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Sample records for virus resistant tomato

  1. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    de Haan,; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R; Grinsven, van, Saskia

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can be obtained by introgression of natural sources of resistance from wild relatives or by expressing viral sequences in transgenic tomato plants. We report high levels of resistance to TSWV obtained...

  2. Transgenic tomato hybrids resistant to tomato spotted wilt virus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haan, de P.; Ultzen, T.; Prins, M.; Gielen, J.; Goldbach, R.; Grinsven, van M.

    1996-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infections cause significant economic losses in the commercial culture of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). Culture practices have only been marginally effective in controlling TSWV. The ultimate way to minimize losses caused by TSWV is resistant varieties. These can

  3. Whitefly population dynamics and evaluation of whitefly-transmitted Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV)-resistant tomato genotypes as whitefly and TYLCV reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus resistant tomato cultivars are a major tool for management of this economically important virus. Results presented emphasize that such resistant tomatoes can serve as virus and whitefly reservoirs and potentially influence virus epidemics....

  4. Understanding the mechanism of resistance breaking on tomato by Tomato mottle mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) has broadened it’s distribution around the world. In our previous work, we observed a partial resistance breaking by ToMMV on tomato. To understand the mechanism of this resistance breaking, we carried out comparative analysis through Sanger sequencing, genotyping ...

  5. Selection of tomato plants resistant to a local Polish isolate of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czech, Andrzej S; Szklarczyk, Marek; Gajewski, Zbigniew; Zukowska, Ewa; Michalik, Barbara; Kobyłko, Tadeusz; Strzałka, Kazimierz

    2003-01-01

    We found that the Sw-5 gene confers resistance to one of the Polish isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). A series of tomato breeding accessions was analysed along with standards of resistance and susceptibility to TSWV. The presence of the Sw-5 gene was determined using the available PCR marker. Subsequently plants from these accessions were grown in the presence of the TSWV isolate from Poland. Some of them developed severe symptoms of the TSWV disease. Expression of the virus proteins was also assayed in tissues of the investigated plants. We found general agreement between either lack or presence of the disease symptoms, virus proteins and resistance gene. Some observed discrepancies of these data are also discussed. Our results indicate that marker-assisted selection can be used for breeding of the TSWV-resistant tomato in Poland.

  6. Eugenol enhances the resistance of tomato against tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chunmei; Fan, Yongjian

    2014-03-15

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease (TYLCVD) causes severe to economic losses in tomato crops in China. The control of TYLCVD is based primarily on the use of synthetic insecticide to control its vector whitefly (Bemisia tabaci). To look for an alternative method for disease control, we investigated the effect of eugenol on controlling TYLCVD. The potential of eugenol to trigger systemic acquired resistance (SAR) in tomato (Jiangsu 14) plants against TYLCV was also investigated. In greenhouse experiments, eugenol significantly reduced disease severity when applied as a foliar spray, thus demonstrating a systemic effect. The disease spread rapidly in control plants and by the end of the experiment almost all control plants showed severe symptoms. Eugenol also induced H₂O₂ accumulation in tomato plants. Activities of peroxidase (POD), polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) were significantly induced compared with those of control plants. As further consequences, increase of salicylic acid (SA) levels and expression of PR-1 proteins, a molecular marker of SAR in tomato, could also be observed. This is the first report of eugenol as an elicitor and its ability to suppress plant virus diseases under greenhouse conditions. It is suggested that eugenol has the potential to be an effective biocontrol agent against TYLCV in tomato plants. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  7. Characterization of major resistance genes to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl disease, a devastating disease of tomato, is caused by a complex of begomoviruses generally referred to as Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Almost all breeding for TYLCV resistance has been based on the introgression of the Ty-1 and Ty-3 resistance loci derived from

  8. Engineering resistance against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus via the CRISPR/Cas9 system in tomato

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2017-12-22

    CRISPR/Cas systems confer molecular immunity against phages and conjugative plasmids in prokaryotes. Recently, CRISPR/Cas9 systems have been used to confer interference against eukaryotic viruses. Here, we engineered Nicotiana benthamiana and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants with the CRISPR/Cas9 system to confer immunity against the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Targeting the TYLCV genome with Cas9-single guide RNA at the sequences encoding the coat protein (CP) or replicase (Rep) resulted in efficient virus interference, as evidenced by low accumulation of the TYLCV DNA genome in the transgenic plants. The CRISPR/Cas9-based immunity remained active across multiple generations in the N. benthamiana and tomato plants. Together, our results confirmed the efficiency of the CRISPR/Cas9 system for stable engineering of TYLCV resistance in N. benthamiana and tomato, and opens the possibilities of engineering virus resistance against single and multiple infectious viruses in other crops.

  9. Evolutionary analysis of tomato Sw-5 resistance-breaking isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Carmelo; Aramburu, José; Galipienso, Luis; Soler, Salvador; Nuez, Fernando; Rubio, Luis

    2011-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) causes severe economic losses in many crops worldwide and often overcomes resistant cultivars used for disease control. Comparison of nucleotide and amino acid sequences suggested that tomato resistance conferred by the gene Sw-5 can be overcome by the amino acid substitution C to Y at position 118 (C118Y) or T120N in the TSWV movement protein, NSm. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that substitution C118Y has occurred independently three times in the studied isolates by convergent evolution, whereas the substitution T120N was a unique event. Analysis of rates of non-synonymous and synonymous changes at individual codons showed that substitution C118Y was positively selected.

  10. Recessive Resistance Derived from Tomato cv. Tyking-Limits Drastically the Spread of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus

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    Rita C. Pereira-Carvalho

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD causes severe damage to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. crops throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. TYLCD is associated with a complex of single-stranded circular DNA plant viruses of the genus Begomovirus (family Geminiviridae transmitted by the whitefy Bemisia tabaci Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae. The tomato inbred line TX 468-RG is a source of monogenic recessive resistance to begomoviruses derived from the hybrid cv. Tyking F1. A detailed analysis of this germplasm source against tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Israel (TYLCV-IL, a widespread TYLCD-associated virus, showed a significant restriction to systemic virus accumulation even under continuous virus supply. The resistance was effective in limiting the onset of TYLCV-IL in tomato, as significantly lower primary spread of the virus occurred in resistant plants. Also, even if a limited number of resistant plants could result infected, they were less efficient virus sources for secondary spread owing to the impaired TYLCV-IL accumulation. Therefore, the incorporation of this resistance into breeding programs might help TYLCD management by drastically limiting TYLCV-IL spread.

  11. Modified expression of alternative oxidase in transgenic tomato and petunia affects the level of tomato spotted wilt virus resistance

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    Ma Hao

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV has a very wide host range, and is transmitted in a persistent manner by several species of thrips. These characteristics make this virus difficult to control. We show here that the over-expression of the mitochondrial alternative oxidase (AOX in tomato and petunia is related to TSWV resistance. Results The open reading frame and full-length sequence of the tomato AOX gene LeAox1au were cloned and introduced into tomato 'Healani' and petunia 'Sheer Madness' using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Highly expressed AOX transgenic tomato and petunia plants were selfed and transgenic R1 seedlings from 10 tomato lines and 12 petunia lines were used for bioassay. For each assayed line, 22 to 32 tomato R1 progeny in three replications and 39 to 128 petunia progeny in 13 replications were challenged with TSWV. Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays showed that the TSWV levels in transgenic tomato line FKT4-1 was significantly lower than that of wild-type controls after challenge with TSWV. In addition, transgenic petunia line FKP10 showed significantly less lesion number and smaller lesion size than non-transgenic controls after inoculation by TSWV. Conclusion In all assayed transgenic tomato lines, a higher percentage of transgenic progeny had lower TSWV levels than non-transgenic plants after challenge with TSWV, and the significantly increased resistant levels of tomato and petunia lines identified in this study indicate that altered expression levels of AOX in tomato and petunia can affect the levels of TSWV resistance.

  12. Characterization of Tomato spotted wilt virus isolates that overcome the Sw-5 resistance gene in tomato and fitness assays

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    Jose ARAMBURU

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance-breaking (RB isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV that overcome the resistance conferred by the Sw-5 gene in tomato have had only a limited spread since they were first detected in north-eastern Spain in 2002. Symptom expression, homogeneity, stability and the transmission capacity of RB and non-resistance breaking (NRB isolates were biologically compared. The fitness of both types of isolates infecting tomato plants was determined in competition assays. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in a wide range of plant species, except RB isolates in tomato carrying the Sw-5 resistance gene and pepper carrying the Tsw resistance gene. The mechanical transmission of RB isolates to tomato plants with the Sw-5 gene failed in some trials, although NRB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when tested with the thrips Frankliniella occidentalis. Biological clones from individual local lesions obtained by mechanically inoculating Nicotiana glutinosa in some TSWV field samples showed that they were biologically homogeneous. Mixed infections of RB and wilt-type isolates were not found. The RB isolates were relatively stable because no reversion to NRB isolates was seen after serial passages in susceptible tomato plants. In competition assays between RB and NRB isolates, after serial passages in susceptible tomato plants, the prevalence of a particular isolate was not related to its capacity to overcome Sw-5 gene resistance. The low spread of the RB isolates in Spain does not seem to be related to a loss of fitness in tomato plants or to differences in transmission capacity by thrips, but it could be related to the reduction of the selection pressure of RB isolates as consequence of the gradual replacement of susceptible tomato plants by resistant tomato plants by growers.

  13. Resistance breaking tomato spotted wilt virus isolates on resistant pepper varieties in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzi, A; Viggiano, A; Fanigliulo, A

    2013-01-01

    In spring 2012, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in southern Italy (Campania and Apulia regions) in protected cultivation, about one month after transplant. The percentage of symptomatic plants was 5-10% and, only in particular cases of advanced stage of cultivation, it reached 30-50% at the end of cycle. All TSWV isolates induced similar systemic symptoms in all resistant infected pepper hybrids: yellowing or browning of apical leaves, which later become necrotic, long necrotic streakson stems, extending to the terminal shoots, complete necrosis of younger fruits and large necrotic streaks and spots on fruits formed after infection. On ripe fruits, yellow spots with concentric rings or necrotic streaks could be observed. Leaf extracts of these samples were tested in ELISA for the detection of TSWV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Potato virus Y (PVY), Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV), Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and Pepper Mottle Virus (PepMoV). Only TSWV was detected in all the field samples tested. The correspondent virus isolates were inoculated mechanically and by Frankliniella occidentalis on to a set of different pepper and tomato hybrids, as well as on some herbaceous test plants, in order to investigate for their ability to overcome the resistance genes Tsw and Sw5, respectively. Tomato hybrids carrying the Sw5 gene were uninfected by all RB isolates, whereas all resistant pepper hybrids became systemically infected. RB isolates did not differ noticeably in transmission efficiency when they were tested with the thrips F. occidentalis. Obtained results demonstrate that evolved strains of TSWV have emerged, that they are able to overcome the Tsw resistance gene in pepper plants experimentally inoculated both

  14. Water Balance, Hormone Homeostasis, and Sugar Signaling Are All Involved in Tomato Resistance to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sade, Dagan; Sade, Nir; Shriki, Oz; Lerner, Stephen; Gebremedhin, Alem; Karavani, Asaf; Brotman, Yariv; Osorio, Sonia; Fernie, Alisdair R; Willmitzer, Lothar; Czosnek, Henryk; Moshelion, Menachem

    2014-08-01

    Vacuolar water movement is largely controlled by membrane channels called tonoplast-intrinsic aquaporins (TIP-AQPs). Some TIP-AQP genes, such as TIP2;2 and TIP1;1, are up-regulated upon exposure to biotic stress. Moreover, TIP1;1 transcript levels are higher in leaves of a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) line resistant to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) than in those of a susceptible line with a similar genetic background. Virus-induced silencing of TIP1;1 in the tomato resistant line and the use of an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) tip1;1 null mutant showed that resistance to TYLCV is severely compromised in the absence of TIP1:1. Constitutive expression of tomato TIP2;2 in transgenic TYLCV-susceptible tomato and Arabidopsis plants was correlated with increased TYLCV resistance, increased transpiration, decreased abscisic acid levels, and increased salicylic acid levels at the early stages of infection. We propose that TIP-AQPs affect the induction of leaf abscisic acid, which leads to increased levels of transpiration and gas exchange, as well as better salicylic acid signaling. © 2014 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  15. Evaluation of thrips resistance in pepper to control Tomato spotted wilt virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, P.C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study was to analyse the effect of thrips ( F. occidentalis ) resistance in pepper ( Capsicum ) on the spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Results demonstrate that the rate of primary TSWV-infection is effectively limited in a thrips-resistant (TR) pepper crop compared

  16. Plant responses to tomato chlorotic mottle virus: Proteomic view of the resistance mechanisms to a bipartite begomovirus in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmo, Lílian S T; Murad, André M; Resende, Renato O; Boiteux, Leonardo S; Ribeiro, Simone G; Jorrín-Novo, Jesús V; Mehta, Angela

    2017-01-16

    Tomato chlorotic mottle virus (ToCMoV) is a widespread bipartite Begomovirus species found in tomato fields in Brazil. In this study, plant responses and putative mechanisms associated with the 'Tyking'-derived recessive resistance to ToCMoV were investigated. Changes in the protein profile in the inoculated plants of two near isogenic tomato lines resistant ('LAM 157') and susceptible ('Santa Clara') to ToCMoV were analyzed. Seedlings were biolistically inoculated with an infectious ToCMoV clone. Leaves from infected plants (confirmed by PCR) were sampled at 15days after inoculation. Proteins were extracted using phenol and analyzed by shotgun MS (2D-nanoUPLC/HDMSE). Out of the 534 identified proteins, 82 presented statistically significant differences in abundance, including 35 unique proteins displayed in the resistant tomato inoculated with ToCMoV. Proteins associated to chromatin structure, cytoskeleton structure, cuticle biosynthesis, and ubiquitin pathway were identified and their putative roles during virus infection process were discussed. The protein profile analysis allowed for the development of a hypothetical model showing how the resistant host cell responds to ToCMoV infection. The data obtained provide a better understanding of resistant mechanisms used by the host plant to contain viral infection and could be the basis for further investigation in other plant-begomovirus pathosystems. In this study we propose a model of resistance to begomovirus in tomato and highlight host proteins, which could be targets for future investigations in plant-begomovirus pathosystems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Cloning and characterization of the durable tomato mosaic virus resistance gene Tm-2(2) from Lycopersicon esculentum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanfermeijer, FC; Dijkhuis, J; Sturre, MJG; de Haan, P; Hille, J

    In tomato, infections by tomato mosaic virus are controlled by durable Tm-2(2) resistance. In order to gain insight into the processes underlying disease resistance and its durability, we cloned and analysed the Tm-2(2) resistance gene and the susceptible allele, tm-2. The Tm-2(2) gene was isolated

  18. Effectiveness of combining resistance to Thielaviopsis basicola and Tomato spotted wilt virus in haploid tobacco genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Trojak-Goluch, Anna; Laskowska, Dorota; Agacka, Monika; Czarnecka, Diana; Kawka, Magdalena; Czubacka, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Black root rot (BRR) caused by Thielaviopsis basicola as well as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) are the most serious problems in tobacco growing regions. We crossed the breeding line WGL 3 carrying BRR resistance derived from N.glauca with the line PW-834 the resistance of which to TSWV was transferred from cultivar Polalta. Anthers obtained from F1 hybrid plants were cultured to induce haploids combining resistance to Th. basicola and TSWV. Flow cytometry analysis revealed 242 haploids and...

  19. Salicylic Acid Is Involved in the Basal Resistance of Tomato Plants to Citrus Exocortis Viroid and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus.

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    M Pilar López-Gresa

    Full Text Available Tomato plants expressing the NahG transgene, which prevents accumulation of endogenous salicylic acid (SA, were used to study the importance of the SA signalling pathway in basal defence against Citrus Exocortis Viroid (CEVd or Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV. The lack of SA accumulation in the CEVd- or TSWV-infected NahG tomato plants led to an early and dramatic disease phenotype, as compared to that observed in the corresponding parental Money Maker. Addition of acibenzolar-S-methyl, a benzothiadiazole (BTH, which activates the systemic acquired resistance pathway downstream of SA signalling, improves resistance of NahG tomato plants to CEVd and TSWV. CEVd and TSWV inoculation induced the accumulation of the hydroxycinnamic amides p-coumaroyltyramine, feruloyltyramine, caffeoylputrescine, and feruloylputrescine, and the defence related proteins PR1 and P23 in NahG plants earlier and with more intensity than in Money Maker plants, indicating that SA is not essential for the induction of these plant defence metabolites and proteins. In addition, NahG plants produced very high levels of ethylene upon CEVd or TSWV infection when compared with infected Money Maker plants, indicating that the absence of SA produced additional effects on other metabolic pathways. This is the first report to show that SA is an important component of basal resistance of tomato plants to both CEVd and TSWV, indicating that SA-dependent defence mechanisms play a key role in limiting the severity of symptoms in CEVd- and TSWV-infected NahG tomato plants.

  20. Salicylic Acid Is Involved in the Basal Resistance of Tomato Plants to Citrus Exocortis Viroid and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gresa, M Pilar; Lisón, Purificación; Yenush, Lynne; Conejero, Vicente; Rodrigo, Ismael; Bellés, José María

    2016-01-01

    Tomato plants expressing the NahG transgene, which prevents accumulation of endogenous salicylic acid (SA), were used to study the importance of the SA signalling pathway in basal defence against Citrus Exocortis Viroid (CEVd) or Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV). The lack of SA accumulation in the CEVd- or TSWV-infected NahG tomato plants led to an early and dramatic disease phenotype, as compared to that observed in the corresponding parental Money Maker. Addition of acibenzolar-S-methyl, a benzothiadiazole (BTH), which activates the systemic acquired resistance pathway downstream of SA signalling, improves resistance of NahG tomato plants to CEVd and TSWV. CEVd and TSWV inoculation induced the accumulation of the hydroxycinnamic amides p-coumaroyltyramine, feruloyltyramine, caffeoylputrescine, and feruloylputrescine, and the defence related proteins PR1 and P23 in NahG plants earlier and with more intensity than in Money Maker plants, indicating that SA is not essential for the induction of these plant defence metabolites and proteins. In addition, NahG plants produced very high levels of ethylene upon CEVd or TSWV infection when compared with infected Money Maker plants, indicating that the absence of SA produced additional effects on other metabolic pathways. This is the first report to show that SA is an important component of basal resistance of tomato plants to both CEVd and TSWV, indicating that SA-dependent defence mechanisms play a key role in limiting the severity of symptoms in CEVd- and TSWV-infected NahG tomato plants.

  1. Assessing the genetic variation of Ty-1 and Ty-3 alleles conferring resistance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus in a broad tomato germplasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caro Rios, C.M.; Verlaan, M.G.; Julian, O.; Finkers, H.J.; Wolters, A.M.A.; Hutton, S.F.; Scott, J.W.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Diez, M.J.; Perez-de-Castro, A.; Bai, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) hampers tomato production worldwide. Our previous studies have focussed on mapping and ultimately cloning of the TYLCV resistance genes Ty-1 and Ty-3. Both genes are derived from Solanum chilense and were shown to be allelic. They code for an RNA-dependent RNA

  2. The Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Resistance Genes Ty-1 and Ty-3 Are Allelic and Code for DFDGD-Class RNA–Dependent RNA Polymerases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verlaan, M.G.; Hutton, S.F.; Ibrahem, R.M.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Scott, J.W.; Edwards, J.D.; Bai, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease incited by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) causes huge losses in tomato production worldwide and is caused by different related begomovirus species. Breeding for TYLCV resistance has been based on the introgression of multiple resistance genes originating

  3. RNA interference-based resistance in transgenic tomato plants against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Oman (TYLCV-OM) and its associated betasatellite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ammara, Um e; Mansoor, Shahid; Saeed, Muhammad; Amin, Imran; Briddon, Rob W; Al-Sadi, Abdullah Mohammed

    2015-03-04

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), a monopartite begomovirus (family Geminiviridae) is responsible for heavy yield losses for tomato production around the globe. In Oman at least five distinct begomoviruses cause disease in tomato, including TYLCV. Unusually, TYLCV infections in Oman are sometimes associated with a betasatellite (Tomato leaf curl betasatellite [ToLCB]; a symptom modulating satellite). RNA interference (RNAi) can be used to develop resistance against begomoviruses at either the transcriptional or post-transcriptional levels. A hairpin RNAi (hpRNAi) construct to express double-stranded RNA homologous to sequences of the intergenic region, coat protein gene, V2 gene and replication-associated gene of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus-Oman (TYLCV-OM) was produced. Initially, transient expression of the hpRNAi construct at the site of virus inoculation was shown to reduce the number of plants developing symptoms when inoculated with either TYLCV-OM or TYLCV-OM with ToLCB-OM to Nicotiana benthamiana or tomato. Solanum lycopersicum L. cv. Pusa Ruby was transformed with the hpRNAi construct and nine confirmed transgenic lines were obtained and challenged with TYLCV-OM and ToLCB-OM by Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation. For all but one line, for which all plants remained symptomless, inoculation with TYLCV-OM led to a proportion (≤25%) of tomato plants developing symptoms of infection. For inoculation with TYLCV-OM and ToLCB-OM all lines showed a proportion of plants (≤45%) symptomatic. However, for all infected transgenic plants the symptoms were milder and virus titre in plants was lower than in infected non-transgenic tomato plants. These results show that RNAi can be used to develop resistance against geminiviruses in tomato. The resistance in this case is not immunity but does reduce the severity of infections and virus titer. Also, the betasatellite may compromise resistance, increasing the proportion of plants which ultimately show symptoms.

  4. Comparative transcriptome profiling of a resistant vs. susceptible tomato (Solanum lycopersicum cultivar in response to infection by tomato yellow leaf curl virus.

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    Tianzi Chen

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV threatens tomato production worldwide by causing leaf yellowing, leaf curling, plant stunting and flower abscission. The current understanding of the host plant defense response to this virus is very limited. Using whole transcriptome sequencing, we analyzed the differential gene expression in response to TYLCV infection in the TYLCV-resistant tomato breeding line CLN2777A (R and TYLCV-susceptible tomato breeding line TMXA48-4-0 (S. The mixed inoculated samples from 3, 5 and 7 day post inoculation (dpi were compared to non-inoculated samples at 0 dpi. Of the total of 34831 mapped transcripts, 209 and 809 genes were differentially expressed in the R and S tomato line, respectively. The proportion of up-regulated differentially expressed genes (DEGs in the R tomato line (58.37% was higher than that in the S line (9.17%. Gene ontology (GO analyses revealed that similar GO terms existed in both DEGs of R and S lines; however, some sets of defense related genes and their expression levels were not similar between the two tomato lines. Genes encoding for WRKY transcriptional factors, R genes, protein kinases and receptor (-like kinases which were identified as down-regulated DEGs in the S line were up-regulated or not differentially expressed in the R line. The up-regulated DEGs in the R tomato line revealed the defense response of tomato to TYLCV infection was characterized by the induction and regulation of a series of genes involved in cell wall reorganization, transcriptional regulation, defense response, ubiquitination, metabolite synthesis and so on. The present study provides insights into various reactions underlining the successful establishment of resistance to TYLCV in the R tomato line, and helps in the identification of important defense-related genes in tomato for TYLCV disease management.

  5. Grafting on a Non-Transgenic Tolerant Tomato Variety Confers Resistance to the Infection of a Sw5-Breaking Strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus via RNA Silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Roberta; Mascia, Tiziana; Kormelink, Richard; Gallitelli, Donato

    2015-01-01

    RNA silencing controls endogenous gene expression and drives defensive reactions against invasive nucleic acids like viruses. In plants, it has been demonstrated that RNA silencing can be transmitted through grafting between scions and silenced rootstocks to attenuate virus and viroid accumulation in the scions. This has been obtained mostly using transgenic plants, which may be a drawback in current agriculture. In the present study, we examined the dynamics of infection of a resistance-breaking strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus (RB-TSWV) through the graft between an old Apulian (southern Italy) tomato variety, denoted Sl-Ma, used as a rootstock and commercial tomato varieties used as scions. In tests with non-grafted plants, Sl-Ma showed resistance to the RB-TSWV infection as viral RNA accumulated at low levels and plants recovered from disease symptoms by 21 days post inoculation. The resistance trait was transmitted to the otherwise highly susceptible tomato genotypes grafted onto Sl-Ma. The results from the analysis of small RNAs hallmark genes involved in RNA silencing and virus-induced gene silencing suggest that RNA silencing is involved in the resistance showed by Sl-Ma against RB-TSWV and in scions grafted on this rootstock. The results from self-grafted susceptible tomato varieties suggest also that RNA silencing is enhanced by the graft itself. We can foresee interesting practical implications of the approach described in this paper.

  6. Grafting on a Non-Transgenic Tolerant Tomato Variety Confers Resistance to the Infection of a Sw5-Breaking Strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus via RNA Silencing.

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    Roberta Spanò

    Full Text Available RNA silencing controls endogenous gene expression and drives defensive reactions against invasive nucleic acids like viruses. In plants, it has been demonstrated that RNA silencing can be transmitted through grafting between scions and silenced rootstocks to attenuate virus and viroid accumulation in the scions. This has been obtained mostly using transgenic plants, which may be a drawback in current agriculture. In the present study, we examined the dynamics of infection of a resistance-breaking strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus (RB-TSWV through the graft between an old Apulian (southern Italy tomato variety, denoted Sl-Ma, used as a rootstock and commercial tomato varieties used as scions. In tests with non-grafted plants, Sl-Ma showed resistance to the RB-TSWV infection as viral RNA accumulated at low levels and plants recovered from disease symptoms by 21 days post inoculation. The resistance trait was transmitted to the otherwise highly susceptible tomato genotypes grafted onto Sl-Ma. The results from the analysis of small RNAs hallmark genes involved in RNA silencing and virus-induced gene silencing suggest that RNA silencing is involved in the resistance showed by Sl-Ma against RB-TSWV and in scions grafted on this rootstock. The results from self-grafted susceptible tomato varieties suggest also that RNA silencing is enhanced by the graft itself. We can foresee interesting practical implications of the approach described in this paper.

  7. Coevolution and hierarchical interactions of Tomato mosaic virus and the resistance gene Tm-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Ishibashi

    Full Text Available During antagonistic coevolution between viruses and their hosts, viruses have a major advantage by evolving more rapidly. Nevertheless, viruses and their hosts coexist and have coevolved, although the processes remain largely unknown. We previously identified Tm-1 that confers resistance to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, and revealed that it encodes a protein that binds ToMV replication proteins and inhibits RNA replication. Tm-1 was introgressed from a wild tomato species Solanum habrochaites into the cultivated tomato species Solanum lycopersicum. In this study, we analyzed Tm-1 alleles in S. habrochaites. Although most part of this gene was under purifying selection, a cluster of nonsynonymous substitutions in a small region important for inhibitory activity was identified, suggesting that the region is under positive selection. We then examined the resistance of S. habrochaites plants to ToMV. Approximately 60% of 149 individuals from 24 accessions were resistant to ToMV, while the others accumulated detectable levels of coat protein after inoculation. Unexpectedly, many S. habrochaites plants were observed in which even multiplication of the Tm-1-resistance-breaking ToMV mutant LT1 was inhibited. An amino acid change in the positively selected region of the Tm-1 protein was responsible for the inhibition of LT1 multiplication. This amino acid change allowed Tm-1 to bind LT1 replication proteins without losing the ability to bind replication proteins of wild-type ToMV. The antiviral spectra and biochemical properties suggest that Tm-1 has evolved by changing the strengths of its inhibitory activity rather than diversifying the recognition spectra. In the LT1-resistant S. habrochaites plants inoculated with LT1, mutant viruses emerged whose multiplication was not inhibited by the Tm-1 allele that confers resistance to LT1. However, the resistance-breaking mutants were less competitive than the parental strains in the absence of Tm-1. Based on

  8. Restricted Spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus in Thrips-Resistant Pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maris, P C; Joosten, N N; Goldbach, R W; Peters, D

    2003-10-01

    ABSTRACT Spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and population development of its vector Frankliniella occidentalis were studied on the pepper accessions CPRO-1 and Pikante Reuzen, which are resistant and susceptible to thrips, respectively. Viruliferous thrips were released on plants of each accession (nonchoice tests) or on plants in a 1:1 mixture of both accessions (choice tests) in small cages containing 8 or 16 plants. Significantly fewer CPRO-1 plants became infected in the primary infection phase in both tests. In the nonchoice test, virus infection of the resistant plants did not increase after the initial infection, but all plants eventually became infected when mixtures of both cultivars were challenged in the secondary infection phase. Secondary spread of TSWV from an infected resistant or susceptible source plant was significantly slower to resistant plants than to susceptible plants, independent of source plant phenotype. The restricted introduction and spread of TSWV in the thrips-resistant cultivar was confirmed in a large-scale greenhouse experiment. The restricted and delayed TSWV spread to plants of the resistant accession in both the cage and the greenhouse experiment was explained by impeded thrips population development. The results obtained indicate that thrips resistance may provide a significant protection to TSWV infection, even when the crop is fully susceptible to the virus.

  9. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 induces systemic resistance in tomato infected by Cucumber mosaic virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonella Vitti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22 to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV.

  10. Effectiveness of combining resistance to Thielaviopsis basicola and Tomato spotted wilt virus in haploid tobacco genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trojak-Goluch, Anna; Laskowska, Dorota; Agacka, Monika; Czarnecka, Diana; Kawka, Magdalena; Czubacka, Anna

    2011-12-01

    Black root rot (BRR) caused by Thielaviopsis basicola as well as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) are the most serious problems in tobacco growing regions. We crossed the breeding line WGL 3 carrying BRR resistance derived from N.glauca with the line PW-834 the resistance of which to TSWV was transferred from cultivar Polalta. Anthers obtained from F(1) hybrid plants were cultured to induce haploids combining resistance to Th. basicola and TSWV. Flow cytometry analysis revealed 242 haploids and 2 spontaneous doubled haploids among regenerants. All haploids were cloned and then evaluated for BRR as well as TSWV resistance. The presence of pathogens was detected by microscopic evaluation of roots or using DAS-ELISA test. Microscopic assessment showed that, 132 haploids had no symptoms of Th. basicola which, together with the absence of symptoms in the F(1) hybrids, indicated a dominant monogenic mode of inheritance. At the same time only 30 haploids demonstrated resistance to TSWV. SCAR markers associated with TSWV resistance gene detection was applied. The results indicate that small proportion of TSWV-resistant haploids is probably due to the influence of deleterious genes flanking the resistance factor that reduced vitality of gametophytes. Altogether, 24 haploids showed multiple resistance to Th. basicola and TSWV.

  11. Resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus infection in transgenic tobacco expressing the viral nucleocapsid gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, D J; Ellis, P J

    1992-01-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing the entire tomato spotted with virus (TSWV) nucleocapsid gene, with the exception of nucleotide encoding three N-terminal amino acids, was isolated by screening a complementary DNA library, prepared against random primed viral RNA, using a specific monoclonal antibody. The insert contained in plasmid pTSW1 was repaired and amplified by polymerase chain reaction, and the complete nucleocapsid protein gene was introduced into Nicotiana tabacum 'Samsun' by leaf disk transformation using Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Transgenic plants expressing the viral nucleocapsid protein were resistant to subsequent infection following mechanical inoculation with TSWV as indicated by a lack of systemic symptoms and little or no systemic accumulation of virus as determined by double antibody sandwich enzyme-liked immunosorbent assay. These results further extend the applicability of coat protein-mediated resistance, as previously demonstrated for a number of simple plant viruses composed of a positive-sense RNA genome encapsidated with a single species of coat protein, to a membrane-encapsidated, multi-component, negative-sense RNA virus.

  12. Genetic mapping of the Tsw locus for resistance to the Tospovirus Tomato spotted wilt virus in Capsicum spp. and its relationship to the Sw-5 gene for resistance to the same pathogen in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, M; Paran, I; Hoffmann, K; Radwanski, E R; Livingstone, K D; Grube, R C; Aftergoot, E; Lapidot, M; Moyer, J

    2000-06-01

    The Tsw gene conferring dominant resistance to the Tospovirus Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in Capsicum spp. has been tagged with a random amplified polymorphic DNA marker and mapped to the distal portion of chromosome 10. No mapped homologues of Sw-5, a phenotypically similar dominant TSWV resistance gene in tomato, map to this region in C. annuum, although a number of Sw-5 homologues are found at corresponding positions in pepper and tomato. The relationship between Tsw and Sw-5 was also examined through genetic studies of TSWV. The capacity of TSWV-A to overcome the Tsw gene in pepper and the Sw-5 gene in tomato maps to different TSWV genome segments. Therefore, despite phenotypic and genetic similarities of resistance in tomato and pepper, we infer that distinct viral gene products control the outcome of infection in plants carrying Sw-5 and Tsw, and that these loci do not appear to share a recent common evolutionary ancestor.

  13. From immunity to susceptibility: virus resistance induced in tomato by a silenced transgene is lost as TGS overcomes PTGS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catoni, Marco; Lucioli, Alessandra; Doblas-Ibáñez, Paula; Accotto, Gian Paolo; Vaira, Anna Maria

    2013-09-01

    Tomato line 30.4 was obtained engineering the nucleocapsid (N) gene of tomato spotted wilt virus into plant genome, and immunity to tomato spotted wilt virus infection of its self-pollinated homozygous progeny was observed. Despite the presence of a high amount of transgenic transcripts, transgenic proteins have not been detected, suggesting a mechanism of resistance mediated by RNA. In the present study, we identify post-transcriptional gene silencing as the main mechanism of resistance, which is able to spread systemically through grafting, and show that the line 30.4 resistant plants produce both 24 and 21-22 nt N-gene specific siRNA classes. The transgenic locus in chromosome 4 shows complex multiple insertions of four T-DNA copies in various orientations, all with 3' end deletions in the terminator and part of the N gene. However, for three of them, polyadenylated transcripts are produced, due to flanking tomato genome sequences acting as alternative terminators. Interestingly, starting at the fifth generation after the transformation event, some individual plants show a tomato spotted wilt virus-susceptible phenotype. The change is associated with the disappearance of transgene-specific transcripts and siRNAs, and with hyper-methylation of the transgene, which proceeds gradually through the generations. Once it reaches a critical threshold, the shift from post-transcriptional gene silencing to transcriptional silencing of the transgene eliminates the previously well established virus resistance. © 2013 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Symptom and Resistance of Cultivated and Wild Capsicum Accessions to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Heon Han

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available One hundred Capsicum accessions were screened for symptomatic response and resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus-pb1 (TSWV-pb1. Symptom and its severity rating were checked by visual observation at 9, 12, 14, and 45 days after inoculation, respectively. Enzyme-linked immune-sorbent assay was performed all tested individuals on non-inoculated upper leaves after the third rating to indentify viral infection. Leaf curling was predominant in almost susceptible individuals of each accession. Stem necrosis was most frequent in wild species while yellowing in commercial hybrids and Korean land race cultivars. Ring spot, a typical symptom of TSWV, was rarely detected in some of a few accessions. Different levels of resistance to TSWV-pb1 were observed among the tested accessions. High level of resistance was detected in 4 commercial cultivars of Kpc- 35, -36, -57, and -62, and 8 wild species of PBI-11, C00105, PBC076, PBC280, PBC426, PBC495, PBC537, and PI201238 through seedling test by mechanical inoculation.

  15. Eugenol confers resistance to Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by regulating the expression of SlPer1 in tomato plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wei-Jie; Lv, Wen-Jing; Li, Li-Na; Yin, Gan; Hang, Xiaofang; Xue, Yanfeng; Chen, Jian; Shi, Zhiqi

    2016-05-25

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is one of the most devastating plant diseases, and poses a significant agricultural concern because of the lack of an efficient control method. Eugenol is a plant-derived natural compound that has been widely used as a food additive and in medicine. In the present study, we demonstrated the potential of eugenol to enhance the resistance of tomato plants to TYLCV. The anti-TYLCV efficiency of eugenol was significantly higher than that of moroxydine hydrochloride (MH), a widely used commercial antiviral agent. Eugenol application stimulated the production of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) and salicylic acid (SA) in tomato plants. The full-length cDNA of SlPer1, which has been suggested to be a host R gene specific to TYLCV, was isolated from tomato plants. A sequence analysis suggested that SlPer1 might be a nucleobase-ascorbate transporter (NAT) belonging to the permease family. The transcript levels of SlPer1 increased markedly in response to treatment with eugenol or TYLCV inoculation. The results of this study also showed that SlPer1 expression was strongly induced by SA, MeJA (jasmonic acid methyl ester), and NO. Thus, we propose that the increased transcription of SlPer1 contributed to the high anti-TYLCV efficiency of eugenol, which might involve in the generation of endogenous SA and NO. Such findings provide the basis for the development of eugenol as an environmental-friendly agricultural antiviral agent. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Thrips resistance in pepper and its consequences for the acquisition and inoculation of Tomato spotted wilt virus by the Western Flower Thrips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, P.C.; Joosten, N.N.; Peters, D.; Goldbach, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Different levels of thrips resistance were found in seven Capsicum accessions. Based on the level of feeding damage, host preference, and host suitability for reproduction, a thrips susceptible and a resistant accession were selected to study their performance as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)

  17. Evaluation of peanut genotypes for resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus by mechanical and thrips inoculation.

    OpenAIRE

    NASCIMENTO, L.C. do; PENSUK, V.; COSTA, N.P. da; ASSIS FILHO, F.M. de; PIO-RIBEIRO, G.; DEOM, C.M.; Sherwood, J.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the reactions of three peanut breeding lines (IC-10, IC-34, and ICGV 86388) to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) by mechanical and thrips inoculation, under greenhouse conditions, and compare them to the reactions of cultivars SunOleic, Georgia Green, and the breeding line C11-2-39. TSWV infection by mechanical inoculation was visually assessed using an index ranging from 0 (no symptoms) to 4 (apical death). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used ...

  18. Remote sensing and serological analysis of the resistance of tomato plants (Lycopersicon escylentum L.) to Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krezhova, Dora; Hristova, Dimitrina; Iliev, Ilko; Yanev, Tony

    Diseases caused by Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) are among the most important factors lim-iting tomato production worldwide, as they can completely destroy the crop. ToMV occurs in most countries of the world, and causes disease epidemics in many crops. Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defence mechanism that plays a central role in disease re-sistance. SAR is induced by most pathogens that cause tissue necrosis. Spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence analysis were applied to establish injury of young tomato plants (Lycopersicon escylentum L.) infected with ToMV. Leaf spectral reflectance and chlorophyll fluorescence were registered by a portable Ocean Optics spectrometer USB 2000 in the visi-ble and near infrared spectral ranges (450-850 nm) at a spectral resolution of 1.5 nm. As a model system, tomato plants of cultivar Nuton resistant to ToMV were used. The plants were grown in a green house under controlled conditions. They were divided into six groups. The first group consisted of untreated (control) plants. At growth stage 4-6 expanded leaf, the second group was inoculated with ToMV. The other four groups were treated with following growth regulators: preparations Spermine, MEIA (beta-monomethyl ester of itaconic acid), (benzo(1,2,3)thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid-S-methyl ester) and Phytoxin VS. On the next day, the tomato plants of these four groups were inoculated with ToMV. The viral concentrations in the plants were determined by the serological method Double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA). All analysis were performed on detached leaves from 20 uninfected and up to 20 leaves from infected plants on the 7th and 14th day after the inocu-lation. The differences between the reflectance spectra of virus-infected and uninfected leaves were analysed in the four most informative for green plants wavelength intervals: green (520-580 nm), red (640-680 nm), red edge (690-710 nm) and near infrared (720-760 nm

  19. The Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus resistance genes Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and code for DFDGD-class RNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maarten G Verlaan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Disease incited by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV causes huge losses in tomato production worldwide and is caused by different related begomovirus species. Breeding for TYLCV resistance has been based on the introgression of multiple resistance genes originating from several wild tomato species. In this study we have fine-mapped the widely used Solanum chilense-derived Ty-1 and Ty-3 genes by screening nearly 12,000 plants for recombination events and generating recombinant inbred lines. Multiple molecular markers were developed and used in combination with disease tests to fine-map the genes to a small genomic region (approximately 70 kb. Using a Tobacco Rattle Virus-Virus Induced Gene Silencing approach, the resistance gene was identified. It is shown that Ty-1 and Ty-3 are allelic and that they code for a RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RDR belonging to the RDRγ type, which has an atypical DFDGD motif in the catalytic domain. In contrast to the RDRα type, characterized by a catalytic DLDGD motif, no clear function has yet been described for the RDRγ type, and thus the Ty-1/Ty-3 gene unveils a completely new class of resistance gene. Although speculative, the resistance mechanism of Ty-1/Ty-3 and its specificity towards TYLCV are discussed in light of the function of the related RDRα class in the amplification of the RNAi response in plants and transcriptional silencing of geminiviruses in plants.

  20. Restricted spread of tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, P.C.; Joosten, N.N.; Goldbach, R.W.; Peters, D.

    2003-01-01

    Spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and population development of its vector Frankliniella occidentalis were studied on the pepper accessions CPRO-1 and Pikante Reuzen, which are resistant and susceptible to thrips, respectively. Viruliferous thrips were released on plants of each accession

  1. A study of the South African tomato curly stunt virus pathosystem: epidemiology, molecular diversity and resistance

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    PhD In South Africa, tomato (Solanum /ycopersicum) is an important vegetable crop with considerable nutritional and economic value. Over the last decade, begomovirus (family Geminiviridae) infections associated with an upsurge of the whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci, on tomato crops has become a serious threat to sustainable tomato production in South Africa. Begomovirus disease control in tomato is challenging and requires an integrated "pest" and "vector" management strategy, primarily ba...

  2. Incorporação de resistência ao mosaico Y em tomateiro Incorporation of resistance to virus Y in tomato varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Nagai

    1969-01-01

    Full Text Available Sessenta tipos de tomateiros, entre selvagens e cultivados, foram testados por inoculação mecânica quanto à sua resistência a estirpes do vírus Y comuns em tomatais no Estado de São Paulo. Um nível satisfatório de resistência foi encontrado em L. pimpinellifolium NAV 1062 e numa variedade de tomate originária do Peru (P.I. 126410. Cruzamentos e retrocruzamentos entre L. pimpincllifolium NAV 1062 e P.I. 126410 com a variedade Santa Cruz e entre os dois primeiros tipos resistentes entre si indicaram que o caráter, alto nível de resistência ao vírus Y destes, é condicionado pelo mesmo par de gens recessivos. Progenies resultantes do cruzamento Santa Cruz x P. I. 126410 mostraram-se mais promissoras que as do cruzamento Santa Cruz x Lycopersicon pimpinellifolium NAV 1062. Seleções feitas em gerações avançadas do primeiro cruzamento, seguidas ou não de retrocruzamentos, deram origem a três grupos de linhagens que possuem características comerciais comparáveis às da variedade Santa Cruz e incorporam nível satisfatório de resistência a estirpes do grupo Y comuns em tomatais. Uma delas, denominada Angela, está sendo distribuída a lavradores, em caráter semi-experimental.Wild and cultivated tomato types were screened by mechanical inoculation, for resistance to strains of the potato virus Y complex common in tomato plantings in the State of São Paulo, Brazil. Out of 60 types tested, immunity to virus Y was found in Lycopersicon peruvianum var. detatum (P. I. 128660 and L. peruvianumvar. humifusum (P. I. 127829; a satisfactory resistance level was found in L. pimpinellifolium NAV 1062 and in an introduction from Peru (P. I. 126410. Difficulties were encountered in obtaining viable hybrids between the immune source plants (Lycopersicon peruvianum and the cultivated tomato varieties. This fact prevented the study of the inheritance of immunity to virus Y in tomato and its incorporation to cultivated types. The behavior

  3. Identification of major QTLs underlying tomato spotted wilt virus resistance in peanut cultivar Florida-EP(TM) '113'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Yu-Chien; Tillman, Barry L; Peng, Ze; Wang, Jianping

    2016-09-06

    Spotted wilt caused by tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is one of the major peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) diseases in the southeastern United States. Occurrence, severity, and symptoms of spotted wilt disease are highly variable from season to season, making it difficult to efficiently evaluate breeding populations for resistance. Molecular markers linked to spotted wilt resistance could overcome this problem and allow selection of resistant lines regardless of environmental conditions. Florida-EP(TM) '113' is a spotted wilt resistant cultivar with a significantly lower infection frequency. However, the genetic basis is still unknown. The objective of this study is to map the major quantitative trait loci (QTLs) linked to spotted wilt resistance in Florida-EP(TM) '113'. Among 2,431 SSR markers located across the whole peanut genome screened between the two parental lines, 329 were polymorphic. Those polymorphic markers were used to further genotype a representative set of individuals in a segregating population. Only polymorphic markers on chromosome A01 showed co-segregation between genotype and phenotype. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) of the representative set of individuals in the segregating population also depicted a strong association between several SNPs on chromosome A01 and the trait, indicating a major QTL on chromosome A01. Therefore marker density was enriched on the A01 chromosome. A linkage map with 23 makers on chromosome A01 was constructed, showing collinearity with the physical map. Combined with phenotypic data, a major QTL flanked by marker AHGS4584 and GM672 was identified on chromosome A01, with up to 22.7 % PVE and 9.0 LOD value. A major QTL controlling the spotted wilt resistance in Florida-EP(TM) '113' was identified. The resistance is most likely contributed by PI 576638, a hirsuta botanical-type line, introduced from Mexico with spotted wilt resistance. The flanking markers of this QTL can be used for further fine mapping and marker

  4. Effect of Spinosad Resistance on Transmission of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus by the Western Flower Thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weiwei; Wan, Yanran; Xie, Wen; Xu, Baoyun; Zhang, Youjun; Wang, Shaoli; Wei, Guoshu; Zhou, Xiaomao; Wu, Qingjun

    2016-02-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is transmitted by Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) in a persistent-propagative manner. We previously observed significant results in terms of feeding behavior of spinosad-susceptible (Ivf03) and -resistant (Spin-R) strains of F. occidentalis using electrical penetration graph. TSWV transmission by the two strains was compared in the present study. The results showed that the titer of TSWV-N RNA (a part of S RNA of TSWV and encoding the nucleocapsid protein) in Ivf03 and Spin-R strains was not significantly different after a 48-h inoculation access period. The TSWV transmission rate did not significantly differ between the two strains and was 51.0% for Ivf03 and 44.4% for Spin-R. The virus transmission rate was significantly higher for males than females of both strains. The virus transmission rate for males and females of Ivf03 was 68.1 and 33.8%, respectively; however, in case of Spin-R, it was 60 and 28.8% for males and females, respectively. Additionally, number of probes and duration of probes were generally greater for viruliferous females of Ivf03 than for viruliferous females of Spin-R but the total number and duration of noningestion probes did not significantly differ between males of the two strains. The latter finding behavior may help explain the similar transmission rates for the susceptible and resistant strains. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Second generation peanut genotypes resistant to thrips-transmitted tomato spotted wilt virus exhibit tolerance rather than true resistance and differentially affect thrips fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Anita; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Sundaraj, Sivamani; Culbreath, Albert K; Riley, David G

    2013-04-01

    Spotted wilt disease caused by Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) (family Bunyaviridae; genus Tospovirus) is a major constraint to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) production in the southeastern United States. Reducing yield losses to TSWV has heavily relied on planting genotypes that reduce the incidence of spotted wilt disease. However, mechanisms conferring resistance to TSWV have not been identified in these genotypes. Furthermore, no information is available on how these genotypes influence thrips fitness. In this study, we investigated the effects of newly released peanut genotypes (Georganic, GA-06G, Tifguard, and NC94022) with field resistance to TSWV and a susceptible genotype (Georgia Green) on tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), fitness, and TSWV incidence. Thrips-mediated transmission resulted in TSWV infection in both TSWV-resistant and susceptible genotypes and they exhibited typical TSWV symptoms. However, some resistant genotypes had reduced viral loads (fewer TSWV N-gene copies) than the susceptible genotype. F. fusca larvae acquired TSWV from resistant and susceptible genotypes indicating that resistant genotypes also can serve as inoculum sources. Unlike resistant genotypes in other crops that produce local lesions (hypersensitive reaction) upon TSWV infection, widespread symptom development was noticed in peanut genotypes. Results indicated that the observed field resistance in peanut genotypes could be because of tolerance. Further, fitness studies revealed some, but not substantial, differences in thrips adult emergence rates and developmental time between resistant and susceptible genotypes. Thrips head capsule length and width were not different when reared on different genotypes.

  6. Evaluation and identification of candidate genes for artificial microRNA-mediated resistance to tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitter, Neena; Zhai, Ying; Bai, Anh Xu; Chua, Keith; Eid, Sahar; Constantin, Myrna; Mitchell, Roger; Pappu, Hanu R

    2016-01-04

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is an economically important viral pathogen of a wide range of field and horticultural crops. We developed an artificial microRNA (amiRNA) strategy against TSWV, targeting the nucleoprotein (N) and silencing suppressor (NSs) genes. The amiRNA constructs replaced the natural miRNA in a shortened Arabidopsis 173-nucleotide (nt) miR159a precursor backbone (athmiR159a) without the stem base extending beyond the miR/miR* duplex. Further, each amiRNA was modified to contain a mismatch (wobble) sequence at nucleotide position 12 and 13 on the complementary strand amiRNA*, mimicking the endogenous miR159a sequence structure. Transient expression in Nicotiana benthamiana demonstrated that the introduction of a wobble sequence did not alter amiRNA expression levels. Following challenge inoculation with TSWV, plants expressing N-specific amiRNAs with or without the wobble remained asymptomatic and were negative for TSWV by ELISA. In contrast, plants expressing the NSs-specific amiRNAs were symptomatic and accumulated high levels of TSWV. Similar findings were obtained in stably transformed Nicotiana tabacum plants. Our results show that a shortened 173-nt athmiR159a backbone is sufficient to express amiRNAs and that the presence of mismatch at position 12-13 does not influence amiRNA expression or conferring of resistance. We also show that selection of target gene and positional effect are critical in amiRNA-based approach for introducing resistance. These findings open the possibility of employing the amiRNA approach for broad-spectrum resistance to tospoviruses as well as other viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Emergence of a resistance breaking TSWV strain in tomato in California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is a highly destructive pathogen of tomato in the central valley of California. During the 2016 tomato growing season, unusually early and severe symptoms of TSWV occurred in fields of TSWV-resistant fresh market tomato cultivars. Disease incidences of 50-80% were ob...

  8. Western flower thrips can transmit Tomato spotted wilt virus from virus-infected tomato fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acquisition and transmission of Tomato spotted wilt virus from symptomatic tomato fruits by western flower thrips was demonstrated for the first time. This suggests that infected tomato fruits may be a source of virus and also provide an additional means of virus movement between geographic areas....

  9. Resistance to tospoviruses in Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with the N gene of tomato spotted wilt virus: correlation between transgene expression and protection in primary transformants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaira, A M; Semeria, L; Crespi, S; Lisa, V; Allavena, A; Accotto, G P

    1995-01-01

    Nicotiana benthamiana was transformed with the nucleoprotein (N) gene of an Italian isolate of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Forty-five T1 primary transformant lines were analyzed for the expression of N protein and for resistance to TSWV and three other tospoviruses: impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), groundnut bud necrosis virus (GBNV), and groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV). Thirteen of these lines were further characterized. Resistance to all TSWV isolates tested was found in two lines. The expression of the transgene (N mRNA) was lower in these resistant lines than in any of the susceptible lines, and the transgene N protein was either absent or present below detectable levels. These lines were susceptible to the other tospoviruses tested, but they developed symptoms milder than controls when inoculated with GRSV. Some of the lines producing high levels of N protein showed delays (of 2-3 weeks) in symptom expression with at least one of the TSWV isolates tested and symptom delay or attenuation with INSV or GRSV (or both). From our results it appears that high expression of TSWV N protein retards, in some cases, disease development by TSWV and INSV. In contrast, the lack of detectable expression of the transgenic N protein, accompanied by limited production of N transcripts, conferred TSWV-specific resistance.

  10. Virus-induced Gene Silencing-based Functional Analyses Revealed the Involvement of Several Putative Trehalose-6-Phosphate Synthase/Phosphatase Genes in Disease Resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Zhang

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose and its metabolism have been demonstrated to play important roles in control of plant growth, development and stress responses. However, direct genetic evidence supporting the functions of trehalose and its metabolism in defense response against pathogens is lacking. In the present study, genome-wide characterization of putative trehalose-related genes identified 11 SlTPSs for trehalose-6-phosphate synthase, 8 SlTPPs for trehalose-6-phosphate phosphatase and one SlTRE1 for trehalase in tomato genome. Nine SlTPSs, 4 SlTPPs and SlTRE1 were selected for functional analyses to explore their involvement in tomato disease resistance. Some selected SlTPSs, SlTPPs and SlTRE1 responded with distinct expression induction patterns to Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst DC3000 as well as to defense signaling hormones (e.g. salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and a precursor of ethylene. Virus-induced gene silencing-mediated silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4 or SlTPS7 led to deregulation of ROS accumulation and attenuated the expression of defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and thus deteriorated the resistance against B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. By contrast, silencing of SlTPS5 or SlTPP2 led to an increased expression of the defense-related genes upon pathogen infection and conferred an increased resistance against Pst DC3000. Silencing of SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 or SlTPP2 affected trehalose level in tomato plants with or without infection of B. cinerea or Pst DC3000. These results demonstrate that SlTPS3, SlTPS4, SlTPS5, SlTPS7 and SlTPP2 play roles in resistance against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, implying the importance of trehalose and tis metabolism in regulation of defense response against pathogens in tomato.

  11. Tomato chlorotic mottle virus is a target of RNA silencing but the presence of specific short interfering RNAs does not guarantee resistance in transgenic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribeiro, S.G.; Lohuis, H.; Goldbach, R.W.; Prins, M.

    2007-01-01

    Tomato chlorotic mottle virus (ToCMoV) is a begomovirus found widespread in tomato fields in Brazil. ToCMoV isolate BA-Se1 (ToCMoV-[BA-Se1]) was shown to trigger the plant RNA silencing surveillance in different host plants and, coinciding with a decrease in viral DNA levels, small interfering RNAs

  12. AP2/ERF Transcription Factors Involved in Response to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curly Virus in Tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Huang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curly virus (TYLCV, transmitted by the whitefly (, causes leaf curling and yellowing, plant dwarfism, and growth inhibition in tomato ( L.. The APETALA2 (AP2 and ethylene response factor (ERF transcription factor (TF family, the largest plant-specific TF family, was identified to function in plant development and pathogen defense. Our study aimed to analyze the mechanism underlying the function of ERF (SlERF TFs in response to TYLCV infection and improve useful information to increase the resistance to TYLCV in tomato. A total of 22 tomato AP2/ERF TFs in response to TYLCV were identified according to transcriptome database. Five ERF-B3 TFs were identified in cultivars Hongbeibei (highly resistant, Zheza-301, Zhefen-702 (both resistant, Jinpeng-1, and Xianke-6 (both susceptible. Interaction network indicated that SlERF TFs could interact with mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK. Expression profiles of five ERF-B3 genes (, , , , and were detected by quantitative real-time–polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR after TYLCV infection in five tomato cultivars. expression was upregulated in five tomato cultivars. The expressions of three genes (, , and were upregulated in Zheza-301 and Zhefen-702. and expressions were downregulated in Hongbeibei and Xianke-6, respectively. Yeast one-hybrid showed that the GCC-box binding ability of ERF-B3 TFs differed in resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars. Expression profiles were related to the GCC-box binding ability of SlERF TFs in resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars. The defense mechanism underlying the tomato’s response to TYLCV involved a complicated network, which provided important information for us in breeding and genetic analysis.

  13. Host plant resistance against tomato spotted wilt virus in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) and its impact on susceptibility to the virus, virus population genetics, and vector feeding behavior and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaraj, Sivamani; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Culbreath, Albert K; Riley, David G; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-02-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) severely affects peanut production in the southeastern United States. Breeding efforts over the last three decades resulted in the release of numerous peanut genotypes with field resistance to TSWV. The degree of field resistance in these genotypes has steadily increased over time, with recently released genotypes exhibiting a higher degree of field resistance than older genotypes. However, most new genotypes have never been evaluated in the greenhouse or laboratory against TSWV or thrips, and the mechanism of resistance is unknown. In this study, TSWV-resistant and -susceptible genotypes were subjected to TSWV mechanical inoculation. The incidence of TSWV infection was 71.7 to 87.2%. Estimation of TSWV nucleocapsid (N) gene copies did not reveal significant differences between resistant and susceptible genotypes. Parsimony and principal component analyses of N gene nucleotide sequences revealed inconsistent differences between virus isolates collected from resistant and susceptible genotypes and between old (collected in 1998) and new (2010) isolates. Amino acid sequence analyses indicated consistent differences between old and new isolates. In addition, we found evidence for overabundance of nonsynonymous substitutions. However, there was no evidence for positive selection. Purifying selection, population expansion, and differentiation seem to have influenced the TSWV populations temporally rather than positive selection induced by host resistance. Choice and no-choice tests indicated that resistant and susceptible genotypes differentially affected thrips feeding and survival. Thrips feeding and survival were suppressed on some resistant genotypes compared with susceptible genotypes. These findings reveal how TSWV resistance in peanut could influence evolution, epidemiology, and management of TSWV.

  14. Evaluation of a SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme involved in resistance to Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis in Solanum peruvianum, through a tomato mottle virus VIGS assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Janeth Esparza-Araiza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm causes bacterial wilt and canker of tomato. Currently, no Solanum lycopersicum resistant varieties are commercially available, but some degree of Cmm resistance has been identified in Solanum peruvianum. Previous research showed up-regulation of a SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme (SCEI transcript in resistant S. peruvianum compared to susceptible S. lycopersicum following infection by Cmm. In order to test the role of SCEI in resistance to Cmm, a fragment of the gene from S. peruvianum was cloned into a novel virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS vector based on the geminivirus Tomato Mottle Virus (ToMoV. Using biolistic inoculation, the ToMoV-based VIGS vector was shown to be effective in S. peruvianum by silencing the magnesium chelatase gene, which resulted in leaf bleaching. The ToMoV_SCEI construct resulted in approx. 61% silencing of SCEI in leaves of S. peruvianum as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. VIGS of SCEI in S. peruvianum resulted in unilateral wilting (15 dpi and subsequent death (20 dpi of the entire plant after Cmm inoculation, whereas empty vector-treated plants only showed wilting in the Cmm-inoculated leaf. SCEI-silenced plants also showed higher Cmm colonization with an average of 4.5 times more damaged tissue compared to the empty vector control plants. SCEI appears to play an important role in the innate immunity of S. peruvianum against Cmm, perhaps through the regulation of WRKY transcription factors, which may lead to expression of proteins involved in salicylic acid-dependent defense responses.

  15. Natural incidence of tomato viruses in the North of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Mohammadi HAJIABADI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey was conducted in Qazvin province in the North of Iran, to determine the incidence of tomato viruses including: Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV, Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV, Tomato ring spot virus (ToRSV, Tomato aspermy virus (TAV, Potato virus Y (PVY, Beet curly top virus (BCTV, and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV. A total of 742 tomato symptomatic samples were collected during the summer of 2007 in five regions of Qazvin province (Qazvin, Takestan, Boeen-Zahra, Alborz and Abiyek and tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. TSWV was detected in Alborz (4.4 % and Abiyek (3.57% regions but TMV and CMV were detected in all five regions. The greatest and least incidence of tomato viruses were recorded in Alborz (40.7 % and Takestan (11.1 %, respectively. The presence of these viruses was also evaluated in the weed hosts as natural sources of plant viruses. The greatest and least incidence of tomato viruses in weed hosts were recorded in Boeen-Zahra (25.6 % and Qazvin (12.8 %, respectively. TSWV was not detected in weeds. Transmission tests demonstrated that Thrips tabaci acts as TSWV carrier and Myzus persicae and Aphis gossypii were CMV carriers. Seed transmission tests were positive for TMV (13 tomato seedlings from 100 seedlings, but no TSWV transmission was observed through the seeds of infected tomato fruits.

  16. Tomato marchitez virus, a new plant picorna-like virus from tomato related to tomato torrado virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, M.; Dullemans, A.M.; Heuvel, van den J.F.J.M.; Maris, P.C.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    A new virus was isolated from a tomato plant from the state of Sinaloa in Mexico. This plant showed symptoms locally known as `marchitez disease¿: severe leaf necrosis, beginning at the base of the leaflets, and necrotic rings on the fruits. A virus was isolated from the infected plant consisting of

  17. Evaluation of a SUMO E2 Conjugating Enzyme Involved in Resistance to Clavibacter michiganensis Subsp. michiganensis in Solanum peruvianum, Through a Tomato Mottle Virus VIGS Assay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esparza-Araiza, Mayra J.; Bañuelos-Hernández, Bernardo; Argüello-Astorga, Gerardo R.; Lara-Ávila, José P.; Goodwin, Paul H.; Isordia-Jasso, María I.; Castillo-Collazo, Rosalba; Rougon-Cardoso, Alejandra; Alpuche-Solís, Ángel G.

    2015-01-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis (Cmm) causes bacterial wilt and canker of tomato. Currently, no Solanum lycopersicum resistant varieties are commercially available, but some degree of Cmm resistance has been identified in Solanum peruvianum. Previous research showed up-regulation of a SUMO E2 conjugating enzyme (SCEI) transcript in S. peruvianum compared to S. lycopersicum following infection with Cmm. In order to test the role of SCEI in resistance to Cmm, a fragment of SCEI from S. peruvianum was cloned into a novel virus-induced gene-silencing (VIGS) vector based on the geminivirus, Tomato Mottle Virus (ToMoV). Using biolistic inoculation, the ToMoV-based VIGS vector was shown to be effective in S. peruvianum by silencing the magnesium chelatase gene, resulting in leaf bleaching. VIGS with the ToMoV_SCEI construct resulted in ~61% silencing of SCEI in leaves of S. peruvianum as determined by quantitative RT-PCR. The SCEI-silenced plants showed unilateral wilting (15 dpi) and subsequent death (20 dpi) of the entire plant after Cmm inoculation, whereas the empty vector-treated plants only showed wilting in the Cmm-inoculated leaf. The SCEI-silenced plants showed higher Cmm colonization and an average of 4.5 times more damaged tissue compared to the empty vector control plants. SCEI appears to play an important role in the innate immunity of S. peruvianum against Cmm, perhaps through the regulation of transcription factors, leading to expression of proteins involved in salicylic acid-dependent defense responses. PMID:26734014

  18. Tomato plant inheritance of antixenotic resistance to tomato leafminer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adilson de Castro Antônio

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to determine the inheritance of resistance by antixenosis in tomato plants (Lycopersicon esculentum to tomato leafminer [Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae]. Evaluations were performed for tomato plants of the generations P1, P2, F1, F2, RC1 and RC2. The measured characteristic in the parents, BGH-1497 (P2 male and 'Santa Clara' (P1 female, and in the F1, F2, RC1 and RC2 generations was the number of eggs per plant. This number was converted to the oviposition nonpreference index. The inheritance of antixenosis resistance of genotype BGH-1497 is ruled by a gene of greater effect and polygenes in epistatic interactions, with a phenotypic proportion of 13:3 between susceptible and resistant genotypes, respectively.

  19. Pepino mosaic virus and Tomato chlorosis virus causing mixed infection in protected tomato crops in Sicily

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SALVATORE DAVINO

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available An unusual virus-like yellow leaf disorder associated with fruit marbling was observed during the winter of 2005 in some greenhouse tomato crops in the province of Ragusa Sicily (Southern Italy. Leaf samples from 250 symptomatic tomato plants were serologically tested by DAS-ELISA technique for 5 viruses: Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV, Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV. PepMV was detected in 215 of the samples. The virus was mechanically transmitted to cucumber, wild metel, wild tobacco and ‘Rio Grande’ tomato. The experimental host range of PepMV-Ragusa differed from that of the PepMV found in Sardinia in 2001, which infected ‘Camone’ tomato. By applying RT-PCR to 25 PepMV-infected tomato plants, the expected 844 bp DNA fragment for PepMV and the expected 439 bp DNA fragment for Tomato chlororis virus (ToCV were obtained from all the samples tested. Sequences of the obtained amplicons were used to study the phylogenetic relationships of the viruses with isolates from other countries. Nucleotide sequence alignments showed that the sequence CP-PepMV-Ragusa (Genbank acc. No. DQ 517884 were 99% homologous with both US2 and Spain-Murcia isolates, while those of ToCV-Ragusa (Genbank acc. No. DQ517885 isolate HSP70, were 99% homologous with the Florida isolate, and 98% with the Lebanon isolate. The results proved that the unusual disorder found in greenhouse tomatoes in Sicily can be associated with infections by PepMV and ToCV, reported for the first time in a mixed infection.

  20. Immunity to tomato yellow leaf curl virus in transgenic tomato is associated with accumulation of transgene small RNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibman, Diana; Prakash, Shanmugam; Wolf, Dalia; Zelcer, Aaron; Anfoka, Ghandi; Haviv, Sabrina; Brumin, Marina; Gaba, Victor; Arazi, Tzahi; Lapidot, Moshe; Gal-On, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Gene silencing is a natural defense response of plants against invading RNA and DNA viruses. The RNA post-transcriptional silencing system has been commonly utilized to generate transgenic crop plants that are "immune" to plant virus infection. Here, we applied this approach against the devastating DNA virus tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) in its host tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). To generate broad resistance to a number of different TYLCV viruses, three conserved sequences (the intergenic region [NCR], V1-V2 and C1-C2 genes) from the genome of the severe virus (TYLCV) were synthesized as a single insert and cloned into a hairpin configuration in a binary vector, which was used to transform TYLCV-susceptible tomato plants. Eight of 28 independent transgenic tomato lines exhibited immunity to TYLCV-Is and to TYLCV-Mld, but not to tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus, which shares relatively low sequence homology with the transgene. In addition, a marker-free (nptII-deleted) transgenic tomato line was generated for the first time by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation without antibiotic selection, followed by screening of 1180 regenerated shoots by whitefly-mediated TYLCV inoculation. Resistant lines showed a high level of transgene-siRNA (t-siRNA) accumulation (22% of total small RNA) with dominant sizes of 21 nt (73%) and 22 nt (22%). The t-siRNA displayed hot-spot distribution ("peaks") along the transgene, with different distribution patterns than the viral-siRNA peaks observed in TYLCV-infected tomato. A grafting experiment demonstrated the mobility of 0.04% of the t-siRNA from transgenic rootstock to non-transformed scion, even though scion resistance against TYLCV was not achieved.

