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Sample records for virus mediated gene

  1. Investigating Gene Function in Cereal Rust Fungi by Plant-Mediated Virus-Induced Gene Silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panwar, Vinay; Bakkeren, Guus

    2017-01-01

    Cereal rust fungi are destructive pathogens, threatening grain production worldwide. Targeted breeding for resistance utilizing host resistance genes has been effective. However, breakdown of resistance occurs frequently and continued efforts are needed to understand how these fungi overcome resistance and to expand the range of available resistance genes. Whole genome sequencing, transcriptomic and proteomic studies followed by genome-wide computational and comparative analyses have identified large repertoire of genes in rust fungi among which are candidates predicted to code for pathogenicity and virulence factors. Some of these genes represent defence triggering avirulence effectors. However, functions of most genes still needs to be assessed to understand the biology of these obligate biotrophic pathogens. Since genetic manipulations such as gene deletion and genetic transformation are not yet feasible in rust fungi, performing functional gene studies is challenging. Recently, Host-induced gene silencing (HIGS) has emerged as a useful tool to characterize gene function in rust fungi while infecting and growing in host plants. We utilized Barley stripe mosaic virus-mediated virus induced gene silencing (BSMV-VIGS) to induce HIGS of candidate rust fungal genes in the wheat host to determine their role in plant-fungal interactions. Here, we describe the methods for using BSMV-VIGS in wheat for functional genomics study in cereal rust fungi.

  2. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Arun

    2008-09-01

    Although the remarkable versatility and efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors in transducing a wide variety of cells and tissues in vitro, and in numerous pre-clinical animal models of human diseases in vivo, have been well established, the published literature is replete with controversies with regard to the efficacy of AAV2 vectors in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transduction. A number of factors have contributed to these controversies, the molecular bases of which have begun to come to light in recent years. With the availability of several novel serotypes (AAV1 through AAV12), rational design of AAV capsid mutants, and strategies (self-complementary vector genomes, hematopoietic cell-specific promoters), it is indeed becoming feasible to achieve efficient transduction of HSC by AAV vectors. Using a murine serial bone marrow transplantation model in vivo, we have recently documented stable integration of the proviral AAV genome into mouse chromosomes, which does not lead to any overt hematological abnormalities. Thus, a better understanding of the AAV-HSC interactions, and the availability of a vast repertoire of novel serotype and capsid mutant vectors, are likely to have significant implications in the use of AAV vectors in high-efficiency transduction of HSCs as well as in gene therapy applications involving the hematopoietic system. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Amplicon Vector–Mediated Gene Expression in Human Glioma Spheroids

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Kaestle; Alexandra Winkeler; Raphaela Richter; Heinrich Sauer; Jürgen Hescheler; Cornel Fraefel; Maria Wartenberg; Andreas H. Jacobs

    2011-01-01

    Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector–mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fl...

  4. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Srivastava, Arun

    2008-01-01

    Although the remarkable versatility and efficacy of recombinant adeno-associated virus 2 (AAV2) vectors in transducing a wide variety of cells and tissues in vitro, and in numerous pre-clinical animal models of human diseases in vivo, have been well established, the published literature is replete with controversies with regard to the efficacy of AAV2 vectors in hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transduction. A number of factors have contributed to these controversies, the molecular bases of whic...

  5. Host-Induced Gene Silencing of Rice Blast Fungus Magnaporthe oryzae Pathogenicity Genes Mediated by the Brome Mosaic Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Zhu, Jian; Liu, Zhixue; Wang, Zhengyi; Zhou, Cheng; Wang, Hong

    2017-09-26

    Magnaporthe oryzae is a devastating plant pathogen, which has a detrimental impact on rice production worldwide. Despite its agronomical importance, some newly-emerging pathotypes often overcome race-specific disease resistance rapidly. It is thus desirable to develop a novel strategy for the long-lasting resistance of rice plants to ever-changing fungal pathogens. Brome mosaic virus (BMV)-induced RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a useful tool to study host-resistance genes for rice blast protection. Planta-generated silencing of targeted genes inside biotrophic pathogens can be achieved by expression of M. oryzae -derived gene fragments in the BMV-mediated gene silencing system, a technique termed host-induced gene silencing (HIGS). In this study, the effectiveness of BMV-mediated HIGS in M. oryzae was examined by targeting three predicted pathogenicity genes, MoABC1, MoMAC1 and MoPMK1 . Systemic generation of fungal gene-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules induced by inoculation of BMV viral vectors inhibited disease development and reduced the transcription of targeted fungal genes after subsequent M. oryzae inoculation. Combined introduction of fungal gene sequences in sense and antisense orientation mediated by the BMV silencing vectors significantly enhanced the efficiency of this host-generated trans-specific RNAi, implying that these fungal genes played crucial roles in pathogenicity. Collectively, our results indicated that BMV-HIGS system was a great strategy for protecting host plants against the invasion of pathogenic fungi.

  6. Imaging Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Amplicon Vector–Mediated Gene Expression in Human Glioma Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Kaestle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Vectors derived from herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 have great potential for transducing therapeutic genes into the central nervous system; however, inefficient distribution of vector particles in vivo may limit their therapeutic potential in patients with gliomas. This study was performed to investigate the extent of HSV-1 amplicon vector–mediated gene expression in a three-dimensional glioma model of multicellular spheroids by imaging highly infectious HSV-1 virions expressing green fluorescent protein (HSV-GFP. After infection or microscopy-guided vector injection of glioma spheroids at various spheroid sizes, injection pressures and injection times, the extent of HSV-1 vector–mediated gene expression was investigated via laser scanning microscopy. Infection of spheroids with HSV-GFP demonstrated a maximal depth of vector-mediated GFP expression at 70 to 80 μm. A > 80% transduction efficiency was reached only in small spheroids with a diameter of 90%. The results demonstrated that vector-mediated gene expression in glioma spheroids was strongly dependent on the mode of vector application—injection pressure and injection time being the most important parameters. The assessment of these vector application parameters in tissue models will contribute to the development of safe and efficient gene therapy protocols for clinical application.

  7. Development of Agrobacterium-mediated virus-induced gene silencing and performance evaluation of four marker genes in Gossypium barbadense.

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    Jinhuan Pang

    Full Text Available Gossypiumbarbadense is a cultivated cotton species and possesses many desirable traits, including high fiber quality and resistance to pathogens, especially Verticilliumdahliae (a devastating pathogen of Gossypium hirsutum, the main cultivated species. These elite traits are difficult to be introduced into G. hirsutum through classical breeding methods. In addition, genetic transformation of G. barbadense has not been successfully performed. It is therefore important to develop methods for evaluating the function and molecular mechanism of genes in G. barbadense. In this study, we had successfully introduced a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS system into three cultivars of G. barbadense by inserting marker genes into the tobacco rattle virus (TRV vector. After we optimized the VIGS conditions, including light intensity, photoperiod, seedling age and Agrobacterium strain, 100% of plants agroinfiltrated with the GaPDS silencing vector showed white colored leaves. Three other marker genes, GaCLA1, GaANS and GaANR, were employed to further test this VIGS system in G. barbadense. The transcript levels of the endogenous genes in the silenced plants were reduced by more than 99% compared to control plants; these plants presented phenotypic symptoms 2 weeks after inoculation. We introduced a fusing sequence fragment of GaPDS and GaANR gene silencing vectors into a single plant, which resulted in both photobleaching and brownish coloration. The extent of silencing in plants agroinfiltrated with fusing two-gene-silencing vector was consistent with plants harboring a single gene silencing vector. The development of this VIGS system should promote analysis of gene function in G. barbadense, and help to contribute desirable traits for breeding of G. barbadense and G. hirsutum.

  8. Differential Cotton leaf crumple virus-VIGS-mediated gene silencing and viral genome localization in different Gossypium hirsutum genetic backgrounds

    KAUST Repository

    Idris, Ali

    2010-12-01

    A Cotton leaf crumple virus (CLCrV)-based gene silencing vector containing a fragment of the Gossypium hirsutum Magnesium chelatase subunit I was used to establish endogenous gene silencing in cotton of varied genetic backgrounds. Biolistic inoculation resulted in systemic and persistent photo-bleaching of the leaves and bolls of the seven cultivars tested, however, the intensity of silencing was variable. CLCrV-VIGS-mediated expression of green fluorescent protein was used to monitor the in planta distribution of the vector, indicating successful phloem invasion in all cultivars tested. Acala SJ-1, one of the cotton cultivars, was identified as a particularly optimal candidate for CLCrV-VIGS-based cotton reverse-genetics. © 2010 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Assessment of different virus-mediated approaches for retinal gene therapy of Usher 1B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Vanda S; Diemer, Tanja; Williams, David S

    2014-01-01

    Usher syndrome type 1B, which is characterized by congenital deafness and progressive retinal degeneration, is caused by the loss of the function of MYO7A. Prevention of the retinal degeneration should be possible by delivering functional MYO7A to retinal cells. Although this approach has been used successfully in clinical trials for Leber congenital amaurosis (LCA2), it remains a challenge for Usher 1B because of the large size of the MYO7A cDNA. Different viral vectors have been tested for use in MYO7A gene therapy. Here, we review approaches with lentiviruses, which can accommodate larger genes, as well as attempts to use adeno-associated virus (AAV), which has a smaller packaging capacity. In conclusion, both types of viral vector appear to be effective. Despite concerns about the ability of lentiviruses to access the photoreceptor cells, a phenotype of the photoreceptors of Myo7a-mutant mice can be corrected. And although MYO7A cDNA is significantly larger than the nominal carrying capacity of AAV, AAV-MYO7A in single vectors also corrected Myo7a-mutant phenotypes in photoreceptor and RPE cells. Interestingly, however, a dual AAV vector approach was found to be much less effective.

  10. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of grapefruit with the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase genes of Citrus tristeza virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus paradisi Macf. cv. Duncan was transformed with constructs coding for the wild-type and mutant RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of Citrus tristeza virus (CTV) for exploring replicase-mediated pathogen-derived resistance (RM-PDR). The RdRp gene was amplified from CTV genome and used to gener...

  11. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Libo, E-mail: libochen888@hotmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China); Guo Guoying [Xinyuan Institute of Medicine and Biotechnology, School of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou 310018 (China); Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe [Division of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institute for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Zhu Ruisen [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Shanghai Sixth People' s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200233 (China)

    2011-07-15

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated {sup 125}I{sup -} up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T{sub 1/2eff} of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or {sup 131}I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%{+-}2.5%, 43.4%{+-}2.8% and 8.6%{+-}1.2% after exposure to {sup 131}I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  12. Radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentivirus-mediated transfer of human sodium iodide symporter gene and herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Libo; Guo Guoying; Liu Tianjing; Guo Lihe; Zhu Ruisen

    2011-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) gene/ganciclovir (GCV) system has been widely used as a traditional gene therapy modality, and the sodium/iodide symporter gene (NIS) has been found to be a novel therapeutic gene. Since the therapeutic effects of radioiodine therapy or prodrug chemotherapy on cancers following NIS or HSV-TK gene transfer need to be enhanced, this study was designed to investigate the feasibility of radiochemotherapy for hepatocarcinoma via coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene. Methods: HepG2 cells were stably transfected with NIS, TK and GFP gene via recombinant lentiviral vector and named HepG2/NTG. Gene expression was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, fluorescence imaging and iodide uptake. The therapeutic effects were assessed by MTT assay and clonogenic assay. Results: HepG2/NTG cells concentrated 125 I - up to 76-fold higher than the wild-type cells within 20 min, and the efflux happened with a T 1/2eff of less than 10 min. The iodide uptake in HepG2/NTG cells was specifically inhibited by sodium perchlorate. Dose-dependent toxicity to HepG2/NTG cells by either GCV or 131 I was revealed by clonogenic assay and MTT assay, respectively. The survival rate of HepG2/NTG cells decreased to 49.7%±2.5%, 43.4%±2.8% and 8.6%±1.2% after exposure to 131 I, GCV and combined therapy, respectively. Conclusion: We demonstrate that radiochemotherapy of hepatocarcinoma via lentiviral-mediated coexpression of NIS gene and HSV-TK gene leads to stronger killing effect than single treatment, and in vivo studies are needed to verify these findings.

  13. Effects of gamma rays, ultraviolet radiation, sunlight, microwaves and electromagnetic fields on gene expression mediated by human immunodeficiency virus promoter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Libertin, C.R.; Woloschak, G.E.; Panozzo, J.; Groh, K.R.; Chang-Liu, Chin-Mei; Schreck, S.

    1994-01-01

    Previous work by our group and others has shown the modulation of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter or long terminal repeat (LTR) after exposure to neutrons and ultraviolet radiations. Using HeLa cells stably transfected with a construct containing the chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT) gene, the transcription of which is mediated by the HIV-LTR, we designed experiments to examine the effects of exposure to different types of radiation (such as γ rays, ultraviolet and sunlight irradiations, electromagnetic fields and microwaves) in HIV-LTR-driven expression of CAT. These results demonstrated ultraviolet-light-induced transcription from the HIV promoter, as has been shown by others. Exposure to other DNA-damaging agents such as γ rays and sunlight (with limited exposures) had no significant effect on transcription mediated by HIV-LTR, suggesting that induction of HIV is not mediated by just any type of DNA damage but rather may require specific types of DNA damage. Microwaves did not cause cell killing when cells in culture were exposed in high volumes of medium, and the same cells showed no changes in expression. When microwave exposure was carried out in low volumes of medium (so that excessive heat was generated) induction of HIV-LTR transcription (as assayed by CAT activity) was evident. Electromagnetic field exposures had no effect on expression of HIV-LTR. These results demonstrate that not all types of radiation and not all DNA-damaging agents are capable of inducing HIV. We hypothesize that induction of HIV transcription may be mediated by several different signals exposure to radiation. 22 refs., 8 figs

  14. Gene therapy strategy for long-term myocardial protection using adeno-associated virus-mediated delivery of heme oxygenase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Luis G; Agrawal, Reitu; Zhang, Lunan; Rezvani, Mojgan; Mangi, Abeel A; Ehsan, Afshin; Griese, Daniel P; Dell'Acqua, Giorgio; Mann, Michael J; Oyama, Junichi; Yet, Shaw-Fang; Layne, Matthew D; Perrella, Mark A; Dzau, Victor J

    2002-02-05

    Ischemia and oxidative stress are the leading mechanisms for tissue injury. An ideal strategy for preventive/protective therapy would be to develop an approach that could confer long-term transgene expression and, consequently, tissue protection from repeated ischemia/reperfusion injury with a single administration of a therapeutic gene. In the present study, we used recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) as a vector for direct delivery of the cytoprotective gene heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) into the rat myocardium, with the purpose of evaluating this strategy as a therapeutic approach for long-term protection from ischemia-induced myocardial injury. Human HO-1 gene (hHO-1) was delivered to normal rat hearts by intramyocardial injection. AAV-mediated transfer of the hHO-1 gene 8 weeks before acute coronary artery ligation and release led to a dramatic reduction (>75%) in left ventricular myocardial infarction. The reduction in infarct size was accompanied by decreases in myocardial lipid peroxidation and in proapoptotic Bax and proinflammatory interleukin-1beta protein abundance, concomitant with an increase in antiapoptotic Bcl-2 protein level. This suggested that the transgene exerts its cardioprotective effects in part by reducing oxidative stress and associated inflammation and apoptotic cell death. This study documents the beneficial therapeutic effect of rAAV-mediated transfer, before myocardial injury, of a cytoprotective gene that confers long-term myocardial protection from ischemia/reperfusion injury. Our data suggest that this novel "pre-event" gene transfer approach may provide sustained tissue protection from future repeated episodes of injury and may be beneficial as preventive therapy for patients with or at risk of developing coronary ischemic events.

  15. NFκB-mediated activation of the cellular FUT3, 5 and 6 gene cluster by herpes simplex virus type 1.

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    Nordén, Rickard; Samuelsson, Ebba; Nyström, Kristina

    2017-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 has the ability to induce expression of a human gene cluster located on chromosome 19 upon infection. This gene cluster contains three fucosyltransferases (encoded by FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6) with the ability to add a fucose to an N-acetylglucosamine residue. Little is known regarding the transcriptional activation of these three genes in human cells. Intriguingly, herpes simplex virus type 1 activates all three genes simultaneously during infection, a situation not observed in uninfected tissue, pointing towards a virus specific mechanism for transcriptional activation. The aim of this study was to define the underlying mechanism for the herpes simplex virus type 1 activation of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcription. The transcriptional activation of the FUT-gene cluster on chromosome 19 in fibroblasts was specific, not involving adjacent genes. Moreover, inhibition of NFκB signaling through panepoxydone treatment significantly decreased the induction of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcriptional activation, as did siRNA targeting of p65, in herpes simplex virus type 1 infected fibroblasts. NFκB and p65 signaling appears to play an important role in the regulation of FUT3, FUT5 and FUT6 transcriptional activation by herpes simplex virus type 1 although additional, unidentified, viral factors might account for part of the mechanism as direct interferon mediated stimulation of NFκB was not sufficient to induce the fucosyltransferase encoding gene cluster in uninfected cells. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Small interference RNA profiling reveals the essential role of human membrane trafficking genes in mediating the infectious entry of dengue virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chu Justin

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dengue virus (DENV is the causative agent of Dengue fever and the life-threatening Dengue Haemorrhagic fever or Dengue shock syndrome. In the absence of anti-viral agents or vaccine, there is an urgent need to develop an effective anti-viral strategy against this medically important viral pathogen. The initial interplay between DENV and the host cells may represent one of the potential anti-viral targeting sites. Currently the involvements of human membrane trafficking host genes or factors that mediate the infectious cellular entry of dengue virus are not well defined. Results In this study, we have used a targeted small interfering RNA (siRNA library to identify and profile key cellular genes involved in processes of endocytosis, cytoskeletal dynamics and endosome trafficking that are important and essential for DENV infection. The infectious entry of DENV into Huh7 cells was shown to be potently inhibited by siRNAs targeting genes associated with clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The important role of clathrin-mediated endocytosis was confirmed by the expression of well-characterized dominant-negative mutants of genes in this pathway and by using the clathrin endocytosis inhibitor chlorpromazine. Furthermore, DENV infection was shown to be sensitive to the disruption of human genes in regulating the early to late endosomal trafficking as well as the endosomal acidic pH. The importance and involvement of both actin and microtubule dynamics in mediating the infectious entry of DENV was also revealed in this study. Conclusions Together, the findings from this study have provided a detail profiling of the human membrane trafficking cellular genes and the mechanistic insight into the interplay of these host genes with DENV to initiate an infection, hence broadening our understanding on the entry pathway of this medically important viral pathogen. These data may also provide a new potential avenue for development of anti

  17. Initial infection of roots and leaves reveals different resistance phenotypes associated with coat protein gene-mediated resistance to Potato mop-top virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germundsson, Anna; Sandgren, Maria; Barker, Hugh; Savenkov, Eugene I; Valkonen, Jari P T

    2002-05-01

    Resistance to the pomovirus Potato mop-top virus (PMTV) was studied in potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Saturna) and Nicotiana benthamiana transformed with the coat protein (CP) gene of PMTV. The incidence of PMTV infections was reduced in tubers of the CP-transgenic potatoes grown in the field in soil infested with the viruliferous vector, Spongospora subterranea. However, in those tubers that were infected, all three virus RNAs were detected and virus titres were high. The CP-transgenic N. benthamiana plants were inoculated with PMTV using two methods. Following mechanical inoculation of leaves, no RNA 3 (the CP-encoding RNA homologous to the transgene) was detected in leaves, but in some plants low amounts of RNA 3 were detected in roots; RNA 2 was readily detected in leaves and roots of several plants. Inoculation of roots using viruliferous S. subterranea resulted in infection of roots in all plants and the three PMTV RNAs were detected. However, no systemic movement of PMTV from roots to the above-ground parts was observed, indicating a novel expression of resistance. These data indicate that the CP gene-mediated resistance to PMTV specifically restricts accumulation of PMTV RNA 3, and is more effective in leaves than roots. Furthermore, expression of resistance is different depending on whether leaves or roots are inoculated. Data do not exclude the possibility that both a protein-mediated and an RNA-mediated resistance mechanism are involved.

  18. Phenotyping of VIGS-mediated gene silencing in rice using a vector derived from a DNA virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kant, Ravi; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2017-07-01

    Target genes in rice can be optimally silenced if inserted in antisense or hairpin orientation in the RTBV-derived VIGS vector and plants grown at 28 °C and 80% humidity after inoculation. Virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a method used to transiently silence genes in dicot as well as monocot plants. For the important monocot species rice, the Rice tungro bacilliform virus (RTBV)-derived VIGS system (RTBV-VIGS), which uses agroinoculation to initiate silencing, has not been standardized for optimal use. Here, using RTBV-VIGS, three sets of conditions were tested to achieve optimal silencing of the rice marker gene phytoene desaturase (pds). The effect of orientation of the insert in the RTBV-VIGS plasmid (sense, antisense and hairpin) on the silencing of the target gene was then evaluated using rice magnesium chelatase subunit H (chlH). Finally, the rice Xa21 gene, conferring resistance against bacterial leaf blight disease (BLB) was silenced using RTBV-VIGS system. In each case, real-time PCR-based assessment indicated approximately 40-80% fall in the accumulation levels of the transcripts of pds, chlH and Xa21. In the case of pds, the appearance of white streaks in the emerging leaves, and for chlH, chlorophyll levels and F v /F m ratio were assessed as phenotypes for silencing. For Xa21, the resistance levels to BLB were assessed by measuring the lesion length and the percent diseased areas of leaves, following challenge inoculation with Xanthomonas oryzae. In each case, the RTBV-MVIGS system gave rise to a discernible phenotype indicating the silencing of the respective target gene using condition III (temperature 28 °C, humidity 80% and 1 mM MES and 20 µM acetosyringone in secondary agrobacterium culture), which revealed the robustness of this gene silencing system for rice.

  19. Salicylic acid is an indispensable component of the Ny-1 resistance-gene-mediated response against Potato virus Y infection in potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baebler, Š; Witek, K; Petek, M; Stare, K; Tušek-Žnidarič, M; Pompe-Novak, M; Renaut, J; Szajko, K; Strzelczyk-Żyta, D; Marczewski, W; Morgiewicz, K; Gruden, K; Hennig, J

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the role of salicylic acid (SA) signalling in Ny-1-mediated hypersensitive resistance (HR) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) to Potato virus Y (PVY). The responses of the Ny-1 allele in the Rywal potato cultivar and transgenic NahG-Rywal potato plants that do not accumulate SA were characterized at the cytological, biochemical, transcriptome, and proteome levels. Analysis of noninoculated and inoculated leaves revealed that HR lesions started to develop from 3 d post inoculation and completely restricted the virus spread. At the cytological level, features of programmed cell death in combination with reactive oxygen species burst were observed. In response to PVY infection, SA was synthesized de novo. The lack of SA accumulation in the NahG plants led to the disease phenotype due to unrestricted viral spreading. Grafting experiments show that SA has a critical role in the inhibition of PVY spreading in parenchymal tissue, but not in vascular veins. The whole transcriptome analysis confirmed the central role of SA in orchestrating Ny-1-mediated responses and showed that the absence of SA leads to significant changes at the transcriptome level, including a delay in activation of expression of genes known to participate in defence responses. Moreover, perturbations in the expression of hormonal signalling genes were detected, shown as a switch from SA to jasmonic acid/ethylene signalling. Viral multiplication in the NahG plants was accompanied by downregulation of photosynthesis genes and activation of multiple energy-producing pathways.

  20. AcMNPV ac143 (odv-e18) is essential for mediating budded virus production and is the 30th baculovirus core gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, Christina B.; Theilmann, David A.

    2008-01-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac143 (odv-e18) is a late gene that encodes for a predicted 9.6 kDa structural protein that locates to the occlusion derived viral envelope and viral induced intranuclear microvesicles [Braunagel, S.C., He, H., Ramamurthy, P., and Summers, M.D. (1996). Transcription, translation, and cellular localization of three Autographa californica nuclear polyhedrosis virus structural proteins: ODV-E18, ODV-E35, and ODV-EC27. Virology 222, 100-114.]. In this study we demonstrate that ac143 is actually a previously unrecognized core gene and that it is essential for mediating budded virus production. To examine the role of ac143 in the baculovirus life cycle, we used the AcMNPV bacmid system to generate an ac143 knockout (KO) virus (AcBAC ac142REP-ac143KO ). Fluorescence and light microscopy showed that infection by AcBAC ac142REP-ac143KO is limited to a single cell and titration assays confirmed that AcBAC ac142REP-ac143KO was unable to produce budded virus (BV). Progression to very late phases of the viral infection was evidenced by the development of occlusion bodies in the nuclei of transfected cells. This correlated with the fact that viral DNA replication was unaffected in AcBAC ac142REP-ac143KO transfected cells. The entire ac143 promoter, which includes three late promoter motifs, is contained within the ac142 open reading frame. Different deletion mutants of this region showed that the integrity of the ac142-ac143 core gene cluster was required for the bacmids to display wild-type patterns of viral replication, BV production and RNA transcription

  1. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene delivery into the scala media of the normal and deafened adult mouse ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilpatrick, L A; Li, Q; Yang, J; Goddard, J C; Fekete, D M; Lang, H

    2011-06-01

    Murine models are ideal for studying cochlear gene transfer, as many hearing loss-related mutations have been discovered and mapped within the mouse genome. However, because of the small size and delicate nature, the membranous labyrinth of the mouse is a challenging target for the delivery of viral vectors. To minimize injection trauma, we developed a procedure for the controlled release of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) into the scala media of adult mice. This procedure poses minimal risk of injury to structures of the cochlea and middle ear, and allows for near-complete preservation of low and middle frequency hearing. In this study, transduction efficiency and cellular specificity of AAV vectors (serotypes 1, 2, 5, 6 and 8) were investigated in normal and drug-deafened ears. Using the cytomegalovirus promoter to drive gene expression, a variety of cell types were transduced successfully, including sensory hair cells and supporting cells, as well as cells in the auditory nerve and spiral ligament. Among all five serotypes, inner hair cells were the most effectively transduced cochlear cell type. All five serotypes of AAV vectors transduced cells of the auditory nerve, though serotype 8 was the most efficient vector for transduction. Our findings indicate that efficient AAV inoculation (via the scala media) can be performed in adult mouse ears, with hearing preservation a realistic goal. The procedure we describe may also have applications for intra-endolymphatic drug delivery in many mouse models of human deafness.

  2. Establishment of an efficient virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) assay in Arabidopsis by Agrobacterium-mediated rubbing infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manhães, Ana Marcia E de A; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Shan, Libo

    2015-01-01

    Several VIGS protocols have been established for high-throughput functional genomic screens as it bypasses the time-consuming and laborious process of generation of transgenic plants. The silencing efficiency in this approach is largely hindered by a technically demanding step in which the first pair of newly emerged true leaves at the 2-week-old stage are infiltrated with a needleless syringe. To further optimize VIGS efficiency and achieve rapid inoculation for a large-scale functional genomic study, here we describe a protocol of an efficient VIGS assay in Arabidopsis using Agrobacterium-mediated rubbing infection. The Agrobacterium inoculation is performed by simply rubbing the leaves with Filter Agent Celite(®) 545. The highly efficient and uniform silencing effect was indicated by the development of a visibly albino phenotype due to silencing of the Cloroplastos alterados 1 (CLA1) gene in the newly emerged leaves. In addition, the albino phenotype could be observed in stems and flowers, indicating its potential application for gene functional studies in the late vegetative development and flowering stages.

  3. Induction of sustained hypercholesterolemia by single adeno-associated virus-mediated gene transfer of mutant hPCSK9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche-Molina, Marta; Sanz-Rosa, David; Cruz, Francisco M; García-Prieto, Jaime; López, Sergio; Abia, Rocío; Muriana, Francisco J G; Fuster, Valentín; Ibáñez, Borja; Bernal, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    Patients with mutations in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene have hypercholesterolemia and are at high risk of adverse cardiovascular events. We aimed to stably express the pathological human D374Y gain-of-function mutant form of PCSK9 (PCSK9(DY)) in adult wild-type mice to generate a hyperlipidemic and proatherogenic animal model, achieved with a single systemic injection with adeno-associated virus (AAV). We constructed an AAV-based vector to support targeted transfer of the PCSK9(DY) gene to liver. After injection with 3.5×10(10) viral particles, mice in the C57BL/6J, 129/SvPasCrlf, or FVB/NCrl backgrounds developed long-term hyperlipidemia with a strong increase in serum low-density lipoprotein. Macroscopic and histological analysis showed atherosclerotic lesions in the aortas of AAV-PCSK9(DY) mice fed a high-fat-diet. Advanced lesions in these high-fat-diet-fed mice also showed evidence of macrophage infiltration and fibrous cap formation. Hepatic AAV-PCSK9(DY) infection did not result in liver damage or signs of immunologic response. We further tested the use of AAV-PCSK9(DY) to study potential genetic interaction with the ApoE gene. Histological analysis of ApoE(-/-) AAV-PCSK9(DY) mice showed a synergistic response to ApoE deficiency, with aortic lesions twice as extensive in ApoE(-/-) AAV-PCSK9(DY)-transexpressing mice as in ApoE(-/-) AAV-Luc controls without altering serum cholesterol levels. Single intravenous AAV-PCSK9(DY) injection is a fast, easy, and cost-effective approach, resulting in rapid and long-term sustained hyperlipidemia and atherosclerosis. We demonstrate as a proof of concept the synergy between PCSK9(DY) gain-of-function and ApoE deficiency. This methodology could allow testing of the genetic interaction of several mutations without the need for complex and time-consuming backcrosses. © 2014 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Latency of Epstein-Barr virus is stabilized by antisense-mediated control of the viral immediate-early gene BZLF-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prang, N; Wolf, H; Schwarzmann, F

    1999-12-01

    The ability of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to avoid lytic replication and to establish a latent infection in B-lymphocytes is fundamental for its lifelong persistence and the pathogenesis of various EBV-associated diseases. The viral immediate-early gene BZLF-1 plays a key role for the induction of lytic replication and its activity is strictly regulated on different levels of gene expression. Recently, it was demonstrated that BZLF-1 is also controlled by a posttranscriptional mechanism. Transient synthesis of a mutated competitor RNA saturated this mechanism and caused both expression of the BZLF-1 protein and the induction of lytic viral replication. Using short overlapping fragments of the competitor, it is shown that this control acts on the unspliced primary transcript. RT-PCR demonstrated unspliced BZLF-1 RNA in latently infected B-lymphocytes in the absence of BZLF-1 protein. Due to the complementarity of the gene BZLF-1 and the latency-associated gene EBNA-1 on the opposite strand of the genome, we propose an antisense-mediated mechanism. RNase protection assays demonstrated transcripts in antisense orientation to the BZLF-1 transcript during latency, which comprise a comparable constellation to other herpesviruses. A combined RNAse protection/RT-PCR assay detected the double-stranded hybrid RNA, consisting of the unspliced BZLF-1 transcript and a noncoding intron of the EBNA-1 gene. Binding of BZLF-1 transcripts is suggested to be an important backup control mechanism in addition to transcriptional regulation, stabilizing latency and preventing inappropriate lytic viral replication in vivo. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. High-throughput gene expression profiling indicates dysregulation of intestinal cell cycle mediators and growth factors during primary simian immunodeficiency virus infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, Michael D; Sankaran, Sumathi; Reay, Elizabeth; Gelli, Angie C; Dandekar, Satya

    2003-07-20

    During primary simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, CD4+ T cells are severely depleted in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), while CD8+ T-cell numbers dramatically increase. To gain an understanding of the molecular basis of this disruption in T-cell homeostasis, host gene expression was monitored in longitudinal jejunum tissue biopsies from SIV-infected rhesus macaques by DNA microarray analysis. Transcription of cyclin E1, CDC2, retinoblastoma, transforming growth factor (TGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and interleukin-2 was repressed while cyclins B1 and D2 and transcription factor E2F were upregulated, indicating a complex dysregulation of growth and proliferation within the intestinal mucosa. Innate, cell-mediated, and humoral immune responses were markedly upregulated in animals that significantly reduced their viral loads and retained more intestinal CD4+ T cells. We conclude that the alterations in intestinal gene expression during primary SIV infection were characteristic of a broad-range immune response, and reflective of the efficacy of viral suppression.

  6. High-throughput gene expression profiling indicates dysregulation of intestinal cell cycle mediators and growth factors during primary simian immunodeficiency virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, Michael D.; Sankaran, Sumathi; Reay, Elizabeth; Gelli, Angie C.; Dandekar, Satya

    2003-01-01

    During primary simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection, CD4+ T cells are severely depleted in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT), while CD8+ T-cell numbers dramatically increase. To gain an understanding of the molecular basis of this disruption in T-cell homeostasis, host gene expression was monitored in longitudinal jejunum tissue biopsies from SIV-infected rhesus macaques by DNA microarray analysis. Transcription of cyclin E1, CDC2, retinoblastoma, transforming growth factor (TGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), and interleukin-2 was repressed while cyclins B1 and D2 and transcription factor E2F were upregulated, indicating a complex dysregulation of growth and proliferation within the intestinal mucosa. Innate, cell-mediated, and humoral immune responses were markedly upregulated in animals that significantly reduced their viral loads and retained more intestinal CD4+ T cells. We conclude that the alterations in intestinal gene expression during primary SIV infection were characteristic of a broad-range immune response, and reflective of the efficacy of viral suppression

  7. Differential Cotton leaf crumple virus-VIGS-mediated gene silencing and viral genome localization in different Gossypium hirsutum genetic backgrounds

    KAUST Repository

    Idris, Ali; Tuttle, John Richard; Robertson, Dominique Niki; Haigler, Candace H.; Brown, Judith K.

    2010-01-01

    inoculation resulted in systemic and persistent photo-bleaching of the leaves and bolls of the seven cultivars tested, however, the intensity of silencing was variable. CLCrV-VIGS-mediated expression of green fluorescent protein was used to monitor

  8. Hepatitis C Virus Frameshift/Alternate Reading Frame Protein Suppresses Interferon Responses Mediated by Pattern Recognition Receptor Retinoic-Acid-Inducible Gene-I.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seung Bum Park

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV actively evades host interferon (IFN responses but the mechanisms of how it does so are not completely understood. In this study, we present evidence for an HCV factor that contributes to the suppression of retinoic-acid-inducible gene-I (RIG-I-mediated IFN induction. Expression of frameshift/alternate reading frame protein (F/ARFP from HCV -2/+1 frame in Huh7 hepatoma cells suppressed type I IFN responses stimulated by HCV RNA pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP and poly(IC. The suppression occurred independently of other HCV factors; and activation of interferon stimulated genes, TNFα, IFN-λ1, and IFN-λ2/3 was likewise suppressed by HCV F/ARFP. Point mutations in the full-length HCV sequence (JFH1 genotype 2a strain were made to introduce premature termination codons in the -2/+1 reading frame coding for F/ARFP while preserving the original reading frame, which enhanced IFNα and IFNβ induction by HCV. The potentiation of IFN response by the F/ARFP mutations was diminished in Huh7.5 cells, which already have a defective RIG-I, and by decreasing RIG-I expression in Huh7 cells. Furthermore, adding F/ARFP back via trans-complementation suppressed IFN induction in the F/ARFP mutant. The F/ARFP mutants, on the other hand, were not resistant to exogenous IFNα. Finally, HCV-infected human liver samples showed significant F/ARFP antibody reactivity, compared to HCV-uninfected control livers. Therefore, HCV F/ARFP likely cooperates with other viral factors to suppress type I and III IFN induction occurring through the RIG-I signaling pathway. This study identifies a novel mechanism of pattern recognition receptor modulation by HCV and suggests a biological function of the HCV alternate reading frame in the modulation of host innate immunity.

  9. MHC and non-MHC genes regulate elimination of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocyte and delayed-type hypersensitivity mediating T lymphocyte activity in parallel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Marker, O

    1989-01-01

    with regard to all three parameters was recessive, indicating that natural tolerance is not the mechanism explaining non-MHC dependent low responsiveness in this system. The implications of these findings are discussed with specific reference to the role of MHC genes in controlling resistance to infectious......, indicating that both H-2 and non-H-2 genes may influence the elimination of this virus. Differences in virus spread prior to appearance of the immune response could not explain the observed differences in clearance rate. On the other hand, inefficient clearance always correlated with low T cell...

  10. Nucleocapsid Gene-Mediated Transgenic Resistance Provides Protection Against Tomato spotted wilt virus Epidemics in the Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrero, S; Culbreath, A K; Csinos, A S; Pappu, H R; Rufty, R C; Daub, M E

    2000-02-01

    ABSTRACT Transformation of plants with the nucleocapsid (N) gene of Tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) provides resistance to disease development; however, information is lacking on the response of plants to natural inoculum in the field. Three tobacco cultivars were transformed with the N gene of a dahlia isolate of TSWV (TSWV-D), and plants were evaluated over several generations in the greenhouse. The resistant phenotype was more frequently observed in 'Burley 21' than in 'KY-14' or 'K-326', but highly resistant 'Burley 21' transgenic lines were resistant to only 44% of the heterologous TSWV isolates tested. Advanced generation (R(3) and R(4)) transgenic resistant lines of 'Burley 21' and a 'K-326' F(1) hybrid containing the N genes of two TSWV isolates were evaluated in the field near Tifton, GA, where TSWV is endemic. Disease development was monitored by symptom expression and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) analysis. Whereas incidence of TSWV infection in 'Burley 21' susceptible controls was 20% in 1996 and 62% in 1997, the mean incidence in transgenic lines was reduced to 4 and 31%, respectively. Three transgenic 'Burley 21' lines were identified that had significantly lower incidence of disease than susceptible controls over the two years of the study. In addition, the rate of disease increase at the onset of the 1997 epidemic was reduced for all the 'Burley 21' transgenic lines compared with the susceptible controls. The 'K-326' F(1) hybrid was as susceptible as the 'K-326' nontransformed control. ELISA analysis demonstrated that symptomless plants from the most resistant 'Burley 21' transgenic lines accumulated detectable nucleocapsid protein, whereas symptomless plants from more susceptible lines did not. We conclude that transgenic resistance to TSWV is effective in reducing incidence of the disease in the field, and that accumulation of transgene protein may be important in broad-spectrum resistance.

  11. A chemical arms race at sea mediates algal host-virus interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidle, Kay D; Vardi, Assaf

    2011-08-01

    Despite the critical importance of viruses in shaping marine microbial ecosystems and lubricating upper ocean biogeochemical cycles, relatively little is known about the molecular mechanisms mediating phytoplankton host-virus interactions. Recent work in algal host-virus systems has begun to shed novel insight into the elegant strategies of viral infection and subcellular regulation of cell fate, which not only reveal tantalizing aspects of viral replication and host resistance strategies but also provide new diagnostic tools toward elucidating the impact of virus-mediated processes in the ocean. Widespread lateral gene transfer between viruses and their hosts plays a prominent role in host-virus diversification and in the regulation of host-virus infection mechanisms by allowing viruses to manipulate and 'rewire' host metabolic pathways to facilitate infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recombinant adeno-associated virus mediates a high level of gene transfer but less efficient integration in the K562 human hematopoietic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, P; McQuiston, S A; Yu, X J; Pepper, K A; Krall, W J; Podsakoff, G M; Kurtzman, G J; Kohn, D B

    1997-03-01

    We tested the ability of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector to express and integrate exogenous DNA into human hematopoietic cells in the absence of selection. We developed an rAAV vector, AAV-tNGFR, carrying a truncated rat nerve growth factor receptor (tNGFR) cDNA as a cell surface reporter under the control of the Moloney murine leukemia virus (MoMuLV) long terminal repeat. An analogous MoMuLV-based retroviral vector (L-tNGFR) was used in parallel, and gene transfer and expression in human hematopoietic cells were assessed by flow cytometry and DNA analyses. Following gene transfer into K562 cells with AAV-tNGFR at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 13 infectious units (IU), 26 to 38% of cells expressed tNGFR on the surface early after transduction, but the proportion of tNGFR expressing cells steadily declined to 3.0 to 3.5% over 1 month of culture. At an MOI of 130 IU, nearly all cells expressed tNGFR immediately posttransduction, but the proportion of cells expressing tNGFR declined to 62% over 2 months of culture. The decline in the proportion of AAV-tNGFR-expressing cells was associated with ongoing losses of vector genomes. In contrast, K562 cells transduced with the retroviral vector L-tNGFR expressed tNGFR in a constant fraction. Integration analyses on clones showed that integration occurred at different sites. Integration frequencies were estimated at about 49% at an MOI of 130 and 2% at an MOI of 1.3. Transduction of primary human CD34+ progenitor cells by AAV-tNGFR was less efficient than with K562 cells and showed a declining percentage of cells expressing tNGFR over 2 weeks of culture. Thus, purified rAAV caused very high gene transfer and expression in human hematopoietic cells early after transduction, which steadily declined during cell passage in the absence of selection. Although the efficiency of integration was low, overall integration was markedly improved at a high MOI. While prolonged episomal persistence may be adequate

  13. Coronavirus gene 7 counteracts host defenses and modulates virus virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jazmina L G Cruz

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV genome contains three accessory genes: 3a, 3b and 7. Gene 7 is only present in members of coronavirus genus a1, and encodes a hydrophobic protein of 78 aa. To study gene 7 function, a recombinant TGEV virus lacking gene 7 was engineered (rTGEV-Δ7. Both the mutant and the parental (rTGEV-wt viruses showed the same growth and viral RNA accumulation kinetics in tissue cultures. Nevertheless, cells infected with rTGEV-Δ7 virus showed an increased cytopathic effect caused by an enhanced apoptosis mediated by caspase activation. Macromolecular synthesis analysis showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus infection led to host translational shut-off and increased cellular RNA degradation compared with rTGEV-wt infection. An increase of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 (eIF2α phosphorylation and an enhanced nuclease, most likely RNase L, activity were observed in rTGEV-Δ7 virus infected cells. These results suggested that the removal of gene 7 promoted an intensified dsRNA-activated host antiviral response. In protein 7 a conserved sequence motif that potentially mediates binding to protein phosphatase 1 catalytic subunit (PP1c, a key regulator of the cell antiviral defenses, was identified. We postulated that TGEV protein 7 may counteract host antiviral response by its association with PP1c. In fact, pull-down assays demonstrated the interaction between TGEV protein 7, but not a protein 7 mutant lacking PP1c binding motif, with PP1. Moreover, the interaction between protein 7 and PP1 was required, during the infection, for eIF2α dephosphorylation and inhibition of cell RNA degradation. Inoculation of newborn piglets with rTGEV-Δ7 and rTGEV-wt viruses showed that rTGEV-Δ7 virus presented accelerated growth kinetics and pathology compared with the parental virus. Overall, the results indicated that gene 7 counteracted host cell defenses, and modified TGEV persistence increasing TGEV survival. Therefore, the

  14. A single point mutation in Tomato spotted wilt virus NSs protein is sufficient to overcome Tsw-gene-mediated resistance in pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almási, Asztéria; Nemes, Katalin; Csömör, Zsófia; Tóbiás, István; Palkovics, László; Salánki, Katalin

    2017-06-01

    The nonstructural protein (NSs) of Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) was previously identified as an avirulence determinant for Tsw-based resistance on pepper. The NSs of wild-type (WT) and resistance-breaking (RB) TSWV strains isolated in Hungary had only two amino acid substitutions (104, 461). We have analysed the ability of the NSs and their point mutant variants to trigger Tsw-mediated hypersensitive responses and RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity in patch assays. We identified a single amino acid change at position 104 (T-A) that was responsible for the necrosis induction or loss, while a significant difference was not detected in the RSS activity of the two parental strains. We have successfully complemented the infection of the WT strain on resistant pepper cultivar with the infectious S RNA transcript of the RB strain and the WT-T104A point mutant. Our work provides direct evidence that a single amino acid change can induce an RB phenotype.

  15. The immunomodulatory gene products of myxoma virus

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    273. Keywords. Gene products; myxoma virus; Oryctolagus cuniculus; poxvirus; skin lesions ...... these data is that these viral proteins do not promote class .... Cudmore S, Reckmann I and Way M 1997 Viral manipulations of the actin ...

  16. Virus-mediated suppression of host non-self recognition facilitates horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songsong Wu

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-self recognition is a common phenomenon among organisms; it often leads to innate immunity to prevent the invasion of parasites and maintain the genetic polymorphism of organisms. Fungal vegetative incompatibility is a type of non-self recognition which often induces programmed cell death (PCD and restricts the spread of molecular parasites. It is not clearly known whether virus infection could attenuate non-self recognition among host individuals to facilitate its spread. Here, we report that a hypovirulence-associated mycoreovirus, named Sclerotinia sclerotiorum mycoreovirus 4 (SsMYRV4, could suppress host non-self recognition and facilitate horizontal transmission of heterologous viruses. We found that cell death in intermingled colony regions between SsMYRV4-infected Sclerotinia sclerotiorum strain and other tested vegetatively incompatible strains was markedly reduced and inhibition barrage lines were not clearly observed. Vegetative incompatibility, which involves Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins signaling pathway, is controlled by specific loci termed het (heterokaryon incompatibility loci. Reactive oxygen species (ROS plays a key role in vegetative incompatibility-mediated PCD. The expression of G protein subunit genes, het genes, and ROS-related genes were significantly down-regulated, and cellular production of ROS was suppressed in the presence of SsMYRV4. Furthermore, SsMYRV4-infected strain could easily accept other viruses through hyphal contact and these viruses could be efficiently transmitted from SsMYRV4-infected strain to other vegetatively incompatible individuals. Thus, we concluded that SsMYRV4 is capable of suppressing host non-self recognition and facilitating heterologous viruses transmission among host individuals. These findings may enhance our understanding of virus ecology, and provide a potential strategy to utilize hypovirulence-associated mycoviruses to control fungal diseases.

  17. Two White Spot Syndrome Virus MicroRNAs Target the Dorsal Gene To Promote Virus Infection in Marsupenaeus japonicus Shrimp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Qian; Huang, Xin; Cui, Yalei; Sun, Jiejie; Wang, Wen; Zhang, Xiaobo

    2017-04-15

    In eukaryotes, microRNAs (miRNAs) serve as regulators of many biological processes, including virus infection. An miRNA can generally target diverse genes during virus-host interactions. However, the regulation of gene expression by multiple miRNAs has not yet been extensively explored during virus infection. This study found that the Spaztle (Spz)-Toll-Dorsal-antilipopolysaccharide factor (ALF) signaling pathway plays a very important role in antiviral immunity against invasion of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) in shrimp ( Marsupenaeus japonicus ). Dorsal , the central gene in the Toll pathway, was targeted by two viral miRNAs (WSSV-miR-N13 and WSSV-miR-N23) during WSSV infection. The regulation of Dorsal expression by viral miRNAs suppressed the Spz-Toll-Dorsal-ALF signaling pathway in shrimp in vivo , leading to virus infection. Our study contributes novel insights into the viral miRNA-mediated Toll signaling pathway during the virus-host interaction. IMPORTANCE An miRNA can target diverse genes during virus-host interactions. However, the regulation of gene expression by multiple miRNAs during virus infection has not yet been extensively explored. The results of this study indicated that the shrimp Dorsal gene, the central gene in the Toll pathway, was targeted by two viral miRNAs during infection with white spot syndrome virus. Regulation of Dorsal expression by viral miRNAs suppressed the Spz-Toll-Dorsal-ALF signaling pathway in shrimp in vivo , leading to virus infection. Our study provides new insight into the viral miRNA-mediated Toll signaling pathway in virus-host interactions. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  18. A Luciferase Reporter Gene Assay to Measure Ebola Virus Viral Protein 35-Associated Inhibition of Double-Stranded RNA-Stimulated, Retinoic Acid-Inducible Gene 1-Mediated Induction of Interferon β.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannas, Valeria; Daino, Gian Luca; Corona, Angela; Esposito, Francesca; Tramontano, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    During Ebola virus (EBOV) infection, the type I interferon α/β (IFN-α/β) innate immune response is suppressed by EBOV viral protein 35 (VP35), a validated drug target. Identification of EBOV VP35 inhibitors requires a cellular system able to assess the VP35-based inhibitory functions of viral double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) IFN-β induction. We established a miniaturized luciferase gene reporter assay in A549 cells that measures IFN-β induction by viral dsRNA and is dose-dependently inhibited by VP35 expression. When compared to influenza A virus NS1 protein, EBOV VP35 showed improved inhibition of viral dsRNA-based IFN-β induction. This assay can be used to screen for EBOV VP35 inhibitors. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Compromised virus control and augmented perforin-mediated immunopathology in IFN-gamma-deficient mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nansen, A; Jensen, Teis; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard

    1999-01-01

    To define the role of IFN-gamma in the control of acute infection with a noncytopathogenic virus, mice with targeted defects of the genes encoding IFN-gamma, perforin, or both were infected i.v. with two strains of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus differing markedly in their capacity to spread...... in wild-type mice. Our results reveal that IFN-gamma is pivotal to T cell-mediated control of a rapidly invasive stain, whereas it is less important in the acute elimination of a slowly invasive strain. Moreover, the majority of mice infected with the rapidly invasive strain succumb to a wasting syndrome...... mediated by CD8+ effector cells. The primary effector mechanism underlying this disease is perforin-dependent lysis, but other mechanisms are also involved. Wasting disease can be prevented if naive CD8+ cells from mice transgenic for an MHC class I-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus...

  20. Validation of reference genes for quantifying changes in gene expression in virus-infected tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Eseul; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Palukaitis, Peter

    2017-10-01

    To facilitate quantification of gene expression changes in virus-infected tobacco plants, eight housekeeping genes were evaluated for their stability of expression during infection by one of three systemically-infecting viruses (cucumber mosaic virus, potato virus X, potato virus Y) or a hypersensitive-response-inducing virus (tobacco mosaic virus; TMV) limited to the inoculated leaf. Five reference-gene validation programs were used to establish the order of the most stable genes for the systemically-infecting viruses as ribosomal protein L25 > β-Tubulin > Actin, and the least stable genes Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (UCE) genes were EF1α > Cysteine protease > Actin, and the least stable genes were GAPDH genes, three defense responsive genes were examined to compare their relative changes in gene expression caused by each virus. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Genetic diversity in the feline leukemia virus gag gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamura, Maki; Watanabe, Shinya; Odahara, Yuka; Nakagawa, So; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2015-06-02

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) belongs to the Gammaretrovirus genus and is horizontally transmitted among cats. FeLV is known to undergo recombination with endogenous retroviruses already present in the host during FeLV-subgroup A infection. Such recombinant FeLVs, designated FeLV-subgroup B or FeLV-subgroup D, can be generated by transduced endogenous retroviral env sequences encoding the viral envelope. These recombinant viruses have biologically distinct properties and may mediate different disease outcomes. The generation of such recombinant viruses resulted in structural diversity of the FeLV particle and genetic diversity of the virus itself. FeLV env diversity through mutation and recombination has been studied, while gag diversity and its possible effects are less well understood. In this study, we investigated recombination events in the gag genes of FeLVs isolated from naturally infected cats and reference isolates. Recombination and phylogenetic analyses indicated that the gag genes often contain endogenous FeLV sequences and were occasionally replaced by entire endogenous FeLV gag genes. Phylogenetic reconstructions of FeLV gag sequences allowed for classification into three distinct clusters, similar to those previously established for the env gene. Analysis of the recombination junctions in FeLV gag indicated that these variants have similar recombination patterns within the same genotypes, indicating that the recombinant viruses were horizontally transmitted among cats. It remains to be investigated whether the recombinant sequences affect the molecular mechanism of FeLV transmission. These findings extend our understanding of gammaretrovirus evolutionary patterns in the field. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Surface gene variants of hepatitis B Virus in Saudi Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qudari, Ahmed Y; Amer, Haitham M; Abdo, Ayman A; Hussain, Zahid; Al-Hamoudi, Waleed; Alswat, Khalid; Almajhdi, Fahad N

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) continues to be one of the most important viral pathogens in humans. Surface (S) protein is the major HBV antigen that mediates virus attachment and entry and determines the virus subtype. Mutations in S gene, particularly in the "a" determinant, can influence virus detection by ELISA and may generate escape mutants. Since no records have documented the S gene mutations in HBV strains circulating in Saudi Arabia, the current study was designed to study sequence variation of S gene in strains circulating in Saudi Arabia and its correlation with clinical and risk factors. A total of 123 HBV-infected patients were recruited for this study. Clinical and biochemical parameters, serological markers, and viral load were determined in all patients. The entire S gene sequence of samples with viral load exceeding 2000 IU/mL was retrieved and exploited in sequence and phylogenetic analysis. A total of 48 mutations (21 unique) were recorded in viral strains in Saudi Arabia, among which 24 (11 unique) changed their respective amino acids. Two amino acid changes were recorded in "a" determinant, including F130L and S135F with no evidence of the vaccine escape mutant G145R in any of the samples. No specific relationship was recognized between the mutation/amino acid change record of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia and clinical or laboratory data. Phylogenetic analysis categorized HBV viral strains in Saudi Arabia as members of subgenotypes D1 and D3. The present report is the first that describes mutation analysis of HBsAg in strains in Saudi Arabia on both nucleotide and amino acid levels. Different substitutions, particularly in major hydrophilic region, may have a potential influence on disease diagnosis, vaccination strategy, and antiviral chemotherapy.

  3. Jasmonic acid-mediated defense suppresses brassinosteroid-mediated susceptibility to Rice black streaked dwarf virus infection in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuqing; Zhang, Hehong; Sun, Zongtao; Li, Junmin; Hong, Gaojie; Zhu, Qisong; Zhou, Xuebiao; MacFarlane, Stuart; Yan, Fei; Chen, Jianping

    2017-04-01

    Plant hormones play a vital role in plant immune responses. However, in contrast to the relative wealth of information on hormone-mediated immunity in dicot plants, little information is available on monocot-virus defense systems. We used a high-throughput-sequencing approach to compare the global gene expression of Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV)-infected rice plants with that of healthy plants. Exogenous hormone applications and transgenic rice were used to test RBSDV infectivity and pathogenicity. Our results revealed that the jasmonic acid (JA) pathway was induced while the brassinosteroid (BR) pathway was suppressed in infected plants. Foliar application of methyl jasmonate (MeJA) or brassinazole (BRZ) resulted in a significant reduction in RBSDV incidence, while epibrassinolide (BL) treatment increased RBSDV infection. Infection studies using coi1-13 and Go mutants demonstrated JA-mediated resistance and BR-mediated susceptibility to RBSDV infection. A mixture of MeJA and BL treatment resulted in a significant reduction in RBSDV infection compared with a single BL treatment. MeJA application efficiently suppressed the expression of BR pathway genes, and this inhibition depended on the JA coreceptor OsCOI1. Collectively, our results reveal that JA-mediated defense can suppress the BR-mediated susceptibility to RBSDV infection. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  4. Artificial Virus as Trump-card to Resolve Exigencies in Targeted Gene Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajithkumar, K C; Pramod, Kannissery

    2018-01-01

    Viruses are potent pathogens that can effectively deliver the genetic material to susceptible host cells. This capability is beneficially utilized to successfully deliver the genetic material. However, the use of virus mediated gene delivery is considered divisive, because the potentially replicable genomes recombine or integrate with the cell DNA resulting in immunogenicity, ranging from inflammation to death. Thus, the need for potentially effective non-viral gene delivery vehicles arises. Non-viral vectors, protein only particles and virus like particles (VLP) can be constructed which contain all the necessary functional moieties. These resemble viruses and are called artificial or synthetic virus. The artificial virus eliminates the disadvantages of viral vectors but retain the beneficial effects of the viruses. Need for further functionalization can be avoided by this approach because incorporation of requisite agents such as cell ligands, membrane active peptides, etc. into proteins is possible. The protein- DNA complexes resemble bacterial inclusion bodies. Nucleic acids influence conformation of protein units which subsequently result in cell uptake and finally to the cell nucleus. Such tunable systems mimic the activities of infected viruses and are used for the safe and effective delivery of drugs and genetic material in gene therapy. The versatility, stability and biocompatible nature of artificial virus along with high transfection efficacy have made it favorite for gene delivery purposes, in addition to being useful for various biomedical and drug delivery applications. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Efficient gene transfer into nondividing cells by adeno-associated virus-based vectors.

    OpenAIRE

    Podsakoff, G; Wong, K K; Chatterjee, S

    1994-01-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are emerging as highly promising for use in human gene therapy by virtue of their characteristics of wide host range, high transduction efficiencies, and lack of cytopathogenicity. To better define the biology of AAV-mediated gene transfer, we tested the ability of an AAV vector to efficiently introduce transgenes into nonproliferating cell populations. Cells were induced into a nonproliferative state by treatment with the DNA synthe...

  6. MicroRNA-Mediated Gene Silencing in Plant Defense and Viral Counter-Defense

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Rui Liu

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are non-coding RNAs of approximately 20–24 nucleotides in length that serve as central regulators of eukaryotic gene expression by targeting mRNAs for cleavage or translational repression. In plants, miRNAs are associated with numerous regulatory pathways in growth and development processes, and defensive responses in plant–pathogen interactions. Recently, significant progress has been made in understanding miRNA-mediated gene silencing and how viruses counter this defense mechanism. Here, we summarize the current knowledge and recent advances in understanding the roles of miRNAs involved in the plant defense against viruses and viral counter-defense. We also document the application of miRNAs in plant antiviral defense. This review discusses the current understanding of the mechanisms of miRNA-mediated gene silencing and provides insights on the never-ending arms race between plants and viruses.

  7. Characterizing Functional Domains for TIM-Mediated Enveloped Virus Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moller-Tank, Sven; Albritton, Lorraine M.; Rennert, Paul D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and other TIM family members were recently identified as phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-mediated virus entry-enhancing receptors (PVEERs). These proteins enhance entry of Ebola virus (EBOV) and other viruses by binding PtdSer on the viral envelope, concentrating virus on the cell surface, and promoting subsequent internalization. The PtdSer-binding activity of the immunoglobulin-like variable (IgV) domain is essential for both virus binding and internalization by TIM-1. However, TIM-3, whose IgV domain also binds PtdSer, does not effectively enhance virus entry, indicating that other domains of TIM proteins are functionally important. Here, we investigate the domains supporting enhancement of enveloped virus entry, thereby defining the features necessary for a functional PVEER. Using a variety of chimeras and deletion mutants, we found that in addition to a functional PtdSer-binding domain PVEERs require a stalk domain of sufficient length, containing sequences that promote an extended structure. Neither the cytoplasmic nor the transmembrane domain of TIM-1 is essential for enhancing virus entry, provided the protein is still plasma membrane bound. Based on these defined characteristics, we generated a mimic lacking TIM sequences and composed of annexin V, the mucin-like domain of α-dystroglycan, and a glycophosphatidylinositol anchor that functioned as a PVEER to enhance transduction of virions displaying Ebola, Chikungunya, Ross River, or Sindbis virus glycoproteins. This identification of the key features necessary for PtdSer-mediated enhancement of virus entry provides a basis for more effective recognition of unknown PVEERs. IMPORTANCE T-cell immunoglobulin and mucin domain 1 (TIM-1) and other TIM family members are recently identified phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-mediated virus entry-enhancing receptors (PVEERs). These proteins enhance virus entry by binding the phospholipid, PtdSer, present on the viral

  8. Generation and characterization of P gene-deficient rabies virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, Youko; Inoue, Satoshi; Nakamichi, Kazuo; Kurane, Ichiro; Sakai, Takeo; Morimoto, Kinjiro

    2004-01-01

    Rabies virus (RV) deficient in the P gene was generated by reverse genetics from cDNA of HEP-Flury strain lacking the entire P gene. The defective virus was propagated and amplified by rescue of virus, using a cell line that complemented the functions of the deficient gene. The P gene-deficient (def-P) virus replicated its genome and produced progeny viruses in the cell lines that constitutively expressed the P protein, although it grew at a slightly retarded rate compared to the parental strain. In contrast, no progeny virus was produced in the infected host when the def-P virus-infected cells that did not express the P protein. However, we found that the def-P virus had the ability to perform primary transcription (by the virion-associated polymerase) in the infected host without de novo P protein synthesis. The def-P virus was apathogenic in adult and suckling mice, even when inoculated intracranially. Inoculation of def-P virus in mice induced high levels of virus-neutralizing antibody (VNA) and conferred protective immunity against a lethal rabies infection. These results demonstrate the potential utility of gene-deficient virus as a novel live attenuated rabies vaccine

  9. Intramuscular Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Expression of Monoclonal Antibodies Provides 100% Protection Against Ebola Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lieshout, Laura P; Soule, Geoff; Sorensen, Debra; Frost, Kathy L; He, Shihua; Tierney, Kevin; Safronetz, David; Booth, Stephanie A; Kobinger, Gary P; Qiu, Xiangguo; Wootton, Sarah K

    2018-03-05

    The 2013-2016 West Africa outbreak demonstrated the epidemic potential of Ebola virus and highlighted the need for counter strategies. Monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based therapies hold promise as treatment options for Ebola virus infections. However, production of clinical-grade mAbs is labor intensive, and immunity is short lived. Conversely, adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated mAb gene transfer provides the host with a genetic blueprint to manufacture mAbs in vivo, leading to steady release of antibody over many months. Here we demonstrate that AAV-mediated expression of nonneutralizing mAb 5D2 or 7C9 confers 100% protection against mouse-adapted Ebola virus infection, while neutralizing mAb 2G4 was 83% protective. A 2-component cocktail, AAV-2G4/AAV-5D2, provided complete protection when administered 7 days prior to challenge and was partially protective with a 3-day lead time. Finally, AAV-mAb therapies provided sustained protection from challenge 5 months following AAV administration. AAV-mAb may be a viable alternative strategy for vaccination against emerging infectious diseases.

  10. Negative regulation of RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling by TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Na-Rae; Shin, Han-Bo; Kim, Hye-In; Choi, Myung-Soo; Inn, Kyung-Soo

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •TRK-fused gene product (TFG) interacts with TRIM25 upon viral infection. •TFG negatively regulates RIG-I mediated antiviral signaling. •TFG depletion leads to enhanced viral replication. •TFG act downstream of MAVS. -- Abstract: RIG-I (retinoic acid inducible gene I)-mediated antiviral signaling serves as the first line of defense against viral infection. Upon detection of viral RNA, RIG-I undergoes TRIM25 (tripartite motif protein 25)-mediated K63-linked ubiquitination, leading to type I interferon (IFN) production. In this study, we demonstrate that TRK-fused gene (TFG) protein, previously identified as a TRIM25-interacting protein, binds TRIM25 upon virus infection and negatively regulates RIG-I-mediated type-I IFN signaling. RIG-I-mediated IFN production and nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling pathways were upregulated by the suppression of TFG expression. Furthermore, vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) replication was significantly inhibited by small inhibitory hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of TFG, supporting the suppressive role of TFG in RIG-I-mediated antiviral signaling. Interestingly, suppression of TFG expression increased not only RIG-I-mediated signaling but also MAVS (mitochondrial antiviral signaling protein)-induced signaling, suggesting that TFG plays a pivotal role in negative regulation of RNA-sensing, RIG-I-like receptor (RLR) family signaling pathways

  11. Interplays between soil-borne plant viruses and RNA silencing-mediated antiviral defense in roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida Bagus Andika

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the majority of plant viruses are transmitted by arthropod vectors and invade the host plants through the aerial parts, there is a considerable number of plant viruses that infect roots via soil-inhabiting vectors such as plasmodiophorids, chytrids, and nematodes. These soil-borne viruses belong to diverse families, and many of them cause serious diseases in major crop plants. Thus, roots are important organs for the life cycle of many viruses. Compared to shoots, roots have a distinct metabolism and particular physiological characteristics due to the differences in development, cell composition, gene expression patterns, and surrounding environmental conditions. RNA silencing is an important innate defense mechanism to combat virus infection in plants, but the specific information on the activities and molecular mechanism of RNA silencing-mediated viral defense in root tissue is still limited. In this review, we summarize and discuss the current knowledge regarding RNA silencing aspects of the interactions between soil-borne viruses and host plants. Overall, research evidence suggests that soil-borne viruses have evolved to adapt to the distinct mechanism of antiviral RNA silencing in roots.

  12. Robust RNA silencing-mediated resistance to Plum pox virus under variable abiotic and biotic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Nicola, Elisa; Tavazza, Mario; Lucioli, Alessandra; Salandri, Laura; Ilardi, Vincenza

    2014-10-01

    Some abiotic and biotic conditions are known to have a negative impact on post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), thus representing a potential concern for the production of stable engineered virus resistance traits. However, depending on the strategy followed to achieve PTGS of the transgene, different responses to external conditions can be expected. In the present study, we utilized the Nicotiana benthamiana–Plum pox virus (PPV) pathosystem to evaluate in detail the stability of intron-hairpin(ihp)-mediated virus resistance under conditions known to adversely affect PTGS. The ihp plants grown at low or high temperatures were fully resistant to multiple PPV challenges, different PPV inoculum concentrations and even to a PPV isolate differing from the ihp construct by more than 28% at the nucleotide level. In addition, infections of ihp plants with viruses belonging to Cucumovirus, Potyvirus or Tombusvirus, all known to affect PTGS at different steps, were not able to defeat PPV resistance. Low temperatures did not affect the accumulation of transgenic small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), whereas a clear increase in the amount of siRNAs was observed during infections sustained by Cucumber mosaic virus and Potato virus Y. Our results show that the above stress factors do not represent an important concern for the production,through ihp-PTGS technology, of transgenic plants having robust virus resistance traits.

  13. A rapid and quantitative assay for measuring antibody-mediated neutralization of West Nile virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pierson, Theodore C.; Sanchez, Melissa D.; Puffer, Bridget A.; Ahmed, Asim A.; Geiss, Brian J.; Valentine, Laura E.; Altamura, Louis A.; Diamond, Michael S.; Doms, Robert W.

