acute and relapsing encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, K T; Robertson, T; Ong, B B; Chong, J W; Yaiw, K C; Wang, L F; Ansford, A J; Tannenberg, A

    2009-06-01

    To study the pathology of two cases of human Hendra virus infection, one with no clinical encephalitis and one with relapsing encephalitis. Autopsy tissues were investigated by light microscopy, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization. In the patient with acute pulmonary syndrome but not clinical acute encephalitis, vasculitis was found in the brain, lung, heart and kidney. Occasionally, viral antigens were demonstrated in vascular walls but multinucleated endothelial syncytia were absent. In the lung, there was severe inflammation, necrosis and viral antigens in type II pneumocytes and macrophages. The rare kidney glomerulus showed inflammation and viral antigens in capillary walls and podocytes. Discrete necrotic/vacuolar plaques in the brain parenchyma were associated with antigens and viral RNA. Brain inflammation was mild although CD68(+) microglia/macrophages were significantly increased. Cytoplasmic viral inclusions and antigens and viral RNA in neurones and ependyma suggested viral replication. In the case of relapsing encephalitis, there was severe widespread meningoencephalitis characterized by neuronal loss, macrophages and other inflammatory cells, reactive blood vessels and perivascular cuffing. Antigens and viral RNA were mainly found in neurones. Vasculitis was absent in all the tissues examined. The case of acute Hendra virus infection demonstrated evidence of systemic infection and acute encephalitis. The case of relapsing Hendra virus encephalitis showed no signs of extraneural infection but in the brain, extensive inflammation and infected neurones were observed. Hendra virus can cause acute and relapsing encephalitis and the findings suggest that the pathology and pathogenesis are similar to Nipah virus infection.

  12. Influenza A Viruses of Human Origin in Swine, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Rejane; Gava, Danielle; Cantão, Maurício Egídio; Ciacci-Zanella, Janice Reis

    2015-01-01

    The evolutionary origins of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus that caused the first outbreak of the 2009 pandemic in Mexico remain unclear, highlighting the lack of swine surveillance in Latin American countries. Although Brazil has one of the largest swine populations in the world, influenza was not thought to be endemic in Brazil’s swine until the major outbreaks of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 in 2009. Through phylogenetic analysis of whole-genome sequences of influenza viruses of the H1N1, H1N2, and H3N2 subtypes collected in swine in Brazil during 2009–2012, we identified multiple previously uncharacterized influenza viruses of human seasonal H1N2 and H3N2 virus origin that have circulated undetected in swine for more than a decade. Viral diversity has further increased in Brazil through reassortment between co-circulating viruses, including A(H1N1)pdm09. The circulation of multiple divergent hemagglutinin lineages challenges the design of effective cross-protective vaccines and highlights the need for additional surveillance. PMID:26196759

  13. Human febrile illness caused by encephalomyocarditis virus infection, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberste, M Steven; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Blair, Patrick; Nix, W Allan; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Comer, James A; Rollin, Pierre; Goldsmith, Cynthia S; Olson, James; Kochel, Tadeusz J

    2009-04-01

    Etiologic studies of acute febrile disease were conducted in sites across South America, including Cusco and Iquitos, Peru. Patients' clinical signs and symptoms were recorded, and acute- and convalescent-phase serum samples were obtained for serologic examination and virus isolation in Vero E6 and C6/36 cells. Virus isolated in Vero E6 cells was identified as encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) by electron microscopy and by subsequent molecular diagnostic testing of samples from 2 febrile patients with nausea, headache, and dyspnea. The virus was recovered from acute-phase serum samples from both case-patients and identified with cardiovirus-specific reverse transcription-PCR and sequencing. Serum samples from case-patient 1 showed cardiovirus antibody by immunoglobulin M ELISA (acute phase 1,024) and by neutralization assay (acute phase 1,280). Serum samples from case-patient 2 did not contain antibodies detectable by either assay. Detection of virus in serum strongly supports a role for EMCV in human infection and febrile illness.

  14. [Identification and genotyping of oncogenic type of human papillomavirus in paraffin-embedded cervical cancer samples in Guangzhou].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li; Yu, Shou-yi; Gou, Sui-qun; Yun, Jin-ping; Zhang, Jun

    2009-12-01

    To investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and genotyping in patients with cervical cancer in Guangzhou in the last 3 decades. HPV L1 gene fragment in paraffin-embedded cervical cancer samples was amplified by HPV-specific PCR with consensus primers, and typing of HPV strains was performed on the basis of sequence analysis of the PCR products. The positivity rates of HPV DNA was 26.2% in the 99 cases of cervical cancer. Five HPV genotypes were identified including HPV16, 18, 33, 52 and 58. HPV16, 58 and 33 are the most common genotypes of HPV, accounting for over 88.4% in the total infected cases, suggesting that the HPV genotypes closely related to cervical cancer is more centralized in Guangzhou.

