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Sample records for virus-infected dendritic cells

  1. Both conventional and interferon killer dendritic cells have antigen-presenting capacity during influenza virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H. Geurts van Kessel (Corine); I.M. Bergen (Ingrid); F. Muskens (Femke); L. Boon (Louis); H.C. Hoogsteden (Henk); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); B.N.M. Lambrecht (Bart)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractNatural killer cells are innate effector cells known for their potential to produce interferon-γ and kill tumour and virus-infected cells. Recently, B220+CD11cintNK1.1+ NK cells were found to also have antigen-presenting capacity like dendritic cells (DC), hence their name

  2. The Role of Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in Innate and Adaptive Immune Responses against Alpha Herpes Virus Infections

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    Philipp Schuster

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In 1999, two independent groups identified plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC as major type I interferon- (IFN- producing cells in the blood. Since then, evidence is accumulating that PDC are a multifunctional cell population effectively coordinating innate and adaptive immune responses. This paper focuses on the role of different immune cells and their interactions in the surveillance of alpha herpes virus infections, summarizes current knowledge on PDC surface receptors and their role in direct cell-cell contacts, and develops a risk factor model for the clinical implications of herpes simplex and varicella zoster virus reactivation. Data from studies involving knockout mice and cell-depletion experiments as well as human studies converge into a “spider web”, in which the direct and indirect crosstalk between many cell populations tightly controls acute, latent, and recurrent alpha herpes virus infections. Notably, cells involved in innate immune regulations appear to shape adaptive immune responses more extensively than previously thought.

  3. A systems immunology approach to plasmacytoid dendritic cell function in cytopathic virus infections.

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    Gennady Bocharov

    Full Text Available Plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC-mediated protection against cytopathic virus infection involves various molecular, cellular, tissue-scale, and organism-scale events. In order to better understand such multiscale interactions, we have implemented a systems immunology approach focusing on the analysis of the structure, dynamics and operating principles of virus-host interactions which constrain the initial spread of the pathogen. Using high-resolution experimental data sets coming from the well-described mouse hepatitis virus (MHV model, we first calibrated basic modules including MHV infection of its primary target cells, i.e. pDCs and macrophages (Mphis. These basic building blocks were used to generate and validate an integrative mathematical model for in vivo infection dynamics. Parameter estimation for the system indicated that on a per capita basis, one infected pDC secretes sufficient type I IFN to protect 10(3 to 10(4 Mphis from cytopathic viral infection. This extremely high protective capacity of pDCs secures the spleen's capability to function as a 'sink' for the virus produced in peripheral organs such as the liver. Furthermore, our results suggest that the pDC population in spleen ensures a robust protection against virus variants which substantially down-modulate IFN secretion. However, the ability of pDCs to protect against severe disease caused by virus variants exhibiting an enhanced liver tropism and higher replication rates appears to be rather limited. Taken together, this systems immunology analysis suggests that antiviral therapy against cytopathic viruses should primarily limit viral replication within peripheral target organs.

  4. A systems immunology approach to plasmacytoid dendritic cell function in cytopathic virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharov, Gennady; Züst, Roland; Cervantes-Barragan, Luisa; Luzyanina, Tatyana; Chiglintsev, Egor; Chereshnev, Valery A; Thiel, Volker; Ludewig, Burkhard

    2010-07-22

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC)-mediated protection against cytopathic virus infection involves various molecular, cellular, tissue-scale, and organism-scale events. In order to better understand such multiscale interactions, we have implemented a systems immunology approach focusing on the analysis of the structure, dynamics and operating principles of virus-host interactions which constrain the initial spread of the pathogen. Using high-resolution experimental data sets coming from the well-described mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) model, we first calibrated basic modules including MHV infection of its primary target cells, i.e. pDCs and macrophages (Mphis). These basic building blocks were used to generate and validate an integrative mathematical model for in vivo infection dynamics. Parameter estimation for the system indicated that on a per capita basis, one infected pDC secretes sufficient type I IFN to protect 10(3) to 10(4) Mphis from cytopathic viral infection. This extremely high protective capacity of pDCs secures the spleen's capability to function as a 'sink' for the virus produced in peripheral organs such as the liver. Furthermore, our results suggest that the pDC population in spleen ensures a robust protection against virus variants which substantially down-modulate IFN secretion. However, the ability of pDCs to protect against severe disease caused by virus variants exhibiting an enhanced liver tropism and higher replication rates appears to be rather limited. Taken together, this systems immunology analysis suggests that antiviral therapy against cytopathic viruses should primarily limit viral replication within peripheral target organs.

  5. Dendritic cells as Achilles? heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Sch?nrich, G?nther; Raftery, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZ...

  6. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    OpenAIRE

    Günther eSchönrich; Martin J. Raftery

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently estab-lishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing V...

  7. Transcriptional Changes during Naturally Acquired Zika Virus Infection Render Dendritic Cells Highly Conducive to Viral Replication

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    Xiaoming Sun

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Although dendritic cells are among the human cell population best equipped for cell-intrinsic antiviral immune defense, they seem highly susceptible to infection with the Zika virus (ZIKV. Using highly purified myeloid dendritic cells isolated from individuals with naturally acquired acute infection, we here show that ZIKV induces profound perturbations of transcriptional signatures relative to healthy donors. Interestingly, we noted a remarkable downregulation of antiviral interferon-stimulated genes and innate immune sensors, suggesting that ZIKV can actively suppress interferon-dependent immune responses. In contrast, several host factors known to support ZIKV infection were strongly upregulated during natural ZIKV infection; these transcripts included AXL, the main entry receptor for ZIKV; SOCS3, a negative regulator of ISG expression; and IDO-1, a recognized inducer of regulatory T cell responses. Thus, during in vivo infection, ZIKV can transform the transcriptome of dendritic cells in favor of the virus to render these cells highly conducive to ZIKV infection.

  8. Predominant infection of CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells during measles virus infection of macaques.

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    Rik L de Swart

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MV is hypothesized to enter the host by infecting epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, followed by viremia mediated by infected monocytes. However, neither of these cell types express signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (CD150, which has been identified as the receptor for wild-type MV. We have infected rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with a recombinant MV strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP; thus bringing together the optimal animal model for measles and a virus that can be detected with unprecedented sensitivity. Blood samples and broncho-alveolar lavages were collected every 3 d, and necropsies were performed upon euthanasia 9 or 15 d after infection. EGFP production by MV-infected cells was visualized macroscopically, in both living and sacrificed animals, and microscopically by confocal microscopy and FACS analysis. At the peak of viremia, EGFP fluorescence was detected in skin, respiratory and digestive tract, but most intensely in all lymphoid tissues. B- and T-lymphocytes expressing CD150 were the major target cells for MV infection. Highest percentages (up to 30% of infected lymphocytes were detected in lymphoid tissues, and the virus preferentially targeted cells with a memory phenotype. Unexpectedly, circulating monocytes did not sustain productive MV infection. In peripheral tissues, large numbers of MV-infected CD11c+ MHC class-II+ myeloid dendritic cells were detected in conjunction with infected T-lymphocytes, suggesting transmission of MV between these cell types. Fluorescent imaging of MV infection in non-human primates demonstrated a crucial role for lymphocytes and dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of measles and measles-associated immunosuppression.

  9. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönrich, Günther; Raftery, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV), a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently establishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs) are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems' Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article.

  10. Dendritic cells as Achilles' heel and Trojan horse during varicella zoster virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther eSchönrich

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Varicella zoster virus (VZV, a human alphaherpesvirus, causes varicella and subsequently estab-lishes latency within sensory nerve ganglia. Later in life VZV can reactivate to cause herpes zoster. A reduced frequency of VZV-specific T cells is strongly associated with herpes zoster illustrating that these immune cells are central to control latency. Dendritic cells (DCs are required for the generation of VZV-specific T cells. However, DCs can also be infected in vitro and in vivo allowing VZV to evade the antiviral immune response. Thus, DCs represent the immune systems’ Achilles heel. Uniquely among the human herpesviruses, VZV infects both DCs and T cells, and exploits both as Trojan horses. During primary infection VZV-infected DCs traffic to the draining lymph nodes and tonsils, where the virus is transferred to T cells. VZV-infected T cells subsequently spread infection throughout the body to give the typical varicella skin rash. The delicate interplay between VZV and DCs and its consequences for viral immune evasion and viral dissemination will be discussed in this article.

  11. Dendritic cells in dengue virus infection: Targets of virus replication and mediators of immunity

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    Michael A. Schmid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are sentinels of the immune system and detect pathogens at sites of entry, such as the skin. In addition to the ability of DCs to control infections directly via their innate immune functions, DCs help to prime adaptive B and T cell responses via antigen presentation in lymphoid tissues. Infected Aedes aegypti or Ae. albopictus mosquitoes transmit the four dengue virus (DENV serotypes to humans while probing for small blood vessels in the skin. DENV causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans, yet no vaccine or specific therapeutic is currently approved. Although primary DENV infection confers life-long protective immunity against re-infection with the same DENV serotype, secondary infection with a different DENV serotype can lead to increased disease severity via cross-reactive T cells or enhancing antibodies. This review summarizes recent findings in humans and animal models about DENV infection of DCs, monocytes and macrophages. We discuss the dual role of DCs as both targets of DENV replication and mediators of innate and adaptive immunity, and summarize immune evasion strategies whereby DENV impairs the function of infected DCs. We suggest that DCs play a key role in priming DENV-specific neutralizing or potentially harmful memory B and T cell responses, and that future DC-directed therapies may help induce protective memory responses and reduce dengue pathogenesis.

  12. Evidence of viral replication in circulating dendritic cells during hepatitis C virus infection.

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    Goutagny, Nadège; Fatmi, Ahmed; De Ledinghen, Victor; Penin, François; Couzigou, Patrice; Inchauspé, Geneviève; Bain, Christine

    2003-06-15

    The existence of extrahepatic sites of hepatitis C virus (HCV) replication has been proposed as a mechanism responsible for the poor antiviral immune response found in chronic infection. Dendritic cells (DCs), as unique antigen-presenting cells able to induce a primary immune response, are prime targets of persistent viruses. From 24 blood samples obtained from HCV-seropositive patients, peripheral blood DCs (PBDCs) were purified. HCV genomic sequences were specifically detected by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in 6 of 24 PBDC pellets, and replicative-strand RNA also was found in 3 of 24 cell purifications. Analysis of the HCV quasi-species distribution in the PBDC population of 1 patient showed the presence of a dominant variant different from that found in plasma with respect to the primary amino-acid sequence and physicochemical profile of the hypervariable region 1 of glycoprotein E2. These data strongly suggest that PBDCs constitute a reservoir in which HCV replication takes place during natural infection.

  13. Dissecting the dendritic cell controversy in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

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    Gehring, Adam J; Ann D'Angelo, June

    2015-05-01

    Therapeutic vaccines to boost endogenous T-cell immunity rely on the stimulatory capacity of dendritic cells (DCs). The functionality of DCs in chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has been a long-standing debate. Therefore, we have attempted to summarize multiple studies investigating DC function in chronic HBV patients to determine whether common observations can be drawn. We found that the frequency and function of ex vivo-tested myeloid and plasmacytoid DCs were largely intact in patients with HBV infection and similar to those of healthy donor DCs. The main exception was reduced IFN-α production by plasmacytoid DC from chronic HBV patients. This reduced IFN-α production correlated with liver inflammation in multiple studies but not with viral load, suggesting that viral antigens have little effect on DC function. The majority of the confusion about DC function arises from studies reporting the reduced function of healthy donor DCs exposed to various sources of HBV in vitro. These direct effects of viral antigens are in contrast to data from HBV-infected patients. The variations in the assays used and areas that require further investigation are also covered.

  14. Quantification and functional analysis of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

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    Goutagny, Nadege; Vieux, Claude; Decullier, Evelyne; Ligeoix, Benoit; Epstein, Alberto; Trepo, Christian; Couzigou, Patrice; Inchauspe, Genevieve; Bain, Christine

    2004-05-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs) are the major producers of interferon (IFN)- alpha within peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We analyzed whether chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection could be linked to a defective function or number of PDCs. We evaluated the capacity of PBMCs from 5 cohorts of subjects to produce IFN- alpha after viral stimulation. We concomitantly analyzed the frequency of PDCs and the levels of IFN- alpha transcripts within the PBMCs from the same cohorts. PBMCs from patients with chronic HCV infection receiving antiviral therapy displayed a reduced capacity to release IFN- alpha, compared with those from healthy individuals, those from long-term responders to therapy, and those from nontreated patients. This defect was significantly correlated with the percentage of PDCs. In addition, PDCs from patients with chronic HCV infection receiving therapy displayed a reduced intrinsic capacity to produce IFN- alpha, which could be linked to the level of IFN- alpha transcripts. Our observations point to an effect of the therapy on either the survival or the localization of PDCs, rather than a direct detrimental effect due to the viral infection during chronic HCV infection.

  15. The role of dendritic cells in immunity against primary Herpes Simplex Virus infections

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    Sammy eBedoui

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV is a DNA virus with tropism for infecting skin and mucosal epithelia during the lytic stages of its complex life cycle. The immune system has evolved a multitude of strategies to respond to primary HSV infections. These include rapid innate immune responses largely driven by pattern recognition systems and protective anti-viral immunity. Dendritic cells (DC represent a versatile and heterogenic group of antigen presenting cells that are important for pathogen recognition at sites of infection and for priming of protective HSV-specific T cells. Here we will review the current knowledge on the role of DCs in the host immune response to primary HSV infection. We will discuss how DCs integrate viral cues into effective innate immune responses, will dissect how HSV infection of DCs interferes with their capacity to migrate from sites of infection to the draining lymph nodes and will outline how migratory DCs can make antigens available to lymph node resident DCs. The role of distinct DC subsets and their relevant contribution to antigen presentation on MHC class I and MHC class II molecules will be detailed in the context of T cell priming in the lymph node and the elicitation of effector function in infected tissues. An improved understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of how DCs recognize HSV, process and present its antigens to naïve and effector T cells will not only assist in the improvement of vaccine-based preventions of this important viral disease, but also serves as a paradigm to resolve basic immunological principles.

  16. Early myeloid dendritic cell dysregulation is predictive of disease progression in simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

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    Viskam Wijewardana

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Myeloid dendritic cells (mDC are lost from blood in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection but the mechanism for this loss and its relationship to disease progression are not known. We studied the mDC response in blood and lymph nodes of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected rhesus macaques with different disease outcomes. Early changes in blood mDC number were inversely correlated with virus load and reflective of eventual disease outcome, as animals with stable infection that remained disease-free for more than one year had average increases in blood mDC of 200% over preinfection levels at virus set-point, whereas animals that progressed rapidly to AIDS had significant loss of mDC at this time. Short term antiretroviral therapy (ART transiently reversed mDC loss in progressor animals, whereas discontinuation of ART resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in mDC over preinfection levels only in stable animals, approaching 10-fold in some cases. Progressive SIV infection was associated with increased CCR7 expression on blood mDC and an 8-fold increase in expression of CCL19 mRNA in lymph nodes, consistent with increased mDC recruitment. Paradoxically, lymph node mDC did not accumulate in progressive infection but rather died from caspase-8-dependent apoptosis that was reduced by ART, indicating that increased recruitment is offset by increased death. Lymph node mDC from both stable and progressor animals remained responsive to exogenous stimulation with a TLR7/8 agonist. These data suggest that mDC are mobilized in SIV infection but that an increase in the CCR7-CCL19 chemokine axis associated with high virus burden in progressive infection promotes exodus of activated mDC from blood into lymph nodes where they die from apoptosis. We suggest that inflamed lymph nodes serve as a sink for mDC through recruitment, activation and death that contributes to AIDS pathogenesis.

  17. Predominant infection of CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells during measles virus infection of macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Swart, Rik L.; Ludlow, Martin; de Witte, Lot; Yanagi, Yusuke; van Amerongen, Geert; McQuaid, Stephen; Yüksel, Selma; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Duprex, W. Paul; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is hypothesized to enter the host by infecting epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, followed by viremia mediated by infected monocytes. However, neither of these cell types express signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (CD150), which has been identified as the receptor

  18. Predominant infection of CD150+ lymphocytes and dendritic cells during measles virus infection of macaques.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. de Swart (Rik); M. Ludlow (Martin); L. de Witte (Lot); Y. Yanagi (Yusuke); G. van Amerongen (Geert); S. McQuaid (Stephen); S. Yüksel (Selma); T.B.H. Geijtenbeek (Teunis); W.P. Duprex (Paul); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractMeasles virus (MV) is hypothesized to enter the host by infecting epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, followed by viremia mediated by infected monocytes. However, neither of these cell types express signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (CD150), which has been identified as the

  19. Immunotherapy with internally inactivated virus loaded dendritic cells boosts cellular immunity but does not affect feline immunodeficiency virus infection course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Giulia; Matteucci, Donatella; Mazzetti, Paola; Tarabella, Francesca; Ricci, Enrica; Bozzacco, Leonia; Merico, Antonio; Pistello, Mauro; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca; Bendinelli, Mauro

    2008-04-17

    Immunotherapy of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV)-infected cats with monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDCs) loaded with aldrithiol-2 (AT2)-inactivated homologous FIV was performed. Although FIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses were markedly increased, viral loads and CD4+ T cell depletion were unaffected, thus indicating that boosting antiviral cell-mediated immunity may not suffice to modify infection course appreciably.

  20. Dendritic cells mediate herpes simplex virus infection and transmission through the C-type lectin DC-SIGN

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Marein A. W. P.; de Witte, Lot; Bolmstedt, Anders; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for the induction of specific immune responses against invading pathogens. Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a common human pathogen that causes painful but mild infections of the skin and mucosa, and which results in latency and recurrent infections. Of the two HSV

  1. Altered immune response of immature dendritic cells upon dengue virus infection in the presence of specific antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres, Silvia; Flipse, Jacky; Upasani, Vinit C.; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Urcuqui-Inchima, Silvio; Smit, Jolanda M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.

    Dengue virus (DENV) replication is known to prevent maturation of infected dendritic cells (DCs) thereby impeding the development of adequate immunity. During secondary DENV infection, dengue-specific antibodies can suppress DENV replication in immature DCs (immDCs), however how dengue-antibody

  2. Immunotherapy with internally inactivated virus loaded dendritic cells boosts cellular immunity but does not affect feline immunodeficiency virus infection course

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    Pistello Mauro

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Immunotherapy of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV-infected cats with monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDCs loaded with aldrithiol-2 (AT2-inactivated homologous FIV was performed. Although FIV-specific lymphoproliferative responses were markedly increased, viral loads and CD4+ T cell depletion were unaffected, thus indicating that boosting antiviral cell-mediated immunity may not suffice to modify infection course appreciably.

  3. Lower number of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in peripheral blood of children with bronchiolitis following respiratory syncytial virus infection

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    Weng, Kaizhi; Zhang, Jiaxiang; Mei, Xuqiao; Wu, Ayang; Zhang, Baozhong; Cai, Mengyun; Zheng, Yuanhai; Ke, Zhuanye

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Dendritic cells (DCs) are key mediators of allergic airway inflammation. Thus, it is important to understand the relationship between respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and DCs, especially in children with RSV bronchiolitis. Methods We collected peripheral blood from 71 children with RSV bronchiolitis at the time of admission and 28 children who were followed up 3 months following admission. Flow cytometry was performed to detect dendritic cell immunophenotypes. Results Patients with RSV bronchiolitis exhibited significantly higher number of myeloid DCs and lower number of plasmacytoid DCs at the time of admission and 3 months following discharge, compared with healthy controls. These children had a significantly higher myeloid/plasmacytoid ratio 3 months after discharge compared with healthy controls. Conclusions Among children with RSV bronchiolitis, there is an imbalance in peripheral blood myeloid/plasmacytoid ratio. The low number of plasmacytoid DCs in peripheral blood indicates the development of bronchiolitis due to RSV infection. PMID:24528606

  4. Dendritic cell subtypes from lymph nodes and blood show contrasted gene expression programs upon Bluetongue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruscanu, Suzana; Jouneau, Luc; Urien, Céline; Bourge, Mickael; Lecardonnel, Jérôme; Moroldo, Marco; Loup, Benoit; Dalod, Marc; Elhmouzi-Younes, Jamila; Bevilacqua, Claudia; Hope, Jayne; Vitour, Damien; Zientara, Stéphan; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle

    2013-08-01

    Human and animal hemorrhagic viruses initially target dendritic cells (DCs). It has been proposed, but not documented, that both plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and conventional DCs (cDCs) may participate in the cytokine storm encountered in these infections. In order to evaluate the contribution of DCs in hemorrhagic virus pathogenesis, we performed a genome-wide expression analysis during infection by Bluetongue virus (BTV), a double-stranded RNA virus that induces hemorrhagic fever in sheep and initially infects cDCs. Both pDCs and cDCs accumulated in regional lymph nodes and spleen during BTV infection. The gene response profiles were performed at the onset of the disease and markedly differed with the DC subtypes and their lymphoid organ location. An integrative knowledge-based analysis revealed that blood pDCs displayed a gene signature related to activation of systemic inflammation and permeability of vasculature. In contrast, the gene profile of pDCs and cDCs in lymph nodes was oriented to inhibition of inflammation, whereas spleen cDCs did not show a clear functional orientation. These analyses indicate that tissue location and DC subtype affect the functional gene expression program induced by BTV and suggest the involvement of blood pDCs in the inflammation and plasma leakage/hemorrhage during BTV infection in the real natural host of the virus. These findings open the avenue to target DCs for therapeutic interventions in viral hemorrhagic diseases.

  5. Impaired Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell (PDC)-NK Cell Activity in Viremic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection Attributable to Impairments in both PDC and NK Cell Function▿

    OpenAIRE

    Conry, Sara J.; Milkovich, Kimberly A.; Yonkers, Nicole L.; Rodriguez, Benigno; Bernstein, Helene B.; Asaad, Robert; Heinzel, Frederick P.; Tary-Lehmann, Magdalena; Lederman, Michael M.; Anthony, Donald D.

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections impair plasmacytoid dendritic cell (PDC) and natural killer (NK) cell subset numbers and functions, though little is known about PDC-NK cell interactions during these infections. We evaluated PDC-dependent NK cell killing and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and granzyme B production, using peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC)-based and purified cell assays of samples from HCV- and HIV-infected subjects. CpG-enhanced PBMC k...

  6. Restoration of TLR3-activated myeloid dendritic cell activity leads to improved natural killer cell function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.T.T.L. Tjwa (Eric); G.W. van Oord (Gertine); P.J. Biesta (Paula); P.A. Boonstra (André); H.L.A. Janssen (Harry); A.M. Woltman (Andrea)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractThere is increasing evidence that the function of NK cells in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB) infection is impaired. The underlying mechanism for the impaired NK cell function is still unknown. Since myeloid dendritic cells (mDC) are potent inducers of NK cells, we investigated

  7. Respiratory syncytial virus infection induces a subset of types I and III interferons in human dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, Philippa; Mane, Viraj P; Chen, Aaron; Dos Santos, Maria B; Schramm, Lynnsie M; Shepard, Rachel E; Luongo, Cindy; Le Nouën, Cyril; Huang, Lei; Yan, Lihan; Buchholz, Ursula J; Jubin, Ronald G; Collins, Peter L; Rabin, Ronald L

    2017-04-01

    Whether respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) induces severe infantile pulmonary disease may depend on viral strain and expression of types I and III interferons (IFNs). These IFNs impact disease severity by inducing expression of many anti-viral IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs). To investigate the impact of RSV strain on IFN and ISG expression, we stimulated human monocyte-derived DCs (MDDCs) with either RSV A2 or Line 19 and measured expression of types I and III IFNs and ISGs. At 24h, A2 elicited higher ISG expression than Line 19. Both strains induced MDDCs to express genes for IFN-β, IFN-α1, IFN-α8, and IFN-λ1-3, but only A2 induced IFN-α2, -α14 and -α21. We then show that IFN-α8 and IFN-α14 most potently induced MDDCs and bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) to express ISGs. Our findings demonstrate that RSV strain may impact patterns of types I and III IFN expression and the magnitude of the ISG response by DCs and BECs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Dengue Virus-Infected Dendritic Cells, but Not Monocytes, Activate Natural Killer Cells through a Contact-Dependent Mechanism Involving Adhesion Molecules

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    Vivian Vasconcelos Costa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play a protective role against dengue virus (DENV infection, but the cellular and molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. Using an optimized humanized mouse model, we show that human NK cells, through the secretion of gamma interferon (IFN-γ, are critical in the early defense against DENV infection. Depletion of NK cells or neutralization of IFN-γ leads to increased viremia and more severe thrombocytopenia and liver damage in humanized mice. In vitro studies using autologous human NK cells show that DENV-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs, but not monocytes, activate NK cells in a contact-dependent manner, resulting in upregulation of CD69 and CD25 and secretion of IFN-γ. Blocking adhesion molecules (LFA-1, DNAM-1, CD2, and 2β4 on NK cells abolishes NK cell activation, IFN-γ secretion, and the control of DENV replication. NK cells activated by infected MDDCs also inhibit DENV infection in monocytes. These findings show the essential role of human NK cells in protection against acute DENV infection in vivo, identify adhesion molecules and dendritic cells required for NK cell activation, and delineate the sequence of events for NK cell activation and protection against DENV infection.

  9. Influenza A virus infection of human primary dendritic cells impairs their ability to cross-present antigen to CD8 T cells.

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    Anna Smed-Sörensen

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV infection is normally controlled by adaptive immune responses initiated by dendritic cells (DCs. We investigated the consequences of IAV infection of human primary DCs on their ability to function as antigen-presenting cells. IAV was internalized by both myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs but only mDCs supported viral replication. Although infected mDCs efficiently presented endogenous IAV antigens on MHC class II, this was not the case for presentation on MHC class I. Indeed, cross-presentation by uninfected cells of minute amounts of endocytosed, exogenous IAV was -300-fold more efficient than presentation of IAV antigens synthesized by infected cells and resulted in a statistically significant increase in expansion of IAV-specific CD8 T cells. Furthermore, IAV infection also impaired cross-presentation of other exogenous antigens, indicating that IAV infection broadly attenuates presentation on MHC class I molecules. Our results suggest that cross-presentation by uninfected mDCs is a preferred mechanism of antigen-presentation for the activation and expansion of CD8 T cells during IAV infection.

  10. Activated CD56(+) lymphocytes (NK+NKT) mediate immunomodulatory and anti-viral effects during Japanese encephalitis virus infection of dendritic cells in-vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sooryanarain, Harini; Ayachit, Vijay; Gore, Milind

    2012-10-25

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) remains one of the major causative agents of pediatric encephalitis. Interaction of dendritic cells (DCs) with innate lymphocytes (NK and NKT) represents a crucial event during anti-viral innate immune response. In the current study, we have tried to understand the interaction between JEV, human monocyte derived DCs (MDDCs), and CD56(+) cells (NK+NKT) in-vitro. We have used two JEV strains (i) JE057434 (neurovirulent, wild-type) and (ii) SA14-14-2 (non-neurovirulent, live-attenuated vaccine) to investigate the effect of viral virulence on the functional status of primary human MDDCs. Our preliminary results indicate that replicating JEV induces MDDCs maturation via PI3K and p38 pathways. We also show that the presence of IL2-activated CD56(+) cells impart both immunomodulatory and anti-viral effects on DCs infected with JEV. Mechanistic studies illustrate that, IL2-activated CD56(+) lymphocytes mediated immunomodulation occurs through direct cell-to-cell contact and TNFα, while the anti-viral effect is dependent on direct cell-to-cell contact. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A prominent role for DC-SIGN+ dendritic cells in initiation and dissemination of measles virus infection in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annelies W Mesman

    Full Text Available Measles virus (MV is a highly contagious virus that is transmitted by aerosols. During systemic infection, CD150(+ T and B lymphocytes in blood and lymphoid tissues are the main cells infected by pathogenic MV. However, it is unclear which cell types are the primary targets for MV in the lungs and how the virus reaches the lymphoid tissues. In vitro studies have shown that dendritic cell (DC C-type lectin DC-SIGN captures MV, leading to infection of DCs as well as transmission to lymphocytes. However, evidence of DC-SIGN-mediated transmission in vivo has not been established. Here we identified DC-SIGN(hi DCs as first target cells in vivo and demonstrate that macaque DC-SIGN functions as an attachment receptor for MV. Notably, DC-SIGN(hi cells from macaque broncho-alveolar lavage and lymph nodes transmit MV to B lymphocytes, providing in vivo support for an important role for DCs in both initiation and dissemination of MV infection.

  12. NK cells and their ability to modulate T cells during virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kevin D; Waggoner, Stephen N; Whitmire, Jason K

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in protection against virus infections, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to thwart NK cell activity. NK cells respond to inflammatory signals at an early stage of virus infection, resulting in proliferation, cytokine production, and cytolytic activity that can reduce virus loads. Moreover, the rapid kinetics of the NK cell response enables NK cells to influence other populations of innate immune cells, affect the inflammatory milieu, and guide adaptive immune responses to infection. Early NK cell interactions with other leukocytes can have long-lasting effects on the number and quality of memory T cells, as well as impact the exhaustion of T cells during chronic infections. The ability of NK cells to modulate T cell responses can be mediated through direct T-NK interactions, cytokine production, or indirectly through dendritic cells and other cell types. Herein, we summarize our current understanding of how NK cells interact with T cells, dendritic cells, B cells, and other cell types involved in adaptive immune responses to virus infection. We outline several mechanisms by which NK cells enhance or suppress adaptive immune response and long-lived immunological memory.

  13. Canine distemper virus infection leads to an inhibitory phenotype of monocyte-derived dendritic cells in vitro with reduced expression of co-stimulatory molecules and increased interleukin-10 transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visar Qeska

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV exhibits a profound lymphotropism that causes immunosuppression and increased susceptibility of affected dogs to opportunistic infections. Similar to human measles virus, CDV is supposed to inhibit terminal differentiation of dendritic cells (DCs, responsible for disturbed repopulation of lymphoid tissues and diminished antigen presenting function in dogs. In order to testify the hypothesis that CDV-infection leads to an impairment of professional antigen presenting cells, canine DCs have been generated from peripheral blood monocytes in vitro and infected with CDV. Virus infection was confirmed and quantified by transmission electron microscopy, CDV-specific immunofluorescence, and virus titration. Flow cytometric analyses revealed a significant down-regulation of the major histocompatibility complex class II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86 in CDV-infected DCs, indicative of disturbed antigen presenting capacity. Molecular analyses revealed an increased expression of the immune inhibitory cytokine interleukin-10 in DCs following infection. Results of the present study demonstrate that CDV causes phenotypical changes and altered cytokine expression of DCs, which represent potential mechanisms to evade host immune responses and might contribute to immune dysfunction and virus persistence in canine distemper.

  14. Rabies virus infection induces type I interferon production in an IPS-1 dependent manner while dendritic cell activation relies on IFNAR signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth J Faul

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available As with many viruses, rabies virus (RABV infection induces type I interferon (IFN production within the infected host cells. However, RABV has evolved mechanisms by which to inhibit IFN production in order to sustain infection. Here we show that RABV infection of dendritic cells (DC induces potent type I IFN production and DC activation. Although DCs are infected by RABV, the viral replication is highly suppressed in DCs, rendering the infection non-productive. We exploited this finding in bone marrow derived DCs (BMDC in order to differentiate which pattern recognition receptor(s (PRR is responsible for inducing type I IFN following infection with RABV. Our results indicate that BMDC activation and type I IFN production following a RABV infection is independent of TLR signaling. However, IPS-1 is essential for both BMDC activation and IFN production. Interestingly, we see that the BMDC activation is primarily due to signaling through the IFNAR and only marginally induced by the initial infection. To further identify the receptor recognizing RABV infection, we next analyzed BMDC from Mda-5-/- and RIG-I-/- mice. In the absence of either receptor, there is a significant decrease in BMDC activation at 12h post infection. However, only RIG-I-/- cells exhibit a delay in type I IFN production. In order to determine the role that IPS-1 plays in vivo, we infected mice with pathogenic RABV. We see that IPS-1-/- mice are more susceptible to infection than IPS-1+/+ mice and have a significantly increased incident of limb paralysis.

  15. Hepatitis B Virus Infection In Patients With Homozygous Sickle Cell ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nnebe-Agumadu U H, and Abiodun P O. Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Patients with Homozygous Sickle Cell Disease (HbSS): Need for Intervention. Annals Biomedical Sciences 2002; 1:79-87. This is a prospective study of 213 patients with sickle cell anaemia (SCA) (112 males and 101 females) aged 6 months to 18 years ...

  16. Human muscle satellite cells as targets of Chikungunya virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Ozden

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya (CHIK virus is a mosquito-transmitted alphavirus that causes in humans an acute infection characterised by fever, polyarthralgia, head-ache, and myalgia. Since 2005, the emergence of CHIK virus was associated with an unprecedented magnitude outbreak of CHIK disease in the Indian Ocean. Clinically, this outbreak was characterized by invalidating poly-arthralgia, with myalgia being reported in 97.7% of cases. Since the cellular targets of CHIK virus in humans are unknown, we studied the pathogenic events and targets of CHIK infection in skeletal muscle. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistology on muscle biopsies from two CHIK virus-infected patients with myositic syndrome showed that viral antigens were found exclusively inside skeletal muscle progenitor cells (designed as satelllite cells, and not in muscle fibers. To evaluate the ability of CHIK virus to replicate in human satellite cells, we assessed virus infection on primary human muscle cells; viral growth was observed in CHIK virus-infected satellite cells with a cytopathic effect, whereas myotubes were essentially refractory to infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This report provides new insights into CHIK virus pathogenesis, since it is the first to identify a cellular target of CHIK virus in humans and to report a selective infection of muscle satellite cells by a viral agent in humans.

  17. Zika virus infection of Hofbauer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoni, Michael K; Jurado, Kellie Ann; Abrahams, Vikki M; Fikrig, Erol; Guller, Seth

    2017-02-01

    Recent studies have linked antenatal infection with Zika virus (ZIKV) with major adverse fetal and neonatal outcomes, including microcephaly. There is a growing consensus for the existence of a congenital Zika syndrome (CZS). Previous studies have indicated that non-placental macrophages play a key role in the replication of dengue virus (DENV), a closely related flavivirus. As the placenta provides the conduit for vertical transmission of certain viruses, and placental Hofbauer cells (HBCs) are fetal-placental macrophages located adjacent to fetal capillaries, it is not surprising that several recent studies have examined infection of HBCs by ZIKV. In this review, we describe congenital abnormalities associated with ZIKV infection, the role of HBCs in the placental response to infection, and evidence for the susceptibility of HBCs to ZIKV infection. We conclude that HBCs may contribute to the spread of ZIKV in placenta and promote vertical transmission of ZIKV, ultimately compromising fetal and neonatal development and function. Current evidence strongly suggests that further studies are warranted to dissect the specific molecular mechanism through which ZIKV infects HBCs and its potential impact on the development of CZS. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Dengue virus infection perturbs lipid homeostasis in infected mosquito cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rushika Perera

    Full Text Available Dengue virus causes ∼50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  19. Dengue Virus Infection Perturbs Lipid Homeostasis in Infected Mosquito Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, Rushika M.; Riley, Catherine; Isaac, Georgis; Hopf- Jannasch, Amber; Moore, Ronald J.; Weitz, Karl K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Metz, Thomas O.; Adamec, Jiri; Kuhn, Richard J.

    2012-03-22

    Dengue virus causes {approx}50-100 million infections per year and thus is considered one of the most aggressive arthropod-borne human pathogen worldwide. During its replication, dengue virus induces dramatic alterations in the intracellular membranes of infected cells. This phenomenon is observed both in human and vector-derived cells. Using high-resolution mass spectrometry of mosquito cells, we show that this membrane remodeling is directly linked to a unique lipid repertoire induced by dengue virus infection. Specifically, 15% of the metabolites detected were significantly different between DENV infected and uninfected cells while 85% of the metabolites detected were significantly different in isolated replication complex membranes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that intracellular lipid redistribution induced by the inhibition of fatty acid synthase, the rate-limiting enzyme in lipid biosynthesis, is sufficient for cell survival but is inhibitory to dengue virus replication. Lipids that have the capacity to destabilize and change the curvature of membranes as well as lipids that change the permeability of membranes are enriched in dengue virus infected cells. Several sphingolipids and other bioactive signaling molecules that are involved in controlling membrane fusion, fission, and trafficking as well as molecules that influence cytoskeletal reorganization are also up regulated during dengue infection. These observations shed light on the emerging role of lipids in shaping the membrane and protein environments during viral infections and suggest membrane-organizing principles that may influence virus-induced intracellular membrane architecture.

  20. NK Cells and Their Ability to Modulate T Cells during Virus Infections

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Kevin D.; Waggoner, Stephen N.; Jason K. Whitmire

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are important in protection against virus infections, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to thwart NK cell activity. NK cells respond to inflammatory signals at an early stage of virus infection, resulting in proliferation, cytokine production, and cytolytic activity that can reduce virus loads. Moreover, the rapid kinetics of the NK cell response enables NK cells to influence other populations of innate immune cells, affect the inflammatory milieu, and guide a...

  1. Functional NK cell cytotoxicity assays against virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicheler, Rebecca J; Stanton, Richard J

    2013-01-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are crucial to the control of many viral infections. They are able to kill infected cells directly through the secretion of cytotoxic granules or through binding to death receptors on target cells. They also secrete cytokines and chemokines and, through interactions with dendritic cells, can shape adaptive immunity. The activity of NK cells can be controlled by a balance of activating and inhibitory signals conveyed through ligands on target cells binding to receptors on the NK cell. As a result viruses have devised mechanisms to modulate the expression of NK ligands on target cells, interfering with NK cell recognition and prolonging the life of infected cells. An understanding of how viruses modulate the NK response can lead to an understanding both of NK cell function, and of virus pathogenesis. Measuring the ability of NK cells to kill target cells infected with different viruses, or expressing different viral proteins, is an invaluable technique to identify the proteins and mechanisms by which viruses modulate the NK response. Here we describe two methods to measure this; one method measures sodium dichromate (51)Cr that is released from target cells as they are killed, and the other uses 7-amino-actinomycin D (7-AAD) to measure apoptosis and death of target cells following incubation with NK cells.

  2. Influenza A virus infection of human Schwann cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joshua; Buchman, Craig A; Fregien, Nevis

    2003-01-01

    Sudden sensorineural hearing loss, vestibular neuronitis, vocal fold paralysis and Bell's palsy have been associated with a viral etiology, due to the infection of nerve cells. The goal of this research was to ascertain whether Schwann cells can support infection with human influenza A virus and thereby represent a plausible alternative site for virus-host interaction. Viral infection of Schwann cells may lead to secretion of inflammatory mediators, leukocyte recruitment, demyelination and nerve damage. Cultured human Schwann cells were exposed to human influenza A virus. Infection was assayed at various times post-inoculation (0, 24, 48 and 72 h) using light microscopy, immunocytochemistry and influenza A virus-specific reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). A group of unexposed cells served as controls. Following exposure to the virus, vacuolization, cellular expansion and detachment from the dish were seen as early as 24 h post-inoculation. The exposed cells demonstrated positive immunocytochemical staining for influenza A virus antigen at 24, 48 and 72 h. Using RT-PCR, a sharp rise in influenza A virus-specific mRNA was detected. Human Schwann cells can be infected with human influenza A virus. Further studies will assess the inflammatory response in this model.

  3. DIESEL EXHAUST ENHANCES INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTIONS IN RESPIRATORY EPITHELIAL CELLS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Several factors, such as age and nutritional status can affect the susceptibility to influenza infections. Moreover, exposure to air pollutants, such as diesel exhaust (DE), has been shown to affect respiratory virus infections in rodent models. Influenza virus primarily infects ...

  4. Role of Natural Killer Cells in Innate Protection Against Lethal Ebola Virus Infection

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Warfield, Kelly

    2004-01-01

    .... Unlike wild-type mice, treatment of NK-deficient or -depleted mice with VLPs had no protective effect against Ebola virus infection and NK cells treated with VLPs protected against Ebola virus...

  5. Respiratory Influenza Virus Infection Induces Memory-like Liver NK Cells in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tingting; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yanshi; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-02-01

    Although NK cells are classified as innate immune cells, recent studies have demonstrated the transformation of NK cells into long-lived memory cells that contribute to secondary immune responses in certain mouse models. However, whether NK cells mount an Ag-specific memory response to acute influenza virus infection has not yet been examined. Here, we show that, consistent with previous studies, lung NK cells play an important role in controlling viral proliferation after primary influenza virus infection. However, although lung NK cells display a memory phenotype at the late stage of infection, these cells do not protect mice against secondary influenza virus infection. Interestingly, liver NK cells from influenza virus-infected mice possess a memory phenotype and protect mice against secondary influenza virus infection. Memory-like liver NK cells display a CD49a+DX5- phenotype, and the adoptive transfer of purified liver CD49a+DX5- NK cells into naive mice followed by viral infection results in protective immunity and decreased viral titer. Moreover, we demonstrate that primary inactivated influenza virus induces memory NK cells residing in the liver of Rag1-/- mice. Collectively, these data suggest that liver CD49a+DX5- NK cells remember encountered Ag from influenza virus after primary infection and are more protective upon subsequent infection. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity Toward Measles Virus-Infected Target Cells in Randomly Bred Syrian Hamsters

    OpenAIRE

    Cremer, Natalie E.; O'Keefe, Beatrice; Hagens, Shirley J.; Diggs, Janice

    1982-01-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CMC) toward measles virus-infected cells was studied by a 51Cr release assay with spleen cells from hamsters inoculated with measles virus (strain Lec) or control antigen and with spleen cells from normal hamsters. Spleen cells from measles virus-inoculated hamsters showed greater CMC toward infected than toward noninfected target cells (designated specific CMC). Specific CMC was maximal 7 days after virus inoculation and was declining by 9 to 10 days. Effector cel...

  7. Swift and Strong NK Cell Responses Protect 129 Mice against High-Dose Influenza Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Wang, Jing; Li, An; Zhao, Wenming; Wang, Dongfang; Zhang, Wei; Yan, Jinghua; Gao, George Fu; Liu, Wenjun; Fang, Min

    2016-02-15

    It is generally unclear what roles NK cells play during influenza virus infection with regard to different host genetic backgrounds. In this study, we show that in six inbred mouse strains, NK cells play an important protective role only in 129 mice during high-dose influenza A H1N1 virus infection. Swift and strong NK cell responses efficiently control early pulmonary viral replication in 129 mice, providing survival privilege. In addition, we identified that early activation of TLRs and RIG-I signaling in 129 mice resulted in quick production of type 1 IFNs and inflammatory cytokines, which are important reasons for the swift kinetics of NK cell responses post influenza virus infection. Thus, under different microenvironments, NK cells play differential roles against viral infections. The kinetics and magnitude of NK cell responses correlate with the distinct roles that NK cells play against influenza virus infections. Thus, our works further our understandings about the complex role of NK cells during influenza virus infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  8. [Shifts in the antioxidant activity in the membrane structures of virus-infected cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrenko, Iu M; Anan'ev, V A; Konstantinova, L A; Vladimirov, Iu A

    1985-01-01

    It is assumed that the process of virus infection of cells causes significant changes in the conditions of lipid peroxidation in membrane structures of such cells. Experiments with virus-infected HeLa cells demonstrated noticeable decrease in the capacity of membrane lipids for peroxidation induced by ultraviolet irradiation and iron monoxide ions. Similar changes were also observed in membranes of chick embryo liver cells infected with viruses. The established reduced capacity of lipids in membranes of virus-infected cells to induced peroxidation (interpreted as the increase of their antioxidant activity) is characteristic of whole membranes only, because the lipids extracted from infected and control cells showed no differences in their capacity to peroxidation in liposomal membranes when oxidation was induced by iron monoxide.

  9. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  10. Biology of Zika Virus Infection in Human Skin Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamel, Rodolphe; Dejarnac, Ophélie; Wichit, Sineewanlaya; Ekchariyawat, Peeraya; Neyret, Aymeric; Luplertlop, Natthanej; Perera-Lecoin, Manuel; Surasombatpattana, Pornapat; Talignani, Loïc; Thomas, Frédéric; Cao-Lormeau, Van-Mai; Choumet, Valérie; Briant, Laurence; Desprès, Philippe; Amara, Ali; Yssel, Hans; Missé, Dorothée

    2015-09-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family, which includes dengue, West Nile, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, that causes a mosquito-borne disease transmitted by the Aedes genus, with recent outbreaks in the South Pacific. Here we examine the importance of human skin in the entry of ZIKV and its contribution to the induction of antiviral immune responses. We show that human dermal fibroblasts, epidermal keratinocytes, and immature dendritic cells are permissive to the most recent ZIKV isolate, responsible for the epidemic in French Polynesia. Several entry and/or adhesion factors, including DC-SIGN, AXL, Tyro3, and, to a lesser extent, TIM-1, permitted ZIKV entry, with a major role for the TAM receptor AXL. The ZIKV permissiveness of human skin fibroblasts was confirmed by the use of a neutralizing antibody and specific RNA silencing. ZIKV induced the transcription of Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3), RIG-I, and MDA5, as well as several interferon-stimulated genes, including OAS2, ISG15, and MX1, characterized by strongly enhanced beta interferon gene expression. ZIKV was found to be sensitive to the antiviral effects of both type I and type II interferons. Finally, infection of skin fibroblasts resulted in the formation of autophagosomes, whose presence was associated with enhanced viral replication, as shown by the use of Torin 1, a chemical inducer of autophagy, and the specific autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine. The results presented herein permit us to gain further insight into the biology of ZIKV and to devise strategies aiming to interfere with the pathology caused by this emerging flavivirus. Zika virus (ZIKV) is an arbovirus belonging to the Flaviviridae family. Vector-mediated transmission of ZIKV is initiated when a blood-feeding female Aedes mosquito injects the virus into the skin of its mammalian host, followed by infection of permissive cells via specific receptors. Indeed, skin immune cells, including dermal

  11. Giant cell arteritis associated with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Giardina

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis is an inflammatory vasculopathy that preferentially affects medium-sized and large arteries. A viral cause has been suspected but not confirmed in polymyalgia rheumatica and giant-cell arteritis. We report the case of a 81-year-old female who suffered from chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection and developed giant cell temporal arteritis.

  12. Immunoregulation by airway epithelial cells (AECs against respiratory virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan YAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The respiratory tract is primary contact site of the body and environment, and it is ventilated by 10-20 thousand liters of air per day. Inevitably, the respiratory system comes into contact with airborne microbes, which contain the disease-causing pathogens. Airway epithelial cells (AECs are known to have innate sensor functions, which are similar to the "professional" immune cells, such as alveolar macrophage and sub- or intra-epithelial dendritic cells (DCs. Thus AECs are able to detect invading microbial danger including different types of respiratory viruses, and mount a potent host response, for example, activating type Ⅰ interferon signaling pathway genes. To avoid chronic inflammation and maintain the immunological homeostasis, the pulmonary system has developed intrinsic mechanisms to control local immune responses. Most recently, the role of AECs in control of local immunity has gained much attention, as 1 AECs express the pattern recognition receptors (PRRs, such as Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid inducible gene Ⅰ (RIG-I-like receptor, and so on, thus AECs are equipped to participate in innate detection of microbial encounter; 2 To keep immunological homeostasis in the respiratory tract, AECs behave not only as innate immune sensors but also as immune modulators in parallel, through modulating the sensitivity of innate immune sensing of both AECs per se and sub- or intra-epithelial immune cells; 3 Loss of modularity capacity of AECs might be involved in the development of chronic airway diseases. In present review, how the AECs act will be intensively discussed in response to respiratory viruses and modulate the local immunity through cis- and trans-factors (direct and indirect factors, as well as the consequence of impairment of this control of local immunity, in the development and exacerbation of airway diseases, such as acute and chronic rhinosinusitis. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.10.02

  13. The depletion of NK cells prevents T cell exhaustion to efficiently control disseminating virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kevin D; Whitmire, Jason K

    2013-01-15

    NK cells have well-established functions in immune defense against virus infections and cancer through their cytolytic activity and production of cytokines. In this study, we examined the frequency of NK cells and their influence on T cell responses in mice given variants of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus that cause acute or persisting infection. We found increased frequencies of circulating NK cells during disseminating infection compared with uninfected or acutely infected mice. Consistent with recent reports, we observed that the depletion of NK cells in mice with disseminated infection increased peak numbers of virus-specific cytokine producing CD8(+) T cells and resulted in the rapid resolution of disseminated infection. Additionally, we show that NK cell depletion sustained T cell responses across time and protected against T cell exhaustion. The positive effects of NK cell depletion on T cell responses only occurred when NK cells were depleted within the first 2 d of infection. We find that the improved CD8(+) T cell response correlated with an enhanced ability of APCs from NK cell-depleted mice to stimulate T cell proliferation, independently of the effects of NK cells on CD4(+) T cells. These results indicate that NK cells play an integral role in limiting the CD8 T cell response and contribute to T cell exhaustion by diminishing APC function during persisting virus infection.

  14. A Delayed Virus Infection Model with Cell-to-Cell Transmission and CTL Immune Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu; Zhang, Tonghua; Xu, Yancong; Zhou, Jinling

    In this paper, a delayed virus infection model with cell-to-cell transmission and CTL immune response is investigated. In the model, time delay is incorporated into the CTL response. By constructing Lyapunov functionals, global dynamical properties of the two boundary equilibria are established. Our results show that time delay in the CTL response process may lead to sustained oscillation. To further investigate the nature of the oscillation, we apply the method of multiple time scales to calculate the normal form on the center manifold of the model. At the end of the paper, numerical simulations are carried out, which support our theoretical results.

  15. Overcoming CD4 Th1 Cell Fate Restrictions to Sustain Antiviral CD8 T Cells and Control Persistent Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Snell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral persistence specifically inhibits CD4 Th1 responses and promotes Tfh immunity, but the mechanisms that suppress Th1 cells and the disease consequences of their loss are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the loss of CD4 Th1 cells specifically leads to progressive CD8 T cell decline and dysfunction during viral persistence. Therapeutically reconstituting CD4 Th1 cells restored CD4 T cell polyfunctionality, enhanced antiviral CD8 T cell numbers and function, and enabled viral control. Mechanistically, combined interaction of PD-L1 and IL-10 by suppressive dendritic cell subsets inhibited new CD4 Th1 cells in both acute and persistent virus infection, demonstrating an unrecognized suppressive function for PD-L1 in virus infection. Thus, the loss of CD4 Th1 cells is a key event leading to progressive CD8 T cell demise during viral persistence with important implications for restoring antiviral CD8 T cell immunity to control persistent viral infection.

  16. HumanViCe: Host ceRNA network in virus infected cells in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman eGhosal

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Host-virus interaction via host cellular components has been an important field of research in recent times. RNA interference mediated by short interfering RNAs and microRNAs (miRNA, is a widespread anti-viral defence strategy. Importantly, viruses also encode their own miRNAs. In recent times miRNAs were identified as key players in host-virus interaction. Furthermore, viruses were shown to exploit the host miRNA networks to suite their own need. The complex cross-talk between host and viral miRNAs and their cellular and viral targets forms the environment for viral pathogenesis. Apart from protein-coding mRNAs, non-coding RNAs may also be targeted by host or viral miRNAs in virus infected cells, and viruses can exploit the host miRNA mediated gene regulatory network via the competing endogenous RNA effect. A recent report showed that viral U-rich non-coding RNAs called HSUR, expressed in primate virus herpesvirus saimiri (HVS infected T cells, were able to bind to three host miRNAs, causing significant alteration in cellular level for one of the miRNAs. We have predicted protein coding and non protein-coding targets for viral and human miRNAs in virus infected cells. We identified viral miRNA targets within host non-coding RNA loci from AGO interacting regions in three different virus infected cells. Gene ontology (GO and pathway enrichment analysis of the genes comprising the ceRNA networks in the virus infected cells revealed enrichment of key cellular signalling pathways related to cell fate decisions and gene transcription, like Notch and Wnt signalling pathways, as well as pathways related to viral entry, replication and virulence. We identified a vast number of non-coding transcripts playing as potential ceRNAs to the immune response associated genes; e.g. APOBEC family genes, in some virus infected cells. All these information are compiled in HumanViCe, a comprehensive database that provides the potential ceRNA networks in virus

  17. Cutting edge: contribution of lung-resident T cell proliferation to the overall magnitude of the antigen-specific CD8 T cell response in the lungs following murine influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGill, Jodi; Legge, Kevin L

    2009-10-01

    Following influenza virus infection, CD8 T cells encounter mature, Ag-bearing dendritic cells within the draining lymph nodes and undergo activation, programmed proliferation, and differentiation to effector cells before migrating to the lungs to mediate viral clearance. However, it remains unclear whether CD8 T cells continue their proliferation after arriving in the lungs. To address this question, we developed a novel, in vivo, dual-label system using intranasal CFSE and BrdU administration to identify virus-specific CD8 T cells that are actively undergoing cell division while in the lungs. With this technique we demonstrate that a high frequency of virus-specific CD8 T cells incorporate BrdU while in the lungs and that this lung-resident proliferation contributes significantly to the magnitude of the Ag-specific CD8 T cell response following influenza virus infection.

  18. Alteration of cell cycle progression by Sindbis virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Ruirong; Saito, Kengo [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Isegawa, Naohisa [Laboratory Animal Center, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan); Shirasawa, Hiroshi, E-mail: sirasawa@faculty.chiba-u.jp [Department of Molecular Virology, Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba University Graduate School of Medicine, 1-8-1 Inohana, Chiba 260-8670 (Japan)

    2015-07-10

    We examined the impact of Sindbis virus (SINV) infection on cell cycle progression in a cancer cell line, HeLa, and a non-cancerous cell line, Vero. Cell cycle analyses showed that SINV infection is able to alter the cell cycle progression in both HeLa and Vero cells, but differently, especially during the early stage of infection. SINV infection affected the expression of several cell cycle regulators (CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, p21, cyclin A and cyclin B) in HeLa cells and caused HeLa cells to accumulate in S phase during the early stage of infection. Monitoring SINV replication in HeLa and Vero cells expressing cell cycle indicators revealed that SINV which infected HeLa cells during G{sub 1} phase preferred to proliferate during S/G{sub 2} phase, and the average time interval for viral replication was significantly shorter in both HeLa and Vero cells infected during G{sub 1} phase than in cells infected during S/G{sub 2} phase. - Highlights: • SINV infection was able to alter the cell cycle progression of infected cancer cells. • SINV infection can affect the expression of cell cycle regulators. • SINV infection exhibited a preference for the timing of viral replication among the cell cycle phases.

  19. In vivo Ebola virus infection leads to a strong innate response in circulating immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Ignacio S; Honko, Anna N; Gire, Stephen K; Winnicki, Sarah M; Melé, Marta; Gerhardinger, Chiara; Lin, Aaron E; Rinn, John L; Sabeti, Pardis C; Hensley, Lisa E; Connor, John H

    2016-09-05

    Ebola virus is the causative agent of a severe syndrome in humans with a fatality rate that can approach 90 %. During infection, the host immune response is thought to become dysregulated, but the mechanisms through which this happens are not entirely understood. In this study, we analyze RNA sequencing data to determine the host response to Ebola virus infection in circulating immune cells. Approximately half of the 100 genes with the strongest early increases in expression were interferon-stimulated genes, such as ISG15, OAS1, IFIT2, HERC5, MX1 and DHX58. Other highly upregulated genes included cytokines CXCL11, CCL7, IL2RA, IL2R1, IL15RA, and CSF2RB, which have not been previously reported to change during Ebola virus infection. Comparing this response in two different models of exposure (intramuscular and aerosol) revealed a similar signature of infection. The strong innate response in the aerosol model was seen not only in circulating cells, but also in primary and secondary target tissues. Conversely, the innate immune response of vaccinated macaques was almost non-existent. This suggests that the innate response is a major aspect of the cellular response to Ebola virus infection in multiple tissues. Ebola virus causes a severe infection in humans that is associated with high mortality. The host immune response to virus infection is thought to be an important aspect leading to severe pathology, but the components of this overactive response are not well characterized. Here, we analyzed how circulating immune cells respond to the virus and found that there is a strong innate response dependent on active virus replication. This finding is in stark contrast to in vitro evidence showing a suppression of innate immune signaling, and it suggests that the strong innate response we observe in infected animals may be an important contributor to pathogenesis.

  20. Hepatitis C virus infection of cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fletcher, Nicola F.; Humphreys, Elizabeth; Jennings, Elliott; Osburn, William; Lissauer, Samantha; Wilson, Garrick K.; van Ijzendoorn, Sven C. D.; Baumert, Thomas F.; Balfe, Peter; Afford, Simon; McKeating, Jane A.

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects the liver and hepatocytes are the major cell type supporting viral replication. Hepatocytes and cholangiocytes derive from a common hepatic progenitor cell that proliferates during inflammatory conditions, raising the possibility that cholangiocytes may support HCV

  1. Activation mechanisms of natural killer cells during influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilwoong Hwang

    Full Text Available During early viral infection, activation of natural killer (NK cells elicits the effector functions of target cell lysis and cytokine production. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to NK cell activation during viral infections are incompletely understood. In this study, using a model of acute viral infection, we investigated the mechanisms controlling cytotoxic activity and cytokine production in response to influenza (flu virus. Analysis of cytokine receptor deficient mice demonstrated that type I interferons (IFNs, but not IL-12 or IL-18, were critical for the NK cell expression of both IFN-γ and granzyme B in response to flu infection. Further, adoptive transfer experiments revealed that NK cell activation was mediated by type I IFNs acting directly on NK cells. Analysis of signal transduction molecules showed that during flu infection, STAT1 activation in NK cells was completely dependent on direct type I IFN signaling, whereas STAT4 activation was only partially dependent. In addition, granzyme B induction in NK cells was mediated by signaling primarily through STAT1, but not STAT4, while IFN-γ production was mediated by signaling through STAT4, but not STAT1. Therefore, our findings demonstrate the importance of direct action of type I IFNs on NK cells to mount effective NK cell responses in the context of flu infection and delineate NK cell signaling pathways responsible for controlling cytotoxic activity and cytokine production.

  2. African horse sickness virus infects BSR cells through macropinocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermaak, Elaine; Conradie, Andelé M; Maree, Francois F; Theron, Jacques

    2016-10-01

    Cellular pathways involved in cell entry by African horse sickness virus (AHSV), a member of the Orbivirus genus within the Reoviridae family, have not yet been determined. Here, we show that acidic pH is required for productive infection of BSR cells by AHSV-4, suggesting that the virus is likely internalized by an endocytic pathway. We subsequently analyzed the major endocytic routes using specific inhibitors and determined the consequences for AHSV-4 entry into BSR cells. The results indicated that virus entry is dynamin dependent, but clathrin- and lipid raft/caveolae-mediated endocytic pathways were not used by AHSV-4 to enter and infect BSR cells. Instead, binding of AHSV-4 to BSR cells stimulated uptake of a macropinocytosis-specific cargo and inhibition of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, actin polymerization and cellular GTPases and kinases involved in macropinocytosis significantly inhibited AHSV-4 infection. Altogether, the data suggest that AHSV-4 infects BSR cells by utilizing macropinocytosis as the primary entry pathway. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Apoptosis transcriptional mechanism of feline infectious peritonitis virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuid, Ahmad Naqib; Safi, Nikoo; Haghani, Amin; Mehrbod, Parvaneh; Haron, Mohd Syamsul Reza; Tan, Sheau Wei; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2015-11-01

    Apoptosis has been postulated to play an important role during feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV) infection; however, its mechanism is not well characterized. This study is focused on apoptosis and transcriptional profiling of FIPV-infected cells following in vitro infection of CRFK cells with FIPV 79-1146 WSU. Flow cytometry was used to determine mode of cell death in first 42 h post infection (hpi). FIPV infected cells underwent early apoptosis at 9 hpi (p apoptosis at 12 hpi (p apoptosis cluster (80 down-regulated and 51 up-regulated) along with increase of apoptosis, p53, p38 MAPK, VEGF and chemokines/cytokines signaling pathways were probably involved in apoptosis process. Six of the de-regulated genes expression (RASSF1, BATF2, MAGEB16, PDCD5, TNFα and TRAF2) and TNFα protein concentration were analyzed by RT-qPCR and ELISA, respectively, at different time-points. Up-regulations of both pro-apoptotic (i.e. PDCD5) and anti-apoptotic (i.e. TRAF2) were detected from first hpi and continuing to deregulate during apoptosis process in the infected cells.

  4. The levels of DNGR-1 and its ligand-bearing cells were altered after human and simian immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Wen-Rong; Li, Dong; Yu, Lei; Wang, Feng-Jie; Xing, Hui; Yang, Gui-Bo

    2017-08-01

    Dendritic cell NK lectin Group Receptor-1 (DNGR-1), also known as C-type lectin domain family 9, member A (CLEC9A), is a member of C-type lectin receptor superfamily expressed primarily on dendritic cells (DC) that excel in cross-presentation of exogenous antigens. To find out whether and how it is affected in human immunodeficiency virus infections or acquired immunodeficiency syndromes (HIV/AIDS), DNGR-1 expression and DNGR-1-binding cells in simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques and antiretroviral therapy (ART)-treated AIDS patients were examined by real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and confocal microscopy. DNGR-1 expression was observed in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues including gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) of rhesus macaques. DNGR-1 mRNA levels were significantly reduced in the blood while significantly elevated in the GALT of SHIV/SIV-infected rhesus macaques. DNGR-1 transcription levels were also significantly reduced in the blood of ART-treated AIDS patients irrespective of viral status. White blood cells with exposed DNGR-1 ligands were significantly increased in ART-treated AIDS patients, while significantly decreased in SIV-infected rhesus macaques. These data indicate that DNGR-1 expression, and by extension, the function of cross-presentation of antigens associated with dead/damaged cells might be compromised in HIV/SIV infection, which might play a role in HIV/AIDS pathogenesis and should be taken into consideration in therapeutic AIDS vaccine development.

