WorldWideScience

Sample records for virus-induced gene silencing-based

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing-based functional characterization of genes associated with powdery mildew resistance in barley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Ingo; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Hrubikova, Katarina; Williamson, Sandie; Dinesen, Malene; Soenderby, Ida E; Sundar, Suresh; Jarmolowski, Artur; Shirasu, Ken; Lacomme, Christophe

    2005-08-01

    We successfully implemented virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley (Hordeum vulgare) for the functional characterization of genes required for Mla13-mediated resistance toward the biotrophic barley pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Initially, barley cultivars were screened for their ability to host the barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-VIGS vector by allowing its replication and systemic movement without causing excessive symptoms. Phytoene desaturase silencing leading to photobleaching was used as a phenotypic marker alongside reverse transcription-PCR data to characterize the silencing response at the molecular level. Barley cultivar Clansman, harboring the Mla13 resistance gene, was chosen as the most suitable host for BSMV-VIGS-based functional characterization of Rar1, Sgt1, and Hsp90 in the Mla-mediated resistance toward powdery mildew. BSMV-induced gene silencing of these candidate genes, which are associated in many but not all race-specific pathways, proved to be robust and could be detected at both mRNA and protein levels for up to 21 d postinoculation. Systemic silencing was observed not only in the newly developed leaves from the main stem but also in axillary shoots. By examining fungal development from an incompatible mildew strain carrying the cognate Avr13 gene on plants BSMV silenced for Rar1, Sgt1, and Hsp90, a resistance-breaking phenotype was observed, while plants infected with BSMV control constructs remained resistant. We demonstrate that Hsp90 is a required component for Mla13-mediated race-specific resistance and that BSMV-induced VIGS is a powerful tool to characterize genes involved in pathogen resistance in barley.

  2. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing-Based Functional Characterization of Genes Associated with Powdery Mildew Resistance in Barley1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Ingo; Barciszewska-Pacak, Maria; Hrubikova, Katarina; Williamson, Sandie; Dinesen, Malene; Soenderby, Ida E.; Sundar, Suresh; Jarmolowski, Artur; Shirasu, Ken; Lacomme, Christophe

    2005-01-01

    We successfully implemented virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) in barley (Hordeum vulgare) for the functional characterization of genes required for Mla13-mediated resistance toward the biotrophic barley pathogen Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Initially, barley cultivars were screened for their ability to host the barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-VIGS vector by allowing its replication and systemic movement without causing excessive symptoms. Phytoene desaturase silencing leading to photobleaching was used as a phenotypic marker alongside reverse transcription-PCR data to characterize the silencing response at the molecular level. Barley cultivar Clansman, harboring the Mla13 resistance gene, was chosen as the most suitable host for BSMV-VIGS-based functional characterization of Rar1, Sgt1, and Hsp90 in the Mla-mediated resistance toward powdery mildew. BSMV-induced gene silencing of these candidate genes, which are associated in many but not all race-specific pathways, proved to be robust and could be detected at both mRNA and protein levels for up to 21 d postinoculation. Systemic silencing was observed not only in the newly developed leaves from the main stem but also in axillary shoots. By examining fungal development from an incompatible mildew strain carrying the cognate Avr13 gene on plants BSMV silenced for Rar1, Sgt1, and Hsp90, a resistance-breaking phenotype was observed, while plants infected with BSMV control constructs remained resistant. We demonstrate that Hsp90 is a required component for Mla13-mediated race-specific resistance and that BSMV-induced VIGS is a powerful tool to characterize genes involved in pathogen resistance in barley. PMID:16040663

  3. Virus-induced Gene Silencing-based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g. salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4 or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  4. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lan-Huan; Wang, Rui-Heng; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Luo, Yun-Bo; Fu, Da-Qi

    2016-01-01

    Solanum rostratum is a “super weed” that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS) and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH) of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum. PMID:27258320

  5. Efficient Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Solanum rostratum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan-Huan Meng

    Full Text Available Solanum rostratum is a "super weed" that grows fast, is widespread, and produces the toxin solanine, which is harmful to both humans and other animals. To our knowledge, no study has focused on its molecular biology owing to the lack of available transgenic methods and sequence information for S. rostratum. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS is a powerful tool for the study of gene function in plants; therefore, in the present study, we aimed to establish tobacco rattle virus (TRV-derived VIGS in S. rostratum. The genes for phytoene desaturase (PDS and Chlorophyll H subunit (ChlH of magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase were cloned from S. rostratum and used as reporters of gene silencing. It was shown that high-efficiency VIGS can be achieved in the leaves, flowers, and fruit of S. rostratum. Moreover, based on our comparison of three different types of infection methods, true leaf infection was found to be more efficient than cotyledon and sprout infiltration in long-term VIGS in multiple plant organs. In conclusion, the VIGS technology and tomato genomic sequences can be used in the future to study gene function in S. rostratum.

  6. Virus-induced gene silencing of Mlo genes induces powdery mildew resistance in Triticum aestivum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Várallyay, Eva; Giczey, Gábor; Burgyán, József

    2012-07-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most important cereal diseases worldwide. Genetic analysis has revealed that mutant alleles of the Mlo gene cause broad-spectrum resistance against this pathogen in barley. In this study, the possibility of inducing broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance against this pathogen by RNAi of the barley Mlo ortholog in wheat was examined using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A clear correlation was found between resistance and accumulation of Mlo-specific siRNAs, raising the possibility of designing powdery mildew resistance in wheat by RNA silencing using both transgenic and non-transgenic approaches.

  7. Protocol: using virus-induced gene silencing to study the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis in Pisum sativum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Olsen, Anne; Johansen, Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an alternative reverse genetics tool for silencing of genes in some plants, which are difficult to transform. The pea early-browning virus (PEBV) has been developed as a VIGS vector and used in pea for functional analysis of several genes. However......, the available PEBV-VIGS protocols are inadequate for studying genes involved in the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Here we describe a PEBV-VIGS protocol suitable for reverse genetics studies in pea of genes involved in the symbiosis with AMF and show its effectiveness in silencing genes...

  8. Virus-induced gene silencing in diverse maize lines using the Brome Mosaic virus-based silencing vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a widely used tool for gene function studies in many plant species, though its use in monocots has been limited. Using a Brome mosaic virus (BMV) vector designed to silence the maize phytoene desaturase gene, a genetically diverse set of maize inbred lines was ...

  9. Stability of Barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing in barley

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun-Rasmussen, Marianne; Madsen, Christian Toft; Jessing, Stine

    2007-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) can be used as a powerful tool for functional genomics studies in plants. With this approach, it is possible to target most genes and downregulate the messenger (m)RNA in a sequence-specific manner. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is an established VIGS vector...... for barley and wheat; however, silencing using this vector is generally transient, with efficient silencing often being confined to the first two or three systemically infected leaves. To investigate this further, part of the barley Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene was inserted into BSMV and the resulting...... photobleaching in infected barley plants was used as a reporter for silencing. In addition, downregulation of PDS mRNA was measured by quantitative reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR). Using fragments of PDS ranging from 128 to 584 nucleotides in BSMV, we observed that insert length...

  10. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize with a Foxtail mosaic virus Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu; Whitham, Steven A

    2018-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technology for rapidly and transiently knocking down the expression of plant genes to study their functions. A VIGS vector for maize derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus, was recently developed. A cloning site created near the 3' end of the FoMV genome enables insertion of 200-400 nucleotide fragments of maize genes targeted for silencing. The recombinant FoMV clones are inoculated into leaves of maize seedlings by biolistic particle delivery, and silencing is typically observed within 2 weeks after inoculation. This chapter provides a protocol for constructing FoMV VIGS clones and inoculating them into maize seedlings.

  11. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscombe, David K.; O’Connor, Sarah E.

    2011-01-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus) plants. Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003–0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. We have developed a VIGS method to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro. PMID:21802100

  12. A virus-induced gene silencing approach to understanding alkaloid metabolism in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liscombe, David K; O'Connor, Sarah E

    2011-11-01

    The anticancer agents vinblastine and vincristine are bisindole alkaloids derived from coupling vindoline and catharanthine, monoterpenoid indole alkaloids produced exclusively by the Madagascar periwinkle (Catharanthus roseus). Industrial production of vinblastine and vincristine currently relies on isolation from C. roseus leaves, a process that affords these compounds in 0.0003-0.01% yields. Metabolic engineering efforts to either improve alkaloid content or provide alternative sources of the bisindole alkaloids ultimately rely on the isolation and characterization of the genes involved. Several vindoline biosynthetic genes have been isolated, and the cellular and subcellular organization of the corresponding enzymes has been well studied. However, due to the leaf-specific localization of vindoline biosynthesis, and the lack of production of this precursor in cell suspension and hairy root cultures of C. roseus, further elucidation of this pathway demands the development of reverse genetics approaches to assay gene function in planta. The bipartite pTRV vector system is a Tobacco Rattle Virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) platform that has provided efficient and effective means to assay gene function in diverse plant systems. A VIGS method was developed herein to investigate gene function in C. roseus plants using the pTRV vector system. The utility of this approach in understanding gene function in C. roseus leaves is demonstrated by silencing known vindoline biosynthetic genes previously characterized in vitro. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-07-28

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Method: low-cost delivery of the cotton leaf crumple virus-induced gene silencing system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuttle John

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously developed a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS vector for cotton from the bipartite geminivirusCotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV. The original CLCrV VIGS vector was designed for biolistic delivery by a gene gun. This prerequisite limited the use of the system to labs with access to biolistic equipment. Here we describe the adaptation of this system for delivery by Agrobacterium (Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We also describe the construction of two low-cost particle inflow guns. Results The biolistic CLCrV vector was transferred into two Agrobacterium binary plasmids. Agroinoculation of the binary plasmids into cotton resulted in silencing and GFP expression comparable to the biolistic vector. Two homemade low-cost gene guns were used to successfully inoculate cotton (G. hirsutum and N. benthamiana with either the CLCrV VIGS vector or the Tomato golden mosaic virus (TGMV VIGS vector respectively. Conclusions These innovations extend the versatility of CLCrV-based VIGS for analyzing gene function in cotton. The two low-cost gene guns make VIGS experiments affordable for both research and teaching labs by providing a working alternative to expensive commercial gene guns.

  15. Virus-induced gene silencing in Catharanthus roseus by biolistic inoculation of tobacco rattle virus vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carqueijeiro, I; Masini, E; Foureau, E; Sepúlveda, L J; Marais, E; Lanoue, A; Besseau, S; Papon, N; Clastre, M; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Glévarec, G; Atehortùa, L; Oudin, A; Courdavault, V

    2015-11-01

    Catharanthus roseus constitutes the unique source of several valuable monoterpenoid indole alkaloids, including the antineoplastics vinblastine and vincristine. These alkaloids result from a complex biosynthetic pathway encompassing between 30 and 50 enzymatic steps whose characterisation is still underway. The most recent identifications of genes from this pathway relied on a tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach, involving an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of plasmids encoding the two genomic components of the virus. As an alternative, we developed a biolistic-mediated approach of inoculation of virus-encoding plasmids that can be easily performed by a simple bombardment of young C. roseus plants. After optimisation of the transformation conditions, we showed that this approach efficiently silenced the phytoene desaturase gene, leading to strong and reproducible photobleaching of leaves. This biolistic transformation was also used to silence a previously characterised gene from the alkaloid biosynthetic pathway, encoding iridoid oxidase. Plant bombardment caused down-regulation of the targeted gene (70%), accompanied by a correlated decreased in MIA biosynthesis (45-90%), similar to results obtained via agro-transformation. Thus, the biolistic-based VIGS approach developed for C. roseus appears suitable for gene function elucidation and can readily be used instead of the Agrobacterium-based approach, e.g. when difficulties arise with agro-inoculations or when Agrobacterium-free procedures are required to avoid plant defence responses. © 2015 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  16. Small molecule antagonism of oxysterol-induced Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Madsen, Christian M; Arfelt, Kristine N

    2013-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (EBI2) was recently identified as the first oxysterol-activated 7TM receptor. EBI2 is essential for B cell trafficking within lymphoid tissues and thus the humoral immune response in general. Here we characterize the antagonism of the non-peptide molecule GSK...

  17. Molecular characterization of oxysterol binding to the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (GPR183)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Norn, Christoffer; Laurent, Stephane

    2012-01-01

    , the family of G protein-coupled seven transmembrane-spanning receptors (7TM receptors) was added to this group. Specifically, the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2 or GPR183) was shown to be activated by several oxysterols, most potently by 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC). Nothing is known about...

  18. Virus-induced gene silencing in Medicago truncatula and Lathyrus odorata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Kjær, Gabriela Didina Constantin; Piednoir, Elodie

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has become an important reverse genetics tool for functional genomics. VIGS vectors based on Pea early browning virus (PEBV, genus Tobravirus) and Bean pod mottle virus (genus Comovirus) are available for the legume species Pisum sativum and Glycine max...

  19. Development of Virus-Induced Gene Expression and Silencing Vector Derived from Grapevine Algerian Latent Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Choi, Hoseong; Kim, Semin; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Grapevine Algerian latent virus (GALV) is a member of the genus Tombusvirus in the Tombusviridae and infects not only woody perennial grapevine plant but also herbaceous Nicotiana benthamiana plant. In this study, we developed GALV-based gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors in N. benthamiana. The GALV coat protein deletion vector, pGMG, was applied to express the reporter gene, green fluorescence protein (GFP), but the expression of GFP was not detected due to the necrotic cell death on the infiltrated leaves. The p19 silencing suppressor of GALV was engineered to inactivate its expression and GFP was successfully expressed with unrelated silencing suppressor, HC-Pro, from soybean mosaic virus. The pGMG vector was used to knock down magnesium chelatase (ChlH) gene in N. benthamaina and the silencing phenotype was clearly observed on systemic leaves. Altogether, the GALV-derived vector is expected to be an attractive tool for useful gene expression and VIGS vectors in grapevine as well as N. benthamiana.

  20. Graft-accelerated virus-induced gene silencing facilitates functional genomics in rose flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Huijun; Shi, Shaochuan; Ma, Nan; Cao, Xiaoqian; Zhang, Hao; Qiu, Xianqin; Wang, Qigang; Jian, Hongying; Zhou, Ningning; Zhang, Zhao; Tang, Kaixue

    2018-01-01

    Rose has emerged as a model ornamental plant for studies of flower development, senescence, and morphology, as well as the metabolism of floral fragrances and colors. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has long been used in functional genomics studies of rose by vacuum infiltration of cuttings or seedlings with an Agrobacterium suspension carrying TRV-derived vectors. However, VIGS in rose flowers remains a challenge because of its low efficiency and long time to establish silencing. Here we present a novel and rapid VIGS method that can be used to analyze gene function in rose, called 'graft-accelerated VIGS', where axillary sprouts are cut from the rose plant and vacuum infiltrated with Agrobacterium. The inoculated scions are then grafted back onto the plants to flower and silencing phenotypes can be observed within 5 weeks, post-infiltration. Using this new method, we successfully silenced expression of the RhDFR1, RhAG, and RhNUDX1 in rose flowers, and affected their color, petal number, as well as fragrance, respectively. This grafting method will facilitate high-throughput functional analysis of genes in rose flowers. Importantly, it may also be applied to other woody species that are not currently amenable to VIGS by conventional leaf or plantlet/seedling infiltration methods. © 2017 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  1. High rates of virus-induced gene silencing by tobacco rattle virus in Populus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zedan; Sun, Jian; Yao, Jun; Wang, Shaojie; Ding, Mingquan; Zhang, Huilong; Qian, Zeyong; Zhao, Nan; Sa, Gang; Zhao, Rui; Shen, Xin; Polle, Andrea; Chen, Shaoliang

    2015-09-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been shown to be an effective tool for investigating gene functions in herbaceous plant species, but has rarely been tested in trees. The establishment of a fast and reliable transformation system is especially important for woody plants, many of which are recalcitrant to transformation. In this study, we established a tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS system for two Populus species, Populus euphratica and P. × canescens. Here, TRV constructs carrying a 266 bp or a 558 bp fragment of the phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene were Agrobacterium-infiltrated into leaves of the two poplar species. Agrobacterium-mediated delivery of the shorter insert, TRV2-PePDS266, into the host poplars resulted in expected photobleaching in both tree species, but not the longer insert, PePDS558. The efficiency of VIGS was temperature-dependent, increasing by raising the temperature from 18 to 28 °C. The optimized TRV-VIGS system at 28 °C resulted in a high silencing frequency and efficiency up to 65-73 and 83-94%, respectively, in the two tested poplars. Moreover, syringe inoculation of Agrobacterium in 100 mM acetosyringone induced a more efficient silencing in the two poplar species, compared with other agroinfiltration methods, e.g., direct injection, misting and agrodrench. There were plant species-related differences in the response to VIGS because the photobleaching symptoms were more severe in P. × canescens than in P. euphratica. Furthermore, VIGS-treated P. euphratica exhibited a higher recovery rate (50%) after several weeks of the virus infection, compared with TRV-infected P. × canescens plants (20%). Expression stability of reference genes was screened to assess the relative abundance of PePDS mRNA in VIGS-treated P. euphratica and P. × canescens. PeACT7 was stably expressed in P. euphratica and UBQ-L was selected as the most suitable reference gene for P. × canescens using three different

  2. Optimized cDNA libraries for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS using tobacco rattle virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Jonathan E

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS has emerged as a method for performing rapid loss-of-function experiments in plants. Despite its expanding use, the effect of host gene insert length and other properties on silencing efficiency have not been systematically tested. In this study, we probed the optimal properties of cDNA fragments of the phytoene desaturase (PDS gene for efficient VIGS in Nicotiana benthamiana using tobacco rattle virus (TRV. Results NbPDS inserts of between 192 bp and 1304 bp led to efficient silencing as determined by analysis of leaf chlorophyll a levels. The region of the NbPDS cDNA used for silencing had a small effect on silencing efficiency with 5' and 3' located inserts performing more poorly than those from the middle. Silencing efficiency was reduced by the inclusion of a 24 bp poly(A or poly(G homopolymeric region. We developed a method for constructing cDNA libraries for use as a source of VIGS-ready constructs. Library construction involved the synthesis of cDNA on a solid phase support, digestion with RsaI to yield short cDNA fragments lacking poly(A tails and suppression subtractive hybridization to enrich for differentially expressed transcripts. We constructed two cDNA libraries from methyl-jasmonate treated N. benthamiana roots and obtained 2948 ESTs. Thirty percent of the cDNA inserts were 401–500 bp in length and 99.5% lacked poly(A tails. To test the efficiency of constructs derived from the VIGS-cDNA libraries, we silenced the nicotine biosynthetic enzyme, putrescine N-methyltransferase (PMT, with ten different VIGS-NbPMT constructs ranging from 122 bp to 517 bp. Leaf nicotine levels were reduced by more than 90% in all plants infected with the NbPMT constructs. Conclusion Based on the silencing of NbPDS and NbPMT, we suggest the following design guidelines for constructs in TRV vectors: (1 Insert lengths should be in the range of ~200 bp to ~1300 bp, (2 they should be positioned in

  3. Stability of gene silencing-based resistance to Plum pox virus in transgenic plum (Prunus domestica L.) under field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hily, Jean-Michel; Scorza, Ralph; Malinowski, Tadeusz; Zawadzka, Barbara; Ravelonandro, Michel

    2004-10-01

    Plum pox virus (PPV) is one of the most devastating diseases of Prunus species. Since few sources of resistance to PPV have been identified, transgene-based resistance offers a complementary approach to developing PPV-resistant stone fruit cultivars. C5, a transgenic clone of Prunus domestica L., containing the PPV coat protein (CP) gene, has been described as highly resistant to PPV in greenhouse tests, displaying characteristics typical of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). We show in this report that C5 trees exposed to natural aphid vectors in the field remained uninfected after 4 years while susceptible transgenic and untransformed trees developed severe symptoms within the first year. C5 trees inoculated by chip budding showed only very mild symptoms and PPV could be detected in these trees by IC-RT-PCR. The PPV-CP transgene in C5 was specifically hyper-methylated with no detectable expression. These results indicate both stability and efficiency of PTGS-based PPV resistance in plum under field conditions.

  4. Development of Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing and performance evaluation of four marker genes in Gossypium barbadense.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhuan Pang

    Full Text Available Gossypiumbarbadense is a cultivated cotton species and possesses many desirable traits, including high fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, especially Verticilliumdahliae (a devastating pathogen of Gossypium hirsutum, the main cultivated species. These elite traits are difficult to be introduced into G. hirsutum through classical breeding methods. In addition, genetic transformation of G. barbadense has not been successfully performed. It is therefore important to develop methods for evaluating the function and molecular mechanism of genes in G. barbadense. In this study, we had successfully introduced a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS system into three cultivars of G. barbadense by inserting marker genes into the tobacco rattle virus (TRV vector. After we optimized the VIGS conditions, including light intensity, photoperiod, seedling age and Agrobacterium strain, 100% of plants agroinfiltrated with the GaPDS silencing vector showed white colored leaves. Three other marker genes, GaCLA1, GaANS and GaANR, were employed to further test this VIGS system in G. barbadense. The transcript levels of the endogenous genes in the silenced plants were reduced by more than 99% compared to control plants; these plants presented phenotypic symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation. We introduced a fusing sequence fragment of GaPDS and GaANR gene silencing vectors into a single plant, which resulted in both photobleaching and brownish coloration. The extent of silencing in plants agroinfiltrated with fusing two-gene-silencing vector was consistent with plants harboring a single gene silencing vector. The development of this VIGS system should promote analysis of gene function in G. barbadense, and help to contribute desirable traits for breeding of G. barbadense and G. hirsutum.

  5. Systemic virus-induced gene silencing allows functional characterization of maize genes during biotrophic interaction with Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Kastner, Christine; Kumlehn, Jochen; Kahmann, Regine; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Infection of maize (Zea mays) plants with the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on the stem, leaves and inflorescences. In this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed massive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression. To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) for maize. Conditions were established that allowed successful U. maydis infection of BMV-preinfected maize plants. This set-up enabled quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based readout. In proof-of-principle experiments, an U. maydis-induced terpene synthase was shown to negatively regulate disease development while a protein involved in cell death inhibition was required for full virulence of U. maydis. The results suggest that this system is a versatile tool for the rapid identification of maize genes that determine compatibility with U. maydis. © (2010) Max Planck Society. Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  6. Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) polymorphisms and expression are associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ruijuan; Liu, Haipeng; Song, Peng; Feng, Yonghong; Qin, Lianhua; Huang, Xiaochen; Chen, Jianxia; Yang, Hua; Liu, Zhonghua; Cui, Zhenglin; Hu, Zhongyi; Ge, Baoxue

    2015-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains a major global health problem and host genetic factors play a critical role in susceptibility and resistance to TB. The aim of this study was to identify novel candidate genes associated with TB susceptibility. We performed a population-based case-control study to genotype 13 tag SNPs spanning Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3), colony stimulating factor 2 (CSF2), IL-4, interferon beta 1 (IFNB1), chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 14 (CXCL14) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (Myd88) genes in 435 pulmonary TB patients and 375 health donors from China. We observed that EBI3 gene rs4740 polymorphism was associated with susceptibility to pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and the allele G was associated with a protective effect against PTB. Furthermore, EBI3 deficiency led to reduced bacterial burden and histopathological impairment in the lung of mice infected with Mycobacterium bovis BCG. Meanwhile, higher abundance of EBI3 was observed in the granuloma of PTB patients and in the lung tissue of BCG-infected mice. Of note, the expression of EBI3 in macrophages was remarkably induced by mycobacteria infection at both mRNA and protein level. In conclusion, EBI3 gene rs4740 polymorphism is closely associated with susceptibility to PTB and the elevation and enrichment of EBI3 in the lung which at least partially derived from macrophages may contribute to the exacerbation of mycobacterial infection. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Virus-induced gene silencing unravels multiple transcription factors involved in floral growth and development in Phalaenopsis orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Lai, Pei-Han; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Hsu, Chia-Chi; Wu, Wan-Lin; Chung, Mei-Chu; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-09-01

    Orchidaceae, one of the largest angiosperm families, has significant commercial value. Isolation of genes involved in orchid floral development and morphogenesis, scent production, and colouration will advance knowledge of orchid flower formation and facilitate breeding new varieties to increase the commercial value. With high-throughput virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), this study identified five transcription factors involved in various aspects of flower morphogenesis in the orchid Phalaenopsis equestris. These genes are PeMADS1, PeMADS7, PeHB, PebHLH, and PeZIP. Silencing PeMADS1 and PebHLH resulted in reduced flower size together with a pelaloid column containing petal-like epidermal cells and alterations of epidermal cell arrangement in lip lateral lobes, respectively. Silencing PeMADS7, PeHB, and PeZIP alone resulted in abortion of the first three fully developed flower buds of an inflorescence, which indicates the roles of the genes in late flower development. Furthermore, double silencing PeMADS1 and PeMADS6, C- and B-class MADS-box genes, respectively, produced a combinatorial phenotype with two genes cloned in separate vectors. Both PeMADS1 and PeMADS6 are required to ensure the normal development of the lip and column as well as the cuticle formation on the floral epidermal cell surface. Thus, VIGS allows for unravelling the interaction between two classes of MADS transcription factors for dictating orchid floral morphogenesis.

  8. A high throughput barley stripe mosaic virus vector for virus induced gene silencing in monocots and dicots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yuan

    Full Text Available Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV is a single-stranded RNA virus with three genome components designated alpha, beta, and gamma. BSMV vectors have previously been shown to be efficient virus induced gene silencing (VIGS vehicles in barley and wheat and have provided important information about host genes functioning during pathogenesis as well as various aspects of genes functioning in development. To permit more effective use of BSMV VIGS for functional genomics experiments, we have developed an Agrobacterium delivery system for BSMV and have coupled this with a ligation independent cloning (LIC strategy to mediate efficient cloning of host genes. Infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves provided excellent sources of virus for secondary BSMV infections and VIGS in cereals. The Agro/LIC BSMV VIGS vectors were able to function in high efficiency down regulation of phytoene desaturase (PDS, magnesium chelatase subunit H (ChlH, and plastid transketolase (TK gene silencing in N. benthamiana and in the monocots, wheat, barley, and the model grass, Brachypodium distachyon. Suppression of an Arabidopsis orthologue cloned from wheat (TaPMR5 also interfered with wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici infections in a manner similar to that of the A. thaliana PMR5 loss-of-function allele. These results imply that the PMR5 gene has maintained similar functions across monocot and dicot families. Our BSMV VIGS system provides substantial advantages in expense, cloning efficiency, ease of manipulation and ability to apply VIGS for high throughput genomics studies.

  9. Bioinformatics analysis of the factors controlling type I IFN gene expression in autoimmune disease and virus-induced immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di eFeng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE and Sjögren's syndrome (SS display increased levels of type I IFN-induced genes. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDCs are natural interferon producing cells and considered to be a primary source of IFN-α in these two diseases. Differential expression patterns of type I IFN inducible transcripts can be found in different immune cell subsets and in patients with both active and inactive autoimmune disease. A type I IFN gene signature generally consists of three groups of IFN-induced genes - those regulated in response to virus-induced type I IFN, those regulated by the IFN-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-regulated kinase (MAPK/ERK pathway, and those by the IFN-induced phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI-3K pathway. These three groups of type I IFN-regulated genes control important cellular processes such as apoptosis, survival, adhesion, and chemotaxis, that when dysregulated, contribute to autoimmunity. With the recent generation of large datasets in the public domain from next-generation sequencing and DNA microarray experiments, one can perform detailed analyses of cell type-specific gene signatures as well as identify distinct transcription factors that differentially regulate these gene signatures. We have performed bioinformatics analysis of data in the public domain and experimental data from our lab to gain insight into the regulation of type I IFN gene expression. We have found that the genetic landscape of the IFNA and IFNB genes are occupied by transcription factors, such as insulators CTCF and cohesin, that negatively regulate transcription, as well as IRF5 and IRF7, that positively and distinctly regulate IFNA subtypes. A detailed understanding of the factors controlling type I IFN gene transcription will significantly aid in the identification and development of new therapeutic strategies targeting the IFN pathway in autoimmune disease.

  10. iTRAQ and virus-induced gene silencing revealed three proteins involved in cold response in bread wheat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Lingran; Zhao, Lei; Ren, Yan; Cui, Dangqun; Chen, Jianhui; Wang, Yongyan; Yu, Pengbo; Chen, Feng

    2017-08-08

    By comparing the differentially accumulated proteins from the derivatives (UC 1110 × PI 610750) in the F10 recombinant inbred line population which differed in cold-tolerance, altogether 223 proteins with significantly altered abundance were identified. The comparison of 10 cold-sensitive descendant lines with 10 cold-tolerant descendant lines identified 140 proteins that showed decreased protein abundance, such as the components of the photosynthesis apparatus and cell-wall metabolism. The identified proteins were classified into the following main groups: protein metabolism, stress/defense, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, sulfur metabolism, nitrogen metabolism, RNA metabolism, energy production, cell-wall metabolism, membrane and transportation, and signal transduction. Results of quantitative real-time PCR of 20 differentially accumulated proteins indicated that the transcriptional expression patterns of 10 genes were consistent with their protein expression models. Virus-induced gene silencing of Hsp90, BBI, and REP14 genes indicated that virus-silenced plants subjected to cold stress had more severe drooping and wilting, an increased rate of relative electrolyte leakage, and reduced relative water content compared to viral control plants. Furthermore, ultrastructural changes of virus-silenced plants were destroyed more severely than those of viral control plants. These results indicate that Hsp90, BBI, and REP14 potentially play vital roles in conferring cold tolerance in bread wheat.

  11. Virus-Induced Silencing of Key Genes Leads to Differential Impact on Withanolide Biosynthesis in Medicinal Plant, Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aditya Vikram; Singh, Deeksha; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Michael, Rahul; Gupta, Parul; Chandra, Deepak; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2017-11-20

    Withanolides are a collection of naturally occurring, pharmacologically active, secondary metabolites synthesised in medicinally important plant, Withania somnifera. These bioactive molecules are C28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids and their synthesis is proposed to take place via the mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways through the sterol pathway using 24-methylene cholesterol as substrate flux. Although the phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities of Withania extracts have been well studied, limited genomic information and difficult genetic transformation have been major bottleneck towards understanding the participation of specific genes in withanolide biosynthesis. In this study, we used Tobacco Rattle Virus (TRV)-mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) approach to study the participation of key genes from MVA, MEP and triterpenoid biosynthesis for their involvement in withanolide biosynthesis. TRV-infected W. somnifera plants displayed unique phenotypic characteristics and differential accumulation of total chlorophyll as well as carotenoid content for each silenced gene apprehending a reduction in overall isoprenoid synthesis. Comprehensive expression analysis of putative genes of withanolide biosynthesis revealed transcriptional modulations conferring the presence of a complex regulatory mechanisms leading to withanolide biosynthesis. In addition, silencing of genes exhibited modulated total and specific withanolide accumulation, at different levels, as compared to control plants. Comparative analysis also suggests major role of MVA pathway as compared to MEP pathway in providing substrate flux for withanolide biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of selected Withania genes of the triterpenoid biosynthetic pathway critically affects withanolide biosynthesis providing new horizons to further explore this process, in planta. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford

  12. Dengue Virus Induces Novel Changes in Gene Expression of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warke, Rajas V.; Xhaja, Kris; Martin, Katherine J.; Fournier, Marcia F.; Shaw, Sunil K.; Brizuela, Nathaly; de Bosch, Norma; Lapointe, David; Ennis, Francis A.; Rothman, Alan L.; Bosch, Irene

    2003-01-01

    Endothelial cells are permissive to dengue virus (DV) infection in vitro, although their importance as targets of DV infection in vivo remains a subject of debate. To analyze the virus-host interaction, we studied the effect of DV infection on gene expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) by using differential display reverse transcription-PCR (DD-RTPCR), quantitative RT-PCR, and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays. DD identified eight differentially expressed cDNAs, including inhibitor of apoptosis-1, 2′-5′ oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), a 2′-5′ OAS-like (OASL) gene, galectin-9, myxovirus protein A (MxA), regulator of G-protein signaling, endothelial and smooth muscle cell-derived neuropilin-like protein, and phospholipid scramblase 1. Microarray analysis of 22,000 human genes confirmed these findings and identified an additional 269 genes that were induced and 126 that were repressed more than fourfold after DV infection. Broad functional responses that were activated included the stress, defense, immune, cell adhesion, wounding, inflammatory, and antiviral pathways. These changes in gene expression were seen after infection of HUVECs with either laboratory-adapted virus or with virus isolated directly from plasma of DV-infected patients. Tumor necrosis factor alpha, OASL, and MxA and h-IAP1 genes were induced within the first 8 to 12 h after infection, suggesting a direct effect of DV infection. These global analyses of DV effects on cellular gene expression identify potentially novel mechanisms involved in dengue disease manifestations such as hemostatic disturbance. PMID:14557666

  13. Melanoma Differentiation-Associated Gene 5 Is Critical for Protection against Theiler's Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young-Hee; Kim, Seung Jae; So, Eui Young; Meng, Liping; Colonna, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Infection of dendritic and glial cells with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces various cytokines via Toll-like receptor- and melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5)-dependent pathways. However, the involvement and role of MDA5 in cytokine gene activation and the pathogenesis of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease are largely unknown. In this study, we demonstrate that MDA5 plays a critical role in the production of TMEV-induced alpha interferon (IFN-α) during early viral infection and in protection against the development of virus-induced demyelinating disease. Our results indicate that MDA5-deficient 129SvJ mice display significantly higher viral loads and apparent demyelinating lesions in the central nerve system (CNS) accompanied by clinical symptoms compared with wild-type 129SvJ mice. During acute viral infection, MDA5-deficient mice produced elevated levels of chemokines, consistent with increased cellular infiltration, but reduced levels of IFN-α, known to control T cell responses and cellular infiltration. Additional studies with isolated CNS glial cells from these mice suggest that cells from MDA5-deficient mice are severely compromised in the production of IFN-α upon viral infection, which results in increased cellular infiltration and viral loads in the CNS. Despite inadequate stimulation, the overall T cell responses to the viral determinants were significantly elevated in MDA5-deficient mice, reflecting the increased cellular infiltration. Therefore, the lack of MDA5-mediated IFN-α production may facilitate a massive viral load and elevated cellular infiltration in the CNS during early viral infection, leading to the pathogenesis of demyelinating disease. PMID:22090123

  14. Gene-gun DNA vaccination aggravates respiratory syncytial virus-induced pneumonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Stryhn, Anette

    2004-01-01

    A CD8+ T-cell memory response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was generated by using a DNA vaccine construct encoding the dominant Kd-restricted epitope from the viral transcription anti-terminator protein M2 (M2(82-90)), linked covalently to human beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). Cutaneous gene...... elicited with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the complete RSV M2 protein, but stronger than those induced by a similar DNA construct without the beta2m gene. DNA vaccination led to enhanced pulmonary disease after RSV challenge, with increased weight loss and cell recruitment to the lung. Depletion...... of CD8+ T cells reduced, but did not abolish, enhancement of disease. Mice vaccinated with a construct encoding a class I-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus epitope and beta2m suffered more severe weight loss after RSV infection than unvaccinated RSV-infected mice, although RSV-specific CD8...

  15. A rapid virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) method for assessing resistance and susceptibility to cassava mosaic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Getu; Chauhan, Raj Deepika; Taylor, Nigel J

    2017-03-07

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMD) is a major constraint to cassava production in sub-Saharan Africa. Under field conditions, evaluation for resistance to CMD takes 12-18 months, often conducted across multiple years and locations under pressure from whitefly-mediated transmission. Under greenhouse or laboratory settings, evaluation for resistance or susceptibility to CMD involves transmission of the causal viruses from an infected source to healthy plants through grafting, or by using Agrobacterium-mediated or biolistic delivery of infectious clones. Following inoculation, visual assessment for CMD symptom development and recovery requires 12-22 weeks. Here we report a rapid screening system for determining resistance and susceptibility to CMD based on virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of an endogenous cassava gene. A VIGS vector was developed based on an infectious clone of the virulent strain of East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-K201). A sequence from the cassava (Manihot esculenta) ortholog of Arabidopsis SPINDLY (SPY) was cloned into the CP position of the DNA-A genomic component and used to inoculate cassava plants by Helios® Gene Gun microparticle bombardment. Silencing of Manihot esculenta SPY (MeSPY) using MeSPY1-VIGS resulted in shoot-tip necrosis followed by death of the whole plant in CMD susceptible cassava plants within 2-4 weeks. CMD resistant cultivars were not affected and remained healthy after challenge with MeSPY1-VIGS. Significantly higher virus titers were detected in CMD-susceptible cassava lines compared to resistant controls and were correlated with a concomitant reduction in MeSPY expression in susceptible plants. A rapid VIGS-based screening system was developed for assessing resistance and susceptibility to CMD. The method is space and resource efficient, reducing the time required to perform CMD screening to as little as 2-4 weeks. It can be employed as a high throughput rapid screening system to assess new cassava cultivars and for

  16. Development of tobacco ringspot virus-based vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing in a variety of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Fumei; Lim, Seungmo; Igori, Davaajargal; Yoo, Ran Hee; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-05-01

    We report here the development of tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV)-based vectors for the transient expression of foreign genes and for the analysis of endogenous gene function in plants using virus-induced gene silencing. The jellyfish green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was inserted between the TRSV movement protein (MP) and coat protein (CP) regions, resulting in high in-frame expression of the RNA2-encoded viral polyprotein. GFP was released from the polyprotein via an N-terminal homologous MP-CP cleavage site and a C-terminal foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2 A catalytic peptide in Nicotiana benthamiana. The VIGS target gene was introduced in the sense and antisense orientations into a SnaBI site, which was created by mutating the sequence following the CP stop codon. VIGS of phytoene desaturase (PDS) in N. benthamiana, Arabidopsis ecotype Col-0, cucurbits and legumes led to obvious photo-bleaching phenotypes. A significant reduction in PDS mRNA levels in silenced plants was confirmed by semi-quantitative RT-PCR. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Virus-induced gene silencing of Withania somnifera squalene synthase negatively regulates sterol and defence-related genes resulting in reduced withanolides and biotic stress tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anup Kumar; Dwivedi, Varun; Rai, Avanish; Pal, Shaifali; Reddy, Sajjalavarahalli Gangireddy Eswara; Rao, Dodaghatta Krishnarao Venkata; Shasany, Ajit Kumar; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2015-12-01

    Withania somnifera (L.) Dunal is an important Indian medicinal plant that produces withanolides, which are triterpenoid steroidal lactones having diverse biological activities. To enable fast and efficient functional characterization of genes in this slow-growing and difficult-to-transform plant, a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) was established by silencing phytoene desaturase (PDS) and squalene synthase (SQS). VIGS of the gene encoding SQS, which provides precursors for triterpenoids, resulted in significant reduction of squalene and withanolides, demonstrating its application in studying withanolides biosynthesis in W. somnifera leaves. A comprehensive analysis of gene expression and sterol pathway intermediates in WsSQS-vigs plants revealed transcriptional modulation with positive feedback regulation of mevalonate pathway genes, and negative feed-forward regulation of downstream sterol pathway genes including DWF1 (delta-24-sterol reductase) and CYP710A1 (C-22-sterol desaturase), resulting in significant reduction of sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol. However, there was little effect of SQS silencing on cholesterol, indicating the contribution of sitosterol, campesterol and stigmasterol, but not of cholesterol, towards withanolides formation. Branch-point oxidosqualene synthases in WsSQS-vigs plants exhibited differential regulation with reduced CAS (cycloartenol synthase) and cycloartenol, and induced BAS (β-amyrin synthase) and β-amyrin. Moreover, SQS silencing also led to the down-regulation of brassinosteroid-6-oxidase-2 (BR6OX2), pathogenesis-related (PR) and nonexpressor of PR (NPR) genes, resulting in reduced tolerance to bacterial and fungal infection as well as to insect feeding. Taken together, SQS silencing negatively regulated sterol and defence-related genes leading to reduced phytosterols, withanolides and biotic stress tolerance, thus implicating the application of VIGS for functional analysis of genes related to withanolides

  18. Utilizing virus-induced gene silencing for the functional characterization of maize genes during infection with the fungal pathogen Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2013-01-01

    While in dicotyledonous plants virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is well established to study plant-pathogen interaction, in monocots only few examples of efficient VIGS have been reported so far. One of the available systems is based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) which allows gene silencing in different cereals including barley (Hordeum vulgare), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and maize (Zea mays).Infection of maize plants by the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on stem, leaves, and inflorescences. During this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed comprehensive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression.To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a VIGS system based on the Brome mosaic virus (BMV) to maize at conditions that allow successful U. maydis infection of BMV pre-infected maize plants. This setup enables quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (q(RT)-PCR)-based readout.

  19. Virus-induced gene-silencing in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of HMW-GS-encoding genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma Meng

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV-based vector has been developed and used for gene silencing in barley and wheat seedlings to assess gene functions in pathogen- or insect-resistance, but conditions for gene silencing in spikes and grains have not been evaluated. In this study, we explored the feasibility of using BSMV for gene silencing in wheat spikes or grains. Results Apparent photobleaching on the spikes infected with BSMV:PDS at heading stage was observed after13 days post inoculation (dpi, and persisted until 30dpi, while the spikes inoculated with BSMV:00 remained green during the same period. Grains of BSMV:PDS infected spikes also exhibited photobleaching. Molecular analysis indicated that photobleached spikes or grains resulted from the reduction of endogenous PDS transcript abundances, suggesting that BSMV:PDS was able to induce PDS silencing in wheat spikes and grains. Inoculation onto wheat spikes from heading to flowering stage was optimal for efficient silencing of PDS in wheat spikes. Furthermore, we used the BSMV-based system to reduce the transcript level of 1Bx14, a gene encoding for High-molecular-weight glutenin subunit 1Bx14 (HMW-GS 1Bx14, by 97 % in the grains of the BSMV:1Bx14 infected spikes at 15dpi, compared with that in BSMV:00 infected spikes, and the reduction persisted until at least 25 dpi. The amount of the HMW-GS 1Bx14 was also detectably decreased. The percentage of glutenin macropolymeric proteins in total proteins was significantly reduced in the grains of 1Bx14-silenced plants as compared with that in the grains of BSMV:00 infected control plants, indicating that HMW-GS 1Bx14 is one of major components participating in the formation of glutenin macropolymers in wheat grains. Conclusion This is one of the first reports of successful application of BSMV-based virus-induced-gene-silencing (VIGS for gene knockdown in wheat spikes and grains and its application in functional analysis of

  20. Aquaporin-mediated long-distance polyphosphate translocation directed towards the host in arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: application of virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Yusuke; Hijikata, Nowaki; Ohtomo, Ryo; Handa, Yoshihiro; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Saito, Katsuharu; Masuta, Chikara; Ezawa, Tatsuhiro

    2016-09-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi translocate polyphosphate through hyphae over a long distance to deliver to the host. More than three decades ago, suppression of host transpiration was found to decelerate phosphate delivery of the fungal symbiont, leading us to hypothesize that transpiration provides a primary driving force for polyphosphate translocation, probably via creating hyphal water flow in which fungal aquaporin(s) may be involved. The impact of transpiration suppression on polyphosphate translocation through hyphae of Rhizophagus clarus was evaluated. An aquaporin gene expressed in intraradical mycelia was characterized and knocked down by virus-induced gene silencing to investigate the involvement of the gene in polyphosphate translocation. Rhizophagus clarus aquaporin 3 (RcAQP3) that was most highly expressed in intraradical mycelia encodes an aquaglyceroporin responsible for water transport across the plasma membrane. Knockdown of RcAQP3 as well as the suppression of host transpiration decelerated polyphosphate translocation in proportion to the levels of knockdown and suppression, respectively. These results provide the first insight into the mechanism underlying long-distance polyphosphate translocation in mycorrhizal associations at the molecular level, in which host transpiration and the fungal aquaporin play key roles. A hypothetical model of the translocation is proposed for further elucidation of the mechanism. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing identifies Catharanthus roseus 7-deoxyloganic acid-7-hydroxylase, a step in iridoid and monoterpene indole alkaloid biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Vonny; Yu, Fang; Altarejos, Joaquín; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2013-12-01

    Iridoids are a major group of biologically active molecules that are present in thousands of plant species, and one versatile iridoid, secologanin, is a precursor for the assembly of thousands of monoterpenoid indole alkaloids (MIAs) as well as a number of quinoline alkaloids. This study uses bioinformatics to screen large databases of annotated transcripts from various MIA-producing plant species to select candidate genes that may be involved in iridoid biosynthesis. Virus-induced gene silencing of the selected genes combined with metabolite analyses of silenced plants was then used to identify the 7-deoxyloganic acid 7-hydroxylase (CrDL7H) that is involved in the 3rd to last step in secologanin biosynthesis. Silencing of CrDL7H reduced secologanin levels by at least 70%, and increased the levels of 7-deoxyloganic acid to over 4 mg g(-1) fresh leaf weight compared to control plants in which this iridoid is not detected. Functional expression of this CrDL7H in yeast confirmed its biochemical activity, and substrate specificity studies showed its preference for 7-deoxyloganic acid over other closely related substrates. Together, these results suggest that hydroxylation precedes carboxy-O-methylation in the secologanin pathway in Catharanthus roseus. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Exon level transcriptomic profiling of HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T cells reveals virus-induced genes and host environment favorable for viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Imbeault

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is extremely specialized since, even amongst CD4(+ T lymphocytes (its major natural reservoir in peripheral blood, the virus productively infects only a small proportion of cells under an activated state. As the percentage of HIV-1-infected cells is very low, most studies have so far failed to capture the precise transcriptomic profile at the whole-genome scale of cells highly susceptible to virus infection. Using Affymetrix Exon array technology and a reporter virus allowing the magnetic isolation of HIV-1-infected cells, we describe the host cell factors most favorable for virus establishment and replication along with an overview of virus-induced changes in host gene expression occurring exclusively in target cells productively infected with HIV-1. We also establish that within a population of activated CD4(+ T cells, HIV-1 has no detectable effect on the transcriptome of uninfected bystander cells at early time points following infection. The data gathered in this study provides unique insights into the biology of HIV-1-infected CD4(+ T cells and identifies genes thought to play a determinant role in the interplay between the virus and its host. Furthermore, it provides the first catalogue of alternative splicing events found in primary human CD4(+ T cells productively infected with HIV-1.

  3. Proteomic and Virus-induced Gene Silencing (VIGS) Analyses Reveal That Gossypol, Brassinosteroids, and Jasmonic acid Contribute to the Resistance of Cotton to Verticillium dahliae *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Long, Lu; Zhu, Long-Fu; Xu, Li; Gao, Wen-Hui; Sun, Long-Qing; Liu, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Xian-Long

    2013-01-01

    Verticillium wilt causes massive annual losses of cotton yield, but the mechanism of cotton resistance to Verticillium dahliae is complex and poorly understood. In this study, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed in resistant cotton (Gossypium barbadense cv7124) on infection with V. dahliae. A total of 188 differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analysis and could be classified into 17 biological processes based on Gene Ontology annotation. Most of these proteins were implicated in stimulus response, cellular processes and metabolic processes. Based on the proteomic analysis, several genes involved in secondary metabolism, reactive oxygen burst and phytohormone signaling pathways were identified for further physiological and molecular analysis. The roles of the corresponding genes were further characterized by employing virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Based on the results, we suggest that the production of gossypol is sufficient to affect the cotton resistance to V. dahliae. Silencing of GbCAD1, a key enzyme involving in gossypol biosynthesis, compromised cotton resistance to V. dahliae. Reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid signaling may be also implicated as regulators in cotton responsive to V. dahliae according to the analysis of GbSSI2, an important regulator in the crosstalk between salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signal pathways. Moreover, brassinosteroids and jasmonic acid signaling may play essential roles in the cotton disease resistance to V. dahliae. The brassinosteroids signaling was activated in cotton on inoculation with V. dahliae and the disease resistance of cotton was enhanced after exogenous application of brassinolide. Meanwhile, jasmonic acid signaling was also activated in cotton after inoculation with V. dahliae and brassinolide application. These data provide highlights in the molecular basis of cotton resistance to V. dahliae. PMID:24019146

  4. Proteomic and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) Analyses reveal that gossypol, brassinosteroids, and jasmonic acid contribute to the resistance of cotton to Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Long, Lu; Zhu, Long-Fu; Xu, Li; Gao, Wen-Hui; Sun, Long-Qing; Liu, Lin-Lin; Zhang, Xian-Long

    2013-12-01

    Verticillium wilt causes massive annual losses of cotton yield, but the mechanism of cotton resistance to Verticillium dahliae is complex and poorly understood. In this study, a comparative proteomic analysis was performed in resistant cotton (Gossypium barbadense cv7124) on infection with V. dahliae. A total of 188 differentially expressed proteins were identified by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) analysis and could be classified into 17 biological processes based on Gene Ontology annotation. Most of these proteins were implicated in stimulus response, cellular processes and metabolic processes. Based on the proteomic analysis, several genes involved in secondary metabolism, reactive oxygen burst and phytohormone signaling pathways were identified for further physiological and molecular analysis. The roles of the corresponding genes were further characterized by employing virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). Based on the results, we suggest that the production of gossypol is sufficient to affect the cotton resistance to V. dahliae. Silencing of GbCAD1, a key enzyme involving in gossypol biosynthesis, compromised cotton resistance to V. dahliae. Reactive oxygen species and salicylic acid signaling may be also implicated as regulators in cotton responsive to V. dahliae according to the analysis of GbSSI2, an important regulator in the crosstalk between salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signal pathways. Moreover, brassinosteroids and jasmonic acid signaling may play essential roles in the cotton disease resistance to V. dahliae. The brassinosteroids signaling was activated in cotton on inoculation with V. dahliae and the disease resistance of cotton was enhanced after exogenous application of brassinolide. Meanwhile, jasmonic acid signaling was also activated in cotton after inoculation with V. dahliae and brassinolide application. These data provide highlights in the molecular basis of cotton resistance to V. dahliae.

  5. De novo foliar transcriptome of Chenopodium amaranticolor and analysis of its gene expression during virus-induced hypersensitive response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Pei, Xinwu; Zhang, Chao; Lu, Zifeng; Wang, Zhixing; Jia, Shirong; Li, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) system of Chenopodium spp. confers broad-spectrum virus resistance. However, little knowledge exists at the genomic level for Chenopodium, thus impeding the advanced molecular research of this attractive feature. Hence, we took advantage of RNA-seq to survey the foliar transcriptome of C. amaranticolor, a Chenopodium species widely used as laboratory indicator for pathogenic viruses, in order to facilitate the characterization of the HR-type of virus resistance. Using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform, we obtained 39,868,984 reads with 3,588,208,560 bp, which were assembled into 112,452 unigenes (3,847 clusters and 108,605 singletons). BlastX search against the NCBI NR database identified 61,698 sequences with a cut-off E-value above 10(-5). Assembled sequences were annotated with gene descriptions, GO, COG and KEGG terms, respectively. A total number of 738 resistance gene analogs (RGAs) and homology sequences of 6 key signaling proteins within the R proteins-directed signaling pathway were identified. Based on this transcriptome data, we investigated the gene expression profiles over the stage of HR induced by Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus by using digital gene expression analysis. Numerous candidate genes specifically or commonly regulated by these two distinct viruses at early and late stages of the HR were identified, and the dynamic changes of the differently expressed genes enriched in the pathway of plant-pathogen interaction were particularly emphasized. To our knowledge, this study is the first description of the genetic makeup of C. amaranticolor, providing deep insight into the comprehensive gene expression information at transcriptional level in this species. The 738 RGAs as well as the differentially regulated genes, particularly the common genes regulated by both TMV and CMV, are suitable candidates which merit further functional characterization to dissect the molecular mechanisms and regulatory

  6. De novo foliar transcriptome of Chenopodium amaranticolor and analysis of its gene expression during virus-induced hypersensitive response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Zhang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The hypersensitive response (HR system of Chenopodium spp. confers broad-spectrum virus resistance. However, little knowledge exists at the genomic level for Chenopodium, thus impeding the advanced molecular research of this attractive feature. Hence, we took advantage of RNA-seq to survey the foliar transcriptome of C. amaranticolor, a Chenopodium species widely used as laboratory indicator for pathogenic viruses, in order to facilitate the characterization of the HR-type of virus resistance. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform, we obtained 39,868,984 reads with 3,588,208,560 bp, which were assembled into 112,452 unigenes (3,847 clusters and 108,605 singletons. BlastX search against the NCBI NR database identified 61,698 sequences with a cut-off E-value above 10(-5. Assembled sequences were annotated with gene descriptions, GO, COG and KEGG terms, respectively. A total number of 738 resistance gene analogs (RGAs and homology sequences of 6 key signaling proteins within the R proteins-directed signaling pathway were identified. Based on this transcriptome data, we investigated the gene expression profiles over the stage of HR induced by Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus by using digital gene expression analysis. Numerous candidate genes specifically or commonly regulated by these two distinct viruses at early and late stages of the HR were identified, and the dynamic changes of the differently expressed genes enriched in the pathway of plant-pathogen interaction were particularly emphasized. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this study is the first description of the genetic makeup of C. amaranticolor, providing deep insight into the comprehensive gene expression information at transcriptional level in this species. The 738 RGAs as well as the differentially regulated genes, particularly the common genes regulated by both TMV and CMV, are suitable candidates which merit further

  7. Virus-induced gene silencing of WRKY53 and an inducible phenylalanine ammonia-lyase in wheat reduces aphid resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although several wheat genes differentially expressed during the Russian wheat aphid resistance response have recently been identified, their requirement for and specific role in resistance remain unclear. Progress in wheat-aphid interaction research is hampered by inadequate collections of mutant g...

  8. Plum pox virus induces differential gene expression in the partially resistant stone fruit tree Prunus armeniaca cv. Goldrich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schurdi-Levraud Escalettes, Valérie; Hullot, Clémence; Wawrzy'nczak, Danuta; Mathieu, Elodie; Eyquard, Jean-Philippe; Le Gall, Olivier; Decroocq, Véronique

    2006-06-07

    We investigated the changes in the expression profiles of the partially resistant apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) cultivar Goldrich following inoculation with Plum pox virus (PPV) using cDNA-amplification fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Altered expression patterns were detected and twenty-one differentially expressed cDNA had homologies with genes in databases coding for proteins involved in metabolism, signal transduction, defense, stress and intra/intercellular connections. Seven of the modified expressed patterns were further investigated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR or Northern blotting. The expression patterns of five of these genes were confirmed in the partially resistant P. armeniaca cv. 'Goldrich' and assessed in a susceptible genotype. One of these cDNAs, coding for a putative class III chitinase, appeared to be repressed in infected plants of the partially resistant genotype and expressed in the susceptible one which could be related to the partially resistant phenotype. On the contrary, the expression patterns of the genes coding for a transketolase, a kinesin-like and an ankyrin-like protein, were clearly linked to the susceptible interaction. These candidate genes could play a role either in the compatible interaction leading to virus invasion or to the quantitative resistance of apricot to PPV.

  9. Flowering Without Vernalization in Winter Canola (Brassica napus: use of Virus-Induced Gene Silencing (VIGS to accelerate genetic gain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raúl Álvarez-Venegas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ciclos de reproducción cortos y la oportunidad de incrementar la ganancia genética, junto con el estudio de las bases moleculares de la vernalización, son áreas esenciales de investigación dentro de la biología de plantas. Varios métodos se han empleado para lograr el silenciamiento génico en plantas, pero ninguno reportado a la fecha para canola (Brassica napus, y en particular para inducir la floración sin vernalización en líneas de invierno a través del uso de secuencias sentido de DNA en vectores diseñados para el silenciamiento génico inducido por virus (VIGS. La presente investigación provee los métodos para transitoriamente regular a la baja, por medio de VIGS, genes de la vernalización en plantas anuales de invierno, específicamente la familia de genes de Flowering Locus C (FLC en canola de invierno (BnFLC1 a BnFLC5. La regulación a la baja de estos genes permite a las plantas anuales de invierno florecer sin vernalización y, consecuentemente, provee los medios para acelerar la ganancia genética. El sistema de silenciamiento propuesto puede ser utilizado para regular a la baja familias de genes, para determinar la función génica, y para inducir la floración sin la vernalización en líneas de invierno tanto del género Brassica como de muchos cultivos importantes de invierno.

  10. Establishment of an efficient virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) assay in Arabidopsis by Agrobacterium-mediated rubbing infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhães, Ana Marcia E de A; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Shan, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Several VIGS protocols have been established for high-throughput functional genomic screens as it bypasses the time-consuming and laborious process of generation of transgenic plants. The silencing efficiency in this approach is largely hindered by a technically demanding step in which the first pair of newly emerged true leaves at the 2-week-old stage are infiltrated with a needleless syringe. To further optimize VIGS efficiency and achieve rapid inoculation for a large-scale functional genomic study, here we describe a protocol of an efficient VIGS assay in Arabidopsis using Agrobacterium-mediated rubbing infection. The Agrobacterium inoculation is performed by simply rubbing the leaves with Filter Agent Celite(®) 545. The highly efficient and uniform silencing effect was indicated by the development of a visibly albino phenotype due to silencing of the Cloroplastos alterados 1 (CLA1) gene in the newly emerged leaves. In addition, the albino phenotype could be observed in stems and flowers, indicating its potential application for gene functional studies in the late vegetative development and flowering stages.

  11. Inefficient viral replication of bovine leukemia virus induced by spontaneous deletion mutation in the G4 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hironobu; Uchiyama, Jumpei; Nikaido, Sae; Sato, Reiichiro; Sakaguchi, Masahiro; Tsukamoto, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    Enzootic bovine leucosis is caused by bovine leukemia virus (BLV) infection, which is highly prevalent in several regions of the world and significantly impacts the livestock industry. In BLV infection, the proviral load in the blood reflects disease progression. Although the BLV genome is highly conserved among retroviruses, genetic variation has been reported. However, the relationship between proviral load and genetic variation is poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the changes in proviral load in BLV-infected cattle in Japan and then identified and analysed a BLV strain pvAF967 that had a static proviral load. First, examining the proviral load in the aleukaemic cattle in 2014 and 2015, cow AF967 showed a static proviral load, while the other cows showed significant increases in proviral load. Sequencing the provirus in cow AF967 showed a deletion of 12 nt located in the G4 gene. An in vitro assay system using BLV molecular clone was set up to evaluate viral replication and production. In this in vitro assay, the deletion mutation in the G4 gene resulted in a significant decrease in viral replication and production. In addition, we showed that the deletion mutation did not affect the viral transcriptional activity of Tax protein, which is also important for virus replication. The emergence of strain pvAF967 that showed a static proviral load, combined with other retrovirus evolutionary traits, suggests that some BLV strains may have evolved to be symbiotic with cattle.

  12. Biased agonism and allosteric modulation of G protein-coupled receptor 183 - a 7TM receptor also known as Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daugvilaite, Viktorija; Madsen, Christian Medom; Lückmann, Michael; Echeverria, Clara Castello; Sailer, Andreas Walter; Frimurer, Thomas Michael; Rosenkilde, Mette Marie; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2017-07-01

    The GPCR Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2, also known as GPR183) is activated by oxysterols and plays a pivotal role in the regulation of B cell migration during immune responses. While the molecular basis of agonist binding has been addressed in several studies, the concept of biased agonism of the EBI2 receptor has not been explored. We investigated the effects of the EBI2 endogenous agonist 7α,25-dihydroxycholesterol (7α,25-OHC) on G protein-dependent and -independent pathways as well as sodium ion allosterism using site-directed mutagenesis and functional studies. Moreover, we generated a homology model of the EBI2 receptor to investigate the structural basis of the allosteric modulation by sodium. Residue N114, located in the middle of transmembrane-III at position III:11/3.35, was found to function as an efficacy switch. Thus, substituting N114 with an alanine (N114A) completely abolished heterotrimeric G protein subunit Gi α activation by 7α,25-OHC even though the specific binding of [3 H]-7α,25-OHC increased. In contrast, the N114A mutant was still able to recruit β-arrestin and even had an enhanced potency (18.7-fold) compared with EBI2 wild type. Sodium had a negative allosteric effect on oxysterol binding that was mediated via N114, verifying the key role of N114. This was further supported by molecular modelling of the ion binding site based on a EBI2 receptor homology model. Collectively, our data point to N114 as a key residue for EBI2 signalling controlling the balance between G protein-dependent and -independent pathways and facilitating sodium binding. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Down-regulation of osmotin (PR5) gene by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) leads to susceptibility of resistant Piper colubrinum Link. to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anu, K; Jessymol, K K; Chidambareswaren, M; Gayathri, G S; Manjula, S

    2015-06-01

    Piper colubrinum Link., a distant relative of Piper nigrum L., is immune to the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora capsici Leonian that causes 'quick wilt' in cultivated black pepper (P. nigrum). The osmotin, PR5 gene homologue, earlier identified from P. colubrinum, showed significant overexpression in response to pathogen and defense signalling molecules. The present study focuses on the functional validation of P. colubrinum osmotin (PcOSM) by virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) using Tobacco Rattle Virus (TRV)-based vector. P. colubrinum plants maintained under controlled growth conditions in a growth chamber were infiltrated with Agrobacterium carrying TRV empty vector (control) and TRV vector carrying PcOSM. Three weeks post infiltration, viral movement was confirmed in newly emerged leaves of infiltrated plants by RT-PCR using TRV RNA1 and TRV RNA2 primers. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR confirmed significant down-regulation of PcOSM gene in TRV-PcOSM infiltrated plant compared with the control plants. The control and silenced plants were challenged with Phytophthora capsici which demonstrated that knock-down of PcOSM in P. colubrinum leads to increased fungal mycelial growth in silenced plants compared to control plants, which was accompanied by decreased accumulation of H2O2 as indicated by 3,3'-diaminobenzidine (DAB) staining. Thus, in this study, we demonstrated that Piper colubrinum osmotin gene is required for resisting P. capsici infection and has possible role in hypersensitive cell death response and oxidative burst signaling during infection.

  14. Deletion of fucose residues in plant N-glycans by repression of the GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase gene using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuo, Kouki; Matsumura, Takeshi

    2011-02-01

    Production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins in plants has many advantages in terms of safety and reduced costs. However, plant-produced glycoproteins have N-glycans with plant-specific sugar residues (core β-1,2-xylose and α-1,3-fucose) and a Lewis a (Le(a) ) epitope, i.e., Galβ(1-3)[Fucα(1-4)]GlcNAc. Because these sugar residues and glycan structures seemed to be immunogenic, several attempts have been made to delete them by repressing their respective glycosyltransferase genes. However, until date, such deletions have not been successful in completely eliminating the fucose residues. In this study, we simultaneously reduced the plant-specific core α-1,3-fucose and α-1,4-fucose residues in the Le(a) epitopes by repressing the Guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-D-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) gene, which is associated with GDP-L-fucose biosynthesis, in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Repression of GMD was achieved using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and RNA interference (RNAi). The proportion of fucose-free N-glycans found in total soluble protein from GMD gene-repressed plants increased by 80% and 95% following VIGS and RNAi, respectively, compared to wild-type plants. A small amount of putative galactose substitution in N-glycans from the NbGMD gene-repressed plants was observed, similar to what has been previously reported GMD-knockout Arabidopsis mutant. On the other hand, the recombinant mouse granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) with fucose-deleted N-glycans was successfully produced in NbGMD-RNAi transgenic N. benthamiana plants. Thus, repression of the GMD gene is thus very useful for deleting immunogenic total fucose residues and facilitating the production of pharmaceutical glycoproteins in plants. © 2010 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  15. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Ishioka, Taisei; Noda, Masahiro; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2013-09-12

    Acute respiratory illness (ARI) due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), human rhinovirus (HRV), human metapneumovirus (HMPV), human parainfluenza virus (HPIV), and human enterovirus infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it has been suggested that HRV infection is detected in the acute exacerbation of asthma and infection is prolonged. Thus it is believed that the main etiological cause of asthma is ARI viruses. Furthermore, the number of asthma patients in most industrial countries has greatly increased, resulting in a morbidity rate of around 10-15% of the population. However, the relationships between viral infections, host immune response, and host factors in the pathophysiology of asthma remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of virus-induced asthma, it is important to assess both the characteristics of the viruses and the host defense mechanisms. Molecular epidemiology enables us to understand the pathogenesis of microorganisms by identifying specific pathways, molecules, and genes that influence the risk of developing a disease. However, the epidemiology of various respiratory viruses associated with virus-induced asthma is not fully understood. Therefore, in this article, we review molecular epidemiological studies of RSV, HRV, HPIV, and HMPV infection associated with virus-induced asthma.

  16. Molecular epidemiology of respiratory viruses in virus-induced asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki eTsukagoshi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Acute respiratory illness (ARI due to various viruses is not only the most common cause of upper respiratory infection in humans but is also a major cause of morbidity and mortality, leading to diseases such as bronchiolitis and pneumonia. Previous studies have shown that respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, human rhinovirus (HRV, human metapneumovirus (HMPV, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV, and human enterovirus (HEV infections may be associated with virus-induced asthma. For example, it has been suggested that HRV infection is detected in the acute exacerbation of asthma and infection is prolonged. Thus it is believed that the main etiological cause of asthma is ARI viruses. Furthermore, the number of asthma patients in most industrial countries has greatly increased, resulting in a morbidity rate of around 10-15% of the population. However, the relationships between viral infections, host immune response, and host factors in the pathophysiology of asthma remain unclear. To gain a better understanding of the epidemiology of virus-induced asthma, it is important to assess both the characteristics of the viruses and the host defense mechanisms. Molecular epidemiology enables us to understand the pathogenesis of microorganisms by identifying specific pathways, molecules, and genes that influence the risk of developing a disease. However, the epidemiology of various respiratory viruses associated with virus-induced asthma is not fully understood. Therefore, in this article, we review molecular epidemiological studies of RSV, HRV, HPIV, and HMPV infection associated with virus-induced asthma.

  17. Virus induced inflammation and cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Scott A; Douglas, Mark W

    2014-04-10

    Chronic inflammation as a result of viral infection significantly increases the likelihood of cancer development. A handful of diverse viruses have confirmed roles in cancer development and progression, but the list of suspected oncogenic viruses is continually growing. Viruses induce cancer directly and indirectly, by activating inflammatory signalling pathways and cytokines, stimulating growth of infected cells and inhibiting apoptosis. Although oncogenic viruses induce inflammation by various mechanisms, it is generally mediated by the MAPK, NFκB and STAT3 signalling pathways. This review will explore the unique mechanisms by which different oncogenic viruses induce inflammation to promote cancer initiation and progression. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Infection of nonhost species dendritic cells in vitro with an attenuated myxoma virus induces gene expression that predicts its efficacy as a vaccine vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, S; Foulon, E; Pignolet, B; Deplanche, M; Caubet, C; Tasca, C; Bertagnoli, S; Meyer, G; Foucras, G

    2011-12-01

    Recombinant myxoma virus (MYXV) can be produced without a loss of infectivity, and its highly specific host range makes it an ideal vaccine vector candidate, although careful examination of its interaction with the immune system is necessary. Similar to rabbit bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), ovine dendritic cells can be infected by SG33, a MYXV vaccine strain, and support recombinant antigen expression. The frequency of infected cells in the nonhost was lower and the virus cycle was abortive in these cell types. Among BM-DC subpopulations, Langerhans cell-like DCs were preferentially infected at low multiplicities of infection. Interestingly, ovine BM-DCs remained susceptible to MYXV after maturation, although apoptosis occurred shortly after infection as a function of the virus titer. When gene expression was assessed in infected BM-DC cultures, type I interferon (IFN)-related and inflammatory genes were strongly upregulated. DC gene expression profiles were compared with the profiles produced by other poxviruses in interaction with DCs, but very few commonalities were found, although genes that were previously shown to predict vaccine efficacy were present. Collectively, these data support the idea that MYXV permits efficient priming of adaptive immune responses and should be considered a promising vaccine vector along with other poxviruses.

  19. Infection of Nonhost Species Dendritic Cells In Vitro with an Attenuated Myxoma Virus Induces Gene Expression That Predicts Its Efficacy as a Vaccine Vector ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Top, S.; Foulon, E.; Pignolet, B.; Deplanche, M.; Caubet, C.; Tasca, C.; Bertagnoli, S.; Meyer, G.; Foucras, G.