  15. Activating the expression of human K-rasG12D stimulates oncogenic transformation in transgenic goat fetal fibroblast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianhua Gong

    Full Text Available Humane use of preclinical large animal cancer models plays a critical role in understanding cancer biology and developing therapeutic treatments. Among the large animal candidates, goats have great potentials as sustainable sources for large animal cancer model development. Goats are easier to handle and cheaper to raise. The genome of the goats has been sequenced recently. It has been known that goats develop skin, adrenal cortex, breast and other types of cancers. Technically, goats are subject to somatic cell nuclear transfer more efficiently and exhibit better viability through the cloning process. Towards the development of a goat cancer model, we created a transgenic goat fetal fibroblast (GFF cell as the donor cell for SCNT. Human mutated K-ras (hK-rasG12D was chosen as the transgene, as it is present in 20% of cancers. Both hK-rasG12D and a herpes simplex viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk reporter genes, flanked by a pair of LoxP sites, were knocked in the GFF endogenous K-ras locus through homologous recombination. Following Cre-mediated activation (with a 95% activation efficiency, hK-rasG12D and HSV1-tk were expressed in the transgenic GFF cells, evidently through the presence of corresponding mRNAs, and confirmed by HSV1-tk protein function assay. The hK-rasG12D expressing GFF cells exhibited enhanced proliferation rates and an anchorage-independent growth behavior. They were able to initiate tumor growth in athymic nude mice. In conclusion, after activating hK-rasG12D gene expression, hK-rasG12D transgenic GFF cells were transformed into tumorgenesis cells. Transgenic goats via SCNT using the above-motioned cells as the donor cells have been established.

  16. Repression of human papillomavirus oncogenes in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells causes the orderly reactivation of dormant tumor suppressor pathways

    OpenAIRE

    Goodwin, Edward C.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    Most cervical carcinomas express high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) E6 and E7 proteins, which neutralize cellular tumor suppressor function. To determine the consequences of removing the E6 and E7 proteins from cervical cancer cells, we infected HeLa cells, a cervical carcinoma cell line that contains HPV18 DNA, with a recombinant virus that expresses the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein. Expression of the E2 protein resulted in rapid repression of HPV E6 and E7 e...

  17. EWS-Oct-4B, an alternative EWS-Oct-4 fusion gene, is a potent oncogene linked to human epithelial tumours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, S; Lim, B; Kim, J

    2010-01-01

    Background: Characterisation of EWS-Oct-4 translocation fusion product in bone and soft-tissue tumours revealed a chimeric gene resulting from an in-frame fusion between EWS (Ewing's sarcoma gene) exons 1–6 and Oct-4 exons 1–4. Recently, an alternative form of the fusion protein between the EWS and Oct-4 genes, named EWS-Oct-4B, was reported in two types of epithelial tumours, a hidradenoma of the skin and a mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the salivary glands. As the N-terminal and POU domains of the EWS-Oct-4 and EWS-Oct-4B proteins are not structurally identical, we decided to investigate the functional consequences of the EWS-Oct-4B fusion. Methods: In this report, we have characterised the EWS-Oct-4B fusion protein. To investigate how the EWS-Oct-4B protein contributes to tumourigenesis in human cancers, we analysed its DNA-binding activity, subcellular localisation, transcriptional activation behaviour, and oncogenic properties. Results: We found that this new chimeric gene encodes a nuclear protein that binds DNA with the same sequence specificity as the parental Oct-4 protein or the fusion EWS-Oct-4 protein. We show that the nuclear localisation signal of EWS-Oct-4B is dependent on the POU DNA-binding domain, and we identified a cluster of basic amino acids, 269RKRKR273, in the POU domain that specifically mediates the nuclear localisation of EWS-Oct-4B. Comparison of the properties of EWS-Oct-4B and EWS-Oct-4 indicated that EWS-Oct-4B is a less-potent transcriptional activator of a reporter construct carrying the Oct-4-binding sites. Deletion analysis of the functional domains of EWS-Oct-4B revealed that the EWS N-terminal domain (NTD)B, POU, and C-terminal domain (CTD) are necessary for its full transactivation potential. Despite its reduced activity as a transcriptional activator, EWS-Oct-4B regulated the expression of fgf-4 (fibroblast growth factor-4) and nanog, which are potent mitogens, as well as of Oct-4 downstream target genes, the promoters of