    2006-01-01

    West Nile virus (WNV) is a neurotropic flavivirus within the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex that is responsible for causing West Nile encephalitis in humans. The surface of WNV virions is covered by a highly ordered icosahedral array of envelope proteins that is responsible for mediating attachment and fusion with target cells. These envelope proteins are also primary targets for the generation of neutralizing antibodies in vivo. In this study, we describe a novel approach for measuring antibody-mediated neutralization of WNV infection using virus-like particles that measure infection as a function of reporter gene expression. These reporter virus particles (RVPs) are produced by complementation of a sub-genomic replicon with WNV structural proteins provided in trans using conventional DNA expression vectors. The precision and accuracy of this approach stem from an ability to measure the outcome of the interaction between antibody and viral antigens under conditions that satisfy the assumptions of the law of mass action as applied to virus neutralization. In addition to its quantitative strengths, this approach allows the production of WNV RVPs bearing the prM-E proteins of different WNV strains and mutants, offering considerable flexibility for the study of the humoral immune response to WNV in vitro. WNV RVPs are capable of only a single round of infection, can be used under BSL-2 conditions, and offer a rapid and quantitative approach for detecting virus entry and its inhibition by neutralizing antibody

  14. Role of CD137 signaling in dengue virus-mediated apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagila, Amar; Netsawang, Janjuree; Srisawat, Chatchawan; Noisakran, Sansanee; Morchang, Atthapan; Yasamut, Umpa; Puttikhunt, Chunya; Kasinrerk, Watchara

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → For the first time the role of CD137 in dengue virus (DENV) infection. → Induction of DENV-mediated apoptosis by CD137 signaling. → Sensitization to CD137-mediated apoptosis by dengue virus capsid protein (DENV C). → Nuclear localization of DENV C is required for CD137-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Hepatic dysfunction is a well recognized feature of dengue virus (DENV) infection. However, molecular mechanisms of hepatic injury are still poorly understood. A complex interaction between DENV and the host immune response contributes to DENV-mediated tissue injury. DENV capsid protein (DENV C) physically interacts with the human death domain-associated protein Daxx. A double substitution mutation in DENV C (R85A/K86A) abrogates Daxx interaction, nuclear localization and apoptosis. Therefore we compared the expression of cell death genes between HepG2 cells expressing DENV C and DENV C (R85A/K86A) using a real-time PCR array. Expression of CD137, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, increased significantly in HepG2 cells expressing DENV C compared to HepG2 cells expressing DENV C (R85A/K86A). In addition, CD137-mediated apoptotic activity in HepG2 cells expressing DENV C was significantly increased by anti-CD137 antibody compared to that of HepG2 cells expressing DENV C (R85A/K86A). In DENV-infected HepG2 cells, CD137 mRNA and CD137 positive cells significantly increased and CD137-mediated apoptotic activity was increased by anti-CD137 antibody. This work is the first to demonstrate the contribution of CD137 signaling to DENV-mediated apoptosis.

  15. Role of CD137 signaling in dengue virus-mediated apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagila, Amar [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Netsawang, Janjuree [Faculty of Medical Technology, Rangsit University, Bangkok (Thailand); Srisawat, Chatchawan [Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Noisakran, Sansanee [Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Research Unit, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Bangkok (Thailand); Morchang, Atthapan; Yasamut, Umpa [Medical Molecular Biology Unit, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Department of Immunology, Faculty of Medicine, Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Puttikhunt, Chunya [Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever Research Unit, Office for Research and Development, Faculty of Medicine Siriraj Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok (Thailand); Medical Biotechnology Unit, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency, Bangkok (Thailand); Kasinrerk, Watchara [Division of Clinical Immunology, Department of Medical Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); Biomedical Technology Research Center, National Center for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, National Science and Technology Development Agency at Chiang Mai University, Chiang Mai (Thailand); and others

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} For the first time the role of CD137 in dengue virus (DENV) infection. {yields} Induction of DENV-mediated apoptosis by CD137 signaling. {yields} Sensitization to CD137-mediated apoptosis by dengue virus capsid protein (DENV C). {yields} Nuclear localization of DENV C is required for CD137-mediated apoptosis. -- Abstract: Hepatic dysfunction is a well recognized feature of dengue virus (DENV) infection. However, molecular mechanisms of hepatic injury are still poorly understood. A complex interaction between DENV and the host immune response contributes to DENV-mediated tissue injury. DENV capsid protein (DENV C) physically interacts with the human death domain-associated protein Daxx. A double substitution mutation in DENV C (R85A/K86A) abrogates Daxx interaction, nuclear localization and apoptosis. Therefore we compared the expression of cell death genes between HepG2 cells expressing DENV C and DENV C (R85A/K86A) using a real-time PCR array. Expression of CD137, which is a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor family, increased significantly in HepG2 cells expressing DENV C compared to HepG2 cells expressing DENV C (R85A/K86A). In addition, CD137-mediated apoptotic activity in HepG2 cells expressing DENV C was significantly increased by anti-CD137 antibody compared to that of HepG2 cells expressing DENV C (R85A/K86A). In DENV-infected HepG2 cells, CD137 mRNA and CD137 positive cells significantly increased and CD137-mediated apoptotic activity was increased by anti-CD137 antibody. This work is the first to demonstrate the contribution of CD137 signaling to DENV-mediated apoptosis.

  16. Determinants of foamy virus envelope glycoprotein mediated resistance to superinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, Angelika; Pietschmann, Thomas; Rethwilm, Axel; Lindemann, Dirk

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the nature of foamy virus (FV) receptor molecules on target cells and their interaction with the viral glycoproteins. Similar to other viruses, cellular expression of the FV Env protein is sufficient to induce resistance to exogenous FV, a phenomenon called superinfection resistance (SIR). In this study we define determinants of the FV Env protein essential for mediating SIR. FV Env requires the extracellular domains of the SU and the TM subunits as well as membrane anchorage, efficient cell surface transport, and most probably correct subunit processing. This is in contrast to murine leukemia virus where secreted proteins comprising the receptor-binding domain in SU are sufficient to induce SIR. Furthermore, we demonstrate that cellular expression of the prototype FV envelope proteins induces SIR against pseudotypes with glycoproteins of other FV species, including of simian, feline, bovine, and equine origin. This implies that all of them use the same receptor molecules for viral entry

  17. Mechanism of feline immunodeficiency virus envelope glycoprotein-mediated fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, Himanshu; Fuller, Frederick J.; Tompkins, Wayne A.F.

    2004-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) shares remarkable homology to primate lentiviruses, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). The process of lentiviral env glycoprotein-mediated fusion of membranes is essential for viral entry and syncytia formation. A detailed understanding of this phenomenon has helped identify new targets for antiviral drug development. Using a model based on syncytia formation between FIV env-expressing cells and a feline CD4+ T cell line we have studied the mechanism of FIV env-mediated fusion. Using this model we show that FIV env-mediated fusion mechanism and kinetics are similar to HIV env. Syncytia formation could be blocked by CXCR4 antagonist AMD3100, establishing the importance of this receptor in FIV gp120 binding. Interestingly, CXCR4 alone was not sufficient to allow fusion by a primary isolate of FIV, as env glycoprotein from FIV-NCSU 1 failed to induce syncytia in several feline cell lines expressing CXCR4. Syncytia formation could be inhibited at a post-CXCR4 binding step by synthetic peptide T1971, which inhibits interaction of heptad repeat regions of gp41 and formation of the hairpin structure. Finally, using site-directed mutagenesis, we also show that a conserved tryptophan-rich region in the membrane proximal ectodomain of gp41 is critical for fusion, possibly at steps post hairpin structure formation

  18. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu; Zhang, Chunquan; Kernodle, Bliss M; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Yu; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Hill, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  20. Follistatin allows efficient retroviral-mediated gene transfer into rat liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgnon, Josephine; Djamouri, Fatima; Lorand, Isabelle; Rico, Virginie Di; Loux, Nathalie; Pages, Jean-Christophe; Franco, Dominique; Capron, Frederique; Weber, Anne

    2005-01-01

    Retroviral vectors are widely used tools for gene therapy. However, in vivo gene transfer is only effective in dividing cells, which, in liver, requires a regenerative stimulus. Follistatin is effective in promoting liver regeneration after 90% and 70% hepatectomy in rats. We studied its efficacy on liver regeneration and retroviral-mediated gene delivery in 50% hepatectomized rats. When human recombinant follistatin was infused into the portal vein immediately after 50% hepatectomy, hepatocyte proliferation was significantly higher than in control 50% hepatectomized rats. A single injection of virus particles administered 23 h after follistatin infusion resulted in more than 20% gene transduction efficiency in hepatocytes compared to 3% in control rats. It is concluded that a single injection of follistatin induces onset of proliferation in 50% hepatectomized rats and allows efficient retroviral-mediated gene transfer to the liver

  1. Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hepatitis B virus DNA polymerase gene polymorphism based prediction of genotypes in chronic HBV patients from Western India. Yashwant G. Chavan, Sharad R. Pawar, Minal Wani, Amol D. Raut, Rabindra N. Misra ...

  2. Hepatitis B virus DNA integration and transactivation of cellular genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV infection is etiologically related to human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Most HCCs contain integrated HBV DNA in hepatocyte, suggesting that the integration may be involved in carcinogenesis. Available data on the integrants from human hepatocellular carcinomas seem to represent primary integrants as well as the products of secondary rearrangements. By means of structural analyses of the possible primary integrants, it has been observed that the replication intermediates of the viral genome are the preferred substrates for integration. The integrated HBV DNA and the target cellular DNA are invariably associated with deletions, possibly reflecting the substrate for, and the mechanism of, the integration reaction. The host DNA sequences as well as the target site of integration in chromosomes are selected randomly suggesting that HBV DNA integration should bring about random mutagenic effects. Analysis of the samples recovered from hepatocellular carcinomas show that the integrated HBV DNA can mediate secondary rearrangements of chromosomes, such as translocations, inversions, deletions and (possibly amplifications. The integration of HBV DNA into the host genome occurs at early steps of clonal tumor expansion. The integration has been shown in a number of cases to affect a variety of cancer-related genes and to exert insertional mutagenesis. However, in contrast to the woodchuck model, in which specific HBV-DNA integration is detectable in most cases, insertional activation or inactivation of cellular genes appears to be a rare event in man. The discovery of transactivating functions exerted by HBx and truncated HBs(urface proteins supports the notion that these could be relevant to hepatocarcinogenesis as these transactivator sequences have been found in a large number of HCC tumors or hepatoma-derived cell lines. The HBx

  3. Accessory genes confer a high replication rate to virulent feline immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troyer, Ryan M; Thompson, Jesse; Elder, John H; VandeWoude, Sue

    2013-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus that causes AIDS in domestic cats, similar to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS in humans. The FIV accessory protein Vif abrogates the inhibition of infection by cat APOBEC3 restriction factors. FIV also encodes a multifunctional OrfA accessory protein that has characteristics similar to HIV Tat, Vpu, Vpr, and Nef. To examine the role of vif and orfA accessory genes in FIV replication and pathogenicity, we generated chimeras between two FIV molecular clones with divergent disease potentials: a highly pathogenic isolate that replicates rapidly in vitro and is associated with significant immunopathology in vivo, FIV-C36 (referred to here as high-virulence FIV [HV-FIV]), and a less-pathogenic strain, FIV-PPR (referred to here as low-virulence FIV [LV-FIV]). Using PCR-driven overlap extension, we produced viruses in which vif, orfA, or both genes from virulent HV-FIV replaced equivalent genes in LV-FIV. The generation of these chimeras is more straightforward in FIV than in primate lentiviruses, since FIV accessory gene open reading frames have very little overlap with other genes. All three chimeric viruses exhibited increased replication kinetics in vitro compared to the replication kinetics of LV-FIV. Chimeras containing HV-Vif or Vif/OrfA had replication rates equivalent to those of the virulent HV-FIV parental virus. Furthermore, small interfering RNA knockdown of feline APOBEC3 genes resulted in equalization of replication rates between LV-FIV and LV-FIV encoding HV-FIV Vif. These findings demonstrate that Vif-APOBEC interactions play a key role in controlling the replication and pathogenicity of this immunodeficiency-inducing virus in its native host species and that accessory genes act as mediators of lentiviral strain-specific virulence.

  4. Systemic gene delivery to the central nervous system using Adeno-associated virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathieu eBOURDENX

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated gene delivery has emerged as an effective and safe tool for both preclinical and clinical studies of neurological disorders. The recent discovery that several serotypes are able to cross the blood-brain-barrier when administered systemically has been a real breakthrough in the field of neurodegenerative diseases. Widespread transgene expression after systemic injection could spark interest as a therapeutic approach. Such strategy will avoid invasive brain surgery and allow non-focal gene therapy promising for CNS diseases affecting large portion of the brain. Here, we will review the recent results achieved through different systemic routes of injection generated in the last decade using systemic AAV-mediated delivery and propose a brief assessment of their values. In particular, we emphasize how the methods used for virus engineering could improve brain transduction after peripheral delivery.

  5. The Measles Virus Receptor SLAMF1 Can Mediate Particle Endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves-Carneiro, Daniel; McKeating, Jane A; Bailey, Dalan

    2017-04-01

    The signaling lymphocyte activation molecule F1 (SLAMF1) is both a microbial sensor and entry receptor for measles virus (MeV). Herein, we describe a new role for SLAMF1 to mediate MeV endocytosis that is in contrast with the alternative, and generally accepted, model that MeV genome enters cells only after fusion at the cell surface. We demonstrated that MeV engagement of SLAMF1 induces dramatic but transient morphological changes, most prominently in the formation of membrane blebs, which were shown to colocalize with incoming viral particles, and rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton in infected cells. MeV infection was dependent on these dynamic cytoskeletal changes as well as fluid uptake through a macropinocytosis-like pathway as chemical inhibition of these processes inhibited entry. Moreover, we identified a role for the RhoA-ROCK-myosin II signaling axis in this MeV internalization process, highlighting a novel role for this recently characterized pathway in virus entry. Our study shows that MeV can hijack a microbial sensor normally involved in bacterial phagocytosis to drive endocytosis using a complex pathway that shares features with canonical viral macropinocytosis, phagocytosis, and mechanotransduction. This uptake pathway is specific to SLAMF1-positive cells and occurs within 60 min of viral attachment. Measles virus remains a significant cause of mortality in human populations, and this research sheds new light on the very first steps of infection of this important pathogen. IMPORTANCE Measles is a significant disease in humans and is estimated to have killed over 200 million people since records began. According to current World Health Organization statistics, it still kills over 100,000 people a year, mostly children in the developing world. The causative agent, measles virus, is a small enveloped RNA virus that infects a broad range of cells during infection. In particular, immune cells are infected via interactions between glycoproteins found

  6. Kallistatin Ameliorates Influenza Virus Pathogenesis by Inhibition of Kallikrein-Related Peptidase 1-Mediated Cleavage of Viral Hemagglutinin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leu, Chia-Hsing; Yang, Mei-Lin; Chung, Nai-Hui; Huang, Yen-Jang; Su, Yu-Chu; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Shieh, Gia-Shing; Chang, Meng-Ya; Wang, Shainn-Wei; Chang, Yao; Chao, Julie; Chao, Lee

    2015-01-01

    Proteolytic cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) of influenza virus by host trypsin-like proteases is required for viral infectivity. Some serine proteases are capable of cleaving influenza virus HA, whereas some serine protease inhibitors (serpins) inhibit the HA cleavage in various cell types. Kallikrein-related peptidase 1 (KLK1, also known as tissue kallikrein) is a widely distributed serine protease. Kallistatin, a serpin synthesized mainly in the liver and rapidly secreted into the circulation, forms complexes with KLK1 and inhibits its activity. Here, we investigated the roles of KLK1 and kallistatin in influenza virus infection. We show that the levels of KLK1 increased, whereas those of kallistatin decreased, in the lungs of mice during influenza virus infection. KLK1 cleaved H1, H2, and H3 HA molecules and consequently enhanced viral production. In contrast, kallistatin inhibited KLK1-mediated HA cleavage and reduced viral production. Cells transduced with the kallistatin gene secreted kallistatin extracellularly, which rendered them more resistant to influenza virus infection. Furthermore, lentivirus-mediated kallistatin gene delivery protected mice against lethal influenza virus challenge by reducing the viral load, inflammation, and injury in the lung. Taking the data together, we determined that KLK1 and kallistatin contribute to the pathogenesis of influenza virus by affecting the cleavage of the HA peptide and inflammatory responses. This study provides a proof of principle for the potential therapeutic application of kallistatin or other KLK1 inhibitors for influenza. Since proteolytic activation also enhances the infectivity of some other viruses, kallistatin and other kallikrein inhibitors may be explored as antiviral agents against these viruses. PMID:26149981

  7. Expression of VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The VP60 gene from rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) YL strain in Northeast of China, under control of the ats1A promoter from Rubisco small subunit genes of Arabidopsis thaliana, was introduced into the transfer deoxyribonucleic acid (T-DNA) region of plant transfer vector pCAMBIA1300 and transferred to ...

  8. Environmental factors influencing gene transfer agent (GTA mediated transduction in the subtropical ocean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren D McDaniel

    Full Text Available Microbial genomic sequence analyses have indicated widespread horizontal gene transfer (HGT. However, an adequate mechanism accounting for the ubiquity of HGT has been lacking. Recently, high frequencies of interspecific gene transfer have been documented, catalyzed by Gene Transfer Agents (GTAs of marine α-Proteobacteria. It has been proposed that the presence of bacterial genes in highly purified viral metagenomes may be due to GTAs. However, factors influencing GTA-mediated gene transfer in the environment have not yet been determined. Several genomically sequenced strains containing complete GTA sequences similar to Rhodobacter capsulatus (RcGTA, type strain were screened to ascertain if they produced putative GTAs, and at what abundance. Five of nine marine strains screened to date spontaneously produced virus-like particles (VLP's in stationary phase. Three of these strains have demonstrated gene transfer activity, two of which were documented by this lab. These two strains Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM and Nitratireductor 44B9s, were utilized to produce GTAs designated RnGTA and NrGTA and gene transfer activity was verified in culture. Cell-free preparations of purified RnGTA and NrGTA particles from marked donor strains were incubated with natural microbial assemblages to determine the level of GTA-mediated gene transfer. In conjunction, several ambient environmental parameters were measured including lysogeny indicated by prophage induction. GTA production in culture systems indicated that approximately half of the strains produced GTA-like particles and maximal GTA counts ranged from 10-30% of host abundance. Modeling of GTA-mediated gene transfer frequencies in natural samples, along with other measured environmental variables, indicated a strong relationship between GTA mediated gene transfer and the combined factors of salinity, multiplicity of infection (MOI and ambient bacterial abundance. These results indicate that GTA-mediated

  9. Mediator and Cohesin Connect Gene Expression and Chromatin Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagey, Michael H.; Newman, Jamie J.; Bilodeau, Steve; Zhan, Ye; Orlando, David A.; van Berkum, Nynke L.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.; Goossens, Jesse; Rahl, Peter B.; Levine, Stuart S.; Taatjes, Dylan J.; Dekker, Job; Young, Richard A.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Transcription factors control cell specific gene expression programs through interactions with diverse coactivators and the transcription apparatus. Gene activation may involve DNA loop formation between enhancer-bound transcription factors and the transcription apparatus at the core promoter, but this process is not well understood. We report here that Mediator and Cohesin physically and functionally connect the enhancers and core promoters of active genes in embryonic stem cells. Mediator, a transcriptional coactivator, forms a complex with Cohesin, which can form rings that connect two DNA segments. The Cohesin loading factor Nipbl is associated with Mediator/Cohesin complexes, providing a means to load Cohesin at promoters. DNA looping is observed between the enhancers and promoters occupied by Mediator and Cohesin. Mediator and Cohesin occupy different promoters in different cells, thus generating cell-type specific DNA loops linked to the gene expression program of each cell. PMID:20720539

  10. Henipavirus Mediated Membrane Fusion, Virus Entry and Targeted Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitar B. Nikolov

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Paramyxoviridae genus Henipavirus is presently represented by the type species Hendra and Nipah viruses which are both recently emerged zoonotic viral pathogens responsible for repeated outbreaks associated with high morbidity and mortality in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. These enveloped viruses bind and enter host target cells through the coordinated activities of their attachment (G and class I fusion (F envelope glycoproteins. The henipavirus G glycoprotein interacts with host cellular B class ephrins, triggering conformational alterations in G that lead to the activation of the F glycoprotein, which facilitates the membrane fusion process. Using the recently published structures of HeV-G and NiV-G and other paramyxovirus glycoproteins, we review the features of the henipavirus envelope glycoproteins that appear essential for mediating the viral fusion process, including receptor binding, G-F interaction, F activation, with an emphasis on G and the mutations that disrupt viral infectivity. Finally, recent candidate therapeutics for henipavirus-mediated disease are summarized in light of their ability to inhibit HeV and NiV entry by targeting their G and F glycoproteins.

  11. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy against chronic hepatitis B virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ying; Zhang, Tian-Ying; Yuan, Quan; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2017-08-03

    The currently available drugs to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection include interferons and nucleos(t)ide analogs, which can only induce disease remission and are inefficient for the functional cure of patients with chronic HBV infection (CHB). Since high titers of circulating hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) may be essential to exhaust the host anti-HBV immune response and they cannot be significantly reduced by current drugs, new antiviral strategies aiming to suppress serum hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) could help restore virus-specific immune responses and promote the eradication of the virus. As an alternative strategy, immunotherapy with HBsAg-specific antibodies has shown some direct HBsAg suppression effects in several preclinical and clinical trial studies. However, most described previously HBsAg-specific antibodies only had very short-term HBsAg suppression effects in CHB patients and animal models mimicking persistent HBV infection. More-potent antibodies with long-lasting HBsAg clearance effects are required for the development of the clinical application of antibody-mediated immunotherapy for CHB treatment. Our recent study described a novel mAb E6F6 that targets a unique epitope on HBsAg. It could durably suppress the levels of HBsAg and HBV DNA via Fcγ receptor-dependent phagocytosis in vivo. In this commentary, we summarize the current research progress, including the therapeutic roles and mechanisms of antibody-mediated HBV clearance as well as the epitope-determined therapeutic potency of the antibody. These insights may provide some clues and guidance to facilitate the development of therapeutic antibodies against persistent viral infection.

  12. Effect of the deletion of genes encoding proteins of the extracellular virion form of vaccinia virus on vaccine immunogenicity and protective effectiveness in the mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement A Meseda

    Full Text Available Antibodies to both infectious forms of vaccinia virus, the mature virion (MV and the enveloped virion (EV, as well as cell-mediated immune response appear to be important for protection against smallpox. EV virus particles, although more labile and less numerous than MV, are important for dissemination and spread of virus in infected hosts and thus important in virus pathogenesis. The importance of the EV A33 and B5 proteins for vaccine induced immunity and protection in a murine intranasal challenge model was evaluated by deletion of both the A33R and B5R genes in a vaccine-derived strain of vaccinia virus. Deletion of either A33R or B5R resulted in viruses with a small plaque phenotype and reduced virus yields, as reported previously, whereas deletion of both EV protein-encoding genes resulted in a virus that formed small infection foci that were detectable and quantifiable only by immunostaining and an even more dramatic decrease in total virus yield in cell culture. Deletion of B5R, either as a single gene knockout or in the double EV gene knockout virus, resulted in a loss of EV neutralizing activity, but all EV gene knockout viruses still induced a robust neutralizing activity against the vaccinia MV form of the virus. The effect of elimination of A33 and/or B5 on the protection afforded by vaccination was evaluated by intranasal challenge with a lethal dose of either vaccinia virus WR or IHD-J, a strain of vaccinia virus that produces relatively higher amounts of EV virus. The results from multiple experiments, using a range of vaccination doses and virus challenge doses, and using mortality, morbidity, and virus dissemination as endpoints, indicate that the absence of A33 and B5 have little effect on the ability of a vaccinia vaccine virus to provide protection against a lethal intranasal challenge in a mouse model.

  13. Recent Trends of Polymer Mediated Liposomal Gene Delivery System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal Kumar Kundu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Advancement in the gene delivery system have resulted in clinical successes in gene therapy for patients with several genetic diseases, such as immunodeficiency diseases, X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (X-ALD blindness, thalassemia, and many more. Among various delivery systems, liposomal mediated gene delivery route is offering great promises for gene therapy. This review is an attempt to depict a portrait about the polymer based liposomal gene delivery systems and their future applications. Herein, we have discussed in detail the characteristics of liposome, importance of polymer for liposome formulation, gene delivery, and future direction of liposome based gene delivery as a whole.

  14. Enhanced Gene Transfer with Fusogenic Liposomes Containing Vesicular Stomatitis Virus G Glycoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Akihiro; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Friedmann, Theodore

    1998-01-01

    Exposure of Lipofectin-DNA complexes to the partially purified G glycoprotein of the vesicular stomatitis virus envelope (VSV-G) results in loss of serum-mediated inhibition and in enhanced efficiency of gene transfer. Sucrose density gradient sedimentation analysis indicated that the VSV-G associates physically with the DNA-lipid complex to produce a VSV-G liposome. The ability to incorporate surrogate viral or cellular envelope components such as VSV-G into liposomes may allow more-efficient and possibly targeted gene delivery by lipofection, both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:9621082

  15. Reference gene selection for quantitative real-time PCR analysis in virus infected cells: SARS corona virus, Yellow fever virus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus and Cytomegalovirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Marcel A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Ten potential reference genes were compared for their use in experiments investigating cellular mRNA expression of virus infected cells. Human cell lines were infected with Cytomegalovirus, Human Herpesvirus-6, Camelpox virus, SARS coronavirus or Yellow fever virus. The expression levels of these genes and the viral replication were determined by real-time PCR. Genes were ranked by the BestKeeper tool, the GeNorm tool and by criteria we reported previously. Ranking lists of the genes tested were tool dependent. However, over all, β-actin is an unsuitable as reference gene, whereas TATA-Box binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl-isomerase A are stable reference genes for expression studies in virus infected cells.

  16. Enhancement of plasmid-mediated stable gene expression by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ARL

    2012-06-12

    Jun 12, 2012 ... production and faithful translation and processing of proteins (Baldi et al., ..... deeper understanding of the interaction of cellular factors and regulatory DNA .... mediated transgene expression in the rat brain. Gene Ther., 7: ...

  17. Gene Therapy Mediated Breast Cancer Immunity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nesbit, Heike

    1999-01-01

    .... POE2 is produced by the cyclooxygenase (COX) mediated oxidation of arachidonic acid. The inhibition of COX activity in B7-1 expressing MDA-MB 231 cells restored the proliferative response of T cells...

  18. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT + colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references

  19. Ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhances the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez, C.F.

    1984-08-01

    The enhancement effects of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation on the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer were studied. Confluent Rat-2 cells were transfected with purified SV40 viral DNA, irradiated with either X-rays or ultraviolet, trypsinized, plated, and assayed for the formation of foci on Rat-2 monolayers. Both ionizing and ultraviolet radiation enhanced the frequency of A-gene transformants/survivor compared to unirradiated transfected cells. These enhancements were non-linear and dose dependent. A recombinant plasmid, pOT-TK5, was constructed that contained the SV40 virus A-gene and the Herpes Simplex virus (HSV) thymidine kinase (TK) gene. Confluent Rat-2 cells transfected with pOT-TK5 DNA and then immediately irradiated with either X-rays or 330 MeV/amu argon particles at the Berkeley Bevalac showed a higher frequency of HAT/sup +/ colonies/survivor than unirradiated transfected cells. Rat-2 cells transfected with the plasmid, pTK2, containing only the HSV TK-gene were enhanced for TK-transformation by both X-rays and ultraviolet radiation. The results demonstrate that radiation enhancement of the efficiency of DNA mediated gene transfer is not explained by increased nuclear uptake of the transfected DNA. Radiation increases the competence of the transfected cell population for genetic transformation. Three models for this increased competence are presented. The targeted integration model, the inducible recombination model, the partition model, and the utilization of DNA mediated gene transfer for DNA repair studies are discussed. 465 references.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors suppress UV-induced human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gene expression at the posttranscriptional level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagoe, S.; Kohda, T.; Oishi, M.

    1991-01-01

    Gene expression of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is induced not only by trans activation mediated through a gene product (tat) encoded by the virus but also by treatment of virus-carrying cells with DNA-damaging agents such as UV light. Employing an artificially constructed DNA in which the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene was placed under the control of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat, we analyzed the induction process in HeLa cells and found that inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase suppressed UV-induced HIV-1 gene expression but not tat-mediated expression. We also found that suppression occurs at the posttranscriptional level. These results indicate that HIV-1 gene expression is activated by at least two different mechanisms, one of which involves poly-ADP ribosylation. A possible new role of poly-ADP ribosylation in the regulation of specific gene expression is also discussed

  1. Immunostimulatory Gene Therapy Using Oncolytic Viruses as Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Loskog

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Immunostimulatory gene therapy has been developed during the past twenty years. The aim of immunostimulatory gene therapy is to tilt the suppressive tumor microenvironment to promote anti-tumor immunity. Hence, like a Trojan horse, the gene vehicle can carry warriors and weapons into enemy territory to combat the tumor from within. The most promising immune stimulators are those activating and sustaining Th1 responses, but even if potent effects were seen in preclinical models, many clinical trials failed to show objective responses in cancer patients. However, with new tools to control ongoing immunosuppression in cancer patients, immunostimulatory gene therapy is now emerging as an interesting option. In parallel, oncolytic viruses have been shown to be safe in patients. To prolong immune stimulation and to increase efficacy, these two fields are now merging and oncolytic viruses are armed with immunostimulatory transgenes. These novel agents are racing towards approval as established cancer immunotherapeutics.

  2. Host genes involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soltani, Jalal

    2009-01-01

    Agrobacterium is the nature’s genetic engineer that can transfer genes across the kingdom barriers to both prokaryotic and eukaryotic host cells. The host genes which are involved in Agrobacterium-mediated transformatiom (AMT) are not well known. Here, I studied in a systematic way to identify the

  3. Virus-induced gene silencing in diverse maize lines using the Brome Mosaic virus-based silencing vector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a widely used tool for gene function studies in many plant species, though its use in monocots has been limited. Using a Brome mosaic virus (BMV) vector designed to silence the maize phytoene desaturase gene, a genetically diverse set of maize inbred lines was ...

  4. A genetic screen identifies interferon-α effector genes required to suppress hepatitis C virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusco, Dahlene N; Brisac, Cynthia; John, Sinu P; Huang, Yi-Wen; Chin, Christopher R; Xie, Tiao; Zhao, Hong; Jilg, Nikolaus; Zhang, Leiliang; Chevaliez, Stephane; Wambua, Daniel; Lin, Wenyu; Peng, Lee; Chung, Raymond T; Brass, Abraham L

    2013-06-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of end-stage liver disease. Interferon-α (IFNα) is an important component of anti-HCV therapy; it up-regulates transcription of IFN-stimulated genes, many of which have been investigated for their antiviral effects. However, all of the genes required for the antiviral function of IFNα (IFN effector genes [IEGs]) are not known. IEGs include not only IFN-stimulated genes, but other nontranscriptionally induced genes that are required for the antiviral effect of IFNα. In contrast to candidate approaches based on analyses of messenger RNA (mRNA) expression, identification of IEGs requires a broad functional approach. We performed an unbiased genome-wide small interfering RNA screen to identify IEGs that inhibit HCV. Huh7.5.1 hepatoma cells were transfected with small interfering RNAs incubated with IFNα and then infected with JFH1 HCV. Cells were stained using HCV core antibody, imaged, and analyzed to determine the percent infection. Candidate IEGs detected in the screen were validated and analyzed further. The screen identified 120 previously unreported IEGs. From these, we more fully evaluated the following: asparagine-linked glycosylation 10 homolog (yeast, α-1,2-glucosyltransferase); butyrylcholinesterase; dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (CD26, adenosine deaminase complexing protein 2); glucokinase (hexokinase 4) regulator; guanylate cyclase 1, soluble, β 3; MYST histone acetyltransferase 1; protein phosphatase 3 (formerly 2B), catalytic subunit, β isoform; peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-γ-DBD-interacting protein 1; and solute carrier family 27 (fatty acid transporter), member 2; and demonstrated that they enabled IFNα-mediated suppression of HCV at multiple steps of its life cycle. Expression of these genes had more potent effects against flaviviridae because a subset was required for IFNα to suppress dengue virus but not influenza A virus. In addition, many of the host genes detected in this

  5. Influenza A Virus with a Human-Like N2 Gene Is Circulating in Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breum, Solvej Østergaard; Hjulsager, Charlotte Kristiane; Trebbien, Ramona

    2013-01-01

    A novel reassortant influenza A virus, H1avN2hu, has been found in Danish swine. The virus contains an H1 gene similar to the hemagglutinin (HA) gene of H1N1 avian-like swine viruses and an N2 gene most closely related to the neuraminidase (NA) gene of human H3N2 viruses from the mid-1990s....

  6. Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular characterization of capsid protein gene of potato virus X from Pakistan. Arshad Jamal, Idrees Ahmad Nasir, Bushra Tabassum, Muhammad Tariq, Abdul Munim Farooq, Zahida Qamar, Mohsin Ahmad Khan, Nadeem Ahmad, Muhammad Shafiq, Muhammad Saleem Haider, M. Arshad Javed, Tayyab Husnain ...

  7. Intranasal treatment with a novel immunomodulator mediates innate immune protection against lethal pneumonia virus of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Elisa C; Garg, Ravendra; Shrivastava, Pratima; Gomis, Susantha; van Drunen Littel-van den Hurk, Sylvia

    2016-11-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the leading cause of acute lower respiratory tract infections in infants and young children. There are no licensed RSV vaccines available, and the few treatment options for high-risk individuals are either extremely costly or cause severe side effects and toxicity. Immunomodulation mediated by a novel formulation consisting of the toll-like receptor 3 agonist poly(I:C), an innate defense regulator peptide and a polyphosphazene (P-I-P) was evaluated in the context of lethal infection with pneumonia virus of mice (PVM). Intranasal delivery of a single dose of P-I-P protected adult mice against PVM when given 24 h prior to challenge. These animals experienced minimal weight loss, no clinical disease, 100% survival, and reduced lung pathology. Similar clinical outcomes were observed in mice treated up to 3 days prior to infection. P-I-P pre-treatment induced early mRNA and protein expression of key chemokine and cytokine genes, reduced the recruitment of neutrophils and eosinophils, decreased virus titers in the lungs, and modulated the delayed exacerbated nature of PVM disease without any short-term side effects. On day 14 post-infection, P-I-P-treated mice were confirmed to be PVM-free. These results demonstrate the capacity of this formulation to prevent PVM and possibly other viral respiratory infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Efficient gene transfer into nondividing cells by adeno-associated virus-based vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podsakoff, G; Wong, K K; Chatterjee, S

    1994-09-01

    Gene transfer vectors based on adeno-associated virus (AAV) are emerging as highly promising for use in human gene therapy by virtue of their characteristics of wide host range, high transduction efficiencies, and lack of cytopathogenicity. To better define the biology of AAV-mediated gene transfer, we tested the ability of an AAV vector to efficiently introduce transgenes into nonproliferating cell populations. Cells were induced into a nonproliferative state by treatment with the DNA synthesis inhibitors fluorodeoxyuridine and aphidicolin or by contact inhibition induced by confluence and serum starvation. Cells in logarithmic growth or DNA synthesis arrest were transduced with vCWR:beta gal, an AAV-based vector encoding beta-galactosidase under Rous sarcoma virus long terminal repeat promoter control. Under each condition tested, vCWR:beta Gal expression in nondividing cells was at least equivalent to that in actively proliferating cells, suggesting that mechanisms for virus attachment, nuclear transport, virion uncoating, and perhaps some limited second-strand synthesis of AAV vectors were present in nondividing cells. Southern hybridization analysis of vector sequences from cells transduced while in DNA synthetic arrest and expanded after release of the block confirmed ultimate integration of the vector genome into cellular chromosomal DNA. These findings may provide the basis for the use of AAV-based vectors for gene transfer into quiescent cell populations such as totipotent hematopoietic stem cells.

  9. Positive-negative-selection-mediated gene targeting in rice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zenpei eShimatani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene targeting (GT refers to the designed modification of genomic sequence(s through homologous recombination (HR. GT is a powerful tool both for the study of gene function and for molecular breeding. However, in transformation of higher plants, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ occurs overwhelmingly in somatic cells, masking HR-mediated GT. Positive-negative selection (PNS is an approach for finding HR-mediated GT events because it can eliminate NHEJ effectively by expression of a negative-selection marker gene. In rice—a major crop worldwide—reproducible PNS-mediated GT of endogenous genes has now been successfully achieved. The procedure is based on strong PNS using diphtheria toxin A-fragment as a negative marker, and has succeeded in the directed modification of several endogenous rice genes in various ways. In addition to gene knock-outs and knock-ins, a nucleotide substitution in a target gene was also achieved recently. This review presents a summary of the development of the rice PNS system, highlighting its advantages. Different types of gene modification and gene editing aimed at developing new plant breeding technology (NPBT based on PNS are discussed.

  10. Identification of Gene Resistance to Avian InfluenzaVirus (Mx Gene among Wild Waterbirds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dewi Elfidasari

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The Mx gene is an antiviral gene used to determine the resistance or the susceptibility to different types of viruses, including the Avian Influenza (AI virus subtype H5N1. The AI virus subtype H5N1 infection in chickens causes Mx gene polymorphism. The Mx+ gene shows resistant to the AIvirus subtype H5N1, whereas the Mx-gene shows signs of susceptible. The objective of thisresearch was to detect the Mxgene in wild aquatic birds using the Polymerase Chain Reaction Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (PCR-RFLP method with the primer pairs F2 and NE-R2/R and the RsaI restriction enzyme. DNA samples were obtained from eight species of wild waterbirds with positive and negative exposure to the AI virus subtype H5N1. DNA amplification results showed that the Mxgene in wild aquatic birds is found in a 100 bp fragment, which is the same as the Mx gene found in chickens. However, unlike chickens, the Mxgene in wild aquatic birds did not show any polymorphism. This study proves that Mx- based resistance to AI virus subtype H5N1 in different in wild birds than in chickens.

  11. Adeno-associated virus for cystic fibrosis gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Martini

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Gene therapy is an alternative treatment for genetic lung disease, especially monogenic disorders such as cystic fibrosis. Cystic fibrosis is a severe autosomal recessive disease affecting one in 2500 live births in the white population, caused by mutation of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR. The disease is classically characterized by pancreatic enzyme insufficiency, an increased concentration of chloride in sweat, and varying severity of chronic obstructive lung disease. Currently, the greatest challenge for gene therapy is finding an ideal vector to deliver the transgene (CFTR to the affected organ (lung. Adeno-associated virus is the most promising viral vector system for the treatment of respiratory disease because it has natural tropism for airway epithelial cells and does not cause any human disease. This review focuses on the basic properties of adeno-associated virus and its use as a vector for cystic fibrosis gene therapy.

  12. Molecular characterisation of lumpy skin disease virus and sheeppox virus based on P32 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.M.A.Rashid

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV and sheeppox virus (SPV have a considerable economic impact on the cattle and small ruminant industry. They are listed in group A of contagious disease by the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE. This study addressed molecular characterisation of first LSDV outbreak and an endemic SPV in Kurdistan region of Iraq based on P32 gene. The results indicated that P32 gene can be successfully used for diagnosis of LSDV. The phylogenic and molecular analysis showed that there may be a new LSDV isolate circulating in Kurdistan which uniquely shared the same characteristic amino acid sequence with SPV and GPV, leucine at amino acid position 51 in P32 gene as well as few genetically distinct SPV causing pox disease in Kurdistan sheep. This study provided sequence information of P32 gene for several LSDV isolates, which positively affects the epidemiological study of Capripoxvirus

  13. RNase L mediated protection from virus induced demyelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derek D C Ireland

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available IFN-alpha/beta plays a critical role in limiting viral spread, restricting viral tropism and protecting mice from neurotropic coronavirus infection. However, the IFN-alpha/beta dependent mechanisms underlying innate anti-viral functions within the CNS are poorly understood. The role of RNase L in viral encephalomyelitis was explored based on its functions in inhibiting translation, inducing apoptosis, and propagating the IFN-alpha/beta pathway through RNA degradation intermediates. Infection of RNase L deficient (RL(-/- mice with a sub-lethal, demyelinating mouse hepatitis virus variant revealed that the majority of mice succumbed to infection by day 12 p.i. However, RNase L deficiency did not affect overall control of infectious virus, or diminish IFN-alpha/beta expression in the CNS. Furthermore, increased morbidity and mortality could not be attributed to altered proinflammatory signals or composition of cells infiltrating the CNS. The unique phenotype of infected RL(-/- mice was rather manifested in earlier onset and increased severity of demyelination and axonal damage in brain stem and spinal cord without evidence for enhanced neuronal infection. Increased tissue damage coincided with sustained brain stem infection, foci of microglia infection in grey matter, and increased apoptotic cells. These data demonstrate a novel protective role for RNase L in viral induced CNS encephalomyelitis, which is not reflected in overall viral control or propagation of IFN-alpha/beta mediated signals. Protective function is rather associated with cell type specific and regional restriction of viral replication in grey matter and ameliorated neurodegeneration and demyelination.

  14. Dysregulation of RNA Mediated Gene Expression in Motor Neuron Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Inês do Carmo G; Rehorst, Wiebke A; Kye, Min Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Recent findings indicate an important role for RNA-mediated gene expression in motor neuron diseases, including ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) and SMA (spinal muscular atrophy). ALS, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease, is an adult-onset progressive neurodegenerative disorder, whereby SMA or "children's Lou Gehrig's disease" is considered a pediatric neurodevelopmental disorder. Despite the difference in genetic causes, both ALS and SMA share common phenotypes; dysfunction/loss of motor neurons that eventually leads to muscle weakness and atrophy. With advanced techniques in molecular genetics and cell biology, current data suggest that these two distinct motor neuron diseases share more than phenotypes; ALS and SMA have similar cellular pathological mechanisms including mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and dysregulation in RNA-mediated gene expression. Here, we will discuss the current findings on these two diseases with specific focus on RNA-mediated gene regulation including miRNA expression, pre-mRNA processing and RNA binding proteins.

  15. DNA-mediated gene transfer into ataxia-telangiectasia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crescenzi, M.; Pulciani, S.; Carbonari, M.; Tedesco, L.; Russo, G.; Gaetano, C.; Fiorilli, M.

    1986-01-01

    The complete description of the genetic lesion(s) underlying the AT mutation might, therefore, highlight not only a DNA-repair pathwa, but also an important aspect of the physiology of lymphocytes. DNA-mediated gene transfer into eukaryotic cells has proved a powerful tool for the molecular cloning of certain mammalian genes. The possibility to clone a given gene using this technology depends, basically, on the availability of a selectable marker associated with the expression of the transfected gene in the recipient cell. Recently, a human DNA repair gene has been cloned in CHO mutant cells by taking advantage of the increased resistance to ultraviolet radiation of the transformants. As a preliminary step toward the molecular cloning of the AT gene(s), the authors have attempted to confer radioresistance to AT cells by transfection with normal human DNA

  16. Mutagenesis-mediated virus extinction: virus-dependent effect of viral load on sensitivity to lethal defection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Moreno

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lethal mutagenesis is a transition towards virus extinction mediated by enhanced mutation rates during viral genome replication, and it is currently under investigation as a potential new antiviral strategy. Viral load and virus fitness are known to influence virus extinction. Here we examine the effect or the multiplicity of infection (MOI on progeny production of several RNA viruses under enhanced mutagenesis. RESULTS: The effect of the mutagenic base analogue 5-fluorouracil (FU on the replication of the arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV can result either in inhibition of progeny production and virus extinction in infections carried out at low multiplicity of infection (MOI, or in a moderate titer decrease without extinction at high MOI. The effect of the MOI is similar for LCMV and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, but minimal or absent for the picornaviruses foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV and encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV. The increase in mutation frequency and Shannon entropy (mutant spectrum complexity as a result of virus passage in the presence of FU was more accentuated at low MOI for LCMV and VSV, and at high MOI for FMDV and EMCV. We present an extension of the lethal defection model that agrees with the experimental results. CONCLUSIONS: (i Low infecting load favoured the extinction of negative strand viruses, LCMV or VSV, with an increase of mutant spectrum complexity. (ii This behaviour is not observed in RNA positive strand viruses, FMDV or EMCV. (iii The accumulation of defector genomes may underlie the MOI-dependent behaviour. (iv LCMV coinfections are allowed but superinfection is strongly restricted in BHK-21 cells. (v The dissimilar effects of the MOI on the efficiency of mutagenic-based extinction of different RNA viruses can have implications for the design of antiviral protocols based on lethal mutagenesis, presently under development.

  17. Perspective on Adeno-Associated Virus Capsid Modification for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nance, Michael E; Duan, Dongsheng

    2015-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a X-linked, progressive childhood myopathy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene, one of the largest genes in the genome. It is characterized by skeletal and cardiac muscle degeneration and dysfunction leading to cardiac and/or respiratory failure. Adeno-associated virus (AAV) is a highly promising gene therapy vector. AAV gene therapy has resulted in unprecedented clinical success for treating several inherited diseases. However, AAV gene therapy for DMD remains a significant challenge. Hurdles for AAV-mediated DMD gene therapy include the difficulty to package the full-length dystrophin coding sequence in an AAV vector, the necessity for whole-body gene delivery, the immune response to dystrophin and AAV capsid, and the species-specific barriers to translate from animal models to human patients. Capsid engineering aims at improving viral vector properties by rational design and/or forced evolution. In this review, we discuss how to use the state-of-the-art AAV capsid engineering technologies to overcome hurdles in AAV-based DMD gene therapy.

  18. A subset of herpes simplex virus replication genes induces DNA amplification within the host cell genome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heilbronn, R.; zur Hausen, H. (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, Heidelberg (West Germany))

    1989-09-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) induces DNA amplification of target genes within the host cell chromosome. To characterize the HSV genes that mediate the amplification effect, combinations of cloned DNA fragments covering the entire HSV genome were transiently transfected into simian virus 40 (SV40)-transformed hamster cells. This led to amplification of the integrated SV40 DNA sequences to a degree comparable to that observed after transfection of intact virion DNA. Transfection of combinations of subclones and of human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter-driven expression constructs for individual open reading frames led to the identification of sic HSV genes which together were necessary and sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification: UL30 (DNA polymerase), UL29 (major DNA-binding protein), UL5, UL8, UL42, and UL52. All of these genes encode proteins necessary for HSV DNA replication. However, an additional gene coding for an HSV origin-binding protein (UL9) was required for origin-dependent HSV DNA replication but was dispensable for SV40 DNA amplification. The results show that a subset of HSV replication genes is sufficient for the induction of DNA amplification. This opens the possibility that HSV expresses functions sufficient for DNA amplification but separate from those responsible for lytic viral growth. HSV infection may thereby induce DNA amplification within the host cell genome without killing the host by lytic viral growth. This may lead to persistence of a cell with a new genetic phenotype, which would have implications for the pathogenicity of the virus in vivo.

  19. Up-regulation of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer impairs adenovirus-mediated gene therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egami, Takuya; Ohuchida, Kenoki; Yasui, Takaharu; Onimaru, Manabu; Toma, Hiroki; Sato, Norihiro; Tanaka, Masao; Mizumoto, Kazuhiro; Matsumoto, Kunio

    2009-01-01

    Adenovirus-mediated gene therapy is a promising approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. We previously reported that radiation enhanced adenovirus-mediated gene expression in pancreatic cancer, suggesting that adenoviral gene therapy might be more effective in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells. In the present study, we compared the transduction efficiency of adenovirus-delivered genes in radiosensitive and radioresistant cells, and investigated the underlying mechanisms. We used an adenovirus expressing the hepatocyte growth factor antagonist, NK4 (Ad-NK4), as a representative gene therapy. We established two radioresistant human pancreatic cancer cell lines using fractionated irradiation. Radiosensitive and radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells were infected with Ad-NK4, and NK4 levels in the cells were measured. In order to investigate the mechanisms responsible for the differences in the transduction efficiency between these cells, we measured expression of the genes mediating adenovirus infection and endocytosis. The results revealed that NK4 levels in radioresistant cells were significantly lower (P<0.01) than those in radiosensitive cells, although there were no significant differences in adenovirus uptake between radiosensitive cells and radioresistant cells. Integrin β3 was up-regulated and the Coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor was down-regulated in radioresistant cells, and inhibition of integrin β3 promoted adenovirus gene transfer. These results suggest that inhibition of integrin β3 in radioresistant pancreatic cancer cells could enhance adenovirus-mediated gene therapy. (author)

  20. Engineering adeno-associated viruses for clinical gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterman, Melissa A; Schaffer, David V

    2014-07-01

    Clinical gene therapy has been increasingly successful owing both to an enhanced molecular understanding of human disease and to progressively improving gene delivery technologies. Among these technologies, delivery vectors based on adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) have emerged as safe and effective and, in one recent case, have led to regulatory approval. Although shortcomings in viral vector properties will render extension of such successes to many other human diseases challenging, new approaches to engineer and improve AAV vectors and their genetic cargo are increasingly helping to overcome these barriers.

  1. Vaccine Mediated Protection Against Zika Virus-Induced Congenital Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richner, Justin M; Jagger, Brett W; Shan, Chao; Fontes, Camila R; Dowd, Kimberly A; Cao, Bin; Himansu, Sunny; Caine, Elizabeth A; Nunes, Bruno T D; Medeiros, Daniele B A; Muruato, Antonio E; Foreman, Bryant M; Luo, Huanle; Wang, Tian; Barrett, Alan D; Weaver, Scott C; Vasconcelos, Pedro F C; Rossi, Shannan L; Ciaramella, Giuseppe; Mysorekar, Indira U; Pierson, Theodore C; Shi, Pei-Yong; Diamond, Michael S

    2017-07-13

    The emergence of Zika virus (ZIKV) and its association with congenital malformations has prompted the rapid development of vaccines. Although efficacy with multiple viral vaccine platforms has been established in animals, no study has addressed protection during pregnancy. We tested in mice two vaccine platforms, a lipid nanoparticle-encapsulated modified mRNA vaccine encoding ZIKV prM and E genes and a live-attenuated ZIKV strain encoding an NS1 protein without glycosylation, for their ability to protect against transmission to the fetus. Vaccinated dams challenged with a heterologous ZIKV strain at embryo day 6 (E6) and evaluated at E13 showed markedly diminished levels of viral RNA in maternal, placental, and fetal tissues, which resulted in protection against placental damage and fetal demise. As modified mRNA and live-attenuated vaccine platforms can restrict in utero transmission of ZIKV in mice, their further development in humans to prevent congenital ZIKV syndrome is warranted. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Identification of certain cancer-mediating genes using Gaussian ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-29

    Sep 29, 2015 ... mance of GFI is compared with 19 exiting cluster validity indices. The results .... Using k-means algorithm on human lung expression data, we have found ... of possible genes that mediate the development of a cancer. In other ...

  3. On revealing the gene targets of Ebola virus microRNAs involved in the human skin microbiome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Chun Hsu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus, a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus, causes severe viral hemorrhagic fever and has a high mortality rate. Histopathological and immunopathological analyses of Ebola virus have revealed that histopathological changes in skin tissue are associated with various degrees of endothelial cell swelling and necrosis. The interactions of microbes within or on a host are a crucial for the skin immune shield. The discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs in Ebola virus implies that immune escape, endothelial cell rupture, and tissue dissolution during Ebola virus infection are a result of the effects of Ebola virus miRNAs. Keratinocytes obtained from normal skin can attach and spread through expression of the thrombospondin family of proteins, playing a role in initiation of cell-mediated immune responses in the skin. Several miRNAs have been shown to bind the 3′ untranslated region of thrombospondin mRNA, thereby controlling its stability and translational activity. In this study, we discovered short RNA sequences that may act as miRNAs from Propionibacterium acnes using a practical workflow of bioinformatics methods. Subsequently, we deciphered the common target gene. These RNA sequences tended to bind to the same thrombospondin protein, THSD4, emphasizing the potential importance of the synergistic binding of miRNAs from Ebola virus, Propionibacterium acnes, and humans to the target. These results provide important insights into the molecular mechanisms of thrombospondin proteins and miRNAs in Ebola virus infection.

  4. Influenza virus induces apoptosis via BAD-mediated mitochondrial dysregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Anh T; Cortens, John P; Du, Qiujiang; Wilkins, John A; Coombs, Kevin M

    2013-01-01

    Influenza virus infection results in host cell death and major tissue damage. Specific components of the apoptotic pathway, a signaling cascade that ultimately leads to cell death, are implicated in promoting influenza virus replication. BAD is a cell death regulator that constitutes a critical control point in the intrinsic apoptosis pathway, which occurs through the dysregulation of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization and the subsequent activation of downstream apoptogenic factors. Here we report a novel proviral role for the proapoptotic protein BAD in influenza virus replication. We show that influenza virus-induced cytopathology and cell death are considerably inhibited in BAD knockdown cells and that both virus replication and viral protein production are dramatically reduced, which suggests that virus-induced apoptosis is BAD dependent. Our data showed that influenza viruses induced phosphorylation of BAD at residues S112 and S136 in a temporal manner. Viral infection also induced BAD cleavage, late in the viral life cycle, to a truncated form that is reportedly a more potent inducer of apoptosis. We further demonstrate that knockdown of BAD resulted in reduced cytochrome c release and suppression of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway during influenza virus replication, as seen by an inhibition of caspases-3, caspase-7, and procyclic acidic repetitive protein (PARP) cleavage. Our data indicate that influenza viruses carefully modulate the activation of the apoptotic pathway that is dependent on the regulatory function of BAD and that failure of apoptosis activation resulted in unproductive viral replication.

  5. JC virus induces altered patterns of cellular gene expression: Interferon-inducible genes as major transcriptional targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verma, Saguna; Ziegler, Katja; Ananthula, Praveen; Co, Juliene K.G.; Frisque, Richard J.; Yanagihara, Richard; Nerurkar, Vivek R.

    2006-01-01

    Human polyomavirus JC (JCV) infects 80% of the population worldwide. Primary infection, typically occurring during childhood, is asymptomatic in immunocompetent individuals and results in lifelong latency and persistent infection. However, among the severely immunocompromised, JCV may cause a fatal demyelinating disease, progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). Virus-host interactions influencing persistence and pathogenicity are not well understood, although significant regulation of JCV activity is thought to occur at the level of transcription. Regulation of the JCV early and late promoters during the lytic cycle is a complex event that requires participation of both viral and cellular factors. We have used cDNA microarray technology to analyze global alterations in gene expression in JCV-permissive primary human fetal glial cells (PHFG). Expression of more than 400 cellular genes was altered, including many that influence cell proliferation, cell communication and interferon (IFN)-mediated host defense responses. Genes in the latter category included signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), interferon stimulating gene 56 (ISG56), myxovirus resistance 1 (MxA), 2'5'-oligoadenylate synthetase (OAS), and cig5. The expression of these genes was further confirmed in JCV-infected PHFG cells and the human glioblastoma cell line U87MG to ensure the specificity of JCV in inducing this strong antiviral response. Results obtained by real-time RT-PCR and Western blot analyses supported the microarray data and provide temporal information related to virus-induced changes in the IFN response pathway. Our data indicate that the induction of an antiviral response may be one of the cellular factors regulating/controlling JCV replication in immunocompetent hosts and therefore constraining the development of PML

  6. Ebola virus infection induces irregular dendritic cell gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Vanessa R; Kalina, Warren V; Williams, Priscilla

    2015-02-01

    Filoviruses subvert the human immune system in part by infecting and replicating in dendritic cells (DCs). Using gene arrays, a phenotypic profile of filovirus infection in human monocyte-derived DCs was assessed. Monocytes from human donors were cultured in GM-CSF and IL-4 and were infected with Ebola virus Kikwit variant for up to 48 h. Extracted DC RNA was analyzed on SuperArray's Dendritic and Antigen Presenting Cell Oligo GEArray and compared to uninfected controls. Infected DCs exhibited increased expression of cytokine, chemokine, antiviral, and anti-apoptotic genes not seen in uninfected controls. Significant increases of intracellular antiviral and MHC I and II genes were also noted in EBOV-infected DCs. However, infected DCs failed to show any significant difference in co-stimulatory T-cell gene expression from uninfected DCs. Moreover, several chemokine genes were activated, but there was sparse expression of chemokine receptors that enabled activated DCs to home to lymph nodes. Overall, statistically significant expression of several intracellular antiviral genes was noted, which may limit viral load but fails to stop replication. EBOV gene expression profiling is of vital importance in understanding pathogenesis and devising novel therapeutic treatments such as small-molecule inhibitors.

  7. The potential of virus-induced gene silencing for speeding up functional characterization of plant genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Benedito, V.A.; Visser, P.B.; Angenent, G.C.; Krens, F.A.

    2004-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has been shown to be of great potential in plant reverse genetics. Advantages of VIGS over other approaches, such as T-DNA or transposon tagging, include the circumvention of plant transformation, methodological simplicity and robustness, and speedy results. These

  8. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in DNA immunized mink challenged with wild-type canine distemper virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Jensen, Trine Hammer; Jensen, Tove Dannemann; Aasted, Bent; Blixenkrone-Møller, Merete

    2009-07-30

    The aim of the study was to investigate the different phases of the immune response after DNA immunization with the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein genes from canine distemper virus (CDV). Although attenuated live CDV vaccines have effectively reduced the incidence of disease, canine distemper is still a problem worldwide. The broad host range of CDV creates a constant viral reservoir among wildlife animals. Our results demonstrated early humoral and cell-mediated immune responses (IFN-gamma) in DNA vaccinated mink compared to mock-vaccinated mink after challenge with a Danish wild-type CDV. The DNA vaccine-induced immunity protected the natural host against disease development.

  9. Rapid detection of genetically diverse tomato black ring virus isolates using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Budzyńska, Daria; Borodynko, Natasza; Pospieszny, Henryk

    2015-12-01

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay (RT-LAMP) has been developed for detection of tomato black ring virus (TBRV) isolates collected from different hosts. One-step RT-LAMP was performed with a set of four primers, the design of which was based on the coat protein gene. Results of RT-LAMP were visualized by direct staining of products with fluorescent dyes, agarose gel electrophoresis, and analysis of amplification curves. The sensitivity of RT-LAMP was 100-fold greater than that of RT-PCR. The RT-LAMP assay developed here is a useful and practical method for diagnosis of TBRV.

  10. AAV-mediated delivery of zinc finger nucleases targeting hepatitis B virus inhibits active replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D Weber

    Full Text Available Despite an existing effective vaccine, hepatitis B virus (HBV remains a major public health concern. There are effective suppressive therapies for HBV, but they remain expensive and inaccessible to many, and not all patients respond well. Furthermore, HBV can persist as genomic covalently closed circular DNA (cccDNA that remains in hepatocytes even during otherwise effective therapy and facilitates rebound in patients after treatment has stopped. Therefore, the need for an effective treatment that targets active and persistent HBV infections remains. As a novel approach to treat HBV, we have targeted the HBV genome for disruption to prevent viral reactivation and replication. We generated 3 zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs that target sequences within the HBV polymerase, core and X genes. Upon the formation of ZFN-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSB, imprecise repair by non-homologous end joining leads to mutations that inactivate HBV genes. We delivered HBV-specific ZFNs using self-complementary adeno-associated virus (scAAV vectors and tested their anti-HBV activity in HepAD38 cells. HBV-ZFNs efficiently disrupted HBV target sites by inducing site-specific mutations. Cytotoxicity was seen with one of the ZFNs. scAAV-mediated delivery of a ZFN targeting HBV polymerase resulted in complete inhibition of HBV DNA replication and production of infectious HBV virions in HepAD38 cells. This effect was sustained for at least 2 weeks following only a single treatment. Furthermore, high specificity was observed for all ZFNs, as negligible off-target cleavage was seen via high-throughput sequencing of 7 closely matched potential off-target sites. These results show that HBV-targeted ZFNs can efficiently inhibit active HBV replication and suppress the cellular template for HBV persistence, making them promising candidates for eradication therapy.

  11. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30II-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M.; Datta, Antara; Hiraragi, Hajime; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13 II and p30 II , which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30 II , a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30 II motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30 II , a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30 II to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30 II -dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30 II -mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30 II -mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30 II -mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30 II modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation

  12. Neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses is determined by arginine 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mögling, Ramona; Richard, Mathilde J; Vliet, Stefan van der; Beek, Ruud van; Schrauwen, Eefje J A; Spronken, Monique I; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Fouchier, Ron A M

    2017-06-01

    Over the last decade, an increasing proportion of circulating human influenza A(H3N2) viruses exhibited haemagglutination activity that was sensitive to neuraminidase inhibitors. This change in haemagglutination as compared to older circulating A(H3N2) viruses prompted an investigation of the underlying molecular basis. Recent human influenza A(H3N2) viruses were found to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes in a manner that could be blocked with either oseltamivir or neuraminidase-specific antisera, indicating that agglutination was driven by neuraminidase, with a low or negligible contribution of haemagglutinin. Using representative virus recombinants it was shown that the haemagglutinin of a recent A(H3N2) virus indeed had decreased activity to agglutinate turkey erythrocytes, while its neuraminidase displayed increased haemagglutinating activity. Viruses with chimeric and mutant neuraminidases were used to identify the amino acid substitution histidine to arginine at position 150 flanking the neuraminidase catalytic site as the determinant of this neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination. An analysis of publicly available neuraminidase gene sequences showed that viruses with histidine at position 150 were rapidly replaced by viruses with arginine at this position between 2005 and 2008, in agreement with the phenotypic data. As a consequence of neuraminidase-mediated haemagglutination of recent A(H3N2) viruses and poor haemagglutination via haemagglutinin, haemagglutination inhibition assays with A(H3N2) antisera are no longer useful to characterize the antigenic properties of the haemagglutinin of these viruses for vaccine strain selection purposes. Continuous monitoring of the evolution of these viruses and potential consequences for vaccine strain selection remains important.

  13. Dendritic cells in dengue virus infection: Targets of virus replication and mediators of immunity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Schmid

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are sentinels of the immune system and detect pathogens at sites of entry, such as the skin. In addition to the ability of DCs to control infections directly via their innate immune functions, DCs help to prime adaptive B and T cell responses via antigen presentation in lymphoid tissues. Infected Aedes aegypti or Ae. albopictus mosquitoes transmit the four dengue virus (DENV serotypes to humans while probing for small blood vessels in the skin. DENV causes the most prevalent arthropod-borne viral disease in humans, yet no vaccine or specific therapeutic is currently approved. Although primary DENV infection confers life-long protective immunity against re-infection with the same DENV serotype, secondary infection with a different DENV serotype can lead to increased disease severity via cross-reactive T cells or enhancing antibodies. This review summarizes recent findings in humans and animal models about DENV infection of DCs, monocytes and macrophages. We discuss the dual role of DCs as both targets of DENV replication and mediators of innate and adaptive immunity, and summarize immune evasion strategies whereby DENV impairs the function of infected DCs. We suggest that DCs play a key role in priming DENV-specific neutralizing or potentially harmful memory B and T cell responses, and that future DC-directed therapies may help induce protective memory responses and reduce dengue pathogenesis.

  14. Targeted decorin gene therapy delivered with adeno-associated virus effectively retards corneal neovascularization in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajiv R Mohan

    Full Text Available Decorin, small leucine-rich proteoglycan, has been shown to modulate angiogenesis in nonocular tissues. This study tested a hypothesis that tissue-selective targeted decorin gene therapy delivered to the rabbit stroma with adeno-associated virus serotype 5 (AAV5 impedes corneal neovascularization (CNV in vivo without significant side effects. An established rabbit CNV model was used. Targeted decorin gene therapy in the rabbit stroma was delivered with a single topical AAV5 titer (100 µl; 5×10(12 vg/ml application onto the stroma for two minutes after removing corneal epithelium. The levels of CNV were examined with stereomicroscopy, H&E staining, lectin, collagen type IV, CD31 immunocytochemistry and CD31 immunoblotting. Real-time PCR quantified mRNA expression of pro- and anti-angiogenic genes. Corneal health in live animals was monitored with clinical, slit-lamp and optical coherence tomography biomicroscopic examinations. Selective decorin delivery into stroma showed significant 52% (p<0.05, 66% (p<0.001, and 63% (p<0.01 reduction at early (day 5, mid (day 10, and late (day 14 stages of CNV in decorin-delivered rabbit corneas compared to control (no decorin delivered corneas in morphometric analysis. The H&E staining, lectin, collagen type IV, CD31 immunostaining (57-65, p<0.5, and CD31 immunoblotting (62-67%, p<0.05 supported morphometric findings. Quantitative PCR studies demonstrated decorin gene therapy down-regulated expression of VEGF, MCP1 and angiopoietin (pro-angiogenic and up-regulated PEDF (anti-angiogenic genes. The clinical, biomicroscopy and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy is safe for the cornea. Tissue-targeted AAV5-mediated decorin gene therapy decreases CNV with no major side effects, and could potentially be used for treating patients.

  15. Transgenic Sugarcane Resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus Based on Coat Protein Gene Silencing by RNA Interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinlong Guo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV, with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms.

  16. Novel reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dukes, J.P.; King, D.P.; Alexandersen, Søren

    2006-01-01

    Speed is paramount in the diagnosis of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) and simplicity is required if a test is to be deployed in the field. The development of a one-step, reverse transcription loop-mediated amplification (RT-LAMP) assay enables FMD virus (FMDV) to be detected in under an hour...... in a single tube without thermal cycling. A fragment of the 3D RNA polymerase gene of the virus is amplified at 65 degrees C in the presence of a primer mixture and both reverse transcriptase and Bst DNA polymerase. Compared with real-time RT-PCR, RT-LAMP was consistently faster, and ten copies of FMDV...... vesicular diseases and from that of genetically related picornaviruses. Diagnostic sensitivity was validated by the amplification of reference FMDV strains and archival material from field cases of FMD. In comparison with the performance of the established diagnostic TaqMan (R) assay, RT-LAMP appears...

