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Sample records for virus type-1 reverse

  1. Inhibition of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Replication prior to Reverse Transcription by Influenza Virus Stimulation

    OpenAIRE

    Pinto, Ligia A.; Blazevic, Vesna; Patterson, Bruce K.; Mac Trubey, C.; Dolan, Matthew J.; Gene M Shearer

    2000-01-01

    It is now recognized that, in addition to drug-mediated therapies against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), the immune system can exert antiviral effects via CD8+ T-cell-generated anti-HIV factors. This study demonstrates that (i) supernatants from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with influenza A virus inhibit replication of CCR5- and CXCR4-tropic HIV-1 isolates prior to reverse transcription; (ii) the HIV-suppressive supernatants can be generated by CD4- or CD...

  2. HuR interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, and modulates reverse transcription in infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennifar Eric

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reverse transcription of the genetic material of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a critical step in the replication cycle of this virus. This process, catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT, is well characterized at the biochemical level. However, in infected cells, reverse transcription occurs in a multiprotein complex – the reverse transcription complex (RTC – consisting of viral genomic RNA associated with viral proteins (including RT and, presumably, as yet uncharacterized cellular proteins. Very little is known about the cellular proteins interacting with the RTC, and with reverse transcriptase in particular. We report here that HIV-1 reverse transcription is affected by the levels of a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein – the RNA-binding protein HuR. A direct protein-protein interaction between RT and HuR was observed in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed in vitro by homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF. We mapped the domain interacting with HuR to the RNAse H domain of RT, and the binding domain for RT to the C-terminus of HuR, partially overlapping the third RRM RNA-binding domain of HuR. HuR silencing with specific siRNAs greatly impaired early and late steps of reverse transcription, significantly inhibiting HIV-1 infection. Moreover, by mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation studies, we could not detect the binding of HuR to the viral RNA. These results suggest that HuR may be involved in and may modulate the reverse transcription reaction of HIV-1, by an as yet unknown mechanism involving a protein-protein interaction with HIV-1 RT.

  3. Variation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase within the simian immunodeficiency virus genome of RT-SHIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra A Wadford

    Full Text Available RT-SHIV is a chimera of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV containing the reverse transcriptase (RT-encoding region of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 within the backbone of SIVmac239. It has been used in a non-human primate model for studies of non-nucleoside RT inhibitors (NNRTI and highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART. We and others have identified several mutations that arise in the "foreign" HIV-1 RT of RT-SHIV during in vivo replication. In this study we catalogued amino acid substitutions in the HIV-1 RT and in regions of the SIV backbone with which RT interacts that emerged 30 weeks post-infection from seven RT-SHIV-infected rhesus macaques. The virus set points varied from relatively high virus load, moderate virus load, to undetectable virus load. The G196R substitution in RT was detected from 6 of 7 animals at week 4 post-infection and remained in virus from 4 of 6 animals at week 30. Virus from four high virus load animals showed several common mutations within RT, including L74V or V75L, G196R, L214F, and K275R. The foreign RT from high virus load isolates exhibited as much variation as that of the highly variable envelope surface glycoprotein, and 10-fold higher than that of the native RT of SIVmac239. Isolates from moderate virus load animals showed much less variation in the foreign RT than the high virus load isolates. No variation was found in SIVmac239 genes known to interact with RT. Our results demonstrate substantial adaptation of the foreign HIV-1 RT in RT-SHIV-infected macaques, which most likely reflects selective pressure upon the foreign RT to attain optimal activity within the context of the chimeric RT-SHIV and the rhesus macaque host.

  4. Highly efficient inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase by aptamers functionalized gold nanoparticles

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    Shiang, Yen-Chun; Ou, Chung-Mao; Chen, Shih-Ju; Ou, Ting-Yu; Lin, Han-Jia; Huang, Chih-Ching; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2013-03-01

    We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45-Au NPs shows inhibitory efficiency in the retroviral replication cycle with a decreasing infectivity (40.2%).We have developed aptamer (Apt)-conjugated gold nanoparticles (Apt-Au NPs, 13 nm in diameter) as highly effective inhibitors for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT). Two Apts, RT1t49 (Aptpol) and ODN 93 (AptRH), which recognize the polymerase and RNase H regions of HIV-1 RT, are used to conjugate Au NPs to prepare Aptpol-Au NPs and AptRH-Au NPs, respectively. In addition to DNA sequence, the surface density of the aptamers on Au NPs (nApt-Au NPs; n is the number of aptamer molecules on each Au NP) and the linker length number (Tm; m is the base number of the deoxythymidine linker) between the aptamer and Au NPs play important roles in determining their inhibition activity. A HIV-lentiviral vector-based antiviral assay has been applied to determine the inhibitory effect of aptamers or Apt-Au NPs on the early stages of their replication cycle. The nuclease-stable G-quadruplex structure of 40AptRH-T45

  5. The binding of a novel bisheteroarylpiperazine mediates inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueweke, T J; Kézdy, F J; Waszak, G A; Deibel, M R; Tarpley, W G

    1992-01-05

    The bisheteroarylpiperazines (BHAPs) are potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) and specifically block HIV-1 replication (Romero, D. L., Busso, M., Tan, C.-K., Reusser, F., Palmer, J. R., Poppe, S. M., Aristoff, P. A., Downey, K. M., So, A. G., Resnick, L., and Tarpley, W. G. (1991) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 88, 8806-8810). Here we show that the radiolabeled BHAP [3H]U-88204 binds specifically to HIV-1 RT with high affinity (KD of 50 nM) and a stoichiometry of 1 mol of U-88204 per 1 mol of p66/p51 RT heterodimer. Binding of [3H]U-88204 to RT is unaffected by the presence of saturating poly(rC).oligo (dG)12-18 template-primer. Direct measurement of competition between [3H]U-88204 and other RT inhibitors for binding to RT reveals mutually exclusive competition between [3H]U-88204 and the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor BI-RG-587 (Kopp, E. B., Miglietta, J. J., Shrutkowski, A. G., Shih, C.-K., Grob, P. M. and Skoog, M.T. (1991) Nucleic Acids Res. 19, 3035-3039), indicating that both share the same binding site. Phosphonoformate in concentrations up to 50 microM shows no competition with [3H]U-88204 for binding to RT either alone or in the presence of template-primer. Dideoxynucleotide RT inhibitors affect the binding of [3H]U-88204 to RT when complementary template-primer is present. [3H]U-88204 and the dideoxynucleotide ddGTP can bind RT simultaneously, but the presence of one ligand decreases the affinity of RT for the second. Inasmuch as ddGTP approximates the nucleotide substrate of RT, the direct demonstration of an RT-dideoxynucleotide-[3H]U-88204 complex validates the use of indirect kinetic methods to assess the strength of BHAP interaction with RT and suggests that RT inhibition by U-88204 is achieved via effects on nucleotide substrate binding.

  6. Lersivirine, a Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor with Activity against Drug-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1▿ ‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbau, Romuald; Mori, Julie; Phillips, Chris; Fishburn, Lesley; Martin, Alex; Mowbray, Charles; Panton, Wendy; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Thornberry, Adele; Ringrose, Heather; Knöchel, Thorsten; Irving, Steve; Westby, Mike; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2010-01-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A major problem with the first approved NNRTIs was the emergence of mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), in particular K103N and Y181C, which led to resistance to the entire class. We adopted an iterative strategy to synthesize and test small molecule inhibitors from a chemical series of pyrazoles against wild-type (wt) RT and the most prevalent NNRTI-resistant mutants. The emerging candidate, lersivirine (UK-453,061), binds the RT enzyme in a novel way (resulting in a unique resistance profile), inhibits over 60% of viruses bearing key RT mutations, with 50% effective concentrations (EC50s) within 10-fold of those for wt viruses, and has excellent selectivity against a range of human targets. Altogether lersivirine is a highly potent and selective NNRTI, with excellent efficacy against NNRTI-resistant viruses. PMID:20660667

  7. Lersivirine, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor with activity against drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbau, Romuald; Mori, Julie; Phillips, Chris; Fishburn, Lesley; Martin, Alex; Mowbray, Charles; Panton, Wendy; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Thornberry, Adele; Ringrose, Heather; Knöchel, Thorsten; Irving, Steve; Westby, Mike; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2010-10-01

    The nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) are key components of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). A major problem with the first approved NNRTIs was the emergence of mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), in particular K103N and Y181C, which led to resistance to the entire class. We adopted an iterative strategy to synthesize and test small molecule inhibitors from a chemical series of pyrazoles against wild-type (wt) RT and the most prevalent NNRTI-resistant mutants. The emerging candidate, lersivirine (UK-453,061), binds the RT enzyme in a novel way (resulting in a unique resistance profile), inhibits over 60% of viruses bearing key RT mutations, with 50% effective concentrations (EC(50)s) within 10-fold of those for wt viruses, and has excellent selectivity against a range of human targets. Altogether lersivirine is a highly potent and selective NNRTI, with excellent efficacy against NNRTI-resistant viruses.

  8. Enzymatic characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase resistant to multiple 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, T; Shirasaka, T; Mitsuya, H

    1995-10-06

    A set of five mutations (A62V, V75I, F77L, F116Y, and Q151M) in the polymerase domain of reverse transcriptase (RT) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), which confers on the virus a reduced sensitivity to multiple therapeutic dideoxynucleosides (ddNs), has been identified. In this study, we defined the biochemical properties of RT with such mutations by using site-directed mutagenesis, overproduction of recombinant RTs, and steady-state kinetic analyses. A single mutation, Q151M, which developed first among the five mutations in patients receiving therapy, most profoundly reduced the sensitivity of RT to multiple ddN 5'-triphosphate (ddNTPs). Addition of other mutations to Q151M further reduced the sensitivity of RT to ddNTPs. RT with the five mutations proved to be resistant by 65-fold to 3'-azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate (AZTTP), 12-fold to ddCTP, 8.8-fold to ddATP, and 3.3-fold to 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine 5'-triphosphate (ddGTP), compared with wild-type RT (RTwt). Steady-state kinetic studies revealed comparable catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km) of RTs carrying combined mutations as compared with that of RTwt (< 3-fold), although a marked difference was noted in inhibition constants (Ki) (e.g. Ki of a mutant RT carrying the five mutations was 62-fold higher for AZTTP than that of RTwt). Thus, we conclude that the alteration of RT's substrate recognition, caused by these mutations, accounts for the observed multi-ddN resistance of HIV-1. The features of multi-ddNTP-resistant RTs should provide insights into the molecular mechanism of RT discriminating ddNTPs from natural substrates.

  9. Reduced replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants that use reverse transcription primers other than the natural tRNA(3Lys)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, A. T.; Klaver, B.; Berkhout, B.

    1995-01-01

    Replication of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses involves reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into a double-stranded DNA. This reaction is primed by the cellular tRNA(3Lys) molecule, which binds to a complementary sequence in the viral genome, referred

  10. Limiting deoxynucleoside triphosphate concentrations emphasize the processivity defect of lamivudine-resistant variants of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Back, N. K.; Berkhout, B.

    1997-01-01

    The nucleoside drug lamivudine (3TC) triggers the selection of resistant forms of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (RT) with a substitution of amino acid 184Met. The 3TC-resistant RT enzymes 184Val and 184Ile exhibit a processivity defect in in vitro assays that

  11. Site-directed mutagenesis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase at amino acid position 138.

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    Pelemans, H; Aertsen, A; Van Laethem, K; Vandamme, A M; De Clercq, E; Pérez-Pérez, M J; San-Félix, A; Velázquez, S; Camarasa, M J; Balzarini, J

    2001-02-01

    TSAO derivatives represent a class of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) that consistently select for the Glu138Lys resistance mutation in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Seven RT mutants (i.e., Ala, Asp, Gln, Gly, Lys, Phe, and Tyr) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant Glu138Asp, Glu138Lys, Glu138Gln, Glu138Ala, and Glu138Gly RTs retained marked catalytic activity. In contrast, the Glu138Phe and Glu138Tyr RT mutants showed poor RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity (30 and 4% of wild-type, respectively). TSAO derivatives lost their inhibitory activity against all mutant enzymes, except against the closely related Glu138Asp RT mutant that remained as sensitive to TSAOs as did wild-type RT. Other NNRTIs, including delavirdine, emivirine, and UC-781, and the NRTI ddGTP retained pronounced inhibitory activity against all mutant enzymes. When the amino acid mutations at position 138 of RT were introduced in recombinant virus clones, the sensitivity/resistance spectrum obtained toward the TSAOs and other NNRTIs was similar to those observed for the isolated recombinant mutant enzymes. The Glu138Lys RT mutant virus had the most marked resistance to TSAOs, followed by the Glu138Gln, Glu138Phe, Glu138Gly, Glu138Tyr, and Glu138Ala virus mutants. The Glu138Asp RT mutant virus kept full sensitivity to the TSAO derivatives. Mixtures of Glu138Lys RT mutant virus with the other virus clones mutated at the 138 position resulted in all cases, except for the Glu138Asp and Glu138Gly RT mutant viruses, in an outgrowth of the Glu138Lys RT mutant virus. Since the Glu138Lys RT proved most resistant to TSAO derivatives, was among the most catalytically efficient enzymes, and resulted in highly replication-competent virus, our data explain why the Glu138Lys RT mutant virus strains but not virus strains containing other amino acids at position 138 invariably emerge in cell cultures under TSAO drug pressure. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  12. Balancing reversion of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte and neutralizing antibody escape mutations within human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Env upon transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peut, Viv; Campbell, Shahan; Gaeguta, Adriana; Center, Rob J; Wilson, Kim; Alcantara, Sheilajen; Fernandez, Caroline S; Purcell, Damian F J; Kent, Stephen J

    2009-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope protein (Env) is subject to both neutralizing antibody (NAb) and CD8 T-cell (cytotoxic T-lymphocyte [CTL]) immune pressure. We studied the reversion of the Env CTL escape mutant virus to the wild type and the relationship between the reversion of CTL mutations with N-linked glycosylation site (NLGS)-driven NAb escape in pigtailed macaques. Env CTL mutations either did not revert to the wild type or only transiently reverted 5 to 7 weeks after infection. The CTL escape mutant reversion was coincident, for the same viral clones, with the loss of NLGS mutations. At one site studied, both CTL and NLGS mutations were needed to confer NAb escape. We conclude that CTL and NAb escape within Env can be tightly linked, suggesting opportunities to induce effective multicomponent anti-Env immunity.

  13. A bioorganometallic approach for rapid electrochemical analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 reverse transcriptase in serum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labib, Mahmoud; Shipman, Patrick O.; Martic, Sanela [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada); Kraatz, Heinz-Bernhard, E-mail: hkraatz@uwo.ca [Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond Street, London, ON, N6A 5B7 (Canada)

    2011-05-30

    Highlights: > Two-dimensional electrochemical assay of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase in serum is presented. > XPS and ToF-SIMS confirmed binding of synthetic ferrocene-lipoic acid to gold. > Dynamic range was 100-500 pg mL{sup -1} with an LOD of 50 pg mL{sup -1}. > The biosensor allows sensitive and selective detection of reverse transcriptase in 20 s. - Abstract: Determination of low-abundance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) enzymes is essential for early detection of the viral infection. Designed for the rapid detection of the virus in human serum, a rapid and ultrasensitive electrochemical assay for HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) is presented in this article. The assay format is based on the formation of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of a synthesized ferrocene (Fc)-labeled lipoic acid onto a gold electrode. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Time-of-Flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) were employed to confirm the binding of the Fc-labeled lipoic acid to the gold via the Au-S bond. A short RT-specific peptide, VEAIIRILQQLLFIH, was covalently attached to the Fc-labeled lipoic acid. Square wave voltammetry (SWV) offered a two-dimensional measurement of RT based on the anodic shift and reduction of current density of the Fc redox signal upon binding of RT to its specific peptide. This allowed a linear quantification of the target RT in the range of 100-500 pg mL{sup -1}, equivalent to 85.5-427.4 fM, with a detection limit of 50 pg mL{sup -1} (42.7 fM). The developed biosensor is inexpensive, easy to prepare and operate, and allows a highly selective detection of RT in 20 s.

  14. Kinetic and mutational analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase inhibition by inophyllums, a novel class of non-nucleoside inhibitors.

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    Taylor, P B; Culp, J S; Debouck, C; Johnson, R K; Patil, A D; Woolf, D J; Brooks, I; Hertzberg, R P

    1994-03-04

    Inophyllums are novel non-nucleoside inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 reverse transcriptase identified through an enzyme screening program and isolated from the plant Calophyllum inophyllum. The kinetics of reverse transcriptase inhibition by inophyllum B were characterized using recombinant purified enzyme, a heteropolymeric RNA template, and a scintillation proximity assay. Preincubation of inhibitor with the enzyme-template-primer complex for 11 min was required for maximal inhibition of reverse transcriptase to occur, suggesting that inophyllum B had a slow on-rate and that template-primer must bind to reverse transcriptase prior to inhibitor binding. Inhibition of reverse transcriptase by inophyllums was shown to be reversible. When thymidine triphosphate was the variable substrate, inophyllum B inhibited reverse transcriptase noncompetitively with a Ki of 42 nM. Enzyme inhibition with respect to template-primer was uncompetitive with a Ki of 26 nM. Reverse transcriptase enzymes containing point mutations in which tyrosine 181 was changed to either cysteine or isoleucine exhibited marginal resistance to inophyllums but were resistant to (+)-(5S)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydro-9-chloro-5-methyl-6- (3-methyl-2-butenyl)-imidazo[4,5,1-j,k][1,4]benzodiazepin-2-(1H)-t hione (TIBO R82913). A mutant enzyme in which tyrosine 188 was changed to leucine was cross-resistant to both inophyllum B and TIBO R82913, as was HIV type 2 reverse transcriptase. These studies suggest that inophyllum B and TIBO R82913 bind to distinct but overlapping sites. Inhibition of avian myeloblastosis virus reverse transcriptase and Moloney murine leukemia virus reverse transcriptase by inophyllum B was detectible, suggesting that these inhibitors may be more promiscuous than other previously described non-nucleoside inhibitors. Inophyllums were active against HIV type 1 in cell culture with IC50 values of approximately 1.5 microM. These studies imply that the inophyllums have a

  15. The role of Thr139 in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase sensitivity to (+)-calanolide A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwerx, Joeri; Rodríguez-Barrios, Fátima; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; San-Félix, Ana; Velázquez, Sonsoles; De Clercq, Erik; Camarasa, María-José; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Gago, Federico; Balzarini, Jan

    2005-09-01

    The coumarins represent a unique class of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) that were isolated from tropical plants. (+)-Calanolide A, the most potent compound of this class, selects for the T139I resistance mutation in HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Seven RTs mutated at amino acid position 139 (Ala, Lys, Tyr, Asp, Ile, Ser, and Gln) were constructed by site-directed mutagenesis. The mutant T139Q enzyme retained full catalytic activity compared with wild-type RT, whereas the mutant T139I, T139S, and T139A RTs retained only 85 to 50% of the activity. Mutant T139K, T139D, and T139Y RTs had seriously impaired catalytic activities. The mutations in the T139I and T139D RTs were shown to destabilize the RT heterodimer. (+)-Calanolide A lost inhibitory activity (up to 20-fold) against the mutant T139Y, T139Q, T139K, and T139I enzymes. All of the mutant enzymes retained marked susceptibility toward the other NNRTIs, including nevirapine, delavirdine, efavirenz, thiocarboxanilide UC-781, quinoxaline GW867420X, TSAO [[2',5'-bis-O-(tert-butyldimethylsilyl)-beta-D-ribofuranosyl]-3'-spiro-5''-(4''-amino-1'',2''-oxathiole-2'',2''-dioxide)] derivatives, and the nucleoside inhibitor, ddGTP. The fact that the T139I RT 1) proved to be resistant to (+)-calanolide A, 2) represents a catalytically efficient enzyme, and 3) requires only a single transition point mutation (ACA-->ATA) in codon 139 seems to explain why mutant T139I RT virus strains, but not virus strains containing other amino acid changes at this position, predominantly emerge in cell cultures under (+)-calanolide A pressure.

  16. Mutagenesis of the Glu-89 residue in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 reverse transcriptases: effects on nucleoside analog resistance.

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Q; Yang, G; Goff, S P; Prasad, V R

    1992-01-01

    A Glu-89-->Gly alteration in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was previously shown to result in resistance to several dideoxynucleoside analogs and to phosphonoformic acid (PFA; foscarnet). This residue was altered to Ala, Val, Ser, Thr, Gln, Asp, Asn, or Lys, and the ddGTP and PFA sensitivities of the mutant RTs were measured. Replacements with Ala, Gly, Val, and Thr led to resistance to inhibition by ddGTP, while mutants with amino acid Ser, Gln, Asn, Asp, ...

  17. Mutagenesis of the Glu-89 residue in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 reverse transcriptases: effects on nucleoside analog resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Q; Yang, G; Goff, S P; Prasad, V R

    1992-12-01

    A Glu-89-->Gly alteration in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) was previously shown to result in resistance to several dideoxynucleoside analogs and to phosphonoformic acid (PFA; foscarnet). This residue was altered to Ala, Val, Ser, Thr, Gln, Asp, Asn, or Lys, and the ddGTP and PFA sensitivities of the mutant RTs were measured. Replacements with Ala, Gly, Val, and Thr led to resistance to inhibition by ddGTP, while mutants with amino acid Ser, Gln, Asn, Asp, or Lys displayed only moderate or no resistance. A similar result was obtained with inhibition by PFA, except that the Asp-89 mutant also displayed resistance. Furthermore, the introduction of Glu-89-->Gly alteration into the RT of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 likewise rendered it resistant to both ddGTP and PFA.

  18. Mutagenic study of codons 74 and 215 of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, which are significant in nucleoside analog resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacey, S F; Larder, B A

    1994-05-01

    Mutation in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (RT) at codon 215 has been shown to play a significant role in resistance to zidovudine (AZT). Substitution of threonine with tyrosine or phenylalanine alone confers decreased susceptibility to the inhibitor. In this study we constructed a panel of 10 viruses with different amino acids at this codon, including 7 novel mutants, and assessed their susceptibilities to AZT. The majority of the new mutants were AZT sensitive, whereas the Thr-215-->Trp mutant was partially resistant (threefold less susceptible). A combination of the Thr-215-->Trp with the other AZT resistance mutations Lys-70-->Arg and Met-41-->Leu gave additive resistance. The Thr-215-->Phe virus was less AZT resistant than the Thr-215-->Tyr mutant, both on its own and when each was combined with the Met-41-->Leu mutant. These observations confirm the general hypothesis that increased bulk of the amino acid side chains at this position confers decreased AZT sensitivity. A leucine-to-valine substitution at codon 74 has previously been found to confer dideoxynucleoside resistance. We constructed mutants with five novel amino acid substitutions (Ala, Gly, Glu, Met, and Asp) at codon 74. Of these, only one (that with the Met substitution) retained enough RT activity to yield viable virus. It thus appears that there are severe structure-function constraints on the amino acid side chains at this position in the enzyme. The activities of the Leu-74-->Ala and Leu-74-->Met RT enzymes expressed in Escherichia coli appeared to have reduced susceptibility to ddGTP compared with the wild-type enzyme. The mutants described in this work may prove useful for correlation with structural studies of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RT.

  19. Intracytoplasmic maturation of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription complexes determines their capacity to integrate into chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashanchi Fatah

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The early events of the HIV-1 life cycle include entry of the viral core into target cell, assembly of the reverse transcription complex (RTCs performing reverse transcription, its transformation into integration-competent complexes called pre-integration complexes (PICs, trafficking of complexes into the nucleus, and finally integration of the viral DNA into chromatin. Molecular details and temporal organization of these processes remain among the least investigated and most controversial problems in the biology of HIV. Results To quantitatively evaluate maturation and nuclear translocation of the HIV-1 RTCs, nucleoprotein complexes isolated from the nucleus (nRTC and cytoplasm (cRTC of HeLa cells infected with MLV Env-pseudotyped HIV-1 were analyzed by real-time PCR. While most complexes completed reverse transcription in the cytoplasm, some got into the nucleus before completing DNA synthesis. The HIV-specific RNA complexes could get into the nucleus when reverse transcription was blocked by reverse transcriptase inhibitor, although nuclear import of RNA complexes was less efficient than of DNA-containing RTCs. Analysis of the RTC nuclear import in synchronized cells infected in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle showed enrichment in the nuclei of RTCs containing incomplete HIV-1 DNA compared to non-synchronized cells, where RTCs with complete reverse transcripts prevailed. Immunoprecipitation assays identified viral proteins IN, Vpr, MA, and cellular Ini1 and PML associated with both cRTCs and nRTCs, whereas CA was detected only in cRTCs and RT was diminished in nRTCs. Cytoplasmic maturation of the complexes was associated with increased immunoreactivity with anti-Vpr and anti-IN antibodies, and decreased reactivity with antibodies to RT. Both cRTCs and nRTCs carried out endogenous reverse transcription reaction in vitro. In contrast to cRTCs, in vitro completion of reverse transcription in nRTCs did not increase their

  20. Extension of mismatched 3' termini of DNA is a major determinant of the infidelity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrino, F W; Preston, B D; Sandell, L L; Loeb, L A

    1989-01-01

    The unusually high error rate of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase (HIV-1 RT) suggests that polymerization errors by this enzyme contribute to the genetic variability of the AIDS virus. We have analyzed the mechanism for HIV-1 RT infidelity by studying two distinct steps that might lead to base substitution mutations: nucleotide misinsertions and elongation from 3'-terminal DNA mispairs. Our results indicate that the capacity of HIV-1 RT to polymerize nucleotides onto mispaired termini is a major factor in the production of mutations by this enzyme. When a noncomplementary dAMP was inserted opposite a template adenine by HIV-1 RT, the nascent 3'-terminal A.A mispair was readily extended by subsequent incorporation of the next complementary nucleotide. The frequencies of nucleotide addition onto 3'-terminal A-A, A-C, and A-G mispairs were determined by quantitating the amount of extended primers with a gel electrophoresis assay and by measuring mutagenesis after hybridization of mismatched primers opposite an amber mutation in bacteriophage phi X174 DNA. The mispair extension frequencies are approximately 50-fold higher by HIV-1 RT than by the mammalian replicative enzyme DNA polymerase alpha. Images PMID:2479023

  1. SJ-3366, a unique and highly potent nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that also inhibits HIV-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckheit, R W; Watson, K; Fliakas-Boltz, V; Russell, J; Loftus, T L; Osterling, M C; Turpin, J A; Pallansch, L A; White, E L; Lee, J W; Lee, S H; Oh, J W; Kwon, H S; Chung, S G; Cho, E H

    2001-02-01

    We have identified and characterized a potent new nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitor (NNRTI) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) that also is active against HIV-2 and which interferes with virus replication by two distinct mechanisms. 1-(3-Cyclopenten-1-yl)methyl-6-(3,5-dimethylbenzoyl)-5-ethyl-2,4-pyrimidinedione (SJ-3366) inhibits HIV-1 replication at concentrations of approximately 1 nM, with a therapeutic index of greater than 4 x 10(6). The efficacy and toxicity of SJ-3366 are consistent when evaluated with established or fresh human cells, and the compound is equipotent against all strains of HIV-1 evaluated, including syncytium-inducing, non-syncytium-inducing, monocyte/macrophage-tropic, and subtype virus strains. Distinct from other members of the pharmacologic class of NNRTIs, SJ-3366 inhibited laboratory and clinical strains of HIV-2 at a concentration of approximately 150 nM, yielding a therapeutic index of approximately 20,000. Like most NNRTIs, the compound was less active when challenged with HIV-1 strains possessing the Y181C, K103N, and Y188C amino acid changes in the RT and selected for a virus with a Y181C amino acid change in the RT after five tissue culture passages in the presence of the compound. In combination anti-HIV assays with nucleoside and nonnucleoside RT and protease inhibitors, additive interactions occurred with all compounds tested with the exception of dideoxyinosine, with which a synergistic interaction was found. Biochemically, SJ-3366 exhibited a K(i) value of 3.2 nM, with a mixed mechanism of inhibition against HIV-1 RT, but it did not inhibit HIV-2 RT. SJ-3366 also inhibited the entry of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 into target cells. On the basis of its therapeutic index and multiple mechanisms of anti-HIV action, SJ-3366 represents an exciting new compound for use in HIV-infected individuals.

  2. Alternative tRNA priming of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcription explains sequence variation in the primer-binding site that has been attributed to APOBEC3G activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Das, Atze T.; Vink, Monique; Berkhout, Ben

    2005-01-01

    It is generally assumed that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) uses exclusively the cellular tRNA(3)(Lys) molecule as a primer for reverse transcription. We demonstrate that HIV-1 uses not only tRNA(3)(Lys) but also an alternative tRNA primer. This tRNA was termed tRNA(5)(Lys), and the

  3. Detection, differentiation, and VP1 sequencing of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 and type 3 by a 1-step duplex reverse-transcription PCR assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, X J; Cheng, A C; Wang, M S; Jia, R Y; Zhu, D K; Chen, S; Liu, M F; Liu, F; Chen, X Y

    2014-09-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is an infectious pathogen causing fatal duck viral hepatitis in ducklings. Although both the inactivated vaccines and live attenuated vaccines have been used to protect ducklings, DHAV-1 and DHAV-3 still cause significant serious damage to the duck industry in China and South Korea. For rapid detection, differentiation, and epidemic investigation of DHAV in China, a genotype-specific 1-step duplex reverse-transcription (RT) PCR assay was established in this study. The sensitivity and specificity of the developed RT-PCR assay was evaluated with nucleic acids extracted from 2 DHAV reference strains, and 9 other infectious viruses and bacteria. The genotype-specific primers amplified different size DNA fragments encompassing the complete VP1 gene of the DHAV-1 or DHAV-3. The assay detected the liver samples collected from experimentally infected ducklings and dead ducklings collected from different regions of China. Sequence analysis of these DNA fragments indicated that VP1 sequences of DHAV-1 can be used to distinguish wild type and vaccine strains. The phylogenetic analysis of VP1 sequences indicated that the developed RT-PCR assay can be used for epidemic investigation of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. The developed RT-PCR assay can be used as a specific molecular tool for simultaneous detection, differentiation, and sequencing the VP1 gene of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, which can be used for understanding the epidemiology and evolution of DHAV. © 2014 Poultry Science Association Inc.

  4. Contribution of the C-terminal tri-lysine regions of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase for efficient reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fowke Keith R

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to mediating the integration process, HIV-1 integrase (IN has also been implicated in different steps during viral life cycle including reverse transcription and viral DNA nuclear import. Although the karyophilic property of HIV-1 IN has been well demonstrated using a variety of experimental approaches, the definition of domain(s and/or motif(s within the protein that mediate viral DNA nuclear import and its mechanism are still disputed and controversial. In this study, we performed mutagenic analyses to investigate the contribution of different regions in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN to protein nuclear localization as well as their effects on virus infection. Results Our analysis showed that replacing lysine residues in two highly conserved tri-lysine regions, which are located within previously described Region C (235WKGPAKLLWKGEGAVV and sequence Q (211KELQKQITK in the C-terminal domain of HIV-1 IN, impaired protein nuclear accumulation, while mutations for RK263,4 had no significant effect. Analysis of their effects on viral infection in a VSV-G pseudotyped RT/IN trans-complemented HIV-1 single cycle replication system revealed that all three C-terminal mutant viruses (KK215,9AA, KK240,4AE and RK263,4AA exhibited more severe defect of induction of β-Gal positive cells and luciferase activity than an IN class 1 mutant D64E in HeLa-CD4-CCR5-β-Gal cells, and in dividing as well as non-dividing C8166 T cells, suggesting that some viral defects are occurring prior to viral integration. Furthermore, by analyzing viral DNA synthesis and the nucleus-associated viral DNA level, the results clearly showed that, although all three C-terminal mutants inhibited viral reverse transcription to different extents, the KK240,4AE mutant exhibited most profound effect on this step, whereas KK215,9AA significantly impaired viral DNA nuclear import. In addition, our analysis could not detect viral DNA integration in each C

  5. Multiple-Dose Pharmacokinetic Behavior of Elvucitabine, a Nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor, Administered over 21 Days with Lopinavir-Ritonavir in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colucci, Philippe; Pottage, John C.; Robison, Heather; Turgeon, Jacques; Schuermann, Dirk; Hoepelman, I. M.; Ducharme, Murray P.

    The purpose of this study was to describe the plasma pharmacokinetics (PK) of elvucitabine at different doses when administered daily or every other day for 21 days with lopinavir-ritonavir ( Kaletra) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected subjects. Three different dosing regimens of

  6. A rapid method for simultaneous detection of phenotypic resistance to inhibitors of protease and reverse transcriptase in recombinant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates from patients treated with antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertogs, K; de Béthune, M P; Miller, V; Ivens, T; Schel, P; Van Cauwenberge, A; Van Den Eynde, C; Van Gerwen, V; Azijn, H; Van Houtte, M; Peeters, F; Staszewski, S; Conant, M; Bloor, S; Kemp, S; Larder, B; Pauwels, R

    1998-02-01

    Combination therapy with protease (PR) and reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitors can efficiently suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication, but the emergence of drug-resistant variants correlates strongly with therapeutic failure. Here we describe a new method for high-throughput analysis of clinical samples that permits the simultaneous detection of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) phenotypic resistance to both RT and PR inhibitors by means of recombinant virus assay technology. HIV-1 RNA is extracted from plasma samples, and a 2.2-kb fragment containing the entire HIV-1 PR- and RT-coding sequence is amplified by nested reverse transcription-PCR. The pool of PR-RT-coding sequences is then cotransfected into CD4+ T lymphocytes (MT4) with the pGEMT3deltaPRT plasmid from which most of the PR (codons 10 to 99) and RT (codons 1 to 482) sequences are deleted. Homologous recombination leads to the generation of chimeric viruses containing PR- and RT-coding sequences derived from HIV-1 RNA in plasma. The susceptibilities of the chimeric viruses to all currently available RT and/or PR inhibitors is determined by an MT4 cell-3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide-based cell viability assay in an automated system that allows high sample throughput. The profile of resistance to all RT and PR inhibitors is displayed graphically in a single PR-RT-Antivirogram. This assay system facilitates the rapid large-scale phenotypic resistance determinations for all RT and PR inhibitors in one standardized assay.

  7. Enzymatic properties and sensitivity to inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase with Glu-138-->Arg and Tyr-188-->His mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H; Vrang, L; Bäckbro, K; Unge, T; Noréen, R; Oberg, B

    1994-05-01

    Two mutants of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT), Tyr-188-->His and Glu-138-->Arg have been prepared and their catalytic properties and sensitivities to inhibitors studied. As compared to wild type RT, a reduction in catalytic efficiency and turn over number was observed, especially for the Tyr-188-->His mutant. The non-nucleoside inhibitors nevirapine, L-697,661 and 9-Cl-TIBO caused a mixed type of inhibition of RT (Arg-138) with respect to substrate, and with the exception of a non-competitive inhibition by nevirapine, also a mixed type of inhibition of RT (His-188). Foscarnet (PFA) caused a non-competitive type of inhibition of RT (Arg-138) and a mixed inhibition of RT (His-188). The inhibition by ddG-TP was competitive with both mutant RTs. Inhibition by nevirapine gave IC50 values of 0.15, 0.23 and 0.72 microM; by 9-Cl-TIBO of 0.20, 2.50 and 10.3 microM; by L-697,661 of 0.064, 0.28 and 0.60 microM; by ddGTP of 0.13, 0.14 and 0.02 microM; by PFA of 17.0, 48.0 and 15.0 microM for RT wt, RT (Arg-138) and RT (His-188), respectively.

  8. Isolation of Ancestral Sylvatic Dengue Virus Type 1, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teoh, Boon-Teong; Sam, Sing-Sin; Abd-Jamil, Juraina

    2010-01-01

    Ancestral sylvatic dengue virus type 1, which was isolated from a monkey in 1972, was isolated from a patient with dengue fever in Malaysia. The virus is neutralized by serum of patients with endemic DENV-1 infection. Rare isolation of this virus suggests a limited spillover infection from an otherwise restricted sylvatic cycle. PMID:21029545

  9. Genetic instability of live, attenuated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 vaccine strains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; Verhoef, K.; van Wamel, J. L.; Back, N. K.

    1999-01-01

    Live, attenuated viruses have been the most successful vaccines in monkey models of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. However, there are several safety concerns about using such an anti-HIV vaccine in humans, including reversion of the vaccine strain to virulence and

  10. Structure--activity relationship studies of 1-(4-chloro-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-(3-propoxypropyl)thiourea, a non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitman, Michal; Lerman, Keti; Nudelman, Abraham; Major, Dan Thomas; Hizi, Amnon; Herschhorn, Alon

    2011-02-01

    The reverse transcriptase (RT) of the human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) is still a prime target for drug development due to the continuing need to block drug-resistant RT mutants by new inhibitors. We have previously identified 1-(4-chloro-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)-3-(3-propoxypropyl)thiourea, compound 1, as a potent RT inhibitor from an available chemical library. Here, we further modified this compound to study structure--activity relationships when replacing various groups in the molecule. Different functional groups were systematically introduced on the aromatic ring and the aliphatic chain of the compound was modified. The effect of these modifications on viral infectivity was then evaluated. The most potent compound found was propyl 4-(amino-N-(4-chloro-2,5-dimethoxyphenyl)methanethioamino)butanoate, 45c, which inhibited infectivity with a calculated IC50 of about 1.1 μM. Docking studies identified potential important interactions between the top scoring ligands and HIV-1 RT, and the predicted relative affinity of the ligands was found to be in agreement with the experimental results. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Viruses and type 1 diabetes: ignorance acquires a better vocabulary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gale, E A M

    2012-04-01

    The hypothesis that a virus might in some way be involved in the causation of type 1 diabetes has a long history, but decades of research have failed to resolve the issue beyond reasonable doubt. Viruses could potentially play a primary role in the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes by initiating autoimmunity, a secondary role by promoting established immune responses, or a tertiary role by precipitating the onset of hyperglycaemia. There is currently little evidence to suggest that viruses play a primary role in the causation of type 1 diabetes, let alone a necessary or sufficient role. Secondary or tertiary roles remain possible, but have yet to be confirmed in prospective studies. © 2011 The Author. Clinical and Experimental Immunology © 2011 British Society for Immunology.

  12. Host-parasite dynamics and outgrowth of virus containing a single K70R amino acid change in reverse transcriptase are responsible for the loss of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA load suppression by zidovudine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jong, M.D. de; Veenstra, J.; Stilianakis, N.I.; Schuurman, R.; Lange, Joep M.A.; Boer, R.J. de; Boucher, C.A.B.

    1996-01-01

    The association between human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) RNA load changes and the emergence of resistant virus variants was investigated in 24 HIV-1-infected asymptomatic persons during 2 years of treatment with zidovudine by sequentially measuring serum HIV-1 RNA load and the relative

  13. Human Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Confiscated Gorilla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxford, Kristie L.; Gardner-Roberts, David; Kinani, Jean-Felix; Spelman, Lucy; Barry, Peter A.; Cranfield, Michael R.; Lowenstine, Linda J.

    2014-01-01

    In 2007, we detected human herpes simplex virus type 1, which caused stomatitis, in a juvenile confiscated eastern lowland gorilla (Gorilla beringei graueri) that had a high degree of direct contact with human caretakers. Our findings confirm that pathogens can transfer between nonhuman primate hosts and humans. PMID:25341185

  14. Lassa Virus Reverse Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Sobrido, Luis; Paessler, Slobodan; de la Torre, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    The Old World (OW) arenavirus Lassa (LASV ) is estimated to infect several hundred thousand people yearly in West Africa, resulting in high numbers of Lassa fever (LF), a viral hemorrhagic fever (HF) disease associated with high morbidity and mortality. To date, no licensed vaccines are available to LASV infections, and anti-LASV drug therapy is limited to an off-label use of ribavirin (Rib) that is only partially effective. The development of reverse genetics has provided investigators with a novel and powerful approach for the investigation of the molecular, cell biology, and pathogenesis of LASV. The use of cell-based LASV minigenome (MG) systems has allowed examining the cis- and trans-acting factors involved in genome replication and gene transcription and the identification of novel drugable LASV targets. Likewise, it is now feasible to rescue infectious recombinant (r)LASV entirely from cloned cDNAs containing predetermined mutations in their genomes to investigate virus-host interactions and mechanisms of pathogenesis, as well as to facilitate screens to identify antiviral drugs against LASV and the implementation of novel strategies to develop live-attenuated vaccines (LAV). In this chapter we will summarize the state-of-the-art experimental procedures for implementation of LASV reverse genetics. In addition, we will briefly discuss some significant translational research developments that have been made possible upon the development of LASV reverse genetics.

  15. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) as a vehicle for therapeutic gene delivery: improvements in vector design and viral production enhance potential to prolong graft survival in pancreatic islet cell transplantation for the reversal of type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapturczak, M H; Flotte, T; Atkinson, M A

    2001-05-01

    Most viral gene delivery syslems utilized to date have demonstrated significant limitations in practicality and safety due to the level and duration of recombinant transgene expression as well as their induction of host immunogenicity to vector proteins. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors appear to offer a vehicle for safe, long-term therapeutic gene transfer; factors afforded through the propensity of rAAV to establish long-term latency without deleterious effects on the host cell and the relative non-immunogenicity of the virus or viral expressed transgenes. The principal historical limitation of this vector system, efficiency of rAAV-mediated transduction, has recently observed a dramatic increase as the titer, purity, and production capacity of rAAV preparations have improved. In terms of systems that could benefit from such improvements, rAAV gene therapy to enhance solid organ transplantation would appear an obvious choice with islet transplantation forming a promising candidate due to the ability to perform viral transductions ex vivo. Currently, islet transplantation can be used to treat type 1 diabetes yet persisting alloimmune and autoimmune responses represent major obstacles to the clinical success for this procedure. The delivery of transgenes capable of interfering with antigenic recognition and/or cell death [e.g., Fas ligand (FasL), Bcl-2, Bcl-XL] as well as imparting tolerance/immunoregulation [e.g., interleukin(IL)-4, IL-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta], or cytoprotection [e.g., heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), catalase, manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD)] may prevent recurrent type 1 diabetes in islet transplantation and offer a promising form of immunotherapy. Research investigations utilizing such systems may also provide information vital to understanding the immunoregulatory mechanisms critical to the development of both alloimmune and autoimmune islet cell rejection mechanisms and recurrent type 1 diabetes.

  16. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROGMANAGER

    2013-04-24

    Apr 24, 2013 ... Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in treatment-naïve adults in Jos,. North Central Nigeria. Anejo-Okopi J. A.1*, Agbaji O. O.1,2, Agaba P. A.1,3, Ugoagwu P. O.1, Were K.4, Onywera H.4,. Owiti P.4, Isa S. E1,2, Otecko N.4 ...

  17. West Nile virus meningitis in a patient with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Pilalas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of West Nile virus lineage 2 in central Macedonia, Greece, in 2010 resulted in large outbreaks for 5 consecutive years. We report a case of viral meningitis in an individual infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1, which preceded the recognition of the outbreak and was confirmed retrospectively as West Nile virus neuroinvasive disease.

  18. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection Associated with Atrial Myxoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanwen; Pan, Zhigang; Ji, Yuan; Sheppard, Mary; Jeffries, Donald J.; Archard, Leonard C.; Zhang, Hongyi

    2003-01-01

    Some findings suggest an infectious factor in cardiac myxoma and certain histopathological features indicate herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We hypothesized that HSV-1 may be involved in the pathogenesis of cardiac myxoma. Paraffin-embedded tissue samples from 17 patients with atrial myxoma were investigated for HSV-1 antigen by immunohistochemistry and viral genomic DNA by nested polymerase chain reaction. The histogenesis and oncogenesis of atrial myxoma were assessed by the expression of calretinin, Ki67, and p53 protein, respectively. Autopsy myocardial samples, including endocardium from 12 patients who died by accident or other conditions, were used for comparison. HSV-1 antigen was detected in atrial myxoma from 12 of 17 patients: 8 of these 12 samples were positive also for HSV-1 DNA. No HSV-1 antigen or DNA was found in tissue from the comparison group. Antigens of HSV-2, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and cytomegalovirus were not found in atrial myxoma. Calretinin was found in myxoma cells of all 17 cases but Ki67 was present only in smooth muscle cells or infiltrating cells in some cases. p53 was not detectable in any myxoma. Most infiltrating cells were cytotoxic T lymphocytes. These data suggest that HSV-1 infection is associated with some cases of sporadic atrial myxoma and that these may result from a chronic inflammatory lesion of endocardium. PMID:14633612

  19. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina Maria Schmidt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems.

  20. Release of Virus from Lymphoid Tissue Affects Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Kinetics in the Blood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Müller, Viktor; Marée, Athanasius F.M.; Boer, R.J. de

    2000-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections have been estimated from plasma virus levels following perturbation of the chronically infected (quasi-) steady state. We extend previous models by also considering the large pool of virus

  1. Seroprevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV1) is a lymphotropic virus which can contribute to carcinogenesis in adult T-cell leukemia, myleopathy and other disorders. 20 million people are affected by this virus in the world. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of human T-cell lymph tropic virus type 1 ...

  2. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease and the Emergence of Drug Resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Nina Rødtness

    Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) protease (PR) is responsible for cleaving ten different sites in the viral Gag and Gag-pol polyproteins, thereby releasing the structural proteins and enzymes necessary for the maturation and infectivity of the HIV-1 virus. The vital role of HIV-1 PR...... in the virus life cycle has made it a major target for drug development and active site competitive inhibitors have been successful in the battle against HIV. Unfortunately, the massive drug pressure along with high-level replication and lack of proofreading by the viral reverse transcriptase have resulted...... in multi-drug-resistant PRs. Computational analysis of a vast number of inhibitor-resistant HIV-1 PR variants can broaden the knowledge of how and why the mutations arise, which would be a great advantage in the design on resistance-evading inhibitors. Here we present a diverse system to select...

  3. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Roberto Lima Machado

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, hepatitis B virus (HBV or hepatitis C virus (HCV are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical manifestations and outcomes of leprosy. HTLV-1, HBV and HCV are associated with leprosy in some regions and institutionalization is an important risk factor for these viral coinfections. Some studies show a higher prevalence of viral coinfection in lepromatous cases. Although HBV and HCV coinfection were associated with reversal reaction in one study, there is a lack of information about the consequences of viral coinfections in leprosy. It is not known whether clinical outcomes associated with leprosy, such as development of reactions or relapses could be attributed to a specific viral coinfection. Furthermore, whether the leprosy subtype may influence the progression of the viral coinfection is unknown. All of these important and intriguing questions await prospective studies to definitively establish the actual relationship between these entities.

  4. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Paulo Roberto Lima; Johnson, Warren D; Glesby, Marshall J

    2012-12-01

    Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical manifestations and outcomes of leprosy. HTLV-1, HBV and HCV are associated with leprosy in some regions and institutionalization is an important risk factor for these viral coinfections. Some studies show a higher prevalence of viral coinfection in lepromatous cases. Although HBV and HCV coinfection were associated with reversal reaction in one study, there is a lack of information about the consequences of viral coinfections in leprosy. It is not known whether clinical outcomes associated with leprosy, such as development of reactions or relapses could be attributed to a specific viral coinfection. Furthermore, whether the leprosy subtype may influence the progression of the viral coinfection is unknown. All of these important and intriguing questions await prospective studies to definitively establish the actual relationship between these entities.

  5. Gene Therapy Vectors Based on Adeno-Associated Virus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Weidong; Chirmule, Narendra; Berta, Scott C.; McCullough, Beth; Gao, Guangping; Wilson, James M.

    1999-01-01

    The complete sequence of adeno-associated virus type 1 (AAV-1) was defined. Its genome of 4,718 nucleotides demonstrates high homology with those of other AAV serotypes, including AAV-6, which appears to have arisen from homologous recombination between AAV-1 and AAV-2. Analysis of sera from nonhuman and human primates for neutralizing antibodies (NAB) against AAV-1 and AAV-2 revealed the following. (i) NAB to AAV-1 are more common than NAB to AAV-2 in nonhuman primates, while the reverse is ...

  6. Induction of alpha interferon by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in human monocyte-macrophage cultures.

    OpenAIRE

    Szebeni, J; Dieffenbach, C; Wahl, S M; Venkateshan, C N; Yeh, A; Popovic, M.; Gartner, S; Wahl, L M; Peterfy, M; Friedman, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    The induction of interferon (IFN) by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in primary, nonstimulated monocyte-macrophage cultures was studied. HIV-1 infection, as confirmed by p24 antigen levels in the cell supernatant, led to the production of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) over 7 to 21 days following infection. In two of seven experiments, the IFN detected was acid labile. Coupled reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis confirmed the induction of IFN-alpha mRNA in cells...

  7. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Neural Xenografts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvetkovich, Therese A.; Lazar, Eliot; Blumberg, Benjamin M.; Saito, Yoshihiro; Eskin, Thomas A.; Reichman, Richard; Baram, David A.; del Cerro, Coca; Gendelman, Howard E.; del Cerro, Manuel; Epstein, Leon G.

    1992-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is highly specific for its human host. To study HIV-1 infection of the human nervous system, we have established a small animal model in which second-trimester (11 to 17.5 weeks) human fetal brain or neural retina is transplanted to the anterior chamber of the eye of immunosuppressed adult rats. The human xenografts vascularized, formed a blood-brain barrier, and differentiated, forming neurons and glia. The xenografts were infected with cell-free HIV-1 or with HIV-1-infected human monocytes. Analysis by polymerase chain reaction revealed HIV-1 sequences in DNA from xenograft tissue exposed to HIV-1 virions, and in situ hybridization demonstrated HIV-1 mRNA localized in macrophages and multinucleated giant cells. Pathological damage was observed only in neural xenografts containing HIV-1-infected human monocytes, supporting the hypothesis that these cells mediate neurotoxicity. This small animal model allows the study of direct and indirect effects of HIV-1 infection on developing human fetal neural tissues, and it should prove useful in evaluating antiviral therapies, which must ultimately target HIV-1 infection of the brain.

  8. Comparison of the Genetic Recombination Rates of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Macrophages and T Cells†

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jianbo; Rhodes, Terence D.; Hu, Wei-Shau

    2005-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) exhibits a high level of genetic variation generated by frequent mutation and genetic recombination during reverse transcription. We have measured HIV-1 recombination rates in T cells in one round of virus replication. It was recently proposed that HIV-1 recombines far more frequently in macrophages than in T cells. In an attempt to delineate the mechanisms that elevate recombination, we measured HIV-1 recombination rates in macrophages at three dif...

  9. Mechanism of inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase and human DNA polymerases alpha, beta, and gamma by the 5'-triphosphates of carbovir, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine, 2',3'-dideoxyguanosine and 3'-deoxythymidine. A novel RNA template for the evaluation of antiretroviral drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, W B; White, E L; Shaddix, S C; Ross, L J; Buckheit, R W; Germany, J M; Secrist, J A; Vince, R; Shannon, W M

    1991-01-25

    Carbovir (the carbocyclic analog of 2'-3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxyguanosine) is a potent inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication. Assays were developed to assess the mechanism of inhibition by the 5'-triphosphate of carbovir of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase using either RNA or DNA templates that contain all four natural nucleotides. Carbovir-TP was a potent inhibitor of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase using either template with Ki values similar to that observed by AZT-TP, ddGTP, and ddTTP. The kinetic constants for incorporation of these nucleotide analogs into DNA by HIV-1 reverse transcriptase using either template were similar to the values seen for their respective natural nucleotides. In addition, the incorporation of either carbovir-TP or AZT-TP in the presence of dGTP or dTTP, respectively, indicated that the mechanism of inhibition by these two nucleotide analogs was due to their incorporation into the DNA resulting in chain termination. Carbovir-TP was not a potent inhibitor of DNA polymerase alpha, beta, or gamma, or DNA primase. Given the potent activity of carbovir-TP against HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and its lack of activity against human DNA polymerases, we believe that further evaluation of this compound as a potential drug for the treatment of HIV-1 infection is warranted.

  10. An outbreak of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 infection in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamomae, Masahiro; Kameyama, Mamoru; Ishii, Jun; Nabe, Mikoto; Ogura, Yuji; Iseki, Hiroshi; Yamamoto, Yu; Mase, Masaji

    2017-05-23

    In June 2015, a highly fatal and acute disease broke out in a duckling farm in Hyogo Prefecture, Japan. The birds exhibited poor growth, reduced movement, lying in a dorsal recumbent position, depression, lethargy, ataxia and opisthotonus, with a high mortality rate of approximately 76%. By performing a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using primers specific for duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1), we obtained the PCR products of a predicted size. The nucleotide sequences of the PCR products showed a >96% identity with that of the DHAV-1, HB02 strain, which was isolated in China. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the DHAV-1 virus has been isolated since its outbreak in Japan in 1963.

  11. The role of human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus coinfections in leprosy

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Roberto Lima Machado; Johnson, Warren D.; Glesby, Marshall J.

    2012-01-01

    Leprosy spectrum and outcome is associated with the host immune response against Mycobacterium leprae. The role of coinfections in leprosy patients may be related to a depression of cellular immunity or amplification of inflammatory responses. Leprosy remains endemic in several regions where human T cell lymphotrophic virus type 1 (HTLV-1), hepatitis B virus (HBV) or hepatitis C virus (HCV) are also endemic. We have evaluated the evidence for the possible role of these viruses in the clinical...

  12. Conformational landscape of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket: lessons for inhibitor design from a cluster analysis of many crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Kristina A; Haq, Omar; Felts, Anthony K; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Eddy; Levy, Ronald M

    2009-10-22

    Clustering of 99 available X-ray crystal structures of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) at the flexible non-nucleoside inhibitor binding pocket (NNIBP) provides information about features of the conformational landscape for binding non-nucleoside inhibitors (NNRTIs), including effects of mutation and crystal forms. The ensemble of NNIBP conformations is separated into eight discrete clusters based primarily on the position of the functionally important primer grip, the displacement of which is believed to be one of the mechanisms of inhibition of RT. Two of these clusters are populated by structures in which the primer grip exhibits novel conformations that differ from the predominant cluster by over 4 A and are induced by the unique inhibitors capravirine and rilpivirine/TMC278. This work identifies a new conformation of the NNIBP that may be used to design NNRTIs. It can also be used to guide more complete exploration of the NNIBP free energy landscape using advanced sampling techniques.

  13. RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type 1 isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Amanda Perse da; Lopes, Juliana Freitas; Paula, Vanessa Salete de

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of RNA interference to inhibit herpes simplex virus type-1 replication in vitro. For herpes simplex virus type-1 gene silencing, three different small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) targeting the herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 gene (sequence si-UL 39-1, si-UL 39-2, and si-UL 39-3) were used, which encode the large subunit of ribonucleotide reductase, an essential enzyme for DNA synthesis. Herpes simplex virus type-1 was isolated from saliva samples and mucocutaneous lesions from infected patients. All mucocutaneous lesions' samples were positive for herpes simplex virus type-1 by real-time PCR and by virus isolation; all herpes simplex virus type-1 from saliva samples were positive by real-time PCR and 50% were positive by virus isolation. The levels of herpes simplex virus type-1 DNA remaining after siRNA treatment were assessed by real-time PCR, whose results demonstrated that the effect of siRNAs on gene expression depends on siRNA concentration. The three siRNA sequences used were able to inhibit viral replication, assessed by real-time PCR and plaque assays and among them, the sequence si-UL 39-1 was the most effective. This sequence inhibited 99% of herpes simplex virus type-1 replication. The results demonstrate that silencing herpes simplex virus type-1 UL39 expression by siRNAs effectively inhibits herpes simplex virus type-1 replication, suggesting that siRNA based antiviral strategy may be a potential therapeutic alternative. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  14. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) genetic diversity and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    8% of the patients' isolates had at least one major resistance mutation in the RT gene: Nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: M41L (1%), K65KR (1%), M184IM (1%), M184V (2%) and T215ADNT (1%), non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors: K103N (2%), K101E (1%), G190A (1%), P225HP (1%), Y181I (1%), ...

  15. Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Chimpanzees

    OpenAIRE

    Santra, Sampa; Fultz, Patricia N.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1999-01-01

    Chimpanzees have been important in studies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis and in evaluation of HIV-1 candidate vaccines. However, little information is available about HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) in these animals. In the present study, in vitro stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from infected chimpanzees with HIV-1 Gag peptides was shown to be a sensitive, reproducible method of expanding HIV-1-specific CD8+ effector CTL. Of ...

  16. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by RNA interference using long-hairpin RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konstantinova, P.; de Vries, W.; Haasnoot, J.; ter Brake, O.; de Haan, P.; Berkhout, B.

    2006-01-01

    Inhibition of virus replication by means of RNA interference has been reported for several important human pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). RNA interference against these pathogens has been accomplished by introduction of virus-specific synthetic small interfering

  17. Type 1 (reversal) lepra reaction in borderline leprosy with unusual clinical presentation--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, H K; Saxena, A K; Jain, R K; Sharma, A K

    1987-01-01

    A male 26 years old patient with BB type of leprosy was encountered with a typical clinical presentations of up-grading (reversal) Type 1 Lepra Reaction. These included sudden appearance of tender, erythematous nodular eruptions mimicking ENL, severe constitutional symptoms like high grade fever, malaise, vomiting, epistaxis, joint pain and tenosynovitis simulating Type 2 Lepra Reaction. To the best of our knowledge, this may be the first such case in our hand.

  18. Autophagy interaction with herpes simplex virus type-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Douglas; Liang, Chengyu

    2016-01-01

    abstract More than 50% of the U.S. population is infected with herpes simplex virus type-I (HSV-1) and global infectious estimates are nearly 90%. HSV-1 is normally seen as a harmless virus but debilitating diseases can arise, including encephalitis and ocular diseases. HSV-1 is unique in that it can undermine host defenses and establish lifelong infection in neurons. Viral reactivation from latency may allow HSV-1 to lay siege to the brain (Herpes encephalitis). Recent advances maintain that HSV-1 proteins act to suppress and/or control the lysosome-dependent degradation pathway of macroautophagy (hereafter autophagy) and consequently, in neurons, may be coupled with the advancement of HSV-1-associated pathogenesis. Furthermore, increasing evidence suggests that HSV-1 infection may constitute a gradual risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders. The relationship between HSV-1 infection and autophagy manipulation combined with neuropathogenesis may be intimately intertwined demanding further investigation. PMID:26934628

  19. Pseudodiploid genome organization AIDS full-length human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Steven R; Duggal, Nisha K; Ndongmo, Clement B; Pacut, Crystal; Telesnitsky, Alice

    2008-03-01

    Template switching between copackaged human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genomic RNAs is genetically silent when identical RNAs are copackaged but yields recombinants when virions contain two distinct RNAs. Sequencing has revealed that errors at retroviral recombination junctions are infrequent, suggesting that template switching is not intrinsically mutagenic. Here, we tested the hypothesis that template switching may instead contribute to replication fidelity. This hypothesis predicts that reverse transcription of a single-copy gene will be more error prone than replication in the presence of a second copy. To test this, HIV-1-based vectors containing both lacZ and the puromycin resistance marker were expressed either alone or with an excess of an "empty" vector lacking lacZ and puro. This resulted in virions with either RNA homodimers or haploid genomes with only a single lacZ-puro RNA. In untreated cells, lacZ inactivation rates suggested that haploid vector reverse transcription was slightly more error prone than that of homodimerized pseudodiploid vectors. Haploid reverse transcription was at least threefold more error prone than pseudodiploid-templated synthesis when slowed by hydroxyurea treatment or stopped prematurely with zidovudine. Individual products of one- and two-copy genes revealed both nucleotide substitutions and deletions, with deletions more frequent than point mutations among haploid genome products. Similar spectra of defective products were observed at early reverse transcription time points and among products of haploid virions. These results indicate that faithful, full-length reverse transcription products were underrepresented in the absence of a reserve of genetic information and suggest that template switching contributes to HIV-1 genomic integrity.

  20. The diversity of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Type 1 and 2 in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Kristensen, Charlotte Sonne

    Both Type 1 and Type 2 PRRS viruses are circulating among Danish pigs. The first appearance of Type 1 PRRSV in Denmark was in 1992 whereas the Type 2 PRRSV was introduced in 1996 after the use of a live attenuated vaccine that reverted to virulence. Since then, vaccination to control the disease...... strains were sequenced. Denmark exports more than 50.000 living pigs each month. A portion of these pigs inevitably harbor PRRSV. Thus, the diversity of PRRSV in Denmark is of interest to other countries besides Denmark. The main objective of the present study was to close the gap in knowledge...... of the results showed that the Type 1 strains all belonged to subtype 1. Based on the ORF5 sequences, the Danish Type 1 viruses clustered into two groups. These two groups shared 84 % to 92 % and 94 % to 99% nucleotide identity to the Lelystad virus, respectively. The sequenced Type 2 viruses showed...

  1. Two weeks taurine supplementation reverses endothelial dysfunction in young male type 1 diabetics.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Michael A

    2010-10-01

    Type 1 diabetics have a well-recognised risk of accelerated cardiovascular disease. Even in the absence of clinical signs there are detectable abnormalities of conduit vessel function. Our group has previously reported reversal of endothelial dysfunction in diabetics with pravastatin. In young asymptomatic smokers, taurine supplementation has a beneficial impact on macrovascular function, assessed by FMD, and shows an up-regulation of nitric oxide from monocyte-endothelial cell interactions. We hypothesise that taurine supplementation reverses early endothelial abnormalities in young male type 1 diabetics, as assessed by applanation tonometry, brachial artery ultrasound and laser Doppler fluximetry. Asymptomatic, male diabetics (n=9) were scanned prior to treatment and then randomised in a double-blind cross-over fashion to receive either 2 weeks placebo or taurine. Control patients (n=10) underwent a baseline scan. Assessed diabetics had detectable, statistically significant abnormalities when compared with controls, in both arterial stiffness (augmentation index) and brachial artery reactivity (FMD). Both of these parameters were returned to control levels with 2 weeks taurine supplementation. In conclusion, 2 weeks taurine supplementation reverses early, detectable conduit vessel abnormalities in young male diabetics. This may have important implications in the long-term treatment of diabetic patients and their subsequent progression towards atherosclerotic disease.

  2. Virus load in chimpanzees infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: effect of pre-exposure vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Haaft, P.; Cornelissen, M.; Goudsmit, J.; Koornstra, W.; Dubbes, R.; Niphuis, H.; Peeters, M.; Thiriart, C.; Bruck, C.; Heeney, J. L.

    1995-01-01

    Many reports indicate that a long-term asymptomatic state following human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is associated with a low amount of circulating virus. To evaluate the possible effect of stabilizing a low virus load by non-sterilizing pre-exposure vaccination, a quantitative

  3. Prevalence and clinical consequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 DNA in human cornea tissues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Remeijer (Lies); R. Duan (Rui); J.M. van Dun (Jessica); M.A.W. Bettink; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBackground. We determined the prevalence and clinical consequences of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV-1), HSV type 2 (HSV-2), and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) in cornea tissues obtained after penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) was performed. Methods. The excised corneas of 83 patients

  4. Effects of morphine on replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2009-05-17

    May 17, 2009 ... Herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 belongs to α- herpesvirinae subfamily of Herpesviridae family. HSV virus genome has a double strand DNA which codes over. 70 gene products. HSV infection is the most common viral infections in human and causes an extended range of diseases (Roizman et al., 1974; ...

  5. Pathogenesis of primary R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 clones in SCID-hu mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scoggins, R. M.; Taylor, J. R.; Patrie, J.; van't Wout, A. B.; Schuitemaker, H.; Camerini, D.

    2000-01-01

    We studied the replication and cytopathicity in SCID-hu mice of R5 human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) biological clones from early and late stages of infection of three patients who never developed MT-2 cell syncytium-inducing (SI; R5X4 or X4) viruses. Several of the late-stage non-MT-2

  6. Mutation Spectra of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Thymidine Kinase Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Qiaosheng; Hwang, Ying T.; Hwang, Charles B. C.

    2002-01-01

    To examine whether the exonuclease activity intrinsic to the polymerase (Pol) of herpes simplex virus type 1 can influence the mutational spectra, we applied the denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) system combined with sequencing to characterize thymidine kinase mutants isolated from both the wild-type virus and a mutant deficient in exonuclease activity, Y7. Wild-type viruses produced predominately frameshift mutations (67%), whereas Y7 replicated a significantly lower proportion ...

  7. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter G E; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain; Cohrs, Randall J

    2015-07-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an 'end-less' state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is increasing

  8. A comparison of herpes simplex virus type 1 and varicella-zoster virus latency and reactivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Peter G. E.; Rovnak, Joel; Badani, Hussain

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1; human herpesvirus 1) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV; human herpesvirus 3) are human neurotropic alphaherpesviruses that cause lifelong infections in ganglia. Following primary infection and establishment of latency, HSV-1 reactivation typically results in herpes labialis (cold sores), but can occur frequently elsewhere on the body at the site of primary infection (e.g. whitlow), particularly at the genitals. Rarely, HSV-1 reactivation can cause encephalitis; however, a third of the cases of HSV-1 encephalitis are associated with HSV-1 primary infection. Primary VZV infection causes varicella (chickenpox) following which latent virus may reactivate decades later to produce herpes zoster (shingles), as well as an increasingly recognized number of subacute, acute and chronic neurological conditions. Following primary infection, both viruses establish a latent infection in neuronal cells in human peripheral ganglia. However, the detailed mechanisms of viral latency and reactivation have yet to be unravelled. In both cases latent viral DNA exists in an ‘end-less’ state where the ends of the virus genome are joined to form structures consistent with unit length episomes and concatemers, from which viral gene transcription is restricted. In latently infected ganglia, the most abundantly detected HSV-1 RNAs are the spliced products originating from the primary latency associated transcript (LAT). This primary LAT is an 8.3 kb unstable transcript from which two stable (1.5 and 2.0 kb) introns are spliced. Transcripts mapping to 12 VZV genes have been detected in human ganglia removed at autopsy; however, it is difficult to ascribe these as transcripts present during latent infection as early-stage virus reactivation may have transpired in the post-mortem time period in the ganglia. Nonetheless, low-level transcription of VZV ORF63 has been repeatedly detected in multiple ganglia removed as close to death as possible. There is

  9. Targeting innate immunity to downmodulate adaptive immunity and reverse type 1 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh A

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Arata Itoh, William M Ridgway Division of Immunology, Allergy and Rheumatology, University of Cincinnati College of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH, USA Abstract: Type 1 diabetes (T1D is characterized by specific destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells accompanied by evidence of beta-cell-directed autoimmunity such as autoreactive T cells and islet autoantibodies (IAAs. Currently, T1D cannot be prevented or reversed in humans. T1D is easy to prevent in the nonobese diabetic (NOD spontaneous mouse model but reversing new-onset T1D in mice is more difficult. Since the discovery of the T-cell receptor in the 1980s and the subsequent identification of autoreactive T cells directed toward beta-cell antigens (eg, insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, the dream of antigen-specific immunotherapy has dominated the field with its promise of specificity and limited side effects. While such approaches have worked in the NOD mouse, however, dozens of human trials have failed. Broader immunosuppressive approaches (originally cyclosporine, subsequently anti-CD3 antibody have shown partial successes (e.g., prolonged C peptide preservation but no major therapeutic efficacy or disease reversal. Human prevention trials have failed, despite the ease of such approaches in the NOD mouse. In the past 50 years, the incidence of T1D has increased dramatically, and one explanation is the “hygiene hypothesis”, which suggests that decreased exposure of the innate immune system to environmental immune stimulants (e.g., bacterial products such as Toll-like receptor (TLR 4-stimulating lipopolysaccharide [LPS] dramatically affects the adaptive immune system and increases subsequent autoimmunity. We have tested the role of innate immunity in autoimmune T1D by treating acute-onset T1D in NOD mice with anti-TLR4/MD-2 agonistic antibodies and have shown a high rate of disease reversal. The TLR4 antibodies do not directly stimulate T cells but induce tolerogenic

  10. The Vpr gene polymorphism of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in China and its clinical significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xia; Zheng, Yuhuang; Li, Hui; Mamadou, Diallo; Zhang, Chunying; He, Yan; Zhou, Huaying; Chen, Zi; Liu, Meng

    2011-07-01

    Recent studies have explored that mutated Human immunodeficiency virus type 1(HIV-1) Vpr genes likely influence clinical manifestations of HIV infected patients. However, the relationship between the mutation sites on HIV Vpr gene and subsequent function changes is still not clear. In this study we investigated such relationship in analyzing the Vpr genes of HIV-1 viruses isolated from 208 HIV-1 infected patients from different regions in China. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR were used to amplify HIV-1 Vpr gene extracted from plasma of 208 HIV-1 infected patients and 153 isolates displayed the target gene sequences. Biological analysis software analyzed the deduced amino acid sequence, and identified the characteristics of the polymorphism of HIV-1 Vpr gene and its clinical significance. Results show the sequence subtypes as follows: CRF01-AE is 51.63%, subtype C is 24.84%, ubtype B is 17.65%, CRF03-AB is 3.92% and CRF08-BC is 1.31%. This paper revealed for the first time the HIV-1 Vpr gene polymorphism in HIV-1 positive individuals in China.: the subtype CRF01-AE is the main Vpr gene subtype in this region. The mutations in the C-terminal were more obvious than those observed in the N-terminal. It was also discovered that in the 77th position, 84.3% of the 153 amino acid sequences were glutamine (Q), which differ from overseas reports. Our data showed that the mutations 63, 70, 85, 86, 89 and 94 of the Vpr gene were possibly correlated with the clinical manifestations of the HIV-1 infected individuals.