  18. Avian Influenza virus glycoproteins restrict virus replication and spread through human airway epithelium at temperatures of the proximal airways.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A Scull

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of avian influenza viruses from bird to human is a rare event even though avian influenza viruses infect the ciliated epithelium of human airways in vitro and ex vivo. Using an in vitro model of human ciliated airway epithelium (HAE, we demonstrate that while human and avian influenza viruses efficiently infect at temperatures of the human distal airways (37 degrees C, avian, but not human, influenza viruses are restricted for infection at the cooler temperatures of the human proximal airways (32 degrees C. These data support the hypothesis that avian influenza viruses, ordinarily adapted to the temperature of the avian enteric tract (40 degrees C, rarely infect humans, in part due to differences in host airway regional temperatures. Previously, a critical residue at position 627 in the avian influenza virus polymerase subunit, PB2, was identified as conferring temperature-dependency in mammalian cells. Here, we use reverse genetics to show that avianization of residue 627 attenuates a human virus, but does not account for the different infection between 32 degrees C and 37 degrees C. To determine the mechanism of temperature restriction of avian influenza viruses in HAE at 32 degrees C, we generated recombinant human influenza viruses in either the A/Victoria/3/75 (H3N2 or A/PR/8/34 (H1N1 genetic background that contained avian or avian-like glycoproteins. Two of these viruses, A/Victoria/3/75 with L226Q and S228G mutations in hemagglutinin (HA and neuraminidase (NA from A/Chick/Italy/1347/99 and A/PR/8/34 containing the H7 and N1 from A/Chick/Italy/1347/99, exhibited temperature restriction approaching that of wholly avian influenza viruses. These data suggest that influenza viruses bearing avian or avian-like surface glycoproteins have a reduced capacity to establish productive infection at the temperature of the human proximal airways. This temperature restriction may limit zoonotic transmission of avian influenza viruses and

  19. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus and the airway

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Analee Milner

    Therefore, it is still of value to recognise and understand the pathology caused by degrees of immune compromise from HIV/AIDS. Ironically, ART may impact on the airway owing to immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome and lipodystrophy. Keywords: AIDS, ART, airway, head and neck manifestation, HIV, human ...

  1. Prevalence of Human Immunodeficiency Virus among tuberculosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Tuberculosis (TB) is a major public health problem worldwide with an estimated one third of the world's population being infected by the agent Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The TB problem has escalated in the last two decades in the developing countries because of the recent pandemic of human ...

  2. Activation of Wnt signaling pathway by human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes in HPV16-positive oropharyngeal squamous carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rampias, Theodore; Boutati, Eleni; Pectasides, Eirini; Sasaki, Clarence; Kountourakis, Panteleimon; Weinberger, Paul; Psyrri, Amanda

    2010-03-01

    We sought to determine the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in nuclear beta-catenin accumulation, a hallmark of activated canonical Wnt signaling pathway. We used HPV16-positive oropharyngeal cancer cell lines 147T and 090, HPV-negative cell line 040T, and cervical cell lines SiHa (bearing integrated HPV16) and HeLa (bearing integrated HPV18) to measure the cytoplasmic and nuclear beta-catenin levels and the beta-catenin/Tcf transcriptional activity before and after E6/E7 gene silencing. Repression of HPV E6 and E7 genes induced a substantial reduction in nuclear beta-catenin levels. Luciferase assay showed that transcriptional activation of Tcf promoter by beta-catenin was lower after silencing. The protein levels of beta-catenin are tightly regulated by the ubiquitin/proteasome system. We therefore performed expression analysis of regulators of beta-catenin degradation and nuclear transport and showed that seven in absentia homologue (Siah-1) mRNA and protein levels were substantially upregulated after E6/E7 repression. Siah-1 protein promotes the degradation of beta-catenin through the ubiquitin/proteasome system. To determine whether Siah-1 is important for the proteasomal degradation of beta-catenin in HPV16-positive oropharyngeal cancer cells, we introduced a Siah-1 expression vector into 147T and 090 cells and found substantial reduction of endogenous beta-catenin in these cells. Thus, E6 and E7 are involved in beta-catenin nuclear accumulation and activation of Wnt signaling in HPV-induced cancers. In addition, we show the significance of the endogenous Siah-1-dependent ubiquitin/proteasome pathway for beta-catenin degradation and its regulation by E6/E7 viral oncoproteins in HPV16-positive oropharyngeal cancer cells.