  17. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer in plants and biosafety considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Shweta; Goyal, Vinod

    2012-12-01

    Agrobacterium, the natures' genetic engineer, has been used as a vector to create transgenic plants. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer in plants is a highly efficient transformation process which is governed by various factors including genotype of the host plant, explant, vector, plasmid, bacterial strain, composition of culture medium, tissue damage, and temperature of co-cultivation. Agrobacterium has been successfully used to transform various economically and horticulturally important monocot and dicot species by standard tissue culture and in planta transformation techniques like floral or seedling infilteration, apical meristem transformation, and the pistil drip methods. Monocots have been comparatively difficult to transform by Agrobacterium. However, successful transformations have been reported in the last few years based on the adjustment of the parameters that govern the responses of monocots to Agrobacterium. A novel Agrobacterium transferred DNA-derived nanocomplex method has been developed which will be highly valuable for plant biology and biotechnology. Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation is known to be the preferred method of creating transgenic plants from a commercial and biosafety perspective. Agrobacterium-mediated gene transfer predominantly results in the integration of foreign genes at a single locus in the host plant, without associated vector backbone and is also known to produce marker free plants, which are the prerequisites for commercialization of transgenic crops. Research in Agrobacterium-mediated transformation can provide new and novel insights into the understanding of the regulatory process controlling molecular, cellular, biochemical, physiological, and developmental processes occurring during Agrobacterium-mediated transformation and also into a wide range of aspects on biological safety of transgenic crops to improve crop production to meet the demands of ever-growing world's population.

  18. associated virus (AAV)-mediated expression of small interfering RNA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2011-04-11

    Apr 11, 2011 ... disadvantages. In this study, a siRNA expression recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV) was .... cleotides were designed, which contained a sense strand of p53 or ..... During MJ, Kaplitt MG, Stem MB, Eidelberg D (2001).

  19. Characterization of soluble glycoprotein D-mediated herpes simplex virus type 1 infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsvitov, Marianna; Frampton, Arthur R.; Shah, Waris A.; Wendell, Steven K.; Ozuer, Ali; Kapacee, Zoher; Goins, William F.; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2007-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) entry into permissive cells involves attachment to cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) and fusion of the virus envelope with the cell membrane triggered by the binding of glycoprotein D (gD) to cognate receptors. In this study, we characterized the observation that soluble forms of the gD ectodomain (sgD) can mediate entry of gD-deficient HSV-1. We examined the efficiency and receptor specificity of this activity and used sequential incubation protocols to determine the order and stability of the initial interactions required for entry. Surprisingly, virus binding to GAGs did not increase the efficiency of sgD-mediated entry and gD-deficient virus was capable of attaching to GAG-deficient cells in the absence of sgD. These observations suggested a novel binding interaction that may play a role in normal HSV infection

  20. Polymicrobial infection and bacterium-mediated epigenetic modification of DNA tumor viruses contribute to pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, J M; Webster-Cyriaque, J

    2014-04-29

    ABSTRACT The human body plays host to a wide variety of microbes, commensal and pathogenic. In addition to interacting with their host, different microbes, such as bacteria and viruses, interact with each other, sometimes in ways that exacerbate disease. In particular, gene expression of a number of viruses, including Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), is known to be regulated by epigenetic modifications induced by bacteria. These viruses establish latent infection in their host cells and can be reactivated by bacterial products. Viral reactivation has been suggested to contribute to periodontal disease and AIDS. In addition, bacterium-virus interactions may play a role in cancers, such as Kaposi's sarcoma, gastric cancer, and head and neck cancer. It is important to consider the effects of coexisting bacterial infections when studying viral diseases in vivo.

  1. T Cell-Mediated Immunity towards Yellow Fever Virus and Useful Animal Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan M; Klimstra, William B

    2017-04-11

    The 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines is among the most effective vaccines ever created. The humoral and cellular immunity elicited by 17D has been well characterized in humans. Neutralizing antibodies have long been known to provide protection against challenge with a wild-type virus. However, a well characterized T cell immune response that is robust, long-lived and polyfunctional is also elicited by 17D. It remains unclear whether this arm of immunity is protective following challenge with a wild-type virus. Here we introduce the 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines, describe the current state of knowledge regarding the immunity directed towards the vaccines in humans and conclude with a discussion of animal models that are useful for evaluating T cell-mediated immune protection to yellow fever virus.

  2. T Cell-Mediated Immunity towards Yellow Fever Virus and Useful Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Alan M.; Klimstra, William B.

    2017-01-01

    The 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines is among the most effective vaccines ever created. The humoral and cellular immunity elicited by 17D has been well characterized in humans. Neutralizing antibodies have long been known to provide protection against challenge with a wild-type virus. However, a well characterized T cell immune response that is robust, long-lived and polyfunctional is also elicited by 17D. It remains unclear whether this arm of immunity is protective following challenge with a wild-type virus. Here we introduce the 17D line of yellow fever virus vaccines, describe the current state of knowledge regarding the immunity directed towards the vaccines in humans and conclude with a discussion of animal models that are useful for evaluating T cell-mediated immune protection to yellow fever virus. PMID:28398253

  3. Analysis of BmNPV orf101 disruption: orf101 is essential for mediating budded virus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huiqing; Li, Mei; Mai, Weijun; Tang, Qi; Li, Guohui; Chen, Keping; Zhou, Yajing

    2014-12-01

    In our previous study, Orf101 (Bm101) of Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) was identified as a component of the budded virions important for viral late gene expression. In this study we demonstrate that Bm101 is actually a previously unrecognized core gene and that it is essential for mediating budded virus production. To determine the role of Bm101 in the baculovirus life cycle, a Bm101 knockout bacmid containing the BmNPV genome was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Furthermore, a Bm101 repair bacmid was constructed by transposing the Bm101 open reading frame with its native promoter region into the polyhedrin locus of the Bm101 knockout bacmid. Bacmid DNA transfection assay revealed that the Bm101 knockout bacmid was unable to produce the infectious budded virus, while the Bm101 repair bacmid rescued this defect, allowing budded-virus titers to reach wild-type levels. Real time PCR analysis indicated that the viral DNA genome in the absence of Bm101 was unaffected in the first 24 h p.t. Thus, studies of a Bm101-null BACmid indicate that Bm101 is required for viral DNA replication during the infection cycle.

  4. Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1)-derived recombinant vectors for gene transfer and gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marconi, Peggy; Fraefel, Cornel; Epstein, Alberto L

    2015-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ) is a human pathogen whose lifestyle is based on a long-term dual interaction with the infected host, being able to establish both lytic and latent infections. The virus genome is a 153-kilobase pair (kbp) double-stranded DNA molecule encoding more than 80 genes. The interest of HSV-1 as gene transfer vector stems from its ability to infect many different cell types, both quiescent and proliferating cells, the very high packaging capacity of the virus capsid, the outstanding neurotropic adaptations that this virus has evolved, and the fact that it never integrates into the cellular chromosomes, thus avoiding the risk of insertional mutagenesis. Two types of vectors can be derived from HSV-1, recombinant vectors and amplicon vectors, and different methodologies have been developed to prepare large stocks of each type of vector. This chapter summarizes the approach most commonly used to prepare recombinant HSV-1 vectors through homologous recombination, either in eukaryotic cells or in bacteria.

  5. VE-Cadherin–Mediated Epigenetic Regulation of Endothelial Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, Marco F.; Giampietro, Costanza; Corada, Monica; Pisati, Federica; Lavarone, Elisa; Cunha, Sara I.; Conze, Lei L.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Joshi, Dhira; Kjaer, Svend; George, Roger; Nye, Emma; Ma, Anqi; Jin, Jian; Mitter, Richard; Lupia, Michela; Cavallaro, Ugo; Pasini, Diego; Calado, Dinis P.

    2018-01-01

    levels of claudin-5 and VE-PTP. Conclusions: These data extend the knowledge of polycomb-mediated regulation of gene expression to endothelial cell differentiation and vessel maturation. The identified mechanism opens novel therapeutic opportunities to modulate endothelial gene expression and induce vascular normalization through pharmacological inhibition of the polycomb-mediated repression system. PMID:29233846

  6. VE-Cadherin-Mediated Epigenetic Regulation of Endothelial Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morini, Marco F; Giampietro, Costanza; Corada, Monica; Pisati, Federica; Lavarone, Elisa; Cunha, Sara I; Conze, Lei L; O'Reilly, Nicola; Joshi, Dhira; Kjaer, Svend; George, Roger; Nye, Emma; Ma, Anqi; Jin, Jian; Mitter, Richard; Lupia, Michela; Cavallaro, Ugo; Pasini, Diego; Calado, Dinis P; Dejana, Elisabetta; Taddei, Andrea

    2018-01-19

    data extend the knowledge of polycomb-mediated regulation of gene expression to endothelial cell differentiation and vessel maturation. The identified mechanism opens novel therapeutic opportunities to modulate endothelial gene expression and induce vascular normalization through pharmacological inhibition of the polycomb-mediated repression system. © 2017 The Authors.

  7. Identification of an attenuated barley stripe mosaic virus for the virus-induced gene silencing of pathogenesis-related wheat genes

    OpenAIRE

    Buhrow, Leann M.; Clark, Shawn M.; Loewen, Michele C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has become an emerging technology for the rapid, efficient functional genomic screening of monocot and dicot species. The barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) has been described as an effective VIGS vehicle for the evaluation of genes involved in wheat and barley phytopathogenesis; however, these studies have been obscured by BSMV-induced phenotypes and defense responses. The utility of BSMV VIGS may be improved using a BSMV genetic background which...

  8. An AFLP marker linked to turnip mosaic virus resistance gene in pak ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An AFLP marker linked to turnip mosaic virus resistance gene in pak-choi. W Xinhua, C Huoying, Z Yuying, H Ruixian. Abstract. Pak-choi is one of the most important vegetable crops in China. Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) is one of its main pathogen. Screening the molecular marker linked to the TuMV resistance gene is an ...

  9. Systemic transport of Alfalfa mosaic virus can be mediated by the movement proteins of several viruses assigned to five genera of the 30K family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajardo, Thor V M; Peiró, Ana; Pallás, Vicente; Sánchez-Navarro, Jesús

    2013-03-01

    We previously showed that the movement protein (MP) gene of Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) is functionally exchangeable for the cell-to-cell transport of the corresponding genes of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Brome mosaic virus, Prunus necrotic ringspot virus, Cucumber mosaic virus and Cowpea mosaic virus. We have analysed the capacity of the heterologous MPs to systemically transport the corresponding chimeric AMV genome. All MPs were competent in systemic transport but required the fusion at their C terminus of the coat protein-interacting C-terminal 44 aa (A44) of the AMV MP. Except for the TMV MP, the presence of the hybrid virus in upper leaves correlated with the capacity to move locally. These results suggest that all the MPs assigned to the 30K superfamily should be exchangeable not only for local virus movement but also for systemic transport when the A44 fragment is present.

  10. Computational fitness landscape for all gene-order permutations of an RNA virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang-il Lim

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available How does the growth of a virus depend on the linear arrangement of genes in its genome? Answering this question may enhance our basic understanding of virus evolution and advance applications of viruses as live attenuated vaccines, gene-therapy vectors, or anti-tumor therapeutics. We used a mathematical model for vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV, a prototype RNA virus that encodes five genes (N-P-M-G-L, to simulate the intracellular growth of all 120 possible gene-order variants. Simulated yields of virus infection varied by 6,000-fold and were found to be most sensitive to gene-order permutations that increased levels of the L gene transcript or reduced levels of the N gene transcript, the lowest and highest expressed genes of the wild-type virus, respectively. Effects of gene order on virus growth also depended upon the host-cell environment, reflecting different resources for protein synthesis and different cell susceptibilities to infection. Moreover, by computationally deleting intergenic attenuations, which define a key mechanism of transcriptional regulation in VSV, the variation in growth associated with the 120 gene-order variants was drastically narrowed from 6,000- to 20-fold, and many variants produced higher progeny yields than wild-type. These results suggest that regulation by intergenic attenuation preceded or co-evolved with the fixation of the wild type gene order in the evolution of VSV. In summary, our models have begun to reveal how gene functions, gene regulation, and genomic organization of viruses interact with their host environments to define processes of viral growth and evolution.

  11. Evaluation of the reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) as a screening method for the detection of influenza viruses in the fecal materials of water birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Hiromi; Sakoda, Yoshihiro; Endo, Mayumi; Motoshima, Masayuki; Yoshino, Fumi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Okamatsu, Masatoshi; Soejima, Takahiro; Senba, Syouhei; Kanda, Hidetoshi; Kida, Hiroshi

    2011-06-01

    Migratory water birds are a natural reservoir for influenza A viruses. Viruses replicate in the intestines of ducks and are shed with the fecal materials. Virus isolation from collected fecal materials, therefore, is an integral part of the surveillance of avian influenza in water birds. In the present study, reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) was assessed for its usefulness in detecting the RNA of influenza A viruses in fecal materials. It was found that, RT-LAMP specifically and sensitively detects the matrix gene of influenza A viruses. Influenza A viruses were isolated from the fecal materials in which viral RNA were detected by RT-LAMP in 35 min. The present findings indicate that RT-LAMP is useful as a high throughput screening method for field samples prior to virus isolation, allowing the processing of hundreds of samples per day.

  12. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A; Kieff, Elliott; Kang, Myung-Soo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. ► A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. ► Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. ► Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)’s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459–607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-Jκ binding to the Jκ site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560–574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated with EBNA1 in vitro, and repressed EBNA1-dependent transcription in vivo. Collectively, this study describes two

  13. Small molecule and peptide-mediated inhibition of Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 1 dimerization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sun Young; Song, Kyung-A [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Kang, Myung-Soo, E-mail: mkang@skku.edu [Samsung Advanced Institute for Health Sciences and Technology (SAIHST), Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Samsung Biomedical Research Institute (SBRI), Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Evidence that targeting EBNA1 dimer, an EBV onco-antigen, can be achievable. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A small molecule and a peptide as EBNA1 dimerization inhibitors identified. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Both inhibitors associated with EBNA1 and blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Also, prevented its dimerization, and repressed viral gene transcription. -- Abstract: Latent Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection is associated with human B cell lymphomas and certain carcinomas. EBV episome persistence, replication, and gene expression are dependent on EBV-encoded nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA1)'s DNA binding domain (DBD)/dimerization domain (DD)-mediated sequence-specific DNA binding activity. Homodimerization of EBNA1 is essential for EBNA1 DNA binding and transactivation. In this study, we characterized a novel small molecule EBNA1 inhibitor EiK1, screened from the previous high throughput screening (HTS). The EiK1 compound specifically inhibited the EBNA1-dependent, OriP-enhanced transcription, but not EBNA1-independent transcription. A Surface Plasmon Resonance Biacore assay revealed that EiK1 associates with EBNA1 amino acid 459-607 DBD/DD. Consistent with the SPR data, in vitro gel shift assays showed that EiK1 suppressed the activity of EBNA1 binding to the cognate familial repeats (FR) sequence, but not control RBP-J{kappa} binding to the J{kappa} site. Subsequently, a cross-linker-mediated in vitro multimerization assay and EBNA1 homodimerization-dependent yeast two-hybrid assay showed that EiK1 significantly inhibited EBNA1 dimerization. In an attempt to identify more highly specific peptide inhibitors, small peptides encompassing the EBNA1 DBD/DD were screened for inhibition of EBNA1 DBD-mediated DNA binding function. The small peptide P85, covering EBNA1 a.a. 560-574, significantly blocked EBNA1 DNA binding activity in vitro, prevented dimerization in vitro and in vivo, associated

  14. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-03-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production.

  15. Virus infection mediates the effects of elevated CO2 on plants and vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trębicki, Piotr; Vandegeer, Rebecca K.; Bosque-Pérez, Nilsa A.; Powell, Kevin S.; Dader, Beatriz; Freeman, Angela J.; Yen, Alan L.; Fitzgerald, Glenn J.; Luck, Jo E.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased significantly and is projected to double by 2100. To increase current food production levels, understanding how pests and diseases respond to future climate driven by increasing CO2 is imperative. We investigated the effects of elevated CO2 (eCO2) on the interactions among wheat (cv. Yitpi), Barley yellow dwarf virus and an important pest and virus vector, the bird cherry-oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi), by examining aphid life history, feeding behavior and plant physiology and biochemistry. Our results showed for the first time that virus infection can mediate effects of eCO2 on plants and pathogen vectors. Changes in plant N concentration influenced aphid life history and behavior, and N concentration was affected by virus infection under eCO2. We observed a reduction in aphid population size and increased feeding damage on noninfected plants under eCO2 but no changes to population and feeding on virus-infected plants irrespective of CO2 treatment. We expect potentially lower future aphid populations on noninfected plants but no change or increased aphid populations on virus-infected plants therefore subsequent virus spread. Our findings underscore the complexity of interactions between plants, insects and viruses under future climate with implications for plant disease epidemiology and crop production. PMID:26941044

  16. Human T lymphotropic virus type-1 p30II alters cellular gene expression to selectively enhance signaling pathways that activate T lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feuer Gerold

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated disorders. HTLV-1 contains both regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13II and p30II, which are incompletely defined in the virus life cycle or HTLV-1 pathogenesis. Proviral clones of the virus with pX ORF-II mutations diminish the ability of the virus to maintain viral loads in vivo. Exogenous expression of p30II differentially modulates CREB and Tax-responsive element-mediated transcription through its interaction with CREB-binding protein/p300 and represses tax/rex RNA nuclear export. Results Herein, we further characterized the role of p30II in regulation of cellular gene expression, using stable p30II expression system employing lentiviral vectors to test cellular gene expression with Affymetrix U133A arrays, representing ~33,000 human genes. Reporter assays in Jurkat T cells and RT-PCR in Jurkat and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes were used to confirm selected gene expression patterns. Our data reveals alterations of interrelated pathways of cell proliferation, T-cell signaling, apoptosis and cell cycle in p30II expressing Jurkat T cells. In all categories, p30II appeared to be an overall repressor of cellular gene expression, while selectively increasing the expression of certain key regulatory genes. Conclusions We are the first to demonstrate that p30II, while repressing the expression of many genes, selectively activates key gene pathways involved in T-cell signaling/activation. Collectively, our data suggests that this complex retrovirus, associated with lymphoproliferative diseases, relies upon accessory gene products to modify cellular environment to promote clonal expansion of the virus genome and thus maintain proviral loads in vivo.

  17. Changes in the topology of gene expression networks by human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) integration in macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Girón, María Juliana; García-Vallejo, Felipe

    2012-01-01

    One key step of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is the integration of its viral cDNA. This process is mediated through complex networks of host-virus interactions that alter several normal cell functions of the host. To study the complexity of disturbances in cell gene expression networks by HIV-1 integration, we constructed a network of human macrophage genes located close to chromatin regions rich in proviruses. To perform the network analysis, we selected 28 genes previously identified as the target of cDNA integration and their transcriptional profiles were obtained from GEO Profiles (NCBI). A total of 2770 interactions among the 28 genes located around the HIV-1 proviruses in human macrophages formed a highly dense main network connected to five sub-networks. The overall network was significantly enriched by genes associated with signal transduction, cellular communication and regulatory processes. To simulate the effects of HIV-1 integration in infected macrophages, five genes with the most number of interaction in the normal network were turned off by putting in zero the correspondent expression values. The HIV-1 infected network showed changes in its topology and alteration in the macrophage functions reflected in a re-programming of biosynthetic and general metabolic process. Understanding the complex virus-host interactions that occur during HIV-1 integration, may provided valuable genomic information to develop new antiviral treatments focusing on the management of some specific gene expression networks associated with viral integration. This is the first gene network which describes the human macrophages genes interactions related with HIV-1 integration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Horizontal gene transfer of an entire metabolic pathway between a eukaryotic alga and its DNA virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monier, Adam; Pagarete, António; de Vargas, Colomban; Allen, Michael J.; Read, Betsy; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Ogata, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    Interactions between viruses and phytoplankton, the main primary producers in the oceans, affect global biogeochemical cycles and climate. Recent studies are increasingly revealing possible cases of gene transfers between cyanobacteria and phages, which might have played significant roles in the evolution of cyanobacteria/phage systems. However, little has been documented about the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer in eukaryotic phytoplankton/virus systems. Here we report phylogenetic evidence for the transfer of seven genes involved in the sphingolipid biosynthesis pathway between the cosmopolitan eukaryotic microalga Emiliania huxleyi and its large DNA virus EhV. PCR assays indicate that these genes are prevalent in E. huxleyi and EhV strains isolated from different geographic locations. Patterns of protein and gene sequence conservation support that these genes are functional in both E. huxleyi and EhV. This is the first clear case of horizontal gene transfer of multiple functionally linked enzymes in a eukaryotic phytoplankton–virus system. We examine arguments for the possible direction of the gene transfer. The virus-to-host direction suggests the existence of ancient viruses that controlled the complex metabolic pathway in order to infect primitive eukaryotic cells. In contrast, the host-to-virus direction suggests that the serial acquisition of genes involved in the same metabolic pathway might have been a strategy for the ancestor of EhVs to stay ahead of their closest relatives in the great evolutionary race for survival. PMID:19451591

  19. The new numerology of immunity mediated by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, P C

    1998-08-01

    Our understanding of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses is currently being revolutionized by peptide-based assay systems that allow flow cytometric analysis of effector and memory cytotoxic T lymphocyte populations. These techniques are, for the first time, putting the analysis of T-cell-mediated immunity on a quantitative basis.

  20. Swine Influenza Virus PA and Neuraminidase Gene Reassortment into Human H1N1 Influenza Virus Is Associated with an Altered Pathogenic Phenotype Linked to Increased MIP-2 Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dlugolenski, Daniel; Jones, Les; Howerth, Elizabeth; Wentworth, David; Tompkins, S Mark; Tripp, Ralph A

    2015-05-01

    Swine are susceptible to infection by both avian and human influenza viruses, and this feature is thought to contribute to novel reassortant influenza viruses. In this study, the influenza virus reassortment rate in swine and human cells was determined. Coinfection of swine cells with 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus (huH1N1) and an endemic swine H1N2 (A/swine/Illinois/02860/09) virus (swH1N2) resulted in a 23% reassortment rate that was independent of α2,3- or α2,6-sialic acid distribution on the cells. The reassortants had altered pathogenic phenotypes linked to introduction of the swine virus PA and neuraminidase (NA) into huH1N1. In mice, the huH1N1 PA and NA mediated increased MIP-2 expression early postinfection, resulting in substantial pulmonary neutrophilia with enhanced lung pathology and disease. The findings support the notion that swine are a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortants independent of sialic acid distribution. These results show the potential for continued reassortment of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus with endemic swine viruses and for reassortants to have increased pathogenicity linked to the swine virus NA and PA genes which are associated with increased pulmonary neutrophil trafficking that is related to MIP-2 expression. Influenza A viruses can change rapidly via reassortment to create a novel virus, and reassortment can result in possible pandemics. Reassortments among subtypes from avian and human viruses led to the 1957 (H2N2 subtype) and 1968 (H3N2 subtype) human influenza pandemics. Recent analyses of circulating isolates have shown that multiple genes can be recombined from human, avian, and swine influenza viruses, leading to triple reassortants. Understanding the factors that can affect influenza A virus reassortment is needed for the establishment of disease intervention strategies that may reduce or preclude pandemics. The findings from this study show that swine cells provide a mixing vessel for influenza virus reassortment

  1. Epstein-Barr virus immediate-early gene product trans-activates gene expression from the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenney, S.; Kamine, J.; Markovitz, D.; Fenrick, R.; Pagano, J.

    1988-01-01

    Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome patients are frequently coinfected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). In this report, the authors demonstrate that an EBV immediate-early gene product, BamHI MLF1, stimulates expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene linked to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) promoter. The HIV promoter sequences necessary for trans-activation by EBV do not include the tat-responsive sequences. In addition, in contrast to the other herpesvirus trans-activators previously studied, the EBV BamHI MLF1 gene product appears to function in part by a posttranscriptional mechanism, since it increases pHIV-CAT protein activity more than it increases HIV-CAT mRNA. This ability of an EBV gene product to activate HIV gene expression may have biologic consequences in persons coinfected with both viruses

  2. The V domain of dog PVRL4 (nectin-4) mediates canine distemper virus entry and virus cell-to-cell spread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S; Richardson, Christopher D

    2014-04-01

    The entry of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a multistep process that involves the attachment of CDV hemagglutinin (H) to its cellular receptor, followed by fusion between virus and cell membranes. Our laboratory recently identified PVRL4 (nectin-4) to be the epithelial receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that the V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry and virus cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, four key amino acid residues within the V domain of dog PVRL4 and two within the CDV hemagglutinin were shown to be essential for receptor-mediated virus entry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Intracistronic complementation in the simian virus 40 A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornow, J; Cole, C N

    1983-01-01

    A set of eight simian virus 40 mutants was constructed with lesions in the A gene, which encodes the large tumor (T) antigen. These mutants have small deletions (3-20 base pairs) at either 0.497, 0.288, or 0.243 map units. Mutants having both in-phase and frameshift mutations at each site were isolated. Neither plaque formation nor replication of the mutant DNAs could be detected after transfection of monkey kidney cells. Another nonviable mutant, dlA2459, had a 14-base-pair deletion at 0.193 map unit and was positive for viral DNA replication. Each of the eight mutants were tested for ability to form plaques after cotransfection with dlA2459 DNA. The four mutants that had in-phase deletions were able to complement dlA2459. The other four, which had frameshift deletions, did not. No plaques were formed after cotransfection of cells with any other pair of group A mutants. This suggests that the defect in dlA2459 defines a distinct functional domain of simian virus 40 T antigen. Images PMID:6312452

  4. Development of a simplified and convenient assay for cell-mediated immunity to the mumps virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Naruhito; Shima, Masayuki; Nakajima, Kazuhiko; Takesue, Yoshio; Okuno, Toshiomi

    2014-09-01

    Because methods for measuring cell-mediated immunity (CMI) to the mumps virus are expensive, time-consuming, and technically demanding, the role of CMI in mumps virus infection remains unclear. To address this issue, we report here the development of a simplified method for measuring mumps virus-specific CMI that is suitable for use in diverse laboratory and clinical settings. A mumps vaccine was cultured with whole blood, and interferon (IFN)-γ released into the culture supernatant was measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. IFN-γ production in blood from vaccinated subjects markedly increased in response to the vaccine and decreased before the antibody titer decreased in some cases, suggesting that this assay may be used as a simple surrogate method for measuring CMI specific for the mumps virus. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Qiu-Lan; Chen, Zhi-Yi; Yang, Feng

    2014-01-01

    With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation) on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo), including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers. PMID:25202710

  6. Ultrasound-Mediated Local Drug and Gene Delivery Using Nanocarriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiu-Lan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of nanotechnology, nanocarriers have been increasingly used for curative drug/gene delivery. Various nanocarriers are being introduced and assessed, such as polymer nanoparticles, liposomes, and micelles. As a novel theranostic system, nanocarriers hold great promise for ultrasound molecular imaging, targeted drug/gene delivery, and therapy. Nanocarriers, with the properties of smaller particle size, and long circulation time, would be advantageous in diagnostic and therapeutic applications. Nanocarriers can pass through blood capillary walls and cell membrane walls to deliver drugs. The mechanisms of interaction between ultrasound and nanocarriers are not clearly understood, which may be related to cavitation, mechanical effects, thermal effects, and so forth. These effects may induce transient membrane permeabilization (sonoporation on a single cell level, cell death, and disruption of tissue structure, ensuring noninvasive, targeted, and efficient drug/gene delivery and therapy. The system has been used in various tissues and organs (in vitro or in vivo, including tumor tissues, kidney, cardiac, skeletal muscle, and vascular smooth muscle. In this review, we explore the research progress and application of ultrasound-mediated local drug/gene delivery with nanocarriers.

  7. Biosafety considerations of RNAi-mediated virus resistance in fruit-tree cultivars and in rootstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemgo, Godwin Nana Yaw; Sabbadini, Silvia; Pandolfini, Tiziana; Mezzetti, Bruno

    2013-12-01

    A major application of RNA interference (RNAi) is envisaged for the production of virus-resistant transgenic plants. For fruit trees, this remains the most, if not the only, viable option for the control of plant viral disease outbreaks in cultivated orchards, due to the difficulties associated with the use of traditional and conventional disease-control measures. The use of RNAi might provide an additional benefit for woody crops if silenced rootstock can efficiently transmit the silencing signal to non-transformed scions, as has already been demonstrated in herbaceous plants. This would provide a great opportunity to produce non-transgenic fruit from transgenic rootstock. In this review, we scrutinise some of the concerns that might arise with the use of RNAi for engineering virus-resistant plants, and we speculate that this virus resistance has fewer biosafety concerns. This is mainly because RNAi-eliciting constructs only express small RNA molecules rather than proteins, and because this technology can be applied using plant rootstock that can confer virus resistance to the scion, leaving the scion untransformed. We discuss the main biosafety concerns related to the release of new types of virus-resistant plants and the risk assessment approaches in the application of existing regulatory systems (in particular, those of the European Union, the USA, and Canada) for the evaluation and approval of RNAi-mediated virus-resistant plants, either as transgenic varieties or as plant virus resistance induced by transgenic rootstock.

  8. DNA sequence of 15 base pairs is sufficient to mediate both glucocorticoid and progesterone induction of gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straehle, U.; Klock, G.; Schuetz, G.

    1987-01-01

    To define the recognition sequence of the glucocorticoid receptor and its relationship with that of the progesterone receptor, oligonucleotides derived from the glucocorticoid response element of the tyrosine aminotransferase gene were tested upstream of a heterologous promoter for their capacity to mediate effects of these two steroids. The authors show that a 15-base-pair sequence with partial symmetry is sufficient to confer glucocorticoid inducibility on the promoter of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase gene. The same 15-base-pair sequence mediates induction by progesterone. Point mutations in the recognition sequence affect inducibility by glucocorticoids and progesterone similarly. Together with the strong conservation of the sequence of the DNA-binding domain of the two receptors, these data suggest that both proteins recognize a sequence that is similar, if not the same

  9. Recombinant adenovirus-mediated gene transfer suppresses experimental arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Quattrocchi

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Collagen Induced Arthritis (CIA is a widely studied animal model to develop and test novel therapeutic approaches for treating Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA in humans. Soluble Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen 4 (CTLA4-Ig, which binds B7 molecule on antigen presenting cells and blocks CD28 mediated T-lymphocyte activation, has been shown to ameliorate experimental autoimmune diseases such as lupus, diabetes and CIA. Objective of our research was to investigate in vivo the effectiveness of blocking the B7/CD28 T-lymphocyte co-stimulatory pathway, utilizing a gene transfer technology, as a therapeutic strategy against CIA. Replication-deficient adenoviruses encoding a chimeric CTLA4-Ig fusion protein, or β-galactosidase as control, have been injected intravenously once at arthritis onset. Disease activity has been monitored by the assessment of clinical score, paw thickness and type II collagen (CII specific cellular and humoral immune responses for 21 days. The adenovirally delivered CTLA4-Ig fusion protein at a dose of 2×108 pfu suppressed established CIA, whereas the control β-galactosidase did not significantly affect the disease course. CII-specific lymphocyte proliferation, IFNg production and anti-CII antibodies were significantly reduced by CTLA4-Ig treatment. Our results demonstrate that blockade of the B7/CD28 co-stimulatory pathway by adenovirus-mediated CTLA4-Ig gene transfer is effective in treating established CIA suggesting its potential in treating RA.

  10. Simian virus 40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oppenheim Ariella

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sepsis remains the leading cause of death in critically ill patients. One of the primary organs affected by sepsis is the lung, presenting as the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS. Organ damage in sepsis involves an alteration in gene expression, making gene transfer a potential therapeutic modality. This work examines the feasibility of applying simian virus 40 (SV40 vectors for pulmonary gene therapy. Methods Sepsis-induced ARDS was established by cecal ligation double puncture (2CLP. SV40 vectors carrying the luciferase reporter gene (SV/luc were administered intratracheally immediately after sepsis induction. Sham operated (SO as well as 2CLP rats given intratracheal PBS or adenovirus expressing luciferase served as controls. Luc transduction was evaluated by in vivo light detection, immunoassay and luciferase mRNA detection by RT-PCR in tissue harvested from septic rats. Vector abundance and distribution into alveolar cells was evaluated using immunostaining for the SV40 VP1 capsid protein as well as by double staining for VP1 and for the surfactant protein C (proSP-C. Immunostaining for T-lymphocytes was used to evaluate the cellular immune response induced by the vector. Results Luc expression measured by in vivo light detection correlated with immunoassay from lung tissue harvested from the same rats. Moreover, our results showed vector presence in type II alveolar cells. The vector did not induce significant cellular immune response. Conclusion In the present study we have demonstrated efficient uptake and expression of an SV40 vector in the lungs of animals with sepsis-induced ARDS. These vectors appear to be capable of in vivo transduction of alveolar type II cells and may thus become a future therapeutic tool.

  11. Amino Acids of Epstein-Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 3A Essential for Repression of Jκ-Mediated Transcription and Their Evolutionary Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbiès-Tran, Rozenn; Stigger-Rosser, Evelyn; Dotson, Travis; Sample, Clare E.

    2001-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) nuclear antigen 3A (EBNA-3A) is essential for virus-mediated immortalization of B lymphocytes in vitro and is believed to regulate transcription of cellular and/or viral genes. One known mechanism of regulation is through its interaction with the cellular transcription factor Jκ. This interaction downregulates transcription mediated by EBNA-2 and Jκ. To identify the amino acids that play a role in this interaction, we have generated mutant EBNA-3A proteins. A mutant EBNA-3A protein in which alanine residues were substituted for amino acids 199, 200, and 202 no longer downregulated transcription. Surprisingly, this mutant protein remained able to coimmunoprecipitate with Jκ. Using a reporter gene assay based on the recruitment of Jκ by various regions spanning EBNA-3A, we have shown that this mutation abolished binding of Jκ to the N-proximal region (amino acids 125 to 222) and that no other region of EBNA-3A alone was sufficient to mediate an association with Jκ. To determine the biological significance of the interaction of EBNA-3A with Jκ, we have studied its conservation in the simian lymphocryptovirus herpesvirus papio (HVP) by cloning HVP-3A, the homolog of EBNA-3A encoded by this virus. This 903-amino-acid protein exhibited 37% identity with its EBV counterpart, mainly within the amino-terminal half. HVP-3A also interacted with Jκ through a region located between amino acids 127 and 223 and also repressed transcription mediated through EBNA-2 and Jκ. The evolutionary conservation of this function, in proteins that have otherwise significantly diverged, argues strongly for an important biological role in virus-mediated immortalization of B lymphocytes. PMID:11119577

  12. Induction and maintenance of DNA methylation in plant promoter sequences by apple latent spherical virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuya eKon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV is an efficient virus-induced gene silencing vector in functional genomics analyses of a broad range of plant species. Here, an Agrobacterium-mediated inoculation (agroinoculation system was developed for the ALSV vector, and virus-induced transcriptional gene silencing (VITGS is described in plants infected with the ALSV vector. The cDNAs of ALSV RNA1 and RNA2 were inserted between the CaMV 35S promoter and the NOS-T sequences in a binary vector pCAMBIA1300 to produce pCALSR1 and pCALSR2-XSB or pCALSR2-XSB/MN. When these vector constructs were agroinoculated into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with a construct expressing a viral silencing suppressor, the infection efficiency of the vectors was 100%. A recombinant ALSV vector carrying part of the 35S promoter sequence induced transcriptional gene silencing of the green fluorescent protein gene in a line of N. benthamiana plants, resulting in the disappearance of green fluorescence of infected plants. Bisulfite sequencing showed that cytosine residues at CG and CHG sites of the 35S promoter sequence were highly methylated in the silenced generation 0 plants infected with the ALSV carrying the promoter sequence as well as in progeny. The ALSV-mediated VITGS state was inherited by progeny for multiple generations. In addition, induction of VITGS of an endogenous gene (chalcone synthase-A was demonstrated in petunia plants infected with an ALSV vector carrying the native promoter sequence. These results suggest that ALSV-based vectors can be applied to study DNA methylation in plant genomes, and provide a useful tool for plant breeding via epigenetic modification.

  13. Homologous recombination mediates functional recovery of dysferlin deficiency following AAV5 gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E Grose

    Full Text Available The dysferlinopathies comprise a group of untreatable muscle disorders including limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2B, Miyoshi myopathy, distal anterior compartment syndrome, and rigid spine syndrome. As with other forms of muscular dystrophy, adeno-associated virus (AAV gene transfer is a particularly auspicious treatment strategy, however the size of the DYSF cDNA (6.5 kb negates packaging into traditional AAV serotypes known to express well in muscle (i.e. rAAV1, 2, 6, 8, 9. Potential advantages of a full cDNA versus a mini-gene include: maintaining structural-functional protein domains, evading protein misfolding, and avoiding novel epitopes that could be immunogenic. AAV5 has demonstrated unique plasticity with regards to packaging capacity and recombination of virions containing homologous regions of cDNA inserts has been implicated in the generation of full-length transcripts. Herein we show for the first time in vivo that homologous recombination following AAV5.DYSF gene transfer leads to the production of full length transcript and protein. Moreover, gene transfer of full-length dysferlin protein in dysferlin deficient mice resulted in expression levels sufficient to correct functional deficits in the diaphragm and importantly in skeletal muscle membrane repair. Intravascular regional gene transfer through the femoral artery produced high levels of transduction and enabled targeting of specific muscle groups affected by the dysferlinopathies setting the stage for potential translation to clinical trials. We provide proof of principle that AAV5 mediated delivery of dysferlin is a highly promising strategy for treatment of dysferlinopathies and has far-reaching implications for the therapeutic delivery of other large genes.

  14. Functional analyses of cellulose synthase genes in flax (Linum usitatissimum) by virus-induced gene silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantreau, Maxime; Chabbert, Brigitte; Billiard, Sylvain; Hawkins, Simon; Neutelings, Godfrey

    2015-12-01

    Flax (Linum usitatissimum) bast fibres are located in the stem cortex where they play an important role in mechanical support. They contain high amounts of cellulose and so are used for linen textiles and in the composite industry. In this study, we screened the annotated flax genome and identified 14 distinct cellulose synthase (CESA) genes using orthologous sequences previously identified. Transcriptomics of 'primary cell wall' and 'secondary cell wall' flax CESA genes showed that some were preferentially expressed in different organs and stem tissues providing clues as to their biological role(s) in planta. The development for the first time in flax of a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach was used to functionally evaluate the biological role of different CESA genes in stem tissues. Quantification of transcript accumulation showed that in many cases, silencing not only affected targeted CESA clades, but also had an impact on other CESA genes. Whatever the targeted clade, inactivation by VIGS affected plant growth. In contrast, only clade 1- and clade 6-targeted plants showed modifications in outer-stem tissue organization and secondary cell wall formation. In these plants, bast fibre number and structure were severely impacted, suggesting that the targeted genes may play an important role in the establishment of the fibre cell wall. Our results provide new fundamental information about cellulose biosynthesis in flax that should facilitate future plant improvement/engineering. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for efficient siRNA mediated gene knock down.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Heinemann

    Full Text Available Laser based transfection methods have proven to be an efficient and gentle alternative to established molecule delivery methods like lipofection or electroporation. Among the laser based methods, gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection bears the major advantage of high throughput and easy usability. This approach uses plasmon resonances on gold nanoparticles unspecifically attached to the cell membrane to evoke transient and spatially defined cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we explore the parameter regime for gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for the delivery of molecules into cell lines and prove its suitability for siRNA mediated gene knock down. The developed setup allows easy usage and safe laser operation in a normal lab environment. We applied a 532 nm Nd:YAG microchip laser emitting 850 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 20.25 kHz. Scanning velocities of the laser spot over the sample of up to 200 mm/s were tested without a decline in perforation efficiency. This velocity leads to a process speed of ∼8 s per well of a 96 well plate. The optimal particle density was determined to be ∼6 particles per cell using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Applying the optimized parameters transfection efficiencies of 88% were achieved in canine pleomorphic adenoma ZMTH3 cells using a fluorescent labeled siRNA while maintaining a high cell viability of >90%. Gene knock down of d2-EGFP was demonstrated and validated by fluorescence repression and western blot analysis. On basis of our findings and established mathematical models we suppose a mixed transfection mechanism consisting of thermal and multiphoton near field effects. Our findings emphasize that gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection provides an excellent tool for molecular delivery for both, high throughput purposes and the transfection of sensitive cells types.

  16. Gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for efficient siRNA mediated gene knock down.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Schieck, Maximilian; Carlson, Regina; Murua Escobar, Hugo; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Laser based transfection methods have proven to be an efficient and gentle alternative to established molecule delivery methods like lipofection or electroporation. Among the laser based methods, gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection bears the major advantage of high throughput and easy usability. This approach uses plasmon resonances on gold nanoparticles unspecifically attached to the cell membrane to evoke transient and spatially defined cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we explore the parameter regime for gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for the delivery of molecules into cell lines and prove its suitability for siRNA mediated gene knock down. The developed setup allows easy usage and safe laser operation in a normal lab environment. We applied a 532 nm Nd:YAG microchip laser emitting 850 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 20.25 kHz. Scanning velocities of the laser spot over the sample of up to 200 mm/s were tested without a decline in perforation efficiency. This velocity leads to a process speed of ∼8 s per well of a 96 well plate. The optimal particle density was determined to be ∼6 particles per cell using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Applying the optimized parameters transfection efficiencies of 88% were achieved in canine pleomorphic adenoma ZMTH3 cells using a fluorescent labeled siRNA while maintaining a high cell viability of >90%. Gene knock down of d2-EGFP was demonstrated and validated by fluorescence repression and western blot analysis. On basis of our findings and established mathematical models we suppose a mixed transfection mechanism consisting of thermal and multiphoton near field effects. Our findings emphasize that gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection provides an excellent tool for molecular delivery for both, high throughput purposes and the transfection of sensitive cells types.

  17. Gold Nanoparticle Mediated Laser Transfection for Efficient siRNA Mediated Gene Knock Down

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinemann, Dag; Schomaker, Markus; Kalies, Stefan; Schieck, Maximilian; Carlson, Regina; Escobar, Hugo Murua; Ripken, Tammo; Meyer, Heiko; Heisterkamp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Laser based transfection methods have proven to be an efficient and gentle alternative to established molecule delivery methods like lipofection or electroporation. Among the laser based methods, gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection bears the major advantage of high throughput and easy usability. This approach uses plasmon resonances on gold nanoparticles unspecifically attached to the cell membrane to evoke transient and spatially defined cell membrane permeabilization. In this study, we explore the parameter regime for gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection for the delivery of molecules into cell lines and prove its suitability for siRNA mediated gene knock down. The developed setup allows easy usage and safe laser operation in a normal lab environment. We applied a 532 nm Nd:YAG microchip laser emitting 850 ps pulses at a repetition rate of 20.25 kHz. Scanning velocities of the laser spot over the sample of up to 200 mm/s were tested without a decline in perforation efficiency. This velocity leads to a process speed of ∼8 s per well of a 96 well plate. The optimal particle density was determined to be ∼6 particles per cell using environmental scanning electron microscopy. Applying the optimized parameters transfection efficiencies of 88% were achieved in canine pleomorphic adenoma ZMTH3 cells using a fluorescent labeled siRNA while maintaining a high cell viability of >90%. Gene knock down of d2-EGFP was demonstrated and validated by fluorescence repression and western blot analysis. On basis of our findings and established mathematical models we suppose a mixed transfection mechanism consisting of thermal and multiphoton near field effects. Our findings emphasize that gold nanoparticle mediated laser transfection provides an excellent tool for molecular delivery for both, high throughput purposes and the transfection of sensitive cells types. PMID:23536802

  18. Lentiviral Vector-Mediated GFP/fluc gene introduction into primary mouse NK cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    L, Thi Thanh Hoa; Tae, Seong Ho; Min, Jung Joon

    2007-01-01

    NK cell is a type of lymphocyte that has ability in defense against virus infection and some kinds of cancer diseases. Recently, using genetic engineering, studies about the roles and functions of NK cells have been developing. In this study, we used lentivirus-based vector encoding GFP/Fluc gene to transfer into primary mouse NK cells. This model is a tool in studying characteristics of NK cells. The lentivirus used in this study was a commercial one, named LentiM1.3-Fluc, encoding GFP and Flue reporter genes under the control of the murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) promoter. LentiM1.3-Fluc was infected into freshly isolated mouse NK cells at 2 20 MOl by incubating or using spin infection. In the spin infection, we gently suspended NK cells in viral fluid, then centrifuged at 2000 rpm, 20 minutes at room temperature and incubated for 1 day. After 1 day, virus was discarded and NK cells were cultured in IL-2 with or without IL-12 supplemented media. Infected NK cells were monitored by using fluorescent microscope for GFP and IVIS machine for Fire-fly luciferase expression. The results showed that using spin infection had much effect on introducing lentiviral vector-mediated reporter gene into NK cells than the way without spin. Also, NK cells which were cultured in IL-2 and IL-12 added media expressed higher fluorescent and luminescent signals than those cultured in only IL-2 supplemented media. When these NK cells were injected subcutaneously in Balb/C mice, the imaging signal was observed transiently. Our study demonstrates that by using a simple method, mouse NK cells can be transfected by lentivirus. And this will be useful in studying biology and therapeutic potential of NK cells. However, we require developing alternative lentiviral vectors with different promoter for in vivo application

  19. Myocardial gene delivery using molecular cardiac surgery with recombinant adeno-associated virus vectors in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, JD; Thesier, DM; Swain, JBD; Katz, MG; Tomasulo, C; Henderson, A; Wang, L; Yarnall, C; Fargnoli, A; Sumaroka, M; Isidro, A; Petrov, M; Holt, D; Nolen-Walston, R; Koch, WJ; Stedman, HH; Rabinowitz, J; Bridges, CR

    2013-01-01

    We use a novel technique that allows for closed recirculation of vector genomes in the cardiac circulation using cardiopulmonary bypass, referred to here as molecular cardiac surgery with recirculating delivery (MCARD). We demonstrate that this platform technology is highly efficient in isolating the heart from the systemic circulation in vivo. Using MCARD, we compare the relative efficacy of single-stranded (ss) adeno-associated virus (AAV)6, ssAAV9 and self-complimentary (sc)AAV6-encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein, driven by the constitutive cytomegalovirus promoter to transduce the ovine myocardium in situ. MCARD allows for the unprecedented delivery of up to 48 green fluorescent protein genome copies per cell globally in the sheep left ventricular (LV) myocardium. We demonstrate that scAAV6-mediated MCARD delivery results in global, cardiac-specific LV gene expression in the ovine heart and provides for considerably more robust and cardiac-specific gene delivery than other available delivery techniques such as intramuscular injection or intracoronary injection; thus, representing a potential, clinically translatable platform for heart failure gene therapy. PMID:21228882

  20. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing of Epstein-Barr virus in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuen, Kit-San; Chan, Chi-Ping; Wong, Nok-Hei Mickey; Ho, Chau-Ha; Ho, Ting-Hin; Lei, Ting; Deng, Wen; Tsao, Sai Wah; Chen, Honglin; Kok, Kin-Hang; Jin, Dong-Yan

    2015-03-01

    The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 (CRISPR-associated 9) system is a highly efficient and powerful tool for RNA-guided editing of the cellular genome. Whether CRISPR/Cas9 can also cleave the genome of DNA viruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), which undergo episomal replication in human cells, remains to be established. Here, we reported on CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome in human cells. Two guide RNAs (gRNAs) were used to direct a targeted deletion of 558 bp in the promoter region of BART (BamHI A rightward transcript) which encodes viral microRNAs (miRNAs). Targeted editing was achieved in several human epithelial cell lines latently infected with EBV, including nasopharyngeal carcinoma C666-1 cells. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the EBV genome was efficient. A recombinant virus with the desired deletion was obtained after puromycin selection of cells expressing Cas9 and gRNAs. No off-target cleavage was found by deep sequencing. The loss of BART miRNA expression and activity was verified, supporting the BART promoter as the major promoter of BART RNA. Although CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing of the multicopy episome of EBV in infected HEK293 cells was mostly incomplete, viruses could be recovered and introduced into other cells at low m.o.i. Recombinant viruses with an edited genome could be further isolated through single-cell sorting. Finally, a DsRed selectable marker was successfully introduced into the EBV genome during the course of CRISPR/Cas9-mediated editing. Taken together, our work provided not only the first genetic evidence that the BART promoter drives the expression of the BART transcript, but also a new and efficient method for targeted editing of EBV genome in human cells. © 2015 The Authors.

  1. TET1-Mediated Hydroxymethylation Facilitates Hypoxic Gene Induction in Neuroblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J. Mariani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ten-eleven-translocation 5-methylcytosine dioxygenase (TET family of enzymes catalyzes the conversion of 5-methylcytosine (5-mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5-hmC, a modified cytosine base that facilitates gene expression. Cells respond to hypoxia by inducing a transcriptional program regulated in part by oxygen-dependent dioxygenases that require Fe(II and α-ketoglutarate. Given that the TET enzymes also require these cofactors, we hypothesized that the TETs regulate the hypoxia-induced transcriptional program. Here, we demonstrate that hypoxia increases global 5-hmC levels, with accumulation of 5-hmC density at canonical hypoxia response genes. A subset of 5-hmC gains colocalize with hypoxia response elements facilitating DNA demethylation and HIF binding. Hypoxia results in transcriptional activation of TET1, and full induction of hypoxia-responsive genes and global 5-hmC increases require TET1. Finally, we show that 5-hmC increases and TET1 upregulation in hypoxia are HIF-1 dependent. These findings establish TET1-mediated 5-hmC changes as an important epigenetic component of the hypoxic response.

  2. Characterization of an artificial swine-origin influenza virus with the same gene combination as H1N1/2009 virus: a genesis clue of pandemic strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xueli; Sun, Yipeng; Pu, Juan; Fan, Lihong; Shi, Weimin; Hu, Yanxin; Yang, Jun; Xu, Qi; Wang, Jingjing; Hou, Dongjun; Ma, Guangpeng; Liu, Jinhua

    2011-01-01

    Pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza virus, derived from a reassortment of avian, human, and swine influenza viruses, possesses a unique gene segment combination that had not been detected previously in animal and human populations. Whether such a gene combination could result in the pathogenicity and transmission as H1N1/2009 virus remains unclear. In the present study, we used reverse genetics to construct a reassortant virus (rH1N1) with the same gene combination as H1N1/2009 virus (NA and M genes from a Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine virus and another six genes from a North American triple-reassortant H1N2 swine virus). Characterization of rH1N1 in mice showed that this virus had higher replicability and pathogenicity than those of the seasonal human H1N1 and Eurasian avian-like swine H1N1 viruses, but was similar to the H1N1/2009 and triple-reassortant H1N2 viruses. Experiments performed on guinea pigs showed that rH1N1 was not transmissible, whereas pandemic H1N1/2009 displayed efficient transmissibility. To further determine which gene segment played a key role in transmissibility, we constructed a series of reassortants derived from rH1N1 and H1N1/2009 viruses. Direct contact transmission studies demonstrated that the HA and NS genes contributed to the transmission of H1N1/2009 virus. Second, the HA gene of H1N1/2009 virus, when combined with the H1N1/2009 NA gene, conferred efficient contact transmission among guinea pigs. The present results reveal that not only gene segment reassortment but also amino acid mutation were needed for the generation of the pandemic influenza virus.

  3. Characterization of an artificial swine-origin influenza virus with the same gene combination as H1N1/2009 virus: a genesis clue of pandemic strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueli Zhao

    Full Text Available Pandemic H1N1/2009 influenza virus, derived from a reassortment of avian, human, and swine influenza viruses, possesses a unique gene segment combination that had not been detected previously in animal and human populations. Whether such a gene combination could result in the pathogenicity and transmission as H1N1/2009 virus remains unclear. In the present study, we used reverse genetics to construct a reassortant virus (rH1N1 with the same gene combination as H1N1/2009 virus (NA and M genes from a Eurasian avian-like H1N1 swine virus and another six genes from a North American triple-reassortant H1N2 swine virus. Characterization of rH1N1 in mice showed that this virus had higher replicability and pathogenicity than those of the seasonal human H1N1 and Eurasian avian-like swine H1N1 viruses, but was similar to the H1N1/2009 and triple-reassortant H1N2 viruses. Experiments performed on guinea pigs showed that rH1N1 was not transmissible, whereas pandemic H1N1/2009 displayed efficient transmissibility. To further determine which gene segment played a key role in transmissibility, we constructed a series of reassortants derived from rH1N1 and H1N1/2009 viruses. Direct contact transmission studies demonstrated that the HA and NS genes contributed to the transmission of H1N1/2009 virus. Second, the HA gene of H1N1/2009 virus, when combined with the H1N1/2009 NA gene, conferred efficient contact transmission among guinea pigs. The present results reveal that not only gene segment reassortment but also amino acid mutation were needed for the generation of the pandemic influenza virus.

  4. Promising MS2 mediated virus-like particle vaccine against foot-and-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan-mei; Zhang, Guo-guang; Huang, Xiao-jun; Chen, Liang; Chen, Hao-tai

    2015-05-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) has caused severe economic losses to millions of farmers worldwide. In this work, the coding genes of 141-160 epitope peptide (EP141-160) of VP1 were inserted into the coat protein (CP) genes of MS2 in prokaryotic expression vector, and the recombinant protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLP). Results showed that the CP-EP141-160 VLP had a strong immunoreaction with the FMD virus (FMDV) antigen in vitro, and also had an effective immune response in mice. Further virus challenge tests were carried out on guinea pigs and swine, high-titer neutralizing antibodies were produced and the CP-EP141-160 VLP vaccine could protect most of the animals against FMDV. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Characterization of the env gene and long terminal repeat of molecularly cloned Friend mink cell focus-inducing virus DNA.

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, A; Sakai, K; Kitamura, N; Nakanishi, S; Niwa, O; Matsuyama, M; Ishimoto, A

    1984-01-01

    The highly oncogenic erythroleukemia-inducing Friend mink cell focus-inducing (MCF) virus was molecularly cloned in phage lambda gtWES.lambda B, and the DNA sequences of the env gene and the long terminal repeat were determined. The nucleotide sequences of Friend MCF virus and Friend spleen focus-forming virus were quite homologous, supporting the hypothesis that Friend spleen focus-forming virus might be generated via Friend MCF virus from an ecotropic Friend virus mainly by some deletions. ...

  6. Inducible nitric-oxide synthase plays a minimal role in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, C; Nansen, A; Christensen, Jeanette Erbo

    1999-01-01

    -mediated immune response was found to be unaltered in iNOS-deficient mice compared with wild-type C57BL/6 mice, and LCMV- induced general immunosuppression was equally pronounced in both strains. In vivo analysis revealed identical kinetics of virus clearance, as well as unaltered clinical severity of systemic......By using mice with a targetted disruption in the gene encoding inducible nitric-oxide synthase (iNOS), we have studied the role of nitric oxide (NO) in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV)-induced, T cell-mediated protective immunity and immunopathology. The afferent phase of the T cell...... LCMV infection in both strains. Concerning the outcome of intracerebral infection, no significant differences were found between iNOS-deficient and wild-type mice in the number or composition of mononuclear cells found in the cerebrospinal fluid on day 6 post-infection. Likewise, NO did not influence...

  7. Pathogenic effects of Rift Valley fever virus NSs gene are alleviated in cultured cells by expressed antiviral short hairpin RNAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Tristan; Paweska, Janusz T; Arbuthnot, Patrick; Weinberg, Marc S

    2012-01-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV), a member of the Bunyaviridae family, may cause severe hepatitis, encephalitis and haemorrhagic fever in humans. There are currently no available licensed vaccines or therapies to treat the viral infection in humans. RNA interference (RNAi)-based viral gene silencing offers a promising approach to inhibiting replication of this highly pathogenic virus. The small (S) segment of the RVFV tripartite genome carries the genetic determinates for pathogenicity during infection. This segment encodes the non-structural S (NSs) and essential nucleocapsid (N) genes. To advance RNAi-based inhibition of RVFV replication, we designed several Pol III short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression cassettes against the NSs and N genes, including a multimerized plasmid vector that included four shRNA expression cassettes. Effective target silencing was demonstrated using full- and partial-length target reporter assays, and confirmed by western blot analysis of exogenous N and NSs expression. Small RNA northern blots showed detectable RNAi guide strand formation from single and multimerized shRNA constructs. Using a cell culture model of RVFV replication, shRNAs targeting the N gene decreased intracellular nucleocapsid protein concentration and viral replication. The shRNAs directed against the NSs gene reduced NSs protein concentrations and alleviated NSs-mediated cytotoxicity, which may be caused by host transcription suppression. These data are the first demonstration that RNAi activators have a potential therapeutic benefit for countering RVFV infection.

  8. Population genetics and comparative genetics of CLDN1, a gene involved in hepatitis C virus entry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, Vincent; O'Brien, Thomas R.; Chanock, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The claudin-1 gene (CLDN1) is a member of a family of genes that encodes proteins found in tight junctions and it has recently been implicated as one of several receptors for late stage binding of hepatitis C virus (HCV). Exploration of the population genetics of this gene could be informative,

  9. Postinduction represssion of the β-interferon gene is mediated through two positive regulatory domains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittemore, L.A.; Maniatis, T.

    1990-01-01

    Virus induction of the human β-interferon (β-IFN) gene results in an increase in the rate of β-IFN mRNA synthesis, followed by a rapid postinduction decrease. In this paper, the authors show that two β-IFN promoter elements, positive regulatory domains I and II (PRDI and PRDII), which are required for virus induction of the β-IFN gene are also required for the postinduction turnoff. Although protein synthesis is not necessary for activation, it is necessary for repression of these promoter elements. Examination of nuclear extracts from cells infected with virus reveals the presence of virus-inducible, cycloheximide-sensitive, DNA-binding activities that interact specifically with PRDI or PRDII. They propose that the postinduction repression of β-IFN gene transcription involves virus inducible repressors that either bind directly to the positive regulatory elements of the β-IFN promoter or inactivate the positive regulatory factors bound to PRDI and PRDII

  10. Role of hypoxia-inducible factor-α in hepatitis-B-virus X protein-mediated MDR1 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, Hyo-Kyung; Han, Chang Yeob; Cheon, Eun-Pa; Lee, Jaewon; Kang, Keon Wook

    2007-01-01

    The transition from chemotherapy-responsive cancer cells to chemotherapy-resistant cancer cells is mainly accompanied by the increased expression of multi-drug resistance 1 (MDR1). We found that hepatitis-B-virus X protein (HBx) increases the transcriptional activity and protein level of MDR1 in a hepatoma cell line, H4IIE. In addition, HBx overexpression made H4IIE cells more resistant to verapamil-uptake. HBx stabilized hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and induced the nuclear translocation of C/EBPβ. Reporter gene analyses showed that HBx increased the reporter activity in the cells transfected with the reporter containing MDR1 gene promoter. Moreover, the luciferase reporter gene activity was significantly inhibited by HIF-1α siRNA but not by overexpression of C/EBP dominant negative mutant. These results imply that HBx increases the MDR1 transporter activity through the transcriptional activation of the MDR1 gene with HIF-1α activation, and suggest HIF-1α for the therapeutic target of HBV-mediated chemoresistance

  11. A plant small polypeptide is a novel component of DNA-binding protein phosphatase 1-mediated resistance to plum pox virus in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló, María José; Carrasco, Jose Luis; Navarrete-Gómez, Marisa; Daniel, Jacques; Granot, David; Vera, Pablo

    2011-12-01

    DNA-binding protein phosphatases (DBPs) have been identified as a novel class of plant-specific regulatory factors playing a role in plant-virus interactions. NtDBP1 from tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) was shown to participate in transcriptional regulation of gene expression in response to virus infection in compatible interactions, and AtDBP1, its closest relative in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), has recently been found to mediate susceptibility to potyvirus, one of the most speciose taxa of plant viruses. Here, we report on the identification of a novel family of highly conserved small polypeptides that interact with DBP1 proteins both in tobacco and Arabidopsis, which we have designated DBP-interacting protein 2 (DIP2). The interaction of AtDIP2 with AtDBP1 was demonstrated in vivo by bimolecular fluorescence complementation, and AtDIP2 was shown to functionally interfere with AtDBP1 in yeast. Furthermore, reducing AtDIP2 gene expression leads to increased susceptibility to the potyvirus Plum pox virus and to a lesser extent also to Turnip mosaic virus, whereas overexpression results in enhanced resistance. Therefore, we describe a novel family of conserved small polypeptides in plants and identify AtDIP2 as a novel host factor contributing to resistance to potyvirus in Arabidopsis.

  12. GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY TO RESPIRATORY SYNCYTIAL VIRUS BRONCHIOLITIS IN PRETERM CHILDREN IS ASSOCIATED WITH AIRWAY REMODELING GENES AND INNATE IMMUNE GENES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siezen, Christine L. E.; Bont, Louis; Hodemaekers, Hennie M.; Ermers, Marieke J.; Doornbos, Gerda; van't Slot, Ruben; Wijmenga, Ciska; van Hottwelingen, Hans C.; Kimpen, Jan L. L.; Kimman, Tjeerd G.; Hoebee, Barbara; Janssen, Riny

    Prematurity is a risk factor for severe respiratory syncytial virus bronchiolitis. We show that genetic factors in innate immune genes (IFNA13, IFNAR2, STAT2. IL27, NFKBIA, C3, IL1RN, TLR5), in innate and adaptive immunity (IFNG), and in airway remodeling genes (ADAM33 and TGFBR1), affect disease

  13. Lethal influenza virus infection in macaques is associated with early dysregulation of inflammatory related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristian Cillóniz

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The enormous toll on human life during the 1918-1919 Spanish influenza pandemic is a constant reminder of the potential lethality of influenza viruses. With the declaration by the World Health Organization of a new H1N1 influenza virus pandemic, and with continued human cases of highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus infection, a better understanding of the host response to highly pathogenic influenza viruses is essential. To this end, we compared pathology and global gene expression profiles in bronchial tissue from macaques infected with either the reconstructed 1918 pandemic virus or the highly pathogenic avian H5N1 virus A/Vietnam/1203/04. Severe pathology was observed in respiratory tissues from 1918 virus-infected animals as early as 12 hours after infection, and pathology steadily increased at later time points. Although tissues from animals infected with A/Vietnam/1203/04 also showed clear signs of pathology early on, less pathology was observed at later time points, and there was evidence of tissue repair. Global transcriptional profiles revealed that specific groups of genes associated with inflammation and cell death were up-regulated in bronchial tissues from animals infected with the 1918 virus but down-regulated in animals infected with A/Vietnam/1203/04. Importantly, the 1918 virus up-regulated key components of the inflammasome, NLRP3 and IL-1beta, whereas these genes were down-regulated by A/Vietnam/1203/04 early after infection. TUNEL assays revealed that both viruses elicited an apoptotic response in lungs and bronchi, although the response occurred earlier during 1918 virus infection. Our findings suggest that the severity of disease in 1918 virus-infected macaques is a consequence of the early up-regulation of cell death and inflammatory related genes, in which additive or synergistic effects likely dictate the severity of tissue damage.

  14. Gene Expression by PBMC in Primary Sclerosing Cholangitis: Evidence for Dysregulation of Immune Mediated Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher A. Aoki

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC is a chronic disease of the bile ducts characterized by an inflammatory infiltrate and obliterative fibrosis. The precise role of the immune system in the pathogenesis of PSC remains unknown. We used RNA microarray analysis to identify immune-related genes and pathways that are differentially expressed in PSC. Messenger RNA (mRNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC was isolated from both patients with PSC and age and sex matched healthy controls. Samples from 5 PSC patients and 5 controls were analyzed by microarray and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data, relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by RT-PCR in 10 PSC patients and 10 controls. Using unsupervised hierarchical clustering, gene expression in PSC was statistically different from our control population. Interestingly, genes within the IL-2 receptor beta, IL-6 and MAP Kinase pathways were found to be differently expressed in patients with PSC compared to controls. Further, individual genes, TNF-α induced protein 6 (TNFaip6 and membrane-spanning 4-domains, subfamily A (ms4a were found to be upregulated in PSC while similar to Mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 5 (SMAD 5 was downregulated. In conclusion, several immune-related pathways and genes were differentially expressed in PSC compared to control patients, giving further evidence that this disease is systemic and immune-mediated.

  15. ONCOLYTIC VIRUS-MEDIATED REVERSAL OF IMPAIRED TUMOR ANTIGEN PRESENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashi Ashok Gujar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anti-tumor immunity can eliminate existing cancer cells and also maintain a constant surveillance against possible relapse. Such an antigen-specific adaptive response begins when tumor-specific T cells become activated. T cell activation requires two signals on antigen presenting cells (APCs: antigen presentation through MHC molecules and co-stimulation. In the absence of one or both of these signals, T cells remain inactivated or can even become tolerized. Cancer cells and their associated microenvironment strategically hinder the processing and presentation of tumor antigens and consequently prevent the development of anti-tumor immunity. Many studies, however, demonstrate that interventions that overturn tumor-associated immune evasion mechanisms can establish anti-tumor immune responses of therapeutic potential. One such intervention is oncolytic virus (OV-based anti-cancer therapy. Here we discuss how OV-induced immunological events override tumor-associated antigen presentation impairment and promote appropriate T cell:APC interaction. Detailed understanding of this phenomenon is pivotal for devising the strategies that will enhance the efficacy of OV-based anti-cancer therapy by complementing its inherent oncolytic

  16. Mutations in the S gene region of hepatitis B virus genotype D in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The gene region of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) is responsible for the expression of surface antigens and includes the 'a'-determinant region. Thus, mutation(s) in this region would afford HBV variants a distinct survival advantage, permitting the mutant virus to escape from the immune system. The aim of this study was to ...

  17. Molecular determinants of dengue virus 2 envelope protein important for virus entry in FcγRIIA-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chotiwan, Nunya; Roehrig, John T.; Schlesinger, Jacob J.; Blair, Carol D.; Huang, Claire Y.-H.