  1. Grafting on a Non-Transgenic Tolerant Tomato Variety Confers Resistance to the Infection of a Sw5- Breaking Strain of Tomato spotted wilt virus via RNA Silencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spanò, R.; Mascia, T.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Gallitelli, D.

    2015-01-01

    RNA silencing controls endogenous gene expression and drives defensive reactions against invasive nucleic acids like viruses. In plants, it has been demonstrated that RNA silencing can be transmitted through grafting between scions and silenced rootstocks to attenuate virus and viroid accumulation

  2. p22 of Tomato chlorosis virus, an RNA silencing suppressor, is naturally expressed in the infected plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) in the genus Crinivirus of the family Closteroviridae, is an economically important emerging disease of tomato worldwide. This whitefly-transmitted virus is difficult to control. The best strategy in viral disease management is through the use of a resistant cultivar....

  3. Predicting the presence of whiteflies and tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Florida tomato fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida is one of the leading states for production of fresh market tomatoes. Production is severely affected by Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). The objective of this study was to identify landscape and climatic factors that drive whitefly populations and TYLCV incidence in commercial tomato ...

  4. Conservation and Dispersion of Genes Conferring Resistance to Tomato Begomoviruses between Tomato and Pepper Genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Mangal

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present climate change scenario, controlling plant disease through exploitation of host plant resistance could contribute toward the sustainable crop production and global food security. In this respect, the identification of new sources of resistance and utilization of genetic diversity within the species may help in the generation of cultivars with improved disease resistance. Begomoviruses namely, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV and Chilli leaf curl virus (ChLCV are known to cause major yield losses in several economically important crop plants of the family Solanaceae. Though co-occurrence, association and synergistic interactions among these viruses in the host plants is reported, whether orthologous genetic loci in related host plants could be responsible for conferring resistance to these viruses has not been investigated yet. Several loci including Ty1, Ty2, Ty3, Ty4, and ty5 have been reported to confer resistance to leaf curl viruses in tomato. Here, we examined the pepper orthologous markers, corresponding to these QTL regions, for polymorphism between ChLCV susceptible and resistant genotypes of pepper. Further, to examine if the polymorphic markers are segregating with the disease resistance, Bulk Segregant Analysis (BSA was performed on F2 population derived from crosses between resistant and susceptible lines. However, none of the markers showed polymorphism in BSA suggesting that the tested markers are not linked to genes/QTLs responsible for conferring resistance to ChLCV in the selected genotypes. In silico analysis was performed to study the synteny and collinearity of genes located within these QTL regions in tomato and pepper genomes, which revealed that more than 60% genes located in Ty2 and Ty4, 13.71% genes in Ty1, 23.07% in Ty3, and 44.77% genes located within ty5 QTL region in tomato are conserved in pepper genome. However, despite such a high conservation in gene content, the linkage relationship in these

  5. Tomato genome-wide transcriptional responses to Fusarium wilt and Tomato Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ferriello, Francesca; Tardella, Luca; Ferrarini, Alberto; Sigillo, Loredana; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Since gene expression approaches constitute a starting point for investigating plant-pathogen systems, we performed a transcriptional analysis to identify a set of genes of interest in tomato plants infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV). Differentially expressed tomato genes upon inoculation with Fol and ToMV were identified at two days post-inoculation. A large overlap was found in differentially expressed genes throughout the two incompatible interactions. However, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis evidenced specific categories in both interactions. Response to ToMV seems more multifaceted, since more than 70 specific categories were enriched versus the 30 detected in Fol interaction. In particular, the virus stimulated the production of an invertase enzyme that is able to redirect the flux of carbohydrates, whereas Fol induced a homeostatic response to prevent the fungus from killing cells. Genomic mapping of transcripts suggested that specific genomic regions are involved in resistance response to pathogen. Coordinated machinery could play an important role in prompting the response, since 60% of pathogen receptor genes (NB-ARC-LRR, RLP, RLK) were differentially regulated during both interactions. Assessment of genomic gene expression patterns could help in building up models of mediated resistance responses.

  6. Tomato genome-wide transcriptional responses to Fusarium wilt and Tomato Mosaic Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Andolfo

    Full Text Available Since gene expression approaches constitute a starting point for investigating plant-pathogen systems, we performed a transcriptional analysis to identify a set of genes of interest in tomato plants infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol and Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV. Differentially expressed tomato genes upon inoculation with Fol and ToMV were identified at two days post-inoculation. A large overlap was found in differentially expressed genes throughout the two incompatible interactions. However, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis evidenced specific categories in both interactions. Response to ToMV seems more multifaceted, since more than 70 specific categories were enriched versus the 30 detected in Fol interaction. In particular, the virus stimulated the production of an invertase enzyme that is able to redirect the flux of carbohydrates, whereas Fol induced a homeostatic response to prevent the fungus from killing cells. Genomic mapping of transcripts suggested that specific genomic regions are involved in resistance response to pathogen. Coordinated machinery could play an important role in prompting the response, since 60% of pathogen receptor genes (NB-ARC-LRR, RLP, RLK were differentially regulated during both interactions. Assessment of genomic gene expression patterns could help in building up models of mediated resistance responses.

  7. Clustering and cellular distribution characteristics of virus particles of Tomato spotted wilt virus and Tomato zonate spot virus in different plant hosts

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Zhongkai; Zheng, Kuanyu; Dong, Jiahong; Fang, Qi; Hong, Jian; Wang, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Tomato zonate spot virus (TZSV) are the two dominant species of thrip-transmitted tospoviruses, cause significant losses in crop yield in Yunnan and its neighboring provinces in China...

  8. A Jasmonate-Inducible Defense Trait Transferred from Wild into Cultivated Tomato Establishes Increased Whitefly Resistance and Reduced Viral Disease Incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escobar-Bravo, R.; Alba, J.M.; Pons, C.; Granell, A.; Kant, M.R.; Moriones, E.; Fernández-Muñoz, R.

    2016-01-01

    Whiteflies damage tomatoes mostly via the viruses they transmit. Cultivated tomatoes lack many of the resistances of their wild relatives. In order to increase protection to its major pest, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci and its transmitted Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV), we introgressed a

  9. A jasmonate-inducible defense trait transferred from wild into cultivated tomato establishes increased whitefly resistance and reduced viral disease incidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Escoba, R.; Alba, J.M.; Pons, C.; Granell, A.; Kant, M.R.; Moriones, E.; Fernández-Muñoz, R.

    2016-01-01

    Whiteflies damage tomatoes mostly via the viruses they transmit. Cultivated tomatoes lack many of the resistances of their wild relatives. In order to increase protection to its major pest, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci and its transmitted Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV), we introgressed a

  10. Tomato chocolàte virus: a new plant virus infecting tomato and a proposed member of the genus Torradovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, M.; Dullemans, A.M.; Heuvel, van den J.F.J.M.; Maris, P.C.; Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    2010-01-01

    A new virus was isolated from a tomato plant from Guatemala showing necrotic spots on the bases of the leaves and chocolate-brown patches on the fruits. Structural and molecular analysis showed the virus to be clearly related to but distinct from the recently described Tomato torrado virus (ToTV)

  11. Reaction of Lycopersicon species and varieties to Potato virus Y (PVY(NTN)) and Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takács, A P; Kazinczi, G; Horváth, J; Gáborjányi, R

    2003-01-01

    Virus susceptibility of 33 Lycopersicon species and varieties to NTN strain of Potato virus Y (PVY(NTN)) and Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) were studied. Inoculated plants were tested for infection symptomatologically, serologically and by back inoculation as well. New incompatible and compatible host-virus relations have been determined. All tested plants were susceptible to ToMV. However, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. convar. parviboccatum Lehm. var. cerasiforme (Dun.) Alef. s.l., L. peruvianum (L.) Mill. and L. hirsutum Humb. et Bonpl. were extreme resistant (immune) to PVY(NTN). Other species were susceptible. Resistant lycopersicon genotypes could be used as sources for virus resistance.

  12. First report of southern Tomato virus in tomato in the Canary Islands, Spain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, M.; Dullemans, A.M.; Espino, A.; Botella, M.; Alfaro-Fernández, A.; Font, M.I.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2006, tomato plants with torrado disease were sampled in Spain. In a sample of cv. Mariana, originating from Gran Canaria, Tomato torrado virus (ToTV, genus Torradovirus) was detected (isolate GCN06; Alfaro-Fernández et al., 2010). In 2013, the sample was further analysed using

  13. Evaluation of peanut genotypes for resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus by mechanical and thrips inoculation Avaliação de genótipos de amendoim em relação à resistência ao Tomato spotted wilt virus por meio de inoculação mecânica e por tripes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Cordeiro do Nascimento

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to evaluate the reactions of three peanut breeding lines (IC-10, IC-34, and ICGV 86388 to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV by mechanical and thrips inoculation, under greenhouse conditions, and compare them to the reactions of cultivars SunOleic, Georgia Green, and the breeding line C11-2-39. TSWV infection by mechanical inoculation was visually assessed using an index ranging from 0 (no symptoms to 4 (apical death. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to confirm TSWV infection from both mechanical and thrips inoculations. IC-10, IC-34, ICGV 86388, and C11-2-39 were more resistant than the cultivars SunOleic and Georgia Green based on mechanical inoculation. Upon thrips inoculation only IC-34 and ICGV-86388 were infected by TSWV, as demonstrated by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR, although no symptoms of infection were observed. The peanut breeding lines IC-10, IC-34, and ICGV 86388 show higher level of resistance to TSWV than cultivar Georgia Green considered a standard for TSWV resistance.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as reações das linhagens de amendoim IC-10, IC-34 e ICGV 86388 quanto à resistência ao Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV, por meio de inoculação mecânica e por tripes, em casa de vegetação, e compará-las às reações das cultivares SunOleic, Georgia Green e da linhagem C11-2-39. A infecção de TSWV após inoculação mecânica foi visualmente avaliada, utilizando-se escala de notas que variam de zero (sem sintomas a quatro (morte apical. A análise pelo teste ELISA confirmou a infecção de TSWV em ambos os tipos de inoculação. As linhagens IC-10, IC-34, ICGV 86388 e C11-2-39 foram mais resistentes do que as cultivares SunOleic e Georgia Green, com base nos resultados da inoculação mecânica. Em relação à inoculação por tripes, apenas IC-34 e ICGV 86388 foram infectadas por TSWV, conforme demonstrado pela reação em cadeia da polimerase com

  14. Effect of tiazofurin on tomato plants infected with tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caner, J; Amélia, M; Alexandre, V; Vicente, M

    1984-12-01

    Tiazofurin (2-beta-D-ribofuranosylthiazole-4-carboxamide) was examined for its activity against tomato-spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in tomato plants. Solutions containing 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/l of the drug were sprayed onto the leaves. The results showed that 100 and 200 mg/l were the most efficient concentrations to suppress TSWV infection, thereby delaying the appearance of systemic symptoms. The drug was more effective in controlling TSWV infection when applied after than before virus inoculation. The results suggest that tiazofurin can be used as an efficient antiviral drug in the treatment of TSWV-infected tomato plants.

  15. Generation and characterization of mutants of tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oliveira Resende, de R.

    1993-01-01

    In nature, tospoviruses like tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) are exclusively transmitted by thrips species (Sakimura, 1962) producing numerous enveloped virions during infection, which accumulate in the cisternae of the endoplasmatic. reticulum. system (Kitajima, 1965; Milne, 1970; Ie,

  16. The role of NSm during tomato spotted wilt virus infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Storms, M.M.H.

    1998-01-01

    In the past ten years the genome organisation of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has been intensively studied in our laboratory. Complete genome sequence data revealed that this enveloped plant virus belongs to the Bunyaviridae, a virus family further restricted to

  17. Evidence of local evolution of tomato-infecting begomovirus species in West Africa: characterization of tomato leaf curl Mali virus and tomato yellow leaf crumple virus from Mali.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Y-C; Noussourou, M; Kon, T; Rojas, M R; Jiang, H; Chen, L-F; Gamby, K; Foster, R; Gilbertson, R L

    2008-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl (TYLC) and tomato leaf curl (ToLC) diseases are serious constraints to tomato production in Mali and other countries in West Africa. In 2003 and 2004, samples of tomato showing virus-like symptoms were collected during a survey of tomato virus diseases in Mali. Three predominant symptom phenotypes were observed: (1) TYLC/ToLC (stunted upright growth and upcurled leaves with interveinal yellowing and vein purpling), (2) yellow leaf crumple and (3) broccoli or bonsai (severe stunting and distorted growth). Squash blot (SB) hybridization with a general begomovirus probe and/or SB/PCR analyses revealed begomovirus infection in plants with each of these symptom phenotypes and no evidence of phytoplasma infection. Sequence analysis of PCR-amplified begomovirus fragments revealed two putative new begomovirus species associated with the TYLC/ToLC and yellow leaf crumple symptom phenotypes, respectively. Full-length clones of these begomoviruses were obtained using PCR and overlapping primers. When introduced into N. benthamiana and tomato plants, these clones induced upward leaf curling and crumpling (the TYLC/ToLC-associated begomovirus) or downward leaf curl/yellow mottle (yellow leaf crumple-associated begomovirus) symptoms. Thus, these begomoviruses were named tomato leaf curl Mali virus (ToLCMLV) and tomato yellow leaf crumple virus (ToYLCrV). The genome organization of both viruses was similar to those of other monopartite begomoviruses. ToLCMLV and ToYLCrV were most closely related to each other and to tobacco leaf curl Zimbabwe virus (TbLCZV-[ZW]) and tomato curly stunt virus from South Africa (ToCSV-ZA). Thus, these likely represent tomato-infecting begomoviruses that evolved from indigenous begomoviruses on the African continent. Mixed infections of ToLCMLV and ToYLCrV in N. benthamiana and tomato plants resulted in more severe symptoms than in plants infected with either virus alone, suggesting a synergistic interaction. Agroinoculation

  18. The tomato gene Sw5 is a member of the coiled coil, nucleotide binding, leucine-rich repeat class of plant resistance genes and confers resistance to TSWV in tobacco

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassova, MI; Klein-Lankhorst, RM; Hille, J; Goldbach, RW; Prins, M; Spassova, Mariana I.; Prins, Theo W.; Klein-Lankhorst, René M.; Goldbach, Rob W.

    2001-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus is an important threat to tomato production worldwide. A single dominant resistance gene locus, Sw5, originating from Lycopersicon peruvianum, has been identified and introgressed in cultivated tomato plants. Here we present the genomic organization of a 35 250 bp fragment

  19. Western flower thrips can transmit Tomato spotted wilt virus from infected tomato fruits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has long been known to spread via plant propagation materials including transplants. Global dissemination of TSWV has also been linked to transport of thrips-infested and virus-infected horticultural and floricultural products through trade and commerce. However, th...

  20. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus C4 protein is a determinant of disease phenotype in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a monopartite begomovirus. Its genome contains six open reading frames, with V1 and V2 in sense, and C1 to C4 in complementary orientation. The functions of V1 and V2 are for coat protein and pre-coat, respectively. C1 is for virus replication, C2 for trans-a...

  1. Whitefly resistance in tomato: from accessions to mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucatti, A.F.

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is affected by a wide range of biotic stresses, of which Bemisia tabaci is one of the most important.Bemisia tabaci affects tomato directly through phloem sap feeding, and indirectly through its ability to be the vector of a large number of viruses. Different methods

  2. Wild tomato introgressions that confer resistance to begomoviruses in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begomoviruses, whitefly-transmitted geminiviruses, are one of the major diseases of tomatoes in subtropical and tropical regions. In Guatemala, several bipartite begomoviruses and the monopartite geminivirus, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, are present. Three experiments were conducted to evaluate th...

  3. Pepino mosaic virus, a first report of a virus infecting tomato in Syria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Fakhro

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This is the first report of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV occurring in tomato plants grown in plastic greenhouses in a Mediterranean city in Syria. One tomato fruit from sixty samples tested positive for this virus by DAS-ELISA. Biotest assay, RT-PCR, and sequencing confirmed the presence of PepMV. The highest sequence identity of the Syrian isolate was with the EU-tomato strains of PepMV.

  4. First Report of Tomato torrado virus Infecting Tomato in Colombia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, M.; Dullemans, A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants grown in plastic greenhouses near Villa de Leyva, northeast of Bogota, Colombia showed necrotic spots on the leaves in September 2008. Initial symptoms were necrosis beginning at the base of leaflets that were surrounded by yellow areas. These symptoms

  5. Incidences and progression of tomato chlorosis virus disease and tomato yellow leaf curl virus disease in tomato under different greenhouse covers in southeast Spain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Velasco; Simon; Janssen; Cenis

    2008-01-01

    ... a physical protection of crops against whiteflies. For tomato chlorosis virus disease (ToCD), the incidence correlated with the type of greenhouse cover and was most reduced under higher quality covers...

  6. Characterization of resistant tomato mutants to bacterial canker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-19

    square analyses were conducted to estimate recessive and dominant ratios for phenotypic resistance. RESULTS. EMS mutation was used to induce point mutation for obtaining resistant tomato plants against bacterial canker.

  7. Towards area wide management of insect vectored viruses of tomatoes in the Bowen district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, P R; Cremer, J E; Roach, R L; Steele, V; Subramaniam, S; Sivasubramaniam, V; Monsour, C; Mullins, T; Persley, D M; Gambley, C F

    2017-09-15

    The Bowen region of Northern Queensland is an important winter production area for tomatoes in Australia. There are three economically important viruses in the region that affect tomato, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato leafroll virus (PLRV), which are vectored by whiteflies, thrips and aphids, respectively. An area wide management approach is required to lower the primary inoculum throughout the district. To this end, we undertook investigations into the virus incidence and alternative hosts for the virus and vectors in different cropping regions throughout the district, as well as local management options such as insecticide application and possible non-host cover crops for the wet-season break in production. The initial incidence of Potato leafroll virus was very high, most probably due to abnormal weather patterns for the district, and has ceased to be a problem. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus is a continual problem even at the beginning of the season, indicating large reservoir host(s) in the environment. Only four alternative hosts have been identified: Stachytarpheta jamaicensis (TSWV), Solanum americanum (PLRV and TYLCV) Trianthema portulacastrum (TYLCV), and Amaranthus viridis(TLYCV). Different insecticide and application options were trialled for protection against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus, with the best possible option yielding marketable fruit more than ninety percent of a resistant hybrid. A trial of yield vs time of infection of TYLCV found that whitefly exclusion for 6 weeks post-transplant yielded an average increase of nearly three kilograms of marketable fruit per plant. A number of pulse crops have been confirmed as non-hosts of tomato yellow leaf curl for use as cover crops in the wet-season break. Most of the production has moved to dual resistant TYLCV/TSWV hybrids, though an area wide management program still needs to be established to reduce the primary inoculum throughout the district

  8. Evaluation of peanut genotypes for resistance to Tomato spotted wilt virus by mechanical and thrips inoculation Avaliação de genótipos de amendoim em relação à resistência ao Tomato spotted wilt virus por meio de inoculação mecânica e por tripes

    OpenAIRE

    Luciana Cordeiro do Nascimento; Viboon Pensuk; Nivânia Pereira da Costa; Francisco Miguel de Assis Filho; Gilvan Pio-Ribeiro; Carl Michael Deom; John Sherwood

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the reactions of three peanut breeding lines (IC-10, IC-34, and ICGV 86388) to Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) by mechanical and thrips inoculation, under greenhouse conditions, and compare them to the reactions of cultivars SunOleic, Georgia Green, and the breeding line C11-2-39. TSWV infection by mechanical inoculation was visually assessed using an index ranging from 0 (no symptoms) to 4 (apical death). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used ...

  9. A jasmonate-inducible defense trait transferred from wild into cultivated tomato establishes increased whitefly resistance and reduced viral disease incidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocío Escobar-Bravo

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Whiteflies damage tomatoes mostly via the viruses they transmit. Cultivated tomatoes lack many of the resistances of their wild relatives. In order to increase protection to its major pest, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci and its transmitted Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV, we introgressed a trichome-based resistance trait from the wild tomato Solanum pimpinellifolium into cultivated tomato, S. lycopersicum. The tomato backcross line BC5S2 contains acylsucrose-producing type-IV trichomes, unlike cultivated tomatoes, and exhibits increased, yet limited protection to whiteflies at early development stages. Treatment of young plants with methyl jasmonate (MeJA resulted in a 60% increase in type-IV trichome density, acylsucrose production, and enhanced resistance to whiteflies, leading to 50% decrease in the virus disease incidence compared to cultivated tomato. Using transcriptomics, metabolite analysis and insect bioassays we established the basis of this inducible resistance. We found that MeJA activated the expression of the genes involved in the biosynthesis of the defensive acylsugars in young BC5S2 plants leading to enhanced chemical defenses in their acquired type-IV trichomes. Our results show that not only constitutive but also these inducible defenses can be transferred from wild into cultivated crops to aid sustainable protection, suggesting that conventional breeding strategies provide a feasible alternative to increase pest resistance in tomato.

  10. Reference Gene Selection for qPCR Analysis in Tomato-Bipartite Begomovirus Interaction and Validation in Additional Tomato-Virus Pathosystems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana L M Lacerda

    Full Text Available Quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR is currently the most sensitive technique used for absolute and relative quantification of a target gene transcript, requiring the use of appropriated reference genes for data normalization. To accurately estimate the relative expression of target tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. genes responsive to several virus species in reverse transcription qPCR analysis, the identification of reliable reference genes is mandatory. In the present study, ten reference genes were analyzed across a set of eight samples: two tomato contrasting genotypes ('Santa Clara', susceptible, and its near-isogenic line 'LAM 157', resistant; subjected to two treatments (inoculation with Tomato chlorotic mottle virus (ToCMoV and its mock-inoculated control and in two distinct times after inoculation (early and late. Reference genes stability was estimated by three statistical programs (geNorm, NormFinder and BestKeeper. To validate the results over broader experimental conditions, a set of ten samples, corresponding to additional three tomato-virus pathosystems that included tospovirus, crinivirus and tymovirus + tobamovirus, was analyzed together with the tomato-ToCMoV pathosystem dataset, using the same algorithms. Taking into account the combined analyses of the ranking order outputs from the three algorithms, TIP41 and EF1 were identified as the most stable genes for tomato-ToCMoV pathosystem, and TIP41 and EXP for the four pathosystems together, and selected to be used as reference in the forthcoming expression qPCR analysis of target genes in experimental conditions involving the aforementioned tomato-virus pathosystems.

  11. Tomato yellow leaf virus (TYLCV): The structure, ecotypes and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tomato yellow leaf virus (TYLCV) transmitted by the whitefly are a group of geminiviruses, which can cause large economic loses. The genome of TYLCV contains six partially overlapping open reading frames (ORFs) bidirectionally arranged into two transcriptional units that are separated by an intergenic region (IR).

  12. Tomato chlorotic spot virus Identified in Marsdenia floribunda in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornamental crops including hoya, annual vinca and portulaca have recently been identified with Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) infections in Florida. Observations of Marsdenia floribunda, commonly known as Madagascar jasmine, in September 2016 revealed TCSV-like symptoms. Testing of these sympt...

  13. Serological detection of viruses infecting tomato and pepper in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mixed viral infections were few, PVY + PVMV occurring only in one tomato leaf sample while PVMV + CMV occurred on three pepper leaf samples. The control of aphid vectors that transmit these viruses and good sanitary practices against soil borne ToMV would minimize disease incidences and subsequent yield loss.

  14. Diversity, Distribution, and Evolution of Tomato Viruses in China Uncovered by Small RNA Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chenxi; Sun, Xuepeng; Taylor, Angela; Jiao, Chen; Xu, Yimin; Cai, Xiaofeng; Wang, Xiaoli; Ge, Chenhui; Pan, Guanghui; Wang, Quanxi; Fei, Zhangjun; Wang, Quanhua

    2017-06-01

    Tomato is a major vegetable crop that has tremendous popularity. However, viral disease is still a major factor limiting tomato production. Here, we report the tomato virome identified through sequencing small RNAs of 170 field-grown samples collected in China. A total of 22 viruses were identified, including both well-documented and newly detected viruses. The tomato viral community is dominated by a few species, and they exhibit polymorphisms and recombination in the genomes with cold spots and hot spots. Most samples were coinfected by multiple viruses, and the majority of identified viruses are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. Evolutionary analysis of one of the most dominant tomato viruses, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), predicts its origin and the time back to its most recent common ancestor. The broadly sampled data have enabled us to identify several unreported viruses in tomato, including a completely new virus, which has a genome of ∼13.4 kb and groups with aphid-transmitted viruses in the genus Cytorhabdovirus Although both DNA and RNA viruses can trigger the biogenesis of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs), we show that features such as length distribution, paired distance, and base selection bias of vsiRNA sequences reflect different plant Dicer-like proteins and Argonautes involved in vsiRNA biogenesis. Collectively, this study offers insights into host-virus interaction in tomato and provides valuable information to facilitate the management of viral diseases. IMPORTANCE Tomato is an important source of micronutrients in the human diet and is extensively consumed around the world. Virus is among the major constraints on tomato production. Categorizing virus species that are capable of infecting tomato and understanding their diversity and evolution are challenging due to difficulties in detecting such fast-evolving biological entities. Here, we report the landscape of the tomato virome in China, the leading country in

  15. Clustering and cellular distribution characteristics of virus particles of Tomato spotted wilt virus and Tomato zonate spot virus in different plant hosts

    OpenAIRE

    ZHANG Zhongkai; Zheng, Kuanyu; Dong, Jiahong; Fang, Qi; Hong, Jian; Wang, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Tomato zonate spot virus (TZSV) are the two dominant species of thrip-transmitted tospoviruses, cause significant losses in crop yield in Yunnan and its neighboring provinces in China. TSWV and TZSV belong to different serogroup of tospoviruses but induce similar symptoms in the same host plant species, which makes diagnostic difficult. We used different electron microscopy preparing methods to investigate clustering and cellular distribution of...

  16. Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) infecting Lycopersicon esculentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafez, El Sayed E; Saber, Ghada A; Fattouh, Faiza A

    2010-01-01

    Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) was detected in tomato crop (Lycopersicon esculentum) in Egypt with characteristic mosaic leaf deformation, stunting, and bushy growth symptoms. TBSV infection was confirmed serologically by ELISA and calculated incidence was 25.5%. Basic physicochemical properties of a purified TBSV Egh isolate were identical to known properties of tombusviruses of isometric 30-nm diameter particles, 41-kDa coat protein and the genome of approximately 4800 nt. This is the first TBSV isolate reported in Egypt. Cloning and partial sequencing of the isolate showed that it is more closely related to TBSV-P and TBSV-Ch than TBSV-Nf and TBSV-S strains of the virus. However, it is distinct from the above strains and could be a new strain of the virus which further confirms the genetic diversity of tombusviruses.

  17. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus can be acquired and transmitted by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) from tomato fruits

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Delatte, H.; Dalmon, A.; Rist, D.; Soustrade, I.; Wuster, G.; Lett, J.M.; Goldbach, R.W.; Peterschmitt, M.; Reynaud, B.

    2003-01-01

    The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is an insect pest causing worldwide economic losses, especially as a vector of geminiviruses such as Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). Currently, imported and exported tomato fruit are not monitored for TYLCV infection because they are not considered to represent a

  18. Tomato chocolate spot virus, a member of a new torradovirus species that causes a necrosis-associated disease of tomato in Guatemala

    OpenAIRE

    Batuman, O; Kuo, Y.-W.; Palmieri, M; Rojas, M. R.; Gilbertson, R. L.

    2010-01-01

    Tomatoes in Guatemala have been affected by a new disease, locally known as ?mancha de chocolate? (chocolate spot). The disease is characterized by distinct necrotic spots on leaves, stems and petioles that eventually expand and cause a dieback of apical tissues. Samples from symptomatic plants tested negative for infection by tomato spotted wilt virus, tobacco streak virus, tobacco etch virus and other known tomato-infecting viruses. A virus-like agent was sap-transmitted from diseased tissu...

  19. Identification of microRNAs and their targets in tomato infected with Cucumber mosaic virus based on deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Junli; Liu, Shasha; Wang, Mengna; Lang, Qiulei; Jin, Chunzhi

    2014-12-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play important regulatory roles in plant development and stress responses. Tomato is an economically important vegetable crop in the world with publicly available genomic information database, but only a limited number of tomato miRNAs have been identified. In this study, two independent small RNA libraries from mock and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-infected tomatoes were constructed, respectively, and sequenced with a high-throughput Illumina Solexa system. Based on sequence analysis and hairpin structure prediction, a total of 50 plant miRNAs and 273 potentially candidate miRNAs (PC-miRNAs) were firstly identified in tomato, with 12 plant miRNAs and 82 PC-miRNAs supported by both the 3p and 5p strands. Comparative analysis revealed that 79 miRNAs (including 15 new tomato miRNAs) and 40 PC-miRNAs were differentially expressed between the two libraries, and the expression patterns of some new tomato miRNAs and PC-miRNAs were further validated by qRT-PCR. Moreover, potential targets for some of the known and new tomato miRNAs were identified by the recently developed degradome sequencing approach, and target annotation indicated that they were involved in multiple biological processes, including transcriptional regulation and virus resistance. Gene ontology analysis of these target transcripts demonstrated that defense response- and photosynthesis-related genes were most affected in CMV-Fny-infected tomatoes. Because tomato is not only an important crop but also is a genetic model for basic biology research, our study contributes to the understanding of miRNAs in response to virus infection.

  20. Analysis of Clonostachys rosea-induced resistance to tomato gray mold disease in tomato leaves.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liana Dalcantara Ongouya Mouekouba

    Full Text Available Tomato gray mold disease, caused by Botrytis cinerea, is a serious disease in tomato. Clonostachys rosea is an antagonistic microorganism to B. cinerea. To investigate the induced resistance mechanism of C. rosea, we examined the effects of these microorganisms on tomato leaves, along with changes in the activities of three defense enzymes (PAL, PPO, GST, second messengers (NO, H2O2, O2(- and phytohormones (IAA, ABA, GA3, ZT, MeJA, SA and C2H4. Compared to the control, all treatments induced higher levels of PAL, PPO and GST activity in tomato leaves and increased NO, SA and GA3 levels. The expression of WRKY and MAPK, two important transcription factors in plant disease resistance, was upregulated in C. rosea- and C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis analysis showed that two abundant proteins were present in the C. rosea plus B. cinerea-treated samples but not in the other samples. These proteins were determined (by mass spectrum analysis to be LEXYL2 (β-xylosidase and ATP synthase CF1 alpha subunit. Therefore, C. rosea plus B. cinerea treatment induces gray mold resistance in tomato. This study provides a basis for elucidating the mechanism of C. rosea as a biocontrol agent.

  1. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses.

  2. Genomics of Fungal Disease Resistance in Tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Panthee, Dilip R.; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important vegetable crop worldwide. Often times, its production is hindered by fungal diseases. Important fungal diseases limiting tomato production are late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, early blight, caused by Alternaria solanii, and septoria leaf spot, caused by Septoria lycopersici, fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporium fsp. oxysporium, and verticilium wilt caused by Verticilium dahlea. The Phytophthora infestans is the same fungus tha...

  3. Tomato necrotic ringspot virus, a new tospovirus isolated in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seepiban, Channarong; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Attathom, Tipvadee; Attathom, Supat

    2011-02-01

    A new tospovirus isolated from naturally infected tomato plants grown in Nakhon Pathom province (Thailand) was characterized. Infected plants showed symptoms consisting of necrotic spots, necrotic ringspots and stem necrosis. This virus was detected using general antibodies that could recognize watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV) and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV). However, it did not react with specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to WSMoV and CaCV or a specific MAb to MYSV. The complete nucleotide sequences of S and M RNAs of the virus were determined. They were 3,023 and 4,716 nucleotides in length, respectively, and contained two ORFs in an ambisense arrangement. Sequence analysis indicated that amino acid sequence of the N protein shared 58.2%, 56.0% and 51.8% identity with those of CaCV, WSMoV and MYSV, respectively. The virus was experimentally transmitted by Thrips palmi and Ceratothripoides claratris. Based on our results, we conclude that this tospovirus isolate should be considered a member of a new species. The name tomato necrotic ringspot virus (TNRV) is proposed for this tospovirus.

  4. Genomics of Fungal Disease Resistance in Tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthee, Dilip R.; Chen, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is an important vegetable crop worldwide. Often times, its production is hindered by fungal diseases. Important fungal diseases limiting tomato production are late blight, caused by Phytophthora infestans, early blight, caused by Alternaria solanii, and septoria leaf spot, caused by Septoria lycopersici, fusarium wilt caused by Fusarium oxysporium fsp. oxysporium, and verticilium wilt caused by Verticilium dahlea. The Phytophthora infestans is the same fungus that caused the devastating loss of potato in Europe in 1845. A similar magnitude of crop loss in tomato has not occurred but Phytophthora infestans has caused the complete loss of tomato crops around the world on a small scale. Several attempts have been made through conventional breeding and the molecular biological approaches to understand the biology of host-pathogen interaction so that the disease can be managed and crop loss prevented. In this review, we present a comprehensive analysis of information produced by molecular genetic and genomic experiments on host-pathogen interactions of late blight, early blight, septoria leaf spot, verticilim wilt and fusarium wilt in tomato. Furthermore, approaches adopted to manage these diseases in tomato including genetic transformation are presented. Attempts made to link molecular markers with putative genes and their use in crop improvement are discussed. PMID:20808521

  5. A Tomato necrotic dwarf virus isolate from Datura with poor transmissibility by the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato necrotic dwarf virus (ToNDV); genus Torradovirus, is a whitefly-transmitted virus that caused significant losses for tomato production in the Imperial Valley of California during the 1980s. The virus causes severe stunting, dwarfing of leaves, foliar and fruit necrosis, and greatly reduced f...

  6. A metabolomics approach to thrips resistance in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero González, Roman Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Western flower thrips is one of the most serious crop pests worldwide. Its control relies mainly on pesticides whose excessive use leads to resistance development and environmental contamination. As an alternative, in this thesis host-plant resistance in wild and domesticated tomatoes was studied

  7. A metabolomics approach to thrips resistance in tomato

    OpenAIRE

    Romero González, Roman Rodolfo

    2011-01-01

    Western flower thrips is one of the most serious crop pests worldwide. Its control relies mainly on pesticides whose excessive use leads to resistance development and environmental contamination. As an alternative, in this thesis host-plant resistance in wild and domesticated tomatoes was studied using metabolomics. Different resistance mechanisms in which mechanical and chemical defenses work coordinately to fend thrips off were observed and contrasted. In all cases resistance was associated...

  8. Field Trial and Molecular Characterization of RNAi-Transgenic Tomato Plants That Exhibit Resistance to Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Geminivirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes, Alejandro; Carlos, Natacha; Ruiz, Yoslaine; Callard, Danay; Sánchez, Yadira; Ochagavía, María Elena; Seguin, Jonathan; Malpica-López, Nachelli; Hohn, Thomas; Lecca, Maria Rita; Pérez, Rosabel; Doreste, Vivian; Rehrauer, Hubert; Farinelli, Laurent; Pujol, Merardo; Pooggin, Mikhail M

    2016-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a widely used approach to generate virus-resistant transgenic crops. However, issues of agricultural importance like the long-term durability of RNAi-mediated resistance under field conditions and the potential side effects provoked in the plant by the stable RNAi expression remain poorly investigated. Here, we performed field trials and molecular characterization studies of two homozygous transgenic tomato lines, with different selection markers, expressing an intron-hairpin RNA cognate to the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) C1 gene. The tested F6 and F4 progenies of the respective kanamycin- and basta-resistant plants exhibited unchanged field resistance to TYLCV and stably expressed the transgene-derived short interfering RNA (siRNAs) to represent 6 to 8% of the total plant small RNAs. This value outnumbered the average percentage of viral siRNAs in the nontransformed plants exposed to TYLCV-infested whiteflies. As a result of the RNAi transgene expression, a common set of up- and downregulated genes was revealed in the transcriptome profile of the plants selected from either of the two transgenic events. A previously unidentified geminivirus causing no symptoms of viral disease was detected in some of the transgenic plants. The novel virus acquired V1 and V2 genes from TYLCV and C1, C2, C3, and C4 genes from a distantly related geminivirus and, thereby, it could evade the repressive sequence-specific action of transgene-derived siRNAs. Our findings shed light on the mechanisms of siRNA-directed antiviral silencing in transgenic plants and highlight the applicability limitations of this technology as it may alter the transcriptional pattern of nontarget genes.

  9. El virus de la mancha clorótica del tomate: Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus has emerged as a major pathogen of vegetables in Puerto Rico, the Caribbean and Florida. This virus is transmitted by thrips making management difficult. Growers must be aware of the distribution, host range, insect vectors, symptoms, modes of transmission to successfully...

  10. Evaluation of tomato varieties for resistance to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clayberg, C.D.

    1972-01-01

    Tomatoes are among the crops most sensitive to ozone. Many researchers tested various varieties for resistance. The tests indicated a variation among tomato varieties for resistance to ozone and that some commercial varieties were as resistant as any lines tested. In the USA and Canada a total of 295 different varieties and hybrids were received and tested for response to ozone during the summer of 1971. Plants were exposed to O/sub 3/ when the first true leaves were 2 1/2 to 4 inches long. Tomato leaves showed typical injury symptoms following exposure to O/sub 3/. Mild symptoms were a chlorotic yellowing or whitening of tissue between the leaf veins, or small brownish necrotic flecks marginally or all over the leaf. Severe damage resulted in large water-soaked areas over the entire leaf surface right after exposure to ozone. Of the various varieties, the most resistant were Pierette and Heinz 1439 in successive tests. Susceptible ones were Roma VF and Fruhernte. Charkowskij and New Yorker were of an intermediate level of resistance. All the ozone-resistant varieties of KY 1, VFN 8, PI 304234, PI 309915, and Manzana (PI 203229) were about equally susceptible under the conditions of testing used. The range between the most resistant and the most susceptible tomato varieties was not as great as in crops like tobacco. 8 references, 2 tables.

  11. MicroRNAs suppress NB domain genes in tomato that confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Shouqiang; Park, Gyungsoon; Atamian, Hagop S; Han, Cliff S; Stajich, Jason E; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Borkovich, Katherine A

    2014-10-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR) plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. We explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker) and resistant (Motelle) tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulated by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB) domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R) gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. Taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs.

  12. MicroRNAs suppress NB domain genes in tomato that confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouqiang Ouyang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs suppress the transcriptional and post-transcriptional expression of genes in plants. Several miRNA families target genes encoding nucleotide-binding site-leucine-rich repeat (NB-LRR plant innate immune receptors. The fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici causes vascular wilt disease in tomato. We explored a role for miRNAs in tomato defense against F. oxysporum using comparative miRNA profiling of susceptible (Moneymaker and resistant (Motelle tomato cultivars. slmiR482f and slmiR5300 were repressed during infection of Motelle with F. oxysporum. Two predicted mRNA targets each of slmiR482f and slmiR5300 exhibited increased expression in Motelle and the ability of these four targets to be regulated by the miRNAs was confirmed by co-expression in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing of the targets in the resistant Motelle cultivar revealed a role in fungal resistance for all four genes. All four targets encode proteins with full or partial nucleotide-binding (NB domains. One slmiR5300 target corresponds to tm-2, a susceptible allele of the Tomato Mosaic Virus resistance gene, supporting functions in immunity to a fungal pathogen. The observation that none of the targets correspond to I-2, the only known resistance (R gene for F. oxysporum in tomato, supports roles for additional R genes in the immune response. Taken together, our findings suggest that Moneymaker is highly susceptible because its potential resistance is insufficiently expressed due to the action of miRNAs.

  13. Tomato spotted wilt virus benefits a non-vector arthropod, Tetranychus urticae, by modulating different plant responses in tomato.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Punya Nachappa

    Full Text Available The interaction between plant viruses and non-vector arthropod herbivores is poorly understood. However, there is accumulating evidence that plant viruses can impact fitness of non-vector herbivores. In this study, we used oligonucleotide microarrays, phytohormone, and total free amino acid analyses to characterize the molecular mechanisms underlying the interaction between Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV and a non-vector arthropod, twospotted spider mite (Tetranychusurticae, on tomato plants, Solanumlycopersicum. Twospotted spider mites showed increased preference for and fecundity on TSWV-infected plants compared to mock-inoculated plants. Transcriptome profiles of TSWV-infected plants indicated significant up-regulation of salicylic acid (SA-related genes, but no apparent down-regulation of jasmonic acid (JA-related genes which could potentially confer induced resistance against TSM. This suggests that there was no antagonistic crosstalk between the signaling pathways to influence the interaction between TSWV and spider mites. In fact, SA- and JA-related genes were up-regulated when plants were challenged with both TSWV and the herbivore. TSWV infection resulted in down-regulation of cell wall-related genes and photosynthesis-associated genes, which may contribute to host plant susceptibility. There was a three-fold increase in total free amino acid content in virus-infected plants compared to mock-inoculated plants. Total free amino acid content is critical for arthropod nutrition and may, in part, explain the apparent positive indirect effect of TSWV on spider mites. Taken together, these data suggest that the mechanism(s of increased host suitability of TSWV-infected plants to non-vector herbivores is complex and likely involves several plant biochemical processes.

  14. The microanalysis on resistance of new tomato genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Calalb

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Microscopic study on the leaf of the new tomato genotypes has shown that the most informative structural indicators of drought resistance of these plants are: a presence, level of development and the distribution of protective and glandulartrichomes on the leaves; b presence and occurrence of the cells with oxalate calcium sand in the leaf mesophyll. Statistical processing of the results determines that new tomato genotypes “Line 50” – ‚Prizor’ × (‚Prizor’ × Lycopersicon hirsutum and “Line 47” – ‘Friguşor’ × (Lycopersicon peruvianum × ‚Victoria’ are resistant to drought.

  15. A New Israeli Tobamovirus Isolate Infects Tomato Plants Harboring Tm-22 Resistance Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luria, Neta; Smith, Elisheva; Reingold, Victoria; Bekelman, Ilana; Lapidot, Moshe; Levin, Ilan; Elad, Nadav; Tam, Yehudit; Sela, Noa; Abu-Ras, Ahmad; Ezra, Nadav; Haberman, Ami; Yitzhak, Liron; Lachman, Oded; Dombrovsky, Aviv

    2017-01-01

    An outbreak of a new disease infecting tomatoes occurred in October-November 2014 at the Ohad village in Southern Israel. Symptomatic plants showed a mosaic pattern on leaves accompanied occasionally by narrowing of leaves and yellow spotted fruit. The disease spread mechanically and rapidly reminiscent of tobamovirus infection. Epidemiological studies showed the spread of the disease in various growing areas, in the South and towards the Southeast and Northern parts of the country within a year. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) analysis showed a single rod-like form characteristic to the Tobamovirus genus. We confirmed Koch's postulates for the disease followed by partial host range determination and revealed that tomato cultivars certified to harbor the Tm-22 resistance gene are susceptible to the new viral disease. We further characterized the viral source of the disease using a range of antisera for serological detection and analyzed various virus genera and families for cross-reactivity with the virus. In addition, next generation sequencing of total small RNA was performed on two cultivars grown in two different locations. In samples collected from commercial cultivars across Israel, we found a single virus that caused the disease. The complete genome sequence of the new Israeli tobamovirus showed high sequence identity to the Jordanian isolate of tomato brown rugose fruit virus.

  16. A New Israeli Tobamovirus Isolate Infects Tomato Plants Harboring Tm-22 Resistance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neta Luria

    Full Text Available An outbreak of a new disease infecting tomatoes occurred in October-November 2014 at the Ohad village in Southern Israel. Symptomatic plants showed a mosaic pattern on leaves accompanied occasionally by narrowing of leaves and yellow spotted fruit. The disease spread mechanically and rapidly reminiscent of tobamovirus infection. Epidemiological studies showed the spread of the disease in various growing areas, in the South and towards the Southeast and Northern parts of the country within a year. Transmission electron microscope (TEM analysis showed a single rod-like form characteristic to the Tobamovirus genus. We confirmed Koch's postulates for the disease followed by partial host range determination and revealed that tomato cultivars certified to harbor the Tm-22 resistance gene are susceptible to the new viral disease. We further characterized the viral source of the disease using a range of antisera for serological detection and analyzed various virus genera and families for cross-reactivity with the virus. In addition, next generation sequencing of total small RNA was performed on two cultivars grown in two different locations. In samples collected from commercial cultivars across Israel, we found a single virus that caused the disease. The complete genome sequence of the new Israeli tobamovirus showed high sequence identity to the Jordanian isolate of tomato brown rugose fruit virus.

  17. Early blight resistance in tomato: screening and genetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaerani, R.

    2006-01-01

    Tomato early blight (EB) caused by the fungus Alternaria solani is a field disease with a worldwide distribution, including Indonesia. The disease is currently controlled using frequent applications of fungicides. The use of resistant cultivar would be an attractive way to reduce fungicide

  18. Characterization of resistant tomato mutants to bacterial canker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-19

    Apr 19, 2012 ... A small scale ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) mutation was used to obtain resistant mutant plants to bacterial canker disease caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate 2 (Cmm2). Susceptible EBR3 tomato line (200) seeds were mutagenised with the chemical EMS. Of the ...

  19. Characterization of resistant tomato mutants to bacterial canker ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A small scale ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS) mutation was used to obtain resistant mutant plants to bacterial canker disease caused by Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. michiganensis isolate 2 (Cmm2). Susceptible EBR3 tomato line (200) seeds were mutagenised with the chemical EMS. Of the constructed M2 population, ...

  20. Phosphorylation and proteome dynamics in pathogen-resistant tomato plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stulemeijer, I.J.E.

    2008-01-01

    Microbial plant pathogens impose a continuous threat on global food production. Similar to disease resistance in mammals, an innate immune system allows plants to recognise pathogens and swiftly activate defence. For the work described in this thesis, the interaction between tomato and the

  1. Genetic analysis of resistance to early blight disease in tomato

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    use

    2011-12-12

    Dec 12, 2011 ... Genetic analysis of resistance to early blight disease in tomato. Özer Çalış* and Şerife Topkaya. Gaziosmanpasa University, Faculty of Agriculture, Plant Protection Department, 60250 Tasliciftlik, Tokat, Turkey. Accepted 12 October, 2011. Early blight is a fungal pathogen that causes destructive necrotic and ...

  2. Enhanced Tomato Disease Resistance Primed by Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan eSong

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Roots of most terrestrial plants form symbiotic associations (mycorrhiza with soil- borne arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. Many studies show that mycorrhizal colonization enhances plant resistance against pathogenic fungi. However, the mechanism of mycorrhiza-induced disease resistance remains equivocal. In this study, we found that mycorrhizal inoculation with AMF Funneliformis mosseae significantly alleviated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. early blight disease caused by Alternaria solani Sorauer. AMF pre-inoculation led to significant increases in activities of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL and lipoxygenase (LOX in tomato leaves upon pathogen inoculation. Mycorrhizal inoculation alone did not influence the transcripts of most genes tested. However, pathogen attack on AMF-inoculated plants provoked strong defense responses of three genes encoding pathogenesis-related (PR proteins, PR1, PR2 and PR3, as well as defense-related genes LOX, AOC and PAL, in tomato leaves. The induction of defense responses in AMF pre-inoculated plants was much higher and more rapid than that in un-inoculated plants in present of pathogen infection. Three tomato genotypes: a Castlemart wild-type (WT plant, a jasmonate (JA biosynthesis mutant (spr2, and a prosystemin-overexpressing 35S::PS plant were used to examine the role of the JA signaling pathway in AMF-primed disease defense. Pathogen infection on mycorrhizal 35S::PS plants led to higher induction of defense-related genes and enzymes relative to WT plants. However, pathogen infection did not induce these genes and enzymes in mycorrhizal spr2 mutant plants. Bioassays showed that 35S::PS plants were more resistant and spr2 plants were more susceptible to early blight compared with WT plants. Our finding indicates that mycorrhizal colonization enhances tomato resistance to early blight by priming systemic defense response, and the JA signaling pathway is essential for

  3. A rapid seedling resistance assay identifies wild tomato lines that are resistant to Psuedomonas syringe pv. tomato race 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacterial speck caused by Pseudomonas syringae has historically been controlled by the Pto/Prf gene cluster. Emerging strains like P. syringae pv. tomato race 1 overcome resistance conferred by Pto/Prf, and can cause serious crop loss under appropriate environmental conditions. We developed a rapid ...

  4. Engineering resistance to virus transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Carr, John Peter; Groen, SC; Wamonje, Francis; Murphy, Alexandra Marie

    2017-01-01

    Engineering plants for resistance to virus transmission by invertebrate vectors has lagged behind other forms of plant protection. Vectors typically transmit more than one virus. Thus, vector resistance could provide a wider range of protection than defenses directed solely against one virus or virus group. We discuss current knowledge of vector-host-virus interactions, the roles of viral gene products in host and vector manipulation, and the effects of semiochemicals on host-vector interact...

  5. Assessment of strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato from Tanzania for resistance to copper and streptomycin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shenge, K.C.; Wydra, K.; Mabagala, M.B.

    2008-01-01

    different ecological conditions in the country. After isolation and identification, the P. s. pv. tomato strains were grown on King's medium B (KB) amended with 20% copper sulphate (w/v). The strains were also assessed for resistance to antibiotics. Results indicated that there was widespread resistance......Fifty-six strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (P.s. pv. tomato) were collected from tomato-producing areas in Tanzania and assessed for resistance to copper and antibiotics. The collection was done from three tomato-producing regions (Morogoro, Arusha and Iringa), representing three...... of the P. s. pv. tomato strains to copper sulphate. The highest level of resistance was recorded from the Arusha region (Northern Tanzania), 83.3% of the P. s. pv. tomato strains from that region showed resistance to copper sulphate. This was followed by Iringa region (Southern Tanzania), from where...

  6. Two MAPK cascades, NPR1, and TGA transcription factors play a role in Pto-mediated disease resistance in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekengren, Sophia K; Liu, Yule; Schiff, Michael; Dinesh-Kumar, S P; Martin, Gregory B

    2003-12-01

    The tomato Pto kinase confers resistance to the causative agent of bacterial speck disease, Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato, by recognizing the pathogen effector proteins AvrPto or AvrPtoB. Pto-mediated resistance requires multiple signal transduction pathways and has been shown to activate many defense responses including an oxidative burst, rapid changes in the expression of over 400 genes, and localized cell death. We have tested the role in Pto-mediated resistance in tomato of a set of 21 genes from other species known to be involved in defense-related signaling. Expression of each gene was suppressed by virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and the effect on disease symptoms and bacterial growth during the tomato-Pseudomonas incompatible interaction was determined. We found that Pto-mediated resistance was compromised by silencing of genes encoding two mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase kinases, MEK1 and MEK2, two MAP kinases, NTF6 and wound-induced protein kinase (WIPK), a key regulator of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), NPR1, and two transcription factors, TGA1a and TGA2.2. A lesser impact on Pto-mediated resistance was observed in plants silenced for RAR1 and COI1. The identification of nine genes that play a role in resistance to bacterial speck disease both advances our knowledge of Pto signal transduction and demonstrates the conservation of many defense signaling components among diverse plant species.

  7. Tomato Apical Leaf Curl Virus: A Novel, Monopartite Geminivirus Detected in Tomatoes in Argentina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos G. Vaghi Medina

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Plant viruses that are members of the Geminiviridae family have circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA genome and are responsible for major crop diseases worldwide. We have identified and characterized a novel monopartite geminivirus infecting tomato in Argentina. The full-length genome was cloned and sequenced. The genome-wide pairwise identity calculation that resulted in a maximum of 63% identity with all of other known geminiviruses indicated that it is a new geminivirus species. Biolistic infected plants presented interveinal yellowing, apical leaf curling and extreme root hypotrophy. Thus, the name proposed for this species is tomato apical leaf curl virus (ToALCV. The phylogenetic inferences suggested different evolutionary relationships for the replication-associated protein (Rep and the coat protein (CP. Besides, the sequence similarity network (SSN protein analyses showed that the complementary-sense gene products (RepA, Rep and C3 are similar to capulavirus while the viron-sense gene products (CP, MP and V3 are similar to topocuvirus, curtovirus and becurtovirus. Based on the data presented, ToALCV genome appears to have “modular organization” supported by its recombination origin. Analyses of the specificity-determining positions (SDPs of the CP of geminiviruses defined nine subgroups that include geminiviruses that share the same type of insect vector. Our sequences were clustered with the sequences of topocuvirus, whose vector is the treehopper, Micrutalis malleifera. Also, a set of the highest scored amino acid residues was predicted for the CP, which could determine differences in virus transmission specificity. We predict that a treehopper could be the vector of ToALCV, but transmission assays need to be performed to confirm this. Given everything we demonstrate in this paper, ToALCV can be considered a type member of a new putative genus of the Geminiviridae family.

  8. Molecular and biological characterization of a new Tomato mild yellow leaf curl Aragua virus strain producing severe symptoms in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romay, Gustavo; Chirinos, Dorys T; Geraud-Pouey, Francis; Gillis, Annika; Mahillon, Jacques; Desbiez, Cécile; Bragard, Claude

    2017-12-01

    Tomato mild yellow leaf curl Aragua virus (ToMYLCV) is a begomovirus first reported infecting tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and milkweed (Euphorbia heterophylla) in Venezuela. In this study, a ToMYLCV isolate (Zulia-219) was completely sequenced and its host range was evaluated. The DNA-A and DNA-B components of isolate Zulia-219 showed 93 and 85% nucleotide sequence identity with the respective counterparts of the ToMYLCV type strain. According to current demarcation criteria for begomovirus species, Zulia-219 is a new strain of ToMYLCV. Interestingly, tomato plants inoculated with ToMYLCV Zulia-219 displayed severe symptoms, including severe chlorotic leaf curling, in contrast to mild symptoms associated with the type strain of this begomovirus. These results indicate potential risks associated with this new ToMYLCV strain for tomato production in Venezuela.

  9. Resistance in tomato and wild relatives to crown and root rot caused by Phytophthora capsici.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quesada-Ocampo, L M; Hausbeck, M K

    2010-06-01

    Phytophthora capsici causes root, crown, and fruit rot of tomato, a major vegetable crop grown worldwide. The objective of this study was to screen tomato cultivars and wild relatives of tomato for resistance to P. capsici. Four P. capsici isolates were individually used to inoculate 6-week-old seedlings (1 g of P. capsici-infested millet seed per 10 g of soilless medium) of 42 tomato cultivars and wild relatives of tomato in a greenhouse. Plants were evaluated daily for wilting and death. All P. capsici isolates tested caused disease in seedlings but some isolates were more pathogenic than others. A wild relative of cultivated tomato, Solanum habrochaites accession LA407, was resistant to all P. capsici isolates tested. Moderate resistance to all isolates was identified in the host genotypes Ha7998, Fla7600, Jolly Elf, and Talladega. P. capsici was frequently recovered from root and crown tissue of symptomatic inoculated seedlings but not from leaf tissue or asymptomatic or control plants. The phenotype of the recovered isolate matched the phenotype of the inoculum. Pathogen presence was confirmed in resistant and moderately resistant tomato genotypes by species-specific polymerase chain reaction of DNA from infected crown and root tissue. Amplified fragment length polymorphisms of tomato genotypes showed a lack of correlation between genetic clusters and susceptibility to P. capsici, indicating that resistance is distributed in several tomato lineages. The results of this study create a baseline for future development of tomato cultivars resistant to P. capsici.

  10. Papaya is not a host for Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    The economic value of tomato production is threatened by tomato yellow leaf-curl virus TYLCV and its vector, the silverleaf whitefly Bemisia tabaci biotype B (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae). Use of papaya Carica papaya L. as a banker plant for a whitefly parasitoid shows promise as a whitefly m...

  11. Newly discovered natural hosts of tomato chlorosis virus in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) is an emerging whitefly-transmitted crinivirus. ToCV was detected in field-grown and greenhouse tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants in Costa Rica in 2007, causing symptoms of severe yellowing and foliar chlorosis. To identify alternative hosts that may serve as viru...

  12. Tomato spotted wilt virus in Sri Lanka: Emerging problems of Tospovirues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Widana Gamage, S.M.K.; Hassani Mehraban, A.; Peters, D.

    2015-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), the type species of the genus Tospovirus has long been reported infecting economically important horticultural crops such as tomato, groundnut, pepper, potato and soybean, all over the world. In Sri Lanka, characteristic tospovirus symptoms such as bud necrosis,

  13. Characterization of two biologically distinct variants of Tomato spotted wilt virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant economic losses result on a wide range of crops due to infection with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). In this study, two TSWV isolates, one from basil and a second from tomato, were established in a common plant host. Viral proteins were monitored over time, plant host ranges were comp...

  14. Transcriptome-wide identification of host genes targeted by tomato spotted wilt virus-derived small interfering RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Shunmugiah V; Williams, Sarah; Kappagantu, Madhu; Mitter, Neena; Pappu, Hanu R

    2017-06-15

    RNA silencing mechanism functions as a major defense against invading viruses. The caveat in the RNA silencing mechanism is that the effector small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) act on any RNA transcripts with sequence complementarity irrespective of target's origin. A subset of highly expressed viral small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) derived from the tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV; Tospovirus: Bunyaviridae) genome was analyzed for their propensity to downregulate the tomato transcriptome. A total of 11898 putative target sites on tomato transcripts were found to exhibit a propensity for down regulation by TSWV-derived vsiRNAs. In total, 2450 unique vsiRNAs were found to have potential cross-reacting capability with the tomato transcriptome. VsiRNAs were found to potentially target a gamut of host genes involved in basal cellular activities including enzymes, transcription factors, membrane transporters, and cytoskeletal proteins. KEGG pathway annotation of targets revealed that the vsiRNAs were mapped to secondary metabolite biosynthesis, amino acids, starch and sucrose metabolism, and carbon and purine metabolism. Transcripts for protein processing, hormone signalling, and plant-pathogen interactions were the most likely targets from the genetic, environmental information processing, and organismal systems, respectively. qRT-PCR validation of target gene expression showed that none of the selected transcripts from tomato cv. Marglobe showed up regulation, and all were down regulated even upto 20 folds (high affinity glucose transporter). However, the expression levels of transcripts from cv. Red Defender revealed differential regulation as three among the target transcripts showed up regulation (Cc-nbs-lrr, resistance protein, AP2-like ethylene-responsive transcription factor, and heat stress transcription factor A3). Accumulation of tomato target mRNAs of corresponding length was proved in both tomato cultivars using 5' RACE analysis. The TSWV-tomato interaction at

  15. Correlations between symptoms and DAS - Elisa values in two sources of resistance against tomato spotted wilt virus Correlações entre sintomas de vira-cabeça e o teste serológico ELISA (DAS em duas diferentes fontes de resistência a tospoviroses em tomateiro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane V. Resende

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available The commercial tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, cultivars Ângela Gigante I-5100 and Santa Clara (tospovirus susceptible, the Stevens cultivar, lines and experimental hybrids (tospovirus resistant, were used: a to evaluate two sources of resistance to tospoviruses in tomato (one from L. esculentum/Rey de Los Tempranos, and another one from L. peruvianum/Stevens; and b to verify statistically significant correlation between virus concentration determined through DAS-ELISA and symptomatology. In the Ângela Gigante I-5100 and the Santa Clara cultivars, the correlation coefficient was highly significant and the symptom average level was high, showing that in susceptible cultivars the symptom evolution is related to the virus multiplication in the plant. As for the TOM 547 and TOM 556 lines (background of Ângela Gigante I-5100 and Santa Clara, respectively, there was no statistical correlation between the symptoms and the viral particle concentration. Plants with light virus symptoms showed high absorbance values. Consequently we may assume that the resistance with `Rey de Los Tempranos' background may be of the tolerant kind because the high virus concentration found does not necessarily relate to a high level of symptoms. In the lines BPX320E 3902-01, BPX320E 3905 and BPX320F 7902 (both with Santa Clara background only few plants showed symptoms, which can be explained by incomplete penetrance of Sw-5 gene. In the case of non-symptomatic plants, the diagnosis using DAS-ELISA revealed negative results. That outcome indicates that in some materials, where resistance is obtained from L. peruvianum, the virus multiplication in the tissues seemed not be present.As cultivares comerciais Ângela Gigante I-5100 e Santa Clara (suscetíveis a tospovírus, a cultivar Stevens, e híbridos experimentais F1 (resistentes a tospoviroses, foram utilizadas para: a avaliar duas fontes de resistência a tospovírus em tomate, uma derivada de Lycopersicon esculentum

  16. Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus: An Emerging Virus Complex Threatening Vegetable and Fiber Crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Moriones

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae represents an important constraint to tomato production, as it causes the most predominant and economically important disease affecting tomato in the Indian sub-continent. However, in recent years, ToLCNDV has been fast extending its host range and spreading to new geographical regions, including the Middle East and the western Mediterranean Basin. Extensive research on the genome structure, protein functions, molecular biology, and plant–virus interactions of ToLCNDV has been conducted in the last decade. Special emphasis has been given to gene silencing suppression ability in order to counteract host plant defense responses. The importance of the interaction with DNA alphasatellites and betasatellites in the biology of the virus has been demonstrated. ToLCNDV genetic variability has been analyzed, providing new insights into the taxonomy, host adaptation, and evolution of this virus. Recombination and pseudorecombination have been shown as motors of diversification and adaptive evolution. Important progress has also been made in control strategies to reduce disease damage. This review highlights these various achievements in the context of the previous knowledge of begomoviruses and their interactions with plants.

  17. Optimizing chemically induced resistance in tomato against Botrytis cinerea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luna, Estrella; Beardon, Emily G; Ravnskov, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Resistance-inducing chemicals can offer broad-spectrum disease protection in crops, but can also affect plant growth and interactions with plant-beneficial microbes. We have evaluated different application methods of ß-aminobutyric acid (BABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) for long-lasting induced...... resistance in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. In addition, we have studied non-target effects on plant growth and root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). Germinating seeds for one week in BABA- or JA-containing solutions promoted seed germination efficiency, did not affect plant growth......, and induced resistance in 4 week-old plants. When formulating BABA and JA in carboxymethyl cellulose seed coating, only BABA was able to induce resistance in 4 week-old plants. Root treatment of 1 week-old seedlings with BABA or JA also induced resistance in 4 week-old plants. However, this seedling treatment...

  18. Diversity of Thrips Species and Vectors of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Tomato Production Systems in Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macharia, Isaac; Backhouse, David; Skilton, Rob; Ateka, Elijah; Wu, Shu-Biao; Njahira, Moses; Maina, Solomon; Harvey, Jagger

    2015-02-01

    Thrips have been recognized as primary vectors of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) with Frankliniella occidentalis (Pergande) reported as the most important and efficient vector, while other species such as Thrips tabaci Lindeman also include populations that can vector the virus. A study was undertaken to establish the diversity of thrips and presence of vectors for TSWV in four major tomato production areas in Kenya. The cytochrome oxidase 1 (CO1) gene was used to generate sequences from thrips samples collected from tomatoes and weeds, and phylogenetic analysis done to establish the variation within potential vector populations. Ceratothripoides brunneus Bagnall was the predominant species of thrips in all areas. F. occidentalis and T. tabaci were abundant in Nakuru, Kirinyaga, and Loitokitok but not detected at Bungoma. Other vectors of tospoviruses identified in low numbers were Frankliniella schultzei (Trybom) and Scirtothrips dorsalis Hood. Variation was observed in T. tabaci, F. occidentalis, and F. schultzei. Kenyan specimens of T. tabaci from tomato belonged to the arrhenotokous group, while those of F. occidentalis clustered with the Western flower thrips G group. The detection of RNA of TSWV in both of these species of thrips supported the role they play as vectors. The study has demonstrated the high diversity of thrips species in tomato production and the occurrence of important vectors of TSWV and other tospoviruses. © The Authors 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Tomato spotted wilt virus infection improves host suitability for its vector Frankliniella occidentalis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maris, P.C.; Joosten, N.N.; Goldbach, R.W.; Peters, D.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infection on plant attractiveness for the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) was studied. Significantly more thrips were recovered on infected than were recovered on noninfected pepper (Capsicum annuum) plants in different preference

  20. First report of Tomato chlorotic spot virus on Annual Vinca (Catharanthus roseus) in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus was identified in the ornamental crop Catharanthus roseus (commonly known as vinca) in south Florida, the first report of this virus naturally infecting this species. Genetic diversity of the virus was characterized. This report provides an overview of this emerging vir...

  1. Evaluation of disinfectants to prevent mechanical transmission of viruses and a viroid in greenhouse tomato production

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Rugang; Baysal-Gurel, Fulya; Abdo, Zaid; Miller, Sally A.; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2015-01-01

    Background In recent years, a number of serious disease outbreaks caused by viruses and viroids on greenhouse tomatoes in North America have resulted in significant economic losses to growers. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of commercial disinfectants against mechanical transmission of these pathogens, and to select disinfectants with broad spectrum reactivity to control general virus and viroid diseases in greenhouse tomato production. Methods A total of 16 d...