  3. Role of trace metals in cell proliferation in the human neuroblastoma: relations with the oncogene N-myc; Le role des metaux trace dans la proliferation des cellules de neuroblastome humaine: relations avec l`oncogene N-myc

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moretto, Ph.; Michelet, C. [Centre d`Etudes Nucleaires, Bordeaux-1 Univ., 33 Gradignan (France); Gouget, B.; Ortega, R.; Sergiant, C.; Llabador, Y.; Simonoff, M. [URA 451, Gradignan (France); Benard, J. [Laboratoire de Pharmacologie Clinique et Moleculaire, Institut Gustave Roussy, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    1997-06-01

    Neuroblastoma is one of the most common tumors in young children. Iron is known to be necessary for cellular proliferation. Several studies have suggested that neuroblastoma cells appear to be relatively sensitive to growth inhibition by specific Fe chelators, in vitro. In addition, it appeared that an increased serum ferritin level at diagnosis was associated with a poorer outcome than a normal level. On the other hand it was reported that untreated primary neuroblastoma had multiple copies of the N-myc oncogene. A significant association between genomic amplification and rapid tumor progression after diagnosis has been demonstrated. In order to study the relationship between iron N-myc amplification, we propose to determine the trace metal content of neuroblastoma cells. Preliminary results obtained with two distinct cell lines: SK-N-SH, a neuroblastoma cell line with a single copy of N-myc and IGR-N-91, a metastatic cell line exhibiting 60 copies of N-myc are presented. (authors) 8 refs.

  4. Canalization of the evolutionary trajectory of the human influenza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Trevor; Rambaut, Andrew; Pascual, Mercedes

    2012-04-30

    Since its emergence in 1968, influenza A (H3N2) has evolved extensively in genotype and antigenic phenotype. However, despite strong pressure to evolve away from human immunity and to diversify in antigenic phenotype, H3N2 influenza shows paradoxically limited genetic and antigenic diversity present at any one time. Here, we propose a simple model of antigenic evolution in the influenza virus that accounts for this apparent discrepancy. In this model, antigenic phenotype is represented by a N-dimensional vector, and virus mutations perturb phenotype within this continuous Euclidean space. We implement this model in a large-scale individual-based simulation, and in doing so, we find a remarkable correspondence between model behavior and observed influenza dynamics. This model displays rapid evolution but low standing diversity and simultaneously accounts for the epidemiological, genetic, antigenic, and geographical patterns displayed by the virus. We find that evolution away from existing human immunity results in rapid population turnover in the influenza virus and that this population turnover occurs primarily along a single antigenic axis. Selective dynamics induce a canalized evolutionary trajectory, in which the evolutionary fate of the influenza population is surprisingly repeatable. In the model, the influenza population shows a 1- to 2-year timescale of repeatability, suggesting a window in which evolutionary dynamics could be, in theory, predictable.

  5. Molecular epidemiology of human rabies viruses in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, Takashi; Ahmed, Kamruddin; Karunanayake, Dushantha; Wimalaratne, Omala; Nanayakkara, Susilakanthi; Perera, Devika; Kobayashi, Yuji; Nishizono, Akira