    2014-01-01

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection may cause severe illness in patients suffering a secondary infection by a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype. During ADE of infection, cross-reactive non- or poorly-neutralizing antibodies form infectious virus-Ab complexes with the newly infecting serotype and enhance virus infection by binding to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) on FcγR-bearing cells. In this study, we determined that molecular determinants of DENV2 envelope protein critical for virus entry during non-ADE infection are also required for ADE infection mediated by FcγRIIA, and binding of virus-Ab complexes with FcγRIIA alone is not sufficient for ADE of infection. The FcγRIIA mainly plays an auxiliary role in concentrating the virus–Ab complex to the cell surface, and other primary cellular receptors are required for virus entry. Understanding the viral entry pathway in ADE of DENV infection will greatly facilitate rational designs of anti-viral therapeutics against severe dengue disease associated with ADE. - Highlights: • KKK305/307/310 in DENV2 E-DIII is critical for virus attachment in ADE and non-ADE infection. • Binding of DENV2–Ab complex with FcγRII alone is not sufficient for virus entry in ADE infection. • Other primary receptors were required for DENV2 internalization during FcγRII–mediated ADE. • G104 and L135 of DENV2 E are critical for virus-mediated membrane fusion. • DENV2 virus-mediated membrane fusion is required for both ADE and non-ADE infection

  18. Molecular determinants of dengue virus 2 envelope protein important for virus entry in FcγRIIA-mediated antibody-dependent enhancement of infection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chotiwan, Nunya; Roehrig, John T. [Arboviral Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States); Schlesinger, Jacob J. [Department of Medicine, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14642 (United States); Blair, Carol D. [Arthropod-borne and Infectious Diseases Laboratory, Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Pathology, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO 80523 (United States); Huang, Claire Y.-H., E-mail: yxh0@cdc.gov [Arboviral Diseases Branch, Division of Vector-Borne Disease, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Fort Collins, CO 80521 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection may cause severe illness in patients suffering a secondary infection by a heterologous dengue virus (DENV) serotype. During ADE of infection, cross-reactive non- or poorly-neutralizing antibodies form infectious virus-Ab complexes with the newly infecting serotype and enhance virus infection by binding to the Fcγ receptors (FcγR) on FcγR-bearing cells. In this study, we determined that molecular determinants of DENV2 envelope protein critical for virus entry during non-ADE infection are also required for ADE infection mediated by FcγRIIA, and binding of virus-Ab complexes with FcγRIIA alone is not sufficient for ADE of infection. The FcγRIIA mainly plays an auxiliary role in concentrating the virus–Ab complex to the cell surface, and other primary cellular receptors are required for virus entry. Understanding the viral entry pathway in ADE of DENV infection will greatly facilitate rational designs of anti-viral therapeutics against severe dengue disease associated with ADE. - Highlights: • KKK305/307/310 in DENV2 E-DIII is critical for virus attachment in ADE and non-ADE infection. • Binding of DENV2–Ab complex with FcγRII alone is not sufficient for virus entry in ADE infection. • Other primary receptors were required for DENV2 internalization during FcγRII–mediated ADE. • G104 and L135 of DENV2 E are critical for virus-mediated membrane fusion. • DENV2 virus-mediated membrane fusion is required for both ADE and non-ADE infection.

  19. Adeno-associated virus-mediated doxycycline-regulatable TRAIL expression suppresses growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Liu; Weilun, Zhang; Minghong, Jiang; Yaxi, Zhang; Shilian, Liu; Yanxin, Liu; Dexian, Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) functions as a cytokine to selectively kill various cancer cells without toxicity to most normal cells. Numerous studies have demonstrated the potential use of recombinant soluble TRAIL as a cancer therapeutic agent. We have showed previous administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector expressing soluble TRAIL results in an efficient suppression of human tumor growth in nude mice. In the present study, we introduced Tet-On gene expression system into the rAAV vector to control the soluble TRAIL expression and evaluate the efficiency of the system in cancer gene therapy. Controllability of the Tet-On system was determined by luciferase activity assay, and Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The breast cancer xenograft animal model was established and recombinant virus was administrated through tail vein injection to evaluate the tumoricidal activity. The expression of soluble TRAIL could be strictly controlled by the Tet-On system in both normal and cancer cells. Transduction of human cancer cell lines with rAAV-TRE-TRAIL&rAAV-Tet-On under the presence of inducer doxycycline resulted in a considerable cell death by apoptosis. Intravenous injection of the recombinant virus efficiently suppressed the growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice when activated by doxycycline. These data suggest that rAAV-mediated soluble TRAIL expression under the control of the Tet-On system is a promising strategy for breast cancer therapy

  20. Adeno-associated virus-mediated doxycycline-regulatable TRAIL expression suppresses growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Liu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL functions as a cytokine to selectively kill various cancer cells without toxicity to most normal cells. Numerous studies have demonstrated the potential use of recombinant soluble TRAIL as a cancer therapeutic agent. We have showed previous administration of a recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV vector expressing soluble TRAIL results in an efficient suppression of human tumor growth in nude mice. In the present study, we introduced Tet-On gene expression system into the rAAV vector to control the soluble TRAIL expression and evaluate the efficiency of the system in cancer gene therapy. Methods Controllability of the Tet-On system was determined by luciferase activity assay, and Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay. Cell viability was determined by MTT assay. The breast cancer xenograft animal model was established and recombinant virus was administrated through tail vein injection to evaluate the tumoricidal activity. Results The expression of soluble TRAIL could be strictly controlled by the Tet-On system in both normal and cancer cells. Transduction of human cancer cell lines with rAAV-TRE-TRAIL&rAAV-Tet-On under the presence of inducer doxycycline resulted in a considerable cell death by apoptosis. Intravenous injection of the recombinant virus efficiently suppressed the growth of human breast carcinoma in nude mice when activated by doxycycline. Conclusion These data suggest that rAAV-mediated soluble TRAIL expression under the control of the Tet-On system is a promising strategy for breast cancer therapy.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta-mediated EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus lytic reactivations in 293 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus (EBV Rta belongs to a lytic switch gene family that is evolutionarily conserved in all gamma-herpesviruses. Emerging evidence indicates that cell cycle arrest is a common means by which herpesviral immediate-early protein hijacks the host cell to advance the virus's lytic cycle progression. To examine the role of Rta in cell cycle regulation, we recently established a doxycycline (Dox-inducible Rta system in 293 cells. In this cell background, inducible Rta modulated the levels of signature G1 arrest proteins, followed by induction of the cellular senescence marker, SA-β-Gal. To delineate the relationship between Rta-induced cell growth arrest and EBV reactivation, recombinant viral genomes were transferred into Rta-inducible 293 cells. Somewhat unexpectedly, we found that Dox-inducible Rta reactivated both EBV and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, to similar efficacy. As a consequence, the Rta-mediated EBV and KSHV lytic replication systems, designated as EREV8 and ERKV, respectively, were homogenous, robust, and concurrent with cell death likely due to permissive lytic replication. In addition, the expression kinetics of EBV lytic genes in Dox-treated EREV8 cells was similar to that of their KSHV counterparts in Dox-induced ERKV cells, suggesting that a common pathway is used to disrupt viral latency in both cell systems. When the time course was compared, cell cycle arrest was achieved between 6 and 48 h, EBV or KSHV reactivation was initiated abruptly at 48 h, and the cellular senescence marker was not detected until 120 h after Dox treatment. These results lead us to hypothesize that in 293 cells, Rta-induced G1 cell cycle arrest could provide (1 an ideal environment for virus reactivation if EBV or KSHV coexists and (2 a preparatory milieu for cell senescence if no viral genome is available. The latter is hypothetical in a transient-lytic situation.

  2. Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Attenuate Immune-Mediated Liver Injury and Compromise Virus Control During Acute Hepatitis B Virus Infection in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Mengmeng; Yuan, Xu; Liu, Dan; Ma, Yuhong; Zhu, Jun; Cui, Jun; Yu, Mengxue; Li, Changyong; Guo, Deyin

    2017-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been used as therapeutic tools not only for their ability to differentiate toward different cells, but also for their unique immunomodulatory properties. However, it is still unknown how MSCs may affect immunity during hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. This study was designed to explore the effect of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs) on hepatic natural killer (NK) cells in a mouse model of acute HBV infection. Mice were injected with 1 × 10 6 BM-MSCs, which stained with chloromethyl derivatives of fluorescein diacetate fluorescent probe, 24 h before hydrodynamic injection of viral DNA (pHBV1.3) through the tail vein. In vivo imaging system revealed that BM-MSCs were accumulated in the injured liver, and they attenuated immune-mediated liver injury during HBV infection, as shown by lower alanine aminotransferase levels, reduced proinflammatory cytokine production, and decreased inflammatory cell infiltration in the liver. Importantly, administration of BM-MSCs restrained the increased expression of natural-killer group 2, member D (NKG2D), an important receptor required for NK cell activation in the liver from HBV-infected mice. BM-MSCs also reduced NKG2D expression on NK cells and suppressed the cytotoxicity of NK cells in vitro. Furthermore, BM-MSC-derived transforming growth factor-β1 suppressed NKG2D expression on NK cells. As a consequence, BM-MSC treatment enhanced HBV gene expression and replication in vivo. These results demonstrate that adoptive transfer of BM-MSCs influences innate immunity and limits immune-mediated liver injury during acute HBV infection by suppressing NK cell activity. Meanwhile, the effect of BM-MSCs on prolonging virus clearance needs to be considered in the future.

  3. Mannosyl Glycodendritic Structure Inhibits DC-SIGN-Mediated Ebola Virus Infection in cis and in trans

    OpenAIRE

    Lasala, Fátima; Arce, Eva; Otero, Joaquín R.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    We have designed a glycodendritic structure, BH30sucMan, that blocks the interaction between dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and Ebola virus (EBOV) envelope. BH30sucMan inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated EBOV infection at nanomolar concentrations. BH30sucMan may counteract important steps of the infective process of EBOV and, potentially, of microorganisms shown to exploit DC-SIGN for cell entry and infection.

  4. Mannosyl Glycodendritic Structure Inhibits DC-SIGN-Mediated Ebola Virus Infection in cis and in trans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasala, Fátima; Arce, Eva; Otero, Joaquín R.; Rojo, Javier; Delgado, Rafael

    2003-01-01

    We have designed a glycodendritic structure, BH30sucMan, that blocks the interaction between dendritic cell-specific intercellular adhesion molecule 3-grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN) and Ebola virus (EBOV) envelope. BH30sucMan inhibits DC-SIGN-mediated EBOV infection at nanomolar concentrations. BH30sucMan may counteract important steps of the infective process of EBOV and, potentially, of microorganisms shown to exploit DC-SIGN for cell entry and infection. PMID:14638512

  5. Multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae, Alphavirus (Togaviridae, Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae, and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish

  6. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yang; Guo, Wanzhu; Xu, Zhiwen; Yan, Qigui; Luo, Yan; Shi, Qian; Chen, Dishi; Zhu, Ling; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2011-06-16

    Porcine parvovirus (PPV) VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs) with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV) system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28) following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31). Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection.

  7. Discovering Host Genes Involved in the Infection by the Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus Complex and in the Establishment of Resistance to the Virus Using Tobacco Rattle Virus-based Post Transcriptional Gene Silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Lozano-Durán

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The development of high-throughput technologies allows for evaluating gene expression at the whole-genome level. Together with proteomic and metabolomic studies, these analyses have resulted in the identification of plant genes whose function or expression is altered as a consequence of pathogen attacks. Members of the Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV complex are among the most important pathogens impairing production of agricultural crops worldwide. To understand how these geminiviruses subjugate plant defenses, and to devise counter-measures, it is essential to identify the host genes affected by infection and to determine their role in susceptible and resistant plants. We have used a reverse genetics approach based on Tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing (TRV-VIGS to uncover genes involved in viral infection of susceptible plants, and to identify genes underlying virus resistance. To identify host genes with a role in geminivirus infection, we have engineered a Nicotiana benthamiana line, coined 2IRGFP, which over-expresses GFP upon virus infection. With this system, we have achieved an accurate description of the dynamics of virus replication in space and time. Upon silencing selected N. benthamiana genes previously shown to be related to host response to geminivirus infection, we have identified eighteen genes involved in a wide array of cellular processes. Plant genes involved in geminivirus resistance were studied by comparing two tomato lines: one resistant (R, the other susceptible (S to the virus. Sixty-nine genes preferentially expressed in R tomatoes were identified by screening cDNA libraries from infected and uninfected R and S genotypes. Out of the 25 genes studied so far, the silencing of five led to the total collapse of resistance, suggesting their involvement in the resistance gene network. This review of our results indicates that TRV-VIGS is an exquisite reverse genetics tool that may provide new insights into the

  8. Distinct patterns of IFITM-mediated restriction of filoviruses, SARS coronavirus, and influenza A virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I-Chueh Huang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-inducible transmembrane proteins 1, 2, and 3 (IFITM1, 2, and 3 are recently identified viral restriction factors that inhibit infection mediated by the influenza A virus (IAV hemagglutinin (HA protein. Here we show that IFITM proteins restricted infection mediated by the entry glycoproteins (GP(1,2 of Marburg and Ebola filoviruses (MARV, EBOV. Consistent with these observations, interferon-β specifically restricted filovirus and IAV entry processes. IFITM proteins also inhibited replication of infectious MARV and EBOV. We observed distinct patterns of IFITM-mediated restriction: compared with IAV, the entry processes of MARV and EBOV were less restricted by IFITM3, but more restricted by IFITM1. Moreover, murine Ifitm5 and 6 did not restrict IAV, but efficiently inhibited filovirus entry. We further demonstrate that replication of infectious SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV and entry mediated by the SARS-CoV spike (S protein are restricted by IFITM proteins. The profile of IFITM-mediated restriction of SARS-CoV was more similar to that of filoviruses than to IAV. Trypsin treatment of receptor-associated SARS-CoV pseudovirions, which bypasses their dependence on lysosomal cathepsin L, also bypassed IFITM-mediated restriction. However, IFITM proteins did not reduce cellular cathepsin activity or limit access of virions to acidic intracellular compartments. Our data indicate that IFITM-mediated restriction is localized to a late stage in the endocytic pathway. They further show that IFITM proteins differentially restrict the entry of a broad range of enveloped viruses, and modulate cellular tropism independently of viral receptor expression.

  9. Extensive immune-mediated hippocampal damage in mice surviving infection with neuroadapted Sindbis virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Takashi; Griffin, Diane E.

    2003-01-01

    Viral infections of the central nervous system and immune responses to these infections cause a variety of neurological diseases. Infection of weanling mice with Sindbis virus causes acute nonfatal encephalomyelitis followed by clearance of infectious virus, but persistence of viral RNA. Infection with a neuroadapted strain of Sindbis virus (NSV) causes fatal encephalomyelitis, but passive transfer of immune serum after infection protects from fatal disease and infectious virus is cleared. To determine whether persistent NSV RNA is associated with neurological damage, we examined the brains of recovered mice and found progressive loss of the hippocampal gyrus, adjacent white matter, and deep cerebral cortex associated with mononuclear cell infiltration. Mice deficient in CD4 + T cells showed less tissue loss, while mice lacking CD8 + T cells showed lesions comparable to those in immunocompetent mice. Mice deficient in both CD4 + and CD8 + T cells developed severe tissue loss similar to immunocompetent mice and this was associated with extensive infiltration of macrophages. The number of CD4 + cells and macrophage/microglial cells, but not CD8 + cells, infiltrating the hippocampal gyrus was correlated with the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling positive pyramidal neurons. These results suggest that CD4 + T cells can promote progressive neuronal death and tissue injury, despite clearance of infectious virus

  10. DMPD: Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 17904888 Signalling pathways mediating type I interferon gene expression. Edwards M...hways mediating type I interferon gene expression. PubmedID 17904888 Title Signalling pathways...R, Slater L, Johnston SL. Microbes Infect. 2007 Sep;9(11):1245-51. Epub 2007 Jul 1. (.png) (.svg) (.html) (.csml) Show Signalling pat

  11. 40 CFR 174.513 - Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene); exemption from the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene... REQUIREMENTS FOR PLANT-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.513 Potato Leaf Roll... protectant Potato Leaf Roll Virus Resistance Gene (also known as orf1/orf2 gene) in or on all food...

  12. The development of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xing Yan; Zhao Jinhua

    2006-01-01

    Suicide gene treatment of tumor catches more and more attention in recent years. Cells transferred with suicide gene from virus or bacteria will express specific enzymes and transform innocuous prodrugs into highly toxic chemotherapeutic drugs. As a result, the cells will be killed. Radionuclide labeled probe can display the biologic characteristics of suicide gene in vivo. This article reviews the development of HSV-tk gene imaging. (authors)

  13. Glycoprotein is enough for sindbis virus-derived DNA vector to express heterogenous genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fu Juanjuan

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To investigate the necessity and potential application of structural genes for expressing heterogenous genes from Sindbis virus-derived vector, the DNA-based expression vector pVaXJ was constructed by placing the recombinant genome of sindbis-like virus XJ-160 under the control of the human cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter of the plasmid pVAX1, in which viral structural genes were replaced by a polylinker cassette to allow for insertion of heterologous genes. The defect helper plasmids pVaE or pVaC were developed by cloning the gene of glycoprotein E3E26KE1 or capsid protein of XJ-160 virus into pVAX1, respectively. The report gene cassette pVaXJ-EGFP or pV-Gluc expressing enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP or Gaussia luciferase (G.luc were constructed by cloning EGFP or G.luc gene into pVaXJ. EGFP or G.luc was expressed in the BHK-21 cells co-transfected with report gene cassettes and pVaE at levels that were comparable to those produced by report gene cassettes, pVaC and pVaE and were much higher than the levels produced by report gene cassette and pVaC, suggesting that glycoprotein is enough for Sindbis virus-derived DNA vector to express heterogenous genes in host cells. The method of gene expression from Sindbis virus-based DNA vector only co-transfected with envelop E gene increase the conveniency and the utility of alphavirus-based vector systems in general.

  14. Replication of alfalfa mosaic virus RNA 3 with movement and coat protein genes replaced by corresponding genes of Prunus necrotic ringspot ilarvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Navarro, J A; Reusken, C B; Bol, J F; Pallás, V

    1997-12-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV) are tripartite positive-strand RNA plant viruses that encode functionally similar translation products. Although the two viruses are phylogenetically closely related, they infect a very different range of natural hosts. The coat protein (CP) gene, the movement protein (MP) gene or both genes in AMV RNA 3 were replaced by the corresponding genes of PNRSV. The chimeric viruses were tested for heterologous encapsidation, replication in protoplasts from plants transformed with AMV replicase genes P1 and P2 (P12 plants) and for cell-to-cell transport in P12 plants. The chimeric viruses exhibited basic competence for encapsidation and replication in P12 protoplasts and for a low level of cell-to-cell movement in P12 plants. The potential involvement of the MP gene in determining host specificity in ilarviruses is discussed.

  15. Tumor virus induction: a model for studying gene derepression by light radiation and chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hellman, K.B.

    1981-01-01

    Cells of most, if not all, animal species contain information for type C retraviruses. This information is normally repressed, but may be derepressed after cellular exposure to a variety of agents. This phenomenon of virus induction can be utilized to investigate the phenomenon of gene derepression, since control of type C virus induction is thought to be under regulatory processes affecting cellular genes. Properties of type C retraviruses, results of virus induction studies, and discussion of a possible mechanism(s) for virus induction are presented in this review. Utilizing the Al-2 nonproducer cell line, originally derived from cells of the BALB/c mouse, quantitative and kinetic dose-response data have been obtained for type C virus induction by uv radiation, chemicals, and biological agents. Studies showing that protease inhibitors suppress induction suggest the presence of a common mechanism for controlling virus induction; i.e., a protein repressor(s) which acts to control virus gene derepression. Since protease inhibitors suppress induction of prophage in E. coli, similar processes may control virus induction in animal and bacterial systems

  16. Suppression of cancer growth in mice by adeno-associated virus vector-mediated IFN-beta expression driven by hTERT promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Ling Feng; Wang, Yi Gang; Xiao, Tian; Zhang, Kang Jiang; Li, Gong Chu; Gu, Jin Fa; Chu, Liang; Tang, Wen Hao; Tan, Wen-Song; Liu, Xin Yuan

    2009-12-28

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) has rapidly become a promising gene delivery vehicle for its excellent advantages of non-immunogenic, low pathogenicity and long-term gene expression in vivo. However, a major obstacle in development of effective AAV vector is the lack of tissue specificity, which caused low efficiency of AAV transfer to target cells. The application of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter is a prior targeting strategy for AAV in cancer gene therapy as hTERT activity is transcriptionally upregulated in most cancer cells. In the present work, we investigated whether AAV-mediated human interferon beta (IFN-beta) gene driven by hTERT promoter could specifically express in tumor cells and suppress tumor cell growth. Our data demonstrated that hTERT promoter-driven IFN-beta expression was the tumor-specific, decreased the cell viability of tumor cells but not normal cells, and induced tumor cell apoptosis via activation of caspase pathway and release of cytochrome c. AAV-mediated IFN-beta expression driven by hTERT promoter significantly suppressed the growth of colorectal cancer and lung cancer xenograft in mice and resulted in tumor cells death in vivo. These data suggested that AAVs in combination with hTERT-mediated IFN-beta expression could exert potential antitumor activity and provide a novel targeting approach to clinical gene therapy of varieties of cancers.

  17. Scavenger Receptor C Mediates Phagocytosis of White Spot Syndrome Virus and Restricts Virus Proliferation in Shrimp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming-Chong; Shi, Xiu-Zhen; Yang, Hui-Ting; Sun, Jie-Jie; Xu, Ling; Wang, Xian-Wei; Zhao, Xiao-Fan

    2016-01-01

    Scavenger receptors are an important class of pattern recognition receptors that play several important roles in host defense against pathogens. The class C scavenger receptors (SRCs) have only been identified in a few invertebrates, and their role in the immune response against viruses is seldom studied. In this study, we firstly identified an SRC from kuruma shrimp, Marsupenaeus japonicus, designated MjSRC, which was significantly upregulated after white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) challenge at the mRNA and protein levels in hemocytes. The quantity of WSSV increased in shrimp after knockdown of MjSRC, compared with the controls. Furthermore, overexpression of MjSRC led to enhanced WSSV elimination via phagocytosis by hemocytes. Pull-down and co-immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated the interaction between MjSRC and the WSSV envelope protein. Electron microscopy observation indicated that the colloidal gold-labeled extracellular domain of MjSRC was located on the outer surface of WSSV. MjSRC formed a trimer and was internalized into the cytoplasm after WSSV challenge, and the internalization was strongly inhibited after knockdown of Mjβ-arrestin2. Further studies found that Mjβ-arrestin2 interacted with the intracellular domain of MjSRC and induced the internalization of WSSV in a clathrin-dependent manner. WSSV were co-localized with lysosomes in hemocytes and the WSSV quantity in shrimp increased after injection of lysosome inhibitor, chloroquine. Collectively, this study demonstrated that MjSRC recognized WSSV via its extracellular domain and invoked hemocyte phagocytosis to restrict WSSV systemic infection. This is the first study to report an SRC as a pattern recognition receptor promoting phagocytosis of a virus. PMID:28027319

  18. Dynamic gene expression analysis in a H1N1 influenza virus mouse pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Yanyan; Gao, Yingjie; Shi, Yujing; Cui, Xiaolan

    2017-06-01

    H1N1, a major pathogenic subtype of influenza A virus, causes a respiratory infection in humans and livestock that can range from a mild infection to more severe pneumonia associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Understanding the dynamic changes in the genome and the related functional changes induced by H1N1 influenza virus infection is essential to elucidating the pathogenesis of this virus and thereby determining strategies to prevent future outbreaks. In this study, we filtered the significantly expressed genes in mouse pneumonia using mRNA microarray analysis. Using STC analysis, seven significant gene clusters were revealed, and using STC-GO analysis, we explored the significant functions of these seven gene clusters. The results revealed GOs related to H1N1 virus-induced inflammatory and immune functions, including innate immune response, inflammatory response, specific immune response, and cellular response to interferon-beta. Furthermore, the dynamic regulation relationships of the key genes in mouse pneumonia were revealed by dynamic gene network analysis, and the most important genes were filtered, including Dhx58, Cxcl10, Cxcl11, Zbp1, Ifit1, Ifih1, Trim25, Mx2, Oas2, Cd274, Irgm1, and Irf7. These results suggested that during mouse pneumonia, changes in the expression of gene clusters and the complex interactions among genes lead to significant changes in function. Dynamic gene expression analysis revealed key genes that performed important functions. These results are a prelude to advancements in mouse H1N1 influenza virus infection biology, as well as the use of mice as a model organism for human H1N1 influenza virus infection studies.

  19. Virus-Induced Silencing of Key Genes Leads to Differential Impact on Withanolide Biosynthesis in the Medicinal Plant, Withania somnifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Aditya Vikram; Singh, Deeksha; Dhar, Yogeshwar Vikram; Michael, Rahul; Gupta, Parul; Chandra, Deepak; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2018-02-01

    Withanolides are a collection of naturally occurring, pharmacologically active, secondary metabolites synthesized in the medicinally important plant, Withania somnifera. These bioactive molecules are C28-steroidal lactone triterpenoids and their synthesis is proposed to take place via the mevalonate (MVA) and 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol-4-phosphate (MEP) pathways through the sterol pathway using 24-methylene cholesterol as substrate flux. Although the phytochemical profiles as well as pharmaceutical activities of Withania extracts have been well studied, limited genomic information and difficult genetic transformation have been a major bottleneck towards understanding the participation of specific genes in withanolide biosynthesis. In this study, we used the Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) approach to study the participation of key genes from MVA, MEP and triterpenoid biosynthesis for their involvement in withanolide biosynthesis. TRV-infected W. somnifera plants displayed unique phenotypic characteristics and differential accumulation of total Chl as well as carotenoid content for each silenced gene suggesting a reduction in overall isoprenoid synthesis. Comprehensive expression analysis of putative genes of withanolide biosynthesis revealed transcriptional modulations conferring the presence of complex regulatory mechanisms leading to withanolide biosynthesis. In addition, silencing of genes exhibited modulated total and specific withanolide accumulation at different levels as compared with control plants. Comparative analysis also suggests a major role for the MVA pathway as compared with the MEP pathway in providing substrate flux for withanolide biosynthesis. These results demonstrate that transcriptional regulation of selected Withania genes of the triterpenoid biosynthetic pathway critically affects withanolide biosynthesis, providing new horizons to explore this process further, in planta.

  20. Horizontal gene transfer and nucleotide compositional anomaly in large DNA viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogata Hiroyuki

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA viruses have a wide range of genome sizes (5 kb up to 1.2 Mb, compared to 0.16 Mb to 1.5 Mb for obligate parasitic bacteria that do not correlate with their virulence or the taxonomic distribution of their hosts. The reasons for such large variation are unclear. According to the traditional view of viruses as gifted "gene pickpockets", large viral genome sizes could originate from numerous gene acquisitions from their hosts. We investigated this hypothesis by studying 67 large DNA viruses with genome sizes larger than 150 kb, including the recently characterized giant mimivirus. Given that horizontally transferred DNA often have anomalous nucleotide compositions differing from the rest of the genome, we conducted a detailed analysis of the inter- and intra-genome compositional properties of these viruses. We then interpreted their compositional heterogeneity in terms of possible causes, including strand asymmetry, gene function/expression, and horizontal transfer. Results We first show that the global nucleotide composition and nucleotide word usage of viral genomes are species-specific and distinct from those of their hosts. Next, we identified compositionally anomalous (cA genes in viral genomes, using a method based on Bayesian inference. The proportion of cA genes is highly variable across viruses and does not exhibit a significant correlation with genome size. The vast majority of the cA genes were of unknown function, lacking homologs in the databases. For genes with known homologs, we found a substantial enrichment of cA genes in specific functional classes for some of the viruses. No significant association was found between cA genes and compositional strand asymmetry. A possible exogenous origin for a small fraction of the cA genes could be confirmed by phylogenetic reconstruction. Conclusion At odds with the traditional dogma, our results argue against frequent genetic transfers to large DNA viruses from their

  1. Correction of mutant Fanconi anemia gene by homologous recombination in human hematopoietic cells using adeno-associated virus vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiboonsukwong, Kittiphong; Ohbayashi, Fumi; Shiiba, Haruka; Aizawa, Emi; Yamashita, Takayuki; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2009-11-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors have been shown to correct a variety of mutations in human cells by homologous recombination (HR) at high rates, which can overcome insertional mutagenesis and transgene silencing, two of the major hurdles in conventional gene addition therapy of inherited diseases. We examined an ability of AAV vectors to repair a mutation in human hematopoietic cells by HR. We infected a human B-lymphoblastoid cell line (BCL) derived from a normal subject with an AAV, which disrupts the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyl transferase1 (HPRT1) locus, to measure the frequency of AAV-mediated HR in BCL cells. We subsequently constructed an AAV vector encoding the normal sequences from the Fanconi anemia group A (FANCA) locus to correct a mutation in the gene in BCL derived from a FANCA patient. Under optimal conditions, approximately 50% of BCL cells were transduced with an AAV serotype 2 (AAV-2) vector. In FANCA BCL cells, up to 0.016% of infected cells were gene-corrected by HR. AAV-mediated restoration of normal genotypic and phenotypic characteristics in FANCA-mutant cells was confirmed at the DNA, protein and functional levels. The results obtained in the present study indicate that AAV vectors may be applicable for gene correction therapy of inherited hematopoietic disorders.

  2. The Mediator subunit SFR6/MED16 controls defence gene expression mediated by salicylic acid and jasmonate responsive pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wathugala, Deepthi L; Hemsley, Piers A; Moffat, Caroline S; Cremelie, Pieter; Knight, Marc R; Knight, Heather

    2012-07-01

    • Arabidopsis SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 (SFR6) controls cold- and drought-inducible gene expression and freezing- and osmotic-stress tolerance. Its identification as a component of the MEDIATOR transcriptional co-activator complex led us to address its involvement in other transcriptional responses. • Gene expression responses to Pseudomonas syringae, ultraviolet-C (UV-C) irradiation, salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) were investigated in three sfr6 mutant alleles by quantitative real-time PCR and susceptibility to UV-C irradiation and Pseudomonas infection were assessed. • sfr6 mutants were more susceptible to both Pseudomonas syringae infection and UV-C irradiation. They exhibited correspondingly weaker PR (pathogenesis-related) gene expression than wild-type Arabidopsis following these treatments or after direct application of SA, involved in response to both UV-C and Pseudomonas infection. Other genes, however, were induced normally in the mutants by these treatments. sfr6 mutants were severely defective in expression of plant defensin genes in response to JA; ectopic expression of defensin genes was provoked in wild-type but not sfr6 by overexpression of ERF5. • SFR6/MED16 controls both SA- and JA-mediated defence gene expression and is necessary for tolerance of Pseudomonas syringae infection and UV-C irradiation. It is not, however, a universal regulator of stress gene transcription and is likely to mediate transcriptional activation of specific regulons only. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  3. Roles of Prolyl Isomerases in RNA-Mediated Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roopa Thapar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases (PPIases that include immunophilins (cyclophilins and FKBPs and parvulins (Pin1, Par14, Par17 participate in cell signaling, transcription, pre-mRNA processing and mRNA decay. The human genome encodes 19 cyclophilins, 18 FKBPs and three parvulins. Immunophilins are receptors for the immunosuppressive drugs cyclosporin A, FK506, and rapamycin that are used in organ transplantation. Pin1 has also been targeted in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease, asthma, and a number of cancers. While these PPIases are characterized as molecular chaperones, they also act in a nonchaperone manner to promote protein-protein interactions using surfaces outside their active sites. The immunosuppressive drugs act by a gain-of-function mechanism by promoting protein-protein interactions in vivo. Several immunophilins have been identified as components of the spliceosome and are essential for alternative splicing. Pin1 plays roles in transcription and RNA processing by catalyzing conformational changes in the RNA Pol II C-terminal domain. Pin1 also binds several RNA binding proteins such as AUF1, KSRP, HuR, and SLBP that regulate mRNA decay by remodeling mRNP complexes. The functions of ribonucleoprotein associated PPIases are largely unknown. This review highlights PPIases that play roles in RNA-mediated gene expression, providing insight into their structures, functions and mechanisms of action in mRNP remodeling in vivo.

  4. Development of a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system for Spinacia oleracea L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lee, Jungmin; Cao, Dang Viet; Kim, Jiwon

    2017-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is known as a rapid and efficient system for studying functions of interesting genes in plants. Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) is widely applied for the gene silencing of many plants. Although spinach is a TRV-susceptible plant, a TRV-based VIGS system has not yet ...

  5. Kinetics of cellular uptake of viruses and nanoparticles via clathrin-mediated endocytosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Anand; Berezhkovskii, Alexander; Nossal, Ralph

    2016-02-01

    Several viruses exploit clathrin-mediated endocytosis to gain entry into host cells. This process is also used extensively in biomedical applications to deliver nanoparticles (NPs) to diseased cells. The internalization of these nano-objects is controlled by the assembly of a clathrin-containing protein coat on the cytoplasmic side of the plasma membrane, which drives the invagination of the membrane and the formation of a cargo-containing endocytic vesicle. Current theoretical models of receptor-mediated endocytosis of viruses and NPs do not explicitly take coat assembly into consideration. In this paper we study cellular uptake of viruses and NPs with a focus on coat assembly. We characterize the internalization process by the mean time between the binding of a particle to the membrane and its entry into the cell. Using a coarse-grained model which maps the stochastic dynamics of coat formation onto a one-dimensional random walk, we derive an analytical formula for this quantity. A study of the dependence of the mean internalization time on NP size shows that there is an upper bound above which this time becomes extremely large, and an optimal size at which it attains a minimum. Our estimates of these sizes compare well with experimental data. We also study the sensitivity of the obtained results on coat parameters to identify factors which significantly affect the internalization kinetics.

  6. AN MHC class I immune evasion gene of Marek's disease virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek's disease virus (MDV) is a widespread a-herpesvirus of chickens that causes T cell tumors. Acute, but not latent, MDV infection has previously been shown to lead to downregulation of cell-surface MHC class I (Virology 282:198–205 (2001)), but the gene(s) involved have not been identified. Here...

  7. Gene structure and expression characteristic of a novel odorant receptor gene cluster in the parasitoid wasp Microplitis mediator (Hymenoptera: Braconidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S-N; Shan, S; Zheng, Y; Peng, Y; Lu, Z-Y; Yang, Y-Q; Li, R-J; Zhang, Y-J; Guo, Y-Y

    2017-08-01

    Odorant receptors (ORs) expressed in the antennae of parasitoid wasps are responsible for detection of various lipophilic airborne molecules. In the present study, 107 novel OR genes were identified from Microplitis mediator antennal transcriptome data. Phylogenetic analysis of the set of OR genes from M. mediator and Microplitis demolitor revealed that M. mediator OR (MmedOR) genes can be classified into different subfamilies, and the majority of MmedORs in each subfamily shared high sequence identities and clear orthologous relationships to M. demolitor ORs. Within a subfamily, six MmedOR genes, MmedOR98, 124, 125, 126, 131 and 155, shared a similar gene structure and were tightly linked in the genome. To evaluate whether the clustered MmedOR genes share common regulatory features, the transcription profile and expression characteristics of the six closely related OR genes were investigated in M. mediator. Rapid amplification of cDNA ends-PCR experiments revealed that the OR genes within the cluster were transcribed as single mRNAs, and a bicistronic mRNA for two adjacent genes (MmedOR124 and MmedOR98) was also detected in female antennae by reverse transcription PCR. In situ hybridization experiments indicated that each OR gene within the cluster was expressed in a different number of cells. Moreover, there was no co-expression of the two highly related OR genes, MmedOR124 and MmedOR98, which appeared to be individually expressed in a distinct population of neurons. Overall, there were distinct expression profiles of closely related MmedOR genes from the same cluster in M. mediator. These data provide a basic understanding of the olfactory coding in parasitoid wasps. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  8. The Mediator Complex MED15 Subunit Mediates Activation of Downstream Lipid-Related Genes by the WRINKLED1 Transcription Factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi Jung; Jang, In-Cheol; Chua, Nam-Hai

    2016-07-01

    The Mediator complex is known to be a master coordinator of transcription by RNA polymerase II, and this complex is recruited by transcription factors (TFs) to target promoters for gene activation or repression. The plant-specific TF WRINKLED1 (WRI1) activates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. However, no Mediator subunit has yet been identified that mediates WRI1 transcriptional activity. Promoter-β-glucuronidase fusion experiments showed that MEDIATOR15 (MED15) is expressed in the same cells in the embryo as WRI1. We found that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) MED15 subunit of the Mediator complex interacts directly with WRI1 in the nucleus. Overexpression of MED15 or WRI1 increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes involved in glycolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis; these genes were down-regulated in wild-type or WRI1-overexpressing plants by silencing of MED15 However, overexpression of MED15 in the wri1 mutant also increased transcript levels of WRI1 target genes, suggesting that MED15 also may act with other TFs to activate downstream lipid-related genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays confirmed the association of MED15 with six WRI1 target gene promoters. Additionally, silencing of MED15 resulted in reduced fatty acid content in seedlings and mature seeds, whereas MED15 overexpression increased fatty acid content in both developmental stages. Similar results were found in wri1 mutant and WRI1 overexpression lines. Together, our results indicate that the WRI1/MED15 complex transcriptionally regulates glycolysis-related and fatty acid biosynthetic genes during embryogenesis. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Novel Strategy to Control Transgene Expression Mediated by a Sendai Virus-Based Vector Using a Nonstructural C Protein and Endogenous MicroRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masayuki Sano

    Full Text Available Tissue-specific control of gene expression is an invaluable tool for studying various biological processes and medical applications. Efficient regulatory systems have been utilized to control transgene expression in various types of DNA viral or integrating viral vectors. However, existing regulatory systems are difficult to transfer into negative-strand RNA virus vector platforms because of significant differences in their transcriptional machineries. In this study, we developed a novel strategy for regulating transgene expression mediated by a cytoplasmic RNA vector based on a replication-defective and persistent Sendai virus (SeVdp. Because of the capacity of Sendai virus (SeV nonstructural C proteins to specifically inhibit viral RNA synthesis, overexpression of C protein significantly reduced transgene expression mediated by SeVdp vectors. We found that SeV C overexpression concomitantly reduced SeVdp mRNA levels and genomic RNA synthesis. To control C expression, target sequences for an endogenous microRNA were incorporated into the 3' untranslated region of the C genes. Incorporation of target sequences for miR-21 into the SeVdp vector restored transgene expression in HeLa cells by decreasing C expression. Furthermore, the SeVdp vector containing target sequences for let-7a enabled cell-specific control of transgene expression in human fibroblasts and induced pluripotent stem cells. Our findings demonstrate that SeV C can be used as an effective regulator for controlling transgene expression. This strategy will contribute to efficient and less toxic SeVdp-mediated gene transfer in various biological applications.

  10. Transcriptomic Analysis of Persistent Infection with Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus in Cattle Suggests Impairment of Apoptosis and Cell-Mediated Immunity in the Nasopharynx.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Eschbaumer

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the mechanisms of persistent foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV infection in cattle, transcriptome alterations associated with the FMDV carrier state were characterized using a bovine whole-transcriptome microarray. Eighteen cattle (8 vaccinated with a recombinant FMDV A vaccine, 10 non-vaccinated were challenged with FMDV A24 Cruzeiro, and the gene expression profiles of nasopharyngeal tissues collected between 21 and 35 days after challenge were compared between 11 persistently infected carriers and 7 non-carriers. Carriers and non-carriers were further compared to 2 naïve animals that had been neither vaccinated nor challenged. At a controlled false-discovery rate of 10% and a minimum difference in expression of 50%, 648 genes were differentially expressed between FMDV carriers and non-carriers, and most (467 had higher expression in carriers. Among these, genes associated with cellular proliferation and the immune response-such as chemokines, cytokines and genes regulating T and B cells-were significantly overrepresented. Differential gene expression was significantly correlated between non-vaccinated and vaccinated animals (biological correlation +0.97, indicating a similar transcriptome profile across these groups. Genes related to prostaglandin E2 production and the induction of regulatory T cells were overexpressed in carriers. In contrast, tissues from non-carrier animals expressed higher levels of complement regulators and pro-apoptotic genes that could promote virus clearance. Based on these findings, we propose a working hypothesis for FMDV persistence in nasopharyngeal tissues of cattle, in which the virus may be maintained by an impairment of apoptosis and the local suppression of cell-mediated antiviral immunity by inducible regulatory T cells.

  11. Fusion protein gene nucleotide sequence similarities, shared antigenic sites and phylogenetic analysis suggest that phocid distemper virus 2 and canine distemper virus belong to the same virus entity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.K.G. Visser (Ilona); R.W.J. van der Heijden (Roger); M.W.G. van de Bildt (Marco); M.J.H. Kenter (Marcel); C. Örvell; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide sequencing of the fusion protein (F) gene of phocid distemper virus-2 (PDV-2), recently isolated from Baikal seals (Phoca sibirica), revealed an open reading frame (nucleotides 84 to 2075) with two potential in-frame ATG translation initiation codons. We suggest that the

  12. Adenovirus-encoding virus-associated RNAs suppress HDGF gene expression to support efficient viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saki Kondo

    Full Text Available Non-coding small RNAs are involved in many physiological responses including viral life cycles. Adenovirus-encoding small RNAs, known as virus-associated RNAs (VA RNAs, are transcribed throughout the replication process in the host cells, and their transcript levels depend on the copy numbers of the viral genome. Therefore, VA RNAs are abundant in infected cells after genome replication, i.e. during the late phase of viral infection. Their function during the late phase is the inhibition of interferon-inducible protein kinase R (PKR activity to prevent antiviral responses; recently, mivaRNAs, the microRNAs processed from VA RNAs, have been reported to inhibit cellular gene expression. Although VA RNA transcription starts during the early phase, little is known about its function. The reason may be because much smaller amount of VA RNAs are transcribed during the early phase than the late phase. In this study, we applied replication-deficient adenovirus vectors (AdVs and novel AdVs lacking VA RNA genes to analyze the expression changes in cellular genes mediated by VA RNAs using microarray analysis. AdVs are suitable to examine the function of VA RNAs during the early phase, since they constitutively express VA RNAs but do not replicate except in 293 cells. We found that the expression level of hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF significantly decreased in response to the VA RNAs under replication-deficient condition, and this suppression was also observed during the early phase under replication-competent conditions. The suppression was independent of mivaRNA-induced downregulation, suggesting that the function of VA RNAs during the early phase differs from that during the late phase. Notably, overexpression of HDGF inhibited AdV growth. This is the first report to show the function, in part, of VA RNAs during the early phase that may be contribute to efficient viral growth.

  13. Recombination-mediated genetic engineering of a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew G Cottingham

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The production, manipulation and rescue of a bacterial artificial chromosome clone of Vaccinia virus (VAC-BAC in order to expedite construction of expression vectors and mutagenesis of the genome has been described (Domi & Moss, 2002, PNAS99 12415-20. The genomic BAC clone was 'rescued' back to infectious virus using a Fowlpox virus helper to supply transcriptional machinery. We apply here a similar approach to the attenuated strain Modified Vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA, now widely used as a safe non-replicating recombinant vaccine vector in mammals, including humans. Four apparently full-length, rescuable clones were obtained, which had indistinguishable immunogenicity in mice. One clone was shotgun sequenced and found to be identical to the parent. We employed GalK recombination-mediated genetic engineering (recombineering of MVA-BAC to delete five selected viral genes. Deletion of C12L, A44L, A46R or B7R did not significantly affect CD8(+ T cell immunogenicity in BALB/c mice, but deletion of B15R enhanced specific CD8(+ T cell responses to one of two endogenous viral epitopes (from the E2 and F2 proteins, in accordance with published work (Staib et al., 2005, J. Gen. Virol.86, 1997-2006. In addition, we found a higher frequency of triple-positive IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-2 secreting E3-specific CD8+ T-cells 8 weeks after vaccination with MVA lacking B15R. Furthermore, a recombinant vaccine capable of inducing CD8(+ T cells against an epitope from Plasmodium berghei was created using GalK counterselection to insert an antigen expression cassette lacking a tandem marker gene into the traditional thymidine kinase locus of MVA-BAC. MVA continues to feature prominently in clinical trials of recombinant vaccines against diseases such as HIV-AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis. Here we demonstrate in proof-of-concept experiments that MVA-BAC recombineering is a viable route to more rapid and efficient generation of new candidate mutant and recombinant

  14. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Lv, Xiaonan [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); CAS Key Lab for Biomedical Effects of Nanomaterials and Nanosafety, National Center for Nanoscience & Technology of China, Beijing 100090 (China); Herrler, Georg [Institute for Virology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover D-30559 (Germany); Enjuanes, Luis [Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, Centro Nacional de Biotecnología (CNB-CSIC), Campus Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain); Zhou, Xingdong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Qu, Bo [Faculty of Life Sciences, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China); Meng, Fandan [Institute for Virology, University of Veterinary Medicine, Hannover D-30559 (Germany); Cong, Chengcheng [College Animal Husbandry and Veterinary Medicine, Shenyang Agricultural University, Shenyang 110161 (China); Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing [College of Veterinary Medicine, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin 150030 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs.

  15. Memory CD8 T cells mediate severe immunopathology following respiratory syncytial virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan E Schmidt

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Memory CD8 T cells can provide protection from re-infection by respiratory viruses such as influenza and SARS. However, the relative contribution of memory CD8 T cells in providing protection against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV infection is currently unclear. To address this knowledge gap, we utilized a prime-boost immunization approach to induce robust memory CD8 T cell responses in the absence of RSV-specific CD4 T cells and antibodies. Unexpectedly, RSV infection of mice with pre-existing CD8 T cell memory led to exacerbated weight loss, pulmonary disease, and lethal immunopathology. The exacerbated disease in immunized mice was not epitope-dependent and occurred despite a significant reduction in RSV viral titers. In addition, the lethal immunopathology was unique to the context of an RSV infection as mice were protected from a normally lethal challenge with a recombinant influenza virus expressing an RSV epitope. Memory CD8 T cells rapidly produced IFN-γ following RSV infection resulting in elevated protein levels in the lung and periphery. Neutralization of IFN-γ in the respiratory tract reduced morbidity and prevented mortality. These results demonstrate that in contrast to other respiratory viruses, RSV-specific memory CD8 T cells can induce lethal immunopathology despite mediating enhanced viral clearance.

  16. Porcine aminopeptidase N mediated polarized infection by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus in target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cong, Yingying; Li, Xiaoxue; Bai, Yunyun; Lv, Xiaonan; Herrler, Georg; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhou, Xingdong; Qu, Bo; Meng, Fandan; Cong, Chengcheng; Ren, Xiaofeng; Li, Guangxing

    2015-01-01

    Infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells by porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) was characterized. Indirect immunofluorescence assay, real-time PCR, and transmission electron microscopy confirmed PEDV can be successfully propagated in immortalized swine small intestine epithelial cells (IECs). Infection involved porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN), a reported cellular receptor for PEDV, transient expression of pAPN and siRNA targeted pAPN increased and decreased the infectivity of PEDV in IECs, respectively. Subsequently, polarized entry into and release from both Vero E6 and IECs was analyzed. PEDV entry into polarized cells and pAPN grown on membrane inserts occurs via apical membrane. The progeny virus released into the medium was also quantified which demonstrated that PEDV is preferentially released from the apical membrane. Collectively, our data demonstrate that pAPN, the cellular receptor for PEDV, mediates polarized PEDV infection. These results imply the possibility that PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in intestinal epithelial cells. - Highlights: • PEDV infection of polarized intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) was characterized. • Porcine aminpeptidase N (pAPN) facilitated PEDV infection in IECs. • PEDV entry into and release from polarized cell via its apical membrane. • PEDV infection may proceed by lateral spread of virus in IECs

  17. Patterns of evolution and host gene mimicry in influenza and other RNA viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Greenbaum

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available It is well known that the dinucleotide CpG is under-represented in the genomic DNA of many vertebrates. This is commonly thought to be due to the methylation of cytosine residues in this dinucleotide and the corresponding high rate of deamination of 5-methycytosine, which lowers the frequency of this dinucleotide in DNA. Surprisingly, many single-stranded RNA viruses that replicate in these vertebrate hosts also have a very low presence of CpG dinucleotides in their genomes. Viruses are obligate intracellular parasites and the evolution of a virus is inexorably linked to the nature and fate of its host. One therefore expects that virus and host genomes should have common features. In this work, we compare evolutionary patterns in the genomes of ssRNA viruses and their hosts. In particular, we have analyzed dinucleotide patterns and found that the same patterns are pervasively over- or under-represented in many RNA viruses and their hosts suggesting that many RNA viruses evolve by mimicking some of the features of their host's genes (DNA and likely also their corresponding mRNAs. When a virus crosses a species barrier into a different host, the pressure to replicate, survive and adapt, leaves a footprint in dinucleotide frequencies. For instance, since human genes seem to be under higher pressure to eliminate CpG dinucleotide motifs than avian genes, this pressure might be reflected in the genomes of human viruses (DNA and RNA viruses when compared to those of the same viruses replicating in avian hosts. To test this idea we have analyzed the evolution of the influenza virus since 1918. We find that the influenza A virus, which originated from an avian reservoir and has been replicating in humans over many generations, evolves in a direction strongly selected to reduce the frequency of CpG dinucleotides in its genome. Consistent with this observation, we find that the influenza B virus, which has spent much more time in the human population, has

  18. The TIM and TAM families of phosphatidylserine receptors mediate dengue virus entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meertens, Laurent; Carnec, Xavier; Lecoin, Manuel Perera; Ramdasi, Rasika; Guivel-Benhassine, Florence; Lew, Erin; Lemke, Greg; Schwartz, Olivier; Amara, Ali

    2012-10-18

    Dengue viruses (DVs) are responsible for the most medically relevant arboviral diseases. However, the molecular interactions mediating DV entry are poorly understood. We determined that TIM and TAM proteins, two receptor families that mediate the phosphatidylserine (PtdSer)-dependent phagocytic removal of apoptotic cells, serve as DV entry factors. Cells poorly susceptible to DV are robustly infected after ectopic expression of TIM or TAM receptors. Conversely, DV infection of susceptible cells is inhibited by anti-TIM or anti-TAM antibodies or knockdown of TIM and TAM expression. TIM receptors facilitate DV entry by directly interacting with virion-associated PtdSer. TAM-mediated infection relies on indirect DV recognition, in which the TAM ligand Gas6 acts as a bridging molecule by binding to PtdSer within the virion. This dual mode of virus recognition by TIM and TAM receptors reveals how DVs usurp the apoptotic cell clearance pathway for infectious entry. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Non-host Plant Resistance against Phytophthora capsici Is Mediated in Part by Members of the I2 R Gene Family in Nicotiana spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Arreguín, Julio C; Shimada-Beltrán, Harumi; Sevillano-Serrano, Jacobo; Moffett, Peter

    2017-01-01

    The identification of host genes associated with resistance to Phytophthora capsici is crucial to developing strategies of control against this oomycete pathogen. Since there are few sources of resistance to P. capsici in crop plants, non-host plants represent a promising source of resistance genes as well as excellent models to study P. capsici - plant interactions. We have previously shown that non-host resistance to P. capsici in Nicotiana spp. is mediated by the recognition of a specific P. capsici effector protein, PcAvr3a1 in a manner that suggests the involvement of a cognate disease resistance (R) genes. Here, we have used virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) and transgenic tobacco plants expressing dsRNA in Nicotiana spp. to identify candidate R genes that mediate non-host resistance to P. capsici . Silencing of members of the I2 multigene family in the partially resistant plant N. edwardsonii and in the resistant N. tabacum resulted in compromised resistance to P. capsici . VIGS of two other components required for R gene-mediated resistance, EDS1 and SGT1 , also enhanced susceptibility to P. capsici in N. edwardsonii , as well as in the susceptible plants N. benthamiana and N. clevelandii . The silencing of I2 family members in N. tabacum also compromised the recognition of PcAvr3a1. These results indicate that in this case, non-host resistance is mediated by the same components normally associated with race-specific resistance.

  20. Chronic Binge Alcohol Administration Dysregulates Hippocampal Genes Involved in Immunity and Neurogenesis in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. Maxi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Alcohol use disorders (AUD exacerbate neurocognitive dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV+ patients. We have shown that chronic binge alcohol (CBA administration (13–14 g EtOH/kg/wk prior to and during simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV infection in rhesus macaques unmasks learning deficits in operant learning and memory tasks. The underlying mechanisms of neurocognitive alterations due to alcohol and SIV are not known. This exploratory study examined the CBA-induced differential expression of hippocampal genes in SIV-infected (CBA/SIV+; n = 2 macaques in contrast to those of sucrose administered, SIV-infected (SUC/SIV+; n = 2 macaques. Transcriptomes of hippocampal samples dissected from brains obtained at necropsy (16 months post-SIV inoculation were analyzed to determine differentially expressed genes. MetaCore from Thomson Reuters revealed enrichment of genes involved in inflammation, immune responses, and neurodevelopment. Functional relevance of these alterations was examined in vitro by exposing murine neural progenitor cells (NPCs to ethanol (EtOH and HIV trans-activator of transcription (Tat protein. EtOH impaired NPC differentiation as indicated by decreased βIII tubulin expression. These findings suggest a role for neuroinflammation and neurogenesis in CBA/SIV neuropathogenesis and warrant further investigation of their potential contribution to CBA-mediated neurobehavioral deficits.

  1. Identification and nucleotide sequence of the thymidine kinase gene of Shope fibroma virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upton, C.; McFadden, G.

    1986-01-01

    The thymidine kinase (TK) gene of Shope fibroma virus (SFV), a tumorigenic leporipoxvirus, was localized within the viral genome with degenerate oligonucleotide probes. These probes were constructed to two regions of high sequence conservation between the vaccinia virus TK gene and those of several known eucaryotic cellular TK genes, including human, mouse, hamster, and chicken TK genes. The oligonucleotide probes initially localized the SFV TK gene 50 kilobases (kb) from the right terminus of the 160-kb SFV genome within the 9.5-kb BamHI-HindIII fragment E. Fine-mapping analysis indicated that the TK Gene was within a 1.2-kb AvaI-HaeIII fragment, and DNA sequencing of this region revealed an open reading frame capable of encoding a polypeptide of 187 amino acids possessing considerable homology to the TK genes of the vaccinia, variola, and monkeypox orthopoxviruses and also to a variety of cellular TK genes. Homology matrix analysis and homology scores suggest that the SFV TK gene has diverged significantly from its counterpart members in the orthopoxvirus genus. Nevertheless, the presence of conserved upstream open reading frames on the 5' side of all of the poxvirus TK genes indicates a similarity of functional organization between the orthopoxviruses and leporipoxviruses. These data suggest a common ancestral origin for at least some of the unique internal regions of the leporipoxviruses and orthopoxviruses as exemplified by SFV and vaccinia virus, respectively

  2. The Ebola virus glycoprotein mediates entry via a non-classical dynamin-dependent macropinocytic pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulherkar, Nirupama; Raaben, Matthijs; Torre, Juan Carlos de la; Whelan, Sean P.; Chandran, Kartik

    2011-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) has been reported to enter cultured cell lines via a dynamin-2-independent macropinocytic pathway or clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The route(s) of productive EBOV internalization into physiologically relevant cell types remain unexplored, and viral-host requirements for this process are incompletely understood. Here, we use electron microscopy and complementary chemical and genetic approaches to demonstrate that the viral glycoprotein, GP, induces macropinocytic uptake of viral particles into cells. GP's highly-glycosylated mucin domain is dispensable for virus-induced macropinocytosis, arguing that interactions between other sequences in GP and the host cell surface are responsible. Unexpectedly, we also found a requirement for the large GTPase dynamin-2, which is proposed to be dispensable for several types of macropinocytosis. Our results provide evidence that EBOV uses an atypical dynamin-dependent macropinocytosis-like entry pathway to enter Vero cells, adherent human peripheral blood-derived monocytes, and a mouse dendritic cell line.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of Epstein-Barr virus identifies variants and genes associated with gastric carcinoma and population structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Youyuan; Xu, Miao; Liang, Liming; Zhang, Haojiong; Xu, Ruihua; Feng, Qisheng; Feng, Lin; Luo, Bing; Zeng, Yi-Xin

    2017-10-01

    Epstein-Barr virus is a ubiquitous virus and is associated with several human malignances, including the significant subset of gastric carcinoma, Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma. Some Epstein-Barr virus-associated diseases are uniquely prevalent in populations with different geographic origins. However, the features of the disease and geographically associated Epstein-Barr virus genetic variation as well as the roles that the variation plays in carcinogenesis and evolution remain unclear. Therefore, in this study, we sequenced 95 geographically distinct Epstein-Barr virus isolates from Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinoma biopsies and saliva of healthy donors to detect variants and genes associated with gastric carcinoma and population structure from a genome-wide spectrum. We demonstrated that Epstein-Barr virus revealed the population structure between North China and South China. In addition, we observed population stratification between Epstein-Barr virus strains from gastric carcinoma and healthy controls, indicating that certain Epstein-Barr virus subtypes are associated with different gastric carcinoma risks. We identified that the BRLF1, BBRF3, and BBLF2/BBLF3 genes had significant associations with gastric carcinoma. LMP1 and BNLF2a genes were strongly geographically associated genes in Epstein-Barr virus. Our study provides insights into the genetic basis of oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus for gastric carcinoma, and the genetic variants associated with gastric carcinoma can serve as biomarkers for oncogenic Epstein-Barr virus.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of the foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA-polymerase gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brindeiro, R.M.; Soares, M.A.; Vianna, A.L.M.; Pontes, O.H.A. de; Pacheco, A.B.F.; Almeida, D.F. de; Tanuri, A.

    1991-01-01

    The foot-and-mouth disease virus RNA-polymerase gene was mutagenised in its active site. Pst I digestion of the polymerase gene (cDNA) generated a 790 bp fragment containing the critical sequence. This fragment was subcloned in M13mp8 for mutagenesis method. The polymerase gene was then reconstructed and subcloned in pUC19. These mutants will be used to study the enzyme structure and activity and to develop intracellular immunization assays in eukaryotic cells. (author)

  5. RNAi-mediated resistance to rice black-streaked dwarf virus in transgenic rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohamed M S; Bian, Shiquan; Wang, Muyue; Zhao, Jing; Zhang, Bingwei; Liu, Qiaoquan; Zhang, Changquan; Tang, Shuzhu; Gu, Minghong; Yu, Hengxiu

    2017-04-01

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV), a member of the genus Fijivirus in the family Reoviridae, causes significant economic losses in rice production in China and many other Asian countries. Development of resistant varieties by using conventional breeding methods is limited, as germplasm with high level of resistance to RBSDV have not yet been found. One of the most promising methods to confer resistance against RBSDV is the use of RNA interference (RNAi) technology. RBSDV non-structural protein P7-2, encoded by S7-2 gene, is a potential F-box protein and involved in the plant-virus interaction through the ubiquitination pathway. P8, encoded by S8 gene, is the minor core protein that possesses potent active transcriptional repression activity. In this study, we transformed rice calli using a mini-twin T-DNA vector harboring RNAi constructs of the RBSDV genes S7-2 or S8, and obtained plants harboring the target gene constructs and the selectable marker gene, hygromycin phosphotransferase (HPT). From the offspring of these transgenic plants, we obtained selectable marker (HPT gene)-free plants. Homozygous T 5 transgenic lines which harbored either S7-2-RNAi or S8-RNAi exhibited high level resistance against RBSDV under field infection pressure from indigenous viruliferous small brown planthoppers. Thus, our results showed that RNA interference with the expression of S7-2 or S8 genes seemed an effective way to induce high level resistance in rice against RBSD disease.

  6. Virus-specific HLA-restricted lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected human monocytes and macrophages mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torpey, D.J. III

    1987-01-01

    Freshly-isolated peripheral blood human monocytes and 5 day in vitro cultured macrophages were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), labeled with /sup 51/Cr, and used as target cells in a 12-14 hour cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from HSV-1 non-immune individuals, whether unstimulated or stimulated with HSV-1 antigen, did not mediate significant lysis of either target cell. HSV-immune MNL, both freshly-isolated and cultured for 5 days without antigen, demonstrated only low levels of natural killer (NK) cell-mediate lysis. MNL from HSV-immune individuals incubated for 5 days in vitro with HSV-1 antigen mediated significant virus-specific lysis of both target cells. Mean virus-specific lysis of autologous monocytes was 8.5(/+-/2.0)% compared to a three-fold greater virus-specific lysis of autologous macrophages. Greater than 70% of this lytic activity was mediated by Leu-11-negative, T3-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Allogeneic target cells lacking a common HLA determinant were not significantly lysed while T8-positive CTL mediated infrequent lysis of target cells sharing a common HLA-A and/or HLA-B determinant. T4-positive lymphocytes were demonstrated to be the predominant cell mediating lysis of autologous target cells and allogeneic target cells sharing both HLA-A and/or HLA-B plus HLA-DR determinants with the CTL; the T4-positive cell was the sole CTL mediator of lysis of allogeneic target cells having a common HLA-DR determinant.

  7. Virus-specific HLA-restricted lysis of herpes simplex virus-infected human monocytes and macrophages mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torpey, D.J. III.

    1987-01-01

    Freshly-isolated peripheral blood human monocytes and 5 day in vitro cultured macrophages were infected with herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), labeled with 51 Cr, and used as target cells in a 12-14 hour cell-mediated cytotoxicity assay. Mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) from HSV-1 non-immune individuals, whether unstimulated or stimulated with HSV-1 antigen, did not mediate significant lysis of either target cell. HSV-immune MNL, both freshly-isolated and cultured for 5 days without antigen, demonstrated only low levels of natural killer (NK) cell-mediate lysis. MNL from HSV-immune individuals incubated for 5 days in vitro with HSV-1 antigen mediated significant virus-specific lysis of both target cells. Mean virus-specific lysis of autologous monocytes was 8.5(/+-/2.0)% compared to a three-fold greater virus-specific lysis of autologous macrophages. Greater than 70% of this lytic activity was mediated by Leu-11-negative, T3-positive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). Allogeneic target cells lacking a common HLA determinant were not significantly lysed while T8-positive CTL mediated infrequent lysis of target cells sharing a common HLA-A and/or HLA-B determinant. T4-positive lymphocytes were demonstrated to be the predominant cell mediating lysis of autologous target cells and allogeneic target cells sharing both HLA-A and/or HLA-B plus HLA-DR determinants with the CTL; the T4-positive cell was the sole CTL mediator of lysis of allogeneic target cells having a common HLA-DR determinant

  8. Recombinant AAV-mediated HSVtk gene transfer with direct intratumoral injections and Tet-On regulation for implanted human breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zi-Bo, LI; Zhao-Jun, ZENG; Qian, CHEN; Sai-Qun, LUO; Wei-Xin, HU

    2006-01-01

    HSVtk/ganciclovir (GCV) gene therapy has been extensively studied in tumors and relies largely on the gene expression of HSVtk. Most studies, however, have failed to demonstrate any significant benefit of a controlled gene expression strategy in cancer treatment. The Tet-On system is commonly used to regulate gene expression following Dox induction. We have evaluated the antitumor effect of HSVtk/ganciclovir gene therapy under Tet-On regulation by means of adeno-associated virus-2 (AAV-2)-mediated HSVtk gene transfer with direct intratumoral injections in mice bearing breast cancer tumors. Recombinant adeno-associated virus-2 (rAAV) was constructed and transduced into MCF-7 cell line. GCV treatment to the rAAV infected MCF-7 cells was performed by MTT assay under the doxycycline (Dox) induction or without Dox induction at a vp (viral particle) number of ≥10 4 /cell. The virus was administered intratumorally to nude mice that had also received GCV intraperitoneally. The antitumor effects were evaluated by measuring tumor regression and histological analysis. We have demonstrated that GCV treatment to the infected MCF-7 cells under the Dox induction was of more inhibited effects than those without Dox induction at ≥10 4 vp/cell. In ex vivo experiments, tumor growth of BALB/C nude mice breast cancer was retarded after rAAV-2/HSVtk/Tet-On was injected into the tumors under the Dox induction. Infiltrating cells were also observed in tumors after Dox induction followed by GCV treatment and cells were profoundly damaged. The expression of HSVtk gene in MCF-7 cells and BALB/C nude mice tumors was up-regulated by Tet-On under Dox induction with reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) analysis. The antitumor effect of rAAV-mediated HSVtk/GCV gene therapy under the Dox induction with direct intratumoral injections may be a useful treatment for breast cancer and other solid tumors

  9. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwon Lee

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections.

  10. Advances in study of perpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase reporter gene imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Ying; Lan Xiaoli; Zhang Yongxue

    2007-01-01

    Radionuclide reporter gene imaging is an effect way to provide qualitative and quantitative information for gene therapy. There are three systems of reporter gene including kinase reporter gene. perpes simplex virus type 1-thymidine kinase (HSV1-tk) has perfect physical and chemical characteristic which is suit for imaging as reporter gene. It has been widely investigated and intensively researched. Two substrates of HSV1-tk are purine nucleosite derivant and acyclovir derivant, which can also be used as reporter probes of HSV1-tk. (authors)

  11. RNAi screen reveals a role of SPHK2 in dengue virus-mediated apoptosis in hepatic cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atthapan Morchang

    Full Text Available Hepatic dysfunction is a feature of dengue virus (DENV infection. Hepatic biopsy specimens obtained from fatal cases of DENV infection show apoptosis, which relates to the pathogenesis of DENV infection. However, how DENV induced liver injury is not fully understood. In this study, we aim to identify the factors that influence cell death by employing an apoptosis-related siRNA library screening. Our results show the effect of 558 gene silencing on caspase 3-mediated apoptosis in DENV-infected Huh7 cells. The majority of genes that contributed to apoptosis were the apoptosis-related kinase enzymes. Tumor necrosis factor superfamily member 12 (TNFSF12, and sphingosine kinase 2 (SPHK2, were selected as the candidate genes to further validate their influences on DENV-induced apoptosis. Transfection of siRNA targeting SPHK2 but not TNFSF12 genes reduced apoptosis determined by Annexin V/PI staining. Knockdown of SPHK2 did not reduce caspase 8 activity; however, did significantly reduce caspase 9 activity, suggesting its involvement of SPHK2 in the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis. Treatment of ABC294649, an inhibitor of SPHK2, reduced the caspase 3 activity, suggesting the involvement of its kinase activity in apoptosis. Knockdown of SPHK2 significantly reduced caspase 3 activity not only in DENV-infected Huh7 cells but also in DENV-infected HepG2 cells. Our results were consistent across all of the four serotypes of DENV infection, which supports the pro-apoptotic role of SPHK2 in DENV-infected liver cells.