  2. Differential expression of tomato spotted wilt virus-derived viral small RNAs in infected commercial and experimental host plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neena Mitter

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Viral small RNAs (vsiRNAs in the infected host can be generated from viral double-stranded RNA replicative intermediates, self-complementary regions of the viral genome or from the action of host RNA-dependent RNA polymerases on viral templates. The vsiRNA abundance and profile as well as the endogenous small RNA population can vary between different hosts infected by the same virus influencing viral pathogenicity and host response. There are no reports on the analysis of vsiRNAs of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV, a segmented negative stranded RNA virus in the family Bunyaviridae, with two of its gene segments showing ambisense gene arrangement. The virus causes significant economic losses to numerous field and horticultural crops worldwide. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV-specific vsiRNAs were characterized by deep sequencing in virus-infected experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana and a commercial, susceptible host tomato. The total small (s RNA reads in TSWV-infected tomato sample showed relatively equal distribution of 21, 22 and 24 nt, whereas N. benthamiana sample was dominated by 24 nt total sRNAs. The number of vsiRNA reads detected in tomato was many a magnitude (~350:1 higher than those found in N. benthamiana, however the profile of vsiRNAs in terms of relative abundance 21, 22 and 24 nt class size was similar in both the hosts. Maximum vsiRNA reads were obtained for the M RNA segment of TSWV while the largest L RNA segment had the least number of vsiRNAs in both tomato and N. benthamiana. Only the silencing suppressor, NSs, of TSWV recorded higher antisense vsiRNA with respect to the coding frame among all the genes of TSWV. SIGNIFICANCE: Details of the origin, distribution and abundance of TSWV vsiRNAs could be useful in designing efficient targets for exploiting RNA interference for virus resistance. It also has major implications toward our understanding of the differential processing of vsi

  3. Differential expression of tomato spotted wilt virus-derived viral small RNAs in infected commercial and experimental host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitter, Neena; Koundal, Vikas; Williams, Sarah; Pappu, Hanu

    2013-01-01

    Viral small RNAs (vsiRNAs) in the infected host can be generated from viral double-stranded RNA replicative intermediates, self-complementary regions of the viral genome or from the action of host RNA-dependent RNA polymerases on viral templates. The vsiRNA abundance and profile as well as the endogenous small RNA population can vary between different hosts infected by the same virus influencing viral pathogenicity and host response. There are no reports on the analysis of vsiRNAs of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), a segmented negative stranded RNA virus in the family Bunyaviridae, with two of its gene segments showing ambisense gene arrangement. The virus causes significant economic losses to numerous field and horticultural crops worldwide. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV)-specific vsiRNAs were characterized by deep sequencing in virus-infected experimental host Nicotiana benthamiana and a commercial, susceptible host tomato. The total small (s) RNA reads in TSWV-infected tomato sample showed relatively equal distribution of 21, 22 and 24 nt, whereas N. benthamiana sample was dominated by 24 nt total sRNAs. The number of vsiRNA reads detected in tomato was many a magnitude (~350:1) higher than those found in N. benthamiana, however the profile of vsiRNAs in terms of relative abundance 21, 22 and 24 nt class size was similar in both the hosts. Maximum vsiRNA reads were obtained for the M RNA segment of TSWV while the largest L RNA segment had the least number of vsiRNAs in both tomato and N. benthamiana. Only the silencing suppressor, NSs, of TSWV recorded higher antisense vsiRNA with respect to the coding frame among all the genes of TSWV. Details of the origin, distribution and abundance of TSWV vsiRNAs could be useful in designing efficient targets for exploiting RNA interference for virus resistance. It also has major implications toward our understanding of the differential processing of vsiRNAs in antiviral defense and viral pathogenicity.

  4. A bench-scale, cost effective and simple method to elicit Lycopersicon esculentum cv. PKM1 (tomato) plants against Cucumber mosaic virus attack using ozone-mediated inactivated Cucumber mosaic virus inoculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudhakar, N; Nagendra-Prasad, D; Mohan, N; Murugesan, K

    2007-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate ozone for inactivation of Cucumber mosaic virus present in the inoculum and to stimulate Lycopersicon esculentum cv. PKM1 (tomato) plants against Cucumber mosaic virus infection by using the inactivated Cucumber mosaic virus inoculum. Application of a T(4) (0.4mg/l) concentration of ozone to the inoculum containing Cucumber mosaic virus resulted in complete inactivation of the virus. The inactivated viral inoculum was mixed with a penetrator (delivery agent), referred to as T(4) preparation, and it was evaluated for the development of systemic acquired resistance in the tomato plants. Application of a T(4) preparation 5 days before inoculation with the Cucumber mosaic virus protected tomato plants from the effects of Cucumber mosaic virus. Among the components of the inactivated virus tested, coat protein subunits and aggregates were responsible for the acquired resistance in tomato plants. In field trials, the results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that, Cucumber mosaic virus accumulation was significantly less for all the test plants (16%) sprayed with the T(4) preparation than untreated control plants (89.5%) at 28 days postinoculation (dpi). A remarkable increase in the activities of the total soluble phenolics (10-fold) and salicylic acid (16-fold) was detected 5 days after the treatment in foliar extracts of test plants relative to untreated control plants. The results showed that treatment of tomato plants with inactivated viral inoculum led to a significant enhancement of protection against Cucumber mosaic virus attack in a manner that mimics a real pathogen and induces systemic acquired resistance.

  5. Resistance Inducers Modulate Pseudomonas syringae pv. Tomato Strain DC3000 Response in Tomato Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalschi, Loredana; Camañes, Gemma; Llorens, Eugenio; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; López, María M.; García-Agustín, Pilar; Vicedo, Begonya

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of hexanoic acid (Hx) as an inducer of resistance in tomato plants against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 was previously demonstrated, and the plant response was characterized. Because little is known about the reaction of the pathogen to this effect, the goal of the present work was to determine whether the changes in the plant defence system affect the pathogen behaviour. This work provides the first demonstration of the response of the pathogen to the changes observed in plants after Hx application in terms of not only the population size but also the transcriptional levels of genes involved in quorum sensing establishment and pathogenesis. Therefore, it is possible that Hx treatment attenuates the virulence and survival of bacteria by preventing or diminishing the appearance of symptoms and controlling the growth of the bacteria in the mesophyll. It is interesting to note that the gene transcriptional changes in the bacteria from the treated plants occur at the same time as the changes in the plants. Hx is able to alter bacteria pathogenesis and survival only when it is applied as a resistance inducer because the changes that it promotes in plants affect the bacteria. PMID:25244125

  6. Influence of spaceflight on the efficiency of tomatoes quality and plant resistance to viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dashchenko, Anna; Mishchenko, Lidiya

    lycopene was performed spectralphotometrical (Mapada UV-1600, China) at wavelengths between 451 nm and 503 nm using hexane. The content of phenolic compounds in tomato fruits was determined by the method (Kondratenko et al .., 2008) on spectrophotometer KFK-3-0,1 at a wavelength of 640 nm. Assessment of the reliability of differences between groups was determined by Student's test. Our attention was brought back in on itself by the fact that the smallest content of pigments in plants was of the seed of the 5th Reproduction : compared with stationary control - 1.7 times (carotene) and 2.3 times (lycopene) from plants seeds that were in space flight - 2.3 and 4.1 times. Because the plants were grown in the field in natural infectious background, there was a high probability of their defeat pathogens of different nature, including viruses. Many authors proven to reduce the concentration of carotene and lycopene in tomatoes with lesions of viruses (Raithak, 2012). In addition, the control plants with symptoms characteristic to those that cause viral infection, namely in 2011 - curling leaves of the "hook-up" in 2012 - except for leaf curl and mosaic back. The research results were confirmed in 2013, namely on the plants of "space" seeds no symptoms of and in control - detection of potato virus Y- Method (RT-PCR) and symptoms of leaf curl and mosaic. Results of the analyzes show that most of polyphenolic compounds contained in fruits of tomatoes, grown from "space" seeds (122 mg /100g). In the steady state control - 114 mg /100 g in the control number 2 - 84 mg /100 g (p <0.01). Numerous studies have shown that a large number of phenolic compounds toxic to a variety of pathogens, including viruses. It was established in response to infection polyphenol content increases, and the stronger, the higher the resistance of plants to pathogens (Gladun etc. .., 2011). In other words, the factors of space flight increase resistance to infection by viruses, as evidenced by the external

  7. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Terumi Itako

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM (0.025 g.L−1, fluazinam (0.25 g.L−1, pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L−1, pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L−1 + 2.2 g.L−1, copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L−1, mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L−1 + 0.60 g.L−1, and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L−1 on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar.

  8. Chemical products induce resistance to Xanthomonas perforans in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itako, Adriana Terumi; Tolentino Júnior, João Batista; Silva Júnior, Tadeu Antônio Fernandes da; Soman, José Marcelo; Maringoni, Antonio Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial spot of tomato, caused by Xanthomonas spp., is a very important disease, especially in the hot and humid periods of the year. The chemical control of the disease has not been very effective for a number of reasons. This study aimed to evaluate, under greenhouse conditions, the efficacy of leaf-spraying chemicals (acibenzolar-S-methyl (ASM) (0.025 g.L(-1)), fluazinam (0.25 g.L(-1)), pyraclostrobin (0.08 g.L(-1)), pyraclostrobin + methiran (0.02 g.L(-1) + 2.2 g.L(-1)), copper oxychloride (1.50 g.L(-1)), mancozeb + copper oxychloride (0.88 g.L(-1) + 0.60 g.L(-1)), and oxytetracycline (0.40 g.L(-1))) on control of bacterial spot. Tomatoes Santa Clara and Gisele cultivars were pulverized 3 days before inoculation with Xanthomonas perforans. The production of enzymes associated with resistance induction (peroxidase, polyphenol oxidase, phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, β-1,3-glucanase, and protease) was quantified from leaf samples collected 24 hours before and 24 hours after chemical spraying and at 1, 2, 4, 6, and 8 days after bacterial inoculation. All products tested controlled bacterial spot, but only ASM, pyraclostrobin, and pyraclostrobin + metiram increased the production of peroxidase in the leaves of the two tomato cultivars, and increased the production of polyphenol oxidase and β-1,3-glucanase in the Santa Clara cultivar.

  9. Influence of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Uneven Distribution on Its Serological Detection in Tomato, Pepper and Ornamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Đekić

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Reliable detection of plant pathogens does not only mean the development of sufficiently sensitive laboratory techniques for their routine testing. Regardless of the sensitivity of applied methods, the proper selection of samples to be tested has crucial influence on method reliability. Due to uneven distribution of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV in naturally infected systemic host plants, the collection and sampling of material for assaying is acritical moment upon which the reliability of laboratory procedure depends. The effect of irregular virus distribution on its serological detection was examined in tomato, pepper and four ornamental species, as its most important host plants in our country.The reliability of virus detection, depending on its uneven distribution, was assessed by serological testing of tomato and pepper symptomatic leaves and fruits, and symptomatic and asymptomatic young and old leaves, as well as flower petals of ornamentals. Although TSWV was detected using ELISA in the majority of plants included in the experiment, the tests indicated an uneven distribution and unequal concentrations of TSWV in different parts of the plants. The virus could not be detected in a certain number of subsamples, prepared from infected tomato and pepper fruits and older ornamental leaves. The virus also could not be detected in some ornamentals and tomato plants with intensive symptoms. Conversely, the virus was detected in three ornamental plants without any symptoms. Examining the virus distribution in different plant parts indicated that the reliability of ELISA could be reached not only by sampling younger ornamental leaves, but also by preparing compound samples with as much leaves as possible, or by testing a greater number of subsamples of the tested plant. Considering a small possibility of TSWV detection in tomato and pepper fruits, the infection of these should be established by testing their leaves. Besides, the data show that

  10. Identification and distribution of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus TYLCV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Leaf samples of 177 tomato plants were collected during 2006-2007 in tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD) infected fields, as well as 100 leaf samples of sweet pepper, common bean, zucchini and the wild species Solanum elaeagnifolium, in order to study the population structure and genetic variation of Tomato yellow ...

  11. Fine mapping of two major QTLs conferring resistance to powdery mildew in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faino, L.; Azizinia, S.; Houshyani Hassanzadeh, B.; Verzaux, E.C.; Ercolano, M.R.; Visser, R.G.F.; Bai, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) is the most cultivated crop in the Solanaceae family and is a host for Oidium neolycopersici, the cause agent of powdery mildew disease. In wild species of tomato, genes (Ol-1–Ol-6) for monogenic resistance have been identified. Moreover, three quantitative resistance

  12. Tomato Sl3-MMP, a member of the Matrix metalloproteinase family, is required for disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dayong; Zhang, Huijuan; Song, Qiuming; Wang, Lu; Liu, Shixia; Hong, Yongbo; Huang, Lei; Song, Fengming

    2015-06-14

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases. MMPs have been characterized in detail in mammals and shown to play key roles in many physiological and pathological processes. Although MMPs in some plant species have been identified, the function of MMPs in biotic stress responses remains elusive. A total of five MMP genes were identified in tomato genome. qRT-PCR analysis revealed that expression of Sl-MMP genes was induced with distinct patterns by infection of Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 and by treatment with defense-related hormones such as salicylic acid, jasmonic acid and ethylene precursor 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based knockdown of individual Sl-MMPs and disease assays indicated that silencing of Sl3-MMP resulted in reduced resistance to B. cinerea and Pst DC3000, whereas silencing of other four Sl-MMPs did not affect the disease resistance against these two pathogens. The Sl3-MMP-silenced tomato plants responded with increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species and alerted expression of defense genes after infection of B. cinerea. Transient expression of Sl3-MMP in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana led to an enhanced resistance to B. cinerea and upregulated expression of defense-related genes. Biochemical assays revealed that the recombinant mature Sl3-MMP protein had proteolytic activities in vitro with distinct preferences for specificity of cleavage sites. The Sl3-MMP protein was targeted onto the plasma membrane of plant cells when transiently expressed in onion epidermal cells. VIGS-based knockdown of Sl3-MMP expression in tomato and gain-of-function transient expression of Sl3-MMP in N. benthamiana demonstrate that Sl3-MMP functions as a positive regulator of defense response against B. cinerea and Pst DC3000.

  13. Tomato chocolate spot virus, a member of a new torradovirus species that causes a necrosis-associated disease of tomato in Guatemala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuman, O; Kuo, Y-W; Palmieri, M; Rojas, M R; Gilbertson, R L

    2010-06-01

    Tomatoes in Guatemala have been affected by a new disease, locally known as "mancha de chocolate" (chocolate spot). The disease is characterized by distinct necrotic spots on leaves, stems and petioles that eventually expand and cause a dieback of apical tissues. Samples from symptomatic plants tested negative for infection by tomato spotted wilt virus, tobacco streak virus, tobacco etch virus and other known tomato-infecting viruses. A virus-like agent was sap-transmitted from diseased tissue to Nicotiana benthamiana and, when graft-transmitted to tomato, this agent induced chocolate spot symptoms. This virus-like agent also was sap-transmitted to Datura stramonium and Nicotiana glutinosa, but not to a range of non-solanaceous indicator plants. Icosahedral virions approximately 28-30 nm in diameter were purified from symptomatic N. benthamiana plants. When rub-inoculated onto leaves of N. benthamiana plants, these virions induced symptoms indistinguishable from those in N. benthamiana plants infected with the sap-transmissible virus associated with chocolate spot disease. Tomatoes inoculated with sap or grafted with shoots from N. benthamiana plants infected with purified virions developed typical chocolate spot symptoms, consistent with this virus being the causal agent of the disease. Analysis of nucleic acids associated with purified virions of the chocolate-spot-associated virus, revealed a genome composed of two single-stranded RNAs of approximately 7.5 and approximately 5.1 kb. Sequence analysis of these RNAs revealed a genome organization similar to recently described torradoviruses, a new group of picorna-like viruses causing necrosis-associated diseases of tomatoes in Europe [tomato torrado virus (ToTV)] and Mexico [tomato apex necrosis virus (ToANV) and tomato marchitez virus (ToMarV)]. Thus, the approximately 7.5 kb and approximately 5.1 kb RNAs of the chocolate-spot-associated virus corresponded to the torradovirus RNA1 and RNA2, respectively; however

  14. Tomato chocolate spot virus, a member of a new torradovirus species that causes a necrosis-associated disease of tomato in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batuman, O.; Kuo, Y.-W.; Palmieri, M.; Rojas, M. R.

    2010-01-01

    Tomatoes in Guatemala have been affected by a new disease, locally known as “mancha de chocolate” (chocolate spot). The disease is characterized by distinct necrotic spots on leaves, stems and petioles that eventually expand and cause a dieback of apical tissues. Samples from symptomatic plants tested negative for infection by tomato spotted wilt virus, tobacco streak virus, tobacco etch virus and other known tomato-infecting viruses. A virus-like agent was sap-transmitted from diseased tissue to Nicotiana benthamiana and, when graft-transmitted to tomato, this agent induced chocolate spot symptoms. This virus-like agent also was sap-transmitted to Datura stramonium and Nicotiana glutinosa, but not to a range of non-solanaceous indicator plants. Icosahedral virions ~28–30 nm in diameter were purified from symptomatic N. benthamiana plants. When rub-inoculated onto leaves of N. benthamiana plants, these virions induced symptoms indistinguishable from those in N. benthamiana plants infected with the sap-transmissible virus associated with chocolate spot disease. Tomatoes inoculated with sap or grafted with shoots from N. benthamiana plants infected with purified virions developed typical chocolate spot symptoms, consistent with this virus being the causal agent of the disease. Analysis of nucleic acids associated with purified virions of the chocolate-spot-associated virus, revealed a genome composed of two single-stranded RNAs of ~7.5 and ~5.1 kb. Sequence analysis of these RNAs revealed a genome organization similar to recently described torradoviruses, a new group of picorna-like viruses causing necrosis-associated diseases of tomatoes in Europe [tomato torrado virus (ToTV)] and Mexico [tomato apex necrosis virus (ToANV) and tomato marchitez virus (ToMarV)]. Thus, the ~7.5 kb and ~5.1 kb RNAs of the chocolate-spot-associated virus corresponded to the torradovirus RNA1 and RNA2, respectively; however, sequence comparisons revealed 64–83% identities with

  15. Companion cropping with potato onion enhances the disease resistance of tomato against Verticillium dahliae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuepeng eFu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Intercropping could alleviate soil-borne diseases, however, few studies focused on the immunity of the host plant induced by the interspecific interactions. To test whether or not intercropping could enhance the disease resistance of host plant, we investigated the effect of companion cropping with potato onion on tomato Verticillium wilt caused by Verticillium dahliae (V. dahliae. To investigate the mechanisms, the root exudates were collected from tomato and potato onion which were grown together or separately, and were used to examine the antifungal activities against V. dahliae in vitro, respectively. Furthermore, RNA-seq was used to examine the expression pattern of genes related to disease resistance in tomato companied with potato onion compared to that in tomato grown alone, under the condition of infection with V. dahliae. The results showed that companion cropping with potato onion could alleviate the incidence and severity of tomato Verticillium wilt. The further studies revealed that the root exudates from tomato companied with potato onion significantly inhibited the mycelia growth and spore germination of V. dahliae. However, there were no significant effects on these two measurements for the root exudates from potato onion grown alone or from potato onion grown with tomato. RNA-seq data analysis showed the disease defense genes associated with pathogenesis-related proteins, biosynthesis of lignin, hormone metabolism and signal transduction were expressed much higher in the tomato companied with potato onion than those in the tomato grown alone, which indicated that these defense genes play important roles in tomato against V. dahliae infection, and meant that the disease resistance of tomato against V. dahliae was enhanced in the companion copping with potato onion. We proposed that companion cropping with potato onion could enhance the disease resistance of tomato against V. dahliae by regulating the expression of genes related

  16. Companion cropping with potato onion enhances the disease resistance of tomato against Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xuepeng; Wu, Xia; Zhou, Xingang; Liu, Shouwei; Shen, Yanhui; Wu, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Intercropping could alleviate soil-borne diseases, however, few studies focused on the immunity of the host plant induced by the interspecific interactions. To test whether or not intercropping could enhance the disease resistance of host plant, we investigated the effect of companion cropping with potato onion on tomato Verticillium wilt caused by Verticillium dahliae (V. dahliae). To investigate the mechanisms, the root exudates were collected from tomato and potato onion which were grown together or separately, and were used to examine the antifungal activities against V. dahliae in vitro, respectively. Furthermore, RNA-seq was used to examine the expression pattern of genes related to disease resistance in tomato companied with potato onion compared to that in tomato grown alone, under the condition of infection with V. dahliae. The results showed that companion cropping with potato onion could alleviate the incidence and severity of tomato Verticillium wilt. The further studies revealed that the root exudates from tomato companied with potato onion significantly inhibited the mycelia growth and spore germination of V. dahliae. However, there were no significant effects on these two measurements for the root exudates from potato onion grown alone or from potato onion grown with tomato. RNA-seq data analysis showed the disease defense genes associated with pathogenesis-related proteins, biosynthesis of lignin, hormone metabolism and signal transduction were expressed much higher in the tomato companied with potato onion than those in the tomato grown alone, which indicated that these defense genes play important roles in tomato against V. dahliae infection, and meant that the disease resistance of tomato against V. dahliae was enhanced in the companion copping with potato onion. We proposed that companion cropping with potato onion could enhance the disease resistance of tomato against V. dahliae by regulating the expression of genes related to disease

  17. Begomovirus diversity in tomato crops and weeds in Ecuador and the detection of a recombinant isolate of rhynchosia golden mosaic Yucatan virus infecting tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz-Carrasco, Lenin C; Castillo-Urquiza, Gloria P; Lima, Alison T M; Xavier, Cesar A D; Vivas-Vivas, Leticia M; Mizubuti, Eduardo S G; Zerbini, F Murilo

    2014-08-01

    Viral diseases caused by begomoviruses are of economic importance due to their adverse effects on the production of tropical and subtropical crops. In Ecuador, despite reports of significant infestations of Bemisia tabaci in the late 1990s, only very recently has a begomovirus, tomato leaf deformation virus (ToLDeV, also present in Peru), been reported in tomato. ToLDeV is the first monopartite begomovirus discovered that originated in the Americas, and its presence in Ecuador highlights the need for a wider survey of tomato-infecting begomoviruses in this country. Tomato and weed samples were collected in 2010 and 2011 in six provinces of Ecuador, and begomovirus genomes were cloned and sequenced using a rolling-circle-amplification-based approach. Most tomato samples from the provinces of Guayas, Loja, Manabi and Santa Elena were infected with tomato leaf deformation virus (ToLDeV). One sample from Manabi had a triple infection with ToLDeV, rhynchosia golden mosaic Yucatan virus (RhGMYuV) and an isolate that was a recombinant between the two. A new begomovirus was detected in another tomato sample from Manabi. Samples of Rhynchosia sp. from the provinces of Guayas and Manabi were infected by RhGMYuV. These results indicate not only the prevalence of ToLDeV in tomato in Ecuador but also the presence of other viruses, albeit at a much lower frequency.

  18. Comparison of cellular responses to Xanthomonas perforans infection between resistant and susceptible tomato accessions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y Q; Zhang, X F; Li, N; Liu, X

    2017-02-01

    Bacterial spot of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) caused by several Xanthomonas species is one of the most destructive diseases. Genes regulating the hypersensitive resistance and field resistance to X. perforans race T3 have been intensively investigated over the last decade. However, a comparative analysis of cellular responses to the pathogen in susceptible and resistant hosts has not been completed, which prevents the detailed understanding of the interactions between the pathogen and tomato plants. In this study, the characteristics of lesions, stomata, and pathogen colonization in hypersensitive response (HR) PI 128216, field-resistant PI 114490, and susceptible OH 88119 tomato plants after inoculation with green fluorescent protein-labeled X. perforans race T3 bacteria were investigated. Significant differences in developmental processes and the micromorphology of spot lesions among three tomato lines were observed. Our results suggested that the faster lesion development in OH 88119 plants compared with that of the other two lines was associated with a greater increase in the stomatal apertures over a longer period following bacterial inoculation. The depth of bacterial colonization and pathogen density inside infected leaves in OH 88119 were also significantly different from that of resistant tomato plants. Determination of the ultrastructural responses to X. perforans among three tomato lines revealed that cell wall defense response was the main difference between resistant and susceptible tomato lines. These results may provide fundamental information for understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms regulating tomato responses to X. perforans race T3. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  19. The route of tomato spotted wilt virus inside the thrips body in relation to transmission efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kritzman, A.; Gera, A.; Raccah, B.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Peters, D.

    2002-01-01

    The route of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in the body of its vectors, Frankliniella occidentalis and Thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) was studied during their development. First instar larvae were allowed, immediately upon hatching, to acquire virus from mechanically infected Datura

  20. Occurrence of Tomato spotted wilt virus in Stevia rebaudiana and Solanum tuberosum in Northern Greece

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzivassiliou, E.K.; Peters, D.; Lolas, P.

    2007-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) was first reported in Greece during 1972 (3) and currently is widespread in the central and northern part of the country infecting several cultivated and wild plant species (1,2). In June 2006, virus-like symptoms similar to

  1. First report of the natural occurrence of tomato chlorotic spot virus in peanuts in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) was identified in peanut in Haiti. This is the first report of TCSV naturally infecting peanut. Genetic diversity of TCSV was characterized. This report provides an overview of this emerging virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and...

  2. Identification and characterization of tomato mutants affected in the Rx-mediated resistance to PVX isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturbois, Bénédicte; Dubrana-Ourabah, Marie-Pierre; Gombert, Julie; Lasseur, Bertrand; Macquet, Audrey; Faure, Chantal; Bendahmane, Abdelhafid; Baurès, Isabelle; Candresse, Thierry

    2012-03-01

    Five tomato mutants affected in the Rx-mediated resistance against Potato virus X (PVX) were identified by screening a mutagenized population derived from a transgenic, Rx1-expressing 'Micro-Tom' line. Contrary to their parental line, they failed to develop lethal systemic necrosis upon infection with the virulent PVX-KH2 isolate. Sequence analysis and quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction experiments indicated that the mutants are not affected in the Rx1 transgene or in the Hsp90, RanGap1 and RanGap2, Rar1 and Sgt1 genes. Inoculation with the PVX-CP4 avirulent isolate demonstrated that the Rx1 resistance was still effective in the mutants. In contrast, the virulent PVX-KH2 isolate accumulation was readily detectable in all mutants, which could further be separated in two groups depending on their ability to restrict the accumulation of PVX-RR, a mutant affected at two key positions for Rx1 elicitor activity. Finally, transient expression of the viral capsid protein elicitor indicated that the various mutants have retained the ability to mount an Rx1-mediated hypersensitive response. Taken together, the results obtained are consistent with a modification of the specificity or intensity of the Rx1-mediated response. The five Micro-Tom mutants should provide very valuable resources for the identification of novel tomato genes affecting the functioning of the Rx gene.

  3. Selection of processing tomato genotypes with high acyl sugar content that are resistant to the tomato pinworm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, D M; Resende, J T V; Faria, M V; Camargo, L K P; Chagas, R R; Lima, I P

    2013-02-08

    Acyl sugars are allelochemicals present at high concentrations in leaves of accessions of the wild tomato Solanum pennellii; they confer resistance to a large number of arthropod pests, including the tomato pinworm, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera, Gelechiidae). Accession 'LA716', with high contents of acyl sugars in the leaves, was used as a source of resistance to start a genetic breeding program of processing cultivated tomato, S. lycopersicum. We selected plants of the F₂ generation of an interspecific cross (S. lycopersicum cv. 'Redenção' x S. pennellii 'LA716') for extremes of concentrations (high and low) of acyl sugars in the leaves and evaluated the resistance of selected genotypes to the tomato pinworm, compared with plants of the parental and F₁ generations. The concentrations of acyl sugars present in the genotypes selected for high contents were close to those of S. pennellii 'LA 716', while the genotypes with low concentrations of acyl sugars were close to cultivar 'Redenção'. The F₁ hybrid ('Redenção' x 'LA716') had intermediate concentrations of acyl sugars, but was closer to Redenção, indicating that the inheritance of this type of character is due to a recessive major gene, along with minor genes with additive effects. There was a direct association between high contents of acyl sugars and non-preference for oviposition and suppression of larval development, indicating that the allelochemical acts through mechanisms of non-preference for oviposition and through antibiosis. Genotypes with high contents of acyl sugars were more effective in reducing the damage caused by the tomato pinworm. Genotypes RVTA-2010pl#94 and RVTA-2010pl#31, selected for high contents of acyl sugars, showed a good level of resistance to T. absoluta, similar to the wild genotype LA716. These genotypes are promising for use in a breeding program for developing commercial processing tomatoes.

  4. Phylogenetic and recombination analysis of tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sen Lian

    Full Text Available Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV severely damages and reduces the yield of many economically important plants worldwide. In this study, we determined the whole-genome sequences of 10 TSWV isolates recently identified from various regions and hosts in Korea. Phylogenetic analysis of these 10 isolates as well as the three previously sequenced isolates indicated that the 13 Korean TSWV isolates could be divided into two groups reflecting either two different origins or divergences of Korean TSWV isolates. In addition, the complete nucleotide sequences for the 13 Korean TSWV isolates along with previously sequenced TSWV RNA segments from Korea and other countries were subjected to phylogenetic and recombination analysis. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that both the RNA L and RNA M segments of most Korean isolates might have originated in Western Europe and North America but that the RNA S segments for all Korean isolates might have originated in China and Japan. Recombination analysis identified a total of 12 recombination events among all isolates and segments and five recombination events among the 13 Korea isolates; among the five recombinants from Korea, three contained the whole RNA L segment, suggesting reassortment rather than recombination. Our analyses provide evidence that both recombination and reassortment have contributed to the molecular diversity of TSWV.

  5. Pattern of the Occurrence of Tomato spotted wilt virus in Jeonnam Province

    OpenAIRE

    Sug-Ju Ko; Beom-Ryong Kang; Duck-Soo Choi; Do-Ik Kim; Gwan-Seok Lee; Chang-Seok Kim; Hong-Soo Choi

    2013-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was occurred at 8 areas including Naju, Suncheon, Younggwang, Youngam, and Shinan in Jeonnam province and the crops of Younggwang were severely damaged by TSWV. The hot pepper (Capsicum annuum), bell pepper (Capsicum annuum v ar. angulosum) and tomato (Solanum lycopersicon) in greenhouse and hot pepper in open field were infected by TSWV. Especially, hot pepper was severely damaged by TSWV infection. The survey data indicated that 1.1−30% in the nu...

  6. Resistance of Commercial Tomato Cultivars to Meloidogyne arenaria and M. incognita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donggeun Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp. are among the main pathogens of greenhouse crops worldwide.Plant resistance is currently the method of choice for controlling these pests. To select resistant tomato againsttwo common species of root-knot nematodes, M. incognita and M. arenaria, 36 commercial tomato(Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cultivars were screened. Seventeen tomato cultivars were resistant to bothroot-knot nematodes: six in cherry tomato, ‘Tenten’, ‘Cadillac’, ‘Cutti’, ‘Sweet’, ‘Ppotto’, ‘Lycopin-9’, eightin globe tomato, ‘Lovely 240’, ‘Dotaerang Dia’, ‘Cupirang’, ‘Dotaerang Master’, ‘Super Dotaerang’,‘Dotaerang Season’, ‘Miroku’, ‘Hoyong’, and three in root stock, ‘Special’, ‘Fighting’, and ‘Magnet’.

  7. Resistance of Commercial Tomato Cultivars to Meloidogyne arenaria and M. incognita

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donggeun Kim

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp. are among the main pathogens of greenhouse crops worldwide. Plant resistance is currently the method of choice for controlling these pests. To select resistant tomato against two common species of root-knot nematodes, M. incognita and M. arenaria, 36 commercial tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cultivars were screened. Seventeen tomato cultivars were resistant to both root-knot nematodes: six in cherry tomato, ‘Tenten’, ‘Cadillac’, ‘Cutti’, ‘Sweet’, ‘Ppotto’, ‘Lycopin-9’, eight in globe tomato, ‘Lovely 240’, ‘Dotaerang Dia’, ‘Cupirang’, ‘Dotaerang Master’, ‘Super Dotaerang’, ‘Dotaerang Season’, ‘Miroku’, ‘Hoyong’, and three in root stock, ‘Special’, ‘Fighting’, and ‘Magnet’.

  8. The arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis attenuates symptom severity and reduces virus concentration in tomato infected by Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffei, Giulia; Miozzi, Laura; Fiorilli, Valentina; Novero, Mara; Lanfranco, Luisa; Accotto, Gian Paolo

    2014-04-01

    The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis is considered a natural instrument to improve plant health and productivity since mycorrhizal plants often show higher tolerance to abiotic and biotic stresses. However, the impact of the AM symbiosis on infection by viral pathogens is still largely uncertain and little explored. In the present study, tomato plants were grown under controlled conditions and inoculated with the AM fungus Funneliformis mosseae. Once the mycorrhizal colonization had developed, plants were inoculated with the Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV), a geminivirus causing one of the most serious viral diseases of tomatoes in Mediterranean areas. Biological conditions consisted of control plants (C), TYLCSV-infected plants (V), mycorrhizal plants (M), and TYLCSV-infected mycorrhizal plants (MV). At the time of analysis, the level of mycorrhiza development and the expression profiles of mycorrhiza-responsive selected genes were not significantly modified by virus infection, thus indicating that the AM symbiosis was unaffected by the presence and spread of the virus. Viral symptoms were milder, and both shoot and root concentrations of viral DNA were lower in MV plants than in V plants. Overall F. mosseae colonization appears to exert a beneficial effect on tomato plants in attenuating the disease caused by TYLCSV.

  9. Resistance-breaking population of Meloidogyne incognita utilizes plant peroxidase to scavenge reactive oxygen species, thereby promoting parasitism on tomato carrying Mi-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Tinglong; Shen, Jinhua; Fa, Yang; Su, Yishi; Wang, Xuan; Li, Hongmei

    2017-01-01

    Resistance conferred by the Mi-1 gene from Solanum peruvianum is effective and widely used for controlling root-knot nematodes (RKNs, Meloidogyne spp.). However, breakdown of resistance by RKNs seriously threatens the durable application of the resistance resource. Here, a resistance-breaking population of M. incognita was selected from an avirulent population by continuously inoculating on Mi-1-carrying tomato. Histological observations showed the resistance-breaking population would not induce hypersensitive response (HR) when infecting Mi-1-carrying tomato, while avirulent population did. A total of 308 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified from Mi-1-carrying tomato upon infection with resistance-breaking versus avirulent populations by RNA-seq. The expression patterns of 23 selected DEGs were validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Subsequently, seven out of nine highly up-regulated DEGs were successfully knocked down in Mi-1-carrying tomato by tobacco rattle virus (TRV) mediated RNAi. The TRV line targeting a peroxidase gene showed a much higher magnitude of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and distinct reduction of pathogenicity upon infection of the resistance-breaking population compared with that of TRV::gfp line. Our results suggested that plant peroxidase might be exploited by resistance-breaking population of M. incognita to scavenge ROS, so as to overcome Mi-1-mediated resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Relationship between Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Viruses and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract · Tomato yellow leaf curl is prevalent in tomato growing districts of Uganda. The disease is known to be spread by a whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in a persistent manner. Some of its symptoms are leaf curl, marginal leaf yellowing, malformation of fruits, stunting and dieback (in case of primary infection at early seedling ...

  11. Resistant pathogens, fungi, and viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, Christopher A; Mansfield, Sara A; Sawyer, Robert G; Cook, Charles H

    2014-12-01

    Although originally described in Staphylococcus aureus, resistance among bacteria has now become a race to determine which classes of bacteria will become more resistant. Availability of antibacterial agents has allowed the development of entirely new diseases caused by nonbacterial pathogens, related largely to fungi that are inherently resistant to antibacterials. This article presents the growing body of knowledge of the herpes family of viruses, and their occurrence and consequences in patients with concomitant surgical disease or critical illness. The focus is on previously immunocompetent patients, as the impact of herpes viruses in immunosuppressed patients has received thorough coverage elsewhere. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The tomato I-3 gene: a novel gene for resistance to Fusarium wilt disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Lim, Ginny T T; Jones, David A

    2015-07-01

    Plant resistance proteins provide race-specific immunity through the recognition of pathogen effectors. The resistance genes I, I-2 and I-3 have been incorporated into cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) from wild tomato species to confer resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) races 1, 2 and 3, respectively. Although the Fol effectors corresponding to these resistance genes have all been identified, only the I-2 resistance gene has been isolated from tomato. To isolate the I-3 resistance gene, we employed a map-based cloning approach and used transgenic complementation to test candidate genes for resistance to Fol race 3. Here, we describe the fine mapping and sequencing of genes at the I-3 locus, which revealed a family of S-receptor-like kinase (SRLK) genes. Transgenic tomato lines were generated with three of these SRLK genes and one was found to confer Avr3-dependent resistance to Fol race 3, confirming it to be I-3. The finding that I-3 encodes an SRLK reveals a new pathway for Fol resistance and a new class of resistance genes, of which Pi-d2 from rice is also a member. The identification of I-3 also allows the investigation of the complex effector-resistance protein interaction involving Avr1-mediated suppression of I-2- and I-3-dependent resistance in tomato. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  13. Molecular Evidence of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus-Sicily Spreading on Tomato, Pepper and Bean in Tunisia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Gorsane

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Unusual symptoms including yellowing, stunting, curling, crumpling and plant size reduction were observed in tomato fields and green houses in Tunisia. These symptoms, generally associated with the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV complex, have become increasingly common in recent years. In order to ascertain the molecular characteristics of Tunisian isolates by PCR, both the coat protein gene and the intergenic region of eleven isolates were amplified using specific primers, and sequenced. The PCR procedure also allowed the amplification of viral DNA fragments using a bean total DNA as a template. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that these Tunisian isolates clustered with a Sicilian isolate of TYLCSV-Sic. This is the first report of the involvement of this viral species in Phaseolus vulgaris disease.

  14. Determination of resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici via molecular markers in tomato lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan PINAR

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL is common in tomato production areas where intensive production causes huge losses. Other plant species as well as biological and chemical control is insufficient to fight with the disease. The most effective solution to this problem is the use of resistant varieties. Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici resistance has been transferred to most of the commercial varieties via classical and molecular marker-assisted selection (MAS. The use of molecular markers in the development of new varieties resistant to this disease, but not allelic race-specific resistance genes allows pyramiding to these genes at one cultivar. Markers which linked to resistance genes for FOL races (0, 1, 2 were improved and routinely used in tomato breeding programs. In this study, 450 pure tomato lines from the gene pool of tomato to the fore in terms of yield and some quality characteristics in Alata Horticultural Research Station Directorate were screened for Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (FOL resistance via developed SCAR and CAPS markers linked to I-1 and I-2. The 88 tomato lines had I-1 gene and 74 of tomato lines yielded band of homozygote resistance allele for I-2. Obtained results in this study show that developed molecular markers for Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. resistance can use easily for the developing of new cultivars.

  15. [Relationship of Zn content and Na/K ratio to the resistance to pathogen invasion in antisense ACS transgenic tomato fruit and normal tomato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Bei; Shen, Lin; Liu, Can; Tian, Shi-Ping; Sheng, Ji-Ping

    2009-02-01

    In the present work, inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) was used to determine the content of Zn, Na and K and the ratio of Na/K in antisense ACS transgenic tomato fruit (in which the antisense ACC synthase gene construct was inserted) and in normal tomato fruit of the same variety (Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Lichun). The difference in mineral elements content between the two tomatoes and the involvement of Zn content and Na/K ratio in the disease resistance of postharvest tomato fruit were discussed. The results showed that the ethylene biosynthesis is limited in antisense ACS transgenic tomato fruit. Meanwhile, the resistance to Rhizopus nigricans invasion of this transgenic tomato was higher, the disease incidence and lesion area in transgenic tomato fruit were 20.0% and 33.3% lower than those in control fruit, respectively. In addition, the content of Zn in transgenic tomato fruit was 0.322 microg x g(-1) and was 1.5 times higher than that in Lichun tomato fruit. There was no significant difference in K content between transgenic tomato fruit and Lichun fruit, but the content of Na in transgenic tomato fruit was significant higher than that in Lichun fruit and the Na/K ratio in transgenic tomato fruit was 2.0 times higher than that in Lichun fruit. It is suggested that the content of Zn and the Na/K ratio may be involved in the resistance response to pathogen invasion and the development of antisense ACS transgenic tomato fruit.

  16. Serological and molecular identification of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus in Khuzestan province of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahrokh MALEKZADEH

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A survey was conducted from 2006 to 2007 to identify the causal agent of leaf curling of tomato in eight major tomato-growing areas of Khuzestan province in southwest of Iran. Tomato leaf samples showing leaf curling, yellowing, and stunting were collected and screened for the presence of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV by TAS-ELISA. Further confi rmation was completed using graft transmission onto healthy tomato plants and PCR. Results confi rmed that TYLCV is a causal agent of tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD and is widely distributed in all the major tomato growing areas in southwest of Iran. The nucleotide sequences of the coat protein (CP gene of four isolates (Dezfoul, Shoush, Behbahan, and Ramhormoz were determined and deposited in GenBank (EF199814-7. Phylogenetic analysis of the CP gene further showed that all four Iranian isolates have very close relationship and formed a Compact cluster together with previously sequenced Iranian TYLCV isolates.

  17. The role of ethylene and wound signaling in resistance of tomato to Botrytis cinerea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Díaz, J.; Have, ten A.; Kan, van J.A.L.

    2002-01-01

    Ethylene, jasmonate, and salicylate play important roles in plant defense responses to pathogens. To investigate the contributions of these compounds in resistance of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea, three types of experiments were conducted: (a) quantitative

  18. Evaluation of disinfectants to prevent mechanical transmission of viruses and a viroid in greenhouse tomato production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rugang; Baysal-Gurel, Fulya; Abdo, Zaid; Miller, Sally A; Ling, Kai-Shu

    2015-01-27

    In recent years, a number of serious disease outbreaks caused by viruses and viroids on greenhouse tomatoes in North America have resulted in significant economic losses to growers. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the effectiveness of commercial disinfectants against mechanical transmission of these pathogens, and to select disinfectants with broad spectrum reactivity to control general virus and viroid diseases in greenhouse tomato production. A total of 16 disinfectants were evaluated against Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd), Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The efficacy of each disinfectant to deactivate the pathogen's infectivity was evaluated in replicate experiments from at least three independent experiments. Any infectivity that remained in the treated solutions was assessed through bioassays on susceptible tomato plants through mechanical inoculation using inocula that had been exposed with the individual disinfectant for three short time periods (0-10 sec, 30 sec and 60 sec). A positive infection on the inoculated plant was determined through symptom observation and confirmed with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PepMV, ToMV, and TMV) and real-time reverse transcription-PCR (PSTVd). Experimental data were analyzed using Logistic regression and the Bayesian methodology. Statistical analyses using logistic regression and the Bayesian methodology indicated that two disinfectants (2% Virkon S and 10% Clorox regular bleach) were the most effective to prevent transmission of PepMV, PSTVd, ToMV, and TMV from mechanical inoculation. Lysol all-purpose cleaner (50%) and nonfat dry milk (20%) were also effective against ToMV and TMV, but with only partial effects for PepMV and PSTVd. With the broad spectrum efficacy against three common viruses and a viroid, several disinfectants, including 2% Virkon S, 10% Clorox regular bleach and 20% nonfat dry milk, are recommend to greenhouse facilities

  19. Tomato SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 contribute to disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yafen; Huang, Lei; Ouyang, Zhigang; Hong, Yongbo; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2014-06-15

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades are highly conserved signaling modules that mediate the transduction of extracellular stimuli via receptors/sensors into intracellular responses and play key roles in plant immunity against pathogen attack. However, the function of tomato MAPK kinases, SlMKKs, in resistance against Botrytis cinerea remains unclear yet. A total of five SlMKK genes with one new member, SlMKK5, were identified in tomato. qRT-PCR analyses revealed that expression of SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 was strongly induced by B. cinerea and by jasmonic acid and ethylene precursor 1-amino cyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based knockdown of individual SlMKKs and disease assays identified that SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 but not other three SlMKKs (SlMKK1, SlMKK3 and SlMKK5) are involved in resistance against B. cinerea. Silencing of SlMKK2 or SlMKK4 resulted in reduced resistance to B. cinerea, increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species and attenuated expression of defense genes after infection of B. cinerea in tomato plants. Furthermore, transient expression of constitutively active phosphomimicking forms SlMKK2DD and SlMKK4DD in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana plants led to enhanced resistance to B. cinerea and elevated expression of defense genes. VIGS-based knockdown of SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 expression in tomato and gain-of-function transient expression of constitutively active phosphomimicking forms SlMKK2DD and SlMKK2DD in N. benthamiana demonstrate that both SlMKK2 and SlMKK4 function as positive regulators of defense response against B. cinerea.

  20. Detection and molecular characterization of tomato yellow leaf curl virus naturally infecting Lycopersicon esculentum in Egypt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabie, M; Ratti, C; Abdel Aleem, E; Fattouh, F

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) infections of tomato crops in Egypt were widely spread in 2014. Infected symptomatic tomato plants from different governorates were sampled. TYLCV strains Israel and Mild (TYLCV-IL, TYLCV-Mild) were identified by multiplex and real-time PCR. In addition, nucleotide sequence analysis of the V1 and V2 protein genes, revealed ten TYLCV Egyptian isolates (TYLCV from TY1 to 10). Phylogenetic analysis showed their high degree of relatedness with TYLCV-IL Jordan isolate (98%). Here we have showed the complete nucleotide sequence of the TYLCV Egyptian isolate TY10, sampled from El Beheira. A high degree of similarity to other previously reported Egyptian isolates and isolates from Jordan and Japan reflect the importance of phylogenetic analysis in monitoring virus genetic diversity and possibilities for divergence of more virulent strains or genotypes.

  1. Emergence of Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus in Vegetables in Florida and the Southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Craig G; Frantz, Galen; Reitz, Stuart R; Funderburk, Joseph E; Mellinger, H Charles; McAvoy, Eugene; Turechek, William W; Marshall, Spencer H; Tantiwanich, Yaowapa; McGrath, Margaret T; Daughtrey, Margery L; Adkins, Scott

    2015-03-01

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) are two emerging tospoviruses in Florida. In a survey of the southeastern United States, GRSV and TCSV were frequently detected in solanaceous crops and weeds with tospovirus-like symptoms in south Florida, and occurred sympatrically with Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in tomato and pepper in south Florida. TSWV was the only tospovirus detected in other survey locations, with the exceptions of GRSV from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in South Carolina and New York, both of which are first reports. Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) were the only non-solanaceous GRSV and/or TCSV hosts identified in experimental host range studies. Little genetic diversity was observed in GRSV and TCSV sequences, likely due to the recent introductions of both viruses. All GRSV isolates characterized were reassortants with the TCSV M RNA. In laboratory transmission studies, Frankliniella schultzei was a more efficient vector of GRSV than F. occidentalis. TCSV was acquired more efficiently than GRSV by F. occidentalis but upon acquisition, transmission frequencies were similar. Further spread of GRSV and TCSV in the United States is possible and detection of mixed infections highlights the opportunity for additional reassortment of tospovirus genomic RNAs.

  2. Naturally occurring broad-spectrum powdery mildew resistance in a Central American tomato accession is caused by loss of mlo function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yuling; Pavan, Stefano; Zheng, Zheng; Zappel, Nana F; Reinstädler, Anja; Lotti, Concetta; De Giovanni, Claudio; Ricciardi, Luigi; Lindhout, Pim; Visser, Richard; Theres, Klaus; Panstruga, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    The resistant cherry tomato (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme) line LC-95, derived from an accession collected in Ecuador, harbors a natural allele (ol-2) that confers broad-spectrum and recessively inherited resistance to powdery mildew (Oidium neolycopersici). As both the genetic and phytopathological characteristics of ol-2-mediated resistance are reminiscent of powdery mildew immunity conferred by loss-of-function mlo alleles in barley and Arabidopsis, we initiated a candidate-gene approach to clone Ol-2. A tomato Mlo gene (SlMlo1) with high sequence-relatedness to barley Mlo and Arabidopsis AtMLO2 mapped to the chromosomal region harboring the Ol-2 locus. Complementation experiments using transgenic tomato lines as well as virus-induced gene silencing assays suggested that loss of SlMlo1 function is responsible for powdery mildew resistance conferred by ol-2. In progeny of a cross between a resistant line bearing ol-2 and the susceptible tomato cultivar Moneymaker, a 19-bp deletion disrupting the SlMlo1 coding region cosegregated with resistance. This polymorphism results in a frameshift and, thus, a truncated nonfunctional SlMlo1 protein. Our findings reveal the second example of a natural mlo mutant that possibly arose post-domestication, suggesting that natural mlo alleles might be evolutionarily short-lived due to fitness costs related to loss of mlo function.

  3. Tomato spotted wilt virus Gc and N proteins interact in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, M.; Borst, J.W.; Goldbach, R.W.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2007-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) virions consist of a nucleocapsid core surrounded by a membrane containing glycoproteins Gn and Gc. To unravel the protein interactions involved in the membrane acquisition of RNPs, TSWV nucleocapsid protein (N), Gn and Gc were expressed and analyzed in BHK21 cells.

  4. Current status of Tomato chlorotic spot virus in Florida and the Caribbean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damaging outbreaks of Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV), an emerging thrips-vectored tospovirus, and several invasive species of thrips are significantly impacting vegetable and other crops in Florida and the Caribbean. Host and geographic ranges of TCSV are continuing to expand in this region. Dev...

  5. Role of the envelope glycoproteins in the infection cycle of tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kikkert, M.

    1999-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) forms the type member of the genus Tospovirus , which today harbors more than twelve different species. TSWV is able to infect an enormous variety of different plants, to which it often causes devastating effects,

  6. Tomato necrotic ring virus (TNRV), a recently described tospovirus species infecting tomato and pepper in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mehraban, A.; Cheewachaiwit, S.; Relevante, C.; Kormelink, R.J.M.; Peters, D.

    2011-01-01

    Two tospovirus isolates collected from tomato and bell pepper in Thailand were studied. The isolates induced severe necrotic mottling and/or necrotic spots and rings on the leaves and fruits of the respective plants as confirmed by back-inoculation. A polyclonal antiserum raised against its

  7. Impact Assessment of agricultural research and development to reduce virus problems in tomato production in Mali: Farmers perceptions

    OpenAIRE

    Nouhoheflin, Theodore; Coulibaly, Ousmane; Norton, Geoff; Soumare, S.; Sissoko, P.

    2008-01-01

    Pests and diseases caused by bacteria, nematodes, fungi and viruses cause significant losses to tomato in West Africa. This study, carried-out within the framework of the IPM-CRSP implemented jointly by IITA, IER and Virginia Tech. and State University, assesses farmers’ perceptions on tomato pests and analyzes factors affecting pest management decision-making. Surveys were carried out in three tomato production areas where pests and diseases are major agricultural problems encountered by far...

  8. Dominant resistance against plant viruses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, de D.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    To establish a successful infection plant viruses have to overcome a defense system composed of several layers. This review will overview the various strategies plants employ to combat viral infections with main emphasis on the current status of single dominant resistance (R) genes identified

  9. Expression and Characterization of a Soluble Form of Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Glycoprotein GN

    OpenAIRE

    Whitfield, Anna E.; Ullman, Diane E.; German, Thomas L

    2004-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), a member of the Tospovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae, is an economically important plant pathogen with a worldwide distribution. TSWV is transmitted to plants via thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), which transmit the virus in a persistent propagative manner. The envelope glycoproteins, GN and GC, are critical for the infection of thrips, but they are not required for the initial infection of plants. Thus, it is assumed that the envelope glycoproteins play ...

  10. In Vitro screening of tomato genotypes for drought resistance using ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drought is a major abiotic factor that limits plant growth and productivity. Tomato is an important vegetable crop and area under production is limited by irrigation water scarcity. Effort was made to screen tomato germplasm under in vitro condition using polyethylene glycol (PEG) at four concentrations (0, 20, 40 and 60 g/l) ...

  11. Sequence characterization of tomato leaf curl Sinaloa virus and tomato severe leaf curl virus: phylogeny of New World begomoviruses and detection of recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, A; Kvarnheden, A; Marcenaro, D; Valkonen, J P T

    2005-07-01

    Diseases caused by begomoviruses (family Geminiviridae, genus Begomovirus) constitute a serious constraint to tomato production in Nicaragua. In this study, the complete nucleotide (nt) sequences of the DNA-A and DNA-B components were determined for the first time for Tomato leaf curl Sinaloa virus (ToLCSinV). In addition, the complete nt sequence was determined for the DNA-A component of two isolates of Tomato severe leaf curl virus (ToSLCV). The genome organization of ToLCSinV and ToSLCV was identical to the bipartite genomes of other begomoviruses described from the Americas. A phylogenetic analysis of DNA-A including 45 begomovirus species showed that the indigenous begomoviruses of the New World can be divided into three major clades and an intermediate group: AbMV clade, SLCV clade, "Brazil clade", and BGYMV group. Phylogenetic analyses of the DNA-A and DNA-B components and their open reading frames indicated that ToLCSinV and ToSLCV belong to different clades: ToLCSinV to the AbMV clade, and ToSLCV to the SLCV clade. The two Nicaraguan isolates of ToSLCV showed a close relationship with ToSLCV from Guatemala (ToSLCV-[GT96-1]) and Tomato chino La Paz virus (ToChLPV), but differed significantly in the AV1 and AC1 regions, respectively. Computer-based predictions indicated that recombination with another begomovirus had taken place within AV1 of ToSLCV dividing this species into two strains. A high probability was also found that ToChLPV is involved in the evolution of ToSLCV.

  12. Lamium amplexicaule (Lamiaceae): a weed reservoir for tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Eui-Joon; Park, Jungan; Lee, Hyejung; Kim, Jaedeok; Choi, Hong-Soo; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll; Kim, Chang-Seok; Lee, Sukchan

    2014-06-01

    After the first identification of tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) in the southern part of Korea in 2008, TYLCV has rapidly spread to tomato farms in most regions of Korea. From 2008 to 2010, a survey of natural weed hosts that could be reservoirs of TYLCV was performed in major tomato production areas of Korea. About 530 samples were collected and identified as belonging to 25 species from 11 families. PCR and Southern hybridization were used to detect TYLCV in samples, and replicating forms of TYLCV DNA were detected in three species (Achyranthes bidentata, Lamium amplexicaule, and Veronica persica) by Southern hybridization. TYLCV transmission mediated by Bemisia tabaci from TYLCV-infected tomato plants to L. amplexicaule was confirmed, and TYLCV-infected L. amplexicaule showed symptoms such as yellowing, stunting, and leaf curling. TYLCV from infected L. amplexicaule was also transmitted to healthy tomato and L. amplexicaule plants by B. tabaci. The rate of infection of L. amplexicaule by TYLCV was similar to that of tomato. This report is the first to show that L. amplexicaule is a reservoir weed host for TYLCV.

  13. Molecular Confirmation of Intraspecific Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Hybrids and Their Evaluation Against Late Blight and Cucumber Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Amjad; Saleem, Muhammad Yussouf; Akhtar, Khalid Pervaiz; Shoaib, Muhammad; Iqbal, Qumer; Asghar, Muhammad

    2017-06-01

    Tomato is one of the most consumed vegetables in the world. Diseases are the number one concern in the development of high-yield and disease-resistant tomato hybrids which is the foremost priority of breeders. Present study was conducted (1) to develop DNA-based markers for genetic confirmation of tomato F1 hybrids, (2) to utilize sequenced characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker linked to the Ph-3 gene for Phytophthora infestans resistance in tomato and (3) to evaluate male and female parental genotypes and their F1 hybrids against late blight (LB) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). For molecular studies, 58 previously reported markers including RAPDs (10), SCAR (01), EST-SSR (01) and SSR (46) were applied. The SCAR marker clearly differentiated the LB3 and LB4 from Roma and T-1359 and provided evidence for Ph-3 gene. The SCAR marker was able to confirm the Ph-3 gene in the hybrids Roma × LB4, Roma × LB3, Riogrande × LB2, Riogrande × LB3 and Roma × LB7. Out of several tested primers, SSR-22 proved useful for genetic confirmation of F1 hybrid TMS1 × Money Maker (MM). For LB, tested hybrids/genotypes were ranked as susceptible to highly susceptible with different infection percentage (IP). However, the pace of symptom development was slower in hybrid Rio × LB2, 45% IP after 10 days of inoculation compared with 85% disease in one of the parent genotypes (Riogrande). None of the tested genotypes was found resistant; however, TMS1 responded as tolerant against CMV using mechanical inoculation. Under natural field conditions, TMS1 was found resistant while hybrids TMS1 × Naqeeb and TMS1 × MM were tolerant where as others were found to be susceptible. In conclusion, all tomato hybrids were genetically confirmed using DNA-based markers. SCAR marker was useful for marker-assisted confirmation of the Ph-3 gene in parental lines and hybrids; however, this gene was unable to provide protection against the local population of P. infestans.

  14. Antagonistic rhizobacteria and jasmonic acid induce resistance against tomato bacterial spot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélvio Gledson Maciel Ferraz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AbstractTomato bacterial spot on tomato may be caused by four species of Xanthomonas and among them X. gardneri(Xg is the most destructive one, especially in areas irrigated using a center pivot system in Minas Gerais state and the midwest region of Brazil. Due to the ineffectiveness of chemical control and the lack of cultivars with high levels of genetic resistance, this study investigated the potential of three antagonists (Streptomyces setonii (UFV618, Bacillus cereus (UFV592 and Serratia marcescens (UFV252, and the hormone jasmonic acid (JA as a positive control, to reduce bacterial spot symptoms and to potentiate defense enzymes in the leaves of tomato plants infected by Xg. Tomato seeds were microbiolized with each antagonist, and the soil was drenched with these bacteria. The plants were sprayed with JA 48 h before Xginoculation. The final average severity on the tomato plants was reduced by 29.44, 59.26 and 61.33% in the UFV592, UFV618 and JA treatments, respectively. The UFV618 antagonist was as effective as JA in reducing bacterial spot symptoms on tomatoes, which can be explained by the greater activities of defense enzymes that are commonly involved in host resistance against bacterial diseases. These results suggest that JA and the UFV618 antagonist can be used in the integrated management of bacterial spot on tomatoes.

  15. First report of tomato chlorotic spot virus in sweet basil (Ocimum basilicum) and purslane (Portulaca oleracea) in Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) has been recently detected in tomato, pepper, hoya and vinca in Florida. Observations of additional crops in 2016 and 2017 revealed TCSV-like symptoms. Testing of these symptomatic plants identified three new hosts of TCSV in Florida: sweet basil (Ocimum basilicu...

  16. Three decades of managing Tomato spotted wilt virus in peanut in southeastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, R; Abney, M R; Culbreath, A K; Kemerait, R C; Tubbs, R S; Monfort, W S; Pappu, H R

    2017-09-15

    Southeastern states namely Georgia, Florida, and Alabama produce two-thirds of the peanuts in the United States. Thrips-transmitted Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), which causes spotted wilt disease, has been a major impediment to peanut production for the past three decades. The cultivars grown in the 1980s were extremely susceptible to TSWV. Early yield losses extended to tens of millions of dollars each year (up to 100% loss in many fields). This situation led to the creation of an interdisciplinary team known as "SWAT: Spotted Wilt Action Team". Initial efforts focused on risk mitigation using a combination of chemical and cultural management practices along with a strong investment in breeding programs. Beginning in the mid 1990s, cultivars with field resistance were developed and integrated with cultural and chemical management options. A Risk Mitigation Index (Peanut Rx) was made available to growers to assess risks, and provide options for mitigating risks such as planting field resistant cultivars with in-furrow insecticides, planting after peak thrips incidence, planting in twin rows, and increasing seeding rates. These efforts helped curtail losses due to spotted wilt. The Peanut Rx continues to be refined every year based on new research findings. Breeding efforts, predominantly in Georgia and Florida, continue to develop cultivars with incremental field resistance. The present-day cultivars (third-generation TSWV-resistant cultivars released after 2010) possess substantially greater field resistance than second-generation (cultivars released from 2000 to 2010) and first-generation (cultivars released from 1994 to 2000) TSWV resistant cultivars. Despite increased field resistance, these cultivars are not immune to TSWV and succumb under high thrips and TSWV pressure. Therefore, field resistant cultivars cannot serve as a 'stand-alone' option and have to be integrated with other management options. The mechanism of resistance is also unknown in field

  17. Companion cropping with potato onion enhances the disease resistance of tomato against Verticillium dahliae

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Xuepeng; Wu, Xia; Zhou, Xingang; Liu, Shouwei; Shen, Yanhui; Wu, Fengzhi

    2015-01-01

    Intercropping could alleviate soil-borne diseases, however, few studies focused on the immunity of the host plant induced by the interspecific interactions. To test whether or not intercropping could enhance the disease resistance of host plant, we investigated the effect of companion cropping with potato onion on tomato Verticillium wilt caused by Verticillium dahliae (V. dahliae). To investigate the mechanisms, the root exudates were collected from tomato and potato onion which were grown t...

  18. CONTROL OF VIRAL DISEASES TRANSMITTED IN A PERSISTENT MANNER BY THRIPS IN PEPPER (TOMATO SPOTTED WILT VIRUS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanigliulo, A; Viggiano, A; Gualco, A; Crescenzi, A

    2014-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt disease is caused by Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV) (Tospovirus, Bunyaviridae), a virus that severely damages and reduces the yield of many economically important plants worldwide and actually it is a major disease affecting the production of tomato and pepper in Italy. Due to the non-predictive nature of its outbreaks combined with the lack of forecasting, adoption of preventive measures have not always been practical, in fact the disease cycle has proven to be extremely difficult to break because of the wide and often overlapping host range of both the virus and the thrips vectors, which transmit the virus in a persistent, circulative, and propagative manner. Moreover recently, resistance breaking (RB) isolates of TSWV that overcome the resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in different pepper hybrids have been recovered in different locations in Italy and also in Brazil, USA, Spain and Australia, and this occurrence raises the question on the importance of a new approach of integrated pest management for TSWV management, including both control of its insect vector and the induction of the plant's resistance against viral infection. In this perspective, a study was performed in 2012 and 2013 with the purpose of evaluating the efficacy of the insecticide Cyantraniliprole alone or combined with Acibenzolar-S-Methyl (ASM), inducer of systemic acquired resistance, in the control of tomato spotted wilt disease in pepper. The experiment was performed in laboratory, in a thermo-conditioned greenhouse, into separate insect-proof cages and consisted of 5 treatments and 2 applications (plus a pre-transplant application for treatments were ASM was used. Variables were the mode of application of ASM in pre-transplant (by foliar or by drench) and the duration of the exposure time of the treated plants to viruliferous insects. Pepper cv. Corno di Toro, devoid of any resistance to TSWV, was used. Plants were observed daily to record any symptom induced by

  19. SlWRKY70 is required for Mi-1-mediated resistance to aphids and nematodes in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atamian, Hagop S; Eulgem, Thomas; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2012-02-01

    Plant resistance (R) gene-mediated defense responses against biotic stresses include vast transcriptional reprogramming. In several plant-pathogen systems, members of the WRKY family of transcription factors have been demonstrated to act as both positive and negative regulators of plant defense transcriptional networks. To identify the possible roles of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) WRKY transcription factors in defense mediated by the R gene Mi-1 against potato aphid, Macrosiphum euphorbiae, and root-knot nematode (RKN), Meloidogyne javanica, we used tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based virus-induced gene silencing and transcriptionally suppressed SlWRKY70, a tomato ortholog of the Arabidopsis thaliana WRKY70 gene. Silencing SlWRKY70 attenuated Mi-1-mediated resistance against both potato aphid and RKN showing that SlWRKY70 is required for Mi-1 function. Furthermore, we found SlWRKY70 transcripts to be inducible in response to aphid infestation and RKN inoculation. Mi-1-mediated recognition of these pests modulates this transcriptional response. As previously described for AtWRKY70, we found SlWRKY70 transcript levels to be up-regulated by salicylic acid and suppressed by methyl jasmonate. This indicates that some aspects of WRKY70 regulation are conserved among distantly related eudicots.

  20. Pelargonium zonate spot virus is transmitted vertically via seed and pollen in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapidot, M; Guenoune-Gelbart, D; Leibman, D; Holdengreber, V; Davidovitz, M; Machbash, Z; Klieman-Shoval, S; Cohen, S; Gal-On, A

    2010-08-01

    In autumn 2007, a new disease with unknown etiology was observed in open-field tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) in the Lachish region of Israel. The symptoms included mild mosaic, leaf malformation, and severe stunting of the plants. The causal agent was readily transmitted mechanically from the sap of infected plants to indicator plants. Viral particles were purified from infected plants and cDNA was synthesized from RNA isolated from the particles. Cloning and sequencing of the cDNA showed 95% identity to RNA 3 of Pelargonium zonate spot virus (PZSV). Using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction, PZSV was detected in both seed and pollen grains of infected tomato plants. Attempts to disinfect seed by using hydrochloric acid and trisodium phosphate failed to eliminate this PZSV detection. Seed from infected tomato plants gave rise to infected seedlings with a seed-transmission rate of PZSV of 11 to 29%. Pollen grains collected from flowers of infected plants were used to hand pollinate healthy mother tomato plants. Although none of the pollinated mother plants became infected with PZSV, 29% of the seedlings produced from seed harvested from these plants were found to be infected. This is the first demonstration that PZSV is transmitted vertically via both pollen and seed in tomato plants.