  11. A CD40-targeted peptide controls and reverses type 1 diabetes in NOD mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitaitis, Gisela M.; Olmstead, Michael H.; Waid, Dan M.; Carter, Jessica R.; Wagner, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Aims/Hypothesis The CD40–CD154 interaction directs autoimmune inflammation. Therefore, a longstanding goal in the treatment of autoimmune disease has been to control the formation of that interaction and thereby prevent destructive inflammation. Antibodies blocking CD154 are successful in mouse models of autoimmune disease but, while promising when used in humans, unfortunate thrombotic events have occurred, forcing the termination of those studies. Methods To address the clinical problem of thrombotic events caused by anti-CD154 antibody treatment, we created a series of small peptides based on the CD154 domain that interacts with CD40 and tested the ability of these peptides to target CD40 and prevent type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. Results We identified a lead candidate, the 15-mer KGYY15 peptide, which specifically targets CD40-positive cells in a size- and sequence-dependent manner. It is highly efficient in preventing hyperglycaemia in NOD mice that spontaneously develop type 1 diabetes. Importantly, KGYY15 can also reverse new-onset hyperglycaemia. KGYY15 is well tolerated and functions to control the cytokine profile of culprit Th40 effector T cells. The KGYY15 peptide is 87% homologous to the human sequence, suggesting that it is an important candidate for translational studies. Conclusions Peptide KGYY15 constitutes a viable therapeutic option to antibody therapy in targeting the CD40–CD154 interaction in type 1 diabetes. Given the involvement of CD40 in autoimmunity in general, it will also be important to evaluate KGYY15 in the treatment of other autoimmune diseases. This alternative therapeutic approach opens new avenues of exploration in targeting receptor–ligand interactions. PMID:25104468

  12. Reversion mutations in patients with leukocyte adhesion deficiency type-1 (LAD-1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tng, Emilia; Rosenzweig, Sergio D.; Hsu, Amy P.; Shaw, Jacqueline M.; Horwitz, Mitchell E.; Linton, Gilda F.; Anderson, Stacie M.; Kirby, Martha R.; Oliveira, Jaõ B.; Brown, Margaret R.; Fleisher, Thomas A.; Law, S. K. Alex

    2008-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion deficiency type-1 (LAD-1) is an autosomal recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in the β2 integrin, CD18, that impair CD11/CD18 heterodimer surface expression and/or function. Absence of functional CD11/CD18 integrins on leukocytes, particularly neutrophils, leads to their incapacity to adhere to the endothelium and migrate to sites of infection. We studied 3 LAD-1 patients with markedly diminished neutrophil CD18 expression, each of whom had a small population of lymphocytes with normal CD18 expression (CD18+). These CD18+ lymphocytes were predominantly cytotoxic T cells, with a memory/effector phenotype. Microsatellite analyses proved patient origin of these cells. Sequencing of T-cell subsets showed that in each patient one CD18 allele had undergone further mutation. Interestingly, all 3 patients were young adults with inflammatory bowel disease. Somatic reversions of inherited mutations in primary T-cell immunodeficiencies are typically associated with milder clinical phenotypes. We hypothesize that these somatic revertant CD18+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) may have altered immune regulation. The discovery of 3 cases of reversion mutations in LAD-1 at one center suggests that this may be a relatively common event in this rare disease. PMID:17875809

  13. Treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected children is associated with a sustained effect on growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Verweel; N.G. Hartwig (Nico); H.J. Scherpbier; R. de Groot (Ronald); T.F.W. Wolfs (Tom); A.M.C. van Rossum (Annemarie)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractINTRODUCTION: Growth failure is a common feature of children with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection. Children who are treated with mono or dual nucleoside analogue reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) therapy show a temporary increase in weight

  14. Recombination analysis and structure prediction show correlation between breakpoint clusters and RNA hairpins in the pol gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 unique recombinant forms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, Andrea; Lai, Alessia; Corvasce, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    Recombination is recognized as a primary force in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolution, increasing viral diversity through reshuffling of genomic portions. The strand-switching activity of reverse transcriptase is required to complete HIV-1 replication and can occur randomly thro...

  15. Selection of peptides interfering with a ribosomal frameshift in the human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Dulude, Dominic; THÉBERGE-JULIEN, GABRIEL; Brakier-Gingras, Léa; Heveker, Nikolaus

    2008-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus of type 1 (HIV-1) uses a programmed -1 ribosomal frameshift to produce the precursor of its enzymes, and changes in frameshift efficiency reduce replicative fitness of the virus. We used a fluorescent two-reporter system to screen for peptides that reduce HIV-1 frameshift in bacteria, knowing that the frameshift can be reproduced in Escherichia coli. Expression of one reporter, the green fluorescent protein (GFP), requires the HIV-1 frameshift, whereas the sec...

  16. Targeting innate immunity to downmodulate adaptive immunity and reverse type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Arata; Ridgway, William M

    2017-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is characterized by specific destruction of pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells accompanied by evidence of beta-cell-directed autoimmunity such as autoreactive T cells and islet autoantibodies (IAAs). Currently, T1D cannot be prevented or reversed in humans. T1D is easy to prevent in the nonobese diabetic (NOD) spontaneous mouse model but reversing new-onset T1D in mice is more difficult. Since the discovery of the T-cell receptor in the 1980s and the subsequent identification of autoreactive T cells directed toward beta-cell antigens (eg, insulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase), the dream of antigen-specific immunotherapy has dominated the field with its promise of specificity and limited side effects. While such approaches have worked in the NOD mouse, however, dozens of human trials have failed. Broader immunosuppressive approaches (originally cyclosporine, subsequently anti-CD3 antibody) have shown partial successes (e.g., prolonged C peptide preservation) but no major therapeutic efficacy or disease reversal. Human prevention trials have failed, despite the ease of such approaches in the NOD mouse. In the past 50 years, the incidence of T1D has increased dramatically, and one explanation is the "hygiene hypothesis", which suggests that decreased exposure of the innate immune system to environmental immune stimulants (e.g., bacterial products such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4-stimulating lipopolysaccharide [LPS]) dramatically affects the adaptive immune system and increases subsequent autoimmunity. We have tested the role of innate immunity in autoimmune T1D by treating acute-onset T1D in NOD mice with anti-TLR4/MD-2 agonistic antibodies and have shown a high rate of disease reversal. The TLR4 antibodies do not directly stimulate T cells but induce tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (APCs) that mediate decreased adaptive T-cell responses. Here, we review our current knowledge and suggest future prospects for targeting innate immunity

  17. Human Ubc9 Contributes to Production of Fully Infectious Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Virions▿

    OpenAIRE

    Jaber, Tareq; Bohl, Christopher R; Lewis, Gentry L.; Wood, Charles; West, John T.; Weldon, Robert A.

    2009-01-01

    Ubc9 was identified as a cellular protein that interacts with the Gag protein of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. We show here that Ubc9 also interacts with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein and that their interaction is important for virus replication. Gag was found to colocalize with Ubc9 predominantly at perinuclear puncta. While cells in which Ubc9 expression was suppressed with RNA interference produced normal numbers of virions, these particles were 8- to 10-fold les...

  18. Timing of HAART initiation and clinical outcomes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconverters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonsson, Michele; Fusco, Jennifer S.; Cole, Stephen R.; Thomas, James C.; Porter, Kholoud; Kaufman, Jay S.; Davidian, Marie; White, Alice D.; Hartmann, Katherine E.; Eron, Joseph J.; del Amo, Julia; Meyer, Laurence; Bucher, Heiner C.; Chene, Geneviève; Pillay, Deenan; Prins, Maria; Rosinska, Magda; Sabin, Caroline; Touloumi, Giota; Lodi, Sara; Coughlin, Kate; Walker, Sarah; Babiker, Abdel; de Luca, Andrea; Fisher, Martin; Muga, Roberto; Kaldor, John; Kelleher, Tony; Ramacciotti, Tim; Gelgor, Linda; Cooper, David; Smith, Don; Gill, John; Jørgensen, Louise Bruun; Nielsen, Claus; Pedersen, Court; Lutsar, Irja; Dabis, Francois; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Masquelier, Bernard; Costagliola, Dominique; Guiguet, Marguerite; Vanhems, Philippe; Chaix, Marie-Laure; Ghosn, Jade; Boufassa, Faroudy; Hamouda, Osamah; Kücherer, Claudia; Bartmeyer, Barbara; Pantazis, Nikos; Hatzakis, Angelos; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Karafoulidou, Anastasia; Rezza, Giovanni; Dorrucci, Maria; Balotta, Claudia; D'Arminio Monforte, Antonella; Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Geskus, Ronald; van der Helm, Jannie; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Sannes, Mette; Brubakk, Oddbjorn; Bakken Kran, Anne-Marte; Rosinska, Magdalena; Gniewosz, Joanna; Camacho, Ricardo; Smolskaya, Tatyana; Tor, Jordi; Garcia de Olalla, Patricia; Cayla, Joan; del Romero, Jorge; Pérez-Hoyos, Santiago; Rickenbach, Martin; Francioli, Patrick; Malyuta, Ruslan; Brettle, Ray; Delpech, Valerie; Lattimore, Sam; Murphy, Gary; Johnson, Anne; Phillips, Andrew; Jaffe, Harold; Morrison, Charles; Salata, Robert; Mugerwa, Roy; Chipato, Tsungai; Amornkul, Pauli

    2011-01-01

    To estimate the clinical benefit of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) initiation vs deferral in a given month in patients with CD4 cell counts less than 800/μL. In this observational cohort study of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 seroconverters from CASCADE (Concerted Action on

  19. Role of the DIS hairpin in replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhout, B.; van Wamel, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    The virion-associated genome of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 consists of a noncovalently linked dimer of two identical, unspliced RNA molecules. A hairpin structure within the untranslated leader transcript is postulated to play a role in RNA dimerization through base pairing of the

  20. Gag sequence variation in a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission cluster influences viral replication fitness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gijsbers, Esther F.; van Nuenen, Ad C.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A.

    2013-01-01

    Three men from a proven homosexual human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transmission cluster showed large variation in their clinical course of infection. To evaluate the effect of evolution of the same viral variant in these three patients, we analysed sequence variation in the capsid

  1. DNA binding properties of the integrase proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.C. van Gent (Dik); Y. Elgersma (Ype); M.W. Bolk; C. Vink (Cornelis); R.H. Plassterk

    1991-01-01

    textabstractIntegration of retroviral DNA into the host chromosome requires the integrase protein (IN). We overexpressed the IN proteins of human immunodeficiency viruses types 1 and 2 (HIV-1 and HIV-2) in E. coli and purified them. Both proteins were found to specifically cut two

  2. Seroprevalence of IgG Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type-1 in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) can cause chronic ulcerative infection in immunosuppressed children leading to latency with subsequent reactivate in the conjunctiva resulting in scarring, thickening of the cornea and blindness. They are also common cause of fatal sporadic encephalitis in 70% of ...

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 (HIV-1) and the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Igor; Heaton, Robert K.

    1990-01-01

    Provides update on what is currently known about neurobehavioral correlates of infection with human immunodeficiency virus-Type 1 (HIV-1), causative agent of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Discusses methodological and theoretical issues complicating interpretation of existing data and suggests strategies for future research in this area. (NB)

  4. 75 FR 59611 - Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Microbiology Devices; Reclassification of Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays; Confirmation of Effective Date AGENCY: Food and...

  5. Salicylate prevents virus-induced type 1 diabetes in the BBDR rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaoxing Yang

    Full Text Available Epidemiologic and clinical evidence suggests that virus infection plays an important role in human type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. We used the virus-inducible BioBreeding Diabetes Resistant (BBDR rat to investigate the ability of sodium salicylate, a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID, to modulate development of type 1 diabetes. BBDR rats treated with Kilham rat virus (KRV and polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (pIC, a TLR3 agonist develop diabetes at nearly 100% incidence by ~2 weeks. We found distinct temporal profiles of the proinflammatory serum cytokines, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ, IL-12, and haptoglobin (an acute phase protein in KRV+pIC treated rats. Significant elevations of IL-1β and IL-12, coupled with sustained elevations of haptoglobin, were specific to KRV+pIC and not found in rats co-treated with pIC and H1, a non-diabetogenic virus. Salicylate administered concurrently with KRV+pIC inhibited the elevations in IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ and haptoglobin almost completely, and reduced IL-12 levels significantly. Salicylate prevented diabetes in a dose-dependent manner, and diabetes-free animals had no evidence of insulitis. Our data support an important role for innate immunity in virus-induced type 1 diabetes pathogenesis. The ability of salicylate to prevent diabetes in this robust animal model demonstrates its potential use to prevent or attenuate human autoimmune diabetes.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in Guangdong province of southern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the outbreak of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 in Guangdong has been documented for more than a decade, the molecular characteristics of such a regional HIV-1 epidemic remained unknown. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By sequencing of HIV-1 pol/env genes and phylogenetic analysis, we performed a molecular epidemiologic study in a representative subset (n  = 200 of the 508 HIV-1-seropositive individuals followed up at the center for HIV/AIDS care and treatment of Guangzhou Hospital of Infectious Diseases. Of 157 samples (54.1% heterosexual acquired adults, 20.4% needle-sharing drug users, 5.7% receivers of blood transfusion, 1.3% men who have sex with men, and 18.5% remained unknown with successful sequencing for both pol and env genes, 105 (66.9% HIV-1 subtype CRF01_AE and 24 (15.3% CRF07_BC, 9 (5.7% B', 5 (3.2% CRF08_BC, 5 (3.2% B, 1 (0.6% C, 3 (1.9% CRF02_AG, and 5 (3.2% inter-region recombinants were identified within pol/env sequences. Thirteen (8.3% samples (3 naïves, 6 and 5 received with antiretroviral treatment [ART] 1-21 weeks and ≥24 weeks respectively showed mutations conferring resistance to nucleoside/nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors or protease inhibitors. Among 63 ART-naïve patients, 3 (4.8% showed single or multiple drug resistant mutations. Phylogenetic analysis showed 8 small clusters (2-3 sequences/cluster with only 17 (10.8% sequences involved. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study confirms that sexual transmission with dominant CRF01_AE strain is a major risk for current HIV-1 outbreak in the Guangdong's general population. The transmission with drug-resistant variants is starting to emerge in this region.

  7. Antiviral Activity of Crude Hydroethanolic Extract from Schinus terebinthifolia against Herpes simplex Virus Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocchi, Samara Requena; Companhoni, Mychelle Vianna Pereira; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Dias Filho, Benedito Prado; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Carollo, Carlos Alexandre; Silva, Denise Brentan; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia

    2017-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus infections persist throughout the lifetime of the host and affect more than 80 % of the humans worldwide. The intensive use of available therapeutic drugs has led to undesirable effects, such as drug-resistant strains, prompting the search for new antiherpetic agents. Although diverse bioactivities have been identified in Schinus terebinthifolia, its antiviral activity has not attracted much attention. The present study evaluated the antiherpetic effects of a crude hydroethanolic extract from the stem bark of S. terebinthifolia against Herpes simplex virus type 1 in vitro and in vivo as well as its genotoxicity in bone marrow in mammals and established the chemical composition of the crude hydroethanolic extract based on liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry and MS/MS. The crude hydroethanolic extract inhibited all of the tested Herpes simplex virus type 1 strains in vitro and was effective in the attachment and penetration stages, and showed virucidal activity, which was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy. The micronucleus test showed that the crude hydroethanolic extract had no genotoxic effect at the concentrations tested. The crude hydroethanolic extract afforded protection against lesions that were caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1 in vivo. Liquid chromatography-diode array detector-mass spectrometry and MS/MS identified 25 substances, which are condensed tannins mainly produced by a B-type linkage and prodelphinidin and procyanidin units. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  8. Social Stress and the Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, David A.; Sheridan, John F.; Dorne, Julianne; Berntson, Gary G.; Candelora, Jessica; Glaser, Ronald

    1998-06-01

    Psychological stress is thought to contribute to reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus (HSV). Although several animal models have been developed in an effort to reproduce different pathogenic aspects of HSV keratitis or labialis, until now, no good animal model existed in which application of a psychological laboratory stressor results in reliable reactivation of the virus. Reported herein, disruption of the social hierarchy within colonies of mice increased aggression among cohorts, activated the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and caused reactivation of latent HSV type 1 in greater than 40% of latently infected animals. However, activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis using restraint stress did not activate the latent virus. Thus, the use of social stress in mice provides a good model in which to investigate the neuroendocrine mechanisms that underlie behaviorally mediated reactivation of latent herpes-viruses.

  9. Lambda Interferon Inhibits Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection of Macrophages ▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hou, Wei; Wang,Xu; Ye, Li; Zhou, Lin; Yang, Zhan-Qiu; Riedel, Eric; Ho, Wen-Zhe

    2009-01-01

    The newly identified type III interferon (IFN-λ) has antiviral activity against a broad spectrum of viruses. We thus examined whether IFN-λ has the ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of blood monocyte-derived macrophages that expressed IFN-λ receptors. Both IFN-λ1 and IFN-λ2, when added to macrophage cultures, inhibited HIV-1 infection and replication. This IFN-λ-mediated anti-HIV-1 activity is broad, as IFN-λ could inhibit infection by both laboratory-ad...

  10. Does porphyrin suppres the apoptotic and necrotic effects of bovine herpes virus type-1(BoHV-1) and herpes simplex virus type-1(HSV-1)?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavuz, Beyza; Yazici, Zafer

    2016-09-01

    In this study, antiviral effect of porphyrin was investigated. Cooper strain of Bovine Herpes Virus type 1(BoHV-1) and Kos strain of Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) were used to determine the potential of porphyrins to inhibit infection in vitro (with morphological and cytopathological criteria). Apoptotic and necrotic changes were determined by using DAPI and propidium staining. The non-cytotoxic dose of porphyrin (NCD-p) was initially calculated as 312.50µg/mL on MDBK and Vero cells. The apoptotic cell (APC) count was found 10% with BoHV-1 while it was 5.3% with BoHV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells between 6th to 24th hours post infection (hpi). Necrotic cell (NEC) count was 51% with BoHV-1 and 37.8% BoHV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells at 24th hpi. On the other hand, the APC count was found 23% with HSV-1, while 22% with the HSV-1 treated with porphyrin on Vero cells between 6th to 24th hpi. NEC count was 49% with HSV-1 and 34% HSV-1 treated with porphyrin on MDBK cells at 24th hpi. The results show that BoHV-1 was inhibited by porphyrin resulting in decreased apoptotic and necrotic changes in MDBK cells. On the contrary, porphyrine was not effective in the inhibition of HSV-1 in terms of apoptosis but it caused necrotic changes in Vero cells.

  11. A Strategy for O-Glycoproteomics of Enveloped Viruses-the O-Glycoproteome of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagdonaite, Ieva; Nordén, Rickard; Joshi, Hiren J

    2015-01-01

    present a novel proteome-wide discovery strategy for O-glycosylation sites on viral envelope proteins using herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) as a model. We identified 74 O-linked glycosylation sites on 8 out of the 12 HSV-1 envelope proteins. Two of the identified glycosites found in glycoprotein B...

  12. Diagnostic Detection of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Antibodies in Urine: a Brazilian Study

    OpenAIRE

    Oelemann, Walter M. R.; Lowndes, Catherine M; Veríssimo Da Costa, Giovani C.; Morgado, Mariza G; Castello-Branco,Luiz Roberto R; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Alary, Michel; Bastos, Francisco I

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated, for the first time in Latin America, the performance of a commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) (Calypte Biomedical Corporation, Berkeley, Calif.) that detects human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-specific antibodies in urine in comparison to standard serological assays (two commercial EIAs and a commercial Western blot [WB] assay). Paired serum and urine specimens were collected from two different groups of Brazilian patients: 225 drug users with unknown HIV status who att...

  13. Primary infection by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus: diagnosis and prognosis.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanhems, P.; Beaulieu, R.

    1997-01-01

    Primary infection by type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is symptomatic in about 70% of cases. The acute illness is a mononucleosis-like syndrome with characteristics such as mucosal ulcerations. The duration and severity of the symptoms appear to be related to the prognosis. After reviewing the most frequent signs and symptoms of primary HIV infection, we report different prognostic studies which examined the association between the acute illness and the progression of HIV disease.

  14. Visualization of herpes simplex virus type 1 virions using fluorescent colors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Lyns; Joshi, Poorval; Dingle, Laura; Huang, Eugene; Grzesik, Peter; Desai, Prashant J

    2017-03-01

    Our laboratory was one of the first to engineer a live fluorescent tag, enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP), that marked the capsid of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and subsequently maturing virus as the particle made its way to the cell surface. In the present study we sought to increase the repertoire of colors available as fusion to the small capsid protein, VP26, so that they can be used alone or in conjunction with other fluorescent tags (fused to other HSV proteins) to follow the virus as it enters and replicates within the cell. We have now generated viruses expressing VP26 fusions with Cerulean, Venus, mOrange, tdTomato, mCherry, and Dronpa3 fluorescent proteins. These fusions were made in a repaired UL35 gene (VP26) background. These fusions do not affect the replication properties of the virus expressing the fusion polypeptide and the fusion tag was stably associated with intranuclear capsids and mature virions. Of note we could not isolate viruses expressing fusions with fluorescent proteins that have a tendency to dimerize. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhanced replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 in human cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, C.S.; Smith, K.O. (Univ. of Kentucky College of Dentistry, Lexington (USA))

    1991-02-01

    The effects of DNA-damaging agents on the replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were assessed in vitro. Monolayers of human lung fibroblast cell lines were exposed to DNA-damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), methyl methanethiosulfonate (MMTS), ultraviolet light (UV), or gamma radiation (GR)) at specific intervals, before or after inoculation with low levels of HSV-1. The ability of cell monolayers to support HSV-1 replication was measured by direct plaque assay and was compared with that of untreated control samples. In this system, monolayers of different cell lines infected with identical HSV-1 strains demonstrated dissimilar levels of recovery of the infectious virus. Exposure of DNA-repair-competent cell cultures to DNA-damaging agents produced time-dependent enhanced virus replication. Treatment with agent before virus inoculation significantly (p less than 0.025) increased the number of plaques by 10 to 68%, compared with untreated control cultures, while treatment with agent after virus adsorption significantly increased (p less than 0.025) the number of plaques by 7 to 15%. In a parallel series of experiments, cells deficient in DNA repair (xeroderma pigmentosum) failed to support enhanced virus replication. These results suggest that after exposure to DNA-damaging agents, fibroblasts competent in DNA repair amplify the replication of HSV-1, and that DNA-repair mechanisms that act on a variety of chromosomal lesions may be involved in the repair and biological activation of HSV-1 genomes.

  16. Genetic studies of cell fusion induced by herpes simplex virus type 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, G.S.; Person, S.; Keller, P.M.

    1980-07-01

    Eight cell fusion-causing syn mutants were isolated from the KOS strain of herpes simplex virus type 1. Unlike the wild-type virus, the mutants produced plaques containing multinucleated cells, or syncytia. Fusion kinetics curves were established with a Coulter Counter assay for the mutants and wild-type virus in single infections of human embryonic lung (HEL) cells, for the mutants and wild-type virus in mixed infections (dominance test), and for pairs of mutants in mixed infection and proceeded with an exponential decrease in the number of small single cells. At some later time that was characteristic of the mutant, there was a significant reduction in the rate of fusion for all but possibly one of the mutants. Although the wild-type virus did not produce syncytial plaques, it did induce a small amount of fusion that stopped abruptly about 2 h after it started. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that both mutants and wild type induce an active fusion inducer and that the activity of this inducer is subsequently inhibited. The extent of fusion is apparently determined by the length of the interval during which the fusion inducer is active. That fusion is actively inhibited in wild-type infections is indicated by the observation that syn mutant-infected cells fused more readily with uninfected cells than with wild type-infected cells.

  17. A Cell Culture Model of Latent and Lytic Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Spiral Ganglion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuehong; Li, Shufeng

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of latent herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) is supposed to be one of the causes of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss. This study aims to establish a cell culture model of latent and lytic HSV-1 infection in spiral ganglia. In the presence of acyclovir, primary cultures of SGNs were latently infected with HSV-1 expressing green fluorescent protein. Four days later, these cells were treated with trichostatin A (TSA), a known chemical reactivator of HSV-1. TCID50 was used to measure the titers of virus in cultures on Vero cells. RNA from cultures was detected for the presence of transcripts of ICP27 and latency-associated transcript (LAT) using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. There is no detectable infectious HSV-1 in latently infected cultures, whereas they could be observed in both lytically infected and latently infected/TSA-treated cultures. LAT was the only detectable transcript during latent infection, whereas lytic ICP27 transcript was detected in lytically infected and latently infected/TSA-treated cultures. Cultured SGNs can be both latently and lytically infected with HSV-1. Furthermore, latently infected SGNs can be reactivated using TSA, yielding infectious virus.

  18. The morphogenesis of herpes simplex virus type 1 in infected parental mouse L fibroblasts and mutant gro29 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Helle Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2003-01-01

    Mutants of cell lines and viruses are important biological tools. The pathway of herpesvirus particle maturation and egress are contentious issues. The mutant gro29 line of mouse L cells is defective for egress of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) virions, and a candidate for studies of virus...

  19. C-terminal Domain Modulates the Nucleic Acid Chaperone Activity of Human T-cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Nucleocapsid Protein via an Electrostatic Mechanism*

    OpenAIRE

    Qualley, Dominic F.; Stewart-Maynard, Kristen M.; Wang, Fei; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J.; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C.; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate nucleic acid (NA) remodeling events critical in viral replication processes such as reverse transcription. Surprisingly, the NC protein from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an extremely poor NA chaperone. Using bulk and single molecule methods, we find that removal of the anionic C-terminal domain (CTD) of HTLV-1 NC results in a protein with chaperone properties comparable with that of other retrovir...

  20. Nef protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: evidence against its role as a transcriptional inhibitor.

    OpenAIRE

    Hammes, S. R.; Dixon, E P; Malim, M H; Cullen, B R; Greene, W C

    1989-01-01

    The type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) encodes a 27-kDa protein termed Nef (negative factor). Nef has been reported to down-regulate viral gene transcription directed by the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. To assess the possible role of Nef in the initiation or maintenance of viral latency, we prepared two different nef expression vectors (pNEF from the HXB-3 proviral clone; pNEF-2/3 from HXB-2 and HXB-3) and a control vector containing a frameshift mutation in the HXB-3 nef coding seque...

  1. Alpha interferon inhibits early stages of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication cycle.

    OpenAIRE

    Shirazi, Y; Pitha, P M

    1992-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed the effect of human alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) on a single replication cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the lymphocytic cell line CEM-174, which is highly sensitive to the antiviral effects of IFN. Pretreatment of cells with 50 to 500 U of recombinant human IFN-alpha per ml resulted in a marked reduction in viral RNA and protein synthesis. The effect of IFN-alpha was dose dependent and was amplified in multiple infection cycle...

  2. Human Ubc9 contributes to production of fully infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 virions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaber, Tareq; Bohl, Christopher R; Lewis, Gentry L; Wood, Charles; West, John T; Weldon, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    Ubc9 was identified as a cellular protein that interacts with the Gag protein of Mason-Pfizer monkey virus. We show here that Ubc9 also interacts with the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag protein and that their interaction is important for virus replication. Gag was found to colocalize with Ubc9 predominantly at perinuclear puncta. While cells in which Ubc9 expression was suppressed with RNA interference produced normal numbers of virions, these particles were 8- to 10-fold less infectious than those produced in the presence of Ubc9. The nature of this defect was assayed for dependence on Ubc9 during viral assembly, trafficking, and Env incorporation. The Gag-mediated assembly of virus particles and protease-mediated processing of Gag and Gag-Pol were unchanged in the absence of Ubc9. However, the stability of the cell-associated Env glycoprotein was decreased and Env incorporation into released virions was altered. Interestingly, overexpression of the Ubc9 trans-dominant-negative mutant C93A, which is a defective E2-SUMO-1 conjugase, suggests that this activity may not be required for interaction with Gag, virion assembly, or infectivity. This finding demonstrates that Ubc9 plays an important role in the production of infectious HIV-1 virions.

  3. Induction of uterine cancer with inactivated herpes simplex virus, types 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wentz, W.B.; Reagan, J.W.; Heggie, A.D.; Fu, Y.S.; Anthony, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    A series of studies were performed to evaluate the oncogenic potential of inactivated herpes simplex viruses types 1 (HSV-1) and 2 (HSV-2) in the mouse cervix. HSV-1 or HSV-2 prepared in HEp-2 cell cultures and inactivated by exposure to formalin or ultraviolet light was applied to the mouse cervix for periods ranging from 20 to 90 weeks. Control mice were exposed for the same period to control fluids. Vaginal cytologic preparations from all animals were examined weekly to detect epithelial abnormalities. Animals were sacrificed and histopathological studies were carried out when cellular changes seen on vaginal smears resembled those indicative of premalignant or malignant changes as previously established in a similar model system using coal tar hydrocarbons. Other animals were exposed for periods up to 90 weeks, or until there was cellular evidence of invasive cancer. Cytologic and histologic materials were coded and evaluated without knowledge of whether they were from virus-exposed or control animals. Premalignant and malignant cervical lesions similar to those that occur in women were encountered in 78 to 90% of the virus-exposed animals. All controls were normal. Invasive cancer was detected in 24 to 60% of the animals and dysplasia was found in 18 to 66%. The yield of invasive cancer was twice as great after exposure to ultraviolet-inactivated HSV-2 as compared with formalin-inactivated virus. Various histologic grades of carcinoma of the cervix and endometrium were found. No primary lesions were found in the vagina or ovaries.

  4. Recombination in vitro between herpes simplex virus type 1 a sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, R C; Dutch, R E; Zemelman, B V; Mocarski, E S; Lehman, I R

    1992-01-01

    We have partially purified an activity from extracts of cells infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 that mediates recombination between repeated copies of the 317-base-pair a sequence of herpes simplex virus type 1. Recombination leads to deletion of a lacZ indicator gene situated between two directly repeated copies of the a sequence and is scored by transformation of lacZ- Escherichia coli. The two products of the reaction can be observed directly by restriction enzyme digestion and Southern blot analysis. The recombinase activity is also detectable, but at a lower level, in uninfected cell extracts. The DNA substrate must contain the two a sequences arranged in direct orientation to generate the lacZ deletion. However, when the a sequences are arranged in inverted orientation, an inversion results. A substrate with two homologous sequences of size and G + C content similar to the a sequence undergoes recombination at a much lower frequency. The reaction requires a divalent cation (Mg2+ or Mn2+) but not ATP or any other nucleoside triphosphate. The simple requirements and specificity for the a sequence suggest that the recombination may proceed by a site-specific mechanism. Images PMID:1332062

  5. Inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 entry by chloride channel inhibitors tamoxifen and NPPB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Kai [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Chen, Maoyun [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Xiang, Yangfei; Ma, Kaiqi [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Jin, Fujun [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); College of pharmacy, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Xiao [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Xiaoyan; Wang, Shaoxiang [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China); Wang, Yifei, E-mail: twang-yf@163.com [Guangzhou Jinan Biomedicine Research and Development Center, National Engineering Research Center of Genetic Medicine, Jinan University, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We analyze the anti-HSV potential of chloride channel inhibitors. • Tamoxifen and NPPB show anti-HSV-1 and anti-ACV-resistant HSV-1 activities. • HSV-1 infection induces intracellular chloride concentration increasing. • Tamoxifen and NPPB inhibit HSV-1 early infection. • Tamoxifen and NPPB prevent the fusion process of HSV-1. - Abstract: Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection is very common worldwide and can cause significant health problems from periodic skin and corneal lesions to encephalitis. Appearance of drug-resistant viruses in clinical therapy has made exploring novel antiviral agents emergent. Here we show that chloride channel inhibitors, including tamoxifen and 5-nitro-2-(3-phenyl-propylamino) benzoic acid (NPPB), exhibited extensive antiviral activities toward HSV-1 and ACV-resistant HSV viruses. HSV-1 infection induced chloride ion influx while treatment with inhibitors reduced the increase of intracellular chloride ion concentration. Pretreatment or treatment of inhibitors at different time points during HSV-1 infection all suppressed viral RNA synthesis, protein expression and virus production. More detailed studies demonstrated that tamoxifen and NPPB acted as potent inhibitors of HSV-1 early entry step by preventing viral binding, penetration and nuclear translocation. Specifically the compounds appeared to affect viral fusion process by inhibiting virus binding to lipid rafts and interrupting calcium homeostasis. Taken together, the observation that tamoxifen and NPPB can block viral entry suggests a stronger potential for these compounds as well as other ion channel inhibitors in antiviral therapy against HSV-1, especially the compound tamoxifen is an immediately actionable drug that can be reused for treatment of HSV-1 infections.

  6. Prevalence of GB virus type C in urban Americans infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chkrebtii Natalia

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract GBV-C virus infection has been linked to improved clinical outcome in HIV-1 co-infected individuals. The epidemiology of GBV-C has, thus far, been limited to the gay male, HIV+ population. Here we describe the prevalence of antibodies against GBV-C envelope glycoprotein E2 and GBV-C viremia in an HIV+ inner city population. This study group is predominantly African-American; 41% of the participants are women. The major risk factor for HIV infection is intravenous drug use. Overall, 56% of the study population had evidence of current or past infection with GBV-C. GBV-C exposure was not associated with hepatitis C virus infection. The group of participants, who had GBV-C viremia and anti-E2 antibodies, had high percentage of patients with an undetectable HIV-1 viral load. These data provide increased insight into the prevalence of GBV-C co-infection in the HIV epidemic in this understudied population.

  7. Reversible steatohepatosis in a young boy with brittle type 1 diabetes mellitus: mauriac syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrivastava, Makardhwaj Sarvadaman; Palkar, Atul Vijay; Padwal, Namita J; Moulick, Nivedita

    2011-07-20

    A 14-year-old male, diagnosed case of type 1 diabetes mellitus since 1 year, presented with uncontrolled blood glucose levels, non-compliance with insulin therapy and recurrent admissions with diabetic ketoacidosis. His blood glucose levels were difficult to control with wide fluctuations in insulin requirement. He had absent secondary sexual characteristics and hepatomegaly. Liver biopsy showed macrovesicularsteatosis without fibrosis or inflammation. Many glycogenated nuclei were present. He was started on intensive insulin therapy, whereby he showed subsequent regression of hepatomegaly and onset of pubertal spurt.

  8. Identification of cellular proteins required for replication of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziuba, Natallia; Ferguson, Monique R; O'Brien, William A; Sanchez, Anthony; Prussia, Andrew J; McDonald, Natalie J; Friedrich, Brian M; Li, Guangyu; Shaw, Michael W; Sheng, Jinsong; Hodge, Thomas W; Rubin, Donald H; Murray, James L

    2012-10-01

    Cellular proteins are essential for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and may serve as viable new targets for treating infection. Using gene trap insertional mutagenesis, a high-throughput approach based on random inactivation of cellular genes, candidate genes were found that limit virus replication when mutated. Disrupted genes (N=87) conferring resistance to lytic infection with several viruses were queried for an affect on HIV-1 replication by utilizing small interfering RNA (siRNA) screens in TZM-bl cells. Several genes regulating diverse pathways were found to be required for HIV-1 replication, including DHX8, DNAJA1, GTF2E1, GTF2E2, HAP1, KALRN, UBA3, UBE2E3, and VMP1. Candidate genes were independently tested in primary human macrophages, toxicity assays, and/or Tat-dependent β-galactosidase reporter assays. Bioinformatics analyses indicated that several host factors present in this study participate in canonical pathways and functional processes implicated in prior genome-wide studies. However, the genes presented in this study did not share identity with those found previously. Novel antiviral targets identified in this study should open new avenues for mechanistic investigation.

  9. Quantitation of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) RNA in Cell-Free Cervicovaginal Secretions: Comparison of Reverse Transcription-PCR Amplification (AMPLICOR HIV-1 MONITOR 1.5) with Enhanced-Sensitivity Branched-DNA Assay (Quantiplex 3.0)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Si-Mohamed, Ali; Andreoletti, Laurent; Colombet, Isabelle; Carreno, Marie-Paule; Lopez, Gladys; Chatelier, Gilles; Kazatchkine, Michel D.; Belec, Laurent

    2001-01-01

    Two commercially available hypersensitive assays for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RNA quantitation, AMPLICOR HIV-1 Monitor Test 1.5 and Quantiplex HIV RNA 3.0, were compared to detect and quantify HIV-1 RNA in the cell-free fraction of cervicovaginal secretions collected by vaginal washing. Three panel specimens were used: pooled cervicovaginal secretions spiked with HIV-1 subtype A or HIV-1 subtype B and cervicovaginal lavages from HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. Compared to the AMPLICOR HIV-1 Monitor Test 1.5 assay, the Quantiplex HIV-1 3.0 assay yielded higher estimates of HIV-1 RNA concentrations in several tested samples spiked with HIV-1 RNA subtype A, as well as subtype B, particularly samples containing low amounts of HIV-1 RNA. The sensitivity and specificity of the AMPLICOR HIV-1 Monitor Test 1.5 assay were 93 and 100%, respectively; the sensitivity and specificity of the Quantiplex HIV RNA 3.0 assay were 97 and 50%, respectively. In conclusion, in quantifying HIV-1 RNA in cervicovaginal secretions, the Quantiplex HIV RNA 3.0 may lack specificity, and the AMPLICOR HIV-1 Monitor Test 1.5 assay, although highly specific, may lack sensitivity. PMID:11376034

  10. Dendritic cells preferentially transfer CXCR4-using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants to CD4(+) T lymphocytes in trans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Montfort, Thijs; Thomas, Adri A. M.; Pollakis, Georgios; Paxton, William A.

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) preferentially utilizes the CCR5 coreceptor for target cell entry in the acute phase of infection, while later in disease progression the virus switches to the CXCR4 coreceptor in approximately 50% of patients. In response to IHV-I the adaptive immune

  11. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and respiratory disease in critically-ill patients: Real pathogen or innocent bystander?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simoons-Smit, A. M.; Kraan, E. M.; Beishuizen, A.; Strack van Schijndel, R. J.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) has been associated with pulmonary disease, mostly in severely immunocompromised patients. After reactivation and shedding in the oropharynx, the virus may reach the lower respiratory tract by aspiration or by contiguous spread. HSV-1 can be detected in clinical

  12. 75 FR 22814 - Guidance for Industry: Nucleic Acid Testing (NAT) for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-30

    ... Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) and Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) NAT, on testing... test results, HIV-1 p24 antigen test results, and anti-HCV test results that were provided in the FDA... (Anti-HCV),'' August 5, 1993; ``Recommendations for Donor Screening with a Licensed Test for HIV-1...

  13. Description of a nonlethal herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D deletion mutant affecting a site frequently used for PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coyle, P V; Jain, S; Wyatt, D; McCaughey, C; O'Neill, H J

    2000-03-01

    We report a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant which failed to amplify with a commonly used glycoprotein D primer set. The virus contained a nine-base deletion in the gene's 5' nontranslated region. The altered amplicon was clearly distinguishable on a 4% high-resolution agarose gel.

  14. Description of a Nonlethal Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Glycoprotein D Deletion Mutant Affecting a Site Frequently Used for PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Coyle, P V; Jain, S; Wyatt, D; McCaughey, C.; O'Neill, H J

    2000-01-01

    We report a herpes simplex virus type 1 mutant which failed to amplify with a commonly used glycoprotein D primer set. The virus contained a nine-base deletion in the gene's 5′ nontranslated region. The altered amplicon was clearly distinguishable on a 4% high-resolution agarose gel.

  15. A reliable phenotype predictor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C based on envelope V3 sequences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, Mark A.; Coetzer, Mia; van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Morris, Lynn; Mullins, James I.

    2006-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) subtype B infections, the emergence of viruses able to use CXCR4 as a coreceptor is well documented and associated with accelerated CD4 decline and disease progression. However, in HIV-1 subtype C infections, responsible for more than 50% of global

  16. Herpes neolabialis: herpes simplex virus type 1 infection of the neolabia in a transgender woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfering, Lian; van der Sluis, Wouter B; Mermans, Joline F; Buncamper, Marlon E

    2017-07-01

    A 24-year-old transgender woman consulted our outpatient clinic with a painful, itchy and red left labia. She underwent a penile inversion vaginoplasty 18 months before presentation. At physical examination of the left labia, erythema, edema and herpetic vesicles with ulceration were observed. A vesicle fluid swab was obtained and the presence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) was detected by PCR assay. Treatment consisted of oral valaciclovir (500 mg twice daily) for a total of five days.Topically-applied lidocaine cream (3%) was used for pain management. Treatment gave symptom relief in five days. At physical examination 14 days after symptom onset, there were no signs of active infection. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of HSV-1 infection of the neolabia in a transgender woman.

  17. Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Infection and Adult T-Cell Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chi-Ping; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the first retrovirus discovered to cause adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), a highly aggressive blood cancer. HTLV-1 research in the past 35 years has been most revealing in the mechanisms of viral oncogenesis. HTLV-1 establishes a lifelong persistent infection in CD4(+) T lymphocytes. The infection outcome is governed by host immunity. ATL develops in 2-5% of infected individuals 30-50 years after initial exposure. HTLV-1 encodes two oncoproteins Tax and HBZ, which are required for initiation of cellular transformation and maintenance of cell proliferation, respectively. HTLV-1 oncogenesis is driven by a clonal selection and expansion process during which both host and viral factors cooperate to impair genome stability, immune surveillance, and other mechanisms of tumor suppression. A better understanding of HTLV-1 biology and leukemogenesis will reveal new strategies and modalities for ATL prevention and treatment.

  18. Alternative nucleophilic substrates for the endonuclease activities of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ealy, Julie B. [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Penn State Lehigh Valley, 2809 E. Saucon Valley Road, Center Valley, PA 18034 (United States); Sudol, Malgorzata [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Krzeminski, Jacek; Amin, Shantu [Department of Pharmacology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Katzman, Michael, E-mail: mkatzman@psu.edu [Department of Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, PO Box 850, Mail Services H036, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Penn State College of Medicine, Milton S. Hershey Medical Center, 500 University Drive, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    Retroviral integrase can use water or some small alcohols as the attacking nucleophile to nick DNA. To characterize the range of compounds that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 integrase can accommodate for its endonuclease activities, we tested 45 potential electron donors (having varied size and number or spacing of nucleophilic groups) as substrates during site-specific nicking at viral DNA ends and during nonspecific nicking reactions. We found that integrase used 22 of the 45 compounds to nick DNA, but not all active compounds were used for both activities. In particular, 13 compounds were used for site-specific and nonspecific nicking, 5 only for site-specific nicking, and 4 only for nonspecific nicking; 23 other compounds were not used for either activity. Thus, integrase can accommodate a large number of nucleophilic substrates but has selective requirements for its different activities, underscoring its dynamic properties and providing new information for modeling and understanding integrase.

  19. Direct comparisons of inhibitor sensitivities of reverse transcriptases from feline and human immunodeficiency viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    North, T W; Cronn, R C; Remington, K M; Tandberg, R T

    1990-01-01

    The sensitivities of reverse transcriptases (RTs) from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) were directly compared. The two enzymes had similar sensitivities to three analogs of dTTP, namely, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine 5'-triphosphate. Each of these analogs demonstrated competitive inhibition of both enzymes. Ki values for inhibition of FIV RT by the...

  20. Cytoplasmic Utilization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genomic RNA Is Not Dependent on a Nuclear Interaction with Gag

    OpenAIRE

    Grewe, Bastian; Hoffmann, Bianca; Ohs, Inga; Blissenbach, Maik; Brandt, Sabine; Tippler, Bettina; Grunwald, Thomas; Überla, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    In some retroviruses, such as Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus, Gag proteins are known to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and are implicated in nuclear export of the viral genomic unspliced RNA (gRNA) for subsequent encapsidation. A similar function has been proposed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag based on the identification of nuclear localization and export signals. However, the ability of HIV-1 Gag to transit through the nucleus has never been...

  1. In vitro replication kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants in relation to virus load in long-term survivors of HIV-1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blaak, H.; Brouwer, M.; Ran, L. J.; de Wolf, F.; Schuitemaker, H.

    1998-01-01

    In 7 long-term survivors (LTS) and 8 progressors, all carrying solely non-syncytium-inducing variants, a possible correlation between in vitro virus replicative capacity, virus load, and clinical course of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection was analyzed. Late in infection, 3 LTS

  2. Attenuated Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 Expressing Ebola Virus Glycoprotein GP Administered Intranasally Is Immunogenic in African Green Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingemann, Matthias; Liu, Xueqiao; Surman, Sonja; Liang, Bo; Herbert, Richard; Hackenberg, Ashley D; Buchholz, Ursula J; Collins, Peter L; Munir, Shirin

    2017-05-15

    The recent 2014-2016 Ebola virus (EBOV) outbreak prompted increased efforts to develop vaccines against EBOV disease. We describe the development and preclinical evaluation of an attenuated recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 1 (rHPIV1) expressing the membrane-anchored form of EBOV glycoprotein GP, as an intranasal (i.n.) EBOV vaccine. GP was codon optimized and expressed either as a full-length protein or as an engineered chimeric form in which its transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail (TMCT) domains were replaced with those of the HPIV1 F protein in an effort to enhance packaging into the vector particle and immunogenicity. GP was inserted either preceding the N gene (pre-N) or between the N and P genes (N-P) of rHPIV1 bearing a stabilized attenuating mutation in the P/C gene (CΔ170). The constructs grew to high titers and efficiently and stably expressed GP. Viruses were attenuated, replicating at low titers over several days, in the respiratory tract of African green monkeys (AGMs). Two doses of candidates expressing GP from the pre-N position elicited higher GP neutralizing serum antibody titers than the N-P viruses, and unmodified GP induced higher levels than its TMCT counterpart. Unmodified EBOV GP was packaged into the HPIV1 particle, and the TMCT modification did not increase packaging or immunogenicity but rather reduced the stability of GP expression during in vivo replication. In conclusion, we identified an attenuated and immunogenic i.n. vaccine candidate expressing GP from the pre-N position. It is expected to be well tolerated in humans and is available for clinical evaluation.IMPORTANCE EBOV hemorrhagic fever is one of the most lethal viral infections and lacks a licensed vaccine. Contact of fluids from infected individuals, including droplets or aerosols, with mucosal surfaces is an important route of EBOV spread during a natural outbreak, and aerosols also might be exploited for intentional virus spread. Therefore, vaccines that protect

  3. Retargeting Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus to Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Dillon; Ramos, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive cancer of CD4/CD25+ T lymphocytes, the etiological agent of which is human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL is highly refractory to current therapies, making the development of new treatments a high priority. Oncolytic viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are being considered as anticancer agents since they readily infect transformed cells compared to normal cells, the former appearing to exhibit defective innate immune responses. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of a recombinant VSV that has been retargeted to specifically infect and replicate in transformed CD4+ cells. This was achieved by replacing the single VSV glycoprotein (G) with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 to create a hybrid fusion protein, gp160G. The resultant virus, VSV-gp160G, was found to only target cells expressing CD4 and retained robust oncolytic activity against HTLV-1 actuated ATL cells. VSV-gp160G was further noted to be highly attenuated and did not replicate efficiently in or induce significant cell death of primary CD4+ T cells. Accordingly, VSV-gp160G did not elicit any evidence of neurotoxicity even in severely immunocompromised animals such as NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ-c-null (NSG) mice. Importantly, VSV-gp160G effectively exerted potent oncolytic activity in patient-derived ATL transplanted into NSG mice and facilitated a significant survival benefit. Our data indicate that VSV-gp160G exerts potent oncolytic efficacy against CD4+ malignant cells and either alone or in conjunction with established therapies may provide an effective treatment in patients displaying ATL. IMPORTANCE Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a serious form of cancer with a high mortality rate. HTLV-1 infection is the etiological agent of ATL and, unfortunately, most patients succumb to the disease within a few years. Current treatment options have failed to significantly improve survival rate. In

  4. Retargeting Oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus to Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Adult T-Cell Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancourt, Dillon; Ramos, Juan Carlos; Barber, Glen N

    2015-12-01

    Adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) is an aggressive cancer of CD4/CD25(+) T lymphocytes, the etiological agent of which is human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1). ATL is highly refractory to current therapies, making the development of new treatments a high priority. Oncolytic viruses such as vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) are being considered as anticancer agents since they readily infect transformed cells compared to normal cells, the former appearing to exhibit defective innate immune responses. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy and safety of a recombinant VSV that has been retargeted to specifically infect and replicate in transformed CD4(+) cells. This was achieved by replacing the single VSV glycoprotein (G) with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 to create a hybrid fusion protein, gp160G. The resultant virus, VSV-gp160G, was found to only target cells expressing CD4 and retained robust oncolytic activity against HTLV-1 actuated ATL cells. VSV-gp160G was further noted to be highly attenuated and did not replicate efficiently in or induce significant cell death of primary CD4(+) T cells. Accordingly, VSV-gp160G did not elicit any evidence of neurotoxicity even in severely immunocompromised animals such as NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγ-c-null (NSG) mice. Importantly, VSV-gp160G effectively exerted potent oncolytic activity in patient-derived ATL transplanted into NSG mice and facilitated a significant survival benefit. Our data indicate that VSV-gp160G exerts potent oncolytic efficacy against CD4(+) malignant cells and either alone or in conjunction with established therapies may provide an effective treatment in patients displaying ATL. Adult T cell leukemia (ATL) is a serious form of cancer with a high mortality rate. HTLV-1 infection is the etiological agent of ATL and, unfortunately, most patients succumb to the disease within a few years. Current treatment options have failed to significantly improve survival rate. In this study, we

  5. Characterization of the Outer Domain of the gp120 Glycoprotein from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinzhen; Tomov, Vesko; Kurteva, Svetla; Wang, Liping; Ren, Xinping; Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Sodroski, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    The core of the gp120 glycoprotein from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is comprised of three major structural domains: the outer domain, the inner domain, and the bridging sheet. The outer domain is exposed on the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimer and contains binding surfaces for neutralizing antibodies such as 2G12, immunoglobulin G1b12, and anti-V3 antibodies. We expressed the outer domain of HIV-1YU2 gp120 as an independent protein, termed OD1. OD1 efficiently bound 2G12 and a large number of anti-V3 antibodies, indicating its structural integrity. Immunochemical studies with OD1 indicated that antibody responses against the outer domain of the HIV-1 gp120 envelope glycoprotein are rare in HIV-1-infected human sera that potently neutralize the virus. Surprisingly, such outer-domain-directed antibody responses are commonly elicited by immunization with recombinant monomeric gp120. Immunization with soluble, stabilized HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein trimers elicited antibody responses that more closely resembled those in the sera of HIV-1-infected individuals. These results underscore the qualitatively different humoral immune responses elicited during natural infection and after gp120 vaccination and help to explain the failure of gp120 as an effective vaccine. PMID:15542649

  6. Replication cycle of duck hepatitis A virus type 1 in duck embryonic hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Fangke; Chen, Yun; Shi, Jintong; Ming, Ke; Liu, Jiaguo, E-mail: liujiaguo@njau.edu.cn; Xiong, Wen; Song, Meiyun; Du, Hongxu; Wang, Yixuan; Zhang, Shuaibin; Wu, Yi; Wang, Deyun; Hu, Yuanliang

    2016-04-15

    Duck hepatitis A virus type 1 (DHAV-1) is an important agent of duck viral hepatitis. Until recently, the replication cycle of DHAV-1 is still unknown. Here duck embryonic hepatocytes infected with DHAV-1 were collected at different time points, and dynamic changes of the relative DHAV-1 gene expression during replication were detected by real-time PCR. And the morphology of hepatocytes infected with DHAV was evaluated by electron microscope. The result suggested that the adsorption of DHAV-1 saturated at 90 min post-infection, and the virus particles with size of about 50 nm including more than 20 nm of vacuum drying gold were observed on the infected cells surface. What's more, the replication lasted around 13 h after the early protein synthesis for about 5 h, and the release of DHAV-1 was in steady state after 32 h. The replication cycle will enrich the data for DVH control and provide the foundation for future studies. - Highlights: • This is the first description of the replication cycle of DHAV-1. • Firstly find that DHAV-1 adsorption saturated at 90 min post-infection. • The replication lasted around 13 h after early protein synthesis for about 5 h. • The release of DHAV-1 was in steady state after 32 h.

  7. Interaction of humic acids and humic-acid-like polymers with herpes simplex virus type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klöcking, Renate; Helbig, Björn

    The study was performed in order to compare the antiviral activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) of synthetic humic-acid-like polymers to that of their low-molecular-weight basic compounds and naturally occurring humic acids (HA) in vitro. HA from peat water showed a moderate antiviral activity at a minimum effective concentration (MEC) of 20 µg/ml. HA-like polymers, i.e. the oxidation products of caffeic acid (KOP), hydrocaffeic acid (HYKOP), chlorogenic acid (CHOP), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (3,4-DHPOP), nordihydroguaretic acid (NOROP), gentisinic acid (GENOP), pyrogallol (PYROP) and gallic acid (GALOP), generally inhibit virus multiplication, although with different potency and selectivity. Of the substances tested, GENOP, KOP, 3,4-DHPOP and HYKOP with MEC values in the range of 2 to 10 µg/ml, proved to be the most potent HSV-1 inhibitors. Despite its lower antiviral potency (MEC 40 µg/ml), CHOP has a remarkable selectivity due to the high concentration of this polymer that is tolerated by the host cells (>640 µg/ml). As a rule, the antiviral activity of the synthetic compounds was restricted to the polymers and was not preformed in the low-molecular-weight basic compounds. This finding speaks in favour of the formation of antivirally active structures during the oxidative polymerization of phenolic compounds and, indirectly, of corresponding structural parts in different HA-type substances.

  8. Immune response of T cells during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Huan; Wei, Bin

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), a neurotropic member of the alphaherpes virus family, is among the most prevalent and successful human pathogens. HSV-1 can cause serious diseases at every stage of life including fatal disseminated disease in newborns, cold sores, eye disease, and fatal encephalitis in adults. HSV-1 infection can trigger rapid immune responses, and efficient inhibition and clearance of HSV-1 infection rely on both the innate and adaptive immune responses of the host. Multiple strategies have been used to restrict host innate immune responses by HSV-1 to facilitate its infection in host cells. The adaptive immunity of the host plays an important role in inhibiting HSV-1 infections. The activation and regulation of T cells are the important aspects of the adaptive immunity. They play a crucial role in host-mediated immunity and are important for clearing HSV-1. In this review, we examine the findings on T cell immune responses during HSV-1 infection, which hold promise in the design of new vaccine candidates for HSV-1.

  9. Bovine lactoferrin peptidic fragments involved in inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siciliano, R; Rega, B; Marchetti, M; Seganti, L; Antonini, G; Valenti, P

    1999-10-14

    Bovine lactoferrin (BLf) prevents the infection of some enveloped and naked viruses. To identify BLf sequences responsible for the antiviral activity, we tested 31 HPLC fractions, derived from tryptic digestion of BLf, toward herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1). Only a few HPLC purified fragments were active against HSV-1, even if at lower extent than the native undigested BLf. Two large fragments, one corresponding to the C-lobe (amino acid sequence 345-689) and the other corresponding to a large portion of the N-lobe (1-280), were inhibitors of HSV-1 infection, while a smaller part of the N-lobe (86-258) was ineffective. Among the low-molecular-weight fragments, only two small peptides, which coeluted in a single chromatographic peak, were effective towards HSV-1. These peptides, both present in the N-lobe, were identified as peptides 222-230 (ADRDQYELL) and 264-269 (EDLIWK). The same peptides, chemically synthesised, were able to inhibit HSV-1 infection only when they were assayed in association. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  10. A randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study to confirm the reversal of hepatorenal syndrome type 1 with terlipressin: the REVERSE trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boyer TD

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Thomas D Boyer,1 Joseph J Medicis,2 Stephen Chris Pappas,3 Jim Potenziano,2 Khuramm Jamil21Department of Medicine, University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ, USA; 2Research and Development, Ikaria, Hampton, NJ, USA; 3Orphan Therapeutics, Lebanon, NJ, USABackground: Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is a rare disorder of marked renal dysfunction in patients with cirrhosis, ascites, and portal hypertension. Type 1 HRS is a rapidly progressive acute kidney injury that develops shortly after a precipitating event, followed by a deterioration of function of other organs (eg, heart, brain, liver, adrenal glands. Presently, no approved drug therapies exist for HRS type 1 in the USA, Canada, or Australia. Given the rarity of this condition and the existing unmet medical need for treatment, the US Food and Drug Administration granted orphan drug and fast-track designations for terlipressin. The objective of the REVERSE trial was to determine the efficacy and safety of intravenous terlipressin compared with placebo in the treatment of adults with HRS type 1 who were also receiving intravenous albumin.Methods: 180 subjects with HRS type 1 were enrolled at 65 investigational sites located in the USA and ten sites in Canada. Patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to treatment with either intravenous terlipressin administered every 6 hours or placebo for up to 14 days. The primary efficacy measure was confirmed HRS reversal, defined as the percentage of patients with two serum creatinine values of ≤1.5 mg/dL at least 48 hours apart, on treatment, and without intervening renal replacement therapy or liver transplantation. Other efficacy measures included change in renal function as reflected in serum creatinine levels, fractional excretion of sodium, recurrence of HRS type 1, transplant-free, dialysis-free, and overall survival.Discussion: Data from this pivotal study are intended to demonstrate whether terlipressin is effective in reversing HRS type 1

  11. Mutations in the 5′ End of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Polypurine Tract Affect RNase H Cleavage Specificity and Virus Titer

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Mary Jane; Julias, John G.; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Arnold, Edward; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2003-01-01

    The RNase H activity of retroviral reverse transcriptases (RTs) degrades viral genomic RNA after it has been copied into DNA, removes the tRNA used to initiate negative-strand DNA synthesis, and generates and removes the polypurine tract (PPT) primer used to initiate positive-strand DNA synthesis. The cleavages that remove the tRNA and that generate and remove the PPT primer must be specific to generate linear viral DNAs with ends that are appropriate for integration into the host cell genome. The crystal structure of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) RT in a complex with an RNA/DNA duplex derived from the PPT revealed that the 5′ end of the PPT deviates from traditional Watson-Crick base pairing. This unusual structure may play a role in the proper recognition of the PPT by HIV-1 RT. We made substitution mutations in the 5′ end of the PPT and determined their effects on virus titer. The results indicated that single and double mutations in the 5′ end of the PPT had modest effects on virus replication in a single-cycle assay. More complex mutations had stronger effects on virus titer. Analysis of the two-long-terminal-repeat circle junctions derived from infecting cells with the mutant viruses indicated that the mutations affected RNase H activity, resulting in the retention of PPT sequences on viral DNA. The mutants tested preferentially retained specific segments of the PPT, suggesting an effect on cleavage specificity. These results suggest that structural features of the PPT are important for its recognition and cleavage in vivo. PMID:14512562

  12. Similarities between Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 and Hepatitis C Virus Genetic and Phenotypic Protease Quasispecies Diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Miguel Angel; Nevot, Maria; Jordan-Paiz, Ana; Franco, Sandra

    2015-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) are two highly variable RNA viruses that cause chronic infections in humans. Although HCV likely preceded the AIDS epidemic by some decades, the global spread of both viruses is a relatively recent event. Nevertheless, HCV global diversity is higher than that of HIV-1. To identify differences in mutant diversity, we compared the HIV-1 protease and HCV NS3 protease quasispecies. Three protease gene quasispecies samples per virus, isolated from a total of six infected patients, were genetically and phenotypically analyzed at high resolution (HIV-1, 308 individual clones; HCV, 299 clones). Single-nucleotide variant frequency did not differ between quasispecies from the two viruses (HIV-1, 2.4 × 10(-3) ± 0.4 × 10(-3); HCV, 2.1 × 10(-3) ± 0.5 × 10(-3)) (P = 0.1680). The proportion of synonymous substitutions to potential synonymous sites was similar (3.667 ± 0.6667 and 2.183 ± 0.9048, respectively) (P = 0.2573), and Shannon's entropy values did not differ between HIV-1 and HCV (0.84 ± 0.02 and 0.83 ± 0.12, respectively) (P = 0.9408). Of note, 65% (HIV-1) and 67% (HCV) of the analyzed enzymes displayed detectable protease activity, suggesting that both proteases have a similar mutational robustness. In both viruses, there was a rugged protease enzymatic activity landscape characterized by a sharp peak, representing the master sequence, surrounded by a collection of diverse variants present at lower frequencies. These results indicate that nucleotide quasispecies diversification during chronic infection is not responsible for the higher worldwide genetic diversity observed in HCV. HCV global diversity is higher than that of HIV-1. We asked whether HCV genetic diversification during infection is responsible for the higher worldwide genetic diversity observed in HCV. To this end, we analyzed and compared the genotype and enzymatic activities of HIV-1 and HCV protease quasispecies existing in

  13. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 p8 protein increases cellular conduits and virus transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Prooyen, Nancy; Gold, Heather; Andresen, Vibeke; Schwartz, Owen; Jones, Kathryn; Ruscetti, Frank; Lockett, Stephen; Gudla, Prabhakar; Venzon, David; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2010-11-30

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the cause of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma as well as tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1-associated myelopathy. HTLV-1 is transmitted to T cells through the virological synapse and by extracellular viral assemblies. Here, we uncovered an additional mechanism of virus transmission that is regulated by the HTLV-1-encoded p8 protein. We found that the p8 protein, known to anergize T cells, is also able to increase T-cell contact through lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 clustering. In addition, p8 augments the number and length of cellular conduits among T cells and is transferred to neighboring T cells through these conduits. p8, by establishing a T-cell network, enhances the envelope-dependent transmission of HTLV-1. Thus, the ability of p8 to simultaneously anergize and cluster T cells, together with its induction of cellular conduits, secures virus propagation while avoiding the host's immune surveillance. This work identifies p8 as a viral target for the development of therapeutic strategies that may limit the expansion of infected cells in HTLV-1 carriers and decrease HTLV-1-associated morbidity.

  14. Autologous neutralizing humoral immunity and evolution of the viral envelope in the course of subtype B human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnik, Evelien M; Pisas, Linaida; van Nuenen, Ad C; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2008-08-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals develop an HIV-specific neutralizing antibody (NAb) response that selects for escape variants of the virus. Here, we studied autologous NAb responses in five typical CCR5-using progressors in relation to viral NAb escape and molecular changes in the viral envelope (Env) in the period from seroconversion until after AIDS diagnosis. In sera from three patients, high-titer neutralizing activity was observed against the earliest autologous virus variants, followed by declining humoral immune responses against subsequent viral escape variants. Autologous neutralizing activity was undetectable in sera from two patients. Patients with high-titer neutralizing activity in serum showed the strongest positive selection pressure on Env early in infection. In the initial phase of infection, gp160 length and the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) increased in viruses from all patients. Over the course of infection, positive selection pressure declined as the NAb response subsided, coinciding with reversions of changes in gp160 length and the number of PNGS. A number of identical amino acid changes were observed over the course of infection in the viral quasispecies of different patients. Our results indicate that although neutralizing autologous humoral immunity may have a limited effect on the disease course, it is an important selection pressure in virus evolution early in infection, while declining HIV-specific humoral immunity in later stages may coincide with reversion of NAb-driven changes in Env.

  15. Herpes simplex virus type 1 is the leading cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garceau, Richard; Leblanc, Danielle; Thibault, Louise; Girouard, Gabriel; Mallet, Manon

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the role of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV1) in the epidemiology of genital herpes in Canada. Data on herpes viral cultures for two consecutive years obtained from L'Hôpital Dr GL Dumont, which performs all the viral culture testing in New Brunswick, were reviewed. It was hypothesized that HSV1 was the main cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick. Samples of genital origin sent to the laboratory for HSV culture testing between July 2006 and June 2008 were analyzed. Samples from an unspecified or a nongenital source were excluded from analysis. Multiple positive samples collected from the same patient were pooled into a single sample. HSV was isolated from 764 different patients. HSV1 was isolated in 62.6% of patients (male, 55%; female, 63.8%). HSV1 was isolated in 73.2% of patients 10 to 39 years of age and in 32% of patients ≥40 years of age. The difference in rates of HSV1 infection between the 10 to 39 years of age group and the ≥40 years of age group was statistically significant (Pgenital site. Significant rate differences were demonstrated between the groups 10 to 39 years of age and ≥40 years of age. Little is known about the role of herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 (HSV1) in the epidemiology of genital herpes in Canada. Data on herpes viral cultures for two consecutive years obtained from L’Hôpital Dr GL Dumont, which performs all the viral culture testing in New Brunswick, were reviewed. It was hypothesized that HSV1 was the main cause of genital herpes in New Brunswick. Samples of genital origin sent to the laboratory for HSV culture testing between July 2006 and June 2008 were analyzed. Samples from an unspecified or a nongenital source were excluded from analysis. Multiple positive samples collected from the same patient were pooled into a single sample. HSV was isolated from 764 different patients. HSV1 was isolated in 62.6% of patients (male, 55%; female, 63.8%). HSV1 was isolated in 73.2% of patients 10 to

  16. Effects of Toll-like receptor 3 on herpes simplex virus type-1-infected mouse neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiuning; Shi, Lihong; Zhang, Haoyun; Li, Ruifang; Liang, Ruiwen; Liu, Zhijun

    2015-03-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the effect of herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) infection on the phosphorylation of interferon regulatory factor 3 (IRF3) and the expression of interferon-β (IFN-β), as well as to clarify the functions of toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3) in mouse neural stem cells (NSCs) infected with HSV-1. In HSV-1-infected cultured NSCs, immunofluorescence, reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction, Western blot, and ELISA were performed to reveal the expression patterns of TLR3, IRF3, and IFN-β. Then, lentivirus-mediated RNA interference (RNAi) was used to block the expression of TLR3, and its effect on host resistance to HSV-1 infection was investigated. Under uninfected conditions, NSCs expressed TLR3 and phosphorylated IRF3, but after infection, the expression level of TLR3 was upregulated and the phosphorylation level of IRF3 in the nucleus was significantly enhanced, while IFN-β was also expressed. After TLR3 expression was blocked by lentivirus-mediated RNAi, IRF3 phosphorylation and IFN-β expression were downregulated. Therefore, HSV-1 upregulated the expression of TLR3 in NSCs and promoted nuclear translocation after IRF3 was phosphorylated to induce IFN-β expression. TLR3 exhibited an anti-HSV-1 infection capacity via innate immune functions.