  12. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid and sensitive detection of sheep pox and goat pox viruses in clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesan, G; Balamurugan, V; Bhanuprakash, V; Singh, R K; Pandey, A B

    2016-06-01

    A Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay targeting the highly conserved DNA polymerase gene of capripox virus genome was developed and evaluated for rapid detection of sheep pox and goat pox viruses. The optimized LAMP assay is found specific and sensitive for amplification of target DNA with a diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of 96.6% and 100% respectively compared to quantitative PCR. The detection rate of LAMP, PCR and Q-PCR assays is found to be 81.5%, 67% and 83% respectively. This LAMP assay has the potential for rapid clinical diagnosis and surveillance of sheep pox and goat pox in field diagnostic laboratories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Heterogeneity within the hemagglutinin genes of canine distemper virus (CDV) strains detected in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martella, V.; Cirone, F.; Elia, G.

    2006-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious viral pathogen causing lethal disease in dogs and other mammalians. A high degree of genetic variation is found between recent CDV strains and the old CDV isolates used in the vaccines and such genetic variation is regarded as a possible cause....... These results suggest that at least three different CDV lineages are present in Italy. Keywords: Canine distemper virus; Dogs; Lineages; H gene...

  14. Rescue of infectious rift valley fever virus entirely from cDNA, analysis of virus lacking the NSs gene, and expression of a foreign gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikegami, Tetsuro; Won, Sungyong; Peters, C J; Makino, Shinji

    2006-03-01

    Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) (genus Phlebovirus, family Bunyaviridae) has a tripartite negative-strand genome, causes a mosquito-borne disease that is endemic in sub-Saharan African countries and that also causes large epidemics among humans and livestock. Furthermore, it is a bioterrorist threat and poses a risk for introduction to other areas. In spite of its danger, neither veterinary nor human vaccines are available. We established a T7 RNA polymerase-driven reverse genetics system to rescue infectious clones of RVFV MP-12 strain entirely from cDNA, the first for any phlebovirus. Expression of viral structural proteins from the protein expression plasmids was not required for virus rescue, whereas NSs protein expression abolished virus rescue. Mutants of MP-12 partially or completely lacking the NSs open reading frame were viable. These NSs deletion mutants replicated efficiently in Vero and 293 cells, but not in MRC-5 cells. In the latter cell line, accumulation of beta interferon mRNA occurred after infection by these NSs deletion mutants, but not after infection by MP-12. The NSs deletion mutants formed larger plaques than MP-12 did in Vero E6 cells and failed to shut off host protein synthesis in Vero cells. An MP-12 mutant carrying a luciferase gene in place of the NSs gene replicated as efficiently as MP-12 did, produced enzymatically active luciferase during replication, and stably retained the luciferase gene after 10 virus passages, representing the first demonstration of foreign gene expression in any bunyavirus. This reverse genetics system can be used to study the molecular virology of RVFV, assess current vaccine candidates, produce new vaccines, and incorporate marker genes into animal vaccines.

  15. A novel recombinant pseudorabies virus expressing parvovirus VP2 gene: Immunogenicity and protective efficacy in swine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Dishi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Porcine parvovirus (PPV VP2 gene has been successfully expressed in many expression systems resulting in self-assembly of virus-like particles (VLPs with similar morphology to the native capsid. Here, a pseudorabies virus (PRV system was adopted to express the PPV VP2 gene. Methods A recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 was obtained by homologous recombination between the vector PRV viral DNA and a transfer plasmid. Then recombinant virus was purified with plaque purification, and its identity confirmed by PCR amplification, Western blot and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA analyses. Electronic microscopy of PRV SA215/VP2 confirmed self-assembly of both pseudorabies virus and VLPs from VP2 protein. Results Immunization of piglets with recombinant virus elicited PRV-specific and PPV-specific humoral immune responses and provided complete protection against a lethal dose of PRV challenges. Gilts immunized with recombinant viruses induced PPV-specific antibodies, and significantly reduced the mortality rate of (1 of 28 following virulent PPV challenge compared with the control (7 of 31. Furthermore, PPV virus DNA was not detected in the fetuses of recombinant virus immunized gilts. Conclusions In this study, a recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 virus expressing PPV VP2 protein was constructed using PRV SA215 vector. The safety, immunogenicity, and protective efficacy of the recombinant virus were demonstrated in piglets and primiparous gilts. This recombinant PRV SA215/VP2 represents a suitable candidate for the development of a bivalent vaccine against both PRV and PPV infection.

  16. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) as an alternative to PCR: A rapid on-site detection of gene doping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salamin, Olivier; Kuuranne, Tiia; Saugy, Martial; Leuenberger, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    Innovation in medical research has been diverted at multiple occasions to enhance human performance. The predicted great progress in gene therapy has raised some concerns regarding its misuse in the world of sports (gene doping) for several years now. Even though there is no evidence that gene doping has ever been used in sports, the continuous improvement of gene therapy techniques increases the likelihood of abuse. Therefore, since 2004, efforts have been invested by the anti-doping community and WADA for the development of detection methods. Several nested PCR and qPCR-based strategies exploiting the absence of introns in the transgenic DNA have been proposed for the long-term detection of transgene in blood. Despite their great sensitivity, those protocols are hampered by limitations of the techniques that can be cumbersome and costly. The purpose of this perspective is to describe a new approach based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) for the detection of gene doping. This protocol enables a rapid and simple method to amplify nucleic acids with a high sensitivity and specificity and with a simple visual detection of the results. LAMP is already being used in clinical application for the detection of viruses or mutations. Therefore, this technique has the potential to be further developed for the detection of foreign genetic material in elite athletes. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Genetic characterization of Italian field strains of Schmallenberg virus based on N and NSs genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izzo, Francesca; Cosseddu, Gian Mario; Polci, Andrea; Iapaolo, Federica; Pinoni, Chiara; Capobianco Dondona, Andrea; Valleriani, Fabrizia; Monaco, Federica

    2016-08-01

    Following its first identification in Germany in 2011, the Schmallenberg virus (SBV) has rapidly spread to many other European countries. Despite the wide dissemination, the molecular characterization of the circulating strains is limited to German, Belgian, Dutch, and Swiss viruses. To fill this gap, partial genetic characterization of 15 Italian field strains was performed, based on S segment genes. Samples were collected in 2012 in two different regions where outbreaks occurred during distinct epidemic seasons. The comparative sequence analysis demonstrated a high molecular stability of the circulating viruses; nevertheless, we identified several variants of the N and NSs proteins not described in other SBV isolates circulating in Europe.

  18. Transcriptional Regulation in Ebola Virus: Effects of Gene Border Structure and Regulatory Elements on Gene Expression and Polymerase Scanning Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauburger, Kristina; Boehmann, Yannik; Krähling, Verena; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-02-15

    The highly pathogenic Ebola virus (EBOV) has a nonsegmented negative-strand (NNS) RNA genome containing seven genes. The viral genes either are separated by intergenic regions (IRs) of variable length or overlap. The structure of the EBOV gene overlaps is conserved throughout all filovirus genomes and is distinct from that of the overlaps found in other NNS RNA viruses. Here, we analyzed how diverse gene borders and noncoding regions surrounding the gene borders influence transcript levels and govern polymerase behavior during viral transcription. Transcription of overlapping genes in EBOV bicistronic minigenomes followed the stop-start mechanism, similar to that followed by IR-containing gene borders. When the gene overlaps were extended, the EBOV polymerase was able to scan the template in an upstream direction. This polymerase feature seems to be generally conserved among NNS RNA virus polymerases. Analysis of IR-containing gene borders showed that the IR sequence plays only a minor role in transcription regulation. Changes in IR length were generally well tolerated, but specific IR lengths led to a strong decrease in downstream gene expression. Correlation analysis revealed that these effects were largely independent of the surrounding gene borders. Each EBOV gene contains exceptionally long untranslated regions (UTRs) flanking the open reading frame. Our data suggest that the UTRs adjacent to the gene borders are the main regulators of transcript levels. A highly complex interplay between the different cis-acting elements to modulate transcription was revealed for specific combinations of IRs and UTRs, emphasizing the importance of the noncoding regions in EBOV gene expression control. Our data extend those from previous analyses investigating the implication of noncoding regions at the EBOV gene borders for gene expression control. We show that EBOV transcription is regulated in a highly complex yet not easily predictable manner by a set of interacting cis

  19. Positive evolution of the glycoprotein (GP) gene is related to transmission of the Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Y X; Wang, L N; Wu, X M; Song, C X

    2016-03-28

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever is a fatal disease caused by the negative-strand RNA of the Ebola virus. A high-intensity outbreak of this fever was reported in West Africa last year; however, there is currently no definitive treatment strategy available for this disease. In this study, we analyzed the molecular evolutionary history and attempted to determine the positive selection sites in the Ebola genes using multiple-genomic sequences of the various Ebola virus subtypes, in order to gain greater clarity into the evolution of the virus and its various subtypes. Only the glycoprotein (GP) gene was positively selected among the 8 Ebola genes, with the other genes remaining in the purification stage. The positive selection sites in the GP gene were identified by a random-site model; these sites were found to be located in the mucin-like region, which is associated with transmembrane protein binding. Additionally, different branches of the phylogenetic tree displayed different positive sites, which in turn was responsible for differences in the cell adhesion ability of the virus. In conclusion, the pattern of positive sites in the GP gene is associated with the epidemiology and prevalence of Ebola in different areas.

  20. Differential gene expression related to Nora virus infection of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, Ethan J; Licking-Murray, Kellie D; Carlson, Kimberly A

    2013-08-01

    Nora virus is a recently discovered RNA picorna-like virus that produces a persistent infection in Drosophila melanogaster, but the antiviral pathway or change in gene expression is unknown. We performed cDNA microarray analysis comparing the gene expression profiles of Nora virus infected and uninfected wild-type D. melanogaster. This analysis yielded 58 genes exhibiting a 1.5-fold change or greater and p-value less than 0.01. Of these genes, 46 were up-regulated and 12 down-regulated in response to infection. To validate the microarray results, qRT-PCR was performed with probes for Chorion protein 16 and Troponin C isoform 4, which show good correspondence with cDNA microarray results. Differential regulation of genes associated with Toll and immune-deficient pathways, cytoskeletal development, Janus Kinase-Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription interactions, and a potential gut-specific innate immune response were found. This genome-wide expression profile of Nora virus infection of D. melanogaster can pinpoint genes of interest for further investigation of antiviral pathways employed, genetic mechanisms, sites of replication, viral persistence, and developmental effects. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. MicroRNA regulation of human protease genes essential for influenza virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A Meliopoulos

    Full Text Available Influenza A virus causes seasonal epidemics and periodic pandemics threatening the health of millions of people each year. Vaccination is an effective strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality, and in the absence of drug resistance, the efficacy of chemoprophylaxis is comparable to that of vaccines. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has emphasized the need for new drug targets. Knowledge of the host cell components required for influenza replication has been an area targeted for disease intervention. In this study, the human protease genes required for influenza virus replication were determined and validated using RNA interference approaches. The genes validated as critical for influenza virus replication were ADAMTS7, CPE, DPP3, MST1, and PRSS12, and pathway analysis showed these genes were in global host cell pathways governing inflammation (NF-κB, cAMP/calcium signaling (CRE/CREB, and apoptosis. Analyses of host microRNAs predicted to govern expression of these genes showed that eight miRNAs regulated gene expression during virus replication. These findings identify unique host genes and microRNAs important for influenza replication providing potential new targets for disease intervention strategies.

  2. MicroRNA regulation of human protease genes essential for influenza virus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meliopoulos, Victoria A; Andersen, Lauren E; Brooks, Paula; Yan, Xiuzhen; Bakre, Abhijeet; Coleman, J Keegan; Tompkins, S Mark; Tripp, Ralph A

    2012-01-01

    Influenza A virus causes seasonal epidemics and periodic pandemics threatening the health of millions of people each year. Vaccination is an effective strategy for reducing morbidity and mortality, and in the absence of drug resistance, the efficacy of chemoprophylaxis is comparable to that of vaccines. However, the rapid emergence of drug resistance has emphasized the need for new drug targets. Knowledge of the host cell components required for influenza replication has been an area targeted for disease intervention. In this study, the human protease genes required for influenza virus replication were determined and validated using RNA interference approaches. The genes validated as critical for influenza virus replication were ADAMTS7, CPE, DPP3, MST1, and PRSS12, and pathway analysis showed these genes were in global host cell pathways governing inflammation (NF-κB), cAMP/calcium signaling (CRE/CREB), and apoptosis. Analyses of host microRNAs predicted to govern expression of these genes showed that eight miRNAs regulated gene expression during virus replication. These findings identify unique host genes and microRNAs important for influenza replication providing potential new targets for disease intervention strategies.

  3. Virus-induced gene silencing in Medicago truncatula and Lathyrus odorata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette; Kjær, Gabriela Didina Constantin; Piednoir, Elodie

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has become an important reverse genetics tool for functional genomics. VIGS vectors based on Pea early browning virus (PEBV, genus Tobravirus) and Bean pod mottle virus (genus Comovirus) are available for the legume species Pisum sativum and Glycine max, respec...

  4. Cadherin-related family member 3, a childhood asthma susceptibility gene product, mediates rhinovirus C binding and replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochkov, Yury A; Watters, Kelly; Ashraf, Shamaila; Griggs, Theodor F; Devries, Mark K; Jackson, Daniel J; Palmenberg, Ann C; Gern, James E

    2015-04-28

    Members of rhinovirus C (RV-C) species are more likely to cause wheezing illnesses and asthma exacerbations compared with other rhinoviruses. The cellular receptor for these viruses was heretofore unknown. We report here that expression of human cadherin-related family member 3 (CDHR3) enables the cells normally unsusceptible to RV-C infection to support both virus binding and replication. A coding single nucleotide polymorphism (rs6967330, C529Y) was previously linked to greater cell-surface expression of CDHR3 protein, and an increased risk of wheezing illnesses and hospitalizations for childhood asthma. Compared with wild-type CDHR3, cells transfected with the CDHR3-Y529 variant had about 10-fold increases in RV-C binding and progeny yields. We developed a transduced HeLa cell line (HeLa-E8) stably expressing CDHR3-Y529 that supports RV-C propagation in vitro. Modeling of CDHR3 structure identified potential binding sites that could impact the virus surface in regions that are highly conserved among all RV-C types. Our findings identify that the asthma susceptibility gene product CDHR3 mediates RV-C entry into host cells, and suggest that rs6967330 mutation could be a risk factor for RV-C wheezing illnesses.

  5. Analysis of immune-related genes during Nora virus infection of Drosophila melanogaster using next generation sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Wilfredo; Page, Alexis M; Carlson, Darby J; Ericson, Brad L; Cserhati, Matyas F; Guda, Chittibabu; Carlson, Kimberly A

    2018-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster depends upon the innate immune system to regulate and combat viral infection. This is a complex, yet widely conserved process that involves a number of immune pathways and gene interactions. In addition, expression of genes involved in immunity are differentially regulated as the organism ages. This is particularly true for viruses that demonstrate chronic infection, as is seen with Nora virus. Nora virus is a persistent non-pathogenic virus that replicates in a horizontal manner in D. melanogaster . The genes involved in the regulation of the immune response to Nora virus infection are largely unknown. In addition, the temporal response of immune response genes as a result of infection has not been examined. In this study, D. melanogaster either infected with Nora virus or left uninfected were aged for 2, 10, 20 and 30 days. The RNA from these samples was analyzed by next generation sequencing (NGS) and the resulting immune-related genes evaluated by utilizing both the PANTHER and DAVID databases, as well as comparison to lists of immune related genes and FlyBase. The data demonstrate that Nora virus infected D. melanogaster exhibit an increase in immune related gene expression over time. In addition, at day 30, the data demonstrate that a persistent immune response may occur leading to an upregulation of specific immune response genes. These results demonstrate the utility of NGS in determining the potential immune system genes involved in Nora virus replication, chronic infection and involvement of antiviral pathways.

  6. Modulation of gene expression in a human cell line caused by poliovirus, vaccinia virus and interferon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoddevik Gunnar

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The project was initiated to describe the response of a human embryonic fibroblast cell line to the replication of two different viruses, and, more specifically, to look for candidate genes involved in viral defense. For this purpose, the cells were synchronously infected with poliovirus in the absence or presence of interferon-alpha, or with vaccinia virus, a virus that is not inhibited by interferon. By comparing the changes in transcriptosome due to these different challenges, it should be possible to suggest genes that might be involved in defense. Results The viral titers were sufficient to yield productive infection in a majority of the cells. The cells were harvested in triplicate at various time-points, and the transcriptosome compared with mock infected cells using oligo-based, global 35 k microarrays. While there was very limited similarities in the response to the different viruses, a large proportion of the genes up-regulated by interferon-alpha were also up-regulated by poliovirus. Interferon-alpha inhibited poliovirus replication, but there were no signs of any interferons being induced by poliovirus. The observations suggest that the cells do launch an antiviral response to poliovirus in the absence of interferon. Analyses of the data led to a list of candidate antiviral genes. Functional information was limited, or absent, for most of the candidate genes. Conclusion The data are relevant for our understanding of how the cells respond to poliovirus and vaccinia virus infection. More annotations, and more microarray studies with related viruses, are required in order to narrow the list of putative defence-related genes.

  7. Recessive resistance to Bean common mosaic virus conferred by the bc-1 and bc-2 genes in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) affects long distance movement of the virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xue; Orellana, Gardenia; Myers, James; Karasev, Alexander V

    2018-04-12

    Recessive resistance to Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) is governed by four genes that include one strain-nonspecific helper gene bc-u, and three strain-specific genes bc-1, bc-2, and bc-3. The bc-3 gene was identified as an eIF4E translation initiation factor gene mediating resistance through disruption of the interaction between this protein and the VPg protein of the virus. The mode of action of bc-1 and bc-2 in expression of BCMV resistance is unknown, although bc-1 gene was found to affect systemic spread of a related potyvirus, Bean common mosaic necrosis virus. To investigate the possible role of both bc-1 and bc-2 genes in replication, cell-to-cell, and long distance movement of BCMV in P. vulgaris, we tested virus spread of eight BCMV isolates representing pathogroups I, IV, VI, VII, and VIII, in a set of bean differentials expressing different combinations of six resistance alleles including bc-u, bc-1, bc-1 2 , bc-2, bc-2 2 , and bc-3. All studied BCMV isolates were able to replicate and spread in inoculated leaves of bean cultivars harboring bc-u, bc-1, bc-1 2 , bc-2, and bc-2 2 alleles and their combinations, while no BCMV replication was found in inoculated leaves of 'IVT7214' carrying the bc-u, bc-2 and bc-3 genes, except for isolate 1755a capable of overcoming the resistance conferred by bc-2 and bc-3. In contrast, the systemic spread of all BCMV isolates from pathogroups I, IV,VI, VII, and VIII was impaired in common bean cultivars carrying bc-1, bc-1 2 , bc-2, and bc-2 2 alleles. The data suggest that bc-1 and bc-2 recessive resistance genes have no effect on the replication and cell-to-cell movement of BCMV, but affect systemic spread of BCMV in common bean. The BCMV resistance conferred by bc-1 and bc-2 and affecting systemic spread was found only partially effective when these two genes were expressed singly. The efficiency of the restriction of the systemic spread of the virus was greatly enhanced when

  8. Internal Gene Cassette from a Genotype S H9N2 Avian Influenza Virus Attenuates the Pathogenicity of H5 Viruses in Chickens and Mice

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    Xiaoli Hao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available H9N2 avian influenza virus (AIV of genotype S frequently donate internal genes to facilitate the generation of novel reassortants such as H7N9, H10N8, H5N2 and H5N6 AIVs, posing an enormous threat to both human health and poultry industry. However, the pathogenicity and transmission of reassortant H5 viruses with internal gene cassette of genotype S H9N2-origin in chickens and mice remain unknown. In this study, four H5 reassortants carrying the HA and NA genes from different clades of H5 viruses and the remaining internal genes from an H9N2 virus of the predominant genotype S were generated by reverse genetics. We found that all four H5 reassortant viruses showed attenuated virulence in both chickens and mice, thus leading to increased the mean death times compared to the corresponding parental viruses. Consistently, the polymerase activity and replication ability in mammalian and avian cells, and the cytokine responses in the lungs of chickens and mice were also decreased when compared to their respective parental viruses. Moreover, these reassortants transmitted from birds to birds by direct contact but not by an airborne route. Our data indicate that the internal genes as a whole cassette from genotype S H9N2 viruses play important roles in reducing the pathogenicity of the H5 recombinants in chickens and mice, and might contribute to the circulation in avian or mammalian hosts.

  9. Establishment of a mouse model for the complete mosquito-mediated transmission cycle of Zika virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Ping Kuo

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is primarily transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes in the subgenus Stegomyia but can also be transmitted sexually and vertically in humans. STAT1 is an important downstream factor that mediates type I and II interferon signaling. In the current study, we showed that mice with STAT1 knockout (Stat1-/- were highly susceptible to ZIKV infection. As low as 5 plaque-forming units of ZIKV could cause viremia and death in Stat1-/- mice. ZIKV replication was initially detected in the spleen but subsequently spread to the brain with concomitant reduction of the virus in the spleen in the infected mice. Furthermore, ZIKV could be transmitted from mosquitoes to Stat1-/- mice back to mosquitoes and then to naïve Stat1-/- mice. The 50% mosquito infectious dose of viremic Stat1-/- mouse blood was close to 810 focus-forming units (ffu/ml. Our further studies indicated that the activation of macrophages and conventional dendritic cells were likely critical for the resolution of ZIKV infection. The newly developed mouse and mosquito transmission models for ZIKV infection will be useful for the evaluation of antiviral drugs targeting the virus, vector, and host.

  10. Annexin A2 Mediates the Localization of Measles Virus Matrix Protein at the Plasma Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Ritsuko; Kubota, Marie; Hashiguchi, Takao; Yanagi, Yusuke; Ohno, Shinji

    2018-02-28

    Annexins are a family of structurally related proteins that bind negatively charged membrane phospholipids in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner. Annexin A2 (AnxA2), a member of the family, has been implicated in a variety of cellular functions including the organization of membrane domains, vesicular trafficking and cell-cell adhesion. AnxA2 generally forms the heterotetrameric complex with a small Ca 2+ -binding protein S100A10. Measles virus (MV), a member of the family Paramyxoviridae , is an enveloped virus with a nonsegmented negative strand RNA genome. Knockdown of AnxA2 greatly reduced MV growth in cells, without affecting its entry and viral RNA production. In MV-infected, AnxA2-knockdown cells, the expression level of the matrix (M) protein, but not other viral proteins, was reduced compared with that in control cells, and the distribution of the M protein at the plasma membrane was decreased. The M protein lines the inner surface of the envelope and plays an important role in virus assembly by connecting the nucleocapsid to the envelope proteins. The M protein bound to AnxA2 independently of AnxA2's phosphorylation or its association with S100A10, and was co-localized with AnxA2 within cells. Truncation of the N-terminal 10 amino acid residues, but not the N-terminal 5 residues, compromised the ability of the M protein to interact with AnxA2 and localize at the plasma membrane. These results indicate that AnxA2 mediates the localization of the MV M protein at the plasma membrane by interacting with its N-terminal region (especially residues at positions 6-10), thereby aiding in MV assembly. IMPORTANCE Measles virus (MV) is an important human pathogen, still claiming ∼ 100,000 lives per year despite the presence of effective vaccines, and causes occasional outbreaks even in developed countries. Replication of viruses largely relies on the functions of host cells. Our study revealed that the reduction of the host protein annexin A2 compromises the replication of

  11. Homologous gene targeting of a carotenoids biosynthetic gene in Rhodosporidium toruloides by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenyi; Yang, Xiaobing; Wang, Xueying; Lin, Xinping; Wang, Yanan; Zhang, Sufang; Luan, Yushi; Zhao, Zongbao K

    2017-07-01

    To target a carotenoid biosynthetic gene in the oleaginous yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides by using the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation (AMT) method. The RHTO_04602 locus of R. toruloides NP11, previously assigned to code the carotenoid biosynthetic gene CRTI, was amplified from genomic DNA and cloned into the binary plasmid pZPK-mcs, resulting in pZPK-CRT. A HYG-expression cassette was inserted into the CRTI sequence of pZPK-CRT by utilizing the restriction-free clone strategy. The resulted plasmid was used to transform R. toruloides cells according to the AMT method, leading to a few white transformants. Sequencing analysis of those transformants confirmed homologous recombination and insertional inactivation of CRTI. When the white variants were transformed with a CRTI-expression cassette, cells became red and produced carotenoids as did the wild-type strain NP11. Successful homologous targeting of the CrtI locus confirmed the function of RHTO_04602 in carotenoids biosynthesis in R. toruloides. It provided valuable information for metabolic engineering of this non-model yeast species.

  12. Novel Feline Leukemia Virus Interference Group Based on the env Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Ariko; Watanabe, Shinya; Hiratsuka, Takahiro; Ito, Jumpei; Ngo, Minh Ha; Makundi, Isaac; Kawasaki, Junna; Endo, Yasuyuki; Tsujimoto, Hajime; Nishigaki, Kazuo

    2016-05-01

    Feline leukemia virus (FeLV) subgroups have emerged in infected cats via the mutation or recombination of the env gene of subgroup A FeLV (FeLV-A), the primary virus. We report the isolation and characterization of a novel env gene, TG35-2, and report that the TG35-2 pseudotype can be categorized as a novel FeLV subgroup. The TG35-2 envelope protein displays strong sequence identity to FeLV-A Env, suggesting that selection pressure in cats causes novel FeLV subgroups to emerge. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Diversification of the Primary Antibody Repertoire by AID-Mediated Gene Conversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, Dennis K; Knight, Katherine L

    2015-01-01

    Gene conversion, mediated by activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID), has been found to contribute to generation of the primary antibody repertoire in several vertebrate species. Generation of the primary antibody repertoire by gene conversion of immunoglobulin (Ig) genes occurs primarily in gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) and is best described in chicken and rabbit. Here, we discuss current knowledge of the mechanism of gene conversion as well as the contribution of the microbiota in promoting gene conversion of Ig genes. Finally, we propose that the antibody diversification strategy used in GALT species, such as chicken and rabbit, is conserved in a subset of human and mouse B cells.

  14. Anti-gp120 minibody gene transfer to female genital epithelial cells protects against HIV-1 virus challenge in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussama M Abdel-Motal

    Full Text Available Although cervico-vaginal epithelial cells of the female lower genital tract provide the initial defense system against HIV-1 infection, the protection is sometimes incomplete. Thus, enhancing anti-HIV-1 humoral immunity at the mucosal cell surface by local expression of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BnAb that block HIV-1 entry would provide an important new intervention that could slow the spread of HIV/AIDS.This study tested the hypothesis that adeno-associated virus (AAV-BnAb gene transfer to cervico-vaginal epithelial cells will lead to protection against HIV-1. Accordingly, a recombinant AAV vector that encodes human b12 anti-HIV gp120 BnAb as a single-chain variable fragment Fc fusion (scFvFc, or "minibody" was constructed. The secreted b12 minibody was shown to be biologically functional in binding to virus envelope protein, neutralizing HIV-1 and importantly, blocking transfer and infectivity of HIV-1(bal in an organotypic human vaginal epithelial cell (VEC model. Furthermore, cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells were found to be efficiently transduced by the optimal AAV serotype mediated expression of GFP.This study provides the foundation for a novel microbicide strategy to protect against sexual transmission of HIV-1 by AAV transfer of broadly neutralizing antibody genes to cervico-vaginal epithelial stem cells that could replenish b12 BnAb secreting cells through multiple menstrual cycles.

  15. Virus pathotype and deep sequencing of the HA gene of a low pathogenicity H7N1 avian influenza virus causing mortality in Turkeys.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Munir Iqbal

    Full Text Available Low pathogenicity avian influenza (LPAI viruses of the H7 subtype generally cause mild disease in poultry. However the evolution of a LPAI virus into highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI virus results in the generation of a virus that can cause severe disease and death. The classification of these two pathotypes is based, in part, on disease signs and death in chickens, as assessed in an intravenous pathogenicity test, but the effect of LPAI viruses in turkeys is less well understood. During an investigation of LPAI virus infection of turkeys, groups of three-week-old birds inoculated with A/chicken/Italy/1279/99 (H7N1 showed severe disease signs and died or were euthanised within seven days of infection. Virus was detected in many internal tissues and organs from culled birds. To examine the possible evolution of the infecting virus to a highly pathogenic form in these turkeys, sequence analysis of the haemagglutinin (HA gene cleavage site was carried out by analysing multiple cDNA amplicons made from swabs and tissue sample extracts employing Sanger and Next Generation Sequencing. In addition, a RT-PCR assay to detect HPAI virus was developed. There was no evidence of the presence of HPAI virus in either the virus used as inoculum or from swabs taken from infected birds. However, a small proportion (<0.5% of virus carried in individual tracheal or liver samples did contain a molecular signature typical of a HPAI virus at the HA cleavage site. All the signature sequences were identical and were similar to HPAI viruses collected during the Italian epizootic in 1999/2000. We assume that the detection of HPAI virus in tissue samples following infection with A/chicken/Italy/1279/99 reflected amplification of a virus present at very low levels within the mixed inoculum but, strikingly, we observed no new HPAI virus signatures in the amplified DNA analysed by deep-sequencing.

  16. Detection of foot-and-mouth disease virus rna by reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hao-tai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP assay was developed for foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV RNA. The amplification was able to finish in 45 min under isothermal condition at 64°C by employing a set of four primers targeting FMDV 2B. The assay showed higher sensitivity than RT-PCR. No cross reactivity was observed from other RNA viruses including classical swine fever virus, swine vesicular disease, porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus, Japanese encephalitis virus. Furthermore, the assay correctly detected 84 FMDV positive samples but not 65 FMDV negative specimens. The result indicated the potential usefulness of the technique as a simple and rapid procedure for the detection of FMDV infection.

  17. Field distribution and DNA transport in solid tumors during electric field-mediated gene delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henshaw, Joshua W; Yuan, Fan

    2008-02-01

    Gene therapy has a great potential in cancer treatment. However, the efficacy of cancer gene therapy is currently limited by the lack of a safe and efficient means to deliver therapeutic genes into the nucleus of tumor cells. One method under investigation for improving local gene delivery is based on the use of pulsed electric field. Despite repeated demonstration of its effectiveness in vivo, the underlying mechanisms behind electric field-mediated gene delivery remain largely unknown. Without a thorough understanding of these mechanisms, it will be difficult to further advance the gene delivery. In this review, the electric field-mediated gene delivery in solid tumors will be examined by following individual transport processes that must occur in vivo for a successful gene transfer. The topics of examination include: (i) major barriers for gene delivery in the body, (ii) distribution of electric fields at both cell and tissue levels during the application of external fields, and (iii) electric field-induced transport of genes across each of the barriers. Through this approach, the review summarizes what is known about the mechanisms behind electric field-mediated gene delivery and what require further investigations in future studies.

  18. Smallpox virus resequencing GeneChips can also rapidly ascertain species status for some zoonotic non-variola orthopoxviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulaiman, Irshad M; Sammons, Scott A; Wohlhueter, Robert M

    2008-04-01

    We recently developed a set of seven resequencing GeneChips for the rapid sequencing of Variola virus strains in the WHO Repository of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In this study, we attempted to hybridize these GeneChips with some known non-Variola orthopoxvirus isolates, including monkeypox, cowpox, and vaccinia viruses, for rapid detection.

  19. Assessment of reference gene stability in Rice stripe virus and Rice black streaked dwarf virus infection rice by quantitative Real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Peng; Lu, Rongfei; Sun, Feng; Lan, Ying; Shen, Wenbiao; Du, Linlin; Zhou, Yijun; Zhou, Tong

    2015-10-24

    Stably expressed reference gene(s) normalization is important for the understanding of gene expression patterns by quantitative Real-time PCR (RT-qPCR), particularly for Rice stripe virus (RSV) and Rice black streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) that caused seriously damage on rice plants in China and Southeast Asia. The expression of fourteen common used reference genes of Oryza sativa L. were evaluated by RT-qPCR in RSV and RBSDV infected rice plants. Suitable normalization reference gene(s) were identified by geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. UBQ 10 + GAPDH and UBC + Actin1 were identified as suitable reference genes for RT-qPCR normalization under RSV and RBSDV infection, respectively. When using multiple reference genes, the expression patterns of OsPRIb and OsWRKY, two virus resistance genes, were approximately similar with that reported previously. Comparatively, by using single reference gene (TIP41-Like), a weaker inducible response was observed. We proposed that the combination of two reference genes could obtain more accurate and reliable normalization of RT-qPCR results in RSV- and RBSDV-infected plants. This work therefore sheds light on establishing a standardized RT-qPCR procedure in RSV- and RBSDV-infected rice plants, and might serve as an important point for discovering complex regulatory networks and identifying genes relevant to biological processes or implicated in virus.

  20. An efficient viral vector for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees and its induced resistance to Plum pox virus via silencing of a host factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hongguang; Wang, Aiming

    2017-03-01

    RNA silencing is a powerful technology for molecular characterization of gene functions in plants. A commonly used approach to the induction of RNA silencing is through genetic transformation. A potent alternative is to use a modified viral vector for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) to degrade RNA molecules sharing similar nucleotide sequence. Unfortunately, genomic studies in many allogamous woody perennials such as peach are severely hindered because they have a long juvenile period and are recalcitrant to genetic transformation. Here, we report the development of a viral vector derived from Prunus necrotic ringspot virus (PNRSV), a widespread fruit tree virus that is endemic in all Prunus fruit production countries and regions in the world. We show that the modified PNRSV vector, harbouring the sense-orientated target gene sequence of 100-200 bp in length in genomic RNA3, could efficiently trigger the silencing of a transgene or an endogenous gene in the model plant Nicotiana benthamiana. We further demonstrate that the PNRSV-based vector could be manipulated to silence endogenous genes in peach such as eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E isoform (eIF(iso)4E), a host factor of many potyviruses including Plum pox virus (PPV). Moreover, the eIF(iso)4E-knocked down peach plants were resistant to PPV. This work opens a potential avenue for the control of virus diseases in perennial trees via viral vector-mediated silencing of host factors, and the PNRSV vector may serve as a powerful molecular tool for functional genomic studies of Prunus fruit trees. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. CD4(+) T cell-mediated protection against a lethal outcome of systemic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus requires CD40 ligand expression, but not IFN-gamma or IL-4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C; Jensen, T; Nansen, A

    1999-01-01

    experiments using B cell- and T cell-deficient recipients revealed that no protection could be obtained in the absence of B cells, whereas treatment with virus-specific immune (IgG) serum controlled viral spreading to the central nervous system (CNS), but did not necessarily accomplish virus elimination......To investigate the mechanism(s) whereby T cells protect against a lethal outcome of systemic infection with vesicular stomatitis virus, mice with targeted defects in genes central to T cell function were tested for resistance to i.v. infection with this virus. Our results show that mice lacking...... the capacity to secrete both IFN-gamma and perforin completely resisted disease. Similar results were obtained using IL-4 knockout mice, indicating that neither cell-mediated nor T(h)2-dependent effector systems were required. In contrast, mice deficient in expression of CD40 ligand were more susceptible than...

  2. Development of three full-length infectious cDNA clones of distinct brassica yellows virus genotypes for agrobacterium-mediated inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Yan; Dong, Shu-Wei; Xiang, Hai-Ying; Chen, Xiang-Ru; Li, Da-Wei; Yu, Jia-Lin; Han, Cheng-Gui

    2015-02-02

    Brassica yellows virus is a newly identified species in the genus of Polerovirus within the family Luteoviridae. Brassica yellows virus (BrYV) is prevalently distributed throughout Mainland China and South Korea, is an important virus infecting cruciferous crops. Based on six BrYV genomic sequences of isolates from oilseed rape, rutabaga, radish, and cabbage, three genotypes, BrYV-A, BrYV-B, and BrYV-C, exist, which mainly differ in the 5' terminal half of the genome. BrYV is an aphid-transmitted and phloem-limited virus. The use of infectious cDNA clones is an alternative means of infecting plants that allows reverse genetic studies to be performed. In this study, full-length cDNA clones of BrYV-A, recombinant BrYV5B3A, and BrYV-C were constructed under control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. An agrobacterium-mediated inoculation system of Nicotiana benthamiana was developed using these cDNA clones. Three days after infiltration with full-length BrYV cDNA clones, necrotic symptoms were observed in the inoculated leaves of N. benthamiana; however, no obvious symptoms appeared in the upper leaves. Reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and western blot detection of samples from the upper leaves showed that the maximum infection efficiency of BrYVs could reach 100%. The infectivity of the BrYV-A, BrYV-5B3A, and BrYV-C cDNA clones was further confirmed by northern hybridization. The system developed here will be useful for further studies of BrYV, such as host range, pathogenicity, viral gene functions, and plant-virus-vector interactions, and especially for discerning the differences among the three genotypes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Analysis of gene expression in fetal and adult cells infected with rubella virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamo, Maria Pilar; Zapata, Marta; Frey, Teryl K.

    2008-01-01

    Congenital infection with rubella virus (RUB) leads to persistent infection and congenital defects and we showed previously that primary human fetal fibroblasts did not undergo apoptosis when infected with RUB, which could promote fetal virus persistence [Adamo, P., Asis, L., Silveyra, P., Cuffini, C., Pedranti, M., Zapata, M., 2004. Rubella virus does not induce apoptosis in primary human embryo fibroblasts cultures: a possible way of viral persistence in congenital infection. Viral Immunol. 17, 87-100]. To extend this observation, gene chip analysis was performed on a line of primary human fetal fibroblasts (10 weeks gestation) and a line of human adult lung fibroblasts (which underwent apoptosis in response to RUB infection) to compare gene expression in infected and uninfected cells. A total of 632 and 516 genes were upregulated or downregulated in the infected fetal and adult cells respectively in comparison to uninfected cells, however only 52 genes were regulated in both cell types. Although the regulated genes were different, across functional gene categories the patterns of gene regulation were similar. In general, regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes following infection appeared to favor apoptosis in the adult cells and lack of apoptosis in the fetal cells, however there was a greater relative expression of anti-apoptotic genes and reduced expression of pro-apoptotic genes in uninfected fetal cells versus uninfected adult cells and thus the lack of apoptosis in fetal cells following RUB infection was also due to the prevailing background of gene expression that is antagonistic to apoptosis. In support of this hypothesis, it was found that of a battery of five chemicals known to induce apoptosis, two induced apoptosis in the adult cells, but not in fetal cells, and two induced apoptosis more rapidly in the adult cells than in fetal cells (the fifth did not induce apoptosis in either). A robust interferon-stimulated gene response was induced

  4. Epstein-Barr virus latent gene sequences as geographical markers of viral origin: unique EBNA3 gene signatures identify Japanese viruses as distinct members of the Asian virus family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Akihisa; Croom-Carter, Deborah; Kondo, Osamu; Yasui, Masahiro; Koyama-Sato, Maho; Inoue, Masami; Kawa, Keisei; Rickinson, Alan B; Tierney, Rosemary J

    2011-05-01

    Polymorphisms in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latent genes can identify virus strains from different human populations and individual strains within a population. An Asian EBV signature has been defined almost exclusively from Chinese viruses, with little information from other Asian countries. Here we sequenced polymorphic regions of the EBNA1, 2, 3A, 3B, 3C and LMP1 genes of 31 Japanese strains from control donors and EBV-associated T/NK-cell lymphoproliferative disease (T/NK-LPD) patients. Though identical to Chinese strains in their dominant EBNA1 and LMP1 alleles, Japanese viruses were subtly different at other loci. Thus, while Chinese viruses mainly fall into two families with strongly linked 'Wu' or 'Li' alleles at EBNA2 and EBNA3A/B/C, Japanese viruses all have the consensus Wu EBNA2 allele but fall into two families at EBNA3A/B/C. One family has variant Li-like sequences at EBNA3A and 3B and the consensus Li sequence at EBNA3C; the other family has variant Wu-like sequences at EBNA3A, variants of a low frequency Chinese allele 'Sp' at EBNA3B and a consensus Sp sequence at EBNA3C. Thus, EBNA3A/B/C allelotypes clearly distinguish Japanese from Chinese strains. Interestingly, most Japanese viruses also lack those immune-escape mutations in the HLA-A11 epitope-encoding region of EBNA3B that are so characteristic of viruses from the highly A11-positive Chinese population. Control donor-derived and T/NK-LPD-derived strains were similarly distributed across allelotypes and, by using allelic polymorphisms to track virus strains in patients pre- and post-haematopoietic stem-cell transplant, we show that a single strain can induce both T/NK-LPD and B-cell-lymphoproliferative disease in the same patient.

  5. Phylogenetic relationships of seven previously unclassified viruses within the family Rhabdoviridae using partial nucleoprotein gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmin, I V; Hughes, G J; Rupprecht, C E

    2006-08-01

    Partial nucleoprotein (N) gene sequences of the rhabdoviruses Obodhiang (OBOV), Kotonkon (KOTV), Rochambeau (RBUV), Kern canyon (KCV), Mount Elgon bat (MEBV), Kolongo (KOLV) and Sandjimba (SJAV) were generated and their phylogenetic positions within the family Rhabdoviridae were determined. Both OBOV and KOTV were placed within the genus Ephemerovirus. RBUV was joined to the same cluster, but more distantly. MEBV and KCV were grouped into a monophyletic cluster (putative genus) with Oita virus (OITAV). These three viruses, originating from different regions of the world, were all isolated from insectivorous bats and may be specific for these mammals. African avian viruses KOLV and SJAV were joined to each other and formed another clade at the genus level. Further, they were grouped with the recently characterized rhabdovirus Tupaia virus (TRV). Although the genetic distance was great, the grouping was supported by consistent bootstrap values. This observation suggests that viruses of this group may be distributed widely in the Old World. Non-synonymous/synonymous substitution ratio estimations (dN/dS) using a partial N gene fragment (241 codons) for the three rhabdovirus genera revealed contrasting patterns of evolution, where dN/dS values follow the pattern Ephemerovirus > Vesiculovirus > Lyssavirus. The magnitude of this ratio corresponds well with the number of negatively selected codons. The accumulation of dS appears evenly distributed along the gene fragment for all three genera. These estimations demonstrated clearly that lyssaviruses are subjected to the strongest constraints against amino acid substitutions, probably related to their particular niche and unique pathobiology.

  6. Characterization of Sri Lanka rabies virus isolates using nucleotide sequence analysis of nucleoprotein gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Y T; Takahashi, H; Kameoka, Y; Shiino, T; Wimalaratne, O; Lodmell, D L

    2001-01-01

    Thirty-four suspected rabid brain samples from 2 humans, 24 dogs, 4 cats, 2 mongooses, I jackal and I water buffalo were collected in 1995-1996 in Sri Lanka. Total RNA was extracted directly from brain suspensions and examined using a one-step reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the rabies virus nucleoprotein (N) gene. Twenty-eight samples were found positive for the virus N gene by RT-PCR and also for the virus antigens by fluorescent antibody (FA) test. Rabies virus isolates obtained from different animal species in different regions of Sri Lanka were genetically homogenous. Sequences of 203 nucleotides (nt)-long RT-PCR products obtained from 16 of 27 samples were found identical. Sequences of 1350 nt of N genes of 14 RT-PCR products were determined. The Sri Lanka isolates under study formed a specific cluster that included also an earlier isolate from India but did not include the known isolates from China, Thailand, Malaysia, Israel, Iran, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Nepal, Philippines, Japan and from several other countries. These results suggest that one type of rabies virus is circulating among human, dog, cat, mongoose, jackal and water buffalo living near Colombo City and in other five remote regions in Sri Lanka.

  7. Genomic characterisation of Wongabel virus reveals novel genes within the Rhabdoviridae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubala, Aneta J; Proll, David F; Barnard, Ross T; Cowled, Chris J; Crameri, Sandra G; Hyatt, Alex D; Boyle, David B

    2008-06-20

    Viruses belonging to the family Rhabdoviridae infect a variety of different hosts, including insects, vertebrates and plants. Currently, there are approximately 200 ICTV-recognised rhabdoviruses isolated around the world. However, the majority remain poorly characterised and only a fraction have been definitively assigned to genera. The genomic and transcriptional complexity displayed by several of the characterised rhabdoviruses indicates large diversity and complexity within this family. To enable an improved taxonomic understanding of this family, it is necessary to gain further information about the poorly characterised members of this family. Here we present the complete genome sequence and predicted transcription strategy of Wongabel virus (WONV), a previously uncharacterised rhabdovirus isolated from biting midges (Culicoides austropalpalis) collected in northern Queensland, Australia. The 13,196 nucleotide genome of WONV encodes five typical rhabdovirus genes N, P, M, G and L. In addition, the WONV genome contains three genes located between the P and M genes (U1, U2, U3) and two open reading frames overlapping with the N and G genes (U4, U5). These five additional genes and their putative protein products appear to be novel, and their functions are unknown. Predictive analysis of the U5 gene product revealed characteristics typical of viroporins, and indicated structural similarities with the alpha-1 protein (putative viroporin) of viruses in the genus Ephemerovirus. Phylogenetic analyses of the N and G proteins of WONV indicated closest similarity with the avian-associated Flanders virus; however, the genomes of these two viruses are significantly diverged. WONV displays a novel and unique genome structure that has not previously been described for any animal rhabdovirus.

  8. Virion Glycoprotein-Mediated Immune Evasion by Human Cytomegalovirus: a Sticky Virus Makes a Slick Getaway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Thomas J.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY The prototypic herpesvirus human cytomegalovirus (CMV) exhibits the extraordinary ability to establish latency and maintain a chronic infection throughout the life of its human host. This is even more remarkable considering the robust adaptive immune response elicited by infection and reactivation from latency. In addition to the ability of CMV to exist in a quiescent latent state, its persistence is enabled by a large repertoire of viral proteins that subvert immune defense mechanisms, such as NK cell activation and major histocompatibility complex antigen presentation, within the cell. However, dissemination outside the cell presents a unique existential challenge to the CMV virion, which is studded with antigenic glycoprotein complexes targeted by a potent neutralizing antibody response. The CMV virion envelope proteins, which are critical mediators of cell attachment and entry, possess various characteristics that can mitigate the humoral immune response and prevent viral clearance. Here we review the CMV glycoprotein complexes crucial for cell attachment and entry and propose inherent properties of these proteins involved in evading the CMV humoral immune response. These include viral glycoprotein polymorphism, epitope competition, Fc receptor-mediated endocytosis, glycan shielding, and cell-to-cell spread. The consequences of CMV virion glycoprotein-mediated immune evasion have a major impact on persistence of the virus in the population, and a comprehensive understanding of these evasion strategies will assist in designing effective CMV biologics and vaccines to limit CMV-associated disease. PMID:27307580

  9. Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) as a reverse genetic tool to study development of symbiotic root nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Gabriela Didina Constantin; Grønlund, Mette; Stougaard, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) can provide a shortcut to plants with altered expression of specific genes. Here, we report that VIGS of the Nodule inception gene (Nin) can alter the nodulation phenotype and Nin gene expression in Pisum sativum. PsNin was chosen as target because of the disti...

  10. PRMT5 Is Upregulated in HTLV-1-Mediated T-Cell Transformation and Selective Inhibition Alters Viral Gene Expression and Infected Cell Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Panfil

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1 is a tumorigenic retrovirus responsible for development of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL. This disease manifests after a long clinical latency period of up to 2–3 decades. Two viral gene products, Tax and HBZ, have transforming properties and play a role in the pathogenic process. Genetic and epigenetic cellular changes also occur in HTLV-1-infected cells, which contribute to transformation and disease development. However, the role of cellular factors in transformation is not completely understood. Herein, we examined the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5 on HTLV-1-mediated cellular transformation and viral gene expression. We found PRMT5 expression was upregulated during HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, as well as in established lymphocytic leukemia/lymphoma cell lines and ATLL patient PBMCs. shRNA-mediated reduction in PRMT5 protein levels or its inhibition by a small molecule inhibitor (PRMT5i in HTLV-1-infected lymphocytes resulted in increased viral gene expression and decreased cellular proliferation. PRMT5i also had selective toxicity in HTLV-1-transformed T-cells. Finally, we demonstrated that PRMT5 and the HTLV-1 p30 protein had an additive inhibitory effect on HTLV-1 gene expression. Our study provides evidence for PRMT5 as a host cell factor important in HTLV-1-mediated T-cell transformation, and a potential target for ATLL treatment.

  11. Gene expression of herpes simplex virus. II. Uv radiological analysis of viral transcription units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millette, R. L.; Klaiber, R.

    1980-01-01

    The transcriptional organization of the genome of herpes simplex virus type 1 was analyzed by measuring the sensitivity of viral polypeptide synthesis to uv irradiation of the infecting virus. Herpes simplex virus type 1 was irradiated with various doses of uv light and used to infect xeroderma pigmentosum fibroblasts. Immediate early transcription units were analyzed by having cycloheximide present throughout the period of infection, removing the drug at 8 h postinfection, and pulse-labeling proteins with [355]methionine. Delayed early transcription units were analyzed in similar studies by having 9-beta-D-arabinofuranosyladenine present during the experiment to block replication of the input irradiated genome. The results indicate that none of the immediate early genes analyzed can be cotranscribed, whereas some of the delayed early genes might be cotranscribed. No evidence was found for the existence of large, multigene transcription units

  12. Gene-gun DNA vaccination aggravates respiratory syncytial virus-induced pneumonitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartholdy, Christina; Olszewska, Wieslawa; Stryhn, Anette

    2004-01-01

    elicited with recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the complete RSV M2 protein, but stronger than those induced by a similar DNA construct without the beta2m gene. DNA vaccination led to enhanced pulmonary disease after RSV challenge, with increased weight loss and cell recruitment to the lung. Depletion......A CD8+ T-cell memory response to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) was generated by using a DNA vaccine construct encoding the dominant Kd-restricted epitope from the viral transcription anti-terminator protein M2 (M2(82-90)), linked covalently to human beta2-microglobulin (beta2m). Cutaneous gene...... of CD8+ T cells reduced, but did not abolish, enhancement of disease. Mice vaccinated with a construct encoding a class I-restricted lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus epitope and beta2m suffered more severe weight loss after RSV infection than unvaccinated RSV-infected mice, although RSV-specific CD8...

  13. Human Antiviral Protein IFIX Suppresses Viral Gene Expression during Herpes Simplex Virus 1 (HSV-1) Infection and Is Counteracted by Virus-induced Proteasomal Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Marni S; Cristea, Ileana M

    2017-04-01

    The interferon-inducible protein X (IFIX), a member of the PYHIN family, was recently recognized as an antiviral factor against infection with herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1). IFIX binds viral DNA upon infection and promotes expression of antiviral cytokines. How IFIX exerts its host defense functions and whether it is inhibited by the virus remain unknown. Here, we integrated live cell microscopy, proteomics, IFIX domain characterization, and molecular virology to investigate IFIX regulation and antiviral functions during HSV-1 infection. We find that IFIX has a dynamic localization during infection that changes from diffuse nuclear and nucleoli distribution in uninfected cells to discrete nuclear puncta early in infection. This is rapidly followed by a reduction in IFIX protein levels. Indeed, using immunoaffinity purification and mass spectrometry, we define IFIX interactions during HSV-1 infection, finding an association with a proteasome subunit and proteins involved in ubiquitin-proteasome processes. Using synchronized HSV-1 infection, microscopy, and proteasome-inhibition experiments, we demonstrate that IFIX co-localizes with nuclear proteasome puncta shortly after 3 h of infection and that its pyrin domain is rapidly degraded in a proteasome-dependent manner. We further demonstrate that, in contrast to several other host defense factors, IFIX degradation is not dependent on the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of the viral protein ICP0. However, we show IFIX degradation requires immediate-early viral gene expression, suggesting a viral host suppression mechanism. The IFIX interactome also demonstrated its association with transcriptional regulatory proteins, including the 5FMC complex. We validate this interaction using microscopy and reciprocal isolations and determine it is mediated by the IFIX HIN domain. Finally, we show IFIX suppresses immediate-early and early viral gene expression during infection. Altogether, our study demonstrates that IFIX antiviral

  14. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses.

  15. Differentially expressed genes in healthy and plum pox virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vozárová, Z; Žilová, M; Šubr, Z

    2015-12-01

    Viruses use both material and energy sources of their hosts and redirect the production of disposable compounds in order to make viral replication more efficient. Metabolism of infected organisms is modified by these enhanced requirements as well by their own defense response. Resulting complex story consists of many regulation events on various gene expression levels. Elucidating these processes may contribute to the knowledge on virus-host interactions and to evolving new antiviral strategies. In our work we applied a subtractive cloning technique to compare the transcriptomes of healthy and plum pox virus (PPV)-infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Several genes were found to be induced or repressed by the PPV infection. The induced genes were mainly related to general stress response or photosynthesis, several repressed genes could be connected with growth defects evoked by the infection. Interestingly, some genes usually up-regulated by fungal or bacterial infection were found repressed in PPV-infected plants. Potential involvement of particular differently expressed genes in the process of PPV infection is discussed.

  16. Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus infection causes modulation of inflammatory and immune response genes in mouse brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puri Raj K

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Neurovirulent Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV causes lethal encephalitis in equines and is transmitted to humans by mosquitoes. VEEV is highly infectious when transmitted by aerosol and has been developed as a bio-warfare agent, making it an important pathogen to study from a military and civilian standpoint. Molecular mechanisms of VEE pathogenesis are poorly understood. To study these, the gene expression profile of VEEV infected mouse brains was investigated. Changes in gene expression were correlated with histological changes in the brain. In addition, a molecular framework of changes in gene expression associated with progression of the disease was studied. Results Our results demonstrate that genes related to important immune pathways such as antigen presentation, inflammation, apoptosis and response to virus (Cxcl10, CxCl11, Ccl5, Ifr7, Ifi27 Oas1b, Fcerg1,Mif, Clusterin and MHC class II were upregulated as a result of virus infection. The number of over-expressed genes (>1.5-fold level increased as the disease progressed (from 197, 296, 400, to 1086 at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours post infection, respectively. Conclusion Identification of differentially expressed genes in brain will help in the understanding of VEEV-induced pathogenesis and selection of biomarkers for diagnosis and targeted therapy of VEEV-induced neurodegeneration.

  17. Efficient Oligo nucleotide mediated CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Editing in Aspergilli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nødvig, Christina Spuur; Hoof, Jakob Blæsbjerg; Kogle, Martin Engelhard

    2018-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 technologies are revolutionizing fungal gene editing. Here we show that survival of specific Cas9/sgRNA mediated DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) depends on the non-homologous end-joining, NHEJ, DNA repair pathway and we use this observation to develop a tool to assess protospacer....... niger, and in A. oryzae indicating that this type of repair may be wide spread in filamentous fungi. Importantly, we demonstrate that by using single-stranded oligo nucleotides for CRISPR-Cas9 mediated gene editing it is possible to introduce specific point mutations as well gene deletions...

  18. Elimination of the truncated message from the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chalmers, D; Ferrand, C; Apperley, JF; Melo, JV; Ebeling, S; Newton, [No Value; Duperrier, A; Hagenbeek, A; Garrett, E; Tiberghien, P; Garin, M

    Introduction of the Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene into target cells renders them susceptible to killing by ganciclovir (GCV). We are studying the use of HSV-tk-transduced T lymphocytes in the context of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. We have previously shown, in vitro

  19. Promoter analysis of the Chilo iridescent virus DNA polymerase and major capsid protein genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nalcacioglu, R.; Marks, H.; Vlak, J.M.; Demirbag, Z.; Oers, van M.M.

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymerase (DNApol) and major capsid protein (MCP) genes were used as models to study promoter activity in Chilo iridescent virus (CIV). Infection of Bombyx mori SPC-BM-36 cells in the presence of inhibitors of DNA or protein synthesis showed that DNApol, as well as helicase, is an

  20. A Virus-Induced Assay for Functional Dissection and Analysis of Monocot and Dicot Flowering Time Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Cheng; Chen, Weiwei; Shen, Jiajia; Cheng, Linming; Akande, Femi; Zhang, Ke; Yuan, Chen; Li, Chunyang; Zhang, Pengcheng; Shi, Nongnong; Cheng, Qi; Liu, Yule; Jackson, Stephen; Hong, Yiguo

    2017-06-01

    Virus-induced flowering (VIF) uses virus vectors to express Flowering Locus T ( FT ) to induce flowering in plants. This approach has recently attracted wide interest for its practical applications in accelerating breeding in crops and woody fruit trees. However, the insight into VIF and its potential as a powerful tool for dissecting florigenic proteins remained to be elucidated. Here, we describe the mechanism and further applications of Potato virus X (PVX)-based VIF in the short-day Nicotiana tabacum cultivar Maryland Mammoth. Ectopic delivery of Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) AtFT by PVX/AtFT did not induce the expression of the endogenous FT ortholog NtFT4 ; however, it was sufficient to trigger flowering in Maryland Mammoth plants grown under noninductive long-day conditions. Infected tobacco plants developed no systemic symptoms, and the PVX-based VIF did not cause transgenerational flowering. We showed that the PVX-based VIF is a much more rapid method to examine the impacts of single amino acid mutations on AtFT for floral induction than making individual transgenic Arabidopsis lines for each mutation. We also used the PVX-based VIF to demonstrate that adding a His- or FLAG-tag to the N or C terminus of AtFT could affect its florigenic activity and that this system can be applied to assay the function of FT genes from heterologous species, including tomato ( Solanum lycopersicum ) SFT and rice ( Oryza sativa ) Hd3a Thus, the PVX-based VIF represents a simple and efficient system to identify individual amino acids that are essential for FT-mediated floral induction and to test the ability of mono- and dicotyledonous FT genes and FT fusion proteins to induce flowering. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  1. Reassortant swine influenza viruses isolated in Japan contain genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanehira, Katsushi; Takemae, Nobuhiro; Uchida, Yuko; Hikono, Hirokazu; Saito, Takehiko

    2014-06-01

    In 2013, three reassortant swine influenza viruses (SIVs)-two H1N2 and one H3N2-were isolated from symptomatic pigs in Japan; each contained genes from the pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 virus and endemic SIVs. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the two H1N2 viruses, A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 and A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013, were reassortants that contain genes from the following three distinct lineages: (i) H1 and nucleoprotein (NP) genes derived from a classical swine H1 HA lineage uniquely circulating among Japanese SIVs; (ii) neuraminidase (NA) genes from human-like H1N2 swine viruses; and (iii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. The H3N2 virus, A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013, comprised genes from two sources: (i) hemagglutinin (HA) and NA genes derived from human and human-like H3N2 swine viruses and (ii) other genes from pandemic A(H1N1) 2009 viruses. Phylogenetic analysis also indicated that each of the reassortants may have arisen independently in Japanese pigs. A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 were found to have strong antigenic reactivities with antisera generated for some seasonal human-lineage viruses isolated during or before 2003, whereas A/swine/Miyazaki/2/2013 reactivities with antisera against viruses isolated after 2004 were clearly weaker. In addition, antisera against some strains of seasonal human-lineage H1 viruses did not react with either A/swine/Gunma/1/2013 or A/swine/Ibaraki/1/2013. These findings indicate that emergence and spread of these reassortant SIVs is a potential public health risk. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. DC-SIGN mediates avian H5N1 influenza virus infection in cis and in trans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.-F.; Huang, Jason C.; Lee, Y.-M.; Liu, S.-J.; Chan, Yu-Jiun; Chau, Y.-P.; Chong, P.; Chen, Y.-M.A.

    2008-01-01

    DC-SIGN, a C-type lectin receptor expressed in dendritic cells (DCs), has been identified as a receptor for human immunodeficiency virus type 1, hepatitis C virus, Ebola virus, cytomegalovirus, dengue virus, and the SARS coronavirus. We used H5N1 pseudotyped and reverse-genetics (RG) virus particles to study their ability to bind with DC-SIGN. Electronic microscopy and functional assay results indicate that pseudotyped viruses containing both HA and NA proteins express hemagglutination and are capable of infecting cells expressing α-2,3-linked sialic acid receptors. Results from a capture assay show that DC-SIGN-expressing cells (including B-THP-1/DC-SIGN and T-THP-1/DC-SIGN) and peripheral blood dendritic cells are capable of transferring H5N1 pseudotyped and RG virus particles to target cells; this action can be blocked by anti-DC-SIGN monoclonal antibodies. In summary, (a) DC-SIGN acts as a capture or attachment molecule for avian H5N1 virus, and (b) DC-SIGN mediates infections in cis and in trans

  3. Membrane fusion inducers, chloroquine and spermidine increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong-Baeza, Carlos; Bustos, Israel; Serna, Manuel; Tescucano, Alonso; Alcantara-Farfan, Veronica; Ibanez, Miguel; Montanez, Cecilia; Wong, Carlos; Baeza, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    Gene transfection into mammalian cells can be achieved with viral and non-viral vectors. Non-viral vectors, such as cationic lipids that form lipoplexes with DNA, are safer and more stable than viral vectors, but their transfection efficiencies are lower. Here we describe that the simultaneous treatment with a membrane fusion inducer (chlorpromazine or procainamide) plus the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection in human (HEK293 and C-33 A) and rat (PC12) cell lines (up to 9.2-fold), as well as in situ in BALB/c mice spleens and livers (up to 6-fold); and that the polyamine spermidine increases lipoplex-mediated gene transfection and expression in cell cultures. The use of these four drugs provides a novel, safe and relatively inexpensive way to considerably increase lipoplex-mediated gene transfection efficiency.

  4. AAV Vectorization of DSB-mediated Gene Editing Technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Rachel J; Hirsch, Matthew L

    2016-01-01

    Recent work both at the bench and the bedside demonstrate zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs), CRISPR/Cas9, and other programmable site-specific endonuclease technologies are being successfully utilized within and alongside AAV vectors to induce therapeutically relevant levels of directed gene editing within the human chromosome. Studies from past decades acknowledge that AAV vector genomes are enhanced substrates for homology-directed repair in the presence or absence of targeted DNA damage within the host genome. Additionally, AAV vectors are currently the most efficient format for in vivo gene delivery with no vector related complications in >100 clinical trials for diverse diseases. At the same time, advancements in the design of custom-engineered site-specific endonucleases and the utilization of elucidated endonuclease formats have resulted in efficient and facile genetic engineering for basic science and for clinical therapies. AAV vectors and gene editing technologies are an obvious marriage, using AAV for the delivery of repair substrate and/or a gene encoding a designer endonuclease; however, while efficient delivery and enhanced gene targeting by vector genomes are advantageous, other attributes of AAV vectors are less desirable for gene editing technologies. This review summarizes the various roles that AAV vectors play in gene editing technologies and provides insight into its trending applications for the treatment of genetic diseases.

  5. Gene S characterization of Hantavirus species Seoul virus isolated from Rattus norvegicuson an Indonesian island

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dian Perwitasari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Hantavirus hidup dan berkembang biak di tubuh hewan pengerat, salah satunya Rattus norvegicus yang banyak ditemukan di daerah kepulauan di Indonesia. Hantavirus spesies Seoul virus (SEOV adalah virus RNA negatif rantai tunggal yang termasuk dalam keluarga Bunyaviridae, mempunyai beberapa gen spesifik terutama gen S yang dapat dikembangkan untuk uji diagnostik. Tujuan penelitian ini ialah untuk mengetahui karakter dari gen S dari Hantavirus spesies Seoulvirus.Metode:Pada penelitian ini dilakukan sekuensing gen S yang berasal dari jaringan paru-paru rodensia.  Fragmen DNA yang disekuensing menggunakan primer DNA SEOS-28F danSEOS -360R,VNS-1501F dan VNS-CSR. Hasil sekuensing dianalisis menggunakan program seqscapedan dianalisis menggunakan program Bioedit dan Mega5. Analisis filogenetik untuk homologi nukleotida dan asam amino dari ketiga strain Kepulauan Seribu tersebut dibandingkan dengan spesies hantavirus lainnya yang diambil dari genebank. Hasil:Analisis Homologi nukleotida dan asam amino antara strain Kepulauan Seribu dengan SEOV menunjukkan homologi nukleotida tertinggi pada strain KS74 (88,4% dan terendah pada KS90 (87,2%, sedangkan homologi asam amino tertinggi adalah strain KS74 (91.3% dan terendah pada strain KS90 (89,5%. Kesimpulan:Karakter gen S virus yang ditemukan di Kepulauan Seribu sebanding dengan virus SEOV yang ditemukan di Singapura dan Korea.  (Health Science Indones 2014;1:1-6Kata kunci:Seoul virus, gen S, Kepulauan Seribu, IndonesiaAbstractBackground: Hantavirus lives and reproduces in the body of rodents. Rattus norvegicuswas one found in the Kepulauan Seribu islands of Indonesia. Hantavirus species Seoul virus (SEOV is a negative single chain RNA viruses included in the family Bunyaviridae. It has a few specific genes, especially genes S that can be developed for a diagnostic test. The aim of this study was to ascertain the character of gene S of hantavirus species Seoul virus. Methods: Gene

  6. BRCA1-mediated repression of select X chromosome genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ropers H Hilger

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recently BRCA1 has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression from the X chromosome. In this study the influence of BRCA1 on expression of X chromosome genes was investigated. Complementary DNA microarrays were used to compare the expression levels of X chromosome genes in 18 BRCA1-associated ovarian cancers to those of the 13 "BRCA1-like" and 14 "BRCA2-like" sporadic tumors (as defined by previously reported expression profiling. Significance was determined using parametric statistics with P

  7. Replacement of the murine leukemia virus (MLV) envelope gene with a truncated HIV envelope gene in MLV generates a virus with impaired replication capacity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nack, Ursula; Schnierle, Barbara S.