  1. Role of Oxalis corniculata L. as plant virus reservoir with special regard to Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV-RB strain occurrence in rock-wool cultivation in Hungary

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    Hodi, Anna Maria

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The creeping wood sorrel (Oxalis corniculata L. in Central Europe occurs mainly in anthropogenic areas, where it grows in parks and landfill sites or in protected cultivation sites like greenhouses and nurseries. In Hungary O. corniculata has been spreading since the 19th century. In glass- and greenhouses it is the only weed species that was able to settle and flourish on hydroponic rock-wool and coconut fibre growing media. Among virus pathogens of forced tomato (LYPES and paprika crops (CPSAN in Hungary the Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus (TSWV has become an important one, severely affecting the plants and on occasions causing 100% yield losses. The spread of the virus was largely assisted by its effective vector the Western Flower Thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande. Initially the control of the disease was based on the control of the thrips, later, virus-resistant varieties were introduced. This however proved insufficient to fight the disease as it was discovered, quite recently, that in certain white pepper (CPSAN varieties the virus was able to break up the resistance. According to data of the year 2012, those varieties that were considered resistant, showed up to 50% virus infection. Considering the wide spread of O. corniculata and increasing occurrence of the resistance-breaking TSWV isolates, surveys in greenhouses were conducted to examine whether the weed could serve as reservoir for TSWV. Samples were collected of the virus infected crop plants and O. corniculata growing in the same coconut fibre cubes. The samples were examined using test-plants, serological and RT-PCR methods. In result it was found that the symptoms were indeed caused by resistance-breaking TSWV isolates. However, no virus was found in the suspected O. corniculata samples. Therefore it was concluded that in this particular case the O. corniculata cannot be considered reservoir for the virus, in the hydroponic culture.

  2. Influence of the Host Cultivar on Disease and Viral Accumulation Dynamics in Tomato under Mixed Infection with Potato virus X and Tomato mosaic virus

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    O.S. Balogun

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available The primary leaves of seedlings of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cultivar Fukuju No. 2 (a common Japanese cultivar that is susceptible to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV, genus Tobamovirus were inoculated at the five-true leaf stage with the O strain of Potato virus X (PVX, genus Potexvirus and with a mixture of that strain plus Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV, genus Tobamovirus. Inoculation resulted in varying degrees of disease manifestation. During the acute stage of the resulting severe disease (between 5 and 12 days postinoculation, PVX and ToMV levels rose considerably in both the inoculated and the systematically infected leaves. Furthermore, levels of PVX in the systemically infected upper leaves (positions 5 to 7 of plants with a mixed infection were three to six times as high as in plants given the single infection, as determined by direct double antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA. In tomato cv. GCR 236 (+/+, symptom manifestation and the accumulation of both PVX and ToMV closely followed the pattern recorded for cv. Fukuju No. 2. In cv. GCR 237 (Tm-1 plants, however, only PVX accumulated while ToMV whether inoculated singly or mixed with PVX was detected neither in the inoculated nor in the systemically infected leaves even 14 days after inoculation. In contrast to other cultivars, SDS-PAGE, Western blot and Northern blot hybridization did not reveal any enhancement of the coat protein and genomic RNA of PVX in such systemically infected leaves. Consequently, the characteristic severe symptoms normally associated with mixed infection in TMV-susceptible cultivars were absent.

  3. Host-Induced Silencing of Pathogenicity Genes Enhances Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum Wilt in Tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharti, Poonam; Jyoti, Poonam; Kapoor, Priya; Sharma, Vandana; Shanmugam, V; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2017-08-01

    This study presents a novel approach of controlling vascular wilt in tomato by RNAi expression directed to pathogenicity genes of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. Vascular wilt of tomato caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici leads to qualitative and quantitative loss of the crop. Limitation in the existing control measures necessitates the development of alternative strategies to increase resistance in the plants against pathogens. Recent findings paved way to RNAi, as a promising method for silencing of pathogenicity genes in fungus and provided effective resistance against fungal pathogens. Here, two important pathogenicity genes FOW2, a Zn(II)2Cys6 family putative transcription regulator, and chsV, a putative myosin motor and a chitin synthase domain, were used for host-induced gene silencing through hairpinRNA cassettes of these genes against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici. HairpinRNAs were assembled in appropriate binary vectors and transformed into tomato plant targeting FOW2 and chsV genes, for two highly pathogenic strains of Fusarium oxysporum viz. TOFOL-IHBT and TOFOL-IVRI. Transgenic tomatoes were analyzed for possible attainment of resistance in transgenic lines against fungal infection. Eight transgenic lines expressing hairpinRNA cassettes showed trivial disease symptoms after 6-8 weeks of infection. Hence, the host-induced posttranscriptional gene silencing of pathogenicity genes in transgenic tomato plants has enhanced their resistance to vascular wilt disease caused by Fusarium oxysporum.

  4. Primeiro relato do Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) em Campanula medium L. no Brasil First report of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infecting Campanula medium in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Ricardo Gioria; Kátia Regiane Brunelli; Romulo Fujito Kobori; Márcia Maria Rabelo Guimarães Kobori; Jorge Alberto Marques Rezende; Elliot Watanabe Kitajima

    2010-01-01

    Plantas de campânula (Campanula medium) exibindo mosaico e necrose foliar e anéis em flores foram coletadas em uma estufa comercial de flores na região de Atibaia, SP. Suspeitando de possível etiologia viral, amostras de tecido lesionado foram analisadas por ensaios de transmissão mecânica, microscopia eletrônica e sorologia. Todos os resultados apontaram para a presença do Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) como o responsável pelos sintomas. Esse é o primeiro relato deste patógeno em campânula...

  5. Tomato defense to Oidium neolycopersici: Dominant Ol genes confer isolate-dependent resistance via a different mechanism than recessive ol-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Y.; Hulst, van der R.G.M.; Bonnema, A.B.; Marcel, T.C.; Meijer-Dekens, R.G.; Niks, R.E.; Lindhout, W.H.

    2005-01-01

    Tomato powdery mildew caused by Oidium neolycopersici has become a globally important disease of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). To study the defense responses of tomato triggered by tomato powdery mildew, we first mapped a set of resistance genes to O. neolycopersici from related Lycopersicon

  6. Clustering and cellular distribution characteristics of virus particles of Tomato spotted wilt virus and Tomato zonate spot virus in different plant hosts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongkai; Zheng, Kuanyu; Dong, Jiahong; Fang, Qi; Hong, Jian; Wang, Xifeng

    2016-01-19

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Tomato zonate spot virus (TZSV) are the two dominant species of thrip-transmitted tospoviruses, cause significant losses in crop yield in Yunnan and its neighboring provinces in China. TSWV and TZSV belong to different serogroup of tospoviruses but induce similar symptoms in the same host plant species, which makes diagnostic difficult. We used different electron microscopy preparing methods to investigate clustering and cellular distribution of TSWV and TZSV in the host plant species. Negative staining of samples infected with TSWV and TZSV revealed that particles usually clustered in the vesicles, including single particle (SP), double particles clustering (DPC), triple particles clustering (TPC). In the immunogold labeling negative staining against proteins of TZSV, the antibodies against Gn protein were stained more strongly than the N protein. Ultrathin section and high pressure freeze (HPF)-electron microscopy preparations revealed that TSWV particles were distributed in the cisternae of endoplasmic reticulum (ER), filamentous inclusions (FI) and Golgi bodies in the mesophyll cells. The TSWV particles clustered as multiple particles clustering (MPC) and distributed in globular viroplasm or cisternae of ER in the top leaf cell. TZSV particles were distributed more abundantly in the swollen membrane of ER in the mesophyll cell than those in the phloem parenchyma cells and were not observed in the top leaf cell. However, TZSV virions were mainly present as single particle in the cytoplasm, with few clustering as MPC. In this study, we identified TSWV and TZSV particles had the distinct cellular distribution patterns in the cytoplasm from different tissues and host plants. This is the first report of specific clustering characteristics of tospoviruses particles as well as the cellular distribution of TSWV particles in the FI and globular viroplasm where as TZSV particles inside the membrane of ER. These results indicated that

  7. A Novel Strain of Tomato Leaf Curl New Delhi Virus Has Spread to the Mediterranean Basin

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    Isabel M. Fortes

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV is a whitefly-transmitted bipartite begomovirus (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae that causes damage to multiple cultivated plant species mainly belonging to the Solanaceae and Cucurbitaceae families. ToLCNDV was limited to Asian countries until 2012, when it was first reported in Spain, causing severe epidemics in cucurbit crops. Here, we show that a genetically-uniform ToLCNDV population is present in Spain, compatible with a recent introduction. Analyses of ToLCNDV isolates reported from other parts of the world indicated that this virus has a highly heterogeneous population genetically with no evident geographical, plant host or year-based phylogenetic groups observed. Isolates emerging in Spain belong to a strain that seems to have evolved by recombination. Isolates of this strain seem adapted to infecting cucurbits, but poorly infect tomatoes.

  8. Genetic analysis to identify good combiners for ToLCV resistance and yield components in tomato using interspecific hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ramesh K; Rai, N; Singh, Major; Singh, S N; Srivastava, K

    2014-12-01

    The interspecific hybridization for tomato leaf curl virus (ToLCV) resistance was carried out among 10 genetically diverse tomato genotypes (diversified by 50 SSR markers). Among the 10 parents, four susceptible cultivars of Solanum lycopersicum were crossed with six resistant wilds, such as S. pimpinellifolium, S. habrochaites, S. chemielewskii, S. ceraseforme, S. peruvianum and S. chilense in a line x tester mating design. All the 24 hybrids and their parents were grown in the field and glasshouse conditions to determine the general-combining abilities (GCA) and specific-combining abilities (SCA). The variances due to SCA and GCA showed both additive and nonadditive gene effects. Based on GCA estimates, EC-520061 and WIR-5032 were good general combiners while based on SCA estimates, PBC x EC-520061 and PBC x EC-521080 were best specific combiners for coefficient of infection and fruit yield per plant in both the environments. These lines could be selected and utilized in ToLCV resistance and high yield breeding programme for improving the traits.

  9. Screening of Tomato Cultivars for Resistance to Pulsarium Wilt in Eastern States of Nigeria

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    M. Y. Nwaiwu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The causual organism of the out-break of wilt disease of tomato in the Imo and Rivers States of Nigeria was identified as Fusarium pallindoroseum (Berk and Rav Booth and Sutton, and its pathogenicity was established. Experiments were designed to screen five tomato cultivars for resistance to F. pallidoroseum. Four methods were employed in the screening experiments. The results of all the methods used showed the cultivar IFe-l as the most susceptible (65 % while the Chef Cultivar was the most resistant with less than 10 % of the test plants wilting.

  10. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato Isolate of Parietaria Mottle Virus from Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Aramburu, José; Rubio, Luis; Galipienso, Luis

    2015-12-17

    We report here the complete genome sequence of isolate T32 of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) infecting tomato plants in Turin, Italy, obtained by Sanger sequencing. T32 shares 90.48 to 96.69% nucleotide identity with other two PoMV isolates, CR8 and Pe1, respectively, whose complete genome sequences are available. Copyright © 2015 Martínez et al.

  11. Inheritance of resistance to Phytophthora infestans (Peronosporales, Pythiaceae) in a new source of resistance in tomato (Solanum sp. (formerly Lycopersicon sp.), Solanales, Solanaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Flávia Barbosa; Silva, Derly José Henriques da; Cruz, Cosme Damião; Mizubuti, Eduardo Seiti Gomide

    2008-01-01

    In Brazil, no commercial tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. formerly Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) varieties are available which are resistant to the late blight, one of the most important tomato diseases, produced by the phytopathogenic oomycete Phytophthora infestans. The wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites Knapp & Spooner, formerly Lycopersicon hirsutum Dunal) shows resistance to P. infestans, because of which we investigated an interspecific cross between S. lycopersicum cv. Santa Clara a...

  12. Cytopathological characteristics of tomato spotted wilt virus isolates

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    Anna Rudzińska-Langwald

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The electron microscopy study revealed that four examined virus isolates in the cells of the infected host plant produced different inclusions depending on the virus isolate and the time of passaging by mechanical transmission. Numerous virus particle inclusions as well as viroplasm and filamentous inclusions typical for TSWV were present in the plant cells infected with TSWV isolate (PPR. This isolate was kept in N. rustica by 4 mechanical transmissions. A similar virus isolate but maintained for 2 years by mechanical transmission in Nicotiana plants (TI produced virus particle inclusions as well as amorphous inclusions typical for defective isolates. In plant cells infected with the same isolate but maintained by mechanical transmission one year longer (T2 no virus particle inclusions were produced. In the amorphous inclusions produced by this isolate virus particles were seen, but they were not surrounded by additional membrane. The isolate G induced only amorphous inclusions dispersed within the cytoplasm of infected cells. No virus particles were seen in the amorphous inclusions. The mechanical transmission of TSWV isolates in N. rustica plants reduced the number of virus particles present in the cytoplasm. The defectivenes of the isolate cause also the appearance of a new type of inclusion - the amorphous inclusions.

  13. Age-related Resistance and the Defense Signaling Pathway of Ph-3 Gene Against Phytophthora infestans in Tomatoes

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    Sayed Rashad Ali Shah

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance (R genes against plant pathogens often have age-related resistance (ARR effects. However, the mechanism involved in this phenomenon remains unknown. In this paper, Solanum lycopersicum ‘CLN2037B’ and S. pimpinellifolium ‘L3708’ harboring the Ph-3 gene, as well as S. habrochaites ‘LA2099’, ‘LA1777’ and ‘LA1033’ harboring quantitative trait loci (QTLs, were tested to investigate age-related resistance against late blight (LB; caused by Phytophthora infestans in the three-leaf stage of the plants. The results demonstrated that the QTL-related LB resistance showed the same age-related resistance as the Ph-3-mediated resistance at the six- and nine-leaf stages compared with the three-leaf stage. This indicated that there is a common defense mechanism in tomatoes against P. infestans via ARR. In addition, we combined ethylene (ET, salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA mutants with virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS to study the Ph-3-dependent resistance signaling pathway. The results showed that ethylene and salicylic acid, but not jasmonic acid, are involved in the LB resistance mediated by the Ph-3 gene.

  14. Primeiro relato do Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV em Campanula medium L. no Brasil First report of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV infecting Campanula medium in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Gioria

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Plantas de campânula (Campanula medium exibindo mosaico e necrose foliar e anéis em flores foram coletadas em uma estufa comercial de flores na região de Atibaia, SP. Suspeitando de possível etiologia viral, amostras de tecido lesionado foram analisadas por ensaios de transmissão mecânica, microscopia eletrônica e sorologia. Todos os resultados apontaram para a presença do Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV como o responsável pelos sintomas. Esse é o primeiro relato deste patógeno em campânula no Brasil.Plants of bellflower (Campanula medium exhibiting symptoms of mosaic, leaf necrosis and flower ring spot were found in a commercial crop in a greenhouse in Atibaia, São Paulo State. Electron microscopy, serology and biological assays indicated the presence of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV. This is the first report of this pathogen in bellflower plants in Brazil.

  15. Resistance mechanisms against Bemisia tabaci in wild relatives of tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsen, van den F.H.W.

    2013-01-01

    The silverleaf whitefly (Bemisia tabaciGenn.) poses a serious threat to tomato cultivation. A large part of the damage is done directly through heavy host plant colonization. Colonization has a negative impact on the plant, as the whitefly takes up nutrients from the phloem and induces phytotoxic

  16. The wild tomato species Solanum chilense shows variation in pathogen resistance between geographically distinct populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Remco Stam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild tomatoes are a valuable source of disease resistance germplasm for tomato (Solanum lycopersicum breeders. Many species are known to possess a certain degree of resistance against certain pathogens; however, evolution of resistance traits is yet poorly understood. For some species, like Solanum chilense, both differences in habitat and within species genetic diversity are very large. Here we aim to investigate the occurrence of spatially heterogeneous coevolutionary pressures between populations of S. chilense. We investigate the phenotypic differences in disease resistance within S. chilense against three common tomato pathogens (Alternaria solani, Phytophthora infestans and a Fusarium sp. and confirm high degrees of variability in resistance properties between selected populations. Using generalised linear mixed models, we show that disease resistance does not follow the known demographic patterns of the species. Models with up to five available climatic and geographic variables are required to best describe resistance differences, confirming the complexity of factors involved in local resistance variation. We confirm that within S. chilense, resistance properties against various pathogens show a mosaic pattern and do not follow environmental patterns, indicating the strength of local pathogen pressures. Our study can form the basis for further investigations of the genetic traits involved.

  17. The durable resistance gene Tm-22 from tomato confers resistance against ToMV in tobacco and preserves its viral specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lanfermeijer, Frank C.; Jiang, Guoyong; Ferwerda, Margriet A.; Dijkhuis, Jos; Yang, Rencui; Hille, Jacques; de Haan, P

    2004-01-01

    Recently we isolated the Tm-22 gene of tomato, which confers resistance to tobamoviruses. The gene encodes a polypeptide that belongs to the group of the CC-NBS-LRR resistance proteins. In this paper, we show that the tomato Tm-22 gene can be functionally transferred into tobacco. After introduction

  18. Broad virus resistance in transgenic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Viruses are significant threats to agricultural crops worldwide and the limited sources of natural resistance warrant the development of novel resistance sources. Several methods of transgenic protection have been successfully applied, including protein- and RNA-mediated approaches. Increased

  19. Tomato SlRbohB, a member of the NADPH oxidase family, is required for disease resistance against Botrytis cinerea and tolerance to drought stress

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    Xiaohui eLi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available NADPH oxidases (also known as respiratory burst oxidase homologues, Rbohs are the enzymes that catalyze the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in plants. In the present study, eight SlRboh genes were identified in tomato and their possible involvement in resistance to Botrytis cinerea and drought tolerance was examined. Expression of SlRbohs was induced by B. cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato but displayed distinct patterns. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS-based silencing of SlRbohB resulted in reduced resistance to B. cinerea but silencing of each of other SlRbohs did not affect the resistance. The SlRbohB-silenced plants accumulated more ROS and attenuated expression of defense genes after infection of B. cinerea than the nonsilenced plants. Silencing of SlRbohB also suppressed flg22-induced ROS burst and the expression of SlLrr22, a marker gene related to PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI. Transient expression of SlRbohB in Nicotiana benthamiana led to enhanced resistance to B. cinerea. Furthermore, silencing of SlRbohB resulted in decreased drought tolerance, accelerated water loss in leaves and altered expression of drought-responsive genes. Our data demonstrate that SlRbohB positively regulates the resistance to B. cinerea, flg22-induced PTI and drought tolerance in tomato.

  20. The role of weeds in the spread of Tomato spotted wilt virus by thrips tabaci (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) in tobacco crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chatzivassiliou, E.K.; Peters, D.; Katis, N.I.

    2007-01-01

    Oviposition of Thrips tabaci, larval development and their potential to acquire Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) from infected Amaranthus retroflexus, Datura stramonium, Lactuca serriola, Solanum nigrum and Sonchus oleraceus plants and the ability of the adults to transmit this virus to these weeds

  1. Evolution and structure of Tomato spotted wilt virus populations: evidence of extensive reassortment and insights into emergence processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tentchev, Diana; Verdin, Eric; Marchal, Cécile; Jacquet, Monique; Aguilar, Juan M; Moury, Benoît

    2011-04-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV; genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae) genetic diversity was evaluated by sequencing parts of the three RNA genome segments of 224 isolates, mostly from pepper and tomato crops in southern Europe. Eighty-three per cent of the isolates showed consistent clustering into three clades, corresponding to their geographical origin, Spain, France or the USA, for the three RNA segments. In contrast, the remaining 17% of isolates did not belong to the same clade for the three RNA segments and were shown to be reassortants. Among them, eight different reassortment patterns were observed. Further phylogenetic analyses provided insights into the dynamic processes of the worldwide resurgence of TSWV that, since the 1980s, has followed the worldwide dispersal of the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) tospovirus vector. For two clades composed essentially of Old World (OW) isolates, tree topology suggested a local re-emergence of indigenous TSWV populations following F. occidentalis introductions, while it could not be excluded that the ancestors of two other OW clades were introduced from North America contemporarily with F. occidentalis. Finally, estimation of the selection intensity that has affected the evolution of the NSs and nucleocapsid proteins encoded by RNA S of TSWV suggests that the former could be involved in the breakdown of resistance conferred by the Tsw gene in pepper.

  2. Down-regulation of acetolactate synthase compromises OI-1- mediated resistance to powdery mildew in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, D.; Huibers, R.P.; Loonen, A.E.H.M.; Visser, R.G.F.; Wolters, A.M.A.; Bai, Y.

    2014-01-01

    Background - In a cDNA-AFLP analysis comparing transcript levels between powdery mildew (Oidium neolycopersici)-susceptible tomato cultivar Moneymaker (MM) and near isogenic lines (NILs) carrying resistance gene Ol-1 or Ol-4, a transcript-derived fragment (TDF) M11E69-195 was found to be present in

  3. Engineering resistance against potato virus Y

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlugt, van der R.A.A.

    1993-01-01

    Potato virus Y is the type species of the potyvirus genus, the largest genus of the plant virus family Potyviridae. The virus causes serious problems in the cultivation of several Solanaceous crops and although certain poly- and monogenic resistances are available,

  4. EKSPRESI GEN PROTEIN SELUBUNG TOMATO INFECTIOUS CHLOROSIS VIRUS PADA ESCHERICHIA COLI

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    Fitrianingrum Kurniawati

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of tomato infectious chlorosis virus coat protein gene on Escherichia coli. Tomato infectious chlorosis virus (TICV is the causal agent of chlorotic disease of tomato. Detection of TICV can be carried out by RT-PCR and serological test. Titer of TICV in plant tissue is very low because TICV is limited to phloem. Serological detection of TICV requires antiserum which is not available in Indonesia. Producing antibody through cloning and coat protein gene (TICV CP gene expression is a promising approach in producing antiserum. The objective of this study was to express TICV CP gene as antigen for antiserum production. TICV CP gene was amplified using RT-PCR from total RNA extracted from TICV infected leaves collected from Cipanas, Cianjur, West Java. The amplified CP gene was then sequenced and sub-cloned into pET 21b expression vector, transformed into Escherichia coli strain BL21 DE3(pLysS and induced expression using IPTG 1 mM overnight at 37 °C. CP that contains 6xhistag was purified using NiNTAspin column and then confirmed by SDS-PAGE. The size of TICV CP gene was 750 bp and the gene was expressed on pET 21 b vector and SDS-PAGE showed a 29 kDa band.

  5. Vegetable crops in the Mediterranean basin with an overview of virus resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitrat, Michel

    2012-01-01

    The Mediterranean area (MA) produces about 12% of the world vegetables both for local consumption and for export. With an average consumption of 242 kg per person and per year (and almost 400 kg in Turkey), vegetables are an important part of the Mediterranean diet. Vegetables are cultivated using different cultivation techniques (for instance, open field or protected), and the importance of viruses varies greatly between these growing conditions. Breeding virus-resistant cultivars is a key component of an integrated pest management strategy. The origin and the diversity of the main vegetables are presented with the sources of virus resistance. The center of origin of most vegetables is not in the MA: for instance, tomato, potato, pepper, bean, squash and pumpkin, and sweetpotato have been introduced from the American continent. Very few original sources of resistance against viruses have been described in local landraces from the MA. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. New Insecticides for Management of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl, a Virus Vectored by the Silverleaf Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, H. A.; Giurcanu, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Greenhouse studies using a randomized complete block design were carried out to evaluate the effect of six insecticides on transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum (Miller) (Solanales: Solanaceae), seedlings that were inoculated with whiteflies from a TYLCV colony in cages 3, 7, or 14?d after treatment with insecticide. The purpose was to reveal differences i...

  7. MicroRNA profiling of tomato leaf curl new delhi virus (tolcndv infected tomato leaves indicates that deregulation of mir159/319 and mir172 might be linked with leaf curl disease

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    Haq Qazi MR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato leaf curl virus (ToLCV, a constituent of the genus Begomovirus, infects tomato and other plants with a hallmark disease symptom of upward leaf curling. Since microRNAs (miRs are known to control plants developmental processes, we evaluated the roles of miRNAs in Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV induced leaf curling. Results Microarray analyses of miRNAs, isolated from the leaves of both healthy and ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv Pusa Ruby, revealed that ToLCNDV infection significantly deregulated various miRNAs representing ~13 different conserved families (e.g., miR319, miR172, etc.. The precursors of these miRNAs showed similar deregulated patterns, indicating that the transcription regulation of respective miRNA genes was perhaps the cause of deregulation. The expression levels of the miRNA-targeted genes were antagonistic with respect to the amount of corresponding miRNA. Such deregulation was tissue-specific in nature as no analogous misexpression was found in flowers. The accumulation of miR159/319 and miR172 was observed to increase with the days post inoculation (dpi of ToLCNDV agroinfection in tomato cv Pusa Ruby. Similarly, these miRs were also induced in ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv JK Asha and chilli plants, both exhibiting leaf curl symptoms. Our results indicate that miR159/319 and miR172 might be associated with leaf curl symptoms. This report raises the possibility of using miRNA(s as potential signature molecules for ToLCNDV infection. Conclusions The expression of several host miRNAs is affected in response to viral infection. The levels of the corresponding pre-miRs and the predicted targets were also deregulated. This change in miRNA expression levels was specific to leaf tissues and observed to be associated with disease progression. Thus, certain host miRs are likely indicator of viral infection and could be potentially employed to develop viral resistance strategies.

  8. Quantitative approach for the early detection of selection for virulence of Meloidogyne incognita on resistant tomato in plastic greenhouses

    OpenAIRE

    Giné Blasco, Ariadna; Sorribas Royo, Francisco Javier

    2017-01-01

    Resistant tomato cultivars are an important tool to control Meloidogyne spp., which cause the highest yield losses attributed to plant-parasitic nematodes. However, the repeated cultivation of Mi resistant cultivars can select virulent populations. In the present study, the susceptible tomato cv. Durinta and the resistant cv. Monika were cultivated from March to July in a plastic greenhouse for 3 years to determine the maximum multiplication rate, maximum nematode density, equilibrium density...

  9. Natural Occurrence of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus in Iranian Cucurbit Crops

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    Sara Yazdani-Khameneh

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The main areas for field-grown vegetable production in Iran were surveyed during the years of 2012–2014 to determine the occurrence of begomoviruses infecting these crops. A total of 787 leaf samples were collected from vegetables and some other host plants showing virus-like symptoms and tested by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA using polyclonal antibodies produced against Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV. According to the ELISA results, 81 samples (10.3% positively reacted with the virus antibodies. Begomovirus infections were confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using previously described TYLCV-specific primer pair TYLCV-Sar/TYLCV-Isr or universal primer pair Begomo-F/Begomo-R. The PCR tests using the primer pair TYLCV-Sar/TYLCV-Isr resulted in the amplification of the expected fragments of ca. 0.67-kb in size for ELISA-positive samples tested from alfalfa, pepper, spinach and tomato plants, confirming the presence of TYLCV. For one melon sample, having a week reaction in ELISA and no reaction in PCR using TYLCV-specific primers, the PCR reaction using the primer pair Begomo-F/Begomo-R resulted in the amplification fragments of the expected size of ca. 2.8 kb. The nucleotide sequences of the DNA amplicons derived from the isolate, Kz-Me198, were determined and compared with other sequences available in GenBank. BLASTN analysis confirmed the begomovirus infection of the sample and showed 99% identities with Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV; phylogenetic analysis supported the results of the database searches. This study reports the natural occurrence of TYLCV in different hosts in Iran. Our results also reveal the emergence of ToLCNDV in Iranian cucurbit crops.

  10. Within-Host Dynamics of the Emergence of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Recombinants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbino, Cica; Gutiérrez, Serafin; Antolik, Anna; Bouazza, Nabila; Doumayrou, Juliette; Granier, Martine; Martin, Darren P.; Peterschmitt, Michel

    2013-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a highly damaging begomovirus native to the Middle East. TYLCV has recently spread worldwide, recombining with other begomoviruses. Recent analysis of mixed infections between TYLCV and Tomato leaf curl Comoros begomovirus (ToLCKMV) has shown that, although natural selection preserves certain co-evolved intra-genomic interactions, numerous and diverse recombinants are produced at 120 days post-inoculation (dpi), and recombinant populations from different tomato plants are very divergent. Here, we investigate the population dynamics that lead to such patterns in tomato plants co-infected with TYLCV and ToLCKMV either by agro-inoculation or using the natural whitefly vector Bemisia tabaci. We monitored the frequency of parental and recombinant genotypes independently in 35 plants between 18 and 330 dpi and identified 177 recombinants isolated at different times. Recombinants were detected from 18 dpi and their frequency increased over time to reach about 50% at 150 dpi regardless of the inoculation method. The distribution of breakpoints detected on 96 fully sequenced recombinants was consistent with a continuous generation of new recombinants as well as random and deterministic effects in their maintenance. A severe population bottleneck of around 10 genomes was estimated during early systemic infection–a phenomenon that could account partially for the heterogeneity in recombinant patterns observed among plants. The detection of the same recombinant genome in six of the thirteen plants analysed beyond 30 dpi supported the influence of selection on observed recombination patterns. Moreover, a highly virulent recombinant genotype dominating virus populations within one plant has, apparently, the potential to be maintained in the natural population according to its infectivity, within-host accumulation, and transmission efficiency - all of which were similar or intermediate to those of the parent genotypes. Our results

  11. Polyphenol oxidase and lysozyme mediate induction of systemic resistance in tomato, when a bioelicitor is used

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    Goel Navodit

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. is attacked by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato causing heavy damage to the crops. The present study focused on the application of aqueous fruit extracts of neem (Azadirachta indica L. on a single node of aseptically raised tomato plants. Observations were done, and the changes in the activity and isoenzyme profile of polyphenol oxidase (PPO and lysozyme, both at the site of treatment as well as away from it, were noted. The results demonstrate that neem extract could significantly induce the activities of both the enzymes as well as upregulate the de novo expression of additional PPO isoenzymes. Induction of systemic acquired resistance (SAR by natural plant extracts is a potent eco-friendly crop protection method.

  12. Evaluation of Alternatives to Carbamate and Organophosphate Insecticides Against Thrips and Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus in Peanut Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marasigan, K; Toews, M; Kemerait, R; Abney, M R; Culbreath, A; Srinivasan, R

    2016-04-01

    Thrips are important pests of peanut. They cause severe feeding injuries on peanut foliage in the early season. They also transmit Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), which causes spotted wilt disease. At-plant insecticides and cultivars that exhibit field resistance to TSWV are often used to manage thrips and spotted wilt disease. Historically, peanut growers used the broad-spectrum insecticides aldicarb (IRAC class 1A; Temik) and phorate (IRAC class 1B; Thimet) for managing thrips and thereby reducing TSWV transmission. Aldicarb has not been produced since 2011 and its usage in peanut will be legally phased out in 2018; therefore, identification of alternative chemistries is critical for thrips and spotted wilt management. Here, eight alternative insecticides, with known thrips activity, were evaluated in field trials conducted from 2011 through 2013. In addition, different application methods of alternatives were also evaluated. Imidacloprid (Admire Pro), thiamethoxam (Actara), spinetoram (Radiant), and cyantraniliprole (Exirel) were as effective as aldicarb and phorate in suppressing thrips, but none of the insecticides significantly suppressed spotted wilt incidence. Nevertheless, greenhouse assays demonstrated that the same alternative insecticides were effective in suppressing thrips feeding and reducing TSWV transmission. Spotted wilt incidence in the greenhouse was more severe (∼80%) than in the field (5–25%). In general, field resistance to TSWV in cultivars only marginally influenced spotted wilt incidence. Results suggest that effective management of thrips using alternative insecticides and subsequent feeding reduction could improve yields under low to moderate virus pressure.

  13. Induced resistance in tomato by SAR activators during predisposing salinity stress

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    Matthew Francis Pye

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant activators are chemicals that induce disease resistance. The phytohormone salicylic acid (SA is a crucial signal for systemic acquired resistance (SAR, and SA-mediated resistance is a target of several commercial plant activators, including Actigard (1,2,3-benzothiadiazole-7-thiocarboxylic acid-s-methyl-ester, BTH and Tiadinil (N-(3-chloro-4-methylphenyl-4-methyl-1,2,3-thiadiazole-5-carboxamide, TDL. BTH and TDL were examined for their impact on abscisic acid (ABA-mediated, salt-induced disease predisposition in tomato seedlings. A brief episode of salt stress to roots significantly increased the severity of disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst and Phytophthora capsici relative to non-stressed plants. Root treatment with TDL induced resistance to Pst in leaves and provided protection in both non-stressed and salt-stressed seedlings in WT and highly susceptible NahG plants. Non-stressed and salt-stressed ABA-deficient sitiens mutants were highly resistant to Pst. Neither TDL nor BTH induced resistance to root infection by P. capsici, nor did they moderate the salt-induced increment in disease severity. Root treatment with these plant activators increased the levels of ABA in roots and shoots similar to levels observed in salt-stressed plants. The results indicate that SAR activators can protect tomato plants from bacterial speck disease under predisposing salt stress, and suggest that some SA-mediated defense responses function sufficiently in plants with elevated levels of ABA.

  14. Induced resistance in tomato by SAR activators during predisposing salinity stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pye, Matthew F; Hakuno, Fumiaki; Macdonald, James D; Bostock, Richard M

    2013-01-01

    Plant activators are chemicals that induce disease resistance. The phytohormone salicylic acid (SA) is a crucial signal for systemic acquired resistance (SAR), and SA-mediated resistance is a target of several commercial plant activators, including Actigard (1,2,3-benzothiadiazole-7-thiocarboxylic acid-S-methyl-ester, BTH) and Tiadinil [N-(3-chloro-4-methylphenyl)-4-methyl-1,2,3-thiadiazole-5-carboxamide, TDL]. BTH and TDL were examined for their impact on abscisic acid (ABA)-mediated, salt-induced disease predisposition in tomato seedlings. A brief episode of salt stress to roots significantly increased the severity of disease caused by Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) and Phytophthora capsici relative to non-stressed plants. Root treatment with TDL induced resistance to Pst in leaves and provided protection in both non-stressed and salt-stressed seedlings in wild-type and highly susceptible NahG plants. Non-stressed and salt-stressed ABA-deficient sitiens mutants were highly resistant to Pst. Neither TDL nor BTH induced resistance to root infection by Phytophthora capsici, nor did they moderate the salt-induced increment in disease severity. Root treatment with these plant activators increased the levels of ABA in roots and shoots similar to levels observed in salt-stressed plants. The results indicate that SAR activators can protect tomato plants from bacterial speck disease under predisposing salt stress, and suggest that some SA-mediated defense responses function sufficiently in plants with elevated levels of ABA.

  15. Pepino mosaic virus: an endemic pathogen of tomato crops

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanssen, I.M.

    2010-01-01

    Owing to their large population size and short generation time, viruses generally have a huge potential to evolve and adapt under natural selection pressure. Despite tremendous efforts in human, animal and plant health management, viral diseases remain difficult to control and eradicate. Moreover,

  16. A cDNA clone of tomato mosaic virus is infectious in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, H; Haeckel, P; Pfitzner, A J

    1992-01-01

    A cDNA clone of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) genomic RNA was fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter and the nopaline synthase gene polyadenylation signal. The transcriptional initiation site of the 35S RNA promoter was altered by in vitro mutagenesis so that the resulting transcripts start at the first nucleotide of the ToMV sequence. In addition, 12 nucleotides were inserted in the 5' untranslated region of the ToMV genome. This plasmid, pSLN, was used to inoculate several host plants of ToMV. Among five plant species tested, only Chenopodium quinoa accumulated large amounts of viral particles. The infectivities and systemic movements of the resulting viruses were the same as those of virus preparations obtained from a ToMV infection of C. quinoa. Primer extension analyses revealed that the 5' end of the viral genomic RNA was identical to those of RNAs isolated from virus progeny of an infection with T7 transcripts analogous to pSLN. Moreover, the insertion in the 5' untranslated region of the viral genome was stably maintained through several systemic passages of the virus. Thus, inoculation of plants with a plasmid containing a cDNA clone of an RNA virus under the control of a eukaryotic promoter seems to be a convenient alternative to the generation of in vitro transcripts and should facilitate the analysis of viral mutants generated at the DNA level. Images PMID:1583735

  17. Degradation mechanisms of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus coat protein following inoculation of tomato plants by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorovits, Rena; Moshe, Adi; Ghanim, Murad; Czosnek, Henryk

    2014-10-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) is a begomovirus infecting tomato cultures worldwide. TYLCV is transmitted to plants by the whitefly Bemisia tabaci. Once in the plant, the virus is subjected to attack by the host-plant defences, which may include sequestration in aggregates, proteolysis, ubiquitination, 26S proteasome degradation and autophagy. Elucidating how the virus avoids destruction will make it possible to understand infection and possibly devise countermeasures. The accumulation of viral coat protein (CP) and of viral DNA in plants is a marker of a successful virus transmission by B. tabaci. In response to infection, tomato tissues display multiple ways of degrading TYLCV proteins and DNA. In this study it is shown that CP (in soluble and insoluble states) is the target of protease digestion, 26S proteasome degradation and autophagy. The highest degradation capacity was detected among soluble proteins and proteins in large aggregates/inclusion bodies; cytoplasmic extracts displayed higher activity than nuclear fractions. The very same fractions possessed the highest capacity to degrade viral genomic DNA. Separately, 26S proteasome degradation was associated with large aggregates (more pronounced in the nuclear than in the cytoplasmic fractions), which are indicators of a successful abduction of plants by viruses. Autophagy/lysosome/vacuole degradation was a characteristic of intermediate aggregates, sequestering the CP in the cytoplasm and retarding the development of large aggregates. Chloroplast proteases were active in soluble as well as in insoluble protein extracts. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this study is the first attempt to identify elements of the virus-targeted degradation machinery, which is a part of the plant response to virus invasion. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  18. Quantification and localization of Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (Geminiviridae in populations of Bemisia tabaci (Hemiptera, Aleyrodidae with differential virus transmission characteristics.

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    Mario Kollenberg

    Full Text Available Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius is one of the economically most damaging insects to crops in tropical and subtropical regions. Severe damage is caused by feeding and more seriously by transmitting viruses. Those of the genus begomovirus (Geminiviridae cause the most significant crop diseases and are transmitted by B. tabaci in a persistent circulative mode, a process which is largely unknown. To analyze the translocation and to identify critical determinants for transmission, two populations of B. tabaci MEAM1 were compared for transmitting Watermelon chlorotic stunt virus (WmCSV and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV. Insect populations were chosen because of their high and respectively low virus transmission efficiency to compare uptake and translocation of virus through insects. Both populations harbored Rickettsia, Hamiltonella and Wolbachia in comparable ratios indicating that endosymbionts might not contribute to the different transmission rates. Quantification by qPCR revealed that WmCSV uptake and virus concentrations in midguts and primary salivary glands were generally higher than TYLCV due to higher virus contents of the source plants. Both viruses accumulated higher in insects from the efficiently compared to the poorly transmitting population. In the latter, virus translocation into the hemolymph was delayed and virus passage was impeded with limited numbers of viruses translocated. FISH analysis confirmed these results with similar virus distribution found in excised organs of both populations. No virus accumulation was found in the midgut lumen of the poor transmitter because of a restrained virus translocation. Results suggest that the poorly transmitting population comprised insects that lacked transmission competence. Those were selected to develop a population that lacks virus transmission. Investigations with insects lacking transmission showed that virus concentrations in midguts were reduced and only negligible virus amounts

  19. [On breeding burst-resistant self-pruning tomatoes : Preliminary communication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschke, M; Schwanitz, F

    1968-01-01

    From crossings of a self-pruning German commercial tomato variety with medium sized round fruits, relative resistance against bursting in rain with a self-pruning Central American form with medium sized pruneshaped and never bursting fruits a selfpruning F1 was obtained whose round fruits of medium size never burst. In the F2 a greater number of self-pruning types with round fruits completely burst-resistant and of medium size was found. One self-pruning and burst-resistant plant had remarkably large fruits. Furthermore, two dwarfs and a great number of "cherry"-tomatoes were found. The value of these findings for plant breeding and evolution is discussed.

  20. The ethylene response factor Pti5 contributes to potato aphid resistance in tomato independent of ethylene signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chengjun; Avila, Carlos A; Goggin, Fiona L

    2015-02-01

    Ethylene response factors (ERFs) comprise a large family of transcription factors that regulate numerous biological processes including growth, development, and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that Pti5, an ERF in tomato [Solanum lycopersicum (Linnaeus)] was transcriptionally upregulated in response to the potato aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (Thomas), and contributed to plant defences that limited the population growth of this phloem-feeding insect. Virus-induced gene silencing of Pti5 enhanced aphid population growth on tomato, both on an aphid-susceptible cultivar and on a near-isogenic genotype that carried the Mi-1.2 resistance (R) gene. These results indicate that Pti5 contributes to basal resistance in susceptible plants and also can synergize with other R gene-mediated defences to limit aphid survival and reproduction. Although Pti5 contains the ERF motif, induction of this gene by aphids was independent of ethylene, since the ACC deaminase (ACD) transgene, which inhibits ethylene synthesis, did not diminish the responsiveness of Pti5 to aphid infestation. Furthermore, experiments with inhibitors of ethylene synthesis revealed that Pti5 and ethylene have distinctly different roles in plant responses to aphids. Whereas Pti5 contributed to antibiotic plant defences that limited aphid survival and reproduction on both resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2-) genotypes, ethylene signalling promoted aphid infestation on susceptible plants but contributed to antixenotic defences that deterred the early stages of aphid host selection on resistant plants. These findings suggest that the antixenotic defences that inhibit aphid settling and the antibiotic defences that depress fecundity and promote mortality are regulated through different signalling pathways. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Sinaloa Tomato Leaf Curl Geminivirus: Biological and Molecular Evidence for a New Subgroup III Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idris, A M; Brown, J K

    1998-07-01

    ABSTRACT The biological and molecular properties of Sinaloa tomato leaf curl virus (STLCV) were investigated in line with the hypothesis that STLCV is a previously uncharacterized, whitefly-transmitted geminivirus from North America. STLCV causes yellow leaf curl symptoms in tomato and yellow-green foliar mottle in pepper. Five species belonging to two plant families were STLCV experimental hosts. STLCV had a persistent relationship with its whitefly vector, Bemisia tabaci. Polymerase chain reaction fragments of STLCV common region (CR) sequences of the A or B genomic components and the viral coat protein gene (AV1) were molecularly cloned and sequenced. The STLCV A- and B-component CR sequences (174 nucleotides each) shared 97.9% identity and contained identical cis elements putatively involved in transcriptional regulation and an origin of replication (the AC cleavage site within the loop of the hairpin structure and two direct repeat sequences thought to constitute the Rep binding motif), which collectively are diagnostic for subgroup III geminiviruses. The STLCV CR sequence shared 23.1 to 77.6% identity with CR sequences of representative geminiviridae, indicating the STLCV CR sequence is unique. Molecular phylogenetic analysis of CR or AV1 sequences of STLCV and the respective sequences of 31 familial members supported the placement of STLCV as a unique bipartite, subgroup III virus most closely related to other viruses from the Western Hemisphere. STLCV is provisionally described as a new species within the genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae.

  2. Mapping Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL for Resistance to Late Blight in Tomato

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    Dilip R. Panthee

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Late blight caused by Phytophthora infestans (Montagne, Bary is a devastating disease of tomato worldwide. There are three known major genes, Ph-1, Ph-2, and Ph-3, conferring resistance to late blight. In addition to these three genes, it is also believed that there are additional factors or quantitative trait loci (QTL conferring resistance to late blight. Precise molecular mapping of all those major genes and potential QTL is important in the development of suitable molecular markers and hence, marker-assisted selection (MAS. The objective of the present study was to map the genes and QTL associated with late blight resistance in a tomato population derived from intra-specific crosses. To achieve this objective, a population, derived from the crossings of NC 1CELBR × Fla. 7775, consisting of 250 individuals at F2 and F2-derived families, were evaluated in replicated trials. These were conducted at Mountain Horticultural Crops Reseach & Extension Center (MHCREC at Mills River, NC, and Mountain Research Staion (MRS at Waynesville, NC in 2011, 2014, and 2015. There were two major QTL associated with late blight resistance located on chromosomes 9 and 10 with likelihood of odd (LOD scores of more than 42 and 6, explaining 67% and 14% of the total phenotypic variation, respectively. The major QTLs are probably caused by the Ph-2 and Ph-3 genes. Furthermore, there was a minor QTL on chromosomes 12, which has not been reported before. This minor QTL may be novel and may be worth investigating further. Source of resistance to Ph-2, Ph-3, and this minor QTL traces back to line L3707, or Richter’s Wild Tomato. The combination of major genes and minor QTL may provide a durable resistance to late blight in tomato.

  3. Stable integration and expression of a plant defensin in tomato confers resistance to fusarium wilt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Naglaa A; Shah, Dilip; Abbas, Dina; Madkour, Magdy

    2010-01-01

    Plant defensins are small cysteine-rich peptides which belong to a group of pathogenasis related defense mechanism proteins. The proteins inhibit the growth of a broad range of microbes and are highly stable under extreme environmental stresses. Tomato cultivation is affected by fungal disease such as Fusarium wilt. In order to overcome fungal damages, transgenic tomato plants expressing the Medicago sativa defensin gene MsDef1 under the control of the CaMV 35S promoter were developed. The Fusarium-susceptible tomato (Lycobersicum esculentum Mill) cultivar CastleRock was used for transformation to acquire fungal resistance. Hypocotyl with a part of cotyledon (hypocotyledonary) for young tomato seedlings were used as an explant material and transformation was performed using the biolistic delivery system. Bombarded shoots were selected on regeneration medium supplemented with hygromycin and suitable concentrations of BA, zeatin ripozide and AgNO(3). Putative transgenic plantlets of T(0) were confirmed by PCR analysis using primers specific for the transgene and the transformation frequency obtained was 52.3%. Transformation and transcription of transgenes were confirmed in T(1) by PCR, Southern hybridizations, and reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR). The copy numbers of integrated transgene into tomato genome ranged between 1-3 copies. Greenhouse bioassay was performed on the transgenic T(1) and T(2) young seedlings and non-transgenic controls by challenging with a vigorous isolate of the fungal pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Lycopersici. The level of fungal infectivity was determined using RT-PCR with tomatinase specific primers. Transgenic lines were more resistant to infection by fusarium than the control plants. These results indicated that overexpressing defensins in transgenic plants confer resistance to fungal pathogens.

  4. Salicylic acid-induced resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sudhamoy; Mallick, Nirupama; Mitra, Adinpunya

    2009-07-01

    We demonstrated that exogenous application of 200 microM salicylic acid through root feeding and foliar spray could induce resistance against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. Lycopersici (Fol) in tomato. Endogenous accumulation of free salicylic acid in tomato roots was detected by HPLC and identification was confirmed by LC-MS/MS analysis. At 168h of salicylic acid treatment through roots, the endogenous salicylic acid level in the roots increased to 1477ngg(-1) FW which was 10 times higher than control plants. Similarly, the salicylic acid content was 1001ngg(-1) FW at 168h of treatment by foliar spray, which was 8.7 times higher than control plants. The activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5) and peroxidase (POD, EC 1.11.1.7) were 5.9 and 4.7 times higher, respectively than the control plants at 168h of salicylic acid feeding through the roots. The increase in PAL and POD activities was 3.7 and 3.3 times higher, respectively at 168h of salicylic acid treatments through foliar spray than control plants. The salicylic acid-treated tomato plants challenged with Fol exhibited significantly reduced vascular browning and leaf yellowing wilting. The mycelial growth of Fol was not significantly affected by salicylic acid. Significant increase in basal level of salicylic acid in noninoculated plants indicated that tomato root system might have the capacity to assimilate and distribute salicylic acid throughout the plant. The results indicated that the induced resistance observed in tomato against Fol might be a case of salicylic acid-dependent systemic acquired resistance.

  5. Serological and molecular characterization of Syrian Tomato spotted wilt virus isolates

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    Faiz ISMAEIL

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Thirty four Syrian isolates of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV collected from tomato and pepper were tested against five specific monoclonal antibodies using TAS-ELISA. The isolates were in two serogroups. Fourteen tomato and sixteen pepper isolates were similar in their reaction with MAb-2, MAb-4, MAb-5 and MAb-6, but did not react with MAb-7 (Serogroup 1. Meanwhile, four isolates collected from pepper reacted with all the MAbs used (Serogroup 2. The expected 620 bp DNA fragment was obtained by RT-PCR from six samples using a specific primer pair designed to amplify the nucleocapsid protein (NP gene of TSWV. The PCR products were sequenced and a phylogenetic tree was constructed. Sequence analysis revealed that the Syrian TSWV isolates were very similar at the nucleotide (97.74 to 99.84% identity and amino acid (96.17 to 99.03% identity sequences levels. The phylogenetic tree showed high similarity of Syrian TSWV isolates with many other representative isolates from different countries.

  6. Pre-infestation of Tomato Plants by Aphids Modulates Transmission-Acquisition Relationship among Whiteflies, Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV) and Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ju L.; Benelli, Giovanni; Desneux, Nicolas; Yang, Xue Q.; Liu, Tong X.; Ge, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Herbivory defense systems in plants are largely regulated by jasmonate-(JA) and salicylate-(SA) signaling pathways. Such defense mechanisms may impact insect feeding dynamic, may also affect the transmission-acquisition relationship among virus, plants and vectoring insects. In the context of the tomato – whitefly – Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV) biological model, we tested the impact of pre-infesting plants with a non-vector insect (aphid Myzus persicae) on feeding dynamics of a vector insect (whitefly Bemisia tabaci) as well as virus transmission-acquisition. We showed that an aphid herbivory period of 0–48 h led to a transient systemic increase of virus concentration in the host plant (root, stem, and leaf), with the same pattern observed in whiteflies feeding on aphid-infested plants. We used real-time quantitative PCR to study the expression of key genes of the SA- and JA-signaling pathways, as well as electrical penetration graph (EPG) to characterize the impact of aphid pre-infestation on whitefly feeding during TYLCV transmission (whitefly to tomato) and acquisition (tomato to whitefly). The impact of the duration of aphid pre-infestation (0, 24, or 48 h) on phloem feeding by whitefly (E2) during the transmission phase was similar to that of global whitefly feeding behavior (E1, E2 and probing duration) during the acquisition phase. In addition, we observed that a longer phase of aphid pre-infestation prior to virus transmission by whitefly led to the up-regulation and down-regulation of SA- and JA-signaling pathway genes, respectively. These results demonstrated a significant impact of aphid pre-infestation on the tomato – whitefly – TYLCV system. Transmission and acquisition of TYLCV was positively correlated with feeding activity of B. tabaci, and both were mediated by the SA- and JA-pathways. TYLCV concentration during the transmission phases was modulated by up- and down-regulation of SA- and JA-pathways, respectively. The two pathways

  7. Pre-infestation of Tomato Plants by Aphids Modulates Transmission-Acquisition Relationship among Whiteflies, Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV and Plants

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    Xiao L. Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Herbivory defense systems in plants are largely regulated by jasmonate-(JA and salicylate-(SA signaling pathways. Such defense mechanisms may impact insect feeding dynamic, may also affect the transmission-acquisition relationship among virus, plants and vectoring insects. In the context of the tomato – whitefly – Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus (TYLCV biological model, we tested the impact of pre-infesting plants with a non-vector insect (aphid Myzus persicae on feeding dynamics of a vector insect (whitefly Bemisia tabaci as well as virus transmission-acquisition. We showed that an aphid herbivory period of 0–48 h led to a transient systemic increase of virus concentration in the host plant (root, stem, and leaf, with the same pattern observed in whiteflies feeding on aphid-infested plants. We used real-time quantitative PCR to study the expression of key genes of the SA- and JA-signaling pathways, as well as electrical penetration graph (EPG to characterize the impact of aphid pre-infestation on whitefly feeding during TYLCV transmission (whitefly to tomato and acquisition (tomato to whitefly. The impact of the duration of aphid pre-infestation (0, 24, or 48 h on phloem feeding by whitefly (E2 during the transmission phase was similar to that of global whitefly feeding behavior (E1, E2 and probing duration during the acquisition phase. In addition, we observed that a longer phase of aphid pre-infestation prior to virus transmission by whitefly led to the up-regulation and down-regulation of SA- and JA-signaling pathway genes, respectively. These results demonstrated a significant impact of aphid pre-infestation on the tomato – whitefly – TYLCV system. Transmission and acquisition of TYLCV was positively correlated with feeding activity of B. tabaci, and both were mediated by the SA- and JA-pathways. TYLCV concentration during the transmission phases was modulated by up- and down-regulation of SA- and JA-pathways, respectively. The two

  8. SlMAPK3 enhances tolerance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by regulating salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yunzhou; Qin, Lei; Zhao, Jingjing; Muhammad, Tayeb; Cao, Hehe; Li, Hailiang; Zhang, Yan; Liang, Yan

    2017-01-01

    Several recent studies have reported on the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK3) in plant immune responses. However, little is known about how MAPK3 functions in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) infected with tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV). There is also uncertainty about the connection between plant MAPK3 and the salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study indicated that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response against TYLCV. Tomato seedlings were inoculated with TYLCV to investigate the possible roles of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 against this virus. Inoculation with TYLCV strongly induced the expression and the activity of all three genes. Silencing of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 reduced tolerance to TYLCV, increased leaf H2O2 concentrations, and attenuated expression of defense-related genes after TYLCV infection, especially in SlMAPK3-silenced plants. Exogenous SA and methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA) both significantly induced SlMAPK3 expression in tomato leaves. Over-expression of SlMAPK3 increased the transcript levels of SA/JA-mediated defense-related genes (PR1, PR1b/SlLapA, SlPI-I, and SlPI-II) and enhanced tolerance to TYLCV. After TYLCV inoculation, the leaves of SlMAPK3 over-expressed plants compared with wild type plants showed less H2O2 accumulation and greater superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), and ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity. Overall, the results suggested that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response of tomato to TYLCV, and that this process may be through either the SA or JA defense-signaling pathways.

  9. SlMAPK3 enhances tolerance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV by regulating salicylic acid and jasmonic acid signaling in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunzhou Li

    Full Text Available Several recent studies have reported on the role of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK3 in plant immune responses. However, little is known about how MAPK3 functions in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. infected with tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV. There is also uncertainty about the connection between plant MAPK3 and the salicylic acid (SA and jasmonic acid (JA defense-signaling pathways. The results of this study indicated that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response against TYLCV. Tomato seedlings were inoculated with TYLCV to investigate the possible roles of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 against this virus. Inoculation with TYLCV strongly induced the expression and the activity of all three genes. Silencing of SlMAPK1, SlMAPK2, and SlMAPK3 reduced tolerance to TYLCV, increased leaf H2O2 concentrations, and attenuated expression of defense-related genes after TYLCV infection, especially in SlMAPK3-silenced plants. Exogenous SA and methyl jasmonic acid (MeJA both significantly induced SlMAPK3 expression in tomato leaves. Over-expression of SlMAPK3 increased the transcript levels of SA/JA-mediated defense-related genes (PR1, PR1b/SlLapA, SlPI-I, and SlPI-II and enhanced tolerance to TYLCV. After TYLCV inoculation, the leaves of SlMAPK3 over-expressed plants compared with wild type plants showed less H2O2 accumulation and greater superoxide dismutase (SOD, peroxidase (POD, catalase (CAT, and ascorbate peroxidase (APX activity. Overall, the results suggested that SlMAPK3 participates in the antiviral response of tomato to TYLCV, and that this process may be through either the SA or JA defense-signaling pathways.

  10. Plant Resistance to the Moth Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae) in Tomato Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohrabi, F; Nooryazdan, H R; Gharati, B; Saeidi, Z

    2017-04-01

    The resistance of 11 tomato cultivars (Ps-6515, Berlina, Poolad, Petoprid-5, Zaman, Matin, Golsar, Sandokan-F1, Golshan-616, Sadeen-95 and Sadeen-21) to the tomato moth, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae) was investigated under field conditions. A randomized complete block design was used with three replications. Data analysis indicated that there were significant differences (P < 0.05) among cultivars regarding leaflet damage, leaf damage, overall plant damage, number of mines per leaf, number of holes on the stem, and fruit. Our findings revealed that the cultivars Berlina, Golsar, Poolad, and Zaman were less suitable cultivars, suggesting that they are more resistant to the tomato moth than the other cultivars. The high density of leaf trichomes present in the cultivars Berlina, Zaman, and Golsar can be one of the possible causes of resistance to T. absoluta. Knowledge of the extent of susceptibility or resistance of cultivars to a pest on a crop is one of the fundamental components of integrated pest management (IPM) programs for any crop.

  11. Transgenic resistance confers effective field level control of bacterial spot disease in tomato.

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    Diana M Horvath

    Full Text Available We investigated whether lines of transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum expressing the Bs2 resistance gene from pepper, a close relative of tomato, demonstrate improved resistance to bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas species in replicated multi-year field trials under commercial type growing conditions. We report that the presence of the Bs2 gene in the highly susceptible VF 36 background reduced disease to extremely low levels, and VF 36-Bs2 plants displayed the lowest disease severity amongst all tomato varieties tested, including commercial and breeding lines with host resistance. Yields of marketable fruit from transgenic lines were typically 2.5 times that of the non-transformed parent line, but varied between 1.5 and 11.5 fold depending on weather conditions and disease pressure. Trials were conducted without application of any copper-based bactericides, presently in wide use despite negative impacts on the environment. This is the first demonstration of effective field resistance in a transgenic genotype based on a plant R gene and provides an opportunity for control of a devastating pathogen while eliminating ineffective copper pesticides.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 on tomato infected with the crinivirus, Tomato chlorosis virus, identifies a temporal shift in gene expression and differential regulation of novel orphan genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteflies threaten agricultural crop production worldwide, are polyphagous in nature, and transmit hundreds of plant viruses. Little information exists on how whitefly gene expression is altered due to feeding on plants infected with a semipersistently transmitted virus. Tomato chlorosis virus (T...

  13. Plant growth and resistance promoted by Streptomyces spp. in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Maila P; Bastos, Matheus S; Xavier, Vanessa B; Cassel, Eduardo; Astarita, Leandro V; Santarém, Eliane R

    2017-09-01

    Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) represent an alternative to improve plant growth and yield as well as to act as agents of biocontrol. This study characterized isolates of Streptomyces spp. (Stm) as PGPR, determined the antagonism of these isolates against Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. brasiliensis (Pcb), evaluated the ability of Stm on promoting growth and modulating the defense-related metabolism of tomato plants, and the potential of Stm isolates on reducing soft rot disease in this species. The VOC profile of Stm was also verified. Promotion of plant growth was assessed indirectly through VOC emission and by direct interaction with Stm isolates in the roots. Evaluation of soft rot disease was performed in vitro on plants treated with Stm and challenged with Pcb. Enzymes related to plant defense were then analyzed in plants treated with three selected isolates of Stm, and PM1 was chosen for further Pcb-challenging experiment. Streptomyces spp. isolates displayed characteristics of PGPR. PM3 was the isolate with efficient antagonism against Pcb by dual-culture. Most of the isolates promoted growth of root and shoot of tomato plants by VOC, and PM5 was the isolate that most promoted growth by direct interaction with Stm. Soft rot disease and mortality of plants were significantly reduced when plants were treated with StmPM1. Modulation of secondary metabolism was observed with Stm treatment, and fast response of polyphenoloxidases was detected in plants pretreated with StmPM1 and challenged with Pcb. Peroxidase was significantly activated three days after infection with Pcb in plants pretreated with StmPM1. Results suggest that Streptomyces sp. PM1 and PM5 have the potential to act as PGPR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Bell and banana pepper exhibit mature-plant resistance to tomato spotted wilt Tospovirus transmitted by Frankliniella fusca (Thysanoptera: Thripidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, A L P; Kahn, N D; Kennedy, G G

    2009-02-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Tospovirus, TSWV) causes annual economic losses in pepper, Capsicum annuum L., across the southern United States and is transmitted by several species of thrips, including the tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds). Reduced virus transmission and symptom severity as plant age increases is known as mature-plant resistance. TSWV transmission to pepper plants was examined in three and four age classes in field and greenhouse trials, respectively. In the field trial, 'Camelot' bell pepper plants were exposed to potentially viruliferous F. fusca 37, 51, or 65 d postsowing. Two greenhouse trials of Camelot bell and one trial each of 'Bounty' and 'Pageant' banana pepper plants were exposed to potentially viruliferous F. fusca, 43, 57, 71, or 85; 48, 62, 75, or 90; 42, 56, 70, or 84; and 43, 57, 71, or 85 d postsowing, respectively. Linear and hyperbolic regressions of percentage of infected plants per block on days postsowing indicated mature-plant resistance in all trials. All models were significant, but hyperbolic curves better fit the data than linear models. Hyperbolic models were used to calculate the number of days posttransplant at which a 50% decrease from the predicted percentage of infected plants at transplant age (42 d postsowing) was expected. This was referred to as days posttransplant-50 (DPT50). DPRT50 occurred within 9 days posttransplant age for all trials, indicating that early TSWV management in pepper is critical.

  15. Analysis of the coding-complete genomic sequence of groundnut ringspot virus suggests a common ancestor with tomato chlorotic spot virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Breuil, Soledad; Cañizares, Joaquín; Blanca, José Miguel; Bejerman, Nicolás; Trucco, Verónica; Giolitti, Fabián; Ziarsolo, Peio; Lenardon, Sergio

    2016-08-01

    Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV) and tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) share biological and serological properties, so their identification is carried out by molecular methods. Their genomes consist of three segmented RNAs: L, M and S. The finding of a reassortant between these two viruses may complicate correct virus identification and requires the characterization of the complete genome. Therefore, we present for the first time the complete sequences of all the genes encoded by a GRSV isolate. The high level of sequence similarity between GRSV and TCSV (over 90 % identity) observed in the genes and proteins encoded in the M RNA support previous results indicating that these viruses probably have a common ancestor.

  16. Predictive Models for Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Spread Dynamics, Considering Frankliniella occidentalis Specific Life Processes as Influenced by the Virus.

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    Pamella Akoth Ogada

    Full Text Available Several models have been studied on predictive epidemics of arthropod vectored plant viruses in an attempt to bring understanding to the complex but specific relationship between the three cornered pathosystem (virus, vector and host plant, as well as their interactions with the environment. A large body of studies mainly focuses on weather based models as management tool for monitoring pests and diseases, with very few incorporating the contribution of vector's life processes in the disease dynamics, which is an essential aspect when mitigating virus incidences in a crop stand. In this study, we hypothesized that the multiplication and spread of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV in a crop stand is strongly related to its influences on Frankliniella occidentalis preferential behavior and life expectancy. Model dynamics of important aspects in disease development within TSWV-F. occidentalis-host plant interactions were developed, focusing on F. occidentalis' life processes as influenced by TSWV. The results show that the influence of TSWV on F. occidentalis preferential behaviour leads to an estimated increase in relative acquisition rate of the virus, and up to 33% increase in transmission rate to healthy plants. Also, increased life expectancy; which relates to improved fitness, is dependent on the virus induced preferential behaviour, consequently promoting multiplication and spread of the virus in a crop stand. The development of vector-based models could further help in elucidating the role of tri-trophic interactions in agricultural disease systems. Use of the model to examine the components of the disease process could also boost our understanding on how specific epidemiological characteristics interact to cause diseases in crops. With this level of understanding we can efficiently develop more precise control strategies for the virus and the vector.

  17. Functional Characterization of a Syntaxin Involved in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Resistance against Powdery Mildew

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    Valentina Bracuto

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Specific syntaxins, such as Arabidopsis AtPEN1 and its barley ortholog ROR2, play a major role in plant defense against powdery mildews. Indeed, the impairment of these genes results in increased fungal penetration in both host and non-host interactions. In this study, a genome-wide survey allowed the identification of 21 tomato syntaxins. Two of them, named SlPEN1a and SlPEN1b, are closely related to AtPEN1. RNAi-based silencing of SlPEN1a in a tomato line carrying a loss-of-function mutation of the susceptibility gene SlMLO1 led to compromised resistance toward the tomato powdery mildew fungus Oidium neolycopersici. Moreover, it resulted in a significant increase in the penetration rate of the non-adapted powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei. Codon-based evolutionary analysis and multiple alignments allowed the detection of amino acid residues that are under purifying selection and are specifically conserved in syntaxins involved in plant-powdery mildew interactions. Our findings provide both insights on the evolution of syntaxins and information about their function which is of interest for future studies on plant–pathogen interactions and tomato breeding.

  18. Rhizobacteria induces resistance against Fusarium wilt of tomato by increasing the activity of defense enzymes

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    Hélvio Gledson Maciel Ferraz

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Fusarium wilt, caused by Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici (Fol, is one of the most important diseases that affect tomato yield worldwide. This study investigated the potential of three antagonists, Streptomyces setonii (UFV 618, Bacillus cereus (UFV 592 and Serratia marcescens (UFV 252, and as positive control the hormone jasmonic acid (JA, to reduce Fusarium wilt symptoms and to potentiate the defense enzymes in the stem tissues of tomato plants infected by Fol. The seeds were microbiolized with each antagonist, and the soil was also drenched with them. The plants were sprayed with JA 48 h before Fol inoculation. The area under the Fusarium wilt index progress curve was reduced by 54, 48, 47 and 45% for the UFV 618, JA, UFV 592 and UFV 252 treatments, respectively. The three antagonists, and even the JA spray, efficiently reduced the Fusarium wilt symptoms on the tomato plant stems, which can be explained by the lower malondialdehyde concentration (an indication of oxidative damage to lipids in the plasma membranes and the greater activities of peroxidases, polyphenoloxidases, glucanases, chitinases, phenylalanine ammonia-lyases and lipoxygenases, which are commonly involved in host resistance against fungal diseases. These results present a novel alternative that can be used in the integrated management of Fusarium wilt on tomatoes.