    2011-01-01

    Recombinant myxoma virus (MYXV) can be produced without a loss of infectivity, and its highly specific host range makes it an ideal vaccine vector candidate, although careful examination of its interaction with the immune system is necessary. Similar to rabbit bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DCs), ovine dendritic cells can be infected by SG33, a MYXV vaccine strain, and support recombinant antigen expression. The frequency of infected cells in the nonhost was lower and the virus cycle was abortive in these cell types. Among BM-DC subpopulations, Langerhans cell-like DCs were preferentially infected at low multiplicities of infection. Interestingly, ovine BM-DCs remained susceptible to MYXV after maturation, although apoptosis occurred shortly after infection as a function of the virus titer. When gene expression was assessed in infected BM-DC cultures, type I interferon (IFN)-related and inflammatory genes were strongly upregulated. DC gene expression profiles were compared with the profiles produced by other poxviruses in interaction with DCs, but very few commonalities were found, although genes that were previously shown to predict vaccine efficacy were present. Collectively, these data support the idea that MYXV permits efficient priming of adaptive immune responses and should be considered a promising vaccine vector along with other poxviruses. PMID:21835800

  20. Redox-related metabolites and gene expression modulated by sugar in sunflower leaves: similarities with Sunflower chlorotic mottle virus-induced symptom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, Marianela; Muñoz, Nacira; Lenardon, Sergio; Lascano, Ramiro

    2013-01-01

    Sugars are part of an integrated redox system, since they are key regulators of respiration and photosynthesis, and therefore of the levels of reducing power, ATP and ROS. These elements are major determinants of the cellular redox state, which is involved in the perception and regulation of many endogenous and environmental stimuli. Our previous findings suggested that early sugar increase produced during compatible Sunflower chlorotic mottle virus (SuCMoV) infection might modulate chlorotic symptom development through redox state alteration in sunflower. The purpose of this work was to characterize redox-related metabolites and gene expression changes associated with high sugar availability and symptom development induced by SuCMoV. The results show that sugar caused an increase in glutathione, ascorbate, pyridine nucleotides, and ATP. In addition, higher sugar availability reduced hydrogen peroxide and ΦPSII. This finding suggests that high sugar availability would be associated with cellular redox alteration and photoinhibitory process. The expression of the genes analyzed was also strongly affected by sugar, such as the down-regulation of psbA and up-regulation of psbO and cp29. The expression level of cytoplasmic (apx-1 and gr)- and chloroplastic (Fe-sod)-targeted genes was also significantly enhanced in sugar-treated leaves. Therefore, all these responses suggest that sugars induce chloroplastic redox state alteration with photoinhibition process that could be contributing to chlorotic symptom development during SuCMoV infection.

  1. Hepatitis B virus induces G1 phase arrest by regulating cell cycle genes in HepG2.2.15 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Chong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To investigate the effect of HBV on the proliferative ability of host cells and explore the potential mechanism. Methods MTT, colony formation assay and tumourigenicity in nude mice were performed to investigate the effect of HBV on the proliferative capability of host cells. In order to explore the potential mechanism, cell cycle and apoptosis were analysed. The cell cycle genes controlling the G1/S phase transition were detected by immunohistochemistry, westernblot and RT-PCR. Results HepG2.2.15 cells showed decreased proliferation ability compared to HepG2 cells. G1 phase arrest was the main cause but was not associated with apoptosis. p53, p21 and total retinoblastoma (Rb were determined to be up-regulated, whereas cyclinE was down-regulated at both the protein and mRNA levels in HepG2.2.15 cells. The phosphorylated Rb in HepG2.2.15 cells was decreased. Conclusions Our results suggested that HBV inhibited the capability of proliferation of HepG2.2.15 cells by regulating cell cycle genes expression and inducing G1 arrest.

  2. Mumps virus induces innate immune responses in mouse ovarian granulosa cells through the activation of Toll-like receptor 2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Wu, Han; Cheng, Lijing; Yan, Keqin; Shi, Lili; Zhao, Xiang; Jiang, Qian; Wang, Fei; Chen, Yongmei; Li, Qihan; Han, Daishu

    2016-11-15

    Mumps virus (MuV) infection may lead to oophoritis and perturb ovarian function. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of innate immune responses to MuV infection in the ovary have not been investigated. This study showed that Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2) and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) cooperatively initiate innate immune responses to MuV infection in mouse ovarian granulosa cells. Ovarian granulosa cells infected with MuV significantly produced pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including interleukin-1β (IL-1β), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1), and type 1 interferons (IFN-α and IFN-β). Knockdown of RIG-I significantly decreased MuV-induced cytokine expression. TLR2 deficiency reduced the expression of IL-1β, TNF-α, and MCP-1 but did not affect the expression of IFN-α and IFN-β in granulosa cells after infection with MuV. Intraperitoneal injection of MuV induced the ovarian innate immune responses in vivo, which suppressed estradiol synthesis and induced granulosa cell apoptosis. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying MuV-induced innate immune responses in the mouse ovary. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The "one-step" Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV)-derived vector is a functional genomics tool for efficient overexpression of heterologous protein, virus-induced gene silencing and genetic mapping of BPMV R-gene in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflieger, Stéphanie; Blanchet, Sophie; Meziadi, Chouaib; Richard, Manon M S; Thareau, Vincent; Mary, Fanny; Mazoyer, Céline; Geffroy, Valérie

    2014-08-29

    Over the last two years, considerable advances have been made in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) genomics, especially with the completion of the genome sequence and the availability of RNAseq data. However, as common bean is recalcitrant to stable genetic transformation, much work remains to be done for the development of functional genomics tools adapted to large-scale studies. Here we report the successful implementation of an efficient viral vector system for foreign gene expression, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and genetic mapping of a BPMV resistance gene in common bean, using a "one-step" BPMV vector originally developed in soybean. With the goal of developing this vector for high-throughput VIGS studies in common bean, we optimized the conditions for rub-inoculation of infectious BPMV-derived plasmids in common bean cv. Black Valentine. We then tested the susceptibility to BPMV of six cultivars, and found that only Black Valentine and JaloEEP558 were susceptible to BPMV. We used a BPMV-GFP construct to detect the spatial and temporal infection patterns of BPMV in vegetative and reproductive tissues. VIGS of the PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PvPDS) marker gene was successfully achieved with recombinant BPMV vectors carrying fragments ranging from 132 to 391 bp. Finally, we mapped a gene for resistance to BPMV (R-BPMV) at one end of linkage group 2, in the vicinity of a locus (I locus) previously shown to be involved in virus resistance. The "one-step" BPMV vector system therefore enables rapid and simple functional studies in common bean, and could be suitable for large-scale analyses. In the post-genomic era, these advances are timely for the common bean research community.

  4. Next generation sequencing for studying viruses and RNA silencing-based antiviral defense in crop plants

    OpenAIRE

    Seguin, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives of this work have been to use next generation sequencing (NGS) and develop bioinformatics tools for plant virus diagnostics and genome reconstruction as well as for investigation of RNA silencing-based antiviral defense. In virus-infected plants, the host Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes process viral double-stranded RNAs into 21-24 nucleotide (nt) short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) which can potentially associate with Argonaute (AGO) proteins and guide the resulting RNA-induce silen...

  5. Nutrigenomics Therapy of Hepatisis C Virus Induced-hepatosteatosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Nutrigenomics is a relatively new branch of nutrition science, which aim is to study the impact of the foods we eat on the function of our genes. Hepatosteatosis is strongly associated with hepatitis C virus infection, which is known to increase the risk of the disease progression and reduce the likelihood of responding to anti- virus treatment. It is well documented that hepatitis C virus can directly alter host cell lipid metabolism through nuclear transcription factors. To date, only a limited number of studies have been on the effect of human foods on the nuclear transcription factors of hepatitis C virus -induced hepatosteatosis. Three nutrients, selected among 46 different nutrients: β-carotene, vitamin D2, and linoleic acid were found in a cell culture system to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. In addition, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) especially arachidonic acid (AA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have been demonstrated to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. These PUFAs, in particular the highly unsaturated n-3 fatty acids change the gene expression of PPARa and SREBP, suppress the expression of mRNAs encoding key metabolic enzymes and hereby suppress hepatic lipogenesis and triglyceride synthesis, as well as secretion and accumulation in tissues. A recent prospective clinical trial of 1,084 chronic hepatitis C patients compared to 2,326 healthy subjects suggests that chronic hepatitis C patients may benefit from strict dietary instructions. Increasing evidence suggest that some crucial nuclear transcription factors related to hepatitis C virus -associated hepatosteatosis and hepatitis C virus RNA itself can be controlled by specific anti- hepatitis C virus nutrition. It seems important that these findings are taken into account and specific nutritional supplements developed to be used in combination with interferon as adjunctive therapy with the aim to improve both the early as well as the sustained

  6. Nutrigenomics therapy of hepatisis C virus induced-hepatosteatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Bengmark, Stig; Qu, Shen

    2010-05-20

    Nutrigenomics is a relatively new branch of nutrition science, which aim is to study the impact of the foods we eat on the function of our genes. Hepatosteatosis is strongly associated with hepatitis C virus infection, which is known to increase the risk of the disease progression and reduce the likelihood of responding to anti- virus treatment. It is well documented that hepatitis C virus can directly alter host cell lipid metabolism through nuclear transcription factors. To date, only a limited number of studies have been on the effect of human foods on the nuclear transcription factors of hepatitis C virus -induced hepatosteatosis.Three nutrients, selected among 46 different nutrients: beta-carotene, vitamin D2, and linoleic acid were found in a cell culture system to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. In addition, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) especially arachidonic acid (AA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) have been demonstrated to inhibit hepatitis C virus RNA replication. These PUFAs, in particular the highly unsaturated n-3 fatty acids change the gene expression of PPARa and SREBP, suppress the expression of mRNAs encoding key metabolic enzymes and hereby suppress hepatic lipogenesis and triglyceride synthesis, as well as secretion and accumulation in tissues. A recent prospective clinical trial of 1,084 chronic hepatitis C patients compared to 2,326 healthy subjects suggests that chronic hepatitis C patients may benefit from strict dietary instructions.Increasing evidence suggest that some crucial nuclear transcription factors related to hepatitis C virus -associated hepatosteatosis and hepatitis C virus RNA itself can be controlled by specific anti- hepatitis C virus nutrition. It seems important that these findings are taken into account and specific nutritional supplements developed to be used in combination with interferon as adjunctive therapy with the aim to improve both the early as well as the sustained

  7. Virus-induced Systemic Vasculitides: New Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loïc Guillevin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The best therapeutic strategy in virus-induced vasculitides should take into account the etiology of the disease and be adapted to the pathogenesis. The combination of antiviral treatments and plasma exchanges has been proven effective in polyarteritis nodosa (PAN. In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-related vasculitis this strategy is also effective and does not jeopardize, like cytotoxic agents, the outcome of AIDS. In vasculitis related to HCV-associated cryoglobulinemia, plasma exchanges improve the outcome but the poor effectiveness of antiviral drugs is not able to favor, usually, a definite recovery of the patients and relapses are frequent.

  8. Myxoma virus induces apoptosis in cultured feline carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, A L; Moldenhauer, T; Doty, R; Mann, T

    2012-10-01

    There is growing interest in utilizing replicating oncolytic viruses as cancer therapeutics agents. The effectiveness of myxoma virus-induced oncolysis was evaluated in two feline cancer cell cultures. Although myxoma virus is a rabbit-specific pathogen, protein expression driven by myxoma virus and production of infectious viral particles were detected. Cell death occurred in primary feline cancer cells within 48 h of inoculation with myxoma virus. Future studies to determine if other feline neoplasms are susceptible to myxoma virus infection are warranted. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Virus -induced plankton dynamic and sea spray oragnics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facchini, Maria Cristina; O'Dowd, Colin; Danovaro, Roberto

    2015-04-01

    The processes that link phytoplankton biomass and productivity to the organic matter enrichment in sea spray aerosol are far from being understood and modelling predictions remain highly uncertain at the moment. While some studies have asserted that the enrichment of OM in sea spray aerosol is independent on marine productivity, others, on the contrary, have shown significant correlation with phytoplankton biomass and productivity (Chl-a retrieved by satellites). Here we show that viral infection of prokaryotes and phytoplankton, by inducing the release of large quantities of surfaceactive organic matter (cell debris, exudates and other colloidal gel-forming material), in part due to cell lysis and plankton defence reactions, and in part from rapid virus multiplication, triggers the organic matter (OM) enrichment in the sea-spray particles during blooms. We show that virus-induced bloom dynamics may explain the contrasting results present in literature on the link between primary productivity and OM sea spray enrichment.

  10. Treatment of Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease with teriflunomide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, Francesca; Li, Libin; Royce, Darlene B; DiSano, Krista D; Pachner, Andrew R

    2017-12-01

    Teriflunomide is an oral therapy approved for the treatment of relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), showing both anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties. Currently, it is uncertain whether one or both of these properties may explain teriflunomide's beneficial effect in MS. Thus, to learn more about its mechanisms of action, we evaluated the effect of teriflunomide in the Theiler's encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) model, which is both a viral infection and an excellent model of the progressive disability of MS. We assessed the effects of the treatment on central nervous system (CNS) viral load, intrathecal immune response, and progressive neurological disability in mice intracranially infected with TMEV. In the TMEV-IDD model, we showed that teriflunomide has both anti-inflammatory and antiviral properties, but there seemed to be no impact on disability progression and intrathecal antibody production. Notably, benefits in TMEV-IDD were mostly mediated by effects on various cytokines produced in the CNS. Perhaps the most interesting result of the study has been teriflunomide's antiviral activity in the CNS, indicating it may have a role as an antiviral prophylactic and therapeutic compound for CNS viral infections.

  11. Infection with influenza virus induces IL-33 in murine lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Goffic, Ronan; Arshad, Muhammad Imran; Rauch, Michel; L'Helgoualc'h, Annie; Delmas, Bernard; Piquet-Pellorce, Claire; Samson, Michel

    2011-12-01

    IL-33, a novel IL-1 family member, is crucially expressed and involved in pulmonary diseases, but its regulation in viral diseases such as influenza A virus (IAV) remains unclear. This study aimed to characterize the expression and release of IL-33 in lungs of IAV-infected mice in vivo and in murine respiratory epithelial cells (MLE-15) in vitro. Our results provide evidence of up-regulation of IL-33 mRNA in IAV-infected murine lungs, compared with noninfected control mice. The overexpression of IL-33 was positively correlated with a significant increase in mRNA encoding the proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-1β, and IL-6, and was also associated with an increase in IFN-β mRNA. A profound overexpression of IL-33 protein was evident in IAV-infected murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages of influenza-infected mice, compared with low concentrations in naive lungs in vivo. Immunolocalization highlighted the cellular expression of IL-33 in alveolar epithelial and endothelial cells, along with increased infiltrate cells in virus-infected lungs. Further in vitro experiments showed an induction of IL-33 transcript-in MLE-15 cells and human epithelial cells (A549) infected with different strains of IAV in comparison with noninfected cells. In conclusion, our findings evidenced a profound expression of IL-33 in lungs during both in vivo and in vitro IAV infections, suggesting a role for IL-33 in virus-induced lung infections.

  12. Virus-induced exacerbations in asthma and COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke eKurai

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is characterized by chronic airway inflammation and/or airflow limitation due to pulmonary emphysema. Chronic bronchitis, pulmonary emphysema, and bronchial asthma may all be associated with airflow limitation; therefore, exacerbation of asthma may be associated with the pathophysiology of COPD. Furthermore, recent studies have suggested that the exacerbation of asthma, namely virus-induced asthma, may be associated with a wide variety of respiratory viruses.COPD and asthma have different underlying pathophysiological processes and thus require individual therapies. Exacerbation of both COPD and asthma, which are basically defined and diagnosed by clinical symptoms, is associated with a rapid decline in lung function and increased mortality. Similar pathogens, including human rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, parainfluenza virus and coronavirus, are also frequently detected during exacerbation of asthma and/or COPD. Immune response to respiratory viral infections, which may be related to the severity of exacerbation in each disease, varies in patients with both COPD and asthma. In this regard, it is crucial to recognize and understand both the similarities and differences of clinical features in patients with COPD and/or asthma associated with respiratory viral infections, especially in the exacerbative stage.In relation to definition, epidemiology, and pathophysiology, this review aims to summarize current knowledge concerning exacerbation of both COPD and asthma by focusing on the clinical significance of associated respiratory virus infections.

  13. Cellular and humoral immunity of virus-induced asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshimichi eOkayama

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Asthma inception is associated with respiratory viral infection, especially infection with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and/or human rhinovirus (HRV, in the vast majority of cases. However, the reason why RSV and HRV induce the majority of bronchiolitis cases during early childhood and why only a small percentage of children with RSV- and HRV-induced bronchiolitis later develop asthma remains unclear. A genetic association study has revealed the important interaction between viral illness and genetic variants in patients with asthma. Severe RSV- and HRV-induced bronchiolitis may be associated with a deficiency in the innate immune response to RSV and HRV. RSV and HRV infections in infants with deficient innate immune response and the dysfunction of regulatory T cells are considered to be a risk factor for the development of asthma. Sensitization to aeroallergens, beginning in the first year of life, consistently predisposes children to HRV-induced wheezing illnesses, but the converse is not true. Some evidence of virus specificity exists, in that allergic sensitization specifically increased the risk of wheezing in individuals infected with HRV, but not RSV. Administration of Palivizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the A antigenic site of the Fusion-protein of RSV, decreases the risk of hospitalization in high-risk infants and the risk of recurrent of wheezing. However, palivizumab did not have any effect on subsequent recurrent wheezing in children with a family history of atopy. These findings suggest that infection with RSV and infection with HRV might predispose individuals to recurrent wheezing through an atopy-independent and an atopy-dependent mechanism, respectively. Respiratory virus-induced wheezing illnesses may encompass multiple sub-phenotypes that relate to asthma in different ways.

  14. Tissue-specific deletion of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) protects mice from virus-induced pancreatitis and myocarditis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallewaard, Nicole L.; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Jin-Wen; Guttenberg, Marta; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY In cultured cells, infection by Group B coxsackieviruses (CVB) is mediated by the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), but the importance of this molecule in CVB disease has not been determined. We used tissue-specific CAR gene deletion to generate mice that lacked CAR within each of two major CVB target organs, the pancreas and heart. Deletion of CAR from the pancreas resulted in a 1000-fold reduction in virus titers within the pancreas during infection, and a significant reduction in virus-induced tissue damage and inflammation. Similarly, cardiomyocyte-specific CAR deletion resulted in a 100-fold reduction in virus titer within the heart, and a marked reduction in cytokine production and histopathology. Although primary cardiomyocytes from control animals were susceptible to virus infection, CAR-deficient cardiomyocytes resisted infection in vitro. These results demonstrate a critical function for CAR in the pathogenesis of CVB infection in vivo, and in virus tropism for the heart and pancreas. PMID:19616768

  15. Ligand Modulation of the Epstein-Barr Virus-induced Seven-transmembrane Receptor EBI2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benned-Jensen, Tau; Smethurst, Christopher; Holst, Peter Johannes

    2011-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus-induced receptor 2 (EBI2) is a constitutively active seven-transmembrane receptor, which was recently shown to orchestrate the positioning of B cells in the follicle. To date, no ligands, endogenously or synthetic, have been identified that modulate EBI2 activity. Here we...

  16. CD154 Blockade Results in Transient Reduction in Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Howard, Laurence M.; Neville, Katherine L.; Haynes, Lia M.; Dal Canto, Mauro C.; Miller, Stephen D

    2003-01-01

    Transient CD154 blockade at the onset of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease ameliorated disease progression for 80 days, reduced immune cell infiltration, and transiently increased viral loads in the central nervous system. Peripheral antiviral and autoimmune T-cell responses were normal, and disease severity returned to control levels by day 120.

  17. Inhibition of Pim1 kinase, new therapeutic approach in virus-induced asthma exacerbations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vries, de Maaike; Bedke, Nicole; Smithers, Natalie P.; Loxham, Matthew; Howarth, Peter H.; Nawijn, Martijn C.; Davies, Donna E.

    Therapeutic options to treat virus-induced asthma exacerbations are limited and urgently needed. Therefore, we tested Pim1 kinase as potential therapeutic target in human rhinovirus (HRV) infections. We hypothesised that inhibition of Pim1 kinase reduces HRV replication by augmenting the

  18. Gene : CBRC-MMUS-14-0102 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-MMUS-14-0102 14 A Orphan receptors EBI2_MOUSE 0.0 100% ref|NP_898852.2| Epstein-Barr virus... induced gene 2 [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE31813.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] dbj|BAE237...50.1| unnamed protein product [Mus musculus] gb|EDL00616.1| Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 [Mus musculus]... 0.0 100% gnl|UG|Mm#S16761247 Mus musculus Epstein-Barr virus induced gene 2 (Ebi

  19. Mechanisms of Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-03-01

    K. K. Wang. Mattmann, and J. Tschopp. 1999. Equine herpesvirus-2 Eli) gene product, 1999. Procaspase-3 and poly(ADP)ribose polymerase (PARP) are...manifestations. The drocyte nuclei of 12 (80%) of 15 brain pression, hypersensitivity syndromes, and next most common presentation is with specimens

  20. Virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma with special emphasis on HBV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ming; Xi, Dong; Ning, Qin

    2017-03-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignant tumor with high lethality, and the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a chief cause. HBV can accelerate HCC via multiple mechanisms. First, HBV induces immune reactions that lead to repeated hepatic inflammation, fibrosis and a deficient immune microenvironment. Subsequently, HBV can modify host genes near the insertion point through DNA integration to cause host cell genome instability and to generate carcinogenic fusion proteins. Additionally, HBV expresses diverse active proteins, especially HBx and HBs, which have a range of transactivation functions such as regulation of apoptosis, interference with intracellular signaling pathways, and alteration of epigenetics. Currently, primary prevention measures for HBV-induced HCC focus on vaccination and antiviral treatment. Here, we report the epidemiology, the molecular mechanism and the progress in therapeutic strategies for controlling HBV-induced HCC.

  1. Heparin prevents Zika virus induced-cytopathic effects in human neural progenitor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezzi, Silvia; Cooper, Lynsay; Rubio, Alicia; Pagani, Isabel; Capobianchi, Maria Rosaria; Ippolito, Giuseppe; Pelletier, Julien; Meneghetti, Maria Cecilia Z; Lima, Marcelo A; Skidmore, Mark A; Broccoli, Vania; Yates, Edwin A; Vicenzi, Elisa

    2017-04-01

    The recent Zika virus (ZIKV) outbreak, which mainly affected Brazil and neighbouring states, demonstrated the paucity of information concerning the epidemiology of several flaviruses, but also highlighted the lack of available agents with which to treat such emerging diseases. Here, we show that heparin, a widely used anticoagulant, while exerting a modest inhibitory effect on Zika Virus replication, fully prevents virus-induced cell death of human neural progenitor cells (NPCs). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  3. A Critical Role for the Type I Interferon Receptor in Virus-Induced Autoimmune Diabetes in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qaisar, Natasha; Lin, Suvana; Ryan, Glennice; Yang, Chaoxing; Oikemus, Sarah R.; Brodsky, Michael H.; Bortell, Rita; Mordes, John P.

    2017-01-01

    The pathogenesis of human type 1 diabetes, characterized by immune-mediated damage of insulin-producing β-cells of pancreatic islets, may involve viral infection. Essential components of the innate immune antiviral response, including type I interferon (IFN) and IFN receptor–mediated signaling pathways, are candidates for determining susceptibility to human type 1 diabetes. Numerous aspects of human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis are recapitulated in the LEW.1WR1 rat model. Diabetes can be induced in LEW.1WR1 weanling rats challenged with virus or with the viral mimetic polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly I:C). We hypothesized that disrupting the cognate type I IFN receptor (type I IFN α/β receptor [IFNAR]) to interrupt IFN signaling would prevent or delay the development of virus-induced diabetes. We generated IFNAR1 subunit–deficient LEW.1WR1 rats using CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats–associated protein 9) genome editing and confirmed functional disruption of the Ifnar1 gene. IFNAR1 deficiency significantly delayed the onset and frequency of diabetes and greatly reduced the intensity of insulitis after poly I:C treatment. The occurrence of Kilham rat virus–induced diabetes was also diminished in IFNAR1-deficient animals. These findings firmly establish that alterations in innate immunity influence the course of autoimmune diabetes and support the use of targeted strategies to limit or prevent the development of type 1 diabetes. PMID:27999109

  4. Nuclear marginalization of host cell chromatin associated with expansion of two discrete virus-induced subnuclear compartments during baculovirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Yu; Abe, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2008-07-01

    Chromatin structure is strictly regulated during the cell cycle. DNA viruses occasionally disturb the spatial organization of the host cell chromatin due to formation of the viral DNA replication compartment. To examine chromatin behavior in baculovirus-infected cells, we constructed recombinant plasmids expressing fluorescent protein-tagged histone H4 molecules and visualized the intracellular localization of chromatin by their transient expression in live infected cells. Similar to other DNA viruses, the baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus induced marginal relocation of chromatin within the nuclei of BmN cells, simultaneously with expansion of the viral DNA replication compartment, the virogenic stroma (VS). In the late stage of infection, however, the peristromal region (PR), another virus-induced subnuclear compartment, was also excluded from the chromatin-localizing area. Provided that late-gene products such as PR proteins (e.g., envelope proteins of the occlusion-derived virus) were expressed, blockage of viral DNA synthesis failed to inhibit chromatin relocation, despite abrogation of VS expansion. Instead, chromatin became marginalized concomitantly with PR expansion, suggesting that the PR contributes directly to chromatin replacement. In addition, chromatin was excluded from relatively large subnuclear structures that were induced in uninfected cells by cotransfection with four baculovirus genes, ie1, lef3, p143, and hr. Omission of any of the four genes, however, failed to result in formation of the large structures or chromatin exclusion. This correlation between compartmentalization and chromatin exclusion suggests the possibility that a chromatin-exclusive property of viral molecules, at least in part, supports nuclear compartmentalization of virus-infected cells.

  5. Nuclear Marginalization of Host Cell Chromatin Associated with Expansion of Two Discrete Virus-Induced Subnuclear Compartments during Baculovirus Infection▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagamine, Toshihiro; Kawasaki, Yu; Abe, Atsushi; Matsumoto, Shogo

    2008-01-01

    Chromatin structure is strictly regulated during the cell cycle. DNA viruses occasionally disturb the spatial organization of the host cell chromatin due to formation of the viral DNA replication compartment. To examine chromatin behavior in baculovirus-infected cells, we constructed recombinant plasmids expressing fluorescent protein-tagged histone H4 molecules and visualized the intracellular localization of chromatin by their transient expression in live infected cells. Similar to other DNA viruses, the baculovirus Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus induced marginal relocation of chromatin within the nuclei of BmN cells, simultaneously with expansion of the viral DNA replication compartment, the virogenic stroma (VS). In the late stage of infection, however, the peristromal region (PR), another virus-induced subnuclear compartment, was also excluded from the chromatin-localizing area. Provided that late-gene products such as PR proteins (e.g., envelope proteins of the occlusion-derived virus) were expressed, blockage of viral DNA synthesis failed to inhibit chromatin relocation, despite abrogation of VS expansion. Instead, chromatin became marginalized concomitantly with PR expansion, suggesting that the PR contributes directly to chromatin replacement. In addition, chromatin was excluded from relatively large subnuclear structures that were induced in uninfected cells by cotransfection with four baculovirus genes, ie1, lef3, p143, and hr. Omission of any of the four genes, however, failed to result in formation of the large structures or chromatin exclusion. This correlation between compartmentalization and chromatin exclusion suggests the possibility that a chromatin-exclusive property of viral molecules, at least in part, supports nuclear compartmentalization of virus-infected cells. PMID:18434402

  6. Salicylate prevents virus-induced type 1 diabetes in the BBDR rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoxing Yang

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that virus infection plays an important role in human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. We used the virus-inducible BioBreeding Diabetes Resistant (BBDR rat to investigate the ability of sodium salicylate, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, to modulate development of type 1 diabetes. BBDR rats treated with Kilham rat virus (KRV and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (pIC, a TLR3 agonist develop diabetes at nearly 100% incidence by ~2 weeks. We found distinct temporal profiles of the proinflammatory serum cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-12, and haptoglobin (an acute phase protein in KRV+pIC treated rats. Significant elevations of IL-1β and IL-12, coupled with sustained elevations of haptoglobin, were specific to KRV+pIC and not found in rats co-treated with pIC and H1, a non-diabetogenic virus. Salicylate administered concurrently with KRV+pIC inhibited the elevations in IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and haptoglobin almost completely, and reduced IL-12 levels significantly. Salicylate prevented diabetes in a dose-dependent manner, and diabetes-free animals had no evidence of insulitis. Our data support an important role for innate immunity in virus-induced type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. The ability of salicylate to prevent diabetes in this robust animal model demonstrates its potential use to prevent or attenuate human autoimmune diabetes.

  7. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhan-Qi; Chen, Ting-Ting; Zhang, Jun; Hu, Nan; Cao, Ming-Ya; Dong, Fei-Fan; Jiang, Ya-Ming; Chen, Peng; Lu, Cheng; Pan, Min-Hui

    2016-06-01

    Although current antiviral strategies can inhibit baculovirus infection and decrease viral DNA replication to a certain extent, novel tools are required for specific and accurate elimination of baculovirus genomes from infected insects. Using the newly developed clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/associated protein 9 nuclease (CRISPR/Cas9) technology, we disrupted a viral genome in infected insect cells in vitro as a defense against viral infection. We optimized the CRISPR/Cas9 system to edit foreign and viral genome in insect cells. Using Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) as a model, we found that the CRISPR/Cas9 system was capable of cleaving the replication key factor ie-1 in BmNPV thus effectively inhibiting virus proliferation. Furthermore, we constructed a virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 editing system, which minimized the probability of off-target effects and was rapidly activated after viral infection. This is the first report describing the application of the CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect antiviral research. Establishment of a highly efficient virus-inducible CRISPR/Cas9 system in insect cells provides insights to produce virus-resistant transgenic strains for future. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Animal Models of Virus-Induced Neurobehavioral Sequelae: Recent Advances, Methodological Issues, and Future Prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Bortolato

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Converging lines of clinical and epidemiological evidence suggest that viral infections in early developmental stages may be a causal factor in neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and autism-spectrum disorders. This etiological link, however, remains controversial in view of the lack of consistent and reproducible associations between viruses and mental illness. Animal models of virus-induced neurobehavioral disturbances afford powerful tools to test etiological hypotheses and explore pathophysiological mechanisms. Prenatal or neonatal inoculations of neurotropic agents (such as herpes-, influenza-, and retroviruses in rodents result in a broad spectrum of long-term alterations reminiscent of psychiatric abnormalities. Nevertheless, the complexity of these sequelae often poses methodological and interpretational challenges and thwarts their characterization. The recent conceptual advancements in psychiatric nosology and behavioral science may help determine new heuristic criteria to enhance the translational value of these models. A particularly critical issue is the identification of intermediate phenotypes, defined as quantifiable factors representing single neurochemical, neuropsychological, or neuroanatomical aspects of a diagnostic category. In this paper, we examine how the employment of these novel concepts may lead to new methodological refinements in the study of virus-induced neurobehavioral sequelae through animal models.

  9. RIG-I Signaling Is Essential for Influenza B Virus-Induced Rapid Interferon Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Sanna M Mäkelä; Österlund, Pamela; Westenius, Veera; Latvala, Sinikka; Diamond, Michael S.; Gale, Michael; Julkunen, Ilkka

    2015-01-01

    Influenza B virus causes annual epidemics and, along with influenza A virus, accounts for substantial disease and economic burden throughout the world. Influenza B virus infects only humans and some marine mammals and is not responsible for pandemics, possibly due to a very low frequency of reassortment and a lower evolutionary rate than that of influenza A virus. Influenza B virus has been less studied than influenza A virus, and thus, a comparison of influenza A and B virus infection mechan...

  10. Characteristics associated with clinical severity and inflammatory phenotype of naturally occurring virus-induced exacerbations of asthma in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Asger; Laing, Ingrid A; Poulsen, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In experimental studies viral infections have been shown to induce type 2 inflammation in asthmatics, but whether this is a feature of naturally occurring virus-induced asthma exacerbations is unknown. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) released from the airway epithelium in response...... occurring virus-induced exacerbations of asthma and whether TSLP is associated with this type 2 inflammation. METHODS: Patients presenting to hospital with acute asthma were examined during the exacerbation, and after 4 weeks recovery. The assessments included spirometry, FeNO and induced sputum...

  11. DNA Oncogenic Virus-Induced Oxidative Stress, Genomic Damage, and Aberrant Epigenetic Alterations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mankgopo Magdeline Kgatle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Approximately 20% of human cancers is attributable to DNA oncogenic viruses such as human papillomavirus (HPV, hepatitis B virus (HBV, and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV. Unrepaired DNA damage is the most common and overlapping feature of these DNA oncogenic viruses and a source of genomic instability and tumour development. Sustained DNA damage results from unceasing production of reactive oxygen species and activation of inflammasome cascades that trigger genomic changes and increased propensity of epigenetic alterations. Accumulation of epigenetic alterations may interfere with genome-wide cellular signalling machineries and promote malignant transformation leading to cancer development. Untangling and understanding the underlying mechanisms that promote these detrimental effects remain the major objectives for ongoing research and hope for effective virus-induced cancer therapy. Here, we review current literature with an emphasis on how DNA damage influences HPV, HVB, and EBV replication and epigenetic alterations that are associated with carcinogenesis.

  12. Fulminant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced inflammation of the CNS involves a cytokine-chemokine-cytokine-chemokine cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette Erbo; Simonsen, Stine; Fenger, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of immunocompetent mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) normally results in fatal CD8+ T cell mediated meningoencephalitis. However, in CXCL10-deficient mice, the virus-induced CD8+ T cell accumulation in the neural parenchyma is impaired, and only 30...

  13. Fulminant lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced inflammation of the CNS involves a cytokine-chemokine-cytokine-chemokine cascade

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jeanette E; Simonsen, Stine; Fenger, Christina

    2009-01-01

    Intracerebral inoculation of immunocompetent mice with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) normally results in fatal CD8+ T cell mediated meningoencephalitis. However, in CXCL10-deficient mice, the virus-induced CD8+ T cell accumulation in the neural parenchyma is impaired, and only 30-50% ...

  14. The immune response in the CNS in Theiler's virus induced demyelinating disease switches from an early adaptive response to a chronic innate-like response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilli, Francesca; Li, Libin; Pachner, Andrew R

    2016-02-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) is an important model of the progressive disability caused by irreversible CNS tissue injury, and provides an example of how a CNS pathogen can cause inflammation, demyelination, and neuronal damage. We were interested in which molecules, especially inflammatory mediators, might be upregulated in the CNS throughout TMEV-IDD. We quantitated by a real-time RT-PCR multi-gene system the expression of a pathway-focused panel of genes at 30 and 165 days post infection, characterizing both the early inflammatory and the late neurodegenerative stages of TMEV-IDD. Also, we measured 32 cytokines/chemokines by multiplex Luminex analysis in CSF specimens from early and late TMEV-IDD as well as sham-treated mice. Results indicate that, in the later stage of TMEV-IDD, activation of the innate immune response is most prominent: TLRs, type I IFN response genes, and innate immunity-associated cytokines were highly expressed in late TMEV-IDD compared to sham (p ≤ 0.0001) and early TMEV-IDD (p disease to different extents. CSF provides an optimal source of biomarkers of CNS neuroinflammation.

  15. Virus-induced airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness in the guinea-pig is inhibited by levodropropizine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folkerts, G; van der Linde, H J; Omini, C; Nijkamp, F P

    1993-08-01

    Intratracheal Parainfluenza type 3 (PI-3) virus inoculation of guinea pigs leads to a non-specific airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo and in vitro which coincides with a significant increase in the number of inflammatory cells in the broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (90% increase, 4 days after inoculation). The activity of the bronchoalveolar cells, as measured by the chemiluminescence production of infected animals is significantly diminished (34.2%, 4 days after inoculation) after renewed stimulation with PI-3 virus in vitro as compared to the chemiluminescence production by bronchoalveolar cells obtained from control guinea pigs. Pretreatment of the guinea-pigs with the antitussive agent levodropropizine, administered intra-peritoneally twice a day for five successive days at a dose of 10 mg/kg, prevents the virus-induced airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo and in vitro, and inhibits the influx of broncho-alveolar cells. Levodropropizine at a dose of 1 mg/kg did not modulate these responses. Further, the decrease in chemiluminescence production of broncho-alveolar cells obtained from virus-infected animals after PI-3 virus stimulation in vitro was inhibited by levodropropizine (10 mg/kg). These data demonstrate the ability of levodropropizine to counteract the hyperresponsiveness phenomenon and the associated inflammatory event induced by PI-3 virus, an effect which may be due to its capacity to act on the peptidergic system or may be due to the anti-allergic/bronchoconstrictor property of this compound.

  16. Outer nuclear membrane fusion of adjacent nuclei in varicella-zoster virus-induced syncytia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Yang, Lianwei; Huang, Xiumin; Fu, Wenkun; Pan, Dequan; Cai, Linli; Ye, Jianghui; Liu, Jian; Xia, Ningshao; Cheng, Tong; Zhu, Hua

    2017-12-01

    Syncytia formation has been considered important for cell-to-cell spread and pathogenesis of many viruses. As a syncytium forms, individual nuclei often congregate together, allowing close contact of nuclear membranes and possibly fusion to occur. However, there is currently no reported evidence of nuclear membrane fusion between adjacent nuclei in wild-type virus-induced syncytia. Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is one typical syncytia-inducing virus that causes chickenpox and shingles in humans. Here, we report, for the first time, an interesting observation of apparent fusion of the outer nuclear membranes from juxtaposed nuclei that comprise VZV syncytia both in ARPE-19 human epithelial cells in vitro and in human skin xenografts in the SCID-hu mouse model in vivo. This work reveals a novel aspect of VZV-related cytopathic effect in the context of multinucleated syncytia. Additionally, the information provided by this study could be helpful for future studies on interactions of viruses with host cell nuclei. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inflammatory cytokine-mediated evasion of virus-induced tumors from NK cell control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Polic, Bojan; Welsh, Raymond M; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2013-07-15

    Infections with DNA tumor viruses, including members of the polyomavirus family, often result in tumor formation in immune-deficient hosts. The complex control involved in antiviral and antitumor immune responses during these infections can be studied in murine polyomavirus (PyV)-infected mice as a model. We found that NK cells efficiently kill cells derived from PyV-induced salivary gland tumors in vitro in an NKG2D (effector cell)-RAE-1 (target cell)-dependent manner; but in T cell-deficient mice, NK cells only delay but do not prevent the development of PyV-induced tumors. In this article, we show that the PyV-induced tumors have infiltrating functional NK cells. The freshly removed tumors, however, lack surface RAE-1 expression, and the tumor tissues produce soluble factors that downregulate RAE-1. These factors include the proinflammatory cytokines IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-33, and TNF. Each of these cytokines downregulates RAE-1 expression and susceptibility to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity. CD11b(+)F4/80(+) macrophages infiltrating the PyV-induced tumors produce high amounts of IL-1β and TNF. Thus, our data suggest a new mechanism whereby inflammatory cytokines generated in the tumor environment lead to evasion of NK cell-mediated control of virus-induced tumors.

  18. Mouse models of multiple sclerosis: experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Derrick P; Richards, Maureen H; Miller, Stephen D

    2012-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler's Murine Encephalitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) are two clinically relevant murine models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, both are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the CNS and demyelination. EAE is induced by either the administration of myelin protein or peptide in adjuvant or by the adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic T cell blasts into naïve recipients. The relative merits of each of these protocols are compared. Depending on the type of question being asked, different mouse strains and peptides are used. Different disease courses are observed with different strains and different peptides in active EAE. These variations are also addressed. Additionally, issues relevant to clinical grading of EAE in mice are discussed. In addition to EAE induction, useful references for other disease indicators such as DTH, in vitro proliferation, and immunohistochemistry are provided. TMEV-IDD is a useful model for understanding the possible viral etiology of MS. This section provides detailed information on the preparation of viral stocks and subsequent intracerebral infection of mice. Additionally, virus plaque assay and clinical disease assessment are discussed. Recently, recombinant TMEV strains have been created for the study of molecular mimicry which incorporate various 30 amino acid myelin epitopes within the leader region of TMEV.

  19. Cure of Chronic Viral Infection and Virus-Induced Type 1 Diabetes by Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Ejrnaes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of neutralizing antibodies is one of the most successful methods to interfere with receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. In particular blockade of soluble inflammatory mediators or their corresponding cellular receptors was proven an effective way to regulate inflammation and/or prevent its negative consequences. However, one problem that comes along with an effective neutralization of inflammatory mediators is the general systemic immunomodulatory effect. It is therefore important to design a treatment regimen in a way to strike at the right place and at the right time in order to achieve maximal effects with minimal duration of immunosuppression or hyperactivation. In this review we reflect on two examples of how short time administration of such neutralizing antibodies can block two distinct inflammatory consequences of viral infection. First, we review recent findings that blockade of IL-10/IL-10R interaction can resolve chronic viral infection and second, we reflect on how neutralization of the chemokine CXCL10 can abrogate virus-induced type 1 diabetes.

  20. A New Mechanism of Vitamin C Effects on A/FM/1/47(H1N1 Virus-Induced Pneumonia in Restraint-Stressed Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Cai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that vitamin C could protect against influenza infection, but little is known about the mechanisms. This study aimed to investigate the influence and possible mechanisms of vitamin C on pneumonia induced by influenza virus in stressed mice. Results showed that restraint stress significantly increased the mortality and the severity of pneumonia in mice caused by A/FM/1/47(H1N1 virus infection, which was attenuated by oral administration of vitamin C (125 and 250 mg/kg. Moreover, vitamin C administration significantly decreased expression of susceptibility genes, including mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS and interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3, and increased expression of NF-κB. These work in conjunction to induce type I interferons (IFNs and elicit innate antiviral response as key factors in RIG-I-mediated signal transduction pathway. The above effects of vitamin C were further found to relate with inhibition of excess CORT synthesis by regulating steroid hydroxylating enzymes in adrenal gland. In conclusion, the protective effects of vitamin C on influenza virus-caused pneumonia might be related to its inhibition of CORT synthesis, which reduces the susceptibility to influenza viral infection in restraint-stressed mice. These findings provide a new mechanism for the effects of vitamin C on influenza virus-induced pneumonia in restraint-stressed mice.

  1. Latitudinal variation in virus-induced mortality of phytoplankton across the North Atlantic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojica, Kristina D A; Huisman, Jef; Wilhelm, Steven W; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2016-02-01

    Viral lysis of phytoplankton constrains marine primary production, food web dynamics and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Yet, little is known about the biogeographical distribution of viral lysis rates across the global ocean. To address this, we investigated phytoplankton group-specific viral lysis rates along a latitudinal gradient within the North Atlantic Ocean. The data show large-scale distribution patterns of different virus groups across the North Atlantic that are associated with the biogeographical distributions of their potential microbial hosts. Average virus-mediated lysis rates of the picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus were lower than those of the picoeukaryotic and nanoeukaryotic phytoplankton (that is, 0.14 per day compared with 0.19 and 0.23 per day, respectively). Total phytoplankton mortality (virus plus grazer-mediated) was comparable to the gross growth rate, demonstrating high turnover rates of phytoplankton populations. Virus-induced mortality was an important loss process at low and mid latitudes, whereas phytoplankton mortality was dominated by microzooplankton grazing at higher latitudes (>56°N). This shift from a viral-lysis-dominated to a grazing-dominated phytoplankton community was associated with a decrease in temperature and salinity, and the decrease in viral lysis rates was also associated with increased vertical mixing at higher latitudes. Ocean-climate models predict that surface warming will lead to an expansion of the stratified and oligotrophic regions of the world's oceans. Our findings suggest that these future shifts in the regional climate of the ocean surface layer are likely to increase the contribution of viral lysis to phytoplankton mortality in the higher-latitude waters of the North Atlantic, which may potentially reduce transfer of matter and energy up the food chain and thus affect the capacity of the northern North Atlantic to act as a long-term sink for CO2.

  2. Canine distemper virus induces apoptosis in cervical tumor derived cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajão Daniela S

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Apoptosis can be induced or inhibited by viral proteins, it can form part of the host defense against virus infection, or it can be a mechanism for viral spread to neighboring cells. Canine distemper virus (CDV induces apoptotic cells in lymphoid tissues and in the cerebellum of dogs naturally infected. CDV also produces a cytopathologic effect, leading to apoptosis in Vero cells in tissue culture. We tested canine distemper virus, a member of the Paramyxoviridae family, for the ability to trigger apoptosis in HeLa cells, derived from cervical cancer cells resistant to apoptosis. To study the effect of CDV infection in HeLa cells, we examined apoptotic markers 24 h post infection (pi, by flow cytometry assay for DNA fragmentation, real-time PCR assay for caspase-3 and caspase-8 mRNA expression, and by caspase-3 and -8 immunocytochemistry. Flow cytometry showed that DNA fragmentation was induced in HeLa cells infected by CDV, and immunocytochemistry revealed a significant increase in the levels of the cleaved active form of caspase-3 protein, but did not show any difference in expression of caspase-8, indicating an intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Confirming this observation, expression of caspase-3 mRNA was higher in CDV infected HeLa cells than control cells; however, there was no statistically significant change in caspase-8 mRNA expression profile. Our data suggest that canine distemper virus induced apoptosis in HeLa cells, triggering apoptosis by the intrinsic pathway, with no participation of the initiator caspase -8 from the extrinsic pathway. In conclusion, the cellular stress caused by CDV infection of HeLa cells, leading to apoptosis, can be used as a tool in future research for cervical cancer treatment and control.

  3. Virus-induced enhancement of arachidonate metabolism by bovine alveolar macrophages in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laegreid, W.W.; Taylor, S.M.; Leid, R.W.; Silflow, R.M.; Evermann, J.R.; Breeze, R.G.; Liggitt, H.D.

    1989-04-01

    Virus infection of alveolar macrophages both in vivo and in vitro has been associated with a variety of changes in cellular function. Some of these changes are identical to the effects that arachidonate-derived mediators, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, and hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids, have on macrophage function. Virus infection of macrophages has been previously shown to increase the output of some arachidonate metabolites, most notably PGE2. However, the effect of virus infection on arachidonate metabolism in general has not been well described. In our experiments, primary cultures of alveolar macrophages obtained from normal cattle by bronchoalveolar lavage, were infected in vitro with parainfluenza type 3 virus. At days 0 to 4 post-infection (p.i.) these cells were labelled with 3H-arachidonic acid and stimulated with either serum-coated zymosan, the calcium ionophore A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate. The complete spectrum of arachidonate-derived metabolites was determined by reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatography with UV and on-line radiometric monitoring of column eluant. The total output of metabolites of arachidonic acid by virus-infected alveolar macrophages was increased over that of noninfected controls (with all stimuli tested) by day 4 p.i. (P less than or equal to 0.05). The production of metabolites by the cyclooxygenase, 12- and 5-lipoxygenase enzyme systems was significantly increased, as was the release of 3H-arachidonate. The lack of stimulus specificity and the increases in arachidonate release suggest that greater substrate availability, due either to increased phospholipase activity or direct virus-membrane interaction, may be responsible for the virus-induced enhancement of metabolite output.

  4. Woodchuck hepatitis virus-induced carcinoma as a relevant natural model for therapy of human hepatoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouillat, C; Manganas, D; Zoulim, F; Vitrey, D; Saguier, G; Guillaud, M; Ain, J F; Duque-Campos, R; Jamard, C; Praves, M; Trepo, C

    1997-06-01

    Eastern American woodchuck (Marmota monax), naturally infected with woodchuck hepatitis virus, a virus similar to human hepatitis B virus, develops liver cancer with a high prevalence. The aim of this work was to assess Marmota monax as a model of human hepatocellular carcinoma, especially to assess new potential adjuvant therapies after surgical resection. Forty-four woodchuck hepatitis virus-infected animals were regularly screened by ultrasound examination from the age of 18 months and for a 30-month period. One or more liver tumors were diagnosed in 31 animals (70%). Five of them with multifocal tumor or poor general status were considered unsuitable for surgery. The other 26 were operated on. At laparotomy no tumor was found in three. The 18 liver tumors studied were hepatocellular carcinomas, grossly and microscopically similar to human hepatocellular carcinoma. Peritumoral parenchyma studied in 13 specimens was always non-cirrhotic but adequate staining demonstrated patterns of fibrosis in four cases. Clear evidence of chronic active hepatitis, periportal hepatitis and steatosis were demonstrated in five, seven and one of the 13 specimens, respectively. Tumors were treated by tumorectomy in eight animals, by alcoholization in seven and by laser photocoagulation in one. A simple tumor biopsy was performed in the other seven. Ten animals died postoperatively. All the survivors in the tumorectomy group died from tumor recurrence within 10-18 months after surgery. It is concluded that woodchuck hepatitis virus-induced liver carcinoma is a natural model of human hepatocellular carcinoma with similar pathology and natural history, including early ultrasonic detection and tumor recurrence after resection. Tumor excision is feasible in this animal model, which now provides the basis for assessment of new potential adjuvant therapies for human hepatocellular carcinoma in an attempt to reduce the high recurrence rate after surgical resection in humans.

  5. CLEC5A regulates Japanese encephalitis virus-induced neuroinflammation and lethality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available CLEC5A/MDL-1, a member of the myeloid C-type lectin family expressed on macrophages and neutrophils, is critical for dengue virus (DV-induced hemorrhagic fever and shock syndrome in Stat1⁻/⁻ mice and ConA-treated wild type mice. However, whether CLEC5A is involved in the pathogenesis of viral encephalitis has not yet been investigated. To investigate the role of CLEC5A to regulate JEV-induced neuroinflammation, antagonistic anti-CLEC5A mAb and CLEC5A-deficient mice were generated. We find that Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV directly interacts with CLEC5A and induces DAP12 phosphorylation in macrophages. In addition, JEV activates macrophages to secrete proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, which are dramatically reduced in JEV-infected Clec5a⁻/⁻ macrophages. Although blockade of CLEC5A cannot inhibit JEV infection of neurons and astrocytes, anti-CLEC5A mAb inhibits JEV-induced proinflammatory cytokine release from microglia and prevents bystander damage to neuronal cells. Moreover, JEV causes blood-brain barrier (BBB disintegrity and lethality in STAT1-deficient (Stat1⁻/⁻ mice, whereas peripheral administration of anti-CLEC5A mAb reduces infiltration of virus-harboring leukocytes into the central nervous system (CNS, restores BBB integrity, attenuates neuroinflammation, and protects mice from JEV-induced lethality. Moreover, all surviving mice develop protective humoral and cellular immunity against JEV infection. These observations demonstrate the critical role of CLEC5A in the pathogenesis of Japanese encephalitis, and identify CLEC5A as a target for the development of new treatments to reduce virus-induced brain damage.

  6. Polyoma virus-induced osteosarcomas in inbred strains of mice: host determinants of metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palanivel Velupillai

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The mouse polyoma virus induces a broad array of solid tumors in mice of many inbred strains. In most strains tumors grow rapidly but fail to metastasize. An exception has been found in the Czech-II/Ei mouse in which bone tumors metastasize regularly to the lung. These tumors resemble human osteosarcoma in their propensity for pulmonary metastasis. Cell lines established from these metastatic tumors have been compared with ones from non-metastatic osteosarcomas arising in C3H/BiDa mice. Osteopontin, a chemokine implicated in migration and metastasis, is known to be transcriptionally induced by the viral middle T antigen. Czech-II/Ei and C3H/BiDa tumor cells expressed middle T and secreted osteopontin at comparable levels as the major chemoattractant. The tumor cell lines migrated equally well in response to recombinant osteopontin as the sole attractant. An important difference emerged in assays for invasion in which tumor cells from Czech-II/Ei mice were able to invade across an extracellular matrix barrier while those from C3H/BiDa mice were unable to invade. Invasive behavior was linked to elevated levels of the metalloproteinase MMP-2 and of the transcription factor NFAT. Inhibition of either MMP-2 or NFAT inhibited invasion by Czech-II/Ei osteosarcoma cells. The metastatic phenotype is dominant in F1 mice. Osteosarcoma cell lines from F1 mice expressed intermediate levels of MMP-2 and NFAT and were invasive. Osteosarcomas in Czech-II/Ei mice retain functional p53. This virus-host model of metastasis differs from engineered models targeting p53 or pRb and provides a system for investigating the genetic and molecular basis of bone tumor metastasis in the absence of p53 loss.

  7. A conserved virus-induced cytoplasmic TRAMP-like complex recruits the exosome to target viral RNA for degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molleston, Jerome M.; Sabin, Leah R.; Moy, Ryan H.; Menghani, Sanjay V.; Rausch, Keiko; Gordesky-Gold, Beth; Hopkins, Kaycie C.; Zhou, Rui; Jensen, Torben Heick; Wilusz, Jeremy E.; Cherry, Sara

    2016-01-01

    RNA degradation is tightly regulated to selectively target aberrant RNAs, including viral RNA, but this regulation is incompletely understood. Through RNAi screening in Drosophila cells, we identified the 3′-to-5′ RNA exosome and two components of the exosome cofactor TRAMP (Trf4/5–Air1/2–Mtr4 polyadenylation) complex, dMtr4 and dZcchc7, as antiviral against a panel of RNA viruses. We extended our studies to human orthologs and found that the exosome as well as TRAMP components hMTR4 and hZCCHC7 are antiviral. While hMTR4 and hZCCHC7 are normally nuclear, infection by cytoplasmic RNA viruses induces their export, forming a cytoplasmic complex that specifically recognizes and induces degradation of viral mRNAs. Furthermore, the 3′ untranslated region (UTR) of bunyaviral mRNA is sufficient to confer virus-induced exosomal degradation. Altogether, our results reveal that signals from viral infection repurpose TRAMP components to a cytoplasmic surveillance role where they selectively engage viral RNAs for degradation to restrict a broad range of viruses. PMID:27474443

  8. Baculovirus vectors expressing F proteins in combination with virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA) molecules confer protection against respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Qiao, Lei; Hu, Xiao; Zhao, Kang; Zhang, Yanwen; Chai, Feng; Pan, Zishu

    2016-01-04

    Baculovirus has been exploited for use as a novel vaccine vector. To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of recombinant baculoviruses (rBVs) expressing respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) proteins, four constructs (Bac-tF/64, Bac-CF, Bac-CF/tF64 and Bac-CF/tF64-VISA) were generated. Bac-tF64 displays the F ectodomain (tF) on the envelope of rBVs, whereas Bac-CF expresses full-length F protein in transduced mammalian cells. Bac-CF/tF64 not only displays tF on the envelope but also expresses F in cells. Bac-CF/tF64-VISA comprises Bac-CF/tF64 harboring the virus-induced signaling adaptor (VISA) gene. After administration to BALB/c mice, all four vectors elicited RSV neutralizing antibody (Ab), systemic Ab (IgG, IgG1, and IgG2a), and cytokine responses. Compared with Bac-tF64, mice inoculated with Bac-CF and Bac-CF/tF64 exhibited an increased mixed Th1/Th2 cytokine response, increased ratios of IgG2a/IgG1 antibody responses, and reduced immunopathology upon RSV challenge. Intriguingly, co-expression of VISA reduced Th2 cytokine (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-10) production induced by Bac-CF/tF64, thus relieving lung pathology upon a subsequent RSV challenge. Our results indicated that the Bac-CF/tF64 vector incorporated with the VISA molecule may provide an effective vaccine strategy for protection against RSV. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Transcriptome Analysis of Capsicum Chlorosis Virus-Induced Hypersensitive Resistance Response in Bell Capsicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirani M K Widana Gamage

    Full Text Available Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV is an emerging pathogen of capsicum, tomato and peanut crops in Australia and South-East Asia. Commercial capsicum cultivars with CaCV resistance are not yet available, but CaCV resistance identified in Capsicum chinense is being introgressed into commercial Bell capsicum. However, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to the resistance response to CaCV infection is limited. Therefore, transcriptome and expression profiling data provide an important resource to better understand CaCV resistance mechanisms.We assembled capsicum transcriptomes and analysed gene expression using Illumina HiSeq platform combined with a tag-based digital gene expression system. Total RNA extracted from CaCV/mock inoculated CaCV resistant (R and susceptible (S capsicum at the time point when R line showed a strong hypersensitive response to CaCV infection was used in transcriptome assembly. Gene expression profiles of R and S capsicum in CaCV- and buffer-inoculated conditions were compared. None of the genes were differentially expressed (DE between R and S cultivars when mock-inoculated, while 2484 genes were DE when inoculated with CaCV. Functional classification revealed that the most highly up-regulated DE genes in R capsicum included pathogenesis-related genes, cell death-associated genes, genes associated with hormone-mediated signalling pathways and genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis of defense-related secondary metabolites. We selected 15 genes to confirm DE expression levels by real-time quantitative PCR.DE transcript profiling data provided comprehensive gene expression information to gain an understanding of the underlying CaCV resistance mechanisms. Further, we identified candidate CaCV resistance genes in the CaCV-resistant C. annuum x C. chinense breeding line. This knowledge will be useful in future for fine mapping of the CaCV resistance locus and potential genetic engineering of resistance into Ca

  10. Tissue-specific deletion of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor protects mice from virus-induced pancreatitis and myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallewaard, Nicole L; Zhang, Lili; Chen, Jin-Wen; Guttenberg, Marta; Sanchez, Melissa D; Bergelson, Jeffrey M

    2009-07-23

    In cultured cells, infection by group B coxsackievirus (CVB) is mediated by the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR), but the importance of this molecule in CVB-induced disease has not been determined. We generated mice with tissue-specific ablation of CAR within each of two major CVB target organs, the pancreas and heart. In the pancreas, deletion of CAR resulted in a significant reduction in both virus titers and virus-induced tissue damage. Similarly, cardiomyocyte-specific CAR deletion resulted in a marked reduction in virus titer, infection-associated cytokine production, and histopathology within the heart. Consistent with the in vivo phenotype, CAR-deficient cardiomyocytes resisted infection in vitro. These results demonstrate a critical function for CAR in the pathogenesis of CVB infection in vivo and in virus tropism for the heart and pancreas.

  11. [Observation of cells tolerant of tobacco mosaic virus in virus-induced local lesions in Datura stramonium L. leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reunov, A V; Lega, S N; Nagorskaia, V P; Lapshina, L A

    2011-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of tobacco mosaic virus-induced local lesions developing in leaves of Datura stramonium plants demonstrated that, in the central area of the lesions, the cell response to viral invasion was not uniform. Most cells exhibited an acute hypersensitive reaction and underwent rapid and complete necrosis. However, some cells, despite considerable virus accumulation and immediate contact with completely collapsed cells, maintained a certain degree of structural integrity. Analysis performed showed that the proportion of collapsed and uncollapsed cells in the lesion centre 3 to 5 days after infection did not change essentially. These data suggest that the absence of hypersensitive response in some cells in the lesion centre is not due to an early stage of infection but is likely caused by cell tolerance of the virus.

  12. Dimethyl fumarate suppresses Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease by modifying the Nrf2-Keap1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Tomiki, Hiroki; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2015-07-01

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) is a modifier of the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-2 (Nrf2)-kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Keap1) pathway. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD) both clinically and histologically. DMF treatment leads to an enhanced Nrf2 antioxidant response in TMEV-IDD mice. DMF treatment in the effector phase significantly suppressed the level of IL-17A mRNA. DMF is known to inhibit differentiation of T helper 17 (Th17) cells via suppressing NF-κB. Taken together, our data suggest that DMF treatment in the effector phase may suppress TMEV-IDD not only via enhancing the antioxidant response but also via suppressing IL-17A. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  13. NK cell activation in human hantavirus infection explained by virus-induced IL-15/IL15Rα expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Monika; Björkström, Niklas K; Gupta, Shawon; Sundström, Karin; Ahlm, Clas; Klingström, Jonas; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf

    2014-11-01

    Clinical infection with hantaviruses cause two severe acute diseases, hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS). These diseases are characterized by strong immune activation, increased vascular permeability, and up to 50% case-fatality rates. One prominent feature observed in clinical hantavirus infection is rapid expansion of natural killer (NK) cells in peripheral blood of affected individuals. We here describe an unusually high state of activation of such expanding NK cells in the acute phase of clinical Puumala hantavirus infection. Expanding NK cells expressed markedly increased levels of activating NK cell receptors and cytotoxic effector molecules. In search for possible mechanisms behind this NK cell activation, we observed virus-induced IL-15 and IL-15Rα on infected endothelial and epithelial cells. Hantavirus-infected cells were shown to strongly activate NK cells in a cell-cell contact-dependent way, and this response was blocked with anti-IL-15 antibodies. Surprisingly, the strength of the IL-15-dependent NK cell response was such that it led to killing of uninfected endothelial cells despite expression of normal levels of HLA class I. In contrast, hantavirus-infected cells were resistant to NK cell lysis, due to a combination of virus-induced increase in HLA class I expression levels and hantavirus-mediated inhibition of apoptosis induction. In summary, we here describe a possible mechanism explaining the massive NK cell activation and proliferation observed in HFRS patients caused by Puumala hantavirus infection. The results add further insights into mechanisms behind the immunopathogenesis of hantavirus infections in humans and identify new possible targets for intervention.

  14. Optimized agroinfiltration and virus-induced gene silencing to study Ve1-mediated Verticillium resistance in tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Z.; Fradin, E.; Jonge, de R.; Esse, van P.; Smit, P.; Liu, C.M.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition of pathogen effectors by plant immune receptors often leads to the activation of a hypersensitive response (HR), which is a rapid and localized cell death of plant tissue surrounding the site at which recognition occurs. Due to its particular amenability to transient assays for

  15. Identification and characterization of small molecule modulators of the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 2 (EBI2) receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gessier, Francois; Preuss, Inga; Yin, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Oxysterols have recently been identified as natural ligands for a G protein-coupled receptor called EBI2 (aka GPR183) ( Nature 2011 , 475 , 524 ; 519 ). EBI2 is highly expressed in immune cells ( J. Biol. Chem. 2006 , 281 , 13199 ), and its activation has been shown to be critical for the adaptiv...

  16. Early life DNA vaccination with the H gene of Canine distemper virus induces robust protection against distemper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Trine Hammer; Nielsen, Line; Aasted, Bent

    2009-01-01

    Young mink kits (n = 8)were vaccinated withDNA plasmids encoding the viral haemagglutinin protein (H) of a vaccine strain of Canine distemper virus (CDV). Virus neutralising (VN) antibodieswere induced after 2 immunisations and after the third immunisation all kits had high VN antibody titres...

  17. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) as a reverse genetic tool to study development of symbiotic root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Gabriela Didina Constantin; Grønlund, Mette; Stougaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    was mediated by agroinfiltration and, 2 weeks later, a Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viceae culture was added in order to induce root nodulation. At this time point, it was estimated that systemic silencing was established because leaves of reference plants inoculated with PEBV carrying a fragment of Phytoene...... desaturase displayed photo bleaching. Three weeks after Rhizobium spp. application, plants inoculated with a control vector nodulated normally, whereas nodulation was almost eliminated in plants inoculated with a vector carrying PsNinA and PsNinC. For plants inoculated with a vector carrying Ps...

  18. Transcriptional changes in canine distemper virus-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis favor a biphasic mode of demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Ulrich

    Full Text Available Canine distemper virus (CDV-induced demyelinating leukoencephalitis in dogs (Canis familiaris is suggested to represent a naturally occurring translational model for subacute sclerosing panencephalitis and multiple sclerosis in humans. The aim of this study was a hypothesis-free microarray analysis of the transcriptional changes within cerebellar specimens of five cases of acute, six cases of subacute demyelinating, and three cases of chronic demyelinating and inflammatory CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to twelve non-infected control dogs. Frozen cerebellar specimens were used for analysis of histopathological changes including demyelination, transcriptional changes employing microarrays, and presence of CDV nucleoprotein RNA and protein using microarrays, RT-qPCR and immunohistochemistry. Microarray analysis revealed 780 differentially expressed probe sets. The dominating change was an up-regulation of genes related to the innate and the humoral immune response, and less distinct the cytotoxic T-cell-mediated immune response in all subtypes of CDV leukoencephalitis as compared to controls. Multiple myelin genes including myelin basic protein and proteolipid protein displayed a selective down-regulation in subacute CDV leukoencephalitis, suggestive of an oligodendrocyte dystrophy. In contrast, a marked up-regulation of multiple immunoglobulin-like expressed sequence tags and the delta polypeptide of the CD3 antigen was observed in chronic CDV leukoencephalitis, in agreement with the hypothesis of an immune-mediated demyelination in the late inflammatory phase of the disease. Analysis of pathways intimately linked to demyelination as determined by morphometry employing correlation-based Gene Set Enrichment Analysis highlighted the pathomechanistic importance of up-regulated genes comprised by the gene ontology terms "viral replication" and "humoral immune response" as well as down-regulated genes functionally related to "metabolite and energy

  19. Replication and virus-induced transcriptome of HAdV-5 in normal host cells versus cancer cells--differences of relevance for adenoviral oncolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik E Dorer

    Full Text Available Adenoviruses (Ads, especially HAdV-5, have been genetically equipped with tumor-restricted replication potential to enable applications in oncolytic cancer therapy. Such oncolytic adenoviruses have been well tolerated in cancer patients, but their anti-tumor efficacy needs to be enhanced. In this regard, it should be considered that cancer cells, dependent on their tissue of origin, can differ substantially from the normal host cells to which Ads are adapted by complex virus-host interactions. Consequently, viral replication efficiency, a key determinant of oncolytic activity, might be suboptimal in cancer cells. Therefore, we have analyzed both the replication kinetics of HAdV-5 and the virus-induced transcriptome in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC in comparison to cancer cells. This is the first report on genome-wide expression profiling of Ads in their native host cells. We found that E1A expression and onset of viral genome replication are most rapid in HBEC and considerably delayed in melanoma cells. In squamous cell lung carcinoma cells, we observed intermediate HAdV-5 replication kinetics. Infectious particle production, viral spread and lytic activity of HAdV-5 were attenuated in melanoma cells versus HBEC. Expression profiling at the onset of viral genome replication revealed that HAdV-5 induced the strongest changes in the cellular transcriptome in HBEC, followed by lung cancer and melanoma cells. We identified prominent regulation of genes involved in cell cycle and DNA metabolism, replication and packaging in HBEC, which is in accord with the necessity to induce S phase for viral replication. Strikingly, in melanoma cells HAdV-5 triggered opposing regulation of said genes and, in contrast to lung cancer cells, no weak S phase induction was detected when using the E2F promoter as reporter. Our results provide a rationale for improving oncolytic adenoviruses either by adaptation of viral infection to target tumor cells or by

  20. Identification and validation of a virus-inducible ta-siRNA-generating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Trans-acting small interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) are a class of endogenous small RNA, associated with posttranscriptional gene silencing. Their biogenesis requires an initial microRNA (miRNA)-mediated cleavage of precursor RNA. Around 20 different ta-siRNA-producing loci (TASs), whose sequences are conserved, are ...

  1. Wild-type rabies virus induces autophagy in human and mouse neuroblastoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiaojiao; Zhu, Shenghe; Hu, Lili; Ye, Pingping; Wang, Yifei; Tian, Qin; Mei, Mingzhu; Chen, Hao; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2016-10-02

    Different rabies virus (RABV) strains have their own biological characteristics, but little is known about their respective impact on autophagy. Therefore, we evaluated whether attenuated RABV HEP-Flury and wild-type RABV GD-SH-01 strains triggered autophagy. We found that GD-SH-01 infection significantly increased the number of autophagy-like vesicles, the accumulation of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-LC3 fluorescence puncta and the conversion of LC3-I to LC3-II, while HEP-Flury was not able to induce this phenomenon. When evaluating autophagic flux, we found that GD-SH-01 infection triggers a complete autophagic response in the human neuroblastoma cell line (SK), while autophagosome fusion with lysosomes was inhibited in a mouse neuroblastoma cell line (NA). In these cells, GD-SH-01 led to apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction while triggering autophagy, and apoptosis could be decreased by enhancing autophagy. To further identify the virus constituent causing autophagy, 5 chimeric recombinant viruses carrying single genes of HEP-Flury instead of those of GD-SH-01 were rescued. While the HEP-Flury virus carrying the wild-type matrix protein (M) gene of RABV triggered LC3-I to LC3-II conversion in SK and NA cells, replacement of genes of nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P) and glycoprotein (G) produced only minor autophagy. But no one single structural protein of GD-SH-01 induced autophagy. Moreover, the AMPK signaling pathway was activated by GD-SH-01 in SK. Therefore, our data provide strong evidence that autophagy is induced by GD-SH-01 and can decrease apoptosis in vitro. Furthermore, the M gene of GD-SH-01 may cooperatively induce autophagy.