    2003-01-01

    Murine leukemia virus (MLV) capsid particles can be efficiently pseudotyped with a variant of the HIV-1 envelope protein (Env) containing the surface glycoprotein gp120-SU and a carboxyl-terminally truncated transmembrane (TM) protein, with only seven cytoplasmic amino acids. MLV/HIV pseudotyped vector particles acquire the natural host tropism of HIV-1 and their entry is dependent on the presence of CD4 and an appropriate co-receptor on the surface of the target cell. We describe here the construction of chimeric MLV/HIV proviruses containing the truncated HIV envelope gene. The MLV/HIV provirus was generated by direct replacement of the MLV envelope gene with HIV Env coding sequences either with or without the additional inclusion of the woodchuck hepatitis virus posttranscriptional regulatory element (WPRE). Chimeric MLV/HIV particles could be generated from transfected 293T cells and were able to infect CD4/CXCR4-positive target cells. However, the second round of infection of target cells was severely impaired, despite the fact that the WPRE element enhanced the amount of viral mRNA detected. Viral particles released from infected cells showed reduced HIV Env incorporation, indicating that additional factors required for efficient replication of MLV/HIV pseudotyped viruses are missing

  8. Poxvirus Host Range Genes and Virus-Host Spectrum: A Critical Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Graziele Pereira; Rodrigues, Rodrigo Araújo Lima; Lima, Maurício Teixeira; Drumond, Betânia Paiva; Abrahão, Jônatas Santos

    2017-11-07

    The Poxviridae family is comprised of double-stranded DNA viruses belonging to nucleocytoplasmic large DNA viruses (NCLDV). Among the NCLDV, poxviruses exhibit the widest known host range, which is likely observed because this viral family has been more heavily investigated. However, relative to each member of the Poxviridae family, the spectrum of the host is variable, where certain viruses can infect a large range of hosts, while others are restricted to only one host species. It has been suggested that the variability in host spectrum among poxviruses is linked with the presence or absence of some host range genes. Would it be possible to extrapolate the restriction of viral replication in a specific cell lineage to an animal, a far more complex organism? In this study, we compare and discuss the relationship between the host range of poxvirus species and the abundance/diversity of host range genes. We analyzed the sequences of 38 previously identified and putative homologs of poxvirus host range genes, and updated these data with deposited sequences of new poxvirus genomes. Overall, the term host range genes might not be the most appropriate for these genes, since no correlation between them and the viruses' host spectrum was observed, and a change in nomenclature should be considered. Finally, we analyzed the evolutionary history of these genes, and reaffirmed the occurrence of horizontal gene transfer (HGT) for certain elements, as previously suggested. Considering the data presented in this study, it is not possible to associate the diversity of host range factors with the amount of hosts of known poxviruses, and this traditional nomenclature creates misunderstandings.

  9. Down-regulation of viral replication by adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNA against cellular cofactors for hepatitis C virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Jing; Yamada, Osamu; Sakamoto, Takashi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Iwai, Takahiro; Matsushita, Yoshihisa; Shimamura, Hideo; Araki, Hiromasa; Shimotohno, Kunitada

    2004-01-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA) is currently being evaluated not only as a powerful tool for functional genomics, but also as a potentially promising therapeutic agent for cancer and infectious diseases. Inhibitory effect of siRNA on viral replication has been demonstrated in multiple pathogenic viruses. However, because of the high sequence specificity of siRNA-mediated RNA degradation, antiviral efficacy of siRNA directed to viral genome will be largely limited by emergence of escape variants resistant to siRNA due to high mutation rates of virus, especially RNA viruses such as poliovirus and hepatitis C virus (HCV). To investigate the therapeutic feasibility of siRNAs specific for the putative cellular cofactors for HCV, we constructed adenovirus vectors expressing siRNAs against La, polypyrimidine tract-binding protein (PTB), subunit gamma of human eukaryotic initiation factors 2B (eIF2Bγ), and human VAMP-associated protein of 33 kDa (hVAP-33). Adenoviral-mediated expression of siRNAs markedly diminished expression of the endogenous genes, and silencing of La, PTB, and hVAP-33 by siRNAs substantially blocked HCV replication in Huh-7 cells. Thus, our studies demonstrate the feasibility and potential of adenoviral-delivered siRNAs specific for cellular cofactors in combating HCV infection, which can be used either alone or in combination with siRNA against viral genome to prevent the escape of mutant variants and provide additive or synergistic anti-HCV effects

  10. The V domain of dog PVRL4 (nectin-4) mediates canine distemper virus entry and virus cell-to-cell spread

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S.; Richardson, Christopher D.

    2014-01-01

    The entry of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a multistep process that involves the attachment of CDV hemagglutinin (H) to its cellular receptor, followed by fusion between virus and cell membranes. Our laboratory recently identified PVRL4 (nectin-4) to be the epithelial receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that the V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry and virus cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, four key amino acid residues within the V domain of dog PVRL4 and two within the CDV hemagglutinin were shown to be essential for receptor-mediated virus entry. - Highlights: • PVRL4 (nectin-4) is the epithelial cell receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. • V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry, cell-to-cell spread, and syncytia formation. • Chimeric PVRL1 backbone substituted with the V domain of PVRL4 can function as a receptor. • Amino acids (F132/P133/A134/G135) within the V domain are essential for PVRL4 receptor activity. • Amino acids (P493/Y539) within CDV H protein are essential for PVRL4 receptor interaction

  11. The V domain of dog PVRL4 (nectin-4) mediates canine distemper virus entry and virus cell-to-cell spread

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delpeut, Sebastien; Noyce, Ryan S. [The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Canadian Center for Vaccinology, Goldbloom Pavilion, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); Richardson, Christopher D., E-mail: chris.richardson@dal.ca [The Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); IWK Health Centre, Canadian Center for Vaccinology, Goldbloom Pavilion, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada B3H 1X5 (Canada); The Department of Pediatrics, Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada)

    2014-04-15

    The entry of canine distemper virus (CDV) is a multistep process that involves the attachment of CDV hemagglutinin (H) to its cellular receptor, followed by fusion between virus and cell membranes. Our laboratory recently identified PVRL4 (nectin-4) to be the epithelial receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. In this study, we demonstrate that the V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry and virus cell-to-cell spread. Furthermore, four key amino acid residues within the V domain of dog PVRL4 and two within the CDV hemagglutinin were shown to be essential for receptor-mediated virus entry. - Highlights: • PVRL4 (nectin-4) is the epithelial cell receptor for measles and canine distemper viruses. • V domain of PVRL4 is critical for CDV entry, cell-to-cell spread, and syncytia formation. • Chimeric PVRL1 backbone substituted with the V domain of PVRL4 can function as a receptor. • Amino acids (F132/P133/A134/G135) within the V domain are essential for PVRL4 receptor activity. • Amino acids (P493/Y539) within CDV H protein are essential for PVRL4 receptor interaction.

  12. Plasmid-Mediated Quinolone Resistance Genes in Escherichia coli ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    PMQR) genes and the prevalence of extended spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) types in Escherichia coli clinical isolates. Methods: Sixty-one ESBL-producing urinary E. coli isolates were studied. An antibiotic susceptibility test was performed ...

  13. Immune-mediated neuropathy with Epstein-Barr virus-positive T-cell lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takaaki; Arai, Ayako; Yokota, Takanori; Imadome, Ken-Ichi; Tomimitsu, Hiroyuki; Miura, Osamu; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2015-01-01

    A 47-year-old man with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive T/NK- cell lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-T/NK-LPD) developed acute-onset weakness. A nerve conduction study showed a conduction block in both the proximal and most distal segments. Although the patient's neuropathy transiently responded to intravenous immunoglobulin, it was progressive for at least 25 days until the start of prednisolone (PSL) administration, after which it remarkably improved. The neuropathy further improved after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT). The present patient's clinical course is not consistent with that of typical Guillain-Barré syndrome. This case suggests that EBV-T/NK-LPD can cause progressive immune-mediated neuropathy as a result of chronic EBV antigen presentation and can be treated with PSL and BMT.

  14. Rapid Newcastle Disease Virus Detection Based on Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification and Optomagnetic Readout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tian, Bo; Ma, Jing; Zardán Gómez de la Torre, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive diagnostic methods based on isothermal amplification are ideal substitutes for PCR in out-of-lab settings. However, there are bottlenecks in terms of establishing low-cost and user-friendly readout methods for isothermal amplification schemes. Combining the high amplification...... efficiency of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) with an optomagnetic nanoparticle-based readout system, we demonstrate ultrasensitive and rapid detection of Newcastle disease virus RNA. Biotinylated amplicons of LAMP and reverse transcription LAMP (RT-LAMP) bind to streptavidin-coated magnetic...... nanoparticles (MNPs) resulting in a dramatical increase in the hydrodynamic size of the MNPs. This increase was measured by an optomagnetic readout system and provided quantitative information on the amount of LAMP target sequence. Our assay resulted in a limit of detection of 10 aM of target sequence...

  15. Evolutionary analysis of hepatitis C virus gene sequences from 1953

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Rebecca R.; Tanaka, Yasuhito; Takebe, Yutaka; Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Buskell, Zelma; Seeff, Leonard; Alter, Harvey J.; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    Reconstructing the transmission history of infectious diseases in the absence of medical or epidemiological records often relies on the evolutionary analysis of pathogen genetic sequences. The precision of evolutionary estimates of epidemic history can be increased by the inclusion of sequences derived from ‘archived’ samples that are genetically distinct from contemporary strains. Historical sequences are especially valuable for viral pathogens that circulated for many years before being formally identified, including HIV and the hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, surprisingly few HCV isolates sampled before discovery of the virus in 1989 are currently available. Here, we report and analyse two HCV subgenomic sequences obtained from infected individuals in 1953, which represent the oldest genetic evidence of HCV infection. The pairwise genetic diversity between the two sequences indicates a substantial period of HCV transmission prior to the 1950s, and their inclusion in evolutionary analyses provides new estimates of the common ancestor of HCV in the USA. To explore and validate the evolutionary information provided by these sequences, we used a new phylogenetic molecular clock method to estimate the date of sampling of the archived strains, plus the dates of four more contemporary reference genomes. Despite the short fragments available, we conclude that the archived sequences are consistent with a proposed sampling date of 1953, although statistical uncertainty is large. Our cross-validation analyses suggest that the bias and low statistical power observed here likely arise from a combination of high evolutionary rate heterogeneity and an unstructured, star-like phylogeny. We expect that attempts to date other historical viruses under similar circumstances will meet similar problems. PMID:23938759

  16. Nymphal RNAi: systemic RNAi mediated gene knockdown in juvenile grasshopper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Ying

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grasshopper serves as important model system in neuroscience, development and evolution. Representatives of this primitive insect group are also highly relevant targets of pest control efforts. Unfortunately, the lack of genetics or gene specific molecular manipulation imposes major limitations to the study of grasshopper biology. Results We investigated whether juvenile instars of the grasshopper species Schistocerca americana are conducive to gene silencing via the systemic RNAi pathway. Injection of dsRNA corresponding to the eye colour gene vermilion into first instar nymphs triggered suppression of ommochrome formation in the eye lasting through two instars equivalent to 10–14 days in absolute time. QRT-PCR analysis revealed a two fold decrease of target transcript levels in affected animals. Control injections of EGFP dsRNA did not result in detectable phenotypic changes. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization detected ubiquitous expression of the grasshopper homolog of the dsRNA channel protein gene sid-1 in embryos, nymphs and adults. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that systemic dsRNA application elicits specific and long-term gene silencing in juvenile grasshopper instars. The conservation of systemic RNAi in the grasshopper suggests that this pathway can be exploited for gene specific manipulation of juvenile and adult instars in a wide range of primitive insects.

  17. Targeted adenovirus mediated inhibition of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory gene expression in endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kułdo, J M; Ásgeirsdóttir, S A; Zwiers, P J; Bellu, A R; Rots, M G; Schalk, J A C; Ogawara, K I; Trautwein, C; Banas, B; Haisma, H J; Molema, G; Kamps, J A A M

    2013-02-28

    In chronic inflammatory diseases the endothelium expresses mediators responsible for harmful leukocyte infiltration. We investigated whether targeted delivery of a therapeutic transgene that inhibits nuclear factor κB signal transduction could silence the proinflammatory activation status of endothelial cells. For this, an adenovirus encoding dominant-negative IκB (dnIκB) as a therapeutic transgene was employed. Selectivity for the endothelial cells was achieved by introduction of antibodies specific for inflammatory endothelial adhesion molecules E-selectin or VCAM-1 chemically linked to the virus via polyethylene glycol. In vitro, the retargeted adenoviruses selectively infected cytokine-activated endothelial cells to express functional transgene. The comparison of transductional capacity of both retargeted viruses revealed that E-selectin based transgene delivery exerted superior pharmacological effects. Targeted delivery mediated dnIκB transgene expression in endothelial cells inhibited the induced expression of several inflammatory genes, including adhesion molecules, cytokines, and chemokines. In vivo, in mice suffering from glomerulonephritis, E-selectin-retargeted adenovirus selectively homed in the kidney to microvascular glomerular endothelium. Subsequent downregulation of endothelial adhesion molecule expression 2 days after induction of inflammation demonstrated the pharmacological potential of this gene therapy approach. The data justify further studies towards therapeutic virus design and optimization of treatment schedules to investigate their capacity to interfere with inflammatory disease progression. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Rapid and efficient introduction of a foreign gene into bacterial artificial chromosome-cloned varicella vaccine by Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somboonthum, Pranee; Koshizuka, Tetsuo; Okamoto, Shigefumi; Matsuura, Masaaki; Gomi, Yasuyuki; Takahashi, Michiaki; Yamanishi, Koichi; Mori, Yasuko

    2010-01-01

    Using a rapid and reliable system based on Tn7-mediated site-specific transposition, we have successfully constructed a recombinant Oka varicella vaccine (vOka) expressing the mumps virus (MuV) fusion protein (F). The backbone of the vector was our previously reported vOka-BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) genome. We inserted the transposon Tn7 attachment sequence, LacZα-mini-attTn7, into the region between ORF12 and ORF13 to generate a vOka-BAC-Tn genome. The MuV-F expressing cassette was transposed into the vOka-BAC genome at the mini-attTn7 transposition site. MuV-F protein was expressed in recombinant virus, rvOka-F infected cells. In addition, the MuV-F protein was cleaved in the rvOka-F infected cells as in MuV-infected cells. The growth of rvOka-F was similar to that of the original recombinant vOka without the F gene. Thus, we show that Tn7-mediated transposition is an efficient method for introducing a foreign gene expression cassette into the vOka-BAC genome as a live virus vector.

  19. An Optimized Protocol to Increase Virus-Induced Gene Silencing Efficiency and Minimize Viral Symptoms in Petunia

    OpenAIRE

    Broderick, Shaun R.; Jones, Michelle L.

    2013-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is used to down-regulate endogenous plant genes. VIGS efficiency depends on viral proliferation and systemic movement throughout the plant. Although tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-based VIGS has been successfully used in petunia (Petunia × hybrida), the protocol has not been thoroughly optimized for efficient and uniform gene down-regulation in this species. Therefore, we evaluated six parameters that improved VIGS in petunia. Inoculation of mechanically wounde...

  20. Adjuvant-Mediated Epitope Specificity and Enhanced Neutralizing Activity of Antibodies Targeting Dengue Virus Envelope Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denicar Lina Nascimento Fabris Maeda

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The heat-labile toxins (LT produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli display adjuvant effects to coadministered antigens, leading to enhanced production of serum antibodies. Despite extensive knowledge of the adjuvant properties of LT derivatives, including in vitro-generated non-toxic mutant forms, little is known about the capacity of these adjuvants to modulate the epitope specificity of antibodies directed against antigens. This study characterizes the role of LT and its non-toxic B subunit (LTB in the modulation of antibody responses to a coadministered antigen, the dengue virus (DENV envelope glycoprotein domain III (EDIII, which binds to surface receptors and mediates virus entry into host cells. In contrast to non-adjuvanted or alum-adjuvanted formulations, antibodies induced in mice immunized with LT or LTB showed enhanced virus-neutralization effects that were not ascribed to a subclass shift or antigen affinity. Nonetheless, immunosignature analyses revealed that purified LT-adjuvanted EDIII-specific antibodies display distinct epitope-binding patterns with regard to antibodies raised in mice immunized with EDIII or the alum-adjuvanted vaccine. Notably, the analyses led to the identification of a specific EDIII epitope located in the EF to FG loop, which is involved in the entry of DENV into eukaryotic cells. The present results demonstrate that LT and LTB modulate the epitope specificity of antibodies generated after immunization with coadministered antigens that, in the case of EDIII, was associated with the induction of neutralizing antibody responses. These results open perspectives for the more rational development of vaccines with enhanced protective effects against DENV infections.

  1. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P viruses.

  2. Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay for rapid detection of BK virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bista, Bipin Raj; Ishwad, Chandra; Wadowsky, Robert M; Manna, Pradip; Randhawa, Parmjeet Singh; Gupta, Gaurav; Adhikari, Meena; Tyagi, Rakhi; Gasper, Gina; Vats, Abhay

    2007-05-01

    Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is a novel method for rapid amplification of DNA. Its advantages include rapidity and minimal equipment requirement. The LAMP assay was developed for BK virus (BKV), which is a leading cause of morbidity in renal transplant recipients. The characteristics of the assay, including its specificity and sensitivity, were evaluated. BKV LAMP was performed using various incubation times with a variety of specimens, including unprocessed urine and plasma samples. A ladder pattern on gel electrophoresis, typical of successful LAMP reactions, was observed specifically only for BKV and not for other viruses. The sensitivity of the assay with 1 h of incubation was 100 copies/tube of a cloned BKV fragment. Additionally, a positive reaction was visually ascertained by a simple color reaction using SYBR green dye. BKV LAMP was also successful for urine and plasma specimens without the need for DNA extraction. Due to its simplicity and specificity, the LAMP assay can potentially be developed for "point of care" screening of BKV.

  3. Phasevarions mediate random switching of gene expression in pathogenic Neisseria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae, the random switching of the modA gene controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable mod genes are also present in Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggesting that phasevarions may occur in these important human pathogens. Phylogenetic studies on phase-variable mod genes associated with type III restriction modification (R-M systems revealed that these organisms have two distinct mod genes--modA and modB. There are also distinct alleles of modA (abundant: modA11, 12, 13; minor: modA4, 15, 18 and modB (modB1, 2. These alleles differ only in their DNA recognition domain. ModA11 was only found in N. meningitidis and modA13 only in N. gonorrhoeae. The recognition site for the modA13 methyltransferase in N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 was identified as 5'-AGAAA-3'. Mutant strains lacking the modA11, 12 or 13 genes were made in N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae and their phenotype analyzed in comparison to a corresponding mod ON wild-type strain. Microarray analysis revealed that in all three modA alleles multiple genes were either upregulated or downregulated, some of which were virulence-associated. For example, in N. meningitidis MC58 (modA11, differentially expressed genes included those encoding the candidate vaccine antigens lactoferrin binding proteins A and B. Functional studies using N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 and the clinical isolate O1G1370 confirmed that modA13 ON and OFF strains have distinct phenotypes in antimicrobial resistance, in a primary human cervical epithelial cell model of infection, and in biofilm formation. This study, in conjunction with our previous work in H. influenzae, indicates

  4. Phasevarions mediate random switching of gene expression in pathogenic Neisseria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikhanta, Yogitha N; Dowideit, Stefanie J; Edwards, Jennifer L; Falsetta, Megan L; Wu, Hsing-Ju; Harrison, Odile B; Fox, Kate L; Seib, Kate L; Maguire, Tina L; Wang, Andrew H-J; Maiden, Martin C; Grimmond, Sean M; Apicella, Michael A; Jennings, Michael P

    2009-04-01

    Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes) that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression). In Haemophilus influenzae, the random switching of the modA gene controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion"), via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable mod genes are also present in Neisseria meningitidis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, suggesting that phasevarions may occur in these important human pathogens. Phylogenetic studies on phase-variable mod genes associated with type III restriction modification (R-M) systems revealed that these organisms have two distinct mod genes--modA and modB. There are also distinct alleles of modA (abundant: modA11, 12, 13; minor: modA4, 15, 18) and modB (modB1, 2). These alleles differ only in their DNA recognition domain. ModA11 was only found in N. meningitidis and modA13 only in N. gonorrhoeae. The recognition site for the modA13 methyltransferase in N. gonorrhoeae strain FA1090 was identified as 5'-AGAAA-3'. Mutant strains lacking the modA11, 12 or 13 genes were made in N. meningitidis and N. gonorrhoeae and their phenotype analyzed in comparison to a corresponding mod ON wild-type strain. Microarray analysis revealed that in all three modA alleles multiple genes were either upregulated or downregulated, some of which were virulence-associated. For example, in N. meningitidis MC58 (modA11), differentially expressed genes included those encoding the candidate vaccine antigens lactoferrin binding proteins A and B. Functional studies using N. gonorrhoeae FA1090 and the clinical isolate O1G1370 confirmed that modA13 ON and OFF strains have distinct phenotypes in antimicrobial resistance, in a primary human cervical epithelial cell model of infection, and in biofilm formation. This study, in conjunction with our previous work in H. influenzae, indicates that

  5. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus BM5 protein regulates progeny virus production and viral gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokusho, Ryuhei; Koh, Yoshikazu; Fujimoto, Masaru; Shimada, Toru; Katsuma, Susumu

    2016-01-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) orf5 (Bm5) is a core gene of lepidopteran baculoviruses and encodes the protein with the conserved amino acid residues (DUF3627) in its C-terminus. Here, we found that Bm5 disruption resulted in lower titers of budded viruses and fewer numbers of occlusion bodies (OBs) in B. mori cultured cells and larvae, although viral genome replication was not affected. Bm5 disruption also caused aberrant expression of various viral genes at the very late stage of infection. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that BM5 localized to the nuclear membrane. We also found that DUF3627 is important for OB production, transcriptional regulation of viral genes, and subcellular localization of BM5. Compared with wild-type BmNPV infection, larval death was delayed when B. mori larvae were infected with Bm5 mutants. These results suggest that BM5 is involved in progeny virus production and regulation of viral gene expression at the very late stage of infection. -- Highlights: •The role of BmNPV BM5 protein was examined in B. mori cultured cells and larvae. •BM5 contributes to efficient production of budded viruses and occlusion bodies. •BM5 regulates viral gene expression at the very late stage of infection. •BM5 dominantly localizes to the nuclear membrane. •Bm5 mutant showed v-cath down-regulation and resulting delay of larval death.

  6. Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus BM5 protein regulates progeny virus production and viral gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokusho, Ryuhei, E-mail: kokusho@ss.ab.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Koh, Yoshikazu; Fujimoto, Masaru; Shimada, Toru; Katsuma, Susumu, E-mail: katsuma@ss.ab.a.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2016-11-15

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) orf5 (Bm5) is a core gene of lepidopteran baculoviruses and encodes the protein with the conserved amino acid residues (DUF3627) in its C-terminus. Here, we found that Bm5 disruption resulted in lower titers of budded viruses and fewer numbers of occlusion bodies (OBs) in B. mori cultured cells and larvae, although viral genome replication was not affected. Bm5 disruption also caused aberrant expression of various viral genes at the very late stage of infection. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that BM5 localized to the nuclear membrane. We also found that DUF3627 is important for OB production, transcriptional regulation of viral genes, and subcellular localization of BM5. Compared with wild-type BmNPV infection, larval death was delayed when B. mori larvae were infected with Bm5 mutants. These results suggest that BM5 is involved in progeny virus production and regulation of viral gene expression at the very late stage of infection. -- Highlights: •The role of BmNPV BM5 protein was examined in B. mori cultured cells and larvae. •BM5 contributes to efficient production of budded viruses and occlusion bodies. •BM5 regulates viral gene expression at the very late stage of infection. •BM5 dominantly localizes to the nuclear membrane. •Bm5 mutant showed v-cath down-regulation and resulting delay of larval death.

  7. IRES-mediated translation of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in cultured cells derived from FMDV-susceptible and -insusceptible animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanda, Takehiro; Ozawa, Makoto; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-03-31

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) possess a positive sense, single stranded RNA genome. Internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) element exists within its 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) of the viral RNA. Translation of the viral RNA is initiated by internal entry of the 40S ribosome within the IRES element. This process is facilitated by cellular factors known as IRES trans-acting factors (ITAFs). Foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) is host-restricted disease for cloven-hoofed animals such as cattle and pigs, but the factors determining the host range have not been identified yet. Although, ITAFs are known to promote IRES-mediated translation, these findings were confirmed only in cells derived from FMDV-insusceptible animals so far. We evaluated and compared the IRES-mediated translation activities among cell lines derived from four different animal species using bicistronic luciferase reporter plasmid, which possesses an FMDV-IRES element between Renilla and Firefly luciferase genes. Furthermore, we analyzed the effect of the cellular factors on IRES-mediated translation by silencing the cellular factors using siRNA in both FMDV-susceptible and -insusceptible animal cells. Our data indicated that IRES-mediated translational activity was not linked to FMDV host range. ITAF45 promoted IRES-mediated translation in all cell lines, and the effects of poly-pyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) were observed only in FMDV-susceptible cells. Thus, PTB and 4E-BP1 may influence the host range of FMDV. IRES-mediated translation activity of FMDV was not predictive of its host range. ITAF45 promoted IRES-mediated translation in all cells, and the effects of PTB and 4E-BP1 were observed only in FMDV-susceptible cells.

  8. Expression of defective measles virus genes in brain tissues of patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baczko, K.; Liebert, U.G.; Billeter, M.; Cattaneo, R.; Budka, H.; Ter Meulen, V.

    1986-01-01

    The persistence of measles virus in selected areas of the brains of four patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) was characterized by immunohistological and biochemical techniques. The five measles virus structural proteins were never simultaneously detectable in any of the bran sections. Nucleocapsid proteins and phosphoproteins were found in every diseased brain area, whereas hemagglutinin protein was detected in two cases, fusion protein was detected in three cases, and matrix protein was detected in only one case. Also, it could be shown that the amounts of measles virus RNA in the brains differed from patient to patient and in the different regions investigated. In all patients, plus-strand RNAs specific for these five viral genes could be detected. However, the amounts of fusion and hemagglutinin mRNAs were low compared with the amounts in lytically infected cells. The presence of particular measles virus RNAs in SSPE-infected brains did not always correlate with mRNA activity. In in vitro translations, the matrix protein was produced in only one case, and the hemagglutinin protein was produced in none. These results indicate that measles virus persistence in SSPE is correlated with different defects of several genes which probably prevent assembly of viral particles in SSPE-infected brain tissue

  9. Phasevarion mediated epigenetic gene regulation in Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yogitha N Srikhanta

    Full Text Available Many host-adapted bacterial pathogens contain DNA methyltransferases (mod genes that are subject to phase-variable expression (high-frequency reversible ON/OFF switching of gene expression. In Haemophilus influenzae and pathogenic Neisseria, the random switching of the modA gene, associated with a phase-variable type III restriction modification (R-M system, controls expression of a phase-variable regulon of genes (a "phasevarion", via differential methylation of the genome in the modA ON and OFF states. Phase-variable type III R-M systems are also found in Helicobacter pylori, suggesting that phasevarions may also exist in this key human pathogen. Phylogenetic studies on the phase-variable type III modH gene revealed that there are 17 distinct alleles in H. pylori, which differ only in their DNA recognition domain. One of the most commonly found alleles was modH5 (16% of isolates. Microarray analysis comparing the wild-type P12modH5 ON strain to a P12ΔmodH5 mutant revealed that six genes were either up- or down-regulated, and some were virulence-associated. These included flaA, which encodes a flagella protein important in motility and hopG, an outer membrane protein essential for colonization and associated with gastric cancer. This study provides the first evidence of this epigenetic mechanism of gene expression in H. pylori. Characterisation of H. pylori modH phasevarions to define stable immunological targets will be essential for vaccine development and may also contribute to understanding H. pylori pathogenesis.

  10. Stability of RNA silencing-based traits after virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Bodil; Albrechtsen, Merete

    2007-01-01

    with constructs based on virus coat protein (CP) genes or other viral genes has been successfully used to engineer PTGS-mediated virus resistance into a large number of crop plants and some transgenic lines have been commercially exploited. However the discovery that plant viruses encode suppressors of gene...... silencing has raised concerns that virus infection of crop plants might reverse the new silencing-based traits. Most studies of virus suppression of silencing have used model systems based on silencing of reporter genes. A few studies have analysed the effects of virus infections on plants with genetically...... engineered virus resistance based on either a simple sense or an inverted repeat construct. We decided to use genetically engineered virus resistance in potato as a model system for further studies of the effect of virus infection on genetically engineered traits. We present for the first time a comparison...

  11. Activity-regulated genes as mediators of neural circuit plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leslie, Jennifer H; Nedivi, Elly

    2011-08-01

    Modifications of neuronal circuits allow the brain to adapt and change with experience. This plasticity manifests during development and throughout life, and can be remarkably long lasting. Evidence has linked activity-regulated gene expression to the long-term structural and electrophysiological adaptations that take place during developmental critical periods, learning and memory, and alterations to sensory map representations in the adult. In all these cases, the cellular response to neuronal activity integrates multiple tightly coordinated mechanisms to precisely orchestrate long-lasting, functional and structural changes in brain circuits. Experience-dependent plasticity is triggered when neuronal excitation activates cellular signaling pathways from the synapse to the nucleus that initiate new programs of gene expression. The protein products of activity-regulated genes then work via a diverse array of cellular mechanisms to modify neuronal functional properties. Synaptic strengthening or weakening can reweight existing circuit connections, while structural changes including synapse addition and elimination create new connections. Posttranscriptional regulatory mechanisms, often also dependent on activity, further modulate activity-regulated gene transcript and protein function. Thus, activity-regulated genes implement varied forms of structural and functional plasticity to fine-tune brain circuit wiring. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Have we found an optimal insertion site in a Newcastle disease virus vector to express a foreign gene for vaccine and gene therapy purposes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using reverse genetics technology, many strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) have been developed as vectors to express foreign genes for vaccine and gene therapy purposes. The foreign gene is usually inserted into a non-coding region of the NDV genome as an independent transcription unit. Eval...

  13. The Arabidopsis mediator complex subunits MED16, MED14, and MED2 regulate mediator and RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Piers A; Hurst, Charlotte H; Kaliyadasa, Ewon; Lamb, Rebecca; Knight, Marc R; De Cothi, Elizabeth A; Steele, John F; Knight, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Mediator16 (MED16; formerly termed SENSITIVE TO FREEZING6 [SFR6]) subunit of the plant Mediator transcriptional coactivator complex regulates cold-responsive gene expression in Arabidopsis thaliana, acting downstream of the C-repeat binding factor (CBF) transcription factors to recruit the core Mediator complex to cold-regulated genes. Here, we use loss-of-function mutants to show that RNA polymerase II recruitment to CBF-responsive cold-regulated genes requires MED16, MED2, and MED14 subunits. Transcription of genes known to be regulated via CBFs binding to the C-repeat motif/drought-responsive element promoter motif requires all three Mediator subunits, as does cold acclimation-induced freezing tolerance. In addition, these three subunits are required for low temperature-induced expression of some other, but not all, cold-responsive genes, including genes that are not known targets of CBFs. Genes inducible by darkness also required MED16 but required a different combination of Mediator subunits for their expression than the genes induced by cold. Together, our data illustrate that plants control transcription of specific genes through the action of subsets of Mediator subunits; the specific combination defined by the nature of the stimulus but also by the identity of the gene induced.

  14. IFN regulatory factor 1 restricts hepatitis E virus replication by activating STAT1 to induce antiviral IFN-stimulated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Lei; Zhou, Xinying; Wang, Wenshi; Wang, Yijin; Yin, Yuebang; Laan, Luc J W van der; Sprengers, Dave; Metselaar, Herold J; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; Pan, Qiuwei

    2016-10-01

    IFN regulatory factor 1 (IRF1) is one of the most important IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) in cellular antiviral immunity. Although hepatitis E virus (HEV) is a leading cause of acute hepatitis worldwide, how ISGs counteract HEV infection is largely unknown. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of IRF1 on HEV replication. Multiple cell lines were used in 2 models that harbor HEV. In different HEV cell culture systems, IRF1 effectively inhibited HEV replication. IRF1 did not trigger IFN production, and chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing data analysis revealed that IRF1 bound to the promoter region of signal transducers and activators of transcription 1 (STAT1). Functional assay confirmed that IRF1 could drive the transcription of STAT1, resulting in elevation of total and phosphorylated STAT1 proteins and further activating the transcription of a panel of downstream antiviral ISGs. By pharmacological inhibitors and RNAi-mediated gene-silencing approaches, we revealed that antiviral function of IRF1 is dependent on the JAK-STAT cascade. Furthermore, induction of ISGs and the anti-HEV effect of IRF1 overlapped that of IFNα, but was potentiated by ribavirin. We demonstrated that IRF1 effectively inhibits HEV replication through the activation of the JAK-STAT pathway, and the subsequent transcription of antiviral ISGs, but independent of IFN production.-Xu, L., Zhou, X., Wang, W., Wang, Y., Yin, Y., van der Laan, L. J. W., Sprengers, D., Metselaar, H. J., Peppelenbosch, M. P., Pan, Q. IFN regulatory factor 1 restricts hepatitis E virus replication by activating STAT1 to induce antiviral IFN-stimulated genes. © FASEB.

  15. Receptor-mediated gene delivery using chemically modified chitosan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, T H; Jiang, H L; Nah, J W; Cho, M H; Akaike, T; Cho, C S

    2007-01-01

    Chitosan has been investigated as a non-viral vector because it has several advantages such as biocompatibility, biodegradability and low toxicity with high cationic potential. However, the low specificity and low transfection efficiency of chitosan need to be solved prior to clinical application. In this paper, we focused on the galactose or mannose ligand modification of chitosan for enhancement of cell specificity and transfection efficiency via receptor-mediated endocytosis in vitro and in vivo

  16. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangquan Wang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21–24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA. By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  17. Hairpin RNA Targeting Multiple Viral Genes Confers Strong Resistance to Rice Black-Streaked Dwarf Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangquan; Li, Wenqi; Zhu, Jinyan; Fan, Fangjun; Wang, Jun; Zhong, Weigong; Wang, Ming-Bo; Liu, Qing; Zhu, Qian-Hao; Zhou, Tong; Lan, Ying; Zhou, Yijun; Yang, Jie

    2016-05-11

    Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV) belongs to the genus Fijivirus in the family of Reoviridae and causes severe yield loss in rice-producing areas in Asia. RNA silencing, as a natural defence mechanism against plant viruses, has been successfully exploited for engineering virus resistance in plants, including rice. In this study, we generated transgenic rice lines harbouring a hairpin RNA (hpRNA) construct targeting four RBSDV genes, S1, S2, S6 and S10, encoding the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, the putative core protein, the RNA silencing suppressor and the outer capsid protein, respectively. Both field nursery and artificial inoculation assays of three generations of the transgenic lines showed that they had strong resistance to RBSDV infection. The RBSDV resistance in the segregating transgenic populations correlated perfectly with the presence of the hpRNA transgene. Furthermore, the hpRNA transgene was expressed in the highly resistant transgenic lines, giving rise to abundant levels of 21-24 nt small interfering RNA (siRNA). By small RNA deep sequencing, the RBSDV-resistant transgenic lines detected siRNAs from all four viral gene sequences in the hpRNA transgene, indicating that the whole chimeric fusion sequence can be efficiently processed by Dicer into siRNAs. Taken together, our results suggest that long hpRNA targeting multiple viral genes can be used to generate stable and durable virus resistance in rice, as well as other plant species.

  18. Vaccine induced antibodies to the first variable loop of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120, mediate antibody-dependent virus inhibition in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialuk, Izabela; Whitney, Stephen; Andresen, Vibeke; Florese, Ruth H; Nacsa, Janos; Cecchinato, Valentina; Valeri, Valerio W; Heraud, Jean-Michel; Gordon, Shari; Parks, Robyn Washington; Montefiori, David C; Venzon, David; Demberg, Thorsten; Guroff, Marjorie Robert-; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2011-12-09

    The role of antibodies directed against the hyper variable envelope region V1 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1), has not been thoroughly studied. We show that a vaccine able to elicit strain-specific non-neutralizing antibodies to this region of gp120 is associated with control of highly pathogenic chimeric SHIV(89.6P) replication in rhesus macaques. The vaccinated animal that had the highest titers of antibodies to the amino terminus portion of V1, prior to challenge, had secondary antibody responses that mediated cell killing by antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), as early as 2 weeks after infection and inhibited viral replication by antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI), by 4 weeks after infection. There was a significant inverse correlation between virus level and binding antibody titers to the envelope protein, (R=-0.83, p=0.015), and ADCVI (R=-0.84 p=0.044). Genotyping of plasma virus demonstrated in vivo selection of three SHIV(89.6P) variants with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites in V1. We found a significant inverse correlation between virus levels and titers of antibodies that mediated ADCVI against all the identified V1 virus variants. A significant inverse correlation was also found between neutralizing antibody titers to SHIV(89.6) and virus levels (R=-0.72 p=0.0050). However, passive inoculation of purified immunoglobulin from animal M316, the macaque that best controlled virus, to a naïve macaque, resulted in a low serum neutralizing antibodies and low ADCVI activity that failed to protect from SHIV(89.6P) challenge. Collectively, while our data suggest that anti-envelope antibodies with neutralizing and non-neutralizing Fc(R-dependent activities may be important in the control of SHIV replication, they also demonstrate that low levels of these antibodies alone are not sufficient to protect from infection. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Nanoparticle-mediated delivery of suicide genes in cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vago, Riccardo; Collico, Veronica; Zuppone, Stefania; Prosperi, Davide; Colombo, Miriam

    2016-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapeutics have been employed in cancer treatment for decades due to their efficacy in killing the malignant cells, but the other side of the coin showed off-target effects, onset of drug resistance and recurrences. To overcome these limitations, different approaches have been investigated and suicide gene therapy has emerged as a promising alternative. This approach consists in the introduction of genetic materials into cancerous cells or the surrounding tissue to cause cell death or retard the growth of the tumor mass. Despite promising results obtained both in vitro and in vivo, this innovative approach has been limited, for long time, to the treatment of localized tumors, due to the suboptimal efficiency in introducing suicide genes into cancer cells. Nanoparticles represent a valuable non-viral delivery system to protect drugs in the bloodstream, to improve biodistribution, and to limit side effects by achieving target selectivity through surface ligands. In this scenario, the real potential of suicide genes can be translated into clinically viable treatments for patients. In the present review, we summarize the recent advances of inorganic nanoparticles as non-viral vectors in terms of therapeutic efficacy, targeting capacity and safety issues. We describe the main suicide genes currently used in therapy, with particular emphasis on toxin-encoding genes of bacterial and plant origin. In addition, we discuss the relevance of molecular targeting and tumor-restricted expression to improve treatment specificity to cancer tissue. Finally, we analyze the main clinical applications, limitations and future perspectives of suicide gene therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. miRNA-mediated functional changes through co-regulating function related genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs play important roles in various biological processes involving fairly complex mechanism. Analysis of genome-wide miRNA microarray demonstrate that a single miRNA can regulate hundreds of genes, but the regulative extent on most individual genes is surprisingly mild so that it is difficult to understand how a miRNA provokes detectable functional changes with such mild regulation. RESULTS: To explore the internal mechanism of miRNA-mediated regulation, we re-analyzed the data collected from genome-wide miRNA microarray with bioinformatics assay, and found that the transfection of miR-181b and miR-34a in Hela and HCT-116 tumor cells regulated large numbers of genes, among which, the genes related to cell growth and cell death demonstrated high Enrichment scores, suggesting that these miRNAs may be important in cell growth and cell death. MiR-181b induced changes in protein expression of most genes that were seemingly related to enhancing cell growth and decreasing cell death, while miR-34a mediated contrary changes of gene expression. Cell growth assays further confirmed this finding. In further study on miR-20b-mediated osteogenesis in hMSCs, miR-20b was found to enhance osteogenesis by activating BMPs/Runx2 signaling pathway in several stages by co-repressing of PPARγ, Bambi and Crim1. CONCLUSIONS: With its multi-target characteristics, miR-181b, miR-34a and miR-20b provoked detectable functional changes by co-regulating functionally-related gene groups or several genes in the same signaling pathway, and thus mild regulation from individual miRNA targeting genes could have contributed to an additive effect. This might also be one of the modes of miRNA-mediated gene regulation.

  1. Apple latent spherical virus vectors for reliable and effective virus-induced gene silencing among a broad range of plants including tobacco, tomato, Arabidopsis thaliana, cucurbits, and legumes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Aki; Yamagata, Kousuke; Sugai, Tomokazu; Takahashi, Yukari; Sugawara, Emiko; Tamura, Akihiro; Yaegashi, Hajime; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Isogai, Masamichi; Takahashi, Hideki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2009-01-01

    Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) vectors were evaluated for virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of endogenous genes among a broad range of plant species. ALSV vectors carrying partial sequences of a subunit of magnesium chelatase (SU) and phytoene desaturase (PDS) genes induced highly uniform knockout phenotypes typical of SU and PDS inhibition on model plants such as tobacco and Arabidopsis thaliana, and economically important crops such as tomato, legume, and cucurbit species. The silencing phenotypes persisted throughout plant growth in these plants. In addition, ALSV vectors could be successfully used to silence a meristem gene, proliferating cell nuclear antigen and disease resistant N gene in tobacco and RCY1 gene in A. thaliana. As ALSV infects most host plants symptomlessly and effectively induces stable VIGS for long periods, the ALSV vector is a valuable tool to determine the functions of interested genes among a broad range of plant species.

  2. Individual co-variation between viral RNA load and gene expression reveals novel host factors during early dengue virus infection of the Aedes aegypti midgut.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent Raquin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Dengue virus (DENV causes more human infections than any other mosquito-borne virus. The current lack of antiviral strategies has prompted genome-wide screens for host genes that are required for DENV infectivity. Earlier transcriptomic studies that identified DENV host factors in the primary vector Aedes aegypti used inbred laboratory colonies and/or pools of mosquitoes that erase individual variation. Here, we performed transcriptome sequencing on individual midguts in a field-derived Ae. aegypti population to identify new candidate host factors modulating DENV replication. We analyzed the transcriptomic data using an approach that accounts for individual co-variation between viral RNA load and gene expression. This approach generates a prediction about the agonist or antagonist effect of candidate genes on DENV replication based on the sign of the correlation between gene expression and viral RNA load. Using this method, we identified 39 candidate genes that went undetected by conventional pairwise comparison of gene expression levels between DENV-infected midguts and uninfected controls. Only four candidate genes were detected by both methods, emphasizing their complementarity. We demonstrated the value of our approach by functional validation of a candidate agonist gene encoding a sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP, which was identified by correlation analysis but not by pairwise comparison. We confirmed that SREBP promotes DENV infection in the midgut by RNAi-mediated gene knockdown in vivo. We suggest that our approach for transcriptomic analysis can empower genome-wide screens for potential agonist or antagonist factors by leveraging inter-individual variation in gene expression. More generally, this method is applicable to a wide range of phenotypic traits displaying inter-individual variation.

  3. Torque Teno Virus Load-Inverse Association With Antibody-Mediated Rejection After Kidney Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiemann, Martin; Puchhammer-Stöckl, Elisabeth; Eskandary, Farsad; Kohlbeck, Philip; Rasoul-Rockenschaub, Susanne; Heilos, Andreas; Kozakowski, Nicolas; Görzer, Irene; Kikić, Željko; Herkner, Harald; Böhmig, Georg A; Bond, Gregor

    2017-02-01

    Antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) represents one of the cardinal causes of late allograft loss after kidney transplantation, and there is great need for noninvasive tools improving early diagnosis of this rejection type. One promising strategy might be the quantification of peripheral blood DNA levels of the highly prevalent and apathogenic Torque Teno virus (TTV), which might mirror the overall level of immunosuppression and thus help determine the risk of alloimmune response. To assess the association between TTV load in the peripheral blood and AMR, 715 kidney transplant recipients (median, 6.3 years posttransplantation) were subjected to a systematical cross-sectional AMR screening and, in parallel, TTV quantification. Eighty-six of these recipients had donor-specific antibodies and underwent protocol biopsy, AMR-positive patients (n = 46) showed only 25% of the TTV levels measured in patients without AMR (P = 0.003). In a generalized linear model, higher TTV levels were associated with a decreased risk for AMR after adjustment for potential confounders (risk ratio 0.94 per TTV log level; 95% confidence interval 0.90-0.99; P = 0.02). Future studies will have to clarify whether longitudinal assessment of TTV load might predict AMR risk and help guide the type and intensity of immunosuppression to prevent antibody-mediated graft injury.

  4. The role of inducer cells in mediating in vitro suppression of feline immunodeficiency virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phadke, Anagha P.; Choi, In-Soo; Li Zhongxia; Weaver, Eric; Collisson, Ellen W.

    2004-01-01

    CD8 + T-cell-mediated suppression of feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) replication has been described by several groups, although the mechanisms of activation and conditions for viral suppression vary with the methodologies. We have previously reported that CD8 + T-cell-mediated suppression of FIV replication required inducer cell stimulation of the effector cells. The focus of the present study was to examine the essential role of inducer cells required for the induction of this soluble anti-FIV activity. Both FIV-PPR-infected T cells and feline skin fibroblasts (FSF) infected with an alphavirus vector expressing FIV capsid or the irrelevant antigen lacZ, stimulated autologous or heterologous effector cells to produce supernatants that suppressed FIV replication. Thus, induction of this suppression of FIV replication did not strictly require autologous inducer cells and did not require the presence of FIV antigen. Anti-viral activity correlated with the presence of CD8 + T cells. Suppression was maximal when the inducer cells and the effector cells were in contact with each other, because separation of the inducer and effector cells by a 0.45-μm membrane reduced FIV suppression by approximately 50%. These findings emphasize the importance for membrane antigen interactions and cytokines in the optimal induction of effector cell synthesis of the soluble anti-FIV activity

  5. Identification of an attenuated barley stripe mosaic virus for the virus-induced gene silencing of pathogenesis-related wheat genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhrow, Leann M; Clark, Shawn M; Loewen, Michele C

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) has become an emerging technology for the rapid, efficient functional genomic screening of monocot and dicot species. The barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) has been described as an effective VIGS vehicle for the evaluation of genes involved in wheat and barley phytopathogenesis; however, these studies have been obscured by BSMV-induced phenotypes and defense responses. The utility of BSMV VIGS may be improved using a BSMV genetic background which is more tolerable to the host plant especially upon secondary infection of highly aggressive, necrotrophic pathogens such as Fusarium graminearum. BSMV-induced VIGS in Triticum aestivum (bread wheat) cv. 'Fielder' was assessed for the study of wheat genes putatively related to Fusarium Head Blight (FHB), the necrotrophism of wheat and other cereals by F. graminearum. Due to the lack of 'Fielder' spike viability and increased accumulation of Fusarium-derived deoxynivalenol contamination upon co-infection of BSMV and FHB, an attenuated BSMV construct was generated by the addition of a glycine-rich, C-terminal peptide to the BSMV γ b protein. This attenuated BSMV effectively silenced target wheat genes while limiting disease severity, deoxynivalenol contamination, and yield loss upon Fusarium co-infection compared to the original BSMV construct. The attenuated BSMV-infected tissue exhibited reduced abscisic, jasmonic, and salicylic acid defense phytohormone accumulation upon secondary Fusarium infection. Finally, the attenuated BSMV was used to investigate the role of the salicylic acid-responsive pathogenesis-related 1 in response to FHB. The use of an attenuated BSMV may be advantageous in characterizing wheat genes involved in phytopathogenesis, including Fusarium necrotrophism, where minimal viral background effects on defense are required. Additionally, the attenuated BSMV elicits reduced defense hormone accumulation, suggesting that this genotype may have applications for the

  6. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by LNA-mediated nuclear interference with HBV DNA transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Zhen; Xiang, Wenqing; Guo, Yajuan; Chen, Zhi; Liu, Wei; Lu, Daru

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → LNA-modified oligonucleotides can pass through the plasma membrane of cultured cells even without using transfection machinery. → LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. → LNA-oligonucleotide designed to target nuclear HBV DNA efficiently suppresses HBV replication and transcription in cultured hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Silencing target genes with small regulatory RNAs is widely used to investigate gene function and therapeutic drug development. Recently, triplex-based approaches have provided another attractive means to achieve targeted gene regulation and gene manipulation at the molecular and cellular levels. Nuclear entry of oligonucleotides and enhancement of their affinity to the DNA targets are key points of such approaches. In this study, we developed lipid-based transport of a locked-nucleic-acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA interference in human hepatocytes expressing HBV genomic DNA. In these cells, the LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The oligonucleotide specifically targeting HBV DNA clearly interfered with HBV DNA transcription as shown by a block in pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) production. The HBV DNA-targeted oligonucleotide suppressed HBV DNA replication and HBV protein production more efficiently than small interfering RNAs directed to the pgRNA. These results demonstrate that fusion with lipid can carry LNA-modified oligonucleotides to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression. Interfering with HBV DNA transcription by LNA-modified oligonucleotides has strong potential as a new strategy for HBV inhibition.

  7. Inhibition of hepatitis B virus (HBV) by LNA-mediated nuclear interference with HBV DNA transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Zhen [The State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and The MOE Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China); Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Program in Molecular Cell Biology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Xiang, Wenqing; Guo, Yajuan [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Program in Molecular Cell Biology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Chen, Zhi [The State Key Laboratory for Infectious Disease, Institute of Infectious Disease, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310003 (China); Liu, Wei, E-mail: liuwei666@zju.edu.cn [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Program in Molecular Cell Biology, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, Zhejiang 310058 (China); Lu, Daru, E-mail: drlu@fudan.edu.cn [The State Key Laboratory of Genetic Engineering and The MOE Key Laboratory of Contemporary Anthropology, School of Life Science, Fudan University, Shanghai 200433 (China)

    2011-06-10

    Highlights: {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides can pass through the plasma membrane of cultured cells even without using transfection machinery. {yields} LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. {yields} LNA-oligonucleotide designed to target nuclear HBV DNA efficiently suppresses HBV replication and transcription in cultured hepatic cells. -- Abstract: Silencing target genes with small regulatory RNAs is widely used to investigate gene function and therapeutic drug development. Recently, triplex-based approaches have provided another attractive means to achieve targeted gene regulation and gene manipulation at the molecular and cellular levels. Nuclear entry of oligonucleotides and enhancement of their affinity to the DNA targets are key points of such approaches. In this study, we developed lipid-based transport of a locked-nucleic-acid (LNA)-modified oligonucleotide for hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA interference in human hepatocytes expressing HBV genomic DNA. In these cells, the LNA-modified oligonucleotides passed efficiently across the cell membrane, and lipid-coating facilitated translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The oligonucleotide specifically targeting HBV DNA clearly interfered with HBV DNA transcription as shown by a block in pregenomic RNA (pgRNA) production. The HBV DNA-targeted oligonucleotide suppressed HBV DNA replication and HBV protein production more efficiently than small interfering RNAs directed to the pgRNA. These results demonstrate that fusion with lipid can carry LNA-modified oligonucleotides to the nucleus where they regulate gene expression. Interfering with HBV DNA transcription by LNA-modified oligonucleotides has strong potential as a new strategy for HBV inhibition.

  8. Systemic virus-induced gene silencing allows functional characterization of maize genes during biotrophic interaction with Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Linde, Karina; Kastner, Christine; Kumlehn, Jochen; Kahmann, Regine; Doehlemann, Gunther

    2011-01-01

    Infection of maize (Zea mays) plants with the corn smut fungus Ustilago maydis leads to the formation of large tumors on the stem, leaves and inflorescences. In this biotrophic interaction, plant defense responses are actively suppressed by the pathogen, and previous transcriptome analyses of infected maize plants showed massive and stage-specific changes in host gene expression during disease progression. To identify maize genes that are functionally involved in the interaction with U. maydis, we adapted a virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) system based on the brome mosaic virus (BMV) for maize. Conditions were established that allowed successful U. maydis infection of BMV-preinfected maize plants. This set-up enabled quantification of VIGS and its impact on U. maydis infection using a quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR)-based readout. In proof-of-principle experiments, an U. maydis-induced terpene synthase was shown to negatively regulate disease development while a protein involved in cell death inhibition was required for full virulence of U. maydis. The results suggest that this system is a versatile tool for the rapid identification of maize genes that determine compatibility with U. maydis. © (2010) Max Planck Society. Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  9. Functional gene silencing mediated by chitosan/siRNA nanocomplexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ji, A M; Su, D; Che, O; Li, W S; Sun, L; Zhang, Z Y; Xu, F [Department of Pharmaceutical Science, Zhujiang Hospital, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510282 (China); Yang, B, E-mail: andrewfxu1998@gmail.co [Department of Chemistry, Indiana University-Bloomington, Bloomington, IN 47405 (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles to knock down FHL2 gene expression were reported in this work. The physicochemical properties such as particle size, surface charge, morphology and complex stability of chitosan nanoparticle-incorporated siRNA were evaluated. Nanoparticles which were formulated with chitosan/siRNA exhibited irregular, lamellar and dendritic structures with a hydrodynamic radius size of about 148 nm and net positive charges with zeta-potential value of 58.5 mV. The knockdown effect of the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles on gene expression in FHL2 over-expressed human colorectal cancer Lovo cells was investigated. The result showed that FHL2 siRNA formulated within chitosan nanoparticles could knock down about 69.6% FHL2 gene expression, which is very similar to the 68.8% reduced gene expression when siRNA was transfected with liposome Lipofectamine. Western analysis further showed significant FHL-2 protein expression reduced by the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. The results also showed that blocking FHL2 expression by siRNA could also inhibit the growth and proliferation of human colorectal cancer Lovo cells. The current results demonstrated that chitosan-based siRNA nanoparticles were a very efficient delivery system for siRNA in vivo as previously reported.

  10. Agrobacterium mediated transformation of annexin gene in tobacco ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    serves as a selectable marker system in plants and its amplification confirmed the presence of annexin ... annexin signaling to many different physiological pro- ..... Lane 7: pGPTV with annexin gene digested with EcoR1 and XbaI. Lane 8:.

  11. Electric pulse-mediated gene delivery to various animal tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mir, Lluis M; Moller, Pernille H; André, Franck

    2005-01-01

    therapy, termed electrogenetherapy (EGT as well). By transfecting cells with a long lifetime, such as muscle fibers, a very long-term expression of genes can be obtained. A great variety of tissues have been transfected successfully, from muscle as the most extensively used, to both soft (e.g., spleen...

  12. Functional gene silencing mediated by chitosan/siRNA nanocomplexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji, A M; Su, D; Che, O; Li, W S; Sun, L; Zhang, Z Y; Xu, F; Yang, B

    2009-01-01

    Chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles to knock down FHL2 gene expression were reported in this work. The physicochemical properties such as particle size, surface charge, morphology and complex stability of chitosan nanoparticle-incorporated siRNA were evaluated. Nanoparticles which were formulated with chitosan/siRNA exhibited irregular, lamellar and dendritic structures with a hydrodynamic radius size of about 148 nm and net positive charges with zeta-potential value of 58.5 mV. The knockdown effect of the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles on gene expression in FHL2 over-expressed human colorectal cancer Lovo cells was investigated. The result showed that FHL2 siRNA formulated within chitosan nanoparticles could knock down about 69.6% FHL2 gene expression, which is very similar to the 68.8% reduced gene expression when siRNA was transfected with liposome Lipofectamine. Western analysis further showed significant FHL-2 protein expression reduced by the chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. The results also showed that blocking FHL2 expression by siRNA could also inhibit the growth and proliferation of human colorectal cancer Lovo cells. The current results demonstrated that chitosan-based siRNA nanoparticles were a very efficient delivery system for siRNA in vivo as previously reported.

  13. Adeno-associated virus vector-mediated transduction in the cat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vite, Charles H; Passini, Marco A; Haskins, Mark E; Wolfe, John H

    2003-10-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors are capable of delivering a therapeutic gene to the mouse brain that can result in long-term and widespread protein production. However, the human infant brain is more than 1000 times larger than the mouse brain, which will make the treatment of global neurometabolic disorders in children more difficult. In this study, we evaluated the ability of three AAV serotypes (1,2, and 5) to transduce cells in the cat brain as a model of a large mammalian brain. The human lysosomal enzyme beta-glucuronidase (GUSB) was used as a reporter gene, because it can be distinguished from feline GUSB by heat stability. The vectors were injected into the cerebral cortex, caudate nucleus, thalamus, corona radiata, internal capsule, and centrum semiovale of 8-week-old cats. The brains were evaluated for gene expression using in situ hybridization and enzyme histochemistry 10 weeks after surgery. The AAV2 vector was capable of transducing cells in the gray matter, while the AAV1 vector resulted in greater transduction of the gray matter than AAV2 as well as transduction of the white matter. AAV5 did not result in detectable transduction in the cat brain.

  14. Co-factors necessary for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Nielsen, Ronni; Stunnenberg, Henk

    of endogenous target gene in different cell types are elusive. To mutually compare the ability of the PPAR subtypes to activate endogenous target genes in a given cell, PPARa, PPARb/d and PPARg2 were HA tagged and rapidly, equally and synchronously expressed using adenoviral delivery. Within a few hours after...... subtype specific activation of target genes. Accumulating evidence suggests that transcriptional co-factors can function as master regulators for nuclear receptors and impose promoter selectivity. To study co-factor necessity for PPAR mediated transactivation of endogenous target genes, specific co...

  15. Gene therapy for human glioblastoma using neurotropic JC virus-like particles as a gene delivery vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun-Nun; Yang, Yu-Hsuan; Wu, Mu-Sheng; Chou, Ming-Chieh; Fang, Chiung-Yao; Lin, Mien-Chun; Tai, Chien-Kuo; Shen, Cheng-Huang; Chen, Pei-Lain; Chang, Deching; Wang, Meilin

    2018-02-02

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor, has a short period of survival even with recent multimodality treatment. The neurotropic JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) infects glial cells and oligodendrocytes and causes fatal progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy in patients with AIDS. In this study, a possible gene therapy strategy for GBM using JCPyV virus-like particles (VLPs) as a gene delivery vector was investigated. We found that JCPyV VLPs were able to deliver the GFP reporter gene into tumor cells (U87-MG) for expression. In an orthotopic xenograft model, nude mice implanted with U87 cells expressing the near-infrared fluorescent protein and then treated by intratumoral injection of JCPyV VLPs carrying the thymidine kinase suicide gene, combined with ganciclovir administration, exhibited significantly prolonged survival and less tumor fluorescence during the experiment compared with controls. Furthermore, JCPyV VLPs were able to protect and deliver a suicide gene to distal subcutaneously implanted U87 cells in nude mice via blood circulation and inhibit tumor growth. These findings show that metastatic brain tumors can be targeted by JCPyV VLPs carrying a therapeutic gene, thus demonstrating the potential of JCPyV VLPs to serve as a gene therapy vector for the far highly treatment-refractory GBM.

  16. Visual detection of West Nile virus using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a vertical flow visualization strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengguo eCao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available West Nile virus (WNV causes a severe zoonosis, which can lead to a large number of casualties and considerable economic losses. A rapid and accurate identification methodfor WNV for use in field laboratories is urgently needed. Here, a method utilizing reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with a vertical flow visualization strip (RT-LAMP-VF was developed to detect the envelope (E gene of WNV. The RT-LAMP-VF assay could detect 102 copies/μl ofan WNV RNA standard using a 40 min amplification reaction followed by a 2 min incubationof the amplification product on the visualization strip, and no cross-reaction with other closely related members of theFlavivirus genus was observed. The assay was further evaluated using cells and mouse brain tissues infected with a recombinant rabies virus expressing the E protein of WNV.The assay produced sensitivities of 101.5TCID50/ml and 101.33 TCID50/ml for detection of the recombinant virus in the cells and brain tissues, respectively. Overall, the RT-LAMP-VF assay developed in this study is rapid, simple and effective, and it is therefore suitable for clinical application in the field.

  17. Identification of an ICP27-responsive element in the coding region of a herpes simplex virus type 1 late gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedlackova, Lenka; Perkins, Keith D; Meyer, Julia; Strain, Anna K; Goldman, Oksana; Rice, Stephen A

    2010-03-01

    During productive herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) infection, a subset of viral delayed-early (DE) and late (L) genes require the immediate-early (IE) protein ICP27 for their expression. However, the cis-acting regulatory sequences in DE and L genes that mediate their specific induction by ICP27 are unknown. One viral L gene that is highly dependent on ICP27 is that encoding glycoprotein C (gC). We previously demonstrated that this gene is posttranscriptionally transactivated by ICP27 in a plasmid cotransfection assay. Based on our past results, we hypothesized that the gC gene possesses a cis-acting inhibitory sequence and that ICP27 overcomes the effects of this sequence to enable efficient gC expression. To test this model, we systematically deleted sequences from the body of the gC gene and tested the resulting constructs for expression. In so doing, we identified a 258-bp "silencing element" (SE) in the 5' portion of the gC coding region. When present, the SE inhibits gC mRNA accumulation from a transiently transfected gC gene, unless ICP27 is present. Moreover, the SE can be transferred to another HSV-1 gene, where it inhibits mRNA accumulation in the absence of ICP27 and confers high-level expression in the presence of ICP27. Thus, for the first time, an ICP27-responsive sequence has been identified in a physiologically relevant ICP27 target gene. To see if the SE functions during viral infection, we engineered HSV-1 recombinants that lack the SE, either in a wild-type (WT) or ICP27-null genetic background. In an ICP27-null background, deletion of the SE led to ICP27-independent expression of the gC gene, demonstrating that the SE functions during viral infection. Surprisingly, the ICP27-independent gC expression seen with the mutant occurred even in the absence of viral DNA synthesis, indicating that the SE helps to regulate the tight DNA replication-dependent expression of gC.

  18. Plant–Agrobacterium interaction mediated by ethylene and super-Agrobacterium conferring efficient gene transfer

    OpenAIRE

    Nonaka, Satoko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens has a unique ability to transfer genes into plant genomes. This ability has been utilized for plant genetic engineering. However, the efficiency is not sufficient for all plant species. Several studies have shown that ethylene decreased the Agrobacterium-mediated transformation frequency. Thus, A. tumefaciens with an ability to suppress ethylene evolution would increase the efficiency of Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Some studies showed that plant growth-pro...

  19. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein gene of Lettuce big-vein virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaya, T; Ishikawa, K; Koganezawa, H

    2001-06-01

    A sequence of 1425 nt was established that included the complete coat protein (CP) gene of Lettuce big-vein virus (LBVV). The LBVV CP gene encodes a 397 amino acid protein with a predicted M(r) of 44486. Antisera raised against synthetic peptides corresponding to N-terminal or C-terminal parts of the LBVV CP reacted in Western blot analysis with a protein with an M(r) of about 48000. RNA extracted from purified particles of LBVV by using proteinase K, SDS and phenol migrated in gels as two single-stranded RNA species of approximately 7.3 kb (ss-1) and 6.6 kb (ss-2). After denaturation by heat and annealing at room temperature, the RNA migrated as four species, ss-1, ss-2 and two additional double-stranded RNAs (ds-1 and ds-2). The Northern blot hybridization analysis using riboprobes from a full-length clone of the LBVV CP gene indicated that ss-2 has a negative-sense nature and contains the LBVV CP gene. Moreover, ds-2 is a double-stranded form of ss-2. Database searches showed that the LBVV CP most resembled the nucleocapsid proteins of rhabdoviruses. These results indicate that it would be appropriate to classify LBVV as a negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus rather than as a double-stranded RNA virus.

  20. Experimental research on treating hepatic carcinoma by arterial injection of liposome mediated p53 genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guangyu, Zhu; Qin, Lu; Gaojun, Teng; Jinhe, Guo; Hui, Yu; Gang, Deng; Shicheng, He; Wen, Fang; Guozhao, Li; Xiaoying, Wei [Zhongda Hospital, Southeast Univ., Nanjing (China)

    2007-02-15

    Objective: To investigate the transfection and expression of p53 genes mediated by liposome and its feasibility in treatment of liver cancer by transcatheter arterial injection on rabbit VX2 hepatocarcinoma model. Methods: pCMV-myc-p53 plasmids, LipofectAMINE and p53-LipofectAMINE complex were infused into tumor's feeding artery of rabbit VX2 hepatocarcinoma model, respectively, and then protein of cancer tissue was extracted, followed by measuring gene transfection and expression by western blot and immunohistochemistry, p53-LipofectAMlNE complex in different doses were infused into tumor's feeding artery of rabbit VX2 hepatocarcinoma model with the gene transfection and expression detected by the same way. Results: Liposome-mediated p53 gene injected through catheter could be successfully transfected and expressed in the cancer tissue of rabbit VX2 hepatocarcinoma model, with transfection efficiency higher than the gene delivery alone. The efficiency and the gene dose has dose-effect relationship. Conclusions: Treatment of liver cancer by transcatheter arterial injection of p53 genes mediated by liposome is a feasible and effective method, with wide prospect of application. (authors)

  1. Experimental research on treating hepatic carcinoma by arterial injection of liposome mediated p53 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guangyu; Lu Qin; Teng Gaojun; Guo Jinhe; Yu Hui; Deng Gang; He Shicheng; Fang Wen; Li Guozhao; Wei Xiaoying

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the transfection and expression of p53 genes mediated by liposome and its feasibility in treatment of liver cancer by transcatheter arterial injection on rabbit VX2 hepatocarcinoma model. Methods: pCMV-myc-p53 plasmids, LipofectAMINE and p53-LipofectAMINE complex were infused into tumor's feeding artery of rabbit VX2 hepatocarcinoma model, respectively, and then protein of cancer tissue was extracted, followed by measuring gene transfection and expression by western blot and immunohistochemistry, p53-LipofectAMlNE complex in different doses were infused into tumor's feeding artery of rabbit VX2 hepatocarcinoma model with the gene transfection and expression detected by the same way. Results: Liposome-mediated p53 gene injected through catheter could be successfully transfected and expressed in the cancer tissue of rabbit VX2 hepatocarcinoma model, with transfection efficiency higher than the gene delivery alone. The efficiency and the gene dose has dose-effect relationship. Conclusions: Treatment of liver cancer by transcatheter arterial injection of p53 genes mediated by liposome is a feasible and effective method, with wide prospect of application. (authors)

  2. Activity and specificity of TRV-mediated gene editing in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ali, Zahir

    2015-06-03

    © 2015 Taylor and Francis Group, LLC. Plant trait engineering requires efficient targeted genome-editing technologies. Clustered regularly interspaced palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)/ CRISPR associated (Cas) type II system is used for targeted genome-editing applications across eukaryotic species including plants. Delivery of genome engineering reagents and recovery of mutants remain challenging tasks for in planta applications. Recently, we reported the development of Tobacco rattle virus (TRV)-mediated genome editing in Nicotiana benthamiana. TRV infects the growing points and possesses small genome size; which facilitate cloning, multiplexing, and agroinfections. Here, we report on the persistent activity and specificity of the TRV-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 system for targeted modification of the Nicotiana benthamiana genome. Our data reveal the persistence of the TRVmediated Cas9 activity for up to 30 d post-agroinefection. Further, our data indicate that TRV-mediated genome editing exhibited no off-target activities at potential off-targets indicating the precision of the system for plant genome engineering. Taken together, our data establish the feasibility and exciting possibilities of using virus-mediated CRISPR/Cas9 for targeted engineering of plant genomes.