    2013-08-01

    Rabies is a lethal zoonotic disease caused by the rabies virus, which is transmitted by rabid animals to humans. Rabies is prevalent in all continents, with over 60% of human deaths occurring in Asia. Sri Lanka is a rabies-endemic country. This study shows that rabies afflicted more older individuals than children in Sri Lanka between 2008 and 2010. This novel finding indicates that older people in Sri Lanka should be more aware of the risk of rabies. Phylogenetic analyses of the rabies N and G genes showed that the Sri Lankan rabies viruses are distinct and probably originated from a single clone. The G-L noncoding region is highly diverse, and is suitable for the analysis of virus evolution within a country. A phylogenetic analysis of this region showed high diversity in the currently circulating Sri Lankan rabies viruses, which can be divided into seven clades. Some clades are unique to a specific geographic region, whereas others occur at multiple locations. This indicates that the movement of dogs, the main rabies-transmitting animal in Sri Lanka, is restricted in some areas but less limited in others. These data may help to formulate a more efficient rabies control program in Sri Lanka. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Unique human immune signature of Ebola virus disease in Guinea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruibal, Paula; Oestereich, Lisa; Lüdtke, Anja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Wozniak, David M.; Kerber, Romy; Korva, Miša; Cabeza-Cabrerizo, Mar; Bore, Joseph A.; Koundouno, Fara Raymond; Duraffour, Sophie; Weller, Romy; Thorenz, Anja; Cimini, Eleonora; Viola, Domenico; Agrati, Chiara; Repits, Johanna; Afrough, Babak; Cowley, Lauren A; Ngabo, Didier; Hinzmann, Julia; Mertens, Marc; Vitoriano, Inês; Logue, Christopher H.; Boettcher, Jan Peter; Pallasch, Elisa; Sachse, Andreas; Bah, Amadou; Nitzsche, Katja; Kuisma, Eeva; Michel, Janine; Holm, Tobias; Zekeng, Elsa-Gayle; García-Dorival, Isabel; Wölfel, Roman; Stoecker, Kilian; Fleischmann, Erna; Strecker, Thomas; Di Caro, Antonino; Avšič-Županc, Tatjana; Kurth, Andreas; Meschi, Silvia; Mély, Stephane; Newman, Edmund; Bocquin, Anne; Kis, Zoltan; Kelterbaum, Anne; Molkenthin, Peter; Carletti, Fabrizio; Portmann, Jasmine; Wolff, Svenja; Castilletti, Concetta; Schudt, Gordian; Fizet, Alexandra; Ottowell, Lisa J.; Herker, Eva; Jacobs, Thomas; Kretschmer, Birte; Severi, Ettore; Ouedraogo, Nobila; Lago, Mar; Negredo, Anabel; Franco, Leticia; Anda, Pedro; Schmiedel, Stefan; Kreuels, Benno; Wichmann, Dominic; Addo, Marylyn M.; Lohse, Ansgar W.; De Clerck, Hilde; Nanclares, Carolina; Jonckheere, Sylvie; Van Herp, Michel; Sprecher, Armand; Xiaojiang, Gao; Carrington, Mary; Miranda, Osvaldo; Castro, Carlos M.; Gabriel, Martin; Drury, Patrick; Formenty, Pierre; Diallo, Boubacar; Koivogui, Lamine; Magassouba, N’Faly; Carroll, Miles W.; Günther, Stephan; Muñoz-Fontela, César

    2016-01-01

    Despite the magnitude of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa, there is still a fundamental lack of knowledge about the pathophysiology of EVD1. In particular, very little is known about human immune responses to Ebola virus (EBOV)2,3. Here, we have for the first time evaluated the physiology of the human T cell immune response in EVD patients at the time of admission at the Ebola Treatment Center (ETC) in Guinea, and longitudinally until discharge or death. Through the use of multiparametric flow cytometry established by the European Mobile Laboratory in the field, we have identified an immune signature that is unique in EVD fatalities. Fatal EVD was characterized by high percentage of CD4 and CD8 T cells expressing the inhibitory molecules cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed cell death-1 (PD-1), which was correlated with elevated inflammatory markers and high virus load. Conversely, surviving individuals showed significantly lower expression of CTLA-4 and PD-1 as well as lower inflammation despite comparable overall T cell activation. Concommittant with virus clearance, survivors mounted a robust EBOV-specific T cell response. Our findings suggest that dysregulation of the T cell response is a key component of EVD pathophysiology. PMID:27147028

  7. Human immunodeficiency virus type-2-A milder, kinder virus: An update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Kannangai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type-2 (HIV-2 belongs to the family retroviridae which is phylogenetically clusters with SIV SM from sooty mangabeys. This virus is morphologically similar to human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 but has got only a 40% homology at the nucleotide level. There is a distinct geographical distribution of HIV-2 unlike HIV-1. There are currently eight subtypes/groups identified with subtype/group A responsible for the majority of infections. HIV-2 shows a considerable difference in the course of the disease. Clinical, haematological and immunological evaluation of individuals infected with HIV-2 has shown the virus to be less pathogenic than HIV-1 although the exact mechanism underlying this difference is not well defined. Similar to HIV-1, the HIV-2 isolates also showed distinct replicative and cytopathic characteristics. The transmission rate for HIV-2 compared to HIV-1 is very low both by heterosexual route and mother to child transmission. The clinical signs and symptoms of immunodeficiency associated with HIV-2 are similar to the ones seen among the HIV-1-infected individuals and they can also progress to AIDS. It is naturally resistant to NNRTI and hence the diagnosis become important as it affects the treatment strategy. Similar to HIV-1, HIV-2 strains of infected individuals also show mutations that can cause drug resistance. The current evidence suggests that there is no protective effective for HIV-2 against HIV-1.