  2. Hepatitis-C-virus-induced microRNAs dampen interferon-mediated antiviral signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarret, Abigail; McFarland, Adelle P; Horner, Stacy M; Kell, Alison; Schwerk, Johannes; Hong, MeeAe; Badil, Samantha; Joslyn, Rochelle C; Baker, Darren P; Carrington, Mary; Hagedorn, Curt H; Gale, Michael; Savan, Ram

    2016-12-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects 200 million people globally, and 60-80% of cases persist as a chronic infection that will progress to cirrhosis and liver cancer in 2-10% of patients. We recently demonstrated that HCV induces aberrant expression of two host microRNAs (miRNAs), miR-208b and miR-499a-5p, encoded by myosin genes in infected hepatocytes. These miRNAs, along with AU-rich-element-mediated decay, suppress IFNL2 and IFNL3, members of the type III interferon (IFN) gene family, to support viral persistence. In this study, we show that miR-208b and miR-499a-5p also dampen type I IFN signaling in HCV-infected hepatocytes by directly down-regulating expression of the type I IFN receptor chain, IFNAR1. Inhibition of these miRNAs by using miRNA inhibitors during HCV infection increased expression of IFNAR1. Additionally, inhibition rescued the antiviral response to exogenous type I IFN, as measured by a marked increase in IFN-stimulated genes and a decrease in HCV load. Treatment of HCV-infected hepatocytes with type I IFN increased expression of myosins over HCV infection alone. Since these miRNAs can suppress type III IFN family members, these data collectively define a novel cross-regulation between type I and III IFNs during HCV infection.

  3. IRES-dependent translational control during virus-induced endoplasmic reticulum stress and apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul eHanson

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Many virus infections and stresses can induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress response, a host self defense mechanism against viral invasion and stress. During this event, viral and cellular gene expression is actively regulated and often encounters a switching of the translation initiation from cap-dependent to IRES (internal ribosome entry sites-dependent. This switching is largely dependent on the mRNA structure of the 5’untranslated region (5’UTR and on the particular stress stimuli. Picornviruses and some other viruses contain an IRES within their 5’UTR of viral genome and employ an IRES-driven mechanism for translation initiation. Recently, a growing number of cellular genes involved in growth control, cell cycle progression and apoptosis were also found to contain one or more IRES within their long highly structured 5’UTRs. These genes initiate translation usually by a cap-dependent mechanism under normal physiological conditions; however, in certain environments, such as infection, starvation and heat shock they shift translation initiation to an IRES-dependent modality. Although the molecular mechanism is not entirely understood, a number of studies have revealed that several cellular biochemical processes are responsible for the switching of translation initiation to IRES-dependent. These include the cleavage of translation initiation factors by viral and/or host proteases, phosphorylation (inactivation of host factors for translation initiation, over-production of homologous proteins of cap-binding protein eIF4E, suppression of cap-binding protein eIF4E expression by specific microRNA, activation of enzymes for mRNA decapping, as well as others. Here, we summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms for the switching of translation initiation, particularly for the proteins involved in cell survival and apoptosis in the ER stress pathways during viral infections.

  4. PTEN: A potential prognostic marker in virus-induced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalid, Ayesha; Hussain, Tabinda; Manzoor, Sobia; Saalim, Muhammad; Khaliq, Saba

    2017-06-01

    PTEN is the second most frequently mutated tumor suppresser gene in cancers after p53. Genetic and epigenetic alterations in the PTEN gene and its regulatory regions have been reported in various studies. PTEN is a crucial downregulator of the pro-survival phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin pathway and also suppresses insulin signaling. Failure to regulate these pathways leads to increase in cell proliferation and migration which in turn promotes tumorigenesis. PTEN underexpression is mediated by a variety of cytokines and stress kinases which seem to collectively induce the RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. In the context of hepatocellular carcinoma, reduced expression of PTEN is seen in nearly half of the cases on average. In some cases, PTEN has been observed to be either mutated or methylated which can also lead to reduced expression or in some cases, complete loss of expression. On the cellular level, PTEN is also a target in the pathogenic pathway of hepatitis C virus core protein and hepatitis B virus X protein. These viruses appear to alter PTEN regulation and pro-apoptotic ability to enhance the process of tumor formation. In perspective of the crucial role PTEN plays in balancing proliferation and apoptosis, we propose PTEN as a valuable marker in the diagnosis, assessment of tumor grade, and disease stage in hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

  5. Decreased Diversity of the Oral Microbiota of Patients with Hepatitis B Virus-Induced Chronic Liver Disease: A Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Zongxin; Liu, Xia; Cheng, Yiwen; Jiang, Xiawei; Jiang, Haiyin; Wang, Yuezhu; Li, Lanjuan

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that altered gut microbiota is implicated in the pathogenesis of hepatitis B virus-induced chronic liver disease (HBV-CLD). However, the structure and composition of the oral microbiota of patients with HBV-CLD remains unclear. High-throughput pyrosequencing showed that decreased oral bacterial diversity was found in patients with HBV-CLD. The Firmicutes/Bacteroidetes ratio was increased significantly, which indicated that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota participated in the process of HBV-CLD development. However, the changing patterns of the oral microbiota in patients with HBV-induced liver cirrhosis (LC) were almost similar to patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). HBV infection resulted in an increase in potential H2S- and CH3SH-producing phylotypes such as Fusobacterium, Filifactor, Eubacterium, Parvimonas and Treponema, which might contribute to the increased oral malodor. These key oral-derived phylotypes might invade into the gut as opportunistic pathogens and contribute to altering the composition of the gut microbiota. This study provided important clues that dysbiosis of the oral microbiota might be involved in the development of HBV-CLD. Greater understanding of the relationships between the dysbiosis of oral microbiota and the development of HBV-CLD might facilitate the development of non-invasive differential diagnostic procedures and targeted treatments of HBV-CLD patients harbouring specific oral phylotypes. PMID:26606973

  6. Therapeutic effect of anti-αv integrin mAb on Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomiki, Hiroki; Kaneyama, Tomoki; Kobayashi, Kunitoshi; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-03-15

    We examined the regulatory role of αv integrins in the development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD), a model of multiple sclerosis (MS). Blockade of αv integrins by anti-αv integrin monoclonal antibody (mAb) in the effector phase significantly suppressed the development of TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. The number of infiltrating mononuclear cells (MNCs) in the CNS was significantly decreased in mice treated with anti-αv integrin mAb. Flow cytometric analysis of cytokine staining revealed that absolute numbers of IFN-γ- and IL-17-producing CD4+ and IFN-γ-producing CD8+ T cells were significantly decreased in the CNS of mice treated with anti-αv integrin mAb. These data suggest that αv integrins may play important roles in the development of TMEV-IDD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Mouse Models of Multiple Sclerosis: Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis and Theiler’s Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Derrick P.; Richards, Maureen H.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) and Theiler’s Murine Encephalitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease (TMEV-IDD) are two clinically relevant murine models of multiple sclerosis (MS). Like MS, both are characterized by mononuclear cell infiltration into the CNS and demyelination. EAE is induced by either the administration of myelin protein or peptide in adjuvant or by the adoptive transfer of encephalitogenic T cell blasts into naïve recipients. The relative merits of each of these protocols are compared. Depending on the type of question being asked, different mouse strains and peptides are used. Different disease courses are observed with different strains and different peptides in active EAE. These variations are also addressed. Additionally, issues relevant to clinical grading of EAE in mice are discussed. In addition to EAE induction, useful references for other disease indicators such as DTH, in vitro proliferation, and immunohistochemistry are provided. TMEV-IDD is a useful model for understanding the possible viral etiology of MS. This section provides detailed information on the preparation of viral stocks and subsequent intracerebral infection of mice. Additionally, virus plaque assay and clinical disease assessment are discussed. Recently, recombinant TMEV strains have been created for the study of molecular mimicry which incorporate various 30 amino acid myelin epitopes within the leader region of TMEV. PMID:22933080

  8. Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee Considerations Regarding the Use of Virus-Induced Carcinogenesis and Oncolytic Viral Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Stephanie D; Hickman-Davis, Judy M; Bergdall, Valerie K

    2016-01-01

    The use of virus-induced carcinogenesis and oncologic experimental animal models is essential in understanding the mechanisms of cancer development to advance prevention, diagnosis, and treatment methods. The Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee (IACUC) is responsible for both the complex philosophical and practical considerations associated with animal models of cancer. Animal models of cancer carry their own unique issues that require special consideration from the IACUC. Many of the considerations to be discussed apply to cancer models in general; specific issues related to viral carcinogenesis or oncolytic viruses will be specifically discussed as they arise. Responsible animal use integrates good science, humane care, and regulatory compliance. To meet those standards, the IACUC, in conjunction with the research investigator and attending veterinarian, must address a wide range of issues, including animal model selection, cancer model selection, humane end point considerations, experimental considerations, postapproval monitoring, reporting requirements, and animal management and personnel safety considerations. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Possible therapeutic effect of orally administered ribavirin for respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome in an immunocompetent patient: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Byung Woo; Lee, Seung Hyeun

    2017-12-20

    Human respiratory syncytial virus usually causes self-limiting upper respiratory infection and occasionally causes pneumonia in immunocompromised hosts. Respiratory syncytial virus-induced severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome in immunocompetent adults has been rarely described. Unfortunately, optimal treatment has not been established for this potentially fatal condition. We report a case of respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome occurring in a previously healthy man successfully treated with orally administered ribavirin. An 81-year-old previously healthy Korean man presented with cough, dyspnea, and febrile sensation. He had hypoxemia with diffuse ground glass opacity evident on chest radiography, which progressed and required mechanical ventilation. All microbiological tests were negative except multiplex real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction using respiratory specimen, which was positive for human adenovirus. Under the diagnosis of respiratory syncytial virus-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome, orally administered ribavirin was administered and he recuperated completely without complications. This case demonstrates the potential usefulness of orally administered ribavirin as a therapeutic option for severe respiratory syncytial virus infection, at least in an immunocompetent host.

  10. Mumps virus-induced innate immune responses in mouse Sertoli and Leydig cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Han; Shi, Lili; Wang, Qing; Cheng, Lijing; Zhao, Xiang; Chen, Qiaoyuan; Jiang, Qian; Feng, Min; Li, Qihan; Han, Daishu

    2016-01-18

    Mumps virus (MuV) infection frequently causes orchitis and impairs male fertility. However, the mechanisms underlying the innate immune responses to MuV infection in the testis have yet to be investigated. This study showed that MuV induced innate immune responses in mouse Sertoli and Leydig cells through TLR2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signaling, which result in the production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, including TNF-α, IL-6, MCP-1, CXCL10, and type 1 interferons (IFN-α and IFN-β). By contrast, MuV did not induce the cytokine production in male germ cells. In response to MuV infection, Sertoli cells produced higher levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines but lower levels of type 1 IFNs than Leydig cells did. The MuV-induced cytokine production by Sertoli and Leydig cells was significantly reduced by the knockout of TLR2 or the knockdown of RIG-I signaling. The local injection of MuV into the testis triggered the testicular innate immune responses in vivo. Moreover, MuV infection suppressed testosterone synthesis by Leydig cells. This is the first study examining the innate immune responses to MuV infection in testicular cells. The results provide novel insights into the mechanisms underlying the MuV-induced innate immune responses in the testis.

  11. Mumps Virus Induces Protein-Kinase-R-Dependent Stress Granules, Partly Suppressing Type III Interferon Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Hashimoto

    Full Text Available Stress granules (SGs are cytoplasmic granular aggregations that are induced by cellular stress, including viral infection. SGs have opposing antiviral and proviral roles, which depend on virus species. The exact function of SGs during viral infection is not fully understood. Here, we showed that mumps virus (MuV induced SGs depending on activation of protein kinase R (PKR. MuV infection strongly induced interferon (IFN-λ1, 2 and 3, and IFN-β through activation of IFN regulatory factor 3 (IRF3 via retinoic acid inducible gene-I (RIG-I and the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS pathway. MuV-induced IFNs were strongly upregulated in PKR-knockdown cells. MuV-induced SG formation was suppressed by knockdown of PKR and SG marker proteins, Ras-GTPase-activating protein SH3-domain-binding protein 1 and T-cell-restricted intracellular antigen-1, and significantly increased the levels of MuV-induced IFN-λ1. However, viral titer was not altered by suppression of SG formation. PKR was required for induction of SGs by MuV infection and regulated type III IFN (IFN-λ1 mRNA stability. MuV-induced SGs partly suppressed type III IFN production by MuV; however, the limited suppression was not sufficient to inhibit MuV replication in cell culture. Our results provide insight into the relationship between SGs and IFN production induced by MuV infection.

  12. Role of Oxidative Stress in Hepatitis C Virus Induced Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Na; Yao, Hui; Nan, Yuemin; Qiao, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the predominant cause of chronic liver diseases and HCC, particularly in Western countries. Multiple molecular mechanisms are involved in the development and progression of HCV-related HCC, of which oxidative stress plays a pivotal role. HCV infection induces overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and impairs the function of endogenous antioxidants. Excessive amount of ROS directly damages DNA, lipids and proteins. Meanwhile, ROS indirectly activates a series of signaling cascades, and modulates the activity of many transcription factors, resulting in altered expression of genes that control cell survival, proliferation, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. In this review, we aim to summarize the possible molecular mechanisms underlying the link between the oxidative stress and hepatocarcinogenesis in HCV-infected individuals, in order to facilitate discovery of possible approaches or interventional targets for HCV-related HCC. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Histone Deacetylase 2 Is a Component of Influenza A Virus-Induced Host Antiviral Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashanth T. Nagesh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Host cells produce variety of antiviral factors that create an antiviral state and target various stages of influenza A virus (IAV life cycle to inhibit infection. However, IAV has evolved various strategies to antagonize those antiviral factors. Recently, we reported that a member of class I host histone deacetylases (HDACs, HDAC1 possesses an anti-IAV function. Herein, we provide evidence that HDAC2, another class I member and closely related to HDAC1 in structure and function, also possesses anti-IAV properties. In turn, IAV, like HDAC1, dysregulates HDAC2, mainly at the polypeptide level through proteasomal degradation to potentially minimize its antiviral effect. We found that IAV downregulated the HDAC2 polypeptide level in A549 cells in an H1N1 strain-independent manner by up to 47%, which was recovered to almost 100% level in the presence of proteasome-inhibitor MG132. A further knockdown in HDAC2 expression by up to 90% via RNA interference augmented the growth kinetics of IAV in A549 cells by more than four-fold after 24 h of infection. Furthermore, the knockdown of HDAC2 expression decreased the IAV-induced phosphorylation of the transcription factor, Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription I (STAT1 and the expression of interferon-stimulated gene, viperin in infected cells by 41 and 53%, respectively. The role of HDAC2 in viperin expression was analogous to that of HDAC1, but it was not in the phosphorylation of STAT1. This indicated that, like HDAC1, HDAC2 is a component of IAV-induced host innate antiviral response and performs both redundant and non-redundant functions vis-a-vis HDAC1; however, IAV dysregulates them both in a redundant manner.

  14. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Rab32 Aggregation and Its Implications for Virion Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Tu M.; Tran, Si C.; Lim, Yun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on cellular factors for viral propagation. Using high-throughput next-generation sequencing, we analyzed the host transcriptomic changes and identified 30 candidate genes which were upregulated in cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. Of these candidates, we selected Rab32 for further investigation. Rab32 is a small GTPase that regulates a variety of intracellular membrane-trafficking events in various cell types. In this study, we demonstrated that both mRNA and protein levels of Rab32 were increased in HCV-infected cells. Furthermore, we showed that HCV infection converted the predominantly expressed GTP-bound Rab32 to GDP-bound Rab32, contributing to the aggregation of Rab32 and thus making it less sensitive to cellular degradation machinery. In addition, GDP-bound Rab32 selectively interacted with HCV core protein and deposited core protein into the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated Rab32-derived aggregated structures in the perinuclear region, which were likely to be viral assembly sites. Using RNA interference technology, we demonstrated that Rab32 was required for the assembly step but not for other stages of the HCV life cycle. Taken together, these data suggest that HCV may modulate Rab32 activity to facilitate virion assembly. IMPORTANCE Rab32, a member of the Ras superfamily of small GTPases, regulates various intracellular membrane-trafficking events in many cell types. In this study, we showed that HCV infection concomitantly increased Rab32 expression at the transcriptional level and altered the balance between GDP- and GTP-bound Rab32 toward production of Rab32-GDP. GDP-bound Rab32 selectively interacted with HCV core protein and enriched core in the ER-associated Rab32-derived aggregated structures that were probably necessary for viral assembly. Indeed, we showed that Rab32 was specifically required for the assembly of HCV. Collectively, our study identifies that Rab32 is a novel

  15. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  16. Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains function as nuclear protein quality control centers during HSV-1 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine M Livingston

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Virus-Induced Chaperone-Enriched (VICE domains form adjacent to nuclear viral replication compartments (RC during the early stages of HSV-1 infection. Between 2 and 3 hours post infection at a MOI of 10, host protein quality control machinery such as molecular chaperones (e.g. Hsc70, the 20S proteasome and ubiquitin are reorganized from a diffuse nuclear distribution pattern to sequestration in VICE domains. The observation that VICE domains contain putative misfolded proteins suggests that they may be similar to nuclear inclusion bodies that form under conditions in which the protein quality control machinery is overwhelmed by the presence of misfolded proteins. The detection of Hsc70 in VICE domains, but not in nuclear inclusion bodies, indicates that Hsc70 is specifically reorganized by HSV-1 infection. We hypothesize that HSV-1 infection induces the formation of nuclear protein quality control centers to remodel or degrade aberrant nuclear proteins that would otherwise interfere with productive infection. Detection of proteolytic activity in VICE domains suggests that substrates may be degraded by the 20S proteasome in VICE domains. FRAP analysis reveals that GFP-Hsc70 is dynamically associated with VICE domains, suggesting a role for Hsc70 in scanning the infected nucleus for misfolded proteins. During 42 degrees C heat shock, Hsc70 is redistributed from VICE domains into RC perhaps to remodel viral replication and regulatory proteins that have become insoluble in these compartments. The experiments presented in this paper suggest that VICE domains are nuclear protein quality control centers that are modified by HSV-1 to promote productive infection.

  17. Incidence, clinical outcome, and management of virus-induced hemorrhagic cystitis in children and adolescents after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczynska, Ewa; Turkiewicz, Dominik; Rybka, Katarzyna; Toporski, Jacek; Kalwak, Krzysztof; Dyla, Agnieszka; Szczyra, Zofia; Chybicka, Alicja

    2005-10-01

    We analyzed the incidence, etiology, risk factors, and clinical management of hemorrhagic cystitis (HC) in 102 children who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplantation: 28 from matched siblings, 57 from unrelated donors, and 17 from mismatched relatives. Conditioning regimens consisted of high-dose chemotherapy (n=83) or total body irradiation (n=19). In all children, urine and plasma were prospectively screened for human polyomavirus (HPV; BK virus [BKV] and JC virus [JCV]) or adenovirus (AdV) DNA with a polymerase chain reaction-based assay. Viral DNA was detected in the urine of 56 children (54.9%): BKV in 48 (47%), JCV in 4 (3.9%), and AdV in 4 (3.9%). HC occurred in 26 children (25.5%), and viruria was detected in all of them: BKV in 21 (80.8%), AdV in 4 (14.4%), and JCV in 1 (3.8%). All patients with AdV viruria developed HC. The cumulative incidence of HC in patients with HPV viruria was 0.43. The only significant risk factor for HC in patients with HPV-positive urine was conditioning with high-dose chemotherapy. Twenty-two children were treated with cidofovir, with no significant toxicity. In all treated patients but 1, the clinical symptoms were moderate, and no HC-related death was observed. We conclude that virus-induced HC is a frequent complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Treatment with cidofovir is feasible, and further studies are warranted to evaluate its activity in HC mediated by BKV or JCV.

  18. The role of myeloid cell activation and arginine metabolism in the pathogenesis of virus-induced diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina S. Burrack

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available When an antiviral immune response is generated, a balance must be reached between two opposing pathways: the production of proinflammatory and cytotoxic effectors that drive a robust antiviral immune response to control the infection and regulators that function to limit or blunt an excessive immune response to minimize immune-mediated pathology and repair tissue damage. Myeloid cells, including monocytes and macrophages, play an important role in this balance, particularly through the activities of the arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes nitric oxide synthase 2 (Nos2; iNOS and arginase 1 (Arg1. Nitric oxide (NO production by iNOS is an important proinflammatory mediator, whereas Arg1-expressing macrophages contribute to the resolution of inflammation and wound repair. In the context of viral infections, expression of these enzymes can result in a variety of outcomes for the host. NO has direct antiviral properties against some viruses, whereas during other virus infections NO can mediate immunopathology and/or inhibit the antiviral immune response to promote chronic infection. Arg1 activity has important wound healing functions but can also inhibit the antiviral immune response during some viral infections. Thus, depending on the specific virus and the tissue(s involved, the activity of both of these arginine-hydrolyzing enzymes can either exacerbate or limit the severity of virus-induced disease. In this review, we will discuss a variety of viral infections, including HIV, SARS-CoV, LCMV, HCV, RSV, and others, where myeloid cells influence the control and clearance of the virus from the host, as well as the severity and resolution of tissue damage, via the activities of iNOS and/or Arg1. Clearly, monocyte/macrophage activation and arginine metabolism will continue to be important areas of investigation in the context of viral infections.

  19. Virus-induced chalazion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, A M; Chan, C-C; Crawford, M A; Tabbarah, Z A; Shen, D; Haddad, W F; Salti, I; Ghazi, N G

    2006-02-01

    To investigate a viral etiology in certain chalazia. A prospective study over 7.5 years of all newly presenting chalazia associated with diffuse follicular conjunctivitis but without any other aetiological factors. Patients were investigated for ocular or systemic infections by history, physical exam, slit-lamp exam, and/or histology of conjunctival biopsy (including transmission electron microscopy). A total of 27 patients developed follicular conjunctivitis without meibomian gland dysfunction, blepharitis, or sexually transmitted diseases. Evidence for a viral aetiology included: recent systemic viral illness (15/27), recent contact with subjects with chalazia or follicular conjunctivitis (5/27), preauricular lymphadenopathy (4/27), viral corneal disease (4/27), or viral particles by ultrastructure (4/4). Chalazia may be associated with viral conjunctivitis. Intralesional corticosteroids should be considered with great caution for viral-induced chalazia.

  20. Identification of novel compounds inhibiting chikungunya virus-induced cell death by high throughput screening of a kinase inhibitor library.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deu John M Cruz

    CHIKV having a novel antiviral activity--inhibition of virus-induced CPE--likely by targeting kinases involved in apoptosis.

  1. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) based silencing of cotton enoyl-CoA reductase (ECR) gene and the role of very long chain fatty acids in normal leaf development and resistance to wilt disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    A Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) assay was employed as a reverse genetic approach to study gene function in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). This approach was used to investigate the function of Enoyl-CoA reductase (GhECR) in pathogen defense. Amino acid sequence al...

  2. Novel Principles of Gamma-Retroviral Insertional Transcription Activation in Murine Leukemia Virus-induced End-stage Tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sokol, Martin; Wabl, Matthias; Rius Ruiz, Irene

    2014-01-01

    Background Insertional mutagenesis screens of retrovirus-induced mouse tumors have proven valuable in human cancer research and for understanding adverse effects of retroviral-based gene therapies. In previous studies, the assignment of mouse genes to individual retroviral integration sites has b......, and for understanding fundamental cellular regulatory principles and retroviral biology.......Background Insertional mutagenesis screens of retrovirus-induced mouse tumors have proven valuable in human cancer research and for understanding adverse effects of retroviral-based gene therapies. In previous studies, the assignment of mouse genes to individual retroviral integration sites has...

  3. Sindbis virus induces the production of a novel class of endogenous siRNAs in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, Z N; Anderson, M A E; Liu, M; Zhang, L; Myles, K M

    2012-06-01

    Small RNA regulatory pathways are used to control the activity of transposons, regulate gene expression and resist infecting viruses. We examined the biogenesis of mRNA-derived endogenous short-interfering RNAs (endo-siRNAs) in the disease vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. Under standard conditions, mRNA-derived endo-siRNAs were produced from the bidirectional transcription of tail-tail overlapping gene pairs. Upon infection with the alphavirus, Sindbis virus (SINV), another class of mRNA-derived endo-siRNAs was observed. Genes producing SINV-induced endo-siRNAs were not enriched for overlapping partners or nearby genes, but were enriched for transcripts with long 3' untranslated regions. Endo-siRNAs from this class derived uniformly from the entire length of the target transcript, and were found to regulate the transcript levels of the genes from which they were derived. Strand-specific quantitative PCR experiments demonstrated that antisense strands of targeted mRNA genes were produced to exonic, but not intronic regions. Finally, small RNAs mapped to both sense and antisense strands of exon-exon junctions, suggesting double-stranded RNA precursors to SINV-induced endo-siRNAs may be synthesized from mature mRNA templates. These results suggest additional complexity in small RNA pathways and gene regulation in the presence of an infecting virus in disease vector mosquitoes. © 2012 The Authors. Insect Molecular Biology © 2012 The Royal Entomological Society.

  4. High fractional exhaled nitric oxide and sputum eosinophils are associated with an increased risk of future virus-induced exacerbations -NDASH- a prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Asger; Laing, Ingrid A; Backer, Vibeke

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The major trigger of asthma exacerbations is infection with a respiratory virus, most commonly rhinovirus. Type 2 inflammation is known to be associated with an increased risk of exacerbations in general. Whether type 2 inflammation at baseline increases the risk of future virus...... the follow-up period. Of these, 15 (68%) had a respiratory virus detected at exacerbation. Sputum eosinophils > 1% at baseline increased the risk of having a subsequent virus-induced exacerbation (HR 7.6 95% CI 1.6-35.2, p=0.010), as did having FeNO > 25 ppb (HR 3.4 95% CI 1.1-10.4, p=0.033). This article...... is protected by copyright. All rights reserved....

  5. Suppressors of cytokine signaling 1 and 3 are up-regulated in brain resident cells in response to virus induced inflammation of the CNS via at least two distinctive pathways

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steffensen, Maria Abildgaard; Fenger, Christina; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo

    2014-01-01

    underlie a virus induced up-regulation of SOCS in the CNS. We found that i.c. infection with either lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) or yellow fever virus (YF) results in gradual up-regulation of SOCS1/3 mRNA expression peaking at day 7 post infection (p.i.). In the LCMV model, SOCS m...

  6. Multiple granulomatous lung lesions in a patient with Epstein-Barr-virus-induced mononucleosis and new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakurai Aki

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Granulomatous lesions are commonly encountered abnormalities in pulmonary pathology, and often pose a diagnostic challenge. We report an unusual case of granulomatous lung disease with uncommon characteristics, which developed following Epstein-Barr-virus-induced mononucleosis and new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus. We aim to highlight a diagnostic approach for the condition and to raise awareness of the possibility of it being related to the immunological reaction caused by Epstein-Barr virus infection. Case presentation A 36-year-old Japanese man, who had been diagnosed with Epstein-Barr-virus-induced infectious mononucleosis, new-onset systemic lupus erythematosus, and secondary Sjögren’s syndrome three weeks previously, presented to our facility with fever and diffuse pulmonary infiltrates. A computed tomography scan of the chest revealed multiple small nodules in both lungs. Fiberoptic bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage revealed lymphocytosis with predominance of T lymphocytes. A histological examination of a lung biopsy taken during video-assisted thoracic surgery showed randomly distributed tiny granulomatous lesions with infiltration of eosinophils. The differential diagnoses included hypersensitivity pneumonitis, sarcoidosis, and pulmonary involvement of Crohn’s disease, systemic lupus erythematosus, and Sjögren’s syndrome, but the clinical and pathological findings were not consistent with any of these. Our patient’s condition did not improve; therefore, prednisolone therapy was started because of the possibility of specific immunological reactions associated with Epstein-Barr virus infection. After steroid treatment, our patient showed radiological and clinical improvement. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient developing randomly distributed multiple granulomatous lung lesions with eosinophilic infiltrates after Epstein-Barr virus infection and systemic

  7. The herpes simplex virus UL20 protein functions in glycoprotein K (gK intracellular transport and virus-induced cell fusion are independent of UL20 functions in cytoplasmic virion envelopment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kousoulas Konstantin G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The HSV-1 UL20 protein (UL20p and glycoprotein K (gK are both important determinants of cytoplasmic virion morphogenesis and virus-induced cell fusion. In this manuscript, we examined the effect of UL20 mutations on the coordinate transport and Trans Golgi Network (TGN localization of UL20p and gK, virus-induced cell fusion and infectious virus production. Deletion of 18 amino acids from the UL20p carboxyl terminus (UL20 mutant 204t inhibited intracellular transport and cell-surface expression of both gK and UL20, resulting in accumulation of UL20p and gK in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER in agreement with the inability of 204t to complement UL20-null virus replication and virus-induced cell fusion. In contrast, less severe carboxyl terminal deletions of either 11 or six amino acids (UL20 mutants 211t and 216t, respectively allowed efficient UL20p and gK intracellular transport, cell-surface expression and TGN colocalization. However, while both 211t and 216t failed to complement for infectious virus production, 216t complemented for virus-induced cell fusion, but 211t did not. These results indicated that the carboxyl terminal six amino acids of UL20p were crucial for infectious virus production, but not involved in intracellular localization of UL20p/gK and concomitant virus-induced cell fusion. In the amino terminus of UL20, UL20p mutants were produced changing one or both of the Y38 and Y49 residues found within putative phosphorylation sites. UL20p tyrosine-modified mutants with both tyrosine residues changed enabled efficient intracellular transport and TGN localization of UL20p and gK, but failed to complement for either infectious virus production, or virus-induced cell fusion. These results show that UL20p functions in cytoplasmic envelopment are separable from UL20 functions in UL20p intracellular transport, cell surface expression and virus-induced cell fusion.

  8. Macrophage Expression of Inflammatory Genes in Response to EMCV Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary R. Shaheen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The expression and production of type 1 interferon is the classic cellular response to virus infection. In addition to this antiviral response, virus infection also stimulates the production of proinflammatory mediators. In this review, the pathways controlling the induction of inflammatory genes and the roles that these inflammatory mediators contribute to host defense against viral pathogens will be discussed. Specific focus will be on the role of the chemokine receptor CCR5, as a signaling receptor controlling the activation of pathways leading to virus-induced inflammatory gene expression.

  9. Infection with street strain rabies virus induces modulation of the microRNA profile of the mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhao Pingsen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rabies virus (RABV causes a fatal infection of the central nervous systems (CNS of warm-blooded animals. Once the clinical symptoms develop, rabies is almost invariably fatal. The mechanism of RABV pathogenesis remains poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that microRNA (miRNA plays an important role in the pathogenesis of viral infections. Our recent findings have revealed that infection with laboratory-fixed rabies virus strain can induce modulation of the microRNA profile of mouse brains. However, no previous report has evaluated the miRNA expression profile of mouse brains infected with RABV street strain. Results The results of microarray analysis show that miRNA expression becomes modulated in the brains of mice infected with street RABV. Quantitative real-time PCR assay of the differentially expressed miRNAs confirmed the results of microarray assay. Functional analysis showed the differentially expressed miRNAs to be involved in many immune-related signaling pathways, such as the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, the MAPK signaling pathway, cytokine-cytokine receptor interactions, and Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis. The predicted expression levels of the target genes of these modulated miRNAs were found to be correlated with gene expression as measured by DNA microarray and qRT-PCR. Conclusion RABV causes significant changes in the miRNA expression profiles of infected mouse brains. Predicted target genes of the differentially expression miRNAs are associated with host immune response, which may provide important information for investigation of RABV pathogenesis and therapeutic method.

  10. Singapore grouper iridovirus, a large DNA virus, induces nonapoptotic cell death by a cell type dependent fashion and evokes ERK signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xiaohong; Huang, Youhua; Ouyang, Zhengliang; Xu, Lixiao; Yan, Yang; Cui, Huachun; Han, Xin; Qin, Qiwei

    2011-08-01

    Virus induced cell death, including apoptosis and nonapoptotic cell death, plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of viral diseases. Singapore grouper iridovirus (SGIV), a novel iridovirus of genus Ranavirus, causes high mortality and heavy economic losses in grouper aquaculture. Here, using fluorescence microscopy, electron microscopy and biochemical assays, we found that SGIV infection in host (grouper spleen, EAGS) cells evoked nonapoptotic programmed cell death (PCD), characterized by appearance of cytoplasmic vacuoles and distended endoplasmic reticulum, in the absence of DNA fragmentation, apoptotic bodies and caspase activation. In contrast, SGIV induced typical apoptosis in non-host (fathead minnow, FHM) cells, as evidenced by caspase activation and DNA fragmentation, suggesting that SGIV infection induced nonapoptotic cell death by a cell type dependent fashion. Furthermore, viral replication was essential for SGIV induced nonapoptotic cell death, but not for apoptosis. Notably, the disruption of mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨm) and externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS) were not detected in EAGS cells but in FHM cells after SGIV infection. Moreover, the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling was involved in SGIV infection induced nonapoptotic cell death and viral replication. This is a first demonstration of ERK-mediated nonapoptotic cell death induced by a DNA virus. These findings contribute to understanding the mechanisms of iridovirus pathogenesis.

  11. The Role of T Cell Immunoglobulin Mucin Domains 1 and 4 in a Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Behçet’s Disease Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju A. Shim

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The T cell immunoglobulin mucin (TIM proteins regulate T cell activation and tolerance. TIM-1 plays an important role in the regulation of immune responses and the development of autoimmune diseases. TIM-4 is a natural ligand of TIM-1, and the interaction of TIM-1 and TIM-4 is involved in the regulation of T helper (Th cell responses and modulation of the Th1/Th2 cytokine balance. Behçet’s disease (BD is a chronic, multisystemic inflammatory disorder with arthritic, intestinal, mucocutaneous, ocular, vascular, and central nervous system involvement. Tim-1 expression was lower in a herpes simplex virus-induced BD mouse model compared to that in asymptomatic BD normal (BDN mice. Tim-4 expression was higher in BD mice than that in BDN mice. In this study, we investigated the Tim expression in a BD mouse model with BD-like symptoms. Tim-1 and Tim-4 expression was regulated by an expression vector or siRNA injected into the BD mouse model. The Tim-1 vector injected into BD mice resulted in changes in BD-like symptoms and decreased the severity score. Treatment with Tim-4 siRNA also improved BD-like symptoms and decreased the severity score accompanied by upregulation of regulatory T cells. We showed that regulating Tim-1 or Tim-4 affected BD-like symptoms in mice.

  12. Optimization of automated segmentation of monkeypox virus-induced lung lesions from normal lung CT images using hard C-means algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Marcelo A.; Thomasson, David; Avila, Nilo A.; Hufton, Jennifer; Senseney, Justin; Johnson, Reed F.; Dyall, Julie

    2013-03-01

    Monkeypox virus is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that results in up to 10% mortality in humans. Knowledge of clinical manifestations and temporal progression of monkeypox disease is limited to data collected from rare outbreaks in remote regions of Central and West Africa. Clinical observations show that monkeypox infection resembles variola infection. Given the limited capability to study monkeypox disease in humans, characterization of the disease in animal models is required. A previous work focused on the identification of inflammatory patterns using PET/CT image modality in two non-human primates previously inoculated with the virus. In this work we extended techniques used in computer-aided detection of lung tumors to identify inflammatory lesions from monkeypox virus infection and their progression using CT images. Accurate estimation of partial volumes of lung lesions via segmentation is difficult because of poor discrimination between blood vessels, diseased regions, and outer structures. We used hard C-means algorithm in conjunction with landmark based registration to estimate the extent of monkeypox virus induced disease before inoculation and after disease progression. Automated estimation is in close agreement with manual segmentation.

  13. Interleukin-10 blocks in vitro replication of human cytomegalovirus by inhibiting the virus-induced autophagy in MRC5 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Zhang, Huiping; Qian, Jihong; Wang, Kanqing; Zhu, Jianxing

    2014-06-13

    Interleukin-10 is an important cytokine that regulates immune response. Previous studies have shown that human cytomegalovirus can trigger cell autophagy during the early stages of infection. To our knowledge, whether IL-10 inhibits HCMV-induced autophagy and virus replication has not been studied previously. We investigated whether IL-10 affects cell viability and autophagy under the conditions of starvation and HCMV infection by using the MRC5 cell line. We also explored the role of IL-10-mediated autophagy on HCMV replication. Our data showed that IL-10 inhibited the autophagic flux of the MRC5 cells irrespective of starvation or HCMV infection, and suppressed HCMV replication. The promotion of autophagy with either a pharmacological inducer (rapamycin), or a technique to over-express the BECN1 gene reversed the effect of IL-10 on virus replication. Furthermore, the PI3K/Akt signal pathway was activated when the cells were pretreated with IL-10. Our results indicated that IL-10 can suppress HCMV replication by inhibiting autophagy in host cells during the early stages of infection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Impact of epidermal growth factor receptor and transforming growth factor-α on hepatitis C virus-induced hepatocarcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Afkar Abdel-Ghany; El-Hindawi, Ali; Hammam, Olfat; Moussa, Mona; Gabal, Samia; Said, Noha

    2015-10-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor system plays a central hepato-protective and pro-regenerative role in liver. Transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) is an important autocrine growth regulator of hepatocytes that plays a role in development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) among patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). This study was done on 40 core liver biopsies from patients with CHC, 20 liver specimens from HCC cases on top of CHC as well as five normal controls. All were immunohistochemically stained with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and TGF-α antibodies. Some selected HCC cases were submitted for FISH technique to detect EGFR gene alteration. By immunohistochemistry EGFR and TGF-α were overexpressed in HCC and cirrhotic cases compared to CHC cases without cirrhosis. Also, their expression was stronger in CHC cases with higher grades of activity and stages of fibrosis compared to lower ones. FISH positive results for EGFR were detected in 33.3% of the examined HCC cases. EGFR and TGF-α can be used as predictive markers for activity, fibrosis, and carcinogenesis in CHC patients. Overexpression of EGFR in HCC patients can be promising in selecting those who can get benefit from anti-EGFR target therapy. © 2015 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Identification of Gelatinases involved in the Rous sarcoma Virus-induced Tumors in Chicks as Prognostic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Kotresh and Meena Kataria

    Full Text Available The present work is undertaken to study the expression of levels of gelatinases in tumorogenesis by Rous sarcoma virus(RSV in layer chicks and explored the possibility of using gelatinases as potential biological markers in metastatic neoplasms. Two days old chicks (40 were divided into two groups (Gp I and Gp II. Gp-I (20 treated with Rous sarcoma virus for tumor induction. The Gp II (control was inoculated with RPMI-1640. Tumors appeared earliest by three days post infection with RSV and were progressive leading to mortality of birds by twenty eight days. Distant tumors were observed in liver, heart, lung, and kidney on post mortem. A prominent band of gelatinase of around 75 kDa was detected in plasma of infected chicks by gelatin zymography. Results indicate over expression of gelatinases and are leaked into plasma on Rous sarcoma virus infection. Expression of gelatinases in primary tumors, metastasized liver, heart, lung and kidney and corresponding tissues in healthy control chicks was determined by RT-PCR analysis. Over expression of gelatinase gene was observed in metastaic tissues and primary tumors than control. The described assays could be used as a prognostic assay method for detection of proteases in metastatic neoplasms of animals. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(11.000: 500-502

  16. Allicin Alleviates Reticuloendotheliosis Virus-Induced ImmunosuppressionviaERK/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Specific Pathogen-Free Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liyuan; Jiao, Hongchao; Zhao, Jingpeng; Wang, Xiaojuan; Sun, Shuhong; Lin, Hai

    2017-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV), a gammaretrovirus in the Retroviridae family, causes an immunosuppressive, oncogenic, and runting-stunting syndrome in multiple avian hosts. Allicin, the main effective component of garlic, has a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties. The hypothesis that allicin could relieve REV-induced immune dysfunction was investigated in vivo and in vitro in the present study. The results showed that dietary allicin supplementation ameliorated REV-induced dysplasia and immune dysfunction in REV-infected chickens. Compared with the control groups, REV infection promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon (IFN)- γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF- α ) , whereas, allicin reversed these changes induced by REV infection. The decreased levels of IFN- α, IFN- β, and IL-2 were observed in REV-infected chickens, which were significantly improved by allicin. Allicin suppressed the REV-induced high expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs) as well as melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5) and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and the nuclear factor kappa B p65. REV stimulated the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, the downstream key signaling molecules of MAPK pathway, while allicin retarded the augmented phosphorylation level induced by REV infection. The decreased phosphorylation level of ERK was associated with REV replication, suggesting that ERK signaling is involved in REV replication, and allicin can alleviate the REV-induced immune dysfunction by inhibiting the activation of ERK. In addition, REV infection induced oxidative damage in thymus and spleen, whereas allicin treatment significantly decreased the oxidative stress induced by REV infection, suggesting that the antioxidant effect of allicin should be at least partially responsible for the harmful effect of REV infection. In conclusion, the findings suggest that allicin alleviates

  17. Hepatitis C virus-induced innate immune responses in human iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Fuminori; Kunito, Takemaru; Takayama, Kazuo; Hashimoto, Rina; Tachibana, Masashi; Sakamoto, Naoya; Wakita, Takaji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-10-15

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver-related morbidity and mortality. In order to develop effective remedies for hepatitis C, it is important to understand the HCV infection profile and host-HCV interaction. HCV-induced innate immune responses play a crucial role in spontaneous HCV clearance; however, HCV-induced innate immune responses have not been fully evaluated in hepatocytes, partly because there are few in vitro models of HCV-induced innate immunity. Recently, human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have received much attention as an in vitro model of infection with various pathogens, including HCV. We previously established highly functional hepatocyte-like cells differentiated from human iPS cells (iPS-HLCs). Here, we examined the potential of iPS-HLCs as an in vitro HCV infection model, especially for evaluation of the relationship between HCV infection levels and HCV-induced innate immunity. Significant expressions of type I and III interferons (IFNs) and IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) were induced following transfection with HCV genomic replicon RNA in iPS-HLCs. Following inoculation with the HCV JFH-1 strain in iPS-HLCs, peaks of HCV genome replication and HCV protein expression were observed on day 2, and then both the HCV genome and protein levels gradually declined, while the mRNA levels of type III IFNs and ISGs peaked at day 2 following inoculation. These results suggest that the HCV genome efficiently replicates in iPS-HLCs, resulting in HCV genome-induced up-regulation of IFNs and ISGs, and thereafter, HCV genome-induced up-regulation of IFNs and ISGs mediates a reduction in the HCV genome and protein levels in iPS-HLCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The evidence of porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus induced nonsuppurative encephalitis as the cause of death in piglets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zi Li

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available An acute outbreak of porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (PHEV infection in piglets, characterized with neurological symptoms, vomiting, diarrhea, and wasting, occurred in China. Coronavirus-like particles were observed in the homogenized tissue suspensions of the brain of dead piglets by electron microscopy, and a wild PHEV strain was isolated, characterized, and designated as PHEV-CC14. Histopathologic examinations of the dead piglets showed characteristics of non-suppurative encephalitis, and some neurons in the cerebral cortex were degenerated and necrotic, and neuronophagia. Similarly, mice inoculated with PHEV-CC14 were found to have central nervous system (CNS dysfunction, with symptoms of depression, arched waists, standing and vellicating front claws. Furthmore, PHEV-positive labeling of neurons in cortices of dead piglets and infected mice supported the viral infections of the nervous system. Then, the major structural genes of PHEV-CC14 were sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed, and the strain shared 95%–99.2% nt identity with the other PHEV strains available in GenBank. Phylogenetic analysis clearly proved that the wild strain clustered into a subclass with a HEV-JT06 strain. These findings suggested that the virus had a strong tropism for CNS, in this way, inducing nonsuppurative encephalitis as the cause of death in piglets. Simultaneously, the predicted risk of widespread transmission showed a certain variation among the PHEV strains currently circulating around the world. Above all, the information presented in this study can not only provide good reference for the experimental diagnosis of PHEV infection for pig breeding, but also promote its new effective vaccine development.

  19. Intracutaneous DNA Vaccination with the E8 Gene of Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus Induces Protective Immunity against Virus Challenge in Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jiafen; Han, Ricai; Cladel, Nancy M.; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D.

    2002-01-01

    The cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model has been used in several studies for testing prophylactic and therapeutic papillomavirus vaccines. Earlier observations had shown that the CRPV nonstructural genes E1, E2, and E6 induced strong to partial protective immunity against CRPV infection. In this study, we found that CRPV E8 immunization eliminated virus-induced papillomas in EIII/JC inbred rabbits (100%) and provided partial protection (55%) against virus challenge in outbred...

  20. Impact of caspase-1/11, -3, -7, or IL-1β/IL-18 deficiency on rabies virus-induced macrophage cell death and onset of disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kip, E; Nazé, F; Suin, V; Vanden Berghe, T; Francart, A; Lamoral, S; Vandenabeele, P; Beyaert, R; Van Gucht, S; Kalai, M

    2017-01-01

    Rabies virus is a highly neurovirulent RNA virus, which causes about 59000 deaths in humans each year. Previously, we described macrophage cytotoxicity upon infection with rabies virus. Here we examined the type of cell death and the role of specific caspases in cell death and disease development upon infection with two laboratory strains of rabies virus: Challenge Virus Standard strain-11 (CVS-11) is highly neurotropic and lethal for mice, while the attenuated Evelyn–Rotnycki–Abelseth (ERA) strain has a broader cell tropism, is non-lethal and has been used as an oral vaccine for animals. Infection of Mf4/4 macrophages with both strains led to caspase-1 activation and IL-1β and IL-18 production, as well as activation of caspases-3, -7, -8, and -9. Moreover, absence of caspase-3, but not of caspase-1 and -11 or -7, partially inhibited virus-induced cell death of bone marrow-derived macrophages. Intranasal inoculation with CVS-11 of mice deficient for either caspase-1 and -11 or -7 or both IL-1β and IL-18 led to general brain infection and lethal disease similar to wild-type mice. Deficiency of caspase-3, on the other hand, significantly delayed the onset of disease, but did not prevent final lethal outcome. Interestingly, deficiency of caspase-1/11, the key executioner of pyroptosis, aggravated disease severity caused by ERA virus, whereas wild-type mice or mice deficient for either caspase-3, -7, or both IL-1β and IL-18 presented the typical mild symptoms associated with ERA virus. In conclusion, rabies virus infection of macrophages induces caspase-1- and caspase-3-dependent cell death. In vivo caspase-1/11 and caspase-3 differently affect disease development in response to infection with the attenuated ERA strain or the virulent CVS-11 strain, respectively. Inflammatory caspases seem to control attenuated rabies virus infection, while caspase-3 aggravates virulent rabies virus infection. PMID:28280602

  1. Virus-induced asthma attack: The importance of allergic inflammation in response to viral antigen in an animal model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skappak, Christopher; Ilarraza, Ramses; Wu, Ying-Qi; Drake, Matthew G; Adamko, Darryl J

    2017-01-01

    Asthma exacerbation can be a life-threatening condition, and is most often triggered by common respiratory viruses. Poor asthma control and worsening of respiratory function is associated with increased airway inflammation, including eosinophilia. Prevention of asthma exacerbation relies on treatment with corticosteroids, which preferentially inhibit allergic inflammation like eosinophils. Human studies demonstrate that inactivated virus can trigger eosinophil activation in vitro through antigen presentation and memory CD4+ lymphocytes. We hypothesized that animals with immunologic memory to a respiratory virus would also develop airway hyperresponsiveness in response to a UV-inactivated form of the virus if they have pre-existing allergic airway inflammation. Guinea pigs were ovalbumin-sensitized, infected with live parainfluenza virus (PIV), aerosol-challenged with ovalbumin, and then re-inoculated 60 days later with live or UV-inactivated PIV. Some animals were either treated with dexamethasone prior to the second viral exposure. Lymphocytes were isolated from parabronchial lymph nodes to confirm immunologic memory to the virus. Airway reactivity was measured and inflammation was assessed using bronchoalveolar lavage and lung histology. The induction of viral immunologic memory was confirmed in infected animals. Allergen sensitized and challenged animals developed airway hyperreactivity with eosinophilic airway inflammation when re-exposed to UV-inactivated PIV, while non-sensitized animals did not. Airway hyperreactivity in the sensitized animals was inhibited by pre-treatment with dexamethasone. We suggest that the response of allergic inflammation to virus antigen is a significant factor causing asthma exacerbation. We propose that this is one mechanism explaining how corticosteroids prevent virus-induced asthma attack.

  2. Central nervous system Toll-like receptor expression in response to Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination disease in resistant and susceptible mouse strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turrin Nicolas P

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In immunopathological diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS, genetic and environmental factors that contribute to the initiation and progression of the disease are often discussed. The Theiler murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelination disease (TMEV-IDD model used to study MS reflects this: genetically susceptible mice infected intra-cerebrally with TMEV develop a chronic demyelination disease. TMEV-IDD can be induced in resistant mouse strains by inducing innate immunity with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Interestingly, Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 is the cognate receptor for LPS and its activation can induces up-regulation of other TLRs, such as TLR7 (the receptor for TMEV and 9, known to be involved in autoimmunity. Up-regulation of TLRs could be involved in precipitating an autoimmune susceptible state. Consequently, we looked at TLR expression in the susceptible (SJL/J and resistant (C57BL/6 strains of mice infected with TMEV. The resistant mice were induced to develop TMEV-IDD by two LPS injections following TMEV infection. Results Both strains were found to up-regulate multiple TLRs (TLR2, 7 and 9 following the TMEV infection. Expression of these TLRs and of viral mRNA was significantly greater in infected SJL/J mice. The susceptible SJL/J mice showed up-regulation of TLR3, 6 and 8, which was not seen in C57BL/6 mice. Conclusion Expression of TLRs by susceptible mice and the up-regulation of the TLRs in resistant mice could participate in priming the mice toward an autoimmune state and develop TMEV-IDD. This could have implications on therapies that target TLRs to prevent the emergence of conditions such as MS in patients at risk for the disease.

  3. Myxoma Virus Induces Type I Interferon Production in Murine Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-Dependent Pathway▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M.; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N.; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-01-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immunocompetent mice. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are potent type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play important roles in antiviral innate immunity. How poxviruses are sensed by pDCs to induce type I IFN production is not well understood. Here we report that infection of primary murine pDCs with myxoma virus, but not with vaccinia virus, induces IFN-α, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) production. Using pDCs derived from genetic knockout mice, we show that the myxoma virus-induced innate immune response requires the endosomal DNA sensor TLR9 and its adaptor MyD88, transcription factors IRF5 and IRF7, and the type I IFN positive-feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1. It is independent of the cytoplasmic RNA sensing pathway mediated by the mitochondrial adaptor molecule MAVS, the TLR3 adaptor TRIF, or the transcription factor IRF3. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrate that myxoma virus-induced type I IFN and IL-12p70 production in murine pDCs is also dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Furthermore, our results reveal that the N-terminal Z-DNA/RNA binding domain of vaccinia virulence factor E3, which is missing in the orthologous M029 protein expressed by myxoma virus, plays an inhibitory role in poxvirus sensing and innate cytokine production by murine pDCs. PMID:21835795

  4. Myxoma virus induces type I interferon production in murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells via a TLR9/MyD88-, IRF5/IRF7-, and IFNAR-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Peihong; Cao, Hua; Merghoub, Taha; Avogadri, Francesca; Wang, Weiyi; Parikh, Tanvi; Fang, Chee-Mun; Pitha, Paula M; Fitzgerald, Katherine A; Rahman, Masmudur M; McFadden, Grant; Hu, Xiaoyu; Houghton, Alan N; Shuman, Stewart; Deng, Liang

    2011-10-01

    Poxviruses are large DNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Myxoma virus is a rabbit poxvirus that belongs to the Leporipoxvirus genus. It causes a lethal disease called myxomatosis in European rabbits but cannot sustain any detectable infection in nonlagomorphs. Vaccinia virus is a prototypal orthopoxvirus that was used as a vaccine to eradicate smallpox. Myxoma virus is nonpathogenic in mice, whereas systemic infection with vaccinia virus can be lethal even in immunocompetent mice. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) are potent type I interferon (IFN)-producing cells that play important roles in antiviral innate immunity. How poxviruses are sensed by pDCs to induce type I IFN production is not well understood. Here we report that infection of primary murine pDCs with myxoma virus, but not with vaccinia virus, induces IFN-α, IFN-β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), and interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70) production. Using pDCs derived from genetic knockout mice, we show that the myxoma virus-induced innate immune response requires the endosomal DNA sensor TLR9 and its adaptor MyD88, transcription factors IRF5 and IRF7, and the type I IFN positive-feedback loop mediated by IFNAR1. It is independent of the cytoplasmic RNA sensing pathway mediated by the mitochondrial adaptor molecule MAVS, the TLR3 adaptor TRIF, or the transcription factor IRF3. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we demonstrate that myxoma virus-induced type I IFN and IL-12p70 production in murine pDCs is also dependent on phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and Akt. Furthermore, our results reveal that the N-terminal Z-DNA/RNA binding domain of vaccinia virulence factor E3, which is missing in the orthologous M029 protein expressed by myxoma virus, plays an inhibitory role in poxvirus sensing and innate cytokine production by murine pDCs.

  5. Immune- and Nonimmune-Compartment-Specific Interferon Responses Are Critical Determinants of Herpes Simplex Virus-Induced Generalized Infections and Acute Liver Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Zachary M; Pasieka, Tracy Jo; Parker, George A; Leib, David A

    2016-12-01

    blindness-inducing herpetic stromal keratitis, highly debilitating and lethal herpes simplex encephalitis, and generalized infections that can lead to herpes simplex virus-induced acute liver failure. While immune compromise is a known factor, the precise mechanisms that lead to generalized HSV infections are unknown. In this study, we used and developed a mouse model system in combination with real-time bioluminescence imaging to demonstrate the relative importance of the immune and nonimmune compartments for containing viral spread and promoting host survival after corneal infection. Our results shed light on the pathogenesis of HSV infections that lead to generalized infection and acute liver failure. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Hepatitis C virus-induced NK cell activation causes metzincin-mediated CD16 cleavage and impaired antibody-dependent cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliviero, Barbara; Mantovani, Stefania; Varchetta, Stefania; Mele, Dalila; Grossi, Giulia; Ludovisi, Serena; Nuti, Elisa; Rossello, Armando; Mondelli, Mario U

    2017-06-01

    The Fc receptor family for immunoglobulin (Ig)G type III (FcγRIII, CD16) is an activating receptor on natural killer (NK) cells and an essential mediator of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). There is only limited information on its role during chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We studied CD16 expression in relation to NK cell functional activity in HCV-infected patients and sought mechanistic insights into virus-induced modulation. NK cell CD16 expression and activation status were evaluated ex vivo by flow cytometry in HCV-infected patients and healthy controls (HC) as well as in vitro after co-culture with HCV-infected HuH7.5 cells. Rituximab-mediated ADCC was assessed in HC and HCV-infected patients using Daudi cells as a target. The role of metzincins in CD16 down-modulation was assessed using specific inhibitory molecules and by evaluating intracellular mRNA levels. HCV-infected patients exhibited increased frequencies of ex vivo activated NK cells and a concomitantly decreased NK CD16 expression, which resulted in impaired ADCC activity. Moreover, exposure of NK cells to culture-derived HCV recapitulated the ex vivo findings of decreased CD16 expression and increased NK cell activation. Importantly, blockade of metzincin-mediated shedding activity, including selective a disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM-17) inhibition, restored NK CD16 expression. Successful treatment with direct-acting antivirals partially improved NK ADCC function despite delayed CD16 reconstitution. Chronic HCV infection induces NK cell activation resulting in ADAM-17-dependent CD16 shedding and consequent impaired ADCC function. Altered ADCC may contribute to failure to eradicate HCV-infected hepatocytes. We show here that hepatitis C virus (HCV) activates natural killer (NK) lymphocytes which, as a consequence, loose their Fc receptor for IgG (CD16), an essential molecule for antibody binding. We show that this occurs through the action of enzymes named

  7. M011L-deficient oncolytic myxoma virus induces apoptosis in brain tumor-initiating cells and enhances survival in a novel immunocompetent mouse model of glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisklakova, Alexandra; McKenzie, Brienne; Zemp, Franz; Lun, Xueqing; Kenchappa, Rajappa S; Etame, Arnold B; Rahman, Masmudur M; Reilly, Karlyne; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; McFadden, Grant; Kurz, Ebba; Forsyth, Peter A

    2016-03-08

    Myxoma virus (MYXV) is a promising oncolytic agent and is highly effective against immortalized glioma cells but less effective against brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), which are believed to mediate glioma development/recurrence. MYXV encodes various proteins to attenuate host cell apoptosis, including an antiapoptotic Bcl-2 homologue known as M011L. Such proteins may limit the ability of MYXV to kill BTICs, which have heightened resistance to apoptosis. We hypothesized that infecting BTICs with an M011L-deficient MYXV construct would overcome BTIC resistance to MYXV. We used patient-derived BTICs to evaluate the efficacy of M011L knockout virus (vMyx-M011L-KO) versus wild-type MYXV (vMyx-WT) and characterized the mechanism of virus-induced cell death in vitro. To extend our findings in a novel immunocompetent animal model, we derived, cultured, and characterized a C57Bl/6J murine BTIC (mBTIC0309) from a spontaneous murine glioma and evaluated vMyx-M011L-KO efficacy with and without temozolomide (TMZ) in mBTIC0309-bearing mice. We demonstrated that vMyx-M011L-KO induces apoptosis in BTICs, dramatically increasing sensitivity to the virus. vMyx-WT failed to induce apoptosis as M011L protein prevented Bax activation and cytochrome c release. In vivo, intracranial implantation of mBTIC0309 generated tumors that closely recapitulated the pathological and molecular profile of human gliomas. Treatment of tumor-bearing mice with vMyx-M011L-KO significantly prolonged survival in immunocompetent-but not immunodeficient-mouse models, an effect that is significantly enhanced in combination with TMZ. Our data suggest that vMyx-M011L-KO is an effective, well-tolerated, proapoptotic oncolytic virus and a strong candidate for clinical translation. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bela-Ong, Dennis; Jalali, Seyed Amir Hossein

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are similar to 22 base pair-long non-coding RNAs which regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells by binding to specific target regions in mRNAs to mediate transcriptional blocking or mRNA cleavage. Through their fundamental roles in cellular pathways, gene r...

  9. Hepatitis C virus NS2 and NS3/4A proteins are potent inhibitors of host cell cytokine/chemokine gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiscott John

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hepatitis C virus (HCV encodes several proteins that interfere with the host cell antiviral response. Previously, the serine protease NS3/4A was shown to inhibit IFN-β gene expression by blocking dsRNA-activated retinoic acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I and Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3-mediated signaling pathways. Results In the present work, we systematically studied the effect of all HCV proteins on IFN gene expression. NS2 and NS3/4A inhibited IFN gene activation. NS3/4A inhibited the Sendai virus-induced expression of multiple IFN (IFN-α, IFN-β and IFN-λ1/IL-29 and chemokine (CCL5, CXCL8 and CXCL10 gene promoters. NS2 and NS3/4A, but not its proteolytically inactive form NS3/4A-S139A, were found to inhibit promoter activity induced by RIG-I or its adaptor protein Cardif (or IPS-1/MAVS/VISA. Both endogenous and transfected Cardif were proteolytically cleaved by NS3/4A but not by NS2 indicating different mechanisms of inhibition of host cell cytokine production by these HCV encoded proteases. Cardif also strongly colocalized with NS3/4A at the mitochondrial membrane, implicating the mitochondrial membrane as the site for proteolytic cleavage. In many experimental systems, IFN priming dramatically enhances RNA virus-induced IFN gene expression; pretreatment of HEK293 cells with IFN-α strongly enhanced RIG-I expression, but failed to protect Cardif from NS3/4A-mediated cleavage and failed to restore Sendai virus-induced IFN-β gene expression. Conclusion HCV NS2 and NS3/4A proteins were identified as potent inhibitors of cytokine gene expression suggesting an important role for HCV proteases in counteracting host cell antiviral response.

  10. Stability of RNA silencing-based traits after virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bodil; Albrechtsen, Merete

    2007-01-01

    engineered virus resistance based on either a simple sense or an inverted repeat construct. We decided to use genetically engineered virus resistance in potato as a model system for further studies of the effect of virus infection on genetically engineered traits. We present for the first time a comparison...

  11. Functional analysis of potato genes involved in quantitative resistance to Phytophthora infestans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Juan; Tian, Zhendong; Liu, Jun; Vleeshouwers, Vivianne G A A; Shi, Xiaolei; Xie, Conghua

    2013-02-01

    The most significant threat to potato production worldwide is the late blight disease, which is caused by the oomycete pathogen Phytophthora infestans. Based on previous cDNA microarrays and cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism analysis, 63 candidate genes that are expected to contribute to developing a durable resistance to late blight were selected for further functional analysis. We performed virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to these candidate genes on both Nicotiana benthamiana and potato, subsequently inoculated detached leaves and assessed the resistance level. Ten genes decreased the resistance to P. infestans after VIGS treatment. Among those, a lipoxygenase (LOX; EC 1.13.11.12) and a suberization-associated anionic peroxidase affected the resistance in both N. benthamiana and potato. Our results identify genes that may play a role in quantitative resistance mechanisms to late blight.

  12. Genes and Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... correctly, a child can have a genetic disorder. Gene therapy is an experimental technique that uses genes to ... or prevent disease. The most common form of gene therapy involves inserting a normal gene to replace an ...

  13. TMEM129 is a Derlin-1 associated ERAD E3 ligase essential for virus-induced degradation of MHC-I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van den Boomen, Dick J H; Timms, Richard T; Grice, Guinevere L

    2014-01-01

    The US11 gene product of human cytomegalovirus promotes viral immune evasion by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. US11 initiates dislocation of newly translocated MHC I from the ER to the cytosol for proteasome-mediated degradation. Despite the critic...

  14. Inducible nitric-oxide synthase plays a minimal role in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Nansen, A; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo

    1999-01-01

    the up-regulation of proinflammatory cytokine/chemokine genes significantly, nor did it influence the development of fatal meningitis. However, a reduced virus-specific delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction was observed in iNOS-deficient mice compared with both IFN-gamma-deficient and wild-type mice...

  15. The level of viral infection of antigen-presenting cells correlates with the level of development of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young Hee; Kang, Hyun Seok; Hou, Wanqiu; Meng, Liping; Kim, Byung S

    2015-02-01

    Intracerebral infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces immune-mediated demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL/J mice but not in resistant C57BL/6 mice. Previous studies have indicated that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play the most prominent role in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. In this study, we used C57BL/6.S (B6.S) congenic mice, which carry H-2(s) MHC genes instead of H-2(b) MHC genes in conjunction with the C57BL/6 (B6) background genes. Our data show that virus-infected B6.S mice are free from disease and have significantly lower viral loads than susceptible SJL mice, particularly in the spinal cord. A strong protective Th1-type T helper response with virtually no pathogenic Th17 response was detected in B6.S mice, in contrast to the reduced Th1- and robust Th17-type responses in SJL mice. Notably, lower levels of viral infectivity in B6.S antigen-presenting cells (APCs) correlated with the disease resistance and T-cell-type response. In vitro studies using APCs from B6.S and SJL mice show that TLR2, -3, -4, and -7, but not TLR9, signaling can replace viral infection and augment the effect of viral infection in the differentiation of the pathogenic Th17 cell type. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the viral replication levels in APCs critically affect the induction of protective versus pathogenic Th cell types via the signaling of pattern recognition receptors for innate immune responses. Our current findings further imply that the levels of viral infectivity/replication and TLR-mediated signaling play critical roles in the pathogenesis of chronic viral diseases. This study indicates that innate immune cytokines produced in antigen-presenting cells stimulating the T cell immune responses during early viral infection play a critical role in determining the susceptibility of mice to the development of demyelinating disease. The level of innate immune cytokines

  16. The Level of Viral Infection of Antigen-Presenting Cells Correlates with the Level of Development of Theiler's Murine Encephalomyelitis Virus-Induced Demyelinating Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Young Hee; Kang, Hyun Seok; Hou, Wanqiu; Meng, Liping

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Intracerebral infection with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces immune-mediated demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL/J mice but not in resistant C57BL/6 mice. Previous studies have indicated that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes play the most prominent role in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. In this study, we used C57BL/6.S (B6.S) congenic mice, which carry H-2s MHC genes instead of H-2b MHC genes in conjunction with the C57BL/6 (B6) background genes. Our data show that virus-infected B6.S mice are free from disease and have significantly lower viral loads than susceptible SJL mice, particularly in the spinal cord. A strong protective Th1-type T helper response with virtually no pathogenic Th17 response was detected in B6.S mice, in contrast to the reduced Th1- and robust Th17-type responses in SJL mice. Notably, lower levels of viral infectivity in B6.S antigen-presenting cells (APCs) correlated with the disease resistance and T-cell-type response. In vitro studies using APCs from B6.S and SJL mice show that TLR2, -3, -4, and -7, but not TLR9, signaling can replace viral infection and augment the effect of viral infection in the differentiation of the pathogenic Th17 cell type. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the viral replication levels in APCs critically affect the induction of protective versus pathogenic Th cell types via the signaling of pattern recognition receptors for innate immune responses. Our current findings further imply that the levels of viral infectivity/replication and TLR-mediated signaling play critical roles in the pathogenesis of chronic viral diseases. IMPORTANCE This study indicates that innate immune cytokines produced in antigen-presenting cells stimulating the T cell immune responses during early viral infection play a critical role in determining the susceptibility of mice to the development of demyelinating disease. The level of innate immune

  17. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bela-ong, Dennis Berbulla; Jalali, Seyed Amir Hossein; Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Lorenzen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~22 base pair-long non-coding RNAs which regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells by binding to specific target regions in mRNAs to mediate transcriptional blocking or mRNA cleavage. Through their fundamental roles in cellular pathways, gene regulation mediated by miRNAs has been shown to be involved in almost all biological phenomena, including development, metabolism, cell cycle, tumor formation, and host-pathogen interactions. To address the latter in a primitive vertebrate host, we here used an array platform to analyze the miRNA response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following inoculation with the virulent fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus. Two clustered miRNAs, miR-462 and miR-731 (herein referred to as miR-462 cluster), described only in teleost fishes, were found to be strongly upregulated, indicating their involvement in fish-virus interactions. We searched for homologues of the two teleost miRNAs in other vertebrate species and investigated whether findings related to ours have been reported for these homologues. Gene synteny analysis along with gene sequence conservation suggested that the teleost fish miR-462 and miR-731 had evolved from the ancestral miR-191 and miR-425 (herein called miR-191 cluster), respectively. Whereas the miR-462 cluster locus is found between two protein-coding genes (intergenic) in teleost fish genomes, the miR-191 cluster locus is found within an intron of a protein-coding gene (intragenic) in the human genome. Interferon (IFN)-inducible and immune-related promoter elements found upstream of the teleost miR-462 cluster locus suggested roles in immune responses to viral pathogens in fish, while in humans, the miR-191 cluster functionally associated with cell cycle regulation. Stimulation of fish cell cultures with the IFN inducer poly I:C accordingly upregulated the expression of miR-462 and miR-731, while no stimulatory effect on miR-191 and miR-425

  18. Two Virus-Induced MicroRNAs Known Only from Teleost Fishes Are Orthologues of MicroRNAs Involved in Cell Cycle Control in Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schyth, Brian Dall; Bela-Ong, Dennis Berbulla; Jalali, Seyed Amir Hossein; Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel; Einer-Jensen, Katja; Pedersen, Finn Skou; Lorenzen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are ~22 base pair-long non-coding RNAs which regulate gene expression in the cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells by binding to specific target regions in mRNAs to mediate transcriptional blocking or mRNA cleavage. Through their fundamental roles in cellular pathways, gene regulation mediated by miRNAs has been shown to be involved in almost all biological phenomena, including development, metabolism, cell cycle, tumor formation, and host-pathogen interactions. To address the latter in a primitive vertebrate host, we here used an array platform to analyze the miRNA response in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) following inoculation with the virulent fish rhabdovirus Viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus. Two clustered miRNAs, miR-462 and miR-731 (herein referred to as miR-462 cluster), described only in teleost fishes, were found to be strongly upregulated, indicating their involvement in fish-virus interactions. We searched for homologues of the two teleost miRNAs in other vertebrate species and investigated whether findings related to ours have been reported for these homologues. Gene synteny analysis along with gene sequence conservation suggested that the teleost fish miR-462 and miR-731 had evolved from the ancestral miR-191 and miR-425 (herein called miR-191 cluster), respectively. Whereas the miR-462 cluster locus is found between two protein-coding genes (intergenic) in teleost fish genomes, the miR-191 cluster locus is found within an intron of a protein-coding gene (intragenic) in the human genome. Interferon (IFN)-inducible and immune-related promoter elements found upstream of the teleost miR-462 cluster locus suggested roles in immune responses to viral pathogens in fish, while in humans, the miR-191 cluster functionally associated with cell cycle regulation. Stimulation of fish cell cultures with the IFN inducer poly I:C accordingly upregulated the expression of miR-462 and miR-731, while no stimulatory effect on miR-191 and miR-425

  19. Quantitative expression profiling of immune response genes in rainbow trout following infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) infection or DNA vaccination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Kurath, Gael; Garver, Kyle A.; Herwig, Russell P.; Winton, James R.