  19. Analysis of the Tomato spotted wilt virus ambisense S RNA-encoded hairpin structure in translation.

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    Christina Geerts-Dimitriadou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The intergenic region (IR of ambisense RNA segments from animal- and plant-infecting (-RNA viruses functions as a bidirectional transcription terminator. The IR sequence of the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV ambisense S RNA contains stretches that are highly rich in A-residues and U-residues and is predicted to fold into a stable hairpin structure. The presence of this hairpin structure sequence in the 3' untranslated region (UTR of TSWV mRNAs implies a possible role in translation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To analyse the role of the predicted hairpin structure in translation, various Renilla luciferase constructs containing modified 3' and/or 5' UTR sequences of the TSWV S RNA encoded nucleocapsid (N gene were analyzed for expression. While good luciferase expression levels were obtained from constructs containing the 5' UTR and the 3' UTR, luciferase expression was lost when the hairpin structure sequence was removed from the 3' UTR. Constructs that only lacked the 5' UTR, still rendered good expression levels. When in addition the entire 3' UTR was exchanged for that of the S RNA encoded non-structural (NSs gene transcript, containing the complementary hairpin folding sequence, the loss of luciferase expression could only be recovered by providing the 5' UTR sequence of the NSs transcript. Luciferase activity remained unaltered when the hairpin structure sequence was swapped for the analogous one from Tomato yellow ring virus, another distinct tospovirus. The addition of N and NSs proteins further increased luciferase expression levels from hairpin structure containing constructs. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest a role for the predicted hairpin structure in translation in concert with the viral N and NSs proteins. The presence of stretches highly rich in A-residues does not rule out a concerted action with a poly(A-tail-binding protein. A common transcription termination and translation strategy for plant

  20. Mini tomato genotypes resistant to the silverleaf whitefly and to two-spotted spider mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciel, G M; Almeida, R S; da Rocha, J P R; Andaló, V; Marquez, G R; Santos, N C; Finzi, R R

    2017-03-22

    The mini tomato production has expanded, becoming an amazing alternative for enterprise. Despite all commercial potential, the cultivation has the occurrence of pests as main obstacle during the crop development. Nowadays, there are no researches that aimed obtaining genotypes with high acylsugar content, capable of providing a broad-spectrum resistance to pests. This study aimed the selection of mini tomato genotypes, with high acylsugar content, and checking the resistance level to the silverleaf whitefly [Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius)] and to the two-spotted spider mites (Tetranychus urticae Koch). Sixteen genotypes were evaluated, from which 12 were on the generation F2BC1, originated from the interespecific cross between Solanum pennellii versus Solanum lycopersicum L. and 4 were check treatments, being three of cultivated tomatos (cv. Santa Clara, UFU-02, and UFU-73) and the wild accession LA-716 (S. pennellii). The variables analyzed were acylsugar content, repellency to the silverleaf whitefly, repellence to the two-spotted spider mites, and density of glandular trichomes. The genotypes UFU-22-F2BC1#9 and UFU-73-F2BC1#11 have high acylsugar content and both are resistant to the pests that were evaluated. New studies must be conducted seeking for inbred lines, obtained from the selected genotypes, aiming to get commercial hybrids with high acylsugar content.

  1. Development and evaluation of robust molecular markers linked to disease resistance in tomato for distinctness, uniformity and stabilty

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arens, P.F.P.; Mansilla, C.; Deinum, D.; Cavellini, L.; Moretti, A.; Rolland, S.; Schoot, van der H.; Calvache, D.; Ponz, F.; Collonnier, C.; Mathis, R.; Smilde, D.; Caranta, C.; Vosman, B.

    2010-01-01

    Molecular markers linked to phenotypically important traits are of great interest especially when traits are difficult and/or costly to be observed. In tomato where a strong focus on resistance breeding has led to the introgression of several resistance genes, resistance traits have become important

  2. Functional characterization of the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) gene of Pepino mosaic virus in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) has caused serious economic losses to many greenhouse tomato productions around the world. This potexvirus genome contains five major open reading frames (ORFs) encoding for a 164-kDa RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), three triple gene block (TGB) proteins of 26, 14 an...

  3. The use of fluorescence microscopy to visualise homotypic interactions of tomato spotted wilt virus nucleocapsid protein in living cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, M.; Borst, J.W.; Goldbach, R.W.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) were employed to study homotypic protein¿protein interactions in living cells. To this end, the nucleocapsid (N) protein of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was expressed as a fusion protein with either

  4. Characterization of a New Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Isolates Found in Hippeastrum hybridum (Hort.) Plants in Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Berniak Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Two Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) isolates H1 and H2 found in Hippeastrum hybridum plants were characterized based on biological, serological, and molecular properties. Virus isolates showed differences in symptom expression – H1 isolate displayed severe necrotic spots and patterns, whereas mild mosaic symptoms were observed on H2-infected H. hybridum plants. Both TSWV isolates showed comparable reactivity with TSWV-specific antibodies and they induced similar symptoms on herbaceous indica...

  5. Identification of whitefly resistance in tomato and hot pepper

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Firdaus, S.

    2012-01-01

    Key words: Capsicum, Bemisia tabaci, trichome density, cuticle thickness
    Whitefly is economically one of the most threatening pests of pepper worldwide, which is mainly caused by its ability to transmit many different viruses. In this research, we characterized pepper germplasm to identify

  6. Characterization of Tomato yellow spot virus, a novel tomato-infecting begomovirus in Brazil Caracterização do Tomato yellow spot virus, um novo begomovírus isolado de tomateiro no Brasil

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    Renata Faier Calegario

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was the biological and molecular characterization of a begomovirus detected in São Joaquim de Bicas, Minas Gerais, Brazil, named TGV-[Bi2], by determining its host range, complete nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic relationships with other begomoviruses. Biological characterization consisted of a host range study using either sap inoculation or particle bombardment as inoculation methods. The yellow spot virus can infect plants in Solanaceae and Amaranthaceae, including economically importat crops as sweet pepper, and weeds as Datura stramonium and Nicotiana silvestris. For the molecular characterization, the full-length genome (DNA-A and DNA-B was amplified, cloned and completely sequenced. Sequence comparisons and phylogenetic analyses indicated that TGV-[Bi2] constitutes a novel begomovirus species named Tomato yellow spot virus (ToYSV, closely related to Sida mottle virus (SiMoV.O objetivo deste trabalho foi a caracterização biológica e molecular de um begomovírus detectado em tomateiros em São Joaquim de Bicas, Minas Gerais, denominado TGV-[Bi2]. A caracterização biológica consistiu em teste de gama de hospedeiros, realizado por meio de inoculação via extrato foliar tamponado ou bombardeamento de partículas. O isolado TGV-[Bi2] infecta plantas das famílias Solanaceae e Amaranthaceae, inclusive espécies economicamente importantes como o pimentão, e algumas plantas daninhas como Datura stramonium e Nicotiana silvestris. A caracterização molecular consistiu na clonagem e seqüenciamento de seu genoma completo (DNA-A e DNA-B. A comparação de seqüências e análise filogenética indicaram que o TGV-[Bi2] constitui uma nova espécie de begomovírus, denominada Tomato yellow spot virus (ToYSV, filogeneticamente relacionado ao Sida mottle virus (SiMoV.

  7. Molecular characterization of the full-length L and M RNAs of Tomato yellow ring virus, a member of the genus Tospovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Tsung-Chi; Li, Ju-Ting; Fan, Ya-Shu; Yeh, Yi-Chun; Yeh, Shyi-Dong; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Tomato yellow ring virus (TYRV), first isolated from tomato in Iran, was classified as a non-approved species of the genus Tospovirus based on the characterization of its genomic S RNA. In the current study, the complete sequences of the genomic L and M RNAs of TYRV were determined and analyzed. The

  8. Hot Air Treatment Induces Disease Resistance through Activating the Phenylpropanoid Metabolism in Cherry Tomato Fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yingying; Zhou, Dandan; Peng, Jing; Pan, Leiqing; Tu, Kang

    2017-09-13

    To explore the effects of hot air (HA, 38 °C for 12 h) treatment on the phenylpropanoid metabolism in cherry tomatoes, phenylpropanoid metabolite levels and the activities and expression of key enzymes were analyzed in HA-treated fruit. HA treatment enhanced phenylpropanoid metabolism, as evidenced by elevated levels of phenolics and flavonoids, higher activities of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase and cinnamate-4-hydroxylase, and upregulated expression of LeCHS, LeCHI, LeF3H, and LeFLS. Levels of several phenylpropanoid metabolites were higher after HA treatment, including p-coumaric acid, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, isoquercitrin, quercetin, and rutin. These metabolic changes may be related to the reduced disease incidence and smaller lesion diameters observed in HA-treated fruit inoculated with Alternaria alternata (black mold) or Botrytis cinerea (gray mold). The results suggest that HA treatment induces disease resistance by activating the phenylpropanoid pathway in cherry tomato fruit.

  9. Differences in insect resistance between tomato species endemic to the Galapagos Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The Galapagos Islands constitute a highly diverse ecosystem and a unique source of variation in the form of endemic species. There are two endemic tomato species, Solanum galapagense and S. cheesmaniae and two introduced tomato species, S. pimpinellifolium and S. lycopersicum. Morphologically the two endemic tomato species of the Galapagos Islands are clearly distinct, but molecular marker analysis showed no clear separation. Tomatoes on the Galapagos are affected by both native and exotic herbivores. Bemisia tabaci is an important introduced insect species that feeds on a wide range of plants. In this article, we address the question whether the differentiation between S. galapagense and S. cheesmaniae may be related to differences in susceptibility towards phloem-feeders and used B. tabaci as a model to evaluate this. Results We have characterized 12 accessions of S. galapagense, 22 of S. cheesmaniae, and one of S. lycopersicum as reference for whitefly resistance using no-choice experiments. Whitefly resistance was found in S. galapagense only and was associated with the presence of relatively high levels of acyl sugars and the presence of glandular trichomes of type I and IV. Genetic fingerprinting using 3316 SNP markers did not show a clear differentiation between the two endemic species. Acyl sugar accumulation as well as the climatic and geographical conditions at the collection sites of the accessions did not follow the morphological species boundaries. Conclusion Our results suggest that S. galapagense and S. cheesmaniae might be morphotypes rather than two species and that their co-existence is likely the result of selective pressure. PMID:23972016

  10. Differences in insect resistance between tomato species endemic to the Galapagos Islands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucatti, Alejandro F; van Heusden, Adriaan W; de Vos, Ric C H; Visser, Richard G F; Vosman, Ben

    2013-08-24

    The Galapagos Islands constitute a highly diverse ecosystem and a unique source of variation in the form of endemic species. There are two endemic tomato species, Solanum galapagense and S. cheesmaniae and two introduced tomato species, S. pimpinellifolium and S. lycopersicum. Morphologically the two endemic tomato species of the Galapagos Islands are clearly distinct, but molecular marker analysis showed no clear separation. Tomatoes on the Galapagos are affected by both native and exotic herbivores. Bemisia tabaci is an important introduced insect species that feeds on a wide range of plants. In this article, we address the question whether the differentiation between S. galapagense and S. cheesmaniae may be related to differences in susceptibility towards phloem-feeders and used B. tabaci as a model to evaluate this. We have characterized 12 accessions of S. galapagense, 22 of S. cheesmaniae, and one of S. lycopersicum as reference for whitefly resistance using no-choice experiments. Whitefly resistance was found in S. galapagense only and was associated with the presence of relatively high levels of acyl sugars and the presence of glandular trichomes of type I and IV. Genetic fingerprinting using 3316 SNP markers did not show a clear differentiation between the two endemic species. Acyl sugar accumulation as well as the climatic and geographical conditions at the collection sites of the accessions did not follow the morphological species boundaries. Our results suggest that S. galapagense and S. cheesmaniae might be morphotypes rather than two species and that their co-existence is likely the result of selective pressure.

  11. Different mechanisms of Trichoderma virens-mediated resistance in tomato against Fusarium wilt involve the jasmonic and salicylic acid pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jogaiah, Sudisha; Abdelrahman, Mostafa; Tran, Lam-Son Phan; Ito, Shin-Ichi

    2017-06-12

    In the present study, we investigated the role of Trichoderma virens (TriV_JSB100) spores or cell-free culture filtrate in the regulation of growth and activation of the defence responses of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants against Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici by the development of a biocontrol-plant-pathogen interaction system. Two-week-old tomato seedlings primed with TriV_JSB100 spores cultured on barley grains (BGS) or with cell-free culture filtrate (CF) were inoculated with Fusarium pathogen under glasshouse conditions; this resulted in significantly lower disease incidence in tomato Oogata-Fukuju plants treated with BGS than in those treated with CF. To dissect the pathways associated with this response, jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) signalling in BGS- and CF-induced resistance was evaluated using JA- and SA-impaired tomato lines. We observed that JA-deficient mutant def1 plants were susceptible to Fusarium pathogen when they were treated with BGS. However, wild-type (WT) BGS-treated tomato plants showed a higher JA level and significantly lower disease incidence. SA-deficient mutant NahG plants treated with CF were also found to be susceptible to Fusarium pathogen and displayed low SA levels, whereas WT CF-treated tomato plants exhibited moderately lower disease levels and substantially higher SA levels. Expression of the JA-responsive defensin gene PDF1 was induced in WT tomato plants treated with BGS, whereas the SA-inducible pathogenesis-related protein 1 acidic (PR1a) gene was up-regulated in WT tomato plants treated with CF. These results suggest that TriV_JSB100 BGS and CF differentially induce JA and SA signalling cascades for the elicitation of Fusarium oxysporum resistance in tomato. © 2017 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  12. New Insecticides for Management of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl, a Virus Vectored by the Silverleaf Whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, H. A.; Giurcanu, M. C.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Greenhouse studies using a randomized complete block design were carried out to evaluate the effect of six insecticides on transmission of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) by the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci biotype B Gennadius (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) to tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum (Miller) (Solanales: Solanaceae), seedlings that were inoculated with whiteflies from a TYLCV colony in cages 3, 7, or 14 d after treatment with insecticide. The purpose was to reveal differences in residual efficacy of four materials that are nearing registration for use on tomato—cyazypyr, flupyradifurone, pyrafluquinazon, and sulfoxaflor—and to compare them with two established insecticides, pymetrozine and a zeta-cypermethrin/bifenthrin combination. Differences in efficacy were expected because these six materials represent five distinct modes of action and both contact and systemic materials. Percentage of tomato seedlings expressing virus symptoms tended to be lowest in seedlings treated with flupyradifurone. The zeta-cypermethrin/bifenthrin insecticide demonstrated comparable efficacy to flupyradifurone in some trials at 3 and 7 d after treatment inoculations, but not the 14 d after treatment inoculation. Pyrafluquinazon was not statistically different from cyazypyr or sulfoxaflor in percentage of plants with virus symptoms in any trial. Percentage virus in the cyazypyr and sulfoxaflor treatments was not statistically different in the 3 and 7 d after treatment inoculations. Among seedlings treated with insecticide, percentage with virus symptoms tended to be highest in the seedlings treated with pymetrozine. PMID:25368089

  13. Pattern of the Occurrence of Tomato spotted wilt virus in Jeonnam Province

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    Sug-Ju Ko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV was occurred at 8 areas including Naju, Suncheon, Younggwang, Youngam, and Shinan in Jeonnam province and the crops of Younggwang were severely damaged by TSWV. The hot pepper (Capsicum annuum, bell pepper (Capsicum annuum v ar. angulosum and tomato (Solanum lycopersicon in greenhouse and hot pepper in open field were infected by TSWV. Especially, hot pepper was severely damaged by TSWV infection. The survey data indicated that 1.1−30% in the nursery field at Naju, Suncheon, and Jangheung were infected by TSWV. Plants were infected by TSWV from early June to August. However, TSWV-infected seedlings from nursery fields showed the disease symptoms from May after transplanting. In pepper greenhouses, Frankliniella occidentalis was more dominant insect vector than Frankliniella intonsa. But in open field, the population of insect vector was opposed to greenhouse. In addition, the removal of weeds was able to delay the incidence of TSWV via side-window of greenhouse in Winter. Taken together, the control of weed and insect vector nearby side-window of greenhouse is important to prevent TSWV infection of plants.

  14. Mi-1-Mediated Resistance to Meloidogyne incognita in Tomato May Not Rely on Ethylene but Hormone Perception through ETR3 Participates in Limiting Nematode Infection in a Susceptible Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhaveri, Teraneh Z.; Kaloshian, Isgouhi

    2013-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes, Meloidogyne spp., are important pests of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) and resistance to the three most prevalent species of this genus, including Meloidogyne incognita, is mediated by the Mi-1 gene. Mi-1 encodes a nucleotide binding (NB) leucine-rich repeat (LRR) resistance (R) protein. Ethylene (ET) is required for the resistance mediated by a subset of NB-LRR proteins and its role in Mi-1-mediated nematode resistance has not been characterized. Infection of tomato roots with M. incognita differentially induces ET biosynthetic genes in both compatible and incompatible interactions. Analyzing the expression of members of the ET biosynthetic gene families ACC synthase (ACS) and ACC oxidase (ACO), in both compatible and incompatible interactions, shows differences in amplitude and temporal expression of both ACS and ACO genes in these two interactions. Since ET can promote both resistance and susceptibility against microbial pathogens in tomato, we investigated the role of ET in Mi-1-mediated resistance to M. incognita using both genetic and pharmacological approaches. Impairing ET biosynthesis or perception using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), the ET-insensitive Never ripe (Nr) mutant, or 1-methylcyclopropene (MCP) treatment, did not attenuate Mi-1-mediated resistance to M. incognita. However, Nr plants compromised in ET perception showed enhanced susceptibility to M. incognita indicating a role for ETR3 in basal resistance to root-knot nematodes. PMID:23717408

  15. Oxylipin biosynthesis genes positively regulate programmed cell death during compatible infections with the synergistic pair potato virus X-potato virus Y and Tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Marcos, Alberto; Pacheco, Remedios; Manzano, Aranzazu; Aguilar, Emmanuel; Tenllado, Francisco

    2013-05-01

    One of the most severe symptoms caused by compatible plant-virus interactions is systemic necrosis, which shares common attributes with the hypersensitive response to incompatible pathogens. Although several studies have identified viral symptom determinants responsible for systemic necrosis, mechanistic models of how they contribute to necrosis in infected plants remain scarce. Here, we examined the involvement of different branches of the oxylipin biosynthesis pathway in the systemic necrosis response caused either by the synergistic interaction of Potato virus X with Potato virus Y (PVX-PVY) or by Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Silencing either 9-lipoxygenase (LOX), 13-LOX, or α-dioxygenase-1 (α-DOX-1) attenuated the programmed cell death (PCD)-associated symptoms caused by infection with either PVX-PVY or TSWV. In contrast, silencing of the jasmonic acid perception gene, COI1 (Coronatine insensitive 1), expedited cell death during infection with compatible viruses. This correlated with an enhanced expression of oxylipin biosynthesis genes and dioxygenase activity in PVX-PVY-infected plants. Moreover, the Arabidopsis thaliana double lox1 α-dox-1 mutant became less susceptible to TSWV infection. We conclude that oxylipin metabolism is a critical component that positively regulates the process of PCD during compatible plant-virus interactions but does not play a role in restraining virus accumulation in planta.

  16. Managing thrips and tospoviruses in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    This fact sheet reports current management recommendations for Tomato spotted wilt virus, Groundnut ringspot virus and Tomato chlorotic spot virus and the thrips that transmits each of these viruses. All three viruses are important pathogens for Florida tomato crops. This information is useful for...

  17. Managing thrips and tospoviruses in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato spotted wilt virus and more recently emerged Tomato chlorotic spot virus and Groundnut ringspot virus are all transmitted by thrips, making managment complex. All three viruses and the thrips vector are major pests of tomato in Florida. Current management tools for these viruses and the th...

  18. Complete genome sequences of three tomato spotted wilt virus isolates from tomato and pepper plants in Korea and their phylogenetic relationship to other TSWV isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Seung; Cho, Won Kyong; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2011-04-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) infects numerous host plants and has three genome segments, called L, M and S. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of three Korean TSWV isolates (TSWV-1 to -3) infecting tomato and pepper plants. Although the nucleotide sequence of TSWV-1 genome isolated from tomato is very different from those of TSWV-2 and TSWV-3 isolated from pepper, the deduced amino acid sequences of the five TSWV genes are highly conserved among all three TSWV isolates. In phylogenetic analysis, deduced RdRp protein sequences of TSWV-2 and TSWV-3 were clustered together with two previously reported isolates from Japan and Korea, while TSWV-1 grouped together with a Hawaiian isolate. A phylogenetic tree based on N protein sequences, however, revealed four distinct groups of TSWV isolates, and all three Korean isolates belonged to group II, together with many other isolates, mostly from Europe and Asia. Interestingly, most American isolates grouped together as group I. Together, these results suggested that these newly identified TSWV isolates might have originated from an Asian ancestor and undergone divergence upon infecting different host plants.

  19. Tomato yellow leaf curl Kanchanaburi virus Penyebab Penyakit Mosaik Kuning pada Tanaman Terung di Jawa

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    Tega Kintasari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Yellow and yellow mosaic symptoms was observed on eggplant (Solanum melongena around Bogor, Bandung, Pati, Rembang, and Bantul during a survey in early 2013. Polymerase chain reaction based detection was carried out using total DNA isolated from symptomatic leaf samples and a pair of Begomovirus-universal primers, SPG1/SPG2. The expected size (~900 bp amplicon was detected from all five symptomatic samples, indicating the presence of Begomovirus infection. Each amplicon was sequenced followed by basic local alignment search tool analysis. It was revealed that the sequence had the highest homology (98.8% with Tomato yellow leaf curl Kanchanaburi virus (TYLCKaV sequence. This is the first report on TYLCKaV infection on eggplant in Indonesia.

  20. Guanylylation-competent replication proteins of Tomato mosaic virus are disulfide-linked.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikiori, Masaki; Meshi, Tetsuo; Ishikawa, Masayuki

    2012-12-05

    The 130-kDa and 180-kDa replication proteins of Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) covalently bind guanylate and transfer it to the 5' end of RNA to form a cap. We found that guanylylation-competent ToMV replication proteins are in membrane-bound, disulfide-linked complexes. Guanylylation-competent replication proteins of Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus behaved similarly. To investigate the roles of disulfide bonding in the functioning of ToMV replication proteins, each of the 19 cysteine residues in the 130-kDa protein was replaced by a serine residue. Interestingly, three mutant proteins (C179S, C186S and C581S) failed not only to be guanylylated, but also to bind to the replication template and membranes. These mutants could trans-complement viral RNA replication. Considering that ToMV replication proteins recognize the replication templates, bind membranes, and are guanylylated in the cytoplasm that provides a reducing condition, we discuss the roles of cysteine residues and disulfide bonds in ToMV RNA replication. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of the Ty-3 Introgression for Conferring Resistance in Recombinant Inbred Lines of Tomato to Bipartite Begomoviruses in Guatemala

    Science.gov (United States)

    Management of begomovirus-incited diseases on tomatoes in Guatemala continues to be a challenge and there continues to be a need to better understand the genetics of resistance to begomoviruses. In this study, the resistant line, Gh13, was crossed with the susceptible line, HUJ-VF, that lacked the ...

  2. Development of a high-resolution melting marker for selecting Fusarium crown and root rot resistance in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Bichseam; Kim, Nahui; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Byung Sup; Jung, Hee-Jeong; Hwang, Indoek; Noua, Ill-Sup; Sim, Sung-Chur; Park, Younghoon

    2016-03-01

    Fusarium crown and root rot is a severe fungal disease of tomato caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici (FORL). In this study, the genomic location of the FORL-resistance locus was determined using a set of molecular markers on chromosome 9 and an F2 population derived from FORL-resistant inbred 'AV107-4' (Solanum lycopersicum) × susceptible 'L3708' (Solanum pimpinellifolium). Bioassay performed using Korean FORL strain KACC 40031 showed single dominant inheritance of FORL resistance in the F2 population. In all, 13 polymerase chain reaction-based markers encompassing approximately 3.6-72.0 Mb of chromosome 9 were developed based on the Tomato-EXPEN 2000 map and SolCAP Tomato single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis. These markers were genotyped on 345 F2 plants, and the FORL-resistance locus was found to be present on a pericentromeric region of suppressed chromosomal recombination in chromosome 9. The location of the FORL-resistance locus was further confirmed by testing these markers against diverse commercial tomato and stock cultivars resistant to FORL. A restriction fragment length polymorphism marker, PNU-D4, located at approximately 6.1 Mb of chromosome 9 showed the highest match with the resistance locus and was used for conducting high-resolution melting analysis for marker-assisted selection of FORL resistance.

  3. The spread of tomato yellow leaf curl virus from the Middle East to the world.

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    Pierre Lefeuvre

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The ongoing global spread of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV; Genus Begomovirus, Family Geminiviridae represents a serious looming threat to tomato production in all temperate parts of the world. Whereas determining where and when TYLCV movements have occurred could help curtail its spread and prevent future movements of related viruses, determining the consequences of past TYLCV movements could reveal the ecological and economic risks associated with similar viral invasions. Towards this end we applied Bayesian phylogeographic inference and recombination analyses to available TYLCV sequences (including those of 15 new Iranian full TYLCV genomes and reconstructed a plausible history of TYLCV's diversification and movements throughout the world. In agreement with historical accounts, our results suggest that the first TYLCVs most probably arose somewhere in the Middle East between the 1930s and 1950s (with 95% highest probability density intervals 1905-1972 and that the global spread of TYLCV only began in the 1980s after the evolution of the TYLCV-Mld and -IL strains. Despite the global distribution of TYLCV we found no convincing evidence anywhere other than the Middle East and the Western Mediterranean of epidemiologically relevant TYLCV variants arising through recombination. Although the region around Iran is both the center of present day TYLCV diversity and the site of the most intensive ongoing TYLCV evolution, the evidence indicates that the region is epidemiologically isolated, which suggests that novel TYLCV variants found there are probably not direct global threats. We instead identify the Mediterranean basin as the main launch-pad of global TYLCV movements.

  4. Benzothiadiazole-Mediated Induced Resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici in Tomato1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benhamou, Nicole; Bélanger, Richard R.

    1998-01-01

    Benzo-(1,2,3)-thiadiazole-7-carbothioic acid S-methyl ester (BTH), a synthetic chemical, was applied as a foliar spray to tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) plants and evaluated for its potential to confer increased resistance against the soil-borne pathogen Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. radicis-lycopersici (FORL). In nontreated tomato plants all root tissues were massively colonized by FORL hyphae. Pathogen ingress toward the vascular stele was accompanied by severe host cell alterations, including cell wall breakdown. In BTH-treated plants striking differences in the rate and extent of fungal colonization were observed. Pathogen growth was restricted to the epidermis and the outer cortex, and fungal ingress was apparently halted by the formation of callose-enriched wall appositions at sites of fungal penetration. In addition, aggregated deposits, which frequently established close contact with the invading hyphae, accumulated in densely colonized epidermal cells and filled most intercellular spaces. Upon incubation of sections with gold-complexed laccase for localization of phenolic-like compounds, a slight deposition of gold particles was observed over both the host cell walls and the wall appositions. Labeling was also detected over the walls of fungal cells showing signs of obvious alteration ranging from cytoplasm disorganization to protoplasm retraction. We provide evidence that foliar applications of BTH sensitize susceptible tomato plants to react more rapidly and more efficiently to FORL attack through the formation of protective layers at sites of potential fungal entry. PMID:9847094

  5. Epidemiology of spotted wilt disease of peanut caused by Tomato spotted wilt virus in the southeastern U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbreath, A K; Srinivasan, R

    2011-08-01

    Spotted wilt disease of peanut (Arachis hypogaea) (SWP), caused by Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae), was first observed in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia in the late 1980s and rapidly became a major limiting factor for peanut production in the region. Tobacco thrips (Frankliniella fusca) and western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis) both occur on peanut throughout the southeastern U.S., but F. fusca is the predominant species that reproduces on peanut, and is considered to be the more important vector. Several non-crop sources of potential primary vectors and TSWV inoculum have been identified, but their relative importance has not been determined. The peanut growing season in Alabama, Florida, and Georgia is from April through November, and 'volunteer' peanut plants can be present for much of the remainder of the year. Therefore peanut itself has huge potential for perpetuating both vector and virus. Symptoms are often evident within a few days of seedling emergence, and disease progress is often rapid within the first 50-60 days after planting. Based on destructive sampling and assays for TSWV, there is often a high incidence of asymptomatic infections even in peanut genotypes that produce few and mild symptoms of infection in the field. Severity of SWP epidemics fluctuates significantly from year to year. The variability has not been fully explained, but lower incidences have been associated with years categorized as "La Niña" in the El Niño-Southern Oscillation. Planting date can have a large effect on disease incidence within a location. This may be linked to the thrips reproductive cycle and environmental effects on the plant and plant-thrips-virus interactions. Row pattern, plant population, and in-furrow applications of phorate insecticide can also affect epidemics of SWP. Considerable progress has been made in developing cultivars with natural field resistance to TSWV. Use of cultivars with moderate field

  6. Beyond Predation: The Zoophytophagous Predator Macrolophus pygmaeus Induces Tomato Resistance against Spider Mites.

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    Maria L Pappas

    Full Text Available Many predatory insects that prey on herbivores also feed on the plant, but it is unknown whether plants affect the performance of herbivores by responding to this phytophagy with defence induction. We investigate whether the prior presence of the omnivorous predator Macrolophus pygmaeus (Rambur on tomato plants affects plant resistance against two different herbivore species. Besides plant-mediated effects of M. pygmaeus on herbivore performance, we examined whether a plant defence trait that is known to be inducible by herbivory, proteinase inhibitors (PI, may also be activated in response to the interactions of this predator with the tomato plant. We show that exposing tomato plants to the omnivorous predator M. pygmaeus reduced performance of a subsequently infesting herbivore, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch, but not of the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood. The spider-mite infested tomato plants experience a lower herbivore load, i.e., number of eggs deposited and individuals present, when previously exposed to the zoophytophagous predator. This effect is not restricted to the exposed leaf and persists on exposed plants for at least two weeks after the removal of the predators. The decreased performance of spider mites as a result of prior exposure of the plant to M. pygmaeus is accompanied by a locally and systemically increased accumulation of transcripts and activity of proteinase inhibitors that are known to be involved in plant defence. Our results demonstrate that zoophytophagous predators can induce plant defence responses and reduce herbivore performance. Hence, the suppression of populations of certain herbivores via consumption may be strengthened by the induction of plant defences by zoophytophagous predators.

  7. Beyond Predation: The Zoophytophagous Predator Macrolophus pygmaeus Induces Tomato Resistance against Spider Mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, Maria L; Steppuhn, Anke; Geuss, Daniel; Topalidou, Nikoleta; Zografou, Aliki; Sabelis, Maurice W; Broufas, George D

    2015-01-01

    Many predatory insects that prey on herbivores also feed on the plant, but it is unknown whether plants affect the performance of herbivores by responding to this phytophagy with defence induction. We investigate whether the prior presence of the omnivorous predator Macrolophus pygmaeus (Rambur) on tomato plants affects plant resistance against two different herbivore species. Besides plant-mediated effects of M. pygmaeus on herbivore performance, we examined whether a plant defence trait that is known to be inducible by herbivory, proteinase inhibitors (PI), may also be activated in response to the interactions of this predator with the tomato plant. We show that exposing tomato plants to the omnivorous predator M. pygmaeus reduced performance of a subsequently infesting herbivore, the two-spotted spider mite Tetranychus urticae Koch, but not of the greenhouse whitefly Trialeurodes vaporariorum (Westwood). The spider-mite infested tomato plants experience a lower herbivore load, i.e., number of eggs deposited and individuals present, when previously exposed to the zoophytophagous predator. This effect is not restricted to the exposed leaf and persists on exposed plants for at least two weeks after the removal of the predators. The decreased performance of spider mites as a result of prior exposure of the plant to M. pygmaeus is accompanied by a locally and systemically increased accumulation of transcripts and activity of proteinase inhibitors that are known to be involved in plant defence. Our results demonstrate that zoophytophagous predators can induce plant defence responses and reduce herbivore performance. Hence, the suppression of populations of certain herbivores via consumption may be strengthened by the induction of plant defences by zoophytophagous predators.

  8. Molecular Characterization of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus in Korea and the Construction of an Infectious Clone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bong Choon Lee

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Several tomato production regions in Korea were surveyed for tomato yellow leaf curl disease (TYLCD. Tomato leaf samples showing TYLCD-like symptoms were collected from Tongyeong (To, Geoje (Gi, and Gimhae (Gh cities of the southern part of Korea. Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV was detected and the full-length genomes of the isolates were sequenced. The TYLCV isolates found in Korea shared high sequence identity (> 99% with TYLCV-IL [JR:Omu:Ng] (AB110217. Phylogenetic relationship analysis revealed that they formed two groups (with little genetic variability, and the To, Gj, and Gh isolates belonged to the TYLCV-IL group. An infectious clone of TYLCV-To (JQ013089 was constructed and agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana, Nicotiana tabacum var. Xanthi, Petunia hybrida, Capsicum annuum, and Lycopersicon esculentum cv. Hausumomotaro. Agroinfection with a dimeric infectious clone of TYLCV-To induced severe leaf curling and stunting symptoms in these plants, excluding C. annuum. Tomato plants then developed typical yellow leaf curl symptoms.

  9. Deciphering the hormonal signalling network behind the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ainhoa eMartinez-Medina

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Root colonization by selected Trichoderma isolates can activate in the plant a systemic defence response that is effective against a broad spectrum of plant pathogens. Diverse plant hormones play pivotal roles in the regulation of the defence signalling network that leads to the induction of systemic resistance triggered by beneficial organisms (ISR. Among them, jasmonic acid (JA and ethylene (ET signalling pathways are generally essential for ISR. However, Trichoderma ISR (TISR is believed to involve a wider variety of signalling routes, interconnected in a complex network of cross-communicating hormone pathways. Using tomato as a model, an integrative analysis of the main mechanisms involved in the systemic resistance induced by Trichoderma harzianum against the necrotrophic leaf pathogen Botrytis cinerea was performed. Root colonization by T. harzianum rendered the leaves more resistant to B. cinerea independently of major effects on plant nutrition. The analysis of disease development in shoots of tomato mutant lines impaired in the synthesis of the key defence related hormones JA, ET, salicylic acid (SA and abscisic acid (ABA and the peptide prosystemin (PS evidenced the requirement of intact JA, SA and ABA signalling pathways for a functional TISR. Expression analysis of several hormone related marker genes point to the role of priming for enhanced JA-dependent defence responses upon pathogen infection. Together, our results indicate that although TISR induced in tomato against the necrotrophs is mainly based on boosted JA-dependent responses, the pathways regulated by the plant hormones SA- and ABA are also required for successful TISR development

  10. Tomato mottle Taino virus pseudorecombines with PYMV but not with ToMoV: implications for the delimitation of cis- and trans-acting replication specificity determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, P L; Guevara-González, R G; Peral, R; Ascencio-Ibañez, J T; Polston, J E; Argüello-Astorga, G R; Vega-Arreguín, J C; Rivera-Bustamante, R F

    2003-09-01

    Over the last decade, the tomato production in Cuba has been affected by new whitefly-associated diseases. In addition to the well-documented presence of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) along the island, the occurrence of bipartite begomoviruses has also been reported. One of them, tentatively named Tomato mottle Taino virus (ToMoTV), has now been cloned and characterized at the molecular level. Its genomic organization is similar to other bipartite geminiviruses. Phylogenetic analyses placed ToMoTV in a subcluster with other geminiviruses isolated in the Caribbean Basin: Tomato mottle virus (ToMoV), Bean dwarf mosaic virus, Abutilon mosaic virus, Sida golden mosaic virus and Potato yellow mosaic virus (PYMV). Biolistic inoculation of tobacco and tomato plants with cloned viral DNA showed that ToMoTV pseudorecombines with PYMV-GP as predicted by the identity of their iterative elements, whereas it does not show the same ability with ToMoV, even when their replication-associated proteins (Rep and REn) show the highest percentage of similarity. A comparative analysis of Rep proteins from begomoviruses that are able to produce viable reassortants suggests that some key elements for virus replication specificity are located in the first ten amino acids of this protein.

  11. Reflective mulch and acibenzolar-S-methyl treatments relative to thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and tomato spotted wilt virus incidence in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, D G; Joseph, S V; Srinivasan, R

    2012-08-01

    Management of thrips-transmitted tomato spotted wilt (TSW) virus typically relies on tactics that either reduce the thrips vector numbers or change the plant's response to the virus to reduce economic loss. We attempted to quantify the interaction between two such tactics, reflective mulch and the plant activator acibenzolar-S-methyl (Actigard), respectively, on a TSW-susceptible tomato hybrid. A split plot experiment was conducted in 2009 and 2010 where main-plots were three types of plastic mulch (two metalized reflective vs. black) and subplots consisted of a range of plant defense activator applications. TSW pressure varied over year with 80% of untreated plants having TSW in 2009 where as thrips and marketable yield in either year. In 2009, the seasonal average of Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) populations and incidence of TSW were significantly lower and yield significantly higher on both reflective mulches than on black mulch. Seasonal averages of thrips and fruit yield differed significantly among treatments of acibenzolar-S-methyl. However, there was a significant acibenzolar-S-methyl by mulch interaction relative to TSW incidence. In 2009, a minimum of acibenzolar-S-methyl at transplant plus foliar treatments at 10 and 20 d after transplant was required to significantly reduce TSW incidence compared with untreated plants before harvest. Under lower TSW pressure in 2010, average TSW incidence was significantly less in all plots treated with acibenzolar-S-methyl treated plots compared with the check. Acibenzolar-S-methyl treatments functioned better with the thrips reducing tactic, ultraviolet-reflective mulch. We propose that acibenzolar-S-methyl is less effective than metalized reflective mulch in reducing the incidence of TSW in tomato.

  12. Comparative Analyses of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus C4 Protein-Interacting Host Proteins in Healthy and Infected Tomato Tissues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Namgyu Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, a member of the genus Begomovirus, is one of the most important viruses of cultivated tomatoes worldwide, mainly causing yellowing and curling of leaves with stunting in plants. TYLCV causes severe problems in sub-tropical and tropical countries, as well as in Korea. However, the mechanism of TYLCV infection remains unclear, although the function of each viral component has been identified. TYLCV C4 codes for a small protein involved in various cellular functions, including symptom determination, gene silencing, viral movement, and induction of the plant defense response. In this study, through yeast-two hybrid screenings, we identified TYLCV C4-interacting host proteins from both healthy and symptom-exhibiting tomato tissues, to determine the role of TYLCV C4 proteins in the infection processes. Comparative analyses of 28 proteins from healthy tissues and 36 from infected tissues showing interactions with TYLCV C4 indicated that TYLCV C4 mainly interacts with host proteins involved in translation, ubiquitination, and plant defense, and most interacting proteins differed between the two tissues but belong to similar molecular functional categories. Four proteins—two ribosomal proteins, S-adenosyl-L-homocysteine hydrolase, and 14-3-3 family protein—were detected in both tissues. Furthermore, the identified proteins in symptom-exhibiting tissues showed greater involvement in plant defenses. Some are key regulators, such as receptor-like kinases and pathogenesis-related proteins, of plant defenses. Thus, TYLCV C4 may contribute to the suppression of host defense during TYLCV infection and be involved in ubiquitination for viral infection.

  13. Engineering resistance to plant viruses: Present status and future prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant viruses cause severe crop losses across the globe. Resistant cultivars together with pesticide application are commonly used to avoid the losses caused by plant viruses. However, very limited success has been achieved at diminishing the impact of plant viruses. Use of virus resistant plant is ...

  14. Indirect selection of industrial tomato genotypes that are resistant to spider mites (Tetranychus urticae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, J E; Resende, J T V; Faria, M V; Schwarz, K; Meert, L

    2015-01-16

    Acyl sugars present in the tomato Solanum lycopersicum 'LA-716' accession confer good levels of resistance to arthropod pests. The objective of the present study was to select F₂ plants from the interspecific cross Solanum pennellii 'LA-716' x Solanum lycopersicum 'Redenção' to assess resistance to spider mites (Tetranychus urticae) based on the leaf acyl sugar content and repellence tests. Four genotypes were selected with high leaflet acyl sugar content (RVTA-2010 pl#31, RVTA-2010 pl#75, RVTA-2010 pl#83, and RVTA-2010 pl#94), and an additional three genotypes with low acyl sugar content were also selected (RVTA-2010 pl#33, RVTA-2010 pl#39, and RVTA-2010 pl#73). The results from the in vivo tests used to confirm the selection of plants resistant to mites indicated that the genotypes with high acyl sugars content did not differ from the resistant parent LA-716. The negative correlation between acyl sugar content and the distance run by the mite along the leaflet surface confirmed the association between high and low allelochemical content and resistance. The medium degree of dominance (MDD) was estimated (MDD = -0.83), indicating that the high acyl sugar content was due to incomplete dominance of a recessive allele. A value of 81.85% was found for the broad sense heritability estimate, which suggests that most among-plant variation in the F2 generation is genetically based. Furthermore, 0.69 genes were estimated, which presumably confirms monogenic inheritance. Thus, indirect selection was an efficient method used to obtain industrial tomato plants that are resistant to spider mites.

  15. Complete nucleotide sequence of a Spanish isolate of Parietaria mottle virus infecting tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipienso, Luis; Rubio, Luis; López, Luis; Soler, Salvador; Aramburu, José

    2009-10-01

    The genome of a Spanish isolate of Parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) obtained from tomato (strain PMoV-T) was completely sequenced. Protein motifs conserved for RNA viruses were identified: the p1 protein contained a metyltransferase domain in its N-terminal half and a triphosphatase/ helicase domain in its C-terminal half, the p2 protein contained a RNA polymerase domain; the 3a protein contained a RNA-binding domain with α-helix and β-sheet secondary structures. In addition, stem-loop structures with potential capacity of protein interactions were predicted on the untranslated terminal regions. Comparison with the other sequenced PMoV isolate showed nucleotide identities of 93, 90, and 93% for genomic RNAs 1, 2 and 3, respectively, and amino acid identities ranging from 88 to 97% for the different proteins. A cytosine deletion was detected at position 1,366 of RNA 3, involving a start codon for the coat protein (CP) gene different from the other PMoV isolate, resulting in a CP 16 amino acids shorter. Comparison of synonymous and nonsynonymous mutations revealed different selective constraints along the genome.

  16. Effects of Thrips Density, Mode of Inoculation, and Plant Age on Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Transmission in Peanut Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Anita; Sundaraj, Sivamani; Culbreath, Albert K; Riley, David G; Abney, Mark R; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu

    2015-02-01

    Spotted wilt caused by tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV; family Bunyaviridae; genus Tospovirus) is a serious disease of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) in the southeastern United States. Peanut genotypes with field resistance to TSWV are effective in suppressing spotted wilt. All commercially available genotypes with field resistance to TSWV were developed through conventional breeding. As a part of the breeding process, peanut genotypes are regularly screened under field situations. Despite numerous advantages associated with field screening, it is often limited by inconsistent vector (thrips) and TSWV pressure. A greenhouse transmission protocol would aid in thorough screening of selected genotypes and conserve time. In this study, various parameters associated with TSWV transmission, including tobacco thrips, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds) density, mode of inoculation, and plant age, were evaluated. Greater incidences of TSWV infection were obtained with thrips-mediated inoculation when compared with mechanical inoculation. TSWV inoculation with three, five, and 10 thrips resulted in greater incidences of TSWV infection in plants than inoculation with one thrips. However, incidences of TSWV infection did not vary between plants inoculated with three, five, and 10 viruliferous thrips. With both thrips-mediated and mechanical inoculation methods, incidences of TSWV infection in 1-wk-old plants were greater than in 4-wk-old plants. TSWV copy numbers, as determined by qPCR, also decreased with plant age. Results suggest that using at least three thrips per plant and 1- to 2-wk-old plants would maximize TSWV infection in inoculated plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of the whitefly, Bemisia tabaci MEAM1 during feeding on tomato infected with the crinivirus, Tomato chlorosis virus, identifies a temporal shift in gene expression and differential regulation of novel orphan genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Navneet; Chen, Wenbo; Zheng, Yi; Hasegawa, Daniel K; Ling, Kai-Shu; Fei, Zhangjun; Wintermantel, William M

    2017-05-11

    Whiteflies threaten agricultural crop production worldwide, are polyphagous in nature, and transmit hundreds of plant viruses. Little is known how whitefly gene expression is altered due to feeding on plants infected with a semipersistently transmitted virus. Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV; genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae) is transmitted by the whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in a semipersistent manner and infects several globally important agricultural and ornamental crops, including tomato. To determine changes in global gene regulation in whiteflies after feeding on tomato plants infected with a crinivirus (ToCV), comparative transcriptomic analysis was performed using RNA-Seq on whitefly (Bemisia tabaci MEAM1) populations after 24, 48, and 72 h acquisition access periods on either ToCV-infected or uninfected tomatoes. Significant differences in gene expression were detected between whiteflies fed on ToCV-infected tomato and those fed on uninfected tomato among the three feeding time periods: 447 up-regulated and 542 down-regulated at 24 h, 4 up-regulated and 7 down-regulated at 48 h, and 50 up-regulated and 160 down-regulated at 72 h. Analysis revealed differential regulation of genes associated with metabolic pathways, signal transduction, transport and catabolism, receptors, glucose transporters, α-glucosidases, and the uric acid pathway in whiteflies fed on ToCV-infected tomatoes, as well as an abundance of differentially regulated novel orphan genes. Results demonstrate for the first time, a specific and temporally regulated response by the whitefly to feeding on a host plant infected with a semipersistently transmitted virus, and advance the understanding of the whitefly vector-virus interactions that facilitate virus transmission. Whitefly transmission of semipersistent viruses is believed to require specific interactions between the virus and its vector that allow binding of virus particles to factors within whitefly mouthparts. Results provide a

  18. Spinosad and the Tomato Borer Tuta absoluta: A Bioinsecticide, an Invasive Pest Threat, and High Insecticide Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Mateus R.; Rodrigues, Agna Rita S.; Silva, Wellington M.; Silva, Tadeu Barbosa M.; Silva, Vitória Regina F.; Guedes, Raul Narciso C.; Siqueira, Herbert Alvaro A.

    2014-01-01

    The introduction of an agricultural pest species into a new environment is a potential threat to agroecosystems of the invaded area. The phytosanitary concern is even greater if the introduced pest’s phenotype expresses traits that will impair the management of that species. The invasive tomato borer, Tuta absoluta (Meyrick) (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae), is one such species and the characterization of the insecticide resistance prevailing in the area of origin is important to guide management efforts in new areas of introduction. The spinosad is one the main insecticides currently used in Brazil for control of the tomato borer; Brazil is the likely source of the introduction of the tomato borer into Europe. For this reason, spinosad resistance in Brazilian populations of this species was characterized. Spinosad resistance has been reported in Brazilian field populations of this pest species, and one resistant population that was used in this study was subjected to an additional seven generations of selection for spinosad resistance reaching levels over 180,000-fold. Inheritance studies indicated that spinosad resistance is monogenic, incompletely recessive and autosomal with high heritability (h2 = 0.71). Spinosad resistance was unstable without selection pressure with a negative rate of change in the resistance level ( = −0.51) indicating an associated adaptive cost. Esterases and cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenases titration decreased with spinosad selection, indicating that these detoxification enzymes are not the underlying resistance mechanism. Furthermore, the cross-resistance spectrum was restricted to the insecticide spinetoram, another spinosyn, suggesting that altered target site may be the mechanism involved. Therefore, the suspension of spinosyn use against the tomato borer would be a useful component in spinosad resistance management for this species. Spinosad use against this species in introduced areas should be carefully monitored to

  19. Transcriptome analysis of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne incognita)-infected tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) roots reveals complex gene expression profiles and metabolic networks of both host and nematode during susceptible and resistance responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shukla, Neha; Yadav, Rachita; Kaur, Pritam

    2017-01-01

    plants and two infection time intervals from resistant plants, grown under soil conditions. Differentially expressed genes during susceptible (1827-tomato, 462-RKN) and resistance (25-tomato, 160-RKN) interactions were identified. In susceptible responses, tomato genes involved in cell wall structure......, development, primary and secondary metabolites and defense signalling pathways along with RKN genes involved in host parasitism, development and defense are discussed. In resistance responses, tomato genes involved in secondary metabolite and hormone-mediated defense responses along with RKN genes involved...

  20. Identification of I-7 expands the repertoire of genes for resistance to Fusarium wilt in tomato to three resistance gene classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Cendales, Yvonne; Catanzariti, Ann-Maree; Baker, Barbara; Mcgrath, Des J; Jones, David A

    2016-04-01

    The tomato I-3 and I-7 genes confer resistance to Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) race 3 and were introgressed into the cultivated tomato, Solanum lycopersicum, from the wild relative Solanum pennellii. I-3 has been identified previously on chromosome 7 and encodes an S-receptor-like kinase, but little is known about I-7. Molecular markers have been developed for the marker-assisted breeding of I-3, but none are available for I-7. We used an RNA-seq and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis approach to map I-7 to a small introgression of S. pennellii DNA (c. 210 kb) on chromosome 8, and identified I-7 as a gene encoding a leucine-rich repeat receptor-like protein (LRR-RLP), thereby expanding the repertoire of resistance protein classes conferring resistance to Fol. Using an eds1 mutant of tomato, we showed that I-7, like many other LRR-RLPs conferring pathogen resistance in tomato, is EDS1 (Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1) dependent. Using transgenic tomato plants carrying only the I-7 gene for Fol resistance, we found that I-7 also confers resistance to Fol races 1 and 2. Given that Fol race 1 carries Avr1, resistance to Fol race 1 indicates that I-7-mediated resistance, unlike I-2- or I-3-mediated resistance, is not suppressed by Avr1. This suggests that Avr1 is not a general suppressor of Fol resistance in tomato, leading us to hypothesize that Avr1 may be acting against an EDS1-independent pathway for resistance activation. The identification of I-7 has allowed us to develop molecular markers for marker-assisted breeding of both genes currently known to confer Fol race 3 resistance (I-3 and I-7). Given that I-7-mediated resistance is not suppressed by Avr1, I-7 may be a useful addition to I-3 in the tomato breeder's toolbox. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Expression and characterization of a soluble form of tomato spotted wilt virus glycoprotein GN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Anna E; Ullman, Diane E; German, Thomas L

    2004-12-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), a member of the Tospovirus genus within the Bunyaviridae, is an economically important plant pathogen with a worldwide distribution. TSWV is transmitted to plants via thrips (Thysanoptera: Thripidae), which transmit the virus in a persistent propagative manner. The envelope glycoproteins, G(N) and G(C), are critical for the infection of thrips, but they are not required for the initial infection of plants. Thus, it is assumed that the envelope glycoproteins play important roles in the entry of TSWV into the insect midgut, the first site of infection. To directly test the hypothesis that G(N) plays a role in TSWV acquisition by thrips, we expressed and purified a soluble, recombinant form of the G(N) protein (G(N)-S). The expression of G(N)-S allowed us to examine the function of G(N) in the absence of other viral proteins. We detected specific binding to thrips midguts when purified G(N)-S was fed to thrips in an in vivo binding assay. The TSWV nucleocapsid protein and human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B did not bind to thrips midguts, indicating that the G(N)-S-thrips midgut interaction is specific. TSWV acquisition inhibition assays revealed that thrips that were concomitantly fed purified TSWV and G(N)-S had reduced amounts of virus in their midguts compared to thrips that were fed TSWV only. Our findings that G(N)-S binds to larval thrips guts and decreases TSWV acquisition provide evidence that G(N) may serve as a viral ligand that mediates the attachment of TSWV to receptors displayed on the epithelial cells of the thrips midgut.

  2. Avaliação da resistência de acessos de tomateiro a tospovírus e a geminivírus Evaluation of tomato accessions for tospovirus and geminivirus resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Luiz Lourenção

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Treze linhagens avançadas e três cultivares de tomateiro foram avaliadas em condições de campo para resistência a tospovírus e a geminivírus, em Campinas (SP. O germoplasma avaliado compreendeu linhagens do grupo IAC e as cultivares Stevens, Franco e IPA-5. Um mesmo experimento foi instalado em duas épocas. Na primeira, o experimento foi conduzido de 12/2001 a 2/2002, e a única espécie de tospovírus incidente foi Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV. Na segunda época, de 7 a 9/2002, houve infecção por Tomato yellow vein streak virus (TYVSV, sendo a avaliação realizada mediante determinação da porcentagem de plantas infectadas e pela intensidade dos sintomas, medida por escala de notas. Não houve discriminação dos tratamentos com base no primeiro critério, mas o uso de notas permitiu a diferenciação do germoplasma, com destaque para a linhagem IAC-S3-16. Considerando-se ambas as épocas, confirmou-se a suscetibilidade de 'IPA-5' aos dois patógenos e demonstrou-se o comportamento de resistência de 'Franco' a TCSV e a TYVSV. Ainda deve ser destacado o desempenho das linhagens IAC-S3-54, IAC-S3-318, IAC-S4-39 e IAC-SVS-1, com baixas porcentagens de infecção por TCSV, e notas de sintomas de TYVSV próximas à média de 'Franco', caracterizando-se como promissoras para obtenção de cultivares com resistência aos dois vírus.Thirteen lines and three commercial tomato cultivars were screened for tospovirus and geminivirus resistance under field conditions, in Campinas, São Paulo State, Brazil. The germplasm comprised advanced IAC lines plus cultivars Stevens, Franco and IPA-5. The same experiment was carried out in two planting seasons. In the first (December 2001 to February 2002, only Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV occurred in the field. In the second (July to September 2002, Tomato yellow vein streak virus (TYVSV was identified in the experimental area, and the evaluation was carried out through counting of infected

  3. The nitrogen availability interferes with mycorrhiza-induced resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Sanchez-Bel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal plants are generally quite efficient in coping with environmental challenges. It has been shown that the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can confer resistance against root and foliar pathogens, although the molecular mechanisms underlying such mycorrhiza-induced resistance (MIR are poorly understood. Tomato plants colonized with the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis display enhanced resistance against the necrotrophic foliar pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Leaves from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM plants develop smaller necrotic lesions, mirrored also by a reduced levels of fungal biomass. A plethora of metabolic changes takes place in AMF colonized plants upon infection. Certain changes located in the oxylipin pathway indicate that several intermediaries are over-accumulated in the AM upon infection. AM plants react by accumulating higher levels of the vitamins folic acid and riboflavin, indolic derivatives and phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and chlorogenic acid. Transcriptional analysis support the key role played by the LOX pathway in the shoots associated with MIR against B. cinerea.Interestingly, plants that have suffered a short period of nitrogen starvation appear to react by reprogramming their metabolic and genetic responses by prioritizing abiotic stress tolerance. Consequently, plants subjected to a transient nitrogen depletion become more susceptible to B. cinerea. Under these experimental conditions, MIR is severely affected although still functional. Many metabolic and transcriptional responses which are accumulated or activated by MIR such NRT2 transcript induction and OPDA and most Trp and indolic derivatives accumulation during MIR were repressed or reduced when tomato plants were depleted of N for 48 h prior infection. These results highlight the beneficial roles of AMF in crop protection by promoting induced resistance not only under optimal nutritional conditions but also buffering the susceptibility

  4. CD40 ligand and tdTomato-armed vaccinia virus for induction of antitumor immune response and tumor imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parviainen, S; Ahonen, M; Diaconu, I; Hirvinen, M; Karttunen, Å; Vähä-Koskela, M; Hemminki, A; Cerullo, V

    2014-02-01

    Oncolytic vaccinia virus is an attractive platform for immunotherapy. Oncolysis releases tumor antigens and provides co-stimulatory danger signals. However, arming the virus can improve efficacy further. CD40 ligand (CD40L, CD154) can induce apoptosis of tumor cells and it also triggers several immune mechanisms. One of these is a T-helper type 1 (Th1) response that leads to activation of cytotoxic T-cells and reduction of immune suppression. Therefore, we constructed an oncolytic vaccinia virus expressing hCD40L (vvdd-hCD40L-tdTomato), which in addition features a cDNA expressing the tdTomato fluorochrome for detection of virus, potentially important for biosafety evaluation. We show effective expression of functional CD40L both in vitro and in vivo. In a xenograft model of bladder carcinoma sensitive to CD40L treatment, we show that growth of tumors was significantly inhibited by the oncolysis and apoptosis following both intravenous and intratumoral administration. In a CD40-negative model, CD40L expression did not add potency to vaccinia oncolysis. Tumors treated with vvdd-mCD40L-tdtomato showed enhanced efficacy in a syngenic mouse model and induced recruitment of antigen-presenting cells and lymphocytes at the tumor site. In summary, oncolytic vaccinia virus coding for CD40L mediates multiple antitumor effects including oncolysis, apoptosis and induction of Th1 type T-cell responses.

  5. Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Benefits Population Growth of the Q Biotype of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maluta, N K P; Garzo, E; Moreno, A; Lopes, J R S; Fereres, A

    2014-08-01

    Plant viruses can directly influence their insect vectors, and indirectly through their shared host plant, altering their behavior and performance in a mutualistic or rather antagonistic manner. One of the most studied begomovirus, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV), may also facilitate the expansion of its vector, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius). Considering the likely expansion of the disease and its major vector, we studied the direct and the indirect effects of a Mediterranean isolate of this virus (TYLCV-IL) on the biological performance of the Q biotype of B. tabaci. The following parameters were examined: development time and viability of nymphs, sex ratio, fecundity, and fertility and longevity. The results varied from positive to neutral depending on the parameter and the effect studied. TYLCV accelerated nymphal developmental and increased male longevity of B. tabaci when viruliferous insects developed on TYLCV-immune eggplants (direct effects). An indirect, positive effect of TYLCV-infected plants was observed on fecundity of B. tabaci, which laid more eggs on virus-infected than on noninfected tomato plants. Our results show that TYLCV enhances the population increase of its whitefly vector and that there is a high risk of rapid expansion of both the virus and its vector-the MED species of B. tabaci-into new areas when both agents interact together.

  6. Molecular Characterization of Tomato leaf curl Palampur virus and Pepper leaf curl betasatellite Naturally Infecting Pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namrata, Jaiswal; Saritha, R K; Datta, D; Singh, M; Dubey, R S; Rai, A B; Rai, M

    2010-10-01

    Pumpkin cultivation in India is affected by severe incidence of a yellow vein mosaic disease. Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus and Squash leaf curl China virus are known to be associated with this disease in India. We were able to identify a third begomovirus-Tomato leaf curl Palampur virus (ToLCPMV), from pumpkin showing typical symptoms of the disease at Varanasi based on the sequence of complete DNA-A genome of the virus. The complete DNA-A sequence of the virus shared more than 99% sequence identity with other ToLCPMV isolates available in the GenBank and clustered with them in the phylogenetic analysis. This betasatellite amplified from the same infected sample has been identified as Pepper leaf curl betasatellite (PepLCB) which also infects chilli in India. There was 92% sequence identity between the two isolates. This is the first report of natural infection of ToLCPMV on pumpkin and association of PepLCB with yellow vein mosaic disease of pumpkin in India.

  7. Determination of whether tomato spotted wilt virus replicates in Toxorhynchites amboinensis mosquitoes and the relatedness of this virus to phleboviruses (family Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Mitchell, C J; Hu, J S; Gonsalves, D; Calisher, C H

    1992-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has been reported to be morphologically, molecularly and structurally similar to viruses in the family Bunyaviridae. By various types of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and Western blot hybridizations, we tested TSWV with antibodies to 12 viruses in the Phlebovirus genus of this family. Serological relatedness was not found between TSWV and phleboviruses. However, one preparation of antibody to Arumowot virus reacted with a 53-kD protein from healthy plant extracts. Six-day-old adult Toxorhynchites amboinensis mosquitoes were inoculated with purified TSWV. Infectious virus was not detected in any of the injected insects during the 5-week test period. However, TSWV antigens were detected in these mosquitoes by ELISA at the original injected level for at least a week after injection. TSWV antigen concentration began to decrease thereafter, but remained at detectable levels for as long as 5 weeks after injection. However, there was no evidence that TSWV replicated in mosquitoes.

  8. Broad taxonomic characterization of Verticillium wilt resistance genes reveals an ancient origin of the tomato Ve1 immune receptor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Song, Yin; Zhang, Zhao; Seidl, Michael F.; Majer, Aljaz; Jakse, Jernej; Javornik, Branka; Thomma, Bart P.H.J.

    2017-01-01

    Plant-pathogenic microbes secrete effector molecules to establish themselves on their hosts, whereas plants use immune receptors to try and intercept such effectors in order to prevent pathogen colonization. The tomato cell surface-localized receptor Ve1 confers race-specific resistance against

  9. Genome Sequence of Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum Strains with Compatible and Incompatible Interactions with the Major Tomato Resistance Source Hawaii 7996.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albuquerque, Greecy M R; Souza, Elineide B; Silva, Adriano M F; Lopes, Carlos A; Boiteux, Leonardo S; Fonseca, Maria Esther de N

    2017-09-07

    We report here the complete genome sequences of two Ralstonia pseudosolanacearum strains, isolated from the warm northeast region of Brazil. They display divergent (compatible versus incompatible) interactions with the resistant tomato line Hawaii 7996. Polymorphisms were detected in a subset of effector genes that might be associated with these contrasting phenotypes. Copyright © 2017 Albuquerque et al.

  10. Loss of function of fatty acid desturase7 in tomato enhances basal aphid resistance in a salicylate-dependent manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivatives mediate induced resistance against caterpillars and other herbivores that cause tissue disruption. Far less is known about the role of jasmonates in plant interactions with phloem-feeding insects such as aphids. This study compared responses in tomato (Solanu...

  11. Detection of Tomato spotted wilt virus in its vector Frankliniella occidentalis by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Giovanna; Roggero, Piero; Tavella, Luciana

    2003-04-01

    A method for rapid and reliable detection of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) (Tospovirus, Bunyaviridae) in its vector Frankliniella occidentalis (Thysanoptera Thripidae) would be a useful tool for studying the epidemiology of this virus. A RT-PCR method developed for this purpose is reported. The method was tested on thrips involved in laboratory transmission trials and on thrips collected in the field, whose capability to transmit TSWV was checked previously by leaf disk assays. The RT-PCR results were consistent with the results obtained by the leaf disk assays. Among thrips involved in laboratory experiments, 97% of the adults that transmitted TSWV were positive by RT-PCR; as did some non-transmitter adults reacted, whereas among field-collected thrips only the individuals able to transmit were positive by RT-PCR. In addition, healthy thrips were allowed to feed as adults on virus-infected leaves for 48 h, and then examined by RT-PCR immediately or after starving or feeding on virus-free plants for various times, to determine if virus ingested (but not transmissible) was also detectable. The virus was detectable immediately after the feed or within 12 and 24 h for individuals starved or fed on virus-free plants, respectively, but not after those periods. Thus, the method could detect rapidly and reliably the virus in vectors from the field, providing 24 h of starving to avoid positive RT-PCR results from thrips simply carrying the virus.

  12. The N protein of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is associated with the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) in Capsicum chinense plants, a hypersensitive host to TSWV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovato, Fernanda Antinolfi; Inoue-Nagata, Alice Kazuko; Nagata, Tatsuya; de Avila, Antônio Carlos; Pereira, Luiz Alfredo Rodrigues; Resende, Renato Oliveira

    2008-11-01

    In sweet pepper, the Tsw gene, originally described in Capsicum chinense, has been widely used as an efficient gene for inducing a hypersensitivity response (HR) derived Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) resistance. Since previously reported studies suggested that the TSWV-S RNA mutation(s) are associated with the breakdown of Tsw mediated TSWV resistance in peppers, the TSWV genes N (structural nucleocapsid protein) and NS(S) (non-structural silencing suppressor protein) were cloned into a Potato virus X (PVX)-based expression vector, and inoculated into the TSWV-resistant C. chinense genotype, PI 159236, to identify the Tsw-HR viral elicitor. Typical HR-like chlorotic and necrotic lesions followed by leaf abscission were observed only in C. chinense plants inoculated with the PVX-N construct. Cytopathological analyses of these plants identified fragmented genomic DNA, indicative of programmed cell death (PCD), in mesophyll cell nuclei surrounding PVX-N-induced necrotic lesions. The other constructs induced only PVX-like symptoms without HR-like lesions and there were no microscopic signs of PCD. The mechanism of TSWV N-gene HR induction is apparently species specific as the N gene of a related tospovirus, Tomato chlorotic spot virus, was not a HR elicitor and did not cause PCD in infected cells.

  13. Loss of Function of FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 in Tomato Enhances Basal Aphid Resistance in a Salicylate-Dependent Manner1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Carlos A.; Arévalo-Soliz, Lirio M.; Jia, Lingling; Navarre, Duroy A.; Chen, Zhaorigetu; Howe, Gregg A.; Meng, Qing-Wei; Smith, Jonathon E.; Goggin, Fiona L.