  5. Regulatory T Cells in Chronic Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.N. Stoop (Jeroen Nicolaas)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractWorldwide 400 million people suffer from chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and approximately 1 million people die annually from HBV-related disease. To clear HBV, an effective immune response, in which several cell types and cytokines play a role, is important. It is known that

  6. Human skin Langerhans cells are targets of dengue virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, SJL; Grouard-Vogel, G; Mascola, [No Value; Brachtel, E; Putvatana, R; Louder, MK; Filgueira, L; Marovich, MA; Wong, HK; Blauvelt, A; Murphy, GS; Robb, ML; Innes, BL; Birx, DL; Hayes, CG; Frankel, SS

    Dengue virus (DV), an arthropod-borne flavivirus, causes a febrile illness for which there is no antiviral treatment and no vaccine(1,2). Macrophages are important in dengue pathogenesis; however, the initial target cell for DV infection remains unknown. As DV is introduced into human skin by

  7. Zika virus infection dysregulates human neural stem cell growth and inhibits differentiation into neuroprogenitor cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devhare, Pradip; Meyer, Keith; Steele, Robert; Ray, Ratna B; Ray, Ranjit

    2017-01-01

    The current outbreak of Zika virus-associated diseases in South America and its threat to spread to other parts of the world has emerged as a global health emergency. A strong link between Zika virus and microcephaly exists, and the potential mechanisms associated with microcephaly are under intense investigation. In this study, we evaluated the effect of Zika virus infection of Asian and African lineages (PRVABC59 and MR766) in human neural stem cells (hNSCs). These two Zika virus strains displayed distinct infection pattern and growth rates in hNSCs. Zika virus MR766 strain increased serine 139 phosphorylation of histone H2AX (γH2AX), a known early cellular response proteins to DNA damage. On the other hand, PRVABC59 strain upregulated serine 15 phosphorylation of p53, p21 and PUMA expression. MR766-infected cells displayed poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3 cleavage. Interestingly, infection of hNSCs by both strains of Zika virus for 24 h, followed by incubation in astrocyte differentiation medium, induced rounding and cell death. However, astrocytes generated from hNSCs by incubation in differentiation medium when infected with Zika virus displayed minimal cytopathic effect at an early time point. Infected hNSCs incubated in astrocyte differentiating medium displayed PARP cleavage within 24–36 h. Together, these results showed that two distinct strains of Zika virus potentiate hNSC growth inhibition by different mechanisms, but both viruses strongly induce death in early differentiating neuroprogenitor cells even at a very low multiplicity of infection. Our observations demonstrate further mechanistic insights for impaired neuronal homeostasis during active Zika virus infection. PMID:29022904

  8. Tinkering with Translation: Protein Synthesis in Virus-Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Derek; Mathews, Michael B.; Mohr, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites, and their replication requires host cell functions. Although the size, composition, complexity, and functions encoded by their genomes are remarkably diverse, all viruses rely absolutely on the protein synthesis machinery of their host cells. Lacking their own translational apparatus, they must recruit cellular ribosomes in order to translate viral mRNAs and produce the protein products required for their replication. In addition, there are other constraints on viral protein production. Crucially, host innate defenses and stress responses capable of inactivating the translation machinery must be effectively neutralized. Furthermore, the limited coding capacity of the viral genome needs to be used optimally. These demands have resulted in complex interactions between virus and host that exploit ostensibly virus-specific mechanisms and, at the same time, illuminate the functioning of the cellular protein synthesis apparatus. PMID:23209131

  9. Differential proteome analysis of chikungunya virus infection on host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Li-Ping Thio

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chikungunya virus (CHIKV is an emerging mosquito-borne alphavirus that has caused multiple unprecedented and re-emerging outbreaks in both tropical and temperate countries. Despite ongoing research efforts, the underlying factors involved in facilitating CHIKV replication during early infection remains ill-characterized. The present study serves to identify host proteins modulated in response to early CHIKV infection using a proteomics approach. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The whole cell proteome profiles of CHIKV-infected and mock control WRL-68 cells were compared and analyzed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE. Fifty-three spots were found to be differentially modulated and 50 were successfully identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF. Eight were significantly up-regulated and 42 were down-regulated. The mRNA expressions of 15 genes were also found to correlate with the corresponding protein expression. STRING network analysis identified several biological processes to be affected, including mRNA processing, translation, energy production and cellular metabolism, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP and cell cycle regulation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study constitutes a first attempt to investigate alteration of the host cellular proteome during early CHIKV infection. Our proteomics data showed that during early infection, CHIKV affected the expression of proteins that are involved in mRNA processing, host metabolic machinery, UPP, and cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1 regulation (in favour of virus survival, replication and transmission. While results from this study complement the proteomics results obtained from previous late host response studies, functional characterization of these proteins is warranted to reinforce our understanding of their roles during early CHIKV infection in humans.

  10. Differential lung NK cell responses in avian influenza virus infected chickens correlate with pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Christine A; de Geus, Eveline D; van Haarlem, Daphne A; van de Haar, Peter M; Löndt, Brandon Z; Graham, Simon P; Göbel, Thomas W; van Eden, Willem; Brookes, Sharon M; Vervelde, Lonneke

    2013-01-01

    Infection of chickens with low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI) virus results in mild clinical signs while infection with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses causes death of the birds within 36-48 hours. Since natural killer (NK) cells have been shown to play an important role in influenza-specific immunity, we hypothesise that NK cells are involved in this difference in pathogenicity. To investigate this, the role of chicken NK-cells in LPAI virus infection was studied. Next activation of lung NK cells upon HPAI virus infection was analysed. Infection with a H9N2 LPAI virus resulted in the presence of viral RNA in the lungs which coincided with enhanced activation of lung NK cells. The presence of H5N1 viruses, measured by detection of viral RNA, did not induce activation of lung NK cells. This suggests that decreased NK-cell activation may be one of the mechanisms associated with the enhanced pathogenicity of H5N1 viruses.

  11. Easy and Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus by Live Fluorescent Visualization of Virus-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tadanobu; Agarikuchi, Takashi; Kurebayashi, Yuuki; Shibahara, Nona; Suzuki, Chihiro; Kishikawa, Akiko; Fukushima, Keijo; Takano, Maiko; Suzuki, Fumie; Wada, Hirohisa; Otsubo, Tadamune; Ikeda, Kiyoshi; Minami, Akira; Suzuki, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    Mumps viruses show diverse cytopathic effects (CPEs) of infected cells and viral plaque formation (no CPE or no plaque formation in some cases) depending on the viral strain, highlighting the difficulty in mumps laboratory studies. In our previous study, a new sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl)-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac), was developed for visualization of sialidase activity. BTP3-Neu5Ac can easily and rapidly perform histochemical fluorescent visualization of influenza viruses and virus-infected cells without an antiviral antibody and cell fixation. In the present study, the potential utility of BTP3-Neu5Ac for rapid detection of mumps virus was demonstrated. BTP3-Neu5Ac could visualize dot-blotted mumps virus, virus-infected cells, and plaques (plaques should be called focuses due to staining of infected cells in this study), even if a CPE was not observed. Furthermore, virus cultivation was possible by direct pick-up from a fluorescent focus. In conventional methods, visible appearance of the CPE and focuses often requires more than 6 days after infection, but the new method with BTP3-Neu5Ac clearly visualized infected cells after 2 days and focuses after 4 days. The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay is a precise, easy, and rapid assay for confirmation and titration of mumps virus.

  12. Easy and Rapid Detection of Mumps Virus by Live Fluorescent Visualization of Virus-Infected Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadanobu Takahashi

    Full Text Available Mumps viruses show diverse cytopathic effects (CPEs of infected cells and viral plaque formation (no CPE or no plaque formation in some cases depending on the viral strain, highlighting the difficulty in mumps laboratory studies. In our previous study, a new sialidase substrate, 2-(benzothiazol-2-yl-4-bromophenyl 5-acetamido-3,5-dideoxy-α-D-glycero-D-galacto-2-nonulopyranosidonic acid (BTP3-Neu5Ac, was developed for visualization of sialidase activity. BTP3-Neu5Ac can easily and rapidly perform histochemical fluorescent visualization of influenza viruses and virus-infected cells without an antiviral antibody and cell fixation. In the present study, the potential utility of BTP3-Neu5Ac for rapid detection of mumps virus was demonstrated. BTP3-Neu5Ac could visualize dot-blotted mumps virus, virus-infected cells, and plaques (plaques should be called focuses due to staining of infected cells in this study, even if a CPE was not observed. Furthermore, virus cultivation was possible by direct pick-up from a fluorescent focus. In conventional methods, visible appearance of the CPE and focuses often requires more than 6 days after infection, but the new method with BTP3-Neu5Ac clearly visualized infected cells after 2 days and focuses after 4 days. The BTP3-Neu5Ac assay is a precise, easy, and rapid assay for confirmation and titration of mumps virus.

  13. A novel single virus infection system reveals that influenza virus preferentially infects cells in g1 phase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuta Ueda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Influenza virus attaches to sialic acid residues on the surface of host cells via the hemagglutinin (HA, a glycoprotein expressed on the viral envelope, and enters into the cytoplasm by receptor-mediated endocytosis. The viral genome is released and transported in to the nucleus, where transcription and replication take place. However, cellular factors affecting the influenza virus infection such as the cell cycle remain uncharacterized. METHODS/RESULTS: To resolve the influence of cell cycle on influenza virus infection, we performed a single-virus infection analysis using optical tweezers. Using this newly developed single-virus infection system, the fluorescence-labeled influenza virus was trapped on a microchip using a laser (1064 nm at 0.6 W, transported, and released onto individual H292 human lung epithelial cells. Interestingly, the influenza virus attached selectively to cells in the G1-phase. To clarify the molecular differences between cells in G1- and S/G2/M-phase, we performed several physical and chemical assays. Results indicated that: 1 the membranes of cells in G1-phase contained greater amounts of sialic acids (glycoproteins than the membranes of cells in S/G2/M-phase; 2 the membrane stiffness of cells in S/G2/M-phase is more rigid than those in G1-phase by measurement using optical tweezers; and 3 S/G2/M-phase cells contained higher content of Gb3, Gb4 and GlcCer than G1-phase cells by an assay for lipid composition. CONCLUSIONS: A novel single-virus infection system was developed to characterize the difference in influenza virus susceptibility between G1- and S/G2/M-phase cells. Differences in virus binding specificity were associated with alterations in the lipid composition, sialic acid content, and membrane stiffness. This single-virus infection system will be useful for studying the infection mechanisms of other viruses.

  14. Correlated fluorescence microscopy and cryo-electron tomography of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampton, Cheri M; Strauss, Joshua D; Ke, Zunlong; Dillard, Rebecca S; Hammonds, Jason E; Alonas, Eric; Desai, Tanay M; Marin, Mariana; Storms, Rachel E; Leon, Fredrick; Melikyan, Gregory B; Santangelo, Philip J; Spearman, Paul W; Wright, Elizabeth R

    2017-01-01

    Correlative light and electron microscopy (CLEM) combines spatiotemporal information from fluorescence light microscopy (fLM) with high-resolution structural data from cryo-electron tomography (cryo-ET). These technologies provide opportunities to bridge knowledge gaps between cell and structural biology. Here we describe our protocol for correlated cryo-fLM, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM), and cryo-ET (i.e., cryo-CLEM) of virus-infected or transfected mammalian cells. Mammalian-derived cells are cultured on EM substrates, using optimized conditions that ensure that the cells are spread thinly across the substrate and are not physically disrupted. The cells are then screened by fLM and vitrified before acquisition of cryo-fLM and cryo-ET images, which is followed by data processing. A complete session from grid preparation through data collection and processing takes 5-15 d for an individual experienced in cryo-EM.

  15. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Influenza B Virus Infection in a Patient with Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvio A. Ñamendys-Silva

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Influenza B virus infections are less common than infections caused by influenza A virus in critically ill patients, but similar mortality rates have been observed for both influenza types. Pneumonia caused by influenza B virus is uncommon and has been reported in pediatric patients and previously healthy adults. Critically ill patients with pneumonia caused by influenza virus may develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. We describe the clinical course of a critically ill patient with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma nongerminal center B-cell phenotype who developed acute respiratory distress syndrome caused by influenza B virus infection. This paper emphasizes the need to suspect influenza B virus infection in critically ill immunocompromised patients with progressive deterioration of cardiopulmonary function despite treatment with antibiotics. Early initiation of neuraminidase inhibitor and the implementation of guidelines for management of severe sepsis and septic shock should be considered.

  16. Diversity of matrix protein in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and measles virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haga, T; Yoshikawa, Y; Yamanouchi, K

    1990-01-01

    Expression of the viral matrix (M) proteins in Vero cells infected with 18 strains of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) virus and measles virus was examined by immunocytochemistry and Western blot analysis using an anti-M monospecific serum and two sera against the M protein specific synthetic peptides. By immunocytochemistry using the anti-M monospecific serum, M protein was detected in all of the virus-infected cells regardless of cell-free virus production. M proteins of the seven non-productive strains were found to vary significantly in their epitope, in their reactivity to different assay systems, and in their molecular weight, whereas M proteins of the other 11 productive strains were detected consistently. These results suggest diversification of M protein of the non-productive strains.

  17. CXCR3 Directs Antigen-Specific Effector CD4+ T Cell Migration to the Lung During Parainfluenza Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Cookenham, Tres; Miller, Shannon C

    2009-01-01

    Effector T cells are a crucial component of the adaptive immune response to respiratory virus infections. Although it was previously reported that the chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR3 affect trafficking of respiratory virus-specific CD8(+) T cells, it is unclear whether these receptors govern e...

  18. Influenza A virus infection of intestinal epithelial cells enhances the adhesion ability of Crohn's disease associated Escherichia coli strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleandri, Marta; Conte, Maria Pia; Simonetti, Giovanna; Panella, Simona; Celestino, Ignacio; Checconi, Paola; Marazzato, Massimiliano; Longhi, Catia; Goldoni, Paola; Nicoletti, Mauro; Barnich, Nicolas; Palamara, Anna Teresa; Schippa, Serena; Nencioni, Lucia

    2015-01-01

    Modifications of intestinal glycoreceptors expression, in particular CEACAM6, typically found in ileal Crohn's disease (CD), favor, among the commensal species of microbiota, the enrichment in Escherichia coli. Removal of protein glycosidic residues by neuraminidase, a sialidase typical of influenza virus, increases adhesion ability of Escherichia coli to Caco-2 intestinal cells. In this study we investigated whether influenza virus infection of human intestinal epithelial cells could influence the adhesiveness of different Escherichia coli strains isolated from CD patients by altering surface glycoreceptors. Influenza virus infection of intestinal cells increased exposure of galactose and mannose residues on the cell surface. In particular, glycoreceptors Thomsen-Friedenreich and CEACAM6 were over-expressed in influenza virus infected cells. In the same experimental conditions, a significant increase in bacterial adhesiveness was observed, independently of their own adhesive ability. The increase was reverted by treatment with anti-TF and anti-CEACAM6 antibodies. Interestingly, influenza virus was able to efficiently replicate in human primary intestinal cells leading to TF exposure. Finally, intestinal infected cells produced high levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines compared to control. Overall these data suggest that influenza virus infection, could constitute an additional risk factor in CD patients.

  19. NK cells exacerbate the pathology of influenza virus infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Gang; Juang, Shih Wei W; Kane, Kevin P

    2013-04-01

    NK cells offer a first line of defense against viruses and are considered beneficial to the host during infection. Nevertheless, little is understood regarding the phenotype and function of NK cells in the lung during influenza virus infection. We found that the frequency of NK cells in mouse lung increased during influenza infection, with the majority of a mature phenotype. Cell surface CD107a and intracellular IFN-γ were detected in cells expressing multiple NK-cell receptors in infected lung, suggesting that NK cells were activated during infection. The activating receptor NKp46 was predominantly negative on such cells, possibly as a result of encountering influenza HA. Depletion of NK cells in vivo with anti-asialo GM1 or anti-NK1.1 reduced mortality from influenza infection and surviving mice recovered their body weight. Pathology induced by NK cells was only observed with high, not medium or low-dose influenza infection, indicating that the severity of infection influences NK-cell-mediated pathology. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of NK cells from influenza-infected lung, but not uninfected lung, resulted in more rapid weight loss and increased mortality of influenza-infected mice. Our results indicate that during severe influenza infection of the lung, NK cells have a deleterious impact on the host, promoting mortality. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Ethanol suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cell trafficking across brain endothelial cells in immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lola C Hudson

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Lola C Hudson1, Brenda A Colby1, Rick B Meeker21Department of Molecular Biosciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC, USA; 2Department of Neurology, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USAAbstract: Earlier studies suggested that the combination of alcohol use and immunodeficiency virus infection resulted in more severe neurologic disease than either condition individually. These deleterious interactions could be due to increased immune cell and virus trafficking or may result from interactions between ethanol and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-associated toxicity within the brain. To determine the extent to which increased trafficking played a role, we examined the effect of ethanol on the migration of different peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMCs subsets across a brain endothelial cell monolayer. We utilized combinations of feline brain endothelial cells with astrocytes, and/or microglia with either acute exposure to 0.08 g/dL ethanol, a combination of ethanol and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV, or FIV alone. Adherence of PBMCs to endothelium was increased in all combinations of cells with the addition of ethanol. Despite increased PBMC adhesion with ethanol treatment, transmigration of B cells, monocytes, CD4 T cells and CD8 T cells was not increased and was actually decreased in the presence of astrocytes. Expression of three common adhesion molecules, intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1, ICAM2, and vascular cell adhesion molecule, was unchanged or slightly decreased by ethanol. This indicated that although adherence is increased by ethanol it is not due to an increased expression of adhesion molecules. RANTES, MIP1α, MIP1β, and MCP-1 mRNA expression was also studied in brain endothelial cells, astrocytes and microglia by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Ethanol treatment of astrocytes resulted in modest changes of

  1. NK-cells are involved in thymic atrophy induced by influenza A virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xuefeng; Lu, Jiao; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Jing; Wu, Jihua; Gao, George Fu; Fang, Min

    2015-11-01

    NK-cells have traditionally been viewed as innate effector lymphocytes that serve as a first line of defence against a range of viruses and tumours. More recently, the importance of NK-cell immunoregulatory functions has been highlighted. NK-cells can inhibit antiviral T-cell responses, and also play an important role in controlling harmful T-cell activity in autoimmunity and transplantation settings. Moreover, immunopathological effects of NK-cells during infection have been reported. Nevertheless, the phenotype and function of NK-cells in the thymus during influenza virus infection is not understood. In the present study, we demonstrated that influenza A virus (IAV) infection in mice led to severe thymic atrophy caused by increased thymic T-cell apoptosis and suppressed proliferation. We found that NK-cells played a critical role in this phenotype. IFN-c production by NK-cells was a contributing factor for thymic atrophy during IAV infection. Taken together, our data indicate that NK-cells are involved in the thymic atrophy associated with IAV infection.

  2. Spatiotemporal quantification of cell dynamics in the lung following influenza virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lu; Xu, Shuoyu; Cheng, Jierong; Zheng, Dahai; Limmon, Gino V.; Leung, Nicola H. N.; Rajapakse, Jagath C.; Chow, Vincent T. K.; Chen, Jianzhu; Yu, Hanry

    2013-04-01

    Lung injury caused by influenza virus infection is widespread. Understanding lung damage and repair progression post infection requires quantitative spatiotemporal information on various cell types mapping into the tissue structure. Based on high content images acquired from an automatic slide scanner, we have developed algorithms to quantify cell infiltration in the lung, loss and recovery of Clara cells in the damaged bronchioles and alveolar type II cells (AT2s) in the damaged alveolar areas, and induction of pro-surfactant protein C (pro-SPC)-expressing bronchiolar epithelial cells (SBECs). These quantitative analyses reveal: prolonged immune cell infiltration into the lung that persisted long after the influenza virus was cleared and paralleled with Clara cell recovery; more rapid loss and recovery of Clara cells as compared to AT2s; and two stages of SBECs from Scgb1a1+ to Scgb1a1-. These results provide evidence supporting a new mechanism of alveolar repair where Clara cells give rise to AT2s through the SBEC intermediates and shed light on the understanding of the lung damage and repair process. The approach and algorithms in quantifying cell-level changes in the tissue context (cell-based tissue informatics) to gain mechanistic insights into the damage and repair process can be expanded and adapted in studying other disease models.

  3. Group 2 innate lymphoid cell production of IL-5 is regulated by NKT cells during influenza virus infection.

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    Stacey Ann Gorski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory virus infections, such as influenza, typically induce a robust type I (pro-inflammatory cytokine immune response, however, the production of type 2 cytokines has been observed. Type 2 cytokine production during respiratory virus infection is linked to asthma exacerbation; however, type 2 cytokines may also be tissue protective. Interleukin (IL-5 is a prototypical type 2 cytokine that is essential for eosinophil maturation and egress out of the bone marrow. However, little is known about the cellular source and underlying cellular and molecular basis for the regulation of IL-5 production during respiratory virus infection. Using a mouse model of influenza virus infection, we found a robust transient release of IL-5 into infected airways along with a significant and progressive accumulation of eosinophils into the lungs, particularly during the recovery phase of infection, i.e. following virus clearance. The cellular source of the IL-5 was group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2 infiltrating the infected lungs. Interestingly, the progressive accumulation of eosinophils following virus clearance is reflected in the rapid expansion of c-kit⁺ IL-5 producing ILC2. We further demonstrate that the enhanced capacity for IL-5 production by ILC2 during recovery is concomitant with the enhanced expression of the IL-33 receptor subunit, ST2, by ILC2. Lastly, we show that NKT cells, as well as alveolar macrophages (AM, are endogenous sources of IL-33 that enhance IL-5 production from ILC2. Collectively, these results reveal that c-kit⁺ ILC2 interaction with IL-33 producing NKT and AM leads to abundant production of IL-5 by ILC2 and accounts for the accumulation of eosinophils observed during the recovery phase of influenza infection.

  4. On the Role of CD8(+) T Cells in Determining Recovery Time from Influenza Virus Infection.

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    Cao, Pengxing; Wang, Zhongfang; Yan, Ada W C; McVernon, Jodie; Xu, Jianqing; Heffernan, Jane M; Kedzierska, Katherine; McCaw, James M

    2016-01-01

    Myriad experiments have identified an important role for CD8(+) T cell response mechanisms in determining recovery from influenza A virus infection. Animal models of influenza infection further implicate multiple elements of the immune response in defining the dynamical characteristics of viral infection. To date, influenza virus models, while capturing particular aspects of the natural infection history, have been unable to reproduce the full gamut of observed viral kinetic behavior in a single coherent framework. Here, we introduce a mathematical model of influenza viral dynamics incorporating innate, humoral, and cellular immune components and explore its properties with a particular emphasis on the role of cellular immunity. Calibrated against a range of murine data, our model is capable of recapitulating observed viral kinetics from a multitude of experiments. Importantly, the model predicts a robust exponential relationship between the level of effector CD8(+) T cells and recovery time, whereby recovery time rapidly decreases to a fixed minimum recovery time with an increasing level of effector CD8(+) T cells. We find support for this relationship in recent clinical data from influenza A (H7N9) hospitalized patients. The exponential relationship implies that people with a lower level of naive CD8(+) T cells may receive significantly more benefit from induction of additional effector CD8(+) T cells arising from immunological memory, itself established through either previous viral infection or T cell-based vaccines.

  5. Borna disease virus infection perturbs energy metabolites and amino acids in cultured human oligodendroglia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongzhong; Gao, Hongchang; Zhang, Liang; Jia, Jianmin; Liu, Xia; Zheng, Peng; Ma, Lihua; Li, Wenjuan; Deng, Jing; Wang, Xiao; Yang, Liu; Wang, Mingju; Xie, Peng

    2012-01-01

    Borna disease virus is a neurotropic, non-cytolytic virus that has been widely employed in neuroscientific research. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with Borna disease viral infection. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying its mode of action remains unclear. Human oligodendroglia cells infected with the human strain Borna disease virus Hu-H1 and non-infected matched control cells were cultured in vitro. At day 14 post-infection, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 28 independent intracellular samples from Borna disease virus-infected cells (n = 14) and matched control cells (n = 14). Partial least squares discriminant analysis was performed to demonstrate that the whole metabonomic patterns enabled discrimination between the two groups, and further statistical testing was applied to determine which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between the two groups. Metabonomic profiling revealed perturbations in 23 metabolites, 19 of which were deemed individually significant: nine energy metabolites (α-glucose, acetate, choline, creatine, formate, myo-inositol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pyruvate, succinate) and ten amino acids (aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine, valine). Partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated that the whole metabolic patterns enabled statistical discrimination between the two groups. Borna disease viral infection perturbs the metabonomic profiles of several metabolites in human oligodendroglia cells cultured in vitro. The findings suggest that Borna disease virus manipulates the host cell's metabolic network to support viral replication and proliferation.

  6. On the role of CD8+ T cells in determining recovery time from influenza virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengxing Cao

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Myriad experiments have identified an important role for CD8+ T cell response mechanisms in determining recovery from influenza A virus infection. Animal models of influenza infection further implicate multiple elements of the immune response in defining the dynamical characteristics of viral infection. To date, influenza virus models, while capturing particular aspects of the natural infection history, have been unable to reproduce the full gamut of observed viral kinetic behaviour in a single coherent framework. Here, we introduce a mathematical model of influenza viral dynamics incorporating innate, humoral and cellular immune components and explore its properties with a particular emphasis on the role of cellular immunity. Calibrated against a range of murine data, our model is capable of recapitulating observed viral kinetics from a multitude of experiments. Importantly, the model predicts a robust exponential relationship between the level of effector CD8+ T cells and recovery time, whereby recovery time rapidly decreases to a fixed minimum recovery time with an increasing level of effector CD8+ T cells. We find support for this relationship in recent clinical data from influenza A(H7N9 hospitalized patients. The exponential relationship implies that people with a lower level of naive CD8+ T cells may receive significantly more benefit from induction of additional effector CD8+ T cells arising from immunological memory, itself established through either previous viral infection or T cell-based vaccines.

  7. Influenza A Virus Infection in Pigs Attracts Multifunctional and Cross-Reactive T Cells to the Lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talker, Stephanie C; Stadler, Maria; Koinig, Hanna C; Mair, Kerstin H; Rodríguez-Gómez, Irene M; Graage, Robert; Zell, Roland; Dürrwald, Ralf; Starick, Elke; Harder, Timm; Weissenböck, Herbert; Lamp, Benjamin; Hammer, Sabine E; Ladinig, Andrea; Saalmüller, Armin; Gerner, Wilhelm

    2016-10-15

    Pigs are natural hosts for influenza A viruses and play a critical role in influenza epidemiology. However, little is known about their influenza-evoked T-cell response. We performed a thorough analysis of both the local and systemic T-cell response in influenza virus-infected pigs, addressing kinetics and phenotype as well as multifunctionality (gamma interferon [IFN-γ], tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], and interleukin-2 [IL-2]) and cross-reactivity. A total of 31 pigs were intratracheally infected with an H1N2 swine influenza A virus (FLUAVsw) and consecutively euthanized. Lungs, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, and blood were sampled during the first 15 days postinfection (p.i.) and at 6 weeks p.i. Ex vivo flow cytometry of lung lymphocytes revealed an increase in proliferating (Ki-67(+)) CD8(+) T cells with an early effector phenotype (perforin(+) CD27(+)) at day 6 p.i. Low frequencies of influenza virus-specific IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells could be detected in the lung as early as 4 days p.i. On consecutive days, influenza virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells produced mainly IFN-γ and/or TNF-α, reaching peak frequencies around day 9 p.i., which were up to 30-fold higher in the lung than in tracheobronchial lymph nodes or blood. At 6 weeks p.i., CD4(+) and CD8(+) memory T cells had accumulated in lung tissue. These cells showed diverse cytokine profiles and in vitro reactivity against heterologous influenza virus strains, all of which supports their potential to combat heterologous influenza virus infections in pigs. Pigs not only are a suitable large-animal model for human influenza virus infection and vaccine development but also play a central role in the emergence of new pandemic strains. Although promising candidate universal vaccines are tested in pigs and local T cells are the major correlate of heterologous control, detailed and targeted analyses of T-cell responses at the site of infection are scarce. With the present study, we

  8. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibayama, Haruna; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Onozawa, Erika; Tsuzura, Akiho; Miura, Osamu; Koyama, Takatoshi; Arai, Ayako

    2017-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) is a disease characterized by clonally proliferating and activated EBV-infected T or NK cells accompanied by chronic inflammation and T- or NK-cell neoplasms. However, the mechanism for developing CAEBV has not been clarified to date. Because the decreased number or inactivation of EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) resulted in the development of EBV-positive B-cell neoplasms, we investigated the number of CTLs in CAEBV patients using the tetrameric complexes of HLA-restricted EBV-specific peptides. Among the seven patients examined, EBV-specific CTLs were detected in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of four cases but were not detected in three cases. The ratio of EBV-specific CTLs in PBMCs tended to be higher in the patients with active disease than in those with inactive disease. In two patients in whom EBV-specific CTLs had not been detected, CTLs appeared after the eradication of EBV-infected T cells by allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. These results suggested that the failure of CTLs had a role in developing CAEBV, although the induction number and function of EBV-specific CTLs might vary in each patient.

  9. Divergent CD4+ T memory stem cell dynamics in pathogenic and nonpathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartwright, Emily K; McGary, Colleen S; Cervasi, Barbara; Micci, Luca; Lawson, Benton; Elliott, Sarah T C; Collman, Ronald G; Bosinger, Steven E; Paiardini, Mirko; Vanderford, Thomas H; Chahroudi, Ann; Silvestri, Guido

    2014-05-15

    Recent studies have identified a subset of memory T cells with stem cell-like properties (T(SCM)) that include increased longevity and proliferative potential. In this study, we examined the dynamics of CD4(+) T(SCM) during pathogenic SIV infection of rhesus macaques (RM) and nonpathogenic SIV infection of sooty mangabeys (SM). Whereas SIV-infected RM show selective numeric preservation of CD4(+) T(SCM), SIV infection induced a complex perturbation of these cells defined by depletion of CD4(+)CCR5(+) T(SCM), increased rates of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation, and high levels of direct virus infection. The increased rates of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation in SIV-infected RM correlated inversely with the levels of central memory CD4(+) T cells. In contrast, nonpathogenic SIV infection of SM evidenced preservation of both CD4(+) T(SCM) and CD4(+) central memory T cells, with normal levels of CD4(+) T(SCM) proliferation, and lack of selective depletion of CD4(+)CCR5(+) T(SCM). Importantly, SIV DNA was below the detectable limit in CD4(+) T(SCM) from 8 of 10 SIV-infected SM. We propose that increased proliferation and infection of CD4(+) T(SCM) may contribute to the pathogenesis of SIV infection in RM.

  10. Blockade of immunosuppressive cytokines restores NK cell antiviral function in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

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    Dimitra Peppa

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available NK cells are enriched in the liver, constituting around a third of intrahepatic lymphocytes. We have previously demonstrated that they upregulate the death ligand TRAIL in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB, allowing them to kill hepatocytes bearing TRAIL receptors. In this study we investigated whether, in addition to their pathogenic role, NK cells have antiviral potential in CHB. We characterised NK cell subsets and effector function in 64 patients with CHB compared to 31 healthy controls. We found that, in contrast to their upregulated TRAIL expression and maintenance of cytolytic function, NK cells had a markedly impaired capacity to produce IFN-γ in CHB. This functional dichotomy of NK cells could be recapitulated in vitro by exposure to the immunosuppressive cytokine IL-10, which was induced in patients with active CHB. IL-10 selectively suppressed NK cell IFN-γ production without altering cytotoxicity or death ligand expression. Potent antiviral therapy reduced TRAIL-expressing CD56(bright NK cells, consistent with the reduction in liver inflammation it induced; however, it was not able to normalise IL-10 levels or the capacity of NK cells to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ. Blockade of IL-10 +/- TGF-β restored the capacity of NK cells from both the periphery and liver of patients with CHB to produce IFN-γ, thereby enhancing their non-cytolytic antiviral capacity. In conclusion, NK cells may be driven to a state of partial functional tolerance by the immunosuppressive cytokine environment in CHB. Their defective capacity to produce the antiviral cytokine IFN-γ persists in patients on antiviral therapy but can be corrected in vitro by IL-10+/- TGF-β blockade.

  11. Improved microarray gene expression profiling of virus-infected cells after removal of viral RNA

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    Rottier Peter JM

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sensitivity and accuracy are key points when using microarrays to detect alterations in gene expression under different conditions. Critical to the acquisition of reliable results is the preparation of the RNA. In the field of virology, when analyzing the host cell's reaction to infection, the often high representation of viral RNA (vRNA within total RNA preparations from infected cells is likely to interfere with microarray analysis. Yet, this effect has not been investigated despite the many reports that describe gene expression profiling of virus-infected cells using microarrays. Results In this study we used coronaviruses as a model to show that vRNA indeed interferes with microarray analysis, decreasing both sensitivity and accuracy. We also demonstrate that the removal of vRNA from total RNA samples, by means of virus-specific oligonucleotide capturing, significantly reduced the number of false-positive hits and increased the sensitivity of the method as tested on different array platforms. Conclusion We therefore recommend the specific removal of vRNA, or of any other abundant 'contaminating' RNAs, from total RNA samples to improve the quality and reliability of microarray analyses.

  12. Flow cytometric monitoring of influenza A virus infection in MDCK cells during vaccine production

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    Reichl Udo

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In cell culture-based influenza vaccine production the monitoring of virus titres and cell physiology during infection is of great importance for process characterisation and optimisation. While conventional virus quantification methods give only virus titres in the culture broth, data obtained by fluorescence labelling of intracellular virus proteins provide additional information on infection dynamics. Flow cytometry represents a valuable tool to investigate the influences of cultivation conditions and process variations on virus replication and virus yields. Results In this study, fluorescein-labelled monoclonal antibodies against influenza A virus matrix protein 1 and nucleoprotein were used for monitoring the infection status of adherent Madin-Darby canine kidney cells from bioreactor samples. Monoclonal antibody binding was shown for influenza A virus strains of different subtypes (H1N1, H1N2, H3N8 and host specificity (human, equine, swine. At high multiplicity of infection in a bioreactor, the onset of viral protein accumulation in adherent cells on microcarriers was detected at about 2 to 4 h post infection by flow cytometry. In contrast, a significant increase in titre by hemagglutination assay was detected at the earliest 4 to 6 h post infection. Conclusion It is shown that flow cytometry is a sensitive and robust method for the monitoring of viral infection in fixed cells from bioreactor samples. Therefore, it is a valuable addition to other detection methods of influenza virus infection such as immunotitration and RNA hybridisation. Thousands of individual cells are measured per sample. Thus, the presented method is believed to be quite independent of the concentration of infected cells (multiplicity of infection and total cell concentration in bioreactors. This allows to perform detailed studies on factors relevant for optimization of virus yields in cell cultures. The method could also be used for process

  13. Ageratum enation virus Infection Induces Programmed Cell Death and Alters Metabolite Biosynthesis in Papaver somniferum

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    Ashish Srivastava

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A previously unknown disease which causes severe vein thickening and inward leaf curl was observed in a number of opium poppy (Papaver somniferum L. plants. The sequence analysis of full-length viral genome and associated betasatellite reveals the occurrence of Ageratum enation virus (AEV and Ageratum leaf curl betasatellite (ALCB, respectively. Co-infiltration of cloned agroinfectious DNAs of AEV and ALCB induces the leaf curl and vein thickening symptoms as were observed naturally. Infectivity assay confirmed this complex as the cause of disease and also satisfied the Koch’s postulates. Comprehensive microscopic analysis of infiltrated plants reveals severe structural anomalies in leaf and stem tissues represented by unorganized cell architecture and vascular bundles. Moreover, the characteristic blebs and membranous vesicles formed due to the virus-induced disintegration of the plasma membrane and intracellular organelles were also present. An accelerated nuclear DNA fragmentation was observed by Comet assay and confirmed by TUNEL and Hoechst dye staining assays suggesting virus-induced programmed cell death. Virus-infection altered the biosynthesis of several important metabolites. The biosynthesis potential of morphine, thebaine, codeine, and papaverine alkaloids reduced significantly in infected plants except for noscapine whose biosynthesis was comparatively enhanced. The expression analysis of corresponding alkaloid pathway genes by real time-PCR corroborated well with the results of HPLC analysis for alkaloid perturbations. The changes in the metabolite and alkaloid contents affect the commercial value of the poppy plants.

  14. MicroRNA expression profiling of primary sheep testicular cells in response to bluetongue virus infection.

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    Du, Junzheng; Gao, Shandian; Tian, Zhancheng; Xing, Shanshan; Huang, Dexuan; Zhang, Guorui; Zheng, Yadong; Liu, Guangyuan; Luo, Jianxun; Chang, Huiyun; Yin, Hong

    2017-04-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is a member of the genus Orbivirus within the family Reoviridae and causes a non-contagious, insect-transmitted disease in domestic and wild ruminants, mainly in sheep and occasionally in cattle and some species of deer. Virus infection can trigger the changes of the cellular microRNA (miRNA) expression profile, which play important post-transcriptional regulatory roles in gene expression and can greatly influence viral replication and pathogenesis. Here, we employed deep sequencing technology to determine which cellular miRNAs were differentially expressed in primary sheep testicular (ST) cells infected with BTV. A total of 25 known miRNAs and 240 novel miRNA candidates that were differentially expressed in BTV-infected and uninfected ST cells were identified, and 251 and 8428 predicted target genes were annotated, respectively. Nine differentially expressed miRNAs and their mRNA targets were validated by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Targets prediction and functional analysis of these regulated miRNAs revealed significant enrichment for several signaling pathways including MAPK, PI3K-Akt, endocytosis, Hippo, NF-kB, viral carcinogenesis, FoxO, and JAK-STAT signaling pathways. This study provides a valuable basis for further investigation on the roles of miRNAs in BTV replication and pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. In-cell infection: a novel pathway for Epstein-Barr virus infection mediated by cell-in-cell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Chao; Chen, Yuhui; Zeng, Musheng; Pei, Rongjuan; Du, Yong; Tang, Linquan; Wang, Mengyi; Hu, Yazhuo; Zhu, Hanyu; He, Meifang; Wei, Xiawei; Wang, Shan; Ning, Xiangkai; Wang, Manna; Wang, Jufang; Ma, Li; Chen, Xinwen; Sun, Qiang; Tang, Hong; Wang, Ying; Wang, Xiaoning

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can infect both susceptible B lymphocytes and non-susceptible epithelial cells (ECs). Viral tropism analyses have revealed two intriguing means of EBV infection, either by a receptor-mediated infection of B cells or by a cell-to-cell contact-mediated infection of non-susceptible ECs. Herein, we report a novel “in-cell infection” mechanism for EBV infection of non-susceptible ECs through the formation of cell-in-cell structures. Epithelial CNE-2 cells were invaded by EBV-infected Akata B cells to form cell-in-cell structures in vitro. Such unique cellular structures could be readily observed in the specimens of nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Importantly, the formation of cell-in-cell structures led to the autonomous activation of EBV within Akata cells and subsequent viral transmission to CNE-2 cells, as evidenced by the expression of viral genes and the presence of virion particles in CNE-2 cells. Significantly, EBV generated from in-cell infected ECs displayed altered tropism with higher infection efficacy to both B cells and ECs. In addition to CNE-2 tumor cells, cell-in-cell structure formation could also mediate EBV infection of NPEC1-Bmi1 cells, an immortalized nasopharyngeal epithelial cell line. Furthermore, efficient infection by this mechanism involved the activation of the PI3K/AKT signaling pathway. Thus, our study identified “in-cell infection” as a novel mechanism for EBV infection. Given the diversity of virus-infected cells and the prevalence of cell-in-cell structures during chronic infection, we speculate that “in-cell infection” is likely a general mechanism for EBV and other viruses to infect non-susceptible ECs. PMID:25916549

  16. Borna disease virus infection perturbs energy metabolites and amino acids in cultured human oligodendroglia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongzhong Huang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Borna disease virus is a neurotropic, non-cytolytic virus that has been widely employed in neuroscientific research. Previous studies have revealed that metabolic perturbations are associated with Borna disease viral infection. However, the pathophysiological mechanism underlying its mode of action remains unclear. METHODOLOGY: Human oligodendroglia cells infected with the human strain Borna disease virus Hu-H1 and non-infected matched control cells were cultured in vitro. At day 14 post-infection, a proton nuclear magnetic resonance-based metabonomic approach was used to differentiate the metabonomic profiles of 28 independent intracellular samples from Borna disease virus-infected cells (n = 14 and matched control cells (n = 14. Partial least squares discriminant analysis was performed to demonstrate that the whole metabonomic patterns enabled discrimination between the two groups, and further statistical testing was applied to determine which individual metabolites displayed significant differences between the two groups. FINDINGS: Metabonomic profiling revealed perturbations in 23 metabolites, 19 of which were deemed individually significant: nine energy metabolites (α-glucose, acetate, choline, creatine, formate, myo-inositol, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, pyruvate, succinate and ten amino acids (aspartate, glutamate, glutamine, glycine, histidine, isoleucine, phenylalanine, threonine, tyrosine, valine. Partial least squares discriminant analysis demonstrated that the whole metabolic patterns enabled statistical discrimination between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Borna disease viral infection perturbs the metabonomic profiles of several metabolites in human oligodendroglia cells cultured in vitro. The findings suggest that Borna disease virus manipulates the host cell's metabolic network to support viral replication and proliferation.

  17. [Divergence Analysis of Hepatitis Virus Infection between Aggressive and Indolent B Cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Wen-Jie; Li, Heng; Liu, Hui-Min; Yi, Shu-Hua; Li, Zeng-Jun; Lu, Rui; Liu, Wei; Zou, De-Hui; Qiu, Lu-Gui

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the prevalence rate of hepatitis B virus(HBV)and hepatitis C virus(HCV)between aggressive and indolent B cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (B-NHL), and to compare the different infection rate of Hepatifis Virus between the 2 groups. Integrated clinical information of 733 newly diagnosed indolent B-NHL patients and 148 aggressive B-NHL patients from January 1994 to January 2014 was retrospectively analyzed. The difference of hepatitis virus infection was compared between the 2 groups. The positive rate of HCV-Ab was 1.8% in 881 newly diagnosed B-NHL patients. The HCV prevalence was 1.9% and 1.35% in the indolent and aggressive B-NHL group respecitvely. Compared with general population, the HCV positive rate was significantly higher in the whole B-NHL group and the indolent group(1.8% vs 0.4%,1.9% vs 1.4%)(P0.05).In the aggressive B-NHL group,the co-expression of HBs-Ag,HBe-Ag and anti-HBc-Ab was 4.4%, which was higher than that in the indolent one (4.7% vs 1.2%)(P0.05). The HCV is more relevant with indolent B-NHL, the HBV has more relevance with the aggressive patients.

  18. DNA microarray global gene expression analysis of influenza virus-infected chicken and duck cells

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    Suresh V. Kuchipudi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The data described in this article pertain to the article by Kuchipudi et al. (2014 titled “Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Infection in Chickens But Not Ducks Is Associated with Elevated Host Immune and Pro-inflammatory Responses” [1]. While infection of chickens with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus subtypes often leads to 100% mortality within 1 to 2 days, infection of ducks in contrast causes mild or no clinical signs. The rapid onset of fatal disease in chickens, but with no evidence of severe clinical symptoms in ducks, suggests underlying differences in their innate immune mechanisms. We used Chicken Genechip microarrays (Affymetrix to analyse the gene expression profiles of primary chicken and duck lung cells infected with a low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI H2N3 virus and two HPAI H5N1 virus subtypes to understand the molecular basis of host susceptibility and resistance in chickens and ducks. Here, we described the experimental design, quality control and analysis that were performed on the data set. The data are publicly available through the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEOdatabase with accession number GSE33389, and the analysis and interpretation of these data are included in Kuchipudi et al. (2014 [1].

  19. Evolving role of 2B4/CD244 in T and NK cell responses during virus infection

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    Stephen Noel Waggoner

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM family receptor, 2B4/CD244, was first implicated in anti-viral immunity by the discovery that mutations of the SLAM-associated protein, SAP/SH2D1A, impaired 2B4-dependent stimulation of T and natural killer (NK cell anti-viral functions in X-linked lymphoproliferative (XLP syndrome patients with uncontrolled Epstein-Barr virus (EBV infections. Engagement of 2B4 has been variably shown to either activate or inhibit lymphocytes which express this receptor. While SAP expression is required for stimulatory functions of 2B4 on lymphocytes, it remains unclear whether inhibitory signals derived from 2B4 can predominate even in the presence of SAP. Regardless, mounting evidence suggests that 2B4 expression by NK and CD8 T cells is altered by virus infection in mice as well as in humans, and 2B4-mediated signaling may be an important determinant of effective immune control of chronic virus infections. In this review, recent findings regarding the expression and function of 2B4 as well as SAP on T and NK cells during virus infection is discussed, with a focus on the role of 2B4-CD48 interactions in crosstalk between innate and adaptive immunity.

  20. Protective essential oil attenuates influenza virus infection: An in vitro study in MDCK cells

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    Metcalf Jordan P

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Influenza is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. The recent pandemic of a novel H1N1 influenza virus has stressed the importance of the search for effective treatments for this disease. Essential oils from aromatic plants have been used for a wide variety of applications, such as personal hygiene, therapeutic massage and even medical practice. In this paper, we investigate the potential role of an essential oil in antiviral activity. Methods We studied a commercial essential oil blend, On Guard™, and evaluated its ability in modulating influenza virus, A/PR8/34 (PR8, infection in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. Influenza virus was first incubated with the essential oil and infectivity in MDCK cells was quantified by fluorescent focus assay (FFA. In order to determine the mechanism of effects of essential oil in viral infection inhibition, we measured hemagglutination (HA activity, binding and internalization of untreated and oil-treated virus in MDCK cells by flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. In addition, the effect of oil treatment on viral transcription and translation were assayed by relative end-point RT-PCR and western blot analysis. Results Influenza virus infectivity was suppressed by essential oil treatment in a dose-dependent manner; the number of nascent viral particles released from MDCK cells was reduced by 90% and by 40% when virus was treated with 1:4,000 and 1:6,000 dilutions of the oil, respectively. Oil treatment of the virus also decreased direct infection of the cells as the number of infected MDCK cells decreased by 90% and 45% when virus was treated with 1:2,000 and 1:3,000 dilutions of the oil, respectively. This was not due to a decrease in HA activity, as HA was preserved despite oil treatment. In addition, oil treatment did not affect virus binding or internalization in MDCK cells. These effects did not appear to be due to cytotoxicity of the oil as MDCK cell

  1. Viral infection, proliferation, and hyperplasia of Hofbauer cells and absence of inflammation characterize the placental pathology of fetuses with congenital Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, David A

    2017-06-01

    Attention is increasingly focused on the potential mechanism(s) for Zika virus infection to be transmitted from an infected mother to her fetus. This communication addresses current evidence for the role of the placenta in vertical transmission of the Zika virus. Placentas from second and third trimester fetuses with confirmed intrauterine Zika virus infection were examined with routine staining to determine the spectrum of pathologic changes. In addition, immunohistochemical staining for macrophages and nuclear proliferation antigens was performed. Viral localization was identified using RNA hybridization. These observations were combined with the recent published results of placental pathology to increase the strength of the pathology data. Results were correlated with published data from experimental studies of Zika virus infection in placental cells and chorionic villous explants. Placentas from fetuses with congenital Zika virus infection are concordant in not having viral-induced placental inflammation. Special stains reveal proliferation and prominent hyperplasia of placental stromal macrophages, termed Hofbauer cells, in the chorionic villi of infected placentas. Zika virus infection is present in Hofbauer cells from second and third trimester placentas. Experimental studies and placentae from infected fetuses reveal that the spectrum of placental cell types infected with the Zika virus is broader during the first trimester than later in gestation. Inflammatory abnormalities of the placenta are not a component of vertical transmission of the Zika virus. The major placental response in second and third trimester transplacental Zika virus infection is proliferation and hyperplasia of Hofbauer cells, which also demonstrate viral infection.

  2. Fast generation of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, P; Bøgh, Marie; Pedersen, A W

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent antigen presenting cells capable of inducing immune responses. DC are widely used as vaccine adjuvant in experimental clinical settings. DC-based vaccines are normally generated using a standard 8day DC protocol (SDDC). In attempts to shorten the vaccine production...... SDDC to the IL-10 inducing stimulus of TLR ligands (R848 and LPS). Thus to determine the clinical relevance of fast DC protocols in cancer settings, small phase I trials should be conducted monitoring regulatory T cells carefully....

  3. CD14+CD16+monocytes are the main target of Zika virus infection in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in a paediatric study in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michlmayr, Daniela; Andrade, Paulina; Gonzalez, Karla; Balmaseda, Angel; Harris, Eva

    2017-11-01

    The recent Zika pandemic in the Americas is linked to congenital birth defects and Guillain-Barré syndrome. White blood cells (WBCs) play an important role in host immune responses early in arboviral infection. Infected WBCs can also function as 'Trojan horses' and carry viruses into immune-sheltered spaces, including the placenta, testes and brain. Therefore, defining which WBCs are permissive to Zika virus (ZIKV) is critical. Here, we analyse ZIKV infectivity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vitro and from Nicaraguan Zika patients and show CD14 + CD16 + monocytes are the main target of infection, with ZIKV replication detected in some dendritic cells. The frequency of CD14 + monocytes was significantly decreased, while the CD14 + CD16 + monocyte population was significantly expanded during ZIKV infection compared to uninfected controls. Viral RNA was detected in PBMCs from all patients, but in serum from only a subset, suggesting PBMCs may be a reservoir for ZIKV. In Zika patients, the frequency of infected cells was lower but the percentage of infected CD14 + CD16 + monocytes was significantly higher compared to dengue cases. The gene expression profile in monocytes isolated from ZIKV- and dengue virus-infected patients was comparable, except for significant differences in interferon-γ, CXCL12, XCL1, interleukin-6 and interleukin-10 levels. Thus, our study provides a detailed picture of the innate immune profile of ZIKV infection and highlights the important role of monocytes, and CD14 + CD16 + monocytes in particular.

  4. Inhibition of Bim enhances replication of varicella-zoster virus and delays plaque formation in virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueqiao; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2014-01-01

    Programmed cell death (apoptosis) is an important host defense mechanism against intracellular pathogens, such as viruses. Accordingly, viruses have evolved multiple mechanisms to modulate apoptosis to enhance replication. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) induces apoptosis in human fibroblasts and melanoma cells. We found that VZV triggered the phosphorylation of the proapoptotic proteins Bim and BAD but had little or no effect on other Bcl-2 family members. Since phosphorylation of Bim and BAD reduces their proapoptotic activity, this may prevent or delay apoptosis in VZV-infected cells. Phosphorylation of Bim but not BAD in VZV-infected cells was dependent on activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. Cells knocked down for Bim showed delayed VZV plaque formation, resulting in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased replication of virus, compared with wild-type cells infected with virus. Conversely, overexpression of Bim resulted in earlier plaque formation, smaller plaques, reduced virus replication, and increased caspase 3 activity. Inhibition of caspase activity in VZV-infected cells overexpressing Bim restored levels of virus production similar to those seen with virus-infected wild-type cells. Previously we showed that VZV ORF12 activates ERK and inhibits apoptosis in virus-infected cells. Here we found that VZV ORF12 contributes to Bim and BAD phosphorylation. In summary, VZV triggers Bim phosphorylation; reduction of Bim levels results in longer survival of VZV-infected cells and increased VZV replication.

  5. Uncompromised NK cell activation is essential for virus-specific CTL activity during acute influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Jian; Liu, Yinping; Wen, Liyan; Huang, Lei; Xiang, Zheng; Lam, Kwok-Tai; Lv, Aizhen; Mao, Huawei; Lau, Yu-Lung; Tu, Wenwei

    2017-04-17

    Natural killer (NK) cells are indispensable components of both the innate and adaptive immune response. However, their precise roles in the cross-talk between innate and adaptive immunity during influenza virus infection remain controversial. By comparing NK cell dynamics and activity under a sub-lethal dose and high dose of influenza virus infection, we showed that influenza virus PR8 directly infected NK cells during natural infection, which was consistent with our previous findings obtained from an in vitro investigation of human NK cells. The impairments in cytotoxicity and IFN-γ production by spleen NK cells following high-dose infection were accompanied by decreased virus-specific killing mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Importantly, the weakened CTL activity could be reversed by adoptive transfer of spleen NK cells harvested from low-dose-infected mice but not healthy donors. Taken together, our data provide direct evidence supporting the contribution of NK cells to antiviral T-cell responses. This study also indicates that a novel NK-targeted immune evasion strategy is used by influenza virus to shrink both innate and adaptive immune responses.Cellular & Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 17 April 2017; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.10.

  6. Cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puram, Sidharth V; Bonni, Azad

    2013-12-01

    The proper formation and morphogenesis of dendrites is fundamental to the establishment of neural circuits in the brain. Following cell cycle exit and migration, neurons undergo organized stages of dendrite morphogenesis, which include dendritic arbor growth and elaboration followed by retraction and pruning. Although these developmental stages were characterized over a century ago, molecular regulators of dendrite morphogenesis have only recently been defined. In particular, studies in Drosophila and mammalian neurons have identified numerous cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite morphogenesis that include transcriptional regulators, cytoskeletal and motor proteins, secretory and endocytic pathways, cell cycle-regulated ubiquitin ligases, and components of other signaling cascades. Here, we review cell-intrinsic drivers of dendrite patterning and discuss how the characterization of such crucial regulators advances our understanding of normal brain development and pathogenesis of diverse cognitive disorders.

  7. DNGR-1 is dispensable for CD8+ T-cell priming during respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durant, Lydia R; Pereira, Catherine; Boakye, Aime; Makris, Spyridon; Kausar, Fahima; Goritzka, Michelle; Johansson, Cecilia

    2014-08-01

    During respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection CD8(+) T cells both assist in viral clearance and contribute to immunopathology. CD8(+) T cells recognize viral peptides presented by dendritic cells (DCs), which can directly present viral antigens when infected or, alternatively, "cross-present" antigens after endocytosis of dead or dying infected cells. Mouse CD8α(+) and CD103(+) DCs excel at cross-presentation, in part because they express the receptor DNGR-1 that detects dead cells by binding to exposed F-actin and routes internalized cell debris into the cross-presentation pathway. As RSV causes death in infected epithelial cells, we tested whether cross-presentation via DNGR-1 is necessary for CD8(+) T-cell responses to the virus. DNGR-1-deficient or wild-type mice were intranasally inoculated with RSV and the magnitude of RSV-specific CD8(+) T-cell induction was measured. We found that during live RSV infection, cross-presentation via DNGR-1 did not have a major role in the generation of RSV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. However, after intranasal immunization with dead cells infected with RSV, a dependence on DNGR-1 for RSV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses was observed, confirming the ascribed role of the receptor. Thus, direct presentation by DCs may be the major pathway initiating CD8(+) T-cell responses to RSV, while DNGR-1-dependent cross-presentation has no detectable role. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Immunology published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. News from dendritic cells in atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäkel, Knut; Hänsel, Anja

    2011-10-01

    Dendritic cells are essential for the generation of innate and adaptive immune responses, which makes them stay on center stage when studying the immuno pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. This review will discuss recent findings on the role of dendritic cells subsets in atopic dermatitis and will report novel findings on how the microenvironment conditions dendritic cells to fuel atopic dermatitis. Several microenvironmental factors characteristic for atopic dermatitis and with direct relevance for the disease have been defined. We now increasingly understand how thymic stromal lymphopoietin and histamine contribute to the disease by modulating the function of dendritic cells. We have learned much about the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis by the studies on inflammatory dendritic epidermal cells. However, the current analysis on the functional and phenotypic heterogeneity of dendritic cells in eczematous skin lesions may lead to the definition of additional dendritic cell types relevant in the pathogenesis of atopic dermatitis. In this respect, it appears interesting to further discuss the parallels and differences in atopic dermatitis and psoriasis. Understanding the heterogeneity of dendritic cells and their functional alteration by local factors in the inflamed skin will provide essential clues to the immunopathogenesis of atopic dermatitis.

  9. Selective susceptibility of human skin antigen presenting cells to productive dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cerny

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is a growing global concern with 390 million people infected each year. Dengue virus (DENV is transmitted by mosquitoes, thus host cells in the skin are the first point of contact with the virus. Human skin contains several populations of antigen-presenting cells which could drive the immune response to DENV in vivo: epidermal Langerhans cells (LCs, three populations of dermal dendritic cells (DCs, and macrophages. Using samples of normal human skin we detected productive infection of CD14(+ and CD1c(+ DCs, LCs and dermal macrophages, which was independent of DC-SIGN expression. LCs produced the highest viral titers and were less sensitive to IFN-β. Nanostring gene expression data showed significant up-regulation of IFN-β, STAT-1 and CCL5 upon viral exposure in susceptible DC populations. In mice infected intra-dermally with DENV we detected parallel populations of infected DCs originating from the dermis and migrating to the skin-draining lymph nodes. Therefore dermal DCs may simultaneously facilitate systemic spread of DENV and initiate the adaptive anti-viral immune response.

  10. Monkeypox virus infection of rhesus macaques induces massive expansion of natural killer cells but suppresses natural killer cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Song

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results showed that the absolute number of total NK cells in the blood increased in response to MPXV infection at a magnitude of 23-fold, manifested by increases in CD56+, CD16+, CD16-CD56- double negative, and CD16+CD56+ double positive NK cell subsets. Similarly, the frequency and NK cell numbers in the lymph nodes also largely increased with the total NK cell number increasing 46.1-fold. NK cells both in the blood and lymph nodes massively proliferated in response to MPXV infection as measured by Ki67 expression. Chemokine receptor analysis revealed reduced expression of CXCR3, CCR7, and CCR6 on NK cells at early time points (days 2 and 4 after virus inoculation, followed by an increased expression of CXCR3 and CCR5 at later time points (days 7-8 of infection. In addition, MPXV infection impaired NK cell degranulation and ablated secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α. Our data suggest a dynamic model by which NK cells respond to MPXV infection of rhesus macaques. Upon virus infection, NK cells proliferated robustly, resulting in massive increases in NK cell numbers. However, the migrating capacity of NK cells to tissues at early time points might be reduced, and the functions of cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion were largely compromised. Collectively, the data may explain, at least partially, the pathogenesis of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques.

  11. Dendritic cells in autoimmune thyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabel, P J; Voorbij, H A; van der Gaag, R D; Wiersinga, W M; de Haan, M; Drexhage, H A

    1987-01-01

    Dendritic cells form a morphologically distinct class of cells characterized by shape, reniform nucleus, absent to weak acid-phosphatase activity and strong Class II MHC determinant positivity. Functionally they are the most efficient cells in antigen presentation to T-lymphocytes which indicates their role in the initiation of an immune response. Using immunehistochemical techniques we studied the presence of dendritic cells in normal Wistar rat and human thyroids, in thyroids of BBW rats developing thyroid autoimmunity and in Graves' goitres. Dendritic cells could be identified in all thyroids studied and were positioned underneath the thyrocytes in between the follicles. Skin dendritic cells travel via lymphatics to draining lymph nodes, thus forming an antigen presenting cell system. It is likely that a similar cell system exists on the level of the thyroid for dendritic cells have also been detected in thyroid draining lymph nodes. In normal thyroid tissue of both human and rat dendritic cells were relatively scarce. During the initial phases of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BBW rat (before the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) numbers of thyroid dendritic cells increased. Intrathyroidal T-helper cells, B-cells or plasma cells could not be found. The thyroid draining lymph node contained large numbers of plasma cells. During the later stages of the thyroid autoimmune response in the BB/W rat (after the appearance of Tg-antibodies in the circulation) and in Graves' goitres dendritic cells were not only present in high number, but 20-30% were seen in contact with now-present intrathyroidal T-helper lymphocytes.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Characterization of Yellow Fever Virus Infection of Human and Non-human Primate Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Interaction with CD4+ T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Cong

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Humans infected with yellow fever virus (YFV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus, can develop illness ranging from a mild febrile disease to hemorrhagic fever and death. The 17D vaccine strain of YFV was developed in the 1930s, has been used continuously since development and has proven very effective. Genetic differences between vaccine and wild-type viruses are few, yet viral or host mechanisms associated with protection or disease are not fully understood. Over the past 20 years, a number of cases of vaccine-associated disease have been identified following vaccination with 17D; these cases have been correlated with reduced immune status at the time of vaccination. Recently, several studies have evaluated T cell responses to vaccination in both humans and non-human primates, but none have evaluated the response to wild-type virus infection. In the studies described here, monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM and dendritic cells (MoDC from both humans and rhesus macaques were evaluated for their ability to support infection with either wild-type Asibi virus or the 17D vaccine strain and the host cytokine and chemokine response characterized. Human MoDC and MDM were also evaluated for their ability to stimulate CD4+ T cells. It was found that MoDC and MDM supported viral replication and that there were differential cytokine responses to infection with either wild-type or vaccine viruses. Additionally, MoDCs infected with live 17D virus were able to stimulate IFN-γ and IL-2 production in CD4+ T cells, while cells infected with Asibi virus were not. These data demonstrate that wild-type and vaccine YFV stimulate different responses in target antigen presenting cells and that wild-type YFV can inhibit MoDC activation of CD4+ T cells, a critical component in development of protective immunity. These data provide initial, but critical insight into regulatory capabilities of wild-type YFV in development of disease.