    2004-01-01

    Infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a well-studied virus of salmonid fishes. A highly efficacious DNA vaccine has been developed against this virus and studies have demonstrated that this vaccine induces both an early and transient non-specific anti-viral phase as well as long-term specific protection. The mechanisms of the early anti-viral phase are not known, but previous studies noted changes in Mx gene expression, suggesting a role for type I interferon. This study used quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase PCR methodology to compare expression changes over time of a number of cytokine or cytokine-related genes in the spleen of rainbow trout following injection with poly I:C, live IHNV, the IHNV DNA vaccine or a control plasmid encoding the non-antigenic luciferase gene. The target genes included Mx-1, viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus induced gene 8 (Vig-8), TNF-α1, TNF-α2, IL-1β1, IL-8, TGF-β1 and Hsp70. Poly I:C stimulation induced several genes but the strongest and significant response was observed in the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes. The live IHN virus induced a significant response in all genes examined except TGF-β1. The control plasmid construct and the IHNV DNA vaccine marginally induced a number of genes, but the main difference between these two groups was a statistically significant induction of the Mx-1 and Vig-8 genes by the IHNV vaccine only. The gene expression profiles elicited by the live virus and the IHNV DNA vaccine differed in a number of aspects but this study confirms the clear role for a type I interferon-like response in early anti-viral defence.

  20. A SQUAMOSA MADS Box Gene Involved in the Regulation of Anthocyanin Accumulation in Bilberry Fruits1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaakola, Laura; Poole, Mervin; Jones, Matthew O.; Kämäräinen-Karppinen, Terttu; Koskimäki, Janne J.; Hohtola, Anja; Häggman, Hely; Fraser, Paul D.; Manning, Kenneth; King, Graham J.; Thomson, Helen; Seymour, Graham B.

    2010-01-01

    Anthocyanins are important health-promoting phytochemicals that are abundant in many fleshy fruits. Bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus) is one of the best sources of these compounds. Here, we report on the expression pattern and functional analysis of a SQUAMOSA-class MADS box transcription factor, VmTDR4, associated with anthocyanin biosynthesis in bilberry. Levels of VmTDR4 expression were spatially and temporally linked with color development and anthocyanin-related gene expression. Virus-induced gene silencing was used to suppress VmTDR4 expression in bilberry, resulting in substantial reduction in anthocyanin levels in fully ripe fruits. Chalcone synthase was used as a positive control in the virus-induced gene silencing experiments. Additionally, in sectors of fruit tissue in which the expression of the VmTDR4 gene was silenced, the expression of R2R3 MYB family transcription factors related to the biosynthesis of flavonoids was also altered. We conclude that VmTDR4 plays an important role in the accumulation of anthocyanins during normal ripening in bilberry, probably through direct or indirect control of transcription factors belonging to the R2R3 MYB family. PMID:20566708

  1. An albumin-mediated cholesterol design-based strategy for tuning siRNA pharmacokinetics and gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bienk, Konrad; Hvam, Michael Lykke; Pakula, Malgorzata Maria

    2016-01-01

    Major challenges for the clinical translation of small interfering RNA (siRNA) include overcoming the poor plasma half-life, site-specific delivery and modulation of gene silencing. In this work, we exploit the intrinsic transport properties of human serum albumin to tune the blood circulatory half......-life, hepatic accumulation and gene silencing; based on the number of siRNA cholesteryl modifications. We demonstrate by a gel shift assay a strong and specific affinity of recombinant human serum albumin (rHSA) towards cholesteryl-modified siRNA (Kd > 1 × 10- 7 M) dependent on number of modifications. The r......HSA/siRNA complex exhibited reduced nuclease degradation and reduced induction of TNF-α production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The increased solubility of heavily cholesteryl modified siRNA in the presence of rHSA facilitated duplex annealing and consequent interaction that allowed in vivo studies...

  2. DNA-mediated immunization of glycoprotein 350 of Epstein-Barr virus induces the effective humoral and cellular immune responses against the antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, S; Chung, Y K; Chang, S H; Kim, J; Kim, H R; Jang, H S; Lee, J C; Chung, G H; Jang, Y S

    2001-08-31

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human pathogen that is involved in numerous diseases and tumors. Since the EBV infection occurs in the early ages of life, and most of the population is subsequently exposed to EBV, the conventional method of vaccination to induce the prophylactic immunity cannot be considered effective in coping with the virus infection. In this study, we tested whether the injection of a plasmid vector that contained the gene for glycoprotein 350 (gp350), which had been identified as a ligand for virus' adsorption and a target for virus neutralizing antibodies, could induce effective immune responses against the antigen. As a result, the injection of the constructed plasmid vector into mice induced the production of gp350-specific antibodies. A major isotype of the gp350-specific antibodies was IgG1. The antibodies efficiently mediated the antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity against the cells expressing the gp350 antigen. In addition, the injection of the constructed plasmid vector stimulated the precursor T cell population that was specific to the gp350 antigen. In addition, gp350-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes were efficiently stimulated by the injection of the constructed plasmid vector. These results suggested that the injection of the plasmid vector, containing the gp350 gene of Epstein-Barr virus, could be one of the most effective ways to induce both prophylactic and therapeutic vaccinations against the virus infection.

  3. Hepatitis C virus induced miR200c down modulates FAP-1, a negative regulator of Src signaling and promotes hepatic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabarinathan Ramachandran

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV induced liver disease is the leading indication for liver transplantation (LTx. Reinfection and accelerated development of fibrosis is a universal phenomenon following LTx. The molecular events that lead to fibrosis following HCV infection still remains poorly defined. In this study, we determined microRNA (miRNA and mRNA expression profiles in livers from chronic HCV patients and normals using microarrays. Using Genego software and pathway finder we performed an interactive analysis to identify target genes that are modulated by miRNAs. 22 miRNAs were up regulated (>2 fold and 35 miRNAs were down regulated (>2fold compared to controls. Liver from HCV patients demonstrated increased expression of 306 genes (>3 fold and reduced expression of 133 genes (>3 fold. Combinatorial analysis of the networks modulated by the miRNAs identified regulation of the phospholipase C pathway (miR200c, miR20b, and miR31through cellular proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (cSrc, response to growth factors and hormones (miR141, miR107 and miR200c through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha and extracellular-signal-regulated kinases, and regulation of cellular proliferation (miR20b, miR10b, and miR141 through cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 1 or CDK-interacting protein 1 p21. Real time PCR (RT-PCR validation of the miRNA in HCV infected livers demonstrated a 3.3 ±0.9 fold increase in miR200c. In vitro transfection of fibroblasts with miR200c resulted in a 2.2 fold reduction in expression of tyrosine-protein phosphatase non-receptor type 13 or FAS associated phosphatase 1 (FAP-1 and 2.3 fold increase in expression of cSrc. miR200c transfection resulted in significant increases in expression of collagen and fibroblast growth factor (2.8 and 3.4 fold, p<0.05. Therefore, we propose that HCV induced increased expression of miR200c can down modulate the expression of FAP1, a critical regulator of Src and MAP kinase pathway that

  4. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus K15 protein contributes to virus-induced angiogenesis by recruiting PLCγ1 and activating NFAT1-dependent RCAN1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, Kiran; Bosco, Raffaella; Gramolelli, Silvia; Haas, Darya A; Kati, Semra; Pietrek, Marcel; Hävemeier, Anika; Yakushko, Yuri; Singh, Vivek Vikram; Dittrich-Breiholz, Oliver; Kracht, Michael; Schulz, Thomas F

    2012-09-01

    Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS), caused by Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV), is a highly vascularised angiogenic tumor of endothelial cells, characterized by latently KSHV-infected spindle cells and a pronounced inflammatory infiltrate. Several KSHV proteins, including LANA-1 (ORF73), vCyclin (ORF72), vGPCR (ORF74), vIL6 (ORF-K2), vCCL-1 (ORF-K6), vCCL-2 (ORF-K4) and K1 have been shown to exert effects that can lead to the proliferation and atypical differentiation of endothelial cells and/or the secretion of cytokines with angiogenic and inflammatory properties (VEGF, bFGF, IL6, IL8, GROα, and TNFβ). To investigate a role of the KSHV K15 protein in KSHV-mediated angiogenesis, we carried out a genome wide gene expression analysis on primary endothelial cells infected with KSHV wildtype (KSHVwt) and a KSHV K15 deletion mutant (KSHVΔK15). We found RCAN1/DSCR1 (Regulator of Calcineurin 1/Down Syndrome critical region 1), a cellular gene involved in angiogenesis, to be differentially expressed in KSHVwt- vs KSHVΔK15-infected cells. During physiological angiogenesis, expression of RCAN1 in endothelial cells is regulated by VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) through a pathway involving the activation of PLCγ1, Calcineurin and NFAT1. We found that K15 directly recruits PLCγ1, and thereby activates Calcineurin/NFAT1-dependent RCAN1 expression which results in the formation of angiogenic tubes. Primary endothelial cells infected with KSHVwt form angiogenic tubes upon activation of the lytic replication cycle. This effect is abrogated when K15 is deleted (KSHVΔK15) or silenced by an siRNA targeting the K15 expression. Our study establishes K15 as one of the KSHV proteins that contribute to KSHV-induced angiogenesis.

  5. Intramuscular DNA Vaccination of Juvenile Carp against Spring Viremia of Carp Virus Induces Full Protection and Establishes a Virus-Specific B and T Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen W. E. Embregts

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Although spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV can cause high mortalities in common carp, a commercial vaccine is not available for worldwide use. Here, we report a DNA vaccine based on the expression of the SVCV glycoprotein (G which, when injected in the muscle even at a single low dose of 0.1 µg DNA/g of fish, confers up to 100% protection against a subsequent bath challenge with SVCV. Importantly, to best validate vaccine efficacy, we also optimized a reliable bath challenge model closely mimicking a natural infection, based on a prolonged exposure of carp to SVCV at 15°C. Using this optimized bath challenge, we showed a strong age-dependent susceptibility of carp to SVCV, with high susceptibility at young age (3 months and a full resistance at 9 months. We visualized local expression of the G protein and associated early inflammatory response by immunohistochemistry and described changes in the gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and antiviral genes in the muscle of vaccinated fish. Adaptive immune responses were investigated by analyzing neutralizing titers against SVCV in the serum of vaccinated fish and the in vitro proliferation capacity of peripheral SVCV-specific T cells. We show significantly higher serum neutralizing titers and the presence of SVCV-specific T cells in the blood of vaccinated fish, which proliferated upon stimulation with SVCV. Altogether, this is the first study reporting on a protective DNA vaccine against SVCV in carp and the first to provide a detailed characterization of local innate as well as systemic adaptive immune responses elicited upon DNA vaccination that suggest a role not only of B cells but also of T cells in the protection conferred by the SVCV-G DNA vaccine.

  6. Kaposi's sarcoma herpesvirus K15 protein contributes to virus-induced angiogenesis by recruiting PLCγ1 and activating NFAT1-dependent RCAN1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiran Bala

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS, caused by Kaposi's Sarcoma Herpesvirus (KSHV, is a highly vascularised angiogenic tumor of endothelial cells, characterized by latently KSHV-infected spindle cells and a pronounced inflammatory infiltrate. Several KSHV proteins, including LANA-1 (ORF73, vCyclin (ORF72, vGPCR (ORF74, vIL6 (ORF-K2, vCCL-1 (ORF-K6, vCCL-2 (ORF-K4 and K1 have been shown to exert effects that can lead to the proliferation and atypical differentiation of endothelial cells and/or the secretion of cytokines with angiogenic and inflammatory properties (VEGF, bFGF, IL6, IL8, GROα, and TNFβ. To investigate a role of the KSHV K15 protein in KSHV-mediated angiogenesis, we carried out a genome wide gene expression analysis on primary endothelial cells infected with KSHV wildtype (KSHVwt and a KSHV K15 deletion mutant (KSHVΔK15. We found RCAN1/DSCR1 (Regulator of Calcineurin 1/Down Syndrome critical region 1, a cellular gene involved in angiogenesis, to be differentially expressed in KSHVwt- vs KSHVΔK15-infected cells. During physiological angiogenesis, expression of RCAN1 in endothelial cells is regulated by VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor through a pathway involving the activation of PLCγ1, Calcineurin and NFAT1. We found that K15 directly recruits PLCγ1, and thereby activates Calcineurin/NFAT1-dependent RCAN1 expression which results in the formation of angiogenic tubes. Primary endothelial cells infected with KSHVwt form angiogenic tubes upon activation of the lytic replication cycle. This effect is abrogated when K15 is deleted (KSHVΔK15 or silenced by an siRNA targeting the K15 expression. Our study establishes K15 as one of the KSHV proteins that contribute to KSHV-induced angiogenesis.

  7. Characterization of a novel mutation in NS1 protein of influenza A virus induced by a chemical substance for the attenuation of pathogenicity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kohei Sasaki

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that live attenuated influenza vaccine (LAIV has the potential for use as a vaccination against flu. In this study, we demonstrated the nature of an influenza A virus (IAV mutant induced by treating the IAV with a stable furan derivative, (1R,2R-1-(5'-methylfur-3'-ylpropane-1,2,3-triol (MFPT, which had been isolated from Streptomyces sp. strain FV60 with the objective of it being an LAIV candidate. The resulting MFPT-resistant (MFPTr IAVs possessed attenuated pathogenicity in vitro and in vivo when compared with that of the parent virus (H1N1 subtype, NWS strain. Sequencing analysis revealed that a novel mutation, C490U in ns gene (P164S in NS1, was detected in all MFPTr virus clones tested. Therefore, NS1 might be a main target of MFPT, and it was suggested that the P164S mutation contributed to the attenuated pathogenicity of the mutants. Although the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K/Akt signaling pathway is one of the targets of NS1, the MFPTr virus suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt when compared with the wild-type (WT virus. It was suggested that this might lead to the subsequent inhibition of the cleavage of PARP-1 and caspase-3, which is important for the progression of apoptosis. At the same time, nucleoprotein (NP was found to be retained in the nuclei in MFPTr virus-infected cells while nuclear export of NP was detected in WT virus-infected cells. In addition, the expression levels of interferon-β transcripts were significantly decreased in MFPTr virus-infected cells. From these results it can be shown that the mutation, NS1P164S, might be one of the key residues to control NS1 function concerning the induction of apoptosis. In conclusion, MFPT induced favorable mutation in the ns gene for the attenuation of IAV, and therefore might provide the novel methodology for preparing LAIVs.

  8. Oral immunization with transgenic rice seeds expressing VP2 protein of infectious bursal disease virus induces protective immune responses in chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jianxiang; Yu, Lian; Li, Long; Hu, Jinqiang; Zhou, Jiyong; Zhou, Xueping

    2007-09-01

    The expression of infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) host-protective immunogen VP2 protein in rice seeds, its immunogenicity and protective capability in chickens were investigated. The VP2 cDNA of IBDV strain ZJ2000 was cloned downstream of the Gt1 promoter of the rice glutelin GluA-2 gene in the binary expression vector, pCambia1301-Gt1. Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing the recombinant vector was used to transform rice embryogenic calli, and 121 transgenic lines were obtained and grown to maturity in a greenhouse. The expression level of VP2 protein in transgenic rice seeds varied from 0.678% to 4.521% microg/mg of the total soluble seed protein. Specific pathogen-free chickens orally vaccinated with transgenic rice seeds expressing VP2 protein produced neutralizing antibodies against IBDV and were protected when challenged with a highly virulent IBDV strain, BC6/85. These results demonstrate that transgenic rice seeds expressing IBDV VP2 can be used as an effective, safe and inexpensive vaccine against IBDV.

  9. Nonstructural Protein 1 of Tick-Borne Encephalitis Virus Induces Oxidative Stress and Activates Antioxidant Defense by the Nrf2/ARE Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Yulia V; Smirnova, Olga A; Ivanov, Alexander V; Starodubova, Elizaveta S; Karpov, Vadim L

    2016-01-01

    Infection with tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV) causes pathological changes in the central nervous system. However, the possible redox alterations in the infected cells that can contribute to the virus pathogenicity remain unknown. In the current study we explored the ability of TBEV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) to induce oxidative stress and activate antioxidant defense via the nuclear factor (erythroid-derived-2)-like 2/antioxidant response element (Nrf2/ARE) pathway. HEK 293T cells were transfected with plasmid encoding NS1 protein, and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using oxidation-sensitive dyes, the activation of the ARE promoter was estimated using a reporter plasmid, and the expression of phase II detoxifying enzymes was quantified by measuring their mRNA levels using RT-qPCR. A high level of ROS production was detected in cells transfected with NS1-expressing plasmid. In addition, this protein activated the promoter with an ARE and upregulated the transcription of ARE-dependent genes that encode phase II enzymes. TBEV NS1 protein both triggers ROS production and activates a defense Nrf2/ARE pathway. These data suggest that a role of redox-mediated processes in TBEV-induced damage of the central nervous system should also be explored. These data can contribute to a better understanding of TBEV pathogenicity, further improvement of TBE treatment, and the development of vaccine candidates against this infection. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  10. TMEM129 is a Derlin-1 associated ERAD E3 ligase essential for virus-induced degradation of MHC-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Boomen, Dick J H; Timms, Richard T; Grice, Guinevere L; Stagg, Helen R; Skødt, Karsten; Dougan, Gordon; Nathan, James A; Lehner, Paul J

    2014-08-05

    The US11 gene product of human cytomegalovirus promotes viral immune evasion by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. US11 initiates dislocation of newly translocated MHC I from the ER to the cytosol for proteasome-mediated degradation. Despite the critical role for ubiquitin in this degradation pathway, the responsible E3 ligase is unknown. In a forward genetic screen for host ERAD components hijacked by US11 in near-haploid KBM7 cells, we identified TMEM129, an uncharacterized polytopic membrane protein. TMEM129 is essential and rate-limiting for US11-mediated MHC-I degradation and acts as a novel ER resident E3 ubiquitin ligase. TMEM129 contains an unusual cysteine-only RING with intrinsic E3 ligase activity and is recruited to US11 via Derlin-1. Together with its E2 conjugase Ube2J2, TMEM129 is responsible for the ubiquitination, dislocation, and subsequent degradation of US11-associated MHC-I. US11 engages two degradation pathways: a Derlin-1/TMEM129-dependent pathway required for MHC-I degradation and a SEL1L/HRD1-dependent pathway required for "free" US11 degradation. Our data show that TMEM129 is a novel ERAD E3 ligase and the central component of a novel mammalian ERAD complex.

  11. The protective immune response against Pseudorabies virus induced by DNA vaccination is impaired if the plasmid harbors a functional Porcine circovirus type 2 rep and origin of replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faurez, Florence; Grasland, Béatrice; Béven, Véronique; Cariolet, Roland; Keranflec'h, André; Henry, Aurélie; Jestin, André; Dory, Daniel

    2012-12-01

    A plasmid rendered replicative in mammalian cells by inserting the Porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) origin of replication and replicase gene (Ori-rep) has been previously constructed. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if the replication capacity of this plasmid could be advantageously used to improve the protective immunity induced by DNA vaccination. In this case we used the porcine Pseudorabies virus (PrV) DNA vaccination model. The replicative capacity of the DNA vaccine did not improve the protective immunity against PrV in pigs, but on the contrary the presence of the PCV2 Ori-rep sequence was harmful in the induction of this immunity compared to an equivalent but non-replicative DNA vaccine. In addition, the distribution and the persistence of the replicative and non-replicative plasmids inside the body were the same. This is the first study showing an in vivo deleterious effect of the replicative active PCV2 Ori-rep on the natural and specific protection against PrV infection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. SB203580 Modulates p38 MAPK Signaling and Dengue Virus-Induced Liver Injury by Reducing MAPKAPK2, HSP27, and ATF2 Phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopinathan Pillai Sreekanth

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV infection causes organ injuries, and the liver is one of the most important sites of DENV infection, where viral replication generates a high viral load. The molecular mechanism of DENV-induced liver injury is still under investigation. The mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs, including p38 MAPK, have roles in the hepatic cell apoptosis induced by DENV. However, the in vivo role of p38 MAPK in DENV-induced liver injury is not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the role of SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, in a mouse model of DENV infection. Both the hematological parameters, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, were improved by SB203580 treatment and liver transaminases and histopathology were also improved. We used a real-time PCR microarray to profile the expression of apoptosis-related genes. Tumor necrosis factor α, caspase 9, caspase 8, and caspase 3 proteins were significantly lower in the SB203580-treated DENV-infected mice than that in the infected control mice. Increased expressions of cytokines including TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10, and chemokines including RANTES and IP-10 in DENV infection were reduced by SB203580 treatment. DENV infection induced the phosphorylation of p38MAPK, and its downstream signals including MAPKAPK2, HSP27 and ATF-2. SB203580 treatment did not decrease the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK, but it significantly reduced the phosphorylation of MAPKAPK2, HSP27, and ATF2. Therefore, SB203580 modulates the downstream signals to p38 MAPK and reduces DENV-induced liver injury.

  13. Allicin Alleviates Reticuloendotheliosis Virus-Induced Immunosuppression via ERK/Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Pathway in Specific Pathogen-Free Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liyuan Wang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV, a gammaretrovirus in the Retroviridae family, causes an immunosuppressive, oncogenic, and runting–stunting syndrome in multiple avian hosts. Allicin, the main effective component of garlic, has a broad spectrum of pharmacological properties. The hypothesis that allicin could relieve REV-induced immune dysfunction was investigated in vivo and in vitro in the present study. The results showed that dietary allicin supplementation ameliorated REV-induced dysplasia and immune dysfunction in REV-infected chickens. Compared with the control groups, REV infection promoted the expression of inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, interferon (IFN-γ, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, whereas, allicin reversed these changes induced by REV infection. The decreased levels of IFN-α, IFN-β, and IL-2 were observed in REV-infected chickens, which were significantly improved by allicin. Allicin suppressed the REV-induced high expression of toll-like receptors (TLRs as well as melanoma differentiation-associated gene 5 (MDA5 and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK and the nuclear factor kappa B p65. REV stimulated the phosphorylation of JNK, ERK, and p38, the downstream key signaling molecules of MAPK pathway, while allicin retarded the augmented phosphorylation level induced by REV infection. The decreased phosphorylation level of ERK was associated with REV replication, suggesting that ERK signaling is involved in REV replication, and allicin can alleviate the REV-induced immune dysfunction by inhibiting the activation of ERK. In addition, REV infection induced oxidative damage in thymus and spleen, whereas allicin treatment significantly decreased the oxidative stress induced by REV infection, suggesting that the antioxidant effect of allicin should be at least partially responsible for the harmful effect of REV infection. In conclusion, the findings suggest that allicin

  14. Gene silencing and gene expression in phytopathogenic fungi using a plant virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia, Tiziana; Nigro, Franco; Abdallah, Alì; Ferrara, Massimo; De Stradis, Angelo; Faedda, Roberto; Palukaitis, Peter; Gallitelli, Donato

    2014-03-18

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a powerful approach for elucidating gene functions in a variety of organisms, including phytopathogenic fungi. In such fungi, RNAi has been induced by expressing hairpin RNAs delivered through plasmids, sequences integrated in fungal or plant genomes, or by RNAi generated in planta by a plant virus infection. All these approaches have some drawbacks ranging from instability of hairpin constructs in fungal cells to difficulties in preparing and handling transgenic plants to silence homologous sequences in fungi grown on these plants. Here we show that RNAi can be expressed in the phytopathogenic fungus Colletotrichum acutatum (strain C71) by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) without a plant intermediate, but by using the direct infection of a recombinant virus vector based on the plant virus, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We provide evidence that a wild-type isolate of TMV is able to enter C71 cells grown in liquid medium, replicate, and persist therein. With a similar approach, a recombinant TMV vector carrying a gene for the ectopic expression of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) induced the stable silencing of the GFP in the C. acutatum transformant line 10 expressing GFP derived from C71. The TMV-based vector also enabled C. acutatum to transiently express exogenous GFP up to six subcultures and for at least 2 mo after infection, without the need to develop transformation technology. With these characteristics, we anticipate this approach will find wider application as a tool in functional genomics of filamentous fungi.

  15. Virus-derived gene expression and RNA interference vector for grapevine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Elizabeth G; Peremyslov, Valera V; Prokhnevsky, Alexey I; Kasschau, Kristin D; Miller, Marilyn; Carrington, James C; Dolja, Valerian V

    2012-06-01

    The improvement of the agricultural and wine-making qualities of the grapevine (Vitis vinifera) is hampered by adherence to traditional varieties, the recalcitrance of this plant to genetic modifications, and public resistance to genetically modified organism (GMO) technologies. To address these challenges, we developed an RNA virus-based vector for the introduction of desired traits into grapevine without heritable modifications to the genome. This vector expresses recombinant proteins in the phloem tissue that is involved in sugar transport throughout the plant, from leaves to roots to berries. Furthermore, the vector provides a powerful RNA interference (RNAi) capability of regulating the expression of endogenous genes via virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS) technology. Additional advantages of this vector include superb genetic capacity and stability, as well as the swiftness of technology implementation. The most significant applications of the viral vector include functional genomics of the grapevine and disease control via RNAi-enabled vaccination against pathogens or invertebrate pests.

  16. Silencing of the SlNAP7 gene influences plastid development and lycopene accumulation in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Da-Qi; Meng, Lan-Huan; Zhu, Ben-Zhong; Zhu, Hong-Liang; Yan, Hua-Xue; Luo, Yun-Bo

    2016-12-01

    Ripening is an important stage of fruit development. To screen the genes associated with pigment formation in tomato fruit, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) cDNA library was constructed by using tomato fruit in the green ripe and break ripe stages, and 129 differential genes were obtained. Using redness as a screening marker, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of the differential genes was performed with a sprout vacuum-infiltration system (SVI). The results showed that silencing the SlNAP7 gene affected the chloroplast development of tomato leaves, manifesting as a photo-bleaching phenotype, and silenced fruit significantly affected the accumulation of lycopene, manifested as a yellow phenotype. In our study, we found that silencing the SlNAP7 gene downregulates the expression of the POR and PORA genes and destroys the normal development of the chloroplast. The expression of related genes included in the lycopene biosynthesis pathway was not significantly changed, but lycopene accumulation was significantly reduced in tomato fruit. Perhaps it was caused by the destruction of the chromoplast, which leads to the oxidation of lycopene. The results show that the SlNAP7 gene influences chloroplast development and lycopene accumulation in tomato.

  17. Integration of ALV intoCTDSPLandCTDSPL2genes in B-cell lymphomas promotes cell immortalization, migration and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winans, Shelby; Flynn, Alyssa; Malhotra, Sanandan; Balagopal, Vidya; Beemon, Karen L

    2017-08-22

    Avian leukosis virus induces tumors in chickens by integrating into the genome and altering expression of nearby genes. Thus, ALV can be used as an insertional mutagenesis tool to identify novel genes involved in tumorigenesis. Deep sequencing analysis of viral integration sites has identified CTDSPL and CTDSPL2 as common integration sites in ALV-induced B-cell lymphomas, suggesting a potential role in driving oncogenesis. We show that in tumors with integrations in these genes, the viral promoter is driving the expression of a truncated fusion transcript. Overexpression in cultured chick embryo fibroblasts reveals that CTDSPL and CTDSPL2 have oncogenic properties, including promoting cell migration. We also show that CTDSPL2 has a previously uncharacterized role in protecting cells from apoptosis induced by oxidative stress. Further, the truncated viral fusion transcripts of both CTDSPL and CTDSPL2 promote immortalization in primary cell culture.

  18. Chilli leaf curl virus-based vector for phloem-specific silencing of endogenous genes and overexpression of foreign genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushwaha, Nirbhay Kumar; Chakraborty, Supriya

    2017-03-01

    Geminiviruses are the largest and most devastating group of plant viruses which contain ssDNA as a genetic material. Geminivirus-derived virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vectors have emerged as an efficient and simple tool to study functional genomics in various plants. However, previously developed VIGS vectors have certain limitations, owing to their inability to be used in tissue-specific functional study. In the present study, we developed a Chilli leaf curl virus (ChiLCV)-based VIGS vector for its tissue-specific utilization by replacing the coat protein gene (open reading frame (ORF) AV1) with the gene of interest for phytoene desaturase (PDS) of Nicotiana benthamiana. Functional validation of ChiLCV-based VIGS in N. benthamiana resulted in systemic silencing of PDS exclusively in the phloem region of inoculated plants. Furthermore, expression of enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) using the same ChiLCV vector was verified in the phloem region of the inoculated plants. Our results also suggested that, during the early phase of infection, ChiLCV was associated with the phloem region, but at later stage of pathogenesis, it can spread into the adjoining non-vascular tissues. Taken together, the newly developed ChiLCV-based vector provides an efficient and versatile tool, which can be exploited to unveil the unknown functions of several phloem-specific genes.

  19. Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Mitochondrial Dysfunctions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birke Bartosch

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis C is characterized by metabolic disorders and a microenvironment in the liver dominated by oxidative stress, inflammation and regeneration processes that lead in the long term to hepatocellular carcinoma. Many lines of evidence suggest that mitochondrial dysfunctions, including modification of metabolic fluxes, generation and elimination of oxidative stress, Ca2+ signaling and apoptosis, play a central role in these processes. However, how these dysfunctions are induced by the virus and whether they play a role in disease progression and neoplastic transformation remains to be determined. Most in vitro studies performed so far have shown that several of the hepatitis C virus (HCV proteins localize to mitochondria, but the consequences of these interactions on mitochondrial functions remain contradictory, probably due to the use of artificial expression and replication systems. In vivo studies are hampered by the fact that innate and adaptive immune responses will overlay mitochondrial dysfunctions induced directly in the hepatocyte by HCV. Thus, the molecular aspects underlying HCV-induced mitochondrial dysfunctions and their roles in viral replication and the associated pathology need yet to be confirmed in the context of productively replicating virus and physiologically relevant in vitro and in vivo model systems.

  20. A Mechanism of Virus-Induced Demyelination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayasri Das Sarma

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Myelin forms an insulating sheath surrounding axons in the central and peripheral nervous systems and is essential for rapid propagation of neuronal action potentials. Demyelination is an acquired disorder in which normally formed myelin degenerates, exposing axons to the extracellular environment. The result is dysfunction of normal neuron-to-neuron communication and in many cases, varying degrees of axonal degeneration. Numerous central nervous system demyelinating disorders exist, including multiple sclerosis. Although demyelination is the major manifestation of most of the demyelinating diseases, recent studies have clearly documented concomitant axonal loss to varying degrees resulting in long-term disability. Axonal injury may occur secondary to myelin damage (outside-in model or myelin damage may occur secondary to axonal injury (inside-out model. Viral induced demyelination models, has provided unique imminent into the cellular mechanisms of myelin destruction. They illustrate mechanisms of viral persistence, including latent infections, virus reactivation and viral-induced tissue damage. These studies have also provided excellent paradigms to study the interactions between the immune system and the central nervous system (CNS. In this review we will discuss potential cellular and molecular mechanism of central nervous system axonal loss and demyelination in a viral induced mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

  1. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gene therapy Overview Gene therapy involves altering the genes inside your body's cells in an effort to treat or stop disease. Genes contain your ... that don't work properly can cause disease. Gene therapy replaces a faulty gene or adds a new ...

  2. Hidden variability of floral homeotic B genes in Solanaceae provides a molecular basis for the evolution of novel functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuten, Koen; Irish, Vivian

    2010-08-01

    B-class MADS box genes specify petal and stamen identities in several core eudicot species. Members of the Solanaceae possess duplicate copies of these genes, allowing for diversification of function. To examine the changing roles of such duplicate orthologs, we assessed the functions of B-class genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference approaches. Loss of function of individual duplicates can have distinct phenotypes, yet complete loss of B-class gene function results in extreme homeotic transformations of petal and stamen identities. We also show that these duplicate gene products have qualitatively different protein-protein interaction capabilities and different regulatory roles. Thus, compensatory changes in B-class MADS box gene duplicate function have occurred in the Solanaceae, in that individual gene roles are distinct, but their combined functions are equivalent. Furthermore, we show that species-specific differences in the stamen regulatory network are associated with differences in the expression of the microRNA miR169. Whereas there is considerable plasticity in individual B-class MADS box transcription factor function, there is overall conservation in the roles of the multimeric MADS box B-class protein complexes, providing robustness in the specification of petal and stamen identities. Such hidden variability in gene function as we observe for individual B-class genes can provide a molecular basis for the evolution of regulatory functions that result in novel morphologies.

  3. Gene profiling of the erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias induced by the Graffi murine retrovirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-David Yaacov

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias are associated with very poor prognoses and the mechanism of blastic transformation is insufficiently elucidated. The murine Graffi leukaemia retrovirus induces erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias when inoculated into NFS mice and represents a good model to study these leukaemias. Methods To expand our understanding of genes specific to these leukaemias, we compared gene expression profiles, measured by microarray and RT-PCR, of all leukaemia types induced by this virus. Results The transcriptome level changes, present between the different leukaemias, led to the identification of specific cancerous signatures. We reported numerous genes that may be potential oncogenes, may have a function related to erythropoiesis or megakaryopoiesis or have a poorly elucidated physiological role. The expression pattern of these genes has been further tested by RT-PCR in different samples, in a Friend erythroleukaemic model and in human leukaemic cell lines. We also screened the megakaryoblastic leukaemias for viral integrations and identified genes targeted by these integrations and potentially implicated in the onset of the disease. Conclusions Taken as a whole, the data obtained from this global gene profiling experiment have provided a detailed characterization of Graffi virus induced erythro- and megakaryoblastic leukaemias with many genes reported specific to the transcriptome of these leukaemias for the first time.

  4. Genetics and evolution of MIXTA genes regulating cotton lint fiber development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huaitong; Tian, Yue; Wan, Qun; Fang, Lei; Guan, Xueying; Chen, Jiedan; Hu, Yan; Ye, Wenxue; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Wangzhen; Chen, Xiaoya; Zhang, Tianzhen

    2017-10-16

    Cotton, with cellulose-enriched mature fibers, is the largest source of natural textiles. Through a map-based cloning strategy, we isolated an industrially important lint fiber development gene (Li3 ) that encodes an MYB-MIXTA-like transcription factor (MML) on chromosome D12 (GhMML4_D12). Virus-induced gene silencing or decreasing the expression of the GhMML4_D12 gene in n2 NSM plants resulted in a significant reduction in epidermal cell prominence and lint fiber production. GhMML4_D12 is arranged in tandem with GhMML3, another MIXTA gene responsible for fuzz fiber development. These two very closely related MIXTA genes direct fiber initiation production in two specialized cell forms: lint and fuzz fibers. They may control the same metabolic pathways in different cell types. The MIXTAs expanded in Malvaceae during their evolution and produced a Malvaceae-specific family that regulates epidermal cell differentiation, different from the gene family that regulates leaf hair trichome development. Cotton has developed a unique transcriptional regulatory network for fiber development. Characterization of target genes regulating fiber production has provided insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cotton fiber development and has allowed the use of genetic engineering to increase lint yield by inducing more epidermal cells to develop into lint rather than fuzz fibers. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. Transcriptional regulation of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation by human papillomavirus 16 oncoproteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyöngyösi, Eszter; Szalmás, Anita; Ferenczi, Annamária; Póliska, Szilárd; Kónya, József; Veress, György

    2015-02-01

    The life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is strictly linked to the differentiation of their natural host cells. The HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins can delay the normal differentiation program of keratinocytes; however, the exact mechanisms responsible for this have not yet been identified. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of HPV16 oncoproteins on the expression of genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Primary human keratinocytes transduced by LXSN (control) retroviruses or virus vectors expressing HPV16 E6, E7 or E6/E7 genes were subjected to gene expression profiling. The results of microarray analysis showed that HPV 16 E6 and E7 have the capacity to downregulate the expression of several genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays were performed to confirm the microarray data. To investigate the effects of the HPV oncoproteins on the promoters of selected keratinocyte differentiation genes, luciferase reporter assays were performed. Our results suggest that the HPV 16 E6 and/or E7 oncogenes are able to downregulate the expression of several genes involved in keratinocyte differentiation (such as desmocollin 1, keratin 4, S100 calcium-binding protein A8 and small proline-rich protein 1A), at least partially by downregulating their promoter activity. This activity of the HPV oncoproteins may have a role in the productive virus life cycle, and also in virus-induced carcinogenesis.

  6. The p53 gene with emphasis on its paralogues in mosquitoes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tien-Huang; Wu, Yi-Jun; Hou, Jiun-Nan; Chiu, Cheng-Hsun; Chen, Wei-June

    2017-12-01

    The p53 gene is highly important in human cancers, as it serves as a tumor-suppressor gene. Subsequently, two p53 homologues, i.e., p73 and p63, with high identity of amino acids were identified, leading to construction of the p53 family. The p53 gene is highly important in human cancer because it usually transcribes genes that function by causing apoptosis in mammalian cells. In contrast, p63 and p73 tend to be more important in modulating development than inducing cell death, even though they share similar protein structures. Relatively recently, p53 was also identified in mosquitoes and many other insect species. Uniquely, its structure lacks the sterile alpha motif domain which is a putative protein-protein interaction domain and exclusively exists at the C-terminal region in p73 and p63 in mammals. A phylogenetic analysis revealed that the p53 gene derived from mosquitoes is composed of two paralogues, p53-1 and p53-2. Of these, only p53-2 is responsively upregulated by dengue 2 virus (DENV2) in C6/36 cells which usually survive the infection. This indicates that the p53 gene is closely related to DENV infection in mosquito cells. The specific significance of p53-2's involvement in cell survival from virus-induced stress is described and briefly discussed in this report. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Cytomegalovirus replicon-based regulation of gene expression in vitro and in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermine Mohr

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence for a connection between DNA replication and the expression of adjacent genes. Therefore, this study addressed the question of whether a herpesvirus origin of replication can be used to activate or increase the expression of adjacent genes. Cell lines carrying an episomal vector, in which reporter genes are linked to the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV origin of lytic replication (oriLyt, were constructed. Reporter gene expression was silenced by a histone-deacetylase-dependent mechanism, but was resolved upon lytic infection with MCMV. Replication of the episome was observed subsequent to infection, leading to the induction of gene expression by more than 1000-fold. oriLyt-based regulation thus provided a unique opportunity for virus-induced conditional gene expression without the need for an additional induction mechanism. This principle was exploited to show effective late trans-complementation of the toxic viral protein M50 and the glycoprotein gO of MCMV. Moreover, the application of this principle for intracellular immunization against herpesvirus infection was demonstrated. The results of the present study show that viral infection specifically activated the expression of a dominant-negative transgene, which inhibited viral growth. This conditional system was operative in explant cultures of transgenic mice, but not in vivo. Several applications are discussed.

  8. gene structure, gene expression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Primer 5.0 software. To adjust for RNA quality and diffe- rences in cDNA concentration, we amplified actin as an internal control with the following primers: PtActin-F (5′-TG. AAGGAGAAACTTGCGTAT-3′) and PtActin-R (5′-GCA. CAATGTTACCGTACAGAT-3′). These genes were ampli- fied from first-strand cDNA using ...

  9. Hidden Variability of Floral Homeotic B Genes in Solanaceae Provides a Molecular Basis for the Evolution of Novel Functions[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuten, Koen; Irish, Vivian

    2010-01-01

    B-class MADS box genes specify petal and stamen identities in several core eudicot species. Members of the Solanaceae possess duplicate copies of these genes, allowing for diversification of function. To examine the changing roles of such duplicate orthologs, we assessed the functions of B-class genes in Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) using virus-induced gene silencing and RNA interference approaches. Loss of function of individual duplicates can have distinct phenotypes, yet complete loss of B-class gene function results in extreme homeotic transformations of petal and stamen identities. We also show that these duplicate gene products have qualitatively different protein–protein interaction capabilities and different regulatory roles. Thus, compensatory changes in B-class MADS box gene duplicate function have occurred in the Solanaceae, in that individual gene roles are distinct, but their combined functions are equivalent. Furthermore, we show that species-specific differences in the stamen regulatory network are associated with differences in the expression of the microRNA miR169. Whereas there is considerable plasticity in individual B-class MADS box transcription factor function, there is overall conservation in the roles of the multimeric MADS box B-class protein complexes, providing robustness in the specification of petal and stamen identities. Such hidden variability in gene function as we observe for individual B-class genes can provide a molecular basis for the evolution of regulatory functions that result in novel morphologies. PMID:20807882

  10. Dynamic gene expression analysis in a H1N1 influenza virus mouse pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanyan; Gao, Yingjie; Shi, Yujing; Cui, Xiaolan

    2017-06-01

    H1N1, a major pathogenic subtype of influenza A virus, causes a respiratory infection in humans and livestock that can range from a mild infection to more severe pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Understanding the dynamic changes in the genome and the related functional changes induced by H1N1 influenza virus infection is essential to elucidating the pathogenesis of this virus and thereby determining strategies to prevent future outbreaks. In this study, we filtered the significantly expressed genes in mouse pneumonia using mRNA microarray analysis. Using STC analysis, seven significant gene clusters were revealed, and using STC-GO analysis, we explored the significant functions of these seven gene clusters. The results revealed GOs related to H1N1 virus-induced inflammatory and immune functions, including innate immune response, inflammatory response, specific immune response, and cellular response to interferon-beta. Furthermore, the dynamic regulation relationships of the key genes in mouse pneumonia were revealed by dynamic gene network analysis, and the most important genes were filtered, including Dhx58, Cxcl10, Cxcl11, Zbp1, Ifit1, Ifih1, Trim25, Mx2, Oas2, Cd274, Irgm1, and Irf7. These results suggested that during mouse pneumonia, changes in the expression of gene clusters and the complex interactions among genes lead to significant changes in function. Dynamic gene expression analysis revealed key genes that performed important functions. These results are a prelude to advancements in mouse H1N1 influenza virus infection biology, as well as the use of mice as a model organism for human H1N1 influenza virus infection studies.

  11. Identification of genes required for nonhost resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae reveals novel signaling components.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Li

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nonhost resistance is a generalized, durable, broad-spectrum resistance exhibited by plant species to a wide variety of microbial pathogens. Although nonhost resistance is an attractive breeding strategy, the molecular basis of this form of resistance remains unclear for many plant-microbe pathosystems, including interactions with the bacterial pathogen of rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS and an assay to detect the hypersensitive response (HR were used to screen for genes required for nonhost resistance to Xoo in N. benthamiana. When infiltrated with Xoo strain YN-1, N. benthamiana plants exhibited a strong necrosis within 24 h and produced a large amount of H(2O(2 in the infiltrated area. Expression of HR- and defense-related genes was induced, whereas bacterial numbers dramatically decreased during necrosis. VIGS of 45 ACE (Avr/Cf-elicited genes revealed identified seven genes required for nonhost resistance to Xoo in N. benthamiana. The seven genes encoded a calreticulin protein (ACE35, an ERF transcriptional factor (ACE43, a novel Solanaceous protein (ACE80, a hydrolase (ACE117, a peroxidase (ACE175 and two proteins with unknown function (ACE95 and ACE112. The results indicate that oxidative burst and calcium-dependent signaling pathways play an important role in nonhost resistance to Xoo. VIGS analysis further revealed that ACE35, ACE80, ACE95 and ACE175, but not the other three ACE genes, interfered with the Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: N. benthamiana plants inoculated with Xoo respond by rapidly eliciting an HR and nonhost resistance. The oxidative burst and other signaling pathways are pivotal in Xoo-N. benthamiana nonhost resistance, and genes involved in this response partially overlap with those involved in Cf/Avr4-dependent HR. The seven genes required for N. benthamiana-mediated resistance to Xoo provide a basis for further dissecting

  12. Silencing of the FRO1 gene and its effects on iron partition in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gama, Florinda; Saavedra, Teresa; Dandlen, Susana; de Varennes, Amarilis; Correia, Pedro J; Pestana, Maribela; Nolasco, Gustavo

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate the dynamic role of the ferric-chelate reductase enzyme (FCR) and to identify possible pathways of regulation of its activity in different plant organs an investigation was conducted by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) using tobacco rattle virus (TRV) to silence the ferric reductase oxidase gene (FRO1) that encodes the FCR enzyme. Half of Nicotiana benthamiana plants received the VIGS vector and the rest remained as control. Four treatments were imposed: two levels of Fe in the nutrient solution (0 or 2.5 μM of Fe), each one with silenced or non-silenced (VIGS-0; VIGS-2.5) plants. Plants grown without iron (0; VIGS-0) developed typical symptoms of iron deficiency in the youngest leaves. To prove that FRO1 silencing had occurred, resupply of Fe (R) was done by adding 2.5 μM of Fe to the nutrient solution in a subset of chlorotic plants (0-R; VIGS-R). Twelve days after resupply, 0-R plants had recovered from Fe deficiency while plants containing the VIGS vector (VIGS-R) remained chlorotic and both FRO1 gene expression and FCR activity were considerably reduced, consequently preventing Fe uptake. With the VIGS technique we were able to silence the FRO1 gene in N. benthamiana and point out its importance in chlorophyll synthesis and Fe partition. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Genome Wide Host Gene Expression Analysis in Chicken Lungs Infected with Avian Influenza Viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip B Ranaware

    Full Text Available The molecular pathogenesis of avian influenza infection varies greatly with individual bird species and virus strain. The molecular pathogenesis of the highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV or the low pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV infection in avian species remains poorly understood. Thus, global immune response of chickens infected with HPAI H5N1 (A/duck/India/02CA10/2011 and LPAI H9N2 (A/duck/India/249800/2010 viruses was studied using microarray to identify crucial host genetic components responsive to these infection. HPAI H5N1 virus induced excessive expression of type I IFNs (IFNA and IFNG, cytokines (IL1B, IL18, IL22, IL13, and IL12B, chemokines (CCL4, CCL19, CCL10, and CX3CL1 and IFN stimulated genes (OASL, MX1, RSAD2, IFITM5, IFIT5, GBP 1, and EIF2AK in lung tissues. This dysregulation of host innate immune genes may be the critical determinant of the severity and the outcome of the influenza infection in chickens. In contrast, the expression levels of most of these genes was not induced in the lungs of LPAI H9N2 virus infected chickens. This study indicated the relationship between host immune genes and their roles in pathogenesis of HPAIV infection in chickens.

  14. Gene Locater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Sehar, Anoosha; Rehman, Inayat-Ur

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Locating genes on a chromosome is important for understanding the gene function and its linkage and recombination. Knowledge of gene positions on chromosomes is necessary for annotation. The study is essential for disease genetics and genomics, among other aspects. Currently available...... software's for calculating recombination frequency is mostly limited to the range and flexibility of this type of analysis. GENE LOCATER is a fully customizable program for calculating recombination frequency, written in JAVA. Through an easy-to-use interface, GENE LOCATOR allows users a high degree...

  15. Gene silencing: concepts, applications, and perspectives in woody plants Silenciamento gênico: conceitos, aplicações e perspectivas em plantas lenhosas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amancio José de Souza

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference, transcriptional gene silencing, virus induced gene silencing, and micro RNAs comprise a series of mechanisms capable of suppressing gene expression in plants. These mechanisms reveal similar biochemical pathways and appear to be related in several levels. The ability to manipulate gene silencing has produced transgenic plants able to switch off endogenous genes and invading nucleic acids. This powerful biotechnological tool has provided plant breeders and researchers with great opportunity to accelerate breeding programs and developmental studies in woody plants. This research work reports on gene silencing in woody plants, and discuss applications and future perspectives.RNA de interferência, silenciamento gênico transcricional, silenciamento gênico induzido por vírus e micro RNAs compõem uma série de mecanismos capazes de suprimir a expressão gênica em plantas. Estes mecanismos revelaram rotas metabólicas parecidas e interagem em vários níveis. A capacidade de manipular técnicas de silenciamento gênico tem produzido plantas transgênicas capazes de suprimir a expressão de genes endógenos e ácidos nucléicos invasores. Esta poderosa ferramenta biotecnológica tem ofertado a possibilidade de acelerar programas de melhoramento e pesquisas em desenvolvimento de plantas lenhosas. Este trabalho visa revisar pesquisas de silenciamento gênico em plantas lenhosas e discutir aplicações e rumos futuros.

  16. The Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus resistance genes Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and code for DFDGD-class RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten G Verlaan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease incited by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV causes huge losses in tomato production worldwide and is caused by different related begomovirus species. Breeding for TYLCV resistance has been based on the introgression of multiple resistance genes originating from several wild tomato species. In this study we have fine-mapped the widely used Solanum chilense-derived Ty-1 and Ty-3 genes by screening nearly 12,000 plants for recombination events and generating recombinant inbred lines. Multiple molecular markers were developed and used in combination with disease tests to fine-map the genes to a small genomic region (approximately 70 kb. Using a Tobacco Rattle Virus-Virus Induced Gene Silencing approach, the resistance gene was identified. It is shown that Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and that they code for a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR belonging to the RDRγ type, which has an atypical DFDGD motif in the catalytic domain. In contrast to the RDRα type, characterized by a catalytic DLDGD motif, no clear function has yet been described for the RDRγ type, and thus the Ty-1/Ty-3 gene unveils a completely new class of resistance gene. Although speculative, the resistance mechanism of Ty-1/Ty-3 and its specificity towards TYLCV are discussed in light of the function of the related RDRα class in the amplification of the RNAi response in plants and transcriptional silencing of geminiviruses in plants.

  17. Suppression substractive hybridisation (SSH) and real time PCR reveal differential gene expression in the Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, challenged with Ostreid herpesvirus 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renault, T; Faury, N; Barbosa-Solomieu, V; Moreau, K

    2011-07-01

    Virus-induced genes were identified using suppression subtractive hybridisation (SSH) from Pacific cupped oyster, Crassostrea gigas, haemocytes challenged by OsHV-1. A total of 304 clones from SSH forward library were sequenced. Among these sequences, some homologues corresponded to (i) immune related genes (macrophage express protein, IK cytokine, interferon-induced protein 44 or multicopper oxidase), (ii) apoptosis related genes (Bcl-2) and (iii) cell signalling and virus receptor genes (glypican). Molecular characterization and phylogenic analysis of 3 immune-related genes (macrophage expressed protein, multicopper oxidase and immunoglobulin domain cell adhesion molecule) were performed. Finally, quantitative PCR revealed significant changes in the expression of immune related genes (multicopper oxidase, macrophage expressed protein, myeloid differentiation factor 88 and interferon-induced protein 44) in oysters experimentally challenged with OsHV-1. These findings provide a first basis for studying the role of innate immunity in response to viruses in bivalves and identified genes may serve as markers of interest in breeding programs in order to obtain selected oysters presenting OsHV-1 resistance. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Trichoderma genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foreman, Pamela [Los Altos, CA; Goedegebuur, Frits [Vlaardingen, NL; Van Solingen, Pieter [Naaldwijk, NL; Ward, Michael [San Francisco, CA

    2012-06-19

    Described herein are novel gene sequences isolated from Trichoderma reesei. Two genes encoding proteins comprising a cellulose binding domain, one encoding an arabionfuranosidase and one encoding an acetylxylanesterase are described. The sequences, CIP1 and CIP2, contain a cellulose binding domain. These proteins are especially useful in the textile and detergent industry and in pulp and paper industry.

  19. Assessing the tobacco-rattle-virus-based vectors system as an efficient gene silencing technique in Datura stramonium (Solanaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eftekhariyan Ghamsari, Mohammad Reza; Karimi, Farah; Mousavi Gargari, Seyed Latif; Hosseini Tafreshi, Seyed Ali; Salami, Seyed Alireza

    2014-12-01

    Datura stramonium is a well-known medicinal plant, which is important for its alkaloids. There are intrinsic limitations for the natural production of alkaloids in plants; metabolic engineering methods can be effectively used to conquer these limitations. In order for this the genes involved in corresponding pathways need to be studied. Virus-Induced Gene Silencing is known as a functional genomics technique to knock-down expression of endogenous genes. In this study, we silenced phytoene desaturase as a marker gene in D. stramonium in a heterologous and homologous manner by tobacco-rattle-virus-based VIGS vectors. Recombinant TRV vector containing pds gene from D. stramonium (pTRV2-Dspds) was constructed and injected into seedlings. The plants injected with pTRV2-Dspds showed photobleaching 2 weeks after infiltration. Spectrophotometric analysis demonstrated that the amount of chlorophylls and carotenoids in leaves of the bleached plants decreased considerably compared to that of the control plants. Semi-Quantitative RT-PCR results also confirmed that the expression of pds gene in the silenced plants was significantly reduced in comparison with the control plants. The results showed that the viral vector was able to influence the levels of total alkaloid content in D. stramonium. Our results illustrated that TRV-based VIGS vectors are able to induce effective and reliable functional gene silencing in D. stramonium as an alternative tool for studying the genes of interest in this plant, such as the targeted genes in tropane alkaloid biosynthetic pathway. The present work is the first report of establishing VIGS as an efficient method for transient silencing of any gene of interest in D. stramonium.

  20. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus induces cross-protective immunity against Eurasian 'avian-like' H1N1 swine viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Maria R; Facchini, Marzia; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Garulli, Bruno; Sciaraffia, Ester; Meola, Monica; Fabiani, Concetta; De Marco, Maria A; Cordioli, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-05-01

    To examine cross-reactivity between hemagglutinin (HA) derived from A/California/7/09 (CA/09) virus and that derived from representative Eurasian "avian-like" (EA) H1N1 swine viruses isolated in Italy between 1999 and 2008 during virological surveillance in pigs. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the HA gene of CA/09 virus (MVA-HA-CA/09) was used as a vaccine to investigate cross-protective immunity against H1N1 swine viruses in mice. Two classical swine H1N1 (CS) viruses and four representative EA-like H1N1 swine viruses previously isolated during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pigs on farms in Northern Italy were used in this study. Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MVA/HA/CA/09 and then challenged intranasally with H1N1 swine viruses. Cross-reactive antibody responses were determined by hemagglutination- inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralizing (MN) assays of sera from MVA-vaccinated mice. The extent of protective immunity against infection with H1N1 swine viruses was determined by measuring lung viral load on days 2 and 4 post-challenge. Systemic immunization of mice with CA/09-derived HA, vectored by MVA, elicited cross-protective immunity against recent EA-like swine viruses. This immune protection was related to the levels of cross-reactive HI antibodies in the sera of the immunized mice and was dependent on the similarity of the antigenic site Sa of H1 HAs. Our findings suggest that the herd immunity elicited in humans by the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus could limit the transmission of recent EA-like swine HA genes into the influenza A virus gene pool in humans. © 2013 The Authors Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing the hemagglutinin of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus induces cross-protective immunity against Eurasian ‘avian-like’ H1N1 swine viruses in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castrucci, Maria R; Facchini, Marzia; Di Mario, Giuseppina; Garulli, Bruno; Sciaraffia, Ester; Meola, Monica; Fabiani, Concetta; De Marco, Maria A; Cordioli, Paolo; Siccardi, Antonio; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Donatelli, Isabella

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To examine cross-reactivity between hemagglutinin (HA) derived from A/California/7/09 (CA/09) virus and that derived from representative Eurasian “avian-like” (EA) H1N1 swine viruses isolated in Italy between 1999 and 2008 during virological surveillance in pigs. Design Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) expressing the HA gene of CA/09 virus (MVA-HA-CA/09) was used as a vaccine to investigate cross-protective immunity against H1N1 swine viruses in mice. Sample Two classical swine H1N1 (CS) viruses and four representative EA-like H1N1 swine viruses previously isolated during outbreaks of respiratory disease in pigs on farms in Northern Italy were used in this study. Setting Female C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with MVA/HA/CA/09 and then challenged intranasally with H1N1 swine viruses. Main outcome measures Cross-reactive antibody responses were determined by hemagglutination- inhibition (HI) and virus microneutralizing (MN) assays of sera from MVA-vaccinated mice. The extent of protective immunity against infection with H1N1 swine viruses was determined by measuring lung viral load on days 2 and 4 post-challenge. Results and Conclusions Systemic immunization of mice with CA/09-derived HA, vectored by MVA, elicited cross-protective immunity against recent EA-like swine viruses. This immune protection was related to the levels of cross-reactive HI antibodies in the sera of the immunized mice and was dependent on the similarity of the antigenic site Sa of H1 HAs. Our findings suggest that the herd immunity elicited in humans by the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus could limit the transmission of recent EA-like swine HA genes into the influenza A virus gene pool in humans. PMID:24373385

  2. Hepatitis B Virus Induces Cell Proliferation via HBx-Induced microRNA-21 in Hepatocellular Carcinoma by Targeting Programmed Cell Death Protein4 (PDCD4) and Phosphatase and Tensin Homologue (PTEN)

    OpenAIRE

    Damania, Preeti; Sen, Bijoya; Dar, Sadaf Bashir; Kumar, Satendra; Kumari, Anupama; Gupta, Ekta; Sarin, Shiv Kumar; Venugopal, Senthil Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B viral infection-induced hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the major problems in the developing countries. One of the HBV proteins, HBx, modulates the host cell machinery via several mechanisms. In this study we hypothesized that HBV enhances cell proliferation via HBx-induced microRNA-21 in hepatocellular carcinoma. HBx gene was over-expressed, and miRNA-21 expression and cell proliferation were measured in Huh 7 and Hep G2 cells. miRNA-21 was over-expressed in these cells, cell ...

  3. Herpes simplex virus induces the marked up-regulation of the zinc finger transcriptional factor INSM1, which modulates the expression and localization of the immediate early protein ICP0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs rapidly shut off macromolecular synthesis in host cells. In contrast, global microarray analyses have shown that HSV infection markedly up-regulates a number of host cell genes that may play important roles in HSV-host cell interactions. To understand the regulatory mechanisms involved, we initiated studies focusing on the zinc finger transcription factor insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1, a host cell protein markedly up-regulated by HSV infection. Results INSM1 gene expression in HSV-1-infected normal human epidermal keratinocytes increased at least 400-fold 9 h after infection; INSM1 promoter activity was also markedly stimulated. Expression and subcellular localization of the immediate early HSV protein ICP0 was affected by INSM1 expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed binding of INSM1 to the ICP0 promoter. Moreover, the role of INSM1 in HSV-1 infection was further clarified by inhibition of HSV-1 replication by INSM1-specific siRNA. Conclusions The results suggest that INSM1 up-regulation plays a positive role in HSV-1 replication, probably by binding to the ICP0 promoter.

  4. Tobacco Rattle Virus-Based Silencing of Enoyl-CoA Reductase Gene and Its Role in Resistance Against Cotton Wilt Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustafa, Roma; Hamza, Muhammad; Kamal, Hira; Mansoor, Shahid; Scheffler, Jodi; Amin, Imran

    2017-07-01

    A Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing assay was employed as a reverse genetic approach to study gene function in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum). This approach was used to investigate the function of the Enoyl-CoA reductase (GhECR) gene in pathogen defense. Amino acid sequence alignment of Arabidopsis ECR with homologous sequence from G. hirsutum, G. arboreum, G. herbaceum and G. barbadense showed that ECRs are highly conserved among these species. TRV-based silencing of GhECR gene in G. hirsutum induced a cell death/necrotic lesion-like phenotype. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR showed reduced GhECR mRNA levels in TRV inoculated plants. Three isolates of Verticillium dahliae (V. dahliae) and Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. vasinfectum (FOV) were used to infect GhECR-silenced plants. Out of 6 races of 2 pathogens, down regulation of GhECR gene resulted in reduced resistance. This is the first report showing that cotton GhECR gene is involved in resistance to different strains of V. dahliae and FOV.

  5. Characterization of a Novel Cotton Subtilase Gene GbSBT1 in Response to Extracellular Stimulations and Its Role in Verticillium Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Xingpeng; Zhang, Zhidong; Wang, Jin; Zuo, Kaijing

    2016-01-01

    Verticillium wilt is a disastrous vascular disease in plants caused by Verticillium dahliae. Verticillium pathogens secrete various disease-causing effectors in cotton. This study identified a subtilase gene GbSBT1 from Gossypium babardense and investigated the roles against V. dahliae infection. GbSBT1 gene expression is responsive to V. dahliae defense signals, jasmonic acid, and ethylene treatments. Moreover, the GbSBT1 protein is mainly localized in the cell membrane and moves into the cytoplasm following jasmonic acid and ethylene treatments. Silencing GbSBT1 gene expression through virus-induced GbSBT1 gene silencing reduced the tolerance of Pima-90 (resistant genotype), but not facilitated the infection process of V. dahliae in Coker-312 (sensitive genotype). Moreover, the ectopically expressed GbSBT1 gene enhanced the resistance of Arabidopsis to Fusarium oxysporum and V. dahliae infection and activated the expression levels of defense-related genes. Furthermore, pull-down, yeast two-hybrid assay, and BiFC analysis revealed that GbSBT1 interacts with a prohibitin (PHB)-like protein expressed in V. dahliae pathogens during infection. In summary, GbSBT1 recognizes the effector PHB protein secreted from V. dahliae and is involved in Verticillium-induced resistance in cotton.

  6. TRV-GFP: a modified Tobacco rattle virus vector for efficient and visualizable analysis of gene function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ji; Pei, Haixia; Zhang, Shuai; Chen, Jiwei; Chen, Wen; Yang, Ruoyun; Meng, Yonglu; You, Jie; Gao, Junping; Ma, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a useful tool for functional characterization of genes in plants. Unfortunately, the efficiency of infection by Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) is relatively low for some non-Solanaceae plants, which are economically important, such as rose (Rosa sp.). Here, to generate an easy traceable TRV vector, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was tagged to the 3' terminus of the coat protein gene in the original TRV2 vector, and the silencing efficiency of the modified TRV-GFP vector was tested in several plants, including Nicotiana benthamiana, Arabidopsis thaliana, rose, strawberry (Fragaria ananassa), and chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum). The results showed that the efficiency of infection by TRV-GFP was equal to that of the original TRV vector in each tested plant. Spread of the modified TRV virus was easy to monitor by using fluorescent microscopy and a hand-held UV lamp. When TRV-GFP was used to silence the endogenous phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in rose cuttings and seedlings, the typical photobleached phenotype was observed in 75-80% plants which were identified as GFP positive by UV lamp. In addition, the abundance of GFP protein, which represented the concentration of TRV virus, was proved to correlate negatively with the level of the PDS gene, suggesting that GFP could be used as an indicator of the degree of silencing of a target gene. Taken together, this work provides a visualizable and efficient tool to predict positive gene silencing plants, which is valuable for research into gene function in plants, especially for non-Solanaceae plants.

  7. TRV–GFP: a modified Tobacco rattle virus vector for efficient and visualizable analysis of gene function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ji; Pei, Haixia; Ma, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a useful tool for functional characterization of genes in plants. Unfortunately, the efficiency of infection by Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) is relatively low for some non-Solanaceae plants, which are economically important, such as rose (Rosa sp.). Here, to generate an easy traceable TRV vector, a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene was tagged to the 3’ terminus of the coat protein gene in the original TRV2 vector, and the silencing efficiency of the modified TRV–GFP vector was tested in several plants, including Nicotiana benthamiana, Arabidopsis thaliana, rose, strawberry (Fragaria ananassa), and chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum). The results showed that the efficiency of infection by TRV–GFP was equal to that of the original TRV vector in each tested plant. Spread of the modified TRV virus was easy to monitor by using fluorescent microscopy and a hand-held UV lamp. When TRV–GFP was used to silence the endogenous phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene in rose cuttings and seedlings, the typical photobleached phenotype was observed in 75–80% plants which were identified as GFP positive by UV lamp. In addition, the abundance of GFP protein, which represented the concentration of TRV virus, was proved to correlate negatively with the level of the PDS gene, suggesting that GFP could be used as an indicator of the degree of silencing of a target gene. Taken together, this work provides a visualizable and efficient tool to predict positive gene silencing plants, which is valuable for research into gene function in plants, especially for non-Solanaceae plants. PMID:24218330

  8. Functional roles of the pepper MLO protein gene, CaMLO2, in abscisic acid signaling and drought sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chae Woo; Lee, Sung Chul

    2014-05-01

    Plants are frequently exposed to various environmental stresses including drought in the natural environment and have evolved physiological, biochemical, and molecular mechanisms to counteract the deleterious effects of stress. Of them, modulation of abscisic acid (ABA) signal transduction allows plants to overcome stress. Recently, Kim and Hwang (Plant J 72:843-855, 2012) identified CaMLO2 that is transcriptionally induced by both biotic and abiotic stress. Based on this, we tested the possibility that CaMLO2 is involved in abiotic stress, although m ildew resistance l ocus O (MLO) proteins have been known as negative regulators in plant defense responses against powdery mildew. The CaMLO2 gene was strongly induced in pepper leaves exposed to ABA and drought. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaMLO2 in pepper plants showed low levels of transpiration and lipid peroxidation in dehydrated leaves. Overexpression of the CaMLO2 gene in Arabidopsis conferred reduced sensitivity to ABA in germination and seedling growth and establishment. High transpiration rates and low degrees of stomatal closure in response to ABA also led transgenic plants to be more vulnerable to drought than the wild-type, which was accompanied by altered expression of stress-related genes. Taken together, these data suggest that CaMLO2 acts as a negative regulator of ABA signaling that suppresses water loss from leaves under drought conditions.

  9. Age-related Resistance and the Defense Signaling Pathway of Ph-3 Gene Against Phytophthora infestans in Tomatoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Rashad Ali Shah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance (R genes against plant pathogens often have age-related resistance (ARR effects. However, the mechanism involved in this phenomenon remains unknown. In this paper, Solanum lycopersicum ‘CLN2037B’ and S. pimpinellifolium ‘L3708’ harboring the Ph-3 gene, as well as S. habrochaites ‘LA2099’, ‘LA1777’ and ‘LA1033’ harboring quantitative trait loci (QTLs, were tested to investigate age-related resistance against late blight (LB; caused by Phytophthora infestans in the three-leaf stage of the plants. The results demonstrated that the QTL-related LB resistance showed the same age-related resistance as the Ph-3-mediated resistance at the six- and nine-leaf stages compared with the three-leaf stage. This indicated that there is a common defense mechanism in tomatoes against P. infestans via ARR. In addition, we combined ethylene (ET, salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA mutants with virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS to study the Ph-3-dependent resistance signaling pathway. The results showed that ethylene and salicylic acid, but not jasmonic acid, are involved in the LB resistance mediated by the Ph-3 gene.