    2012-01-01

    We report here that disruption of function of the ω-3 FATTY ACID DESATURASE7 (FAD7) enhances plant defenses against aphids. The suppressor of prosystemin-mediated responses2 (spr2) mutation in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which eliminates the function of FAD7, reduces the settling behavior, survival, and fecundity of the potato aphid (Macrosiphum euphorbiae). Likewise, the antisense suppression of LeFAD7 expression in wild-type tomato plants reduces aphid infestations. Aphid resistance in the spr2 mutant is associated with enhanced levels of salicylic acid (SA) and mRNA encoding the pathogenesis-related protein P4. Introduction of the Naphthalene/salicylate hydroxylase transgene, which suppresses SA accumulation, restores wild-type levels of aphid susceptibility to spr2. Resistance in spr2 is also lost when we utilize virus-induced gene silencing to suppress the expression of NONEXPRESSOR OF PATHOGENESIS-RELATED PROTEINS1 (NPR1), a positive regulator of many SA-dependent defenses. These results indicate that FAD7 suppresses defenses against aphids that are mediated through SA and NPR1. Although loss of function of FAD7 also inhibits the synthesis of jasmonate (JA), the effects of this desaturase on aphid resistance are not dependent on JA; other mutants impaired in JA synthesis (acx1) or perception (jai1-1) show wild-type levels of aphid susceptibility, and spr2 retains aphid resistance when treated with methyl jasmonate. Thus, FAD7 may influence JA-dependent defenses against chewing insects and SA-dependent defenses against aphids through independent effects on JA synthesis and SA signaling. The Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants Atfad7-2 and Atfad7-1fad8 also show enhanced resistance to the green peach aphid (Myzus persicae) compared with wild-type controls, indicating that FAD7 influences plant-aphid interactions in at least two plant families. PMID:22291202

  14. Tomato yellow vein streak virus: relationship with Bemisia tabaci biotype B and host range Tomato yellow vein streak virus: interação com a Bemisia tabaci biótipo B e gama de hospedeiros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Firmino

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The Tomato yellow vein streak virus (ToYVSV is a putative species of begomovirus, which was prevalent on tomato crops in São Paulo State, Brazil, until 2005. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the interaction between ToYVSV and its vector Bemisia tabaci biotype B and to identify alternative hosts for the virus. The minimum acquisition and inoculation access periods of ToYVSV by B. tabaci were 30 min and 10 min, respectively. Seventy five percent of tomato-test plants were infected when the acquisition and inoculation access periods were 24 h. The latent period of the virus in the insect was 16 h. The ToYVSV was retained by B. tabaci until 20 days after acquisition. First generation of adult whiteflies obtained from viruliferous females were virus free as shown by PCR analysis and did not transmit the virus to tomato plants. Out of 34 species of test-plants inoculated with ToYVSV only Capsicum annuum, Chenopodium amaranticolor, C. quinoa, Datura stramonium, Gomphrena globosa, Nicotiana clevelandii and N. tabacum cv. TNN were susceptible to infection. B. tabaci biotype B was able to acquire the virus from all these susceptible species, transmitting it to tomato plants.O Tomato yellow vein streak virus (ToYVSV é uma espécie putativa de begomovirus que infecta o tomateiro (Solanum lycopersicon em diversas regiões do Brasil onde se cultiva essa solanácea, sendo a espécie prevalente no estado de São Paulo até 2005. Estudou-se a interação do ToYVSV com a Bemisia tabaci biótipo B e identificaram-se hospedeiras alternativas deste vírus. Os períodos de acesso mínimo de aquisição (PAA e de inoculação (PAI foram de 30 min e 10 min, respectivamente. A porcentagem de plantas infectadas chegou até cerca de 75% após um PAA e PAI de 24 h. O período de latência do vírus no vetor foi de 16 horas. O ToYVSV foi retido pela B. tabaci até 20 dias após a aquisição do vírus. Não foi detectada transmissão do vírus para prog

  15. Characteristics of Cucumber mosaic virus-GTN and Resistance Evaluation of Chilli Pepper Cultivars to Two Cucumber mosaic virus Isolates

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    Gug-Seoun Choi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV is one of the most destructive viruses in chilli pepper. An isolate of CMV was obtained from the chilli pepper cv. Chungyang showing top necrosis symptom in 2013 and designated as CMV-GTN. CMV-GTN was compared with the well-characterized isolate, CMV-Ca-P1, by investigating their amino acid sequences of the coat protein (CP and biological reactions in several host plants. The CP of CMV-Ca-P1 composed of 217 amino acids but that of CMV-GTN composed of 218 amino acids by including additional valine in the 57th amino acid position. Amino acid sequence similarity of the CP gene among CMV-GTN and other CMV isolates recorded in the GeneBank database ranged from 96% to 99%. CMV-GTN was selected as a representative isolate to screen the resistance pepper cultivars to CMV because it was highly pathogenic to tomatoes and peppers upon biological assays. The virulence of CMV-GTN was tested on 135 pepper cultivars which has been bred in Korea and compared with that of CMV-Ca-P1. Only the cv. Premium was resistant and three cvs. Hot star, Kaiser, and Good choice were moderately resistant to CMV-GTN, whereas two cvs. Baerotta and Kaiser were resistant to CMV-Ca-P1.

  16. Characterization of a New Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Isolates Found in Hippeastrum hybridum (Hort. Plants in Poland

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    Berniak Hanna

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Two Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV isolates H1 and H2 found in Hippeastrum hybridum plants were characterized based on biological, serological, and molecular properties. Virus isolates showed differences in symptom expression – H1 isolate displayed severe necrotic spots and patterns, whereas mild mosaic symptoms were observed on H2-infected H. hybridum plants. Both TSWV isolates showed comparable reactivity with TSWV-specific antibodies and they induced similar symptoms on herbaceous indicator plants, but some differences between these isolates were detected at the nucleotide sequence level of genomic S and M ssRNAs segment fragments. The nucleotide sequences encoding nucleocapsid (N and nonstructural (NSs and NSm proteins showed 98.2%, 97.5%, and 96.5% identity, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of N and NSs sequences conducted for tested isolates and 31 TSWV isolates included for comparison revealed that H1 and H2 isolates fell into the same cluster and they were grouped together with isolates found previously in different vegetables, ornamentals, and weeds. When NSm ORF was analyzed, the tested isolates formed a separate cluster: H1 isolate showed the highest affinity with TSWV isolates infecting chrysanthemum and pepper plants, whereas H2 isolate was most closely related to other virus isolates found in sweet pepper and tomatoes. These results indicate that both isolates were reassortants between different virus isolates, and represented two novel genetic patterns of TSWV.

  17. Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici induces distinct transcriptome reprogramming in resistant and susceptible isogenic tomato lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Daniele; Ferriello, Francesca; Puopolo, Gerardo; Zoina, Astolfo; D'Esposito, Daniela; Tardella, Luca; Ferrarini, Alberto; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella

    2016-02-27

    Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici (FORL) is one of the most destructive necrotrophic pathogens affecting tomato crops, causing considerable field and greenhouse yield losses. Despite such major economic impact, little is known about the molecular mechanisms regulating Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. radicis-lycopersici resistance in tomato. A transcriptomic experiment was carried out in order to investigate the main mechanisms of FORL response in resistant and susceptible isogenic tomato lines. Microarray analysis at 15 DPI (days post inoculum) revealed a distinct gene expression pattern between the two genotypes in the inoculated vs non-inoculated conditions. A model of plant response both for compatible and incompatible reactions was proposed. In particular, in the incompatible interaction an activation of defense genes related to secondary metabolite production and tryptophan metabolism was observed. Moreover, maintenance of the cell osmotic potential after the FORL challenging was mediated by a dehydration-induced protein. As for the compatible interaction, activation of an oxidative burst mediated by peroxidases and a cytochrome monooxygenase induced cell degeneration and necrosis. Our work allowed comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of the tomato-FORL interaction. The result obtained emphasizes a different transcriptional reaction between the resistant and the susceptible genotype to the FORL challenge. Our findings could lead to the improvement in disease control strategies.

  18. Transcriptome changes associated with Tomato spotted wilt virus infection in various life stages of its thrips vector, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Anita; Champagne, Donald E; Culbreath, Albert K; Rotenberg, Dorith; Whitfield, Anna E; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu

    2017-08-01

    Persistent propagative viruses maintain intricate interactions with their arthropod vectors. In this study, we investigated the transcriptome-level responses associated with a persistent propagative phytovirus infection in various life stages of its vector using an Illumina HiSeq sequencing platform. The pathosystem components included a Tospovirus, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), its insect vector, Frankliniella fusca (Hinds), and a plant host, Arachis hypogaea (L.). We assembled (de novo) reads from three developmental stage groups of virus-exposed and non-virus-exposed F. fusca into one transcriptome consisting of 72 366 contigs and identified 1161 differentially expressed (DE) contigs. The number of DE contigs was greatest in adults (female) (562) when compared with larvae (first and second instars) (395) and pupae (pre- and pupae) (204). Upregulated contigs in virus-exposed thrips had blastx annotations associated with intracellular transport and virus replication. Upregulated contigs were also assigned blastx annotations associated with immune responses, including apoptosis and phagocytosis. In virus-exposed larvae, Blast2GO analysis identified functional groups, such as multicellular development with downregulated contigs, while reproduction, embryo development and growth were identified with upregulated contigs in virus-exposed adults. This study provides insights into differences in transcriptome-level responses modulated by TSWV in various life stages of an important vector, F. fusca.

  19. The Effects of Root-knot Nematode Infection and Mi-mediated Nematode Resistance in Tomato on Plant Fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbett, Brandon P.; Jia, Lingling; Sayler, Ronald J.; Arevalo-Soliz, Lirio Milenka

    2011-01-01

    The Mi-1.2 resistance gene in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) confers resistance against several species of root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.). This study examined the impact of M. javanica on the reproductive fitness of near-isogenic tomato cultivars with and without Mi-1.2 under field and greenhouse conditions. Surprisingly, neither nematode inoculation or host plant resistance impacted the yield of mature fruits in field microplots (inoculum=8,000 eggs/plant), or fruit or seed production in a follow-up greenhouse bioassay conducted with a higher inoculum level (20,000 eggs/plant). However, under heavy nematode pressure (200,000 eggs/plant), greenhouse-grown plants carrying Mi-1.2 had more than ten-fold greater fruit production than susceptible plants and nearly forty-fold greater estimated lifetime seed production, confirming prior reports of the benefits of Mi-1.2. In all cases Mi-mediated resistance significantly reduced nematode reproduction. These results indicated that tomato can utilize tolerance mechanisms to compensate for moderate levels of nematode infection, but that the Mi-1.2 resistance gene confers a dramatic fitness benefit under heavy nematode pressure. No significant cost of resistance was detected in the absence of nematode infection. PMID:22791916

  20. Effects of Biochar Amendment on Tomato Bacterial Wilt Resistance and Soil Microbial Amount and Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial wilt is a serious soilborne disease of Solanaceae crops which is caused by Ralstonia solanacearum. The important role of biochar in enhancing disease resistance in plants has been verified; however, the underlying mechanism remains not fully understood. In this study, two different biochars, made from peanut shell (BC1 and wheat straw (BC2, were added to Ralstonia solanacearum-infected soil to explore the interrelation among biochar, tomato bacterial wilt, and soil microbial properties. The results showed that both BC1 and BC2 treatments significantly reduced the disease index of bacterial wilt by 28.6% and 65.7%, respectively. The populations of R. solanacearum in soil were also significantly decreased by biochar application. Ralstonia solanacearum infection significantly reduced the densities of soil bacteria and actinomycetes and increased the ratio of soil fungi/bacteria in the soil. By contrast, BC1 and BC2 addition to pathogen-infected soil significantly increased the densities of soil bacteria and actinomycetes but decreased the density of fungi and the ratios of soil fungi/bacteria and fungi/actinomycetes. Biochar treatments also increased soil neutral phosphatase and urease activity. Furthermore, higher metabolic capabilities of microorganisms by biochar application were found at 96 and 144 h in Biolog EcoPlates. These results suggest that both peanut and wheat biochar amendments were effective in inhibiting tomato bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum. The results suggest a relationship between the disease resistance of the plants and the changes in soil microbial population densities and activity.

  1. Cucumber mosaic virus associated RNA 5: causal agent for tomato necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaper, J M; Waterworth, H E

    1977-04-22

    A small replicating RNA, encapsidated with and dependent on, but not part of the viral genome, modifies disease expression depending on the host. In tomato plants, it causes a lethal necrotic disease which is probably the same as that which, in 1972, destroyed most of the field tomato crop in large regions of the French Alsace.

  2. Ryanodine receptor point mutations confer diamide insecticide resistance in tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roditakis, Emmanouil; Steinbach, Denise; Moritz, Gerald; Vasakis, Emmanouil; Stavrakaki, Marianna; Ilias, Aris; García-Vidal, Lidia; Martínez-Aguirre, María Del Rosario; Bielza, Pablo; Morou, Evangelia; Silva, Jefferson E; Silva, Wellington M; Siqueira, Ηerbert A A; Iqbal, Sofia; Troczka, Bartlomiej J; Williamson, Martin S; Bass, Chris; Tsagkarakou, Anastasia; Vontas, John; Nauen, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Insect ryanodine receptors (RyR) are the molecular target-site for the recently introduced diamide insecticides. Diamides are particularly active on Lepidoptera pests, including tomato leafminer, Tuta absoluta (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae). High levels of diamide resistance were recently described in some European populations of T. absoluta, however, the mechanisms of resistance remained unknown. In this study the molecular basis of diamide resistance was investigated in a diamide resistant strain from Italy (IT-GELA-SD4), and additional resistant field populations collected in Greece, Spain and Brazil. The genetics of resistance was investigated by reciprocally crossing strain IT-GELA-SD4 with a susceptible strain and revealed an autosomal incompletely recessive mode of inheritance. To investigate the possible role of target-site mutations as known from diamondback moth (Plutella xylostella), we sequenced respective domains of the RyR gene of T. absoluta. Genotyping of individuals of IT-GELA-SD4 and field-collected strains showing different levels of diamide resistance revealed the presence of G4903E and I4746M RyR target-site mutations. These amino acid substitutions correspond to those recently described for diamide resistant diamondback moth, i.e. G4946E and I4790M. We also detected two novel mutations, G4903V and I4746T, in some of the resistant T. absoluta strains. Radioligand binding studies with thoracic membrane preparations of the IT-GELA-SD4 strain provided functional evidence that these mutations alter the affinity of the RyR to diamides. In combination with previous work on P. xylostella our study highlights the importance of position G4903 (G4946 in P. xylostella) of the insect RyR in defining sensitivity to diamides. The discovery of diamide resistance mutations in T. absoluta populations of diverse geographic origin has serious implications for the efficacy of diamides under applied conditions. The implementation of appropriate resistance

  3. Inhibitory effect of Distamycin-A and a pyrazino-pyrazine derivative on tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Fazio, G; Kudamatsu, M

    1983-08-01

    Distamycin-A hydrochloride, a synthetic antibiotic, and 2,3-dihydroxy-6-bromo-pyrazino (2,3-beta) pyrazine derivative, were used against tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in tobacco plants. The drugs were applied to the leaves at concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/l. The results showed that both drugs delayed virus spread within the plant, retarding the appearance of systemic symptoms. A virus recovery test, carried out on primary leaves of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. Manteiga, showed that TSWV replication was markedly inhibited by the pyrazino-pyrazine derivative at concentrations of 200 and 400 mg/l and, to a lower extent, by Dystamycin-A at 400 mg/l.

  4. Allelic Tests and Sequence Analysis of Three Genes for Resistance to Xanthomonas perforans Race T3 in Tomato

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    Zhao Baimei

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Three crosses, Hawaii7981 × PI128216, Hawaii7981 × LA1589, and PI128216 × LA1589, were made to develop F2 populations for testing allelism among three genes Xv3, Rx4, and RxLA1589 conferring resistance to bacterial spot caused by Xanthomonas perforans race T3 in tomato. Each population consisted of 535–1 655 individuals. An infiltration method was used to inoculate the leaves of the parental and F2 plants as well as the susceptible control OH88119 for detecting hypersensitive resistance (HR. The results showed that all the tomato plants except OH88119 had HR to race T3, indicating that Xv3, Rx4, and RxLA1589 were allelic genes. Genomic DNA fragments of the Rx4 alleles from Hawaii7981, PI128216, and LA1589 were amplified using gene-specific primers and sequenced. No sequence variation was observed in the coding region of Rx4 in the three resistant lines. Based on the published map positions of these loci as well as the allelic tests and sequence data obtained in this study, we speculated that Xv3, Rx4, and RxLA1589 were the same gene. The results will provide useful information for understanding the mechanism of resistance to race T3 and developing resistant tomato varieties.

  5. Ozone and Eusarium: effects on the growth and development of a wilt-susceptible tomato and a wilt-resistant tomato

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manning, W.J.; Vardaro, P.M.

    1976-01-01

    Seedlings of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cultivars Rutgers (Fusarium-susceptible) and Supersonic (Fusarium-resistant) were transplanted into 20 cm diam. pots of either steamed soil or steamed soil infested with Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (race 1) and grown for 45 days in 2 paired greenhouses. One contained charcoal-filtered air and the other filtered air plus ozone at 0.06-0.08 ppm for 6 hr/day 5 day/week. Slight to moderate white stippling was observed on the older leaves of all plants exposed to ozone. Fusarium wilt symptoms were noted in Rutgers plants grown in filtered air 14-18 days before they were noted in comparable plants exposed to ozone. Symptom expression and death of plants progressed more rapidly in filtered air. Ozone retarded growth and delayed wilt symptoms in Rutgers plants. Supersonic plants did not develop wilt symptoms, but fusarium significantly reduced (P=0.05) root and top dry weights of plants grown in filtered air. Plant height and root and top dry weights for Supersonic plants in Fusarium-infested soil were further significantly (P-0.05) reduced by ozone. Ozone and Fusarium, singly or together in an additive manner, significantly reduced the growth and development of a Fusarium-resistant tomato.

  6. Reação de acessos de Lycopersicon spp. a um isolado de Potato Virus Y (PVYº de tomateiro Reaction of accesses of Lycopersicon spp. to an isolate of Potato Virus Y (PVYº in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Regina Luz Palazzo

    2008-01-01

    -ELISA, pela análise do χ2 utilizando-se a proporção de plantas sintomáticas e assintomáticas, com resultados positivos ou que não manifestaram sintomas e reagiram negativamente, em PTA-ELISA, constituindo, portanto fontes potenciais de genes de resistência para o PVY em tomate.Samples of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill ‘Alambra’ were collected in commercial fields of Elias Fausto, Monte-Mor and Mogi-Guaçu, SP. The plants with virus-like symptoms, especially yellow mosaic were submitted, to biological and serological identification tests. For biological tests, the host range was determined by indicator and differential plants in the family Chenopodiaceae and Solanaceae. The serological identification was made by PTA-ELISA with polyclonal antiserum against Tospovirus, Tobamovirus, Potyvirus and Cucumovirus and by DAS-ELISA, by using monoclonal antibodies against PVY common strain (PVYº, PVY chlorotic strain (PVY C and PVY necrotic strain (PVY N. All the tested samples showed positive reaction in PTA-ELISA with antiserum against PVY and negative reaction with the antiserum against the remaining viruses. In DAS-ELISA, positive reaction occurred with PVY common strain. Among the host plants, Chenopodium amaranticolor reacted with local lesions, while N. glutinosa and N. tabacum ‘WB’ showed systemic mosaic and the ‘Alambra’ reacted with yellow mosaic, while Datura stramonium, D. metel and C. annuum ‘Magda’ were not infected. The reaction on the differential host C. annuum ‘Magda’ permitted to identify the PVY pathotype 1 in all the 19 samples. To evaluate the reaction of the 19 accesses of Lycopersicon spp. from the IAC active bank of germoplasm, one of the samples of tomato ‘Alambra’ from Elias Fausto was inoculated on tomato accesses and also, the variety ‘Alambra’ was used as a positive control. The experiments delineation was randomized and the plant reaction was evaluated by presence and type of symptoms, and also by positive and

  7. [Advances in genetic engineering of plant virus resistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxim, Yakupjan; Ismayil, Asigul; Wang, Yunjing; Liu, Yule

    2015-06-01

    Plant virus is one of the most economical devastating microorganisms for global agriculture. Although several strategies are useful for controlling viral infection, such as resistant breeds cultivation, chemical bactericides treatment, blocking the infection source, tissue detoxification and field sanitation, viral disease is still a problem in agricultural production. Genetic engineering approach offers various options for introducing virus resistance into crop plants. This paper reviews the current strategies of developing virus resistant transgenic plants.

  8. Genetic diversity and distribution of a distinct strain of Chili leaf curl virus and associated betasatellite infecting tomato and pepper in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Akhtar J; Akhtar, Sohail; Al-Zaidi, Amal M; Singh, Achuit K; Briddon, Rob W

    2013-10-01

    Tomato and pepper are widely grown in Oman for local consumption. A countrywide survey was conducted during 2010-2011 to collect samples and assess the diversity of begomoviruses associated with leaf curl disease of tomato and pepper. A virus previously only identified on the Indian subcontinent, chili leaf curl virus (ChLCV), was found associated with tomato and pepper diseases in all vegetable grown areas of Oman. Some of the infected plant samples were also found to contain a betasatellite. A total of 19 potentially full-length begomovirus and eight betasatellite clones were sequenced. The begomovirus clones showed >96% nucleotide sequence identity, showing them to represent a single species. Comparisons to sequences available in the databases showed the highest levels of nucleotide sequence identity (88.0-91.1%) to isolates of the "Pakistan" strain of ChLCV (ChLCV-PK), indicating the virus from Oman to be a distinct strain, for which the name Oman strain (ChLCV-OM) is proposed. An analysis for recombination showed ChLCV-OM likely to have originated by recombination between ChLCV-PK (the major parent), pepper leaf curl Lahore virus and a third strain of ChLCV. The betasatellite sequences obtained were shown to have high levels of identity to isolates of tomato leaf curl betasatellite (ToLCB) previous shown to be present in Oman. For the disease in tomato Koch's postulates were satisfied by Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation of virus and betasatellites clones. This showed the symptoms induced by the virus in the presence of the betasatellite to be enhanced, although viral DNA levels were not affected. ChLCV-OM is the fourth begomovirus identified in tomato in Oman and the first in Capsicum. The significance of these findings is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of seed treatment by cold plasma on the resistance of tomato to Ralstonia solanacearum (Bacterial Wilt.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiafeng Jiang

    Full Text Available This study investigated the effect of cold plasma seed treatment on tomato bacterial wilt, caused by Ralstonia solanacearum (R. solanacearum, and the regulation of resistance mechanisms. The effect of cold plasma of 80W on seed germination, plant growth, nutrient uptake, disease severity, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 concentration and activities of peroxidase (POD; EC 1.11.1.7, polyphenol oxidase (PPO; EC 1.10.3.2 and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL; EC 4.3.1.5 were examined in tomato plants. Plasma treatment increased tomato resistance to R. solanacearum with an efficacy of 25.0%. Plasma treatment significantly increased both germination and plant growth in comparison with the control treatment, and plasma-treated plants absorbed more calcium and boron than the controls. In addition, H2O2 levels in treated plants rose faster and reached a higher peak, at 2.579 µM gFW-1, 140% greater than that of the control. Activities of POD (421.3 U gFW-1, PPO (508.8 U gFW-1 and PAL (707.3 U gFW-1 were also greater in the treated plants than in the controls (103.0 U gFW-1, 166.0 U gFW-1 and 309.4 U gFW-1, respectively. These results suggest that plasma treatment affects the regulation of plant growth, H2O2 concentration, and POD, PPO and PAL activity in tomato, resulting in an improved resistance to R. solanacearum. Consequently, cold plasma seed treatment has the potential to control tomato bacterial wilt caused by R. solanacearum.

  10. Occurrence of copper-resistant strains and a shift in Xanthomonas spp. causing tomato bacterial spot in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Pervaiz A; Khabbaz, Salah Eddin; Weselowski, Brian; Zhang, Liang

    2015-10-01

    Field strains of tomato bacterial spot pathogen (Xanthomonas euvesicatoria, X. vesicatoria, X. perforans, and X. gardneri) were characterized for sensitivity to copper and species composition. A total of 98 strains were isolated from symptomatic leaf and fruit samples collected from 18 tomato fields in Ontario. In greenhouse pathogenicity tests, most of the field strains caused severe (37 strains) to highly severe (23 strains) symptoms on 'Bonny Best' tomato plants, whereas 38 strains caused moderate symptoms. In MGY agar plates amended with various concentrations of copper sulfate, 11 strains were completely sensitive (no growth) and 87 strains were resistant (grew on 1.0 mmol/L or higher copper concentration). PCR analysis of the hrp gene cluster followed by restriction digestion with HaeIII and sequencing identified X. gardneri (35 strains) and X. perforans (26 strains) as predominant species and X. euvesicatoria and X. vesicatoria as less common species in Ontario tomato fields. Separation of field strains into various species was also confirmed with starch hydrolysis activity on agar medium. Moreover, 72 field strains produced shiny greenish-yellow colonies surrounded by a milky zone on xanthomonad differential (Xan-D) medium, and the colonies of 26 strains did not produce a milky zone. Thirty-four strains could not be clustered into any species and 25 of those strains were negative for the hrp gene PCR and also did not produce a milky zone around colonies on Xan-D medium. Our results suggest a widespread existence of copper-resistant strains and an increase in X. perforans strains of bacterial spot pathogen in Ontario. This information on copper resistance and species composition within bacterial spot pathogens in Ontario will be helpful for developing effective disease management strategies, making cultivar selection, and breeding new tomato cultivars.

  11. Expression of Rice Chitinase Gene in Genetically Engineered Tomato Confers Enhanced Resistance to Fusarium Wilt and Early Blight

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    Nyla Jabeen

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This is the first study reporting the evaluation of transgenic lines of tomato harboring rice chitinase (RCG3 gene for resistance to two important fungal pathogens Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol causing fusarium wilt and Alternaria solani causing early blight (EB. In this study, three transgenic lines TL1, TL2 and TL3 of tomato Solanum lycopersicum Mill. cv. Riogrande genetically engineered with rice chitinase (RCG 3 gene and their R1 progeny was tested for resistance to Fol by root dip method and A. solani by detached leaf assay. All the R0 transgenic lines were highly resistant to these fungal pathogens compared to non-transgenic control plants. The pattern of segregation of three independent transformant for Fol and A. solani was also studied. Mendelian segregation was observed in transgenic lines 2 and 3 while it was not observed in transgenic line 1. It was concluded that introduction of chitinase gene in susceptible cultivar of tomato not only enhanced the resistance but was stably inherited in transgenic lines 2 and 3.

  12. Breeding Beans with Bruchid and Multiple Virus Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are worldwide threats to dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production. Beans planted in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean also need resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). The common bean weev...

  13. Development of Rapid Immune-gold Strip Kit for On-Site Diagnosis of Tomato spotted wilt virus

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    Ju-Yeon Yoon

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A rapid, user-friendly and simple immune-chromatographic dipstick kit named ‘rapid immune-gold strip’ (RIGS kit was developed in a novel single strip format to detect on-site detection of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV. Immunoglobulin G (IgG from polyclonal antisera raised in rabbits against TSWV was purified through protein- A affinity chromatography and then the purified TSWV-IgG was conjugated to colloidal gold nano-particles which served as a test line on nitrocellulose membrane. Protein A that non-specifically binds to TSWV antibody was used as a control line on the same strip. The diagnosis process with the TSWV-RIGS involves simply grinding the suspect plant sample in a bag that contains the extraction buffer and inserting the strip the bag. Results can be seen in 2-5 minutes. The flow of the complexes of gold particles coated with TSWV-IgG and a crude sap from TSWV-infected pepper, tobacco and tomato plants resulted in intensive color formed on the test lines proportional to the concentrations of TSWV. The RIGS-TSWV kit did not show any cross-reactions against other tomato-infecting viruses unrelated to TSWV. These results indicate that the TSWV-RIGS kit is highly sensitive and is not required for laboratory training and experience prior to testing. The TSWV-RIGS kit is suitable for on-site detection of suspect TSWV-infected plants as well as for laboratory diagnosis.

  14. The nucleocapsid protein of an enveloped plant virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus, facilitates long-distance movement of Tobacco mosaic virus hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqiang; Zhang, Chao; Li, Weimin

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the potential role(s) of the nucleocapsid (N) protein of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), the open reading frame for the N protein was expressed from a Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based vector encoding only the TMV replicase proteins. In the absence of other TSWV-encoded proteins, the transiently expressed N protein facilitated long-distance movement of the TMV-based hybrids in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana [NB-MP(+)] expressing movement protein of TMV, thus providing the functional demonstration of the N protein in long-distance RNA movement. Removal of the N-terminal 39 amino acids (N-NΔ39), the C-terminal 26 amino acids (N-CΔ26) or both of them (N-NΔ39CΔ26) abolished the long-distance movement function, indicating the essential role of both N- and C-terminus. In contrast, alanine substitution of the phenylalanines at positions 242 and 246 (N242/262A), two crucial amino acids for homotypic interaction of the N protein, had little effect, suggesting that the N protein could function in long-distance movement in the form of monomers. In addition, both the wild type N and the alanine mutant N242/262A hardly induced local symptoms in NB-MP(+) plants and TMV-MP transgenic N. tabacum cv. Xanthi. The deletion mutants N-NΔ39, N-CΔ26 and N-NΔ39CΔ26, however, induced apparent symptoms of necrotic ringspots, necrosis or chlorotic spots in all inoculated leaves. On the basis of these findings, the potential role of N during the TSWV infection was discussed. To our knowledge, this is the first report that the N protein of an enveloped plant virus functioned in long-distance movement. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Application of cellular breeding method to assess the quality of tomato varieties (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. and their resistance to bacterial diseases’ agents

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    Ю. В. Коломієць

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Assessing under in vitro conditions the degree of resistance to agents of bacterial diseases of tomato varie­ties which are included into the State Register of plant varieties suitable for dissemination in Ukraine in 2015. Defining integrated biochemical indices of the quality of tomato fruits with different resistance to agents of bacterial disea­ses. Methods. In the course of performance biotechnological methods were used to select callus cells with increased resistance to the agents of bacterial diseases, biochemical ones – determine qualitative and quantitative indicators of the tomato fruit quality, statistical ones – analyse experimental data. Results. Studied tomato varieties of Ukrainian breeding had different resistance to warm cells of agents of bacterial speck, bacterial black spot and to exopolysaccharides of bacterial canker agents. ‘Chaika’, ‘Klondaik’, ‘Zoreslav’, ‘Flandriia’, ‘Legin’, ‘Oberig’, ‘Atlasnyi’, ‘Gospodar’ and ‘Kimmeriiets’ tomato varieties were distinguished by high palatability traits and quality. Conclusions. It was found that tomato varieties ‘Chaika’, ‘Klondaik’ and ‘Zoreslav’ are resistant to bacterial canker, bacterial speck and bacterial black spot; ‘Flandriia’ and ‘Legin’ – to bacterial black spot, ‘Oberig’, ‘Atlasnyi’, ‘Gospodar’ and ‘Kimmeriiets’ – to bacterial speck.

  16. A longevity assurance gene homolog of tomato mediates resistance to Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici toxins and fumonisin B1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandwagt, Bas F.; Mesbah, Laurent A.; Takken, Frank L. W.; Laurent, Pascal L.; Kneppers, Tarcies J. A.; Hille, Jacques; Nijkamp, H. John J.

    2000-01-01

    The phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici (AAL) produces toxins that are essential for pathogenicity of the fungus on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). AAL toxins and fumonisins of the unrelated fungus Fusarium moniliforme are sphinganine-analog mycotoxins (SAMs), which cause inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis in vitro and are toxic for some plant species and mammalian cell lines. Sphingolipids can be determinants in the proliferation or death of cells. We investigated the tomato Alternaria stem canker (Asc) locus, which mediates resistance to SAM-induced apoptosis. Until now, mycotoxin resistance of plants has been associated with detoxification and altered affinity or absence of the toxin targets. Here we show that SAM resistance of tomato is determined by Asc-1, a gene homologous to the yeast longevity assurance gene LAG1 and that susceptibility is associated with a mutant Asc-1. Because both sphingolipid synthesis and LAG1 facilitate endocytosis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored proteins in yeast, we propose a role for Asc-1 in a salvage mechanism of sphingolipid-depleted plant cells. PMID:10781105

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of Tomato mosaic virus from Hemerocallis sp. and Impatiens hawkeri Análise filogenética de Tomato mosaic virus isolado de Hemerocallis sp. e Impatiens hawkeri

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    Lígia Maria Lembo Duarte

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The culture and commercialization of ornamental plants have considerably increased in the last years. To supply the commercial demand, several Hemerocallis and Impatiens varieties have been bred for appreciated qualities such as flowers with a diversity of shapes and colors. With the aim of characterizing the tobamovirus isolated from Hemerocallis sp. (tobamo-H and Impatiens hawkeri (tobamo-I from the USA and São Paulo, respectively, as well as to establish phylogenetic relationships between them and other Tobamovirus species, the viruses were submitted to RNA extraction, RT-PCR amplification, coat-protein gene sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. Comparison of tobamovirus homologous sequences yielded values superior to 98.5% of identity with Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV isolates at the nucleotide level. In relation to tobamo-H, 100% of identity with ToMV from tomatoes from Australia and Peru was found. Based on maximum likelihood (ML analysis it was suggested that tobamo-H and tobamo-I share a common ancestor with ToMV, Tobacco mosaic virus, Odontoglossum ringspot virus and Pepper mild mottle virus. The tree topology reconstructed under ML methodology shows a monophyletic group, supported by 100% of bootstrap, consisting of various ToMV isolates from different hosts, including some ornamentals, from different geographical locations. The results indicate that Hemerocallis sp. and I. hawkeri are infected by ToMV. This is the first report of the occurrence of this virus in ornamental species in Brazil.O cultivo e comercialização de plantas ornamentais têm aumentado consideravelmente nos últimos anos. Para suprir a demanda comercial, diversas variedades de Hemerocallis sp. e Impatiens hawkeri têm sido desenvolvidas pelas qualidades apreciáveis como flores com diversidade de formas e cores. Com o objetivo de caracterizar o tobamovirus isolado de Hemerocallis sp. (tobamo-H e Impatiens hawkeri (tobamo-I provenientes dos EUA e São Paulo

  18. The NSs protein of tomato spotted wilt virus is required for persistent infection and transmission by Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaria, P; Bosco, L; Vallino, M; Ciuffo, M; Mautino, G C; Tavella, L; Turina, M

    2014-05-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is the type member of tospoviruses (genus Tospovirus), plant-infecting viruses that cause severe damage to ornamental and vegetable crops. Tospoviruses are transmitted by thrips in the circulative propagative mode. We generated a collection of NSs-defective TSWV isolates and showed that TSWV coding for truncated NSs protein could not be transmitted by Frankliniella occidentalis. Quantitative reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunostaining of individual insects detected the mutant virus in second-instar larvae and adult insects, demonstrating that insects could acquire and accumulate the NSs-defective virus. Nevertheless, adults carried a significantly lower viral load, resulting in the absence of transmission. Genome sequencing and analyses of reassortant isolates showed genetic evidence of the association between the loss of competence in transmission and the mutation in the NSs coding sequence. Our findings offer new insight into the TSWV-thrips interaction and Tospovirus pathogenesis and highlight, for the first time in the Bunyaviridae family, a major role for the S segment, and specifically for the NSs protein, in virulence and efficient infection in insect vector individuals. Our work is the first to show a role for the NSs protein in virus accumulation in the insect vector in the Bunyaviridae family: demonstration was obtained for the system TSWV-F. occidentalis, arguably one of the most damaging combination for vegetable crops. Genetic evidence of the involvement of the NSs protein in vector transmission was provided with multiple approaches.

  19. Differences in insect resistance between tomato species endemic to the Galapagos Islands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucatti, A.F.; Heusden, van A.W.; Vos, de R.C.H.; Visser, R.G.F.; Vosman, B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The Galapagos Islands constitute a highly diverse ecosystem and a unique source of variation in the form of endemic species. There are two endemic tomato species, Solanum galapagense and S. cheesmaniae and two introduced tomato species, S. pimpinellifolium and S. lycopersicum.

  20. Tomato SlERF.A1, SlERF.B4, SlERF.C3 and SlERF.A3, Members of B3 Group of ERF Family, Are Required for Resistance to Botrytis cinerea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Zhigang; Liu, Shixia; Huang, Lihong; Hong, Yongbo; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Lei; Zhang, Yafen; Zhang, Huijuan; Li, Dayong; Song, Fengming

    2016-01-01

    The Ethylene-Responsive Factors (ERFs) comprise a large family of transcriptional factors that play critical roles in plant immunity. Gray mold disease caused by Botrytis cinerea, a typical necrotrophic fungal pathogen, is the serious disease that threatens tomato production worldwide. However, littler is known about the molecular mechanism regulating the immunity to B. cinerea in tomato. In the present study, virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS)-based functional analyses of 18 members of B3 group (also called Group IX) in tomato ERF family were performed to identify putative ERFs that are involved in disease resistance against B. cinerea. VIGS-based silencing of either SlERF.B1 or SlERF.C2 had lethal effect while silencing of SlERF.A3 (Pit4) significantly suppressed vegetative growth of tomato plants. Importantly, silencing of SlERF.A1, SlERF.A3, SlERF.B4, or SlERF.C3 resulted in increased susceptibility to B. cinerea, attenuated the B. cinerea-induced expression of jasmonic acid/ethylene-mediated signaling responsive defense genes and promoted the B. cinerea-induced H2O2 accumulation. However, silencing of SlERF.A3 also decreased the resistance against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst) DC3000 but silencing of SlERF.A1, SlERF.B4 or SlERF.C3 did not affect the resistance to this bacterial pathogen. Expression of SlERF.A1, SlERF.A3, SlERF.B4, or SlERF.C3 was induced by B. cinerea and by defense signaling hormones such as salicylic acid, methyl jasmonate, and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (an ethylene precursor). SlERF.A1, SlERF.B4, SlERF.C3, and SlERF.A3 proteins were found to localize in nucleus of cells and possess transactivation activity in yeasts. These data suggest that SlERF.A1, SlERF.B4, and SlERF.C3, three previously uncharacterized ERFs in B3 group, and SlERF.A3, a previously identified ERF with function in immunity to Pst DC3000, play important roles in resistance against B. cinerea in tomato. PMID:28083004

  1. Specific Insect-Virus Interactions Are Responsible for Variation in Competency of Different Thrips tabaci Isolines to Transmit Different Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Isolates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Alana L.; Kennedy, George G.

    2013-01-01

    Local adaptation between sympatric host and parasite populations driven by vector genetics appears to be a factor that influences dynamics of disease epidemics and evolution of insect-vectored viruses. Although T. tabaci is the primary vector of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in some areas of the world, it is not an important vector of this economically important plant virus in many areas where it occurs. Previous studies suggest that genetic variation of thrips populations, virus isolates, or both are important factors underlying the localized importance of this species as a vector of TSWV. This study was undertaken to quantify variation in transmissibility of TSWV isolates by T. tabaci, in the ability of T. tabaci to transmit isolates of TSWV, and to examine the possibility that genetic interactions and local adaptation contribute to the localized nature of this species as a vector of TSWV. Isofemale lines of Thrips tabaci from multiple locations were tested for their ability to transmit multiple TSWV isolates collected at the same and different locations as the thrips. Results revealed that the probability of an isofemale line transmitting TSWV varied among virus isolates, and the probability of an isolate being transmitted varied among isofemale lines. These results indicate that the interaction of T. tabaci and TSWV isolate genetic determinants underlie successful transmission of TSWV by T. tabaci. Further analysis revealed sympatric vector-virus pairing resulted in higher transmission than allopatric pairing, which suggests that local adaptation is occurring between T. tabaci and TSWV isolates. PMID:23358707

  2. Characterization of whitefly and whitefly-borne virus populations in tomato- and sweet pepper-growing greenhouses in the Cartago province, Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crop production in greenhouse environments requires special care. Poor management can favor pest related problems which can lead to economic losses. Whiteflies and whitefly-borne viruses are major constraints to the production of tomato and sweet pepper both in field and greenhouses settings. Limit...

  3. Application of phage display in selecting Tomato spotted wilt virus - specific single-chain antibodies (scFvs) for sensitive diagnosis in ELISA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Griep, R.A.; Prins, M.; Twisk, van C.; Keller, H.J.H.G.; Kerschbaumer, R.J.; Kormelink, R.; Goldbach, R.W.; Schots, A.

    2000-01-01

    A panel of recombinant single-chain antibodies (scFvs) against structural proteins of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was retrieved from a human combinatorial scFv antibody library using the novel phage display technique. After subcloning the encoding DNA sequences in the expression vector pSKAP/S,

  4. Pathogen derived resistance to Potato virus Y: mechanisms and risks

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    T. MÄKI-VALKAMA

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Since the concept of pathogen derived resistance (PDR was proposed in 1985, genetic transformation of plants to express virus-derived sequences has been used to engineer resistance to many viruses. This paper reviews PDR approaches to Potato virus Y (PVY, type member of the genus Potyvirus. PDR to viruses operates often through RNA-mediated resistance mechanisms that do not require protein expression. Studies on the RNA-mediated resistance have led to the discovery of post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS, a mechanism that controls gene expression in eukaryotic cells and provides natural protection against virus infections. Viruses, in turn, can suppress the PTGS with some of their proteins, such as the helper component-proteinase protein of PVY. Expression of PVY proteins in transgenic plants entails a risk for heterologous encapsidation or synergism with viruses that infect the PVY-resistant transgenic plant. These risks are avoided using RNA-mediated resistance, but a risk still exists for recombination between the transgene transcript and the RNA genome of the infecting virus, which may create a virus with altered properties. The harmful consequences can be limited to some extent by removing functional motifs from the viral sequence used as a transgene.;

  5. Inheritance of resistance to Phytophthora infestans (Peronosporales, Pythiaceae in a new source of resistance in tomato (Solanum sp. (formerly Lycopersicon sp., Solanales, Solanaceae

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    Flávia Barbosa Abreu

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In Brazil, no commercial tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. formerly Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. varieties are available which are resistant to the late blight, one of the most important tomato diseases, produced by the phytopathogenic oomycete Phytophthora infestans. The wild tomato (Solanum habrochaites Knapp & Spooner, formerly Lycopersicon hirsutum Dunal shows resistance to P. infestans, because of which we investigated an interspecific cross between S. lycopersicum cv. Santa Clara and S. habrochaites accession BGH 6902 maintained at the Horticultural Germplasm Bank at the Federal University of Viçosa (Banco de Germoplasma de Horticultura (BGH, Universidade Federal de Viçosa (UFV, Viçosa, Minas Gerais, Brazil The genitors, F1, F2, BC1 and BC2 were used to study the inheritance of resistance to P. infestans and to estimate the genetic parameters associated with resistance. Analysis of the area under the disease progress curve (AUDPC indicated that inheritance is polygenic and that dominance controls character, whereas mean analysis showed that the additive effect was the most important. Although the character presents variability, the heritability is low which generates the need to better control the environment to obtain success with the selection.

  6. Isolation and characterization of cidofovir resistant vaccinia viruses

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    Prichard Mark N

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The emergence of drug resistant viruses, together with the possibility of increased virulence, is an important concern in the development of new antiviral compounds. Cidofovir (CDV is a phosphonate nucleotide that is approved for use against cytomegalovirus retinitis and for the emergency treatment of smallpox or complications following vaccination. One mode of action for CDV has been demonstrated to be the inhibition of the viral DNA polymerase. Results We have isolated several CDV resistant (CDVR vaccinia viruses through a one step process, two of which have unique single mutations within the DNA polymerase. An additional resistant virus isolate provides evidence of a second site mutation within the genome involved in CDV resistance. The CDVR viruses were 3–7 fold more resistant to the drug than the parental viruses. The virulence of the CDVR viruses was tested in mice inoculated intranasally and all were found to be attenuated. Conclusion Resistance to CDV in vaccinia virus can be conferred individually by at least two different mutations within the DNA polymerase gene. Additional genes may be involved. This one step approach for isolating resistant viruses without serial passage and in the presence of low doses of drug minimizes unintended secondary mutations and is applicable to other potential antiviral agents.

  7. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Tushar K; Papolu, Pradeep K; Banakar, Prakash; Choudhary, Divya; Sirohi, Anil; Rao, Uma

    2015-01-01

    Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita) cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco, and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1), was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato, suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the RNAi construct of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60-80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated downregulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants.

  8. Tomato transgenic plants expressing hairpin construct of a nematode protease gene conferred enhanced resistance to root-knot nematodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tushar Kanti Dutta

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita cause substantial yield losses in vegetables worldwide, and are difficult to manage. Continuous withdrawal of environmentally-harmful nematicides from the global market warrants the need for novel nematode management strategies. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco and soybean that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. Herein, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1, was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato, suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the RNAi construct of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60-80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in vivo silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated downregulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants.

  9. Systemic resistance and lipoxygenase-related defence response induced in tomato by Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1

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    Dommes Jacques

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed the ability of Pseudomonas putida strain BTP1 to promote induced systemic resistance (ISR in different host plants. Since ISR is long-lasting and not conducive for development of resistance of the targeted pathogen, this phenomenon can take part of disease control strategies. However, in spite of the numerous examples of ISR induced by PGPR in plants, only a few biochemical studies have associated the protective effect with specific host metabolic changes. Results In this study, we showed the protective effect of this bacterium in tomato against Botrytis cinerea. Following treatment by P. putida BTP1, analyses of acid-hydrolyzed leaf extracts showed an accumulation of antifungal material after pathogen infection. The fungitoxic compounds thus mainly accumulate as conjugates from which active aglycones may be liberated through the activity of hydrolytic enzymes. These results suggest that strain BTP1 can elicit systemic phytoalexin accumulation in tomato as one defence mechanism. On another hand, we have shown that key enzymes of the lipoxygenase pathway are stimulated in plants treated with the bacteria as compared with control plants. Interestingly, this stimulation is observed only after pathogen challenge in agreement with the priming concept almost invariably associated with the ISR phenomenon. Conclusion Through the demonstration of phytoalexin accumulation and LOX pathway stimulation in tomato, this work provides new insights into the diversity of defence mechanisms that are inducible by non-pathogenic bacteria in the context of ISR.

  10. Response of tomato rootstocks with the Mi resistance gene to Meloidogyne incognita race 2 at different soil temperatures

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    Zubeyir Devran

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Rootstocks have been effective against many soil-borne pathogens in protected tomato production. Rootstocks with heat-stable root-knot nematode resistance may prolong the production season since the root-knot nematode resistance gene Mi-1.2 irreversibly breaks down at soil temperatures above 28°C. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of soil temperature on root-knot nematode resistance conferred by two genes of tomato, using some commercial tomato cultivars, rootstocks, and PI lines. The response of these genes against Meloidogyne incognita race 2 was studied in two commonly used rootstock cv.  Beaufort and Vigomax, in tomato cultivars Astona RN F1 and Simita F1, and in Solanum lycopersicum L. accessions PI126443 and PI270435, known to possess heat-stable nematode resistance, at 24°C and 32°C under controlled conditions.  Each plant was inoculated with 1000 M. incognita race 2 second-stage juveniles (J2s and its response was evaluated 8 weeks post inoculation. The presence of the Mi-1.2 gene was determined with molecular markers. Astona RN F1, Vigomax, Beaufort, PI126443 and PI 270435 which carried the Mi-1.2 gene were resistant to Meloidogyne incognita race 2 at 24°C. The egg masses and J2s were significantly fewer in these lines than in the susceptible Simita F1 at 24°C, and there were no significant differences among resistant plants. In contrast, there were significant differences in the galling index among heat-stable sources and plants containing the Mi-1.2 gene. Simita F1, Astona RN F1 and the rootstocks had a susceptible reaction to M. incognita race 2 at 32°C, but PI 126443 and PI 270435 were resistant.  However, at this temperature there were significant differences in the number of juveniles in the soil, the egg mass and the galling index between the heat-stable and the heat-unstable plants.Rootstocks have been effective against many soil-borne pathogens in protected tomato production. Rootstocks with

  11. The Heterologous Expression of the p22 RNA Silencing Suppressor of the Crinivirus Tomato Chlorosis Virus from Tobacco Rattle Virus and Potato Virus X Enhances Disease Severity but Does Not Complement Suppressor-Defective Mutant Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landeo-Ríos, Yazmín; Navas-Castillo, Jesús; Moriones, Enrique; Cañizares, M. Carmen

    2017-11-24

    To counteract host antiviral RNA silencing, plant viruses express suppressor proteins that function as pathogenicity enhancers. The genome of the Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) (genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae) encodes an RNA silencing suppressor, the protein p22, that has been described as having one of the longest lasting local suppressor activities when assayed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Since suppression of RNA silencing and the ability to enhance disease severity are closely associated, we analyzed the effect of expressing p22 in heterologous viral contexts. Thus, we studied the effect of the expression of ToCV p22 from viral vectors Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Potato virus X (PVX), and from attenuated suppressor mutants in N. benthamiana plants. Our results show that although an exacerbation of disease symptoms leading to plant death was observed in the heterologous expression of ToCV p22 from both viruses, only in the case of TRV did increased viral accumulation occur. The heterologous expression of ToCV p22 could not complement suppressor-defective mutant viruses.

  12. The Heterologous Expression of the p22 RNA Silencing Suppressor of the Crinivirus Tomato Chlorosis Virus from Tobacco Rattle Virus and Potato Virus X Enhances Disease Severity but Does Not Complement Suppressor-Defective Mutant Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazmín Landeo-Ríos

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available To counteract host antiviral RNA silencing, plant viruses express suppressor proteins that function as pathogenicity enhancers. The genome of the Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV (genus Crinivirus, family Closteroviridae encodes an RNA silencing suppressor, the protein p22, that has been described as having one of the longest lasting local suppressor activities when assayed in Nicotiana benthamiana. Since suppression of RNA silencing and the ability to enhance disease severity are closely associated, we analyzed the effect of expressing p22 in heterologous viral contexts. Thus, we studied the effect of the expression of ToCV p22 from viral vectors Tobacco rattle virus (TRV and Potato virus X (PVX, and from attenuated suppressor mutants in N. benthamiana plants. Our results show that although an exacerbation of disease symptoms leading to plant death was observed in the heterologous expression of ToCV p22 from both viruses, only in the case of TRV did increased viral accumulation occur. The heterologous expression of ToCV p22 could not complement suppressor-defective mutant viruses.

  13. Rapid spread of tomato yellow leaf curl virus in China is aided differentially by two invasive whiteflies.

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    Huipeng Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV was introduced into China in 2006, approximately 10 years after the introduction of an invasive whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Genn. B biotype. Even so the distribution and prevalence of TYLCV remained limited, and the economic damage was minimal. Following the introduction of Q biotype into China in 2003, the prevalence and spread of TYLCV started to accelerate. This has lead to the hypothesis that the two biotypes might not be equally competent vectors of TYLCV. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The infection frequency of TYLCV in the field-collected B. tabaci populations was investigated, the acquisition and transmission capability of TYLCV by B and Q biotypes were compared under the laboratory conditions. Analysis of B. tabaci populations from 55 field sites revealed the existence of 12 B and 43 Q biotypes across 18 provinces in China. The acquisition and transmission experiments showed that both B and Q biotypes can acquire and transmit the virus, however, Q biotype demonstrated superior acquisition and transmission capability than its B counterparts. Specifically, Q biotype acquired significantly more viral DNA than the B biotype, and reached the maximum viral load in a substantially shorter period of time. Although TYLCV was shown to be transmitted horizontally by both biotypes, Q biotype exhibited significantly higher viral transmission frequency than B biotype. Vertical transmission result, on the other hand, indicated that TYLCV DNA can be detected in eggs and nymphs, but not in pupae and adults of the first generation progeny. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These combined results suggested that the epidemiology of TYLCV was aided differentially by the two invasive whiteflies (B and Q biotypes through horizontal but not vertical transmission of the virus. This is consistent with the concomitant eruption of TYLCV in tomato fields following the recent rapid invasion of Q biotype whitefly in China.

  14. First report of tomato chlorotic spot virus in non-solanaceous weeds erect spiderling (Boerhavia erecta) and asian spiderflower (Cleome viscosa), and sweet chili pepper (Capsicum chinense) in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) has recently been detected in tomato, bell pepper, jimsonweed and lettuce in Puerto Rico. Observations of weeds and additional crops in 2015 and 2016 revealed TCSV-like symptoms. Testing of these symptomatic plants identified three new hosts of TCSV in Puerto Ric...

  15. A Solanum lycopersicum × Solanum pimpinellifolium Linkage Map of Tomato Displaying Genomic Locations of R-Genes, RGAs, and Candidate Resistance/Defense-Response ESTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Arun; Zhang, Liping; Niño-Liu, David; Ashrafi, Hamid; Foolad, Majid R.

    2008-01-01

    We have identified an accession (LA2093) within the tomato wild species Solanum pimpinellifolium with many desirable characteristics, including biotic and abiotic stress tolerance and good fruit quality. To utilize the full genetic potential of LA2093 in tomato breeding, we have developed a linkage map based on an F2 population of a cross between LA2093 and a tomato breeding line, using 115 RFLP, 94 EST, and 41 RGA markers. The map spanned 1002.4 cM of the 12 tomato chromosomes with an average marker distance of 4.0 cM. The length of the map and linear order of the markers were in good agreement with the published maps of tomato. The ESTs were chosen based on their sequence similarities with known resistance or defense-response genes, signal-transduction factors, transcriptional regulators, and genes encoding pathogenesis-related proteins. Locations of several ESTs and RGAs coincided with locations of several known tomato resistance genes and quantitative resistance loci (QRLs), suggesting that candidate-gene approach may be effective in identifying and mapping new R genes. This map will be useful for marker-assisted exploitation of desirable traits in LA2093 and other S. pimpinellifolium accessions, and possibly for utilization of genetic variation within S. lycopersicum. PMID:19223983

  16. Genetic analysis to identify good combiners for ToLCV resistance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The interspecific hybridization for tomato leaf curl virus (ToLCV) resistance was carried out among 10 genetically diverse tomato genotypes (diversified by 50 SSR markers). Among the 10 parents, four susceptible cultivars of Solanum lycopersicum were crossed with six resistant wilds, such as S. pimpinellifolium, ...

  17. Editing plants for virus resistance using CRISPR-Cas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J C; Hu, J S

    This minireview summarizes recent advancements using the clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats-associated nuclease systems (CRISPR-Cas) derived from prokaryotes to breed plants resistant to DNA and RNA viruses. The CRISPR-Cas system represents a powerful tool able to edit and insert novel traits into plants precisely at chosen loci offering enormous advantages to classical breeding. Approaches to engineering plant virus resistance in both transgenic and non-transgenic plants are discussed. Iterations of the CRISPR-Cas system, FnCas9 and C2c2 capable of editing RNA in eukaryotic cells offer a particular advantage for providing resistance to RNA viruses which represent the great majority of known plant viruses. Scientists have obtained conflicting results using gene silencing technology to produce transgenic plants resistant to geminiviruses. CRISPR-Cas systems engineered in plants to target geminiviruses have consistently reduced virus accumulation providing increased resistance to virus infection. CRISPR-Cas may provide novel and reliable approaches to control geminiviruses and other ssDNA viruses such as Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV).

  18. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tomato with rolB gene results in enhancement of fruit quality and foliar resistance against fungal pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arshad, Waheed; Haq, Ihsan-ul-; Waheed, Mohammad Tahir; Mysore, Kirankumar S; Mirza, Bushra

    2014-01-01

    Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is the second most important cultivated crop next to potato, worldwide. Tomato serves as an important source of antioxidants in human diet. Alternaria solani and Fusarium oxysporum cause early blight and vascular wilt of tomato, respectively, resulting in severe crop losses. The foremost objective of the present study was to generate transgenic tomato plants with rolB gene and evaluate its effect on plant morphology, nutritional contents, yield and resistance against fungal infection. Tomato cv. Rio Grande was transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes. rolB. Biochemical analyses showed considerable improvement in nutritional quality of transgenic tomato fruits as indicated by 62% increase in lycopene content, 225% in ascorbic acid content, 58% in total phenolics and 26% in free radical scavenging activity. Furthermore, rolB gene significantly improved the defence response of leaves of transgenic plants against two pathogenic fungal strains A. solani and F. oxysporum. Contrarily, transformed plants exhibited altered morphology and reduced fruit yield. In conclusion, rolB gene from A. rhizogenes can be used to generate transgenic tomato with increased nutritional contents of fruits as well as improved foliar tolerance against fungal pathogens.

  19. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tomato with rolB gene results in enhancement of fruit quality and foliar resistance against fungal pathogens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waheed Arshad

    Full Text Available Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. is the second most important cultivated crop next to potato, worldwide. Tomato serves as an important source of antioxidants in human diet. Alternaria solani and Fusarium oxysporum cause early blight and vascular wilt of tomato, respectively, resulting in severe crop losses. The foremost objective of the present study was to generate transgenic tomato plants with rolB gene and evaluate its effect on plant morphology, nutritional contents, yield and resistance against fungal infection. Tomato cv. Rio Grande was transformed via Agrobacterium tumefaciens harbouring rolB gene of Agrobacterium rhizogenes. rolB. Biochemical analyses showed considerable improvement in nutritional quality of transgenic tomato fruits as indicated by 62% increase in lycopene content, 225% in ascorbic acid content, 58% in total phenolics and 26% in free radical scavenging activity. Furthermore, rolB gene significantly improved the defence response of leaves of transgenic plants against two pathogenic fungal strains A. solani and F. oxysporum. Contrarily, transformed plants exhibited altered morphology and reduced fruit yield. In conclusion, rolB gene from A. rhizogenes can be used to generate transgenic tomato with increased nutritional contents of fruits as well as improved foliar tolerance against fungal pathogens.

  20. Naturally occurring broad-spectrum powdery mildw resistance in a central American tomato accession is caused by loss of Mlo function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bai, Y.; Pavan, S.N.C.; Zheng, Z.; Zappel, N.F.; Reinstadler, A.; Lotti, C.; Giovanni, de C.; Ricciardi, L.; Lindhout, P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Theres, K.; Panstruga, R.

    2008-01-01

    The resistant cherry tomato (Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme) line LC-95, derived from an accession collected in Ecuador, harbors a natural allele (ol-2) that confers broad-spectrum and recessively inherited resistance to powdery mildew (Oidium neolycopersici). As both the genetic and

  1. Targeting chitinase gene of Helicoverpa armigera by host-induced RNA interference confers insect resistance in tobacco and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamta; Reddy, K R K; Rajam, M V

    2016-02-01

    Helicoverpa armigera Hübner (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) is a devastating agricultural insect pest with broad spectrum of host range, causing million dollars crop loss annually. Limitations in the present conventional and transgenic approaches have made it crucial to develop sustainable and environmental friendly methods for crop improvement. In the present study, host-induced RNA interference (HI-RNAi) approach was used to develop H. armigera resistant tobacco and tomato plants. Chitinase (HaCHI) gene, critically required for insect molting and metamorphosis was selected as a potential target. Hair-pin RNAi construct was prepared from the conserved off-target free partial HaCHI gene sequence and was used to generate several HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato plants. Northern hybridization confirmed the production of HaCHI gene-specific siRNAs in HaCHI-RNAi tobacco and tomato lines. Continuous feeding on leaves of RNAi lines drastically reduced the target gene transcripts and consequently, affected the overall growth and survival of H. armigera. Various developmental deformities were also manifested in H. armigera larvae after feeding on the leaves of RNAi lines. These results demonstrated the role of chitinase in insect development and potential of HI-RNAi for effective management of H. armigera.

  2. The plant virus Tomato Spotted Wilt Tospovirus activates the immune system of its main insect vector, Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medeiros, Ricardo B; Resende, Renato de O; de Avila, Antonio Carlos

    2004-05-01

    Tospoviruses have the ability to infect plants and their insect vectors. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV), the type species in the Tospovirus genus, infects its most important insect vector, Frankliniella occidentalis, the western flower thrips (WFT). However, no detrimental effects on the life cycle or cytopathological changes have been reported in the WFT after TSWV infection, and relatively few viral particles can be observed even several days after infection. We hypothesized that TSWV infection triggers an immune response in the WFT. Using subtractive cDNA libraries to probe WFT DNA macroarrays, we found that the WFT's immune system is activated by TSWV infection. The activated genes included (i) those encoding antimicrobial peptides, such as defensin and cecropin; (ii) genes involved in pathogen recognition, such as those encoding lectins; (iii) those encoding receptors that activate the innate immune response, such as Toll-3; and (iv) those encoding members of signal transduction pathways activated by Toll-like receptors, such as JNK kinase. Transcriptional upregulation of these genes after TSWV infection was confirmed by Northern analysis, and the kinetics of the immune response was measured over time. Several of the detected genes were activated at the same time that viral replication was first detected by reverse transcription-PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the activation of an insect vector immune response by a plant virus. The results may lead to a better understanding of insects' immune responses against viruses and may help in the future development of novel control strategies against plant viruses, as well as human and animal viruses transmitted by insect vectors.

  3. Resistance maximization principle for defending networks against virus attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Angsheng; Zhang, Xiaohui; Pan, Yicheng

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the defending of networks against virus attack. We define the resistance of a network to be the maximum number of bits required to determine the code of the module that is accessible from random walk, from which random walk cannot escape. We show that for any network G, R(G) =H1(G) -H2(G) , where R(G) is the resistance of G, H1(G) and H2(G) are the one- and two-dimensional structural information of G, respectively, and that resistance maximization is the principle for defending networks against virus attack. By using the theory, we investigate the defending of real world networks and of the networks generated by the preferential attachment and the security models. We show that there exist networks that are defensible by a small number of controllers from cascading failure of any virus attack. Our theory demonstrates that resistance maximization is the principle for defending networks against virus attacks.

  4. Elevated CO2 reduces the resistance and tolerance of tomato plants to Helicoverpa armigera by suppressing the JA signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huijuan Guo

    Full Text Available Both resistance and tolerance, which are two strategies that plants use to limit biotic stress, are affected by the abiotic environment including atmospheric CO(2 levels. We tested the hypothesis that elevated CO(2 would reduce resistance (i.e., the ability to prevent damage but enhance tolerance (i.e., the ability to regrow and compensate for damage after the damage has occurred of tomato plants to the cotton bollworm, Helicoverpa armigera. The results showed that elevated CO(2 reduced resistance by decreasing the jasmonic acid (JA level and activities of lipoxygenase, proteinase inhibitors, and polyphenol oxidase in wild-type (WT plants infested with H. armigera. Consequently, the activities of total protease, trypsin-like enzymes, and weak and active alkaline trypsin-like enzymes increased in the midgut of H. armigera when fed on WT plants grown under elevated CO(2. Unexpectedly, the tolerance of the WT to H. armigera (in terms of photosynthetic rate, activity of sucrose phosphate synthases, flower number, and plant biomass and height was also reduced by elevated CO(2. Under ambient CO(2, the expression of resistance and tolerance to H. armigera was much greater in wild type than in spr2 (a JA-deficient genotype plants, but elevated CO(2 reduced these differences of the resistance and tolerance between WT and spr2 plants. The results suggest that the JA signaling pathway contributes to both plant resistance and tolerance to herbivorous insects and that by suppressing the JA signaling pathway, elevated CO(2 will simultaneously reduce the resistance and tolerance of tomato plants.

  5. Tomato cystine-knot miniproteins possessing anti-angiogenic activity exhibit in vitro gastrointestinal stability, intestinal absorption and resistance to food industrial processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treggiari, Davide; Zoccatelli, Gianni; Chignola, Roberto; Molesini, Barbara; Minuz, Pietro; Pandolfini, Tiziana

    2017-04-15

    The cystine-knot miniproteins present in tomato fruit (TCMPs) have been shown to exert anti-angiogenic effects by inhibiting endothelial cell migration and to display resistance to gastrointestinal proteolytic attack. To better define the pharmacological potential of TCMPs, their oral bioavailability and their resistance to industrial processing must be assessed. To explore the intestinal transport of TCMPs we used the differentiated Caco-2 cells model. After 24h incubation, 37.73±9.34% of TCMPs crossed the epithelium, without altering the integrity of the cell layer. To assess the effects of the industrial processing on the biochemical features and the biological activity of TCMPs, we developed a method for purifying the proteins from tomato paste. The tomato-paste purified TCMPs retained the resistance to gastrointestinal digestion and the inhibitory activity towards endothelial cell migration. Our previous and present results collectively demonstrate that TCMPs possess interesting features for drug development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Nanobody-mediated resistance to Grapevine fanleaf virus in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemmer, Caroline; Djennane, Samia; Ackerer, Léa; Hleibieh, Kamal; Marmonier, Aurélie; Gersch, Sophie; Garcia, Shahinez; Vigne, Emmanuelle; Komar, Véronique; Perrin, Mireille; Gertz, Claude; Belval, Lorène; Berthold, François; Monsion, Baptiste; Schmitt-Keichinger, Corinne; Lemaire, Olivier; Lorber, Bernard; Gutiérrez, Carlos; Muyldermans, Serge; Demangeat, Gérard; Ritzenthaler, Christophe

    2017-08-10

    Since their discovery, single-domain antigen-binding fragments of camelid-derived heavy-chain-only antibodies, also known as nanobodies (Nbs), have proven to be of outstanding interest as therapeutics against human diseases and pathogens including viruses, but their use against phytopathogens remains limited. Many plant viruses including Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV), a nematode-transmitted icosahedral virus and causal agent of fanleaf degenerative disease, have worldwide distribution and huge burden on crop yields representing billions of US dollars of losses annually, yet solutions to combat these viruses are often limited or inefficient. Here, we identified a Nb specific to GFLV that confers strong resistance to GFLV upon stable expression in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana and also in grapevine rootstock, the natural host of the virus. We showed that resistance was effective against a broad range of GFLV isolates independently of the inoculation method including upon nematode transmission but not against its close relative, Arabis mosaic virus. We also demonstrated that virus neutralization occurs at an early step of the virus life cycle, prior to cell-to-cell movement. Our findings will not only be instrumental to confer resistance to GFLV in grapevine, but more generally they pave the way for the generation of novel antiviral strategies in plants based on Nbs. © 2017 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Comparison of the complete sequences of three different isolates of Pepino mosaic virus: size variability of the TGBp3 protein between tomato and L. peruvianum isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, C; Soler, S; Nuez, F

    2005-03-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of the genomes of two Spanish isolates (LE-2000 and LE-2002) from tomato and one Peruvian isolate (LP-2001) from Lycopersicon peruvianum of the Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) were determined. The tomato isolates share identities higher than 99%, while the genome of LP-2001 had mean nucleotide identities of 95.6% to 96.0% with tomato isolates. The predicted amino acid sequences showed similarities ranging between 95.2% and 100% with TGBp3 and TGBp2 and CP proteins, respectively. In LP-2001 two main differences were found with respect to the tomato isolates; (i) the 5' untranslated region (UTR) was 2 nt shorter by deletion at position 12-13 and it had some polymorphims at the putative promoter sequence reported for PepMV tomato isolates and other potexviruses, which could be functionally significant for RNA replication, and (ii) the TGBp3 protein had two extra amino acids in the C-terminal region.