  13. RNA sensors enable human mast cell anti-viral chemokine production and IFN-mediated protection in response to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael G Brown

    Full Text Available Dengue hemorrhagic fever and/or dengue shock syndrome represent the most serious pathophysiological manifestations of human dengue virus infection. Despite intensive research, the mechanisms and important cellular players that contribute to dengue disease are unclear. Mast cells are tissue-resident innate immune cells that play a sentinel cell role in host protection against infectious agents via pathogen-recognition receptors by producing potent mediators that modulate inflammation, cell recruitment and normal vascular homeostasis. Most importantly, mast cells are susceptible to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection and respond with selective cytokine and chemokine responses. In order to obtain a global view of dengue virus-induced gene regulation in mast cells, primary human cord blood-derived mast cells (CBMCs and the KU812 and HMC-1 mast cell lines were infected with dengue virus in the presence of dengue-immune sera and their responses were evaluated at the mRNA and protein levels. Mast cells responded to antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection or polyinosiniċpolycytidylic acid treatment with the production of type I interferons and the rapid and potent production of chemokines including CCL4, CCL5 and CXCL10. Multiple interferon-stimulated genes were also upregulated as well as mRNA and protein for the RNA sensors PKR, RIG-I and MDA5. Dengue virus-induced chemokine production by KU812 cells was significantly modulated by siRNA knockdown of RIG-I and PKR, in a negative and positive manner, respectively. Pretreatment of fresh KU812 cells with supernatants from dengue virus-infected mast cells provided protection from subsequent infection with dengue virus in a type I interferon-dependent manner. These findings support a role for tissue-resident mast cells in the early detection of antibody-enhanced dengue virus infection via RNA sensors, the protection of neighbouring cells through interferon production and the potential recruitment of

  14. Attachment and Postattachment Receptors Important for Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Cell-to-Cell Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Huahao; Qiao, Luhua; Kang, Kyung-Don; Fan, Junfen; Wei, Wensheng; Luo, Guangxiang

    2017-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) requires multiple receptors for its attachment to and entry into cells. Our previous studies found that human syndecan-1 (SDC-1), SDC-2, and T cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-containing protein 1 (TIM-1) are HCV attachment receptors. Other cell surface molecules, such as CD81, Claudin-1 (CLDN1), Occludin (OCLN), SR-BI, and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), function mainly at postattachment steps and are considered postattachment receptors. The underlying molecular mechanisms of different receptors in HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission remain elusive. In the present study, we used a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas9 technology, gene-specific small interfering RNAs, and a newly developed luciferase-based reporter system to quantitatively determine the importance of individual receptors in HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission. Knockouts of SDC-1 and SDC-2 resulted in remarkable reductions of HCV infection and cell attachment, whereas SDC-3 and SDC-4 knockouts did not affect HCV infection. Defective HCV attachment to SDC-1 and/or SDC-2 knockout cells was completely restored by SDC-1 and SDC-2 but not SDC-4 expression. Knockout of the attachment receptors SDC-1, SDC-2, and TIM-1 also modestly decreased HCV cell-to-cell transmission. In contrast, silencing and knockout of the postattachment receptors CD81, CLDN1, OCLN, SR-BI, and LDLR greatly impaired both HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission. Additionally, apolipoprotein E was found to be important for HCV cell-to-cell spread, but very-low-density lipoprotein (VLDL)-containing mouse serum did not affect HCV cell-to-cell transmission, although it inhibited cell-free infection. These findings demonstrate that attachment receptors are essential for initial HCV binding and that postattachment receptors are important for both HCV cell-free and cell-to-cell transmission. IMPORTANCE The importance and underlying molecular mechanisms

  15. Tumor Necrosis Factor-Mediated Survival of CD169+ Cells Promotes Immune Activation during Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169(+) cells during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infections is increasingly recognized, factors regulating CD169(+) cells during viral infections remain...... defense against viral pathogens. CD169(+) macrophages are shown to activate innate and adaptive immunity via "enforced virus replication" a controlled amplification of virus particles. However, factors regulating the CD169(+) macrophages remain to be studied. In this paper, we show that after Vesicular...... stomatitis virus infection, phagocytes produce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) which signals via TNFR1 and promote "enforced virus replication" in CD169(+) macrophages. Consequently, lack of TNF or TNFR1 resulted in defective immune activation and VSV clearance....

  16. A Cap-to-Tail Guide to mRNA Translation Strategies in Virus-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, Eric; Mohr, Ian; Walsh, Derek

    2016-09-29

    Although viruses require cellular functions to replicate, their absolute dependence upon the host translation machinery to produce polypeptides indispensable for their reproduction is most conspicuous. Despite their incredible diversity, the mRNAs produced by all viruses must engage cellular ribosomes. This has proven to be anything but a passive process and has revealed a remarkable array of tactics for rapidly subverting control over and dominating cellular regulatory pathways that influence translation initiation, elongation, and termination. Besides enforcing viral mRNA translation, these processes profoundly impact host cell-intrinsic immune defenses at the ready to deny foreign mRNA access to ribosomes and block protein synthesis. Finally, genome size constraints have driven the evolution of resourceful strategies for maximizing viral coding capacity. Here, we review the amazing strategies that work to regulate translation in virus-infected cells, highlighting both virus-specific tactics and the tremendous insight they provide into fundamental translational control mechanisms in health and disease.

  17. Comparison of host cell gene expression in cowpox, monkeypox or vaccinia virus-infected cells reveals virus-specific regulation of immune response genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourquain, Daniel; Dabrowski, Piotr Wojtek; Nitsche, Andreas

    2013-02-20

    Animal-borne orthopoxviruses, like monkeypox, vaccinia and the closely related cowpox virus, are all capable of causing zoonotic infections in humans, representing a potential threat to human health. The disease caused by each virus differs in terms of symptoms and severity, but little is yet know about the reasons for these varying phenotypes. They may be explained by the unique repertoire of immune and host cell modulating factors encoded by each virus. In this study, we analysed the specific modulation of the host cell's gene expression profile by cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus infection. We aimed to identify mechanisms that are either common to orthopoxvirus infection or specific to certain orthopoxvirus species, allowing a more detailed description of differences in virus-host cell interactions between individual orthopoxviruses. To this end, we analysed changes in host cell gene expression of HeLa cells in response to infection with cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus, using whole-genome gene expression microarrays, and compared these to each other and to non-infected cells. Despite a dominating non-responsiveness of cellular transcription towards orthopoxvirus infection, we could identify several clusters of infection-modulated genes. These clusters are either commonly regulated by orthopoxvirus infection or are uniquely regulated by infection with a specific orthopoxvirus, with major differences being observed in immune response genes. Most noticeable was an induction of genes involved in leukocyte migration and activation in cowpox and monkeypox virus-infected cells, which was not observed following vaccinia virus infection. Despite their close genetic relationship, the expression profiles induced by infection with different orthopoxviruses vary significantly. It may be speculated that these differences at the cellular level contribute to the individual characteristics of cowpox, monkeypox and vaccinia virus infections in certain host species.

  18. Control of Epstein-Barr virus infection in vitro by T helper cells specific for virion glycoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikary, Dinesh; Behrends, Uta; Moosmann, Andreas; Witter, Klaus; Bornkamm, Georg W; Mautner, Josef

    2006-04-17

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) establishes lifelong persistent infections in humans by latently infecting B cells, with occasional cycles of reactivation, virus production, and reinfection. Protective immunity against EBV is mediated by T cells, but the role of EBV-specific T helper (Th) cells is still poorly defined. Here, we study the Th response to the EBV lytic cycle proteins BLLF1 (gp350/220), BALF4 (gp110), and BZLF1 and show that glycoprotein-specific Th cells recognize EBV-positive cells directly; surprisingly, a much higher percentage of target cells than those expressing lytic cycle proteins were recognized. Antigen is efficiently transferred to bystander B cells by receptor-mediated uptake of released virions, resulting in recognition of target cells incubated with virus entry before latency is established. Glycoprotein-specific Th cells are cytolytic and inhibit proliferation of lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and the outgrowth of LCL after infection of primary B cells with EBV. These results establish a novel role for glycoprotein-specific Th cells in the control of EBV infection and identify virion proteins as important immune targets. These findings have implications for the treatment of diseases associated with EBV and potentially other coated viruses infecting MHC class II-positive cells.

  19. Changes in cell adhesion molecule expression on T cells associated with systemic virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O

    1994-01-01

    Virus-induced changes in adhesion molecule expression on T cells were investigated to understand how antiviral effector cells migrate into infectious foci. FACS analysis revealed that after systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus a number of cell adhesion molecules, including VLA......, it was found that up-regulation of VLA-4 expression on splenic T cells correlated with influx of inflammatory cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of intracerebrally infected animals, and that the number of CD8+VLA-4hi cells increased from lymph nodes and spleen to blood and cerebrospinal fluid. These results......-4, LFA-1, and ICAM-1, are up-regulated on CD8+ cells, whereas the lymph node homing receptor MEL-14 is down-regulated during the infection; only marginal changes were observed for CD4+ cells. Basically similar but less marked results were obtained in mice infected with Pichinde virus. Further...

  20. Resting B cells as a transfer vehicle for Epstein-Barr virus infection of epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannon-Lowe, C D; Neuhierl, B; Baldwin, G; Rickinson, A B; Delecluse, H-J

    2006-05-02

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), an orally transmitted herpesvirus, efficiently targets B lymphocytes through binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein gp350 to the complement receptor CD21. How the virus accesses epithelial cells is less well understood, because such cells are largely resistant to infection with cell-free virus in vitro. Here, we show that, after binding to primary B cells, most Epstein-Barr virions are not internalized but remain on the B cell surface and from there can transfer efficiently to CD21-negative epithelial cells, increasing epithelial infection by 10(3)- to 10(4)-fold compared with cell-free virus. Transfer infection is associated with the formation of B cell-epithelial conjugates with gp350/CD21 complexes focused at the intercellular synapse; transfer involves the gp85 and gp110 viral glycoproteins but is independent of gp42, the HLA class II ligand that is essential for B cell entry. Therefore, through efficient binding to the B cell surface, EBV has developed a means of simultaneously accessing both lymphoid and epithelial compartments; in particular, infection of pharyngeal epithelium by orally transmitted virus becomes independent of initial virus replication in the B cell system.

  1. Hepatitis C virus infection of a Vero cell clone displaying efficient virus-cell binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, M B; Carloni, G; Manzin, A; Nasorri, F; Ponzetto, A; Clementi, M

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of Vero cells and derivative cell clones to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was assayed by qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Cell extracts from Vero cells inoculated with HCV were tested for the presence of both positive and negative strands of HCV RNA; in parallel, cell-free HCV genomes were assayed in culture supernatant fluids. Quantitation of genomic HCV RNA molecules in infected cells by competitive reverse transcription PCR (cRT-PCR) indicated that HCV replication was more efficient in a derivative clone (named clone 10) than in parental Vero cells or other clones under study. Analysis of HCV-binding to cell receptors, performed by cRT-PCR quantitation of viral particles adsorbed to the cell surface, demonstrated a 10-fold higher virus-binding level of clone 10 than that of parental Vero cells. The results shown here indicate that the Vero clone 10 may constitute an efficient model system for analysing early events in HCV infection as well as a source of virus for diagnostic and biotechnological applications.

  2. Influenza H5N1 virus infection of polarized human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuen Kit M

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus is entrenched in poultry in Asia and Africa and continues to infect humans zoonotically causing acute respiratory disease syndrome and death. There is evidence that the virus may sometimes spread beyond respiratory tract to cause disseminated infection. The primary target cell for HPAI H5N1 virus in human lung is the alveolar epithelial cell. Alveolar epithelium and its adjacent lung microvascular endothelium form host barriers to the initiation of infection and dissemination of influenza H5N1 infection in humans. These are polarized cells and the polarity of influenza virus entry and egress as well as the secretion of cytokines and chemokines from the virus infected cells are likely to be central to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Aim To study influenza A (H5N1 virus replication and host innate immune responses in polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells and its relevance to the pathogenesis of human H5N1 disease. Methods We use an in vitro model of polarized primary human alveolar epithelial cells and lung microvascular endothelial cells grown in transwell culture inserts to compare infection with influenza A subtype H1N1 and H5N1 viruses via the apical or basolateral surfaces. Results We demonstrate that both influenza H1N1 and H5N1 viruses efficiently infect alveolar epithelial cells from both apical and basolateral surface of the epithelium but release of newly formed virus is mainly from the apical side of the epithelium. In contrast, influenza H5N1 virus, but not H1N1 virus, efficiently infected polarized microvascular endothelial cells from both apical and basolateral aspects. This provides a mechanistic explanation for how H5N1 virus may infect the lung from systemic circulation. Epidemiological evidence has implicated ingestion of virus-contaminated foods as the source of infection in some instances and our

  3. A mouse model to study immunity against pseudorabies virus infection: Significance of CD4+ and CD8+ cells in protective immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bianchi, A.T.J.; Moonen-Leusen, H.W.M.; Milligen, van F.J.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Zwart, R.J.; Kimman, T.G.

    1998-01-01

    In this study we firstly established a vaccination/challenge model to study pseudorabies virus infection in mice. The mouse model was used to investigate the significance of CD4 and CD8 cells and of IFN production in protective immunity. Functional depletion of CD4 and CD8 and IFN was obtained in

  4. Dendritic cells derived from bone marrow cells fail to acquire and present major histocompatibility complex antigens from other dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedford, Penelope A; Burke, Fiona; Stagg, Andrew J; Knight, Stella C

    2008-01-01

    Dendritic cells stimulate primary T-cell responses and a major activation route is via presentation of antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. This presentation of pre-processed antigens most likely proceeds through transfer of functional major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens through exosomes, ‘live nibbling’ or apoptotic vesicles. We hypothesized that not all dendritic cell populations may both donate MHC antigen to dendritic cells and present antigens acquired from other dendritic cells. All populations tested, including those derived from bone marrow precursor cells stimulated primary, allogeneic T-cell responses and acted as accessory cells for mitogen stimulation. Populations of responder type, splenic dendritic cells promoted allogeneic responses indirectly but those derived from bone marrow cells blocked rather than promoted T-cell proliferation. To identify mechanisms underlying this difference we studied transfer of I-A antigens between cells. Active, two-way transfer of allogeneic I-A occurred between splenic primary antigen presenting cells including CD8α+ lymphoid dendritic cells, CD8α− myeloid dendritic cells and B220+ cells; all these cell types donated as well as acquired MHC molecules. By contrast, the bone marrow-derived dendritic cells donated I-A antigens but acquired negligible amounts. Thus, dendritic cells derived directly from bone marrow cells may stimulate primary T-cell responses through transferring functional MHC to other dendritic cells but may not be able to acquire and present antigens from other dendritic cells. The evidence suggests that T-cell activation may be blocked by the presence of dendritic cells that have not matured through lymphoid tissues which are unable to acquire and present antigens pre-processed by other dendritic cells. PMID:18266716

  5. Dendritic cells in peripheral tolerance and immunity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gad, Monika; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Pedersen, Anders Elm

    2003-01-01

    Dendritic cells capable of influencing immunity exist as functionally distinct subsets, T cell-tolerizing and T cell-immunizing subsets. The present paper reviews how these subsets of DCs develop, differentiate and function in vivo and in vitro at the cellular and molecular level. In particular......, the role of DCs in the generation of regulatory T cells is highlighted....

  6. NK cells inhibit humoral immunity by reducing the abundance of CD4+ T follicular helper cells during a chronic virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Kevin D; Kline, Hannah C; Whitmire, Jason K

    2015-08-01

    There is a need to understand better how to improve B cell responses and immunity to persisting virus infections, which often cause debilitating illness or death. People with chronic virus infection show evidence of improved virus control when there is a strong neutralizing antibody response, and conversely, B cell dysfunction is associated with higher viral loads. We showed previously that NK cells inhibit CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses to disseminating LCMV infection and that depletion of NK cells attenuates chronic infection. Here, we examined the effect of NK cell depletion on B cell responses to LCMV infection in mice. Whereas mice infected acutely generated a peak level of antibody soon after the infection was resolved, mice infected chronically showed a continued increase in antibody levels that exceeded those after acute infection. We found that early NK cell depletion rapidly increased virus-specific antibody levels to chronic infection, and this effect depended on CD4(+) T cells and was associated with elevated numbers of CXCR5(+)CD4(+) TFH cells. However, the NK cell-depleted mice controlled the infection and by 1 mo pi, had lower TFH cell numbers and antibody levels compared with mice with sustained infection. Finally, we show that NK cell depletion improved antiviral CD8(+) T cell responses only when B cells and virus-specific antibody were present. Our data indicate that NK cells diminish immunity to chronic infection, in part, by suppressing TFH cell and antibody responses. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  7. T Cells that Recognize HPV Protein Can Target Virus-Infected Cells | Center for Cancer Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is a promising form of cancer immunotherapy. Treating patients with T cells isolated from a tumor and subsequently expanded in the lab can cause the complete regression of some melanomas and cervical cancers, but the treatment is currently restricted to a few cancer types. An approach that may be applied to a wider array of cancers involves modifying peripheral blood T cells with chimeric antigen receptors or T-cell receptors (TCR) that target specific tumor antigens. Unfortunately, epithelial cancers, which are the vast majority of cancers diagnosed, have proven difficult to treat this way because most identified antigens are shared with healthy tissues and targeting them leads to toxic side effects. However, cancers caused by persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, including cervical, head and neck, anal, vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers, may be particularly amenable to the latter form of ACT since the E6 and E7 viral proteins are essential for cancer formation but are not produced in normal tissues. To test this idea, Christian Hinrichs, M.D., and his colleagues examined tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from a patient who experienced a prolonged disease-free period after her second surgical removal of metastatic anal cancer in the hopes of identifying a TCR against one of the HPV oncoproteins.

  8. Live cell imaging and analysis of lipid droplets biogenesis in hepatatis C virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevo-Yassaf, Inbar; Lovelle, Marcos; Nahmias, Yaakov; Hirschberg, Koret; Sklan, Ella H

    2017-08-15

    Lipid droplets (LDs) are regulated neutral lipid storage organelles having a central role in numerous cellular processes as well as in various pathologies such as metabolic disorders, immune responses and during pathogen infection. Due to the growing significance of LDs, extensive efforts are made to study the mechanism and the dynamics of their formation and life history and how are these diverted or modified by pathogens. Real-time visualization of lipid droplet biogenesis can assist in clarifying these and other important issues and may have implications towards understanding the pathogenesis of the associated diseases. Typically, LDs are post-experimentally stained using lipophilic dyes and are visualized under a microscope. Alternatively, overexpression of LD-associated proteins or immunofluorescence analyses are used to identify and follow LDs. These experimental approaches only examine a single end point of the experiment and cannot answer questions regarding LD dynamics. Here, we describe a simple and novel experimental setting that allows real-time fluorescence staining and detection of LDs in cultured living as well as infected cells. This method is quick and simple and is not restricted to a specific dye or cell line. Using this system, the biogenesis of LDs and their growth is demonstrated in cells infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), confirming the strength of this method and the wide range of its applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cytokines Produced in Response to Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection of ARPE-19 Cells Stimulate Lymphocyte Chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graybill, Chiharu; Claypool, David J; Brinton, John T; Levin, Myron J; Lee, Katherine S

    2017-11-15

    Posterior uveitis is an ocular complication that can occur with reactivation of varicella-zoster virus (VZV). It may lead to loss of vision due to retinal detachment and chronic inflammation, which often causes more severe disease than the virus infection itself. To increase our understanding of the immune response, we infected the retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cell line, ARPE-19, with cell-associated VZV and compared its response to that of the MeWo cell line using multiplex assays. We observed (1) a difference in the magnitude and kinetics of cytokine responses between the 2 cell types and (2) differential migration of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells towards these cytokines. Thus, our data provide information about the cytokine and lymphocytic responses to VZV infection of RPE cells, thereby providing a useful platform for future studies to address mechanisms underlying the immunopathology of VZV-associated posterior uveitis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Alterations in ATR in nasal NK/T-cell lymphoma and chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Angen; Takakuwa, Tetsuya; Luo, Wen-Juan; Fujita, Shigeki; Aozasa, Katsuyuki

    2006-07-01

    Nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (NKTCL) and chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) are relatively frequent, especially in Asia, and are poor in prognosis. Both diseases are proliferative diseases of NK/T cells that show highly complicated karyotypes, suggesting the involvement of chromosomal instability. ATR is an important gene for DNA damage response and chromosomal stability. To evaluate the role of ATR gene alterations in the pathogenesis of NKTCL and CAEBV, the whole coding region of the ATR gene was examined in cell lines derived from NKTCL and CAEBV, as well as tumor samples from patients. ATR alterations were detected in two of eight NKTCL and in one of three CAEBV lines. Most aberrant transcripts observed were deletions resulting from aberrant splicing. ATR alterations were also detected in four of 10 NKTCL clinical samples. Both NKTCL and CAEBV cell lines with ATR alterations showed a delay or abrogation in repair of ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks and ultraviolet-induced DNA single-strand breaks, and both exhibited a defect in p53 accumulation. These findings show that alterations in the ATR gene result in an abnormal response to DNA double-strand break and single-strand break repair, suggesting a role for ATR gene alterations in NKTCL lymphomagenesis.

  11. Tissue-specific programming of memory CD8 T cell subsets impacts protection against lethal respiratory virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abboud, Georges; Desai, Pritesh; Dastmalchi, Farhad; Stanfield, Jessica; Tahiliani, Vikas; Hutchinson, Tarun E; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram

    2016-12-12

    How tissue-specific anatomical distribution and phenotypic specialization are linked to protective efficacy of memory T cells against reinfection is unclear. Here, we show that lung environmental cues program recently recruited central-like memory cells with migratory potentials for their tissue-specific functions during lethal respiratory virus infection. After entering the lung, some central-like cells retain their original CD27hiCXCR3hi phenotype, enabling them to localize near the infected bronchiolar epithelium and airway lumen to function as the first line of defense against pathogen encounter. Others, in response to local cytokine triggers, undergo a secondary program of differentiation that leads to the loss of CXCR3, migration arrest, and clustering within peribronchoarterial areas and in interalveolar septa. Here, the immune system adapts its response to prevent systemic viral dissemination and mortality. These results reveal the striking and unexpected spatial organization of central- versus effector-like memory cells within the lung and how cooperation between these two subsets contributes to host defense. © 2016 Abboud et al.

  12. Symptomatic BK Virus Infection Is Associated with Kidney Function Decline and Poor Overall Survival in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abudayyeh, Ala; Hamdi, Amir; Lin, Heather; Abdelrahim, Maen; Rondon, Gabriela; Andersson, Borje S; Afrough, Aimaz; Martinez, Charles S; Tarrand, Jeffrey J; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Marin, David; Gaber, A. Osama; Salahudeen, Abdulla; Oran, Betul; Chemaly, Roy F.; Olson, Amanda; Jones, Roy; Popat, Uday; Champlin, Richard E; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Winkelmayer, Wolfgang C.; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2017-01-01

    Nephropathy due to BK virus infection is an evolving challenge in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We hypothesized that BKV infection was a marker of Kidney Function Decline and a poor prognostic factor in HSCT recipients who experience this complication. In this retrospective study, we analyzed all patients who underwent their first allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at our institution between 2004 and 2012. We evaluated the incidence of persistent kidney function decline, which was defined as a confirmed reduction in estimated glomerular filtration rate of at least 25% from baseline using the CKD-EPI equation. Cox proportional hazard regression was used to model the cause-specific hazard of kidney function decline and Fine and Gray’s method was used to account for the competing risks of death. Among 2477 recipients of a first allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, BK viruria was detected in 25% (n=629) and kidney function decline in 944 (38.1%). On multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, sex, acute graft-versus-host disease, chronic graft versus host disease, preparative conditioning regimen, and graft source, BK viruria remained a significant risk factor for kidney function decline (P <0.001). In addition, patients with BKV infection and kidney function decline experienced worse overall survival. Post-allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, BKV infection was strongly and independently associated with subsequent kidney function decline and worse patient survival after HSCT. PMID:26608093

  13. Localization of the nonstructural protein NS1 in bluetongue virus-infected cells and its presence in virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, B T; Hyatt, A D; White, J R

    1988-04-01

    Seven monoclonal antibodies to the nonstructural protein NS1 of an Australian isolate of bluetongue virus (BTV) have been used in immunofluoresence and immunogold procedures to locate NS1 in virus-infected cells and cytoskeletons. The antibodies fall into three groups indicating that NS1 contains at least three antigenic sites. One group consists of four antibodies which react solely with cytoskeleton-associated virus-specific tubules. A second group contains one antibody which reacts with cytoskeleton-associated virus particles, released viruses, and purified virus and core particles. Two antibodies constituting a third group react with both tubules and cytoskeleton-associated and released virus particles. NS1 was found in [35S]methionine-labeled, purified virus and core particles. Immunofluorescence tests reveal that those antibodies which react with virus particles also bind to cytoskeleton-associated virus inclusion bodies (VIB). The nature of this association was examined by probing cytoskeletons of BTV-infected cells with antibodies to NS1 and protein A-gold. VIB observed in thin sections were not uniformly labeled. Gold was associated with fibrillar arrays found around virus particles either leaving or in close proximity to the VIB. Fibrillar material was not found in association with all virus particles elsewhere in the cell and this suggests that fibril-virus complexes may be intermediate in virus morphogenesis.

  14. Cd1d is expressed on dermal dendritic cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerlini, G; Hefti, H P; Kleinhans, M; Nickoloff, B J; Burg, G; Nestle, F O

    2001-09-01

    CD1 proteins are a family of cell surface molecules that present lipid antigens to T cells. We investigated skin dendritic cells and monocyte-derived dendritic cells for expression of CD1 molecules using a panel of 10 different monoclonal antibodies focusing on the recently described CD1d molecule. By immunohistochemical analysis, CD1d expression in normal human skin was restricted to dendritic appearing cells in the papillary dermis mainly located in a perivascular localization. Langerhans cells did not show detectable CD1d expression in situ. Epidermal/dermal cell suspensions analyzed by flow cytometry demonstrated distinct subpopulations of HLA-DR positive dermal dendritic cells expressing CD1a, CD1b, and CD1c. CD1d was expressed on HLA-DRbright dermal antigen-presenting cells in dermal suspensions (16% +/- 3.6%), as well as on highly enriched dermal dendritic cells migrating out of skin explants (60.5% +/- 8.0%). Migrated mature dermal dendritic cells coexpressed CD83 and CD1d. Western blot analysis on microdissected skin sections revealed the presence of a 50-55 kDa CD1d molecule in dermis, suggesting that CD1d is highly glycosylated in skin. Both immature and mature monocyte-derived dendritic cells cultured in autologous plasma expressed CD1d molecules. In contrast, culture in fetal bovine serum downregulated CD1d expression. In conclusion, antigen-presenting cells in skin express different sets of CD1 molecules including CD1d and might play a role in lipid antigen presentation in various skin diseases. Differential expression of CD1 molecules depending on culture conditions might have an impact on clinical applications of dendritic cells for immunotherapy.

  15. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  16. Macrophages, Dendritic Cells, and Regression of Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan E. Feig

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is the number one cause of death in the Western world. It results from the interaction between modified lipoproteins and monocyte-derived cells such as macrophages, dendritic cells, T cells, and other cellular elements of the arterial wall. This inflammatory process can ultimately lead to the development of complex lesions, or plaques, that protrude into the arterial lumen. Ultimately, plaque rupture and thrombosis can occur leading to the clinical complications of myocardial infarction or stroke. Although each of the cell types plays roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, in this review, the focus will be primarily on the monocyte derived cells- macrophages and dendritic cells. The roles of these cell types in atherogenesis will be highlighted. Finally, the mechanisms of atherosclerosis regression as it relates to these cells will be discussed.

  17. Differential proteomics of Aedes albopictus salivary gland, midgut and C6/36 cell induced by dengue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meichun; Zheng, Xiaoying; Wu, Yu; Gan, Ming; He, Ai; Li, Zhuoya; Zhang, Dongjing; Wu, Xiansheng; Zhan, Ximei

    2013-09-01

    The interaction between dengue virus (DENV) and vector mosquitoes are still poorly understood at present. In this study, 2-D DIGE combined with MS was used to analyze the differential proteomes of Aedes albopictus salivary gland, midgut and C6/36 cells induced by DENV-2. Our results indicated that the virus infection regulated several functional classes of proteins. Among them, 26 were successfully analyzed by real-time RT-PCR. The mRNA levels of 15 were the highest in salivary gland, 2 in midgut and none in C6/36 cells, however, 18 were the least in fat body compared to other organs. Interestingly, the changes of differential proteins mRNA were the most obvious in fat body post-infection. Chaperone, cytoskeleton and energy metabolism enzyme were the most down- or up- regulated proteins after DENV-2 infection. The abundant expression of these proteins in salivary gland may relate to its high susceptibility. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Longitudinal Analysis of Natural Killer Cells in Dengue Virus-Infected Patients in Comparison to Chikungunya and Chikungunya/Dengue Virus-Infected Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Petitdemange

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV is the most prominent arbovirus worldwide, causing major epidemics in South-East Asia, South America and Africa. In 2010, a major DENV-2 outbreak occurred in Gabon with cases of patients co-infected with chikungunya virus (CHIKV. Although the innate immune response is thought to be of primordial importance in the development and outcome of arbovirus-associated pathologies, our knowledge of the role of natural killer (NK cells during DENV-2 infection is in its infancy.We performed the first extensive comparative longitudinal characterization of NK cells in patients infected by DENV-2, CHIKV or both viruses. Hierarchical clustering and principal component analyses were performed to discriminate between CHIKV and DENV-2 infected patients.We observed that both activation and differentiation of NK cells are induced during the acute phase of infection by DENV-2 and CHIKV. Combinatorial analysis however, revealed that both arboviruses induced two different signatures of NK-cell responses, with CHIKV more associated with terminal differentiation, and DENV-2 with inhibitory KIRs. We show also that intracellular production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ by NK cells is strongly stimulated in acute DENV-2 infection, compared to CHIKV.Although specific differences were observed between CHIKV and DENV-2 infections, the significant remodeling of NK cell populations observed here suggests their potential roles in the control of both infections.

  19. Rapid production of a H₉ N₂ influenza vaccine from MDCK cells for protecting chicken against influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhenghua; Lu, Zhongzheng; Wang, Lei; Huo, Zeren; Cui, Jianhua; Zheng, Tingting; Dai, Qing; Chen, Cuiling; Qin, Mengying; Chen, Meihua; Yang, Rirong

    2015-04-01

    H9N2 subtype avian influenza viruses are widespread in domestic poultry, and vaccination remains the most effective way to protect the chicken population from avian influenza pandemics. Currently, egg-based H9N2 influenza vaccine production has several disadvantages and mammalian MDCK cells are being investigated as candidates for influenza vaccine production. However, little research has been conducted on low pathogenic avian influenza viruses (LPAIV) such as H9N2 replicating in mammalian cells using microcarrier beads in a bioreactor. In this study, we present a systematic analysis of a safe H9N2 influenza vaccine derived from MDCK cells for protecting chickens against influenza virus infection. In 2008, we isolated two novel H9N2 influenza viruses from chickens raised in southern China, and these H9N2 viruses were adapted to MDCK cells. The H9N2 virus was produced in MDCK cells in a scalable bioreactor, purified, inactivated, and investigated for use as a vaccine. The MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine was able to induce high titers of neutralizing antibodies in chickens of different ages. Histopathological examination, direct immunofluorescence, HI assay, CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio test, and cytokine evaluation indicated that the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine evoked a rapid and effective immune response to protect chickens from influenza infection. High titers of H9N2-specific antibodies were maintained in chickens for 5 months, and the MDCK-derived H9N2 vaccine had no effects on chicken growth. The use of MDCK cells in bioreactors for LPAIV vaccine production is an attractive option to prevent outbreaks of LPAIV in poultry.

  20. Ebola virus infection inversely correlates with the overall expression levels of promyelocytic leukaemia (PML protein in cultured cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szekely Laszlo

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ebola virus causes severe, often fatal hemorrhagic fever in humans. The mechanism of escape from cellular anti-viral mechanisms is not yet fully understood. The promyelocytic leukaemia (PML associated nuclear body is part of the interferon inducible cellular defense system. Several RNA viruses have been found to interfere with the anti-viral function of the PML body. The possible interaction between Ebola virus and the PML bodies has not yet been explored. Results We found that two cell lines, Vero E6 and MCF7, support virus production at high and low levels respectively. The expression of viral proteins was visualized and quantified using high resolution immunofluorescence microscopy. Ebola encoded NP and VP35 accumulated in cytoplasmic inclusion bodies whereas VP40 was mainly membrane associated but it was also present diffusely in the cytoplasm as well as in the euchromatic areas of the nucleus. The anti-VP40 antibody also allowed the detection of extracellular virions. Interferon-alpha treatment decreased the production of all three viral proteins and delayed the development of cytopathic effects in both cell lines. Virus infection and interferon-alpha treatment induced high levels of PML protein expression in MCF7 but much less in Vero E6 cells. No disruption of PML bodies, a common phenomenon induced by a variety of different viruses, was observed. Conclusion We have established a simple fixation and immunofluorescence staining procedure that allows specific co-detection and precise sub-cellular localization of the PML nuclear bodies and the Ebola virus encoded proteins NP, VP35 and VP40 in formaldehyde treated cells. Interferon-alpha treatment delays virus production in vitro. Intact PML bodies may play an anti-viral role in Ebola infected cells.

  1. Upregulation of the Tim-3/galectin-9 pathway of T cell exhaustion in chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaia Nebbia

    Full Text Available The S-type lectin galectin-9 binds to the negative regulatory molecule Tim-3 on T cells and induces their apoptotic deletion or functional inactivation. We investigated whether galectin-9/Tim-3 interactions contribute to the deletion and exhaustion of the antiviral T cell response in chronic hepatitis B virus infection (CHB. We found Tim-3 to be expressed on a higher percentage of CD4 and CD8 T cells from patients with CHB than healthy controls (p<0.0001 and to be enriched on activated T cells and those infiltrating the HBV-infected liver. Direct ex vivo examination of virus-specific CD8 T cells binding HLA-A2/peptide multimers revealed that Tim-3 was more highly upregulated on HBV-specific CD8 T cells than CMV-specific CD8 T cells or the global CD8 T cell population in patients with CHB (p<0.001 or than on HBV-specific CD8 after resolution of infection. T cells expressing Tim-3 had an impaired ability to produce IFN-γ and TNF-α upon recognition of HBV-peptides and were susceptible to galectin-9-triggered cell death in vitro. Galectin-9 was detectable at increased concentrations in the sera of patients with active CHB-related liver inflammation (p = 0.02 and was strongly expressed by Kupffer cells within the liver sinusoidal network. Tim-3 blockade resulted in enhanced expansion of HBV-specific CD8 T cells able to produce cytokines and mediate cytotoxicity in vitro. Blocking PD-1 in combination with Tim-3 enhanced the number of patients from whom functional antiviral responses could be recovered and/or the strength of responses, indicating that these co-inhibitory molecules play a non-redundant role in driving T cell exhaustion in CHB. Patients taking antivirals able to potently suppress HBV viraemia continued to express Tim-3 on their T cells and respond to Tim-3 blockade. In summary, both Tim-3 and galectin-9 are increased in CHB and may contribute to the inhibition and deletion of T cells as they infiltrate the HBV-infected liver.

  2. MYC overexpression imposes a nonimmunogenic phenotype on Epstein–Barr virus-infected B cells

    OpenAIRE

    Staege, Martin S.; Lee, Steven P.; Frisan, Teresa; Mautner, Josef; Scholz, Siegfried; Pajic, Alexander; Rickinson, Alan B.; Masucci, Maria G.; Polack, Axel; Bornkamm, Georg W.

    2002-01-01

    Lymphoblastoid cell lines, generated by immortalization of normal B cells by Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) in vitro, have strong antigen-presenting capacity, are sensitive to EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells, and are highly allostimulatory in mixed lymphocyte culture. By contrast, EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells are poor antigen presenters, are not recognized by EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells, and are poorly allostimulatory, which raises the question of whether immunological pressure exerte...

  3. High Content Image Based Analysis Identifies Cell Cycle Inhibitors as Regulators of Ebola Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Bavari

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses modulate a number of host biological responses including the cell cycle to favor their replication. In this study, we developed a high-content imaging (HCI assay to measure DNA content and identify different phases of the cell cycle. We then investigated the potential effects of cell cycle arrest on Ebola virus (EBOV infection. Cells arrested in G1 phase by serum starvation or G1/S phase using aphidicolin or G2/M phase using nocodazole showed much reduced EBOV infection compared to the untreated control. Release of cells from serum starvation or aphidicolin block resulted in a time-dependent increase in the percentage of EBOV infected cells. The effect of EBOV infection on cell cycle progression was found to be cell-type dependent. Infection of asynchronous MCF-10A cells with EBOV resulted in a reduced number of cells in G2/M phase with concomitant increase of cells in G1 phase. However, these effects were not observed in HeLa or A549 cells. Together, our studies suggest that EBOV requires actively proliferating cells for efficient replication. Furthermore, multiplexing of HCI based assays to detect viral infection, cell cycle status and other phenotypic changes in a single cell population will provide useful information during screening campaigns using siRNA and small molecule therapeutics.

  4. Small RNA profiling of influenza A virus-infected cells identifies miR-449b as a regulator of histone deacetylase 1 and interferon beta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William A Buggele

    Full Text Available The mammalian antiviral response relies on the alteration of cellular gene expression, to induce the production of antiviral effectors and regulate their activities. Recent research has indicated that virus infections can induce the accumulation of cellular microRNA (miRNA species that influence the stability of host mRNAs and their protein products. To determine the potential for miRNA regulation of cellular responses to influenza A virus infection, small RNA profiling was carried out using next generation sequencing. Comparison of miRNA expression profiles in uninfected human A549 cells to cells infected with influenza A virus strains A/Udorn/72 and A/WSN/33, revealed virus-induced changes in miRNA abundance. Gene expression analysis identified mRNA targets for a cohort of highly inducible miRNAs linked to diverse cellular functions. Experiments demonstrate that the histone deacetylase, HDAC1, can be regulated by influenza-inducible miR-449b, resulting in altered mRNA and protein levels. Expression of miR-449b enhances virus and poly(I:C activation of the IFNβ promoter, a process known to be negatively regulated by HDAC1. These findings demonstrate miRNA induction by influenza A virus infection and elucidate an example of miRNA control of antiviral gene expression in human cells, defining a role for miR-449b in regulation of HDAC1 and antiviral cytokine signaling.

  5. Viruses infecting marine molluscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arzul, Isabelle; Corbeil, Serge; Morga, Benjamin; Renault, Tristan

    2017-07-01

    Although a wide range of viruses have been reported in marine molluscs, most of these reports rely on ultrastructural examination and few of these viruses have been fully characterized. The lack of marine mollusc cell lines restricts virus isolation capacities and subsequent characterization works. Our current knowledge is mostly restricted to viruses affecting farmed species such as oysters Crassostrea gigas, abalone Haliotis diversicolor supertexta or the scallop Chlamys farreri. Molecular approaches which are needed to identify virus affiliation have been carried out for a small number of viruses, most of them belonging to the Herpesviridae and birnaviridae families. These last years, the use of New Generation Sequencing approach has allowed increasing the number of sequenced viral genomes and has improved our capacity to investigate the diversity of viruses infecting marine molluscs. This new information has in turn allowed designing more efficient diagnostic tools. Moreover, the development of experimental infection protocols has answered some questions regarding the pathogenesis of these viruses and their interactions with their hosts. Control and management of viral diseases in molluscs mostly involve active surveillance, implementation of effective bio security measures and development of breeding programs. However factors triggering pathogen development and the life cycle and status of the viruses outside their mollusc hosts still need further investigations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Effects of Double Combinations of Amantadine, Oseltamivir, and Ribavirin on Influenza A (H5N1) Virus Infections in Cell Culture and in Mice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smee, Donald F.; Hurst, Brett L.; Wong, Min-Hui; Bailey, Kevin W.; Morrey, John D.

    2009-01-01

    An amantadine-resistant influenza A/Duck/MN/1525/81 (H5N1) virus was developed from the low-pathogenic North American wild-type (amantadine-sensitive) virus for studying treatment of infections in cell culture and in mice. Double combinations of amantadine, oseltamivir (or the cell culture-active form, oseltamivir carboxylate), and ribavirin were used. Amantadine-oseltamivir carboxylate and amantadine-ribavirin combinations showed synergistic interactions over a range of doses against wild-type virus in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell culture, but oseltamivir carboxylate-ribavirin combinations did not. Primarily additive interactions were seen with oseltamivir carboxylate-ribavirin combinations against amantadine-resistant virus. The presence of amantadine in drug combinations against the resistant virus did not improve activity. The wild-type and amantadine-resistant viruses were lethal to mice by intranasal instillation. The resistant virus infection could not be treated with amantadine up to 100 mg/kg body weight/day, whereas the wild-type virus infection was treatable with oral doses of 10 (weakly effective) to 100 mg/kg/day administered twice a day for 5 days starting 4 h prior to virus exposure. Drug combination studies showed that treatment of the amantadine-resistant virus infection with amantadine-oseltamivir or amantadine-ribavirin combinations was not significantly better than using oseltamivir or ribavirin alone. In contrast, the oseltamivir-ribavirin (25- and 75-mg/kg/day combination) treatments produced significant reductions in mortality. The wild-type virus infection was markedly reduced in severity by all three combinations (amantadine, 10 mg/kg/day combined with the other compounds at 20 or 40 mg/kg/day) compared to monotherapy with the three compounds. Results indicate a lack of benefit of amantadine in combinations against amantadine-resistant virus, but positive benefits in combinations against amantadine-sensitive virus. PMID:19273672

  7. Cytotoxic CD4 T Cells: Differentiation, Function, and Application to Dengue Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Tian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV has spread through most tropical and subtropical areas of the world and represents a serious public health problem. The control of DENV infection has not yet been fully successful due to lack of effective therapeutics or vaccines. Nevertheless, a better understanding of the immune responses against DENV infection may reveal new strategies for eliciting and improving antiviral immunity. T cells provide protective immunity against various viral infections by generating effector cells that cooperate to eliminate antigens and memory cells that can survive for long periods with enhanced abilities to control recurring pathogens. Following activation, CD8 T cells can migrate to sites of infection and kill infected cells, whereas CD4 T cells contribute to the elimination of pathogens by trafficking to infected tissues and providing help to innate immune responses, B cells, as well as CD8 T cells. However, it is now evident that CD4 T cells can also perform cytotoxic functions and induce the apoptosis of target cells. Importantly, accumulating studies demonstrate that cytotoxic CD4 T cells develop following DENV infections and may play a crucial role in protecting the host from severe dengue disease. We review our current understanding of the differentiation and function of cytotoxic CD4 T cells, with a focus on DENV infection, and discuss the potential of harnessing these cells for the prevention and treatment of DENV infection and disease.

  8. MYC Overexpression Imposes a Nonimmunogenic Phenotype on Epstein-Barr Virus-Infected B Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martin S. Staege; Steven P. Lee; Teresa Frisan; Josef Mautner; Siegfried Scholz; Alexander Pajic; Alan B. Rickinson; Maria G. Masucci; Axel Polack; Georg W. Bornkamm

    2002-01-01

    .... By contrast, EBV-positive Burkitt lymphoma (BL) cells are poor antigen presenters, are not recognized by EBV-specific cytotoxic T cells, and are poorly allostimulatory, which raises the question of whether immunological pressure exerted during BL...

  9. The impact of Zika virus infection on human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luplertlop, Natthanej; Suwanmanee, San; Muangkaew, Watcharamat; Ampawong, Sumate; Kitisin, Thitinan; Poovorawan, Yong

    2017-01-01

    An increase in Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic during the last decade has become a major global concern as the virus affects both newborns and adult humans. Earlier studies have shown the impact of ZIKV infection in developing human foetus. However, effective in vitro model of target cells for studying the ZIKV infection in adult human neurons is not available. This study aimed to establish the use of human neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y) for studying an infection of ZIKV in vitro. ZIKV growth kinetics, viral toxicity, and SH-SY5Y cell vialibity were determined after ZIKV infection in SH-SY5Y cells in vitro. ZIKV-infected SH-SY5Y cells were morphologically analysed and compared with nonhuman primate Vero cells. Furthermore, the susceptibility of SH-SY5Y cells to ZIKV infection was also determined. The results showed that ZIKV efficiently infects SH-SY5Y cell lines in vitro. Gradual changes of several cellular homeostasis parameters including cell viability, cytotoxicity, and cell morphology were observed in ZIKVinfected SH-SY5Y cells when compared to mock-treated or non-human primate cells. Interestingly, ZIKV particles were detected in the nucleoplasmic compartment of the infected SH-SY5Y cells. The results suggest that ZIKV particle can be detected in the nucleoplasmic compartment of the infected SH-SY5Y cells beside the known viral replicating cytoplasmic area. Hence, SH-SY5Y cells can be used as an in vitro adult human neuronal cell-based model, for further elucidating the ZIKV biology, and highlight other possible significance of Zika virus distribution through nuclear localization, which may correlate to the neuropathological defects in ZIKV-infected adult humans.

  10. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells : Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ritter, J.B.; Wahl, A.S.; Freund, S.; Genzel, Y.; Reichl, U.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus

  11. Flow cytometric analysis of in vitro bluetongue virus infection of bovine blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barratt-Boyes, S M; Rossitto, P V; Stott, J L; MacLachlan, N J

    1992-08-01

    Cultures of adherent and non-adherent bovine peripheral blood mononuclear (PBM) cells were inoculated with bluetongue virus (BTV) serotype 10. Some cultures of non-adherent cells were stimulated with interleukin 2 (IL-2) and concanavalin A for 24 h prior to virus inoculation. Cells were harvested at various intervals up to 72 h after inoculation. A panel of leukocyte differentiation antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), specific for bovine CD2, CD4 or CD8, monocytes and granulocytes, B cells, gamma delta T cells or the IL-2 receptor (IL-2r), was directly conjugated to fluorescein isothiocyanate, and a MAb specific for the BTV major core protein VP7 was directly conjugated to phycoerythrin. Cells were labelled with conjugated MAbs in single- and double-label immunofluorescence studies to identify specifically the BTV-infected cells in inoculated cultures. The viability of cells was determined by propidium iodide exclusion, and all analyses were done using flow cytometry. Productive infection of cultures of PBM cells was confirmed by virus titration. The data revealed a clear difference between subsets of bovine PBM cells in susceptibility to infection with BTV in vitro. Monocytes were readily infected with BTV, as were stimulated CD4+ cells, and infection was cytopathic to monocytes and stimulated lymphocytes. The proportion of infected cells decreased after 24 h and virus titres dropped markedly by 72 h in all cultures. CD4+ cells in cultures of unstimulated non-adherent cells inoculated with BTV showed increased expression of IL-2r. The possible relevance of these findings to the pathogenesis of BTV infection of cattle is discussed.

  12. Involvement of NK Cells in IL-28B-Mediated Immunity against Influenza Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanshi; Li, Tingting; Chen, Yongyan; Wei, Haiming; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2017-08-01

    IL-28B is a member of the newly discovered type III IFN family and exhibits unique antiviral properties compared with other family members. NK cells play a critical role in defending against viruses; however, little is known about the role of IL-28B in NK cell function. In a mouse model of influenza A virus (mouse adapted influenza A/PR/8/34 strain) infection, long-term overexpression of IL-28B induced by hepatocyte-specific gene delivery exerted a strong antiviral effect in the presence of NK cells. In IL-28B-overexpressing wild-type mice, the percentages and absolute numbers of NK cells in the spleen, liver, and lung were markedly increased, with higher proliferation and accelerated NK cell maturation based on phenotypes staining with CD11b and CD27 or CD11b and KLRG1. Furthermore, the effect of IL-28B on NK cells was macrophage dependent, as confirmed in an in vitro coculture assay and in in vivo macrophage- or alveolar macrophage-depletion experiments. Transwell studies demonstrated that CFSE-labeled NK cell proliferation was driven, in a dose-dependent manner, by unknown soluble factor(s) secreted by IL-28B-stimulated alveolar macrophages, without requiring direct cell-cell contact. An understanding of the NK cell-promoting features of IL-28B will facilitate future clinical application of this cytokine. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. CD8+ T cells control Ross River virus infection in musculoskeletal tissues of infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrack, Kristina S.; Montgomery, Stephanie A.; Homann, Dirk; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Ross River virus (RRV), chikungunya virus (CHIKV), and related alphaviruses cause debilitating polyarthralgia and myalgia. Mouse models of RRV and CHIKV have demonstrated a role for the adaptive immune response in the control of these infections. However, questions remain regarding the role for T cells in viral control, including the magnitude, location, and dynamics of CD8+ T cell responses. To address these questions, we generated a recombinant RRV expressing the H-2b-restricted gp33 determinant derived from the glycoprotein (gp) of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) (“RRV-LCMV”). Utilizing tetramers, we tracked gp33-specific CD8+ T cells during RRV-LCMV infection. We found that acute RRV infection induces activation of CD8+ T cell responses in lymphoid and musculoskeletal tissues that peak from 10 to 14 days post-inoculation (dpi), suggesting that CD8+ T cells contribute to control of acute RRV infection. Mice genetically deficient for CD8+ T cells or wild-type mice depleted of CD8+ T cells had elevated RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue, but not joint-associated tissues, at 14 dpi, suggesting that the ability of CD8+ T cells to control RRV infection is tissue-dependent. Finally, adoptively transferred T cells were capable of reducing RRV loads in skeletal muscle tissue of Rag1−/− mice, indicating that T cells can contribute to the control of RRV infection in the absence of B cells and antibody. Collectively, these data demonstrate a role for T cells in the control of RRV infection and suggest that the antiviral capacity of T cells is controlled in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:25488988

  14. Metabolic effects of influenza virus infection in cultured animal cells: Intra- and extracellular metabolite profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genzel Yvonne

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many details in cell culture-derived influenza vaccine production are still poorly understood and approaches for process optimization mainly remain empirical. More insights on mammalian cell metabolism after a viral infection could give hints on limitations and cell-specific virus production capacities. A detailed metabolic characterization of an influenza infected adherent cell line (MDCK was carried out based on extracellular and intracellular measurements of metabolite concentrations. Results For most metabolites the comparison of infected (human influenza A/PR/8/34 and mock-infected cells showed a very similar behavior during the first 10-12 h post infection (pi. Significant changes were observed after about 12 h pi: (1 uptake of extracellular glucose and lactate release into the cell culture supernatant were clearly increased in infected cells compared to mock-infected cells. At the same time (12 h pi intracellular metabolite concentrations of the upper part of glycolysis were significantly increased. On the contrary, nucleoside triphosphate concentrations of infected cells dropped clearly after 12 h pi. This behaviour was observed for two different human influenza A/PR/8/34 strains at slightly different time points. Conclusions Comparing these results with literature values for the time course of infection with same influenza strains, underline the hypothesis that influenza infection only represents a minor additional burden for host cell metabolism. The metabolic changes observed after12 h pi are most probably caused by the onset of apoptosis in infected cells. The comparison of experimental data from two variants of the A/PR/8/34 virus strain (RKI versus NIBSC with different productivities and infection dynamics showed comparable metabolic patterns but a clearly different timely behavior. Thus, infection dynamics are obviously reflected in host cell metabolism.

  15. Differentiation-Dependent KLF4 Expression Promotes Lytic Epstein-Barr Virus Infection in Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dhananjay M Nawandar

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV is a human herpesvirus associated with B-cell and epithelial cell malignancies. EBV lytically infects normal differentiated oral epithelial cells, where it causes a tongue lesion known as oral hairy leukoplakia (OHL in immunosuppressed patients. However, the cellular mechanism(s that enable EBV to establish exclusively lytic infection in normal differentiated oral epithelial cells are not currently understood. Here we show that a cellular transcription factor known to promote epithelial cell differentiation, KLF4, induces differentiation-dependent lytic EBV infection by binding to and activating the two EBV immediate-early gene (BZLF1 and BRLF1 promoters. We demonstrate that latently EBV-infected, telomerase-immortalized normal oral keratinocyte (NOKs cells undergo lytic viral reactivation confined to the more differentiated cell layers in organotypic raft culture. Furthermore, we show that endogenous KLF4 expression is required for efficient lytic viral reactivation in response to phorbol ester and sodium butyrate treatment in several different EBV-infected epithelial cell lines, and that the combination of KLF4 and another differentiation-dependent cellular transcription factor, BLIMP1, is highly synergistic for inducing lytic EBV infection. We confirm that both KLF4 and BLIMP1 are expressed in differentiated, but not undifferentiated, epithelial cells in normal tongue tissue, and show that KLF4 and BLIMP1 are both expressed in a patient-derived OHL lesion. In contrast, KLF4 protein is not detectably expressed in B cells, where EBV normally enters latent infection, although KLF4 over-expression is sufficient to induce lytic EBV reactivation in Burkitt lymphoma cells. Thus, KLF4, together with BLIMP1, plays a critical role in mediating lytic EBV reactivation in epithelial cells.

  16. Apoptosis and necrosis in vaccinia virus-infected HeLa G and BSC-40 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liskova, Jana; Knitlova, Jarmila; Honner, Richard; Melkova, Zora

    2011-09-01

    In most cells, vaccinia virus (VACV) infection is considered to cause a lytic cell death, an equivalent of necrosis. However, upon infection of the epithelial cell lines HeLa G and BSC-40 with VACV strain Western Reserve (WR), we have previously observed an increased activation of and activity attributable to caspases, a typical sign of apoptosis. In this paper, we have further analyzed the type of cell death in VACV-infected cells HeLa G and BSC-40. In a cell-based flow cytometric assay, we showed a specific activation of caspase-2 and 4 in HeLa G and BSC-40 cells infected with VACV, strain WR, while we did not find any effects of inhibitors of calpain and cathepsin D and E. The actual activity of the two caspases, but also of caspase-3, was then confirmed in lysates of infected HeLa G, but not in BSC-40 cells. Accordingly, poly(ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) cleavage was found increased only in infected HeLa G cells. Consequently, we have determined morphological features of apoptosis and/or activity of the executioner caspase-3 in infected HeLa G cells in situ, while only a background apoptosis was observed in infected BSC-40 cells. Finally, vaccination strains Dryvax and Praha were found to induce apoptosis in both HeLa G and BSC-40 cells, as characterized morphologically and by PARP cleavage. These findings may be important for understanding the differences in VACV-host interactions and post-vaccination complications in different individuals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Susceptibility of naïve and differentiated PC12 cells to Japanese encephalitis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian-Ri; Wu, Chih-Cheng; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Ou, Yen-Chuan; Lin, Shih-Yi; Wang, Ya-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ying; Raung, Shue-Ling; Liao, Su-Lan; Chen, Chun-Jung

    2017-02-01

    Japanese encephalitis is a mosquito-borne disease caused by Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection. Although JEV infects and replicates in cells with multiple tissue origins, neurons are the preferential cells for JEV infection. Currently, the identities of JEV cell tropism are largely unclear. To gain better insight into the underlying identities of JEV cell tropism, this study was designed to compare the JEV cell tropism with naïve or differentiated PC12 cells. Through nerve growth factor-differentiated PC12 cells, we discovered that JEV efficiently replicated in differentiated PC12 cells rather than naïve cells. Mechanistic studies revealed that viral adsorption/attachment seemed not to be a crucial factor. Supporting data showed that antagonizing postreceptor intracellular signaling of interferons, along with the activation of suppressor of cytokine signaling-3 (SOCS3) expression and protein tyrosine phosphatase activity, were apparent in differentiated PC12 cells after JEV infection. Independent of differentiating inducing agents, the upregulation of SOCS3 expression and protein tyrosine phosphatase activity, as well as preferential JEV tropism, were common in JEV-infected differentiated PC12 cells. Using cultured primary neurons, JEV efficiently replicated in embryonic neurons rather than adult neurons, and the preference was accompanied by higher SOCS3 expression and protein tyrosine phosphatase activity. Given that both SOCS3 and protein tyrosine phosphatases have been implicated in the process of neuronal differentiation, JEV infection seems to not only create an antagonizing strategy to escape host's interferon antiviral response but also takes advantage of cellular machinery to favor its replication. Taken together, current findings imply that dynamic changes within cellular regulators of antiviral machinery could be accompanied by events of neuronal differentiation, thus concurrently playing roles in the control of JEV cell tropism and

  18. CD69 Deficiency Enhances the Host Response to Vaccinia Virus Infection through Altered NK Cell Homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notario, Laura; Alari-Pahissa, Elisenda; de Molina, Antonio; Lauzurica, Pilar

    2016-07-15

    During the host response to viral infection, the transmembrane CD69 protein is highly upregulated in all immune cells. We have studied the role of CD69 in the murine immune response to vaccinia virus (VACV) infection, and we report that the absence of CD69 enhances protection against VACV at both short and long times postinfection in immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice. Natural killer (NK) cells were implicated in the increased infection control, since the differences were greatly diminished when NK cells were depleted. This role of NK cells was not based on an altered NK cell reactivity, since CD69 did not affect the NK cell activation threshold in response to major histocompatibility complex class I NK cell targets or protein kinase C activation. Instead, NK cell numbers were increased in the spleen and peritoneum of CD69-deficient infected mice. That was not just secondary to better infection control in CD69-deficient mice, since NK cell numbers in the spleens and the blood of uninfected CD69(-/-) mice were already augmented. CD69-deficient NK cells from infected mice did not have an altered proliferation capacity. However, a lower spontaneous cell death rate was observed for CD69(-/-) lymphocytes. Thus, our results suggest that CD69 limits the innate immune response to VACV infection at least in part through cell homeostatic survival. We show that increased natural killer (NK) cell numbers augment the host response and survival after infection with vaccinia virus. This phenotype is found in the absence of CD69 in immunocompetent and immunodeficient hosts. As part of the innate immune system, NK lymphocytes are activated and participate in the defense against infection. Several studies have focused on the contribution of NK cells to protection against infection with vaccinia virus. In this study, it was demonstrated that the augmented early NK cell response in the absence of CD69 is responsible for the increased protection seen during infection with

  19. NK Cell Responses to Human Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Kim; Braun, Monika; Pakalniene, Jolita; Lunemann, Sebastian; Enqvist, Monika; Dailidyte, Laura; Schaffer, Marie; Lindquist, Lars; Mickiene, Aukse; Michaëlsson, Jakob; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; Gredmark-Russ, Sara

    2016-10-01

    Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) is a flavivirus that is transferred to humans by infected ticks. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis, a severe infection of the CNS with a high risk for long-lasting sequelae. Currently, no treatment exists for the disease. Understanding the cellular immune response to this infection is important to gain further understanding into the pathogenesis, treatment, and prevention of the disease. NK cells are known to participate in the control of viral infections. We performed a longitudinal analysis of the human NK cell response to TBEV infection in a cohort of infected individuals from the onset of severe clinical symptoms to the convalescence phase. NK cell activation, as measured by expression of Ki67, was apparent at the time of hospitalization. By 3 wk after hospitalization, it decreased to levels seen in healthy controls. Concomitant with the increase in NK cell activation, augmented levels of IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, IFN-γ, and TNF were detected in patient plasma. This TBEV-induced NK cell activation was restricted predominantly to differentiated CD57(+)CD56(dim) NK cells. Functionally, CD56(dim) NK cells responded poorly to target cells at the time of hospitalization, but they recovered functional capacity to control levels during the convalescent phase. In contrast, the responsiveness of NK cells to cytokine stimulation remained intact throughout the disease. These findings demonstrate that NK cells respond to TBEV infection with characteristics that are distinct from those of other human viral infections and provide insights into the NK cell response to clinical TBEV infection. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  20. TNF-mediated survival of CD169(+) cells promotes immune activation during vesicular stomatitis virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shinde, Prashant V; Xu, Haifeng C; Maney, Sathish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Innate immune activation is essential to mount an effective antiviral response and to prime adaptive immunity. Although a crucial role of CD169(+) cells during vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infections is increasingly recognized, factors regulating CD169(+) cells during viral infections remain ...

  1. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Delvecchio

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  2. Spectroscopic investigation of herpes simplex viruses infected cells and their response to antiviral therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erukhimovitch, Vitaly; Talyshinsky, Marina; Souprun, Yelena; Huleihel, Mahmoud

    2006-07-01

    In the present study, we used microscopic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) to evaluate the antiviral activity of known antiviral agents against herpes viruses. The antiviral activity of Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) (which is an active compound of propolis) against herpes simplex type 1 and 2 was examined in cell culture. The advantage of microscopic FTIR spectroscopy over conventional FTIR spectroscopy is that it facilitates inspection of restricted regions of cell culture or tissue. Our results showed significant spectral differences at early stages of infection between infected and non-infected cells, and between infected cells treated with the used antiviral agent and those not treated. In infected cells, there was a considerable increase in phosphate levels. Our results show that treatment with used antiviral agent considerably abolish the spectral changes induced by the viral infection. In addition, it is possible to track by FTIR microscopy method the deferential effect of various doses of the drug.

  3. Chloroquine, an Endocytosis Blocking Agent, Inhibits Zika Virus Infection in Different Cell Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvecchio, Rodrigo; Higa, Luiza M; Pezzuto, Paula; Valadão, Ana Luiza; Garcez, Patrícia P; Monteiro, Fábio L; Loiola, Erick C; Dias, André A; Silva, Fábio J M; Aliota, Matthew T; Caine, Elizabeth A; Osorio, Jorge E; Bellio, Maria; O'Connor, David H; Rehen, Stevens; de Aguiar, Renato Santana; Savarino, Andrea; Campanati, Loraine; Tanuri, Amilcar

    2016-11-29

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in utero might lead to microcephaly and other congenital defects. Since no specific therapy is available thus far, there is an urgent need for the discovery of agents capable of inhibiting its viral replication and deleterious effects. Chloroquine is widely used as an antimalarial drug, anti-inflammatory agent, and it also shows antiviral activity against several viruses. Here we show that chloroquine exhibits antiviral activity against ZIKV in Vero cells, human brain microvascular endothelial cells, human neural stem cells, and mouse neurospheres. We demonstrate that chloroquine reduces the number of ZIKV-infected cells in vitro, and inhibits virus production and cell death promoted by ZIKV infection without cytotoxic effects. In addition, chloroquine treatment partially reveres morphological changes induced by ZIKV infection in mouse neurospheres.

  4. Development of a membrane fusible drug carrier from erythrocytes by the spontaneous transfer of viral fusion protein from influenza virus-infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogure, K; Okuda, O; Itoh, T; Hayashi, K; Ueno, M

    1997-05-01

    In order to develop a membrane fusible drug carrier from human erythrocytes, we attempted the reconstitution of influenza virus fusion protein hemagglutinin (HA) to an erythrocyte membrane. In this study, we succeeded in the preparation of HA-reconstituted erythrocytes (HA-erythrocytes) by the incubation of erythrocytes with influenza virus-infected CV-1 cells, and confirmed the ability of HA-erythrocytes to fuse with the cell membrane. Furthermore, by using an HA-reconstituted ghost (HA-ghost), which entrapped fluorescent-labeled ovalbumin, 25% of the protein was incorporated into cells through the fusion of the HA-ghost with the cell membrane.