  10. Silencing of the CaCP Gene Delays Salt- and Osmotic-Induced Leaf Senescence in Capsicum annuum L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Juan Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cysteine proteinases have been known to participate in developmental processes and in response to stress in plants. Our present research reported that a novel CP gene, CaCP, was involved in leaf senescence in pepper (Capsicum annuum L.. The full-length CaCP cDNA is comprised of 1316 bp, contains 1044 nucleotides in open reading frame (ORF, and encodes a 347 amino acid protein. The deduced protein belongs to the papain-like cysteine proteases (CPs superfamily, containing a highly conserved ERFNIN motif, a GCNGG motif and a conserved catalytic triad. This protein localized to the vacuole of plant cells. Real-time quantitative PCR analysis revealed that the expression level of CaCP gene was dramatically higher in leaves and flowers than that in roots, stems and fruits. Moreover, CaCP transcripts were induced upon during leaf senescence. CaCP expression was upregulated by plant hormones, especially salicylic acid. CaCP was also significantly induced by abiotic and biotic stress treatments, including high salinity, mannitol and Phytophthora capsici. Loss of function of CaCP using the virus-induced gene-silencing technique in pepper plants led to enhanced tolerance to salt- and osmotic-induced stress. Taken together, these results suggest that CaCP is a senescence-associated gene, which is involved in developmental senescence and regulates salt- and osmotic-induced leaf senescence in pepper.

  11. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene plays a key role in the quality of corm and yield of cormels in gladiolus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seng, Shanshan, E-mail: seshsh108@126.com [Beijing Key Laboratory of Development and Quality Control of Ornamental Crops, Department of Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, China Agricultural University, Yuan Mingyuan Western Road 2#, Beijing 100193 (China); Wu, Jian [Beijing Key Laboratory of Development and Quality Control of Ornamental Crops, Department of Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, China Agricultural University, Yuan Mingyuan Western Road 2#, Beijing 100193 (China); Sui, Juanjuan [Beijing Key Laboratory of Development and Quality Control of Ornamental Crops, Department of Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, China Agricultural University, Yuan Mingyuan Western Road 2#, Beijing 100193 (China); College of Biology, Fuyang Normal College, Qinghe Western Road 100#, Fuyang 236037, Anhui (China); Wu, Chenyu; Zhong, Xionghui; Liu, Chen; Liu, Chao; Gong, Benhe; Zhang, Fengqin; He, Junna [Beijing Key Laboratory of Development and Quality Control of Ornamental Crops, Department of Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, China Agricultural University, Yuan Mingyuan Western Road 2#, Beijing 100193 (China); Yi, Mingfang, E-mail: ymfang@cau.edu.cn [Beijing Key Laboratory of Development and Quality Control of Ornamental Crops, Department of Ornamental Horticulture and Landscape Architecture, China Agricultural University, Yuan Mingyuan Western Road 2#, Beijing 100193 (China)

    2016-05-20

    Starch is the main storage compound in underground organs like corms. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) plays a key role in regulating starch biosynthesis in storage organs and is likely one of the most important determinant of sink strength. Here, we identify an AGPase gene (GhAGPS1) from gladiolus. The highest transcriptional levels of GhAGPS1 were observed in cormels and corms. Transformation of GhAGPS1 into Arabidopsis rescued the phenotype of aps1 mutant. Silencing GhAGPS1 in gladiolus corms by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) decreased the transcriptional levels of two genes and starch content. Transmission electron microscopy analyses of leaf and corm sections confirmed that starch biosynthesis was inhibited. Corm weight and cormel number reduced significantly in the silenced plants. Taken together, these results indicate that inhibiting the expression of AGPase gene could impair starch synthesis, which results in the lowered corm quality and cormel yield in gladiolus. -- Highlights: •Cormel quantity was reduced significantly in silenced Gladiolus plants. •Corm quality was declined significantly in silenced Gladiolus plants. •Starch synthesis was inhibited in silenced Gladiolus plants.

  12. Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or improve your body's ability to fight disease. Gene therapy holds promise for treating a wide range of diseases, such as cancer, cystic fibrosis, heart disease, diabetes, hemophilia and AIDS. Researchers are still studying how and ...

  13. Characterization and expression profile of CaNAC2 pepper gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li eGuo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The plant-specific NAC (NAM, ATAF, and CUC transcription factors have diverse role in development and stress regulation. A new transcript encoding NAC protein, homologous to nam-like protein 4 from Petunia was identified from an ABA-regulated subtractive cDNA library of Capsicum annuum seedling. Here, this homolog (named CaNAC2 from Capsicum annuum was characterized and investigated its role in abiotic stress tolerance. Our results indicated that a plant-specific and conserved NAC domain was located in the N-terminus domain of CaNAC2 which was predicted to encode a polypeptide of 410 amino acids. Phylogenetic analysis showed that CaNAC2 belonged to the NAC2 subgroup of the orthologous group 4d. The protein CaNAC2 was subcellularly localized in the nucleus and it had transcriptional activity in yeast cell. CaNAC2 was expressed mainly in seed and root. The transcription expression of CaNAC2 was strongly induced by cold, salt and ABA treatment and inhibited by osmotic stress and SA treatment. Silence of CaNAC2 in virus-induced gene silenced pepper seedlings resulted in the increased susceptibility to cold stress and delayed the salt-induced leaf chlorophyll degradation. These results indicated that this novel CaNAC2 gene might be involved in pepper response to abiotic stress tolerance.

  14. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Guo, Wanzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Yan, Qigui; Luo, Yan; Shi, Qian; Chen, Dishi; Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2011-06-16

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28) following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31). Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection.

  15. Phenotyping of VIGS-mediated gene silencing in rice using a vector derived from a DNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2017-07-01

    Target genes in rice can be optimally silenced if inserted in antisense or hairpin orientation in the RTBV-derived VIGS vector and plants grown at 28 °C and 80% humidity after inoculation. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a method used to transiently silence genes in dicot as well as monocot plants. For the important monocot species rice, the Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV)-derived VIGS system (RTBV-VIGS), which uses agroinoculation to initiate silencing, has not been standardized for optimal use. Here, using RTBV-VIGS, three sets of conditions were tested to achieve optimal silencing of the rice marker gene phytoene desaturase (pds). The effect of orientation of the insert in the RTBV-VIGS plasmid (sense, antisense and hairpin) on the silencing of the target gene was then evaluated using rice magnesium chelatase subunit H (chlH). Finally, the rice Xa21 gene, conferring resistance against bacterial leaf blight disease (BLB) was silenced using RTBV-VIGS system. In each case, real-time PCR-based assessment indicated approximately 40-80% fall in the accumulation levels of the transcripts of pds, chlH and Xa21. In the case of pds, the appearance of white streaks in the emerging leaves, and for chlH, chlorophyll levels and F v /F m ratio were assessed as phenotypes for silencing. For Xa21, the resistance levels to BLB were assessed by measuring the lesion length and the percent diseased areas of leaves, following challenge inoculation with Xanthomonas oryzae. In each case, the RTBV-MVIGS system gave rise to a discernible phenotype indicating the silencing of the respective target gene using condition III (temperature 28 °C, humidity 80% and 1 mM MES and 20 µM acetosyringone in secondary agrobacterium culture), which revealed the robustness of this gene silencing system for rice.

  16. Investigations of barley stripe mosaic virus as a gene silencing vector in barley roots and in Brachypodium distachyon and oat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Lena

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene silencing vectors based on Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV are used extensively in cereals to study gene function, but nearly all studies have been limited to genes expressed in leaves of barley and wheat. However since many important aspects of plant biology are based on root-expressed genes we wanted to explore the potential of BSMV for silencing genes in root tissues. Furthermore, the newly completed genome sequence of the emerging cereal model species Brachypodium distachyon as well as the increasing amount of EST sequence information available for oat (Avena species have created a need for tools to study gene function in these species. Results Here we demonstrate the successful BSMV-mediated virus induced gene silencing (VIGS of three different genes in barley roots, i.e. the barley homologues of the IPS1, PHR1, and PHO2 genes known to participate in Pi uptake and reallocation in Arabidopsis. Attempts to silence two other genes, the Pi transporter gene HvPht1;1 and the endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene HvCel1, in barley roots were unsuccessful, probably due to instability of the plant gene inserts in the viral vector. In B. distachyon leaves, significant silencing of the PHYTOENE DESATURASE (BdPDS gene was obtained as shown by photobleaching as well as quantitative RT-PCR analysis. On the other hand, only very limited silencing of the oat AsPDS gene was observed in both hexaploid (A. sativa and diploid (A. strigosa oat. Finally, two modifications of the BSMV vector are presented, allowing ligation-free cloning of DNA fragments into the BSMV-γ component. Conclusions Our results show that BSMV can be used as a vector for gene silencing in barley roots and in B. distachyon leaves and possibly roots, opening up possibilities for using VIGS to study cereal root biology and to exploit the wealth of genome information in the new cereal model plant B. distachyon. On the other hand, the silencing induced by BSMV in oat seemed too

  17. Characteristic of the pepper CaRGA2 gene in defense responses against Phytophthora capsici Leonian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying-Li; Jia, Qing-Li; Li, Da-Wei; Wang, Jun-E; Yin, Yan-Xu; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2013-04-25

    The most significant threat to pepper production worldwide is the Phytophthora blight, which is caused by the oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora capsici Leonian. In an effort to help control this disease, we isolated and characterized a P. capsici resistance gene, CaRGA2, from a high resistant pepper (C. annuum CM334) and analyzed its function by the method of real-time PCR and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The CaRGA2 has a full-length cDNA of 3,018 bp with 2,874 bp open reading frame (ORF) and encodes a 957-aa protein. The protein has a predicted molecular weight of 108.6 kDa, and the isoelectric point is 8.106. Quantitative real-time PCR indicated that CaRGA2 expression was rapidly induced by P. capsici. The gene expression pattern was different between the resistant and susceptible cultivars. CaRGA2 was quickly expressed in the resistant cultivar, CM334, and reached to a peak at 24 h after inoculation with P. capsici, five-fold higher than that of susceptible cultivar. Our results suggest that CaRGA2 has a distinct pattern of expression and plays a critical role in P. capsici stress tolerance. When the CaRGA2 gene was silenced via VIGS, the resistance level was clearly suppressed, an observation that was supported by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and detached leave inoculation. VIGS analysis revealed their importance in the surveillance to P. capsici in pepper. Our results support the idea that the CaRGA2 gene may show their response in resistance against P. capsici. These analyses will aid in an effort towards breeding for broad and durable resistance in economically important pepper cultivars.

  18. Hepatitis B virus induces cell proliferation via HBx-induced microRNA-21 in hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting programmed cell death protein4 (PDCD4 and phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preeti Damania

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B viral infection-induced hepatocellular carcinoma is one of the major problems in the developing countries. One of the HBV proteins, HBx, modulates the host cell machinery via several mechanisms. In this study we hypothesized that HBV enhances cell proliferation via HBx-induced microRNA-21 in hepatocellular carcinoma. HBx gene was over-expressed, and miRNA-21 expression and cell proliferation were measured in Huh 7 and Hep G2 cells. miRNA-21 was over-expressed in these cells, cell proliferation and the target proteins were analyzed. To confirm the role of miRNA-21 in HBx-induced proliferation, Hep G 2.2.1.5 cells (a cell line that expresses HBV stably were used for miRNA-21 inhibition studies. HBx over-expression enhanced proliferation (3.7- and 4.5-fold increase; n = 3; p<0.01 and miRNA-21 expression (24- and 36-fold increase, normalized with 5S rRNA; p<0.001 in Huh 7 and Hep G2 cells respectively. HBx also resulted in the inhibition of miRNA-21 target proteins, PDCD4 and PTEN. miRNA-21 resulted in a significant increase in proliferation (2- and 2.3-fold increase over control cells; p<0.05 in Huh 7 and Hep G2 cells respectively and decreased target proteins, PDCD4 and PTEN expression. Anti-miR-21 resulted in a significant decrease in proliferation (p<0.05 and increased miRNA-21 target protein expression. We conclude that HBV infection enhances cell proliferation, at least in part, via HBx-induced miRNA-21 expression during hepatocellular carcinoma progression.

  19. Suppression of the homeobox gene HDTF1 enhances resistance to Verticillium dahliae and Botrytis cinerea in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Wei; Long, Lu; Xu, Li; Lindsey, Keith; Zhang, Xianlong; Zhu, Longfu

    2016-05-01

    Development of pathogen-resistant crops, such as fungus-resistant cotton, has significantly reduced chemical application and improved crop yield and quality. However, the mechanism of resistance to cotton pathogens such as Verticillium dahliae is still poorly understood. In this study, we characterized a cotton gene (HDTF1) that was isolated following transcriptome profiling during the resistance response of cotton to V. dahliae. HDTF1 putatively encodes a homeodomain transcription factor, and its expression was found to be down-regulated in cotton upon inoculation with V. dahliae and Botrytis cinerea. To characterise the involvement of HDTF1 in the response to these pathogens, we used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to generate HDTF1-silenced cotton. VIGS reduction in HDTF1 expression significantly enhanced cotton plant resistance to both pathogens. HDTF1 silencing resulted in activation of jasmonic acid (JA)-mediated signaling and JA accumulation. However, the silenced plants were not altered in the accumulation of salicylic acid (SA) or the expression of marker genes associated with SA signaling. These results suggest that HDTF1 is a negative regulator of the JA pathway, and resistance to V. dahliae and B. cinerea can be engineered by activation of JA signaling. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  20. Tobacco Rar1, EDS1 and NPR1/NIM1 like genes are required for N-mediated resistance to tobacco mosaic virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yule; Schiff, Michael; Marathe, Rajendra; Dinesh-Kumar, S P

    2002-05-01

    The tobacco N gene confers resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and encodes a Toll-interleukin-1 receptor/nucleotide binding site/leucine-rich repeat (TIR-NBS-LRR) class protein. We have developed and used a tobacco rattle virus (TRV) based virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) system to investigate the role of tobacco candidate genes in the N-mediated signalling pathway. To accomplish this we generated transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana containing the tobacco N gene. The transgenic lines exhibit hypersensitive response (HR) to TMV and restrict virus spread to the inoculated site. This demonstrates that the tobacco N gene can confer resistance to TMV in heterologous N. benthamiana. We have used this line to study the role of tobacco Rar1-, EDS1-, and NPR1/NIM1- like genes in N-mediated resistance to TMV using a TRV based VIGS approach. Our VIGS analysis suggests that these genes are required for N function. EDS1-like gene requirement for the N function suggests that EDS1 could be a common component of bacterial, fungal and viral resistance signalling mediated by the TIR-NBS-LRR class of resistance proteins. Requirement of Rar1- like gene for N-mediated resistance to TMV and some powdery mildew resistance genes in barley provide the first example of converging points in the disease resistance signalling pathways mediated by TIR-NBS-LRR and CC-NBS-LRR proteins. The TRV based VIGS approach as described here to study N-mediated resistance signalling will be useful for the analysis of not only disease resistance signalling pathways but also of other signalling pathways in genetically intractable plant systems.

  1. Functional roles of the pepper RING finger protein gene, CaRING1, in abscisic acid signaling and dehydration tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Chae Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, which include pathogens and conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major plant hormone involved in signal transduction pathways that mediate the defense response of plants to abiotic stress. Previously, we isolated Ring finger protein gene (CaRING1) from pepper (Capsicum annuum), which is associated with resistance to bacterial pathogens, accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Here, we report a new function of the CaRING1 gene product in the ABA-mediated defense responses of plants to dehydration stress. The expression of the CaRING1 gene was induced in pepper leaves treated with ABA or exposed to dehydration or NaCl. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 in pepper plants exhibited low degree of ABA-induced stomatal closure and high levels of transpirational water loss in dehydrated leaves. These led to be more vulnerable to dehydration stress in CaRING1-silenced pepper than in the control pepper, accompanied by reduction of ABA-regulated gene expression and low accumulation of ABA and H2O2. In contrast, CaRING1-overexpressing transgenic plants showed enhanced sensitivity to ABA during the seedling growth and establishment. These plants were also more tolerant to dehydration stress than the wild-type plants because of high ABA accumulation, enhanced stomatal closure and increased expression of stress-responsive genes. Together, these results suggest that the CaRING1 acts as positive factor for dehydration tolerance in Arabidopsis by modulating ABA biosynthesis and ABA-mediated stomatal closing and gene expression.

  2. Sub-functionalization to ovule development following duplication of a floral organ identity gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galimba, Kelsey D; Di Stilio, Verónica S

    2015-09-01

    Gene duplications result in paralogs that may be maintained due to the gain of novel functions (neo-functionalization) or the partitioning of ancestral function (sub-functionalization). Plant genomes are especially prone to duplication; paralogs are particularly widespread in the floral MADS box transcription factors that control organ identity through the ABC model of flower development. C class genes establish stamen and carpel identity and control floral meristem determinacy, and are largely conserved across the angiosperm phylogeny. Originally, an additional D class had been identified as controlling ovule identity; yet subsequent studies indicated that both C and D lineage genes more commonly control ovule development redundantly. The ranunculid Thalictrum thalictroides has two orthologs of the Arabidopsis thaliana C class gene AGAMOUS (AG), ThtAG1 and ThtAG2 (Thalictrum thalictroides AGAMOUS1/2). We previously showed that ThtAG1 exhibits typical C class function; here we examine the role of its paralog, ThtAG2. Our phylogenetic analysis shows that ThtAG2 falls within the C lineage, together with ThtAG1, and is consistent with previous findings of a Ranunculales-specific duplication in this clade. However, ThtAG2 is not expressed in stamens, but rather solely in carpels and ovules. This female-specific expression pattern is consistent with D lineage genes, and with other C lineage genes known to be involved in ovule identity. Given the divergent expression of ThtAG2, we tested the hypothesis that it has acquired ovule identity function. Molecular evolution analyses showed evidence of positive selection on ThtAG2-a pattern that supports divergence of function by sub-functionalization. Down-regulation of ThtAG2 by virus-induced gene silencing resulted in homeotic conversions of ovules into carpel-like structures. Taken together, our results suggest that, although ThtAG2 falls within the C lineage, it has diverged to acquire "D function" as an ovule identity gene

  3. Gene Ontology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaston K. Mazandu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The wide coverage and biological relevance of the Gene Ontology (GO, confirmed through its successful use in protein function prediction, have led to the growth in its popularity. In order to exploit the extent of biological knowledge that GO offers in describing genes or groups of genes, there is a need for an efficient, scalable similarity measure for GO terms and GO-annotated proteins. While several GO similarity measures exist, none adequately addresses all issues surrounding the design and usage of the ontology. We introduce a new metric for measuring the distance between two GO terms using the intrinsic topology of the GO-DAG, thus enabling the measurement of functional similarities between proteins based on their GO annotations. We assess the performance of this metric using a ROC analysis on human protein-protein interaction datasets and correlation coefficient analysis on the selected set of protein pairs from the CESSM online tool. This metric achieves good performance compared to the existing annotation-based GO measures. We used this new metric to assess functional similarity between orthologues, and show that it is effective at determining whether orthologues are annotated with similar functions and identifying cases where annotation is inconsistent between orthologues.

  4. The F Gene of Rodent Brain-Adapted Mumps Virus Is a Major Determinant of Neurovirulence▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemon, Ken; Rima, Bertus K.; McQuaid, Stephen; Allen, Ingrid V.; Duprex, W. Paul

    2007-01-01

    Prior to the introduction of live-attenuated vaccines, mumps virus (MuV) was the leading cause of virus-induced meningitis. Although vaccination has been effective at controlling the disease, the use of insufficiently attenuated strains has been associated with high rates of aseptic meningitis in vaccinees. The molecular basis of MuV attenuation is poorly understood, and no reliable molecular markers of virulence have been identified. In this study, reverse genetics has been used to identify molecular determinants of MuV neuropathogenesis. Recombinant viruses, containing the envelope-associated genes from the Kilham (MuVKH) rodent brain-adapted strain of MuV, were generated in the Jeryl Lynn 5 (MuVJL5) vaccine strain background. The syncytium phenotypes of the recombinant viruses on Vero cells differed depending on the source of the fusion (F) and hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) glycoproteins, with heterologous combinations showing either an increase or a decrease in the level of cell fusion compared to that of the homologous parental combinations. This was confirmed by transiently cotransfecting eukaryotic F and HN glycoprotein expression constructs. A Lewis rat model that discriminates between neurovirulent and nonneurovirulent MuV strains based on the extent of hydrocephalus induced in the rat brain after intracerebral inoculation was used to assess the phenotype of the recombinant viruses. Expression of the matrix (M), small hydrophobic (SH), or HN gene in isolation did not confer a neurovirulent phenotype. Expression of the F gene of the neurovirulent strain alone was sufficient to induce significant levels of hydrocephalus. Coexpression of the homologous HN gene led to a marginal increase in the level of hydrocephalus. PMID:17475640

  5. Enhancement or Attenuation of Disease by Deletion of Genes from Citrus Tristeza Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana

    2012-01-01

    Stem pitting is a common virus-induced disease of perennial woody plants induced by a range of different viruses. The phenotype results from sporadic areas of the stem in which normal xylem and phloem development is prevented during growth of stems. These alterations interfere with carbohydrate transport, resulting in reduced plant growth and yield. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a phloem-limited closterovirus, induces economically important stem-pitting diseases of citrus. CTV has three nonconserved genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not related to genes of other viruses and that are not required for systemic infection of some species of citrus, which allowed us to examine the effect of deletions of these genes on symptom phenotypes. In the most susceptible experimental host, Citrus macrophylla, the full-length virus causes only very mild stem-pitting symptoms. Surprisingly, we found that certain deletion combinations (p33 and p18 and/or p13) induced greatly increased stem-pitting symptoms, while other combinations (p13 or p13 plus p18) resulted in reduced stem pitting. These results suggest that the stem-pitting phenotype, which is one of more economically important disease phenotypes, can result not from a specific sequence or protein but from a balance between the expression of different viral genes. Unexpectedly, using green fluorescent protein-tagged full-length virus and deletion mutants (CTV9Δp33 and CTV9Δp33Δp18Δp13), the virus was found at pitted areas in abnormal locations outside the normal ring of phloem. Thus, increased stem pitting was associated not only with a prevention of xylem production but also with a proliferation of cells that supported viral replication, suggesting that at random areas of stems the virus can elicit changes in cellular differentiation and development. PMID:22593155

  6. Enhancement or attenuation of disease by deletion of genes from Citrus tristeza virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Dawson, William O

    2012-08-01

    Stem pitting is a common virus-induced disease of perennial woody plants induced by a range of different viruses. The phenotype results from sporadic areas of the stem in which normal xylem and phloem development is prevented during growth of stems. These alterations interfere with carbohydrate transport, resulting in reduced plant growth and yield. Citrus tristeza virus (CTV), a phloem-limited closterovirus, induces economically important stem-pitting diseases of citrus. CTV has three nonconserved genes (p33, p18, and p13) that are not related to genes of other viruses and that are not required for systemic infection of some species of citrus, which allowed us to examine the effect of deletions of these genes on symptom phenotypes. In the most susceptible experimental host, Citrus macrophylla, the full-length virus causes only very mild stem-pitting symptoms. Surprisingly, we found that certain deletion combinations (p33 and p18 and/or p13) induced greatly increased stem-pitting symptoms, while other combinations (p13 or p13 plus p18) resulted in reduced stem pitting. These results suggest that the stem-pitting phenotype, which is one of more economically important disease phenotypes, can result not from a specific sequence or protein but from a balance between the expression of different viral genes. Unexpectedly, using green fluorescent protein-tagged full-length virus and deletion mutants (CTV9Δp33 and CTV9Δp33Δp18Δp13), the virus was found at pitted areas in abnormal locations outside the normal ring of phloem. Thus, increased stem pitting was associated not only with a prevention of xylem production but also with a proliferation of cells that supported viral replication, suggesting that at random areas of stems the virus can elicit changes in cellular differentiation and development.

  7. The BTB and CNC homology 1 (BACH1) target genes are involved in the oxidative stress response and in control of the cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Schmidt, Dominic; Manke, Thomas; Piccini, Ilaria; Sultan, Marc; Borodina, Tatiana; Balzereit, Daniela; Wruck, Wasco; Soldatov, Alexey; Vingron, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2011-07-01

    The regulation of gene expression in response to environmental signals and metabolic imbalances is a key step in maintaining cellular homeostasis. BTB and CNC homology 1 (BACH1) is a heme-binding transcription factor repressing the transcription from a subset of MAF recognition elements at low intracellular heme levels. Upon heme binding, BACH1 is released from the MAF recognition elements, resulting in increased expression of antioxidant response genes. To systematically address the gene regulatory networks involving BACH1, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis of BACH1 target genes in HEK 293 cells with knockdown of BACH1 using three independent types of small interfering RNAs followed by transcriptome profiling using microarrays. The 59 BACH1 target genes identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing were found highly enriched in genes showing expression changes after BACH1 knockdown, demonstrating the impact of BACH1 repression on transcription. In addition to known and new BACH1 targets involved in heme degradation (HMOX1, FTL, FTH1, ME1, and SLC48A1) and redox regulation (GCLC, GCLM, and SLC7A11), we also discovered BACH1 target genes affecting cell cycle and apoptosis pathways (ITPR2, CALM1, SQSTM1, TFE3, EWSR1, CDK6, BCL2L11, and MAFG) as well as subcellular transport processes (CLSTN1, PSAP, MAPT, and vault RNA). The newly identified impact of BACH1 on genes involved in neurodegenerative processes and proliferation provides an interesting basis for future dissection of BACH1-mediated gene repression in neurodegeneration and virus-induced cancerogenesis.

  8. The BTB and CNC Homology 1 (BACH1) Target Genes Are Involved in the Oxidative Stress Response and in Control of the Cell Cycle*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnatz, Hans-Jörg; Schmidt, Dominic; Manke, Thomas; Piccini, Ilaria; Sultan, Marc; Borodina, Tatiana; Balzereit, Daniela; Wruck, Wasco; Soldatov, Alexey; Vingron, Martin; Lehrach, Hans; Yaspo, Marie-Laure

    2011-01-01

    The regulation of gene expression in response to environmental signals and metabolic imbalances is a key step in maintaining cellular homeostasis. BTB and CNC homology 1 (BACH1) is a heme-binding transcription factor repressing the transcription from a subset of MAF recognition elements at low intracellular heme levels. Upon heme binding, BACH1 is released from the MAF recognition elements, resulting in increased expression of antioxidant response genes. To systematically address the gene regulatory networks involving BACH1, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing analysis of BACH1 target genes in HEK 293 cells with knockdown of BACH1 using three independent types of small interfering RNAs followed by transcriptome profiling using microarrays. The 59 BACH1 target genes identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing were found highly enriched in genes showing expression changes after BACH1 knockdown, demonstrating the impact of BACH1 repression on transcription. In addition to known and new BACH1 targets involved in heme degradation (HMOX1, FTL, FTH1, ME1, and SLC48A1) and redox regulation (GCLC, GCLM, and SLC7A11), we also discovered BACH1 target genes affecting cell cycle and apoptosis pathways (ITPR2, CALM1, SQSTM1, TFE3, EWSR1, CDK6, BCL2L11, and MAFG) as well as subcellular transport processes (CLSTN1, PSAP, MAPT, and vault RNA). The newly identified impact of BACH1 on genes involved in neurodegenerative processes and proliferation provides an interesting basis for future dissection of BACH1-mediated gene repression in neurodegeneration and virus-induced cancerogenesis. PMID:21555518

  9. A new ethylene-responsive factor CaPTI1 gene of pepper (Capsicum annuum L. involved in the regulation of defense response to Phytophthora capsici

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing-Hao eJin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethylene-responsive factors (ERF are usually considered to play diverse roles in plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, an ERF gene CaPTI1 was isolated from pepper transcriptome database. CaPTI1 contains an open reading frame (ORF of 543bp, which encodes a putative polypeptide of 180 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 20.30 kDa. Results of expression profile showed that CaPTI1 had a highest expression level in roots and this gene could not only response to the infection of Phytophthora capsici and the stresses of cold and drought, but also be induced by the signaling molecule (salicylic acid (SA, Methyl Jasmonate (MeJA, Ethephon (ETH and hydogen peroxide (H2O2. Furthermore, virus-induce gene silencing (VIGS of CaPTI1 in pepper weakened the defense response significantly by reducing the expression of defense related genes CaPR1, CaDEF1 and CaSAR82 and also the root activity. These results suggested that CaPTI1 is involved in the regulation of defense response to P. capsici in pepper.

  10. A New Ethylene-Responsive Factor CaPTI1 Gene of Pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) Involved in the Regulation of Defense Response to Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Jing-Hao; Zhang, Huai-Xia; Tan, Jun-Yi; Yan, Ming-Jia; Li, Da-Wei; Khan, Abid; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene-responsive factors (ERF) are usually considered to play diverse roles in plant response to biotic and abiotic stresses. In this study, an ERF gene CaPTI1 was isolated from pepper transcriptome database. CaPTI1 contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 543 bp, which encodes a putative polypeptide of 180 amino acids with a theoretical molecular weight of 20.30 kDa. Results of expression profile showed that CaPTI1 had a highest expression level in roots and this gene could not only response to the infection of Phytophthora capsici and the stresses of cold and drought, but also be induced by the signaling molecule (salicylic acid, Methyl Jasmonate, Ethephon, and hydogen peroxide). Furthermore, virus-induce gene silencing (VIGS) of CaPTI1 in pepper weakened the defense response significantly by reducing the expression of defense related genes CaPR1, CaDEF1 and CaSAR82 and also the root activity. These results suggested that CaPTI1 is involved in the regulation of defense response to P. capsici in pepper.

  11. Characterization, Expression, and Functional Analysis of a Novel NAC Gene Associated with Resistance to Verticillium Wilt and Abiotic Stress in Cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weina; Yuan, Youlu; Yang, Can; Geng, Shuaipeng; Sun, Quan; Long, Lu; Cai, Chaowei; Chu, Zongyan; Liu, Xin; Wang, Guanghao; Du, Xiongming; Miao, Chen; Zhang, Xiao; Cai, Yingfan

    2016-12-07

    Elucidating the mechanism of resistance to biotic and abiotic stress is of great importance in cotton. In this study, a gene containing the NAC domain, designated GbNAC1, was identified from Gossypium barbadense L. Homologous sequence alignment indicated that GbNAC1 belongs to the TERN subgroup. GbNAC1 protein localized to the cell nucleus. GbNAC1 was expressed in roots, stems, and leaves, and was especially highly expressed in vascular bundles. Functional analysis showed that cotton resistance to Verticillium wilt was reduced when the GbNAC1 gene was silenced using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) method. GbNAC1-overexpressing Arabidopsis showed enhanced resistance to Verticillium dahliae compared to wild-type. Thus, GbNAC1 is involved in the positive regulation of resistance to Verticillium wilt. In addition, analysis of GbNAC1-overexpressing Arabidopsis under different stress treatments indicated that it is involved in plant growth, development, and response to various abiotic stresses (ABA, mannitol, and NaCl). This suggests that GbNAC1 plays an important role in resistance to biotic and abiotic stresses in cotton. This study provides a foundation for further study of the function of NAC genes in cotton and other plants. Copyright © 2016 Wang et al.

  12. Silencing of an α-dioxygenase gene, Ca-DOX, retards growth and suppresses basal disease resistance responses in Capsicum annum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chi Eun; Ha, Young-Im; Choi, Hyoju; Moon, Ju Yeon; Lee, Jiyoung; Shin, Ah-Young; Park, Chang Jin; Yoon, Gyeong Mee; Kwon, Suk-Yoon; Jo, Ick-Hyun; Park, Jeong Mee

    2017-03-01

    Alpha-dioxygenases (α-DOX) catalyzing the primary oxygenation of fatty acids to oxylipins were recently found in plants. Here, the biological roles of the pepper α-DOX (Ca-DOX) gene, which is strongly induced during non-host pathogen infection in chili pepper, were examined. Virus-induced gene silencing demonstrated that down-regulation of Ca-DOX enhanced susceptibility to bacterial pathogens and suppressed the hypersensitive response via the suppression of pathogenesis-related genes such as PR4, proteinase inhibitor II and lipid transfer protein (PR14). Ca-DOX-silenced pepper plants also exhibited more retarded growth with lower epidermal cell numbers and reduced cell wall thickness than control plants. To better understand regulation of Ca-DOX, transgenic Arabidopsis plants harboring the β-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter gene driven from a putative Ca-DOX promoter were generated. GUS expression was significantly induced upon avirulent pathogen infection in transgenic Arabidopsis leaves, whereas GUS induction was relatively weak upon virulent pathogen treatment. After treatment with plant hormones, early and strong GUS expression was seen after treatment of salicylic acid, whereas ethylene and methyl jasmonate treatments produced relatively weak and late GUS signals. These results will enable us to further understand the role of α-DOX, which is important in lipid metabolism, defense responses, and growth development in plants.

  13. Inhibition of cytokine gene expression and induction of chemokine genes in non-lymphatic cells infected with SARS coronavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weber Friedemann

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV is the etiologic agent of the severe acute respiratory syndrome. SARS-CoV mainly infects tissues of non-lymphatic origin, and the cytokine profile of those cells can determine the course of disease. Here, we investigated the cytokine response of two human non-lymphatic cell lines, Caco-2 and HEK 293, which are fully permissive for SARS-CoV. Results A comparison with established cytokine-inducing viruses revealed that SARS-CoV only weakly triggered a cytokine response. In particular, SARS-CoV did not activate significant transcription of the interferons IFN-α, IFN-β, IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2/3, as well as of the interferon-induced antiviral genes ISG56 and MxA, the chemokine RANTES and the interleukine IL-6. Interestingly, however, SARS-CoV strongly induced the chemokines IP-10 and IL-8 in the colon carcinoma cell line Caco-2, but not in the embryonic kidney cell line 293. Conclusion Our data indicate that SARS-CoV suppresses the antiviral cytokine system of non-immune cells to a large extent, thus buying time for dissemination in the host. However, synthesis of IP-10 and IL-8, which are established markers for acute-stage SARS, escapes the virus-induced silencing at least in some cell types. Therefore, the progressive infiltration of immune cells into the infected lungs observed in SARS patients could be due to the production of these chemokines by the infected tissue cells.

  14. Isolation and characterization of a novel wall-associated kinase gene TaWAK5 in wheat (Triticum aestivum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Wall-associated kinases (WAKs play an important role in plant defense and development. Considerable progress has been made in understanding WAK genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, much less is known about these genes in common wheat. Here, we isolated a novel wheat WAK gene TaWAK5 from sharp eyespot disease-resistant wheat line CI12633, based on a differentially-expressed sequence identified by microarray analysis. The transcript abundance of TaWAK5 was rapidly increased following inoculation with the pathogen Rhizoctonia cerealis. TaWAK5 in resistant wheat lines was induced to higher levels than in susceptible lines at 7 days post inoculation with R. cerealis. The expression of TaWAK5 was also induced by treatments with exogenous salicylic acid, abscisic acid, and methyl jasmonate. The deduced TaWAK5 protein contained a signal peptide, two epidermal growth factor (EGF-like repeats, a transmembrane domain, and a serine/threonine protein kinase catalytic domain. Subcellular localization analyses in onion epidermal cells indicated that the TaWAK5 protein was localized to the plasma membrane. Virus-induced gene silencing of TaWAK5 in CI12633 plants showed that the silencing of TaWAK5 did not obviously impair wheat resistance to R. cerealis, suggesting that TaWAK5 may be not the major gene in wheat defense response to R. cerealis, or that it is functionally redundant with other genes. This study paves the way for further research into WAK functions in wheat stress physiology.

  15. Tomato NAC transcription factor SlSRN1 positively regulates defense response against biotic stress but negatively regulates abiotic stress response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Liu

    Full Text Available Biotic and abiotic stresses are major unfavorable factors that affect crop productivity worldwide. NAC proteins comprise a large family of transcription factors that play important roles in plant growth and development as well as in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. In a virus-induced gene silencing-based screening to identify genes that are involved in defense response against Botrytis cinerea, we identified a tomato NAC gene SlSRN1 (Solanum lycopersicum Stress-related NAC1. SlSRN1 is a plasma membrane-localized protein with transactivation activity in yeast. Expression of SlSRN1 was significantly induced by infection with B. cinerea or Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000, leading to 6-8 folds higher than that in the mock-inoculated plants. Expression of SlSRN1 was also induced by salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid and by drought stress. Silencing of SlSRN1 resulted in increased severity of diseases caused by B. cinerea and Pst DC3000. However, silencing of SlSRN1 resulted in increased tolerance against oxidative and drought stresses. Furthermore, silencing of SlSRN1 accelerated accumulation of reactive oxygen species but attenuated expression of defense genes after infection by B. cinerea. Our results demonstrate that SlSRN1 is a positive regulator of defense response against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000 but is a negative regulator for oxidative and drought stress response in tomato.

  16. A recombinant rabies virus encoding two copies of the glycoprotein gene confers protection in dogs against a virulent challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Yang, Youtian; Sun, Zhaojin; Chen, Jing; Ai, Jun; Dun, Can; Fu, Zhen F; Niu, Xuefeng; Guo, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    The rabies virus (RABV) glycoprotein (G) is the principal antigen responsible for the induction of virus neutralizing antibodies (VNA) and is the major modality of protective immunity in animals. A recombinant RABV HEP-Flury strain was generated by reverse genetics to encode two copies of the G-gene (referred to as HEP-dG). The biological properties of HEP-dG were compared to those of the parental virus (HEP-Flury strain). The HEP-dG recombinant virus grew 100 times more efficiently in BHK-21 cell than the parental virus, yet the virulence of the dG recombinant virus in suckling mice was lower than the parental virus. The HEP-dG virus can improve the expression of G-gene mRNA and the G protein and produce more offspring viruses in cells. The amount of G protein revealed a positive relationship with immunogenicity in mice and dogs. The inactivated HEP-dG recombinant virus induced higher levels of VNA and conferred better protection against virulent RABV in mice and dogs than the inactivated parental virus and a commercial vaccine. The protective antibody persisted for at least 12 months. These data demonstrate that the HEP-dG is stable, induces a strong VNA response and confers protective immunity more effectively than the RABV HEP-Flury strain. HEP-dG could be a potential candidate in the development of novel inactivated rabies vaccines.

  17. Prequels to Synthetic Biology: From Candidate Gene Identification and Validation to Enzyme Subcellular Localization in Plant and Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foureau, E; Carqueijeiro, I; Dugé de Bernonville, T; Melin, C; Lafontaine, F; Besseau, S; Lanoue, A; Papon, N; Oudin, A; Glévarec, G; Clastre, M; St-Pierre, B; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, N; Courdavault, V

    2016-01-01

    Natural compounds extracted from microorganisms or plants constitute an inexhaustible source of valuable molecules whose supply can be potentially challenged by limitations in biological sourcing. The recent progress in synthetic biology combined to the increasing access to extensive transcriptomics and genomics data now provide new alternatives to produce these molecules by transferring their whole biosynthetic pathway in heterologous production platforms such as yeasts or bacteria. While the generation of high titer producing strains remains per se an arduous field of investigation, elucidation of the biosynthetic pathways as well as characterization of their complex subcellular organization are essential prequels to the efficient development of such bioengineering approaches. Using examples from plants and yeasts as a framework, we describe potent methods to rationalize the study of partially characterized pathways, including the basics of computational applications to identify candidate genes in transcriptomics data and the validation of their function by an improved procedure of virus-induced gene silencing mediated by direct DNA transfer to get around possible resistance to Agrobacterium-delivery of viral vectors. To identify potential alterations of biosynthetic fluxes resulting from enzyme mislocalizations in reconstituted pathways, we also detail protocols aiming at characterizing subcellular localizations of protein in plant cells by expression of fluorescent protein fusions through biolistic-mediated transient transformation, and localization of transferred enzymes in yeast using similar fluorescence procedures. Albeit initially developed for the Madagascar periwinkle, these methods may be applied to other plant species or organisms in order to establish synthetic biology platform. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. RhNAC3, a stress-associated NAC transcription factor, has a role in dehydration tolerance through regulating osmotic stress-related genes in rose petals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xinqiang; Zhang, Changqing; Lü, Peitao; Jiang, Guimei; Liu, Xiaowei; Dai, Fanwei; Gao, Junping

    2014-01-01

    Petal cell expansion depends on cell wall metabolism, changes in cell turgor pressure and restructuring of the cytoskeleton, and recovery ability of petal cell expansion is defined as an indicator of dehydration tolerance in flowers. We previously reported that RhNAC2, a development-related NAC domain transcription factor, confers dehydration tolerance through regulating cell wall-related genes in rose petals. Here, we identify RhNAC3, a novel rose SNAC gene, and its expression in petals induced by dehydration, wounding, exogenous ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA). Expression studies in Arabidopsis protoplasts and yeast show that RhNAC3 has transactivation activity along its full length and in the carboxyl-terminal domain. Silencing RhNAC3 in rose petals by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) significantly decreased the cell expansion of rose petals under rehydration conditions. In total, 24 of 27 osmotic stress-related genes were down-regulated in RhNAC3-silenced rose petals, while only 4 of 22 cell expansion-related genes were down-regulated. Overexpression of RhNAC3 in Arabidopsis gave improved drought tolerance, with lower water loss of leaves in transgenic plants. Arabidopsis ATH1 microarray analysis showed that RhNAC3 regulated the expression of stress-responsive genes in overexpressing lines, and further analysis revealed that most of the RhNAC3-up-regulated genes were involved in the response to osmotic stress. Comparative analysis revealed that different transcription regulation existed between RhNAC3 and RhNAC2. Taken together, these data indicate that RhNAC3, as a positive regulator, confers dehydration tolerance of rose petals mainly through regulating osmotic adjustment-associated genes. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Cloning and Characterization of the CarbcL Gene Related to Chlorophyll in Pepper (Capsicum annuum L. under Fruit Shade Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Bin eWang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Light is an important environmental factor during fruit development and ripening in pepper. Bagging is a significant agrotechnology for the illumination regulation of fruits; some previous researches had showed that bagging could improve the appearance and external quality of fruits and cause them to mature early. However, it would decrease the intrinsic qualities of fruits; especially, fruit bagging could decrease the content of capsanthin in peppers. Based on above-mentioned results, fruit bagging was used as the method of fruits shade stress in the experiment to explore the characteristics and molecular mechanisms of pepper fruits color change under shade stress. By using cDNA-AFLP under fruits shading, a fragment related to fruit color was obtained. Next, the full-length coding sequence of the gene was cloned from the fruits of pepper. Homologous gene alignment confirmed that the gene has high homology with the rbcL gene, named CarbcL. The function of the CarbcL gene was identified through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS, it was found that the fruit color changed completely from green to red except for some residue of green fleck when CarbcL gene was silenced, and the green color of fruits had not fully faded in the control group and the empty vector group. Combination of determining the content of chlorophyll, it showed that CarbcL was involved in the metabolic control of chlorophyll in pepper fruits; subsequently, HPLC was used to determine the content of capsanthin in pepper fruit which CarbcL gene silencing, and it was also found that the content of capsanthin decreased sharply. These results further confirmed that CarbcL involved in the adjustment of chlorophyll and capsanthin.

  20. Genome-wide association study discovered candidate genes of Verticillium wilt resistance in upland cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tinggang; Ma, Xuefeng; Li, Nanyang; Zhou, Lei; Liu, Zheng; Han, Huanyong; Gui, Yuejing; Bao, Yuming; Chen, Jieyin; Dai, Xiaofeng

    2017-12-01

    Verticillium wilt (VW), caused by infection by Verticillium dahliae, is considered one of the most yield-limiting diseases in cotton. To examine the genetic architecture of cotton VW resistance, we performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using a panel of 299 accessions and 85 630 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) detected using the specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing (SLAF-seq) approach. Trait-SNP association analysis detected a total of 17 significant SNPs at P resistance on A10 were continuous and common in three environments (RDIG2015, RDIF2015 and RDIF2016). Haplotype block structure analysis predicted 22 candidate genes for VW resistance based on A10_99672586 with a minimum P-value (-log10 P = 6.21). One of these genes (CG02) was near the significant SNP A10_99672586 (0.26 Mb), located in a 372-kb haplotype block, and its Arabidopsis AT3G25510 homologues contain TIR-NBS-LRR domains that may be involved in disease resistance response. Real-time quantitative PCR and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) analysis showed that CG02 was specific to up-regulation in the resistant (R) genotype Zhongzhimian2 (ZZM2) and that silenced plants were more susceptible to V. dahliae. These results indicate that CG02 is likely the candidate gene for resistance against V. dahliae in cotton. The identified locus or gene may serve as a promising target for genetic engineering and selection for improving resistance to VW in cotton. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. RAGE deficiency predisposes mice to virus-induced paucigranulocytic asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, Md Ashik; Short, Kirsty Renfree; Zhang, Vivan; Gan, Wan Jun; Loh, Zhixuan; Werder, Rhiannon B; Simpson, Jennifer; Sly, Peter D; Mazzone, Stuart B; Spann, Kirsten M; Ferreira, Manuel Ar; Upham, John W; Sukkar, Maria B; Phipps, Simon

    2017-01-18

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease. Although many patients with asthma develop type-2 dominated eosinophilic inflammation, a number of individuals develop paucigranulocytic asthma, which occurs in the absence of eosinophilia or neutrophilia. The aetiology of paucigranulocytic asthma is unknown. However, both respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and mutations in the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) are risk factors for asthma development. Here, we show that RAGE deficiency impairs anti-viral immunity during an early-life infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; a murine analogue of RSV). The elevated viral load was associated with the release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) which triggered airway smooth muscle remodelling in early-life. Re-infection with PVM in later-life induced many of the cardinal features of asthma in the absence of eosinophilic or neutrophilic inflammation. Anti-HMGB1 mitigated both early-life viral disease and asthma-like features, highlighting HMGB1 as a possible novel therapeutic target.

  2. Influenza Virus Induces Apoptosis via BAD-Mediated Mitochondrial Dysregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Anh T; Cortens, John P.; Du, Qiujiang; Wilkins, John A.; Coombs, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus infection results in host cell death and major tissue damage. Specific components of the apoptotic pathway, a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to cell death, are implicated in promoting influenza virus replication. BAD is a cell death regulator that constitutes a critical control point in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, which occurs through the dysregulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and the subsequent activation of downstream apoptogenic factors...

  3. Influenza Virus Induces Bacterial and Nonbacterial Otitis Media

    OpenAIRE

    Short, Kirsty R.; Diavatopoulos, Dimitri A.; Thornton, Ruth; Pedersen, John; Richard A. Strugnell; Wise, Andrew K.; Reading, Patrick C.; Wijburg, Odilia L.

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus had high bacterial load in the middle ear, middle ear inflammation, and hearing loss. In contrast, mice colonized with S. pneumoniae alone had significantly less bacteria in the ear, minimal hearing ...

  4. RAGE deficiency predisposes mice to virus-induced paucigranulocytic asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arikkatt, Jaisy; Ullah, Md Ashik; Short, Kirsty Renfree; Zhang, Vivan; Gan, Wan Jun; Loh, Zhixuan; Werder, Rhiannon B; Simpson, Jennifer; Sly, Peter D; Mazzone, Stuart B; Spann, Kirsten M; Ferreira, Manuel AR; Upham, John W; Sukkar, Maria B; Phipps, Simon

    2017-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease. Although many patients with asthma develop type-2 dominated eosinophilic inflammation, a number of individuals develop paucigranulocytic asthma, which occurs in the absence of eosinophilia or neutrophilia. The aetiology of paucigranulocytic asthma is unknown. However, both respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection and mutations in the receptor for advanced glycation endproducts (RAGE) are risk factors for asthma development. Here, we show that RAGE deficiency impairs anti-viral immunity during an early-life infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM; a murine analogue of RSV). The elevated viral load was associated with the release of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) which triggered airway smooth muscle remodelling in early-life. Re-infection with PVM in later-life induced many of the cardinal features of asthma in the absence of eosinophilic or neutrophilic inflammation. Anti-HMGB1 mitigated both early-life viral disease and asthma-like features, highlighting HMGB1 as a possible novel therapeutic target. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21199.001 PMID:28099113

  5. Influenza virus induces bacterial and nonbacterial otitis media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Short, K.R.; Diavatopoulos, D.A.; Thornton, R.; Pedersen, J.; Strugnell, R.A.; Wise, A.K.; Reading, P.C.; Wijburg, O.L.

    2011-01-01

    Otitis media (OM) is one of the most common childhood diseases. OM can arise when a viral infection enables bacteria to disseminate from the nasopharynx to the middle ear. Here, we provide the first infant murine model for disease. Mice coinfected with Streptococcus pneumoniae and influenza virus

  6. Mechanisms of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced hemopoietic dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Pisa, P; Bro-Jørgensen, K

    1986-01-01

    Results of this study showed that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection causes a marked activation of natural killer (NK) cells not only in the spleen but also in the bone marrow. This activity reached its peak at about day 3 of infection and declined after days 6 to 7. Enhanced NK cell...... the receptivity for syngeneic hemopoietic cells. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that NK cell activation causes rejection of syngeneic stem cells, thus resulting in hemopoietic depression. To understand the mechanisms behind the prolonged decrease in bone marrow receptivity (and bone marrow....... It seems, therefore, that as NK cell activity declines, the spleen regains the ability to support growth of hemopoietic cells and the bone marrow resumes an elevated export of stem cells to the spleen. This diversion of hemopoiesis could explain both the long-standing deficiencies of the bone marrow...

  7. Oxidative Lung Injury in Virus-Induced Wheezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    predominantly in skeletal muscle, heart, brain , and thymus [23,24], we first investigated the role of HDAC class I proteins, specifically HDAC1, 2, and 3, in RSV...acute respiratory tract illness through adulthood [2]. Several recent studies have directly or indirectly indicated an important role of ROS produced...of total cell lysates. The membrane was stripped and reprobed for -actin to determine equal loading of the samples (A, middle ). Densitometric

  8. Contribution of dendritic cells to measles virus induced immunosuppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, Melissa M; Bellini, William J; Rota, Paul A

    2013-03-01

    Measles virus (MV) remains an important pathogen in children worldwide. The morbidity and mortality of MV is associated with severe immune suppression. Dendritic cells (DCs) were identified as initial target cells in vivo, and DCs were efficiently infected by MV in vitro. MV infection of DCs likely contributes to functional deficiency in these cells; therefore playing a role in MV-induced immunosuppression. DCs appeared to mature phenotypically; however, the ability of infected cells to stimulate T cells was compromised. Phenotypic maturation of infected immature DCs was partially controlled by IFN production; however, infected DCs also maintained markers of an immature phenotype such as the continued uptake of antigen and lack of expression of chemokine receptor CCR7. Furthermore, mature DCs did not appear to maintain phenotypic maturation following infection demonstrated by decreased MHC and co-stimulatory molecule expression. Several mechanisms of MV-induced DC dysfunction have been suggested, each likely contributing to the immunosuppressive effect of MV-infected DCs. Infected DCs responded aberrantly to secondary maturation stimuli such as CD40L or TLR4 stimulation. MV infection resulted in apoptosis in DC/T-cell cocultures, which may contribute to a reduced T-cell response. Additionally, the immunological synapse between infected DCs and T cells was compromised resulting in reduced T-cell interaction times and activation signaling. The mechanisms of MV contribution to DC dysfunction appear multifaceted and central to MV-induced immunosuppression. Published 2012. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Mechanisms of Virus-Induced Neural Cell Death

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-09-01

    of Guillain -Barr6 syndrome , absence of BZLF1 transcription. The absence of both 450 acute demyelinating encephalitis, transverse myelitis, and and...43 W 1,904 nd CVID/IVIG GCV Improved 28 Guillain -Barr1 M 55 W 2,000 nd A NONE ACV Stable EBV = Epstein- Barr virus; CSF = cerebrospinal fluid; CNSL... Guillain -Barr6 syndrome , acute demy- 6 - elinating encephalitis, polyradiculomyelitis, or trans- verse myelitis (see Table). T -CSF examinations showed

  10. Epstein-Barr virus-induced systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    6d. on bachelors above 18, to assist in covering the expenses of the small-pox epidemic. It may bring in cash, but we doubt the ulterior effect. It is cheap at that. . A death from chloroform is reported from the New. Somerset Hospital. It is regrettable, but no more an indication of the danger attending the administration than a.

  11. Lethal Mutagenesis of Hepatitis C Virus Induced by Favipiravir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana I de Ávila

    Full Text Available Lethal mutagenesis is an antiviral approach that consists in extinguishing a virus by an excess of mutations acquired during replication in the presence of a mutagen. Here we show that favipiravir (T-705 is a potent mutagenic agent for hepatitis C virus (HCV during its replication in human hepatoma cells. T-705 leads to an excess of G → A and C → U transitions in the mutant spectrum of preextinction HCV populations. Infectivity decreased significantly in the presence of concentrations of T-705 which are 2- to 8-fold lower than its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50. Passaging the virus five times in the presence of 400 μM T-705 resulted in virus extinction. Since T-705 has undergone advanced clinical trials for approval for human use, the results open a new approach based on lethal mutagenesis to treat hepatitis C virus infections. If proven effective for HCV in vivo, this new anti-HCV agent may be useful in patient groups that fail current therapeutic regimens.

  12. Oxidative Lung Injury in Virus-Induced Wheezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-01

    in other disease models, such as cardiac hypertrophy and ischemia-reperfusion injury, as well as rheumathoid arthritis (20, 43). HDAC1 and 2 activity...model we will determine by established clinical-like parameters and pathophysiologic endpoints of airway dysfunction the effect of such pharmacologic...synthesis.  There are no studies investigating the role of H2S generation in pathophysiology of viral infections or the use of H2S donors as

  13. Ecotropic murine leukemia virus-induced fusion of murine cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinter, A.; Chen, T.; Lowy, A.; Cortez, N.G.; Silagi, S.

    1986-03-01

    Extensive fusion occurs upon cocultivation of murine fibroblasts producing ecotropic murine leukemia viruses (MuLVs) with a large variety of murine cell lines in the presence of the polyene antibiotic amphotericin B, the active component of the antifungal agent Fungizone. The resulting polykaryocytes contain nuclei from both infected and uninfected cells, as evidenced by autoradiographic labeling experiments in which one or the other parent cell type was separately labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine and fused with an unlabeled parent. This cell fusion specifically requires the presence of an ecotropic MuLV-producing parent and is not observed for cells producing xenotropic, amphotropic, or dualtropic viruses. Mouse cells infected with nonecotropic viruses retain their sensitivity toward fusion, whereas infection with ecotropic viruses abrogates the fusion of these cells upon cocultivation with other ecotropic MuLV-producing cells. Nonmurine cells lacking the ecotropic gp70 receptor are not fused under similar conditions. Fusion is effectively inhibited by monospecific antisera to gp70, but not by antisera to p15(E), and studies with monoclonal antibodies identify distinct amino- and carboxy-terminal gp70 regions which play a role in the fusion reaction. The enhanced fusion which occurs in the presence of amphotericin B provides a rapid and sensitive assay for the expression of ecotropic MuLVs and should facilitate further mechanistic studies of MuLV-induced fusion of murine cells.

  14. [Haemorrhagic exanthema due to dengue virus induced by acetylsalicylic acid].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valerio, L; de Balanzó, X; Jiménez, O; Pedro-Bolet, M L

    2006-01-01

    Dengue fever, a viral infectious disease characteristic of tropical climates, is considered to be a re-emergent pathology responsible for several serious outbreaks in the last decade. Some factors have been involved in the spread of the virus and its vectorial mosquito carrier: human alteration of the ecosystems, improvement and speed in the transit of goods and people and climate changes. As a reflection of this, an increase in imported cases is probable, especially in tourists coming from endemic areas, considering its short period of incubation (7-10 days). The recognition of personal antecedents of journeys, the main symptoms of the disease and the potential presence of complications (haemorrhagic dengue) should be included in the examination of fever of unknown origin or feverish exanthema. The case of a patient is presented whose clinical picture of classic dengue fever was worsened by self-treatment with acetylsalicylic acid.

  15. Oxidative Lung Injury in Virus-Induced Wheezing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Flavonoids are a ubiquitous group of polyphenolic substances present in seeds, fruit skin or peel, and flowers of most plants. Among them, quercetin and...study investigating the effect of di- etary flavonoids , including quercetin and catechins, on the infectivity and replication of RSV. In this study... flavonoids quercetin and EGCG, the nonflavonoids curcumin and re- sveratrol, and the phenolic acid and diterpens rosmarinic and carnosic (carnasol) acids

  16. Porcine Epidemic Diarrhea Virus Induces Autophagy to Benefit Its Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaozhen Guo

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The new porcine epidemic diarrhea (PED has caused devastating economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Despite extensive research on the relationship between autophagy and virus infection, the concrete role of autophagy in porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV infection has not been reported. In this study, autophagy was demonstrated to be triggered by the effective replication of PEDV through transmission electron microscopy, confocal microscopy, and Western blot analysis. Moreover, autophagy was confirmed to benefit PEDV replication by using autophagy regulators and RNA interference. Furthermore, autophagy might be associated with the expression of inflammatory cytokines and have a positive feedback loop with the NF-κB signaling pathway during PEDV infection. This work is the first attempt to explore the complex interplay between autophagy and PEDV infection. Our findings might accelerate our understanding of the pathogenesis of PEDV infection and provide new insights into the development of effective therapeutic strategies.

  17. Epstein-Barr virus-induced systemic lupus erythematosus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and anorexia; the adenopathy persisted. The week after this she developed vasculitic lesions on the palms and soles, arthritis of the right knee and moderate hypertension. Urinary dipstick testing showed proteinuria + + and haematuria + +. A screen for auto-immune diseases revealed that antinuclear antibodies were ...

  18. Assessment of reference gene stability influenced by extremely divergent disease symptoms in Solanum lycopersicum L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Przemysław; Wrzesińska, Barbara; Obrępalska-Stęplowska, Aleksandra

    2013-12-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is one of the most important vegetables of great worldwide economic value. The scientific importance of the vegetable results from the fact that the genome of S. lycopersicum has been sequenced. This allows researchers to study fundamental mechanisms playing an essential role during tomato development and response to environmental factors contributing significantly to cell metabolism alterations. Parallel with the development of contemporary genetics and the constant increase in sequencing data, progress has to be aligned with improvement of experimental methods used for studying genes functions and gene expression levels, of which the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is still the most reliable. As well as with other nucleic acid-based methods used for comparison of the abundance of specific RNAs, the RT-qPCR data have to be normalised to the levels of RNAs represented stably in a cell. To achieve the goal, the so-called housekeeping genes (i.e., RNAs encoding, for instance, proteins playing an important role in the cell metabolism or structure maintenance), are used for normalisation of the target gene expression data. However, a number of studies have indicated the transcriptional instability of commonly used reference genes analysed in different situations or conditions; for instance, the origin of cells, tissue types, or environmental or other experimental conditions. The expression of ten common housekeeping genes of S. lycopersicum, namely EF1α, TUB, CAC, EXP, RPL8, GAPDH, TBP, ACT, SAND and 18S rRNA were examined during viral infections of tomato. Changes in the expression levels of the genes were estimated by comparison of the non-inoculated tomato plants with those infected with commonly known tomato viral pathogens, Tomato torrado virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Tobacco mosaic virus and Pepino mosaic virus, inducing a diverse range of disease symptoms on the common host, ranging from mild leaves chlorosis to

  19. Molecular analysis of common wheat genes encoding three types of cytosolic heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90): functional involvement of cytosolic Hsp90s in the control of wheat seedling growth and disease resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Guan-Feng; Wei, Xuening; Fan, Renchun; Zhou, Huanbin; Wang, Xianping; Yu, Chunmei; Dong, Lingli; Dong, Zhenying; Wang, Xiaojie; Kang, Zhensheng; Ling, Hongqing; Shen, Qian-Hua; Wang, Daowen; Zhang, Xiangqi

    2011-07-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) molecular chaperones play important roles in plant growth and responses to environmental stimuli. However, little is known about the genes encoding Hsp90s in common wheat. Here, we report genetic and functional analysis of the genes specifying cytosolic Hsp90s in this species. Three groups of homoeologous genes (TaHsp90.1, TaHsp90.2 and TaHsp90.3), encoding three types of cytosolic Hsp90, were isolated. The loci containing TaHsp90.1, TaHsp90.2 and TaHsp90.3 genes were assigned to groups 2, 7 and 5 chromosomes, respectively. TaHsp90.1 genes exhibited higher transcript levels in the stamen than in the leaf, root and culm. TaHsp90.2 and TaHsp90.3 genes were more ubiquitously transcribed in the vegetative and reproductive organs examined. Decreasing the expression of TaHsp90.1 genes through virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) caused pronounced inhibition of wheat seedling growth, whereas the suppression of TaHsp90.2 or TaHsp90.3 genes via VIGS compromised the hypersensitive resistance response of the wheat variety Suwon 11 to stripe rust fungus. Our work represents the first systematic determination of wheat genes encoding cytosolic Hsp90s, and provides useful evidence for the functional involvement of cytosolic Hsp90s in the control of seedling growth and disease resistance in common wheat. © 2011 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2011 New Phytologist Trust.

  20. Transcriptome profiling of petal abscission zone and functional analysis of an Aux/IAA family gene RhIAA16 involved in petal shedding in rose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuerong Gao

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Roses are one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone during petal shedding using Illumina technology. We identified a total of 2592 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs during rose petal shedding. Gene ontology term enrichment and pathway analysis revealed that major biochemical pathways the DTGs were involved in included ethylene biosynthesis, starch degradation, superpathway of cytosolic glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle, photorespiration and the lactose degradation III pathway. This suggests that alterations in carbon metabolism are an important part of rose petal abscission. Among these DTGs, approximately 150 genes putatively encoding transcription factors were identified in rose abscission zone. These included zinc finger, WRKY, ERF, and Aux/IAA gene families, suggesting that petal abscission involves complex transcriptional reprogramming. Approximately 108 DTGs were related to hormone pathways, of which auxin and ethylene related DTGs were the largest groups including 52 and 41 genes, respectively. These also included 12 DTGs related to gibberellin and 6 DTGs in jasmonic acid pathway. Surprisingly, no DTGs involved in the biosynthesis/signaling of abscisic acid, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and salicylic acid pathways were detected. Moreover, among DTGs related to auxin, we identified an Aux/IAA gene RhIAA16 that was up-regulated in response to petal shedding. Down-regulation of RhIAA16 by virus-induced gene silencing in rose promoted petal abscission, suggesting that RhIAA16 plays an important role in rose petal abscission.

  1. Transcriptome Profiling of Petal Abscission Zone and Functional Analysis of an Aux/IAA Family GeneRhIAA16Involved in Petal Shedding in Rose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yuerong; Liu, Chun; Li, Xiaodong; Xu, Haiqian; Liang, Yue; Ma, Nan; Fei, Zhangjun; Gao, Junping; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Ma, Chao

    2016-01-01

    Roses are one of the most important cut flowers among ornamental plants. Rose flower longevity is largely dependent on the timing of petal shedding occurrence. To understand the molecular mechanism underlying petal abscission in rose, we performed transcriptome profiling of the petal abscission zone during petal shedding using Illumina technology. We identified a total of 2592 differentially transcribed genes (DTGs) during rose petal shedding. Gene ontology term enrichment and pathway analysis revealed that major biochemical pathways the DTGs were involved in included ethylene biosynthesis, starch degradation, superpathway of cytosolic glycolysis, pyruvate dehydrogenase and TCA cycle, photorespiration and the lactose degradation III pathway. This suggests that alterations in carbon metabolism are an important part of rose petal abscission. Among these DTGs, approximately 150 genes putatively encoding transcription factors were identified in rose abscission zone. These included zinc finger, WRKY, ERF, and Aux/IAA gene families, suggesting that petal abscission involves complex transcriptional reprogramming. Approximately 108 DTGs were related to hormone pathways, of which auxin and ethylene related DTGs were the largest groups including 52 and 41 genes, respectively. These also included 12 DTGs related to gibberellin and 6 DTGs in jasmonic acid pathway. Surprisingly, no DTGs involved in the biosynthesis/signaling of abscisic acid, cytokinin, brassinosteroid, and salicylic acid pathways were detected. Moreover, among DTGs related to auxin, we identified an Aux/IAA gene RhIAA16 that was up-regulated in response to petal shedding. Down-regulation of RhIAA16 by virus-induced gene silencing in rose promoted petal abscission, suggesting that RhIAA16 plays an important role in rose petal abscission.

  2. Enhanced Host-Parasite Resistance Based on Down-Regulation of Phelipanche aegyptiaca Target Genes Is Likely by Mobile Small RNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj K. Dubey

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing refers to diverse mechanisms that control gene expression at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels which can also be used in parasitic pathogens of plants that Broomrapes (Orobanche/Phelipanche spp. are holoparasitic plants that subsist on the roots of a variety of agricultural crops and cause severe negative effects on the yield and yield quality of those crops. Effective methods for controlling parasitic weeds are scarce, with only a few known cases of genetic resistance. In the current study, we suggest an improved strategy for the control of parasitic weeds based on trans-specific gene-silencing of three parasite genes at once. We used two strategies to express dsRNA containing selected sequences of three Phelipanche aegyptiaca genes PaACS, PaM6PR, and PaPrx1 (pma: transient expression using Tobacco rattle virus (TRV:pma as a virus-induced gene-silencing vector and stable expression in transgenic tomato Solanum lycopersicum (Mill. plants harboring a hairpin construct (pBINPLUS35:pma. siRNA-mediated transgene-silencing (20–24 nt was detected in the host plants. Our results demonstrate that the quantities of PaACS and PaM6PR transcripts from P. aegyptiaca tubercles grown on transgenic tomato or on TRV-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants were significantly reduced. However, only partial reductions in the quantity of PaPrx1 transcripts were observed in the parasite tubercles grown on tomato and on N. benthamiana plants. Concomitant with the suppression of the target genes, there were significant decreases in the number and weight of the parasite tubercles that grew on the host plants, in both the transient and the stable experimental systems. The results of the work carried out using both strategies point to the movement of mobile exogenous siRNA from the host to the parasite, leading to the impaired expression of essential parasite target genes.

  3. Special Issue: Gene Conversion in Duplicated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideki Innan

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene conversion is an outcome of recombination, causing non-reciprocal transfer of a DNA fragment. Several decades later than the discovery of crossing over, gene conversion was first recognized in fungi when non-Mendelian allelic distortion was observed. Gene conversion occurs when a double-strand break is repaired by using homologous sequences in the genome. In meiosis, there is a strong preference to use the orthologous region (allelic gene conversion, which causes non-Mendelian allelic distortion, but paralogous or duplicated regions can also be used for the repair (inter-locus gene conversion, also referred to as non-allelic and ectopic gene conversion. The focus of this special issue is the latter, interlocus gene conversion; the rate is lower than allelic gene conversion but it has more impact on phenotype because more drastic changes in DNA sequence are involved.

  4. Improved foreign gene expression in plants using a virus-encoded suppressor of RNA silencing modified to be developmentally harmless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Pooja; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Alvarado, Veria Y; Sainsbury, Frank; Saunders, Keith; Lomonossoff, George P; Scholthof, Herman B

    2011-08-01

    Endeavours to obtain elevated and prolonged levels of foreign gene expression in plants are often hampered by the onset of RNA silencing that negatively affects target gene expression. Plant virus-encoded suppressors of RNA silencing are useful tools for counteracting silencing but their wide applicability in transgenic plants is limited because their expression often causes harmful developmental effects. We hypothesized that a previously characterized tombusvirus P19 mutant (P19/R43W), typified by reduced symptomatic effects while maintaining the ability to sequester short-interfering RNAs, could be used to suppress virus-induced RNA silencing without the concomitant developmental effects. To investigate this, transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana was used to evaluate the ability of P19/R43W to enhance heterologous gene expression. Although less potent than wt-P19, P19/R43W was an effective suppressor when used to enhance protein expression from either a traditional T-DNA expression cassette or using the CPMV-HT expression system. Stable transformation of N. benthamiana yielded plants that expressed detectable levels of P19/R43W that was functional as a suppressor. Transgenic co-expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) and P19/R43W also showed elevated accumulation of GFP compared with the levels found in the absence of a suppressor. In all cases, transgenic expression of P19/R43W caused no or minimal morphological defects and plants produced normal-looking flowers and fertile seed. We conclude that the expression of P19/R43W is developmentally harmless to plants while providing a suitable platform for transient or transgenic overexpression of value-added genes in plants with reduced hindrance by RNA silencing. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2010 Society for Experimental Biology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd. No claim to original US government works.