  8. 'BRS Tospodoro': a high lycopene processing tomato cultivar adapted to organic cropping systems and with multiple resistance to pathogens 'BRS Tospodoro': Cultivar de tomate para processamento com alto licopeno, adaptada aos sistemas de cultivo orgânico e com múltiplos genes de resistência a patógenos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo de B Giordano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available 'BRS Tospodoro' is a high lycopene tomato cultivar, which combines multiple disease resistance genes and desirable processing traits. This cultivar was found to be suitable for both conventional and organic crop systems. 'BRS Tospodoro' was obtained via backcross breeding using 'Viradoro' as recurrent parent and the inbred line 'CNPH 1306' as the donor of the Pto gene (resistance to Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato race 0. 'BRS Tospodoro' has the Mi1-2 gene that controls resistance to root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne incognita, M. javanica, and M. arenaria as well as tolerance to populations of the aphid Macrosiphum euphorbiae (vector of Potyvirus species, and to whiteflies (Bemisia tabaci. 'BRS Tospodoro' has also the Sw-5b gene, which controls resistance to major Tospovirus species (Groundnut ringspotirus, Tomato chlorotic spot virus, Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus, and Tomato spotted wilt virus. This cultivar is also resistant to Stemphylium solani and S. lycopersici (Sm gene, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 1 (I-1 gene and Verticillium dahlie race 1 (Ve gene. 'BRS Tospodoro' presents uniform fruit ripening, with the first harvest being done around 110 to 120 days after plant emergence. The fruits are firm, square-shaped, with an average weight of 46 g (in organic cropping to above 70 g (in conventional cropping. The soluble solids content is in the range between 4.6 and 4.8 ºBrix. The external fruit color is uniform (gene u and bright red (L* = 44.1; a* = 33.9; b* = 20.4. The average lycopene content of mature fruits is 104 µg/g. This cultivar has the jointless locus (j2, which facilitates both manual and mechanical harvesting. 'BRS Tospodoro' has determinate growth habit (locus sp with vigorous foliage, which provides good fruit protection from sunscald. 'BRS Tospodoro' can be cultivated in all the traditional processing tomato-producing areas of Brazil without the need of any technical adjustment. 'BRS Tospodoro' displayed

  9. Induced resistance in tomato fruit by γ-aminobutyric acid for the control of alternaria rot caused by Alternaria alternata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiali; Sun, Cui; Zhang, Yangyang; Fu, Da; Zheng, Xiaodong; Yu, Ting

    2017-04-15

    The study investigated the effect of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) on the control of alternaria rot in tomato fruit and the possible mechanism involved. Our results showed exogenous GABA could stimulate remarkable resistance to the alternaria rot, while it had no direct antifungal activity against Alternaria alternata. Moreover, the activities of antioxidant enzymes, including peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase, along with the expression of these corresponding genes, were significantly induced in the GABA treatment. The obtained data suggested GABA induced resistance against the necrotrophic pathogen A. alternata, at least in part by activating antioxidant enzymes, restricting the levels of cell death caused by reactive oxygen species. Meanwhile, the key enzyme genes of GABA shunt, GABA transaminase and succinic-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, were found up-regulated in the GABA treatment. The activation of the GABA shunt might play a vital role in the resistance mechanism underpinning GABA-induced plant immunity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Transgenic strategies to confer resistance against viruses in rice plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahide eSasaya

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rice (Oryza sativa L. is cultivated in more than 100 countries and supports nearly half of the world’s population. Developing efficient methods to control rice viruses is thus an urgent necessity because viruses cause serious losses in rice yield. Most rice viruses are transmitted by insect vectors, notably planthoppers and leafhoppers. Viruliferous insect vectors can disperse their viruses over relatively long distances, and eradication of the viruses is very difficult once they become widespread. Exploitation of natural genetic sources of resistance is one of the most effective approaches to protect crops from virus infection; however, only a few naturally occurring rice genes confer resistance against rice viruses. In an effort to improve control, many investigators are using genetic engineering of rice plants as a potential strategy to control viral diseases. Using viral genes to confer pathogen-derived resistance against crops is a well-established procedure, and the expression of various viral gene products has proved to be effective in preventing or reducing infection by various plant viruses since the 1990s. RNA-interference (RNAi, also known as RNA silencing, is one of the most efficient methods to confer resistance against plant viruses on their respective crops. In this article, we review the recent progress, mainly conducted by our research group, in transgenic strategies to confer resistance against tenuiviruses and reoviruses in rice plants. Our findings also illustrate that not all RNAi constructs against viral RNAs are equally effective in preventing virus infection and that it is important to identify the viral Achilles’ heel gene to target for RNAi attack when engineering plants.

  11. Transgenic strategies to confer resistance against viruses in rice plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaya, Takahide; Nakazono-Nagaoka, Eiko; Saika, Hiroaki; Aoki, Hideyuki; Hiraguri, Akihiro; Netsu, Osamu; Uehara-Ichiki, Tamaki; Onuki, Masatoshi; Toki, Seichi; Saito, Koji; Yatou, Osamu

    2014-01-13

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) is cultivated in more than 100 countries and supports nearly half of the world's population. Developing efficient methods to control rice viruses is thus an urgent necessity because viruses cause serious losses in rice yield. Most rice viruses are transmitted by insect vectors, notably planthoppers and leafhoppers. Viruliferous insect vectors can disperse their viruses over relatively long distances, and eradication of the viruses is very difficult once they become widespread. Exploitation of natural genetic sources of resistance is one of the most effective approaches to protect crops from virus infection; however, only a few naturally occurring rice genes confer resistance against rice viruses. Many investigators are using genetic engineering of rice plants as a potential strategy to control viral diseases. Using viral genes to confer pathogen-derived resistance against crops is a well-established procedure, and the expression of various viral gene products has proved to be effective in preventing or reducing infection by various plant viruses since the 1990s. RNA interference (RNAi), also known as RNA silencing, is one of the most efficient methods to confer resistance against plant viruses on their respective crops. In this article, we review the recent progress, mainly conducted by our research group, in transgenic strategies to confer resistance against tenuiviruses and reoviruses in rice plants. Our findings also illustrate that not all RNAi constructs against viral RNAs are equally effective in preventing virus infection and that it is important to identify the viral "Achilles' heel" gene to target for RNAi attack when engineering plants.

  12. The Whitefly Bemisia tabaci Knottin-1 Gene Is Implicated in Regulating the Quantity of Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Ingested and Transmitted by the Insect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliza Hariton Shalev

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The whitefly Bemisia tabaci is a major pest to agricultural crops. It transmits begomoviruses, such as Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, in a circular, persistent fashion. Transcriptome analyses revealed that B. tabaci knottin genes were responsive to various stresses. Upon ingestion of tomato begomoviruses, two of the four knottin genes were upregulated, knot-1 (with the highest expression and knot-3. In this study, we examined the involvement of B. tabaci knottin genes in relation to TYLCV circulative transmission. Knottins were silenced by feeding whiteflies with knottin dsRNA via detached tomato leaves. Large amounts of knot-1 transcripts were present in the abdomen of whiteflies, an obligatory transit site of begomoviruses in their circulative transmission pathway; knot-1 silencing significantly depleted the abdomen from knot-1 transcripts. Knot-1 silencing led to an increase in the amounts of TYLCV ingested by the insects and transmitted to tomato test plants by several orders of magnitude. This effect was not observed following knot-3 silencing. Hence, knot-1 plays a role in restricting the quantity of virions an insect may acquire and transmit. We suggest that knot-1 protects B. tabaci against deleterious effects caused by TYLCV by limiting the amount of virus associated with the whitefly vector.

  13. Dynamic metabolic reprogramming of steroidal glycol-alkaloid and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis may impart early blight resistance in wild tomato (Solanum arcanum Peralta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Balkrishna A; Dholakia, Bhushan B; Hussain, Khalid; Panda, Sayantan; Meir, Sagit; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph; Giri, Ashok P; Kamble, Avinash C

    2017-11-01

    Exploration with high throughput leaf metabolomics along with functional genomics in wild tomato unreveal potential role of steroidal glyco-alkaloids and phenylpropanoids during early blight resistance. Alternaria solani severely affects tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) yield causing early blight (EB) disease in tropical environment. Wild relative, Solanum arcanum Peralta could be a potential source of EB resistance; however, its underlying molecular mechanism largely remains unexplored. Hence, non-targeted metabolomics was applied on resistant and susceptible S. arcanum accessions upon A. solani inoculation to unravel metabolic dynamics during different stages of disease progression. Total 2047 potential metabolite peaks (mass signals) were detected of which 681 and 684 metabolites revealed significant modulation and clear differentiation in resistant and susceptible accessions, respectively. Majority of the EB-triggered metabolic changes were active from steroidal glycol-alkaloid (SGA), lignin and flavonoid biosynthetic pathways. Further, biochemical and gene expression analyses of key enzymes from these pathways positively correlated with phenotypic variation in the S. arcanum accessions indicating their potential role in EB. Additionally, transcription factors regulating lignin biosynthesis were also up-regulated in resistant plants and electrophoretic mobility shift assay revealed sequence-specific binding of rSaWRKY1 with MYB20 promoter. Moreover, transcript accumulation of key genes from phenylpropanoid and SGA pathways along with WRKY and MYB in WRKY1 transgenic tomato lines supported above findings. Overall, this study highlights vital roles of SGAs as phytoalexins and phenylpropanoids along with lignin accumulation unrevealing possible mechanistic basis of EB resistance in wild tomato.

  14. Study the effect of bacterial 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACC deaminase on resistance to salt stress in tomato plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam SADRNIA

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase (ACC deaminase produced by rhizobacteria could be remove theethylene precursor and stimulate plant growth. Aim of the work was investigation on effect of rhizosphere bacteria Pseudomonasmendocina containing plasmid carrying gene encoding ACC deaminase on resistance of tomato plant to salinity. Amplification ofacds gene in selected Pseudomonas was performed; the g e n e w a s c l o n e d i n Escherichia coli and was cloned subsequently in P.mendocina. Enzyme activity was determined in cloned Escherichia coli and cloned P. mendocina for confirmation of geneexpression. Effect of bacterial ACC deaminase on resistance of tomato plants to NaCl was studied in Pot and Greenhouse. In potexperiment, tomato plant treated by cloned P. mendocina was compared with plants treated by P. mendocina (without plasmid andcontrol group. Salinity were established by adding 172 and 207 mM of NaCl to irrigated water. Greenhouse experiments wereconducted in similar groups of bacteria in 207 mM of NaCl. Results obtained from pot experiment revealed that plants treated bycloned P. mendocina in 172 mM of NaCl was showed increasing content of growth than ones treated by P. mendocina and controlas 11%, 18.4% growth for the shoot, 16.6%, 3.7% for roots and 9.6%, 27.5% for wet weight after five weeks, respectively. In 207mM of NaCl, the results were as 14.9 %, 9.7% for shoot, 94.3%, 15.7% for roots and 96.4%, 50.6% for wet weight, respectively. Ingreenhouse experiment, results in same parameter in 207 mM of NaCl were revealed as 63.7%, 7 times for shoot, 2.8, 14 times forroots and 66.1%, 154 times for wet weight, respectively. We concluded that recombinant P. mendocina producing ACC deaminaseby reduction of ethylene content of tomato plant in high salt concentrations could result in improvement of plant resistance tosalinity.

  15. Thrips developmental stage-specific transcriptome response to tomato spotted wilt virus during the virus infection cycle in Frankliniella occidentalis, the primary vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneweis, Derek J; Whitfield, Anna E; Rotenberg, Dorith

    2017-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is transmitted by Frankliniella occidentalis in a circulative-propagative manner. Little is known about thrips vector response to TSWV during the infection process from larval acquisition to adult inoculation of plants. Whole-body transcriptome response to virus infection was determined for first-instar larval, pre-pupal and adult thrips using RNA-Seq. TSWV responsive genes were identified using preliminary sequence of a draft genome of F. occidentalis as a reference and three developmental-stage transcriptomes were assembled. Processes and functions associated with host defense, insect cuticle structure and development, metabolism and transport were perturbed by TSWV infection as inferred by ontologies of responsive genes. The repertoire of genes responsive to TSWV varied between developmental stages, possibly reflecting the link between thrips development and the virus dissemination route in the vector. This study provides the foundation for exploration of tissue-specific expression in response to TSWV and functional analysis of thrips gene function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Tomato bushy stunt virus and DI RNAs as a model for studying mechanisms of RNA virus replication, pathogenicity and recombination. Final technical report for 1994--1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, T.J. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). School of Biological Sciences; Jackson, A.O. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Plant Biology

    1997-12-31

    Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) is a small icosahedral virus with a very broad host-range. The symptoms of systemic infection range from mild mosaic to severe necrosis that often results in death. The genome of TBSV is composed of a single plus stranded RNA molecule with five genes. Two 5 inch genes are translated from the viral RNA, and the remaining three are translated from two subgenomic RNAs. Prior to the DOE supported studies, TBSV gene function had been assigned solely on the basis of sequence similarity with other virus genes of known function. The two 5 inch proximal genes (p33 and p92) were thought to be involved in viral replication, the middle gene encoded the capsid protein (p41), but no clear function was assigned to two nested 3 inch genes (p19 and p22), although it was suggested that at least one could be involved in movement. This research has determined the roles of each of the viral genes in the infection process, and the authors have obtained considerable genetic information pertinent to the contributions of the coat protein and the nested genes to the disease phenotypes observed in several host plants. They have also identified another genetic element with a short open reading frame in the 3 inch-noncoding region of the genome that provides a host-dependent replication function.

  17. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asunción Delgado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance.

  18. Development of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay as a simple detection method of Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus in chrysanthemum and tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Ryoji; Fukuta, Shiro; Matsumoto, Yuho; Hasegawa, Toru; Kojima, Hiroko; Hotta, Makiko; Miyake, Noriyuki

    2016-10-01

    For a simple and rapid detection of Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV) from chrysanthemum and tomato, a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed. A primer set designed to the genome sequences of CSNV worked most efficiently at 63°C and could detect CSNV RNA within 12min by fluorescence monitoring using an isothermal DNA amplification and fluorescence detection device. The result of a specificity test using seven other viruses and one viroid-infectable chrysanthemum or tomato showed that the assay could amplify CSNV specifically, and a sensitivity comparison showed that the RT-LAMP assay was as sensitive as the reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The RT-LAMP assay using crude RNA, extracted simply, could detect CSNV. Overall, the RT-LAMP assay was found to be a simple, specific, convenient, and time-saving method for CSNV detection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a microarray for simultaneous detection and differentiation of different tospoviruses that are serologically related to Tomato spotted wilt virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu-Yuan; Ye, He-Yi; Chen, Tsang-Hai; Chen, Tsung-Chi

    2017-01-10

    Tospoviruses, the plant-infecting genus in the family Bunyaviridae, are thrips borne and cause severe agricultural losses worldwide. Based on the serological relationships of the structural nucleocapsid protein (NP), the current tospoviruses are divided into six serogroups. The use of NP-antisera is convenient for virus detection, but it is insufficient to identify virus species grouped in a serogroup due to the serological cross-reaction. Alternatively, virus species can be identified by the N gene amplification using specific primers. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is the type species of the genus Tospovirus and one of the most destructive plant viruses. Eight known tospoviruses, Alstroemeria necrotic streak virus (ANSV), Chrysanthemum stem necrosis virus (CSNV), Groundnut ringspot virus (GRSV), Impatiens necrotic spot virus (INSV), Melon severe mosaic virus (MeSMV), Pepper necrotic spot virus (PNSV), Tomato chlorotic spot virus (TCSV) and Zucchini lethal chlorosis virus (ZLCV), sharing serological relatedness with TSWV in NP, are grouped in the TSWV serogroup. Most of the TSWV-serogroup viruses prevail in Europe and America. An efficient diagnostic method is necessary for inspecting these tospoviruses in Asia, including Taiwan. A microarray platform was developed for simultaneous detection and identification of TSWV-serogroup tospoviruses. Total RNAs extracted from Chenopodium quinoa leaves separately inoculated with ANSV, CSNV, GRSV, INSV, TCSV and TSWV were used for testing purposes. The 5'-biotinylated degenerate forward and reverse primers were designed from the consensus sequences of N genes of TSWV-serogroup tospoviruses for reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) amplification. Virus-specific oligonucleotide probes were spotted on the surface of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) chips to hybridize with PCR products. The hybridization signals were visualized by hydrolysis of NBT/BCIP with streptavidine-conjugated alkaline phosphatase. The

  20. Rapid accumulation and low degradation: key parameters of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus persistence in its insect vector Bemisia tabaci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Nathalie; Rimbaud, Loup; Chiroleu, Frédéric; Reynaud, Bernard; Thébaud, Gaël; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2015-01-01

    Of worldwide economic importance, Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV, Begomovirus) is responsible for one of the most devastating plant diseases in warm and temperate regions. The DNA begomoviruses (Geminiviridae) are transmitted by the whitefly species complex Bemisia tabaci. Although geminiviruses have long been described as circulative non-propagative viruses, observations such as long persistence of TYLCV in B. tabaci raised the question of their possible replication in the vector. We monitored two major TYLCV strains, Mild (Mld) and Israel (IL), in the invasive B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 cryptic species, during and after the viral acquisition, within two timeframes (0–144 hours or 0–20 days). TYLCV DNA was quantified using real-time PCR, and the complementary DNA strand of TYLCV involved in viral replication was specifically quantified using anchored real-time PCR. The DNA of both TYLCV strains accumulated exponentially during acquisition but remained stable after viral acquisition had stopped. Neither replication nor vertical transmission were observed. In conclusion, our quantification of the viral loads and complementary strands of both Mld and IL strains of TYLCV in B. tabaci point to an efficient accumulation and preservation mechanism, rather than to a dynamic equilibrium between replication and degradation. PMID:26625871

  1. [A co-dominant molecular marker of fusarium wilt resistance gene I-2 derived from gene sequence in tomato].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Shuan-Cang; Zou, Yan-Min

    2008-07-01

    Sequence-specific PCR primers, I-2/5F and I-2/5R were designed according to the sequence from 3 132 bp to 3 765 bp in I-2 gene. With them a 633 bp fragment was amplified from 03F-7 with a genotype of I-2 / I-2, 693 bp fragment from Moneymaker with a genotype of i-2/ i-2, and both fragments from Tebao with heterozygous genotype I-2 / i -2. These two specific fragments were cloned and sequenced. The results from multiple sequence alignment showed that the 633 bp fragment from 03F-7 was identical with the sequence from 3 132 bp to 3 765 bp in I-2 gene. Compared with the sequence of I-2 gene, there were a large number of mutations and a 60 bp fragment inserted in susceptible alleles. The PCR primer combination, I-2/5F and I-2/5R can be used to distinguish homozygous resistant, heterozygous and homozygous susceptible materials, and it is a functional co-dominant marker in I-2 gene selection. Moreover, this marker was employed on 16 major tomato varieties for I-2 locus genotyping, in which half of the varieties contain I-2 gene, and only one variety is homozygous resistant. In addition, simultaneous detection system for I-2 and Tm-2(2) was established by a single PCR and a Hind III digestion. It provides a powerful tool for multiple genes selection in tomato breeding program.

  2. Isolation of NBS-LRR class resistant gene (I2 gene) from tomato ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Three races of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici race 1, 2 and 3 are identified depending on the avirulence protein or effector protein secreted by fungal pathogen during the host colonization in tomato. These effector proteins are recognized by the host innate immune system based on R gene expressions that are I1, ...

  3. Polyamines attenuate ethylene-mediated defense responses to abrogate resistance to Botrytis cinerea in tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Transgenic tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) lines over-expressing yeast spermidine synthase (ySpdSyn), an enzyme involved in polyamine (PA) biosynthesis, were developed. These transgenic lines accumulate higher levels of spermidine (Spd) than the wild type plants and were examined for responses to the...

  4. Tomato early blight (Alternaria solani): the pathogen, genetics and breeding for resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaerani, R.; Voorrips, R.E.

    2006-01-01

    Alternaria solani causes diseases on foliage (early blight), basal stems of seedlings (collar rot), stems of adult plants (stem lesions), and fruits (fruit rot) of tomato. Early blight is the most destructive of these diseases and hence receives considerable attention in breeding. For over 60 years,

  5. Mineral Content in Leaves of Tomato Plants Grafted on Solanum Rootstocks

    OpenAIRE

    松添, 直隆; 間, 浩美; 花田, 勝美; モハメド, アリ; 大久保, 敬; 藤枝, 國光

    1995-01-01

    Nutrient uptake of tomato plants cv. Momotaro grafted on Solanum sisymbriifoliulm, S. torvum and S. toxicarium which are resistant to soil-born disease were compared with tomato grafted on its own root, a tomato/tomato, scion/rootstock combination. Mineral content in leaves of tomato/S. sisymbriifoliulm was nearly equal to that of tomato/tomato. In leaves of tomato/S. torvum, nitrogen content was higher, and magnesium content was lower than those of tomato/tomato. Furthermore, phosphorus and ...

  6. POTENCY OF PREDATOR (Menochilus sexmaculatus AUGMENTATION FOR WHITE FLY (Bemisia tabaci MANAGEMENT AND ITS EFFECT ON GEMINI VIRUS INFESTATION ON TOMATO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Setiawati

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Bemisia tabaci (Gen. (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae is one of the most serious pests on tomato. It is mainly controlled by chemi-cal means, requiring some 25 sprays during the average growing season. The extensive and repeated use of insecticides has dis-rupted the natural balance between this pest and its natural enemies. In this study, Menochilus sexmaculatus F. was evalu-ated as a possible biological control agent of B. tabaci and its effect on Gemini virus infestation. The study was conducted at the experimental station of the Indonesian Vegetables Research Institute (IVeGRI in Lembang, West Java (1,250 m above sea level from August to December 2008. The experimental plots consisted of 0.35 ha of tomato (± 100 m2 per plot and spatially separated with four rows of maize (a minimum of 1 m inter-plot distance to prevent cross-contamination among plots. The experiment was arranged in completely randomized block design with eight treatments and four replications. M. sexmaculatus were released at 24 days after planting. The treatments were designed according dosages and schedules at three released populations (i.e. 10 predators per plot, 20 predators per plot, and 10 predators per plot at vegetative stage followed by 20 predators per plot at generative stage; two places of release (center and edge of the plot; and two schedules of release (weekly and biweekly. Efficacy of the predator was measured in terms of the density of B. tabaci, both before and after release of the predator and its effect on Gemini virus infestation. The result indicated the potential use of M. sexmaculatus to control B. tabaci and its effect on Gemini virus infestation on tomato. Reductions in B. tabaci populations and subsequent tomato yields were significant. B. tabaci population in plots receiving 10 predators showed 73.62% and 75.75% reductions by the end of experiment. The incidence and intensity of Gemini virus were consistently and significantly lowest and tomato yield

  7. Broad taxonomic characterization of Verticillium wilt resistance genes reveals an ancient origin of the tomato Ve1 immune receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yin; Zhang, Zhao; Seidl, Michael F; Majer, Aljaz; Jakse, Jernej; Javornik, Branka; Thomma, Bart P H J

    2017-02-01

    Plant-pathogenic microbes secrete effector molecules to establish themselves on their hosts, whereas plants use immune receptors to try and intercept such effectors in order to prevent pathogen colonization. The tomato cell surface-localized receptor Ve1 confers race-specific resistance against race 1 strains of the soil-borne vascular wilt fungus Verticillium dahliae which secrete the Ave1 effector. Here, we describe the cloning and characterization of Ve1 homologues from tobacco (Nicotiana glutinosa), potato (Solanum tuberosum), wild eggplant (Solanum torvum) and hop (Humulus lupulus), and demonstrate that particular Ve1 homologues govern resistance against V. dahliae race 1 strains through the recognition of the Ave1 effector. Phylogenetic analysis shows that Ve1 homologues are widely distributed in land plants. Thus, our study suggests an ancient origin of the Ve1 immune receptor in the plant kingdom. © 2016 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  8. Association of tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus DNA-B with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus in okra showing yellow vein mosaic disease symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkataravanappa, V; Lakshminarayana Reddy, C N; Jalali, S; Krishna Reddy, M

    2015-06-01

    Okra samples showing yellow vein mosaic, vein twisting and bushy appearance were collected from different locations of India during the surveys conducted between years 2005-2009. The dot blot and PCR detection revealed that 75.14% of the samples were associated with monopartite begomovirus and remaining samples with bipartite virus. Whitefly transmission was established for three samples representing widely separated geographical locations which are negative to betasatellites and associated with DNA-B. Genome components of these three representative isolates were cloned and sequenced. The analysis of DNA-A-like sequence revealed that three begomovirus isolates shared more than 93% nucleotide sequence identity with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus from India (BYVMV), a monopartite begomovirus species that was reported previously as causative agent of bhendi yellow mosaic disease in association of bhendi yellow vein mosaic betasatellite. Further, the DNA-B-like sequences associated with the three virus isolates shared no more than 90% sequence identity with tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). Analyses of putative iteron-binding sequence required for trans-replication suggests that begomovirus sequences shared compatible rep-binding iterons with DNA-B of ToLCNDV. Our data suggest that the monopartite begomovirus associated with okra yellow vein disease has captured DNA-B of ToLCNDV to infect okra. Widespread distribution of the complex shows the increasing trend of the capturing of DNA-B of ToLCNDV by monopartite begomoviruses in the Indian subcontinent. The recombination analysis showed that the DNA-A might have been derived from the inter-specific recombination of begomoviruses, while DNA-B was derived from the ToLCNDV infecting different hosts.

  9. New Sources of Tobamoviruses, CMV and Bacterial Spot Resistance in Pepper

    OpenAIRE

    Stoimenova, Elisaveta; Mitrev, Sasa; Bogatzevska, Nevena

    2005-01-01

    The pepper cultivars Zlaten medal, Alfi and Zalfi, the six Macedonian pepper accessions and the five Bulgarian lines have been screening for the resistance to cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), tobamoviruses and Xanthomonas vesicatoria pepper - tomato pathotype (XvPT).

  10. Tomato spotted wilt virus particle assembly : studying the role of the structural proteins in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snippe, M.

    2006-01-01

    Members of the Bunyaviridae have spherical, enveloped virus particles that acquire their lipid membrane at the Golgi complex. For the animal-infecting bunyaviruses, virus assembly involves budding of ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) into vacuolised lumen of the Golgi complex, after which the

  11. Infection of Alstroemeria Plants with Tomato yellow ring virus in Iran

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beikzadeh, N.; Bayat, H.; Jafarpour, B.; Rohani, H.; Peters, D.; Hassani-Mehraban, A.

    2012-01-01

    Alstroemeria cv. Ovation plants with virus-like necrotic spots and streaks on leaves and petals were observed in greenhouses in Khorasan Razavi (Mashhad) and Markazi (Mahallat) provinces, Iran. Samples with virus-like symptoms reacted positively in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with a polyclonal

  12. The epidemiology and spread of drug resistant human influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurt, Aeron C

    2014-10-01

    Significant changes in the circulation of antiviral-resistant influenza viruses have occurred over the last decade. The emergence and continued circulation of adamantane-resistant A(H3N2) and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses mean that the adamantanes are no longer recommended for use. Resistance to the newer class of drugs, the neuraminidase inhibitors, is typically associated with poorer viral replication and transmission. But 'permissive' mutations, that compensated for impairment of viral function in A(H1N1) viruses during 2007/2008, enabled them to acquire the H275Y NA resistance mutation without fitness loss, resulting in their rapid global spread. Permissive mutations now appear to be present in A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses thereby increasing the risk that oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses may also spread globally, a concerning scenario given that oseltamivir is the most widely used influenza antiviral. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Mi-1.2, an R gene for aphid resistance in tomato, has direct negative effects on a zoophytophagous biocontrol agent, Orius insidiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallipparambil, Godshen R; Sayler, Ronald J; Shapiro, Jeffrey P; Thomas, Jean M G; Kring, Timothy J; Goggin, Fiona L

    2015-02-01

    Mi-1.2 is a single dominant gene in tomato that confers race-specific resistance against certain phloem-feeding herbivores including aphids, whiteflies, psyllids, and root-knot nematodes. Few prior studies have considered the potential non-target effects of race-specific resistance genes (R genes), and this paper evaluates the compatibility of Mi-mediated resistance in tomato with a beneficial zoophytophagous predator, Orius insidiosus (Say). In addition to preying on aphids and other pests, this piercing-sucking insect also feeds from the xylem, epidermis, and/or mesophyll, and oviposits within plant tissues. Comparison of O. insidiosus confined to isogenic tomato plants with and without Mi-1.2 revealed that immatures of O. insidiosus had lower survival on resistant plants even when the immatures were provisioned with prey that did not feed on the host plant. Molecular gut content analysis confirmed that adults and immatures of O. insidiosus feed on both resistant (Mi-1.2+) and susceptible (Mi-1.2-) genotypes, and bioassays suggest that resistance does not affect oviposition rates, plant sampling, or prey acceptance by O. insidiosus adults. These results demonstrate a direct negative impact of R-gene-mediated host plant resistance on a non-target beneficial species, and reveal that Mi-mediated resistance can impact organisms that do not feed on phloem sap. Through laser capture microdissection and RT-PCR, Mi-1.2 transcripts were detected in the epidermis and mesophyll as well as the phloem of tomato plants, consistent with our observations that Mi-mediated resistance is active outside the phloem. These results suggest that the mode of action and potential ecological impacts of Mi-mediated resistance are broader than previously assumed. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  14. Role of dioxygenase α-DOX2 and SA in basal response and in hexanoic acid-induced resistance of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants against Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angulo, Carlos; de la O Leyva, María; Finiti, Ivan; López-Cruz, Jaime; Fernández-Crespo, Emma; García-Agustín, Pilar; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2015-03-01

    Resistance of tomato (Solanum Lycopersicum) to the fungal pathogen Botrytis cinerea requires complex interplay between hormonal signalling. In this study, we explored the involvement of new oxylipins in the tomato basal and induced response to this necrotroph through the functional analysis of the tomato α-dioxygenase2 (α-DOX2)-deficient mutant divaricata. We also investigated the role of SA in the defence response against this necrotrophic fungus using SA-deficient tomato nahG plants. The plants lacking dioxigenase α-DOX2, which catalyses oxylipins production from fatty acids, were more susceptible to Botrytis, and hexanoic acid-induced resistance (Hx-IR) was impaired; hence α-DOX2 is required for both tomato defence and the enhanced protection conferred by natural inducer hexanoic acid (Hx) against B. cinerea. The divaricata plants accumulated less pathogen-induced callose and presented lower levels of jasmonic acid (JA) and 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) upon infection if compared to the wild type. Glutathion-S-transferase (GST) gene expression decreased and ROS production significantly increased in Botrytis-infected divaricata plants. These results indicate that absence of α-DOX2 influences the hormonal changes, oxidative burst and callose deposition that occur upon Botrytis infection in tomato. The study of SA-deficient nahG tomato plants showed that the plants with low SA levels displayed increased resistance to Botrytis, but were unable to display Hx-IR. This supports the involvement of SA in Hx-IR. NaghG plants displayed reduced callose and ROS accumulation upon infection and an increased GST expression. This reflects a positive relationship between SA and these defensive mechanisms in tomato. Finally, Hx boosted the pathogen-induced callose in nahG plants, suggesting that this priming mechanism is SA-independent. Our results support the involvement of the oxylipins pathway and SA in tomato response to Botrytis, probably through complex crosstalk of

  15. Silencing and heterologous expression of ppo-2 indicate a specific function of a single polyphenol oxidase isoform in resistance of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) against Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Carolin; Dirks, Mareike E; Gronover, Christian Schulze; Prüfer, Dirk; Moerschbacher, Bruno M

    2012-02-01

    Dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) possesses an unusually high degree of disease resistance. As this plant exhibits high polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activity and PPO have been implicated in resistance against pests and pathogens, we analyzed the potential involvement of five PPO isoenzymes in the resistance of dandelion against Botrytis cinerea and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. Only one PPO (ppo-2) was induced during infection, and ppo-2 promoter and β-glucuronidase marker gene fusions revealed strong induction of the gene surrounding lesions induced by B. cinerea. Specific RNAi silencing reduced ppo-2 expression only, and concomitantly increased plant susceptibility to P. syringae pv. tomato. At 4 days postinoculation, P. syringae pv. tomato populations were strongly increased in the ppo-2 RNAi lines compared with wild-type plants. When the dandelion ppo-2 gene was expressed in Arabidopsis thaliana, a plant having no PPO gene, active protein was formed and protein extracts of the transgenic plants exhibited substrate-dependent antimicrobial activity against P. syringae pv. tomato. These results clearly indicate a strong contribution of a specific, single PPO isoform to disease resistance. Therefore, we propose that specific PPO isoenzymes be included in a new family of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins.

  16. Identification of tomato phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase-C (PI-PLC) family members and the role of PLC4 and PLC6 in HR and disease resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, J.H.; Abd-El-Haliem, A.; Fradin, E.F.; Berg, van den G.C.M.; Ekengren, S.K.; Meijer, H.J.G.; Seifi Abdolabad, A.R.; Bai, Y.; Have, ten A.; Munnik, T.; Thomma, B.P.H.J.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2010-01-01

    The perception of pathogen-derived elicitors by plants has been suggested to involve phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase-C (PI-PLC) signalling. Here we show that PLC isoforms are required for the hypersensitive response (HR) and disease resistance. We characterised the tomato [Solanum

  17. Cytogenetic and molecular studies on tomato chromosomes using diploid tomato and tomato monosomic additions in tetraploid potato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chang, S.B.

    2004-01-01

    Geneticists have studied the tomato, Lycopersicon esculentum, for several decades and now obtained a saturated linkage map on which numerous genes controlling morphological traits and disease resistances, and molecular markers have been positioned. They also investigated the chromosomes of tomato,

  18. The Ve-mediated resistance response of the tomato to Verticillium dahliae involves H2O2, peroxidase and lignins and drives PAL gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merino Fuencisla

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Verticillium dahliae is a fungal pathogen that infects a wide range of hosts. The only known genes for resistance to Verticillium in the Solanaceae are found in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Ve locus, formed by two linked genes, Ve1 and Ve2. To characterize the resistance response mediated by the tomato Ve gene, we inoculated two nearly isogenic tomato lines, LA3030 (ve/ve and LA3038 (Ve/Ve, with V. dahliae. Results We found induction of H2O2 production in roots of inoculated plants, followed by an increase in peroxidase activity only in roots of inoculated resistant plants. Phenylalanine-ammonia lyase (PAL activity was also increased in resistant roots 2 hours after inoculation, while induction of PAL activity in susceptible roots was not seen until 48 hours after inoculation. Phenylpropanoid metabolism was also affected, with increases in ferulic acid, p-coumaric acid, vanillin and p-hydroxybenzaldehyde contents in resistant roots after inoculation. Six tomato PAL cDNA sequences (PAL1 - PAL6 were found in the SolGenes tomato EST database. RT-PCR analysis showed that these genes were expressed in all organs of the plant, albeit at different levels. Real-time RT-PCR indicated distinct patterns of expression of the different PAL genes in V. dahliae-inoculated roots. Phylogenetic analysis of 48 partial PAL cDNAs corresponding to 19 plant species grouped angiosperm PAL sequences into four clusters, suggesting functional differences among the six tomato genes, with PAL2 and PAL6 presumably involved in lignification, and the remaining PAL genes implicated in other biological processes. An increase in the synthesis of lignins was found 16 and 28 days after inoculation in both lines; this increase was greater and faster to develop in the resistant line. In both resistant and susceptible inoculated plants, an increase in the ratio of guaiacyl/syringyl units was detected 16 days after inoculation, resulting from the lowered amount

  19. A New Israeli Tobamovirus Isolate Infects Tomato Plants Harboring Tm-22 Resistance Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Luria, Neta; Smith, Elisheva; Reingold, Victoria; Bekelman, Ilana; Lapidot, Moshe; Levin, Ilan; Elad, Nadav; Tam, Yehudit; Sela, Noa; Abu-Ras, Ahmad; Ezra, Nadav; Haberman, Ami; Yitzhak, Liron; Lachman, Oded; Dombrovsky, Aviv

    2017-01-01

    An outbreak of a new disease infecting tomatoes occurred in October-November 2014 at the Ohad village in Southern Israel. Symptomatic plants showed a mosaic pattern on leaves accompanied occasionally by narrowing of leaves and yellow spotted fruit. The disease spread mechanically and rapidly reminiscent of tobamovirus infection. Epidemiological studies showed the spread of the disease in various growing areas, in the South and towards the Southeast and Northern parts of the country within a y...

  20. Root-associated bacterial endophytes from Ralstonia solanacearum resistant and susceptible tomato cultivars and their pathogen antagonistic effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reshmi eUpreti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to assess if the root-associated native bacterial endophytes in tomato have any bearing in governing the host resistance to the wilt pathogen Ralstonia solanacearum. Internal colonization of roots by bacterial endophytes was confirmed through confocal imaging after SYTO-9 staining. Endophytes were isolated from surface-sterilized roots of 4-week old seedlings of known wilt resistant (R tomato cultivar Arka Abha and susceptible (S cv. Arka Vikas on nutrient agar after plating the tissue homogenate. Arka Abha displayed more diversity with nine distinct organisms while Arka Vikas showed five species with two common organisms (Pseudomonas oleovorans and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Screening for general indicators of biocontrol potential showed more isolates from Arka Abha positive for siderophore, HCN and antibiotic biosynthesis than from Arka Vikas. Direct challenge against the pathogen indicated strong antagonism by three Arka Abha isolates (P. oleovorans, Pantoea ananatis and Enterobacter cloacae and moderate activity by three others, while just one isolate from Arka Vikas (P. oleovorans showed strong antagonism. Validation for the presence of bacterial endophytes on three R cultivars (Arka Alok, Arka Ananya, Arka Samrat showed 8-9 antagonistic bacteria in them in comparison with four species in the three S cultivars (Arka Ashish, Arka Meghali, Arka Saurabhav. Altogether 34 isolates belonging to five classes, 16 genera and 27 species with 23 of them exhibiting pathogen antagonism were isolated from the four R cultivars against 17 isolates under three classes, seven genera and 13 species from the four S cultivars with eight isolates displaying antagonistic effects. The prevalence of higher endophytic bacterial diversity and more antagonistic organisms associated with the seedling roots of resistant cultivars over susceptible genotypes suggest a possible role by the root-associated endophytes in natural defense against the

  1. Detection and management of antiviral resistance for influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boivin, Guy

    2013-11-01

    Neuraminidase inhibitors (NAIs) are first-line agents for the treatment and prevention of influenza virus infections. As for other antivirals, the development of resistance to NAIs has become an important concern particularly in the case of A(H1N1) viruses and oseltamivir. The most frequently reported change conferring oseltamivir resistance in that viral context is the H275Y neuraminidase mutation (N1 numbering). Recent studies have shown that, in the presence of the appropriate permissive mutations, the H275Y variant can retain virulence and transmissibility in some viral backgrounds. Most oseltamivir-resistant influenza A virus infections can be managed with the use of inhaled or intravenous zanamivir, another NAI. New NAI compounds and non-neuraminidase agents as well as combination therapies are currently in clinical evaluation for the treatment for severe influenza infections. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. A nuclear localization for Avr2 from Fusarium oxysporum is required to activate the tomato resistance protein I-2

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    Lisong eMa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Plant pathogens secrete effector proteins to promote host colonisation. During infection of tomato xylem vessels, Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol secretes the Avr2 effector protein. Besides being a virulence factor, Avr2 is recognised intracellularly by the tomato I-2 resistance protein, resulting in the induction of host defences. Here, we show that AVR2 is highly expressed in root- and xylem-colonising hyphae three days post inoculation of roots. Co-expression of I-2 with AVR2 deletion constructs using agroinfiltration in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves revealed that, except for the N-terminal 17 amino acids, the entire AVR2 protein is required to trigger I-2-mediated cell death. The truncated Avr2 variants are still able to form homo-dimers, showing that the central region of Avr2 is required for dimerization. Simultaneous production of I-2 and Avr2 chimeras carrying various subcellular localization signals in N. benthamiana leaves revealed that a nuclear localization of Avr2 is required to trigger I-2-dependent cell death. Nuclear exclusion of Avr2 prevented its activation of I-2, suggesting that Avr2 is recognised by I-2 in the nucleus.

  3. Fontes de resistência a Scrobipalpula absoluta (Meyrick, 1917 em tomateiro Sources of resistance to Scrobipalpula absoluta (Meyrick, 1917 in tomato

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    André Luiz Lourenção

    1984-01-01

    Full Text Available Com o objetivo de encontrar fontes de resistência à traça Scrobipalpula absoluta (Meyr., em tomateiro, foram avaliados diversos genótipos das espécies Lycopersicon esculentum, L. pimpinellifolium e L. peruvianum. Em triagem inicial em casa de vegetação, as introduções NAV 29 e NAV 115, pertencentes a L. peruvianum, destacaram-se como os genótipos mais resistentes a esse inseto, apresentando a menor perda de área foliar. Uma linhagem de L. pimpinellifolium, NAV 98, mostrou-se menos atacada nos ponteiros que os genótipos de L. esculentum. Uma mistura de pólen de NAV 29 e NAV 115 foi utilizada para polinização de plantas dessas duas introduções, e as sementes obtidas desse processo denominaram-se NAV 29/115. A seguir, foi feito experimento em casa de vegetação envolvendo NAV 29/115, NAV 98, 'Rio Grande' e 'Pavesetter', sendo esses dois cultivares de L. esculentum de crescimento determinado. A infestação foi artificial, através de plantas fortemente infestadas pela traça e colocadas entre as plantas do experimento. Avaliações feitas periodicamente estimando visualmente a porcentagem de área foliar consumida pelas lagartas de S. absoluta, evidenciaram alta resistência de NAV 29/115 em relação aos demais materiais. O presente trabalho mostra que NAV 29, NAV 115 e NAV 29/115, genótipos de L. peruvianum, constituem promissoras fontes de resistência à traça S. absoluta.Eighty-five wild and cultivated tomato accessions, being 71 Lycopersicon esculentum, 10 L. pimpinellifolium and 4 L. peruvianum, were evaluated in greenhouse, under artificial infestation, for resistance to Scrobipalpula absoluta (Meyr. (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae. NAV 29 and NAV 115 (L. peruvianum showed the least foliar damage while NAV 98 (L. pimpinellifolium was less attacked in the buds than cultivated tomatoes (L. esculentum. Then, a comparative trial was carried out among the Rio Grande and Pacesetter tomato cultivars, NAV 98 and NAV 29/115 (mixed

  4. Fungicide resistance of Botrytis cinerea in tomato greenhouses in the Canary Islands and effectiveness of non-chemical treatments against gray mold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez, A; Acosta, A; Rodríguez, C

    2014-09-01

    Tomato greenhouses in the Canary Islands, Spain, were surveyed to estimate frequencies of resistance to benzimidazoles, dicarboximides, anilinopyrimidines and N-phenylcarbamates in Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to carbendazim, iprodione, pyrimethanil and diethofencarb was found in 74.2, 86.4, 28.8 and 31.8% of isolates, respectively. Benzimidazole- and anilinopyrimide-resistant isolates were highly resistant, showing EC50 values above 500 µg/ml carbendazim and a mean EC50 value of 28.42 µg/ml pyrimethanil, respectively. By contrast, a low level of resistance was observed among dicarboximide-resistant isolates (mean EC50 value of 1.81 µg/ml iprodione). Phenotypes with double resistance to carbendazim and iprodione, and triple resistance to carbendazim, iprodione and pyrimethanil were the most common, occurring in 36.4 and 28.8% of isolates. The surveyed greenhouses had never been treated with fenhexamid and Signum™ (pre-packed mixture of boscalid and pyraclostrobin), and baseline sensitivities of B. cinerea isolates to these fungicides were determined. The EC50 values were within the range of 0.009-0.795 µg/ml fenhexamid and of 0.014-0.48 µg/ml Signum. In addition, available formulations based on elicitors of plant defense response and biocontrol agents were evaluated against B. cinerea in tomato plants under semi-controlled greenhouse conditions, the yeast Candida sake CPA-1 being able to reduce gray mold significantly when it was applied on petiole wounds and the plants were inoculated 24 h later. Likewise, C. sake was effective against B. cinerea in harvested tomato fruits, yeast-treated tomatoes showed a 70.66 and 30.31% reduction in the diameters of decay lesions compared with controls after 10 days of storage at 20 and 9 °C, respectively.

  5. Inducible Expression of the De-Novo Designed Antimicrobial Peptide SP1-1 in Tomato Confers Resistance to Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria.

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    Areli Herrera Diaz

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are small peptides with less than 50 amino acids and are part of the innate immune response in almost all organisms, including bacteria, vertebrates, invertebrates and plants. AMPs are active against a broad-spectrum of pathogens. The inducible expression of AMPs in plants is a promising approach to combat plant pathogens with minimal negative side effects, such as phytotoxicity or infertility. In this study, inducible expression of the de-novo designed AMP SP1-1 in Micro Tom tomato protected tomato fruits against bacterial spot disease caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. vesicatoria. The peptide SP1-1 was targeted to the apoplast which is the primary infection site for plant pathogens, by fusing SP1-1 peptide to the signal peptide RsAFP1 of radish (Raphanus sativus. The pathogen inducibility of the expression was enabled by using an optimized inducible 4XW2/4XS promoter. As a result, the tomato fruits of independently generated SP1-1 transgenic lines were significantly more resistant to X. campestris pv. vesicatoria than WT tomato fruits. In transgenic lines, bacterial infection was reduced up to 65% in comparison to the infection of WT plants. Our study demonstrates that the combination of the 4XW2/4XS cis-element from parsley with the synthetic antimicrobial peptide SP1-1 is a good alternative to protect tomato fruits against infections with X. campestris pv. vesicatoria.

  6. Novel Mutations Detected in Avirulence Genes Overcoming Tomato Cf Resistance Genes in Isolates of a Japanese Population of Cladosporium fulvum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iida, Yuichiro; van 't Hof, Pieter; Beenen, Henriek; Mesarich, Carl; Kubota, Masaharu; Stergiopoulos, Ioannis; Mehrabi, Rahim; Notsu, Ayumi; Fujiwara, Kazuki; Bahkali, Ali; Abd-Elsalam, Kamel; Collemare, Jérôme; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2015-01-01

    Leaf mold of tomato is caused by the biotrophic fungus Cladosporium fulvum which complies with the gene-for-gene system. The disease was first reported in Japan in the 1920s and has since been frequently observed. Initially only race 0 isolates were reported, but since the consecutive introduction of resistance genes Cf-2, Cf-4, Cf-5 and Cf-9 new races have evolved. Here we first determined the virulence spectrum of 133 C. fulvum isolates collected from 22 prefectures in Japan, and subsequently sequenced the avirulence (Avr) genes Avr2, Avr4, Avr4E, Avr5 and Avr9 to determine the molecular basis of overcoming Cf genes. Twelve races of C. fulvum with a different virulence spectrum were identified, of which races 9, 2.9, 4.9, 4.5.9 and 4.9.11 occur only in Japan. The Avr genes in many of these races contain unique mutations not observed in races identified elsewhere in the world including (i) frameshift mutations and (ii) transposon insertions in Avr2, (iii) point mutations in Avr4 and Avr4E, and (iv) deletions of Avr4E, Avr5 and Avr9. New races have developed by selection pressure imposed by consecutive introductions of Cf-2, Cf-4, Cf-5 and Cf-9 genes in commercially grown tomato cultivars. Our study shows that molecular variations to adapt to different Cf genes in an isolated C. fulvum population in Japan are novel but overall follow similar patterns as those observed in populations from other parts of the world. Implications for breeding of more durable C. fulvum resistant varieties are discussed.

  7. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TS WV, weeds and thrip vectors in the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L. in the Andean region of Cundinamarca (Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everth E Ebratt R

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence and distribution of the TSWV, weeds and thrip vectors in major tomato producing areas in the Andean department of Cundinamarca (Oriente, Sumapaz and Ubate provinces were assessed with the DAS ELISA technique, evaluating the presence of the TSWV in tomato tissue, associated thrips and weeds. High incidences were observed in different provinces of the Andean department of Cundinamarca. The average viral incidence reached 23.3% in Sumapaz, 19.4% in Oriente and 4% in Ubate. The symptoms observed were: brown spots and concentric rings in the leaf area, stems and fruits; browning and spotting in the flower; and wilting in the leaves, stems and flowers. The thrip species with the highest presence were Frankliniella occidentalis, followed by Thrips palmi and Thrips tabaci. We determined the important role of weeds as inoculum sources and vector reservoirs for the species Emilia sonchifolia and Amaranthus dubius

  8. First report of Potato virus V and Peru tomato mosaic virus on tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) orchards of Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Ecuador, tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) represents an important cash crop for hundreds of small farmers. In 2013, leaves from tamarillo plants showing severe virus-like symptoms (mosaic, mottling and leaf deformation) were collected from old orchards in Pichincha and Tungurahua. Double-stranded RN...

  9. Transgenic resistance to Citrus tristeza virus in grapefruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Febres, Vicente J; Lee, Richard F; Moore, Gloria A

    2008-01-01

    Grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) transgenic plants transformed with a variety of constructs derived from the Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) genome were tested for their resistance to the virus. Most transgenic lines were susceptible (27 lines), a few were partially resistant (6 lines) and only one line, transformed with the 3' end of CTV was resistant. Transgene expression levels and siRNA accumulation were determined to identify whether the resistance observed was RNA-mediated. The responses were varied. At least one resistant plant from a partially resistant line showed no steady-state transgene mRNA, siRNA accumulation and no viral RNA, implicating posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) as the mechanism of resistance. The most resistant line showed no transgene mRNA accumulation and promoter methylation of cytosines in all contexts, the hallmark of RNA-directed DNA methylation and transcriptional gene silencing (TGS). The variety of responses, even among clonally propagated plants, is unexplained but is not unique to citrus. The genetics of CTV, host response or other factors may be responsible for this variability.

  10. First report of Tomato chlorosis virus infecting sweet pepper in Costa Rica

    Science.gov (United States)

    In September 2008, a survey of whiteflies and whitefly-borne viruses was performed in greenhouses in the province of Cartago, Costa Rica. During this survey, sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum cv. Nataly) plants showing interveinal chlorosis, enations, necrosis, and mild upward leaf curling were observed...

  11. Transcriptome Analysis of Capsicum Chlorosis Virus-Induced Hypersensitive Resistance Response in Bell Capsicum.

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    Shirani M K Widana Gamage

    Full Text Available Capsicum chlorosis virus (CaCV is an emerging pathogen of capsicum, tomato and peanut crops in Australia and South-East Asia. Commercial capsicum cultivars with CaCV resistance are not yet available, but CaCV resistance identified in Capsicum chinense is being introgressed into commercial Bell capsicum. However, our knowledge of the molecular mechanisms leading to the resistance response to CaCV infection is limited. Therefore, transcriptome and expression profiling data provide an important resource to better understand CaCV resistance mechanisms.We assembled capsicum transcriptomes and analysed gene expression using Illumina HiSeq platform combined with a tag-based digital gene expression system. Total RNA extracted from CaCV/mock inoculated CaCV resistant (R and susceptible (S capsicum at the time point when R line showed a strong hypersensitive response to CaCV infection was used in transcriptome assembly. Gene expression profiles of R and S capsicum in CaCV- and buffer-inoculated conditions were compared. None of the genes were differentially expressed (DE between R and S cultivars when mock-inoculated, while 2484 genes were DE when inoculated with CaCV. Functional classification revealed that the most highly up-regulated DE genes in R capsicum included pathogenesis-related genes, cell death-associated genes, genes associated with hormone-mediated signalling pathways and genes encoding enzymes involved in synthesis of defense-related secondary metabolites. We selected 15 genes to confirm DE expression levels by real-time quantitative PCR.DE transcript profiling data provided comprehensive gene expression information to gain an understanding of the underlying CaCV resistance mechanisms. Further, we identified candidate CaCV resistance genes in the CaCV-resistant C. annuum x C. chinense breeding line. This knowledge will be useful in future for fine mapping of the CaCV resistance locus and potential genetic engineering of resistance into Ca

  12. Post-transcriptional regulation of fruit ripening and disease resistance in tomato by the vacuolar protease SlVPE3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weihao; Cai, Jianghua; Wang, Peiwen; Tian, Shiping; Qin, Guozheng

    2017-03-07

    Proteases represent one of the most abundant classes of enzymes in eukaryotes and are known to play key roles in many biological processes in plants. However, little is known about their functions in fruit ripening and disease resistance, which are unique to flowering plants and required for seed maturation and dispersal. Elucidating the genetic mechanisms of fruit ripening and disease resistance is an important goal given the biological and dietary significance of fruit. Through expression profile analyses of genes encoding tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cysteine proteases, we identify a number of genes whose expression increases during fruit ripening. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated repression of SlVPE3, a vacuolar protease gene, results in alterations in fruit pigmentation, lycopene biosynthesis, and ethylene production, suggesting that SlVPE3 is necessary for normal fruit ripening. Surprisingly, the SlVPE3 RNAi fruit are more susceptible to the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Quantitative proteomic analysis identified 314 proteins that differentially accumulate upon SlVPE3 silencing, including proteins associated with fruit ripening and disease resistance. To identify the direct SlVPE3 targets and mechanisms contributing to fungal pathogen resistance, we perform a screening of SlVPE3-interacting proteins using co-immunoprecipitation coupled with mass spectrometry. We show that SlVPE3 is required for the cleavage of the serine protease inhibitor KTI4, which contributes to resistance against the fungal pathogen B. cinerea. Our findings contribute to elucidating gene regulatory networks and mechanisms that control fruit ripening and disease resistance responses.

  13. Antiviral resistance in herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus infections: diagnosis and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piret, Jocelyne; Boivin, Guy

    2016-12-01

    Aciclovir (ACV) is the first-line drug for the management of herpes simplex virus (HSV) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) infections. Long-term administration of ACV for the treatment of severe infections in immunocompromised patients can lead to the development of drug resistance. Furthermore, the emergence of isolates resistant to ACV is increasingly recognized in immunocompetent individuals with herpetic keratitis. This review describes the mechanisms involved in drug resistance for HSV and VZV, the laboratory diagnosis and management of patients with infections refractory to ACV therapy. Genotypic testing is more frequently performed for the diagnosis of infections caused by drug-resistant HSV or VZV isolates. Molecular biology-based systems for the generation of recombinant viruses have been developed to link unknown mutations with their drug phenotypes. Fast and sensitive methods based on next-generation sequencing will improve the detection of heterogeneous viral populations of drug-resistant viruses and their temporal changes during antiviral therapy, which could allow better patient management. Novel promising compounds acting on targets that differ from the viral DNA polymerase are under clinical development. Antiviral drug resistance monitoring for HSV and VZV is required for a rational use of antiviral therapy in high-risk populations.

  14. Hepatitis C Virus Resistance to Carbohydrate-Binding Agents.

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    Laure Izquierdo

    Full Text Available Carbohydrate binding agents (CBAs, including natural lectins, are more and more considered as broad-spectrum antivirals. These molecules are able to directly inhibit many viruses such as Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV, Hepatitis C Virus (HCV, Dengue Virus, Ebola Virus or Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus through binding to envelope protein N-glycans. In the case of HIV, it has been shown that CBAs select for mutant viruses with N-glycosylation site deletions which are more sensitive to neutralizing antibodies. In this study we aimed at evaluating the HCV resistance to CBAs in vitro. HCV was cultivated in the presence of increasing Galanthus nivalis agglutinin (GNA, Cyanovirin-N, Concanavalin-A or Griffithsin concentrations, during more than eight weeks. At the end of lectin exposure, the genome of the isolated strains was sequenced and several potential resistance mutations in the E1E2 envelope glycoproteins were identified. The effect of these mutations on viral fitness as well as on sensitivity to inhibition by lectins, soluble CD81 or the 3/11 neutralizing antibody was assessed. Surprisingly, none of these mutations, alone or in combination, conferred resistance to CBAs. In contrast, we observed that some mutants were more sensitive to 3/11 or CD81-LEL inhibition. Additionally, several mutations were identified in the Core and the non-structural proteins. Thus, our results suggest that in contrast to HIV, HCV resistance to CBAs is not directly conferred by mutations in the envelope protein genes but could occur through an indirect mechanism involving mutations in other viral proteins. Further investigations are needed to completely elucidate the underlying mechanisms.

  15. Marker assisted identification of tospovirus resistant tomato genotypes in segregating progenies Identificação de genótipos de tomateiro resistentes a tospovirus em progênies segregantes com marcador molecular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildon Rodrigues do Nascimento

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The SCAR (Sequence Characterized Amplified Region 'Sw-421' molecular marker is located at 1.0 cM from the Sw-5 allele, originated from Lycopersicon peruvianum (L., which confers resistance to the tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV. However, it had not been tested yet in advanced tomato populations. The goal of this study was to distinguish resistant homozygotes (Sw-5/Sw-5 and heterozygotes (Sw-5/Sw-5+ from susceptible (Sw-5+/Sw-5+ plants in crossing populations with the Stevens cultivar and advanced backcrossing populations by using 'Sw421' SCAR marker. The amplification of 940 bp and 900 bp bands characterized the resistant homozygotes and susceptible controls, respectively. A two band pattern (900 bp and 940 bp was observed in heterozygote genotypes (Sw-5/Sw-5+, which confirmed the co-dominant inheritance mechanism of the marker. Fifty seven plants from the isogenic progenies were characterized based on bands pattern: 18 plants (31.6% were identified as resistant homozygotes, 8 plants (14.0% as resistant heterozygotes and 31 plants (54.4% were characterized as susceptible. The SCAR 'Sw-421' marker is an important tool for selection and pyramid resistance alleles, mainly when other resistance sources to the TSWV are available, such as the Rey de los Tempranos source.O marcador molecular SCAR 'Sw-421' é localizado a 1,0 cM do alelo Sw-5, proveniente de Lycopersicon peruvianum (L., que confere resistência ao vira-çabeça em tomateiro. Contudo, o mesmo ainda não havia sido testado em populações avançadas de tomateiro. O objetivo do trabalho foi distinguir plantas resistentes homozigotas (Sw-5/Sw-5, resistentes heterozigotas (Sw-5/Sw-5+ e suscetíveis (Sw-5+/Sw-5+ pelo marcador SCAR 'Sw-421'. As amplificações de bandas de 940 pb e 900 pb caracterizaram os genótipos resistentes homozigotos e suscetíveis, respectivamente. Duas bandas (900 pb e 940 pb foram observadas nos genótipos heterozigotos, confirmando a herança codominante do marcador

  16. Molecular characterization and infectivity of a Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus variant associated with newly emerging yellow mosaic disease of eggplant in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee Sunil K

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Begomoviruses have emerged as serious problem for vegetable and fiber crops in the recent past, frequently in tropical and subtropical region of the world. The association of begomovirus with eggplant yellow mosaic disease is hitherto unknown apart from one report from Thailand. A survey in Nagpur, Central India, in 2009-2010 showed severe incidence of eggplant yellow mosaic disease. Here, we have identified and characterized a begomovirus responsible for the newly emerging yellow mosaic disease of eggplant in India. Results The complete DNA-A and DNA-B genomic components of the causative virus were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence analysis of DNA-A showed that it shared highest 97.6% identity with Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus-India[India:Udaipur:Okra:2007] and lowest 87.9% identity with Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus-India[India:NewDelhi:Papaya:2005], while DNA-B showed highest 94.1% identity with ToLCNDV-IN[IN:UD:Ok:07] and lowest 76.2% identity with ToLCNDV-India[India:Lucknow]. Thus, it appears that this begomovirus is a variant of ubiquitous ToLCNDV and hence, we suggest the name ToLCNDV-India[India:Nagpur:Eggplant:2009] for this variant. The pathogenicity of ToLCNDV-IN[IN:Nag:Egg:09] isolate was confirmed by agroinfiltraion and dimeric clones of DNA-A and DNA-B induced characteristic yellow mosaic symptoms in eggplants and leaf curling in tomato plants. Conclusion This is the first report of a ToLCNDV variant moving to a new agriculturally important host, eggplant and causing yellow mosaic disease. This is also a first experimental demonstration of Koch's postulate for a begomovirus associated with eggplant yellow mosaic disease.

  17. Using Resurrected Ancestral Proviral Proteins to Engineer Virus Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Asunción; Arco, Rocio; Ibarra-Molero, Beatriz; Sanchez-Ruiz, Jose M

    2017-05-09

    Proviral factors are host proteins hijacked by viruses for processes essential for virus propagation such as cellular entry and replication. Pathogens and their hosts co-evolve. It follows that replacing a proviral factor with a functional ancestral form of the same protein could prevent viral propagation without fatally compromising organismal fitness. Here, we provide proof of concept of this notion. Thioredoxins serve as general oxidoreductases in all known cells. We report that several laboratory resurrections of Precambrian thioredoxins display substantial levels of functionality within Escherichia coli. Unlike E. coli thioredoxin, however, these ancestral thioredoxins are not efficiently recruited by the bacteriophage T7 for its replisome and therefore prevent phage propagation in E. coli. These results suggest an approach to the engineering of virus resistance. Diseases caused by viruses may have a devastating effect in agriculture. We discuss how the suggested approach could be applied to the engineering of plant virus resistance. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The effector protein Avr2 of the xylem-colonizing fungus Fusarium oxysporum activates the tomato resistance protein I-2 intracellularly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houterman, Petra M; Ma, Lisong; van Ooijen, Gerben; de Vroomen, Marianne J; Cornelissen, Ben J C; Takken, Frank L W; Rep, Martijn

    2009-06-01

    To promote host colonization, many plant pathogens secrete effector proteins that either suppress or counteract host defences. However, when these effectors are recognized by the host's innate immune system, they trigger resistance rather than promoting virulence. Effectors are therefore key molecules in determining disease susceptibility or resistance. We show here that Avr2, secreted by the vascular wilt fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol), shows both activities: it is required for full virulence in a susceptible host and also triggers resistance in tomato plants carrying the resistance gene I-2. Point mutations in AVR2, causing single amino acid changes, are associated with I-2-breakingFol strains. These point mutations prevent recognition by I-2, both in tomato and when both genes are co-expressed in leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Fol strains carrying the Avr2 variants are equally virulent, showing that virulence and avirulence functions can be uncoupled. Although Avr2 is secreted into the xylem sap when Fol colonizes tomato, the Avr2 protein can be recognized intracellularly by I-2, implying uptake by host cells.

  19. Ultrastructural Changes Caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in Meloidogyne javanica Induced Giant Cells in Fusarium Resistant and Susceptible Tomato Cultivars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattah, F.; Webster, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) seedlings, susceptible (cv. Pearson A-I Improved) and resistant (cv. Pearson Improved) to race 1 Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Sacc.) Snyd &Hans., were inoculated with Meloidogyne javanica (Trueb) Chitwood second-stage juveniles and 3 weeks later with race 1 F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici spores. One week after fungal inoculation, no fungus was visible in root tissue of the tomato cultivars and the giant cells were normal. Two weeks after fungal inoculation, abundant hyphae were visible in xylem tissues of Fusarium-susceptible but not of Fusarium-resistant plants. In susceptible plants, giant cell degeneration occurred, characterized by membrane and organelle disruption. In addition, where hyphae were in direct contact with the giant cell, dissolution of the giant cell wall occurred. Three weeks after fungal inoculation, fungal hyphae and spores were visible inside xylem tissues and giant cells in Fusarium-susceptible plants and in xylem tissue of the resistant plants. In susceptible and resistant plants, giant cell degeneration was apparent. Giant cell walls were completely broken down in Fusarium-susceptible tomato plants. In both cultivars infected by Fusarium, giant cell nuclei became spherical and dark inclusions occurred within the chromatin material which condensed adjacent to the fragmented nuclear membrane. No such ultrastructural changes were seen in the giant cells of control plants inoculated with nematode alone. Giant cell deterioration in both cultivars is probably caused by toxic fungal metabolites. PMID:19295778

  20. Characterization of polygenic resistance to powdery mildew in tomato at cytological, biochemical and gene expression level

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li Chengwei,; Faino, L.; Dong, Lin; Fan, Junmei; Kiss, L.; Giovanni, de C.; Lebeda, A.; Scott, J.; Matsuda, Y.; Toyoda, H.; Lindhout, P.; Visser, R.G.F.; Bonnema, A.B.; Bai, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research in the area of plant innate immunity has increased considerably our understanding of the molecular mechanisms associated with resistance controlled by a dominant resistance gene. In contrast, little is known about the molecular basis underlying the resistance conferred by

  1. Characterization of resistance genes to Cladosporium fulvum on the short arm of chromosome 1 of tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanstra, J.

    2000-01-01

    Plant breeders generally use qualitative resistance that is associated with a hypersensitive reaction (HR) to obtain cultivars that are resistant to pathogens and pests. The genetics of this resistance is based on the gene-for-gene relationship, which involves the product of a plant

  2. New insecticides for management of tomato yellow leaf curl, a virus vectored by the silverleaf whitefly, Bemisia tabaci

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smith, H A; Giurcanu, M C

    2014-01-01

    .... The purpose was to reveal differences in residual efficacy of four materials that are nearing registration for use on tomato-cyazypyr, flupyradifurone, pyrafluquinazon, and sulfoxaflor-and to compare...