  5. [ZIKA--VIRUS INFECTION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velev, V

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes the knowledge of the scientific community for Zika-virus infection. It became popular because of severe congenital damage causes of CNS in newborns whose mothers are infected during pregnancy, as well as the risk of pandemic distribution. Discusses the peculiarities of the biology and ecology of vectors--blood-sucking mosquitoes Aedes; stages in the spread of infection and practical problems which caused during pregnancy. Attention is paid to the recommendations that allow leading national and international medical organizations to deal with the threat Zika-virus infection.

  6. Natural Killer Cell Function and Dysfunction in Hepatitis C Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla A. Holder

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses must continually adapt against dynamic innate and adaptive responses of the host immune system to establish chronic infection. Only a small minority (~20% of those exposed to hepatitis C virus (HCV spontaneously clear infection, leaving approximately 200 million people worldwide chronically infected with HCV. A number of recent research studies suggest that establishment and maintenance of chronic HCV infection involve natural killer (NK cell dysfunction. This relationship is illustrated in vitro by disruption of typical NK cell responses including both cell-mediated cytotoxicity and cytokine production. Expression of a number of activating NK cell receptors in vivo is also affected in chronic HCV infection. Thus, direct in vivo and in vitro evidence of compromised NK function in chronic HCV infection in conjunction with significant epidemiological associations between the outcome of HCV infection and certain combinations of NK cell regulatory receptor and class I human histocompatibility linked antigen (HLA genotypes indicate that NK cells are important in the immune response against HCV infection. In this review, we highlight evidence suggesting that selective impairment of NK cell activity is related to establishment of chronic HCV infection.

  7. Cytoarchitecture of Zika virus infection in human neuroblastoma and Aedes albopictus cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offerdahl, Danielle K; Dorward, David W; Hansen, Bryan T; Bloom, Marshall E

    2017-01-15

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) pandemic is a global concern due to its role in the development of congenital anomalies of the central nervous system. This mosquito-borne flavivirus alternates between mammalian and mosquito hosts, but information about the biogenesis of ZIKV is limited. Using a human neuroblastoma cell line (SK-N-SH) and an Aedes albopictus mosquito cell line (C6/36), we characterized ZIKV infection by immunofluorescence, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron tomography (ET) to better understand infection in these disparate host cells. ZIKV replicated well in both cell lines, but infected SK-N-SH cells suffered a lytic crisis. Flaviviruses scavenge host cell membranes to serve as replication platforms and ZIKV showed the hallmarks of this process. Via TEM, we identified virus particles and 60-100nm spherular vesicles. ET revealed these vesicular replication compartments contain smaller 20-30nm spherular structures. Our studies indicate that SK-N-SH and C6/36 cells are relevant models for viral cytoarchitecture study. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Rapamycin-induced autophagy restricts porcine epidemic diarrhea virus infectivity in porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Seongyeol; Gu, Min Jeong; Kim, Cheol Gyun; Kye, Yoon Chul; Lim, Younggap; Lee, Ji Eun; Park, Byung-Chul; Chu, Hyuk; Han, Seung Hyun; Yun, Cheol-Heui

    2017-10-01

    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) invades porcine intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) and causes diarrhea and dehydration in pigs. In the present study, we showed a suppression of PEDV infection in porcine jejunum intestinal epithelial cells (IPEC-J2) by an increase in autophagy. Autophagy was activated by rapamycin at a dose that does not affect cell viability and tight junction permeability. The induction of autophagy was examined by LC3I/LC3II conversion. To confirm the autophagic-flux (entire autophagy pathway), autophagolysosomes were examined by an immunofluorescence assay. Pre-treatment with rapamycin significantly restricted not only a 1 h infection but also a longer infection (24 h) with PEDV, while this effect disappeared when autophagy was blocked. Co-localization of PEDV and autophagosomes suggests that PEDV could be a target of autophagy. Moreover, alleviation of PEDV-induced cell death in IPEC-J2 cells pretreated with rapamycin demonstrates a protective effect of rapamycin against PEDV-induced epithelial cell death. Collectively, the present study suggests an early prevention against PEDV infection in IPEC-J2 cells via autophagy that might be an effective strategy for the restriction of PEDV, and opens up the possibility of the use of rapamycin in vivo as an effective prophylactic and prevention treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. NK cells in hepatitis B virus infection: a potent target for immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabani, Ziba; Bagheri, Masomeh; Zare-Bidaki, Mohammad; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossein; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Mohammadi Nejad, Mozafar; Kennedy, Derek

    2014-07-01

    Viruses, including hepatitis B virus (HBV), are the most prevalent and infectious agents that lead to liver disease in humans. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and cirrhosis of the liver are the most serious complications arising from prolonged forms of hepatitis B. Previous studies demonstrated that patients suffering from long-term HBV infections are unable to eradicate HBV from hepatocytes completely. The mechanisms responsible for progression of these forms of infection have not yet been clarified. However, it seems that there are differences in genetic and immunological parameters when comparing patients to subjects who successfully clear HBV infections, and these may represent the causes of long-term infection. Natural killer (NK) cells, the main innate immune cells that target viral infections, play important roles in the eradication of HBV from hepatocytes. NK cells carry several stimulatory and inhibitor receptors, and binding of receptors with their ligands results in activation and suppression of NK cells, respectively. The aim of this review is to address the recent information regarding NK cell phenotype, functions and modifications in hepatitis B. This review addresses the recent data regarding the roles of NK cells as novel targets for immunotherapies that target hepatitis B infection. It also discusses the potential to reduce the risk of HCC or cirrhosis of the liver by targeting NK cells.

  10. Long-lived CD8+ T cell responses following Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goedhals, Dominique; Paweska, Janusz T; Burt, Felicity J

    2017-12-01

    Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus (CCHFV) is a member of the Orthonairovirus genus of the Nairoviridae family and is associated with haemorrhagic fever in humans. Although T lymphocyte responses are known to play a role in protection from and clearance of viral infections, specific T cell epitopes have yet to be identified for CCHFV following infection. A panel of overlapping peptides covering the CCHFV nucleoprotein and the structural glycoproteins, GN and GC, were screened by ELISpot assay to detect interferon gamma (IFN-γ) production in vitro by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from eleven survivors with previous laboratory confirmed CCHFV infection. Reactive peptides were located predominantly on the nucleoprotein, with only one survivor reacting to two peptides from the glycoprotein GC. No single epitope was immunodominant, however all but one survivor showed reactivity to at least one T cell epitope. The responses were present at high frequency and detectable several years after the acute infection despite the absence of continued antigenic stimulation. T cell depletion studies confirmed that IFN-γ production as detected using the ELISpot assay was mediated chiefly by CD8+ T cells. This is the first description of CD8+ T cell epitopic regions for CCHFV and provides confirmation of long-lived T cell responses in survivors of CCHFV infection.

  11. Cathepsin L is required for ecotropic murine leukemia virus infection in NIH3T3 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshii, Hiroaki; Kamiyama, Haruka; Minematsu, Kazuo; Goto, Kensuke; Mizota, Tsutomu; Oishi, Kazunori; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Yamamoto, Naoki; Kubo, Yoshinao

    2009-01-01

    Recently it has been reported that a cathepsin B inhibitor, CA-074Me, attenuates ecotropic murine leukemia virus (Eco-MLV) infection in NIH3T3 cells, suggesting that cathepsin B is required for the Eco-MLV infection. However, cathepsin B activity was negative or extremely low in NIH3T3 cells. How did CA-074Me attenuate the Eco-MLV infection? The CA-074Me treatment of NIH3T3 cells inhibited cathepsin L activity, and a cathepsin L specific inhibitor, CLIK148, attenuated the Eco-MLV vector infec...

  12. Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hölzer, Martin; Krähling, Verena; Amman, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result...... expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine...

  13. Systemic Virus Infections Differentially Modulate Cell Cycle State and Functionality of Long-Term Hematopoietic Stem Cells In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph Hirche

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Quiescent long-term hematopoietic stem cells (LT-HSCs are efficiently activated by type I interferon (IFN-I. However, this effect remains poorly investigated in the context of IFN-I-inducing virus infections. Here we report that both vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection induce LT-HSC activation that substantially differs from the effects triggered upon injection of synthetic IFN-I-inducing agents. In both infections, inflammatory responses had to exceed local thresholds within the bone marrow to confer LT-HSC cell cycle entry, and IFN-I receptor triggering was not critical for this activation. After resolution of acute MCMV infection, LT-HSCs returned to phenotypic quiescence. However, non-acute MCMV infection induced a sustained inflammatory milieu within the bone marrow that was associated with long-lasting impairment of LT-HSC function. In conclusion, our results show that systemic virus infections fundamentally affect LT-HSCs and that also non-acute inflammatory stimuli in bone marrow donors can affect the reconstitution potential of bone marrow transplants.

  14. A DNA Vaccine Protects Human Immune Cells against Zika Virus Infection in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohua Yi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A DNA vaccine encoding prM and E protein has been shown to induce protection against Zika virus (ZIKV infection in mice and monkeys. However, its effectiveness in humans remains undefined. Moreover, identification of which immune cell types are specifically infected in humans is unclear. We show that human myeloid cells and B cells are primary targets of ZIKV in humanized mice. We also show that a DNA vaccine encoding full length prM and E protein protects humanized mice from ZIKV infection. Following administration of the DNA vaccine, humanized DRAG mice developed antibodies targeting ZIKV as measured by ELISA and neutralization assays. Moreover, following ZIKV challenge, vaccinated animals presented virtually no detectable virus in human cells and in serum, whereas unvaccinated animals displayed robust infection, as measured by qRT-PCR. Our results utilizing humanized mice show potential efficacy for a targeted DNA vaccine against ZIKV in humans.

  15. Role of Natural Killer and Gamma-Delta T cells in West Nile Virus Infection

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    Thomas Welte

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells and Gamma-delta T cells are both innate lymphocytes that respond rapidly and non-specifically to viral infection and other pathogens. They are also known to form a unique link between innate and adaptive immunity. Although they have similar immune features and effector functions, accumulating evidence in mice and humans suggest these two cell types have distinct roles in the control of infection by West Nile virus (WNV, a re-emerging pathogen that has caused fatal encephalitis in North America over the past decade. This review will discuss recent studies on these two cell types in protective immunity and viral pathogenesis during WNV infection.

  16. Early events associated with infection of Epstein-Barr virus infection of primary B-cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabyasachi Halder

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Epstein Barr virus (EBV is closely associated with the development of a vast number of human cancers. To develop a system for monitoring early cellular and viral events associated with EBV infection a self-recombining BAC containing 172-kb of the Epstein Barr virus genome BAC-EBV designated as MD1 BAC (Chen et al., 2005, J.Virology was used to introduce an expression cassette of green fluorescent protein (GFP by homologous recombination, and the resultant BAC clone, BAC-GFP-EBV was transfected into the HEK 293T epithelial cell line. The resulting recombinant GFP EBV was induced to produce progeny virus by chemical inducer from the stable HEK 293T BAC GFP EBV cell line and the virus was used to immortalize human primary B-cell as monitored by green fluorescence and outgrowth of the primary B cells. The infection, B-cell activation and cell proliferation due to GFP EBV was monitored by the expression of the B-cell surface antigens CD5, CD10, CD19, CD23, CD39, CD40 , CD44 and the intercellular proliferation marker Ki-67 using Flow cytometry. The results show a dramatic increase in Ki-67 which continues to increase by 6-7 days post-infection. Likewise, CD40 signals showed a gradual increase, whereas CD23 signals were increased by 6-12 hours, maximally by 3 days and then decreased. Monitoring the viral gene expression pattern showed an early burst of lytic gene expression. This up-regulation of lytic gene expression prior to latent genes during early infection strongly suggests that EBV infects primary B-cell with an initial burst of lytic gene expression and the resulting progeny virus is competent for infecting new primary B-cells. This process may be critical for establishment of latency prior to cellular transformation. The newly infected primary B-cells can be further analyzed for investigating B cell activation due to EBV infection.

  17. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Fifth People' s Hospital of Shanghai, School of Medicine, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200240 (China); Zhao, Libo [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The Third People' s Hospital of Chongqing, 400014 (China); Yang, Yongtao [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Bornavirus Research Group affiliated to the Free University of Berlin, Berlin (Germany); Huang, Hua [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Huang, Rongzhong [Department of Rehabilitative Medicine, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400010 (China); Zhang, Liang [Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); Institute of Neuroscience, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, 400016 (China); and others

    2014-09-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Methods: Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Results: Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. Conclusions: BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. - Highlights: • A human strain of BDV (BDV Hu-H1) was used to infect human oligodendroglial cells (OL cells). • This study is the first to reveal the host proteomic and histone Kac profiles in BDV-infected OL cells. • BDV infection affected the expression of many transcription factors and several HATs and HDACs.

  18. Superinfection exclusion is absent during acute Junin virus infection of Vero and A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudin, Raphaël; Kirchhausen, Tomas

    2015-11-09

    Many viruses have evolved strategies of so-called "superinfection exclusion" to prevent re-infection of a cell that the same virus has already infected. Although Old World arenavirus infection results in down-regulation of its viral receptor and thus superinfection exclusion, whether New World arenaviruses have evolved such a mechanism remains unclear. Here we show that acute infection by the New World Junin virus (JUNV) failed to down-regulate the transferrin receptor and did not induce superinfection exclusion. We observed that Vero cells infected by a first round of JUNV (Candid1 strain) preserve an ability to internalize new incoming JUNV particles that is comparable to that of non-infected cells. Moreover, we developed a dual infection assay with the wild-type Candid1 JUNV and a recombinant JUNV-GFP virus to discriminate between first and second infections at the transcriptional and translational levels. We found that Vero and A549 cells already infected by JUNV were fully competent to transcribe viral RNA from a second round of infection. Furthermore, flow cytometry analysis of viral protein expression indicated that viral translation was normal, regardless of whether cells were previously infected or not. We conclude that in acutely infected cells, Junin virus lacks a superinfection exclusion mechanism.

  19. Effect of ultrasound on herpes simplex virus infection in cell culture

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    Iwai Soichi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ultrasound has been shown to increase the efficiency of gene expression from retroviruses, adenoviruses and adeno-associated viruses. The effect of ultrasound to stimulate cell membrane permeabilization on infection with an oncolytic herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 was examined. Results Vero monkey kidney cells were infected with HSV-1 and exposed to 1 MHz ultrasound after an adsorption period. The number of plaques was significantly greater than that of the untreated control. A combination of ultrasound and microbubbles further increased the plaque number. Similar results were obtained using a different type of HSV-1 and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC cells. The appropriate intensity, duty cycle and time of ultrasound to increase the plaque number were 0.5 W/cm2, 20% duty cycle and 10 sec, respectively. Ultrasound with microbubbles at an intensity of 2.0 W/cm2, at 50% duty cycle, or for 40 sec reduced cell viability. Conclusion These results indicate that ultrasound promotes the entry of oncolytic HSV-1 into cells. It may be useful to enhance the efficiency of HSV-1 infection in oncolytic virotherapy.

  20. Zika virus infection reprograms global transcription of host cells to allow sustained infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shashi Kant; Dang, Jason; Qin, Yue; Lichinchi, Gianluigi; Bansal, Vikas; Rana, Tariq M

    2017-04-26

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging virus causally linked to neurological disorders, including congenital microcephaly and Guillain-Barré syndrome. There are currently no targeted therapies for ZIKV infection. To identify novel antiviral targets and to elucidate the mechanisms by which ZIKV exploits the host cell machinery to support sustained replication, we analyzed the transcriptomic landscape of human microglia, fibroblast, embryonic kidney and monocyte-derived macrophage cell lines before and after ZIKV infection. The four cell types differed in their susceptibility to ZIKV infection, consistent with differences in their expression of viral response genes before infection. Clustering and network analyses of genes differentially expressed after ZIKV infection revealed changes related to the adaptive immune system, angiogenesis and host metabolic processes that are conducive to sustained viral production. Genes related to the adaptive immune response were downregulated in microglia cells, suggesting that ZIKV effectively evades the immune response after reaching the central nervous system. Like other viruses, ZIKV diverts host cell resources and reprograms the metabolic machinery to support RNA metabolism, ATP production and glycolysis. Consistent with these transcriptomic analyses, nucleoside metabolic inhibitors abrogated ZIKV replication in microglia cells.

  1. Zika Virus Infection of the Human Glomerular Cells: Implications for Viral Reservoirs and Renal Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcendor, Donald J

    2017-07-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection in the human renal compartment has not been reported. Several clinical reports have describe high-level persistent viral shedding in the urine of infected patients, but the associated mechanisms have not been explored until now. The current study examined cellular components of the glomerulus of the human kidney for ZIKV infectivity. I infected primary human podocytes, renal glomerular endothelial cells (GECs), and mesangial cells with ZIKV. Viral infectivity was analyzed by means of microscopy, immunofluorescence, real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1β, interferon β, and RANTES (regulated on activation of normal T cells expressed and secreted) were assessed using qRT-PCR. I show that glomerular podocytes, renal GECs, and mesangial cells are permissive for ZIKV infection. ZIKV infectivity was confirmed in all 3 cell types by means of immunofluorescence staining, RT-PCR, and qRT-PCR, and qRT-PCR analysis revealed increased transcriptional induction of interleukin 1β, interferon β, and RANTES in ZIKV-infected podocytes at 72 hours, compared with renal GECs and mesangial cells. The findings of this study support the notion that the glomerulus may serve as an amplification reservoir for ZIKV in the renal compartment. The impact of ZIKV infection in the human renal compartment is unknown and will require further study.

  2. Cell Cycle-independent Role of Cyclin D3 in Host Restriction of Influenza Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ying; Mok, Chris Ka-Pun; Chan, Michael Chi Wai; Zhang, Yang; Nal, Béatrice; Kien, François; Bruzzone, Roberto; Sanyal, Sumana

    2017-01-01

    To identify new host factors that modulate the replication of influenza A virus, we performed a yeast two-hybrid screen using the cytoplasmic tail of matrix protein 2 from the highly pathogenic H5N1 strain. The screen revealed a high-score interaction with cyclin D3, a key regulator of cell cycle early G1 phase. M2-cyclin D3 interaction was validated through GST pull-down and recapitulated in influenza A/WSN/33-infected cells. Knockdown of Ccnd3 by small interfering RNA significantly enhanced virus progeny titers in cell culture supernatants. Interestingly, the increase in virus production was due to cyclin D3 deficiency per se and not merely a consequence of cell cycle deregulation. A combined knockdown of Ccnd3 and Rb1, which rescued cell cycle progression into S phase, failed to normalize virus production. Infection by influenza A virus triggered redistribution of cyclin D3 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, followed by its proteasomal degradation. When overexpressed in HEK 293T cells, cyclin D3 impaired binding of M2 with M1, which is essential for proper assembly of progeny virions, lending further support to its role as a putative restriction factor. Our study describes the identification and characterization of cyclin D3 as a novel interactor of influenza A virus M2 protein. We hypothesize that competitive inhibition of M1-M2 interaction by cyclin D3 impairs infectious virion formation and results in attenuated virus production. In addition, we provide mechanistic insights into the dynamic interplay of influenza virus with the host cell cycle machinery during infection. PMID:28130444

  3. Influence of Epstein-Barr virus infection in adult T-cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Satomi; Maeda, Yasuhiro; Yamaguchi, Terufumi; Hanamoto, Hitoshi; Hijikata, Yasuki; Tanaka, Miyako; Takai, Shunsuke; Hirase, Chikara; Morita, Yasuyoshi; Kanamaru, Akihisa

    2008-06-01

    The involvement of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells in organs such as the skin and lymph nodes is observed in about 50% of cases of ATL. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection has often been observed in the clinical course of ATL. In this study, we established two B-cell lines from peripheral blood of patients with ATL. EBV DNA, proviral DNA for HTLV-1 and Tax mRNA were detected in both lines. As part of the characterization of these cells, an enhanced expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) (CD54) or ICAM-3 (ICAM-3) (CD50), lymphocyte function-1 (LFA-1) (CD11a/CD18), and Mac-1 (CD11b/CD18) was observed. To investigate the role of the interaction of these viruses, we transfected EBV and/or HTLV-1 into a healthy donor's lymphocytes, an EBV-infected B cell line, Raji, and a HTLV-1 negative T-cell line, Jurkat. Enhanced expression of adhesion molecules was also observed in double transfectants (EBV and HTLV-1). In the clinical course of ATL, LMP-1, EBNA-2, CD50 and CD54 were detected in lymph nodes and skin specimens by immunohistochemical staining. Furthermore, high levels of interleukin-4 (IL-4) were detected in these cell lines and transfectants. The results indicated that coinfection with HTLV-1 and EBV may induce aggressive organ involvement through the enhanced expression of adhesion molecules via IL-4 signaling. A new mechanism of ATL involvement is discussed.

  4. NK cell immunophenotypic and genotypic analysis of infants with severe respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noyola, Daniel E; Juárez-Vega, Guillermo; Monjarás-Ávila, César; Escalante-Padrón, Francisco; Rangel-Ramírez, Verónica; Cadena-Mota, Sandra; Monsiváis-Urenda, Adriana; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A; González-Amaro, Roberto

    2015-07-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants. Reduced numbers of NK cells have been reported in infants with severe RSV infection; however, the precise role of NK cells during acute RSV infection is unclear. In this study the NK and T cell phenotypes, LILRB1 gene polymorphisms and KIR genotypes of infants hospitalized with RSV infection were analyzed. Compared to controls, infants with acute RSV infection showed a higher proportion of LILRB1+ T cells; in addition, a subgroup of infants with RSV infection showed an increase in LILRB1+ NK cells. No differences in NKG2C, NKG2A, or CD161 expression between RSV infected infants and controls were observed. LILRB1 genotype distribution of the rs3760860 A>G, and rs3760861 A>G single nucleotide polymorphisms differed between infants with RSV infection and healthy donors, whereas no differences in any of the KIR genes were observed. Our results suggest that LILRB1 participates in the pathogenesis of RSV infection. Further studies are needed to define the role of LILRB1+ NK in response to RSV and to confirm an association between LILRB1 polymorphisms and the risk of severe RSV infection. © 2015 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. Influence of cellular trafficking pathway on bluetongue virus infection in ovine cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Bishnupriya; Celma, Cristina C; Roy, Polly

    2015-05-13

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), a non-enveloped arbovirus, causes hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. However, the influence of natural host cell proteins on BTV replication process is not defined. In addition to cell lysis, BTV also exits non-ovine cultured cells by non-lytic pathways mediated by nonstructural protein NS3 that interacts with virus capsid and cellular proteins belonging to calpactin and ESCRT family. The PPXY late domain motif known to recruit NEDD4 family of HECT ubiquitin E3 ligases is also highly conserved in NS3. In this study using a mixture of molecular, biochemical and microscopic techniques we have analyzed the importance of ovine cellular proteins and vesicles in BTV infection. Electron microscopic analysis of BTV infected ovine cells demonstrated close association of mature particles with intracellular vesicles. Inhibition of Multi Vesicular Body (MVB) resident lipid phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate resulted in decreased total virus titre suggesting that the vesicles might be MVBs. Proteasome mediated inhibition of ubiquitin or modification of virus lacking the PPXY in NS3 reduced virus growth. Thus, our study demonstrated that cellular components comprising of MVB and exocytic pathways proteins are involved in BTV replication in ovine cells.

  6. Human borna disease virus infection impacts host proteome and histone lysine acetylation in human oligodendroglia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Zhao, Libo; Yang, Yongtao; Bode, Liv; Huang, Hua; Liu, Chengyu; Huang, Rongzhong; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Xiao; Zhang, Lujun; Liu, Siwen; Zhou, Jingjing; Li, Xin; He, Tieming; Cheng, Zhongyi; Xie, Peng

    2014-09-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) replicates in the nucleus and establishes persistent infections in mammalian hosts. A human BDV strain was used to address the first time, how BDV infection impacts the proteome and histone lysine acetylation (Kac) of human oligodendroglial (OL) cells, thus allowing a better understanding of infection-driven pathophysiology in vitro. Proteome and histone lysine acetylation were profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Histone acetylation changes were validated by biochemistry assays. Post BDV infection, 4383 quantifiable differential proteins were identified and functionally annotated to metabolism pathways, immune response, DNA replication, DNA repair, and transcriptional regulation. Sixteen of the thirty identified Kac sites in core histones presented altered acetylation levels post infection. BDV infection using a human strain impacted the whole proteome and histone lysine acetylation in OL cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Polymer based biosensor for rapid electrochemical detection of virus infection of human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiilerich-Pedersen, Katrine; Poulsen, Claus R.; Jain, Titoo

    2011-01-01

    The demand in the field of medical diagnostics for simple, cost efficient and disposable devices is growing. Here, we present a label free, all-polymer electrochemical biosensor for detection of acute viral disease. The dynamics of a viral infection in human cell culture was investigated in a micro...... fluidic system on conductive polymer PEDOT:TsO microelectrodes by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and video time lapse microscopy.Employing this sensitive, real time electrochemical technique, we could measure the immediate cell response to cytomegalovirus, and detect an infection within 3h, which...

  8. Protection against bovine leukosis virus infection in sheep with the BL 20 bovine lymphoblastoid cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D H; Lucas, M H; Sands, J; Wibberley, G

    1982-11-01

    The bovine lymphoblastoid BL 20 cell line derived from a case of sporadic bovine leukosis when inoculated into sheep did not induce an antibody response directed against bovine leukosis virus (BLV) structural proteins. Sheep were inoculated twice with the BL 20 cell line and then challenged with BLV infected lymphocytes. Three out of four sheep challenged four weeks after BL 20 inoculation did not develop BLV antibodies. Of the 12 sheep challenged later, three sheep did not develop BLV antibodies. BLV was isolated from all the seropositive animals and from none of the seronegative animals.

  9. Epstein–Barr Virus Infection of Mammary Epithelial Cells Promotes Malignant Transformation

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    Hai Hu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Whether the human tumor virus, Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV, promotes breast cancer remains controversial and a potential mechanism has remained elusive. Here we show that EBV can infect primary mammary epithelial cells (MECs that express the receptor CD21. EBV infection leads to the expansion of early MEC progenitor cells with a stem cell phenotype, activates MET signaling and enforces a differentiation block. When MECs were implanted as xenografts, EBV infection cooperated with activated Ras and accelerated the formation of breast cancer. Infection in EBV-related tumors was of a latency type II pattern, similar to nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. A human gene expression signature for MECs infected with EBV, termed EBVness, was associated with high grade, estrogen-receptor-negative status, p53 mutation and poor survival. In 11/33 EBVness-positive tumors, EBV-DNA was detected by fluorescent in situ hybridization for the viral LMP1 and BXLF2 genes. In an analysis of the TCGA breast cancer data EBVness correlated with the presence of the APOBEC mutational signature. We conclude that a contribution of EBV to breast cancer etiology is plausible, through a mechanism in which EBV infection predisposes mammary epithelial cells to malignant transformation, but is no longer required once malignant transformation has occurred.

  10. Deep sequencing of virus-infected cells reveals HIV-encoded small RNAs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schopman, Nick C. T.; Willemsen, Marcel; Liu, Ying Poi; Bradley, Ted; van Kampen, Antoine; Baas, Frank; Berkhout, Ben; Haasnoot, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Small virus-derived interfering RNAs (viRNAs) play an important role in antiviral defence in plants, insects and nematodes by triggering the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway. The role of RNAi as an antiviral defence mechanism in mammalian cells has been obscure due to the lack of viRNA detection.

  11. Active Epstein-Barr virus infection after allogeneic stem cell transplantation : re-infection or reactivation?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E; Spijkers, S; Moschatsis, S; Boland, GJ; Thijsen, SFT; van Loon, AM; Verdonck, LF

    Recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplants (SCT) often show active Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection, which may progress to EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. It is not known whether these EBV infections are true reactivations of the endogenous EBV strain or re-infections with an

  12. Pandemic Influenza A (H1N1) Virus Infection Increases Apoptosis and HIV-1 Replication in HIV-1 Infected Jurkat Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xue; Tan, Jiying; Biswas, Santanu; Zhao, Jiangqin; Devadas, Krishnakumar; Ye, Zhiping; Hewlett, Indira

    2016-02-02

    Influenza virus infection has a significant impact on public health, since it is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. It is not well-known whether influenza virus infection affects cell death and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication in HIV-1-infected patients. Using a lymphoma cell line, Jurkat, we examined the in vitro effects of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) virus (pH1N1) infection on cell death and HIV-1 RNA production in infected cells. We found that pH1N1 infection increased apoptotic cell death through Fas and Bax-mediated pathways in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells. Infection with pH1N1 virus could promote HIV-1 RNA production by activating host transcription factors including nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-ĸB), nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) and activator protein 1 (AP-1) through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways and T-cell antigen receptor (TCR)-related pathways. The replication of HIV-1 latent infection could be reactivated by pH1N1 infection through TCR and apoptotic pathways. These data indicate that HIV-1 replication can be activated by pH1N1 virus in HIV-1-infected cells resulting in induction of cell death through apoptotic pathways.

  13. Dendritic Cells as Danger-Recognizing Biosensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seokmann Hong

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are antigen presenting cells that are characterized by a potent capacity to initiate immune responses. DCs comprise several subsets with distinct phenotypes. After sensing any danger(s to the host via their innate immune receptors such as Toll-like receptors, DCs become mature and subsequently present antigens to CD4+ T cells. Since DCs possess the intrinsic capacity to polarize CD4+ helper cells, it is critical to understand the immunological roles of DCs for clinical applications. Here, we review the different DC subsets, their danger-sensing receptors and immunological functions. Furthermore, the cytokine reporter mouse model for studying DC activation is introduced.

  14. Human natural killer cells prevent infectious mononucleosis features by targeting lytic Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chijioke, Obinna; Müller, Anne; Feederle, Regina; Barros, Mario Henrique M; Krieg, Carsten; Emmel, Vanessa; Marcenaro, Emanuela; Leung, Carol S; Antsiferova, Olga; Landtwing, Vanessa; Bossart, Walter; Moretta, Alessandro; Hassan, Rocio; Boyman, Onur; Niedobitek, Gerald; Delecluse, Henri-Jacques; Capaul, Riccarda; Münz, Christian

    2013-12-26

    Primary infection with the human oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) can result in infectious mononucleosis (IM), a self-limiting disease caused by massive lymphocyte expansion that predisposes for the development of distinct EBV-associated lymphomas. Why some individuals experience this symptomatic primary EBV infection, whereas the majority acquires the virus asymptomatically, remains unclear. Using a mouse model with reconstituted human immune system components, we show that depletion of human natural killer (NK) cells enhances IM symptoms and promotes EBV-associated tumorigenesis mainly because of a loss of immune control over lytic EBV infection. These data suggest that failure of innate immune control by human NK cells augments symptomatic lytic EBV infection, which drives lymphocyte expansion and predisposes for EBV-associated malignancies. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Induction of Stress Granule-Like Structures in Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Infected Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinh, Phat X.; Beura, Lalit K.; Das, Phani B.; Panda, Debasis; Das, Anshuman

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies from our laboratory revealed that cellular poly(C) binding protein 2 (PCBP2) downregulates vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) gene expression. We show here that VSV infection induces the formation of granular structures in the cytoplasm containing cellular RNA-binding proteins, including PCBP2, T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen 1 (TIA1), and TIA1-related protein (TIAR). Depletion of TIA1 via small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), but not depletion of TIAR, results in enhanced VSV growth and gene expression. The VSV-induced granules appear to be similar to the stress granules (SGs) generated in cells triggered by heat shock or oxidative stress but do not contain some of the bona fide SG markers, such as eukaryotic initiation factor 3 (eIF3) or eIF4A, or the processing body (PB) markers, such as mRNA-decapping enzyme 1A (DCP1a), and thus may not represent canonical SGs or PBs. Our results revealed that the VSV-induced granules, called SG-like structures here, contain the viral replicative proteins and RNAs. The formation and maintenance of the SG-like structures required viral replication and ongoing protein synthesis, but an intact cytoskeletal network was not necessary. These results suggest that cells respond to VSV infection by aggregating the antiviral proteins, such as PCBP2 and TIA1, to form SG-like structures. The functional significance of these SG-like structures in VSV-infected cells is currently under investigation. PMID:23077311

  16. Differential Responses of Human Fetal Brain Neural Stem Cells to Zika Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica L. McGrath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV infection causes microcephaly in a subset of infants born to infected pregnant mothers. It is unknown whether human individual differences contribute to differential susceptibility of ZIKV-related neuropathology. Here, we use an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain, isolated from the 2015 Mexican outbreak (Mex1-7, to infect primary human neural stem cells (hNSCs originally derived from three individual fetal brains. All three strains of hNSCs exhibited similar rates of Mex1-7 infection and reduced proliferation. However, Mex1-7 decreased neuronal differentiation in only two of the three stem cell strains. Correspondingly, ZIKA-mediated transcriptome alterations were similar in these two strains but significantly different from that of the third strain with no ZIKV-induced neuronal reduction. This study thus confirms that an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain infects primary hNSCs and demonstrates a cell-strain-dependent response of hNSCs to ZIKV infection.

  17. Differential Responses of Human Fetal Brain Neural Stem Cells to Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Erica L; Rossi, Shannan L; Gao, Junling; Widen, Steven G; Grant, Auston C; Dunn, Tiffany J; Azar, Sasha R; Roundy, Christopher M; Xiong, Ying; Prusak, Deborah J; Loucas, Bradford D; Wood, Thomas G; Yu, Yongjia; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; Weaver, Scott C; Vasilakis, Nikos; Wu, Ping

    2017-03-14

    Zika virus (ZIKV) infection causes microcephaly in a subset of infants born to infected pregnant mothers. It is unknown whether human individual differences contribute to differential susceptibility of ZIKV-related neuropathology. Here, we use an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain, isolated from the 2015 Mexican outbreak (Mex1-7), to infect primary human neural stem cells (hNSCs) originally derived from three individual fetal brains. All three strains of hNSCs exhibited similar rates of Mex1-7 infection and reduced proliferation. However, Mex1-7 decreased neuronal differentiation in only two of the three stem cell strains. Correspondingly, ZIKA-mediated transcriptome alterations were similar in these two strains but significantly different from that of the third strain with no ZIKV-induced neuronal reduction. This study thus confirms that an Asian-lineage ZIKV strain infects primary hNSCs and demonstrates a cell-strain-dependent response of hNSCs to ZIKV infection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A20 (Tnfaip3 deficiency in myeloid cells protects against influenza A virus infection.

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    Jonathan Maelfait

    Full Text Available The innate immune response provides the first line of defense against viruses and other pathogens by responding to specific microbial molecules. Influenza A virus (IAV produces double-stranded RNA as an intermediate during the replication life cycle, which activates the intracellular pathogen recognition receptor RIG-I and induces the production of proinflammatory cytokines and antiviral interferon. Understanding the mechanisms that regulate innate immune responses to IAV and other viruses is of key importance to develop novel therapeutic strategies. Here we used myeloid cell specific A20 knockout mice to examine the role of the ubiquitin-editing protein A20 in the response of myeloid cells to IAV infection. A20 deficient macrophages were hyperresponsive to double stranded RNA and IAV infection, as illustrated by enhanced NF-κB and IRF3 activation, concomitant with increased production of proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines and type I interferon. In vivo this was associated with an increased number of alveolar macrophages and neutrophils in the lungs of IAV infected mice. Surprisingly, myeloid cell specific A20 knockout mice are protected against lethal IAV infection. These results challenge the general belief that an excessive host proinflammatory response is associated with IAV-induced lethality, and suggest that under certain conditions inhibition of A20 might be of interest in the management of IAV infections.

  19. Interation of mRNA with proteins in vesicular stomatitis virus-infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, S.A.; Choi, Y.D.; Dreyfuss, G.

    1986-02-01

    The interaction of mRNA with proteins in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells was studied by photochemical cross-linking in intact cells. The major (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled proteins which became cross-linked by UV light to mRNA in uninfected and in VSV-infected HeLa cells were similar and had apparent mobilities in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis corresponding to 135, 93, 72, 68, 53, 50, 43, and 36 kilodaltons. The proteins which were cross-linked in vivo specifically to the five mRNAs of VSV were labeled through radioactive nucleotides incorporated only into VSV mRNAs under conditions in which only VSV mRNAs are labeled. The same major mRNP proteins that became cross-linked to host mRNAs also became cross-linked to VSV mRNAs, although several quantitative differences were detected. Photochemical cross-linking and immunoblotting of cross-linked mRNPs with VSV antiserum demonstrated that in addition to host proteins VSV mRNAs also became cross-linked to the VSV-encoded N protein. The poly(A) segment of both host and VSV mRNAs was associated in vivo selectively with the 72-kilodalton polypeptide. The major proteins of mRNA-ribonucleoprotein complexes are therefore ubiquitous and common to different mRNAs. Furthermore, since the major messenger ribonucleoproteins interact also with VSV mRNAs even though these mRNAs are transcribed in the cytoplasm, it appears that nuclear transcription and nucleocytoplasmic transport are not necessary for mRNA to interact with these proteins.

  20. Role of Dendritic Cells in Immune Dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savary, Cherylyn A.

    1997-01-01

    Specific aims include: (1) Application of the bioreactor to enhance cytokine-regulated proliferation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC); (2) Based on clues from spaceflight: compare the frequency and function of DC in normal donors and immunocompromised cancer patients; and (3) Initiate studies on the efficiency of cytokine therapy and DC-assisted immunotherapy (using bioreactor-expanded DC) in animal models of experimental fungal infections.

  1. Zika Virus Infects, Activates, and Crosses Brain Microvascular Endothelial Cells, without Barrier Disruption

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    Michelle P. Papa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV has been associated to central nervous system (CNS harm, and virus was detected in the brain and cerebrospinal fluids of microcephaly and meningoencephalitis cases. However, the mechanism by which the virus reaches the CNS is unclear. Here, we addressed the effects of ZIKV replication in human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs, as an in vitro model of blood brain barrier (BBB, and evaluated virus extravasation and BBB integrity in an in vivo mouse experimental model. HBMECs were productively infected by African and Brazilian ZIKV strains (ZIKVMR766 and ZIKVPE243, which induce increased production of type I and type III IFN, inflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Infection with ZIKVMR766 promoted earlier cellular death, in comparison to ZIKVPE243, but infection with either strain did not result in enhanced endothelial permeability. Despite the maintenance of endothelial integrity, infectious virus particles crossed the monolayer by endocytosis/exocytosis-dependent replication pathway or by transcytosis. Remarkably, both viruses' strains infected IFNAR deficient mice, with high viral load being detected in the brains, without BBB disruption, which was only detected at later time points after infection. These data suggest that ZIKV infects and activates endothelial cells, and might reach the CNS through basolateral release, transcytosis or transinfection processes. These findings further improve the current knowledge regarding ZIKV dissemination pathways.

  2. Inhibition of measles virus infections in cell cultures by peptide-conjugated morpholino oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sleeman, Katrina; Stein, David A; Tamin, Azaibi; Reddish, Michael; Iversen, Patrick L; Rota, Paul A

    2009-03-01

    Measles virus (MeV) is a highly contagious human pathogen. Despite the success of measles vaccination programs, measles is still responsible for an estimated 245,000 deaths each year. There are currently no antiviral compounds available for the treatment of measles. Peptide-conjugated phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PPMO) are antisense compounds that enter cells readily and can interfere with mRNA function by steric blocking. A panel of PPMO was designed to target various sequences of MeV RNA that are known to be important for viral replication. Five PPMO, targeting MeV genomic RNA or mRNA, inhibited the replication of MeV, in a dose-responsive and sequence-specific manner in cultured cells. One of the highly active PPMO (PPMO 454), targeting a conserved sequence in the translation start site of the mRNA coding for the nucleocapsid protein, inhibited multiple genotypes of MeV. This report provides evidence that PPMO treatment represents a promising approach for developing antiviral agents against measles and other paramyxoviruses.

  3. Borna disease virus infects human neural progenitor cells and impairs neurogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnic, Dragan; Stevanovic, Vladimir; Cochet, Marielle; Agier, Cécilia; Richardson, Jennifer; Montero-Menei, Claudia N; Milhavet, Ollivier; Eloit, Marc; Coulpier, Muriel

    2012-03-01

    Understanding the complex mechanisms by which infectious agents can disrupt behavior represents a major challenge. The Borna disease virus (BDV), a potential human pathogen, provides a unique model to study such mechanisms. Because BDV induces neurodegeneration in brain areas that are still undergoing maturation at the time of infection, we tested the hypothesis that BDV interferes with neurogenesis. We showed that human neural stem/progenitor cells are highly permissive to BDV, although infection does not alter their survival or undifferentiated phenotype. In contrast, upon the induction of differentiation, BDV is capable of severely impairing neurogenesis by interfering with the survival of newly generated neurons. Such impairment was specific to neurogenesis, since astrogliogenesis was unaltered. In conclusion, we demonstrate a new mechanism by which BDV might impair neural function and brain plasticity in infected individuals. These results may contribute to a better understanding of behavioral disorders associated with BDV infection.

  4. Electronic cigarette liquid increases inflammation and virus infection in primary human airway epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qun Wu

    Full Text Available The use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes is rapidly increasing in the United States, especially among young people since e-cigarettes have been perceived as a safer alternative to conventional tobacco cigarettes. However, the scientific evidence regarding the human health effects of e-cigarettes on the lung is extremely limited. The major goal of our current study is to determine if e-cigarette use alters human young subject airway epithelial functions such as inflammatory response and innate immune defense against respiratory viral (i.e., human rhinovirus, HRV infection.We examined the effects of e-cigarette liquid (e-liquid on pro-inflammatory cytokine (e.g., IL-6 production, HRV infection and host defense molecules (e.g., short palate, lung, and nasal epithelium clone 1, SPLUNC1 in primary human airway epithelial cells from young healthy non-smokers. Additionally, we examined the role of SPLUNC1 in lung defense against HRV infection using a SPLUNC1 knockout mouse model. We found that nicotine-free e-liquid promoted IL-6 production and HRV infection. Addition of nicotine into e-liquid further amplified the effects of nicotine-free e-liquid. Moreover, SPLUNC1 deficiency in mice significantly increased lung HRV loads. E-liquid inhibited SPLUNC1 expression in primary human airway epithelial cells. These findings strongly suggest the deleterious health effects of e-cigarettes in the airways of young people. Our data will guide future studies to evaluate the impact of e-cigarettes on lung health in human populations, and help inform the public about potential health risks of e-cigarettes.

  5. IRF9 Prevents CD8+T Cell Exhaustion in an Extrinsic Manner during Acute Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Magdalena; Suprunenko, Tamara; Ashhurst, Thomas; Marbach, Felix; Raifer, Hartmann; Wolff, Svenja; Strecker, Thomas; Viengkhou, Barney; Jung, So Ri; Obermann, Hannah-Lena; Bauer, Stefan; Xu, Haifeng C; Lang, Philipp A; Tom, Adomati; Lang, Karl S; King, Nicholas J C; Campbell, Iain L; Hofer, Markus J

    2017-11-15

    Effective CD8 + T cell responses play an important role in determining the course of a viral infection. Overwhelming antigen exposure can result in suboptimal CD8 + T cell responses, leading to chronic infection. This altered CD8 + T cell differentiation state, termed exhaustion, is characterized by reduced effector function, upregulation of inhibitory receptors, and altered expression of transcription factors. Prevention of overwhelming antigen exposure to limit CD8 + T cell exhaustion is of significant interest for the control of chronic infection. The transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) is a component of type I interferon (IFN-I) signaling downstream of the IFN-I receptor (IFNAR). Using acute infection of mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) strain Armstrong, we show here that IRF9 limited early LCMV replication by regulating expression of interferon-stimulated genes and IFN-I and by controlling levels of IRF7, a transcription factor essential for IFN-I production. Infection of IRF9- or IFNAR-deficient mice led to a loss of early restriction of viral replication and impaired antiviral responses in dendritic cells, resulting in CD8 + T cell exhaustion and chronic infection. Differences in the antiviral activities of IRF9- and IFNAR-deficient mice and dendritic cells provided further evidence of IRF9-independent IFN-I signaling. Thus, our findings illustrate a CD8 + T cell-extrinsic function for IRF9, as a signaling factor downstream of IFNAR, in preventing overwhelming antigen exposure resulting in CD8 + T cell exhaustion and, ultimately, chronic infection. IMPORTANCE During early viral infection, overwhelming antigen exposure can cause functional exhaustion of CD8 + T cells and lead to chronic infection. Here we show that the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 9 (IRF9) plays a decisive role in preventing CD8 + T cell exhaustion. Using acute infection of mice with LCMV strain Armstrong, we found that IRF9

  6. Aptamers targeting rabies virus-infected cells inhibit street rabies virus in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Hong-Ru; Hu, Gui-Qiu; Li, Ling; Gao, Yu-Wei; Yang, Song-Tao; Xia, Xian-Zhu

    2014-08-01

    Rabies is a viral infection of the CNS that is almost always fatal once symptoms occur. No effective treatment of the disease is available and novel antiviral strategies are urgently required. Street rabies viruses are field isolates known to be highly neurotropic. Aptamers are single-stranded oligonucleotides that bind their targets with high affinity and specificity and thus have potential for use in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In this study, we demonstrate that the aptamers FO24 and FO21, which target RABV-infected cells, can significantly protect mice from a lethal dose of the street rabies virus FJ strain in vivo. Groups receiving preexposure prophylaxis had higher survival rates than the groups receiving postexposure prophylaxis. When mice were inoculated with aptamers (4 nmol) for 24h by intracranial or intramuscular injection prior to intramuscular inoculation with the FJ strain, approximately 60% of the mice survived. These results indicate that the FO21 and FO24 aptamers may be used to develop preventative antiviral therapy against rabies disease. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Injection drug use facilitates hepatitis C virus infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resti, Massimo; Azzari, Chiara; Moriondo, Maria; Betti, Letizia; Sforzi, Idanna; Novembre, Elio; Vierucci, Alberto

    2002-08-01

    Infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been demonstrated and has been found to play a role in relapse of HCV disease and vertical transmission of HCV. Injection drug use is thought to impair function of the immune system and induce tolerance to viruses; therefore, HCV infection of PBMCs could be more likely to occur in injection drug users (IDUs) with HCV infection. Of 108 women who tested negative for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and positive for HCV RNA, 51 had a history of injection drug use and 57 had no known risk factor for HCV infection. HCV infection was found, by nested reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis, in the PBMCs of 33 IDUs and of 13 non-IDUs (P=.00003). No correlation was found between infection of the PBMCs and HCV genotype or virus load. Route of transmission and viral factors, as well as immunologic dysfunction, may play a role in viral tropism.

  8. No evidence of human papilloma virus infection in basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yalda Nahidi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common skin cancer among whites, and several risk factors have been discussed in itsdevelopment and progress. Detection of human papilloma virus (HPV deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA BCCs in some studies suggests that the virus may play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Several molecular studies showed conflicting reports. Aims: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between HPV and BCC using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Materials and Methods: HPV DNA detection was done for 42 paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of BCC and 42 normal skin samples around the lesions by PCR using GP5+/GP6+ primers. Results: HPV DNA was not found in any of the 42 samples of BCC, and only one normal skin sample around the lesions was positive for HPV DNA by PCR. Conclusion: In this study, no statistically significant difference was seen between the presence of HPV DNA in BCC and normal skin around the lesion, and HPV is not likely to have an important role in pathogenesis of BCC.

  9. Multiple human papilloma virus infections predominant in squamous cell cervical carcinoma in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edhyana Sahiratmadja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Persistent infection of high risk genotypes of human papilloma virus (hrHPV has been established as the etiological cause for cervical cancer, and the most prevalent genotypes that infect the cervical tissue are HPV-16 and HPV-18. However, HPV genotype profile has been shown to differ according to geographical distribution across the globe. The present study aimed to determine the HPV genotype distribution in cervical cancer patients from Bandung, Indonesia. METHODS During the period of July – November 2010 viral DNA was extracted from randomly chosen cervical cancer biopsies and subjected to genotype determination using the diagnostic linear array genotyping test (Roche. The distribution of HPV genotypes was explored and the prevalence of HPV genotypes was mapped. RESULTS Of 96 cervical cancer tissue samples, 76 (79.2% were histopathologically classified as squamous cell cervical carcinoma. Due to the high cost of HPV genotyping tests, only twenty-five samples were randomly genotyped. Almost 90% of the cervical cancer patients were multiply infected with HPV-16 in combination with HPV-18, HPV-45, or HPV-52. The HPV-16 genotype had the highest prevalence, all samples being infected with HPV-16. CONCLUSION The cervical cancer cases were predominantly infected by multiple hrHPVs with HPV-16 as the major genotype among other hrHPVs, supporting the carcinogenic role of this hrHPV. Therefore, screening for hrHPVs in the general population is urgently needed as a means of early detection of cervical cancer.

  10. Multiple human papilloma virus infections predominant in squamous cell cervical carcinoma in Bandung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edhyana Sahiratmadja

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Persistent infection of high risk genotypes of human papilloma virus (hrHPV has been established as the etiological cause for cervical cancer, and the most prevalent genotypes that infect the cervical tissue are HPV-16 and HPV-18. However, HPV genotype profile has been shown to differ according to geographical distribution across the globe. The present study aimed to determine the HPV genotype distribution in cervical cancer patients from Bandung, Indonesia. Methods During the period of July – November 2010 viral DNA was extracted from randomly chosen cervical cancer biopsies and subjected to genotype determination using the diagnostic linear array genotyping test (Roche. The distribution of HPV genotypes was explored and the prevalence of HPV genotypes was mapped. Results Of 96 cervical cancer tissue samples, 76 (79.2% were histopathologically classified as squamous cell cervical carcinoma. Due to the high cost of HPV genotyping tests, only twenty-five samples were randomly genotyped. Almost 90% of the cervical cancer patients were multiply infected with HPV-16 in combination with HPV-18, HPV-45, or HPV-52. The HPV-16 genotype had the highest prevalence, all samples being infected with HPV-16. Conclusion The cervical cancer cases were predominantly infected by multiple hrHPVs with HPV-16 as the major genotype among other hrHPVs, supporting the carcinogenic role of this hrHPV. Therefore, screening for hrHPVs in the general population is urgently needed as a means of early detection of cervical cancer.

  11. L-selectin Is Essential for Delivery of Activated CD8+ T Cells to Virus-Infected Organs for Protective Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Rebar N.; Watson, H. Angharad; Vigar, Miriam; Ohme, Julia; Thomson, Amanda; Humphreys, Ian R.; Ager, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Summary Cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes play a critical role in the host response to infection by viruses. The ability to secrete cytotoxic chemicals and cytokines is considered pivotal for eliminating virus. Of equal importance is how effector CD8+ T cells home to virus-infected tissues. L-selectin has not been considered important for effector T cell homing, because levels are low on activated T cells. We report here that, although L-selectin expression is downregulated following T cell priming in lymph nodes, L-selectin is re-expressed on activated CD8+ T cells entering the bloodstream, and recruitment of activated CD8+ T cells from the bloodstream into virus-infected tissues is L-selectin dependent. Furthermore, L-selectin on effector CD8+ T cells confers protective immunity to two evolutionally distinct viruses, vaccinia and influenza, which infect mucosal and visceral organs, respectively. These results connect homing and a function of virus-specific CD8+ T cells to a single molecule, L-selectin. PMID:26804910

  12. Aedes aegypti saliva alters leukocyte recruitment and cytokine signaling by antigen-presenting cells during West Nile virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley S Schneider

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV is transmitted during mosquito bloodfeeding. Consequently, the first vertebrate cells to contact WNV are cells in the skin, followed by those in the draining lymph node. Macrophages and dendritic cells are critical early responders in host defense against WNV infection, not just because of their role in orchestrating the immune response, but also because of their importance as sites of early peripheral viral replication. Antigen-presenting cell (APC signals have a profound effect on host antiviral responses and disease severity. During transmission, WNV is intimately associated with mosquito saliva. Due to the ability of mosquito saliva to affect inflammation and immune responses, and the importance of understanding early events in WNV infection, we investigated whether mosquito saliva alters APC signaling during arbovirus infection, and if alterations in cell recruitment occur when WNV infection is initiated with mosquito saliva. Accordingly, experiments were performed with cultured dendritic cells and macrophages, flow cytometry was used to characterize infiltrating cell types in the skin and lymph nodes during early infection, and real-time RT-PCR was employed to evaluate virus and cytokine levels. Our in vitro results suggest that mosquito saliva significantly decreases the expression of interferon-beta and inducible nitric oxide synthase in macrophages (by as much as 50 and 70%, respectively, whilst transiently enhancing interleukin-10 (IL-10 expression. In vivo results indicate that the predominate effect of mosquito feeding is to significantly reduce the recruitment of T cells, leading the inoculation site of mice exposed to WNV alone to have up to 2.8 fold more t cells as mice infected in the presence of mosquito saliva. These shifts in cell population are associated with significantly elevated IL-10 and WNV (up to 4.0 and 10 fold, respectively in the skin and draining lymph nodes. These results suggest that mosquito

  13. Sterilizing immunity to influenza virus infection requires local antigen-specific T cell response in the lungs

    OpenAIRE

    Avijit Dutta; Ching-Tai Huang; Chun-Yen Lin; Tse-Ching Chen; Yung-Chang Lin; Chia-Shiang Chang; Yueh-Chia He

    2016-01-01

    Sterilizing immunity is a unique immune status, which prevents effective virus infection into the host. It is different from the immunity that allows infection but with subsequent successful eradication of the virus. Pre-infection induces sterilizing immunity to homologous influenza virus challenge in ferret. In our antigen-specific experimental system, mice pre-infected with PR8 influenza virus through nasal route are likewise resistant to reinfection of the same strain of virus. The virus i...

  14. Intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes exert potent protective cytotoxic activity during an acute virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, S; Bühler-Jungo, M; Mueller, C

    2000-02-15

    After systemic infection of mice with 104 PFU of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV), infected cells are detected simultaneously in various organs, including spleen and intestinal mucosa. Most notably, virus-infected cells are also present among CD11c+ dendritic cells in the subepithelial area of the small intestinal mucosa. Some of these virus-infected cells are in close spatial association with intestinal intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL). Therefore, we compared virus-specific cytotoxic activity of CD8 splenocytes with that of IEL subsets. While ex vivo isolated TCRalphabeta+CD8alphaalpha+ IEL exert only minimal virus-specific cytotoxicity, maximum specific killing mediated by TCRalphabeta+CD8alphabeta+ IEL on day 8 postinfection exceeds maximum cytotoxic activity observed with CD8 splenocytes when assessed in vitro. Maximum cytotoxic activity of IEL is preceded by peak perforin and granzyme B mRNA expression in IEL around day 6 postinfection, suggesting a recent activation in situ. The antivirus cytotoxicity of in vivo primed IEL is further demonstrated by the protection from virus production in the spleen of mice infected with LCMV 10 h before adoptive cell transfer. These data indicate a potent priming of LCMV-specific IEL in situ after systemic LCMV infection and suggest that cytotoxic IEL markedly contribute to the elimination of virus-infected cells in the intestinal mucosa.

  15. [Dendritic cells in cancer immunotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gato, M; Liechtenstein, T; Blanco-Luquín, I; Zudaire, M I; Kochan, G; Escors, D

    2015-01-01

    Since the beginning of the 20th century, biomedical scientists have tried to take advantage of the natural anti-cancer activities of the immune system. However, all the scientific and medical efforts dedicated to this have not resulted in the expected success. In fact, classical antineoplastic treatments such as surgery, radio and chemotherapy are still first line treatments. Even so, there is a quantity of experimental evidence demonstrating that cancer cells are immunogenic. However, the effective activation of anti-cancer T cell responses closely depends on an efficient antigen presentation carried out by professional antigen presenting cells such as DC. Although there are a number of strategies to strengthen antigen presentation by DC, anti-cancer immunotherapy is not as effective as we would expect according to preclinical data accumulated in recent decades. We do not aim to make an exhaustive review of DC immunotherapy here, which is an extensive research subject already dealt with in many specialised reviews. Instead, we present the experimental approaches undertaken by our group over the last decade, by modifying DC to improve their anti-tumour capacities.

  16. Killer dendritic cells: IKDC and the others.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonmort, Mathieu; Dalod, Marc; Mignot, Grégoire; Ullrich, Evelyn; Chaput, Nathalie; Zitvogel, Laurence

    2008-10-01

    Tumors can regress as a result of invading myeloid and lymphoid cells that act in concert. Although the myeloid cells are widely recognized as antigen presenters and lymphoid cells as classical effectors, recent evidence revealed the capacity of dendritic cells (DC) to kill tumor cells. The functional concept of 'natural killer (NK) myeloid DC' is supported by mouse and human in vitro data that may be clinically relevant because human killer DC can contribute to tumor shrinking during topical therapy with toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists. Whether tumor killing by DC is a 'catalyzing' step for efficient crosspresentation and/or a promoting step for an immunogenic cell death pathway remains an open question. We also discuss how interferon-producing killer DC (IKDC) may participate in the control of tumor progression.

  17. Proteomic profiling of chikungunya virus-infected human muscle cells: reveal the role of cytoskeleton network in CHIKV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Too Horng Khit; Tan, Eng Lee; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2014-08-28

    information on our understanding on the mechanisms of virus infection and its dependency of host proteins for replication. In light of the muscle-related clinical manifestations of myositis resulting from CHIKV-infection, human rhabdomyosarcoma cells, SJCRH30 were utilized in this protein profiling study, in order to decipher the pathogenesis of CHIKV. This study has identified an arrays of host proteins that are differentially regulated upon CHIKV infection including that of the cytoskeletal protein, vimentin that plays significant role in aiding the replication of CHIKV within the host cells through 2DE assay. Immunofluorescence assay further shows that the novel interaction between cytoskeleton structure and CHIKV replication complex by forming an intercalating network around the replication complexes and facilitating various stages of the virus life cycle. This novel finding has inevitably led to a deeper understanding of CHIKV pathogenesis in revealing the importance of host proteins during CHIKV replication, as well as contributing to the development of specific antiviral strategies against this medically important viral pathogen. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of immunity in post-exposure vaccination against Ebola virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven B Bradfute

    Full Text Available Ebolaviruses can cause severe hemorrhagic fever that is characterized by rapid viral replication, coagulopathy, inflammation, and high lethality rates. Although there is no clinically proven vaccine or treatment for Ebola virus infection, a virus-like particle (VLP vaccine is effective in mice, guinea pigs, and non-human primates when given pre-infection. In this work, we report that VLPs protect Ebola virus-infected mice when given 24 hours post-infection. Analysis of cytokine expression in serum revealed a decrease in pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine levels in mice given VLPs post-exposure compared to infected, untreated mice. Using knockout mice, we show that VLP-mediated post-exposure protection requires perforin, B cells, macrophages, conventional dendritic cells (cDCs, and either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. Protection was Ebola virus-specific, as marburgvirus VLPs did not protect Ebola virus-infected mice. Increased antibody production in VLP-treated mice correlated with protection, and macrophages were required for this increased production. However, NK cells, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha were not required for post-exposure-mediated protection. These data suggest that a non-replicating Ebola virus vaccine can provide post-exposure protection and that the mechanisms of immune protection in this setting require both increased antibody production and generation of cytotoxic T cells.

  19. Turnover rates of B cells, T cells, and NK cells in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Mohri, H.; Ho, D.D.; Perelson, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    We determined average cellular turnover rates by fitting mathematical models to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine measurements in SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. The daily turnover rates of CD4(+) T cells, CD4(-) T cells, CD20(+) B cells, and CD16(+) NK cells in normal uninfected rhesus macaques

  20. Immune monitoring using mRNA-transfected dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Troels Holz; Svane, Inge Marie; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are known to be the most potent antigen presenting cell in the immune system and are used as cellular adjuvants in therapeutic anticancer vaccines using various tumor-associated antigens or their derivatives. One way of loading antigen into the dendritic cells is by m......RNA electroporation, ensuring presentation of antigen through major histocompatibility complex I and potentially activating T cells, enabling them to kill the tumor cells. Despite extensive research in the field, only one dendritic cell-based vaccine has been approved. There is therefore a great need to elucidate...... and understand the immunological impact of dendritic cell vaccination in order to improve clinical benefit. In this chapter, we describe a method for performing immune monitoring using peripheral blood mononuclear cells and autologous dendritic cells transfected with tumor-associated antigen-encoding mRNA....

  1. Targeting vaccines to dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foged, Camilla; Sundblad, Anne; Hovgaard, Lars

    2002-01-01

    to be far superior to that of B-cells and macrophages. DC are localized at strategic places in the body at sites used by pathogens to enter the organism, and are thereby in an optimal position to capture antigens. In general, vaccination strategies try to mimic the invasiveness of the pathogens. DC...... are considered to play a central role for the provocation of primary immune responses by vaccination. A rational way of improving the potency and safety of new and already existing vaccines could therefore be to direct vaccines specifically to DC. There is a need for developing multifunctional vaccine drug...... delivery systems (DDS) with adjuvant effect that target DC directly and induce optimal immune responses. This paper will review the current knowledge of DC physiology as well as the progress in the field of novel vaccination strategies that directly or indirectly aim at targeting DC....

  2. Targeting dendritic cells--why bother?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutz, Martin; Tacken, Paul J; Figdor, Carl G

    2013-04-11

    Vaccination is among the most efficient forms of immunotherapy. Although sometimes inducing lifelong protective B-cell responses, T-cell-mediated immunity remains challenging. Targeting antigen to dendritic cells (DCs) is an extensively explored concept aimed at improving cellular immunity. The identification of various DC subsets with distinct functional characteristics now allows for the fine-tuning of targeting strategies. Although some of these DC subsets are regarded as superior for (cross-) priming of naive T cells, controversies still remain about which subset represents the best target for immunotherapy. Because targeting the antigen alone may not be sufficient to obtain effective T-cell responses, delivery systems have been developed to target multiple vaccine components to DCs. In this Perspective, we discuss the pros and cons of targeting DCs: if targeting is beneficial at all and which vaccine vehicles and immunization routes represent promising strategies to reach and activate DCs.

  3. Dendritic cell-tumor cell hybrids and immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cathelin, Dominique; Nicolas, Alexandra; Bouchot, André

    2011-01-01

    still require optimization. An alternative technique for providing antigens to DC consists of the direct fusion of dendritic cells with tumor cells. These resulting hybrid cells may express both major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules associated with tumor antigens...... to inducing hybrid formation by expression of viral fusogenic membrane glycoproteins....