  17. Evolutionary analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 therapies based on conditionally replicating vectors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruian Ke

    Full Text Available Efforts to reduce the viral load of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 during long-term treatment are challenged by the evolution of anti-viral resistance mutants. Recent studies have shown that gene therapy approaches based on conditionally replicating vectors (CRVs could have many advantages over anti-viral drugs and other approaches to therapy, potentially including the ability to circumvent the problem of evolved resistance. However, research to date has not explored the evolutionary consequences of long-term treatment of HIV-1 infections with conditionally replicating vectors. In this study, we analyze a computational model of the within-host co-evolutionary dynamics of HIV-1 and conditionally replicating vectors, using the recently proposed 'therapeutic interfering particle' as an example. The model keeps track of the stochastic process of viral mutation, and the deterministic population dynamics of T cells as well as different strains of CRV and HIV-1 particles. We show that early in the co-infection, mutant HIV-1 genotypes that escape suppression by CRV therapy appear; this is similar to the dynamics observed in drug treatments and other gene therapies. In contrast to other treatments, however, the CRV population is able to evolve and catch up with the dominant HIV-1 escape mutant and persist long-term in most cases. On evolutionary grounds, gene therapies based on CRVs appear to be a promising tool for long-term treatment of HIV-1. Our model allows us to propose design principles to optimize the efficacy of this class of gene therapies. In addition, because of the analogy between CRVs and naturally-occurring defective interfering particles, our results also shed light on the co-evolutionary dynamics of wild-type viruses and their defective interfering particles during natural infections.

  18. Prevalence of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 among blood donors from Mashhad, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Gholamin, Mehran; Tabatabaee, Abbas; Farid, Reza; Houshmand, Massoud; Abbaszadegan, Morteza

    2003-06-01

    The city of Mashhad is the capital of Khorasan, the northeastern province of Iran, which has been recognized as an area where human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is endemic. All serum samples from blood donors are routinely screened for HTLV-1 by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). In the present study, 28,926 donors (81.86% male and 18.14% female) with a mean age of 32 years (range, 18 to 65 years) were screened in a 6 months period (July to December 1999). Of these donors in the primary screening, 228 (0.78%) tested positive by ELISA. The positive samples were confirmed by Western blot (WB) analysis. The WB results indicated that, of 228 positive ELISA specimens, 91.2% (208 specimens) were HTLV-1, 4.82% (11 specimens) were HTLV, 3.5% (8 specimens) were indeterminate, and 0.44% (1 specimen) was not confirmed. HTLV refers to samples in which the complete viral antigen banding patterns on WB strips were not present. In order to further evaluate the detection methodologies used, the HTLV-1-seropositive samples, the indeterminant samples, and/or HTLV samples were examined and confirmed by PCR. The HTLV samples were determined to be HTLV-1, the remaining samples were indeterminant, and the negative sample could not be confirmed for HTLV-1 by PCR. The prevalence of HTLV-1 infection in our study was 0.77% among blood bank donors, which reconfirms the city of Mashhad as an area where the virus is endemic compared to other regions in the world. The incidence was correlated with increasing age, and it was higher in females than in males.

  19. The Human Polycomb Group EED Protein Interacts with the Integrase of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Violot, Sébastien; Hong, Saw See; Rakotobe, Dina; Petit, Caroline; Gay, Bernard; Moreau, Karen; Billaud, Geneviève; Priet, Stéphane; Sire, Joséphine; Schwartz, Olivier; Mouscadet, Jean-François; Boulanger, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Human EED, a member of the superfamily of WD-40 repeat proteins and of the Polycomb group proteins, has been identified as a cellular partner of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix (MA) protein (R. Peytavi et al., J. Biol. Chem. 274:1635-1645, 1999). In the present study, EED was found to interact with HIV-1 integrase (IN) both in vitro and in vivo in yeast. In vitro, data from mutagenesis studies, pull-down assays, and phage biopanning suggested that EED-binding site(s) are located in the C-terminal domain of IN, between residues 212 and 264. In EED, two putative discrete IN-binding sites were mapped to its N-terminal moiety, at a distance from the MA-binding site, but EED-IN interaction also required the integrity of the EED last two WD repeats. EED showed an apparent positive effect on IN-mediated DNA integration reaction in vitro, in a dose-dependent manner. In situ analysis by immunoelectron microscopy (IEM) of cellular distribution of IN and EED in HIV-1-infected cells (HeLa CD4+ cells or MT4 lymphoid cells) showed that IN and EED colocalized in the nucleus and near nuclear pores, with maximum colocalization events occurring at 6 h postinfection (p.i.). Triple colocalizations of IN, EED, and MA were also observed in the nucleoplasm of infected cells at 6 h p.i., suggesting the ocurrence of multiprotein complexes involving these three proteins at early steps of the HIV-1 virus life cycle. Such IEM patterns were not observed with a noninfectious, envelope deletion mutant of HIV-1. PMID:14610174

  20. Alpha interferon-induced antiretroviral activities: restriction of viral nucleic acid synthesis and progeny virion production in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected monocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Baca-Regen, L; Heinzinger, N; Stevenson, M; Gendelman, H E

    1994-01-01

    Alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) restricts multiple steps of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) life cycle. A well-described effect of IFN-alpha is in the modulation of viral nucleic acid synthesis. We demonstrate that IFN-alpha influences HIV-1 DNA synthesis principally by reducing the production of late products of reverse transcription. The magnitude of IFN-alpha-induced downregulation of HIV-1 DNA and/or progeny virion production was dependent on the IFN-alpha concentration, the ...

  1. Type 1 and type 2 cytokine profiles in children exposed to or infected with vertically transmitted human immunodeficiency virus.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, B. N.; Lu, J. G.; Kline, M.W.; Paul, M.; Doyle, M; Kozinetz, C; Shearer, W T; Reuben, J. M.

    1996-01-01

    In human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, cytokine production profiles switch from predominantly type 1 (interleukin-2 [IL-2] and gamma interferon [IFN-gamma]) to type 2 (IL-4 and IL-10) cytokines with disease progression. To test this hypothesis in vertically HIV-infected children, we measured cytokine transcription and production in rapid progressors (RPs), seroreverters (SRs), and those children exposed to HIV in utero (P0s). Production of type 1 and type 2 cytokines was measu...

  2. DNA replication catalyzed by herpes simplex virus type 1 proteins reveals trombone loops at the fork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermek, Oya; Willcox, Smaranda; Griffith, Jack D

    2015-01-30

    Using purified replication factors encoded by herpes simplex virus type 1 and a 70-base minicircle template, we obtained robust DNA synthesis with leading strand products of >20,000 nucleotides and lagging strand fragments from 600 to 9,000 nucleotides as seen by alkaline gel electrophoresis. ICP8 was crucial for the synthesis on both strands. Visualization of the deproteinized products using electron microscopy revealed long, linear dsDNAs, and in 87%, one end, presumably the end with the 70-base circle, was single-stranded. The remaining 13% had multiple single-stranded segments separated by dsDNA segments 500 to 1,000 nucleotides in length located at one end. These features are diagnostic of the trombone mechanism of replication. Indeed, when the products were examined with the replication proteins bound, a dsDNA loop was frequently associated with the replication complex located at one end of the replicated DNA. Furthermore, the frequency of loops correlated with the fraction of DNA undergoing Okazaki fragment synthesis. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. In-vivo immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of herpes simplex virus type 1 keratitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Stephen C.; Laird, Jeffery A.; Beuerman, Roger W.

    1996-05-01

    The white-light confocal microscope offers an in vivo, cellular-level resolution view of the cornea. This instrument has proven to be a valuable research and diagnostic tool for the study of infectious keratitis. In this study, we investigate the direct visualization of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected corneal epithelium, with in vivo confocal microscopy, using HSV-1 immunofluorescent antibodies. New Zealand white rabbits were infected with McKrae strain of HSV-1 in one eye; the other eye of each rabbit was used as an uninfected control. Four days later, the rabbits were anesthetized and a cellulose sponge was applied to each cornea, and a drop of direct HSV fluorescein-tagged antibody was placed on each sponge every 3 to 5 minutes for 1 hour. Fluorescence confocal microscopy was then performed. The HSV-infected corneas showed broad regions of hyperfluorescent epithelial cells. The uninfected corneas revealed no background fluorescence. Thus, using the confocal microscope with a fluorescent cube, we were able to visualize HSV-infected corneal epithelial cells tagged with a direct fluorescent antibody. This process may prove to be a useful clinical tool for the in vivo diagnosis of HSV keratitis.

  4. Oligomerization within Virions and Subcellular Localization of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Integrase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Caroline; Schwartz, Olivier; Mammano, Fabrizio

    1999-01-01

    Previous biochemical and genetic evidence indicated that the functional form of retroviral integrase protein (IN) is a multimer. A direct demonstration of IN oligomerization during the infectious cycle was, however, missing, due to the absence of a sensitive detection method. We describe here the generation of infectious human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) viral clones carrying IN protein tagged with highly antigenic epitopes. In this setting, we could readily visualize IN both in producer cells and in viral particles. More interestingly, we detected IN oligomers, the formation of which was dependent on disulfide bridges and took place inside virions. Additionally, expression of a tagged HIV-1 IN in the absence of other viral components resulted in almost exclusive nuclear accumulation of the protein. Mutation of a conserved cysteine in the proposed dimer interface determined the loss of viral infectivity, associated with a reduction of IN oligomer formation and the redistribution of the mutated protein in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Epitope tagging of HIV-1 IN expressed alone or in the context of a replication-competent viral clone provides powerful tools to validate debated issues on the implication of this enzyme in different steps of the viral cycle. PMID:10233971

  5. Hepatitis C virus infection and type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Alessandro; Ferrari, Silvia Martina; Giuggioli, Dilia; Di Domenicantonio, Andrea; Ruffilli, Ilaria; Corrado, Alda; Fabiani, Silvia; Marchi, Santino; Ferri, Clodoveo; Ferrannini, Ele; Fallahi, Poupak

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and diabetes mellitus are two major public health problems that cause devastating health and financial burdens worldwide. Diabetes can be classified into two major types: type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and T2DM. T2DM is a common endocrine disorder that encompasses multifactorial mechanisms, and T1DM is an immunologically mediated disease. Many epidemiological studies have shown an association between T2DM and chronic hepatitis C (CHC) infection. The processes through which CHC is associated with T2DM seem to involve direct viral effects, insulin resistance, proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and other immune-mediated mechanisms. Few data have been reported on the association of CHC and T1DM and reports on the potential association between T1DM and acute HCV infection are even rarer. A small number of studies indicate that interferon-α therapy can stimulate pancreatic autoimmunity and in certain cases lead to the development of T1DM. Diabetes and CHC have important interactions. Diabetic CHC patients have an increased risk of developing cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma compared with non-diabetic CHC subjects. However, clinical trials on HCV-positive patients have reported improvements in glucose metabolism after antiviral treatment. Further studies are needed to improve prevention policies and to foster adequate and cost-effective programmes for the surveillance and treatment of diabetic CHC patients. PMID:25317237

  6. Sexual transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur Paiva

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is endemic in many parts of the world and is primarily transmitted through sexual intercourse or from mother to child. Sexual transmission occurs more efficiently from men to women than women to men and might be enhanced by sexually transmitted diseases that cause ulcers and result in mucosal ruptures, such as syphilis, herpes simplex type 2 (HSV-2, and chancroid. Other sexually transmitted diseases might result in the recruitment of inflammatory cells and could increase the risk of HTLV-1 acquisition and transmission. Additionally, factors that are associated with higher transmission risks include the presence of antibodies against the viral oncoprotein Tax (anti-Tax, a higher proviral load in peripheral blood lymphocytes, and increased cervicovaginal or seminal secretions. Seminal fluid has been reported to increase HTLV replication and transmission, whereas male circumcision and neutralizing antibodies might have a protective effect. Recently, free virions were discovered in plasma, which reveals a possible new mode of HTLV replication. It is unclear how this discovery might affect the routes of HTLV transmission, particularly sexual transmission, because HTLV transmission rates are significantly higher from men to women than women to men.

  7. Cure of Chronic Viral Infection and Virus-Induced Type 1 Diabetes by Neutralizing Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Ejrnaes

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of neutralizing antibodies is one of the most successful methods to interfere with receptor-ligand interactions in vivo. In particular blockade of soluble inflammatory mediators or their corresponding cellular receptors was proven an effective way to regulate inflammation and/or prevent its negative consequences. However, one problem that comes along with an effective neutralization of inflammatory mediators is the general systemic immunomodulatory effect. It is therefore important to design a treatment regimen in a way to strike at the right place and at the right time in order to achieve maximal effects with minimal duration of immunosuppression or hyperactivation. In this review we reflect on two examples of how short time administration of such neutralizing antibodies can block two distinct inflammatory consequences of viral infection. First, we review recent findings that blockade of IL-10/IL-10R interaction can resolve chronic viral infection and second, we reflect on how neutralization of the chemokine CXCL10 can abrogate virus-induced type 1 diabetes.

  8. Global and Regional Estimates of Prevalent and Incident Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infections in 2012.

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    Katharine J Looker

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 commonly causes orolabial ulcers, while HSV-2 commonly causes genital ulcers. However, HSV-1 is an increasing cause of genital infection. Previously, the World Health Organization estimated the global burden of HSV-2 for 2003 and for 2012. The global burden of HSV-1 has not been estimated.We fitted a constant-incidence model to pooled HSV-1 prevalence data from literature searches for 6 World Health Organization regions and used 2012 population data to derive global numbers of 0-49-year-olds with prevalent and incident HSV-1 infection. To estimate genital HSV-1, we applied values for the proportion of incident infections that are genital.We estimated that 3709 million people (range: 3440-3878 million aged 0-49 years had prevalent HSV-1 infection in 2012 (67%, with highest prevalence in Africa, South-East Asia and Western Pacific. Assuming 50% of incident infections among 15-49-year-olds are genital, an estimated 140 million (range: 67-212 million people had prevalent genital HSV-1 infection, most of which occurred in the Americas, Europe and Western Pacific.The global burden of HSV-1 infection is huge. Genital HSV-1 burden can be substantial but varies widely by region. Future control efforts, including development of HSV vaccines, should consider the epidemiology of HSV-1 in addition to HSV-2, and especially the relative contribution of HSV-1 to genital infection.

  9. Dependence of herpes simplex virus type 1-induced cell fusion on cell type

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bzik, D.J.; Person, S.

    1981-04-15

    Syncytial mutants of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), such as syn20, cause extensive fusion of human embryonic lung (HEL) cells but only a small amount of fusion of human epidermoid carcinoma No. 2 (HEp-2) cells. In order to determine the cellular basis of this difference in fusion, sparse cultures of syn20-infected HEL or HEp-2 cells, previously labeled with (/sup 3/H)thymidine, were surrounded with uninfected, unlabeled HEL or HEp-2 cells. The fusion of radioactive with nonradioactive cells was determined at different times after infection using radioautography. The major difference in the fusion capacity of HEL and HEp-2 cells was not due to a difference in cell-surface receptors for a fusion factor in the two cell types. The process of infection of HEp-2 cells did not cause the plasma membranes of the cells to become refractory to fusion, because syn20-infected HEL cells fused equally well with either uninfected or infected HEp-2 cells. In a mixed infection with equal numbers of MP and its nonsyncytial parent, mP, extensive fusion was observed for infected HEL cells and significantly less fusion was observed for infected African green monkey (CV-1), baby hamster kidney (BHK-21), and HEp-2 cells.

  10. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes are coexpr......In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...

  11. Hepatitis B virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 co-infection in the Northern Territory, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Ian; Davies, Jane; Baird, Rob W

    2017-05-01

    To establish the relationship between hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) serological markers in the Northern Territory, Australia. A retrospective serological study of patients presenting to public healthcare facilities in the Northern Territory between 2008 and 2015 was performed in order to determine the presence and relationships of serological markers of HBV and HTLV-1. Seven hundred and forty individual patients were found to be serologically positive for HTLV-1 in the Northern Territory over the 8-year period. Hepatitis B results were available for 521 of these patients. Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positivity was demonstrated in 15.9% (83/521) of this cohort, which was significantly different to the HTLV-1-negative group (3.7%, 125/3354) (pTerritory. When considering the higher exposure to HBV in HTLV-1-positive individuals, the clearance of HBV appears lower than in those individuals testing HTLV-1-negative. A lower prevalence of clearance in HTVL-1-positive individuals than in HTLV-1-negative individuals, as signified by formation of HBVcAb and HBVsAb in HTVL-1 positive individual's may equate to higher prevalence of ongoing coinfection. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Immunogenicity of a modified-live virus vaccine against bovine viral diarrhea virus types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, bovine parainfluenza-3 virus, and bovine respiratory syncytial virus when administered intranasally in young calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenzhi; Ellis, John; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda; Brady, Ryan; Trigo, Emilio

    2010-05-14

    The immunogenicity of an intranasally-administered modified-live virus (MLV) vaccine in 3-8 day old calves was evaluated against bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) types 1 and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) virus, parainfluenza-3 (PI-3) virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). Calves were intranasally vaccinated with a single dose of a multivalent MLV vaccine and were challenged with one of the respective viruses three to four weeks post-vaccination in five separate studies. There was significant sparing of diseases in calves intranasally vaccinated with the MLV vaccine, as indicated by significantly fewer clinical signs, lower rectal temperatures, reduced viral shedding, greater white blood cell and platelet counts, and less severe pulmonary lesions than control animals. This was the first MLV combination vaccine to demonstrate efficacy against BVDV types 1 and 2, IBR, PI-3 and BRSV in calves 3-8 days of age. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Emergence of viruses resistant to neutralization by V3-specific antibodies in experimental human immunodeficiency virus type 1 IIIB infection of chimpanzees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nara, P. L.; Smit, L.; Dunlop, N.; Hatch, W.; Merges, M.; Waters, D.; Kelliher, J.; Gallo, R. C.; Fischinger, P. J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1990-01-01

    Emergence in two chimpanzees of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) IIIB variants resistant to neutralization by the preexisting antibody is described. Viruses isolated from the HIV-1 IIIB gp120-vaccinated and -challenged animal were more resistant to neutralization by the chimpanzee's own

  14. Multicenter evaluation of the new Abbott RealTime assays for quantitative detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus RNA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schutten, Martin; Peters, D; Back, N K T; Beld, M; Beuselinck, K; Foulongne, V; Geretti, A-M; Pandiani, L; Tiemann, C; Niesters, H G M

    The analytical performances of the new Abbott RealTime hepatitis C virus (HCV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 viral load assays were compared at nine laboratories with different competitor assays. These included the Abbott LcX, Bayer Versant bDNA, Roche COBAS Amplicor, and Roche COBAS

  15. Seroprevalence of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and 2 in Taiwan and Risk Factor Analysis, 2007.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Hsiang Shen

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 and 2 (HSV-2 are common human pathogens and might cause severe illness. Following primary infection, the viruses establish lifelong latent infection and are transmitted by close contact, both sexual and nonsexual. However, the information about the seroprevalence of HSV-1 and HSV-2 across all age groups is limited.Residual sera collected during the nationwide serosurvey in 2007 in Taiwan were selected for the study. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to detect anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 type-specific glycoprotein IgG. Demographics and personal health data were used for risk analysis.A total of 1411 and 1072 serum samples were included for anti-HSV-1 and anti-HSV-2 seroprevalence analysis, respectively. The weighted overall seroprevalence was 63.2% for HSV-1, and 7.7% for HSV-2, respectively. The HSV-1 seropositive rate was 19.2% for those less than 5 years old, increased to 46.4% for those aged 5-13 years, 60.9% for those aged 14-29 years, and reached as much as 95.0% for those aged over 30 years. In contrast, the HSV-2 seropositve rate was 1.6% for those less than 30 years old, rose to 10.1% for those age 30-39 years, and was up to 31.2% for those aged over 60 years. A significantly higher HSV-2 seropositive rate was noted in females than males aged over 40 years (26.3% v.s. 16.8%, and the overall HSV-2 seropositive rate was almost twice higher in females than males. Smoking history, drinking habit, and educational level were associated with the HSV-1 seropositivity. Female gender and rural residence were independent factors for the HSV-2 seropositivity.An obvious increase of primary HSV-1 infection occurred in late adolescents and young adults, joined by the rise of HSV-2 infection in middle-aged adults, especially females. The acquistion and transmission of HSV warrant further studies in the susceptible population.

  16. Characterization of Three nef-Defective Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Strains Associated with Long-Term Nonprogression

    OpenAIRE

    David I. Rhodes; Ashton, Lesley; Solomon, Ajantha; Carr, Andrew; Cooper, David; Kaldor, John; Deacon, Nicholas

    2000-01-01

    Long-term survivors (LTS) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection provide an opportunity to investigate both viral and host factors that influence the rate of disease progression. We have identified three HIV-1-infected individuals in Australia who have been infected for over 11 years with viruses that contain deletions in the nef and nef-long terminal repeat (nef/LTR) overlap regions. These viruses differ from each other and from other nef-defective strains of HIV-1 previous...

  17. Characterization of Three nef-Defective Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Strains Associated with Long-Term Nonprogression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, David I.; Ashton, Lesley; Solomon, Ajantha; Carr, Andrew; Cooper, David; Kaldor, John; Deacon, Nicholas

    2000-01-01

    Long-term survivors (LTS) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection provide an opportunity to investigate both viral and host factors that influence the rate of disease progression. We have identified three HIV-1-infected individuals in Australia who have been infected for over 11 years with viruses that contain deletions in the nef and nef-long terminal repeat (nef/LTR) overlap regions. These viruses differ from each other and from other nef-defective strains of HIV-1 previously identified in Australia. One individual, LTS 3, is infected with a virus containing a nef gene with a deletion of 29 bp from the nef/LTR overlap region, resulting in a truncated Nef open reading frame. In addition to the Nef defect, only viruses containing truncated Vif open reading frames of 37 or 69 amino acids could be detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from this patient. LTS 3 had a viral load of less than 20 copies of RNA/ml of plasma. The other two long-term survivors, LTS 9 and LTS 11, had loads of less than 200 copies of RNA/ml of plasma and are infected with viruses with larger deletions in both the nef alone and nef/LTR overlap regions. These viruses contain wild-type vif, vpu, and vpr accessory genes. All three strains of virus had envelope sequences characteristic of macrophagetropic viruses. These findings further indicate the reduced pathogenic potential of nef-defective viruses. PMID:11044102

  18. Apelin, the natural ligand of the orphan seven-transmembrane receptor APJ, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cayabyab, M.; Hinuma, S.; Farzan, M.; Choe, H.; Fukusumi, S.; Kitada, C.; Nishizawa, N.; Hosoya, M.; Nishimura, O.; Messele, T.; Pollakis, G.; Goudsmit, J.; Fujino, M.; Sodroski, J.

    2000-01-01

    In addition to the CCR5 and CXCR4 chemokine receptors, a subset of primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates can also use the seven-transmembrane-domain receptor APJ as a coreceptor. A previously identified ligand of APJ, apelin, specifically inhibited the entry of primary

  19. Semen parameters of a semen donor before and after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1: Case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, E.; Cornelissen, M.; de Vries, J. W.; Lowe, S. H.; Jurriaans, S.; Repping, S.; van der Veen, F.

    2004-01-01

    Semen samples from a donor who seroconverted for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) during the period that he was donating at our clinic were stored before and after infection. Semen analysis was done on all of these samples before cryopreservation. Retrospectively, both qualitative and

  20. Cellular gene expression upon human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection of CD4(+)-T-cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van 't Wout, Angélique B.; Lehrman, Ginger K.; Mikheeva, Svetlana A.; O'Keeffe, Gemma C.; Katze, Michael G.; Bumgarner, Roger E.; Geiss, Gary K.; Mullins, James I.

    2003-01-01

    The expression levels of approximately 4,600 cellular RNA transcripts were assessed in CD4(+)-T-cell lines at different times after infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain BRU (HIV-1(BRU)) using DNA microarrays. We found that several classes of genes were inhibited by HIV-1(BRU)

  1. Adherence and acceptability of once daily Lamivudine and abacavir in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infected children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LePrevost, M.; Green, H.; Flynn, J.; Head, S.; Clapson, M.; Lyall, H.; Novelli, V.; Farrelly, L.; Walker, A.S.; Burger, D.M.; Gibb, D.

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Data on adherence to and acceptability of once daily lamivudine and abacavir are few. METHODS: Twenty-four U.K. human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infected children 2-13 years of age participated in the Pediatric European Network for the Treatment of AIDS (PENTA) 13 single arm, open

  2. Distinctiveness of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotypes from Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Seropositive and -Seronegative Patients in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Niyaz; Caviedes, Luz; Alam, Mahfooz; Rao, K. Rajender; Sangal, Vartul; Sheen, Patricia; Gilman, Robert H.; Hasnain, Seyed E.

    2003-01-01

    Genotypic analysis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates obtained from human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-seropositive (n = 80) and -seronegative (n = 25) patients from Lima, Peru, revealed two distinct genotypes correlating with the host immune status. While the level of intrastrain diversity of DNA fingerprints of HIV-seropositive isolates was less pronounced, these isolates showed many clonal groupings. PMID:12682166

  3. Glycoprotein I of herpes simplex virus type 1 contains a unique polymorphic tandem-repeated mucin region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norberg, Peter; Olofsson, Sigvard; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Glycoprotein I (gI) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) contains a tandem repeat (TR) region including the amino acids serine and threonine, residues that can be utilized for O-glycosylation. The length of this TR region was determined for 82 clinical HSV-1 isolates and the results revealed...

  4. Necroptosis takes place in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1-infected CD4+ T lymphocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Pan

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection is characterized by progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes and dysfunction of the immune system. The numbers of CD4+ T lymphocytes in the human body are maintained constantly by homeostatic mechanisms that failed during HIV-1 infection, resulting in progressive loss of CD4+ T cells mainly via apoptosis. Recently, a non-apoptotic form of necrotic programmed cell death, named necroptosis, has been investigated in many biological and pathological processes. We then determine whether HIV-1-infected cells also undergo necroptosis. In this report, we demonstrate that HIV-1 not only induces apoptosis, but also mediates necroptosis in the infected primary CD4+ T lymphocytes and CD4+ T-cell lines. Necroptosis-dependent cytopathic effects are significantly increased in HIV-1-infected Jurkat cells that is lack of Fas-associated protein-containing death domain (FADD, indicating that necroptosis occurs as an alternative cell death mechanism in the absence of apoptosis. Unlike apoptosis, necroptosis mainly occurs in HIV-infected cells and spares bystander damage. Treatment with necrostatin-1(Nec-1, a RIP1 inhibitor that specifically blocks the necroptosis pathway, potently restrains HIV-1-induced cytopathic effect and interestingly, inhibits the formation of HIV-induced syncytia in CD4+ T-cell lines. This suggests that syncytia formation is mediated, at least partially, by necroptosis-related processes. Furthermore, we also found that the HIV-1 infection-augmented tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α plays a key role in inducing necroptosis and HIV-1 Envelope and Tat proteins function as its co-factors. Taken together,necroptosis can function as an alternative cell death pathway in lieu of apoptosis during HIV-1 infection, thereby also contributing to HIV-1-induced cytopathic effects. Our results reveal that in addition to apoptosis, necroptosis also plays an important role in HIV-1-induced pathogenesis.

  5. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1-infected cells secrete exosomes that contain Tax protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V; Sampey, Gavin C; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-08-08

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Human T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1-infected Cells Secrete Exosomes That Contain Tax Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworski, Elizabeth; Narayanan, Aarthi; Van Duyne, Rachel; Shabbeer-Meyering, Shabana; Iordanskiy, Sergey; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Das, Ravi; Afonso, Philippe V.; Sampey, Gavin C.; Chung, Myung; Popratiloff, Anastas; Shrestha, Bindesh; Sehgal, Mohit; Jain, Pooja; Vertes, Akos; Mahieux, Renaud; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2014-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the causative agent of adult T-cell leukemia and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis. The HTLV-1 transactivator protein Tax controls many critical cellular pathways, including host cell DNA damage response mechanisms, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis. Extracellular vesicles called exosomes play critical roles during pathogenic viral infections as delivery vehicles for host and viral components, including proteins, mRNA, and microRNA. We hypothesized that exosomes derived from HTLV-1-infected cells contain unique host and viral proteins that may contribute to HTLV-1-induced pathogenesis. We found exosomes derived from infected cells to contain Tax protein and proinflammatory mediators as well as viral mRNA transcripts, including Tax, HBZ, and Env. Furthermore, we observed that exosomes released from HTLV-1-infected Tax-expressing cells contributed to enhanced survival of exosome-recipient cells when treated with Fas antibody. This survival was cFLIP-dependent, with Tax showing induction of NF-κB in exosome-recipient cells. Finally, IL-2-dependent CTLL-2 cells that received Tax-containing exosomes were protected from apoptosis through activation of AKT. Similar experiments with primary cultures showed protection and survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells even in the absence of phytohemagglutinin/IL-2. Surviving cells contained more phosphorylated Rb, consistent with the role of Tax in regulation of the cell cycle. Collectively, these results suggest that exosomes may play an important role in extracellular delivery of functional HTLV-1 proteins and mRNA to recipient cells. PMID:24939845

  7. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Other Pathogens are Key Causative Factors in Sporadic Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Steven A; Harris, Elizabeth A

    2015-01-01

    This review focuses on research in epidemiology, neuropathology, molecular biology, and genetics regarding the hypothesis that pathogens interact with susceptibility genes and are causative in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD). Sporadic AD is a complex multifactorial neurodegenerative disease with evidence indicating coexisting multi-pathogen and inflammatory etiologies. There are significant associations between AD and various pathogens, including Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Cytomegalovirus, and other Herpesviridae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, spirochetes, Helicobacter pylori, and various periodontal pathogens. These pathogens are able to evade destruction by the host immune system, leading to persistent infection. Bacterial and viral DNA and RNA and bacterial ligands increase the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules and activate the innate and adaptive immune systems. Evidence demonstrates that pathogens directly and indirectly induce AD pathology, including amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation, phosphorylation of tau protein, neuronal injury, and apoptosis. Chronic brain infection with HSV-1, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and spirochetes results in complex processes that interact to cause a vicious cycle of uncontrolled neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Infections such as Cytomegalovirus, Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal pathogens induce production of systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines that may cross the blood-brain barrier to promote neurodegeneration. Pathogen-induced inflammation and central nervous system accumulation of Aβ damages the blood-brain barrier, which contributes to the pathophysiology of AD. Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) enhances brain infiltration by pathogens including HSV-1 and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. ApoE4 is also associated with an increased pro-inflammatory response by the immune system. Potential antimicrobial treatments for AD are discussed, including the rationale for antiviral and antibiotic clinical trials.

  8. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection and disease in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mendoza, Carmen; Caballero, Estrella; Aguilera, Antonio; Requena, Silvia; de Lejarazu, Raúl Ortiz; Pirón, María; González, Rocío; Jiménez, Ana; Roc, Lourdes; Treviño, Ana; Benito, Rafael; Fernández-Alonso, Miriam; Aguinaga, Aitziber; Rodríguez, Carmen; García-Costa, Juan; Blanco, Lidia; Ramos, José M; Calderón, Enrique; Eirós, José M; Sauleda, Silvia; Barreiro, Pablo; Soriano, Vicente

    2017-07-31

    : Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is a neglected disease despite roughly 15 million people are chronically infected worldwide. Lifelong less than 10% of carriers develop life-threatening diseases, mostly a subacute myelopathy known as tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP) and a lymphoproliferative disorder named adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). HTLV-1 is efficiently transmitted perinatally (breastfeeding), sexually (more from men to women) and parenterally (transfusions, injection drug user (IDU), and transplants). To date there is neither prophylactic vaccine nor effective antiviral therapy. A total of 327 cases of HTLV-1 infection had been reported at the HTLV-1 Spanish registry until December 2016, of whom 34 had been diagnosed with TSP and 25 with ATL. Overall 62% were Latin American immigrants and 13% were persons of African origin. The incidence of HTLV-1 in Spain has remained stable for nearly a decade with 20-25 new cases yearly. Of the 21 newly diagnosed HTLV-1 cases during year 2016, one was a native Spaniard pregnant woman, and four presented with symptomatic disease, including three with ATL and one with TSP. Underdiagnosis of HTLV-1 in Spain must be high (iceberg model), which may account for the disproportionate high rate of symptomatic cases (almost 20%) and the late recognition of preventable HTLV-1 transmissions in special populations, such as newborns and transplant recipients. Our current estimate is of 10 000 persons living with HTLV-1 infection in Spain. Given the large flux of immigrants and visitors from HTLV-1 endemic regions to Spain, the expansion of HTLV-1 screening policies is warranted. At this time, it seems worth recommending HTLV testing to all donor/recipient organ transplants and pregnant women regardless place of birth. Although current leukoreduction procedures largely prevent HTLV-1 transmission by blood transfusions, HTLV testing of all first-time donors should be cost-effective contributing to unveil

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus type-1 induces a regulatory B cell-like phenotype in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Abente, Jacobo; Prieto-Sanchez, Adrián; Muñoz-Fernandez, Maria-Ángeles; Correa-Rocha, Rafael; Pion, Marjorie

    2017-07-17

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) usually show a general dysregulation and hyper-activation of the immune system. A direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B-cell phenotypes and functions has been previously described. However, the consequences of B-cell dysregulation are still poorly understood. We evaluated the phenotypic changes in primary B cells after direct contact with HIV-1 particles in comparison with different types of stimuli. The functionality of treated B cells was challenged in co-culture experiments with autologous CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. We demonstrated that HIV-1 induces a phenotypic change in B cells towards a regulatory B-cell phenotype, showing a higher level of IL-10, TGF-β1, EBI3 or IL-12(p35) mRNA expression and acquiring an immunosuppressive profile. The acquisition of a Breg phenotype was confirmed by co-culture experiments where HIV-treated B cells reduced the proliferation and the TNFα production of CD4+ or CD8+ T cells. This suppressive ability of HIV-treated B cells was dependent on cell-to-cell contact between these B cells and effector cells. To our knowledge, these data provide the first evidence that HIV-1 can directly induce a regulatory B cell-like immunosuppressive phenotype, which could have the ability to impair specific immune responses. This dysregulation could constitute one of the mechanisms underlying unsuccessful efforts to develop an efficient vaccine against HIV-1.Cellular &Molecular Immunology advance online publication, 17 July 2017; doi:10.1038/cmi.2017.48.

  10. Retinal Nerve Fiber Layer Thickness in Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Harold; Hage, Rabih; Jeannin, Séverine; Cabre, Philippe; Olindo, Stéphane

    2017-10-06

    To determine whether there is an optic neuropathy (ON) in patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection. We included HTLV-1 asymptomatic carriers (a.c.HTLV-1) and tropical spastic paraparesis/HTLV-1 associated myelopathy (TSP/HAM) patients between January 1st, 2014 and March 31st, 2015. All patients had complete eye examination. The visual acuity (VA) and retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness were measured and compared to age- and sex-matched control groups including patients seen in our refraction clinic with no previous medical or surgical history. Thirty-one a.c.HTLV-1 (group 1) and 29 TSP/HAM patients (group 2) were included. The average RNFL thickness was 99.9 ± 14.3 µm in group 1 and 87.8 ± 19.2 µm in group 2. The average RFNL thicknesses were lower in both groups, when compared to controls. The difference was significant in patients with TSP/HAM (87.8 ± 19.2 µm vs. 97 ± 7.8 µm; p = 0.003) who also had significantly decreased VA. We report here the first study about the RNFL thickness in patients with TSP/HAM. In these patients, there is decrease of the RNFL thickness with subtle but definite decrease of VA. This suggests that subclinical ON occurs in the natural history of the disease. The diagnosis of TSP/HAM must be evoked as a differential of primary progressive multiple sclerosis in a population at risk. Moreover, RNFL thinning with no evidence of glaucoma should raise suspicion for HTLV-1 infection and TSP/HAM in a population at risk.

  11. Effects of Mutations in the G Tract of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Polypurine Tract on Virus Replication and RNase H Cleavage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julias, John G.; McWilliams, Mary Jane; Sarafianos, Stefan G.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Arnold, Eddy; Hughes, Stephen H.

    2004-01-01

    The RNase H cleavages that generate and remove the polypurine tract (PPT) primer during retroviral reverse transcription must be specific in order to create a linear viral DNA that is suitable for integration. Lentiviruses contain a highly conserved sequence consisting of six guanine residues at the 3′ end of the PPT (hereafter referred to as the G tract). We introduced mutations into the G tract of a human immunodeficiency virus type 1-based vector and determined the effects on the virus titer and RNase H cleavage specificity. Most mutations in the G tract had little or no effect on the virus titer. Mutations at the second and fifth positions of the G tract increased the proportion of two-long-terminal-repeat (2-LTR) circle junctions with one or two nucleotide insertions. The second and fifth positions of the G tract make specific contacts with amino acids in the RNase H domain that are important for RNase H cleavage specificity. These complementary data define protein-nucleic acid interactions that help control the specificity of RNase H cleavage. When the G-tract mutants were analyzed in a viral background that was deficient in integrase, in most cases the proportion of consensus 2-LTR circle junctions increased. However, in the case of a mutant with Ts at the second and fifth positions of the G tract, the proportion of 2-LTR circle junctions containing the one-nucleotide insertion increased, suggesting that linear viral DNAs containing an extra base are substrates for integration. This result is consistent with the idea that the 3′ end-processing reactions of retroviral integrases may help to generate defined ends from a heterogenous population of linear viral DNAs. PMID:15542682

  12. Analysis of contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL43 protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether UL43 protein, which is highly conserved in alpha- and gamma herpes viruses, and a non-glycosylated transmembrane protein, is involved in virus entry and virus-induced cell fusion. Methods: Mutagenesis was accomplished by a markerless two-step Red recombination mutagenesis system ...

  13. Analysis of contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL43 protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate whether UL43 protein, which is highly conserved in alpha- and gamma herpes viruses, and a non-glycosylated transmembrane protein, is involved in virus entry and virus-induced cell fusion. Methods: Mutagenesis was accomplished by a markerless two-step Red recombination mutagenesis.

  14. Inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 glycoprotein-mediated cell-cell fusion by immunor (IM28

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akoume Marie-Yvonne

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Immunor (IM28, an analog of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA, inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 by inhibiting reverse transcriptase. We assessed the ability of IM28 to inhibit the cell-cell fusion mediated by HIV envelope glycoprotein in an in vitro system. For this purpose, we co-cultured TF228.1.16, a T-cell line expressing stably HIV-1 glycoprotein envelopes, with an equal number of 293/CD4+, another T cell line expressing CD4, and with the SupT1 cell line with or without IM28. Results In the absence of IM28, TF228.1.16 fused with 293/CD4+, inducing numerous large syncytia. Syncytia appeared more rapidly when TF228.1.16 was co-cultured with SupT1 cells than when it was co-cultured with the 293/CD4+ cell line. IM28 (1.6 – 45 μg/ml completely inhibits cell-cell fusion. IM28 also prevented the development of new syncytia in infected cells and protected naive SupT1 cells from HIV-1 infection. Evaluation of 50% inhibitory dose (IC50 of IM28 revealed a decrease in HIV-1 replication with an IC50 of 22 mM and 50% cytotoxicity dose (CC50 as determined on MT2 cells was 75 mM giving a selectivity index of 3.4 Conclusions These findings suggest that IM28 exerts an inhibitory action on the env proteins that mediate cell-cell fusion between infected and healthy cells. They also suggest that IM28 interferes with biochemical processes to stop the progression of existing syncytia. This property may lead to the development of a new class of therapeutic drug.

  15. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemán, Yoan; Vinken, Lore; Kourí, Vivian; Pérez, Lissette; Álvarez, Alina; Abrahantes, Yeissel; Fonseca, Carlos; Pérez, Jorge; Correa, Consuelo; Soto, Yudira; Schrooten, Yoeri; Vandamme, Anne-Mieke; Van Laethem, Kristel

    2015-01-01

    As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial assays.

  16. Performance of an in-house human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotyping system for assessment of drug resistance in Cuba.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoan Alemán

    Full Text Available As commercial human immunodeficiency virus type 1 drug resistance assays are expensive, they are not commonly used in resource-limited settings. Hence, a more affordable in-house procedure was set up taking into account the specific epidemiological and economic circumstances of Cuba. The performance characteristics of the in-house assay were evaluated using clinical samples with various subtypes and resistance patterns. The lower limit of amplification was determined on dilutions series of 20 clinical isolates and ranged from 84 to 529 RNA copies/mL. For the assessment of trueness, 14 clinical samples were analyzed and the ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System v2.0 was used as the reference standard. The mean nucleotide sequence identity between the two assays was 98.7% ± 1.0. Additionally, 99.0% of the amino acids at drug resistance positions were identical. The sensitivity and specificity in detecting drug resistance mutations was respectively 94.1% and 99.5%. Only few discordances in drug resistance interpretation patterns were observed. The repeatability and reproducibility were evaluated using 10 clinical samples with 3 replicates per sample. The in-house test was very precise as nucleotide sequence identity among paired nucleotide sequences ranged from 98.7% to 99.9%. The acceptance criteria were met by the in-house test for all performance characteristics, demonstrating a high degree of accuracy. Subsequently, the applicability in routine clinical practice was evaluated on 380 plasma samples. The amplification success rate was 91% and good quality consensus sequences encoding the entire protease and the first 335 codons in reverse transcriptase could be obtained for 99% of the successful amplicons. The reagent cost per sample using the in-house procedure was around € 80 per genotyping attempt. Overall, the in-house assay provided good results, was feasible with equipment and reagents available in Cuba and was half as expensive as commercial

  17. Hepatitis C virus infection in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes mellitus: A single center study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hekma Saad Farghaly

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Only few studies have evaluated the epidemiology and risk factors of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in Egyptian children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. The present study aimed at measurement of the rates of anti-HCV positivity by Enzyme-Linked Immuno-Sorbent Assay (ELISA test and of HCV-Ribonucleic acid (RNA positivity by polymerase chain reaction (PCR among children with T1DM and to study the possible risk factors of infection. Settings and Design: Cross-sectional controlled study. Materials and Methods: The study included 150 children with T1DM (Group 1 (mean age 14. 76 ± 6.4 years. Fifty children age and sex-matched were included as control group (Group 2 (mean age 13.62 ± 2.11 years. They were screened for HCV antibodies using third generation ELISA and HCV-RNA positivity by PCR. Results: The frequency of anti-HCV positivity by ELISA was significantly higher in children with T1DM (n = 150 in comparison wiith control group (n = 50 (12% vs 6%; P<0.001, while the frequency of HCV-RNA positivity by PCR among the cases testing positive by ELISA was 75% for both diabetic group and control group. There were no significant differences in serum levels of liver biochemical profile in diabetic children with anti-HCV positivity (n = 18 in comparison to those with anti-HCV negativity (n = 132. Residence in rural area, low socioeconomic class and prior hospitalization were significant risk factors for anti-HCV positivity by ELISA. Conclusions: The frequency of HCV infection in children with T1DM in Upper Egypt appears to be high and is mainly related to residence in rural area, low socioeconomic class and prior hospitalization. HCV infection in these children is not associated with significant changes in hepatic biochemical parameters. Recommendations: Implementation of strict infection control measures are highly recommended to reduce the frequency of HCV infection. Furthermore, the silent evolution of HCV infection in children

  18. Resistant mechanism against nelfinavir of subtype C human immunodeficiency virus type 1 proteases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Dai, Qi; Li, Lihua; Xiu, Zhilong

    2011-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease (HIV-1 PR) is one of the major targets of anti-AIDS drug discovery, and the subtype C HIV-1 is infecting more and more humans. In this work, we executed computational simulations of subtype B (labeled B(WT)) HIV-1 PR, D30N mutant B (labeled B(D30N)) HIV-1 PR, subtype C (labeled C(Ref)) HIV-1 PR, D30N mutant C (labeled C(D30N)) HIV-1 PR, and D30N/N83T mutant C (labeled C(D30N/N83T)) HIV-1 PR with drug nelfinavir (NFV), aiming at clarifying (1) the resistant mechanism against NFV due to D30N mutation in subtype C HIV-1 PR; (2) the reason that the emergence rate of N83T mutation in C(D30N) HIV-1 PR is higher than that in B(D30N) HIV-1 PR; (3) the affinity of NFV with C(D30N/N83T) HIV-1 PR is higher than B(D30N) and C(D30N) HIV-1 PRs. The results indicate: (1) D30N mutation in subtype C HIV-1 PR reduces the hydrogen bond between the 30th residue and NFV, and the binding free energy contributions of some residues decrease; (2) the hydrogen bonds between the 83th/83'th residue and the 34th/34'th residue exist in both B(D30N) and C(D30N/N83T) HIV-1 PRs, while they disappear in C(D30N) HIV-1 PR. Meanwhile, the binding free energy contribution of N30 in C(D30N) is lower than that in B(D30N) and C(D30N/N83T); (3) N83T mutation makes some residues dislocate, and the contributions of these residues to binding free energy in C(D30N/N83T) increase comparing to those in B(D30N) and C(D30N). Our findings suggest that despite the nonactive site mutations, the polymorphisms regulate the emergence rates of these drug-resistant mutants.

  19. Vaccination Reduces Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Sequence Reversion through Enhanced Viral Control▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R.; Yeh, Wendy W.; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Clarke, Ryon H.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that vaccination prior to infection may direct the mutational evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to a less fit virus, resulting in an attenuated course of disease. The present study was initiated to explore whether prior immunization might prevent the reversion of the virus to the wild-type form. Mamu-A*01 monkeys were vaccinated to generate a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to the immunodominant Gag p11C epitope and were then challenged with a cloned pathogenic CXCR4-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) expressing a mutant Gag p11C sequence (Δp11C SHIV). The epitopic and extraepitopic compensatory mutations introduced into gag of Δp11C SHIV resulted in attenuated replicative capacity and eventual reversions to the wild-type Gag p11C sequence in naïve rhesus monkeys. However, in vaccinated rhesus monkeys, no reversions of the challenge virus were observed, an effect that may have been a consequence of significantly decreased viral replication rather than a redirection of the mutational evolution of the virus. These findings highlight the multifactorial pressures that affect the evolution of primate immunodeficiency viruses. PMID:20881040

  20. Vaccination reduces simian-human immunodeficiency virus sequence reversion through enhanced viral control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manuel, Edwin R; Yeh, Wendy W; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Clarke, Ryon H; Lifton, Michelle A; Letvin, Norman L

    2010-12-01

    It has been suggested that vaccination prior to infection may direct the mutational evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) to a less fit virus, resulting in an attenuated course of disease. The present study was initiated to explore whether prior immunization might prevent the reversion of the virus to the wild-type form. Mamu-A*01 monkeys were vaccinated to generate a cytotoxic T-lymphocyte response to the immunodominant Gag p11C epitope and were then challenged with a cloned pathogenic CXCR4-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) expressing a mutant Gag p11C sequence (Δp11C SHIV). The epitopic and extraepitopic compensatory mutations introduced into gag of Δp11C SHIV resulted in attenuated replicative capacity and eventual reversions to the wild-type Gag p11C sequence in naïve rhesus monkeys. However, in vaccinated rhesus monkeys, no reversions of the challenge virus were observed, an effect that may have been a consequence of significantly decreased viral replication rather than a redirection of the mutational evolution of the virus. These findings highlight the multifactorial pressures that affect the evolution of primate immunodeficiency viruses.

  1. Genome-wide engineering of an infectious clone of herpes simplex virus type 1 using synthetic genomics assembly methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldfield, Lauren M; Grzesik, Peter; Voorhies, Alexander A; Alperovich, Nina; MacMath, Derek; Najera, Claudia D; Chandra, Diya Sabrina; Prasad, Sanjana; Noskov, Vladimir N; Montague, Michael G; Friedman, Robert M; Desai, Prashant J; Vashee, Sanjay

    2017-10-17

    Here, we present a transformational approach to genome engineering of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), which has a large DNA genome, using synthetic genomics tools. We believe this method will enable more rapid and complex modifications of HSV-1 and other large DNA viruses than previous technologies, facilitating many useful applications. Yeast transformation-associated recombination was used to clone 11 fragments comprising the HSV-1 strain KOS 152 kb genome. Using overlapping sequences between the adjacent pieces, we assembled the fragments into a complete virus genome in yeast, transferred it into an Escherichia coli host, and reconstituted infectious virus following transfection into mammalian cells. The virus derived from this yeast-assembled genome, KOS YA , replicated with kinetics similar to wild-type virus. We demonstrated the utility of this modular assembly technology by making numerous modifications to a single gene, making changes to two genes at the same time and, finally, generating individual and combinatorial deletions to a set of five conserved genes that encode virion structural proteins. While the ability to perform genome-wide editing through assembly methods in large DNA virus genomes raises dual-use concerns, we believe the incremental risks are outweighed by potential benefits. These include enhanced functional studies, generation of oncolytic virus vectors, development of delivery platforms of genes for vaccines or therapy, as well as more rapid development of countermeasures against potential biothreats.

  2. Immunity status of adults and children against poliomyelitis virus type 1 strains CHAT and Sabin (LSc-2ab) in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eggers, Maren; Terletskaia-Ladwig, Elena; Rabenau, Holger F; Doerr, Hans W; Diedrich, Sabine; Enders, Gisela; Enders, Martin

    2010-12-09

    In October 2007, the working group CEN/TC 216 of the European Committee for standardisation suggested that the Sabin oral poliovirus vaccine type 1 strain (LSc-2ab) presently used for virucidal tests should be replaced by another attenuated vaccine poliovirus type 1 strain, CHAT. Both strains were historically used as oral vaccines, but the Sabin type 1 strain was acknowledged to be more attenuated. In Germany, vaccination against poliomyelitis was introduced in 1962 using the oral polio vaccine (OPV) containing Sabin strain LSc-2ab. The vaccination schedule was changed from OPV to an inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) containing wild polio virus type 1 strain Mahoney in 1998. In the present study, we assessed potential differences in neutralising antibody titres to Sabin and CHAT in persons with a history of either OPV, IPV, or OPV with IPV booster. Neutralisation poliovirus antibodies against CHAT and Sabin 1 were measured in sera of 41 adults vaccinated with OPV. Additionally, sera from 28 children less than 10 years of age and immunised with IPV only were analysed. The neutralisation assay against poliovirus was performed according to WHO guidelines. The neutralisation activity against CHAT in adults with OPV vaccination history was significantly lower than against Sabin poliovirus type 1 strains (Wilcoxon signed-rank test P CHAT were less than 8, although the titre against Sabin 1 varied between 8 and 64. Following IPV booster, anti-CHAT antibodies increased rapidly in sera of CHAT-negative adults with OPV history. Sera from children with IPV history neutralised CHAT and Sabin 1 strains equally. The lack of neutralising antibodies against the CHAT strain in persons vaccinated with OPV might be associated with an increased risk of reinfection with the CHAT polio virus type 1, and this implies a putative risk of transmission of the virus to polio-free communities. We strongly suggest that laboratory workers who were immunised with OPV receive a booster vaccination

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Type 1 LTR DNA contains an intrinsic gene producing antisense RNA and protein products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiao Chiu-Bin

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While viruses have long been shown to capitalize on their limited genomic size by utilizing both strands of DNA or complementary DNA/RNA intermediates to code for viral proteins, it has been assumed that human retroviruses have all their major proteins translated only from the plus or sense strand of RNA, despite their requirement for a dsDNA proviral intermediate. Several studies, however, have suggested the presence of antisense transcription for both HIV-1 and HTLV-1. More recently an antisense transcript responsible for the HTLV-1 bZIP factor (HBZ protein has been described. In this study we investigated the possibility of an antisense gene contained within the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR. Results Inspection of published sequences revealed a potential transcription initiator element (INR situated downstream of, and in reverse orientation to, the usual HIV-1 promoter and transcription start site. This antisense initiator (HIVaINR suggested the possibility of an antisense gene responsible for RNA and protein production. We show that antisense transcripts are generated, in vitro and in vivo, originating from the TAR DNA of the HIV-1 LTR. To test the possibility that protein(s could be translated from this novel HIV-1 antisense RNA, recombinant HIV antisense gene-FLAG vectors were designed. Recombinant protein(s were produced and isolated utilizing carboxy-terminal FLAG epitope (DYKDDDDK sequences. In addition, affinity-purified antisera to an internal peptide derived from the HIV antisense protein (HAP sequences identified HAPs from HIV+ human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Conclusion HIV-1 contains an antisense gene in the U3-R regions of the LTR responsible for both an antisense RNA transcript and proteins. This antisense transcript has tremendous potential for intrinsic RNA regulation because of its overlap with the beginning of all HIV-1 sense RNA transcripts by 25 nucleotides. The

  4. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4+ T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    McLinden, James H.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K.; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Bhattarai, Nirjal; Xiang, Jinhua

    2013-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glyc...

  5. Upregulation of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptors in Dopamine D2 Receptor Knockout Mice Is Reversed by Chronic Forced Ethanol Consumption

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanos, P.K.; Wang, G.; Thanos, P.K.; Gopez, V.; Delis, F.; Michaelides, M.; Grand, D.K.; Wang, G.-J.; Kunos, G.; Volkow, N.D.

    2011-01-01

    The anatomical proximity of the cannabinoid type 1 (CNR1/CB1R) and the dopamine D2 receptors (DRD2), their ability to form CB1R-DRD2 heteromers, their opposing roles in locomotion, and their involvement in ethanol's reinforcing and addictive properties prompted us to study the levels and distribution of CB1R after chronic ethanol intake, in the presence and absence of DRD2. We monitored the drinking patterns and locomotor activity of Drd2+/+ and Drd2-/- mice consuming either water or a 20% (v/v) ethanol solution (forced ethanol intake) for 6 months and used the selective CB1 receptor antagonist [{sup 3}H]SR141716A to quantify CB1R levels in different brain regions with in vitro receptor autoradiography. We found that the lack of DRD2 leads to a marked upregulation (approximately 2-fold increase) of CB1R in the cerebral cortex, the caudate-putamen, and the nucleus accumbens, which was reversed by chronic ethanol intake. The results suggest that DRD2-mediated dopaminergic neurotransmission and chronic ethanol intake exert an inhibitory effect on cannabinoid receptor expression in cortical and striatal regions implicated in the reinforcing and addictive properties of ethanol.

  6. Bile salt-stimulated lipase from human milk binds DC-SIGN and inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transfer to CD4+ T cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naarding, Marloes A.; Dirac, Annette M.; Ludwig, Irene S.; Speijer, Dave; Lindquist, Susanne; Vestman, Eva-Lotta; Stax, Martijn J.; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H.; Pollakis, Georgios; Hernell, Olle; Paxton, William A.

    2006-01-01

    A wide range of pathogens, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, Mycobacterium, Leishmania, and Helicobacter pylori, can interact with dendritic cell (DC)-specific ICAM3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN), expressed on DCs

  7. Evaluation of a multiple-cycle, recombinant virus, growth competition assay that uses flow cytometry to measure replication efficiency of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dykes, Carrie; Wang, Jiong; Jin, Xia; Planelles, Vicente; An, Dong Sung; Tallo, Amanda; Huang, Yangxin; Wu, Hulin; Demeter, Lisa M

    2006-06-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication efficiency or fitness, as measured in cell culture, has been postulated to correlate with clinical outcome of HIV infection, although this is still controversial. One limitation is the lack of high-throughput assays that can measure replication efficiency over multiple rounds of replication. We have developed a multiple-cycle growth competition assay to measure HIV-1 replication efficiency that uses flow cytometry to determine the relative proportions of test and reference viruses, each of which expresses a different reporter gene in place of nef. The reporter genes are expressed on the surface of infected cells and are detected by commercially available fluorescence-labeled antibodies. This method is less labor-intensive than those that require isolation and amplification of nucleic acids. The two reporter gene products are detected with similar specificity and sensitivity, and the proportion of infected cells in culture correlates with the amount of viral p24 antigen produced in the culture supernatant. HIV replication efficiencies of six different drug-resistant site-directed mutants were reproducibly quantified and were similar to those obtained with a growth competition assay in which the relative proportion of each variant was measured by sequence analysis, indicating that recombination between the pol and reporter genes was negligible. This assay also reproducibly quantified the relative fitness conferred by protease and reverse transcriptase sequences containing multiple drug resistance mutations, amplified from patient plasma. This flow cytometry-based growth competition assay offers advantages over current assays for HIV replication efficiency and should prove useful for the evaluation of patient samples in clinical trials.

  8. Neutralizing antibody response during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection: type and group specificity and viral escape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, M; Sönnerborg, A; Svennerholm, B

    1993-01-01

    demonstrated, suggesting that the majority of the change in neutralization sensitivity is driven by the selective pressure of type-specific NA. Furthermore, no differences were observed in sensitivity to neutralization by anti-carbohydrate neutralizing monoclonal antibodies or the lectin concanavalin A......The paradox that group-specific neutralizing antibodies (NA) exist in the majority of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients, whereas the NA response against autologous HIV-1 virus isolates is highly type-specific, motivated us to study the type- and group-specific NA...

  9. Cloning of the herpes simplex virus type 1 genome as a novel luciferase-tagged infectious bacterial artificial chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, You; Wang, Shuai; Zhu, Hua; Zheng, Chunfu

    2011-12-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a ubiquitous human pathogen of skin and mucous membranes. In the present study, the genome of the HSV-1 F strain was cloned as an infectious bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone without any deletions of the viral genes. Additionally, a firefly luciferase cassette was inserted to generate a novel luciferase-expressing HSV-1 BAC. Importantly, the resulting recombinant HSV-1 BAC Luc behaved indistinguishably from the wild-type virus in Vero cells, and the luciferase activity could be easily quantified in vitro. Thus, this novel HSV-1 BAC system would serve as a powerful tool for gene function profiling.

  10. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    In order to study the stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody (MAb) neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in antibody excess and under equilibrium conditions, we exploited the ability of HIV-1 to generate mixed oligomers when different env genes...... neutralization gradually increased. Virus neutralization by virion aggregation was minimal, as MAb binding to HIV-1 Env did not interfere with an AMLV Env-mediated infection by HIV-1(AMLV/HIV-1) pseudotypes of CD4(-) HEK293 cells. MAb neutralization of chimeric virions could be described as a third...

  11. Analysis of contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 UL43 protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    system implemented on the Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC). ... UL43 gene of HSV-1 encodes a non- glycosylated transmembrane protein which is conserved only in alpha- and gamma herpes viruses [8]. The HSV-1 UL43 has been ... AG-3'), which mutates the initiation codon from.

  12. CD40 ligand exhibits a direct antiviral effect on Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 infection via a PI3K-dependent, autophagy-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlahava, Virginia-Maria; Eliopoulos, Aristides G; Sourvinos, George

    2015-06-01

    The interaction between CD40 and its ligand, CD40L/CD154, is crucial for the efficient initiation and regulation of immune responses against viruses. Herpes Simplex Virus type-1 (HSV-1) is a neurotropic virus capable of manipulating host responses and exploiting host proteins to establish productive infection. Herein we have examined the impact of CD40L-mediated CD40 activation on HSV-1 replication in U2OS cells stably expressing the CD40 receptor. Treatment of these cells with CD40L significantly reduced the HSV-1 progeny virus compared to non-treated cells. The activation of CD40 signaling did not affect the binding of HSV-1 virions on the cell surface but rather delayed the translocation of VP16 to the nucleus, affecting all stages of viral life cycle. Using pharmacological inhibitors and RNAi we show that inhibition of PI3 kinase but not autophagy reverses the effects of CD40L on HSV-1 replication. Collectively, these data demonstrate that CD40 activation exerts a direct inhibitory effect on HSV-1, initiating from the very early stages of the infection by exploiting PI3 kinase-dependent but autophagy-independent mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct Phenotypical and Functional Dysregulation of Primary Human B Cells by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios; María Ángeles Muñoz-Fernandez; Marjorie Pion

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and pheno...

  14. A Mutation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease, N88S, That Causes In Vitro Hypersensitivity to Amprenavir

    OpenAIRE

    Ziermann, Rainer; Limoli, Kay; Das, Kalyan; Arnold, Edward; Petropoulos, Christos J.; Parkin, Neil T.

    2000-01-01

    Amprenavir (Agenerase, 141-W94, VX-478) is a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor (PRI) recently approved for the treatment of HIV-1 infection in the United States. A major cause of treatment failure is the development of resistance to PRIs. One potential use for amprenavir is as salvage therapy for patients for whom treatment that includes one (or more) of the other four currently approved PRIs-saquinavir, indinavir, ritonavir, and nelfinavir-has failed. We evaluate...

  15. The reverse genetics applied to fish RNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biacchesi Stéphane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aquaculture has expanded rapidly to become a major economic and food-producing sector worldwide these last 30 years. In parallel, viral diseases have emerged and rapidly spread from farm to farm causing enormous economic losses. The most problematic viruses encountered in the field are mainly, but not exclusively, RNA viruses belonging to the Novirhabdovirus, Aquabirnavirus, Alphavirus and Betanodavirus genera. The recent establishment of reverse genetics systems to recover infectious fish RNA viruses entirely from cDNA has made possible to genetically manipulate the viral genome. These systems have provided powerful tools to study all aspects of the virus biology and virus-host interactions but also gave the opportunity to use these viruses as live vaccines or as gene vectors. This review provides an overview on the recent breakthroughs achieved by using these reverse genetics systems in terms of viral protein function, virulence and host-specificity factor, vaccine development and vector design.

  16. Modes of transmission of Simian T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1 in semi-captive mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussel, Marion; Pontier, Dominique; Ngoubangoye, Barthélémy; Kazanji, Mirdad; Verrier, Delphine; Fouchet, David

    2015-09-30

    Non-human primates (NHPs) often live in inaccessible areas, have cryptic behaviors, and are difficult to follow in the wild. Here, we present a study on the spread of the simian T-lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (STLV-1), the simian counterpart of the human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) in a semi-captive mandrill colony. This study combines 28 years of longitudinal monitoring, including behavioral data, with a dynamic mathematical model and Bayesian inference. Three transmission modes were suspected: aggressive, sexual and familial. Our results show that among males, STLV-1 transmission occurs preferentially via aggression. Because of their impressive aggressive behavior male mandrills can easily transmit the virus during fights. On the contrary, sexual activity seems to have little effect. Thus transmission appears to occur primarily via male-male and female-female contact. In addition, for young mandrills, familial transmission appears to play an important role in virus spread. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Chimpanzee GB virus C and GB virus A E2 envelope glycoproteins contain a peptide motif that inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication in human CD4+ T-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, James H.; Stapleton, Jack T.; Klinzman, Donna; Murthy, Krishna K.; Chang, Qing; Kaufman, Thomas M.; Bhattarai, Nirjal

    2013-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) is a lymphotropic virus that can cause persistent infection in humans. GBV-C is not associated with any disease, but is associated with reduced mortality in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals. Related viruses have been isolated from chimpanzees (GBV-Ccpz) and from New World primates (GB virus type A, GBV-A). These viruses are also capable of establishing persistent infection. We determined the nucleotide sequence encoding the envelope glycoprotein (E2) of two GBV-Ccpz isolates obtained from the sera of captive chimpanzees. The deduced GBV-Ccpz E2 protein differed from human GBV-C by 31 % at the amino acid level. Similar to human GBV-C E2, expression of GBV-Ccpz E2 in a tet-off human CD4+ Jurkat T-cell line significantly inhibited the replication of diverse HIV-1 isolates. This anti-HIV-replication effect of GBV-Ccpz E2 protein was reversed by maintaining cells in doxycycline to reduce E2 expression. Previously, we found a 17 aa region within human GBV-C E2 that was sufficient to inhibit HIV-1. Although GBV-Ccpz E2 differed by 3 aa differences in this region, the chimpanzee GBV-C 17mer E2 peptide inhibited HIV-1 replication. Similarly, the GBV-A peptide that aligns with this GBV-C E2 region inhibited HIV-1 replication despite sharing only 5 aa with the human GBV-C E2 sequence. Thus, despite amino acid differences, the peptide region on both the GBV-Ccpz and the GBV-A E2 protein inhibit HIV-1 replication similar to human GBV-C. Consequently, GBV-Ccpz or GBV-A infection of non-human primates may provide an animal model to study GB virus–HIV interactions. PMID:23288422

  18. Optimization and immune recognition of multiple novel conserved HLA-A2, human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific CTL epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbet, Sylvie; Nielsen, Henrik Vedel; Vinner, Lasse

    2003-01-01

    MHC-I-restricted cytotoxic responses are considered a critical component of protective immunity against viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CTLs directed against accessory and early regulatory HIV-1 proteins might be particularly effective; however, CTL epitopes...... and more conserved. Such epitope peptides were anchor-optimized to improve immunogenicity and further increase the number of potential vaccine epitopes. About 67 % of anchor-optimized vaccine epitopes induced immune responses against the corresponding non-immunogenic naturally occurring epitopes....... This study demonstrates the potency of ANNs for identifying putative virus CTL epitopes, and the new HIV-1 CTL epitopes identified should have significant implications for HIV-1 vaccine development. As a novel vaccine approach, it is proposed to increase the coverage of HIV variants by including multiple...

  19. Optimization and immune recognition of multiple novel conserved HLA-A2, human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific CTL epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbet, S.; Nielsen, H.V.; Vinner, L.

    2003-01-01

    MHC-I-restricted cytotoxic responses are considered a critical component of protective immunity against viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CTLs directed against accessory and early regulatory HIV-1 proteins might be particularly effective; however, CTL epitopes...... conserved. Such epitope peptides were anchor-optimized to improve immunogenicity and further increase the number of potential vaccine epitopes. About 67% of anchor-optimized vaccine epitopes induced immune responses against the corresponding non-immunogenic naturally occurring epitopes. This study...... demonstrates the potency of ANNs for identifying putative virus CTL epitopes, and the new HIV-1 CTL epitopes identified should have significant implications for HIV-1 vaccine development. As a novel vaccine approach, it is proposed to increase the coverage of HIV variants by including multiple anchor...

  20. The N137 and P140 amino acids in the p51 and the P95 amino acid in the p66 subunit of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase are instrumental to maintain catalytic activity and to design new classes of anti-HIV-1 drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auwerx, Joeri; Van Nieuwenhove, Joke; Rodríguez-Barrios, Fátima; de Castro, Sonia; Velázquez, Sonsoles; Ceccherini-Silberstein, Francesca; De Clercq, Erik; Camarasa, María-José; Perno, Carlo-Federico; Gago, Federico; Balzarini, Jan

    2005-04-25

    Amino acids N137 and P140 in the p51 subunit of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) are part of the beta7-beta8-loop that contributes to the formation of the base of the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor (NNRTI)-binding pocket and makes up a substantial part of the dimerization interface. Amino acid P95 in p66 also markedly contributes to the dimerization binding energy. Nine RT mutants at amino acid 137 were constructed bearing the mutations Y, K, T, D, A, Q, S, H or E. The prolines at amino acid positions 95 and 140 were replaced by alanine in separate enzymes. We found that all mutant RT enzymes showed a dramatically decreased RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity. None of the mutant RT enzymes showed marked resistance against any of the clinically used NNRTIs but they surprisingly lost significant sensitivity for NRTIs such as ddGTP. The denaturation analyses of the mutant RTs by urea are suggestive for a relevant role of N137 in the stability of the RT heterodimer and support the view that the beta7-beta8 loop in p51 is a hot spot for RT dimerization and instrumental for efficient polymerase catalytic activity. Consequently, N137 and P140 in p51 and P95 in p66 should be attractive targets in the design of new structural classes of RT inhibitors aimed at compromising the optimal interaction of the beta7-beta8 loop in p51 at the p66/p51 dimerization interface.