  5. Silencing of a Germin-Like Protein Gene (CchGLP in Geminivirus-Resistant Pepper (Capsicum chinense Jacq. BG-3821 Increases Susceptibility to Single and Mixed Infections by Geminiviruses PHYVV and PepGMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Mejía-Teniente

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Germin-like proteins (GLPs are encoded by a family of genes found in all plants, and in terms of function, the GLPs are implicated in the response of plants to biotic and abiotic stresses. CchGLP is a gene encoding a GLP identified in a geminivirus-resistant Capsicum chinense Jacq accession named BG-3821, and it is important in geminivirus resistance when transferred to susceptible tobacco in transgenic experiments. To characterize the role of this GLP in geminivirus resistance in the original accession from which this gene was identified, this work aimed at demonstrating the possible role of CchGLP in resistance to geminiviruses in Capsicum chinense Jacq. BG-3821. Virus-induced gene silencing studies using a geminiviral vector based in PHYVV component A, displaying that silencing of CchGLP in accession BG-3821, increased susceptibility to geminivirus single and mixed infections. These results suggested that CchGLP is an important factor for geminivirus resistance in C. chinense BG-3821 accession.

  6. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Results Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28) following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31). Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. Conclusions In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection. PMID:21679423

  7. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dishi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Results Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28 following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31. Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. Conclusions In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection.

  8. Essential Bacillus subtilis genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobayashi, K.; Ehrlich, S.D.; Albertini, A.

    2003-01-01

    To estimate the minimal gene set required to sustain bacterial life in nutritious conditions, we carried out a systematic inactivation of Bacillus subtilis genes. Among approximate to4,100 genes of the organism, only 192 were shown to be indispensable by this or previous work. Another 79 genes were...

  9. Immunogenicity and virulence of attenuated vaccinia virus Tian Tan encoding HIV-1 muti-epitope genes, p24 and cholera toxin B subunit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Shouwen; Wang, Yuhang; Liu, Cunxia; Wang, Maopeng; Zhu, Yilong; Tan, Peng; Ren, Dayong; Li, Xiao; Tian, Mingyao; Yin, Ronglan; Li, Chang; Jin, Ningyi

    2015-07-01

    No effective prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine against HIV-1 in humans is currently available. This study analyzes the immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant attenuated vaccinia virus. A chimeric gene of HIV-1 multi-epitope genes containing CpG ODN and cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) was inserted into Chinese vaccinia virus Tian Tan strain (VTT) mutant strain. The recombinant virus rddVTT(-CCMp24) was assessed for immunogenicity and safety in mice. Results showed that the protein CCMp24 was expressed stably in BHK-21 infected with rddVTT(-CCMp24). And the recombinant virus induced the production of HIV-1 p24 specific immunoglobulin G (IgG), IL-2 and IL-4. The recombinant vaccine induced γ-interferon secretion against HIV peptides, and elicited a certain levels of immunological memory. Results indicated that the recombinant virus had certain immunogenicity to HIV-1. Additionally, the virulence of the recombinant virus was been attenuated in vivo of mice compared with wild type VTT (wtVTT), and the introduction of CTB and HIV Mp24 did not alter the infectivity and virulence of defective vaccinia virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transcriptome analysis of H2O2-treated wheat seedlings reveals a H2O2-responsive fatty acid desaturase gene participating in powdery mildew resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aili Li

    Full Text Available Hydrogen peroxide (H(2O(2 plays important roles in plant biotic and abiotic stress responses. However, the effect of H(2O(2 stress on the bread wheat transcriptome is still lacking. To investigate the cellular and metabolic responses triggered by H(2O(2, we performed an mRNA tag analysis of wheat seedlings under 10 mM H(2O(2 treatment for 6 hour in one powdery mildew (PM resistant (PmA and two susceptible (Cha and Han lines. In total, 6,156, 6,875 and 3,276 transcripts were found to be differentially expressed in PmA, Han and Cha respectively. Among them, 260 genes exhibited consistent expression patterns in all three wheat lines and may represent a subset of basal H(2O(2 responsive genes that were associated with cell defense, signal transduction, photosynthesis, carbohydrate metabolism, lipid metabolism, redox homeostasis, and transport. Among genes specific to PmA, 'transport' activity was significantly enriched in Gene Ontology analysis. MapMan classification showed that, while both up- and down- regulations were observed for auxin, abscisic acid, and brassinolides signaling genes, the jasmonic acid and ethylene signaling pathway genes were all up-regulated, suggesting H(2O(2-enhanced JA/Et functions in PmA. To further study whether any of these genes were involved in wheat PM response, 19 H(2O(2-responsive putative defense related genes were assayed in wheat seedlings infected with Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici (Bgt. Eight of these genes were found to be co-regulated by H(2O(2 and Bgt, among which a fatty acid desaturase gene TaFAD was then confirmed by virus induced gene silencing (VIGS to be required for the PM resistance. Together, our data presents the first global picture of the wheat transcriptome under H(2O(2 stress and uncovers potential links between H(2O(2 and Bgt responses, hence providing important candidate genes for the PM resistance in wheat.

  11. An efficient viral vector for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees and its induced resistance to Plum pox virus via silencing of a host factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2017-03-01

    RNA silencing is a powerful technology for molecular characterization of gene functions in plants. A commonly used approach to the induction of RNA silencing is through genetic transformation. A potent alternative is to use a modified viral vector for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to degrade RNA molecules sharing similar nucleotide sequence. Unfortunately, genomic studies in many allogamous woody perennials such as peach are severely hindered because they have a long juvenile period and are recalcitrant to genetic transformation. Here, we report the development of a viral vector derived from Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), a widespread fruit tree virus that is endemic in all Prunus fruit production countries and regions in the world. We show that the modified PNRSV vector, harbouring the sense-orientated target gene sequence of 100-200 bp in length in genomic RNA3, could efficiently trigger the silencing of a transgene or an endogenous gene in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. We further demonstrate that the PNRSV-based vector could be manipulated to silence endogenous genes in peach such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E isoform (eIF(iso)4E), a host factor of many potyviruses including Plum pox virus (PPV). Moreover, the eIF(iso)4E-knocked down peach plants were resistant to PPV. This work opens a potential avenue for the control of virus diseases in perennial trees via viral vector-mediated silencing of host factors, and the PNRSV vector may serve as a powerful molecular tool for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. The interaction between endogenous 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 and Cucumber mosaic virus LS2b protein affects viral replication, infection and gene silencing suppressor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruilin Wang

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is a model virus for plant-virus protein interaction and mechanism research because of its wide distribution, high-level of replication and simple genome structure. The 2b protein is a multifunctional protein encoded by CMV that suppresses RNA silencing-based antiviral defense and contributes to CMV virulence in host plants. In this report, 12 host proteins were identified as CMV LS2b binding partners using the yeast two-hybrid screen system from the Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library. Among the host proteins, 30S ribosomal subunit protein S11 (RPS11 was selected for further studies. The interaction between LS2b and full-length RPS11 was confirmed using the yeast two-hybrid system. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BIFC assays observed by confocal laser microscopy and Glutathione S-transferase (GST pull-down assays were used to verify the interaction between endogenous NbRPS11 and viral CMVLS2b both in vivo and in vitro. TRV-based gene silencing vector was used to knockdown NbRPS11 transcription, and immunoblot analysis revealed a decline in infectious viral RNA replication and a decrease in CMV infection in RPS11 down-regulated Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Thus, the knockdown of RPS11 likely inhibited CMV replication and accumulation. The gene silencing suppressor activity of CMV2b protein was reduced by the RPS11 knockdown. This study demonstrated that the function of viral LS2b protein was remarkably affected by the interaction with host RPS11 protein.

  13. Human Gene Therapy: Genes without Frontiers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Eric J.

    2002-01-01

    Describes the latest advancements and setbacks in human gene therapy to provide reference material for biology teachers to use in their science classes. Focuses on basic concepts such as recombinant DNA technology, and provides examples of human gene therapy such as severe combined immunodeficiency syndrome, familial hypercholesterolemia, and…

  14. Genes and Hearing Loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Genes and Hearing Loss Genes and Hearing Loss Patient Health Information News media interested in ... One of the most common birth defects is hearing loss or deafness (congenital), which can affect as ...

  15. Epigenetics: beyond genes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fossey, A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory processes lead to differential gene expression and are referred to as epigenetic phenomena; these are ubiquitous processes in the biological world. These reversible heritable changes concern DNA and RNA, their interactions...

  16. Polydactyly and genes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Phadke, Shubha R; Sankar, V H

    2010-01-01

    .... A lot of information about genes involved in development is available now. Genetics of hand development and genes involved in polydactyly syndromes is discussed in this article as a prototype to know about genetics of malformations...

  17. Evolution of gene expression after gene amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Nelson; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Yongrui; Messing, Joachim

    2015-04-24

    We took a rather unique approach to investigate the conservation of gene expression of prolamin storage protein genes across two different subfamilies of the Poaceae. We took advantage of oat plants carrying single maize chromosomes in different cultivars, called oat-maize addition (OMA) lines, which permitted us to determine whether regulation of gene expression was conserved between the two species. We found that γ-zeins are expressed in OMA7.06, which carries maize chromosome 7 even in the absence of the trans-acting maize prolamin-box-binding factor (PBF), which regulates their expression. This is likely because oat PBF can substitute for the function of maize PBF as shown in our transient expression data, using a γ-zein promoter fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP). Despite this conservation, the younger, recently amplified prolamin genes in maize, absent in oat, are not expressed in the corresponding OMAs. However, maize can express the oldest prolamin gene, the wheat high-molecular weight glutenin Dx5 gene, even when maize Pbf is knocked down (through PbfRNAi), and/or another maize transcription factor, Opaque-2 (O2) is knocked out (in maize o2 mutant). Therefore, older genes are conserved in their regulation, whereas younger ones diverged during evolution and eventually acquired a new repertoire of suitable transcriptional activators. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Nodulin 22, a novel small heat-shock protein of the endoplasmic reticulum, is linked to the unfolded protein response in common bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-López, Jonathan; Martínez-Centeno, Cynthia; Padmanaban, Annamalai; Guillén, Gabriel; Olivares, Juan Elías; Stefano, Giovanni; Lledías, Fernando; Ramos, Fernando; Ghabrial, Said A; Brandizzi, Federica; Rocha-Sosa, Mario; Díaz-Camino, Claudia; Sanchez, Federico

    2014-01-01

    The importance of plant small heat shock proteins (sHsp) in multiple cellular processes has been evidenced by their unusual abundance and diversity; however, little is known about their biological role. Here, we characterized the in vitro chaperone activity and subcellular localization of nodulin 22 of Phaseolus vulgaris (PvNod22; common bean) and explored its cellular function through a virus-induced gene silencing-based reverse genetics approach. We established that PvNod22 facilitated the refolding of a model substrate in vitro, suggesting that it acts as a molecular chaperone in the cell. Through microscopy analyses of PvNod22, we determined its localization in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Furthermore, we found that silencing of PvNod22 resulted in necrotic lesions in the aerial organs of P. vulgaris plants cultivated under optimal conditions and that downregulation of PvNod22 activated the ER-unfolded protein response (UPR) and cell death. We also established that PvNod22 expression in wild-type bean plants was modulated by abiotic stress but not by chemicals that trigger the UPR, indicating PvNod22 is not under UPR control. Our results suggest that the ability of PvNod22 to suppress protein aggregation contributes to the maintenance of ER homeostasis, thus preventing the induction of cell death via UPR in response to oxidative stress during plant-microbe interactions.

  19. How Genes Evolve

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evolutionary history of duplicated genes within a given lineage. The timings of gene duplication events can be inferred ... evolutionary history of the creatures in which various globin genes are found, the timings of the ..... But I cannot find heart to give any part of my life for money-making purposes ... : In 1901, one of the large ...

  20. Discovering genes underlying QTL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanavichit, Apichart [Kasetsart University, Kamphaengsaen, Nakorn Pathom (Thailand)

    2002-02-01

    A map-based approach has allowed scientists to discover few genes at a time. In addition, the reproductive barrier between cultivated rice and wild relatives has prevented us from utilizing the germ plasm by a map-based approach. Most genetic traits important to agriculture or human diseases are manifested as observable, quantitative phenotypes called Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL). In many instances, the complexity of the phenotype/genotype interaction and the general lack of clearly identifiable gene products render the direct molecular cloning approach ineffective, thus additional strategies like genome mapping are required to identify the QTL in question. Genome mapping requires no prior knowledge of the gene function, but utilizes statistical methods to identify the most likely gene location. To completely characterize genes of interest, the initially mapped region of a gene location will have to be narrowed down to a size that is suitable for cloning and sequencing. Strategies for gene identification within the critical region have to be applied after the sequencing of a potentially large clone or set of clones that contains this gene(s). Tremendous success of positional cloning has been shown for cloning many genes responsible for human diseases, including cystic fibrosis and muscular dystrophy as well as plant disease resistance genes. Genome and QTL mapping, positional cloning: the pre-genomics era, comparative approaches to gene identification, and positional cloning: the genomics era are discussed in the report. (M. Suetake)

  1. A Novel Peroxidase CanPOD Gene of Pepper Is Involved in Defense Responses to Phytophtora capsici Infection as well as Abiotic Stress Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun-E; Liu, Ke-Ke; Li, Da-Wei; Zhang, Ying-Li; Zhao, Qian; He, Yu-Mei; Gong, Zhen-Hui

    2013-02-04

    Peroxidases are involved in many plant processes including plant defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. We isolated a novel peroxidase gene CanPOD from leaves of pepper cultivar A3. The full-length gene has a 1353-bp cDNA sequence and contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 975-bp, which encodes a putative polypeptide of 324 amino acids with a theoretical protein size of 34.93 kDa. CanPOD showed diverse expression levels in different tissues of pepper plants. To evaluate the role of CanPOD in plant stress responses, the expression patterns of CanPOD were examined using Real-Time RT-PCR. The results indicated that CanPOD was significantly induced by Phytophtora capsici. Moreover, CanPOD was also up-regulated in leaves after salt and drought stress treatments. In addition, CanPOD expression was strongly induced by signaling hormones salicylic acid (SA). In contrast, CanPOD was not highly expressed after treatment with cold. Meanwhile, in order to further assess the role of gene CanPOD in defense response to P. capsici attack, we performed a loss-of-function experiment using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) technique in pepper plants. In comparison to the control plant, the expression levels of CanPOD were obviously decreased in CanPOD-silenced pepper plants. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of P. capsici on detached-leaves and found that the CanPOD-silenced plant leaves were highly susceptible to P. capsici infection. Taken together, our results suggested that CanPOD is involved in defense responses to P. capsici infection as well as abiotic stresses in pepper plants.

  2. A Novel Peroxidase CanPOD Gene of Pepper Is Involved in Defense Responses to Phytophtora capsici Infection as well as Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Mei He

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases are involved in many plant processes including plant defense responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. We isolated a novel peroxidase gene CanPOD from leaves of pepper cultivar A3. The full-length gene has a 1353-bp cDNA sequence and contains an open reading frame (ORF of 975-bp, which encodes a putative polypeptide of 324 amino acids with a theoretical protein size of 34.93 kDa. CanPOD showed diverse expression levels in different tissues of pepper plants. To evaluate the role of CanPOD in plant stress responses, the expression patterns of CanPOD were examined using Real-Time RT-PCR. The results indicated that CanPOD was significantly induced by Phytophtora capsici. Moreover, CanPOD was also up-regulated in leaves after salt and drought stress treatments. In addition, CanPOD expression was strongly induced by signaling hormones salicylic acid (SA. In contrast, CanPOD was not highly expressed after treatment with cold. Meanwhile, in order to further assess the role of gene CanPOD in defense response to P. capsici attack, we performed a loss-of-function experiment using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS technique in pepper plants. In comparison to the control plant, the expression levels of CanPOD were obviously decreased in CanPOD-silenced pepper plants. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of P. capsici on detached-leaves and found that the CanPOD-silenced plant leaves were highly susceptible to P. capsici infection. Taken together, our results suggested that CanPOD is involved in defense responses to P. capsici infection as well as abiotic stresses in pepper plants.

  3. TaSCL14, a novel wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) GRAS gene, regulates plant growth, photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kunmei; Li, Hongwei; Chen, Yaofeng; Zheng, Qi; Li, Bin; Li, Zhensheng

    2015-01-20

    Rates of photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence are all important physiological factors that affect plant development and thus agricultural productivity. GRAS proteins play essential roles in plant growth and development as well as in plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. So far few GRAS genes in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) have been characterized. A previous transcriptome analysis indicated that the expression of a GRAS gene (TaSCL14) was induced by high-light stress in Xiaoyan 54 (XY54), a common wheat cultivar with strong tolerance to high-light stress. In this study, TaSCL14 gene was isolated from XY54 and mapped on chromosome 4A. TaSCL14 was expressed in various wheat organs, with high levels in stems and roots. Our results confirmed that TaSCL14 expression was indeed responsive to high-light stress. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV)-based virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of TaSCL14 in wheat was performed to help characterize its potential functions. Silencing of TaSCL14 resulted in inhibited plant growth, decreased photosynthetic capacity, and reduced tolerance to photooxidative stress. In addition, silencing of TaSCL14 in wheat promoted leaf senescence induced by darkness. These results suggest that TaSCL14 may act as a multifunctional regulator involved in plant growth, photosynthesis, tolerance to photooxidative stress, and senescence. Copyright © 2014 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, and Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The Mi-9 Gene from Solanum arcanum Conferring Heat-Stable Resistance to Root-Knot Nematodes Is a Homolog of Mi-11[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jablonska, Barbara; Ammiraju, Jetty S.S.; Bhattarai, Kishor K.; Mantelin, Sophie; de Ilarduya, Oscar Martinez; Roberts, Philip A.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2007-01-01

    Resistance conferred by the Mi-1 gene from Solanum peruvianum is effective and widely used for limiting root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne spp.) yield loss in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), but the resistance is ineffective at soil temperatures above 28°C. Previously, we mapped the heat-stable resistance gene Mi-9 in Solanum arcanum accession LA2157 to the short arm of chromosome 6, in a genetic interval as Mi-1 and the Cladosporium fulvum resistance gene Cf2. We developed a fine map of the Mi-9 region by resistance and marker screening of an F2 population and derived F3 families from resistant LA2157 × susceptible LA392. Mi-1 intron 1 flanking primers were designed to amplify intron 1 and fingerprint Mi-1 homologs. Using these primers, we identified seven Mi-1 homologs in the mapping parents. Cf-2 and Mi-1 homologs were mapped on chromosome 6 using a subset of the F2. Cf-2 homologs did not segregate with Mi-9 resistance, but three Mi-1 homologs (RH1, RH2, and RH4) from LA2157 and one (SH1) from LA392 colocalized to the Mi-9 region. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that six Mi-1 homologs are expressed in LA2157 roots. We targeted transcripts of Mi-1 homologs for degradation with tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing using Agrobacterium infiltration with a TRV-Mi construct. In most LA2157 plants infiltrated with the TRV-Mi construct, Mi-9-meditated heat-stable root-knot nematode resistance was compromised at 32°C, indicating that the heat-stable resistance is mediated by a homolog of Mi-1. PMID:17172289

  5. Physiological function of IspE, a plastid MEP pathway gene for isoprenoid biosynthesis, in organelle biogenesis and cell morphogenesis in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chang Sook; Pai, Hyun-Sook

    2008-03-01

    Isoprenoid biosynthesis in plants occurs by two independent pathways: the cytosolic mevalonate (MVA) pathway and the plastidic methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway. In this study, we investigated the cellular effects of depletion of IspE, a protein involved in the MEP pathway, using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). The IspE gene is preferentially expressed in young tissues, and induced by light and methyl jasmonate. The GFP fusion protein of IspE was targeted to chloroplasts. Reduction of IspE expression by VIGS resulted in a severe leaf yellowing phenotype. At the cellular level, depletion of IspE severely affected chloroplast development, dramatically reducing both the number and size of chloroplasts. Interestingly, mitochondrial development was also impaired, suggesting a possibility that the plastidic MEP pathway contributes to mitochondrial isoprenoid biosynthesis in leaves. A deficiency in IspE activity decreased cellular levels of the metabolites produced by the MEP pathway, such as chlorophylls and carotenoids, and stimulated expression of some of the downstream MEP pathway genes, particularly IspF and IspG. Interestingly, the IspE VIGS lines had significantly increased numbers of cells of reduced size in all leaf layers, compared with TRV control and other VIGS lines for the MEP pathway genes. The increased cell division in the IspE VIGS lines was particularly pronounced in the abaxial epidermal layer, in which the over-proliferated cells bulged out of the plane, making the surface uneven. In addition, trichome numbers dramatically increased and the stomata size varied in the affected tissues. Our results show that IspE deficiency causes novel developmental phenotypes distinct from the phenotypes of other MEP pathway mutants, indicating that IspE may have an additional role in plant development besides its role in isoprenoid biosynthesis.

  6. Downregulation of a barley (Hordeum vulgare) leucine-rich repeat, non-arginine-aspartate receptor-like protein kinase reduces expression of numerous genes involved in plant pathogen defense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, David L; Huang, Li; Fischer, Andreas M

    2016-03-01

    Pattern recognition receptors represent a first line of plant defense against pathogens. Comparing the flag leaf transcriptomes of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) near-isogenic lines varying in the allelic state of a locus controlling senescence, we have previously identified a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein kinase gene (LRR-RLK; GenBank accession: AK249842), which was strongly upregulated in leaves of early-as compared to late-senescing germplasm. Bioinformatic analysis indicated that this gene codes for a subfamily XII, non-arginine-aspartate (non-RD) LRR-RLK. Virus-induced gene silencing resulted in a two-fold reduction of transcript levels as compared to controls. Transcriptomic comparison of leaves from untreated plants, from plants treated with virus only without any plant sequences (referred to as 'empty virus' control), and from plants in which AK249842 expression was knocked down identified numerous genes involved in pathogen defense. These genes were strongly induced in 'empty virus' as compared to untreated controls, but their expression was significantly reduced (again compared to 'empty virus' controls) when AK249842 was knocked down, indicating that their expression partially depends on the LRR-RLK investigated here. Expression analysis, using datasets from BarleyBase/PLEXdb, demonstrated that AK249842 transcript levels are heavily influenced by the allelic state of the well-characterized mildew resistance a (Mla) locus, and that the gene is induced after powdery mildew and stem rust infection. Together, our data suggest that AK249842 is a barley pattern recognition receptor with a tentative role in defense against fungal pathogens, setting the stage for its full functional characterization. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Infection of human islets of Langerhans with two strains of Coxsackie B virus serotype 1: assessment of virus replication, degree of cell death and induction of genes involved in the innate immunity pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagandula, Mahesh; Richardson, Sarah J; Oberste, M Steven; Sioofy-Khojine, Amir-Babak; Hyöty, Heikki; Morgan, Noel G; Korsgren, Olle; Frisk, Gun

    2014-08-01

    Type 1 diabetes mellitus is believed to be triggered, in part, by one or more environmental factors and human enteroviruses (HEVs) are among the candidates. Therefore, this study has examined whether two strains of HEV may differentially affect the induction of genes involved in pathways leading to the synthesis of islet hormones, chemokines and cytokines in isolated, highly purified, human islets. Isolated, purified human pancreatic islets were infected with strains of Coxsackievirus B1.Viral replication and the degree of CPE/islet dissociation were monitored. The expression of insulin, glucagon, CXCL10, TLR3, IF1H1, CCL5, OAS-1, IFNβ, and DDX58 was analyzed. Both strains replicated in islets but only one of strain caused rapid islet dissociation/CPE. Expression of the insulin gene was reduced during infection of islets with either viral strain but the gene encoding glucagon was unaffected. All genes analyzed which are involved in viral sensing and the development of innate immunity were induced by Coxsackie B viruses, with the notable exception of TLR3. There was no qualitative difference in the expression pattern between each strain but the magnitude of the response varied between donors. The lack of virus induced expression of TLR3, together with the differential regulation of IF1H1, OAS1 and IFNβ, (each of which has polymorphic variants influence the predisposition to type 1 diabetes), that might result in defective clearance of virus from islet cells. The reduced expression of the insulin gene and the unaffected expression of the gene encoding glucagon by Coxsackie B1 infection is consistent with the preferential β-cell tropism of the virus. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Gene therapy in periodontics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anirban; Singh, Nidhi; Saluja, Mini

    2013-01-01

    GENES are made of DNA - the code of life. They are made up of two types of base pair from different number of hydrogen bonds AT, GC which can be turned into instruction. Everyone inherits genes from their parents and passes them on in turn to their children. Every person's genes are different, and the changes in sequence determine the inherited differences between each of us. Some changes, usually in a single gene, may cause serious diseases. Gene therapy is ‘the use of genes as medicine’. It involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working gene copy into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. Thus it may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. It has a promising era in the field of periodontics. Gene therapy has been used as a mode of tissue engineering in periodontics. The tissue engineering approach reconstructs the natural target tissue by combining four elements namely: Scaffold, signaling molecules, cells and blood supply and thus can help in the reconstruction of damaged periodontium including cementum, gingival, periodontal ligament and bone. PMID:23869119

  9. Gene therapy: An overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudip Indu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy "the use of genes as medicine" involves the transfer of a therapeutic or working copy of a gene into specific cells of an individual in order to repair a faulty gene copy. The technique may be used to replace a faulty gene, or to introduce a new gene whose function is to cure or to favorably modify the clinical course of a condition. The objective of gene therapy is to introduce new genetic material into target cells while causing no damage to the surrounding healthy cells and tissues, hence the treatment related morbidity is decreased. The delivery system includes a vector that delivers a therapeutic gene into the patient′s target cell. Functional proteins are created from the therapeutic gene causing the cell to return to a normal stage. The vectors used in gene therapy can be viral and non-viral. Gene therapy, an emerging field of biomedicine, is still at infancy and much research remains to be done before this approach to the treatment of condition will realize its full potential.

  10. Modelling prokaryote gene content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Susko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The patchy distribution of genes across the prokaryotes may be caused by multiple gene losses or lateral transfer. Probabilistic models of gene gain and loss are needed to distinguish between these possibilities. Existing models allow only single genes to be gained and lost, despite the empirical evidence for multi-gene events. We compare birth-death models (currently the only widely-used models, in which only one gene can be gained or lost at a time to blocks models (allowing gain and loss of multiple genes within a family. We analyze two pairs of genomes: two E. coli strains, and the distantly-related Archaeoglobus fulgidus (archaea and Bacillus subtilis (gram positive bacteria. Blocks models describe the data much better than birth-death models. Our models suggest that lateral transfers of multiple genes from the same family are rare (although transfers of single genes are probably common. For both pairs, the estimated median time that a gene will remain in the genome is not much greater than the time separating the common ancestors of the archaea and bacteria. Deep phylogenetic reconstruction from sequence data will therefore depend on choosing genes likely to remain in the genome for a long time. Phylogenies based on the blocks model are more biologically plausible than phylogenies based on the birth-death model.

  11. Retrieval with gene queries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan Padmini

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accuracy of document retrieval from MEDLINE for gene queries is crucially important for many applications in bioinformatics. We explore five information retrieval-based methods to rank documents retrieved by PubMed gene queries for the human genome. The aim is to rank relevant documents higher in the retrieved list. We address the special challenges faced due to ambiguity in gene nomenclature: gene terms that refer to multiple genes, gene terms that are also English words, and gene terms that have other biological meanings. Results Our two baseline ranking strategies are quite similar in performance. Two of our three LocusLink-based strategies offer significant improvements. These methods work very well even when there is ambiguity in the gene terms. Our best ranking strategy offers significant improvements on three different kinds of ambiguities over our two baseline strategies (improvements range from 15.9% to 17.7% and 11.7% to 13.3% depending on the baseline. For most genes the best ranking query is one that is built from the LocusLink (now Entrez Gene summary and product information along with the gene names and aliases. For others, the gene names and aliases suffice. We also present an approach that successfully predicts, for a given gene, which of these two ranking queries is more appropriate. Conclusion We explore the effect of different post-retrieval strategies on the ranking of documents returned by PubMed for human gene queries. We have successfully applied some of these strategies to improve the ranking of relevant documents in the retrieved sets. This holds true even when various kinds of ambiguity are encountered. We feel that it would be very useful to apply strategies like ours on PubMed search results as these are not ordered by relevance in any way. This is especially so for queries that retrieve a large number of documents.

  12. Genome-wide association study identified genetic variations and candidate genes for plant architecture component traits in Chinese upland cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Junji; Li, Libei; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Caixiang; Gu, Lijiao; Wang, Hantao; Wei, Hengling; Liu, Qibao; Huang, Long; Yu, Shuxun

    2018-03-01

    Thirty significant associations between 22 SNPs and five plant architecture component traits in Chinese upland cotton were identified via GWAS. Four peak SNP loci located on chromosome D03 were simultaneously associated with more plant architecture component traits. A candidate gene, Gh_D03G0922, might be responsible for plant height in upland cotton. A compact plant architecture is increasingly required for mechanized harvesting processes in China. Therefore, cotton plant architecture is an important trait, and its components, such as plant height, fruit branch length and fruit branch angle, affect the suitability of a cultivar for mechanized harvesting. To determine the genetic basis of cotton plant architecture, a genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed using a panel composed of 355 accessions and 93,250 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) identified using the specific-locus amplified fragment sequencing method. Thirty significant associations between 22 SNPs and five plant architecture component traits were identified via GWAS. Most importantly, four peak SNP loci located on chromosome D03 were simultaneously associated with more plant architecture component traits, and these SNPs were harbored in one linkage disequilibrium block. Furthermore, 21 candidate genes for plant architecture were predicted in a 0.95-Mb region including the four peak SNPs. One of these genes (Gh_D03G0922) was near the significant SNP D03_31584163 (8.40 kb), and its Arabidopsis homologs contain MADS-box domains that might be involved in plant growth and development. qRT-PCR showed that the expression of Gh_D03G0922 was upregulated in the apical buds and young leaves of the short and compact cotton varieties, and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) proved that the silenced plants exhibited increased PH. These results indicate that Gh_D03G0922 is likely the candidate gene for PH in cotton. The genetic variations and candidate genes identified in this study lay a foundation

  13. Primetime for Learning Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keifer, Joyce

    2017-02-11

    Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF), by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be "poised" for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  14. Primetime for Learning Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyce Keifer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Learning genes in mature neurons are uniquely suited to respond rapidly to specific environmental stimuli. Expression of individual learning genes, therefore, requires regulatory mechanisms that have the flexibility to respond with transcriptional activation or repression to select appropriate physiological and behavioral responses. Among the mechanisms that equip genes to respond adaptively are bivalent domains. These are specific histone modifications localized to gene promoters that are characteristic of both gene activation and repression, and have been studied primarily for developmental genes in embryonic stem cells. In this review, studies of the epigenetic regulation of learning genes in neurons, particularly the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene (BDNF, by methylation/demethylation and chromatin modifications in the context of learning and memory will be highlighted. Because of the unique function of learning genes in the mature brain, it is proposed that bivalent domains are a characteristic feature of the chromatin landscape surrounding their promoters. This allows them to be “poised” for rapid response to activate or repress gene expression depending on environmental stimuli.

  15. Viral gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancheño-Corvo, P; Martín-Duque, P

    2006-12-01

    Cancer is a multigenic disorder involving mutations of both tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes. A large body of preclinical data, however, has suggested that cancer growth can be arrested or reversed by treatment with gene transfer vectors that carry a single growth inhibitory or pro-apoptotic gene or a gene that can recruit immune responses against the tumor. Many of these gene transfer vectors are modified viruses. The ability for the delivery of therapeutic genes, made them desirable for engineering virus vector systems. The viral vectors recently in laboratory and clinical use are based on RNA and DNA viruses processing very different genomic structures and host ranges. Particular viruses have been selected as gene delivery vehicles because of their capacities to carry foreign genes and their ability to efficiently deliver these genes associated with efficient gene expression. These are the major reasons why viral vectors derived from retroviruses, adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, herpesvirus and poxvirus are employed in more than 70% of clinical gene therapy trials worldwide. Because these vector systems have unique advantages and limitations, each has applications for which it is best suited. Retroviral vectors can permanently integrate into the genome of the infected cell, but require mitotic cell division for transduction. Adenoviral vectors can efficiently deliver genes to a wide variety of dividing and nondividing cell types, but immune elimination of infected cells often limits gene expression in vivo. Herpes simplex virus can deliver large amounts of exogenous DNA; however, cytotoxicity and maintenance of transgene expression remain as obstacles. AAV also infects many non-dividing and dividing cell types, but has a limited DNA capacity. This review discusses current and emerging virusbased genetic engineering strategies for the delivery of therapeutic molecules or several approaches for cancer treatment.

  16. Gene manupulations in invertebrates

    OpenAIRE

    Čermáková, Eliška

    2017-01-01

    Gene manipulations in invertebrates are based on the same approches used in vertebrates. The are applied for the development of new genotypes in model species, convenient as model systems of human hereditary diseases etc. Gene manipulations are important as well for practical purposes, which is shown by the example of trangenic mosquitoes. Recently, it has been proved that programmable nucleases can be successfully used in invertebrates. Key words: Gene manipulations, invertebrates, methods, ...

  17. Genes and Social Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Gene E.; Fernald, Russell D.; Clayton, David F.

    2008-01-01

    What specific genes and regulatory sequences contribute to the organization and functioning of brain circuits that support social behavior? How does social experience interact with information in the genome to modulate these brain circuits? Here we address these questions by highlighting progress that has been made in identifying and understanding two key “vectors of influence” that link genes, brain, and social behavior: 1) social information alters gene readout in the brain to influence beh...

  18. History of gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirth, Thomas; Parker, Nigel; Ylä-Herttuala, Seppo

    2013-08-10

    Two decades after the initial gene therapy trials and more than 1700 approved clinical trials worldwide we not only have gained much new information and knowledge regarding gene therapy in general, but also learned to understand the concern that has persisted in society. Despite the setbacks gene therapy has faced, success stories have increasingly emerged. Examples for these are the positive recommendation for a gene therapy product (Glybera) by the EMA for approval in the European Union and the positive trials for the treatment of ADA deficiency, SCID-X1 and adrenoleukodystrophy. Nevertheless, our knowledge continues to grow and during the course of time more safety data has become available that helps us to develop better gene therapy approaches. Also, with the increased understanding of molecular medicine, we have been able to develop more specific and efficient gene transfer vectors which are now producing clinical results. In this review, we will take a historical view and highlight some of the milestones that had an important impact on the development of gene therapy. We will also discuss briefly the safety and ethical aspects of gene therapy and address some concerns that have been connected with gene therapy as an important therapeutic modality. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Silencing the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 Genes in Tomato Reduces Abscisic Acid—Mediated Drought Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Liang

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Drought is a major threat to agriculture production worldwide. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs play a pivotal role in sensing and converting stress signals into appropriate responses so that plants can adapt and survive. To examine the function of MAPKs in the drought tolerance of tomato plants, we silenced the SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 genes in wild-type plants using the virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS method. The results indicate that silencing the individual genes or co-silencing SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 reduced the drought tolerance of tomato plants by varying degrees. Co-silencing SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 impaired abscisic acid (ABA-induced and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2-induced stomatal closure and enhanced ABA-induced H2O2 production. Similar results were observed when silencing SpMPK3 alone, but not when SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 were individually silenced. These data suggest that the functions of SpMPK1 and SpMPK2 are redundant, and they overlap with that of SpMPK3 in drought stress signaling pathways. In addition, we found that SpMPK3 may regulate H2O2 levels by mediating the expression of CAT1. Hence, SpMPK1, SpMPK2, and SpMPK3 may play crucial roles in enhancing tomato plants’ drought tolerance by influencing stomatal activity and H2O2 production via the ABA-H2O2 pathway.

  20. Chromatin loops, gene positioning, and gene expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holwerda, S.; de Laat, W.

    2012-01-01

    Technological developments and intense research over the last years have led to a better understanding of the 3D structure of the genome and its influence on genome function inside the cell nucleus. We will summarize topological studies performed on four model gene loci: the alpha- and beta-globin

  1. One gene's shattering effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsen, Kenneth M

    2012-05-29

    A new study shows that three independent mutations in the Sh1 gene, which encodes a YABBY transcription factor, gave rise to the non-shattering seed phenotype in domesticated sorghum. This same gene may have also had a role in the domestication of other cereals, including maize and rice.

  2. Adenovirus Vectors for Gene Therapy, Vaccination and Cancer Gene Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Wold, William S. M.; Toth, Karoly

    2013-01-01

    Adenovirus vectors are the most commonly employed vector for cancer gene therapy. They are also used for gene therapy and as vaccines to express foreign antigens. Adenovirus vectors can be replication-defective; certain essential viral genes are deleted and replaced by a cassette that expresses a foreign therapeutic gene. Such vectors are used for gene therapy, as vaccines, and for cancer therapy. Replication-competent (oncolytic) vectors are employed for cancer gene therapy. Oncolytic vector...

  3. Development of a new vector using Soybean yellow common mosaic virus for gene function study or heterologous protein expression in soybeans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Seungmo; Nam, Moon; Kim, Kil Hyun; Lee, Su-Heon; Moon, Jung-Kyung; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Choung, Myoung-Gun; Kim, Sang-Mok; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-02-01

    A new vector using Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) was constructed for gene function study or heterologous protein expression in soybeans. The in vitro transcript with a 5' cap analog m7GpppG from an SYCMV full-length infectious vector driven by a T7 promoter infected soybeans (pSYCMVT7-full). The symptoms observed in the soybeans infected with either the sap from SYCMV-infected leaves or pSYCMVT7-full were indistinguishable, suggesting that the vector exhibits equivalent biological activity as the virus itself. To utilize the vector further, a DNA-based vector driven by the Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter was constructed. The complete sequence of the SYCMV genome was inserted into a binary vector flanked by a CaMV 35S promoter at the 5' terminus of the SYCMV genome and a cis-cleaving ribozyme sequence followed by a nopaline synthase terminator at the 3' terminus of the SYCMV genome (pSYCMV-full). The SYCMV-derived vector was tested for use as a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) vector for the functional analysis of soybean genes. VIGS constructs containing either a fragment of the Phytoene desaturase (PDS) gene (pSYCMV-PDS1) or a fragment of the small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (RbcS) gene (pSYCMV-RbcS2) were constructed. Plants infiltrated with each vector using the Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation method exhibited distinct symptoms, such as photo-bleaching in plants infiltrated with pSYCMV-PDS1 and yellow or pale green coloring in plants infiltrated with pSYCMV-RbcS2. In addition, down-regulation of the transcripts of the two target genes was confirmed via northern blot analysis. Particle bombardment and direct plasmid DNA rubbing were also confirmed as alternative inoculation methods. To determine if the SYCMV vector can be used for the expression of heterologous proteins in soybean plants, the vector encoding amino acids 135-160 of VP1 of Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O1 Campos (O1C

  4. Gene therapy flexes muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandenDriessche, Thierry

    2005-09-01

    This commentary highlights the promising results of recent studies in animal models of Duchenne muscular dystrophy and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis that have clearly demonstrated the potential of gene therapy for tackling these diseases. In the absence of effective drugs or other treatments, these advances in gene therapy technology represent the best hope for those patients and families that are blighted by these diseases. Diseases characterized by progressive muscle degeneration are often incurable and affect a relatively large number of individuals. The progressive deterioration of muscle function is like the sword of Damocles that constantly reminds patients suffering from these diseases of their tragic fate, since most of them will eventually die from cardiac or pulmonary dysfunction. Some of these disorders are due to mutations in genes that directly influence the integrity of muscle fibers, such as in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a recessive X-linked genetic disease. Others result from a progressive neurodegeneration of the motoneurons that are essential for maintaining muscle function, such as in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The genetic basis of DMD is relatively well understood as it is due to mutations in the dystrophin gene that encodes the cognate sarcolemmal protein. In contrast, the cause of ALS is poorly defined, with the exception of some dominantly inherited familial cases of ALS that are due to gain-of-function mutations in the gene encoding superoxide dismutase (SODG93A). Gene therapy for these disorders has been hampered by the inability to achieve widespread gene transfer. Moreover, since familial ALS is due to a dominant gain-of-function mutation, inhibition of gene expression (rather than gene augmentation) would be required to correct the phenotype, which is particularly challenging. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Antisense gene silencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Troels T; Nielsen, Jørgen E

    2013-01-01

    Since the first reports that double-stranded RNAs can efficiently silence gene expression in C. elegans, the technology of RNA interference (RNAi) has been intensively exploited as an experimental tool to study gene function. With the subsequent discovery that RNAi could also be applied...... to mammalian cells, the technology of RNAi expanded from being a valuable experimental tool to being an applicable method for gene-specific therapeutic regulation, and much effort has been put into further refinement of the technique. This review will focus on how RNAi has developed over the years and how...

  6. Gene Therapy for Hemophilia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathwani, Amit C; Davidoff, Andrew M; Tuddenham, Edward G D

    2017-10-01

    The best currently available treatments for hemophilia A and B (factor VIII or factor IX deficiency, respectively) require frequent intravenous infusion of highly expensive proteins that have short half-lives. Factor levels follow a saw-tooth pattern that is seldom in the normal range and falls so low that breakthrough bleeding occurs. Most hemophiliacs worldwide do not have access to even this level of care. In stark contrast, gene therapy holds out the hope of a cure by inducing continuous endogenous expression of factor VIII or factor IX following transfer of a functional gene to replace the hemophilic patient's own defective gene. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of the innate immune-related genes expression in H9N2 avian influenza virus-infected chicken macrophage-like cells (HD11) in response to Escherichia coli LPS stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xuefeng; Liu, Caihong; Li, Ruiqiao; Zhang, Huizhu; Xu, Xingang; Wang, Jingyu

    2017-04-01

    Macrophages play important roles in mediating virus-induced innate immune responses and are thought to be involved in the pathogenesis of bacterial superinfections. The innate immune response initiated by both low pathogenicity AIV and bacterial superinfection in their avian host is not fully understood. We therefore determine the transcripts of innate immune-related genes following avian H9N2 AIV virus infection and E. coli LPS co-stimulation of avian macrophage-like cell line HD11 cells. More pronounced expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and IL-1β) as well as the inflammatory chemokines (CXCLi1 and CXCLi2) was observed in virus infected plus LPS treated HD11 cells compared to H9N2 virus solely infected control. For two superinfection groups, the levels of genes examined in a prior H9N2 virus infection before secondary LPS treatment group were significantly higher as compared with simultaneous virus infection plus LPS stimulation group. Interestingly, similar high levels of IL-6 gene were observed between LPS sole stimulation group and two superinfection groups. Moreover, IL-10 and TGF-β3 mRNA levels in both superinfection groups were moderately upregulated compared to sole LPS stimulation group or virus alone infection group. Although TLR4 and MDA5 levels in virus alone infection group were significantly lower compared to that in both superinfection groups, TLR4 upregulation respond more rapid to virus sole infection compared to LPS plus virus superinfection. Collectively, innate immune-related genes respond more pronounced in LPS stimulation plus H9N2 virus infection HD11 cells compared to sole virus infection or LPS alone stimulation control cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. A Raf-like MAPKKK gene, GhRaf19, negatively regulates tolerance to drought and salt and positively regulates resistance to cold stress by modulating reactive oxygen species in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Haihong; Hao, Lili; Guo, Xulei; Liu, Shuchang; Yan, Yan; Guo, Xingqi

    2016-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinases (MAPKKKs) function at the top level of MAPK cascades and play important roles in plant development and stress responses. Although MAPKKKs comprise the largest family in the MAPK cascades, very few Raf-like MAPKKKs have been functionally identified, especially in the economically important crop cotton. In this study, a Raf-like MAPKKK gene, GhRaf19, was characterized for the first time in cotton. Our data show that the expression of GhRaf19 was inhibited by PEG and NaCl and induced by cold (4°C) and H2O2. Furthermore, when GhRaf19 was silenced in cotton using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), tolerance to drought and salt stress were enhanced, the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was reduced, and ROS-related gene expression was increased. Consistent with these results, in N. benthamiana, overexpressing-GhRaf19 reduced tolerance to drought and salt. However, GhRaf19-silenced plants showed lowered resistance to cold in cotton, and this effect was correlated with the accumulation of ROS. In contrast, overexpressing GhRaf19 in N. benthamiana increased resistance to cold by inducing higher levels of expression and activity of ROS-related antioxidant genes/enzymes. These results indicate that GhRaf19 negatively regulates tolerance to drought and salt and positively regulates resistance to cold stress by modulating cellular ROS in cotton. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Cloning of Gossypium hirsutum Sucrose Non-Fermenting 1-Related Protein Kinase 2 Gene (GhSnRK2) and Its Overexpression in Transgenic Arabidopsis Escalates Drought and Low Temperature Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Babatunde; Zhang, Xueyan; Liu, Chuanliang; Yang, Zhaoen; Yang, Zuoren; Wang, Qianhua; Zhao, Ge; Li, Fuguang

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of stress tolerance and the use of modern genetics approaches for the improvement of drought stress tolerance have been major focuses of plant molecular biologists. In the present study, we cloned the Gossypium hirsutum sucrose non-fermenting 1-related protein kinase 2 (GhSnRK2) gene and investigated its functions in transgenic Arabidopsis. We further elucidated the function of this gene in transgenic cotton using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) techniques. We hypothesized that GhSnRK2 participates in the stress signaling pathway and elucidated its role in enhancing stress tolerance in plants via various stress-related pathways and stress-responsive genes. We determined that the subcellular localization of the GhSnRK2-green fluorescent protein (GFP) was localized in the nuclei and cytoplasm. In contrast to wild-type plants, transgenic plants overexpressing GhSnRK2 exhibited increased tolerance to drought, cold, abscisic acid and salt stresses, suggesting that GhSnRK2 acts as a positive regulator in response to cold and drought stresses. Plants overexpressing GhSnRK2 displayed evidence of reduced water loss, turgor regulation, elevated relative water content, biomass, and proline accumulation. qRT-PCR analysis of GhSnRK2 expression suggested that this gene may function in diverse tissues. Under normal and stress conditions, the expression levels of stress-inducible genes, such as AtRD29A, AtRD29B, AtP5CS1, AtABI3, AtCBF1, and AtABI5, were increased in the GhSnRK2-overexpressing plants compared to the wild-type plants. GhSnRK2 gene silencing alleviated drought tolerance in cotton plants, indicating that VIGS technique can certainly be used as an effective means to examine gene function by knocking down the expression of distinctly expressed genes. The results of this study suggested that the GhSnRK2 gene, when incorporated into Arabidopsis, functions in positive responses to drought stress and in low temperature tolerance. PMID:25393623

  10. Genes underlying altruism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Graham J; Hurd, Peter L; Crespi, Bernard J

    2013-01-01

    William D. Hamilton postulated the existence of 'genes underlying altruism', under the rubric of inclusive fitness theory, a half-century ago. Such genes are now poised for discovery. In this article, we develop a set of intuitive criteria for the recognition and analysis of genes for altruism and describe the first candidate genes affecting altruism from social insects and humans. We also provide evidence from a human population for genetically based trade-offs, underlain by oxytocin-system polymorphisms, between alleles for altruism and alleles for non-social cognition. Such trade-offs between self-oriented and altruistic behaviour may influence the evolution of phenotypic diversity across all social animals.

  11. Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene Expression Omnibus is a public functional genomics data repository supporting MIAME-compliant submissions of array- and sequence-based data. Tools are provided...

  12. Evidence for homosexuality gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pool, R.

    1993-07-16

    A genetic analysis of 40 pairs of homosexual brothers has uncovered a region on the X chromosome that appears to contain a gene or genes for homosexuality. When analyzing the pedigrees of homosexual males, the researcheres found evidence that the trait has a higher likelihood of being passed through maternal genes. This led them to search the X chromosome for genes predisposing to homosexuality. The researchers examined the X chromosomes of pairs of homosexual brothers for regions of DNA that most or all had in common. Of the 40 sets of brothers, 33 shared a set of five markers in the q28 region of the long arm of the X chromosome. The linkage has a LOD score of 4.0, which translates into a 99.5% certainty that there is a gene or genes in this area that predispose males to homosexuality. The chief researcher warns, however, that this one site cannot explain all instances of homosexuality, since there were some cases where the trait seemed to be passed paternally. And even among those brothers where there was no evidence that the trait was passed paternally, seven sets of brothers did not share the Xq28 markers. It seems likely that homosexuality arises from a variety of causes.

  13. Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in the Etiology of Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Adegoke, Olufemi

    2003-01-01

    The objective of this CDA is to evaluate the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in the etiology of breast cancer in two ongoing case-control studies, the Shanghai Breast Cancer Study (SBCS...

  14. Evaluation of the zoonotic potential of a novel reassortant H1N2 swine influenza virus with gene constellation derived from multiple viral sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee Hoon; Pascua, Philippe Noriel Q; Decano, Arun G; Kim, Se Mi; Park, Su-Jin; Kwon, Hyeok-Il; Kim, Eun-Ha; Kim, Young-Il; Kim, HyongKyu; Kim, Seok-Yong; Song, Min-Suk; Jang, Hyung-Kwan; Park, Bong Kyun; Choi, Young Ki

    2015-08-01

    In 2011-2012, contemporary North American-like H3N2 swine influenza viruses (SIVs) possessing the 2009 pandemic H1N1 matrix gene (H3N2pM-like virus) were detected in domestic pigs of South Korea where H1N2 SIV strains are endemic. More recently, we isolated novel reassortant H1N2 SIVs bearing the Eurasian avian-like swine H1-like hemagglutinin and Korean swine H1N2-like neuraminidase in the internal gene backbone of the H3N2pM-like virus. In the present study, we clearly provide evidence on the genetic origins of the novel H1N2 SIVs virus through genetic and phylogenetic analyses. In vitro studies demonstrated that, in comparison with a pre-existing 2012 Korean H1N2 SIV [A/swine/Korea/CY03-11/2012 (CY03-11/2012)], the 2013 novel reassortant H1N2 isolate [A/swine/Korea/CY0423/2013 (CY0423-12/2013)] replicated more efficiently in differentiated primary human bronchial epithelial cells. The CY0423-12/2013 virus induced higher viral titers than the CY03-11/2012 virus in the lungs and nasal turbinates of infected mice and nasal wash samples of ferrets. Moreover, the 2013 H1N2 reassortant, but not the intact 2012 H1N2 virus, was transmissible to naïve contact ferrets via respiratory-droplets. Noting that the viral precursors have the ability to infect humans, our findings highlight the potential threat of a novel reassortant H1N2 SIV to public health and underscore the need to further strengthen influenza surveillance strategies worldwide, including swine populations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A viral satellite RNA induces yellow symptoms on tobacco by targeting a gene involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis using the RNA silencing machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimura, Hanako; Pantaleo, Vitantonio; Ishihara, Takeaki; Myojo, Nobutoshi; Inaba, Jun-ichi; Sueda, Kae; Burgyán, József; Masuta, Chikara

    2011-05-01

    Symptoms on virus-infected plants are often very specific to the given virus. The molecular mechanisms involved in viral symptom induction have been extensively studied, but are still poorly understood. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) Y satellite RNA (Y-sat) is a non-coding subviral RNA and modifies the typical symptom induced by CMV in specific hosts; Y-sat causes a bright yellow mosaic on its natural host Nicotiana tabacum. The Y-sat-induced yellow mosaic failed to develop in the infected Arabidopsis and tomato plants suggesting a very specific interaction between Y-sat and its host. In this study, we revealed that Y-sat produces specific short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which interfere with a host gene, thus inducing the specific symptom. We found that the mRNA of tobacco magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase subunit I (ChlI, the key gene involved in chlorophyll synthesis) had a 22-nt sequence that was complementary to the Y-sat sequence, including four G-U pairs, and that the Y-sat-derived siRNAs in the virus-infected plant downregulate the mRNA of ChlI by targeting the complementary sequence. ChlI mRNA was also downregulated in the transgenic lines that express Y-sat inverted repeats. Strikingly, modifying the Y-sat sequence in order to restore the 22-nt complementarity to Arabidopsis and tomato ChlI mRNA resulted in yellowing symptoms in Y-sat-infected Arabidopsis and tomato, respectively. In 5'-RACE experiments, the ChlI transcript was cleaved at the expected middle position of the 22-nt complementary sequence. In GFP sensor experiments using agroinfiltration, we further demonstrated that Y-sat specifically targeted the sensor mRNA containing the 22-nt complementary sequence of ChlI. Our findings provide direct evidence that the identified siRNAs derived from viral satellite RNA directly modulate the viral disease symptom by RNA silencing-based regulation of a host gene.

  16. A viral satellite RNA induces yellow symptoms on tobacco by targeting a gene involved in chlorophyll biosynthesis using the RNA silencing machinery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanako Shimura

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Symptoms on virus-infected plants are often very specific to the given virus. The molecular mechanisms involved in viral symptom induction have been extensively studied, but are still poorly understood. Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV Y satellite RNA (Y-sat is a non-coding subviral RNA and modifies the typical symptom induced by CMV in specific hosts; Y-sat causes a bright yellow mosaic on its natural host Nicotiana tabacum. The Y-sat-induced yellow mosaic failed to develop in the infected Arabidopsis and tomato plants suggesting a very specific interaction between Y-sat and its host. In this study, we revealed that Y-sat produces specific short interfering RNAs (siRNAs, which interfere with a host gene, thus inducing the specific symptom. We found that the mRNA of tobacco magnesium protoporphyrin chelatase subunit I (ChlI, the key gene involved in chlorophyll synthesis had a 22-nt sequence that was complementary to the Y-sat sequence, including four G-U pairs, and that the Y-sat-derived siRNAs in the virus-infected plant downregulate the mRNA of ChlI by targeting the complementary sequence. ChlI mRNA was also downregulated in the transgenic lines that express Y-sat inverted repeats. Strikingly, modifying the Y-sat sequence in order to restore the 22-nt complementarity to Arabidopsis and tomato ChlI mRNA resulted in yellowing symptoms in Y-sat-infected Arabidopsis and tomato, respectively. In 5'-RACE experiments, the ChlI transcript was cleaved at the expected middle position of the 22-nt complementary sequence. In GFP sensor experiments using agroinfiltration, we further demonstrated that Y-sat specifically targeted the sensor mRNA containing the 22-nt complementary sequence of ChlI. Our findings provide direct evidence that the identified siRNAs derived from viral satellite RNA directly modulate the viral disease symptom by RNA silencing-based regulation of a host gene.

  17. The Mycoplasma hominis vaa gene displays a mosaic gene structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Thomas; Emmersen, Jeppe M. G.; Jensen, Lise T.

    1998-01-01

    Mycoplasma hominis contains a variable adherence-associated (vaa) gene. To classify variants of the vaa genes, we examined 42 M. hominis isolated by PCR, DNA sequencing and immunoblotting. This uncovered the existence of five gene categories. Comparison of the gene types revealed a modular...

  18. Ribosomal genes in focus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koberna, Karel; Malínský, Jan; Pliss, Artem; Mašata, Martin; Večeřová, Jaromíra; Fialová, Markéta; Bednár, Jan; Raška, Ivan

    2002-01-01

    T he organization of transcriptionally active ribosomal genes in animal cell nucleoli is investigated in this study in order to address the long-standing controversy with regard to the intranucleolar localization of these genes. Detailed analyses of HeLa cell nucleoli include direct localization of ribosomal genes by in situ hybridization and their indirect localization via nascent ribosomal transcript mappings. On the light microscopy (LM) level, ribosomal genes map in 10–40 fluorescence foci per nucleus, and transcription activity is associated with most foci. We demonstrate that each nucleolar focus observed by LM corresponds, on the EM level, to an individual fibrillar center (FC) and surrounding dense fibrillar components (DFCs). The EM data identify the DFC as the nucleolar subcompartment in which rRNA synthesis takes place, consistent with detection of rDNA within the DFC. The highly sensitive method for mapping nascent transcripts in permeabilized cells on ultrastructural level provides intense and unambiguous clustered immunogold signal over the DFC, whereas very little to no label is detected over the FC. This signal is strongly indicative of nascent “Christmas trees” of rRNA associated with individual rDNA genes, sampled on the surface of thin sections. Stereological analysis of the clustered transcription signal further suggests that these Christmas trees may be contorted in space and exhibit a DNA compaction ratio on the order of 4–5.5. PMID:12034768

  19. On sports and genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Chen, Jieming; Gerstein, Mark

    2012-12-01

    Our genes influence our athletic ability. However, the causal genetic factors and mechanisms, and the extent of their effects, remain largely elusive. Many studies investigate this association between specific genes and athletic performance. Such studies have increased in number over the past few years, as recent developments and patents in DNA sequencing have made large amounts of sequencing data available for such analysis. In this paper, we consider four of the most intensively studied genes in relation to athletic ability: angiotensin I-converting enzyme, alpha-actinin 3, peroxismose proliferator-activator receptor alpha and nitric oxide synthase 3. We investigate the connection between genotype and athletic phenotype in the context of these four genes in various sport fields and across different ethnicities and genders. We do an extensive literature survey on these genes and the polymorphisms (single nucleotide polymorphisms or indels) found to be associated with athletic performance. We also present, for each of these polymorphisms, the allele frequencies in the different ethnicities reported in the pilot phase of the 1000 Genomes Project - arguably the largest human genome-sequencing endeavor to date. We discuss the considerable success, and significant drawbacks, of past research along these lines, and propose interesting directions for future research.

  20. Recombination in immunoglobulin gene loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komisarenko S. V.

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Gene network of the lymphoid cell differentiation coordinates precisely the recombination process in immunoglobulin gene loci. In our opinion, cellular microRNAs can contribute to the allelic exclusion through microRNA-directed DNA methylation and participate in retargeting recombinases activity from the gene loci of heavy immunoglobulin chains to the gene loci of light chains

  1. Gene therapy prospects--intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podolska, Karolina; Stachurska, Anna; Hajdukiewicz, Karolina; Małecki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    Gene therapy is recognized to be a novel method for the treatment of various disorders. Gene therapy strategies involve gene manipulation on broad biological processes responsible for the spreading of diseases. Cancer, monogenic diseases, vascular and infectious diseases are the main targets of gene therapy. In order to obtain valuable experimental and clinical results, sufficient gene transfer methods are required. Therapeutic genes can be administered into target tissues via gene carriers commonly defined as vectors. The retroviral, adenoviral and adeno-associated virus based vectors are most frequently used in the clinic. So far, gene preparations may be administered directly into target organs or by intravenous, intramuscular, intratumor or intranasal injections. It is common knowledge that the number of gene therapy clinical trials has rapidly increased. However, some limitations such as transfection efficiency and stable and long-term gene expression are still not resolved. Consequently, great effort is focused on the evaluation of new strategies of gene delivery. There are many expectations associated with intranasal delivery of gene preparations for the treatment of diseases. Intranasal delivery of therapeutic genes is regarded as one of the most promising forms of pulmonary gene therapy research. Gene therapy based on inhalation of gene preparations offers an alternative way for the treatment of patients suffering from such lung diseases as cystic fibrosis, alpha-1-antitrypsin defect, or cancer. Experimental and first clinical trials based on plasmid vectors or recombinant viruses have revealed that gene preparations can effectively deliver therapeutic or marker genes to the cells of the respiratory tract. The noninvasive intranasal delivery of gene preparations or conventional drugs seems to be very encouraging, although basic scientific research still has to continue.

  2. Gene decay in archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. J. van Passel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The gene-dense chromosomes of archaea and bacteria were long thought to be devoid of pseudogenes, but with the massive increase in available genome sequences, whole genome comparisons between closely related species have identified mutations that have rendered numerous genes inactive. Comparative analyses of sequenced archaeal genomes revealed numerous pseudogenes, which can constitute up to 8.6% of the annotated coding sequences in some genomes. The largest proportion of pseudogenes is created by gene truncations, followed by frameshift mutations. Within archaeal genomes, large numbers of pseudogenes contain more than one inactivating mutation, suggesting that pseudogenes are deleted from the genome more slowly in archaea than in bacteria. Although archaea seem to retain pseudogenes longer than do bacteria, most archaeal genomes have unique repertoires of pseudogenes.

  3. Mechanisms of Horizontal Gene Transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Cafini Barrado, Fabio; Medrano Romero, Verónica; Morikawa, Kazuya

    2017-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer plays important roles in the evolution of S. aureus, and indeed, a variety of virulence factors and antibiotic resistance genes are embedded in a series of mobile genetic elements. In this chapter, we review the mechanisms of horizontal gene transfer, including recent findings on the natural genetic competence. Then, we consider the transfer of two important antibiotic resistance genes: the methicillin resistance gene, mecA (in Staphylococcal Cassette Chromosome) and ...

  4. Idiomatic (gene) expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rockman, Matthew V

    2003-05-01

    Hidden among the myriad nucleotide variants that constitute each species' gene pool are a few variants that contribute to phenotypic variation. Many of these differences that make a difference are non-coding cis-regulatory variants, which, unlike coding variants, can only be identified through laborious experimental analysis. Recently, Cowles et al.1 described a screening method that does an end-run around this problem by searching for genes whose cis regulation varies without having to find the polymorphic nucleotides that influence transcription. While we will continue to require a diverse arsenal of experimental methods, this versatile method will speed the identification of functional genetic variation. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A Bayesian approach to gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in chronic fatigue syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Eugene; Hsu, Sen-Yen

    2009-01-01

    In the study of genomics, it is essential to address gene-gene and gene-environment interactions for describing the complex traits that involves disease-related mechanisms. In this work, our goal is to detect gene-gene and gene-environment interactions resulting from the analysis of chronic fatigue syndrome patients' genetic and demographic factors including SNPs, age, gender and BMI. We employed the dataset that was original to the previous study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Chronic Fatigue Syndrome Research Group. To investigate gene-gene and gene-environment interactions, we implemented a Bayesian based method for identifying significant interactions between factors. Here, we employed a two-stage Bayesian variable selection methodology based on Markov Chain Monte Carlo approaches. By applying our Bayesian based approach, NR3C1 was found in the significant two-locus gene-gene effect model, as well as in the significant two-factor gene-environment effect model. Furthermore, a significant gene-environment interaction was identified between NR3C1 and gender. These results support the hypothesis that NR3C1 and gender may play a role in biological mechanisms associated with chronic fatigue syndrome. We demonstrated that our Bayesian based approach is a promising method to assess the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in chronic fatigue syndrome patients by using genetic factors, such as SNPs, and demographic factors such as age, gender and BMI.

  6. Neighboring Genes Show Correlated Evolution in Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanbarian, Avazeh T.; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2015-01-01

    When considering the evolution of a gene’s expression profile, we commonly assume that this is unaffected by its genomic neighborhood. This is, however, in contrast to what we know about the lack of autonomy between neighboring genes in gene expression profiles in extant taxa. Indeed, in all eukaryotic genomes genes of similar expression-profile tend to cluster, reflecting chromatin level dynamics. Does it follow that if a gene increases expression in a particular lineage then the genomic neighbors will also increase in their expression or is gene expression evolution autonomous? To address this here we consider evolution of human gene expression since the human-chimp common ancestor, allowing for both variation in estimation of current expression level and error in Bayesian estimation of the ancestral state. We find that in all tissues and both sexes, the change in gene expression of a focal gene on average predicts the change in gene expression of neighbors. The effect is highly pronounced in the immediate vicinity (genes increasing their expression in humans tend to avoid nuclear lamina domains and be enriched for the gene activator 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, we conclude that, most probably owing to chromatin level control of gene expression, a change in gene expression of one gene likely affects the expression evolution of neighbors, what we term expression piggybacking, an analog of hitchhiking. PMID:25743543

  7. Gene Therapy and Children (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Needs a Kidney Transplant Vision Facts and Myths Gene Therapy and Children KidsHealth > For Parents > Gene Therapy and ... by a "bad" gene. continue Two Types of Gene Therapy The two forms of gene therapy are: Somatic ...

  8. Novel constructs for efficient cloning of sRNA-encoding DNA and uniform silencing of plant genes employing artificial trans-acting small interfering RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baykal, Ulku; Liu, Hua; Chen, Xinlu; Nguyen, Henry T; Zhang, Zhanyuan J

    2016-10-01

    TAS atasiRNA-producing region swapping used one-step, high efficiency, and high fidelity directional TC-cloning. Uniform silencing was achieved without lethality using miRNA trigger- TAS overexpression fusion cassettes to generate 21-nt atasiRNA. Plant transgenic technologies are very important for basic plant research and biotechnology. Artificial trans-acting small interfering RNA (atasiRNA) represents an attractive platform with certain advantages over other silencing approaches, such as hairpin RNA, artificial microRNA (amiRNA), and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). In this study, we developed two types of constructs for atasiRNA-mediated gene silencing in plants. To functionally validate our constructs, we chose TAS1a as a test model. Type 1 constructs had miR173-precursor sequence fused with TAS1a locus driven by single promoter-terminator cassette, which simplified the expression cassette and resulted in uniform gene silencing. Type 2 constructs contained two separate cassettes for miR173 and TAS1a co-expression. The constructs in each type were further improved by deploying the XcmI-based TC-cloning system for highly efficient directional cloning of short DNA fragments encoding atasiRNAs into TAS1a locus. The effectiveness of the constructs was demonstrated by cloning an atasiRNA DNA into the TC site of engineered TAS1a and silencing of CHLORINA 42 (CH42) gene in Arabidopsis. Our results show that the directional TC-cloning of the atasiRNA DNA into the engineered TAS1a is highly efficient and the miR173-TAS1a fusion system provides an attractive alternative to achieve moderate but more uniform gene silencing without lethality, as compared to conventional two separate cassettes for miR173 and TAS locus co-expression system. The design principles described here should be applicable to other TAS loci such as TAS1b, TAS1c, TAS2, or TAS3, and cloning of amiRNA into amiRNA stem-loop.

  9. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Rene G.; Apfel, Robert E.; Brandsma, Janet L.

    2002-05-01

    Gene therapy is a promising modality for the treatment of a variety of human diseases both inherited and acquired, such as cystic fibrosis and cancer. The lack of an effective, safe method for the delivery of foreign genes into the cells, a process known as transfection, limits this effort. Ultrasound mediated gene transfection is an attractive method for gene delivery since it is a noninvasive technique, does not introduce any viral particles into the host and can offer very good temporal and spatial control. Previous investigators have shown that sonication increases transfection efficiency with and without ultrasound contrast agents. The mechanism is believed to be via a cavitation process where collapsing bubble nuclei permeabilize the cell membrane leading to increased DNA transfer. The research is focused on the use of pulsed wave high frequency focused ultrasound to transfect DNA into mammalian cells in vitro and in vivo. A better understanding of the mechanism behind the transfection process is also sought. A summary of some in vitro results to date will be presented, which includes the design of a sonication chamber that allows us to model the in vivo case more accurately.

  10. What is a Gene?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    His other interests include reading, photography and listening to classical music. The first part of this general article appeared in April 1997. S C Lakhotia. The first part of this article traced the evolution of the concept of a gene from Mendel's times to the middle of this century: starting from the imaginary factors of Mendel, the.

  11. Genes in mammalian reproduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwatkin, R.B.L. [ed.

    1996-11-01

    This is an informative book which deals mainly with genomic imprinting, the role of steroid hormones in development, the expression of a variety of genes during development and the link to hereditary diseases. It is an up-to-date review in a field that is quickly changing and provides valuable basic information and current research trends.

  12. (FIE) gene from soybean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. NJ TONUKARI

    2012-04-17

    Apr 17, 2012 ... Harb. Protoc. doi:10.1101/pdb.prot4666. Xu H, Li Y, Yan Y, Wang K, Gao Y, Hu Y (2010). Genome-scale identification of Soybean BURP domain-containing genes and their expression under stress treatments. BMC Plant Biol. 10: 197. Yadegari R, Kinoshita T, Lotan O, Cohen G, Katz A, Choi Y, Nakashima.

  13. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 12; Issue 4. Silence of the Genes - 2006 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. Utpal Nath Saumitra Das. General Article Volume 12 Issue 4 April 2007 pp 6-18. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Silence of the Genes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    research for several decades (See Resonance, Vol. 12, pp.47–53,. March 2007). RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel mechanism for controlling gene expression. In this mechanism, tiny double-stranded RNA molecules called 'small interfering RNA' (siRNA) degrade cellu- lar mRNA that has sequence similarity with them.