  3. Identification of multiple sites suitable for insertion of foreign genes in herpes simplex virus genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Tomomi; Arii, Jun; Akashi, Hiroomi; Kawaguchi, Yasushi

    2009-03-01

    Information on sites in HSV genomes at which foreign gene(s) can be inserted without disrupting viral genes or affecting properties of the parental virus are important for basic research on HSV and development of HSV-based vectors for human therapy. The intergenic region between HSV-1 UL3 and UL4 genes has been reported to satisfy the requirements for such an insertion site. The UL3 and UL4 genes are oriented toward the intergenic region and, therefore, insertion of a foreign gene(s) into the region between the UL3 and UL4 polyadenylation signals should not disrupt any viral genes or transcriptional units. HSV-1 and HSV-2 each have more than 10 additional regions structurally similar to the intergenic region between UL3 and UL4. In the studies reported here, it has been demonstrated that insertion of a reporter gene expression cassette into several of the HSV-1 and HSV-2 intergenic regions has no effect on viral growth in cell culture or virulence in mice, suggesting that these multiple intergenic regions may be suitable HSV sites for insertion of foreign genes.

  4. Use of λgt11 to isolate genes for two pseudorabies virus glycoproteins with homology to herpes simplex virus and varicella-zoster virus glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovskis, E.A.; Timmins, J.G.; Post, L.E.

    1986-01-01

    A library of pseudorabies virus (PRV) DNA fragments was constructed in the expression cloning vector λgt11. The library was screened with antisera which reacted with mixtures of PRV proteins to isolate recombinant bacteriophages expressing PRV proteins. By the nature of the λgt11 vector, the cloned proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli as β-galactosidase fusion proteins. The fusion proteins from 35 of these phages were purified and injected into mice to raise antisera. The antisera were screened by several different assays, including immunoprecipitation of [ 14 C]glucosamine-labeled PRV proteins. This method identified phages expressing three different PRV glycoproteins: the secreted glycoprotein, gX; gI; and a glycoprotein that had not been previously identified, which we designate gp63. The gp63 and gI genes map adjacent to each other in the small unique region of the PRV genome. The DNA sequence was determined for the region of the genome encoding gp63 and gI. It was found that gp63 has a region of homology with a herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) protein, encoded by US7, and also with varicella-zoster virus (VZV) gpIV. The gI protein sequence has a region of homology with HSV-1 gE and VZV gpI. It is concluded that PRV, HSV, and VZV all have a cluster of homologous glycoprotein genes in the small unique components of their genomes and that the organization of these genes is conserved

  5. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Rubio

    Full Text Available RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925, which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  6. Gene Expression Analysis of Plum pox virus (Sharka) Susceptibility/Resistance in Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Manuel; Ballester, Ana Rosa; Olivares, Pedro Manuel; Castro de Moura, Manuel; Dicenta, Federico; Martínez-Gómez, Pedro

    2015-01-01

    RNA-Seq has proven to be a very powerful tool in the analysis of the Plum pox virus (PPV, sharka disease)/Prunus interaction. This technique is an important complementary tool to other means of studying genomics. In this work an analysis of gene expression of resistance/susceptibility to PPV in apricot is performed. RNA-Seq has been applied to analyse the gene expression changes induced by PPV infection in leaves from two full-sib apricot genotypes, "Rojo Pasión" and "Z506-7", resistant and susceptible to PPV, respectively. Transcriptomic analyses revealed the existence of more than 2,000 genes related to the pathogen response and resistance to PPV in apricot. These results showed that the response to infection by the virus in the susceptible genotype is associated with an induction of genes involved in pathogen resistance such as the allene oxide synthase, S-adenosylmethionine synthetase 2 and the major MLP-like protein 423. Over-expression of the Dicer protein 2a may indicate the suppression of a gene silencing mechanism of the plant by PPV HCPro and P1 PPV proteins. On the other hand, there were 164 genes involved in resistance mechanisms that have been identified in apricot, 49 of which are located in the PPVres region (scaffold 1 positions from 8,050,804 to 8,244,925), which is responsible for PPV resistance in apricot. Among these genes in apricot there are several MATH domain-containing genes, although other genes inside (Pleiotropic drug resistance 9 gene) or outside (CAP, Cysteine-rich secretory proteins, Antigen 5 and Pathogenesis-related 1 protein; and LEA, Late embryogenesis abundant protein) PPVres region could also be involved in the resistance.

  7. Repressor-mediated tissue-specific gene expression in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B [Athens, GA; Balish, Rebecca S [Oxford, OH; Tehryung, Kim [Athens, GA; McKinney, Elizabeth C [Athens, GA

    2009-02-17

    Plant tissue specific gene expression by way of repressor-operator complexes, has enabled outcomes including, without limitation, male sterility and engineered plants having root-specific gene expression of relevant proteins to clean environmental pollutants from soil and water. A mercury hyperaccumulation strategy requires that mercuric ion reductase coding sequence is strongly expressed. The actin promoter vector, A2pot, engineered to contain bacterial lac operator sequences, directed strong expression in all plant vegetative organs and tissues. In contrast, the expression from the A2pot construct was restricted primarily to root tissues when a modified bacterial repressor (LacIn) was coexpressed from the light-regulated rubisco small subunit promoter in above-ground tissues. Also provided are analogous repressor operator complexes for selective expression in other plant tissues, for example, to produce male sterile plants.

  8. Roll of hemagglutinin gene in the biology of avian inflenza virus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Soltanialvar

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The hemagglutinin (HA, the major envelope glycoprotein of influenza, plays an important role during the early stage of infection, and changes in the HA gene prior to the emergence of pathogenic avian influenza viruses. The HA protein controls viral entry through membrane fusion of the viral envelope with the host cell membrane and allows the genetic information released to initiate new virus synthesis. Sharp antigenic variation of HA remains the critical challenge to the development of effective vaccines. Therefore, we highlight the role of HA in need of review: structure of HA, the fusion process and the HA receptor binding specificity in interspecies transmission and the impact of multiple mutations at antigenic sites and host antibodies to the parental virus, and the host susceptibility to productive infection by the drift strains.

  9. Depletion of Mediator Kinase Module Subunits Represses Superenhancer-Associated Genes in Colon Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuuluvainen, Emilia; Domènech-Moreno, Eva; Niemelä, Elina H; Mäkelä, Tomi P

    2018-06-01

    In cancer, oncogene activation is partly mediated by acquired superenhancers, which therefore represent potential targets for inhibition. Superenhancers are enriched for BRD4 and Mediator, and both BRD4 and the Mediator MED12 subunit are disproportionally required for expression of superenhancer-associated genes in stem cells. Here we show that depletion of Mediator kinase module subunit MED12 or MED13 together with MED13L can be used to reduce expression of cancer-acquired superenhancer genes, such as the MYC gene, in colon cancer cells, with a concomitant decrease in proliferation. Whereas depletion of MED12 or MED13/MED13L caused a disproportional decrease of superenhancer gene expression, this was not seen with depletion of the kinases cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK8) and CDK19. MED12-MED13/MED13L-dependent superenhancer genes were coregulated by β-catenin, which has previously been shown to associate with MED12. Importantly, β-catenin depletion caused reduced binding of MED12 at the MYC superenhancer. The effect of MED12 or MED13/MED13L depletion on cancer-acquired superenhancer gene expression was more specific than and partially distinct from that of BRD4 depletion, with the most efficient inhibition seen with combined targeting. These results identify a requirement of MED12 and MED13/MED13L for expression of acquired superenhancer genes in colon cancer, implicating these Mediator subunits as potential therapeutic targets for colon cancer, alone or together with BRD4. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Microbiology.

  10. Thermodynamic control of small RNA-mediated gene silencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumiko eUi-Tei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs are crucial regulators of posttranscriptional gene silencing, which is referred to as RNA interference (RNAi or RNA silencing. In RNAi, siRNA loaded onto the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC downregulates target gene expression by cleaving mRNA whose sequence is perfectly complementary to the siRNA guide strand. We previously showed that highly functional siRNAs possessed the following characteristics: A or U residues at nucleotide position 1 measured from the 5’ terminal, four to seven A/Us in positions 1–7, and G or C residues at position 19. This finding indicated that an RNA strand with a thermodynamically unstable 5’ terminal is easily retained in the RISC and functions as a guide strand. In addition, it is clear that unintended genes with complementarities only in the seed region (positions 2–8 are also downregulated by off-target effects. siRNA efficiency is mainly determined by the Watson-Crick base-pairing stability formed between the siRNA seed region and target mRNA. siRNAs with a low seed-target duplex melting temperature (Tm have little or no seed-dependent off-target activity. Thus, important parts of the RNA silencing machinery may be regulated by nucleotide base-pairing thermodynamic stability. A mechanistic understanding of thermodynamic control may enable an efficient target gene-specific RNAi for functional genomics and safe therapeutic applications.

  11. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amber eFrick

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS, we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01x10-8. Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05.In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Thus, further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies.

  12. A CRISPR-Based Screen Identifies Genes Essential for West-Nile-Virus-Induced Cell Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Hongming; Dang, Ying; Wu, Yonggan; Jia, Gengxiang; Anaya, Edgar; Zhang, Junli; Abraham, Sojan; Choi, Jang-Gi; Shi, Guojun; Qi, Ling; Manjunath, N; Wu, Haoquan

    2015-07-28

    West Nile virus (WNV) causes an acute neurological infection attended by massive neuronal cell death. However, the mechanism(s) behind the virus-induced cell death is poorly understood. Using a library containing 77,406 sgRNAs targeting 20,121 genes, we performed a genome-wide screen followed by a second screen with a sub-library. Among the genes identified, seven genes, EMC2, EMC3, SEL1L, DERL2, UBE2G2, UBE2J1, and HRD1, stood out as having the strongest phenotype, whose knockout conferred strong protection against WNV-induced cell death with two different WNV strains and in three cell lines. Interestingly, knockout of these genes did not block WNV replication. Thus, these appear to be essential genes that link WNV replication to downstream cell death pathway(s). In addition, the fact that all of these genes belong to the ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggests that this might be the primary driver of WNV-induced cell death. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Stunned Silence: Gene Expression Programs in Human Cells Infected with Monkeypox or Vaccinia Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubins, Kathleen H.; Hensley, Lisa E.; Relman, David A.; Brown, Patrick O.

    2011-01-01

    Poxviruses use an arsenal of molecular weapons to evade detection and disarm host immune responses. We used DNA microarrays to investigate the gene expression responses to infection by monkeypox virus (MPV), an emerging human pathogen, and Vaccinia virus (VAC), a widely used model and vaccine organism, in primary human macrophages, primary human fibroblasts and HeLa cells. Even as the overwhelmingly infected cells approached their demise, with extensive cytopathic changes, their gene expression programs appeared almost oblivious to poxvirus infection. Although killed (gamma-irradiated) MPV potently induced a transcriptional program characteristic of the interferon response, no such response was observed during infection with either live MPV or VAC. Moreover, while the gene expression response of infected cells to stimulation with ionomycin plus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA), or poly (I-C) was largely unimpaired by infection with MPV, a cluster of pro-inflammatory genes were a notable exception. Poly(I-C) induction of genes involved in alerting the innate immune system to the infectious threat, including TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha and beta, CCL5 and IL-6, were suppressed by infection with live MPV. Thus, MPV selectively inhibits expression of genes with critical roles in cell-signaling pathways that activate innate immune responses, as part of its strategy for stealthy infection. PMID:21267444

  14. Stunned silence: gene expression programs in human cells infected with monkeypox or vaccinia virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen H Rubins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Poxviruses use an arsenal of molecular weapons to evade detection and disarm host immune responses. We used DNA microarrays to investigate the gene expression responses to infection by monkeypox virus (MPV, an emerging human pathogen, and Vaccinia virus (VAC, a widely used model and vaccine organism, in primary human macrophages, primary human fibroblasts and HeLa cells. Even as the overwhelmingly infected cells approached their demise, with extensive cytopathic changes, their gene expression programs appeared almost oblivious to poxvirus infection. Although killed (gamma-irradiated MPV potently induced a transcriptional program characteristic of the interferon response, no such response was observed during infection with either live MPV or VAC. Moreover, while the gene expression response of infected cells to stimulation with ionomycin plus phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA, or poly (I-C was largely unimpaired by infection with MPV, a cluster of pro-inflammatory genes were a notable exception. Poly(I-C induction of genes involved in alerting the innate immune system to the infectious threat, including TNF-alpha, IL-1 alpha and beta, CCL5 and IL-6, were suppressed by infection with live MPV. Thus, MPV selectively inhibits expression of genes with critical roles in cell-signaling pathways that activate innate immune responses, as part of its strategy for stealthy infection.

  15. Ultrasound-mediated interferon β gene transfection inhibits growth of malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Kazuki; Feril, Loreto B.; Tachibana, Katsuro; Takahashi, Akira; Matsuo, Miki; Endo, Hitomi; Harada, Yoshimi; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Successful ultrasound-mediated transfection of melanoma (C32) cells with IFN-β genes both in vitro and in vivo. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited proliferation of melanoma cells in vitro. → Ultrasound-mediated IFN-β transfection inhibited melanoma tumor growth in vivo. -- Abstract: We investigated the effects of ultrasound-mediated transfection (sonotransfection) of interferon β (IFN-β) gene on melanoma (C32) both in vitro and in vivo. C32 cells were sonotransfected with IFN-β in vitro. Subcutaneous C32 tumors in mice were sonicated weekly immediately after intra-tumor injection with IFN-β genes mixed with microbubbles. Successful sonotransfection with IFN-β gene in vitro was confirmed by ELISA, which resulted in C32 growth inhibition. In vivo, the growth ratio of tumors transfected with IFN-β gene was significantly lower than the other experimental groups. These results may lead to a new method of treatment against melanoma and other hard-to-treat cancers.

  16. Enhanced virus resistance in transgenic maize expressing a dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease gene from E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiuling Cao

    Full Text Available Maize rough dwarf disease (MRDD, caused by several Fijiviruses in the family Reoviridae, is a global disease that is responsible for substantial yield losses in maize. Although some maize germplasm have low levels of polygenic resistance to MRDD, highly resistant cultivated varieties are not available for agronomic field production in China. In this work, we have generated transgenic maize lines that constitutively express rnc70, a mutant E. coli dsRNA-specific endoribonuclease gene. Transgenic lines were propagated and screened under field conditions for 12 generations. During three years of evaluations, two transgenic lines and their progeny were challenged with Rice black-streaked dwarf virus (RBSDV, the causal agent of MRDD in China, and these plants exhibited reduced levels of disease severity. In two normal years of MRDD abundance, both lines were more resistant than non-transgenic plants. Even in the most serious MRDD year, six out of seven progeny from one line were resistant, whereas non-transgenic plants were highly susceptible. Molecular approaches in the T12 generation revealed that the rnc70 transgene was integrated and expressed stably in transgenic lines. Under artificial conditions permitting heavy virus inoculation, the T12 progeny of two highly resistant lines had a reduced incidence of MRDD and accumulation of RBSDV in infected plants. In addition, we confirmed that the RNC70 protein could bind directly to RBSDV dsRNA in vitro. Overall, our data show that RNC70-mediated resistance in transgenic maize can provide efficient protection against dsRNA virus infection.

  17. Establishment of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid detection and differentiation of canine distemper virus infected and vaccinated animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Da-Fei; Liu, Chun-Guo; Tian, Jin; Jiang, Yi-Tong; Zhang, Xiao-Zhan; Chai, Hong-Liang; Yang, Tian-Kuo; Yin, Xiu-Chen; Zhang, Hong-Ying; Liu, Ming; Hua, Yu-Ping; Qu, Lian-Dong

    2015-06-01

    Although widespread vaccination against canine distemper virus (CDV) has been conducted for many decades, several canine distemper outbreaks in vaccinated animals have been reported frequently. In order to detect and differentiate the wild-type and vaccine strains of the CDV from the vaccinated animals, a novel reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) method was developed. A set of four primers-two internal and two external-were designed to target the H gene for the specific detection of wild-type CDV variants. The CDV-H RT-LAMP assay rapidly amplified the target gene, within 60 min, using a water bath held at a constant temperature of 65°C. The assay was 100-fold more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR, with a detection limit of 10(-1)TCID50ml(-1). The system showed a preference for wild-type CDV, and exhibited less sensitivity to canine parvovirus, canine adenovirus type 1 and type 2, canine coronavirus, and canine parainfluenza virus. The assay was validated using 102 clinical samples obtained from vaccinated dog farms, and the results were comparable to a multiplex nested RT-PCR assay. The specific CDV-H RT-LAMP assay provides a simple, rapid, and sensitive tool for the detection of canines infected with wild-type CDV from canines vaccinated with attenuated vaccine. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of Interferon-Stimulated Gene Proteins That Inhibit Human Parainfluenza Virus Type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabbani, M A G; Ribaudo, Michael; Guo, Ju-Tao; Barik, Sailen

    2016-12-15

    A major arm of cellular innate immunity is type I interferon (IFN), represented by IFN-α and IFN-β. Type I IFN transcriptionally induces a large number of cellular genes, collectively known as IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, which act as antivirals. The IFIT (interferon-induced proteins with tetratricopeptide repeats) family proteins constitute a major subclass of ISG proteins and are characterized by multiple tetratricopeptide repeats (TPRs). In this study, we have interrogated IFIT proteins for the ability to inhibit the growth of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3), a nonsegmented negative-strand RNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family and a major cause of respiratory disease in children. We found that IFIT1 significantly inhibited PIV3, whereas IFIT2, IFIT3, and IFIT5 were less effective or not at all. In further screening a set of ISG proteins we discovered that several other such proteins also inhibited PIV3, including IFITM1, IDO (indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase), PKR (protein kinase, RNA activated), and viperin (virus inhibitory protein, endoplasmic reticulum associated, interferon inducible)/Cig5. The antiviral effect of IDO, the enzyme that catalyzes the first step of tryptophan degradation, could be counteracted by tryptophan. These results advance our knowledge of diverse ISG proteins functioning as antivirals and may provide novel approaches against PIV3. The innate immunity of the host, typified by interferon (IFN), is a major antiviral defense. IFN inhibits virus growth by inducing a large number of IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) proteins, several of which have been shown to have specific antiviral functions. Parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) is major pathogen of children, and no reliable vaccine or specific antiviral against it currently exists. In this article, we report several ISG proteins that strongly inhibit PIV3 growth, the use of which may allow a better antiviral regimen targeting PIV3. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology

  19. An adeno-associated virus-based intracellular sensor of pathological nuclear factor-κB activation for disease-inducible gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelwahed Chtarto

    Full Text Available Stimulation of resident cells by NF-κB activating cytokines is a central element of inflammatory and degenerative disorders of the central nervous system (CNS. This disease-mediated NF-κB activation could be used to drive transgene expression selectively in affected cells, using adeno-associated virus (AAV-mediated gene transfer. We have constructed a series of AAV vectors expressing GFP under the control of different promoters including NF-κB -responsive elements. As an initial screen, the vectors were tested in vitro in HEK-293T cells treated with TNF-α. The best profile of GFP induction was obtained with a promoter containing two blocks of four NF-κB -responsive sequences from the human JCV neurotropic polyoma virus promoter, fused to a new tight minimal CMV promoter, optimally distant from each other. A therapeutical gene, glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF cDNA under the control of serotype 1-encapsidated NF-κB -responsive AAV vector (AAV-NF was protective in senescent cultures of mouse cortical neurons. AAV-NF was then evaluated in vivo in the kainic acid (KA-induced status epilepticus rat model for temporal lobe epilepsy, a major neurological disorder with a central pathophysiological role for NF-κB activation. We demonstrate that AAV-NF, injected in the hippocampus, responded to disease induction by mediating GFP expression, preferentially in CA1 and CA3 neurons and astrocytes, specifically in regions where inflammatory markers were also induced. Altogether, these data demonstrate the feasibility to use disease-activated transcription factor-responsive elements in order to drive transgene expression specifically in affected cells in inflammatory CNS disorders using AAV-mediated gene transfer.

  20. Durable field resistance to wheat yellow mosaic virus in transgenic wheat containing the antisense virus polymerase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; Sun, Liying; Wu, Hongya; Chen, Jiong; Ma, Youzhi; Zhang, Xiaoxiang; Du, Lipu; Cheng, Shunhe; Zhang, Boqiao; Ye, Xingguo; Pang, Junlan; Zhang, Xinmei; Li, Liancheng; Andika, Ida B; Chen, Jianping; Xu, Huijun

    2014-05-01

    Wheat yellow mosaic virus (WYMV) has spread rapidly and causes serious yield losses in the major wheat-growing areas in China. Because it is vectored by the fungus-like organism Polymyxa graminis that survives for long periods in soil, it is difficult to eliminate by conventional crop management or fungicides. There is also only limited resistance in commercial cultivars. In this research, fourteen independent transgenic events were obtained by co-transformation with the antisense NIb8 gene (the NIb replicase of WYMV) and a selectable gene bar. Four original transgenic lines (N12, N13, N14 and N15) and an offspring line (N12-1) showed high and durable resistance to WYMV in the field. Four resistant lines were shown to have segregated and only contain NIb8 (without bar) by PCR and herbicide resistance testing in the later generations. Line N12-1 showed broad-spectrum resistance to WYMV isolates from different sites in China. After growing in the infested soil, WYMV could not be detected by tissue printing and Western blot assays of transgenic wheat. The grain yield of transgenic wheat was about 10% greater than the wild-type susceptible control. Northern blot and small RNA deep sequencing analyses showed that there was no accumulation of small interfering RNAs targeting the NIb8 gene in transgenic wheat plants, suggesting that transgene RNA silencing, a common mechanism of virus-derived disease resistance, is not involved in the process of WYMV resistance. This durable and broad-spectrum resistance to WYMV in transgenic wheat will be useful for alleviating the damage caused by WYMV. © 2013 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. An Improved Single-Step Cloning Strategy Simplifies the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-Mediated Transformation (ATMT)-Based Gene-Disruption Method for Verticillium dahliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sheng; Xing, Haiying; Hua, Chenlei; Guo, Hui-Shan; Zhang, Jie

    2016-06-01

    The soilborne fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae infects a broad range of plant species to cause severe diseases. The availability of Verticillium genome sequences has provided opportunities for large-scale investigations of individual gene function in Verticillium strains using Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (ATMT)-based gene-disruption strategies. Traditional ATMT vectors require multiple cloning steps and elaborate characterization procedures to achieve successful gene replacement; thus, these vectors are not suitable for high-throughput ATMT-based gene deletion. Several advancements have been made that either involve simplification of the steps required for gene-deletion vector construction or increase the efficiency of the technique for rapid recombinant characterization. However, an ATMT binary vector that is both simple and efficient is still lacking. Here, we generated a USER-ATMT dual-selection (DS) binary vector, which combines both the advantages of the USER single-step cloning technique and the efficiency of the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase negative-selection marker. Highly efficient deletion of three different genes in V. dahliae using the USER-ATMT-DS vector enabled verification that this newly-generated vector not only facilitates the cloning process but also simplifies the subsequent identification of fungal homologous recombinants. The results suggest that the USER-ATMT-DS vector is applicable for efficient gene deletion and suitable for large-scale gene deletion in V. dahliae.

  2. Effective generation of transgenic pigs and mice by linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Keejong; Qian, Jin; Jiang, MeiSheng; Liu, Yi-Hsin; Wu, Ming-Che; Chen, Chi-Dar; Lai, Chao-Kuen; Lo, Hsin-Lung; Hsiao, Chin-Ton; Brown, Lucy; Bolen, James; Huang, Hsiao-I; Ho, Pei-Yu; Shih, Ping Yao; Yao, Chen-Wen

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Background Transgenic animals have become valuable tools for both research and applied purposes. The current method of gene transfer, microinjection, which is widely used in transgenic mouse production, has only had limited success in producing transgenic animals of larger or higher species. Here, we report a linker based sperm-mediated gene transfer method (LB-SMGT) that greatly improves the production efficiency of large transgenic animals. Results The linker protein, a monoclonal ...

  3. BDNF gene delivery mediated by neuron-targeted nanoparticles is neuroprotective in peripheral nerve injury

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, CDF; Gonçalves, NP; Gomes, CP; Saraiva, MJ; Pêgo, AP

    2017-01-01

    Neuron-targeted gene delivery is a promising strategy to treat peripheral neuropathies. Here we propose the use of polymeric nanoparticles based on thiolated trimethyl chitosan (TMCSH) to mediate targeted gene delivery to peripheral neurons upon a peripheral and minimally invasive intramuscular administration. Nanoparticles were grafted with the non-toxic carboxylic fragment of the tetanus neurotoxin (HC) to allow neuron targeting and were explored to deliver a plasmid DNA encoding for the br...

  4. Optimization of cationic lipid mediated gene transfer: structure-function, physico-chemical, and cellular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrière, Marie; Tranchant, Isabelle; Niore, Pierre-Antoine; Byk, Gerardo; Mignet, Nathalie; Escriou, Virginie; Scherman, Daniel; Herscovici, Jean

    2002-01-01

    The rationale design aimed at the enhancement of cationic lipid mediated gene transfer is discussed. These improvements are based on the straight evaluation of the structure-activity relationship and on the introduction of new structures. Much attention have been given to the supramolecular structures of the lipid/DNA complexes, to the effect of serum on gene transfer and to the intracellular trafficking of the lipoplexes. Finally new avenue using reducible cationic lipids has been discussed.

  5. DNA microarray global gene expression analysis of influenza virus-infected chicken and duck cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh V. Kuchipudi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The data described in this article pertain to the article by Kuchipudi et al. (2014 titled “Highly Pathogenic Avian Influenza Virus Infection in Chickens But Not Ducks Is Associated with Elevated Host Immune and Pro-inflammatory Responses” [1]. While infection of chickens with highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI H5N1 virus subtypes often leads to 100% mortality within 1 to 2 days, infection of ducks in contrast causes mild or no clinical signs. The rapid onset of fatal disease in chickens, but with no evidence of severe clinical symptoms in ducks, suggests underlying differences in their innate immune mechanisms. We used Chicken Genechip microarrays (Affymetrix to analyse the gene expression profiles of primary chicken and duck lung cells infected with a low pathogenic avian influenza (LPAI H2N3 virus and two HPAI H5N1 virus subtypes to understand the molecular basis of host susceptibility and resistance in chickens and ducks. Here, we described the experimental design, quality control and analysis that were performed on the data set. The data are publicly available through the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEOdatabase with accession number GSE33389, and the analysis and interpretation of these data are included in Kuchipudi et al. (2014 [1].

  6. Differentiation of Xylella fastidiosa strains via multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Jennifer K; Havird, Justin C; De La Fuente, Leonardo

    2012-03-01

    Isolates of the plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa are genetically very similar, but studies on their biological traits have indicated differences in virulence and infection symptomatology. Taxonomic analyses have identified several subspecies, and phylogenetic analyses of housekeeping genes have shown broad host-based genetic differences; however, results are still inconclusive for genetic differentiation of isolates within subspecies. This study employs multilocus sequence analysis of environmentally mediated genes (MLSA-E; genes influenced by environmental factors) to investigate X. fastidiosa relationships and differentiate isolates with low genetic variability. Potential environmentally mediated genes, including host colonization and survival genes related to infection establishment, were identified a priori. The ratio of the rate of nonsynonymous substitutions to the rate of synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) was calculated to select genes that may be under increased positive selection compared to previously studied housekeeping genes. Nine genes were sequenced from 54 X. fastidiosa isolates infecting different host plants across the United States. Results of maximum likelihood (ML) and Bayesian phylogenetic (BP) analyses are in agreement with known X. fastidiosa subspecies clades but show novel within-subspecies differentiation, including geographic differentiation, and provide additional information regarding host-based isolate variation and specificity. dN/dS ratios of environmentally mediated genes, though gene dN/dS ratios and correlate with increased sequence variability. MLSA-E can more precisely resolve relationships between closely related bacterial strains with low genetic variability, such as X. fastidiosa isolates. Discovering the genetic relationships between X. fastidiosa isolates will provide new insights into the epidemiology of populations of X. fastidiosa, allowing improved disease management in economically important crops.

  7. Epstein-Barr Virus MicroRNA miR-BART20-5p Suppresses Lytic Induction by Inhibiting BAD-Mediated caspase-3-Dependent Apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoji; Choi, Hoyun; Lee, Suk Kyeong

    2016-02-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human gammaherpesvirus associated with a variety of tumor types. EBV can establish latency or undergo lytic replication in host cells. In general, EBV remains latent in tumors and expresses a limited repertoire of latent proteins to avoid host immune surveillance. When the lytic cycle is triggered by some as-yet-unknown form of stimulation, lytic gene expression and progeny virus production commence. Thus far, the exact mechanism of EBV latency maintenance and the in vivo triggering signal for lytic induction have yet to be elucidated. Previously, we have shown that the EBV microRNA miR-BART20-5p directly targets the immediate early genes BRLF1 and BZLF1 as well as Bcl-2-associated death promoter (BAD) in EBV-associated gastric carcinoma. In this study, we found that both mRNA and protein levels of BRLF1 and BZLF1 were suppressed in cells following BAD knockdown and increased after BAD overexpression. Progeny virus production was also downregulated by specific knockdown of BAD. Our results demonstrated that caspase-3-dependent apoptosis is a prerequisite for BAD-mediated EBV lytic cycle induction. Therefore, our data suggest that miR-BART20-5p plays an important role in latency maintenance and tumor persistence of EBV-associated gastric carcinoma by inhibiting BAD-mediated caspase-3-dependent apoptosis, which would trigger immediate early gene expression. EBV has an ability to remain latent in host cells, including EBV-associated tumor cells hiding from immune surveillance. However, the exact molecular mechanisms of EBV latency maintenance remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrated that miR-BART20-5p inhibited the expression of EBV immediate early genes indirectly, by suppressing BAD-induced caspase-3-dependent apoptosis, in addition to directly, as we previously reported. Our study suggests that EBV-associated tumor cells might endure apoptotic stress to some extent and remain latent with the aid of miR-BART20-5p. Blocking the

  8. Developing an Alternanthera mosaic virus vector for efficient clonging of Whitefly cDNA RNAi to screen gene function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV; genus Potexvirus) is distinguished from the type member of the genus, Potato virus X by features of viral movement and variation within triple gene block protein 1 (TGB1). AltMV TGB1 variants TGB1L88 and TGB1P88 confer strong and weak silencing suppression, respect...

  9. An emerging avian influenza A virus H5N7 is a genetic reassortant of highly pathogenic genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bragstad, K.; Jørgensen, Poul Henrik; Handberg, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    We full genome characterised the newly discovered avian influenza virus H5N7 subtype combination isolated from a stock of Danish game ducks to investigate the composition of the genome and possible features of high pathogenicity. It was found that the haemagglutinin and the acidic polymerase gene...... low pathogenic avian influenza A viruses. (c) 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved....

  10. Chloroquine mediated modulation of Anopheles gambiae gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Abrantes

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Plasmodium development in the mosquito is crucial for malaria transmission and depends on the parasite's interaction with a variety of cell types and specific mosquito factors that have both positive and negative effects on infection. Whereas the defensive response of the mosquito contributes to a decrease in parasite numbers during these stages, some components of the blood meal are known to favor infection, potentiating the risk of increased transmission. The presence of the antimalarial drug chloroquine in the mosquito's blood meal has been associated with an increase in Plasmodium infectivity for the mosquito, which is possibly caused by chloroquine interfering with the capacity of the mosquito to defend against the infection.In this study, we report a detailed survey of the Anopheles gambiae genes that are differentially regulated by the presence of chloroquine in the blood meal, using an A. gambiae cDNA microarray. The effect of chloroquine on transcript abundance was evaluated separately for non-infected and Plasmodium berghei-infected mosquitoes. Chloroquine was found to affect the abundance of transcripts that encode proteins involved in a variety of processes, including immunity, apoptosis, cytoskeleton and the response to oxidative stress. This pattern of differential gene expression may explain the weakened mosquito defense response which accounts for the increased infectivity observed in chloroquine-treated mosquitoes.The results of the present study suggest that chloroquine can interfere with several putative mosquito mechanisms of defense against Plasmodium at the level of gene expression and highlight the need for a better understanding of the impacts of antimalarial agents on parasite transmission.

  11. T-cell receptor gene rearrangement in Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbello, L; Riva, M; Veronese, S; Nosari, A M; Ravano, E; Colosimo, A; Paris, L; Morra, E

    2012-09-01

    This report describes the case of a previously healthy young man who presented with fever, pharyngitis, cervical lymphadenopathy, lymphocytosis, and severe thrombocytopenia. Serological tests for Epstein-Barr virus were diagnostic of a primary Epstein-Barr virus infectious mononucleosis but severe thrombocytopenia aroused the suspicion of a lymphoproliferative disease. T-cell receptor gene analysis performed on peripheral and bone marrow blood revealed a T-cell receptor γ-chain rearrangement without the evidence of malignancy using standard histologic and immunophenotype studies. Signs and symptoms of the infectious disease, blood count, and T-cell receptor gene rearrangement resolved with observation without the evidence of emergence of a lymphoproliferative disease. In the contest of a suspected lymphoproliferative disease, molecular results should be integrated with all available data for an appropriate diagnosis.

  12. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in DNA immunized mink challenged with wild-type canine distemper virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Line; Søgaard, Mette; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the different phases of the immune response after DNA immunization with the hemagglutinin and nucleoprotein genes from canine distemper virus (CDV). Although attenuated live CDV vaccines have effectively reduced the incidence of disease, canine distemper...

  13. Characterization of foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products with antisera against bacterially synthesized fusion proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strebel, K.; Beck, E.; Strohmaier, K.; Schaller, H.

    1986-01-01

    Defined segments of the cloned foot-and-mouth disease virus genome corresponding to all parts of the coding region were expressed in Escherichia coli as fusions to the N-terminal part of the MS2-polymerase gene under the control of the inducible λPL promoter. All constructs yielded large amounts of proteins, which were purified and used to raise sequence-specific antisera in rabbits. These antisera were used to identify the corresponding viral gene products in 35 S-labeled extracts from foot-and-mouth disease virus-infected BHK cells. This allowed us to locate unequivocally all mature foot-and-mouth disease virus gene products in the nucleotide sequence, to identify precursor-product relationships, and to detect several foot-and mouth disease virus gene products not previously identified in vivo or in vitro

  14. Advances in ultrasound-targeted microbubble-mediated gene therapy for liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cuiyuan; Zhang, Hong; Bai, Ruidan

    2017-07-01

    Hepatic fibrosis develops as a wound-healing scar in response to acute and chronic liver inflammation and can lead to cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. The condition arises due to increased synthesis and reduced degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM) and is a common pathological sequela of chronic liver disease. Excessive deposition of ECM in the liver causes liver dysfunction, ascites, and eventually upper gastrointestinal bleeding as well as a series of complications. However, fibrosis can be reversed before developing into cirrhosis and has thus been the subject of extensive researches particularly at the gene level. Currently, therapeutic genes are imported into the damaged liver to delay or prevent the development of liver fibrosis by regulating the expression of exogenous genes. One technique of gene delivery uses ultrasound targeting of microbubbles combined with therapeutic genes where the time and intensity of the ultrasound can control the release process. Ultrasound irradiation of microbubbles in the vicinity of cells changes the permeability of the cell membrane by its cavitation effect and enhances gene transfection. In this paper, recent progress in the field is reviewed with emphasis on the following aspects: the types of ultrasound microbubbles, the construction of an ultrasound-mediated gene delivery system, the mechanism of ultrasound microbubble-mediated gene transfer and the application of ultrasound microbubbles in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  15. Advances in ultrasound-targeted microbubble-mediated gene therapy for liver fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuiyuan Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic fibrosis develops as a wound-healing scar in response to acute and chronic liver inflammation and can lead to cirrhosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B and C. The condition arises due to increased synthesis and reduced degradation of extracellular matrix (ECM and is a common pathological sequela of chronic liver disease. Excessive deposition of ECM in the liver causes liver dysfunction, ascites, and eventually upper gastrointestinal bleeding as well as a series of complications. However, fibrosis can be reversed before developing into cirrhosis and has thus been the subject of extensive researches particularly at the gene level. Currently, therapeutic genes are imported into the damaged liver to delay or prevent the development of liver fibrosis by regulating the expression of exogenous genes. One technique of gene delivery uses ultrasound targeting of microbubbles combined with therapeutic genes where the time and intensity of the ultrasound can control the release process. Ultrasound irradiation of microbubbles in the vicinity of cells changes the permeability of the cell membrane by its cavitation effect and enhances gene transfection. In this paper, recent progress in the field is reviewed with emphasis on the following aspects: the types of ultrasound microbubbles, the construction of an ultrasound-mediated gene delivery system, the mechanism of ultrasound microbubble–mediated gene transfer and the application of ultrasound microbubbles in the treatment of liver fibrosis.

  16. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smialowska, Agata; Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen; Kylsten, Per; Swoboda, Peter; Ekwall, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe

  17. A complete analysis of HA and NA genes of influenza A viruses.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shi, Weifeng

    2010-12-01

    More and more nucleotide sequences of type A influenza virus are available in public databases. Although these sequences have been the focus of many molecular epidemiological and phylogenetic analyses, most studies only deal with a few representative sequences. In this paper, we present a complete analysis of all Haemagglutinin (HA) and Neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences available to allow large scale analyses of the evolution and epidemiology of type A influenza.

  18. Neutralized adenovirus-immune complexes can mediate effective gene transfer via an Fc receptor-dependent infection pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leopold, Philip L; Wendland, Rebecca L; Vincent, Theresa; Crystal, Ronald G

    2006-10-01

    Neutralization of adenovirus (Ad) by anti-Ad neutralizing antibodies in serum involves formation of Ad-immune complexes that prevent the virus from interacting with target cells. We hypothesized that Ad-immune complexes likely contain viable Ad vectors which, although no longer capable of gaining access to receptors on target cells, may be able to express transgenes in cells bearing Fc receptors for immunoglobulins, i.e., that antibody-based "neutralization" of Ad vectors may be circumvented by the Fc receptor pathway. To test this hypothesis, we expressed the Fcgamma receptor IIA (FcgammaR) in A549 lung epithelial cells or human dermal fibroblasts and evaluated gene transfer in the presence of human neutralizing anti-Ad serum. FcgammaR-expressing cells bound and internalized copious amounts of Ad, with a distinct population of internalized Ad trafficking to the nucleus. The dose-response curves for inhibition of gene transfer revealed that FcgammaR-expressing cells required a more-than-10-fold higher concentration of anti-Ad serum to achieve 50% inhibition of Ad-encoded beta-galactosidase expression compared with non-FcgammaR-expressing cells. The discrepancy between neutralization of Ad during infection of FcgammaR-expressing cells and neutralization of Ad during infection of non-FcgammaR-expressing cells occurred with either heat-inactivated or non-heat-inactivated sera, was blocked by addition of purified Fc domain protein, and did not require the cytoplasmic domain of FcgammaR, suggesting that immune complex internalization proceeded via endocytosis rather than phagocytosis. FcgammaR-mediated infection by Ad-immune complexes did not require expression of the coxsackie virus-Ad receptor (CAR) since similar data were obtained when CAR-deficient human dermal fibroblasts were engineered to express FcgammaR. However, interaction of the Ad penton base with cell surface integrins contributed to the difference in neutralization between FcgammaR-expressing and non

  19. Analysis of a Gene Regulatory Cascade Mediating Circadian Rhythm in Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Haifang; Du, Jiulin; Yan, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In the study of circadian rhythms, it has been a puzzle how a limited number of circadian clock genes can control diverse aspects of physiology. Here we investigate circadian gene expression genome-wide using larval zebrafish as a model system. We made use of a spatial gene expression atlas to investigate the expression of circadian genes in various tissues and cell types. Comparison of genome-wide circadian gene expression data between zebrafish and mouse revealed a nearly anti-phase relationship and allowed us to detect novel evolutionarily conserved circadian genes in vertebrates. We identified three groups of zebrafish genes with distinct responses to light entrainment: fast light-induced genes, slow light-induced genes, and dark-induced genes. Our computational analysis of the circadian gene regulatory network revealed several transcription factors (TFs) involved in diverse aspects of circadian physiology through transcriptional cascade. Of these, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor a (mitfa), a dark-induced TF, mediates a circadian rhythm of melanin synthesis, which may be involved in zebrafish's adaptation to daily light cycling. Our study describes a systematic method to discover previously unidentified TFs involved in circadian physiology in complex organisms. PMID:23468616

  20. Polydnaviruses of Parasitic Wasps: Domestication of Viruses To Act as Gene Delivery Vectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael R. Strand

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Symbiosis is a common phenomenon in which associated organisms can cooperate in ways that increase their ability to survive, reproduce, or utilize hostile environments. Here, we discuss polydnavirus symbionts of parasitic wasps. These viruses are novel in two ways: (1 they have become non-autonomous domesticated entities that cannot replicate outside of wasps; and (2 they function as a delivery vector of genes that ensure successful parasitism of host insects that wasps parasitize. In this review we discuss how these novelties may have arisen, which genes are potentially involved, and what the consequences have been for genome evolution.

  1. Epstein-Barr Virus BKRF4 Gene Product Is Required for Efficient Progeny Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masud, H M Abdullah Al; Watanabe, Takahiro; Yoshida, Masahiro; Sato, Yoshitaka; Goshima, Fumi; Kimura, Hiroshi; Murata, Takayuki

    2017-12-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), a member of human gammaherpesvirus, infects mainly B cells. EBV has two alternative life cycles, latent and lytic, and is reactivated occasionally from the latent stage to the lytic cycle. To combat EBV-associated disorders, understanding the molecular mechanisms of the EBV lytic replication cycle is also important. Here, we focused on an EBV lytic gene, BKRF4. Using our anti-BKRF4 antibody, we revealed that the BKRF4 gene product is expressed during the lytic cycle with late kinetics. To characterize the role of BKRF4, we constructed BKRF4-knockout mutants using the bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and CRISPR/Cas9 systems. Although disruption of the BKRF4 gene had almost no effect on viral protein expression and DNA synthesis, it significantly decreased progeny virion levels in HEK293 and Akata cells. Furthermore, we show that BKRF4 is involved not only in production of progeny virions but also in increasing the infectivity of the virus particles. Immunoprecipitation assays revealed that BKRF4 interacted with a virion protein, BGLF2. We showed that the C-terminal region of BKRF4 was critical for this interaction and for efficient progeny production. Immunofluorescence analysis revealed that BKRF4 partially colocalized with BGLF2 in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Finally, we showed that BKRF4 is a phosphorylated, possible tegument protein and that the EBV protein kinase BGLF4 may be important for this phosphorylation. Taken together, our data suggest that BKRF4 is involved in the production of infectious virions. IMPORTANCE Although the latent genes of EBV have been studied extensively, the lytic genes are less well characterized. This study focused on one such lytic gene, BKRF4, which is conserved only among gammaherpesviruses (ORF45 of Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus or murine herpesvirus 68). After preparing the BKRF4 knockout virus using B95-8 EBV-BAC, we demonstrated that the BKRF4 gene was involved in infectious

  2. Conditional expression of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein gene in Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Rose, J K; Shafferman, A

    1981-01-01

    Bacterial plasmids that directed expression of the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (G-protein) gene under control of the tryptophan operon regulatory region were constructed. A plasmid directing the synthesis of a G-protein-like protein (containing the NH2-terminal segment of seven amino acids encoded by the trpE gene fused to the complete G-protein sequence lacking only its NH2-terminal methionine) could be transformed into trpR+ (repressed) but not into trpR- (derepressed) cells. Th...

  3. Treatment of rat gliomas with recombinant retrovirus harboring Herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hlavaty, J.; Hlubinova, K.; Altanerova, V.; Liska, J.; Altaner, C.

    1997-01-01

    The retrovirus vector containing Herpes simplex virus type 1 thymidine kinase (HSVtk) gene was constructed. The vector was transfected into the packaging cell line PG13. It was shown that individual transfected cells differ in the production of recombinant retrovirus and in their susceptibility to be killed by ganciclovir. Recombinant retrovirus with a gibbon envelope was able to transduced the HSVtk gene into rat glioma cells. In vivo studies confirmed the ability of intraperitoneal ganciclovir administration to influence subcutaneous and intracerebral tumors developed after injection of C 6 rat glioma cells with subsequent injection of HSVtk retrovirus producing cells. (author)

  4. Productive infection of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in dendritic cells requires fusion-mediated viral entry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janas, Alicia M.; Dong, Chunsheng; Wang Jianhua; Wu Li

    2008-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) enters dendritic cells (DCs) through endocytosis and viral receptor-mediated fusion. Although endocytosis-mediated HIV-1 entry can generate productive infection in certain cell types, including human monocyte-derived macrophages, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs appears to be dependent on fusion-mediated viral entry. It remains to be defined whether endocytosed HIV-1 in DCs can initiate productive infection. Using HIV-1 infection and cellular fractionation assays to measure productive viral infection and entry, here we show that HIV-1 enters monocyte-derived DCs predominately through endocytosis; however, endocytosed HIV-1 cannot initiate productive HIV-1 infection in DCs. In contrast, productive HIV-1 infection in DCs requires fusion-mediated viral entry. Together, these results provide functional evidence in understanding HIV-1 cis-infection of DCs, suggesting that different pathways of HIV-1 entry into DCs determine the outcome of viral infection

  5. Efficient photoreceptor-targeted gene expression in vivo by recombinant adeno-associated virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flannery, J G; Zolotukhin, S; Vaquero, M I; LaVail, M M; Muzyczka, N; Hauswirth, W W

    1997-06-24

    We describe a general approach for achieving efficient and cell type-specific expression of exogenous genes in photoreceptor cells of the mammalian retina. Recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vectors were used to transfer the bacterial lacZ gene or a synthetic green fluorescent protein gene (gfp) to mouse or rat retinas after injection into the subretinal space. Using a proximal murine rod opsin promoter (+86 to -385) to drive expression, reporter gene product was found exclusively in photoreceptors, not in any other retinal cell type or in the adjacent retinal pigment epithelium. GFP-expressing photoreceptors typically encompassed 10-20% of the total retinal area after a single 2-microl injection. Photoreceptors were transduced with nearly 100% efficiency in the region directly surrounding the injection site. We estimate approximately 2.5 million photoreceptors were transduced as a result of the single subretinal inoculation. This level of gene transfer and expression suggests the feasibility of genetic therapy for retinal disease. The gfp-containing rAAV stock was substantially free of both adenovirus and wild-type AAV, as judged by plaque assay and infectious center assay, respectively. Thus, highly purified, helper virus-free rAAV vectors can achieve high-frequency tissue-specific transduction of terminally differentiated, postmitotic photoreceptor cells.

  6. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (USA))

    1988-11-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human {alpha}{sub 1}-antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the {alpha}{sub 1} antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes.

  7. Retroviral-mediated gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary mouse hepatocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, H.; Armentano, D.; Mackenzie-Graham, L.; Shen, R.F.; Darlington, G.; Ledley, F.D.; Woo, S.L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Genetic therapy for phenylketonuria (severe phenylalanine hydroxylase deficiency) may require introduction of a normal phenylalanine hydroxylase gene into hepatic cells of patients. The authors report development of a recombinant retrovirus based on the N2 vector for gene transfer and expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA in primary mouse hepatocytes. This construct contains an internal promoter of the human α 1 -antitrypsin gene driving transcription of the phenylalanine hydroxylase cDNA. Primary mouse hepatocytes were isolated from newborn mice, infected with the recombinant virus, and selected for expression of the neomycin-resistance gene. Hepatocytes transformed with the recombinant virus contained high levels of human phenylalanine hydroxylase mRNA transcripts originating from the retroviral and internal promoters. These results demonstrate that the transcriptional regulatory elements of the α 1 antitrypsin gene retain their tissue-specific function in the recombinant provirus and establish a method for efficient transfer and high-level expression of human phenylalanine hydroxylase in primary hepatocytes

  8. Promoter analysis of the Chilo iridescent virus DNA polymerase and major capsid protein genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nalcacioglu, Remziye; Marks, Hendrik; Vlak, Just M.; Demirbag, Zihni; Oers, Monique M. van

    2003-01-01

    The DNA polymerase (DNApol) and major capsid protein (MCP) genes were used as models to study promoter activity in Chilo iridescent virus (CIV). Infection of Bombyx mori SPC-BM-36 cells in the presence of inhibitors of DNA or protein synthesis showed that DNApol, as well as helicase, is an immediate-early gene and confirmed that the major capsid protein (MCP) is a late gene. Transcription of DNApol initiated 35 nt upstream and that of MCP 14 nt upstream of the translational start site. In a luciferase reporter gene assay both promoters were active only when cells were infected with CIV. For DNApol sequences between position -27 and -6, relative to the transcriptional start site, were essential for promoter activity. Furthermore, mutation of a G within the sequence TTGTTTT located just upstream of the DNApol transcription initiation site reduced the promoter activity by 25%. Sequences crucial for MCP promoter activity are located between positions -53 and -29

  9. Computational modeling identifies key gene regulatory interactions underlying phenobarbital-mediated tumor promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisier, Raphaëlle; Unterberger, Elif B.; Goodman, Jay I.; Schwarz, Michael; Moggs, Jonathan; Terranova, Rémi; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Gene regulatory interactions underlying the early stages of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis are poorly understood. Here, we have identified key candidate regulators of phenobarbital (PB)-mediated mouse liver tumorigenesis, a well-characterized model of non-genotoxic carcinogenesis, by applying a new computational modeling approach to a comprehensive collection of in vivo gene expression studies. We have combined our previously developed motif activity response analysis (MARA), which models gene expression patterns in terms of computationally predicted transcription factor binding sites with singular value decomposition (SVD) of the inferred motif activities, to disentangle the roles that different transcriptional regulators play in specific biological pathways of tumor promotion. Furthermore, transgenic mouse models enabled us to identify which of these regulatory activities was downstream of constitutive androstane receptor and β-catenin signaling, both crucial components of PB-mediated liver tumorigenesis. We propose novel roles for E2F and ZFP161 in PB-mediated hepatocyte proliferation and suggest that PB-mediated suppression of ESR1 activity contributes to the development of a tumor-prone environment. Our study shows that combining MARA with SVD allows for automated identification of independent transcription regulatory programs within a complex in vivo tissue environment and provides novel mechanistic insights into PB-mediated hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:24464994

  10. Genetic variability and evolutionary implications of RNA silencing suppressor genes in RNA1 of sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus isolates infecting sweetpotato and related wild species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur K Tugume

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bipartite single-stranded RNA genome of Sweet potato chlorotic stunt virus (SPCSV, genus Crinivirus; Closteroviridae encodes a Class 1 RNase III (RNase3, a putative hydrophobic protein (p7 and a 22-kDa protein (p22 from genes located in RNA1. RNase3 and p22 suppress RNA silencing, the basal antiviral defence mechanism in plants. RNase3 is sufficient to render sweetpotato (Ipomoea batatas virus-susceptible and predisposes it to development of severe diseases following infection with unrelated virus. The incidence, strains and gene content of SPCSV infecting wild plant species have not been studied. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Thirty SPCSV isolates were characterized from 10 wild Ipomoea species, Hewittia sublobata or Lepistemon owariensis (family Convolvulaceae in Uganda and compared with 34 local SPCSV isolates infecting sweetpotatoes. All isolates belonged to the East African (EA strain of SPCSV and contained RNase3 and p7, but p22 was not detected in six isolates. The three genes showed only limited genetic variability and the proteins were under purifying selection. SPCSV isolates lacking p22 synergized with Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (SPFMV, genus potyvirus; Potyviridae and caused severe symptoms in co-infected sweetpotato plants. One SPCSV isolate enhanced accumulation of SPFMV, but no severe symptoms developed. A new whitefly-transmitted virus (KML33b encoding an RNase3 homolog (<56% identity to SPCSV RNase3 able to suppresses sense-mediated RNA silencing was detected in I. sinensis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: SPCSV isolates infecting wild species and sweetpotato in Uganda were genetically undifferentiated, suggesting inter-species transmission of SPCSV. Most isolates in Uganda contained p22, unlike SPCSV isolates characterized from other countries and continents. Enhanced accumulation of SPFMV and increased disease severity were found to be uncoupled phenotypic outcomes of RNase3-mediated viral synergism in

  11. The glycoprotein genes and gene junctions of the fish rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus and hirame rhabdovirus: Analysis of relationships with other rhabdoviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjorklund, H.V.; Higman, K.H.; Kurath, G.

    1996-01-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the glycoprotein genes and all of the internal gene junctions of the fish pathogenic rhabdoviruses spring viremia of carp virus (SVCV) and hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV) have been determined from cDNA clones generated from viral genomic RNA. The SVCV glycoprotein gene sequence is 1588 nucleotides (nt) long and encodes a 509 amino acid (aa) protein. The HIRRV glycoprotein gene sequence comprises 1612 nt, coding for a 508 aa protein. In sequence comparisons of 15 rhabdovirus glycoproteins, the SVCV glycoprotein gene showed the highest amino acid sequence identity (31.2–33.2%) with vesicular stomatitis New Jersey virus (VSNJV), Chandipura virus (CHPV) and vesicular stomatitis Indiana virus (VSIV). The HIRRV glycoprotein gene showed a very high amino acid sequence identity (74.3%) with the glycoprotein gene of another fish pathogenic rhabdovirus, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), but no significant similarity with glycoproteins of VSIV or rabies virus (RABV). In phylogenetic analyses SVCV was grouped consistently with VSIV, VSNJV and CHPV in the Vesiculovirus genus of Rhabdoviridae. The fish rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) showed close relationships with each other, but only very distant relationships with mammalian rhabdoviruses. The gene junctions are highly conserved between SVCV and VSIV, well conserved between IHNV and HIRRV, but not conserved between HIRRV/IHNV and RABV. Based on the combined results we suggest that the fish lyssa-type rhabdoviruses HIRRV, IHNV and VHSV may be grouped in their own genus within the family Rhabdoviridae. Aquarhabdovirus has been proposed for the name of this new genus.

  12. Gamma interferon augments Fc gamma receptor-mediated dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Kontny, U; Kurane, I; Ennis, F A

    1988-01-01

    It has been reported that anti-dengue antibodies at subneutralizing concentrations augment dengue virus infection of monocytic cells. This is due to the increased uptake of dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexes by cells via Fc gamma receptors. We analyzed the effects of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN-gamma) on dengue virus infection of human monocytic cells. U937 cells, a human monocytic cell line, were infected with dengue virus in the form of virus-antibody complexe...

  13. A Simple Laboratory Practical to Illustrate RNA Mediated Gene Interference Using Drosophila Cell Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buluwela, Laki; Kamalati, Tahereh; Photiou, Andy; Heathcote, Dean A.; Jones, Michael D.; Ali, Simak

    2010-01-01

    RNA mediated gene interference (RNAi) is now a key tool in eukaryotic cell and molecular biology research. This article describes a five session laboratory practical, spread over a seven day period, to introduce and illustrate the technique. During the exercise, students working in small groups purify PCR products that encode "in vitro"…

  14. Ovarian cancer targeted adenoviral-mediated mda-7/IL-24 gene therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mahasreshti, PJ; Kataram, M; Wu, HJ; Yalavarthy, LP; Carey, D; Dent, P; Chada, S; Alvarez, RD; Haisma, HJ; Fisher, PB; Curiel, DT

    Objective. We have previously shown that adenoviral-mediated melanoma differentiation-associated gene-7 (Ad.mda-7) therapy induces apoptosis in ovarian cancer cells. However, the apoptosis induction was low and directly correlated with infectivity of Ad.mda-7. The objective of this study was to

  15. Optimization of Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression of heterologous genes in spinach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Dang Viet; Pamplona, Reniel S.; Kim, Jiwon

    2017-01-01

    The Agrobacterium-mediated transient assay is a relatively rapid technique and a promising approach for assessing the expression of a gene of interest. Despite the successful application of this transient expression system in several plant species, it is not well understood in spinach. In this st...

  16. Impact of pEGFP mediated ING4 gene on growth of glioma U251 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-06-22

    Jun 22, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. Impact of pEGFP mediated ING4 gene on growth of glioma U251 cells and its potential molecular mechanism. Yuefei Deng*, Bingxi Lei and Yiying Zhao. Department of Neurosurgery, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou 510120, China.

  17. Silencing SlMED18, tomato Mediator subunit 18 gene, restricts internode elongation and leaf expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yunshu; Hu, Zongli; Zhang, Jianling; Yu, XiaoHui; Guo, Jun-E; Liang, Honglian; Liao, Changguang; Chen, Guoping

    2018-02-19

    Mediator complex, a conserved multi-protein, is necessary for controlling RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription in eukaryotes. Given little is known about them in tomato, a tomato Mediator subunit 18 gene was isolated and named SlMED18. To further explore the function of SlMED18, the transgenic tomato plants targeting SlMED18 by RNAi-mediated gene silencing were generated. The SlMED18-RNAi lines exhibited multiple developmental defects, including smaller size and slower growth rate of plant and significantly smaller compound leaves. The contents of endogenous bioactive GA 3 in SlMED18 silenced lines were slightly less than that in wild type. Furthermore, qRT-PCR analysis indicated that expression of gibberellins biosynthesis genes such as SlGACPS and SlGA20x2, auxin transport genes (PIN1, PIN4, LAX1 and LAX2) and several key regulators, KNOX1, KNOX2, PHAN and LANCEOLATE(LA), which involved in the leaf morphogenesis were significantly down-regulated in SlMED18-RNAi lines. These results illustrated that SlMED18 plays an essential role in regulating plant internode elongation and leaf expansion in tomato plants and it acts as a key positive regulator of gibberellins biosynthesis and signal transduction as well as auxin proper transport signalling. These findings are the basis for understanding the function of the individual Mediator subunits in tomato.

  18. Rice Yellow Mottle Virus stress responsive genes from susceptible and tolerant rice genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siré Christelle

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The effects of viral infection involve concomitant plant gene variations and cellular changes. A simple system is required to assess the complexity of host responses to viral infection. The genome of the Rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV is a single-stranded RNA with a simple organisation. It is the most well-known monocotyledon virus model. Several studies on its biology, structure and phylogeography have provided a suitable background for further genetic studies. 12 rice chromosome sequences are now available and provide strong support for genomic studies, particularly physical mapping and gene identification. Results The present data, obtained through the cDNA-AFLP technique, demonstrate differential responses to RYMV of two different rice cultivars, i.e. susceptible IR64 (Oryza sativa indica, and partially resistant Azucena (O. s. japonica. This RNA profiling provides a new original dataset that will enable us to gain greater insight into the RYMV/rice interaction and the specificity of the host response. Using the SIM4 subroutine, we took the intron/exon structure of the gene into account and mapped 281 RYMV stress responsive (RSR transcripts on 12 rice chromosomes corresponding to 234 RSR genes. We also mapped previously identified deregulated proteins and genes involved in partial resistance and thus constructed the first global physical map of the RYMV/rice interaction. RSR transcripts on rice chromosomes 4 and 10 were found to be not randomly distributed. Seven genes were identified in the susceptible and partially resistant cultivars, and transcripts were colocalized for these seven genes in both cultivars. During virus infection, many concomitant plant gene expression changes may be associated with host changes caused by the infection process, general stress or defence responses. We noted that some genes (e.g. ABC transporters were regulated throughout the kinetics of infection and differentiated susceptible and

  19. Adeno-Associated Virus-Mediated Correction of a Canine Model of Glycogen Storage Disease Type Ia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, David A.; Correia, Catherine E.; Conlon, Thomas; Specht, Andrew; Verstegen, John; Onclin-Verstegen, Karine; Campbell-Thompson, Martha; Dhaliwal, Gurmeet; Mirian, Layla; Cossette, Holly; Falk, Darin J.; Germain, Sean; Clement, Nathalie; Porvasnik, Stacy; Fiske, Laurie; Struck, Maggie; Ramirez, Harvey E.; Jordan, Juan; Andrutis, Karl; Chou, Janice Y.; Byrne, Barry J.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Glycogen storage disease type Ia (GSDIa; von Gierke disease; MIM 232200) is caused by a deficiency in glucose-6-phosphatase-α. Patients with GSDIa are unable to maintain glucose homeostasis and suffer from severe hypoglycemia, hepatomegaly, hyperlipidemia, hyperuricemia, and lactic acidosis. The canine model of GSDIa is naturally occurring and recapitulates almost all aspects of the human form of disease. We investigated the potential of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) vector-based therapy to treat the canine model of GSDIa. After delivery of a therapeutic rAAV2/8 vector to a 1-day-old GSDIa dog, improvement was noted as early as 2 weeks posttreatment. Correction was transient, however, and by 2 months posttreatment the rAAV2/8-treated dog could no longer sustain normal blood glucose levels after 1 hr of fasting. The same animal was then dosed with a therapeutic rAAV2/1 vector delivered via the portal vein. Two months after rAAV2/1 dosing, both blood glucose and lactate levels were normal at 4 hr postfasting. With more prolonged fasting, the dog still maintained near-normal glucose concentrations, but lactate levels were elevated by 9 hr, indicating that partial correction was achieved. Dietary glucose supplementation was discontinued starting 1 month after rAAV2/1 delivery and the dog continues to thrive with minimal laboratory abnormalities at 23 months of age (18 months after rAAV2/1 treatment). These results demonstrate that delivery of rAAV vectors can mediate significant correction of the GSDIa phenotype and that gene transfer may be a promising alternative therapy for this disease and other genetic diseases of the liver. PMID:20163245

  20. Herpes simplex virus internalization into epithelial cells requires Na+/H+ exchangers and p21-activated kinases but neither clathrin- nor caveolin-mediated endocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devadas, Deepika; Koithan, Thalea; Diestel, Randi; Prank, Ute; Sodeik, Beate; Döhner, Katinka

    2014-11-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) is an alphaherpesvirus that has been reported to infect some epithelial cell types by fusion at the plasma membrane but others by endocytosis. To determine the molecular mechanisms of productive HSV-1 cell entry, we perturbed key endocytosis host factors using specific inhibitors, RNA interference (RNAi), or overexpression of dominant negative proteins and investigated their effects on HSV-1 infection in the permissive epithelial cell lines Vero, HeLa, HEp-2, and PtK2. HSV-1 internalization required neither endosomal acidification nor clathrin- or caveolin-mediated endocytosis. In contrast, HSV-1 gene expression and internalization were significantly reduced after treatment with 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride (EIPA). EIPA blocks the activity of Na(+)/H(+) exchangers, which are plasma membrane proteins implicated in all forms of macropinocytosis. HSV-1 internalization furthermore required the function of p21-activated kinases that contribute to macropinosome formation. However, in contrast to some forms of macropinocytosis, HSV-1 did not enlist the activities of protein kinase C (PKC), tyrosine kinases, C-terminal binding protein 1, or dynamin to activate its internalization. These data suggest that HSV-1 depends on Na(+)/H(+) exchangers and p21-activated kinases either for macropinocytosis or for local actin rearrangements required for fusion at the plasma membrane or subsequent passage through the actin cortex underneath the plasma membrane. After initial replication in epithelial cells, herpes simplex viruses (HSVs) establish latent infections in neurons innervating these regions. Upon primary infection and reactivation from latency, HSVs cause many human skin and neurological diseases, particularly in immunocompromised hosts, despite the availability of effective antiviral drugs. Many viruses use macropinocytosis for virus internalization, and many host factors mediating this entry route have been identified, although the

  1. Enhanced resistance to herpes simplex virus type 1 infection in transgenic mice expressing a soluble form of herpesvirus entry mediator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ono, Etsuro; Yoshino, Saori; Amagai, Keiko; Taharaguchi, Satoshi; Kimura, Chiemi; Morimoto, Junko; Inobe, Manabu; Uenishi, Tomoko; Uede, Toshimitsu

    2004-01-01

    Herpesvirus entry mediator (HVEM) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor family used as a cellular receptor by virion glycoprotein D (gD) of herpes simplex virus (HSV). Both human and mouse forms of HVEM can mediate entry of HSV-1 but have no entry activity for pseudorabies virus (PRV). To assess the antiviral potential of HVEM in vivo, three transgenic mouse lines expressing a soluble form of HVEM (HVEMIg) consisting of an extracellular domain of murine HVEM and the Fc portion of human IgG1 were generated. All of the transgenic mouse lines showed marked resistance to HSV-1 infection when the mice were challenged intraperitoneally with HSV-1, but not to PRV infection. The present results demonstrate that HVEMIg is able to exert a significant antiviral effect against HSV-1 infection in vivo

  2. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of tomato with the ICE1 transcription factor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juan, J X; Yu, X H; Jiang, X M; Gao, Z; Zhang, Y; Li, W; Duan, Y D; Yang, G

    2015-01-30

    ICE1 genes play a very important role in plants in cold conditions. To improve the cold resistance of tomato, the ICE1 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana was used to construct the plant expression vector p3301-ICE1, and was overexpressed in tomato through Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Five strains of resistant plants were obtained. PCR and half-quantitative results showed that the ICE1 gene was transferred to tomato; three strains tested positive. After low-temperature stress treatment, praline content and peroxide and catalase activities in the transgenic tomato plants were higher compared with non-transgenic controls, while malondialdehyde content was clearly lower.