  1. Postnatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: the breast-feeding dilemma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Perre, P

    1995-08-01

    Human milk has been considered only recently as a source of transmission for the human immunodeficiency virus. The estimated postnatal transmission rate from mothers who acquired human immunodeficiency virus infection while lactating is 26% (95% confidence interval 13% to 39%) and may be in the range of 8% to 18% from mothers who were infected before becoming pregnant. Risk factors for postnatal transmission include maternal immune deficiency and the presence of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells in milk. Some milk factors may be protective against postnatal transmission such as specific immunoglobulin A and immunoglobulin M and a molecule able to inhibit the binding of human immunodeficiency virus to CD4. In addition to its safety and its birth-spacing properties, breast-feeding provides immunologic protection and an ideal nutritional content to the infant. In a poor hygienic environment artificial feeding dramatically increases morbidity and mortality from diarrheal diseases and respiratory infections. Consequently, according to our current knowledge the World Health Organization and the United Nations Children's Fund reasonably recommend continuing breast-feeding promotion in women living in settings where infectious diseases and malnutrition are the primary causes of infant deaths such as in many developing countries. In settings where infectious diseases and malnutrition are not the primary causes of infant deaths, such as in most of the settings in the developed world, the advisory group recommends against breast-feeding for mothers with proved human immunodeficiency virus-1 infection.

  2. DR_SEQAN: a PC/Windows-based software to evaluate drug resistance using human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menéndez-Arias Luis

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genotypic assays based on DNA sequencing of part or the whole reverse transcriptase (RT- and protease (PR-coding regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genome have become part of the routine clinical management of HIV-infected individuals. However, the results are difficult to interpret due to complex interactions between mutations found in viral genes. Results DR_SEQAN is a tool to analyze RT and PR sequences. The program output includes a list containing all of the amino acid changes found in the query sequence in comparison with the sequence of a wild-type HIV-1 strain. Translation of codons containing nucleotide mixtures can result in potential ambiguities or heterogeneities in the amino acid sequence. The program identifies all possible combinations of 2 or 3 amino acids that derive from translation of triplets containing nucleotide mixtures. In addition, when ambiguities affect codons relevant for drug resistance, DR_SEQAN allows the user to select the appropriate mutation to be considered by the program's drug resistance interpretation algorithm. Resistance is predicted using a rule-based algorithm, whose efficiency and accuracy has been tested with a large set of drug susceptibility data. Drug resistance predictions given by DR_SEQAN were consistent with phenotypic data and coherent with predictions provided by other publicly available algorithms. In addition, the program output provides two tables showing published drug susceptibility data and references for mutations and combinations of mutations found in the analyzed sequence. These data are retrieved from an integrated relational database, implemented in Microsoft Access, which includes two sets of non-redundant core tables (one for combinations of mutations in the PR and the other for combinations in the RT. Conclusion DR_SEQAN is an easy to use off-line application that provides expert advice on HIV genotypic resistance interpretation. It is

  3. Characterization of virus-primed CD8+ T cells with a type 1 cytokine profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Stenvang, J P; Marker, O

    1996-01-01

    Infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is associated with marked polyclonal activation of the CD8+ T cell subpopulation. In this report the cytokine production of virus-activated T cells is analyzed and the producing cell subset is characterized phenotypically. Coinciding with other....... Phenotypically, the main cytokine-producing cell subset is found to be CD8+ cells targeted for homing to inflammatory sites (VLA-4hiL-selectinlo) of which 30-40% were positive by intracellular staining for IFN-gamma. This subset also contains all T cells with a cytotoxic potential as measured by redirected...

  4. Expression of the herpes simplex virus type 1 latency-associated transcripts does not influence latency establishment of virus mutants deficient for neuronal replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, M P; Efstathiou, S

    2013-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 establishes latency within neurons of the trigeminal ganglion. During latency, viral gene expression is largely restricted to the latency-associated transcripts (LATs), which, whilst not essential for any aspect of latency, function to suppress lytic gene expression and enhance the survival of virus-infected neurons. The latent cell population comprises primary-order neurons infected directly from peripheral tissues and cells infected following further virus spread within the ganglion. In order to assess the role of LAT expression on latency establishment within first-order neurons, we infected ROSA26R reporter mice with Cre recombinase-expressing recombinant viruses harbouring deletion of the thymidine kinase lytic gene and/or the core LAT promoter. We found that LAT expression did not impact on latency establishment in viruses unable to replicate in neurons, and under these conditions, it was not required for the survival of neurons between 3 and 31 days post-infection.

  5. Clustering patterns of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte epitopes in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) proteins reveal imprints of immune evasion on HIV-1 global variation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusim, K.; Kesmir, Can; Gaschen, B.

    2002-01-01

    The human cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) has been intensely studied, and hundreds of CTL epitopes have been experimentally defined, published, and compiled in the HIV Molecular Immunology Database. Maps of CTL epitopes on HIV-1 protein sequences...... reveal that defined epitopes tend to cluster. Here we integrate the global sequence and immunology databases to systematically explore the relationship between HIV-1 amino acid sequences and CTL epitope distributions. CTL responses to five HIV-1 proteins, Gag p17, Gag p24, reverse transcriptase (RT), Env......, and Nef, have been particularly well characterized in the literature to date. Through comparing CTL epitope distributions in these five proteins to global protein sequence alignments, we identified distinct characteristics of HIV amino acid sequences that correlate with CTL epitope localization. First...

  6. Herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 modulate autophagy in SIRC ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Autophagy and apoptosis function as important early cellular defense mechanisms in infections and other diseases. The outcome of an infection is determined by a complex interplay between the pathogenic microorganism and these intracellular pathways. To better understand the cytopathogenicity of Herpes simplex virus ...

  7. Corneal herpes simplex virus type 1 superinfection in patients with recrudescent herpetic keratitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Remeijer (Lies); J. Maertzdorf (Jeroen); J. Buitenwerf (Johannes); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Herpetic keratitis is a common sequel of a corneal infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Recrudescent herpetic keratitis (RHK) may result in irreversible damage to the cornea. Recurrences may be caused by reactivation of endogenous HSV-1 or reinfection with exogenous

  8. Corneal herpes simplex virus type 1 superinfection in patients with recrudescent herpetic keratitis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Remeijer (Lies); J. Maertzdorf (Jeroen); J. Buitenwerf (Johannes); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractPURPOSE: Herpetic keratitis is a common sequel of a corneal infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1. Recrudescent herpetic keratitis (RHK) may result in irreversible damage to the cornea. Recurrences may be caused by reactivation of endogenous HSV-1 or reinfection with exogenous

  9. Effects of morphine on replication of herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2009-05-17

    May 17, 2009 ... and most of them inhibit viral DNA synthesis. Recently, ... penicillin and 100 µg/ml of streptomycin. Herpes simplex virus type .... Viral DNA synthesis. To determine presence of viral DNA in morphine treated. Monavari and Shahrabadi 2947. Figure 5a. Electron micrograph of morphine treated infected cells in ...

  10. Cytoplasmic utilization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomic RNA is not dependent on a nuclear interaction with gag.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grewe, Bastian; Hoffmann, Bianca; Ohs, Inga; Blissenbach, Maik; Brandt, Sabine; Tippler, Bettina; Grunwald, Thomas; Uberla, Klaus

    2012-03-01

    In some retroviruses, such as Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus, Gag proteins are known to shuttle between the nucleus and the cytoplasm and are implicated in nuclear export of the viral genomic unspliced RNA (gRNA) for subsequent encapsidation. A similar function has been proposed for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag based on the identification of nuclear localization and export signals. However, the ability of HIV-1 Gag to transit through the nucleus has never been confirmed. In addition, the lentiviral Rev protein promotes efficient nuclear gRNA export, and previous reports indicate a cytoplasmic interaction between Gag and gRNA. Therefore, functional effects of HIV-1 Gag on gRNA and its usage were explored. Expression of gag in the absence of Rev was not able to increase cytoplasmic gRNA levels of subgenomic, proviral, or lentiviral vector constructs, and gene expression from genomic reporter plasmids could not be induced by Gag provided in trans. Furthermore, Gag lacking the reported nuclear localization and export signals was still able to mediate an efficient packaging process. Although small amounts of Gag were detectable in the nuclei of transfected cells, a Crm1-dependent nuclear export signal in Gag could not be confirmed. Thus, our study does not provide any evidence for a nuclear function of HIV-1 Gag. The encapsidation process of HIV-1 therefore clearly differs from that of Rous sarcoma virus and prototype foamy virus.

  11. Making Sense of Multifunctional Proteins: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Accessory and Regulatory Proteins and Connections to Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faust, Tyler B; Binning, Jennifer M; Gross, John D; Frankel, Alan D

    2017-09-29

    Viruses are completely dependent upon cellular machinery to support replication and have therefore developed strategies to co-opt cellular processes to optimize infection and counter host immune defenses. Many viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), encode a relatively small number of genes. Viruses with limited genetic content often encode multifunctional proteins that function at multiple stages of the viral replication cycle. In this review, we discuss the functions of HIV-1 regulatory (Tat and Rev) and accessory (Vif, Vpr, Vpu, and Nef) proteins. Each of these proteins has a highly conserved primary activity; however, numerous additional activities have been attributed to these viral proteins. We explore the possibility that HIV-1 proteins leverage their multifunctional nature to alter host transcriptional networks to elicit a diverse set of cellular responses. Although these transcriptional effects appear to benefit the virus, it is not yet clear whether they are strongly selected for during viral evolution or are a ripple effect from the primary function. As our detailed knowledge of these viral proteins improves, we will undoubtedly uncover how the multifunctional nature of these HIV-1 regulatory and accessory proteins, and in particular their transcriptional functions, work to drive viral pathogenesis.

  12. Ninety-Nine Is Not Enough: Molecular Characterization of Inhibitor-Resistant Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Protease Mutants with Insertions in the Flap Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koiek, Milan; Saskova, Klara Grantz; Rezaova, Pavlina; Brynda, Jii; van Maarseveen, Noortje M.; De Jong, Dorien; Boucher, Charles A.; Kagan, Ron M.; Nijhuis, Monique; Konvalinka, Jan (Quest); (Charles U); (Utrecht)

    2008-07-21

    While the selection of amino acid insertions in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) reverse transcriptase (RT) is a known mechanism of resistance against RT inhibitors, very few reports on the selection of insertions in the protease (PR) coding region have been published. It is still unclear whether these insertions impact protease inhibitor (PI) resistance and/or viral replication capacity. We show that the prevalence of insertions, especially between amino acids 30 to 41 of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) PR, has increased in recent years. We identified amino acid insertions at positions 33 and 35 of the PR of HIV-1-infected patients who had undergone prolonged treatment with PIs, and we characterized the contribution of these insertions to viral resistance. We prepared the corresponding mutated, recombinant PR variants with or without insertions at positions 33 and 35 and characterized them in terms of enzyme kinetics and crystal structures. We also engineered the corresponding recombinant viruses and analyzed the PR susceptibility and replication capacity by recombinant virus assay. Both in vitro methods confirmed that the amino acid insertions at positions 33 and 35 contribute to the viral resistance to most of the tested PIs. The structural analysis revealed local structural rearrangements in the flap region and in the substrate binding pockets. The enlargement of the PR substrate binding site together with impaired flap dynamics could account for the weaker inhibitor binding by the insertion mutants. Amino acid insertions in the vicinity of the binding cleft therefore represent a novel mechanism of HIV resistance development.

  13. Multi-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor resistant HIV type-1 in a patient from Sierra Leone failing stavudine, lamivudine and nevirapine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hamers, Raph L.; Wensing, Annemarie M. J.; Back, Nicole K. T.; Arcilla, Maria S.; Frissen, Jos P. H.

    2011-01-01

    We report a 33-year-old HIV type-1 (HIV-1)-infected male from Sierra Leone who harboured extensive drug resistance mutations to all nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) and non-NRTIs, including the multi-NRTI-resistance Q151M complex, K65R, M184I and Y181I, after using standard

  14. Detection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein by aptamer-based biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Uda; Fatin, M. F.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Uda, M. N. A.

    2017-03-01

    A study was conducted to detect the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) Tat protein using interdigitated electrodes. The measurements and images of the IDEs' finger gaps and the images of chitosan-carbon nanotubes deposited on top of the interdigitated electrodes were taken using the Scanning Electron Microscope. The detection of HIV-1 Tat protein was done using split aptamers and aptamer tail. Biosensors were chosen as diagnostic equipment due to their rapid diagnostic capabilities.

  15. Contributions of herpes simplex virus type 1 envelope proteins to entry by endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) proteins specifically required for endocytic entry but not direct penetration have not been identified. HSVs deleted of gE, gG, gI, gJ, gM, UL45, or Us9 entered cells via either pH-dependent or pH-independent endocytosis and were inactivated by mildly acidic pH. Thus, the ...

  16. Complete genome sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of dengue type 1 virus isolated from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhar, Esam I; Hashem, Anwar M; El-Kafrawy, Sherif A; Abol-Ela, Said; Abd-Alla, Adly M M; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Farraj, Suha A; Othman, Norah A; Ben-Helaby, Huda G; Ashshi, Ahmed; Madani, Tariq A; Jamjoom, Ghazi

    2015-01-16

    Dengue viruses (DENVs) are mosquito-borne viruses which can cause disease ranging from mild fever to severe dengue infection. These viruses are endemic in several tropical and subtropical regions. Multiple outbreaks of DENV serotypes 1, 2 and 3 (DENV-1, DENV-2 and DENV-3) have been reported from the western region in Saudi Arabia since 1994. Strains from at least two genotypes of DENV-1 (Asia and America/Africa genotypes) have been circulating in western Saudi Arabia until 2006. However, all previous studies reported from Saudi Arabia were based on partial sequencing data of the envelope (E) gene without any reports of full genome sequences for any DENV serotypes circulating in Saudi Arabia. Here, we report the isolation and the first complete genome sequence of a DENV-1 strain (DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011) isolated from a patient from Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in 2011. Whole genome sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed high similarity between DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011 strain and D1/H/IMTSSA/98/606 isolate (Asian genotype) reported from Djibouti in 1998. Further analysis of the full envelope gene revealed a close relationship between DENV-1-Jeddah-1-2011 strain and isolates reported between 2004-2006 from Jeddah as well as recent isolates from Somalia, suggesting the widespread of the Asian genotype in this region. These data suggest that strains belonging to the Asian genotype might have been introduced into Saudi Arabia long before 2004 most probably by African pilgrims and continued to circulate in western Saudi Arabia at least until 2011. Most importantly, these results indicate that pilgrims from dengue endemic regions can play an important role in the spread of new DENVs in Saudi Arabia and the rest of the world. Therefore, availability of complete genome sequences would serve as a reference for future epidemiological studies of DENV-1 viruses.

  17. Human complement receptor type 1/CD35 is an Epstein-Barr Virus receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogembo, Javier G; Kannan, Lakshmi; Ghiran, Ionita; Nicholson-Weller, Anne; Finberg, Robert W; Tsokos, George C; Fingeroth, Joyce D

    2013-02-21

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) attachment to primary B cells initiates virus entry. Although CD21 is the only known receptor for EBVgp350/220, a recent report documents EBV-infected B cells from a patient genetically deficient in CD21. On normal resting B cells, CD21 forms two membrane complexes: one with CD19 and another with CD35. Whereas the CD21/CD19 complex is widely retained on immortalized and B cell tumor lines, the related complement-regulatory protein CD35 is lost. To determine the role(s) of CD35 in initial infection, we transduced a CD21-negative pre-B cell and myeloid leukemia line with CD35, CD21, or both. Cells expressing CD35 alone bound gp350/220 and became latently infected when the fusion receptor HLA II was coexpressed. Temporal, biophysical, and structural characteristics of CD35-mediated infection were distinct from CD21. Identification of CD35 as an EBV receptor uncovers a salient role in primary infection, addresses unsettled questions of virus tropism, and underscores the importance of EBVgp350/220 for vaccine development. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Human Complement Receptor Type 1/CD35 Is an Epstein-Barr Virus Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier G. Ogembo

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV attachment to primary B cells initiates virus entry. Although CD21 is the only known receptor for EBVgp350/220, a recent report documents EBV-infected B cells from a patient genetically deficient in CD21. On normal resting B cells, CD21 forms two membrane complexes: one with CD19 and another with CD35. Whereas the CD21/CD19 complex is widely retained on immortalized and B cell tumor lines, the related complement-regulatory protein CD35 is lost. To determine the role(s of CD35 in initial infection, we transduced a CD21-negative pre-B cell and myeloid leukemia line with CD35, CD21, or both. Cells expressing CD35 alone bound gp350/220 and became latently infected when the fusion receptor HLA II was coexpressed. Temporal, biophysical, and structural characteristics of CD35-mediated infection were distinct from CD21. Identification of CD35 as an EBV receptor uncovers a salient role in primary infection, addresses unsettled questions of virus tropism, and underscores the importance of EBVgp350/220 for vaccine development.

  19. Inhibitory effects of Korean medicinal plants and camelliatannin H from Camellia japonica on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong Cheol; Hur, Jong Moon; Park, Ju Gwon; Hatano, Tsutomu; Yoshida, Takashi; Miyashiro, Hirotsugu; Min, Byung Sun; Hattori, Masao

    2002-08-01

    To identify substances with anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity in traditional medicines, 101 extracts of Korean medicinal plants were screened for their inhibitory effects on HIV type 1 protease (PR). The enzyme activity was determined by HPLC. Of the extracts tested, strong inhibitory effects were observed in the acetone extracts of the pericarp and leaves of Camellia japonica, the water extract of the leaves of Sageretia theezans and the methanol extract of the aerial part of Sophora flavescens. Camelliatannin H from the pericarp of C. japonica, showed a potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 PR with IC(50) of 0.9 microM. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Antibody titers for canine parvovirus type-2, canine distemper virus, and canine adenovirus type-1 in adult household dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taguchi, Masayuki; Namikawa, Kazuhiko; Maruo, Takuya; Orito, Kensuke; Lynch, Jonathan; Sahara, Hiroeki

    2011-09-01

    Serum antibody titers for canine parvovirus type-2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV) and canine adenovirus type-1 (CAV-1) were investigated in 1031 healthy adult household dogs (2 to 18 years old) given an annual inoculation in the previous 11 to 13 months. The number of dogs retaining significant titers of antibodies against CPV-2, CDV, and CAV-1 were 888 (86%), 744 (72%), and 732 (71%), respectively. There were no differences between males and females in antibody titers against the 3 viruses. Antibody titer for CPV-2 was significantly higher in younger dogs than in older dogs, CDV antibody was significantly higher in older dogs than in younger dogs, and CAV titer was not associated with age.

  1. Optimization and immune recognition of multiple novel conserved HLA-A2, human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific CTL epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corbet, S; Nielsen, HV; Vinner, L

    2003-01-01

    MHC-I-restricted cytotoxic responses are considered a critical component of protective immunity against viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). CTLs directed against accessory and early regulatory HIV-1 proteins might be particularly effective; however, CTL epitopes......-1 strains. HLA-A2 binding was validated experimentally and binders were tested for their ability to induce CTL and IFN-gamma responses. About 69 % were immunogenic in HLA-A2 transgenic mice and 61 % were recognized by CD8(+) T-cells from 17 HLA-A2 HIV-1-positive patients. Thus, 31 novel conserved...... in these proteins are rarely found. Novel artificial neural networks (ANNs) were used to quantitatively predict HLA-A2-binding CTL epitope peptides from publicly available full-length HIV-1 protein sequences. Epitopes were selected based on their novelty, predicted HLA-A2-binding affinity and conservation among HIV...

  2. Direct inactivation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by a novel small-molecule entry inhibitor, DCM205.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Yen T; Meadows, D Christopher; Srivastava, Indresh K; Gervay-Hague, Jacquelyn; North, Thomas W

    2007-05-01

    With more than 40 million people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), there is an urgent need to develop drugs that can be used in the form of a topical microbicide to prevent infection through sexual transmission. DCM205 is a recently discovered small-molecule inhibitor of HIV type 1 (HIV-1) that is able to directly inactivate HIV-1 in the absence of a cellular target. DCM205 is active against CXCR4-, CCR5-, and dual-tropic laboratory-adapted and primary strains of HIV-1. DCM205 binds to the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, and competition studies map the DCM205 binding at or near the V3 loop of gp120. Binding to this site interferes with the soluble CD4 interaction. With its ability to disable the virus particle, DCM205 represents a promising new class of HIV entry inhibitor that can be used as a strategy in the prevention of HIV-1/AIDS.

  3. Adaptation of Subtype A Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope to Pig-Tailed Macaque Cells▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Daryl; Overbaugh, Julie

    2011-01-01

    The relevance of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) infection of macaques to HIV-1 infection in humans depends on how closely SHIVs mimic HIV-1 transmission, pathogenesis, and diversity. Circulating HIV-1 strains are predominantly subtypes C and A and overwhelmingly require CCR5 for entry, yet most SHIVs incorporate CXCR4-using subtype B envelopes (Envs). While pathogenic subtype C-based SHIVs have been constructed, the subtype A-based SHIVs (SHIV-As) constructed to date have been unable to replicate in macaque cells. To understand the barriers to SHIV-A replication in macaque cells, HIVAQ23/SIVvif was constructed by engineering a CCR5-tropic subtype A provirus to express SIV vif, which counters the macaque APOBEC3G restriction. HIVAQ23/SIVvif replicated poorly in pig-tailed macaque (Ptm) lymphocytes, but viruses were adapted to Ptm lymphocytes. Two independent mutations in gp120, G312V (V3 loop) and A204E (C2 region), were identified that increased peak virus levels by >100-fold. Introduction of G312V and A204E to multiple subtype A Envs and substitution of G312 and A204 with other residues increased entry into Ptm cells by 10- to 100-fold. G312V and A204E Env variants continued to require CCR5 for entry but were up to 50- and 200-fold more sensitive to neutralization by IgG1b12 and soluble CD4 and had a 5- to 50-fold increase in their ability to utilize Ptm CD4 compared to their wild-type counterparts. These findings identify the inefficient use of Ptm CD4 as an unappreciated restriction to subtype A HIV-1 replication in Ptm cells and reveal amino acid changes to gp120 that can overcome this barrier. PMID:21325401

  4. Extracellular vesicles during Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 infection: an inquire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalamvoki, Maria; Deschamps, Thibaut

    2016-04-05

    Extracellular vesicles are defined as a heterogeneous group of vesicles that are released by prokaryotic to higher eukaryotic cells and by plant cells in an evolutionary conserved manner. The significance of these vesicles lies in their capacity to transfer selected cargo composed of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids to both recipient and parent cells and to influence various physiological and pathological functions. Microorganisms such as parasites, fungi and protozoa and even single cell organisms such as bacteria generate extracellular vesicles. In addition, several viruses have evolved strategies to hijack the extracellular vesicles for egress or to alter the surrounding environment. The thesis of this article is that: a) during HSV-1 infection vesicles are delivered from infected to uninfected cells that influence the infection; b) the cargo of these vesicles consists of viral and host transcripts (mRNAs, miRNAs and non-coding RNAs) and proteins including innate immune components, such as STING; and c) the viral vesicles carry the tetraspanins CD9, CD63 and CD81, which are considered as markers of exosomes. Therefore, we assume that the STING-carrying vesicles, produced during HSV-1 infection, are reminiscent to exosomes. The presumed functions of the exosomes released from HSV-1 infected cells include priming the recipient cells and accelerating antiviral responses to control the dissemination of the virus. This may be one strategy used by the virus to prevent the elimination by the host and establish persistent infection. In conclusion, the modification of the cargo of exosomes appears to be part of the strategy that HSV-1 has evolved to establish lifelong persistent infections into the human body to ensure successful dissemination between individuals.

  5. Characterization of Tissue Tropism Determinants of Adeno-Associated Virus Type 1

    OpenAIRE

    Hauck, Bernd; Xiao, Weidong

    2003-01-01

    Muscle is an attractive target for gene delivery because of its mass and because vectors can be delivered in a noninvasive fashion. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been shown to be effective for muscle-targeted gene transfer. Recent progress in characterization of AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) and AAV6 demonstrated that these two AAV serotypes are far more efficient in transducing muscle than is the traditionally used AAV2. Since all cis elements are identical in these vectors, the potential determi...

  6. Antibody neutralization escape mediated by point mutations in the intracytoplasmic tail of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalia, Vandana; Sarkar, Surojit; Gupta, Phalguni; Montelaro, Ronald C

    2005-02-01

    The persistence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in the presence of robust host immunity has been associated in part with variation in viral envelope proteins leading to antigenic variation and escape from neutralizing antibodies. Previous studies of natural neutralization escape mutants have predominantly focused on gp120 and gp41 ectodomain sequence variations that alter antibody binding via changes in conformation or glycosylation pattern of the Env, likely due to the immune pressure exerted on the exposed ectodomain component of the glycoprotein. Here, we show for the first time a novel mechanism by which point mutations in the intracytoplasmic tail of the transmembrane component (gp41) of envelope can render the virus resistant to neutralization by monoclonal antibodies and broadly neutralizing polyclonal serum antibodies. Point mutations in a highly conserved structural motif within the intracytoplasmic tail resulted in decreased binding of neutralizing antibodies to the Env ectodomain, evidently due to allosteric changes both in the gp41 ectodomain and in gp120. While receptor binding and infectivity of the mutant virus remained unaltered, the changes in Env antigenicity were associated with an increase in neutralization resistance of the mutant virus. These studies demonstrate the structurally integrated nature of gp120 and gp41 and underscore a previously unrecognized potentially critical role for even minor sequence variation of the intracytoplasmic tail in modulating the antigenicity of the ectodomain of HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein complex.

  7. The Vif accessory protein alters the cell cycle of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infected cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiangfang; Shackelford, Jason M; Casella, Carolyn R; Shivers, Debra K; Rapaport, Eric L; Liu, Bindong; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Finkel, Terri H

    2007-03-15

    The viral infectivity factor gene (vif) of HIV-1 increases the infectivity of viral particles by inactivation of cellular anti-viral factors, and supports productive viral replication in primary human CD4 T cells and in certain non-permissive T cell lines. Here, we demonstrate that Vif also contributes to the arrest of HIV-1 infected cells in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle. Viruses deleted in Vif or Vpr induce less cell cycle arrest than wild-type virus, while cells infected with HIV-1 deleted in both Vif and Vpr have a cell cycle profile equivalent to that of uninfected cells. Furthermore, expression of Vif alone induces accumulation of cells in the G(2) phase of the cell cycle. These data demonstrate a novel role for Vif in cell cycle regulation and suggest that Vif and Vpr independently drive G(2) arrest in HIV-1 infected cells. Our results may have implications for the actions and interactions of key HIV-1 accessory proteins in AIDS pathogenesis.

  8. Attenuated Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 Expressing the Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) Fusion (F) Glycoprotein from an Added Gene: Effects of Prefusion Stabilization and Packaging of RSV F.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; Liang, Bo; Ngwuta, Joan; Liu, Xueqiao; Surman, Sonja; Lingemann, Matthias; Kwong, Peter D; Graham, Barney S; Collins, Peter L; Munir, Shirin

    2017-11-15

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most prevalent worldwide cause of severe respiratory tract infection in infants and young children. Human parainfluenza virus type 1 (HPIV1) also causes severe pediatric respiratory illness, especially croup. Both viruses lack vaccines. Here, we describe the preclinical development of a bivalent RSV/HPIV1 vaccine based on a recombinant HPIV1 vector, attenuated by a stabilized mutation, that expresses RSV F protein modified for increased stability in the prefusion (pre-F) conformation by previously described disulfide bond (DS) and hydrophobic cavity-filling (Cav1) mutations. RSV F was expressed from the first or second gene position as the full-length protein or as a chimeric protein with its transmembrane and cytoplasmic tail (TMCT) domains substituted with those of HPIV1 F in an effort to direct packaging in the vector particles. All constructs were recovered by reverse genetics. The TMCT versions of RSV F were packaged in the rHPIV1 particles much more efficiently than their full-length counterparts. In hamsters, the presence of the RSV F gene, and in particular the TMCT versions, was attenuating and resulted in reduced immunogenicity. However, the vector expressing full-length RSV F from the pre-N position was immunogenic for RSV and HPIV1. It conferred complement-independent high-quality RSV-neutralizing antibodies at titers similar to those of wild-type RSV and provided protection against RSV challenge. The vectors exhibited stable RSV F expression in vitro and in vivo In conclusion, an attenuated rHPIV1 vector expressing a pre-F-stabilized form of RSV F demonstrated promising immunogenicity and should be further developed as an intranasal pediatric vaccine.IMPORTANCE RSV and HPIV1 are major viral causes of acute pediatric respiratory illness for which no vaccines or suitable antiviral drugs are available. The RSV F glycoprotein is the major RSV neutralization antigen. We used a rHPIV1 vector, bearing a

  9. Humoral, mucosal, and cellular immunity in response to a human immunodeficiency virus type 1 immunogen expressed by a Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus vaccine vector.

    OpenAIRE

    Caley, I J; Betts, M R; Irlbeck, D M; Davis, N L; Swanstrom, R; Frelinger, J A; Johnston, R E

    1997-01-01

    A molecularly cloned attenuated strain of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEE) has been genetically configured as a replication-competent vaccine vector for the expression of heterologous viral proteins (N. L. Davis, K. W. Brown, and R. E. Johnston, J. Virol. 70:3781-3787, 1996). The matrix/capsid (MA/CA) coding domain of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) was cloned into the VEE vector to determine the ability of a VEE vector to stimulate an anti-HIV immune response in mice. T...

  10. Phylogeography and Molecular Epidemiology of an Epidemic Strain of Dengue Virus Type 1 in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocwieja, Karen E.; Fernando, Anira N.; Sherrill-Mix, Scott; Sundararaman, Sesh A.; Tennekoon, Rashika N.; Tippalagama, Rashmi; Krishnananthasivam, Shivankari; Premawansa, Gayani; Premawansa, Sunil; De Silva, Aruna Dharshan

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, a severe epidemic of dengue disease occurred in Sri Lanka, with higher mortality and morbidity than any previously recorded epidemic in the country. It corresponded to a shift to dengue virus 1 as the major disease-causing serotype in Sri Lanka. Dengue disease reached epidemic levels in the next 3 years. We report phylogenetic evidence that the 2009 epidemic DENV-1 strain continued to circulate within the population and caused severe disease in the epidemic of 2012. Bayesian phylogeographic analyses suggest that the 2009 Sri Lankan epidemic DENV-1 strain may have traveled directly or indirectly from Thailand through China to Sri Lanka, and after spreading within the Sri Lankan population, it traveled to Pakistan and Singapore. Our findings delineate the dissemination route of a virulent DENV-1 strain in Asia. Understanding such routes will be of particular importance to global control efforts. PMID:24799375

  11. Oral ulcers in children under chemotherapy: clinical characteristics and their relation with Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 and Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda, Ester; Brethauer, Ursula; Rojas, Jaime; Fernández, Eduardo; Le Fort, Patricia

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the clinical characteristics of oral ulcers in pediatric oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy and their relation with the presence of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1 and Candida albicans. The sample consisted of 20 ulcerative lesions from 15 children treated with chemotherapy in the Pediatric Service of the Regional Hospital of Concepción, Chile. Two calibrated clinicians performed clinical diagnosis of the ulcers and registered general data from the patients (age, general diagnosis, absolute neutrophil count, and number of days after chemotherapy) and clinical characteristic of the ulcers: number, size, location, presence or absence of pain and inflammatory halo, edge characteristics, and exudate type. Additional to clinical diagnosis, culture for Candida albicans (C) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 was performed. Ten ulcers occurred in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, five in patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia and five in patients with other neoplastic diseases. Eight ulcers were HSV (+) / C (-), 6 HSV (-) / C (-), 4 HSV (+) / C (+) and 2 HSV (-) / C (+). Preferential location was the hard palate. Most lesions were multiple, painful, with inflammatory halo, irregular edges and fibrinous exudate. The average size was 6,5 millimeters, and the mean number of days after chemotherapy was 7.5 days. Oral ulcers in children with oncological diseases did not present a specific clinical pattern. They were strongly associated with HSV.

  12. Autophagy is involved in anti-viral activity of pentagalloylglucose (PGG) against Herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in vitro

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    Pei, Ying, E-mail: peiying-19802@163.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Chen, Zhen-Ping, E-mail: 530670663@qq.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Ju, Huai-Qiang, E-mail: 344464448@qq.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Komatsu, Masaaki, E-mail: komatsu-ms@igakuken.or.jp [Laboratory of Frontier Science, Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Medical Science, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8613 (Japan); Ji, Yu-hua, E-mail: tjyh@jnu.edu.cn [Institute of Tissue Transplantation and Immunology, College of Life Science and Technology, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China); Liu, Ge, E-mail: lggege_15@hotmail.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Guo, Chao-wan, E-mail: chaovan_kwok@hotmail.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Zhang, Ying-Jun, E-mail: zhangyj@mail.kib.ac.cn [Kunming Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan, Kunming 650204 (China); Yang, Chong-Ren, E-mail: cryang@mail.kib.ac.cn [Kunming Institute of Botany, the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Yunnan, Kunming 650204 (China); Wang, Yi-Fei, E-mail: twang-yf@163.com [Biomedicine Research and Development Center of Jinan University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510632 (China); Kitazato, Kaio, E-mail: kkholi@msn.com [Division of Molecular Pharmacology of Infectious agents, Department of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan)

    2011-02-11

    Research highlights: {yields} We showed PGG has anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and can induce autophgy. {yields} Autophagy may be a novel and important mechanism mediating PGG anti-viral activities. {yields} Inhibition of mTOR pathway is an important mechanism of induction of autophagy by PGG. -- Abstract: Pentagalloylglucose (PGG) is a natural polyphenolic compound with broad-spectrum anti-viral activity, however, the mechanisms underlying anti-viral activity remain undefined. In this study, we investigated the effects of PGG on anti-viral activity against Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) associated with autophagy. We found that the PGG anti-HSV-1 activity was impaired significantly in MEF-atg7{sup -/-} cells (autophagy-defective cells) derived from an atg7{sup -/-} knockout mouse. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that PGG-induced autophagosomes engulfed HSV-1 virions. The mTOR signaling pathway, an essential pathway for the regulation of autophagy, was found to be suppressed following PGG treatment. Data presented in this report demonstrated for the first time that autophagy induced following PGG treatment contributed to its anti-HSV activity in vitro.

  13. Comparison of Heterologous Prime-Boost Strategies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Using Negative Stranded RNA Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Tessa M; Wanjalla, Celestine N; Gomme, Emily A; Wirblich, Christoph; Gatt, Anthony; Carnero, Elena; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Lyles, Douglas S; McGettigan, James P; Schnell, Matthias J

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed a heterologous prime-boost vaccine approach against HIV-1 using three different antigenically unrelated negative-stranded viruses (NSV) expressing HIV-1 Gag as vaccine vectors: rabies virus (RABV), vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Newcastle disease virus (NDV). We hypothesized that this approach would result in more robust cellular immune responses than those achieved with the use of any of the vaccines alone in a homologous prime-boost regimen. To this end, we primed BALB/c mice with each of the NSV-based vectors. Primed mice were rested for thirty-five days after which we administered a second immunization with the same or heterologous NSV-Gag viruses. The magnitude and quality of the Gag-specific CD8(+) T cells in response to these vectors post boost were measured. In addition, we performed challenge experiments using vaccinia virus expressing HIV-1 Gag (VV-Gag) thirty-three days after the boost inoculation. Our results showed that the choice of the vaccine used for priming was important for the detected Gag-specific CD8(+) T cell recall responses post boost and that NDV-Gag appeared to result in a more robust recall of CD8(+) T cell responses independent of the prime vaccine used. However, the different prime-boost strategies were not distinct for the parameters studied in the challenge experiments using VV-Gag but did indicate some benefits compared to single immunizations. Taken together, our data show that NSV vectors can individually stimulate HIV-Gag specific CD8(+) T cells that are effectively recalled by other NSV vectors in a heterologous prime-boost approach. These results provide evidence that RABV, VSV and NDV can be used in combination to develop vaccines needing prime-boost regimens to stimulate effective immune responses.

  14. Comparison of Heterologous Prime-Boost Strategies against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Gag Using Negative Stranded RNA Viruses.

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    Tessa M Lawrence

    Full Text Available This study analyzed a heterologous prime-boost vaccine approach against HIV-1 using three different antigenically unrelated negative-stranded viruses (NSV expressing HIV-1 Gag as vaccine vectors: rabies virus (RABV, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV and Newcastle disease virus (NDV. We hypothesized that this approach would result in more robust cellular immune responses than those achieved with the use of any of the vaccines alone in a homologous prime-boost regimen. To this end, we primed BALB/c mice with each of the NSV-based vectors. Primed mice were rested for thirty-five days after which we administered a second immunization with the same or heterologous NSV-Gag viruses. The magnitude and quality of the Gag-specific CD8(+ T cells in response to these vectors post boost were measured. In addition, we performed challenge experiments using vaccinia virus expressing HIV-1 Gag (VV-Gag thirty-three days after the boost inoculation. Our results showed that the choice of the vaccine used for priming was important for the detected Gag-specific CD8(+ T cell recall responses post boost and that NDV-Gag appeared to result in a more robust recall of CD8(+ T cell responses independent of the prime vaccine used. However, the different prime-boost strategies were not distinct for the parameters studied in the challenge experiments using VV-Gag but did indicate some benefits compared to single immunizations. Taken together, our data show that NSV vectors can individually stimulate HIV-Gag specific CD8(+ T cells that are effectively recalled by other NSV vectors in a heterologous prime-boost approach. These results provide evidence that RABV, VSV and NDV can be used in combination to develop vaccines needing prime-boost regimens to stimulate effective immune responses.

  15. Deciphering human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmission and early envelope diversification by single-genome amplification and sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F; Bailes, Elizabeth; Pham, Kimmy T; Salazar, Maria G; Guffey, M Brad; Keele, Brandon F; Derdeyn, Cynthia A; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Allen, Susan; Manigart, Olivier; Mulenga, Joseph; Anderson, Jeffrey A; Swanstrom, Ronald; Haynes, Barton F; Athreya, Gayathri S; Korber, Bette T M; Sharp, Paul M; Shaw, George M; Hahn, Beatrice H

    2008-04-01

    Accurate identification of the transmitted virus and sequences evolving from it could be instrumental in elucidating the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and in developing vaccines, drugs, or microbicides to prevent infection. Here we describe an experimental approach to analyze HIV-1 env genes as intact genetic units amplified from plasma virion RNA by single-genome amplification (SGA), followed by direct sequencing of uncloned DNA amplicons. We show that this strategy precludes in vitro artifacts caused by Taq-induced nucleotide substitutions and template switching, provides an accurate representation of the env quasispecies in vivo, and has an overall error rate (including nucleotide misincorporation, insertion, and deletion) of less than 8 x 10(-5). Applying this method to the analysis of virus in plasma from 12 Zambian subjects from whom samples were obtained within 3 months of seroconversion, we show that transmitted or early founder viruses can be identified and that molecular pathways and rates of early env diversification can be defined. Specifically, we show that 8 of the 12 subjects were each infected by a single virus, while 4 others acquired more than one virus; that the rate of virus evolution in one subject during an 80-day period spanning seroconversion was 1.7 x 10(-5) substitutions per site per day; and that evidence of strong immunologic selection can be seen in Env and overlapping Rev sequences based on nonrandom accumulation of nonsynonymous mutations. We also compared the results of the SGA approach with those of more-conventional bulk PCR amplification methods performed on the same patient samples and found that the latter is associated with excessive rates of Taq-induced recombination, nucleotide misincorporation, template resampling, and cloning bias. These findings indicate that HIV-1 env genes, other viral genes, and even full-length viral genomes responsible for productive clinical infection can be identified

  16. Deciphering Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transmission and Early Envelope Diversification by Single-Genome Amplification and Sequencing▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Bailes, Elizabeth; Pham, Kimmy T.; Salazar, Maria G.; Guffey, M. Brad; Keele, Brandon F.; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.; Farmer, Paul; Hunter, Eric; Allen, Susan; Manigart, Olivier; Mulenga, Joseph; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Swanstrom, Ronald; Haynes, Barton F.; Athreya, Gayathri S.; Korber, Bette T. M.; Sharp, Paul M.; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.

    2008-01-01

    Accurate identification of the transmitted virus and sequences evolving from it could be instrumental in elucidating the transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and in developing vaccines, drugs, or microbicides to prevent infection. Here we describe an experimental approach to analyze HIV-1 env genes as intact genetic units amplified from plasma virion RNA by single-genome amplification (SGA), followed by direct sequencing of uncloned DNA amplicons. We show that this strategy precludes in vitro artifacts caused by Taq-induced nucleotide substitutions and template switching, provides an accurate representation of the env quasispecies in vivo, and has an overall error rate (including nucleotide misincorporation, insertion, and deletion) of less than 8 × 10−5. Applying this method to the analysis of virus in plasma from 12 Zambian subjects from whom samples were obtained within 3 months of seroconversion, we show that transmitted or early founder viruses can be identified and that molecular pathways and rates of early env diversification can be defined. Specifically, we show that 8 of the 12 subjects were each infected by a single virus, while 4 others acquired more than one virus; that the rate of virus evolution in one subject during an 80-day period spanning seroconversion was 1.7 × 10−5 substitutions per site per day; and that evidence of strong immunologic selection can be seen in Env and overlapping Rev sequences based on nonrandom accumulation of nonsynonymous mutations. We also compared the results of the SGA approach with those of more-conventional bulk PCR amplification methods performed on the same patient samples and found that the latter is associated with excessive rates of Taq-induced recombination, nucleotide misincorporation, template resampling, and cloning bias. These findings indicate that HIV-1 env genes, other viral genes, and even full-length viral genomes responsible for productive clinical infection can be identified

  17. An outbreak of herpes simplex virus type 1 in an intensive care nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerberg, O; Watts, J; Chernesky, M; Luchsinger, I; Rawls, W

    1983-01-01

    Neonatal herpes simplex infection is not a common occurrence but one which warrants particular concern. An 1800-g premature infant who developed respiratory distress and died at 12 days unexpectedly yielded HSV from a culture of cerebrospinal fluid. There were no mucocutaneous lesions. Ten days later three other infants (ages 40, 69 and 11 days) developed vesicles which yielded herpes simplex. Health care staff cohorts were assigned to "clean" or "exposed" nursery areas. The three secondarily infected cases were treated with vidarabine and did not develop systemic symptoms. Typing of the isolates using immunofluorescence and monoclonal antibodies revealed all to be herpes simplex type 1. Restriction endonuclease cleavage of viral DNA determined that the isolates from the four infants were identical. The mothers of the infants denied any history of recent or recurrent herpes, and their cervical cultures were negative. The source of the outbreak has remained unknown. The possibility of manual transmission to the secondary cases remains likely despite standard infection control practices. Cohort isolation of all exposed patients prevented further spread.

  18. Serological evaluation of possible exposure to Ljungan virus and related parechovirus in autoimmune (type 1) diabetes in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, A-L; Vaziri-Sani, F; Broberg, P; Elfaitouri, A; Pipkorn, R; Blomberg, J; Ivarsson, S-A; Elding Larsson, H; Lernmark, Å

    2015-07-01

    Exposure to Ljungan virus (LV) is implicated in the risk of autoimmune (type 1) diabetes but possible contribution by other parechoviruses is not ruled out. The aim was to compare children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes in 2005-2011 (n = 69) with healthy controls (n = 294), all from the Jämtland County in Sweden, using an exploratory suspension multiplex immunoassay for IgM and IgG against 26 peptides of LV, human parechoviruses (HPeV), Aichi virus and poliovirus in relation to a radiobinding assay (RBA) for antibodies against LV and InfluenzaA/H1N1pdm09. Islet autoantibodies and HLA-DQ genotypes were also determined. 1) All five LV-peptide antibodies correlated to each other (P RBA detected LV antibodies correlated with young age at diagnosis (P RBA LV antibodies (P = 0.009); 5) HPeV3-peptide-IgM and -IgG showed inter-peptide correlations (P RBA LV antibodies without relation to insulin autoantibody positivity (P = 0.072 and P = 0.486, respectively). Both exploratory suspension multiplex IgG to LV-peptide VP1_31-60 and RBA detected LV antibodies correlated with insulin autoantibodies and HLA-DQ8 suggesting possible role in type 1 diabetes. It remains to be determined if cross-reactivity or concomitant exposure to LV and HPeV3 contributes to the seroprevalence. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr: oligomerization is an essential feature for its incorporation into virus particles

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    Klein-Seetharaman Judith

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HIV-1 Vpr, a nonstructural viral protein associated with virus particles, has a positive role in the efficient transport of PIC into the nucleus of non-dividing target cells and enhances virus replication in primary T cells. Vpr is a 96 amino acid protein and the structure by NMR shows three helical domains. Vpr has been shown to exist as dimers and higher order oligomers. Considering the multifunctional nature of Vpr, the contribution of distinct helical domains to the dimer/oligomer structure of Vpr and the relevance of this feature to its functions are not clear. To address this, we have utilized molecular modeling approaches to identify putative models of oligomerization. The predicted interface residues were subjected to site-directed mutagenesis and evaluated their role in intermolecular interaction and virion incorporation. The interaction between Vpr molecules was monitored by Bimolecular Fluorescence complementation (BiFC method. The results show that Vpr forms oligomers in live cells and residues in helical domains play critical roles in oligomerization. Interestingly, Vpr molecules defective in oligomerization also fail to incorporate into the virus particles. Based on the data, we suggest that oligomerization of Vpr is essential for virion incorporation property and may also have a role in the events associated with virus infection.

  20. Autoprocessing of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease miniprecursor fusions in mammalian cells

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    Chen Chaoping

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV protease (PR is a virus-encoded aspartic protease that is essential for viral replication and infectivity. The fully active and mature dimeric protease is released from the Gag-Pol polyprotein as a result of precursor autoprocessing. Results We here describe a simple model system to directly examine HIV protease autoprocessing in transfected mammalian cells. A fusion precursor was engineered encoding GST fused to a well-characterized miniprecursor, consisting of the mature protease along with its upstream transframe region (TFR, and small peptide epitopes to facilitate detection of the precursor substrate and autoprocessing products. In HEK 293T cells, the resulting chimeric precursor undergoes effective autoprocessing, producing mature protease that is rapidly degraded likely via autoproteolysis. The known protease inhibitors Darunavir and Indinavir suppressed both precursor autoprocessing and autoproteolysis in a dose-dependent manner. Protease mutations that inhibit Gag processing as characterized using proviruses also reduced autoprocessing efficiency when they were introduced to the fusion precursor. Interestingly, autoprocessing of the fusion precursor requires neither the full proteolytic activity nor the majority of the N-terminal TFR region. Conclusions We suggest that the fusion precursors provide a useful system to study protease autoprocessing in mammalian cells, and may be further developed for screening of new drugs targeting HIV protease autoprocessing.

  1. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef Inhibits Autophagy through Transcription Factor EB Sequestration.

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    Grant R Campbell

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available HIV Nef acts as an anti-autophagic maturation factor through interaction with beclin-1 (BECN1. We report that exposure of macrophages to infectious or non-infectious purified HIV induces toll-like receptor 8 (TLR8 and BECN1 dependent dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB and that this correlates with an increase in autophagy markers. RNA interference for ATG13, TFEB, TLR8, or BECN1 inhibits this HIV-induced autophagy. However, once HIV establishes a productive infection, TFEB phosphorylation and cytoplasmic sequestration are increased resulting in decreased autophagy markers. Moreover, by 7 d post-infection, autophagy levels are similar to mock infected controls. Conversely, although Nef deleted HIV similarly induces TFEB dephosphorylation and nuclear localization, and increases autophagy, these levels remain elevated during continued productive infection. Thus, the interaction between HIV and TLR8 serves as a signal for autophagy induction that is dependent upon the dephosphorylation and nuclear translocation of TFEB. During permissive infection, Nef binds BECN1 resulting in mammalian target of rapamycin (MTOR activation, TFEB phosphorylation and cytosolic sequestration, and the inhibition of autophagy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a virus modulating TFEB localization and helps to explain how HIV modulates autophagy to promote its own replication and cell survival.

  2. Adhesion and fusion efficiencies of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) surface proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrowsky, Terrence M.; Rabi, S. Alireza; Nedellec, Rebecca; Daniels, Brian R.; Mullins, James I.; Mosier, Donald E.; Siliciano, Robert F.; Wirtz, Denis

    2013-10-01

    In about half of patients infected with HIV-1 subtype B, viral populations shift from utilizing the transmembrane protein CCR5 to CXCR4, as well as or instead of CCR5, during late stage progression of the disease. How the relative adhesion efficiency and fusion competency of the viral Env proteins relate to infection during this transition is not well understood. Using a virus-cell fusion assay and live-cell single-molecule force spectroscopy, we compare the entry competency of viral clones to tensile strengths of the individual Env-receptor bonds of Env proteins obtained from a HIV-1 infected patient prior to and during coreceptor switching. The results suggest that the genetic determinants of viral entry were predominantly enriched in the C3, HR1 and CD regions rather than V3. Env proteins can better mediate entry into cells after coreceptor switch; this effective entry capacity does not correlate with the bond strengths between viral Env and cellular receptors.

  3. First report of multiple lineages of dengue viruses type 1 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Flavia B; Nogueira, Fernanda B; Castro, Márcia G; Nunes, Priscila Cg; de Filippis, Ana Maria B; Faria, Nieli Rc; Simões, Jaqueline Bs; Sampaio, Simone A; Santos, Clarice R; Nogueira, Rita Maria R

    2011-08-03

    In Brazil dengue has been a major public health problem since DENV-1 introduction and spread in 1986. After a low or silent co-circulation, DENV-1 re-emerged in 2009 causing a major epidemic in the country in 2010 and 2011. In this study, the phylogeny of DENV-1 strains isolated in RJ after its first introduction in 1986 and after its emergence in 2009 and 2010 was performed in order to document possible evolutionary patterns or introductions in a re-emergent virus. The analysis of the E gene sequences demonstrated that DENV-1 isolated during 2009/2010 still belong to genotype V (Americas/Africa) but grouping in a distinct clade (lineage II) of that represented by earlier DENV-1 (lineage I). However, strains isolated in 2011 grouped together forming another distinct clade (lineage III). The monitoring of DENV is important to observe the spread of potentially virulent strains as well to evaluate its impact over the population during an outbreak. Whether explosive epidemics reported in Brazil caused mainly by DENV-1 was due to lineage replacement, or due the population susceptibility to this serotype which has not circulated for almost a decade or even due to the occurrence of secondary infections in a hyperendemic country, is not clear. This is the first report of multiple lineages of DENV-1 detected in Brazil.

  4. First report of multiple lineages of dengue viruses type 1 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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    Simões Jaqueline BS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Brazil dengue has been a major public health problem since DENV-1 introduction and spread in 1986. After a low or silent co-circulation, DENV-1 re-emerged in 2009 causing a major epidemic in the country in 2010 and 2011. In this study, the phylogeny of DENV-1 strains isolated in RJ after its first introduction in 1986 and after its emergence in 2009 and 2010 was performed in order to document possible evolutionary patterns or introductions in a re-emergent virus. Findings The analysis of the E gene sequences demonstrated that DENV-1 isolated during 2009/2010 still belong to genotype V (Americas/Africa but grouping in a distinct clade (lineage II of that represented by earlier DENV-1 (lineage I. However, strains isolated in 2011 grouped together forming another distinct clade (lineage III. Conclusions The monitoring of DENV is important to observe the spread of potentially virulent strains as well to evaluate its impact over the population during an outbreak. Whether explosive epidemics reported in Brazil caused mainly by DENV-1 was due to lineage replacement, or due the population susceptibility to this serotype which has not circulated for almost a decade or even due to the occurrence of secondary infections in a hyperendemic country, is not clear. This is the first report of multiple lineages of DENV-1 detected in Brazil.

  5. Association between herpes simplex virus Types 1 and 2 with cardiac myxoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anvari, Maryam Sotoudeh; Sabagh, Moud; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza; Ziaei, Shayan; Boroumand, Mohammad Ali; Pourgholi, Leyla; Jenab, Yaser; Abbasi, Kyomars

    Most cases of atrial myxoma are sporadic, and the exact etiology is unknown. We examined if herpes simplex virus (HSV)-1 and HSV-2 antigens and/or DNA could be detected in a cohort of Iranian patients with cardiac myxomas. From July 2004 to June 2014, among a total of 36,703 patients undergoing open heart surgeries, consecutive patients with cardiac myxoma who were treated by surgical excision at our center included in this study. Of 73 patients studied, 56% were female with a mean age of 54 years (ranging from 23 to 77 years). Seventy-four myxomas were surgically removed from 73 patients, since one patient had two myxomas which were located on both the right atrium and right ventricle. The materials for this analysis were retrospectively gathered from extracted tumors that stored in a pathology bank of tissue paraffin blocks. The formalin fixed paraffin embedded tissue samples were investigated for HSV genomic DNA by both immunohistochemistry (IHC) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. In all 74 cases there was no presence of HSV 1 and HSV 2 infection. This suggests that HSV may not play a role in sporadic cardiac myxomas; however, evidence for such association is currently lacking, and further studies are required to determine such a role. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Impaired plant growth and development caused by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueno, Marni E; Hibi, Yurina; Imai, Kenichi; Laurena, Antonio C; Okamoto, Takashi

    2010-10-01

    Previous attempts to express the human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) Tat (trans-activator of transcription) protein in plants resulted in a number of physiological abnormalities, such as stunted growth and absence of seed formation, that could not be explained. In the study reported here, we expressed Tat in tomato and observed phenotypic abnormalities, including stunted growth, absence of root formation, chlorosis, and plant death, as a result of reduced cytokinin levels. These reduced levels were ascribed to a differentially expressed CKO35 in Tat-bombarded tomato. Of the two CKO isoforms that are naturally expressed in tomato, CKO43 and CKO37, only the expression of CKO37 was affected by Tat. Our analysis of the Tat confirmed that the Arg-rich and RGD motifs of Tat have functional relevance in tomato and that independent mutations at these motifs caused inhibition of the differentially expressed CKO isoform and the extracellular secretion of the Tat protein, respectively, in our Tat-bombarded tomato samples.

  7. Evidence for positive selection on the E2 gene of bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fangqiang; Zhang, Chuyu

    2007-12-01

    Despite the growing interest in the molecular epidemiology of pestivirus, there have been few attempts to determine which regions of the pestivirus genome are subject to positive selection, although this may be a key indicator of the nature of the interaction between host and virus. By using likelihood-based methods for phylogenetic inference, the positive selection pressure of BVDV-1 E2 gene were assessed and a site-by-site analysis of the dN/dS ratio was performed, to identify specific codons undergoing diversifying positive selection. The overall omega was 0.20, indicating that most sites were subject to strong purifying selection and five positively selected sites (886, 888, 905, 944, and 946) were identified. It is surprising to find that all the potential positively selected sites fall within the C-terminal of E2, and out of the N-terminal of E2 which is thought to be surface-exposed and therefore prime targets for host antibody response. In conclusion, these results suggest that selection favoring avoidance of antibody recognition has not been a major factor in the history of BVDV-1. Further analysis is necessary to see if amino acid substitutions in the BVDV-1 positively selected sites can lead to change of host tropism or\\and escape from epitope-specific CD8 T-cell response.

  8. The Vif protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is posttranslationally modified by ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dussart, Sylvie; Courcoul, Marianne; Bessou, Gilles; Douaisi, Marc; Duverger, Yohann; Vigne, Robert; Decroly, Etienne

    2004-02-27

    The viral infectivity factor (Vif), one of the six HIV-1 auxiliary genes, is absolutely necessary for productive infection in primary CD4-positive T lymphocytes and macrophages. Vif overcomes the antiviral function of the host factor APOBEC3G. To better understand this mechanism, it is of interest to characterize cellular proteins that interact with Vif and may regulate its function. Here, we show that Vif binds to hNedd4 and AIP4, two HECT E3 ubiquitin ligases. WW domains present in those HECT enzymes contribute to the binding of Vif. Moreover, the region of Vif, which includes amino acids 20-128 and interacts with the hNedd4 WW domains, does not contain proline-rich stretches. Lastly, we show that Vif undergoes post-translational modifications by addition of ubiquitin both in cells overexpressing Vif and in cells expressing HIV-1 provirus. Vif is mainly mono-ubiquitinated, a modification known to address the Gag precursor to the virus budding site.

  9. Characterization of tissue tropism determinants of adeno-associated virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauck, Bernd; Xiao, Weidong

    2003-02-01

    Muscle is an attractive target for gene delivery because of its mass and because vectors can be delivered in a noninvasive fashion. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has been shown to be effective for muscle-targeted gene transfer. Recent progress in characterization of AAV serotype 1 (AAV1) and AAV6 demonstrated that these two AAV serotypes are far more efficient in transducing muscle than is the traditionally used AAV2. Since all cis elements are identical in these vectors, the potential determinants for their differences in transducing muscle appear to be located within the AAV capsid proteins. In the present study, a series of AAV capsid mutants were generated to identify the major regions affecting AAV transduction efficiency in muscle. Replacement of amino acids 350 to 736 of AAV2 VP1 with the corresponding amino acids from VP1 of AAV1 resulted in a hybrid vector that behaved very similarly to AAV1 in vitro and in vivo in muscle. Characterization of additional mutants carrying smaller regions of the AAV1 VP1 amino acid sequence in the AAV2 capsid protein suggested that amino acids 350 to 430 of VP1 function as a major tissue tropism determinant. Further analysis showed that the heparin binding domain and the major antigenic determinants in the AAV capsid region were not necessary for the efficiency of AAV1 transduction of muscle.

  10. The Effect of Cumin Seed Extracts against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in Vero Cell Culture

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    Mohammad Motamedifar

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. [family Apiaceae]seed essential oil is reported to have antiseptic activity.Until now the antiviral properties of cumin seed extracts onviruses such as herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1 have not beenstudied. The objective of this study was to investigate the invitro effects of aqueous, methanolic and hydroalcoholic extractsof cumin seed on HSV-1 growth in Vero cell line.Methods: Antiviral activity of various concentrations aqueous,hydroalcoholic and methanolic extracts of cumin seed in Verocells were studied using plaque reduction assays. The 50%cytotoxic concentration (CC50, 50% inhibitory concentration(IC50, and therapeutic index of the effective extracts were calculated.Results: Methanolic extract of cumin seed showed a significantantiviral activity on HSV-1 in Vero cell line. Its CC50 forVero cells, IC50 and the therapeutic index for HSV-1 were0.45, 0.18 mg/mL and 2.5, respectively. Aqueous and hydroalcoholicextracts of cumin seeds showed no inhibitory effecton HSV-1.Conclusion: The methanolic extract of cumin seed producesanti-HSV-1 effect. Probable interference of phenolic compoundswith fusion of Vero cell membrane and HSV-1 envelopemight be the mechanism of such inhibitory effect. Furtherstudies are required to ascertain its in vivo antiviral propertiesand potential toxicity.Iran J Med Sci 2010; 35(4: 304-309.

  11. Detection of herpes simplex virus type 1 in rheumatic valvular tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi-gang; Wang, Xiu-nan; Li, Yan-wen; Zhang, Hong-yi; Archard, Leonard C

    2005-03-05

    Rheumatic heart disease (RHD) is the most important sequela of rheumatic fever (RF): evidence that streptococcal infection is aetiological is prominent, but sometimes contradictory. Acute HSV-1 infection in mouse leads to carditis and valvulitis whereas recurrent infection results in inflammatory granulomatous lesions that resemble Aschoff bodies. Cells containing HSV-1 inclusions or virus infected giant cells appear similar to Anitschkow cells or Aschoff cells respectively. We hypothesized that HSV-1 infection also may be involved in RHD. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded valvular tissue samples from 32 patients with RHD were investigated for evidence of HSV-1 infection. HSV-1 antigen was detected by immunohistochemistry, using HSV-1-specific monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies. HSV-1 glycoprotein D gene sequences were amplified by nPCR, using beta-globin gene amplification in the same samples as internal control. Valvular tissue from 5 cases of sudden death and 3 cases died of neisseria meningitis without a history of valvular disease was used for comparison. HSV-1-infected lung tissue was used as positive control. HSV-1 antigens were detected in valvular tissues from 21 of 32 (65.6%) patients. Fifteen of these 21 (46.9% of cases), but no antigen-negative sample, were positive also for HSV DNA. Nucleotide sequence of PCR products was homologous to the targeted region of the HSV-1 glycoprotein D gene. HSV-1 antigen was present also in one case of sudden death but viral DNA was not found in any tissue sample from the comparison group. Results from reagent and positive controls were as anticipated. This is the first study to show the presence of HSV-1 antigen and genomic DNA in valvular tissues from patients with RHD and provides evidence for an association of HSV-1 infection with some cases of rheumatic valvular disease.

  12. A lethal model of disseminated dengue virus type 1 infection in AG129 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milligan, Gregg N; Sarathy, Vanessa V; White, Mellodee M; Greenberg, M Banks; Campbell, Gerald A; Pyles, Richard B; Barrett, Alan D T; Bourne, Nigel

    2017-10-01

    The mosquito-borne disease dengue is caused by four serologically and genetically related flaviviruses termed DENV-1 to DENV-4. Dengue is a global public health concern, with both the geographical range and burden of disease increasing rapidly. Clinically, dengue ranges from a relatively mild self-limiting illness to a severe life-threatening and sometimes fatal disease. Infection with one DENV serotype produces life-long homotypic immunity, but incomplete and short-term heterotypic protection. The development of small-animal models that recapitulate the characteristics of the disseminated disease seen clinically has been difficult, slowing the development of vaccines and therapeutics. The AG129 mouse (deficient in interferon alpha/beta and gamma receptor signalling) has proven to be valuable for this purpose, with the development of models of disseminated DENV-2,-3 and -4 disease. Recently, a DENV-1 AG129 model was described, but it requires antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) to produce lethality. Here we describe a new AG129 model utilizing a non-mouse-adapted DENV-1 strain, West Pacific 74, that does not require ADE to induce lethal disease. Following high-titre intraperitoneal challenge, animals experience a virus infection with dissemination to multiple visceral tissues, including the liver, spleen and intestine. The animals also become thrombocytopenic, but vascular leakage is less prominent than in AG129 models with other DENV serotypes. Taken together, our studies demonstrate that this model is an important addition to dengue research, particularly for understanding the pathological basis of the disease between DENV serotypes and allowing the full spectrum of activity to test comparisons for putative vaccines and antivirals.

  13. Antiviral Activity of Hatay Propolis Against Replication of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ayse; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Duran, Nizami; Jenedi, Kemal; Bolgul, Behiye Sezgin; Miraloglu, Meral; Muz, Mustafa

    2016-02-09

    BACKGROUND Propolis is a bee product widely used in folk medicine and possessing many pharmacological properties. In this study we aimed to investigate: i) the antiviral activities of Hatay propolis samples against HSV-1 and HSV-2 in HEp-2 cell line, and ii) the presence of the synergistic effects of propolis with acyclovir against these viruses. MATERIAL AND METHODS All experiments were carried out in HEp-2 cell cultures. Proliferation assays were performed in 24-well flat bottom microplates. We inoculated 1x105 cells per ml and RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal calf serum into each well. Studies to determine cytotoxic effect were performed. To investigate the presence of antiviral activity of propolis samples, different concentrations of propolis (3200, 1600, 800, 400, 200, 100, 75, 50, and 25 μg/mL) were added into the culture medium. The amplifications of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA were performed by real-time PCR method. Acyclovir (Sigma, USA) was chosen as a positive control. Cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). RESULTS The replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 was significantly suppressed in the presence of 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL of Hatay propolis. We found that propolis began to inhibit HSV-1 replication after 24 h of incubation and propolis activity against HSV-2 was found to start at 48 h following incubation. The activity of propolis against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was confirmed by a significant decrease in the number of viral copies. CONCLUSIONS We determined that Hatay propolis samples have important antiviral effects compared with acyclovir. In particular, the synergy produced by antiviral activity of propolis and acyclovir combined had a stronger effect against HSV-1 and HSV-2 than acyclovir alone.

  14. Antiviral Activity of Hatay Propolis Against Replication of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Type 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ayse; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Duran, Nizami; Jenedi, Kemal; Bolgul, Behiye Sezgin; Miraloglu, Meral; Muz, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Background Propolis is a bee product widely used in folk medicine and possessing many pharmacological properties. In this study we aimed to investigate: i) the antiviral activities of Hatay propolis samples against HSV-1 and HSV-2 in HEp-2 cell line, and ii) the presence of the synergistic effects of propolis with acyclovir against these viruses. Material/Methods All experiments were carried out in HEp-2 cell cultures. Proliferation assays were performed in 24-well flat bottom microplates. We inoculated 1×105 cells per ml and RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal calf serum into each well. Studies to determine cytotoxic effect were performed. To investigate the presence of antiviral activity of propolis samples, different concentrations of propolis (3200, 1600, 800, 400, 200, 100, 75, 50, and 25 μg/mL) were added into the culture medium. The amplifications of HSV-1 and HSV-2 DNA were performed by real-time PCR method. Acyclovir (Sigma, USA) was chosen as a positive control. Cell morphology was evaluated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The replication of HSV-1 and HSV-2 was significantly suppressed in the presence of 25, 50, and 100 μg/mL of Hatay propolis. We found that propolis began to inhibit HSV-1 replication after 24 h of incubation and propolis activity against HSV-2 was found to start at 48 h following incubation. The activity of propolis against both HSV-1 and HSV-2 was confirmed by a significant decrease in the number of viral copies. Conclusions We determined that Hatay propolis samples have important antiviral effects compared with acyclovir. In particular, the synergy produced by antiviral activity of propolis and acyclovir combined had a stronger effect against HSV-1 and HSV-2 than acyclovir alone. PMID:26856414

  15. Massive Iatrogenic Outbreak of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Rural Cambodia, 2014-2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouet, François; Nouhin, Janin; Zheng, Du-Ping; Roche, Benjamin; Black, Allison; Prak, Sophearot; Leoz, Marie; Gaudy-Graffin, Catherine; Ferradini, Laurent; Mom, Chandara; Mam, Sovatha; Gautier, Charlotte; Lesage, Gérard; Ken, Sreymom; Phon, Kerya; Kerleguer, Alexandra; Yang, Chunfu; Killam, William; Fujita, Masami; Mean, Chhivun; Fontenille, Didier; Barin, Francis; Plantier, Jean-Christophe; Bedford, Trevor; Ramos, Artur; Saphonn, Vonthanak

    2017-12-04

    In 2014-2015, 242 individuals aged 2-89 were newly HIV-1 diagnosed in Roka, a rural commune in Cambodia. A case-control study attributed the outbreak to unsafe injections. We aimed to reconstruct the likely transmission history of the outbreak. We assessed in 209 (86.4%) HIV-infected cases the presence of hepatitis C and B viruses (HCV, HBV). We identified recent infections using antibody (Ab) avidity testing for HIV and HCV, and HBcIgM Ab for HBV. We performed evolutionary phylogenetic analyses of viral strains. Geographical coordinates and parenteral exposure through medical services provided by an unlicensed health care practitioner were obtained from 193 cases and 1499 controls during interviews. Cases were co-infected with HCV (78.5%) and HBV (12.9%). We identified 79 (37.8%) recent (<130 days) HIV infections. Phylogeny of 202 HIV env C2V3 sequences showed a 198-sample CRF01_AE strains cluster, with time to most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) in September 2013 (95% highest posterior density, August 2012-July 2014), and a peak of 15 infections/day in September 2014. Three geospatial HIV hotspots were discernible in Roka and correlated with high exposure to the practitioner (P=0.04). Fifty-nine (38.6%) of 153 tested cases showed recent (<180 days) HCV infections. Ninety HCV NS5B sequences formed three main clades, one containing 34 subtypes 1b with tMRCA in 2012, and two with 51 subtypes 6e and tMRCAs in 2002-2003. Unsafe injections in Cambodia most likely led to an explosive iatrogenic spreading of HIV, associated with a long-standing and more genetically-diverse HCV propagation.