  8. Constitutively Expressed IFITM3 Protein in Human Endothelial Cells Poses an Early Infection Block to Human Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangjie; Zeng, Hui; Kumar, Amrita; Belser, Jessica A; Maines, Taronna R; Tumpey, Terrence M

    2016-12-15

    A role for pulmonary endothelial cells in the orchestration of cytokine production and leukocyte recruitment during influenza virus infection, leading to severe lung damage, has been recently identified. As the mechanistic pathway for this ability is not fully known, we extended previous studies on influenza virus tropism in cultured human pulmonary endothelial cells. We found that a subset of avian influenza viruses, including potentially pandemic H5N1, H7N9, and H9N2 viruses, could infect human pulmonary endothelial cells (HULEC) with high efficiency compared to human H1N1 or H3N2 viruses. In HULEC, human influenza viruses were capable of binding to host cellular receptors, becoming internalized and initiating hemifusion but failing to uncoat the viral nucleocapsid and to replicate in host nuclei. Unlike numerous cell types, including epithelial cells, we found that pulmonary endothelial cells constitutively express a high level of the restriction protein IFITM3 in endosomal compartments. IFITM3 knockdown by small interfering RNA (siRNA) could partially rescue H1N1 virus infection in HULEC, suggesting IFITM3 proteins were involved in blocking human influenza virus infection in endothelial cells. In contrast, selected avian influenza viruses were able to escape IFITM3 restriction in endothelial cells, possibly by fusing in early endosomes at higher pH or by other, unknown mechanisms. Collectively, our study demonstrates that the human pulmonary endothelium possesses intrinsic immunity to human influenza viruses, in part due to the constitutive expression of IFITM3 proteins. Notably, certain avian influenza viruses have evolved to escape this restriction, possibly contributing to virus-induced pneumonia and severe lung disease in humans. Avian influenza viruses, including H5N1 and H7N9, have been associated with severe respiratory disease and fatal outcomes in humans. Although acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and progressive pulmonary endothelial damage

  9. Docking to Explicate Interface between Plant-Originated Inhibitors and E6 Oncogenic Protein of Highly Threatening Human Papillomavirus 18

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    Satish Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The leading cause of cancer mortality globally amongst the women is due to human papillomavirus (HPV infection. There is need to explore anti-cancerous drugs against this life-threatening infection. Traditionally, different natural compounds such as withaferin A, artemisinin, ursolic acid, ferulic acid, (--epigallocatechin-3-gallate, berberin, resveratrol, jaceosidin, curcumin, gingerol, indol-3-carbinol, and silymarin have been used as hopeful source of cancer treatment. These natural inhibitors have been shown to block HPV infection by different researchers. In the present study, we explored these natural compounds against E6 oncoprotein of high risk HPV18, which is known to inactivate tumor suppressor p53 protein. E6, a high throughput protein model of HPV18, was predicted to anticipate the interaction mechanism of E6 oncoprotein with these natural inhibitors using structure-based drug designing approach. Docking analysis showed the interaction of these natural inhibitors with p53 binding site of E6 protein residues 108-117 (CQKPLNPAEK and help reinstatement of normal p53 functioning. Further, docking analysis besides helping in silico validations of natural compounds also helped elucidating the molecular mechanism of inhibition of HPV oncoproteins.

  10. Silencing of E7 oncogene restores functional E-cadherin expression in human papillomavirus 16-transformed keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caberg, Jean-Hubert D; Hubert, Pascale M; Begon, Dominique Y; Herfs, Michael F; Roncarati, Patrick J; Boniver, Jacques J; Delvenne, Philippe O

    2008-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, particularly type 16, is causally associated with cancer of the uterine cervix. The persistence or progression of cervical lesions suggests that viral antigens are not adequately presented to the immune system. This hypothesis is reinforced by the observation that most squamous intra-epithelial lesions show quantitative and functional alterations of Langerhans cells (LCs). Moreover, E-cadherin-dependent adhesion of LC to keratinocytes (KCs) is defective in cervical HPV16-associated (pre)neoplastic lesions. The possible role of viral oncoprotein E7 in the reduced levels of cell surface E-cadherin was investigated by silencing HPV16 E7 by RNA interference (siRNA). This treatment induced an increased cell surface E-cadherin expression in HPV16-positive KC and a significant adhesion of LC to these squamous cells. The E-cadherin re-expression following HPV16 E7 silencing was associated with increased detection levels of retinoblastoma protein and the activating protein (AP)-2alpha transcription factor. These data suggest that HPV16 E7-induced alterations of LC/KC adhesion may play a role in the defective immune response during cervical carcinogenesis.