  3. Development of transgenic watermelon resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus and Watermelon mosaic virus by using a single chimeric transgene construct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Ku, Hsin-Mei; Chiang, Yi-Hua; Ho, Hsiu-Yin; Yu, Tsong-Ann; Jan, Fuh-Jyh

    2012-10-01

    Watermelon, an important fruit crop worldwide, is prone to attack by several viruses that often results in destructive yield loss. To develop a transgenic watermelon resistant to multiple virus infection, a single chimeric transgene comprising a silencer DNA from the partial N gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) fused to the partial coat protein (CP) gene sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) was constructed and transformed into watermelon (cv. Feeling) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Single or multiple transgene copies randomly inserted into various locations in the genome were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Transgenic watermelon R(0) plants were individually challenged with CMV, CGMMV or WMV, or with a mixture of these three viruses for resistance evaluation. Two lines were identified to exhibit resistance to CMV, CGMMV, WMV individually, and a mixed inoculation of the three viruses. The R(1) progeny of the two resistant R(0) lines showed resistance to CMV and WMV, but not to CGMMV. Low level accumulation of transgene transcripts in resistant plants and small interfering (si) RNAs specific to CMV and WMV were readily detected in the resistant R(1) plants by northern blot analysis, indicating that the resistance was established via RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Loss of the CGMMV CP-transgene fragment in R1 progeny might be the reason for the failure to resistant CGMMV infection, as shown by the absence of a hybridization signal and no detectable siRNA specific to CGMMV in Southern and northern blot analyses. In summary, this study demonstrated that fusion of different viral CP gene fragments in transgenic watermelon contributed to multiple virus resistance via PTGS. The construct and resistant watermelon lines developed in this study could be used in a watermelon breeding program for resistance to multiple viruses.

  4. Genome Sequences of Two Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato Race 1 Strains, Isolated from Tomato Fields in California

    OpenAIRE

    Thapa, Shree P.; Coaker, Gitta

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato race 1 strains have evolved to overcome genetic resistance in tomato. Here, we present the draft genome sequences of two race 1 P.?syringae pv. tomato strains, A9 and 407, isolated from diseased tomato plants in California.

  5. Advanced loop-mediated isothermal amplification method for sensitive and specific detection of Tomato chlorosis virus using a uracil DNA glycosylase to control carry-over contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kil, Eui-Joon; Kim, Sunhoo; Lee, Ye-Ji; Kang, Eun-Ha; Lee, Minji; Cho, Sang-Ho; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Lee, Kyeong-Yeoll; Heo, Noh-Youl; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kwon, Suk-Tae; Lee, Sukchan

    2015-03-01

    In 2013, Tomato chlorosis virus (ToCV) was identified in symptomatic tomato plants in Korea. In the present study, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method was developed using four specific primers designed against ORF6 in ToCV RNA2 to detect ToCV rapidly and with high sensitivity. The optimized reaction involved incubation of a reaction mixture containing 2U Bst DNA polymerase and 4mM MgSO4 for 1h at 60-62 °C. Although specific and rapid detection of ToCV by LAMP was confirmed, false-positive reactions caused by carry-over contamination sometimes occurred because of the high sensitivity of LAMP compared with other detection methods. To prevent false-positive reactions, dUTP was substituted for dTTP and uracil-DNA glycosylase (UDG) was added to the LAMP reaction. First, the LAMP reaction was conducted successfully with substitution of dUTP for dTTP. Before the next reaction, LAMP products with incorporated dUTP were cleaved selectively by UDG without any effect on thymine-containing DNA (template DNA). This modified LAMP method complemented with UDG treatment to prevent carry-over contamination offers a potentially powerful method for detecting plant viruses. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The NSm proteins of phylogenetically related tospoviruses trigger Sw-5b–mediated resistance dissociated of their cell-to-cell movement function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leastro, Mikhail Oliveira; Oliveira, De Athos Silva; Pallás, Vicente; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús A.; Kormelink, Richard; Resende, Renato Oliveira

    2017-01-01

    The cell-to-cell movement protein (NSM) in members of the tospovirus species Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) has been recently identified as the effector of the single dominant Sw-5b resistance gene from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.). Although most TSWV isolates shows a

  7. The detection of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in individual thrips using real time fluorescent RT-PCR (TaqMan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonham, N; Smith, P; Walsh, K; Tame, J; Morris, J; Spence, N; Bennison, J; Barker, I

    2002-03-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is an important virus, economically in the UK, causing damaging disease in ornamental and vegetable crops. The virus is vectored by several species of thrips, most importantly the western flower thrips (Frankliniella occidentalis Pergande [Thysanoptera: Thripidae]). The vector thrips themselves constitute a damaging pest and are difficult to control completely. Monitoring thrips numbers is an important part of the control of virus, but does not give information on how many of the thrips are viruliferous. Monitoring the presence of viruliferous thrips at an early stage of an epidemic may lead to improved disease control, since virus can be spread effectively whilst vector pressure is low and symptoms may take several weeks to appear on some hosts. This paper describes the development of a sensitive and robust, high-throughput method for the detection of TSWV in individual insects based on TaqMan chemistry. The method incorporates a novel RNA specific internal control to increase the reliability of the results. Results are also presented on comparisons of different extraction methods, including insects taken from sticky traps, for high-throughout testing. Implementation of a method such as this for the reliable detection of TSWV in individual thrips would aid the understanding of the progress of TSWV epidemics, and offer an early disease warning system for growers.

  8. Detoxification activity and energy cost is attenuated in whiteflies feeding on tomato yellow leaf curl China virus-infected tobacco plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, J-B; Wang, Y-L; Wang, J; Wang, X-W; Liu, S-S

    2013-10-01

    The begomovirus Tomato yellow leaf curl China virus (TYLCCNV) can benefit its vector, the whitefly Bemisia tabaci, through suppressing the defences of their shared host plants. However, the mechanisms of this vector-virus mutualism remain largely unknown on the insect side of the interaction. Here, we compared the transcriptional profiles of female adult whiteflies of B. tabaci Middle East-Asia Minor 1 feeding on TYLCCNV-free and TYLCCNV-infected tobacco plants using the next-generation sequencing technique and quantitative real-time PCR. Interestingly, the genes involved in the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway and detoxification enzyme were down-regulated in whiteflies feeding on virus-infected plants. Decreased detoxification activity costs less energy, which may reduce OXPHOS activity. Moreover, the genes involved in redox activity were also down-regulated, which may indicate that the reduced OXPHOS activity decreased reactive oxygen species production. Reduced detoxification activity is likely to attenuate energy costs, thereby enhancing the performance of whiteflies on virus-infected plants. These results provide further insight into the mechanisms of the plant-mediated whitefly-virus mutualism. Moreover, our study suggests that investigating the transcriptional profiles on the insect side of the interaction can advance our understanding of the tripartite interactions. © 2013 Royal Entomological Society.

  9. L. peruvianum as a source for resistance to C michiganensis ssp. michiganensis in tomato

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heusden, van S.; Vrielink, R.; Lindhout, P.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty three accessions of L. peruvianum were screened for resistance to Clavibater michiganensis ssp. michiganensis (bacterial canker). Resistance was detected in five accessions. One of these, L. peruvianum LA2157 was crossed with a susceptible accession of L. peruvainum and with the cultivated

  10. Within plant resistance to water flow in tomato and sweet melons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the evaporative flux method, measurements of transpiration flux and leaf water potential were used to calculate the total resistance to water flow using Ohm's law analogy. Measurements of tranpiration flux (Q) relationship, plant resistance calculated from the slope of their relationship, ranged from 6.57x10-01 to ...

  11. within plant resistance to water flow in tomato and sweet melons ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    In the evaporative flux method, measure- ments of transpiration flux and leaf water potential were used to calculate the total resistance to water flow using .... Plant resistance is modulated by changes in the status of water conducting system, ... The understanding of plant water relations in crop species have implications for ...

  12. A soluble form of the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) glycoprotein G(N) (G(N)-S) inhibits transmission of TSWV by Frankliniella occidentalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, A E; Kumar, N K K; Rotenberg, D; Ullman, D E; Wyman, E A; Zietlow, C; Willis, D K; German, T L

    2008-01-01

    Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is an economically important virus that is transmitted in a persistent propagative manner by its thrips vector, Frankliniella occidentalis. Previously, we found that a soluble form of the envelope glycoprotein G(N) (G(N)-S) specifically bound thrips midguts and reduced the amount of detectable virus inside midgut tissues. The aim of this research was to (i) determine if G(N)-S alters TSWV transmission by thrips and, if so, (ii) determine the duration of this effect. In one study, insects were given an acquisition access period (AAP) with G(N)-S mixed with purified virus and individual insects were assayed for transmission. We found that G(N)-S reduced the percent of transmitting adults by eightfold. In a second study, thrips were given an AAP on G(N)-S protein and then placed on TSWV-infected plant material. Individual insects were assayed for transmission over three time intervals of 2 to 3, 4 to 5, and 6 to 7 days post-adult eclosion. We observed a significant reduction in virus transmission that persisted to the same degree throughout the time course. Real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis of virus titer in individual insects revealed that the proportion of thrips infected with virus was reduced threefold when insects were preexposed to the G(N)-S protein as compared to no exposure to protein, and nontransmitters were not infected with virus. These results demonstrate that thrips transmission of a tospovirus can be reduced by exogenous viral glycoprotein.

  13. Impact of Piriformospora indica on tomato growth and on interaction with fungal and viral pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhro, Ahmad; Andrade-Linares, Diana Rocío; von Bargen, Susanne; Bandte, Martina; Büttner, Carmen; Grosch, Rita; Schwarz, Dietmar; Franken, Philipp

    2010-03-01

    Piriformospora indica is a root endophytic fungus with plant-promoting properties in numerous plant species and induces resistance against root and shoot pathogens in barley, wheat, and Arabidopsis. A study over several years showed that the endophyte P. indica colonised the roots of the most consumed vegetable crop tomato. P. indica improved the growth of tomato resulting in increased biomass of leaves by up to 20%. Limitation of disease severity caused by Verticillium dahliae by more than 30% was observed on tomato plants colonised by the endophyte. Further experiments were carried out in hydroponic cultures which are commonly used for the indoor production of tomatoes in central Europe. After adaptation of inoculation techniques (inoculum density, plant stage), it was shown that P. indica influences the concentration of Pepino mosaic virus in tomato shoots. The outcome of the interaction seems to be affected by light intensity. Most importantly, the endophyte increases tomato fruit biomass in hydroponic culture concerning fresh weight (up to 100%) and dry matter content (up to 20%). Hence, P. indica represents a suitable growth promoting endophyte for tomato which can be applied in production systems of this important vegetable plant not only in soil, but also in hydroponic cultures.

  14. [Examination of processed vegetable foods for the presence of common DNA sequences of genetically modified tomatoes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitagawa, Mamiko; Nakamura, Kosuke; Kondo, Kazunari; Ubukata, Shoji; Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    The contamination of processed vegetable foods with genetically modified tomatoes was investigated by the use of qualitative PCR methods to detect the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter (P35S) and the kanamycin resistance gene (NPTII). DNA fragments of P35S and NPTII were detected in vegetable juice samples, possibly due to contamination with the genomes of cauliflower mosaic virus infecting juice ingredients of Brassica species and soil bacteria, respectively. Therefore, to detect the transformation construct sequences of GM tomatoes, primer pairs were designed for qualitative PCR to specifically detect the border region between P35S and NPTII, and the border region between nopaline synthase gene promoter and NPTII. No amplification of the targeted sequences was observed using genomic DNA purified from the juice ingredients. The developed qualitative PCR method is considered to be a reliable tool to check contamination of products with GM tomatoes.

  15. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Wei

    Full Text Available The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2. However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G. Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3-7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface.

  16. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3-7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface.

  17. Genetic makeup of amantadine-resistant and oseltamivir-resistant human influenza A/H1N1 viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaraket, Hassan; Saito, Reiko; Suzuki, Yasushi; Baranovich, Tatiana; Dapat, Clyde; Caperig-Dapat, Isolde; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2010-04-01

    The emergence and widespread occurrence of antiviral drug-resistant seasonal human influenza A viruses, especially oseltamivir-resistant A/H1N1 virus, are major concerns. To understand the genetic background of antiviral drug-resistant A/H1N1 viruses, we performed full genome sequencing of prepandemic A/H1N1 strains. Seasonal influenza A/H1N1 viruses, including antiviral-susceptible viruses, amantadine-resistant viruses, and oseltamivir-resistant viruses, obtained from several areas in Japan during the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 influenza seasons were analyzed. Sequencing of the full genomes of these viruses was performed, and the phylogenetic relationships among the sequences of each individual genome segment were inferred. Reference genome sequences from the Influenza Virus Resource database were included to determine the closest ancestor for each segment. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the oseltamivir-resistant strain evolved from a reassortant oseltamivir-susceptible strain (clade 2B) which circulated in the 2007-2008 season by acquiring the H275Y resistance-conferring mutation in the NA gene. The oseltamivir-resistant lineage (corresponding to the Northern European resistant lineage) represented 100% of the H1N1 isolates from the 2008-2009 season and further acquired at least one mutation in each of the polymerase basic protein 2 (PB2), polymerase basic protein 1 (PB1), hemagglutinin (HA), and neuraminidase (NA) genes. Therefore, a reassortment event involving two distinct oseltamivir-susceptible lineages, followed by the H275Y substitution in the NA gene and other mutations elsewhere in the genome, contributed to the emergence of the oseltamivir-resistant lineage. In contrast, amantadine-resistant viruses from the 2007-2008 season distinctly clustered in clade 2C and were characterized by extensive amino acid substitutions across their genomes, suggesting that a fitness gap among its genetic components might have driven these mutations to maintain it in the

  18. Expression of tomato salicylic acid (SA)-responsive pathogenesis-related genes in Mi-1-mediated and SA-induced resistance to root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molinari, Sergio; Fanelli, Elena; Leonetti, Paola

    2014-04-01

    The expression pattern of pathogenesis-related genes PR-1, PR-2 and PR-5, considered as markers for salicylic acid (SA)-dependent systemic acquired resistance (SAR), was examined in the roots and shoots of tomato plants pre-treated with SA and subsequently infected with root-knot nematodes (RKNs) (Meloidogyne incognita). PR-1 was up-regulated in both roots and shoots of SA-treated plants, whereas the expression of PR-5 was enhanced only in roots. The over-expression of PR-1 in the whole plant occurred as soon as 1 day after SA treatment. Up-regulation of the PR-1 gene was considered to be the main marker of SAR elicitation. One day after treatment, plants were inoculated with active juveniles (J2s) of M. incognita. The number of J2s that entered the roots and started to develop was significantly lower in SA-treated than in untreated plants at 5 and 15 days after inoculation. The expression pattern of PR-1, PR-2 and PR-5 was also examined in the roots and shoots of susceptible and Mi-1-carrying resistant tomato plants infected by RKNs. Nematode infection produced a down-regulation of PR genes in both roots and shoots of SA-treated and untreated plants, and in roots of Mi-carrying resistant plants. Moreover, in resistant infected plants, PR gene expression, in particular PR-1 gene expression, was highly induced in shoots. Thus, nematode infection was demonstrated to elicit SAR in shoots of resistant plants. The data presented in this study show that the repression of host defence SA signalling is associated with the successful development of RKNs, and that SA exogenously added as a soil drench is able to trigger a SAR-like response to RKNs in tomato. © 2013 BSPP AND JOHN WILEY & SONS LTD.

  19. Quantitative trait loci for resistance to maize streak virus disease in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Maize streak virus disease is an important disease of maize in Kenya. In this study, we mapped and characterized quantitative trait loci affecting resistance to maize streak virus in maize populations of S4 families from the cross of one resistant MAL13 and one susceptible MAL9 recombinant inbred lines. Resistance was ...

  20. Redenção: nova cultivar de tomate para a indústria resistente a geminivírus e tospovírus Redenção: a new tomato cultivar for industry resistant to tospovirus and geminivirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edinardo Ferraz

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available 'Redenção' é uma cultivar de tomate para processamento industrial, resistente a geminivírus e tospovírus. Foi selecionada por seis ciclos de seleção, a partir do cruzamento entre o acesso "LA 3473" e a cultivar Viradoro. O acesso "LA 3473" é portador do gene TY-1 que confere tolerância ao Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV. A cultivar Viradoro, contendo em sua genealogia IPA-5, possui o gene Sw-5, oriundo da linhagem TSW-10, que confere resistência a tospovírus. 'Redenção' foi selecionada empregando-se os métodos bulk e seleção de plantas individuais com controle do pedigree. Apresenta formato de frutos alongados, com peso médio de 110 g, boa firmeza, coloração de polpa vermelho intenso e uniforme. Em avaliações de campo apresentou produtividade média de 88,9 t/ha, valor equivalente a híbridos e cultivares do mercado. Espera-se que com essa nova cultivar, consolide-se a revitalização da cadeia agroprocessadora do tomate na região do Sub-Médio São Francisco, considerada por suas características edafo-climáticas, como uma das melhores regiões para cultivo do tomateiro no Brasil.Redenção is a tomato cultivar for processing, resistant to tospovirus and geminivirus. It is a result of a six cycle selection from the cross between access LA 3473 and the cv. Viradoro. The access LA 3473 has the gene TY-1 that confers tolerance to the Tomato yellow leaf curly virus (TYLCV. The cultivar Viradoro is a cultivar with IPA-5 background and has the Sw-5 gene that confers resistance to tospovirus. Redenção was selected using the bulk and pedigree selection method. It has elongated fruits, red intense color, firm and uniform, with an average weight of 110 g. Under field exposition showed an average yield of 88.9 t/ha equivalent to local hybrids and commercial cultivars. The authors expect that this new cultivar consolidate the revitalization of the tomato processing chain in the Sub medium São Francisco River Region which is

  1. Mechanisms of virus resistance and antiviral activity of snake venoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JVR Rivero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses depend on cell metabolism for their own propagation. The need to foster an intimate relationship with the host has resulted in the development of various strategies designed to help virus escape from the defense mechanisms present in the host. Over millions of years, the unremitting battle between pathogens and their hosts has led to changes in evolution of the immune system. Snake venoms are biological resources that have antiviral activity, hence substances of significant pharmacological value. The biodiversity in Brazil with respect to snakes is one of the richest on the planet; nevertheless, studies on the antiviral activity of venom from Brazilian snakes are scarce. The antiviral properties of snake venom appear as new promising therapeutic alternative against the defense mechanisms developed by viruses. In the current study, scientific papers published in recent years on the antiviral activity of venom from various species of snakes were reviewed. The objective of this review is to discuss the mechanisms of resistance developed by viruses and the components of snake venoms that present antiviral activity, particularly, enzymes, amino acids, peptides and proteins.

  2. A longevity assurance gene homolog of tomato mediates resistance to Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici toxins and fumonisin B1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brandwagt, Bas F.; Mesbah, Laurent A.; Takken, Frank L.W.; Laurent, Pascal L.; Kneppers, Tarcies J.A.; Hille, Jacques; Nijkamp, H. John J.

    2000-01-01

    The phytopathogenic fungus Alternaria alternata f. sp. lycopersici (AAL) produces toxins that are essential for pathogenicity of the fungus on tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum). AAL toxins and fumonisins of the unrelated fungus Fusarium moniliforme are sphinganine-analog mycotoxins (SAMs), which

  3. Solanum lycopersicum (Tomato)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pavan, S.N.C.; Heusden, van A.W.; Bai, Y.

    2009-01-01

    After its introduction in Europe the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) has gone a long way. Dedicated breeding has resulted in numerous cultivars grown all over the world, differing in all kind of aspects such as yield, shape, resistance, taste and quality. Modern cultivars are sold as hybrids with a

  4. Novos acessos de tomateiro resistentes à mosca-branca biótipo B New accessions of tomato resistant to whitefly biotype B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa de Sena Fernandes

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi selecionar novas fontes de resistência a Bemisia tabaci biótipo B, entre 34 acessos de tomateiro (Lycopersicon esculentum, do Banco de Germoplasma de Hortaliças da UFV. Avaliaram-se os números de adultos, ovos e ninfas por planta, além da densidade de tricomas. Detectaram-se diferenças entre os acessos nas variáveis avaliadas. Os acessos BGH-166, BGH-616, BGH-850, BGH-990, BGH-2102 e BGH-2125 apresentaram menor número de adultos, ovos e ninfas por planta e tiveram menor densidade de tricomas. A resistência dos acessos de tomate à mosca-branca foi associada a uma menor densidade de tricomas.The objective of this work was to evaluate resistance to Bemisia tabaci biotype B in 34 tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum accessions from the Banco de Germoplasma de Hortaliças of UFV. The number of adults, eggs and nymphs per plant besides of trichome density were evaluated. Differences between accessions were found for the evaluated variables. Accessions BGH-166, BGH-616, BGH-850, BGH-990, BGH-2102 and BGH-2125 presented less infestation of adults, eggs and nymphs per plant and showed lower trichome density. The resistance of these tomato accessions to whitefly was associated to a lower trichome density.

  5. Resistência por antibiose de Lycopersicon peruvianum à traça do tomateiro Antibiosis resistance of Lycopersicon peruvianum to tomato leafminer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Akiyoshi Suinaga

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi realizado em casa de vegetação na Universidade Federal de Viçosa e objetivou estudar a resistência por antibiose do acesso CNPH 101 de Lycopersicon peruvianum a traça do tomateiro Tuta absoluta (Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae e as possíveis causas químicas desta resistência. Os tratamentos foram as espécies de tomateiro Lycopersicon esculentum (cvs. IPA-5 e Santa Clara: padrões de suscetibilidade e o acesso de L. peruvianum. As características avaliadas foram: mortalidade larval, peso de pupas e proporção sexual, duração das fases larval e pupal e números de ovos/fêmea de T. absoluta. Realizou-se extração hexânica nas folhas e os extratos obtidos foram submetidos a cromatografia gasosa associada a espectrômetro de massa. O acesso CNPH 101 de L. peruvianum apresentou resistência a T. absoluta afetando a mortalidade larval e duração da fase pupal. Duas substâncias (provavelmente o 4-metil-2,6-di-tert-butilfenol e outra com tempo de retenção 18,8 min. no cromatograma estiveram associadas ao fato de que L. esculentum é mais suscetível a T. absoluta do que L. peruvianum. Foram detectadas duas substâncias associadas a plantas da cultivar Santa Clara (provavelmente o transcarofileno e de L. peruvianum (provavelmente o hexadecano mais suscetíveis a T. absoluta. Foi detectada uma substância (com tempo de retenção 22,796 min. no cromatograma associada a plantas de L. peruvianum mais resistentes a T. absoluta.This work was carried out in a greenhouse in the Federal University of Viçosa, to evaluate the antibiosis of Lycopersicon peruvianum (CNPH 101 to tomato leafminer Tuta absoluta (Meyrick (Lepidoptera: Gelechiidae and its possible chemical causes. The treatments were represented by the species of tomato Lycopersicon esculentum (cv. Santa Clara and IPA-5: susceptibility patterns to T. absoluta and the introduction CNPH 101 of L. peruvianum. The characteristics assessed were: larval mortality, pupal

  6. Effect of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici on the soil-to-root translocation of heavy metals in tomato plants susceptible and resistant to the fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales Escobosa, Alma Rosa; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Landero Figueroa, Julio Alberto; Gutíerrez Corona, J Felix; Wrobel, Kazimierz

    2010-12-08

    The purpose of this work was to gain an insight on the potential role of the phytopathogenic fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici in the translocation of metals and metalloids from soil to plant roots in tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum). Two varieties of tomato (one susceptible and another resistant to infection by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici) were challenged with the fungus for different periods of time, and several elements (V, Cr, Mn, Co, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Mo, Ag, Cd, Pb) were determined in roots and in soil substrate. Additionally, phenolic plant products were also analyzed for the evaluation of the plant response to biotic stress. In order to obtain representative results for plants cultivated in noncontaminated environments, the infected and control plants were grown in commercial soil with natural, relatively low metal concentrations, partly associated with humic substances. Using such an experimental design, a specific role of the fungus could be observed, while possible effects of plant exposure to elevated concentrations of heavy metals were avoided. In the infected plants of two varieties, the root concentrations of several metals/metalloids were increased compared to control plants; however, the results obtained for elements and for phenolic compounds were significantly different in the two plant varieties. It is proposed that both Lycopersicum esculentum colonization by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici and the increase of metal bioavailability due to fungus-assisted solubilization of soil humic substances contribute to element traffic from soil to roots in tomato plant.

  7. Resistência de linhagens avançadas de tomateiro a tospovírus Tospovirus resistance of tomato advanced lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANDRÉ LUIZ LOURENÇÃO

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Linhagens avançadas de tomateiro resultantes do programa de melhoramento do Instituto Agronômico, Campinas (IAC foram avaliadas em relação à resistência a tospovírus, à produtividade e ao teor de sólidos solúveis em condições de campo. Em 1995/96, as linhagens IAC S4-3, IAC S4-4, IAC S4-13 e IAC S4-17 comportaram-se como resistentes a tospovírus em Campinas (SP e em Petrolina (PE, apresentando a IAC S4-17, na última localidade, níveis de produtividade próximos aos do AG-45, o cultivar mais produtivo, porém considerado suscetível a tospovírus. Em 1996/97, em Campinas, linhagens derivadas de outras fontes de resistência a tospovírus exibiram, em condições de telado, níveis de resistência inferiores aos das derivadas de ‘Stevens’. Nesse mesmo ano agrícola e local, em campo, dez seleções feitas nas linhagens do grupo IAC S4, para tamanho e firmeza de frutos, apresentaram resistência aos isolados locais de tospovírus. Nove novas seleções, nesse germoplasma, foram comparadas em campo, em 1997/98, com quatro linhagens e um cultivar desenvolvidos pela SVS do Brasil Sementes Ltda: o nível de infecção devido a tospovírus variou de 70,3 (‘Colosso’ até 8,6% (IAC S4-4-16G, atingindo 100% na testemunha suscetível, IPA-6. Em Patos de Minas (MG, em 1997, as linhagens IAC S4-3-10 e IAC S4-3-18H revelaram valores de brix intermediários entre os cultivares IPA-5 e AG-45, este, o de melhor desempenho nessa característica; em relação à produtividade, as duas linhagens IAC tiveram as mais altas produções, embora com crescimento vegetativo vigoroso e ciclo longo.Tomato advanced lines, obtained in the IAC breeding program, were recently evaluated, under different Brazilian states producing areas to tospovirus reaction, fruit yield and soluble solid contents. In the growing season 95/96, IAC S4-3, IAC S4-4, IAC S4-13 and IAC S4-17, behaved as tospovirus resistant in Campinas, State of São Paulo, and Petrolina, State of

  8. Fruit-specific overexpression of wound-induced tap1 under E8 promoter in tomato confers resistance to fungal pathogens at ripening stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kesanakurti, Divya; Kolattukudy, Pappachan E; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bhardwaja

    2012-10-01

    Based on high economic importance and nutritious value of tomato fruits and as previous studies employed E8 promoter in fruit ripening-specific gene expression, we have developed transgenic tomato plants overexpressing tomato anionic peroxidase cDNA (tap1) under E8 promoter. Stable transgene integration was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern analysis for nptII. Northern blotting confirmed elevated tap1 levels in the breaker- and red-ripe stages of T(1) transgenic fruits, whereas wild-type (WT) plants did not show tap1 expression in these developmental stages. Further, tap1 expression levels were significantly enhanced in response to wounding in breaker- and red-ripe stages of transgenic fruits, whereas wound-induced expression of tap1 was not detected in WT fruits. Confocal microscopy revealed high accumulation of phenolic compounds at the wound site in transgenic fruits suggesting a role of tap1 in wound-induced phenolic polymerization. Total peroxidase activity has increased remarkably in transgenic pericarp tissues in response to wounding, while very less or minimal levels were recorded in WT pericarp tissues. Transgenic fruits also displayed reduced post-harvest decay and increased resistance toward Alternaria alternata and Fusarium solani infection with noticeable inhibition in lesion formation. Conidiospore germination and mycelial growth of F. solani were severely inhibited when treated with E8-tap1 fruit extracts compared to WT fruits. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay showed reduced spore viability when incubated in E8-tap1 fruit extracts. Thus, fruit-specific expression of tap1 using E8 promoter is associated with enhanced total peroxidase activity and high phenolic accumulation in fruits with minimized post-harvest deterioration caused by wounding and fungal attack in tomato fruits. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2012.

  9. Recessive Resistance to Plant Viruses: Potential Resistance Genes Beyond Translation Initiation Factors

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    Masayoshi Hashimoto

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The ability of plant viruses to propagate their genomes in host cells depends on many host factors. In the absence of an agrochemical that specifically targets plant viral infection cycles, one of the most effective methods for controlling viral diseases in plants is taking advantage of the host plant’s resistance machinery. Recessive resistance is conferred by a recessive gene mutation that encodes a host factor critical for viral infection. It is a branch of the resistance machinery and, as an inherited characteristic, is very durable. Moreover, recessive resistance may be acquired by a deficiency in a negative regulator of plant defense responses, possibly due to the autoactivation of defense signaling. Eukaryotic translation initiation factor (eIF 4E and eIF4G and their isoforms are the most widely exploited recessive resistance genes in several crop species, and they are effective against a subset of viral species. However, the establishment of efficient, recessive resistance-type antiviral control strategies against a wider range of plant viral diseases requires genetic resources other than eIF4Es. In this review, we focus on recent advances related to antiviral recessive resistance genes evaluated in model plants and several crop species. We also address the roles of next-generation sequencing and genome editing technologies in improving plant genetic resources for recessive resistance-based antiviral breeding in various crop species.

  10. De novo transcriptome sequencing in Frankliniella occidentalis to identify genes involved in plant virus transmission and insecticide resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhijun; Zhang, Pengjun; Li, Weidi; Zhang, Jinming; Huang, Fang; Yang, Jian; Bei, Yawei; Lu, Yaobin

    2013-05-01

    The western flower thrips (WFT), Frankliniella occidentalis, a world-wide invasive insect, causes agricultural damage by directly feeding and by indirectly vectoring Tospoviruses, such as Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). We characterized the transcriptome of WFT and analyzed global gene expression of WFT response to TSWV infection using Illumina sequencing platform. We compiled 59,932 unigenes, and identified 36,339 unigenes by similarity analysis against public databases, most of which were annotated using gene ontology (GO) and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) analysis. Within these annotated transcripts, we collected 278 sequences related to insecticide resistance. GO and KEGG analysis of different expression genes between TSWV-infected and non-infected WFT population revealed that TSWV can regulate cellular process and immune response, which might lead to low virus titers in thrips cells and no detrimental effects on F. occidentalis. This data-set not only enriches genomic resource for WFT, but also benefits research into its molecular genetics and functional genomics. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Genetic and host-associated differentiation within Thrips tabaci Lindeman (Thysanoptera: Thripidae) and its links to Tomato spotted wilt virus-vector competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmore, G C; Poke, F S; Allen, G R; Wilson, C R

    2013-09-01

    Of eight thelytokous populations of onion thrips (Thrips tabaci) collected from potato (three populations), onion (four) or Chrysanthemum (one) hosts from various regions of Australia, only those from potato were capable of transmitting Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) in controlled transmission experiments. Genetic differentiation of seven of these eight populations, and nine others not tested for TSWV vector competence, was examined by comparison of the DNA sequences of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene. All Australian populations of T. tabaci grouped within the European 'L2' clade of Brunner et al. (2004). Within this clade the seven populations from potato, the three from onion, and the four from other hosts (Chrysanthemum, Impatiens, lucerne, blackberry nightshade) clustered as three distinct sub-groupings characterised by source host. Geographical source of thrips populations had no influence on genetic diversity. These results link genetic differentiation of thelytokous T. tabaci to source host and to TSWV vector capacity for the first time.

  12. Mutational analysis of two highly conserved motifs in the silencing suppressor encoded by tomato spotted wilt virus (genus Tospovirus, family Bunyaviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhai, Ying; Bag, Sudeep; Mitter, Neena; Turina, Massimo; Pappu, Hanu R

    2014-06-01

    Tospoviruses cause serious economic losses to a wide range of field and horticultural crops on a global scale. The NSs gene encoded by tospoviruses acts as a suppressor of host plant defense. We identified amino acid motifs that are conserved in all of the NSs proteins of tospoviruses for which the sequence is known. Using tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) as a model, the role of these motifs in suppressor activity of NSs was investigated. Using site-directed point mutations in two conserved motifs, glycine, lysine and valine/threonine (GKV/T) at positions 181-183 and tyrosine and leucine (YL) at positions 412-413, and an assay to measure the reversal of gene silencing in Nicotiana benthamiana line 16c, we show that substitutions (K182 to A, and L413 to A) in these motifs abolished suppressor activity of the NSs protein, indicating that these two motifs are essential for the RNAi suppressor function of tospoviruses.

  13. Tomato Preserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Wendy Tessman

    1996-01-01

    Describes a project in which students selected seeds from two heirloom varieties of tomatoes, sowed the seeds, harvested the tomatoes, and fermented the seeds. Details are provided for each step of the project and the school address is included so that other students can begin similar projects. (DDR)

  14. Effect of plant resistance and BioAct WG (Purpureocillium lilacinum strain 251) on Meloidogyne incognita in a tomato-cucumber rotation in a greenhouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giné, Ariadna; Sorribas, Francisco J

    2017-05-01

    The effectiveness of combining resistant tomato with BioAct WG (Purpureocillium lilacinum strain 251, Pl251) against Meloidogyne incognita was assessed in a tomato-cucumber rotation in a greenhouse over 2 years. Additionally, the enzymatic activity of the fungus, the percentage of fungal egg and juvenile parasitism, cardinal temperatures and the effect of water potential on mycelial growth and the soil receptivity to Pl251 were determined in vitro. Plant resistance was the only factor that suppressed nematode and crop yield losses. Percentage of egg parasitism in plots treated with BioAct WG was less than 2.6%. However, under in vitro conditions, Pl251 showed protease, lipase and chitinase activities and parasitised 94.5% of eggs, but no juveniles. Cardinal temperatures were 14.2, 24-26 and 35.4 °C. The maximum Pl251 mycelial growth was at -0.25 MPa and 25 °C. Soil temperatures and water potential in the greenhouse were in the range of the fungus. However, soil receptivity was lower in greenhouse soil, irrespective of sterilisation, than in sterilised sand. Plant resistance was the only factor able to suppress nematode densities, disease severity and yield losses, and to protect the following cucumber crop. Environmental factors involved in soil receptivity could have negatively affected fungus effectiveness. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. The tomato UV-damaged DNA-binding protein-1 (DDB1) is implicated in pathogenesis-related (PR) gene expression and resistance to Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jikai; Li, Hanjing; Miao, Min; Tang, Xiaofeng; Giovannoni, Jim; Xiao, Fangming; Liu, Yongsheng

    2012-02-01

    Plants defend themselves against potential pathogens via the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this PAMP-triggered immunity (PTI) are largely unknown. In this study, we show that tomato HP1/DDB1, coding for a key component of the CUL4-based ubiquitin E3 ligase complex, is required for resistance to Agrobacterium tumefaciens. We found that the DDB1-deficient mutant (high pigment-1, hp1) is susceptible to nontumorigenic A. tumefaciens. The efficiency of callus generation from the hp1 cotyledons was extremely low as a result of the necrosis caused by Agrobacterium infection. On infiltration of nontumorigenic A. tumefaciens into leaves, the hp1 mutant moderately supported Agrobacterium growth and developed disease symptoms, but the expression of the pathogenesis-related gene SlPR1a1 and several PTI marker genes was compromised at different levels. Moreover, exogenous application of salicylic acid (SA) triggered SlPR1a1 gene expression and enhanced resistance to A. tumefaciens in wild-type tomato plants, whereas these SA-regulated defence responses were abolished in hp1 mutant plants. Thus, HP1/DDB1 may function through interaction with the SA-regulated PTI pathway in resistance against Agrobacterium infection. © 2011 THE AUTHORS. MOLECULAR PLANT PATHOLOGY © 2011 BSPP AND BLACKWELL PUBLISHING LTD.

  16. Transgenic virus resistance in crop-wild Cucurbita pepo does not prevent vertical transmission of zucchini yellow mosaic virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. E. Simmons; Holly Prendeville; J. P. Dunham; M. J. Ferrari; J. D. Earnest; D. Pilson; G. P. Munkvold; E. C. Holmes; A. G. Stephenson

    2015-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an economically important pathogen of cucurbits that is transmitted both horizontally and vertically. Although ZYMV is seed-transmitted in Cucurbita pepo, the potential for seed transmission in virus-resistant transgenic cultivars is not known. We crossed and backcrossed a transgenic...

  17. Mutations Conferring Resistance to Viral DNA Polymerase Inhibitors in Camelpox Virus Give Different Drug-Susceptibility Profiles in Vaccinia Virus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Duraffour, S.; Andrei, G.; Topalis, D.; Krečmerová, Marcela; Crance, J. M.; Garin, D.; Snoeck, R.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 86, č. 13 (2012), s. 7310-7325 ISSN 0022-538X Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : camelpox virus * CMLV * vaccinia virus VACV * acyclic nucleoside phosphonates * HPMPDAP * cidofovir * drug resistance Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.076, year: 2012

  18. Resistance of Aerosolized Bacterial Viruses to Four Germicidal Products.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Turgeon

    Full Text Available Viral diseases can spread through a variety of routes including aerosols. Yet, limited data are available on the efficacy of aerosolized chemicals to reduce viral loads in the air. Bacteriophages (phages are often used as surrogates for hazardous viruses in aerosol studies because they are inexpensive, easy to handle, and safe for laboratory workers. Moreover, several of these bacterial viruses display physical characteristics similar to pathogenic human and animal viruses, like morphological size, type of nucleic acids, capsid morphology, and the presence of an envelope. In this study, the efficacy of four chemicals was evaluated on four airborne phages at two different relative humidity levels. Non-tailed bacteriophages MS2 (single-stranded RNA, ϕ6 (double-stranded RNA, enveloped, PR772 (double-stranded DNA, and ϕX174 (single-stranded DNA were first aerosolized in a 55L rotative environmental chamber at 19°C with 25% and 50% relative humidity. Then, hydrogen peroxide, Eugenol (phenylpropene used in commercial perfumes and flavorings, Mist® (automobile disinfectant containing Triethylene glycol, and Pledge® (multisurface disinfectant containing Isopropanol, n-Alkyl Dimethyl Benzyl Amonium Chlorides, and n-Alkyl Dimethyl Ethylbenzyl Ammonium Chloride were nebulized with the phages using a separate nebulizer. Aerosols were maintained in suspension during 10 minutes, 1 hour, and 2 hours. Viral aerosols were sampled using an SKC BioSampler and samples were analyzed using qPCR and plaque assays. The resistance levels of the four phages varied depending on the relative humidity (RH and germicidal products tested. Phage MS2 was the most stable airborne virus under the environmental conditions tested while phage PR772 was the least stable. Pledge® and Eugenol reduced the infectivity of all airborne phages tested. At 25% RH, Pledge® and Eugenol were more effective at reducing infectivity of RNA phages ϕ6 and MS2. At 50% RH, Pledge® was the most

  19. Control of Disease Induced by Tospoviruses in Tomato: An Update of the Genetic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Cebolla-Cornejo

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Advances in the search for genetic resistance to tospoviruses affecting tomato crops are reviewed. The economic losses caused by Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV, the great number of hosts it affects and its wide distribution around the world has made TSWV one of the ten most important plant viruses. Other viruses in or related to the same genus also cause severe damage, although their presence in the world is much more localized. Due to the limited effectiveness of physical, chemical and biological control methods, the use of genetic resistance for control is the best management strategy on a medium-long term basis. Given the relative ease with which new TSWV isolates that overcome existing genetic resistance are generated, it is of prime importance to continue the search for new sources of resistance, as well as to promote a better exploitation of available ones. A better understanding of the mechanisms causing resistance and of their genetic control, as well as the identification of molecular markers linked to resistance genes, would enable the pyramiding of different resistance genes. This would be a positive contribution to the development of a greater and more durable resistance. It is also necessary to further the study of genetic resistance to other viruses of the genus Tospovirus, as globalisation can speed up their distribution throughout the world.

  20. Ocorrência de fungos filamentosos termo-resistentes em polpa de tomate envasada assepticamente Occurrence of heat resistant molds in tomato pulp packed aseptically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávio BAGLIONI

    1999-05-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho teve como objetivo principal determinar a ocorrência de fungos filamentosos termo-resistentes durante o processamento asséptico de polpa de tomate (8° BRIX. Durante o período de safra de tomate foram feitas amostragens em 9 lotes (3 no início, 3 no pico e 3 em fim de safra e no período de entresafra em 5 lotes. Foi feita a enumeração de fungos termo-resistentes nas amostras coletadas durante as diferentes etapas do processo asséptico de cada lote. Foram obtidas contagens médias relativamente baixas, variando entre This work aimed at determining the occurrence of heat resistant molds during the aseptic processing of tomato pulp (8° BRIX. During tomato harvest, 9 lots were sampled (3 at the beginning, 3 at the apex and 3 at the end of harvest and other 5 lots were sampled between harvest. For each lot, the enumeration of heat resistant molds was carried out in samples collected during the aseptic process. The mean count of heat resistant molds was relatively low, ranging from <1 to 8CFU/100mL of sample. The higher counts were observed in the raw material and the pre-wash and transportation water. Fifty strains of heat resistant molds detected in the enumeration procedure were isolated, codified and stocked. One-month-old spores of each isolate were submitted to different heat shocks to select the most heat resistant mold. The most heat resistant isolated strain (survived 100° C/25 minutes was identified as Neosartorya fischeri.

  1. Necrotizing Keratitis Caused by Acyclovir-Resistant Herpes Simplex Virus

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    Koji Toriyama

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a case of necrotizing keratitis caused by acyclovir (ACV-resistant herpes simplex virus (HSV with a clinical appearance similar to a previous fungal keratitis infection. Methods: Observational case report. Results: Penetrating keratoplasty was performed in the left eye with a history of herpetic keratitis that resolved with periodic treatment with ACV ointment and a topical steroid. The left eye was painful and red with an abscess and corneal erosion in the peripheral donor cornea. Examination of the scraped corneal epithelium by light microscopy and culturing identified Candida albicans; polymerase chain reaction (PCR was negative for human herpes viruses. After antifungal treatment, the ocular pain gradually decreased and the lesions slowly improved but recurred with a similar clinical appearance. A second light microscopy examination and cultures were negative for pathogens including C. albicans. PCR was positive for HSV-1 DNA; treatment with 3% topical ACV ointment was unsuccessful. A third examination showed only HSV-1 DNA. Despite antiviral ACV ointment, no clinical improvement occurred based on the HSV DNA copy numbers, which were the same before and after treatment, indicating a possible ACV-resistant strain. When topical trifluorothymidine was substituted for ACV, clinical improvement occurred and the HSV DNA copy numbers decreased. Conclusion: Necrotizing keratitis induced by ACV-resistant HSV occurred independently after fungal keratitis, with a similar clinical appearance in this case, making diagnosis and treatment difficult. Monitoring the HSV DNA load by real-time PCR could be useful for refractory cases even with atypical clinical appearances.

  2. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    -targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission...

  3. Amantadine resistance among highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1) isolated from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Aron; Sood, Richa; Chanu, Kh Victoria; Bhatia, Sandeep; Khandia, Rekha; Pateriya, A K; Nagarajan, S; Dimri, U; Kulkarni, D D

    2016-02-01

    Emergence of antiviral resistance among H5N1 avian influenza viruses is the major challenge in the control of pandemic influenza. Matrix 2 (M2) inhibitors (amantadine and rimantadine) and neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir and zanamivir) are the two classes of antiviral agents that are specifically active against influenza viruses and are used for both treatment and prophylaxis of influenza infections. Amantadine targets the M2 ion channel of influenza A virus and interrupts virus life cycle through blockade of hydrogen ion influx. This prevents uncoating of the virus in infected host cells which impedes the release of ribonucleoprotein required for transcription and replication of virion in the nucleus. The present study was carried out to review the status of amantadine resistance in H5N1 viruses isolated from India and to study their replicative capability. Results of the study revealed resistance to amantadine in antiviral assay among four H5N1 viruses out of which two viruses had Serine 31 Asparagine (AGT-AAT i.e., S31N) mutation and two had Valine 27 Alanine (GTT-GCT i.e., V27A) mutation. The four resistant viruses not only exhibited significant difference in effective concentration 50% (EC50) values of amantadine hydrochloride from that of susceptible viruses (P amantadine could also be demonstrated in a simple HA test after replication of the viruses in MDCK cells in presence of amantadine. The study identifies the correlation between in vitro antiviral assay and presence of established molecular markers of resistance, the retention of replicative capacity in the presence of amantadine hydrochloride by the resistant viruses and the emergence of resistant mutations against amantadine among avian influenza viruses (H5N1) without selective drug pressure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Risca do tomateiro em São Paulo, causada por estirpe do vírus Y Tomato streak induced by a strain of the potato virus y in São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Costa

    1960-01-01

    Full Text Available Uma forma de risca do tomateiro, causada por um único vírus que pertence ao complexo do vírus Y da batatinha, foi registrada em diversas zonas do Estado de São Paulo onde é cultivada essa planta. A risca do tomateiro é considerada moléstia diferente daquela descrita de Piedade e também causada por uma estirpe do mesmo complexo. Foram notadas diferenças em sintomatologia, círculo de hospedeiras e nas propriedades do vírus in vitro. A risca do tomateiro em São Paulo é semelhante a uma moléstia que foi descrita em tomatais do sul da Flórida. 0 vírus da risca causa murcha das folhas inferiores de plantas de fumo de diversas variedades. Esse sintoma já tinha sido descrito em plantas de fumo infetadas com o vírus das faixas das nervuras em Kentucky. Foi notada certa correlação entre surtos severos da risca do tomateiro e a presença de plantações velhas de pimentão nas vizinhanças dos tomatais. As plantações de batata não são consideradas como fontes de vírus, pois a maioria das variedades comerciais não é suscetível à estirpe causadora da risca. A risca do tomateiro é fàcilmente transmitida mecanicamente e há indicações de que uma certa disseminação da moléstia pode resultar das operações culturais manuais como a desbrota, amarração etc. Os afídios Aphis rumicis, Myzus persicae, Macro-siphum solanifotii e Pentatrichopus fragaefolii mostraram-se capazes de transmitir a risca. Medidas de contrôle visando eliminar as fontes de vírus e controlar os vectores são discutidas.A type of tomato streak due to a single virus, considered to be a strain of the potato virus Y complex, has been recorded from several tomato growing areas in the state of São Paulo. Tomato streak is considered different from a disease described from Piedade and also caused by a strain of potato virus Y. Differences were noted in symptomatology, host range, and virus properties. Tomato streak in São Paulo resembles closely a disease

  5. RESISTENCIA AL PERFORADOR DEL FRUTO DEL TOMATE DERIVADA DE ESPECIES SILVESTRES DE Solanum spp. RESISTANCE TO TOMATO FRUIT BORER DERIVED FROM WILD SPECIES OF Solanum spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Alirio Vallejo Cabrera

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la resistencia al pasador del fruto Neoleucinodes elegantalis en doce introducciones silvestres de Solanum sección Lycopersicum. Las introducciones PI 134417, PI134418 y PI 126449 Solanum habrochaites var. glabratum, las introducciones LA 1624 y LA2092 de S. habrochaites var. typicum y la introducción LA 444-1 de S. peruvianum, presentaron alta resistencia al pasador del fruto de tomate N. elegantalis. Se realizó la introgresión genética de la resistencia al pasador del fruto presente en la introducción PI 134418 de S. habrochaites var. glabratum hacia el cultivar Unapal - Maravilla de S. lycopersicum. Se encontró asociación positiva altamente significativa entre el daño causado por el insecto plaga y el peso del fruto; a medida que se recupera el peso del fruto del cultivar Unapal - Maravilla (padre recurrente, por sucesivos retrocruzamientos, se disminuye la resistencia al insecto plaga. Los tricomas y el número de frutos por racimo no afectaron la infestación y el daño de los frutos por parte del insecto; mientras que el peso de fruto si tuvo efecto importante ya que tiende a producir mayor daño a medida que se incrementa el peso de fruto. El método del retrocruzamiento fue efectivo para romper la asociación entre el peso de fruto y la resistencia al insecto. Se obtuvieron plantas recombinantes RC2 con resistencia al pasador del fruto y pesos de fruto entre 45,1 y 68,6g.Twelve wild introductions of Solanum section Lycopersicum were evaluated to determine their resistance to tomato fruit borer Neoleucinodes elegantalis. The introductions PI 134417, PI134418 and PI 126449 of Solanum habrochaites var. glabratum, the introduction LA 1624 and LA2092 of S. habrochaites var. typicum, and the introduction LA 444-1 of S. peruvianum, presented high resistance to the tomato fruit borer of tomato N. elegantalis. Genetic introgression of resistance to tomato fruit borer in the introduction PI 134418 S. habrochaites var. glabratum

  6. The Tomato spotted wilt virus genome is processed differentially in its plant host Arachis hypogaea and its thrips vector Frankliniella fusca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen John Fletcher

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Thrips-transmitted tospoviruses are economically important viruses affecting a wide range of field and horticultural crops worldwide. Tomato spotted wilt virus is the type member of the Tospovirus genus with a broad host range of more than 900 plant species. Interactions between these viruses and their plant hosts and insect vectors via RNA interference pathways are likely a key determinant of pathogenicity. The current investigation, for the first time, compares biogenesis of small RNAs between the plant host and insect vector in the presence or absence of TSWV. Unique viral small interfering RNA (vsiRNA profiles are evident for Arachis hypogaea (peanut and Frankliniella fusca (thrips vector following infection with TSWV. Differences between vsiRNA profiles for these plant and insect species, such as the relative abundance of 21 nt and 22 nt vsiRNAs and locations of alignment hotspots, reflect the diverse siRNA biosynthesis pathways of their respective kingdoms. The presence of unique vsiRNAs in F. fusca samples indicates that vsiRNA generation takes place within the thrips, and not solely through uptake via feeding on vsiRNAs produced in infected A. hypogaea. The study also shows key vsiRNA profile differences for TSWV among plant families, which are evident in the case of A. hypogaea, a legume, and members of Solanaceae (S. lycopersicum and N. benthamiana. Distinctively, overall small RNA biogenesis in A. hypogaea is markedly affected with an absence of the 24 nt small RNAs in TSWV-infected plants, possibly leading to wide-spread molecular and phenotypic perturbations specific to this species. These findings add significant information on the host-virus-vector interaction in terms of RNAi pathways and may lead to better crop and vector specific control strategies.

  7. The Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Genome Is Processed Differentially in its Plant Host Arachis hypogaea and its Thrips Vector Frankliniella fusca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephen J; Shrestha, Anita; Peters, Jonathan R; Carroll, Bernard J; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Pappu, Hanu R; Mitter, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Thrips-transmitted tospoviruses are economically important viruses affecting a wide range of field and horticultural crops worldwide. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is the type member of the Tospovirus genus with a broad host range of more than 900 plant species. Interactions between these viruses and their plant hosts and insect vectors via RNAi pathways are likely a key determinant of pathogenicity. The current investigation, for the first time, compares biogenesis of small RNAs between the plant host and insect vector in the presence or absence of TSWV. Unique viral small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) profiles are evident for Arachis hypogaea (peanut) and Frankliniella fusca (thrips vector) following infection with TSWV. Differences between vsiRNA profiles for these plant and insect species, such as the relative abundance of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs and locations of alignment hotspots, reflect the diverse siRNA biosynthesis pathways of their respective kingdoms. The presence of unique vsiRNAs in F. fusca samples indicates that vsiRNA generation takes place within the thrips, and not solely through uptake via feeding on vsiRNAs produced in infected A. hypogaea. The study also shows key vsiRNA profile differences for TSWV among plant families, which are evident in the case of A. hypogaea, a legume, and members of Solanaceae (S. lycopersicum and Nicotiana benthamiana). Distinctively, overall small RNA (sRNA) biogenesis in A. hypogaea is markedly affected with an absence of the 24 nt sRNAs in TSWV-infected plants, possibly leading to wide-spread molecular and phenotypic perturbations specific to this species. These findings add significant information on the host-virus-vector interaction in terms of RNAi pathways and may lead to better crop and vector specific control strategies.

  8. The sequencing of the complete genome of a Tomato black ring virus (TBRV) and of the RNA2 of three Grapevine chrome mosaic virus (GCMV) isolates from grapevine reveals the possible recombinant origin of GCMV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Digiaro, M; Yahyaoui, E; Martelli, G P; Elbeaino, T

    2015-02-01

    The complete genome of a Tomato black ring virus isolate (TBRV-Mirs) (RNA1, 7,366 nt and RNA2, 4,640 nt) and the RNA2 sequences (4,437; 4,445; and 4,442 nts) of three Grapevine chrome mosaic virus isolates (GCMV-H6, -H15, and -H27) were determined. All RNAs contained a single open reading frame encoding polyproteins of 254 kDa (p1) and 149 kDa (p2) for TBRV-Mirs RNA1 and RNA2, respectively, and 146 kDa for GCMV RNA2. p1 of TBRV-Mirs showed the highest identity with TBRV-MJ (94 %), Beet ringspot virus (BRSV, 82 %), and Grapevine Anatolian ringspot virus (GARSV, 66 %), while p2 showed the highest identity with TBRV isolates MJ (89 %) and ED (85 %), followed by BRSV (65 %), GCMV (58 %), and GARSV (57 %). The amino acid identity of RNA2 sequences of four GCMV isolates (three from this study and one from GenBank) ranged from 91 to 98 %, the homing protein being the most variable. The RDP3 program predicted putative intra-species recombination events for GCMV-H6 and recognized GCMV as a putative inter-species recombinant between GARSV and TBRV. In both cases, the recombination events were at the movement protein level.

  9. Screening and genetic analysis of resistance to peanut stunt virus in soybean: identification of the putative Rpsv1 resistance gene

    OpenAIRE

    Saruta, Masayasu; TAKADA, Yoshitake; KIKUCHI, Akio; Yamada, Tetsusya; Komatsu,Kunihiko; Sayama, Takashi; Ishimoto, Masao; Okabe, Akinori

    2012-01-01

    The peanut stunt virus (PSV) causes yield losses in soybean and reduced seed quality due to seed mottling. The objectives of this study were to determine the phenotypic reactions of soybean germplasms to inoculation with two PSV isolates (PSV-K, PSV-T), the inheritance of PSV resistance in soybean cultivars, and the locus of the PSV resistance gene. We investigated the PSV resistance of 132 soybean cultivars to both PSV isolates; of these, 73 cultivars exhibited resistance to both PSV isolate...

  10. Novel influenza A(H1N1) 2009 in vitro reassortant viruses with oseltamivir resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ottmann, Michèle; Duchamp, Maude Bouscambert; Casalegno, Jean-Sébastien; Frobert, Emilie; Moulès, Vincent; Ferraris, Olivier; Valette, Martine; Escuret, Vanessa; Lina, Bruno

    2010-01-01

    With the recent emergence of the novel A(H1N1) virus in 2009, the efficacy of available drugs, such as neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors, is of great concern for good patient care. Influenza viruses are known to be able to acquire resistance. In 2007, A(H1N1) viruses related to A/Brisbane/59/2007 (H1N1) (A[H1N1] Brisbane-like virus), which are naturally resistant to oseltamivir, emerged. Resistance to oseltamivir can be acquired either by spontaneous mutation in the NA (H275Y in N1), or by reassortment with a mutated NA. It is therefore crucial to determine the risk of pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus acquiring resistance against oseltamivir by reassortment. We estimated the capacity of reassortment between the A(H1N1) 2009 virus and an oseltamivir-resistant A(H1N1) Brisbane-like virus by in vitro coinfections of influenza-permissive cells. The screening and the analysis of reassortant viruses was performed by specific reverse transcriptase PCRs and by sequencing. Out of 50 analysed reassortant viruses, two harboured the haemagglutinin (HA) segment from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and the mutated NA originated from the A(H1N1) Brisbane-like virus. The replicating capacities of these viruses were measured, showing no difference as compared to the two parental strains, suggesting that acquisition of the mutated NA segment did not impair viral fitness in vitro. Our results suggest that the novel A(H1N1) 2009 virus can acquire by in vitro genetic reassortment the H275Y mutated NA segment conferring resistance to oseltamivir.

  11. Cold Stress Tolerance in Psychrotolerant Soil Bacteria and Their Conferred Chilling Resistance in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum Mill. under Low Temperatures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parthiban Subramanian

    Full Text Available The present work aimed to study the culturable diversity of psychrotolerant bacteria persistent in soil under overwintering conditions, evaluate their ability to sustain plant growth and alleviate chilling stress in tomato. Psychrotolerant bacteria were isolated from agricultural field soil samples colleced during winter and then used to study chilling stress alleviation in tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum cv Mill. Selective isolation after enrichment at 5°C yielded 40 bacterial isolates. Phylogenetic studies indicated their distribution in genera Arthrobacter, Flavimonas, Flavobacterium, Massilia, Pedobacter and Pseudomonas. Strains OS211, OB146, OB155 and OS261 consistently improved germination and plant growth when a chilling stress of 15°C was imposed and therefore were selected for pot experiments. Tomato plants treated with the selected four isolates exhibited significant tolerance to chilling as observed through reduction in membrane damage and activation of antioxidant enzymes along with proline synthesis in the leaves when exposed to chilling temperature conditions (15°C. Psychrotolerant physiology of the isolated bacteria combined with their ability to improve germination, plant growth and induce antioxidant capacity in tomato plants can be employed to protect plants against chilling stress.

  12. Effects of cucumber mosaic virus infection on electron transport and antioxidant system in chloroplasts and mitochondria of cucumber and tomato leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xing-Shun; Wang, Yan-Jie; Mao, Wei-Hua; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Nogués, Salvador; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2009-03-01

    We examined the responses of the photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport and antioxidant systems in cell organelles of cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) and tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) leaves to infection of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) by comparing the gas exchange, Chl fluorescence, respiratory electron transport, superoxide dismutase (SOD, EC 1.15.1.1) and ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle enzymes and the production of H(2)O(2) in chloroplasts, mitochondria and soluble fraction in virus-infected and non-infected leaves. Long-term CMV infection resulted in decreased photosynthesis and respiration rates. Photosynthetic electron flux to carbon reduction, respiratory electron transport via both complex I and complex II and also the Cyt respiration rate all significantly decreased, while photosynthetic alternative electron flux and alternative respiration significantly increased. These changes in electron transport were accompanied by a general increase in the activities of SOD/AsA-GSH cycle enzymes followed by an increased H(2)O(2) accumulation in chloroplasts and mitochondria. These results demonstrated that disturbance of photosynthetic and respiratory electron transport by CMV also affected the antioxidative systems, thereby leading to oxidative stress in various organelles.

  13. MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO IDENTIFY TOMATO MOSAIC TOBAMOVIRUS (TOMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Keila M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies were obtained against Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV isolated in Brazil. One antibody (8G7G2 isotyped as IgG2b (kappa light chain showed strong specificity and very low cross reaction with the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. It can be used in identification of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV.

  14. Transcriptomics of the interaction between the monopartite phloem-limited geminivirus tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus and Solanum lycopersicum highlights a role for plant hormones, autophagy and plant immune system fine tuning during infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Miozzi

    Full Text Available Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV, a DNA virus belonging to the genus Begomovirus, causes severe losses in tomato crops. It infects only a limited number of cells in the vascular tissues, making difficult to detect changes in host gene expression linked to its presence. Here we present the first microarray study of transcriptional changes induced by the phloem-limited geminivirus TYLCSV infecting tomato, its natural host. The analysis was performed on the midrib of mature leaves, a material naturally enriched in vascular tissues. A total of 2206 genes were up-regulated and 1398 were down-regulated in infected plants, with an overrepresentation of genes involved in hormone metabolism and responses, nucleic acid metabolism, regulation of transcription, ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and autophagy among those up-regulated, and in primary and secondary metabolism, phosphorylation, transcription and methylation-dependent chromatin silencing among those down-regulated. Our analysis showed a series of responses, such as the induction of GA- and ABA-responsive genes, the activation of the autophagic process and the fine tuning of the plant immune system, observed only in TYLCSV-tomato compatible interaction so far. On the other hand, comparisons with transcriptional changes observed in other geminivirus-plant interactions highlighted common host responses consisting in the deregulation of biotic stress responsive genes, key enzymes in the ethylene biosynthesis and methylation cycle, components of the ubiquitin proteasome system and DNA polymerases II. The involvement of conserved miRNAs and of solanaceous- and tomato-specific miRNAs in geminivirus infection, investigated by integrating differential gene expression data with miRNA targeting data, is discussed.

  15. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  16. Herencia de la resistencia a Phoma andina var. Crystalliniformis en tomate Resistance hederabillty of Phoma andina var. Eristalliniformis in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortina Guerrero Hernando Alfonso

    1988-12-01


    dificultades, la resistencia de L. hirsutum a L. esculentum, siempre que no existan efectos pleiotrópicos o de grupos de ligamiento.
    The inheritance of Phoma andina var. erystalliniformis resistanee derived from the wild species, related to tomate, Lyeopersieon hirsutum was studies at "La Selva" ICA's Experiment Station located at Rionegro (Antioquia, between may and september of 1987. The study was done by employing 6 families in which four different resistent L.
    hirsutum accessions and four susceptible L. eseulentum genotypes were used as parents. Each of the families included: the parents, the generations F1 and F2 and backcrosses from the F1 to each one of the parents. The
    researeh was carried out with an complete block design with tree replicates. The plants were scored individually, for some families 60 days after transplanting and for the remaning 80 days after transplantinq, by employing a scale in which 7 means killed plants and O no symtoms. Both, the original and the transformed data were subject the following analysis: mean components by using the scaling test (Mather and Jinks, 1971 and Cavalli test; variance components by employing Mather's methology (Mather y Jinks, 1971; different estimates of heritability and the minimum number of gene pairs differentiating the susceptible and resistent parents.
    In all the studied familles there was an additive variance with high values, a dominance variance close to zero and low environmental variance. The heritability for the resistance was high both in broad and narrow sense, The minimum number of gene pairs differentiating the resistant and susceptible parents was estimated between 3 and 4.
    Based on the aboye, it is possible to introduce in the cultivated tomato Phoma andina resistance, being important determine before to do so, possible deleterous pleitropic
    effects or deletereous linkage groups with the resistant genes.

  17. Reação de resistência de genótipos de tomateiro (Lycopersicum spp. à infecção por Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn Resistance reaction of tomato genotypes (Lycopersicum spp. to Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M. Rodrigues Cassiolato

    1994-12-01

    Full Text Available Dada a importância da tomaticultura no Brasil e das enfermidades que atacam esta cultura, da mesma forma que visando futuros estados em programas de melhoramento vegetal para resistência à patógenos, este trabalho teve por objetivos: avaliar o grau de patogenicidade de quatro isolados de Rhizoctonia solani obtidos de plantas doentes de tomateiro (RT, berinjelas (RB1 e RB2 e pimentão (RP, em viveiros, frente a 9 genótipos de tomateiros e avaliar a reação de resistência de 73 genótipos de tomateiros ao R. solani. Nos experimentos utilizou-se solo esterilizado, em condições de casa de vegetação. Para o experimento I, os isolados de R. solani, oriundos das plantas de tomateiro (RT e berinjela (RB, foram igualmente mais patogênicos que os isolados de berinjela (RB, e pimentão (RP, com relação aos 9 genótipos de tomateiro testados. Pode-se dizer que os isolados variaram em graus de agressividade. Quanto às reações de resistência a R. solani, observou-se que os diferentes genótipos não diferiram estatisticamente entre si. Com relação ao experimento II, entre os 73 genótipos de tomateiro (incluindo espécies selvagens, variedades nacionais e introduções, pode-se observar que houve grande variabilidade quanto a reação de resistência a R. solani (isolado do tomateiro - RT, com percentuais de sobrevivência de plantas variando de 91%, para a cultivar Quinck Pick, até 0% de sobrevivência para o genótipo LA-462. Não foi verificada imunidade em nenhum material avaliado e sim níveis de resistência, onde esta, expressa em percentagem de sobrevivência, ocorreu de uma maneira contínua, desde uma reação de suscetibilidade até altos níveis de resistência.The present study was undertaken with the following objectives: 1 to evaluate the level of pathogenicity of four Rhizoctonia solani isolates obtained from diseased tomato plants (RT, from eggplant (RB1 and RB2, and pepper (RP and tested on 9 tomato genotypes grown in

  18. The Tomato Spotted Wilt Virus Genome Is Processed Differentially in its Plant Host Arachis hypogaea and its Thrips Vector Frankliniella fusca

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Stephen J.; Shrestha, Anita; Peters, Jonathan R.; Carroll, Bernard J.; Srinivasan, Rajagopalbabu; Pappu, Hanu R.; Mitter, Neena

    2016-01-01

    Thrips-transmitted tospoviruses are economically important viruses affecting a wide range of field and horticultural crops worldwide. Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is the type member of the Tospovirus genus with a broad host range of more than 900 plant species. Interactions between these viruses and their plant hosts and insect vectors via RNAi pathways are likely a key determinant of pathogenicity. The current investigation, for the first time, compares biogenesis of small RNAs between the plant host and insect vector in the presence or absence of TSWV. Unique viral small interfering RNA (vsiRNA) profiles are evident for Arachis hypogaea (peanut) and Frankliniella fusca (thrips vector) following infection with TSWV. Differences between vsiRNA profiles for these plant and insect species, such as the relative abundance of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs and locations of alignment hotspots, reflect the diverse siRNA biosynthesis pathways of their respective kingdoms. The presence of unique vsiRNAs in F. fusca samples indicates that vsiRNA generation takes place within the thrips, and not solely through uptake via feeding on vsiRNAs produced in infected A. hypogaea. The study also shows key vsiRNA profile differences for TSWV among plant families, which are evident in the case of A. hypogaea, a legume, and members of Solanaceae (S. lycopersicum and Nicotiana benthamiana). Distinctively, overall small RNA (sRNA) biogenesis in A. hypogaea is markedly affected with an absence of the 24 nt sRNAs in TSWV-infected plants, possibly leading to wide-spread molecular and phenotypic perturbations specific to this species. These findings add significant information on the host–virus–vector interaction in terms of RNAi pathways and may lead to better crop and vector specific control strategies. PMID:27656190

  19. Sequence characterization, molecular