  15. Gene therapy in pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Si-Xue; Xia, Zhong-Sheng; Zhong, Ying-Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer (PC) is a highly lethal disease and notoriously difficult to treat. Only a small proportion of PC patients are eligible for surgical resection, whilst conventional chemoradiotherapy only has a modest effect with substantial toxicity. Gene therapy has become a new widely investigated therapeutic approach for PC. This article reviews the basic rationale, gene delivery methods, therapeutic targets and developments of laboratory research and clinical trials in gene therapy of PC by searching the literature published in English using the PubMed database and analyzing clinical trials registered on the Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website (http://www. wiley.co.uk/genmed/ clinical). Viral vectors are main gene delivery tools in gene therapy of cancer, and especially, oncolytic virus shows brighter prospect due to its tumor-targeting property. Efficient therapeutic targets for gene therapy include tumor suppressor gene p53, mutant oncogene K-ras, anti-angiogenesis gene VEGFR, suicide gene HSK-TK, cytosine deaminase and cytochrome p450, multiple cytokine genes and so on. Combining different targets or combination strategies with traditional chemoradiotherapy may be a more effective approach to improve the efficacy of cancer gene therapy. Cancer gene therapy is not yet applied in clinical practice, but basic and clinical studies have demonstrated its safety and clinical benefits. Gene therapy will be a new and promising field for the treatment of PC. PMID:25309069

  16. Genes2FANs: connecting genes through functional association networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dannenfelser Ruth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein-protein, cell signaling, metabolic, and transcriptional interaction networks are useful for identifying connections between lists of experimentally identified genes/proteins. However, besides physical or co-expression interactions there are many ways in which pairs of genes, or their protein products, can be associated. By systematically incorporating knowledge on shared properties of genes from diverse sources to build functional association networks (FANs, researchers may be able to identify additional functional interactions between groups of genes that are not readily apparent. Results Genes2FANs is a web based tool and a database that utilizes 14 carefully constructed FANs and a large-scale protein-protein interaction (PPI network to build subnetworks that connect lists of human and mouse genes. The FANs are created from mammalian gene set libraries where mouse genes are converted to their human orthologs. The tool takes as input a list of human or mouse Entrez gene symbols to produce a subnetwork and a ranked list of intermediate genes that are used to connect the query input list. In addition, users can enter any PubMed search term and then the system automatically converts the returned results to gene lists using GeneRIF. This gene list is then used as input to generate a subnetwork from the user’s PubMed query. As a case study, we applied Genes2FANs to connect disease genes from 90 well-studied disorders. We find an inverse correlation between the counts of links connecting disease genes through PPI and links connecting diseases genes through FANs, separating diseases into two categories. Conclusions Genes2FANs is a useful tool for interpreting the relationships between gene/protein lists in the context of their various functions and networks. Combining functional association interactions with physical PPIs can be useful for revealing new biology and help form hypotheses for further experimentation. Our

  17. Using gene expression noise to understand gene regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munsky, B.; Neuert, G.; van Oudenaarden, A.

    2012-01-01

    Phenotypic variation is ubiquitous in biology and is often traceable to underlying genetic and environmental variation. However, even genetically identical cells in identical environments display variable phenotypes. Stochastic gene expression, or gene expression "noise," has been suggested as a

  18. Gene set analysis for longitudinal gene expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piepho Hans-Peter

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene set analysis (GSA has become a successful tool to interpret gene expression profiles in terms of biological functions, molecular pathways, or genomic locations. GSA performs statistical tests for independent microarray samples at the level of gene sets rather than individual genes. Nowadays, an increasing number of microarray studies are conducted to explore the dynamic changes of gene expression in a variety of species and biological scenarios. In these longitudinal studies, gene expression is repeatedly measured over time such that a GSA needs to take into account the within-gene correlations in addition to possible between-gene correlations. Results We provide a robust nonparametric approach to compare the expressions of longitudinally measured sets of genes under multiple treatments or experimental conditions. The limiting distributions of our statistics are derived when the number of genes goes to infinity while the number of replications can be small. When the number of genes in a gene set is small, we recommend permutation tests based on our nonparametric test statistics to achieve reliable type I error and better power while incorporating unknown correlations between and within-genes. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed method has a greater power than other methods for various data distributions and heteroscedastic correlation structures. This method was used for an IL-2 stimulation study and significantly altered gene sets were identified. Conclusions The simulation study and the real data application showed that the proposed gene set analysis provides a promising tool for longitudinal microarray analysis. R scripts for simulating longitudinal data and calculating the nonparametric statistics are posted on the North Dakota INBRE website http://ndinbre.org/programs/bioinformatics.php. Raw microarray data is available in Gene Expression Omnibus (National Center for Biotechnology Information with

  19. Optimal Reference Genes for Gene Expression Normalization in Trichomonas vaginalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Odelta; de Vargas Rigo, Graziela; Frasson, Amanda Piccoli; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2015-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis is the etiologic agent of trichomonosis, the most common non-viral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. This infection is associated with several health consequences, including cervical and prostate cancers and HIV acquisition. Gene expression analysis has been facilitated because of available genome sequences and large-scale transcriptomes in T. vaginalis, particularly using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), one of the most used methods for molecular studies. Reference genes for normalization are crucial to ensure the accuracy of this method. However, to the best of our knowledge, a systematic validation of reference genes has not been performed for T. vaginalis. In this study, the transcripts of nine candidate reference genes were quantified using qRT-PCR under different cultivation conditions, and the stability of these genes was compared using the geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The most stable reference genes were α-tubulin, actin and DNATopII, and, conversely, the widely used T. vaginalis reference genes GAPDH and β-tubulin were less stable. The PFOR gene was used to validate the reliability of the use of these candidate reference genes. As expected, the PFOR gene was upregulated when the trophozoites were cultivated with ferrous ammonium sulfate when the DNATopII, α-tubulin and actin genes were used as normalizing gene. By contrast, the PFOR gene was downregulated when the GAPDH gene was used as an internal control, leading to misinterpretation of the data. These results provide an important starting point for reference gene selection and gene expression analysis with qRT-PCR studies of T. vaginalis. PMID:26393928

  20. Genes, stress, and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J

    2005-05-01

    A relationship between genetic makeup and susceptibility to major depressive disorder (MDD) has long been suspected on the basis of family and twin studies. A metaanalysis of reports on the basis of twin studies has estimated MDD's degree of heritability to be 0.33 (confidence interval, 0.26-0.39). Among families exhibiting an increased prevalence of MDD, risk of developing the illness was enhanced in members exposed to a highly stressful environment. Aberrant genes can predispose to depression in a number of ways, for example, by diminishing production of growth factors that act during brain development. An aberrant gene could also increase or decrease a neurotransmitter's release into synapses, its actions, or its duration of activity. The gene products of greatest interest at present are those involved in the synthesis and actions of serotonin; among them, the serotonin-uptake protein localized within the terminals and dendrites of serotonin-releasing neurons. It has been found that the Vmax of platelet serotonin uptake is low in some patients with MDD; also, Vmax is highly correlated in twins. Antidepressant drugs such as the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors act on this uptake protein. The specific genetic locus causing serotonin uptake to be lower in some patients with major depression involves a polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) in the promoter region of the gene for the uptake protein. The gene itself exists as several alleles, the short "S" allele and the long "L" allele. The S variant is associated with less, and the L variant with more, of the uptake protein. The effect of stressful life events on depressive symptoms in young adults was found to be significantly stronger among SS or SL subjects than among LL subjects. Neuroimaging studies showed that people with the SS or SL alleles exhibited a greater activation of the amygdala in response to fearful stimuli than those with LL. It has been reported recently that mutations in the gene that controls

  1. Vertebrate gene predictions and the problem of large genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jun; Li, ShengTing; Zhang, Yong

    2003-01-01

    To find unknown protein-coding genes, annotation pipelines use a combination of ab initio gene prediction and similarity to experimentally confirmed genes or proteins. Here, we show that although the ab initio predictions have an intrinsically high false-positive rate, they also have a consistent...

  2. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein.

  3. Gene therapy in keratoconus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahgol Farjadnia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Keratoconus (KC is the most common ectasia of the cornea and is a common reason for corneal transplant. Therapeutic strategies that can arrest the progression of this disease and modify the underlying pathogenesis are getting more and more popularity among scientists. Cumulating data represent strong evidence of a genetic role in the pathogenesis of KC. Different loci have been identified, and certain mutations have also been mapped for this disease. Moreover, Biophysical properties of the cornea create an appropriate candidate of this tissue for gene therapy. Immune privilege, transparency and ex vivo stability are among these properties. Recent advantage in vectors, besides the ability to modulate the corneal milieu for accepting the target gene for a longer period and fruitful translation, make a big hope for stupendous results reasonable.

  4. The sulfatase gene family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parenti, G; Meroni, G; Ballabio, A

    1997-06-01

    During the past few years, molecular analyses have provided important insights into the biochemistry and genetics of the sulfatase family of enzymes, identifying the molecular bases of inherited diseases caused by sulfatase deficiencies. New members of the sulfatase gene family have been identified in man and other species using a genomic approach. These include the gene encoding arylsulfatase E, which is involved in X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata, a disorder of cartilage and bone development. Another important breakthrough has been the discovery of the biochemical basis of multiple sulfatase deficiency, an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by a severe of all sulfatase activities. These discoveries, together with the resolution of the crystallographic structure of sulfatases, have improved our understanding of the function and evolution of this fascinating family of enzymes.

  5. Brains, Genes and Primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmonte, Juan Carlos Izpisua; Callaway, Edward M.; Churchland, Patricia; Caddick, Sarah J.; Feng, Guoping; Homanics, Gregg E.; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Leopold, David A.; Miller, Cory T.; Mitchell, Jude F.; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat; Moutri, Alysson R.; Movshon, J. Anthony; Okano, Hideyuki; Reynolds, John H.; Ringach, Dario; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Silva, Afonso C.; Strick, Peter L.; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    One of the great strengths of the mouse model is the wide array of genetic tools that have been developed. Striking examples include methods for directed modification of the genome, and for regulated expression or inactivation of genes. Within neuroscience, it is now routine to express reporter genes, neuronal activity indicators and opsins in specific neuronal types in the mouse. However, there are considerable anatomical, physiological, cognitive and behavioral differences between the mouse and the human that, in some areas of inquiry, limit the degree to which insights derived from the mouse can be applied to understanding human neurobiology. Several recent advances have now brought into reach the goal of applying these tools to understanding the primate brain. Here we describe these advances, consider their potential to advance our understanding of the human brain and brain disorders, discuss bioethical considerations, and describe what will be needed to move forward. PMID:25950631

  6. PRRT2 gene mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Alice R.; Bhatia, Kailash P.; Stamelou, Maria; Dale, Russell C.; Kurian, Manju A.; Schneider, Susanne A.; Wali, G.M.; Counihan, Tim; Schapira, Anthony H.; Spacey, Sian D.; Valente, Enza-Maria; Silveira-Moriyama, Laura; Teive, Hélio A.G.; Raskin, Salmo; Sander, Josemir W.; Lees, Andrew; Warner, Tom; Kullmann, Dimitri M.; Wood, Nicholas W.; Hanna, Michael

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The proline-rich transmembrane protein (PRRT2) gene was recently identified using exome sequencing as the cause of autosomal dominant paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia (PKD) with or without infantile convulsions (IC) (PKD/IC syndrome). Episodic neurologic disorders, such as epilepsy, migraine, and paroxysmal movement disorders, often coexist and are thought to have a shared channel-related etiology. To investigate further the frequency, spectrum, and phenotype of PRRT2 mutations, we analyzed this gene in 3 large series of episodic neurologic disorders with PKD/IC, episodic ataxia (EA), and hemiplegic migraine (HM). Methods: The PRRT2 gene was sequenced in 58 family probands/sporadic individuals with PKD/IC, 182 with EA, 128 with HM, and 475 UK and 96 Asian controls. Results: PRRT2 genetic mutations were identified in 28 out of 58 individuals with PKD/IC (48%), 1/182 individuals with EA, and 1/128 individuals with HM. A number of loss-of-function and coding missense mutations were identified; the most common mutation found was the p.R217Pfs*8 insertion. Males were more frequently affected than females (ratio 52:32). There was a high proportion of PRRT2 mutations found in families and sporadic cases with PKD associated with migraine or HM (10 out of 28). One family had EA with HM and another large family had typical HM alone. Conclusions: This work expands the phenotype of mutations in the PRRT2 gene to include the frequent occurrence of migraine and HM with PKD/IC, and the association of mutations with EA and HM and with familial HM alone. We have also extended the PRRT2 mutation type and frequency in PKD and other episodic neurologic disorders. PMID:23077024

  7. Gene Porter Bridwell

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  8. Genealogy and gene trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmuson, Marianne

    2008-02-01

    Heredity can be followed in persons or in genes. Persons can be identified only a few generations back, but simplified models indicate that universal ancestors to all now living persons have occurred in the past. Genetic variability can be characterized as variants of DNA sequences. Data are available only from living persons, but from the pattern of variation gene trees can be inferred by means of coalescence models. The merging of lines backwards in time leads to a MRCA (most recent common ancestor). The time and place of living for this inferred person can give insights in human evolutionary history. Demographic processes are incorporated in the model, but since culture and customs are known to influence demography the models used ought to be tested against available genealogy. The Icelandic data base offers a possibility to do so and points to some discrepancies. Mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosome patterns give a rather consistent view of human evolutionary history during the latest 100 000 years but the earlier epochs of human evolution demand gene trees with longer branches. The results of such studies reveal as yet unsolved problems about the sources of our genome.

  9. Gene-gene and gene-environmental interactions of childhood asthma: a multifactor dimension reduction approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Wei Su

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The importance of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions on asthma is well documented in literature, but a systematic analysis on the interaction between various genetic and environmental factors is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We conducted a population-based, case-control study comprised of seventh-grade children from 14 Taiwanese communities. A total of 235 asthmatic cases and 1,310 non-asthmatic controls were selected for DNA collection and genotyping. We examined the gene-gene and gene-environment interactions between 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in antioxidative, inflammatory and obesity-related genes, and childhood asthma. Environmental exposures and disease status were obtained from parental questionnaires. The model-free and non-parametrical multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR method was used for the analysis. A three-way gene-gene interaction was elucidated between the gene coding glutathione S-transferase P (GSTP1, the gene coding interleukin-4 receptor alpha chain (IL4Ra and the gene coding insulin induced gene 2 (INSIG2 on the risk of lifetime asthma. The testing-balanced accuracy on asthma was 57.83% with a cross-validation consistency of 10 out of 10. The interaction of preterm birth and indoor dampness had the highest training-balanced accuracy at 59.09%. Indoor dampness also interacted with many genes, including IL13, beta-2 adrenergic receptor (ADRB2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6. We also used likelihood ratio tests for interaction and chi-square tests to validate our results and all tests showed statistical significance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results of this study suggest that GSTP1, INSIG2 and IL4Ra may influence the lifetime asthma susceptibility through gene-gene interactions in schoolchildren. Home dampness combined with each one of the genes STAT6, IL13 and ADRB2 could raise the asthma risk.

  10. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  11. Independent Gene Discovery and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palsule, Vrushalee; Coric, Dijana; Delancy, Russell; Dunham, Heather; Melancon, Caleb; Thompson, Dennis; Toms, Jamie; White, Ashley; Shultz, Jeffry

    2010-01-01

    A clear understanding of basic gene structure is critical when teaching molecular genetics, the central dogma and the biological sciences. We sought to create a gene-based teaching project to improve students' understanding of gene structure and to integrate this into a research project that can be implemented by instructors at the secondary level…

  12. Gene probes: principles and protocols

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rapley, Ralph; Aquino de Muro, Marilena

    2002-01-01

    ... of labeled DNA has allowed genes to be mapped to single chromosomes and in many cases to a single chromosome band, promoting significant advance in human genome mapping. Gene Probes: Principles and Protocols presents the principles for gene probe design, labeling, detection, target format, and hybridization conditions together with detailed protocols, accom...

  13. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  14. Optimal gene partition into operons correlates with gene functional order

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaslaver, Alon; Mayo, Avi; Ronen, Michal; Alon, Uri

    2006-09-01

    Gene arrangement into operons varies between bacterial species. Genes in a given system can be on one operon in some organisms and on several operons in other organisms. Existing theories explain why genes that work together should be on the same operon, since this allows for advantageous lateral gene transfer and accurate stoichiometry. But what causes the frequent separation into multiple operons of co-regulated genes that act together in a pathway? Here we suggest that separation is due to benefits made possible by differential regulation of each operon. We present a simple mathematical model for the optimal distribution of genes into operons based on a balance of the cost of operons and the benefit of regulation that provides 'just-when-needed' temporal order. The analysis predicts that genes are arranged such that genes on the same operon do not skip functional steps in the pathway. This prediction is supported by genomic data from 137 bacterial genomes. Our work suggests that gene arrangement is not only the result of random historical drift, genome re-arrangement and gene transfer, but has elements that are solutions of an evolutionary optimization problem. Thus gene functional order may be inferred by analyzing the operon structure across different genomes.

  15. Somatic gene therapy for dyslipidemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belalcazar, M; Chan, L

    1999-09-01

    Somatic gene transfer is a valuable tool for the in vivo evaluation of lipoprotein metabolism. It has been used to dissect metabolic pathways, to establish structure-function relationships of various gene products, and to evaluate conventional lipid-lowering and novel therapeutic genes for the treatment of lipoprotein disorders. In this article we review some general aspects of somatic gene therapy and the different vehicles used for the delivery of therapeutic genes. We highlight some recent advances in adenoviral vector development that make this vector an attractive system for clinical trials.

  16. Gene electrotransfer in clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gehl, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapte...... describes how gene therapy may be performed using electric pulses to enhance uptake and expression.......Electroporation is increasingly being used for delivery of chemotherapy to tumors. Likewise, gene delivery by electroporation is rapidly gaining momentum for both vaccination purposes and for delivery of genes coding for other therapeutic molecules, such as chronic diseases or cancer. This chapter...

  17. Tumor-suppressing gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bingliang; Roth, Jack A

    2003-01-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes play pivotal roles in maintaining genome integrity and in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Their loss-of-function mutations are related directly to tumorigenesis. Thus, use of tumor-suppressor genes as anticancer therapeutics has been investigated rigorously in both experimental and clinical researches. Transfer of various tumor-suppressor genes directly to cancer cells has been demonstrated to suppress tumor growth via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest and, in some cases, with evidence for bystander effects. Various studies also have shown that combination of tumor-suppressor gene therapy with conventional anticancer therapy can yield synergistic therapeutic benefits. Clinical trials with tumor-suppressor genes, especially the p53 gene, have demonstrated that the treatment is well tolerated, and; favorable clinical responses, including a pathologically complete responses, have been observed in a subset of patients with advanced disease or with cancers resistant to conventional therapy. Yet, current gene replacement approaches in cancer gene therapy must be improved if they are to have a broader clinical impact. Efficient systemic gene delivery systems will be required ultimately for treatment of metastatic disease. In this review, we have recently summarized achievements in tumor-suppressor gene therapy with a focus on the p53 gene.

  18. Horizontal gene transfer in choanoflagellates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Richard P

    2013-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT), also known as lateral gene transfer, results in the rapid acquisition of genes from another organism. HGT has long been known to be a driving force in speciation in prokaryotes, and there is evidence for HGT from symbiotic and infectious bacteria to metazoans, as well as from protists to bacteria. Recently, it has become clear that as many as a 1,000 genes in the genome of the choanoflagellate Monosiga brevicollis may have been acquired by HGT. Interestingly, these genes reportedly come from algae, bacteria, and other choanoflagellate prey. Some of these genes appear to have allowed an ancestral choanoflagellate to exploit nutrient-poor environments and were not passed on to metazoan descendents. However, some of these genes are also found in animal genomes, suggesting that HGT into a common ancestor of choanozoans and animals may have contributed to metazoan evolution. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Gene finding in novel genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korf Ian

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational gene prediction continues to be an important problem, especially for genomes with little experimental data. Results I introduce the SNAP gene finder which has been designed to be easily adaptable to a variety of genomes. In novel genomes without an appropriate gene finder, I demonstrate that employing a foreign gene finder can produce highly inaccurate results, and that the most compatible parameters may not come from the nearest phylogenetic neighbor. I find that foreign gene finders are more usefully employed to bootstrap parameter estimation and that the resulting parameters can be highly accurate. Conclusion Since gene prediction is sensitive to species-specific parameters, every genome needs a dedicated gene finder.

  20. Progress in gene targeting and gene therapy for retinitis pigmentosa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrar, G.J.; Humphries, M.M.; Erven, A. [Trinity College, Dublin (Ireland)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Previously, we localized disease genes involved in retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited retinal degeneration, close to the rhodopsin and peripherin genes on 3q and 6p. Subsequently, we and others identified mutations in these genes in RP patients. Currently animal models for human retinopathies are being generated using gene targeting by homologous recombination in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Genomic clones for retinal genes including rhodopsin and peripherin have been obtained from a phage library carrying mouse DNA isogenic with the ES cell line (CC1.2). The peripherin clone has been sequenced to establish the genomic structure of the mouse gene. Targeting vectors for rhodopsin and peripherin including a neomycin cassette for positive selection and thymidine kinase genes enabling selection against random intergrants are under construction. Progress in vector construction will be presented. Simultaneously we are developing systems for delivery of gene therapies to retinal tissues utilizing replication-deficient adenovirus (Ad5). Efficacy of infection subsequent to various methods of intraocular injection and with varying viral titers is being assayed using an adenovirus construct containing a CMV promoter LacZ fusion as reporter and the range of tissues infected and the level of duration of LacZ expression monitored. Viral constructs with the LacZ reporter gene under the control of retinal specific promoters such as rhodopsin and IRBP cloned into pXCJL.1 are under construction. An update on developments in photoreceptor cell-directed expression of virally delivered genes will be presented.

  1. From gene expression to gene regulatory networks in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Chris J; Manfield, Iain W; Bulpitt, Andrew J; Gilmartin, Philip M; Westhead, David R

    2009-09-03

    The elucidation of networks from a compendium of gene expression data is one of the goals of systems biology and can be a valuable source of new hypotheses for experimental researchers. For Arabidopsis, there exist several thousand microarrays which form a valuable resource from which to learn. A novel Bayesian network-based algorithm to infer gene regulatory networks from gene expression data is introduced and applied to learn parts of the transcriptomic network in Arabidopsis thaliana from a large number (thousands) of separate microarray experiments. Starting from an initial set of genes of interest, a network is grown by iterative addition to the model of the gene, from another defined set of genes, which gives the 'best' learned network structure. The gene set for iterative growth can be as large as the entire genome. A number of networks are inferred and analysed; these show (i) an agreement with the current literature on the circadian clock network, (ii) the ability to model other networks, and (iii) that the learned network hypotheses can suggest new roles for poorly characterized genes, through addition of relevant genes from an unconstrained list of over 15,000 possible genes. To demonstrate the latter point, the method is used to suggest that particular GATA transcription factors are regulators of photosynthetic genes. Additionally, the performance in recovering a known network from different amounts of synthetically generated data is evaluated. Our results show that plausible regulatory networks can be learned from such gene expression data alone. This work demonstrates that network hypotheses can be generated from existing gene expression data for use by experimental biologists.

  2. Gene circuit analysis of the terminal gap gene huckebein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maksat Ashyraliyev

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The early embryo of Drosophila melanogaster provides a powerful model system to study the role of genes in pattern formation. The gap gene network constitutes the first zygotic regulatory tier in the hierarchy of the segmentation genes involved in specifying the position of body segments. Here, we use an integrative, systems-level approach to investigate the regulatory effect of the terminal gap gene huckebein (hkb on gap gene expression. We present quantitative expression data for the Hkb protein, which enable us to include hkb in gap gene circuit models. Gap gene circuits are mathematical models of gene networks used as computational tools to extract regulatory information from spatial expression data. This is achieved by fitting the model to gap gene expression patterns, in order to obtain estimates for regulatory parameters which predict a specific network topology. We show how considering variability in the data combined with analysis of parameter determinability significantly improves the biological relevance and consistency of the approach. Our models are in agreement with earlier results, which they extend in two important respects: First, we show that Hkb is involved in the regulation of the posterior hunchback (hb domain, but does not have any other essential function. Specifically, Hkb is required for the anterior shift in the posterior border of this domain, which is now reproduced correctly in our models. Second, gap gene circuits presented here are able to reproduce mutants of terminal gap genes, while previously published models were unable to reproduce any null mutants correctly. As a consequence, our models now capture the expression dynamics of all posterior gap genes and some variational properties of the system correctly. This is an important step towards a better, quantitative understanding of the developmental and evolutionary dynamics of the gap gene network.

  3. The Caenorhabditis chemoreceptor gene families

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robertson Hugh M

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chemoreceptor proteins mediate the first step in the transduction of environmental chemical stimuli, defining the breadth of detection and conferring stimulus specificity. Animal genomes contain families of genes encoding chemoreceptors that mediate taste, olfaction, and pheromone responses. The size and diversity of these families reflect the biology of chemoperception in specific species. Results Based on manual curation and sequence comparisons among putative G-protein-coupled chemoreceptor genes in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, we identified approximately 1300 genes and 400 pseudogenes in the 19 largest gene families, most of which fall into larger superfamilies. In the related species C. briggsae and C. remanei, we identified most or all genes in each of the 19 families. For most families, C. elegans has the largest number of genes and C. briggsae the smallest number, suggesting changes in the importance of chemoperception among the species. Protein trees reveal family-specific and species-specific patterns of gene duplication and gene loss. The frequency of strict orthologs varies among the families, from just over 50% in two families to less than 5% in three families. Several families include large species-specific expansions, mostly in C. elegans and C. remanei. Conclusion Chemoreceptor gene families in Caenorhabditis species are large and evolutionarily dynamic as a result of gene duplication and gene loss. These dynamics shape the chemoreceptor gene complements in Caenorhabditis species and define the receptor space available for chemosensory responses. To explain these patterns, we propose the gray pawn hypothesis: individual genes are of little significance, but the aggregate of a large number of diverse genes is required to cover a large phenotype space.

  4. MUTATIONS IN CALMODULIN GENES

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to an isolated polynucleotide encoding at least a part of calmodulin and an isolated polypeptide comprising at least a part of a calmodulin protein, wherein the polynucleotide and the polypeptide comprise at least one mutation associated with a cardiac disorder...... the binding of calmodulin to ryanodine receptor 2 and use of such compound in a treatment of an individual having a cardiac disorder. The invention further provides a kit that can be used to detect specific mutations in calmodulin encoding genes....

  5. Gene expression analysis identifies global gene dosage sensitivity in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; Karjalainen, Juha M.; Krajewska, Malgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Many cancer-associated somatic copy number alterations (SCNAs) are known. Currently, one of the challenges is to identify the molecular downstream effects of these variants. Although several SCNAs are known to change gene expression levels, it is not clear whether each individual SCNA affects gene...... expression. We reanalyzed 77,840 expression profiles and observed a limited set of 'transcriptional components' that describe well-known biology, explain the vast majority of variation in gene expression and enable us to predict the biological function of genes. On correcting expression profiles...... for these components, we observed that the residual expression levels (in 'functional genomic mRNA' profiling) correlated strongly with copy number. DNA copy number correlated positively with expression levels for 99% of all abundantly expressed human genes, indicating global gene dosage sensitivity. By applying...

  6. The infinitely many genes model with horizontal gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Baumdicker, Franz; Pfaffelhuber, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The genome of bacterial species is much more flexible than that of eukaryotes. Moreover, the distributed genome hypothesis for bacteria states that the total number of genes present in a bacterial population is greater than the genome of every single individual. The pangenome, i.e. the set of all genes of a bacterial species (or a sample), comprises the core genes which are present in all living individuals, and accessory genes, which are carried only by some individuals. In order to use acce...

  7. Are TMEM genes potential candidate genes for panic disorder?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NO, Gregersen; Buttenschøn, Henriette Nørmølle; Hedemand, Anne

    2014-01-01

    We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12, a previou......We analysed single nucleotide polymorphisms in two transmembrane genes (TMEM98 and TMEM132E) in panic disorder (PD) patients and control individuals from the Faroe Islands, Denmark and Germany. The genes encode single-pass membrane proteins and are located within chromosome 17q11.2-q12...

  8. Gene therapy for psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelfand, Yaroslav; Kaplitt, Michael G

    2013-01-01

    Gene therapy has become of increasing interest in clinical neurosurgery with the completion of numerous clinical trials for Parkinson disease, Alzheimer disease, and pediatric genetic disorders. With improved understanding of the dysfunctional circuitry mediating various psychiatric disorders, deep brain stimulation for refractory psychiatric diseases is being increasingly explored in human patients. These factors are likely to facilitate development of gene therapy for psychiatric diseases. Because delivery of gene therapy agents would require the same surgical techniques currently being employed for deep brain stimulation, neurosurgeons are likely to lead the development of this field, as has occurred in other areas of clinical gene therapy for neurologic disorders. We review the current state of gene therapy for psychiatric disorders and focus specifically on particular areas of promising research that may translate into human trials for depression, drug addiction, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and schizophrenia. Issues that are relatively unique to psychiatric gene therapy are also discussed. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Complete suppression of viral gene expression is associated with the onset and progression of lymphoid malignancy: observations in Bovine Leukemia Virus-infected sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burny Arsène

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During malignant progression, tumor cells need to acquire novel characteristics that lead to uncontrolled growth and reduced immunogenicity. In the Bovine Leukemia Virus-induced ovine leukemia model, silencing of viral gene expression has been proposed as a mechanism leading to immune evasion. However, whether proviral expression in tumors is completely suppressed in vivo was not conclusively demonstrated. Therefore, we studied viral expression in two selected experimentally-infected sheep, the virus or the disease of which had features that made it possible to distinguish tumor cells from their nontransformed counterparts. Results In the first animal, we observed the emergence of a genetically modified provirus simultaneously with leukemia onset. We found a Tax-mutated (TaxK303 replication-deficient provirus in the malignant B-cell clone while functional provirus (TaxE303 had been consistently monitored over the 17-month aleukemic period. In the second case, both non-transformed and transformed BLV-infected cells were present at the same time, but at distinct sites. While there was potentially-active provirus in the non-leukemic blood B-cell population, as demonstrated by ex-vivo culture and injection into naïve sheep, virus expression was completely suppressed in the malignant B-cells isolated from the lymphoid tumors despite the absence of genetic alterations in the proviral genome. These observations suggest that silencing of viral genes, including the oncoprotein Tax, is associated with tumor onset. Conclusion Our findings suggest that silencing is critical for tumor progression and identify two distinct mechanisms-genetic and epigenetic-involved in the complete suppression of virus and Tax expression. We demonstrate that, in contrast to systems that require sustained oncogene expression, the major viral transforming protein Tax can be turned-off without reversing the transformed phenotype. We propose that suppression

  10. Gene set analysis for GWAS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debrabant, Birgit; Soerensen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    Abstract We discuss the use of modified Kolmogorov-Smirnov (KS) statistics in the context of gene set analysis and review corresponding null and alternative hypotheses. Especially, we show that, when enhancing the impact of highly significant genes in the calculation of the test statistic...... parameter and the genesis and distribution of the gene-level statistics, and illustrate the effects of differential weighting in a real-life example....

  11. A genetic ensemble approach for gene-gene interaction identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Joshua WK

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has now become clear that gene-gene interactions and gene-environment interactions are ubiquitous and fundamental mechanisms for the development of complex diseases. Though a considerable effort has been put into developing statistical models and algorithmic strategies for identifying such interactions, the accurate identification of those genetic interactions has been proven to be very challenging. Methods In this paper, we propose a new approach for identifying such gene-gene and gene-environment interactions underlying complex diseases. This is a hybrid algorithm and it combines genetic algorithm (GA and an ensemble of classifiers (called genetic ensemble. Using this approach, the original problem of SNP interaction identification is converted into a data mining problem of combinatorial feature selection. By collecting various single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP subsets as well as environmental factors generated in multiple GA runs, patterns of gene-gene and gene-environment interactions can be extracted using a simple combinatorial ranking method. Also considered in this study is the idea of combining identification results obtained from multiple algorithms. A novel formula based on pairwise double fault is designed to quantify the degree of complementarity. Conclusions Our simulation study demonstrates that the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm has comparable identification power to Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR and is slightly better than Polymorphism Interaction Analysis (PIA, which are the two most popular methods for gene-gene interaction identification. More importantly, the identification results generated by using our genetic ensemble algorithm are highly complementary to those obtained by PIA and MDR. Experimental results from our simulation studies and real world data application also confirm the effectiveness of the proposed genetic ensemble algorithm, as well as the potential benefits of

  12. Gene therapy for hemophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Herzog, Roland W.

    2015-01-01

    Hemophilia is an X-linked inherited bleeding disorder consisting of two classifications, hemophilia A and hemophilia B, depending on the underlying mutation. Although the disease is currently treatable with intravenous delivery of replacement recombinant clotting factor, this approach represents a significant cost both monetarily and in terms of quality of life. Gene therapy is an attractive alternative approach to the treatment of hemophilia that would ideally provide life-long correction of clotting activity with a single injection. In this review, we will discuss the multitude of approaches that have been explored for the treatment of both hemophilia A and B, including both in vivo and ex vivo approaches with viral and nonviral delivery vectors. PMID:25553466

  13. Introduction: Cancer Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Constructing, evaluating, and interpreting gene networks generally sits within the broader field of systems biology, which continues to emerge rapidly, particular with respect to its application to understanding the complexity of signaling in the context of cancer biology. For the purposes of this volume, we take a broad definition of systems biology. Considering an organism or disease within an organism as a system, systems biology is the study of the integrated and coordinated interactions of the network(s) of genes, their variants both natural and mutated (e.g., polymorphisms, rearrangements, alternate splicing, mutations), their proteins and isoforms, and the organic and inorganic molecules with which they interact, to execute the biochemical reactions (e.g., as enzymes, substrates, products) that reflect the function of that system. Central to systems biology, and perhaps the only approach that can effectively manage the complexity of such systems, is the building of quantitative multiscale predictive models. The predictions of the models can vary substantially depending on the nature of the model and its inputoutput relationships. For example, a model may predict the outcome of a specific molecular reaction(s), a cellular phenotype (e.g., alive, dead, growth arrest, proliferation, and motility), a change in the respective prevalence of cell or subpopulations, a patient or patient subgroup outcome(s). Such models necessarily require computers. Computational modeling can be thought of as using machine learning and related tools to integrate the very high dimensional data generated from modern, high throughput omics technologies including genomics (next generation sequencing), transcriptomics (gene expression microarrays; RNAseq), metabolomics and proteomics (ultra high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry), and "subomic" technologies to study the kinome, methylome, and others. Mathematical modeling can be thought of as the use of ordinary

  14. Pompe disease gene therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Barry J.; Falk, Darin J.; Pacak, Christina A.; Nayak, Sushrusha; Herzog, Roland W.; Elder, Melissa E.; Collins, Shelley W.; Conlon, Thomas J.; Clement, Nathalie; Cleaver, Brian D.; Cloutier, Denise A.; Porvasnik, Stacy L.; Islam, Saleem; Elmallah, Mai K.; Martin, Anatole; Smith, Barbara K.; Fuller, David D.; Lawson, Lee Ann; Mah, Cathryn S.

    2011-01-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive metabolic myopathy caused by the deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme acid alpha-glucosidase and results in cellular lysosomal and cytoplasmic glycogen accumulation. A wide spectrum of disease exists from hypotonia and severe cardiac hypertrophy in the first few months of life due to severe mutations to a milder form with the onset of symptoms in adulthood. In either condition, the involvement of several systems leads to progressive weakness and disability. In early-onset severe cases, the natural history is characteristically cardiorespiratory failure and death in the first year of life. Since the advent of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), the clinical outcomes have improved. However, it has become apparent that a new natural history is being defined in which some patients have substantial improvement following ERT, while others develop chronic disability reminiscent of the late-onset disease. In order to improve on the current clinical outcomes in Pompe patients with diminished clinical response to ERT, we sought to address the cause and potential for the treatment of disease manifestations which are not amenable to ERT. In this review, we will focus on the preclinical studies that are relevant to the development of a gene therapy strategy for Pompe disease, and have led to the first clinical trial of recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated gene-based therapy for Pompe disease. We will cover the preliminary laboratory studies and rationale for a clinical trial, which is based on the treatment of the high rate of respiratory failure in the early-onset patients receiving ERT. PMID:21518733

  15. Gene therapy for meningioma : improved gene delivery with targeted adenoviruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirven, CMF; Grill, J; Lamfers, MLM; Van der Valk, P; Leonhart, AM; Van Beusechem, VW; Haisma, HJ; Pinedo, HM; Curiel, DT; Vandertop, WP; Gerritsen, WR

    Object. Due to their surgical inaccessibility or aggressive behavior, some meningiomas cannot be cured with current treatment strategies. Gene therapy is an emerging strategy for the treatment of brain tumors, which the authors investigated to determine whether adenoviruses could be used for gene

  16. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Lin (Honghuang); M. Mueller-Nurasyid; A.V. Smith (Albert Vernon); D.E. Arking (Dan); J. Barnard (John); T.M. Bartz (Traci M.); K.L. Lunetta (Kathryn); K. Lohman (Kurt); M.E. Kleber (Marcus); S.A. Lubitz (Steven); Geelhoed, B. (Bastiaan); S. Trompet (Stella); M.N. Niemeijer (Maartje); T. Kacprowski (Tim); D.I. Chasman (Daniel); Klarin, D. (Derek); M.F. Sinner (Moritz); M. Waldenberger (Melanie); T. Meitinger (Thomas); T.B. Harris (Tamara); L.J. Launer (Lenore); E.Z. Soliman (Elsayed Z.); L. Chen (Lin); J.D. Smith (Jonathan); D.R. van Wagoner (David); Rotter, J.I. (Jerome I.); B.M. Psaty (Bruce); Xie, Z. (Zhijun); A.E. Hendricks (Audrey E.); Ding, J. (Jingzhong); G.E. Delgado (Graciela E.); N. Verweij (Niek); P. van der Harst (Pim); P.W. MacFarlane (Peter); I. Ford (Ian); A. Hofman (Albert); A.G. Uitterlinden (André); J. Heeringa (Jan); O.H. Franco (Oscar); J.A. Kors (Jan); Weiss, S. (Stefan); H. Völzke (Henry); L.M. Rose (Lynda); Natarajan, P. (Pradeep); S. Kathiresan (Sekar); S. Kääb (Stefan); V. Gudnason (Vilmundur); A. Alonso (Alvaro); M.K. Chung (Mina); S.R. Heckbert (Susan); E.J. Benjamin (Emelia); Y. Liu (Yongmei); W. März (Winfried); S.A. Rienstra; J.W. Jukema (Jan Wouter); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); M. Dörr (Marcus); C.M. Albert (Christine); P.T. Ellinor (Patrick)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAtrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility.

  17. Gene-gene Interaction Analyses for Atrial Fibrillation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, Honghuang; Mueller-Nurasyid, Martina; Smith, Albert V.; Arking, Dan E.; Barnard, John; Bartz, Traci M.; Lunetta, Kathryn L.; Lohman, Kurt; Kleber, Marcus E.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Geelhoed, Bastiaan; Trompet, Stella; Niemeijer, Maartje N.; Kacprowski, Tim; Chasman, Daniel I.; Klarin, Derek; Sinner, Moritz F.; Waldenberger, Melanie; Meitinger, Thomas; Harris, Tamara B.; Launer, Lenore J.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Chen, Lin Y.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Van Wagoner, David R.; Rotter, Jerome I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Xie, Zhijun; Hendricks, Audrey E.; Ding, Jingzhong; Delgado, Graciela E.; Verweij, Niek; van der Harst, Pim; Macfarlane, Peter W.; Ford, Ian; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, Andre; Heeringa, Jan; Franco, Oscar H.; Kors, Jan A.; Weiss, Stefan; Volzke, Henry; Rose, Lynda M.; Natarajan, Pradeep; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kaab, Stefan; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Alonso, Alvaro; Chung, Mina K.; Heckbert, Susan R.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Liu, Yongmei; Marz, Winfried; Rienstra, Michiel; Jukema, J. Wouter; Stricker, Bruno H.; Dorr, Marcus; Albert, Christine M.; Ellinor, Patrick T.

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heritable disease that affects more than thirty million individuals worldwide. Extensive efforts have been devoted to the study of genetic determinants of AF. The objective of our study is to examine the effect of gene-gene interaction on AF susceptibility. We performed

  18. Classifying genes to the correct Gene Ontology Slim term in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using neighbouring genes with classification learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsatsoulis Costas

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is increasing evidence that gene location and surrounding genes influence the functionality of genes in the eukaryotic genome. Knowing the Gene Ontology Slim terms associated with a gene gives us insight into a gene's functionality by informing us how its gene product behaves in a cellular context using three different ontologies: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. In this study, we analyzed if we could classify a gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to its correct Gene Ontology Slim term using information about its location in the genome and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes using classification learning. Results We performed experiments to establish that the MultiBoostAB algorithm using the J48 classifier could correctly classify Gene Ontology Slim terms of a gene given information regarding the gene's location and information from its nearest-neighbouring genes for training. Different neighbourhood sizes were examined to determine how many nearest neighbours should be included around each gene to provide better classification rules. Our results show that by just incorporating neighbour information from each gene's two-nearest neighbours, the percentage of correctly classified genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term for each ontology reaches over 80% with high accuracy (reflected in F-measures over 0.80 of the classification rules produced. Conclusions We confirmed that in classifying genes to their correct Gene Ontology Slim term, the inclusion of neighbour information from those genes is beneficial. Knowing the location of a gene and the Gene Ontology Slim information from neighbouring genes gives us insight into that gene's functionality. This benefit is seen by just including information from a gene's two-nearest neighbouring genes.

  19. Electro-acupuncture-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, J; Qin, Y; Fu, A; Tang, J; Chen, G; Cai, D; Han, J

    1998-10-01

    Gene transfer is one of the key techniques in gene therapy application. Unfortunately, it seems that by now, there still exists no approach with simplicity, easiness, efficiency and safety. A novel method for gene delivery, electro-acupuncture needle-mediated gene transfer which combined the Chinese traditional acupuncture with modem gene introduction, was developed. With acupuncture needle carrying exogenous gene into muscle after direct electronic stimuli, efficient gene delivery was achieved.

  20. Determining Semantically Related Significant Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2014-01-01

    GO relation embodies some aspects of existence dependency. If GO term xis existence-dependent on GO term y, the presence of y implies the presence of x. Therefore, the genes annotated with the function of the GO term y are usually functionally and semantically related to the genes annotated with the function of the GO term x. A large number of gene set enrichment analysis methods have been developed in recent years for analyzing gene sets enrichment. However, most of these methods overlook the structural dependencies between GO terms in GO graph by not considering the concept of existence dependency. We propose in this paper a biological search engine called RSGSearch that identifies enriched sets of genes annotated with different functions using the concept of existence dependency. We observe that GO term xcannot be existence-dependent on GO term y, if x- and y- have the same specificity (biological characteristics). After encoding into a numeric format the contributions of GO terms annotating target genes to the semantics of their lowest common ancestors (LCAs), RSGSearch uses microarray experiment to identify the most significant LCA that annotates the result genes. We evaluated RSGSearch experimentally and compared it with five gene set enrichment systems. Results showed marked improvement.

  1. Uncovering trends in gene naming

    OpenAIRE

    Seringhaus, Michael R.; Cayting, Philip D; Gerstein, Mark B.

    2008-01-01

    We take stock of current genetic nomenclature and attempt to organize strange and notable gene names. We categorize, for instance, those that involve a naming system transferred from another context (for example, Pavlov’s dogs). We hope this analysis provides clues to better steer gene naming in the future.

  2. Uncovering trends in gene naming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seringhaus, Michael R; Cayting, Philip D; Gerstein, Mark B

    2008-01-31

    We take stock of current genetic nomenclature and attempt to organize strange and notable gene names. We categorize, for instance, those that involve a naming system transferred from another context (for example, Pavlov's dogs). We hope this analysis provides clues to better steer gene naming in the future.

  3. Gene Synthesis with HG Khorana

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 12. Gene Synthesis with H G Khorana. Marvin H Caruthers. General Article Volume 17 Issue 12 December 2012 pp ... Keywords. Chemical synthesis of genes for yeast alanine tRNA and E. coli supressor tRNA; Khorana's philosophy on science.

  4. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Ban

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4 and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg. Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity.

  5. On meme--gene coevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, L; Holland, O; Blackmore, S

    2000-01-01

    In this article we examine the effects of the emergence of a new replicator, memes, on the evolution of a pre-existing replicator, genes. Using a version of the NKCS model we examine the effects of increasing the rate of meme evolution in relation to the rate of gene evolution, for various degrees of interdependence between the two replicators. That is, the effects of memes' (suggested) more rapid rate of evolution in comparison to that of genes is investigated using a tunable model of coevolution. It is found that, for almost any degree of interdependence between the two replicators, as the rate of meme evolution increases, a phase transition-like dynamic occurs under which memes have a significantly detrimental effect on the evolution of genes, quickly resulting in the cessation of effective gene evolution. Conversely, the memes experience a sharp increase in benefit from increasing their rate of evolution. We then examine the effects of enabling genes to reduce the percentage of gene-detrimental evolutionary steps taken by memes. Here a critical region emerges as the comparative rate of meme evolution increases, such that if genes cannot effectively select memes a high percentage of the time, they suffer from meme evolution as if they had almost no selective capability.

  6. Homeobox gene expression in Brachiopoda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altenburger, Andreas; Martinez, Pedro; Wanninger, Andreas

    2011-01-01

    The molecular control that underlies brachiopod ontogeny is largely unknown. In order to contribute to this issue we analyzed the expression pattern of two homeobox containing genes, Not and Cdx, during development of the rhynchonelliform (i.e., articulate) brachiopod Terebratalia transversa....... Not is a homeobox containing gene that regulates the formation of the notochord in chordates, while Cdx (caudal) is a ParaHox gene involved in the formation of posterior tissues of various animal phyla. The T. transversa homolog, TtrNot, is expressed in the ectoderm from the beginning of gastrulation until...... formation. TtrNot expression is absent in unfertilized eggs, in embryos prior to gastrulation, and in settled individuals during and after metamorphosis. Comparison with the expression patterns of Not genes in other metazoan phyla suggests an ancestral role for this gene in gastrulation and germ layer...

  7. CNS Genes Implicated in Relapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willard M. Freeman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug abuse is a condition that impacts not only the individual drug user, but society as a whole. Although prevention of initial drug use is the most effective way to prevent addiction, avoiding relapse is a crucial component of drug addiction recovery. Recent studies suggest that there is a set of genes whose expression is robustly and stably altered following drug use and ensuing abstinence. Such stable changes in gene expression correlate with ultrastructural changes in brain as well as alterations in behavior. As persistent molecular changes, these genes may provide targets for the development of therapeutics. Developing a list of well-characterized candidate genes and examining the effect of manipulating these genes will contribute to the ultimate goal of developing effective treatments to prevent relapse to drug use.

  8. Gene Discovery Methods from Large-Scale Gene Expression Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Akifumi; Yano, Kentaro

    2010-01-01

    Microarrays provide genome-wide gene expression changes. In current analyses, the majority of genes on the array are frequently eliminated for further analysis just in order for computational effort to be affordable. This strategy risks failure to discover whole sets of genes related to a quantitative trait of interest, which is generally controlled by several loci that might be eliminated in current approaches. Here, we describe a high-throughput gene discovery method based on correspondence analysis with a new index for expression ratios [arctan (1/ratio)] and three artificial marker genes. This method allows us to quickly analyze the whole microarray dataset without elimination and discover up/down-regulated genes related to a trait of interest. We employed an example dataset to show the theoretical advantage of this method. We then used the method to identify 88 cancer-related genes from a published microarray data from patients with breast cancer. This method can be easily performed and the result is also visible in three-dimensional viewing software that we have developed. Our method is useful for revaluating the wealth of microarray data available from web-sites.

  9. Gene recognition by combination of several gene-finding programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, K; Takagi, T

    1998-01-01

    A number of programs have been developed to predict the eukaryotic gene structures in DNA sequences. However, gene finding is still a challenging problem. We have explored the effectiveness when the results of several gene-finding programs were re-analyzed and combined. We studied several methods with four programs (FEXH, GeneParser3, GEN-SCAN and GRAIL2). By HIGHEST-policy combination method or BOUNDARY method, approximate correlation (AC) improved by 3-5% in comparison with the best single gene-finding program. From another viewpoint, OR-based combination of the four programs is the most reliable to know whether a candidate exon overlaps with the real exon or not, although it is less sensitive than GENSCAN for exon-intron boundaries. Our methods can easily be extended to combine other programs. We have developed a server program (Shirokane System) and a client program (GeneScope) to use the methods. GeneScope is available through a WWW site (http://gf.genome.ad.jp/). (katsu,takagi)@ims.u-tokyo.ac.jp

  10. Reference gene screening for analyzing gene expression across goat tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Xing; Li, Yun-Sheng; Ding, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Rong; Zhang, Yun-Hai

    2013-12-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) is one of the important methods for investigating the changes in mRNA expression levels in cells and tissues. Selection of the proper reference genes is very important when calibrating the results of real-time quantitative PCR. Studies on the selection of reference genes in goat tissues are limited, despite the economic importance of their meat and dairy products. We used real-time quantitative PCR to detect the expression levels of eight reference gene candidates (18S, TBP, HMBS, YWHAZ, ACTB, HPRT1, GAPDH and EEF1A2) in ten tissues types sourced from Boer goats. The optimal reference gene combination was selected according to the results determined by geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper software packages. The analyses showed that tissue is an important variability factor in genes expression stability. When all tissues were considered, 18S, TBP and HMBS is the optimal reference combination for calibrating quantitative PCR analysis of gene expression from goat tissues. Dividing data set by tissues, ACTB was the most stable in stomach, small intestine and ovary, 18S in heart and spleen, HMBS in uterus and lung, TBP in liver, HPRT1 in kidney and GAPDH in muscle. Overall, this study provided valuable information about the goat reference genes that can be used in order to perform a proper normalisation when relative quantification by qRT-PCR studies is undertaken.

  11. Reference Gene Screening for Analyzing Gene Expression Across Goat Tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Zhang

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Real-time quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR is one of the important methods for investigating the changes in mRNA expression levels in cells and tissues. Selection of the proper reference genes is very important when calibrating the results of real-time quantitative PCR. Studies on the selection of reference genes in goat tissues are limited, despite the economic importance of their meat and dairy products. We used real-time quantitative PCR to detect the expression levels of eight reference gene candidates (18S, TBP, HMBS, YWHAZ, ACTB, HPRT1, GAPDH and EEF1A2 in ten tissues types sourced from Boer goats. The optimal reference gene combination was selected according to the results determined by geNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper software packages. The analyses showed that tissue is an important variability factor in genes expression stability. When all tissues were considered, 18S, TBP and HMBS is the optimal reference combination for calibrating quantitative PCR analysis of gene expression from goat tissues. Dividing data set by tissues, ACTB was the most stable in stomach, small intestine and ovary, 18S in heart and spleen, HMBS in uterus and lung, TBP in liver, HPRT1 in kidney and GAPDH in muscle. Overall, this study provided valuable information about the goat reference genes that can be used in order to perform a proper normalisation when relative quantification by qRT-PCR studies is undertaken.

  12. Phylogenetic analysis of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Casey W; Luo, Xi; Wu, Zhijin

    2013-11-01

    Phylogenetic analyses of gene expression have great potential for addressing a wide range of questions. These analyses will, for example, identify genes that have evolutionary shifts in expression that are correlated with evolutionary changes in morphological, physiological, and developmental characters of interest. This will provide entirely new opportunities to identify genes related to particular phenotypes. There are, however, 3 key challenges that must be addressed for such studies to realize their potential. First, data on gene expression must be measured from multiple species, some of which may be field-collected, and parameterized in such a way that they can be compared across species. Second, it will be necessary to develop comparative phylogenetic methods suitable for large multidimensional datasets. In most phylogenetic comparative studies to date, the number n of independent observations (independent contrasts) has been greater than the number p of variables (characters). The behavior of comparative methods for these classic problems is now well understood under a wide variety of conditions. In studies of gene expression, and in studies based on other high-throughput tools, the number n of samples is dwarfed by the number p of variables. The estimated covariance matrices will be singular, complicating their analysis and interpretation, and prone to spurious results. Third, new approaches are needed to investigate the expression of the many genes whose phylogenies are not congruent with species phylogenies due to gene loss, gene duplication, and incomplete lineage sorting. Here we outline general considerations of project design for phylogenetic analyses of gene expression and suggest solutions to these three categories of challenges. These topics are relevant to high-throughput phenotypic data well beyond gene expression.

  13. Gene Prediction Using Multinomial Probit Regression with Bayesian Gene Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Wang, Xiaodong; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2004-12-01

    A critical issue for the construction of genetic regulatory networks is the identification of network topology from data. In the context of deterministic and probabilistic Boolean networks, as well as their extension to multilevel quantization, this issue is related to the more general problem of expression prediction in which we want to find small subsets of genes to be used as predictors of target genes. Given some maximum number of predictors to be used, a full search of all possible predictor sets is combinatorially prohibitive except for small predictors sets, and even then, may require supercomputing. Hence, suboptimal approaches to finding predictor sets and network topologies are desirable. This paper considers Bayesian variable selection for prediction using a multinomial probit regression model with data augmentation to turn the multinomial problem into a sequence of smoothing problems. There are multiple regression equations and we want to select the same strongest genes for all regression equations to constitute a target predictor set or, in the context of a genetic network, the dependency set for the target. The probit regressor is approximated as a linear combination of the genes and a Gibbs sampler is employed to find the strongest genes. Numerical techniques to speed up the computation are discussed. After finding the strongest genes, we predict the target gene based on the strongest genes, with the coefficient of determination being used to measure predictor accuracy. Using malignant melanoma microarray data, we compare two predictor models, the estimated probit regressors themselves and the optimal full-logic predictor based on the selected strongest genes, and we compare these to optimal prediction without feature selection.

  14. Gene Prediction Using Multinomial Probit Regression with Bayesian Gene Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiaodong

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A critical issue for the construction of genetic regulatory networks is the identification of network topology from data. In the context of deterministic and probabilistic Boolean networks, as well as their extension to multilevel quantization, this issue is related to the more general problem of expression prediction in which we want to find small subsets of genes to be used as predictors of target genes. Given some maximum number of predictors to be used, a full search of all possible predictor sets is combinatorially prohibitive except for small predictors sets, and even then, may require supercomputing. Hence, suboptimal approaches to finding predictor sets and network topologies are desirable. This paper considers Bayesian variable selection for prediction using a multinomial probit regression model with data augmentation to turn the multinomial problem into a sequence of smoothing problems. There are multiple regression equations and we want to select the same strongest genes for all regression equations to constitute a target predictor set or, in the context of a genetic network, the dependency set for the target. The probit regressor is approximated as a linear combination of the genes and a Gibbs sampler is employed to find the strongest genes. Numerical techniques to speed up the computation are discussed. After finding the strongest genes, we predict the target gene based on the strongest genes, with the coefficient of determination being used to measure predictor accuracy. Using malignant melanoma microarray data, we compare two predictor models, the estimated probit regressors themselves and the optimal full-logic predictor based on the selected strongest genes, and we compare these to optimal prediction without feature selection.

  15. Therapeutic genes for anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolenta, Chiara; Porcellini, Simona; Alberici, Luca

    2013-01-01

    The multiple therapeutic approaches developed so far to cope HIV-1 infection, such as anti-retroviral drugs, germicides and several attempts of therapeutic vaccination have provided significant amelioration in terms of life-quality and survival rate of AIDS patients. Nevertheless, no approach has demonstrated efficacy in eradicating this lethal, if untreated, infection. The curative power of gene therapy has been proven for the treatment of monogenic immunodeficiensies, where permanent gene modification of host cells is sufficient to correct the defect for life-time. No doubt, a similar concept is not applicable for gene therapy of infectious immunodeficiensies as AIDS, where there is not a single gene to be corrected; rather engineered cells must gain immunotherapeutic or antiviral features to grant either short- or long-term efficacy mostly by acquisition of antiviral genes or payloads. Anti-HIV/AIDS gene therapy is one of the most promising strategy, although challenging, to eradicate HIV-1 infection. In fact, genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells with one or multiple therapeutic genes is expected to originate blood cell progenies resistant to viral infection and thereby able to prevail on infected unprotected cells. Ultimately, protected cells will re-establish a functional immune system able to control HIV-1 replication. More than hundred gene therapy clinical trials against AIDS employing different viral vectors and transgenes have been approved or are currently ongoing worldwide. This review will overview anti-HIV-1 infection gene therapy field evaluating strength and weakness of the transgenes and payloads used in the past and of those potentially exploitable in the future.

  16. Antibodies against nonstructural protein 1 protect mice from dengue virus-induced mast cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ya-Ting; Wan, Shu-Wen; Chang, Yu-Chang; Lee, Chien-Kuo; Wu-Hsieh, Betty A; Anderson, Robert; Lin, Yee-Shin

    2017-02-27

    Dengue virus (DENV) infection causes dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF), and dengue shock syndrome (DSS). DHF/DSS patients have been reported to have increased levels of urinary histamine, chymase, and tryptase, which are major granule-associated mediators from mast cells. Previous studies also showed that DENV-infected human mast cells induce production of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, suggesting a role played by mast cells in vascular perturbation as well as leukocyte recruitment. In this study, we show that DENV but not UV-inactivated DENV enhanced degranulation of mast cells and production of chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10) in a mouse model. We have previously shown that antibodies (Abs) against a modified DENV nonstructural protein 1 (NS1), designated DJ NS1, provide protection in mice against DENV challenge. In the present study, we investigate the effects of DJ NS1 Abs on mast cell-associated activities. We showed that administration of anti-DJ NS1 Abs into mice resulted in a reduction of mast cell degranulation and macrophage infiltration at local skin DENV infection sites. The production of DENV-induced chemokines (MCP-1, RANTES, and IP-10) and the percentages of tryptase-positive activated mast cells were also reduced by treatment with anti-DJ NS1 Abs. These results indicate that Abs against NS1 protein provide multiple therapeutic benefits, some of which involve modulating DENV-induced mast cell activation.Laboratory Investigation advance online publication, 27 February 2017; doi:10.1038/labinvest.2017.10.

  17. Self Amplifying RNA Vaccines for Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus Induce Robust Protective Immunogenicity in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-18

    Dupuy,b Clayton W. Beard,a,1 Carolyn M. Six,b Connie S. 3 Schmaljohn,b Peter Mason,c,2 Andrew J. Geall,a,3 Jeffery B. Ulmer,a and Dong Yua 4 a GSK...Annu Rev 698 Microbiol. 2001;55:235-53. 699 [2] Pittman PR, Makuch RS, Mangiafico JA, Cannon TL, Gibbs PH, Peters CJ. Long-term 700 duration of... Reed DS, Lind CM, Lackemeyer MG, Sullivan LJ, Pratt WD, Parker MD. Genetically 705 engineered, live, attenuated vaccines protect nonhuman primates

  18. Latitudinal variation in virus-induced mortality of phytoplankton across the North Atlantic Ocean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mojica, K.D.A.; Huisman, J.; Wilhelm, S.W.; Brussaard, C.P.D.

    2016-01-01

    Viral lysis of phytoplankton constrains marine primary production, food web dynamics and biogeochemical cycles in the ocean. Yet, little is known about the biogeographical distribution of viral lysis rates across the global ocean. To address this, we investigated phytoplankton group-specific viral

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells alleviate Japanese encephalitis virus-induced neuroinflammation and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Peiyu; Ye, Chuantao; Zheng, Xuyang; Yang, Jing; Ye, Wei; Wang, Yuan; Zhou, Yun; Ma, Hongwei; Han, Peijun; Zhang, Hai; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Fanglin; Lei, Yingfeng; Jia, Zhansheng

    2017-02-16

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is the leading cause of viral encephalitis in Asia. Japanese encephalitis (JE) caused by JEV is characterized by extensive inflammatory cytokine secretion, microglia activation, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and neuronal death, all of which contribute to the vicious cycle of inflammatory damage. There are currently no effective treatments for JE. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been demonstrated to have a therapeutic effect on many central nervous system (CNS) diseases by regulating inflammation and other mechanisms. In vivo, 8- to 10-week-old mice were infected intraperitoneally with JEV and syngeneic bone marrow MSCs were administered through the caudal vein at 1 and 3 days post-infection. The mortality, body weight, and behavior were monitored daily. Brains from each group were harvested at the indicated times for hematoxylin and eosin staining, immunohistochemical observation, flow cytometric analysis, TUNEL staining, Western blot, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, and BBB permeability assays. In vitro, co-culture and mixed culture experiments of MSCs with either microglia or neurons were performed, and then the activation state of microglia and survival rate of neurons were tested 48 h post-infection. MSC treatment reduced JEV-induced mortality and improved the recovery from JE in our mouse model. The inflammatory response, microglia activation, neuronal damage, BBB destruction, and viral load (VL) were significantly decreased in the MSC-treated group. In co-culture experiments, MSCs reprogrammed M1-to-M2 switching in microglia and improved neuron survival. Additionally, the VL was decreased in Neuro2a cells in the presence of MSCs accompanied by increased expression of interferon-α/β. MSC treatment alleviated JEV-induced inflammation and mortality in mice.

  20. Well-tolerated Spirulina extract inhibits influenza virus replication and reduces virus-induced mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Chang, Gi-Kung; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Hu, I-Chen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-04-12

    Influenza is one of the most common human respiratory diseases, and represents a serious public health concern. However, the high mutability of influenza viruses has hampered vaccine development, and resistant strains to existing anti-viral drugs have also emerged. Novel anti-influenza therapies are urgently needed, and in this study, we describe the anti-viral properties of a Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) cold water extract. Anti-viral effects have previously been reported for extracts and specific substances derived from Spirulina, and here we show that this Spirulina cold water extract has low cellular toxicity, and is well-tolerated in animal models at one dose as high as 5,000 mg/kg, or 3,000 mg/kg/day for 14 successive days. Anti-flu efficacy studies revealed that the Spirulina extract inhibited viral plaque formation in a broad range of influenza viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant strains. Spirulina extract was found to act at an early stage of infection to reduce virus yields in cells and improve survival in influenza-infected mice, with inhibition of influenza hemagglutination identified as one of the mechanisms involved. Together, these results suggest that the cold water extract of Spirulina might serve as a safe and effective therapeutic agent to manage influenza outbreaks, and further clinical investigation may be warranted.

  1. Vaccinia virus induces rapid necrosis in keratinocytes by a STAT3-dependent mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong He

    Full Text Available Humans with a dominant negative mutation in STAT3 are susceptible to severe skin infections, suggesting an essential role for STAT3 signaling in defense against cutaneous pathogens.To focus on innate antiviral defenses in keratinocytes, we used a standard model of cutaneous infection of severe combined immunodeficient mice with the current smallpox vaccine, ACAM-2000. In parallel, early events post-infection with the smallpox vaccine ACAM-2000 were investigated in cultured keratinocytes of human and mouse origin.Mice treated topically with a STAT3 inhibitor (Stattic developed larger vaccinia lesions with higher virus titers and died more rapidly than untreated controls. Cultured human and murine keratinocytes infected with ACAM-2000 underwent rapid necrosis, but when treated with Stattic or with inhibitors of RIP1 kinase or caspase-1, they survived longer, produced higher titers of virus, and showed reduced activation of type I interferon responses and inflammatory cytokines release. Treatment with inhibitors of RIP1 kinase and STAT3, but not caspase-1, also reduced the inflammatory response of keratinocytes to TLR ligands. Vaccinia growth properties in Vero cells, which are known to be defective in some antiviral responses, were unaffected by inhibition of RIP1K, caspase-1, or STAT3.Our findings indicate that keratinocytes suppress the replication and spread of vaccinia virus by undergoing rapid programmed cell death, in a process requiring STAT3. These data offer a new framework for understanding susceptibility to skin infection in patients with STAT3 mutations. Interventions which promote prompt necroptosis/pyroptosis of infected keratinocytes may reduce risks associated with vaccination with live vaccinia virus.

  2. The involvement of survival signaling pathways in rubella-virus induced apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cooray Samantha

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rubella virus (RV causes severe congenital defects when acquired during the first trimester of pregnancy. RV cytopathic effect has been shown to be due to caspase-dependent apoptosis in a number of susceptible cell lines, and it has been suggested that this apoptotic induction could be a causal factor in the development of such defects. Often the outcome of apoptotic stimuli is dependent on apoptotic, proliferative and survival signaling mechanisms in the cell. Therefore we investigated the role of phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K-Akt survival signaling and Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK proliferative signaling during RV-induced apoptosis in RK13 cells. Increasing levels of phosphorylated ERK, Akt and GSK3β were detected from 24–96 hours post-infection, concomitant with RV-induced apoptotic signals. Inhibition of PI3K-Akt signaling reduced cell viability, and increased the speed and magnitude of RV-induced apoptosis, suggesting that this pathway contributes to cell survival during RV infection. In contrast, inhibition of the Ras-Raf-MEK-ERK pathway impaired RV replication and growth and reduced RV-induced apoptosis, suggesting that the normal cellular growth is required for efficient virus production.