  16. Population migration and the spread of types 1 and 2 human immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T C

    1994-03-29

    Over 14 million people are estimated to be infected with the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV), with nearly three-fourths of the infected persons residing in developing countries. One factor responsible for dissemination of both HIV-1 and HIV-2 worldwide was the intense migration of individuals, from rural to urban centers with subsequent return migration and internationally due to civil wars, tourism, business purposes, and the drug trade. In sub-Saharan Africa, between 1960 and 1980, urban centers with more than 500,000 inhabitants increased from 3 to 28, and more than 75 military coups occurred in 30 countries. The result was a massive migration of rural inhabitants to urban centers concomitant with the spread of HIV-1 to large population centers. With the associated demographic, economic, and social changes, an epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases and HIV-1 was ignited. Migratory patterns were also responsible for the spread of endemic HIV-2 to neighboring West African countries and eventually to Europe, the Americans, and India. Although Southeast Asia was the last region in which HIV-1 was introduced, it has the greatest potential for rapid spread due to population density and inherent risk behaviors. Thus, the migration of poor, rural, and young sexually active individuals to urban centers coupled with large international movements of HIV-infected individuals played a prominent role in the dissemination of HIV globally. The economic recession has aggravated the transmission of HIV by directly increasing the population at risk through increased urban migration, disruption of rural families and cultural values, poverty, and prostitution and indirectly through a decrease in health care provision. Consequently, social and economic reform as well as sexual behavior education need to be intensified if HIV transmission is to be controlled.

  17. A new class of dual-targeted antivirals: monophosphorylated acyclovir prodrug derivatives suppress both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and herpes simplex virus type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanpouille, Christophe; Lisco, Andrea; Derudas, Marco; Saba, Elisa; Grivel, Jean-Charles; Brichacek, Beda; Scrimieri, Francesca; Schinazi, Raymond; Schols, Dominique; McGuigan, Christopher; Balzarini, Jan; Margolis, Leonid

    2010-02-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) are responsible for 2 intersecting epidemics in which the disease caused by 1 virus facilitates the transmission of and pathogenesis by the other. Therefore, suppression of one virus infection will affect the other. Acyclovir, a common antiherpetic drug, was shown to directly suppress both viruses in coinfected tissues. However, both antiviral activities of acyclovir are dependent on phosphorylation by the nucleoside kinase activity of coinfecting human herpesviruses. We developed acyclovir ProTides, monophosphorylated acyclovir with the phosphate group masked by lipophilic groups to allow efficient cellular uptake, and investigated their antiviral potential in cell lines and in human tissues ex vivo. Acyclovir ProTides suppressed both HIV-1 and HSV-2 at median effective concentrations in the submicromolar range in ex vivo lymphoid and cervicovaginal human tissues and at 3-12 micromol/L in CD4(+) T cells. Acyclovir ProTides retained activity against acyclovir-resistant HSV-2. Acyclovir ProTides represent a new class of antivirals that suppress both HIV-1 and HSV-2 by directly and independently blocking the key replicative enzymes of both viruses. Further optimization of such compounds may lead to double-targeted antivirals that can prevent viral transmission and treat the 2 synergistic diseases caused by HIV-1 and HSV-2. To our knowledge, the acyclovir ProTides described here represent the first example of acyclic nucleoside monophosphate prodrugs being active against HIV-1.

  18. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Long Terminal Repeat 5' Region from Patients with Tropical Spastic Paraparesis/Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Myelopathy and Asymptomatic Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Filipe Ferreira de Almeida; de Oliveira, Tulio; Giovanetti, Marta; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze patients by deep sequencing the human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) region in order to determine if minor and/or major mutations in this promoter region might be associated with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP)/human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy (HAM) outcome or proviral load or HTLV-1 expression. This study is a cross-sectional analyze of 29 HTLV-1-infected patients with TSP/HAM or asymptomatic carriers. Proviral DNA from those subjects was submitted to a nested PCR for the HTLV-1 LTR5' region. The HTLV-1 LTR5' purified products were submitted to deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent sequencing technology (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA). We found that samples with low proviral load showed more detected minor mutations than the samples with high proviral load. Mutations in 136 positions were found over the 520-bp analyzed fragment of HTLV-1 LTR5' with at least 1% frequency. Eleven mutations were present in the previously determined major transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and in more than one patient, indicating that there might be a differential HTLV-1 expression comparing individuals or in comparing different cells from the same individual. Three mutations were statistically significant using the Fisher nonparametric test between the groups but were not present in previously determined TFBS (G126C/T, G306C, and C479T). Those mutations that were not present in previously determined TFBS were statistically significant in this study and were most frequent in patients with low proviral load or in asymptomatic carriers. Although those mutations were not present in previously determined TFBS, one of those mutations (G306C/A) was present in an Sp-1 binding site determined by in silico analysis, and its presence abrogated the site for Sp-1 binding and created a new possible ATF binding site.

  19. Protection from persistent infection with a bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) type 1b strain by a modified-live vaccine containing BVDV types 1a and 2, infectious bovine rhinotracheitis virus, parainfluenza 3 virus and bovine respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Wenzhi; Mattick, Debra; Smith, Linda

    2011-06-24

    Recent studies showed that BVDV-1b subgenotype is dominant in North and South American field BVDV isolates. However, nearly all commercially available BVDV-1 vaccines contain BVDV-1a strains. In order to study the efficacy of BVDV-1a vaccine against BVDV-1b infection, this study was designed to evaluate a modified-live vaccine (MLV) containing BVDV-1a and BVDV-2 strains for its efficacy in prevention of persistent infection of fetuses against BVDV-1b strain, when the heifers were vaccinated prior to breeding. Heifers were vaccinated subcutaneously with a single dose of the MLV and bred four weeks after vaccination. The pregnant heifers were challenged with a non-cytopathic BVDV-1b strain at approximately 80 days of gestation. Vaccinated heifers were protected from clinical disease and viremia caused by the BVDV-1b virus. At approximately 155 days of gestation, the fetuses were harvested and tissue samples of thymus, lungs, spleen, kidney and intestines were collected for virus isolation. BVDV was isolated from 100% of the fetuses in the non-vaccinated control group, and from only one fetus (4.3%) from the vaccinated group. Results demonstrated that the MLV containing BVDV-1a and BVDV-2 strains provided 96% protection from fetal persistent infection caused by the BVDV-1b strain. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Dual Simian Foamy Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infections in Persons from Côte d'Ivoire.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William M Switzer

    Full Text Available Zoonotic transmission of simian retroviruses in West-Central Africa occurring in primate hunters has resulted in pandemic spread of human immunodeficiency viruses (HIVs and human T-lymphotropic viruses (HTLVs. While simian foamy virus (SFV and simian T- lymphotropic virus (STLV-like infection were reported in healthy persons exposed to nonhuman primates (NHPs in West-Central Africa, less is known about the distribution of these viruses in Western Africa and in hospitalized populations. We serologically screened for SFV and STLV infection using 1,529 specimens collected between 1985 and 1997 from Côte d'Ivoire patients with high HIV prevalence. PCR amplification and analysis of SFV, STLV, and HIV/SIV sequences from PBMCs was used to investigate possible simian origin of infection. We confirmed SFV antibodies in three persons (0.2%, two of whom were HIV-1-infected. SFV polymerase (pol and LTR sequences were detected in PBMC DNA available for one HIV-infected person. Phylogenetic comparisons with new SFV sequences from African guenons showed infection likely originated from a Chlorocebus sabaeus monkey endemic to Côte d'Ivoire. 4.6% of persons were HTLV seropositive and PCR testing of PBMCs from 15 HTLV seroreactive persons identified nine with HTLV-1 and one with HTLV-2 LTR sequences. Phylogenetic analysis showed that two persons had STLV-1-like infections, seven were HTLV-1, and one was an HTLV-2 infection. 310/858 (53%, 8/858 (0.93%, and 18/858 (2.1% were HIV-1, HIV-2, and HIV-positive but undifferentiated by serology, respectively. No SIV sequences were found in persons with HIV-2 antibodies (n = 1 or with undifferentiated HIV results (n = 7. We document SFV, STLV-1-like, and dual SFV/HIV infection in Côte d'Ivoire expanding the geographic range for zoonotic simian retrovirus transmission to West Africa. These findings highlight the need to define the public health consequences of these infections. Studying dual HIV-1/SFV infections in

  1. Compartmentalized human immunodeficiency virus type 1 originates from long-lived cells in some subjects with HIV-1-associated dementia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Gretja; Spudich, Serena; Harrington, Patrick; Price, Richard W; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2009-04-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades the central nervous system (CNS) shortly after systemic infection and can result in the subsequent development of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) in a subset of infected individuals. Genetically compartmentalized virus in the CNS is associated with HAD, suggesting autonomous viral replication as a factor in the disease process. We examined the source of compartmentalized HIV-1 in the CNS of subjects with HIV-1-associated neurological disease and in asymptomatic subjects who were initiating antiretroviral therapy. The heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA), targeting the variable regions of env, was used to determine which HIV-1 genetic variants in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compartmentalized and which variants were shared with the blood plasma. We then measured the viral decay kinetics of individual variants after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Compartmentalized HIV-1 variants in the CSF of asymptomatic subjects decayed rapidly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, with a mean half-life of 1.57 days. Rapid viral decay was also measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in four HAD subjects (t(1/2) mean = 2.27 days). However, slow viral decay was measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants from an additional four subjects with neurological disease (t(1/2) range = 9.85 days to no initial decay). The slow decay detected for CSF-compartmentalized variants was not associated with poor CNS drug penetration, drug resistant virus in the CSF, or the presence of X4 virus genotypes. We found that the slow decay measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in subjects with neurological disease was correlated with low peripheral CD4 cell count and reduced CSF pleocytosis. We propose a model in which infiltrating macrophages replace CD4(+) T cells as the primary source of productive viral replication in the CNS to maintain high viral loads in the CSF in a substantial subset of subjects with HAD.

  2. Compartmentalized human immunodeficiency virus type 1 originates from long-lived cells in some subjects with HIV-1-associated dementia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretja Schnell

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 invades the central nervous system (CNS shortly after systemic infection and can result in the subsequent development of HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD in a subset of infected individuals. Genetically compartmentalized virus in the CNS is associated with HAD, suggesting autonomous viral replication as a factor in the disease process. We examined the source of compartmentalized HIV-1 in the CNS of subjects with HIV-1-associated neurological disease and in asymptomatic subjects who were initiating antiretroviral therapy. The heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA, targeting the variable regions of env, was used to determine which HIV-1 genetic variants in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF were compartmentalized and which variants were shared with the blood plasma. We then measured the viral decay kinetics of individual variants after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Compartmentalized HIV-1 variants in the CSF of asymptomatic subjects decayed rapidly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, with a mean half-life of 1.57 days. Rapid viral decay was also measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in four HAD subjects (t(1/2 mean = 2.27 days. However, slow viral decay was measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants from an additional four subjects with neurological disease (t(1/2 range = 9.85 days to no initial decay. The slow decay detected for CSF-compartmentalized variants was not associated with poor CNS drug penetration, drug resistant virus in the CSF, or the presence of X4 virus genotypes. We found that the slow decay measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in subjects with neurological disease was correlated with low peripheral CD4 cell count and reduced CSF pleocytosis. We propose a model in which infiltrating macrophages replace CD4(+ T cells as the primary source of productive viral replication in the CNS to maintain high viral loads in the CSF in a substantial subset of subjects with HAD.

  3. Neutralizing antibody and perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1. New York City Perinatal HIV Transmission Collaborative Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hengel, R L; Kennedy, M S; Steketee, R W; Thea, D M; Abrams, E J; Lambert, G; McDougal, J S

    1998-04-10

    The major immunologic determinants for perinatal transmission of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) remain largely unknown. The presence of maternal neutralizing antibodies has been proposed as an explanation for why the majority of infants born to untreated HIV-1-infected women do not become infected. Using maternal and infant specimens collected as part of a longitudinal cohort study of perinatal transmission in New York City between 1991 and 1995, we successfully obtained primary viral isolates from 10 of 20 perinatally nontransmitting (NTR) women, 14 of 20 perinatally transmitting (TR) women, and 13 of 13 of their HIV-1-infected infants. Neutralizing antibody titers were then determined using a titer reduction assay. TR and NTR women did not differ in their ability to neutralize autologous virus or laboratory strains LAI and MN. Infant viruses were not less sensitive to neutralization by maternal sera than autologous viruses. Similarly, TR and NTR isolates were neutralized equally well using a reference serum with broad neutralizing ability. Finally, a heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA) was used to analyze the degree of viral homology within 13 TR maternal-infant pairs. In eight pairs, maternal and infant isolates were highly homologous. In five pairs, lesser degrees of homology were observed, consistent with perinatal transmission of a minor species. However, these isolates were no more or less resistant to maternal sera than were homologous isolates. Thus we found no association between the presence of neutralizing antibody in maternal sera as measured by a titer reduction neutralization (inactivation) assay and perinatal transmission of HIV-1.

  4. Genetic and antigenic characterization of complete genomes of Type 1 Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome viruses (PRRSV) isolated in Denmark over a period of 10 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Kristensen, Charlotte

    2013-01-01

    Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) caused by the PRRS virus (PRRSV) is considered one of the most devastating swine diseases worldwide. PRRS viruses are divided into two major genotypes, Type 1 and Type 2, with pronounced diversity between and within the genotypes. In Denmark more...

  5. Autologous neutralizing humoral immunity and evolution of the viral envelope in the course of subtype B human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunnik, Evelien M.; Pisas, Linaida; van Nuenen, Ad C.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2008-01-01

    Most human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals develop an HIV-specific neutralizing antibody (NAb) response that selects for escape variants of the virus. Here, we studied autologous NAb responses in five typical CCR5-using progressors in relation to viral NAb escape and

  6. EPSTEIN-BARR VIRUS-DRIVEN LYMPHOMAGENESIS IN THE CONTEXT OF HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS TYPE 1 INFECTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Raffaella ePetrara

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Epstein–Barr Virus (EBV is a ubiquitous human γ-herpes virus which establishes a life-long asymptomatic infection in immunocompetent hosts. In HIV-1 infected patients, the impaired immunosurveillance against EBV may favor the development of EBV-related diseases, ranging from lymphoproliferative disorders to B-cell Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL. Antiretroviral therapy (ART has significantly modified the natural course of HIV-1 infection, resulting in decreased HIV-1 plasmaviremia, increased CD4 lymphocytes, and decreased opportunistic infections, indicating a restoration of immune functions. However, the impact of ART appears to be less favorable on EBV-related malignancies than on other AIDS-defining tumors (ADC, such as Kaposi’s Sarcoma, and NHL remains the most common cancer during the ART era. EBV-driven tumors are associated with selective expression of latent oncogenic proteins, but uncontrolled lytic cycle with virus replication and/or reactivation may favor cell transformation, at least in the early phases. Several host's factors may promote EBV reactivation and replication; besides immunodepression, inflammation/chronic immune stimulation may play an important role. Microbial pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs and endogenous damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs, through Toll-like receptors (TLR, activate the immune system and may promote EBV reactivation and/or polyclonal expansion of EBV-infected cells. A body of evidence suggests that chronic immune stimulation is a hallmark of HIV-1 pathogenesis and may persist even in ART-treated patients. This review focuses on lymphomagenesis driven by EBV both in the context of the natural history of HIV-1 infection and in ART-treated patients. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the expansion of EBV-infected cells is a premise for the identification of prognostic markers of EBV-associated malignancies.

  7. Assessment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and risk practices among female commercial sex workers in Isla Margarita, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Beau; Pacheco, Maria E; Aponte, Carlos; Michini, Ana; Taibo, Maria E; Pinto, Belkis; Montano, Silvia M; Chauca, Gloria; Negrete, Monica; Russell, Kevin L; Sanchez, Jose L

    2006-01-01

    Sexual transmission represents the principal mode of transmission for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) worldwide. We examined the HIV-1 seroprevalence and risk factors for infection among 613 female commercial sex workers (FCSW) in Isla Margarita, Venezuela. Recruitment was conducted in street venues and working locations. None of the FCSW tested positive for HIV; this correlated with the low self-reported rates of sexually transmitted infections (6%), drug use (80% of time) with clients; however, such practices were found to be very uncommon in nonclient relations (<20% of the time). Understanding the sexual risk behaviors, beliefs, and drug use patterns of FCSW is important for future development of effective public prevention policies and educational campaigns aimed at decreasing the risk of infection with HIV-1 and other sexually transmitted infections among FCSW.

  8. Alterations in T cell phenotype and human immunodeficiency virus type 1-specific cytotoxicity after potent antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seth, A; Markee, J; Hoering, A; Sevin, A; Sabath, D E; Schmitz, J E; Kuroda, M J; Lifton, M A; Hirsch, M S; Collier, A C; Letvin, N L; McElrath, M J

    2001-03-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) are an important defense against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 but ultimately fail to control infection. To determine whether more efficient sustained immunity is induced by suppressing replication, the evolution of T cell phenotypes and HIV-specific CD8+ lymphocytes was prospectively investigated in 41 patients initiating combination therapy. Suppression of viremia to or =1 immunodominant epitope, representing either a new or an increased CTL response after treatment. Thus, activated CD8+ T cells, including those recognizing immunodominant epitopes, decline with combination therapy. However, the overall level of antigen-specific cells that are capable of differentiating into effectors remains stable, and the recognition of new epitopes may occur.

  9. The Tudor domain protein Spindlin1 is involved in intrinsic antiviral defense against incoming hepatitis B Virus and herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurélie Ducroux

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis B virus infection (HBV is a major risk factor for the development of hepatocellular carcinoma. HBV replicates from a covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA that remains as an episome within the nucleus of infected cells and serves as a template for the transcription of HBV RNAs. The regulatory protein HBx has been shown to be essential for cccDNA transcription in the context of infection. Here we identified Spindlin1, a cellular Tudor-domain protein, as an HBx interacting partner. We further demonstrated that Spindlin1 is recruited to the cccDNA and inhibits its transcription in the context of infection. Spindlin1 knockdown induced an increase in HBV transcription and in histone H4K4 trimethylation at the cccDNA, suggesting that Spindlin1 impacts on epigenetic regulation. Spindlin1-induced transcriptional inhibition was greater for the HBV virus deficient for the expression of HBx than for the HBV WT virus, suggesting that HBx counteracts Spindlin1 repression. Importantly, we showed that the repressive role of Spindlin1 is not limited to HBV transcription but also extends to other DNA virus that replicate within the nucleus such as Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1. Taken together our results identify Spindlin1 as a critical component of the intrinsic antiviral defense and shed new light on the function of HBx in HBV infection.

  10. Induction and reversal of myotonic dystrophy type 1 pre-mRNA splicing defects by small molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Childs-Disney, Jessica L; Stepniak-Konieczna, Ewa; Tran, Tuan; Yildirim, Ilyas; Park, HaJeung; Chen, Catherine Z; Hoskins, Jason; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan J; Patnaik, Samarjit; Zheng, Wei; Austin, Chris P; Schatz, George C; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles A; Disney, Matthew D

    2013-01-01

    The ability to control pre-mRNA splicing with small molecules could facilitate the development of therapeutics or cell-based circuits that control gene function. Myotonic dystrophy type 1 is caused by the dysregulation of alternative pre-mRNA splicing due to sequestration of muscleblind-like 1 protein (MBNL1) by expanded, non-coding r(CUG) repeats (r(CUG)(exp)). Here we report two small molecules that induce or ameliorate alternative splicing dysregulation. A thiophene-containing small molecule (1) inhibits the interaction of MBNL1 with its natural pre-mRNA substrates. Compound (2), a substituted naphthyridine, binds r(CUG)(exp) and displaces MBNL1. Structural models show that 1 binds MBNL1 in the Zn-finger domain and that 2 interacts with UU loops in r(CUG)(exp). This study provides a structural framework for small molecules that target MBNL1 by mimicking r(CUG)(exp) and shows that targeting MBNL1 causes dysregulation of alternative splicing, suggesting that MBNL1 is thus not a suitable therapeutic target for the treatment of myotonic dystrophy type 1.

  11. Macrophage Tropism of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Facilitates In Vivo Escape from Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Pressure

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    Schutten, M.; van Baalen, C. A.; Guillon, C.; Huisman, R. C.; Boers, P. H. M.; Sintnicolaas, K.; Gruters, R. A.; Osterhaus, A. D. M. E.

    2001-01-01

    Early after seroconversion, macrophage-tropic human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) variants are predominantly found, even when a mixture of macrophage-tropic and non-macrophage-tropic variants was transmitted. For virus contracted by sexual transmission, this is presently explained by selection at the port of entry, where macrophages are infected and T cells are relatively rare. Here we explore an additional mechanism to explain the selection of macrophage-tropic variants in cases where the mucosa is bypassed during transmission, such as blood transfusion, needle-stick accidents, or intravenous drug abuse. With molecularly cloned primary isolates of HIV-1 in irradiated mice that had been reconstituted with a high dose of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we found that a macrophage-tropic HIV-1 clone escaped more efficiently from specific cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) pressure than its non-macrophage-tropic counterpart. We propose that CTLs favor the selective outgrowth of macrophage-tropic HIV-1 variants because infected macrophages are less susceptible to CTL activity than infected T cells. PMID:11222694

  12. Analysis of virion-incorporated host proteins required for herpes simplex virus type 1 infection through a RNA interference screen.

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    Camille Stegen

    Full Text Available Viruses are strictly dependent on cells to propagate and many incorporate host proteins in their viral particles, but the significance of this incorporation is poorly understood. Recently, we performed the first comprehensive characterization of the mature herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 in which up to 49 distinct cellular proteins were identified by mass spectrometry. In the present study, we sought to identify if these cellular factors are relevant for the HSV-1 life cycle. To this end, we performed a small interfering RNA functional screen and found that 15 of these host proteins altered HSV-1 proliferation in cell culture, without any significant effect on cell viability. Moreover, the siRNA used had no negative consequences for Adenovirus type 5 propagation (with one exception indicating that the modulation was specific for HSV-1 and not merely due to unhealthy cells. The positive host proteins include several Rab GTPases and other intracellular transport components as well as proteins involved in signal transduction, gene regulation and immunity. Remarkably, in most cases when virions were depleted for one of the above proteins, they replicated more poorly in subsequent infections in wild type cells. This highlights for the first time that both the cellular and virion-associated pools of many of these proteins actively contribute to viral propagation. Altogether, these findings underscore the power and biological relevance of combining proteomics and RNA interference to identify novel host-pathogen interactions.

  13. Immunopathogenesis of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis: Recent Perspectives

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    Mineki Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a replication-competent human retrovirus associated with two distinct types of disease only in a minority of infected individuals: the malignancy known as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and a chronic inflammatory central nervous system disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HAM/TSP is a chronic progressive myelopathy characterized by spastic paraparesis, sphincter dysfunction, and mild sensory disturbance in the lower extremities. Although the factors that cause these different manifestations of HTLV-1 infection are not fully understood, accumulating evidence from host population genetics, viral genetics, DNA expression microarrays, and assays of lymphocyte function suggests that complex virus-host interactions and the host immune response play an important role in the pathogenesis of HAM/TSP. Especially, the efficiency of an individual's cytotoxic T-cell (CTL response to HTLV-1 limits the HTLV-1 proviral load and the risk of HAM/TSP. This paper focuses on the recent advances in HAM/TSP research with the aim to identify the precise mechanisms of disease, in order to develop effective treatment and prevention.

  14. Efficacy of Brazilian Propolis against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Mice and Their Modes of Antiherpetic Efficacies

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    Tomomi Shimizu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol extracts (AF-06, 07, and 08, 10 mg/kg of Brazilian propolis were administered orally to cutaneously herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1-infected mice three times daily on days 0 to 6 after infection to evaluate their efficacies against HSV-1 infection and significantly limited development of herpetic skin lesions. AF-07 and 08 significantly reduced virus titers in brain and/or skin on day 4 without toxicity, but AF-08 had no anti-HSV-1 activity in vitro. AF-06 and 08 significantly enhanced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH to inactivated HSV-1 antigen in infected mice. Oral AF-08-administration significantly augmented interferon (IFN-γ production by HSV-1 antigen from splenocytes of HSV-1-infected mice, while direct exposure of splenocytes of infected mice to AF-06 significantly elevated IFN-γ production in vitro. Thus, AF-08 might have components that are active in vivo even after oral administration and those of AF-06 might be active only in vitro. Because DTH is a major host defense for intradermal HSV-1 infection, augmentation of DTH response by AF-06 or 08, directly or indirectly, respectively, may contribute to their efficacies against HSV-1 infection. In addition, AF-06 and 07 possibly contain anti-HSV-1 components contributing to their efficacies. Such biological activities of Brazilian propolis may be useful to analyze its pharmacological actions.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag engages the Bro1 domain of ALIX/AIP1 through the nucleocapsid.

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    Popov, Sergei; Popova, Elena; Inoue, Michio; Göttlinger, Heinrich G

    2008-02-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and other retroviruses harbor short peptide motifs in Gag that promote the release of infectious virions. These motifs, known as late assembly (L) domains, recruit a cellular budding machinery that is required for the formation of multivesicular bodies (MVBs). The primary L domain of HIV-1 maps to a PTAP motif in the p6 region of Gag and engages the MVB pathway by binding to Tsg101. Additionally, HIV-1 p6 harbors an auxiliary L domain that binds to the V domain of ALIX, another component of the MVB pathway. We now show that ALIX also binds to the nucleocapsid (NC) domain of HIV-1 Gag and that ALIX and its isolated Bro1 domain can be specifically packaged into viral particles via NC. The interaction with ALIX depended on the zinc fingers of NC, which mediate the specific packaging of genomic viral RNA, but was not disrupted by nuclease treatment. We also observed that HIV-1 zinc finger mutants were defective for particle production and exhibited a similar defect in Gag processing as a PTAP deletion mutant. The effects of the zinc finger and PTAP mutations were not additive, suggesting a functional relationship between NC and p6. However, in contrast to the PTAP deletion mutant, the double mutants could not be rescued by overexpressing ALIX, further supporting the notion that NC plays a role in virus release.

  16. Prevalence of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 among blood donors in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Márcia Poinho EncarnaçÃo de; Gato, Cynara Melo; Maciel, Lucinei Alves; Lalwani, Pritesh; Costa, Cristóvão Alves; Lalwani, Jaila Dias Borges

    2017-12-21

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2) is endemic in Brazil, but few studies have investigated the seroprevalence of HTLV and its subtypes among blood donors in the capital city Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. To estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 and to identify circulating subtypes among blood donors in Manaus. Blood donors (2001-2003) were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies by ELISA. Positive results were confirmed and subtyped by Western blot assays. Prevalence rates were calculated and compared with demographic data. Among the 87,402 individuals screened, 116 (0.13%) were seropositive for HTLV-1/2. A second sample (76/116) was collected and retested by HTLV-1/2 ELISA, of which only 41/76 were positive. Western blot confirmed HTLV infection in 24/41 retested blood donors [HTLV-1 (n=16), HTLV-2 (n=5) and HTLV-untypable (n=3)]. HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are prevalent among blood donors in Manaus. However, additional studies are needed to comprehend the epidemiology of HTLV-1/2 in Amazonas not only to understand the pathophysiology of the disease providing adequate medical assistance, but also to reduce or block virus transmission.

  17. Prevalence of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 among blood donors in Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil

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    Márcia Poinho EncarnaçÃo de Morais

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 and 2 (HTLV-1/2 is endemic in Brazil, but few studies have investigated the seroprevalence of HTLV and its subtypes among blood donors in the capital city Manaus, Amazonas State, Brazil. Aim: To estimate the seroprevalence of HTLV-1/2 and to identify circulating subtypes among blood donors in Manaus. Materials and Methods: Blood donors (2001-2003 were screened for HTLV-1/2 antibodies by ELISA. Positive results were confirmed and subtyped by Western blot assays. Prevalence rates were calculated and compared with demographic data. Results: Among the 87,402 individuals screened, 116 (0.13% were seropositive for HTLV-1/2. A second sample (76/116 was collected and retested by HTLV-1/2 ELISA, of which only 41/76 were positive. Western blot confirmed HTLV infection in 24/41 retested blood donors [HTLV-1 (n=16, HTLV-2 (n=5 and HTLV-untypable (n=3]. Discussion: HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 are prevalent among blood donors in Manaus. However, additional studies are needed to comprehend the epidemiology of HTLV-1/2 in Amazonas not only to understand the pathophysiology of the disease providing adequate medical assistance, but also to reduce or block virus transmission.

  18. Clinical development of talimogene laherparepvec (T-VEC): a modified herpes simplex virus type-1-derived oncolytic immunotherapy.

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    Harrington, Kevin J; Puzanov, Igor; Hecht, J Randolph; Hodi, F Stephen; Szabo, Zsolt; Murugappan, Swami; Kaufman, Howard L

    2015-01-01

    Tumor immunotherapy is emerging as a promising new treatment option for patients with cancer. T-VEC is an intralesional oncolytic virus therapy based on a modified herpes simplex virus type-1. T-VEC selectively targets tumor cells, causing regression in injected lesions and inducing immunologic responses that mediate regression at uninjected/distant sites. In a randomized phase III trial, T-VEC met its primary endpoint of improving the durable response rate vs granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with unresectable melanoma. Responses were observed in injected and uninjected regional and visceral lesions. Exploratory analyses suggested survival differences in favor of T-VEC in patients with untreated or stage IIIB/IIIC/IVM1a disease. T-VEC was generally well tolerated, the most common adverse events being flu-like symptoms. Here, we overview recent advances in cancer immunotherapy, focusing on the clinical development of T-VEC, from first-in-human studies and studies in other cancer types, to ongoing combination trials with checkpoint inhibitors.

  19. Ocular herpes simplex virus type 1: is the cornea a reservoir for viral latency or a fast pit stop?

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    Kennedy, David P; Clement, Christian; Arceneaux, Richard L; Bhattacharjee, Partha S; Huq, Tashfin S; Hill, James M

    2011-03-01

    To present a review supporting and refuting evidence from mouse, rabbit, nonhuman primate, and human studies of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) concerning corneal latency. More than 50 research articles on HSV-1 published in peer-reviewed journals were examined. Infectious HSV-1 has been found in mouse denervated tissues and in tissues with negative cultures from the corresponding ganglion. However, the different mouse strains have shown varied responses to different strains of HSV, making it difficult to relate such findings to humans. Rabbit studies provide excellent evidence for HSV-1 corneal latency including data on HSV-1 migration from the cornea into the corneoscleral rim and on the distribution of HSV-1 DNA in the cornea. However, the available methods for the detection of infectious HSV-1 may not be sensitive enough to detect low-level infection. Infectious HSV-1 has been successfully isolated from the tears of nonhuman primates in the absence of detectable corneal lesions. The recurrence of corneal ulcers in nonhuman primates before the appearance of infectious HSV-1 in tears suggests that the origin of the HSV-1 is the cornea, rather than the trigeminal ganglion. Human studies presented evidence of both ganglion and corneal latency. Understanding HSV-1 disease progression and the possibility of corneal latency could lead to more effective treatments for herpetic keratitis. However, it is unlikely that operational latency in the cornea will be definitively proven unless a new method with higher sensitivity for the detection of infectious virus is developed.

  20. Clinical pathophysiology of human T-lymphotropic virus-type1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis

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    Yoshihisa eYamano

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1, a human retrovirus, is the causative agent of a progressive neurological disease termed HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. HAM/TSP is a chronic inflammatory disease of the central nervous system and is characterized by unremitting myelopathic symptoms such as spastic paraparesis, lower limb sensory disturbance, and bladder/bowel dysfunction. Approximately 0.25%–3.8% of HTLV-1-infected individuals develop HAM/TSP, which is more common in women than in men. Since the discovery of HAM/TSP, significant advances have been made with respect to elucidating the virological, molecular, and immunopathological mechanisms underlying this disease. These findings suggest that spinal cord invasion by HTLV-1-infected T cells triggers a strong virus-specific immune response and increases proinflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, leading to chronic lymphocytic inflammation and tissue damage in spinal cord lesions. However, little progress has been made in the development of an optimal treatment for HAM/TSP, more specifically in the identification of biomarkers for predicting disease progression and of molecular targets for novel therapeutic strategies targeting the underlying pathological mechanisms. This review summarizes current clinical and pathophysiological knowledge on HAM/TSP and discusses future focus areas for research on this disease.

  1. Evaluation of antiviral activity of South American plant extracts against herpes simplex virus type 1 and rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Vanessa; Chávez, Juliana H; Reginatto, Flávio H; Zucolotto, Silvana M; Niero, Rivaldo; Navarro, Dionezine; Yunes, Rosendo A; Schenkel, Eloir P; Barardi, Célia R M; Zanetti, Carlos R; Simões, Cláudia M O

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the screening of different South American plant extracts and fractions. Aqueous and organic extracts were prepared and tested for antiherpetic (HSV-1, KOS and 29R strains) and antirabies (PV strain) activities. The evaluation of the potential antiviral activity of these extracts was performed by using an MTT assay for HSV-1, and by a viral cytopathic effect (CPE) inhibitory method for rabies virus (RV). The results were expressed as 50% cytotoxicity (CC(50)) for MTT assay and 50% effective (EC(50)) concentrations for CPE, and with them it was possible to calculate the selectivity indices (SI = CC(50)/EC(50)) of each tested material. From the 18 extracts/fractions tested, six extracts and four fractions showed antiviral action. Ilex paraguariensis, Lafoensia pacari, Passiflora edulis, Rubus imperialis and Slonea guianensis showed values of SI > 7 against HSV-1 KOS and 29-R strains and Alamanda schottii showed a SI of 5.6 against RV, PV strain.

  2. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and Alzheimer's disease: increasing evidence for a major role of the virus

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    Ruth Frances Itzhaki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHSV1, when present in brain of carriers of the type 4 allele of the apolipoprotein E gene (APOE, has been implicated as a major factor in AD. It is proposed that virus is normally latent in many elderly brains but reactivates periodically (as in the peripheral nervous system under certain conditions, for example stress, immunosuppression, and peripheral infection, causing cumulative damage and eventually development of AD. Diverse approaches have provided data that explicitly support, directly or indirectly, these concepts. Several have confirmed HSV1 DNA presence in human brains, and the HSV1-APOE-ε4 association in AD. Further, studies on HSV1-infected APOE-transgenic mice have shown that APOE-e4 animals display a greater potential for viral damage. Reactivated HSV1 can cause direct and inflammatory damage, probably involving increased formation of beta amyloid (Aβ and of AD-like tau (P-tau - changes found to occur in HSV1-infected cell cultures. Implicating HSV1 further in AD is the discovery that HSV1 DNA is specifically localised in amyloid plaques in AD. Other relevant, harmful effects of infection include the following: dynamic interactions between HSV1 and amyloid precursor protein (APP, which would affect both viral and APP transport; induction of toll-like receptors in HSV1-infected astrocyte cultures, which has been linked to the likely effects of reactivation of the virus in brain. Several epidemiological studies have shown, using serological data, an association between systemic infections and cognitive decline, with HSV1 particularly implicated. Genetic studies too have linked various pathways in AD with those occurring on HSV1 infection. In relation to the potential usage of antivirals to treat AD patients, acyclovir (ACV is effective in reducing HSV1-induced AD-like changes in cell cultures, and valacyclovir, the bioactive form of ACV, might be most effective if combined with an antiviral that acts by a different

  3. Herpes simplex virus type 1-based amplicon vectors for fundamental research in neurosciences and gene therapy of neurological diseases.

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    Jerusalinsky, Diana; Baez, María Verónica; Epstein, Alberto Luis

    2012-01-01

    Somatic manipulation of the nervous system without the involvement of the germinal line appears as a powerful counterpart of the transgenic strategy. The use of viral vectors to produce specific, transient and localized knockout, knockdown, ectopic expression or overexpression of a gene, leads to the possibility of analyzing both in vitro and in vivo molecular basis of neural function. In this approach, viral particles engineered to carry transgenic sequences are delivered into discrete brain regions, to transduce cells that will express the transgenic products. Amplicons are replication-incompetent helper-dependent vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), with several advantages that potentiate their use in neurosciences: (1) minimal toxicity: amplicons do not encode any virus proteins, are neither toxic for the infected cells nor pathogenic for the inoculated animals and elicit low levels of adaptive immune responses; (2) extensive transgene capacity to carry up to 150-kb of foreign DNA; i.e., entire genes with regulatory sequences could be delivered; (3) widespread cellular tropism: amplicons can experimentally infect several cell types including glial cells, though naturally the virus infects mainly neurons and epithelial cells; (4) since the viral genome does not integrate into cellular chromosomes there is low probability to induce insertional mutagenesis. Recent investigations on gene transfer into the brain using these vectors, have focused on gene therapy of inherited genetic diseases affecting the nervous system, such as ataxias, or on neurodegenerative disorders using experimental models of Parkinson's or Alzheimer's disease. Another group of studies used amplicons to investigate complex neural functions such as neuroplasticity, anxiety, learning and memory. In this short review, we summarize recent data supporting the potential of HSV-1 based amplicon vector model for gene delivery and modulation of gene expression in primary cultures

  4. Molecular epidemiology of simian T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in wild and captive sooty mangabeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traina-Dorge, Vicki L; Lorino, Rebecca; Gormus, Bobby J; Metzger, Michael; Telfer, Paul; Richardson, David; Robertson, David L; Marx, Preston A; Apetrei, Cristian

    2005-02-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the prevalence and diversity of simian T-cell lymphotropic virus (STLV) isolates within the long-established Tulane National Primate Research Center (TNPRC) colony of sooty mangabeys (SMs; Cercocebus atys). Serological analysis determined that 22 of 39 animals (56%) were positive for STLV type 1 (STLV-1). A second group of thirteen SM bush meat samples from Sierra Leone in Africa was also included and tested only by PCR. Twenty-two of 39 captive animals (56%) and 3 of 13 bush meat samples (23%) were positive for STLV-1, as shown by testing with PCR. Nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of viral strains obtained demonstrated that STLV-1 strains from SMs (STLV-1sm strains) from the TNPRC colony and Sierra Leone formed a single cluster together with the previously reported STLV-1sm strain from the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. These data confirm that Africa is the origin for TNPRC STLV-1sm and suggest that Sierra Leone is the origin for the SM colonies in the United States. The TNPRC STLV-1sm strains further divided into two subclusters, suggesting STLV-1sm infection of two original founder SMs at the time of their importation into the United States. STLV-1sm diversity in the TNPRC colony matches the high diversity of SIVsm in the already reported colony. The lack of correlation between the lineage of the simian immunodeficiency virus from SMs (SIVsm) and the STLV-1sm subcluster distribution of the TNPRC strains suggests that intracolony transmissions of both viruses were independent events.

  5. Fate of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor and nuclear lamins in herpes simplex virus type 1 infection.

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    Scott, E S; O'Hare, P

    2001-09-01

    During herpesvirus egress, capsids bud through the inner nuclear membrane. Underlying this membrane is the nuclear lamina, a meshwork of intermediate filaments with which it is tightly associated. Details of alterations to the lamina and the inner nuclear membrane during infection and the mechanisms involved in capsid transport across these structures remain unclear. Here we describe the fate of key protein components of the nuclear envelope and lamina during herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. We followed the distribution of the inner nuclear membrane protein lamin B receptor (LBR) and lamins A and B(2) tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) in live infected cells. Together with additional results from indirect immunofluorescence, our studies reveal major morphologic distortion of nuclear-rim LBR and lamins A/C, B(1), and B(2). By 8 h p.i., we also observed a significant redistribution of LBR-GFP to the endoplasmic reticulum, where it colocalized with a subpopulation of cytoplasmic glycoprotein B by immunofluorescence. In addition, analysis by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching reveals that LBR-GFP exhibited increased diffusional mobility within the nuclear membrane of infected cells. This is consistent with the disruption of interactions between LBR and the underlying lamina. In addition to studying stably expressed GFP-lamins by fluorescence microscopy, we studied endogenous A- and B-type lamins in infected cells by Western blotting. Both approaches reveal a loss of lamins associated with virus infection. These data indicate major disruption of the nuclear envelope and lamina of HSV-1-infected cells and are consistent with a virus-induced dismantling of the nuclear lamina, possibly in order to gain access to the inner nuclear membrane.

  6. The use of human cornea organotypic cultures to study herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced inflammation.

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    Drevets, Peter; Chucair-Elliott, Ana; Shrestha, Priyadarsini; Jinkins, Jeremy; Karamichos, Dimitrios; Carr, Daniel J J

    2015-10-01

    To determine the utility of human organotypic cornea cultures as a model to study herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-induced inflammation and neovascularization. Human organotypic cornea cultures were established from corneas with an intact limbus that were retrieved from donated whole globes. One cornea culture was infected with HSV-1 (10(4) plaque-forming units), while the other cornea from the same donor was mock-infected. Supernatants were collected at intervals post-culture with and without infection to determine viral titer (by plaque assay) and pro-angiogenic and proinflammatory cytokine concentration by suspension array analysis. In some experiments, the cultured corneas were collected and evaluated for HSV-1 antigens by immunohistochemical means. Another set of experiments measured susceptibility of human three-dimensional cornea fibroblast constructs, in the presence and absence of TGF-β1, to HSV-1 infection in terms of viral replication and the inflammatory response to infection as a comparison to the organotypic cornea cultures. Organotypic cornea cultures and three-dimensional fibroblast constructs exhibited varying degrees of susceptibility to HSV-1. Fibroblast constructs were more susceptible to infection in terms of infectious virus recovered in a shorter period of time. There were changes in the levels of select pro-angiogenic or proinflammatory cytokines that were dictated as much by the cultures producing them as by whether they were infected with HSV-1 or treated with TGF-β1. Organotypic cornea and three-dimensional fibroblast cultures are likely useful for the identification and short-term study of novel antiviral compounds and virus replication, but are limited in the study of the local immune response to infection.

  7. Short communication. Prevalence of antibodies against Parainfluenza virus type 3, Respiratory syncitial virus and bovine Herpesvirus type 1 in sheep from Northern Prefectures of Japan

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    Massimo Giangaspero

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Ovine sera collected in the Prefectures of Hokkaido, Aomori and Iwate in the Northern Japan were examined for the presence of antibodies against Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV, bovine Herpesvirus type 1 (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis: IBR and Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3 using serum neutralisation (SN and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA tests. Twenty-three animals (11.73% out of the 196 tested were sero-positive to PIV3. Sixteen animals (8.69% out of the 184 tested reacted to RSV. No animals were positive to IBR antigen. Sero-conversions to PIV3 were detected in Hokkaido and Iwate (14.92% and 8.82%, respectively. Antibodies against RSV were detected in Hokkaido (9.23% and Aomori (14.28%. Although no diagnostic measures were in place, the infections did not appear to be related to any reduction in sheep productivity.

  8. Prevalence of antibodies against Parainfluenza virus type 3, Respiratory syncitial virus and bovine Herpesvirus type 1 in sheep from Northern Prefectures of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giangaspero, Massimo; Savini, Giovanni; Orusa, Riccardo; Osawa, Takeshi; Harasawa, Ryô

    2013-01-01

    Ovine sera collected in the Prefectures of Hokkaido, Aomori and Iwate in the Northern Japan were examined for the presence of antibodies against Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), bovine Herpesvirus type 1 (infectious bovine rhinotracheitis: IBR) and Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) using serum neutralisation (SN) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) tests. Twenty-three animals (11.73%) out of the 196 tested were sero-positive to PIV3. Sixteen animals (8.69%) out of the 184 tested reacted to RSV. No animals were positive to IBR antigen. Sero-conversions to PIV3 were detected in Hokkaido and Iwate (14.92% and 8.82%, respectively). Antibodies against RSV were detected in Hokkaido (9.23%) and Aomori (14.28%). Although no diagnostic measures were in place, the infections did not appear to be related to any reduction in sheep productivity.

  9. Nucleotide sequences of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) affecting virus entry, cell fusion, and production of glycoprotein gB (VP7)

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    DeLuca, N.; Bzik, D.J.; Bond, V.C.; Person, S.; Snipes, W.

    1982-10-30

    The tsB5 strain of Herpes Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1) contains at least two mutations; one mutation specifies the syncytial phenotype and the other confers temperature sensitivity for virus growth. These functions are known to be located between the prototypic map coordinates 0.30 and 0.42. In this study it was demonstrated that tsB5 enters human embryonic lung (HEL) cells more rapidly than KOS, another strain of HSV-1. The EcoRI restriction fragment F from the KOS strain (map coordinates 0.315 to 0.421) was mapped with eight restriction endonucleases, and 16 recombinant plasmids were constructed which contained varying portions of the KOS genome. Recombinant viruses were generated by marker-rescue and marker-transfer cotransfection procedures, using intact DNA from one strain and a recombinant plasmid containing DNA from the other strain. The region of the crossover between the two nonisogenic strains was inferred by the identification of restriction sites in the recombinants that were characteristic of the parental strains. The recombinants were subjected to phenotypic analysis. Syncytium formation, rate of virus entry, and the production of gB were all separable by the crossovers that produced the recombinants. The KOS sequences which rescue the syncytial phenotype of tsB5 were localized to 1.5 kb (map coordinates 0.345 to 0.355), and the temperature-sensitive mutation was localized to 1.2 kb (0.360 to 0.368), giving an average separation between the mutations of 2.5 kb on the 150-kb genome. DNA sequences that specify a functional domain for virus entry were localized to the nucleotide sequences between the two mutations. All three functions could be encoded by the virus gene specifying the gB glycoprotein.

  10. Possible Therapeutic Doses of Cannabinoid Type 1 Receptor Antagonist Reverses Key Alterations in Fragile X Syndrome Mouse Model

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    Maria Gomis-González

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common monogenetic cause of intellectual disability. The cognitive deficits in the mouse model for this disorder, the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 (Fmr1 knockout (KO mouse, have been restored by different pharmacological approaches, among those the blockade of cannabinoid type 1 (CB1 receptor. In this regard, our previous study showed that the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist rimonabant normalized a number of core features in the Fmr1 knockout mouse. Rimonabant was commercialized at high doses for its anti-obesity properties, and withdrawn from the market on the bases of mood-related adverse effects. In this study we show, by using electrophysiological approaches, that low dosages of rimonabant (0.1 mg/kg manage to normalize metabotropic glutamate receptor dependent long-term depression (mGluR-LTD. In addition, low doses of rimonabant (from 0.01 mg/kg equally normalized the cognitive deficit in the mouse model of FXS. These doses of rimonabant were from 30 to 300 times lower than those required to reduce body weight in rodents and to presumably produce adverse effects in humans. Furthermore, NESS0327, a CB1 receptor neutral antagonist, was also effective in preventing the novel object-recognition memory deficit in Fmr1 KO mice. These data further support targeting CB1 receptors as a relevant therapy for FXS.

  11. Synaptic dysfunction in the hippocampus accompanies learning and memory deficits in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 Tat transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitting, Sylvia; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna M; Bull, Cecilia; Skoff, Robert P; Lichtman, Aron H; Wise, Laura E; Fox, Michael A; Su, Jianmin; Medina, Alexandre E; Krahe, Thomas E; Knapp, Pamela E; Guido, William; Hauser, Kurt F

    2013-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), including memory dysfunction, continue to be a major clinical manifestation of HIV type-1 infection. Viral proteins released by infected glia are thought to be the principal triggers of inflammation and bystander neuronal injury and death, thereby driving key symptomatology of HAND. We used a glial fibrillary acidic protein-driven, doxycycline-inducible HIV type-1 transactivator of transcription (Tat) transgenic mouse model and examined structure-function relationships in hippocampal pyramidal cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) neurons using morphologic, electrophysiological (long-term potentiation [LTP]), and behavioral (Morris water maze, fear-conditioning) approaches. Tat induction caused a variety of different inclusions in astrocytes characteristic of lysosomes, autophagic vacuoles, and lamellar bodies, which were typically present within distal cytoplasmic processes. In pyramidal CA1 neurons, Tat induction reduced the number of apical dendritic spines, while disrupting the distribution of synaptic proteins (synaptotagmin 2 and gephyrin) associated with inhibitory transmission but with minimal dendritic pathology and no evidence of pyramidal neuron death. Electrophysiological assessment of excitatory postsynaptic field potential at Schaffer collateral/commissural fiber-CA1 synapses showed near total suppression of LTP in mice expressing Tat. The loss in LTP coincided with disruptions in learning and memory. Tat expression in the brain results in profound functional changes in synaptic physiology and in behavior that are accompanied by only modest structural changes and minimal pathology. Tat likely contributes to HAND by causing molecular changes that disrupt synaptic organization, with inhibitory presynaptic terminals containing synaptotagmin 2 appearing especially vulnerable. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Subacute herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis as an initial presentation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and multiple sclerosis: a case report

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    Corman Lourdes C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis presents acutely in patients who are immunocompetent. We report what we believe to be the first published case of a subacute course of herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis in a patient with asymptomatic chronic lymphocytic leukemia who subsequently developed multiple sclerosis. Case presentation A 49-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of fever blisters presented to the emergency department with a history of left temporal headache for four weeks, and numbness of the left face and leg for two weeks. A complete blood count revealed white blood cell count of 11,820 cells/mL, with an absolute lymphocyte count of 7304 cells/mL. The cerebrospinal fluid contained 6 white blood cells/μL, 63 red blood cells/μL, 54 mg glucose/dL, and 49 mg total protein/dL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed meningoencephalitis and bilateral ventriculitis. Cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction for herpes simplex virus type 1 was positive, and the patient's symptoms resolved after ten days of treatment with parenteral aciclovir. Incidental findings on peripheral blood smear and flow cytometry testing confirmed chronic lymphocytic leukemia. One month later, she developed bilateral numbness of the hands and feet; a repeat cerebrospinal fluid polymerase chain reaction for herpes simplex virus type 1 at this time was negative. A repeat magnetic resonance imaging scan showed an expansion of the peri-ventricular lesions, and the cerebrospinal fluid contained elevated oligoclonal bands and myelin basic protein. A brain biopsy revealed gliosis consistent with multiple sclerosis, and the patient responded to treatment with high-dose parenteral steroids. Conclusion Herpes simplex virus type 1 encephalitis is a rare presentation of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Our patient had an atypical, subacute course, presumably due to immunosuppression from chronic lymphocytic leukemia. This unusual

  13. Restoration of Immune Response by a Cationic Amphiphilic Drug (AY 9944) In Vitro: A New Approach To Chemotherapy against Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1

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    Achour, Ammar; Landureau, Jean-Charles; Salerno-Concalves, Rosangela; Mazière, Jean-Claude; Zagury, Daniel

    1998-01-01

    AY 9944 [AY; trans-1,4-bis(chlorobenzylaminomethyl)-cyclohexane dihydrochloride], an inhibitor of sterol synthesis, was found to help restore the normal mitogenic responses and cytokine profiles of peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from AIDS patients in vitro. Compared to untreated cells, the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected PBMCs precultured in the presence of AY exhibited a normal rate of either mitogen-induced or recall- and superantigen-induced proliferation. After 2 weeks in the presence of the drug, the percentage of dead CD4+ cells in HIV-1-infected cultures was comparable to that observed in uninfected cultures, while over the same time interval it increased by three- to fivefold in HIV-1-infected cultures maintained in the absence of AY. AY also stimulated by 2- to 12-fold interleukin-12 (IL-12) and (gamma interferon production. For IL-12, this effect appears to be related to an increase in corresponding IL-12 p35 and IL-12 p40 mRNA levels. Moreover, AY restored the expression of the IL-2 receptor, which was severely impaired in HIV-1-infected PBMCs. Although the drug has no direct antiviral effect (it does not significantly inhibit reverse transcriptase activity measured in vitro), it might be considered a potential therapeutic agent for HIV-infected patients, in that it may correct viral infection-related immune system defects by indirectly enhancing the level of resistance to HIV and opportunistic infections. PMID:9756745

  14. Sequence and structural determinants required for priming of plus-strand DNA synthesis by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 polypurine tract.

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    Powell, M D; Levin, J G

    1996-08-01

    At the 3' end of all retroviral genomes there is a short, highly conserved sequence known as the polypurine tract (PPT), which serves as the primer for plus-strand DNA synthesis. We have identified the determinants for in vitro priming by the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) PPT. We show that when the PPT is removed and placed into different nucleotide contexts, new priming sites are produced at the precise 3' end of the PPT. In addition, we find that a hybrid consisting of a 15- or 20-nucleotide RNA primer annealed to a 35-nucleotide DNA template is competent for initiation of plus-strand synthesis with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase. Thus, no cis-acting elements appear to be required for priming activity. Changes at the 5' end of the PPT have no effect on primer function, whereas the identity of bases at the 3' end is crucial. A primer containing only the 6 G residues from the 3' end of the wild-type PPT sequence and 9 bases of random sequence at the 5' end functions like a wild-type PPT. A short hybrid having a similar helical structure but a primary sequence different from that of the PPT is cleaved imprecisely, resulting in initiation of synthesis at multiple sites; however, total primer extension is close to the wild-type level. We conclude that helical structure as well as the presence of particular bases at the 3' end of the PPT is essential for PPT function.

  15. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 prevalence in northeastern Iran, Sabzevar: an epidemiologic-based study and phylogenetic analysis.

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    Azarpazhooh, Mahmoud Reza; Hasanpour, Kazem; Ghanbari, Mohsen; Rezaee, S A Rahim; Mashkani, Baratali; Hedayati-Moghaddam, Mohammad Reza; Valizadeh, Narges; Farid Hosseini, Reza; Foroghipoor, Mohsen; Soltanifar, Azadeh; Sahebari, Maryam; Azadmanesh, Keyhan; Hassanshahi, Gholahossein; Rafatpanah, Houshang

    2012-09-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I) is an important global health problem in the world mainly in the endemic areas of HTLV-I infection. It was previously reported that Mashhad, in northeastern Iran, is a new endemic region of HTLV-I. The aim of this study was to examine the prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of HTLV-I in Sabzevar, located in the southeast of Mashhad. In this cross-sectional study 1445 individuals were selected by multistage cluster sampling. Serum samples were screened for anti-HTLV-I antibody using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); all of the ELISA-positive samples were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Long terminal repeat (LTR) sequencing was carried out to determine the type of HTLV-I in Sabzevar. In the primary screening by ELISA, 26/1445 (1.8%) of those sampled were reactive for HTLV-I antibody. Twenty-four out of 26 samples were confirmed HTLV-I infection by PCR (24/1445). The overall prevalence of HTLV-I infection in Sabzevar is 1.66%. The prevalence of the virus infection in men and women was 2.42% (11/455) and 1.31% (13/989), respectively. Seroprevalence was associated with age, increasing significantly among those older than 30 years (p=0.015), and a history of surgery (p=0.002), imprisonment (p=0.018), and hospitalization (p=0.005). Three out of 24 positive HTLV-I samples were selected for sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of LTR. The results showed that HTLV-I in Sabzevar belonged to the cosmopolitan subtype. The present study showed Sabzevar is a new endemic area for HTLV-I infection. Our study emphasizes that systemic HTLV-I screening of blood donors in Sabzevar and other cities in Khorasan province is important and should be taken into account.

  16. Lymphotropic Virions Affect Chemokine Receptor-Mediated Neural Signaling and Apoptosis: Implications for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jialin; Ghorpade, Anuja; Niemann, Douglas; Cotter, Robin L.; Thylin, Michael R.; Epstein, Leon; Swartz, Jennifer M.; Shepard, Robin B.; Liu, Xiaojuan; Nukuna, Adeline; Gendelman, Howard E.

    1999-01-01

    Chemokine receptors pivotal for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in lymphocytes and macrophages (CCR3, CCR5, and CXCR4) are expressed on neural cells (microglia, astrocytes, and/or neurons). It is these cells which are damaged during progressive HIV-1 infection of the central nervous system. We theorize that viral coreceptors could effect neural cell damage during HIV-1-associated dementia (HAD) without simultaneously affecting viral replication. To these ends, we studied the ability of diverse viral strains to affect intracellular signaling and apoptosis of neurons, astrocytes, and monocyte-derived macrophages. Inhibition of cyclic AMP, activation of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, and apoptosis were induced by diverse HIV-1 strains, principally in neurons. Virions from T-cell-tropic (T-tropic) strains (MN, IIIB, and Lai) produced the most significant alterations in signaling of neurons and astrocytes. The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, induced markedly less neural damage than purified virions. Macrophage-tropic (M-tropic) strains (ADA, JR-FL, Bal, MS-CSF, and DJV) produced the least neural damage, while 89.6, a dual-tropic HIV-1 strain, elicited intermediate neural cell damage. All T-tropic strain-mediated neuronal impairments were blocked by the CXCR4 antibody, 12G5. In contrast, the M-tropic strains were only partially blocked by 12G5. CXCR4-mediated neuronal apoptosis was confirmed in pure populations of rat cerebellar granule neurons and was blocked by HA1004, an inhibitor of calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II, protein kinase A, and protein kinase C. Taken together, these results suggest that progeny HIV-1 virions can influence neuronal signal transduction and apoptosis. This process occurs, in part, through CXCR4 and is independent of CD4 binding. T-tropic viruses that traffic in and out of the brain during progressive HIV-1 disease may play an important role in HAD neuropathogenesis. PMID:10482576

  17. EXPRESSION OF GLYCOPROTEIN gD AND EVALUATION OF IMMUNE RESPONSE OF BOVINE HERPES VIRUS TYPE-1 IN BUFFALO

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    Sumit Chowdhury

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Bovine Herpes Virus type-1 (BoHV-1 causes a multitude of clinical symptoms in cattle, buffaloes and small ruminants. No effective live attenuated or killed vaccine is currently available and extensive research work in progress towards the development of the subunit and genetically engineered vaccine. Since DNA vaccine is currently regarded as most important breakthrough in vaccinology, the present work was aimed at construction of DNA vaccine using most immunogenic glycoprotein gD and studying its immune response and protection in buffalo. gD specific DIG labelled probe was used to screen gD specific clones from cDNA library. The gD specific cloned plasmid was purified for eukaryotic expression. The SDS-PAGE & Western blot analysis showed the transient expression of the expected 71 kDa gD following transfection in COS-7 cells. Four seronegative buffalo calves were immunized at 0, 30 and 60 days with recombinant purified plasmid and two calves were kept as control. The result of SNT, ELISA and MTT indicate gene specific seroconversion and CMI response following immunization with plasmid. At 86 days of post first vaccination, animals were challenged with virulent BoHV-1 (216/IBR. Hematological picture of the control animals showed leucopenia and that was due to destruction of lymphocytes shown by TLC and apoptosis study. Vaccinated animals showed reduced virus shedding in terms of days post challenge as well as titers compared to the controls. Based on the above findings, we concluded that DNA based vaccine induces specific and protective immune responses to the buffalo.

  18. Transmission of human immunodeficiency virus Type-1 by fresh-frozen plasma treated with methylene blue and light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Manuel; Luis-Hidalgo, Mar; Bracho, María Alma; Blanquer, Amando; Larrea, Luis; Villalba, José; Puig, Nieves; Planelles, Dolores; Montoro, José; González-Candelas, Fernando; Roig, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The risk of transfusion-transmitted infection (TTI) has been minimized by introduction of nucleic acid testing (NAT) and pathogen inactivation (PI). This case report describes transmission of human immunodeficiency virus Type 1 (HIV-1) to two recipients despite these measures. In March 2009 a possible TTI of HIV-1 was identified in a patient that had received pooled buffy coat platelet concentrate (BC-PLT) in November 2005. The subsequent lookback study found two more patients who had received methylene blue (MB)-treated fresh-frozen plasma (FFP) and red blood cells (RBCs) from the same donation. In November 2005 the donor had tested negative for both HIV antibodies and HIV-1 RNA by 44 minipool (44 MP) NAT. Repository samples of this donation and samples from the recipients were used for viral load (VL) and sequence analysis. HIV-1 RNA was detectable by individual donation (ID)-NAT in the repository sample from the 2005 window period donation and a VL of 135 copies/mL was measured. HIV-1 infection was confirmed in both recipients of both BC-PLT (65 mL of plasma) and MB-FFP (261 mL of plasma), but not in the patient that had received 4-week-old RBCs (20 mL of plasma). The sequence analysis revealed a close phylogenetic relationship between the virus strains isolated from the donor and recipients, compatible with TTI. Approximately 17,600 and 4400 virions in the MB-FFP and BC-PLT were infectious, but 1350 virions in the RBCs were not. ID-NAT would have prevented this transmission, but the combination of MP-NAT and MB-PI did not. © 2015 AABB.

  19. Impact of HLA in mother and child on disease progression of pediatric human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

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    Thobakgale, Christina F; Prendergast, Andrew; Crawford, Hayley; Mkhwanazi, Nompumelelo; Ramduth, Danni; Reddy, Sharon; Molina, Claudia; Mncube, Zenele; Leslie, Alasdair; Prado, Julia; Chonco, Fundi; Mphatshwe, Wendy; Tudor-Williams, Gareth; Jeena, Prakash; Blanckenberg, Natasha; Dong, Krista; Kiepiela, Photini; Coovadia, Hoosen; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D; Goulder, Philip J R

    2009-10-01

    A broad Gag-specific CD8(+) T-cell response is associated with effective control of adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. The association of certain HLA class I molecules, such as HLA-B*57, -B*5801, and -B*8101, with immune control is linked to mutations within Gag epitopes presented by these alleles that allow HIV to evade the immune response but that also reduce viral replicative capacity. Transmission of such viruses containing mutations within Gag epitopes results in lower viral loads in adult recipients. In this study of pediatric infection, we tested the hypothesis that children may tend to progress relatively slowly if either they themselves possess one of the protective HLA-B alleles or the mother possesses one of these alleles, thereby transmitting a low-fitness virus to the child. We analyzed HLA type, CD8(+) T-cell responses, and viral sequence changes for 61 mother-child pairs from Durban, South Africa, who were monitored from birth. Slow progression was significantly associated with the mother or child possessing one of the protective HLA-B alleles, and more significantly so when the protective allele was not shared by mother and child (P = 0.007). Slow progressors tended to make CD8(+) T-cell responses to Gag epitopes presented by the protective HLA-B alleles, in contrast to progressors expressing the same alleles (P = 0.07; Fisher's exact test). Mothers expressing the protective alleles were significantly more likely to transmit escape variants within the Gag epitopes presented by those alleles than mothers not expressing those alleles (75% versus 21%; P = 0.001). Reversion of transmitted escape mutations was observed in all slow-progressing children whose mothers possessed protective HLA-B alleles. These data show that HLA class I alleles influence disease progression in pediatric as well as adult infection, both as a result of the CD8(+) T-cell responses generated in the child and through the transmission of low-fitness viruses by the

  20. Vaccine induced antibodies to the first variable loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, mediate antibody-dependent virus inhibition in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialuk, Izabela; Whitney, Stephen; Andresen, Vibeke; Florese, Ruth H; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Valeri, Valerio W; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Gordon, Shari; Parks, Robyn Washington; Montefiori, David C; Venzon, David; Demberg, Thorsten; Guroff, Marjorie Robert-; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-12-09

    The role of antibodies directed against the hyper variable envelope region V1 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has not been thoroughly studied. We show that a vaccine able to elicit strain-specific non-neutralizing antibodies to this region of gp120 is associated with control of highly pathogenic chimeric SHIV(89.6P) replication in rhesus macaques. The vaccinated animal that had the highest titers of antibodies to the amino terminus portion of V1, prior to challenge, had secondary antibody responses that mediated cell killing by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as early as 2 weeks after infection and inhibited viral replication by antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), by 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant inverse correlation between virus level and binding antibody titers to the envelope protein, (R=-0.83, p=0.015), and ADCVI (R=-0.84 p=0.044). Genotyping of plasma virus demonstrated in vivo selection of three SHIV(89.6P) variants with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites in V1. We found a significant inverse correlation between virus levels and titers of antibodies that mediated ADCVI against all the identified V1 virus variants. A significant inverse correlation was also found between neutralizing antibody titers to SHIV(89.6) and virus levels (R=-0.72 p=0.0050). However, passive inoculation of purified immunoglobulin from animal M316, the macaque that best controlled virus, to a naïve macaque, resulted in a low serum neutralizing antibodies and low ADCVI activity that failed to protect from SHIV(89.6P) challenge. Collectively, while our data suggest that anti-envelope antibodies with neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc(R-dependent activities may be important in the control of SHIV replication, they also demonstrate that low levels of these antibodies alone are not sufficient to protect from infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr protein and its carboxy-terminally truncated form induce apoptosis in tumor cells

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    Takeshima Shin-nosuke

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 accessory protein Vpr induces apoptosis after cell cycle arrest at the G2 phase in primate cells. We have reported previously that C81, a carboxy-terminally truncated form of Vpr, interferes with cell proliferation and results in apoptosis without G2 arrest. Here, we investigated whether this property of Vpr and C81 could be exploited for use as a potential anticancer agent. First, we demonstrated that C81 induced G1 arrest and apoptosis in all tumor cells tested. In contrast, Vpr resulted in G2 arrest and apoptosis in HeLa and 293 T cells. Vpr also suppressed the damaged-DNA-specific binding protein 1 (DDB1 in HepG2 cells, thereby inducing apoptosis without G2 arrest. G2 arrest was restored when DDB1 was overexpressed in cells that also expressed Vpr. Surprisingly, C81 induced G2 arrest when DDB1 was overexpressed in HepG2 cells, but not in HeLa or 293 T cells. Thus, the induction of Vpr- and C81-mediated cell cycle arrest appears to depend on the cell type, whereas apoptosis was observed in all tumor cells tested. Overall, Vpr and C81 have potential as novel therapeutic agents for treatment of cancer.

  2. Direct Phenotypical and Functional Dysregulation of Primary Human B Cells by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) Type 1 In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perisé-Barrios, Ana Judith; Muñoz-Fernandez, María Ángeles; Pion, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. Methods/Principal Findings We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. Conclusion/Significance We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease. PMID:22768302

  3. Human APOBEC3 induced mutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 contributes to adaptation and evolution in natural infection.

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    Eun-Young Kim

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Human APOBEC3 proteins are cytidine deaminases that contribute broadly to innate immunity through the control of exogenous retrovirus replication and endogenous retroelement retrotransposition. As an intrinsic antiretroviral defense mechanism, APOBEC3 proteins induce extensive guanosine-to-adenosine (G-to-A mutagenesis and inhibit synthesis of nascent human immunodeficiency virus-type 1 (HIV-1 cDNA. Human APOBEC3 proteins have additionally been proposed to induce infrequent, potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutations that make subtle contributions to sequence diversification of the viral genome and adaptation though acquisition of beneficial mutations. Using single-cycle HIV-1 infections in culture and highly parallel DNA sequencing, we defined trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G, and APOBEC3H. We then compared these APOBEC3 editing contexts with the patterns of G-to-A mutations in HIV-1 DNA in cells obtained sequentially from ten patients with primary HIV-1 infection. Viral substitutions were highest in the preferred trinucleotide contexts of the edited sites for the APOBEC3 deaminases. Consistent with the effects of immune selection, amino acid changes accumulated at the APOBEC3 editing contexts located within human leukocyte antigen (HLA-appropriate epitopes that are known or predicted to enable peptide binding. Thus, APOBEC3 activity may induce mutations that influence the genetic diversity and adaptation of the HIV-1 population in natural infection.