  4. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia in a Black Malian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... adhesion molecule 1) by blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms. JAMA Dermatology 2014;150:73‑6. 11. Goren Sahin D, Akay OM, Uskudar Teke H, Andic N, Gunduz E. Gulbas Z. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia successfully treated by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation ...

  5. A temporal role of type I interferon signaling in CD8+ T cell maturation during acute West Nile virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia K Pinto

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A genetic absence of the common IFN-α/β signaling receptor (IFNAR in mice is associated with enhanced viral replication and altered adaptive immune responses. However, analysis of IFNAR(-/- mice is limited for studying the functions of type I IFN at discrete stages of viral infection. To define the temporal functions of type I IFN signaling in the context of infection by West Nile virus (WNV, we treated mice with MAR1-5A3, a neutralizing, non cell-depleting anti-IFNAR antibody. Inhibition of type I IFN signaling at or before day 2 after infection was associated with markedly enhanced viral burden, whereas treatment at day 4 had substantially less effect on WNV dissemination. While antibody treatment prior to infection resulted in massive expansion of virus-specific CD8(+ T cells, blockade of type I IFN signaling starting at day 4 induced dysfunctional CD8(+ T cells with depressed cytokine responses and expression of phenotypic markers suggesting exhaustion. Thus, only the later maturation phase of anti-WNV CD8(+ T cell development requires type I IFN signaling. WNV infection experiments in BATF3(-/- mice, which lack CD8-α dendritic cells and have impaired priming due to inefficient antigen cross-presentation, revealed a similar effect of blocking IFN signaling on CD8(+ T cell maturation. Collectively, our results suggest that cell non-autonomous type I IFN signaling shapes maturation of antiviral CD8(+ T cell response at a stage distinct from the initial priming event.

  6. Gliadin fragments promote migration of dendritic cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chládková, Barbara; Kamanová, Jana; Palová-Jelínková, Lenka; Cinová, Jana; Šebo, Peter; Tučková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 15, č. 4 (2011), 938-948 ISSN 1582-1838 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA310/07/0414; GA ČR GD310/08/H077; GA ČR GA310/08/0447; GA AV ČR IAA500200801; GA AV ČR IAA500200914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : celiac disease * gliadin * dendritic cell Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 4.125, year: 2011

  7. Viruses, dendritic cells and the lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graham Barney S

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The interaction between viruses and dendritic cells (DCs is varied and complex. DCs are key elements in the development of a host response to pathogens such as viruses, but viruses have developed survival tactics to either evade or diminish the immune system that functions to kill and eliminate these micro-organisms. In the present review we summarize current concepts regarding the function of DCs in the immune system, our understanding of how viruses alter DC function to attenuate both the virus-specific and global immune response, and how we may be able to exploit DC function to prevent or treat viral infections.

  8. Inhibition of ERK and proliferation in NK cell lines by soluble HLA-E released from Japanese encephalitis virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shwetank; Date, Onkar Sanjay; Carbone, Ennio; Manjunath, Ramanathapuram

    2014-11-01

    Productive infection of human endothelial cells with Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a single stranded RNA virus induces shedding of sHLA-E. We show here that sHLA-E that is released upon infection with this flavivirus can inhibit IL-2 and PMA mediated ERK 1/2 phosphorylation in two NK cell lines, Nishi and NKL. Virus infected or IFN-γ treated cell culture supernatants containing sHLA-E were found to partially inhibit IL-2 mediated induction of CD25 molecules on NKL cells. It was also found that sHLA-E could inhibit IL-2 induced [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation suggesting that, similar to cell surface expressed HLA-E, sHLA-E could also inhibit NK cell responses. Hence JEV-induced shedding of sHLA-E needs further investigation to better understand immune responses in JEV infections since it may have a role in viral evasion of NK cell responses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Human dendritic cell culture and bacterial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Hannah E; Klein, Nigel; Dixon, Garth L J

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a key role in the development of natural immunity to microbes. The DC form a bridge between the innate and adaptive immune system by providing key instructions particularly to antigen naïve T-cells. The interaction of DC with T lymphocytes involves three signals: (1) antigen processing and presentation in context of MHC Class I and/or II, (2) expression of T cell co-stimulatory molecules, and (3) cytokine production. Studying the interactions of DCs with specific pathogens allows for better understanding of how protective immunity is generated, and may be particularly useful for assessing vaccine components. In this chapter, we describe methods to generate human monocyte-derived DCs and assess their maturation, activation, and function, using interaction with the gram-negative bacterial pathogen Neisseria meningitidis as a model.

  10. Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freer, Giulia; Matteucci, Donatella

    2009-07-01

    Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs) are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

  11. Influence of dendritic cells on viral pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Freer

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Although most viral infections cause minor, if any, symptoms, a certain number result in serious illness. Viral disease symptoms result both from direct viral replication within host cells and from indirect immunopathological consequences. Dendritic cells (DCs are key determinants of viral disease outcome; they activate immune responses during viral infection and direct T cells toward distinct T helper type responses. Certain viruses are able to skew cytokine secretion by DCs inducing and/or downregulating the immune system with the aim of facilitating and prolonging release of progeny. Thus, the interaction of DCs with viruses most often results in the absence of disease or complete recovery when natural functions of DCs prevail, but may lead to chronic illness or death when these functions are outmanoeuvred by viruses in the exploitation of DCs.

  12. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Zuidscherwoude (Malou); K. Worah (Kuntal); A. Van Der Schaaf (Alie); S.I. Buschow (Sonja I.); A.B. Spriel (Annemiek )

    2017-01-01

    textabstractDendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the

  13. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidscherwoude, M.C.; Worah, K.; Schaaf, A. van der; Buschow, S.I.; Spriel, A.B. van

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the complete

  14. Dendritic cell-based immunotherapy in ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coosemans, An; Vergote, Ignace; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2013-12-01

    Worldwide, 80% of patients with ovarian cancer die of the disease. New treatments for this aggressive disease are therefore being intensively searched. Although dendritic cell-based vaccines against gynecological malignancies are in their infancy, this immunotherapeutic approach holds much promise. Here, we present our view on an optimal dendritic cell-based immunotherapeutic strategy against ovarian cancer.

  15. Modulatory activities of Zingiber offiinale Roscoe methanol extract on the expression and activity of MMPs and TIMPs on dengue virus infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binita Koirala Sharma

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the effect of methanolic extract of Zingiber officinale (ZOM rhizome on the activity and expression profile of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-2, MMP-9 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1, TIMP-2 at the mRNA level in dengue virus infected Vero cells. Methods: Total phenolic content and [6]-gingerol content in ZOM were determined by utilizing Folin-Ciocalteu reagent and high performance liquid chromatography. IC50 value of ZOM for Vero cells was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Vero cells were infected with dengue virus to induce MMPs production. Modulatory effect of ZOM on the activity and expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 were demonstrated by using gelatin zymography and real time RT-PCR respectively. Results: Amount of total phenolics in ZOM in terms of mg gallic acid equivalents/g was (252.89 ± 0.56 and it possessed (137.32 ± 2.47 mg [6]-gingerol content per gram of extract. The IC 50 value of ZOM was 221.5 µg/mL for Vero cells. The activities of MMP-2 and to a lesser extent MMP-9 were significantly enhanced in the conditioned media collected from the dengue virus infected Vero cells compared to conditioned media from non-infected cells and their activities were significantly inhibited by ZOM in dose-dependent manner. ZOM significantly downregulated the mRNA expression of MMP-2 and MMP-9 and upregulated the mRNA expression of TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 in dengue virus infected Vero cells in concentrationdependent manner. Conclusions: The results of this study suggest that ZOM may be effective in the control of dengue-virus-induced permeability through the reduction of activities and expression of proteases which degrade the adhesion molecules between cells. This may provide the basis for developing new and effective methods in controlling severe dengue complications.

  16. Dendritic cells recognize tumor-specific glycosylation of carcinoembryonic antigen on colorectal cancer cells through dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3-grabbing nonintegrin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gisbergen, Klaas P. J. M.; Aarnoudse, Corlien A.; Meijer, Gerrit A.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells play a pivotal role in the induction of antitumor immune responses. Immature dendritic cells are located intratumorally within colorectal cancer and intimately interact with tumor cells, whereas mature dendritic cells are present peripheral to the tumor. The majority of colorectal

  17. Modulation of the innate immune-related genes expression in H9N2 avian influenza virus-infected chicken macrophage-like cells (HD11) in response to Escherichia coli LPS stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xuefeng; Liu, Caihong; Li, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Huizhu; Xu, Xingang; Wang, Jingyu

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages play important roles in mediating virus-induced innate immune responses and are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of bacterial superinfections. The innate immune response initiated by both low pathogenicity AIV and bacterial superinfection in their avian host is not fully understood. We therefore determine the transcripts of innate immune-related genes following avian H9N2 AIV virus infection and E. coli LPS co-stimulation of avian macrophage-like cell line HD11 cells. More pronounced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1β) as well as the inflammatory chemokines (CXCLi1 and CXCLi2) was observed in virus infected plus LPS treated HD11 cells compared to H9N2 virus solely infected control. For two superinfection groups, the levels of genes examined in a prior H9N2 virus infection before secondary LPS treatment group were significantly higher as compared with simultaneous virus infection plus LPS stimulation group. Interestingly, similar high levels of IL-6 gene were observed between LPS sole stimulation group and two superinfection groups. Moreover, IL-10 and TGF-β3 mRNA levels in both superinfection groups were moderately upregulated compared to sole LPS stimulation group or virus alone infection group. Although TLR4 and MDA5 levels in virus alone infection group were significantly lower compared to that in both superinfection groups, TLR4 upregulation respond more rapid to virus sole infection compared to LPS plus virus superinfection. Collectively, innate immune-related genes respond more pronounced in LPS stimulation plus H9N2 virus infection HD11 cells compared to sole virus infection or LPS alone stimulation control cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Dendritic cells and aging: consequences for autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anshu; Sridharan, Aishwarya; Prakash, Sangeetha; Agrawal, Harsh

    2012-01-01

    The immune system has evolved to mount immune responses against foreign pathogens and to remain silent against self-antigens. A balance between immunity and tolerance is required as any disturbance may result in chronic inflammation or autoimmunity. Dendritic cells (DCs) actively participate in maintaining this balance. Under steady-state conditions, DCs remain in an immature state and do not mount an immune response against circulating self-antigens in the periphery, which maintains a state of tolerance. By contrast, foreign antigens result in DC maturation and DC-induced T-cell activation. Inappropriate maturation of DCs due to infections or tissue injury may cause alterations in the balance between the tolerogenic and immunogenic functions of DCs and instigate the development of autoimmune diseases. This article provides an overview of the effects of advancing age on DC functions and their implications in autoimmunity.

  19. CD163 positive subsets of blood dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maniecki, Maciej Bogdan; Møller, Holger Jon; Moestrup, Søren Kragh

    2006-01-01

    expression in dendritic cells (DCs) was investigated using multicolor flow cytometry in peripheral blood from 31 healthy donors and 15 HIV-1 patients in addition to umbilical cord blood from 5 newborn infants. Total RNA was isolated from MACS purified DCs and CD163 mRNA was determined with real-time reverse...... transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The effect of glucocorticoid and phorbol ester stimulation on monocyte and dendritic cell CD163 and CD91 expression was investigated in cell culture of mononuclear cells using multicolor flow cytometry. We identified two CD163+ subsets in human blood with dendritic cell...

  20. Probiotics, dendritic cells and bladder cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feyisetan, Oladapo; Tracey, Christopher; Hellawell, Giles O

    2012-06-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? The suppressor effect of probiotics on superficial bladder cancer is an observed phenomenon but the specific mechanism is poorly understood. The evidence strongly suggests natural killer (NK) cells are the anti-tumour effector cells involved and NK cell activity correlates with the observed anti-tumour effect in mice. It is also known that dendritic cells (DC) cells are responsible for the recruitment and mobilization of NK cells so therefore it may be inferred that DC cells are most likely to be the interphase point at which probiotics act. In support of this, purification of NK cells was associated with a decrease in NK cells activity. The current use of intravesical bacille Calmette-Guérin in the management of superficial bladder cancer is based on the effect of a localised immune response. In the same way, understanding the mechanism of action of probiotics and the role of DC may potentially offer another avenue via which the immune system may be manipulated to resist bladder cancer. Probiotic foods have been available in the UK since 1996 with the arrival of the fermented milk drink (Yakult) from Japan. The presence of live bacterial ingredients (usually lactobacilli species) may confer health benefits when present in sufficient numbers. The role of probiotics in colo-rectal cancer may be related in part to the suppression of harmful colonic bacteria but other immune mechanisms are involved. Anti-cancer effects outside the colon were suggested by a Japanese report of altered rates of bladder tumour recurrence after ingestion of a particular probiotic. Dendritic cells play a central role to the general regulation of the immune response that may be modified by probiotics. The addition of probiotics to the diet may confer benefit by altering rates of bladder tumour recurrence and also alter the response to immune mechanisms involved with the application of intravesical treatments (bacille Calmette

  1. A Case of Human Lassa Virus Infection With Robust Acute T-Cell Activation and Long-Term Virus-Specific T-Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElroy, Anita K; Akondy, Rama S; Harmon, Jessica R; Ellebedy, Ali H; Cannon, Deborah; Klena, John D; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Mehta, Aneesh K; Kraft, Colleen S; Lyon, Marshall G; Varkey, Jay B; Ribner, Bruce S; Nichol, Stuart T; Spiropoulou, Christina F

    2017-06-15

    A nurse who acquired Lassa virus infection in Togo in the spring of 2016 was repatriated to the United States for care at Emory University Hospital. Serial sampling from this patient permitted the characterization of several aspects of the innate and cellular immune responses to Lassa virus. Although most of the immune responses correlated with the kinetics of viremia resolution, the CD8 T-cell response was of surprisingly high magnitude and prolonged duration, implying prolonged presentation of viral antigens. Indeed, long after viremia resolution, there was persistent viral RNA detected in the semen of the patient, accompanied by epididymitis, suggesting the male reproductive tract as 1 site of antigen persistence. Consistent with the magnitude of acute T-cell responses, the patient ultimately developed long-term, polyfunctional memory T-cell responses to Lassa virus. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2017. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  2. Granulocytes as modulators of dendritic cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedveld, Annelot; Groot Kormelink, Tom; van Egmond, Marjolein; de Jong, Esther C

    2017-10-01

    Effector T cell development is directly driven by APCs, in particular, by antigen-primed dendritic cells (DCs). Depending on the pathogenic stimulus and the microenvironment, DCs induce proliferation and polarization of naive CD4+ T cells into different effector subsets, such as Th1, Th2, Th17, or regulatory T cells (Tregs). During inflammation, DCs are found in close proximity to other innate immune cells, including all granulocyte subtypes, which potentially influence the immunomodulatory capacities of DCs. Neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils are rapidly recruited into infected tissues where their main function is to eliminate invading pathogens. Mast cells are tissue-resident granulocytes that also contribute to host defense against pathogens but have, thus far, primarily been associated with their detrimental roles in allergic diseases. Although granulocytes have always been considered essential in innate immunity, their ability to influence the development of adaptive immunity has long been overlooked. This view is now changing, as multiple studies showed significant modulating effects of granulocytes on key players of adaptive immunity, including DCs and lymphocytes. Neutrophils, eosinophils, basophils, and mast cells regulate recruitment and activation of DCs through the release of mediators or via direct cell-cell contact, thereby influencing antigen-specific T cell responses. In this review, we will summarize the current knowledge on the impact of granulocytes on DC functioning and the subsequent putative consequences of this cross-talk on T cell proliferation and polarization. Together, this overview underscores the importance of granulocyte-DC communication to establish optimal immune responses. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  3. Induction of RNA interference in dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mu; Qian, Hua; Ichim, Thomas E; Ge, Wei-Wen; Popov, Igor A; Rycerz, Katarzyna; Neu, John; White, David; Zhong, Robert; Min, Wei-Ping

    2004-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) reside at the center of the immunological universe, possessing the ability both to stimulate and inhibit various types of responses. Tolerogenic/regulatory DC with therapeutic properties can be generated through various means of manipulations in vitro and in vivo. Here we describe several attractive strategies for manipulation of DC using the novel technique of RNA interference (RNAi). Additionally, we overview some of our data regarding yet undescribed characteristics of RNAi in DC such as specific transfection strategies, persistence of gene silencing, and multi-gene silencing. The advantages of using RNAi for DC genetic manipulation gives rise to the promise of generating tailor-made DC that can be used effectively to treat a variety of immunologically mediated diseases.

  4. Maturation of dendritic cells by bacterial immunomodulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spisek, Radek; Brazova, Jitka; Rozkova, Daniela; Zapletalova, Katerina; Sediva, Anna; Bartunkova, Jirina

    2004-07-29

    Dendritic cells (DC) become fully functional upon maturation by various stimuli. We tested whether an immunostimulatory effect of clinically used immunomodulators (Luivac, Biostim, Ribomunyl, Imudon, Bronchovaxom) is caused by direct DC activation. We found that Luivac, Biostim and Ribomunyl have a very high DC stimulatory potential in vitro. The level of DC activation was comparable or higher than DC maturation induced by standard maturation stimuli, Poly (I:C) or lipopolysaccharide. Treated DC had activated phenotype, reduced phagocytic activity and they induced the proliferation of allogeneic T lymphocytes. These results are important for understanding the physiology of action of these widely prescribed agents. Administration of bacterial immunomodulators should be considered with care to avoid the potential risk of inducing an autoimmune disease. They could also be used as well-defined maturating agents in the protocols used for the ex vivo production of DC-based vaccines for clinical trials.

  5. Dendritic cell immunotherapy in uterine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coosemans, An; Tuyaerts, Sandra; Vanderstraeten, Anke; Vergote, Ignace; Amant, Frédéric; Van Gool, Stefaan W

    2014-01-01

    Uterine cancer is the most common pelvic gynecological malignancy. Uterine sarcomas and relapsed uterine carcinomas have limited treatment options. The search for new therapies is urgent. Dendritic cell (DC) immunotherapy holds much promise, though has been poorly explored in uterine cancer. This commentary gives an insight in existing DC immunotherapy studies in uterine cancer and summarizes the possibilities and the importance of the loading of tumor antigens onto DC and their subsequent maturation. However, the sole application of DC immunotherapy to target uterine cancer will be insufficient because of tumor-induced immunosuppression, which will hamper the establishment of an effective anti-tumor immune response. The authors give an overview on the limited existing immunosuppressive data and propose a novel approach on DC immunotherapy in uterine cancer.

  6. Poxvirus antigen staining of immune cells as a biomarker to predict disease outcome in monkeypox and cowpox virus infection in non-human primates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haifeng Song

    Full Text Available Infection of non-human primates (NHPs such as rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with monkeypox virus (MPXV or cowpox virus (CPXV serve as models to study poxvirus pathogenesis and to evaluate vaccines and anti-orthopox therapeutics. Intravenous inoculation of macaques with high dose of MPXV (>1-2×10(7 PFU or CPXV (>10(2 PFU results in 80% to 100% mortality and 66 to 100% mortality respectively. Here we report that NHPs with positive detection of poxvirus antigens in immune cells by flow cytometric staining, especially in monocytes and granulocytes succumbed to virus infection and that early positive pox staining is a strong predictor for lethality. Samples from four independent studies were analyzed. Eighteen NHPs from three different experiments were inoculated with two different MPXV strains at lethal doses. Ten NHPs displayed positive pox-staining and all 10 NHPs reached moribund endpoint. In contrast, none of the three NHPs that survived anticipated lethal virus dose showed apparent virus staining in the monocytes and granulocytes. In addition, three NHPs that were challenged with a lethal dose of MPXV and received cidofovir treatment were pox-antigen negative and all three NHPs survived. Furthermore, data from a CPXV study also demonstrated that 6/9 NHPs were pox-antigen staining positive and all 6 NHPs reached euthanasia endpoint, while the three survivors were pox-antigen staining negative. Thus, we conclude that monitoring pox-antigen staining in immune cells can be used as a biomarker to predict the prognosis of virus infection. Future studies should focus on the mechanisms and implications of the pox-infection of immune cells and the correlation between pox-antigen detection in immune cells and disease progression in human poxviral infection.

  7. Dendritic Cells in the Cancer Microenvironment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Ma, Galina V. Shurin, Zhu Peiyuan, Michael R. Shurin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The complexity of the tumor immunoenvironment is underscored by the emergence and discovery of different subsets of immune effectors and regulatory cells. Tumor-induced polarization of immune cell differentiation and function makes this unique environment even more intricate and variable. Dendritic cells (DCs represent a special group of cells that display different phenotype and activity at the tumor site and exhibit differential pro-tumorigenic and anti-tumorigenic functions. DCs play a key role in inducing and maintaining the antitumor immunity, but in the tumor environment their antigen-presenting function may be lost or inefficient. DCs might be also polarized into immunosuppressive/tolerogenic regulatory DCs, which limit activity of effector T cells and support tumor growth and progression. Although various factors and signaling pathways have been described to be responsible for abnormal functioning of DCs in cancer, there are still no feasible therapeutic modalities available for preventing or reversing DC malfunction in tumor-bearing hosts. Thus, better understanding of DC immunobiology in cancer is pivotal for designing novel or improved therapeutic approaches that will allow proper functioning of DCs in patients with cancer.

  8. Viewpoint: factors involved in type I interferon responses during porcine virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summerfield, Artur

    2012-07-15

    Since type I interferon (IFN-I) is considered a potent antiviral defence mechanism, it is not surprising that during evolution viruses have development of various mechanisms to counteract IFN-I induction or release. Despite this, certain virus infections are associated with very high levels of systemic IFN-I. One explanation for this observation is the presence of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC), which are able to produce high levels of IFN-I despite the presence of viral IFN-I antagonists. Examples of virus infection in pigs including classical swine fever virus, influenza virus, foot-and-mouth disease virus, and porcine circo virus type 2 highlight factors involved in controlling such responses and illustrate potential negative and positive effects for the host. Based on published data, we propose that in addition to the ability to activate pDC, the ability to spread systemically, and the tropism for lymphoid tissue also represent important factors contributing to strong systemic IFN-I responses during certain virus infections. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Administration of Lactococcus lactis strain Plasma induces maturation of plasmacytoid dendritic cells and protection from rotavirus infection in suckling mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jounai, Kenta; Sugimura, Tetsu; Morita, Yuji; Ohshio, Konomi; Fujiwara, Daisuke

    2018-03-01

    Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis JCM 5805 (LC-Plasma) is a strain of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) that activates murine and human plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) to express interferons (IFNs). Oral administration of LC-Plasma drastically decreased fatality levels caused by parainfluenza virus infection in a murine model. In this study, we investigated the anti-viral effects of oral administration of LC-Plasma using a suckling mouse model of rhesus rotavirus (RV) infection. LC-Plasma-fed mice showed improvement in retardation of body weight gain, fecal scores, and a reduction in RV titer in the feces when compared to control mice. The mechanism of anti-viral effects elicited by LC-Plasma administration was investigated using naive mice: in the LC-Plasma -fed mice, lamina propria (LP) pDCs resident in the small intestine were significantly matured and the proportion of pDCs was increased. The expression levels of anti-viral factors induced by IFNs, such as Isg15, Mx1, Oasl2 and Viperin, and an anti-bacterial factor Reg3γ, were up-regulated in the small intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) of LC-Plasma-fed mice. The specific LAB strain may affect the anti-viral immunological profile of IECs via maturation of LP pDCs, leading to protection from RV virus infection in vivo. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adhesion of dendritic cells to endothelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alun Brown, K

    2001-01-01

    Many of the interdigitating dendritic cells (DC) that reside in lymph nodes arise from the migration of tissue interstitial DC such as Langerhans cells in the skin (1). Although this migration appears to be stimulated by cytokines (2), relatively little is known of the mechanisms underlying the maintenance and expansion of DC in the skin. Langerhans cells are bone-marrow derived (3), and their replacement in the epidermis following transportation of antigen to lymphoid tissue is likely to depend upon the tissue extravasation of circulating DC. Moreover, the continuous passage of DC across blood vessel walls could be responsible for the increase in DC numbers in tumors (4) and sites of chronic inflammation (5,6). Thus, germane to both homeostasis and pathological disturbance would be the interaction of circulating DC with blood vessel walls, and their subsequent entry into the surrounding tissue. The first stage in leukocyte migration across blood vessel walls is binding to vascular endothelium, and for lymphocytes, monocytes and neutrophils this event is governed by adhesion molecules on their surface recognizing corresponding endothelial ligands commonly referred to as vascular adhesion molecules (7). Despite the plethora of information concerning the molecular nature of the attachment of the major leukocyte subpopulations to endothelium, relatively few studies have been undertaken with DC. Understanding the controlling features of DC-endo-thelial cell interaction would be relevant to the clinical application of DC in immunodeficient disorders and malignancies (8,9) and to antagonizing their entry into sites of chronic inflammatory lesions.

  11. Probiotics in respiratory virus infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtoranta, L; Pitkäranta, A; Korpela, R

    2014-08-01

    Viral respiratory infections are the most common diseases in humans. A large range of etiologic agents challenge the development of efficient therapies. Research suggests that probiotics are able to decrease the risk or duration of respiratory infection symptoms. However, the antiviral mechanisms of probiotics are unclear. The purpose of this paper is to review the current knowledge on the effects of probiotics on respiratory virus infections and to provide insights on the possible antiviral mechanisms of probiotics. A PubMed and Scopus database search was performed up to January 2014 using appropriate search terms on probiotic and respiratory virus infections in cell models, in animal models, and in humans, and reviewed for their relevance. Altogether, thirty-three clinical trials were reviewed. The studies varied highly in study design, outcome measures, probiotics, dose, and matrices used. Twenty-eight trials reported that probiotics had beneficial effects in the outcome of respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and five showed no clear benefit. Only eight studies reported investigating viral etiology from the respiratory tract, and one of these reported a significant decrease in viral load. Based on experimental studies, probiotics may exert antiviral effects directly in probiotic-virus interaction or via stimulation of the immune system. Although probiotics seem to be beneficial in respiratory illnesses, the role of probiotics on specific viruses has not been investigated sufficiently. Due to the lack of confirmatory studies and varied data available, more randomized, double-blind, and placebo-controlled trials in different age populations investigating probiotic dose response, comparing probiotic strains/genera, and elucidating the antiviral effect mechanisms are necessary.

  12. Metabolism Is Central to Tolerogenic Dendritic Cell Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Jing Sim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunological tolerance is a fundamental tenant of immune homeostasis and overall health. Self-tolerance is a critical component of the immune system that allows for the recognition of self, resulting in hyporeactivity instead of immunogenicity. Dendritic cells are central to the establishment of dominant immune tolerance through the secretion of immunosuppressive cytokines and regulatory polarization of T cells. Cellular metabolism holds the key to determining DC immunogenic or tolerogenic cell fate. Recent studies have demonstrated that dendritic cell maturation leads to a shift toward a glycolytic metabolic state and preferred use of glucose as a carbon source. In contrast, tolerogenic dendritic cells favor oxidative phosphorylation and fatty acid oxidation. This dichotomous metabolic reprogramming of dendritic cells drives differential cellular function and plays a role in pathologies, such as autoimmune disease. Pharmacological alterations in metabolism have promising therapeutic potential.

  13. The dendritic cell niche in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    OpenAIRE

    Haczku, Angela

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The pulmonary innate immune system is heavily implicated in the perpetual airway inflammation and impaired host defense characterizing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The airways of patients suffering from COPD are infiltrated by various immune and inflammatory cells including macrophages, neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. While the role of macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes is well characterized, the contribution of dendritic cells to COPD pathog...

  14. Neonatal CD8 T-cell hierarchy is distinct from adults and is influenced by intrinsic T cell properties in respiratory syncytial virus infected mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tracy J Ruckwardt

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Following respiratory syncytial virus infection of adult CB6F1 hybrid mice, a predictable CD8+ T cell epitope hierarchy is established with a strongly dominant response to a K(d-restricted peptide (SYIGSINNI from the M2 protein. The response to K(dM2(82-90 is ∼5-fold higher than the response to a subdominant epitope from the M protein (NAITNAKII, D(bM(187-195. After infection of neonatal mice, a distinctly different epitope hierarchy emerges with codominant responses to K(dM2(82-90 and D(bM(187-195. Adoptive transfer of naïve CD8+ T cells from adults into congenic neonates prior to infection indicates that intrinsic CD8+ T cell factors contribute to age-related differences in hierarchy. Epitope-specific precursor frequency differs between adults and neonates and influences, but does not predict the hierarchy following infection. Additionally, dominance of K(dM2(82-90-specific cells does not correlate with TdT activity. Epitope-specific Vβ repertoire usage is more restricted and functional avidity is lower in neonatal mice. The neonatal pattern of codominance changes after infection at 10 days of age, and rapidly shifts to the adult pattern of extreme K(dM2(82-90-dominance. Thus, the functional properties of T cells are selectively modified by developmental factors in an epitope-specific and age-dependent manner.

  15. Cellular transcriptional profiling in influenza A virus-infected lung epithelial cells: The role of the nonstructural NS1 protein in the evasion of the host innate defense and its potential contribution to pandemic influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiss, Gary K.; Salvatore, Mirella; Tumpey, Terrence M.; Carter, Victoria S.; Wang, Xiuyan; Basler, Christopher F.; Taubenberger, Jeffery K.; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Palese, Peter; Katze, Michael G.; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2002-08-01

    The NS1 protein of influenza A virus contributes to viral pathogenesis, primarily by enabling the virus to disarm the host cell type IFN defense system. We examined the downstream effects of NS1 protein expression during influenza A virus infection on global cellular mRNA levels by measuring expression of over 13,000 cellular genes in response to infection with wild-type and mutant viruses in human lung epithelial cells. Influenza A/PR/8/34 virus infection resulted in a significant induction of genes involved in the IFN pathway. Deletion of the viral NS1 gene increased the number and magnitude of expression of cellular genes implicated in the IFN, NF-B, and other antiviral pathways. Interestingly, different IFN-induced genes showed different sensitivities to NS1-mediated inhibition of their expression. A recombinant virus with a C-terminal deletion in its NS1 gene induced an intermediate cellular mRNA expression pattern between wild-type and NS1 knockout viruses. Most significantly, a virus containing the 1918 pandemic NS1 gene was more efficient at blocking the expression of IFN-regulated genes than its parental influenza A/WSN/33 virus. Taken together, our results suggest that the cellular response to influenza A virus infection in human lung cells is significantly influenced by the sequence of the NS1 gene, demonstrating the importance of the NS1 protein in regulating the host cell response triggered by virus infection.

  16. Dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein vaccine provides help to a recombinant Newcastle disease virus vectored vaccine including mobilization of protective CD8+T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngu, Loveline N; Nji, Nadesh N; Ambada, Georgia; Ngoh, Apeh A; Njambe Priso, Ghislain D; Tchadji, Jules C; Lissom, Abel; Magagoum, Suzanne H; Sake, Carol N; Tchouangueu, Thibau F; Chukwuma, George O; Okoli, Arinze S; Sagnia, Bertrand; Chukwuanukwu, Rebecca; Tebit, Denis M; Esimone, Charles O; Waffo, Alain B; Park, Chae G; Überla, Klaus; Nchinda, Godwin W

    2018-03-01

    Recombinant Newcastle Disease virus (rNDV) vectored vaccines are safe mucosal applicable vaccines with intrinsic immune-modulatory properties for the induction of efficient immunity. Like all viral vectored vaccines repeated inoculation via mucosal routes invariably results to immunity against viral vaccine vectors. To obviate immunity against viral vaccine vectors and improve the ability of rNDV vectored vaccines in inducing T cell immunity in murine air way we have directed dendritic cell targeted HIV-1 gag protein (DEC-Gag) vaccine; for the induction of helper CD4 + T cells to a Recombinant Newcastle disease virus expressing codon optimized HIV-1 Gag P55 (rNDV-L-Gag) vaccine. We do so through successive administration of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein plus polyICLC (DEC-Gag) vaccine and rNDV-L-Gag. First strong gag specific helper CD4 + T cells are induced in mice by selected targeting of anti-DEC205-gagP24 protein vaccine to dendritic cells (DC) in situ together with polyICLC as adjuvant. This targeting helped T cell immunity develop to a subsequent rNDV-L-Gag vaccine and improved both systemic and mucosal gag specific immunity. This sequential DEC-Gag vaccine prime followed by an rNDV-L-gag boost results to improved viral vectored immunization in murine airway, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site. Thus, complementary prime boost vaccination, in which prime and boost favor distinct types of T cell immunity, improves viral vectored immunization, including mobilization of protective CD8 + T cells to a pathogenic virus infection site such as the murine airway. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and DiseasePublished by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Dendritic Cell Interactions with Lymphatic Endothelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Erica; Nitschké, Maximilian

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Afferent lymphatic vessels fulfill essential immune functions by transporting leukocytes and lymph-borne antigen to draining lymph nodes (dLNs). An important cell type migrating through lymphatic vessels are dendritic cells (DCs). DCs reside in peripheral tissues like the skin, where they take up antigen and transport it via the lymphatic vascular network to dLNs for subsequent presentation to T cells. As such, DCs play a key role in the induction of adaptive immune responses during infection and vaccination, but also for the maintenance of tolerance. Although the migratory pattern of DCs has been known for long time, interactions between DCs and lymphatic vessels are only now starting to be unraveled at the cellular level. In particular, new tools for visualizing lymphatic vessels in combination with time-lapse microscopy have recently generated valuable insights into the process of DC migration to dLNs. In this review we summarize and discuss current approaches for visualizing DCs and lymphatic vessels in tissues for imaging applications. Furthermore, we review the current state of knowledge about DC migration towards, into and within lymphatic vessels, particularly focusing on the cellular interactions that take place between DCs and the lymphatic endothelium. PMID:24044757

  18. The CD8+ dendritic cell subset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortman, Ken; Heath, William R

    2010-03-01

    Mouse lymphoid tissues contain a subset of dendritic cells (DCs) expressing CD8 alpha together with a pattern of other surface molecules that distinguishes them from other DCs. These molecules include particular Toll-like receptor and C-type lectin pattern recognition receptors. A similar DC subset, although lacking CD8 expression, exists in humans. The mouse CD8(+) DCs are non-migrating resident DCs derived from a precursor, distinct from monocytes, that continuously seeds the lymphoid organs from bone marrow. They differ in several key functions from their CD8(-) DC neighbors. They efficiently cross-present exogenous cell-bound and soluble antigens on major histocompatibility complex class I. On activation, they are major producers of interleukin-12 and stimulate inflammatory responses. In steady state, they have immune regulatory properties and help maintain tolerance to self-tissues. During infection with intracellular pathogens, they become major presenters of pathogen antigens, promoting CD8(+) T-cell responses to the invading pathogens. Targeting vaccine antigens to the CD8(+) DCs has proved an effective way to induce cytotoxic T lymphocytes and antibody responses.

  19. Histamine regulates murine primary dendritic cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenk, Heiko; Neumann, Detlef; Kloth, Christina

    2016-10-01

    The modulation of antigen uptake and activation of dendritic cells (DCs) by histamine may function as a regulator of inflammation. Therefore, we sought to determine the impact of histamine on antigen uptake by and activation of murine DCs. DCs from spleen and lung were either identified by flow cytometry or were immunomagnetically enriched. Cells were stimulated with histamine, and the regulation of MHC-II and co-stimulatory molecule expression (CD80, CD86, and ICOS-L) and antigen uptake were quantified by flow cytometry. Individual contributions of the histamine receptor subtypes were determined by using the antagonists mepyramine (histamine H1-receptor: H1R), famotidine (H2R), and JNJ 7777120 (H4R). Histamine accelerated the uptake of soluble antigen via the H1R, H2R, and H4R in splenic DCs. Co-stimulatory molecule expression was enhanced already by enrichment procedures, thus, the analyses were performed in unseparated cell populations. Histamine enhanced the expression of CD86 and ICOS-L while expression of CD80 was unaffected. Antagonism at H1R, H2R, and H4R and at H1R and H4R reduced the histamine-induced enhanced expression of CD86 and ICOS-L, respectively. Histamine contributes to the regulation of the immunological synapse by stimulation of antigen uptake and activation of DCs via H1R, H2R, and H4R.

  20. Brain dendritic cells: biology and pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agostino, Paul M; Gottfried-Blackmore, Andres; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Bulloch, Karen

    2012-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the professional antigen-presenting cells of the immune system. In their quiescent and mature form, the presentation of self-antigens by DC leads to tolerance; whereas, antigen presentation by mature DC, after stimulation by pathogen-associated molecular patterns, leads to the onset of antigen-specific immunity. DC have been found in many of the major organs in mammals (e.g. skin, heart, lungs, intestines and spleen); while the brain has long been considered devoid of DC in the absence of neuroinflammation. Consequently, microglia, the resident immune cell of the brain, have been charged with many functional attributes commonly ascribed to DC. Recent evidence has challenged the notion that DC are either absent or minimal players in brain immune surveillance. This review will discuss the recent literature examining DC involvement within both the young and aged steady-state brain. We will also examine DC contributions during various forms of neuroinflammation resulting from neurodegenerative autoimmune disease, injury, and CNS infections. This review also touches upon DC trafficking between the central nervous system and peripheral immune compartments during viral infections, the new molecular technologies that could be employed to enhance our current understanding of brain DC ontogeny, and some potential therapeutic uses of DC within the CNS.

  1. Use and abuse of dendritic cells by Toxoplasma gondii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanecka, Anna; Frickel, Eva-Maria

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitous apicomplexan parasite Toxoplasma gondii stimulates its host’s immune response to achieve quiescent chronic infection. Central to this goal are host dendritic cells. The parasite exploits dendritic cells to disseminate through the body, produce pro-inflammatory cytokines, present its antigens to the immune system and yet at the same time subvert their signaling pathways in order to evade detection. This carefully struck balance by Toxoplasma makes it the most successful parasite on this planet. Recent progress has highlighted specific parasite and host molecules that mediate some of these processes particularly in dendritic cells and in other cells of the innate immune system. Critically, there are several important factors that need to be taken into consideration when concluding how the dendritic cells and the immune system deal with a Toxoplasma infection, including the route of administration, parasite strain and host genotype. PMID:23221473

  2. The Secretion of IL-22 from Mucosal NKp44+ NK Cells Is Associated with Microbial Translocation and Virus Infection in SIV/SHIV-Infected Chinese Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microbial translocation (MT causes systemic immune activation in chronic human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. The role of a novel subtype of innate lymphoid cells, the NKp44+ NK cells, in HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus- (SIV- induced MT remains unknown. In this study, 12 simian-human immunodeficiency virus- (SHIV- infected macaques were chosen and split into two groups based on the MT level. Blood and Peripheral lymphoid tissue were sampled for flow cytometric analysis, viral load detection, and interleukin testing. Then, six naive Chinese macaques were used to determine the dynamics of cytokine secretion from mucosal NKp44+ NK cells in different phases of SIV infection. As a result, the degranulation capacity and IL-22 production of mucosal NKp44+ NK cells were associated with the MT level in the SHIV-infected macaques. And the number of mucosal NKp44+ NK cells and IL-22 secretion by these cells were lower in the chronic phase than in the early acute phase of SIV infection. The number of mucosal NKp44+ NK cells and interleukin-22 (IL-22 secretion by these cells increased before MT occurred. Therefore, we conclude that a decline in IL-22 production from mucosal NKp44+ NK cells induced by virus infection may be one of the causes of microbial translocation in HIV/SIV infection.

  3. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1) shapes both innate and CD8(+) T cell immune responses against West Nile virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brien, James D; Daffis, Stephane; Lazear, Helen M; Cho, Hyelim; Suthar, Mehul S; Gale, Michael; Diamond, Michael S

    2011-09-01

    Interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-1 is an immunomodulatory transcription factor that functions downstream of pathogen recognition receptor signaling and has been implicated as a regulator of type I interferon (IFN)-αβ expression and the immune response to virus infections. However, this role for IRF-1 remains controversial because altered type I IFN responses have not been systemically observed in IRF-1(-/-) mice. To evaluate the relationship of IRF-1 and immune regulation, we assessed West Nile virus (WNV) infectivity and the host response in IRF-1(-/-) cells and mice. IRF-1(-/-) mice were highly vulnerable to WNV infection with enhanced viral replication in peripheral tissues and rapid dissemination into the central nervous system. Ex vivo analysis revealed a cell-type specific antiviral role as IRF-1(-/-) macrophages supported enhanced WNV replication but infection was unaltered in IRF-1(-/-) fibroblasts. IRF-1 also had an independent and paradoxical effect on CD8(+) T cell expansion. Although markedly fewer CD8(+) T cells were observed in naïve animals as described previously, remarkably, IRF-1(-/-) mice rapidly expanded their pool of WNV-specific cytolytic CD8(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer and in vitro proliferation experiments established both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic effects of IRF-1 on the expansion of CD8(+) T cells. Thus, IRF-1 restricts WNV infection by modulating the expression of innate antiviral effector molecules while shaping the antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell response.

  4. Interferon regulatory factor-1 (IRF-1 shapes both innate and CD8(+ T cell immune responses against West Nile virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D Brien

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Interferon regulatory factor (IRF-1 is an immunomodulatory transcription factor that functions downstream of pathogen recognition receptor signaling and has been implicated as a regulator of type I interferon (IFN-αβ expression and the immune response to virus infections. However, this role for IRF-1 remains controversial because altered type I IFN responses have not been systemically observed in IRF-1(-/- mice. To evaluate the relationship of IRF-1 and immune regulation, we assessed West Nile virus (WNV infectivity and the host response in IRF-1(-/- cells and mice. IRF-1(-/- mice were highly vulnerable to WNV infection with enhanced viral replication in peripheral tissues and rapid dissemination into the central nervous system. Ex vivo analysis revealed a cell-type specific antiviral role as IRF-1(-/- macrophages supported enhanced WNV replication but infection was unaltered in IRF-1(-/- fibroblasts. IRF-1 also had an independent and paradoxical effect on CD8(+ T cell expansion. Although markedly fewer CD8(+ T cells were observed in naïve animals as described previously, remarkably, IRF-1(-/- mice rapidly expanded their pool of WNV-specific cytolytic CD8(+ T cells. Adoptive transfer and in vitro proliferation experiments established both cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic effects of IRF-1 on the expansion of CD8(+ T cells. Thus, IRF-1 restricts WNV infection by modulating the expression of innate antiviral effector molecules while shaping the antigen-specific CD8(+ T cell response.

  5. Differences between T cell-type and natural killer cell-type chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Hoshino, Yo; Hara, Shinya; Sugaya, Naomi; Kawada, Jun-Ichi; Shibata, Yukiko; Kojima, Seiji; Nagasaka, Tetsuro; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Morishima, Tsuneo

    2005-02-15

    Infections of T cells and natural killer (NK) cells play a central role in the pathogenesis of chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV) infection. To characterize the virologic and cytokine profiles of T cell-type and NK cell-type infection, 39 patients with CAEBV infection were analyzed. Patients with T cell-type infection had higher titers of immunoglobulin G against early and late EBV antigens, suggesting lytic cycle infection. However, the pattern of EBV gene expression was latency type II; BZLF1, which is a hallmark of lytic cycle infection, could not be detected in any patients, regardless of infection type. Patients with CAEBV infection had high concentrations of proinflammatory, T helper cell type 1, and anti-inflammatory cytokines. The cytokine profile in patients with NK cell-type infection was similar to that in patients with T cell-type infection, but the concentration of IL-13 was high in patients with NK cell-type infection. These findings should help to clarify the pathogenesis of CAEBV infection and facilitate the development of more-effective treatments.

  6. Differential protection of injured retinal ganglion cell dendrites by brimonidine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, James D; Duong-Polk, Karen X; Hammond, Dustin; Chindasub, Panida; Leung, Christopher Kai-Shun; Weinreb, Robert N

    2015-01-29

    To determine whether brimonidine protects against the retraction and loss of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) dendrites after optic nerve crush (ONC). Fluorescent RGCs of mice expressing yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) under the control of the Thy-1 promoter (Thy1-YFP mice) were imaged in vivo and assigned to one of six groups according to dendrite structure. The mice then received brimonidine every other day starting 2 days before, or 2 or 6 days after, unilateral ONC. Control animals received vehicle every other day starting 2 days before ONC. Control animals received vehicle every other day starting 2 days before ONC. Total dendrite length, dendrite branching complexity, and the time until complete loss of dendrites were assessed weekly for 4 weeks. Overall, brimonidine treatment significantly slowed the complete loss of RGC dendrites and significantly slowed the reduction of total dendrite length and branching complexity. Separate analysis of each RGC group showed brimonidine significantly delayed the time until complete loss of dendrites in four of the RGC groups. These delays generally were similar when treatment started either 2 days before or 2 days after ONC, but were smaller or absent when treatment started 6 days after ONC Protection against loss of total dendrite length and loss of branching complexity was observed in three of the RGC groups. In two of these RGC groups, protective effects persisted until the end of the study. Brimonidine protects many RGC types against dendrite retraction, loss of branching complexity, and complete loss of dendrites following ONC. However, the pattern and magnitude of this protection differs substantially among different RGC types. These results indicate that requirements for RGC-protective therapies following optic nerve injury may differ among RGC types. Copyright 2015 The Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Inc.

  7. Early T Cell Recognition of B Cells following Epstein-Barr Virus Infection: Identifying Potential Targets for Prophylactic Vaccination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jill M Brooks

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus, a B-lymphotropic herpesvirus, is the cause of infectious mononucleosis, has strong aetiologic links with several malignancies and has been implicated in certain autoimmune diseases. Efforts to develop a prophylactic vaccine to prevent or reduce EBV-associated disease have, to date, focused on the induction of neutralising antibody responses. However, such vaccines might be further improved by inducing T cell responses capable of recognising and killing recently-infected B cells. In that context, EBNA2, EBNA-LP and BHRF1 are the first viral antigens expressed during the initial stage of B cell growth transformation, yet have been poorly characterised as CD8+ T cell targets. Here we describe CD8+ T cell responses against each of these three "first wave" proteins, identifying target epitopes and HLA restricting alleles. While EBNA-LP and BHRF1 each contained one strong CD8 epitope, epitopes within EBNA2 induced immunodominant responses through several less common HLA class I alleles (e.g. B*3801 and B*5501, as well as subdominant responses through common class I alleles (e.g. B7 and C*0304. Importantly, such EBNA2-specific CD8+ T cells recognised B cells within the first day post-infection, prior to CD8+ T cells against well-characterised latent target antigens such as EBNA3B or LMP2, and effectively inhibited outgrowth of EBV-transformed B cell lines. We infer that "first wave" antigens of the growth-transforming infection, especially EBNA2, constitute potential CD8+ T cell immunogens for inclusion in prophylactic EBV vaccine design.

  8. Deciphering dendritic cell heterogenity in immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël eChopin

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are specialized antigen presenting cells that are exquisitely adapted to sense pathogens and induce the development of adaptive immune responses. They form a complex network of phenotypically and functionally distinct subsets. Within this network, individual DC subsets display highly specific roles in local immunosurveillance, migration and antigen presentation. This division of labor amongst DCs offers great potential to tune the immune response by harnessing subset-specific attributes of DCs in the clinical setting. Until recently, our understanding of DC subsets has been limited and paralleled by poor clinical translation and efficacy. We have now begun to unravel how different DC subsets develop within a complex multilayered system. These finding open up exciting possibilities for targeted manipulation of DC subsets. Furthermore, ground-breaking developments overcoming a major translational obstacle – identification of similar DC populations in mouse and man – now set the stage for significant advances in the field. Here we explore the determinants that underpin cellular and transcriptional heterogeneity within the DC network, how these influence DC distribution and localization at steady-state, and the capacity of DCs to present antigens via direct or cross-presentation during pathogen infection.

  9. Rheumatoid arthritis synovium contains plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavanagh, Lois L; Boyce, Amanda; Smith, Louise; Padmanabha, Jagadish; Filgueira, Luis; Pietschmann, Peter; Thomas, Ranjeny

    2005-01-01

    We have previously described enrichment of antigen-presenting HLA-DR+ nuclear RelB+ dendritic cells (DCs) in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) synovium. CD123+HLA-DR+ plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) and their precursors have been identified in human peripheral blood (PB), lymphoid tissue, and some inflamed tissues. We hypothesized recruitment of pDCs into the inflamed RA synovial environment and their contribution as antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and inflammatory cells in RA. CD11c+ myeloid DCs and CD123+ pDCs were compared in normal and RA PB, synovial fluid (SF), and synovial tissue by flow cytometry, immunohistochemistry, and electron microscopy and were sorted for functional studies. Nuclear RelB-CD123+ DCs were located in perivascular regions of RA, in a similar frequency to nuclear RelB+CD123- DCs, but not normal synovial tissue sublining. Apart from higher expression of HLA-DR, the numbers and phenotypes of SF pDCs were similar to those of normal PB pDCs. While the APC function of PB pDCs was less efficient than that of PB myeloid DCs, RA SF pDCs efficiently activated resting allogeneic PB T cells, and high levels of IFN-γ, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor α were produced in response to incubation of allogeneic T cells with either type of SF DCs. Thus, pDCs are recruited to RA synovial tissue and comprise an APC population distinct from the previously described nuclear RelB+ synovial DCs. pDCs may contribute significantly to the local inflammatory environment. PMID:15743469

  10. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1998-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene-modified fibroblasts with breast tumor-pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  11. Breast Cancer Vaccines Based on Dendritic Cells and the Chemokines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mule, James

    1997-01-01

    The major objective of this project is to establish a new modality for the treatment of breast cancer that employs the combination of chemokine gene modified fibroblasts with breast tumor pulsed dendritic cells (DC...

  12. CTLA-4 blockade during dendritic cell based booster vaccination influences dendritic cell survival and CTL expansion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Anders E; Ronchese, Franca

    2007-01-01

    and the lysis of relevant in vivo targets. However, the CTLA-4 blockage dependent expansion of CTLs also affect DC survival during booster DC injections and our data suggest that during a booster DC vaccine, the largest increase in CTL levels is already obtained during the first vaccination.......Dendritic cells (DCs) are potent antigen-presenting cells and critical for the priming of CD8+ T cells. Therefore the use of these cells as adjuvant cells has been tested in a large number of experimental and clinical vaccination studies, in particular cancer vaccine studies. A number of protocols...... are emerging that combine vaccination with CTL expanding strategies, such as e.g. blockade of CTLA-4 signalling. On the other hand, the lifespan and in vivo survival of therapeutic DCs have only been addressed in a few studies, although this is of importance for the kinetics of CTL induction during vaccination...

  13. Dendritic polymers: Universal glue for cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frey, Holger

    2012-05-01

    A dendritic polymer consisting of inversely oriented lipid head groups on a polyvalent polyglycerol scaffold makes an effective reversible biomembrane adhesive that may find use as a tissue sealant and a drug-delivery vehicle.

  14. Bluetongue virus infection alters the impedance of monolayers of bovine endothelial cells as a result of cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drew, Clifton P; Gardner, Ian A; Mayo, Christie E; Matsuo, Eiko; Roy, Polly; MacLachlan, N James

    2010-07-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the cause of bluetongue, an emerging, arthropod-transmitted disease of ungulates. Bluetongue is characterized by vascular injury with hemorrhage, tissue infarction and widespread edema, lesions that are consistent with those of the so-called viral hemorrhagic fevers. To further investigate the pathogenesis of vascular injury in bluetongue, we utilized an electrical impedance assay and immunofluorescence staining to compare the effects of BTV infection on cultured bovine endothelial cells (bPAEC) with those of inducers of cell death (Triton X-100) and interendothelial gap formation (tissue necrosis factor [TNF]). The data confirm that the adherens junctions of BTV-infected bPAECs remained intact until 24h post-infection, and that loss of monolayer impedance precisely coincided with onset of virus-induced cell death. In contrast, recombinant bovine TNF-alpha caused rapid loss of bPAEC monolayer impedance that was associated with interendothelial gap formation and redistribution of VE-cadherin, but without early cell death. The data from these in vitro studies are consistent with a pathogenesis of bluetongue that involves virus-induced vascular injury leading to thrombosis, hemorrhage and tissue necrosis. However, the contribution of cytokine-induced interendothelial gap formation with subsequent edema and hypovolemic shock contributes to the pathogenesis of bluetongue remains to be fully characterized. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Interaction and Mutual Activation of Different Innate Immune Cells Is Necessary to Kill and Clear Hepatitis C Virus-Infected Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöss, Volker; Grünvogel, Oliver; Wabnitz, Guido; Eigenbrod, Tatjana; Ehrhardt, Stefanie; Lasitschka, Felix; Lohmann, Volker; Dalpke, Alexander H

    2017-01-01

    Innate immune cells can sense hepatitis C virus (HCV)-infected cells and respond with anti-viral actions including secretion of interferons (IFNs). In previous studies, the response of individual innate immune cells against HCV was analyzed in detail. We hypothesized that interaction of multiple innate immune cells increases the magnitude of the immune response and eventually leads to clearance of HCV-infected cells. To investigate this, we co-cultured Huh-7 HCV subgenomic replicon (SGR) cells with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We confirm secretion of IFNα by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) and IFNγ by natural killer (NK) cells in the co-culture setup. Moreover, we observed that also monocytes contribute to the anti-viral response. Flow cytometry and ImageStream analysis demonstrated that monocytes take up material from HCV SGR cells in co-culture with PBMCs. Preceding the uptake, PBMCs caused apoptosis of HCV SGR cells by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression on NK cells. We observed that only the interplay of monocytes, pDCs, and NK cells resulted in efficient clearance of HCV SGR cells, while these cell populations alone did not kill HCV SGR cells. Despite similar TRAIL receptor expression on Huh-7 control cells and HCV SGR cells, HCV activated PBMCs specifically killed HCV SGR cells and did not target Huh-7 control cells. Finally, we showed that HCV replicating cells per se are sensitive toward TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Our results highlight the importance of the interplay of different innate immune cells to initiate an efficient, rapid, and specific response against HCV-infected cells.

  16. IFNAR2-dependent gene expression profile induced by IFN-α in Pteropus alecto bat cells and impact of IFNAR2 knockout on virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Zhang

    Full Text Available Bats are important reservoirs of many viruses, which are capable of infecting the host without inducing obvious clinical diseases. Interferon and the downstream interferon regulated genes (IRGs are known to act as the first line of defense against viral infections. Little is known about the transcriptional profile of genes being induced by interferon in bats and their role in controlling virus infection. In this study, we constructed IFNAR2 knockout bat cell lines using CRISPR technology and further characterized gene expression profiles induced by the most abundant IFN-α (IFN-α3. Firstly, we demonstrated that the CRISPR/Cas9 system is applicable for bat cells as this represents the first CRIPSR knockout cell line for bats. Our results showed the pleiotropic effect of IFN-α3 on the bat kidney cell line, PaKiT03. As expected, we confirmed that IFNAR2 is indispensable for IFN-a signaling pathway and plays an important role in antiviral immunity. Unexpectedly, we also identified novel IFNAR2-dependent IRGs which are enriched in pathways related to cancer. To our knowledge, this seems to be bat-specific as no such observation has been reported for other mammalian species. This study expands our knowledge about bat immunology and the cell line established can provide a powerful tool for future study into virus-bat interaction and cancer biology.

  17. The dendritic cell side of the immunological synapse

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verboogen, D.R.J.; Dingjan, I.; Revelo, N.H.; Visser, L.J.; Beest, M.B.A. ter; Bogaart, G. van den

    2016-01-01

    Immune responses are initiated by the interactions between antigen-presenting cells (APCs), such as dendritic cells (DCs), with responder cells, such as T cells, via a tight cellular contact interface called the immunological synapse. The immunological synapse is a highly organized subcellular

  18. Nomenclature of monocytes and dendritic cells in blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Ziegler-Heitbrock (Loems); P. Ancuta (Petronela); S. Crowe (Suzanne); M. Dalod (Marc); V. Grau (Veronika); D.N. Hart (Derek); P.J. Leenen (Pieter); Y.J. Liu; G. MacPherson (Gordon); G.J. Randolph (Gwendalyn); J. Scherberich (Juergen); J. Schmitz (Juergen); K. Shortman (Ken); S. Sozzani (Silvano); H. Strobl (Herbert); M. Zembala (Marek); J.M. Austyn (Jonathan); M.B. Lutz (Manfred)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMonocytes and cells of the dendritic cell lineage circulate in blood and eventually migrate into tissue where they further mature and serve various functions, most notably in immune defense. Over recent years these cells have been characterized in detail with the use of cell surface

  19. Immune roles of dendritic cells in stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cheng; Liao, Wenwei; Liu, Furong; Zhu, Xiaofeng; He, Xiaoshun; Hu, Anbin

    2017-11-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells and initial stimulators for immune response. DCs can shape their functions based on their immune states, which are crucial for the balance of immunity and tolerance to preserve homeostasis. In the immune response involved in stem cell transplantation, DCs also play important roles in inducing immune tolerance and antitumor immunity. After the rapid development of stem cell transplantation technology in recent years, the risks of graft rejection, tumor recurrence, and tumorigenicity are still present after stem cell transplantation. It is important to understand the mechanisms of DC-mediated immune tolerance and stimulation during stem cell transplantation. In this review, we will summarize and analyze the regulatory mechanisms of DCs in stem cell transplantation and their application in clinical settings. It may help to promote the innovation in basic theories and therapeutic approaches of stem cell transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Highly dynamic microtubules improve the effectiveness of early stages of human influenza A/NWS/33 virus infection in LLC-MK2 cells.

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    De Conto, Flora; Di Lonardo, Enrica; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to investigate the role of microtubule dynamics in the initiation of NWS/33 human influenza A (NWS) virus infection in MDCK and LLC-MK2 mammalian kidney cells. We previously demonstrated a host-dependent role of the actin cytoskeleton in inducing restriction during the early phases of NWS infection. Furthermore, we showed the differential infectious entry of NWS virus in the above mentioned cell models. By first employing a panel of microtubule-modulators, we evidenced that microtubule-stabilization negatively interferes with NWS replication in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells. Conversely, microtubule-depolymerization improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 but not in the MDCK model. By using immunofluorescence labelling and Western blotting analyses upon NWS infection in mammalian kidney cells, it was observed that the occurrence of alpha-tubulin hyperacetylation--a post-translational modified form suggestive of stable microtubules--was significantly delayed in LLC-MK2 when compared to MDCK cells. Furthermore, mock-infected LLC-MK2 cells were shown to have higher levels of both acetylated alpha-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4), the latter being essential for the maintenance of normal microtubule polymer levels in interphase epithelial cells. Finally, to obtain highly dynamic microtubules in LLC-MK2 cells, we knocked down the expression of MAP4 by using a RNA-mediated RNA interference approach. The results evidenced that MAP4 silencing improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 cells. By evidencing the cell type-dependent regulatory role of microtubule dynamics on NWS replication in mammalian kidney cells, we demonstrated that microtubule-stabilization represents a restriction factor for the initiation of NWS infection in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells.

  1. Highly dynamic microtubules improve the effectiveness of early stages of human influenza A/NWS/33 virus infection in LLC-MK2 cells.

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    Flora De Conto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This study aims to investigate the role of microtubule dynamics in the initiation of NWS/33 human influenza A (NWS virus infection in MDCK and LLC-MK2 mammalian kidney cells. We previously demonstrated a host-dependent role of the actin cytoskeleton in inducing restriction during the early phases of NWS infection. Furthermore, we showed the differential infectious entry of NWS virus in the above mentioned cell models. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By first employing a panel of microtubule-modulators, we evidenced that microtubule-stabilization negatively interferes with NWS replication in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells. Conversely, microtubule-depolymerization improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 but not in the MDCK model. By using immunofluorescence labelling and Western blotting analyses upon NWS infection in mammalian kidney cells, it was observed that the occurrence of alpha-tubulin hyperacetylation--a post-translational modified form suggestive of stable microtubules--was significantly delayed in LLC-MK2 when compared to MDCK cells. Furthermore, mock-infected LLC-MK2 cells were shown to have higher levels of both acetylated alpha-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4, the latter being essential for the maintenance of normal microtubule polymer levels in interphase epithelial cells. Finally, to obtain highly dynamic microtubules in LLC-MK2 cells, we knocked down the expression of MAP4 by using a RNA-mediated RNA interference approach. The results evidenced that MAP4 silencing improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 cells. CONCLUSION: By evidencing the cell type-dependent regulatory role of microtubule dynamics on NWS replication in mammalian kidney cells, we demonstrated that microtubule-stabilization represents a restriction factor for the initiation of NWS infection in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells.

  2. Highly Dynamic Microtubules Improve the Effectiveness of Early Stages of Human Influenza A/NWS/33 Virus Infection in LLC-MK2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, Flora; Di Lonardo, Enrica; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Chezzi, Carlo; Medici, Maria Cristina; Calderaro, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate the role of microtubule dynamics in the initiation of NWS/33 human influenza A (NWS) virus infection in MDCK and LLC-MK2 mammalian kidney cells. We previously demonstrated a host-dependent role of the actin cytoskeleton in inducing restriction during the early phases of NWS infection. Furthermore, we showed the differential infectious entry of NWS virus in the above mentioned cell models. Methodology/Principal Findings By first employing a panel of microtubule-modulators, we evidenced that microtubule-stabilization negatively interferes with NWS replication in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells. Conversely, microtubule-depolymerization improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 but not in the MDCK model. By using immunofluorescence labelling and Western blotting analyses upon NWS infection in mammalian kidney cells, it was observed that the occurrence of alpha-tubulin hyperacetylation - a post-translational modified form suggestive of stable microtubules - was significantly delayed in LLC-MK2 when compared to MDCK cells. Furthermore, mock-infected LLC-MK2 cells were shown to have higher levels of both acetylated alpha-tubulin and microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4), the latter being essential for the maintenance of normal microtubule polymer levels in interphase epithelial cells. Finally, to obtain highly dynamic microtubules in LLC-MK2 cells, we knocked down the expression of MAP4 by using a RNA-mediated RNA interference approach. The results evidenced that MAP4 silencing improves NWS growth in LLC-MK2 cells. Conclusion By evidencing the cell type-dependent regulatory role of microtubule dynamics on NWS replication in mammalian kidney cells, we demonstrated that microtubule-stabilization represents a restriction factor for the initiation of NWS infection in LLC-MK2 but not in MDCK cells. PMID:22911759

  3. The dendritic cell niche in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

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    Haczku Angela

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The pulmonary innate immune system is heavily implicated in the perpetual airway inflammation and impaired host defense characterizing Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD. The airways of patients suffering from COPD are infiltrated by various immune and inflammatory cells including macrophages, neutrophils, T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. While the role of macrophages, neutrophils and T lymphocytes is well characterized, the contribution of dendritic cells to COPD pathogenesis is still the subject of emerging research. A paper by Botelho and colleagues in the current issue of Respiratory Research investigates the importance of dendritic cell recruitment in cigarette-smoke induced acute and chronic inflammation in mice. Dendritic cells of the healthy lung parenchyma and airways perform an important sentinel function and regulate immune homeostasis. During inflammatory responses the function and migration pattern of these cells is dramatically altered but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Botelho and colleagues demonstrate here the importance of IL-1R1/IL-1α related mechanisms including CCL20 production in cigarette-smoke induced recruitment of dendritic cells and T cell activation in the mouse lung.