  3. Inactivated Sendai virus induces apoptosis mediated by reactive oxygen species in murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Li, Ling Yu; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Quan

    2016-12-01

    This paper aims to investigate the apoptotic effect of inactivated Sendai virus (hemagglutinating virus of Japan-enveloped, HVJ-E) on murine melanoma cells (B16F10) and the possible mechanisms involved in the putative apoptotic reactions. B16F10 cells were treated with HVJ-E at various multiplicities of infection (MOI), and the reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell viability, and apoptosis were measured. Next, the roles of ROS in the regulation of Bcl-2/Bax and the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways in HVJ-E-treated B16F10 cells were analyzed. To further evaluate the cytotoxic effect of HVJ-E-generated ROS on B16F10 cells, HVJ-E was intratumorally injected, both with and without N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), into melanoma tumors on BALB/c mice. Tumor volume was then monitored for 3 weeks, and the tumor proteins were separated for immunoblot assay. Treatment of B16F10 cells with HVJ-E resulted in a dose-dependent inhibition of cell-viability and an induction of apoptosis. The latter effect was associated with the generation of ROS. Inhibition of ROS generation by NAC resulted in a significant reduction of HVJ-E-induced Erk1/2, JNK, and p38 MAPK activation. Additionally, ROS inhibition caused a decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio as well as promoting activation of apoptosis both in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that HVJ-E possesses potential anticancer activity in B16F10 cells through ROS-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction involving the MAPK pathway. Copyright © 2016 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  4. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneyber, Martin C. J.; van Heerde, Marc; Twisk, Jos W. R.; Plotz, Frans B.; Markhors, Dick G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  5. Intracerebral infection with dengue-3 virus induces meningoencephalitis and behavioral changes that precede lethality in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Dengue, one of the most important arboviral diseases of humans, may cause severe systemic disease. Although dengue virus (DENV) has been considered to be a non-neurotropic virus, dengue infection has been associated recently with a series of neurological syndromes, including encephalitis. In this work, we evaluated behavioral changes and inflammatory parameters in C57BL/6 mice infected with non-adapted dengue virus 3 (DENV-3) genotype I. Methods C57BL/6 mice received 4 × 103 PFU of DENV-3 by an intracranial route. We evaluated the trafficking of leukocytes in brain microvasculature using intravital microscopy, and evaluated chemokine and cytokine profiling by an ELISA test at 3 and 6 days post infection (p.i.). Furthermore, we determined myeloperoxidase activity and immune cell populations, and also performed histopathological analysis and immunostaining for the virus in brain tissue. Results All animals developed signs of encephalitis and died by day 8 p.i. Motor behavior and muscle tone and strength parameters declined at day 7 p.i. We observed increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in brain microvasculature of infected mice at days 3 and 6 p.i. The infection was followed by significant increases in IFN-γ, TNF-α, CCL2, CCL5, CXCL1, and CXCL2. Histological analysis showed evidence of meningoencephalitis and reactive gliosis. Increased numbers of neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in brain of infected animals, notably at day 6 p.i. Cells immunoreactive for anti-NS-3 were visualized throughout the brain. Conclusion Intracerebral infection with non-adapted DENV-3 induces encephalitis and behavioral changes that precede lethality in mice. PMID:21388530

  6. Characterization of Influenza Virus-Induced Leukocyte Adherence to Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cell Monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    with other viruses. HL-60 cell adherence to endothelial cell virus type A, which did not infect human venous or bovine monolayers was modulated by...LEUCOCYTE ADHERENC:E TO [NDOTIIELIL (FS1% A. B reawsd on parainfluenza virus-infected airway epithelial Poiy-iiysine Codled IPLC) Wells PLC.Wells cells...an antibody against ICAN1- I has no significant effect PLC Wells Virus on parainfluenza -induced neutrophil adherence (58). In 25 *HSV-intected HUVEC

  7. IL-1 signal affects both protection and pathogenesis of virus-induced chronic CNS demyelinating disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Theiler’s virus infection induces chronic demyelinating disease in mice and has been investigated as an infectious model for multiple sclerosis (MS). IL-1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of both the autoimmune disease model (EAE) and this viral model for MS. However, IL-1 is known to play an important protective role against certain viral infections. Therefore, it is unclear whether IL-1-mediated signaling plays a protective or pathogenic role in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. Methods Female C57BL/6 mice and B6.129S7-Il1r1tm1Imx/J mice (IL-1R KO) were infected with Theiler’s murine encephalomyelitis virus (1 x 106 PFU). Differences in the development of demyelinating disease and changes in the histopathology were compared. Viral persistence, cytokine production, and immune responses in the CNS of infected mice were analyzed using quantitative PCR, ELISA, and flow cytometry. Results Administration of IL-1β, thereby rending resistant B6 mice susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelinating disease, induced a high level of Th17 response. Interestingly, infection of TMEV into IL-1R-deficient resistant C57BL/6 (B6) mice also induced TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. High viral persistence was found in the late stage of viral infection in IL-1R-deficient mice, although there were few differences in the initial anti-viral immune responses and viral persistent levels between the WT B6 and IL-1R-deficiecent mice. The initial type I IFN responses and the expression of PDL-1 and Tim-3 were higher in the CNS of TMEV-infected IL-1R-deficient mice, leading to deficiencies in T cell function that permit viral persistence. Conclusions These results suggest that the presence of high IL-1 level exerts the pathogenic role by elevating pathogenic Th17 responses, whereas the lack of IL-1 signals promotes viral persistence in the spinal cord due to insufficient T cell activation by elevating the production of inhibitory cytokines and regulatory molecules. Therefore, the balance of IL-1 signaling appears to be extremely important for the protection from TMEV-induced demyelinating disease, and either too much or too little signaling promotes the development of disease. PMID:22985464

  8. 1, 8-Cineol Protect Against Influenza-Virus-Induced Pneumonia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yun; Lai, Yanni; Wang, Yao; Liu, Ni; Zhang, Fengxue; Xu, Peiping

    2016-08-01

    1,8-Cineol is a major monoterpene principally from eucalyptus essential oils and has been shown to exert anti-inflammatory, antiviral, and inhibitory of nuclear factor (NF)-kB effect. In the present study, we evaluated the effect of 1,8-cineol on mice infected with influenza A virus. We found that 1,8-cineol protects against influenza viral infection in mice. Moreover, 1,8-cineol efficiently decreased the level of IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, and MCP-1 in nasal lavage fluids and the level of IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and IFN-γ in lung tissues of mice infected with influenza virus. The results also showed that 1,8-cineol reduced the expression of NF-kB p65, intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM)-1 in lung tissues. Thus, 1,8-cineol appears to be able to augment protection against IFV infection in mice via attenuation of pulmonary inflammatory responses.

  9. Serological response to rabies virus induced by commercial vaccines in cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathias Martins

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The antibody response to rabies virus (RABV induced by commercial vaccines in heifers was investigated. For this, 84 heifers were vaccinated twice (30 days interval with each of four vaccines (G1 = 14 animals; G2 = 24; G3 = 22 and G4 = 24 and received a booster vaccination 360 days later. Serum samples collected at different intervals after vaccination and 30 days after booster were submitted to a virus neutralizing (VN assay for RABV antibodies. Thirty days after the second vaccine dose, 92% of the immunized animals presented VN titers ≥0.5UI/mL (geometric medium titers [GMT] 1.7 to 3.8UI/mL. At the day of the booster (360 days post-vaccination; however, the percentage of animals harboring antibody titers ≥0.5UI/mL had dropped to 31% (0-80% of the animals, depending on the vaccine, resulting in lower GMT (0.1 to 0.6UI/mL. Booster vaccination at day 360 resulted in a detectable anamnestic response in all groups, resulting in 83% of animals (65 to 100% harboring VN titers ≥0.5UI/mL thirty days later (GMT 0.6 to 4.3UI/mL. These results indicated that these vaccines were able to induce an adequate anti-RABV response in all animals after prime vaccination (and after booster as well. However, the titers decreased, reaching titers <0.5UI/mL in approximately 70% of animals within the interval before the recommended booster. Thus, booster vaccination for rabies in cattle using the current vaccines should be performed before the recommended one-year interval, as to maintain neutralizing antibodies levels in most vaccinated animals.

  10. Hepatitis E Virus Induced Acute Liver Failure with Scrub Typhus Coinfection in a Pregnant Woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Nipun; Sharma, Megha; Biswal, Manisha; Taneja, Sunil; Batra, Nitya; Kumar, Abhay; Dhiman, Radha K

    2017-06-01

    Coinfections contribute significantly to diagnostic challenges of acute febrile illnesses, especially in endemic areas. The confusion caused by overlapping clinical features impedes timely management. Herein, we report an unusual, previously unreported case of a pregnant woman suffering from a coinfection of scrub typhus and hepatitis E virus. A 25-year-old, 31-week pregnant woman presented with jaundice for 5 days and altered sensorium for 2 days. She had features of both viral acute liver failure (ALF) and tropical infections mimicking ALF, including hyperbilirubinemia, coagulopathy, anemia, thrombocytopenia, intravascular hemolysis, and hepatosplenomegaly. Etiological workup revealed rare coinfection of hepatitis E and scrub typhus. Despite all supportive measures, the patient succumbed to her illness (i.e., absent brainstem reflexes and intracranial bleed secondary to coagulopathy) and had poor fetal outcome, which resulted in stillbirth. ALF in a pregnant woman is a medical and obstetric emergency. It can result from varied etiologies that though differ in their incidence, mode of occurrence, and pregnancy outcome, can clinically masquerade as each other, causing diagnostic dilemma. This unusual case report highlights the significance of keeping all such possibilities in mind while managing a pregnant woman with ALF, especially in a country like India where maternal and perinatal mortality rates, the core indicators of national health, are still among the highest in the world.

  11. Review for Disease of the Year: Varicella Zoster Virus-Induced Anterior Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Cimino, Luca; Akova, Yonca Aydin

    2017-10-12

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV)-induced anterior uveitis (AU) may complicate the course of primary varicella infection typically seen in children. In adults, especially with advanced age, VZV AU is more commonly associated with herpes zoster ophthalmicus (HZO) with or without skin rash affecting the distribution of the ophthalmic nerve due to reactivation of the latent VZV in the trigeminal ganglion. While it is typically a mild self-limiting AU in primary infection, HZO AU is often accompanied by keratitis, may have a chronic recurrent course, and lead to sectoral iris atrophy, pupillary distortion, and ocular hypertension. Diagnosis is often clinical and proven by analysis of aqueous humor for viral genome or antiviral antibodies. Systemic antiviral agents and topical steroids are the mainstay of treatment. Visual prognosis is favorable with timely diagnosis and appropriate treatment.

  12. Higher incidence of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphocyte transformation in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tørring, Caroline Winther; Andreasen, Charlotte; Gehr, Nikolaj

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with multiple sclerosis (MS), and EBV may transform lymphoblastoid cell lines more frequently in MS patients than controls, but it is not clear whether this reflects a higher viral load or an enhanced ability to reactivate EBV. Material...

  13. Oxidative stress, a trigger of hepatitis C and B virus-induced liver carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander V.; Valuev-Elliston, Vladimir T.; Tyurina, Daria A.; Ivanova, Olga N.; Kochetkov, Sergey N.; Bartosch, Birke; Isaguliants, Maria G.

    2017-01-01

    Virally induced liver cancer usually evolves over long periods of time in the context of a strongly oxidative microenvironment, characterized by chronic liver inflammation and regeneration processes. They ultimately lead to oncogenic mutations in many cellular signaling cascades that drive cell growth and proliferation. Oxidative stress, induced by hepatitis viruses, therefore is one of the factors that drives the neoplastic transformation process in the liver. This review summarizes current knowledge on oxidative stress and oxidative stress responses induced by human hepatitis B and C viruses. It focuses on the molecular mechanisms by which these viruses activate cellular enzymes/systems that generate or scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and control cellular redox homeostasis. The impact of an altered cellular redox homeostasis on the initiation and establishment of chronic viral infection, as well as on the course and outcome of liver fibrosis and hepatocarcinogenesis will be discussed The review neither discusses reactive nitrogen species, although their metabolism is interferes with that of ROS, nor antioxidants as potential therapeutic remedies against viral infections, both subjects meriting an independent review. PMID:27965466

  14. DNA vaccination protects mice against Zika virus-induced damage to the testes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bryan D.; Muthumani, Kar; Warner, Bryce M.; Majer, Anna; Hagan, Mable; Audet, Jonathan; Stein, Derek R.; Ranadheera, Charlene; Racine, Trina; De La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Piret, Jocelyne; Kucas, Stephanie; Tran, Kaylie N.; Frost, Kathy L.; De Graff, Christine; Soule, Geoff; Scharikow, Leanne; Scott, Jennifer; McTavish, Gordon; Smid, Valerie; Park, Young K.; Maslow, Joel N.; Sardesai, Niranjan Y.; Kim, J. Joseph; Yao, Xiao-jian; Bello, Alexander; Lindsay, Robbin; Boivin, Guy; Booth, Stephanie A.; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Safronetz, David; Weiner, David B.; Kobinger, Gary P.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen causally associated with serious sequelae in fetuses, inducing fetal microcephaly and other neurodevelopment defects. ZIKV is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, but can persist in human semen and sperm, and sexual transmission has been documented. Moreover, exposure of type-I interferon knockout mice to ZIKV results in severe damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. Candidate ZIKV vaccines have shown protective efficacy in preclinical studies carried out in animal models, and several vaccines have entered clinical trials. Here, we report that administration of a synthetic DNA vaccine encoding ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prME) completely protects mice against ZIKV-associated damage to the testes and sperm and prevents viral persistence in the testes following challenge with a contemporary strain of ZIKV. These data suggest that DNA vaccination merits further investigation as a potential means to reduce ZIKV persistence in the male reproductive tract. PMID:28589934

  15. Immunological responses against human papilloma virus and human papilloma virus induced laryngeal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitose, Shun-ichi; Sakazaki, T; Ono, T; Kurita, T; Mihashi, H; Nakashima, T

    2010-06-01

    This study aimed to clarify the local immune status in the larynx in the presence of infection or carcinogenesis associated with human papilloma virus. Cytological samples (for human papilloma virus detection) and laryngeal secretions (for immunoglobulin assessment) were obtained from 31 patients with laryngeal disease, during microscopic laryngeal surgery. On histological examination, 12 patients had squamous cell carcinoma, four had laryngeal papilloma and 15 had other benign laryngeal disease. Cytological samples were tested for human papilloma virus DNA using the Hybrid Capture 2 assay. High risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected in 25 per cent of patients (three of 12) with laryngeal cancer. Low risk human papilloma virus DNA was detected only in three laryngeal papilloma patients. The mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A in human papilloma virus DNA positive patients were more than twice those in human papilloma virus DNA negative patients. A statistically significant difference was observed between the secretory immunoglobulin A concentrations in the two groups. Patients with laryngeal cancer had higher laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type, compared with patients with benign laryngeal disease. The study assessed the mean laryngeal secretion concentrations of each immunoglobulin type in the 12 laryngeal cancer patients, comparing human papilloma virus DNA positive patients (n = 3) and human papilloma virus DNA negative patients (n = 9); the mean concentrations of immunoglobulins M, G and A and secretory immunoglobulin A tended to be greater in human papilloma virus DNA positive cancer patients, compared with human papilloma virus DNA negative cancer patients. These results suggest that the local laryngeal immune response is activated by infection or carcinogenesis due to human papilloma virus. The findings strongly suggest that secretory IgA has inhibitory activity against infection or carcinogenesis associated with human papilloma virus in the larynx.

  16. Monocytes inhibit hepatitis C virus-induced TRAIL expression on CD56bright NK cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mele, Dalila; Mantovani, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Grossi, Giulia; Lombardi, Andrea; Mondelli, Mario U; Varchetta, Stefania

    2017-12-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We have previously shown that culture-derived HCV (HCVcc) enhance tumor necrosis-factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) expression on healthy NK cells, but not on those from patients infected with HCV, which was likely dependent on accessory cells. Here we sought to elucidate the mechanisms involved in altered TRAIL upregulation in this setting. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from controls and patients infected with HCV were exposed to HCVcc. Cell depletions were performed to identify cells responsible for NK cell activation. Flow cytometry and ELISA were used to identify the cytokines involved in the NK activation process. In patients infected with HCV, soluble factors secreted by control PBMC restored the ability of NK cells to express TRAIL. Of note, CD14+ cell depletion had identical effects upon virus exposure and promoted increased degranulation. Moreover, increased concentrations of interleukin (IL)-18 binding protein a (IL-18BPa) and IL-36 receptor antagonist (IL-36RA) were observed after PBMC exposure to HCVcc in patients with HCV. HCVcc-induced NK cell TRAIL expression was inhibited by IL-18BPa and IL-36RA in control subjects. There were statistically significant correlations between IL-18BPa and indices of liver inflammation and fibrosis, supporting a role for this protein in the pathogenesis of chronic HCV infection. During chronic HCV infection, monocytes play a key role in negative regulation of NK cell activation, predominantly via secretion of inhibitors of IL-18 and IL-36. Coordination and collaboration between immune cells are essential to fight pathogens. Herein we show that during HCV infection monocytes secrete IL-18 and IL-36 inhibitory proteins, reducing NK cell activation, and consequently inhibiting their ability to express TRAIL and kill target cells. Copyright © 2017 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Dengue Virus Induces NK Cell Activation through TRAIL Expression during Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandini, Mariana; Petitinga-Paiva, Fabienne; Marinho, Cíntia Ferreira; Correa, Gladys; De Oliveira-Pinto, Luzia Maria; de Souza, Luiz José; Cunha, Rivaldo Venâncio; Kubelka, Claire Fernandes; de Azeredo, Elzinandes Leal

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness with a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms ranging from mild to severe forms characterized by plasma leakage that can be fatal. NK cells are one of the main effectors in early infection and may play an important role in dengue pathogenesis. We investigated NK cell involvement during dengue infection. A higher frequency of NK cell subsets and TRAIL+NK cells was found in mild DF cases when compared to that in severe cases or healthy donors. NK activation markers such as CD107a and TLR3 were upregulated in patients' cells compared to those in healthy donors. In addition, IL12 related to NK cell activation were upregulated in mild DF cases. In vitro PBMC culture models show that DENV-stimulated and IFNα-stimulated NK cells were able to express TRAIL, suggesting an indirect activation of cells, regarding TRAIL expression. Type I IFN receptor blockage on DENV-stimulated PBMCs showed TRAIL expression on NK cells is partially IFNα dependent. In addition, during PBMC stimulation, TRAIL expression on NK cells was inversely correlated with DENV-positive monocytes. Therefore, we observed DENV-induced activation of NK cell populations. A higher activation of NK cells would promote limited viral spread, resulting in decreased inflammatory response, contributing to protection against dengue severity.

  18. Dengue Virus Induces NK Cell Activation through TRAIL Expression during Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Gandini; Fabienne Petitinga-Paiva; Cíntia Ferreira Marinho; Gladys Correa; Luzia Maria De Oliveira-Pinto; Luiz José de Souza; Rivaldo Venâncio Cunha; Claire Fernandes Kubelka; Elzinandes Leal de Azeredo

    2017-01-01

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness with a wide spectrum of signs and symptoms ranging from mild to severe forms characterized by plasma leakage that can be fatal. NK cells are one of the main effectors in early infection and may play an important role in dengue pathogenesis. We investigated NK cell involvement during dengue infection. A higher frequency of NK cell subsets and TRAIL+NK cells was found in mild DF cases when compared to that in severe cases or healthy donors. NK activation marke...

  19. Human CD4+ T cell epitopes from vaccinia virus induced by vaccination or infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Mauricio Calvo-Calle

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of vaccinia virus in basic and applied immunology, our knowledge of the human immune response directed against this virus is very limited. CD4(+ T cell responses are an important component of immunity induced by current vaccinia-based vaccines, and likely will be required for new subunit vaccine approaches, but to date vaccinia-specific CD4(+ T cell responses have been poorly characterized, and CD4(+ T cell epitopes have been reported only recently. Classical approaches used to identify T cell epitopes are not practical for large genomes like vaccinia. We developed and validated a highly efficient computational approach that combines prediction of class II MHC-peptide binding activity with prediction of antigen processing and presentation. Using this approach and screening only 36 peptides, we identified 25 epitopes recognized by T cells from vaccinia-immune individuals. Although the predictions were made for HLA-DR1, eight of the peptides were recognized by donors of multiple haplotypes. T cell responses were observed in samples of peripheral blood obtained many years after primary vaccination, and were amplified after booster immunization. Peptides recognized by multiple donors are highly conserved across the poxvirus family, including variola, the causative agent of smallpox, and may be useful in development of a new generation of smallpox vaccines and in the analysis of the immune response elicited to vaccinia virus. Moreover, the epitope identification approach developed here should find application to other large-genome pathogens.

  20. Human CD4+ T Cell Epitopes from Vaccinia Virus Induced by Vaccination or Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo-Calle, J. Mauricio; Strug, Iwona; Nastke, Maria-Dorothea; Baker, Stephen P; Stern, Lawrence J

    2007-01-01

    Despite the importance of vaccinia virus in basic and applied immunology, our knowledge of the human immune response directed against this virus is very limited. CD4+ T cell responses are an important component of immunity induced by current vaccinia-based vaccines, and likely will be required for new subunit vaccine approaches, but to date vaccinia-specific CD4+ T cell responses have been poorly characterized, and CD4+ T cell epitopes have been reported only recently. Classical approaches used to identify T cell epitopes are not practical for large genomes like vaccinia. We developed and validated a highly efficient computational approach that combines prediction of class II MHC-peptide binding activity with prediction of antigen processing and presentation. Using this approach and screening only 36 peptides, we identified 25 epitopes recognized by T cells from vaccinia-immune individuals. Although the predictions were made for HLA-DR1, eight of the peptides were recognized by donors of multiple haplotypes. T cell responses were observed in samples of peripheral blood obtained many years after primary vaccination, and were amplified after booster immunization. Peptides recognized by multiple donors are highly conserved across the poxvirus family, including variola, the causative agent of smallpox, and may be useful in development of a new generation of smallpox vaccines and in the analysis of the immune response elicited to vaccinia virus. Moreover, the epitope identification approach developed here should find application to other large-genome pathogens. PMID:17937498

  1. Varicella-zoster virus induces the formation of dynamic nuclear capsid aggregates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lebrun, Marielle [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Thelen, Nicolas; Thiry, Marc [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Neurosciences, Laboratory of Cellular and Tissular Biology, Liege (Belgium); Riva, Laura; Ote, Isabelle; Condé, Claude; Vandevenne, Patricia [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Di Valentin, Emmanuel [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Viral Vectors Platform, Liege (Belgium); Bontems, Sébastien [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium); Sadzot-Delvaux, Catherine, E-mail: csadzot@ulg.ac.be [University of Liege (ULg), GIGA-Infection Immunity and Inflammation, Laboratory of Virology and Immunology, Liege (Belgium)

    2014-04-15

    The first step of herpesviruses virion assembly occurs in the nucleus. However, the exact site where nucleocapsids are assembled, where the genome and the inner tegument are acquired, remains controversial. We created a recombinant VZV expressing ORF23 (homologous to HSV-1 VP26) fused to the eGFP and dually fluorescent viruses with a tegument protein additionally fused to a red tag (ORF9, ORF21 and ORF22 corresponding to HSV-1 UL49, UL37 and UL36). We identified nuclear dense structures containing the major capsid protein, the scaffold protein and maturing protease, as well as ORF21 and ORF22. Correlative microscopy demonstrated that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates and time-lapse video imaging showed that they appear prior to the accumulation of cytoplasmic capsids, presumably undergoing the secondary egress, and are highly dynamic. Our observations suggest that these structures might represent a nuclear area important for capsid assembly and/or maturation before the budding at the inner nuclear membrane. - Highlights: • We created a recombinant VZV expressing the small capsid protein fused to the eGFP. • We identified nuclear dense structures containing capsid and procapsid proteins. • Correlative microscopy showed that the structures correspond to capsid aggregates. • Procapsids and partial capsids are found within the aggregates of WT and eGFP-23 VZV. • FRAP and FLIP experiments demonstrated that they are dynamic structures.

  2. A nano-view of West Nile virus-induced cellular changes during infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ng Mah-Lee

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microscopic imaging of viruses and their interactions with and effects on host cells are frequently held back by limitations of the microscope's resolution or the invasive nature of the sample preparation procedures. It is also difficult to have a technique that would allow simultaneous imaging of both surface and sub-surface on the same cell. This has hampered endeavours to elucidate virus-host interactions. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, which is commonly used in the physical sciences, is now becoming a good correlative form of microscopy used to complement existing optical, confocal and electron microscopy for biological applications Results In this study, the West Nile (Sarafend virus-infected Vero cell model was used. The atomic force microscope was found to be useful in producing high resolution images of virus-host events with minimal sample processing requirements. The AFM was able to image the budding of the West Nile (Sarafend virus at the infected cell surface. Proliferation of the filopodia and thickening of clusters of actin filaments accompanied West Nile virus replication. Conclusions The study shows that the AFM is useful for virus-host interaction studies. The technique provides morphological information on both the virus and the host cell during the infection stages.

  3. Hepatitis C virus induces E6AP-dependent degradation of the retinoblastoma protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Munakata

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is a positive-strand RNA virus that frequently causes persistent infections and is uniquely associated with the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. While the mechanism(s by which the virus promotes cancer are poorly defined, previous studies indicate that the HCV RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, nonstructural protein 5B (NS5B, forms a complex with the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (pRb, targeting it for degradation, activating E2F-responsive promoters, and stimulating cellular proliferation. Here, we describe the mechanism underlying pRb regulation by HCV and its relevance to HCV infection. We show that the abundance of pRb is strongly downregulated, and its normal nuclear localization altered to include a major cytoplasmic component, following infection of cultured hepatoma cells with either genotype 1a or 2a HCV. We further demonstrate that this is due to NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb and its subsequent degradation via the proteasome. The NS5B-dependent ubiquitination of pRb requires the ubiquitin ligase activity of E6-associated protein (E6AP, as pRb abundance was restored by siRNA knockdown of E6AP or overexpression of a dominant-negative E6AP mutant in cells containing HCV RNA replicons. E6AP also forms a complex with pRb in an NS5B-dependent manner. These findings suggest a novel mechanism for the regulation of pRb in which the HCV NS5B protein traps pRb in the cytoplasm, and subsequently recruits E6AP to this complex in a process that leads to the ubiquitination of pRb. The disruption of pRb/E2F regulatory pathways in cells infected with HCV is likely to promote hepatocellular proliferation and chromosomal instability, factors important for the development of liver cancer.

  4. Lactogenic immunity to transmissible gastroenteritis virus induced by a subunit immunogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, P M; Frank, C J; Moore, D G; Sagona, M A; Johnson, C J

    1983-12-01

    A subunit prepared from transmissible gastroenteritis (TGE) virus and used to immunize 24 gilts prior to farrowing induced production of specific antibody in the serum and milk. Challenge of pigs, two to seven days of age and suckling on the vaccinated gilts, with the Illinois strain of TGE virus resulted in morbidity of 28% and mortality of 4% as compared with 100 and 73%, respectively, for control piglets. Piglets nursing on a sow which had been immunized approximately 10 months previously were not protected, indicating that lactogenic immunity may be of short duration. Revaccination of this animal resulted in an anamnestic response.

  5. Intracerebral infection with dengue-3 virus induces meningoencephalitis and behavioral changes that precede lethality in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos Marco A

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue, one of the most important arboviral diseases of humans, may cause severe systemic disease. Although dengue virus (DENV has been considered to be a non-neurotropic virus, dengue infection has been associated recently with a series of neurological syndromes, including encephalitis. In this work, we evaluated behavioral changes and inflammatory parameters in C57BL/6 mice infected with non-adapted dengue virus 3 (DENV-3 genotype I. Methods C57BL/6 mice received 4 × 103 PFU of DENV-3 by an intracranial route. We evaluated the trafficking of leukocytes in brain microvasculature using intravital microscopy, and evaluated chemokine and cytokine profiling by an ELISA test at 3 and 6 days post infection (p.i.. Furthermore, we determined myeloperoxidase activity and immune cell populations, and also performed histopathological analysis and immunostaining for the virus in brain tissue. Results All animals developed signs of encephalitis and died by day 8 p.i. Motor behavior and muscle tone and strength parameters declined at day 7 p.i. We observed increased leukocyte rolling and adhesion in brain microvasculature of infected mice at days 3 and 6 p.i. The infection was followed by significant increases in IFN-γ, TNF-α, CCL2, CCL5, CXCL1, and CXCL2. Histological analysis showed evidence of meningoencephalitis and reactive gliosis. Increased numbers of neutrophils, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were detected in brain of infected animals, notably at day 6 p.i. Cells immunoreactive for anti-NS-3 were visualized throughout the brain. Conclusion Intracerebral infection with non-adapted DENV-3 induces encephalitis and behavioral changes that precede lethality in mice.

  6. The TIM-3 pathway ameliorates Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneyama, Tomoki; Tomiki, Hiroki; Tsugane, Sayaka; Inaba, Yuji; Ichikawa, Motoki; Akiba, Hisaya; Yagita, Hideo; Kim, Byung S; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2014-07-01

    Infection by Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) in the central nervous system (CNS) induces an immune-mediated demyelinating disease in susceptible mouse strains and serves as a relevant infection model for human multiple sclerosis. T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain-3 (TIM-3) has been demonstrated to play a crucial role in the maintenance of peripheral tolerance. In this study, we examined the regulatory role of the TIM-3 pathway in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease (TMEV-IDD). The expression of TIM-3 was increased at both protein and mRNA levels in the spinal cords of mice with TMEV-IDD compared with naive controls. In addition, by utilizing a blocking mAb, we demonstrate that TIM-3 negatively regulates TMEV-specific ex vivo production of IFN-γ and IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and IFN-γ by CD8(+) T cells from the CNS of mice with TMEV-IDD at 36 days post-infection (dpi). In vivo blockade of TIM-3 by using the anti-TIM-3 mAb resulted in significant exacerbation of the development of TMEV-IDD both clinically and histologically. The number of infiltrating mononuclear cells in the CNS was also increased in mice administered with anti-TIM-3 mAb both at the induction phase (10 dpi) and at the effector phase (36 dpi). Flow cytometric analysis of intracellular cytokines revealed that the number of CD4(+) T cells producing TNF, IL-4, IL-10 and IL-17 was significantly increased at the effector phase in the CNS of anti-TIM-3 mAb-treated mice. These results suggest that the TIM-3 pathway plays a critical role in the regulation of TMEV-IDD. © The Japanese Society for Immunology. 2014. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. IFNγ influences type I interferon response and susceptibility to Theiler's virus-induced demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, Jenna L; Olson, Julie K

    2013-08-01

    Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) induces a demyelinating disease in susceptible SJL mice that has similarities to multiple sclerosis in humans. TMEV infection of susceptible mice leads to a persistent virus infection of the central nervous system (CNS), which promotes the development of demyelinating disease associated with an inflammatory immune response in the CNS. TMEV infection of resistant C57BL6 mice results in viral clearance without development of demyelinating disease. Interestingly, TMEV infection of resistant mice deficient in IFNγ leads to a persistent virus infection in the CNS and development of demyelinating disease. We have previously shown that the innate immune response affects development of TMEV- induced demyelinating disease, thus we wanted to determine the role of IFNγ during the innate immune response. TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice had an altered innate immune response, including reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, especially type I interferons. Administration of type I interferons, IFNα and IFNß, to TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response restored the expression of innate immune cytokines. Most importantly, administration of type I interferons to IFNγ-deficient mice during the innate immune response decreased the virus load in the CNS and decreased development of demyelinating disease. Microglia are the CNS resident immune cells that express innate immune receptors. In TMEV-infected IFNγ-deficient mice, microglia had reduced expression of innate immune cytokines, and administration of type I interferons to these mice restored the innate immune response by microglia. In the absence of IFNγ, microglia from TMEV-infected mice had reduced expression of some innate immune receptors and signaling molecules, especially IRF1. These results suggest that IFNγ plays an important role in the innate immune response to TMEV by enhancing the expression of innate immune cytokines, especially type I interferons, which directly affects the development of demyelinating disease.

  8. IL-1 signal affects both protection and pathogenesis of virus-induced chronic CNS demyelinating disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byung S; Jin, Young-Hee; Meng, Liping; Hou, Wanqiu; Kang, Hyun Seok; Park, Hey Suk; Koh, Chang-Sung

    2012-09-17

    Theiler's virus infection induces chronic demyelinating disease in mice and has been investigated as an infectious model for multiple sclerosis (MS). IL-1 plays an important role in the pathogenesis of both the autoimmune disease model (EAE) and this viral model for MS. However, IL-1 is known to play an important protective role against certain viral infections. Therefore, it is unclear whether IL-1-mediated signaling plays a protective or pathogenic role in the development of TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. Female C57BL/6 mice and B6.129S7-Il1r1tm1Imx/J mice (IL-1R KO) were infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (1 x 106 PFU). Differences in the development of demyelinating disease and changes in the histopathology were compared. Viral persistence, cytokine production, and immune responses in the CNS of infected mice were analyzed using quantitative PCR, ELISA, and flow cytometry. Administration of IL-1β, thereby rending resistant B6 mice susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelinating disease, induced a high level of Th17 response. Interestingly, infection of TMEV into IL-1R-deficient resistant C57BL/6 (B6) mice also induced TMEV-induced demyelinating disease. High viral persistence was found in the late stage of viral infection in IL-1R-deficient mice, although there were few differences in the initial anti-viral immune responses and viral persistent levels between the WT B6 and IL-1R-deficiecent mice. The initial type I IFN responses and the expression of PDL-1 and Tim-3 were higher in the CNS of TMEV-infected IL-1R-deficient mice, leading to deficiencies in T cell function that permit viral persistence. These results suggest that the presence of high IL-1 level exerts the pathogenic role by elevating pathogenic Th17 responses, whereas the lack of IL-1 signals promotes viral persistence in the spinal cord due to insufficient T cell activation by elevating the production of inhibitory cytokines and regulatory molecules. Therefore, the balance of IL-1 signaling appears to be extremely important for the protection from TMEV-induced demyelinating disease, and either too much or too little signaling promotes the development of disease.

  9. Characterization of the Zika virus induced small RNA response in Aedes aegypti cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margus Varjak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi controls arbovirus infections in mosquitoes. Two different RNAi pathways are involved in antiviral responses: the PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA and exogenous short interfering RNA (exo-siRNA pathways, which are characterized by the production of virus-derived small RNAs of 25-29 and 21 nucleotides, respectively. The exo-siRNA pathway is considered to be the key mosquito antiviral response mechanism. In Aedes aegypti-derived cells, Zika virus (ZIKV-specific siRNAs were produced and loaded into the exo-siRNA pathway effector protein Argonaute 2 (Ago2; although the knockdown of Ago2 did not enhance virus replication. Enhanced ZIKV replication was observed in a Dcr2-knockout cell line suggesting that the exo-siRNA pathway is implicated in the antiviral response. Although ZIKV-specific piRNA-sized small RNAs were detected, these lacked the characteristic piRNA ping-pong signature motif and were bound to Ago3 but not Piwi5 or Piwi6. Silencing of PIWI proteins indicated that the knockdown of Ago3, Piwi5 or Piwi6 did not enhance ZIKV replication and only Piwi4 displayed antiviral activity. We also report that the expression of ZIKV capsid (C protein amplified the replication of a reporter alphavirus; although, unlike yellow fever virus C protein, it does not inhibit the exo-siRNA pathway. Our findings elucidate ZIKV-mosquito RNAi interactions that are important for understanding its spread.

  10. Immunization with truncated envelope protein of Zika virus induces protective immune response in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jian-Feng; Qiu, Yang; Yu, Jiu-Yang; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Han-Xiao; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2017-08-30

    The global spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) as well as its unexpected link to infant microcephaly have resulted in serious public health concerns. No antiviral drugs against ZIKV is currently available, and vaccine development is of high priority to prepare for potential ZIKV pandemic. In the present study, a truncated E protein with the N-terminal 90% region reserved (E90) from a contemporary ZIKV strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by a Ni-NTA column, and characterized by Western blotting assays. Immunization with recombinant E90 induced robust ZIKV-specific humoral response in adult BALB/c mice. Passive transfer of the antisera from E90-immunized mice conferred full protection against lethal ZIKV challenge in a neonatal mice model. Our results indicate that recombinant ZIKV E90 described here represents as a promising ZIKV subunit vaccine that deserves further clinical development.

  11. DNA vaccination protects mice against Zika virus-induced damage to the testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Bryan D; Muthumani, Kar; Warner, Bryce M; Majer, Anna; Hagan, Mable; Audet, Jonathan; Stein, Derek R; Ranadheera, Charlene; Racine, Trina; De La Vega, Marc-Antoine; Piret, Jocelyne; Kucas, Stephanie; Tran, Kaylie N; Frost, Kathy L; De Graff, Christine; Soule, Geoff; Scharikow, Leanne; Scott, Jennifer; McTavish, Gordon; Smid, Valerie; Park, Young K; Maslow, Joel N; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Kim, J Joseph; Yao, Xiao-Jian; Bello, Alexander; Lindsay, Robbin; Boivin, Guy; Booth, Stephanie A; Kobasa, Darwyn; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Safronetz, David; Weiner, David B; Kobinger, Gary P

    2017-06-07

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging pathogen causally associated with serious sequelae in fetuses, inducing fetal microcephaly and other neurodevelopment defects. ZIKV is primarily transmitted by mosquitoes, but can persist in human semen and sperm, and sexual transmission has been documented. Moreover, exposure of type-I interferon knockout mice to ZIKV results in severe damage to the testes, epididymis and sperm. Candidate ZIKV vaccines have shown protective efficacy in preclinical studies carried out in animal models, and several vaccines have entered clinical trials. Here, we report that administration of a synthetic DNA vaccine encoding ZIKV pre-membrane and envelope (prME) completely protects mice against ZIKV-associated damage to the testes and sperm and prevents viral persistence in the testes following challenge with a contemporary strain of ZIKV. These data suggest that DNA vaccination merits further investigation as a potential means to reduce ZIKV persistence in the male reproductive tract.

  12. Immunization with truncated envelope protein of Zika virus induces protective immune response in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Jian-Feng; Qiu, Yang; Yu, Jiu-Yang; Wang, Hong-Jiang; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhao, Hui; Sun, Han-Xiao; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2017-01-01

    The global spread of Zika virus (ZIKV) as well as its unexpected link to infant microcephaly have resulted in serious public health concerns. No antiviral drugs against ZIKV is currently available, and vaccine development is of high priority to prepare for potential ZIKV pandemic. In the present study, a truncated E protein with the N-terminal 90% region reserved (E90) from a contemporary ZIKV strain was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, purified by a Ni-NTA column, and characterized ...

  13. Effects of dietary fat on virus-induced pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirev, T.; Woutersen, R.A.; Kril, A.

    2002-01-01

    The present study was performed to assess the effects of diets supplemented with low (5%) and high (20%) corn oil on a Pts 56 retrovirus-induced model of pancreatic carcinogenesis in guinea fowl. The early microscopic lesions appear after 3 mo after virus treatment and progress over time. Eight to

  14. Four-segmented Rift Valley fever virus induces sterile immunity in sheep after a single vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wichgers Schreur, P.J.; Kant-Eenbergen, H.C.M.; Keulen, van L.J.M.; Moormann, R.J.M.; Kortekaas, J.A.

    2015-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a mosquito-borne virus in the Bunyaviridae family, causes recurrent outbreaks with severe disease in ruminants and occasionally humans. The virus comprises a segmented genome consisting of a small (S), medium (M) and large (L) RNA segment of negative polarity. The

  15. Proteomic Profiling of Human Liver Biopsies: Hepatitis C Virus-Induced Fibrosis and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, Deborah L.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Paeper, Bryan; Proll, Sean; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Carithers, Jr., Robert L.; Larson , Anne M.; Yeh, Matthew M.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Katze, Michael G.

    2007-09-01

    Liver biopsies from HCV-infected patients offer the unique opportunity to study human liver biology and disease in vivo. However, the low protein yields associated with these small samples present a significant challenge for proteomic analysis. In this study we describe the application of an ultra-sensitive proteomics platform for performing robust quantitative proteomic studies on microgram amounts of HCV-infected human liver tissue from 15 patients at different stages of fibrosis. A high quality liver protein data base containing 5,920 unique protein identifications supported high throughput quantitative studies using 16O:18O stable isotope labeling in combination with the accurate mass and time (AMT) tag approach. A total of 1,641 liver biopsy proteins were quantified and ANOVA identified 210 proteins exhibiting statistically significant differences associated with fibrosis stage. Hierarchical clustering revealed that biopsies representative of later fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 3-4) exhibited a distinct protein expression profile indicating an apparent down-regulation of many proteins when compared to samples from earlier fibrosis stages (e.g. Batts-Ludwig stages 0-2). Functional analysis of these signature proteins suggests that impairment of key mitochondrial processes including fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation, and response to oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species occurs during advanced stage 3-4 fibrosis. In conclusion, the results reported here represent a significant advancement in clinical proteomics providing to our knowledge, the first demonstration of global proteomic alterations accompanying liver disease progression in patients chronically infected with HCV. Our findings contribute to a generally emerging theme associating oxidative stress and hepatic mitochondrial dysfunction with HCV pathogenesis.

  16. Plant infection by two different viruses induce contrasting changes of vectors fitness and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnais, Quentin; Couty, Aude; Uzest, Maryline; Brault, Véronique; Ameline, Arnaud

    2017-07-21

    Insect-vectored plant viruses can induce changes in plant phenotypes, thus influencing plant-vector interactions in a way that may promote their dispersal according to their mode of transmission (i.e., circulative vs. noncirculative). This indirect vector manipulation requires host-virus-vector coevolution and would thus be effective solely in very specific plant-virus-vector species associations. Some studies suggest this manipulation may depend on multiple factors relative to various intrinsic characteristics of vectors such as transmission efficiency. In anintegrative study, we tested the effects of infection of the Brassicaceae Camelina sativa with the noncirculative Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) or the circulative Turnip yellows virus (TuYV) on the host-plant colonization of two aphid species differing in their virus transmission efficiency: the polyphagous Myzus persicae, efficient vector of both viruses, and the Brassicaceae specialist Brevicoryne brassicae, poor vector of TuYV and efficient vector of CaMV. Results confirmed the important role of virus mode of transmission as plant-mediated effects of CaMV on the two aphid species induced negative alterations of feeding behavior (i.e., decreased phloem sap ingestion) and performance that were both conducive for virus fitness by promoting dispersion after a rapid acquisition. In addition, virus transmission efficiency may also play a role in vector manipulation by viruses as only the responses of the efficient vector to plant-mediated effects of TuYV, that is, enhanced feeding behavior and performances, were favorable to their acquisition and further dispersal. Altogether, this work demonstrated that vector transmission efficiency also has to be considered when studying the mechanisms underlying vector manipulation by viruses. Our results also reinforce the idea that vector manipulation requires coevolution between plant, virus and vector. © 2017 Institute of Zoology, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  17. Prevention of herpes simplex virus induced stromal keratitis by a glycoprotein B-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Krawczyk

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of acyclovir (ACV and multidrug-resistant strains in patients with corneal HSV-1 infections leading to Herpetic Stromal Keratitis (HSK is a major health problem in industrialized countries and often results in blindness. To overcome this obstacle, we have previously developed an HSV-gB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2c that proved to be highly protective in immunodeficient NOD/SCID-mice towards genital infections. In the present study, we examined the effectivity of mAb 2c in preventing the immunopathological disease HSK in the HSK BALB/c mouse model. Therefore, mice were inoculated with HSV-1 strain KOS on the scarified cornea to induce HSK and subsequently either systemically or topically treated with mAb 2c. Systemic treatment was performed by intravenous administration of mAb 2c 24 h prior to infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis or 24, 40, and 56 hours after infection (post-exposure immunotherapy. Topical treatment was performed by periodical inoculations (5 times per day of antibody-containing eye drops as control, starting at 24 h post infection. Systemic antibody treatment markedly reduced viral loads at the site of infection and completely protected mice from developing HSK. The administration of the antiviral antibody prior or post infection was equally effective. Topical treatment had no improving effect on the severity of HSK. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mAb 2c proved to be an excellent drug for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections and for prevention of HSK and blindness. Moreover, the humanized counterpart (mAb hu2c was equally effective in protecting mice from HSV-induced HSK when compared to the parental mouse antibody. These results warrant the future development of this antibody as a novel approach for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections in humans.

  18. "Proliferation of cytotoxic and activated T cells during acute Epstein-Barr virus induced Infectious Mononucleosis "

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoori SD

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available The immune responses that develop following Epstien-Barr Virus (EBV infection are complex and involve both humoral and to a greater extent cell-mediated immune mechanisms. To evaluate the immune response, flow cytometric analysis of the peripheral blood of six patients during the acute phase of EBV infection was performed. This analysis revealed a significant increase in the percentages and the absolute number of CD8+cytotoxic and activated (HLA-DR+ - T lymphocytes and in some cases with a concomitan decrease in the percentages of B (CD19+ lymphocytes and T helper (CD4+ lymphocytes. These patient invariably had inverted CD4/CD8 ratio. All changes reversed to normal level during the recovery phase of infection. It is therefore concluded that EBV specific cytotoxic and activated T lymphocytes are essential in controlling acute EBV infection presented by the infected B cells.

  19. Herpes simplex virus induces neural oxidative damage via microglial cell Toll-like receptor-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Little Morgan R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Using a murine model of herpes simplex virus (HSV-1 encephalitis, our laboratory has determined that induction of proinflammatory mediators in response to viral infection is largely mediated through a Toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2-dependent mechanism. Published studies have shown that, like other inflammatory mediators, reactive oxygen species (ROS are generated during viral brain infection. It is increasingly clear that ROS are responsible for facilitating secondary tissue damage during central nervous system infection and may contribute to neurotoxicity associated with herpes encephalitis. Methods Purified microglial cell and mixed neural cell cultures were prepared from C57B/6 and TLR2-/- mice. Intracellular ROS production in cultured murine microglia was measured via 2', 7'-Dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA oxidation. An assay for 8-isoprostane, a marker of lipid peroxidation, was utilized to measure free radical-associated cellular damage. Mixed neural cultures obtained from β-actin promoter-luciferase transgenic mice were used to detect neurotoxicity induced by HSV-infected microglia. Results Stimulation with HSV-1 elevated intracellular ROS in wild-type microglial cell cultures, while TLR2-/- microglia displayed delayed and attenuated ROS production following viral infection. HSV-infected TLR2-/- microglia produced less neuronal oxidative damage to mixed neural cell cultures in comparison to HSV-infected wild-type microglia. Further, HSV-infected TLR2-/- microglia were found to be less cytotoxic to cultured neurons compared to HSV-infected wild-type microglia. These effects were associated with decreased activation of p38 MAPK and p42/p44 ERK in TLR2-/- mice. Conclusions These studies demonstrate the importance of microglial cell TLR2 in inducing oxidative stress and neuronal damage in response to viral infection.

  20. Well-tolerated Spirulina extract inhibits influenza virus replication and reduces virus-induced mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Hsiang; Chang, Gi-Kung; Kuo, Shu-Ming; Huang, Sheng-Yu; Hu, I-Chen; Lo, Yu-Lun; Shih, Shin-Ru

    2016-01-01

    Influenza is one of the most common human respiratory diseases, and represents a serious public health concern. However, the high mutability of influenza viruses has hampered vaccine development, and resistant strains to existing anti-viral drugs have also emerged. Novel anti-influenza therapies are urgently needed, and in this study, we describe the anti-viral properties of a Spirulina (Arthrospira platensis) cold water extract. Anti-viral effects have previously been reported for extracts and specific substances derived from Spirulina, and here we show that this Spirulina cold water extract has low cellular toxicity, and is well-tolerated in animal models at one dose as high as 5,000 mg/kg, or 3,000 mg/kg/day for 14 successive days. Anti-flu efficacy studies revealed that the Spirulina extract inhibited viral plaque formation in a broad range of influenza viruses, including oseltamivir-resistant strains. Spirulina extract was found to act at an early stage of infection to reduce virus yields in cells and improve survival in influenza-infected mice, with inhibition of influenza hemagglutination identified as one of the mechanisms involved. Together, these results suggest that the cold water extract of Spirulina might serve as a safe and effective therapeutic agent to manage influenza outbreaks, and further clinical investigation may be warranted. PMID:27067133

  1. Type I interferon is a therapeutic target for virus-induced lethal vascular damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccala, Roberto; Welch, Megan J; Gonzalez-Quintial, Rosana; Walsh, Kevin B; Teijaro, John R; Nguyen, Anthony; Ng, Cherie T; Sullivan, Brian M; Zarpellon, Alessandro; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Theofilopoulos, Argyrios N; Oldstone, Michael B A

    2014-06-17

    The outcome of a viral infection reflects the balance between virus virulence and host susceptibility. The clone 13 (Cl13) variant of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus--a prototype of Old World arenaviruses closely related to Lassa fever virus--elicits in C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice abundant negative immunoregulatory molecules, associated with T-cell exhaustion, negligible T-cell-mediated injury, and high virus titers that persist. Conversely, here we report that in NZB mice, despite the efficient induction of immunoregulatory molecules and high viremia, Cl13 generated a robust cytotoxic T-cell response, resulting in thrombocytopenia, pulmonary endothelial cell loss, vascular leakage, and death within 6-8 d. These pathogenic events required type I IFN (IFN-I) signaling on nonhematopoietic cells and were completely abrogated by IFN-I receptor blockade. Thus, IFN-I may play a prominent role in hemorrhagic fevers and other acute virus infections associated with severe vascular pathology, and targeting IFN-I or downstream effector molecules may be an effective therapeutic approach.

  2. Dengue virus induces mitochondrial elongation through impairment of Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Vincent; Lang, Diane; Valois, Sierra; Rothman, Alan L; Medin, Carey L

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that undergo continuous cycles of fission and fusion to maintain essential cellular functions. An imbalance between these two processes can result in many pathophysiological outcomes. Dengue virus (DENV) interacts with cellular organelles, including mitochondria, to successfully replicate in cells. This study used live-cell imaging and found an increase in mitochondrial length and respiration during DENV infection. The level of mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), was decreased on mitochondria during DENV infection, as well as Drp1 phosphorylated on serine 616, which is important for mitochondrial fission. DENV proteins NS4b and NS3 were also associated with subcellular fractions of mitochondria. Induction of fission through uncoupling of mitochondria or overexpression of Drp1 wild-type and Drp1 with a phosphomimetic mutation (S616D) significantly reduced viral replication. These results demonstrate that DENV infection causes an imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics by inhibiting Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission, which promotes viral replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Myxoma Virus Induces Ligand Independent Extrinsic Apoptosis in Human Myeloma Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartee, Mee Y; Dunlap, Katherine M; Bartee, Eric

    2016-04-01

    Multiple myeloma is a clonal malignancy of plasma B cells. Although recent advances have improved overall prognosis, virtually all myeloma patients still succumb to relapsing disease. Therefore, novel therapies to treat this disease remain urgently needed. We have recently shown that treatment of human multiple myeloma cells with an oncolytic virus known as myxoma results in rapid cell death even in the absence of viral replication; however, the specific mechanisms and pathways involved remain unknown. To determine how myxoma virus eliminates human multiple myeloma cells, we queried the apoptotic pathways that were activated after viral infection using immunoblot analysis and other cell biology approaches. Our results indicate that myxoma virus infection initiates apoptosis in multiple myeloma cells through activation of the extrinsic initiator caspase-8. Caspase-8 activation subsequently results in cleavage of BH3 interacting-domain death agonist and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential causing secondary activation of caspase-9. Activation of caspase-8 appears to be independent of extrinsic death ligands and instead correlates with depletion of cellular inhibitors of apoptosis. We hypothesize that this depletion results from virally mediated host-protein shutoff because a myxoma construct that overexpresses the viral decapping enzymes displays improved oncolytic potential. Taken together, these results suggest that myxoma virus eliminates human multiple myeloma cells through a pathway unique to oncolytic poxviruses, making it an excellent therapeutic option for the treatment of relapsed or refractory patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Human Monoclonal Antibodies against West Nile Virus Induced by Natural Infection Neutralize at a Postattachment Step

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Matthew R.; Moesker, Bastiaan; Goudsmit, Jaap; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Austin, S. Kyle; Oliphant, Theodore; Nelson, Steevenson; Pierson, Theodore C.; Wilschut, Jan; Throsby, Mark; Diamond, Michael S.

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus that is now a primary cause of epidemic encephalitis in North America. Studies of mice have demonstrated that the humoral immune response against WNV limits primary infection and protects against a secondary challenge. The most-potent neutralizing

  5. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus induces apoptosis through a mitochondria-mediated pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sang-Myeong; Kleiboeker, Steven B

    2007-09-01

    As with a number of other viruses, Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) has been shown to induce apoptosis, although the mechanism(s) involved remain unknown. In this study we have characterized the apoptotic pathways activated by PRRSV infection. PRRSV-infected cells showed evidence of apoptosis including phosphatidylserine exposure, chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, caspase activation (including caspase-8, 9, 3), and PARP cleavage. DNA fragmentation was dependent on caspase activation but blocking apoptosis by a caspase inhibitor did not affect PRRSV replication. Upregulation of Bax expression by PRRSV infection was followed by disruption of the mitochondria transmembrane potential, resulting in cytochrome c redistridution to the cytoplasm and subsequent caspase-9 activation. A crosstalk between the extrinsic and intrinsic pathways was demonstrated by dependency of caspase-9 activation on active caspase-8 and by Bid cleavage. Furthermore, in this study we provide evidence of the possible involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative stress in apoptosis induced by PRRSV. Our data indicated that cell death caused by PRRSV infection involves necrosis as well as apoptosis. In summary, these findings demonstrate mechanisms by which PRRSV induces apoptosis and will contribute to an enhanced understanding of PRRSV pathogenesis.

  6. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    OpenAIRE

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of mechanical ventilation with heliox in these patients is unclear. The objective of this prospective cross-over study was to determine the effects of mechanical ventilation with heliox 60/40 versus conven...

  7. Heliox reduces respiratory system resistance in respiratory syncytial virus induced respiratory failure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kneijber, M.C.J.; van Heerde, M.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Plotz, F.; Markhorst, D.G.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) lower respiratory tract disease is characterised by narrowing of the airways resulting in increased airway resistance, air-trapping and respiratory acidosis. These problems might be overcome using helium-oxygen gas mixture. However, the effect of

  8. Functional activation of myelin-specific T cells by virus-induced molecular mimicry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Julie K; Eagar, Todd N; Miller, Stephen D

    2002-09-01

    Molecular mimicry is the process by which T cells activated in response to determinants on an infecting microorganism cross-react with self epitopes, leading to an autoimmune disease. Normally, infection of SJL/J mice with the BeAn strain of Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV) results in a persistent CNS infection, leading to a chronic progressive, CD4(+) T cell-mediated demyelinating disease. Myelin damage is initiated by T cell responses to virus persisting in CNS APCs, and progressive demyelinating disease (50 days postinfection) is perpetuated by myelin epitope-specific CD4(+) T cells activated by epitope spreading. We developed an infectious model of molecular mimicry by inserting a sequence encompassing the immunodominant myelin epitope, proteolipid protein (PLP) 139-151, into the coding region of a nonpathogenic TMEV variant. PLP139-TMEV-infected mice developed a rapid onset paralytic inflammatory, demyelinating disease paralleled by the activation of PLP139-151-specific CD4(+) Th1 responses within 10-14 days postinfection. The current studies demonstrate that the early onset demyelinating disease induced by PLP139-TMEV is the direct result of autoreactive PLP139-151-specific CD4(+) T cell responses. PLP139-151-specific CD4(+) T cells from PLP139-TMEV-infected mice transferred demyelinating disease to naive recipients and PLP139-151-specific tolerance before infection prevented clinical disease. Finally, infection with the mimic virus at sites peripheral to the CNS induced early demyelinating disease, suggesting that the PLP139-151-specific CD4(+) T cells could be activated in the periphery and traffic to the CNS. Collectively, infection with PLP139-151 mimic encoding TMEV serves as an excellent model for molecular mimicry by inducing pathologic myelin-specific CD4(+) T cells via a natural virus infection.

  9. Studies on virus-induced cell fusion. Progress report, July 1, 1978-July 31, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, S.

    1979-08-01

    We have determined the extent of fusion in mixed Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) cell populations. Labeled, sparse, infected cells were surrounded by unlabeled, excess, uninfected (or infected) cells to determine if fusion inhibition is active when present in the same cell as fusion factor, when present in cells that do not contain fusion factor, or in both situations. We found that wild type infected cells fuse to the same extent with each other as with uninfected cells. Therefore fusion inhibitor is active when present in the same cell as fusion factor. Other experiments indicate that the inhibition activity can also cause a small decrease of fusion when fusion factor and fusion inhibitor are present in different, but neighboring, cells. Marked variations are found in the capacity of different cell types, such as human embryonic lung (HEDL) and HEp-2 to support fusion by particular syn mutants. The difference in fusion capacity of the two cell types may be due to a difference in a cellular factor affecting the activity of viral, fusion-associated molecules, and not to cell surface differences of the uninfected cells. (PCS)

  10. Watsonianone A from Rhodomyrtus tomentosa Fruit Attenuates Respiratory-Syncytial-Virus-Induced Inflammation In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Ling; Chen, Li-Feng; Zhang, Yu-Bo; Liu, Zhong; Xiao, Xu-Hui; Tang, Wei; Wang, Guo-Cai; Song, Wen-Jun; Li, Yao-Lan; Li, Man-Mei

    2017-05-03

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is one of the most common respiratory pathogens. Immoderate inflammation plays a great role in causing RSV-induced diseases. In the present study, watsonianone A, isolated from the fruit of Rhodomyrtus tomentosa (Ait.) Hassk, was found to show a good inhibitory effect on RSV-induced NO production, with a half-maximal inhibitory concentration of 37.2 ± 1.6 μM. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction analyses indicated that watsonianone A markedly reduced both mRNA and protein levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in RSV-infected RAW264.7 cells. Mechanistically, watsonianone A inhibited nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation by suppressing IκBα phosphorylation. Further analysis revealed that watsonianone A activated the thioredoxin system and decreased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, which are closely associated with NF-κB activation in RSV-infected cells. These results reveal that watsonianone A can attenuate RSV-induced inflammation via the suppression of ROS-sensitive inflammatory signaling.

  11. Identification and validation of a virus-inducible ta-siRNA-generating ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-02-01

    Feb 1, 2016 ... which was indicated while comparing the small RNA deep sequencing data of healthy tomato plants ... TAS-mRNA by miR828, based on small RNA deep se- quencing data of tomato (Pusa Ruby). ..... human genome. Genome Biol. 10 25. Li F, Orban R and Baker B 2012 SoMART: a web server for plant.

  12. Evidence based selection of housekeeping genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jonge, Hendrik J. M.; Fehrmann, Rudolf S. N.; de Bont, Eveline S. J. M.; Hofstra, Robert M. W.; Gerbens, Frans; Kamps, Willem A.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; van der Zee, Ate G. J.; te Meerman, Gerard J.; ter Elst, Arja

    2007-01-01

    For accurate and reliable gene expression analysis, normalization of gene expression data against housekeeping genes (reference or internal control genes) is required. It is known that commonly used housekeeping genes (e. g. ACTB, GAPDH, HPRT1, and B2M) vary considerably under different experimental

  13. Human Lacrimal Gland Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Kumar Aakalu

    Full Text Available The study of human lacrimal gland biology and development is limited. Lacrimal gland tissue is damaged or poorly functional in a number of disease states including dry eye disease. Development of cell based therapies for lacrimal gland diseases requires a better understanding of the gene expression and signaling pathways in lacrimal gland. Differential gene expression analysis between lacrimal gland and other embryologically similar tissues may be helpful in furthering our understanding of lacrimal gland development.We performed global gene expression analysis of human lacrimal gland tissue using Affymetrix ® gene expression arrays. Primary data from our laboratory was compared with datasets available in the NLM GEO database for other surface ectodermal tissues including salivary gland, skin, conjunctiva and corneal epithelium.The analysis revealed statistically significant difference in the gene expression of lacrimal gland tissue compared to other ectodermal tissues. The lacrimal gland specific, cell surface secretory protein encoding genes and critical signaling pathways which distinguish lacrimal gland from other ectodermal tissues are described.Differential gene expression in human lacrimal gland compared with other ectodermal tissue types revealed interesting patterns which may serve as the basis for future studies in directed differentiation among other areas.

  14. GENES IN SPORT AND DOPING

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaliszewski, P.; Majorczyk, E.; Zembroń-Łacny, A.

    2013-01-01

    Genes control biological processes such as muscle production of energy, mitochondria biogenesis, bone formation, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, vasodilation, neurogenesis, etc. DNA profiling for athletes reveals genetic variations that may be associated with endurance ability, muscle performance and power exercise, tendon susceptibility to injuries and psychological aptitude. Already, over 200 genes relating to physical performance have been identified by several research groups. Athletes’ genotyping is developing as a tool for the formulation of personalized training and nutritional programmes to optimize sport training as well as for the prediction of exercise-related injuries. On the other hand, development of molecular technology and gene therapy creates a risk of non-therapeutic use of cells, genes and genetic elements to improve athletic performance. Therefore, the World Anti-Doping Agency decided to include prohibition of gene doping within their World Anti-Doping Code in 2003. In this review article, we will provide a current overview of genes for use in athletes’ genotyping and gene doping possibilities, including their development and detection techniques. PMID:24744482

  15. GENES IN SPORT AND DOPING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Pokrywka

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Genes control biological processes such as muscle production of energy, mitochondria biogenesis, bone formation erythropoiesis, angiogenesis, vasodilation, neurogenesis, etc. DNA profiling for athletes reveals genetic variations that may be associated with endurance ability, muscle performance and power exercise, tendon susceptibility to injuries and psychological aptitude. Already, over 200 genes relating to physical performance have been identified by several research groups. Athletes’ genotyping is developing as a tool for the formulation of personalized training and nutritional programmes to optimize sport training as well as for the prediction of exercise-related injuries. On the other hand, development of molecular technology and gene therapy creates a risk of non-therapeutic use of cells, genes and genetic elements to improve athletic performance. Therefore, the World Anti-Doping Agency decided to include prohibition of gene doping within their World Anti-Doping Code in 2003. In this review article, we will provide a current overview of genes for use in athletes’ genotyping and gene doping possibilities, including their development and detection techniques.

  16. Positive and negative roles for soybean MPK6 in regulating defense responses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Liu, Jian-Zhong; Braun, Edward; Qiu, Wen-Li; Shi, Ya-Fei; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar C; Navarre, Duroy; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    .... However, the functional importance of soybean MPK6 in disease resistance has not been investigated. Here, we showed that silencing of GmMPK6 in soybean using virus-induced gene silencing mediated by Bean pod mottle virus (BPMV...

  17. Protein: MPA1 [TP Atlas

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available MPA1 TLR signaling molecules RSAD2 CIG5 Radical S-adenosyl methionine domain-containing protein 2 Cytomegalo...virus-induced gene 5 protein, Viperin, Virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticu

  18. Gene expression profiles in skeletal muscle after gene electrotransfer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hojman, Pernille; Zibert, John R; Gissel, Hanne

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene transfer by electroporation (DNA electrotransfer) to muscle results in high level long term transgenic expression, showing great promise for treatment of e.g. protein deficiency syndromes. However little is known about the effects of DNA electrotransfer on muscle fibres. We have...... therefore investigated transcriptional changes through gene expression profile analyses, morphological changes by histological analysis, and physiological changes by force generation measurements. DNA electrotransfer was obtained using a combination of a short high voltage pulse (HV, 1000 V/cm, 100 mus......) followed by a long low voltage pulse (LV, 100 V/cm, 400 ms); a pulse combination optimised for efficient and safe gene transfer. Muscles were transfected with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and excised at 4 hours, 48 hours or 3 weeks after treatment. RESULTS: Differentially expressed genes were...

  19. Cloning and selection of reference genes for gene expression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Full length mRNA sequences of Ac-β-actin and Ac-gapdh, and partial mRNA sequences of Ac-18SrRNA and Ac-ubiquitin were cloned from pineapple in this study. The four genes were tested as housekeeping genes in three experimental sets. GeNorm and NormFinder analysis revealed that β-actin was the most ...

  20. Gene therapy of cancer by vaccines carrying inserted immunostimulatory genes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bubeník, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 3 (2007), s. 71-73 ISSN 0015-5500 Grant - others:EU-FP6 NoE Clinigene(XE) 018933; Liga proti rakovině, Praha(CZ) XX Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : gene therapy * immunostimulatory genes * vaccine Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.596, year: 2007

  1. Correction of gene expression data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Darbani Shirvanehdeh, Behrooz; Stewart, C. Neal, Jr.; Noeparvar, Shahin

    2014-01-01

    This report investigates for the first time the potential inter-treatment bias source of cell number for gene expression studies. Cell-number bias can affect gene expression analysis when comparing samples with unequal total cellular RNA content or with different RNA extraction efficiencies....... For maximal reliability of analysis, therefore, comparisons should be performed at the cellular level. This could be accomplished using an appropriate correction method that can detect and remove the inter-treatment bias for cell-number. Based on inter-treatment variations of reference genes, we introduce...

  2. Gene Therapy Approaches to Hemoglobinopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Giuliana; Cavazzana, Marina; Mavilio, Fulvio

    2017-10-01

    Gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies is currently based on transplantation of autologous hematopoietic stem cells genetically modified with a lentiviral vector expressing a globin gene under the control of globin transcriptional regulatory elements. Preclinical and early clinical studies showed the safety and potential efficacy of this therapeutic approach as well as the hurdles still limiting its general application. In addition, for both beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease, an altered bone marrow microenvironment reduces the efficiency of stem cell harvesting as well as engraftment. These hurdles need be addressed for gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies to become a clinical reality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Panspermia and horizontal gene transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyce, Brig

    2009-08-01

    Evidence that extremophiles are hardy and ubiquitous is helping to make panspermia a respectable theory. But even if life on Earth originally came from space, biologists assume that the subsequent evolution of life is still governed by the darwinian paradigm. In this review we show how panspermia could amend darwinism and point to a cosmic source for, not only extremophiles but, all of life. This version of panspermia can be called "strong panspermia." To support this theory we will discuss recent evidence pertaining to horizontal gene transfer, viruses, genes apparently older than the Earthly evolution of the features they encode, and primate-specific genes without identifiable precursors.

  4. Genomics screens for metastasis genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinchun; Huang, Qihong

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for most cancer mortality. The process of metastasis is complex, requiring the coordinated expression and fine regulation of many genes in multiple pathways in both the tumor and host tissues. Identification and characterization of the genetic programs that regulate metastasis is critical to understanding the metastatic process and discovering molecular targets for the prevention and treatment of metastasis. Genomic approaches and functional genomic analyses can systemically discover metastasis genes. In this review, we summarize the genetic tools and methods that have been used to identify and characterize the genes that play critical roles in metastasis. PMID:22684367

  5. American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chicago Learn More Close The American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy ASGCT is the primary membership organization for scientists, ... Therapeutics Official Journal of the American Society of Gene & Cell Therapy Molecular Therapy is the leading journal for gene ...

  6. Gene Expression Analysis of Breast Cancer Progression

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerald, Wiliam L

    2004-01-01

    ... to identify genes, gene expression profiles and molecular pathways associated with metastatic BC we have performed genome-wide gene expression analysis of a large number of breast cancer samples...

  7. Novel genes in LDL metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Mette; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize recent findings from genome-wide association studies (GWAS), whole-exome sequencing of patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and 'exome chip' studies pointing to novel genes in LDL metabolism. RECENT FINDINGS: The genetic loci for ATP-binding cassette......-exome sequencing and 'exome chip' studies have additionally suggested several novel genes in LDL metabolism including insulin-induced gene 2, signal transducing adaptor family member 1, lysosomal acid lipase A, patatin-like phospholipase domain-containing protein 5 and transmembrane 6 superfamily member 2. Most...... of these findings still require independent replications and/or functional studies to confirm the exact role in LDL metabolism and the clinical implications for human health. SUMMARY: GWAS, exome sequencing studies, and recently 'exome chip' studies have suggested several novel genes with effects on LDL cholesterol...

  8. Candidate genes in panic disorder

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howe, A. S.; Buttenschön, Henriette N; Bani-Fatemi, A.

    2016-01-01

    The utilization of molecular genetics approaches in examination of panic disorder (PD) has implicated several variants as potential susceptibility factors for panicogenesis. However, the identification of robust PD susceptibility genes has been complicated by phenotypic diversity, underpowered...

  9. Sleep deprivation and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Souza, Annie; Ribeiro, Sidarta

    2015-01-01

    Sleep occurs in a wide range of animal species as a vital process for the maintenance of homeostasis, metabolic restoration, physiological regulation, and adaptive cognitive functions in the central nervous system. Long-term perturbations induced by the lack of sleep are mostly mediated by changes at the level of transcription and translation. This chapter reviews studies in humans, rodents, and flies to address the various ways by which sleep deprivation affects gene expression in the nervous system, with a focus on genes related to neuronal plasticity, brain function, and cognition. However, the effects of sleep deprivation on gene expression and the functional consequences of sleep loss are clearly not restricted to the cognitive domain but may include increased inflammation, expression of stress-related genes, general impairment of protein translation, metabolic imbalance, and thermal deregulation.

  10. Gene Therapy for Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Denyer

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Current pharmacological and surgical treatments for Parkinson's disease offer symptomatic improvements to those suffering from this incurable degenerative neurological disorder, but none of these has convincingly shown effects on disease progression. Novel approaches based on gene therapy have several potential advantages over conventional treatment modalities. These could be used to provide more consistent dopamine supplementation, potentially providing superior symptomatic relief with fewer side effects. More radically, gene therapy could be used to correct the imbalances in basal ganglia circuitry associated with the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or to preserve or restore dopaminergic neurons lost during the disease process itself. The latter neuroprotective approach is the most exciting, as it could theoretically be disease modifying rather than simply symptom alleviating. Gene therapy agents using these approaches are currently making the transition from the laboratory to the bedside. This paper summarises the theoretical approaches to gene therapy for Parkinson's disease and the findings of clinical trials in this rapidly changing field.

  11. Deregulated genes in sporadic vestibular schwannomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cayé-Thomasen, Per; Helweg-Larsen, Rehannah Holga Andrea; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2010-01-01

    In search of genes associated with vestibular schwannoma tumorigenesis, this study examines the gene expression in human vestibular nerve versus vestibular schwannoma tissue samples using microarray technology....

  12. Gene expression based cancer classification

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Tarek; Reda Abd Elwahab; Mahmoud Shoman

    2017-01-01

    Cancer classification based on molecular level investigation has gained the interest of researches as it provides a systematic, accurate and objective diagnosis for different cancer types. Several recent researches have been studying the problem of cancer classification using data mining methods, machine learning algorithms and statistical methods to reach an efficient analysis f