  4. Higher rate of major depression among blood donor candidates infected with human t-cell lymphotropic virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stumpf, Barbara P; Carneiro-Proietti, Anna Bárbara; Proietti, Fernando A; Rocha, Fábio L

    2008-01-01

    Viral infections have been previously associated with psychiatric disorders. This work aimed to study the relationship between the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) and depression. A case-control study with prevalent cases was conducted from April 2004 to June 2005. Participants were from a public transfusion center in Belo Horizonte, Brazil. The base population was composed of blood donor candidates infected with HTLV-1 (asymptomatic carriers), followed-up in a cohort study. As a control group, HTLV-1 seronegative blood donors were selected in a random fashion. Study participants underwent psychiatric evaluation using a structured diagnostic instrument, the Mini International Neuropsychiatry Interview (MINI), to estimate the rate of depression. The interviewer was unaware of participants' HTLV-1 serostatus. The co-variables studied were gender, age, formal education, personal income, and the presence of other psychiatric diagnoses. Logistic regression was used to examine the relation between HTLV-1 infection and depression. The final sample was composed of 74 individuals infected with HTLV-1 and 24 uninfected controls. The rate of depression was significantly higher in HTLV-1 carriers when compared with controls (39% vs. 8%; p-value = 0.005). HTLV-1 infection was independently associated with depression (OR = 6.17; CI 95% = 1.32-28.82). The results showed a higher rate of depression in HTLV-1 infected individuals. It was not possible to determine whether depression was related to knowledge of chronic retroviral infection or related to a biological effect of the retroviral infection.

  5. Neurological morbidity among human T-lymphotropic-virus-type-1-infected individuals in a rural West African population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, S; van der Loeff, M Schim; McConkey, S; Cooper, M; Sarge-Njie, R; Kaye, S; Whittle, H

    2009-01-01

    Community-based neurological data about human T lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) morbidity in sub-Saharan Africa are scarce. To ascertain the prevalence of neurological morbidity, in particular tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP), among HTLV-1-infected subjects and to compare TSP prevalence in HTLV-1-infected with that in non-infected subjects in a rural West African population. A cross-sectional study of HTLV-1-infected cases and controls (ratio 4:1) from a rural community (population approximately 10 000, HTLV-1 prevalence 7.7%). One neurologist masked to HTLV-1 serological status assessed all subjects. Clinical criteria were employed to diagnose TSP. From 205 eligible cases and controls, 139 were recruited with a mean age of 56 years, and 113 (81%) were HTLV-1-infected. 108/139 (78%) were female, and 8/113 HTLV-1 infected cases (7.1%) had a definite or probable TSP (all females; mean age 67 years) compared with 0/26 controls. Two with TSP were co-infected with HIV-2. Complaints of back pain and leg weakness were more common in HTLV-1-infected individuals (p = 0.03, p = 0.02), but no single symptom distinguished between subjects with and without TSP. We report a prevalence of TSP among HTLV-1-infected persons in this rural West African setting of 7.1%. There are difficulties excluding other potential aetiologies here.

  6. Sustained Elevation of Kynurenic Acid in the Cerebrospinal Fluid of Patients with Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Encephalitis

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    Ann Atlas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus (HSV type 1 encephalitis (HSE is a viral infectious disease with commonly occurring neurodegeneration and neurological/cognitive long-term sequelae. Kynurenic acid (KYNA is a neuroactive tryptophan metabolite, which is elevated in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF during viral infection as a result of immune activation. The aim of the study was to investigate the role of endogenous brain KYNA for the long-term outcome of the disease. CSF KYNA concentration was analyzed in 25 HSE patients along the course of the disease and compared with that of 25 age-matched healthy volunteers. Within 3 weeks of admission CSF KYNA of HSE patients was markedly elevated (median 33.6 nM compared to healthy volunteers (median 1.45 nM. Following a decline observed after 1–2 months, levels of CSF KYNA were elevated more than 1 year after admission (median 3.4 nM range: 1–9 years. A negative correlation was found between initial CSF KYNA concentrations and severity of the long-term sequelae. This study show a marked elevation in CSF KYNA from patients with HSE, most pronounced during the acute phase of the disease and slowly declining along the recovery. We propose that brain KYNA might potentially protect against neurodegeneration while causing a long-lasting loss in cognitive function associated with the disease.

  7. Endonuclease G, a candidate human enzyme for the initiation of genomic inversion in herpes simplex type 1 virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke-Jung; Zemelman, Boris V; Lehman, I Robert

    2002-06-07

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) a sequence is present as a direct repeat at the two termini of the 152-kilobase viral genome and as an inverted repeat at the junction of the two unique components L and S. During replication, the HSV-1 genome undergoes inversion of L and S, producing an equimolar mixture of the four possible isomers. Isomerization is believed to result from recombination triggered by breakage at the a sequence, a recombinational hot spot. We have identified an enzyme in HeLa cell extracts that preferentially cleaves the a sequence and have purified it to near homogeneity. Microsequencing showed it to be human endonuclease G, an enzyme with a strong preference for G+C-rich sequences. Endonuclease G appears to be the only cellular enzyme that can specifically cleave the a sequence. Endonuclease G also showed the predicted recombination properties in an in vitro recombination assay. Based on these findings, we propose that endonuclease G initiates the a sequence-mediated inversion of the L and S components during HSV-1 DNA replication.

  8. Direct phenotypical and functional dysregulation of primary human B cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perisé-Barrios, Ana Judith; Muñoz-Fernandez, María Ángeles; Pion, Marjorie

    2012-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR) and somatic hypermutation (SHM). Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease.

  9. Direct phenotypical and functional dysregulation of primary human B cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 in vitro.

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    Ana Judith Perisé-Barrios

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 induces a general dysregulation of immune system. Dysregulation of B cell compartment is generally thought to be induced by HIV-related immune activation and lymphopenia. However, a direct influence of HIV-1 particles on B cells was recently proposed as the third pathway of B cells dysregulation. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We evaluated the direct and specific consequences of HIV-1 contact on activation, survival, proliferation and phenotype of primary B cells in vitro. Moreover, we examined expression of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID mRNA that is responsible for class switch recombination (CSR and somatic hypermutation (SHM. Here, we report that changes observed in cellular proliferation, phenotypes and activation of B cells could be caused by direct contact between HIV-1 particles and primary B cells in vitro. Finally, direct HIV-1-derived B cells activation led to the increase of AID mRNA expression and its subsequent CSR function was detected in vitro. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: We showed that HIV-1 could directly induce primary B cells dysregulation triggering phenotypical and functional abilities of B cells in vitro that could explain in some extent early B-cell abnormalities in HIV disease.

  10. Leukotrienes are upregulated and associated with human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1-associated neuroinflammatory disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Caetano Trindade

    Full Text Available Leukotrienes (LTs are lipid mediators involved in several inflammatory disorders. We investigated the LT pathway in human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1 infection by evaluating LT levels in HTLV-1-infected patients classified according to the clinical status as asymptomatic carriers (HACs and HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP patients. Bioactive LTB(4 and CysLTs were both increased in the plasma and in the supernatant of peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures of HTLV-1-infected when compared to non-infected. Interestingly, CysLT concentrations were increased in HAM/TSP patients. Also, the concentration of plasma LTB(4 and LTC(4 positively correlated with the HTLV-1 proviral load in HTLV-1-infected individuals. The gene expression levels of LT receptors were differentially modulated in CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells of HTLV-1-infected patients. Analysis of the overall plasma signature of immune mediators demonstrated that LT and chemokine amounts were elevated during HTLV-1 infection. Importantly, in addition to CysLTs, IP-10 was also identified as a biomarker for HAM/TSP activity. These data suggest that LTs are likely to be associated with HTLV-1 infection and HAM/TSP development, suggesting their putative use for clinical monitoring.

  11. Effect of combination antiretroviral therapy on T-cell immunity in acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, U; Berrey, M M; Huang, Y; Markee, J; Brown, D J; Ap, S; Musey, L; Schacker, T; Corey, L; McElrath, M J

    2000-01-01

    T-cell responses were evaluated prospectively in 41 patients with acute human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection (30 untreated and 11 receiving zidovudine, lamivudine, and indinavir) and in 38 uninfected adults. By 6-12 months, treated patients had significantly greater median Candida and tetanus lymphoproliferative responses (stimulation index [SI], 76 and 55, respectively) than did untreated patients (SI, 7 and 6, P=.02 and.001, respectively), and the responses of treated patients surpassed those of uninfected adults (SI, 19 and 32, P= .002 and .101, respectively). Unlike the patients in the untreated group, the patients in the treated group mounted a 6-fold increased HIV-1 p24 response (SI increase, 1.0 to 5.7, P= .01) within 3 months. HIV-1-specific cytotoxicity remained detectable in most treated patients. Thus, combination therapy administered within 3-4 months of infection was associated with improved T-cell memory responses that were distinct from those of untreated patients. The amplified HIV-1-specific T-cell responses may help maintain cytotoxic activities.

  12. The prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and hepatitis C virus among injection drug users who use high risk inner-city locales in Miami, Florida

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyde B McCoy

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to estimate the prevalence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 and hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infection in hard-to-reach intravenous drug users, 199 subjects from high-risk inner-city locales, the so called "shooting galleries", were consented, interviewed, and tested in Miami, FL, US. Positive HIV-1 status was based on repeatedly reactive ELISA and confirmatory Western Blot. Positive HCV status was based on reactive ELISA and confirmatory polymerase chain reaction techniques. Overall, 50 (25% were not infected with either virus, 61 (31% were HIV-1/HCV co-infected, 17 (8% infected by HIV-1 only, and 71 (36% infected by HCV only. The results of the multivariable analyses showed that more years using heroin was the only significant risk factor for HCV only infection (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval = 1.07, 1.24 and for HIV-1/HCV co-infection (odds ratio = 1.17; 95% confidence interval = 1.09, 1.26. This paper demonstrates that HIV-1/HCV co-infection is highly prevalent among so called "shooting galleries".

  13. Molecular and clinical study on prevalence of feline herpesvirus type 1 and calicivirus in correlation with feline leukemia and immunodeficiency viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Najafi, Hamideh; MADADGAR, Omid; Jamshidi, Shahram; Ghalyanchi Langeroudi, Arash; Darzi Lemraski, Mahdieh

    2014-01-01

    Upper respiratory tract diseases (URTD) are common clinical problem in cats worldwide. Feline calicivirus (FCV) and feline herpesvirus type 1 (FHV-1) are the main primary pathogens. Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) are also among the most common infectious diseases of cats which suppress the immunity. Oropharyngeal and conjunctival swabs and blood samples were taken from 16 cats with clinical signs of URTD and 26 clinically healthy cats. PCR and RT-PCR were...

  14. A case Report of Human T-cell lymphotropic Virus Type 1(HTLV1 Infected Virus with Similar Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms in a Non-endemic Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Moghadam Ahmadi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Human lymphotropic retrovirus type 1( HTLV1 is the first known virus which could cause serious diseases such as adult leukemia- lymphoma T-cell lymphoma (ATL and Tropical Spastic (TSP. On the other hand, due to the HTLV1 similarity symptoms in patients with multiple sclerosis symptoms in Khorasan as the region's endemic, knowledge and understanding of the virus and the disease is necessary in other areas as well. The aim of the present case report study was to investigate the HTLV1 infected virus with similar multiple sclerosis symptoms in a Non-endemic area. Case presentation: The patient in the present case report study was a 56 years old women which her illness was early diagnosed as MS (multiple sclerosis.  No sign of improvement in therapy period was observed. Therefore, due to limited symptoms in lower extremities and sphincter dysfunction, her serum and cerebrospinal fluid for the presence of antibodies anti HTLV1 was evaluated. The presence of Abs with clinical symptoms, cause diagnosis of the virus in the patient. Conclusion: This patient was referred with symptoms of progressive paraparesis spatic and at first her disease was mistakenly diagnosed as MS.  Due to lack of response to treatment and atypical clinical symptoms related to MS and Khorasan province after two years the patient was diagnosis as HTLV1. It is recommended to apply differential diagnosis of MS in specific geographic regions, such infection  as HTLV1 especially in endemic areas should be considered.

  15. NFκB-mediated activation of the cellular FUT3, 5 and 6 gene cluster by herpes simplex virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordén, Rickard; Samuelsson, Ebba; Nyström, Kristina

    2017-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 has the ability to induce expression of a human gene cluster located on chromosome 19 upon infection. This gene cluster contains three fucosyltransferases (encoded by FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6) with the ability to add a fucose to an N-acetylglucosamine residue. Little is known regarding the transcriptional activation of these three genes in human cells. Intriguingly, herpes simplex virus type 1 activates all three genes simultaneously during infection, a situation not observed in uninfected tissue, pointing towards a virus specific mechanism for transcriptional activation. The aim of this study was to define the underlying mechanism for the herpes simplex virus type 1 activation of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcription. The transcriptional activation of the FUT-gene cluster on chromosome 19 in fibroblasts was specific, not involving adjacent genes. Moreover, inhibition of NFκB signaling through panepoxydone treatment significantly decreased the induction of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcriptional activation, as did siRNA targeting of p65, in herpes simplex virus type 1 infected fibroblasts. NFκB and p65 signaling appears to play an important role in the regulation of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcriptional activation by herpes simplex virus type 1 although additional, unidentified, viral factors might account for part of the mechanism as direct interferon mediated stimulation of NFκB was not sufficient to induce the fucosyltransferase encoding gene cluster in uninfected cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Discovery and preliminary structure-activity relationship of the marine natural product manzamines as herpes simplex virus type-1 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palem, Jayavardhana R; Mudit, Mudit; Hsia, Shao-Chung V; Sayed, Khalid A El

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) is a member of alpha-herpesviridae family and is known to cause contagious human infections. The marine habitat is a rich source of structurally unique bioactive secondary metabolites. A small library of marine natural product classes 1-10 has been screened to discover a new hit entity active against HSV-1. Manzamine A showed potent activity against HSV-1 via targeting the viral gene ICP0. Manzamine A is a β-carboline alkaloid isolated from the Indo-Pacific sponge Acanthostrongylophora species. Currently, acyclovir is the drug of choice for HSV-1 infections. Compared with 50 µM acyclovir, manzamine A at 1 µM concentration produced potent repressive effects on viral replication and release of infectious viruses in SIRC cells in recent studies. The potent anti-HSV-1 activity of manzamine A prompted a preliminary structure-activity relationship study by testing targeted manzamines. These included 8-hydroxymanzamine A (11), to test the effect of the C-8 hydroxy substitution at the β-carboline moiety; manzamine E (12), to assess the importance of substitution at the azacyclooctane ring; and ircinal A (13), to determine whether the β-carboline ring is required for the activity. Manzamine A was chemically transformed to its salt forms, manzamine A monohydrochloride (14) and manzamine A monotartrate (15), to test whether improving water solubility and hydrophilicity will positively affect the activity. Compounds were tested for activity against HSV-1 using fluorescent microscopy and plaque assay. The results showed the reduced anti-HSV-1 activity of 11, suggesting that C-8 hydroxy substitution might adversely affect the activity. Similarly, manzamines 12 and 13 showed no activity against HSV-1, indicating the preference of the unsubstituted azacylcooctane and β-carboline rings to the activity. Anti-HSV-1 activity was significantly improved for the manzamine A salts 14 and 15, suggesting that improving the overall water solubility

  17. Molecular epidemiology of endemic human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 in a rural community in Guinea-Bissau.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla van Tienen

    Full Text Available Human T-Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 infection causes lethal adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and severely debilitating HTLV-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP in up to 5% of infected adults. HTLV-1 is endemic in parts of Africa and the highest prevalence in West Africa (5% has been reported in Caio, a rural area in the North-West of Guinea-Bissau. It is not known which HTLV-1 variants are present in this community. Sequence data can provide insights in the molecular epidemiology and help to understand the origin and spread of HTLV-1.To gain insight into the molecular diversity of HTLV-1 in West Africa.HTLV-1 infected individuals were identified in community surveys between 1990-2007. The complete Long Terminal Repeat (LTR and p24 coding region of HTLV-1 was sequenced from infected subjects. Socio-demographic data were obtained from community census and from interviews performed by fieldworkers. Phylogenetic analyses were performed to characterize the relationship between the Caio HTLV-1 and HTLV-1 from other parts of the world.LTR and p24 sequences were obtained from 72 individuals (36 LTR, 24 p24 only and 12 both. Consistent with the low evolutionary change of HTLV-1, many of the sequences from unrelated individuals showed 100% nucleotide identity. Most (45 of 46 of the LTR sequences clustered with the Cosmopolitan HTLV-1 subtype 1a, subgroup D (1aD. LTR and p24 sequences from two subjects were divergent and formed a significant cluster with HTLV-1 subtype 1g, and with the most divergent African Simian T-cell Lymphotropic Virus, Tan90.The Cosmopolitan HTLV-1 1aD predominates in this rural West African community. However, HTLV-1 subtype 1g is also present. This subtype has not been described before in West Africa and may be more widespread than previously thought. These data are in line with the hypothesis that multiple monkey-to-man zoonotic events are contributing to HTLV-1 diversity.

  18. Selective decrease in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-induced alpha interferon production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells during HIV-1 infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Ferbas, J; Navratil, J; Logar, A; Rinaldo, C

    1995-01-01

    We previously reported that human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), herpes simplex virus (HSV), and Sendai virus induce higher levels of alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) in blood dendritic cells than in monocytes of healthy donors. In the present study, the levels of IFN-alpha induced by T-cell tropic (IIIb and RF) and monocytotropic (BaL) strains of HIV-1 and by HSV were significantly decreased in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from subjects with asymptomatic and symptom...

  19. Lack of enhancing effect of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of human blood monocytes and peritoneal macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Shadduck, P P; Weinberg, J B; Haney, A. F.; Bartlett, J. A.; Langlois, A J; Bolognesi, D P; Matthews, T J

    1991-01-01

    The influence of human anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) antibody on HIV-1 infection of freshly isolated normal human peritoneal macrophages and blood monocytes was examined. Each of 14 HIV antibody-positive human serum samples was found to block the infection of four virus isolates (human T-cell lymphotropic virus type IIIBa-L [HTLV-IIIBa-L], HTLV-IIIB, D.U. 6587-7, and D.U. 7887-8) at serum dilutions ranging from 10(-1) to 10(-2). Three of these isolates (HTLV-IIIBa-L, D.U. 6...

  20. UCLA1, a synthetic derivative of a gp120 RNA aptamer, inhibits entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtype C

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mufhandu, Hazel T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Entry of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) into cells is mediated by the virion surface envelope (Env) glycoproteins, making it a desirable target for antiretroviral entry inhibitors. We previously isolated a family of gp120 binding RNA...

  1. Detergent extraction of herpes simplex virus type 1 glycoprotein D by zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents and purification by ion-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Welling-Wester, S; Feijlbrief, M; Koedijk, DGAM; Welling, GW

    1998-01-01

    Detergents (surfactants) are the key reagents in the extraction and purification of integral membrane proteins. Zwitterionic and non-ionic detergents were used for the extraction of recombinant glycoprotein D (gD-1) of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) from insect cells infected with recombinant

  2. HUMAN-IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS (HIV) TYPE-1 INFECTION STATUS AND IN-VITRO SUSCEPTIBILITY TO HIV-INFECTION AMONG HIGH-RISK HIV-1 SERONEGATIVE HEMOPHILIACS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LEDERMAN, MM; JACKSON, JB; KRONER, BL; WHITE, GC; EYSTER, ME; ALEDORT, LM; HILGARTNER, MW; KESSLER, CM; COHEN, AR; KIGER, KP; GOEDERT, JJ

    Blood samples were obtained from 16 hemophiliacs who had a 50%-94% defined risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type 1 infection on the basis of treatment history and from 14 controls not at risk for HIV infection. HIV-1 was not detected in any of 12 patient samples by cocultivation nor in 14

  3. Randomized trial to evaluate indinavir/ritonavir versus saquinavir/ritonavir in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients: the MaxCmin1 Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragsted, Ulrik Bak; Gerstoft, Jan; Pedersen, Court

    2003-01-01

    This trial assessed the rate of virological failure at 48 weeks in adult human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1-infected patients assigned indinavir/ritonavir (Idv/Rtv; 800/100 mg 2 times daily) or saquinavir/ritonavir (Sqv/Rtv; 1000/100 mg 2 times daily) in an open-label, randomized (1:1...

  4. Natural infection with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) induces humoral and T cell responses to the HSV-1 glycoprotein H : L complex

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, DF; Verjans, GMGM; Osterhaus, ADME; van Kooij, A; Welling, GW; Scheffer, AJ; The, TH; Welling-Wester, S

    The glycoproteins of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) are important targets for the immune system in the control of HSV-1 infections. The humoral and T cell responses to the glycoprotein (g)H-t(His):gL complex of HSV-1 were studied in seven HSV-1-seropositive and three HSV-1-seronegative healthy

  5. Susceptibility of Drug-Resistant Clinical Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Strains to Essential Oils of Ginger, Thyme, Hyssop, and Sandalwood▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzler, Paul; Koch, Christine; Reichling, Jürgen

    2007-01-01

    Acyclovir-resistant clinical isolates of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were analyzed in vitro for their susceptibilities to essential oils of ginger, thyme, hyssop, and sandalwood. All essential oils exhibited high levels of virucidal activity against acyclovir-sensitive strain KOS and acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 clinical isolates and reduced plaque formation significantly. PMID:17353250

  6. Prevalence and association between herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2-specific antibodies in attendees at a sexually transmitted disease clinic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W. Roest; W.I. van der Meijden (Willem); G. van Dijk (Grietje); J. Groen (Jan); P.G.H. Mulder (Paul); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.M.G.M. Verjans (George)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and HSV-2 was determined in 1993 and 1998 in a randomly selected study group of 1024 and 654 attendees, respectively, at the sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic of the University Hospital Rotterdam-Dijkzigt, The

  7. Emergence of monoclonal antibody b12-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants during natural infection in the absence of humoral or cellular immune pressure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bunnik, Evelien M.; van Gils, Marit J.; Lobbrecht, Marilie S. D.; Pisas, Linaida; Nanlohy, Nening M.; van Baarle, Debbie; van Nuenen, Ad C.; Hessell, Ann J.; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2010-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies such as b12, which targets the highly conserved CD4-binding site, raises a significant hurdle for the development of a neutralizing antibody-based vaccine. Here, 15 individuals were studied of whom seven

  8. Evolution of the V3 envelope domain in proviral sequences and isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 during transition of the viral biological phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiken, C. L.; de Jong, J. J.; Baan, E.; Keulen, W.; Tersmette, M.; Goudsmit, J.

    1992-01-01

    The third variable domain (V3) of the envelope gene of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 contains a major neutralization epitope and determinants of syncytium-inducing (SI) capacity and replication rate (reviewed by J. P. Moore and P. L. Nara, AIDS Suppl. 2:S21-S33, 1991). Sequences were generated

  9. Production of Interferon α by Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 in Human Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells Is Dependent on Induction of Autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Dejiang; Kang, Kyung Hee; Spector, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background. The mechanisms responsible for interferon α (IFN-α) production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) during human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection are unknown. This research examined the roles of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) and autophagy in IFN-α production by pDCs during HIV-1 infection.

  10. Molecular analysis of critical sequences within the EBNA-2 type 1 gene from Epstein-Barr virus isolates from patients with infectious mononucleosis, tonsillar hyperplasia, and HIV infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Al-Homsi, A. S.; Berger, C.; van Baarle, D.; Kersten, M. J.; Klein, M. R.; McQuain, C.; van Oers, R.; Knecht, H.

    1998-01-01

    EBNA-2 is the first protein to be detected after infection of primary B lymphocytes by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and plays an essential role as transcriptional activator in EBV-induced lymphocyte transformation. We analysed by PCR and sequencing regions of the EBNA-2 type 1 gene from isolates from 13

  11. Antiviral effects of milk proteins : Acylation results in polyanionic compounds with potent activity against human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 in vitro

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swart, P J; Kuipers, M E; Smit, C; Pauwels, R; deBéthune, M P; de Clercq, E; Meijer, D K; Huisman, J G

    1996-01-01

    A number of native and modified milk proteins from bovine or human sources were analyzed for their inhibitory effects on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 in vitro in an MT4 cell test system, The proteins investigated were lactoferrin, alpha-lactalbumin, beta-lactoglobulin A, and

  12. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in the Netherlands: seroprevalence, risk factors and changes during a 12-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenberg, Petra J.; Tjhie, Jeroen H. T.; de Melker, Hester E.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.; van Bergen, Jan E. A. M.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; van Benthem, Birgit H. B.

    2016-01-01

    Genital herpes results in considerable morbidity, including risk of neonatal herpes, and is increasingly being caused by Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1. Possibly children are less often HSV-1 infected, leaving them susceptible until sexual debut. We assessed changes in the Dutch HSV-1 and HSV-2

  13. Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 in the Netherlands : seroprevalence, risk factors and changes during a 12-year period

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woestenberg, Petra J; Tjhie, Jeroen H T; de Melker, Hester E; van der Klis, Fiona R M; van Bergen, Jan E A M; van der Sande, Marianne A B|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/205083420; van Benthem, Birgit H B

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Genital herpes results in considerable morbidity, including risk of neonatal herpes, and is increasingly being caused by Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) type 1. Possibly children are less often HSV-1 infected, leaving them susceptible until sexual debut. We assessed changes in the Dutch HSV-1

  14. RETINAL MANIFESTATIONS IN ADULT T-CELL LEUKEMIA/LYMPHOMA RELATED TO INFECTION BY THE HUMAN T-CELL LYMPHOTROPIC VIRUS TYPE-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merle, Harold; Hage, Rabih; Meniane, Jean-Côme; Deligny, Christophe; Plumelle, Yves; Donnio, Angélique; Jean-Charles, Albert

    2016-07-01

    To describe the retinal manifestations in adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) related to an infection by the human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1). Retrospective case series of patients with ATL with retinal findings. A total of 175 patients were diagnosed with ATL in Martinique between 1983 and 2013. Three of them showed intraocular findings related to ATL. They were bilateral deep retinal infiltrates associated with intermediate uveitis. In two cases, the ATL diagnosis was known. In the third, fluorescein angiography was remarkable for deep retinal infiltrates although fundus examination was unremarkable. The ATL cells were found in the blood of this patient. Despite chemotherapy, infiltrates progressed from the retinal periphery to the posterior pole in two patients, thus reducing visual acuity to light perception. They were associated with vasculitis. Retinal involvement in ATL is very rare. It can occur at any point during the natural course of the disease. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 carriers should benefit from a regular ophthalmic examination, and a fluorescein angiography must be performed in all patients with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 with vitreous cells. The presence of deep retinal infiltrates must raise suspicion for ATL in a patient with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1.

  15. Occluding the Mannose Moieties on Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gp120 with Griffithsin Improves the Antibody Responses to Both Proteins in Mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Banerjee, Kaustuv; Michael, Elizabeth; Eggink, Dirk; van Montfort, Thijs; Lasnik, Amanda B.; Palmer, Kenneth E.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Moore, John P.; Klasse, Per Johan

    2012-01-01

    To assess the influence of mannosylated glycans on the immunogenicity of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Env proteins, we immunized mice with monomeric gp120 in the presence and absence of the mannose-binding protein, griffithsin (GRFT). For comparison, other groups of mice received the

  16. Genotypic Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Isolates in Immunocompromised Patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Perse da Silva

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 is a prevalent human pathogen that causes a variety of diseases, including an increased risk of developing more severe disease in HIV-infected individuals. In Brazil, there is no information about the molecular epidemiology of HSV-1 infection, especially in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to perform the genotypic characterization of HSV-1 among HIV-infected patients. A total of 214 serum samples from HIV-positive patients without HSV infection symptoms were enrolled in one of two reference hospitals for HIV infection managing in Rio de Janeiro. The gG and gI genes were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP and full nucleotide sequencing of the US8 (1601 bp, UL44 (1996 bp, and UL23 (1244 bp regions was performed. A total of 38.3% (82/214 and 32.7% (70/214 of the serum samples tested positive for gG and gI genes, respectively. RFLP analysis classified the HSV-1 as belonging to genotype A. Phylogenetic analysis of the Brazilian samples for the US8, UL44, and UL23 regions demonstrated that the nucleotide identity between Brazilian samples was higher than 97% for all genes. No acyclovir mutation was detected in the patients. The shedding of HSV in the serum samples from HIV-positive patients who were asymptomatic for HSV infection was detected in this work. This is the first report of molecular characterization of HSV-1 in Brazilian samples since there is no previous data available in the literature concerning the genotypic classification and stable distribution of Brazilian strains of HSV-1 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

  17. Genotypic Characterization of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Isolates in Immunocompromised Patients in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perse da Silva, Amanda; Lopes, Amanda de Oliveira; Vieira, Yasmine Rangel; de Almeida, Adilson José; Sion, Fernando Samuel; Grinsztejn, Beatriz; Wagner, Sandra; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is a prevalent human pathogen that causes a variety of diseases, including an increased risk of developing more severe disease in HIV-infected individuals. In Brazil, there is no information about the molecular epidemiology of HSV-1 infection, especially in HIV-infected individuals. The aim of this study was to perform the genotypic characterization of HSV-1 among HIV-infected patients. A total of 214 serum samples from HIV-positive patients without HSV infection symptoms were enrolled in one of two reference hospitals for HIV infection managing in Rio de Janeiro. The gG and gI genes were analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and full nucleotide sequencing of the US8 (1601 bp), UL44 (1996 bp), and UL23 (1244 bp) regions was performed. A total of 38.3% (82/214) and 32.7% (70/214) of the serum samples tested positive for gG and gI genes, respectively. RFLP analysis classified the HSV-1 as belonging to genotype A. Phylogenetic analysis of the Brazilian samples for the US8, UL44, and UL23 regions demonstrated that the nucleotide identity between Brazilian samples was higher than 97% for all genes. No acyclovir mutation was detected in the patients. The shedding of HSV in the serum samples from HIV-positive patients who were asymptomatic for HSV infection was detected in this work. This is the first report of molecular characterization of HSV-1 in Brazilian samples since there is no previous data available in the literature concerning the genotypic classification and stable distribution of Brazilian strains of HSV-1 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. PMID:26407292

  18. Recovery of hematopoietic activity in bone marrow from human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected patients during highly active antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isgrò, A; Mezzaroma, I; Aiuti, A; De Vita, L; Franchi, F; Pandolfi, F; Alario, C; Ficara, F; Riva, E; Antonelli, G; Aiuti, F

    2000-10-10

    The mechanisms responsible for the hematopoietic failure in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients are still unknown. Several findings indicate that the in vitro proliferative potential of precursor cells from AIDS patients is reduced. The changes seen in bone marrow (BM) morphology and the defective BM functions associated with cytopenias have both been proposed as potential explanations. In patients treated with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) an immune reconstitution associated with increased whole blood cell counts has been described. We have investigated the effects of HAART on the number of colony-forming cells (CFCs) and long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs), using long-term BM cell cultures (LTBMC) in a group of subjects with HIV-1 infection enrolled in an open study to evaluate the mechanisms of immune reconstitution during HAART. In each patient, the increase in colony growth was homogeneous, regardless of the type of hematopoietic progenitor cells assayed; in four subjects an increase in the most primitive progenitor cells (LTC-ICs) was observed. These findings were associated with the in vivo data showing increased numbers of BM mononuclear cells (BMMCs) after HAART and with a rise in peripheral CD4(+) T cell counts and decreased levels of plasma HIV-1 RNA. A decreased number of hematopoietic progenitor cells and/or a defective modulation of progenitor cell growth might be the cause of the hematological abnormalities in AIDS patients. Controlling HIV-1 replication by HAART could determine a restoration of stem cell activity, probably because of the suppression of factors that inhibit normal hematopoiesis.

  19. Comparative Analysis of the Antiviral Activity of Camel, Bovine, and Human Lactoperoxidases Against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fakharany, Esmail M; Uversky, Vladimir N; Redwan, Elrashdy M

    2017-05-01

    Lactoperoxidase is a milk hemoprotein that acts as a non-immunoglobulin protective protein and shows strong antimicrobial activity. Bovine milk contains about 15 and 7 times higher levels of lactoperoxidase than human colustrum and camel milk, respectively. Human, bovine, and camel lactoperoxidases (hLPO, bLPO, and cLPO, respectively) were purified as homogeneous samples with specific activities of 4.2, 61.3, and 8.7 u/mg, respectively. The optimal working pH was 7.5 (hLPO and bLPO) and 6.5 (cLPO), whereas the optimal working temperature for these proteins was 40 °C. The K m of hLPO, cLPO, and bLPO were 17, 16, and 19 mM, and their corresponding V max values were 2, 1.7, and 2.7 μmol/min ml. However, in the presence of H2O2, the K m values were 11 mM for hLPO and cLPO and 20 mM for bLPO, while the corresponding V max values were 1.17 for hLPO and 1.4 μmol/min ml for cLPO and bLPO. All three proteins were able to inhibit the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in Vero cell line model. The relative antiviral activities were proportional to the protein concentrations. The highest anti-HSV-1 activity was exhibited by bLPO that inhibited the HSV particles at a concentration of 0.5 mg/ml with the relative activity of 100%.

  20. Matrix Degradation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Associated Tuberculosis and Tuberculosis Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Naomi F; Wilkinson, Katalin A; Meintjes, Graeme; Tezera, Liku B; Goliath, Rene; Peyper, Janique M; Tadokera, Rebecca; Opondo, Charles; Coussens, Anna K; Wilkinson, Robert J; Friedland, Jon S; Elkington, Paul T

    2017-07-01

    Extensive immunopathology occurs in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/tuberculosis (TB) coinfection, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not well-defined. Excessive matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity is emerging as a key process but has not been systematically studied in HIV-associated TB. We performed a cross-sectional study of matrix turnover in HIV type 1 (HIV-1)-infected and -uninfected TB patients and controls, and a prospective cohort study of HIV-1-infected TB patients at risk of TB immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (TB-IRIS), in Cape Town, South Africa. Sputum and plasma MMP concentrations were quantified by Luminex, plasma procollagen III N-terminal propeptide (PIIINP) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and urinary lipoarabinomannan (LAM) by Alere Determine TB LAM assay. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy donors were cultured with Mycobacterium tuberculosis and extracellular matrix in a 3D model of TB granuloma formation. MMP activity differed between HIV-1-infected and -uninfected TB patients and corresponded with specific TB clinical phenotypes. HIV-1-infected TB patients had reduced pulmonary MMP concentrations, associated with reduced cavitation, but increased plasma PIIINP, compared to HIV-1-uninfected TB patients. Elevated extrapulmonary extracellular matrix turnover was associated with TB-IRIS, both before and during TB-IRIS onset. The predominant collagenase was MMP-8, which was likely neutrophil derived and M. tuberculosis-antigen driven. Mycobacterium tuberculosis-induced matrix degradation was suppressed by the MMP inhibitor doxycycline in vitro. MMP activity in TB differs by HIV-1 status and compartment, and releases matrix degradation products. Matrix turnover in HIV-1-infected patients is increased before and during TB-IRIS, informing novel diagnostic strategies. MMP inhibition is a potential host-directed therapy strategy for prevention and treatment of TB-IRIS.

  1. Barefoot Plantar Pressure Indicates Progressive Neurological Damage in Patients with Human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Helena B Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available The human T-Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 (HTLV-1 is a retrovirus associated with neurological alterations; individuals with HTLV-1 infection may develop HTLV-1 associated myelopathy / tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. Frequent neurological complaints include foot numbness and leg weakness. In this study, we compared the distribution of the body weight on different areas of the foot in HTLV-1 patients with HAM/TSP, asymptomatic HTLV-1 patients, and healthy individuals.We studied 36 HTLV-1 infected patients, who were divided in two groups of 18 patients each based on whether or not they had been diagnosed with HAM/TSP, and 17 control subjects. The evaluation included an interview on the patient's clinical history and examinations of the patient's reflexes, foot skin tactile sensitivity, and risk of falling. The pressure distribution on different areas of the foot was measured with baropodometry, using a pressure platform, while the patients had their eyes open or closed.The prevalence of neurological disturbances-altered reflexes and skin tactile sensitivity and increased risk of falling-was higher in HTLV-1 HAM/TSP patients than in HTLV-1 asymptomatic patients. The medium and maximum pressure values were higher in the forefoot than in the midfoot and hindfoot in both HTLV-1 groups. In addition, the pressure on the hindfoot was lower in HAM/TSP patients compared to control subjects.The neurological disturbances associated with HTLV-1 infection gradually worsened from HTLV-1 asymptomatic patients to HAM/TSP patients. Baropodometry is a valuable tool to establish the extent of neurological damage in patients suffering from HTLV-1 infection.

  2. Small-molecule inhibitor which reactivates p53 in human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-transformed cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Jin; Dasgupta, Arindam; Huang, Keven; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Pise-Masison, Cynthia; Gurova, Katerina V; Brady, John N

    2008-09-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is the etiologic agent of the aggressive and fatal disease adult T-cell leukemia. Previous studies have demonstrated that the HTLV-1-encoded Tax protein inhibits the function of tumor suppressor p53 through a Tax-induced NF-kappaB pathway. Given these attributes, we were interested in the activity of small-molecule inhibitor 9-aminoacridine (9AA), an anticancer drug that targets two important stress response pathways, NF-kappaB and p53. In the present study, we have examined the effects of 9AA on HTLV-1-transformed cells. Treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA resulted in a dramatic decrease in cell viability. Consistent with these results, we observed an increase in the percentage of cells in sub-G(1) and an increase in the number of cells positive by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling assay following treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA. In each assay, HTLV-1-transformed cells C8166, Hut102, and MT2 were more sensitive to treatment with 9AA than control CEM and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Analyzing p53 function, we demonstrate that treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells with 9AA resulted in an increase in p53 protein and activation of p53 transcription activity. Of significance, 9AA-induced cell death could be blocked by introduction of a p53 small interfering RNA, linking p53 activity and cell death. These results suggest that Tax-repressed p53 function in HTLV-1-transformed cells is "druggable" and can be restored by treatment with 9AA. The fact that 9AA induces p53 and inhibits NF-kappaB suggests a promising strategy for the treatment of HTLV-1-transformed cells.

  3. Proviral Features of Human T Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 in Carriers with Indeterminate Western Blot Analysis Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuramitsu, Madoka; Sekizuka, Tsuyoshi; Yamochi, Tadanori; Firouzi, Sanaz; Sato, Tomoo; Umeki, Kazumi; Sasaki, Daisuke; Hasegawa, Hiroo; Kubota, Ryuji; Sobata, Rieko; Matsumoto, Chieko; Kaneko, Noriaki; Momose, Haruka; Araki, Kumiko; Saito, Masumichi; Nosaka, Kisato; Utsunomiya, Atae; Koh, Ki-Ryang; Ogata, Masao; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Iwanaga, Masako; Sagara, Yasuko; Yamano, Yoshihisa; Okayama, Akihiko; Miura, Kiyonori; Satake, Masahiro; Saito, Shigeru; Itabashi, Kazuo; Yamaguchi, Kazunari; Kuroda, Makoto; Watanabe, Toshiki; Okuma, Kazu; Hamaguchi, Isao

    2017-09-01

    Western blotting (WB) for human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is performed to confirm anti-HTLV-1 antibodies detected at the initial screening of blood donors and in pregnant women. However, the frequent occurrence of indeterminate results is a problem with this test. We therefore assessed the cause of indeterminate WB results by analyzing HTLV-1 provirus genomic sequences. A quantitative PCR assay measuring HTLV-1 provirus in WB-indeterminate samples revealed that the median proviral load was approximately 100-fold lower than that of WB-positive samples (0.01 versus 0.71 copy/100 cells). Phylogenic analysis of the complete HTLV-1 genomes of WB-indeterminate samples did not identify any specific phylogenetic groups. When we analyzed the nucleotide changes in 19 HTLV-1 isolates from WB-indeterminate samples, we identified 135 single nucleotide substitutions, composed of four types, G to A (29%), C to T (19%), T to C (19%), and A to G (16%). In the most frequent G-to-A substitution, 64% occurred at GG dinucleotides, indicating that APOBEC3G is responsible for mutagenesis in WB-indeterminate samples. Moreover, interestingly, five WB-indeterminate isolates had nonsense mutations in Pol and/or Tax, Env, p12, and p30. These findings suggest that WB-indeterminate carriers have low production of viral antigens because of a combination of a low proviral load and mutations in the provirus, which may interfere with host recognition of HTLV-1 antigens. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  4. Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 and Other Pathogens are Key Causative Factors in Sporadic Alzheimer’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Steven A.; Harris, Elizabeth A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This review focuses on research in epidemiology, neuropathology, molecular biology, and genetics regarding the hypothesis that pathogens interact with susceptibility genes and are causative in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Sporadic AD is a complex multifactorial neurodegenerative disease with evidence indicating coexisting multi-pathogen and inflammatory etiologies. There are significant associations between AD and various pathogens, including Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Cytomegalovirus, and other Herpesviridae, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, spirochetes, Helicobacter pylori, and various periodontal pathogens. These pathogens are able to evade destruction by the host immune system, leading to persistent infection. Bacterial and viral DNA and RNA and bacterial ligands increase the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules and activate the innate and adaptive immune systems. Evidence demonstrates that pathogens directly and indirectly induce AD pathology, including amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation, phosphorylation of tau protein, neuronal injury, and apoptosis. Chronic brain infection with HSV-1, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and spirochetes results in complex processes that interact to cause a vicious cycle of uncontrolled neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Infections such as Cytomegalovirus, Helicobacter pylori, and periodontal pathogens induce production of systemic pro-inflammatory cytokines that may cross the blood-brain barrier to promote neurodegeneration. Pathogen-induced inflammation and central nervous system accumulation of Aβ damages the blood-brain barrier, which contributes to the pathophysiology of AD. Apolipoprotein E4 (ApoE4) enhances brain infiltration by pathogens including HSV-1 and Chlamydophila pneumoniae. ApoE4 is also associated with an increased pro-inflammatory response by the immune system. Potential antimicrobial treatments for AD are discussed, including the rationale for antiviral and antibiotic clinical trials. PMID

  5. CTA1-DD adjuvant promotes strong immunity against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoproteins following mucosal immunization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundling, Christopher; Schön, Karin; Mörner, Andreas; Forsell, Mattias N E; Wyatt, Richard T; Thorstensson, Rigmor; Karlsson Hedestam, Gunilla B; Lycke, Nils Y

    2008-12-01

    Strategies to induce potent and broad antibody responses against the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) envelope glycoproteins (Env) at both systemic and mucosal sites represent a central goal for HIV-1 vaccine development. Here, we show that the non-toxic CTA1-DD adjuvant promoted mucosal and systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses following intranasal (i.n.) immunizations with trimeric or monomeric forms of HIV-1 Env in mice and in non-human primates. Env-specific IgG subclasses in the serum of immunized mice reflected a balanced Th1/Th2 type of response. Strikingly, i.n. immunizations with Env and the CTA1-DD adjuvant induced substantial levels of mucosal anti-Env IgA in bronchial alveolar lavage and also detectable levels in vaginal secretions. By contrast, parenteral immunizations of Env formulated in Ribi did not stimulate mucosal IgA responses, while the two adjuvants induced a similar distribution of Env-specific IgG-subclasses in serum. A single parenteral boost with Env in Ribi adjuvant into mice previously primed i.n. with Env and CTA1-DD, augmented the serum anti-Env IgG levels to similar magnitudes as those observed after three intraperitoneal immunizations with Env in Ribi. The augmenting potency of CTA1-DD was similar to that of LTK63 or CpG oligodeoxynucleotides (ODN). However, in contrast to CpG ODN, the effect of CTA1-DD and LTK63 appeared to be independent of MyD88 and toll-like receptor signalling. This is the first demonstration that CTA1-DD augments specific immune responses also in non-human primates, suggesting that this adjuvant could be explored further as a clinically safe mucosal vaccine adjuvant for humoral and cell-mediated immunity against HIV-1 Env.

  6. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 infection is frequent in rural communities of the southern Andes of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ita, Fanny; Mayer, Erick F; Verdonck, Kristien; Gonzalez, Elsa; Clark, Daniel; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2014-02-01

    To evaluate the presence of human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection in isolated rural communities in the southern Andes of Peru. We conducted a cross-sectional study in five communities located in three provinces in Ayacucho, Peru. The five communities are located at >3000 meters above sea level and are mainly rural, and more than 85% of the population speaks Quechua. Volunteers aged 12 years and older were included. Clinical and epidemiological data were collected, along with a blood sample for serological testing. We included 397 participants; their median age was 41 years (interquartile range 31-57 years) and 69% were women. According to our definitions, 98% were of Quechua origin. HTLV-1 was diagnosed in 11 people: 0/164 in Cangallo, 3/154 (2%) in Vilcashuaman, and 8/79 (10%) in Parinacochas. There were no cases of HTLV-2. All the HTLV-1-positive participants were born in Ayacucho and were of Quechua origin; they ranged in age from 29 to 87 years (median 56 years) and 10/11 were women. Ten were apparently healthy, and one woman was diagnosed with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). Three out of 11 had a family member with a lower limb impairment compatible with HAM/TSP. The fact that HTLV-1 infection was present in two out of three provinces suggests that HTLV-1 could be highly endemic in the southern Andes in the Quechua population. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  7. Blockade but not overexpression of the junctional adhesion molecule C influences virus-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selina Christen

    Full Text Available Type 1 diabetes (T1D results from the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreas. Recruitment of inflammatory cells is prerequisite to beta-cell-injury. The junctional adhesion molecule (JAM family proteins JAM-B and JAM-C are involved in polarized leukocyte transendothelial migration and are expressed by vascular endothelial cells of peripheral tissue and high endothelial venules in lympoid organs. Blocking of JAM-C efficiently attenuated cerulean-induced pancreatitis, rheumatoid arthritis or inflammation induced by ischemia and reperfusion in mice. In order to investigate the influence of JAM-C on trafficking and transmigration of antigen-specific, autoaggressive T-cells, we used transgenic mice that express a protein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV as a target autoantigen in the β-cells of the islets of Langerhans under the rat insulin promoter (RIP. Such RIP-LCMV mice turn diabetic after infection with LCMV. We found that upon LCMV-infection JAM-C protein was upregulated around the islets in RIP-LCMV mice. JAM-C expression correlated with islet infiltration and functional beta-cell impairment. Blockade with a neutralizing anti-JAM-C antibody reduced the T1D incidence. However, JAM-C overexpression on endothelial cells did not accelerate diabetes in the RIP-LCMV model. In summary, our data suggest that JAM-C might be involved in the final steps of trafficking and transmigration of antigen-specific autoaggressive T-cells to the islets of Langerhans.

  8. Blockade but not overexpression of the junctional adhesion molecule C influences virus-induced type 1 diabetes in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christen, Selina; Coppieters, Ken; Rose, Kerstin; Holdener, Martin; Bayer, Monika; Pfeilschifter, Josef M; Hintermann, Edith; von Herrath, Matthias G; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Imhof, Beat A; Christen, Urs

    2013-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) results from the autoimmune destruction of insulin-producing beta-cells in the pancreas. Recruitment of inflammatory cells is prerequisite to beta-cell-injury. The junctional adhesion molecule (JAM) family proteins JAM-B and JAM-C are involved in polarized leukocyte transendothelial migration and are expressed by vascular endothelial cells of peripheral tissue and high endothelial venules in lympoid organs. Blocking of JAM-C efficiently attenuated cerulean-induced pancreatitis, rheumatoid arthritis or inflammation induced by ischemia and reperfusion in mice. In order to investigate the influence of JAM-C on trafficking and transmigration of antigen-specific, autoaggressive T-cells, we used transgenic mice that express a protein of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) as a target autoantigen in the β-cells of the islets of Langerhans under the rat insulin promoter (RIP). Such RIP-LCMV mice turn diabetic after infection with LCMV. We found that upon LCMV-infection JAM-C protein was upregulated around the islets in RIP-LCMV mice. JAM-C expression correlated with islet infiltration and functional beta-cell impairment. Blockade with a neutralizing anti-JAM-C antibody reduced the T1D incidence. However, JAM-C overexpression on endothelial cells did not accelerate diabetes in the RIP-LCMV model. In summary, our data suggest that JAM-C might be involved in the final steps of trafficking and transmigration of antigen-specific autoaggressive T-cells to the islets of Langerhans.

  9. Systemic cancer gene therapy using adeno-associated virus type 1 vector expressing MDA-7/IL24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Ichiro; Miyake, Koichi; Hanawa, Hideki; Kurai, Toshiyuki; Hirai, Yukihiko; Ishizaki, Masamichi; Uchida, Eiji; Tajiri, Takashi; Shimada, Takashi

    2007-10-01

    Melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7/interleukin-24 (mda-7/IL24), selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells without harming normal cells. It also exerts immunomodulatory and antiangiogenic effects, as well as potent antitumor bystander effects, making it an ideal candidate for a new anticancer gene therapy. Here, we examined the feasibility of adeno-associated virus type 1 (AAV1) vector-mediated systemic gene therapy using mda-7/IL24. In vitro studies showed that medium conditioned by AAV1-mda7-transducedC2C12 cells induces tumor cell-specific apoptosis and inhibits angiogenesis in a human umbilical vein endothelial cell tube formation assay. To assess the in vivo effects of AAV1-mediated systemic delivery of MDA-7/IL24, we generated a subcutaneous tumor model by injecting Ehrlich ascites tumor cells into the dorsum of DDY mice. A single intravenous injection of AAV1-mda7 (2.0 x 10(11) viral genomes) significantly inhibited tumor growth. In addition, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), and immunohistochemical analyses showed significant induction of tumor-cell-specific apoptosis and reduction of microvessel formation within the tumors, and there was a significant increase in survival among the AAV1-mda7-treated mice. These results clearly demonstrate that continuous systemic delivery of MDA-7/IL24 can serve as an effective treatment for cancer. Thus, AAV1 vector-mediated systemic delivery of MDA-7/IL24 represents a potentially important new approach to anticancer therapy.

  10. Importance of purine and pyrimidine content of local nucleotide sequences (six bases long) for evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, H

    1991-10-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 evolves rapidly, and random base change is thought to act as a major factor in this evolution. However, segments of the viral genome differ in their variability: there is the highly variable env gene, particularly hypervariable regions located within env, and, in contrast, the conservative gag and pol genes. Computer analysis of the nucleotide sequences of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 isolates reveals that base substitution in this virus is nonrandom and affected by local nucleotide sequences. Certain local sequences 6 base pairs long are excessively frequent in the hypervariable regions. These sequences exhibit base-substitution hotspots at specific positions in their 6 bases. The hotspots tend to be nonsilent letters of codons in the hypervariable regions--thus leading to marked amino acid substitutions there. Conversely, in the conservative gag and pol genes the hotspots tend to be silent letters because of a difference in codon frame from the hypervariable regions. Furthermore, base substitutions in the local sequences that frequently appear in the conservative genes occurred at a low level, even within the variable env. Thus, despite the high variability of this virus, the conservative genes and their products could be conserved. These may be some of the strategies evolved in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 to allow for positive-selection pressures, such as the host immune system, and negative-selection pressures on the conservative gene products.

  11. Detection of Antibody-Dependent Complement-Mediated Inactivation of both Autologous and Heterologous Virus in Primary Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Infection†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aasa-Chapman, Marlén M. I.; Holuigue, Sophie; Aubin, Keith; Wong, MaiLee; Jones, Nicola A.; Cornforth, David; Pellegrino, Pierre; Newton, Philippa; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; McKnight, Áine

    2005-01-01

    Specific CD8 T-cell responses to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are induced in primary infection and make an important contribution to the control of early viral replication. The importance of neutralizing antibodies in containing primary viremia is questioned because they usually arise much later. Nevertheless antienvelope antibodies develop simultaneously with, or even before, peak viremia. We determined whether such antibodies might control viremia by complement-mediated inactivation (CMI). In each of seven patients studied, antibodies capable of CMI appeared at or shortly after the peak in viremia, concomitantly with detection of virus-specific T-cell responses. The CMI was effective on both autologous and heterologous HIV-1 isolates. Activation of the classical pathway and direct viral lysis were at least partly responsible. Since immunoglobulin G (IgG)-antibodies triggered the CMI, specific memory B cells could also be induced by vaccination. Thus, consideration should be given to vaccination strategies that induce IgG antibodies capable of CMI. PMID:15709001

  12. Trans-activation of the JC virus late promoter by the tat protein of type 1 human immunodeficiency virus in glial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, Hiroomi; Lashgari, M.; Amini, S.; Khalili, K. (Thomas Jefferson Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA)); Rappaport, J.; Wong-Staal, F. (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a demyelinating disease of the central nervous system caused by the JC virus (JCV), a human papovavirus. PML is a relatively rare disease seen predominantly in immunocompromised individuals and is a frequent complication observed in AIDS patients. The significantly higher incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders has suggested that the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in the brain may directly or indirectly contribute to the pathogenesis of this disease. In the present study the authors have examined the expression of the JCV genome in both glial and non-glial cells in the presence of HIV-1 regulatory proteins. They find that the HIV-1-encoded trans-regulatory protein tat increases the basal activity of the JCV late promoter, JCV{sub L}, in glial cells. They conclude that the presence of the HIV-1-encoded tat protein may positively affect the JCV lytic cycle in glial cells by stimulating JCV gene expression. The results suggest a mechanism for the relatively high incidence of PML in AIDS patients than in other immunosuppressive disorders. Furthermore, the findings indicate that the HIV-1 regulatory protein tat may stimulate other viral and perhaps cellular promoters, in addition to its own.

  13. Duration of serological response to canine parvovirus-type 2, canine distemper virus, canine adenovirus type 1 and canine parainfluenza virus in client-owned dogs in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S A; Zwijnenberg, R J; Huang, J; Hodge, A; Day, M J

    2012-12-01

    To determine whether client-owned dogs in Australia, last vaccinated with Canvac(®) vaccines containing canine parvovirus-type 2 (CPV-2), canine distemper virus (CDV), canine adenovirus type 2 (CAV-2) ± canine parainfluenza virus (CPiV) at least 18 months ago, were seropositive or responded serologically to revaccination. A total of 235 dogs were recruited from 23 veterinary clinics, representing a variety of breeds, ages and time since last vaccination (TSLV: range 1.5-9 years, mean 2.8 years). Dogs had a blood sample taken and were revaccinated on day 0. A second blood sample was taken 7-14 days later. Blood samples were assessed for antibody titres to CPV-2 (by haemagglutination inhibition) and CDV, CAV type 1 (CAV-1) and CPiV (by virus neutralisation). Dogs with a day 0 titre >10 or a four-fold increase in titre following revaccination were considered to be serological responders. The overall percentage of dogs classified as serological responders was 98.7% for CPV-2, 96.6% for CDV, 99.6% for CAV-1 and 90.3% for CPiV. These results suggest that the duration of serological response induced by modified-live vaccines against CPV-2, CDV, CAV-1 and CPiV, including Canvac(®) vaccines, is beyond 18 months and may extend up to 9 years. Accordingly, these vaccines may be considered for use in extended revaccination interval protocols as recommended by current canine vaccine guidelines. © 2012 The Authors. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2012 Australian Veterinary Association.

  14. Hepatitis C virus and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 co-infection: impact on liver disease, virological markers, and neurological outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíndola, Otávio M; Vizzoni, Alexandre G; Lampe, Elisabeth; Andrada-Serpa, Maria José; Araújo, Abelardo Q C; Leite, Ana Claudia C

    2017-04-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is associated with neurological abnormalities, such as HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP) and peripheral neuropathy (PN). Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the leading cause of chronic liver disease worldwide, and causes PN in approximately 9% of patients. Because the interplay between these potentially neuropathogenic viruses in the same individual is still poorly understood, the clinical and laboratory outcomes of co-infected patients were evaluated and compared with those of controls. The prevalence rates of neurological and laboratory abnormalities were evaluated in HCV/HTLV-1 co-infected patients (n=50), and in subjects with single HCV (n=46) or HTLV-1 (n=150) infection. A higher frequency of isolated PN was present in HCV-infected patients; this was not associated with cryoglobulinemia. No difference was found in the frequency of PN or HAM/TSP when co-infected subjects were compared to singly infected subjects. Hepatic involvement was present in HCV-infected subjects, as shown by increased levels of serum alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, gamma-glutamyl transferase, and bilirubin, in addition to thrombocytopenia. On the other hand, HCV/HTLV-1 co-infected individuals presented a better prognosis for hepatic involvement when compared with singly HCV-infected subjects. These data suggest that HCV/HTLV-1 co-infection does not mutualistically alter the outcome with regard to neurological manifestations. Nonetheless, changes in the immunological environment induced by HTLV-1 infection could lead to a reduction in hepatic damage, even without significant HCV clearance. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Bovine Herpes Virus 1 (BHV-1) and Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1) Promote Survival of Latently Infected Sensory Neurons, in Part by Inhibiting Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Clinton

    2013-01-01

    α-Herpesvirinae subfamily members, including herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and bovine herpes virus 1 (BHV-1), initiate infection in mucosal surfaces. BHV-1 and HSV-1 enter sensory neurons by cell-cell spread where a burst of viral gene expression occurs. When compared to non-neuronal cells, viral gene expression is quickly extinguished in sensory neurons resulting in neuronal survival and latency. The HSV-1 latency associated transcript (LAT), which is abundantly expressed in latently infected neurons, inhibits apoptosis, viral transcription, and productive infection, and directly or indirectly enhances reactivation from latency in small animal models. Three anti-apoptosis genes can be substituted for LAT, which will restore wild type levels of reactivation from latency to a LAT null mutant virus. Two small non-coding RNAs encoded by LAT possess anti-apoptosis functions in transfected cells. The BHV-1 latency related RNA (LR-RNA), like LAT, is abundantly expressed during latency. The LR-RNA encodes a protein (ORF2) and two microRNAs that are expressed in certain latently infected neurons. Wild-type expression of LR gene products is required for stress-induced reactivation from latency in cattle. ORF2 has anti-apoptosis functions and interacts with certain cellular transcription factors that stimulate viral transcription and productive infection. ORF2 is predicted to promote survival of infected neurons by inhibiting apoptosis and sequestering cellular transcription factors which stimulate productive infection. In addition, the LR encoded microRNAs inhibit viral transcription and apoptosis. In summary, the ability of BHV-1 and HSV-1 to interfere with apoptosis and productive infection in sensory neurons is crucial for the life-long latency-reactivation cycle in their respective hosts. PMID:25278776

  16. Reverse Genetics Plasmid for Cloning Unstable Influenza A Virus Gene Segments

    OpenAIRE

    Zhou, Bin; Jerzak, Greta; Scholes, Derek T.; Donnelly, Matthew E.; Li, Yan; Wentworth, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Reverse genetics approaches that enable the generation of recombinant influenza A viruses entirely from plasmids are invaluable for studies on virus replication, morphogenesis, pathogenesis, or transmission. Furthermore, influenza virus reverse genetics is now critical for the development of new vaccines for this human and animal pathogen. Periodically, influenza gene segments are unstable within plasmids in bacteria. The PB2 gene segment of a highly pathogenic avian H5 influenza virus A/Turk...

  17. C-terminal domain modulates the nucleic acid chaperone activity of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 nucleocapsid protein via an electrostatic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualley, Dominic F; Stewart-Maynard, Kristen M; Wang, Fei; Mitra, Mithun; Gorelick, Robert J; Rouzina, Ioulia; Williams, Mark C; Musier-Forsyth, Karin

    2010-01-01

    Retroviral nucleocapsid (NC) proteins are molecular chaperones that facilitate nucleic acid (NA) remodeling events critical in viral replication processes such as reverse transcription. Surprisingly, the NC protein from human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an extremely poor NA chaperone. Using bulk and single molecule methods, we find that removal of the anionic C-terminal domain (CTD) of HTLV-1 NC results in a protein with chaperone properties comparable with that of other retroviral NCs. Increasing the ionic strength of the solution also improves the chaperone activity of full-length HTLV-1 NC. To determine how the CTD negatively modulates the chaperone activity of HTLV-1 NC, we quantified the thermodynamics and kinetics of wild-type and mutant HTLV-1 NC/NA interactions. The wild-type protein exhibits very slow dissociation kinetics, and removal of the CTD or mutations that eliminate acidic residues dramatically increase the protein/DNA interaction kinetics. Taken together, these results suggest that the anionic CTD interacts with the cationic N-terminal domain intramolecularly when HTLV-1 NC is not bound to nucleic acids, and similar interactions occur between neighboring molecules when NC is NA-bound. The intramolecular N-terminal domain-CTD attraction slows down the association of the HTLV-1 NC with NA, whereas the intermolecular interaction leads to multimerization of HTLV-1 NC on the NA. The latter inhibits both NA/NC aggregation and rapid protein dissociation from single-stranded DNA. These features make HTLV-1 NC a poor NA chaperone, despite its robust duplex destabilizing capability.

  18. In vitro evaluation of herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, C.-H. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Liu, R.-S. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); National Yang-Ming University Medical School and National PET/Cyclotron Center, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Wang, H.-E. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Hwang, J.-J. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Deng, W.-P. [Institute of Biomedical Material, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-C. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China); Chen, F.-D. [Department of Medical Radiation Technology and Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei 112, Taiwan (China) and Institute of Radiological Sciences, Central Taiwan University of Science and Technology Taichung 112, Taiwan (China)]. E-mail: d49220009@ym.edu.tw

    2006-07-15

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) reporter system is being used to directly and indirectly monitor therapeutic gene expression, immune cell trafficking and protein-protein interactions in various living animals. However, the issues of HSV1-TK enzyme stability in living cells and whether this reporter system is optimal for dynamic studies of gene expression events in genetic imaging have not be addressed. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the application of this reporter system in dynamic studies of transcriptional gene regulation. To achieve this purpose, we established two tetracycline-inducible murine sarcoma cell lines, tetracycline-turn-off HSV1-tk-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-HSV1-tk) and tetracycline-turn-off Luc-expressing cell line (NG4TL4/tet-off-Luc), to create an artificially regulated gene expression model in vitro. The dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of doxycycline (Dox) inductions were monitored by HSV1-TK or by the firefly luciferase reporter gene using HSV1-TK enzyme activity assay and luciferase assay, respectively. The results of dynamic gene expression studies showed that the luciferase gene is an optimal reporter gene for monitoring short-timescale, dynamic transcriptional events mediating a series of Dox inductions, whereas the HSV1-tk is not optimal to achieve this purpose. Furthermore, the enzyme half-life of HSV1-TK in NG4TL4 cells is about 35 h after cycloheximide-induced protein inhibition. On the other hand, the results of an efflux assay of [{sup 131}I] FIAU and [{sup 3}H] GCV revealed that the molecular probe phosphorylated by HSV1-TK can be trapped long term within HSV1-TK stably transformed cells. Therefore, a long half-life radionuclide is not suitable for dynamic gene expression studies. Based on these results, we suggest that the HSV1-TK reporter system is not optimal for monitoring short-timescale dynamic processes such as kinetic gene expression controlled by

  19. Effect of Probiotic Bacteria on Microbial Host Defense, Growth, and Immune Function in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type-1 Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stig Bengmark

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1 infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to

  20. The combined effects of irradiation and herpes simplex virus type 1 infection on an immortal gingival cell line

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral mucosa is frequently exposed to Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection and irradiation due to dental radiography. During radiotherapy for oral cancer, the surrounding clinically normal tissues are also irradiated. This prompted us to study the effects of HSV-1 infection and irradiation on viability and apoptosis of oral epithelial cells. Methods Immortal gingival keratinocyte (HMK) cells were infected with HSV-1 at a low multiplicity of infection (MOI) and irradiated with 2 Gy 24 hours post infection. The cells were then harvested at 24, 72 and 144 hours post irradiation for viability assays and qRT-PCR analyses for the apoptosis-related genes caspases 3, 8, and 9, bcl-2, NFκB1, and viral gene VP16. Mann–Whitney U-test was used for statistical calculations. Results Irradiation improved the cell viability at 144 hours post irradiation (P = 0.05), which was further improved by HSV-1 infection at MOI of 0.00001 (P = 0.05). Simultaneously, the combined effects of infection at MOI of 0.0001 and irradiation resulted in upregulation in NFκB1 (P = 0.05). The combined effects of irradiation and HSV infection also significantly downregulated the expression of caspases 3, 8, and 9 at 144 hours (P = 0.05) whereas caspase 3 and 8 significantly upregulated in non-irradiated, HSV-infected cells as compared to uninfected controls (P = 0.05). Infection with 0.0001 MOI downregulated bcl-2 in non-irradiated cells but was upregulated by 27% after irradiation when compared to non-irradiated infected cells (P = 0.05). Irradiation had no effect on HSV-1 shedding or HSV gene expression at 144 hours. Conclusions HSV-1 infection may improve the viability of immortal cells after irradiation. The effect might be related to inhibition of apoptosis. PMID:25005804

  1. Effect of probiotic bacteria on microbial host defense, growth, and immune function in human immunodeficiency virus type-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham-Rundles, Susanna; Ahrné, Siv; Johann-Liang, Rosemary; Abuav, Rachel; Dunn-Navarra, Ann-Margaret; Grassey, Claudia; Bengmark, Stig; Cervia, Joseph S

    2011-12-01

    The hypothesis that probiotic administration protects the gut surface and could delay progression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus type1 (HIV-1) infection to the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) was proposed in 1995. Over the last five years, new studies have clarified the significance of HIV-1 infection of the gut associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) for subsequent alterations in the microflora and breakdown of the gut mucosal barrier leading to pathogenesis and development of AIDS. Current studies show that loss of gut CD4+ Th17 cells, which differentiate in response to normal microflora, occurs early in HIV-1 disease. Microbial translocation and suppression of the T regulatory (Treg) cell response is associated with chronic immune activation and inflammation. Combinations of probiotic bacteria which upregulate Treg activation have shown promise in suppressing pro inflammatory immune response in models of autoimmunity including inflammatory bowel disease and provide a rationale for use of probiotics in HIV-1/AIDS. Disturbance of the microbiota early in HIV-1 infection leads to greater dominance of potential pathogens, reducing levels of bifidobacteria and lactobacillus species and increasing mucosal inflammation. The interaction of chronic or recurrent infections, and immune activation contributes to nutritional deficiencies that have lasting consequences especially in the HIV-1 infected child. While effective anti-retroviral therapy (ART) has enhanced survival, wasting is still an independent predictor of survival and a major presenting symptom. Congenital exposure to HIV-1 is a risk factor for growth delay in both infected and non-infected infants. Nutritional intervention after 6 months of age appears to be largely ineffective. A meta analysis of randomized, controlled clinical trials of infant formulae supplemented with Bifidobacterium lactis showed that weight gain was significantly greater in infants who received B. lactis compared to formula alone

  2. Attenuated Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 1 (HPIV1) Expressing the Fusion Glycoprotein of Human Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) as a Bivalent HPIV1/RSV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackow, Natalie; Amaro-Carambot, Emérito; Liang, Bo; Surman, Sonja; Lingemann, Matthias; Yang, Lijuan; Collins, Peter L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Live attenuated recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 1 (rHPIV1) was investigated as a vector to express the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) fusion (F) glycoprotein, to provide a bivalent vaccine against RSV and HPIV1. The RSV F gene was engineered to include HPIV1 transcription signals and inserted individually into three gene locations in each of the two attenuated rHPIV1 backbones. Each backbone contained a single previously described attenuating mutation that was stabilized against deattenuation, specifically, a non-temperature-sensitive deletion mutation involving 6 nucleotides in the overlapping P/C open reading frames (ORFs) (CΔ170) or a temperature-sensitive missense mutation in the L ORF (LY942A). The insertion sites in the genome were pre-N (F1), N-P (F2), or P-M (F3) and were identical for both backbones. In vitro, the presence of the F insert reduced the rate of virus replication, but the final titers were the same as the final titer of wild-type (wt) HPIV1. High levels of RSV F expression in cultured cells were observed with rHPIV1-CΔ170-F1, -F2, and -F3 and rHPIV1-LY942A-F1. In hamsters, the rHPIV1-CΔ170-F1, -F2, and -F3 vectors were moderately restricted in the nasal turbinates, highly restricted in lungs, and genetically stable in vivo. Among the CΔ170 vectors, the F1 virus was the most immunogenic and protective against wt RSV challenge. The rHPIV1-LY942A vectors were highly restricted in vivo and were not detectably immunogenic or protective, indicative of overattenuation. The CΔ170-F1 construct appears to be suitably attenuated and immunogenic for further development as a bivalent intranasal pediatric vaccine. IMPORTANCE There are no vaccines for the pediatric respiratory pathogens RSV and HPIV. We are developing live attenuated RSV and HPIV vaccines for use in virus-naive infants. Live attenuated RSV strains in particular are difficult to develop due to their poor growth and physical instability, but these obstacles could be

  3. Attenuation of Recombinant Vesicular Stomatitis Virus-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Vaccine Vectors by Gene Translocations and G Gene Truncation Reduces Neurovirulence and Enhances Immunogenicity in Mice▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, David; Wright, Kevin J.; Calderon, Priscilla C.; Guo, Min; Nasar, Farooq; Johnson, J. Erik; Coleman, John W.; Lee, Margaret; Kotash, Cheryl; Yurgelonis, Irene; Natuk, Robert J.; Hendry, R. Michael; Udem, Stephen A.; Clarke, David K.