  4. Complete response of metastatic renal cancer with dendritic cell vaccine

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    Dall'Oglio Marcos

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We report a case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma that presented involution following therapy with dendritic cells. CASE REPORT: Male, 51-year old patient underwent left radical nephrectomy in September 1999 due to renal cell carcinoma, evolved with recurrence of the neoplasia in January 2002, confirmed by resection of the lesion. A vaccine therapy based on dendritic cells was then performed during 5 months (4 applications. After this period, there was occurrence of new lesions, whose resection revealed areas of necrosis and inflammatory infiltrate. DISCUSSION: The outcome of renal cell carcinoma is influenced by prognostic factors that confer more aggressive tumor characteristics. However, in cases of recurrence, the systemic therapy with dendritic cells-based vaccine can be associated with a better outcome with regression of disease.

  5. Immunity and Tolerance Induced by Intestinal Mucosal Dendritic Cells

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    Julio Aliberti

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells present in the digestive tract are constantly exposed to environmental antigens, commensal flora, and invading pathogens. Under steady-state conditions, these cells have high tolerogenic potential, triggering differentiation of regulatory T cells to protect the host from unwanted proinflammatory immune responses to innocuous antigens or commensals. On the other hand, these cells must discriminate between commensal flora and invading pathogens and mount powerful immune response against pathogens. A potential result of unbalanced tolerogenic versus proinflammatory responses mediated by dendritic cells is associated with chronic inflammatory conditions, such as Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, food allergies, and celiac disease. Herein, we review the dendritic cell population involved in mediating tolerance and immunity in mucosal surfaces, the progress in unveiling their development in vivo, and factors that can influence their functions.

  6. A Model of Dendritic Cell Therapy for Melanoma

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    Ami eRadunskaya

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are a promising immunotherapy tool for boosting an individual's antigen specific immune response to cancer. We develop a mathematical model using differential and delay-differential equations to describe the interactions between dendritic cells, effector-immune cells and tumor cells. We account for the trafficking of immune cells between lymph, blood, and tumor compartments. Our model reflects experimental results both for dendritic-cell trafficking and for immune suppression of tumor growth in mice. In addition, in silico experiments suggest more effective immunotherapy treatment protocols can be achieved by modifying dose location and schedule. A sensitivity analysis of the model reveals which patient-specific parameters have the greatest impact on treatment efficacy.

  7. Human intestinal dendritic cells as controllers of mucosal immunity

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    David Bernardo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells are the most potent, professional antigen-presenting cells in the body; following antigen presentation they control the type (proinflammatory/regulatory of immune response that will take place, as well as its location. Given their high plasticity and maturation ability in response to local danger signals derived from innate immunity, dendritic cells are key actors in the connection between innate immunity and adaptive immunity responses. In the gut dendritic cells control immune tolerance mechanisms against food and/or commensal flora antigens, and are also capable of initiating an active immune response in the presence of invading pathogens. Dendritic cells are thus highly efficient in controlling the delicate balance between tolerance and immunity in an environment so rich in antigens as the gut, and any factor involving these cells may impact their function, ultimately leading to the development of bowel conditions such as celiac disease or inflammatory bowel disease. In this review we shall summarize our understanding of human intestinal dendritic cells, their ability to express and induce migration markers, the various environmental factors modulating their properties, their subsets in the gut, and the problems entailed by their study, including identification strategies, differences between humans and murine models, and phenotypical variations along the gastrointestinal tract.

  8. Hemorrhagic cystitis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants is the complex result of BK virus infection, preparative regimen intensity and donor type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Leandro de Padua; Patah, Poliana A; Saliba, Rima M; Szewczyk, Nicholas A; Gilman, Lisa; Neumann, Joyce; Han, Xiang-Yang; Tarrand, Jeffrey; Ribeiro, Rachel; Gulbis, Alison; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Jones, Roy; Popat, Uday; Walker, Julia A; Petropoulos, Demetrios; Chiattone, Alexandre; Stewart, John; El-Zimaity, Maha; Anderlini, Paolo; Giralt, Sergio; Champlin, Richard E; de Lima, Marcos

    2010-07-01

    Hemorrhagic cystitis is a common cause of morbidity after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, frequently associated with BK virus infection. We hypothesized that patients with positive BK viruria before unrelated or mismatched related donor allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have a higher incidence of hemorrhagic cystitis. To test this hypothesis, we prospectively studied 209 patients (median age 49 years, range 19-71) with hematologic malignancies who received bone marrow (n=78), peripheral blood (n=108) or umbilical cord blood (n=23) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation after myeloablative (n=110) or reduced intensity conditioning (n=99). Donors were unrelated (n=201) or haploidentical related (n=8). Twenty-five patients developed hemorrhagic cystitis. Pre-transplant BK viruria detected by quantitative PCR was positive in 96 patients. The one-year cumulative incidence of hemorrhagic cystitis was 16% in the PCR-positive group versus 9% in the PCR-negative group (P=0.1). The use of umbilical cord blood or a haploidentical donor was the only significant predictor of the incidence of hemorrhagic cystitis on univariate analysis. There was also a trend for a higher incidence after myeloablative conditioning. Multivariate analysis showed that patients who had a positive PCR pre-transplant and received haploidentical or cord blood grafts with myeloablative conditioning had a significantly higher risk of developing hemorrhagic cystitis (58%) than all other recipients (7%, PHemorrhagic cystitis is the result of a complex interaction of donor type, preparative regimen intensity, and BK viruria.

  9. Analysis of the changes in expression levels of sialic acid on influenza-virus-infected cells using lectin-tagged polymeric nanoparticles

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    Jaebum Cho

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections affect millions around the world, sometimes leading to severe consequences or even epidemics. Understanding the molecular dynamics during viral infections would provide crucial information for preventing or stopping the progress of infections. However, the current methods often involve the disruption of the infected cells or expensive and time-consuming procedures. In this study, fluorescent polymeric nanoparticles were fabricated and used as bioimaging nanoprobes that can monitor the progression of influenza viral infection through the changes in the expression levels of sialic acids expressed on the cell membrane. The nanoparticles were composed of a biocompatible monomer to prevent non-specific interactions, a hydrophobic monomer to form the core, a fluorescent monomer, and a protein-binding monomer to conjugate lectin, which binds sialic acids. It was shown that these lectin-tagged nanoparticles that specifically target sialic acids could track the changes in the expression levels of sialic acids caused by influenza viral infections in human lung epithelial cells. There was a sudden drop in the levels of sialic acid at the initial onset of virus infection (t = 0~1 hr and at approximately 4~5 hrs post-infection. The latter drop correlated with the production of viral proteins that was confirmed using traditional techniques. Thus, the accuracy, the rapidity and the efficacy of the nanoprobes were demonstrated. Such molecular bioimaging tools, which allow easy-handling and in situ monitoring, would be useful to directly observe and decipher the viral infection mechanisms.

  10. Oral squamous cell carcinoma patients which human papilloma virus infection: a case control study in Muwardi Hospital Surakarta, Central Java, Indonesia

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    SUHARTONO TAAT PUTRA

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Prayitno A, Aznar E, Poernomo, Putra ST. 2011. Oral squamous cell carcinoma patients which human papilloma virus infection: a case control study in Muwardi Hospital Surakarta, Central Java, Indonesia. Nusantara Bioscience 3: 64-67. Annual incidence rates for oral and pharyngeal cancer are estimated at 25 cases per 100,000 in developing countries. Human papilloma virus (HPV was implicated in pathogenesis of Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma (OSCC. Aims of this research were to know the incidence of OSSC patient which realized HPV infection. Women OSCC (15 and Benign Oral Squamous Cells (BOSC (40 tissue biopsy frozen sections were from Departement of Oral and Dental, Muwardi Hospital in Surakarta from January to December 2007. Tissue was cut into two parts. To ascertain the type of neoplasm was subsequently stains with HE. To amplify the L1-HPV gene for 450bp long. The collected data was analyzed by Chi Square Test. The result of this experiment showed nine patients from 40 patients BOSC identified have HPV infections (9/40 = 23%. Eleven patient from 15 patient OSCC identified have HPV infections (11/15 = 73%. From Chi Square analysis have significant differences between BOSC and OSCC. HPV is a factor for OSCC pathogenesis.

  11. Rice Bran Feruloylated Oligosaccharides Activate Dendritic Cells via Toll-Like Receptor 2 and 4 Signaling

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    Chi Chen Lin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the effects of feruloylated oligosaccharides (FOs of rice bran on murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs and the potential pathway through which the effects are mediated. We found that FOs induced phenotypic maturation of DCs, as shown by the increased expression of CD40, CD80/CD86 and MHC-I/II molecules. FOs efficiently induced maturation of DCs generated from C3H/HeN or C57BL/6 mice with normal toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4 or TLR-2 but not DCs from mice with mutated TLR4 or TLR2. The mechanism of action of FOs may be mediated by increased phosphorylation of ERK, p38 and JNK mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPKs and increased NF-kB activity, which are important signaling molecules downstream of TLR-4 and TLR-2. These data suggest that FOs induce DCs maturation through TLR-4 and/or TLR-2 and that FOs might have potential efficacy against tumor or virus infection or represent a candidate-adjuvant approach for application in immunotherapy and vaccination.

  12. Actin' on HIV: How Dendritic Cells Spread Infection.

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    Donahue, Daniel A; Schwartz, Olivier

    2016-03-09

    Dendritic cells (DCs) capture HIV particles and transmit them to CD4 T cells. In a recent article published in Cell, Ménager and Littman (2016) perform an shRNA screen in DCs and find that actin nucleation and stabilization regulate HIV uptake and maintain the virus on membrane protrusions for efficient transfer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Interferon-γ Inhibits Ebola Virus Infection.

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    Bethany A Rhein

    Full Text Available Ebola virus outbreaks, such as the 2014 Makona epidemic in West Africa, are episodic and deadly. Filovirus antivirals are currently not clinically available. Our findings suggest interferon gamma, an FDA-approved drug, may serve as a novel and effective prophylactic or treatment option. Using mouse-adapted Ebola virus, we found that murine interferon gamma administered 24 hours before or after infection robustly protects lethally-challenged mice and reduces morbidity and serum viral titers. Furthermore, we demonstrated that interferon gamma profoundly inhibits Ebola virus infection of macrophages, an early cellular target of infection. As early as six hours following in vitro infection, Ebola virus RNA levels in interferon gamma-treated macrophages were lower than in infected, untreated cells. Addition of the protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, to interferon gamma-treated macrophages did not further reduce viral RNA levels, suggesting that interferon gamma blocks life cycle events that require protein synthesis such as virus replication. Microarray studies with interferon gamma-treated human macrophages identified more than 160 interferon-stimulated genes. Ectopic expression of a select group of these genes inhibited Ebola virus infection. These studies provide new potential avenues for antiviral targeting as these genes that have not previously appreciated to inhibit negative strand RNA viruses and specifically Ebola virus infection. As treatment of interferon gamma robustly protects mice from lethal Ebola virus infection, we propose that interferon gamma should be further evaluated for its efficacy as a prophylactic and/or therapeutic strategy against filoviruses. Use of this FDA-approved drug could rapidly be deployed during future outbreaks.

  14. Distinct T and NK cell populations may serve as immune correlates of protection against symptomatic pandemic influenza A(H1N1 virus infection during pregnancy.

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    Miloje Savic

    Full Text Available Maternal influenza infection during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. However, the link between the anti-influenza immune responses and health-related risks during infection is not well understood. We have analyzed memory T and NK cell mediated immunity (CMI responses in pandemic influenza A(H1N1pdm09 (pdm09 virus infected non-vaccinated pregnant women participating in the Norwegian Influenza Pregnancy Cohort (NorFlu. The cohort includes information on immunization, self-reported health and disease status, and biological samples (plasma and PBMC. Infected cases (N = 75 were defined by having a serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI titer > = 20 to influenza pdm09 virus at the time of delivery, while controls (N = 75 were randomly selected among non-infected pregnant women (HI titer <10. In ELISpot assays cases had higher frequencies of IFNγ+ CD8+ T cells responding to pdm09 virus or conserved CD8 T cell-restricted influenza A virus epitopes, compared to controls. Within this T cell population, frequencies of CD95+ late effector (CD45RA+CCR7- and naive (CD45RA+CCR7+ CD8+ memory T cells correlated inversely with self-reported influenza illness (ILI symptoms. ILI symptoms in infected women were also associated with lower numbers of poly-functional (IFNγ+TNFα+, IL2+IFNγ+, IL2+IFNγ+TNFα+ CD4+ T cells and increased frequencies of IFNγ+CD3-CD7+ NK cells compared to asymptomatic cases, or controls, after stimulation with the pdm09 virus. Taken together, virus specific and functionally distinct T and NK cell populations may serve as cellular immune correlates of clinical outcomes of pandemic influenza disease in pregnant women. Our results may provide information important for future universal influenza vaccine design.

  15. Influenza virus infection but not H1N1 influenza virus immunization is associated with changes in peripheral blood NK cell subset levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Reyes, A; Noyola, D E; Monsiváis-Urenda, A; Alvarez-Quiroga, C; González-Amaro, R

    2013-08-01

    The innate immune system constitutes the first line of defense against viral agents, and NK cells seem to have an important protective role during the early phases of influenza virus infections. We decided to assess the levels of NK and NKT lymphocytes and the expression levels of different membrane receptors (NKp44, NKp46, NKG2A, killer cell immune-like receptor [KIR] 3DL1/DS1, KIR2DL1/DS1, and CD161) in peripheral blood samples of patients with influenza (n = 17) and healthy individuals immunized against this virus (seasonal and [H1N1]pdm2009 influenza vaccines; n = 15 and 12, respectively). Blood samples were obtained from all individuals, and NK and NKT cell subsets were analyzed by multiparametric flow cytometry. We found that the patients with severe influenza (n = 9) showed significant increases in the percentages of NKp46(+) NKp44(+) NK cells and the proportions of NK and NKT lymphocytes expressing KIR2DL1 and KIR3DL1 and reductions in the percentages of NKp46(+) NKp44(-) NK cells compared to those in the healthy controls (n = 27). In contrast, influenza immunization, against either the seasonal or the pandemic H1N1 virus, was not associated with important changes in the levels of NK and NKT lymphocytes or the expression levels of the different receptors by these cells. Our data suggest that severe influenza is associated with important and complex alterations on NK cells, which might contribute to the pathogenesis of this condition.

  16. Distinct T and NK cell populations may serve as immune correlates of protection against symptomatic pandemic influenza A(H1N1) virus infection during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savic, Miloje; Dembinski, Jennifer L; Laake, Ida; Hungnes, Olav; Cox, Rebecca; Oftung, Fredrik; Trogstad, Lill; Mjaaland, Siri

    2017-01-01

    Maternal influenza infection during pregnancy is associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. However, the link between the anti-influenza immune responses and health-related risks during infection is not well understood. We have analyzed memory T and NK cell mediated immunity (CMI) responses in pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 (pdm09) virus infected non-vaccinated pregnant women participating in the Norwegian Influenza Pregnancy Cohort (NorFlu). The cohort includes information on immunization, self-reported health and disease status, and biological samples (plasma and PBMC). Infected cases (N = 75) were defined by having a serum hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titer > = 20 to influenza pdm09 virus at the time of delivery, while controls (N = 75) were randomly selected among non-infected pregnant women (HI titer virus or conserved CD8 T cell-restricted influenza A virus epitopes, compared to controls. Within this T cell population, frequencies of CD95+ late effector (CD45RA+CCR7-) and naive (CD45RA+CCR7+) CD8+ memory T cells correlated inversely with self-reported influenza illness (ILI) symptoms. ILI symptoms in infected women were also associated with lower numbers of poly-functional (IFNγ+TNFα+, IL2+IFNγ+, IL2+IFNγ+TNFα+) CD4+ T cells and increased frequencies of IFNγ+CD3-CD7+ NK cells compared to asymptomatic cases, or controls, after stimulation with the pdm09 virus. Taken together, virus specific and functionally distinct T and NK cell populations may serve as cellular immune correlates of clinical outcomes of pandemic influenza disease in pregnant women. Our results may provide information important for future universal influenza vaccine design.

  17. Involvement of dendritic cells in autoimmune diseases in children

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    Reed Ann M

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DCs are professional antigen-presenting cells that are specialized in the uptake of antigens and their transport from peripheral tissues to the lymphoid organs. Over the last decades, the properties of DCs have been intensely studied and much knowledge has been gained about the role of DCs in various diseases and health conditions where the immune system is involved, particularly in cancer and autoimmune disorders. Emerging clues in autoimmune diseases, suggest that dendritic cell dysregulation might be involved in the development of various autoimmune disorders in both adults and children. However, studies investigating a possible contribution of DCs in autoimmune diseases in the pediatric population alone are scanty. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current literature on the relevance of dendritic cells in the most common autoimmune conditions of childhood.

  18. Occult Hepatitis B virus infection in previously screened, blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: implications for blood transfusion and stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olotu, Amadin A; Oyelese, Adesola O; Salawu, Lateef; Audu, Rosemary A; Okwuraiwe, Azuka P; Aboderin, Aaron O

    2016-05-05

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission through blood transfusion is reduced by screening for hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). However this method cannot detect the presence of occult hepatitis B virus infection. This study sought to determine the prevalence of occult hepatitis B virus infection among blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria. For the first time in Nigeria we employed an automated real-time PCR- method to investigate the prevalence of occult HBV in blood donors. Blood donors screened with HBsAg immunochromatographic rapid test kits at the blood transfusion units of two hospitals and found to be negative were recruited into the study. Questionnaires to elicit risk factors for HBV infection were administered and then 10 ml of blood was collected from each donor. Plasma samples obtained from these HBsAg negative blood donors were screened again for HBsAg using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method, and those found negative were screened for the presence of total antibody to the HBV core antigen (anti-HBc) using ELISA method. Those positive to anti-HBc were then tested for HBV DNA, using an automated real-time PCR method. Five hundred and seven blood donors found HBsAg negative by immunochromatographic rapid test kits at both blood transfusion units, were tested for HBsAg using ELISA and 5 (1 %) were HBsAg positive. The 502 found negative were tested for anti-HBc and 354 (70.5 %) were found positive implying previous exposure to HBV and 19 (5.4 %) of the 354 anti-HBc positive had HBV DNA signifying occult HBV infection. No risk factors were found to be associated with the presence of HBV DNA among those who tested positive. Occult HBV infection exists in blood donors in Ile-Ife, Nigeria and the use of HBsAg alone for screening prospective donors will not eliminate the risk of HBV transmission in blood transfusion or stem cell transplantation.

  19. Defining dendritic cells by conditional and constitutive cell ablation.

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    Bar-On, Liat; Jung, Steffen

    2010-03-01

    Recent years have seen a major advance in our understanding of the organization of the dendritic cell (DC) compartment. Particularly rewarding in this respect have been studies investigating DC origins, based on the identification of transcription factor and growth factor requirements, as well as direct demonstrations of precursor/progeny relationships by adoptive cell transfers. However, to fully understand the organization of the DC compartment, functional definitions of DC subsets must be provided and potential task divisions revealed that distinguish DC from other immune cells, including the closely related mononuclear phagocytes, such as macrophages. In fact, functional definitions might eventually replace the current distinction between DC and macrophages, which is in part based on arbitrary historic considerations, i.e. mononuclear phagocytes identified before the advent of DC in the mid 1970s generally termed macrophages. In this article, we review recent insight in the functions of classical DC in the mouse, focusing on our own work involving conditional and constitutive cell ablation.

  20. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell Lymphoma: A Questionable Association with Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma

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    Daniel Benharroch

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An elderly woman presented with generalized lymphadenopathy, several systemic symptoms, and splenomegaly. An inguinal lymph node excision revealed a compound picture. One aspect of the lymph node morphology, including cells with follicular T-helper cell phenotype, was most consistent with angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The other component, revealing spindle cells forming whorls with immunostaining for CD21, CD23, and fascin, might be an integral part of this T-cell lymphoma. However, due to the often massive involvement of the nodal tissue by these follicular dendritic cells, these areas were questionably suggestive of involvement by follicular dendritic cell sarcoma. We raise herein the issue of the borderline area between advanced follicular dendritic cell expansion in angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma and a massive follicular dendritic cell proliferation consistent with follicular dendritic cells sarcoma, in the absence of a genomic analysis.

  1. A distinct subtype of Epstein Barr virus positive T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disorder: Adult patients with chronic active Epstein Barr virus infection-like features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Keisuke; Miyoshi, Hiroaki; Suzuki, Takaharu; Kozai, Yasuji; Kato, Koji; Miyahara, Masaharu; Yujiri, Toshiaki; Oishi, Naoki; Choi, Ilseung; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Muta, Tsuyoshi; Kume, Masaaki; Moriguchi, Sayaka; Tamura, Shinobu; Kato, Takeharu; Tagawa, Hiroyuki; Makiyama, Junya; Kanisawa, Yuji; Sasaki, Yuya; Kurita, Daisuke; Yamada, Kyohei; Shimono, Joji; Sone, Hirohito; Takizawa, Jun; Seto, Masao; Kimura, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Koichi

    2017-12-14

    The characteristics of adult patients with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (adult-onset CAEBV) are poorly recognized, hindering early diagnosis and an improved prognosis. Adult-onset CAEBV (n = 54) diagnosed between 2005 and 2015 were conducted. Adult-onset was defined as an estimated age of onset ≥15 years. To characterize the clinical features of adult-onset CAEBV, we compared them to those of pediatric-onset (estimated age of onset Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen antibody titer, and the presence of hemophagocytic syndrome were associated with a poor prognosis (P = 0.0087, P = 0.0236, and P = 0.0149, respectively). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may improve survival (P = 0.0289). Compared to that for pediatric-onset CAEBV and ENKTL, adult-onset CAEBV had a poorer prognosis (P < 0.001 and P = 0.0484, respectively). CAEBV can develop in a wide age-range, with clinical differences between adult-onset and pediatric-onset CAEBV. Adult-onset CAEBV is a disease with a poor prognosis and further research is needed. Copyright © 2017, Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  2. Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection associated with hemophagocytic syndrome and extra-nodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma in an 18-year-old girl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yawei; Yang, Junwen; Lian, Guanghui; Chen, Shuijiao; Chen, Linlin; Li, Fujun

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus infection (CAEBV) associated with hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) and extra-nodal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphoma (ENKL) is a rare life-threatening disorder. This disease is easily misdiagnosed because of its varied presentations. Patient concerns: An 18-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with a history of edema in the lower limbs and intermittent fever lasting for more than 1 month. At admission, she had severe liver injury of unknown etiology. Laboratory test results revealed pancytopenia, hyperferritinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypofibrinogenemia. Results of serologic tests for EBV were positive. Results of a skin biopsy indicated EBV-positive NK/T-cell lymphoma, and bone marrow aspiration revealed focal hemophagocytosis and atypical lymphoid cells. Diagnosis: On the basis of these findings, we diagnosed the case as extra-nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma-associated HPS (natural killer/T-cell lymphoma-associated hemophagocytic syndrome), which is commonly induced by CAEBV. Interventions: Treatment consisted of general management of hepatitis, supplemented with albumin and empirical antibiotic therapy. Outcomes: The patient died from massive gastrointestinal hemorrhage a week after she was discharged from the hospital. Lessons: ENKL and HPS present with varied features and are generally fatal; therefore, clinicians should proceed with caution in suspected cases. HPS should be considered when the patient presents with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, pancytopenia, and liver failure. When HPS is suspected, clinicians should determine the underlying cause, such as severe infection, including infection with viruses such as EBV; genetic predisposition; or underlying malignancies, especially lymphoma because of its strong association with HPS. PMID:28489771

  3. Tumor-Mediated Suppression of Dendritic Cell Vaccines

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Akporiaye, Emmanuel

    2004-01-01

    .... One of these factors is Transforming Growth Factor-beta (TGF-beta). TGF-beta is produced in large quantities by different types of cancer including breast cancer and inhibits the actions of several immune cells including dendritic cells (DC...

  4. Investigating Human Dendritic Cell Immune Responses to Borrelia burgdorferi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Lauren M. K.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2018-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that recognize and phagocytose pathogens, and help to orchestrate adaptive immune responses to combat them. DCs are abundant in the skin where Borrelia burgdorferi first enters the body during a tick bite, and are thus critical in

  5. Phenotypical and functional characterization of clinical-grade dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, I.J.M. de; Adema, G.J.; Punt, C.J.A.; Figdor, C.G.

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen-presenting cells and form a promising new treatment modality. Fully activated DC loaded with antigen are very useful in stimulating immune responses, in particular those to combat cancer. Immature DC can either cause immunological tolerance or induce

  6. IL-10 control of dendritic cells in the skin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.E. Clausen (Bjorn); M.J.H. Girard-Madoux (Mathilde)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractInterleukin-10 (IL-10) is a potent immunomodulatory cytokine, whose cellular targets have not yet been precisely identified. Mice bearing a dendritic cell (DC)-specific defect in the IL-10 receptor mice exhibit exaggerated T-cell reactivation in the skin, highlighting a key function of

  7. Dendritic cell maturation results in pronounced changes in glycan expression affecting recognition by siglecs and galectins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bax, Marieke; Garcia-Vallejo, Juan J.; Jang-Lee, Jihye; North, Simon J.; Gilmartin, Tim J.; Hernandez, Gilberto; Crocker, Paul R.; Leffler, Hakon; Head, Steven R.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Dell, Anne; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent APC in the organism. Immature dendritic cells (iDC) reside in the tissue where they capture pathogens whereas mature dendritic cells (mDC) are able to activate T cells in the lymph node. This dramatic functional change is mediated by an important genetic

  8. Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pandemic Other Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Language: English (US) Español Recommend on Facebook Tweet ... A Viruses Avian Influenza A Virus Infections in Humans Although avian influenza A viruses usually do not ...

  9. miR-146a negatively regulates the induction of proinflammatory cytokines in response to Japanese encephalitis virus infection in microglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Minnan; Du, Ganqin; Zhao, Jiegang; Du, Xiaowei

    2017-06-01

    Increasing evidence confirms the involvement of virus infection and miRNA, such as miR-146a, in neuroinflammation-associated epilepsy. In the present study, we investigated the upregulation of miR-146a with RT-qPCR and in situ hybridization methods in a mice infection model of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) and in vitro. Subsequently we investigated the involvement of miR-146a in modulating JEV-induced neuroinflammation. It was demonstrated that JEV infection promoted miR-146a production in BALB/c mice brain and in cultured mouse microglial C8-B4 cells, along with pro-inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-β and IFN-α. We also found that miR-146a exerted negative regulatory effects upon IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-β and IFN-α in C8-B4 cells. Accordingly, miR-146a downregulation with a miR-146a inhibitor promoted the upregulation of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, IFN-β and IFN-α, whereas miR-146a upregulation with miR-146a mimics reduced the upregulation of these cytokines. Moreover, miR-146a exerted no regulation upon JEV growth in C8-B4 cells. In conclusion, JEV infection upregulated miR-146a and pro-inflammatory cytokine production, in mice brain and in cultured C8-B4 cells. Furthermore, miR-146a negatively regulated the production of JEV-induced pro-inflammatory cytokines, in virus growth independent fashion, identifying miR-146a as a negative feedback regulator in JEV-induced neuroinflammation, and possibly in epilepsy.

  10. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Infects Follicular Helper CD4 T Cells in Lymphoid Tissues during Pathogenic Infection of Pigtail Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yin; Weatherall, Chris; Bailey, Michelle; Alcantara, Sheilajen; De Rose, Robert; Estaquier, Jerome; Wilson, Kim; Suzuki, Kazuo; Corbeil, Jacques; Cooper, David A.; Kent, Stephen J.; Kelleher, Anthony D.

    2013-01-01

    T follicular helper (Tfh) cells are a specialized subset of memory CD4+ T cells that are found exclusively within the germinal centers of secondary lymphoid tissues and are important for adaptive antibody responses and B cell memory. Tfh cells do not express CCR5, the primary entry coreceptor for both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), and therefore, we hypothesized that these cells would avoid infection. We studied lymph nodes and spleens from pigtail macaques infected with pathogenic strain SIVmac239 or SIVmac251, to investigate the susceptibility of Tfh cells to SIV infection. Pigtail macaque PD-1high CD127low memory CD4+ T cells have a phenotype comparable to that of human Tfh cells, expressing high levels of CXCR5, interleukin-21 (IL-21), Bcl-6, and inducible T cell costimulator (ICOS). As judged by either proviral DNA or cell-associated viral RNA measurements, macaque Tfh cells were infected with SIV at levels comparable to those in other CD4+ memory T cells. Infection of macaque Tfh cells was evident within weeks of inoculation, yet we confirmed that Tfh cells do not express CCR5 or either of the well-known alternative SIV coreceptors, CXCR6 and GPR15. Mutations in the SIV envelope gp120 region occurred in chronically infected macaques but were uniform across each T cell subset investigated, indicating that the viruses used the same coreceptors to enter different cell subsets. Early infection of Tfh cells represents an unexpected focus of viral infection. Infection of Tfh cells does not interrupt antibody production but may be a factor that limits the quality of antibody responses and has implications for assessing the size of the viral reservoir. PMID:23325697

  11. Highly active antiretroviral therapy normalizes the function of progenitor cells in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam Nielsen, S; Kjaer Ersboll, A; Mathiesen, Lars Reinhardt

    1998-01-01

    CD34 cells from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons have been described to be impaired in function. The effect of highly active antiretroviral treatment (HAART) on the function of CD34 cells in HIV-infected patients was examined. Numbers and function of CD34 cells from 11 HIV....../mL eliminated the differences between HIV-infected patients and controls. Significant increases in numbers of CD34 cells were not detected. Of importance, the cloning efficiency of CD34 cells increased from 1.7% prior to therapy to a peak at 18.7% (P=.003). In conclusion, HAART normalized CD34 cell function...

  12. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  13. NK cells lacking FcεRIγ are associated with reduced liver damage in chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jun S; Ali, Alaa K; Kim, Sungjin; Corsi, Daniel J; Cooper, Curtis L; Lee, Seung-Hwan

    2016-04-01

    A novel subset of human natural killer (NK) cells, which displays potent and broad antiviral responsiveness in concert with virus-specific antibodies, was recently uncovered in cytomegalovirus (CMV)+ individuals. This NK-cell subset (g-NK) was characterized by a deficiency in the expression of FcεRIγ adaptor protein and the long-lasting memory-like NK-cell phenotype, suggesting a role in chronic infections. This study investigates whether the g-NK-cell subset is associated with the magnitude of liver disease during chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Analysis of g-NK-cell proportions and function in the PBMCs of healthy controls and chronic HCV subjects showed that chronic HCV subjects had slightly lower proportions of the g-NK-cell subset having similarly enhanced antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity responses compared to conventional NK cells. Notably, among CMV+ chronic HCV patients, lower levels of liver enzymes and fibrosis were found in those possessing g-NK cells. g-NK cells were predominant among the CD56(neg) NK cell population often found in chronic HCV patients, suggesting their involvement in immune response during HCV infection. For the first time, our findings indicate that the presence of the g-NK cells in CMV+ individuals is associated with amelioration of liver disease in chronic HCV infection, suggesting the beneficial roles of g-NK cells during a chronic infection. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Equine dendritic cells generated with horse serum have enhanced functionality in comparison to dendritic cells generated with fetal bovine serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, Anja; Everett, Helen; Hamza, Eman; Garbani, Mattia; Gerber, Vinzenz; Marti, Eliane; Steinbach, Falko

    2016-11-15

    Dendritic cells are professional antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in the initiation and modulation of T cell responses. They have been studied widely for their potential clinical applications, but for clinical use to be successful, alternatives to xenogeneic substances like fetal bovine serum (FBS) in cell culture need to be found. Protocols for the generation of dendritic cells ex vivo from monocytes are well established for several species, including horses. Currently, the gold standard protocol for generating dendritic cells from monocytes across various species relies upon a combination of GM-CSF and IL-4 added to cell culture medium which is supplemented with FBS. The aim of this study was to substitute FBS with heterologous horse serum. For this purpose, equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (eqMoDC) were generated in the presence of horse serum or FBS and analysed for the effect on morphology, phenotype and immunological properties. Changes in the expression of phenotypic markers (CD14, CD86, CD206) were assessed during dendritic cell maturation by flow cytometry. To obtain a more complete picture of the eqMoDC differentiation and assess possible differences between FBS- and horse serum-driven cultures, a transcriptomic microarray analysis was performed. Lastly, immature eqMoDC were primed with a primary antigen (ovalbumin) or a recall antigen (tetanus toxoid) and, after maturation, were co-cultured with freshly isolated autologous CD5 + T lymphocytes to assess their T cell stimulatory capacity. The microarray analysis demonstrated that eqMoDC generated with horse serum were indistinguishable from those generated with FBS. However, eqMoDC incubated with horse serum-supplemented medium exhibited a more characteristic dendritic cell morphology during differentiation from monocytes. A significant increase in cell viability was also observed in eqMoDC cultured with horse serum. Furthermore, eqMoDC generated in the presence of horse serum

  15. DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin on dendritic cells that unveils many aspects of dendritic cell biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Engering, Anneke; van Kooyk, Yvette

    2002-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are present in essentially every tissue where they operate at the interface of innate and acquired immunity by recognizing pathogens and presenting pathogen-derived peptides to T cells. It is becoming clear that not all C-type lectins on DC serve as antigen receptors recognizing

  16. Characterization of natural Epstein-Barr virus infection and replication in smooth muscle cells from a leiomyosarcoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenson, H B; Montalvo, E A; McClain, K L; Ench, Y; Heard, P; Christy, B A; Dewalt-Hagan, P J; Moyer, M P

    1999-01-01

    Cells from a leiomyosarcoma tumor (LMS-1) from a patient with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were explanted, cultured in vitro, and studied by phase-contrast microscopy for morphologic and growth characteristics, immunostaining for cell markers, EBER in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction for detection of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and immunostaining for expression of EBV antigens. The cells exhibited very slow growth in vitro, with unusual elliptical and spindle-shaped morphology and fragmentation of the cytoplasm into long, tapering, cytoplasmic processes. Greater than 90% of cells expressed diffuse distribution of the smooth muscle isoform of actin by immunoperoxidase staining. Approximately 25% of cells expressed very bright fluorescence by immunostaining of the smooth muscle isoforms of calponin and actin. The majority of cells demonstrated a weak signal for CD21; approximately 5-10% of cells showed a strong signal that was confined to cell surfaces. The cultured cells harbored EBV, and infectious EBV continued to be detected by polymerase chain reaction and virus culture through several passages in vitro. Several EBV antigens were expressed, including latent antigen EBNA-1, immediate-early antigen BZLF1, early antigen EA-D, and late antigens, including viral capsid antigen p160, gp125, and membrane antigen gp350. Human umbilical cord lymphocytes that were transformed with virus isolated from cultured cells yielded immortalized cell lines that expressed EBV antigens similar to other EBV-transformed lymphocyte cell lines. These results confirm that EBV is capable of lytic infection of smooth muscle cells with expression of a repertoire of latent and replicative viral products and production of infectious virus. EBV infection of smooth muscle cells may contribute to the oncogenesis of leiomyosarcomas.

  17. Additive protection by antioxidant and apoptosis-inhibiting effects on mosquito cells with dengue 2 virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien-Huang Chen

    Full Text Available Cytopathic effects (CPEs in mosquito cells are generally trivial compared to those that occur in mammalian cells, which usually end up undergoing apoptosis during dengue virus (DENV infection. However, oxidative stress was detected in both types of infected cells. Despite this, the survival of mosquito cells benefits from the upregulation of genes related to antioxidant defense, such as glutathione S transferase (GST. A second defense system, i.e., consisting of antiapoptotic effects, was also shown to play a role in protecting mosquito cells against DENV infection. This system is regulated by an inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP that is an upstream regulator of caspases-9 and -3. DENV-infected C6/36 cells with double knockdown of GST and the IAP showed a synergistic effect on activation of these two caspases, causing a higher rate of apoptosis (> 20% than those with knockdown of each single gene (-10%. It seems that the IAP acts as a second line of defense with an additional effect on the survival of mosquito cells with DENV infection. Compared to mammalian cells, residual hydrogen peroxide in DENV-infected C6/36 cells may signal for upregulation of the IAP. This novel finding sheds light on virus/cell interactions and their coevolution that may elucidate how mosquitoes can be a vector of DENV and probably most other arboviruses in nature.

  18. Type I and Type II Interferon Coordinately Regulate Suppressive Dendritic Cell Fate and Function during Viral Persistence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron R Cunningham

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Persistent viral infections are simultaneously associated with chronic inflammation and highly potent immunosuppressive programs mediated by IL-10 and PDL1 that attenuate antiviral T cell responses. Inhibiting these suppressive signals enhances T cell function to control persistent infection; yet, the underlying signals and mechanisms that program immunosuppressive cell fates and functions are not well understood. Herein, we use lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection (LCMV to demonstrate that the induction and functional programming of immunosuppressive dendritic cells (DCs during viral persistence are separable mechanisms programmed by factors primarily considered pro-inflammatory. IFNγ first induces the de novo development of naive monocytes into DCs with immunosuppressive potential. Type I interferon (IFN-I then directly targets these newly generated DCs to program their potent T cell immunosuppressive functions while simultaneously inhibiting conventional DCs with T cell stimulating capacity. These mechanisms of monocyte conversion are constant throughout persistent infection, establishing a system to continuously interpret and shape the immunologic environment. MyD88 signaling was required for the differentiation of suppressive DCs, whereas inhibition of stimulatory DCs was dependent on MAVS signaling, demonstrating a bifurcation in the pathogen recognition pathways that promote distinct elements of IFN-I mediated immunosuppression. Further, a similar suppressive DC origin and differentiation was also observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, HIV infection and cancer. Ultimately, targeting the underlying mechanisms that induce immunosuppression could simultaneously prevent multiple suppressive signals to further restore T cell function and control persistent infections.

  19. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection is associated with long-standing perturbation of LFA-1 expression on CD8+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Scheynius, A

    1995-01-01

    belonged to the CD8+LFA-1hi subset and, correspondingly, the ligand ICAM-1 was found to be up-regulated on endothelial cells in the inflamed meninges. Preincubation of LCMV-primed donor splenocytes with anti-LFA-1 markedly inhibited the transfer of virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity to naive......Flow cytometric analysis of splenocytes from mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus revealed marked and long-standing up-regulation of LFA-1 expression on CD8+, but not on CD4+ T cells. Appearance of CD8+ T cells with a changed expression of adhesion molecules reflected polyclonal...... activation and expansion which was demonstrated not to depend on CD4+ T cells or their products. Cell sorting experiments defined virus-specific CTL to be included in this population (LFA-1hiMEL-14lo), but since about 80% of splenic CD8+ T cells have a changed phenotype, extensive bystander activation must...

  20. Mapping and Role of the CD8+ T Cell Response During Primary Zika Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elong Ngono, Annie; Vizcarra, Edward A; Tang, William W; Sheets, Nicholas; Joo, Yunichel; Kim, Kenneth; Gorman, Matthew J; Diamond, Michael S; Shresta, Sujan

    2017-01-11

    CD8+ T cells may play a dual role in protection against and pathogenesis of flaviviruses, including Zika virus (ZIKV). We evaluated the CD8+ T cell response in ZIKV-infected LysMCre+IFNARfl/fl C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice lacking the type I interferon receptor in a subset of myeloid cells. In total, 26 and 15 CD8+ T cell-reactive peptides for ZIKV African (MR766) and Asian (FSS13025) lineage strains, respectively, were identified and validated. CD8+ T cells from infected mice were polyfunctional and mediated cytotoxicity. Adoptive transfer of ZIKV-immune CD8+ T cells reduced viral burdens, whereas their depletion led to higher tissue burdens, and CD8-/- mice displayed higher mortality with ZIKV infection. Collectively, these results demonstrate that CD8+ T cells protect against ZIKV infection. Further, this study provides a T cell competent mouse model for investigating ZIKV-specific T cell responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bidirectional factors impact the migration of NK cells to draining lymph node in aged mice during influenza virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xuefeng; Lu, Jiao; Wang, Haoyu; Liu, Xiaofei; Wang, Jing; Zhou, Kai; Jiang, Wei; Wang, Yingchun; Fang, Min

    2017-10-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in controlling several viral diseases. Our previous studies demonstrated an age-dependent susceptibility to mousepox due to defective NK cell responses and trafficking. However, the mechanisms that underlie the age-related impairment in NK cell migration have yet to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that after influenza A virus (IAV) infection, NK cells from aged mice (17-19months old) failed to accumulate in draining lymph node (D-LN). We found that both environmental and intrinsic factors played roles for this defect. After infection, increase of chemokine transcripts, especially CXCL9, 10 and 11, which are important for NK cells homing to D-LN, was significantly lower in the D-LN of aged mice compared with those of young mice. Further, the expression levels of β2-integrins and β-actins, which play critical roles in NK cells homing to D-LN failed to be up-regulated in NK cells from aged mice. Finally, actin polymerization rates in NK cells from aged mice were also delayed compared to that of the young mice after IAV infection. Taken together, our data indicate that bi-directional factors play essential roles in the defective NK cell trafficking to the D-LN in the aged mice after IAV infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Gene expression profiling of monkeypox virus-infected cells reveals novel interfaces for host-virus interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ichou Mohamed

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Monkeypox virus (MPV is a zoonotic Orthopoxvirus and a potential biothreat agent that causes human disease with varying morbidity and mortality. Members of the Orthopoxvirus genus have been shown to suppress antiviral cell defenses, exploit host cell machinery, and delay infection-induced cell death. However, a comprehensive study of all host genes and virus-targeted host networks during infection is lacking. To better understand viral strategies adopted in manipulating routine host biology on global scale, we investigated the effect of MPV infection on Macaca mulatta kidney epithelial cells (MK2 using GeneChip rhesus macaque genome microarrays. Functional analysis of genes differentially expressed at 3 and 7 hours post infection showed distinctive regulation of canonical pathways and networks. While the majority of modulated histone-encoding genes exhibited sharp copy number increases, many of its transcription regulators were substantially suppressed; suggesting involvement of unknown viral factors in host histone expression. In agreement with known viral dependence on actin in motility, egress, and infection of adjacent cells, our results showed extensive regulation of genes usually involved in controlling actin expression dynamics. Similarly, a substantial ratio of genes contributing to cell cycle checkpoints exhibited concerted regulation that favors cell cycle progression in G1, S, G2 phases, but arrest cells in G2 phase and inhibits entry into mitosis. Moreover, the data showed that large number of infection-regulated genes is involved in molecular mechanisms characteristic of cancer canonical pathways. Interestingly, ten ion channels and transporters showed progressive suppression during the course of infection. Although the outcome of this unusual channel expression on cell osmotic homeostasis remains unknown, instability of cell osmotic balance and membrane potential has been implicated in intracellular pathogens egress. Our

  3. Dengue virus infection mediates HMGB1 release from monocytes involving PCAF acetylase complex and induces vascular leakage in endothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siew Pei Ong

    Full Text Available High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1 protein is released from cells as a pro-inflammatory cytokine in response to an injury or infection. During dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF/dengue shock syndrome (DSS, a number of pro-inflammatory cytokines are released, contributing to disease pathogenesis. In this study, the release of HMGB1 from human myelogenous leukemia cell line K562 and primary peripheral blood monocytes (PBM cells was examined during dengue virus (DV-infection. HMGB1 was shown to translocate from cell nuclei to the cytoplasm in both K562- and PBM-infected cells. The translocation of HMGB1 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm was shown to be mediated by the host cell p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF acetylase complex in K562 cells. In addition, DV capsid protein was observed to be the putative viral protein in actuating HMGB1 migration from the nucleus to cytoplasm through the involvement of PCAF acetylase. HMGB1 was released from DV-infected K562 cells into the extracellular milieu in a multiplicity of infection (M.O.I.-independent manner and its release can be inhibited by the addition of 1-5 mM of ethyl pyruvate (EP in a dose-dependent manner. Application of DV-infected K562 cell culture supernatants to primary endothelial cells induced vascular permeability. In contrast, supernatants from DV-infected K562 cells treated with EP or HMGB1 neutralizing antibody were observed to maintain the structural integrity of the vascular barrier.

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  16. Characterization of temperature-sensitive HVJ (Sendai virus) infection in Vero cells: inhibitory mechanism of viral production at 41 degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Etsuko; Ishida, Yo-ichi; Sugimoto, Masao; Hiraki, Akihiro; Kim, Jeman

    2003-01-01

    In a previous study, it was found that the synthesis of hemagglutinating virus of Japan (HVJ; Sendai virus)-specific proteins was inhibited at the transcriptional level at 41 degrees in LLC-MK2 cells. During an investigation of the temperature sensitivity of HVJ production in other host cells, the synthesis of HVJ-specific proteins was recognized even at 41 degrees in Vero cells. Viral production, however, was not detected, indicating the inhibition of steps after the synthesis of viral proteins. Hemadsorption activity was not detected at 41 degrees, suggesting problems with the envelope proteins, especially hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) protein, at the cell membrane. Immunofluorescent staining and surface immunoprecipitation showed that HN protein was not present on the surface in spite of its localization in the cytoplasm. Further, analysis of the cell membrane fraction suggested that fusion (F) protein was integrated into the cell membrane but HN protein was not at 41 degrees. Electron microscopic observation showed that budding sites with spike structures formed and nucleocapsids assembled under the sites at 41 degrees without HN protein, although budded HVJ virions were not detected. At this time, F protein was exposed to the cell membrane and interacted with matrix and nucleocapsid proteins. The results suggested that the suppression of HVJ production at 41 degrees was due to the absence of HN protein in the membrane of Vero cells. Copyright 2003 S. Karger AG, Basel

  17. Analysis of host- and strain-dependent cell death responses during infectious salmon anemia virus infection in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mjaaland Siri

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV is an aquatic orthomyxovirus and the causative agent of infectious salmon anemia (ISA, a disease of great importance in the Atlantic salmon farming industry. In vitro, ISAV infection causes cytophatic effect (CPE in cell lines from Atlantic salmon, leading to rounding and finally detachment of the cells from the substratum. In this study, we investigated the mode of cell death during in vitro ISAV infection in different Atlantic salmon cell lines, using four ISAV strains causing different mortality in vivo. Results The results show that caspase 3/7 activity increased during the course of infection in ASK and SHK-1 cells, infected cells showed increased surface expression of phosphatidylserine and increased PI uptake, compared to mock infected cells; and morphological alterations of the mitochondria were observed. Expression analysis of immune relevant genes revealed no correlation between in vivo mortality and expression, but good correlation in expression of interferon genes. Conclusion Results from this study indicate that there is both strain and cell type dependent differences in the virus-host interaction during ISAV infection. This is important to bear in mind when extrapolating in vitro findings to the in vivo situation.

  18. Cytomegalovirus-Driven Adaptive-Like Natural Killer Cell Expansions Are Unaffected by Concurrent Chronic Hepatitis Virus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David F. G. Malone

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Adaptive-like expansions of natural killer (NK cell subsets are known to occur in response to human cytomegalovirus (CMV infection. These expansions are typically made up of NKG2C+ NK cells with particular killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR expression patterns. Such NK cell expansion patterns are also seen in patients with viral hepatitis infection. Yet, it is not known if the viral hepatitis infection promotes the appearance of such expansions or if effects are solely attributed to underlying CMV infection. In sizeable cohorts of CMV seropositive hepatitis B virus (HBV, hepatitis C virus (HCV, and hepatitis delta virus (HDV infected patients, we analyzed NK cells for expression of NKG2A, NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory KIRs to assess the appearance of NK cell expansions characteristic of what has been seen in CMV seropositive healthy individuals. Adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in viral hepatitis patients were strongly associated with CMV seropositivity. The number of subjects with these expansions did not differ between CMV seropositive viral hepatitis patients and corresponding healthy controls. Hence, we conclude that adaptive-like NK cell expansions observed in HBV, HCV, and/or HDV infected individuals are not caused by the chronic hepatitis infections per se, but rather are a consequence of underlying CMV infection.

  19. RNA-Seq Based Transcriptome Analysis of the Type I Interferon Host Response upon Vaccinia Virus Infection of Mouse Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Hernáez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Vaccinia virus (VACV encodes the soluble type I interferon (IFN binding protein B18 that is secreted from infected cells and also attaches to the cell surface, as an immunomodulatory strategy to inhibit the host IFN response. By using next generation sequencing technologies, we performed a detailed RNA-seq study to dissect at the transcriptional level the modulation of the IFN based host response by VACV and B18. Transcriptome profiling of L929 cells after incubation with purified recombinant B18 protein showed that attachment of B18 to the cell surface does not trigger cell signalling leading to transcriptional activation. Consistent with its ability to bind type I IFN, B18 completely inhibited the IFN-mediated modulation of host gene expression. Addition of UV-inactivated virus particles to cell cultures altered the expression of a set of 53 cellular genes, including genes involved in innate immunity. Differential gene expression analyses of cells infected with replication competent VACV identified the activation of a broad range of host genes involved in multiple cellular pathways. Interestingly, we did not detect an IFN-mediated response among the transcriptional changes induced by VACV, even after the addition of IFN to cells infected with a mutant VACV lacking B18. This is consistent with additional viral mechanisms acting at different levels to block IFN responses during VACV infection.

  20. Retinal ganglion cell dendritic atrophy in DBA/2J glaucoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pete A Williams

    Full Text Available Glaucoma is a complex disease affecting an estimated 70 million people worldwide, characterised by the progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells and accompanying visual field loss. The common site of damage to retinal ganglion cells is thought to be at the optic nerve head, however evidence from other optic neuropathies and neurodegenerative disorders suggests that dendritic structures undergo a prolonged period of atrophy that may accompany or even precede soma loss and neuronal cell death. Using the DBA/2J mouse model of glaucoma this investigation aims to elucidate the impact of increasing intraocular pressure on retinal ganglion cell dendrites using DBA/2J mice that express YFP throughout the retinal ganglion cells driven by Thy1 (DBA/2J.Thy1(YFP and DiOlistically labelled retinal ganglion cells in DBA/2J mice. Here we show retinal ganglion cell dendritic degeneration in DiOlistically labelled DBA/2J retinal ganglion cells but not in the DBA/2J.Thy1(YFP retinal ganglion cells suggesting that a potential downregulation of Thy1 allows only 'healthy' retinal ganglion cells to express YFP. These data may highlight alternative pathways to retinal ganglion cell loss in DBA/2J glaucoma.

  1. Specificity and dynamics of effector and memory CD8 T cell responses in human tick-borne encephalitis virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Blom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV is transferred to humans by ticks. The virus causes tick-borne encephalitis (TBE with symptoms such as meningitis and meningoencephalitis. About one third of the patients suffer from long-lasting sequelae after clearance of the infection. Studies of the immune response during TBEV-infection are essential to the understanding of host responses to TBEV-infection and for the development of therapeutics. Here, we studied in detail the primary CD8 T cell response to TBEV in patients with acute TBE. Peripheral blood CD8 T cells mounted a considerable response to TBEV-infection as assessed by Ki67 and CD38 co-expression. These activated cells showed a CD45RA-CCR7-CD127- phenotype at day 7 after hospitalization, phenotypically defining them as effector cells. An immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted TBEV epitope was identified and utilized to study the characteristics and temporal dynamics of the antigen-specific response. The functional profile of TBEV-specific CD8 T cells was dominated by variants of mono-functional cells as the effector response matured. Antigen-specific CD8 T cells predominantly displayed a distinct Eomes+Ki67+T-bet+ effector phenotype at the peak of the response, which transitioned to an Eomes-Ki67-T-bet+ phenotype as the infection resolved and memory was established. These transcription factors thus characterize and discriminate stages of the antigen-specific T cell response during acute TBEV-infection. Altogether, CD8 T cells responded strongly to acute TBEV infection and passed through an effector phase, prior to gradual differentiation into memory cells with distinct transcription factor expression-patterns throughout the different phases.

  2. Detailed morphological characterisation of Hendra virus infection of different cell types using super-resolution and conventional imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monaghan, Paul; Green, Diane; Pallister, Jackie; Klein, Reuben; White, John; Williams, Catherine; McMillan, Paul; Tilley, Leann; Lampe, Marko; Hawes, Pippa; Wang, Lin-Fa

    2014-11-27

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a pleomorphic virus belonging to the Paramyxovirus family. Our long-term aim is to understand the process of assembly of HeV virions. As a first step, we sought to determine the most appropriate cell culture system with which to study this process, and then to use this model to define the morphology of the virus and identify the site of assembly by imaging key virus encoded proteins in infected cells. A range of primary cells and immortalised cell lines were infected with HeV, fixed at various time points post-infection, labelled for HeV proteins and imaged by confocal, super-resolution and transmission electron microscopy. Significant differences were noted in viral protein distribution depending on the infected cell type. At 8 hpi HeV G protein was detected in the endoplasmic reticulum and M protein was seen predominantly in the nucleus in all cells tested. At 18 hpi, HeV-infected Vero cells showed M and G proteins throughout the cell and in transmission electron microscope (TEM) sections, in pleomorphic virus-like structures. In HeV infected MDBK, A549 and HeLa cells, HeV M protein was seen predominantly in the nucleus with G protein at the membrane. In HeV-infected primary bovine and porcine aortic endothelial cells and two bat-derived cell lines, HeV M protein was not seen at such high levels in the nucleus at any time point tested (8,12, 18, 24, 48 hpi) but was observed predominantly at the cell surface in a punctate pattern co-localised with G protein. These HeV M and G positive structures were confirmed as round HeV virions by TEM and super-resolution (SR) microscopy. SR imaging demonstrated for the first time sub-virion imaging of paramyxovirus proteins and the respective localisation of HeV G, M and N proteins within virions. These findings provide novel insights into the structure of HeV and show that for HeV imaging studies the choice of tissue culture cells may affect the experimental results. The results also indicate that He

  3. Characterization of the specific CD4+ T cell response against the F protein during chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, De-Yong; Jin, Gen-Di; Yao, Bi-Lian; Zhang, Dong-Hua; Gu, Lei-Lei; Lu, Zhi-Meng; Gong, Qiming; Lone, Yu-Chun; Deng, Qiang; Zhang, Xin-Xin

    2010-12-06

    The hepatitis C virus (HCV) Alternate Reading Frame Protein (ARFP or F protein) presents a double-frame shift product of the HCV core gene. We and others have previously reported that the specific antibodies against the F protein could be raised in the sera of HCV chronically infected patients. However, the specific CD4(+) T cell responses against the F protein during HCV infection and the pathological implications remained unclear. In the current study, we screened the MHC class II-presenting epitopes of the F protein through HLA-transgenic mouse models and eventually validated the specific CD4(+) T cell responses in HCV chronically infected patients. DNA vaccination in HLA-DR1 and-DP4 transgenic mouse models, proliferation assay to test the F protein specific T cell response, genotyping of Chronic HCV patients and testing the F-peptide stimulated T cell response in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) by in vitro expansion and interferon (IFN)- γ intracellular staining. At least three peptides within HCV F protein were identified as HLA-DR or HLA-DP4 presenting epitopes by the proliferation assays in mouse models. Further study with human PBMCs evidenced the specific CD4(+) T cell responses against HCV F protein as well in patients chronically infected with HCV. The current study provided the evidence for the first time that HCV F protein could elicit specific CD4(+) T cell response, which may provide an insight into the immunopathogenesis during HCV chronic infection.

  4. Type I IFN triggers RIG-I/TLR3/NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation in influenza A virus infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Pothlichet

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus (IAV triggers a contagious and potentially lethal respiratory disease. A protective IL-1β response is mediated by innate receptors in macrophages and lung epithelial cells. NLRP3 is crucial in macrophages; however, which sensors elicit IL-1β secretion in lung epithelial cells remains undetermined. Here, we describe for the first time the relative roles of the host innate receptors RIG-I (DDX58, TLR3, and NLRP3 in the IL-1β response to IAV in primary lung epithelial cells. To activate IL-1β secretion, these cells employ partially redundant recognition mechanisms that differ from those described in macrophages. RIG-I had the strongest effect through a MAVS/TRIM25/Riplet-dependent type I IFN signaling pathway upstream of TLR3 and NLRP3. Notably, RIG-I also activated the inflammasome through interaction with caspase 1 and ASC in primary lung epithelial cells. Thus, NS1, an influenza virulence factor that inhibits the RIG-I/type I IFN pathway, strongly modulated the IL-1β response in lung epithelial cells and in ferrets. The NS1 protein derived from a highly pathogenic strain resulted in increased interaction with RIG-I and inhibited type I IFN and IL-1β responses compared to the least pathogenic virus strains. These findings demonstrate that in IAV-infected lung epithelial cells RIG-I activates the inflammasome both directly and through a type I IFN positive feedback loop.

  5. Type I IFN triggers RIG-I/TLR3/NLRP3-dependent inflammasome activation in influenza A virus infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothlichet, Julien; Meunier, Isabelle; Davis, Beckley K; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Skamene, Emil; von Messling, Veronika; Vidal, Silvia M

    2013-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) triggers a contagious and potentially lethal respiratory disease. A protective IL-1β response is mediated by innate receptors in macrophages and lung epithelial cells. NLRP3 is crucial in macrophages; however, which sensors elicit IL-1β secretion in lung epithelial cells remains undetermined. Here, we describe for the first time the relative roles of the host innate receptors RIG-I (DDX58), TLR3, and NLRP3 in the IL-1β response to IAV in primary lung epithelial cells. To activate IL-1β secretion, these cells employ partially redundant recognition mechanisms that differ from those described in macrophages. RIG-I had the strongest effect through a MAVS/TRIM25/Riplet-dependent type I IFN signaling pathway upstream of TLR3 and NLRP3. Notably, RIG-I also activated the inflammasome through interaction with caspase 1 and ASC in primary lung epithelial cells. Thus, NS1, an influenza virulence factor that inhibits the RIG-I/type I IFN pathway, strongly modulated the IL-1β response in lung epithelial cells and in ferrets. The NS1 protein derived from a highly pathogenic strain resulted in increased interaction with RIG-I and inhibited type I IFN and IL-1β responses compared to the least pathogenic virus strains. These findings demonstrate that in IAV-infected lung epithelial cells RIG-I activates the inflammasome both directly and through a type I IFN positive feedback loop.

  6. Virus infection speeds: Theory versus experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Daniel R.; Fort, Joaquim

    2010-12-01

    In order to explain the speed of Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV) infections, we develop a simple model that improves previous approaches to the propagation of virus infections. For VSV infections, we find that the delay time elapsed between the adsorption of a viral particle into a cell and the release of its progeny has a very important effect. Moreover, this delay time makes the adsorption rate essentially irrelevant in order to predict VSV infection speeds. Numerical simulations are in agreement with the analytical results. Our model satisfactorily explains the experimentally measured speeds of VSV infections.

  7. Overexpression of Fc receptor-like 1 associated with B-cell activation during hepatitis B virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke Wang

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV infection has not been explored in depth. In the present study, the activation status of B cells from peripheral blood of healthy controls (N = 20 and patients with acute hepatitis B (AHB, N = 15 or chronic hepatitis B (CHB, N = 30 was evaluated by measuring the expression levels of B-cell activation markers CD69 and CD86, using quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Moreover, the potential mechanism underlying B-cell activation during HBV infection was further investigated by analyzing the expression profile of FCRL1, an intrinsic activation molecule of B cells. An elevation in the levels of B-cell activation markers including CD69 and CD86 was observed in the AHB patients (44.31 ± 9.27, 27.64 ± 9.26% compared to CHB patients (30.35 ± 11.27, 18.41 ± 6.56%, P < 0.05, which was still higher than healthy controls (12.23 ± 7.84, 8.22 ± 3.43%, P < 0.05. Furthermore, the expression of FCRL1 was found to be similar to B-cell activation markers, which was highest in AHB patients (70.15 ± 17.11%, lowest in healthy donors (36.32 ± 9.98%, P < 0.05 and half-way between these levels in patients with CHB (55.17 ± 12.03%, P < 0.05. The results were positively associated with aberrant B-cell activation. These data suggest that B cells can play a role in HBV infection, and therefore more effort should be devoted to exploring their functions.

  8. Overexpression of Fc receptor-like 1 associated with B-cell activation during hepatitis B virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ke [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province (China); Pei, Hao [Wuxi Hospital of Infectious Disease, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province (China); Huang, Biao; Yang, Run-Lin [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province (China); Wu, Hang-Yuan [Wuxi Hospital of Infectious Disease, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province (China); Zhu, Xue; Zhu, Lan [Key Laboratory of Nuclear Medicine, Ministry of Health, Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Molecular Nuclear Medicine, Jiangsu Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Wuxi, Jiangsu Province (China)

    2012-08-17

    The role of B cells in the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection has not been explored in depth. In the present study, the activation status of B cells from peripheral blood of healthy controls (N = 20) and patients with acute hepatitis B (AHB, N = 15) or chronic hepatitis B (CHB, N = 30) was evaluated by measuring the expression levels of B-cell activation markers CD69 and CD86, using quantitative real-time PCR and flow cytometry. Moreover, the potential mechanism underlying B-cell activation during HBV infection was further investigated by analyzing the expression profile of FCRL1, an intrinsic activation molecule of B cells. An elevation in the levels of B-cell activation markers including CD69 and CD86 was observed in the AHB patients (44.31 ± 9.27, 27.64 ± 9.26%) compared to CHB patients (30.35 ± 11.27, 18.41 ± 6.56%, P < 0.05), which was still higher than healthy controls (12.23 ± 7.84, 8.22 ± 3.43%, P < 0.05). Furthermore, the expression of FCRL1 was found to be similar to B-cell activation markers, which was highest in AHB patients (70.15 ± 17.11%), lowest in healthy donors (36.32 ± 9.98%, P < 0.05) and half-way between these levels in patients with CHB (55.17 ± 12.03%, P < 0.05). The results were positively associated with aberrant B-cell activation. These data suggest that B cells can play a role in HBV infection, and therefore more effort should be devoted to exploring their functions.