  3. Dengue virus serotype 2 infection alters midgut and carcass gene expression in the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus.

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    Hitoshi Tsujimoto

    Full Text Available The Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus is currently an important vector for dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, and its role in transmission of arthropod-borne viruses (arboviruses may increase in the future due to its ability to colonize temperate regions. In contrast to Aedes aegypti, the dominant vector of dengue, chikungunya and Zika virus, genetic responses of Ae. albopictus upon infection with an arbovirus are not well characterized. Here we present a study of the changes in transcript expression in Ae. albopictus exposed to dengue virus serotype 2 via feeding on an artificial bloodmeal.We isolated midguts and midgut-free carcasses of Ae. albopictus fed on bloodmeals containing dengue virus as well as controls fed on virus-free control meals at day 1 and day 5 post-feeding. We confirmed infection of midguts from mosquitoes sampled on day 5 post-feeding via RT-PCR. RNAseq analysis revealed dynamic modulation of the expression of several putative immunity and dengue virus-responsive genes, some of whose expression was verified by qRT-PCR. For example, a serine protease gene was up-regulated in the midgut at 1 day post infection, which may potentially enhance mosquito susceptibility to dengue infection, while 14 leucine-rich repeat genes, previously shown to be involved in mosquito antiviral defenses, were down-regulated in the carcass at 5 days post infection. The number of significantly modulated genes decreased over time in midguts and increased in carcasses.Dengue virus exposure results in the modulation of genes in a time- and site-specific manner. Previous literature on the interaction between mosquitoes and mosquito-borne pathogens suggests that most of the changes that occurred in Ae. albopictus exposed to DENV would favor virus infection. Many genes identified in this study warrant further characterization to understand their role in viral manipulation of and antiviral response of Ae. albopictus.

  4. Identification of virus and nematode resistance genes in the Chilota Potato Genebank of the Universidad Austral de Chile

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    Marlon López

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Potato Genebank of the Universidad Austral de Chile (UACh is an important gene bank in Chile. The accessions collected all over the country possess high genetic diversity, present interesting agronomic and cooking traits, and show resistance to biotic and abiotic stress. A particularly interesting subgroup of the gene bank includes the accessions collected in the South of Chile, the Chilota Potato Genebank. The focus of this study is the identification of virus and nematode resistant genes in potatoes (Solatium tuberosum L., using the RYSC3 and YES3-3B molecular markers. The Potato virus Y(PVY resistance genes Ry adg and Ry sto were identified. Furthermore, the CP60 marker was used to assess the Rx resistance gene that confers resistance to Potato virus X (PVX. In addition, the HC and GRO1-4 markers were utilized to identify the GpaVvrn_QTL and Gro1-4, resistance genes of Globodera pallida and Globodera rostochiensis, respectively. Both G. pallida and G. rostochiensis are Potato Cyst Nematodes (PCN. The plant material used in this study included leaves from 271 accessions of the gene bank. These samples were collected in the field where natural pathogen pressure of potential viruses and diseases exists. ELISA assays were run for field detection of PVY and PVX. However, there have been no previous reports of nematode presence in the plant material. The results herein presented indicate presence of virus and nematode resistance genes in accessions of the Chilota Potato Genebank. In terms of virus resistance, 99 accessions out of the 271 tested possess the Ry adg resistance gene and 17 accessions of these 271 tested have the Ry sto resistance gene. Also, 10 accessions showed positive amplification of the Rxl resistant gene marker. As to nematode resistance, 99 accessions have possible resistance to G. pallida and 54 accessions show potential resistance to G. rostochiensis as detected using the available molecular markers.

  5. Inhibition of microtubules and dynein rescues human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from owl monkey TRIMCyp-mediated restriction in a cellular context-specific fashion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlica, Paulina; Dufour, Caroline; Berthoux, Lionel

    2015-04-01

    IFN-induced restriction factors can significantly affect the replicative capacity of retroviruses in mammals. TRIM5α (tripartite motif protein 5, isoform α) is a restriction factor that acts at early stages of the virus life cycle by intercepting and destabilizing incoming retroviral cores. Sensitivity to TRIM5α maps to the N-terminal domain of the retroviral capsid proteins. In several New World and Old World monkey species, independent events of retrotransposon-mediated insertion of the cyclophilin A (CypA)-coding sequence in the trim5 gene have given rise to TRIMCyp (also called TRIM5-CypA), a hybrid protein that is active against some lentiviruses in a species-specific fashion. In particular, TRIMCyp from the owl monkey (omkTRIMCyp) very efficiently inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Previously, we showed that disrupting the integrity of microtubules (MTs) and of cytoplasmic dynein complexes partially rescued replication of retroviruses, including HIV-1, from restriction mediated by TRIM5α. Here, we showed that efficient restriction of HIV-1 by omkTRIMCyp was similarly dependent on the MT network and on dynein complexes, but in a context-dependent fashion. When omkTRIMCyp was expressed in human HeLa cells, restriction was partially counteracted by pharmacological agents targeting MTs or by small interfering RNA-mediated inhibition of dynein. The same drugs (nocodazole and paclitaxel) also rescued HIV-1 from restriction in cat CRFK cells, although to a lesser extent. Strikingly, neither nocodazole, paclitaxel nor depletion of the dynein heavy chain had a significant effect on the restriction of HIV-1 in an owl monkey cell line. These results suggested the existence of cell-specific functional interactions between MTs/dynein and TRIMCyp. © 2015 The Authors.

  6. Generation of a non-transmissive Borna disease virus vector lacking both matrix and glycoprotein genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujino, Kan; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Daito, Takuji; Makino, Akiko; Honda, Tomoyuki; Tomonaga, Keizo

    2017-09-01

    Borna disease virus (BoDV), a prototype of mammalian bornavirus, is a non-segmented, negative strand RNA virus that often causes severe neurological disorders in infected animals, including horses and sheep. Unique among animal RNA viruses, BoDV transcribes and replicates non-cytopathically in the cell nucleus, leading to establishment of long-lasting persistent infection. This striking feature of BoDV indicates its potential as an RNA virus vector system. It has previously been demonstrated by our team that recombinant BoDV (rBoDV) lacking an envelope glycoprotein (G) gene develops persistent infections in transduced cells without loss of the viral genome. In this study, a novel non-transmissive rBoDV, rBoDV ΔMG, which lacks both matrix (M) and G genes in the genome, is reported. rBoDV-ΔMG expressing green fluorescence protein (GFP), rBoDV ΔMG-GFP, was efficiently generated in Vero/MG cells stably expressing both BoDV M and G proteins. Infection with rBoDV ΔMG-GFP was persistently maintained in the parent Vero cells without propagation within cell culture. The optimal ratio of M and G for efficient viral particle production by transient transfection of M and G expression plasmids into cells persistently infected with rBoDV ΔMG-GFP was also demonstrated. These findings indicate that the rBoDV ΔMG-based BoDV vector may provide an extremely safe virus vector system and could be a novel strategy for investigating the function of M and G proteins and the host range of bornaviruses. © 2017 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  7. Strategies to regulate transcription factor-mediated gene positioning and interchromosomal clustering at the nuclear periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randise-Hinchliff, Carlo; Coukos, Robert; Sood, Varun; Sumner, Michael Chas; Zdraljevic, Stefan; Meldi Sholl, Lauren; Garvey Brickner, Donna; Ahmed, Sara; Watchmaker, Lauren; Brickner, Jason H

    2016-03-14

    In budding yeast, targeting of active genes to the nuclear pore complex (NPC) and interchromosomal clustering is mediated by transcription factor (TF) binding sites in the gene promoters. For example, the binding sites for the TFs Put3, Ste12, and Gcn4 are necessary and sufficient to promote positioning at the nuclear periphery and interchromosomal clustering. However, in all three cases, gene positioning and interchromosomal clustering are regulated. Under uninducing conditions, local recruitment of the Rpd3(L) histone deacetylase by transcriptional repressors blocks Put3 DNA binding. This is a general function of yeast repressors: 16 of 21 repressors blocked Put3-mediated subnuclear positioning; 11 of these required Rpd3. In contrast, Ste12-mediated gene positioning is regulated independently of DNA binding by mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation of the Dig2 inhibitor, and Gcn4-dependent targeting is up-regulated by increasing Gcn4 protein levels. These different regulatory strategies provide either qualitative switch-like control or quantitative control of gene positioning over different time scales. © 2016 Randise-Hinchliff et al.

  8. Nodular Scleritis Associated with Herpes Zoster Virus: An Infectious and Immune-Mediated Process

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    Mónica Loureiro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To describe a case of anterior nodular scleritis, preceded by an anterior hypertensive uveitis, which was primarily caused by varicella zoster virus (VZV. Case Report. A 54-year-old woman presented with anterior uveitis of the right eye presumably caused by herpetic viral disease and was successfully treated. Two months later, she developed a nodular scleritis and started oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory without effect. A complete laboratory workup revealed positivity for HLA-B27; the infectious workup was negative. Therapy was changed to oral prednisolone and an incomplete improvement occurred. Therefore, a diagnostic anterior paracentesis was performed and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR analysis revealed VZV. She was treated with valacyclovir and the oral prednisolone began to decrease; however, a marked worsening of the scleritis occurred with the reduction of the daily dose; subsequently, methotrexate was introduced allowing the suspension of the prednisolone and led to clinical resolution of the scleritis. Conclusion. This report of anterior nodular scleritis caused by VZV argues in favor of an underlying immune-mediated component, requiring immunosuppressive therapy for clinical resolution. The PCR analysis of the aqueous humor was revealed to be a valuable technique and should be considered in cases of scleritis with poor response to treatment.

  9. Respiratory Syncytial Virus Disease Is Mediated by Age-Variable IL-33.

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    Jordy Saravia

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is the most common cause of infant hospitalizations and severe RSV infections are a significant risk factor for childhood asthma. The pathogenic mechanisms responsible for RSV induced immunopathophysiology remain elusive. Using an age-appropriate mouse model of RSV, we show that IL-33 plays a critical role in the immunopathogenesis of severe RSV, which is associated with higher group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s specifically in neonates. Infection with RSV induced rapid IL-33 expression and an increase in ILC2 numbers in the lungs of neonatal mice; this was not observed in adult mice. Blocking IL-33 with antibodies or using an IL-33 receptor knockout mouse during infection was sufficient to inhibit RSV immunopathogenesis (i.e., airway hyperresponsiveness, Th2 inflammation, eosinophilia, and mucus hyperproduction; whereas administration of IL-33 to adult mice during RSV infection was sufficient to induce RSV disease. Additionally, elevated IL-33 and IL-13 were observed in nasal aspirates from infants hospitalized with RSV; these cytokines declined during convalescence. In summary, IL-33 is necessary, either directly or indirectly, to induce ILC2s and the Th2 biased immunopathophysiology observed following neonatal RSV infection. This study provides a mechanism involving IL-33 and ILC2s in RSV mediated human asthma.

  10. Assembly of tobacco mosaic virus into fibrous and macroscopic bundled arrays mediated by surface aniline polymerization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Zhongwei; Bruckman, Michael A; Li, Siqi; Lee, L Andrew; Lee, Byeongdu; Pingali, Sai Venkatesh; Thiyagarajan, P; Wang, Qian

    2007-06-05

    One-dimensional (1D) polyaniline/tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) composite nanofibers and macroscopic bundles of such fibers were generated via a self-assembly process of TMV assisted by in-situ polymerization of polyaniline on the surface of TMV. At near-neutral reaction pH, branched polyaniline formed on the surface of TMV preventing lateral association. Therefore, long 1D nanofibers were observed with high aspect ratios and excellent processibility. At a lower pH, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that initially long nanofibers were formed which resulted in bundled structures upon long-time reaction, presumably mediated by the hydrophobic interaction because of the polyaniline on the surface of TMV. In-situ time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering study of TMV at different reaction conditions supported this mechanism. This novel strategy to assemble TMV into 1D and 3D supramolecular composites could be utilized in the fabrication of advanced materials for potential applications including electronics, optics, sensing, and biomedical engineering.

  11. Thrombocytopenia in Dengue: Interrelationship between Virus and the Imbalance between Coagulation and Fibrinolysis and Inflammatory Mediators

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    Elzinandes Leal de Azeredo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Dengue is an infectious disease caused by dengue virus (DENV. In general, dengue is a self-limiting acute febrile illness followed by a phase of critical defervescence, in which patients may improve or progress to a severe form. Severe illness is characterized by hemodynamic disturbances, increased vascular permeability, hypovolemia, hypotension, and shock. Thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction are common in both cases and are related to the clinical outcome. Different mechanisms have been hypothesized to explain DENV-associated thrombocytopenia, including the suppression of bone marrow and the peripheral destruction of platelets. Studies have shown DENV-infected hematopoietic progenitors or bone marrow stromal cells. Moreover, anti-platelet antibodies would be involved in peripheral platelet destruction as platelets interact with endothelial cells, immune cells, and/or DENV. It is not yet clear whether platelets play a role in the viral spread. Here, we focus on the mechanisms of thrombocytopenia and platelet dysfunction in DENV infection. Because platelets participate in the inflammatory and immune response by promoting cytokine, chemokine, and inflammatory mediator secretion, their relevance as “immune-like effector cells” will be discussed. Finally, an implication for platelets in plasma leakage will be also regarded, as thrombocytopenia is associated with clinical outcome and higher mortality.

  12. Molecular epidemiology of the SH (small hydrophobic) gene of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV), over 2 consecutive years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Hildenêr Nogueira; Botosso, Viviane Fongaro; Oliveira, Danielle Bruna Leal; Campos, Angélica Cristine de Almeida; Leal, Andrea Lima; Silva, Tereza Souza; Bosso, Patrícia Alves Ramos; Moraes, Claudia Trigo Pedroso; Filho, Claudionor Gomes da Silva; Vieira, Sandra Elisabete; Gilio, Alfredo Elias; Stewien, Klaus Eberhard; Durigon, Edison Luiz

    2012-01-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) strains were isolated from nasopharyngeal aspirates collected from 965 children between 2004 and 2005, yielding 424 positive samples. We sequenced the small hydrophobic protein (SH) gene of 117 strains and compared them with other viruses identified worldwide. Phylogenetic analysis showed a low genetic variability among the isolates but allowed us to classify the viruses into different genotypes for both groups, HRSVA and HRSVB. It is also shown that the novel BA-like genotype was well segregated from the others, indicating that the mutations are not limited to the G gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Kidney-specific Sonoporation-mediated Gene Transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Ryo; Kami, Daisuke; Kusaba, Tetsuro; Kirita, Yuhei; Kishida, Tsunao; Mazda, Osam; Adachi, Takaomi; Gojo, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Sonoporation can deliver agents to target local organs by systemic administration, while decreasing the associated risk of adverse effects. Sonoporation has been used for a variety of materials and in a variety of organs. Herein, we demonstrated that local sonoporation to the kidney can offer highly efficient transfer of oligonucleotides, which were systemically administrated to the tubular epithelium with high specificity. Ultrasonic wave irradiation to the kidney collapsed the microbubbles and transiently affected the glomerular filtration barrier and increased glomerular permeability. Oligonucleotides were passed through the barrier all at once and were absorbed throughout the tubular epithelium. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα), which plays a central role in renal ischemia-reperfusion injury, was targeted using small interfering RNA (siRNA) with renal sonoporation in a murine model. The reduction of TNFα expression after single gene transfer significantly inhibited the expression of kidney injury markers, suggesting that systemic administration of siRNA under temporary and local sonoporation could be applicable in the clinical setting of ischemic acute kidney injury.

  14. KAP1 regulates type I interferon/STAT1-mediated IRF-1 gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitani, Shinya; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Ikeda, Osamu; Togi, Sumihito; Muromoto, Ryuta; Sekine, Yuichi; Ohta, Kazuhide; Ishiyama, Hironobu; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2008-01-01

    Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STATs) mediate cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in immune responses, hematopoiesis, neurogenesis, and other biological processes. Recently, we showed that KAP1 is a novel STAT-binding partner that regulates STAT3-mediated transactivation. KAP1 is a universal co-repressor protein for the KRAB zinc finger protein superfamily of transcriptional repressors. In this study, we found KAP1-dependent repression of interferon (IFN)/STAT1-mediated signaling. We also demonstrated that endogenous KAP1 associates with endogenous STAT1 in vivo. Importantly, a small-interfering RNA-mediated reduction in KAP1 expression enhanced IFN-induced STAT1-dependent IRF-1 gene expression. These results indicate that KAP1 may act as an endogenous regulator of the IFN/STAT1 signaling pathway

  15. Development of a Reverse Transcription Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Method for the Rapid Detection of Subtype H7N9 Avian Influenza Virus

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    Hongmei Bao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel influenza A (H7N9 virus has emerged in China. To rapidly detect this virus from clinical samples, we developed a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP method for the detection of the H7N9 virus. The minimum detection limit of the RT-LAMP assay was 0.01 PFU H7N9 virus, making this method 100-fold more sensitive to the detection of the H7N9 virus than conventional RT-PCR. The H7N9 virus RT-LAMP assays can efficiently detect different sources of H7N9 influenza virus RNA (from chickens, pigeons, the environment, and humans. No cross-reactive amplification with the RNA of other subtype influenza viruses or of other avian respiratory viruses was observed. The assays can effectively detect H7N9 influenza virus RNA in drinking water, soil, cloacal swab, and tracheal swab samples that were collected from live poultry markets, as well as human H7N9 virus, in less than 30 min. These results suggest that the H7N9 virus RT-LAMP assays were efficient, practical, and rapid diagnostic methods for the epidemiological surveillance and diagnosis of influenza A (H7N9 virus from different resource samples.

  16. Competition between virus-derived and endogenous small RNAs regulates gene expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkies, Peter; Ashe, Alyson; Le Pen, Jérémie; McKie, Mikel A; Miska, Eric A

    2013-08-01

    Positive-strand RNA viruses encompass more than one-third of known virus genera and include many medically and agriculturally relevant human, animal, and plant pathogens. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans and its natural pathogen, the positive-strand RNA virus Orsay, have recently emerged as a new animal model to understand the mechanisms and evolution of innate immune responses. In particular, the RNA interference (RNAi) pathway is required for C. elegans resistance to viral infection. Here we report the first genome-wide analyses of gene expression upon viral infection in C. elegans. Using the laboratory strain N2, we identify a novel C. elegans innate immune response specific to viral infection. A subset of these changes is driven by the RNAi response to the virus, which redirects the Argonaute protein RDE-1 from its endogenous small RNA cofactors, leading to loss of repression of endogenous RDE-1 targets. Additionally, we show that a C. elegans wild isolate, JU1580, has a distinct gene expression signature in response to viral infection. This is associated with a reduction in microRNA (miRNA) levels and an up-regulation of their target genes. Intriguingly, alterations in miRNA levels upon JU1580 infection are associated with a transformation of the antiviral transcriptional response into an antibacterial-like response. Together our data support a model whereby antiviral RNAi competes with endogenous small RNA pathways, causing widespread transcriptional changes. This provides an elegant mechanism for C. elegans to orchestrate its antiviral response, which may have significance for the relationship between small RNA pathways and immune regulation in other organisms.

  17. Extreme Mutation Tolerance: Nearly Half of the Archaeal Fusellovirus Sulfolobus Spindle-Shaped Virus 1 Genes Are Not Required for Virus Function, Including the Minor Capsid Protein Gene vp3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iverson, Eric A; Goodman, David A; Gorchels, Madeline E; Stedman, Kenneth M

    2017-05-15

    Viruses infecting the Archaea harbor a tremendous amount of genetic diversity. This is especially true for the spindle-shaped viruses of the family Fuselloviridae , where >90% of the viral genes do not have detectable homologs in public databases. This significantly limits our ability to elucidate the role of viral proteins in the infection cycle. To address this, we have developed genetic techniques to study the well-characterized fusellovirus Sulfolobus spindle-shaped virus 1 (SSV1), which infects Sulfolobus solfataricus in volcanic hot springs at 80°C and pH 3. Here, we present a new comparative genome analysis and a thorough genetic analysis of SSV1 using both specific and random mutagenesis and thereby generate mutations in all open reading frames. We demonstrate that almost half of the SSV1 genes are not essential for infectivity, and the requirement for a particular gene correlates well with its degree of conservation within the Fuselloviridae The major capsid gene vp1 is essential for SSV1 infectivity. However, the universally conserved minor capsid gene vp3 could be deleted without a loss in infectivity and results in virions with abnormal morphology. IMPORTANCE Most of the putative genes in the spindle-shaped archaeal hyperthermophile fuselloviruses have no sequences that are clearly similar to characterized genes. In order to determine which of these SSV genes are important for function, we disrupted all of the putative genes in the prototypical fusellovirus, SSV1. Surprisingly, about half of the genes could be disrupted without destroying virus function. Even deletions of one of the known structural protein genes that is present in all known fuselloviruses, vp3 , allows the production of infectious viruses. However, viruses lacking vp3 have abnormal shapes, indicating that the vp3 gene is important for virus structure. Identification of essential genes will allow focused research on minimal SSV genomes and further understanding of the structure of

  18. Tissue-specific expression of silkmoth chorion genes in vivo using Bombyx mori nuclear polyhedrosis virus as a transducing vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iatrou, K; Meidinger, R G

    1990-01-01

    A pair of silkmoth chorion chromosomal genes, HcA.12-HcB.12, was inserted into a baculovirus transfer vector, pBmp2, derived from the nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Bombyx mori. This vector, which permits the insertion of foreign genetic material in the vicinity of a mutationally inactivated polyhedrin gene, was used to acquire the corresponding recombinant virus. Injection of mutant silkmoth pupae that lack all Hc chorion genes with the recombinant virus resulted in the infection of all internal organs including follicular tissue. Analysis of RNA from infected tissues has demonstrated that the two chorion genes present in the viral genome are correctly transcribed under the control of their own promoter in follicular cells, the tissue in which chorion genes are normally expressed. The chorion primary transcripts are also correctly processed in the infected follicular cells and yield mature mRNAs indistinguishable from authentic chorion mRNAs present in wild-type follicles. These results demonstrate that recombinant nuclear polyhedrosis viruses can be used as transducing vectors for introducing genetic material of host origin into the cells of the organism and that the transduced genes are transiently expressed in a tissue-specific manner under the control of their resident regulatory sequences. Thus we show the in vivo expression of cloned genes under cellular promoter control in an insect other than Drosophila melanogaster. The approach should be applicable to all insect systems that are subject to nuclear polyhedrosis virus infection. Images PMID:2187186

  19. TRAF1 Coordinates Polyubiquitin Signaling to Enhance Epstein-Barr Virus LMP1-Mediated Growth and Survival Pathway Activation.

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    Hannah Greenfeld

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV encoded oncoprotein Latent Membrane Protein 1 (LMP1 signals through two C-terminal tail domains to drive cell growth, survival and transformation. The LMP1 membrane-proximal TES1/CTAR1 domain recruits TRAFs to activate MAP kinase, non-canonical and canonical NF-kB pathways, and is critical for EBV-mediated B-cell transformation. TRAF1 is amongst the most highly TES1-induced target genes and is abundantly expressed in EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disorders. We found that TRAF1 expression enhanced LMP1 TES1 domain-mediated activation of the p38, JNK, ERK and canonical NF-kB pathways, but not non-canonical NF-kB pathway activity. To gain insights into how TRAF1 amplifies LMP1 TES1 MAP kinase and canonical NF-kB pathways, we performed proteomic analysis of TRAF1 complexes immuno-purified from cells uninduced or induced for LMP1 TES1 signaling. Unexpectedly, we found that LMP1 TES1 domain signaling induced an association between TRAF1 and the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC, and stimulated linear (M1-linked polyubiquitin chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes. LMP1 or TRAF1 complexes isolated from EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid B cell lines (LCLs were highly modified by M1-linked polyubiqutin chains. The M1-ubiquitin binding proteins IKK-gamma/NEMO, A20 and ABIN1 each associate with TRAF1 in cells that express LMP1. TRAF2, but not the cIAP1 or cIAP2 ubiquitin ligases, plays a key role in LUBAC recruitment and M1-chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes, implicating the TRAF1:TRAF2 heterotrimer in LMP1 TES1-dependent LUBAC activation. Depletion of either TRAF1, or the LUBAC ubiquitin E3 ligase subunit HOIP, markedly impaired LCL growth. Likewise, LMP1 or TRAF1 complexes purified from LCLs were decorated by lysine 63 (K63-linked polyubiqutin chains. LMP1 TES1 signaling induced K63-polyubiquitin chain attachment to TRAF1 complexes, and TRAF2 was identified as K63-Ub chain target. Co-localization of M1- and K63

  20. Efficacy of In Vivo Electroporation-Mediated IL-10 Gene Delivery on Survival of Skin Flaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyed Jafari, S Morteza; Shafighi, Maziar; Beltraminelli, Helmut; Weber, Benedikt; Schmid, Ralph A; Geiser, Thomas; Gazdhar, Amiq; Hunger, Robert E

    2018-04-01

    Despite advances in understanding the underlying mechanisms of flap necrosis and improvement in surgical techniques, skin flap necrosis after reconstructive surgery remains a crucial issue. We investigated the efficacy of electroporation-mediated IL-10 gene transfer to random skin flap with an aim to accelerate wound healing and improve skin flap survival. Nine male Wistar rats (300-330 g) were divided in two groups (a) control group (n = 5), only surgery no gene transfer, and (b) experimental group, received electroporation-mediated IL-10 gene transfer 24 h before the surgery as prophylaxis (n = 4). Random skin flap (McFarlane) was performed in both groups. Planimetry, Laser Doppler imaging, and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate the effect of IL-10 gene transfer between study groups at day 7. Electroporation-mediated IL-10 gene transfer decreased percentage of flap necrosis (p value = 0.0159) and increased cutaneous perfusion compared to the control group (p value = 0.0159). In addition, Spearman's rank correlation showed a significant negative correlation between percentage of flap necrosis and Laser Index (p value = 0.0083, r -0.83, respectively). Furthermore, significantly higher mean CD31 + vessel density was detected in the experimental group compared to the control group (p value = 0.0159). Additionally, semi-quantitative image analysis showed lower inflammatory cell count in experimental group compared to control group (p value = 0.0317). In vivo electroporation-mediated IL-10 gene transfer reduced necrosis, enhanced survival and vascularity in the ischemic skin flap.

  1. C/EBPβ Mediates Growth Hormone-Regulated Expression of Multiple Target Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Tracy X.; Lin, Grace; LaPensee, Christopher R.; Calinescu, Anda-Alexandra; Rathore, Maanjot; Streeter, Cale; Piwien-Pilipuk, Graciela; Lanning, Nathan; Jin, Hui; Carter-Su, Christin; Qin, Zhaohui S.

    2011-01-01

    Regulation of c-Fos transcription by GH is mediated by CCAAT/enhancer binding protein β (C/EBPβ). This study examines the role of C/EBPβ in mediating GH activation of other early response genes, including Cyr61, Btg2, Socs3, Zfp36, and Socs1. C/EBPβ depletion using short hairpin RNA impaired responsiveness of these genes to GH, as seen for c-Fos. Rescue with wild-type C/EBPβ led to GH-dependent recruitment of the coactivator p300 to the c-Fos promoter. In contrast, rescue with C/EBPβ mutated at the ERK phosphorylation site at T188 failed to induce GH-dependent recruitment of p300, indicating that ERK-mediated phosphorylation of C/EBPβ at T188 is required for GH-induced recruitment of p300 to c-Fos. GH also induced the occupancy of phosphorylated C/EBPβ and p300 on Cyr61, Btg2, and Socs3 at predicted C/EBP-cAMP response element-binding protein motifs in their promoters. Consistent with a role for ERKs in GH-induced expression of these genes, treatment with U0126 to block ERK phosphorylation inhibited their GH-induced expression. In contrast, GH-dependent expression of Zfp36 and Socs1 was not inhibited by U0126. Thus, induction of multiple early response genes by GH in 3T3-F442A cells is mediated by C/EBPβ. A subset of these genes is regulated similarly to c-Fos, through a mechanism involving GH-stimulated ERK 1/2 activation, phosphorylation of C/EBPβ, and recruitment of p300. Overall, these studies suggest that C/EBPβ, like the signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins, regulates multiple genes in response to GH. PMID:21292824

  2. Gelatin nanoparticles enhance delivery of hepatitis C virus recombinant NS2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabet, Salwa; George, Marina A; El-Shorbagy, Haidan M; Bassiony, Heba; Farroh, Khaled Y; Youssef, Tareq; Salaheldin, Taher A

    2017-01-01

    Development of an effective non-viral vaccine against hepatitis C virus infection is of a great importance. Gelatin nanoparticles (Gel.NPs) have an attention and promising approach as a viable carrier for delivery of vaccine, gene, drug and other biomolecules in the body. The present study aimed to develop stable Gel.NPs conjugated with nonstructural protein 2 (NS2) gene of Hepatitis C Virus genotype 4a (HCV4a) as a safe and an efficient vaccine delivery system. Gel.NPs were synthesized and characterized (size: 150±2 nm and zeta potential +17.6 mv). NS2 gene was successfully cloned and expressed into E. coli M15 using pQE-30 vector. Antigenicity of the recombinant NS2 protein was confirmed by Western blotting to verify the efficiency of NS2 as a possible vaccine. Then NS2 gene was conjugated to gelatin nanoparticles and a successful conjugation was confirmed by labeling and imaging using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscope (CLSM). Interestingly, the transformation of the conjugated NS2/Gel.NPs complex into E. coli DH5-α was 50% more efficient than transformation with the gene alone. In addition, conjugated NS2/Gel.NPs with ratio 1:100 (w/w) showed higher transformation efficiency into E. coli DH5-α than the other ratios (1:50 and 2:50). Gel.NPs effectively enhanced the gene delivery in bacterial cells without affecting the structure of NS2 gene and could be used as a safe, easy, rapid, cost-effective and non-viral vaccine delivery system for HCV.

  3. In silico analysis of miRNA-mediated gene regulation in OCA and OA genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamaraj, Balu; Gopalakrishnan, Chandrasekhar; Purohit, Rituraj

    2014-12-01

    Albinism is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder due to low secretion of melanin. The oculocutaneous albinism (OCA) and ocular albinism (OA) genes are responsible for melanin production and also act as a potential targets for miRNAs. The role of miRNA is to inhibit the protein synthesis partially or completely by binding with the 3'UTR of the mRNA thus regulating gene expression. In this analysis, we predicted the genetic variation that occurred in 3'UTR of the transcript which can be a reason for low melanin production thus causing albinism. The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3'UTR cause more new binding sites for miRNA which binds with mRNA which leads to inhibit the translation process either partially or completely. The SNPs in the mRNA of OCA and OA genes can create new binding sites for miRNA which may control the gene expression and lead to hypopigmentation. We have developed a computational procedure to determine the SNPs in the 3'UTR region of mRNA of OCA (TYR, OCA2, TYRP1 and SLC45A2) and OA (GPR143) genes which will be a potential cause for albinism. We identified 37 SNPs in five genes that are predicted to create 87 new binding sites on mRNA, which may lead to abrogation of the translation process. Expression analysis confirms that these genes are highly expressed in skin and eye regions. It is well supported by enrichment analysis that these genes are mainly involved in eye pigmentation and melanin biosynthesis process. The network analysis also shows how the genes are interacting and expressing in a complex network. This insight provides clue to wet-lab researches to understand the expression pattern of OCA and OA genes and binding phenomenon of mRNA and miRNA upon mutation, which is responsible for inhibition of translation process at genomic levels.

  4. Positive Selection on Hemagglutinin and Neuraminidase Genes of H1N1 Influenza Viruses

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Li, Wenfu

    2011-04-21

    Abstract Background Since its emergence in March 2009, the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza A virus has posed a serious threat to public health. To trace the evolutionary path of these new pathogens, we performed a selection-pressure analysis of a large number of hemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA) gene sequences of H1N1 influenza viruses from different hosts. Results Phylogenetic analysis revealed that both HA and NA genes have evolved into five distinct clusters, with further analyses indicating that the pandemic 2009 strains have experienced the strongest positive selection. We also found evidence of strong selection acting on the seasonal human H1N1 isolates. However, swine viruses from North America and Eurasia were under weak positive selection, while there was no significant evidence of positive selection acting on the avian isolates. A site-by-site analysis revealed that the positively selected sites were located in both of the cleaved products of HA (HA1 and HA2), as well as NA. In addition, the pandemic 2009 strains were subject to differential selection pressures compared to seasonal human, North American swine and Eurasian swine H1N1 viruses. Conclusions Most of these positively and\\/or differentially selected sites were situated in the B-cell and\\/or T-cell antigenic regions, suggesting that selection at these sites might be responsible for the antigenic variation of the viruses. Moreover, some sites were also associated with glycosylation and receptor-binding ability. Thus, selection at these positions might have helped the pandemic 2009 H1N1 viruses to adapt to the new hosts after they were introduced from pigs to humans. Positive selection on position 274 of NA protein, associated with drug resistance, might account for the prevalence of drug-resistant variants of seasonal human H1N1 influenza viruses, but there was no evidence that positive selection was responsible for the spread of the drug resistance of the pandemic H1N1 strains.

  5. Baculovirus-mediated gene transfer in butterfly wings in vivo: an efficient expression system with an anti-gp64 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhungel, Bidur; Ohno, Yoshikazu; Matayoshi, Rie; Otaki, Joji M

    2013-03-25

    Candidate genes for color pattern formation in butterfly wings have been known based on gene expression patterns since the 1990s, but their functions remain elusive due to a lack of a functional assay. Several methods of transferring and expressing a foreign gene in butterfly wings have been reported, but they have suffered from low success rates or low expression levels. Here, we developed a simple, practical method to efficiently deliver and express a foreign gene using baculovirus-mediated gene transfer in butterfly wings in vivo. A recombinant baculovirus containing a gene for green fluorescent protein (GFP) was injected into pupae of the blue pansy butterfly Junonia orithya (Nymphalidae). GFP fluorescence was detected in the pupal wings and other body parts of the injected individuals three to five days post-injection at various degrees of fluorescence. We obtained a high GFP expression rate at relatively high virus titers, but it was associated with pupal death before color pattern formation in wings. To reduce the high mortality rate caused by the baculovirus treatment, we administered an anti-gp64 antibody, which was raised against baculovirus coat protein gp64, to infected pupae after the baculovirus injection. This treatment greatly reduced the mortality rate of the infected pupae. GFP fluorescence was observed in pupal and adult wings and other body parts of the antibody-treated individuals at various degrees of fluorescence. Importantly, we obtained completely developed wings with a normal color pattern, in which fluorescent signals originated directly from scales or the basal membrane after the removal of scales. GFP fluorescence in wing tissues spatially coincided with anti-GFP antibody staining, confirming that the fluorescent signals originated from the expressed GFP molecules. Our baculovirus-mediated gene transfer system with an anti-gp64 antibody is reasonably efficient, and it can be an invaluable tool to transfer, express, and functionally

  6. Naturally Occurring Frameshift Mutations in the tvb Receptor Gene Are Responsible for Decreased Susceptibility of Chicken to Infection with Avian Leukosis Virus Subgroups B, D, and E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinjian; Chen, Weiguo; Zhang, Huanmin; Li, Aijun; Shu, Dingming; Li, Hongxing; Dai, Zhenkai; Yan, Yiming; Zhang, Xinheng; Lin, Wencheng; Ma, Jingyun; Xie, Qingmei

    2018-04-15

    The group of highly related avian leukosis viruses (ALVs) in chickens are thought to have evolved from a common retroviral ancestor into six subgroups, A to E and J. These ALV subgroups use diverse cellular proteins encoded by four genetic loci in chickens as receptors to gain entry into host cells. Hosts exposed to ALVs might be under selective pressure to develop resistance to ALV infection. Indeed, resistance alleles have previously been identified in all four receptor loci in chickens. The tvb gene encodes a receptor, which determines the susceptibility of host cells to ALV subgroup B (ALV-B), ALV-D, and ALV-E. Here we describe the identification of two novel alleles of the tvb receptor gene, which possess independent insertions each within exon 4. The insertions resulted in frameshift mutations that reveal a premature stop codon that causes nonsense-mediated decay of the mutant mRNA and the production of truncated Tvb protein. As a result, we observed that the frameshift mutations in the tvb gene significantly lower the binding affinity of the truncated Tvb receptors for the ALV-B, ALV-D, and ALV-E envelope glycoproteins and significantly reduce susceptibility to infection by ALV-B, ALV-D and ALV-E in vitro and in vivo Taken together, these findings suggest that frameshift mutation can be a molecular mechanism of reducing susceptibility to ALV and enhance our understanding of virus-host coevolution. IMPORTANCE Avian leukosis virus (ALV) once caused devastating economic loss to the U.S. poultry industry prior the current eradication schemes in place, and it continues to cause severe calamity to the poultry industry in China and Southeast Asia, where deployment of a complete eradication scheme remains a challenge. The tvb gene encodes the cellular receptor necessary for subgroup B, D, and E ALV infection. Two tvb allelic variants that resulted from frameshift mutations have been identified in this study, which have been shown to have significantly reduced

  7. Representing virus-host interactions and other multi-organism processes in the Gene Ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foulger, R E; Osumi-Sutherland, D; McIntosh, B K; Hulo, C; Masson, P; Poux, S; Le Mercier, P; Lomax, J

    2015-07-28

    The Gene Ontology project is a collaborative effort to provide descriptions of gene products in a consistent and computable language, and in a species-independent manner. The Gene Ontology is designed to be applicable to all organisms but up to now has been largely under-utilized for prokaryotes and viruses, in part because of a lack of appropriate ontology terms. To address this issue, we have developed a set of Gene Ontology classes that are applicable to microbes and their hosts, improving both coverage and quality in this area of the Gene Ontology. Describing microbial and viral gene products brings with it the additional challenge of capturing both the host and the microbe. Recognising this, we have worked closely with annotation groups to test and optimize the GO classes, and we describe here a set of annotation guidelines that allow the controlled description of two interacting organisms. Building on the microbial resources already in existence such as ViralZone, UniProtKB keywords and MeGO, this project provides an integrated ontology to describe interactions between microbial species and their hosts, with mappings to the external resources above. Housing this information within the freely-accessible Gene Ontology project allows the classes and annotation structure to be utilized by a large community of biologists and users.

  8. Divergent evolution of multiple virus-resistance genes from a progenitor in Capsicum spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saet-Byul; Kang, Won-Hee; Huy, Hoang Ngoc; Yeom, Seon-In; An, Jeong-Tak; Kim, Seungill; Kang, Min-Young; Kim, Hyun Jung; Jo, Yeong Deuk; Ha, Yeaseong; Choi, Doil; Kang, Byoung-Cheorl

    2017-01-01

    Plants have evolved hundreds of nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich domain proteins (NLRs) as potential intracellular immune receptors, but the evolutionary mechanism leading to the ability to recognize specific pathogen effectors is elusive. Here, we cloned Pvr4 (a Potyvirus resistance gene in Capsicum annuum) and Tsw (a Tomato spotted wilt virus resistance gene in Capsicum chinense) via a genome-based approach using independent segregating populations. The genes both encode typical NLRs and are located at the same locus on pepper chromosome 10. Despite the fact that these two genes recognize completely different viral effectors, the genomic structures and coding sequences of the two genes are strikingly similar. Phylogenetic studies revealed that these two immune receptors diverged from a progenitor gene of a common ancestor. Our results suggest that sequence variations caused by gene duplication and neofunctionalization may underlie the evolution of the ability to specifically recognize different effectors. These findings thereby provide insight into the divergent evolution of plant immune receptors. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Vesicular stomatitis virus enables gene transfer and transsynaptic tracing in a wide range of organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundell, Nathan A; Beier, Kevin T; Pan, Y Albert; Lapan, Sylvain W; Göz Aytürk, Didem; Berezovskii, Vladimir K; Wark, Abigail R; Drokhlyansky, Eugene; Bielecki, Jan; Born, Richard T; Schier, Alexander F; Cepko, Constance L

    2015-08-01

    Current limitations in technology have prevented an extensive analysis of the connections among neurons, particularly within nonmammalian organisms. We developed a transsynaptic viral tracer originally for use in mice, and then tested its utility in a broader range of organisms. By engineering the vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) to encode a fluorophore and either the rabies virus glycoprotein (RABV-G) or its own glycoprotein (VSV-G), we created viruses that can transsynaptically label neuronal circuits in either the retrograde or anterograde direction, respectively. The vectors were investigated for their utility as polysynaptic tracers of chicken and zebrafish visual pathways. They showed patterns of connectivity consistent with previously characterized visual system connections, and revealed several potentially novel connections. Further, these vectors were shown to infect neurons in several other vertebrates, including Old and New World monkeys, seahorses, axolotls, and Xenopus. They were also shown to infect two invertebrates, Drosophila melanogaster, and the box jellyfish, Tripedalia cystophora, a species previously intractable for gene transfer, although no clear evidence of transsynaptic spread was observed in these species. These vectors provide a starting point for transsynaptic tracing in most vertebrates, and are also excellent candidates for gene transfer in organisms that have been refractory to other methods. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Thermo-Regulation of Genes Mediating Motility and Plant Interactions in Pseudomonas syringae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hockett, Kevin L.; Burch, Adrien Y.; Lindow, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is an important phyllosphere colonist that utilizes flagellum-mediated motility both as a means to explore leaf surfaces, as well as to invade into leaf interiors, where it survives as a pathogen. We found that multiple forms of flagellum-mediated motility are thermo-suppressed, including swarming and swimming motility. Suppression of swarming motility occurs between 28° and 30°C, which coincides with the optimal growth temperature of P. syringae. Both fliC (encoding flagellin) and syfA (encoding a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase involved in syringafactin biosynthesis) were suppressed with increasing temperature. RNA-seq revealed 1440 genes of the P. syringae genome are temperature sensitive in expression. Genes involved in polysaccharide synthesis and regulation, phage and IS elements, type VI secretion, chemosensing and chemotaxis, translation, flagellar synthesis and motility, and phytotoxin synthesis and transport were generally repressed at 30°C, while genes involved in transcriptional regulation, quaternary ammonium compound metabolism and transport, chaperone/heat shock proteins, and hypothetical genes were generally induced at 30°C. Deletion of flgM, a key regulator in the transition from class III to class IV gene expression, led to elevated and constitutive expression of fliC regardless of temperature, but did not affect thermo-regulation of syfA. This work highlights the importance of temperature in the biology of P. syringae, as many genes encoding traits important for plant-microbe interactions were thermo-regulated. PMID:23527276

  11. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  12. Gene expression in blood of children and adolescents: Mediation between childhood maltreatment and major depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spindola, Leticia Maria; Pan, Pedro Mario; Moretti, Patricia Natalia; Ota, Vanessa Kiyomi; Santoro, Marcos Leite; Cogo-Moreira, Hugo; Gadelha, Ary; Salum, Giovanni; Manfro, Gisele Gus; Mari, Jair Jesus; Brentani, Helena; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Brietzke, Elisa; Miguel, Euripedes Constantino; Rohde, Luis Augusto; Sato, João Ricardo; Bressan, Rodrigo Affonseca; Belangero, Sintia Iole

    2017-09-01

    Investigating major depressive disorder (MDD) in childhood and adolescence can help reveal the relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors to MDD, since early stages of disease have less influence of illness exposure. Thus, we investigated the mRNA expression of 12 genes related to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, inflammation, neurodevelopment and neurotransmission in the blood of children and adolescents with MDD and tested whether a history of childhood maltreatment (CM) affects MDD through gene expression. Whole-blood mRNA levels of 12 genes were compared among 20 children and adolescents with MDD diagnosis (MDD group), 49 participants without MDD diagnosis but with high levels of depressive symptoms (DS group), and 61 healthy controls (HC group). The differentially expressed genes were inserted in a mediation model in which CM, MDD, and gene expression were, respectively, the independent variable, outcome, and intermediary variable. NR3C1, TNF, TNFR1 and IL1B were expressed at significantly lower levels in the MDD group than in the other groups. CM history did not exert a significant direct effect on MDD. However, an indirect effect of the aggregate expression of the 4 genes mediated the relationship between CM and MDD. In the largest study investigating gene expression in children with MDD, we demonstrated that NR3C1, TNF, TNFR1 and IL1B expression levels are related to MDD and conjunctly mediate the effect of CM history on the risk of developing MDD. This supports a role of glucocorticoids and inflammation as potential effectors of environmental stress in MDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nipbl and mediator cooperatively regulate gene expression to control limb development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiko Muto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Haploinsufficiency for Nipbl, a cohesin loading protein, causes Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS, the most common "cohesinopathy". It has been proposed that the effects of Nipbl-haploinsufficiency result from disruption of long-range communication between DNA elements. Here we use zebrafish and mouse models of CdLS to examine how transcriptional changes caused by Nipbl deficiency give rise to limb defects, a common condition in individuals with CdLS. In the zebrafish pectoral fin (forelimb, knockdown of Nipbl expression led to size reductions and patterning defects that were preceded by dysregulated expression of key early limb development genes, including fgfs, shha, hand2 and multiple hox genes. In limb buds of Nipbl-haploinsufficient mice, transcriptome analysis revealed many similar gene expression changes, as well as altered expression of additional classes of genes that play roles in limb development. In both species, the pattern of dysregulation of hox-gene expression depended on genomic location within the Hox clusters. In view of studies suggesting that Nipbl colocalizes with the mediator complex, which facilitates enhancer-promoter communication, we also examined zebrafish deficient for the Med12 Mediator subunit, and found they resembled Nipbl-deficient fish in both morphology and gene expression. Moreover, combined partial reduction of both Nipbl and Med12 had a strongly synergistic effect, consistent with both molecules acting in a common pathway. In addition, three-dimensional fluorescent in situ hybridization revealed that Nipbl and Med12 are required to bring regions containing long-range enhancers into close proximity with the zebrafish hoxda cluster. These data demonstrate a crucial role for Nipbl in limb development, and support the view that its actions on multiple gene pathways result from its influence, together with Mediator, on regulation of long-range chromosomal interactions.

  14. 18S rRNA is a reliable normalisation gene for real time PCR based on influenza virus infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuchipudi Suresh V

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One requisite of quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR is to normalise the data with an internal reference gene that is invariant regardless of treatment, such as virus infection. Several studies have found variability in the expression of commonly used housekeeping genes, such as beta-actin (ACTB and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, under different experimental settings. However, ACTB and GAPDH remain widely used in the studies of host gene response to virus infections, including influenza viruses. To date no detailed study has been described that compares the suitability of commonly used housekeeping genes in influenza virus infections. The present study evaluated several commonly used housekeeping genes [ACTB, GAPDH, 18S ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA, ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial F1 complex, beta polypeptide (ATP5B and ATP synthase, H+ transporting, mitochondrial Fo complex, subunit C1 (subunit 9 (ATP5G1] to identify the most stably expressed gene in human, pig, chicken and duck cells infected with a range of influenza A virus subtypes. Results The relative expression stability of commonly used housekeeping genes were determined in primary human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs, pig tracheal epithelial cells (PTECs, and chicken and duck primary lung-derived cells infected with five influenza A virus subtypes. Analysis of qRT-PCR data from virus and mock infected cells using NormFinder and BestKeeper software programmes found that 18S rRNA was the most stable gene in HBECs, PTECs and avian lung cells. Conclusions Based on the presented data from cell culture models (HBECs, PTECs, chicken and duck lung cells infected with a range of influenza viruses, we found that 18S rRNA is the most stable reference gene for normalising qRT-PCR data. Expression levels of the other housekeeping genes evaluated in this study (including ACTB and GPADH were highly affected by influenza virus infection and

  15. Characterization of ORF89 - A latency-related gene of white spot syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kwang, Jimmy

    2004-01-01

    Open reading frame 89 (ORF89) is one of the three genes that are believed to be involved in the latent infection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Here, we report the structure and functional characterization of ORF89. cDNA sequencing, 5' RLM-RACE, and 3' RLM-RACE showed that ORF89 gene is transcribed into an unspliced mRNA of 4436 nucleotides, which is predicted to encode a protein of 1437 amino acids. ORF89 expressed an approximately 165-kDa protein in Sf9 cells that localized in the nucleus. Amino acids 678-683 were found to be essential for nuclear localization. Cotransfection assays demonstrated that ORF89 protein repressed its own promoter as well as those of a protein kinase and the thymidine-thymidylate kinase genes of WSSV. SYBR Green real-time PCR indicated that the repression occurred at the transcriptional level

  16. Bacterial viruses enable their host to acquire antibiotic resistance genes from neighbouring cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Krause; Leisner, Jørgen; Cohn, Marianne Thorup

    2016-01-01

    Prophages are quiescent viruses located in the chromosomes of bacteria. In the human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, prophages are omnipresent and are believed to be responsible for the spread of some antibiotic resistance genes. Here we demonstrate that release of phages from a subpopulation of S....... aureus cells enables the intact, prophage-containing population to acquire beneficial genes from competing, phage-susceptible strains present in the same environment. Phage infection kills competitor cells and bits of their DNA are occasionally captured in viral transducing particles. Return...... of such particles to the prophage-containing population can drive the transfer of genes encoding potentially useful traits such as antibiotic resistance. This process, which can be viewed as ‘auto-transduction’, allows S. aureus to efficiently acquire antibiotic resistance both in vitro and in an in vivo virulence...

  17. Prediction of the Ebola Virus Infection Related Human Genes Using Protein-Protein Interaction Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, HuanHuan; Zhang, YuHang; Zhao, Jia; Zhu, Liucun; Wang, Yi; Li, JiaRui; Feng, Yuan-Ming; Zhang, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) is caused by Ebola virus (EBOV). It is reported that human could be infected by EBOV with a high fatality rate. However, association factors between EBOV and host still tend to be ambiguous. According to the "guilt by association" (GBA) principle, proteins interacting with each other are very likely to function similarly or the same. Based on this assumption, we tried to obtain EBOV infection-related human genes in a protein-protein interaction network using Dijkstra algorithm. We hope it could contribute to the discovery of novel effective treatments. Finally, 15 genes were selected as potential EBOV infection-related human genes. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Nuclear translocation and regulation of intranuclear distribution of cytoplasmic poly(A-binding protein are distinct processes mediated by two Epstein Barr virus proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Park

    Full Text Available Many viruses target cytoplasmic polyA binding protein (PABPC to effect widespread inhibition of host gene expression, a process termed viral host-shutoff (vhs. During lytic replication of Epstein Barr Virus (EBV we observed that PABPC was efficiently translocated from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Translocated PABPC was diffusely distributed but was excluded from viral replication compartments. Vhs during EBV infection is regulated by the viral alkaline nuclease, BGLF5. Transfection of BGLF5 alone into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells promoted translocation of PAPBC that was distributed in clumps in the nucleus. ZEBRA, a viral bZIP protein, performs essential functions in the lytic program of EBV, including activation or repression of downstream viral genes. ZEBRA is also an essential replication protein that binds to viral oriLyt and interacts with other viral replication proteins. We report that ZEBRA also functions as a regulator of vhs. ZEBRA translocated PABPC to the nucleus, controlled the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused global shutoff of host gene expression. Transfection of ZEBRA alone into 293 cells caused nuclear translocation of PABPC in the majority of cells in which ZEBRA was expressed. Co-transfection of ZEBRA with BGLF5 into BGLF5-KO cells or uninfected 293 cells rescued the diffuse intranuclear pattern of PABPC seen during lytic replication. ZEBRA mutants defective for DNA-binding were capable of regulating the intranuclear distribution of PABPC, and caused PABPC to co-localize with ZEBRA. One ZEBRA mutant, Z(S186E, was deficient in translocation yet was capable of altering the intranuclear distribution of PABPC. Therefore ZEBRA-mediated nuclear translocation of PABPC and regulation of intranuclear PABPC distribution are distinct events. Using a click chemistry-based assay for new protein synthesis, we show that ZEBRA and BGLF5 each function as viral host shutoff factors.

  19. Gene repair of an Usher syndrome causing mutation by zinc-finger nuclease mediated homologous recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overlack, Nora; Goldmann, Tobias; Wolfrum, Uwe; Nagel-Wolfrum, Kerstin

    2012-06-26

    Human Usher syndrome (USH) is the most frequent cause of inherited deaf-blindness. It is clinically and genetically heterogeneous, assigned to three clinical types of which the most severe type is USH1. No effective treatment for the ophthalmic component of USH exists. Gene augmentation is an attractive strategy for hereditary retinal diseases. However, several USH genes, like USH1C, are expressed in various isoforms, hampering gene augmentation. As an alternative treatment strategy, we applied the zinc-finger nuclease (ZFN) technology for targeted gene repair of an USH1C, causing mutation by homologous recombination. We designed ZFNs customized for the p.R31X nonsense mutation in Ush1c. We evaluated ZFNs for DNA cleavage capability and analyzed ZFNs biocompatibilities by XTT assays. We demonstrated ZFNs mediated gene repair on genomic level by digestion assays and DNA sequencing, and on protein level by indirect immunofluorescence and Western blot analyses. The specifically designed ZFNs did not show cytotoxic effects in a p.R31X cell line. We demonstrated that ZFN induced cleavage of their target sequence. We showed that simultaneous application of ZFN and rescue DNA induced gene repair of the disease-causing mutation on the genomic level, resulting in recovery of protein expression. In our present study, we analyzed for the first time ZFN-activated gene repair of an USH gene. The data highlight the ability of ZFNs to induce targeted homologous recombination and mediate gene repair in USH. We provide further evidence that the ZFN technology holds great potential to recover disease-causing mutations in inherited retinal disorders.

  20. Fto colocalizes with a satiety mediator oxytocin in the brain and upregulates oxytocin gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olszewski, Pawel K., E-mail: olsze005@umn.edu [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Minnesota Obesity Center, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Fredriksson, Robert; Eriksson, Jenny D. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Mitra, Anaya [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Radomska, Katarzyna J. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Gosnell, Blake A. [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Solvang, Maria N. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden); Levine, Allen S. [Minnesota Obesity Center, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Department of Food Science and Nutrition, Saint Paul, MN 55108 (United States); Schioeth, Helgi B. [Department of Neuroscience, Functional Pharmacology, Uppsala University, 75124 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} The majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto. {yields} The level of colocalization is similar in the male and female brain. {yields} Fto overexpression in hypothalamic neurons increases oxytocin mRNA levels by 50%. {yields} Oxytocin does not affect Fto expression through negative feedback mechanisms. -- Abstract: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been associated with obesity in humans. Alterations in Fto expression in transgenic animals affect body weight, energy expenditure and food intake. Fto, a nuclear protein and proposed transcription co-factor, has been speculated to affect energy balance through a functional relationship with specific genes encoding feeding-related peptides. Herein, we employed double immunohistochemistry and showed that the majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto in the brain of male and female mice. We then overexpressed Fto in a murine hypothalamic cell line and, using qPCR, detected a 50% increase in the level of oxytocin mRNA. Expression levels of several other feeding-related genes, including neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related protein (AgRP), were unaffected by the FTO transfection. Addition of 10 and 100 nmol oxytocin to the cell culture medium did not affect Fto expression in hypothalamic cells. We conclude that Fto, a proposed transcription co-factor, influences expression of the gene encoding a satiety mediator, oxytocin.

  1. Fto colocalizes with a satiety mediator oxytocin in the brain and upregulates oxytocin gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olszewski, Pawel K.; Fredriksson, Robert; Eriksson, Jenny D.; Mitra, Anaya; Radomska, Katarzyna J.; Gosnell, Blake A.; Solvang, Maria N.; Levine, Allen S.; Schioeth, Helgi B.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto. → The level of colocalization is similar in the male and female brain. → Fto overexpression in hypothalamic neurons increases oxytocin mRNA levels by 50%. → Oxytocin does not affect Fto expression through negative feedback mechanisms. -- Abstract: Single nucleotide polymorphisms in the fat mass and obesity-associated (FTO) gene have been associated with obesity in humans. Alterations in Fto expression in transgenic animals affect body weight, energy expenditure and food intake. Fto, a nuclear protein and proposed transcription co-factor, has been speculated to affect energy balance through a functional relationship with specific genes encoding feeding-related peptides. Herein, we employed double immunohistochemistry and showed that the majority of neurons synthesizing a satiety mediator, oxytocin, coexpress Fto in the brain of male and female mice. We then overexpressed Fto in a murine hypothalamic cell line and, using qPCR, detected a 50% increase in the level of oxytocin mRNA. Expression levels of several other feeding-related genes, including neuropeptide Y (NPY) and Agouti-related protein (AgRP), were unaffected by the FTO transfection. Addition of 10 and 100 nmol oxytocin to the cell culture medium did not affect Fto expression in hypothalamic cells. We conclude that Fto, a proposed transcription co-factor, influences expression of the gene encoding a satiety mediator, oxytocin.

  2. Modulation of flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes and anthocyanins due to virus infection in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gutha Linga R

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Symptoms of grapevine leafroll disease (GLRD in red-fruited wine grape (Vitis vinifera L. cultivars consist of green veins and red and reddish-purple discoloration of inter-veinal areas of leaves. The reddish-purple color of symptomatic leaves may be due to the accumulation of anthocyanins and could reflect an up-regulation of genes involved in their biosynthesis. Results We examined six putative constitutively expressed genes, Ubiquitin, Actin, GAPDH, EF1-a, SAND and NAD5, for their potential as references for normalization of gene expression in reverse transcription-quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. Using the geNorm program, a combination of two genes (Actin and NAD5 was identified as the stable set of reference genes for normalization of gene expression data obtained from grapevine leaves. By using gene-specific RT-qPCR in combination with a reliable normalization factor, we compared relative expression of the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes between leaves infected with Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 3 (GLRaV-3 and exhibiting GLRD symptoms and virus-free green leaves obtained from a red-fruited wine grape cultivar (cv. Merlot. The expression levels of these different genes ranged from two- to fifty-fold increase in virus-infected leaves. Among them, CHS3, F3'5'H, F3H1, LDOX, LAR1 and MybA1 showed greater than 10-fold increase suggesting that they were expressed at significantly higher levels in virus-infected symptomatic leaves. HPLC profiling of anthocyanins extracted from leaves indicated the presence of cyanidin-3-glucoside and malvidin-3-glucoside only in virus-infected symptomatic leaves. The results also showed 24% higher levels of flavonols in virus-infected symptomatic leaves than in virus-free green leaves, with quercetin followed by myricetin being the predominant compounds. Proanthocyanidins, estimated as total tannins by protein precipitation method, were 36% higher in virus

  3. Construction of a fusion gene containing hepatitis B virus L gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... the successful construction of a recombinant yeast expression vector containing gene coding L protein and Ag85B ..... the production of memory T cells, promote cytokine secretion and ... Dual DNA vaccination of rainbow trout.

  4. Exosomes mediate hepatitis B virus (HBV) transmission and NK-cell dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yinli; Han, Qiuju; Hou, Zhaohua; Zhang, Cai; Tian, Zhigang; Zhang, Jian

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that exosomes can transfer genetic material between cells. However, their roles in hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remain unclear. Here, we report that exosomes present in the sera of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients contained both HBV nucleic acids and HBV proteins, and transferred HBV to hepatocytes in an active manner. Notably, HBV nucleic acids were detected in natural killer (NK) cells from both CHB patients and healthy donors after exposure to HBV-positive exosomes. Through real-time fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, 1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3',-tetramethylindodicarbocyanine, 4-chlorobenzenesulfnate salt (DiD)-labeled exosomes were observed to interact with NK cells and to be taken up by NK cells, which was enhanced by transforming growth factor-β treatment. Furthermore, HBV-positive exosomes impaired NK-cell functions, including interferon (IFN)-γ production, cytolytic activity, NK-cell proliferation and survival, as well as the responsiveness of the cells to poly (I:C) stimulation. HBV infection suppressed the expression of pattern-recognition receptors, especially retinoic acid inducible gene I (RIG-I), on NK cells, resulting in the dampening of the nuclear factor κB(NF-κB) and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Our results highlight a previously unappreciated role of exosomes in HBV transmission and NK-cell dysfunction during CHB infection. PMID:27238466

  5. Coupled Transcriptome and Proteome Analysis of Human Lymphotropic Tumor Viruses: Insights on the Detection and Discovery of Viral Genes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dresang, Lindsay R.; Teuton, Jeremy R.; Feng, Huichen; Jacobs, Jon M.; Camp, David G.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Li, Zhihua; Smith, Richard D.; Sugden, Bill; Moore, Patrick S.; Chang, Yuan

    2011-12-20

    Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) are related human tumor viruses that cause primary effusion lymphomas (PEL) and Burkitt's lymphomas (BL), respectively. Viral genes expressed in naturally-infected cancer cells contribute to disease pathogenesis; knowing which viral genes are expressed is critical in understanding how these viruses cause cancer. To evaluate the expression of viral genes, we used high-resolution separation and mass spectrometry coupled with custom tiling arrays to align the viral proteomes and transcriptomes of three PEL and two BL cell lines under latent and lytic culture conditions. Results The majority of viral genes were efficiently detected at the transcript and/or protein level on manipulating the viral life cycle. Overall the correlation of expressed viral proteins and transcripts was highly complementary in both validating and providing orthogonal data with latent/lytic viral gene expression. Our approach also identified novel viral genes in both KSHV and EBV, and extends viral genome annotation. Several previously uncharacterized genes were validated at both transcript and protein levels. Conclusions This systems biology approach coupling proteome and transcriptome measurements provides a comprehensive view of viral gene expression that could not have been attained using each methodology independently. Detection of viral proteins in combination with viral transcripts is a potentially powerful method for establishing virus-disease relationships.

  6. Tsw gene-based resistance is triggered by a functional RNA silencing suppressor protein of the Tomato spotted wilt virus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronde, de D.; Butterbach, P.B.E.; Lohuis, H.; Hedil, M.; Lent, van J.W.M.; Kormelink, R.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    As a result of contradictory reports, the avirulence (Avr) determinant that triggers Tsw gene-based resistance in Capsicum annuum against the Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) is still unresolved. Here, the N and NSs genes of resistance-inducing (RI) and resistance-breaking (RB) isolates were cloned

  7. Serum as a modulator of lipoplex-mediated gene transfection : dependence of amphiphile, cell type and complex stability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Audouy, S; Molema, G; de Leij, L; Hoekstra, D

    2000-01-01

    Background Cationic liposomes belong to the family of non-viral vectors for gene delivery. Despite several drawbacks, such as low efficiency compared to viruses and inactivation by serum, cationic liposomes remain a promising tool for gene therapy. Therefore further investigation of the mechanism of

  8. Polycistronic artificial miRNA-mediated resistance to Wheat dwarf virus in barley is highly efficient at low temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kis, András; Tholt, Gergely; Ivanics, Milán; Várallyay, Éva; Jenes, Barnabás; Havelda, Zoltán

    2016-04-01

    Infection of Wheat dwarf virus (WDV) strains on barley results in dwarf disease, imposing severe economic losses on crop production. As the natural resistance resources against this virus are limited, it is imperative to elaborate a biotechnological approach that will provide effective and safe immunity to a wide range of WDV strains. Because vector insect-mediated WDV infection occurs during cool periods in nature, it is important to identify a technology which is effective at lower temperature. In this study, we designed artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs) using a barley miRNA precursor backbone, which target different conservative sequence elements of the WDV strains. Potential amiRNA sequences were selected to minimize the off-target effects and were tested in a transient sensor system in order to select the most effective constructs at low temperature. On the basis of the data obtained, a polycistronic amiRNA precursor construct (VirusBuster171) was built expressing three amiRNAs simultaneously. The construct was transformed into barley under the control of a constitutive promoter. The transgenic lines were kept at 12-15 °C to mimic autumn and spring conditions in which major WDV infection and accumulation take place. We were able to establish a stable barley transgenic line displaying resistance to insect-mediated WDV infection. Our study demonstrates that amiRNA technology can be an efficient tool for the introduction of highly efficient resistance in barley against a DNA virus belonging to the Geminiviridae family, and this resistance is effective at low temperature where the natural insect vector mediates the infection process. © 2015 BSPP and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Enzootic genotype S of H9N2 avian influenza viruses donates internal genes to emerging zoonotic influenza viruses in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Min; Chen, Hongzhi; Li, Qunhui; Huang, Junqing; Zhao, Mingjun; Gu, Xiaobing; Jiang, Kaijun; Wang, Xiaoquan; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-12-05

    Avian influenza viruses of subtype H9N2 are widely prevalent in poultry in many Asian countries, and the segmented nature of the viral genome results in multiple distinct genotypes via reassortment. In this study, genetic evolution of H9N2 viruses circulating in eastern China during 2007-2013 was analyzed. The results showed that the diversity of the gene constellations generated six distinct genotypes, in which a novel genotype (S) bearing the backbone of A/chicken/Shanghai/F/98-like viruses by acquiring A/quail/Hong Kong/G1/97-like polymerase basic subunit 2 and matrix genes has gradually established its ecological niche and been consistently prevalent in chicken flocks in eastern China since its first detection in 2007. Furthermore, genotype S possessed the peculiarity to donate most of its gene segments to other emerging influenza A viruses in China, including the novel reassortant highly pathogenic avian influenza H5N2, the 2013 novel H7N7, H7N9 and the latest reassortant H10N8 viruses, with potential threat to poultry industry and human health. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.