    2008-01-01

    Recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (rVSV) has shown great potential as a new viral vector for vaccination. However, the prototypic rVSV vector described previously was found to be insufficiently attenuated for clinical evaluation when assessed for neurovirulence in nonhuman primates. Here, we describe the attenuation, neurovirulence, and immunogenicity of rVSV vectors expressing human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag. These rVSV vectors were attenuated by combinations of the following manipulations: N gene translocations (N4), G gene truncations (CT1 or CT9), noncytopathic M gene mutations (Mncp), and positioning of the gag gene into the first position of the viral genome (gag1). The resulting N4CT1-gag1, N4CT9-gag1, and MncpCT1-gag1 vectors demonstrated dramatically reduced neurovirulence in mice following direct intracranial inoculation. Surprisingly, in spite of a very high level of attenuation, the N4CT1-gag1 and N4CT9-gag1 vectors generated robust Gag-specific immune responses following intramuscular immunization that were equivalent to or greater than immune responses generated by the more virulent prototypic vectors. MncpCT1-gag1 also induced Gag-specific immune responses following intramuscular immunization that were equivalent to immune responses generated by the prototypic rVSV vector. Placement of the gag gene in the first position of the VSV genome was associated with increased in vitro expression of Gag protein, in vivo expression of Gag mRNA, and enhanced immunogenicity of the vector. These findings demonstrate that through directed manipulation of the rVSV genome, vectors that have reduced neurovirulence and enhanced immunogenicity can be made. PMID:17942549

  4. Comparative Immunogenicity in Rhesus Monkeys of DNA Plasmid, Recombinant Vaccinia Virus, and Replication-Defective Adenovirus Vectors Expressing a Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 gag Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casimiro, Danilo R.; Chen, Ling; Fu, Tong-Ming; Evans, Robert K.; Caulfield, Michael J.; Davies, Mary-Ellen; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Minchun; Huang, Lingyi; Harris, Virginia; Freed, Daniel C.; Wilson, Keith A.; Dubey, Sheri; Zhu, De-Min; Nawrocki, Denise; Mach, Henryk; Troutman, Robert; Isopi, Lynne; Williams, Donna; Hurni, William; Xu, Zheng; Smith, Jeffrey G.; Wang, Su; Liu, Xu; Guan, Liming; Long, Romnie; Trigona, Wendy; Heidecker, Gwendolyn J.; Perry, Helen C.; Persaud, Natasha; Toner, Timothy J.; Su, Qin; Liang, Xiaoping; Youil, Rima; Chastain, Michael; Bett, Andrew J.; Volkin, David B.; Emini, Emilio A.; Shiver, John W.

    2003-01-01

    Cellular immune responses, particularly those associated with CD3+ CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), play a primary role in controlling viral infection, including persistent infection with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Accordingly, recent HIV-1 vaccine research efforts have focused on establishing the optimal means of eliciting such antiviral CTL immune responses. We evaluated several DNA vaccine formulations, a modified vaccinia virus Ankara vector, and a replication-defective adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) vector, each expressing the same codon-optimized HIV-1 gag gene for immunogenicity in rhesus monkeys. The DNA vaccines were formulated with and without one of two chemical adjuvants (aluminum phosphate and CRL1005). The Ad5-gag vector was the most effective in eliciting anti-Gag CTL. The vaccine produced both CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses, with the latter consistently being the dominant component. To determine the effect of existing antiadenovirus immunity on Ad5-gag-induced immune responses, monkeys were exposed to adenovirus subtype 5 that did not encode antigen prior to immunization with Ad5-gag. The resulting anti-Gag T-cell responses were attenuated but not abolished. Regimens that involved priming with different DNA vaccine formulations followed by boosting with the adenovirus vector were also compared. Of the formulations tested, the DNA-CRL1005 vaccine primed T-cell responses most effectively and provided the best overall immune responses after boosting with Ad5-gag. These results are suggestive of an immunization strategy for humans that are centered on use of the adenovirus vector and in which existing adenovirus immunity may be overcome by combined immunization with adjuvanted DNA and adenovirus vector boosting. PMID:12743287

  5. Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Virology, Reverse Genetics, and Pathogenesis of Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fearns, Rachel; Graham, Barney S.

    2016-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is an enveloped, nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of family Paramyxoviridae. RSV is the most complex member of the family in terms of the number of genes and proteins. It is also relatively divergent and distinct from the prototype members of the family. In the past 30 years, we have seen a tremendous increase in our understanding of the molecular biology of RSV based on a succession of advances involving molecular cloning, reverse genetics, and detailed studies of protein function and structure. Much remains to be learned. RSV disease is complex and variable, and the host and viral factors that determine tropism and disease are poorly understood. RSV is notable for a historic vaccine failure in the 1960s involving a formalin-inactivated vaccine that primed for enhanced disease in RSV naïve recipients. Live vaccine candidates have been shown to be free of this complication. However, development of subunit or other protein-based vaccines for pediatric use is hampered by the possibility of enhanced disease and the difficulty of reliably demonstrating its absence in preclinical studies. PMID:24362682

  6. Synthetic-peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for screening human serum or plasma for antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and type 2.

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, L; Boyle, R W; M. Zhang; Castillo, J; Whittier, S; Della-Latta, P; Clarke, L M; George, J R; Fang, X; Wang, J G; Hosein, B; C. Y. Wang

    1997-01-01

    A synthetic-peptide-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (EIA) capable of screening for antibodies to both human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and HIV-2 has been developed for use in blood banks and diagnostic laboratories. Microtiter wells are coated with two synthetic peptides, one corresponding to the highly conserved envelope region of HIV-1 and another corresponding to the conserved envelope region of HIV-2. Overall, sensitivity was 100% in 303 individuals diagnosed with AIDS ...

  7. Synthetic peptides define the fine specificity of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) gp160 humoral immune response in HIV type 1-infected chimpanzees.

    OpenAIRE

    Warren, R Q; Wolf, H; Shuler, K R; Eichberg, J W; Zajac, R A; Boswell, R N; Kanda, P; Kennedy, R C

    1990-01-01

    The fine specificities of antibodies produced against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) gp160 were examined in sera from 23 HIV-1-infected chimpanzees. These animals had been infected with one of six isolates of HIV-1. Sera were screened by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for reactivity against seven synthetic peptides corresponding to regions of gp160. Chimpanzees appear to remain healthy after infection with HIV-1, suggesting that these animals may prevent extensive spread of th...

  8. Chronic psychosocial stress induces reversible mitochondrial damage and corticotropin-releasing factor receptor type-1 upregulation in the rat intestine and IBS-like gut dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vicario, María; Alonso, Carmen; Guilarte, Mar; Serra, Jordi; Martínez, Cristina; González-Castro, Ana M; Lobo, Beatriz; Antolín, María; Andreu, Antoni L; García-Arumí, Elena; Casellas, Montserrat; Saperas, Esteban; Malagelada, Juan Ramón; Azpiroz, Fernando; Santos, Javier

    2012-01-01

    The association between psychological and environmental stress with functional gastrointestinal disorders, especially irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), is well established. However, the underlying pathogenic mechanisms remain unknown. We aimed to probe chronic psychosocial stress as a primary inducer of intestinal dysfunction and investigate corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) signaling and mitochondrial damage as key contributors to the stress-mediated effects. Wistar-Kyoto rats were submitted to crowding stress (CS; 8 rats/cage) or sham-crowding stress (SC; 2 rats/cage) for up to 15 consecutive days. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity was evaluated. Intestinal tissues were obtained 1h, 1, 7, or 30 days after stress exposure, to assess neutrophil infiltration, epithelial ion transport, mitochondrial function, and CRF receptors expression. Colonic response to CRF (10 μg/kg i.p.) and hyperalgesia were evaluated after ending stress exposure. Chronic psychosocial stress activated HPA axis and induced reversible intestinal mucosal inflammation. Epithelial permeability and conductance were increased in CS rats, effect that lasted for up to 7 days after stress cessation. Visceral hypersensitivity persisted for up to 30 days post stress. Abnormal colonic response to exogenous CRF lasted for up to 7 days after stress. Mitochondrial activity was disturbed throughout the intestine, although mitochondrial response to CRF was preserved. Colonic expression of CRF receptor type-1 was increased in CS rats, and negatively correlated with body weight gain. In conclusion, chronic psychosocial stress triggers reversible inflammation, persistent epithelial dysfunction, and colonic hyperalgesia. These findings support crowding stress as a suitable animal model to unravel the complex pathophysiology underlying to common human intestinal stress-related disorders, such as IBS. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Reversal of adipose tissue loss by probucol in mice with deficiency of both scavenger receptor class B type 1 and LDL receptor on high fat diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xin; Liao, Jiawei; Huang, Xiaomin; Wang, Yuhui; Huang, Wei; Liu, George

    2017-05-15

    Scavenger receptor class B type 1(SR-B1) and low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) play vital roles in cholesterol homeostasis. Previous studies indicated a strong link between cholesterol and adipose tissue (AT). In this study, adult male SR-B1 and LDLR double knockout (DKO) mice were fed with high fat diet (HFD) for 3 months. Interestingly, we found severe loss of AT in DKO mice fed with HFD. To reverse the AT loss in DKO mice, 1% probucol was added in HFD. In DKO mice on HFD, plasma total cholesterol (TC) and free cholesterol (FC) levels were increased 6 and 15 folds respectively compared with wild type (WT) mice. We found severe loss of AT in whole body of DKO mice compared with WT or single KO mice. In AT of DKO mice, histology showed the very small size of adipocytes and infiltration of inflammatory cells; Genes expressions related to fatty acid uptake, lipogenesis and adipogenesis were decreased; TUNEL analysis and related genes expressions of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and inflammation were significantly higher than those of WT or single KO mice. Probucol could reduce increased TC and FC levels, and reverse the loss of fat and apoptosis of AT in DKO mice. AT loss in DKO mice with HFD was probably due to high levels of FC which led to apoptosis induced by ER stress and inflammation of AT. This study provided a novel utility of probucol in rescue of fat loss in DKO mice. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Fast and robust methods for full genome sequencing of Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV) Type 1 and Type 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvisgaard, Lise Kirstine; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Fahnøe, Ulrik

    followed by cycle sequencing of clones. The genome lengths were determined to be 14,876-15,098 and 15,342-15,408 nucleotides long for the Type 1 and Type 2 strains, respectively. These methods will greatly facilitate the generation of more complete genome PRRSV sequences globally which in turn may lead....... In the present study, fast and robust methods for long range RT-PCR amplification and subsequent next generation sequencing (NGS) of PRRSV Type 1 and Type 2 viruses were developed and validated on nine Type 1 and nine Type 2 PRRSV viruses. The methods were shown to generate robust and reliable sequences both...... on primary material and cell culture adapted viruses and the protocols were shown to perform well on all three NGS platforms tested (Roche 454 FLX, Illumina HiSeq 2000, and Ion Torrent PGM™ Sequencer). To complete the sequences at the 5’ end, 5’ Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (5’ RACE) was conducted...

  11. Immunogenetics and the Pathological Mechanisms of Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1- (HTLV-1-Associated Myelopathy/Tropical Spastic Paraparesis (HAM/TSP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mineki Saito

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1 is a replication-competent human retrovirus associated with two distinct types of disease only in a minority of infected individuals: the malignancy known as adult T-cell leukemia (ATL and a chronic inflammatory central nervous system disease HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP. Although the factors that cause these different manifestations of HTLV-1 infection are not fully understood, accumulating evidence suggests that complex virus-host interactions play an important role in determining the risk of HAM/TSP. This review focuses on the role of the immune response in controlling or limiting viral persistence in HAM/TSP patients, and the reason why some HTLV-1-infected people develop HAM/TSP whereas the majority remains asymptomatic carriers of the virus.

  12. Replication of different clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in primary fetal human astrocytes: enhancement of viral gene expression by Nef.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bencheikh, M; Bentsman, G; Sarkissian, N; Canki, M; Volsky, D J

    1999-04-01

    Dementia is a common complication of AIDS which is associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection of brain macrophages and microglia. Recent studies have shown that astrocytes are also infected in the brain but HIV-1 replication in these cells is restricted. To determine virus specificity of this restriction we tested the expression of 15 HIV-1 molecular clones in primary human fetal astrocytes by infection and DNA transfection. Infection with cell-free viruses was poorly productive and revealed no clone-specific differences. In contrast, transfected cells produced transiently high levels of HIV-1 p24 core antigen, up to 50 nanograms per ml culture supernatant, and nanogram levels of p24 were detected 3-4 weeks after transfection of some viral clones. The average peak expression of HIV-1 in astrocytes varied as a function of viral clone used by a factor of 15 but the differences and the subsequent virus spread did not correlate with the tropism of the viral clones to T cells or macrophages. Functional vif, vpu, and vpr genes were dispensable for virus replication from transfected DNA, but intact nef provided a detectable enhancement of early viral gene expression and promoted maintenance of HIV-1 infection. We conclude that primary astrocytes present no fundamental barriers to moderate expression of different strains of HIV-1 and that the presence of functional Nef is advantageous to virus infection in these cells.

  13. Herpes simplex viruses type 1 and 2 photoinactivated in the presence of methylene blue transform human and mouse cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michútová, M; Mrázová, V; Kúdelová, M; Smolinská, M; Šupoliková, M; Vrbová, M; Golais, F

    Three strains of herpes simplex virus, K17syn- and HSZPsyn+ of type 1 (HSV-1) and USsyn- of type 2 (HSV-2), were photoinactivated in the presence of methylene blue and used to infect 3 cell lines, normal human lung tissue cells (MRC-5), mouse epithelial cells (NIH3T3), and human lung carcinoma cells (A549). The virus titer and phenotype of cells were evaluated to compare the characteristics of normal and carcinoma cells infected with non-syncytial (non-syn) and syncytial (syn) strains of herpes simplex viruses. We found that the cells of both normal cell lines infected with photoinactivated K17syn- and USsyn- but not HSZPsyn+ acquired transformed phenotype accompanied by the presence of virus. Surprisingly, the infection with photoinactivated viruses K17syn- and USsyn- but not HSZPsyn+ resulted in the suppression of the transformed phenotype of A549 cells. Using nested PCR, herpesviral DNA was identified in newly transformed cells and cells that lost the transformed phenotype. The effect of putative herpesvirus-related growth factors (HRGF) produced by cells infected with photoinactivated viruses was quantified and compared. Since methylene blue is currently used in phototherapy of herpetic lesions, these results raise the question of whether such therapy is risky to human health.

  14. Human parainfluenza virus types 1-4 in hospitalized children with acute lower respiratory infections in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ni-Guang; Duan, Zhao-Jun; Xie, Zhi-Ping; Zhong, Li-Li; Zeng, Sai-Zhen; Huang, Han; Gao, Han-Chun; Zhang, Bing

    2016-12-01

    Human parainfluenza viruses (HPIVs) are an important cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections (ALRTIs). HPIV-4, a newly identified virus, has been associated with severe ALRTIs recently. A total of 771 nasopharyngeal aspirate samples were collected from hospitalized children between March 2010 and February 2011. HPIVs were detected by Nest-PCR, and other known respiratory viruses were detected by RT-PCR and PCR. All amplification products were sequenced. HPIVs were detected in 151 (19.58%) patients, of whom 28 (3.63%) were positive for HPIV-4, 12(1.55%) for HPIV-1, 4 (0.51%) for HPIV-2, and 107 (13.87%) for HPIV-3. Only three were found to be co-infected with different types of HPIVs. All HPIV-positive children were under 5 years of age, with the majority being less than 1 year. Only the detection rate of HPIV-3 had a significant statistical difference (χ 2  = 29.648, P = 0.000) between ages. HPIV-3 and HPIV-4 were detected during the summer. Sixty (39.74%) were co-infected with other respiratory viruses, and human rhinovirus (HRV) was the most common co-infecting virus. The most frequent clinical diagnosis was bronchopneumonia, and all patients had cough; some patients who were infected with HPIV-3 and HPIV-4 had polypnea and cyanosis. No significant difference was found in clinical manifestations between those who were infected with HPIV-4 and HPIV-3. Two genotypes for HPIV-4 were prevalent, although HPIV-4a dominated. HPIV-4 is an important virus for children hospitalized with ALRTIs in China. HRV was the most common co-infecting virus. Two genotypes for HPIV-4 are prevalent, HPIV-4a dominated. J. Med. Virol. 88:2085-2091, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Virus-like particles derived from Pichia pastoris-expressed dengue virus type 1 glycoprotein elicit homotypic virus-neutralizing envelope domain III-directed antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddar, Ankur; Ramasamy, Viswanathan; Shukla, Rahul; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Arora, Upasana; Jain, Swatantra K; Swaminathan, Sathyamangalam; Khanna, Navin

    2016-06-14

    Four antigenically distinct serotypes (1-4) of dengue viruses (DENVs) cause dengue disease. Antibodies to any one DENV serotype have the potential to predispose an individual to more severe disease upon infection with a different DENV serotype. A dengue vaccine must elicit homotypic neutralizing antibodies to all four DENV serotypes to avoid the risk of such antibody-dependent enhancement in the vaccine recipient. This is a formidable challenge as evident from the lack of protective efficacy against DENV-2 by a tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine that has completed phase III trials recently. These trial data underscore the need to explore non-replicating subunit vaccine alternatives. Recently, using the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris, we showed that DENV-2 and DENV-3 envelope (E) glycoproteins, expressed in absence of prM, implicated in causing severe dengue disease, self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs), which elicit predominantly virus-neutralizing antibodies and confer significant protection against lethal DENV challenge in an animal model. The current study extends this work to a third DENV serotype. We cloned and expressed DENV-1 E antigen in P. pastoris, and purified it to near homogeneity. Recombinant DENV-1 E underwent post-translational processing, namely, signal peptide cleavage and glycosylation. Purified DENV-1 E self-assembled into stable VLPs, based on electron microscopy and dynamic light scattering analysis. Epitope mapping with monoclonal antibodies revealed that the VLPs retained the overall antigenic integrity of the virion particles despite the absence of prM. Subtle changes accompanied the efficient display of E domain III (EDIII), which contains type-specific neutralizing epitopes. These VLPs were immunogenic, eliciting predominantly homotypic EDIII-directed DENV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies. This work demonstrates the inherent potential of P. pastoris-expressed DENV-1 E glycoprotein to self-assemble into VLPs

  16. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Genotypic and Pharmacokinetic Determinants of the Virological Response to Lopinavir-Ritonavir-Containing Therapy in Protease Inhibitor-Experienced Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masquelier, Bernard; Breilh, Dominique; Neau, Didier; Lawson-Ayayi, Sylvie; Lavignolle, Valérie; Ragnaud, Jean-Marie; Dupon, Michel; Morlat, Philippe; Dabis, F.; Fleury, H.

    2002-01-01

    The response to regimens including lopinavir-ritonavir (LPV/r) in patients who have received multiple protease (PR) inhibitors (PI) can be analyzed in terms of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genotypic and pharmacokinetic (pK) determinants. We studied these factors and the evolution of HIV-1 resistance in response to LPV/r in a prospective study of patients receiving LPV/r under a temporary authorization in Bordeaux, France. HIV-1 PR and reverse transcriptase sequences were determined at baseline LPV/r for all the patients and at month 3 (M3) and M6 in the absence of response to treatment. pK measurements were determined at M1 and M3. Virological failure (VF) was defined as a plasma viral load ≥400 copies/ml at M3. A multivariate analysis of the predictors of VF, including clinical and biological characteristics and the treatment history of the patients, was performed. The PR gene sequence at M0, including individual mutations or a previously defined LPV mutation score (D. J. Kempf, J. D. Isaacson, M. S. King, S. C. Brun, Y. Xu, K. Real, B. M. Bernstein, A. J. Japour, E. Sun, and R. A. Rode, J. Virol. 75:7262-7269, 2001), and the individual exposure to LPV were also included covariates. Sixty-eight patients were enrolled. Thirty-four percent had a virological response at M3. An LPV mutation score of >5 mutations, the presence of the PR I54V mutation at baseline, a high number of previous PIs, prior therapy with ritonavir or indinavir, absence of coprescription of efavirenz, and a lower exposure to LPV or lower LPV trough concentrations were independently associated with VF on LPV/r. Additional PI resistance mutations, including primary mutation I50V, could be selected in patients failing on LPV/r. Genotypic and pK parameters should be used to optimize the virological response to LPV/r in PI-experienced patients and to avoid further viral evolution. PMID:12183249

  17. Herpes simplex virus type-1(HSV-1 oncolytic and highly fusogenic mutants carrying the NV1020 genomic deletion effectively inhibit primary and metastatic tumors in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Andrew T

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The NV1020 oncolytic herpes simplex virus type-1 has shown significant promise for the treatment of many different types of tumors in experimental animal models and human trials. Previously, we described the construction and use of the NV1020-like virus OncSyn to treat human breast tumors implanted in nude mice. The syncytial mutation gKsyn1 (Ala-to-Val at position 40 was introduced into the OncSyn viral genome cloned into a bacterial artificial chromosome using double-red mutagenesis in E. coli to produce the OncdSyn virus carrying syncytial mutations in both gB(syn3 and gK(syn1. Results The OncdSyn virus caused extensive virus-induced cell fusion in cell culture. The oncolytic potential of the OncSyn and OncdSyn viruses was tested in the highly metastatic syngeneic mouse model system, which utilizes 4T1 murine mammary cancer cells implanted within the interscapular region of Balb/c mice. Mice were given three consecutive intratumor injections of OncSyn, OncdSyn, or phosphate buffered saline four days apart. Both OncSyn and OncdSyn virus injections resulted in significant reduction of tumor sizes (p Conclusion These results show that the attenuated, but highly fusogenic OncSyn and OncdSyn viruses can effectively reduce primary and metastatic breast tumors in immuncompetent mice. The available bac-cloned OncSyn and OncdSyn viral genomes can be rapidly modified to express a number of different anti-tumor and immunomodulatory genes that can further enhance their anti-tumor potency.

  18. Emergence of monoclonal antibody b12-resistant human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants during natural infection in the absence of humoral or cellular immune pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnik, Evelien M; van Gils, Marit J; Lobbrecht, Marilie S D; Pisas, Linaida; Nanlohy, Nening M; van Baarle, Debbie; van Nuenen, Ad C; Hessell, Ann J; Schuitemaker, Hanneke

    2010-05-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) resistance to broadly neutralizing antibodies such as b12, which targets the highly conserved CD4-binding site, raises a significant hurdle for the development of a neutralizing antibody-based vaccine. Here, 15 individuals were studied of whom seven developed b12-resistant viruses late in infection. The study investigated whether immune pressure may be involved in the selection of these viruses in vivo. Although four out of seven patients showed HIV-1-specific broadly neutralizing activity in serum, none of these patients had CD4-binding site-directed antibodies, indicating that strong humoral immunity is not a prerequisite for the outgrowth of b12-resistant viruses. In virus variants from one patient, who showed extremely weak heterologous and autologous neutralizing activity in serum, mutations were identified in the envelope that coincided with changes in b12 neutralization sensitivity. Lack of cytotoxic T-cell activity against epitopes with and without these mutations excluded a role for host cellular immunity in the selection of b12-resistant mutant viruses in this patient. However, b12 resistance correlated well with increased virus replication kinetics, indicating that selection for enhanced infectivity, possibly driven by the low availability of target cells in the later stages of disease, may coincide with increased resistance to CD4-binding site-directed agents, such as b12. These results showed that b12-resistant HIV-1 variants can emerge during the course of natural infection in the absence of both humoral and cellular immune pressure, suggestive of other mechanisms playing a role in the selective outgrowth of b12-resistant viruses.

  19. Monitoring processed, mature Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 particles immediately following treatment with a protease inhibitor-containing treatment regimen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuritzkes Daniel R

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Protease inhibitors (PIs block HIV-1 maturation into an infectious virus particle by inhibiting the protease processing of gag and gag-pol precursor proteins. We have used a simple anti-HIV-1 p24 Western blot to monitor the processing of p55gag precursor into the mature p24 capsid immediately following the first dosage of a PI-containing treatment regimen. Evidence of PI activity was observed in plasma virus as early as 72 hours post treatment-initiation and was predictive of plasma viral RNA decrease at 4 weeks.

  20. Reduced Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-Specific CD4+ T-Cell Responses in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-HBV-Coinfected Individuals Receiving HBV-Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, J. Judy; Wightman, Fiona; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Ayres, Anna; Kent, Stephen J.; Sasadeusz, Joseph; Sharon R Lewin

    2005-01-01

    Functional hepatitis B virus (HBV)-specific T cells are significantly diminished in individuals chronically infected with HBV compared to individuals with self-limiting HBV infection or those on anti-HBV therapy. In individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), coinfection with HBV is associated with an increased risk of worsening liver function following antiviral therapy and of more rapid HBV disease progression. Total HBV-specific T-cell responses in subjects with ...

  1. Rapid disease progression in human immunodeficiency virus type 1-infected individuals with adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole prophylaxis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenstra, J.; Veugelers, P. J.; Keet, I. P.; van der Ven, A. J. A. M.; Miedema, F.; Lange, J. M.; Coutinho, R. A.

    1997-01-01

    We studied the relation between the occurrence of adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (TMP-SMZ) prophylaxis and the subsequent course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in a cohort of homosexual men. Adverse reactions to TMP-SMZ were associated with a more rapid

  2. Dimerization and template switching in the 5 ' untranslated region between various subtypes of human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andersen, Ebbe Sloth; Jeeninga, Rienk E.; Damgaard, Christian Kroun; Berkhout, Ben; Kjems, Jørgen

    2003-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) particle contains two identical RNA strands, each corresponding to the entire genome. The 5' untranslated region (UTR) of each RNA strand contains extensive secondary and tertiary structures that are instrumental in different steps of the viral

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr polymorphisms associated with progressor and nonprogressor individuals alter Vpr-associated functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Kevin; Walker, Leah A; Guha, Debjani; Murali, Ramachandran; Watkins, Simon C; Tarwater, Patrick; Srinivasan, Alagarsamy; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2014-03-01

    Following infection with Human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) there is a remarkable variation in virus replication and disease progression. Both host and viral factors have been implicated in the observed differences in disease status. Here, we focus on understanding the contribution of HIV-1 viral protein R (Vpr) by evaluating the disease-associated Vpr polymorphism and its biological functions from HIV-1 positive rapid progressor (RP) and long-term nonprogressor (LTNP) subjects. Results presented here show distinct variation in phenotypes of Vpr alleles from LTNP and RP subjects. Most notably, the polymorphism of Vpr at R36W and L68M associated with RP shows higher levels of oligomerization, and increased virus replication, whereas R77Q exhibits poor replication kinetics. Interestingly, we did not observe correlation with cell cycle arrest function. Together these results indicate that polymorphisms in Vpr in part may contribute to altered virus replication kinetics leading to the observed differences in disease progression in LTNP and RP groups.

  4. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Nef protein modulates the lipid composition of virions and host cell membrane microdomains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geyer Matthias

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Nef protein of Human Immunodeficiency Viruses optimizes viral spread in the infected host by manipulating cellular transport and signal transduction machineries. Nef also boosts the infectivity of HIV particles by an unknown mechanism. Recent studies suggested a correlation between the association of Nef with lipid raft microdomains and its positive effects on virion infectivity. Furthermore, the lipidome analysis of HIV-1 particles revealed a marked enrichment of classical raft lipids and thus identified HIV-1 virions as an example for naturally occurring membrane microdomains. Since Nef modulates the protein composition and function of membrane microdomains we tested here if Nef also has the propensity to alter microdomain lipid composition. Results Quantitative mass spectrometric lipidome analysis of highly purified HIV-1 particles revealed that the presence of Nef during virus production from T lymphocytes enforced their raft character via a significant reduction of polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine species and a specific enrichment of sphingomyelin. In contrast, Nef did not significantly affect virion levels of phosphoglycerolipids or cholesterol. The observed alterations in virion lipid composition were insufficient to mediate Nef's effect on particle infectivity and Nef augmented virion infectivity independently of whether virus entry was targeted to or excluded from membrane microdomains. However, altered lipid compositions similar to those observed in virions were also detected in detergent-resistant membrane preparations of virus producing cells. Conclusion Nef alters not only the proteome but also the lipid composition of host cell microdomains. This novel activity represents a previously unrecognized mechanism by which Nef could manipulate HIV-1 target cells to facilitate virus propagation in vivo.

  5. Interleukin-27 Inhibits Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection by Activating STAT1 and 3, Interleukin-6, and Chemokines IP-10 and MIG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heikkilä, Outi; Nygårdas, Michaela; Paavilainen, Henrik; Ryödi, Elina; Hukkanen, Veijo

    2016-11-01

    Interleukin-27 (IL-27) inhibits the replication of many viruses, but the mechanism differs according to virus and cell type. In this study, we observed that IL-27 expression was upregulated in herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-infected SJL/J mice, which led us to further investigate the role of IL-27 in HSV-1 infection using epithelial, glioma, and immunological cells as cell models. We showed that in all studied cell lines, the IL-27 messenger RNA (mRNA) level was upregulated due to the HSV-1 infection. When the cells were primed with IL-27 before the virus infection, the virus release was prevented, indicating an antiviral role of IL-27 in HSV-1 infection. Furthermore, we observed that IL-27 secretion to the culture medium was reduced in infected epithelial and immunological cells, but not in glioma cells. Not surprisingly, HSV-1 induced type I, II, and III interferons regardless of cell line, but IL-27 itself caused varying interferon responses dependent on cell type. However, common to all cell types was the IL-27-stimulated secretion of IL-6 and chemokines IP-10 and MIG. In addition, IL-27 stimulation activated STAT1 and STAT3 in HeLa and T98G cells, suggesting that IL-27 engages the STAT1/3 pathway, which then leads to the upregulation of IL-6, IP-10, and MIG.

  6. Computational characterization of structural role of the non-active site mutation M36I of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ode, Hirotaka; Matsuyama, Shou; Hata, Masayuki; Neya, Saburo; Kakizawa, Junko; Sugiura, Wataru; Hoshino, Tyuji

    2007-07-13

    A prominent characteristic of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is its high genetic variability, which generates diversity of the virus and often causes a serious problem of the emergence of drug-resistant mutants. Subtype B HIV-1 is dominant in advanced countries, and the mortality rate due to subtype B HIV-1 has been decreased during the past decade. In contrast, the number of patients with non-subtype B viruses is still increasing in developing countries. One of the reasons for the prevalence of non-subtype B viruses is lack of information about the biological and therapeutic differences between subtype B and non-subtype B viruses. M36I is the most frequently observed polymorphism in non-subtype B HIV-1 proteases. However, since the 36th residue is located at a non-active site of the protease and has no direct interaction with any ligands, the structural role of M36I remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of M36I protease in complex with nelfinavir and revealed the influence of the M36I mutation. The results show that M36I regulates the size of the binding cavity of the protease. The reason for the rare emergence of D30N variants in non-subtype B HIV-1 proteases was also clarified from our computational analysis.

  7. Prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 in blood donors of the Caruaru Blood Center (Hemope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleska Mayara Gomes de Lima

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There is difficulty in gathering data on the prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus in blood donors as confirmatory testing is not mandatory in Brazil. This suggests there may be an underreporting of the prevalence. OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 in donors of a blood bank in Caruaru, Brazil. METHODS: This was an observational, epidemiological, descriptive, longitudinal and retrospective study with information about the serology of donors of the Caruaru Blood Center, Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia de Pernambuco (Hemope from May 2006 to December 2010. The data were analyzed using the Excel 2010 computer program (Microsoft Office(r. RESULTS: Of 61,881 donors, 60 (0.096% individuals were identified as potential carriers of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2. Of these, 28 (0.045% were positive and 32 (0.051% had inconclusive results in the serological screening. Forty-five (0.072% were retested; 17 were positive (0.027% and 3 inconclusive (0.005%. After confirmatory tests, 8 were positive (0.013%. Six (75% of the confirmed cases were women. CONCLUSION: Epidemiological surveys like this are very important in order to create campaigns to attract donors and reduce the costs of laboratory tests.

  8. Prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 in blood donors of the Caruaru Blood Center (Hemope).

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima, Waleska Mayara Gomes; Esteves, Fabrício Andrade Martins; Torres, Maria do Carmo Morais Rodrigues; Pires, Edna Suely Feitosa

    2013-01-01

    There is difficulty in gathering data on the prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus in blood donors as confirmatory testing is not mandatory in Brazil. This suggests there may be an underreporting of the prevalence. To estimate the prevalence of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2 in donors of a blood bank in Caruaru, Brazil. This was an observational, epidemiological, descriptive, longitudinal and retrospective study with information about the serology of donors of the Caruaru Blood Center, Fundação de Hematologia e Hemoterapia de Pernambuco (Hemope) from May 2006 to December 2010. The data were analyzed using the Excel 2010 computer program (Microsoft Office(®)). Of 61,881 donors, 60 (0.096%) individuals were identified as potential carriers of human T-cell lymphotropic virus types 1 and 2. Of these, 28 (0.045%) were positive and 32 (0.051%) had inconclusive results in the serological screening. Forty-five (0.072%) were retested; 17 were positive (0.027%) and 3 inconclusive (0.005%). After confirmatory tests, 8 were positive (0.013%). Six (75%) of the confirmed cases were women. Epidemiological surveys like this are very important in order to create campaigns to attract donors and reduce the costs of laboratory tests.

  9. Comparison of protection provided by type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome field viruses against homologous and heterologous challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyuhyung; Park, Changhoon; Jeong, Jiwoon; Chae, Chanhee

    2016-08-15

    The objective of this study was to compare protection provided by type 1 and type 2 porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) against homologous and heterologous challenge based on clinical, virological, immunological, and pathological analysis. At 3 and 8 weeks of age, pigs were inoculated intranasally with either 3mL of tissue culture fluid containing 10(5) TCID50/mL of type 1 PRRSV or 3mL of tissue culture fluid containing 10(5) TCID50/mL of type 2 PRRSV. The homologous challenges resulted in a significant boost of the neutralizing antibodies (NA) and interferon-γ secreting cells (IFN-γ-SC) compared to heterologous challenges. The reduction of secondary challenging PRRSV viremia coincided with the appearance of homologous PRRSV-specific NA and IFN-γ-SC. Homologous challenge reduced the severity of lung lesions and levels of PRRSV viremia significantly in pigs in comparison with heterologous challenge. The differences in homologous and heterologous NA and IFN-γ-SC response may explain the differences in protection against homologous and heterologous challenge between type 1 and type 2 PRRSV. Primary challenge (immunization) with type 1 PRRSV provided protection against the secondary homologous challenge with type 1 PRRSV but failed to provide protection against the secondary heterologous challenge of type 2 PRRSV. Primary challenge with type 2 PRRSV provided protection against both the secondary homologous challenge with type 2 PRRSV and the secondary heterologous challenge with type 1 PRRSV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Escape from the Primary CD8+ Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nicola A.; Wei, Xiping; Flower, Darren R.; Wong, MaiLee; Michor, Franziska; Saag, Michael S.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Nowak, Martin A.; Shaw, George M.; Borrow, Persephone

    2004-01-01

    CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in containment of virus replication in primary human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. HIV's ability to mutate to escape from CTL pressure is increasingly recognized; but comprehensive studies of escape from the CD8 T cell response in primary HIV infection are currently lacking. Here, we have fully characterized the primary CTL response to autologous virus Env, Gag, and Tat proteins in three patients, and investigated the extent, kinetics, and mechanisms of viral escape from epitope-specific components of the response. In all three individuals, we observed variation beginning within weeks of infection at epitope-containing sites in the viral quasispecies, which conferred escape by mechanisms including altered peptide presentation/recognition and altered antigen processing. The number of epitope-containing regions exhibiting evidence of early CTL escape ranged from 1 out of 21 in a subject who controlled viral replication effectively to 5 out of 7 in a subject who did not. Evaluation of the extent and kinetics of HIV-1 escape from >40 different epitope-specific CD8 T cell responses enabled analysis of factors determining escape and suggested that escape is restricted by costs to intrinsic viral fitness and by broad, codominant distribution of CTL-mediated pressure on viral replication. PMID:15545352

  11. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C; Dauer, William; Johnson, David; Roller, Richard J

    2014-07-01

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Nuclear envelope breakdown induced by herpes simplex virus type 1 involves the activity of viral fusion proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maric, Martina; Haugo, Alison C. [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Dauer, William [Department of Neurology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Johnson, David [Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR 97201 (United States); Roller, Richard J., E-mail: richard-roller@uiowa.edu [Department of Microbiology, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Herpesvirus infection reorganizes components of the nuclear lamina usually without loss of integrity of the nuclear membranes. We report that wild-type HSV infection can cause dissolution of the nuclear envelope in transformed mouse embryonic fibroblasts that do not express torsinA. Nuclear envelope breakdown is accompanied by an eight-fold inhibition of virus replication. Breakdown of the membrane is much more limited during infection with viruses that lack the gB and gH genes, suggesting that breakdown involves factors that promote fusion at the nuclear membrane. Nuclear envelope breakdown is also inhibited during infection with virus that does not express UL34, but is enhanced when the US3 gene is deleted, suggesting that envelope breakdown may be enhanced by nuclear lamina disruption. Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the UL34 gene suggesting that mixing of nuclear and cytoplasmic contents is insufficient to bypass loss of the normal nuclear egress pathway. - Highlights: • We show that wild-type HSV can induce breakdown of the nuclear envelope in a specific cell system. • The viral fusion proteins gB and gH are required for induction of nuclear envelope breakdown. • Nuclear envelope breakdown cannot compensate for deletion of the HSV UL34 gene.

  13. Analysis of the acute phase responses of Serum Amyloid A, Haptoglobin and Type 1 Interferon in cattle experimentally infected with foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype O

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenfeldt, Carolina; Heegaard, Peter M. H.; Stockmarr, Anders

    2011-01-01

    A series of challenge experiments were performed in order to investigate the acute phase responses to foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection in cattle and possible implications for the development of persistently infected "carriers". The host response to infection was investigated through....... There was a statistically significant difference in the HP response between carriers and non-carriers with a lower response in the animals that subsequently developed into FMDV carriers. It was concluded that the induction of SAA, HP and type 1 IFN in serum can be used as markers of acute infection by FMDV in cattle....... measurements of the concentrations of the acute phase proteins (APPs) serum amyloid A (SAA) and haptoglobin (HP), as well as the bioactivity of type 1 interferon (IFN) in serum of infected animals. Results were based on measurements from a total of 36 infected animals of which 24 were kept for observational...

  14. Rise in seroprevalence of herpes simplex virus type 1 among highly sexual active homosexual men and an increasing association between herpes simplex virus type 2 and HIV over time (1984-2003)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Colette; Pfrommer, Christiaan; Mindel, Adrian; Taylor, Janette; Spaargaren, Joke; Berkhout, Ben; Coutinho, Roel; Dukers, Nicole H. T. M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Herpes simplex virus type 1 and type 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) are both highly prevalent. The rate of genital HSV-1 transmission is reportedly increasing over time. HSV-2 is considered to be an important risk factor for HIV transmission. We therefore studied changes in the HSV-1 and HSV-2

  15. Rapid Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Differentiation of Immunoglobulin G Antibodies to Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Group M, HIV-1 Group O, and HIV-2

    OpenAIRE

    Vallari, Ana S.; Hickman, Robert K.; Hackett, John R.; Brennan, Catherine A.; Varitek, Vincent A.; Devare, Sushil G.

    1998-01-01

    A rapid immunodiagnostic test that detects and discriminates human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infections on the basis of viral type, HIV type 1 (HIV-1) group M, HIV-1 group O, or HIV-2, was developed. The rapid assay for the detection of HIV (HIV rapid assay) was designed as an instrument-free chromatographic immunoassay that detects immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies to HIV. To assess the performance of the HIV rapid assay, 470 HIV-positive plasma samples were tested by PCR and/or Western b...

  16. Synthesis of 3-O-sulfonated heparan sulfate octasaccharides that inhibit the herpes simplex virus type 1 host-cell interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yu-Peng; Lin, Shu-Yi; Huang, Cheng-Yen; Zulueta, Medel Manuel L.; Liu, Jing-Yuan; Chang, Wen; Hung, Shang-Cheng

    2011-07-01

    Cell surface carbohydrates play significant roles in a number of biologically important processes. Heparan sulfate, for instance, is a ubiquitously distributed polysulfated polysaccharide that is involved, among other things, in the initial step of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. The virus interacts with cell-surface heparan sulfate to facilitate host-cell attachment and entry. 3-O-Sulfonated heparan sulfate has been found to function as an HSV-1 entry receptor. Achieving a complete understanding of these interactions requires the chemical synthesis of such oligosaccharides, but this remains challenging. Here, we present a convenient approach for the synthesis of two irregular 3-O-sulfonated heparan sulfate octasaccharides, making use of a key disaccharide intermediate to acquire different building blocks for the oligosaccharide chain assembly. Despite substantial structural differences, the prepared 3-O-sulfonated sugars blocked viral infection in a dosage-dependent manner with remarkable similarity to one another.

  17. Secondary structure of gp160 and gp120 envelope glycoproteins of human immunodeficiency virus type 1: a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decroly, E; Cornet, B; Martin, I; Ruysschaert, J M; Vandenbranden, M

    1993-06-01

    The secondary structure of the precursor (gp160) of the envelope protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (BH10) and its receptor-binding subunit (gp120) was studied by Fourier-transformed attenuated total reflection spectroscopy. A higher alpha-helix/beta-sheet ratio in the gp120 subunit than in the precursor indicates a structural heterogeneity between the two subunits (gp120 and gp41), in agreement with classical secondary-structure predictions. The secondary structure of gp41 was estimated and compared with existing models. The high alpha-helical content in gp41 and the dominant beta-sheet content in gp120 resemble the distribution in influenza virus hemagglutinin subunits.

  18. Exposed hydrophobic residues in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Vpr helix-1 are important for cell cycle arrest and cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Anthony Barnitz

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 accessory protein viral protein R (Vpr is a major determinant for virus-induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and cytopathicity. Vpr is thought to perform these functions through the interaction with partner proteins. The NMR structure of Vpr revealed solvent exposed hydrophobic amino acids along helices 1 and 3 of Vpr, which could be putative protein binding domains. We previously showed that the hydrophobic patch along helix-3 was important for G2/M blockade and cytopathicity. Mutations of the exposed hydrophobic residues along helix-1 were found to reduce Vpr-induced cell cycle arrest and cell death as well. The levels of toxicity during virion delivery of Vpr correlated with G2/M arrest. Thus, the exposed hydrophobic amino acids in the amino-terminal helix-1 are important for the cell cycle arrest and cytopathicity functions of Vpr.

  19. Identification of a conserved B-cell epitope on duck hepatitis A type 1 virus VP1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoying; Li, Xiaojun; Zhang, Qingshan; Wulin, Shaozhou; Bai, Xiaofei; Zhang, Tingting; Wang, Yue; Liu, Ming; Zhang, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a major structural protein that induces neutralizing antibodies in ducks; however, B-cell epitopes on the VP1 protein of duck hepatitis A genotype 1 virus (DHAV-1) have not been characterized. To characterize B-cell epitopes on VP1, we used the monoclonal antibody (mAb) 2D10 against Escherichia coli-expressed VP1 of DHAV-1. In vitro, mAb 2D10 neutralized DHAV-1 virus. By using an array of overlapping 12-mer peptides, we found that mAb 2D10 recognized phages displaying peptides with the consensus motif LPAPTS. Sequence alignment showed that the epitope 173LPAPTS178 is highly conserved among the DHAV-1 genotypes. Moreover, the six amino acid peptide LPAPTS was proven to be the minimal unit of the epitope with maximal binding activity to mAb 2D10. DHAV-1-positive duck serum reacted with the epitope in dot blotting assay, revealing the importance of the six amino acids of the epitope for antibody-epitope binding. Competitive inhibition assays of mAb 2D10 binding to synthetic LPAPTS peptides and truncated VP1 protein fragments, detected by Western blotting, also verify that LPAPTS was the VP1 epitope. We identified LPAPTS as a VP1-specific linear B-cell epitope recognized by the neutralizing mAb 2D10. Our findings have potential applications in the development of diagnostic techniques and epitope-based marker vaccines against DHAV-1.

  20. Distribution of Dengue Virus Types 1 and 4 in Blood Components from Infected Blood Donors from Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Añez, Germán; Heisey, Daniel A R; Chancey, Caren; Fares, Rafaelle C G; Espina, Luz M; Souza, Kátia P R; Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Krysztof, David E; Foster, Gregory A; Stramer, Susan L; Rios, Maria

    2016-02-01

    Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease caused by the four dengue viruses (DENV-1 to 4) that can also be transmitted by blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The distribution of DENV in the components of blood from infected donors is poorly understood. We used an in-house TaqMan qRT-PCR assay to test residual samples of plasma, cellular components of whole blood (CCWB), serum and clot specimens from the same collection from blood donors who were DENV-RNA-reactive in a parallel blood safety study. To assess whether DENV RNA detected by TaqMan was associated with infectious virus, DENV infectivity in available samples was determined by culture in mosquito cells. DENV RNA was detected by TaqMan in all tested blood components, albeit more consistently in the cellular components; 78.8% of CCWB, 73.3% of clots, 86.7% of sera and 41.8% of plasma samples. DENV-1 was detected in 48 plasma and 97 CCWB samples while DENV-4 was detected in 21 plasma and 31 CCWB samples. In mosquito cell cultures, 29/111 (26.1%) plasma and 32/97 (32.7%) CCWB samples were infectious. A subset of samples from 29 donors was separately analyzed to compare DENV viral loads in the available blood components. DENV viral loads did not differ significantly between components and ranged from 3-8 log10 PCR-detectable units/ml. DENV was present in all tested components from most donors, and viral RNA was not preferentially distributed in any of the tested components. Infectious DENV was also present in similar proportions in cultured plasma, clot and CCWB samples, indicating that these components may serve as a resource when sample sizes are limited. However, these results suggest that the sensitivity of the nucleic acid tests (NAT) for these viruses would not be improved by testing whole blood or components other than plasma.

  1. Evaluation of single-round infectious, chimeric dengue type 1 virus as an antigen for dengue functional antibody assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Suzuki, Ryosuke; Konishi, Eiji

    2014-07-23

    Dengue fever and dengue hemorrhagic fever are endemic throughout tropical and subtropical countries. Four serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV-1 to DENV-4), each with several genotypes including various subclades, are co-distributed in most endemic areas. Infection-neutralizing and -enhancing antibodies are believed to play protective and pathogenic roles, respectively. Measurement of these functional antibodies against a variety of viral strains is thus important for evaluating coverage and safety of dengue vaccine candidates. Although transportation of live virus materials beyond national borders is increasingly limited, this difficulty may be overcome using biotechnology that enables generation of an antibody-assay antigen equivalent to authentic virus based on viral sequence information. A rapid system to produce flavivirus single-round infectious particles (SRIPs) was recently developed using a Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) subgenomic replicon plasmid. This system allows production of chimeric SRIPs that have surface proteins of other flaviviruses. In the present study, SRIPs of DENV-1 (D1-SRIPs) were evaluated as an antigen for functional antibody assays. Inclusion of the whole mature capsid gene of JEV into the replicon plasmid provided higher D1-SRIP yields than did its exclusion in cases where a DENV-1 surface-protein-expressing plasmid was used for co-transfection of 293T cells with the replicon plasmid. In an assay to measure the balance between neutralizing and enhancing activities, dose (antibody dilution)-dependent activity curves in dengue-immune human sera or mouse monoclonal antibodies obtained using D1-SRIP antigen were equivalent to those obtained using DENV-1 antigen. Similar results were obtained using additional DENV-2 and DENV-3 systems. In a conventional Vero-cell neutralization test, a significant correlation was shown between antibody titers obtained using D1-SRIP and DENV-1 antigens. These results demonstrate the utility of D1-SRIPs as

  2. APOBEC3G-induced hypermutation of human immunodeficiency virus type-1 is typically a discrete "all or nothing" phenomenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Armitage, Andrew E; Deforche, Koen; Chang, Chih-Hao

    2012-01-01

    -lethal frequencies that could increase viral diversification. We show in vitro that limiting-levels of hA3G-activity (i.e. when only a single hA3G-unit is likely to act on HIV) produce hypermutation frequencies similar to those in patients and demonstrate in silico that potentially non-lethal G-to-A mutation rates......" phenomenon. Thus, therapeutic measures that inhibit the interaction between Vif and hA3G will likely not increase virus diversification but expand the fraction of hypermutated proviruses within the infected host....

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 genotyping in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: assessing subtype and drug-resistance associated mutations in HIV-1 infected individuals failing highly active antiretroviral therapy

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    JC Couto-Fernandez

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 drug resistance mutation profiles and evaluate the distribution of the genetic subtypes in the state of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, blood samples from 547 HIV-1 infected patients failing antiretroviral (ARV therapy, were collected during the years 2002 and 2003 to perform the viral resistance genotyping at the Renageno Laboratory from Rio de Janeiro (Oswaldo Cruz Foundation. Viral resistance genotyping was performed using ViroSeqTM Genotyping System (Celera Diagnostic-Abbott, US. The HIV-1 subtyping based on polymerase (pol gene sequences (protease and reverse transcriptase-RT regions was as follows: subtype B (91.2%, subtype F (4.9%, and B/F viral recombinant forms (3.3%. The subtype C was identified in two patients (0.4% and the recombinant CRF_02/AG virus was found infecting one patient (0.2%. The HIV-1 genotyping profile associated to the reverse transcriptase inhibitors has shown a high frequency of the M184V mutation followed by the timidine-associated mutations. The K103N mutation was the most prevalent to the non-nucleoside RT inhibitor and the resistance associated to protease inhibitor showed the minor mutations L63P, L10F/R, and A71V as the more prevalent. A large proportion of subtype B was observed in HIV-1 treated patients from Rio de Janeiro. In addition, we have identified the circulation of drug-resistant HIV-1 subtype C and are presenting the first report of the occurrence of an African recombinant CRF_02/AG virus in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. A clear association between HIV-1 subtypes and protease resistance mutations was observed in this study. The maintenance of resistance genotyping programs for HIV-1 failing patients is important to the management of ARV therapies and to attempt and monitor the HIV-1 subtype prevalence in Brazil.

  4. Replication-Coupled Recruitment of Viral and Cellular Factors to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Replication Forks for the Maintenance and Expression of Viral Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dembowski, Jill A; Dremel, Sarah E; DeLuca, Neal A

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infects over half the human population. Much of the infectious cycle occurs in the nucleus of cells where the virus has evolved mechanisms to manipulate host processes for the production of virus. The genome of HSV-1 is coordinately expressed, maintained, and replicated such that progeny virions are produced within 4-6 hours post infection. In this study, we selectively purify HSV-1 replication forks and associated proteins from virus-infected cells and identify select viral and cellular replication, repair, and transcription factors that associate with viral replication forks. Pulse chase analyses and imaging studies reveal temporal and spatial dynamics between viral replication forks and associated proteins and demonstrate that several DNA repair complexes and key transcription factors are recruited to or near replication forks. Consistent with these observations we show that the initiation of viral DNA replication is sufficient to license late gene transcription. These data provide insight into mechanisms that couple HSV-1 DNA replication with transcription and repair for the coordinated expression and maintenance of the viral genome.

  5. The effect of antiviral activity of a green seaweed from the Persian Gulf, Caulerpa sertularioides on Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1

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    Keyvan Zandi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: By considering the daily increase in drug resistance of various viruses, novel antiviral compounds extracted from natural resources – due to their fewer side effects, had always been important to researchers. In the present study, we investigated antiviral activity of the hot water extract of a green seaweed, Caulerpa sertularioides, collected from coastal water of Bushehr in the Persian Gulf, against Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 (HSV-1. Methods: The hot water extract of a green seaweed, Caulerpa sertularioides was sterilized by autoclave and filtration methods. After determining its cytotoxic concentration 50 (CC50 value, the effect of the extract on the inhibition of HSV-1 replication was examined in Vero cell culture. Results: The extract showed antiviral activity against HSV-1 in both attachment and entry of virus to the Vero cells and also on post attachment stages of virus replication. Inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50 values of the autoclaved extract were 81µg/ml and 126 µg/ml for attachment and post attachment stages, respectively. IC50 values of the filtered extract were 73 µg/ml and 104 µg/ml for attachment and post attachment stages, respectively. CC50 values for autoclaved and filtered extracts were 3140 µg/ml and 3095 µg/ml, respectively. Conclusion: The hot water extract of Caulerpa sertularioides of the Persian Gulf had antiviral effect against HSV-1.

  6. Introduction of Exogenous Epitopes in the Variable Regions of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Envelope Glycoprotein: Effect on Viral Infectivity and the Neutralization Phenotype▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Aaron; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2009-01-01

    In this study we examined whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is equally susceptible to neutralization by a given antibody when the epitope of this antibody is introduced at different positions within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). To this end, we introduced two exogenous “epitope tags” at different locations within three major Env regions in two distinct HIV-1 isolates. We examined how the introduction of the exogenous epitopes affects Env expression, Env incorporation into virions, Env fusogenic potential, and viral susceptibility to neutralization. Our data indicate that even within the same Env region, the exact positioning of the epitope impacts the susceptibility of the virus to neutralization by the antibody that binds to that epitope. Our data also indicate that even if the same epitope is introduced in the exact same position on two different Envs, its exposure and, as a result, the neutralization susceptibility of the virus, can be very different. In contrast to the findings of previous studies conducted with HIV-1 isolates other than those used here, but in agreement with results obtained with simian immunodeficiency virus, we observed that tagging of the fourth variable region of Env (V4) did not result in neutralization by the anti-tag antibodies. Our data indicate that epitopes in V4 are not properly exposed within the functional HIV-1 trimeric Env spike, suggesting that V4 may not be a good target for vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies. PMID:19494007

  7. Introduction of exogenous epitopes in the variable regions of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 envelope glycoprotein: effect on viral infectivity and the neutralization phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Aaron; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2009-08-01

    In this study we examined whether human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is equally susceptible to neutralization by a given antibody when the epitope of this antibody is introduced at different positions within the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env). To this end, we introduced two exogenous "epitope tags" at different locations within three major Env regions in two distinct HIV-1 isolates. We examined how the introduction of the exogenous epitopes affects Env expression, Env incorporation into virions, Env fusogenic potential, and viral susceptibility to neutralization. Our data indicate that even within the same Env region, the exact positioning of the epitope impacts the susceptibility of the virus to neutralization by the antibody that binds to that epitope. Our data also indicate that even if the same epitope is introduced in the exact same position on two different Envs, its exposure and, as a result, the neutralization susceptibility of the virus, can be very different. In contrast to the findings of previous studies conducted with HIV-1 isolates other than those used here, but in agreement with results obtained with simian immunodeficiency virus, we observed that tagging of the fourth variable region of Env (V4) did not result in neutralization by the anti-tag antibodies. Our data indicate that epitopes in V4 are not properly exposed within the functional HIV-1 trimeric Env spike, suggesting that V4 may not be a good target for vaccine-elicited neutralizing antibodies.

  8. Prevalence of herpes simplex types 1 and 2, varicella zoster virus, cytomegalovirus, immunoglobulin G antibodies among female university students in Syria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barah, Faraj

    2012-09-01

    To examine the current seroepidemiology of immunoglobulin (Ig)G for herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV 1-2), varicella zoster virus (VZV), and cytomegalovirus (CMV) among university females of childbearing age in Syria. A cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the female students of the Pharmacy College, Kalamoon University, Deratiah, Syria, where 316 sera were collected from October 2009 to November 2010, and subjected to HSV 1-2, VZV, and CMV IgG screening and titration using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based techniques in the Microbiology Laboratory. A total of 164 participants were positive for HSV 1-2 IgG giving a prevalence of 52%, leaving a relatively high proportion of susceptibility among the tested group. For VZV, 91% of the participants (n=287) were positive for its specific IgG, while, regarding CMV, 74.5% (n=235) were positive, and 25.5% were negative for CMV specific IgG. Although most participants were seropositive for herpes viruses IgG, suggesting a natural virus circulation within the community, screening for protective immunity is suggested against HSV, since a relatively high proportion of tested females are still susceptible. In addition, and because of its nasty outcomes during pregnancy, IgG against CMV should also be tested. High percentage of positivity towards VZV could be explained due to introduction of the new vaccine program, and therefore, further analysis during pregnancy is not recommended.

  9. Inhibition of cell-to-cell transmission of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 in vitro by carbohydrate-binding agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrieri, Emanuela; Ascolani, Arianna; Igarashi, Yasuhiro; Oki, Toshikazu; Mastino, Antonio; Balzarini, Jan; Macchi, Beatrice

    2008-08-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals can be infected by human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) upon cocultivation of the PBMCs with irradiated HTLV-1-transformed human MT-2 cells. This model system closely mimics HTLV-1 transmission through cell-to-cell contact. Carbohydrate-binding agents (CBAs) such as the alpha(1,3)/alpha(1,6)mannose-specific Hippeastrum hybrid agglutinin and the GlcNAc-specific Urtica dioica agglutinin, and also the small, nonpeptidic alpha(1,2)-mannose-specific antibiotic pradimicin A, were able to efficiently prevent cell-to-cell HTLV-1 transmission at nontoxic concentrations, as evidenced by the lack of appearance of virus-specific mRNA and of the viral protein Tax in the acceptor cells. Consistently, antivirally active doses of CBAs fully prevented HTLV-1-induced stimulation of PBMC growth. The inhibitory effects of CBAs on HTLV-1 transmission were also evident when HTLV-1-infected C5MJ cells were used in place of MT-2 cells as a virus donor cell line. The anti-HTLV-1 properties of the CBAs highlight the importance of the envelope glycans in events underlying HTLV-1 passage from cell to cell and indicate that CBAs should be further investigated for their potential to prevent HTLV-1 infection, including mother-to-child virus transmission by cell-to-cell contact through breast milk feeding.

  10. Quantitative analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 DNA dynamics by real-time PCR: integration efficiency in stimulated and unstimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Youichi; Misawa, Naoko; Sato, Chihiro; Ebina, Hirotaka; Masuda, Takao; Yamamoto, Naoki; Koyanagi, Yoshio

    2003-10-01

    We established a set of real-time PCR assay to accurately quantify human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) DNA in infected cells. Using this assay we were able to measure the strong-stop, full-length/ 1-LTR circle, 2-LTR circle, and integrated forms of viral DNA, and the data provided was quite consistent with the characteristics of mutant viruses in early phase of infection. Since our assay is particularly applicable to quantify the integrated DNA in small scale of samples, we measured the level of integrated DNA in wild-type virus (WT)- or Vpr-defective virus (deltaVpr)-infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and examined whether quiescent condition of the PBMC influences integration step of HIV-1. Under stimulating condition approximately 25% of total viral DNA was in integrated form in either WT- or DeltaVpr-infected cells. In contrast, under unstimulated condition the level of integration efficiency was not significantly reduced in WT-infected cells, while this efficiency was severely impaired in the absence of vpr gene. This result clearly demonstrated a crucial role of the Vpr for nuclear localization and subsequent integration of viral DNA in nondividing cells. Therefore, our assay is useful for analyzing the events in early phase of HIV-1 infection under various conditions.

  11. Determination of the seroprevalence of Newcastle disease virus (avian paramyxovirus type 1 in Zambian backyard chicken flocks

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    Chimuka Musako

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A cross-sectional study was conducted in five provinces and 11 districts of Zambia to determine the seroprevalence of Newcastle disease in Zambian backyard chicken flocks. Of the chickens sampled, 73.9% tested positive for avian paramyxovirus type 1 antibodies by means of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Seroprevalence varied amongst the five provinces sampled, ranging from 82.6% in the Eastern Province to 48.3% in Luapula Province. Seroprevalence also varied amongst the 11 districts sampled, ranging from 91.3% in Monze district of Southern Province to 22.8% in Mufulira district of the Copperbelt province. Overall, the seroprevalence of Newcastle disease in Zambian backyard chicken flocks has increased since the previous study conducted in 1994.

  12. DNA vaccine prime and recombinant FPV vaccine boost: an important candidate immunization strategy to control bluetongue virus type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junping; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qingyuan; Sun, Encheng; Feng, Yufei; Lv, Shuang; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Haixiu; Wu, Donglai

    2015-10-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is the causative agent of bluetongue (BT), an important sheep disease that caused great economic loss to the sheep industry. There are 26 BTV serotypes based on the outer protein VP2. However, the serotypes BTV-1 and BTV-16 are the two most prevalent serotypes in China. Vaccination is the most effective method of preventing viral infections. Therefore, the need for an effective vaccine against BTV is urgent. In this study, DNA vaccines and recombinant fowlpox virus (rFPV) vaccines expressing VP2 alone or VP2 in combination with VP5 or co-expressing the VP2 and VP5 proteins of BTV-1 were evaluated in both mice and sheep. Several strategies were tested in mice, including DNA vaccine prime and boost, rFPV vaccine prime and boost, and DNA vaccine prime and rFPV vaccine boost. We then determined the best vaccine strategy in sheep. Our results indicated that a strategy combining a DNA vaccine prime (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) followed by an rFPV vaccine boost (co-expressing VP2 and VP5) induced a high titer of neutralizing antibodies in sheep. Therefore, our data suggest that a DNA vaccine consisting of a pCAG-(VP2+VP5) prime and an rFPV-(VP2+VP5) boost is an important candidate for the design of a novel vaccine against BTV-1.

  13. Label-Free Electrochemical Detection of the Specific Oligonucleotide Sequence of Dengue Virus Type 1 on Pencil Graphite Electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Elaine; Nascimento, Gustavo; Santana, Nataly; Ferreira, Danielly; Lima, Manoel; Natividade, Edna; Martins, Danyelly; Lima-Filho, José

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor that relies on the adsorption immobilization of the 18-mer single-stranded nucleic acid related to dengue virus gene 1 on activated pencil graphite was developed. Hybridization between the probe and its complementary oligonucleotides (the target) was investigated by monitoring guanine oxidation by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). The pencil graphite electrode was made of ordinary pencil lead (type 4B). The polished surface of the working electrode was activated by applying a potential of 1.8 V for 5 min. Afterward, the dengue oligonucleotides probe was immobilized on the activated electrode by applying 0.5 V to the electrode in 0.5 M acetate buffer (pH 5.0) for 5 min. The hybridization process was carried out by incubating at the annealing temperature of the oligonucleotides. A time of five minutes and concentration of 1 μM were found to be the optimal conditions for probe immobilization. The electrochemical detection of annealing between the DNA probe (TS-1P) immobilized on the modified electrode, and the target (TS-1T) was achieved. The target could be quantified in a range from 1 to 40 nM with good linearity and a detection limit of 0.92 nM. The specificity of the electrochemical biosensor was tested using non-complementary sequences of dengue virus 2 and 3. PMID:22163916

  14. Reversal of type 1 diabetes via islet β cell regeneration following immune modulation by cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells

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    Zhao Yong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inability to control autoimmunity is the primary barrier to developing a cure for type 1 diabetes (T1D. Evidence that human cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs can control autoimmune responses by altering regulatory T cells (Tregs and human islet β cell-specific T cell clones offers promise for a new approach to overcome the autoimmunity underlying T1D. Methods We developed a procedure for Stem Cell Educator therapy in which a patient's blood is circulated through a closed-loop system that separates lymphocytes from the whole blood and briefly co-cultures them with adherent CB-SCs before returning them to the patient's circulation. In an open-label, phase1/phase 2 study, patients (n = 15 with T1D received one treatment with the Stem Cell Educator. Median age was 29 years (range: 15 to 41, and median diabetic history was 8 years (range: 1 to 21. Results Stem Cell Educator therapy was well tolerated in all participants with minimal pain from two venipunctures and no adverse events. Stem Cell Educator therapy can markedly improve C-peptide levels, reduce the median glycated hemoglobin A1C (HbA1C values, and decrease the median daily dose of insulin in patients with some residual β cell function (n = 6 and patients with no residual pancreatic islet β cell function (n = 6. Treatment also produced an increase in basal and glucose-stimulated C-peptide levels through 40 weeks. However, participants in the Control Group (n = 3 did not exhibit significant change at any follow-up. Individuals who received Stem Cell Educator therapy exhibited increased expression of co-stimulating molecules (specifically, CD28 and ICOS, increases in the number of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ Tregs, and restoration of Th1/Th2/Th3 cytokine balance. Conclusions Stem Cell Educator therapy is safe, and in individuals with moderate or severe T1D, a single treatment produces lasting improvement in metabolic control. Initial results indicate Stem Cell

  15. Evolutionary dynamics of the American African genotype of dengue type 1 virus in India (1962-2005).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, J A; Cherian, S; Walimbe, A M; Patil, B R; Sathe, P S; Shah, P S; Cecilia, D

    2011-08-01

    Dengue is a major health problem in India with all four serotypes represented. Recently there has been an increase in the occurrence of dengue-1 outbreaks. It is possible that there have been changes in the genetics of dengue virus-1 (DENV-1), either by fresh introductions or by evolution in situ. The studies on DENV-1 evolution so far have no Indian sequences included. To gain insight into the dynamics of DENV-1 in India, the envelope (E) gene of thirteen virus isolates representative of the period 1962-2005 were sequenced and analyzed together with the available sequences of 40 globally representative isolates. All the Indian DENV-1 isolates were found to belong to the American African (AMAF) genotype. With the addition of 13 Indian isolates, the AMAF genotype can now be called Cosmopolitan. The Indian isolates were distributed into four lineages, India I, II, III and the Africa lineage, now called Afro-India. Of these, India III was the oldest and extinct lineage; the Afro-India was a transient lineage while India I, imported from Singapore and India II, evolving in situ, were the circulating lineages. Despite the extinction and introduction of lineages, no specific codon site was observed to be under selection pressure. The rate of nucleotide substitution estimated for DENV-1 was 6.5 × 10(-4) substitutions/site/year, and the time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA) was estimated to be 78-180 years (1825-1925), similar to previous estimates. The tMRCA for the AMAF/Cosmopolitan genotype was 56-98 years (1907-1949), a period that covers World War I and II. The two imports from Africa (1953-1968) and Singapore (1964-1975) and an export to the Americas (1955-1965) prove that there have been changes in the lineage of the DENV-1 viruses circulating in India which has contributed to the global dynamics of DENV-1 evolution and perhaps to the changing epidemiology of dengue in India. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Stoichiometry of monoclonal antibody neutralization of T-cell line-adapted human immunodeficiency virus type 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schønning, Kristian; Lund, O; Lund, O S

    1999-01-01

    , these data could not exclude the existence of a threshold for neutralization. However, results from MAb neutralization of chimeric virus containing wild-type Env and Env defective in CD4 binding was readily explained by a model of incremental MAb neutralization. In summary, the data indicate that MAb......-order function of the proportion of Env antigen refractory to MAb binding. This scenario is consistent with the Env oligomer constituting the minimal functional unit and neutralization occurring incrementally as each Env oligomer binds MAb. Alternatively, the data could be fit to a sigmoid function. Thus...... neutralization of T-cell line-adapted HIV-1 is incremental rather than all or none and that each MAb binding an Env oligomer reduces the likelihood of infection....