  9. Construction and evaluation of rats' tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Construction and evaluation of rats' tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC) induced by NF-κB ... Department of Clinical Laboratory Hematology, Affiliated Hospital of Guiyang Medical College, Guiyang Medical ... through detection of specific markers OX-62; 4) Evaluation of mature state of DC via the determination of the expression.

  10. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell leukemia in a black Malian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare, clinically aggressive hematologic malignancy, that most commonly manifests as cutaneous lesions. A 19-year-old Malian female was admitted to the Unit of Medicine of Hopital du Mali with anemia, fever, weakness, and weight loss. On physical examination ...

  11. Processing of MHC class II in dendritic cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Broeke, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    In the past years we performed studies to gain more insight into the processing of major histocompatibility class II (MHC class II) in dendritic cells. We focused on the sorting mechanisms of MHC class II, the degradation of its associated Ii and peptide loading at the endosomal system. In addition,

  12. Migration of dendritic cell based cancer vaccines: in vivo veritas?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adema, Gosse J.; de Vries, I. Jolanda M.; Punt, Cornelis J. A.; Figdor, Carl G.

    2005-01-01

    Ex vivo generated cancer vaccines based on dendritic cells (DCs) are currently applied in the clinic. The migration of DCs from the tissues to the lymph nodes is tightly controlled and involves many different mediators and their receptors. A recent study demonstrated that the rate of migration of

  13. Comparative analysis of nasal and oral mucosa dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Allam, J.P.; Niederhagen, B.; Bucheler, M.; Appel, T.; Betten, H.; Bieber, T.; Bergé, S.J.; Novak, N.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mucosal dendritic cells (DC) play a crucial role in tolerance induction as seen in mucosal immunotherapy of atopic diseases. Nevertheless little is known about the phenotypical differences of oral and nasal mucosal DC (nmDC). Recently, we could show that oral mucosal myeloid CD1a(+) DC

  14. Menage a trois: Borrelia, dendritic cells, and tick saliva interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Lauren M. K.; Veerman, Christiaan C.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Hovius, Joppe W. R.

    2014-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, the causative agent of Lyme borreliosis, is inoculated into the skin during an lxodes tick bite where it is recognised and captured by dendritic cells (DCs). However, considering the propensity of Borrelia to disseminate, it would appear that DCs fall short in

  15. Loss of CD47 Makes Dendritic Cells See Red

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Timo K.; van Bruggen, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Whereas dendritic cells (DCs) can be activated in many ways to trigger immunity, hardly anything is known about the mechanisms that counterbalance DC activation. Cyster and colleagues now demonstrate that the "self" molecule CD47 on erythrocytes critically restricts splenic DC activation

  16. Modulation of cytokine production profiles in splenic dendritic cells ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We examined the role of splenic dendritic cells in immune response to Toxoplasma gondii infection in SAG1 (P30+) transgenic mice by investigating the kinetics of intracellular cytokines expression of IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and IFN-γ by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) using flow cytometry, and compared the results to those of ...

  17. Modulation of synaptic potentials and cell excitability by dendritic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Modulation of synaptic potentials and cell excitability by dendritic. KIR and KAs channels in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons: A computational study. JESSY JOHN* and ROHIT MANCHANDA. Biomedical Engineering group, Department of Biosciences and Bioengineering, Indian Institute of Technology. Bombay ...

  18. Tick-borne encephalitis virus infects human brain microvascular endothelial cells without compromising blood-brain barrier integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palus, Martin; Vancova, Marie; Sirmarova, Jana; Elsterova, Jana; Perner, Jan; Ruzek, Daniel

    2017-07-01

    Alteration of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is a hallmark of tick-borne encephalitis (TBE), a life-threating human viral neuroinfection. However, the mechanism of BBB breakdown during TBE, as well as TBE virus (TBEV) entry into the brain is unclear. Here, primary human microvascular endothelial cells (HBMECs) were infected with TBEV to study interactions with the BBB. Although the number of infected cells was relatively low in culture (10 6 pfu/ml). Infection did not induce any significant changes in the expression of key tight junction proteins or upregulate the expression of cell adhesion molecules, and did not alter the highly organized intercellular junctions between HBMECs. In an in vitro BBB model, the virus crossed the BBB via a transcellular pathway without compromising the integrity of the cell monolayer. The results indicate that HBMECs may support TBEV entry into the brain without altering BBB integrity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mosquito C6/36 Cells Reveals Host Proteins Involved in Zika Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Qi-Lin; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Shao-bo; Wang, Wei; Deng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Gengfu; Zhang, Lei-Ke

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae. During replication processes, flavivirus manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while the host cells activate antiviral responses. Identification of host proteins involved in the flavivirus replication process may lead to the discovery of antiviral targets. The mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are epidemiologically important vectors for ZIKV, and effectiv...

  20. Shared Alterations in NK Cell Frequency, Phenotype, and Function in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Hepatitis C Virus Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Ute-Christiane; Owen, Rachel E.; Taylor, Elizabeth; Worth, Andrew; Naoumov, Nikolai; Willberg, Christian; Tang, Kwok; Newton, Phillipa; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Klenerman, Paul; Borrow, Persephone

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) cause clinically important persistent infections. The effects of virus persistence on innate immunity, including NK cell responses, and the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined the frequency, phenotype, and function of peripheral blood CD3− CD56+ NK subsets in HIV+ and HCV+ patients and identified significantly reduced numbers of total NK cells and a striking shift in NK subsets, with a marked decrease in the CD56dim cell fraction compared to CD56bright cells, in both infections. This shift influenced the phenotype and functional capacity (gamma interferon production, killing) of the total NK pool. In addition, abnormalities in the functional capacity of the CD56dim NK subset were observed in HIV+ patients. The shared NK alterations were found to be associated with a significant reduction in serum levels of the innate cytokine interleukin 15 (IL-15). In vitro stimulation with IL-15 rescued NK cells of HIV+ and HCV+ patients from apoptosis and enhanced proliferation and functional activity. We hypothesize that the reduced levels of IL-15 present in the serum during HIV and HCV infections might impact NK cell homeostasis, contributing to the common alterations of the NK pool observed in these unrelated infections. PMID:16160163

  1. Fashioning regulatory dendritic cells: what is currently in vogue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taner, Timuçin; Thomson, Angus W

    2004-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are uniquely well-equipped antigen-presenting cells with remarkable plasticity, whose differentiation and function can be manipulated in vitro and in vivo. With increased understanding of their immunoregulatory properties, strategies to enhance DC tolerogenicity have emerged. Carefully fashioned DCs, the result of biological, pharmacological or genetic modification, hold promise as new cell-based therapies of organ allograft rejection and autoimmune diseases.

  2. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Mosquito C6/36 Cells Reveals Host Proteins Involved in Zika Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Qi-Lin; Deng, Cheng-Lin; Chen, Xi; Wang, Jun; Wang, Shao-Bo; Wang, Wei; Deng, Fei; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Gengfu; Zhang, Lei-Ke

    2017-06-15

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus belonging to the genus Flavivirus of the family Flaviviridae During replication processes, flavivirus manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while the host cells activate antiviral responses. Identification of host proteins involved in the flavivirus replication process may lead to the discovery of antiviral targets. The mosquitoes Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus are epidemiologically important vectors for ZIKV, and effective restrictions of ZIKV replication in mosquitoes will be vital in controlling the spread of virus. In this study, an iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis of ZIKV-infected Aedes albopictus C6/36 cells was performed to investigate host proteins involved in the ZIKV infection process. A total of 3,544 host proteins were quantified, with 200 being differentially regulated, among which CHCHD2 can be upregulated by ZIKV infection in both mosquito C6/36 and human HeLa cells. Our further study indicated that CHCHD2 can promote ZIKV replication and inhibit beta interferon (IFN-β) production in HeLa cells, suggesting that ZIKV infection may upregulate CHCHD2 to inhibit IFN-I production and thus promote virus replication. Bioinformatics analysis of regulated host proteins highlighted several ZIKV infection-regulated biological processes. Further study indicated that the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays roles in the ZIKV entry process and that an FDA-approved inhibitor of the 20S proteasome, bortezomib, can inhibit ZIKV infection in vivo Our study illustrated how host cells respond to ZIKV infection and also provided a candidate drug for the control of ZIKV infection in mosquitoes and treatment of ZIKV infection in patients. IMPORTANCE ZIKV infection poses great threats to human health, and there is no FDA-approved drug available for the treatment of ZIKV infection. During replication, ZIKV manipulates host cell systems to facilitate its replication, while host cells activate

  3. Regulatory T cells contribute to the impaired immune response in patients with chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoop, Jeroen N; van der Molen, Renate G; Baan, Carla C; van der Laan, Luc J W; Kuipers, Ernst J; Kusters, Johannes G; Janssen, Harry L A

    2005-04-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is characterized by a weak immune response to HBV. Regulatory T cells (T(reg)) can suppress the function of effector T cells and may thus be key players in this impaired immune response. Changes in the functionality or number of T(reg) could explain the decreased antiviral response in chronic HBV patients. To investigate the role of T(reg) in chronic HBV infection, we compared the proportional frequency and functionality of T(reg) in peripheral blood of 50 chronic HBV patients, 23 healthy controls, and 9 individuals with a resolved HBV infection. A higher percentage of T(reg), defined as CD4, CD25, CD45RO, and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4-positive cells, was detected within the population of CD4(+) cells in peripheral blood of chronic HBV patients compared with healthy controls and individuals with a resolved HBV infection. Accordingly, chronic HBV patients displayed a higher FoxP3 messenger RNA level than healthy controls. Depletion of CD25(+) cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of chronic HBV patients resulted in an enhanced proliferation after stimulation with HBV core antigen. Reconstitution of these depleted PBMC with CD4(+)CD25(+) T(reg) resulted in a dose-dependent reduction of both HBV-specific proliferation and interferon gamma production. In conclusion, chronic HBV patients harbor an increased percentage of T(reg) in peripheral blood compared with controls. T(reg) have an immunosuppressive effect on HBV-specific T helper cells. The presence of HBV-specific T(reg) could contribute to an inadequate immune response against the virus, leading to chronic infection.

  4. Clonal Expansion of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Cells and Human Immunodeficiency Virus Persistence During Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, James I; Frenkel, Lisa M

    2017-03-15

    The latent HIV-1 reservoir in blood decays very slowly, even during prolonged suppression of viral replication by antiretroviral therapy (ART). Mechanisms for reservoir persistence include replenishment through low-level viral replication, longevity and homeostatic proliferation of memory T cells, and most recently appreciated, clonal expansion of HIV-infected cells. Clonally expanded cells make up a large and increasing fraction of the residual infected cell population on ART, and insertion of HIV proviruses into certain host cellular genes has been associated with this proliferation. That the vast majority of proviruses are defective clouds our assessment of the degree to which clonally expanded cells harbor infectious viruses, and thus the extent to which they contribute to reservoirs relevant to curing infection. This review summarizes past studies that have defined our current understanding and the gaps in our knowledge of the mechanisms by which proviral integration and clonal expansion sustain the HIV reservoir. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Age-Dependent Cell Trafficking Defects in Draining Lymph Nodes Impair Adaptive Immunity and Control of West Nile Virus Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin M Richner

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impaired immune responses in the elderly lead to reduced vaccine efficacy and increased susceptibility to viral infections. Although several groups have documented age-dependent defects in adaptive immune priming, the deficits that occur prior to antigen encounter remain largely unexplored. Herein, we identify novel mechanisms for compromised adaptive immunity that occurs with aging in the context of infection with West Nile virus (WNV, an encephalitic flavivirus that preferentially causes disease in the elderly. An impaired IgM and IgG response and enhanced vulnerability to WNV infection during aging was linked to delayed germinal center formation in the draining lymph node (DLN. Adoptive transfer studies and two-photon intravital microscopy revealed a decreased trafficking capacity of donor naïve CD4+ T cells from old mice, which manifested as impaired T cell diapedesis at high endothelial venules and reduced cell motility within DLN prior to antigen encounter. Furthermore, leukocyte accumulation in the DLN within the first few days of WNV infection or antigen-adjuvant administration was diminished more generally in old mice and associated with a second aging-related defect in local cytokine and chemokine production. Thus, age-dependent cell-intrinsic and environmental defects in the DLN result in delayed immune cell recruitment and antigen recognition. These deficits compromise priming of early adaptive immune responses and likely contribute to the susceptibility of old animals to acute WNV infection.

  6. Phenotyping and susceptibility of established porcine cells lines to African Swine Fever Virus infection and viral production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Elena G; Riera, Elena; Nogal, Marisa; Gallardo, Carmina; Fernández, Paloma; Bello-Morales, Raquel; López-Guerrero, José Antonio; Chitko-McKown, Carol G; Richt, Jürgen A; Revilla, Yolanda

    2017-09-04

    African swine fever virus (ASFV) is a highly pathogenic, double-stranded DNA virus with a marked tropism for cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, affecting swine species and provoking severe economic losses and health threats. In the present study, four established porcine cell lines, IPAM-WT, IPAM-CD163, C∆2+ and WSL, were compared to porcine alveolar macrophage (PAM) in terms of surface marker phenotype, susceptibility to ASFV infection and virus production. The virulent ASFV Armenia/07, E70 or the naturally attenuated NHV/P68 strains were used as viral models. Cells expressed only low levels of specific receptors linked to the monocyte/macrophage lineage, with low levels of infection overall, with the exception of WSL, which showed more efficient production of strain NHV/P68 but not of strains E70 and Armenia/07.

  7. Proteasomes raise the microtubule dynamics in influenza A (H1N1) virus-infected LLC-MK2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Conto, Flora; Chezzi, Carlo; Fazzi, Alessandra; Razin, Sergey V; Arcangeletti, Maria Cristina; Medici, Maria Cristina; Gatti, Rita; Calderaro, Adriana

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of microtubule networks are known to have an impact on replication of influenza A virus in some cellular models. Here we present evidence suggesting that at late stages of LLC-MK2 cell infection by influenza A (H1N1) virus the ubiquitin-proteasome protein degradation system participates in destabilization of microtubules, and favours virus replication. Chemical inhibition of proteasome activity partially suppresses influenza A virus replication, while stimulation of proteasome activity favours influenza A virus replication. Conversely, in another cellular model, A549 cells, inhibitors and activators of proteasomes have a small effect on influenza A virus replication. These data suggest that influenza A virus might take selective advantage of proteasome functions in order to set up a favourable cytoskeletal "environment" for its replication and spread. Furthermore, the relationship between influenza virus and the host cell is likely to depend on both the cellular model and the virus strain.

  8. Elevated Serum Levels of Matrix Metalloproteinase 9 in Severe Dengue Virus Infection at Sanglah Hospital Denpasar, Bali - Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Dian Sukmawati

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus - infected dendritic cells along with cytokines overproduction trigger endothelial barrier dysfunction and plasma leakage through matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-9 over production. The event is responsible for more severe dengue virus infection’s manifestation. The study objective is to measure the association of MMP-9 serum level with disease severity of dengue virus infection. Prospective study of 70 participants hospitalized in Internal Medicine ward of Sanglah Hospital Denpasar, during 1 July 2011 – 31 December 2011 and diagnosed as dengue virus infection were followed during their hospital stay. Baseline demographic were obtained on admission, serum level of MMP-9 was measured once at third – fifth day from fever onset. Independent-samples t test was used to compare the MMP 9 levels among diagnosis groups and exploration of variables were using logistic regression analysis.  There was significant higher level of MMP-9 serum level on DHF (median [range] compared to DF (367.78 ng/mL [81.16 – 797.79] vs. 128.67 ng/mL [41.79 – 327.32]; p < 0.0001. After adjusted with baseline hematocrit, for every 10 ng/mL elevation of MMP-9 serum contributes to 1.159 increased risk of DHF with optimal threshold MMP-9 level is 330 ng/mL (100 % sensitivity, 64% specificity.MMP-9 level is associated with dengue severity. The measurement was able to predict the DHF among those infected with dengue virus infection. This may lead to a novel marker of dengue hemorrhagic fever predictor.

  9. Viral replication rate regulates clinical outcome and CD8 T cell responses during highly pathogenic H5N1 influenza virus infection in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuko Hatta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Since the first recorded infection of humans with H5N1 viruses of avian origin in 1997, sporadic human infections continue to occur with a staggering mortality rate of >60%. Although sustained human-to-human transmission has not occurred yet, there is a growing concern that these H5N1 viruses might acquire this trait and raise the specter of a pandemic. Despite progress in deciphering viral determinants of pathogenicity, we still lack crucial information on virus/immune system interactions pertaining to severe disease and high mortality associated with human H5N1 influenza virus infections. Using two human isolates of H5N1 viruses that differ in their pathogenicity in mice, we have defined mechanistic links among the rate of viral replication, mortality, CD8 T cell responses, and immunopathology. The extreme pathogenicity of H5N1 viruses was directly linked to the ability of the virus to replicate rapidly, and swiftly attain high steady-state titers in the lungs within 48 hours after infection. The remarkably high replication rate of the highly pathogenic H5N1 virus did not prevent the induction of IFN-β or activation of CD8 T cells, but the CD8 T cell response was ineffective in controlling viral replication in the lungs and CD8 T cell deficiency did not affect viral titers or mortality. Additionally, BIM deficiency ameliorated lung pathology and inhibited T cell apoptosis without affecting survival of mice. Therefore, rapidly replicating, highly lethal H5N1 viruses could simply outpace and overwhelm the adaptive immune responses, and kill the host by direct cytopathic effects. However, therapeutic suppression of early viral replication and the associated enhancement of CD8 T cell responses improved the survival of mice following a lethal H5N1 infection. These findings suggest that suppression of early H5N1 virus replication is key to the programming of an effective host response, which has implications in treatment of this infection in humans.

  10. Prevalence of hematological abnormalities and detection of infected bone marrow cells in asymptomatic cats with feline immunodeficiency virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Yasuhito; Horiuchi, Hiroshi; Mizukoshi, Fuminori; Baba, Kenji; Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2009-05-12

    Peripheral blood cytopenia such as anemia, leukopenia with neutropenia and thrombocytopenia is frequently observed in cats infected with feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV). Although previous studies report that cytopenia has been observed in FIV-infected symptomatic cats, yet the asymptomatic cats also present cytopenia occasionally. In the present study, hematological and virological analyses in FIV-infected asymptomatic cats were carried out to understand the prevalence and pathogenesis of peripheral blood cytopenia in FIV infection. Hematological abnormalities were detected in 24 of 50 FIV-infected asymptomatic cats (48%) in which no other cause of cytopenia than FIV infection was observed. Anemia only, neutropenia only, thrombocytopenia only, bicytopenia and pancytopenia were observed in 10%, 10%, 6%, 14% and 8%, respectively. Bone marrow (BM) examination was performed in 8 FIV-infected asymptomatic cats with peripheral blood cytopenia. Myeloid dysplasia was observed in 4 cats with neutropenia of which 2 cats with concurrent thrombocytopenia presented morphological abnormalities of megakaryocytes. FIV-infected BM cells in the 8 cats were analyzed by PCR and immunocytochemistry. Lobulated mononuclear cells in BM were infected with FIV in 5 cats with neutropenia of which 2 cats with concurrent thrombocytopenia showed FIV-infected megakaryocytes. Parts of isolated stromal cells from BM were infected with FIV in all the 8 cats. Present results suggest that FIV infection of BM cells can cause peripheral blood cytopenia and myelodysplasia even if the cat is asymptomatic. Such FIV-related hematological abnormalities are supposed to be diagnosed as FIV-myelopathy.

  11. Respiratory influenza virus infection induces intestinal immune injury via microbiota-mediated Th17 cell-dependent inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Li, Fengqi; Wei, Haiming; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2014-11-17

    Influenza in humans is often accompanied by gastroenteritis-like symptoms such as diarrhea, but the underlying mechanism is not yet understood. We explored the occurrence of gastroenteritis-like symptoms using a mouse model of respiratory influenza infection. We found that respiratory influenza infection caused intestinal injury when lung injury occurred, which was not due to direct intestinal viral infection. Influenza infection altered the intestinal microbiota composition, which was mediated by IFN-γ produced by lung-derived CCR9(+)CD4(+) T cells recruited into the small intestine. Th17 cells markedly increased in the small intestine after PR8 infection, and neutralizing IL-17A reduced intestinal injury. Moreover, antibiotic depletion of intestinal microbiota reduced IL-17A production and attenuated influenza-caused intestinal injury. Further study showed that the alteration of intestinal microbiota significantly stimulated IL-15 production from intestinal epithelial cells, which subsequently promoted Th17 cell polarization in the small intestine in situ. Thus, our findings provide new insights into an undescribed mechanism by which respiratory influenza infection causes intestinal disease. © 2014 Wang et al.

  12. Cell-culture derived fowl adenovirus serotype 4 inactivated vaccine provides complete protection for virus infection on SPF chickens

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Du, Dongying; Zhang, Pantao; Li, Xiangdong; Tian, Hui; Cheng, Yi; Sheng, Dongbei; Han, Xueying; Shan, Yihong; Li, Xuefeng; Yuan, Yue; Zhang, Haiyang; Xue, Jingjing; Liu, Wujie; Tian, Kegong

    2017-01-01

    .... So far, there is no commercial vaccine available to control this disease. In this study, we reported the development of both embryo-adapted and cell-culture derived inactivated FAdV-4 vaccines and evaluated their efficacies in chicken...

  13. Evaluation of annexin V and Calcein-AM as markers of mononuclear cell apoptosis during human immunodeficiency virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila F.R. Palma

    Full Text Available Evaluation of apoptosis by flow cytometry is generally accomplished by methods that use annexin V-FITC as vital dye, which access phosphatidylserine exposed on the external membrane at the beginning of this process. In addition, the concomitant use of propidium iodide makes possible to verify the characteristic nuclear alterations in the late stages of apoptosis, as a consequence of the increase in membrane permeability. On the other hand, the use of calcein-AM in association with ethidium homodimer (EthD-1 allows the evaluation of cell apoptosis through detection of esterase activity and cellular membrane physical and chemical alterations. The aim of this study was to compare the sensibility of calcein-AM and EthD-1 with annexin V-FITC and propidium iodide for early apoptosis evaluation in peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture, obtained from HIV-infected patients. Apoptosis and cellular viability were detected and quantified by flow cytometry after 24 and 48 hours incubation times. Our results showed that calcein-AM/EthD-1 was more sensitive for apoptotic cell quantification in both incubation times than annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide (mean of 46.95% ± 3.56, p < 0.0001, for 24 hours and mean of 37.67% ± 2.47, p < 0.0014 for 48 hours, besides allowing to clearly define viable, apoptotic and dead cell populations.

  14. Role of cellular caspases, nuclear factor-kappa B and interferon regulatory factors in Bluetongue virus infection and cell fate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roy Polly

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bluetongue virus (BTV infection causes haemorrhagic disease in ruminants and induces cell death. The pathogenesis in animals and in cell culture has been linked to BTV-induced apoptosis. Results In this report, we investigated BTV-induced apoptosis in cell culture in depth and show that both extrinsic (caspase-8 activation and intrinsic (caspase-9 activation pathways play roles in BTV apoptosis. Further, by using chemical inhibitors and knock-out cell lines, we show that these pathways act independently of each other in BTV infected cells. In addition to activation of caspase-8, -9 and executioner caspase-3, we also identified that BTV infection causes the activation of caspase-7, which results in the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP. BTV-induced cell death appears to be due to apoptosis rather than necrosis, as the HMBG-1 was not translocated from the nucleus. We also examined if NF-κB response is related to BTV-induced apoptosis as in reovirus. Our data suggests that NF-κB response is not linked to the induction of apoptosis. It is controlled by the degradation of only IκBα but not IκBβ, resulting in a rapid transient response during BTV infection. This was supported using an NF-κB dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, which demonstrated early response, that appeared to be suppressed by the late stage of BTV replication. Furthermore, virus titres were higher in the presence of NF-κB inhibitor (SN50, indicating that NF-κB has a role in initiating an antiviral environment. In addition, we show that BTV infection induces the translocation of interferon regulatory factors (IRF-3 and IRF-7 into the nucleus. The induction of IRF responses, when measured by IRF dependent luciferase reporter gene assay, revealed that the IRF responses, like NF-κB response, were also at early stage of infection and mirrored the timing of NF-κB induction. Conclusion BTV triggers a wide range of caspase activities resulting

  15. Zika Virus Infects Human Sertoli Cells and Modulates the Integrity of theIn VitroBlood-Testis Barrier Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemann, David N; Strange, Daniel P; Maharaj, Payal N; Shi, Pei-Yong; Verma, Saguna

    2017-11-15

    Confirmed reports of Zika virus (ZIKV) in human seminal fluid for months after the clearance of viremia suggest the ability of ZIKV to establish persistent infection in the seminiferous tubules, an immune-privileged site in the testis protected by the blood-testis barrier, also called the Sertoli cell (SC) barrier (SCB). However, cellular targets of ZIKV in human testis and mechanisms by which the virus enters seminiferous tubules remain unclear. We demonstrate that primary human SCs were highly susceptible to ZIKV compared to the closely related dengue virus and induced the expression of alpha interferon (IFN-α), key cytokines, and cell adhesion molecules (vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 [VCAM-1] and intracellular adhesion molecule 1 [ICAM-1]). Furthermore, using an in vitro SCB model, we show that ZIKV was released on the adluminal side of the SCB model with a higher efficiency than in the blood-brain barrier model. ZIKV-infected SCs exhibited enhanced adhesion of leukocytes that correlated with decreases in SCB integrity. ZIKV infection did not affect the expression of tight and adherens junction proteins such as ZO-1, claudin, and JAM-A; however, exposure of SCs to inflammatory mediators derived from ZIKV-infected macrophages led to the degradation of the ZO-1 protein, which correlated with increased SCB permeability. Taken together, our data suggest that infection of SCs may be one of the crucial steps by which ZIKV gains access to the site of spermatozoon development and identify SCs as a therapeutic target to clear testicular infections. The SCB model opens up opportunities to assess interactions of SCs with other testicular cells and to test the ability of anti-ZIKV drugs to cross the barrier. IMPORTANCE Recent outbreaks of ZIKV, a neglected mosquito-borne flavivirus, have identified sexual transmission as a new route of disease spread, which has not been reported for other flaviviruses. To be able to sexually transmit for months after the clearance of

  16. Successful Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantation for an Adult Case of Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saburi, Masuho; Ogata, Masao; Satou, Takako; Yoshida, Natsumi; Nagamatsu, Kentaro; Nashimoto, Yuko; Moroga, Yui; Takano, Kuniko; Kohno, Kazuhiro; Shirao, Kuniaki

    A 41-year-old man was referred to our hospital for treatment of anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK)-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV) was diagnosed based on the findings of elevated EBV antibody titers and positive EBV-DNA in the peripheral blood, and cord blood stem cell transplantation (CBT) was performed. The EBV-DNA levels in the blood fell below the limit of detection. His lymphoma relapsed on Day 165 with the appearance of eruptions, which disappeared after the withdrawal of tacrolimus. One year after transplantation, there were no signs of recurrence. This encouraging result suggests that CBT should be considered for adult cases of CAEBV with aggressive clinical manifestations.

  17. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) successfully treated with allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taketani, T; Kikuchi, A; Inatomi, J; Hanada, R; Kawaguchi, H; Ida, K; Oh-Ishi, T; Arai, T; Kishimoto, H; Yamamoto, K

    2002-03-01

    We report a pediatric case of CAEBV and T cell-based Hodgkin's-like disease successfully treated with allo PBSCT from an HLA-matched sibling. The diagnosis of CAEBV was made from clinical signs and the presence of the EBV genome in PBMC and tumor cells. Conditioning with busulfan (BU) + etoposide (VP16) + cyclophosphamide (CY) was effective and well tolerated. EBV was totally eradicated by 3 months after allo PBSCT. Although she suffered from chronic GVHD of the liver, she has been well and free of disease for 47 months since PBSCT. We suggest allo PBSCT for CAEBV as a potent therapeutic strategy for eradication of the EBV genome and allowing immunological reconstitution.

  18. Lower expression of CD81 B-cell receptor in lymphoproliferative diseases associated with hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacoub, P; Bourlière, M; Hausfater, P; Charlotte, F; Khiri, H; Toci, S; Piette, J C; Poynard, T; Halfon, P

    2003-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is frequently associated with type II mixed cryoglobulinaemia (MC), a benign lymphoproliferative disease (LPD). More recently, HCV has been implicated as a possible aetiologic factor of B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL). CD81, a B-cell surface receptor, has been proposed as a receptor for HCV binding and entry in circulating B cells. The stimulation of CD81 complex enables B cells to respond to lower concentrations of antigen and finally induces B-cell proliferation. We studied the phenotypic expression of CD81, CD19 and CD5 on circulating B cells in HCV patients LPD-positive or LPD-negative. Sixty-two patients were anti-HCV antibody positive. Among HCV positive patients, 44 were HCV RNA positive with an histologically proven chronic active hepatitis of whom 10 had a B-NHL, 14 an MC and 24 no extrahepatic manifestation. Eighteen patients were HCV RNA negative with evidence of resolved infection. A control group included 40 healthy subjects. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were stained for surface expression of CD81, CD19 and CD5 using monoclonal antibodies, and were analyzed by flow cytometry. The percentage of PBMC expressing CD81, CD19 and CD5 receptors were compared between the groups by univariate analysis. Logistic regression model variables were then evaluated to correlate the presence of an LPD with HCV infection characteristics (i.e. age, gender, genotype, duration of infection, HCV RNA positivity, liver histological lesions), or phenotypic expression of CD81, CD19 and CD5 receptors on PBMC. HCV antibody-positive compared with HCV-negative subjects had a higher expression of CD19 receptor (23 +/- 13 vs 13 +/- 1%, P = 0.003). Among HCV RNA positive-patients, LPD+ compared with LPD- patients had a lower expression of CD81 (58 +/- 28 vs 82 +/- 18%, P = 0.001) and CD5 receptor (66 +/- 16 vs 74 +/- 13%, P = 0.04). In multivariate analysis, the expression of CD81 receptor was a negative (OR = 0.15, 95% CI = 0

  19. Persistent human Borna disease virus infection modifies the acetylome of human oligodendroglia cells towards higher energy and transporter levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xia; Liu, Siwen; Bode, Liv; Liu, Chengyu; Zhang, Liang; Wang, Xiao; Li, Dan; Lei, Yang; Peng, Xiaojun; Cheng, Zhongyi; Xie, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus persistently infecting mammalian hosts including humans. Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a key protein post-translational modification (PTM). The unexpectedly broad regulatory scope of Kac let us to profile the entire acetylome upon BDV infection. The acetylome was profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. We identified and quantified 791 Kac sites in 473 Kac proteins in human BDV Hu-H1-infected and non-infected oligodendroglial (OL) cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that BDV infection alters the acetylation of metabolic proteins, membrane-associated proteins and transmembrane transporter activity, and affects the acetylation of several lysine acetyltransferases (KAT). Upon BDV persistence the OL acetylome is manipulated towards higher energy and transporter levels necessary for shuttling BDV proteins to and from nuclear replication sites. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of the miRNA expression profile in an Aedes albopictus cell line in response to bluetongue virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Shanshan; Du, Junzheng; Gao, Shandian; Tian, Zhancheng; Zheng, Yadong; Liu, Guangyuan; Luo, Jianxun; Yin, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Cellular microRNAs (miRNAs) have been reported to be key regulators of virus-host interactions. Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an insect-borne virus that causes huge economic losses in the livestock industry worldwide. Aedes albopictus cell lines have become powerful and convenient tools for studying BTV-vector interactions. However, the role of miRNAs in A. albopictus cells during BTV infection is not well understood. In this study, we performed a deep sequencing analysis of small RNA libraries of BTV-infected and mock-infected A. albopictus cells, and a total of 11,206,854 and 12,125,274 clean reads were identified, respectively. A differential expression analysis showed that 140 miRNAs, including 15 known and 125 novel miRNAs, were significantly dysregulated after infection, and a total of 414 and 2307 target genes were annotated, respectively. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction validated the expression patterns of 11 selected miRNAs and their mRNA targets. Functional annotation of the target genes suggested that these target genes were mainly involved in metabolic pathways, oxidative phosphorylation, endocytosis, RNA transport, as well as the FoxO, Hippo, Jak-STAT, and MAPK signaling pathways. This is the first systematic study on the effect of BTV infection on miRNA expression in A. albopictus cells. This investigation provides information concerning the cellular miRNA expression profile in response to BTV infection, and it offers clues for identifying potential candidates for vector-based antiviral strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Gene Expression Profiling of Monkeypox Virus-Infected Cells Reveals Novel Interfaces for Host-Virus Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-28

    2 days before infection with MPV. Culture medium was removed and cells were inoculated with crude monkey- pox virus-Katako Kombe strain (MPV-KK) at...morphology, cellular develop- ment, small molecule biochemistry, and posttransla- tional modification (Fig. 4B). The expression of histones exhibited...modulation have been described pre- viously, as in the indirect consequences of Ras, Rho, and Rab small GTPases regulation [87], its effect on viral

  2. Phenotype and function of CD209+ bovine blood dendritic cells, monocyte-derived-dendritic cells and monocyte-derived macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phylogenic comparisons of the mononuclear phagocyte system (MPS) of humans and mice demonstrate phenotypic divergence of dendritic cell (DC) subsets that play similar roles in innate and adaptive immunity. Although differing in phenotype, DC can be classified into four groups according to ontogeny a...

  3. Virus infection, antiviral immunity, and autoimmunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getts, Daniel R; Chastain, Emily M L; Terry, Rachael L; Miller, Stephen D

    2013-09-01

    As a group of disorders, autoimmunity ranks as the third most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. However, the etiology of most autoimmune diseases remains unknown. Although genetic linkage studies support a critical underlying role for genetics, the geographic distribution of these disorders as well as the low concordance rates in monozygotic twins suggest that a combination of other factors including environmental ones are involved. Virus infection is a primary factor that has been implicated in the initiation of autoimmune disease. Infection triggers a robust and usually well-coordinated immune response that is critical for viral clearance. However, in some instances, immune regulatory mechanisms may falter, culminating in the breakdown of self-tolerance, resulting in immune-mediated attack directed against both viral and self-antigens. Traditionally, cross-reactive T-cell recognition, known as molecular mimicry, as well as bystander T-cell activation, culminating in epitope spreading, have been the predominant mechanisms elucidated through which infection may culminate in an T-cell-mediated autoimmune response. However, other hypotheses including virus-induced decoy of the immune system also warrant discussion in regard to their potential for triggering autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which virus infection and antiviral immunity contribute to the development of autoimmunity. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection with marked pericardial effusion successfully treated with allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Shinichiro; Takeda, Yusuke; Isshiki, Yusuke; Yamazaki, Atsuko; Nakao, Sanshiro; Takaishi, Koji; Nagao, Yuhei; Hasegawa, Nagisa; Togasaki, Emi; Shimizu, Ryoh; Kawajiri, Chika; Sakai, Shio; Mimura, Naoya; Takeuchi, Masahiro; Ohwada, Chikako; Sakaida, Emiko; Iseki, Tohru; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Nakaseko, Chiaki

    2016-05-01

    A 23-year-old woman presented with a persistent fever and shortness of breath. Computed tomography showed marked pericardial effusion, hepatosplenomegaly, and cervical and mediastinal lymph node swelling. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antibody titers were abnormally elevated, and the copy number of EBV-DNA was increased in peripheral blood. Based on these observations, she was diagnosed with chronic active EBV infection (CAEBV). The EBV-infected cells in her peripheral blood were CD4(+)T lymphocytes. Fever and pericardial effusion improved following treatment with a combination of prednisolone, etoposide, and cyclosporine; however, peripheral blood EBV-DNA levels remained high. The patient underwent allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation from an EBV-seronegative, HLA-matched sibling donor, with fludarabine and melphalan conditioning. The post-transplantation course was uneventful, except for mild skin acute graft-versus-host disease (grade 2). EBV-DNA became undetectable in peripheral blood 98 days post transplantation. She has since been in good health without disease recurrence. CAEBV is a potentially fatal disease caused by persistent EBV infection of T lymphocytes or natural killer cells, thus requiring prompt treatment and allogeneic transplantation. Pericardial effusion is rarely observed in CAEBV and can impede its diagnosis. Therefore, we should be aware that patients may present with marked pericardial effusion as an initial manifestation of CAEBV.

  5. Rift valley fever virus infection of human cells and insect hosts is promoted by protein kinase C epsilon.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Marie Filone

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available As an arthropod-borne human pathogen, Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV cycles between an insect vector and mammalian hosts. Little is known about the cellular requirements for infection in either host. Here we developed a tissue culture model for RVFV infection of human and insect cells that is amenable to high-throughput screening. Using this approach we screened a library of 1280 small molecules with pharmacologically defined activities and identified 59 drugs that inhibited RVFV infection with 15 inhibiting RVFV replication in both human and insect cells. Amongst the 15 inhibitors that blocked infection in both hosts was a subset that inhibits protein kinase C. Further studies found that infection is dependent upon the novel protein kinase C isozyme epsilon (PKCε in both human and insect cells as well as in adult flies. Altogether, these data show that inhibition of cellular factors required for early steps in the infection cycle including PKCε can block RVFV infection, and may represent a starting point for the development of anti-RVFV therapeutics.

  6. Persistent human Borna disease virus infection modifies the acetylome of human oligodendroglia cells towards higher energy and transporter levels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Xia [Shanghai Key Laboratory of Forensic Medicine, Institute of Forensic Science, Ministry of Justice, Shanghai 200063 (China); Liu, Siwen [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Bode, Liv [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Liu, Chengyu [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Zhang, Liang [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Wang, Xiao [Institute of Neuroscience and the Collaborative Innovation Center for Brain Science, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Neurobiology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Li, Dan [Department of Pathology, Faculty of Basic Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Lei, Yang [Department of Internal Medicine, University-Town Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016 (China); Peng, Xiaojun [Jingjie PTM BioLab (Hangzhou) Co. Ltd, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Cheng, Zhongyi [Advanced Institute of Translational Medicine, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); and others

    2015-11-15

    Background: Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic RNA virus persistently infecting mammalian hosts including humans. Lysine acetylation (Kac) is a key protein post-translational modification (PTM). The unexpectedly broad regulatory scope of Kac let us to profile the entire acetylome upon BDV infection. Methods: The acetylome was profiled through stable isotope labeling for cell culture (SILAC)-based quantitative proteomics. The quantifiable proteome was annotated using bioinformatics. Results: We identified and quantified 791 Kac sites in 473 Kac proteins in human BDV Hu-H1-infected and non-infected oligodendroglial (OL) cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that BDV infection alters the acetylation of metabolic proteins, membrane-associated proteins and transmembrane transporter activity, and affects the acetylation of several lysine acetyltransferases (KAT). Conclusions: Upon BDV persistence the OL acetylome is manipulated towards higher energy and transporter levels necessary for shuttling BDV proteins to and from nuclear replication sites. - Highlights: • We used SILAC-based proteomics to analyze the acetylome of BDV infected OL cells. • We quantified 791Kac sites in 473 proteins. • Bioinformatic analysis revealed altered acetylation of metabolic proteins et al. • BDV manipulates the OL acetylome towards higher energy and transporter levels. • BDV infection is associated with enriched phosphate-associated metabolic processes.

  7. Immune response of Th17-associated cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Milena S; Santos, Taciana P S; Santos, Priscila L; Schinoni, Maria Isabel; Oliveira, Isabela S; Pereira, Ariana B; Atta, Ajax M; Sousa-Atta, Maria Luiza B

    2017-09-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) chronic infection causes severe cellular immune dysfunction. Here, we investigated the production of Th17-associated cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of untreated patients with HCV, patients presenting an early virologic response (EVR) after 12weeks of treatment with interferon-α plus ribavirin with or without HCV protease inhibitors, and patients who were nonresponders to HCV therapy. PBMCs were stimulated with HCV core and nonstructural antigens, and the production of Th17-associated cytokines was measured with a Milliplex MAP immunoassay. Core-stimulated PBMCs from both untreated and nonresponder patients produced interleukin (IL)-17A, and vigorous production of IL-17A in response to NS3 antigen was only verified in the untreated group. Nonresponder patients also produced IL-17F after core antigen stimulation. IL-21 production was unaltered in the three groups of patients, whereas IL-17E and IL-22 were not detected. The production of Th17 cytokines by cells from patients showing an EVR was insignificant. IL-17A and IL-17F levels were not correlated with alanine aminotransferase levels or viremia. However, advanced fibrosis was associated with higher IL-17A production in T0 cells stimulated with core antigen. Untreated patients with HCV and patients who were nonresponders to antiviral treatment differed in their PBMC immune responses of Th17-associated cytokines. The early virological response to antiviral treatment dramatically decreased Th17 immune responses to HCV antigens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Interaction with Tsg101 is necessary for the efficient transport and release of nucleocapsids in marburg virus-infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Dolnik

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery supports the efficient budding of Marburg virus (MARV and many other enveloped viruses. Interaction between components of the ESCRT machinery and viral proteins is predominantly mediated by short tetrapeptide motifs, known as late domains. MARV contains late domain motifs in the matrix protein VP40 and in the genome-encapsidating nucleoprotein (NP. The PSAP late domain motif of NP recruits the ESCRT-I protein tumor susceptibility gene 101 (Tsg101. Here, we generated a recombinant MARV encoding NP with a mutated PSAP late domain (rMARV(PSAPmut. rMARV(PSAPmut was attenuated by up to one log compared with recombinant wild-type MARV (rMARV(wt, formed smaller plaques and exhibited delayed virus release. Nucleocapsids in rMARV(PSAPmut-infected cells were more densely packed inside viral inclusions and more abundant in the cytoplasm than in rMARV(wt-infected cells. A similar phenotype was detected when MARV-infected cells were depleted of Tsg101. Live-cell imaging analyses revealed that Tsg101 accumulated in inclusions of rMARV(wt-infected cells and was co-transported together with nucleocapsids. In contrast, rMARV(PSAPmut nucleocapsids did not display co-localization with Tsg101, had significantly shorter transport trajectories, and migration close to the plasma membrane was severely impaired, resulting in reduced recruitment into filopodia, the major budding sites of MARV. We further show that the Tsg101 interacting protein IQGAP1, an actin cytoskeleton regulator, was recruited into inclusions and to individual nucleocapsids together with Tsg101. Moreover, IQGAP1 was detected in a contrail-like structure at the rear end of migrating nucleocapsids. Down regulation of IQGAP1 impaired release of MARV. These results indicate that the PSAP motif in NP, which enables binding to Tsg101, is important for the efficient actin-dependent transport of nucleocapsids to the sites of budding. Thus

  9. Chemokines: a new dendritic cell signal for T cell activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A Thaiss

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are the main inducers and regulators of cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL responses against viruses and tumors. One checkpoint to avoid misguided CTL activation, which might damage healthy cells of the body, is the necessity for multiple activation signals, involving both antigenic as well as additional signals that reflect the presence of pathogens. DCs provide both signals when activated by ligands of pattern recognition receptors and licensed by helper lymphocytes. Recently, it has been established that such T cell licensing can be facilitated by CD4+ T helper cells (classical licensing or by NKT cells (alternative licensing. Licensing regulates the DC/CTL cross-talk at multiple layers. Direct recruitment of CTLs through chemokines released by licensed DCs has recently emerged as a common theme and has a crucial impact on the efficiency of CTL responses. Here, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of DC licensing for cross-priming and implications for the temporal and spatial regulation underlying this process. Future vaccination strategies will benefit from a deeper insight into the mechanisms that govern CTL activation.

  10. Attenuation of influenza virus infectivity with herbal-marine compound (HESA-A: an in vitro study in MDCK cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrbod Parvaneh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The influenza virus is still one of the most important respiratory risks affecting humans which require effective treatments. In this case, traditional medications are of interest. HESA-A is an active natural biological compound from herbal-marine origin. Previous studies have reported that the therapeutic properties of HESA-A are able to treat psoriasis vulgaris and cancers. However, no antiviral properties have been reported. Methods This study was designed to investigate the potential antiviral properties of HESA-A and its effects in modulating TNF-α and IL-6 cytokine levels. HESA-A was prepared in normal saline as a stock solution (0.8 mg/ml, pH = 7.4. Percentages of cell survival when exposed to different concentrations of HESA-A at different time intervals was determined by MTT assay. To study the potential antiviral activity of HESA-A, Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK cells were treated with the effective concentration (EC50 of HESA-A (0.025 mg/ml and 100 TCID50/0.1 ml of virus sample under different types of exposure. Results Based on the MTT method and hemagglutination assay (HA, HESA-A is capable of improving cell viability to 31% and decreasing HA titre to almost 99% in co-penetration exposures. In addition, based on quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, it was found that HESA-A causes decrements in TNF-α and IL-6 cytokine expressions, which was significant for TNF-α (p ≤ 0.05 but not for IL-6. Conclusion In conclusion, HESA-A was effective against influenza infection through suppressing cytokine expression.

  11. Healthy rabbits are susceptible to Epstein-Barr virus infection and infected cells proliferate in immunosuppressed animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Gulfaraz; Ahmed, Waqar; Philip, Pretty S; Ali, Mahmoud H; Adem, Abdu

    2015-02-18

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is an oncogenic virus implicated in the pathogenesis of several human malignancies. However, due to the lack of a suitable animal model, a number of fundamental questions pertaining to the biology of EBV remain poorly understood. Here, we explore the potential of rabbits as a model for EBV infection and investigate the impact of immunosuppression on viral proliferation and gene expression. Six healthy New Zealand white rabbits were inoculated intravenously with EBV and blood samples collected prior to infection and for 7 weeks post-infection. Three weeks after the last blood collection, animals were immunosuppressed with daily intramuscular injections of cyclosporin A at doses of 20 mg/kg for 15 days and blood collected twice a week from each rabbit. The animals were subsequently sacrificed and tissues from all major organs were collected for subsequent analysis. Following intravenous inoculation, all 6 rabbits seroconverted with raised IgG and IgM titres to EBV, but viral DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) could only be detected intermittently. Following immunosuppression however, EBV DNA could be readily detected in PBMCs from all 4 rabbits that survived the treatment. Quantitative PCR indicated an increase in EBV viral load in PBMCs as the duration of immunosuppression increased. At autopsy, splenomegaly was seen in 3/4 rabbits, but spleens from all 4 rabbit were EBV PCR positive. EBER-in situ hybridization and immunoshistochemistry revealed the presence of a large number of EBER-positive and LMP-1 positive lymphoblasts in the spleens of 3/4 rabbits. To a lesser extent, EBER-positive cells were also seen in the portal tract regions of the liver of these rabbits. Western blotting indicated that EBNA-1 and EBNA-2 were also expressed in the liver and spleen of infected animals. EBV can infect healthy rabbits and the infected cells proliferate when the animals are immunocompromised. The infected cells expressed several EBV

  12. Suppression of Zika virus infection and replication in endothelial cells and astrocytes by PKA inhibitor PKI 14-22.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Fan; Ramos da Silva, Suzane; Huang, I-Chueh; Jung, Jae U; Gao, Shou-Jiang

    2017-12-06

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV), a re-emerging flavivirus, and its associated neurological disorders, such as Guillain-Barré (GB) syndrome and microcephaly, have generated an urgent need for developing effective ZIKV vaccines and therapeutic agents. Here, we used human endothelial cells and astrocytes, both of which represent key cell types for ZIKV infection, to identify potential inhibitors for ZIKV replication. Because several pathways, including AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), protein kinase A (PKA), and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways, have been reported to play important roles in flavivirus replication, we tested inhibitors or agonists of these pathways for their effects on ZIKV replication. We identified PKA inhibitor, PKI 14-22 (PKI), as a potent inhibitor of ZIKV replication. PKI effectively suppressed the replication of ZIKV from both African and Asian/American lineages with high efficiency and minimal cytotoxicity. While ZIKV infection did not induce PKA activation, endogenous PKA activity was essential for supporting ZIKV replication. Interestingly, in addition to PKA, PKI also inhibited other unknown target(s) to block ZIKV replication. PKI inhibited ZIKV replication at the post-entry stage by preferentially affecting negative-sense RNA synthesis as well as viral protein translation. Together, these results have identified a potential inhibitor of ZIKV replication, which could be further explored for future therapeutic application.ImportanceThere is an urgent need to develop effective vaccines and therapeutic agents against Zika virus (ZIKV) infection, a re-emerging flavivirus associated with neurological disorders including Guillain-Barré (GB) syndrome and microcephaly. By screening for inhibitors of several cellular pathways, we have identified PKA inhibitor PKI 14-22 (PKI) as a potent inhibitor of ZIKV replication. We have shown that PKI effectively suppresses the replication of ZIKV of all the strains

  13. Monocyte-derived dendritic cells upregulate extracellular catabolism of aggregated LDL upon maturation, leading to foam cell formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haka, Abigail S.; Singh, Rajesh K.; Grosheva, Inna; Hoffner, Haley; Capetillo-Zarate, Estibaliz; Chin, Harvey F.; Anandasabapathy, Niroshana; Maxfield, Frederick R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Although dendritic cells are known to play a role in atherosclerosis, few studies have examined the contribution of the wide variety of dendritic cell subsets. Accordingly, their roles in atherogenesis remain largely unknown. We investigated the ability of different dendritic cell subsets to become foam cells following contact with aggregated LDL (the predominant form of LDL found in atherosclerotic plaques). Approach and Results We demonstrate that both murine and human monocyte-derived dendritic cells use exophagy to degrade aggregated LDL, leading to foam cell formation, while monocyte-independent dendritic cells are unable to clear LDL aggregates by this mechanism. Exophagy is a catabolic process in which objects that cannot be internalized by phagocytosis (due to their size or association with extracellular structures) are initially digested in an extracellular acidic lytic compartment. Surprisingly, we found that monocyte-derived dendritic cells upregulate exophagy upon maturation. This contrasts various forms of endocytic internalization in dendritic cells, which decrease upon maturation. Finally, we show that our in vitro results are consistent with dendritic cell lipid accumulation in plaques of an ApoE−/− mouse model of atherosclerosis. Conclusions Our results show that monocyte-derived dendritic cells use exophagy to degrade aggregated LDL and become foam cells, while monocyte-independent dendritic cells are unable to clear LDL deposits. Further, we find that exophagy is upregulated upon dendritic cell maturation. Thus, exophagy-mediated foam cell formation in monocyte-derived dendritic cells could play a significant role in atherogenesis. PMID:26293468

  14. Dendritic cells and isolevuglandins in immunity, inflammation, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Kala B; Davies, Sean S; Kirabo, Annet

    2017-03-01

    Hypertension is the major risk factor for morbidity and mortality from myocardial infarction, stroke, heart failure, and chronic kidney disease. Despite its importance, the pathogenesis of essential hypertension is poorly understood. During the past several years, it has become evident that T cells contribute to hypertension. Activated T cells accumulate in the perivascular space and the kidney and release cytokines that promote vascular dysfunction and end-organ damage. Although dendritic cells play a pivotal role in initiating adaptive immune responses, T cells have taken center stage in studies implicating the immune system in the genesis of hypertension. The mechanisms by which T cells are activated and the antigens involved are poorly understood. We recently showed that hypertension is associated with increased dendritic cell production of the TH17 polarizing cytokines, IL-6, IL-1β, and IL-23. This occurs in part by increased superoxide production via NADPH oxidase and protein modification by highly reactive isolevuglandins (IsoLGs). IsoLGs are produced via the isoprostane pathway of free radical-mediated lipid peroxidation and, when adducted to proteins, have the potential to act as neoantigens. In this review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the role of antigen-presenting dendritic cells in the pathophysiology of hypertension and highlight potential neoantigens that may contribute to this disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  15. Real-Time Light Scattering Tracking of Gold Nanoparticles- bioconjugated Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infecting HEp-2 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Xiao-Yan; Zheng, Lin-Ling; Gao, Peng-Fei; Yang, Xiao-Xi; Li, Chun-Mei; Li, Yuan Fang; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2014-03-01

    Real-time tracking of virus invasion is crucial for understanding viral infection mechanism, which, however, needs simple and efficient labeling chemistry with improved signal-to-noise ratio. For that purpose, herein we investigated the invasion dynamics of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) through dark-field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique by using Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) as light scattering labels. RSV, a ubiquitous, non-segmented, pleiomorphic and negative-sense RNA virus, is an important human pathogen in infants, the elderly, and the immunocompromised. In order to label the enveloped virus of paramyxoviridae family, an efficient streptavidin (SA)-biotin binding chemistry was employed, wherein AuNPs and RSV particles modified with SA and biotin, respectively, allowing the AuNP-modified RSVs to maintain their virulence without affecting the native activities of RSV, making the long dynamic visualization successful for the RSV infections into human epidermis larynx carcinoma cells.

  16. Sensing and control of bluetongue virus infection in epithelial cells via RIG-I and MDA5 helicases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauveau, Emilie; Doceul, Virginie; Lara, Estelle; Adam, Micheline; Breard, Emmanuel; Sailleau, Corinne; Viarouge, Cyril; Desprat, Alexandra; Meyer, Gilles; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Ruscanu, Suzana; Charley, Bernard; Zientara, Stéphan; Vitour, Damien

    2012-11-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV), an arthropod-borne member of the Reoviridae family, is a double-stranded RNA virus that causes an economically important livestock disease that has spread across Europe in recent decades. Production of type I interferon (alpha/beta interferon [IFN-α/β]) has been reported in vivo and in vitro upon BTV infection. However, the cellular sensors and signaling pathways involved in this process remain unknown. Here we studied the mechanisms responsible for the production of IFN-β in response to BTV serotype 8. Upon BTV infection of A549 cells, expression of IFN-β and other proinflammatory cytokines was strongly induced at both the protein and mRNA levels. This response appeared to be dependent on virus replication, since exposure to UV-inactivated virus failed to induce IFN-β. We also demonstrated that BTV infection activated the transcription factors IFN regulatory factor 3 and nuclear factor κB. We investigated the role of several pattern recognition receptors in this response and showed that expression of IFN-β was greatly reduced after small-interfering-RNA-mediated knockdown of the RNA helicase encoded by retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) or melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5). In contrast, silencing of MyD88, Toll-like receptor 3, or the recently described DexD/H-box helicase DDX1 sensor had no or a weak effect on IFN-β induction, suggesting that the RIG-I-like receptor pathway is specifically engaged for BTV sensing. Moreover, we also showed that overexpression of either RIG-I or MDA5 impaired BTV expression in infected A549 cells. Overall, this indicates that RIG-I and MDA5 can both contribute to the recognition and control of BTV infection.

  17. Cigarette smoke promotes dendritic cell accumulation in COPD; a Lung Tissue Research Consortium study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Eunhee S

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Abnormal immune responses are believed to be highly relevant in the pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Dendritic cells provide a critical checkpoint for immunity by their capacity to both induce and suppress immunity. Although evident that cigarette smoke, the primary cause of COPD, significantly influences dendritic cell functions, little is known about the roles of dendritic cells in the pathogenesis of COPD. Methods The extent of dendritic cell infiltration in COPD tissue specimens was determined using immunohistochemical localization of CD83+ cells (marker of matured myeloid dendritic cells, and CD1a+ cells (Langerhans cells. The extent of tissue infiltration with Langerhans cells was also determined by the relative expression of the CD207 gene in COPD versus control tissues. To determine mechanisms by which dendritic cells accumulate in COPD, complimentary studies were conducted using monocyte-derived human dendritic cells exposed to cigarette smoke extract (CSE, and dendritic cells extracted from mice chronically exposed to cigarette smoke. Results In human COPD lung tissue, we detected a significant increase in the total number of CD83+ cells, and significantly higher amounts of CD207 mRNA when compared with control tissue. Human monocyte-derived dendritic cells exposed to CSE (0.1-2% exhibited enhanced survival in vitro when compared with control dendritic cells. Murine dendritic cells extracted from mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 4 weeks, also demonstrated enhanced survival compared to dendritic cells extracted from control mice. Acute exposure of human dendritic cells to CSE induced the cellular pro-survival proteins heme-oxygenase-1 (HO-1, and B cell lymphoma leukemia-x(L (Bcl-xL, predominantly through oxidative stress. Although activated human dendritic cells conditioned with CSE expressed diminished migratory CCR7 expression, their migration towards the CCR7 ligand CCL21 was not

  18. MYC Gene Rearrangements Are Closely Associated with Poor Survival of Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma with Hepatitis B Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihe Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify clinical adverse prognostic factors affecting overall survival (OS of diffuse large B cell (DLBCL patients with hepatitis B virus (HBV infection. In this study, 30 DLBCL patients with HBV infection and 51 DLBCL patients with HBV-free were reviewed retrospectively. As of July 2016, the median follow-up period was 26.4 months (3.0~65.0 months. The median OS of patients in HBV infection group was 38.6 months, while that of patients in HBV-free group was not reached (P=0.042; the median progression-free survival (PFS of patients in HBV infection group was worse than that in HBV-free group, 18.5 months and 38.5 months (P=0.118, respectively. The rate of MYC and BCL2 gene rearrangements in HBV infection group was significantly higher than that in HBV-free group, 20.0% versus 3.9% (P=0.019 and 23.3% versus 5.9% (P=0.021, respectively. Multivariable analysis indicated that IPI (P=0.002, chemotherapy regimens (P=0.017, and MYC gene rearrangements (P=0.004 were independent adverse prognostic factors for all DLBCL patients in this study. Results demonstrated that the poor survival of DLBCL patients with HBV infection was closely involved in chemotherapy regimens, IPI, and MYC gene rearrangements.

  19. Kidney and bladder outcomes in children with hemorrhagic cystitis and BK virus infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oshrine, Benjamin; Bunin, Nancy; Li, Yimei; Furth, Susan; Laskin, Benjamin L

    2013-12-01

    BK virus (BKV) infection is associated with hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) recipients and nephropathy after kidney transplantation. We assessed the association between BKV and kidney and bladder complications in children developing HC by retrospectively reviewing 221 consecutive pediatric allogeneic HSCT recipients at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia from 2005 to 2011. We included all patients with BKV PCR testing performed for clinical indication from day 0 until 1 year post-HSCT (N = 68). We assessed the association of any BKV infection (urine and/or blood) or peak BK viremia ≥ 10,000 copies/mL (high viremia) with severe HC (defined as grade IV-bladder catheterization or surgical intervention); the need for dialysis; serum creatinine-estimated glomerular filtration rate at the time of BKV testing, day 100, and day 365; and death. Children with high viremia more likely developed severe HC compared with those with peak viremia < 10,000 copies/mL (21% versus 2%; P = .02). BKV infection of the blood or urine was not associated with the need for dialysis, change in estimated glomerular filtration rate, or mortality. BKV infection is common after pediatric allogeneic HSCT, and plasma testing in those with HC may predict patients who will develop severe bladder injury. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Suppression subtractive hybridization coupled with microarray analysis to examine differential expression of genes in virus infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Shirin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available High throughput detection of differential expression of genes is an efficient means of identifying genes and pathways that may play a role in biological systems under certain experimental conditions. There exist a variety of approaches that could be used to identify groups of genes that change in expression in response to a particular stimulus or environment. We here describe the application of suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH coupled with cDNA microarray analysis for isolation and identification of chicken transcripts that change in expression on infection of host cells with a paramyxovirus. SSH was used for initial isolation of differentially expressed transcripts, a large-scale validation of which was accomplished by microarray analysis. The data reveals a large group of regulated genes constituting many biochemical pathways that could serve as targets for future investigations to explore their role in paramyxovirus pathogenesis. The detailed methods described herein could be useful and adaptable to any biological system for studying changes in gene expression.

  1. Protective Effect of Panax notoginseng Root Water Extract against Influenza A Virus Infection by Enhancing Antiviral Interferon-Mediated Immune Responses and Natural Killer Cell Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang-Gi Choi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Influenza is an acute respiratory illness caused by the influenza A virus, which causes economic losses and social disruption mainly by increasing hospitalization and mortality rates among the elderly and people with chronic diseases. Influenza vaccines are the most effective means of preventing seasonal influenza, but can be completely ineffective if there is an antigenic mismatch between the seasonal vaccine virus and the virus circulating in the community. In addition, influenza viruses resistant to antiviral drugs are emerging worldwide. Thus, there is an urgent need to develop new vaccines and antiviral drugs against these viruses. In this study, we conducted in vitro and in vivo analyses of the antiviral effect of Panax notoginseng root (PNR, which is used as an herbal medicine and nutritional supplement in Korea and China. We confirmed that PNR significantly prevented influenza virus infection in a concentration-dependent manner in mouse macrophages. In addition, PNR pretreatment inhibited viral protein (PB1, PB2, HA, NA, M1, PA, M2, and NP and viral mRNA (NS1, HA, PB2, PA, NP, M1, and M2 expression. PNR pretreatment also increased the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines [tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin 6] and interferon (IFN-beta and the phosphorylation of type-I IFN-related proteins (TANK-binding kinase 1, STAT1, and IRF3 in vitro. In mice exposed to the influenza A H1N1 virus, PNR treatment decreased mortality by 90% and prevented weight loss (by approximately 10% compared with the findings in untreated animals. In addition, splenocytes from PNR-administered mice displayed significantly enhanced natural killer (NK cell activity against YAC-1 cells. Taking these findings together, PNR stimulates an antiviral response in murine macrophages and mice that protects against viral infection, which may be attributable to its ability to stimulate NK cell activity. Further investigations are needed to reveal the molecular

  2. HIV-1-infected monocyte-derived dendritic cells do not undergo maturation but can elicit IL-10 production and T cell regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granelli-Piperno, Angela; Golebiowska, Angelika; Trumpfheller, Christine; Siegal, Frederick P.; Steinman, Ralph M.