  11. Beta-catenin accelerates human papilloma virus type-16 mediated cervical carcinogenesis in transgenic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gülay Bulut

    Full Text Available Human papilloma virus (HPV is the principal etiological agent of cervical cancer in women, and its DNA is present in virtually all of these tumors. However, exposure to the high-risk HPV types alone is insufficient for tumor development. Identifying specific collaborating factors that will lead to cervical cancer remains an unanswered question, especially because millions of women are exposed to HPV. Our earlier work using an in vitro model indicated that activation of the canonical Wnt pathway in HPV-positive epithelial cells was sufficient to induce anchorage independent growth. We therefore hypothesized that constitutive activation of this pathway might function as the "second hit." To address this possibility, we developed two double-transgenic (DT mouse models, K14-E7/ΔN87βcat and K14-HPV16/ΔN87βcat that express either the proteins encoded by the E7 oncogene or the HPV16 early region along with constitutively active β-catenin, which was expressed by linking it to the keratin-14 (K14 promoter. We initiated tumor formation by treating all groups with estrogen for six months. Invasive cervical cancer was observed in 11% of the K14-ΔN87βcat mice, expressing activated β-catenin and in 50% of the animals expressing the HPV16 E7 oncogene. In double-transgenic mice, coexpression of β-catenin and HPV16 E7 induced invasive cervical cancer at about 7 months in 94% of the cases. We did not observe cervical cancer in any group unless the mice were treated with estrogen. In the second model, K14-HPV16 mice suffered cervical dysplasias, but this phenotype was not augmented in HPV16/ΔN87βcat mice. In summary, the phenotypes of the K14-E7/ΔN87βcat mice support the hypothesis that activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in HPV-associated premalignant lesions plays a functional role in accelerating cervical carcinogenesis.

  12. Enabling a robust scalable manufacturing process for therapeutic exosomes through oncogenic immortalization of human ESC-derived MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choo Andre

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exosomes or secreted bi-lipid vesicles from human ESC-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hESC-MSCs have been shown to reduce myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in animal models. However, as hESC-MSCs are not infinitely expansible, large scale production of these exosomes would require replenishment of hESC-MSC through derivation from hESCs and incur recurring costs for testing and validation of each new batch. Our aim was therefore to investigate if MYC immortalization of hESC-MSC would circumvent this constraint without compromising the production of therapeutically efficacious exosomes. Methods The hESC-MSCs were transfected by lentivirus carrying a MYC gene. The transformed cells were analyzed for MYC transgene integration, transcript and protein levels, and surface markers, rate of cell cycling, telomerase activity, karyotype, genome-wide gene expression and differentiation potential. The exosomes were isolated by HPLC fractionation and tested in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury, and infarct sizes were further assessed by using Evans' blue dye injection and TTC staining. Results MYC-transformed MSCs largely resembled the parental hESC-MSCs with major differences being reduced plastic adherence, faster growth, failure to senesce, increased MYC protein expression, and loss of in vitro adipogenic potential that technically rendered the transformed cells as non-MSCs. Unexpectedly, exosomes from MYC-transformed MSCs were able to reduce relative infarct size in a mouse model of myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury indicating that the capacity for producing therapeutic exosomes was preserved. Conclusion Our results demonstrated that MYC transformation is a practical strategy in ensuring an infinite supply of cells for the production of exosomes in the milligram range as either therapeutic agents or delivery vehicles. In addition, the increased proliferative rate by MYC transformation reduces the time

  13. HUMAN PAPILLOMA VIRUS IMMUNOGEN CREATION ON THE BASE OF CHIMERIC RECOMBINANT PROTEIN L2E7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. S. Malakhov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The cervical cancer is one of the most common diseases in world. This malignancy is the seventh highest prevalence oncological disease worldwide and the second highest prevalence oncological disease of women in the world. Meanwhile women need to be infected by human papilloma virus (HPV is absolutely necessary for it further evolution, HPV DNA was found in 99.97% cases of disease. Except cervical cancer, HPV cause 85% of rectal cancer, 50% of the vulva, vagina and penis cancers, 20% of oropharyngeal cancer and 10% of larynx and esophagus cancers. In 2009, 14 000 women were diagnosed with cervical cancer in Russia. The growth in morbidity was 19% (in comparison with 1999. The most effective recognised measure for almost each infection prophylaxis is a vaccination. Two human papilloma virus vaccines are available in Russia nowadays — Gardasil and Cervarix, produced in Belgium and the Netherlands respectively. Cervarix is a bivalent vaccine based on virus-like particles (VLP of two types. Recombinant major capsid proteins L1 HPV 16 and HPV 18 express in baculovirus expression system and self-assembled into virus-like particles (about 70 percent of cervical cancers are caused by HPV 16 and HPV 18. VLP of each strain produced in different baculovirus vectors and then combined in single drug. Gardasil is like Cervarix with few exceptions. Producing organisms are fungi S. cerevisiae in this case, and this vaccine contains low-risk HPV 6 and HPV 11 VLP. Thus, Gardasil is quadrivalent HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine. These vaccines are very effective in averting infection of disease and don’t have significant side-effects, however they have some disadvantages. Firstly, they have a high price because of necessity of their expression in eukaryotic cells. Secondly, they are strain-specific, so vaccines are completely effective only for virus’s strains which are represented in the vaccine. Thirdly, it`s the absence of therapeutic (treatment of established