  17. Neutralizing and enhancing antibody responses to five genotypes of dengue virus type 1 (DENV-1) in DENV-1 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Atsushi; Moi, Meng Ling; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kurane, Ichiro; Konishi, Eiji

    2017-02-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) has four distinct serotypes, DENV-1-4, with four to six genotypes in each serotype. The World Health Organization recommends tetravalent formulations including one genotype of each serotype as safe and effective dengue vaccines. Here, we investigated the impact of genotype on the neutralizing antibody responses to DENV-1 in humans. Convalescent sera collected from patients with primary infection of DENV-1 were examined for neutralizing antibody against single-round infectious particles of the five DENV-1 genotypes (GI-GV). In both GI- and GIV-infected patients, their neutralizing antibody titres against the five genotypes were similar, differing ≤4-fold from the homogenotypic responses. The enhancing activities against the five genotypes were also similar in these sera. Thus, the genotype strains of DENV-1 showed no significant antigenic differences in these patients, suggesting that GI- or GIV-derived vaccine antigens should induce equivalent levels of neutralizing antibodies against all DENV-1 genotypes.

  18. The association of metabolic syndrome and Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus type 1: The Persian Gulf Healthy Heart Study

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    Pazoki Raha

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome together with insulin resistance and their consequences are basic factors in pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Chronic infections with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1, cytomegalovirus (CMV, and Chlamydia pneumoniae are associated with the development of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The infectious aspects of metabolic syndrome have not been investigated. Methods In a cross-sectional, population-based study, we used National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP-Adult Treatment Panel (ATP-III criteria in 1791 subjects, aged 25 years and over, selected by cluster random sampling in three Iranian ports in the northern Persian Gulf. Sera were analyzed for IgG antibodies to Chlamydia pneumoniae, HSV-1, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori and CMV using ELISA. Results In multiple logistic regression analysis, of the infectious agents, CMV [OR = 1.81 (1.05–3.10; p = 0.03], H. pylori [OR = 1.50 (1.12–2.00; p = 0.007] and Chlamydia pneumoniae [OR = 1.69 (1.27–2.25; p Conclusion The metabolic syndrome, which occurs very frequently in the general population, has a significant association with prior infection with Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori, cytomegalovirus and herpes simplex virus type 1. Hypothesis about participation of infection in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome should be investigated.

  19. Herpes simplex virus type 1 recombination: the Uc-DR1 region is required for high-level a-sequence-mediated recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutch, R E; Zemelman, B V; Lehman, I R

    1994-01-01

    The a sequences of herpes simplex virus type 1 are believed to be the cis sites for inversion events that generate four isomeric forms of the viral genome. Using an assay that measures deletion of a beta-galactosidase gene positioned between two directly repeated sequences in plasmids transiently maintained in Vero cells, we had found that the a sequence is more recombinogenic than another sequence of similar size. To investigate the basis for the enhanced recombination mediated by the a sequence, we examined plasmids containing direct repeats of approximately 350 bp from a variety of sources and with a wide range of G+C content. We observed that all of these plasmids show similar recombination frequencies (3 to 4%) in herpes simplex virus type 1-infected cells. However, recombination between directly repeated a sequences occurs at twice this frequency (6 to 10%). In addition, we find that insertion of a cleavage site for an a-sequence-specific endonuclease into the repeated sequences does not appreciably increase the frequency of recombination, indicating that the presence of endonuclease cleavage sites within the a sequence does not account for its recombinogenicity. Finally, by replacing segments of the a sequence with DNA fragments of similar length, we have determined that only the 95-bp Uc-DR1 segment is indispensable for high-level a-sequence-mediated recombination. Images PMID:8189511

  20. Chitosan as an Immunomodulating Adjuvant on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection

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    Bunsoon Choi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Herpes disease caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 is an intractable condition. It is a major concern in public health. Our purpose of this study was to verify the function of chitosan as an adjuvant for immune regulation specifically under herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 infection. Ahead of HSV infection, chitosan, heat inactivated green fluorescent protein expressing HSV (G-HSV, and a combination of chitosan and G-HSV were used to pretreat ICR mice followed by HSV-1 infection. Using flow cytometric analysis, the frequencies of T-cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, and natural killer (NK cells were analyzed by surface expression of CD4+, CD8+, CD14+, CD11c+, NK1.1+, and DX5+ cells. In HSV infected mice, chitosan treatment significantly increased the frequencies of CD4+ T-cells (33.6±5.78% compared to those in the control group (24.02±12.47%, p=0.05. The frequencies of DC and NK cells were also significantly different between chitosan treated mice and control mice. In addition, anti-HSV IgG antibody was downregulated in chitosan treated mice. These results suggest that chitosan is a potential modulator or immune stimulator as an adjuvant in HSV-1 infected mice.

  1. Chitosan as an Immunomodulating Adjuvant on T-Cells and Antigen-Presenting Cells in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Do-Hyun; Anower, A. K. M. Mostafa; Islam, S. M. Shamsul

    2016-01-01

    Herpes disease caused by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is an intractable condition. It is a major concern in public health. Our purpose of this study was to verify the function of chitosan as an adjuvant for immune regulation specifically under herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection. Ahead of HSV infection, chitosan, heat inactivated green fluorescent protein expressing HSV (G-HSV), and a combination of chitosan and G-HSV were used to pretreat ICR mice followed by HSV-1 infection. Using flow cytometric analysis, the frequencies of T-cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), and natural killer (NK) cells were analyzed by surface expression of CD4+, CD8+, CD14+, CD11c+, NK1.1+, and DX5+ cells. In HSV infected mice, chitosan treatment significantly increased the frequencies of CD4+ T-cells (33.6 ± 5.78%) compared to those in the control group (24.02 ± 12.47%, p = 0.05). The frequencies of DC and NK cells were also significantly different between chitosan treated mice and control mice. In addition, anti-HSV IgG antibody was downregulated in chitosan treated mice. These results suggest that chitosan is a potential modulator or immune stimulator as an adjuvant in HSV-1 infected mice. PMID:28096567

  2. Amino acid substitutions in the thymidine kinase gene of induced acyclovir-resistant herpes simplex virus type 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussin, Ainulkhir; Nor, Norefrina Shafinaz Md; Ibrahim, Nazlina

    2013-11-01

    Acyclovir (ACV) is an antiviral drug of choice in healthcare setting to treat infections caused by herpes viruses, including, but not limited to genital herpes, cold sores, shingles and chicken pox. Acyclovir resistance has emerged significantly due to extensive use and misuse of this antiviral in human, especially in immunocompromised patients. However, it remains unclear about the amino acid substitutions in thymidine (TK) gene, which specifically confer the resistance-associated mutation in herpes simplex virus. Hence, acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 was selected at high concentration (2.0 - 4.5 μg/mL), and the TK-gene was subjected to sequencing and genotypic characterization. Genotypic sequences comparison was done using HSV-1 17 (GenBank Accesion no. X14112) for resistance-associated mutation determination whereas HSV-1 KOS, HSV-1 473/08 and HSV clinical isolates sequences were used for polymorphism-associated mutation. The result showed that amino acid substitutions at the non-conserved region (UKM-1: Gln34Lys, UKM-2: Arg32Ser & UKM-5: Arg32Cys) and ATP-binding site (UKM-3: Tyr53End & UKM-4: Ile54Leu) of the TK-gene. These discoveries play an important role to extend another dimension to the evolution of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1 and suggest that selection at high ACV concentration induced ACV-resistant HSV-1 evolution. These findings also expand the knowledge on the type of mutations among acyclovir-resistant HSV-1. In conclusion, HSV-1 showed multiple strategies to exhibit acyclovir resistance, including amino acid substitutions in the TK gene.

  3. Thermal stability of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 receptors, CD4 and CXCR4, reconstituted in proteoliposomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail A Zhukovsky

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The entry of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1 into host cells involves the interaction of the viral exterior envelope glycoprotein, gp120, and receptors on the target cell. The HIV-1 receptors are CD4 and one of two chemokine receptors, CCR5 or CXCR4.We created proteoliposomes that contain CD4, the primary HIV-1 receptor, and one of the coreceptors, CXCR4. Antibodies against CD4 and CXCR4 specifically bound the proteoliposomes. CXCL12, the natural ligand for CXCR4, and the small-molecule CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, bound the proteoliposomes with affinities close to those associated with the binding of these molecules to cells expressing CXCR4 and CD4. The HIV-1 gp120 exterior envelope glycoprotein bound tightly to proteoliposomes expressing only CD4 and, in the presence of soluble CD4, bound weakly to proteoliposomes expressing only CXCR4. The thermal stability of CD4 and CXCR4 inserted into liposomes was examined. Thermal denaturation of CXCR4 followed second-order kinetics, with an activation energy (E(a of 269 kJ/mol (64.3 kcal/mol and an inactivation temperature (T(i of 56°C. Thermal inactivation of CD4 exhibited a reaction order of 1.3, an E(a of 278 kJ/mol (66.5 kcal/mol, and a T(i of 52.2°C. The second-order denaturation kinetics of CXCR4 is unusual among G protein-coupled receptors, and may result from dimeric interactions between CXCR4 molecules.Our studies with proteoliposomes containing the native HIV-1 receptors allowed an examination of the binding of biologically important ligands and revealed the higher-order denaturation kinetics of these receptors. CD4/CXCR4-proteoliposomes may be useful for the study of virus-target cell interactions and for the identification of inhibitors.

  4. Hypermutagenesis of RNA Using Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Reverse Transcriptase and Biased dNTP Concentrations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Miguel Angel Martinez; Jean-Pierre Vartanian; Simon Wain-Hobson

    1994-01-01

    ...:30, comparable to that within the retroviral replication complex, G → A hypermutants were produced in a simple in vitro reaction using highly biased dNTP concentrations-i.e., a low ratio of [dCTP]/[dTTP]. Up to 38...

  5. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

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    Feuer Gerold

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo.

  6. Plasma drug concentrations and virologic evaluations after stopping treatment with nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors in HIV type 1-infected children.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cressey, T.R.; Green, H.; Khoo, S.; Treluyer, J.M.; Compagnucci, A.; Saidi, Y.; Lallemant, M.; Gibb, D.M.; Burger, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The optimum strategy for stopping treatment with drugs that have different half-lives in a combination regimen to minimize the risk of selecting drug-resistant viruses remains unknown. We evaluated drug concentrations in plasma, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load, and development of

  7. Development and validation of a real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay for investigation of wild poliovirus type 1-South Asian (SOAS) strain reintroduced into Israel, 2013 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindiyeh, M Y; Moran-Gilad, J; Manor, Y; Ram, D; Shulman, L M; Sofer, D; Mendelson, E

    2014-02-20

    In February 2013, wild poliovirus type 1 (WPV1) was reintroduced into southern Israel and resulted in continuous silent circulation in the highly immune population. As a part of the public health emergency response, a novel real time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay was developed, to allow for the sensitive and specific detection of the circulatingWPV1-South Asian (SOAS) strain. Specific primers and probes derived from the VP-1 region were designed, based on sequenced sewage isolates, and used to simultaneously amplify this WPV1-SOAS sequence together with bacteriophage MS-2 as internal control. High titre WPV1-SOAS stock virus was used for assay optimisation and 50 processed sewage samples collected from southern Israel and tested by reference culture based methods were used for analytical validation of the assay’s performance. The limit of detection of the multiplex qRT-PCR (SOAS/MS-2) assay was 0.1 plaque-forming unit (pfu)/reaction (20 pfu/mL) for WPV1-SOAS RNA with 100% sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values when compared to the culture based method. The turnaround time was rapid, providing results for environmental samples within 24 to 48 hours from completion of sewage processing, instead of five to seven days by culture-based analysis. Direct sewage testing by qRT-PCR assay proved to be a useful tool for rapid detection and environmental surveillance of WPV1-SOAS circulating strain during emergency response. Application of the approach for detection of WPV1-SOAS in stool samples obtained during acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) surveillance or field surveys should be further evaluated.

  8. Alix serves as an adaptor that allows human parainfluenza virus type 1 to interact with the host cell ESCRT system.

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    Jim Boonyaratanakornkit

    Full Text Available The cellular ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport system functions in cargo-sorting, in the formation of intraluminal vesicles that comprise multivesicular bodies (MVB, and in cytokinesis, and this system can be hijacked by a number of enveloped viruses to promote budding. The respiratory pathogen human parainfluenza virus type I (HPIV1 encodes a nested set of accessory C proteins that play important roles in down-regulating viral transcription and replication, in suppressing the type I interferon (IFN response, and in suppressing apoptosis. Deletion or mutation of the C proteins attenuates HPIV1 in vivo, and such mutants are being evaluated preclinically and clinically as vaccines. We show here that the C proteins interact and co-localize with the cellular protein Alix, which is a member of the class E vacuolar protein sorting (Vps proteins that assemble at endosomal membranes into ESCRT complexes. The HPIV1 C proteins interact with the Bro1 domain of Alix at a site that is also required for the interaction between Alix and Chmp4b, a subunit of ESCRT-III. The C proteins are ubiquitinated and subjected to proteasome-mediated degradation, but the interaction with AlixBro1 protects the C proteins from degradation. Neither over-expression nor knock-down of Alix expression had an effect on HPIV1 replication, although this might be due to the large redundancy of Alix-like proteins. In contrast, knocking down the expression of Chmp4 led to an approximately 100-fold reduction in viral titer during infection with wild-type (WT HPIV1. This level of reduction was similar to that observed for the viral mutant, P(C- HPIV1, in which expression of the C proteins were knocked out. Chmp4 is capable of out-competing the HPIV1 C proteins for binding Alix. Together, this suggests a possible model in which Chmp4, through Alix, recruits the C proteins to a common site on intracellular membranes and facilitates budding.

  9. Alix serves as an adaptor that allows human parainfluenza virus type 1 to interact with the host cell ESCRT system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonyaratanakornkit, Jim; Schomacker, Henrick; Collins, Peter; Schmidt, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    The cellular ESCRT (endosomal sorting complex required for transport) system functions in cargo-sorting, in the formation of intraluminal vesicles that comprise multivesicular bodies (MVB), and in cytokinesis, and this system can be hijacked by a number of enveloped viruses to promote budding. The respiratory pathogen human parainfluenza virus type I (HPIV1) encodes a nested set of accessory C proteins that play important roles in down-regulating viral transcription and replication, in suppressing the type I interferon (IFN) response, and in suppressing apoptosis. Deletion or mutation of the C proteins attenuates HPIV1 in vivo, and such mutants are being evaluated preclinically and clinically as vaccines. We show here that the C proteins interact and co-localize with the cellular protein Alix, which is a member of the class E vacuolar protein sorting (Vps) proteins that assemble at endosomal membranes into ESCRT complexes. The HPIV1 C proteins interact with the Bro1 domain of Alix at a site that is also required for the interaction between Alix and Chmp4b, a subunit of ESCRT-III. The C proteins are ubiquitinated and subjected to proteasome-mediated degradation, but the interaction with AlixBro1 protects the C proteins from degradation. Neither over-expression nor knock-down of Alix expression had an effect on HPIV1 replication, although this might be due to the large redundancy of Alix-like proteins. In contrast, knocking down the expression of Chmp4 led to an approximately 100-fold reduction in viral titer during infection with wild-type (WT) HPIV1. This level of reduction was similar to that observed for the viral mutant, P(C-) HPIV1, in which expression of the C proteins were knocked out. Chmp4 is capable of out-competing the HPIV1 C proteins for binding Alix. Together, this suggests a possible model in which Chmp4, through Alix, recruits the C proteins to a common site on intracellular membranes and facilitates budding.

  10. Humoral and cellular capsid-specific immune responses to adeno-associated virus type 1 in randomized healthy donors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veron, Philippe; Leborgne, Christian; Monteilhet, Virginie; Boutin, Sylvie; Martin, Samia; Moullier, Philippe; Masurier, Carole

    2012-06-15

    A major impediment to the use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated gene delivery to muscle in clinical applications is the pre-existing immune responses against the vector. Pre-existing humoral response to different AAV serotypes is now well documented. In contrast, cellular responses to AAV capsid have not been analyzed in a systematic manner, despite the risk of T cell reactivation upon gene transfer. AAV1 has been widely used in humans to target muscle. In this study, we analyzed PBMCs and sera of healthy donors for the presence of AAV1 capsid-specific T cell responses and AAV1 neutralizing factors. Approximately 30% of donors presented AAV1 capsid-specific T cells, mainly effector memory CD8(+) cells. IFN-γ-producing cells were also observed among effector memory CD4(+) cells for two of these donors. Moreover, to our knowledge, this study shows for the first time on a large cohort that there was no correlation between AAV1-specific T cell and humoral responses. Indeed, most donors presenting specific Ig and neutralizing factors were negative for cellular response (and vice versa). These new data raise the question of prescreening patients not only for the humoral response, but also for the cellular response. Clearly, a better understanding of the natural immunology of AAV serotypes will allow us to improve AAV gene therapy and make it an efficient treatment for genetic disease.

  11. Genetic imprint of vaccination on simian/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmitted viral genomes in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Varela

    Full Text Available Understanding the genetic, antigenic and structural changes that occur during HIV-1 infection in response to pre-existing immunity will facilitate current efforts to develop an HIV-1 vaccine. Much is known about HIV-1 variation at the population level but little with regard to specific changes occurring in the envelope glycoprotein within a host in response to immune pressure elicited by antibodies. The aim of this study was to track and map specific early genetic changes occurring in the viral envelope gene following vaccination using a highly controlled viral challenge setting in the SHIV macaque model. We generated 449 full-length env sequences from vaccinees, and 63 from the virus inoculum. Analysis revealed a different pattern in the distribution and frequency of mutations in the regions of the envelope gene targeted by the vaccine as well as different patterns of diversification between animals in the naïve control group and vaccinees. Given the high stringency of the model it is remarkable that we were able to identify genetic changes associated with the vaccination. This work provides insight into the characterization of breakthrough viral populations in less than fully efficacious vaccines and illustrates the value of HIV-1 Env SHIV challenge model in macaques to unravel the mechanisms driving HIV-1 envelope genetic diversity in the presence of vaccine induced-responses.

  12. Biophysical and Structural Studies on the Capsid Protein of the Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1: A New Drug Target?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Neira

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available AIDS affects 30 million people worldwide and is one of the deadliest epidemics in human history. It is caused by a retrovirus, HIV, whose mature capsid (enclosing the RNA with other proteins is formed by the assembly of several hundred copies of a protein, CA*. The C-terminal domain of such protein, CAC, is a driving force in virus assembly and the connections in the mature capsid lattice indicate that CAC joins through homodimerization of the CA hexamers. In the first part of this work, I shall review the biophysical studies carried out with the dimeric wild-type CAC protein and a mutant monomeric variant. The results open new venues for the development of drugs able to interact either with the dimeric species, hampering its assembly, or with the monomeric species, obstructing its folding. In the second part of this review, I shall describe the structures of complexes of CAC with small molecules able to weaken its dimerization. Furthermore, interactions with other proteins and lipids are also described. The whole set of results suggests that much of the surface of CAC does not accommodate binding per se, but rather binding sites in the protein are predefined, i.e., there are “hot” spots for binding in CAC (whatever be the molecule to bind. These “hot” residues involve most of the dimerization interface (an α-helix of the CAC wild-type protein, but also polypeptide patches at the other helices.

  13. Distinct transduction difference between adeno-associated virus type 1 and type 6 vectors in human polarized airway epithelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Z; Lei-Butters, D C M; Keiser, N W; Engelhardt, J F

    2013-03-01

    Of the many biologically isolated adeno-associated virus (AAV) serotypes, AAV1 and AAV6 share the highest degree of sequence homology, with only six different capsid residues. We compared the transduction efficiencies of rAAV1 and rAAV6 in primary polarized human airway epithelia and found significant differences in their abilities to transduce epithelia from the apical and basolateral membranes. rAAV1 transduction was ~10-fold higher than rAAV6 following apical infection, whereas rAAV6 transduction was ~10-fold higher than rAAV1 following basolateral infection. Furthermore, rAAV6 demonstrated significant polarity of transduction (100-fold; basolateral » apical), whereas rAAV1 transduced from both membranes with equal efficiency. To evaluate capsid residues responsible for the observed serotype differences, we mutated the six divergent amino acids either alone or in combination. Results from these studies demonstrated that capsid residues 418 and 531 most significantly controlled membrane polarity differences in transduction between serotypes, with the rAAV6-D418E/K531E mutant demonstrating decreased (~10-fold) basolateral transduction and the rAAV1-E418D/E531K mutant demonstrating a transduction polarity identical to rAAV6-WT (wild type). However, none of the rAAV6 mutants obtained apical transduction efficiencies of rAAV1-WT, suggesting that all six divergent capsid residues in AAV1 act in concert to improve apical transduction of HAE.

  14. Production of recombinant scFv against p24 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 by phage display technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadzadeh, Sara; Rajabibazl, Masoumeh; Fourozandeh, Mehdi; Rasaee, Mohammad Javad; Rahbarizadeh, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    Phage display has a fundamental role in protein isolation and engineering. Isolated proteins produced with this method can be modified for specific binding and affinity. P24 is the most produced protein during human immune deficiency virus (HIV) replication; especially in the early steps of HIV-1 infection, its evaluation may have diagnostic values. To test the HIV-1 infection, p24 antigen assay appears to be a very promising alternative to RNA assays. In this study, we have generated a recombinant mouse single chain antibody fragment against p24 of the HIV-1 with the use of phage display technology. After isolation of antibody variable-region (V) gene of B cells extracted from the spleen of an immunized mouse, a library of single chain Fv fragments (scFv) was constructed. The library was used in a series of bio-panning processes against recombinant p24 protein expressed from Escherichia coli. The isolated scFv antibody specifically recognizes the HIV-1 capsid protein p24. The affinity constant of the isolated scFv antibody (MF85) was found to be 2×10(-9) M. Our studies showed that the MF85 scFV antibody has similar properties as that of monoclonal antibodies produced by the hybridoma technology.

  15. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 reservoirs: mechanisms of latency and therapeutic strategies = Reservorios del virus de inmunodeficiencia humana tipo 1 (VIH-1: mecanismos de latencia y estrategias terapéuticas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcia Anaya, Eliuth David

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 can establish a latent infection in different kind of cells, which constitute the cellular reservoirs for the virus and allow its maintenance in the body indefinitely, even in patients with antiretroviral treatment. The main reservoirs of the HIV-1 are resting CD4+ T cells, although cells like monocytes/macrophages, dendritic cells, and other cells like hematopoietic stem cells and mast cells may be reservoirs of the virus. There are different mechanisms that contribute to the establishment and maintenance of latency in those cells, and include transcriptional interference, low availability of transcription factors, chromatin condensation, some microRNA that block viral translation, and so on. The knowledge of these mechanisms is crucial for the development of new drugs that may eliminate the virus from the body and lead to a cure.

  16. The role of triple infection with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV type-1 on CD4+ lymphocyte levels in the highly HIV infected population of North-Central Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JC Forbi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available We set out to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C among human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1 infected individuals in North-Central Nigeria to define the influence of these infections on CD4+ lymphocytes cells among our patients as access to antiretroviral therapy improves across the Nigerian nation. The CD4+ values of 180 confirmed HIV-1 infected individuals were enumerated using a superior fluorescence-activated cell sorter system. These patients were tested for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV using third generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Fifty (27.8% patients had active hepatitis B virus (HBV infection while 33 (18.3% tested positive for anti-HCV antibody. Of these infections, 110 (61.1%, 37 (20.6%, and 20 (11.1% had HIV only, HBV/HIV-only, and HCV/HIV-only respectively. A HBV/HCV/HIV coinfection prevalence of 7.2% (13 patients was recorded. Patients coinfected with HIV/HBV/HCV appeared to have lower CD4+ counts (mean = 107 cells/µl; AIDS defining when compared to HBV/HIV-only (mean = 377 cells/µl, HCV/HIV-only (mean = 373 cells/µl and patients with mono HIV infection (mean = 478 cells/µl. Coinfection with HBV or HCV is relatively common among HIV-infected patients in Nigeria and should be a big consideration in the initiation and choice of therapy.

  17. The role of triple infection with hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type-1 on CD4+ lymphocyte levels in the highly HIV infected population of North-Central Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbi, J C; Gabadi, S; Alabi, R; Iperepolu, H O; Pam, C R; Entonu, P E; Agwale, S M

    2007-06-01

    We set out to determine the seroprevalence of hepatitis B and C among human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) infected individuals in North-Central Nigeria to define the influence of these infections on CD4+ lymphocytes cells among our patients as access to antiretroviral therapy improves across the Nigerian nation. The CD4+ values of 180 confirmed HIV-1 infected individuals were enumerated using a superior fluorescence-activated cell sorter system. These patients were tested for the presence of hepatitis B surface antigen and anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) using third generation enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Fifty (27.8%) patients had active hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection while 33 (18.3%) tested positive for anti-HCV antibody. Of these infections, 110 (61.1%), 37 (20.6%), and 20 (11.1%) had HIV only, HBV/HIV-only, and HCV/HIV-only respectively. A HBV/HCV/HIV coinfection prevalence of 7.2% (13 patients) was recorded. Patients coinfected with HIV/HBV/HCV appeared to have lower CD4+ counts (mean = 107 cells/microl; AIDS defining) when compared to HBV/HIV-only (mean = 377 cells/microl), HCV/HIV-only (mean = 373 cells/microl) and patients with mono HIV infection (mean = 478 cells/microl). Coinfection with HBV or HCV is relatively common among HIV-infected patients in Nigeria and should be a big consideration in the initiation and choice of therapy.

  18. In vitro Cytotoxicity and Anti-herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Activity of Hydroethanolic Extract, Fractions, and Isolated Compounds from Stem Bark of Schinus terebinthifolius Raddi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocchi, Samara Requena; de Moura-Costa, Gislaine Franco; Novello, Claudio Roberto; Rodrigues, Juliana; Longhini, Renata; de Mello, João Carlos Palazzo; Filho, Benedito Prado Dias; Nakamura, Celso Vataru; Ueda-Nakamura, Tânia

    2016-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) is associated with orofacial infections and is transmitted by direct contact with infected secretions. Several efforts have been expended in the search for drugs to the treatment for herpes. Schinus terebinthifolius is used in several illnesses and among them, for the topical treatment of skin wounds, especially wounds of mucous membranes, whether infected or not. To evaluate the cytotoxicity and anti-HSV-1 activity of the crude hydroethanolic extract (CHE) from the stem bark of S. terebinthifolius, as well as its fractions and isolated compounds. The CHE was subjected to bioguided fractionation. The anti-HSV-1 activity and the cytotoxicity of the CHE, its fractions, and isolated compounds were evaluated in vitro by SRB method. A preliminar investigation of the action of CHE in the virus-host interaction was conducted by the same assay. CHE presented flavan-3-ols and showed anti-HSV-1 activity, better than its fractions and isolated compounds. The class of substances found in CHE can bind to proteins to form unstable complexes and enveloped viruses, as HSV-1 may be vulnerable to this action. Our results suggest that the CHE interfered with virion envelope structures, masking viral receptors that are necessary for adsorption or entry into host cells. The plant investigated exhibited potential for future development treatment against HSV-1, but further tests are necessary, especially to elucidate the mechanism of action of CHE, as well as preclinical and clinical studies to confirm its safety and efficacy. Crude hydroethanolic extract (CHE) presents promising activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV 1), with selectivity index (SI) = 22.50CHE has flavan-3-ols in its composition, such as catechin and gallocatechinThe fractions and isolated compounds obtained from CHE by bioguided fractionation are less active than the CHE against HSV-1CHE interferes with viral entry process in the host cell and acts directly on the viral

  19. Co-infections associated with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in pregnant women from southern Brazil: high rate of intraepithelial cervical lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tornatore

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-positive pregnant women require specific prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. The efficacy of established approaches is further challenged by co-infection with other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of co-infections in pregnant women infected with different HIV-1 subtypes and to relate these findings, together with additional demographic and clinical parameters, to maternal and infant outcomes. Blood samples from pregnant women were collected and tested for syphilis, hepatitis B virus (HBV and hepatitis C virus (HCV. Human papillomavirus (HPV diagnosis was evaluated by the presence of alterations in the cervical epithelium detected through a cytopathological exam. Medical charts provided patient data for the mothers and children. Statistical analyses were conducted with STATA 9.0. We found a prevalence of 10.8% for HCV, 2.3% for chronic HBV, 3.1% for syphilis and 40.8% for HPV. Of those co-infected with HPV, 52.9% presented high-grade intraepithelial lesions or in situ carcinoma. Prematurity, birth weight, Apgar 1' and 5' and Capurro scores were similar between co-infected and non-co-infected women. The presence of other STDs did not impact maternal and concept outcomes. More than half of the patients presenting cervical cytology abnormalities suggestive of HPV had high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or cervical cancer, evidencing an alarming rate of these lesions.

  20. Epidemiology of genital herpes simplex virus type 1 and 2 infections in southwestern Finland during a 10-year period (2003-2012).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortekangas-Savolainen, Outi; Orhanen, Elina; Puodinketo, Teemu; Vuorinen, Tytti

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the proportion of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 (HSV-1 and HSV-2) in genital infections during a 10-year period (2003-2012) among outpatients of a clinic of sexually transmitted disease in Southwestern Finland. We analyzed prospectively the proportion of HSV-1- or HSV-2-positive culture samples from our sexually transmitted disease clinic outpatients with genital herpes infection during the years 2003 to 2012 and compared the proportions of positive HSV-1 and HSV-2 findings with the age and sex of the patients. Herpes simplex virus type 2 was typed in 66.4% (557/839) and HSV-1 in 33.6% (282/839) of the patients during the entire study period. The mean age of male patients (26.3 years) with a laboratory-confirmed HSV-1 infection was significantly lower than that in male patients with an HSV-2 infection in 2003 to 2007 (26.3 vs. 32.9 years), with P Herpes simplex virus type 2 was still the most common causative agent of genital herpes in Southwestern Finland, but the proportion of HSV-1 was increasingly high. The age difference between male patients with HSV-1 and HSV-2 narrowed during the years studied.

  1. Breadth of neutralizing antibody response to human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is affected by factors early in infection but does not influence disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piantadosi, Anne; Panteleeff, Dana; Blish, Catherine A; Baeten, Jared M; Jaoko, Walter; McClelland, R Scott; Overbaugh, Julie

    2009-10-01

    The determinants of a broad neutralizing antibody (NAb) response and its effect on human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease progression are not well defined, partly because most prior studies of a broad NAb response were cross-sectional. We examined correlates of NAb response breadth among 70 HIV-infected, antiretroviral-naïve Kenyan women from a longitudinal seroincident cohort. NAb response breadth was measured 5 years after infection against five subtype A viruses and one subtype B virus. Greater NAb response breadth was associated with a higher viral load set point and greater HIV-1 env diversity early in infection. However, greater NAb response breadth was not associated with a delayed time to a CD4(+) T-cell count of <200, antiretroviral therapy, or death. Thus, a broad NAb response results from a high level of antigenic stimulation early in infection, which likely accounts for prior observations that greater NAb response breadth is associated with a higher viral load later in infection.

  2. Use of PCR-based assays for the detection of the adventitious agent porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV1) in vaccines, and for confirming the identity of cell substrates and viruses used in vaccine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Deepak; Beach, Nathan M; Meng, Xiang-Jin; Hegde, Nagendra R

    2012-01-01

    Safety and quality are important issues for vaccines. Whereas reversion to virulence poses a safety risk with live attenuated vaccines, the potential for the presence of adventitious agents is also an issue of vaccine quality. The recent detection or porcine circovirus type 1 (PCV1) in human vaccines has further highlighted the importance of quality control in vaccine production. The purpose of this study was to use a novel conventional PCR to detect PCV1, and subsequently screen materials used in the manufacture of vaccines at Bharat Biotech International Limited, India. The genome or gene fragments of PCV1 were not detected in any of the vaccines and materials tested, including the live attenuated rotavirus vaccine candidate ROTAVAC(®). Further, the identity of the cells and the viruses used as starting materials in the manufacture of these vaccines was confirmed by species-specific PCR or virus-specific RT-PCR, and no cross-contamination was detected in any case. The methods can be applied for regular in-house quality control screening of raw materials and seeds/banks, as well as formulated vaccines. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. [Human immunodeficiency virus and AIDS in terms of reverse transcriptase and molecular evolution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, H

    1998-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) evolves rapidly in the host. The computer analysis of the HIV-1 genome has shown that the mutation manner is dependent on oligonucleotide sequences (in particular, six bases long); thus HIV-1 adaptively evolves. The six-base-long interaction between template-primer oligonucleotide and the reverse transcriptase (RT) has been revealed by the crystal structure of RT, in vitro termination assay of plymerization, and hydroxyl radical footprint analysis. It has been thought that AIDS is caused by the large numbers of HIV-1 quasispecies yielded by the adaptive and rapid evolution in the host. However, the slow evolution and the high levels of viral RNA in the progressive HIV-1 infected individuals (progressives) were recently reported; in contrast, the adaptive and rapid evolution and the low viral-RNA levels were reported in the non-progressives. This suggests that the physiological environment, e.g. pH and dNTP balance, in which RT works in the progressives is different from that in the non-progressives.

  4. Functional stability of unliganded envelope glycoprotein spikes among isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1.

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    Nitish Agrawal

    Full Text Available The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env spike is challenging to study at the molecular level, due in part to its genetic variability, structural heterogeneity and lability. However, the extent of lability in Env function, particularly for primary isolates across clades, has not been explored. Here, we probe stability of function for variant Envs of a range of isolates from chronic and acute infection, and from clades A, B and C, all on a constant virus backbone. Stability is elucidated in terms of the sensitivity of isolate infectivity to destabilizing conditions. A heat-gradient assay was used to determine T(90 values, the temperature at which HIV-1 infectivity is decreased by 90% in 1 h, which ranged between ∼40 to 49°C (n = 34. For select Envs (n = 10, the half-lives of infectivity decay at 37°C were also determined and these correlated significantly with the T(90 (p = 0.029, though two 'outliers' were identified. Specificity in functional Env stability was also evident. For example, Env variant HIV-1(ADA was found to be labile to heat, 37°C decay, and guanidinium hydrochloride but not to urea or extremes of pH, when compared to its thermostable counterpart, HIV-1(JR-CSF. Blue native PAGE analyses revealed that Env-dependent viral inactivation preceded complete dissociation of Env trimers. The viral membrane and membrane-proximal external region (MPER of gp41 were also shown to be important for maintaining trimer stability at physiological temperature. Overall, our results indicate that primary HIV-1 Envs can have diverse sensitivities to functional inactivation in vitro, including at physiological temperature, and suggest that parameters of functional Env stability may be helpful in the study and optimization of native Env mimetics and vaccines.

  5. Novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors screened by the cytoprotective function of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat.

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    Yuri Kim

    Full Text Available The PI3K/Akt pathway regulates various stress-related cellular responses such as cell survival, cell proliferation, metabolism and protein synthesis. Many cancer cell types display the activation of this pathway, and compounds inhibiting this cell survival pathway have been extensively evaluated as anti-cancer agents. In addition to cancers, several human viruses, such as HTLV, HPV, HCV and HIV-1, also modulate this pathway, presumably in order to extend the life span of the infected target cells for productive viral replication. The expression of HIV-1 Tat protein exhibited the cytoprotective effect in macrophages and a human microglial cell line by inhibiting the negative regulator of this pathway, PTEN. This cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 appears to contribute to the long-term survival and persistent HIV-1 production in human macrophage reservoirs. In this study we exploited the PI3K/Akt dependent cytoprotective effect of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. We screened a collection of compounds known to modulate inflammation, and identified three novel compounds: Lancemaside A, Compound K and Arctigenin that abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. All three compounds antagonized the kinase activity of Akt. Further detailed signaling studies revealed that each of these three compounds targeted different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Arctigenin regulates the upstream PI3K enzyme from converting PIP2 to PIP3. Lancemaside A1 inhibited the movement of Akt to the plasma membrane, a critical step for Akt activation. Compound K inhibited Akt phosphorylation. This study supports that Tat-expressing CHME5 cells are an effective model system for screening novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors.

  6. Novel PI3K/Akt Inhibitors Screened by the Cytoprotective Function of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong-Hyun; Kim, Baek

    2011-01-01

    The PI3K/Akt pathway regulates various stress-related cellular responses such as cell survival, cell proliferation, metabolism and protein synthesis. Many cancer cell types display the activation of this pathway, and compounds inhibiting this cell survival pathway have been extensively evaluated as anti-cancer agents. In addition to cancers, several human viruses, such as HTLV, HPV, HCV and HIV-1, also modulate this pathway, presumably in order to extend the life span of the infected target cells for productive viral replication. The expression of HIV-1 Tat protein exhibited the cytoprotective effect in macrophages and a human microglial cell line by inhibiting the negative regulator of this pathway, PTEN. This cytoprotective effect of HIV-1 appears to contribute to the long-term survival and persistent HIV-1 production in human macrophage reservoirs. In this study we exploited the PI3K/Akt dependent cytoprotective effect of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. We screened a collection of compounds known to modulate inflammation, and identified three novel compounds: Lancemaside A, Compound K and Arctigenin that abolished the cytoprotective phenotype of Tat-expressing CHME5 cells. All three compounds antagonized the kinase activity of Akt. Further detailed signaling studies revealed that each of these three compounds targeted different steps of the PI3K/Akt pathway. Arctigenin regulates the upstream PI3K enzyme from converting PIP2 to PIP3. Lancemaside A1 inhibited the movement of Akt to the plasma membrane, a critical step for Akt activation. Compound K inhibited Akt phosphorylation. This study supports that Tat-expressing CHME5 cells are an effective model system for screening novel PI3K/Akt inhibitors. PMID:21765914

  7. A single amino acid substitution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein affects viral sensitivity to TRIM5α

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    Shioda Tatsuo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 productively infects only humans and chimpanzees but not Old World monkeys, such as rhesus and cynomolgus (CM monkeys. To establish a monkey model of HIV-1/AIDS, several HIV-1 derivatives have been constructed. We previously reported that efficient replication of HIV-1 in CM cells was achieved after we replaced the loop between α-helices 6 and 7 (L6/7 of the capsid protein (CA with that of SIVmac239 in addition to the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5 and vif. This virus (NL-4/5S6/7SvifS was supposed to escape from host restriction factors cyclophilin A, CM TRIM5α, and APOBEC3G. However, the replicative capability of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS in human cells was severely impaired. Results By long-term cultivation of human CEMss cells infected with NL-4/5S6/7SvifS, we succeeded in rescuing the impaired replicative capability of the virus in human cells. Sequence analysis of the CA region of the adapted virus revealed a G-to-E substitution at the 116th position of the CA (G116E. Introduction of this substitution into the molecular DNA clone of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS indeed improved the virus' replicative capability in human cells. Although the G116E substitution occurred during long-term cultivation of human cells infected with NL-4/5S6/7SvifS, the viruses with G116E unexpectedly became resistant to CM, but not human TRIM5α-mediated restriction. The 3-D model showed that position 116 is located in the 6th helix near L4/5 and L6/7 and is apparently exposed to the protein surface. The amino acid substitution at the 116th position caused a change in the structure of the protein surface because of the replacement of G (which has no side chain with E (which has a long negatively charged side chain. Conclusions We succeeded in rescuing the impaired replicative capability of NL-4/5S6/7SvifS and report a mutation that improved the replicative capability of the virus. Unexpectedly, HIV-1 with this

  8. Direct comparisons of inhibitor sensitivities of reverse transcriptases from feline and human immunodeficiency viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, T W; Cronn, R C; Remington, K M; Tandberg, R T

    1990-08-01

    The sensitivities of reverse transcriptases (RTs) from feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV) were directly compared. The two enzymes had similar sensitivities to three analogs of dTTP, namely, 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, 2',3'-dideoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate, and 2',3'-dideoxy-2',3'-didehydrothymidine 5'-triphosphate. Each of these analogs demonstrated competitive inhibition of both enzymes. Ki values for inhibition of FIV RT by these three inhibitors were 3.3, 6.7, and 1.8 nM, respectively; Ki values for inhibition of the HIV enzyme were 6.5, 5.9, and 8.3 nM, respectively. Ratios of the Ki for the inhibitor to the Km for the substrate were also determined for each inhibitor, and no differences between the two enzymes greater than threefold were observed. Inhibition constants for 3'-amino-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate and 3'-fluoro-3'-deoxythymidine 5'-triphosphate were determined for FIV RT, and these were similar to published values for HIV RT. The activities of three dideoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates against FIV RT were determined; ddGTP was slightly more potent than ddTTP, whereas both were much more effective than ddCTP. The activity of a noncompetitive inhibitor, phosphonoformate, was also examined with the FIV enzyme; it was much more active with poly(rA)-oligo(dT) as the template-primer than with poly(rC)-oligo(dG) or poly(rI)-oligo(dC).

  9. Molecular evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 upon transmission between human leukocyte antigen disparate donor-recipient pairs.

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    Marjon Navis

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: To address evolution of HIV-1 after transmission, we studied sequence dynamics in and outside predicted epitopes of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL in subtype B HIV-1 variants that were isolated from 5 therapy-naive horizontal HLA-disparate donor-recipient pairs from the Amsterdam Cohort Studies on HIV-1 infection and AIDS. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the first weeks after transmission, the majority of donor-derived mutations in and outside donor-HLA-restricted epitopes in Gag, Env, and Nef, were preserved in the recipient. Reversion to the HIV-1 subtype B consensus sequence of mutations in- and outside donor-HLA-restricted CTL epitopes, and new mutations away from the consensus B sequence mostly within recipient-HLA-restricted epitopes, contributed equally to the early sequence changes. In the subsequent period (1-2 years after transmission, still only a low number of both reverting and forward mutations had occurred. During subsequent long-term follow-up, sequence dynamics were dominated by forward mutations, mostly (50-85% in recipient-HLA-restricted CTL epitopes. At the end of long-term follow-up, on average 43% of the transmitted CTL escape mutations in donor-HLA-restricted epitopes had reverted to the subtype B consensus sequence. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The relatively high proportion of long-term preserved mutations after transmission points to a lack of back selection even in the absence of CTL pressure, which may lead to an accumulating loss of critical CTL epitopes. Our data are supportive for a continuous adaptation of HIV-1 to host immune pressures which may have implications for vaccine design.

  10. Deciphering the complex distribution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 subtypes among different cohorts in Northern Tanzania.

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    Harr F Njai

    Full Text Available Increased understanding of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 is challenging but important in the development of an effective vaccine. We aimed to describe the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes in northern Tanzania among women enrolled in studies preparing for HIV-1 prevention trials (hospitality facility-worker cohorts, and among men and women in an open cohort demographic surveillance system (Kisesa cohort.The polymerase encompassing partial reverse transcriptase was sequenced and phylogenetic analysis performed and subtype determined. Questionnaires documented demographic data. We examined factors associated with subtype using multinomial logistic regression, adjusted for study, age, and sex.Among 140 individuals (125 women and 15 men, subtype A1 predominated (54, 39%, followed by C (46, 33%, D (25, 18% and unique recombinant forms (URFs (15, 11%. There was weak evidence to suggest different subtype frequencies by study (for example, 18% URFs in the Kisesa cohort versus 5-9% in the hospitality facility-worker cohorts; adjusted relative-risk ratio (aRR = 2.35 [95% CI 0.59,9.32]; global p = 0.09. Compared to men, women were less likely to have subtype D versus A (aRR = 0.12 [95% CI 0.02,0.76]; global p = 0.05. There was a trend to suggest lower relative risk of subtype D compared to A with older age (aRR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23,0.85] per 10 years; global p = 0.05.We observed multiple subtypes, confirming the complex genetic diversity of HIV-1 strains circulating in northern Tanzania, and found some differences between cohorts and by age and sex. This has important implications for vaccine design and development, providing opportunity to determine vaccine efficacy in diverse HIV-1 strains.

  11. Deciphering the Complex Distribution of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Subtypes among Different Cohorts in Northern Tanzania

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njai, Harr F.; Ewings, Fiona M.; Lyimo, Eric; Foulongne, Vincent; Ngerageza, Dhamira; Mongi, Aika; Ssemwanga, Deogratius; Andreasen, Aura; Nyombi, Balthazar; Ao, Tony; Michael, Denna; Urassa, Mark; Todd, Jim; Zaba, Basia; Changalucha, John; Hayes, Richard; Kapiga, Saidi H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Increased understanding of the genetic diversity of HIV-1 is challenging but important in the development of an effective vaccine. We aimed to describe the distribution of HIV-1 subtypes in northern Tanzania among women enrolled in studies preparing for HIV-1 prevention trials (hospitality facility-worker cohorts), and among men and women in an open cohort demographic surveillance system (Kisesa cohort). Methods The polymerase encompassing partial reverse transcriptase was sequenced and phylogenetic analysis performed and subtype determined. Questionnaires documented demographic data. We examined factors associated with subtype using multinomial logistic regression, adjusted for study, age, and sex. Results Among 140 individuals (125 women and 15 men), subtype A1 predominated (54, 39%), followed by C (46, 33%), D (25, 18%) and unique recombinant forms (URFs) (15, 11%). There was weak evidence to suggest different subtype frequencies by study (for example, 18% URFs in the Kisesa cohort versus 5–9% in the hospitality facility-worker cohorts; adjusted relative-risk ratio (aRR) = 2.35 [95% CI 0.59,9.32]; global p = 0.09). Compared to men, women were less likely to have subtype D versus A (aRR = 0.12 [95% CI 0.02,0.76]; global p = 0.05). There was a trend to suggest lower relative risk of subtype D compared to A with older age (aRR = 0.44 [95% CI 0.23,0.85] per 10 years; global p = 0.05). Conclusions We observed multiple subtypes, confirming the complex genetic diversity of HIV-1 strains circulating in northern Tanzania, and found some differences between cohorts and by age and sex. This has important implications for vaccine design and development, providing opportunity to determine vaccine efficacy in diverse HIV-1 strains. PMID:24349139

  12. High levels of chronic immune activation in the T-cell compartments of patients coinfected with hepatitis C virus and human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and on highly active antiretroviral therapy are reverted by alpha interferon and ribavirin treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez, Veronica D; Falconer, Karolin; Blom, Kim G

    2009-01-01

    Chronic immune activation is a driver of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) disease progression. Here, we describe that subjects with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV)/HIV-1 coinfection display sharply elevated immune activation as determined by CD38 expression in T cells. This occurs......, despite effective antiretroviral therapy, in both CD8 and CD4 T cells and is more pronounced than in the appropriate monoinfected control groups. Interestingly, the suppression of HCV by pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin treatment reduces activation. High HCV loads and elevated levels of chronic...

  13. Colony-Stimulating Factor 1 Receptor Antagonists Sensitize Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1-Infected Macrophages to TRAIL-Mediated Killing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunyat, Francesc; Rainho, Jennifer N; West, Brian; Swainson, Louise; McCune, Joseph M; Stevenson, Mario

    2016-07-15

    Strategies aimed at eliminating persistent viral reservoirs from HIV-1-infected individuals have focused on CD4(+) T-cell reservoirs. However, very little attention has been given to approaches that could promote elimination of tissue macrophage reservoirs. HIV-1 infection of macrophages induces phosphorylation of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF-1R), which confers resistance to apoptotic pathways driven by tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), thereby promoting viral persistence. In this study, we assessed whether CSF-1R antagonists (PLX647, PLX3397, and PLX5622) restored apoptotic sensitivity of HIV-1-infected macrophages in vitro PLX647, PLX3397, and PLX5622 at clinically relevant concentrations blocked the activation of CSF-1R and reduced the viability of infected macrophages, as well as the extent of viral replication. Our data show that strategies targeting monocyte colony-stimulating factor (MCSF) signaling could be used to promote elimination of HIV-1-infected myeloid cells and to contribute to the elimination of persistent viral reservoirs. As the HIV/AIDS research field explores approaches to eliminate HIV-1 in individuals on suppressive antiviral therapy, those approaches will need to eliminate both CD4(+) T-cell and myeloid cell reservoirs. Most of the attention has focused on CD4(+) T-cell reservoirs, and scant attention has been paid to myeloid cell reservoirs. The distinct nature of the infection in myeloid cells versus CD4(+) T cells will likely dictate different approaches in order to achieve their elimination. For CD4(+) T cells, most strategies focus on promoting virus reactivation to promote immune-mediated clearance and/or elimination by viral cytopathicity. Macrophages resist viral cytopathic effects and CD8(+) T-cell killing. Therefore, we have explored clearance strategies that render macrophages sensitive to viral cytopathicity. This research helps inform the design of strategies to promote

  14. A subset of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long-term non-progressors is characterized by the unique presence of ancestral sequences in the viral population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Gonzalo; Casado, Concepción; Sandonis, Virginia; Alonso-Nieto, Manuela; Vicario, José Luis; García, Soledad; Hernando, Victoria; Rodríguez, Carmen; del Romero, Jorge; López-Galíndez, Cecilio

    2005-02-01

    Within human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected patients, there are those who have been infected for more than 10 years with a CD4+ cell count of >500 cells microl(-1) and who remain asymptomatic without antiretroviral therapy; these patients are designated long-term non-progressors (LTNPs). In a set of 16 LTNPs, viral dating, DNA viral load, quasispecies heterogeneity and antibody (Ab) titres against gp160 and beta2 microglobulin (beta2m) were determined. Plasma viral RNA and CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell numbers were estimated in more than three samples per patient. Host genetic characteristics, such as Delta32-CCR5 genotype and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype and supertypes, and clinical-epidemiological factors were evaluated. Dating of global populations and of DNA and RNA viral quasispecies identified two subsets of patients: one displaying only ancestral sequences and the other displaying predominantly modern sequences. The ancestral patients displayed a significant reduction in RNA and DNA viral loads, quasispecies heterogeneity, CD8+ cell number, anti-gp160 Ab titres and beta2m level, and they were also associated with better use of safe-sex practices and higher presence of the HLA sB58 supertype than the modern subset. Viral dating has therefore permitted the segregation of LTNPs into two subsets that show very different virological, immunological, host and clinical-epidemiological characteristics. Moreover, whereas the modern subset displayed low levels of virus replication, the ancestral group displayed not only a very limited virus replication, often to undetectable levels, but also very slow or arrested viral evolution, maintaining the close relationship of the viral population to the transmitted virus.

  15. Compartmentalized Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Originates from Long-Lived Cells in Some Subjects with HIV-1–Associated Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnell, Gretja; Spudich, Serena; Harrington, Patrick; Price, Richard W.; Swanstrom, Ronald

    2009-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) invades the central nervous system (CNS) shortly after systemic infection and can result in the subsequent development of HIV-1–associated dementia (HAD) in a subset of infected individuals. Genetically compartmentalized virus in the CNS is associated with HAD, suggesting autonomous viral replication as a factor in the disease process. We examined the source of compartmentalized HIV-1 in the CNS of subjects with HIV-1–associated neurological disease and in asymptomatic subjects who were initiating antiretroviral therapy. The heteroduplex tracking assay (HTA), targeting the variable regions of env, was used to determine which HIV-1 genetic variants in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were compartmentalized and which variants were shared with the blood plasma. We then measured the viral decay kinetics of individual variants after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy. Compartmentalized HIV-1 variants in the CSF of asymptomatic subjects decayed rapidly after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy, with a mean half-life of 1.57 days. Rapid viral decay was also measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in four HAD subjects (t1/2 mean = 2.27 days). However, slow viral decay was measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants from an additional four subjects with neurological disease (t1/2 range = 9.85 days to no initial decay). The slow decay detected for CSF-compartmentalized variants was not associated with poor CNS drug penetration, drug resistant virus in the CSF, or the presence of X4 virus genotypes. We found that the slow decay measured for CSF-compartmentalized variants in subjects with neurological disease was correlated with low peripheral CD4 cell count and reduced CSF pleocytosis. We propose a model in which infiltrating macrophages replace CD4+ T cells as the primary source of productive viral replication in the CNS to maintain high viral loads in the CSF in a substantial subset of subjects with HAD

  16. Mutations within Four Distinct Gag Proteins Are Required To Restore Replication of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 after Deletion Mutagenesis within the Dimerization Initiation Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Chen; Rong, Liwei; Quan, Yudong; Laughrea, Michael; Kleiman, Lawrence; Wainberg, Mark A.

    1999-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) genomic RNA segments at nucleotide (nt) positions +240 to +274 are thought to form a stem-loop secondary structure, termed SL1, that serves as a dimerization initiation site for viral genomic RNA. We have generated two distinct deletion mutations within this region, termed BH10-LD3 and BH10-LD4, involving nt positions +238 to +253 and +261 to +274, respectively, and have shown that each of these resulted in significant diminutions in levels of viral infectiousness. However, long-term culture of each of these viruses in MT-2 cells resulted in a restoration of infectiousness, due to a series of compensatory point mutations within four distinct proteins that are normally cleaved from the Gag precursor. In the case of BH10-LD3, these four mutations were MA1, CA1, MP2, and MNC, and they involved changes of amino acid Val-35 to Ile within the matrix protein (MA), Ile-91 to Thr within the capsid (CA), Thr-12 to Ile within p2, and Thr-24 to Ile within the nucleocapsid (NC). The order in which these mutations were acquired by the mutated BH10-LD3 was MNC > CA1 > MP2 > MA1. The results of site-directed mutagenesis studies confirmed that each of these four substitutions contributed to the increased viability of the mutated BH10-LD3 viruses and that the MNC substitution, which was acquired first, played the most important role in this regard. Three point mutations, MP2, MNC, and MA2, were also shown to be sequentially acquired by viruses that had emerged in culture from the BH10-LD4 deletion. The first two of these were identical to those described above, while the last involved a change of Val-35 to Leu. All three of these substitutions were necessary to restore the infectiousness of mutated BH10-LD4 viruses to wild-type levels, although the MP2 mutation alone, but neither of the other two substitutions, was able to confer some viability on BH10-LD4 viruses. Studies of viral RNA packaging showed that the BH10-LD4 deletion only

  17. A systematic analysis of host factors reveals a Med23-interferon-λ regulatory axis against herpes simplex virus type 1 replication.

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    Samantha J Griffiths

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 is a neurotropic virus causing vesicular oral or genital skin lesions, meningitis and other diseases particularly harmful in immunocompromised individuals. To comprehensively investigate the complex interaction between HSV-1 and its host we combined two genome-scale screens for host factors (HFs involved in virus replication. A yeast two-hybrid screen for protein interactions and a RNA interference (RNAi screen with a druggable genome small interfering RNA (siRNA library confirmed existing and identified novel HFs which functionally influence HSV-1 infection. Bioinformatic analyses found the 358 HFs were enriched for several pathways and multi-protein complexes. Of particular interest was the identification of Med23 as a strongly anti-viral component of the largely pro-viral Mediator complex, which links specific transcription factors to RNA polymerase II. The anti-viral effect of Med23 on HSV-1 replication was confirmed in gain-of-function gene overexpression experiments, and this inhibitory effect was specific to HSV-1, as a range of other viruses including Vaccinia virus and Semliki Forest virus were unaffected by Med23 depletion. We found Med23 significantly upregulated expression of the type III interferon family (IFN-λ at the mRNA and protein level by directly interacting with the transcription factor IRF7. The synergistic effect of Med23 and IRF7 on IFN-λ induction suggests this is the major transcription factor for IFN-λ expression. Genotypic analysis of patients suffering recurrent orofacial HSV-1 outbreaks, previously shown to be deficient in IFN-λ secretion, found a significant correlation with a single nucleotide polymorphism in the IFN-λ3 (IL28b promoter strongly linked to Hepatitis C disease and treatment outcome. This paper describes a link between Med23 and IFN-λ, provides evidence for the crucial role of IFN-λ in HSV-1 immune control, and highlights the power of integrative genome

  18. Comparison of the effect of Carbovir, AZT, and dideoxynucleoside triphosphates on the activity of human immunodeficiency virus reverse transcriptase and selected human polymerases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, E L; Parker, W B; Macy, L J; Shaddix, S C; McCaleb, G; Secrist, J A; Vince, R; Shannon, W M

    1989-06-15

    Carbocylic 2',3'-didehydro-2',3'-dideoxyguanosine (Carbovir; NSC 614846) is an antiretroviral agent which may be useful in the treatment of AIDS. We have synthesized the 5'-triphosphate of Carbovir and examined its ability to inhibit human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) reverse transcriptase (EC 2.7.7.49) and other retroviral reverse transcriptases, as well as human DNA polymerases alpha, beta, gamma (EC 2.7.7.7) and DNA primase (EC 2.7.7.6). Carbovir triphosphate emerges as a highly selective inhibitor of reverse transcriptases with little, if any, effect on the cellular enzymes. 3'-Azido-2',3'-dideoxythymidine (AZT) triphosphate and the two dideoxynucleoside triphosphates, ddTTP and ddGTP, inhibited HIV-1 reverse transcriptase to the same degree as Carbovir triphosphate, but were less selective in that they also inhibited DNA polymerases beta and gamma. We conclude that Carbovir is a highly selective antiretroviral agent.

  19. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of a New Acyclic Pyrimidine Derivative as a Probe for Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Thymidine Kinase Gene Expression

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    Simon M. Ametamey

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available With the idea of finding a more selective radiotracer for imaging herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk gene expression by means of positron emission tomography (PET, a novel [18F]fluorine radiolabeled pyrimidine with 4-hydroxy-3-(hydroxymethylbutyl side chain at N-1 (HHB-5-[18F]FEP was prepared and evaluated as a potential PET probe. Unlabeled reference compound, HHB-5-FEP, was synthesized via a five-step reaction sequence starting from 5-(2-acetoxyethyl-4-methoxypyrimidin-2-one. The radiosynthesis of HHB-[18F]-FEP was accomplished by nucleophilic radiofluorination of a tosylate precursor using [18F]fluoride-cryptate complex in 45% ± 4 (n = 4 radiochemical yields and high purity (>99%. The biological evaluation indicated the feasibility of using HHB-5-[18F]FEP as a PET radiotracer for monitoring HSV1-tk expression in vivo.

  20. Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis: Viral load and muscle tone are correlated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zunt, JR; Montano, SM; Beck, I; Alarcón, JOV; Frenkel, LM; Bautista, CT; Price, R; Longstreth, WT

    2009-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infections are associated with varying degrees of HTLV-1 viral load and spasticity. Increased viral load is associated with higher risk of developing HTLV-1–associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP). The authors performed a cross-sectional study of 24 people with HAM/TSP in Lima, Perú, to determine if higher HTLV-1 viral load was correlated with increased muscle tone, measured with a device providing quantitative spasticity assessment (QSA). Median HTLV-1 viral load was 17.0 copies/100 peripheral blood mononuclear cells and QSA value was 39.9 Newton-meters/radian. HTLV-1 viral load was significantly correlated with QSA value (Spearman rho = .48, P = .02), suggesting viral load may play a role in expression of symptomatic neurologic disease. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine if treatments that reduce viral load will reduce muscle tone. PMID:17162662

  1. Coinfection by Strongyloides stercoralis in blood donors infected with human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 in São Paulo city, Brazil

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    Pedro P Chieffi

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of coinfection with Strongyloides stercoralis and human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type 1 (HTML-1 was determined in 91 blood donors examined at the blood bank of a large hospital in São Paulo city, Brazil. As control group 61 individuals, not infected by HTLV-1, were submitted to the same techniques for the diagnosis of S. stercoralis infection. In HTLV-1 infected patients the frequency of S. stercoralis infection was 12.1%; on the other hand, the control group showed a frequency significantly lower of S. stercoralis infection (1.6%, suggesting that HTLV-1 patients shoud be considered as a high risk group for strongyloidiasis in São Paulo city.

  2. Epigenetic control and reintegration of extrachromosomal proviral DNA in HL60 cells chronically infected with human T cell leukaemia virus type 1.

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    Hiramatsu, K; Yonemoto, R; Yoshikura, H

    1988-03-01

    Extrachromosomal human T cell leukaemia virus type 1 (HTLV-I) proviruses are persistently maintained in HTLV-I-infected human promyelocytic leukaemia (HL60) cells even 24 months after viral infection. By successive recloning of these HTLV-I-infected clones, and by Southern blot analysis of their HTLV-I proviruses, we concluded the following. The copy number of extrachromosomal proviruses fluctuated, and this fluctuation was probably dependent on the epigenetic conditions in the host cell, HL60. The transient appearance of a high copy number of extrachromosomal proviruses was followed by an increase in the copy number of integrated proviruses. Persistence of extrachromosomal proviruses appeared to be caused by an intracellular rather than an intercellular mechanism.

  3. Parainfluenza virus infection associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome: a case report

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    Ogunneye Owolabi

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a clinical and radiological entity. The most accepted theory of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is a loss of autoregulation in cerebral blood flow with a subsequent increase in vascular permeability and leakage of blood plasma and erythrocytes, producing vasogenic edema. In infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome, a clinical pattern consistent with systemic inflammatory response syndrome develops. Parainfluenza virus has not been reported in the medical literature to be associated with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome. Case presentation We report herein the case of a 54-year-old Caucasian woman with posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome associated with parainfluenza virus infection who presented with generalized headache, blurring of vision, new-onset seizure and flu-like symptoms. Conclusion Infection-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome as well as hypertension-associated posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome favor the contribution of endothelial dysfunction to the pathophysiology of this clinicoradiological syndrome. In view of the reversible nature of this clinical entity, it is important that all physicians are well aware of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in patients presenting with headache and seizure activity. A detailed clinical assessment leading to the recognition of precipitant factors in posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is paramount.

  4. Detection and identification of dengue virus isolates from Brazil by a simplified reverse transcription - polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR method

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    FIGUEIREDO Luiz Tadeu Moraes

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available We show here a simplified RT-PCR for identification of dengue virus types 1 and 2. Five dengue virus strains, isolated from Brazilian patients, and yellow fever vaccine 17DD as a negative control, were used in this study. C6/36 cells were infected and supernatants were collected after 7 days. The RT-PCR, done in a single reaction vessel, was carried out following a 1/10 dilution of virus in distilled water or in a detergent mixture containing Nonidet P40. The 50 µl assay reaction mixture included 50 pmol of specific primers amplifying a 482 base pair sequence for dengue type 1 and 210 base pair sequence for dengue type 2. In other assays, we used dengue virus consensus primers having maximum sequence similarity to the four serotypes, amplifying a 511 base pair sequence. The reaction mixture also contained 0.1 mM of the four deoxynucleoside triphosphates, 7.5 U of reverse transcriptase, 1U of thermostable Taq DNA polymerase. The mixture was incubated for 5 minutes at 37ºC for reverse transcription followed by 30 cycles of two-step PCR amplification (92ºC for 60 seconds, 53ºC for 60 seconds with slow temperature increment. The PCR products were subjected to 1.7% agarose gel electrophoresis and visualized by UV light after staining with ethidium bromide solution. Low virus titer around 10 3, 6 TCID50/ml was detected by RT-PCR for dengue type 1. Specific DNA amplification was observed with all the Brazilian dengue strains by using dengue virus consensus primers. As compared to other RT-PCRs, this assay is less laborious, done in a shorter time, and has reduced risk of contamination

  5. Pathology and Virus Distribution in the Lung and Lymphoid Tissues of Pigs Experimentally Inoculated with Three Distinct Type 1 PRRS Virus Isolates of Varying Pathogenicity.

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    Morgan, S B; Frossard, J P; Pallares, F J; Gough, J; Stadejek, T; Graham, S P; Steinbach, F; Drew, T W; Salguero, F J

    2016-06-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) continues to be the most economically important disease of swine worldwide. The appearance of highly pathogenic PRRS virus (PRRSV) strains in Europe and Asia has raised concerns about this disease and initiated increased efforts to understand the pathogenesis. In this study, we have compared the pathology and the virus distribution in tissues of pigs experimentally inoculated with three different genotype 1 PRRSV isolates. Sixty 5-week-old pigs were inoculated intranasally with a) the Lelystad virus (LV), b) a field strain from the UK causing respiratory clinical signs (UK) or c) a highly pathogenic strain from Belarus (BE). Sixteen animals were mock-infected and used as controls. The animals were euthanized at 3, 7 and 35 days post-infection (dpi), and lung and lymphoid tissues collected for histopathological examination and PRRSV detection by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Histopathological lesions consisted of interstitial pneumonia with mononuclear cell infiltrates in the lungs, lymphoid depletion, apoptosis and follicular hyperplasia in the spleen, lymph nodes and tonsil and lymphoid depletion in the thymus. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus was detected mainly in monocytes-macrophages. BE-infected animals showed the highest pathological scores and the highest presence of virus at 3 and 7 dpi, followed by the UK field strain and then LV. Moderate lesions were observed at 35 dpi with lesser detection of PRRSV by IHC in each infected group. The highly pathogenic BE strain induced more severe pathology in both lungs and lymphoid organs of pigs compared with the classic field isolate and the prototype LV. The increased severity of pathology was in correlation with the presence of a higher number of PRRSV-infected cells in the tissues. © 2014 Crown copyright. This article is published with the permission of the Controller of HMSO/Queen‘s Printer for Scotland and Animal and Plant Health Agency.

  6. Weaning management of newly received beef calves with or without exposure to a persistently infected bovine viral diarrhea virus type 1b calf: Effects on health, performance, BVDV type 1a titers, and circulating leukocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) is a major culprit in the development of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) either directly via acute clinical illness or indirect effects of immunosuppression. Calves born persistently infected (PI) with BVDV are the primary transmission source of the virus; however...

  7. Charge reversal of the rodlike colloidal fd virus through surface chemical modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenkun; Buitenhuis, Johan; Cukkemane, Abhishek; Brocker, Melanie; Bott, Michael; Dhont, Jan K G

    2010-07-06

    There is increasing interest in the use of viruses as model systems for fundamental research and as templates for nanomaterials. In this work, the rodlike fd virus was subjected to chemical modifications targeting different solvent-exposed functional groups in order to tune its surface properties, especially reversing the surface charge from negative to positive. The carboxyl groups of fd were coupled with different kinds of organic amines by carbodiimide chemistry, resulting in modified viruses that are positively charged over a wide range of pH. Care was taken to minimize intervirus cross linking, which often occurs because of such modifications. The surface amino groups were also grafted with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) end-functionalized with an active succinimidyl ester in order to introduce a steric stabilization effect. By combining charge reversal with PEG grafting, a reversible attraction between positively and negatively charged PEG-grafted fd viruses could be realized, which was tuned by the ionic strength of the solution. In addition, a charge-reversed fd virus forms only a pure nematic phase in contrast to the cholesteric phase of the wild type. These modified viruses might be used as model systems in soft condensed matter physics, for example, in the study of polyelectrolyte complexes or lyotropic liquid-crystalline phase behavior.

  8. Activation of Cellular Immunity in Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1-Infected Mice by the Oral Administration of Aqueous Extract of Moringa oleifera Lam. Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurokawa, Masahiko; Wadhwani, Ashish; Kai, Hisahiro; Hidaka, Muneaki; Yoshida, Hiroki; Sugita, Chihiro; Watanabe, Wataru; Matsuno, Koji; Hagiwara, Akinori

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera Lam. is used as a nutritive vegetable and spice. Its ethanol extract has been previously shown to be significantly effective in alleviating herpetic skin lesions in mice. In this study, we evaluated the alleviation by the aqueous extract (AqMOL) and assessed the mode of its anti-herpetic action in a murine cutaneous herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection model. AqMOL (300 mg/kg) was administered orally to HSV-1-infected mice three times daily on days 0 to 5 after infection. AqMOL significantly limited the development of herpetic skin lesions and reduced virus titers in the brain on day 4 without toxicity. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction to inactivated HSV-1 antigen was significantly stronger in infected mice administered AqMOL and AqMOL augmented interferon (IFN)-γ production by HSV-1 antigen from splenocytes of HSV-1-infected mice at 4 days post-infection. AqMOL administration was effective in elevating the ratio of CD11b(+) and CD49b(+) subpopulations of splenocytes in infected mice. As DTH is a major host defense mechanism for intradermal HSV infection, augmentation of the DTH response by AqMOL may contribute to their efficacies against HSV-1 infection. These results provided an important insights into the mechanism by which AqMOL activates cellular immunity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.