    2004-05-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) undergo maturation during virus infection and thereby become potent stimulators of cell-mediated immunity. HIV-1 replicates in immature DCs, but we now find that infection is not accompanied by many components of maturation in either infected cells or uninfected bystanders. The infected cultures do not develop potent stimulating activity for the mixed leukocyte reaction (MLR), and the DCs producing HIV-1 gag p24 do not express CD83 and DC-lysosome-associated membrane protein maturation markers. If different maturation stimuli are applied to DCs infected with HIV-1, the infected cells selectively fail to mature. When DCs from HIV-1-infected patients are infected and cultured with autologous T cells, IL-10 was produced in 6 of 10 patients. These DC-T cell cocultures could suppress another immune response, the MLR. The regulation was partially IL-10-dependent and correlated in extent with the level of IL-10 produced. Suppressor cells only developed from infected patients, rather than healthy controls, and the DCs had to be exposed to live virus rather than HIV-1 gag peptides or protein. These results indicate that HIV-1-infected DCs have two previously unrecognized means to evade immune responses: maturation can be blocked reducing the efficacy of antigen presentation from infected cells, and T cell-dependent suppression can be induced.

  3. Antiviral therapy improves overall survival in hepatitis C virus-infected patients who develop diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosry, Jeff; Mahale, Parag; Turturro, Francesco; Miranda, Roberto N; Economides, Minas P; Granwehr, Bruno P; Torres, Harrys A

    2016-12-01

    Chronic Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is associated with increased incidence of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Several studies have demonstrated regression of indolent lymphoma with antiviral therapy (AVT) alone. However, the role of AVT in HCV-infected patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is unclear. We therefore analyzed AVT's impact on oncologic outcomes of HCV-infected patients (cases) who developed DLBCL. Cases seen at our institution (June 2004-May 2014) were matched with uninfected counterparts (controls) and then divided according to prior AVT consisting of interferon-based regimens. We studied 304 patients (76 cases and 228 controls). More cases than controls had extranodal (79% vs. 72%; p = 0.07) and upper gastrointestinal (GI; 42% vs. 24%; p = 0.004) involvement. Cases never given AVT had DLBCL more refractory to first-line chemotherapy than that in the controls (33% vs. 17%; p = 0.05) and exhibited a trend toward more progressive lymphoma at last examination compared to controls (50% vs. 32%; p = 0.09) or cases given AVT (50% vs. 27%; p = 0.06). Cases never given AVT had worse 5-year overall survival (OS) rates than did the controls (HR, 2.3 [95% CI, 1.01-5.3]; p = 0.04). Furthermore, AVT improved 5-year OS rates among cases in both univariate (median [Interquartile range]: 39 [26-56] vs. 16 [6-41] months, p = 0.02) and multivariate analyses (HR = 0.21 [95% CI, 0.06-0.69]; p = 0.01). This study highlights the negative impact of chronic HCV on survival of DLBCL patients and shows that treatment of HCV infection is associated with a better cancer response to chemotherapy and improves 5-year OS. © 2016 UICC.

  4. Using Zebrafish Models of Human Influenza A Virus Infections to Screen Antiviral Drugs and Characterize Host Immune Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Con; Jurcyzszak, Denise; Goody, Michelle F; Gabor, Kristin A; Longfellow, Jacob R; Millard, Paul J; Kim, Carol H

    2017-01-20

    Each year, seasonal influenza outbreaks profoundly affect societies worldwide. In spite of global efforts, influenza remains an intractable healthcare burden. The principle strategy to curtail infections is yearly vaccination. In individuals who have contracted influenza, antiviral drugs can mitigate symptoms. There is a clear and unmet need to develop alternative strategies to combat influenza. Several animal models have been created to model host-influenza interactions. Here, protocols for generating zebrafish models for systemic and localized human influenza A virus (IAV) infection are described. Using a systemic IAV infection model, small molecules with potential antiviral activity can be screened. As a proof-of-principle, a protocol that demonstrates the efficacy of the antiviral drug Zanamivir in IAV-infected zebrafish is described. It shows how disease phenotypes can be quantified to score the relative efficacy of potential antivirals in IAV-infected zebrafish. In recent years, there has been increased appreciation for the critical role neutrophils play in the human host response to influenza infection. The zebrafish has proven to be an indispensable model for the study of neutrophil biology, with direct impacts on human medicine. A protocol to generate a localized IAV infection in the Tg(mpx:mCherry) zebrafish line to study neutrophil biology in the context of a localized viral infection is described. Neutrophil recruitment to localized infection sites provides an additional quantifiable phenotype for assessing experimental manipulations that may have therapeutic applications. Both zebrafish protocols described faithfully recapitulate aspects of human IAV infection. The zebrafish model possesses numerous inherent advantages, including high fecundity, optical clarity, amenability to drug screening, and availability of transgenic lines, including those in which immune cells such as neutrophils are labeled with fluorescent proteins. The protocols detailed here

  5. Genetic and structural basis for selection of a ubiquitous T cell receptor deployed in Epstein-Barr virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Miles

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Despite the ∼10(18 αβ T cell receptor (TCR structures that can be randomly manufactured by the human thymus, some surface more frequently than others. The pinnacles of this distortion are public TCRs, which exhibit amino acid-identical structures across different individuals. Public TCRs are thought to result from both recombinatorial bias and antigen-driven selection, but the mechanisms that underlie inter-individual TCR sharing are still largely theoretical. To examine this phenomenon at the atomic level, we solved the co-complex structure of one of the most widespread and numerically frequent public TCRs in the human population. The archetypal AS01 public TCR recognizes an immunodominant BMLF1 peptide, derived from the ubiquitous Epstein-Barr virus, bound to HLA-A*0201. The AS01 TCR was observed to dock in a diagonal fashion, grasping the solvent exposed peptide crest with two sets of complementarity-determining region (CDR loops, and was fastened to the peptide and HLA-A*0201 platform with residue sets found only within TCR genes biased in the public response. Computer simulations of a random V(DJ recombination process demonstrated that both TCRα and TCRβ amino acid sequences could be manufactured easily, thereby explaining the prevalence of this receptor across different individuals. Interestingly, the AS01 TCR was encoded largely by germline DNA, indicating that the TCR loci already comprise gene segments that specifically recognize this ancient pathogen. Such pattern recognition receptor-like traits within the αβ TCR system further blur the boundaries between the adaptive and innate immune systems.

  6. Genetic and Structural Basis for Selection of a Ubiquitous T Cell Receptor Deployed in Epstein-Barr Virus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gostick, Emma; Schauenburg, Andrea J. A.; Dolton, Garry; Venturi, Vanessa; Davenport, Miles P.; Tan, Mai Ping; Burrows, Scott R.; Wooldridge, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Despite the ∼1018 αβ T cell receptor (TCR) structures that can be randomly manufactured by the human thymus, some surface more frequently than others. The pinnacles of this distortion are public TCRs, which exhibit amino acid-identical structures across different individuals. Public TCRs are thought to result from both recombinatorial bias and antigen-driven selection, but the mechanisms that underlie inter-individual TCR sharing are still largely theoretical. To examine this phenomenon at the atomic level, we solved the co-complex structure of one of the most widespread and numerically frequent public TCRs in the human population. The archetypal AS01 public TCR recognizes an immunodominant BMLF1 peptide, derived from the ubiquitous Epstein-Barr virus, bound to HLA-A*0201. The AS01 TCR was observed to dock in a diagonal fashion, grasping the solvent exposed peptide crest with two sets of complementarity-determining region (CDR) loops, and was fastened to the peptide and HLA-A*0201 platform with residue sets found only within TCR genes biased in the public response. Computer simulations of a random V(D)J recombination process demonstrated that both TCRα and TCRβ amino acid sequences could be manufactured easily, thereby explaining the prevalence of this receptor across different individuals. Interestingly, the AS01 TCR was encoded largely by germline DNA, indicating that the TCR loci already comprise gene segments that specifically recognize this ancient pathogen. Such pattern recognition receptor-like traits within the αβ TCR system further blur the boundaries between the adaptive and innate immune systems. PMID:21124993

  7. Murine and Human Model Systems for the Study of Dendritic Cell Immunobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargadon, Kristian M

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells are a population of innate immune cells that possess their own effector functions as well as numerous regulatory properties that shape the activity of other innate and adaptive cells of the immune system. Following their development from either lymphoid or myeloid progenitors, the function of dendritic cells is tightly linked to their maturation and activation status. Differentiation into specialized subsets of dendritic cells also contributes to the diverse immunologic functions of these cells. Because of the key role played by dendritic cells in the regulation of both immune tolerance and activation, significant efforts have been focused on understanding dendritic cell biology. This review highlights the model systems currently available to study dendritic cell immunobiology and emphasizes the advantages and disadvantages to each system in both murine and human settings. In particular, in vitro cell culture systems involving immortalized dendritic cell lines, ex vivo systems for differentiating and expanding dendritic cells from their precursor populations, and systems for expanding, ablating, and manipulating dendritic cells in vivo are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of these systems to our current understanding of the development, function, and immunotherapeutic applications of dendritic cells, and insights into how these models might be extended in the future to answer remaining questions in the field are discussed.

  8. Human Dendritic Cell Response Signatures Distinguish 1918, Pandemic, and Seasonal H1N1 Influenza Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Boris M; Thakar, Juilee; Albrecht, Randy A; Avey, Stefan; Zaslavsky, Elena; Marjanovic, Nada; Chikina, Maria; Fribourg, Miguel; Hayot, Fernand; Schmolke, Mirco; Meng, Hailong; Wetmur, James; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Kleinstein, Steven H; Sealfon, Stuart C

    2015-10-01

    Influenza viruses continue to present global threats to human health. Antigenic drift and shift, genetic reassortment, and cross-species transmission generate new strains with differences in epidemiology and clinical severity. We compared the temporal transcriptional responses of human dendritic cells (DC) to infection with two pandemic (A/Brevig Mission/1/1918, A/California/4/2009) and two seasonal (A/New Caledonia/20/1999, A/Texas/36/1991) H1N1 influenza viruses. Strain-specific response differences included stronger activation of NF-κB following infection with A/New Caledonia/20/1999 and a unique cluster of genes expressed following infection with A/Brevig Mission/1/1918. A common antiviral program showing strain-specific timing was identified in the early DC response and found to correspond with reported transcript changes in blood during symptomatic human influenza virus infection. Comparison of the global responses to the seasonal and pandemic strains showed that a dramatic divergence occurred after 4 h, with only the seasonal strains inducing widespread mRNA loss. Continuously evolving influenza viruses present a global threat to human health; however, these host responses display strain-dependent differences that are incompletely understood. Thus, we conducted a detailed comparative study assessing the immune responses of human DC to infection with two pandemic and two seasonal H1N1 influenza strains. We identified in the immune response to viral infection both common and strain-specific features. Among the stain-specific elements were a time shift of the interferon-stimulated gene response, selective induction of NF-κB signaling by one of the seasonal strains, and massive RNA degradation as early as 4 h postinfection by the seasonal, but not the pandemic, viruses. These findings illuminate new aspects of the distinct differences in the immune responses to pandemic and seasonal influenza viruses. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All

  9. Zika virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nazerai, Loulieta; Scholler, Amalie Skak; Buus, Soren

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus that has drawn worldwide attention due to its association to neurologic complications, particularly severe congenital malformations. While ZIKV can replicate efficiently and cause disease in human hosts, it fails to replicate to substantial titers...... mice by introducing the virus directly in the brain via intracerebral (i.c.) inoculation. In this way, the antigen is precisely placed at the site of interest, evading the first line of defense, and thus rendering the mice susceptible to infection. We found that, while intravenous (i.v.) inoculation...... of two different strains of WT mice with low doses of ZIKV does not result in viremia, it is nevertheless able to induce both cell-mediated and humoral immunity as well as clinical protection against subsequent i.c challenge with lethal doses of the virus. In order to determine the contribution of key...

  10. Partial depletion of natural CD4⁺CD25⁺ regulatory T cells with anti-CD25 antibody does not alter the course of acute influenza A virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard J Betts

    Full Text Available Foxp3⁺CD4⁺ regulatory T cells represent a T cell subset with well-characterized immunosuppressive effects during immune homeostasis and chronic infections, and there is emerging evidence to suggest these cells temper pulmonary inflammation in response to acute viral infection. Recent studies have demonstrated treatment with PC61 CD25-depleting antibody potentiates inflammation in a murine model of RSV infection, while paradoxically delaying recruitment of CD8⁺ T cells to the site of inflammation. The present study therefore sought to examine the role of these cells in a murine model of acute influenza A virus infection through the administration of PC61 CD25-depleting antibody. PC61 antibody is able to partially deplete CD25⁺Foxp3⁺ regulatory T cells to a comparable degree as seen within previous work examining RSV, however this does not alter influenza A-virus induced mortality, weight loss, viral clearance and cellularity within the lung. Collectively, these data demonstrate that partial depletion of CD4⁺CD25⁺ regulatory T cells with PC61 antibody does not alter the course of influenza A virus infection.

  11. MAVS Is Essential for Primary CD4+ T Cell Immunity but Not for Recall T Cell Responses following an Attenuated West Nile Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huanle; Winkelmann, Evandro; Xie, Guorui; Fang, Rong; Peng, Bi-Hung; Li, Li; Lazear, Helen M; Paessler, Slobodan; Diamond, Michael S; Gale, Michael; Barrett, Alan D; Wang, Tian

    2017-03-15

    The use of pathogen recognition receptor (PRR) agonists and the molecular mechanisms involved have been the major focus of research in individual vaccine development. West Nile virus (WNV) nonstructural (NS) 4B-P38G mutant has several features for an ideal vaccine candidate, including significantly reduced neuroinvasiveness, induction of strong adaptive immunity, and protection of mice from wild-type (WT) WNV infection. Here, we determined the role of mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein (MAVS), the adaptor protein for RIG-I-like receptor in regulating host immunity against the NS4B-P38G vaccine. We found that Mavs-/- mice were more susceptible to NS4B-P38G priming than WT mice. Mavs-/- mice had a transiently reduced production of antiviral cytokines and an impaired CD4+ T cell response in peripheral organs. However, antibody and CD8+ T cell responses were minimally affected. NS4B-P38G induced lower type I interferon (IFN), IFN-stimulating gene, and proinflammatory cytokine responses in Mavs-/- dendritic cells and subsequently compromised the antigen-presenting capacity for CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, Mavs-/- mice surviving NS4B-P38G priming were all protected from a lethal WT WNV challenge. NS4B-P38G-primed Mavs-/- mice exhibited equivalent levels of protective CD4+ T cell recall response, a modestly reduced WNV-specific IgM production, but more robust CD8+ T cell recall response. Taken together, our results suggest that MAVS is essential for boosting optimal primary CD4+ T cell responses upon NS4B-P38G vaccination and yet is dispensable for host protection and recall T cell responses during secondary WT WNV infection.IMPORTANCE The production of innate cytokines induced by the recognition of pathogen recognition receptors (PRRs) via their cognate ligands are critical for enhancing antigen-presenting cell functions and influencing T cell responses during microbial infection. The use of PRR agonists and the underlying molecular mechanisms have been the major

  12. Klotho sensitive regulation of dendritic cell functions by vitamin E

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan, Nguyen Thi; Trang, Phi Thi Thu; Van Phong, Nguyen; Toan, Nguyen Linh; Trung, Do Minh; Bac, Nguyen Duy; Nguyen, Viet Linh; Hoang, Nguyen Huy; Van Hai, Nong

    2016-01-01

    Background Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional antigen-presenting cells for naive T cells to link innate and acquired immunity. Klotho, an anti-aging protein, participates in the regulation of Ca2+ dependent migration in DCs. Vitamin E (VitE) is an essential antioxidant to protect cells from damage and elicits its inhibitory effects on NF-?B-mediated inflammatory response. However, the roles of VitE on mouse DC functions and the contribution of klotho to those effects both ...

  13. Viral piracy: HIV-1 targets dendritic cells for transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekkerkerker, Annemarie N; van Kooyk, Yvette; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B H

    2006-04-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the professional antigen presenting cells, are critical for host immunity by inducing specific immune responses against a broad variety of pathogens. Remarkably the human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) subverts DC function leading to spread of the virus. At an early phase of HIV-1 transmission, DCs capture HIV-1 at mucosal surfaces and transmit the virus to T cells in secondary lymphoid tissues. Capture of the virus on DCs takes place via C-type lectins of which the dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule-3 (ICAM-3) grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) is the best studied. DC-SIGN-captured HIV-1 particles accumulate in CD81(+) multivesicular bodies (MVBs) in DCs and are subsequently transmitted to CD4+ T cells resulting in infection of T cells. The viral cell-to-cell transmission takes place at the DC-T cell interface termed the infectious synapse. Recent studies demonstrate that direct infection of DCs contributes to the transmission to T cells at a later phase. Moreover, the infected DCs may function as cellular reservoirs for HIV-1. This review discusses the different processes that govern viral piracy of DCs by HIV-1, emphasizing the intracellular routing of the virus from capture on the cell surface to egress in the infectious synapse.

  14. Atypical protein kinase C regulates primary dendrite specification of cerebellar Purkinje cells by localizing Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Koji; Kani, Shuichi; Shimizu, Takashi; Bae, Young-Ki; Abe, Takaya; Hibi, Masahiko

    2010-12-15

    Neurons have highly polarized structures that determine what parts of the soma elaborate the axon and dendrites. However, little is known about the mechanisms that establish neuronal polarity in vivo. Cerebellar Purkinje cells extend a single primary dendrite from the soma that ramifies into a highly branched dendritic arbor. We used the zebrafish cerebellum to investigate the mechanisms by which Purkinje cells acquire these characteristics. To examine dendritic morphogenesis in individual Purkinje cells, we marked the cell membrane using a Purkinje cell-specific promoter to drive membrane-targeted fluorescent proteins. We found that zebrafish Purkinje cells initially extend multiple neurites from the soma and subsequently retract all but one, which becomes the primary dendrite. In addition, the Golgi apparatus specifically locates to the root of the primary dendrite, and its localization is already established in immature Purkinje cells that have multiple neurites. Inhibiting secretory trafficking through the Golgi apparatus reduces dendritic growth, suggesting that the Golgi apparatus is involved in the dendritic morphogenesis. We also demonstrated that in a mutant of an atypical protein kinase C (aPKC), Prkci, Purkinje cells retain multiple primary dendrites and show disrupted localization of the Golgi apparatus. Furthermore, a mosaic inhibition of Prkci in Purkinje cells recapitulates the aPKC mutant phenotype. These results suggest that the aPKC cell autonomously controls the Golgi localization and thereby regulates the specification of the primary dendrite of Purkinje cells.

  15. Multiple modes of action potential initiation and propagation in mitral cell primary dendrite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Wei R; Shen, Gongyu Y; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2002-01-01

    The mitral cell primary dendrite plays an important role in transmitting distal olfactory nerve input from olfactory glomerulus to the soma-axon initial segment. To understand how dendritic active properties are involved in this transmission, we have combined dual soma and dendritic patch recordi...

  16. Human Melanoma-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Regulate Dendritic Cell Maturation

    OpenAIRE

    Maus, Rachel L. G.; Jakub, James W.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Trace A. Christensen; Noble-Orcutt, Klara; Sachs, Zohar; Hieken, Tina J.; Markovic, Svetomir N.

    2017-01-01

    Evolution of melanoma from a primary tumor to widespread metastasis is crucially dependent on lymphatic spread. The mechanisms regulating the initial step in metastatic dissemination via regional lymph nodes remain largely unknown; however, evidence supporting the establishment of a pre-metastatic niche is evolving. We have previously described a dysfunctional immune profile including reduced expression of dendritic cell (DC) maturation markers in the first node draining from the primary tumo...

  17. Dendritic thickness: a morphometric parameter to classify mouse retinal ganglion cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.D. Loopuijt

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available To study the dendritic morphology of retinal ganglion cells in wild-type mice we intracellularly injected these cells with Lucifer yellow in an in vitro preparation of the retina. Subsequently, quantified values of dendritic thickness, number of branching points and level of stratification of 73 Lucifer yellow-filled ganglion cells were analyzed by statistical methods, resulting in a classification into 9 groups. The variables dendritic thickness, number of branching points per cell and level of stratification were independent of each other. Number of branching points and level of stratification were independent of eccentricity, whereas dendritic thickness was positively dependent (r = 0.37 on it. The frequency distribution of dendritic thickness tended to be multimodal, indicating the presence of at least two cell populations composed of neurons with dendritic diameters either smaller or larger than 1.8 µm ("thin" or "thick" dendrites, respectively. Three cells (4.5% were bistratified, having thick dendrites, and the others (95.5% were monostratified. Using k-means cluster analysis, monostratified cells with either thin or thick dendrites were further subdivided according to level of stratification and number of branching points: cells with thin dendrites were divided into 2 groups with outer stratification (0-40% and 2 groups with inner (50-100% stratification, whereas cells with thick dendrites were divided into one group with outer and 3 groups with inner stratification. We postulate, that one group of cells with thin dendrites resembles cat ß-cells, whereas one group of cells with thick dendrites includes cells that resemble cat a-cells.

  18. KINETIC PROFILE OF INFLUENZA VIRUS INFECTION IN THREE RAT STRAINS

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbstractInfluenza infection is a respiratory disease of viral origin that can cause major epidemics in man. The influenza virus infects and damages epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and causes pneumonia. Lung lesions of mice infected with influenza virus resembl...

  19. Viral protein synthesis in cowpea mosaic virus infected protoplasts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rottier, P.

    1980-01-01

    In contrast to the situation concerning bacterial and, to a lesser extent, animal RNA viruses, little is known about the biochemical processes occurring in plant cells due to plant RNA virus infection. Such processes are difficult to study using intact plants or leaves. Great effort has

  20. [Zika virus infection during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picone, O; Vauloup-Fellous, C; D'Ortenzio, E; Huissoud, C; Carles, G; Benachi, A; Faye, A; Luton, D; Paty, M-C; Ayoubi, J-M; Yazdanpanah, Y; Mandelbrot, L; Matheron, S

    2016-05-01

    A Zika virus epidemic is currently ongoing in the Americas. This virus is linked to congenital infections with potential severe neurodevelopmental dysfunction. However, incidence of fetal infection and whether this virus is responsible of other fetal complications are still unknown. National and international public health authorities recommend caution and several prevention measures. Declaration of Zika virus infection is now mandatory in France. Given the available knowledge on Zika virus, we suggest here a review of the current recommendations for management of pregnancy in case of suspicious or infection by Zika virus in a pregnant woman. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Targeting dendritic cells in vivo for cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina eCaminschi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies that recognise cell surface molecules have been used deliver antigenic cargo to dendritic cells (DC for induction of immune responses. The encouraging anti-tumour immunity elicited using this immunisation strategy suggests its suitability for clinical trials. This review discusses the complex network of DC, the functional specialisation of DC-subsets, the immunological outcomes of targeting different DC-subsets and their cell surface receptors, and the requirements for the induction of effective anti-tumour immunity. Finally, we review preclinical experiments and the progress towards targeting human DC in vivo.

  2. Dendritic Cell Immune Responses in HIV-1 Controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Gayo, Enrique; Yu, Xu G

    2017-02-01

    Robust HIV-1-specific CD8 T cell responses are currently regarded as the main correlate of immune defense in rare individuals who achieve natural, drug-free control of HIV-1; however, the mechanisms that support evolution of such powerful immune responses are not well understood. Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized innate immune cells critical for immune recognition, immune regulation, and immune induction, but their possible contribution to HIV-1 immune defense in controllers remains ill-defined. Recent studies suggest that myeloid DCs from controllers have improved abilities to recognize HIV-1 through cytoplasmic immune sensors, resulting in more potent, cell-intrinsic type I interferon secretion in response to viral infection. This innate immune response may facilitate DC-mediated induction of highly potent antiviral HIV-1-specific T cells. Moreover, protective HLA class I isotypes restricting HIV-1-specific CD8 T cells may influence DC function through specific interactions with innate myelomonocytic MHC class I receptors from the leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptor family. Bi-directional interactions between dendritic cells and HIV-1-specific T cells may contribute to natural HIV-1 immune control, highlighting the importance of a fine-tuned interplay between innate and adaptive immune activities for effective antiviral immune defense.

  3. Hepatitis Virus Infections in Poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yugo, Danielle M; Hauck, Ruediger; Shivaprasad, H L; Meng, Xiang-Jin

    2016-09-01

    Viral hepatitis in poultry is a complex disease syndrome caused by several viruses belonging to different families including avian hepatitis E virus (HEV), duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV-1, -2, -3), duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3, fowl adenoviruses (FAdV), and turkey hepatitis virus (THV). While these hepatitis viruses share the same target organ, the liver, they each possess unique clinical and biological features. In this article, we aim to review the common and unique features of major poultry hepatitis viruses in an effort to identify the knowledge gaps and aid the prevention and control of poultry viral hepatitis. Avian HEV is an Orthohepevirus B in the family Hepeviridae that naturally infects chickens and consists of three distinct genotypes worldwide. Avian HEV is associated with hepatitis-splenomegaly syndrome or big liver and spleen disease in chickens, although the majority of the infected birds are subclinical. Avihepadnaviruses in the family of Hepadnaviridae have been isolated from ducks, snow geese, white storks, grey herons, cranes, and parrots. DHBV evolved with the host as a noncytopathic form without clinical signs and rarely progressed to chronicity. The outcome for DHBV infection varies by the host's ability to elicit an immune response and is dose and age dependent in ducks, thus mimicking the pathogenesis of human hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections and providing an excellent animal model for human HBV. DHAV is a picornavirus that causes a highly contagious virus infection in ducks with up to 100% flock mortality in ducklings under 6 wk of age, while older birds remain unaffected. The high morbidity and mortality has an economic impact on intensive duck production farming. Duck hepatitis virus Types 2 and 3 are astroviruses in the family of Astroviridae with similarity phylogenetically to turkey astroviruses, implicating the potential for cross-species infections between strains. Duck astrovirus (DAstV) causes

  4. Defining in vivo dendritic cell functions using CD11c-DTR transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-On, Liat; Jung, Steffen

    2010-01-01

    The study of dendritic cell involvement in complex phenomena that rely on multi-cellular interactions, such as immune homeostasis, stimulation, and tolerization, called for the investigation of dendritic cell functions within physiological context. To this end we have developed a conditional cell ablation strategy that is based on dendritic cell-restricted expression of a Diphtheria Toxin receptor (DTR) using the CD11c/Itgax promoter. Here, we provide basic protocols that describe the use of this prototypic dendritic cell ablation model and highlight pitfalls and strengths of the approach.

  5. Dendritic cell podosome dynamics does not depend on the F-actin regulator SWAP-70.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Götz

    Full Text Available In addition to classical adhesion structures like filopodia or focal adhesions, dendritic cells similar to macrophages and osteoclasts assemble highly dynamic F-actin structures called podosomes. They are involved in cellular processes such as extracellular matrix degradation, bone resorption by osteoclasts, and trans-cellular diapedesis of lymphocytes. Besides adhesion and migration, podosomes enable dendritic cells to degrade connective tissue by matrix metalloproteinases. SWAP-70 interacts with RhoGTPases and F-actin and regulates migration of dendritic cells. SWAP-70 deficient osteoclasts are impaired in F-actin-ring formation and bone resorption. In the present study, we demonstrate that SWAP-70 is not required for podosome formation and F-actin turnover in dendritic cells. Furthermore, we found that toll-like receptor 4 ligand induced podosome disassembly and podosome-mediated matrix degradation is not affected by SWAP-70 in dendritic cells. Thus, podosome formation and function in dendritic cells is independent of SWAP-70.

  6. Classing it up to get noticed : MHC class 1 antigen display in dendritic cells and neuroblastoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spel, Lotte

    2018-01-01

    In this thesis I have explored the process of MHC-1-mediated antigen presentation in two distinctive cell types: dendritic cells and neuroblastoma tumor cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are pivotal players that bridge innate and adaptive immunity. DCs are able to engulf tumor-derived material and

  7. Dendritic cell based vaccines for HIV infection: The way ahead

    OpenAIRE

    García, Felipe; Plana, Montserrat; Climent, Nuria; León, Agathe; Gatell, Jose M.; Gallart, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells have a central role in HIV infection. On one hand, they are essential to induce strong HIV-specific CD4+ helper T-cell responses that are crucial to achieve a sustained and effective HIV-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T-lymphocyte able to control HIV replication. On the other hand, DCs contribute to virus dissemination and HIV itself could avoid a correct antigen presentation. As the efficacy of immune therapy and therapeutic vaccines against HIV infection has been modest in the best...

  8. The role of dendritic cells in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2017-01-01

    infiltrating human tumors, but less information is known about how these T-cells gain access to the tumor or how they are primed to become tumor-specific. Here, we highlight recent findings that demonstrate a vital role of CD103+ DCs, which have been shown to be experts in cross-priming and the induction...

  9. A possible mechanism of NK cell-lineage granular lymphocyte proliferative disorder (NK-GLPD) in a patient with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) and severe hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (SHMB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohshima, Shiro; Ishii, Masaru; Asada, Hideo; Tatekawa, Toyoshi; Yamaguchi, Norihiko; Kobayashi, Hideyuki; Ishii, Taeko; Mima, Toru; Kawase, Ichiro; Saeki, Yukihiko

    2002-08-01

    We report the case of a young female patient with chronic active Epstein-Barr virus infection (CAEBV) and severe hypersensitivity to mosquito bites (SHMB). She showed a marked increase of NK cell population in peripheral blood. The NK cell population was suggested to be infected with EBV, and to be oligoclonal by Southern blotting using an EBV genome terminal-repeat probe. The NK cells aberrantly expressed CD25, a high affinity receptor for IL-2, and showed an augmented in vitro proliferative response to IL-2. Moreover, they also showed enhanced expression of both Fas-ligand and Bcl-2, and resistance to in vitro Fas-induced apoptotic cell death (Fas-ACD). Taken together, these observations suggested that both the augmentation of proliferative response to IL-2 and the decrease in Fas-ACD may cause NK cell lineage granular lymphocyte proliferative disorder (NK-GLPD) in patients with CAEBV and SHMB.

  10. Avian influenza A virus PB2 promotes interferon type I inducing properties of a swine strain in porcine dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocana-Macchi, Manuela; Ricklin, Meret E.; Python, Sylvie; Monika, Gsell-Albert [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland); Stech, Juergen; Stech, Olga [Friedrich-Loeffler Institut, Greifswald-Insel Riems (Germany); Summerfield, Artur, E-mail: artur.summerfield@ivi.admin.ch [Institute of Virology and Immunoprophylaxis, Mittelhaeusern (Switzerland)

    2012-05-25

    The 2009 influenza A virus (IAV) pandemic resulted from reassortment of avian, human and swine strains probably in pigs. To elucidate the role of viral genes in host adaptation regarding innate immune responses, we focussed on the effect of genes from an avian H5N1 and a porcine H1N1 IAV on infectivity and activation of porcine GM-CSF-induced dendritic cells (DC). The highest interferon type I responses were achieved by the porcine virus reassortant containing the avian polymerase gene PB2. This finding was not due to differential tropism since all viruses infected DC equally. All viruses equally induced MHC class II, but porcine H1N1 expressing the avian viral PB2 induced more prominent nuclear NF-{kappa}B translocation compared to its parent IAV. The enhanced activation of DC may be detrimental or beneficial. An over-stimulation of innate responses could result in either pronounced tissue damage or increased resistance against IAV reassortants carrying avian PB2.

  11. Dendritic cells modified by vitamin D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Ayako Wakatsuki; Claesson, Mogens Helweg; Zocca, Mai-Britt

    2011-01-01

    T cells, VD3-modulated DCs are safe and potentially more effective alternatives to currently available immunoregulatory therapies. While a number of considerations remain, including the establishment of a reliable quality control measure to ensure the safety and efficacy of VD3-DCs in vivo...... and the optimal frequency, dose, and route of DC administration to achieve therapeutic effects in humans, adoptive VD3-DC transfer represents one of the most promising approaches to future treatment of autoimmune diseases....

  12. Divergent Effects of Dendritic Cells on Pancreatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    of cytokines and chemokines - We showed that DC do not induce PSC expression of ECM proteins - We showed that DC induce PSC expression of cytokines... hepatocellular carcinoma by the intestinal microbiota and TLR4. Cancer Cell. 21:504–516. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ccr.2012.02.007 De Monte, L., M...nearly 15% of intrapancreatic leukocytes. Intrapancreatic DCs acquired a distinct immune phenotype in mice with acute pancreatitis; they expressed

  13. Dendritic Cell Cancer Vaccines: From the Bench to the Bedside

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamar Katz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The recognition that the development of cancer is associated with acquired immunodeficiency, mostly against cancer cells themselves, and understanding pathways inducing this immunosuppression, has led to a tremendous development of new immunological approaches, both vaccines and drugs, which overcome this inhibition. Both “passive” (e.g. strategies relying on the administration of specific T cells and “active” vaccines (e.g. peptide-directed or whole-cell vaccines have become attractive immunological approaches, inducing cell death by targeting tumor-associated antigens. Whereas peptide-targeted vaccines are usually directed against a single antigen, whole-cell vaccines (e.g. dendritic cell vaccines are aimed to induce robust responsiveness by targeting several tumor-related antigens simultaneously. The combination of vaccines with new immuno-stimulating agents which target “immunosuppressive checkpoints” (anti-CTLA-4, PD-1, etc. is likely to improve and maintain immune response induced by vaccination.

  14. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy of Breast Cancer: Modulation by CpG

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baar, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    ... in the United States in 2004. Thus, patients with MBC who fail conventional therapies are candidates for clinical trials using novel therapeutic approaches, including immunotherapy. Dendritic cells (DC...

  15. Allergen recognition by innate immune cells: critical role of dendritic and epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian eSalazar

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Allergy is an exacerbated response of the immune system against non-self-proteins called allergens and is typically characterized by biased type-2 T helper cell and deleterious IgE mediated immune responses. The allergic cascade starts with the recognition of allergens by antigen presenting cells, mainly dendritic cells, culminating in mast cell sensitization and triggering. Dendritic cells have been demonstrated to play a crucial role in orchestrating allergic diseases. Using different C-type lectin receptors dendritic cells are able to recognize and internalize a number of allergens from diverse sources leading to sensitization. Furthermore, there is increasing evidence highlighting the role of epithelial cells in triggering and modulating immune responses to allergens. As well as providing a physical barrier, epithelial cells can interact with allergens and influence dendritic cells behaviour through the release of a number of Th2 promoting cytokines. In this review we will summarise current understanding of how allergens are recognised by dendritic cells and epithelial cells and what are the consequences of such interaction in the context of allergic sensitisation and downstream events leading to allergic inflammation. Better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of allergen recognition and associated signalling pathways could enable developing more effective therapeutic strategies that target the initial steps of allergic sensitisation hence hindering development or progression of allergic diseases.

  16. Functional changes of dendritic cells in hypersensivity reactions to amoxicillin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.M.F. Lima

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of dendritic cell (DC involvement in responses to haptenic drugs is needed, because it represents a possible approach to the development of an in vitro test, which could identify patients prone to drug allergies. There are two main DC subsets: plasmacytoid DC (pDC and myeloid DC (mDC. β-lactams form hapten-carrier conjugates and may provide a suitable model to study DC behavior in drug allergy reactions. It has been demonstrated that drugs interact differently with DC in drug allergic and non-allergic patients, but there are no studies regarding these subsets. Our aim was to assess the functional changes of mDC and pDC harvested from an amoxicillin-hypersensitive 32-year-old woman who experienced a severe maculopapular exanthema as reflected in interleukin-6 (IL-6 production after stimulation with this drug and penicillin. We also aim to demonstrate, for the first time, the feasibility of this method for dendritic cell isolation followed by in vitro stimulation for studies of drug allergy physiopathology. DC were harvested using a double Percoll density gradient, which generates a basophil-depleted cell (BDC suspension. Further, pDC were isolated by blood DC antigen 4-positive magnetic selection and gravity filtration through magnetized columns. After stimulation with amoxicillin, penicillin and positive and negative controls, IL-6 production was measured by ELISA. A positive dose-response curve for IL-6 after stimulation with amoxicillin and penicillin was observed for pDC, but not for mDC or BDC suspension. These preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of this methodology to expand the knowledge of the effect of dendritic cell activation by drug allergens.

  17. Deficient CD4+ T cell priming and regression of CD8+ T cell functionality in virus-infected mice lacking a normal B cell compartment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2003-01-01

    In this study, we investigate the state of T cell-mediated immunity in B cell-deficient (B(-/-)) mice infected with two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus known to differ markedly in their capacity to persist. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the more persisting virus, virus......-specific CD8(+) T cells are initially generated that are qualitatively similar to those in wild-type mice. However, although cell numbers are well sustained over time, the capacity to produce cytokines is rapidly impaired. In similarly infected B(-/-) BALB/c mice, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are completely...... deleted, indicating that host genotype influences the severity of the T cell defect. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the less persisting virus, CD8(+) T cell dysfunction was not as pronounced, although it was clearly present. Most importantly, the appearance of dysfunctional CD8(+) T cells clearly...

  18. Investigating evolutionary conservation of dendritic cell subset identity and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thien-Phong eVu Manh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC were initially defined as mononuclear phagocytes with a dendritic morphology and an exquisite efficiency for naïve T cell activation. DC encompass several subsets initially identified by their expression of specific cell surface molecules and later shown to excel in distinct functions and to develop under the instruction of different transcription factors or cytokines. Very few cell surface molecules are expressed in a specific manner on any immune cell type. Hence, to identify cell types, the sole use of a small number of cell surface markers in classical flow cytometry can be deceiving. Moreover, the markers currently used to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets vary depending on the tissue and animal species studied and even between laboratories. This has led to confusion in the definition of DC subset identity and in their attribution of specific functions. There is a strong need to identify a rigorous and consensus way to define mononuclear phagocyte subsets, with precise guidelines potentially applicable throughout tissues and species. We will discuss the advantages, drawbacks and complementarities of different methodologies: cell surface phenotyping, ontogeny, functional characterization and molecular profiling. We will advocate that gene expression profiling is a very rigorous, largely unbiased and accessible method to define the identity of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, which strengthens and refines surface phenotyping. It is uniquely powerful to yield new, experimentally testable, hypotheses on the ontogeny or functions of mononuclear phagocyte subsets, their molecular regulation and their evolutionary conservation. We propose defining cell populations based on a combination of cell surface phenotyping, expression analysis of hallmark genes and robust functional assays, in order to reach a consensus and integrate faster the huge but scattered knowledge accumulated by different laboratories on different cell types

  19. Polyelectrolyte coating of ferumoxytol nanoparticles for labeling of dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celikkin, Nehar; Jakubcová, Lucie; Zenke, Martin; Hoss, Mareike; Wong, John Erik; Hieronymus, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Engineered magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are emerging to be used as cell tracers, drug delivery vehicles, and contrast agents for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for enhanced theragnostic applications in biomedicine. In vitro labeling of target cell populations with MNPs and their implantation into animal models and patients shows promising outcomes in monitoring successful cell engraftment, differentiation and migration by using MRI. Dendritic cells (DCs) are professional antigen-presenting cells that initiate adaptive immune responses. Thus, DCs have been the focus of cellular immunotherapy and are increasingly applied in clinical trials. Here, we addressed the coating of different polyelectrolytes (PE) around ferumoxytol particles using the layer-by-layer technique. The impact of PE-coated ferumoxytol particles for labeling of DCs and Flt3+ DC progenitors was then investigated. The results from our studies revealed that PE-coated ferumoxytol particles can be readily employed for labeling of DC and DC progenitors and thus are potentially suitable as contrast agents for MRI tracking.

  20. Deficient CD4+ T cell priming and regression of CD8+ T cell functionality in virus-infected mice lacking a normal B cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Kauffmann, Susanne Ørding; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2003-11-01

    In this study, we investigate the state of T cell-mediated immunity in B cell-deficient (B(-/-)) mice infected with two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus known to differ markedly in their capacity to persist. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the more persisting virus, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are initially generated that are qualitatively similar to those in wild-type mice. However, although cell numbers are well sustained over time, the capacity to produce cytokines is rapidly impaired. In similarly infected B(-/-) BALB/c mice, virus-specific CD8(+) T cells are completely deleted, indicating that host genotype influences the severity of the T cell defect. In B(-/-) C57BL mice infected with the less persisting virus, CD8(+) T cell dysfunction was not as pronounced, although it was clearly present. Most importantly, the appearance of dysfunctional CD8(+) T cells clearly precedes recrudescence of detectable virus, indicating that the T cell defect is not simply a secondary event due to virus buildup resulting from the failure of B(-/-) mice to produce neutralizing Abs. In contrast with CD8(+) T cells, which initially respond almost as in wild-type mice, the priming of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells was markedly impaired in B(-/-) mice infected with either virus strain. Thus, our results indicate that B cells play an important role in antiviral immunity not only as Ab producers, but also in promoting an optimal and sustained T cell response. The T cell defects are likely to contribute to the chronic course of viral infection in B(-/-) mice.

  1. Dendritic Cell Regulation by Cannabinoid-Based Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Svensson

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Cannabinoid pharmacology has made important advances in recent years after the cannabinoid system was discovered. Studies in experimental models and in humans have produced promising results using cannabinoid-based drugs for the treatment of obesity and cancer, as well as neuroinflammatory and chronic inflammatory diseases. Moreover, as we discuss here, additional studies also indicates that these drugs have immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties including modulation of immune cell function. Thus, manipulation of the endocannabinoid system in vivo may provide novel therapeutic strategies against inflammatory disorders. At least two types of cannabinoid receptors, cannabinoid 1 and cannabinoid 2 receptors are expressed on immune cells such as dendritic cells (DC. Dendritic cells are recognized for their critical role in initiating and maintaining immune responses. Therefore, DC are potential targets for cannabinoid-mediated modulation. Here, we review the effects of cannabinoids on DC and provide some perspective concerning the therapeutic potential of cannabinoids for the treatment of human diseases involving aberrant inflammatory processes.

  2. Influence of lipid rafts on CD1d presentation by dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Wei; Martaresche, Cecile; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie

    2011-01-01

    Our main objective was to analyze the role of lipid rafts in the activation of Valpha-14(-) and Valpha-14(+) T hybridomas by dendritic cells. We showed that activation of Valpha-14(+) hybridomas by dendritic cells or other CD1d-expressing cells was altered by disruption of lipid rafts...

  3. IL-4 orchestrates STAT6-mediated DNA demethylation leading to dendritic cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vento-Tormo, Roser; Company, Carlos; Rodríguez-Ubreva, Javier; de la Rica, Lorenzo; Urquiza, José M; Javierre, Biola M; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Luque, Ana; Esteller, Manel; Aran, Josep M; Álvarez-Errico, Damiana; Ballestar, Esteban

    2016-01-13

    The role of cytokines in establishing specific transcriptional programmes in innate immune cells has long been recognized. However, little is known about how these extracellular factors instruct innate immune cell epigenomes to engage specific differentiation states. Human monocytes differentiate under inflammatory conditions into effector cells with non-redundant functions, such as dendritic cells and macrophages. In this context, interleukin 4 (IL-4) and granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) drive dendritic cell differentiation, whereas GM-CSF alone leads to macrophage differentiation. Here, we investigate the role of IL-4 in directing functionally relevant dendritic-cell-specific DNA methylation changes. A comparison of DNA methylome dynamics during differentiation from human monocytes to dendritic cells and macrophages identified gene sets undergoing dendritic-cell-specific or macrophage-specific demethylation. Demethylation is TET2-dependent and is essential for acquiring proper dendritic cell and macrophage identity. Most importantly, activation of the JAK3-STAT6 pathway, downstream of IL-4, is required for the acquisition of the dendritic-cell-specific demethylation and expression signature, following STAT6 binding. A constitutively activated form of STAT6 is able to bypass IL-4 upstream signalling and instruct dendritic-cell-specific functional DNA methylation changes. Our study is the first description of a cytokine-mediated sequence of events leading to direct gene-specific demethylation in innate immune cell differentiation.

  4. Large-Scale mRNA Transfection of Dendritic Cells by Electroporation in Continuous Flow Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Selmeczi, Dávid; Hansen, Thomas Steen; Met, Özcan

    2016-01-01

    with high cell survival. Continuous flow of suspended dendritic cells through a channel incorporating spatially separated microporous meshes with a synchronized electrical pulsing sequence can yield dendritic cell transfection rates of >75 % with survival rates of >90 %. This chapter describes...

  5. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF THE HERPES SIMPLEX VIRUS INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ljiljana Kostadinović

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Over 150 sorts of viruses are capable of causing diseases of the respiratory ways. The virus infections have become the cost to be paid for urbanization and industrialization. The acute virus infections jeopardize mankind by their complications with numerous consequences. They open up the way to super infections, they provoke endogenous infections and lead to insufficiency of the vital organs. The viruses penetrate the organism mainly through the respiratory ways, digestive and urinary-sexual organs and skin. Some viruses immediately at the place of their entrance into the organism find receptive cells in which they can multiply (herpes virus and etc.. Some viruses must get through the blood, through the lymph or the nerve fibers to the target organs that they have affinity for.The changes that primarily occur in the mouth with manifest lymphadenopathy of the surrounding area emerge with respect to the type of the acute infection dis-ease.The human herpes viruses are responsible for a great number of diseases in people; that is why it can be said that the infections they induce are a very frequent cause of people's diseases in the world. Man is natural and the only host for the types I and II of the herpes simplex virus (HSV; that is why the infected person is regarded as the source of infection. The infection transmission can be by direct contact or over the contaminated secretions during the sexual intercourse. The age and the socioeconomic status (living conditions, level of medical culture, habits, etc. affect to agreat extent epidemiology of the HSV infection. The HSV distribution in the region of Niš in the five-year period (from 1987 to 1992 was the highest in the early and late summer (June and September.

  6. A multiscale fluidic device for the study of dendrite-mediated cell to cell communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCutcheon, Sean; Majeska, Robert; Schaffler, Mitchell; Vazquez, Maribel

    2017-08-08

    Many cell types communicate by means of dendritic extensions via a multi-tiered set of geometric and chemical cues. Until recently, mimicking the compartmentalized in vivo cellular environment of dendrite-expressing cells such as osteocytes and motor neurons in a spatially and temporally controllable manner was limited by the challenges of in vitro device fabrication at submicron scales. Utilizing the improved resolution of current fabrication technology, we have designed a multiscale device, the Macro-micro-nano system, or Mμn, composed of two distinct cell-seeding and interrogation compartments separated by a nanochannel array. The array enables dendrite ingrowth, while providing a mechanism for fluidic sequestration and/or temporally-mediated diffusible signaling between cell populations. Modeling of the Mμn system predicted the ability to isolate diffusible signals, namely ATP. Empirical diffusion studies verified computational modeling. In addition, cell viability, dendrite interaction with the nanoarray, and cellular purinergic response to heat shock were experimentally evaluated within the device for both osteocytes and motor neurons. Our results describe a novel in vitro system in which dendrite-expressing cell types can be studied within nano-environments that mimic in vivo conditions. In particular, the Mμn system enables real-time observation of cell to cell communication between cell populations in distinct, but fluidically coupled regions.

  7. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren

    2003-01-01

    for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity...... endpoints, including toxicity and response evaluation. This paper aims to review the technical aspects and clinical impact of vaccination trials, focusing on the generation of DC-based vaccines, evaluation of immunologic parameters and design of clinical trials necessary to meet the need for good laboratory...

  8. Follicular Dendritic Cell Sarcoma Mediastinum - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushan, Kirti

    2014-12-01

    Follicular dendritic cell tumor (FDCT) are extremely rare difficult to diagnose category tumors.There has been a considerable controversy in medical community regarding precise classification and optimal management of this tumor with some treating it as a form of non Hodgkins lymphoma and some as soft tissue sarcomas.The number of published cases are still low and documentation too heterogenous to give statistically ified therapeutic recommendation of these tumors.This case report aims to highlight various aspects of diagnosing and treating this rare entity.

  9. Exosomes from B cells and Dendritic cells: mechanisms of formation, secretion and targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buschow, S.I.

    2006-01-01

    Many cell types, including dendritic cells (DC) and B cells, secrete small vesicles called exosomes. Exosomes from immune cells are thought to have immuno-regulatory functions but their precise role remains unresolved. The aim of the studies presented in this thesis was to get more insight into the

  10. Topical vaccination with functionalized particles targeting dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baleeiro, Renato B; Wiesmüller, Karl-Heinz; Reiter, Yoran; Baude, Barbara; Dähne, Lars; Patzelt, Alexa; Lademann, Jürgen; Barbuto, José A; Walden, Peter

    2013-08-01

    Needle-free vaccination, for reasons of safety, economy, and convenience, is a central goal in vaccine development, but it also needs to meet the immunological requirements for efficient induction of prophylactic and therapeutic immune responses. Combining the principles of noninvasive delivery to dendritic cells (DCs) through skin and the immunological principles of cell-mediated immunity, we developed microparticle-based topical vaccines. We show here that the microparticles are efficient carriers for coordinated delivery of the essential vaccine constituents to DCs for cross-presentation of the antigens and stimulation of T-cell responses. When applied to the skin, the microparticles penetrate into hair follicles and target the resident DCs, the immunologically most potent cells and site for induction of efficient immune responses. The microparticle vaccine principle can be applied to different antigen formats such as peptides and proteins, or nucleic acids coding for the antigens.

  11. Virus interactions with endocytic pathways in macrophages and dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercer, Jason; Greber, Urs F

    2013-08-01

    Macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are at the front line of defence against fungi, bacteria, and viruses. Together with physical barriers, such as mucus and a range of antimicrobial compounds, they constitute a major part of the intrinsic and innate immune systems. They have elaborate features, including pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and specialized endocytic mechanisms, cytokines and chemokines, and the ability to call on reserves. As masters of manipulation and counter-attack, viruses shunt intrinsic and innate recognition, enter immune cells, and spread from these cells throughout an organism. Here, we review mechanisms by which viruses subvert endocytic and pathogen-sensing functions of macrophages and DCs, while highlighting possible strategic advantages of infecting cells normally tuned into pathogen destruction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neisseria gonorrhoeae Suppresses Dendritic Cell-Induced, Antigen-Dependent CD4 T Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weiyan; Ventevogel, Melissa S.; Knilans, Kayla J.; Anderson, James E.; Oldach, Laurel M.; McKinnon, Karen P.; Hobbs, Marcia M.; Sempowski, Gregory D.; Duncan, Joseph A.

    2012-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the second most common sexually transmitted bacterial pathogen worldwide. Diseases associated with N. gonorrhoeae cause localized inflammation of the urethra and cervix. Despite this inflammatory response, infected individuals do not develop protective adaptive immune responses to N. gonorrhoeae. N. gonorrhoeae is a highly adapted pathogen that has acquired multiple mechanisms to evade its host's immune system, including the ability to manipulate multiple immune signaling pathways. N. gonorrhoeae has previously been shown to engage immunosuppressive signaling pathways in B and T lymphocytes. We have now found that N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses adaptive immune responses through effects on antigen presenting cells. Using primary, murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells and lymphocytes, we show that N. gonorrhoeae-exposed dendritic cells fail to elicit antigen-induced CD4+ T lymphocyte proliferation. N. gonorrhoeae exposure leads to upregulation of a number of secreted and dendritic cell surface proteins with immunosuppressive properties, particularly Interleukin 10 (IL-10) and Programmed Death Ligand 1 (PD-L1). We also show that N. gonorrhoeae is able to inhibit dendritic cell- induced proliferation of human T-cells and that human dendritic cells upregulate similar immunosuppressive molecules. Our data suggest that, in addition to being able to directly influence host lymphocytes, N. gonorrhoeae also suppresses development of adaptive immune responses through interactions with host antigen presenting cells. These findings suggest that gonococcal factors involved in host immune suppression may be useful targets in developing vaccines that induce protective adaptive immune responses to this pathogen. PMID:22844448

  13. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  14. Ragweed Subpollen Particles of Respirable Size Activate Human Dendritic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazmandi, Kitti; Kumar, Brahma V.; Szabo, Krisztina; Boldogh, Istvan; Szoor, Arpad; Vereb, Gyorgy; Veres, Agota; Lanyi, Arpad; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Bacsi, Attila

    2012-01-01

    Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia) pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs) of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(P)H oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs). We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(P)H oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs) in the airways and SPPs' NAD(P)H oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins. PMID:23251688

  15. Ragweed subpollen particles of respirable size activate human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitti Pazmandi

    Full Text Available Ragweed (Ambrosia artemisiifolia pollen grains, which are generally considered too large to reach the lower respiratory tract, release subpollen particles (SPPs of respirable size upon hydration. These SPPs contain allergenic proteins and functional NAD(PH oxidases. In this study, we examined whether exposure to SPPs initiates the activation of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (moDCs. We found that treatment with freshly isolated ragweed SPPs increased the intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS in moDCs. Phagocytosis of SPPs by moDCs, as demonstrated by confocal laser-scanning microscopy, led to an up-regulation of the cell surface expression of CD40, CD80, CD86, and HLA-DQ and an increase in the production of IL-6, TNF-α, IL-8, and IL-10. Furthermore, SPP-treated moDCs had an increased capacity to stimulate the proliferation of naïve T cells. Co-culture of SPP-treated moDCs with allogeneic CD3(+ pan-T cells resulted in increased secretion of IFN-γ and IL-17 by T cells of both allergic and non-allergic subjects, but induced the production of IL-4 exclusively from the T cells of allergic individuals. Addition of exogenous NADPH further increased, while heat-inactivation or pre-treatment with diphenyleneiodonium (DPI, an inhibitor of NADPH oxidases, strongly diminished, the ability of SPPs to induce phenotypic and functional changes in moDCs, indicating that these processes were mediated, at least partly, by the intrinsic NAD(PH oxidase activity of SPPs. Collectively, our data suggest that inhaled ragweed SPPs are fully capable of activating dendritic cells (DCs in the airways and SPPs' NAD(PH oxidase activity is involved in initiation of adaptive immune responses against innocuous pollen proteins.

  16. Sendai Virus Infection Induces Efficient Adaptive Immunity Independently of Type I Interferons

    OpenAIRE

    López, Carolina B.; Yount, Jacob S.; Hermesh, Tamar; Moran, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    Adaptive immunity in response to virus infection involves the generation of Th1 cells, cytotoxic T cells, and antibodies. This type of immune response is crucial for the clearance of virus infection and for long-term protection against reinfection. Type I interferons (IFNs), the primary innate cytokines that control virus growth and spreading, can influence various aspects of adaptive immunity. The development of antiviral immunity depends on many viral and cellular factors, and the extent to...

  17. Vitamin A deficient mice exhibit increased viral antigens and enhanced cytokine/chemokine production in nasal tissues following respiratory virus infection despite the presence of FoxP3+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penkert, Rhiannon R; Surman, Sherri L; Jones, Bart G; Sealy, Robert E; Vogel, Peter; Neale, Geoffrey; Hurwitz, Julia L

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 250 million children under the age of five suffer from vitamin A deficiencies (VAD). Individuals with VAD experience higher rates of mortality and increased morbidity during enteric and respiratory infections compared with those who are vitamin A sufficient. Previously, our laboratory has demonstrated that VAD mice have significantly impaired virus-specific IgA and CD8(+) T-cell responses in the airways. Here, we demonstrate that VAD mice experience enhanced cytokine/chemokine gene expression and release in the respiratory tract 10 days following virus infection compared with control vitamin A sufficient animals. Cytokines/chemokines that are reproducibly up-regulated at the gene expression and protein levels include IFNγ and IL-6. Despite previous indications that cytokine dysregulation in VAD animals might reflect low forkhead box P3 (FoxP3)-positive regulatory T-cell frequencies, we found no reduction in FoxP3(+) T cells in VAD respiratory tissues. As an alternative explanation for the high cytokine levels, we found that the extent of virus infection and the persistence of viral antigens were increased on day 10 post-infection in VAD animals compared with controls, and consequently that respiratory tract tissues had an increased potential to activate virus-specific T cells. Results encourage cautious management of viral infections in patients with VAD, as efforts to enhance FoxP3(+) T cell frequencies and quell immune effectors could potentially exacerbate disease if the virus has not been cleared. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Krebs cycle rewired for macrophage and dendritic cell effector functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Dylan Gerard; O'Neill, Luke A J

    2017-10-01

    The Krebs cycle is an amphibolic pathway operating in the mitochondrial matrix of all eukaryotic organisms. In response to proinflammatory stimuli, macrophages and dendritic cells undergo profound metabolic remodelling to support the biosynthetic and bioenergetic requirements of the cell. Recently, it has been discovered that this metabolic shift also involves the rewiring of the Krebs cycle to regulate cellular metabolic flux and the accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates, notably, citrate, succinate and fumarate. Interestingly, a new role for Krebs cycle intermediates as signalling molecules and immunomodulators that dictate the inflammatory response has begun to emerge. This review will discuss the latest developments in Krebs cycle rewiring and immune cell effector functions, with a particular focus on the regulation of cytokine production. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  19. Follicular Dendritic Cells Retain Infectious HIV in Cycling Endosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balthasar A Heesters

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the success of antiretroviral therapy (ART, it does not cure Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV and discontinuation results in viral rebound. Follicular dendritic cells (FDC are in direct contact with CD4+ T cells and they retain intact antigen for prolonged periods. We found that human FDC isolated from patients on ART retain infectious HIV within a non-degradative cycling compartment and transmit infectious virus to uninfected CD4 T cells in vitro. Importantly, treatment of the HIV+ FDC with a soluble complement receptor 2 purges the FDC of HIV virions and prevents viral transmission in vitro. Our results provide an explanation for how FDC can retain infectious HIV for extended periods and suggest a therapeutic strategy to achieve cure in HIV-infected humans.

  20. Nanocarriers targeting dendritic cells for pulmonary vaccine delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Nitesh K; Somavarapu, Satyanarayana; Gordon, Stephen B; Hutcheon, Gillian A; Saleem, Imran Y

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary vaccine delivery has gained significant attention as an alternate route for vaccination without the use of needles. Immunization through the pulmonary route induces both mucosal and systemic immunity, and the delivery of antigens in a dry powder state can overcome some challenges such as cold-chain and availability of medical personnel compared to traditional liquid-based vaccines. Antigens formulated as nanoparticles (NPs) reach the respiratory airways of the lungs providing greater chance of uptake by relevant immune cells. In addition, effective targeting of antigens to the most 'professional' antigen presenting cells (APCs), the dendritic cells (DCs) yields an enhanced immune response and the use of an adjuvant further augments the generated immune response thus requiring less antigen/dosage to achieve vaccination. This review discusses the pulmonary delivery of vaccines, methods of preparing NPs for antigen delivery and targeting, the importance of targeting DCs and different techniques involved in formulating dry powders suitable for inhalation.

  1. Breaking T cell tolerance to beta cell antigens by merocytic dendritic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Jonathan D.; Janssen, Edith M.

    2013-01-01

    In type 1 diabetes (T1D), a break in central and peripheral tolerance results in antigen-specific T cells destroying insulin-producing, pancreatic beta cells. Herein, we discuss the critical sub-population of dendritic cells responsible for mediating both the cross-presentation of islet antigen to CD8+ T cells and the direct presentation of beta cell antigen to CD4+ T cells. These cells, termed merocytic dendritic cells (mcDC), are more numerous in nonobese diabetic (NOD), and antigen-loaded mcDC rescue CD8+ T cells from peripheral anergy and deletion, and stimulate islet-reactive CD4+ T cells. When purified from the pancreatic lymph nodes of overtly diabetic NOD mice, mcDC can break peripheral T cell tolerance to beta cell antigens in vivo and induce rapid onset T cell-mediated T1D in young NOD mouse. Thus, the mcDC subset appears to represent the long-sought critical antigen presenting cell responsible for breaking peripheral tolerance to beta cell antigen in vivo. PMID:21626409

  2. Dentate granule cells form hilar basal dendrites in a rat model of hypoxia-ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Cintra, Sofia; Xue, Baogang; Spigelman, Igor; Van, K; Wong, Alan M; Obenaus, Andre; Ribak, Charles E

    2009-08-18

    Hilar basal dendrites form on dentate granule cells following seizures. To determine whether other brain insults cause the formation of hilar basal dendrites, a model of global cerebral hypoxia/ischemia was used. Rats underwent a transient induction of ischemia by occlusion of both common carotid arteries followed by reperfusion. Hippocampal slices were prepared from these animals 1 month after the ischemic insult, and granule cells were labeled with a retrograde tracing technique after biocytin injections into stratum lucidum of CA3b. Ischemic rats had numerous biocytin-labeled granule cells with hilar basal dendrites located at the hilar border of the granule cell layer. Quantitative analysis of ischemic rats compared to controls showed a significant increase in the percentage of biocytin-labeled granule cells with hilar basal dendrites. These data demonstrate that other brain insults in addition to epilepsy may result in the formation of hilar basal dendrites on granule cells.

  3. Differential expression of tetraspanin superfamily members in dendritic cell subsets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuidscherwoude, Malou; Worah, Kuntal; van der Schaaf, Alie; Buschow, Sonja I; van Spriel, Annemiek B

    2017-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), which are essential for initiating immune responses, are comprised of different subsets. Tetraspanins organize dendritic cell membranes by facilitating protein-protein interactions within the so called tetraspanin web. In this study we analyzed expression of the complete tetraspanin superfamily in primary murine (CD4+, CD8+, pDC) and human DC subsets (CD1c+, CD141+, pDC) at the transcriptome and proteome level. Different RNA and protein expression profiles for the tetraspanin genes across human and murine DC subsets were identified. Although RNA expression levels of CD37 and CD82 were not significantly different between human DC subsets, CD9 RNA was highly expressed in pDCs, while CD9 protein expression was lower. This indicates that relative RNA and protein expression levels are not always in agreement. Both murine CD8α+ DCs and its regarded human counterpart, CD141+ DCs, displayed relatively high protein levels of CD81. CD53 protein was highly expressed on human pDCs in contrast to the relatively low protein expression of most other tetraspanins. This study demonstrates that tetraspanins are differentia