  14. Immune Modulation in Primary Vaccinia virus Zoonotic Human Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Assis Silva Gomes

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2010, the WHO celebrated the 30th anniversary of the smallpox eradication. Ironically, infections caused by viruses related to smallpox are being increasingly reported worldwide, including Monkeypox, Cowpox, and Vaccinia virus (VACV. Little is known about the human immunological responses elicited during acute infections caused by orthopoxviruses. We have followed VACV zoonotic outbreaks taking place in Brazil and analyzed cellular immune responses in patients acutely infected by VACV. Results indicated that these patients show a biased immune modulation when compared to noninfected controls. Amounts of B cells are low and less activated in infected patients. Although present, T CD4+ cells are also less activated when compared to noninfected individuals, and so are monocytes/macrophages. Similar results were obtained when Balb/C mice were experimentally infected with a VACV sample isolated during the zoonotic outbreaks. Taking together, the data suggest that zoonotic VACVs modulate specific immune cell compartments during an acute infection in humans.

  15. Mandatory premarital testing for human immunodeficiency virus. The Illinois experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnock, B J; Kelly, C J

    1989-06-16

    During the first 6 months of legislatively mandated premarital testing for human immunodeficiency virus in Illinois, 8 of 70,846 applicants for marriage licenses were found to be seropositive, yielding a seroprevalence of 0.011%. The total cost of the testing program for 6 months is estimated at $2.5 million or $312,000 per seropositive individual identified. Half of the reported seropositive individuals reported a history of risk behavior. During the same period, the number of marriage licenses issued in Illinois decreased by 22.5%, while the number of licenses issued to Illinois residents in surrounding states increased significantly. We conclude that mandatory premarital testing is not a cost-effective method for the control of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

  16. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Lima Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, hepatitis B virus (HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical manifestations and outcomes of leprosy. HTLV-1, HBV and HCV are associated with leprosy in some regions and institutionalization is an important risk factor for these viral coinfections. Some studies show a higher prevalence of viral coinfection in lepromatous cases. Although HBV and HCV coinfection were associated with reversal reaction in one study, there is a lack of information about the consequences of viral coinfections in leprosy. It is not known whether clinical outcomes associated with leprosy, such as development of reactions or relapses could be attributed to a specific viral coinfection. Furthermore, whether the leprosy subtype may influence the progression of the viral coinfection is unknown. All of these important and intriguing questions await prospective studies to definitively establish the actual relationship between these entities.

  17. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Johnson, Warren D; Glesby, Marshall J

    2012-12-01

    Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical manifestations and outcomes of leprosy. HTLV-1, HBV and HCV are associated with leprosy in some regions and institutionalization is an important risk factor for these viral coinfections. Some studies show a higher prevalence of viral coinfection in lepromatous cases. Although HBV and HCV coinfection were associated with reversal reaction in one study, there is a lack of information about the consequences of viral coinfections in leprosy. It is not known whether clinical outcomes associated with leprosy, such as development of reactions or relapses could be attributed to a specific viral coinfection. Furthermore, whether the leprosy subtype may influence the progression of the viral coinfection is unknown. All of these important and intriguing questions await prospective studies to definitively establish the actual relationship between these entities.

  18. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by RNA interference using long-hairpin RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantinova, P.; de Vries, W.; Haasnoot, J.; ter Brake, O.; de Haan, P.; Berkhout, B.

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of virus replication by means of RNA interference has been reported for several important human pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). RNA interference against these pathogens has been accomplished by introduction of virus-specific synthetic small interfering

  19. Arterial Disease in Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Stein, James H.; Currier, Judith S.; HSUE, Priscilla Y

    2014-01-01

    With advances in antiretroviral therapy, individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are living longer and increasingly die of non-HIV related diseases such as cardiovascular disease (CVD). Several observational studies suggest that HIV-infected patients on ART are at increased CVD risk; however, the precise mechanisms underlying the association between HIV infection and CVD risk are uncertain. Atherosclerosis and arterial disease in HIV-infected individuals is a multifactor...

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROGMANAGER

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in treatment-naïve adults in Jos,. North Central Nigeria. Anejo-Okopi J. A.1*, Agbaji O. O.1,2, Agaba P. A.1,3, Ugoagwu P. O.1, Were K.4, Onywera H.4,. Owiti P.4, Isa S. E1,2, Otecko N.4 ...